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Box 1, Folder 22, Document 1

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_022_001.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 22, Document 1
  • Text: if I _y 2, 196 F . Choyce City' t.torn y City Lew partm nt 261 Fir t N tional B k BUildin Atl nt , Georgi 30303 1 fo Yow: contin nd I cor ally, Clo ure JClhjW 0 • �
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 22, Folder topic: Parks department | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 1, Folder 22, Document 15

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_022_015.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 22, Document 15
  • Text: 2-11-69 Dear Virginia : Miss Bessie L. Whitehead was rated by Alberta, Marvin, and me on January 29. Noee of us gave her a passing score. She did not impress me as someone who had the temp,.erament, personality, or back~round to make a successful Recreat io n Leader. She came to my office yesterday in a very angry mood, threw the letter on my desk, and said she was not going to take that king of 11 - - - - 11 • She talked on for quite some time, saying, among other things, that s he was not going to told no if she had to get a gun and come up here and shoot somebody. I did not say a great deal to her - I was listening most of the time - but I was polite and tried to be helpful. She see med to have calmed down some when she left. IY~ft:- /IJ1 1ss ~~ ~ f?,'//,j~ r t ,, �
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 22, Folder topic: Parks department | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 1, Folder 22, Document 24

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_022_024.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 22, Document 24
  • Text: CITY OF ATLANTA DEPARTMENT OF PARKS OFFICE OF GENERAL MANAGER ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 JACK C. DELI US G EN ER A L MANA GER • F R ED P . WHIT LE Y A SST . May 19, 1969 GE N. M A NAGE R FRED. W. BO SWEL L A SST . GE N.MAN A G ER VIRGINIA CARMI C HAEL. CIR . O F RE CREATION MEM O RAND U M S T AN LE Y T . MARTIN AD M I N . ASS IST A NT TO: All Park and Recreation Supervisors and Foremen FROM: Stan Martin• Assistant General Manager of Parks SUBJECT: Opening of Swimming Pools for 1969 Season All swimming pools will open on Saturday, June 7, 1969, and will remain open through Labor Day, September 1, 1969. The hours of operation will be from 12 Noon until 8:30 P.M., Monday through Saturday and from 1:00 P.M. until 8 : 30 P.M. on Sundays , Swimming classes will be taught by our staff for a period of eight weeks beginning June 16 through August 8 from 10:00 A.M. until 12 Noon, Monday through Friday. Children 12 years old and under will be allowed to swim free from 12 Noon until 2:00 P.M., Monday through Saturday. All port-a-pools will be open from June 7 through Labor Day, and will be used only for organized swimming classea supervised by our recreation staff. STMJr:bt �
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 22, Folder topic: Parks department | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 1, Folder 22, Document 27

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_022_027.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 22, Document 27
  • Text: CITY OF .ATLANT.A CITY HALL ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR R EARL LANDERS, Administrative Ass istant MRS. ANN M. MOSES , Executive Secretary DAN E. SWEAT, JR ., Director of Governmental Liaison · June 27, 1969 MEMORANDUM TO: Johnny Robinson FROM: George J. Berry SUBJECT: City-owned lot at Richardson and Conley Streets. At your request, I reviewed our situation on this piece of property with the foll owing findings : 1. In 1944, Mayor Hartsfield granted an elderly lady permission to use this lot. The city had owned it for a very long time. In the late 1800' s the lot had been used as a dump for "night soil. " The lady had continued to use t he prope r ty and had some sort of church constructed on it which the City Housing Code Division has recently requi re d her to de m olish . Cons e quently, she does not now occupy the property . This lady now feels that she has a legal right to the prop e rty, howeve r, because she has had effective possession for this l ength of tim e. 2. In 1967 th e City Parks Department was investigati ng all city - o wn e d p r ope r ty to determine th e i r feas i bili ty fo r us e a s playl ot s . Whe n Jack D e lius was investigating thi s p roperty the eld erly lady (kno w n loc ally as "the witch docto r") plac e d a "hex " o n h im fo r p r opos i ng to us e h er p r oper ty . 3. Becaus e of it s po s s ible us e by the Parks D e p artment, the Law Department initiated an action to determine the validity of the city's title . Associate City Attorney, Ralph Jenkin s , represente d the city and while he wa s unable to remove the hex from Mr. D eliu s , did s ucceed in w i nning the case and clearing the city' s title to the lot . �June 27, 1969 Memo to Johnny Robinson Page Two 4. Pete Williams of the Land Department says that the boundaries of the lot need to be surveyed. He feels that an adjoining building is encroaching on the property. 5. Because of the time factor, the Parks Department arranged for another playlot in the vicinity with which they are satisfied. Mr. Delius advised me that they now have no plans to use this lot. 6. Mr. Jenkins advised me by telephone that if the city is serious in wanting to assert its title to this property, it is important that this property be put to some definite use or it be declared surplus and sold. I did not inquire into his legal reasons for this position, but he felt that the failure of the city to act would strengthen the claimant's case and could possibly result in overturning the court's decision . A third alternative, therefor e , would be to abandon the property to the claimant. Very truly yours , GJB :p �
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 22, Folder topic: Parks department | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 1, Folder 22, Document 11

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_022_011.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 22, Document 11
  • Text: J uery 2 , 199 N 0 U 1tt J ck n c .. tatu of c ri ·1 rn r of . rk 1 ... • • , • ., • • · nd er ion �
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 22, Folder topic: Parks department | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 1, Folder 22, Document 18

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_022_018.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 22, Document 18
  • Text: ITY OF ATLAN A DEPARTMENT of PARKS Office of General Manager Atlanta, Georgia 30303 March 18, 1969 MEMORANDUM JACK C. DELIUS GENERAL MANAGER a TO: Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. FROM: Jack C. Delius, General Manager of Parks and Recreation SUBJECT: Concession Bids for North Fulton Golf Course and Piedmont Park. The Parks Committee of the Board of Aldermen advertised four times the concession privil e ges at North Fulton Golf Course and Piedmont Park. Only one bid was rec eived for e ach of the s e locations. Mr. Paul Lavin, Golf Profe ssional a t North Fulton Golf Cours e, entered the only bid of $1,500. 00 a year for a three - y e ar p e riod. This amount is identic a l to what we were receiving from this concession stand up to 196 7. C o mmitt ee also received o ne bid on the Pie dmont P a rk Concession in the amount of $1,750.00 per year for a two -yea r p er iod. M r. J. W. Oldkn ow, the current C oncessionaire, was the only bidder. He had been paying $1,555.0 0 per year. Parks Committee op ened these bids on March 11 , 1969 and asked that I forward the information to you with their recommendation that we accept these bids. If you should find them acceptable, I shall proceed to have the proper r e solutions drawn, contract agreements prepared, etc. Thank you v e ry much. J C D :jw I/~ -lf?~c~G( A4 3/'f t �
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 22, Folder topic: Parks department | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 1, Folder 22, Document 19

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_022_019.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 22, Document 19
  • Text: Februsry 10, 1969 ME MO R A N D U M TO: Virgini a Ca rmichael, Director of Recreation FROM: J a ck C. Delius, General Manager of Parks & Recreation Miss Hattie Thomas of the Mayor ' s Office has asked me t o i nvestigate the situation i nvolvi ng the prospective employment of Miss Bessie L. Whitehead, f or the position (as I understand it) o f Communi ty Recreat ion Director. Miss Whitehead apparently succe sful ly passed the written part of the examina tion but received a letter dated January 31, 1969 from the Pers onnel Department stating that she had failed the oral. Miss Whitehead further s tates that on February 10, 1969 she "talked to someone in Recreation" who said they s imply c ould not understand how she could have failed the oral. 0 I advised Miss Thomas that we were not privileged t o eiam the oral done by a t l east three different people, one of whom only normally repre sents this department . However, . I would ask you to look into this and see if there has been any mistakes made,, etc . Would you please advise Miss Whitehead at 1220 Gardenia St.,N, W. of the circumstances and also post Miss Thomas in the Mayor's Office . Thank you very much . JCD:bf cc: J~iss Hattie Thomas,, Secretary, Mayo r 's Office �
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 22, Folder topic: Parks department | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 1, Folder 22, Document 23

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_022_023.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 22, Document 23
  • Text: SUH-MEG EXTENSION OPii'IGE ,50tl McDaniel Sta Apt. 18_53 Atlanta , Georgia 30312 I I fRO~OSED ~ROGRAM STRUCTURE for RECREA'l1I ON FACILITY IN 1'-LECHANICSVILLE Io FOCUS ' To meet the needs of the community, the recreation faci lfty should have a comprehensive program. The program should be broad a.nd inclusive enough to provide activities for all age groupso The activities should include: athletics, table games, a variety of outdoor games, interest groups~ a gameroom for small kids, a quiet room for reading and lounge, coed groups and activities, and adult groups and a ctivitieso The governing body for the facility is an elected, 12-member Advis ory Board. The Board is made up of persons from the Jvie chani csville community . They are as follows: Rev. F.W. Melville, Chairman Mrs. Rosa Hampton, Vice Chairman Mrs. Rosa Griffin, Secretary Mrs. Bertha Barton, Assistant Secretary Rev. M.M. Thomas, Treasurer Mrs .. Annie R 0 Newton (s·'7 '7 - S li..\v Miss Lois Wilson ~rs. Emma Thomas ( 4 young people will be elected to the Board) I I . PROGRAM A. Softball l o 20 teams ac 5-10& under te ams ( 3 boys and 2 girls ) b., 5-12 & under teams ( 3 boys and 2 girl s ) c. 5-15 & under te ams {j boys and 2 gi rls ) d. 2-17 & under teams {l boy and 1 giri ) e. J Adult teruns ( 2 men and jj 1 women) �I ( B. page 2 { Baseball I 5 teams a. l.;.10 & under team b. 1-12 & under tes.m Cc, 1-15 & under · team / / d. 1-17 & under team e. 1 adult team 1. 1 >~-·--=- ·· c. Gym Activities (inside rag house) 1. 2 table tennis Sets 2. 2 Billiard Tables 3o 2 Caron Boards 4. l Weightlifting set 5. 2 card tables (for checkers) D. Game Room (for small kids) 1. Table games 2. Selected activities '-----.... ..______ E. . A Quiet Room - _ __ l . "'For Re a ding 2. lounge for staff 3. For counse ling 4. For small meetings F. Other Outside Games 1. Volleyball 2. Basketball 3. Cro que t 4., Horse shoe s 5. Soccer {outside Goals) G. Other Adult ,Activities 1. Barbe cues 2. Othe r Suggeste d Activities He Coed Activities le A Youth Council 2., Youth Social Activities a . Dances b .. Parties -- �Io Phys~cal Equipment and De velopme nts I 1. Softball and baseball fields developed (leveled and scraped) 2o Spectator seats on softball and baseball fields J. A 5ft. fence to enclose the area. 1 4, The Building needs painting and decorating on the inslde A telephone needs to be installed I (I} . L--\ 11 t-i , s -Ic L D · J • Staff 5. r 1. 3 Male Workers ao 1 worker for gym activities(inside). b. 2 workers for softball and baseball fields 2. 5 a. b. c. d, Female Workers 1 worker for gym activities (inside) 1 worker for game room (for small kids) 2 workers for softball and other outside games. 1 worker to serve as receptionist-secretary. Submitted by: Grady Butler Extension Area Mgr. SUJvI-1'-'I.EC Extension Office 5/1/69 �
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 22, Folder topic: Parks department | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 1, Folder 22, Document 26

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_022_026.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 22, Document 26
  • Text: October 6, 1969 MEMORANDUM To: Mayor Allen From: Dan Sweat Subject: Proposed $100, 000 Park Project W have be n un bl · to secur wh t w feel re good recommend tions for project through th usual ources and h v , th r Sol"e, taken the lib rty of ng th reeomm nd tion ourselv s . In su g sting poeslbl proj ct w re som what at di advantage in not knowing th I: lings of the donor . Fo7 xatnple, ls h motivat d by charit bl con ider tion hkh would lend itself to pl'oject in ome· die dv tag d rea? Is he motiv ted by rtletic cons i d r tions? Hietol'ic: con ldel'ation ? Do h wt h . proj ct to b memori l to him lf or hi•! mily? In th · v nt that the City w 1' to ~ c lv an unantlclpat d $100, 000 gr t, lt ould b - our hope th t th • fun
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 22, Folder topic: Parks department | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 1, Folder 22, Document 29

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_022_029.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 22, Document 29
  • Text: l( ~ p • / , .- , I . - ·.; -··~ .Jr S.~i~ rt/1ENT OF P/\Rl
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 22, Folder topic: Parks department | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 1, Folder 22, Complete Folder

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_022.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 22, Complete Folder
  • Text: if I _y 2, 196 F . Choyce City' t.torn y City Lew partm nt 261 Fir t N tional B k BUildin Atl nt , Georgi 30303 1 fo Yow: contin nd I cor ally, Clo ure JClhjW 0 • �May 2, 1969 Mr . J. Forrest Gee Purchasing Agent City of Atlant City Hall Atlant~ , Georgia 30303 Dear Forrest: Thank you very much for your letter of April 30, 1969 regarding the fire at er er on Park and y memorandum of A ril 24. As previously stated, we are extremely an..~ious to get back into operation at Per~ rson Park at the earliest p:,ssible date and it has been determined that it would not be practic l for the limited number of car nters in this department to undert ke the rep ir, Becau e of the time element in bidding, prep ration of oo.nt.rects, etc. , I ' m afraid th eummer • uld be ov r; before subst ntial repairs had been mad. were delight _ when informe by the insur nee c rrier th t they would prefer to follow the policy curr ntly used by the Atlanta School s yst in permitting the inpur n ca~rier to bring in t ir own bonded cont,:aotor to do the rk. Accordingly , I discussed this matter with llrJ Chairman, s ell with. Mr . Charl s vis and Mr. Earl Landers . 11 o,f thes gentlemen gJ;e d tbat the most practical thing to do is to allow the insur nc comp ny to engag oontr ctor . It did not occur to me that thi-, propos arr ng ent ·w ould have to be cleared by the Purchasing Commi.ttee ince City funds w re really not inVQlv d. Accordingly , with th pprov l of my COroroitte , I authorized ccur te Con.atruction ·Company to stei-t WQrk on Perkerson Recreation building Tuesday, My 6, 1969. A Mr. 1th; of Accur te Con t..r:uction Comp n.y, Monday th c rtif1c t t l phon 523-1986, w1i1 upply insqranc protecting th City of Atl nt during tb r .ir Thus, it lf. y 5th Bo rd of Aldel:me rizin th City to llow it ng priv t , con truct1-on fim. I bo our ction is within th spirit. nd int nt of otion 31.-37 of the City Cod, nd Ip rticul rly ppr ci your c lll it provision to my t t ntion. .-U �Mr-. J. For rest Gee May 2, 1969 - 2 - Finally, we have entered a cla im for fire loss on the contents of the building and there will be many do zens of items we will have to requi sition f or repl acement purposes on an emer gency basis. Sincerely , J a ck c. Delius Ge neral nager of Parks and Recreation u J CD; j w cc: Mr . R. Earl Landers , Mayor ' s ()ffice ~ Mr. Thomas F . Choyce, Associate City Attorrey Honorable Char l ie Left wich Mr. Pi erce i t ley , Assistant General Man· ger o f . arks Mr . St anley T. Martin , ssi st an Gen r al Mana er of Parks Miss Virgi nia Carmio ael, Dire ctor of Recreation Mrs. Mary s e Liady , Communi t y Ce nte r Director �C TY OF A LANTA DEPARTMENT of PARKS Office of General Manager Atlanta, Georgia 30303 May 8, 1969 JACK C. DELIUS GENERAL MANAGER " Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. City of Atlanta City Hall .A tlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mayor Allen: I plan to be out of the City from Friday, May 30, through Sunday, June 1, at Roosevelt State Park in Pine Mountain, Georgia. If you should have to contact me, I will be in Cabin No. 8, and the Superintendent of the Park is Mr. Bill Marx. In my absence, Mr. Pierce Whitley, Assistant General Manager of Parks, will be in charge of field operation and Mr. Stanley T. Martin, Jr., Assistant General Manager of Parks, will be in charge of administration. neral Manager of rks and Recreation JCD:jw cc: Parks Committee Mr. Pierce Whitley Mr. Stanley T. Martin , Jr. Miss Virginia Carmichael Mr. John Roth �Mr. Earl Land~rs : (This relates to Sandy Creek Park & f . ~ I possible swap for Adamsville ' .Heal th Center) I l . . rI j . ·. . ., . .l ' -I~ . !rouble ,, . l _dded Later, the .£.&Jl Committee: 1. Agreed 1ouse the Atlanta Area Transportation Study as a "guide " to further studies . .2. Agreed to cooperate with Central Atlanta: Progress on a study of the downtown business 3. Balked at a request of Ful- 1 ' ion County to relocate Carroll Road from Sanely Creek and i ' ! ankhead Hi ghway for expan- j I ·ion of the Fu lton County Air- I ort. All en pointed out that the , ity had made Ca rroll Road : >f our-l anes a short time ago and 11ore investiga tion as to r eason I ~r 'or the relocation are needed. 1 i 1e -~~ -Firestone Ca ' Tires Back .. . , ·> -I r· 1I I I· l _/ . ! t. 0 �A RESOLUTION BY PLAN NING AND DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE AND PUBLIC WORKS COMMITTEE APPROVING RELOCATION STUDIES AND THE SURVEYING AND PREPARATION OF RIGHT-OF-WAY PLANS FOR CARROLL ROAD AT THE EARLIEST POSSIBLE TIME AS A COMPLIMENTARY PROJECT TO THE EXPANSION OF FULTON COUNTY AIRPORT. WHEREAS, the improvement of traffic movement on the major streets of Atlanta is an obvious necessity, and WHEREAS, the State Highway Department of Georgia is preparing to make specific plans for the widening and relocation of Carroll Road to a four-lane divided r~adway from Gordon Road to Bankhead Highway as a complimentary projecf to the expansion of Fulton County Airport, and WHEREAS, these proposed improvements have been reviewed by the Planning and Public Works Departments, and WHEREAS, the State Highway Department must have the City of · Atlanta's official endorsement of this project before financial participation for preliminary engineering by the Federal Bureau of Public Roads can be obtained. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Mayor and Boord of Aldermen that the proposed relocation end improvements of Carrol I Road referred to by project number F-126-1 (2) and describe.d in further detai I by the attached drawings and text, be approved for relocation studies and preliminary engineering plans and any such studies and plans shall be submitted to the Mayor and Board of Aldermen for further consideration and approval. Attachment �H . H. HUCKE B A .JIM L . G IL LI S , S R . 51'ATE HIGHWAY ENC,INE(A 0 IRE.C T OR W. M . WILLIAMS EM O R Y C . PARR I S H SCCAET4RY • TREASU A ER C XE. C UT I VE ASSISTAN T DtR C CTO R April 24, 1969 _ D. l'!ingfield Planni~g 0i rector Atl ant a Reg i on lle tropolitan Planni ng Co:::.nis sion 900 Gl0nn 3uilding Atlant a, Georgia 30302 .M.r"'". J. Dear Sir: Pursuant to the provisions of Seciion 204 of Title II - ? l2~~ ad ~s t::::-oooli t an D2ve lor:::-.2nt o: Pujl i c Lc.·,v 39 -754 > T , e De:::'.):-!s ·t :::- 2°: i c:-. C:.. t::. :::s c:.r.c Me tro ool i t 2n D~ve~o~~e~t Ac t o: l9S6 , we a::::-e her ety su t ~itt i~g vc.rious materi al ::-el c..:{v-2 too-::- p:.:-o j ec-.:. ~::- -iL.6-1 (2), rul ton County. This project c2.lls for a 4 l an e divi ded roadway c.nd ::::-elocc.tion of portion of t he ro&t~ay necessitated _by the planned expansion of ?ulton County Airpo::-t. Please review this request prior to our request to the Bureau of Public Roads for prelirainary engineering authorizat:o~. Yours very truly, STAT~ EIG:-:t:;..y DEPAR.T:.:El'-ll O? G~O?..GIA DIVI SICN OF HIGE'!.AY PLANNH'.G By Leland S. Veal State Highway Planning Engineer WA.'Y/lcr Attachment cc: R.M. Breen L.E. Parker l I I! �JI M L. GILLIS . SR . $Slate 1~iglih1a~ P tµc1rhnc1tl of ®torgia io. 2 (gnµitol ~ quarc DIR ECTOR H . H . HUCKEBA STATE HIGHWAY (NGINEER ~tl1tnla, (6rorgia 3L13311, EM OR Y C . P ARR I S H EXECUT I V E ASS I STANT DIR E C T OR W . M . WILLIAMS SECAETAAY · TREASU REA May 22, 1969 Mr. Collier Gl adin Planning Direct or City of Atlanta Planning Department City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Sir : The State Highway Department is actively pursuing participation from the Bureau -of Public Roads in preliminary engineering for Carroll Road (F-126-1), between Gordon Road and Bankhead Highway. This proj ect will provide for p~eliminary engineering and relocation studies to determine location and prepare plans for future 4-lane divided roadway. Relocation of a portion of F-126 is necessitated by planned expansion of Fulton County Airport. a We need the City of Atlanta's official endorsement of this project through resolution so that we can secure the necessary approval. Please communicate this request through the proper governmental procedures. We have attached various material relative to this project for your information and assistance in gaining an official statement of endorsement. Thank you for your help in this matter. Yours very truly, SI'ATE HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT OF GEORGIA DIVISIO~ OF HIGHNAY PLANNING By --?. / ~ .-/1' // /r-".f:-c5.-'(_/ (_,( __,{._C'- Leland S. Veal State Highway Planning Engineer _WAH/lcr Attachments , �F -1 26 - 1 (2) CA ROLL ROAD STUDY - + + - RELOCATED PORTION + �SAM YORTY MA YOR OFFICE OF THE MAYOR CITY HALL Los ANGELES , CALIFORNIA 90012 June 25, 1969 Hon0rab le Ivan Allen , Jr. Mayor of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mayor Allen: One of the most satisfying develo pments in Los Angeles during the past year has been the suc ce ss and the steadily increasing public support and recognition of DIRECTION SPORTS, Inc. , a privately operated non-profit program for disadvantaged youngsters . DIRECTION SPORTS (see enclosed brochure) is the brainchild of its president and project direct or , Tulle y Brown, who initiate d t he program la st September in the Los Angeles area. As a result of the wide coverage given it locally and nationally, the program's unique method -- which uses a sports f ormat as a means of improving learning motivation and educational ski lls -- has been brought to the attention of an estimated more than one hundred million Americans. In response to this publicity DIRECTION SPORTS has received over a thousand letters, written by individual cit izens, by officials of city, state, and federal government , and by faculty members of numerous universities, asking how they might put the program to work in their cities . Subsequently, a major foundation has expresse d interest in paying half the cost of travel and lodging for representatives of the Mayors of one hundred American cities to attend a special five-day DIRECTION SPORTS workshop. The workshop sessions are to be held August 4th through 8th in Los Angeles. At Mr. Brown's request, I am writing you personally, in advance of formal and final structuring of the planned summer workshop, to invite your consideration of his program and to request a wri tten response to my office in regard to your interest in having your c i t y part i cipate. Your pos i tive reply will be additional indicat i on to the foundat i on which is considering a financ i al commitment to the workshop operation of the nat i onal interest in the DIRECTION SPORTS program . �Page 2 of 2 The City of Los Angeles intends to do everything poss ib le to ensure that the workshop sessions are successful in enabling every participant to return to his ci ty with the information and expe r i ence necessary to conduct a pilot DIRECTION SPORTS program for the benefi t of its constituency. It is our hope that thi s conference will move us further ahead, as individual c i ties, toward a coalition of common interest in the educat ional development of all disadvantaged American youngsters. I will look forward to hearing from you . Cordially, Enclosure �• DIRECTION SPORTS, Inc. 4415 West Pico Blvd. Los Angeles) Calif. 90019 {213) 937-3540 DIRECTION SPORTS Seminar August 4-8, 1909 " ·0ne of the most gratifying experiences in developing this program has been to discover the great variety of people who find common purpose in contributing to the disadvantaged youth of a city. This kind of cooperation has made it possible for DIRECTION SPORTS to achieve, in a short period of timeJ a "substa ntial improvement 11 (see psychometric studies results included in brochure) in the · learning skill development of youngsters living in those areas of Los Angeles with the highest percentage of school "drop-8uts". \ . In response to the na tional interest in DIRECTION SP0R'rS, we are planning a five-day Seminar so that other cities can become familiar with our format and materials, and so tha t the excitement of a nationwide program benefitting disadvant aged underachievers can become a reality. We will bring together the talents and r esources of the many individuals and groups who have contributed ·to the ongoing DIREC'I'I0N SPORTS program in order to make our Seminar workshops as instructive and comprehensive as possible. Our purpose is to offer participants materials and support for initial pilot prog rams based on the DIRECTION SPORTS format and adaptable to thei r respective c it ies. Seminar workshops will include the following: _1) Special ~re-tested "chalk tal ks" ( see sample in brochure ) designed to c arry fifth and s ixt h grade students in a DIRECTION SPORTS program throughout the 1969- 1970 school year. The s e materials are . developed by Fred Niedemeyer, Ph.D. of the Ing l ewood , Califor-Dia Southi'Jes t Regiona l Laboratory (funded in part by the Bureau of Researc h of the U. S. Office of Education ) and by Robert Filep, Ph.D. from the national Tnstit ut e for Educat ional Development. 2) Evalua tive and te sting proced ures deve loped by Stephen Klein, Ph.D. and members of his staff fro m t he UCLA Research and Develop~IBnt Cent er, us ing a n ational grading prog ram from Educationa l Testing Service, Inc. 3) Promotion and publicity resources, including: �-2- a) . b) c) • Bruce Johnson, Vice President and West Co2.st Manager of 1,Ietro Radio S2.les, has pledged ongoing media support of all DIRECTION SPOnTS progr2. ms through the auspices of 2.11 1•etro Me dia stations and affiliat es throughout the United States. Howard Mi ller, Western Director of the USO, will provide a format for developing local advisory board and fund-raising task force~. Community service film strips designed both for radio and for television and produced by local studios in conju..nc tion with the Motion Picture Producers Association will be availab le. These films include presentations by nationally known personalities, includ ing such stars a~ Greg Morris of Mission Imnossible. 4) Organizationa l structure and job descriptions for a six-team DIRECTION SPORTS pilot program, presented by Booz, Allen, and Hamilton, Inc., management consultants. 5) Per~onnel testing and screening forms developed by Robert A. Jones, Director, Testing Bureau, University of Southern California. - 6)~ Daily sports activity lesson ~lans, prepared by coaches _Walt Thurmond ( Cal State L.A.), John McKay (USC), John Wooden (UCL.A), and others. ,· 7) 8) Group discussion tech.niques, presented by a staff of psycholog ists, including Victor Coppin, M.A. of the DIRECTION SPORTS staff. Legal aspects of organizational structure, presented by Gerald Kleinman, partner in the lav1 firm of_ Loeb and Loeb. ( Any and all new DIRECTION SPORTS programs can re ce ive non-profit status, based on the fact that DIRECTION SPORTS , Inc. is a federally · chartered non-profit corporati on.) -~ 9) Use of park and recreation facil i ties, discuss ed by Jos eph Lewis of the City of Los Angeles Department of Parks and Recr2at i on. 10) Association with c i ty school s ys tems, discu s s ed by Sam Hammer~an, Dir ect or of the Offi ce of Urban Affairs, Los Angeles City Scho ols . 11) The submission of the names of all new members so that. the DIREC·TION SPORTS jacket can be sent. . I �-3- • A formal agenda will be included in the final invitation. Also, the nat i ona l television shows being boo ked will be outlined. Please call or i,1 ri te should ·you have any questions. Loo king forward to ·mee tins; ;your representative 2.nd coming to your city in the future, I remain, ... i I l ~ -# i. ! j .,!I l J ! I • �r Birection Sports An educational/motivational program designed for underprivileged children �- . . ---- - - - ... _., ,..., _ ____ . .. ---· I A Piece of Glass ... a Stolen Car Direction Sports was never formally planned- it happened. "How it happened" is covered below in an excerpt from A Sports Story for Christmas, written by John Hall for the Los Angeles Times on December 15, 1967. "A foot slashed by broken glass and a stolen car have combined to produce what may be the Christmas sports story of the season. "If this sounds unlikely, you just don't know Tulley Brown. "Brown is a 34-year-old law school grad, a Santa Monica resident who has an overwhelming ompassion for sports and youngsters. While living in J-2 different countries during recent years, Brown found the two mixed wonderfully. "But his story really began one morning when he was doing his daily four miles of running on the beach at Santa Monica. Tulley Brown plans a football jamboree with YMCA Director Geor{?e Pohlman. c Copyrir,ht 1969, Dlrc,:t,on Sports Inc He stepped on a piece of glass and cut his foot. "Looking for emergency treatment, he came across a doctor connected with [ a center for] retarded and disturbed children. '·One thing led to another and Brown soon quit his old job [as a sales executive] to take over as athletic director ... "Bringing in several Lakers to help him at times, he began to get the kids to take out their frustrations and erase their doubts on the basketball floor. Psychiatrists used the word 'amazing; to describe the progress he was able to make. Parents were overjoyed. "About this time, Brown's car was stolen ... Typically. Tulley's reaction after an 18year-old boy was arrested for the theft was regret. He urged police not to press charges. "He and his wife asked to adopt the boy, an orphan who had been shuffled around various foster homes'.' Instead. the boy was sent to a juvenile camp, serving a sentence of fifteen months. Tulley learned from the probation officer on the case that often in such situations a minority or poor youngster would be sentenced while, for the same offense, a white middle-class youngster would be released to his parents on probation. Married and the father of three children, Brown returned to business and spent the next six months putting together a program that could help provide clisadvantaged youths with reasons to stay straight. If the magnetism of sports could break through to the retarded and emotionally disturbed, then why not use this magnet(continued, inside back cover) - �Direction Sports: the fundamental concept "Among the educational approaches which we believe should be considered and evaluated are the current efjorts to develop new patterns of education which do not fit into the traditional patterns'.' Recommendation of the PRESIDENT'S COMM ISSION ON CIVIL DISORDERS ( 1968 ) DIRECTION SPORTS is a Los A ngeles-based project des igned to answer that recommendation with an innovative programinvolving educationally disadvan taged youngsters, through the magnetism of sports, with local yo uth leadership, professionals in the fields of education and psychology, and other concerned adults from all parts of Los A ngeles Co unty. Direction Sports objectives: For the first time, to expand the content and go als of the average sports program for youth. Specifically, to use the universal appeal of "Little League" type sports activities for the development of basic learning skills ( through ca refu lly prepared "chalk talks") and to build positive self concepts and social attitudes ( through post-practice group discussions) . To provide an opportunjty for meaningful exchanges of communication and va lues among both youngsters and adults from a variety of ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds ( through regul arly scheduled fi eld trips and group activities). To help resolve the tremendous disparity between the number of privately funded sports program s for youngsters in middle class or suburban areas and the programs available to youngsters from disadvantaged communities . The kinds of social problems which prompted the idea of DIR ECTION SPORTS are common knowledge, but have never been considered as responsive to simple, direct solutions. A brief review fo llows of those problems, their consequences, and the solutions the DIR ECTION SPORTS program offe rs . O ur primary co ncern is to show th at there is an alternative to the current expenditure of billions of doll ars to treat social symptoms. T here is a way to affect their causes. The problems we face Welfare. More than 7 mill ion Ameri cans are now receiving welfare assistance, and another 14 million citizens are identified as eligible fo r aid ; a total of 2 1 milli on persons in thls country whose family income is below what the government �"Recidivism" - an ugly word we have to face up to defines as basic subsistence. For example, six out of every ten Black children subsist on welfare payments at least a part of their lives. Did you know th at if you are born in a poverty area, odds are about ten to one you'll remain there for life? A Culture of Hopelessness. The old myth that citizens "on welfare" are so by choice is no longer tenable. Rather, the children of the poor grow up conditioned to failure, to the uselessness of ambition and the futility of dreams. To quote anthropologist Elliot Liebow, " In the end, a man's wife and children become a symbol of h.i s own failure as a man and the easy camaraderie of 'the corner' becomes an irresistible lure. At the moment he submits, he comes into his full inheritance bequeathed him by his p arent s, teachers, employers, and society at large. This is the step into failure from which few if any return and it is at this point that the rest of society can wring its hands or rejoice in the certain knowledge that he has ended up preci sely as they had predicted he would'.' Educational Dilemna. Educational surveys of the learning skills of youngsters from the depressed areas of Los Angeles County indicate the relatively poor learning skill improvement of minority youth. From the Los Angeles Times, January 10, 1969: "Many Anglo students in the Los Angeles City School System showed marked improvement in reading last year, but Negro and Mex.ican-American youngsters made only slight advances, test scores indicated .. . The reading scores climbed as high as 16 percentage points . .. In predominantly Negro and Mexican-American schools, however, the scores rose only an average of two points and rem ained at generally low levels. The lowest percentage increases, one percent, were recorded by first graders in the north and mostly Negro south-central areas and the predominately Mexican-American east side'.' The consequences Failure-Punishment Syndrome. Here's what th e GOVERNOR'S COMM ISSION ON THE LOS ANGELES RIOTS (August, 1967) had to say : "The actions taken thus far in Los Anoeles b ' and , for that matter, elsewhere throughout the United States, fail to meet the urgent ex isting need; and unless and until we in our City and State, a nd throughout the United States , solve the fundamental problem of raising the level of scholastic achi evement of disadvantaged children, we can not hope to solve all other problems of our disadvantaged minorities . . '.' It is clear that a grossly disproportionate number of underp1ivileged children experience fai lure in their first contact with the greater society-when they enter schoo l. Civil Disorders and Delinquency . T he NATIONAL A DVISORY COMM ISSION ON C IVIL DISORDERS has reported, "The expression of in adeq uate educational practices lies in the high incidence of riot participation by ghetto youth who had not completed high school. Our survey of r iot cities found that the typical riot participant was a lzigh school drop out . . '.' Recidivism. Almost half the juveniles released on parole in Los Angeles County are back in detention camps within six months. With a total minority population of about 20 percent in the county as a whole, nearly 50 percent of its detention camp members are ei ther Negro or MexicanAmerican . Neither a city nor a nation can begin to realize its potential whil e continuing to fai l to reac h so high a percentage of its youth. Without a significant impact on the source of these concerns, the nation can only continue to expend increasing billions in the treatment of crime, poverty and unemployment. �There can be no real solution in attempting to treat these consequences as though they were solvable on a symptom level. The great majority of programs for the disadvantaged reach people after they are already in trouble. DIRECTION SPORTS is preventive treatment- working logically at the source-and is using the most successful formula which has proven successful in regularly motivating and involving more than one million youths throughout the United States: privately funded sports programs. Special programs for underachievers can be successful. It was demonstrated recently in an experiment conducted by the San Francisco City School System, combining smaller classes with experienced teachers. One of these experimental classes achieved the highest reading scores for its age group of any public school class in the city- "and every one of these children was black'. ' Most school districts in the country are making conscientious efforts to improve the learning achievements of children from underprivileged areas. Whether the full burden of such an accomplishment should be placed on the schools alone is debatable. On the other hand, conditions never have been more ready for the development of "new patterns of education" to support and reinforce the schools' efforts. A crucial need Currently, privately funded sports programs for youngsters provide the most popular youth format in the nation. Yet little has been done to overcome the scarcity of these kinds of programs for underprivileged boys and girls. For example, in 1968 the tremendously popular Little League Baseball program involved approximately 55,620youngsters from the greater Los Angeles area. Yet of this total number not one team was in operation within the immense minority population corridor extending through Los Angeles from North Broadway south of the central city to adjoining Compton and including some 200,000 school age children. Economic breakdown of family income in th e Los Angeles area shows clearly the areas of the city which cannot support conventional privately financed sports programs of the Little League type. Family income, J960/ 1965 estimated U nder $5 .000 $5,000 - 6,999 $7,000 - 9,999 $ 10,000 and over Sources: Un ited States Census, and A nn ual R ep o rts, Fran chise T ax Board. State of California. �The magnetism and personal satisfaction of sports The Direction Sports program The premise of DIRECTION SPORTS is that the magnetism and personal satisfactions of athletic competition can provide a motivational breakthrough for normal but disadvantaged youngsters - that it can provide a basic format through which learning skills and positive attitudes toward education itself can be developed, using sports-related group discussions and curricula, and com~unity adult leadership. California State College at Los Angeles volunteered a room for an initial training seminar for DIRECTION SPORTS' staff, and two Cal State coaches, Walt Thurmond and Robert Miller, prepared special guidelines for instruction in football and basketball. Young college men who had grown up in disadvantaged communities were hired as DIRECTION SPORTS youth leader trainees. Their first formal training meeting was set at the University of Southern California and kicked off with speeches by football coaches John McKay, Dave Levy, and Willie Brown. During that first week trainees attended lectures on methods of instruction, coaching, and group discussion techniques, concluding their training with a two-hour session at the office of UCLA's John Wooden. On the final day the new DIRECTION SPORTS coaches put on a demonstration for their instructors at Cal State, working with youngsters from city poverty neighborhoods. DIRECTION SPORTS is answering a dual need- the need for privately funded sports programs in underprivileged areas, and the need to deal early with the threat of educational underachievement. Therefore, the program itself duplicates other youth sports programs but adds two unique new features - "chalk talks" designed to promote learning skills, and professionally supervised gro ui:; discussions. An afternoon schedule 3 : 30-3 : 35 p.m.-Orientation. 3: 35-4: 00 p.m.-"chalk taJk" learning sk ills. ( For an example of a typical DIRECTION SPORTS chalk talk, see the materials included at the back of this brochure.) 4: 00-5: 00 p.m.- Team practice. These practice sessions follow a daily plan carefully developed and formalized by professional college coaches. 5 : 00-5 : 30 p.m.- Group discussion. Group discussions are led by the comm unity coaches; a professional psychologist participates regularly to reinforce their talks. T he basic group discussion outline is as follows: 1. What makes a boy like himself? (Goal: Positive self con- cepts and social attitudes.) 2. Why are there schools? (Goal: Value of education. ) 3. What do I want to become? (Goal: Steps necessary for achievements.) 4. What jobs are available? (Goal: Opportunities for work experience.) 5. If I were . .. "role playing" a) a fireman? (Goal: Value of property.) b) a policeman? (Goal : Value of the law.) c ) an athletic hero? (Goal : Responsibility to others.) d ) blind? ( after visiting school for blind children) (Goal: Self-discipline.) 6. If I fail (sports, school, etc.)? (Goal: Work harder. ) Special Saturday activities Saturdays are game days. DIRECTION SPORTS' unique feature on Saturdays is that before each game teams meet in a "spelling bee" kind of competition involving math, spelling, and reading problems. Winning teams are rated " touchdowns;' "baskets;' etc. corresponding to the seasonal sport they are engaged in that day on the athletic field. These scores are added to each team's actual game score at the end of the playing day, and the winning team thus has the highest combined total. Every other Saturday all the youngsters go on a special trip after the game. Since DIRECTION SPORTS started in 1968, its young athletes have shared in experiences such as : 1) Yachting, as the guests of 24 boat owners at the Marina Del R ey. 2) Guests of the University of Southern California at the USC-Cal football game. 3) Guests of the National General Corporation, which provided a private showing of the film, "The Paper Lion;' for 150 youngsters. 4) Guests at a UCLA basketball practice. After practice, the youths met the players, and Lou Alcindor gave an inspirational talk which no one present will ever forget. 5) Guests of the Griffith Park Observatory for a showing of "The Sun, and Its Family of Planets'.' 6) Guests of the Los Angeles Music Center at a childrens' concert. DIRECTION SPORTS is operating now in park and recreation facilities within four poverty communities of metropolitan Los Angeles. These communities were chosen because of their high percentage of school drop-outs and rate of delinquency. The program currently employs the following adult personnel : one project director (full time) , one secretary ( full time) , �Top: The GauchO\· in pre-game "pep talk" w ith Cooch Pichardo. Center: A portrait of the Lions at Fred Rob erts Porli. ll'ith Coachn Brud1·!wH· and Mvles in ch ari;e. 50"/, of the ho1·1 h111·c, 110 _lather and 80 r/c of their fa111i /ie1 are on 11•c•lfare. Center rii;h1 · 1 he lions in their "chalk talk.·· T h e rnhject , 1 1pe//1111;. 80110111 · Coach Carroll H'atclws the Trojan pvra111id co1111 111111hli/l[: doll"//. I Pi(/\'C/" ri!?lit center re11wi11, 1111ide11tified J �The Direction Sports Va riety Show: Top left; top right: Youngsters are guests of universities at a1hletic events (SC-C al game, in this case) . Top. cPnter-left and cen ter-right: R egular competition-the No rmandie Park Rams. halftime with the South Park Trojans . and th e East L.A. Packers. C harge! Center and top-center: Excitin g "chalk talks" by l'isiting athletes and regu lar coaches-here Trojans respond to Oly111p ic Gold Medalist Bob Seagren. while at another site Coach V ic Pichardo teaches Gauchos. Barrom left: One day Brown h eard a group of litt le girls practicing yells. When he learned they had decided to be the Trojan cheerleaders. h e had sll'eaters 111ade and ask ed USC songleader Penny Ward to do some coach i11g. Bottom: Direction Sports A wards Banquet made possihle hv co111rilmtio11s from seven food 111arkets a11d the cateri11g of the K i11g Swede Re.1·ta1irant. M;1gicia11 Barry Lee of the Mag ic Cast le captil'(ffes the clti/dren. 01·er 200 persons atte11ded rite a/loir. i11d11di11:,1 97r;,. of rite parents i11vited. �A broad-based community response ... one educational psychologist ( part time), two psychometrists (part time ), one curricula specialist (part time), and ten field coaches ( part time) . Direction Sports results are measurable Fred Neidemeyer from Southwest Regional Laboratory (Curriculum Center) , an agency of the Federal Government, has contrac.ted to design special curricula using sports activities and concepts to teach sper;ific learning skills. Victor Coppin, M.A., USC psychologist, contracted to coordinate group discussions aimed at developing self pride and positive social attitudes among the youngsters participating in the project. Two psychometrists, Dr. Stephen Klein of UCLA and Dr. Ralph Hoepfner of USC, were enlisted to develop cross-validation methods for testing the actual effectiveness of DIRECTION SPORTS. The testing program compares the progress in specific learning areas of DIRECTION SPORTS experimental and control teams. See first post test results inside back cover. The basic design of the program is indicated in this table : Victor Coppin Pre-tests Treatment(s) Post-tests Teams 1-3 (Direction Sports) Math Spelling Attitudes Math and attitudes "instruction" Math Spelling Attitudes Teams 4-5 (Direction Sports) Math Spelling Attitudes Spelling instruction Math Spelling Attitudes teams (Comparison groups) Math Spelling Attitudes ·None Math Spelling Attitudes YMCA The DIRECTION SPORTS groups being compared are essentially equal in all other variables (socio-economic level, age, presence of father, etc.), so that the unique aspects of the program can be validly measured and evaluated. Los Angeles responds In its first four months of operation, the DIRECTION SPORTS concept attracted so much attention that it was featured on eight television programs-KTLA, KCOP, and CBS and NBC affiliates.With additional coverage through KGFJ and KFWB radio shows, it is estimated that the story of DIRECTION SPORTS has been told to more than three million people in the Los Angeles area. The first national attention given the project was a feature article in the Christian Science Monitor ( copy enclosed) , and The Johnny Carson Show. The national magazine, Sports Illustrated, is providing a weekly subscription for every boy in the program. The 7-Up Bottling Company has donated uniforms. In November of 1968 CBS-Los Angeles, with the approval of its national office, voted DIRECTION SPORTS one of the top six programs in Los Angeles and contributed a thousand dollars worth of jackets, track shoes, and pants for the future use of program youngsters. Numerous additional supporters a nd contributors are listed on the back cover of this brochure. Endorsements Fred N iedemeyer, Stephen K lein Here is what some well known public officials have said about the DIRECTION SPORTS program: . .. "I believe the program has merit. T he activities appear to be planned with great care, and the instructions are clear and explicit. DIRECTION SPORTS 'concern for the welfare of youngsters in our minority communities is commendable'. ' -Thomas Reddin, Chief of Police, City of Los Angeles "The concept of using sports as a touchstone to educational achievement for youngsters who have heretofore with- �Top: Direction Sports coac~es , (from left to right) Acuna, ,...,~,,.- Galindo, C astruita, Myles, Cano , Bethel, Spaulding, Bradshaw and Carroll. with Director Tulley Brown appear at USC's Bovard Field with coaches John McKay and Dave Levy and players 0. ] . Simpson and Steve Sogge . Center left: Ray Norton, 1960 world record holder, now with CBS. speaks at A wards Banquet. Center riRht: Los Angeles Chief of Police Thomas Reddin discusses the project with Brown . Bottom left: Mayor Sam Yorty proclaims "Direction Sports Week" for 1he Ci1v of Los Angeles, March 31 -April 6. 1969. Bot10111: Heisman Trophy winner Mike Garrell at a chalk talk'.' ..J �You are needed ... will you help? drawn from full participation in the educational process because of a belief that other incentives are nonexistent and that society is oblivious to their needs, is, in my opinon, extremely innovative ·and worth pursuing. I feel the program will make a significant contribution in developing a faith in the American system for these youngsters, and in the extreme, may salvage some youngsters who otherwise would be lost to society'. ' - T homas Lynch, Attorney G eneral, State of California "The program not only offers deprived youngsters an opportunity to participate in a nation ally recognized sports program but it also provides for educational enrichment for the participants as an integral part of the fo rmat'.' - Peter Pitchess, Sheriff, County of Los A ngeles "I can think of no alternative to fo rmal study better suited to inculcate the rudiments of reading, writing and arithmetic into the untutored mind than an organi zed sports program. I heartily encourage all personnel associated with the DIRECTrON SPORTS project to implement it with expediency and total effort'.' - Sam Yorty, Mayor of Los Angeles "Since three of the DIR ECTION SPO RTS teams operate in the 29th Senato rial District I can personally attest to the fact that the children and families involved are most enthusiastic about the use of a sports form at to teach learning sk ills and develop positive self concepts and social attitudes. DIR ECTION SPORTS is a uniquely beautiful program capable of making a significant di fference to thousands of minority people'.' -Mervyn M . Dymally, State Senator, 29th District Most of all, it's working! T he best way to confirm this is to see the program in action for yourself. Write DIRECTION SPORTS fo r a schedule of daily practice and teaching sessions or weekend team and intramural games. You are invited and welcome! Plans for the future Plans are underway to begin a similar program this year for girls, ages 9 through 11 , from the same communities. By September of ] 969 it is anticipated that DIRECTION SPORTS will have spread to every disadvantaged area of greater Los Angeles, and will include pilot programs for 12 to 14 year old boys. By September of 1970 it is intended that all youngsters ages 12 through 14 will be able to participate in the program. Subsequently, with private and public support, DIRECTION SPORTS is designed to expand to every disadvantaged community in America. P lans are underway for a seminar which will be held in Los Angeles fo r representatives from all interested cities in America. Half the cost of travel and accommodations will be defrayed and DIRECTION SPORTS' materials and methods of operation will be presented to the delegates. A nd, with this support and leadership, this unique program will be capable of regularly involving over one million under-privileged boys and girl s between the ages of 9 and 14 in an enriching and meaningful learning-through-playing experience which offers a new pattern for educational motivation and success. DIRECTION SPORTS is at this time, totally supported by volunteer fu nds and is a non-profit corporation . A U contributions, large or small, are tax deductible. If you're concerned about your tax doll ar-and who isn't? -the greatest saving you can make is your contribution to a program li ke this one - a contribution toward redirecting a youngster today to prevent hi m from becoming a public expense tomorrow. DIRECTION SPORTS would like to continue happening won't you please help? �UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGE LES DERKELEY • DAVIS • IR VI NE • I.OS ANGEL ES • RIVERSIDE • SAN DI EGO • SAN F RAN CISCO SANTA B ARBARA• SANTA CRUZ C E N TER FOR THE ST UDY O F EVALU ATIO N U CLA GR A DU ATE SCH OO L OF EDUCATION LOS ANG E LES, CALIFOR N IA TO: MR. TULLY BROWN FROM: DR. STEPHEN KLEI~ DATE,: APRIL 21, 1969 SUBJECT: PRELIMINARY EVALUATION RESULTS 900 24 Background In the fall of 1968, the five teams took a 44 item mathematics test dealing with adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing whole numbers; and a 20 item spelling test involving sports related words, such as "offense." Two teams received spelling instruction while the other three received mathematics instruction. The five teams were retested in February of 1969 with tests that were very similar to ones they took in the fall (i.e., the formats and instructions were the same but the questions were different so as to eliminate possible biases, such as memory). Results The results of the two testings appear in the table below. An inspection of this table indicates the following : (1) The teams had comparable (and relatively poor) performance before training in both mathematics and spelling. (2) The teams receiv i ng training in an area have shown substantial i mprovement in that a r e a, e.g . , the three teams receiving mathematics instruction impro ve d 28% in mathematics compared to only 9% for the teams recei v ing spelling instruction . Average Pe r c~nt Co r rect Te ams r e c ei v ing : Typ e of Te s t Fa ll Test i ng Win ter Te sting Difference Mathema t ics Instructi on Ma th e_ma t ic s Sp ellin g 54% 66 % 82% 51% +28% -15% Spel l in g Instruction Mathematics Spel l ing 54% 55% 63% 78% + 9% +23% �-UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY PARK LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 90007 DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY APTITUDES RESEARCH PROJECT J . P. GUILFORD, DIRECTOR R. HOEFFNER, ASSISTANT DIRECTOR May 7, 1969 Mr. Tully Brown Direction Sports 4415 W. Pico Blvd. Los Angeles, California Dear Tully: Upon receiving Dr. Klein's preliminary evaluation of the DIRECTION SPORTS program, I am pleased to concur with him in the conclusion that your program has had a beneficial effect. While Dr. Klein's evaluation was primarily of a descriptive nature; describing the results after the fact, I thought it might be interesting to see what we might be able to generalize to future seasons or other cities from what we now know. Accordingly, I performed two t-tests, one for math achievement and one for spelling achievement. The two general hypotheses I evaluated were: 1 . .J;mprovement in math achievement in the mathematics-instruction groups (experimental) is greater than improvement in math achievement in the spelling-instruction groups (control). 2. Improvement in spelling achievement in the spelling-instruction g roups (expe rime ntal) is greater than the improve me nt in the mathi nstruction groups (control ). To compute the two statistics, I e mployed only the 24 math boys and the 16 spelling boys who had all pretest and posttest scores, My reason for excluding s o many o f the boys in your pro gram who did not have complete sets of scores for these t-tests wa s that we cannot be sure what the instructional effect was for them. The t values for the math-score comparison was 2.949, significant at the . 01 level , while the t value for the spelling-score comparison was 1.445, n ot significant. The conclusions we can draw are these: with gre at confiden c e we can e xpect y our program (or ones like it) to effect significant improvement in the mathematical facility of disadvantaged , minority boys ; we cannot be v ery confident of a similar eff e ct in spellin g ability , altho ught the data indicates a similar spelling improvement~ Of course, the mathematics tests and e x e rc ises were further d eveloped and refined than those for spelling at the init iation of this program. It is quite possible that with refin eme nt of the spelling program we will find significant impro v ement there too. The preliminary findings, therefore, may b e expected not to be sensiti v e to real improvements and we will h a v e to await the final data to find out if spelling can be re all y improved. SW [;{/{fttoe p fner RH:ak �Chalk Talk 17 I. Objectives : ¢:6-Basic Division ±7 - Advanced Addition 8 -Advanced Subtraction III. Materials: blackboard and cha lk for instructor. paper a nd pencil for each boy. IV. Activity: I . Motivation: [t's very important for you to be aware of the score and the yardage at all times during the game . Then you will be a ble to choose the best type of play to m ake. Let's tak e a look a t a w ho le game here and how it is scored quarter by quarter. ( Pass out game-sheets to boys. ) Coach draws game sheet on boa rd to fi ll in . 2. D escription of Activity: a. What is the total time of a game? (After they answer, write it in the square marked " total time'.') b. How is a game divided up? (quarters). How m a ny minutes in each qua rter? (Say it and then write it under time for each quarter.) How m a ny minutes in a half? ( oral answer ). c . Okay-now le t's figure out the score for each qua rter. ( Coach writes o n blackboard.) 1) l n the first quarter, the Rams made a touchdown and then made the conversion; the 49ers just made the touchdown. Now fill in the score at the end of the first quarter. (7-6). 2) l n the second quarter, the Rams made a field goal ( 3) and the 49ers made a touchdown and the conversion ( 7) . Write down the score for the end of the second ( I 0-13). 3) In the third quarter, the Rams score two touchdowns, but make onl y one of the conversions. How many points is that? ( 13 ). The 49ers make a touchdown and the conversion (7). What is the score of the game now? (23-20.) 4) In the fin al quarter, the Rams do not score; the 49ers 111ake a field goal (3) .What's the final score of the game? (tie ga111e : 23-23) . d. Now you'll notice on the right-hand side of each square. the re is a section that says total yards gained. Fill in the following information: I) In the fi rst quarter, the Ra111s 111 adc a total yard gain of -13 : the 49ers 111ade 51 ( this is total, not net). 2) In the second quarter, the Rams 111ade 40: the 49ers 45. (Boys fill in this infor111ation as you read it-you write it on the board ga111e-chart.) 3) In the third quarter, Ra111s gain 50 yds. 49ers gain 47. 4) In the first quarter, the Ra111s 111ake 42 yds : 49ers 55 . e. What is the total yardage gain for the R ams? ( 17 5) ( Boys will add the numbers up in the m a rgin of their paper ; have them just raise the ir ha nd when they have the a nswer, but do not shout it out). What is the tota l yardage game now for the 49ers? (51 + 45 + 47 + 55 = 198) f. This is total yards gained ; to determine the ne t ya rds gained we must subtract the penalties. I ) The Rams were penalized three times for off-sides ( 15 yds.) and once for clipping ( 15 yds.) How 111any yards did they lose altogether? ( 30) 2) The 49ers were penalized twice for off-sides ( 10) and once for unsportsmanlike conduct ( 15) . H ow many yards were they penalized altogether? (25) (The process here will be first computing the off-sides penalty 5 x 2 I 0, and then adding IO plus 15.) g. Finally, how will we determine the net ya rds ga ined for each team? (Have one boy explain the process: to subtract the total pena lty yards from the total yards gained . ) l) What was the Rams net yard gain ? ( 145) 2) What was the 49ers net yard gain? ( 173 ) = Game Chart Quarter 1 Time: L Quarter 2 Time : L Rams: Total yards gained_ R ams: Total yards gainer! 49ers: Total yards gainerl 49ers: Total yards gained Score: Rams D 49ers D Quarter 3 Score: R ams Time : L D 49ers D Quarter 4 Time : R ams: Total yards gained Rams : Total yards gainerl 49ers : Total yards gainer! 49ers: Total yards gainer! Score : Rams D 49e rs Total yards gained in game by Rams: Rams penalties Net yards gained in game by Rams: Total yards gained in game by 49ers: 49ers penalties Net yards gained in game by 49ers: D Final Score : Rams § § D 49ers L_ D Total T ime : © Copyright 1969, Direct ion Sports I nc . �TRIBUTE TO DIRECTION SPORTS HON. ALPHONZO BELL OF CALIFORNIA IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Monday, April 21, 1969 Mr. BELL of California. Mr. Speaker, it is a pleasure to call the attention of this House to a unique and successful program that has been operating in the Watts area of Los Angeles. Direction Sports begins where Little League leaves off-it serves those who have no fathers to participate, those who have no money for uniforms, insurance, and the other requisites of Little League participation. But Direction Sports gives the boys it serves more than an opportunity to participate in the kind of athletic competition enjoyed by their middle-class counterparts. Through techniques developed by the Southwest Regional Lab in Inglewood, Calif.-a project which has received more than $4 million from the Office of Education's Bureau of Research in the past 2 years-Direction Sports youngsters improve their learning skills and social attitudes by means of educative chalk talks. In my view, Direction Sports is precisely the kind of innovative program that those of us who have been struggling to find solutions to urban ills have encouraged in legislation passed in recent years. As important as the heartwarming results described in the following article by the Christian Science Monitor, however, is the fact that program evaluation have shown a statistically significant increase in participants' mathematics achievement scores. Mr. Speaker, I wish to commend the Monitor's article to the attention of my colleagues, especially those whose con= stituencies include disadvantaged metro= poli tan areas. �THE CHR.TSTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR WEEKEND ISSUE Monday, January 20, 1969 Watts: 'Direction Sports' By Cliff Gewe cke Sports correspon dent .of The Christi an Science Monitor Los Angeles Ever since the Watts, and other, r iots of 1965, sports programs for the underpr ivileged Negro youngster have come to the fore. The idea seems to,.be : get more of these youngsters off t he streets , inspire a nd ·s kill them with sports (and sports her oes ), and potent ia l r uffians and "lost causes" may be motivated info becomin g useful , proctuctive citizens. One of the most r e cent, and per haps most fa r sighted, of these program s - which emanated in the Watts se ction of Los Angeles during 1968 - is " Dir ection Sports," an affiliate of the Urban Affairs Foundation , Inc. E ssentially, it is a " Little League for the unde rprivileged. " But it h as distinct over tones, and undt!rtones, of improving positive learning skills through orientation, "chalk ta lks, " and gr oup discussions. 'Tremendous disparity? " P rivately funded sports progr a ms involve more than one million youngsters. a nd are th e most popular youth form a t in the na tion," says for m er sales r epresentative Tulley Brown, who is program dir ector for Direction Sports. " Yet, the re is a trem endous dispa rity between the n um ber of pr ivately funded sports p rogram s fo r the youth in middle-class are as a s opposed to those in the underprivileged a reas." To drive home his point, Brown cite s this statistic: that , in a Jette r dated Aug. 2, 1968, A. E . Houghton, secretary of Little L ea gue Ba seba ll, headquartered in Willia msport , Pa ., stated the re were 55,620 youngste rs involved in the Greater L os Angeles area. "Of this number," e mphasizes Brown, "not one tea m opera tes in the immense minority corridor extending from North Broa dway south to Compton a nd including som e 200,000 school-age children. "The reasons for this are basic," he a dds. " Little L eagu e progra m s function with the assista nce of fathers, often with the youngsters paying for their own insu rance a nd m edical che ckup. A general requirem ent is tha t tlic: youngsters have ha d not m ore than one 'D ' in the precP.d ing sem ester's schoolwork- and no _police record. Little League for underprivileged Started offic ially Sept. 23 with the advent of the pa st fo otball sea son, Dire ction Sports encompa ssed some 75 youngster s in the preteenage category. Pla ns are to go through the m ajor spor ts in-season- basketball, tra ck, baseball. And to expand to other (older and younger ) age categories, and even to reach into the participation of girls in the p rogram. Letters of commenda tion have been received fro m su ch m en as California a ttorney general Tom Lynch, Los Angeles County sheriff P eter P itchess, Los Angeles police chief Tom Reddin, and Los Angeles mayor Sam Yorty. Unique chalk talk The program has been fea tured on some eight southern Ca lifornia television programs. Sports I!lustrated is p roviding a weekly m agazine subscription for every boy in the p roject, and the 7-Up Bottling Compa ny ha s donated uniforms. CBS-Los Angeles, after voting Direction Sports one of the top six pi;ograms in Los Angeles, contdbuted $1,000 worth of jackets, track shoes, and pants for future use by the youngsters. Don't qualify for Little League " Direction Sports" head man Tulley Brown disc usses team tactics with youngsters in the Watts section of Los Angeles. The program's educative chalk talks serve as a teach ing aid. " Too often, " Brown continued , " the youngsters in the ghet tos do not have fathers to participa te , money to pay for insurance and doctors, a dequa te grade s, and they do have police r ecords. Thus, cla ss ical Little L eague is untena ble in deprived a reas." The idea is to m otivate pote ntial ruffians and "lost causes" into becoming useful , productive citizens through the ins pira tion of sports. Yet, if the program is to continue to th rive ( and, even, go national perhaps someday) more funds, a nd help, will be needed. (A free brochure m ay be obtained by writing: P roject Director Tulley N. Brown, Direction Sports , Inc., Ur ban Affa irs Founda tion, 955 S. Western Ave., Suite 204, Los An geles, Ca lif. 90006). R ecently, the writer sat in (with Brown, a Negro group leader re cruited from a nearby college, and a dozen youngster s ) on one of the educative chalk talks tha t utilize sports as " transference" for learning. " Ricky," said the leader, pointing to a la d in the front row, " how m any points do you get for a touchdown?" "Six," answered Ricky. " How many points for a fielg goal?" " Two." "You sure?" " Three?" replied R icky, hesitantly. " Add six and three and what do you get," asked the le ader. Nine! "Good! Now," continued the leade r, " in basketball you get how m a ny points for a field goal ? . . . and two minus nine is . . . " And so the questions, and the transferenceof-learning skills answers, spread throughout the room- pe rhaps someday soon to spread throughout the United States with Tulley Brown' s dream of " Direction Sports becoming the Little Lea gue of minority a reas." �r t...+·"1"'~' C: I t ii t I O N ~ o n Mo nday, Ma rch 31, 1969 OIREC:tION SPORTS a nnoun ces this or ga n1 za rion will be ho ldin g a semina r this summer for repre se ntatives of eve r y major c it y th a r wo uld like t o sta rt a pilot program of Its own thi s comin g Sep t embe r; and ~OIREC:tION SPORTS is a unique p rogram us in g a Little League,type form a t , plu s ~ i ona l f ea rur es , th e spec iall y prepared "C: ha l k t a l k" by rhe Fede ra l Govern • me nr's So urh wes t Re gi ona l Labo r a tory and seco ndly p rot estation by cross discussions r einforced by a psycholo g ist , desi gned ro de ve l op posit i ve se lf , co nc epts and socia l a ttitud es; and a majo r foundation has a lr ea dy of fer ed, pendin g fin a l ap pro va l o f th e ir 143.215.248.55 12:53, 29 December 2017 (EST)-1'4. ro defra y ha lf the cost f or each c l r y des irou s of a ttendin g the semi na r; ~ the prog r am Invo l ves 9 ro 12, yea r , o ld boys and pr ese ntl y th e re a r e app roxl • ma t e y ~e hundred chi l dren Invo l ved: it is th e hope of a l I co nce rned that th e OIRF:C:t!ON Ma rc h 31 , 1969 C:ounci Iman , �~ OIRECTIO \J SQORTS , INC, . 15 OQERATI NG AN EOL!C,ATIO\J r\ L rl .'D SQORTS QROGR /1 ,11 flE\JEFITI NG 015 /\ 0V /\N TAGEOCHILDRE N IN THE CIT\' OF LOS /\NG HES ; AND ~ T H E Sl!C,C,E SS OF DIRI:: C,TION SQ ORTS , I\J(. IN DF.VUOQ ING 100 Mil.L ION QCDP.L.E AC ROSS THE Nrl TIO N, Sl!C,H RI;Sl!L.TS HAV ING 13EE\J 1\IEASLIRED lW THE RESE ARCH /\'JD OE\/UOl?,\IE NT Cf,\JTCR AT LI.C,.L. A.; AN O WHEREAS, DIRECTION SQORTS, INC. IS HOl, OlNG A SEMI \J/\R IN LOS ANG ELI::S TIIIS sm1.11rn so THl\T All TH C ,\l/1]011 CITIES or THI; NA TIO N CAN llC PROVIDED \\ ITH THE IR SP.EC, IALl, Y QRF.Q/\RED ~ll\ TERIALS I\J ORDER TO HE GI\J THE IR O\\N DIR [C: , TIO N SP ORTS QROJ ECTS: ~ !~ ~ ! , SAM YORT\' , MA\' OR OF Tllf. C, ITY OF 1, 05 ,q:-JG F,1, ES.00 HF;R[, , 11\' C, O~IME\JD TIII S OLITSTAND I ' G PROGRA ,\ I /1\/D QROCL il l~I TH E \\' EEK Of MARCH 31 , 1969 , TO AQRIL 6 , 1969 HS "D IRECTIO N SPORYS \VF.El<" IN THE CITY OF 1,0 5 rl \/ GHE5. �(continu'eti) ism to serve underprivileged but otherwise normal children? The basic needs of underprivileged youths seemed to be positive self concepts and social attitudes, and learning skills. It is on these concepts that Direction Sports is designed. Ga th Hintz, Director of Community Relations for CBS affili te K XT, writes, "In our day-to-day involvement with all aspects of the community and with the people who are concerned with improving community problems, Tulley Brown stands out as one of those rare, dedicated individuals who knows what must be done and how to go about doing it. We at KNXT know that if Tulley is connected with a project, it is going to be 99 9/ 10% right for us, and worthy of our involvement'.' Direction Sports began its regular operation on September 23rd, I 968, with Brown devoting full time to its operation. On January I 6th, I 969 Direction Sports, Inc. became a non-profit corporation. In CBS executives Garth Hintz and Joe Dyer present new team jackets to Tulley Brown. this brief time the program has become one of the most widely covered projects in the Los Angeles area. In large part the future of Direction Sports, Inc. depends on the readers of this brochure. As John Hall wrote in concluding the column quoted above, "It's a dream. But it's a dream to build a world on:' �SPONSORS AND CONTRIBUTORS ABC Markets Alpha Beta Acme Markets, Inc. Arden-Mayfair, Inc. The Boys Market, Inc. CBS-Los Angeles, KNXT Reeta Brooks Lilian Rosenthal James Yester Continental Graphics Market Basket Stores Ralphs Grocery Co. Royal Crown Beverage Co. Safeway Stores, Inc. Sears Roebuck & Co. 7-Up Bottling Co. Sports Illustrated Uniroyal Inc. Vons Grocery Co. W J. Voit Rubber Corp. LEGAL SERVICES Fulwider-Patten ( copyright, service mark) Henry Grivi Loeb & Loeb (incorporation) Western Law Study Center, use MAN AG EM ENT CONSULT ANTS Boaz, All en & Hamilton (growth and planning) TRAN £PORTA TION South Los Angeles Transportation Co. Watts Labor Community Action Comm. STAFF Project Director: Tulley R. Brown Psychometrists: Dr. Ralph Hoepfner, use Dr. Stephen Klein, UCLA Psychologist: Victor Coppin, M.A., use Curriculum Designers: Winston Doby, M.A., UCLA Dr. Neal Dorian, JET Fred Niedemeyer, M .A., Southwest Regional Laboratory ( Curriculum Center) Consultant Services: Carolee Gardner Clerical: Carol Brown, Jacqueline Brown, Billy Spencer Photography: Doug Lew, Win Muldrow, Doris Nieh, Kent Oppenheimer, Don Rypinski Coaches: Bill Caldwell Michael Cano Frank Cano Bill Carroll Eldred Eubanks Earl Myles Bruce Nelson Victor Pichardo Lance Rentzal Jess Saenz Michael Spaulding Special thanks to Frank Stanley, Los Angeles Urban League, Senator Mervyn Dymally, and the Urban Affairs Foundation for giving Direction Sports a home to grow up in. Birection Sports 4415 West Pico Boulevard, Los Angeles, Caljfornia 90019 / (213) 937-3540 �J uery 2 , 199 N 0 U 1tt J ck n c .. tatu of c ri ·1 rn r of . rk 1 ... • • , • ., • • · nd er ion �y --- DEPARTMENT OF PARKS OFFICE OF GENER A L MANAGER ATLANTA, GEO RG IA 30303 February 20, 1969 MEMORANDUM JAC K C . DELIUS GENER A L MANAG E R TO: Parks Committee of the Board of Aldermen Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. Alderman Milton G. Farris Mr. R. Earl Landers Thomp so n & Hancock Architects Finch, Alexander, Barnes, Rothschild & Pascal Architects Mr. Stanley T. Martin, Jr. Mr. Charle s L. Dav is Mr. Beverly DuBose, Jr. FROM: Jack SUBJECT: Cyclo rama Survey PIERCE YI . WHI TL EY ASST. GEN . MANAGER FRED W. BOSWELL ASST . GEN . MANAGER VI RGIN IA CARMICHAEL DIR . OF RECRE::AT!ON STANL EY T , MARTIN AOMIN . ASSISTANT c. De lius, General Manager of Parks and Recreation In acco rdance with in structions from the Parks Committee of the Board of Aldermen, ·we ha ve fini shed the survey pertaining to th e Cyclorama and its possible relocation. The results are attached for your information. Thank you for your continuing interest. Enclosure JCD : jw �·--- - - -- CYCLORAMA SURVEY A SUMMARY OF QUESTIONNAIRES February 17, 1969 As of January .24, 1969, 2,013 of the 5,000 postcards were returned to this office. This represents an impressive response of 40.3¾. We understand from public opinion firms, etc., that as much as a 10¾ resp~nse is considered adequate and favorable. Seven basi j questions were asked on the survey card and not every question was answered by everyone who returned a card. As to the question, 11 Your home town or point of origin?, 11 l, 97 3 responded. Of this number, 966 (or 49¾) were from the southeastern United States. They represented a total of forty-five states and the District of Columbia. Interestingly enough, 1.89¾ of all visitors during the period tested were from foreign countries. Those listing Atlanta under question one represent 7.6¾ of the survey, and those from outside Atlanta but living in Georgia represented 10.9¾ of the survey. As to question two, 11 Are you on vacation or a business trip?, 11 61.6¾ were on vacation, 21.8¾ were on business, and 16.5¾ were on business and vacation. As to question three, 11 How did you hear of cyclorama?, 11 a total of 1,689 of the 2,013 cards responded to this question. The largest single group were told of the Cyclorama by friends, with the next group having heard of it through relatives, and the third group bein g natives of the City of Atlanta. Georgia Welcome stations, encyclopedi as, Georgia Motor Club, tax i drivers, newspapers, magazine s and history books, Welcome Wagon, etc. were listed as sources where the tOurists learned of the Cyclorama. As to question four, 11 Did you have trouble locating the park?, 11 of the 1.960 who responded to this question, only 12 . 1¾ said they had trouble locating Grant Park. Questio n five. This i ·s a very important question consisting of the 11 Did you following: come to Grant Park specifically to see the Cyclorama; · or, to see the Zoo and Cyclorama; or, to see the Zoo and decided to visit the Cyclorama? 11 A total of 1,.939 of the 2,013 answered this question. 79.9¾ stated they came td Grant Park e x clusively to see the Cyclorama ; 17¾ said they came to Grant Park to see the Zoo and the Cyclor ama, a n d only 3 . 1¾ stated they came to Gran t Park prima r i ly t o see t he Zoo a n d , while ther e, decided to take in the Cyclorama . Qu e" st ion six a sk s , 11 Do you feel the Cy clorama should be move d to anoth e r loc a t io n? 11 Of the 2, 013 answering this questio n, ( please no t e e very card answe r e d q u est i o n six ) 76¾ said , 11 No , do not move i t t o a nother locatio n. 11 9¾ said , 11 Yes , do move it , " and 15¾ ha d n ot r eached a c o nclusion. Of the 2,013 c a rds which a n s were d q uest io n s i x, 217 we re fro m the Atl a nta Metro a re a . Of the se 217 , 7 5% s aid ; 11 Do no t move the Cyclorama,11 19¾ s a id, "Do move i t, 11 a n d 7¾ h ad n o o pinion. Question seven asks, "Would you rather see the Cyclorama located near downtown motels , civic centers, etc.? 11 Again, 2,013 of the 2 , 013 r ·e turned �Cyclorama Survey Summary (cont'd) - 2 - February 17, 1969 cards answered question seven. 74% stated they would not prefer to see the Cyclorama downtown, 11% said they would, and 1'5% had no opinion. Of the 2,013 cards answering question seven, 217 were from the Metro area. Of this 217, 74% said, 11 No, do not move it downtown, 11 15% said "D:> move it downtown, 11 and 11¾ had no opinion. JCD:jw �CYCLORAMA SURVEY AS OF January 24, 1969 1. Your home town or point of origin? L/ :;-· STAT t: 1, /, ?c 149 66 1 ·11 85 17 21 4 1-51 / o. 9 ~ 0 216 3 1 97 37 16 ·3 34 37 2 18 40 90 25 25 27 2. Atlanta - .. Alabama -Alaska Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware FloridaGeorgiaHawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky - Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minne sota Mississippi - Missouri -- 3 3 5 12 68 96 6 84 15 6 48 3 82 1 75 82 8 4-7 18 25 15 29 5 4 Montana i- 1), c, Nebraska New Hampshire New Jersey New York N. CarolinaN. Dakota Ohio Ok·lahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island S. Carolin~ S. -Dakota Tennessee.._ Texas Utah VirginiaWashington Washington, D.C.---, W. Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming No State S Foreign Countries 14 Canada 7 Switzerland 1 Venezuala 1 Ireland 4 Germany 3 Japan 6 England 3 Australia 4 Holland 2 Puerto Rico 1 Grand Bahamas 1 Brazil 1 South America 1 Iran 1 France 1 South Africa 1 Norway 1 Mexico 2 Wales 2 Scotland 2 Isreal 2 India 2 Ecuador 2 Denmark 1 Kenya 1 Sweden Are you on vacation or a business trip? fs,l.f.o'70 Vacation - 1,080 3. '1 6 e:, r- n-o lNV s.e. 1£,'Sd)o .:i..1,8/'o Business - 381 Both - 290 -r·oi---A <... 1 'l S / How did you hear of Cyclorama? 759 293 109 144 29 42 5 30 2 28 46 8 30 1 1 Friend s Relatives Native .Return Vi s it Tour Folde rs, Brochure s , Pamphlet s , e tc. Welcome St a tio n Motel s & Hot e l s Airport Adve rti sement School Chamber of Commerce Li t erature & Books Worl d Book Ency. Ga. I nfo. Offi ce 3 Transit Authority 36 A.A.,_f:\. 3 16 1 4 19 6 9 8 25 Cab Driver Maps Governme nt Office Sightseeing Trip, News paper Grey Line Magazine History Guide Book or Trave l Folder Civ i l War Centinne l Lectu r es We lcome Wagon Trave l Bur eau 1 2 1 3 1 Hospitality Hou se 3 While a t zoo 1 Study of monume nt s 7 Conve n tion 2 Information De sk 2 New York Time Post 3 Motor Club 1 Movie Guide 1 American He ritage 1 Hert z 2 Curt is , 1 000 1 Superior Bumper Products of Atlanta �CYCLORA.MA--suRVEY January 24, 1 969 Page 2 4. Did yo/ have trouble locating the Park? No - lr' 721 Yes - 239 I 2_. \ °lo 5. Did you come to Grant Park specific a lly to see the Cyclorama?; or, to ' see the Zoo & Cyclorama; or, to see Zoo and decided to visit Cyclorama? ~ ~.t?o 1q~9'rO 'rJ'l< . '7 ? . CJ ·1 o I 7 ?o Zoo and decided - 61 Cyclorama - 1,549 Zoo & Cyclorama - 329 6. Do you feel Cyclorama should b e moved to another location? No - 1,539 (76%) Yes - 17_9 (9%) No Opinion - 295 ( 15%) Yes - 41 (19%) No Opinion - 15 (7%) Jo I 3 '\-OTA,.,_ Metro Atlanta No - l~l (74%) 7. 217 l ufh-. Would you r a the r see Cyc lorama l ocat e d n ear d o wntown hot e l s , motels, in a civic center? No - 1,496 (74%) Yes - 21 0 (li%) No Op inion - 307 ( 15%) d u I 3 l C//71·L Ye s - 33 (15%) No Opinion - 24 (11%) 2 I Metro Atlanta No - 160 (74%) . NOTE: Thi s includes all the c a rd s tha t h ave b een given ou t at the Cyclorama . Thi s will b e fina l exc e pt for a ve ry f e w tha t a r e b e ing r e turne d by ma il. d-0\:, Cf\'2-l)5 Ou""t Of- So oo. '-+o."3 fF/o 1 l u7Tk_ �CITY OF ATLANTA DEPARTMENT OF PARKS OFFICE OF GENERAL MANAGER ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 February 18, 1969 MEMORANDUM JA C K C . DE L IUS GE N ER AL MANAGE R F RED P. WHI TL E Y ASST . G E N . MAN A GER FRED. W. BOSWELL ASST . GE N. MANAG ER VIRGI NI A CARMICHAEL. C I R . OF RECR E ATION TO : Mr s . Hattie Thomas O ffic e of the M a yor FRO M : Vir ginia C armichael RE : Miss B e ssie L. Whitehead STA NLE Y T . MARTIN AOMIN . . ASSI S TANT Attached you will find informati o n which I have d iscuss e d with you on t h e phone , a l so some information from t h e P e r s onnel D e p artment . I have done int ens i ve inve stiga tion t o s ee who M i ss W hit ehead m i g h t h av e talke d with i n the D ivision o f Recr e atio n who said they simpl y could n ot und e rsta nd how she c o uld have fail e d the oral. She could h a v e t a lke d t o some s t a ff m e mbe r working in the fi e l d. Howe v e r, s h e did not t a lk to a nyone in the a dministra tive offic e . I trus t this m eets with your sati s fa ctio n . VC / p ah A ttach m e n ts �2-11-69 Dear Virginia : Miss Bessie L. Whitehead was rated by Alberta, Marvin, and me on January 29. Noee of us gave her a passing score. She did not impress me as someone who had the temp,.erament, personality, or back~round to make a successful Recreat io n Leader. She came to my office yesterday in a very angry mood, threw the letter on my desk, and said she was not going to take that king of 11 - - - - 11 • She talked on for quite some time, saying, among other things, that s he was not going to told no if she had to get a gun and come up here and shoot somebody. I did not say a great deal to her - I was listening most of the time - but I was polite and tried to be helpful. She see med to have calmed down some when she left. IY~ft:- /IJ1 1ss ~~ ~ f?,'//,j~ r t ,, �-. / . January 31, 1969 Miss Bessie L. Whit_ehead 1220 Gardenia Street N. w. Atlanta, Georgia 30314 Dear Miss Whitehead: I regret to inform you that in the recent interview for Community Recreation Leader you did not attain a passing score. Therefore, your name will not appear on the eligible list. I appreciate the interest manifested .by you in undergoing this examination, and 1 hope that you v ill participate in such future tests as may interest you and for which you may be suited. Ii I I' ll · Very truly, CARL T. SUTHERLAND Director of Personnel CTS:BG:erw �Have you e ver applied for City of Atla nt a~ Q e mp\cyrr,~nc? ·' 1("Yes" -chec:k wi th Interviewer b efcre completing chi s form. 5i2-4463, Exe. 267 CITY OF ATLANTA PERSONNEL BOARD Veteran - - - -- - - - - - APPLICATION FOR CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATION Chauffeur - - - - - - - - - 260 CENTRAL A VENUE, S. W. ATL ANTA, GEORGIA 30303 L icense# - - - - - - - -- Operato r - - - - -- - - -,-,J ,,? --7c;, / / . z:_L ( /)-re/ / 1/(,; , Socia l Security Number: , / / POSITION APPLIED FOR DATE DO NOT USE THIS SPACE DATE OF EXAM .Ir,·, t t-Oi (' _. ~ L ~CND 1Jf1N 9 ~ 1QRQ Discharge ' Medical License I I Experience Trade Report Pase Emp. Additional Remarks: ! ,4-1 _ I Mr. Education Court Record ,/ -- . rl - z. LO ~ . 6 2 -::.t_e,,·. C,:::-~fT //4V a ~ 17 "°. Alternate Number Heighc / 4/~I/ // Check appropriate: / /".. Weight White / - ,O{) o/ v").'ZJ=/.c(/Z.---::::, Telephone Number,· Place of Birch / fl <..--?- ¼-- 7 I/O ,?Lc{,...-4? ~/ _ / A e ·From ·-/2;- - - To C ;z -f.!!«7=:; Are yo u a c iti ze n of the United Scaces ?/c..,,.~v_/c.., -;_;--..., ,_;?'.-;{__=-/.,.,_,_,.., ·(- - - - -- - - - - - - - Wha·c is your husband's or wi fe's n ame? _ _ _:,.1_ _ _ __ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ ~ ~7 z=:;>1ale - - - S in gle ~ i v orced---Widow 0 No. of children Colored - - - Female ~ 1 a rri ed - - - Separated - - - Widower - - - No. of depende nts _,___ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ If answer ro any ques tion be low is " Yes", explain. (Ask for extra sheet if nee d ed). Have you any disease, physical disability, or defect? f} /} Ha ve you ever been treated for a nervous or mental condition? Are you receiving disability compensation? Have you ever be en sued on a debt? fJ O 1J O ,0 I? . - Have .yo u ever h ad y~ur wa.ges garnisheed? ,rf (9 Have you ever filed for or been awarded bankruptcy judgmen t? EXPLANATI ON : - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - -- -- Have you ever been arrested or given a traffic ticket? f 12 Have you a ny p as t due debts? ~/J--'/J-'-___ - - - - - - - - -- - -- - - - - -- -- - - - - - - - - - /J() If "YES" li st all crimes or misd e meanor s, includin g traffic violation s, w ich which you have bee n c h arged. Fail ure to admit any offe ns e regardless of wh e n or where it o ccurred , may cause rejection of applica tion. (A sk for extra sheet if n ecessa ry). _CHARGE List any mac hin es or equipme nt chat you c a n operate e ffici e ntl y. .W2v Ha ve yo u h ad milit ary service? ,.. "'.... w a: N <( J, l: a: 0 11. Are yo u pres e ntl y employe d? _ __,f?..,._..c/,.-,.... 7 ____~ /? f-;; Have you ever worked for the Ci:;o~ Atl a nt a ? - ~fl~.L~. 7_ ___ How many times we re you in se rvi ce ? _ _ _ _ _ __ _ / DO NOT WR IT E BELOW THIS LINE ' Branch of Se rvice Se rv ice Duties Da te en liste d Disch a rge rev ie wed by Dace sepa rate d Reason for dis c h arge Form Ho no ra bl ,. VA l e t te r date d Seria l o r File No . Wh e n _ __ _ Are y ou interes te d in p erma ne nt work?_,..,.-:/ .,.,/J .., .,5%? ~/.' ,,_,_______ .,. 7J/ V '1/,I Are you w illin g to accept te mp orar}' work?' b{fL<' Were a'll di sc h arges "Honorable"? - - - - - - - - - - -- - (IJ > SENTENCE i FINE CITY & STA TE WHEN P e r cent di sa bilit y Re ma rks �Educational Record Name of School & Location .t i ~ /4~"/7,Z- /'4/1/21/,,I(? / V;J/JJ./J·- v;?/4<1,,; v7 :&;· //·-;/ 7 . - ,efJ;; r . / /fl 'i~//4//1'-7 II /Yl/Y) - -·f l/.1/ /{ V ,.,.. _ / "' ....... El.cmencary - Hi gh School Lase Year Atte nd e d -· ly-5q ·vq._,i~· , -- c,..,v(/";,..,,'-',_..1-..,., College1 Univ. ' Post Graduate Encircle highest grade comple_tf. d. . / " ) ., Graduate 1-2-3-4-t§,-7·8 /~·!!.& Ye s ~ - 9-10-1 (i'y No Yes-- ·· N o - -- ~ Degree & Major Subj ect Yes-No - - Yes-NO - - - Trade or Business School . No. of months attended Final Salary;,·· 1) j, I I City Zip Code /,: .."-/ L.1! ~. ,,U ,f:-,_ -. 4 _\· (,, l I State Dare Sta rted I . Dace Left ,f ( ,' \..__,./ Fina l Sa lary _· r .,·., .: , , (.~ Mailing Addre~s ~ / - 'v' .l Number Describe Duties cf _( ·j Street . State City / i ,.{', . / / ~ ·/;,,.,.!_, ' !'.:..- '. Mailing Address Rea s on ·for Le a ving Numbe r Des cribe Duti es , Zip Code Fina l Sala ry Street ') ,. . Dire'ction City '-- State Zip Code /, . Fina l Salary Number De scribe Duties , R eason for Lea vin g i, , <1 C\-•:'-/. ('..t •'./) - I/ j (.,, .) Mailing Addres~ c -/ I ,,, / t.c--.:.1'(_,,,.,-- { · '/ Dace L e ft < /, .') Firm's Na me I - /! - /, _A1i/.'t'. ;;!.. Da ce· Sea. reed .7 - / ·- ... Direction L ·) i '-/ . Firm's Na me ,.. Date Left ·- /i ~- ( i I ! / Dace Sta rt~ Zip Code 1-;:..., L Stree t Dire ctio n ~ / ).,_ 'J..'.-~ !. ._:.,.,:_;__,/ • \... REF E R E N.t ES: Li s t names ~nd comp l ete addresses of three c h arac te r ~e feren ces. Do no t li s t re l atives or former emp l oyers. . ADDRESS - ')' s.,. / 'r,.- .- - ,. . , e r I - l1. L L 1.;-f!f / r--2 (MIDDLE NAME • Le~ (FIR~'i' NAME) IF NONE PUT NMN) I certify that I am the above individual taking this examination. I understand that if it is later established tha t I have misrepresented myself, I and the person being misrepresented will be permanently barred fro m City employment and may be ptosecuted by the courts. If either is already employed by the City of Atlanta h.e may be subj ect: to suspens ion dismissal. 1/ L_ . ? /~ ,.:j /J ,. I ·"/./ . . . . . \.., S IGNED c,-. . "")v:~;;.1 ,1..-.L-"J, ·1",-~-- _;,.. -~~ ._; ,J ~ -. /;7 (,_/ _.J ~d ,1/' ~ _."'t" ,r.·.r·.f. ,,--1 . {/~fl'C. ..0:0-~". ~ ,l ,11··" • ·,1.? ,)' ,,, .,.... ,_.,r',;: j/ · 4: ...... ..I' .· ,·· -~-~-.. / V ::,,.:""i.J-, ' ,,•.,:,..,. ~-·~ --- " --· /' .,v' • .... \,,,-(;','.<....-.:,:::,..,,-,' .. '"'~ �ITY OF ATLAN A DEPARTMENT of PARKS Office of General Manager Atlanta, Georgia 30303 March 18, 1969 MEMORANDUM JACK C. DELIUS GENERAL MANAGER a TO: Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. FROM: Jack C. Delius, General Manager of Parks and Recreation SUBJECT: Concession Bids for North Fulton Golf Course and Piedmont Park. The Parks Committee of the Board of Aldermen advertised four times the concession privil e ges at North Fulton Golf Course and Piedmont Park. Only one bid was rec eived for e ach of the s e locations. Mr. Paul Lavin, Golf Profe ssional a t North Fulton Golf Cours e, entered the only bid of $1,500. 00 a year for a three - y e ar p e riod. This amount is identic a l to what we were receiving from this concession stand up to 196 7. C o mmitt ee also received o ne bid on the Pie dmont P a rk Concession in the amount of $1,750.00 per year for a two -yea r p er iod. M r. J. W. Oldkn ow, the current C oncessionaire, was the only bidder. He had been paying $1,555.0 0 per year. Parks Committee op ened these bids on March 11 , 1969 and asked that I forward the information to you with their recommendation that we accept these bids. If you should find them acceptable, I shall proceed to have the proper r e solutions drawn, contract agreements prepared, etc. Thank you v e ry much. J C D :jw I/~ -lf?~c~G( A4 3/'f t �Februsry 10, 1969 ME MO R A N D U M TO: Virgini a Ca rmichael, Director of Recreation FROM: J a ck C. Delius, General Manager of Parks & Recreation Miss Hattie Thomas of the Mayor ' s Office has asked me t o i nvestigate the situation i nvolvi ng the prospective employment of Miss Bessie L. Whitehead, f or the position (as I understand it) o f Communi ty Recreat ion Director. Miss Whitehead apparently succe sful ly passed the written part of the examina tion but received a letter dated January 31, 1969 from the Pers onnel Department stating that she had failed the oral. Miss Whitehead further s tates that on February 10, 1969 she "talked to someone in Recreation" who said they s imply c ould not understand how she could have failed the oral. 0 I advised Miss Thomas that we were not privileged t o eiam the oral done by a t l east three different people, one of whom only normally repre sents this department . However, . I would ask you to look into this and see if there has been any mistakes made,, etc . Would you please advise Miss Whitehead at 1220 Gardenia St.,N, W. of the circumstances and also post Miss Thomas in the Mayor's Office . Thank you very much . JCD:bf cc: J~iss Hattie Thomas,, Secretary, Mayo r 's Office �At>l"il a. 1969 MEMOR.ANDU TO: Mr. Eddie MeLemore. Recreatlon Supervf.acn• PBOH I Jack SUBJBCT1 Mr. Joe Gentry, Pcka Bngf.neei-iog Divialon c. Q48er of P-oks and Recreation De11ua• Genei-al Dev lopaent of temporary C"ecr tf.on f .ci1£ty 1 472 111 Mr . arl Land r , oft tn this d ·pctm .ot t.ak1 Str et, s. w. (Id Coq,any) yor'• Office, baa~ aaed ken tntei:eat ovu the f Bden ~ -DY - t 472 Ir Stre, t, s. w. and converti th facility into- a t of t '*"U'Y r a · al:i,oo. f c,u.c:y. there ie a poeaibiU.ey th building could be r .novated to aoae lildc. d ext nt rut, ae, you - y II th laud djac ot t-o th •ti"Uetur bas been cl · in lo th for · playgJ:"QUDd" • Landet"a h I a keel Mr. Jobnny Robwoa, <:omaiUlltty s a. s CoordJ. tor., to C0017d1nat th1e p,:oJ ct. We ha be n dnaed by Mr. HowAC'd Op nahaw,. the Dir ccor of & • cleVi lo t f~ the Atlaat lfoua _ Ailthori.ty that th rt Company ha, b en acquk d by the Routing . ut~ity nd th4t th forMI" aw-r1ar will •hcnttly b 1IOV1 • ~ t h ~ r II Atlant HoUall Autbot'iey wt,11 be in po1itlo ·t o 1 • for •·-~ C' cw- ation ct:lv1t4 , etc . thi pro etty .. �Memorandum Toe Aprl.l 8, 1969 · ssra. Eddie McLemare/Joe Gentty check with me fi-equently aa to prograaa being mad • JCDajw cc: Deacon Peters, c/o BOA Sum-Mee · ighborhood Center 6S Geor 1a Avenue Me ara. Earl Lander • Mayor's Office .Johnny Robtnson, May.31:• s Of fie ROQald Wolf , Poat Offic Box 1328, Atl nt ., G • 30301 Wtllt .. T. Huntley, 111. i>,:itcbar4 & Jard a, %Ge. 2250 N. ~id HU1o ad wa N.E. Atl ta, GeO.i' 30329 Pat Batton, elo • A. Ston & Associate 482 Armour otrcle:, • ,1 . Atlanta, Goor la 30324 . I �March 19, 1969 Mr . Jack C. Delius General Manager Parks D partment Atlanta, Georgia Dear Jack~' W have reviewed your memorandum of March 18, 1969 relating to conce sion bide for North Fulton Golf Cour e and Piedmont Park. Tb bid ubmitted by Mr. Paul Lavin for the North Fulton Oolf Cour nd by Mr . J ~ W. Oldknow for Pi dmont Park ar acceptable by the Mayor . It ie, ther fore , r quested that you proce d to have then c ss ry resolution dr wn nd the contract agreements prep red. Sincerely yours, R. E rl Lander Admlni•tr tive A . sis REL:lp nt �C~TY. ·TA OF DEPARTMENT of PARKS Office of General Manager Atlanta, Georgia 30303 May 2, 1969 MEMORANDUM JACK- C. DELIUS GENERAL MANAGER TO: Mr. Joe Gentry, Parks Engineering Miss Jimmie Mims, Assistant Director of Recreation FROM: Jack c. Delius, General Manager of Parks and Recreation SUBJECT: '--------· . · Eden Rag Company (Ira Street) I am attachin·g ··for each of you a Xerox of a proposed Recreation Program to take place -at the former Eden Rag Company building on Ira Street. I am asking Joe Gentry to coordinate all the improve· ments to the building and the surrounding land, and have already discus sed some of this with Mr. Roland Ebright, Foreman of Adams Park. It will be necessary to ask Fred Shepherd to give us his opinion as soon as possible as to the practicality of moving certain pieces of superstructure in the warehouse section of the building. Also, · Mr. Earl Landers advises that Pete Peterson, of the City Hall, has a number of spare plumbing fixtures we might use in replacing those vandali zed . You should talk to Mr. Grady Butler, the Extension Area Manager of Sum-Mee, and discuss the particulars on the renovation of this building. Overtime is authorized through Range 46 for painters,· carpenters, electricians, to get on this project immediately. Severa l trees will have to be removed, lights added to the field and general illumination (not professional athletic lights), utilities turned on, a telephone installed, etc. Please r e vie w the attached list. Miss Mims, it is the City ·s wish to staff this facility as soon as practical and to supply the equipment on the attached list where possible. Please have your Recreation Coordinator or the Recreation Supervisor work closely with Mr. Butler. An excellent job has been done in organi zing the Neighborhood Advisory Committee, and we should c e rtainly l e nd an ear to their advice. Finally, the first order of business will be to regrade and make playable the ball field to the north of the build ing and the construction of a ball field to the south of the . building. Mr. Butier can fill you in o n this. A nQmber of City official s have expressed personal interest in the success of this program and I --· / �I . I Mr • . Joe Gentry Memo t,o: May 2, 1969 Miss Jimmie Mims I I Page1 2 I __! .: . · --- ·appreciate their cooperation. The Optimist Club of Executive Park may vote to render certain assistance to us with this project and Mr. Johnny Robinson is currently contacting this group to determine what aid may be forthcoming. · JCD:jw cc: ·- Mr. R. Earl . Landers, Mayor·s Office ~ Mr. Johnny Robinson, Community Development Coordinator Mr. Grady Butler, Extension Area Manager, Sum-Mee Extension Office Mr. J. ,D. Chamblee, Parks Maintenance ·Superintendent Mr. Pierce Whitley, Asst. Gen. Mgr. of Parks Mr. Staniey T. Martin, Asst. Gen. Mgr. of Parks Mr. Bob Johnson, Chief Electrician Mr. Fred Shepherd, City Architect Mr. Eddie McLemore, Recreation Supervisor Mr. Ron Ransom, Recreation Coordinator ....,. _ . - - -- ,,, �SUH-MEG EXTENSION OPii'IGE ,50tl McDaniel Sta Apt. 18_53 Atlanta , Georgia 30312 I I fRO~OSED ~ROGRAM STRUCTURE for RECREA'l1I ON FACILITY IN 1'-LECHANICSVILLE Io FOCUS ' To meet the needs of the community, the recreation faci lfty should have a comprehensive program. The program should be broad a.nd inclusive enough to provide activities for all age groupso The activities should include: athletics, table games, a variety of outdoor games, interest groups~ a gameroom for small kids, a quiet room for reading and lounge, coed groups and activities, and adult groups and a ctivitieso The governing body for the facility is an elected, 12-member Advis ory Board. The Board is made up of persons from the Jvie chani csville community . They are as follows: Rev. F.W. Melville, Chairman Mrs. Rosa Hampton, Vice Chairman Mrs. Rosa Griffin, Secretary Mrs. Bertha Barton, Assistant Secretary Rev. M.M. Thomas, Treasurer Mrs .. Annie R 0 Newton (s·'7 '7 - S li..\v Miss Lois Wilson ~rs. Emma Thomas ( 4 young people will be elected to the Board) I I . PROGRAM A. Softball l o 20 teams ac 5-10& under te ams ( 3 boys and 2 girls ) b., 5-12 & under teams ( 3 boys and 2 girl s ) c. 5-15 & under te ams {j boys and 2 gi rls ) d. 2-17 & under teams {l boy and 1 giri ) e. J Adult teruns ( 2 men and jj 1 women) �I ( B. page 2 { Baseball I 5 teams a. l.;.10 & under team b. 1-12 & under tes.m Cc, 1-15 & under · team / / d. 1-17 & under team e. 1 adult team 1. 1 >~-·--=- ·· c. Gym Activities (inside rag house) 1. 2 table tennis Sets 2. 2 Billiard Tables 3o 2 Caron Boards 4. l Weightlifting set 5. 2 card tables (for checkers) D. Game Room (for small kids) 1. Table games 2. Selected activities '-----.... ..______ E. . A Quiet Room - _ __ l . "'For Re a ding 2. lounge for staff 3. For counse ling 4. For small meetings F. Other Outside Games 1. Volleyball 2. Basketball 3. Cro que t 4., Horse shoe s 5. Soccer {outside Goals) G. Other Adult ,Activities 1. Barbe cues 2. Othe r Suggeste d Activities He Coed Activities le A Youth Council 2., Youth Social Activities a . Dances b .. Parties -- �Io Phys~cal Equipment and De velopme nts I 1. Softball and baseball fields developed (leveled and scraped) 2o Spectator seats on softball and baseball fields J. A 5ft. fence to enclose the area. 1 4, The Building needs painting and decorating on the inslde A telephone needs to be installed I (I} . L--\ 11 t-i , s -Ic L D · J • Staff 5. r 1. 3 Male Workers ao 1 worker for gym activities(inside). b. 2 workers for softball and baseball fields 2. 5 a. b. c. d, Female Workers 1 worker for gym activities (inside) 1 worker for game room (for small kids) 2 workers for softball and other outside games. 1 worker to serve as receptionist-secretary. Submitted by: Grady Butler Extension Area Mgr. SUJvI-1'-'I.EC Extension Office 5/1/69 �CITY OF ATLANTA DEPARTMENT OF PARKS OFFICE OF GENERAL MANAGER ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 JACK C. DELI US G EN ER A L MANA GER • F R ED P . WHIT LE Y A SST . May 19, 1969 GE N. M A NAGE R FRED. W. BO SWEL L A SST . GE N.MAN A G ER VIRGINIA CARMI C HAEL. CIR . O F RE CREATION MEM O RAND U M S T AN LE Y T . MARTIN AD M I N . ASS IST A NT TO: All Park and Recreation Supervisors and Foremen FROM: Stan Martin• Assistant General Manager of Parks SUBJECT: Opening of Swimming Pools for 1969 Season All swimming pools will open on Saturday, June 7, 1969, and will remain open through Labor Day, September 1, 1969. The hours of operation will be from 12 Noon until 8:30 P.M., Monday through Saturday and from 1:00 P.M. until 8 : 30 P.M. on Sundays , Swimming classes will be taught by our staff for a period of eight weeks beginning June 16 through August 8 from 10:00 A.M. until 12 Noon, Monday through Friday. Children 12 years old and under will be allowed to swim free from 12 Noon until 2:00 P.M., Monday through Saturday. All port-a-pools will be open from June 7 through Labor Day, and will be used only for organized swimming classea supervised by our recreation staff. STMJr:bt �-- - - - 11 I July 7 11 1969 MEMO TO: $9 J c J c. SUBJECt: Shutt:la _ · nk rf "= OU , ANf> U GStstant Oir Ct~ £ U.us, ~ . rtei- 1 t-l,'.111ag-«;lt of Parka -a nd . s • t1 ta Stadt - to City Hell t ion ecre ti.on �October 6, 1969 MEMORANDUM To: Mayor Allen From: Dan Sweat Subject: Proposed $100, 000 Park Project W have be n un bl · to secur wh t w feel re good recommend tions for project through th usual ources and h v , th r Sol"e, taken the lib rty of ng th reeomm nd tion ourselv s . In su g sting poeslbl proj ct w re som what at di advantage in not knowing th I: lings of the donor . Fo7 xatnple, ls h motivat d by charit bl con ider tion hkh would lend itself to pl'oject in ome· die dv tag d rea? Is he motiv ted by rtletic cons i d r tions? Hietol'ic: con ldel'ation ? Do h wt h . proj ct to b memori l to him lf or hi•! mily? In th · v nt that the City w 1' to ~ c lv an unantlclpat d $100, 000 gr t, lt ould b - our hope th t th • fun . - J ACK ~ . DEL IUS GE NERAL MANAGER M E M O R A N D U M STANLEY T. MART I N , J R. ASS T. GEN . MANAGER F. PI ERCE WHI TL EY ASST.G E N . MANAGER C ARL VI. RYALS, JR . SR. ADM I N. ASS ISTANT V IRG I N I A CARMICHAE L DIR. O F RE,CREATION TO: -Jimmie Mims , As sis t ant Director of Recreation FROM : Jack C. Delius, Gene ral Manager SUBJECT : Rec r eati on Assistance to Faye tt e , Mississippi Mayo r Charles Ev ers \ Ber t a Frizzel l ha s checke d th e ai rli nes and finds that De lta fli es into Natc hez , Mississippi which is the n earest airport apparently to Fayette, Mis si ssippi . The tra nsportation round trip touri st class is $115 . 5 .0 . I will r e ques t for you this amount of mone y plus $25 . 00 p er diem expense for the one night you probably will . stay and $25 . 00 . t ravel expense for a total request of $ 1 65 . 50 . I make r eference on the request for travel expenses to the fact that Mr. Dan Sweat ha s asked 0s to give assistanc e t o Faye tt e, Mississippi . As t o the cost of construction of the r ec r eation buildinggymnasium and other items, I he l d a meeting this morning with the Park Engineers and we came up with some rough ballfield prices . First of a ll, a recreation building that would includ e a regulation college typ e basketba ll court with two small courts crosswise, rollaway bleache rs, a r ecreation or multi -purpose room, a library, dance studio, locke r room, showers, e tc . ,·as we ll as a special club and trophy room would c e rtainly add up to at l east 12,900 square feet . I have analyzed the square footage in several of the b e tt e r gymnasiu m-recreati on building compl exes in Ge orgia s uch as Da lton and East Point and find they run sl i g htly over 12,000 s quare fee t. Th e Park Engineers have es timated cost of construction of this typ e of building at a bout $20.00 p er square foot and so you could say that this building, less land, would cost b e tween $200,000-$240,000. Now, that figure would not include the cos t of i nstalling l ockers, etc . f,,'-iT r. ~\.... / .c-· l';- "'.·.. , �MEMORANDUM Jimmi e Mims Octob er 23, 1 969 As to an outdoor recrea tion area , the information we have from Fayette, Miss issippi is rather nebulous . The cost of a multiple purpose game court is running about $3,500 each here in At lanta . It can be done out of concrete and you could skate on it and have other act i vit i es r e quiring a hard . surface such as basketball, e tc. Basketball courts are also running about $3,500 each ; badminton courts about $3 ,000 each, voll eyball courts about $3,000 , and doubl e court t ennis faciliti es about $7,000 . The engineers es timat e that out door handball courts properly construct ed and f e n ced would run about $2,000 each . The co s t of constructing a baseba ll .d i amond, socc er fi e ld, quar t er mil e cinder track , arch ery range and hors eshoe pit s , if in fact the land is fai r ly level and requir es little grading, would run about $25 ,000 including the lighting . It is worth noting that we have spent up to $15,000 for just the light for a l arge baseball diamond . As to the campsites , they run about $500 each . Outdoor toil e t ·facilities are shockingly expensive . We have spent up to $20,000 for ladi es and mens r es trooms . However, the engineers think that from $8,000 -10,000 would cover this it em . Mis s issippi might want to build their own or conside r buying one alre~dy pre-fabricated from Sup er Secure in California. You will recall that we have us ed Super Secure at Anderson and.Bedford - Pine . The water fountains ccst $160 . 00 ea~h p lus installation and water pipe . We are not sure about item 7 11 The outdoor area which should b e light e d 11 and thus we are refraining from g iving any s ort of pric e . We r eally don 1 t know what siz e area the y are _talking a bout. The las t item, number 8, calls for construction of a strong fence around the entire playarea . A six foot fence of reasonably sturdy gauge runs about $4 . oo a foot installe d . In othe r word s , a 100 f ee t would cost $400.00; a 1,000 fe e t, .a $1,000.00. I am sending Dan Sweat a copy of thi s memorandum and hav e a call into him at this time to ask him whether I should proceed to make a r e ques t for your travel expenses. JCD:bf cc: Dan Swe at Dan: Jimmie Mims is on a very badly needed vacation and wil l be back on duty Monday, October 27, and could leave mos t anytime a ft e~ that for the trip to Fayette. �l( ~ p • / , .- , I . - ·.; -··~ .Jr S.~i~ rt/1ENT OF P/\Rliy Hig'.1 School SchooJ. -Tota l Se rved by ~Iur.~D:1 ries Schoo l Brown Avenue and J ones joro Road · Park A'renu.e cJncl Lc1 nsin ~ · Hice Her.1ori;1l 670 Ad.?.i r PciTk 500 Pittman Park 1~50 Bethlehem Center Schoo·J. Tota 1 Served by- A . I\. . J ones E_lementc1ry Sc:1001 Howell Pa rk 500 500 Norcross Play lot , 500 . / .Ha;rne s Playlot 500 Oa kla nd City Playlot 670 Cr.?.ddock School School Tota l 200 ~--·· 2u70 Serve-1 b;,, Pey ton _Forres t Ele1r.ent-:1ry School Adamsville Park 500 Phylot - 2185 1.Terben.?. Str2- et 0 1600 0 �r · I TOTA L l\iUI'-tJ~R OF P :\ ::.TIC IPA?•:TS Wilson Avenue 700 Tremont Dr ive 900 Collier Pa rks 1100 English Park 500 JOO Wilson Eills Pa rk Schoo]. Tot2l 5600 Served by Pr::or Stree t School Cn.pi tol .Avenue Pl ay lot 1500 ~d Cook Recreation Center 1500 T:.fes l ey '.:-louse 800 ·. Ira Re cre ation 1500 Pry or Street School 3000 1 fashington-Rycle r 1000 Dodd PJ.a;y-lot 1000 Playlot - 71 Little Stree t 10()0 Playlot - 941 McDanie l Stre et 600 Pla'-rlot - Ge or co-1. n a nd YcD::ini e l St r se t 650 Play l ot - A tla n-La Sta dilun Pa rkin g Lot 750 .; 0 Playlot - Nary and _Colei-na n Street School Tota l 600 12°, !ioc5 0 0 Se rv e d by D. H. Stan t on Schoo l - r!;i.ygood and Cre :.-1 S~r e e t Pl a.ylot 900 Danie l St~nton Pa r k 900 1000 Ri cha r ds on St r ee t Ce nt e r 650 Conna lly Street Cente r E . P . Jo'(l.n son Sch oo l Tot a l �PR09L~MS E~COUNTlR~D 1. Inadequate propara tj_on of food. 2. The t rucks stil l have not been p1·ovided with a c aae in . I b orde r t o hold food in place. 3. Schools were not provi ded wiU1 enou~h i ce . 4. ·. The s anduiches were t oo -:3.ry bec ause t here was p l ain peanut ' bu tt~r . In ac!.diticn , h : t r o.ve J. i ng to var:i.ou.s schoo l s , I f ound th':lt bro,-mies ,,1ere bein g made with pe a nut butter and wsre not co.::1pJ.etely cooked. 5. I be l ieve fo e !1eals offere d could be more substs.nti.al if c ertciin ot:1 er commodit i es were prep :->r-:id. For exarnpJ.e , tr1e rne~ls would b e much b e tte r i.f merlts were added to the sup -plements . / 0 �I. TOT AL NUI-m~:- OF P/\. nTICIP/ ,NTS - ---- - ·-------1 Served by 1..-, ~-·...,..-, ..·· "-~::i,. .. ·r_ u, '-"' ": -n l .r..r•• 1 -:-i""Y ?7 19'0e:9 o-r= J ...,...,.t.1·1""··y 23 1 1rir..9 ';,/ -,;.,z."'"" •-· ··. ··,;-,crnd _w ~- .. '-.. ...,. $35.500.00 to H~cs. Cl2.z-:. ·u,:i oi $3,COO.OQ to F-.nyr::onil C. Ballard P the ___.., th - t- ::-:-i.~ 1.. ' ". c:.y, r::n:dng a tot..:i.1 nmount of j. c-.L..:. \. ~ "J , L . .,__ _,. i,.._,,J,-•..... _ ) , .l.. $38,500.00. apnrni g;-,·,. J testified th-3.t in h:1.s ODin" 11::! leased fee was $36,800.00 nna th9 value --~- ~,. , 200. 00, in th,~ total ~~ount of $33,000.00. L - - -- - tenant Tt,:ill"'·"'d .,.."' ,~-:..,...Le·"u b·i~·,-= 0- 1-r... , "-~.,., cM u.J.~ , J..~!_}... J.'-"u-!..il.o __ u ""-.,j _ the vc,.lue of the le as ehold was $1l~,oco.oo. Pi"1---~ .1.11_ .1 1 1 .. • 0 ~ and in his O?inion Mr. Cl;:i.J'.':~ r;;;p~e::;cntscl Hrs. Clzi::c1c, and in his op:1.11:lc,:1 tha valm of th-~ lc.nd anJ buildii.1.g w~s $60,000.00 n et to Nrs. Cl~~·k nftGr thB payr::~nt of income tmcrn. �Mx:. Paul , n. Iv~Y Je.:rn1t11:y {27, 1969 Pcige 2 , I . it -~ . . At the hear.::_n3, 11r. Clark attemptecJ to :i.1:.trocluco ~ le:1.sa e n tered into on S0.ptember 18, 1968, b et-:,;,:i~n Hrs. Cln:1:k anc1 E,:. Ba 11n r..,.. L ... - .. 1969, to Oct ob~r. 3J.i) 1972. On obj 0 c t:i on , t h'.3 le ass u2s e:~cluclccl -fro:;:J co::.!r;;icfo·.,_·.::J.tio:-! b2.::rti.1sc rr..s.t1~ aft.9:-c both p m:ti98 h3d notice of ~ a .f 0 f .- ,.;J ,.....,. _.._. - - ·- ·- V ·- , .. _ _ _.._ _::.. "' .l. , · - - V...._•'----' ~.l.. -• - I ii I -..1 · th,3 ··co-r-1.d,:;r:na.tion suit. '1.'he a rr:ount a u2.r.cfa f·•;--r,n • i•3.• rn ~r, j C-j .=,..3 t~,;:, ,'- 1t',r->_ 0'•...'"'1"• ~u _,..,b - •- .:., .u_; wJ .I:"' - Or.l. Q ~ir.--,••. r--.,_u..,. c. •• ri u ..... 1., ,_,.;, L--.1.--U .... .,1,.. J natt2 ..., ... . ) -I-- , tli_,';Lt'Co...., ,~1 ~ -..,.-r·il"i <'l" b :-iz".,1 t:hP len a1 4'.;. f:tlir!g en n·s to ·the J,, - _ .. 0 -:= -r-,~ ·(" -~ d - - ' - ' - - c,:. to th2m by tb.i3 s;;,::a:;:d · to E1.·. BallarcJ, I · uou 1c1 z-ccorr:::.:·:;i.'i.d no appt~t.1.. l ,::uless f:tlcd by· H:rs. C1.e.rk. In th-2 . c v 2r1t of 11r.s. Cl~:d-:. , :-'D D app0al, then I '\·70n1d recou:-;-:,.e~l d that c1:a E.p;_x ~al be fllecl a\1~-rJ of Ht. Ballo.:.:d. , _. ', Please let ma kno:1 yon:r w:1.chcs in th:1.s rr.3. t t a r.. . Fe:n:in Y. Assist.::.nt City Attorney Y-il.1/ljl cc: Nr • .Sta.n I·far tin. . \ �
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 22, Folder topic: Parks department | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 1, Folder 22, Document 4

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_022_004.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 22, Document 4
  • Text: Mr. Earl Land~rs : (This relates to Sandy Creek Park & f . ~ I possible swap for Adamsville ' .Heal th Center) I l . . rI j . ·. . ., . .l ' -I~ . !rouble ,, . l _dded Later, the .£.&Jl Committee: 1. Agreed 1ouse the Atlanta Area Transportation Study as a "guide " to further studies . .2. Agreed to cooperate with Central Atlanta: Progress on a study of the downtown business 3. Balked at a request of Ful- 1 ' ion County to relocate Carroll Road from Sanely Creek and i ' ! ankhead Hi ghway for expan- j I ·ion of the Fu lton County Air- I ort. All en pointed out that the , ity had made Ca rroll Road : >f our-l anes a short time ago and 11ore investiga tion as to r eason I ~r 'or the relocation are needed. 1 i 1e -~~ -Firestone Ca ' Tires Back .. . , ·> -I r· 1I I I· l _/ . ! t. 0 �
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 22, Folder topic: Parks department | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 1, Folder 22, Document 5

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_022_005.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 22, Document 5
  • Text: A RESOLUTION BY PLAN NING AND DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE AND PUBLIC WORKS COMMITTEE APPROVING RELOCATION STUDIES AND THE SURVEYING AND PREPARATION OF RIGHT-OF-WAY PLANS FOR CARROLL ROAD AT THE EARLIEST POSSIBLE TIME AS A COMPLIMENTARY PROJECT TO THE EXPANSION OF FULTON COUNTY AIRPORT. WHEREAS, the improvement of traffic movement on the major streets of Atlanta is an obvious necessity, and WHEREAS, the State Highway Department of Georgia is preparing to make specific plans for the widening and relocation of Carroll Road to a four-lane divided r~adway from Gordon Road to Bankhead Highway as a complimentary projecf to the expansion of Fulton County Airport, and WHEREAS, these proposed improvements have been reviewed by the Planning and Public Works Departments, and WHEREAS, the State Highway Department must have the City of · Atlanta's official endorsement of this project before financial participation for preliminary engineering by the Federal Bureau of Public Roads can be obtained. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Mayor and Boord of Aldermen that the proposed relocation end improvements of Carrol I Road referred to by project number F-126-1 (2) and describe.d in further detai I by the attached drawings and text, be approved for relocation studies and preliminary engineering plans and any such studies and plans shall be submitted to the Mayor and Board of Aldermen for further consideration and approval. Attachment �
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 22, Folder topic: Parks department | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 1, Folder 22, Document 6

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_022_006.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 22, Document 6
  • Text: H . H. HUCKE B A .JIM L . G IL LI S , S R . 51'ATE HIGHWAY ENC,INE(A 0 IRE.C T OR W. M . WILLIAMS EM O R Y C . PARR I S H SCCAET4RY • TREASU A ER C XE. C UT I VE ASSISTAN T DtR C CTO R April 24, 1969 _ D. l'!ingfield Planni~g 0i rector Atl ant a Reg i on lle tropolitan Planni ng Co:::.nis sion 900 Gl0nn 3uilding Atlant a, Georgia 30302 .M.r"'". J. Dear Sir: Pursuant to the provisions of Seciion 204 of Title II - ? l2~~ ad ~s t::::-oooli t an D2ve lor:::-.2nt o: Pujl i c Lc.·,v 39 -754 > T , e De:::'.):-!s ·t :::- 2°: i c:-. C:.. t::. :::s c:.r.c Me tro ool i t 2n D~ve~o~~e~t Ac t o: l9S6 , we a::::-e her ety su t ~itt i~g vc.rious materi al ::-el c..:{v-2 too-::- p:.:-o j ec-.:. ~::- -iL.6-1 (2), rul ton County. This project c2.lls for a 4 l an e divi ded roadway c.nd ::::-elocc.tion of portion of t he ro&t~ay necessitated _by the planned expansion of ?ulton County Airpo::-t. Please review this request prior to our request to the Bureau of Public Roads for prelirainary engineering authorizat:o~. Yours very truly, STAT~ EIG:-:t:;..y DEPAR.T:.:El'-ll O? G~O?..GIA DIVI SICN OF HIGE'!.AY PLANNH'.G By Leland S. Veal State Highway Planning Engineer WA.'Y/lcr Attachment cc: R.M. Breen L.E. Parker l I I! �
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 22, Folder topic: Parks department | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 1, Folder 22, Document 7

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_022_007.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 22, Document 7
  • Text: JI M L. GILLIS . SR . $Slate 1~iglih1a~ P tµc1rhnc1tl of ®torgia io. 2 (gnµitol ~ quarc DIR ECTOR H . H . HUCKEBA STATE HIGHWAY (NGINEER ~tl1tnla, (6rorgia 3L13311, EM OR Y C . P ARR I S H EXECUT I V E ASS I STANT DIR E C T OR W . M . WILLIAMS SECAETAAY · TREASU REA May 22, 1969 Mr. Collier Gl adin Planning Direct or City of Atlanta Planning Department City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Sir : The State Highway Department is actively pursuing participation from the Bureau -of Public Roads in preliminary engineering for Carroll Road (F-126-1), between Gordon Road and Bankhead Highway. This proj ect will provide for p~eliminary engineering and relocation studies to determine location and prepare plans for future 4-lane divided roadway. Relocation of a portion of F-126 is necessitated by planned expansion of Fulton County Airport. a We need the City of Atlanta's official endorsement of this project through resolution so that we can secure the necessary approval. Please communicate this request through the proper governmental procedures. We have attached various material relative to this project for your information and assistance in gaining an official statement of endorsement. Thank you for your help in this matter. Yours very truly, SI'ATE HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT OF GEORGIA DIVISIO~ OF HIGHNAY PLANNING By --?. / ~ .-/1' // /r-".f:-c5.-'(_/ (_,( __,{._C'- Leland S. Veal State Highway Planning Engineer _WAH/lcr Attachments , �F -1 26 - 1 (2) CA ROLL ROAD STUDY - + + - RELOCATED PORTION + �
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 22, Folder topic: Parks department | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 1, Folder 22, Document 10

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_022_010.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 22, Document 10
  • Text: r Birection Sports An educational/motivational program designed for underprivileged children �- . . ---- - - - ... _., ,..., _ ____ . .. ---· I A Piece of Glass ... a Stolen Car Direction Sports was never formally planned- it happened. "How it happened" is covered below in an excerpt from A Sports Story for Christmas, written by John Hall for the Los Angeles Times on December 15, 1967. "A foot slashed by broken glass and a stolen car have combined to produce what may be the Christmas sports story of the season. "If this sounds unlikely, you just don't know Tulley Brown. "Brown is a 34-year-old law school grad, a Santa Monica resident who has an overwhelming ompassion for sports and youngsters. While living in J-2 different countries during recent years, Brown found the two mixed wonderfully. "But his story really began one morning when he was doing his daily four miles of running on the beach at Santa Monica. Tulley Brown plans a football jamboree with YMCA Director Geor{?e Pohlman. c Copyrir,ht 1969, Dlrc,:t,on Sports Inc He stepped on a piece of glass and cut his foot. "Looking for emergency treatment, he came across a doctor connected with [ a center for] retarded and disturbed children. '·One thing led to another and Brown soon quit his old job [as a sales executive] to take over as athletic director ... "Bringing in several Lakers to help him at times, he began to get the kids to take out their frustrations and erase their doubts on the basketball floor. Psychiatrists used the word 'amazing; to describe the progress he was able to make. Parents were overjoyed. "About this time, Brown's car was stolen ... Typically. Tulley's reaction after an 18year-old boy was arrested for the theft was regret. He urged police not to press charges. "He and his wife asked to adopt the boy, an orphan who had been shuffled around various foster homes'.' Instead. the boy was sent to a juvenile camp, serving a sentence of fifteen months. Tulley learned from the probation officer on the case that often in such situations a minority or poor youngster would be sentenced while, for the same offense, a white middle-class youngster would be released to his parents on probation. Married and the father of three children, Brown returned to business and spent the next six months putting together a program that could help provide clisadvantaged youths with reasons to stay straight. If the magnetism of sports could break through to the retarded and emotionally disturbed, then why not use this magnet(continued, inside back cover) - �Direction Sports: the fundamental concept "Among the educational approaches which we believe should be considered and evaluated are the current efjorts to develop new patterns of education which do not fit into the traditional patterns'.' Recommendation of the PRESIDENT'S COMM ISSION ON CIVIL DISORDERS ( 1968 ) DIRECTION SPORTS is a Los A ngeles-based project des igned to answer that recommendation with an innovative programinvolving educationally disadvan taged youngsters, through the magnetism of sports, with local yo uth leadership, professionals in the fields of education and psychology, and other concerned adults from all parts of Los A ngeles Co unty. Direction Sports objectives: For the first time, to expand the content and go als of the average sports program for youth. Specifically, to use the universal appeal of "Little League" type sports activities for the development of basic learning skills ( through ca refu lly prepared "chalk talks") and to build positive self concepts and social attitudes ( through post-practice group discussions) . To provide an opportunjty for meaningful exchanges of communication and va lues among both youngsters and adults from a variety of ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds ( through regul arly scheduled fi eld trips and group activities). To help resolve the tremendous disparity between the number of privately funded sports program s for youngsters in middle class or suburban areas and the programs available to youngsters from disadvantaged communities . The kinds of social problems which prompted the idea of DIR ECTION SPORTS are common knowledge, but have never been considered as responsive to simple, direct solutions. A brief review fo llows of those problems, their consequences, and the solutions the DIR ECTION SPORTS program offe rs . O ur primary co ncern is to show th at there is an alternative to the current expenditure of billions of doll ars to treat social symptoms. T here is a way to affect their causes. The problems we face Welfare. More than 7 mill ion Ameri cans are now receiving welfare assistance, and another 14 million citizens are identified as eligible fo r aid ; a total of 2 1 milli on persons in thls country whose family income is below what the government �"Recidivism" - an ugly word we have to face up to defines as basic subsistence. For example, six out of every ten Black children subsist on welfare payments at least a part of their lives. Did you know th at if you are born in a poverty area, odds are about ten to one you'll remain there for life? A Culture of Hopelessness. The old myth that citizens "on welfare" are so by choice is no longer tenable. Rather, the children of the poor grow up conditioned to failure, to the uselessness of ambition and the futility of dreams. To quote anthropologist Elliot Liebow, " In the end, a man's wife and children become a symbol of h.i s own failure as a man and the easy camaraderie of 'the corner' becomes an irresistible lure. At the moment he submits, he comes into his full inheritance bequeathed him by his p arent s, teachers, employers, and society at large. This is the step into failure from which few if any return and it is at this point that the rest of society can wring its hands or rejoice in the certain knowledge that he has ended up preci sely as they had predicted he would'.' Educational Dilemna. Educational surveys of the learning skills of youngsters from the depressed areas of Los Angeles County indicate the relatively poor learning skill improvement of minority youth. From the Los Angeles Times, January 10, 1969: "Many Anglo students in the Los Angeles City School System showed marked improvement in reading last year, but Negro and Mex.ican-American youngsters made only slight advances, test scores indicated .. . The reading scores climbed as high as 16 percentage points . .. In predominantly Negro and Mexican-American schools, however, the scores rose only an average of two points and rem ained at generally low levels. The lowest percentage increases, one percent, were recorded by first graders in the north and mostly Negro south-central areas and the predominately Mexican-American east side'.' The consequences Failure-Punishment Syndrome. Here's what th e GOVERNOR'S COMM ISSION ON THE LOS ANGELES RIOTS (August, 1967) had to say : "The actions taken thus far in Los Anoeles b ' and , for that matter, elsewhere throughout the United States, fail to meet the urgent ex isting need; and unless and until we in our City and State, a nd throughout the United States , solve the fundamental problem of raising the level of scholastic achi evement of disadvantaged children, we can not hope to solve all other problems of our disadvantaged minorities . . '.' It is clear that a grossly disproportionate number of underp1ivileged children experience fai lure in their first contact with the greater society-when they enter schoo l. Civil Disorders and Delinquency . T he NATIONAL A DVISORY COMM ISSION ON C IVIL DISORDERS has reported, "The expression of in adeq uate educational practices lies in the high incidence of riot participation by ghetto youth who had not completed high school. Our survey of r iot cities found that the typical riot participant was a lzigh school drop out . . '.' Recidivism. Almost half the juveniles released on parole in Los Angeles County are back in detention camps within six months. With a total minority population of about 20 percent in the county as a whole, nearly 50 percent of its detention camp members are ei ther Negro or MexicanAmerican . Neither a city nor a nation can begin to realize its potential whil e continuing to fai l to reac h so high a percentage of its youth. Without a significant impact on the source of these concerns, the nation can only continue to expend increasing billions in the treatment of crime, poverty and unemployment. �There can be no real solution in attempting to treat these consequences as though they were solvable on a symptom level. The great majority of programs for the disadvantaged reach people after they are already in trouble. DIRECTION SPORTS is preventive treatment- working logically at the source-and is using the most successful formula which has proven successful in regularly motivating and involving more than one million youths throughout the United States: privately funded sports programs. Special programs for underachievers can be successful. It was demonstrated recently in an experiment conducted by the San Francisco City School System, combining smaller classes with experienced teachers. One of these experimental classes achieved the highest reading scores for its age group of any public school class in the city- "and every one of these children was black'. ' Most school districts in the country are making conscientious efforts to improve the learning achievements of children from underprivileged areas. Whether the full burden of such an accomplishment should be placed on the schools alone is debatable. On the other hand, conditions never have been more ready for the development of "new patterns of education" to support and reinforce the schools' efforts. A crucial need Currently, privately funded sports programs for youngsters provide the most popular youth format in the nation. Yet little has been done to overcome the scarcity of these kinds of programs for underprivileged boys and girls. For example, in 1968 the tremendously popular Little League Baseball program involved approximately 55,620youngsters from the greater Los Angeles area. Yet of this total number not one team was in operation within the immense minority population corridor extending through Los Angeles from North Broadway south of the central city to adjoining Compton and including some 200,000 school age children. Economic breakdown of family income in th e Los Angeles area shows clearly the areas of the city which cannot support conventional privately financed sports programs of the Little League type. Family income, J960/ 1965 estimated U nder $5 .000 $5,000 - 6,999 $7,000 - 9,999 $ 10,000 and over Sources: Un ited States Census, and A nn ual R ep o rts, Fran chise T ax Board. State of California. �The magnetism and personal satisfaction of sports The Direction Sports program The premise of DIRECTION SPORTS is that the magnetism and personal satisfactions of athletic competition can provide a motivational breakthrough for normal but disadvantaged youngsters - that it can provide a basic format through which learning skills and positive attitudes toward education itself can be developed, using sports-related group discussions and curricula, and com~unity adult leadership. California State College at Los Angeles volunteered a room for an initial training seminar for DIRECTION SPORTS' staff, and two Cal State coaches, Walt Thurmond and Robert Miller, prepared special guidelines for instruction in football and basketball. Young college men who had grown up in disadvantaged communities were hired as DIRECTION SPORTS youth leader trainees. Their first formal training meeting was set at the University of Southern California and kicked off with speeches by football coaches John McKay, Dave Levy, and Willie Brown. During that first week trainees attended lectures on methods of instruction, coaching, and group discussion techniques, concluding their training with a two-hour session at the office of UCLA's John Wooden. On the final day the new DIRECTION SPORTS coaches put on a demonstration for their instructors at Cal State, working with youngsters from city poverty neighborhoods. DIRECTION SPORTS is answering a dual need- the need for privately funded sports programs in underprivileged areas, and the need to deal early with the threat of educational underachievement. Therefore, the program itself duplicates other youth sports programs but adds two unique new features - "chalk talks" designed to promote learning skills, and professionally supervised gro ui:; discussions. An afternoon schedule 3 : 30-3 : 35 p.m.-Orientation. 3: 35-4: 00 p.m.-"chalk taJk" learning sk ills. ( For an example of a typical DIRECTION SPORTS chalk talk, see the materials included at the back of this brochure.) 4: 00-5: 00 p.m.- Team practice. These practice sessions follow a daily plan carefully developed and formalized by professional college coaches. 5 : 00-5 : 30 p.m.- Group discussion. Group discussions are led by the comm unity coaches; a professional psychologist participates regularly to reinforce their talks. T he basic group discussion outline is as follows: 1. What makes a boy like himself? (Goal: Positive self con- cepts and social attitudes.) 2. Why are there schools? (Goal: Value of education. ) 3. What do I want to become? (Goal: Steps necessary for achievements.) 4. What jobs are available? (Goal: Opportunities for work experience.) 5. If I were . .. "role playing" a) a fireman? (Goal: Value of property.) b) a policeman? (Goal : Value of the law.) c ) an athletic hero? (Goal : Responsibility to others.) d ) blind? ( after visiting school for blind children) (Goal: Self-discipline.) 6. If I fail (sports, school, etc.)? (Goal: Work harder. ) Special Saturday activities Saturdays are game days. DIRECTION SPORTS' unique feature on Saturdays is that before each game teams meet in a "spelling bee" kind of competition involving math, spelling, and reading problems. Winning teams are rated " touchdowns;' "baskets;' etc. corresponding to the seasonal sport they are engaged in that day on the athletic field. These scores are added to each team's actual game score at the end of the playing day, and the winning team thus has the highest combined total. Every other Saturday all the youngsters go on a special trip after the game. Since DIRECTION SPORTS started in 1968, its young athletes have shared in experiences such as : 1) Yachting, as the guests of 24 boat owners at the Marina Del R ey. 2) Guests of the University of Southern California at the USC-Cal football game. 3) Guests of the National General Corporation, which provided a private showing of the film, "The Paper Lion;' for 150 youngsters. 4) Guests at a UCLA basketball practice. After practice, the youths met the players, and Lou Alcindor gave an inspirational talk which no one present will ever forget. 5) Guests of the Griffith Park Observatory for a showing of "The Sun, and Its Family of Planets'.' 6) Guests of the Los Angeles Music Center at a childrens' concert. DIRECTION SPORTS is operating now in park and recreation facilities within four poverty communities of metropolitan Los Angeles. These communities were chosen because of their high percentage of school drop-outs and rate of delinquency. The program currently employs the following adult personnel : one project director (full time) , one secretary ( full time) , �Top: The GauchO\· in pre-game "pep talk" w ith Cooch Pichardo. Center: A portrait of the Lions at Fred Rob erts Porli. ll'ith Coachn Brud1·!wH· and Mvles in ch ari;e. 50"/, of the ho1·1 h111·c, 110 _lather and 80 r/c of their fa111i /ie1 are on 11•c•lfare. Center rii;h1 · 1 he lions in their "chalk talk.·· T h e rnhject , 1 1pe//1111;. 80110111 · Coach Carroll H'atclws the Trojan pvra111id co1111 111111hli/l[: doll"//. I Pi(/\'C/" ri!?lit center re11wi11, 1111ide11tified J �The Direction Sports Va riety Show: Top left; top right: Youngsters are guests of universities at a1hletic events (SC-C al game, in this case) . Top. cPnter-left and cen ter-right: R egular competition-the No rmandie Park Rams. halftime with the South Park Trojans . and th e East L.A. Packers. C harge! Center and top-center: Excitin g "chalk talks" by l'isiting athletes and regu lar coaches-here Trojans respond to Oly111p ic Gold Medalist Bob Seagren. while at another site Coach V ic Pichardo teaches Gauchos. Barrom left: One day Brown h eard a group of litt le girls practicing yells. When he learned they had decided to be the Trojan cheerleaders. h e had sll'eaters 111ade and ask ed USC songleader Penny Ward to do some coach i11g. Bottom: Direction Sports A wards Banquet made possihle hv co111rilmtio11s from seven food 111arkets a11d the cateri11g of the K i11g Swede Re.1·ta1irant. M;1gicia11 Barry Lee of the Mag ic Cast le captil'(ffes the clti/dren. 01·er 200 persons atte11ded rite a/loir. i11d11di11:,1 97r;,. of rite parents i11vited. �A broad-based community response ... one educational psychologist ( part time), two psychometrists (part time ), one curricula specialist (part time), and ten field coaches ( part time) . Direction Sports results are measurable Fred Neidemeyer from Southwest Regional Laboratory (Curriculum Center) , an agency of the Federal Government, has contrac.ted to design special curricula using sports activities and concepts to teach sper;ific learning skills. Victor Coppin, M.A., USC psychologist, contracted to coordinate group discussions aimed at developing self pride and positive social attitudes among the youngsters participating in the project. Two psychometrists, Dr. Stephen Klein of UCLA and Dr. Ralph Hoepfner of USC, were enlisted to develop cross-validation methods for testing the actual effectiveness of DIRECTION SPORTS. The testing program compares the progress in specific learning areas of DIRECTION SPORTS experimental and control teams. See first post test results inside back cover. The basic design of the program is indicated in this table : Victor Coppin Pre-tests Treatment(s) Post-tests Teams 1-3 (Direction Sports) Math Spelling Attitudes Math and attitudes "instruction" Math Spelling Attitudes Teams 4-5 (Direction Sports) Math Spelling Attitudes Spelling instruction Math Spelling Attitudes teams (Comparison groups) Math Spelling Attitudes ·None Math Spelling Attitudes YMCA The DIRECTION SPORTS groups being compared are essentially equal in all other variables (socio-economic level, age, presence of father, etc.), so that the unique aspects of the program can be validly measured and evaluated. Los Angeles responds In its first four months of operation, the DIRECTION SPORTS concept attracted so much attention that it was featured on eight television programs-KTLA, KCOP, and CBS and NBC affiliates.With additional coverage through KGFJ and KFWB radio shows, it is estimated that the story of DIRECTION SPORTS has been told to more than three million people in the Los Angeles area. The first national attention given the project was a feature article in the Christian Science Monitor ( copy enclosed) , and The Johnny Carson Show. The national magazine, Sports Illustrated, is providing a weekly subscription for every boy in the program. The 7-Up Bottling Company has donated uniforms. In November of 1968 CBS-Los Angeles, with the approval of its national office, voted DIRECTION SPORTS one of the top six programs in Los Angeles and contributed a thousand dollars worth of jackets, track shoes, and pants for the future use of program youngsters. Numerous additional supporters a nd contributors are listed on the back cover of this brochure. Endorsements Fred N iedemeyer, Stephen K lein Here is what some well known public officials have said about the DIRECTION SPORTS program: . .. "I believe the program has merit. T he activities appear to be planned with great care, and the instructions are clear and explicit. DIRECTION SPORTS 'concern for the welfare of youngsters in our minority communities is commendable'. ' -Thomas Reddin, Chief of Police, City of Los Angeles "The concept of using sports as a touchstone to educational achievement for youngsters who have heretofore with- �Top: Direction Sports coac~es , (from left to right) Acuna, ,...,~,,.- Galindo, C astruita, Myles, Cano , Bethel, Spaulding, Bradshaw and Carroll. with Director Tulley Brown appear at USC's Bovard Field with coaches John McKay and Dave Levy and players 0. ] . Simpson and Steve Sogge . Center left: Ray Norton, 1960 world record holder, now with CBS. speaks at A wards Banquet. Center riRht: Los Angeles Chief of Police Thomas Reddin discusses the project with Brown . Bottom left: Mayor Sam Yorty proclaims "Direction Sports Week" for 1he Ci1v of Los Angeles, March 31 -April 6. 1969. Bot10111: Heisman Trophy winner Mike Garrell at a chalk talk'.' ..J �You are needed ... will you help? drawn from full participation in the educational process because of a belief that other incentives are nonexistent and that society is oblivious to their needs, is, in my opinon, extremely innovative ·and worth pursuing. I feel the program will make a significant contribution in developing a faith in the American system for these youngsters, and in the extreme, may salvage some youngsters who otherwise would be lost to society'. ' - T homas Lynch, Attorney G eneral, State of California "The program not only offers deprived youngsters an opportunity to participate in a nation ally recognized sports program but it also provides for educational enrichment for the participants as an integral part of the fo rmat'.' - Peter Pitchess, Sheriff, County of Los A ngeles "I can think of no alternative to fo rmal study better suited to inculcate the rudiments of reading, writing and arithmetic into the untutored mind than an organi zed sports program. I heartily encourage all personnel associated with the DIRECTrON SPORTS project to implement it with expediency and total effort'.' - Sam Yorty, Mayor of Los Angeles "Since three of the DIR ECTION SPO RTS teams operate in the 29th Senato rial District I can personally attest to the fact that the children and families involved are most enthusiastic about the use of a sports form at to teach learning sk ills and develop positive self concepts and social attitudes. DIR ECTION SPORTS is a uniquely beautiful program capable of making a significant di fference to thousands of minority people'.' -Mervyn M . Dymally, State Senator, 29th District Most of all, it's working! T he best way to confirm this is to see the program in action for yourself. Write DIRECTION SPORTS fo r a schedule of daily practice and teaching sessions or weekend team and intramural games. You are invited and welcome! Plans for the future Plans are underway to begin a similar program this year for girls, ages 9 through 11 , from the same communities. By September of ] 969 it is anticipated that DIRECTION SPORTS will have spread to every disadvantaged area of greater Los Angeles, and will include pilot programs for 12 to 14 year old boys. By September of 1970 it is intended that all youngsters ages 12 through 14 will be able to participate in the program. Subsequently, with private and public support, DIRECTION SPORTS is designed to expand to every disadvantaged community in America. P lans are underway for a seminar which will be held in Los Angeles fo r representatives from all interested cities in America. Half the cost of travel and accommodations will be defrayed and DIRECTION SPORTS' materials and methods of operation will be presented to the delegates. A nd, with this support and leadership, this unique program will be capable of regularly involving over one million under-privileged boys and girl s between the ages of 9 and 14 in an enriching and meaningful learning-through-playing experience which offers a new pattern for educational motivation and success. DIRECTION SPORTS is at this time, totally supported by volunteer fu nds and is a non-profit corporation . A U contributions, large or small, are tax deductible. If you're concerned about your tax doll ar-and who isn't? -the greatest saving you can make is your contribution to a program li ke this one - a contribution toward redirecting a youngster today to prevent hi m from becoming a public expense tomorrow. DIRECTION SPORTS would like to continue happening won't you please help? �UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGE LES DERKELEY • DAVIS • IR VI NE • I.OS ANGEL ES • RIVERSIDE • SAN DI EGO • SAN F RAN CISCO SANTA B ARBARA• SANTA CRUZ C E N TER FOR THE ST UDY O F EVALU ATIO N U CLA GR A DU ATE SCH OO L OF EDUCATION LOS ANG E LES, CALIFOR N IA TO: MR. TULLY BROWN FROM: DR. STEPHEN KLEI~ DATE,: APRIL 21, 1969 SUBJECT: PRELIMINARY EVALUATION RESULTS 900 24 Background In the fall of 1968, the five teams took a 44 item mathematics test dealing with adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing whole numbers; and a 20 item spelling test involving sports related words, such as "offense." Two teams received spelling instruction while the other three received mathematics instruction. The five teams were retested in February of 1969 with tests that were very similar to ones they took in the fall (i.e., the formats and instructions were the same but the questions were different so as to eliminate possible biases, such as memory). Results The results of the two testings appear in the table below. An inspection of this table indicates the following : (1) The teams had comparable (and relatively poor) performance before training in both mathematics and spelling. (2) The teams receiv i ng training in an area have shown substantial i mprovement in that a r e a, e.g . , the three teams receiving mathematics instruction impro ve d 28% in mathematics compared to only 9% for the teams recei v ing spelling instruction . Average Pe r c~nt Co r rect Te ams r e c ei v ing : Typ e of Te s t Fa ll Test i ng Win ter Te sting Difference Mathema t ics Instructi on Ma th e_ma t ic s Sp ellin g 54% 66 % 82% 51% +28% -15% Spel l in g Instruction Mathematics Spel l ing 54% 55% 63% 78% + 9% +23% �-UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY PARK LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 90007 DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY APTITUDES RESEARCH PROJECT J . P. GUILFORD, DIRECTOR R. HOEFFNER, ASSISTANT DIRECTOR May 7, 1969 Mr. Tully Brown Direction Sports 4415 W. Pico Blvd. Los Angeles, California Dear Tully: Upon receiving Dr. Klein's preliminary evaluation of the DIRECTION SPORTS program, I am pleased to concur with him in the conclusion that your program has had a beneficial effect. While Dr. Klein's evaluation was primarily of a descriptive nature; describing the results after the fact, I thought it might be interesting to see what we might be able to generalize to future seasons or other cities from what we now know. Accordingly, I performed two t-tests, one for math achievement and one for spelling achievement. The two general hypotheses I evaluated were: 1 . .J;mprovement in math achievement in the mathematics-instruction groups (experimental) is greater than improvement in math achievement in the spelling-instruction groups (control). 2. Improvement in spelling achievement in the spelling-instruction g roups (expe rime ntal) is greater than the improve me nt in the mathi nstruction groups (control ). To compute the two statistics, I e mployed only the 24 math boys and the 16 spelling boys who had all pretest and posttest scores, My reason for excluding s o many o f the boys in your pro gram who did not have complete sets of scores for these t-tests wa s that we cannot be sure what the instructional effect was for them. The t values for the math-score comparison was 2.949, significant at the . 01 level , while the t value for the spelling-score comparison was 1.445, n ot significant. The conclusions we can draw are these: with gre at confiden c e we can e xpect y our program (or ones like it) to effect significant improvement in the mathematical facility of disadvantaged , minority boys ; we cannot be v ery confident of a similar eff e ct in spellin g ability , altho ught the data indicates a similar spelling improvement~ Of course, the mathematics tests and e x e rc ises were further d eveloped and refined than those for spelling at the init iation of this program. It is quite possible that with refin eme nt of the spelling program we will find significant impro v ement there too. The preliminary findings, therefore, may b e expected not to be sensiti v e to real improvements and we will h a v e to await the final data to find out if spelling can be re all y improved. SW [;{/{fttoe p fner RH:ak �Chalk Talk 17 I. Objectives : ¢:6-Basic Division ±7 - Advanced Addition 8 -Advanced Subtraction III. Materials: blackboard and cha lk for instructor. paper a nd pencil for each boy. IV. Activity: I . Motivation: [t's very important for you to be aware of the score and the yardage at all times during the game . Then you will be a ble to choose the best type of play to m ake. Let's tak e a look a t a w ho le game here and how it is scored quarter by quarter. ( Pass out game-sheets to boys. ) Coach draws game sheet on boa rd to fi ll in . 2. D escription of Activity: a. What is the total time of a game? (After they answer, write it in the square marked " total time'.') b. How is a game divided up? (quarters). How m a ny minutes in each qua rter? (Say it and then write it under time for each quarter.) How m a ny minutes in a half? ( oral answer ). c . Okay-now le t's figure out the score for each qua rter. ( Coach writes o n blackboard.) 1) l n the first quarter, the Rams made a touchdown and then made the conversion; the 49ers just made the touchdown. Now fill in the score at the end of the first quarter. (7-6). 2) l n the second quarter, the Rams made a field goal ( 3) and the 49ers made a touchdown and the conversion ( 7) . Write down the score for the end of the second ( I 0-13). 3) In the third quarter, the Rams score two touchdowns, but make onl y one of the conversions. How many points is that? ( 13 ). The 49ers make a touchdown and the conversion (7). What is the score of the game now? (23-20.) 4) In the fin al quarter, the Rams do not score; the 49ers 111ake a field goal (3) .What's the final score of the game? (tie ga111e : 23-23) . d. Now you'll notice on the right-hand side of each square. the re is a section that says total yards gained. Fill in the following information: I) In the fi rst quarter, the Ra111s 111 adc a total yard gain of -13 : the 49ers 111ade 51 ( this is total, not net). 2) In the second quarter, the Rams 111ade 40: the 49ers 45. (Boys fill in this infor111ation as you read it-you write it on the board ga111e-chart.) 3) In the third quarter, Ra111s gain 50 yds. 49ers gain 47. 4) In the first quarter, the Ra111s 111ake 42 yds : 49ers 55 . e. What is the total yardage gain for the R ams? ( 17 5) ( Boys will add the numbers up in the m a rgin of their paper ; have them just raise the ir ha nd when they have the a nswer, but do not shout it out). What is the tota l yardage game now for the 49ers? (51 + 45 + 47 + 55 = 198) f. This is total yards gained ; to determine the ne t ya rds gained we must subtract the penalties. I ) The Rams were penalized three times for off-sides ( 15 yds.) and once for clipping ( 15 yds.) How 111any yards did they lose altogether? ( 30) 2) The 49ers were penalized twice for off-sides ( 10) and once for unsportsmanlike conduct ( 15) . H ow many yards were they penalized altogether? (25) (The process here will be first computing the off-sides penalty 5 x 2 I 0, and then adding IO plus 15.) g. Finally, how will we determine the net ya rds ga ined for each team? (Have one boy explain the process: to subtract the total pena lty yards from the total yards gained . ) l) What was the Rams net yard gain ? ( 145) 2) What was the 49ers net yard gain? ( 173 ) = Game Chart Quarter 1 Time: L Quarter 2 Time : L Rams: Total yards gained_ R ams: Total yards gainer! 49ers: Total yards gainerl 49ers: Total yards gained Score: Rams D 49ers D Quarter 3 Score: R ams Time : L D 49ers D Quarter 4 Time : R ams: Total yards gained Rams : Total yards gainerl 49ers : Total yards gainer! 49ers: Total yards gainer! Score : Rams D 49e rs Total yards gained in game by Rams: Rams penalties Net yards gained in game by Rams: Total yards gained in game by 49ers: 49ers penalties Net yards gained in game by 49ers: D Final Score : Rams § § D 49ers L_ D Total T ime : © Copyright 1969, Direct ion Sports I nc . �TRIBUTE TO DIRECTION SPORTS HON. ALPHONZO BELL OF CALIFORNIA IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Monday, April 21, 1969 Mr. BELL of California. Mr. Speaker, it is a pleasure to call the attention of this House to a unique and successful program that has been operating in the Watts area of Los Angeles. Direction Sports begins where Little League leaves off-it serves those who have no fathers to participate, those who have no money for uniforms, insurance, and the other requisites of Little League participation. But Direction Sports gives the boys it serves more than an opportunity to participate in the kind of athletic competition enjoyed by their middle-class counterparts. Through techniques developed by the Southwest Regional Lab in Inglewood, Calif.-a project which has received more than $4 million from the Office of Education's Bureau of Research in the past 2 years-Direction Sports youngsters improve their learning skills and social attitudes by means of educative chalk talks. In my view, Direction Sports is precisely the kind of innovative program that those of us who have been struggling to find solutions to urban ills have encouraged in legislation passed in recent years. As important as the heartwarming results described in the following article by the Christian Science Monitor, however, is the fact that program evaluation have shown a statistically significant increase in participants' mathematics achievement scores. Mr. Speaker, I wish to commend the Monitor's article to the attention of my colleagues, especially those whose con= stituencies include disadvantaged metro= poli tan areas. �THE CHR.TSTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR WEEKEND ISSUE Monday, January 20, 1969 Watts: 'Direction Sports' By Cliff Gewe cke Sports correspon dent .of The Christi an Science Monitor Los Angeles Ever since the Watts, and other, r iots of 1965, sports programs for the underpr ivileged Negro youngster have come to the fore. The idea seems to,.be : get more of these youngsters off t he streets , inspire a nd ·s kill them with sports (and sports her oes ), and potent ia l r uffians and "lost causes" may be motivated info becomin g useful , proctuctive citizens. One of the most r e cent, and per haps most fa r sighted, of these program s - which emanated in the Watts se ction of Los Angeles during 1968 - is " Dir ection Sports," an affiliate of the Urban Affairs Foundation , Inc. E ssentially, it is a " Little League for the unde rprivileged. " But it h as distinct over tones, and undt!rtones, of improving positive learning skills through orientation, "chalk ta lks, " and gr oup discussions. 'Tremendous disparity? " P rivately funded sports progr a ms involve more than one million youngsters. a nd are th e most popular youth form a t in the na tion," says for m er sales r epresentative Tulley Brown, who is program dir ector for Direction Sports. " Yet, the re is a trem endous dispa rity between the n um ber of pr ivately funded sports p rogram s fo r the youth in middle-class are as a s opposed to those in the underprivileged a reas." To drive home his point, Brown cite s this statistic: that , in a Jette r dated Aug. 2, 1968, A. E . Houghton, secretary of Little L ea gue Ba seba ll, headquartered in Willia msport , Pa ., stated the re were 55,620 youngste rs involved in the Greater L os Angeles area. "Of this number," e mphasizes Brown, "not one tea m opera tes in the immense minority corridor extending from North Broa dway south to Compton a nd including som e 200,000 school-age children. "The reasons for this are basic," he a dds. " Little L eagu e progra m s function with the assista nce of fathers, often with the youngsters paying for their own insu rance a nd m edical che ckup. A general requirem ent is tha t tlic: youngsters have ha d not m ore than one 'D ' in the precP.d ing sem ester's schoolwork- and no _police record. Little League for underprivileged Started offic ially Sept. 23 with the advent of the pa st fo otball sea son, Dire ction Sports encompa ssed some 75 youngster s in the preteenage category. Pla ns are to go through the m ajor spor ts in-season- basketball, tra ck, baseball. And to expand to other (older and younger ) age categories, and even to reach into the participation of girls in the p rogram. Letters of commenda tion have been received fro m su ch m en as California a ttorney general Tom Lynch, Los Angeles County sheriff P eter P itchess, Los Angeles police chief Tom Reddin, and Los Angeles mayor Sam Yorty. Unique chalk talk The program has been fea tured on some eight southern Ca lifornia television programs. Sports I!lustrated is p roviding a weekly m agazine subscription for every boy in the p roject, and the 7-Up Bottling Compa ny ha s donated uniforms. CBS-Los Angeles, after voting Direction Sports one of the top six pi;ograms in Los Angeles, contdbuted $1,000 worth of jackets, track shoes, and pants for future use by the youngsters. Don't qualify for Little League " Direction Sports" head man Tulley Brown disc usses team tactics with youngsters in the Watts section of Los Angeles. The program's educative chalk talks serve as a teach ing aid. " Too often, " Brown continued , " the youngsters in the ghet tos do not have fathers to participa te , money to pay for insurance and doctors, a dequa te grade s, and they do have police r ecords. Thus, cla ss ical Little L eague is untena ble in deprived a reas." The idea is to m otivate pote ntial ruffians and "lost causes" into becoming useful , productive citizens through the ins pira tion of sports. Yet, if the program is to continue to th rive ( and, even, go national perhaps someday) more funds, a nd help, will be needed. (A free brochure m ay be obtained by writing: P roject Director Tulley N. Brown, Direction Sports , Inc., Ur ban Affa irs Founda tion, 955 S. Western Ave., Suite 204, Los An geles, Ca lif. 90006). R ecently, the writer sat in (with Brown, a Negro group leader re cruited from a nearby college, and a dozen youngster s ) on one of the educative chalk talks tha t utilize sports as " transference" for learning. " Ricky," said the leader, pointing to a la d in the front row, " how m any points do you get for a touchdown?" "Six," answered Ricky. " How many points for a fielg goal?" " Two." "You sure?" " Three?" replied R icky, hesitantly. " Add six and three and what do you get," asked the le ader. Nine! "Good! Now," continued the leade r, " in basketball you get how m a ny points for a field goal ? . . . and two minus nine is . . . " And so the questions, and the transferenceof-learning skills answers, spread throughout the room- pe rhaps someday soon to spread throughout the United States with Tulley Brown' s dream of " Direction Sports becoming the Little Lea gue of minority a reas." �r t...+·"1"'~' C: I t ii t I O N ~ o n Mo nday, Ma rch 31, 1969 OIREC:tION SPORTS a nnoun ces this or ga n1 za rion will be ho ldin g a semina r this summer for repre se ntatives of eve r y major c it y th a r wo uld like t o sta rt a pilot program of Its own thi s comin g Sep t embe r; and ~OIREC:tION SPORTS is a unique p rogram us in g a Little League,type form a t , plu s ~ i ona l f ea rur es , th e spec iall y prepared "C: ha l k t a l k" by rhe Fede ra l Govern • me nr's So urh wes t Re gi ona l Labo r a tory and seco ndly p rot estation by cross discussions r einforced by a psycholo g ist , desi gned ro de ve l op posit i ve se lf , co nc epts and socia l a ttitud es; and a majo r foundation has a lr ea dy of fer ed, pendin g fin a l ap pro va l o f th e ir 143.215.248.55 12:53, 29 December 2017 (EST)-1'4. ro defra y ha lf the cost f or each c l r y des irou s of a ttendin g the semi na r; ~ the prog r am Invo l ves 9 ro 12, yea r , o ld boys and pr ese ntl y th e re a r e app roxl • ma t e y ~e hundred chi l dren Invo l ved: it is th e hope of a l I co nce rned that th e OIRF:C:t!ON Ma rc h 31 , 1969 C:ounci Iman , �~ OIRECTIO \J SQORTS , INC, . 15 OQERATI NG AN EOL!C,ATIO\J r\ L rl .'D SQORTS QROGR /1 ,11 flE\JEFITI NG 015 /\ 0V /\N TAGEOCHILDRE N IN THE CIT\' OF LOS /\NG HES ; AND ~ T H E Sl!C,C,E SS OF DIRI:: C,TION SQ ORTS , I\J(. IN DF.VUOQ ING 100 Mil.L ION QCDP.L.E AC ROSS THE Nrl TIO N, Sl!C,H RI;Sl!L.TS HAV ING 13EE\J 1\IEASLIRED lW THE RESE ARCH /\'JD OE\/UOl?,\IE NT Cf,\JTCR AT LI.C,.L. A.; AN O WHEREAS, DIRECTION SQORTS, INC. IS HOl, OlNG A SEMI \J/\R IN LOS ANG ELI::S TIIIS sm1.11rn so THl\T All TH C ,\l/1]011 CITIES or THI; NA TIO N CAN llC PROVIDED \\ ITH THE IR SP.EC, IALl, Y QRF.Q/\RED ~ll\ TERIALS I\J ORDER TO HE GI\J THE IR O\\N DIR [C: , TIO N SP ORTS QROJ ECTS: ~ !~ ~ ! , SAM YORT\' , MA\' OR OF Tllf. C, ITY OF 1, 05 ,q:-JG F,1, ES.00 HF;R[, , 11\' C, O~IME\JD TIII S OLITSTAND I ' G PROGRA ,\ I /1\/D QROCL il l~I TH E \\' EEK Of MARCH 31 , 1969 , TO AQRIL 6 , 1969 HS "D IRECTIO N SPORYS \VF.El<" IN THE CITY OF 1,0 5 rl \/ GHE5. �(continu'eti) ism to serve underprivileged but otherwise normal children? The basic needs of underprivileged youths seemed to be positive self concepts and social attitudes, and learning skills. It is on these concepts that Direction Sports is designed. Ga th Hintz, Director of Community Relations for CBS affili te K XT, writes, "In our day-to-day involvement with all aspects of the community and with the people who are concerned with improving community problems, Tulley Brown stands out as one of those rare, dedicated individuals who knows what must be done and how to go about doing it. We at KNXT know that if Tulley is connected with a project, it is going to be 99 9/ 10% right for us, and worthy of our involvement'.' Direction Sports began its regular operation on September 23rd, I 968, with Brown devoting full time to its operation. On January I 6th, I 969 Direction Sports, Inc. became a non-profit corporation. In CBS executives Garth Hintz and Joe Dyer present new team jackets to Tulley Brown. this brief time the program has become one of the most widely covered projects in the Los Angeles area. In large part the future of Direction Sports, Inc. depends on the readers of this brochure. As John Hall wrote in concluding the column quoted above, "It's a dream. But it's a dream to build a world on:' �SPONSORS AND CONTRIBUTORS ABC Markets Alpha Beta Acme Markets, Inc. Arden-Mayfair, Inc. The Boys Market, Inc. CBS-Los Angeles, KNXT Reeta Brooks Lilian Rosenthal James Yester Continental Graphics Market Basket Stores Ralphs Grocery Co. Royal Crown Beverage Co. Safeway Stores, Inc. Sears Roebuck & Co. 7-Up Bottling Co. Sports Illustrated Uniroyal Inc. Vons Grocery Co. W J. Voit Rubber Corp. LEGAL SERVICES Fulwider-Patten ( copyright, service mark) Henry Grivi Loeb & Loeb (incorporation) Western Law Study Center, use MAN AG EM ENT CONSULT ANTS Boaz, All en & Hamilton (growth and planning) TRAN £PORTA TION South Los Angeles Transportation Co. Watts Labor Community Action Comm. STAFF Project Director: Tulley R. Brown Psychometrists: Dr. Ralph Hoepfner, use Dr. Stephen Klein, UCLA Psychologist: Victor Coppin, M.A., use Curriculum Designers: Winston Doby, M.A., UCLA Dr. Neal Dorian, JET Fred Niedemeyer, M .A., Southwest Regional Laboratory ( Curriculum Center) Consultant Services: Carolee Gardner Clerical: Carol Brown, Jacqueline Brown, Billy Spencer Photography: Doug Lew, Win Muldrow, Doris Nieh, Kent Oppenheimer, Don Rypinski Coaches: Bill Caldwell Michael Cano Frank Cano Bill Carroll Eldred Eubanks Earl Myles Bruce Nelson Victor Pichardo Lance Rentzal Jess Saenz Michael Spaulding Special thanks to Frank Stanley, Los Angeles Urban League, Senator Mervyn Dymally, and the Urban Affairs Foundation for giving Direction Sports a home to grow up in. Birection Sports 4415 West Pico Boulevard, Los Angeles, Caljfornia 90019 / (213) 937-3540 �
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 22, Folder topic: Parks department | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 1, Folder 22, Document 16

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_022_016.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 22, Document 16
  • Text: -. / . January 31, 1969 Miss Bessie L. Whit_ehead 1220 Gardenia Street N. w. Atlanta, Georgia 30314 Dear Miss Whitehead: I regret to inform you that in the recent interview for Community Recreation Leader you did not attain a passing score. Therefore, your name will not appear on the eligible list. I appreciate the interest manifested .by you in undergoing this examination, and 1 hope that you v ill participate in such future tests as may interest you and for which you may be suited. Ii I I' ll · Very truly, CARL T. SUTHERLAND Director of Personnel CTS:BG:erw �
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 22, Folder topic: Parks department | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 1, Folder 22, Document 25

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_022_025.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 22, Document 25
  • Text: -- - - - 11 I July 7 11 1969 MEMO TO: $9 J c J c. SUBJECt: Shutt:la _ · nk rf "= OU , ANf> U GStstant Oir Ct~ £ U.us, ~ . rtei- 1 t-l,'.111ag-«;lt of Parka -a nd . s • t1 ta Stadt - to City Hell t ion ecre ti.on �
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 22, Folder topic: Parks department | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 1, Folder 22, Document 2

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_022_002.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 22, Document 2
  • Text: May 2, 1969 Mr . J. Forrest Gee Purchasing Agent City of Atlant City Hall Atlant~ , Georgia 30303 Dear Forrest: Thank you very much for your letter of April 30, 1969 regarding the fire at er er on Park and y memorandum of A ril 24. As previously stated, we are extremely an..~ious to get back into operation at Per~ rson Park at the earliest p:,ssible date and it has been determined that it would not be practic l for the limited number of car nters in this department to undert ke the rep ir, Becau e of the time element in bidding, prep ration of oo.nt.rects, etc. , I ' m afraid th eummer • uld be ov r; before subst ntial repairs had been mad. were delight _ when informe by the insur nee c rrier th t they would prefer to follow the policy curr ntly used by the Atlanta School s yst in permitting the inpur n ca~rier to bring in t ir own bonded cont,:aotor to do the rk. Accordingly , I discussed this matter with llrJ Chairman, s ell with. Mr . Charl s vis and Mr. Earl Landers . 11 o,f thes gentlemen gJ;e d tbat the most practical thing to do is to allow the insur nc comp ny to engag oontr ctor . It did not occur to me that thi-, propos arr ng ent ·w ould have to be cleared by the Purchasing Commi.ttee ince City funds w re really not inVQlv d. Accordingly , with th pprov l of my COroroitte , I authorized ccur te Con.atruction ·Company to stei-t WQrk on Perkerson Recreation building Tuesday, My 6, 1969. A Mr. 1th; of Accur te Con t..r:uction Comp n.y, Monday th c rtif1c t t l phon 523-1986, w1i1 upply insqranc protecting th City of Atl nt during tb r .ir Thus, it lf. y 5th Bo rd of Aldel:me rizin th City to llow it ng priv t , con truct1-on fim. I bo our ction is within th spirit. nd int nt of otion 31.-37 of the City Cod, nd Ip rticul rly ppr ci your c lll it provision to my t t ntion. .-U �Mr-. J. For rest Gee May 2, 1969 - 2 - Finally, we have entered a cla im for fire loss on the contents of the building and there will be many do zens of items we will have to requi sition f or repl acement purposes on an emer gency basis. Sincerely , J a ck c. Delius Ge neral nager of Parks and Recreation u J CD; j w cc: Mr . R. Earl Landers , Mayor ' s ()ffice ~ Mr. Thomas F . Choyce, Associate City Attorrey Honorable Char l ie Left wich Mr. Pi erce i t ley , Assistant General Man· ger o f . arks Mr . St anley T. Martin , ssi st an Gen r al Mana er of Parks Miss Virgi nia Carmio ael, Dire ctor of Recreation Mrs. Mary s e Liady , Communi t y Ce nte r Director �
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 22, Folder topic: Parks department | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 1, Folder 22, Document 3

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_001_022_003.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 1, Folder 22, Document 3
  • Text: C TY OF A LANTA DEPARTMENT of PARKS Office of General Manager Atlanta, Georgia 30303 May 8, 1969 JACK C. DELIUS GENERAL MANAGER " Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. City of Atlanta City Hall .A tlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mayor Allen: I plan to be out of the City from Friday, May 30, through Sunday, June 1, at Roosevelt State Park in Pine Mountain, Georgia. If you should have to contact me, I will be in Cabin No. 8, and the Superintendent of the Park is Mr. Bill Marx. In my absence, Mr. Pierce Whitley, Assistant General Manager of Parks, will be in charge of field operation and Mr. Stanley T. Martin, Jr., Assistant General Manager of Parks, will be in charge of administration. neral Manager of rks and Recreation JCD:jw cc: Parks Committee Mr. Pierce Whitley Mr. Stanley T. Martin , Jr. Miss Virginia Carmichael Mr. John Roth �
  • Tags: Box 1, Box 1 Folder 22, Folder topic: Parks department | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017