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Box 19, Folder 15, Document 2

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_015_002.pdf
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  • Title: Box 19, Folder 15, Document 2
  • Text: 908 Cas c ade Avenu e , S . W. At la nt a , Ge or gi a 30311 -- ------~ Ho n. Iv an Al le n, Ma yor Ci ty Hal l At _a nt a , Ge org i a �
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 15, Folder topic: Atlanta Braves | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 19, Folder 15, Document 3

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_015_003.pdf
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  • Title: Box 19, Folder 15, Document 3
  • Text: NORTH AVENUE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH CORNER PEACHTREE ST , AND NORTH A VENUE ATLANTA , GEORGIA 30308 WILSON L . NEARING MINISTER T O THE COMMUNIT Y June 21 , 1 96 6 Han o Ivan Allen City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Dear Ma y or Allen: Mrs. Moses has t a lked with you conc erning ou r i nterest i n having t h e Braves h ere for a service. This cop y for y our informationo N/men �
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 15, Folder topic: Atlanta Braves | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 19, Folder 15, Document 5

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_015_005.pdf
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  • Title: Box 19, Folder 15, Document 5
  • Text:
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 15, Folder topic: Atlanta Braves | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 19, Folder 15, Document 10

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_015_010.pdf
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  • Title: Box 19, Folder 15, Document 10
  • Text: ��»:~- r_~~ - -~ i~;~' ;';-, .;.. .... . ~ _,,,:. ' ', l_ . ' .. . . 7 �
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 15, Folder topic: Atlanta Braves | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 19, Folder 15, Document 15

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_015_015.pdf
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  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 15, Document 15
  • Text: Play ball in Atlanta with two major league newspapers If you want to score big in the Southeast's first major league city, lead off with T he A tl ant a Journal and The Atlanta Constitution . Heaviest hitters on an adverti ser's tea m. Best double-play combin ati on in anybod y's lineup! A nd the game is worth your wi nnin g. Now 1,200,000 consumers in Metropolitan Atlanta . Annual reta il sales over $2 billion. Half a milli on families read and respond to advertising in The Atlanta Journ al and Co nstitution. You can have them in the palm of your glove. Let's play ball! mbt Allnnla Journal Cn 1·cr.1· Dixie Lik e th e Dew THE ATLANTA CONSTITUTION Th e Sout h's Standard News paper Half a MILLION every Sunday! Largest Sunday newspaper in the South . Represented by Story & Kelley-Smith, Inc. James E. Stanford, National Advertisin g Ma nager, 750 Third Ave., New York. �
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 15, Folder topic: Atlanta Braves | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 19, Folder 15, Document 16

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_015_016.pdf
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  • Title: Box 19, Folder 15, Document 16
  • Text: Re 1d ntial Voe School MILWAUKEE SENT NEL. PAGE 1, PART 2 THURSDAY, APR. 14, 1966 / George A. ParKinson, director of the Milwaukee vocational school, recommended Wednesday that Milwaukee apply fot a federal grant to establish a residential vo. cational school which would be much like a college campus. The school would- include dormitories and classroom space for approximately 1,500 students between 15 and 21 years of age. · The total cost of construction and equipment, estimated at approximately five mil- lion dollars, w o u 1 d be continued in the , vocational financed by the federal gov- school budget with costs for ernment, under Parkinson's outside students covered by proposal. their communities. Preliminary grant1, of $100 . Parkinson said that "high 000 for planning and archite~tural services for the school ranking _officials" in the buare included in the 1967 fed- reau of vocational and adult eral .fiscal bud.g et, he said. education in the federal deParkinson said that under partment of health, educathe present_ law the govern- tion and welfare (HEW) sugment will finance all opera- . gested that Milwaukee would tions of the school. However, be an "ideal place" for such after a number of years, fed- a school. The vocational education eral participation in the project might dec~ease, he said. act of 1963 authorizes apThen the proJect would be propriations for construction, I City April Traffic Hits New High I Milwaukee's downtown traf. lllonthl count of traffic on the Y freeway taken ]a t tions t his month and can only ast-West . ' . s be relieved 'through greater use Week, taJ11ed 9~,000 vehicles of mass transit, Martin E. in a 24 hour period. Bruening, city traffic engineer, Th· rPassed the previous said Wednesday. high i~f 000, set last August. · d owntown trafBruening said a reg u la r Brue ·ng' said ni fie is risirlg b Y "leaps and fie load has hit record propor- £ s:o Council Urged lio I' Buy 1 , 025 V0teMach•tnes bounds" this year. I> r . 0 u 5 24 hour traffic counte v 10 the East-West freeway s O 79,938 vehicles this Janua~e_r:z,538 in February and 88,974 ~ n r,,tarch. · 100 Many Cars" "Just . A.Ith h there 1s much const~UCti~~g dO~town, Br~ening s~1d, th traffic overload 1s due s1ni e ••too many cars " The city election commission Ply to · Wednesday recommended that ."it's like ttYin~ tto pour three low bids for the sale or lease Pints of milk in a quar t of 1,025 voting machines to bottle," he saidMilwaukee be accepted by the 13 r . 11 g suggested three central board of purchases. soiu/ en 1 ions: of "f The commission's recommen- • Gr ter use reeway dation, however, was contin- flyers ,;a articularly by those gent upon a city attorney's of- Who kp downtown. . . .L or fice review to mak e cert am 4,e • at.ed s y s t e m of machines satisfy all legal re- Parit~ gradtl to "weed out the an.d 1ng fees . ,, quirements. ay parkel · Andrew L. Lehrbaumme_r, • l' ·f11ate cl o sin g of city purchasing agent, and Wil- Wisc0he _ult~"'- from N. 8th st. liam J . O'Malley, secretary of east t nsin btlt rnass transit and this sign pos t e d b y some pran kster at the. commission, said . that the deJive~ all th8 turn-off road to the Stadium. choice between outright pur- 13 Yaid in an inte chase or lease of the machines vie,:Uening 5 rorists c o rn i n r-Sentinel Photo - - - - - - - would be the task of the com- dow that 010 ilY cannot g ° w Motorists traveling on the East-West expressway Wednesday were greeted with C'.,y to A,·d State Dr,·ve 0 n 8 ars' 8 ack Sa Ie$ Tax mon council. . 0 tpoinu;t~:ne :~ e Ct "J)Ortaf ; rta.1 serv1.:.,, .. v· Lehrbaummer Tuesday acF .,, flyers Help cepted bids from the Shoup lie r~eW\ East-West freeVoting Machine Corp., Bala- way said th would have surCynwyd, Pa., and the Automat• passe~lreadYrated ca_pacity of ic Voting Machine Corp., James- 5,00o its per hOUr m one di. town, N. Y. reqio c~rs sh hours except for The city of Milwaukee hAS ' Local I i c ens in g boards 1in Mtlwaukee. sub1ect to coun- He rejected a bid from In- the fti. m r~/ flyers frorn the M reewo. · enter, w re ~d to rip ·i, a . thrnt1ghout th~ state have been di appro ·al Two Bids Accepted Urged equipment and operation of these schools. Sites for seven such institutions were 'selected two years ago by the commissioner of vocational education. These sites have now been discarded and new sites will ~e selected this spring, Parkmson said. Members of the Milwaukee board of vocational and adult education will vote on the recommendation Apr. 22. Parkinson said the school would be exclusively for those students whose home environ- ment is not conducive to study. He said that students would probably have to be recommended for admission by the welfare department of their county. Parkinson stressed that the students would not necessarily be "problem" children, but persons from homes where the parents were the problem or other distractions are present. The school would be seL up on a regional basis with students from several states coming to Milwaukee for training. �---,- 12,721 See Braves Bow Again, 6-0 Bucs Win On Law's 4-Hitter Sentinel SPORTS By RED THISTED PAGE 2, PART 2 Sentinel Staff Writer Atlanta, Ga.-It was an unproductive night !or the Braves here Wednesday as they gave a sad sack performance in bowing for the second straight time to the Pittsburgh Pirates. This time they were b lanked on four hits, 6-0, and there was positively nothing for the 12,· 721 fans to cheer about. Bolin Blanks Cubs, 4-0 San Francisco, Calif. - A' - THURSDAY, APR. 14, 1966 Bob Bolin shut out Chicago on Astros Rout Koufax, 7-6 four hits Wednesday night as the San Francisco Giants carved out a 4-0 victory over the Cubs. The f I a m e throwing right hander with the easy motion struck out nine and walked none. Only three times did the Cubs get a man past first and only once got more than one man on base. 4 ' -- i �Complete Coverage of Braves Decision MILWAUKEE SENTINEL EXTRA IN FIFTIES Partly cloud y west, fair east Thuriday. Highs mostly in the f ifties, lower near the lake. Maps, tables, page 2. FINAL 34 PAGES--3 PARTS THURSDAY MORNING, APRil, 14, 1966 ROLLER: EXPAND IN '67 OR BRAVES HERE IN '66 By WlLIJAM JANZ Circuit Judge Elmer W. Roll· er Wednesday night ordered the Braves back from Atlanta this season unless the National league expands and grants this city a franchise for 1967. He gave the league until May 16 to sub m It a written plan for expansion. He said ex· pansion was feasible in the National league and that Milwau- kee can support major league ba1>ebaU. The stay will expire on May 18 if no expansion plan is sul). mitted. the court said. If the plan is unsatisfactory, the stay wi11 be lifted, the judge said, and the court will take-- over supervision of Braves games here or appoint a board or commission to do so. He also fined each of the defendants, the Braves, the league and its other clubs, SS,000 for violation of state antitrust laws. The historic decision was announced after the judge and his staff had worked 36 straight hour~ to complete the 175 page document. At the decision, near pandemonium broke out in the courtroom, filled with 150 persons, including many newsmen who raced through the courtroom to telephones. 111111111111111111 1111 11 1111111111111111111 11 111111 11 111 11111 111 111 111111111 111 11 1111 Ready Lloyd Larson Group To Run Club, ~h!u:!~ ~1 with an earlier decision by a superior court in Fulton oount_v, Ga., which ordered the Braves to play their games in Atlanta. Judge Roller, County Judge Marvin, Holz and several court reporters started their marathon session in chambers around 9 a.m. Tuesdav. The decision was passed out to Turn lo Page 9, Col. I By J OE PECOR Someone yelled, "He's ordered the Bravei; back to MUwaukee!" By GORDON GOTnJEB "We •.re rea.dy, wi\lin~ and Then it was wild .. 1~;e: M~:;u: l;si:;..:~:::~n::ht n::r;;,~ Jn fact, leaTfles~ r TIMES hlrdiy-10:30, U0 • -·~t~:w.:.,./:i HJ .. OdOR •.. " .I'.~ 'C -·~d~ ,i,. r;h;~,. Ja1Jool11',S•ntlncl A. ~BST 1111, S1.15, IEATRE $1.50, $2 ~ , Sale U Door EVER MADE!" I OR BY MAIL Ill IDoySe1.-s ..... TH SIDE urt Theatre iltl W. P"OlldduLac,,U. 'mohs as INGING NUN" lior,andl,l~r GARSON MOOREHEAD ers at 8:45 a.m. Tuesday 11601 W. Lincoln av., West in Washington said they knew of no basis for such an action. and worked until the decision Allis. ATANTA KEPT IT QUIET From Sentinel Wire Services found out it was not on file. I know I'll need some proor of my age when I file for my social security benefits. Any suggestions? A. B., Milwaukee. A. :;~p~!~J1 ~~ \1~~i OMEGA Watches H HOUR WATCH IIEBVlCZ ~ '~~.~.;~p N111¥.(74Ulf ~;ir~:::::::::~:,::::·:::::_:,';:·:: ~:: ~li;ig1:l~1t~;l;; OPEN MON., THURS. and FRI. Iii 9 'I Did the Best I Could' World in Brief N. Water Q, :~e:~1:t~ t=~o gne~ The judge thanked everyone for bearing with him during delays in announcing the decision. Judge Roller said he wanted to announce the decision Tuesday before the Braves opening game in Atlanta, but it wasn't ready, he explained. The 64 year old jurist said he plans to "sleep a little later tomorow. "Then I might take a couple of clays off to visit my brother," he said. He admitted that he had felt some pressure from "mostly baseball fans" d u ring and after the trial. "I got the nicest letters from people in Atlanta. I don't wish them any bad luck," he said. •i~'.;- 5 5 w, "'" t:1:~· NRO~cl _Miu Top .. s4495 ,:;:::nM~:i.1!0~ .,, ... s5500 Oct.son T•blu ~:C~ux~ SwiYcl Ch.in, .... 1~H1._1 T•blc1, ........ s3300 s1695 s399s 2714 W . CENTER ST. Sears Save at Sears • . • Headquarters for All Types of Fencing You Can Count on l Js ... Quality Cost~ No Morp at SPar~ ~~,:f~.~t~ LAST 3 DAYS! IHGITUP" IRDHERS" Ive-In ii~iia~ ~iu;~- Mi~ Save 8 15.07 011 This 40 Gallon Gas Water Heater Regular 8 79.95 Now Only 64 8 ~ Chain Link Fencing NO MONEY DOWN Surround your home and property with the kind of year after year protection only steel fencing provides. Complete galvanizing leaves no surfaces to rust. Neat diamond pattern en h ances the beau t y of a n y yard, harmoni zes with any styl e of architecture. Makes attractive as well as protective frame for well kept lawns and gardens. on Sears Easy Pay m e nl Pla n • Plen ly of hot water for all l1 o usch old n eeds • H eats 58,8 gallon s per hour at 60 degree rise I NSTALLATIONS ARRANGED ... NO MONEY DOWN;:;,;,:;~::;;; Enjoy plenty of hot water for shaving, cooking, cleaning, laundry. Around the clock service! Hot ,vater when you need it! IM Wh ite Ceda r Stoc kad e ~0dfft!ORSE" 1 3. 3:13, ~:13. 1,1 .. r"it'l·a'li.o'l•p11- 1AIR LADr 2,00 an11 Installations Arranged s,11, Open Tonight and Every lllonday, Wednesday, Thu rsday, F riday ' til 9 Open iTONIGHTl and Every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday aad Friday 'til 9 Open E~·ery Day at 9 a.m.; Open Tuesday and Satui:-day ' til 5:30 p,m. SHOP AT SEARS AND SAVE Satisfaction G uaranteed o.-Your Money Back ISearsl SEARS, ROEBUCK AND CO. Available at All Sears Stores I I . ,..... ,_. · - · · ·,. . -~ "· · '· -~ Open Every Day at 9 a. m.; Open Tuesday a ud Satu rday 'til 5:30 p.m. SHOP AT SEARS AND SAVE a • ... ,rd 1"" .i.. "' ...., ,,..,, ._,....~. --~ ••• ~ .. ~. ........ a eedSears ·"""" """"I"'"""'" ...... """ 1o,!!",£i.f;;::., ir:,cu:t · ;on:~r;::k s'::l l""'~-:::::;_~,.. 1 =~:-,"'I~!;':.. st·r 18 0 or su.u, 1ouuc1t AND co. �CONCLUSIONS OF LAW What Judge Roller Said The conclLtSions drawn by Circuit Judge Elmer W. Roller in his decision in the Braves case: SOME SNOOZED, OTHERS WAITED IN JUDGE ROLLER'S COURTROOM FOR THE VER~Y.,_.iP1>oto ., Excerpts From Decision Excerpts from the decision ha n de d down by Circuit Judge Elmer w. Roller: . . . Concededly the case is novel, but that does no t mean that it can possess no legal merit. I presents unusual and perplexing questions which arise from a business which in modus operandi occupies an unusual pos.itlon in the economy of the nation. The question is hardly whether an identical factual situation has b e e n adjudicated but ratt.er whether the facts presented here constitute a violation of the S~te·s Antitrust I aw s within applicable principles of law. The tenn, organized baseball refers to "the many professional clubs a n d leagues which have subjected themselves to the jurisdiction of the Commissioner c:,f Baseball and have contracted with one another to abide by certain rules and regulations." •.. The claim that organized baseball is a monopoly is fully supported in the record. Its economic control is achieved principally by agreements, viz., (a) the Constitution and Rules of t h e National League of Professional Baseball Clubs . (b) the National Le a g u e Agreement to which ea c h Major League and all member clubs are parties, and (c) the Major League Rules, promulgated pursuant to the agreement and binding upon both Leagues, their member clubs and players. ... The reserve clause Is good for the whole life of the ballplayer. The effect of the Uniform Player's Contract and the Major League Rules by which the player agrees in his contract to be bound are: (I) A player wishing to p 1a y professional baseball must sign a contract with a professional baseball club: (2) The terms of that contract commit the player to being reserved for a period during a term for which he is not under contract and to an indefinite number of renewals of his contract; (3) A player who fails to contract, who violates his contract or reservation may be placed on the restricted or disqualified list and be ine 11 g i bl e to play for any league in organized baseball. . . . The interrelated rules and agreements created a monopoly of the market (territorial franchises) and over the raw material of the business (the right to the services of baseball players). From the very outset of the case the court has been met with a continuing challenge to its jurisdiction. Defendants assert that because of the unique nature of the 12,721 SEE BRAVES LOSE The Pittsburgh Pirates defeated the Braves before only 12,721 persons in Atlanta Wednesday night, 6 to 0. The stadium in Atlanta has 51,377 seats. Details in sports section. baseball business, because of its national scope and character, it requires a uniform, national system of regulation. . . . Their jurisdictional objections rest on the fed· era! decisions holding that organized professional baseball is not within the scope of the Sherman Antitrust Act, and in progression t he y maintain that the business is not amenable to state law. . . For reasons previously considered. the court was and is of the opinion that the f e de r a 1 decisions are not conclusive of this In seeking to recover a forfeiture the State has a pecuniary interest in the lawsuit and is the real party in interest and, in the court's o p i n i o n, If the injunctive remedy was the sole relief sought the State would be the real party in interest in bringing the action to en· force the antitrust laws in its sovereign and governmental capacity as the statute directs. The possibility that the County of Milwaukee or private citizens may incidentally be benefited by this action does not nullify the State's real party in interest status or convert the action to a private lawsuit between individuals. From a review of the record the court concludes that the financial success of a Major League baseball operation in a community and the determination of whether the economic situation in such com• munity is such that It can and will support the continued operation of baseball can be made only on the basis of and in terms of a reasonable period of time. Mr. Lou Perini moved the Braves to Milwaukee in 1953. He continued to own the Braves until November 26, 1962, when the club was sold to its present ownership. Mr. Perini had acquired the club in 1945. It was in very bad financial straits. He paid very little for it other than to assume certain liabilities in the amount of $305,000 and to pay for the organizational costs in the amount of $6,508. Consequently the total purchase price was $311,508. . . . Although the record does not reveal the exact measure of the financial success of the Perini operation in Milwaukee, there is sufficient evidence to conclude that it was exceedingly lucrative. ... The court is satisfied that the effect upon Braves' attendance by the introduction of Major League baseball in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area was infinitesimal. Likewise the contrast presented by the argument that Milwaukee's contribution to the League's tow attendance d r opp e d from 20 per cent for the period of 1953 to 1960 to 8 per cent in 1961 to 1964 is misleading. It Ignores the fact that the team's standing had never been below s e c o n d place during the first period and it was in fourth and fifth and sixth place in the second period. It ignores the fact that the league was expanded to ten teams and that two competitive t e a m s were transferTed to the populous areas of Los Angeles and San Francisco. The Court has already noted the reasonable explanation for the failure of local residents to invest substantially in the Braves stock. There is also some evidence that stock offered by Perini at $12.25 a share in 1961 had dropped to $3.375 in 1962 which fact may well have been reflected in the attitude of local investors in 1963. There is no doubt that there were some differences and problems concerning both the lease and sale of television rights. However, there is evidence that in July of 1964, County Executive John Doyne inquired of Mr. {William C.) Bartholomay whether the r e was anything that the Braves wanted changed in the lease. At that time the lease had one year to run. Doyne testified that Bartholomay stated that the contract was satisfactory. This is confirmed by Mr. McHale's testimony to the extent that he stated that they were satisfied with the percentage rentals, but for them to at· tempt to change several annoying problems would create bad public relations. ... The record does not justify giving serious consideration to the claim of problems with reference to the lease. Some concern was expressed relative to an un· favorable political climate in Milwaukee by several of the members of the National League. . . . All was directed towards Mr. (Eugene H.) Grobschmidt except for one other instance. Some of the statements of the Chairman of the County Board were brash and offend· ing and in one instance constituted a "low blow," as the p r e s s aptly described it. There is no proof in the record that the statements of Mr. Grobschmldt evinced or created a political situation... Now In regard to an unfriendly press. P e o p I e in baseball, like people in any other public business, cannot (and indeed the record herein indicates that they do not) expect to be without the critical com· m e n t of an independent press. There are two daily newspapers in Milwaukee, one is a morning paper, the other an evening paper. The record in this case demonstrates that Major League baseball was covered favorably by the newspapers in Milwaukee. . . . Neither can it be said in the face of these circumstances that the c iv i c leaders of Milwaukee and Wisconsin did not lend their full measure of support to the team. The record will not support a conclusion that the public officials were unfriendly to the Braves. During the decade between 1950 and 1960, Milwaukee has grown faster than any of the older, well-established Major League areas of the northwest and midwest; only the western cities and Washington, D. C. have exceeded its rate ot growth. Projections for the 1960-1980 period for Milwaukee range from 0.8 to 2.1%. . . . Wisconsin's growth rate during 1960-1980 is ex- pected to grow faster than most states in which there are Major League teams. The several owners whose depositions were read upon this trial are substantially in agreement that the Major Leagues will expand. They assert, however, that expansion is not feasible at the present time. They say there is a shortage of players. 1lle Court is satisfied, however, from the testimony of former Commissioner Ford C. Frick, Mr. William L. (Bill) Veeck, Mr. (Bobby) Bragan, field manager of the Braves, and also from the testimony of Mr. (Warren) Giles and Mr. (Walter) O'Malley, that there are sufficient baseball players to stock a team in Milwaukee. I. The defendant corporations have violated Section 133.01 of the Wisconsin Statutes (1963) in the following respects: a. Having agreed among themselves to control and allocate professional baseball players, to assign to the respective corporate defendants exclusive territorial rights and privileges respecting the exhibition of professional Major League baseball games, and to limit the number of members in the National League of Professional Baseball Clubs of which the defendants are all the constituent members, they have now agreed to transfer the site of Major League baseball exhibitions from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to Atlanta, Georgia, with the result that trade and commerce within the State of Wisconsin have been substantially restrained. b. They have combined and conspired among themselves to monopolize the business of Major League professional baseball within the State of Wisconsin. 2. The National League of Professional Baseball Clubs Is and has been the means and instrumentality by which the corporate defendants have engaged in the practices referred to in Paragraph 1 hereof. 3. By means of the practices outlined In Paragraph l hereof the corporate defendants and their counterpart members of the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs have acquired monopolistic control of all available ball players of Major League caliber with the result that the granting of per· mission from one of the said leagues in the form of a franchise to operate a Major League baseball team is necessary for any person to engage in the business of professional Major League baseball. 4. The corporate defendants' monopolistic control of Major League professional baseball requires the defendants to exercise reasonable control and to follow reasonable procedures In the issuance ot memberships in the National League of Professional Baseball Clubs and in the definition of sites for baseball exhibitions and as respects the transfer of memberships. 5. The transfer by the corporate defendants of the franchise in the National League of Professional Baseball Clubs from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and the refusal to issue a replacement franchise allowing the exhibition of Major League baseball in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, was an unreasonable exercise of the monopolistic control of the business of Major League professional baseball and was in violation of Section 133.0J, Wisconsin Statutes. 6. The refusal of the National League and the failure of the American League to issue a franchise to Milwaukee county or the Milwaukee Brewers Baseball Club, Inc., was a concerted refusal to deal in restraint of trade and commerce within the State ot Wisconsin in violation of Section 133.01, Wisconsin Statutes (1963). 7. This court hu jurisdiction over all of the parties and of the subject matter hereof. 8. The State of Wisconsin is the real party in interest in this action. The Attorney General and the Corporation Counsel of Milwaukee County were authorized to bring this action under the statutes of the State of Wisconsin, Teams, Inc., the Greater Milwaukee Committee and other private citizens in Wisconsin were entltled to inform the Attorney General of alleged violations of Section 133.01, Wisconsin Statutes (1963). 9. That by reason of said violation of Section 133.01 aald defendants and each of them has incurred a forfeiture provided by Statute. 10. That the plaintiff is entitled to judgment against said defendants and each of them in the sum of SS,000 with costs and disbursements. 11. That the plaintiff Is entitled to the JnjuncUve relief prayed for in its complaint. 12. That the defendant Milwaukee Braves, Inc., now known as Atlanta Braves, Inc., and all other defendants herein, shall be and they are hereby restrained and enjoined from playing the home championship schedule of the defendant Milwaukee Braves, Inc., now known as Atlanta Braves, Inc., in any city or place other than in the County of Milwaukee, State of Wisconsin, at County Stadium; provided that: I.) This order shall be stayed, under the continuing jurisdiction of the Court to the 18th day of May, 1966, and may thereafter be extended in the event that the defendants shall, prior to 12:00 o'clock noon, C.S.T., on the 16th day of May, 1966, submit to this Court a written plan or plans for expansion of the defendant National League of Professional Baseball Clubs so as to permit Major League baseball to be played at County Stadium with the City of Milwaukee a1 its "home," effective with the playing season for the year 1967: 2.) Such expansion shall contemplate the granting of a National League fra~1.hise to the County of Milwaukee or to such qualified third parties as shall be interested In acquiring a National League franchise, and will advise the Court of such fact. 3. ) The Court reserves jurisdiction in connection with any such plan or plans untH the same may be consummated between the ultimate parties. 4.) So that there will be no misunderstanding, the stay herein granted will expire at 12:00 o'clock noon, C.S.T., on May 16th, 1966, if no such plan is submitted within said time. Likewise, the stay, or any extension thereof granted on the strength of any plan submitted, will be terminated by the Court in the event the Court concludes that the plan is unsatisfactory. 5.) The defendant. Milwaukee Braves, Inc., now known as Atlanta Braves, Inc., will perform its home games In the County of Milwaukee under the supervision ot the court and such board or commission hereinafter appointed by the court. LET JUDGMENT BE ENTERED ACCORDINGLY. BY THE COURT: (Signed Elmer W. Roller) Circuit Judge Dated; April 13th, 1966. No formal agrttment is necessary to constitute the unlawful conspiracy, nor is it material to prove that the ultimate object of the combination Is to restrain trade, if it in fact does unreasonably do ,~ . . . Even if the shutdown of baseball in Milwaukee was not intended to restrain trade, the decisions to transfer, not to expand, and to refuse to deal with the Milwaukee market would nevertheless be illegal efforts to protect and extend the power of an existing monopoly. Even if Organized Baseball is a self-regulating monopoly enjoying some kind of privileged position under the antitrust laws, actions charged are nevertheless actionable restraints of trade and abuse cl monopoly power. The violation here concerns the abuse by the monopoly of its power in a manner which will have the effect to re-strain trade and commerce within this State. The assumption of the reasonableness of the agreements by w h I c h ocganlzed baseball maintains its internal control, as those agreements affect people within the structure of Organized Badeball, do not sanction the monopoly to restrain trade and commerce outside of baseball. . . . The Sherman Act provides that the several district courts of the United States are invested with jurisdiction to prevent and restrain violations of the Sherman Act. . .• A recurring defense argument and, in fact. an affirmative jurisdictional defense is that the action by the State of Wisconsin attempts to compel the defendant to continue to do business in the State in violation of the Federal Constitution. Defendants ask in what posi• tion does the state find itself in attacking the monopoly and then asking for it to come back to the state? In the court's opinion the plaintiff presents a legally adequate answer to that defense. Plaintiff states that there are two solutions to the question. One is to dissolve the monopoly, void the uniform player contract and re-establish competition. The other is to let baseball continue to enjoy the internal monopolistic prerogatives which it deems necessary for the continuance of top level competition in Major League baseball but to require them by court decree to respond in a responsible and reason- Willard Stafford, ,peci.,I counsel for the state of Wisconsin in the antitrust suit against the Braves and the National league, showed his feelings Wednesday night after reading highlights of the decision of Circuit Judge Elmer Roller. -UPI able manner in matters pertaining to the transfer and allocation of franchises. The state asserts that it has elected the latter course which presents two primary factua l issues: (a) whether the decision of the owners, the National League, made in October and November of 1964, was a responsible and reasonable decision or was arbitrary or even capricious and whether the refusal of the league to deal, to grant an expansion franchise was arbitrary, (b) whether or not the self-regulated monopoly has accorded all interested parties due process. Findings of Foci Milwaukee County is unable to secure as a tenant for Milwaukee County Stadium a Major Le a g u e professional baseball team playing its home games on the championship schedule in Milwaukee County Stadium. The termination of the exhibition of Major League baseball games in Milwaukee County Stadium prevents the sale at Major League professional games in Milwaukee County Stadium of substantial amounts of food, beverages and merchandise. The termination or the exhibition of Major League baseball games in the Milwaukee County Stadium restrains and prevents the sales of commodities and services by restaurants, hotels, motels, taxis and other transportation facilities to spectators who would attend Major League professional games at Milwaukee County Stadium. The termination of t.he exhibition of Major League professional baseball games at Milwaukee County Stadium prevents the Milwaukee newspapers, radio stations and television stations from print· ing, broadcasting and telecasting Major League professional baseball games at Milwaukee County Stadium. The termination of the exhibition of Major League baseball games at Milwaukee County Stadium eliminates the competition for spectators which heretofore existed between the Milwaukee County Stadium and Wrigley Field and Comiskey Park in Chicago, Illinois. The termination of the exhibition of Major L e a g u e baseball games at Milwaukee County Stadium eliminates the competition which heretofore existed between television and radio stations located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and Chicago, Illinois, for the Major League audience in Southern Wisconsin and Northern Illinois. In the absence of a Majo r League baseball club playing its home championship schedule of games in Milwaukee County Stadium, the State of Wisconsin, County of Milwaukee, and City of Mllwaukee will be deprived or substantial tax revenues previously levied upon the sales of food. beverages and souvenirs at the exhibition of Major League baseball games at Milwaukee County Stadium. The termination of the exhibition of Major League baseball games in Milwaukee Pho!o br Ra.Loh Sehauer County Stadium will deprive the public, within commuting range of said Stadium, of the economic and recreational benefits of the exhibition or Major League professional championship baseball games at Milwaukee County Stadium. The defendants and the American League and its member clubs, the National Association of Professional Baseball Leagues, the member leagues and member clubs of the aforementioned National Association, have an economic monopoly over the exh i bi tio n of professiona l baseball. The Constitution of the National League grants unlimited power and discretion to determine the location of a franchise; provides it no objective standards for determining whether or not to grant a request for a transfer of a franchise, and contains no rules of procedure which would accord the city, county or state from which any such proposed transfer would be made, an opportunity to be heard. During the period 1953-1962 the National League Baseball Club of Milwaukee, Inc., the corporate predecessor of d~ fendant Milwaukee Braves, Inc., eamed more than $7,500,000 before taxes fro m baseball operations. In 1962 the Braves' franchises, player contracts and other assets carried on the books at approximately $322,000 were transferred from Nation a I League Baseball Club of Mil· waukee, Inc., ultimately to defendant Milwaukee Br aves, Inc., for $6,218,480. As a result of said transfer, National League Baseball Club of Milwaukee, Inc., realized gain of approximately $5,583,000 give or take $1,000,000. During the above period salaries of $-445,000 were paid to the Perini family and dividends ot $300,000 were paid to the Perini Corporation. Over the five year period 1960-1964 on a cash basis the Braves and their corporate predecessors realized total income of $836,900. The Braves reported to their share-holders net losses of $43,378 in 1963 and $45,270 in 1964. Net income from operations was reported as $82,393 in 1953 and $104,730 in 1964 . These net Income figures were reduced by interest expense on funds borrowed t.o purchase the Braves of $125,771 and $150,000 respectively tn arriving at the net loss figures. In 1964 $48,800 of expense in connection with relocation of the franchise were charged against income. Had scouting expenses been capitalized as were player acquisition a n d development costs as sound accounting methods would require, the Braves would have shown a net income of approximately $170,000 in 1963 and $151,000 in 1964. The Braves net receipts from the sale of radio and television broadcasting rights compare favorably with the net receipts of the defendant clubs that submitted figures to this court. During the period from 1953 through 1965, the Mil· waukee Braves, Inc. and its corporate predecessors had a total home paid attendance of 19,551.163. This was greater than any club in either Major League with the exception of the defendant, Los Angeles (Brooklyn) Dodgers. The average annual attend· ance for this period in Mil· waukee was over 1.5 million. This average was the second highest of any club in either league. The attendance level was 31 % more than the average of teams in the defend· ant National League and 52% higher than the average for teams in the American League. Milwaukee home attendance increased from 773,· 818 in 1962 to 910,911 in 1964, despite the rumored relocation of the franchise to Atlanta, Georgia. The level of Attendance in 1965 was not representative, due to the fact that the franchise was to be relocated In Atlanta, Georgia for the 1966 season. The Braves were financially successful during the time It operated a National league baseball club in Milwaukee. Milwaukee has the demographic economic and population characteristics necessary to support a Major League baseball club. Milwaukee has the ability to reasonably support a Major League team. . . . . Expansion ot the National League is feasible. �Thursday, April 14, 1966 iv•10Ia f e d Sfa f e l aws the Braves for not promoting interest in attendance during I 1965. after announcing the team would move. Braves officials and some Milwaukee, Wis., to Atlanta, other baseball e:,i;ecutive~ BRAVES r:iid Continued From Page I ~~i~nt~~ 143.215.248.55:16:45, 29 December 2017 (EST)~I ha-:re Orporation Counsel > bring this acUon in. Teams, Inc., the private citizens In Attorney General WilJConsln Statutes ~:;i5amen about 8:45 p.m. Wed-~~ ;!i:n!~~e zed the press m Mil· fo;;i;eau::~es leaving here, Sox. y. . of Wisconsin have been sub- However, Judge Roller said, the state will be deprived of The Braves hav~ repo:ted subJudge Roller said the defend- tantially restrained ., the de- "The re c O rd in this case th d t' al stantlal losses m Milwaukee th!st1~!g:r1=~~1y"}:'! ~ ~a~t143.215.248.55te~;;: :ision _said. , ' de:~~SY!~: :~~r:jr:v~er:t~e ~nef~~:;143.215.248.55i~rea ion championship schedule of the The Judge said the defendants' ha th 1 1 MJ "Although the record does the depreciation of the player defendant Milwaukee Brave s, "monopol istic _control of major by ke n,,ewspapers n · not reveal the exact measure contracts and the costs of play- iection 133.01 said d a forfeiture pro- ~e~i~: f~~f143.215.248.55 16:45, 29 December 2017 (EST)::~n~s~a~x:r: kee, state of w J s con s In, at cise reasonable control." County Stadium.... " He added that the transfer of If no expansion plan is. sub- the Milwaukee franchise and ~he mitted by May 16, the JUdg~ ~fusal t~ re~lace that franchise pnent against said f ~.000 with costs =~:i143.215.248.55 ~o~~ 143.215.248.55 16:45, 29 December 2017 (EST) ii143.215.248.55 16:45, 29 December 2017 (EST) 143.215.248.55n~; ~~a~if!143.215.248.55 ~~r1~f 16:45, 29 December 2017 (EST)~ ~~c:143.215.248.55 16:45, 29 December 2017 (EST)ee ~en~_ev;~i~!~ ~~! ~:18:!; w~ue C:dded, "P~ple In basebait., like people m any ot~er there is sufflcient evidence ~ pubhc busmess, cannot ,ca nd IR• conclude that it was exceeding~e:'s ~or: 0 hne~~tex~~ ly lucrative," the judge said. to be without ythe critical com- When Lou Perini, who brought t e fnjuncilve relief 143.215.248.55dt~; ~~.;' c:uo~dH:esa%rr;:~ ~~t!h:xec;;Ise ;~h~~o~~:i~s~f~ ment of an Independent press. ~~5~1 ~1 l~ s, Inc., now known ~~:n Ci~ defendants herein, tnd enjoined f rom of the defendant lanta Braves, Inc., mty of Milwaukee, IVided that: ontinuing jurisd!c1y, 1966, and may It the defendants m the 16th day of plan or plans for ue of Professional 11,le baseball to be r Milwaukee as Its for the year 1967; he granting of a f Milwaukee or to lerested in acqui r• advise the Court ,nnection with any consummated t,e.. '-CCORDINGLY. Y 1HE COURT: Elmer W. Roller) Circuit Judge .. ultimately to delwaukee Br aves, ,218,480. As a re. transfer. National eball Club of Mil!., realized gain of ly $5,583,000 give 1,000,000. During period salaries of rere paid to the y and dividends of ire paid to the Petion. five year period n a cash basis the I their corporate 1 realized total $836,900. The rted to thei r sharelosses of $43,378 t S45,270 in 1964. from operations ~d as $82,393 in 1104,730 In 1964. icomefigureswere interest expense borrowed to purraves of $125,771 M) respectively In the net loSll fig64 $48,800 of exmectlon with relo1e franchise were linst income. Jng expenses been is were player acn d development IOund accounting )uld require, the lld have shown a of approximately 1963 and $15 1,000 res net receipts ale or radio and roadcasting rights vorably with the of the defendant submitted figures t. he period rrom h 1965, the MUlVes, Inc. and its ?redecessors had e paid attendance 3. This was great· y club in either ue with the exhe defendant, Los -ooklyn) Dodgers. e annual attend(is period in Mil' over 1.5 million. e was the second my club in either , attendance level 1ore than the avms in the defend· 1 League and 52% the average for the Ame r ican waukee home at-:reased from 773,lo 910,911 in 1964, rumored reloca• franchise to At· gla. The level of in 1965 was not ve, due to the b.e franchise was .ated in Atlanta, the 1966 season. ~ were rinancialtl during the time a National league tb in Milwaukee. has the demogramic and popula.eristics necessary a Major League b. Milwaukee has o reasonably sup. League team. !:xpansion of the ague is feasible. !:,'-! ~:~~;' ~:~ ~=~~ ~~!a~r:~~i~. that the ~C:ju!ai:feir~f:~~n bir~:~:e r;ria~:a!~~a~~:.n~:t..143.215.248.55 rnro~1~:~~:s a:~ ~t:p~~:~ state. t: ~~ 11~a~:;::1~~d sa~~: th at case. Judge R O 11 er s~:;:· Roller said the refusal ~~i!fd c:rJci~!inl~~e~S:ly c~: ~hi!~o~:ui!:~r~t:e~":;r; .. d f1~a "The defendant, Milwaukee of both the National and Am~ri- fects attenda_nce, but tha~ some degree and the a~tendance re- baseball 1s_ a monopoly.,1s fully 143.215.248.55:: ~/~h~c143.215.248.55 ~i~~f143.215.248.55n; a~~Jeres::~s17~; :143.215.248.55 16:45, 29 December 2017 (EST)f~~.. 0 hra!°s" ~ : ~ s~::~nf::;:::~rt deci- 1 ~!neil3iaef:~e~;:n~; iveesg!:;~ ·i~ Milwaukee under the supervl- waukee Brewers Baseball Club, you. 143.215.248.55-i 143.215.248.55sa~n~ the deci&on. ~~n (~~ -143.215.248.55orMit ov~:t~Jh~~e~~a~oP143.215.248.55 16:45, 29 December 2017 (EST)f~n~ sions have upheld baseball in ,/ran~ec:r:::1~\0!nt~~: ·;;a:C:t143.215.248.55:~ u~~d fi~g~ 143.215.248.55tsth~ .. ~: f:!:~1 ~: after a ppointed by the court." co~men:e within the sta te of The Mtl"."aukee ~entmel) a nd there was a public offering of cisions are not conclusive of t:~ W~:o:::: ~= 143.215.248.55 ::;~;i:;:~; to" i~~s;!e~h~avs~t:o;f a~aj~ :it~~a;t~~S:an~·:~%5f~Y1~: ci!~c al:d~:s"r:~t ~ 143.215.248.55 t~fJ =f.?UP who were not local league baseball exhibitions from the judge said. He also blamed not supl?Ort the team, Judge He referred to William C. - - -- - - - -- - - - -- - - R~_J~e sa:~rd will not support !;!~r:~in.head ot th e Braves By SUE KAUFMAN "Before J made this trip I had decided that college had n~thlng to offer me ... I was going to get married." That's what Sandra Mc- s::~ ~~,:~·:i~e:~~ a conclusion that the public of- "None of the Bartholomay ficials ~ere unfriendly to the grou~ had any e:,i;tensive experlBraves, he stated. ence m baseball nor had demonJudge Roller said that if the strated any ability as baseball league desired to go to Atlanta entrepreneurs," he said. "All and offer baseball to the south- that was being offered to the The pupils visited the Oshkosh campus Tuesday morning and 143.215.248.55 16:45, 29 December 2017 (EST)e;os~~t.;u~d~y ~~nhti in college dormitories after attending discussion and information sessions. "The girls in the dorm were 1 s ljiiiiii,jii·ii·ii·ii•iilii..ii•iiliillii!'ii-ii•ii•ii•ii•ii•ii,iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiij _ { ' ~ 1 _. ~ ' s I ave on por swear I - -- an Dressmaking Supplies' d ,--------, 0- Thr~ T ..... to I P.•-: •nd a.t.. , •·•- to • p...._ r rL Mal] Ordffa Profflptly FIiied • SPECIAL P URCHASE ON DRESSMAKING SUPPLIES • • • These low priCNI m ay never be offered again because we bought close-ou t lots at distress Meri• !ice prices. S tock up now! -·,'",m""",•.,..,.'!',~..--P---------p---~,O~&QuA~ ZIPPERS f!r.:i~¾,fi_=!'J.a.ndi. 5~ TO Uc. uch . · · · · ······ t.arse spooi. of ara.nd Na1na THREAD !;!:._to UH ,,.rd ... §Qc BUTTONS PERCALE Pearl, lone, Plastic:, 1c Metal, Leather o.~zmillion &uuon,. V, lue, to S9c and nnalQ,..lllr - TJUTETJl V,luu to 95c. .... 35· - Yar4 ~-~~'.::·.r="" •-4 Lolli Worry of Slipping or Irritating? misses' sizes. Shop early for best selection. ~~ • • t es TOur Dlsslpa f ear of Co ege Part 1, Page 9 !~~f~:·n11 Ptn SPECIAL PURCHASE-SPORTSWEAR Skirts, stretch slacks, blouses, sweaters, ½ PRICE shorts. All f irst quality. J unior and t sta-r:e!s ~~:i~:s~tsla:~l~,~~d that the attendance ~e:1:~;~!~~rs:::ri~1; B;:\:::\oted, "It is said ru;a::;;· had objected to the they combined and conspired at Braves home games from the cordial treatment he re- that there was a lack of enthusi- jurisdiction of the court, among themse~ves to monopo-1953 through 1965 was 19·551 •· ceived when he tried to con-asm on the part of those per- However. the Judge said the 0 i~ g p~~;~:tina~f ba:~1~ B~C:,~~d f~:~~eth!:e143.215.248.55a\ ~eare:P (aih: =~iei143.215.248.55e!h!:143.215.248.55n! ~s:~ j16:45, 29 December 2017 (EST)0 8 within the state of Wisconsin," Los Angeles durmg that period. Braves· franchise in Milwau- knowledge or the Individuals he ruled. Rumors of the Braves moving kee." comprising the BartholoADVERTISEMENT itanding, the stay , noon, C.S.T., on nitted within said thereof granted on be terminated by !fl that the plan is c., now known as me games in the 1 of the court and lppointed by the Impair the continued development ot the quallty of the team." . The state m the long trial ~'!;ri~S::n~~ 1~:tic Judge Roller also noted that ship in 196 2 to a Chicago based Ing this power against the would do the same in the event control of the b~smess of maio.~ MILWAUKEE SENTINEL eastern part of the country, It selected Milwa~ee. business- ui~e party In l~terest in thel Apr. 6._ He orginally ~nnounced lan early ruling was out of the could have awarded a new men was a minonty interest In suit Baseball said the s t a t e that hu1 decision might come question. franchise to Atlanta. the operating companr--4 frac· was not a party In interest last weekend, but as he waded Meanwhile, the Braves opened He said there were enough tlonal ti:iteres\ I whtc~ ~ad Judge Roller worked on his through the mountain of trial thei r season against the Pittsplayers available for a newr143.215.248.55oen di stasteihe~the:we~ruling almost day and night test! many which ra n 7,000burge Pirates in Atlanta (Ga.) team, including a new team mino:rti ~!:'.frs of the White since the 38 day trial ended pages, it became apparent that Tuesday night. ~:t !as ! =143.215.248.55 FALSE TE ETH UCH Pu 7143.215.248.55A\~~&\! 61c • ond LESS! FASHION FABRICS SHOP beembilrruledb}'l • Manhattan Bullding • 617 N. 2nd 14 8th Floor J::.._Sou,f'.,,or shop all over town ~~2~e;143.215.248.55 16:45, 29 December 2017 (EST)· .;}ifl~e ~fr~t; , sC.h:r:oar~~ Milwaukee public school sys- Division senior said. tern guidance counselor, Wed- Each girl and boy on the tour nesday, was assigned a college "room"But now I've changed myl mat~" for the night at. the unimind ... I want to go to cql- vers1ty. lege," Miss McCi:eary said. to~J";es143.215.248.55 16:45, 29 December 2017 (EST)rit~!a~l~~;~t ';;~~ The tr(p to which the young essary to be a brain to stay in Negro g1~l referred _was made college," said Spencer Coggs. ~y 40 Milwauke~ high school 2907 N. 2nd st., another North JU~lors .and semo:-i (? three Division senior. "This guy said Wisconsin State university cam- what it really takes is hard pus~hkosh, Stevens Point work " and Whitewater. Co~gs is planning to major In The pupils had been chosen English and is considering Oshf rom five Milwaukee_high koshStateat present. sch~ls. The trip was designed The pupils from North and fo r d1sad_vantaged stud~nts who. West Division, Lincoln, Rufus were believed to be u~ii:tfonned · King and Riverside high schools as to the opportumtles pre-, visited the Whitewater campus 5ef!ted .by the Wisconsin state Wednesday. Unlike Stevens umvers1ty system. !Point and Oshkosh, the campus Most of the 40 students were there was deserted, beca~se Negroes. students are on Easter vacation. The group left Milwaukee by The tired pupils returned to bus Tuesday, accompanied by Milwaukee late Wednesday afJohn Bussone, guidance coun- ternoon to begin t<;i sift thr?ugh selor and math Instructor at the bundles of ~nformat10nal Lincoln hig h school, and Mrs. books and bulletms they re. Scott. ceived during their tour. with this all-purpose charge card Think of t he conve nience. Shop where you'd like to shop. Save on all t he special sa les, no need to have ca sh . Just say "charge if' with you r new First Wisconsi n Charge Card. Yo u'll get on ly on e monthly bill for wh atever yo u buy. Ma ke just one pa yment . If you pay within 2 5 days it's all free. Should you decide to m ake budget payments, you ca n for an addi tional charge (and your unpaid balance is even cove red by life insu rance) M ake sure you enjoy th is easier way. App ly for yo ur First Wisconsin Charge Ca rd , today. FIRST WISCONSIN CHARGE CARD 10 1 4 5 8 3 FWCC JAMES TURNER 0000 mtt.1 • 3 67 IUIJfCT TO Tlll~S 0" lliV111H SIDI MAIL THIS COUPON TODAY ... and get yours now I (~ don·t rnn h1v. to b. • ~nk custo"*) FlflST WIS CONIIJI CHAflGE CAllD 11'. 0 . •011I0101 MHw•uk..., M acon.In 13101 I Yes, I would like to hav& an application fo r a First Wisconsin Charge Card. I understand that this costs me no thing and that there is no other obligation, I ..................... . Name .••• ,, •• .. •••• . •••••••.•...••• . •.••••••••••.••• ~ Address ••.•••• , . , .• ,, .. .•••• , ••••.• ,, ••• , ••••••.••• · CUSHION YOUR WALK· City •••••• • , ••••.•...•••..••••. . ••• ••• Ztp •••••••• ••• • MEN'S FINE QUALITY SLIP-ONS OXFORDS or Cushion Insoles • TopQuall t,- by U.S. Mtr. ~~;:\ s9g1 at Thi5 l= LOW Pric::e I lm!1HlitPI lnli!IWNill •• WE MEASURE THE FOOT .. . • • • ·-~-h~k • 6621 W . Fond du L,c Av. • 710 1 W, • S. 7th ancl W. Greenfitld , , • S. 27th,nclW. N,tional II • • • • • • • • •=- • • • •~ -=a=a • • (In FIRST WISCONSIN NATIONAL BANK OF MILWAUKEE Greenfield Av. . I • -., • LH'S ,in FAMILY SHO E STORES Shoppins Center) • • • �
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 15, Folder topic: Atlanta Braves | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 19, Folder 15, Document 25

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_015_025.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 15, Document 25
  • Text: GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ATLANTA. GEO RGIA 30332 SCH OO L O F IN D USTRIA L MANAGEMENT August 5, 1966 J >- ' v ./1,, ' ) / u.,,--( \,J l-·-._1L t The Honorable Ivan H. Allen Mayor of Atlanta Georgia Dear Mayor Allen: One of the degree requirements for a Master of Science in Industrial Management at Georgia Tech is an independent research project to be chosen by the student involved. In fulfilling this requirement, we have undertaken an analysis of the economic impact of the Atlanta Braves on the city of Atlanta. During a conversation this morning with Dale Henson, of the Chamber of Corrnnerce, it was pointed up that the results of this study might be of interest to your office. The effort has been underwritten by the Braves and includes some 1500 personal interviews during ball games, so it should be as comprehensive as anything which is currently available . The study will be completed during September and the Braves should be able to distribute the findings shortly thereafter; however, we are in no position to counnit the Braves management to any specific publication date. If your office has any information which might serve t o make the study more complete and/or valid, we would appreciate it if it could be forwarded to us, or we would b e glad to make arrangements to visit your office and obtain it personally. We will appreciate any help which you might provide and hope that the published r esults will be of use to your office. Ge orge D. Hou ser ~c:?.c:J~-!7 Rober t A. Weinberg �
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 15, Folder topic: Atlanta Braves | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 19, Folder 15, Document 29

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_015_029.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 15, Document 29
  • Text: ATLANTA STADIUM ATLANTA, GA . 30312 AC 404- 522 - 7630 July 22, 1966 Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. City of Atlanta City I:Jall Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mayor Allen: My contribution t o the parade was very small, but anything that you would like the writer to do I'm at your valued commands. Thank you for the license plate, and we'll continue to sing the praises of Atlanta on our visits into the hinterlands. Just a voice crying in the wilderness to have the fans "rally" around the Braves. Glennon a Sales Director EG:lc �
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 15, Folder topic: Atlanta Braves | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 19, Folder 15, Document 37

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_015_037.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 15, Document 37
  • Text: June Z7, 1966 Mr. H . Charles Ftedericks P. 0 . B 1094 Rome , G orgia 30161 D r Mr . Fredi ric Thi will cknowledge receipt of yo r le:tte~ of J'l.llle Z3rd reque ting further infOJ!'ma reg rding y ur risit t the At nta Staclimn. ,..__ i _ your letter to the ALW,;MG the pedal request that they a.dvi e y t lUl
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 15, Folder topic: Atlanta Braves | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 19, Folder 15, Document 38

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_015_038.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 15, Document 38
  • Text: r'c )~ ~ ,/ 7 Jc+/")) ~ SECOM SYSTEMS / SOUTHEASTERN COM M UNICATIONS SYSTEMS , I NC . • 1 S 26 HOWELL MILL RD ., NW• ATLANTA , GEORGIA 30318 • ( 4 04) 351 - 6453 Jun e 1, 1966 The Honorabl e Ivan Allen , Jr . Mayor, City of Atl anta r'ity Hall Atlant a , Georoi a Dear Mayor Allen : I have s pent the l ast two e veni nqs out at our Stadium watchi ng our Rrave s , 'T'h e ni qhts were not exactl y the Braves ' ni ohts , nor the fans ~ Thev were , however, eveni ngs of exci t i no b aseball for basebal l fans . Almost every o l d-line ma jor l eague c i ty has had to experi ence seasons of u p s and downs , and y et t hey hav e manaoed t o sustai n t h eir support for their t e ams ; sunnort i n the f or m of adulati ng pai d attPndance a t aames . The resul t s are evi dent where a t eam has not b een supported ; the t eam moves out of town , as was the case of Mil wau kee . I was ext reme lv di s turbed to see s o many people l eavinq so ear l y dur i nq the qame and the drop off i n attendance 'Tuesday ni ah t over Monday eveni na . Mo st disturbi nq were comments such as , "'T'hev ought to go back t o Mil waukee, if Milwaukee will t ake them ba ck ." I a l so hear commPnts t o the effect that At l ant a i s a foot ball t own and will nP.ver suppor t a l osing baseball team . We a r e a ma j or l eague c i t y at t hi s noin t on l y to thP. point that we now have a maj or l eague t eam. We will be a ma j or l eaque baseball c itv in fact and deed when the Braves a ~e aiven real support . Everybody l oves a winner , but even wi nners have to lose s ome times , and at t imes even for l ong stretches . Pro and con opi ni ons abou t Br agan and i ndividual pl ay ers are h ealthy and are a oart of spectator sports , bu t f i ckl eness can on l y go s o far. The verv worst thinq that 6oul d happen i s havi nq t he Braves win a penant i n their first year here . All that can happen after that i s for the team to stay s tatus quo or go down . I think that news medi a have donP. a fai r ly good job of promoti no the Braves , but more is needed . The civi c leaders who hel ped brina thP Rraves to u s have to maintain and radiate thei r enthusiasm. Unfortunatel y, Atlanta does not h ave New York ' s sense of humor that has more than sustained the Mets through several dark years. D I STR IB U TOR OF@ IICIID-l -11111 �Mavbe we ouqht to start openi ng up our somewhat starched collars and introduce more showmanship into activities at the Stadium. Atlanta is a potpourri of people from all over the country. Why not have "New Yorkers ' Niqht" when the Mets are here, and Phili=idelphia niaht when the Phillies are here, etc. We don't have to ao to quite the extremes of Bill Veeck, (or do we?) but more color would add to the f un . Anyway, vou have to agr ee that baseball is a lways good, but we n eed the fans out there durinq good times and not s o good times. Let's make each and every Brave feel as biq in Atlanta, as biq as Atlanta now feels that it is in the world of sports. Cor dia lly, SECOM SYSTEMS, I NC. Ceff:::i7!f' I President J BH/ ms CC: Mr . J ohn Mc Hal e President Atl anta Braves Baseb a ll Cl ub Atlanta Stadium 521 Capitol Av e ., s.w. Atlanta, Geor gi a �
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 15, Folder topic: Atlanta Braves | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 19, Folder 15, Complete Folder

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_015.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 15, Complete Folder
  • Text: ---re Tv II W ft /,-. J._ e tJ ~~J~ zl- ~ <~ "f?,J .?JGohn .J . MCHale President and General Manager ATLANTA BRAVES, INC . Atlanta Stadium / Atlanta. Ga . 30312 / AC 404-522-7630 �908 Cas c ade Avenu e , S . W. At la nt a , Ge or gi a 30311 -- ------~ Ho n. Iv an Al le n, Ma yor Ci ty Hal l At _a nt a , Ge org i a �NORTH AVENUE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH CORNER PEACHTREE ST , AND NORTH A VENUE ATLANTA , GEORGIA 30308 WILSON L . NEARING MINISTER T O THE COMMUNIT Y June 21 , 1 96 6 Han o Ivan Allen City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Dear Ma y or Allen: Mrs. Moses has t a lked with you conc erning ou r i nterest i n having t h e Braves h ere for a service. This cop y for y our informationo N/men �From the Desk of WILLIAM C. BARTHOLOMAY < ��A TLANTA ,GEORGI A f!l'twni - Mr s . A nn M . Moses /) ~ ~-~ -~~ r143.215.248.55 1 JJ 143.215.248.55 16:44, 29 December 2017 (EST) ~ I ' ~ ~ - ~ ~ ~ ~ 143.215.248.55-~_fl ¥d143.215.248.55/U ~ F ORM 25-6 , �.0 0 T 1.4 RS.0() l. 5 3 fl .6 L1 350.00 ?i. 3 A c:; .6 4 S 1. 3 1 7 .8 0 l 4. 6 P. :i . 4 4 T �o @143.215.248.55 16:44, 29 December 2017 (EST) 0 <( . " po ATLANTA,GEORGIA - 'ia.1 1, 5,,,,,. - Ann M. Mom M.s / ~ '/-2 d; ; (!£-1r '- <1 t;uw'.u j)Allll~u IJ/!lfeS 9 733. ~ /~/o / ~t O, e& ~ Ot) c::; 9;2. 0 0 3;o /) 1%5~·00 I /_.. JJ ;Nc- 1 ~061~I (!11--?7/ "-tr - ) QO J () . 0 (.) (le ' ess W11vi:+rJA.rt11a - I 2, 00. 70 · 74' o/o ~Jurs j ' FORM 25-6 o -o 3 _;-3. 70 1f'10 JO/ I I '-/- t, !V/ e-Y..f__ (JO- - ~ tl/- c t.. ~ t 'Jow R.. 0 Vv6RQ I( R .s--r OL D ~ -I JI,, ~- 11/4. Follo v,h ';J(!_ /\J LJO/\J ~ '17/"i=' ,lrv C ·, / A L R£'.A.t> v h/4v£ /t-m £ . ,:;, I /cA It?. 4?E ~m E A,-TL,c,,rvr4 /' II .Nib . /0 ~e I Vo..)v fV0 ,./D;;;_RNL A AID --Ti?A-- /Yf . Ar ; } ,, rJ) 5~€_ ~A -'I< ~ DF J...v c.. /<. Mo111 {);V ~ z;;/4.N A.r.Jo,/JG- R 34? 0 .S-w /E.E;- 0 ~A'R.I< FoRE~ 1 r LL, �,\ 4 Section 3 ·A, f. L. OWNERS ·SEEK NO NODS SAYS WILSON CHI CAGO TRIBUNE, 'l' UESiJAY, APRIL 1 ST. IGNATIUS TOPPLED BY H LY CROSS ·ieague President Tells .I..· of Hot Potatoes i· [Continued from first page] "Note the family �*** \.GO TRIBUNE, T UESDAY, AP RIL 12, 1966 I'VE ALWAYS SAID YOU HERE'S ~MEW~IZE A BQIGHT f30Y1 THING FORYOU TO GRASP, SANO'/ - \/Ef r . 0 u 5 24 hour traffic counte v 10 the East-West freeway s O 79,938 vehicles this Janua~e_r:z,538 in February and 88,974 ~ n r,,tarch. · 100 Many Cars" "Just . A.Ith h there 1s much const~UCti~~g dO~town, Br~ening s~1d, th traffic overload 1s due s1ni e ••too many cars " The city election commission Ply to · Wednesday recommended that ."it's like ttYin~ tto pour three low bids for the sale or lease Pints of milk in a quar t of 1,025 voting machines to bottle," he saidMilwaukee be accepted by the 13 r . 11 g suggested three central board of purchases. soiu/ en 1 ions: of "f The commission's recommen- • Gr ter use reeway dation, however, was contin- flyers ,;a articularly by those gent upon a city attorney's of- Who kp downtown. . . .L or fice review to mak e cert am 4,e • at.ed s y s t e m of machines satisfy all legal re- Parit~ gradtl to "weed out the an.d 1ng fees . ,, quirements. ay parkel · Andrew L. Lehrbaumme_r, • l' ·f11ate cl o sin g of city purchasing agent, and Wil- Wisc0he _ult~"'- from N. 8th st. liam J . O'Malley, secretary of east t nsin btlt rnass transit and this sign pos t e d b y some pran kster at the. commission, said . that the deJive~ all th8 turn-off road to the Stadium. choice between outright pur- 13 Yaid in an inte chase or lease of the machines vie,:Uening 5 rorists c o rn i n r-Sentinel Photo - - - - - - - would be the task of the com- dow that 010 ilY cannot g ° w Motorists traveling on the East-West expressway Wednesday were greeted with C'.,y to A,·d State Dr,·ve 0 n 8 ars' 8 ack Sa Ie$ Tax mon council. . 0 tpoinu;t~:ne :~ e Ct "J)Ortaf ; rta.1 serv1.:.,, .. v· Lehrbaummer Tuesday acF .,, flyers Help cepted bids from the Shoup lie r~eW\ East-West freeVoting Machine Corp., Bala- way said th would have surCynwyd, Pa., and the Automat• passe~lreadYrated ca_pacity of ic Voting Machine Corp., James- 5,00o its per hOUr m one di. town, N. Y. reqio c~rs sh hours except for The city of Milwaukee hAS ' Local I i c ens in g boards 1in Mtlwaukee. sub1ect to coun- He rejected a bid from In- the fti. m r~/ flyers frorn the M reewo. · enter, w re ~d to rip ·i, a . thrnt1ghout th~ state have been di appro ·al Two Bids Accepted Urged equipment and operation of these schools. Sites for seven such institutions were 'selected two years ago by the commissioner of vocational education. These sites have now been discarded and new sites will ~e selected this spring, Parkmson said. Members of the Milwaukee board of vocational and adult education will vote on the recommendation Apr. 22. Parkinson said the school would be exclusively for those students whose home environ- ment is not conducive to study. He said that students would probably have to be recommended for admission by the welfare department of their county. Parkinson stressed that the students would not necessarily be "problem" children, but persons from homes where the parents were the problem or other distractions are present. The school would be seL up on a regional basis with students from several states coming to Milwaukee for training. �---,- 12,721 See Braves Bow Again, 6-0 Bucs Win On Law's 4-Hitter Sentinel SPORTS By RED THISTED PAGE 2, PART 2 Sentinel Staff Writer Atlanta, Ga.-It was an unproductive night !or the Braves here Wednesday as they gave a sad sack performance in bowing for the second straight time to the Pittsburgh Pirates. This time they were b lanked on four hits, 6-0, and there was positively nothing for the 12,· 721 fans to cheer about. Bolin Blanks Cubs, 4-0 San Francisco, Calif. - A' - THURSDAY, APR. 14, 1966 Bob Bolin shut out Chicago on Astros Rout Koufax, 7-6 four hits Wednesday night as the San Francisco Giants carved out a 4-0 victory over the Cubs. The f I a m e throwing right hander with the easy motion struck out nine and walked none. Only three times did the Cubs get a man past first and only once got more than one man on base. 4 ' -- i �Complete Coverage of Braves Decision MILWAUKEE SENTINEL EXTRA IN FIFTIES Partly cloud y west, fair east Thuriday. Highs mostly in the f ifties, lower near the lake. Maps, tables, page 2. FINAL 34 PAGES--3 PARTS THURSDAY MORNING, APRil, 14, 1966 ROLLER: EXPAND IN '67 OR BRAVES HERE IN '66 By WlLIJAM JANZ Circuit Judge Elmer W. Roll· er Wednesday night ordered the Braves back from Atlanta this season unless the National league expands and grants this city a franchise for 1967. He gave the league until May 16 to sub m It a written plan for expansion. He said ex· pansion was feasible in the National league and that Milwau- kee can support major league ba1>ebaU. The stay will expire on May 18 if no expansion plan is sul). mitted. the court said. If the plan is unsatisfactory, the stay wi11 be lifted, the judge said, and the court will take-- over supervision of Braves games here or appoint a board or commission to do so. He also fined each of the defendants, the Braves, the league and its other clubs, SS,000 for violation of state antitrust laws. The historic decision was announced after the judge and his staff had worked 36 straight hour~ to complete the 175 page document. At the decision, near pandemonium broke out in the courtroom, filled with 150 persons, including many newsmen who raced through the courtroom to telephones. 111111111111111111 1111 11 1111111111111111111 11 111111 11 111 11111 111 111 111111111 111 11 1111 Ready Lloyd Larson Group To Run Club, ~h!u:!~ ~1 with an earlier decision by a superior court in Fulton oount_v, Ga., which ordered the Braves to play their games in Atlanta. Judge Roller, County Judge Marvin, Holz and several court reporters started their marathon session in chambers around 9 a.m. Tuesdav. The decision was passed out to Turn lo Page 9, Col. I By J OE PECOR Someone yelled, "He's ordered the Bravei; back to MUwaukee!" By GORDON GOTnJEB "We •.re rea.dy, wi\lin~ and Then it was wild .. 1~;e: M~:;u: l;si:;..:~:::~n::ht n::r;;,~ Jn fact, leaTfles~ r TIMES hlrdiy-10:30, U0 • -·~t~:w.:.,./:i HJ .. OdOR •.. " .I'.~ 'C -·~d~ ,i,. r;h;~,. Ja1Jool11',S•ntlncl A. ~BST 1111, S1.15, IEATRE $1.50, $2 ~ , Sale U Door EVER MADE!" I OR BY MAIL Ill IDoySe1.-s ..... TH SIDE urt Theatre iltl W. P"OlldduLac,,U. 'mohs as INGING NUN" lior,andl,l~r GARSON MOOREHEAD ers at 8:45 a.m. Tuesday 11601 W. Lincoln av., West in Washington said they knew of no basis for such an action. and worked until the decision Allis. ATANTA KEPT IT QUIET From Sentinel Wire Services found out it was not on file. I know I'll need some proor of my age when I file for my social security benefits. Any suggestions? A. B., Milwaukee. A. :;~p~!~J1 ~~ \1~~i OMEGA Watches H HOUR WATCH IIEBVlCZ ~ '~~.~.;~p N111¥.(74Ulf ~;ir~:::::::::~:,::::·:::::_:,';:·:: ~:: ~li;ig1:l~1t~;l;; OPEN MON., THURS. and FRI. Iii 9 'I Did the Best I Could' World in Brief N. Water Q, :~e:~1:t~ t=~o gne~ The judge thanked everyone for bearing with him during delays in announcing the decision. Judge Roller said he wanted to announce the decision Tuesday before the Braves opening game in Atlanta, but it wasn't ready, he explained. The 64 year old jurist said he plans to "sleep a little later tomorow. "Then I might take a couple of clays off to visit my brother," he said. He admitted that he had felt some pressure from "mostly baseball fans" d u ring and after the trial. "I got the nicest letters from people in Atlanta. I don't wish them any bad luck," he said. •i~'.;- 5 5 w, "'" t:1:~· NRO~cl _Miu Top .. s4495 ,:;:::nM~:i.1!0~ .,, ... s5500 Oct.son T•blu ~:C~ux~ SwiYcl Ch.in, .... 1~H1._1 T•blc1, ........ s3300 s1695 s399s 2714 W . CENTER ST. Sears Save at Sears • . • Headquarters for All Types of Fencing You Can Count on l Js ... Quality Cost~ No Morp at SPar~ ~~,:f~.~t~ LAST 3 DAYS! IHGITUP" IRDHERS" Ive-In ii~iia~ ~iu;~- Mi~ Save 8 15.07 011 This 40 Gallon Gas Water Heater Regular 8 79.95 Now Only 64 8 ~ Chain Link Fencing NO MONEY DOWN Surround your home and property with the kind of year after year protection only steel fencing provides. Complete galvanizing leaves no surfaces to rust. Neat diamond pattern en h ances the beau t y of a n y yard, harmoni zes with any styl e of architecture. Makes attractive as well as protective frame for well kept lawns and gardens. on Sears Easy Pay m e nl Pla n • Plen ly of hot water for all l1 o usch old n eeds • H eats 58,8 gallon s per hour at 60 degree rise I NSTALLATIONS ARRANGED ... NO MONEY DOWN;:;,;,:;~::;;; Enjoy plenty of hot water for shaving, cooking, cleaning, laundry. Around the clock service! Hot ,vater when you need it! IM Wh ite Ceda r Stoc kad e ~0dfft!ORSE" 1 3. 3:13, ~:13. 1,1 .. r"it'l·a'li.o'l•p11- 1AIR LADr 2,00 an11 Installations Arranged s,11, Open Tonight and Every lllonday, Wednesday, Thu rsday, F riday ' til 9 Open iTONIGHTl and Every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday aad Friday 'til 9 Open E~·ery Day at 9 a.m.; Open Tuesday and Satui:-day ' til 5:30 p,m. SHOP AT SEARS AND SAVE Satisfaction G uaranteed o.-Your Money Back ISearsl SEARS, ROEBUCK AND CO. Available at All Sears Stores I I . ,..... ,_. · - · · ·,. . -~ "· · '· -~ Open Every Day at 9 a. m.; Open Tuesday a ud Satu rday 'til 5:30 p.m. SHOP AT SEARS AND SAVE a • ... ,rd 1"" .i.. "' ...., ,,..,, ._,....~. --~ ••• ~ .. ~. ........ a eedSears ·"""" """"I"'"""'" ...... """ 1o,!!",£i.f;;::., ir:,cu:t · ;on:~r;::k s'::l l""'~-:::::;_~,.. 1 =~:-,"'I~!;':.. st·r 18 0 or su.u, 1ouuc1t AND co. �CONCLUSIONS OF LAW What Judge Roller Said The conclLtSions drawn by Circuit Judge Elmer W. Roller in his decision in the Braves case: SOME SNOOZED, OTHERS WAITED IN JUDGE ROLLER'S COURTROOM FOR THE VER~Y.,_.iP1>oto ., Excerpts From Decision Excerpts from the decision ha n de d down by Circuit Judge Elmer w. Roller: . . . Concededly the case is novel, but that does no t mean that it can possess no legal merit. I presents unusual and perplexing questions which arise from a business which in modus operandi occupies an unusual pos.itlon in the economy of the nation. The question is hardly whether an identical factual situation has b e e n adjudicated but ratt.er whether the facts presented here constitute a violation of the S~te·s Antitrust I aw s within applicable principles of law. The tenn, organized baseball refers to "the many professional clubs a n d leagues which have subjected themselves to the jurisdiction of the Commissioner c:,f Baseball and have contracted with one another to abide by certain rules and regulations." •.. The claim that organized baseball is a monopoly is fully supported in the record. Its economic control is achieved principally by agreements, viz., (a) the Constitution and Rules of t h e National League of Professional Baseball Clubs . (b) the National Le a g u e Agreement to which ea c h Major League and all member clubs are parties, and (c) the Major League Rules, promulgated pursuant to the agreement and binding upon both Leagues, their member clubs and players. ... The reserve clause Is good for the whole life of the ballplayer. The effect of the Uniform Player's Contract and the Major League Rules by which the player agrees in his contract to be bound are: (I) A player wishing to p 1a y professional baseball must sign a contract with a professional baseball club: (2) The terms of that contract commit the player to being reserved for a period during a term for which he is not under contract and to an indefinite number of renewals of his contract; (3) A player who fails to contract, who violates his contract or reservation may be placed on the restricted or disqualified list and be ine 11 g i bl e to play for any league in organized baseball. . . . The interrelated rules and agreements created a monopoly of the market (territorial franchises) and over the raw material of the business (the right to the services of baseball players). From the very outset of the case the court has been met with a continuing challenge to its jurisdiction. Defendants assert that because of the unique nature of the 12,721 SEE BRAVES LOSE The Pittsburgh Pirates defeated the Braves before only 12,721 persons in Atlanta Wednesday night, 6 to 0. The stadium in Atlanta has 51,377 seats. Details in sports section. baseball business, because of its national scope and character, it requires a uniform, national system of regulation. . . . Their jurisdictional objections rest on the fed· era! decisions holding that organized professional baseball is not within the scope of the Sherman Antitrust Act, and in progression t he y maintain that the business is not amenable to state law. . . For reasons previously considered. the court was and is of the opinion that the f e de r a 1 decisions are not conclusive of this In seeking to recover a forfeiture the State has a pecuniary interest in the lawsuit and is the real party in interest and, in the court's o p i n i o n, If the injunctive remedy was the sole relief sought the State would be the real party in interest in bringing the action to en· force the antitrust laws in its sovereign and governmental capacity as the statute directs. The possibility that the County of Milwaukee or private citizens may incidentally be benefited by this action does not nullify the State's real party in interest status or convert the action to a private lawsuit between individuals. From a review of the record the court concludes that the financial success of a Major League baseball operation in a community and the determination of whether the economic situation in such com• munity is such that It can and will support the continued operation of baseball can be made only on the basis of and in terms of a reasonable period of time. Mr. Lou Perini moved the Braves to Milwaukee in 1953. He continued to own the Braves until November 26, 1962, when the club was sold to its present ownership. Mr. Perini had acquired the club in 1945. It was in very bad financial straits. He paid very little for it other than to assume certain liabilities in the amount of $305,000 and to pay for the organizational costs in the amount of $6,508. Consequently the total purchase price was $311,508. . . . Although the record does not reveal the exact measure of the financial success of the Perini operation in Milwaukee, there is sufficient evidence to conclude that it was exceedingly lucrative. ... The court is satisfied that the effect upon Braves' attendance by the introduction of Major League baseball in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area was infinitesimal. Likewise the contrast presented by the argument that Milwaukee's contribution to the League's tow attendance d r opp e d from 20 per cent for the period of 1953 to 1960 to 8 per cent in 1961 to 1964 is misleading. It Ignores the fact that the team's standing had never been below s e c o n d place during the first period and it was in fourth and fifth and sixth place in the second period. It ignores the fact that the league was expanded to ten teams and that two competitive t e a m s were transferTed to the populous areas of Los Angeles and San Francisco. The Court has already noted the reasonable explanation for the failure of local residents to invest substantially in the Braves stock. There is also some evidence that stock offered by Perini at $12.25 a share in 1961 had dropped to $3.375 in 1962 which fact may well have been reflected in the attitude of local investors in 1963. There is no doubt that there were some differences and problems concerning both the lease and sale of television rights. However, there is evidence that in July of 1964, County Executive John Doyne inquired of Mr. {William C.) Bartholomay whether the r e was anything that the Braves wanted changed in the lease. At that time the lease had one year to run. Doyne testified that Bartholomay stated that the contract was satisfactory. This is confirmed by Mr. McHale's testimony to the extent that he stated that they were satisfied with the percentage rentals, but for them to at· tempt to change several annoying problems would create bad public relations. ... The record does not justify giving serious consideration to the claim of problems with reference to the lease. Some concern was expressed relative to an un· favorable political climate in Milwaukee by several of the members of the National League. . . . All was directed towards Mr. (Eugene H.) Grobschmidt except for one other instance. Some of the statements of the Chairman of the County Board were brash and offend· ing and in one instance constituted a "low blow," as the p r e s s aptly described it. There is no proof in the record that the statements of Mr. Grobschmldt evinced or created a political situation... Now In regard to an unfriendly press. P e o p I e in baseball, like people in any other public business, cannot (and indeed the record herein indicates that they do not) expect to be without the critical com· m e n t of an independent press. There are two daily newspapers in Milwaukee, one is a morning paper, the other an evening paper. The record in this case demonstrates that Major League baseball was covered favorably by the newspapers in Milwaukee. . . . Neither can it be said in the face of these circumstances that the c iv i c leaders of Milwaukee and Wisconsin did not lend their full measure of support to the team. The record will not support a conclusion that the public officials were unfriendly to the Braves. During the decade between 1950 and 1960, Milwaukee has grown faster than any of the older, well-established Major League areas of the northwest and midwest; only the western cities and Washington, D. C. have exceeded its rate ot growth. Projections for the 1960-1980 period for Milwaukee range from 0.8 to 2.1%. . . . Wisconsin's growth rate during 1960-1980 is ex- pected to grow faster than most states in which there are Major League teams. The several owners whose depositions were read upon this trial are substantially in agreement that the Major Leagues will expand. They assert, however, that expansion is not feasible at the present time. They say there is a shortage of players. 1lle Court is satisfied, however, from the testimony of former Commissioner Ford C. Frick, Mr. William L. (Bill) Veeck, Mr. (Bobby) Bragan, field manager of the Braves, and also from the testimony of Mr. (Warren) Giles and Mr. (Walter) O'Malley, that there are sufficient baseball players to stock a team in Milwaukee. I. The defendant corporations have violated Section 133.01 of the Wisconsin Statutes (1963) in the following respects: a. Having agreed among themselves to control and allocate professional baseball players, to assign to the respective corporate defendants exclusive territorial rights and privileges respecting the exhibition of professional Major League baseball games, and to limit the number of members in the National League of Professional Baseball Clubs of which the defendants are all the constituent members, they have now agreed to transfer the site of Major League baseball exhibitions from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to Atlanta, Georgia, with the result that trade and commerce within the State of Wisconsin have been substantially restrained. b. They have combined and conspired among themselves to monopolize the business of Major League professional baseball within the State of Wisconsin. 2. The National League of Professional Baseball Clubs Is and has been the means and instrumentality by which the corporate defendants have engaged in the practices referred to in Paragraph 1 hereof. 3. By means of the practices outlined In Paragraph l hereof the corporate defendants and their counterpart members of the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs have acquired monopolistic control of all available ball players of Major League caliber with the result that the granting of per· mission from one of the said leagues in the form of a franchise to operate a Major League baseball team is necessary for any person to engage in the business of professional Major League baseball. 4. The corporate defendants' monopolistic control of Major League professional baseball requires the defendants to exercise reasonable control and to follow reasonable procedures In the issuance ot memberships in the National League of Professional Baseball Clubs and in the definition of sites for baseball exhibitions and as respects the transfer of memberships. 5. The transfer by the corporate defendants of the franchise in the National League of Professional Baseball Clubs from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and the refusal to issue a replacement franchise allowing the exhibition of Major League baseball in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, was an unreasonable exercise of the monopolistic control of the business of Major League professional baseball and was in violation of Section 133.0J, Wisconsin Statutes. 6. The refusal of the National League and the failure of the American League to issue a franchise to Milwaukee county or the Milwaukee Brewers Baseball Club, Inc., was a concerted refusal to deal in restraint of trade and commerce within the State ot Wisconsin in violation of Section 133.01, Wisconsin Statutes (1963). 7. This court hu jurisdiction over all of the parties and of the subject matter hereof. 8. The State of Wisconsin is the real party in interest in this action. The Attorney General and the Corporation Counsel of Milwaukee County were authorized to bring this action under the statutes of the State of Wisconsin, Teams, Inc., the Greater Milwaukee Committee and other private citizens in Wisconsin were entltled to inform the Attorney General of alleged violations of Section 133.01, Wisconsin Statutes (1963). 9. That by reason of said violation of Section 133.01 aald defendants and each of them has incurred a forfeiture provided by Statute. 10. That the plaintiff is entitled to judgment against said defendants and each of them in the sum of SS,000 with costs and disbursements. 11. That the plaintiff Is entitled to the JnjuncUve relief prayed for in its complaint. 12. That the defendant Milwaukee Braves, Inc., now known as Atlanta Braves, Inc., and all other defendants herein, shall be and they are hereby restrained and enjoined from playing the home championship schedule of the defendant Milwaukee Braves, Inc., now known as Atlanta Braves, Inc., in any city or place other than in the County of Milwaukee, State of Wisconsin, at County Stadium; provided that: I.) This order shall be stayed, under the continuing jurisdiction of the Court to the 18th day of May, 1966, and may thereafter be extended in the event that the defendants shall, prior to 12:00 o'clock noon, C.S.T., on the 16th day of May, 1966, submit to this Court a written plan or plans for expansion of the defendant National League of Professional Baseball Clubs so as to permit Major League baseball to be played at County Stadium with the City of Milwaukee a1 its "home," effective with the playing season for the year 1967: 2.) Such expansion shall contemplate the granting of a National League fra~1.hise to the County of Milwaukee or to such qualified third parties as shall be interested In acquiring a National League franchise, and will advise the Court of such fact. 3. ) The Court reserves jurisdiction in connection with any such plan or plans untH the same may be consummated between the ultimate parties. 4.) So that there will be no misunderstanding, the stay herein granted will expire at 12:00 o'clock noon, C.S.T., on May 16th, 1966, if no such plan is submitted within said time. Likewise, the stay, or any extension thereof granted on the strength of any plan submitted, will be terminated by the Court in the event the Court concludes that the plan is unsatisfactory. 5.) The defendant. Milwaukee Braves, Inc., now known as Atlanta Braves, Inc., will perform its home games In the County of Milwaukee under the supervision ot the court and such board or commission hereinafter appointed by the court. LET JUDGMENT BE ENTERED ACCORDINGLY. BY THE COURT: (Signed Elmer W. Roller) Circuit Judge Dated; April 13th, 1966. No formal agrttment is necessary to constitute the unlawful conspiracy, nor is it material to prove that the ultimate object of the combination Is to restrain trade, if it in fact does unreasonably do ,~ . . . Even if the shutdown of baseball in Milwaukee was not intended to restrain trade, the decisions to transfer, not to expand, and to refuse to deal with the Milwaukee market would nevertheless be illegal efforts to protect and extend the power of an existing monopoly. Even if Organized Baseball is a self-regulating monopoly enjoying some kind of privileged position under the antitrust laws, actions charged are nevertheless actionable restraints of trade and abuse cl monopoly power. The violation here concerns the abuse by the monopoly of its power in a manner which will have the effect to re-strain trade and commerce within this State. The assumption of the reasonableness of the agreements by w h I c h ocganlzed baseball maintains its internal control, as those agreements affect people within the structure of Organized Badeball, do not sanction the monopoly to restrain trade and commerce outside of baseball. . . . The Sherman Act provides that the several district courts of the United States are invested with jurisdiction to prevent and restrain violations of the Sherman Act. . .• A recurring defense argument and, in fact. an affirmative jurisdictional defense is that the action by the State of Wisconsin attempts to compel the defendant to continue to do business in the State in violation of the Federal Constitution. Defendants ask in what posi• tion does the state find itself in attacking the monopoly and then asking for it to come back to the state? In the court's opinion the plaintiff presents a legally adequate answer to that defense. Plaintiff states that there are two solutions to the question. One is to dissolve the monopoly, void the uniform player contract and re-establish competition. The other is to let baseball continue to enjoy the internal monopolistic prerogatives which it deems necessary for the continuance of top level competition in Major League baseball but to require them by court decree to respond in a responsible and reason- Willard Stafford, ,peci.,I counsel for the state of Wisconsin in the antitrust suit against the Braves and the National league, showed his feelings Wednesday night after reading highlights of the decision of Circuit Judge Elmer Roller. -UPI able manner in matters pertaining to the transfer and allocation of franchises. The state asserts that it has elected the latter course which presents two primary factua l issues: (a) whether the decision of the owners, the National League, made in October and November of 1964, was a responsible and reasonable decision or was arbitrary or even capricious and whether the refusal of the league to deal, to grant an expansion franchise was arbitrary, (b) whether or not the self-regulated monopoly has accorded all interested parties due process. Findings of Foci Milwaukee County is unable to secure as a tenant for Milwaukee County Stadium a Major Le a g u e professional baseball team playing its home games on the championship schedule in Milwaukee County Stadium. The termination of the exhibition of Major League baseball games in Milwaukee County Stadium prevents the sale at Major League professional games in Milwaukee County Stadium of substantial amounts of food, beverages and merchandise. The termination or the exhibition of Major League baseball games in the Milwaukee County Stadium restrains and prevents the sales of commodities and services by restaurants, hotels, motels, taxis and other transportation facilities to spectators who would attend Major League professional games at Milwaukee County Stadium. The termination of t.he exhibition of Major League professional baseball games at Milwaukee County Stadium prevents the Milwaukee newspapers, radio stations and television stations from print· ing, broadcasting and telecasting Major League professional baseball games at Milwaukee County Stadium. The termination of the exhibition of Major League baseball games at Milwaukee County Stadium eliminates the competition for spectators which heretofore existed between the Milwaukee County Stadium and Wrigley Field and Comiskey Park in Chicago, Illinois. The termination of the exhibition of Major L e a g u e baseball games at Milwaukee County Stadium eliminates the competition which heretofore existed between television and radio stations located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and Chicago, Illinois, for the Major League audience in Southern Wisconsin and Northern Illinois. In the absence of a Majo r League baseball club playing its home championship schedule of games in Milwaukee County Stadium, the State of Wisconsin, County of Milwaukee, and City of Mllwaukee will be deprived or substantial tax revenues previously levied upon the sales of food. beverages and souvenirs at the exhibition of Major League baseball games at Milwaukee County Stadium. The termination of the exhibition of Major League baseball games in Milwaukee Pho!o br Ra.Loh Sehauer County Stadium will deprive the public, within commuting range of said Stadium, of the economic and recreational benefits of the exhibition or Major League professional championship baseball games at Milwaukee County Stadium. The defendants and the American League and its member clubs, the National Association of Professional Baseball Leagues, the member leagues and member clubs of the aforementioned National Association, have an economic monopoly over the exh i bi tio n of professiona l baseball. The Constitution of the National League grants unlimited power and discretion to determine the location of a franchise; provides it no objective standards for determining whether or not to grant a request for a transfer of a franchise, and contains no rules of procedure which would accord the city, county or state from which any such proposed transfer would be made, an opportunity to be heard. During the period 1953-1962 the National League Baseball Club of Milwaukee, Inc., the corporate predecessor of d~ fendant Milwaukee Braves, Inc., eamed more than $7,500,000 before taxes fro m baseball operations. In 1962 the Braves' franchises, player contracts and other assets carried on the books at approximately $322,000 were transferred from Nation a I League Baseball Club of Mil· waukee, Inc., ultimately to defendant Milwaukee Br aves, Inc., for $6,218,480. As a result of said transfer, National League Baseball Club of Milwaukee, Inc., realized gain of approximately $5,583,000 give or take $1,000,000. During the above period salaries of $-445,000 were paid to the Perini family and dividends ot $300,000 were paid to the Perini Corporation. Over the five year period 1960-1964 on a cash basis the Braves and their corporate predecessors realized total income of $836,900. The Braves reported to their share-holders net losses of $43,378 in 1963 and $45,270 in 1964. Net income from operations was reported as $82,393 in 1953 and $104,730 in 1964 . These net Income figures were reduced by interest expense on funds borrowed t.o purchase the Braves of $125,771 and $150,000 respectively tn arriving at the net loss figures. In 1964 $48,800 of expense in connection with relocation of the franchise were charged against income. Had scouting expenses been capitalized as were player acquisition a n d development costs as sound accounting methods would require, the Braves would have shown a net income of approximately $170,000 in 1963 and $151,000 in 1964. The Braves net receipts from the sale of radio and television broadcasting rights compare favorably with the net receipts of the defendant clubs that submitted figures to this court. During the period from 1953 through 1965, the Mil· waukee Braves, Inc. and its corporate predecessors had a total home paid attendance of 19,551.163. This was greater than any club in either Major League with the exception of the defendant, Los Angeles (Brooklyn) Dodgers. The average annual attend· ance for this period in Mil· waukee was over 1.5 million. This average was the second highest of any club in either league. The attendance level was 31 % more than the average of teams in the defend· ant National League and 52% higher than the average for teams in the American League. Milwaukee home attendance increased from 773,· 818 in 1962 to 910,911 in 1964, despite the rumored relocation of the franchise to Atlanta, Georgia. The level of Attendance in 1965 was not representative, due to the fact that the franchise was to be relocated In Atlanta, Georgia for the 1966 season. The Braves were financially successful during the time It operated a National league baseball club in Milwaukee. Milwaukee has the demographic economic and population characteristics necessary to support a Major League baseball club. Milwaukee has the ability to reasonably support a Major League team. . . . . Expansion ot the National League is feasible. �Thursday, April 14, 1966 iv•10Ia f e d Sfa f e l aws the Braves for not promoting interest in attendance during I 1965. after announcing the team would move. Braves officials and some Milwaukee, Wis., to Atlanta, other baseball e:,i;ecutive~ BRAVES r:iid Continued From Page I ~~i~nt~~ 143.215.248.55:16:44, 29 December 2017 (EST)~I ha-:re Orporation Counsel > bring this acUon in. Teams, Inc., the private citizens In Attorney General WilJConsln Statutes ~:;i5amen about 8:45 p.m. Wed-~~ ;!i:n!~~e zed the press m Mil· fo;;i;eau::~es leaving here, Sox. y. . of Wisconsin have been sub- However, Judge Roller said, the state will be deprived of The Braves hav~ repo:ted subJudge Roller said the defend- tantially restrained ., the de- "The re c O rd in this case th d t' al stantlal losses m Milwaukee th!st1~!g:r1=~~1y"}:'! ~ ~a~t143.215.248.55te~;;: :ision _said. , ' de:~~SY!~: :~~r:jr:v~er:t~e ~nef~~:;143.215.248.55i~rea ion championship schedule of the The Judge said the defendants' ha th 1 1 MJ "Although the record does the depreciation of the player defendant Milwaukee Brave s, "monopol istic _control of major by ke n,,ewspapers n · not reveal the exact measure contracts and the costs of play- iection 133.01 said d a forfeiture pro- ~e~i~: f~~f143.215.248.55 16:44, 29 December 2017 (EST)::~n~s~a~x:r: kee, state of w J s con s In, at cise reasonable control." County Stadium.... " He added that the transfer of If no expansion plan is. sub- the Milwaukee franchise and ~he mitted by May 16, the JUdg~ ~fusal t~ re~lace that franchise pnent against said f ~.000 with costs =~:i143.215.248.55 ~o~~ 143.215.248.55 16:44, 29 December 2017 (EST) ii143.215.248.55 16:44, 29 December 2017 (EST) 143.215.248.55n~; ~~a~if!143.215.248.55 ~~r1~f 16:44, 29 December 2017 (EST)~ ~~c:143.215.248.55 16:44, 29 December 2017 (EST)ee ~en~_ev;~i~!~ ~~! ~:18:!; w~ue C:dded, "P~ple In basebait., like people m any ot~er there is sufflcient evidence ~ pubhc busmess, cannot ,ca nd IR• conclude that it was exceeding~e:'s ~or: 0 hne~~tex~~ ly lucrative," the judge said. to be without ythe critical com- When Lou Perini, who brought t e fnjuncilve relief 143.215.248.55dt~; ~~.;' c:uo~dH:esa%rr;:~ ~~t!h:xec;;Ise ;~h~~o~~:i~s~f~ ment of an Independent press. ~~5~1 ~1 l~ s, Inc., now known ~~:n Ci~ defendants herein, tnd enjoined f rom of the defendant lanta Braves, Inc., mty of Milwaukee, IVided that: ontinuing jurisd!c1y, 1966, and may It the defendants m the 16th day of plan or plans for ue of Professional 11,le baseball to be r Milwaukee as Its for the year 1967; he granting of a f Milwaukee or to lerested in acqui r• advise the Court ,nnection with any consummated t,e.. '-CCORDINGLY. Y 1HE COURT: Elmer W. Roller) Circuit Judge .. ultimately to delwaukee Br aves, ,218,480. As a re. transfer. National eball Club of Mil!., realized gain of ly $5,583,000 give 1,000,000. During period salaries of rere paid to the y and dividends of ire paid to the Petion. five year period n a cash basis the I their corporate 1 realized total $836,900. The rted to thei r sharelosses of $43,378 t S45,270 in 1964. from operations ~d as $82,393 in 1104,730 In 1964. icomefigureswere interest expense borrowed to purraves of $125,771 M) respectively In the net loSll fig64 $48,800 of exmectlon with relo1e franchise were linst income. Jng expenses been is were player acn d development IOund accounting )uld require, the lld have shown a of approximately 1963 and $15 1,000 res net receipts ale or radio and roadcasting rights vorably with the of the defendant submitted figures t. he period rrom h 1965, the MUlVes, Inc. and its ?redecessors had e paid attendance 3. This was great· y club in either ue with the exhe defendant, Los -ooklyn) Dodgers. e annual attend(is period in Mil' over 1.5 million. e was the second my club in either , attendance level 1ore than the avms in the defend· 1 League and 52% the average for the Ame r ican waukee home at-:reased from 773,lo 910,911 in 1964, rumored reloca• franchise to At· gla. The level of in 1965 was not ve, due to the b.e franchise was .ated in Atlanta, the 1966 season. ~ were rinancialtl during the time a National league tb in Milwaukee. has the demogramic and popula.eristics necessary a Major League b. Milwaukee has o reasonably sup. League team. !:xpansion of the ague is feasible. !:,'-! ~:~~;' ~:~ ~=~~ ~~!a~r:~~i~. that the ~C:ju!ai:feir~f:~~n bir~:~:e r;ria~:a!~~a~~:.n~:t..143.215.248.55 rnro~1~:~~:s a:~ ~t:p~~:~ state. t: ~~ 11~a~:;::1~~d sa~~: th at case. Judge R O 11 er s~:;:· Roller said the refusal ~~i!fd c:rJci~!inl~~e~S:ly c~: ~hi!~o~:ui!:~r~t:e~":;r; .. d f1~a "The defendant, Milwaukee of both the National and Am~ri- fects attenda_nce, but tha~ some degree and the a~tendance re- baseball 1s_ a monopoly.,1s fully 143.215.248.55:: ~/~h~c143.215.248.55 ~i~~f143.215.248.55n; a~~Jeres::~s17~; :143.215.248.55 16:44, 29 December 2017 (EST)f~~.. 0 hra!°s" ~ : ~ s~::~nf::;:::~rt deci- 1 ~!neil3iaef:~e~;:n~; iveesg!:;~ ·i~ Milwaukee under the supervl- waukee Brewers Baseball Club, you. 143.215.248.55-i 143.215.248.55sa~n~ the deci&on. ~~n (~~ -143.215.248.55orMit ov~:t~Jh~~e~~a~oP143.215.248.55 16:44, 29 December 2017 (EST)f~n~ sions have upheld baseball in ,/ran~ec:r:::1~\0!nt~~: ·;;a:C:t143.215.248.55:~ u~~d fi~g~ 143.215.248.55tsth~ .. ~: f:!:~1 ~: after a ppointed by the court." co~men:e within the sta te of The Mtl"."aukee ~entmel) a nd there was a public offering of cisions are not conclusive of t:~ W~:o:::: ~= 143.215.248.55 ::;~;i:;:~; to" i~~s;!e~h~avs~t:o;f a~aj~ :it~~a;t~~S:an~·:~%5f~Y1~: ci!~c al:d~:s"r:~t ~ 143.215.248.55 t~fJ =f.?UP who were not local league baseball exhibitions from the judge said. He also blamed not supl?Ort the team, Judge He referred to William C. - - -- - - - -- - - - -- - - R~_J~e sa:~rd will not support !;!~r:~in.head ot th e Braves By SUE KAUFMAN "Before J made this trip I had decided that college had n~thlng to offer me ... I was going to get married." That's what Sandra Mc- s::~ ~~,:~·:i~e:~~ a conclusion that the public of- "None of the Bartholomay ficials ~ere unfriendly to the grou~ had any e:,i;tensive experlBraves, he stated. ence m baseball nor had demonJudge Roller said that if the strated any ability as baseball league desired to go to Atlanta entrepreneurs," he said. "All and offer baseball to the south- that was being offered to the The pupils visited the Oshkosh campus Tuesday morning and 143.215.248.55 16:44, 29 December 2017 (EST)e;os~~t.;u~d~y ~~nhti in college dormitories after attending discussion and information sessions. "The girls in the dorm were 1 s ljiiiiii,jii·ii·ii·ii•iilii..ii•iiliillii!'ii-ii•ii•ii•ii•ii•ii,iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiij _ { ' ~ 1 _. ~ ' s I ave on por swear I - -- an Dressmaking Supplies' d ,--------, 0- Thr~ T ..... to I P.•-: •nd a.t.. , •·•- to • p...._ r rL Mal] Ordffa Profflptly FIiied • SPECIAL P URCHASE ON DRESSMAKING SUPPLIES • • • These low priCNI m ay never be offered again because we bought close-ou t lots at distress Meri• !ice prices. S tock up now! -·,'",m""",•.,..,.'!',~..--P---------p---~,O~&QuA~ ZIPPERS f!r.:i~¾,fi_=!'J.a.ndi. 5~ TO Uc. uch . · · · · ······ t.arse spooi. of ara.nd Na1na THREAD !;!:._to UH ,,.rd ... §Qc BUTTONS PERCALE Pearl, lone, Plastic:, 1c Metal, Leather o.~zmillion &uuon,. V, lue, to S9c and nnalQ,..lllr - TJUTETJl V,luu to 95c. .... 35· - Yar4 ~-~~'.::·.r="" •-4 Lolli Worry of Slipping or Irritating? misses' sizes. Shop early for best selection. ~~ • • t es TOur Dlsslpa f ear of Co ege Part 1, Page 9 !~~f~:·n11 Ptn SPECIAL PURCHASE-SPORTSWEAR Skirts, stretch slacks, blouses, sweaters, ½ PRICE shorts. All f irst quality. J unior and t sta-r:e!s ~~:i~:s~tsla:~l~,~~d that the attendance ~e:1:~;~!~~rs:::ri~1; B;:\:::\oted, "It is said ru;a::;;· had objected to the they combined and conspired at Braves home games from the cordial treatment he re- that there was a lack of enthusi- jurisdiction of the court, among themse~ves to monopo-1953 through 1965 was 19·551 •· ceived when he tried to con-asm on the part of those per- However. the Judge said the 0 i~ g p~~;~:tina~f ba:~1~ B~C:,~~d f~:~~eth!:e143.215.248.55a\ ~eare:P (aih: =~iei143.215.248.55e!h!:143.215.248.55n! ~s:~ j16:44, 29 December 2017 (EST)0 8 within the state of Wisconsin," Los Angeles durmg that period. Braves· franchise in Milwau- knowledge or the Individuals he ruled. Rumors of the Braves moving kee." comprising the BartholoADVERTISEMENT itanding, the stay , noon, C.S.T., on nitted within said thereof granted on be terminated by !fl that the plan is c., now known as me games in the 1 of the court and lppointed by the Impair the continued development ot the quallty of the team." . The state m the long trial ~'!;ri~S::n~~ 1~:tic Judge Roller also noted that ship in 196 2 to a Chicago based Ing this power against the would do the same in the event control of the b~smess of maio.~ MILWAUKEE SENTINEL eastern part of the country, It selected Milwa~ee. business- ui~e party In l~terest in thel Apr. 6._ He orginally ~nnounced lan early ruling was out of the could have awarded a new men was a minonty interest In suit Baseball said the s t a t e that hu1 decision might come question. franchise to Atlanta. the operating companr--4 frac· was not a party In interest last weekend, but as he waded Meanwhile, the Braves opened He said there were enough tlonal ti:iteres\ I whtc~ ~ad Judge Roller worked on his through the mountain of trial thei r season against the Pittsplayers available for a newr143.215.248.55oen di stasteihe~the:we~ruling almost day and night test! many which ra n 7,000burge Pirates in Atlanta (Ga.) team, including a new team mino:rti ~!:'.frs of the White since the 38 day trial ended pages, it became apparent that Tuesday night. ~:t !as ! =143.215.248.55 FALSE TE ETH UCH Pu 7143.215.248.55A\~~&\! 61c • ond LESS! FASHION FABRICS SHOP beembilrruledb}'l • Manhattan Bullding • 617 N. 2nd 14 8th Floor J::.._Sou,f'.,,or shop all over town ~~2~e;143.215.248.55 16:44, 29 December 2017 (EST)· .;}ifl~e ~fr~t; , sC.h:r:oar~~ Milwaukee public school sys- Division senior said. tern guidance counselor, Wed- Each girl and boy on the tour nesday, was assigned a college "room"But now I've changed myl mat~" for the night at. the unimind ... I want to go to cql- vers1ty. lege," Miss McCi:eary said. to~J";es143.215.248.55 16:44, 29 December 2017 (EST)rit~!a~l~~;~t ';;~~ The tr(p to which the young essary to be a brain to stay in Negro g1~l referred _was made college," said Spencer Coggs. ~y 40 Milwauke~ high school 2907 N. 2nd st., another North JU~lors .and semo:-i (? three Division senior. "This guy said Wisconsin State university cam- what it really takes is hard pus~hkosh, Stevens Point work " and Whitewater. Co~gs is planning to major In The pupils had been chosen English and is considering Oshf rom five Milwaukee_high koshStateat present. sch~ls. The trip was designed The pupils from North and fo r d1sad_vantaged stud~nts who. West Division, Lincoln, Rufus were believed to be u~ii:tfonned · King and Riverside high schools as to the opportumtles pre-, visited the Whitewater campus 5ef!ted .by the Wisconsin state Wednesday. Unlike Stevens umvers1ty system. !Point and Oshkosh, the campus Most of the 40 students were there was deserted, beca~se Negroes. students are on Easter vacation. The group left Milwaukee by The tired pupils returned to bus Tuesday, accompanied by Milwaukee late Wednesday afJohn Bussone, guidance coun- ternoon to begin t<;i sift thr?ugh selor and math Instructor at the bundles of ~nformat10nal Lincoln hig h school, and Mrs. books and bulletms they re. Scott. ceived during their tour. with this all-purpose charge card Think of t he conve nience. Shop where you'd like to shop. Save on all t he special sa les, no need to have ca sh . Just say "charge if' with you r new First Wisconsi n Charge Card. Yo u'll get on ly on e monthly bill for wh atever yo u buy. Ma ke just one pa yment . If you pay within 2 5 days it's all free. Should you decide to m ake budget payments, you ca n for an addi tional charge (and your unpaid balance is even cove red by life insu rance) M ake sure you enjoy th is easier way. App ly for yo ur First Wisconsin Charge Ca rd , today. FIRST WISCONSIN CHARGE CARD 10 1 4 5 8 3 FWCC JAMES TURNER 0000 mtt.1 • 3 67 IUIJfCT TO Tlll~S 0" lliV111H SIDI MAIL THIS COUPON TODAY ... and get yours now I (~ don·t rnn h1v. to b. • ~nk custo"*) FlflST WIS CONIIJI CHAflGE CAllD 11'. 0 . •011I0101 MHw•uk..., M acon.In 13101 I Yes, I would like to hav& an application fo r a First Wisconsin Charge Card. I understand that this costs me no thing and that there is no other obligation, I ..................... . Name .••• ,, •• .. •••• . •••••••.•...••• . •.••••••••••.••• ~ Address ••.•••• , . , .• ,, .. .•••• , ••••.• ,, ••• , ••••••.••• · CUSHION YOUR WALK· City •••••• • , ••••.•...•••..••••. . ••• ••• Ztp •••••••• ••• • MEN'S FINE QUALITY SLIP-ONS OXFORDS or Cushion Insoles • TopQuall t,- by U.S. Mtr. ~~;:\ s9g1 at Thi5 l= LOW Pric::e I lm!1HlitPI lnli!IWNill •• WE MEASURE THE FOOT .. . • • • ·-~-h~k • 6621 W . Fond du L,c Av. • 710 1 W, • S. 7th ancl W. Greenfitld , , • S. 27th,nclW. N,tional II • • • • • • • • •=- • • • •~ -=a=a • • (In FIRST WISCONSIN NATIONAL BANK OF MILWAUKEE Greenfield Av. . I • -., • LH'S ,in FAMILY SHO E STORES Shoppins Center) • • • �___________________________________ ., June 3~ 1966 Mr . John Doran 550-7th Street~ N St. Petersburg. Florida Dear Mr. Doran: I appreciate your letter and your generous comments about the Atlanta Stadium. I c ertainly hope the Atlanta Brave have your suppo~t, win or lose. will continue to Sincerely, Ivan Allen, Jr. IAJr •• b a �June 2, 1966 Mr . Joseph B . Hinerfield, President Sec Oin Sys terns, Inc. 1526 Howell Mill Road, N . W. Atlanta, Georgia 30318 Dear Mr . Hinerfield: Thank y ou very muc h for your letter of J une 1st and your suggestions about the promotion of the Atlanta Braves . I shall be delighted to discuss thi with the proper pal:'tie and certainly appreciate your enthu iastic interest. Sincerely your , Ivan Allen, Jr. M ayor lAJr/br �STATIS TICS EXTRACTED FROM T!:lZ ATLANTA BRAVES ECONOHI C :,11.f'.!'~.CT STUDY CONDUCTED BY THE GEORGL\ TE"' H. SCHOOL OF INDUST R'Li\.L MANAGEMENT. 1. Att enda nce Season (exc ludi ng chi l dren) Out- o f - town fans Local fans 2. 1 :) 53 9 ~ 80 1 634,3 98 (41 per cent of total) 905 , 403 ( 59 pe rcent of total) Radio followi ng_ 82 percent of loca l f ans f ol lowed the Braves 0 :1. t ' e ra dio regularly, as did 59 percent of out -o f - t own fans for an average of 73 pe r cent for all fa ns. 3. Mode of t ranspo rta ti on Mode Drove car t o St adi um Drove car t o t own and walked Dr ove car to town and cook bus Drove car t o ot her and took bus Took bus only Charter bus Tax i Walked 4. Percen t of Atte ndance 81 1 D ( 12 percent used bus) 2 2 2 Seat preference Loca l f ans domi nated the General Admission (7 0 pe:rcenc a nd Pavilion (68 perc.ent) wh ile ou -of - ::own f ans grav ita ted towa rd t:he more expen sive Loge (SO percent) and Fi eld Level (48 percent) s eats . 5. Cha r acteris t ics of local . fan s Typical f a n expected t o se e 16 to 25 games over the season . Over 107 , 000 di ffere nt At lantans attended at l ease one game , 40 percent o f the l ocal fa ns live in the Nor theas t sec t io n of Atlanta wi t h t he r est being e qua lly distribu ted ov er other quad r an t s . 52 pe rcent of t he loca l fan s came with their Families , The ave rage dis tance trave lled by a fa n was 8 .4 miles . 6. Characteristics of out-of-town f a ns 78 per c ent o f out- of-town fan s (32 percenr o f tot.al ) came t o Atlanta pr imarily to se e a bal l game , 7 percent we r on business , 6 percent were on v aca t ion~ L perc ent we r e visi ~ing friends and t h e remainder we r e just passi ng tr..rough 1 conve n.r.io::ie e r ing , et c . The typical out -o f - t own fan expected to see 4 games over t he sea s on. About 174 , 000 di fferent out of t owners came t o se e the Brave s play . 75 , 000 wer e fr om other towns and cities in Georgi a and 99 , 000 came fr om 23 di ffe r ent s t a t:e s , primar i ly Al abama ( 13 percent), Tenne ssee ( 11 percent) , Soath Ca r ol ina ( 9 percent ), North Ca ro li nc;1. ( 9 percen t ) and Flori da 5 per c ent). Groups came from as far away as Lo s Angeles , Ch icago ., and Ottawa . �Page 2, BRAVES STATISTICS 55 p er c.ent of out -of-r own fans came wi th the i r fami _i .e s and 6 percent came wi th orga ni zed groups, T'ne av erage distance travelled primarily t o s e e a ball game was 146 mil es . 16 percep t t ~avel l ed l e&s than :30 .Le;s , 21 percent 50-99 miles ~ 18 p ercent 100 -14 9 miles , 12 percent 150-·199 miles 16 p 2:::c en~ 200-300 mi le s a nd 16 pe rce nt mo re than 300 miles . 7. Expendi t ures Expenditures by al l fa L.s i n th e local ec onomy a re e s r.ima. ted at $9, 254 , 000 . This fig.i re i ::J.cludes expenditure s by o--:. t ·· o f- t own fans, local fans , visiting t eams, v isi t i ng scout s , and ~he Braves , but excludes fun ds leaving At l anta in s upport of t he farm system, for sp r i ng tra ini ng, through visit ing teams ~ and f or suppcrt of t he National Le ague . T'r..e se expend i tu.r es are divided as foll ows : Amount Percent It E.m Conces s ions 17 $L.539 , ooo Gasoline 6 .529, 000 Food and entertainment 27 2 , 52'7 ~000 2 Parking 178 3000 Buses 1 106 , 000 30 2 , 771 , 000 Game ( ticket rev enue remairring in Atlanta) 16 Lodging l 515 , 000 1 Ot he r ( includ i ng t axi servi ce ) 89 2000 100 $9, 254, 000 Tot al Th e relarive i mpo r tanc e of the se expenditures by l oca l and by out -oftown fa ns is indica t e d in the diagrams on page 3 . 8. The multipli er e ffe ct Es tima tes of the mul tiplie r for Atlant a indi ca t e that new money spent in Atlanta resul t s in the up t o .3.3 times the or i ginal amount in income for At lantans. Unle ss a n E-conomy is ent irely self ·- stl' ffi cient ~ a portion of circula t ing expenditures leaks out wi t h e ach r ..r ans ac t ion in paymen t f or other goods i supplies acd services importe:d from other areas. Calcula t ions in.d i e-a te that ch is leakage may be as small as 30 percent fo r Atlanta. As ci r culat i on -:-. ont inuE'.s ~ lo cal incomes iri.c rease in a c ont inuing but diminishi ng d :ain o This i ncrea s e ultimate ly reaches 3, 3 times the original expenc.iture , On t his basis , t:he di re c t ex penditures listed abov e c ou ld eventually me a n _230 , 538 , 000 i n additional incomes for Atlan t a ns . If on l y expenditures by out-of - t owners were included as new money , their expenditures of $6 ~311 , 000 would mean up to $20 ~826 , 000 in additio nal i nc omes f or Atlantan s . 9. Non-economi c impact Atlanta was mentioned over 280 , 000 t imes i.n daily newspapers , 4 local games we re carr ied nationally by NBC -TV s 21 Sout heas t e r n TV stations televised 20 games , and 39 re gional r ad i o s tat i ons regularly broadcasted gam.es o Brav es personne l made ove r 395 appearance s across the sta te and mad e pre- s e ason vi.s i t s t o 24 major ci ties i n t he S.o utheast. �Page 3, BRAVES STATISTICS ' EXPENDITURE CATEGORIES FOR BRAVES FANS EXPENDITURES OF LOCAL FANS Transport ation $260 , 000 $2,943,000 9% Concessions and Entertainmenf $20 2, 000 7% $905 , 000 31% Game $1,576,000 53% EXPENDITURES BY OUT-OF-TOWN FANS $643,000 10% Lodging $1,515,000 24% Game $1 , 195,000 19% Food and Entertainment $2,3 25 , 000 36% �October 18, 1966 Mr. P . Cotter 99 Rock Lane W t Rock Ferry, Birkenhead Cheshire, England Dear Mr . Cotter: This will acknowledge receipt of your lett r regarding your interest in teaching Soccer in Atl ta . Sin<: the Soccer fr nchise is owned by the Atl nta Braves , 1 am forw rding yOU:r letter to Mr. R ichard Cecil for consider tio • Sincerely yours, Ivan Allen, Jr. M yor lAJr/br CC: Mr. Richard Cecil �G \ October 17, 1966 Mr. Keith E . Carrington, Esq. 3 King ' s Ro Waltbam Cros Hert' , Engl De r Mr. Carringto : I cer ·n1y ppr ciate yo:\U' nice l tter r gardin the BBC T levi ion Program about Atl and ou:r d ah new Soccer fr chise . e are the advent of tbi s tin Atl ample ed om Sine r ly y I ll All n, Jr. yr 1A3r/ CC: Mr. Richard Cecil ' �August Z3, 1966 Mr. John McHale Th Atlanta B v Atlanta Stadi Atl Dear John: M y good fri , Ke thM 1 u. ad he ia making appli tton to ell Brav bia c in F y tt ville ~ xt y ar. Sincer ly your , lAJ'r/br CC: Mr. Kenneth Mel ar t t �August 15. 1966 Miss Phillis Kapp c/o S. R . Freeman Landmark Apartm nt 112.204 215 Piedmont Avenu Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mi Kapp: ill acknowledge receipt of your lettu requ ting a refund from. the Barbara Str is nd Conce.rt. Thi 1 am forwar your letter to Mr . Rod Kim Dir ctor of Spec· 1 Events for the Bra , I re it will rec ive proper c ider ti • Sincerely your , Ivan All,n, Jr. M yor lAJr/bz CC: Mr. Rod Kimball �August 9, 1966 Professor George D . Houser Professor Robert A. Weinberg Georgia Institute of Technology School of Industrial Management Atlanta, Georgia 30332 Dear Professors Houser and Weinberg: I am pleas d to lea:rn of the independent research project chosen by one of your students regarding the economic impact of the Braves' move to Atlanta. I am sure that all of the available information has been given to yoq and I look forward to reviewing the report when it is published. Sincerely, Ivan All n. Jr. Mayor 1A.1r:eo �GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ATLANTA. GEO RGIA 30332 SCH OO L O F IN D USTRIA L MANAGEMENT August 5, 1966 J >- ' v ./1,, ' ) / u.,,--( \,J l-·-._1L t The Honorable Ivan H. Allen Mayor of Atlanta Georgia Dear Mayor Allen: One of the degree requirements for a Master of Science in Industrial Management at Georgia Tech is an independent research project to be chosen by the student involved. In fulfilling this requirement, we have undertaken an analysis of the economic impact of the Atlanta Braves on the city of Atlanta. During a conversation this morning with Dale Henson, of the Chamber of Corrnnerce, it was pointed up that the results of this study might be of interest to your office. The effort has been underwritten by the Braves and includes some 1500 personal interviews during ball games, so it should be as comprehensive as anything which is currently available . The study will be completed during September and the Braves should be able to distribute the findings shortly thereafter; however, we are in no position to counnit the Braves management to any specific publication date. If your office has any information which might serve t o make the study more complete and/or valid, we would appreciate it if it could be forwarded to us, or we would b e glad to make arrangements to visit your office and obtain it personally. We will appreciate any help which you might provide and hope that the published r esults will be of use to your office. Ge orge D. Hou ser ~c:?.c:J~-!7 Rober t A. Weinberg �August 1, 1966 Mr . J olm J . McHale President and General Manager Atlanta Braves, Inc . Atlanta Stadium Atlanta, Georgia Dear John: We tho ou.ghly enjoyed the Virginia peanuts which you sent us at the game. This was a great week-end and I know August 8th will further enhance our attendance r cords. Sincei- ly yours, Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor IAJ"J:/br �August 3, 1966 Mrs . JoAnne Norton Mr • Suzanne Dunn 908 C scade Avenue, S . W. Atlanta, Geor · 303ll D r Mr • No,rto and Mrs. Dunn: This . ·n acknowledge r ceipt of your lett r of July 28th regarding your recent trip to the Stadium ith your Cub Sc t · ck. t your trip did not provide opportunity to meet all of th Braves, but l m ur you -realiz th many problem th hlch major 1 agu. team t confronted. I cert inly hope that in th future the Bra c · .n ep the public fully in.for d to the vailabiltty f the players to n auto rap • 1 sorry Sincerely you.re. I Allen, Jr. M yor lA.1r/ r CC: Mr. John McHale �July 28, 1966 Hon. Iv a n Allen, Ma yor City Hall Atl ant a , Georgia Dear Sir: On Jwly 27th we c ar ri e d twel ve Cub Sc outs to Atlanta Stadi um t o see the ball game and to meet the Br a ve s - or s o we thought. We had been up to th e Stad ium Office on a pr evious vi s i t an d th e young l ad y told us we c ould bri ng th e boys to an ev ening game a t 6 p . m. and they c ould be t aken i nt o t he dugout to meet the pl a yer ~. To con f irm this I c alled Mr . Jo e Gersho n, Presi de n t of th e Br a ves 400 Club. He r efe rr e d me to Mr . J erry Sachs, Public Rel at i ons Dir e ctor of the Br a ves . His office told me t o bring th e bo ys down t o ~e dugout level seats at 6 p . m. and, e ven thoug h th e y c oul d not go into th e dugout, the pl ayers woul d c ome ov er and si gn their aut ograph bo oks. This we did . We had t h e Cub s the r e at 5:45 and the y wer e the only c h i ldr en in th e stands at th e time. Felipe Alou an d Mack Jon es c ame over and were extremely nice t o the boys, s i gn in g their books and letting th e boys make the ir picture s and talk in g to them. Howe ver t he rest of the team were ru de to the poi nt of being nas ty to t he childr en. Twelve s mall boys wer e very di sapp ointe d; ho wever , they were s t ill pulling for their Br a ves wh en t he y t ook the fi eld. How does a pa r e nt or l eader of chil dr en, tell a boy th a t his idol ma y be a great pl a yer on the field but tha t he is not muc h as a man? We ho pe that s ome thing c a n be do ne s o t hat oth er childr e n will not be di sapp ointed as ours were. If ne c es sary, th e pers onn el s hould i ns truct a nyon e who c alls th at it i s not poss ible to me e t th e Bra ves. Althou gh I f e el th a t thi s would be c ould for the s pirit of the pla yers as wel l as th e f a ns if there wa s a closer r el a t i onsh i p . Your s vory tru l y, cc: Mr • . John McHal e I i/J J] A �ATLANTA STADIUM ATLANTA, GA . 30312 AC 404- 522 - 7630 July 22, 1966 Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. City of Atlanta City I:Jall Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mayor Allen: My contribution t o the parade was very small, but anything that you would like the writer to do I'm at your valued commands. Thank you for the license plate, and we'll continue to sing the praises of Atlanta on our visits into the hinterlands. Just a voice crying in the wilderness to have the fans "rally" around the Braves. Glennon a Sales Director EG:lc �July 19, 1966 Mis Peggy Launius 200 Mont omery Ferry Drive, N . E . A rtm nt H21 Atlan , Georg· D arjMi T SU L uni nk you for your letter of July 18th and your e tio 'If rcilng the na t the Atlanta Stadium. 1 am f o aJ'd your lett r to th in ord ~ that y ur fine u g ti pro r c • eration. Sine r 1y y Iv A M yor IAJr/br CC: Mr. Jerry Sachs l" , , Jr. �July 18. 1966 Mr . Har old Butl r 1439 L wrencevill R d Dec tur. Georgi 30030 Dear Mr • Batl r : I ha e read you.r letter with great int r _ t and think that s ggy Learmiu uggeaU has considerabl m rit. I am for them tt Br ·'tr imm d..ia.te co in ord _r ·t hat ider ti Sincei-ely your , Ivan Allen, Jr. yor lAJ~/br Mr. Jerry Sachs �June 29 , 1966 Mr . A. H. Thorpe President Local 148 Atlanta Federation of Musicians 62 2 Loew's Theatre Building Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mr. Thorpe : Some time ago Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr . referred to me a fine letter you had written him. I would like you to know that the Braves would be honored to work with your organization at any time, but we have established a firm charity program which will involve the improvement of our neighborhood. We believe this is our primary obligation and one that can benefit all of Atlanta. I certainly would appreciate the pleasure of meeting you personally and perhaps you would find a time in your schedule which would permit you to be my guest at a ball game . WCB:ls cc: Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. / �June 21, 1966 Mr. William c. Bartholomay The Atlanta Br ves At lanta, Georgia oeai: • Bartholo ay : orth Avenue Presbyteri· n Church is vitally interested ha ve in all activiti s of th Atlant c munity . Your Br v given tre ndous li.ft to our area . or tbi reason w ould like to become better acquainted with you nd the Brav s , nd give th people of Atlanta an opportunity to oet t he . W thought that p rh p s during one ot your bom t nd e ight dcsignat our v n'ng ervice a "Atl nta Brav I igbt" nd hav r c ption £or you and the te a~ter rd. Thi uld give th b 11 ply r n opportunity to worship tog th r with the Atlant co uni~y nd tb n et th in~or lly l t r . We not d you will be bo July 17 nd 31. P rhap it could b rr g d eitb r on of thee night. Sincer ly, ilson L . N ring Minist r tot Co N/ unity �J une 27 , 1966 Mr. Wil son L. Nearing North Avenue Presbyt er ian Church Corner Peachtree St . and Nor th Avenue At l anta, Georgia 30308 Dear Mr . Nearing: Thank you very much for your fine let t er of June 21, 1966. I am honored to accept your cordial invitation on behalf of the Braves and I would suggest that July 17 would probably be the most convenient date from our standpoint. The team leaves on a road trip immediately after the game of July 31, whereas we will still be home on J uly 17. Mr . John McHale, president and general manager of the Braves, will also be with me on July 17 and he will arran~e to bring additional members of our front office as well as a representative group of players. I have asked him to get in touch with you later on with the list of our total delegation . Once again I want to express my thanks for your thoughtfulness. Looking forward to meetinr. you soon. am C. Bartholomay rman of the Board WCB:ls cc: Mr. John Mcllale be: Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. �June 30, 1966 M r. Warren Giles P resident National Baseball League 680 Fifth Avenue New York, New York Dear Warren : I wish you could bav been here la t weekend when the Brave dr w over 160, 000 in thr e day • It was great confirmation of your faith in bringing th National League to Atlanta, for which we hall always be most rateful. Sincer ly~ Ivan Allen, Jr. yor IA.Jr:am �i1 1· NOR H AVENUE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH CORNER PEACHTREE ST, AND NORTH AVENUE , ATLANTA. GEORGIA 30308 I ·lM I N Is TE Rs V ERNON S . BROYLES. JR , COOK W. FREEMAN WILSON L. NEARING /JOSEPH G. HOLT I June 21, 1966 I' Mro William C 0 Ba tholomay The Atlanta BraveJ Atlanta, Georgia I . Dear Mr. Bartholomay: . I . . . . d North Avenue P resbyterian Church is vitally intereste in all activities 1of the Atlanta commun i tyo Your Braves have given a tremendous lift t o our area., For this reason we would like to become better acquainted with you and the Braves, and g ive the people of Atlanta an o ppor tunity - to meet them. We thought that perhaps during one of your home stands we might designate our evening service as "Atlanta Braves Night" and have a ~reception f o r you and the team afterwards 0 This would give the ball players an op p ortunity to wor ship together with the Atlanta community and t hen meet them inf orma lly later We · noted you will be 'home July 17 and 310 Perh ap s it could be ar r anged either one of these ni ghts 0 0 - Min i ster to N/ men ---- -143.215.248.55 ,- �June Z7, 1966 Mr. H . Charles Ftedericks P. 0 . B 1094 Rome , G orgia 30161 D r Mr . Fredi ric Thi will cknowledge receipt of yo r le:tte~ of J'l.llle Z3rd reque ting further infOJ!'ma reg rding y ur risit t the At nta Staclimn. ,..__ i _ your letter to the ALW,;MG the pedal request that they a.dvi e y t lUl TOTAL BUD . 'l' 2 , 945 $26,002 �BRAVES OPENING GAME CELEBRATION Estimated Income From paying gu yor • Dinn r ts to $ 15,,000 Prom Atl nta Chamber of Commerce 5;000 Prom S,,000 tlant Brav Tot 1 $ 25,000 �April 15, 1966 Memo to: From: Peggy Baker Subj,eet: April 12 Dinner The following analysis 1a ba ed on information furn1shed 1 p· id tickets., cash receipts ,. accts . rec . from Curtis Complimentary tiokets, , 11 expenses (eoma from Susan stimated) Tickets 1 s information should be praotic lly final, unless problems develop in ccts. rec. Since portion of expens s are b sea on estimates_. t here may b some slight eh nge in these, but th big mounto (M rr1ott) ere fin 1., ~ubj ct to receipt or actual bill (ther is 50 error h r ) • Aft r oh of you has bov, ple e 41sou s pos 1ble. d n op,po;rturtity to tudy th ny v r1 nc s 1th me a quickly Th nk NOI'E TO IAJr. ONLY: tt ched is budg t h t wh1oh w s gi n to you w ks go -- tigutes t t ~ight . P m1n ~ updating, b sed on 1nro trom Susan. t1c1t 1sd t·init. bout 1,000 ov r th1 buds t, which 1 till ry in The by Oood 1n tour �JtNALYSIS OF TICKET DISTRIBUTION, APRIL ll DINNER Compliment ry tickets: Braves, players and wives Braves, front office end wives Braves, owners and wives Reynolds party Bartholomay party Pirates owners and wives 49 35 20 40 45 Aldermen and wives Fulton County Leg. Del . and wives Dinner committee nd wives and husbands County comm. and ives Congres men, Senators .and wives Governor, Mayors of Louisville, Columbia Mayor 's Staff Bell & Stanton Spe<;ial guests 26 382 Press 72 Georgia Mayors, est. Paid ttck ts @ Fil"ms, 9QQ, Ind., .l ·~ , 15.00 e C ah Acot r ce1pt Tot l ticket 83 8 28 .pprox • pprox. on hand • R C. Tot 1 tioket 6 6 ... lea from .bove h 4 Total Total Total o 20 in ciroul tion u o Diff r nc not u d 1,045 15,675 10,155 ~·~20 $1-,75 �ESTIMATE OF EXPENSES, APRIL 11 DINNER Marriott: 1,442 Q1nners@ $6.75 ea. Gratuity, 15% Sales tax., 35' 9,733.50 1,460 .00 ~2 .00 150 bottles wine@ $8 . 00 ea. 1 bottle champagn $10.00 ea. @ 1,200.00 Gratuity, 15~ Salee tax , 10.00 180i50 ~6-~0 3% or approximately 8.92 per place Ber for 30 minute Reception Gratuity, 15% Sales t ~, 3% .. .... $12,912.30 $ 1.,148.oo l 3 .20 34.44 Bartenders 66,oo $ i.,421.64 Valet p_ rk1ng Check room Spotlight nd operator $ 11 M rriott Th r 1a figur $ .1,426.80 $ 1,426.· Total food and wine service Tot l of' 11,485.50 $11 ., ~5 . 50 50 diff 50.00 xp nse .. ~ 100.00 150.00 • 1 ' • • • $ _300.00 14,633.9 * noe b teen this -nd your 185.00 t d 25.00 t1ek t ·, est:tm ted Invit tione an<1 po -t g Flo er& tor l pl T legr -m.· nd ti·o k t l1verie by Wet r.n Onion., sttm t d TO'!' L O A.tl, DINNER PENSiS 758.00 75.00 25.00 4~0.00 • • • • • • $1,918.00 16,551. -· ~ �4/13/ Ann: I am h eading home, mainly be caus e I have no maid and the kids will be home fro m s c hool soon -- bu t also beca use I feel awful -- suffering f rom the "after s " probably . It wil l be impossible to tel l exa c tly where we s tand until the pie c es of the puzz le are c omp letely put together, in about this order: ' 1. Curtis is putt ing toge ther a detailed list of: Tic iets pur chased by firm s Tickets purchased by individual s and che cking th is against: Cash receipts on hand or deposited t o CofC a cct . Ac c ounts re c eivable, either billed by him or those clea ring through here - 3 distribuoors, Dobb s House and che c k f or 54 c it y de pt . hea d tickets. It wil l be late th is aft ernoon before he has this in shape, partially due to CofC board me eting today . He can bring it over late today or early Thursday morning , and he wil l also have the followi ng from Susan (Susan wil l be out of town Thursday so c annot get wi th us to c hec k the final fi gu re s until Friday morning. ) Susan is giving to Curtis: Ti ckets given comp limentary from original list of political people, digni taries, mayors, etc. Ti ckets given to Braves peop l e on original basis Ticket s given t o Reynolds and Bartholomay late Monday for other Braves people and friends She will also give him: Es timates on c osts of printing tickets, programs Cost of band Cost of actual meals served incl. wine Cost of free bar She said the wine was part of mea l and was on original recommendation. Flowers were provided by Marriott. Strictly off the record, and I shouldn 't even say it, but it looks like we sold around 1,000 tickets and gave away 500. On that basis, there is certain to be a deficit, perhaps as much as $2,000 -- but we won't know until the following information is complete. I will be out of pocket m os t of tomorrow, but will be here F riday to conclude the above, hopefully. PB �pril 15, 1966 to: 17or All Ann o e Su a 1D curt1 e Dr1slcell PiggyBkF l ubJect: pz-1112 Dinn P Ttr followt ts, C l t1e ts. Su n ,et · . c, 11 e.xi:teruleo ( t st y ui 1 ) �UTION, tYSIS OP TICKET DIST Compl1 t .nt PRIL ll I> t : 9 15 1V. 0 i.o 5 ·1 20 26 i: 6 6 lu bi 8 28 • 72 ~, t. Tot l .: t " • • • 1,0 ~ 15~675 �1, 2 dinner antuit, 15~ S le x~ 6. 75 . 11, 85,.50 .80 r riott o ditt '1' .l.L oe • • • • • • • nc , b t • • • • • n t 1• . . . . . ,. �ASS I GNl'l.tENTS / 1. Press kit - B 2. Press invitations - B 3. Press tours - Spo rt s Committee, . Geo rg ia Press Association 4. Press party - At l a n ta Braves 5. Today Show - _WSB-TV (May or to Le onard Reinch) 6. Press wire service sto r i es - B 7. Regional press of f ices (Time, News week, etc.) - B 8. Industrial editors - B & S, C of C 9. Negro market - Spo rts Cammi ttee (with help from B S, Atlanta Brave s & S, Atl anta Braves & S & S & S) 10. College edito r s - B 11. Traffic handling - Atlanta Transit Sys tem 12. Convention and Tr ade Shows - C of C 13~ Half holiday - Mayor (with help from B 14 . State Chamber - C of C (Atlant a ) 15. Celebrities - B 16. Political inv itations - Mayor, Governor (with help from C of C) .17. Baseball invitations - Atlanta Braves 18. Business invi tations - C of 19 . TV personalit i e s - TV stations (urged by Mayo r ) 20 . Pittsburgh delegation - Sports Committe, Mayo r XERO 1 c 0Pv & ·-- & & S, C of C S) & S, Atlanta Braves, Forio c XERO COP Y ,--., - - - - - XERO COPY r �Assignments Page Two XERO COPY 21. Mayor's dinner - C of C 22. Easter Parade - B 23. Professional clubs - B 24. Brave s sponsors - Atlanta Braves (with help from B & S) 2 5. Parade - 26. Radio and TV support - Sports Committee (with help from Mayor) 27. Georgia Press Association - B 28. Advertising - Tucker Wayne and Sports Committee 29. Reverse to New York - C of C, Mayor 30. Season tickets - Mayor, B 31. Atmosphere - Sports Committee 32. School participation - Mayor, Sid Scarbo r o 33. Budget - B 34. Supporting advertising - Tucker Wayne 35 . Braves Days Sales - Sports Committee 36. Radio and TV promo spots - Tucker Wayne 37. Hotels, motels, restau rant support - Sports Committee 38. P rivate clubs - Sports Committee (perhaps mayor) 39. Ticket sal es - Atlanta Brave s & S & S, C of C (parade· commit tee headed by Frank F 1 ing) & XERO ! C OPY & & S, Atlanta Braves S, Atlanta Braves S, C o f C, Atlanta Braves, Mayor XE RO I COP Y ,...,, 1XERO - - - ----..---- COPY _,_ �.ASSIGNMENTS MAYOR ALLEN ~ "Todayll Show - WSB-TV (M yor to Leonard Reinch) ~ alf holi day - with halp from Bell & Stanton /- e):{"i? II/ rl....A'olitical invitations - with Governor and h lp ~. - from C of C ~ P i t t burgh d legation - with Sport~ Committee R dio -/)c;Jn e.. ~ d W upport - will help Sports Committee Revere to N York - s a on tick t - with ~ u d g e t - with & , ~-ate olube---i,,;..ea• ith C of C & S, Atlant C of C; At lant Br vs Br V C t!V\ f, �f !.- . . ' ·,• 1:,. ATLANTA BRAVES OPENING ATLANTA STADIUM April 12, 1966 An Operations Manual on the Job to be Done Prepared for The Atlanta Chamber of Commerce and The Atlanta Braves by Bell & Stanton, Inc. February 20, 1966 -- XERO COP Y XEROf COP Y ~ .....,, - ~...., --- l XERO - - - - - - - -.-,-.-~ COPY , '""' - - - - - - - - • ~ RO jcoPv r"' �: 1,, ,• CONTENTS OBJECT IVES ••••••••....•••••••.•••••••••• .•••••••••• 1 INTRODUCTION .••••...••.••.•••.•.•..••••••••••••••• 2 SUMMARY OF RECOMMENDATIONS •••••••••••••••••••••••• 4 DETAILED PLANS ••••.•.••.•.•••••••.•.•••.•••••••••. 9 _SEASON TICKET SALES ..•.•.•••.•••..•••.••••••••••• 10 ADVERTISING SUPPORT .•••.•••••.••••.••••.••••••••• 13 DOWNTOWN OFFICES, HOTEL S, RESTAURANTS, POLICE .••• 16 NATIONAL PRESS PREVIEW ..••••••••••••••••.•••••••• 1 7 PERSON-TO-PERSON VISITS •••••••••••••••••••••••• : .19 POLITICAL GUESTS .•••..••..••..•••.••.•••••••••••• 21 CELEBRITIES AND BASEBALL LEADERS .•••••••••••••••• 22 GAIN SUPPORT OF PRIVATE CLUBS •..•.•.••..••••••••• 23 THE MAYOR 'S DINNER .• • .••••••••••••.•••••••••••••• 24 THE OPENING DAY PARADE ••• ~ •••••.•••• • •••••••••••• 2 6 NATIONAL AND LOCAL TELEVISION AND RADI0 •••••••••• 28 THE "AWAY" GAMES WITH METS AND CARDINALS ••••••••• 30 APPENDICES • •.. • •...•.•. • •.•••••• • ••••.•••••••••• •• I # # # # - XERO ' - -- XERO I COP Y ' .... . _ · COPY j XERO I CO P Y ! !·xERo COPY J �/ . '.: I '• i ' •. Atlanta Braves Opening OM-1 OBJECTIVES 1. To fill Atlanta Stadium opening night, April 12. 2. To sell a maximum number of season tickets. 3. To obtain maximum interest in the Atlanta Braves -locally, statewide, regionally through the entire market area, and nationally, It is this year's biggest baseball story. 4. Gaining momentum from all that is done, this operation is a prime generator of max imum favorable attention for Atlanta. Our major objective, then, is to pivot this exciting baseball team and its home city on a 360 degree swing of visibility surpassing any attention a ny city has received in the past . ---... XERO l C O PY \ - ! XE RO l / COP Y r rx;;:RO ) COP Y n �,•, · '.: ' l, .. Atlanta Braves Opening OM-2 INTRODUCTION Atlanta and the Braves are linked together~ what helps one on opening day supports the other. We have a brief period of time in which to build a strong local sense of this joint destiny. We have a brief period of time to help the entire Atlanta metropolitan area re-capture and put on a continuing basis, the sense of active pride in the Braves they had when the team signed to come here, and which was so manifest as the Stadium itself was completed and opened. All of that was preparation. It was passive, as far as the entire populace .was concerned. them to beam with pride, and they did. move into effective action: We asked Now we ask them to to talk up the Braves, to support the Braves, to realize in so doing that all of this effort demonstrates to the nation at large that Atlanta is the city of spirit and "can-do" in th~ entire United States . , (mo r e) - ~ ~ -r-,--,-, - --------,,~~...-~., ~ ~ I ~------- - - -- RO ) COPY ~ �: ,, . '.. , .I. Atlanta Braves Opening OM-3 As in every good thing that has transformed this town, the lead has to come from the business community. The business community is in City Hall. It is in office with the largest plurality ever given a Mayor of a major city. Now that Mayor needs votes again -- in the form of an all-out effort in behalf of Atlanta's reputation when the eyes of the nation are on this city opening night, April 12. Essentially, that is what the plan of action on the following pages is all about. Bell & Stanton, Inc. ·XERo COP Y ~ j coPY I ~ ) COPY I �I, Atlanta Braves Opening OM-4 . SUMMARY OF RECOMMENDATIONS To put across the biggest opening day baseball ever has seen, we can think no little thoughts. However, big thoughts are a futile exercise in mental gymnastics unless supported with practical follow-through . .. We need the help of all concerned to make certain we have both, for only the thorough execution of this big job in the end will win the day for Atlanta and for the Braves. 1. It is urgent that we get Atlanta into action on season ticket sales. This will take personal contact from the highest levels of the Atlanta business community, directed toward the highest levels of the Atlanta business community, plus efforts at that same level aimed at business leaders in other market cities. 2. We need to start the ball rolling so that every ad carried in the early part of Opening Week refers to the Braves; every downtown office building takes on the challenge of creating banners; every local theatre enters the act; every school and college hereabouts becomes involved., as does every tax idriv er, every bus d r i v e r, every membe r o f t he polic e f orc e . (mo r e) /~ ( COP Y f ----- ~ RO ' COPY �J'. j 'l i Atlanta Braves Opening OM-5 (Summary of Recommendations continued) In addition to the regularly assigned sports writers covering the ~ i.,. 3 - ?Z--, "l f March 26, 27 and 2&; -Braves exhibition series Bell & Stanton will invite travel and general feature writers to Atlanta at that time. Plans call for them to see a game, be given personalized tours of the city, and be guests at a superb dinner hosted by Atlanta Newspapers, Incorporated and Jack Tarver. We have already begun working with the national magazines; Look Magazine will be here on assignment right after Washington's Birthday as a first step. We need to get national television, including network news shows. The "Today" Show should broadcast from Atlanta opening day, on the day after, or both. We need more press association series on Atlanta and its team; the hassle with Milwaukee has made this the biggest sports yarn in years. 4. We need to have the cream of Atlanta's business community take on the task of personally inviting the very top leaders of the nation to be their house guests over Opening Day . Every branch of a national firm should have its national president here. game . This is far more than a baseball It is Atlanta's day in the court of public opinion when everything that makes this town great is on display. >< ERO COPY /xe:RO COP Y ""'"' I .,.-,---,a::, (more ) .,.,,,...._.........,~~ XE RO \ COP Y �,, ·.'.'. Atlanta Braves Opening OM-6 (Summary of Recommendations continued) 5. We need help in pulling our loftiest national political l e aders here, and that need goes right to the top. We need all southern governors and . many mayors here. 6. We need to get glittering celebrities here, and we shall call on BiJl Bartholomay personally to guide and help us on that. We will call on Georgia advertisers who use p ersonalities in their campaigns to have those celebrities here. And of course baseball's offi cialdom is a vit a l part of the program. 7. We need to mount a Mayor's Dinner on the eve of the Big Game which will show the greatest outpouring of Atlant a ·• s e lite-- and the nation's well-known figures--that Atlanta has seen since the 1939 premiere of "Gone With The Wind " . . 8. We need a p arade Open i ng Da y aft ernoon which will be unfor g e ttable in Atlanta's annals . We see this as f eaturin g e v e r y high school a nd c olleg~ band in the area, e ach band sponsored by an Atlantaarea business firm; Braves and P i rates s t ars; the Mayor; -- ..... XERO C OPY The Governor; celebrities. (more) rxi;:R O l COPY I -- {x E RO jCOP Y,' �,~... ' _!,t Atlanta Braves Opening OM-7 (Summary of Recommendations continued) The bands later go to the game with tickets paid for by their sponsors. Who ever heard of such generosity and spirit on the part of business leaders? It takes Atlanta to put this over. 9. We need to coordinate with Pittsburgh leaders to get a representative Pittsburgh group here. We need to get plans started as well for the Atlanta leadership to be in New York Friday, April .15, when the Braves open the Mets' home season, and in St. Louis, Thursday, May 12, when the Braves open the new St. Louis stadium. This is the essence of the bold but simple program which we ask Atlanta to support. As we write today, we cannot estimate costs precisely. If all who come to the Mayor's Dinner pay substantially more than the $7.50 cost per head of the affair, we can obtain part of the needed funds at that time. Atlanta will spend what is needed, regardless of where the funds come from, we are confident of that. (more) ~-,,...,, - - - - - - - - - - - - -,....~"i",,...,...,-..------------,~..,..-......,.,.-14~--- - - - - - - , . - - - - - -- - 7 �Atlanta Braves Opening OM-8 \ (Summary of Recommendations continued) At Bell & Stanton we will not spend any significant amount without prior clearance from the Chamber. thing must be clear: One this over all is Atlanta's challenge, for in saluting the entry of the Braves, Atlanta salutes itself and she shows the nation once and for all, the kind of fibre that makes up this remarkable community. - XERO COPY hERO jcoPY �'.. ·.= , I, ! Atlanta Braves Opening OM-9 DETAILED PLANS In the s e ction that f ollows; we list specific plans, with complete assignments. The Bell & Stanton public relations orga nization is c h arged with working closely with the Chambe r, wi t h t he Braves, and with all other involved groups and individuals. We must see to the action of each committee. Overall supervision will be the responsibility of the firm's presiden t, Alan Bel l , from New York, and of Seni or Vice-President George Goodwin from the Atlanta office. The specific Be ll & Sta nton executive under them will be David Pearson of Atlanta. Already the Ch amber has o f fered t o l end the firm extra manpower as evidence of strong support. Extra people as needed will be employed o n a temporary basis if t h e pac e builds up t oo s wiftl y. In any event , addi tional staff from the New York Bell & Stanton o ff ice, headed by Exec u t ive Vice-President Edward S t a nton a nd by the New York acc o u nt e x e c uti ve for "Forward Atlanta, " Margaret Larson, will be c lo s e ly involved at all times. X E RO C O P \' ~ I COPY I':"'"' -r·--~-, - fuR0 1c0Pv 1 �·'., Atlanta Braves Opening OM-],O SEASON TICKET SALES The Assistant General Manager of the Braves, Jim Fanning, has led a task force which already has sold some 3,000 season tickets during the course of an intense area campaign over months. It is only now, after Fulton Superior Court Judge McKenzie has spoken, that it is possible for anyone to be able to go all-out on this. Season tickets should be sold to every business organization in this area, for use of its employees and customers. This sales need comes at a time when the Braves organization must turn its attention more and more to spring training. The community can -- and we $Uggest, must -- help put across this sales effort. 1. We suggest that Mayor Allen assemble in his office a group of leading businessmen ·to take over on this project as they would on any eme rgency, for we approach crisis when we have s old so few se ason tickets this close to Opening Day of our first Big League season. (more ) l, -- XERO COP Y ---~------·- ~ , coP v ~ ~ RO , ,copy ...\ ....' - .......--~-------,--..,..;l coPv ,...-----~-------,,.,,. �.~ Atlanta Braves Opening OM-11 (Season Ticket Sales continued) 2. 3. Let the group that meets with the Mayor include: A. The five major bank presidents B. The president of the Sales Executives Association C. '!'he Chamber prcsidcn-:t- I}:.:: ThQ Chamber exectttiue-vi ce- presi den:!:_ & Marketing If the Mayor agrees, the banks should be asked to use their contact officers, both from the main office and from branches. These officers should contact all corporate customers, urging those customers to buy season tickets to be used by their executives, by their employees, and by their customers. The contact officers should take specific ticket orders -- with no money _changing hands. A s e nior officer in each bank should receive these orders and should relay them to Mr. Fanning of the Braves, who will fill the orders a nd b ill the pur chase r direct. (more) jXERO ) COPY !.""~...,_,, --- I XERO COPY �. ,·~ . ,a,~ Atlanta Braves Opening OM-:-12 (Season Ticket Sales continued) (NOTE: Bell & Stanton will provide all banks with lists broken down by categories of the firms and individuals who already have purchased season tickets.) Mr. Fanning, for his part, will supply daily lists of new purchasers to all bank supervisory officers involved. Mr. Fanning will supply all contact officers with adequate supplies of season ticket brochures and ticket order blanks. He also will see that ticket sales personnel is available at the Stadium to serve purchasers who want to select seats in person. As a final poI t: e should be constant 0 the UCA xrno) ~ COPY~ ~ --~-- -- ! COP Y ~ I I ..--~~ -- t xEAO j COPY �Atlanta Braves Opening OM-13 ADVERTISING SUPPORT Tucker Wayne & Co., as advertising agency for "Forward Atlanta" and for the Braves, is requested to assemble at the earliest moment a gathering of all agencies, all advertising managers, all sales managers of newspapers, radio and TV, all retail sales promotion directors, newspaper representatives and the Georgia Association of Broadcasters to consider the following points: A. Insofar as is feasible, every advertising message placed locally beginning with Easter Sunday, and continuing through Opening Day (the following Tuesday) should salute the Braves, or otherwise speak of them. B. We would hope all concerned would explore the possibility of a special section to be run in both newspapers on opening day. be pulled out and saved. This would be something to It would be filled with news and advertising material suitable for such a special section, commemorating the day Atlanta Goes Big League. (more) IXERO j COPY f l"'"'\ r- J XERO J COP Y I--- XERO COPY �,. ..... ' ' •,I .,:, Atlanta Braves Opening OM-14 (Advertising Support continued) c. Every store in and around should have special windows and in-store displays to salute the opening of the first season. Tucker Wayne is requested to assign one staff member to stay with this, working separately with the sales promotion department of each major store, and working with managers of others. The Braves will make some display material available, but basically all of this should be put together as the contribution of the stores involved. 1. As a subpoint, stores are urged to consider tying their sales which start on Monday after Easter to the debu t o f the team. Why not call the events: "Braves Day Sales?" D. We ask that Tucker Wa yne work with the Georgia .>' Association of Broadcasters to prepare a special one-minute promotional film for the Opening Day, and these would be made available at no cost to all TV stations in the entire market area, as well as to as many motion picture theatres as seems feasible (all those in greater Atlanta at least). We would hope these would be run as public service gestures . (More) XE RO t ~CO PY I ...., XERO l COP Y ! ~ , - ...- -1CXERO OP Y ...--- ~ ~ ~ RO - - ----- -- j coPv ...... ,,..... �·,,. .~ ., Atlanta Braves Opening OM-15 (Advertising Support continued) E. We specially ask that the adve~tising agencies of the four sponsors of the Braves -- CocaCola, Pure Oil, P. Lorillard, and Falstaff -- work closely with the coordinating committee. Their active help in mounting promotional spot campaigns, advance advertising, and banners, cards, and giveaways would be of great worth to all concerned. # # # # - ~ XER O l COPY ~ ' COPY t hERO jCOPY �,., '·:,' Atlanta Braves Opening OM-16 DOWNTOWN OFFICES, HOTELS, RESTAURANTS, POLICE We ask the Chamber of Commerce to assign a staff executive to work closely with all employers of office staffs in the downtown to arrange for display material in the f orm of banners or window painting. to evidence enthusiasm f or the start of baseball . This would be appropriate activity for members of the Junior Chamber to take on, under direction of the "Forward Atlanta" group at the Chamber. Further , t he Chamber s h ould contact the Rest aurant Association,the Mot el Association and individual major hotels to arrange for lob b y di s pl a ys, spe ci a l menus keyed to Ope n i ng Day, s p e ci a l r oom not ices t o be in eve ry guest room eac h d ay of the Opening We ek. No group is mor e imp o rtant to Big League b a s eb a ll o n a c o ntinuing b as i s than the Police De partment . We s u ggest an immediat e meet ing he ld with Che i f Jenkins by t h e executive vice-pr e side nt o f t he Chambe r, and by r e presentative s o f Be ll & St a n t on, to discu ss a ll mat ters pl a nne d, a nd to solicit coop eration . ## ..- ----. XERO ! fl.C OP>' ~ -.. lxe:~1· ~ --- 1coP Y l!""" , . _ . . . -~ RO OPY - - - -- -- -- . - -- ~ ) • ~ RO j coPY �I •:, , 1·:, Atlanta Braves Opening OM-17 NATIONAL PRESS PREVIEW Two weekends before Easter is, under the circumstances, an appropriate time for having the nation's top travel ar.d general writers come to Atlanta, with their wives, as guests of the city. It would be inappropriate to ask them to be away from their homes on Easter weekend, and the J1'/i;;; date, while not ideal, would permit their schedule in Atlanta to include attending the exhibition game Sunday, h 1/)J,z_{t . - - ~ b e t w e e n the _Br aves and the ~ .Doq~ 0 r.:5. _ This tour would be low in key, and would give us an opportunity to show Atlanta during the dogwood time, and at the same time let the visitors soak up the baseball flavor. They would be supplied with press kits material on all the lures of Atlanta, latest material on the Braves and on the stadium -- would be taken to our major attractions here . they would not be rushed. But They should have time for golf, Stone Mountain, the Cyclorama or for a trip to Lake Lanier's Yacht Club for houseboating and for Saturday lunch . We suggest they have a Spring Weekend in Atlanta beginning with Friday evening departure from New Yor k, return ing to New York Sunday evenin g , following the ball game . ---::oPr XERO .-.--...,.,, (mor e) ' XERO f -.. - -- - - -- ' COPY .,..... I - ~~n. =....--.... XE RO COPY - -- - -- - - - - - �, ·'.: '.','. Atlanta Braves Opening OM-18 (National Press Preview continued) We would show these people Atlanta and the surrounding areas on Saturday, with the high point being a fine dinner at which the Cox newspapers would be the host. Talks would be given by Mayor Allen and by Ralph McGill, who of course is known and respected by all the journalists attending. The quality of Atlanta that will appeal to the visitors will include their exposure to Atlanta's springtime loveliness, and the Sunday highlight of the stadium and the ball game. We will have perhaps 80 people in all, 40 writers and 40 wives . We will need hotel rooms; we suggest they all be at one hotel such as the Marriott. We propose that we be given permission to establish a committee to e xplore this proposal thoroughly. On this committ ee should be offi c ial s fr om De lta, f r om the Mar r i ott, from the Chamber, from Cox newspapers, from the Braves and of cours e Be ll & Stanton . This is d e signed t o h a ve maj o r trav e l sto ries break in key n ewspapers around ope n i ng week of the s e ason, at a t ime when, h opefully , s o much els e wil l be appearing o n t h e new b as eb a ll t e am a nd i t s city. This adva nce expo s ur e is need e d to g a i n t h e f u l l p r ess cov e r ag e . (more ) . ~ XE R O j ~ OP Y ~~ -- XERO I COPY j --- / XERO l COPY - - - - - - -- ~-,--.--.,· 1 /':"!I - - - - - - - - - -- XER O COP Y �. ·.:., ·':· Atlanta Braves Opening OM-19 PERSON-TO-PERSON VISITS We ask the president of the Chamber and the head of "Forward Atlanta" to take on the task of coordinating with the business and cultural elite of Atlanta an unprecede n t ed "Red carpet" invitation to their peers nationally, to come to Atlanta for the Opening Day festivities. These would be friends inviting friends, and the guests for the most part would be houseguests. Essentially, we seek to have a significant number of the nation's decision makers in Atlanta, not just for the ball game, but primarily to sample Atlanta's atmosphere in springtime and its spirit in general. To do this properly , we need help from Lockheed to fly in certain of the guests. Others of course will have their own corporate aircraft or will fly commercially. But the availability o f J etStar help from Lockheed would be of the greatest help, and would be of worth to Lockheed as well in its role as the greatest single industry in Georgia . (more ) ,~ XERO COPY COPY - - - -- - - - -- ~ , t [xERCi 1C OPY ~ ~~ - -- - - -- - - ~-~1 ~ ----------- I �·I Atlanta Braves Opening OM-20 (Person-To-Person Visits continued) The guests would come on Monday after Easter, in time for the Mayor's Dinner. If they cannot come until Tuesday, they will see the downtown parade, see the ball game, see the first class facilities in the Stadium and catch the way Atlanta is on the move. XERO \COPY - ,,,---- -:-.. XERO f C OP Y f N-- l XERO CO P Y ~ - - - -- - - -- - ~-~ r'T, lxERO j C OP Y' - ~ �,-·. · ,,.,. I •: , I Atlanta Braves Opening OM~2_],____ .. __ .. ____ . __ . POLITICAL GUESTS With the active help of Mayor Allen and the Governor, it is hoped that political guests of the first rank will converge on Atlanta, both for the Mayor's Dinner on Monday, and for the game and all that goes with it on Tuesday. How appropriate it would be if it is the President who throws out the first ball. We know thought is being given to all of this. On other lev e l s , thi s occ a sion is an opport uni t y for all the Governors of the South, and the . mayors of the largest citi es o f the South, to c ome to Atlanta o f ficially . Bell & S tanton sug g e sts it work with the Ma yor, and with the Gove rnor , on all aspects of this obj e ctive . It f i ts Atl a nta ' s role o f lea dership f or the entire South , howe ver; f or h e r to t hink in just such t e rms as she puts t o gether t he o f f icial i nvitation l i st. X~o COPY - - - - -- - - - -- @t COPY f r:c::,---------""'~---, p-1 I-'"-XERO 'COP Y, �,.. ,,, '· ; , Atlanta Braves Opening OM-22 CELEBRITIES AND BASEBALL LEADERS Top Hollywood and public personalities who also are baseball fans would add much to the excitement and Mr. Bartholomay will be very impact of Opening Day. helpful in this area. He already has offered to help. We'll call on him for an all-out effort to entice to Atlanta the Danny Kayes, the Natalie Woods, and other stars who are red-hot fans. The Commissioner of baseball, the presidents of both leagues, all team owners, and other such luminaries comprise an obvious invitation list which will be worked out with the Braves, both for the Mayor's Dinner and for Opening Day. - --------- - .....~- ~~ -- -- - - - -- .-~--...~ I r,;-;;:RO \ J COP Y �'(·, I ',1, t Atlanta Braves Opening OM-23 GAIN SUPPORT OF PRIVATE CLUBS We suggest Mayor Allen appoint private club co-chairmen, one white and the other Negro, to gain the support of all the social organizations serving Atlanta. The men chosen for these roles should be impressed with the need to get on with the task of rallying every social club in Atlanta behind the Opening Day program. This would include more than decorating the clubs, although that and canvassing the membership in behalf of the events is important. We believe a need exists for an early buffet the night of the game and that arrangements should be made for buses to take members to the stadium. XERO COPY fuRO j COPY �,., ,. ,' · Atlanta Braves Opening OM-24 THE MAYOR'S DINNER We see the Monday n_ight, black-tie dinner for 1,200 at the Marriott as representing Atlanta's official statement in behalf of the Braves. finest of affairs. long, .~a It should be the very The list of speakers should be not too we &iggest >i t m:igt!I 3,e 11n approprj ate place for t 175tr:We r-t-s--wd t er s of W; a, ii a Lv:.::,mark the i r deb l!ti:: as eFJ-t--ert ainerc, j" c:4-in.nerJL ~ t he tradition othm- citjes. ~ annual baseball.._ In e=CCect, '.3 the Ma:l"or!s ~ _,i..:i,...,:,--,F+~'f--::::;;;9~tF"fi i=-.e se;r;ics of afinua:r dilrli'e~hat It may be that one of the celebrities under discussion could entertain at the dinner. In every way, it should be an affair at which the most polished guest would feel comfortable. Although the dinner, as we see it, should be at the Marriott, that is only because it has the largest room for the purpose. We would hope all hotels in Atlanta, in their realization of how much the presence of baseball will mean to them, would cooperate in all aspects of the event, and have the menus so publicly state. -- XERO i C OPY \ (more) ......rS)· ~--- -----------.~ - ~· f u RO ' tcoPr �' , ... ,, . ., ,·.,, '•·' Atlanta Braves Opening OM-25 (Mayor's Dinner continued) Therefore, we suggest the Mayor appoint a Dinner Committee which would cut across the hotel community of Atlanta, and which also would include representatives of the Braves, of the Chamber, both sports editors, and the general managers of all radio and TV stations. We suggest the possibility of charging $15 per ticket, rather than the actual cost of $7.50, in order to obtain promotional funds to go toward meeting the City's and Chamber's special April expenses. >·.. .,. ··;ff:,;.· other franchise, must rank as An z., mam test dnver of ur. t \{3' : ~·on~ of the most bizarre legal conventional ca rs at t he Indi t \ 1, • :~'\. · /:· ulmgs of all . time. The Braves ana polis speedway this year· ,,·,,·.,, by t he . F or d s w h'1c1 -~,'.%•.·.'., fmtend d I to I abide d G · law- t h'111 k s rea r eng111e e era a w an eorg1a 1aw. &~·:' not Wisconsin's interpreta tion have dom111ated the track th( ......... ....,.v. ,•.:.~ ..... ~.-,. , , of the la w. las t two yea rs can be beaten -UPI Teleohato-...,i.,:;~r...... we can get the turbim If Ralph Neely w_ants to pl , ea ac e qua lified," he sa id Wednesday : pro fo o tba ll, he mus~ . do ._ i HERB LY01:'1, in Chicaf,o Trib- " we'll win the c.ce." w ith the Houston OIiers of / une gossip column Tower He meant the 500 mi ler May the American F o .o t b a 11 Ticker" - The Atlanta Braves league, the United $tatk·s cir- owners have t his new, heap big O. . cuit court of appeal~ ruled headache: Powerful C r a c ker- Cheesbourg has uee,i workmg Wednesday. Neely. s I n e d town biz, civic a nd political with t wo cars, one owned by with the Oilers in ·1964, but leaders a re suddenly pressur- orm Dernier of Niaga ra Falls, subsequently si g n'-!;! d ·,,.iJ.nd ing 'em to quit selling choice ,i . Y ., with a 1,400 horsepower , Journal Wire Serv ices played last year fo r ~e D~l- box seats to Negro fa ns. The General Elect ·ic t urbo shaft en-1 Detroit, Mich.·- Doctors at las Cowboys of. the Na tional _ Braves' big chiefs are totally g ine, and a n0v0tty dreamed up Henry Ford hospital confirmed Football league. igno rin g this nonsensical pitch. -~y Albert H. Ste. n of Orinda, Wednesday that Manager Charlie Dressen of the Detroit Tigers had suffered his second heart attack in 14 months and said he would be confined for at least three weeks and might not be able to return to his manageria l Another in a series on a ably more t han $50,000 in a j river into rouble - somepost fo r several months. imes bad trouble. The own· driver's v iew of' the activities shiny new race car. It is the Coach Bob Swift, who took at the Indianapolis speedway · pride of his life. But he has er wanes a brave driver. But over .for Dressen when he suf- leading up t o the annual 500 · to sta nd by, acting uncon- he also wants a careful drivfered a heart a~tack in spring mile race May 30. cerned, while a driver wheels er. He · wants to admir~ his . training in 1965, has been By i\IAIUO ANDTIETTI it around the track, in and car after the race, too. pl. ced in charge of the club. The owner usually selects NDIANAPOLIS, Ind. _ Tl}e out of traffic, at speeds of Dressen w as not permitted more than 160 miles an hour. the kind of car he wants. But most nervous people a t the visitors except for members of in this _area, the driver. also is Mistakes Costly his immediate family or tele- Indianapolis speedway d uring vitally concerned. It is no exphone calls until further notice the mont h of May must be If the driver makes a mis- aggeration to say that a drivbut hospital officials said there the car owners. The drivers take-and is lucky-he can al- er is betting hb life on the was "some evidence of general ( usually are pretty relaxed, at ways walk back to the pits car he is racing. improvement." This year there has been a 1 and say, "Sorry about that, " It has been determined tha t least until race day. But racing has become a Chief." But t he only thing an · Jot of talk about the differe nt t Mr. Dressen has a coronary artery ,hrombosis," the hospital very expensive business. The owner can do is figure he types of cars tha t will try to t make the "500" field. I think ) statement said. "He has rested men who enter cars h e r e comfortably and there are no sometimes must feel like t he has a head start on his own this is a good thing for rac- ], · i new complications. His condi- man who is letting his son junkyard. Owners, therefore, ing. A few years ago the Offen- r, tion is stable, but remains seri- drive his new automobile for are very careful in their sethe first time. He tries to be lection of drivers and choice hauser roadsters dominated t ous." the race. They were great Dressen, 67, in his 16th sea- calm and optimistic. But he · of equipment. In the high speeds of auto race cars, duraole and sim- Sj son as a major league manager, keeps his hands in his pockled the Milwaukee Braves to ets, to keep from putting racing, one mistake, a frac- ple for mechanics to work tl second place in the National them in front of his eyes. tion of a second of hesitation with. But because of their a: league race of 1960. He has invested consider- at the wrong time can get a domination, a lot of the sus- ti for $ 2,500.,000. ..it wo,ild, b e a 90 day wonder made of precast concrete. . , Rap ~t Pho~mx . John Lans111g, vice-presi~ent of the Pacific Power and Light Co. , appeared al?ne for Port)a nd, O_re. He said he got the 1mpress10n . that the. ow~er~ "were lookmg over their noses at _his ~rese~t~tion. - ns111g ridicule~ th e chanc~s c,, ·orne other b ids and sa 1 ?o.-~ a nd was w ill111g to w a it 10 ;:he time when an 18th and 19th fra nchise was awa r~ed. Lansing rapped Phoenix, sayin" "Nobody in his right mind w~~ild go ther e. You get on t he f re e w a y a nd make the wron"' turn at Tucson a nd you could0 end u p in Mexico without seeing a ny people." In a surp rising development, Bill Sulliva n, owner of the Boston Patriots of the AFL, welcomed a n NFL team to tha t ci ty in a Jetter to Rozelle. , Rozelle· said tha~ three ma· or league teams m one sta~ium ·(Fenway park) "may be undesirable." }Ie meant the Patriots, the baseball Red Sox a nd an NFL team · But Mayor John F. Collins of Boston quoted Red Sox VicePresident Dick O'Connell as saying t hat the Red Sox would leave ~osto_n !f a_ stadium were not built w1th111 five years. Philadelphia Phillies, W ednes· day was. sent to the minor leagues by the Cardinals. Johnson was optioned to Tul· sa and outfielder-first baseman Bob Tolan was, recalled from Tulsa to replace him. Johns on is batting .186 for t he Cardinals, Tola n .319 fo r Tulsa. Pi tcher Tug McGraw of t he New York Mets was placed on the disabled list because of a sore elbow. 0 l ? ------------- 1: . T llf 11ne • .-,, , ;/ t l ' .\<.. d h resse ad ear A )Lack Car Owirlers Cr §§ n I > ,.._J, ' • • :..i. �May 25, 1966 Mr. Austin Brown Atlanta Braves Atlanta Stadium Atlanta, Georgia ,, I Dear Mr. Brown: Please send Mayor Bates two tickets along . a bill for same. If fo:i:- so.me re son be does not pay for the tickets, please let me know. Sincerely yours, Ivan Allen, Jr. yor lAJr/br �M y 25, 19l>6 Hon r 1:>l e Le ter L . Bat s yor of Colwnbi Columbia, South Carolina Dear L ster: to band.I y our tick t B v e ind,. SiAc r ly your•, l• n All ayor lAJr/ ~ CC: Mr. Au ti Brown Atlanta Br ve • ~r . �CITY OF COLUMBIA SOUTH CAROLINA LESTER L . BATES May 23, 1966 M A YOR Dear Ivan: Some very good friends 0£ mine plan to be in Atlanta on June 2, and I would appreciate it i£ you could arrange to get me two good tickets £or the baseball game on that date. Please advise me 0£ the cost 0£ these tickets, and I will send my check £or same. With kind personal regards and best wishes, I am Sincerely yours , Lester L . Bat e s Mayor Th e Honorabl e Ivan All e n , May o r Ci t y 0£ Atlanta At lanta , Geo r gia LLB:bb / ·, -/ / l -- �May 20., 1966 Mr. Joe H . Gerson 729 W . Peachtree Street, N . E . Atlanta , Georgia 30308 Dear Joe: The c ontract with the Braves is public information and is on file with the City Clerk (Mr. J . J. Little, First Floor. C i ty Hall). lt is an extremely bulky contract and I doubt if you would want to read all of it. It is essentially the best contract in the National League . I am attaching hereto a summ ry of the contract which I aed during my a:ampaign. My advice to you is don"t get sick listening to sick people. They are simply not worth it. Sinn rely your • Iv: n Allen, Jr. M yo:r IAJr:lp �POPULATION COMPARISONS BASED ON 1960 CENSUS Metropolitan Area 1,017 City Atlanta 487 Baltimore 939 1,727 Cleveland 876 1,797 Houston 938 1,243 Kansas City 476 1,039 Los Angeles 2,479 ~ 6, 743 Milwaukee 741 1, 194 Minneapolis - St. Paul 796 1, 482 7,782 10,695 New York 2,783 San Francisco 368 ) ) 743 ) Washington 764 2,002 Oakland II I) - ~- I\ ... , . "" - . �COMPARISON OF AGREEMENTS BETWEEN CITIES AND MAJOR LEAGUE TEAMS • CITY Atlanta STADIUM RENTAL City gets 5% of first million paid admissions, 7% on million to 1,500,000 and 10% on over 1,500,000. (Contract s·ame as Milwaukee.) CONCESSIONS City gets from 10% to 16%, depen ding on volume. OTHER Parkin g remains wi th Stadium Authority . Author ity gets le% of any pay TV {s ame as New York). Br aves will be . credited up ii.o $500,000 moving e xpenses . I j, Baltimore City gets $75,000 or 7% of paid admissions, whichever is greater. City gets 10%. Cleveland City gets $60,000 basic rental against 7% of paid admissions, whichever is greater. City gets 45%. (Equipment paid for by city.) Houston City gets $562,500 to $747,000, depending on income. City retains all concessions. Ka nsas City Leas e signed at e nd of 1963 season (lease non-c a nc e llable prior to e nd of 1967 season) provides: for 1963 a nd 1964 $1 p e r y ear rental; for 1 9 65 through 1 9 6 7 $1 per y e ar plus 5% o f all p a i d admissio n s if a t t e nda nce exc e eds 950,000 . Ci ty gets 7'½."/4. Ea r lie r lease p r o vided $1,000 r e nt plus 5% of paid admi s sions b u t wa s c a ncel l ab l e by Athl e tics i f paid a dmiss~ons f e ll b e l ow 850,000 . �.- .P - .,,- ~ J .. .: , COMPARISON OF AGREEMENTS BETWEEN CITIES AND MAJOR LEAGUE TEAMS Page Two CITY STADIUM RENTAL CONCESSIONS Los Angeles (Dodgers) City gave Walter O'Malley 328 acres of downtown property. City built access roads. No rental charged . Dodgers get all. Milwaukee Same as Atlanta. Same as Atlanta. Minnesota City gets 7% of paid admissions. City gets 10%. New York (Shea Stadium) Rental is $450,000, decreasing $20,000 annually during contract Mets get all. Oakland In third year city would get $125,000. (This was offer - no team yet.) To be negotiated. City gets $125,000 or 5% of paid admissions, whichever is greater. Lease is for three years. Giants get all. City gets $65,000 or 7% of paid admissions, whichever greater. City gets 13%. · san Francisco Washington OTHER Dodgers get all. of parking. . City gets 10% of any pay TV. City gets 85.1% up to $300,000; 95.1% thereover . of parking. �POPULATION COMPARISONS BASED ON 1960 CENSUS City Metropolitan Area 1,017 Atlanta 487 1. Baltimore 939 1,727 Cleveland 876 1,797 Houston 938 1,243 Kansas City 476 1,039 Los Angeles 2,479 , 6, 743 .. , .... ~ Milwaukee 741 1,194 Minneapolis - St. Paul 796 1,482 7,782 10,695 New York 2,783 San Francisco 368 ) ) 743 ) Washington 764 2,002 Oakland �. ·-=-.... ' . '-,. i COMPARISON OF AGREEMENTS BETWEEN CITIES AND MAJOR LEAGUE TEAMS ICITY Atlanta STADIUM RENTAL City gets 5% of first million paid admissions, 7% on million to 1,500,000 and 10% on over 1,500,000 . (Contract s·ame as Milwaukee.) CONCESSIONS City gets from 10% to 16%, depending on volume . Parking remains with Stadium Authority. Authority gets le% of any pay TV (same as New York) • Baltimore City gets $75,000 or 7% of paid admissions, whichever is greater. City gets 10%. , Cleveland City gets $60,000 basic rental against 7% of paid admissions, whichever is greater. City gets 45%. (Equipment paid for by city.) Houston City gets $562,500 to $747,000, depending on income. ., City retains all concessions . Kansas City Lease signed at end of 1963 season (lease non-cancellable prior to end of 1967 s eason) provides: f or 1963 a n d 1964 $1 per ye ar rental ; for 1 9 65 t h rough 1 9 67 $1 per y e ar plus 5% of all paid a dmissions i f a ttendan ce exce eds 950,000. City gets 7½°/o. Ear l ier l ease prov i de d $1, 0 00 re nt plus 5% of paid adm issions b u t was cance ll able by At hl e ti cs if paid a dmissions fell be low 85 0, 0 00 . OTHER j Br aves will be credited up t.o $500,000 moving expenses. �
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 15, Folder topic: Atlanta Braves | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 19, Folder 15, Document 8

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_015_008.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 15, Document 8
  • Text: o @143.215.248.55 16:45, 29 December 2017 (EST) 0 <( . " po ATLANTA,GEORGIA - 'ia.1 1, 5,,,,,. - Ann M. Mom M.s / ~ '/-2 d; ; (!£-1r '- <1 t;uw'.u j)Allll~u IJ/!lfeS 9 733. ~ /~/o / ~t O, e& ~ Ot) c::; 9;2. 0 0 3;o /) 1%5~·00 I /_.. JJ ;Nc- 1 ~061~I (!11--?7/ "-tr - ) QO J () . 0 (.) (le ' ess W11vi:+rJA.rt11a - I 2, 00. 70 · 74' o/o ~Jurs j ' FORM 25-6 o -o 3 _;-3. 70 1f'10 JO/ I I '-/- t, !V/ e-Y..f__ (JO- - ~ tl/-
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 15, Folder topic: Atlanta Braves | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 19, Folder 15, Document 9

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_015_009.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 15, Document 9
  • Text: ATLANTA, GEORGIA From Betty Robinson Ann, Dave Pierson {688 - 3643) dictated this to me over the phone. Pleas e g et Mr. Alle n to a pprove it and we are to let Dave know if it is o. k . Betty F O RM 25-7 �
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 15, Folder topic: Atlanta Braves | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 19, Folder 15, Document 12

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_015_012.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 15, Document 12
  • Text: ,\ 4 Section 3 ·A, f. L. OWNERS ·SEEK NO NODS SAYS WILSON CHI CAGO TRIBUNE, 'l' UESiJAY, APRIL 1 ST. IGNATIUS TOPPLED BY H LY CROSS ·ieague President Tells .I..· of Hot Potatoes i· [Continued from first page] "Note the family �*** \.GO TRIBUNE, T UESDAY, AP RIL 12, 1966 I'VE ALWAYS SAID YOU HERE'S ~MEW~IZE A BQIGHT f30Y1 THING FORYOU TO GRASP, SANO'/ - \/Ef
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 15, Folder topic: Atlanta Braves | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 19, Folder 15, Document 19

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_015_019.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 15, Document 19
  • Text: STATIS TICS EXTRACTED FROM T!:lZ ATLANTA BRAVES ECONOHI C :,11.f'.!'~.CT STUDY CONDUCTED BY THE GEORGL\ TE"' H. SCHOOL OF INDUST R'Li\.L MANAGEMENT. 1. Att enda nce Season (exc ludi ng chi l dren) Out- o f - town fans Local fans 2. 1 :) 53 9 ~ 80 1 634,3 98 (41 per cent of total) 905 , 403 ( 59 pe rcent of total) Radio followi ng_ 82 percent of loca l f ans f ol lowed the Braves 0 :1. t ' e ra dio regularly, as did 59 percent of out -o f - t own fans for an average of 73 pe r cent for all fa ns. 3. Mode of t ranspo rta ti on Mode Drove car t o St adi um Drove car t o t own and walked Dr ove car to town and cook bus Drove car t o ot her and took bus Took bus only Charter bus Tax i Walked 4. Percen t of Atte ndance 81 1 D ( 12 percent used bus) 2 2 2 Seat preference Loca l f ans domi nated the General Admission (7 0 pe:rcenc a nd Pavilion (68 perc.ent) wh ile ou -of - ::own f ans grav ita ted towa rd t:he more expen sive Loge (SO percent) and Fi eld Level (48 percent) s eats . 5. Cha r acteris t ics of local . fan s Typical f a n expected t o se e 16 to 25 games over the season . Over 107 , 000 di ffere nt At lantans attended at l ease one game , 40 percent o f the l ocal fa ns live in the Nor theas t sec t io n of Atlanta wi t h t he r est being e qua lly distribu ted ov er other quad r an t s . 52 pe rcent of t he loca l fan s came with their Families , The ave rage dis tance trave lled by a fa n was 8 .4 miles . 6. Characteristics of out-of-town f a ns 78 per c ent o f out- of-town fan s (32 percenr o f tot.al ) came t o Atlanta pr imarily to se e a bal l game , 7 percent we r on business , 6 percent were on v aca t ion~ L perc ent we r e visi ~ing friends and t h e remainder we r e just passi ng tr..rough 1 conve n.r.io::ie e r ing , et c . The typical out -o f - t own fan expected to see 4 games over t he sea s on. About 174 , 000 di fferent out of t owners came t o se e the Brave s play . 75 , 000 wer e fr om other towns and cities in Georgi a and 99 , 000 came fr om 23 di ffe r ent s t a t:e s , primar i ly Al abama ( 13 percent), Tenne ssee ( 11 percent) , Soath Ca r ol ina ( 9 percent ), North Ca ro li nc;1. ( 9 percen t ) and Flori da 5 per c ent). Groups came from as far away as Lo s Angeles , Ch icago ., and Ottawa . �Page 2, BRAVES STATISTICS 55 p er c.ent of out -of-r own fans came wi th the i r fami _i .e s and 6 percent came wi th orga ni zed groups, T'ne av erage distance travelled primarily t o s e e a ball game was 146 mil es . 16 percep t t ~avel l ed l e&s than :30 .Le;s , 21 percent 50-99 miles ~ 18 p ercent 100 -14 9 miles , 12 percent 150-·199 miles 16 p 2:::c en~ 200-300 mi le s a nd 16 pe rce nt mo re than 300 miles . 7. Expendi t ures Expenditures by al l fa L.s i n th e local ec onomy a re e s r.ima. ted at $9, 254 , 000 . This fig.i re i ::J.cludes expenditure s by o--:. t ·· o f- t own fans, local fans , visiting t eams, v isi t i ng scout s , and ~he Braves , but excludes fun ds leaving At l anta in s upport of t he farm system, for sp r i ng tra ini ng, through visit ing teams ~ and f or suppcrt of t he National Le ague . T'r..e se expend i tu.r es are divided as foll ows : Amount Percent It E.m Conces s ions 17 $L.539 , ooo Gasoline 6 .529, 000 Food and entertainment 27 2 , 52'7 ~000 2 Parking 178 3000 Buses 1 106 , 000 30 2 , 771 , 000 Game ( ticket rev enue remairring in Atlanta) 16 Lodging l 515 , 000 1 Ot he r ( includ i ng t axi servi ce ) 89 2000 100 $9, 254, 000 Tot al Th e relarive i mpo r tanc e of the se expenditures by l oca l and by out -oftown fa ns is indica t e d in the diagrams on page 3 . 8. The multipli er e ffe ct Es tima tes of the mul tiplie r for Atlant a indi ca t e that new money spent in Atlanta resul t s in the up t o .3.3 times the or i ginal amount in income for At lantans. Unle ss a n E-conomy is ent irely self ·- stl' ffi cient ~ a portion of circula t ing expenditures leaks out wi t h e ach r ..r ans ac t ion in paymen t f or other goods i supplies acd services importe:d from other areas. Calcula t ions in.d i e-a te that ch is leakage may be as small as 30 percent fo r Atlanta. As ci r culat i on -:-. ont inuE'.s ~ lo cal incomes iri.c rease in a c ont inuing but diminishi ng d :ain o This i ncrea s e ultimate ly reaches 3, 3 times the original expenc.iture , On t his basis , t:he di re c t ex penditures listed abov e c ou ld eventually me a n _230 , 538 , 000 i n additional incomes for Atlan t a ns . If on l y expenditures by out-of - t owners were included as new money , their expenditures of $6 ~311 , 000 would mean up to $20 ~826 , 000 in additio nal i nc omes f or Atlantan s . 9. Non-economi c impact Atlanta was mentioned over 280 , 000 t imes i.n daily newspapers , 4 local games we re carr ied nationally by NBC -TV s 21 Sout heas t e r n TV stations televised 20 games , and 39 re gional r ad i o s tat i ons regularly broadcasted gam.es o Brav es personne l made ove r 395 appearance s across the sta te and mad e pre- s e ason vi.s i t s t o 24 major ci ties i n t he S.o utheast. �Page 3, BRAVES STATISTICS ' EXPENDITURE CATEGORIES FOR BRAVES FANS EXPENDITURES OF LOCAL FANS Transport ation $260 , 000 $2,943,000 9% Concessions and Entertainmenf $20 2, 000 7% $905 , 000 31% Game $1,576,000 53% EXPENDITURES BY OUT-OF-TOWN FANS $643,000 10% Lodging $1,515,000 24% Game $1 , 195,000 19% Food and Entertainment $2,3 25 , 000 36% �
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 15, Folder topic: Atlanta Braves | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 19, Folder 15, Document 21

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_015_021.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 15, Document 21
  • Text: G \ October 17, 1966 Mr. Keith E . Carrington, Esq. 3 King ' s Ro Waltbam Cros Hert' , Engl De r Mr. Carringto : I cer ·n1y ppr ciate yo:\U' nice l tter r gardin the BBC T levi ion Program about Atl and ou:r d ah new Soccer fr chise . e are the advent of tbi s tin Atl ample ed om Sine r ly y I ll All n, Jr. yr 1A3r/ CC: Mr. Richard Cecil ' �
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 15, Folder topic: Atlanta Braves | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 19, Folder 15, Document 22

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_015_022.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 15, Document 22
  • Text: August Z3, 1966 Mr. John McHale Th Atlanta B v Atlanta Stadi Atl Dear John: M y good fri , Ke thM 1 u. ad he ia making appli tton to ell Brav bia c in F y tt ville ~ xt y ar. Sincer ly your , lAJ'r/br CC: Mr. Kenneth Mel ar t t �
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 15, Folder topic: Atlanta Braves | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 19, Folder 15, Document 31

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_015_031.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 15, Document 31
  • Text: July 18. 1966 Mr . Har old Butl r 1439 L wrencevill R d Dec tur. Georgi 30030 Dear Mr • Batl r : I ha e read you.r letter with great int r _ t and think that s ggy Learmiu uggeaU has considerabl m rit. I am for them tt Br ·'tr imm d..ia.te co in ord _r ·t hat ider ti Sincei-ely your , Ivan Allen, Jr. yor lAJ~/br Mr. Jerry Sachs �
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 15, Folder topic: Atlanta Braves | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 19, Folder 15, Document 35

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_015_035.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 15, Document 35
  • Text: June 30, 1966 M r. Warren Giles P resident National Baseball League 680 Fifth Avenue New York, New York Dear Warren : I wish you could bav been here la t weekend when the Brave dr w over 160, 000 in thr e day • It was great confirmation of your faith in bringing th National League to Atlanta, for which we hall always be most rateful. Sincer ly~ Ivan Allen, Jr. yor IA.Jr:am �
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 15, Folder topic: Atlanta Braves | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 19, Folder 15, Document 39

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_015_039.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 15, Document 39
  • Text: May 31, 1966 Mr. Bill M c Neely Lake Toxaway, North Carolina Dear Bill: Louise and I are delighted to know that you are bringing a group down from the Rosemond High School. We should like very much to have them as our guests at the baseball game on Saturday evening. I am having the Braves Ticket Office mail 18 tickets direct to you. I hope they enjoy the game, and I sure hope we win! Sincerely, Ivan Allen, Jr. IAJr:am �
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 15, Folder topic: Atlanta Braves | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017