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Box 12, Folder 28, Document 1

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_012_028_001.pdf
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  • Title: Box 12, Folder 28, Document 1
  • Text: Bedeviled by long, hazardous hours, low pay, public abuse and unrealistic court decisions, policemen across the country are at an all-tim e low in morale. Is it any wonder that police departments are so dangerously undermanned that crime is flourishing? Our Alarming Police Shortage BY \ i\l JLLI AM SCHULZ M m ajor crim es a re committed during a typica l week in the city of Los Angeles. Twenty-five women are raped; fo ur citizens are murdered; 190 others are bea ten , kni fed or shot. Poli ce switchboa rds light up w ith reports of r 53 robberies, 445 stolen ca rs, 637 larcen ies involving $50 or m ore, and 1076 housebrea kings . Yet thi s orgy of law less ness is no reAection on the L os Ange les Poli ce Depa rtm ent. " We just don't have the m a npowe r to keep crim e in check," says embat tl ed poli ce chi ef Thom as Reddin . " We need 10,000 m en, but we ca n't even fi ll our a uthori zed st reng th of 5383." ORE THA N 2500 Officials in every sect ion of the co untry echo C hief Reddin 's complaint. Ameri ca is desperately underprotected - at a tim e w hen crime is grow in g six tim es fas t er than p op ul a t io n- a nd t he situ a ti o n is wo rsening rapidly. Demoralized by in a dequ a te wages, fr ustrated by judicial nitpicking , sickened by citize n apathy, poli cemen by the thousa nds are turning in their badges, whi le potentia l replacem ents look elsewhere fo r employm ent. A survey of 36 m ajo r departments from Bo sto n to Hono lulu di sc loses that not one is up to authorized st reng th. U.S . Ass istant Atto rn ey General Fred Vin son, Jr., puts the I �2 THE READER'S DIGEST nationwide police sh ortage at a frightening 50,000. On the Run. New York's 73rd Precinct - the teeming Brownsville section of Brooklyn-is a microcosm of the national problem. Last summer, the "normal complement" of 374 men needed to safeguard the area was short by more than roo. Bone-weary officers put in r6-hour days in the attempt to maintain law and order. But they were no match for ma rauding criminals. Homicides soared. Stores were repeatedly burglarized . Policemen themselves were mugged in broad daylight. "They've got us on the run," an exhausted patrolman said bitterly. "And they know it." To remedy the situation, ew York officials have la unched a highpowered recruiting campaign. But their problem is not unique. Recruiters from the Washington, D.C., police department comb the eastern United States, a nd cannot fill the nearly 400 vacancies on their 3100man force. Meanwhile, crime in the nation's capital increased 38 percent in a recent 12-m onth period. Behind the cold statistics are the individuals who suffer: the mercha nt forced out of business by repeated holdups; the pretty teen-ager disfig ured for li fe by a n assailant's razor; the young housewife thrust into widowhood by an armed robber - and you may well be next. For make no mistake about it: every gap in the "thin blue line" means that more citizens get hurt. This was demonst rated vividly in mid-1966, when hundreds of Chicago police were taken off their regular beats to quell potential riots in the tense Eighth District. During this time, the city's crime soared 29.8 percent over the previous year, with increases recorded in 20 of 21 police districts. The sole exception: the Eighth District. H igh Risk, Low Pay. The shamefu l events of last summer, during which more than 100 communities were ravaged by riot, have made the police manpower situation even more acute.For example, 20 men had signed up to take the examination for admission to the undermanned P lainfield, .J., police department. Then came that city's riot, in the course of which a young patrolman was stomped to death by a savage mob. Only five of the applicants showed up to take the test. Of the five, only two qualified. In nearby ewark, a policeman threatening to turn in his badge said, "They just buried the best man I've ever known" -this of Frederick Toto, a decorated policema n shot to death by a sniper during the July riot. 'Tm not afraid, but m y wife's near a nervous b reakdown." But the riots are only part of it. In recent months I have traveled from one end of the country to the other, interviewing former policemen as well as harried young patrolmen who at least for now, are stick ing it out. From their stories t hi s dep lorable f inanci al picture emerges : Although the Office of Economic �OUR A L ARMING POLICE SHORTAGE Opportunity puts the pove rt y level a t $3200 for a non -farm fa mily of fou r, patrolmen in Di ck so n , Tenn., start at $2400 a year ; in Durant, Okla., at $2760; in Glasgow, Ky., at $3000. Coeur d 'A lene, Idaho, pays its patrolmen an annual ·$5280, but requires them to work 54-hour weeks . Salaries in large r citi es, while hig her, are nonetheless disg raceful. In Seattle, cable splicers ea rn $375 a month more than poli ce men; Chicago electri cia ns receive $1.40 an hour more than the patrolman on the bea t; carpenters in N ew York comma nd 50 percent m ore per hour than patrolmen. M oreover, the cable sp li cer, e lect rici a n a nd carpente r work 35- or 40-hour weeks, with genero us ove rtime. The policeman toils ni g h ts and holidays, rarely with overt im e, often under in cr edibl e stra in , hi s li fe freq uentl y in danger. In 1966, 23,000 poli cemen were assa ulted in the lin e of duty. More appa lling than low pay to m an y po li cemen is the att itude of the publi c. "I'm willing to take m y chances w ith the punks and the hoods," says a vetera n policeman in Balt imore. "A ll I ask is a li ttle support from the average citizen." Yet, all too often, peop le "wa lk the ot her way." Fo r h::i lf ::i n hour, t wo membe rs of t h e C a li fo rni a Hi g h way Patrol teetered on the edge of a bridge 185 feet above Sa n Pedro Bay, st ruggling to save a man bent on suicide. Agai n and aga in they shouted for help to passing cars. Not one driver stopped, or even bothered 3 to ca ll for aid when he reached the end of the bridge. In another insta nce, a Sa n Fran cisco policeman attempted to arrest two drunks on a downtown street. Forty minutes late r he was ca rried into San Fra ncisco General Hospital, his cheek slas hed open, his nose broken . "The crowd just let them beat m e," he sa id . "People act as if the police were their enemies." Case Dismissed. A nother m ajor factor in the sorry state of police morale is th e se ries of vague and loosely wo rded Supreme Court rulings handed down in rece nt years. Consider these typical cases reported to the Senate Subcommittee on C rimin al L aws a nd P rocedures: • " Thi s fe llow went throug h a red lig ht a nd ran into me," an a ng ry motorist told the policem an dispatc hed to the scene of a traffic acci dent in Providence, R.I . " Is that so?" the officer inqu ired of the second motor ist. The latter ad mi tted that he had indeed run the li g ht. Later, the case aga in st him was thrown out of co urt . Why? Th e poli cema n had fa iled to notify him of hi s rig hts, as required by the Supreme Court's 1966 Mira nda decisi on,* before asking, " ls that so'" • An officer in Torran ce, Ca lif., picked up two young men on narcotics cha rges. Acu tely ::iwa re of Miranda, the pol ice man in formed the suspects, "Yo u have the rig ht to • Whi ch ,a ,·s that a suspect mu, t be info rmed of hi s right to silence, of his rig ht to a lawyer e,-cn if he cannot affn rd o ne. a nd of the fact tha t a nything he sa ys ca n be held .tga in !-i t hirn in court . �THE READER'S DIGEST the services of a n attorney during all stages of the proceedings against you." Tot good enough, Judge Otto Willett ruled in dismissing the charges. What the officer should have said, Willett declared, was, "You have the right to the services of an attorney prior to any questioning." The defendants left the cou rtroom gn nnmg . " itpicking of this kind h;r.; had a disastrous effect on our force," says Lt. L ee J. As hma n, head of the T orrance narcotics squad. "Some veteran officers have become so frustrated they've simp ly quit." Turnstile Justice. Just as demoralizing is the cava lier attitude that m any judges have toward juvenile crime. Co nsider the case 0£ Harry Sylvester Jones, Jr., a Washing ton, D.C., delinquent who was g iven an earl y release from reform schoolonl y to embark on a criminal career that included rape, auto theft and g rand larceny. Sentenced to prison three times in eig ht years, Jones was three times released on parole or p robation. Within seven m onths after he was released for the third tim e, he had raped two women at kni fe-point, stabbed a nother nine times as she knelt in church, and committed his third rape against a 54-yea r-old wom an he trapped in an elevator. Jones is ha rd ly unique. Police fil es in every state bulge with cases in which innocent members of society pay fo r the mistakes of unrealistic judges and pa role o fficers. The careers of Gregory Ulas Powell and 4 Jimmy L ee Smith, young Cali forn ians who had amassed 25 arrests by the time they were 30, are depressingly typical. On the night of M arch 9, 1963, en route to their fi fth robbery in two weeks, Powell a nd Smith were stopped for a defective taill ig ht by Los Angeles policemen Ian James Campbell and K arl Hettinger. The unsuspecting officers were promptly kidnaped at g u npoint, d riven n o rt h in to K e rn County an d m arched on to a deserted field . As the officers stood with their hands raised, Powell calmly fired a .32-caliber bu llet into Campbell's mouth. Hettinger whirled and ra n, miraculously escaping as Powell soug ht to gun him down and Smith pumped four more slug s into the dying Campbell. The lesson to be learned from that March night is the folly of turnstile justice. Campbell's killers were both- on parole. Eight tim es they had been the recipients of judicia l leniency in the form of conditional release, parole or probation. N or has their luck run out. C aptured within hours of the murder, the two were convicted a nd sentenced to death . But, last July, the Ca liforni a Suprem e Court reversed the convictions on the ground that the defendants had not been fully ad vised o f their rig hts, and ordered a new tria l, perhaps p roviding a noth e r oppo rt u nit y to prove tha t crime does pay. " The. weakness in our handling of re peating offenders has caused vet- �5 OUR ALA RMIN G POLICE SHORTAGE eran law-e nforcement officers to of a nonparti sa n crime comm ittee. throw up their hands in despair," Mobili z ing public support, the comsays FBI Director J. Edgar H oover. mittee won an imm edi ate $rooo pay " Worse, it makes ou tsta nding you ng hik e for Cincinnati 's policemen, men reluctant to enter the law- with promises of m ore to come. enforcement profession at the ve ry Today, a bi t m ore than a year later, tim e their services are so gravely m orale is m eas urably improved. needed." Resig nations and retirements have A Major Commitment. Wh at can been slas hed by two thirds, and the we do to close the dangerous "police force is aga in attracting ambitious gap"? Two steps are clearl y called yo un g recru its. "We've got to unfor : dersta nd," says John Held, " that 1. We must pay th e police a Living yo u ca n't stop crim e wi th an underwage. James Ro ye r, father of two, ma nn ed police force whose morale resig ned from the C incinnati police has been broken." 2. T,Ve must provide th e police the department in the summer of 1966. "My ran k is that of police specialist," moral su pport they so desperately he wrote. "My sa la ry, after -nine need. Througho ut the countr y, poyea rs, is $7507- I have no union , no lice efforts to improve community g uild and ve ry few rig hts - civil or relation s have been undermined by otherwise. Our city perso nn el offi cer a co n cer t ed campa ig n of ab u se. classifies me as se mi-sk illed labor Commonest charge is that of "police my co llege degree, g raduate work, brutality." Yet a tas k force of the adva nced train ing and yea rs of pro- Pres id e nt 's Cr im e Co mmi ss ion, fess ional ex perience notwithstand- whi ch w itn essed 5339 " police-citi zen ing . Private industr y has offered m e encounters," during 850 eight-hour a substa ntia l sa lary increase and an patrols, fo und only 20 cases in which opportunity fo r advancem ent. I re- police were fe lt to have used ung ret that thi s co uld not be ac hieved necessa ry force. " Th at is a reco rd of as an employe of the people of Cin- . sa ti sfactory perfo rm ance in 99.63 percinn ati. " cent of the sa mple under stud y," Jim Royer was not a lone, as City says syndicated newspaper columCou nc ilm a n Jo hn E. H e ld w as ni st Jam es J. Kilpatrick. "What shocked to nnd . M any of the city's other occupa tion or profession boasts outstand ing poli cem en we re q uit- a better record ?" To counterbala nce the work of poting the force to acce pt hig her-paying jobs as g ua rd s, truck dri vers, lice-baiting grou ps, F red E . Inbau, sa lesmen. Crime was up sharp ly; the professor of crim inal law at Northnumber of offenses culmin ating in western University, recently formed a rrest was down 25 percent from a n organ iza tion ca lled A mericans the preceding yea r. for Effective L aw Enfo rcement "to H eld led the ng ht for the creatio n represent the law-abiding p ubli c and �THE READER:S DIGEST its embattled protectors." Enthusiastically supported by many of the country's top experts on crime and punishment, AELE will defend , among others, policemen it considers unjustly accused of brutality; draft m odel anti~crime statutes; and argue major cases in the nation's courts. Meanwhile, in Indi ana polis, a band of housewives has demonstrated that anyone may enlist in the battle for law and order. Stunned by the brutal slaying of a 90-year-old woman, a group of women residents initi ate d the Indian apo lis AntiCrime Crusade in March 1962. Since then, enlisti ng more than 60,000 women in its ranks, the Crusade has won badly needed pay hikes for the Indianapolis police, lobbied for effective anti-crime measures and sat in on more than 80,000 court cases to keep local judges on their toes. Its dogged efforts have helped to curb Indianapolis crime and have 6 won the kudos of the President's Crime Commission. The exodus of policemen can be stopped. Thousands of young men can be persuaded to make law enforcement their career. But it will require a major commitment from ordinary citizens across the land, not only in dollars but in spirit. As Rep. Joel T. Broyhill, of Virginia, has said, "In part because we, as ordinary citizens, have waited too long to fight back, a pol ice uniform today is the target for epithets and abuse. It is time to ask our decen t citizens for collective action; our public officials for more backbone; our courts for more reality. We must stop this nonsense not tomorrow, not next week, but today." Rep rints of this art icle arc available. Prices, postpaid to one add ress: 10 - 50¢; 50 - $2; 100 - $3 .50; 500 - $ 12.50; 1000 - $18 . Address Reprint Editor, The Readers Digest, Plcasamvillc, N.Y. 10570 REPRINTED FROM THE JANUARY 1968 ISSUE OF THE READER ' S DIGE ST ©1967 THE READER ' S DIGEST ASSOC I ATION , I NC., PLEASANTVILLE, N. Y. 10570 PRIN TED IN U.S.A. �
  • Tags: Box 12, Box 12 Folder 28, Folder topic: Police Department | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 12, Folder 28, Document 5

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_012_028_005.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 12, Folder 28, Document 5
  • Text: Mr .E r qn 9r Of fice G'.?. • �- -- - ~- -- Vo ·ri8 D r · ng 164 T") hode I c- "c1 t, v e. '•Ir, s .. in2:t0 . , D. C. 71T.rl. ~ !"_.J ·' !, • �
  • Tags: Box 12, Box 12 Folder 28, Folder topic: Police Department | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 12, Folder 28, Document 9

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_012_028_009.pdf
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  • Title: Box 12, Folder 28, Document 9
  • Text: Mayor Ivan Allen City Hall As t he parents of the c hildren at Warren. Jaekson School, we feel t ha t it is necessary for t!heir safety tha t a polie e woman ·-lYe ·stat ioned on Mt. Paran Road to assist them in crossi ng o We feel that economy is not a factor where t he safety of our children i s involved o ..... ... • w �
  • Tags: Box 12, Box 12 Folder 28, Folder topic: Police Department | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 12, Folder 28, Document 14

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_012_028_014.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 12, Folder 28, Document 14
  • Text: JULY 1967 LAW ENFORCEMENT BULLETIN r7 therefore believe it is my duty to my country to love it, to support its constitution, to obey its laws, to respect its flag, and to defend it against all enemies. • JJ WILLIAM TYLER PAGE FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION JD EDGAR HOOVER, DIRECTOR UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE �JULY 1967 VOL. 36 NO. 7 ..,_ ...... . __ ·-· ·----·-* " ... ._ ,__,...,,....,, , ,__,, _CTGO ,_ -·- THE COV ER- Patriotism and respect /o r the fi ag. S ee Mr. Hoove r's message on page 1. -- LAW ENFORCEMENT BULLETIN CONTENTS Message From Director]. Edgar Hoover . 1 An American Policeman in England, by Lt. R obert C. Mitchell, Multnomah County Department of Public Safety, Portland, Oreg. 2 Search of Motor Vehicles (Part V) 7 Seeing More While Looking Less, by C. Alex Pantaleoni, Coordinator of Police Science, Rio Hondo Junior College, Santa Fe Springs, Calif. . 9 A Public Safety Cruiser, by Warren Dodson, Chief of Police, Abilene, Tex. 12 The Silent Witness 17 FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION Wanted by the FBI 24 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Tribute to Peace Officers Published by the Washington, D.C. 20535 ( inside back cover) �CAN THERE BE ANY ACT more sickening and revolting than a crowd of so-called citizens desecrating and burning their country's flag? Those who resort to such moronic behavior are surely lost in the depths of depravity. Obviously, their first loyalty is not to the United States. emphasized and excluded from several phases of our life. Many educators and other leaders seem to feel it is no longer necessary for boys and girls to be concerned with how our country came into being, what it stands for, and the courageous and noble deeds of our forefathers to preserve it. True, our Nation is founded on concepts and principles which encourage dissent and opposition. These are traditions we must always defend and support. But touching a torch to the flag far exceeds reasonable protest. It is a shameful act which serves no purpose but to encourage those who want our country to erupt in violence and destruction. Conditions are now such in some circles that an individual who professes love of his country, reverence for its flag, and belief in the principles which make our Nation great is considered a yokel. Open aversion to patriotism of any form is increasing. Even some news media take a "tongue-in-cheek" approach to persons and groups which promote and pa1iicipate in patriotic endeavors. Love of one's country is treated as some kind of social disease to be tolerated, if not stamped out. Protests are made that too much patriotism leads to international conflict. I submit that the United States will never have anything to fear from its ardent and genuinely patriotic citizens. On this 191st anniversary of the Declaration of Independence, we might ask what causes unpatriotic outbursts and irrational protests. Why do people turn against their native land and openly support totalitarian forces whose goal is to enslave the world- forces which do not even allow token opposition from their subjects ? Why do some individuals refuse to serve and defend their country? Why do they burn their draft cards and their flag? There may be many reasons for such action, but I am fully convinced that dying patriotism is one major cause. Love of country is being de- JULY 1, 1967 American history proves that freedom and liberty come at high prices and that their upkeep is costly and time-consuming. As Daniel Webster so aptly put it, " God grants libe1iy only to those who love it and are always ready to guard and defend it. Let our object be our country . . . "-not our country the object of desecration and abuse. �An American Policeman • 1n England Lt. ROBERT C. MITCHELL Multnomah County Departmen t of Public Safety, Portland, Oreg. Lightweight motorcycles are used to patrol extensive rural beats. An American police officer, for a period of 6 months, exchanged home, car, and job with his English counterpart in an experiment in the observation of police work in a foreign country. �Law Enforcement Foreign Exchange Experiment 0 n April 1, 1966, I began a 6month tour of duty with the Lancashire Constabulary, England's second largest police force. At the same time, Chief Insp. John P. Kennard, of the Lancashire force, was assigned to the Multnomah County Sheriff's Office, Portland, Oreg., to study our organization and methods. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first direct exchange of police personnel between an American and a foreign police agency. I t should not be the last. The exchange was total in that we traded houses and a utomobiles as well as jobs during this period . Personal problems arose almost immediately, b ut none were beyond solution. For example, both of our insurance companies had to be contacted and their feelings determined as to continued insurance coverage on the automobiles. Chief Inspector Kennard I fo und that the fir ms with which we dealt were fascinated by the idea of the exchange and were more than glad to give us their full cooperation. My own children are grown, but Chief Inspector and Mrs. Kennard were bringing their two daughters, Paula, age 3, and Alison, age 9, to the United States. Our local elementary school was delighted with the idea of enrolling Alison for the balance of the school term. House payments and the forwarding of pay were left in the competent hands . of the assistant cashier of our bank. Advantages of Venture There are tremendous advantages, both personal and professional, for the police officer chosen to participate in such a venture. The exposure to different concepts, tools, techniques, and training methods is bound to create a thirst for further knowledge. The exchange certainly changed any_preconceived ideas of ours about the " typical" Englishman. We had prnbably seen too many motion pie- tures depicting stereotyped roles of the English and heard too many jokes about their lack of a sense of humor. We found a warmhearted, generous, and hospitable people with a sense of humor as keen as our own. There are differences in living conditions, monetary systems, and many of the things which we take for granted in -t he United States. We found no real difficulty in adapting to these differences. Housing, or a housing allowance, is provided for the British policeman by his force. Thus we found ourselves housed in one of a row of nine police houses. They were more or less identical, of standard brick construction, and heated by coal fireplaces. Our neighbors were policemen and their families. Some of the friendships formed with our neighbors will last a lifetime. I believe that living under these conditions proved the necessity of a n Chief Supt. William Little (right), uN" Division (Ashton-Unde r-Lyne ), and Lie ute nant Mitche ll. a'~a July 1967 3 �and as a result we both found ourselves being invited to speak to various civic organizations. It is our hope that we left a good impression of Americans with those organizations. The Unarmed Police Lieutena nt Mitchell chats with offi cers in the communications section, a vita l public service in all police departments. officer involved in such an exchange being accompanied by his wife a nd famil y. It would have been difficult, if not impossible, fo r a single man to have fitted in with the fa mily atmosphere of this police community. Scope o f the Exchange Inasmuch as this was to be a new experience, neither my sheriff nor I was in a position to know just what we should consider as the scope of the experiment. I was given specific a reas to study : The penal system, the use of the summons as opposed to physical arrest, and the relationship of the British police with the public they serve. Beyond these three points, I was given a free hand to delve into anything I felt would be of value to us. Chief Constable Col. T. Eric St. Johnston was on a world tour at the time of my arrival, but he had left instructions that I was not to be " desk bound" but was to be left ver y much as a free agent to come and go as I 4 saw fit. Visits had been scheduled for me with police fo rces in England, Scotland, Northern Ireland, and the Isle of Man. Although b ased at Lancashire Constabular y Headquarters, I visited each of its 18 divisions as well as 15 other police forces, In every case I was given any information I requested, shown anything I wished to see, and given free access to anything I fo und of interest. Each fo rce visited had ar ranged both professional and social engagements which they felt would be of value and interest to both Mrs. Mitchell and me. As a result, we h ad access to ma ny places and activities that no tourist would ever have. Thro ugh these programs we were able to broaden our outlook far beyond the confines of the police service. Being cast in the role of an ambassador of good will came as something of a surprise, but both my wife and I fo und ourselves placed in this position. P ress and television coverage of the exchange was quite extensive, After 22 years of close association with a sidearm, it was both pleasant and disconcerting to find myself work ing with policemen who neither use firearms nor care to use them. This, of course, was the first difference to be encountered in our two police systems and was the one on which I was most often questioned. The arming of the British police became the subj ect of a great deal of public controversy when Detective Sgt. Chris Head and P olice Constables Geoffrey F ox and David W ombwell were slain in London on August 12, 1966. Oddly enough, the police were not nearly as enthusiastic about being armed as the public was about a rming them. In my opinion the answer to this problem may lie in stiffer prison sentences for those criminals wh o use a gun against an unarmed society and unarmed police fo rces. The British policeman has spent nearly 150 years in building the tradition of keeping the peace without the use of firearms. This is a tradition which should be kept as long as it is possible to do so. I t would be h ighly improper if I were to create the impression that the police are completely inept in the use of firearms. Every force has a num ber of men trained in the use of weapons, and the equipment i available for issue when it is needed . Standard ization The British police enjoy a standardization of many elements of the police service that may not be attainable in the United States. P a y scales are the same in all E ngli h forces, with the exception of London, which FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin �allows a cost-of-living adjustment. Entrance requirements may vary slightly from force to force, but conditions of service are the same in all forces. This standardization is also found in training, uniforms, and retirement benefits. It would appear that the key to standardization is the 50 percent grant from the national treasury of the annual budget of each police force. Every force is inspected annually by one of Her Majesty's Inspectors of Constabulary. His report, indicating that the force is up to standards, determines whether the grant will be allo wed. Although placin g chief constables in a ver y advantageous position when presenting the p olice budget to their local authority, this system does place the national government squarely in the local police picture. Any suggestions presented to the chief constables by the Home Secretary will usually be implemented. Without a doubt, this is the major factor in achieving the uniformity which I found so impressive. Training Program The value of standardization is most apparent in the training program. England is divided into eight geographic police districts, each with a district training center. Recruits from every force in the district train together and take the same 13-week basic training course. This concept of training is possible where criminal law is national in scope rather than regional, as in our own State statutes. Women police constables in patrol cars undertake the same duties as the men but especially concern themselves with cases involving women and children. The police car is white so that it can be readily identified as a police vehicle. Training does not stop at the recruit level. Inservice training is carried out within the forces, · and refresher courses are offered at the district trammg center. Specialized courses are frequently given in the larger forces with vacancies in the class held open for officers from surrounding forces. One of the more interesting inservice training courses is the refresher course for sergeants of the Lancashire Constabulary. It is based on a concept of three R's: 1. Relax-by virtu e of short hours, no pres- sure, and long weekends. 2. Refre sh- the officer's kn owl edge of th e latest laws and court decisions. 3. Ren ew- the officer's enthusiasm for his job, the department, and th e future. Supt. Walter Butterworth, now retired, assured me that the relaxed atmosphere, the roundtable conference approach to teaching, a nd the complete lack of pressure do send the men back to their posts with a far better outlook on their job. The Police College at Bramshill is the seat of higher education for the whole of the English police service. The 6-month Senior Staff Course trains officers of the rank of inspector and above to assume the highest posts in the police service. The Intermediate Command Course, lasting 3 months, is designed to train inspectors and chief inspectors in the responsibilities of posts held by superintendents and chief superintendents. Sergeants and newly promoted inspectors attend the 6-m onth " A" Course to prepare them for the duties of inspector and chi ef inspector. The Special Course impressed me with the potenti al of hav in g tremendous impact on the British police service of the future. Young offi cers of outstanding pro mise, wh o have passed hi gh ) n pro motio nal examinations, are assig ned to this 1-year course under a q uota system. They are given the temporar y ra nk of sergeant 5 �for the duration of the course, the rank being made permanent after the successful conclusion of their studies. There are a number of scholarships available for the outstanding officers in the class to continue on to university studies. I would hope that the P olice College program could be expanded to accommodate far more students. The coll~ge graduated 448* men and women in 1965 from a total authorized police strength of about 95,000. Crime prevention and public relations are sometimes treated as sepa- On the day I inspected this installation, police were keeping a parking lot and a city street with a high crime rate under surveillance. Any suspicious activity was reported to plainclothes officers on the ground who immediately investigated !he situation. In addition to setting up many good arrests, this system appears to keep many of the thieves · off balance, as they are never quite sure where the television will be installed next. With the cooperation of BBC and the independent television stations, the police sponsor regional programs Officer and police dog patrol a children's playground at Kirkby near Liverpool . rate fun ctions, but to me they appear to interlock to such an extent that it is difficult to tell where one stops and the other begins. Most of the forces I visited had assigned offi cers to the crime prevention detail on a full-tim e basis, and these men were very devoted to the program. In addition to the expected posters, pamphlets, and personal contacts with business people, I found two techniques th at were of great interest. The Liverpool City P olice have mounted mo vable television cameras atop one of the do wntown buildings. R eport o f H er i\ laj cs ty·s Ch ief Ins pec tor o f Co n stnbu lnry for th e Year, ] 965 (Lond on: Her Majes ty' s Sta ti onery Office, 1966), p. 33 . 6 with such titles as " P olice File" and " P olice Five." These programs are on the air during prime time in the evening, and public reception and reaction are excellent. The usual fo rmat might show a photograph of a wanted man, a certain type of vehicle the police are looking fo r , a list of stolen items, and a missing person . " Police File" is aired at 7 p.m. on Frida y over Granada TV. The ro ugh scri pt is written by the Manchester City P olice public relations offi cer and is then poli shed by television script writers under his supervision. T his is not an attempt at censorship or co ntrol by the television people, but is designed to convert the script from police language to television language. Forty-eight police forces in the Granada viewing area contribute to the program through the Manchester Police. Displays Also of particular interest and value are large assortments of locks and security devices displayed by most crime prevention officers and · provided through the courtesy of the manufacturers of such hardware. Many officers pointed out that the businessman should be invited to the police station to view these displays privately. There was a strong suspicion that the local burglars would enjoy attending any public display of such security devices. During my tour in England, I had the pleasure of visiting the following police departments: Lancashire Constabulary, P reston Borough P olice, Ro yal Ulster Constabulary, Liverpool City P olice, Isle of Man Con stabular y, Manchester City Police, Birmingham City P olice, Coventry City P olice, Stockport Borough Po lice, Blackpool Boro ugh Police, City of London P olice, London Metrop olitan Police, Southport Boro ugh P olice, Edinb urgh City P olice, Glasgow City Police, and Durham Constabulary. The British Police m an I have touched briefl y on a few of the many facets of the British police service. I should like to generalize a bit and attempt to describe the Br itish policeman . He is a first-rate police officer by the standar ds of any p olice agency known to me. He is gro3sly underpaid when one weighs his respo~sibilities against those of men employed by British industry. He perfo rms the deeds of valor which a re expected of policemen everywhere. The 1965 report of Her Majesty's ( Continued on page 16) FBI Law Enforcement Bull eti n �Search of Motor Vehicles This is the fifth of a series of articles discussing the Fecleral law on search of motor vehicles. VI. Consent Searches The constitutional p r o t e ct i o n against unreasonable searches and seizures provided by the fourth amendment can be waived by the express consent of the person whose· property is to be searched. On Lee v. U.S., 343 U.S. 74-7 (1952 ) . Because of the obvious advantages it offers over the search by warrant or incidental to arrest, the consent search has become a popular method of sec uring evidence from suspected offenders. Where properly obtained from the party in interest, it _avoids the requirements of probable cause and particularity of description necessary to a valid warrant. And since it need not be tied to an arrest, the contemporaneo us factors of time and place associated with the incidental search are also inapplicable. But it is precisely because thi s technique circumvents these traditi onal safeguards of privacy that consent searches are looked upon with disfavor by the courts. When one consents to a search of his automobile, it is said that he waives any constitutional right of privacy he might otherwise en joy over the vehicle or any property contained therein. And as in all situations involving a waiver of fundamental constitutional rights, it can be expected that the pr,osccution will have to meet a hi gh standard of proof. Johnson v. Zerbst, 304 U.S. 458 ( 1938) . In general, the limitations set on consent searches are the same considerations that have been employed in the past in determining the voluntariness of confessions. Thus the courts have held that consent must be given in circum263-817 0 - 67- - 2 stances free of "d uress or coercion," that it be " knowingly and intelligently:' given, and that it be stated in a "clear and unequivocal" manner. Because these determinations generally involve inquiries into the subjective state of mind of the suspect, the officer, or both, they present practical difficulties in judicial supervision which more often than not are resolved in favor of the criminally accused. A. Duress or Coercion Applicability of the fourth amendment guaranty of immunity from unreasonable searches or seizures is not dependent upon any affirmative assertion by the private citizen. U.S. v. Rembert, 284. F. 996, 998 (1922); Dacle v. State, 188 Okla. 677, 112 P. 2d 1102 (1941) . To hold otherwise would require the individual to make the difficult choice either of challengin g the officer's authority, perhaps by force, or waiving his constitutional rights through inaction. I bicl. Thus, in many cases where a consensual situation is in issue, there is no overt indication that the person voiced objection or otherwise contested the search. The courts must therefore look to the surrounding circumstances to determine whether or not the purported consent was induced by pressure or coercion. Peaceful submission under such circumstances is not consent but simply acquiescence to higher authority and cannot lawfully support a search without a warrant. U.S. v. Rembert, supra; Johnson v. U.S., 333 U.S. 10 (194-8) ; Amos v. U.S. , 255 U.S. 313 (1921). There is, of course, no easy yardstick by which to measure the degree 7 �of coercion or duress necessary to vitiate an expressed consent, for this must depend upon the characteristic facts of each case. Nonetheless, it is possible to identify several factors which generally influence the courts in making this determination. It has been held, for example, that the attitude and conduct of the advising officer are an important consideration, particularly where they might indicate that he had intended to search in any event. If he states peremptorily, "Open the glove compartment," or "I want to look in the trunk of your car," it is likely that this will be viewed as coercive. The courts have also pointed to such factors as undue emphasis on authority and even an aggressive manner as being sufficient to invalidate consent. U.S. v. Kelih, 272 Fed. 484 (1922). Similarly, the time of night, U.S. v. Roberts, 179 F. Supp. 478 (1959), number of officers seeking consent, U.S. v. Alberti, 120 F. Supp. 171 ( 1954,) , display of weapons or other symbols of authority, U.S. v. Marquette, 271 Fed. 120 (1920), or presence of the suspect's family during questioning, Catalanotte v. U.S., 208 F. 2d 264, (1953) , all tend to create a strong implication of CO· ercion. It is important therefore that the police avoid use of demanding words or gestures or any comment which might be construed to mean that the subj ect has no ch oice but to allow a search. This issue often arises when an officer threatens to procure a search war rant if consent is not given. It has been held by some courts that permission given under these circumstances is a mere submission to a uthority and that the individual yields his rights only because he feels there is no reasonable alternative but to consent. U.S. v. Baldacci, 42 F. 2d 567 (1930); U.S . v. Dix on, 117 F. Supp. 925 (194-9) ; see also, Weecl v. U.S., 340 F. 2d 827 (1965 ). On the other hand, it is arguable 8 that knowledge that one cannot lawfully prevent a search indefinitely may enable him to make a more intelligent decision as to whether and how much he will cooperate. It is not required, of course, that the individual desire a search be made of his property, but only that he make a free and voluntary choice on the matter. Accordingly, some cases hold that where the officer in good faith informs a party of the likelihood that a ~varrant will be issued, he does no more than advise the _suspect of the legal alternatives confronting him, and, i"n the absence of any aggravating circumstances, this factor alone will not invalidate the consent. Simmons v. Bomar, 230 F. Supp. 226 (1964) . This line of reasoning is implicit in Hamilton v. State of North Carolina, 290 F. Supp. 632 (1966 ) , wh ere po· lice, alerted to a recent safe robber y, arrested the defendant near his automobile. The arresting officer asked for permission to search the car, stating that he did not have a warrant with him but could get one if necessar y. The defendant replied, "There is no need of that. You can search the car ." He then handed the keys to the officer who searched the vehicle and found a pistol. In denying a petition for habeas corpus, the Federal district court ruled, " The fact that the officer told [the defendant] that he did not have a search warrant but that he could get one is immaterial." Citing an earlier appellate decision, the court stated, " a defendant cannot assert the illegality of a search made with his consent, though given in response to a threat to procure a search warrant." !cl. at 635. See, Gatterdam v. U.S. , 5 F. 2d 673 ( 1925 ); K ershner v. Boles, 212 F. Supp. 9 ( 1963 ), modified and aff'd, Boles v. Kershner, 320 F. 2d 284, ( 1963) . There is common agreement, however, that if the consent is obtained through fra ud, deception, or misrepresentation regard- mg either the officer's authority or intention to secure a formal warrant, the search will be invalid. Bolger v. U.S., 189 F. Supp. 237 (1960 ) , a:ff'd 293 F. 2d 368, rev'd on other grounds, 371 U.S. 392 ( 1963 ) ; Pekar v. U.S., 315 F. 2d 319 (1965 ) ;U.S. v. Wallace, 160 F. Supp. 859 (1958) . One of the more troublesome issues of consent arises when permission to conduct a warrantless search is obtained from one who is under arrest or otherwise subj ected to official restraint. Since intimidation and duress are necessarily implicit in such situations, it is especially difficult for the prosecution to convince the court that the waiver was given free from negating pressure or ·c oercion. U.S. v. Wallace, 160 F. Supp. 859 (1958 ) . But while some courts consistently view consent given b y one in police custody as invalid, Judd v. U.S., 190 F . 2d 649 (D.C. Cir . 1951 ), most Federal courts will inquire into the total circumstances of the case. Burke v. U.S. 328 F. 2d 399 (1st Cir.) , cert. denied, 379 U.S. 84.9 ( 1964); U.S . v. Paradise, 253 F . 2d 319 (2d Cir. ) (1958 ) ; U.S. v. Perez, 242 F . 2d 867 (2d Cir. ), cert. denied, 354, U .S. 941 ( 1957 ) ; Gendron v. U.S ., 227 F. Supp. 182 (1964,) ; Kershner v. Boles, supra; Hamilton v. State of No rth Carolina, supra. On the other hand, where condi tions of the restraint indicate a high probability of intimidation, consent by the person in custody will usually be invalid. This is often the result when a display of firea rms or other open show of force is made during the course of the arrest. Thus, in one case police officers, exhibiting drawn pistols and riot gun, stopped the defendant's veh icle an d placed the occupants under arrest fo r vagrancy a nd auto theft. One of the offi cers asked the defendan t, Weed, about a vehicle parked approximately one and onehalf blocks a way from the scene of ( Continued on page 20) FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin �A New Application of an Established Technique- Less [seeing I Looking More While Law enforcement officials are constantly seeking new and productive means to solve old and persistent problems. Rapid technological advances mark the pattern of growth of today's police forces, but sometimes a new and modified application of an old method proves highly effective. Such is the case with the proposal presented in 1964 to the California Peace Officer's Training Division by the California Optometric Association. In charge of the research proposal was Dr. Arthur Heinsen of San Jose. In 1964 vision science as applied to law enforcement was a new application of an already known and established training technique. During World War II many courses were developed for aircraft spotters and other military personnel receiving tachistoscopic training. Such a course conJuly 1967 sisted of Hashing silhouettes of various aircraft, naval vessels, and other military equipment on a screen for a fraction of a second. With speedy identification as their ultimate goal, the military was very successful with this type of training. However, after the war, the consequent reduction of a constant need created obsolescence for the tachistoscopic training. With an official of the California State Department of Education, Dr. Heinsen and I explored the feasibility of a pifot research study to present a new application of the tachistoscopic tramm g. Our final project involved the development of an optometric program applicable to law enforcement personnel and suitable for possible incorporation by the department of education into a teaching manual. The manual would then be available to local law enforcement agencies C. ALEX PANTALEON!* Coordinator of Polic-e S·cience, Rio Hondo Junior College, Santa Fe Springs, Calif. M r. P an taleoni recei ced his Bachelo r of A rts t11l d Maste r of S ci ence degrees from California Sta t e College and has done additional gradu at e work nt U.C .L.A. and the Unive rsity of Washington. 9 �which would be able to conduct their own local program. The necessary funds for the pr oj ect were made possible by a contract grant from the department of education to the California Optometric Association to develop and prepare a teaching syllabus that included equipment, supplies, and training aids. Early in the development of the program, it became increasingly evident that at least one complete course would have to be offered prior to completion of a syllabus worthy of distribution. Accordingly, the Rio Hondo Junior College participated in a National Defense Education Act grant which provided matching funds for the cost of initiating this type of pilot program. Three-Part Program The theor y of vision was the first a rea wherein the optometrist could apply already established and known training procedures. Already in use and available for application to this program was a basic slide series prepared by Dr. Ralph Schrock of Chula Vista. This excellent slide series was used in the beginning phases of train. ing with the tach istoscope. The use of symbols, such as numbers, letters, and geometric configurations, applies training techniques similar to those currently used in speedreading. This method begins by h aving the students view one digit for a fraction of a second and thereafter three, four, five, and more digits. This allows the students to develop their perception and " after-image recall" so that they perceive more in a given time period. As a second step, the motivation fo r police officer personnel required the use of numerous law enforcement "s~enes," which were prepared in cooperation with the Los Angeles P olice Department and the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. As a one-man patrol unit, an officer remains extremely busy while driving 25 miles an h our on routine patrol, operating his radio, and referring to a list of stolen cars. When he passes an alley, he has but a fraction of a second to glance down it and determine whether any police action is needed. Frequently, he is already past the alley at the time of his mental reconstruction of the perceptual "after image." T his was only one of the many areas that were developed to orient the program toward law enforcement. Students in the program use p eriph e ral s timulators to increase more accurate fi xa tions. The initial phase of letters and numbers rendered itself very naturally to the speedy identification and recognition of license plate numbers. After the initial slide series, numerous license plates were flashed on the screen and, thereafter, pictures of autom obiles were placed on the screen to simulate various driving conditions which might be encountered by the patrol officer. The third phase involved actual eye training, using specialized equipment developed by Dr . Schrock in cooperation with the Keystone View Co. The first pilot program was ready and offered on a test basis in the spring semester of 1965 at Rio Hondo Junior College. The course was designed to cover 30 h ours on the basis of a 2-hour class twice a week. However , the initial pilot course was for 34, h ours, with the additional h ours at the beginning a nd end devoted completely to testing. T his comprehensive testing si:rved to properly evaluate the total project and was not merely a part of the traihing program. T esting With a Control Group Twenty-six students from 14 different law enforcement agencies started the program. A group of 25 officers from the Los Angeles P olice Department's cadet class was chosen as the control group. Accordingly, both groups were tested with tachistoscopic slides and a series of timed tests developed by the Califo rnia Test Bureau. The parts of the multiple aptitude tests that were used were : ( 1 ) Factor II: P erceptual Speed: Test 3-Language Usage. Test 4--Routine Clerical Facility. (2) F actor IV : Spatial Visualization. Test 8-Spatial Relations, two dimension. Test 9- Spatial Relations, three dimension. FBI Law Enforcemen t Bulleti n �The group scheduled to undergo the training was further tested for peripheral vision and possible vision deficiencies. Two of the students needed glasses, but they were allowed to continue the program and their improvement was measured accordingly. Because of its initial testing and its research problems, the pilot course was conducted by local optometrists, Dr. Homer Hendrickson and Dr. Luprelle Williams. These two optometrists studied , reevaluated, and rewrote the course as it progressed. In short, the course consisted of three basic phases for each session. The first phase involved vision theory, which explained the functions of vision memory and the various structures which permit vision . The second phase of instruction revolved around tachistoscopic training, using the basic law enforcement slide series. The third pha3e involved actual exercise and development of vision skills throu gh use of optometric equipment developed by Keystone Co. The vision science kits included stereoscopes, plus and minus lenses, peripheral stimulators, and chiro-3copic drawings as well as manuals on their use. Two students used a kit on a "coach-buddy" system. It should be noted that the kits cost $125 each and refill consumable supplies for each kit cost $25. At the completion of the course, both gro ups we re again tested. Comparison of the two sets of tests provided an evaluative basis inasmuch as the Los Angeles P olice Department cadets had been given no specialized visual training. The results were evalu ated by Dr. Melvin H. Dunn , an analytical psychologist and chairman of special services education at the University of Nevada, Reno, Nev. His complete report confirms that there was a high degree of improvement on the part of the trainin g program g ro up. Definite improvement was achieved in speed and adjustment of July 1967 <· .s; .t. .r. ·> ¢:- ~ ¢ -~ !,~ h','I ' S \tf!tJ&. \\'t.S!tOS ., Students improve the visual ability of their eyes to converge accurately and quickly at various distances. fo cus, span of perception, and "afterimage recall." In addition , Dr. Dunn's report indicates the training was more beneficial for yo unger students than it was for older students. There also appeared to be a correlation between I.Q. and vision ability. The self-evaluation reports prepared by the sudents indicated certain unexpected benefits. One student stated he was an avid golfer and that the course had taken five or six strokes off hi s handicap because he was able to judge distances more accurately. Another student who played in a semiprofessional softball league indicated his batting average had improved over 20 percent. Additional Studies Followup 3tudies made 6 months later indicated a reduction in proficiency. The optometrists felt that this loss could be reduced to a negligible percentage if the trained officers were assigned to patrol functions exclusively after their training. This procedure might help the officers maintain their acuity through prac- tice. The expected net result of the officer's maintenance of his improved visual acuity is the reality of a "foureyed" one-man patrol unit. The coune, taught by Dr. Williams, was again offered by the college in the spring of 1966, at which time several preservice police science students were also enrolled. The improvement noted after the course was very similar to that in the pilot pro gram; however, the improvement was much greater in the younger students between the ages of 19 and 22, thereby suggesting that this training be conducted for recruits rather than for older officers. The college is offering the course again this year. The California State Department ·o f Education is proceedin g with the production of the teaching syllabus as well as conducting programs throughout the State. Dr. Williams is most satisfied with the results of the program and feels very strongly that this course can be presented throughout the country if it is taught by an optometrist who is familiar with the program. Rio Hondo Junior College has added this course to its vast police curriculum. 11 �A Public Safety Cruiser l WARREN DODSON Th e A bilene sa fety cruisers have the necessary equipment for any emergency. Chief of Police, Abilene, Tex. Abilene to the public safety cruiser which was inaugurated in February of 1963. Since then its sound in emergency situations has become a source of comfort and solace to many of Abilene's citizens. Purpose of Cruiser "D ogs were once content to howl at train whistles, fire trucks, and Civil Defense sirens. Now they have another electronic tormentor. It's the 'yelper' on the Abilene Police Department's new public safety cruiser. Every time the powerful wagon roars off to the scene of a bad wreck or other emergency, the dogs join in the chorus." This excerpt from an article which appeared in the Abilene Reporter News shows the immediate reaction of 12 FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin Capable of performing a multitude of tasks relating to public welfare and safety, our public safety cruiser is a multipurpose police unit designed and equipped to render service and protection for citizens while aiding in the enforcement of laws. As a police unit, public safety officers are responsible for the enforcement of all laws of the State of Texas and the city of Abilene. They respond to all calls of the police dispatcher just as any other police unit. The safety cruiser is assigned to a district to patrol with due regard for the enforcement of all laws including those pertaining specifically to traffic. However, as a specialty unit, it is not assigned to investigate traffic accidents, handle domestic problems, or transport prisoners. Likewise, it July 1967 is not required to respond to calls involving misdemeanors~ unless the call is an emergency. As a public safety unit, it responds to all major accidents where persons are injured for the purposes of rendering first aid, releasing trapped persons, and preventing fire. The cruiser responds to all calls of an emergency nature, such as drowning cases in which they use scuba diving equipment to dive, locate, and recover the victims and render what first aid is possible. When the fire department arrives on the scene with its equipment for dragging, etc., the public safety officers assist as directed by commanding officers of the fire or police department. The unit also responds to any call concerning unconscious or seriously injured people, _ like those suffering from heat exhaustion, strokes, poisoning, asphyxiation, electrical shock, or heart attack. The unit frees trapped persons and removes and destroys the explosive in cases involving an explosion or explosive material. Under normal circumstances, this unit does not respond to calls involving gunshot or knife wounds unless so directed and then op.ly to render what first aid is needed at the scene or to act as a backup unit. As a fire patrol unit, the . public safety cruiser responds to all fire alarms and upon arrival extinguishes all small fires that can be controlled with a hand extinguisher, if the fire department unit has not arrived. At all major fires, the public safety officers are under the immediate control of the fire department supervisors and carry out their orders immediately to the best of their abilities. While on patrol, our officers always watch for fire hazards and notify the fire department of any encountered. The public safety cruiser never, under any circumstances, operates as an ambulance. However, in many cases the assistance of the public safety officers is needed by the ambulance attendant. In such cases, one of our officers ( the cruiser is a two-man unit) will accompany the victim in the ambulance to the hospital and will render aid and assistance if necessary. The public safety cruiser is not a rescue unit per se, nor is it an ambulance, but it is basically a police 13 �unit fully equipped to handle all types of emergencies. Services Rendered "Send the safety cruiser" has become the most common request at the Abilene Police Department. In ali emergencies, both large and small, our citizens have come to rely on the se.rvices rendered by the cruiser. Many of the calls are humorous (such as, " My cat is caught in the air conditioner"), but others are tragic and often fraught with danger for our safety officers. Recently, on an attempted suicide -call, the person threatenino- suicide was located in a garage, . o H holding a razor to his wrist. . e refused to lay the razor down. One of the safety officers calmly talked to the disturbed person and grabbed the razor away from his wrist while the other officers assisted in restraining the individual. During the first 14 months, the cruiser made 740 emergency calls. Out of this total number of calls, emergency oxygen was administered to 83 people. Man y of these first calls involved life- or-death situations. \ Record of Service In the 3½ years that the cruiser has been in existence, we have a record of first aid bein g administered 983 times. The resuscitator has been used 294 times, the scuba diving equipment 9 times, and the fire extinguishers 79 times. The safety officers have administered a rtificial respiration 18 times and assisted in sav ing 20 persons wh o had attempted suicide. Th ey also performed ma ny min or services, such as in cases involvin g citizens who had locked themselves out of their cars or homes, fin gers ca uo-ht in a utomati c electri cal kitchen 0 appli ances, ca rs with dead batteri es, etc. 14 One phase of training given by our local physicians has come in handy a number of times-how to deliver a baby. Incidentally, the first baby delivered by our public safety officers was 1 year to the day from the time they began their duties. Since that time a number of Abilene's "young o-eneration" has arrived with the aso sistance of the safety officers. In one case the parents honored the officers by naming the new arrival after them. Last year, during the national scare that dolls shipped home to loved ones by servicemen in Vietnam might be booby trapped, these officers, who are thoroughly trained in the handling of explosives, checked more than 500 of these dolls. However, they found none containing explosives. SCUBA Gear The SCUBA diving gear ha.:5 been a real asset to our police department as well as to the public. In some cases, the public safety officers have retrieved discarded evidence from one of the three large lakes nea r Abilene. In cases involving a possible drownin O' rr one officer begins dressing for divinoen route to the scene and is 0 ready to don the underwater breathing apparatus when he arrives. In one such incident where a double drowning was reported at Lake For:t Phantom Hill, both bodies were recovered within 5 minutes after our cruiser arrived at the scene of the emergency. While the diver goes into the water, his partner maintains the safety line and has the resuscitator read y to administer oxygen when th e victims are located. The most co mmon treatment given by the offi cers is to apply a medical swab to a cut or laceration a nd an anti septic bandage while awaitin g the ambulance at the scene. They apply an air splint to broken limbs q uite often also. Thi s p rocedure is of grea t assistan ce to the hospital because it allows them to make an X-ray without removing the splint. Emergency Procedure Since it stays in-service at all times, the cruiser seldom is preceded to the scene of an emergency by an ambulance. Because it is on call for emergencies, both officers are never out of the cruiser at once except at the scene of an emergency. This policy is also true in cases where the public safety officer is writing a traffic citation. If, in an y case, the officers have to be out of the car at the same time, they are able to switch their radio to a public address system which enables them to hear all calls from the dispatcher. After making an emergency run , they call the station and are switched onto a dictating machine to record a report of their run. This is then typed by a clerk typist and placed in a file. Conception of th e Unit We conceived the idea for a public safety unit after the drowning of two youths in a creek which flows th ro ugh Abilene's city limits. We were the first called to the scene of this tragic occurrence, but when the drownings were established, the fire department with their boats and rescue equipment had to be called because we did not have the necessary training or prope r eq ui pment to retrieve the victims. A short time a fter this, on a dark rainy night, an a utomobile crashed into a utility pole causing a high voltage line to come p recariously close to the vehicle. There was some diffi culty getting the occupa nts of the car to remain in the car until the utility co mpany co uld be summoned to remove the live wire. The many spectators who were attracted to this incident were in jeopardy of coming in FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin �The unit' s portable oxygen kit has b een used to save several lives. contact with the high voltage wire which hung close to the gro und . Some of these individuals stooped t o go under this wire before ou r officers at the scene could move them back to a safe distance. After this tragic incident and near catastrophic occurrence, we began to plan and resea rch for a police unit which wo uld be trained to cope with all types of emergency and rescue work. After discussing our ideas abo ut the safe ty unit, we assigned senior staff officer Capt. L. A. Martin to head the planning a nd research. We contacted the director of civil defense and obtained hi s opinion as to what type of emergency gear would be needed to eq uip the unit. Next, we called the fi re chi ef for con sultation and considered his recommendations. Then we invited the local chapter of the Ameri can Red Cross to assist in the train ing of each officer assigned to the safety unit in advanced first aid co urses. We contacted the local medical society, and they agreed to appoint a committee to serve in an advisory July 1967 capacity as well as. to assist m the training of the officer s. After months of a rdent research , the plans were fin ally fo rmulated and presented to the city governmen t. They were hesistant at fi rst to approve such a project mainl y beca use of the expense of such a unit. However, when they were presented all the fac ts of the value of its services, they gave us the authority to proceed wi th our plans. After m uch consideration , we chose a fo ur -doo r stati on wagon as the vehicle for th is unit. I ts equipment included spotlights, large revolving red lights, a nd an electronic siren and public address system to iden tify it as an emergency vehicle. Selection and Training of P e rsonnel The men operating and maintaining the public safe ty cruiser are all vo lunteers carefull y screened on the basis of their experience, aptitu de, a nd mental and ph ysical abilities. A committee comp osed of train ing office rs fr om both the fi re and police departments, plus the city's personnel director and assistant city manager, screens the volunteers before they receive joint approval by the chiefs ·of both departments. The fire department conducted the initial training of the pu'blic safety officers over a 3-week period. This training covered such basic firefi ghting techniques and subj ects as: small structure fires, ladder and aerial work, elements and causes of fires the duties of fire hosemen, fire re: sponse and attack, rescue and carries, safety techniques, the use of a gas mask, ventilation of a fire, and fire hazards. Experienced fire department training officers personally conducted or supervised these training sessions and exercises. The second phase of training included a 1-week session in high-risk rescue work at Texas A. & M. College. Thi s second step included " hotwire" handling and first aid through the advanced level, along with instructions in the use of such life-saving appa ratuses as resuscitators, oxygen equipment, cutting torches, etc. Additional trainin g included defen sive d riving, scuba di ving, explosives handling, and radiological monito ring. The Taylor-Jones Count y Medical Society fu rn ished the physicians who trained our officers in such techniq ues as how t o deliver a baby during emergency conditions and other emergency aid that could be rende red at the accide nt scene. Thi s extensive emergency tra ining, plus the past experience and training that normally is retained by vetera n poli ce officers, full y prepared our p ublic safety offi cers to cope with any emergency that might arise. · Ve hicle and Equipment As mentioned above, the p ublic safe ty cruiser is a n up-to-da te station wago n eq uipped with radi os on both 15 �police and fire department frequen- has run approximately $30 per month cies, emergency lights and sirens, res- in keeping it equipped. cue and first aid equipment, and firefighting extinguishers and tools. Evaluation A partial list of the cruiser equipment includes: fire extinguishers, There seemed to be some skepticism ( dry, CO 2 , and water) , fireman boots, at the start as to the true value of such helmets, bunker coats, gloves, safe- a unit as the public safety cruiser. It ty goggles, gas masks, completely had only been in service a few days equipped toolbox, axe, sledge ham- when the public began to recognize its mer, disposable blankets, army blan- worth. One lady wrote our department and kets, ropes, _block and tackle, large, co~pletely equipped first aid kit (in- the Abilene Reporter News the followcluding splints, medicold compresses, ing letter after her husband had been etc.), Porto-Power kit, frogman suit aided by our public safety officers : and scuba equipment, lanterns, hot " He is alive today due to the excellent stick (for handling high voltage service rendered by your safety wire), stretcher, Scott resuscitator, cruiser and its men. My husband Scott air pack (for use in building had an acute attack o-f allergy, to the filled with smoke, etc.) , battery jump point of death. He collapsed from cables, tools for entering locked ve- lack of oxygen and at one time comhicles, various types of saws, and pletelr: stopped breathing. Officer other tools to cover any type of emer- Bill Paul, our neighbor, rendered first gency situation. When the unit aid and called the cruiser. makes an emergency run and the offi"We are grateful to the Abilene Pocers have no tool to cover the particu- lice Department and its men for the lar type of situation, they immediately service rendered. Words seem inadeadd that tool. The initial total cost quate when you are trying to thank for equipping the cruiser ran close to someone for saving your mate's life." $3,000. The average cost of supplies We have received numerous similar letters of thanks and appreciation from citizens. Public acceptance of the safety cruiser grew until it was necessary for us to add a second unit in July of 1965. Even physicians now tell their heart patients and others who may need emergency aid to call the safety cruiser prior to calling them. Not only do our public safety officers feel a keen sense of pride in being able to serve humanity in this capacity, but the citizens of Abilene are very proud of our cruiser and the men who operate it. We feel that it has done more for the benefit of public relations than any other thing that the department has ever undertaken. One of the big selling points that we used in getting our cruiser approved was, " If one life is saved, it will he well worth all the expense." Well, the public safety cruiser has more than proved its worth. This is attested to by many local physicians, families who have been assisted, and three Red Cross Life Saving Awards earned by the men who operate Abilene's public safety cruiser. AMERICAN POLICEMAN Chief Inspector of Constabulary lists 58 awards for gallantry to British policemen ranging in rank from constable to inspector. Two of them are posthumous. Five civilians who assisted the police are also on the list. Armed with a whistle, a wooden truncheon, a pair of handcuffs, and, if available, a personal radio, the British policeman performs the same duties as his American counterpart. I formed the impression that, although he may be as young as 19, a great deal of his success is based on his almost amazing personal dignity when on duty. Most of the policemen I came in contact with were more than deserving of the English term of ap. "He,s a proper Copper." pro bat10n, 1 ( Continued from page 6) A police employee explains lo Lieutenant Mitchell her department's records and flling system . FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin �Let the bank robber b eware! More and more his criminal acts are b e ing w atched by a sile nt witness-the hidden cameraw hich re cords the infallible truth. Washington area. These identifications supported prior investigation by FBI Agents who had developed the man as a suspect. He was arrested and charged with bank robbery. The value of a strategically placed camera and resulting publicity of suspects ia illustrated by another incident in which a subject was caught on camera in the act of committing a bank robbery. In this incident a youth entered the National Savings & Trust Co. in the District of Columbia on January 4-, 1967, at which time he took an estimated $6,000. The picture taken by a hidden camera during the robbery showed a man wearing glasses, with his hand partially covering a pistol, at a teller's window. The suspect in the photograph released to newspapers by the FBI was recognized by a local police officer. He notified police investigators who arrested the youth . Just in Time I n identifying bank robbers, many times a picture . is worth a th o usand descriptio ns-espec ia ll y if th e ph otograph catches the bandi t com mittin g the robbery. Abo ut 6 :45 p.m. , December 6, 1966, three armed men, all wearin g sun glasses, ente red a branch of the So uth ern Maryland Bank and Trust Co. a t Oxo n Hill, Md. , a nd ordered two ma le tellers to th e rear of th e bank. One of the robbers ha nded a la undry-t ype bag lo the fema le tell er and ordered her to J)UL al/ the money from the cash drawer into th e ba~. Then the robbers fled. Total amount of mone y taken was $1,659. The bank is equipped with a co ncealed camera whi ch runs continu ously during bankin g hours a nd takes photographs at r eg ular inter vals. T he July 1967 film in th e camera was processed by the FBI. Three frames contained photogra p hs of the per so ns in volved in the r obber y, one of which was a good clear picture of the fa ce of one of the ro bber s. He was wearing a special police offi cer 's uniform, including a b adge a nd cap. Th e ph otograph and p ertinent information co ncerning the robber y were pr epar ed by the FBI and r eleased to all maj or newspapers in th e Washin gton, D.C. area for p ublication in t he hope o f sec ur in g a n ide 11Lification . Several calls were recei ved fr om citizens who sa id they could p ositively id entify the s ub ject of the ph oto g raph. He was s ub sequen tl y identi fied by th ree people as a n ind ividu al who had pr evio usly worked in th e In one instance, a camera had been installed only the day before the robbery, when shortl y before noon a masked bandit, accompanied by a teenage female, entered a banking institution in Cleveland , Ohio. Brandishing a small h and weapon, the masked man warned bank employees that this wa.;; a stickup and to stand back. Stationing himself in front of a teller's window, he waited while his accomplice calml y proceeded to empt y the money fr om the teller's cash dra we r into a b row n paper bag . One of the b ank tellers had observed Lhe m a sked bandit e nle r the bunk and had immediately tripped a silent alarm which also set a hidden movie camera into motion. T wo minutes after the bandits had fled wi th $2 ,,372, detecti ves fro m th e Cleveland Police Department arri ved at the b an k and rushed the film for 17 �immediate processin g. FBI Agents dispatched to the scene commenced immediate investigation. Still prints of the film taken during the robbery were distributed to police officers, FBI Agents, surrounding police dep·a rtments, and to newspapers. The film was rushed to TV stations and given nationwide coverage. The youthful b ank robber turned himself in to police the foll owing day. He told police he h ad gone to Indiana by bu:, after the robbery, but when he realized the robbery film was being shown on TV, he had decided to return to Cleveland and surrender. "Where can you go when you're on TV all the time !" was the remark he made to detectives and FBI Agents. The girl was arrested the following day when her whereabouts was made known to police by an anonymous telephone call. The man was sentenced to a term of 10 to 25 years in the State penitentiary. The girl was. placed on probation fo r 2 years. Joe Meador, caught by a hidden camera , wa s convicted on charges of robbing a bank of more than $30,000. Ne rv ous Robbe r Another bank robber, an 18-yearold youth, robbed the Citizens & Southern Emory Bank, Decatur, Ga. Holding a sawed-off shotgun, he herded 18 persons into the open space of the bank lobby, then ordered the tellers to put the money in a green paper bag he was carrying. , He showed extreme nervo usness and at one time was heard to remark, " I swear to God, I'm scared to death ." He obtained $19,475 and escaped in a stolen car. The bank manager in an office ad joining the lobby, seeing this acti on, set off the silent bank ala rm which also activated the bank's two hidden cameras. Ten clear photographs of the robber were taken during the course of the robbery. These were released to all available news media and dis18 ' . Jo e Meador photographed following h is arrest. pl ayed thro ughout the Nation. The robber was identified as Stephen P atrick Wilkie by a tenant of a home where the robber had been livin g for several months; but he, in the meantime, was traveling all over the co untr y living a life of luxur y on th e money he had stolen. When a phone call to his hometown revealed that he was wa nted by the FBI fo r b ank ro bber y, he surrendered to Specia l Agents in San Francisco. He was sentenced to 10 yea rs fr1 the custody of the Attorney General. In another ro bbery two bro th ers armed with h andguns entered an Indiana bank and forced the manager to fi ll a cloth bag with money fro m the vault and the tellers' cashboxes. After obtaining $30,845, one of the brothers r ipped two sequence cameras from the wall of the bank and took them along when they fled from the scene. Apparently they had no objections to being photographed during the robbery, but they made sure the film co uld not be developed after they left. During the ensuing investigation, one of the bank tellers told FBI FBI Law EnforcelT! ent Bull etin �Agents that she recognized one of the robbers as having b een in the bank some 6 weeks previously to cash a check. With the cooperation of the bank officials, FBI Agents assisted the teller in the task that lay before her in effecting an identification. Sequence camera films for the preceding 6 weeks were developed and shown to the teller. F or several h ours each day fo r 11 days, she sat with FBI Agents reviewing the frames, until one day, after having viewed some 20,000 frames, she picked up the frame identifying the robber- the man who h ad entered the bank almost 6 weeks before the robbery. N umerous prints of this photograph were made and circulated iby the FBI to various sources. T hree days after the photograph was first obtained, a trusty of a local county jail identified the bank robber as Joe Wayne Meador. With h is identification, the brother , Ratline Meador, was fo und to answer the description of the other robber. Green Thuml1 Both men denied guilt of the rob bery, stating they had been planting tobacco on the far m of a relative at the time. T his in fo rmation was checked out, but apparently tobacco was not the only thing they had planted. After many hours of backbreaking digging, FBI Agents unearthed a 25-pound la rd can which had been b uried some 15 inches under a stable. Inside the lard can was a plastic container ; inside the plastic container was a styr ofoa m ice bucket ; and inside the bucket was $ 11,000 completely saturated with talcum powder. Confronted with the buried treasure, the brothers accompanied FBI Agents to another location where a simi lar lard can was buried containing a nother bucket a nd $11,487 comJuly 1967 pletely saturated with talcum powder. The brothers explained that the talcum powder served as a dehydrating agent for the preservation of the buried money. FBI Agents and SCUBA divers located the cameras in a deep creek running through a heavily wooded area in the geileral vicinity of the bank. Although t he cameras had been completely submerged for almost a month, it was possible t o develop 1½ frames on the exp osed film which clearly showed one of the victim tellers with hands upraised a nd one of the brothers standing nearby. The two brothers were each sentenced to 10 years' imprisonment. pictures or show them on television which requires pictures of good quality if results are to be achieved from such investigative procedures. Experience in the FBI with pictures provided by numerous bank camera installations have led to the following conclusions with respect to these installations: 1. Cameras of 35 mm. or larger negative size will produce better results than cameras of smaller negative size. 2. A sequence camera is preferable to · a movie camera. This kind of camera will produce a series of still photographs tha t will ordinarily be of higher quality for identification purposes and will also record the action. 3. Camera (s) (more than one if necessary) ( Continued on page 24) Camera Scores Again Another y
  • Tags: Box 12, Box 12 Folder 28, Folder topic: Police Department | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 12, Folder 28, Document 17

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_012_028_017.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 12, Folder 28, Document 17
  • Text: ��~ tiJl;j,ePme1,ot, ® a,-...,.,,.,, . 5 T 2897N - • J �
  • Tags: Box 12, Box 12 Folder 28, Folder topic: Police Department | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 12, Folder 28, Document 19

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_012_028_019.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 12, Folder 28, Document 19
  • Text: ~ ~ " & , , , 9 ' ~ , ( 3__ _ --- ~ u;. -~~ ~~3_f_<-J::-~- - _ _ _ _ _3_ - _2 f-~7-~I~ ~ 2L¼o4 ~""=---...:- - - - - - ~ -~ �
  • Tags: Box 12, Box 12 Folder 28, Folder topic: Police Department | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 12, Folder 28, Document 28

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_012_028_028.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 12, Folder 28, Document 28
  • Text: DEFEN D ANT SE E R EV E RS E S IDE No. CITY OF ATLANTA Municipal Traffi c Court of Atlanta 751566 104 Trinity Avenue, S. W. Re sident / ,._ _,,.,: ,r.'; I' _ Addres,,__ ._- _ ..,_ -..._ _._- _- -· _,.___ _~ _ ·•...,;·;... · - - - ' -·Business Addres,,__ _ _· .c..·:.c. -<.A'--_.;,....;.~ - - -'- ,;. ' -' - ...L-.-='- , •• ~ - -- - - "" -"-'- ... - -- -•' Owne r of Vehic le_ _ _--:.. · .c..'.:... ' - ~'-------- - -- - -- - -- - ./ Dri ve r Col or _ _r'--_ _ _ _ Li ce nse No. t:---; , Make of se ~ - ~"=--, - - -- - Veh icle _ Bir th ; Date / ., .., -/ / ":> / / . ..---y·\-- , .;.-_ ___ ,i' -'-' ---'--"'· - - - ' ~ - - - - - - -- _ Li cense Numb er ~ 1 / (- , _ _ _:)) • ' ~ I '-·· ' tJ 1 • • YOU ARE HEREBY COM MANDED, to be and app ear at the MUNICIPAL TRAFFIC ' COURT OF ATLANTA, to be held in the TRAFFIC COURT BUILDING, 104 Trinity Avenue, S. W. at _ 7 ~· ,,,. .• - - - - - - -- - - - - - . . . . . - -·'---• to answe r , Jo th e charge of ,; -··---~~ D D D D / ·-- _·_ o'c lo ck _ _ M. on the-2.-2-day of_"-, _, ..,_/~-· _ _ 19_ :_ / / Exceedi ng Speed Limit <- --~M.P.H. in _ _ _ M.P.H. Zo ne) Vi olatin g Traffic Signal (R ed Light} Ordinance_ _ __ _ __ Violating Stop Sign Ordinance _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ __ Ill ega l Park ing (describe) • "- Location~_ _ _ _ -1o_ ..._ -~ / _._-:i=_'_._,,_ ,_.r _, ___ _ ___ / ,•,/ t'_ _ _ A.M. P.M . I n th e City of At lanta o n th e,~ -""---day o f~ •c.-..·'_,_.,,..__ 19 _._ tlll 'l - - ' dny oL __ _ __.....,,._·_ 19--- I / I / By Officers _ __.,,,_ (_ _ ~ ~·- ,_,. _.-_-_~_{).. _ -:.' - - · - -__ .,._-_ _ __ _ . ..., D Number Arr ested D Copy (" _, / Assi gnm en~ ""'~ -~ ·" _ ...,_ Di st._,_ - _- _. __ �
  • Tags: Box 12, Box 12 Folder 28, Folder topic: Police Department | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 12, Folder 28, Document 2

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_012_028_002.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 12, Folder 28, Document 2
  • Text: Mrs, Birdie N. Ba ldwin 4401 Lake Forrest Drive, N. W. Atlanta, Georgia 30305 Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 �
  • Tags: Box 12, Box 12 Folder 28, Folder topic: Police Department | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 12, Folder 28, Document 3

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_012_028_003.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 12, Folder 28, Document 3
  • Text: ound Over n Burglary A man identified by police field coordinator for- the Stu tlent Non-Violent Coordinatin mittee Friday was he! tier $5,000 bond for the Fult ty grand jury in connecti the burglary of a Peac Street clothing store. ·ckerson and Harvey G , 21, and a third man 11 apprehended, were wa onnection with a $3,000 Oct. 13 of Spencer eachtree St. NE , dete . They added Gay w d Friday night and w ·gned in Municipal Cou day. 'Records show Rickersoia esteci here Sept. 14, 1 e Boulevard (NE) riots. In the burglary, detecy. aid a skylight atop the bull as pried open and the m ise brought back out th e _skylight. Detectives ey had recovered four ut of an assortment of e ·ve impor ted coats, sw nd shirts reported taken e fi rm. �
  • Tags: Box 12, Box 12 Folder 28, Folder topic: Police Department | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 12, Folder 28, Document 10

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_012_028_010.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 12, Folder 28, Document 10
  • Text: Ivan: Is this the sort of thing we should have to put up with? Could I obtain a permit to carry a protective weapon in my car? Don �
  • Tags: Box 12, Box 12 Folder 28, Folder topic: Police Department | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 12, Folder 28, Document 11

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_012_028_011.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 12, Folder 28, Document 11
  • Text: JIP. u~;.;;....c.• ..._O _R _G_A_N_1z_AT_1o_ N _ ~ ~ PUBLIC RELATIONS WASl-llNGTON, D. C. 20001 z ~ (j) m 0 n (j) > MOSS 1-l. KENDRIX Director Wl-lAT Tl-lE PUBLIC Tl-llNKS - COUN TSI A TL ANTA O F F I CE : LOBBY FLOOR , WALUHAJE APARTMENT S 7 9 4-766 6 �
  • Tags: Box 12, Box 12 Folder 28, Folder topic: Police Department | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 12, Folder 28, Document 22

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_012_028_022.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 12, Folder 28, Document 22
  • Text: - ~ ' THE CITY OF NEW YORK . COMMISSION ON HUMAN RIGHTS 80 LAFAYETTE STREET NEW YORK, N. Y. 10013 AN EQUAL Cl IANCE TODA Y--A BETTER CiTY T().~..10RROW The Honorable Ivan Allen , Jr ., Mayor City Hall Atlanta, Georgia .AI FO R POLICE EMERGENCY ONLY DIAL 440-1234 �I ~ § 1'1H 1 ,: .• / / ,, •.. ·~ ' ,c_f\. -, ·"' �
  • Tags: Box 12, Box 12 Folder 28, Folder topic: Police Department | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 12, Folder 28, Document 24

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_012_028_024.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 12, Folder 28, Document 24
  • Text: I �
  • Tags: Box 12, Box 12 Folder 28, Folder topic: Police Department | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 12, Folder 28, Document 26

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_012_028_026.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 12, Folder 28, Document 26
  • Text:
  • Tags: Box 12, Box 12 Folder 28, Folder topic: Police Department | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 12, Folder 28, Document 29

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_012_028_029.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 12, Folder 28, Document 29
  • Text: L - ar-ef)!:t ~ Hd ~ -:a.,.· 1 .~ t I.U.f ""41 I~ Q_ �
  • Tags: Box 12, Box 12 Folder 28, Folder topic: Police Department | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 12, Folder 28, Document 30

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_012_028_030.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 12, Folder 28, Document 30
  • Text: Adantd police adapt to neiv restrictions Fashion hunters bag trophies in Italy �
  • Tags: Box 12, Box 12 Folder 28, Folder topic: Police Department | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 12, Folder 28, Document 32

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_012_028_032.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 12, Folder 28, Document 32
  • Text: _ _I (1f ..IJ ·""ILL I ·· -- L . r; 71,VJJ.!U.Ll WQ /lfJ.. /~I~,,,;: vp-r ~ t / W <,Z. ( f/e ll.eCfiueA:t &:d you caJ.J.. each. rrie"'P.Oell. of- ih.e boal'.d and ~ be a6ofuh.ed and ~ ~ un.iU.. .i_;f_ M a:or.JW.AR!i ) 7. K~ _.. -"" , .Xe :IIU.D. ?/',fCJ /.J -~C!4. 622 ;.£52lf Ell/.J. 2JJ-Lf!62 /: ,7, ~ (C!4. ,,. 794-25/0 8U1, 5d2-5J95 Chwu..C!4 Le/;fwi-c)i ,'(e.:; -, .'_\:;._:\_,;..;,-. •-:,,;-'-'·: .:-._,·,. -- .. . ,_,._...·. :----- --- ..';. ·..: .. . ., . .. . ·. ,. ' - ·- .-~-~·-~..__.,-'~.\~_·.. _;\;. j:~ :;~-~-~~,-.:- :-~.0 ·: -:-· -; .. . ~ . -~.:~,. ..-~~ --\ .>·-}.. _,. 0 1,1 II __ ·----· . ?j-v.,. {/.J..ja J-o~~-~:A:1,,U (ulv.2e) r975 !.0:J:ui-JJv.J;(-_eJ?_ .·va.fl- ·1,ie rhone 37J- i9,'S6 s· ,. . ---::(/,i/'v1. f.(1__~,dw_)_J__ j_,;j a me@&-'« of th.e Y(ed. p,ord f(,LJ.J and. N.u.J 6e~ ~-Hlr?gggd wUh. · mi~y CwiJ. "Yfjhh:i ·;;l/iJU/:J,1• Sh.e 1k 6em..;; - payed ii2, 500. 00 pell. yea", pl.lv.j ~ -bi i.h.e iaX-(X'-f;eM o/. Atl.nrd:a.) · I 'O •• • Rabbi Jacob :7oi.lwcAU.d. ,c: :r,lllD..e.il __ , -.,J AV ,_, r';)]0_I IU.o Ii • I, v..r?.11. !3uJ./.::ur.:-.I.. (tJuJ.e./:·tlwellai.. ,1-{k.rda, fa• 233-3365 <:573-1731 . 79 I I i:h. 8.-1.!. N. C• Y:1.ni:.a; ;c, p/wne d71l-J986 AL L, FeJ..drra.n., r, . ~ ...·- .. . ·, ~ {if"'.f.'/") ;-,-; .,J , /'.:J. J:Jj?_• f..ll Gt,, . I ' ~ 1 1/ . .j. ) nz..<.!1.' v....Cl ' I · iV ,?..o ,',. } ·. - ·~._, : .·..:.. . l < • - ~ • (,c pr..one 627-1 !d7 ',1.n;J.11., ; ~. I Jn.vi..1?1J i<.al.e11. liJJe;za)_ jeu;,wh. Lawy.e/l. 1455 5. _;joWv.Jon Fe1UZ.!j ·/d. li'~ C• '/U.ln.nla, {p. 255-7694 525-6836 {Jo/.Jeph. ftaM,
  • Tags: Box 12, Box 12 Folder 28, Folder topic: Police Department | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 12, Folder 28, Document 33

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_012_028_033.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 12, Folder 28, Document 33
  • Text: = u IT D IC I I C. KN IGHTS OF THE KU KLU X lUA c.AIU..-1:li.an. /Ju..e"IM :f.o p!Wi.~i. i.o '/2.e lvallfi of- Al..d.eMWI. and M/2 ih.a:I. t/2.e (orrrnu.ni..i.'j i(ua:f.i.oM Corrt!U..,M-Wll. be aoofuh.ed. /v/l ¼e 6e-1i. i.n..:f.ell.v.Ji. o/ ih.e Si.ate v/- ~eolif,1U1- and hnelli.ca. J/ jVU d.e-1.i..R.e We/1£1211.M. /j/wuim.; ¼e fl.ed. af-µJi..ai.i.oM o/- ih.e !(IJJ and. ih.e I kdi.»ri.al. [vun.c.J. oI- (h.WLcAe-1, wlli..i.e to ~ , 1 t nci.U11..ed.. µ,~ lvnelli.can .101.di...eM all.e and d.~ .i..fl. V.i.e.:f. !Yam foll. iAe pfl.e/.Jefl.KJ.i.i.on O / a A.ee c.Alli.d:..i...an. !vne1U..ca. Ji. iA vnl.y. {.aiA i.h.ai. we h.eAe ed. h.ome Mk. 0UA.1elve-1 uAeih.ell. we j'..tte ,a/w/l.JUU) Ou.fl. d.ecli..crdi..on i.o ih.e I.WM/u..p of Je-1u-1 61/- / . J ~ up {oil. r;oa and COWUR!f Oil. ute we -Li.he let.e.A, utw d.e.n,i.ed. OUA Loflli, v11. )wia-1 uJw be.:vw.Jed. hi.m? r;od., ~ve Lv.J men. li.h.e '.':h.e pMr}ie:I., ltmi...el., utw uJu..l.e /.acinr;
  • Tags: Box 12, Box 12 Folder 28, Folder topic: Police Department | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 12, Folder 28, Document 34

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_012_028_034.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 12, Folder 28, Document 34
  • Text: ' POLICE DEPARTMENT STATE OF GEORGIA UNITED STATES CITY OF ATLANTA Annual Report 1966 Atlanta, Georgia �T hi s re port published by C it y of Atla nta e mpl o yees. �1966 Atlanta Police Department Chief of Police Police Committee Board of Alclerx-i:-:t{~n Richard C. Freeman , Chairman C ha rli e Leftwich , Vi ce C hairman Q. V . Willi a mson J a ck Summ e rs Sam Masse i] , Jr. , (Pr es iden t B o ard of A ld e rm e n) Iva n Al l e n , Jr. , Ma yo r Ex -Off i c io Board of Aldermen. SA M MASS'E LL , J R . - Pr es ide nt of Boa rd l s t. 1s t. 211d. 2ud. 3rd. 3rd. 4th. Ward Ro be rt S . Dennis Ward E. G regory Gri gg s Ward E d. A . Gill iam Ward J. M. Flanig e n Ward Wm. T . (Bill )K nig ht Ward Q . .V . Wi l liamson ll'ard Hugh Pie r ce 4th. Ward Charlie Le ft wich Geo rg e Cotsakis G. Ever e tt Milli can Ric h a rd C . Fre e man Ce c il Turn e r J ack Summ e rs Mil ton G . F a rris Rodney M. C ook 8 th. Ward Dougl a s L. (Buddy) Fow lk es 5th. 5th. 6 th. 6 th. 7 th. 7 th. 8 th . \Vard Ward Wa rd Ward ll' ard Ward Ward A tlanta, G e orgia �IVAN ALLEN , JR. Ma yo r 2 �CITY O F .ATLANTA. CITY HALL ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Ar ea Code 404 Dec e mb e r 31, 1966 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR R. EARL LANDERS, Admini strative Ass istant MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secreta ry DAN E. SWEAT, JR ., Director of Governm ental Liaison A MES SAGE F ROM THE MAYOR: As we enter the last third of the nineteen s ixti e s , we find 'our s elves continually facing rapid a nd fa r reaching ch a ng e s in the methods and proc e dures of law enforcement. T o mee t th e d ema nds of our challenging time s, our police departm e nt mu s t be highl y trained in ma ny s p e cializ e d fields. Accordin gl y we are carrying on progra ms of exploration as we seek n e w and improved tech niq ues i n o ur e nd eavor to attain and mainta in th e highest professional standards in l a w enforcement. Le t me invite your a ttention to s ome s ignificant forward steps taken during 1966: For exa mpl e, we a re now using a n electronic computer to record and proc e s s traffic tick e ts . We plan to exten d this fa st a nd a ccurate method to h a ndle oth e r police re cord s . Again, the Atla nta Me trop o l , the l aw e nforce ment organiz a tion which no w co ve rs our fiv e county metro a rea, is c o n_duc ti ng a searching study of crim e in our me tro a re a . Th e fe de ral gove rnme nt is considering making a gra nt to assis t u s in this s tudy . We also are studying th e feas ibi li ty of provi ding police officers with e quipm e nt th a t will enable them to maintain cons ta nt c o mmunic a ti on. As th e s itu a tion no w s ta nd s, s c i entis ts ca n be in constant touch with satellites million s of mile s di s ta nt but we lo s e touch with a polic e officer when he goes a few yards away fro m h is c a r r a dio wi thin our city limits. To make our c ommun i cations mo re e fficient , a thre e way ra dio fre quency s y s tem will be installed this year. This will provide a sep a rate wave l e ngth for th e north s ide, the s outh s ide and the detective division. It will take care of our n eeds for ma ny ye a rs to come . Again, colleges here are carryin g o n a research prog ra m to d e termine if i t is a d visabl e to conduct an accredited course in police t rai ni ng for l aw e n fo rce me nt offi c e rs. To sum up, Atlanta's police departmen t is ev er mindful tha t we must n ever let up i n our war on crime and it is always exerting its u tmost e ffo rts to make Atl a nta the mo s t c rime fr e e ci ty in our land. Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor �POLICE COMMITTEE OF ALDERMANIC BOARD RICH A RD C. FREE MAN, Chairm an C HA R LIE LEFTW ICH, Vice-Chairman SAM MASSELL, JR., (President Board o f Aldermen) J AC K SUMMERS Q. V. WILLIAMSON 4 �HENRY L. BOWDEN City Attorney LEWIS R. SLATON Solicitor General Fulton County JOHN E . DOUGHERTY Assoc iate City Attorney 5 �HERBERT T. JENKINS Chief of Police 6 �CITY OF ATLANTA DEPARTMENT of POLICE Atlanta 3, Georgia HERBERT T . JENKINS Chief January 1, 1967 Ma yor a nd Board of Aldermen City Hall Atla nta, Georgia Ge ntl emen: I submit here with the 87th Annual Report of the Atlanta Police Department for the year 1966. C rime reports in the first part of the year genera lly showed a marked decrease . Rape, auto theft a nd larceny unde r $50 .00 , continued to show a decre ase for the entire year. But, during the last part of the year, whe n th e police were pre occupied with a firemen' s strike a nd racial disturbances , with street fighting, crime in all o the r c a tegories, i ncluding tra ffic fata lities and traffi c a ccidents , were on th e increa se. 1966 was the first full year of major leagu.e baseball and major league football in the City of Atlanta. T h e tra ffic control program at the stadium was excelle nt, allowing between 50,000 and 60,000 visito rs , on ma ny occasion s, to leave th e sta dium in a fe w minutes , without undue delay . T h e Detective Divi s ion, esp e cia lly the Lott er y Squa d, was v e ry much on the ale rt for gambling of all ki nds , and many gambli ng ·a rre s t s we re ma de - but, nothing was dis covere d to indica te th a t ga mbling wa s on the in cr ease , o r that out-of-town ga mblers were a ttempting to operate in the City of Atlanta. The Internal Se curity Squa d wa s reorganized during th e year, and this dep a rtment is enjoying the tightest internal se c urity of any poli ce depa rtm e nt in th e n a tion . The Atl a nta Police Departm ent h as a very fin e li aison with all fe d eral a g encie s, e spe cially the Offi ce of Law Enforcement Assi s ta n ce , a nd a dditiona l ass istance a nd equipment a re e xp e cted to be added during the coming y e a r. The morale, training and discipline in the de p a rtme nt continues on th e upward tre nd , and we wi s h to aga in e xpre ss our de ep app re ciation to Mayor I van Alle n , Jr. , th e Atla nta Crime C ommiss ion , a nd th e Boa rd of Alde rme n for the very fin e h e lp and assis ta n ce t he d epartm e nt h as recei ved in the y ear 1966. R e spectfully, ~ff~ Herber t T . J e nkin s C hief o f Pol ice • �ATLANTA THE CITY WE PROTECT Atlanta, the Capital of Georgia, is the commercial, industrial and financial dynamo of the Southeast. Facts about Atlanta: 126 .8 Square miles policed within the City of Atlanta. 403.1 Square miles (Fulton County minus portion of City of Atlanta within Fulton C ounty; Police d in unincorpora ted area, area outs ide city poli ce d through contract with county. ) 89,872 Atlanta Population (City) in 1900 . 200 ,616 Atlanta Popula tion (City) in 1920. 345,000 Atla nta Popula tion (City) in 1946. 499,000 Atlanta Population (City) in 1966. Atlanta is situated 1,050 fe e t a bov e s ea l evel , ha ving the hig hes t a ltitude of a ny cit y its size or l a rger in the Unite d Sta tes, De nv e r exc e pted . Atla nta is not dominated by a ny one industria l group and its fa ctory output is we ll diversified , having some 1,550 manufacturers who turn out more than 3,500 different commoditi es . Atlanta has a 61.2° F. Annual Temperature and 49.3 inches of rainfall yearly . Atla nta i s th e larges t ra ilroa d c ente r in the South . It h as 13 lin es of 7 rail way s yst ems. Th e Atla nta Airport ranks 4 th i n the n a tion in the numbe r of p assenger enp lanements and 5th in depa rtures. Atla nta h as 19 C oll eges and ln s tirutions of high er l earning , h a vi ng an e nroll ment of over 30 ,000. Th ere a re more ins titutions o f hig h er l earning for Negros i n Atla nta t h a n in a ny other city in the world. Atla nta r a ted 4th in the na tion in dolla r volum e of downtown buildi ng c ons tru c t i on. (Refers to the c e ntra l bu s ine s s dis tric t.) Corpor ate Atl anta rated 10th in th e nation in total valu e of building permits authorized. 8 �LAW ENFORCEMENT L et's A11 Work Effectively Never Forgetting Our DIRECTING TRAFFIC Responsibilities Concerning Every Man Exercising Necessary Tolerance 9 LOADING PRISONERS IN PATROL WAGON �TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Accide nt s - T ra ffic . . . . . 27- 28 Ac c id e nt s - Tra ffi c Summ a ry . 26 Aggrava ted As sault s 37 Atl a nta F ac ts . . . 8 Automobil es Sto l e n an d Recovered 45 Burgl a ry . . . . . 36 Cases Book e d fo r T ri al 43 C l ass ifi catio n o f P e rsonne l 13 C ompa ri so n o f T raffi c Cases 1965 - 1966 29 Comp a ri son o f Major Crim es 1965 1966 17 Con cealin g Id e ntity 21 Cos t o f Op eration 49 Crim e Preventio n 24 D i s tributi on o f Crime by Mon th 42 Ide ntificati on Bur eau 22- 23 In t e rn al Securi ty 30 La rcen y . . . . 18 Le tter by Chi e f . 7 Le tter by Mayo r. 3 Ma jo r Cr imes . . 19 Mi ss ing P e rson s Bureau 42 Murder . . . . 14-15- 16 Organizat io n al Chart 11 Po li c e Deten tion Ward - Gra dy Ho s pi tal 20 Po l i c e T rai ning - Ac tiviti e s 46-47 -48 R a d io Dispat c hes Ha ndl e d . 39 Repo r ts No t on F. B . I. R epo rt 45 Traffic C as e s Book e d . . . 29 Unincorporate d Area R eport s 31-32-33 Va lu e of Prope rty R eporte d Stol e n a nd R e turn e d. 38 10 J �ORGANIZATIONAL CHART Mayo r and Board of Ald e rme n Po li ce Comm ittee I Chief -.--I S E R V ICE DIVISION i---, l SUPER I NTEN D ENT 2 CAPTAINS 3 L IEUT E N ANTS l SERGEANT 9 PATROLM E N 2 1 C LE RKS 11 COMM UN I CA T IONS 17T EL . OPE R . 3 LABOR ER S 2 D ET EC TI V E BU I LD ING MAINTENANCE - - I N T E RNAL SECU RITY SUPPLIE S EQUIPMEN T 1- SUPER INTEND E NT · CA P TAINS LIEUTENANTS SERGEAN T S PAT R OLM E N SCHOOL POLICEWOMEN CL ERKS EQU IP ME NT OPER . l 5 7 10 2 89 3 SUPER INTENDEN T CAPTA IN S LI E UT E NANT S SERGEANTS PATRO LM E N GUARDS I CAPTAI N LI EUT E NAN T SERGEANT DETE CTIVE I GE N E RAL INVESTI GATIONS BUREAU SP EC IAL SECURITY SQUAD CR IME PREVENTION CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS I I SQUADS I AUTO THE FT BUR GLARY HOMICIDE L AR C E NY ROB BE RY VICE FUGI T IVE JUVENI L E LOTTE RY I I TRAFF IC SAFE TY E DUC ATI ON ,_ T RA FFI C CO N TROL A CCID E N T IN VESTIGAT ION UNI T S UNIF O RM D I VISIO N ~ R EPORT I D EN TI F ICATION TRAFFI C D IVI SION l 3 5 11 l 90 11 2 3 l l l l 2 CRI ME - I NV E NT OR Y ,_ DET EC T I V E DIVIS I O N l SUPE R IN T ENDE N T 4 CA PTA I NS 8 L I EUTENANTS 16 SERGEAN T S 11 0 D ETECT I VE S 8 PATROLME N 3 POLI C EWO M EN 18 ! DEN T. AI D ES 27 C LE RKS 3TEL .OP E R . 4 GUAR D S I COMMU NIC AT IO NS - ~ LJcHOOL P AT RO L L- I WATCHES MOR NIN G DAY EVEN ING I I UN INCORP ORATED DE T A I L WATCHES MORNING DAY E V E NING DETENTION D I VIS I ON ~ l l 2 3 42 12 5 9 SUPER INT ENDEN T C APTAIN LIEUTENANTS SE RG E ANT S PATRO L M E N MAT R ON S CLERKS GUARDS TRAIN ING DIVISION .___ l 3 l l l SUP E R I NTENDENT LIEUTENANTS SE RGEANT P A T RO L M E N C LERK ~ LI DETEN T I ON BU ILDING I CASHI ER, BOOKIN G PR ISONERS DETE NTION WARD GRAD Y HO SP ITA L PERSONNEL POLICE IN V EST I GATION TRAINING G uards t emporarrly employe d rn patrolm e n vaca nc i e s . P e rs onn e l as of December 31 , 196 /J. �DIVISIONS OF DEPARTMENT DETECTIVE SERVICE BUREAU SUPERINTE NDEN T FR E D BEERMAN Commanding Officer SUPERI NTENDENT CLINTON CHAFIN Comma nding Officer TRAFFIC UNIFORM DIVISION SUP ERINTEND ENT JAMES L. MOSE LEY Comma nding Officer DETENTION DIVISION SU P E RINTENDENT J. F. BROWN C omma nding Offic er DIVISION SUPE RI NTENDENT I. G. COWAN Comm a nd in g Officer DIVISION TRAINING 12 DIVIS I ON SUPERINT E ND E NT J . L. T UGGLE C ommanding Offi ce r �PERSONNEL OF POLICE DEPARTMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1966 Positions Authorized Rank and Grade 1 Chief of Police 6 Superintendents 13 . 29 Lieu tenants 42 . Sergeants 114 Detectives 591 . Patrolmen 3 Policewomen 1 Guard 3 Telephone Maintenance 1 Superintendent of Identific a tion Captains 6 Identification Aides No. 2 12 Identification Aides No. 1 7 . . . Radio Technicians 1 Comm uni cation Engineer 4 Switchboard Operator No . 2 Hi Switchboard Operator No. 1 12 . Prison Matrons 1 . . . 1 Equipment Operator No. 1 2 . . . . . Porters 1 Ste no-Clerk No. 4 6 Steno - Clerk No. 2 1 . Typist-Clerk No . 3 35 Typist - Clerks No. 2 1 . . . Acco unt C l erk 5 Fingerprint Rollers 1 . Clerk No . 4 4 . C lerks No. 2 2 Key Punch Op e rators 112 Traffic Policewomen (School) 1,034 Total 13 Laborers �HOMICIDE 50 25 100 75 125 105 C lea red By Arrest 1964 106 98 C l eared By Arres t 1965 100 C lea re d By Arrest Murder 1966 121 RACIAL DIST RI BUT 10 N KILLED BY UNKNOWN OF MURDERS : KILLED BY WHITE 1964 1965 1966 1964 1965 1966 White 0 1 1 22 20 Negro 1 1 3 2 1 KILLED BY NEGRO T OTAL 1964 1965 1966 1 966 24 3 3 3 28 1 78 74 89 93 121 Murder Weapon Used Where Comm itted Knives 25 Pistols 67 Residences Shotguns (; Business Pla ces Rifles 5 Streets Other 18 Total 121 Total 14 1964 1965 1 96 6 76 72 85 8 9 16 22 19 20 106 100 121 �ATLANTA HOMICIDES 1920 TH ROU GH 1966 Year Number 1920 192 1 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 45 37 52 40 60 44 54 63 55 113 111 101 104 Not Known 97 11 8 115 81 84 111 106 · 84 58 69 91 97 91 76 88 101 83 102 74 85 79 85 82 83 74 67 47 84 87 106 100 121 P ERPETRATORS Negro Male N e gro Male Negro Male Negro Female Negro Female White Ma le White Ma le Whi t e Fema l e Negro Male White Female White Male Unknown kill s kill s kill s kill s kill s kill s kills kills kills kill s kill s Whit e Ne gro Ne gro Negro Negro Wh ite White Wh it·e White Whit e Ne g ro 3 48 Male Male Fema l e Mal e Female Male Femal e Mal e F e male F e male Ma le 21 19 1 15 5 4 0 0 1 4 VICT IMS 23 5 70 23 White Mal e White Female Negro Mal e Negro Fema l e Tota l 121 JUVENILES 6 Homicide vi c tim s a re ju ve nil es 7 Ju ve nil es a rres t e d as p e rp e trators INC O ME A RE AS 92 Homi c ides committe d in lo w i n com e a reas 27 Homicid es co mmitt e d in me dium in c om e a reas 2 Ho micides c ommitte d in h igh incom e a r eas R EC ORD 89 of the p erpe t ra tor s h a d poli ce re cords 28 of th e p erpe t ra tors ha d no polic e reco rd s 4 o f th e p e rpe tra tor s were unkno wn POPULAT IO N 200 ,6 16 286,000 345,000 499 ,00 0 1920 1936 1946 1966 15 �MURDER 1959 1960 19 61 196 2 1963 19 64 1965 1966 JANUARY 8 7 8 11 4 9 8 12 FEBU RARY 4 2 1 1 3 6 6 6 MARCH 6 7 5 5 6 7 5 3 AP RI L 5 4 8 10 6 16 8 12 MAY 4 7 7 7 12 10 5 12 JUNE 5 2 2 8 4 7 10 16 JU LY 8 12 5 9 10 7 12 13 AUGUST 8 2 9 8 8 10 11 15 SEPTEMBER 7 4 2 8 12 9 8 8 OCTOBER 7 9 9 3 7 10 11 8 NOVEMBE R 7 6 8 7 6 7 4 9 DECEMBER 5 5 10 7 9 8 12 7 Total 74 67 74 84 87 106 100 121 Cl eared by Ar rest 71 68* 70 81 83 105 98 118 8 10 17 22 15 25 24 28 66 57 57 62 72 81 76 93 Numbe r Wh it e Num ber Co l o red I I II MUR DER Doy of Week Monday T u esday Wednesday Thursday Fri day Sa turday Sunda y Total 17 9 7 8 21 38 21 121 Indi cate s that more cases were so lved than committed during the year, some we re crimes of previous years. 16 �1965 - 1966 COMPARISON OF MAJOR CRIMES SUPERINTENDENT CL INTON C HAFIN Detective Bureau PERCENTAGE OF INCREASE OR DE CREASE CLEARED BY ARREST 1965 1966 PERCENTAG E OF CLEAR-UP NAT'L AVERAGE 11 8 97 % 9 1% 125 7 91 81 82 % 64 % 144 17 + 13% 216 267 56 % 38% 345 37 925 + 2% 801 837 90 % 73 % 1,0 19 52 4,820 5,29 1 +10 % 1,468 1,341 25 % 25 % 1,43 1 64 1 8,168 8,255 + 1% 2,019 2,782 30 % 20 % 4,232 1 ,899 33 % 25 % 922 311 1965 1966 Homicid e JOO 121 +20 % 98 Ra e 11 5 99 -1 4% Robbery 4 17 473 Assault 903 Burgla ry La rcen y Under $50. CRIME ...... TOTAL ARREST JUVENILE --.J Larceny Over $50. 4, 200 4,851 +15% 592 1,218 Auto Th eft 2,974 2,39 1 - 20 % 1,0 14 79 1 Autos Recovered 1,9 / 2 2,280 TOTAL CRIMES. 1965 . 21,697 TOTAL ARRESTS . 8 ,218 TOTAL CRIMES. 1966. 22,4 06 TOTAL JUVENILE ARRESTS. 2,964 Incre a se of 3.3 % J anuar y - Dece mber, 1966 in c ompariso n with s am e p e riod, 1965 c ounting Larc eny un der $50 . Not c ou n ting Larc eny under $50 . Inc re a se 4. 6% .. . . . �LARCENY REPORTS INVESTIGATED IN 1966 POCKET PICKING w 0- 0 0 0 0 0 0 ,-.:, 0 0 '° 0 0 V1 0 0 ,-.:, 0 ,-.:, V1 w J:>. J:>. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 V1 0 0 0 $50.00 and over . 4,851 $ 5.00 6,371 to $50.00 322 Under $5 .00 1,884 TOTAL REPORTS INVESTIGATED . PURSE-SNATCHING 306 1,092 SHOP - LIFTING THEFTS FROM AUTO (EX CLUDE ACCESSORIES) 2,7 17 AUTO ACCESSORIES 3,510 877 BICYCL E FR OM B UI LD IN G 2,961 A LL O T H ERS C OIN MACH I NE S 13,106 851 370 18 �,~ ...... ...... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8,255 8,168 P ICK PO C KET 5, 291 4,820 1,468 473 925 903 837 801 SHOP LI FT / NG 115 121 118 19 �PO L IC E D ET E NT 10 N WAR D AT GRADY HOSPITAL Maximum security 1s now provided at Grady Hos pital for prisoners requumg medica l attention. Six rooms, approximately twenty fe e t squ are, are used as a detention ward a t the hospital for prisoners requiring emergency treatment. A security force varying from two to five officers are on duty in the d e tention ward constantly . Police officers are trained to recognize visibl e physical illness m arrested persons. Evidence of a n y of the following are carried directly to Grady Hospital: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Appearance of any type illness . Having a ny type injury. Una ble to give the ir n a me a nd address m a cohe rent manner. Unable to walk under their own power. If they possess a card indicating they are a diabetic or an epihleptic c ase. Persons a rrested and charged with operating a vehicle under the influence of alcohol or drugs are carried to the Grady Hospital. They have the privilege of taking or rejecting a blood test to determin e the amount of alcohol or drugs c onsumed. The blood is forwarded to th e Georgia State C rime Laboratory where a chemical analysis test is ma d e . The results of th e t es t are forwarded to th e traffic court to be introduc ed as evide nce. After a prisoner has been treated a t the hospital, a doctor determines if their physical condition warrants their being sent to the city jail. D ETENTIO N WARD - GR ADY HOSPITAL 20 I I �- -- - - - - - - - - ···~·-· - - IDENTITY CONCEALING .A. rmed robbers attempt -- to conceal their ide nt ity by we aring various disguises. Rubber masks, nylon stockings, and la r ge colored eye glasses are w orn by the criminal whe n perpetrating an act of armed robbery. Banks and other financ ia l institutions install ROBBERS CAUG HT hidden cameras whic h have numerous controls placed 1n strategic The cameras take positions in the bank. still and motion pictures of the robber in action. D i sguises attempt to are w orn eliminate by the positive criminal 1n an identification by wit n esses or hidden cameras. NYL ON ST OC KI NG DIS GUISE 21 - l �I ACTIVITIES OF IDENTIFICATION Pe rson s photographed and fingerprinted Person s identified by fin gerprints Sets of fing erp rints made Disposition s to th e F. B. I. Reports to the variou s courts Report s to probation office , parole board, board of corrections and Bell wood Camp Pers ons checked for jury duty Criminal calls made for ph otos a nd fingerprint dustin g OTHER BUREA U 1966 1965 32 , 2" 6 . Railroad Train 14 2 7. Bicycli st 46 4 4 a ~ a N 0\ C: a V, --·- 8. Animal l 9. Fi xe d Obj e ct 116 10. Oth e r Obj ect 4 l 1 84 l 4 0 u 11. Other Non-collision 16 4 3 l 2,816 1,876 704 12 12. TOTALS 25,041 94 236 22,131 105 persons killed in 94 fatal accidents . CODE FOR INJURY A - Visible sign s of injury, as bleed in g or distorted member; or had to be carried from the scene. B Other vi s ible injury , a s brui ses , abra s ions, s well in g, l imping , etc. C No vi s ible injury but complaint of pain or momentary uncon s ciou sness . 105 1,000 �r~ 26000 24000 22000 20000 18000 17,243 16000 14000 12000 10000 8000 5,269 6000 r--- 4000 N 3000 2500 2000 1500 944 1000 500 100 50 0 667 5 73 806 �ACCIDE N TS 7966 A// Acc idents Con tri bu ting C ircums tance s Indi cated Fa ta l Ac c iden ts 1965 1966 1966 196 5 830 706 25 18 Fail to yield right-of-way 4,423 3,430 5 2 Drove left of center 1,131 969 11 9 Improper o ve rtaking 634 489 2 0 Past stop sign 1,107 820 3 1 Disrega rd ed traffic signal 1,254 858 1 0 Follow e d too closely 6,854 5,643 0 4 Made improper t urn 1,667 1,254 0 0 Other improp e r driving 5,360 4, 169 26 17 428 373 0 0 21 16 0 0 938 818 6 4 24, 647 19,545 79 55 Speeding too fas t Inadequ a t e brakes Improper lights Had bee n drinking To tal 1966 105 P ersons kill ed in 94 fatal accidents • 1965 84 P ersons killed in 8 1 fa tal acciden ts By Day o f Week Perso ns Ki ll e d B y Hour of Day 11 - 12 12- 1 1- 2 2- 3 3- 4 4- 5 5- 6 6- 7 Tota l AM AM AM AM AM AM AM AM 6 6 6 6 6 1 2 4 37 7- 8 AM 8-9 AM 9- 10 AM 10-11 AM 11 AM to 12 PM 12- 1 PM I - 2 PM 2- 3 PM Total 4 3 2 5 0 2 2 0 18 28 3- 4 PM 4- 5 PM 5-6 PM 6 - 7 PM 7- 8 PM 8- 9 PM 9-10 PM 10-11 PM 5 4 8 7 7 3 6 10 Mo nday T u es day 12 17 Wednesday T hur sday Fri d ay Saturday Sunday 8 16 7 25 20 T o tal 50 Total 105 �TOTAL TRAFFIC ARREST 1966 1966 CHA RG E 60 233 33 2, 546 1965 CHANGE 3 - 89 4 3 , 192 54 3 ,181 223 44 1 3 ,285 61 5 5,3 10 16 , l 0 6 1 , 067 28 1 , 2 13 215 8 32 6, 58 1 1, 185 636 4,298 40 22 30 , 06 8 1 ,6 98 197 19 , 555 8, 5 8 6 18 I 3 ,77 1 9 24 635 81 l 175 4 3 10 97 11 l 46 2 57 32 2 29 2,54 0 638 3,956 75 3, 066 20 5 88 l O, 34 8 69 9 5, 4 37 19, 086 1,3 47 30 1,1 53 262 773 6,80 9 1, 232 7 34 4,24 1 4l 71 3 5 , 08 1 3, 0 92 167 2 l , 5 58 11 , 0 45 11 2 3 , 726 89 1 652 89 0 50 0 9 38 1 50 10 9 295 128,631 141, 17 6 -12 ,545 1,0 l 0 4 ,4 99 2,547 979 9 ,0 89 11 6 98 1 l , 39 0 1 ,822 2,355 77 l , 37 2 8 74 5, 10 7 3,75 1 1 , 157 l O, 3 20 100 1 , 0 76 1 , 449 2,28 1 2,80 5 1 26 17 0 1 36 - 60 8 - 1 ,2 0 4 - 178 - 1 ,2 3 1 16 - 95 - 59 - 459 - 4 50 - 49 1 , 20 2 26,23 7 1 5 4 , 868 29,2 1 6 1 70 ,3 9 2 -2, 979 - 1 5,. 52 4 D runk o n s tr e e t Dru nk in a uto mob il e Och e r non-traffic vi o l ati ons 477 25 1 935 462 3 31 632 15 - 80 30 3 1 ,663 156,531 20, 50 1 l ,42 5 238 TOTAL ALL VIOLATIONS 1 7 1,8 1 7 20 , 178 - 15,286 32 3 A llowin g a n o ther to dri ve U / I A ll ow in g a n o th e r to drive w i th o ut li ce n se Dri v i ng o n s id ewa lk Drivin g on wro n g s i de o f s tree t D r i v i ng wh i le dri v ers li ce n s e s u s p e nd ed Dri v in g wro n g w a y o n o n e w a y s tr ee t Fa ilin g co g i ve a prope r s i g n a l F a ilin g to g r a nt o r y i e ld ri g ht o f way F a ilin g co obe y offi c ers s i g n a l Fa i li n g to p u l l to c u rb to u n l oa d pas se n ge r Fai lin g co r e m a in i n pro pe r l a n e Fa ilin g co s e t bra k es a nd c urb w h ee l s Fa ilin g to sto p wh e n tra ffi c obs truct e d Fo ll owi n g too cl o se l y I lle g a l o r i mprope r rurn Impedin g r eg ul a r mo v em e nt of tra ffi c Im prop e r e n t e rin g o r l eavin g ·ve h icl e I m pro pe r back in g Imprope r br a k es Im p rop e r e m e r gin g fro m pri va t e dr i ve Im prop e r o r no li g ht s Improp e r pass i n g Impro pe r s ca re fro m pa rk e d p os i ti o n Op e ratin g motor v e h i cl e U / I Pro jec tin g l o ad R i d in g Do ubl e o n moto r scoo t e r Speed in g V i o l a tin g pe d es tri ans d uti es Vio l a ci n g p e d es tri a n s ri g ht s V i o l a cin g r ed li g h t o rd i n a n ce Vio l a tin g stop s i g n o rdin a n ce Bloc k i n g t r a ffi c Im prope r c h a n g in g l anes Motor ve hi cle co llidin g w i t h o bj ec t Ve h icle l ea v in g s t reet o r roa d way Vehic l e co ll i din g wi t h park e d ve h i c l e Blocking in t ersection Fai l to g ra n t R / W to pedestr i a n Oc h er ha za rdo u s v io l ations V i o l ating m i n i m u m s p ee d l aw Drag Ra c i n g C ross in g Median 596 TOTAL HA ZARDOUS VIOLAT IO NS Fa il to abide Fa il to appea r in co urt o n co p y I l l eg a l pa rkin g (re s tr i c t e d ar ea ) Improper muffl er N o dri vers l i ce n s e Vio l at i n g t ru c k a nd tra il er ord in a n ce V i o latin g sect i o n 18.1 73 (Fa il re po rt acc . ) Il l ega l pa rkin g (O ve rt im e) Ille g a l parki n g (Impound) VS MVL O ch e r n on-haz ardou s v i o l a t io n s Vio l at in g Scace In s pect i o n L aw TOTAL TRAFFIC V IOLATIONS Cases in vo l vin g acc id e n t s 29 6 - 42 - 764 - 21 11 5 18 - 44 2,93 7 -8 - 4 - 12 7 - 2, 9 80 - 28 0 - 2 60 - 47 59 - 228 - 47 - 98 57 - 1 - 49 - 5 , 01 3 - 1 , 394 30 -2 ,0 0 3 - 2 , 4 59 69 45 33 - 17 - 79 - 3 25 -5 - 71 47 2 16 7 �INTERNAL SECURITY The Atlanta Police De pa rtm e nt s Internal Security Squad und e rw e nt a re organization this year. Th ey are to perform the following functions within th e department, In ves ti ga te and ascertain th e hone s ty and int eg rity of all police personnel. In ves ti ga t e a ll rumors and complaints of polic e brutality or other police mi sco nduct. In ves tiga t e a nd approve or re jec t , all applications for extra police jobs and inves tiga te a ll ba d debt s compl a int s. Inves ti ga te a nd certify a ll n ew e mployees a nd a ll former e mployees requestin g ree mpl oyment. Establish a sys te ma tic file on compl a ints a nd report imm e di a tel y to 'the Chi ef of Police any case th a t mi ght require dis c iplina ry ac tion ; and to furnish a summary r eport of a ll activiti es t o the Chief of Police. P O L IC E OFF IC ERS ASSAULTED 1966 OFFICERS JAN. F EB. MAR. APR . MAY J UNE J ULY AUG . SEPT . OCT. 0\'. D E C. TOTAL OFFICERS OFFICERS UNR U LY PRISONERS OFFICERS INJU RED BY ASSAULTED INJURED IN ASSAULTE D PRISONERS NOT INJ URED ACCIDENTS 21 18 25 29 30 25 35 316 20 16 24 29 31 25 36 29 25 32 29 20 7 4 7 10 13 4 12 6 9 7 9 10 13 12 17 19 18 21 24 23 16 25 20 10 12 10 18 16 10 14 12 12 15 9 12 15 316 98 * 218 155 27 24 33 31 18 Of fi ce rs re c e i, •iii g 111i11 or i11j11r y 11 0! sh Oll"/1. O11/ y cases re quir ing bo s pital t re at 111 e 11t i11cluded. In some incidents, more than one officer and one prisoner a re involved. 30 �UNINCORPORATED AREA - 1966 OFFENSES AND ACTIVITIES REPORT UNINCORPORATED AREA OF FULTON COUNTY * * Police services furnished to the Unincorporated Area of Fulton County are furnished by con tract between City of Atlanta and Fulton County. PERSONNEL AND EQUIPMENT December 31 , 1966 2 1 2 36 12 11 4 Captains Lieutenant (Detective) Sergeants Patrolmen Patrol Cars School Traffic Policewomen Motorcycles (Radio) * * * * Total traffic accidents Inju ries Deaths Jan. Fe b . M ar. A pr. May Jul y Au g. Sept . Oct. Nov . Dec . Total 107 78 90 100 109 93 133 124 106 126 90 11 7 127 3 53 48 48 59 53 49 83 82 55 81 49 67 68 7 1 0 2 5 2 2 4 4 3 0 4 2 29 June * * * * VA L UE OF PROPERT Y STOL E N RECOVERED 1965 1966 19 65 1966 1965 Burglaries 318 4 22 $ 72,823 .6 5 $108 ,726 .97 $11 ,840. 70 $10 ,9 17.21 Larcenies 312 366 34, 538 .70 53, 11 6.8 5 64 5.1 7 1, 528.11 48 72 61,900.00 93 , 500.00 79 , 500.00 77, 250.00 169,262.35 255,343 .82 91,985.87 89,695 .32 Larceny of Automobiles Totals 31 1966 �UNINCORPORATED AREA ARRESTS NUMBER OF ARRESTS FBI REPORT - PART ONE 1964 Arrests CRIMIN AL HOMICIDE: Murder & Nonnegligent Manslaughter Manslaughter Forc ible Rape Robbery Aggravated Assault Burglary Larceny Auto Theft Total - Part 7965 4 1 4 2 6 7 9 1 31 12 3 6 5 35 35 42 16 40 726 708 143 6 7 2 29 3 0 3 10 58 One 7966 5 3 39 FBI REPORT - PART TWO Ocher assau lts Arson Forgery & Counterfeiting Fraud Embezzlement Stolen Property, Buying, Receiving , Poss ess ing Va ndalism Weapons: Carrying, Possessing, Etc. Pros ti tu tion and Comm ercialized Vice Sex Offenses Narcotic Drug Laws Gambling Offenses Against the Family & C hildre n Drivin g under th e Influence Liquor Laws Drunkennes s Disorderly Condu c e Vagrancy All Och er Offenses (Except Traffic) 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 3 4 0 0 4 5 10 10 0 3 2 1 14 3 13 10 5 1 6 4 5 5 0 205 24 200 22 0 205 8 350 72 30 5 55 309 61 3 143 1 1 169 190 Total - Part Two 836 794 860 Total - Part One and Part Two 962 902 1003 21 35 24 58 21 40 54 22 237 37 60 81 9 0 OTHER TRAFFIC ARRESTS Driving o n Wrong s ide o f Stree t Failing co Yield Right-Of-Way Followin g coo C lo se Hit & Run No Driv e rs Li cen se Re d Li ght Spe e din g Seate Motor Ve hicl e Laws Stop S i gn Ocher Traffi c Cas es 221 29 68 0 17 1 11 6 19 28 1 59 943 445 82 1 162 531 544 Total Other Traffic Cases 2066 2483 2747 GRAND TOTAL 3028 3385 3750 396 32 2 14 565 409 �. UNINCORPORATED . . AREA - REPORTS NUMBER OF OFFENSES F BI RE PORT - PART ONE 796 4 Offens e 7965 7966 CRIMINAL HOMICIDE Murder & Non n egligen ce Manslaughter by Negligence 4 2 1 6 7 15 Forcible Rape Rape by Force Assault to Rape-Assault 9 9 0 3 2 1 5 3 2 Robbery Armed - Any Weapon Strong - Arm, No Weapon 12 8 4 9 7 2 3 2 1 Assault Gun Knife, or Cutting Instrument Other Dangerous Weapon · Hands, Fists , Feet, E tc . , Aggravated Other Assaults, Not Aggravated 23 11 5 2 0 5 11 3 4 0 1 3 18 6 2 0 2 8 Burglary Forci ble Entry Un lawful Entry, No Force A ttempted Forcible E n try 257 253 1 3 318 299 7 12 422 409 2 11 LARCENY $5 0 & Over Under $5 0 161 159 159 153 208 158 Auto Theft 60 48 72 687 708 908 Death , Acc idental Dea th , Na tural Doors & Windows fou nd Op en Fires Impounded Auto s, Etc. Lost Ma li cious Mischi ef Miscellaneous P e rsons Injured Suicides Whiskey Stills Destroyed Whi s k ey C ars Confi sca ted 1 11 3 27 240 10 138 13 7 4 4 11 13 15 39 221 10 12 4 124 40 4 11 7 4 13 23 52 202 16 203 145 43 6 3 1 Total 557 679 71 1 GRAND TOTAL 1244 1327 16 19 Illegal (Non-T ax Paid) Whiskey and Mas h Destroyed 1769½ 3678 4886 ½ Ga l. Total REPORTS NOT SHOWN ON FBI REPORT 99 33 . . - �SIXTEEN MILLION MILES Atlanta police deportment ' s vehicles traveled over sixteen million miles rendering--police serv ice in 1966. u u u C C I- 0 0 C) I- 0 IC) C) 0 z- z 0 Patrol cars, which include traffic occident z: investigation and uniform prowl cars, drove 1n excess of thirteen million C) c V) miles during < 3:: the year. 0 Comparison Atlanta from 1n ~ police vehicles Atlanta realistic would to Washington, <( 3:: 3:: 3:: 0 0 z 1- < z < I- < have driven < < ..J manner - z c V) <( I<( 1- 1- z z <( <( ..J ..J ..J I- I- I- <( <( < D. C., 26,185 I- z c V) I- < more z z c V) < 1- C z 0 I- I- u V) times. D... 0::: loo LL') fxtending th i s analysis further, the patrol 00 wagons drove a distance equal to 437 trips N N from Atlanta to Washington, D. C., motorcycles 1,699 trips, detective cars 2,858 trips and the patrol vehicles 21,191. V) w ..J ..J I- 0 0::: V) I- Ck:: <( D... 34 u >- . u <( u u w tw C 0::: V) 0 Ck:: <( I- u 0 ~ ..J 0 Ck:: z 0 I- C) <( D... < 3:: �WIG SNATCHING Lad ies pa rt i c i pating 1n a ne w fad created a n e w ty pe c ri me . Un expe cte d in v itations to attend social affairs o ft en occur w hen the ladies are unp re p are d an d ti me d o-e s no t permit a vis it to a beau t y s hop . Wi g s a re p u rchased for v arious reasons . It permits a la d y to be re ady to attend social WIG SNATCHI N G affairs in a ma t t er o f minut e s. Wig thieves ca n d e te c t a lady attired in a wig. The perpetrat o rs drive s o r r uns by and snatches the wig from t h e head of the v ic t im . Wigs vary 1n prices fr o m $50 .00 to $1,000 .00. WI G SNATC H I N G 35 �BURGLARY I Residence Night 1966 Residence Residence NON - RES. NON - RES. NON-RES. Total Day Unknown Night Day U nknown Number 212 10 25 389 66,382.96 Value 51 81 10 Feb. 59 83 16 199 9 38 404 95,871.18 March 47 113 20 206 9 24 419 87 , 579 .31 April 64 71 12 191 13 21 372 59,920.49 May 64 75 22 225 7 37 430 88,116.90 June 63 77 22 178 11 21 372 73,06 1.10 July 61 68 26 214 9 25 403 84,786.1 9 Au g. 68 77 15 249 1 34 444 53,247.26 Sept. 76 116 13 289 13 23 530 55,407.94 Oct. 63 111 33 267 11 24 509 81,900.55 Nov . 64 120 23 230 9 38 484 112,021. 19 Dec . 109 115 15 258 11 27 535 82,810.94 Total 789 1107 227 2718 113 337 5291 941,106.01 Jan ! I 36 �AGGRAVATED ASSAULT 7966 0 White woman a ttacks White woman 25 50 75 00 125 150 175 200 225 50 275 300 25 350 75 00 425 50 475 6 Weapon s Day or Weel1 White woman accac ks White man 13 Whi t e woman accacks Negro woman NONE White wo man accacks Negro man NONE. I I Sa turday 138 94 58 62 75 174 324 Total 925 Sunday Monday T u esday Wednesday Thursday Friday White man attacks White woman White man attacks White man White man attacks Negro woma n White man attacks Negro man Negro woman attacks White woman Negro woman attacks White man 107 Force (Bod ily) Pis col Shotgun Rifle Ice Pick Knife Iron Pipe Och e rs Unknown Total 9 25 NONE 10 l NONE Negro woma n attacks Negro woman 102 Negro woman attacks Negro man Neg ro ma n attacks White woman Negro ma n attacks White man 28 THROW I NG AC ID Negro ma n attac ks Negro woma n 399 Ne gro man attac k s Negro man 22 Noc seat e d TOT AL 925 37 14 323 32 14 5 379 3 91 64 �VALUE OF PROPERTY REPORTED STOLEN AND RECOVE RE D 1965 1966 Stol e n J a nua ry $ Re co vered $ 6 23, 837.30 382,93 2.74 Stolen $ 417,605.07 Recovered $ 218,378.60 Febu ra ry 580, 408.24 339, 025.37 505,288 .07 246,675.92 Ma rch 640,6 15.86 392,054. 34 452,772 .43 235, 47 5.97 Apri l 563, 173. 51 297,661.1 2 445,658. 08 243,827.21 May 510,609.67 267,098.49 429,356 .67 193,988.50 Jun e 466,5 34.20 270,067.7 1 407,708. 25 223,72 5.45 Jul y 502,505 .86 280 ,137.3 5 521 ,843.60 302, 805.81 Augus t 475,086.62 198, 181.05 522, 363.66 253,723.91 September 483,731.2 1 306, 387. 47 355 ,099.78 229,289.76 O ctober 424,970.92 265,815.69 48 1,287.02 252,040 .08 Nove mber 390,923.62 210,183.11 476,416. 72 240,367 . 43 Decem ber 510 ,868 . 54 26 4,456.61 500,772.77 265,611.51 $6,173,265. 55 $3 , 474,001.05 $5,516 ,172.12 $2,905,910.15 Tota l 38 �NEW COMMUNICATION SYSTEM Improved talk-out radio capabilities are realized wi th th e installation of a new radio an tenna tower located on th e top of the jail buil ding standi ng 27 0 feet above ground. This system has three separate freq u encies for polic e serv ice a nd on e for the Fire Depa rtment. The s ystem i s so designed th a t in the event of an emergency, a ny or a ll of the channels may be tied together a nd opera t ed by any of th e three main operating positions. Ea ch re ceiver is equipped with a spa re rec eiver fo r e mergencies. We ha ve two additiona l ant e nna towers, one 10 th e southwes t and one in the no rthwes t sec tion of the city , both stan din g 169 feet in height . A third antenn a s y stem is located on top o f Gra dy Ho s pita l and is 305 feet abo v e groun d . Conjestio n will b e g re a tl y reduced in our radio comm un ica ti ng sys t em fo r ma ny y e a rs to come. RADIO Summa ry of Work by Radio Station KIA - 532 196 4 1966 1965 1,3 24 3 , 134 3,879 4 17, 6S9 421 ,662 428 ,802 9, 0 4 5 11 , 538 12 , 143 40 , 05 7 38, 465 38,143 Lookouts and Misce ll a n eo us Call s 27 3, 85 7 303 , 554 309 ,7 08 Total Call s 741,972 778,353 792,675 Other Loca l Depa rtme nts Dispatch es City Dispatches Unincorporate d Are a Wagon Calls NEW ANTENNA 39 �TV/O MILLION DOLLARS IN COUNTERFEIT MONEY SEIZED Alm os t two milli o n do ll a rs 1n counterfei t mon ey co nfi s c a ted a t th e A tlanta Ai rpo rt in Nove mb e r. Mr. Ba rn ey We nt z , Sp ec i a l Age nt i n c h arge of th e Se cre t Servi ce o p era tion sa i d th e counte rfe it bill s we re print e d in dow nto wn A tl a nta . H e sa id p e rf ec t pl a nnin g, timing a nd co -op e ra ti o n b e twee n th e Sec r e t Se rvi ce, Atl a n ta Po li ce, De puty U.S. Mars h a l s a n d n a rco tic a ge nts res ulte d in a ppr e h en d in g s ix p erpe trato rs a n d con fi sca tin g th e c o unt e rf eit mo n ey. Split seco nd timin g r es ult ed 1n th e a rr es t o f th e c ount e rfe ite rs. On e brok e away a nd was very d ra ma ti ca ll y ap preh end ed in th e n e twork o f ra mp s a t th e Airpo rt. Airpo rt pa trolm e n block ed a car co ntai nin g two me mbe rs o f th e co unt e rfeit rin g. l\fr . We ntz s ta t ed th a t thi s i s th e la rges t a mo unt o f co unte rfeit bill s eve r co nfi sca t e d rn th e South . COUNTE R FE I T MONEY 40 �WEAPONS OF AGGRESSION In commi tti ng a crime, criminals do not hesitate to kill or mut ilate anyone who intefers or attem pts t o apprehend them. Weapons of agression vary from a broken bottle to high powered automatic firearms. A favorite homemade weapon weapon of young known hoodulums as is a the tenderizer. It consist of four razor sharp nails driven through a piece of wood with a support back of the nail head. It is used in place of brass knucks and inflicts fo ur lacerations with a single stroke. WEAPONS Other weapons are pistols, shotguns, rifles, broken bottles, icepicks, iron pipes, axes and numerou s cutt ing t ype instruments. We apons of ag ression are not us ed exclusively by crimina ls . Domestic, street, and neighborhood a rguments often terminate in physical combat and weapons of agressi on are used. TE ND E RIZE R 41 �CRIME REPORT BUREAU Distribution of Crimes by Months Rape Robbery Aggravated Assaults J anuary February March April May June July Augus t September October November December 12 6 15 4 12 8 8 4 7 5 7 34 51 30 46 27 24 39 42 24 47 54 55 75 68 93 91 84 57 86 79 88 Totals 99 473 11 Burglary L arceny Auto L arceny 63 69 389 404 419 372 430 372 403 444 530 509 484 535 1,025 1,125 1,172 1,096 1,153 942 1,007 1,140 993 1,186 1,060 1,207 195 215 170 208 152 190 201 212 165 226 216 241 925 5,291 13,106 2,391 72 MISSING P E RSONS BUREAU NEGRO WHITE Age Male Female Male Female Totals 1- 5 8 3 20 8 39 6 - 10 22 8 25 12 67 .11 - 16 196 210 74 126 606 17 - 20 60 110 28 35 233 21 - 30 84 84 32 51 251 31 - 40 46 49 29 38 162 41 - 50 42 33 23 25 123 OVER 50 23 20 29 18 90 481 517 266 313 1,571 Totals 95 % of persons reported missing located or returned. 42 .. �CASES BOOKE D Typ e of Vi olation White Male Whi te Fem al e Negro Mal e Negro Femal e 17 Ye ars and Un der Total Number Arreste d Murder and Non-Negligent Ma ns lau ghte r 21 2 75 18 9 125 Rape 18 0 103 0 23 144 Robbery 75 10 191 2 67 345 Agrava t ed Assa ult 158 20 200 83 1,019 Burgl ary 310 558 15 229 558 367 964 14 307 725 2,17 4 1,431 4,23 2 243 412 10 28 242 681 7 420 2 2 14 94 1 134 12 922 1,349 66 10 18 18 18 0 11 0 31 146 174 0 134 Larceny Auto Theft Othe r Assaults Arson E mbezzlement 88 0 29 0 34 28 0 Stolen Property (Receiving) 37 6 51 13 27 120 8 149 34 266 577 Forgery and Coun terfeiting Fraud' Vandalism 72 1 21 95 33 33 142 11 89 4 1,206 211 Sex offenses, except Rape & Prostitution 184 6 151 20 40 401 Narcotic and Dangerous Drugs 248 86 83 30 4 451 87 5 16 405 234 34 765 37 44 14 154 Weapons - C. C. W. - C. P .. W. L. Prostitution a nd Vice Gambling Offenses against Family-Children Driving Under the Influence 268 43 2,604 222 1,385 54 33 13 4,298 774 Liquor Laws 199 11 341 210 Drunkenness 25,755 2,305 16,369 2,709 238 47,376 4,505 800 74 8,605 2, 289 2,152 18,35 1 89 5 91 0 11 360 41 758 458 458 6,518 7,100 86,192 Disorderly Conduct Vagrancy 181 All other, except traffic 173 0 77 0 376 0 36,388 4, 146 32,040 Run - Aways- loitering-Curfew Total General Court Case s 43 76,516 �NARCOTICS Atlanta is narcotics. agents relatively City work free from evils police, State and in close harmony of Federal in the pre- vention and spread of the dreaded disease known as dope addiction. The Atlanta Police Departments' Vice Squad and the school detectives maintain a strict surveillance on the activities of the high school students. This strict surveillance is reaping dividends. CO NFI SCATED DRUGS Smoking of marijuana or use of drugs i n the proh ibited classification is not prevalent in our high school system. LEG VEINS USED BY DOPE ADDICTS AFTER ARMS VEINS COLLASPE. 44 �CRI ME REPORT BUREAU Reports not sho wn on F.B.I. Annual R e port Lost Items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Recoveries , fqund , impounded, Etc. . . . Forgery, worthless and ficticious checks. Open doors and windows found by patrolmen Fires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Deaths , found dead , no crime . . . . . . . Damage to police property , cars , motorcycles, etc. Persons injured , other than traffic accidents, etc . . Malicious Mischief and vandalism . . . . . . . . Confiscated non-tax paid whiskey (no vehicles involved) Miscellaneous Whiske y cars confiscated. Lotte ry cars confiscated . Narcotic cars confiscated Unrul y prisoners Damage to City property - non-police Officers injured . . . . . . . . . Mol e sting minors, public indecency, etc. A ttempted suicide . . . Sui c ide s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 982 5,205 1,631 884 901 797 825 1,007 2,551 141 1,001 53 31 7 316 522 253 260 173 60 91 191 109 38 69 6,501 1,571 80 350 F ire - Smoking in Bed . . . . . P e rs ons bitten by dogs and cats . A ccidental shootings Injure d in fir e s . . . . . . Suspi c iou s fir e s , a rson, e tc. Arr es t . . . . . . Missi n g Pe rs on s Vul_g a r ph o n e ca ll s Opera tin g with out owners co n s ent Total 26,600 Uni n corporated area repo rts. Unfounded reports . . . . . Report shown on F . B . I. co py . 1, 691 1,048 23,605 Total 53, 944 AUTOMOBILES STOLEN AND RECOVERED 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 Automobil es re porte d sto l en 2,58 1 2,7 18 3,622 3,417 4, 210 2,974 2,39 1 Sto l en automobil es recovered 2, 185 2,269 2, 510 2, 536 3,03 5 2,280 1,972 Stolen elsewh ere, recove red here in 1966 Number 194 Value $355,244.0 0 45 �ATLANTA POLICE TRAINING DEPARTMENT DIVISION 1. Conducted 2 Recruit Classes, 288 hours each, attended by 59 Atlanta Police Officers and 4 courtesy officers from Police Departments in the Atlanta Metropolitan Area. 2. Issued over 18,000 IACP Training Keys to members of the department and conducted 2 department-wide examinations on the contents of the IACP Training Ke y s. 3. Corresponded with 37 individuals seeking information regarding employment with the Atlanta Police Department. 4. Corresponded with 10 organizations which were seeking information of an organizational or technical nature. 5. In conjunction with the F . B . I., a 2 week Recruit Training School was conducted for Metropol. 6. 2 officers worked in conjunction with the Institute of Government of the University of Georgia in producing a series of television shows on Law Enforcement. 7. I officer completed a 6 hour Civil Defense Course on "Shelter Management" and "Radiological Monitoring.' ' 8. 40 officers completed a 3 week course conducted by the Traffic Institute, Northwestern University at the Atlanta Police Academy. 15 of these were City of Atlanta police officers. 9. I officer completed a 40 i.our Red Cross Course, Water Safety Instructor. 10. Conducted two 20 hour Red C ross courses on Life Saving and Water Safety. 11. 3 officers attended Mental Health Seminar. 12 . Conducted Auto Theft Seminar for 70 officers. 13. K-9 training for 9 officers and dogs on searching a building. 14. Riot control training course for 25 officers. 15. Chief H. T. Jenkins attended the Management Institute for Police Chiefs at Harvard University Graduate School of Business Administration from July 3 through August 19, 1966. 16. 52 officers att ended 1 day Auto Theft Conferen ce. 17 .. l officer attended Civil Defense Course at Stanford University, Menlo , California. 18. 2 officers attended Driver Improvemen t Program Instructors Course . 19. The Training Division personnel lectured at 25 various organizations such as churches, clubs, schools , etc., during 1966. 20 . Escort ed 587 persons from religious, educational and military groups through th e Police HQ Building. 46 L �21. Conducted 23 investigations on applicants for re-instatement to the Police Department. 16 officers re-instated and employed IOI new police officers. 22. Conducted 16 investigations on applicants for other police agencies. 23. I officer graduated from the F. B. I. National Academy in Washington, D. C. The purpose of the three months course at the "West Point of Law Enforcement" is to provide officers with a knowledge of the latest administrative and investigative developments in the law enforcement profession. 24 . 7 officers attended the F. B. I. National Academy Associated Retraining Session for 3 days. 25. 2 officers attended the Police Information Network Demonstration conducted by the Metropolitan Atlanta Council of Local Governments and Atlanta Metropol at Georgia State College. 21':i. Riot Control Training Course for 25 officers. 27 . Manned armoured ca r and C. D. wagon and i ss ued riot equipment during e me rge ncy . 28 . 26 officers attended a one-week administration school sponsored by the F. B. I. , Metropol , The Georgia Asso ci a tion of C hiefs of Police and the Georgia Municipal Association. 29. 5 offic ers attended th e one day F. B. I. Law E nforce me nt Confere n ce on Public Relations Community Relations, Scienc e and the Law Breaker, and the Na tiona l Crime Information Cente r, The Computer and Mo dern Communication s, a t the Georgia Police Academy, Georgia State Patrol. 30. 126 showings of I. A. C. P . sight and s ound training film- s trips to the D~partment. 31. In cooperation with the Departme nt of State Age ncy for top ranking foreign police Inte rna tio na l Development, we escorted 34 office rs throu gh the Police HQ B uilding a nd gave th e m a n indoctrination program. 32. In coopuation with the Atlanta Committee for Interna tional Visitors , we escorted throu gh the Police HQ Building a nd conducted a n indoctrination program. 33. 2 offic ers gave a speed and s kidmarks de mon stration a nd l ec ture for T raffic Judges semina r at Emory University. 34. 6 civilian employees investigated prior to empl oyment by the Atlanta Police De partment. 35 . Distributed pamphl et "Know Your Rights" to a ll members of the Police De partment. 36. Made a survey of the Police Department to see if a Pol ice Science Progra m a t Ge orgia State College would be feasibl e. 37. 295 police applicants intervi ewed and inve s tigated. 38. Self-defense and K-9 Corp s demon s trations g i ven at L e nox Square . 39. Interviewed and investigated 20 appli cants for Neighborhood Yo uth Corp s a nd e mp loyed 31. 47 �40. Investigated, interviewed and employed 45 applicants for Police Guard. 41. The I.A. C.P. film "Every Hour - Every Day" with Dann y Thomas was shown co man y civic groups. 42. Processed all extra job requests . 43. 2 police guard's re-instated . 44. Conducted bri e fing on Traffic Control Signals and Gestures for 8 new officers. 45. Made a record check on 200 person s for th e Georgia Co mmission on Ju venil.e D e linqu enc y . 46 . Prepared and distribut e d 1 ,000 copies of a 17 page handout on City Ordin a nc es . * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * We added a sight and sound proje cto r sys t e m co our roll call trainin g in Jul y . The Intern a cio nal Association of Chiefs of Police offers chi s trainin g program co a ll police d epa rtm e nts. Thi s system emphasizes per tin ent as pec ts of police training a nd is proving co b e very effective and appreciated by th e me n . N E W PROJ ECTOR 48 �* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * POLICE DEPARTMENT COST OF OPERATION 1966 Purchase of Equipment. 180,739. 59 Ligh ts a nd P ower . . . 22,609 . 30 Service, Moto r Trans po rt Department 520,022 . 51 Uniforms . . . . . . . 88,146.78 Other Cost of Operation 202,282. 18 Salaries . . . . . . . 5,246,0 14. 55 Salaries - Traffic Policewomen (School Crossings) 90,606.90 Rentals , I.B.M. Etc. 81,042.36 Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . · $6, 431,464.17 �OFFICIAL SEAL CITY OF ATLANTA Edited by Lieutenant CHARLIE BLACKWELL Statistics by TABULATION SECTION �
  • Tags: Box 12, Box 12 Folder 28, Folder topic: Police Department | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 12, Folder 28, Document 35

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_012_028_035.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 12, Folder 28, Document 35
  • Text: �POLICE COMMITTEE OF ALDERMANIC BOARD JACK SUMMERS, Chairman SAM MASSELL. JR. , (President Board of Aldermen) CHARLIE LEFTWI CH, Vice-Cha i rman Q. V . \VILL/AMSON GEORGE COTSAKIS 4 �HENRY L. BOWDEN City Attorney LEWIS R. SLATON Solicitor General Fulton County JOHN E. DOUGHERTY Associate City Attorney �HERBERT T. JENKINS Chief of Police 6 �CITY OF ATLANTA DEPARTMENT of POLICE Atlanta 3, Georgia January 1, 1968 HERBERT T. JENKINS Ch ief Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. and Board of Aldermen City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Gentlemen: I submit herewith the 88th Annual Report of the Atlanta Police Depa rtm e nt for the year 1967. We wish to express our deep app_r eciation to Mayor Ivan A lle n , Jr. , the members of the Police Committee, and the Board of Aldermen for the very fine help and assistance the depar tm e nt has recei v ed in the year 1967. Resp e ctfully, r::1--r J ..&• .11..:~ Chie ,f of Police P' l 7 • �PRESIDENT JOHNSON AND THE NATIONAL ADVISORY COMMISSION ON CIVIL DISORDERS > nr u r ~n G) m u I m n < m -< "Tl C )> )> m. ~ ~ I -U N 0 cm 0) z r (/) -( ) I (/) -,.,.n z: > 1"11 u n I o r (/) I ~ 0...,, ~ r u  :E )> )> ~ -< 0 (/) u  :E (/) ;u r-G) I ~ m 0 )> o"Tl ~ u m )> )> z~ , -r m (/) -I -U 7' )> om 7' o - C 00~ --p O;::.; > r m u ~ -< 0 C o (/) m r ~ �YOU CAN HELP FIGHT CRIME AND PRESERVE ATLANTA ALERT YOURSELF -- LEARN TO PROTECT YOURSELF AND YO~R PROPERTY TAKE PRECAUTIONARY MEASURES -- DO NOT LEAVE KEYS IN AUTOMOBILE -- OR HOUSE KEY UNDER DOORMAT OR IN MAILBOX -- LOCK ALL DOORS AND WINDOWS. PROWLERS TO POLICE . REPORT LI GHTED AREAS OFFER SOME PROTECTION ESPECIALLY FOR WOMEN AND CHILDREN. ALWAYS WRITE THE LICENSE NUMBER AND A COMPLETE DESCRIPTION OF THE PERPETRATORS OF ANY CRIMES YOU WI TNESS IMMEDIATELY AFTER THE INCIDENT. NEV ER FLASH MONEY OR EXPENSIVE JEWELRY IN PUBLIC PLACES. TEACH YOUR CHILDREN NOT TO ACCEPT GIFTS, GET IN CARS OR TALK WITH STRAN- GERS. ALL CITIZENS SHOULD COOPERATE WITH LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES IN COMBATING CRIME. PUBLIC APATHY SHOULD BE ELIMINATED. �TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Accidents - Traffic . . . . . 27-28 Accidents - Traffic Summary . 26 Aggravated Assaults 37 Atlanta Grows 14 . . . Automobiles Stolen and Recovered 41 Burglary . . . . . . . 36 Burglars Select Victim 20 Cases Booked for Trial 43 Classification of Personnel 13 Comparison of Traffic Cases 1966 - 1967 29 Comparison of Major Crimes 1966 - 1967 17 Cost of Operation . 48 Credit Cards . . 34 24-25 Crime Prevention Distribution of Crime by Month 42 Identification Bureau 22-23 Internal Security 46 K-9 . . 21 Larceny 18 Letter by Chief . 7 Letter by Mayor. 3 Major Crimes . . 19 Missing Persons Bureau 42 Murder ...... . 1 5-16 Officers Retired in 1967 49 Organizational Chart 11 Police Emergency Vehicle . 30 Police Training - Activities . 44-45 Radio Dispatches Handled . . 22 Reports Not on F. B. I. Report 41 Safety Committee . . . 40 Traffic Cases Booked . 29 Unincorporated Area Reports 31 -3 2-33 Value of Property Reported Stolen and Returned 38 10 �ORGANIZATIONAL CHART Mayor and Board of Aldermen Police Committee I Chief -.- I BUILDING MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES EQUIPMENT INVENTORY SERVICE DIVISION r----, - - 1 3 1 8 26 11 17 3 SUPERINTENDENT LIEUTENANTS SERGEANT PATROLMEN CLERKS COMMUNICATIONS TEL. OPER. LABORERS BUREAU CRIME PREVENTION I 1 SUPERINTENDENT 3 CAPTAINS 13 LIEUTENANTS 2 SERGEANTS 170 PATROLMEN 115 SCHOOL POLICEWOMEN 3 CLERKS 1 EQUIPMENT OPER. - 1 5 19 1 384 SUPER INT ENDENT CAPTAINS LIEUTENANTS SERGEANT PATROLMEN I GENERAL INVESTIGATIONS I TRAFFIC SAFETY EDUCATION SPECIAL SECURITY SQUAD CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS I TRA FF IC CONTROd ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION UNITS UNIFORM DIVISION I- I IDENTIFICATION - 1 CAPTAIN 2 LI EU TENANTS 3 DETECTIVES CRIME REPORT - I TRAFFIC DIVISION - INTERNAL SECURITY ·- DETECTIVE DI VISION 1 SUPERINTENDENT 5 CAPTAINS 18 LIEUTENANTS 6 SERGEANTS 127 DETECTIVES 40 PATROLMEN 3 PO LI CEWOM EN 17 !DENT. AIDES 29 CLERKS 3 TE L . OP ER. 2 GU AR DS 5 COMMUNICATIONS I COMMUNICATIONS -~ I SCHOOL PATROL I SQUADS AUTO THEFT BURGLARY HOMICIDE LARCENY ROBBERY VICE FUGITIVE JUVENILE LOTTERY WATCHES MORNING DAY EVENING - l I WATCHES MORNING UNINCORPORATED DETAIL I TASK FORCE DAY EVE NING DETENTION DIVISION - 1 SUPERINT ENDENT 3 LIEUTENANTS 3 SERGEANTS 36 PATROLMEN 12 MATRONS 8 CLERKS 3 GUARDS TRAINING DIVISION - 1 2 1 1 SUPERINTENDENT LIEUTENANTS SERGEANT CLERK ,__ LI DETENTION BUILDING CASHIER, BOOKING PRISONERS DETENTION WARD GRADY HOSPITAL PERSONNEL POLICE INVESTIGATION TRAINING Guards tern p oraril y emp l o y e d in p atrolmen vacancies. P e rs onnel as of December 31, 1967. �DIVISIONS OF DEPARTMENT DETECTIVE BUREAU SERVICE D I VIS I O N SUPERINT END EN T C LIN TON _CH AF IN SUPE RI NTEND ENT FRED BEERMAN Comma nding Offic er C omm a nding Offi c er TRAFFIC DIVISION UN I FORM DIVIS 10 N SUP ERINTEN DENT J AMES L. MOSELEY SUPER I NTENDENT J. F. BROWN C omma nding Offic er Commanding Officer DETENTION DIVISION TRAINING SU PER I NTE NDE NT I . G . COWAN DIVISION J. L. T GGLE Comma nding Officer SUPERINTENDE T Comm a ndin g O ffi ce r 12 �PERSONNEL OF POLICE DEPARTMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1967 Rank and Grade Number of Positions Authorized 1 Chief of Police 6 Superintendent 14 . . Captain 60 Lieutenant 14 Sergeant 130 Detective 643 Patrolman 3 Policewoman 3 . . . 5 Communication Clerk 3 Communication Serviceman 1 Communication Supervisor 2 Communication Technician 2 . . . . Custodial Worker 3 Electronics Technician I 1 Equipment Operator 11 Identification & Record Technician I 6 Identification & Record Technician II 5 Keypunch Operator 2 Police Di spa tcher 12 Police Matron Clerk 1 . . . 2 Principal Clerk 1 Principal Stenographer 5 . . . Senior Clerk 3 Senior Stenographer 3 Senior Typist - Clerk 4 S tenographer 1 Storekeeper 17 Switchboard Operator I 3 Switchboard Operator II 40 . . . . . Typist - Clerk 115 School Traffic Policewoman 1, 122 Total 13 Presser �-- - - - - -- = = = =- ATLANTA GROWS The population of Atlanta is growing by leaps and bounds. This growth is accompanied by a similiar growth in traffic. The Atlanta Region Metropolitan Planning Commission predicts by 1983, there will be an estimated four million six hundred thousand vehicular trips made each day on the streets and highways of Metropolitan Atlanta. HEAVY TRAFFIC These predictions are based on statistics and information compiled by the Commission and the Georgia State Highway Department. HEAVY TRAFFIC 14 �HOMICIDE 50 25 75 100 125 150 175 98 Cleared By Arrest 1965 100 118 Cleared By Arrest 1966 121 C l eared By Arre st 137 1967 141 RACIAL DISTRIBUTION OF MURDERS: KILLED BY UNKN OWN 196 5 White Negro 1 1 KILLED BY WHITE 1966 1967 1965 1 3 2 2 20 1 1966 , 1967 24 1 14 2 KILLED BY NEGRO 1965 1966 3 74 3 89 TOTAL 1967 1967 2 119 18 123 141 Murder Weapon Used Where Committed Knives 24 Pis tols 87 Residences Shotguns 14 Business Place s Rifles 1966 1967 72 85 88 9 16 19 19 20 34 100 121 141 5 Stree ts 11 Other Total l 1965 141 Total 15 �MURDER J U V E N IL E S P E RPETR ATORS Negro Negro Negro Negro Negro White White White Negro White White Unknown Male Male Male Female Female Male Male Female Male Female Male kills kills kills kills kills kills kills kills kills kills kills White Negro Negro Negro Negro White White White White White Negro Male Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Fema le Male 2 5 5 72 Homicide victims are juveniles Ju veniles a rreste d a s perpetra tors 25 21 1 9 3 2 0 0 2 4 RECORD 103 30 8 of the p e rpetrators had poli c e records of the perpetrators ha d no police records of the perpetrators were unknown VICTIMS 15 3 White Male White Fema le Negro Male Negro Female 96 IN C OM E AREA S 27 Total 141 102 31 8 Homicide s committed i n low i ncom e a reas Homicide s committed in medium i ncome areas Homicide s committe d in hi gh i ncom e areas 196 4 1965 1966 1967 87 106 100 12 1 141 81 83 105 98 118 137 17 22 15 25 24 28 18 57 62 72 81 76 93 123 1960 1961 1962 196 3 Total 67 74 84 Cleared by Arres t 68 70 Number White 10 Numbe r C olored 57 Doy of Week Monda y Tu es d a y We d nesday 15 13 15 T hur s d a y Friday 18 12 16 Sa t u rd ay 44 Su nday Tora! 24 141 �1966 - 1967 COMPARISON OF MAJOR CRIMES Sl:PERINTENDENT CLINTON CHAFIN Detective Bureau CRIME ........... PERCENTAGE OF INCREASE OR DECREASE CLEARED BY ARREST 1966 1967 NAT'L PERCENTAGE OF AVERAGE CLEAR-UP TOTAL ARREST JUVENILE 1966 1967 Homicide 121 141 + 17% 118 137 97% 89% 139 7 Rape 99 129 + 30% 81 102 79% 62% 121 9 Robbery 473 613 + 30% 267 362 59% 32% 384 91 Assault 925 872 - 6% 837 784 90% 72% 947 50 Burglary 5,291 5,646 7% 1,341 1,800 32% 22% 1,595 793 Larceny Over $50 4,851 4,518 -7% 1,218 1,474 Larceny Under $50 8,255 35% 19% 3,869 1,613 8,632 + 5% 2,782 3,077 Auto Theft 2,391 2,693 + 13% 791 895 33% 23% 1,031 372 Autos Recovered 1,972 2,125 + TOTAL CRIMES - 1966 . 22,406 TOTAL ARRESTS . . . TOTAL CRIMES - 1967 . 23,244 INCLUDED IN THIS TOTAL ARE 2,935 JUVENILE ARRESTS OR 36% In crease of 3. 7% Januar.y through December, 1967 in comparison with same period, 1966, counting Larceny under I 50., not counting Larceny under S50, increase 3. 3%- . . . . . . . 8 ,086 �LARCENY REPORTS INVESTIGATED IN 1967 POCKET PICKING w 0 0 0 °' 0 0 0 -0 N 0 0 <.Tl 0 N 0 0 0 0 0 0 N <.Tl 0 0 w Js. 0 0 0 0 ,.o 0 0 $ 50.00 and over , 4,518 $ 5.00 to $ 50 .00 6,1 4 5 Under $ 5.00 2 ,48i 352 TOTAL REPORTS INVESTIGATED. PURSE-SNATCHING Js. <.Tl 0 289 SHOP - LIFTING 1, 100 THEFTS FROM AUTO (EXCLUDE ACC ESSOR IE S) 2, 867 AUTO ACCESSORIES 3,074 BICYCLE 785 FROM BUILDING 3,28 1 ALL OTHERS 1,074 COIN MACHINES 328 18 13, 150 �.1000 0000 V\ V\ N 9000 00 N r() \0 00 - V\ 00 .... 00 V\ ~' 0 0 00 N t- oo °'.... N -- N 00 �. BURGLARS SELECT VICTIMS The contents of a home determines where some burglars strike, nowadays. A unique system is used in obtaining a list of major appliances he can steal from each home. Information is gathered for the burglar by women who call residences stating she is making a survey and gives the name of a prominent organization with the assurance that she is not conducting a sales gimmick and requests cooperation by answering a few questions needed by her research program. The caller then reads a list of questions such as: Number in family Number employed outside the home Televisions -- size, model, color or black and white Sewing machine -- make, manual or electric Vacuum cleaner -- make and type Radios -- make and size Stereo, if portable Lawn mowers, make, size, riding or self propelled Air conditioning units -- make, tonnage of portable units The caller thanks the housewife for being very helpful. The burglar now has a list of what each home contains. He becomes very selective in his profession. "Ye s, we have a c olor te levis ion." 20 �K-9 SQUAD Outrunning an escaping burglar who has a head start can be very difficult for a police officer, but a simple matter for a K-9 dog, thereby creating a need for a K-9 Squad. Our K-9 Squad consists of one lieutenant and twelve officers, each with a trained dog. When off duty, the dog resides at the hoine of the officer. Befo.re an officer is assigned to the K-9 Squad, his neighborhood is checked for any adverse attitude directed towar.ds a dog living in the vicinity, also, the pen in which the dog is kept must be sanitary and well constructed so as to prevent the dog from escaping. A prospective K-9 dog must have above average intelligence and of even temperment, not over two years of age or under one year of age, should weigh 80 lbs., or more, be in good health, male sex and German Shepherd breed. In selecting a dog for the K-9 Corp, approximately six out of every ten dogs fail to pass tests required by the trainer and are eliminated as prospects for our K-9 Corp. After a dog is selected, he is put through training periods by a professional dog trainer. He is taught to be aggressive and not afraid of gun fire or noise. The dog, during its course of training, is taught to grab the arm in which a perpetrator holds a weapon, thereby preventing use of such weapon. The dog is taught to hold the subject without inflicting additional injury pending the the arrival of the officer. The officer that the new dog will be assigned to work with also attends training school. After graduation, they are designated for street duty. Training wi II continue under the supervision of our professional trainer. Periodically he conducts re-training programs in which the dog is given various tests which indicate its merits and capabilities. The K-9 Squad has two trucks designed to hold the dogs. The trucks are used in covering large areas and transporting the dog from one section to another when necessary. K-9 dogs are very valuable when used for searching large buildings, warehouses and unlighted areas for hidden criminals. 21 �- - - -- - -- - - - - -- - ACTIVITIES OF IDENTIFICATION BUREAU Persons photographed and fingerprinted Persons identified by fingerprints Sets of fingerprints made Dis positions to the F. B. I. Reports to the various courts Reports to probation office , parole board, board of corrections and Bellwood Camp Persons checked for jury duty Criminal calls made for photos and fingerprint dus ting 1966 1967 32,266 12,867 48,646 7,970 23,081 33,177 13,276 49,318 28,270 23 ,580 2,278 51,902 1,665 3,587 397 2,535 7,785 1,688 358 2,141 273 27 8,037 2,161 360 1,826 435 61 OTHER ACTIVITIES Fingerprints classified Wanted persons flagged Latent prints identified Records to Strip File Color photo calls Silv er Nitrate processing RADIO Summary of Work by Radio Station KIA - 532 1965 1966 1967 Othe r Local Departments Dis pa tch es City Dispatches Unincorporated Are a Wagon Calls Lookouts and Miscellaneous Calls 3,134 421,66 2 11 , 538 38,465 303,554 3,879 428 ,802 12,143 38, 143 309 ,708 3,944 413,126 11,369 41,824 295,492 Total Ca ll s 778,353 792,675 765,755 22 �IDENTIFICATION BUREAU A new system was started on a trial basis in the photography section this year. Color slides are made of all persons arrested for robbery and sex crimes. Their image is projected on a screen in exact life size, in natural color and is reviewed by victims and witnesses for identification purposes. The slides are classified and filed according to age, race, sex and height of arrested person. The system is cross indexed with the identification number. During 1967 over 1,700 color slides were made. This system is a great improvement over the four inch by five inch black and white mug shots and produced such favorable results that our present plans are to expand it until all major crimes are eventually included in this color slide system. SEARCHING FOR PERPETRATOR 23 �CRIME PREVENTION ii I, A new concept in cnme prevention was inaugurated by this department during 1967. We are striving to change the thinking and behavior of potential criminals by creating a desire for them to become worthwhile citizens with a correct sense of values which include a respect for City, State and Federal laws and an obedience to home regulation. WE SUPPORT LAW ENFORCEMEN T To deter a person from becoming a criminal and taking the first wrong step, this training must start with youth. Some sections of the city already contain recreational organizations and agencies capable of absorbing the youth population into various constructive activities. SKATE-O-RAMA 2,500 participat ed 24 �CRIME PREVENTION II , In other areas of the city, we find a need for youth guidance organiz a tions. Realizing this need, the department has broadened the structure of crime pre vention by sponsoring several aven ue s of activity for our young people. We encourage and assist groups such as Junior Deputy and Junior Crime Prevention Clubs, since these groups participate in crime prevention by influencing other people to live clean lives. JUNIOR CRIME FIGHTERS Our officers co-operate in providing sight-se e ing tours for the youngsters and assist the Jay cees in providing entertainment during half-time periods at ne ighborhood non-professional football games. Our officers speak to many adult groups suc h as PTA's, ci vic organizations and schools on vanous crime prevention subjects. LOST CHILD FINDS FRIEND 25 �1967 TRAFFIC ACCIDENT SUMMARY l. TYPE OF ACCIDENT All Accidents Motor Vehicle: 1. Ran off Rood ·-3: - 4, Motor vehicle in traffic Property Damage Total Ki lied 16 1,568 27 7 1 48 a b C 737 571 150 16 8 37 16 13 8 29 617 337 189 91 1,364 878 341 145 17,956 39 2,807 1,331 668 808 1, 450 3 105 75 26 4 1,342 3 144 93 38 13 14 9 3 2 67 35 23 9 1 1 40 11 8 2 1 16 1 1 13 9 3 1 4, 861 2,646 1, 196 5 1 2 12 7. Bicyclist 66 1 61 32 21 8 4 i: 8, Animol 1 1 1 9. Fixed object 51 11 7 10. Other object 17 1 11, Other non-collision 25 10 7 2 1 15 2, 907 1,914 735 261 21,001 u 86 32 8 VI 257 19,352 1 --·-0 806 83 21 C 0 1, 149 C 183 6, Ra ilroad train 0 b 327 > 0 -- a 593 ~ 0 Total 29 ..r:: IJ NUMBER OF PERSONS In jured 622 5, Parked motor vehicle u - Total 64 3. Pedestrian ..r:: Fatal 23 2,328 2, Overturned on road NUMBER OF ACCIDENTS Non-Fatal 1 3 1 2 12. TOTALS 23 , 997 89 100 1,019 100 persons killed in 89 fatal accidents. CODE FOR INJURY A - Visible signs of injury, as bleeding or distorted member; or had to be carried from the scene. B. - Other visible in jury, as bruises, abrasions, swelling, limp ing, etc. C. - N o visible injury but complaint of pain or momentary unconsciousness. -" - I ' A ' , ~- - , ' .,, 7 I ,,-~$ , ' I r .:::' ~ I I l I : :' ,~ l ' 't- '::' ' ' ' ,' I .f L ~~ I 1 ,"- ' ~' , - \ ' q, f \ ~ ,_ ffl ' ,- \) /. I I L()b__, '- . -( �26000 24000 22000 20000 18000 17,243 16000 16,428 14000 12000 10000 8000 6 , 833 6,719 6000 r--- 4000 N 3000 25 00 2000 1500 1000 500 100 so 0 94 4 850 �ACCIDENTS 1967 Contributing C ircumstanc e s Ind icated F ata l Accidents All Accidents 1966 Speeding too fas t 1967 1966 1967 830 796 25 15 Fail to yield right-of-way 4,423 4, 075 5 5 Drove le ft of c e nter 1,131 1, 137 11 11 Improper overta king 634 579 2 2 Past stop sign 1,107 1, 111 3 0 Disregarded tra ffic signa l 1,254 1, 220 1 5 Followed too clos ely 6,85 4 6,285 0 2 Ma de improper turn 1,667 1,700 0 0 Other improper driving 5,360 5,49 5 26 31 428 353 0 0 21 26 0 0 938 996 6 2 24,647 23,773 79 73 Ina dequa te brakes Imprope r li gh ts Ha d been drinking Total 1966 105 P ersons ki lle d in 94 fata l a ccident s • 1967 100 P e rsons k illed in 89 fatal ac cide nts By Day of Week Persons Kill ed by Hou r o f Day 11 12 1 2 3 4 5 6 - 12 AM 1 AM 2 AM 3 AM 4 AM 5 AM 6 AM 7 AM Tota l 6 3 1 3 0 1 2 6 22 7 - 8 AM 8 - 9 AM 9 - 10 AM 10 - 11 AM 11 AM to 12 P M 12 - 1 PM 1 - 2 PM 2 - 3 PM Total 4 3 2 1 3 4 6 9 32 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 IO - 4 PM 5 PM 6 PM 7 PM 8 PM 9 PM 10 PM 11 PM Total 28 7 2 7 9 5 11 3 2 46 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Total IO 11 13 11 20 22 13 100 �TOTAL TRAFFIC ARREST 1967 CHARGE I \ Allowing another to drive U/ I Allowing another to drive without license Driving on sidewalk Dri ving on wrong side of street Driving while drivers license suspended Driving wrong way on one way street Failing to give a proper signal Failing co grant or yie ld right of way Failing to obey officers signal Failing to pull to curb to unload passenger Failing to remain in proper lane Failing to -set brakes and curb wheels Failing to stop when traffic obstructed Following too closely Illegal or improper turn Impeding regular movement of traffic Improper entering or leaving vehicle Improper backing Improper brakes Improper emerging from private drive Improper or no lights Improper passing Improper start from parked position Operating motor ve hicle U/I Proj e cti ng load Riding double on motor scooter Spe ed ing Vio lating pedestrians duties Viol a tin g pedestrians rights Viola tin g red li ght ordinance Violati ng stop sign ordinance Blocking traffic Improper changing lanes Motor vehicle colliding with object Ve hicl e leaving street or roadway Vehicle colliding with parked vehicle Bloc king intersection Fail to grant R/W to pedestrian O ther hazardous violations Violating min imu m speed l aw Drag Raci ng Crossing Median TOTAL HAZARDOUS VIOLATIONS ., Fail co abide Fail co appear in court on copy Illegal parking (restricted a rea ) Improper muffler No drivers li c ense Violating truc k and trailer ordinanc e Violating section 18.173 (Fail report a cc.) Illegal parking (overtime) Illegal pzirking (impound) VSMVL Other non-hazardous violations Violating St ate Inspection Law TOTAL TRAFFIC VIOLATIONS Drunk on street Drunk in automobile Ocher non-traffic violations TOT AL ALL VIOLATIONS Cases involving accidents 29 1967 1966 CHANGE 86 305 31 2,384 555 2,484 39 3,086 206 30 9,763 45 9 4,739 15,715 737 17 1,014 185 786 5,075 898 664 4,762 98 6 32,627 1,119 252 19,275 10,490 62 4,033 886 647 844 84 4 358 221 171 347 60 233 33 2,546 596 3,192 54 3,181 223 44 13,285 61 5 5,310 16,106 1,067 28 1,213 215 832 6,581 1,185 636 4,298 40 22 30,068 1,698 197 19,555 8,586 181 3,771 924 635 811 175 4 310 97 111 462 26 72 -2 - 162 - 41 -708 - 15 - 95 -17 - 14 -3522 - 16 4 - 571 - 391 - 330 - 11 -199 - 30 - 46 - 1,506 -287 28 464 58 -1 6 2559 - 579 55 - 280 1,904 - 119 262 - 38 12 33 -91 0 48 124 60 -115 125,139 972 4,218 1,792 1,057 8,415 44 1,114 712 1,86 1 2,564 71 3,839 128,631 1,010 4,499 2,547 979 9,089 116 981 1,390 1,822 2,355 77 1,372 -3492 -38 - 281 - 755 78 -674 -72 133 -678 39 209 -6 2,467 26,659 151,798 389 263 859 26,237 154,868 477 251 935 42 2 -3070 -88 12 -76 1,5 11 153,309 19,377 1,663 156,531 20, 501 -152 -3222 -1 , 12 4 �POLICE EMERGENCY VEHICLES Accidents on our expressway system usually are more s_evere than accidents occurring in slow moving areas. Often times, people are trapped inside wrecked vehicles. Danger of fire is ev er present, thus creating the need for emergency rescue vehicles with great maneuverbility and power. Io answer of chis need , two small but powerful vehicles equipped with four-wheel driv e capable of moving heavy broken down trucks from the traffic arteries were added to the mobile units this year. They are manned by officers trained in resuscitation , first aid and other phases of rescue work. Due to their great maneuverbility, these small vehicles can reach the scene of an emergency much faster than the large heavy type rescue vehicles. These vehicles are in addition to the four trucks that patrol our expressway syste m rendering assistance to stranded motorists . When not involved in rescue operations, the vehicles patrol the e x pre s sways helping ocher police units in the regulation and control of vehicular traffic. Personnel assigned to these vehicles are experts in operating the following equipment c a rried in the vehicles. Resuscitator First Aid Kit Porter power jack Hydraulic jack Wire cutter Jumper cable Metal cutter Bolt cutter Snatch block Wench AC power generator unit Fire extinguisher Electric Metal saw Tow chain Leg splint Arm splin t P O WER JA C K FORCES DOOR OPEN - RESUSC ITA TOR USED 30 �UNINCORPORATED AREA - 1967 OFFENSES AND ACTIVITIES RE PORT UNINCORPORATED AREA OF F ULT ON C OUNTY * * * * Pol ice services furnis h e d to the Unincorpora ted Area of F ulton County are furnis hed by contract between City of Atlanta a nd F ulton County. P E RSO NNEL AN D E QU IP MENT De cember 3 1, 1967 2 C a pta in s 1 L i e u tenant (De tec ti ve) 4 De tec tives 4 Lieutenants (Uniform) P a trolmen P a trol cars Police Wome n (School T ra ffi c) Motorcycles 44 12 11 4 * * * * Apr. May June J uly Aug . Sept. Oct. Nov . Dec. Total 99 111 86. 11 4 104 134 94 126 140 139 1,331 41 42 76 62 70 75 89 56 90 76 68 796 6 0 3 0 1 1 4 2 1 4 4 30 Jan . Feb. Mar. Total traffic accide nts 88 96 Injuries 51 Deaths 4 * * * * VALUE O F PROPERTY STOLEN RECOVERED 1967 1966 1967 1966 1967 1966 Burglaries 423 422 $113,721.63 $108,726.97 $ 8,244-91 $10,917.21 Larcenies 451 366 $101,908.01 53 ,116.85 8,902.62 1,528.11 49 72 86,965.00 93,500.00 66, 015 .00 77,250.00 302,594.64 255,343.82 83,162.53 89,695.32 Larceny of Automobiles Totals 31 �UNINCORPORATED AREA ARRESTS NUMBER OF ARRESTS FBI REPORT - PART ONE 1965 Arrests CRIMINAL HOMICIDE: Murde r & Nonnegligent Mansl aughter Ma ns l aughte r Forcible R a pe Robbery Aggravated As s ault Burglary Larceny Auto Theft 1 1966 4 9 1967 2 7 3 11 9 93 118 7 3 6 5 35 35 16 5 3 39 42 40 108 143 256 7 2 3 3 0 4 5 29 1 0 4 0 3 9 5 1 0 10 13 0 3 1 4 0 200 22 305 55 1 169 10 5 6 5 0 205 8 309 61 1 190 2 26 18 0 4 2 0 0 255 5 266 1 0 31 4 Total - Part Two 794 860 908 Total - Part One a nd P a rt Two 902 1003 1164 35 40 54 22 237 37 821 162 531 544 60 81 116 19 281 59 943 214 565 409 96 152 166 23 349 158 1640 368 985 531 Total Other Traffic Cases 2483 2747 4468 GRAND TOTAL 3385 3750 5632 Total - Part One 1 13 FBI REPORT - PART TWO Other Assaults Arson Forge ry & Counterfe itin g Fraud Embez zlement Stol en P roperty, Buying, Re c eiving, Possessing Vandalism Weapons: Carrying, Possessing, E tc. Pros titution and Comme rc ialized Vice Sex Offenses Narcotic Drug Laws Gambli ng Offe nses Agains t the Family & Children Driving under the Influenc e Liquor Laws Drunkenness Disorderly Conduct Va gra nc y All Other Offe ns es (Exc ept Traffic ) 10 0 OTHER TRAFF IC ARRESTS Driving on Wron g Side of Street Failing to Yield R ight-Of-Way Following T oo C lose Hit & Run No Drivers License Red Light Speeding State-Motor Vehicle Laws Stop Sign Other Traffic Cases 32 �UNINCORPORATED AREA REPORTS FBI REPORT - PART ONE NUMBER OF OFFENSES Offense 1965 1966 1967 CRIMINAL HOMICIDE Murder & Nonnegligence Manslaughter by Negligence 1 6 7 15 10 Forcible Rape Rape by Force Ass ault to Rape-Assault 3 2 1 5 3 2 3 3 0 Robbery Armed - Any Weapon Strong -Arm , No Weapon 9 7 2 3 2 1 6 4 2 11 3 4 0 1 3 l8 6 2 0 2 8 24 7 2 5 2 8 Burglary Forcible Entry Unlawful Entry, No Force Attempted Forc ible Entry 318 299 7 12 422 409 2 11 423 408 3 12 LARCENY $ 50 & Over Under $ 50 159 153 208 158 253 198 Auto Theft 48 72 49 708 908 968 11 4 13 23 52 202 16 203 145 43 6 3 5 18 62 45 201 35 240 117 31 2 1 3 Assault Gun Knife, or Cutting Instrument Other Dangerous Weapon Hands, Fis ts, Feet, E tc., Aggravated Other Assaults , Not Aggravated Total 2 REPO RTS NOT SHOWN ON FBI REPORT Death , Accidental Death , Natural Doors & Windows Found Open Fires Impounded Autos, Etc. Lost Malicious Mischief Misce llaneous Perso ns Injure d Suicides Whiskey Stills De s troyed Whiskey Cars Confiscated 124 124 40 4 11 7 Total 619 711 760 GRAND TOTAL 1327 1619 1728 Illegal (Non-Tax Pa id) Whiskey and Mash De stroyed 3618 4886½ 13 15 39 221 10 33 1 2336 Gal. �LARCENY OF CREDIT CARDS Over 140,000,000 credit cards were in circulation in 1966. This number greatly increased during 1967 . Illegal and unauthorized use of credit cards cost American citizens between twenty-five and thirty million dollars per year and from all indications, this amount will continue to increase. Merely by presenting a credit card, cash and most any type of service or commodity is obtainable on demand by the holder of credit cards. Various methods a re used to obtain credit cards, Some are stolen by pocket pickers , some by resident burglars and some from hotel and motel guests. They are also counterfeited. Airlines, department stores and service stations are targets in the credit card racket. Tremendous bills are run up very fast at motels and hotels especially in large cities . before the owner has any knowledge that. his credit card has been stolen. Service stations are frequent victims in this sophisticated form of larceny . Not only is the credit card used for purchasing motor fuel, it is used for purchasing tires a nd other items offered for sale in the station . In one case, a victim received a bill for twenty high priced automobile tires that had been purchased two at a time in different stations between Atlanta and C a lifornia , using a stolen credit card. In a distant city, a young boy with a stolen credit card ran up bills for over ten thousand dollars having parties and purchasing gifts for girls he met, before being apprehended. HOTEL PAID B Y CR EDIT CARD 34 �GULLIBLE CITIZENS SWINDLED Widows and poor citizens are swindled by fast talking con-men who represent themselves as being reputable building contractors. These contractors seek their victims by door-to-door contact and telephone calls. The victim is promised first class workmanship below the market cost, for additional rooms , carports, driveways, patios and other type of remodeling to their home. In some instances, the victim signs a second mortgage unbeknowing. Tliis is done by the swindler at the time of the signing of the contract. He shuffles a mortgage paper in with the contract papers and the victim innocently signs all papers. In other cases , the perpetrator is given 50% of the total amount of the contract to purchase building material. The balance to be paid upon completion of the job . The perpetrator spends about a half day tearing out or doing preparatory work, leaves the job, neve_r to be heard of again. In mos t cas es , the victims are widows and uneducated people who are not in the position to sta nd such losses . In cases where second mortgages are made, the victim is laboring under the illusion that she is to pay a reasonable amount of money for the job. She is shocked when she receives a past due noti ce that she has failed to pay the first payment due on her second mortgage, which in most cases 1s more tha n she ordinarily would have paid had she been dealing with a reputable contra ctor . SI GNS MOR TGAGE AND C ONTR ACT 35 �BURGLARY 1967 Residence Night Residence Day Residence NON-RES. NON-RES. NON-RES. Total Unknown Night Day Unknown Number Value Jan. 65 108 14 322 15 42 566 90,694.33 Feb. 45 82 22 251 8 34 442 79, 085.84 March 61 97 27 204 9 31 429 65,667.1 7 April 75 113 14 191 7 22 422 54,856.2 1 May 67 89 18 194 10 19 397 73,426.26 June 68 71 19 223 8 14 403 56,908.22 July 77 66 20 304 19 22 508 51 ,821.18 Aug. 87 91 18 217 9 27 449 49,747.. 82 Sept. 85 96 21 190 17 32 441 55,667. 69 Oct. 85 122 25 229 9 19 489 82 ,203. 76 Nov. 58 141 27 287 8 27 548 97 ,476.49 Dec. 79 116 36 284 11 26 552 99,876.88 Total 852 1, 192 261 130 315 5,646 857,431 .85 2,896 36 �AGGRAVATED ASSAULT 1967 0 25 50 75 l 00 125 150 175 200 225 250 275 300 325 350 375 400 425 50 475 White woman attacks White woman 4 White woman attacks White man 9 White woman attacks Negro woman 0 Sund ay Monday Tuesday Wednesday White woman attac ks Negro man Weapons Day of Week 0 Thursday Friday Saturday White man attacks White woman 163 80 91 59 68 -122 289 Force (Bodily) Pistol 26 8 7 343 7 91 19 872 Sho tgun Rifle Ice Pick Knife Iron Pipe Others Unknown 98 White man attacks White man Wh ite man attacks Negro woman 0 White man attacks Negro man 8 Ne gro woman attacks White woman 0 Negro woman attacks White man 0 Total 872 Total Negro woman atta cks Negro wo ma n Negro woman attacks Negro man Negro man attacks White woman Negro man attacks White man Negro man attacks Negro woman 408 Negro man attacks Negro man Not state d TOTAL 872 37 27 344 �VALUE OF PROPERTY REPORTED STOLEN AND RECOVERED 1967 1966 'Recovered Stolen Reco v e red 417,605.07 $ 218,378.60 $ 510,739.19 $ 285, 498.62 February 505,288.07 246,675.92 490,538.26 247,489.86 March 452 ,772.43 235 ,475.97 481,22 7.07 267, 296.99 April 445,658.08 243,827.21 394, 606.97 208,463.8 4 May 429,356.67 193,988.50 470, 556.01 232,849.% June 407 ,708.25 223,725.45 441,070.61 180,665.70 July 521,843.60 302,805.81 575,660.44 31 8,1 65 .97 August 522 ,363.66 253 ,723.91 564,732. 54 243,6 57.05 September 355,099. 78 229 ,289.76 499,018 .38 301,573.84 October 481,287.02 252,0 40.08 470,409 .42 233,370.68 November 476, 416.72 240,367.43 643,693.25 293 ,048.14 December 500 ,772.77 265 ,6 11. 51 639,217. 54 361 ,290.81 $5,516,172 . 12 $2,905,910 . 15 $6,181,469 .68 $3, 173,370.86 Stolen January Total $ 38 �WORTHWHILE ENDEAVORS Many of our police officers are engaged in var10us rypes of commendable activity during their off-duty hours. This rype activity varies from boy scout leadership to conducting religious services for our silent citizens. Due to the limited space m this publication, we are illustrating only two of these endeavors. While a ssi gned to the Morning Watch (12PM-8AM) Officer C. L. Huddleston observed groups of deaf people gathering for fo od and fellowship in a downtown restaurant. He obs erved them very closely and became interested in them. Years lat er, he transferred from the mission committee to the silent department in his church. Not knowing the A B C' s in the si gn language, he studied the sign language i n orde r to take part in teaching the word of God to our d eaf c itizens . Officer Huddles ton now teaches a class of 45 deaf people each Sunday. *********** BIBLE TEACHING BY SIGN LANGUAGE Ray H . Billings, assigned to the Radio Division , the hol der of a Bachelor of Elec tri cal E ngineering Degree from Georgia T e ch , has be en an active scouter for 12 years. He has been a member of the Di strict Eagle Re view Board for 8 yea rs . He served in other capacities such a s c ub pack Trea sur er-secretary , troop a dva ncement chairma n , troop committee ch airman , a ss is tan t scou t ma ster and institutiona l representati ve . Such acu v1ty as overnight campi ng, hikes into various points' throughout the Sta te o f Georgia a nd attending the s ummer troop outings and te a chi ng the boy s scouting s ki lls i s greatly enjoyed by Mr . Billings . S C OUTING 39 �POLICE SAFETY COMMITTEE A Safety Committee authorized to investigate all incidents where police personnel are involved in vehicular accidents and city property is damaged, meets once each week. This Committee consists of one superintendent who acts as chairman and votes only in case of a tie, one lieutenant who acts as secretary and is in charge of motorized equipment, and does not vote, one detective and three patrolmen. After reviewing the evidence, the Committee will decide on one of the following: 1. The officer involved is exonerated. 2. Guilty of failure to avoid or prevent an accident with no penalty. 3. The officer involved be required to give a five minute safety lecture at roll call training. 4.' The Traffic Court conducts a school where first offenders attend in lieu of paying a fine . Traffic laws a re reviewed . The officer must attend one of these schools in uniform in his off duty hours. 5- Probation by Safety Committee for specified time. 6. The officer involved be assigned to a foot beat and not a llowed to dri ve a police vehicle . 7 . The officer be suspended, not to exceed five days. 8. Charges be preferred against the officer and tried before the Police Committee. SA FE TY COMMITTEE 40 �CRIME REPORT BUREAU Reports not shown on F. B. I. Annual Report Lost Ite ms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Recoveries, found, impounded, Etc. . . . Forgery, worthless and ficticious checks. Open doors and windows found by patrolmen Fire s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Deaths, found dead, no crime . . . . Damage to police property, cars, motorcycles, etc. Pers ons i n jured , other than traffic accidents , etc. Mali cious Mi schief and vandalism . Burned to Dea th . . . . Miscellaneous . . . . . Whiskey cars confiscated Lottery c a rs c onfiscated . Narcotic cars confiscated Unruly pri sone rs . . . . Damage to City p roperty - non-police Offic ers injured . . . . . . . . . Moles ting minor, pu blic indec en cy, e tc . Attempted suicide. . . Suic ides . . . . . . . . . . . Fire - Smokin g in Bed . . . . . Persons bi tten by dogs and c ats Accidental s hootings . • . Injured in fires . . . . . . Sus pic ious fires , ars on , etc . Arrest . . . . . . Missing P ersons . . . . . Vulgar phone c a lls . . . . Operating without owners consent . 1, 149 5,456 1, 454 1,082 748 835 673 1, 018 2,510 5 838 47 26 9 358 441 270 254 200 55 75 139 92 26 55 7,114 1,719 55 327 Total . . . . . . . . . . 27,030 Unin corporated area reports Unincorporated area unfounde d reports Unfounded reports (City) . . . . . . Report shown on F . B . I. copy (City) 1,728 58 1,846 22 , 16 8 Tota l . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52,830 AUTO MOB I LES STOLE N AND R E COVERED 196 1 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 Au tomobil es reported stolen 2,718 3,622 3,417 4 , 210 2,974 2 , 391 2,693 Stolen automobiles recovere d 2 ,269 2, 510 2,536 3,0 35 2,280 1 ,972 2, 12 5 Stolen elsewhere, recovered h ere in 1967 Number 222 Value $365,504.00 41 �CRIME REPORT BUREAU Distribution of Crimes by Months Robbery Aggravated Assaults Burglary Larceny 8 17 12 10 13 9 49 56 39 51 40 33 38 68 54 49 68 68 63 58 51 86 79 76 96 106 59 53 1,137 1,061 1,148 1,101 1,141 969 1,103 1,136 73 566 442 429 422 397 403 508 449 44 1 489 548 552 1,068 1,096 1,191 220 229 214 181 233 196 252 242 184 191 267 284 129 613 872 5,646 13,1 50 2,693 Rape J anuary Fe bruary March April May Jun e July Augus t September October November December Totals 5 4 15 10 17 9 72 999 Auto Larceny MISS I NG PERSONS NEGRO WHITE Age Male Femal e Mal e Female Totals 1 - 5 5 6 8 4 23 6 - 10 24 9 29 19 81 11 - 16 209 286 108 190 793 17 - 20 69 111 32 69 281 21 - 30 68 71 37 44 220 31 - 40 38 35 26 33 132 4 1 - 50 33 19 22 7 81 OVE R 50 47 18 28 15 108 493 555 290 381 1,719 Tota l s 96% of pers ons reported missing located or returned. �CASES BOOKED Type of Violation White Mal e Whi te Femal e Negro Male Negro Female 17 Yea rs and Under Total Number Arrested White Negro Murder and Non-Negligent 14 Rape 28 Robbery 73 Aggravated Assault 126 Burglary 230 Larceny 516 Auto Theft 232 Other Assaults 529 Arson 2 F orgery and Counterfeiting 88 Fra ud 93 Embezzlement 0 Stolen Properry (Receiving) 51 Vandalism 132 Weapons - C. C. W. - C. P . W. L. 320 Prostitution and Vice 46 47 0 24 33 0 10 IO 21 116 79 183 563 422 924 312 694 4 50 33 0 58 173 885 31 21 0 3 160 20 333 10 110 4 20 20 0 6 28 100 32 0 10 0 14 103 13 66 9 617 291 518 1,345 164 296 50 159 2 5 10 21 7 10 0 0 12 19 154 133 22 98 I 4 139 121 384 947 1,595 3,869 1,031 1,589 17 213 196 0 156 630 1,446 230 273 Narcoti c and Dangerous Drugs 318 Gambling 85 Offenses agains t Family-Children 57 Driving Unde r the Influ e nce 2,795 Liqu o r L aws 289 Drunkenness 25, 508 Disorderly Conduc t 6,387 Vagrancy 145 All other, except traffic 216 Run-Aways-loitering-Curfew 0 15 95 14 20 243 43 2,113 1,032 106 49 0 206 184 709 29 1,630 534 14,315 9,729 104 298 0 22 57 357 18 64 190 1,887 2,579 14 75 0 31 29 18 14 11 49 0 6 25 5 16 9 77 56 1,068 1,574 14 8 44 13 380 234 576 686 1,225 130 4,762 1,081 43 ,956 22,369 391 695 61 4 Total 4,290 32,241 6,130 2,863 4,971 89,048 Manslaughter 2 0 9 23 15 233 17 92 Sex offenses, except Rape & Prostitution 38,553 General Court Cases 43 79,280 �TRAINING DIVISION Conducted four Recruit Classes, 240 hours each with eight (8) visiting office rs from police departments in the Atlanta Metropolitan :Area. Conducted three examinations on Training Bulletins furnished by International Chiefs of Police Association. One officer graduated from the F. B. I. National Academy in Washington , D. C. The purpose of the three months course at the "West Point of Law Enforcement" is to prov ide officers with a knowledge of the latest administrative and investigative developments in the law enforcement profession. Two officers graduated from the Southern Police Institute , Louisville, Kentucky. A three months course in Police Organization and Administration , Human Relations , Criminal Law , Police Planning, Traffic Control, Juvenile Investigations and Public Speaking. Conducted thirty-seven (37) tours of the Police Station for a total of 506 p e rsons. Three (3) officers attended the Aircraft Rescue Demonstration School. Nine (9) officers attended two weeks Traffic School at the Georgia State Police Academy sponsored by Northwestern Traffic Institute. Twelve (12) officers received s pecia l first aid a nd rescue ope rations c ourse fa milia rizing them with new emergency units. One officer attended Harvard University three weeks for a course m " Manage ment Insti tute for Police Chiefs". Se venteen (17 ) officers a ttende d Georgia State Police Acad e my for a course m Police Manage ment and recruit s chool. One officer attended a Workshop at the University of Georgia for one week for a cours e i n Polic e Supervision. Three (3) officers attended the University of Ge org ia for a course in C ommunity R e la ti ons. (one week) Sixty-six (66) officers were issued the report on the President's Crime C ommission entitled "Challenge of Crime in a Free Society" Dis tributed 20,800 copie s of I. A. C. P. Tra ining Keys to me mbe rs of the departme nt. Dis tribute d 287 copies of " Ana lys i s of Ge neral S ta tutes E nacted at the 1967 Se s s ion o f the Ge n e ra l Assembly." Conduc ted thirty-nine (39) lectures to civic g roups, c hurches , and s ch ools. Two (2) officers ma de two fil ms for trai ni ng purposes. 44 �TRAINING DIVISION Ten (10) officers lectured at the Georgia State Police Academy. 340 officers were given firearms instruction at the Atlanta Police Departtnent Pistol Range. Twenty-six (26) Sight and Sound Training Films sponsored by the International Association of Chiefs of Police were shown to members of the departtnent. 800 members of this departtnent participated in law enforcement training programs at the University of Georgia, Division of Law and Government. 38,400 Training Bulletins issued in conjunction with this program. INTERNAL SECURITY The Atlanta Police Department's Internal Security Squad is charged with, and performed the following functions: Investigated and made su=ary and final reports on complaints against Police Departtnent Personnel. Investigate and as certain the honesty and integrity of police personnel. Interviewed 583 new police applicants. Conducted a complete investigation on 368, recommended 2 51 for employment and of this number, 167 were employed. Intervi ewed 37 applicants for reinstatement as patrolmen. recommended reinsta ting 21 as patrolmen . Conducted investigation on 33 and Conducted 15 investigations on applicants for out-of-town police departtnents. Investigated and approved or rejected a ll applications for extra police jobs for off-duty and retired officers. Established a systematic file on complaints a nd report i=ediately to the Chief of Police any case that might require disc iplinary ac tion; and to furnish a summary report of all activities to the Chief of Police . POLICE OFFICERS ASSAULTED OFFICERS ASSAULTED JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC. TOTAL 19 33 33 29 26 24 38 26 34 32 28 33 355 OFFICE RS INJURED B Y PRISONERS OFFICERS ASSAULTED NOT INJURED OFFICERS INJURED IN ACC ID ENTS UNRULY PRISONERS 6 6 15 23 22 18 22 15 28 22 27 22 22 27 IO 9 15 17 15 21 12 12 15 23 14 15 18 33 33 29 25 29 38 24 34 34 28 33 92 263 178 358 4 10 11 11 4 9 IO 4 7 10 Officers receiving minor injury not shown. Only cases requiring hospital treatment included. In some incidents, more than on e office r and one prisoner are involved. 45 �KNOWLEDGEABLE A number of our police personnel have earned their college diplomas. Forty-eight officers now attend colleges and universities in the Atlanta area, completing courses of instructions in their off-duty hours. Thirty-three of our officers are holders of bachelor degrees and eight have masters degrees in law. Fourteen officers have completed courses at the FBI Academy. Several have attended the Traffic Institute at Northwestern University and the Southern Police Institute. The Georgia State College now offers a two year course in Police Administration which leads to an Associates of Arts Degree. The College is one of the few institutions in the nation offering this course. Twenty-six Atlanta police officers are presently enrolled in this degree program. Various degrees held by other officers include: One 'Bachelor Electrical Engineering One Associate of Art Three Bachelor of Business Administration ~ r J_.? Three Bachelor of Science Four Bachelor of Art One Bachelor of Divinity r .j ATTEN DING COLLEGE 46 �ALCOHOLISM A ruling by the Superior Court caused a change in drunkenness cases booked after July 19, 1%7. This ruling applies only to chronic alcoholic cases. In the new ruling, the order stated that "excusal of one afflicted with chronic alcoholism from criminal prosecution is confined exclusively to those acts on his part which are compulsive as symptomatic of the disease and with respect to other behavior -- not characteristic of confirmed chronic alcoholism - he should be judged as any person not so afflicted." The judge did not exclude those drinkers whose alcoholic binges cause great harm to others and to the peace in general. It did not excuse those who get drunk and disturb the peace at will. It did Iiot excuse arrest of those drunk on the streets or in public places who are not classed as chronic alcoholics. The menace to the community of such persons will still be acknowledged. The Fulton County case is the first time in Georgia alcoholism has been judged to be a disease a nd not a cri me. Chronic alcoholics are not exempted from criminal guilt in cases involving criminality. The ruling reduced the effectiveness to only cases of drunkenness, loitering, and other directly rel ated to the state of intoxication. ALCOHOLIC 47 �ATTEMPT SUICIDE Attempt suicides show a drastic increase in recent years. In 1963 one hundred and forty-seven persons attempted to take their own lives. 1n 1967 two hundred persons attempted to take their lives. The records indicate that people who survive this searing emotional experience constitute a pool from which completed suicides are later drawn. Below is the age, sex and race breakdown on attempt suicides for 1967. 20 & 21-25 26-30 36-40 31-35 41 - 45 46 -50 51-55 56& Under Total Over White Male 10 16 6 5 10 5 3 5 8 68 White Female 12 16 17 13 9 7 1 3 3 81 7 3 3 2 2 0 0 0 0 17 Negro Female 15 11 3 3 1 2 1 0 0 34 Total 42 46 29 23 22 14 5 8 11 200 Negro Male POLICE DEPARTMENT COST OF OPERATION 1967 Purchase of Equipment. · · $ 274,260.99 Lights and Power . . . . 21,101.33 Service, Motor Transport Department . 575,966.95 Uniforms . . . . . . . 112,648.50 Other Cost of Operations 212,387.14 Salaries . . . . . . . 6,284,103.15 Salaries - Traffic Policewomen (School Crossings) 99,835 .60 Renta ls , I. B. M. E tc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105,377.77 Tota l . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 7,685,681.43 �t f'li. 1 nlMoh.:vi 1 IK ; ('ir:.;;'!!, S/J'*'W t; '••"'n^ .... I"'" , '•'! ^5^ 1 > H 1.' 111:' ;ii : >ii g— -«pv' fi^i^FviP-taaan jRt i 'i- Miti" .1,1 'ili V. Si! "I Ill .d',! .'I . '-.lie, MM m ri- hi. Sii ' Ji Kii POLICE OFFICERS PENSION IN 1967 Ififikuiiiferfi' •rft' •/fl'w I.?: 'if rv^r-'! Name Rank Retirement Date iU TV«i I, , ' Years of Service .♦,tU . Young Howard Allen 1. February 1, 1967 Detective ♦Hti 28 years '•1 Marion W. Blackwell 2. March 28, 1967 Lieutenant fjr. 25 years 3. Lewis L. Lackland Patrolman April 15, 1967 25 years 4. E. C.(Roy) Mitchell Patrolman May 1, 1967 25 years 5. George L. Newton Patrolman July 3, 1967 28 years 6. Durrell Fuller Patrolman July 7, 1967 30 years 7. Robert L. Shutley Detective August 1, 1967 25 years 8. Charles E. Strickland, Sr. Patrolman August 7, 1967 29 years 9. David W. Clayton, Jr. Patrolman August 18, 1967 (Disability) , , V' SX' Sdf " ' 1 ' 4 .A: - 24 years 1 ♦1., ' fi 10. Clem H. Former, Jr. Lieutenant August 28, 1967 25 years 11. Edwin A. Barfield Lieutenant August 31, 1967 28 years 12. Erah C. Carter Patrolman October 11, 1967 25 years 13. George E. Wallace Patrolman October 20, 1967 31 years (|7- '!. 'r hi cL ' t', >'i4h 14. Norman R. Clodfelter Sergeant October 21, 1967 s< 28 years . G Quinton F. Hays 15. November 30, 1967 Patrolman I f" I I'yl 25 years v/i NOTE: i )«ii To qualify for retirement an officer must be 55 years of age and have a minimum of 25 years of service. ti n ^ t-iSv.::- . B o iu Ty o o O o a p JS ro H XT O VN rg S ^ (N a. w o sq^ T—I o SO C\ cA 00 CO SO O r-S \c 00 > r(N v/^ CO sO - ^ KS CO -<1 CO \r\ e C ^ " c vr\ \r iT \r CN O o CO ' . �OFFICIAL SEAL CITY OF ATLANTA I Edited by Lieutenant CHARLIE BLACKWELL Statistics by TABULATION SEC TION �
  • Tags: Box 12, Box 12 Folder 28, Folder topic: Police Department | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017