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Box 14, Folder 20, Document 2

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_014_020_002.pdf
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  • Title: Box 14, Folder 20, Document 2
  • Text: United States of America Vol. 112 veragc of lc,c1l employees under the State mertt system; (2) technical services In one or m ore areas or personnel admJnlstratlon s uch as recruitm e nt. exnmlnations, classification and compensation pla ns; (3 J cooperative resear ch and demon stration projects for the u se of valid personnel m ethods ; or (4) intergovernmental cooperntlve arra n gem ents between the Sta te and local governments or among local governments, Including facili tating Inter jur isdictional loans, transfers or promotions or personnel; (c) provide for financial participation by State or such local governments, or both, In the costs of providing services a t least equa l In runount to the F ed er al grants, a nd provid e further thn t the opera tlon of the pla n will not result in a r eduction In State and local expenditures or a eubstitutlon of Federal for State or loca l funds for personnel admin is tration; and (d) provide that the State agency will m a ke such reports in such form and containing su ch information as t he Secretary may from time to time r equire and shall keep and m a ke available such records as he may require for the verification of such reports, Part C. Grants for personnel administration in m etropolitan areas Soc. 207(a). From the sums appropriated under section 202 ( c ) the Secretary shall m a ke an nually payments to States or m&tropolitan units of general loca l government which have projects approved by him under section 206. SENATE (b) The Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare, with the concurrence of the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, shall establlsh such standards for the distribution of grants under this section among the States a nd among such metropolitan units as will most effectively carry out the purposes of this Act, and shall estabJlsh regulations for financial participation by States or such units, or b oth, in an amount equal to at least one-third of the costs of each project, including the reasonable value of facliities a nd personnel services made avaliable by the State or such loca l government for the administration of the project. Project requirements SEC. 208, Projects to be approved for grants unde r section 207 shall conform to ,criteria established in regUlations which shall be Issu ed by the Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare, with the concurrence of the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development. Grants wiU be used, in accordance with such regulations, for projects for strengthening personnel administration on a merit basis in order to meet increasingly critical problems of administration In metropolitan units of general loca l government. Projects may Include, but are not limited to-( 1) assessment of m anpower needs In developing programs and methods for meeting them; (2) Improvement of classification and compensatioh plans, and recruitment and examinations, particularly for profeeslonal, administrative and technical personnel In shortage ca tegorles; (3) application of psychological and other research in personnel administration directed toward improvement of selection and development of members of disadvantaged groups whose capacities are not being fully used; (4) plans for establishing auxiliary or support types of positions to perform a ppropriate functions currently performed In occupations In which there are now shortages; (5)research and demonstration relating to t echniques, such as electr onic d a ta processing, for Improving the speed and quality of personnel operations; and ( 6) cooperative activities in recruitment and examining by governmental Jurisdictions operating In metropolitan areaa. Exceptlon--Submittal of Local Projects SEC. 209. After the expiration of one year from the date or enactment of this Act, if a State h as n ot submitted any proje{:ts under section 208 of this title which have received approval, the metropolitan units of general local government may submit proj ects for approval , a nd such projects may be approved If they comply with the reqUlrements or section 208. Administration SEC. 210. The provisions of this title shall be adminis tered by the Secr etary, who Is authorized to furnish such technica l assistance to States or units or general local governments and to prescribe such regulations as may be necessary to carry out the purposes of this title , Suspension of Grants SEC. 2 11. Whenever the Secretary, after giving reasonable notice and opportunity for hearing to the State or local agency administering a plan approval under this title, finds ( 1) that s uch plan has been so changed that it no longer complies with the provisions of thls title, or (2) that 1n the administration of the plan there Is a failure to comply substantially with any s uch provision, the Secr etary shall notify such agency o! h!s findings and no further payments will be made to the State or other recipient under this title (or in his discretion further pay- 1 May 25, 1966 ments wlll be limited to projects pnder, or portions of, the plan not affected by such failure), until he ls satisfied that there will no longer be a ny failure to comply. TITLE III-AUTHORIZATION FOR TRAINING D eclaration of Purpose SEC. 301. The plll'pose of this title is to foster the training of State and local employees by permitting their attendance at Federal courses, and by authortzing Federal departments or agencies administering grantin-aid progrruns to conduct training and to permit Federal grants to States and localities to be used for training and educational leave. Participation In Federal Programs SEC. 302. Any Federal department or agency conductlng training programs for professiona l, administrative, or technical employees In the Federa l service is a uthorized to include In such programs , under conditions imposed by the head of such agency, State and local officers and employees in sim_Uar or related functions, on the request of the State or local government. Fees for attendance at any such training program may be received by the Federal agency conducting It and expended In the same manner as fees r eceived for attendance of Federal employees, or the payment of fees may be waived in occupational categories d etermined by the head of the Federa l department or agency to be in short supply. Training In Grant-Aided Programs SEC. 303 , Any Federal department or agency administering a program of gr ants or financia l assistance to States and localities is au thorized (a) to conduct training for State and local officers and employees in professional, administrative, and technical fields r elated to such programs: (b) to make grants to State and localities from Federal funds appropriated for State or local administrative expenses of the program, unc!er the usual terms and conditions of such grants, for the conduct of training for S tate and local officers and employees In such progra m: and (c) to make grants to State and loca lities from Federal funds appropriated for State or local administra tive expenses of the progr am , under the usual terms a nd conditions of s u ch grants, for education a l leave or comparable arrangements for sala ries a nd training expenses or employees In professiona l, administrative, and technica l fields who h ave been employed under a merit system of personn el administration in State or local agencies ad ministering the federally aided program, In order for . them to attend university or other training courses related to the program. S aving Provis ion SEC. 304. The a uthorizations in this title are not a limita tion on exis ting authority u nder la w for Federal d epartments or agencies to conduct training or to make grants for training or edu cational leave. TITLE IV-GRANTS FOR TRAINING OF STATE AND LOCAL EMPLOYEES Declaration of Purpose SEC. 401. The purpose of this title Is to promote higher levels of performance of employees In the public service, particularly in professional, administrative, and techn ica l fields , and the development of employee potentia l by providing Federal assistance to State and local gov er nm en ts to ins ti tu t c and carry out programs for the training of their employees ln fields where such Federal assistance is not already provided under grant-in s.Id or other statutes. Appropriation Authorization SEC. 402. There Is h ereby authorized to be appropriated the following sums for payments to States and units of general local government which h a ve plans approved un der this title for the training of their employees: tl0,000,000 for fiscal year 1967, $25,- �May 25, 1966 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD - 000,000 for fiscal year 1968, and $50,000,000 for each of fiscal years 1969, 1970, and 1971. Grants Authorized SEC. 403(a). From the sums appropriated under section 402 the Civil Service Commission (hereinafter referred to as the Commission). shall make annually grants to States or units of general local government which have plans approved by It under sections 404 and 405, respectively. , (b) The sums available annually !or grants under this section shall be allotted among the States, and between States a nd units of general local government In a State, under formulas to be approved by the Commission which shall gi ve weight to the number of State and local employees, the number of local governments p a rticipating, the scope of training to be provided , and the financial ab lllty of th e State as indicated by Its relative per capita Income , excep.t that each State will receive not Jess than $25,000 for fiscal year 1967 and $50,000 annually therea fter. Requirements of State plans SEC. 404. A State plan for training of officers and employees to be approved mus t ( 1) designate the State agency for the admini stration of the plan; ( 2) set forth a program for the training of omcers and employees of States and units of general loca l government which will meet the objectives of this title and provide for training personnel of agencies not r ece iving assis tance under other Federal program s ; (3) provide for continuing assessment of trai ning needs ; (4) set for th equitable standards for the selection and assignment of personnel for training; (5) provide fo r the efficient utillzation of p ersonnel who h ave been given such training, a nd for their continued service for a reasonable p eriod of time; (6) provide that educational leave or other arra n gements for p aymP.nt of salary and training expenses for period s In excess or one month in a ny one year sh a ll be allowed only for career personnel empl oyed in accordance with a merit system; (7) set forth, when training ls to be given through univers ity or other nongovernmental facilities t h e policies with respect to the selection of such facilities and the types of agreements to be entered Into for th e training ; and (8) provide for financl ,t l p:nticlpation by the States. the uni ts of genera l loca l government thereof, or from private sources. in a n amount equal to one-fourth of the cost or the training, In cluding the reasonable value of facilities and personal se rvices made available for admini stration of the training, provided that the operation of the plan wlll not r esu lt in a reduction in State and local expenditures or substitution of Federal for State or loca l funds !or training . Exception-Submitta l of Loca l Plans SEC. 405. I! after one year from the effective date of this Act, a State has not sub mitted and had approved a plan under sec tion 404, Including provision for training o! local governmental emr-'oyees Involving expenditures at Ins t equ iv alent to the expendi tures for training of State government employees, one or more units of general loca l government In the State Jointly or severally may submit a plan for such training during the following fiscal year, designating a single local agency for adm ini stration and otherwise conforming to the requirements of section 404 under regulations which sha ll be prescrl bed by the Commission with the concurrence or the Secretary o! Housing and Urban Development. Administration SEC. 406. The provisions of this title shall be admlnlstered by the Commission, which SENATE 10989 Is authorized to furnish such technical assistance to States or units of general iocal government a nd to prescribe such regulations as m ay be necessary to carry out the purposes of this title. Suspension of Grants SEC. 407. Whenever the Commlssion, after giving reasona ble notice and opportunity for hearing to the State or other agency administering any plan app~oved under this title, finds (a) that a State or other plan has been so changed that It no longer compiles with the provis ions of th.ls title, or (b) that in the administration of the plan there ls a !allure to comply s ubstantially with any such provision', the Commission shall notify such agency of !ts findings and no further payments will be made to the State or other recipient under this title (or In !ts discretion further payments wlll be llmlted to projects under, or portions of, the plan not affected by such !allure) until It ls satisfied that there will no longer be any failure to comply. Metropolltan Unit of General Local Government SEC. 703. "Metropolltan un!t(s) of general local government" mea ns any city or comp a ra ble general-purpose political subdivision of a State with a population of 100,000 or more, as determined by the most recent Federal census, or any county or parish with such population which Includes a city or comparable subdivision with a population of 50,000 or more, as determined by such census. Non-metropolltan Unit qf General Loca l Government SEC. 704. "Non-metropolltan unlt(s) of general local government" means any city, county, p al\ish, town, village or other generalpurpose polltlca l subdivision of a State, except such units of general local government as are included In section 703 of this Act. TITLE V-COOPERATION JN PERSONNEL RECRUITMENT AND EXAMINATION SECTION-BY-SECTION ANALYSIS OF THE INTER- SEC. 501. The Commission Is authorized to Join, on a shared-cost basis, with State or units of general local government or both, in cooperative recruitment or examinations under such regulations as may be Jointly agreed upon . SEC. 502. The Commission Is authorized, upon written request from a State, a unit of general loca l government thereof, or both, and under such regulations as may be Jointly agreed upon , to certify to such agencies, from appropriate registers, a llst of ellglble personnel who h av e successfully completed such examinations a nd satisfied such requirements as the Commiss ion has prescribed, upon the pay ment by the unit of government making the request, of the salaries and such other costs for performing such service. SEC. 503. The terms of reimbursement for the service authorized under section 502 shall be d etermined by the Commission. All mon eys received by the Commission In payment for furnishing such serv ice a uthorized s hall be deposited to the credit of the a ppropriation of the Commission. There being no objection, the bill and the section-by-section analysis was ordered to be printed in the RECORD , as follows: GOVERNMENTAL PERSONNEL ACT OF Section 1. Short title. Section 2. Declaration of Polley. 1966 Under our federal system and In an Increasingly complex society, effective State and local governments are Indispensable. Their efficiency a nd administrative competence Is of nationa l concern, p articularly since many programs they administer are federally financed . The appllcatlon of merit systems of p ersonnel administration In certain federally aided progra ms h as contributed to their efficiency, and such systems should b e extended to other grant programs. Federa l fin a ncia l a nd technical assistance should a lso be made avallable to State and local governments to strengthen their overall personnel administration. The Federal Government should encourage and assist in the continuing training and development of State and local employees, particularly in professional, administrative and technical fields , in order to Improve the capab!llty of the public service. The Act recognizes that the success o'f the Joint-action programs enacted by the Congress and the State legislatures Is vitally affected by the caliber of State a nd loca l personnel a dministering them. It recognizes TITLE VI-AUTHORITY FOR INTERSTATE COMPACTS that a ll levels of government Involved · In SEC. 601. To promote higher personnel these Joint ventures-Including the Federal standa rds and mobillty of quallfied person- Government-have not only a right but a n el, particularly profession a l , administrative, duty to take steps to see that such progra ms and tech nical personnel In s hortage cate- are efficiently a dministered and that the -gorlcs, the consent of the Congress Is hereby fund s provided a re u sed effectively to accom give n to any two or more States to enter Into plish the purposes prescribed by Jaw . The compacts or other agreements, not In conflict Act, then, Is designed to assist State and with any law of the United States, for co- loca l governments in strengthening their opernLlve efforts and mutual assistance (In- partners hip role In the federal system. cluding the establishment of such agencies, States and Iocall ties are facing cri tlca l Joint or otherwise, as they deem desirable) for the admin is tration of personnel and problems In the recruitment, selection. and training programs for officers and employees retention of well-qualified personnel for new and expanded programs. This shortage Is of State a nd local governments. acute In the upper levels, both In the public TITLE VII-DEFINITIONS and pri vate sectors of the economy. The When used tn this Act, State and loca l flnanclal and technical resources for publlc personnel a dministration State SEC. 701. The term "State" means any of and staff development, however, h ave not the several States of the United States, the kept pace with the growth of the programs District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, any terri- they administer. Yet, qualified personnel tory or possession of the United States, or and sound personnel policies are absolutely any agency or lnstrumentallty of a State, but essential to effective governmental operadoes not Include the governments of the po- tions . The Act proposes to bulld on the Interlltical subdivisions of any State. governmental personnel experience in certain Merit System grant-In-aid programs. It would make SEC. 702. "Merit system" means a planned matching grants and technical services availState or local operation to develop and main- able to State and local governments for the tain an efficient career service, under publlc improvement of their overall personnel adrules, which among other provisions Include ministration . It would encourage cooperaappointment through competitive examina- tive efforts In recruitment and training on tion, nondiscrimination in race, polltlcs or an lnterle vel and Interstate basis. It would rellglon, equal pay ror equal work, tenure make available Federal training facilities contingent on successful performance, and and also provide grants and technical assistpromotion on evaluated capacity and service. ance for training. Thus, It balances the need �10990 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD-SENATE t o f ost er dynamic p ersonnel systems f o r r ecrui t m e nt of Sta te ana local staffs of high ca p a.c lty with an effort to assis t In their continuous development. TITL E I - EXT E N S ION OF THE M ERIT SYS T EM I N F E DERALLY AIDED PROGRAM S This title a uthorizes the Preside n t, In orde r to achie v e grea ter efficiency in a dministr ation of p rogr a m s fina nce
  • Tags: Box 14, Box 14 Folder 20, Folder topic: Urban Policy Council | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 14, Folder 20, Document 3

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_014_020_003.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 14, Folder 20, Document 3
  • Text: ~ /V&k ~ ·~:c:. ,~~2~ @}~@~®~ ~'CQJ~IT©IT~£& COLUMBUS M A YOR MA LCOL M // R. MAC L EA N, ,u .A A First Vi ce President ~-L// SAVANNAH MAYOR J o H N L. C ROMARTIE, GA IN ESVILLE ~ ~ © © ~~ IT©~ VV . EL~·t E R GEORGE, 4 06 FULTON FEDERAL BUILDING• / ATL A NTA . GEORGIA 30303 / Second V ice President Executive Director TELEPHONE 255-0424 June 3, 1966 ACT I V E PAST PR E SID E NT S C I T Y COMM I SS I ONER J O H N E . YA RB R OUGH I MMED I ATE P AST P R ES I D E N T ROME , GA . MA Y OR R ANDO L P H M EDL OCK S T ONE M O UNTAIN , G A . MAYOR W . 8. W ITHE R S M OULT RI E , GA . Mr. Dan E. Sweat, Associate Administrato :ti EOA, Inc. /__ 101 Marietta Street Building, Room 400 ( _ _ Atlanta, Georgia 30303 CIT Y CO MM I S SIONER C A RL E . PRU E TT GR I F FIN , GA . Dear Dan: M AY OR 8 . F. ME RRITT , JR . MAC O N , GA . FIRST DISTR I CT PRES I DENT MAYOR J AC K A . LER O Y AILEY I am calling a meeting of the GMA Services Evaluation Committee for Thursday, June 9, 1966. The meeting will begin at 12:00 Noon in Elmer George's office, and after luncheon together, we will wind up at approximately 3:00 P. M. D I R ECTOR MAYOR J . W . SNE L L WRIGHTS V I L L E S E CO ND P RES I DENT MAYOR W . PE LH AM DIST RI CT P. H EN R Y D I REC T OR M AY O R MACK E . W ILLI S B A I N B R I DGE THI RD Elmer and Jim Burgees have been working up several important items for consideration by the committee and these have been documented, to save time. D I ST RI CT PRESIDENT R ICHARD 8 . RAY PERR Y DIRE C TOR MA Y OR 0 . E . WH I T E P I NE MOUNTA I N F O URTH I do not believe there will be a more important GMA program this year than the one being undertaken by our committee and it will be appreciated if you will be pre sent. Before it is over, we may have to involve Federal agencies, the National League of Cities, our Congressional delegation, the Governor, State Legislature and county officials. DISTR IC T PRES I DEN T C O U NCILMAN LI NT O N BROOME DO RAV ILLE DI R ECTOR CO U NCILMAN C L Y DE J. H IC KS CONYERS FIFTH DISTRICT PR ES I DEN T MAYOR A U BRE Y E . GREENW A Y ROSWE LL D I RECT O R ALDERMAN E . GR E GOR Y GR I G GS AT LANTA SIXTH Please advise on the attached postal card if you can attend this first meeting of our committee. DISTRICT PRES I DEN T MA Y OR J . GARD N ER NE W MA N L AG RAN G E D I R E CTOR MA Y OR HE R BERT H . JONES Sinc e r e l y, Mc DONO UGH SEVENTH ~ DISTRICT PRE S I DEN T MAYO R J . C . WOODS TR I ON D I RE C T O R MA Y O R R A L P H R . C LA R K, JR . John Cromartie, Chairman GMA E valuation C ommittee R I NGGO LD EIGHTH DISTRICT PRE S I DE N T MAYOR E LT ON D . B ROO K S DOU GL A S J C:rg Enclo s u r e D I R ECTOR MA YOR JAM ES T . WI ND S OR , JR . McRA E NINTH DISTRICT PAES I OE N M A.YO R 0U A R D B. W H ITL OW C_A Rf"ESVl l,.L E D I RE C T O R MA YOR MR6 . JE SS I E L . GA R NES COUNC IL MAN GEORGE D A HLON E GA T l! N T H D I ST RI CT PRES I DE NT MA YO R JULIU S ATHENS F. B I SHOP D I RECTOR GEORGE: A . SANCKEN. J R . A U G USTA H. BULL O CK ATHENS D IR E C T OR S STATE AT LARGE M ,,,.YO R W I LLIAM JA C K DE C ATUR ALPERMAN ,J , J , S HOOS SAVANNAII H A M I LTO N MAYOR JOHN C . E DENFIELD THOMASTON AL OC RM AN CCIL. T U R N Crt ATLANTA MAYOR LEE E . CARTER HARTW E LL C ITY M A NAGER -'OHN H , MA R K l AND PRFSIDE'NT, CITY MA.NAGFRS ' SECTION DECA TU R ADMIN ASSIST R TRAVIS HIGGIN80THAM PRE SI DENT . C I TY CLERKS ' SECTION ALBANY CITY ATTORN E Y WILLIAM E SMITH PRESIDENT , CITY ATTORN EYS' SECTION AMERIC U S �
  • Tags: Box 14, Box 14 Folder 20, Folder topic: Urban Policy Council | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 14, Folder 20, Complete Folder

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_014_020.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 14, Folder 20, Complete Folder
  • Text: @}IlE©~@~ ~ C 1TY C°'veragc of lc,c1l employees under the State mertt system; (2) technical services In one or m ore areas or personnel admJnlstratlon s uch as recruitm e nt. exnmlnations, classification and compensation pla ns; (3 J cooperative resear ch and demon stration projects for the u se of valid personnel m ethods ; or (4) intergovernmental cooperntlve arra n gem ents between the Sta te and local governments or among local governments, Including facili tating Inter jur isdictional loans, transfers or promotions or personnel; (c) provide for financial participation by State or such local governments, or both, In the costs of providing services a t least equa l In runount to the F ed er al grants, a nd provid e further thn t the opera tlon of the pla n will not result in a r eduction In State and local expenditures or a eubstitutlon of Federal for State or loca l funds for personnel admin is tration; and (d) provide that the State agency will m a ke such reports in such form and containing su ch information as t he Secretary may from time to time r equire and shall keep and m a ke available such records as he may require for the verification of such reports, Part C. Grants for personnel administration in m etropolitan areas Soc. 207(a). From the sums appropriated under section 202 ( c ) the Secretary shall m a ke an nually payments to States or m&tropolitan units of general loca l government which have projects approved by him under section 206. SENATE (b) The Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare, with the concurrence of the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, shall establlsh such standards for the distribution of grants under this section among the States a nd among such metropolitan units as will most effectively carry out the purposes of this Act, and shall estabJlsh regulations for financial participation by States or such units, or b oth, in an amount equal to at least one-third of the costs of each project, including the reasonable value of facliities a nd personnel services made avaliable by the State or such loca l government for the administration of the project. Project requirements SEC. 208, Projects to be approved for grants unde r section 207 shall conform to ,criteria established in regUlations which shall be Issu ed by the Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare, with the concurrence of the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development. Grants wiU be used, in accordance with such regulations, for projects for strengthening personnel administration on a merit basis in order to meet increasingly critical problems of administration In metropolitan units of general loca l government. Projects may Include, but are not limited to-( 1) assessment of m anpower needs In developing programs and methods for meeting them; (2) Improvement of classification and compensatioh plans, and recruitment and examinations, particularly for profeeslonal, administrative and technical personnel In shortage ca tegorles; (3) application of psychological and other research in personnel administration directed toward improvement of selection and development of members of disadvantaged groups whose capacities are not being fully used; (4) plans for establishing auxiliary or support types of positions to perform a ppropriate functions currently performed In occupations In which there are now shortages; (5)research and demonstration relating to t echniques, such as electr onic d a ta processing, for Improving the speed and quality of personnel operations; and ( 6) cooperative activities in recruitment and examining by governmental Jurisdictions operating In metropolitan areaa. Exceptlon--Submittal of Local Projects SEC. 209. After the expiration of one year from the date or enactment of this Act, if a State h as n ot submitted any proje{:ts under section 208 of this title which have received approval, the metropolitan units of general local government may submit proj ects for approval , a nd such projects may be approved If they comply with the reqUlrements or section 208. Administration SEC. 210. The provisions of this title shall be adminis tered by the Secr etary, who Is authorized to furnish such technica l assistance to States or units or general local governments and to prescribe such regulations as may be necessary to carry out the purposes of this title , Suspension of Grants SEC. 2 11. Whenever the Secretary, after giving reasonable notice and opportunity for hearing to the State or local agency administering a plan approval under this title, finds ( 1) that s uch plan has been so changed that it no longer complies with the provisions of thls title, or (2) that 1n the administration of the plan there Is a failure to comply substantially with any s uch provision, the Secr etary shall notify such agency o! h!s findings and no further payments will be made to the State or other recipient under this title (or in his discretion further pay- 1 May 25, 1966 ments wlll be limited to projects pnder, or portions of, the plan not affected by such failure), until he ls satisfied that there will no longer be a ny failure to comply. TITLE III-AUTHORIZATION FOR TRAINING D eclaration of Purpose SEC. 301. The plll'pose of this title is to foster the training of State and local employees by permitting their attendance at Federal courses, and by authortzing Federal departments or agencies administering grantin-aid progrruns to conduct training and to permit Federal grants to States and localities to be used for training and educational leave. Participation In Federal Programs SEC. 302. Any Federal department or agency conductlng training programs for professiona l, administrative, or technical employees In the Federa l service is a uthorized to include In such programs , under conditions imposed by the head of such agency, State and local officers and employees in sim_Uar or related functions, on the request of the State or local government. Fees for attendance at any such training program may be received by the Federal agency conducting It and expended In the same manner as fees r eceived for attendance of Federal employees, or the payment of fees may be waived in occupational categories d etermined by the head of the Federa l department or agency to be in short supply. Training In Grant-Aided Programs SEC. 303 , Any Federal department or agency administering a program of gr ants or financia l assistance to States and localities is au thorized (a) to conduct training for State and local officers and employees in professional, administrative, and technical fields r elated to such programs: (b) to make grants to State and localities from Federal funds appropriated for State or local administrative expenses of the program, unc!er the usual terms and conditions of such grants, for the conduct of training for S tate and local officers and employees In such progra m: and (c) to make grants to State and loca lities from Federal funds appropriated for State or local administra tive expenses of the progr am , under the usual terms a nd conditions of s u ch grants, for education a l leave or comparable arrangements for sala ries a nd training expenses or employees In professiona l, administrative, and technica l fields who h ave been employed under a merit system of personn el administration in State or local agencies ad ministering the federally aided program, In order for . them to attend university or other training courses related to the program. S aving Provis ion SEC. 304. The a uthorizations in this title are not a limita tion on exis ting authority u nder la w for Federal d epartments or agencies to conduct training or to make grants for training or edu cational leave. TITLE IV-GRANTS FOR TRAINING OF STATE AND LOCAL EMPLOYEES Declaration of Purpose SEC. 401. The purpose of this title Is to promote higher levels of performance of employees In the public service, particularly in professional, administrative, and techn ica l fields , and the development of employee potentia l by providing Federal assistance to State and local gov er nm en ts to ins ti tu t c and carry out programs for the training of their employees ln fields where such Federal assistance is not already provided under grant-in s.Id or other statutes. Appropriation Authorization SEC. 402. There Is h ereby authorized to be appropriated the following sums for payments to States and units of general local government which h a ve plans approved un der this title for the training of their employees: tl0,000,000 for fiscal year 1967, $25,- �May 25, 1966 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD - 000,000 for fiscal year 1968, and $50,000,000 for each of fiscal years 1969, 1970, and 1971. Grants Authorized SEC. 403(a). From the sums appropriated under section 402 the Civil Service Commission (hereinafter referred to as the Commission). shall make annually grants to States or units of general local government which have plans approved by It under sections 404 and 405, respectively. , (b) The sums available annually !or grants under this section shall be allotted among the States, and between States a nd units of general local government In a State, under formulas to be approved by the Commission which shall gi ve weight to the number of State and local employees, the number of local governments p a rticipating, the scope of training to be provided , and the financial ab lllty of th e State as indicated by Its relative per capita Income , excep.t that each State will receive not Jess than $25,000 for fiscal year 1967 and $50,000 annually therea fter. Requirements of State plans SEC. 404. A State plan for training of officers and employees to be approved mus t ( 1) designate the State agency for the admini stration of the plan; ( 2) set forth a program for the training of omcers and employees of States and units of general loca l government which will meet the objectives of this title and provide for training personnel of agencies not r ece iving assis tance under other Federal program s ; (3) provide for continuing assessment of trai ning needs ; (4) set for th equitable standards for the selection and assignment of personnel for training; (5) provide fo r the efficient utillzation of p ersonnel who h ave been given such training, a nd for their continued service for a reasonable p eriod of time; (6) provide that educational leave or other arra n gements for p aymP.nt of salary and training expenses for period s In excess or one month in a ny one year sh a ll be allowed only for career personnel empl oyed in accordance with a merit system; (7) set forth, when training ls to be given through univers ity or other nongovernmental facilities t h e policies with respect to the selection of such facilities and the types of agreements to be entered Into for th e training ; and (8) provide for financl ,t l p:nticlpation by the States. the uni ts of genera l loca l government thereof, or from private sources. in a n amount equal to one-fourth of the cost or the training, In cluding the reasonable value of facilities and personal se rvices made available for admini stration of the training, provided that the operation of the plan wlll not r esu lt in a reduction in State and local expenditures or substitution of Federal for State or loca l funds !or training . Exception-Submitta l of Loca l Plans SEC. 405. I! after one year from the effective date of this Act, a State has not sub mitted and had approved a plan under sec tion 404, Including provision for training o! local governmental emr-'oyees Involving expenditures at Ins t equ iv alent to the expendi tures for training of State government employees, one or more units of general loca l government In the State Jointly or severally may submit a plan for such training during the following fiscal year, designating a single local agency for adm ini stration and otherwise conforming to the requirements of section 404 under regulations which sha ll be prescrl bed by the Commission with the concurrence or the Secretary o! Housing and Urban Development. Administration SEC. 406. The provisions of this title shall be admlnlstered by the Commission, which SENATE 10989 Is authorized to furnish such technical assistance to States or units of general iocal government a nd to prescribe such regulations as m ay be necessary to carry out the purposes of this title. Suspension of Grants SEC. 407. Whenever the Commlssion, after giving reasona ble notice and opportunity for hearing to the State or other agency administering any plan app~oved under this title, finds (a) that a State or other plan has been so changed that It no longer compiles with the provis ions of th.ls title, or (b) that in the administration of the plan there ls a !allure to comply s ubstantially with any such provision', the Commission shall notify such agency of !ts findings and no further payments will be made to the State or other recipient under this title (or In !ts discretion further payments wlll be llmlted to projects under, or portions of, the plan not affected by such !allure) until It ls satisfied that there will no longer be any failure to comply. Metropolltan Unit of General Local Government SEC. 703. "Metropolltan un!t(s) of general local government" mea ns any city or comp a ra ble general-purpose political subdivision of a State with a population of 100,000 or more, as determined by the most recent Federal census, or any county or parish with such population which Includes a city or comparable subdivision with a population of 50,000 or more, as determined by such census. Non-metropolltan Unit qf General Loca l Government SEC. 704. "Non-metropolltan unlt(s) of general local government" means any city, county, p al\ish, town, village or other generalpurpose polltlca l subdivision of a State, except such units of general local government as are included In section 703 of this Act. TITLE V-COOPERATION JN PERSONNEL RECRUITMENT AND EXAMINATION SECTION-BY-SECTION ANALYSIS OF THE INTER- SEC. 501. The Commission Is authorized to Join, on a shared-cost basis, with State or units of general local government or both, in cooperative recruitment or examinations under such regulations as may be Jointly agreed upon . SEC. 502. The Commission Is authorized, upon written request from a State, a unit of general loca l government thereof, or both, and under such regulations as may be Jointly agreed upon , to certify to such agencies, from appropriate registers, a llst of ellglble personnel who h av e successfully completed such examinations a nd satisfied such requirements as the Commiss ion has prescribed, upon the pay ment by the unit of government making the request, of the salaries and such other costs for performing such service. SEC. 503. The terms of reimbursement for the service authorized under section 502 shall be d etermined by the Commission. All mon eys received by the Commission In payment for furnishing such serv ice a uthorized s hall be deposited to the credit of the a ppropriation of the Commission. There being no objection, the bill and the section-by-section analysis was ordered to be printed in the RECORD , as follows: GOVERNMENTAL PERSONNEL ACT OF Section 1. Short title. Section 2. Declaration of Polley. 1966 Under our federal system and In an Increasingly complex society, effective State and local governments are Indispensable. Their efficiency a nd administrative competence Is of nationa l concern, p articularly since many programs they administer are federally financed . The appllcatlon of merit systems of p ersonnel administration In certain federally aided progra ms h as contributed to their efficiency, and such systems should b e extended to other grant programs. Federa l fin a ncia l a nd technical assistance should a lso be made avallable to State and local governments to strengthen their overall personnel administration. The Federal Government should encourage and assist in the continuing training and development of State and local employees, particularly in professional, administrative and technical fields , in order to Improve the capab!llty of the public service. The Act recognizes that the success o'f the Joint-action programs enacted by the Congress and the State legislatures Is vitally affected by the caliber of State a nd loca l personnel a dministering them. It recognizes TITLE VI-AUTHORITY FOR INTERSTATE COMPACTS that a ll levels of government Involved · In SEC. 601. To promote higher personnel these Joint ventures-Including the Federal standa rds and mobillty of quallfied person- Government-have not only a right but a n el, particularly profession a l , administrative, duty to take steps to see that such progra ms and tech nical personnel In s hortage cate- are efficiently a dministered and that the -gorlcs, the consent of the Congress Is hereby fund s provided a re u sed effectively to accom give n to any two or more States to enter Into plish the purposes prescribed by Jaw . The compacts or other agreements, not In conflict Act, then, Is designed to assist State and with any law of the United States, for co- loca l governments in strengthening their opernLlve efforts and mutual assistance (In- partners hip role In the federal system. cluding the establishment of such agencies, States and Iocall ties are facing cri tlca l Joint or otherwise, as they deem desirable) for the admin is tration of personnel and problems In the recruitment, selection. and training programs for officers and employees retention of well-qualified personnel for new and expanded programs. This shortage Is of State a nd local governments. acute In the upper levels, both In the public TITLE VII-DEFINITIONS and pri vate sectors of the economy. The When used tn this Act, State and loca l flnanclal and technical resources for publlc personnel a dministration State SEC. 701. The term "State" means any of and staff development, however, h ave not the several States of the United States, the kept pace with the growth of the programs District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, any terri- they administer. Yet, qualified personnel tory or possession of the United States, or and sound personnel policies are absolutely any agency or lnstrumentallty of a State, but essential to effective governmental operadoes not Include the governments of the po- tions . The Act proposes to bulld on the Interlltical subdivisions of any State. governmental personnel experience in certain Merit System grant-In-aid programs. It would make SEC. 702. "Merit system" means a planned matching grants and technical services availState or local operation to develop and main- able to State and local governments for the tain an efficient career service, under publlc improvement of their overall personnel adrules, which among other provisions Include ministration . It would encourage cooperaappointment through competitive examina- tive efforts In recruitment and training on tion, nondiscrimination in race, polltlcs or an lnterle vel and Interstate basis. It would rellglon, equal pay ror equal work, tenure make available Federal training facilities contingent on successful performance, and and also provide grants and technical assistpromotion on evaluated capacity and service. ance for training. Thus, It balances the need �10990 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD-SENATE t o f ost er dynamic p ersonnel systems f o r r ecrui t m e nt of Sta te ana local staffs of high ca p a.c lty with an effort to assis t In their continuous development. TITL E I - EXT E N S ION OF THE M ERIT SYS T EM I N F E DERALLY AIDED PROGRAM S This title a uthorizes the Preside n t, In orde r to achie v e grea ter efficiency in a dministr ation of p rogr a m s fina nce
  • Tags: Box 14, Box 14 Folder 20, Folder topic: Urban Policy Council | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 14, Folder 20, Document 6

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_014_020_006.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 14, Folder 20, Document 6
  • Text: DRA F T M EMO RA NDUM URB A N P OL I CY COUN CI L �MEMORANDUM URBAN POLICY COUNCIL The purpose of this memorandum is to present a statement of the need for establishing a steering committee or Council on Urban Policy in this state to consider formulation of policy recommendations with regard to local government involvement in the development of federal grant-in-aid legislation as affecting urban program development in Georgia . As a bas i c premise it is felt that local government off icials and administrators should play an active part in the initial formulation of federal grant-in-aid legislation that affects the growth, development, administration, and operation of local gover nment in Georg i a. Local govern- ment off icial s and administrator s should also b e cons u lted in the dev e lopment of implementing administrative regulations for such l e gislation . Many fe deral grant- in- aid programs app ear to be f ounded to a l a r ge degree upon criter i a or standards of app lication as de t e r mined almost ent i rely a t the federal leve l . An example is curr ent leg islation in Congress to es t ablish communi ty development dis tr i c ts, the make up and c omposit ion of which is proposed to be approv ed by a cabinet officer based upon prede t ermined criter ia . Intergovernmen tal Cooperation There is strong proba bility that future urban programs, of even our larger c ities , wil l as a p rerequisi t e to fe deral a pp rova l , have t o be reviewed by regional organizations or area p fanning and development commissions. The Intergovernmental Coop eration Act of 1965 (S . 561) which passed the Senate and not the Hou se would have required review by a metropolitan planning agency before the federal government would act. �-2- Regional organizations composed of public officials are now recognized by federal law. These organizations have come into being to meet the need for dealing with problems of urban develop~ent that transcend established political and jurisdictional boundaries and cut across entire regions. These organizations will play a vital role in total coordinated urban development. Only recently were these organizations recognized by the federal government to be more than mere planning agencies. Future federal policy con- templates grants to these agencies conditioned upon mandatory not voluntary membership. Also being considered in some quarters is the evolvement of this regional voluntary association of local governments into an instrumentality, either operating regional type functions or serving as the control center over other regional, functional units. Thus, our traditional gen- eral purpose cities and counties of today may be defining tomorrow's regional general purpose network of government. It should be apparent that these developments are restructuring our intergovernmental relationships in the urban area. Workable Program Part of the problem of local inflexibility and lack of administrative coordination perhaps lies with the over involvement of federal staff personnel in the development and implementation of federal grant-in-aid programs. There has not been enough involvement by local administrators and decision-makers in federal aid program development and implementation . There are many examples of past legislative grant-in-aid enactments by the Congress that often hamstring local government administrative machinery because of the inflexibility of black and white implementing �-3- federal rules and regulations which apply to all units of government regardless of size. development. A good example is the workable program for community This program as a prerequisite to involvement in certain federal programs is lacking in flexibility, in its application, and imposes standards laid down without regard to the fact that local ability to implement and execute programs varies between large and small cities . The requirement of a long range capjtal improvements budget is certainly desirable as a basis for scheduling of projects. However, many local units of government do not even have annual operating budgets. Con- sequently, the reality of a blanket requirement of a long range capital improvements program without requiring operating budgets is open toquestion. The arbitrary requirement that the workable program be recertified each year regardless of size of city results in local administrative falsifying each year. There is a real question of whether the large city should be required to recertify the workable program each year -- why not every five years or every ten years? One large city produced a model workable program and was so claimed by the federal administrator to be one of the best workable programs in the nation. The next year the workable program of that city was not recerti- fied because the federal administrator had said that it had not changed enough over the previous year as reflected by the city's progress reports . Another city was refused recertification because the administrator said the city needed four additional housing inspectors over the previo us year's commitment . Yet no standards or justification were stated as to why these requirements were imposed . �-4- In large cities, specific programs do not necessarily reflect dramatic changes on a yearly basis . Thus, recertification of the workable program for many cities is certainly jeopardized unless that city can "pad" its progress reports in order to convince the federal administrator of progress (not given units of progress but progress) and thus secure recertification. There is involvement in the initial drafting and development of federal legislation because of NLC, USCM, and NACO activities, committee hearings, etc. Yet it appears that broad discretion is given to federal administra- tors with regard to program implementation of legislation . This can be seen in the writing and drafting of agency regulations for implementation. The preparation of such regulations should involve the local public official or administrator in order to bridge the gulf between policy makers and practitioners. Quite often the administrative regulations seem to go much further than the intent of legislation. Urban Renewal In the case of urban renewal, real estate acquisition is supposed to be based upon a program of local determination. The criteria on rehabili- tation are extremely rigid on what a city is allowed to do . The same cri- teria apply to a large agency with large projects as we ll as to a small agency working on a single project. The large agency with the larger pro- jects need more flexibility in the planning, direction , and execution of such projects than would be the case of a small agency . Urban renewal regulations make reference to specific noncash credit items such as a 100% credit for a street serving the project, 50% for a boundary street, 25% for sewer line, etc. However, specific noncash items cannot always be apportioned in specific terms to a given urban renewal �-5- project . As an al t ernative, why not allow an over all total grant with credit given fo r noncash items i n a prog r am sense rathe r t han i n specifics so that the local credit items could be reflected in an overall urban renewal plan, as opposed to spe cific items on a project basis . Specific criteria and prerequisite standards are a pplied in the development of urban renewal projects . Yet similar requirements for streets, highways, and other physical facilities _may be programmed with a total disregard for city 's master plan . Economic Opportunity Program The followi ng is a discussion of areas where cit i es (particularly, mayors) have encountered local problems i n a dmin is t r a tion of the Economic Opportunity Program . Ma ny ma yors would have l iked to have ha d some say in t he initial developme nt of VI STA (Vo lunteers In Se rvic e To Ame rica ), or dome st ic peace corp s program. Apparent ly, many mayor s we r e not i nvolved in the i n i t i al devel op- ment of t his p r ogram , a nd consequent l y, fo und i t ne ces s a ry to refuse part i cipat i on in the VISTA program or were re quired t o use their influence to cancel VISTA pr ograms op erating within t h eir communities . An understanding of the extent of the role of VISTA with in the political area is a demand the mayors could assert . However, this would be in opposition t o the philosophy of VI STA in gra nt ing great flexib ility and freed om. Thu s, EOA, b earing in mind th e problems wh ich could be created for the mayor and the city council by completely unhindered volunteers, has had to demand that VISTA volunte e r s be tie d down to s pec i f i c a ssignments . This has been par ticularly true of the program in Atlanta . �-6- The question of the mayors veto of OEO projects is continuously raised. Certainly obstructionist politicians should not be able to deny necessary and reasonable prog r ams for their citizens o Yet, neither the federal gov- ernment nor any other agency should be in a position to institute programs utilizing tax resources in a political subdivision with complete disregard of the elected leaders of that subdivision . The OEO philosophy demands involv~ment of the poor at the local level by CAP agencies in planning and in conducting CAP programs o However, this philosophy of involvement does not apparently apply at the Washington level. Many programs have originated from Washington with fairly stringent guidelines in which there have been no participation by municipal officials or other interested gro ups at the local level . Many of these programs are under the guise of demonstration programs such as the Foster Grandparents Demonstration project (as conducted in Atlanta) and many of them are actually designed to be on-going projects . Recent changes in the requ irements of the Small Business Development Center program under Ti tle IV of the Economic Opportunity Act is an indication of lack of consideration on the part of local officials in making sweeping changes in the intent and content of a prog r am . The or iginal Title IV p r ovis i on was des i gned to help increase employment by p roviding low inter est loans to small businessmen who would gua r an t ee creation of additional jobs wh i ch co ul d be filled by the poor as well as the creation of new entrepreneurs under low i ncome groups o The initial guidelines have now been so changed that the program simply i s be ing conducted to see how many loans can be g r an ted t o persons who are no t now in business and who are in poverty o The SBA makes it clea r that it is inter ested in making a s many loans as poss i ble to Negroes t o start small businesses . �-7- Recreat i on Rec ent Congre ss e s of t h e Uni ted States, recogn i z i ng the growing demand by citizens for recreation and parks, have passed considerable legislation affecting these movements . The recreation profess i on, although pleased to see the vast interest in recreation and parks on the Federal level of government, does hold some reservations about it . Specifically, the Federal governm~nt has classified all recreation and parks under one heading -- "Outdoor Recreation" . tributes to a narrow view of recreation . This fact alone con- Recreation, as it is conducted in Georgia cities, includes every facet of leisure pursuits for the development of the citizenry . The area of "Outdoor" recreation is only one com- ponent of the field of recreation . It is the feeling of many persons in the field that future wording in Federal legislation should state plainly -- "Recreation" in its broadest sense and not "Outdoor Recreation" . Current Federal laws , such as the Land and Water Conservation Fund Bi ll, th e Housing and Ur ba n Dev e lopment Act of 1965, t he Older Ame r i cans Act , the Economic Oppo r tun ity Ac t of 1965, and many o the r s hav e aff ec ted the gr owth and development of r e c rea tion i n the nation . Bas i c ally sound legislation h a s los t t he ma i n emphas i s on t he p ro gr ams t h r ough gui delines e stabl i shed by t he various Fede ral de partmen t s admini s tering t he p ro g r ams < Bas ic p r og r ams orig i n a l ly i n c l ude d in t h e leg i sla tio n have be en g iven s uch low prior ity t h a t app r oval of a n a ppl ic a t ion i s almo s t i mp oss i bl e . Rec ent Fede r al legis l ation re lating t o recrea t i on and pa r ks wi l l have a g re a t i mpact upo n the r e c r ea tion an d pa r ks moveme n t in t h e Uni t e d States . The r e a r e, however, many a r eas of t h e pr esent l egi slat i on which cou ld be i mp r oved t o b etter s erve t h e communit i e s . �-8- These are : 1. The Feder al government or t he Federal departments administer i ng the legislation has plac ed guidelines on the prog r ams which mak e them quite diffi cult fo r many communi t i e s to take advantage . (a) Practically all the curr ent programs require deta i led communitywide planni ng o Although this requirement is bas ically good, it makes many of our smaller communities inelig i ble from lack of proper finances fo r planning . Federal agencies admi n i stering the programs should be giv en leadway in approving applications from small communities who do not fully meet the guideli nes established by the Federal departme nt . (b) The community leader shi p should be permitted to bes t determine the mo r e sui table locat i on fo r a ny program or facil i ty . It should not be r est ric ted en t ire l y to poverty areas . (c) St ate governments s hould be given the authority to r enew, recomme nd, and approv e appl i cations pr i or to submiss i on t o the Fe deral government . St ate ag en cies are awa r e of th e needs of commun i t ies in t heir res pective s tate s and wi ll a c t wi th sp e e d and e f fi ciency . Cur rently many pr ograms by-pass the stat e al t og e ther . I n suc h i n- s tance s th i s rend er s the a r ea planning and dev elopme n t commi ss i ons and similar groups less effective in guid ing orderly planning a nd deve l opment . By t h e same token, s t a te agencie s c ap a b le of a ssis t - i ng communities with v arious deve lopme n ts, are seldom consul t ed. ( d) Pr e sent p rogr am app lications are by far too difficul t for t he a verage community t o comp l ete and fi le with the proper agency . Pres ent methods almost requ i re the full-time services of a person trained for this pur pose . Many of our smal ler communities cannot aff ord to employ such a person . �-9- (e) Guidelines should be set forth in common terms understandable by all communities o Presently, it is the case where some of the fed- eral employees with the a dministering department s do not agree on t he requirements o This simply causes confusion and misunderstand- ing on the part of local gov e r nments o (f) Federal employees should be qualified to interpret and supervise Federal programs in which they work o It is inconceivable that a person trained in forestry, agriculture, and hort iculture can do the total job necessary for recreation and parks o Recreation is a new profession with personnel trained in this field . Personnel possessing the b ro ad concept of recreation and parks should administer Federal programs o The Land and Water Conser v ation Fund Bill is designed to provide matching funds up to 50 % to states and their political subd ivisions for planning, acquisition and deve lopment of out door recreation areas o State pla nn i ng is essential . Each state, in order to be eligible (Georgia could receive up t o $2 million annually in th i s 25-year program) must prepare a state plan wh i c h must be approved by t he Bureau of Outdoor Recreation " As of May 1 , 1966, comprehensive statewide out doo r re reation plans have been a pp r ov ed exc ept Georg i a, Iowa, North Caro lina, Ut ah , and Wyoming . Proje c ts will no t be approv ed unt i l the s t a t e plan i s app r oved . This law stat es spec if ically that matching funds "may be made available to political subdivi s i ons" o Upon maki ng furth er inquiries as to how the communities a c tually fit int o the plan and how t hey will parti cipa t e in the prog r am , no clear cut answers were a vailable o Actually, local communities do no t now know t o �-10- what ex tent they will be i ncluded in the program . The contention of ma ny i s t hat a state plan canno t be a comprehensive one unless it i nclude s the needs and capabil i t i es of communitie s . After all, the masses of the people are loc ated largely in the urban areas . Al- though the Georgia plan now being developed might include the communities, this does not seem to be the case since inquiries point to the fact that no community has been requested to participate in the planning . It seems, in this light, plans cannot be made for communities without the communities' assistanc e . This piec e of legislat i on is vital to all c i ties and consequently, they should hav e a v o ice i n the make-up of the program in Georgia . In other s t a t es a tt emp t s hav e been made to remove the L&WFB from politics and t o i nsure that project s are considered on the basis of need . In one st_a te, fo r ex ample, ov e r 100 car efully selected leaders were b r ought t og ethe r i n t he form i ng of a c ouncil fo r th e purpose of es tabl i shi ng guidelines fo r t h e prog r am . It wa s t heir r esponsib i l i ty to determ i ne a r eal basi c point -- what percent a ge of the funds would be al l o ca t ed t o l ocal communit i e s, s tate parks, and f ed eral agenci e s wi t hin the s tate . A l ay group , rep resent i ng v a r i ou s i n teres ts, should b e a pp oin ted f o r t he pur pos e of maki ng t h ese s ame deci s i on s i n Ge or g i a . Additionally, t h i s same gr oup or a similar one should b e app oint ed and authorized to rev iew e a ch p iece of fed era l leg islation p ri or t o its i mp l eme n tation i n Ge or g i a, and make certa in procedural recommenda tions . Without positive action t he r e is a po s sib i l ity that Land a nd Water funds will comp letely elude the c ities of Georgia . immediate positive s teps . This situation r e quires �-11- Conclusion The broad shopp i ng market of federal programs portrays a gross amount of money for use locally as the federal government sees fit, and according to its program emphasis o In many cases, the emphas i s on specific prog r ams and projects is determi ned nationally not locally o However, it is believed that many of our cities , large and small, do have the capability of making such determinations and should be allowed the administrative flexibility to determine the level of emphasis that should be placed on specific local programs o If such were the case, a city could submit a comprehensive state- ment of its needs in terms of pri ority and emphasis on local programs and be given a grant with the nec essary flexibility for implementation in accordance to priorities as determi ned locally by that city o Urban Policy Council In conclusion it is fe l t t ha t this state could take a very pos i tive step toward harmonious coord i nation of federal grant-in-aid p r ograms and urban development by e s tab lish ing a s t eering committee or council on urban policy char ged with t he res ponsibility of dev eloping a statement of pol icy for coord i nat i on, dev elopment and administration prog r ams deal ing wit h the total grow t h and development of our communities o be composed of the f ollowing : Such a commi t tee should r e p resentatives of municipal gov ernment t hrough t he Georg i a Municipal Association; r ep r esentatives of county government t h r ough the As so c iation of County Commissioners of Geor gia, rep r e sentatives of stat e gov ernment t h r ough the Executive Off ic e; and r ep r es ent atives of Georgia ' s Congressional Delegation o This commi ttee could hav e t he g iven responsibility for the performance of the fol lowing basic functions: �-12- 1. To analyz e the t r ends , condi tions , needs, and problems affecting local government in Geo r gia ' s rapidly urbaniz i ng s t ate; 2. To def i ne the compl i mentary and cooperative roles of local, state, and federal agenc ies with respe c t to the development and implementation of urban programs; 3. To re commend appropriate policies that would govern the working relationsh i ps bet ween local, state and federal agenc ies in the development, implementation, and coordination of programs to cope with urban growth . �
  • Tags: Box 14, Box 14 Folder 20, Folder topic: Urban Policy Council | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 14, Folder 20, Document 1

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_014_020_001.pdf
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  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 14, Folder 20, Document 1
  • Text: @}IlE©~@~ ~ C 1TY C°'
  • Tags: Box 14, Box 14 Folder 20, Folder topic: Urban Policy Council | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 14, Folder 20, Document 4

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_014_020_004.pdf
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  • Title: Box 14, Folder 20, Document 4
  • Text: ce~®~®rr£. ~'(QJ~Il©Il~£& ~~©©Il£.~Il©~ CITY CO MM IS SIONER J . STE VE KNIGHT, C OLUMBUS MAYOR MALCOLM SAVANNAH MACLEAN, MAY OR J OHN L. CROMARTIE, GAINESVll.LE W. 406 FULTON FEDERAL BUILDING• / R. ATLANTA . GEORGIA 30303 ELMER GEORGE, President First Vice President Second Vice President Executive Director / TELEPHONE 255-0424 May 31, 1966 ACTIVE PAST PRESIDENTS CITY COMMISSIONER JOHN E . YARBROUGH IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT ROM E, GA . MAYOR RANDOLPH MEDLOCK S TO NE MO U NTA IN , GA . MAYOR W . B . WITHERS MO ULTRIE , GA . CITY COMMISSIONER C ARL E . PRUEl"r GRIFFIN, GA . MAYOR B . F. MERRITT, JR. MACON, GA . FIRST Mr . Dan Sweat Federal Programs Coordinator City Hall Atlanta, Georgia DISTRICT PRE SIDENT MA YOR JACK A . L E RO Y AILE Y DIRE CTOR MAYOR J. W. SNELL WRIGHTSVILLE SECOND DISTRICT PRESIDENT MAYOR W. P . HENRY PELHAM DIRECTOR COUNCILMAN J. C , MINTER CAIRO THIRD DISTRICT Dear Dan : I appointed a committee during the l ast board meeting in At lanta for the purpose of evaluating the role of the Georgia Munic ipal Association as relates to the part the Association should pl ay in relation to the metropolitan local councils of government and to area planning and development commissions . PRESIDENT RICHARD B . RAY PERRY DIRECTOR MAYOR 0 . E . WHITE PINE MOUNTAIN FOURTH DISTRICT PRESIDENT COUNC IL MAN LINTON BROOME DORA VI LLE DI RECTOR C OUNCILMAN CLYDE J . HICKS CON YE RS FIFTH DISTRICT PRESIDENT MAYOR AUBREY E. GREEN WAY ROSWELL DIRECTOR ALDERMAN E . GREGORY GRIGGS ATLA NTA SIXTH DISTRICT PRESIDENT MAYO R J . GARONER NEWMAN LAGRANGE DIRECTOR MAYOR H ERBERT H . JONES McDONOUGH SEVENTH DISTRICT PRESIDENT MAYOR J . C . WOODS TRION DIRECTOR MAYOR R ALP H R . CLARK, JR . RINGGOLD EIGHTH DISTRICT Under Section 701- G of the 1965 Housing Act , certain grants may be made to metropolitan loca l councils of government for studies and data collection, etc . It has occurred to the GMA. staff that a relationship might be developed between the local council s and the Association which would have the eff ect of (1) providing the already existing resources of the Association to local councils, thereby avoiding unnecessary duplication and competition of GMA. programs which have been over 33 years in the making and (2) providing a strong liaison between the larger urban a reas in the evaluation of programs which are directed, or should be directed, toward our large cities and/ or their respective metropolitan areas . Since counties are involved in the metropolitan loc al councils of government , it might be of benefit to work with the Assoc iation of County Commissioners in developing joint policy in support of our l arge urban areas, recognizing at the same time , that local decision-making mus t not be interfered with, nor any joint programs pursued, except with the consent of l ocal officials. PRESIDENT MAYOR ELTON D . BROO K S DOUGLAS D I REC T OR MA YO R J AMES T . WINDSOR , JR . MCRAE NINTH Another area for possible considerati on by the committ ee is the problems of the local community out side the metropolitan areas . DISTRICT PRESIDENT MAYOR OUARD 8 CARNESV ILLE . WHITLOW DIRECTOR MAYOR MRS . JESSIE L . GARNER DAHLONEGA TENTH COUNCILMAN GEORGE H . BULLO CK ATH E NS ALDERMAN J . J . S H OOS S A VAN NA H MAYOR WILLIAM JAC K H AM ILTON DE C ATUR ALDERMAN C EC IL T UR NER ATLA N TA MAYOR JOHN C . EDENFIELD THOMASTON MAYOR LE E E . CAR T E R HARTWE LL DI STR ICT PRES I DEN T MAYOR JULIUS F . BISHOP ATHENS DIRECTOR GEORGE A . SANC K EN , JR . AUGUSTA DIR ECTORS STATE AT L A RGE CITY MANAG E R JOH N H . MAR K LAND P RE S IDE N T , C I T Y MA NA G E RS ' SE C TION D E C AT U R A D MI N . AS SI ST . R . TRAVIS HIGGINBOTHAM PR E S IDEN T . CI T Y C L E R KS· SEC TION ALB A NY CI T Y ATT OR N E Y W I LLI AM E . S MI TH PRESIDENT , C IT Y ATTOR N EYS ' S EC TION A M E RI C US �Mr. Dan Sweat - 2- May 3l, l 966 There are some problems developing in relation to programs of area planning and development commissions whi ch serve communities outside metropolitan areas. There are federal programs being developed for municipalities under 5,500 population, administered by the Farmers Home Administration and other agencies of the Federal Department of Agriculture. These deserve serious review. For the citie s of over 5,500 population outside standard metropolitan statistical areas, there are other problems, or opportunities . In addition, there are other problems in relation to new and/ or changing federal grant and loan programs which need t o be studied. It has t aken the Georgia Municipal Associ ation 33 years to devel op a coordinated program to assist our cities and towns at the political l evel, as well as at the servic e level. We need to evaluate the role of the Association with the new metropolitan local councils of government, the area commissions and our total membership. The committee, as appointed, is as follows: Mayor John Cromartie, Gainesville, Chairman Mayor Howard Atherton, Marietta, Vice- Chairman Mayo r J ack LeRoy, Ailey J ames B. Blackburn, City Attorney Savannah Dan Sweat , Federal Programs Coordinator, Atlanta Pl ease r eturn the attached card, advising of your acceptance . Sincerely, J. Steve Knight President JSK/ r s cc: Malcolm Maclean enclosure �
  • Tags: Box 14, Box 14 Folder 20, Folder topic: Urban Policy Council | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 14, Folder 20, Document 5

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_014_020_005.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 14, Folder 20, Document 5
  • Text: J. CITY C o:vtM ISSI ONER C OLU?lo·£DU S MAY O R MA L COLM R. S TEVE KNIG H T, MACLEA N , President Fi rst V ice President SAVANNAH MAYO R J mrn L. CROMARTm , GAINESVIL L E W. 406 FULTON FEDER A L BUIL D ING• / AT L AN TA. GEO R GIA 30303 / Second Vice President E xecut ive D irector E LM ER G EORGE , TELEPHONE 2 5 5 -0 4 24 May 17, 1966 ACTIVE PAST PRESIDENTS C I TY CO MM I SS I ONER JOH N E . YARBROUGH I MM EDI A T E PAST PRES I DE N T RO M E , GA . MAY O R R ANDO LPH ME DLOCK S TONE MO U NTA I N , G A . MAYOR W . B . W I THERS MOULTRIE , GA . CITY COMM IS S IO NER C AR L E . PRUEl"r GR I FF I N , GA . MAYOR B . F. MERR IT T , J R . MA C ON , GA . FIRST DISTRICT Mr. Dan Sweat Coordinator of Governmental Liaison City Hall Atlanta, Georgia PR E S I D EN T M AYOR J ACK A . L ERO Y A ILE Y Dear Dan : DIRE CTOR MAYO R J . W . SNELL WR I GHT S V I LL E SECOND DISTRICT PRES I DENT MAYOR W . P . H ENRY PELH A M DI R EC TOR M AYOR M A C K E . W I LLIS BA I N BR I DGE THIRD DISTRICT PRESIDE N T R I CH A RD 8 . RAY PERR Y D I REC T OR MA Y OR 0 . E . WHI TE PI N E MOUNTAIN FOURTH Enclosed are copies of a draft memorandum on the urban pol:icy council. I have included in the memorandum the statements and thoughts that you had on the Economic Opportunity Program . I would appreciate your review of the memorandum and any suggestions that you may have for its improvement . Any other ideas or changes that you feel should be covered in a memorandum of this nature would be most welcome . DISTRICT PRE SI D EN T COUN C IL M A N L I N TO N BROOM E DORAVILLE DIRECTO R I look forward to hearing from you . Please do not hesitate to call on us whenever we can be of service or assistance. COUNCIL M AN CLYDE J . HIC KS CONYERS FIFTH Sincerely yours , DISTRICT P RE S I DENT M AYO R A U B REY E . GREENWAY RO SWE LL DI RE C TO R A L DERMAN E . GREGORY GR I GGS ATLAN TA SIXTH Jr. D I STRICT PR E SIDE N T MAYOR J . GARDNER NEWMAN L AGRA N GE DIRECTOR MAYOR HERBERT H . JONES JVBJr/ rs McDO N O UGH SEVENTH DISTRICT PRES I DENT enclosures MA Y OR J. C . WOODS TRI O N D I RECTOR MAYOR RA L PH R . CLAR K, JR . R I NGGOLD EI GH TH D I S TRICT PRES I DENT M A YOR ELTON D . BROOKS DOU G L A S D I RE C TO R MAYOR J AME S T . WI NDSOR , JR . MC RAE NINTH D I S T R ICT PRESID ENT MA Y OR DU A R D B . WH I TLOW CARNE S VI L LE DIRECTOR MA Y OR M R S . J ESSIE L . GA R N E R COUNCILMAN G EOR G E H . B U LLO CK DAH LO NE GA T E NTH AT H ENS DI S TRICT PRESIDENT M AYOR JULIU S F. B I S H OP ATHENS DIRECTOR GEORG E A. S ANCK E N. J R . AUGUSTA DI R ECTO R S STATE M A YOR WI L L IAM J ACK H AM ILTON DECATU R AL DERMAN J . J . S HOOS SA VANNA H A LDERMAN CECIL T U R NER AT L AN T A AT LARGE MAYOR JOHN C . E DENF IEL D T HOMAST ON M AYOR L EE E . CARTER HARTWEL L CI T Y MANA G ER JOHN H. MAR K LAND PRES I DE NT . C IT Y M ANAGER S' SECTION DECAT UR AOMIN A SSIS T . R . TR AVIS HI G GINBOTHAM PRES I D E NT , C I TY CLERK S ' S EC TION ALBANY C I TY ATTORNEY WIL L IAM E SM I TH PRESIDENT. CIT Y A T T OR NEY S ' S E C TION AMER I CUS �
  • Tags: Box 14, Box 14 Folder 20, Folder topic: Urban Policy Council | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017