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Box 2, Folder 25, Document 5

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_002_025_005.pdf
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  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 2, Folder 25, Document 5
  • Text: WES'=FERN- B NlON SENDING BLANK CALL LETTERS F .T T 5/21 /69 CHARGE rn Mayor I s Office - City Hall T he Honorable Spiro T. Agnew Vice President of the United States Washington, D. C . Thank you for your w ire advising me of the funds now available to h e lp expand transportation in support of Summer Youth Pro g rams . W e w ill b e a w a itin g furth e r d etails fr om the Pro g ram Admini s t ra t or . Ivan Allen, Jr . , Ma yor Send the abov.e message, subject lo lhe terms on back hereof, which are hereby agreed lo PLEASE TYPE OR WRITE PLAINLY WITHIN BORDER-DO NOT FOLD 1269-!R ~-ss1 �
  • Tags: Box 2, Box 2 Folder 25, Folder topic: Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 2, Folder 25, Document 10

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_002_025_010.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 2, Folder 25, Document 10
  • Text: METROPOLIT/'J l i\.TLL\NT/i. YOUTH OPPORTUNITY COUNCIL'S PL~~ FOR THE 1969 YOUTH OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM MR. CLl\RENCE E. ELSAS, GENERll.L CHAIRNL\N MRS. Cf.RR.IE B. WRIGHT, GENERAL CO-CHAIRMi\N �CONTENTS I. II. General Introduction Planning 3 III. Employment 11 IV. Recreation 17 Camping 37 Education 39 Arts 54 Social Services 70 v. VI. VII. VIII. IX. x. Special Events .. 75 Volunteers 77 Transportation 79 XII. Special Programs 80 XIII. Public Relations 82 XI. Summary �GENERAL INTRODUCTION In 1968, The City of Atlanta, Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc., The Community Chest and several other private and public agencies and organizations sponsored a Youth Opportunity Program. More than 65 agencies and •rganizations participated in this program (See Attachment 1). The overall objectives cf the Youth Opportunity Program are to provide needed services to the poor, unemployed, socially retarded, culturally deprived and academically delinquent youth in the Metropolitan Atlanta Area. The majer efforts of the Youth Opportunity Program are aimed at eliminating these conditinns. Through the outstanding efforts and accomplishments of EOA, The City of Atlanta, The FEB, The Community Chest and several other agencies and organizations, the 1968 YOP yie lded the foll owing: 1. 14,990 youth attended sunnner school; 2. 3,000 youth received special remedial aid; 3. 1,400 youth received special tutorial help ; 4. 2,500 youth were contacted and urged to return to school ; 5. 1,500 youth participated in enrichment programs ; 6. 5,000 youth participated in Fine Arts prcgrams and activities ; 7. 525,000 youth par ticipated in Recreational Programs ; 8. 1,100 federa l employees volunteered to hel p in the YOP; 9. 20,000 youth participated in camping activities ; 10. Private businesses donated $237,000 in cash, equipment or services to the YOP. Although the 1968 YOP wa s a general succe ss, some gaps and omissions did oc cur. These were identifie d as follows : �-21. Recreation activities for youth ages 16-21 were virtually non-existent; 2. Ge nerally, no programs operated on week-ends; 3. Several agencies and organizations did not fulfill their employment commitments for poor youth; 4. Coordination and communication between some agencies were generally lacking; 5. The location of programs was widespread. However, areas such :1s Capitol Homes, Blair Village, Hentown, StewartLakewood, Cabbagetown, Mill Village, Knight Park, Adamsville, Mechanicsville, Peopletown, Joyland, Blue Heaven, Bush Mountain and Bass received little or no program input; 6. Resident camping opportunities for poor youth were woefully lacking ; 7. The more attractive and de sirable special eve nts resources were not enough to meet the need; 8. Tr ansportation remained a serious and difficult problem to deal with. The s e we r e the major problems which occurre d during the 1968 YOP. �PL..:\NNING 1969 In December, 1968, Vice President Hubert llumphrey sent a telegram to Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. i :::.r:!ic c. tin:: that federal funds will be provided to the City of Atlanta for YOP Planning. Mayor Allen promptly designated the Youth Council as the agency responsible for coordination of the Metropolitan Youth Opportunity Program. In addition, Mayor /,llen appointed Mr. Clarence Elsas, Chairman of the 1969 Youth Opportunity Program. t,_ chart of the Metropolitan Youth Opportunity Council is attached. The major agencies involved in the 1969 YOP Planning are EOL., The City of Atlanta , The Community Chest, The Feder al Executive Board, The Georgia State Employment Servoce, The Na tional Alliance of Bus i nessmen, The Atlanta f.rt s hlliance, Fulton County Government, DeKa lb County Government, The Community Chest Agencies , WAOK Radio Sta t ion , WSB Radio Station, The Georgia Arts Commiss i on, The DeKalb County He a lth Department, The Chr i stian Council , Li ller, Battle, Nea l and Lindsey, The Chamber of Commer ce, The Junior Chamber of Comr.1erce, The Atlanta Pol i ce Department , Mor ehouse Co llege, The nt l ant a Ur ban League , Emor y University , Atlanta Unive rsi t y , The At lant a Youth Congre ss , The Of f i ce of Government a l Lai son, The Metr opolitan Cornniss i ou on Crime and Delinquency , The At l anta Chi l dren and Youth Service s Couns il. A Technica l Executive Committee was created to assist and direct the overall Youth Opportunity Program Pl anning. Major decisions made by the Technical Executive Committee are as follows: 1. That the Atlanta Pub l ic Schools will concentrate on educational programs, and not be responsible for operating special recreational programs; �-!,..- 2. Tho.t the /1.tlanta Public Schools will make their facilities available to any group wishing to utilize them provided such group assurae full responsibility for custodial and administrative costs; 3. That the Public Schools will indicate in early spring, those schools where summer programs will be located; ~-. That the Parks and Recreation Department will indicate in early spring where surmner programs will be located; 5. That the Parks and Recreation Department will submit a listing of desirable school facilities which they might utilize; 6. That EOf, provide a listing of locations and programs which comm rmmity residents indicate are more desirable; 7. That the Chest agencies provide the Technical Executive Cornmittee with a listinr; of programs which will be operai::ed with summer funds, as well as, a listing of summer prograras and locations which will be operated on their regular budget; 8. That the Georgia State Employment Service be respons i ble for most YOP employment screening, processing and recruitment; 9. That the Georgia State Employment Service locate the Summer Youth Opportunity Center by Harch 15. (136 Marietta Street) Planning fo r the 1969 YOP centers around the implementation of t he above recommendations in addition to regular and ongoing activi ties. In late 1968, EO~ be ga n holding planning meetings i n al l of the ECA neighborhood service centers. At these meetings, residents and youth of the EOn service ar eas made valuable suggestions concerning the types, locations , and hours of operation of summer pro gr ams i n the i r neighborhoods. The suggestions of ne ighbor hood re s i dents provided a va l uab le guide f or YOP planning . These mee t i ngs we r e planne d and implemented by Mr. Duke Harris on, Recreation Coordinator, EO~ . Based on the recommendations abov e, a s wel l as sug8es tions by residents and youth, the Executive Technica l Committee set the following priorities: �-51. Employment a. b. 2. Recreation a. b. 3. c. d, b. b. b. Free passes and admi s sions t o place s of ente rtainment and enrichment for youth of all age s. Volunteers a. b. 9. Couns el ing and thera peutic s ervice s for all youth 13-21 who mi gh t need such Establ ishment of such a s ervice which pre sen tly does no t exist in t he Metropo l itan area . Spe c ial Events a. 8. Re siden t camp i nc exper iences for inner city poor youth of a ll a ges Day camp oppor tunities for inner city youth . Soc ia l Services a. 7. Special programs i n the Fine Arts for inner city poor youth ll~-21 years of a ge Es t abl i shment of a broad based Community /ir ts Pro gram. Camping a. 6. Tutorial and study hel p ? r os raQS Remedial programs i n poverty schools Cultura l e nrichment programs Special enrichment a nd tutorial programs for socially and academically reta rded youth. /ir ts a. 5. Organized athletic activities for inner city youth; Organized activities for older teenagers 16-21 during evening hours. Education a. b. l~. Youth 14-21 years of a8e Poor Youth EnGendering ~o l untccrs to assist operating agencies in areas of need. ~ggressive recruitment of youth vo l un teers. Transportation a. b. Centralize the transporation funds and dispa tching of buses Provide adequate transportation for all program components ~:e ed i nt i t • �~ 1 -6- 10. Public Relations a. b. 11. Widespread distribution of progran locations, operation, requirements, cost, etc. to utilizers of services through the various medin Effective publicizing of program achievements to total com• munity. Urban Corps a. b. Provide meaningful employment for poor college youth, who need money to return to school Provide agencies with an additional personnel resource at low cost. In addition to the suggestions concerning major programming, the Committee suggested that special attention be given to unemployed youth, 16-21; socially and academically retarded youth, 6-18; culturally deprived youth, all ages, and youth leadership and development ages ll~-25. The Technical Executive Committee also a greed that effective program planning depends upon the availability of funds and resources for prograr~aing. In this respect, the Committee agreed t o work toward an early coP.1r1itment of funds for prograrrnning. Such funds i nclude planning funds $45,000, OEO-EOA, $612,000, City of Atlanta $300,000, The Community Chest $15,000. funds have been c orrnnitted . J\.11 of these �-7- / 1"1ETROPOLITf.N COUNCIL ON YOUTH OPPORTUNITY Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. Honorary Chairman DeKalb Cormnissioner, Clark Harrison~ Honorary V. Chainnan Fulton Conunissioner, Walter Mitchell - Honorary V. Chairman Mr. Clarence Elsas, General Chairman Mrs. Carrie B. Wright, General V. Chairman Program SubCommittees - Employment - Mr. Harding B. Young - Recreation Mr. ~ . B. Padgett, Chairman - Camping Mr . Frank Player, Chairman Mr. Charles Green, Chairman - Education Dr. Hilliard Bowen , Chairman Mrs. Mary Sanf ord, Co-Cha irman - nr ts Mrs. Rhodes Perdue , Chairman Mrs . Harold Bar r e t t , Co-Chairman - Soci al Services Mrs . Benj amin Brown, Cha irman - Special Events Mr. Waymon Wright , Chai rman - Volunteers Mrs . Frances Parham, Chai rman - Transportation Mr. Robert Woods I, - Public Relations Mr. Zenas Sears, Chairman Technical Executive Committee - Mr. Dan Sweat Mr. James McGovern Mr. Peter White Mr. Jerry Luxemberger Mr. Jack Delius - Mr. John Cox - Mr. Alan Koth - Mr. Lyndon Wade - Mr. Clinton Rogers - Mr. Thomas J. Par ham ~Mr .Richard Hicks - Dr. John Letson - Mr . Nicholas Novak - Mr . J ame s Rogers - Dr. Harmon Moor e - Mr . Michael Hollis - Mr . A. B. Padgett - }1r . Harold Barr e t t - Mr . I r win Lewis - Ca pt. Howard Baugh - Mr . Ermne tt Lee �- 8- Agencies and Organizations Providing Planning - Coordina tion l\.ssistance to the Metropolita n Council on Youth Opportunity Federal Agencies Federal Executive Board Defense Depa rtment Labor Department Housing and Ur ban Development Health, Education and Welfare Interior Department Commerce Department Department of Justice (CRS) .L\.griculture OEO Civil Service Commission Department of Transportation State L\gencies Offi ce of the Governor Defense Family and Ch i ldre n Service s Educa tion Hea l t h Governor Commis s ion on Cr ime and Justice .L\.r t s Commis sion Recr eation Connnis s i on University of Georgia Ge or gia St a t e Co l l ege Georgia De pa r tment of Labor Me ntal Health Ins t itu te Scholar ship and Loan Commission County Fulton County Commissioners Fulton County De partment of Family a nd Children Services Fulton County Schools DeKa lb County Department of Family and Chi ldren Services DeKalb Count y Schools Fulton Count y Juve nile Cour t Fulton County Hea lth Department DeKalb County Recreation Depa r t ment DeKalb County Heal th Depa r t ment Suicide Prevention �-9- City of l'i.tlanta Office of Mayor Palnning Department Personnel Public Works Dc p~rtment Recreation and Parks Comptroller Children and Youth Services City Service Coordination Connnunity Relations Cormnission Police Department Atlanta Public Library Model cities Fire Department Other Public Agencies Economic Opportunity Atlanta Board of Education Atlanta Housing Authority Clayton County Board of Decatur Publi c Schools Private Non-Profit Health Education and Welfare l\.gencies Community Chest··Uni ted Appeal Corrnnunity Council of Atlanta Atlanta Menta l He alth Associa tion f..merican Social Health Association l\.nti-Defamation League Camp Fit e Gir ls Atlanta Employment Eva luation Services Center I;c/3<'.l l f',i d Society Atlanta Univer si t y School of Socia l Work Atlanta Urban League Bethlehem Wesley Cormnunity Centers Bi g Brothers Associa t i on of Atlan ta Atlanta Univer s i t y Multi - pur pose Training Center Cancer Socie ty of Atlant a Ge or gia He art hssoc iat ion Me tropo l i tan Cr i me Connniss i on Goodwi ll Industry Boys Club, Inc. of At l ant a Boy Sc outs, At l anta L\rea Counci l Butler Street YMCA Camp Fire Gir l s, I nc. Carrie Steele Pitts Home s Catholic Social Service s of Atlanta Children Center of Metropolitan Atlanta Greater Atlanta Connnittee on Crime and Delinquency �-10Grady Homes Conununity Girls Clubs Kirkwood Christian Center National Youth Courtesy Foundations Paul P.nderson Youth Home Planned Parenthood fi.ssocintion of L"..t lanta Emory University Metropolitan YMCA Metropolitan YWCfi. Travelers Aid Society of Atlanta Women in Community Services St. Vincent DePaul Society Salvation Army .! • / · '· c--,~.: ,. Religious Christian Council of Metropolitan Atlanta Metropolitan Council of Churches liME Ministers Union Inter-Denominational Ministerial Alliance Baptist Ministers Union Atlanta Archdiocese Georgia Council of Churches Business, Civil Right Services and Educational GrouEs Atlanta Chamber of Commerce Merit Employers As sociation Retail Wholesale Merchants Association Frontier Club National Congre ss of Colored Parents and Teachers National Conference of Christian and Jews Atlanta Bar Association Optimist Club of Atlanta Y's Club Butler Street YMCA Rotary Club of Atlanta Kiwanis Club Jr. League Emory University Atlanta Traffic and Snfety Council Junior Chamber of Commerce Council of Jewish Women Apartment Owners Association NAACP Metropolitan Commission on Crime and Delinquency Georgia Labor Council /\FL-CIO �EMPLOYMENT Mr. Harding B. Young - Chairman The major emphasis of the 1969 Youth Opportunity Program is youth employment. An employment sub-committee is now working to deal with the problems in this area. Several agencies will assume major r esponsibilities for the Youth Employment phase of the YOP. Ge orgia State Employment Services The Ge orgia State Employment Services will be generally responsible for the processing , sc r ee ning, referring and follow-up for the following agencies : The Nationa l Al l iance of Busine ssmen, Fulton County, Rent-A-Kid, Fe de ral Agencie s, AFL-CIO, miscellane ous pl acements , NAACP, and the Atlanta Youth Congre ss. additional t a s ks. In add i tion , the Employment Se rvice has undertaken seve r al The s e inc l ude : 1. Ma i le d 13,000 Job Solicitations Le tter s to pr ospective employe rs in the met r opolitan area; 2. Loca te d the Summe r Youth Opportunity Cente r at 136 Marie tta Street ; 3. Es t ablis hed l aison be t ween NAB and the GSES ; 4. Me t with t he At l a nta Brave s and Atlanta Chie fs a nd arranged f or 10,000 free t icke t s ea ch to a Ba s e ba ll Game and a Soccer Game. The GSES has a s s i gned Mr . J im Wa ite s t o s erve a s direct or of the Job So l icitation Sta ff. The e nti r e s taff will be on board and ope rating by May 19th. Nat iona l Al l i a nce of Busine ssme n The Nat i onal All iance of Bus i ne ssme n wil l devel op summer j obs f or youth who will be return ing t o s choo l . -11- Such j obs are being developed in t he �I -12various industries and businesses through out the Metropolitan Atlanta Area. Mr. Henry Reid is the contact for the NAB Program. RENT-A-KID A unique and imaginative employment program will operate in the Sunnner of 1969. This program is named Rent-A-Kid. The Main Office of Rent-A-Kid will be located in the State Employment facility at 136 Marietta Street . Rent-A-Kid is designed to provide part-time and domestic type employment for youth 14-16 who, because of laws and other reasons, cannot get jobs. It will fill the employment gap between the 14 year old to 16 year old youth. The various locations, contacts and other information concerning Rent-A-Kid is as follows: 1. Bedford Pine 547 Hunt Street, N.E. 2. Gr ant Park 645 Grant Street , S.E. 3. West End 1040 Fair Street, s . w. Agency Affiliations Contact St. Vincent de Paul Joe Flannagan 523-5431 Ga. Ave. Presby. Church Jim Hicks 688-0871 M. Agnes J ones School Ge ne Ruyle 758-8326 Phone 4. Forest Park 4871 College St reet Fore st Park, Ge or gia Clayt on County EOA Jane Tap p 366-0516 5. Conyers 929 Connnercial Street Conyers, Ge orgia Roc kdale County EOA Ed Gamble 48 3-9512 6. Techwood 840 Marietta Street Ce nt ral City EOA Tonnny Hess 873-6759 7. N.W. Perry Extension N.W. Perry EOA 1927 Hollywood Road 1 N.W. George Dodd 799-9322 8. Dixie Hills 2913 Verbena Street West Central EOA Amos Parker 799-0331 9. Kirkwood Edgewood EOA George Wilborn 378-3643 �-13Mr s. Joy Rue l is coordinating the Rent-A-Kid Project. Earn and Learn Anothe r unique and innovative employment project is the Earn and Learn Proj e ct. This pr oj e ct is also de signed to pr ovide employment for youth 14-16 years of age. Earn a nd Learn is sponso red by several churches. 1. Trinity Me thodist Church Rev e r e nd Frank We athe rsby 265 Wa shington St ree t , S . W. 688 - 1567 2. Pe achtree Pre sbyt e rian Church Re verend W. W. Wi ll i amson 3443 Roswe l l Roa d, N. W. 237-157 8 3. North De catur Pre sby t e rian Church Reve r end T. W. Tuc ke r 611 Me dlock Road De catur , Ge org i a 63 6-1 06 9 4. Hillside Pre sbyt er ian Rev e r e nd Rola nd Perdue 18 79 Col unvia Dr i ve De catur , Ge org i a 289- 3092 5. Ea s t La ke Me thodis t Chur ch Rev e r e nd Phi l Barnhar t 2500 Bouleva r d Drive , N. E. 377 -1 505 The se are : Economic Oppor t unity At l a nta Ano ther youth empl oymen t activity t o be under t ake n thi s sunnner will be t he EOA Summe r Youth Employmen t Pr ogram . I n a dd i tion to youth be ing employed t hrough the EOA f unde d proposa ls, EOA wi l l h i r e 253 youth this s ummer . The s e j ob s will be pr ovide d t hr ough the EOA Neigh bor hood Serv i ce Center s. Fe deral Agenc i e s The various f e deral a genc i e s will be hi ring youth aga i n t h i s s ummer . �-14In addition to Civil Service Jobs, youth will be provided with other types of employment. City of Atlanta As a spe cial surrnner e ffort the City of Atlanta will be hiring youth in part-time and full-time jobs. Fulton County The Fulton County Department of Family and Children Services and the Fulton County Personnel Departments will be hiring youth this summer to work in various jobs. Urban Corp Urban Corp is a special project which provides sunnner jobs for college and unive rsity youth. Such youth will work in branches of government or with privat e , non-profit agencies. AFL-CIO The AFL-CIO will provide jobs for youth 18 and over . Such jobs will be ava ilable in construction and bui l ding t rade s. Neighborhood Youth Corp (In-school) NYC (in- s chool) wi ll ena ble 1,200 youth to earn money dur ing the summer months. Mr . Wi l liam Mars hall coordina tes the in-school pr ogram. At lanta Police Department The Atlanta Police De partment will hire yo ut h th is summer to work as Corrnnunity Service Off icers. NAACP The NAACP will sponsor a Youth Employment Project. will serve youth ages 16-22 . This project The project will unde ttake its own job develop- �-15ment and recruitment. cost. In addition, job referrals will be provided free of This project proposes to place 200 youth during the summer 1969. project will be located at 136 Marietta Street. The Contact Miss Angela McClung at 577-5821 or 577-4399. Atla nta Youth Congress The Atlanta Youth Congress will solicit jobs from small neighbo~hood businesses. In addition, the Youth Congress will provide volunteers to the Ge orgia State Employment Services to pe rfor m job placeme nt tasks. The Youth Congress expects to develop 200 jobs. The goals and commitments of the various agencie s providing and/or soliciting jobs a r e a s follows : AGENCY National Alliance ,·of · Businessme n EMPLOYMENT GOAL 2 , 500 EOA 253 EOA Funde d Pr oposa ls 331 Urban Cor p 300 NYC City of Atlanta Fulton County Rent-A-Kid 1 , 200 830 36 2 , 000 Earn a nd Learn 100 Federal Agencies 638 AFL-CIO 150 Atlanta Police De partme nt 50 Miscellaneous (GSES) 300 NAACP 200 Atlanta Youth Congress 100 TOTAL 8,988 �• -16The employment aspect of the Youth Opportunity Program is well ahead of the 1968 program. 6,100. For example, in 1968 the job commitment was In 1969 the commitment is 8,988 or 47% more than 1968. �RECREATION Mr. A. B. Padgett, Chairman There are approximately 500,000 youth in Metropolitan At lanta. Most of these youth will be seeking ways to spend their leisure time during the summer months. Unfortunately , the lack of recreational and leisure time activities is most acute in the poverty communities. City of Atlanta Parks & Recreation Department To meet the acute shortage of whole some recreation in poverty communities the major a gencies are pooling their resources . Forsmost among these agencies is the Atlanta Parks and Recreati on Department. The Parks Department i s a ssuming the larger portion of operating responsibilities f or the Youth Opportuni t y Recreation Program. The Atlanta Parks a~d Recreation Department will ex pand the r egular program during the months of June , July, and Augus t with particular emphasis on provi ding needed recreationa l faci l ities and ac tivities f or the peop l e living in the disadvantaged areas of t he city. Leadership i s provided at twenty-four locations in the target areas on a twelve mon th basis. wi ll be opened . For the summer of 1969, forty-ei ght a ddi tional areas The use of t wenty-seve n differ ent school f acilities has been requested and, granted. This will give a tota l of ninety-nine supervised re- creati on areas f or t h is summer. AB added requests are anticipated, it is most probable t hat over one hundred areas will be in operation before t he end of t he summer . Block parks will be open from 9:00 .'i.. M. until 9:00 P.M. a r.d connnuni ty -17- �-18center buildingx from 10: 00 A.M. until 10 :30 P,M. Monday through Saturdya. An additional staff of approximately t wo hundred and seventy-five trained in various recreation skills will be employed. There will also be one hundred and seventy youth assistants (age 16-25) employed from the target areas. They will be placed in job slots in their own neighborhoods. Another five hundred youth a.ssi:.tants will be given an opportunity for a camping-work experience at Wi lderne ss Camp. Fifteen At lanta Concentrated Employment Program (ACEP) workers will a lso participate in the program. Close coord ina tion has been maintained throughout the fall and winter with Economic Op portunity Atlanta and the ~tlanta Youth Council. Members of the Recreation Department staff have attended meetings with members of the various neighborhoods in the ~ity to determine thei r needs and desires in the type program to be offered this summer. Activities t o be offered wi ll include the f ollowing: Ar ts a nd Crafts Paint ing Drawi ng - pencil , crayon Sculpture Ceramics Clay Pa pier-Mache Crepe paper projec t s Block pr inting Weavi ng Stitcher y Jewelr y making Wood working Puppetry Camp Crafts Swimming Tennis Go lf Archery Badminton '.::anoeing Drama Chorus Singing game s Music appreciation Physical Fitness S limna s tics Wrestling Boxing Weight Lifting Gymnastics Tumbling Se lf De fense Judo Softba ll Ba seball Basketball Volleyball Soccer Track <'x Fie ld Tab l e Tenni s Day Camps Re s ident Camps Wilderne ss Camp Nature Programs Golde n Age Clubs Teen Clubs Charm Cl asses Low organized games �-19Folk dancing Modern dancing Tap dancing Baton twirling Cheer leading · Social Recreation Sewing Flower arrangements Table games Quiet games Horseshoes Box hocke y Model boats Model cars Mode l airplanes Photography Movie s Trips - Kennesaw, Six Flaes Over Ge orgia , Baseball and Soccer Games, Zoo, Cyclorama, Stone Moun tai n , Coca Cola Company, Lays Potatoe Chip, General Motors, and other points of interest in Atlan ta. Tournaments - Softba ll, Baseball, Basketba ll, Te nnis. Wilderness Camp - fifty underpr i v i ledged boys per day for ten weeks - earning $1.60 per hour for five hour pe r day. Track and Fi eld Meet - Boys and Girls. Swimming Me ets - Boys and Girls. Contests - Hula Hoop, Horseshoes, Car r om. Picni cs, Parties, Da nces Play Day - Ci ty-Wide Guitar Le ssons - Ba ttle of the Bands Airplane Flights Free mi lk, f ru i t ,j u ice, and c ookies Sprink l er s The f irst week of June will be devoted to a training session f or al l new per sonnel. t:,.11 areas wi ll b e open a nd a full program in effect starting June 9 a nd wi ll con t i nue through Labor Day~ September 1. Parks , Playground s & Recreat ion Ce nt er Area I Twe lve Month Ooe rntion Home Park Howell Park J. A. White Summer ~'(Ashby Circ le '>'(Madd ox ~'(Mc'.lgnol ia & Maple �*Central City (717 Marietta) 'cHaynes \-Ladd Street 'cMoz ley Park ,',Techwood .,,,University ',Vine Ci ty Strong & Kennedy '<'Thurmond '<'Hctshington \-Wes t End Park ',Tnrget Areas - lt'.~ Total 17 Area I I Twelve Month Operation Summer Orchnrd Knob Pe r kerson S outh Bend ',Adair \-Joy land 7•Pittman 'c (Thomasville - not open) (Under Construction) \-Bethlehem Center \-Brown Avenue \-Carver Georgia-McDaniel \-Mary-Coleman \-Park Av enue -Lansing 7·Plunkettown ', Target Areas - 11 Total lliArea III Twelve Month Operation Sunnner Go.rden Hills E. P. Howell Knight Peachtree Hills 'cBedford-Pine \-Butler ,'<'Forrest & Fort ·k666 Pa rkway .,,,Angier & Pa rkw-ay 'cBoulevo.rd & Auburn Boule v ard Place & Gle nn Iris \-Daniel Street Hanover* Renfr oe Perry Bou levard - Lively \-Piedmont Park \-Sampson & East ,'<-Vernon Street Wylie - Tye >\-618 Invin Stree t ·k Tnrge t Areas - ll} Total 19 Area I V Twelve Month Opera tion Summer Ad ams Adamsville Ben Hill We st Manor Anderson >'rEnglish Park >'t- A.: dington Circle >',Center Hill Mary George Ave. - Perry Homes '<"Radc liffe ',Perry Boulevard - Habershall .,,,Tremont Drive �-21'>'(Wilson Avenue 2185 Verbena Street '""Grove '"'Gun Club Area Target Areas - 12 Total 16 V Twelve Month Operation Sunnner Brownwood East Lake '"'Bass ,'(Branham ,'(Cook ,'I-Daniel Stanton '>'(Dodd Avenue 71 Little Street '>'(Capitol Avenue ,'l'C:apitol Homes Center ,'<'Connally Street '"'Gilliam ,':Grant Park ,'<'Haygood-Crew Ira ,'<'Pryor ,'<'Richardson Street Center Stadium Walker Park Washington-Ryder '"'Wesley Windsor-Ri chardson Target Areas - 20 Tota l 22 Swimming Pools The f ollowing are opened dai ly for those wishing to swim. Lessons are scheduled from 10: 00 A.M. - 12:00 Noon, Monday - Friday for individua ls who come t o the parks and register. Adams Cand ler Chastain Memor ial Garden Hills J oyland South Bend Washingt on Wesley Avenue John i'. , Wh ite These pools are opened dai ly. 10:00 A. M. - 3:00 P.M. , Monday - Friday: Gun Club Maddox Mozley Lessons are offered to groups from �-22Oakland Piedmont Pittman · . .• l PORTABLE POOLS Area I Marvin Billups Thurmond Street Magnolia & Maple (moved from Rhodes) Ladd Street (new-if available) /i.rea I I Mollie Wagoner Georgia Avenue - McDanie l Plunket town Thomasville Area I II Pending Bu t ler Hanover - Renfroe .Sampoon East (moved from Wylie-Tye ) Bedford Pi ne (moved from Nerritts ) Irwin St r ee t (new - if available) /:..rea I V David Knowlton Verbena Street Perry - Habershall Ar l ington Circ l e (new - if available) !1.rea V Eddie McLemore Li tt l e Street (moved fr om Connally ) Haygood - Crew Washington - Ryder Wa l ker Park (new - if avai l ab l e ) Rec r ea tion in the El ementary Schools Recreat i ona l and enrichment pr ograms will be sponsored at some of t he At l anta Sch ools by the City Parks and Recreation Depa rtment. The program wi ll consist of a variety of recreationa l activ ities and enrichment programs such as: arts and crafts, drama, singing for fun, entertai~,ment, fie l d trips, swimming, etc. The recreation program in the fo llowing schools will bogin June 9, 1969 and terminate August 23, 1969: �-23- Area I I II II II III III III IV IV V V V V V I III IV V V School Craddock Hardnett Blair Village Gilbert Harper But l e r Forrest Hill Scott Walter 1.iJ hite Cook Hubert Johnson Pryor Toomer Hashington Grady West Fulton Bass Murphy Saturday Daily Hours L} :00 L:-:00 4:30 4 : 30 4:30 4:00 /+ :00 L~ :00 4:00 L} :00 1:00 12:00 12:00 12:00 12:00 4:00 L~ : 00 4:00 12: 00 12:00 P.M.-9:00 P.M. -9: 00 P.M.-9: 30 P,M.-9:30 P. M.-9: 30 P;M.-9:00 P.M. - 9 :00 P.M.-9:00 P.M.-9:00 P.M.-9 : 00 P, M.-9 : 00 P .M. - 8 :00 P.M.-8:00 P,M.-3: 00 P. M.-8 :00 P.M.- 9 :00 P . M. -9 :00 P. M.-9: 00 P.M.-8 : 00 P . M. - 8 :00 P.M. P.M. P,M. P.M. P.M. P. M. P.M. P. M. P.M. P.M. P.M. P.M. p . M. p .M. p . M. P.M. p .M. p . M. P. M. P. M. 1: 00 1:00 9:00 9 :00 9 :00 9: 00 9:00 9:00 1 : 00 1:00 1:00 12:00 12:00 12:00 12:00 1: 00 9:00 1 :00 12 : 00 12:00 P.M.-6 :00 P .M. -6 :00 A.M.-9:00 A.M.-9:00 A.M.-9: 00 A.M.-1:00 A.M. -1 :00 A.M.-1:00 P .M.-6: 00 P .M. -6 :00 P . M. -6 :00 P.M.-8 :00 P. M.-3: 00 P.M. - 8: 00 P, M.-3: 00 P.M.-6 :00 P. M.-6 :00 P.M.-6:00 P. M.-8 :00 P.M.-8 :00 P.M. P.M. p .M. P.M. P.M. p .M. p .M. P.M. p .M. p .M. p .M. P.M. p .M. P. M. P. M. P. M. p . M. P. M. P. M. P.M. �Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. Another large recreation component for 1969 will be the EOA Recreation Program, This program will operate through the 14 Neighborhood Service Centers of EO.i\ . I't will cover most of the poverty areas in f,tlanta and the Metropolitan Area, These programs are as follows: EOA Central City Neighborhood Service Center will operate a summer recreation program. locations: This will be operational in the following Central City Youth Center, Salvation Army Red Shield facility, area playlots and the neighborhood service center. Youth will be employed as assistants for the program. These youth will be recruited. from the Central City target areas. The following activities are planned: Field trips, dances, sports, counseling, employment referral, arts and crafts. Activities will also be offered t o young adults in the evenings. This program is de• signed to meet the demands of all age levels in target area. EOA East Central Neighborhood Service Center will offer programs involved in employment, cultural, and recreaticnal activities, Referral and program assistance will be gi ven to other agencies operating programs i n the target areas of East Central. The program will consist of sports, r e creation activitie s , youth center , cul t ur al ac tivities, arts and cra f ts, and f i eld t ri ps. Youth wi ll be employed t o assist in t hese projects. These yout h wi ll be r ecr u ite d fr om the EOA t arge t areas . EOA Edgewood Neighbor hood Ser vice Ce nt er wi ll organiz e a r e creation, cu l tural and empl oyment pr ogram. Programs wi l l include recreati onal sports, dancing classes (balle ts), tours, drama experience, trips �-25to the then.ters, plays, musicals. skating, anc! horseback riding. Other activities are bm;1 ling, Other aspects of the program includes referral to other programs offered in the t a rget areas, coordination of resident camping and day camp programs, establishment of a target area youth council. L campmobile will also tour the areas of high population on a weekly schedule. Youth and young adults wi ll be employed to assist and direct these l)rograms in the target areas of EO.'.,.• EOA Gwinnett Coun ty Ne ighborhood Service Cen ter will organize r ural and semi-rura l recreational spor ts, league plan, playlots, field trips, camping, sewing, personal hutiene, water and heating, safety, first aid, drama, musical activities. councils wi ll be organi zed to assist i n these programs. project will be operated in the EOil. target a r eas. Youth Thi s Youth and young adults will be employed t o assist and direct these programs. EOA Nt~ H~Washington Neighborhood Ser vice Center will organi ze recr eat i on, cultur al/educati onal , and employment programs. Pr o - grams wi ll include sports , clinics, dances, dram.a, t he ater, and organizat i on of youth c ounci ls . Youth and young adu l t s wi l l be hired t o as s i s t and direct thes e programs. The pr oj ects uill be located and operated in the EOA target areas . EO/\. North Fulton Neighb orhood Service Ce nte r will organize rural and semi-rural programs f or youth and young adults. Programs will include recreational sports, indoor and out-of-door activities, arts and crafts, fishing, bicycling, trips and tours, and organization of youth council. Youth and young adults will be employed �-26- to assist and direct these programs. These programs will be in the target areas of Eo:·t , E01\ Northwest (Perry Homes) l'eighborhood Service Center will organize recreation, education, and employment programs. Programs will in- clude recreation , sports, art , ar ts and crafts, music trai ning, drama, teenage clubs, tJa ll of Pr ide (paintings of famous heroes for ar t part i cipants) , and all types of r ecreational acti vities. way house will be established for school drop-out s. h half- This project will a ttccpt t o h~vc youth r e turn to school via sports, education, and counseling. Yout h and young a dults will be employed to assist and direc t the many varied programs offered, All programs will be conduc ted i n the EOA t a rge t a reas. EOA Pittsburgh Neighborhood Service Center will organize recreat ion, counseling, a nd employment programs. Pr ograms offered will be re- crea t i oruil spor t s , ar ts and crafts, cult ural tours, youth councils , expa nding a ctivi t i es, and program referral. Youth and young adult~ wi l l be employed t o assis t and di r e ct these programs offered. These pr ograms wi ll serve in the t arget areas of EOA. EOA Price Neighbor hood Servi ce Center wi ll or ganize recrea t i onal, cultura l and e ducationa l programs. Activ ities offered wi ll be re- creational sports, boxing , bowling , swirmning, league spor ts, t rips, arts and c rafts, drama , danc ing, ba llet l essons, campi ng t rips , baseball c linics , and pr ogram r eferral. Yout h and young adults wil l be employed to assist in t hese programs. Programs wil l be operated in the target ureas of EOt .• EOA South Fulton Neighborhood Se rvice ~e nter will organize a recreation and employment program for youth in the rural and semi- �-27- rural South Fulton target areas of EOi.\ . The activities will include recreational sports, arts and crafts, playlots, pro3ram referrals, employment and employment referral, personal hygiene and grooming, cultural activities, drama and field trips. The youth recruited for these programs offered by the Neighborhood Service Center would not have any extensive surrnner programs were it not for t he EO!. Neighborhood Service Center and volunteer residents of South Fulton. Youth and young adults will be employed to direct and assist the many varied programs offered by the Neighborhood Service Center. EOA Summerhill-Mechanicsville Neighborhood Gervice ~enter will organize surrnner recreational, educational, and employment programs, educational programs, dance, arts, tutorial project, sports, leagues, trips, dances, economic workshops, scouts, boys and girls and teenage referral. Youth will be employed in these programs to assist the professionals. This program will be in the EOf.. target aree.s. EOA West Central Neighborhood Service Center will organize a recreational, educational program for the Neighborhood Service Center target areas. Programs offered will include recreation, sports, arts and crafts, tours, cultural and educational activities, employment referral and counseling. Youth and young adults wi.11 be employed to assist in program activities offered by the Neighborhood Service Center. Volunteers will be organized to assist in programs not fully staffed due to lack of funds. This program will operate during the twelve weeks of the local school vacation in the EOt. target areas. EOA We st End Neighborhood Se rvice Center will conduct a recreational, educational, cultural and employment program. Programs will include �-28sports, playlots, arts and crafts, cultural activities, record hops, outing, teen town, art workshops, field trips, referrals to other agency programs. Employment referrals~ youth cent ers, and counseling and still other aspects of the program. Partici- pants will be recrui ted from the target areas of West End Neighborhood Service Center. Youth will be employed to assist i n t he operation of these projects. These projects will operate in EOA target area. EO/i. Rockdale-Conyers Ueiehborhood Service Center will organize a rural and semi-rural recreation project. The EOA Neighborhood Service Center will be the only agency providing r ecreation in the county. The program consists of a youth center, use of a school, and playlots. This program will also provide recreation sports, night activities for teenagers , dances, leagues (baseball) , tutorial program, camping , trips, and counseli ng. Youth and young adults will be hired to assist the professionals in these projects. Community Chest c, Other 1:.genc i es In addition to the specia l recrea tional activities to be undertaken by EOL He ighborhood Service Centers, EO/', has cont racted wi th sever al ot her private age nc i es for r ecr eat iona l ser vices in the tar ge t a rea s lis ted below. The :\.t l anta Gir ls ' Club , Inc ., wi ll oper ate e xpanded pr ograms at three clubs. The Gir ls ' Club wi l l offe r sports, c ounse ling, coed programs, homemaking , r es ident camp ing, trips and outings, arts and crafts , educational and cultural activities , recruit girl s from the target areas of EOL. The program will Ten young girls 14-21 �7 -29will be hired to assist the professionals during the summer. The hours at these clubs will also be extended. The Atlanta Area Boy Scouts will recruit 150 non-scouts and 150 youth who a re non-scout members to Day Camping two days per week for five weeks . Transportation wil l be provided, m8als and equi_p- ment to insure the youth having a good experience . This camp is a resident camp and offers more than the normal day camp program. Youth recruited will be in t he age r8nge of 11-13 . Recruitment will be made via the EOA Service Cel!ters i n the target areas. A youth (16-21 ) will be hil.-ed for every 10 boys attending camp. The Butler Street YMCA will ex pe.nd its norII'.al progr ams during the summer months . The~1 will a lso employ 100 area youth a s lock.er room attendants, program assistants, and send 300 youth to resident camp. Part of the day would be in re pairing building , cutting trees, grass, etc. for recreation. The .reoninder of the day wi ll be used Youth will a lso be hired as kitche n helpers, junior l eaders, and assistant cabin counselors. fl t een program will be operat ed during t he evening hours for dances, pool, swinnning, movies, field trips , ycuth forum discussions, and lectures. Other facilities being u ti l ized by the Butler Stree t YMC~ will be the Sumrr.er hill 'll1CA Branch, Perry Home s YMCL and the Butler Street Re sid ent Camp, ll.llatoona. The Grady Homes Girls' Club, Inc. wil l expand their program in the conmrunity in hours of operation, 500 add i tional gi rls, and employment of youth ( gir ls) 14-21 , from the community being s erved. grams wili be normal Gir ls 1 Club activities. Pro- f,n expanded day camp will be operated for gir ls 6 .,14 years of age from 9 :00 A.M. to 3 :00 P .M. and youths (g~_r l s) employe d as program assistants. The �-30Day Camp will offer outings, etiquette, dramatics, films, record hops , and plays by the participants will be from the EOll. target areas. The Metropolitan ll.tlanta Boys' Clubs will operate six clubs in the target areas of EOA. The clubs wi ll expand their hours during the sunnner months from 9: 00 l1. . M. to 10: 00 P. M. six days per week. In addition, the Boys' Club will hire 62 youth to a ssist the professional staff. The Boys' Clubs will expand thei r programs in areas of spor ts, counseling, education, workshops, and normal Boys' Clubs programs for disadvantaged poor youth. The Metr opolitan YMCA of Atlanta and The Southea stern YMC~ will conduct a r ecreational program i n swimming. will be to teach youth to swim. The Swimning Program The normal YMCA program will also be expanded during the sunnner months. n-ie Northwest Georgia Girl Scout Council will ope r a t e day camps for girls which will include sports, hea lth and safety, citizenshi p , i nte r national scout program, arts, cooking , outdoor living, s e l f government, housekeeping, ri1oney management, family re l a t i ons , na ture and natura l scie nce. I n a ddit i on , 32 girls wi ll be t ake n t o re s ident camp (age s 10- 15 ) f or a two week period. This program will be operated in t he target areas of EOA. The Roya l Knights Foundati on, Inc. , will organize recreational programs f~r you th in the Vine City L\rea. The program wi l l be sports, trips, counseling, indoor and outdoor activities, day camp, teenage program --until 9: 00 P.M. , boxing, employment referral and pool. Youth will be employed to assist i n the programs. This pro- ject will operate i n the N.1'.SH-Washington EOJ.\. area. The YMCL\ of �-31Atlanta will operate expanded prograns for girls in the poverty areas of At lanta. Program activities will include preparin8 girls to pro- perly seek employment, how to dress .'.:!.nd act during an interview, how to answer an e:mployer, ·· fi lling out applications, refe:rences, what relat ions of employer and employee should be, and introductions to new job openings. A phase of the project will also be in working, training, office filing, business machines, and cash registers. '.nether progrQm offered will be a training program for girls to work with children in Heads t ar t programs. .A operated prior to the summer operation. sur.nner day camp ·will be Twelve young girls will be given in-service training to a ssist the professiona ls during the da y camp operations. L i.o ther program will be an enrichment (cultural a nd tutorial) , drana, sewing and grooming program with group discussions in history and contributions of famoun /imer icans. These programs will be operated in the EO/\. target area s. The U.S. Army Youth Opportunity Program is a spe cia l project opera ted by the U.S. Army. 'TI1is program operates t o assist disadvantaged youth in the EO,:\ East Central Neighborhood Service Center area of At l anta. I t wi ll operate year round and wi ll serve about 100 youth. The project offers recreation, sports, indoor activities, ganes, trips, tours, charn classes, movies , sewing, reading, music, arts a nd crafts, drama, health educa tion a nd driver education. youth recruited and referred by the /:..ges of EOI\. Ea st Centra l Nei ghborhood Service Ce nter t o this project a re 11- 18 boys a nd gir ls. The only cha nge i n the sur:u:ner of f ered will be more outd oor activ it ies. The Vine City Founda tion wi ll . h ire youth a s rec reation organizers to r ecrui t youth for you t h progrnn s that be s t fit their nee ds. Pro-- �-32grruns will also be organized by youth in the following areas: creation, tutorial, and cultural. re- A group dynamics program will be organized by hard core youth and supervised by the Vine City Foundation staff. Four hard core youth will be hired to work in this project. The WAOK Ra dio Station will conduct street dances, record hops for youth during the suP..10.er months. Ten youth will be hired as Disc Jockeys to conduct their prograr.ts. WJ.'..OK will conduct its program in the target a rea s of EOA. The Wesley Community Center and Bethlehem Center will c onduct a n expanded summer recreational program. Trips, outings, crafts, camping , and gar:ies indoor and outdoors are sane features of the prograra . main feature of this project is snall group participa nts. will be recruited fr or.i the EO/\. tar get areas of ,'\.tlant a . The The youth The program will a lso be operated in an EOn tar get area. Corm:1Unity Chest L'..gencies (Re gular Surrnner Programs) Most of the Cor.ununity Che st Agencies and other group service a ge ncies will conduct on-goi ng progr ams during t he sufJille r. Such progr ams wi ll be ava il- able to childr e n and youth through out the metropolitan a rea . The a ctivities of t he sa pr ogr ar.ts wi ll be generally available t o regular members of such agencie s . In a dd it ion , the se agenc i es have i ndi cat ed t hat t hey wi ll make e ffor t s to expand their regu lar programs and ext end t hem t hrou gh ou t the Summe r Vacation Period. These agencies are l isted a s f ol lows: 1. 2. 3. Campfire Gir ls /\.tlanta Girls Club, Inc. Bethlehem Community Center ~- o Boy Scouts �-335. 6. 7. 8. 9~ 10. 11 . 12 . Bu tler Stree t YMCA Grady Homes Girls Club At lanta Boys Club Gir l Scout s Savannah Stree t Neighborhood House Wesley Hous e Centers Me t r opol itan YMC~ Me t ropolitan YWCA DeKalb County EOli.- RecrGnt i on Depar t men t The DeKalb County EOh and Recrea t ion Depar tment have pool ed their resources in efforts to prov ide additional service s to DeKa lb County ' s You th dur i ng t he surmner months. Sever a l programs are pl anned t o effec t a more comprehensive surmner program . The areas planned for are a s follows : filea Location Supervisors Chamblee Dorav ille Church lot at Peachtree Industrinl Road 1 - $900 plus 3 NYC workers Clarkston The end of Clark Street 1 - $900 plus 3 NYC workers Tucker Peters Road 1 - $900 plus 3 NYC worke rs Washington Park Tobie Grant Park To be prov ided by DeKa lb Recreation Department 3 NYC workers nee ded Redan Rednn Elenentary School 1 - $900 plus 3 NYC workers Lithonia Bruce Stree t Element a ry or Lithonia High School 1 - $900 plus 3 NYC workers Bouldercrest Boulder cre s t Elementary Schoo l 1 - $900 plus 3 NYC workers Mil l er Grove Mi ller Grove Bap tis t Church 1 - $900 pl us 3 NYC workers Stone Mountain Stone Mountai n Par k Stillhous e 1 - $900 pl us 3 NYC workers �-1 The YMCL\ will handle this aren 3 NYC workers needed Oakhurst Lynwood Park Lynwood Park Eler.1entary School 1 - $900 plus 3 NYC workers Oglethorpe f'l.partments 08lethorpe f'l.partments 1 - $900 plus# NYC workers County Linc To be provided by DeKalb Recreation Departraent 3 NYC workers needed DeKalb l1emorial Park 1 - $900 Check with YMCL\ to see if they can operate it $9,900 Total amoun ts needed: ~tlanta Junior Chamber of Commerce L\nother privately spons ored summer program will be the various activitie s of the At lanta Junior Chamber of Commerce. There proGrams will be : Vacation Days, a series of daily r e creational and educational fie l d trips for younger chi l dren from several poverty areas; The Little Street Community Center, a multi-purpose recreation fac ility l ocated in the Sur.merbill neighborhood . Several Metropolitan Public Recreati on de partments wi ll be offering special programs during the summer . These i nc lude College Park, Ea st Poi nt, DeKalb,County , Cl ayton County and Fulton County . Communi ty Schools The L\t l anta c oE1munity schools will offer a ctivities for children, you th , and a dults in each of t he communities listed below : �-35- Elementary Schools High Schools Bethune Bryant Capitol Avenue Coan Middle Cooper Street Gideons Grant Park Jerome Jones M. Agnes Jones Ware Archer Brown Dykes Howard Parks, Jr. Price Smith Special enrichment and recreational activities will be planned according to the interest of the community participants. Some of the activities might include: Archery Ceramics Cooking for Fun Creative Crafts Creative Dramatics Creative Writing Gymnastics Judo Modern Dance Photography Puppetry Quiet Games Sewing Softball Tab le Tennis Tailoring Track and Field Typin::; The enrichment activities will be scheduled for an eight-week period be ginnigg June 9, 1969 and ending A~gust 2, 1969. The recreational activities will begin at the sane time but will be extended until ~UGUSt 23, 1969. The EO~ Recreation Pr ogram is cooperati on with Parks and Recreation Department and the Community Chest will provide widespread distribution of programs activi ties • •mother significant factor of the 1969 Recrea tion pro3ram i s that it will cover the areas of unmet and new needs as identified by the Technical Executive Corrnnittee dur ing the planning process. Morehouse College Morehouse Col le ge wi ll sponsor a Summer Sports Program for dis advantaged youth. This program is funded by the National Collegiate .l\.thletic �-36Association for approximately $35,000. Two hundred fifty youth will participate in this program, most of which will live in close proximity to Morehouse College. The program will provide a hot lunch. It also provides youth with training in the various athletic skills. EOn, Parks and Recreation, The Community Chest and the Youth Coun~il will refer youth to the project. The project will operate four hours a day (9:30 - 1:30) for six weeks. The Youth Opportunity Recreation Program as presently planned shows nruch potential and improvement over 1968. program ever. Hopefully 1969 will have the best �l CAMPING Mr. Frank Player, Jr. - Chairman Mr. Charles Green - Co-Chairman In 1968, only 5% of the inner city poor youth participated in resident campi ng activities. In order to prevent the scarcity of camping opportunities for poor youth from reoccuring in 1969, a Camping Sub-Committee was created in January, 1969 to deal with the problem of resident camping opportunities and cnmperships for poor youth. The camping sub-committee has sent camping questionnaires to all groups which operate resident and/or day camps. The purpose of the question- naire is to find out how agencies utilize their camps and camperships to benefit poor youth. Several of the agencies have indicated that they will provide camping opportunities for poor youth. These are as follows: RESIDENT l\GENCY LOCLi.TIONS Camp Fi re Girls Camp Camp Camp Camp Camp We s l ey House - - -CAMP Toccoa Eluta- Mt. Par an Rd.• Tawasi•Mathis Da iry Farm Cobb- Mt. View Comm. Cen . Wohelo•Mt. Gilead 464 295 Camp Wesley, Fairburn Bethlehem Cent er 275 Bert Adams (Hon. Scout ) Camp Orr 420 Salvation .1rmy Camp Grandview 300 Boys Club Camp Kiwanis 600 Grady Girls Club Friendship Day Camp Herndon Day Camp Carver University Day Camp John Hope Bowen Day Camp Perry Day Camp Grady Metropolitan Boy Scouts -37- ~'i DAY CL\MP 150 80 800 �-38Kirkwood Community Camp Calvin Church's Christian :camp Michael Center YWCA (72 Edgewood) Cc.np High lnnd I-Ii - neighbor 75 1.:-5 7 80 YWC.l\. (599 Tatnall) Phyllis Wheatley & 1\ tlanta Parks Recreation Lake .L\l toorra, Ackw'Orth, Ga. Wilderness-Barton County 1.:-00 350 /'. tlanta Presby. Camp Calvin, Route 2 , Calvin 138 Butler St. YMCA Lake Altoona Eastside Day Camp--22 Butler L,, OO Girl Scouts Girl Scouts (City) Day Camps Girls Club (City) Jaycees Camp Timber Ridge, Mableton Camp Pine Acres-/i.ckworth, Ga. Camp Gazelle Dew-/'.rmuchee, Ga. 200 800 616 Stone Mountain Washington Park Dunwoody Fairburn-Kiwanis Club Lake Spivey Jones Chastain Park Fairwood 2,900 Donnelly /'. venue Grant Park Techwood Project-116 Pine Tri-Cities-Bachelor Camp Wesley 225 Lake L\.ltoona 300 (overnight ) 900 In addition, t he Camp ing Sub-Committee has contacted every service club and civic group in the Metropolitan Area asking them to increase the number of camperships they are providing t o agencies. The Thomas Beverage Company, the local who lesaler for the Schlitz Brewing Company is sponsoring a unique camping-incentice program. will provide 30 youth with Camperships for one week as a beginning. This program �iii EDUC11.TION Dr. Hi lliard Bowen - Chairman Mrs. Mary Sanford - Co-Chairman The major Youth Opportunity Program educational activities will be operated by the various school systems. Objectives: 1. To provide needed remedial and tutorial programs for youth; 2. To provide vocational information and educational activities needed by youth to enter the labor force; 3. To allow creative and innovative educational programs not possibl~ during the winter months; 4. To offer programs and courses not genera lly available to poor youth during the regular school year. Special Goals: 1. To provide surmner remedial programs for 2,000 students; 2. To provide vocational, technical and occupationa l information for 2,000 students; 3. To provide tutoria l services for 1 , 400 students; 4. To provide enri chment and advance programs for 1,000 s tudents; S. To launch an inte nsive back- to-school campaign to ge t 2, 000 s tudent s to retur n to s chool . The Atla nta School System h~s a lready i ndica ted that it will c oncentrate only on e ducationa l a cti v i t ie s i n the summe r 1969. In addition, the Atlanta Schoo l System has indicated t hat one experiment a l pr ograms will be undertaken this sunnner, which wi l l uti l ize students in curriculum planning activities. In addition to obtaining the above c ommitment, the educational subcommittee has also contacted parochial and private schools. The committee was informed by such schools that they will not be operating any summer programs, but they might let agencies utilize their facilities for special educational activities. -39- �-40Atlanta Public Schools 'nle Atlanta Public School System has indicated that there will not be tuition charge for students attending regular elementary summer school or the fourth quarter sessions of high school. Summer school programs will be offered at the following elementary schools: Area I .i\rea IV Bethune Carter Couch English ./\venue Hardnett Harris Herndon M.A. Jones Lee-Rusk Luckie Ware !inderson Park Grove Park Kimberly Peyton Forrest Towns Venetian Hills Walter White Williams Area II .i\rea V Gideons Gilbert Guice Harper Perkerson Sloter Capitol Avenue Coan Cooper East Lake Hubert Milton Avenue Pryor Reynolds Slaton D. H. Stant on Toomer Wesley Grant Park Primary Area III Fi nch Goldsmith Hil l John Hope Jacks on Morni ng side Pitts Rivers Whittaker EMR programs will be offered at those schools designated by an asterisk .. �In addition to summer school, Head Start programs will also be offered. These programs will be offered in the following schools: t..rea I Lee-Ruck Luckie Ware Bethune Ca rter English Avenue Primary Hardnett l1.rea II Harper Slater Dobbs Gideons Gilbert Area III John Hope Pitts Goldsmith Hill .£\rea IV Mayson Williams Anderson Park Carey Grove Park .£\rea Capitol i\venue Cook Cooper Grant Pa rk Primary V Pryor Slaton Toomer Wesley �-42SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES A number of special programs in addition to the regular summer programs will be offered at schools throughout the city. Students interested in these programs but who attend other schools may enroll .as space permits. J\.rea I Bethune Carter English l\.venue Hardnett Harris Herndon M.A. Jones Lee-Rusk Ware Band, 1\rt, and Choral Music Spanish, Typing, and Band Band, Typing, Sewing, and Woodshop Choral Music Music and Art Art, Band, and Typing E.I.P. Projects l\.rt, Music, Speech E. I. P. Projects Area II Gideons Gilbert Guice Harper Perkerson Slater Art, Instrumental Music, Physical Education,Typing Art, Physical Education, Vocal Music 1\rt, Physical Education, Vocal Instrument Music !\.rt, Typing, Physical Education, Vocal Instrumental Music Art, Typing, Vocal and Instrumental Music J\.rt, Physical Education, Vocal and Instrumental Music, Typing ,\rea III Finch Goldsraith Hill John Hope Jackson Morningside Pitts Rivers Vocal Music, Typing Vocal Music Typing, Vocal Music Drama, Vocal Music Dancing Class, Vocal Music Typing, Vocal Music Vocal Music J\.r t, Drama, Speech Therapy, Vocal Music �-43SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES (CONTINUED) Area IV Instrumental Music ••• Individual, small ensemble, and group instrument will be offered for band and string instrumentalists. Classes will be for beginning, intermediate, and advanced students. <' Anderson Park Cascade Continental Colony Kimberly Towns Instrumental Music Instrumental Music Band Creative i\rts, Instrumental Music Creative i\rts, Instrumental Music Area V i\rts and Crafts, Instrumental and Vocal Music, and Speech Therapy will be offered in all sunnner schools in this area. Coan Middle School will offer: Guitar Home Economics Indus trial 1\rts a course that involves music and mathematics (5-8 grades) (5-8 grades) A special course in model cars tha t includes experiences in language arts and 1Tlll.thematics. Pryor Street will offer: Ceramics Home Economics (Sewing, Cooking a nd Home Decoration) Dramatics Public Speaking Typing �-44HIGH SCHOOLS All high schools will operate the fourth quarter schedule beginning June 4, 1969 and ending August 15, 1969. Special Opportunities Listed below arc courses other than regula r quarter offerings which will be available a t specified high schools. Students in any school may rP Bi Bter for these cours es. Arts and Cra fts •• • Dougl a ss Hi gh School of fe r s Arts and Crafts for students adults. 5 quarter hours AviaUon,,.Primarily a fl i ght training program taking advantage . of the best flying s eas on wi th re lated ground school. The beginni ng stude nt will have a n opportuni ty to get in a s much flyi ng a s poss i ble while star ting the regular erounc school. The adva nced s t udent may continue worki ng toward Pilot Cert i fic a t e requirements . Cost of flying : $11.00 per hour , Cessna 150 , Link tra iner time may be avai l ab le at a reasonable cost of $5.00 per hour . For a dd iti ona l i nformation call Mrs . Ge orgia Kingdom a t 755-2231. Grady ~ Price - Washington 15 quar t e r hours Computer Progr am (APL) .•• A course in basic Computer Techni ques will be offered a t Washi ngt on High School . 5 quar ter hours Cla ss Piano .• • nn opp ortunity to study the piano a nd to l ear n to pla y s i mple nrusic will be offered a t Smi th Hi gh School. 5 quarte r hours Dance • •• Mode r n Dancing wil l be a par t of t he 4th quar t er a ct i vities a t Washi ngton High School . 5 quarte r h ours Drive r and Traffic Safety Educat ion, • • Driver a nd Traff ic Sa fe ty Education consists of two closely articulated phases: (1) Classroom instruction ( Driver Education 301 ) in driver and traffic safety education cohsists of t hirty hours of instruction dealing with driver, the vehicle, the roads, other users of the roadway, traffic laws, insurance, and defensive driving . (2) Practice driving (Driver Education 302) refers to six hours of incar instruction in the skills necessary f or safe driving. �-45Driver and Traffic Safety Educat::.on (continued) . •. Practice driving for those pupils who have corapleted the classroom work will be available a t all of the high schools ope rating the 4 t h quarter , providing enrollment is sufficient to warrant the course " Student&, not t a king other subjects, may reque s t to be s cheduled fo:i: either t he first f ive weeks or the last five weeks of t h e L'.-t'h qu a rter. S tud e.nt taking other ;: ,;.b j e ~ts will be scheduled to d1:ive at reg~l m·: inter vah, during the 10 -,week period . The complete program, con:3 i s ting of the clas s r oom phase a nd practice r~r i:uj_ng, will be offered cit p:zk~ and £2..uB_lass_. Engl:i.sh as a Second Lc1.n gun8e •. • Thj_s c O!Jrse wi ll be of ferecl on the high school level for no c re~i t t o t Los e s tuclentn of :forc=>i.gn b ackgr ound tvho are I1aving d i f ficult y 5.n t:1.0:t :.· c l.ao oeG becau se: of a de f:i. c i er:..::y i n English. QE~dY..non credit. Health Occ.upationnl __':[rain:be -~ -~fl.!,.• , 'ilii& c ou:::-se wi ll b e offere d .:1t Douglass High School. Thie wi U :i.ncl1.1ce (a) Work S tL:: 1c1.·.: cn iu t h~s e , '.l!'.'t; ['.r". u t iliz~.nc the f i:. :_; h :-F ~1.: n.n t:.:. 5. Assignme nt of a coor dina t or t o cooperate fully wi th Ci ty Services Coor dina tors in a nsweri;:ig compla ints and grievance s that come under the jurisdi ction of the Fire De partme nt �-82PUBLICITY Mr. Zenas ~eo..ro - Chairman Liller, Neal, Battle and Lindsey, Public Relations firm has agreed a3ain this year to serve as publicity consultant for the Youth Opportunity Pro3ram. The plan is as follows: 1. To secure a part-time public relations intern be13innin3 May 4, who will become full-time July 10, 1969. Under the close supervision of Liller, Neal, Battle and Lindsey, the intern will operate a Mock Public Relations L'\cency to provide service for participating acencies in the YOP. The intern 1 s initial activities in the YOP will include: developing a brochure, contacting the News Media, developing materials for Nl\B, YOP, and Rent-A-Kid programs, setting up an effective referral and information system
  • Tags: Box 2, Box 2 Folder 25, Folder topic: Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 2, Folder 25, Document 9

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_002_025_009.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 2, Folder 25, Document 9
  • Text: CONGRESS ATLANTA (An Affiliate of the Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council) MICHAEL R. HOLLIS President PAMELA WILLIAMS Vice President MERI CURTIN, Corresponding Secretary AL THEA TURK, Recording Secretary WILLIAM TOLIVER, Treasurer GREGORY McKINNEY, Parliamentarian BARBARA HARRIS, Reporter 68 MITCHELL STREET, 1201-B ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 522-4463, EXT. 437 NEWS RELEASE ATTENTION YOUTH!!! The Atlanta Youth Congress will hold its second General Assembly meeting, Tuesday, March 25, 1969, City Hall, Committee Room 2, at 4:15 p.m. All members and interested youth are urged to at t end. If your club or organization is not represented i n the Youth Congress, please have a representative come to the meeting on March 25. Remember, THE FUTURE OF ATLANTA DEPENDS ON YOU Michael - Hollis, President Youth Congress 11 TO SEEK A NEW.ER WORLD" �
  • Tags: Box 2, Box 2 Folder 25, Folder topic: Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 2, Folder 25, Document 2

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_002_025_002.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 2, Folder 25, Document 2
  • Text: LILLER NEAL BATTLE & LINDSEY ~7a,nd!7)~~ ATLANTA RICHMOND TAMPA NEW YORK INC �
  • Tags: Box 2, Box 2 Folder 25, Folder topic: Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 2, Folder 25, Document 4

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_002_025_004.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 2, Folder 25, Document 4
  • Text: I ( - C O~NT MAKE YOUR SUMMER �
  • Tags: Box 2, Box 2 Folder 25, Folder topic: Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 2, Folder 25, Complete Folder

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_002_025.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 2, Folder 25, Complete Folder
  • Text: Metropolitan Atlanta Youth Opportunity Program SUMMER 1969 AN INVENTORY OF CHILDREN AND YOUTH ACTIVITIES IN SOUTHWEST ATLANTA Compiled By The Metro-Atlanta Youth Opportunity Council \ MAYO.R IVAN ALLEN, JR. Honorary Chairman CLARENCE E. ELSAS General Chairman MRS. CARRIE 8. WRIGHT . Vice General Chairman JOHN COX ' Executive Secre.tary For Further Information Call- 522-4463, Ext. 437 Printed By Atlantcs Puhllc Schools Atlanta Area Techn/c11I School li>epartment of Graphic Arts �YOtmt OPPORTUNITIES PROGRAM GENERAL INFORMATION I. II. General information concerning Youth Opportunity Program in recreation and educa tion--please call: A. Youth Opportunity Center 522 W. Peachtree St., N.W. 875-0971 B. Youth Council 68 Mitchell Street 522-4463, ext. 437 C. E.O.A. 101 Marietta St., N.W. 52S-4262 D. C011111Unity Council 120 Marietta St., N.W. . S77-2250 E. City Parks 260 Central Ave., S.W. 522-4463 F. Conaunity Chest 167 Walton St., N.W. 525-3487 B. full-time youth (16-21) Youth Opportunity Center 522 W. Peachtree St., N.W. C. ( 875-0971) part-time (Rent-A-Kid office nearest you) 1. Bedford Pine 547 Hunt St., N.E. 523-5431 2. Grant Park 645 Grant St., S.E. 688-0871 3. West End 1040 Fair St., S.W. 758-8326 4. Forest Park 4871 College St. Forest Park, Ga. 366-0516 5. Conyers 929 Conmercial St. Conyers, Ga. 483-9512 6. Techwood 840 Marietta St., N.W. 873-6759 7. Northwest Perry 1927 Hollywood Rd., N.W. 799-9322 8. Dixie Hills 2193 Verbena St ,,, N.W. 799-0331 9. Kirkwood 1723 Blvd. Dr., S.E. 378-3643 Headquarters 136 Marietta St., N.W. 10. Atlanta Urban Corps (C~Jlege Students Only) 30 Courtland Street, N.E. (524-8091 1. IV. Recreation EMPLOYMENT: A. III . & Public Employment: a. City of Atlanta ·Personnel Department 522-4463, ext. 267 b. Fulton County Personnel Department 572-2383 c. DeKalb County Personnel Department 371-2331 EDUCATION: 224 Central Ave. 761-5411 A. Atlanta Public Schools B. DeKalb County Bd. of Education 443-2311 C. Fulton County Bd. of Educatic,n 572-2161 RECREATION: A. Atlanta Parks & Recreation Dept. 260 Central Ave. B. E.O.A. 101 Marietta St ~ 525-4262 C. Coumunity Chest 167 Walton St. 52S-3487 D. Deltalb Recreation & E.O.A. 522-4463, at . 31.1 284-2288 -1- �E. V. Call Clty Recreation Dept. in your ar~# CHURCH PROGRAMS (Bible schools, retreat,, etc.) A. Atlanta Christi.an CoUneil B, Yotir c:lenOPd.natioiial bcxiy 524-1167 1, Methodist J:V. VIL 522-9065 2, 'Presbyterian 3, Baptist 525-7796 4. Catholic 523-4614 5. EpiscopaU.a• 261-2796 6. Christian 261-4132 'PER.5-0NAL SOCiAL }'R.OBLE?,f.S A~ Youth Council 522-4463, ext. 437 B4 Communtty Rel4tions CoJr,u4~~ion 522-4463, ext. 433 C.. Community Chest 525-3487 DA Crime Prevent ion Bureau 522-7363 E .. O.A.--For -additional information concerning recreationa, educational, and emplo~ent opportunities, contact your local Neighborhoo.d Service Center: NOIE: 1. West End N,S.C. 727 Lawton St. 753-6101 2. Nash-Washington N.s.c. 247 Ashby St. 524-2084 3. Price N . S • C. 1127 Capitol Ave. 522-2792 4. So. Fulton N~S.C. 2735 E. Point St. East Point, Ga. 767-7541 5. Central City N.S.C. 840 Marietta St. 873-6759 6. Northwest Perry & Bowen Homes , N1. s.c. 1927 Hollywood Rd. 799-9322 7. East Central N.s.c. 486 Decatur St. 577-1735 8. Summerhill-Mechanicsville N.s.c. 65 Georgia Ave. 577-1351 9. Gwinnett Connty Office 147 Clayton St. Lawrenceville, Ga. 963-1808 10. Rockdal e- Conyers Office City Hall Conyers, Ga. 483-9512 11. Edgewood N.s.c. 1723 Blvd. Dr. 378-3696 12. North Fulton N.s.c. 27 Oak St. Roswell, Ga. 993-3795 13. Pittsburgh N.s.c. 933\ McDaniel St. 523-1577 14. West Central N.s.c. 2193 Verbena St. 799-0331 Youth are urged and should feel free to take the initiative to make initial contacts with businesses for a job. CIT'l OF ATLANTA --- Fire Dept. 'lbe fire Department will conduct upon request fire prevention programs and activities. 'Jhese include : talks, demonstrations, film, literature, visitt: to local fire stations and street showers. Through the Parks Dept • . Call: 523-6952 -2- �OPPORTUNITIES FOR LEARNim ATI.ANTA PUBLIC SCHOOLS IN SotmlWEST ARFA HIGH SCHOOLS Atlanta for the first time, is offering its fourth quarter program for all hiRh schools, from June 4th - August 15th. A regular schedule of courses will be offered plus make-up work. In addition, special opportunities will be offered at several ochools. Washington High -- 758-8871 Special programs are: Aviation, computer programming, dance, russian and advisor vocational programs in food, shop, welding, auto mechanics, mechanical drawing, drafting, architecture, engine repair, auto ~~dy repair and painting. ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS Hardnett Harris M. A. Jones Lee-Rusk Kimberly Peyton Forest Venetian Hills Capitol Ave. Gideon Gilbert Derkerson Slater Cooper Pryor Elementary school p,rogracs will emphasize improving skills in language and arithmetic; eru::ichment and special programs include arts and crafts, instrumental and vocal music, speech therapy, dramatics, physical education, typing, m,m., dancing. Fror.:i. June 17-July 25. 8:30 - 11:30 - Monday - Friday CCM1UNITY SCHOOLS Comta11nity schools will offer special activities for children, youth or adults in the COI:lillUnity. Enrichment and recreational activities will include ceramics, cooking, dramatics, creative writing, judo. gymnastics, sewing and typing. The coomunity schools in your area are: Bryant, Capitol Ave., Cooper St. Gideon, M.A. Jones, Brown, Parks Jr. High. Enrichment activities will begin June 9 and will operate through Aug. 2. Recreation activities will also begin June 9 but will extend through Aug. 23. HEADSTART If your child h3s never been to school, and will be attending for the first time in September, check with your neighborhood service center (EO\) to see if he is eligible. If your child is eligible the following schools will operate Headstart programs: Hardnett Gideon Gilbert Lee-Rusk Capitol Ave. Cooper Pryor ATLANrA PUBLIC LIBRARY Adair Park Atlanta University West End (EM) Fulton County Schools Fulton County Board of Education will be operating regular summer terms at High Schoo ls and Elementary Schodls including Pre-School in the following locations: High Schools Elementary 4-7 Milton High North Springs Russell High College Park Campbell Roswell Guy Webb Harris St. North Ave. M. P. Word Avery Quillian - 1- Pre-School & Remedial Reading Dodd Roswel 1 Cedar Grove Central Park Beavers College St. East Point Fairburn Palmetto �OPPORTUNITIES FOR RECREATION Supervised recreation programs, 1nstruction, and athletic leagues are available at the following locations th1oughout the summer for all ages. Activities include swinming, tennis, softball, baseball, basketball, track, volleyball, gymnastics, art and crafts and many, many more. CITY OF ATIANTA. PARRS AND RECREATION DEPT. Perks, Recreation Centers, Playgrounds and Playlots. Howell Park Mary Coleman Dodd Ave. 941 McDaniel Ira Mozley Park Adams Pryor West End Park Adamsville Richardson St. Center Perkerson Benthill Walker Park Adair West Manor Washington-Ryder Windsor-Richardson J. A. White ( Swimning) ( Swimning ) J oyland (Swimming) Wilson Ave. Pittman ( Swimming ) .Oakland City ( Swimning ) PARK~ D&ARTMENT RECREA~ION. ACTIVITIES OPERATED IN SCHOOLS Schools Daily Hours ,.m. - Saturday -»~oo Harnett Elem 4:00 Gilbert Elem 4:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. 9:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. 12:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. 12:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. 4:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. 1:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. Pryor Elem. Washington High 9:00 p.m. p.m. • 6:00 p.m ,COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES Morehouse College -- 223 Chestnut - W. Fair They will operate a comprehensive s,~r recreation program in cooperation with YOP and Comnunity Chest agencies and E~ in NSC in the area. It will consist of sports education and instructional programs. Boys (12-14 years): Basketball, softball, swinaing, track and field eventa. Girls (12-14 years): Swi11111ing, gym, tennis, etc. Dates: June 15-July 25. Ages for both groups--12-14. SPECIAL StHIER RECREATION (EOI\ Expansion Program) For youth of all ages from EOA. target area. crafts, tours, dancing, Youth Council. Program will include sports, arts and Neighborhood Service Center (EM) Pittsburg NSC (EOA.) 993\ McDanile St., ~.E. -- 523-1577 Price NSC (EOt\) 1127 Capitol Ave., s.w., -- S22-5792 Program will include: sports, boxing, bowling, swinming, trips, arts and craits, drama, dancing, camping, baseball, clinics. South Fulton NSC (EOA.) 2735 East Point St. -- 767-7541 Programs will 'include: sporte, .!lt:ts and crafts, drama, trips and tours. West End NSC (EM) 727 Lawton St. S.W~ -- 7S3-~101 Program will include: aporcc~ -.,laylot activity, arts and crafts, field trips, record hops. -2- �Northwest Ga . Girl Scout Council - 40 16th St. - 876-0734 Day camp for girls Resident Camp for girls Activities will include sports , :citizenship, scouting, arts , cooking, housekeeping, money management, nature and natural science. YWCA - At lanta - 72 Edgewood Ave., N.E. 524-3416 Activit ies include employment counseling, grooming, work training, day camp, drama, sewing and group discussion. REGUIAR SUMMER PROORAM Atlanta Girl s Club 1191 Donneliy Ave., s.w. 758-1467 Call about program in your area Girls 6-18 (fee) Grady Homes Girls Club Centers: Carven Conm. Branch, 73 Meldon Ave.,# 539Cooper St. and John Hope Homes, 527 Roach St. s.w. Activities include: arts and crafts, homemaking, swim:ning, dancing, Gi~ls 6-18 (fee) Bot Scouts - 167 Walton St. N.W. - 523-7805 Ca 1 for scouting activities in -your community (fee) Butler Street YMCA - 524-0246 22 But l er St., N.~. Activit i es: Resident and Day Camp Swiuming, arts and crafts, movies, karate, softball, basketball, worship, table games, music, educational trips. Ph~l l is Wheatley Braach YWCA 59 Tatnall s.w. Activities: Arts, crafts, games, basketball, trips, etc. Atlanta Girls Club 1191 Donnelly Ave., 758-1467 s.w. Emmons House. S.W. 1017 Capitol Ave. Act ivities: field trips, dancing, singing, swimmins, reading program, drama, art, 3rd through 7th grades. June 23 - Aug. 8. 525-5948 Bethlehem Com:nunity Center Activities: general playground activities - active and quiet games, athletic games, tutori ng, arts, music, drama. Ages 3 years t o 21 years. Mid June - Mid August. 622-0912 Lucille Ave. Baptist Center Activities: teen clubs, recreation, folk singing, spiritual movies, tutoring. 755- 1389 Oakhurst FroJect Act ivities: general playground activities, tutorial proeram, remedial reading, pr~• school activities, arts, crafts, music. Ages 5-18 378- 3677 Wesley Community Center (Rebecca St. Center) 342 Richardson St. s.w. 688- 1482 (fee) camp Fire Girls, 525-7636 167 Walton St., N.W. Program for Girls 7-18 (fee) Butler Street YMCA 524-0246 22 Sutler St. Program for boys and girls 6 and above (fee) -4- �C,!OUNCE THAT urnrn f\Jt-0$ A.RE EEING "IAOE AVt1-!LAH£ HY TI-lE Df.P.l.R.1¥.ft..lT$ Cr' TRA"'1SPO¼'HATIOI', .f..ND ~iO-lJS.IMl ,U,[) VT< [!AN Dfi\!tlOW.ENi' 10 'HELP C nre:s fxf'AND TP.ANSPCRTA TION r tr-.: 1, SUPf>ORT fF YOU"fH ~CG.RA!"!S OP(RATE ON A THC PROORA"', wru.. PERCENT LOC~l 1-rATCH!NG THI$ $U-ffi\:ER. PERCENT ff.OtllAL TC 25 B SIS A."iG 'iill E£ OPtRATEC JOlNTU BY Tl-!( N.41.TlOP-IAl LEAGUE or ctn.Es llND u .. s. CONf'tREI-CE: og.- MA'fOAS. YOUR YOU'TH COORClNATOR 'i il l.. $H(>l'nL'f Rf CEi.V€ DE TAltf.:D INF"O" MATT.CN fl-"ROK TH£ P fH)G~i',l"i ADl'l1NISTRAT~q ~, o>ili' 1270 ( 1- 5 1 ) t;.: ~ e 1. Q t}, . ,!. _ __~e~J:. JL.-- _ __ 1- .l. �~ Liller Neal Battle & Lindsey, Inc. Atlaota Richmood Tampa New Yock I' YOUTH OPPORTUNITY COUNCIL Review of Public Service Material Available May 29, 1969 �~ Liller Neal Battle & Lindsey, Inc. Atlaota R;chmood Tampa NewYo,k YOUTH OPPORTUNITY CDUNCIL Review of Public Service Material Available THEME The theme for the 1969 campaign is "Make Your Summer Count." This has been adapted in a number of ways for use in print and broadcast materials, as outlined below, TELEVISION Three television spots have been filmed featuring the Atlanta Braves' Sonny Jackson. Ba s ic copy approach i s to impress upon Atlanta youth the fact that ther e ar e a multi tude of activiti e s avail abl e . We anticipate featuring a telephone number in each spot, giving the hours when the number can be reach ed ; in an effort to encourage kid s t o get infor mat i on immediate ly. The 1O-second spot will feature Sonnr Jackson, the tel ephone number , and the "Make Your Summer Count" logo. We will also prepare a 2O-second spot wi th the same basic elements. We are hopeful of preparing a 3O-second television spot which will also fea t ure news6l ips of some of the activi t ies t aking pl ace l ast year in co njunction with Sonny Jackson. �• ~ Liller Neal Battle & Lindsey, Inc. Atlaota Richmood Tampa New Yo,k - 2 - ' Station I.D.'s will be made available to each of the four Atlanta tele~ision stations. While no definite commitment can be made by any of the stations as to the use of tHe I.D.'s or the television spots, Liller Neal Battle & Lindsey will be contacting station representatives to outline the program and elicit whatever commitment can be made by the stations. Liller Neal Battle & Lindsey will also be following up with stations in this area. RADIO A musical jingle has been prepared for use by Atlanta area radio -stations. The basis of these radio spots is the theme set to music with a 45-second music-under segment. Information from various agencies will be funneled into John Cox's office, well in advance, and this will be condensed and sent to cooperating radio stations at · least one week in advance of all activities. The stations will then promote these various activities in conjunction with the musical jingle •. These will be rotated through their schedules, and hopefully, a majority of the activities will be promoted on the air each week. There is also a shorter version of this musical jingle which will be used in the same manner. A very brief "radio I.D. will also be supplied to the stations which will simply be the theme itself, At the outset of the radio campaign, Liller Neal Battle & will also be contacting radio stations to outline the program. Lindsey �~ Liller Neal Battle & Lindsey, Inc. '"'" R;chmoad Tampa New Yock - 3 - Copy will be supplied to radio stations by Liller Neal Battle & Lindsey to be used in conjunction with the theme and the announcements at the outset of the program. This will be done in an effort to apprise listeners of the. programmed announcements throughout the summer, indicating to them that the theme and the music mean now is the time to listen for upcoming activities. It is extremely important that all agencies cooperate in this effort by channeling information into John Cox's office well ahead of time. Stations are deluged with requests to promote activities (for example, WSB-TV actually promoted well over 350 different public service organizations in the last year). The agency will be promoting the fact to individual radio and television stations that this weekly run-down from John Cox's office will cover a majority of activities taking place throughout the summer. There is no question but that each of the various agencies involved can benefit tremendously from this overall effort. NEWSPAPER We are now preparing recommended public service newspaper ads for various publications in the metro Atlanta area. This will be basically broken down into two communications objectives. The first will be to reach the parents of children who can participate in the many programs and the children themselves. Secondly, there will be messages directed to the entire community indicating that Atlanta does care, there are a multitude of programs going on during the summer, and that there are many ways that the average citizen can cooperate in making the programs an even bigger success. �- r- ~ Liller Neal Battle & Lindsey, Inc. Atlanta Richmond Tampa New York - 4 - All print advertising will carry the "Make Your Summer Count" logo, and these logos are now available to the various agencies participating in the program for use in their own materials. �NOW NEWSFROM VI C E PRESJDEMT SPIRO T . AGMEW, CHAIRMAM VOL. II, NO. 40 ON YOUTH OPPORTUNI 801 • 19th STREET, H.W., WASHIHGTOM, D.C. Tel : 202/382-1534 DECEMBER 12, 1969 36 VO LUNT ARY AGENCIES IN CLEVELAND PROVIDE J O BS FOR DISADVANT A GED YOU T H For the s econd consecut i ve y e ar, member voluntary a g encies of Cleve land' s Welfar e F e deration participate d durin g 19 6 9 in a summer jobs pro g ram for n e arly 500 disadvantag ed youth. The 36 participating a gencies pro v id e d w ork s tation s and super v 1s 10n for youth w ho w ork e d as day and m u si c cam p aid es , phys ical therapy assistants, and outreach workers. One hundr e d a nd thirty - e ig ht of the j obs we re financ e d directly fro m a ge ncy bud get s, an inc r e as e o f n early 100 per c e nt fro m 196 8. The program was c oor dinate d b y C l eveland I s Manpower P lanning and D e velopm ent Commi s sion . Additional information is available fr o m the We lfare Federation, 1001 H u ron Road, Cl e v e land , Ohio, 44115. 3 1 DE TR O IT HIG H SCHOO L ST UDE N TS PROVIDED P U BLIC RELATIO NS T RAININ G Thirt y- a n e D etr o it high s c h ool stu d ents parti c ipate d this s pr ing m a four- week tr a ini n g pr o gr a m in public re 1 a t ions. H eld at Way ne St a te University, the project was designe d to trai n youth for s u mmer jobs as c ommunication aides at 17 n e ighbo r hood centers. Students received instruction in n e ws release writing, interviewing, poster and handbill design, and l ettering. To suppl ement classr o om ses sions, field trip s were made to anew spa per, radio and television s tations, an advertising firm, and a printing company. Professional public relations p ersons w orke d w ith e ach student m an advi sory capacity dur ing the training program and made periodic vis its to the job sites dur ing the summer. The project was funded by the D e troit Pub 1 i c Schools In -School Neighborhood Youth Project and United Community Services. C ITY BRIEFS -- Alfred Collins, a second-year participant in a photographic workshop sponsored by the Chicago Co mm i tt e e on Urban Opportunity in conjunction with t h e President 's Council on Youth Opportunity, recent 1 y received an award for being one of the winner s in a national photography contest. -- A group of inner-city students in Washington, D.C., has organized a 11 Teen Corps 11 which will sponsor employment clinics to help youth learn how to obtain and hold a j ob. �-2POST OFFICE I BIG BROTHER I PROJECT CUTS JOB DROPOUT RATE A "big brother" program to help young employees in the summer jobs program of the U.S. Post Office Department cut the job dropout rate from more than 20 per cent in 1968 to less than 10 per cent nation w ide this past summer. More than 1, 800 fu 11-t i me employees volunteered to act as co u n s e 1 ors to the approximately 7,900 disadvantaged youth hired this summer, a ratio of almost one to five. In Washington, 53 v o 1 un teer s worked with 253 youth and k ept all but nine on the job from June to September - - a loss of about 3 . 5 per cent. Encouraged to solicit potential s ummer employees from dis advantaged communities, volunteers helped youth through the ce r tification process and arranged for adv ance vouchers for those youth who ne e ded money for car fa r e, lunches , and clothes for work . Counselors also organized a ft e r - work activities and helped youth deal w ith personal difficulties as necessary. The Post Office r e laxe d work pressures upon counselor s so they could spend more time w ith the four or five youth working along side them . JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL YOUTH AIDED BY DES MOINES 'NEW HORIZON' PROGRAM A w o rk pr o gr am d e si g ned to encour age 14 and 15- year-o ld youth to remain in scho ol ha s been developed in Des Moines b y C ommun i ty Improve ment, In c. , in c ooperat io n w it h the public s c hool s . The "New Horiz o n s" w o rk-stu dy program b egan as a thre e -year demonstration pr oj ect with y o uth enro lle d from the seventh thr ough the n i nth gr ade in two targ et area junio r h igh s chools. The p r o gram now operates int hr e e hig h s c ho o ls and serve s m o re t h a n 40 0 youth . Students enro lled i n 11 N ew Hori z ons II a ttend s chool in the morni n gs and hold part-time job s i n the a fternoon for up to t h ree hours a day. Northwestern B ell T elephone, Equitable L ife Insurance Company, and several city offi c es provide work sites , supervision, and s alar ies f or the youth. 51 STUDENTS ENR O L L ED IN MINNEA P OLIS URBAN CORPS Du r in g the summer of 19 69, 51 student inte rns re p rese nting 23 co 11 e g e s a nd univers iti es in nine states, participated in the Minneapo l is Urban Corps program . Students performed a variety of tasks during the summer including writing technical articles for the Wate r Works Departme n t, researching robbery t re nds fo r the Poli ce "D e pa r tme nt, an d surve ying all Minneapolis b o a r d in g homes in an e ffo r t to he 1 p rev ise ordinances governing t h em. In addition to the ir regula r dut i es, students als o attended a weekly "Sympo sium on Urban Affa irs II w hich focused on critic al urban problems. A report on the Minneapolis project, including an e v a 1 u at ion by interns and city pe r son n e 1, is av a i 1 ab 1 e from Michael B . Goldstein, Director, Urban Corps National Development Office, 250 Broadway, New York, New York, 10007. �- 3C A R E ER DEVELO PME N T A W ARDS ENCOURA GE VO C A T IONAL TRAINING An educat i o n a l a s s is tanc e pro g r am to encourage and help stud e nts wit h inte r ests and t a lents in n on - academic fields is e nterin g it s second ye a r in Princet o n , N. J . The Career D e ve l opmen t Aw ards Pro g ram (CDA) is designed to p r o v ide s chola r s hips for ta lente d yout h w ho r e qu i r e fin an c ial a s sistance fo r furt h er voca t io n a 1 tr ainin g. It is al s o conc e rn e d w ith t h e stud e nt who pl ans t o a t t en d co llege a nd has t h e r e source s to do so , b ut whose ca re e r g oa l s might best be served by t e chnical-vocational t ra i n ing after s e c ondary school. L a un c he d b y a n ad v isory c o mmitt ee fr o m the P r inc e ton ar e a ; the progr a m i s s p o ns or ed b y t h e Educat i on a 1 Testing S ervi c e, a n d is privately finan c ed through l ocal fund - r ais in g. Student s inter e ste d in the a w ard s program w e re r equ ir e d to submit application s a nd b e inte rv ie we d by an eig h t - membe r se l e ction committee made up of l o cal b us in e s s people . During the first ye a r of t h e pr oj e c t, 15 · s t u d ent s receive d the career awards and their plans r a nged from tw o - y e ar s e c r etaria l course s to a six-month computer programming cou r s e . Additional information on the Career D evelopm ent Awards P ro gram is available from the Education al Tes ting Servic e , Princeto n, N. J., 08540. TITLE ONE TASK FORCE LAUNCHED BY U.S. OFFICE OF EDUCATION A 15-member intradepartmental task force to l ook into the operations of Title I of the Elementary and Se cond a ry Educati on Act ha s been named by Dr . Jame s E. Allen, Jr. , Commissioner of Edu c ation in the U.S . Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. Among the i ssues the task force will examine a re in ternal management of Title I in the U.S. Office of Education, criter i a and guidelines, technical assistance and evaluation, and T itle I relationship s with other U .S. Offic e of Education programs and how they can work together to serve disadvantaged children . T it 1 e I, ESEA, is the largest Fed er al aid-to-education program. _ It is specifically des i g n e d for education a 11 y dis advantaged children. During the last school ye ar, Title I served nearly eight mi 11 ion children in about 16,000 school districts across the Nation. NOW - - AND THEN .... "Strengthening the Neighborhood Youth Corps," a report on a study of spec i a 1 services provided NYC enrollees, is available from the United Neighborhood Houses, 114 East 32nd Street, New York, N . Y., 10016 (75¢). �- -4SUMMER HIGHWAY JOBS FOR GHETTO YOUTH REACH NEW HIGH IN 1969 A 127.4 per cent increase over 1968 in the number of dis advantaged youth hired to work on the Federal-State highway program has been reported for th e 1969 Summer Youth Opportunity Campaign of the Department of Transportation I s Federal Highway Administration. Now in its fourth ye a r, the Federal Highway Administration program is designed to obtain summer employment for youth with both private contractors and State highway d e partments. A total of 44, 596 youth were reported hired across the Nation last summer, a 45 per cent increase over the 30, 57 3 hired in 1968. Of · these, 27,260 were disadvantaged youth. The District of Columbia ranked first in providing jobs to the dis advantaged, hiring 4, 700 youth. Other states int he top five were Illinois, 2,151; Texas, 1,845; Ohio, 1,603; and Kansas, 1,548. In most instances, the youth were hired as laborers. However, a wide range of jobs was provided. Among the developments in the prog ram were: The N e w Mexico State High w a y Commission assi gned youth to materials and testin g jobs, photogrammetry, brid ge design, and spe cial services. In Wyoming, various unions waived initiation fees as inducement to youth who wanted to work in hi ghway construction. ,:, In T e nnessee, disadvantaged youth worked on landscaping and maintaining the trees and shrubs planted alon g the highway . They re ceived training and close supervision in tree - trimming, mulching, planting, fertilizing, and pest control. ,:, New J er sey carried on are c r u it men t campai gn int he g hetto areas of Newa r k and Trenton . For most of the youth re cr uite d , it w as the first job they had ever had. GSA oc 10 . s9e s PRESIDENT 'S COUNCIL ON YOUTH OPPORTUNITY WASHINGTON, D. C. '. 20006 OFF ICIAL BUS l ·N ESS PRINTED MATTER POSTAGE AND PR ES I DE NT' S F EES PAID COUNCIL ON YOUTH OPPORTUNITY D OF F �CONGRESS ATLANTA (An Affiliate of the Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council) MICHAEL R. HOLLIS President PAMELA WILLIAMS Vice President MERI CURTIN, Corresponding Secretary AL THEA TURK, Recording Secretary WILLIAM TOLIVER, Treasurer GREGORY McKINNEY, Parliamentarian BARBARA HARRIS, Reporter 68 MITCHELL STREET, 1201-B ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 522-4463, EXT. 437 NEWS RELEASE ATTENTION YOUTH!!! The Atlanta Youth Congress will hold its second General Assembly meeting, Tuesday, March 25, 1969, City Hall, Committee Room 2, at 4:15 p.m. All members and interested youth are urged to at t end. If your club or organization is not represented i n the Youth Congress, please have a representative come to the meeting on March 25. Remember, THE FUTURE OF ATLANTA DEPENDS ON YOU Michael - Hollis, President Youth Congress 11 TO SEEK A NEW.ER WORLD" �METROPOLIT/'J l i\.TLL\NT/i. YOUTH OPPORTUNITY COUNCIL'S PL~~ FOR THE 1969 YOUTH OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM MR. CLl\RENCE E. ELSAS, GENERll.L CHAIRNL\N MRS. Cf.RR.IE B. WRIGHT, GENERAL CO-CHAIRMi\N �CONTENTS I. II. General Introduction Planning 3 III. Employment 11 IV. Recreation 17 Camping 37 Education 39 Arts 54 Social Services 70 v. VI. VII. VIII. IX. x. Special Events .. 75 Volunteers 77 Transportation 79 XII. Special Programs 80 XIII. Public Relations 82 XI. Summary �GENERAL INTRODUCTION In 1968, The City of Atlanta, Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc., The Community Chest and several other private and public agencies and organizations sponsored a Youth Opportunity Program. More than 65 agencies and •rganizations participated in this program (See Attachment 1). The overall objectives cf the Youth Opportunity Program are to provide needed services to the poor, unemployed, socially retarded, culturally deprived and academically delinquent youth in the Metropolitan Atlanta Area. The majer efforts of the Youth Opportunity Program are aimed at eliminating these conditinns. Through the outstanding efforts and accomplishments of EOA, The City of Atlanta, The FEB, The Community Chest and several other agencies and organizations, the 1968 YOP yie lded the foll owing: 1. 14,990 youth attended sunnner school; 2. 3,000 youth received special remedial aid; 3. 1,400 youth received special tutorial help ; 4. 2,500 youth were contacted and urged to return to school ; 5. 1,500 youth participated in enrichment programs ; 6. 5,000 youth participated in Fine Arts prcgrams and activities ; 7. 525,000 youth par ticipated in Recreational Programs ; 8. 1,100 federa l employees volunteered to hel p in the YOP; 9. 20,000 youth participated in camping activities ; 10. Private businesses donated $237,000 in cash, equipment or services to the YOP. Although the 1968 YOP wa s a general succe ss, some gaps and omissions did oc cur. These were identifie d as follows : �-21. Recreation activities for youth ages 16-21 were virtually non-existent; 2. Ge nerally, no programs operated on week-ends; 3. Several agencies and organizations did not fulfill their employment commitments for poor youth; 4. Coordination and communication between some agencies were generally lacking; 5. The location of programs was widespread. However, areas such :1s Capitol Homes, Blair Village, Hentown, StewartLakewood, Cabbagetown, Mill Village, Knight Park, Adamsville, Mechanicsville, Peopletown, Joyland, Blue Heaven, Bush Mountain and Bass received little or no program input; 6. Resident camping opportunities for poor youth were woefully lacking ; 7. The more attractive and de sirable special eve nts resources were not enough to meet the need; 8. Tr ansportation remained a serious and difficult problem to deal with. The s e we r e the major problems which occurre d during the 1968 YOP. �PL..:\NNING 1969 In December, 1968, Vice President Hubert llumphrey sent a telegram to Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. i :::.r:!ic c. tin:: that federal funds will be provided to the City of Atlanta for YOP Planning. Mayor Allen promptly designated the Youth Council as the agency responsible for coordination of the Metropolitan Youth Opportunity Program. In addition, Mayor /,llen appointed Mr. Clarence Elsas, Chairman of the 1969 Youth Opportunity Program. t,_ chart of the Metropolitan Youth Opportunity Council is attached. The major agencies involved in the 1969 YOP Planning are EOL., The City of Atlanta , The Community Chest, The Feder al Executive Board, The Georgia State Employment Servoce, The Na tional Alliance of Bus i nessmen, The Atlanta f.rt s hlliance, Fulton County Government, DeKa lb County Government, The Community Chest Agencies , WAOK Radio Sta t ion , WSB Radio Station, The Georgia Arts Commiss i on, The DeKalb County He a lth Department, The Chr i stian Council , Li ller, Battle, Nea l and Lindsey, The Chamber of Commer ce, The Junior Chamber of Comr.1erce, The Atlanta Pol i ce Department , Mor ehouse Co llege, The nt l ant a Ur ban League , Emor y University , Atlanta Unive rsi t y , The At lant a Youth Congre ss , The Of f i ce of Government a l Lai son, The Metr opolitan Cornniss i ou on Crime and Delinquency , The At l anta Chi l dren and Youth Service s Couns il. A Technica l Executive Committee was created to assist and direct the overall Youth Opportunity Program Pl anning. Major decisions made by the Technical Executive Committee are as follows: 1. That the Atlanta Pub l ic Schools will concentrate on educational programs, and not be responsible for operating special recreational programs; �-!,..- 2. Tho.t the /1.tlanta Public Schools will make their facilities available to any group wishing to utilize them provided such group assurae full responsibility for custodial and administrative costs; 3. That the Public Schools will indicate in early spring, those schools where summer programs will be located; ~-. That the Parks and Recreation Department will indicate in early spring where surmner programs will be located; 5. That the Parks and Recreation Department will submit a listing of desirable school facilities which they might utilize; 6. That EOf, provide a listing of locations and programs which comm rmmity residents indicate are more desirable; 7. That the Chest agencies provide the Technical Executive Cornmittee with a listinr; of programs which will be operai::ed with summer funds, as well as, a listing of summer prograras and locations which will be operated on their regular budget; 8. That the Georgia State Employment Service be respons i ble for most YOP employment screening, processing and recruitment; 9. That the Georgia State Employment Service locate the Summer Youth Opportunity Center by Harch 15. (136 Marietta Street) Planning fo r the 1969 YOP centers around the implementation of t he above recommendations in addition to regular and ongoing activi ties. In late 1968, EO~ be ga n holding planning meetings i n al l of the ECA neighborhood service centers. At these meetings, residents and youth of the EOn service ar eas made valuable suggestions concerning the types, locations , and hours of operation of summer pro gr ams i n the i r neighborhoods. The suggestions of ne ighbor hood re s i dents provided a va l uab le guide f or YOP planning . These mee t i ngs we r e planne d and implemented by Mr. Duke Harris on, Recreation Coordinator, EO~ . Based on the recommendations abov e, a s wel l as sug8es tions by residents and youth, the Executive Technica l Committee set the following priorities: �-51. Employment a. b. 2. Recreation a. b. 3. c. d, b. b. b. Free passes and admi s sions t o place s of ente rtainment and enrichment for youth of all age s. Volunteers a. b. 9. Couns el ing and thera peutic s ervice s for all youth 13-21 who mi gh t need such Establ ishment of such a s ervice which pre sen tly does no t exist in t he Metropo l itan area . Spe c ial Events a. 8. Re siden t camp i nc exper iences for inner city poor youth of a ll a ges Day camp oppor tunities for inner city youth . Soc ia l Services a. 7. Special programs i n the Fine Arts for inner city poor youth ll~-21 years of a ge Es t abl i shment of a broad based Community /ir ts Pro gram. Camping a. 6. Tutorial and study hel p ? r os raQS Remedial programs i n poverty schools Cultura l e nrichment programs Special enrichment a nd tutorial programs for socially and academically reta rded youth. /ir ts a. 5. Organized athletic activities for inner city youth; Organized activities for older teenagers 16-21 during evening hours. Education a. b. l~. Youth 14-21 years of a8e Poor Youth EnGendering ~o l untccrs to assist operating agencies in areas of need. ~ggressive recruitment of youth vo l un teers. Transportation a. b. Centralize the transporation funds and dispa tching of buses Provide adequate transportation for all program components ~:e ed i nt i t • �~ 1 -6- 10. Public Relations a. b. 11. Widespread distribution of progran locations, operation, requirements, cost, etc. to utilizers of services through the various medin Effective publicizing of program achievements to total com• munity. Urban Corps a. b. Provide meaningful employment for poor college youth, who need money to return to school Provide agencies with an additional personnel resource at low cost. In addition to the suggestions concerning major programming, the Committee suggested that special attention be given to unemployed youth, 16-21; socially and academically retarded youth, 6-18; culturally deprived youth, all ages, and youth leadership and development ages ll~-25. The Technical Executive Committee also a greed that effective program planning depends upon the availability of funds and resources for prograr~aing. In this respect, the Committee agreed t o work toward an early coP.1r1itment of funds for prograrrnning. Such funds i nclude planning funds $45,000, OEO-EOA, $612,000, City of Atlanta $300,000, The Community Chest $15,000. funds have been c orrnnitted . J\.11 of these �-7- / 1"1ETROPOLITf.N COUNCIL ON YOUTH OPPORTUNITY Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. Honorary Chairman DeKalb Cormnissioner, Clark Harrison~ Honorary V. Chainnan Fulton Conunissioner, Walter Mitchell - Honorary V. Chairman Mr. Clarence Elsas, General Chairman Mrs. Carrie B. Wright, General V. Chairman Program SubCommittees - Employment - Mr. Harding B. Young - Recreation Mr. ~ . B. Padgett, Chairman - Camping Mr . Frank Player, Chairman Mr. Charles Green, Chairman - Education Dr. Hilliard Bowen , Chairman Mrs. Mary Sanf ord, Co-Cha irman - nr ts Mrs. Rhodes Perdue , Chairman Mrs . Harold Bar r e t t , Co-Chairman - Soci al Services Mrs . Benj amin Brown, Cha irman - Special Events Mr. Waymon Wright , Chai rman - Volunteers Mrs . Frances Parham, Chai rman - Transportation Mr. Robert Woods I, - Public Relations Mr. Zenas Sears, Chairman Technical Executive Committee - Mr. Dan Sweat Mr. James McGovern Mr. Peter White Mr. Jerry Luxemberger Mr. Jack Delius - Mr. John Cox - Mr. Alan Koth - Mr. Lyndon Wade - Mr. Clinton Rogers - Mr. Thomas J. Par ham ~Mr .Richard Hicks - Dr. John Letson - Mr . Nicholas Novak - Mr . J ame s Rogers - Dr. Harmon Moor e - Mr . Michael Hollis - Mr . A. B. Padgett - }1r . Harold Barr e t t - Mr . I r win Lewis - Ca pt. Howard Baugh - Mr . Ermne tt Lee �- 8- Agencies and Organizations Providing Planning - Coordina tion l\.ssistance to the Metropolita n Council on Youth Opportunity Federal Agencies Federal Executive Board Defense Depa rtment Labor Department Housing and Ur ban Development Health, Education and Welfare Interior Department Commerce Department Department of Justice (CRS) .L\.griculture OEO Civil Service Commission Department of Transportation State L\gencies Offi ce of the Governor Defense Family and Ch i ldre n Service s Educa tion Hea l t h Governor Commis s ion on Cr ime and Justice .L\.r t s Commis sion Recr eation Connnis s i on University of Georgia Ge or gia St a t e Co l l ege Georgia De pa r tment of Labor Me ntal Health Ins t itu te Scholar ship and Loan Commission County Fulton County Commissioners Fulton County De partment of Family a nd Children Services Fulton County Schools DeKa lb County Department of Family and Chi ldren Services DeKalb Count y Schools Fulton Count y Juve nile Cour t Fulton County Hea lth Department DeKalb County Recreation Depa r t ment DeKalb County Heal th Depa r t ment Suicide Prevention �-9- City of l'i.tlanta Office of Mayor Palnning Department Personnel Public Works Dc p~rtment Recreation and Parks Comptroller Children and Youth Services City Service Coordination Connnunity Relations Cormnission Police Department Atlanta Public Library Model cities Fire Department Other Public Agencies Economic Opportunity Atlanta Board of Education Atlanta Housing Authority Clayton County Board of Decatur Publi c Schools Private Non-Profit Health Education and Welfare l\.gencies Community Chest··Uni ted Appeal Corrnnunity Council of Atlanta Atlanta Menta l He alth Associa tion f..merican Social Health Association l\.nti-Defamation League Camp Fit e Gir ls Atlanta Employment Eva luation Services Center I;c/3<'.l l f',i d Society Atlanta Univer si t y School of Socia l Work Atlanta Urban League Bethlehem Wesley Cormnunity Centers Bi g Brothers Associa t i on of Atlan ta Atlanta Univer s i t y Multi - pur pose Training Center Cancer Socie ty of Atlant a Ge or gia He art hssoc iat ion Me tropo l i tan Cr i me Connniss i on Goodwi ll Industry Boys Club, Inc. of At l ant a Boy Sc outs, At l anta L\rea Counci l Butler Street YMCA Camp Fire Gir l s, I nc. Carrie Steele Pitts Home s Catholic Social Service s of Atlanta Children Center of Metropolitan Atlanta Greater Atlanta Connnittee on Crime and Delinquency �-10Grady Homes Conununity Girls Clubs Kirkwood Christian Center National Youth Courtesy Foundations Paul P.nderson Youth Home Planned Parenthood fi.ssocintion of L"..t lanta Emory University Metropolitan YMCA Metropolitan YWCfi. Travelers Aid Society of Atlanta Women in Community Services St. Vincent DePaul Society Salvation Army .! • / · '· c--,~.: ,. Religious Christian Council of Metropolitan Atlanta Metropolitan Council of Churches liME Ministers Union Inter-Denominational Ministerial Alliance Baptist Ministers Union Atlanta Archdiocese Georgia Council of Churches Business, Civil Right Services and Educational GrouEs Atlanta Chamber of Commerce Merit Employers As sociation Retail Wholesale Merchants Association Frontier Club National Congre ss of Colored Parents and Teachers National Conference of Christian and Jews Atlanta Bar Association Optimist Club of Atlanta Y's Club Butler Street YMCA Rotary Club of Atlanta Kiwanis Club Jr. League Emory University Atlanta Traffic and Snfety Council Junior Chamber of Commerce Council of Jewish Women Apartment Owners Association NAACP Metropolitan Commission on Crime and Delinquency Georgia Labor Council /\FL-CIO �EMPLOYMENT Mr. Harding B. Young - Chairman The major emphasis of the 1969 Youth Opportunity Program is youth employment. An employment sub-committee is now working to deal with the problems in this area. Several agencies will assume major r esponsibilities for the Youth Employment phase of the YOP. Ge orgia State Employment Services The Ge orgia State Employment Services will be generally responsible for the processing , sc r ee ning, referring and follow-up for the following agencies : The Nationa l Al l iance of Busine ssmen, Fulton County, Rent-A-Kid, Fe de ral Agencie s, AFL-CIO, miscellane ous pl acements , NAACP, and the Atlanta Youth Congre ss. additional t a s ks. In add i tion , the Employment Se rvice has undertaken seve r al The s e inc l ude : 1. Ma i le d 13,000 Job Solicitations Le tter s to pr ospective employe rs in the met r opolitan area; 2. Loca te d the Summe r Youth Opportunity Cente r at 136 Marie tta Street ; 3. Es t ablis hed l aison be t ween NAB and the GSES ; 4. Me t with t he At l a nta Brave s and Atlanta Chie fs a nd arranged f or 10,000 free t icke t s ea ch to a Ba s e ba ll Game and a Soccer Game. The GSES has a s s i gned Mr . J im Wa ite s t o s erve a s direct or of the Job So l icitation Sta ff. The e nti r e s taff will be on board and ope rating by May 19th. Nat iona l Al l i a nce of Busine ssme n The Nat i onal All iance of Bus i ne ssme n wil l devel op summer j obs f or youth who will be return ing t o s choo l . -11- Such j obs are being developed in t he �I -12various industries and businesses through out the Metropolitan Atlanta Area. Mr. Henry Reid is the contact for the NAB Program. RENT-A-KID A unique and imaginative employment program will operate in the Sunnner of 1969. This program is named Rent-A-Kid. The Main Office of Rent-A-Kid will be located in the State Employment facility at 136 Marietta Street . Rent-A-Kid is designed to provide part-time and domestic type employment for youth 14-16 who, because of laws and other reasons, cannot get jobs. It will fill the employment gap between the 14 year old to 16 year old youth. The various locations, contacts and other information concerning Rent-A-Kid is as follows: 1. Bedford Pine 547 Hunt Street, N.E. 2. Gr ant Park 645 Grant Street , S.E. 3. West End 1040 Fair Street, s . w. Agency Affiliations Contact St. Vincent de Paul Joe Flannagan 523-5431 Ga. Ave. Presby. Church Jim Hicks 688-0871 M. Agnes J ones School Ge ne Ruyle 758-8326 Phone 4. Forest Park 4871 College St reet Fore st Park, Ge or gia Clayt on County EOA Jane Tap p 366-0516 5. Conyers 929 Connnercial Street Conyers, Ge orgia Roc kdale County EOA Ed Gamble 48 3-9512 6. Techwood 840 Marietta Street Ce nt ral City EOA Tonnny Hess 873-6759 7. N.W. Perry Extension N.W. Perry EOA 1927 Hollywood Road 1 N.W. George Dodd 799-9322 8. Dixie Hills 2913 Verbena Street West Central EOA Amos Parker 799-0331 9. Kirkwood Edgewood EOA George Wilborn 378-3643 �-13Mr s. Joy Rue l is coordinating the Rent-A-Kid Project. Earn and Learn Anothe r unique and innovative employment project is the Earn and Learn Proj e ct. This pr oj e ct is also de signed to pr ovide employment for youth 14-16 years of age. Earn a nd Learn is sponso red by several churches. 1. Trinity Me thodist Church Rev e r e nd Frank We athe rsby 265 Wa shington St ree t , S . W. 688 - 1567 2. Pe achtree Pre sbyt e rian Church Re verend W. W. Wi ll i amson 3443 Roswe l l Roa d, N. W. 237-157 8 3. North De catur Pre sby t e rian Church Reve r end T. W. Tuc ke r 611 Me dlock Road De catur , Ge org i a 63 6-1 06 9 4. Hillside Pre sbyt er ian Rev e r e nd Rola nd Perdue 18 79 Col unvia Dr i ve De catur , Ge org i a 289- 3092 5. Ea s t La ke Me thodis t Chur ch Rev e r e nd Phi l Barnhar t 2500 Bouleva r d Drive , N. E. 377 -1 505 The se are : Economic Oppor t unity At l a nta Ano ther youth empl oymen t activity t o be under t ake n thi s sunnner will be t he EOA Summe r Youth Employmen t Pr ogram . I n a dd i tion to youth be ing employed t hrough the EOA f unde d proposa ls, EOA wi l l h i r e 253 youth this s ummer . The s e j ob s will be pr ovide d t hr ough the EOA Neigh bor hood Serv i ce Center s. Fe deral Agenc i e s The various f e deral a genc i e s will be hi ring youth aga i n t h i s s ummer . �-14In addition to Civil Service Jobs, youth will be provided with other types of employment. City of Atlanta As a spe cial surrnner e ffort the City of Atlanta will be hiring youth in part-time and full-time jobs. Fulton County The Fulton County Department of Family and Children Services and the Fulton County Personnel Departments will be hiring youth this summer to work in various jobs. Urban Corp Urban Corp is a special project which provides sunnner jobs for college and unive rsity youth. Such youth will work in branches of government or with privat e , non-profit agencies. AFL-CIO The AFL-CIO will provide jobs for youth 18 and over . Such jobs will be ava ilable in construction and bui l ding t rade s. Neighborhood Youth Corp (In-school) NYC (in- s chool) wi ll ena ble 1,200 youth to earn money dur ing the summer months. Mr . Wi l liam Mars hall coordina tes the in-school pr ogram. At lanta Police Department The Atlanta Police De partment will hire yo ut h th is summer to work as Corrnnunity Service Off icers. NAACP The NAACP will sponsor a Youth Employment Project. will serve youth ages 16-22 . This project The project will unde ttake its own job develop- �-15ment and recruitment. cost. In addition, job referrals will be provided free of This project proposes to place 200 youth during the summer 1969. project will be located at 136 Marietta Street. The Contact Miss Angela McClung at 577-5821 or 577-4399. Atla nta Youth Congress The Atlanta Youth Congress will solicit jobs from small neighbo~hood businesses. In addition, the Youth Congress will provide volunteers to the Ge orgia State Employment Services to pe rfor m job placeme nt tasks. The Youth Congress expects to develop 200 jobs. The goals and commitments of the various agencie s providing and/or soliciting jobs a r e a s follows : AGENCY National Alliance ,·of · Businessme n EMPLOYMENT GOAL 2 , 500 EOA 253 EOA Funde d Pr oposa ls 331 Urban Cor p 300 NYC City of Atlanta Fulton County Rent-A-Kid 1 , 200 830 36 2 , 000 Earn a nd Learn 100 Federal Agencies 638 AFL-CIO 150 Atlanta Police De partme nt 50 Miscellaneous (GSES) 300 NAACP 200 Atlanta Youth Congress 100 TOTAL 8,988 �• -16The employment aspect of the Youth Opportunity Program is well ahead of the 1968 program. 6,100. For example, in 1968 the job commitment was In 1969 the commitment is 8,988 or 47% more than 1968. �RECREATION Mr. A. B. Padgett, Chairman There are approximately 500,000 youth in Metropolitan At lanta. Most of these youth will be seeking ways to spend their leisure time during the summer months. Unfortunately , the lack of recreational and leisure time activities is most acute in the poverty communities. City of Atlanta Parks & Recreation Department To meet the acute shortage of whole some recreation in poverty communities the major a gencies are pooling their resources . Forsmost among these agencies is the Atlanta Parks and Recreati on Department. The Parks Department i s a ssuming the larger portion of operating responsibilities f or the Youth Opportuni t y Recreation Program. The Atlanta Parks a~d Recreation Department will ex pand the r egular program during the months of June , July, and Augus t with particular emphasis on provi ding needed recreationa l faci l ities and ac tivities f or the peop l e living in the disadvantaged areas of t he city. Leadership i s provided at twenty-four locations in the target areas on a twelve mon th basis. wi ll be opened . For the summer of 1969, forty-ei ght a ddi tional areas The use of t wenty-seve n differ ent school f acilities has been requested and, granted. This will give a tota l of ninety-nine supervised re- creati on areas f or t h is summer. AB added requests are anticipated, it is most probable t hat over one hundred areas will be in operation before t he end of t he summer . Block parks will be open from 9:00 .'i.. M. until 9:00 P.M. a r.d connnuni ty -17- �-18center buildingx from 10: 00 A.M. until 10 :30 P,M. Monday through Saturdya. An additional staff of approximately t wo hundred and seventy-five trained in various recreation skills will be employed. There will also be one hundred and seventy youth assistants (age 16-25) employed from the target areas. They will be placed in job slots in their own neighborhoods. Another five hundred youth a.ssi:.tants will be given an opportunity for a camping-work experience at Wi lderne ss Camp. Fifteen At lanta Concentrated Employment Program (ACEP) workers will a lso participate in the program. Close coord ina tion has been maintained throughout the fall and winter with Economic Op portunity Atlanta and the ~tlanta Youth Council. Members of the Recreation Department staff have attended meetings with members of the various neighborhoods in the ~ity to determine thei r needs and desires in the type program to be offered this summer. Activities t o be offered wi ll include the f ollowing: Ar ts a nd Crafts Paint ing Drawi ng - pencil , crayon Sculpture Ceramics Clay Pa pier-Mache Crepe paper projec t s Block pr inting Weavi ng Stitcher y Jewelr y making Wood working Puppetry Camp Crafts Swimming Tennis Go lf Archery Badminton '.::anoeing Drama Chorus Singing game s Music appreciation Physical Fitness S limna s tics Wrestling Boxing Weight Lifting Gymnastics Tumbling Se lf De fense Judo Softba ll Ba seball Basketball Volleyball Soccer Track <'x Fie ld Tab l e Tenni s Day Camps Re s ident Camps Wilderne ss Camp Nature Programs Golde n Age Clubs Teen Clubs Charm Cl asses Low organized games �-19Folk dancing Modern dancing Tap dancing Baton twirling Cheer leading · Social Recreation Sewing Flower arrangements Table games Quiet games Horseshoes Box hocke y Model boats Model cars Mode l airplanes Photography Movie s Trips - Kennesaw, Six Flaes Over Ge orgia , Baseball and Soccer Games, Zoo, Cyclorama, Stone Moun tai n , Coca Cola Company, Lays Potatoe Chip, General Motors, and other points of interest in Atlan ta. Tournaments - Softba ll, Baseball, Basketba ll, Te nnis. Wilderness Camp - fifty underpr i v i ledged boys per day for ten weeks - earning $1.60 per hour for five hour pe r day. Track and Fi eld Meet - Boys and Girls. Swimming Me ets - Boys and Girls. Contests - Hula Hoop, Horseshoes, Car r om. Picni cs, Parties, Da nces Play Day - Ci ty-Wide Guitar Le ssons - Ba ttle of the Bands Airplane Flights Free mi lk, f ru i t ,j u ice, and c ookies Sprink l er s The f irst week of June will be devoted to a training session f or al l new per sonnel. t:,.11 areas wi ll b e open a nd a full program in effect starting June 9 a nd wi ll con t i nue through Labor Day~ September 1. Parks , Playground s & Recreat ion Ce nt er Area I Twe lve Month Ooe rntion Home Park Howell Park J. A. White Summer ~'(Ashby Circ le '>'(Madd ox ~'(Mc'.lgnol ia & Maple �*Central City (717 Marietta) 'cHaynes \-Ladd Street 'cMoz ley Park ,',Techwood .,,,University ',Vine Ci ty Strong & Kennedy '<'Thurmond '<'Hctshington \-Wes t End Park ',Tnrget Areas - lt'.~ Total 17 Area I I Twelve Month Operation Summer Orchnrd Knob Pe r kerson S outh Bend ',Adair \-Joy land 7•Pittman 'c (Thomasville - not open) (Under Construction) \-Bethlehem Center \-Brown Avenue \-Carver Georgia-McDaniel \-Mary-Coleman \-Park Av enue -Lansing 7·Plunkettown ', Target Areas - 11 Total lliArea III Twelve Month Operation Sunnner Go.rden Hills E. P. Howell Knight Peachtree Hills 'cBedford-Pine \-Butler ,'<'Forrest & Fort ·k666 Pa rkway .,,,Angier & Pa rkw-ay 'cBoulevo.rd & Auburn Boule v ard Place & Gle nn Iris \-Daniel Street Hanover* Renfr oe Perry Bou levard - Lively \-Piedmont Park \-Sampson & East ,'<-Vernon Street Wylie - Tye >\-618 Invin Stree t ·k Tnrge t Areas - ll} Total 19 Area I V Twelve Month Opera tion Summer Ad ams Adamsville Ben Hill We st Manor Anderson >'rEnglish Park >'t- A.: dington Circle >',Center Hill Mary George Ave. - Perry Homes '<"Radc liffe ',Perry Boulevard - Habershall .,,,Tremont Drive �-21'>'(Wilson Avenue 2185 Verbena Street '""Grove '"'Gun Club Area Target Areas - 12 Total 16 V Twelve Month Operation Sunnner Brownwood East Lake '"'Bass ,'(Branham ,'(Cook ,'I-Daniel Stanton '>'(Dodd Avenue 71 Little Street '>'(Capitol Avenue ,'l'C:apitol Homes Center ,'<'Connally Street '"'Gilliam ,':Grant Park ,'<'Haygood-Crew Ira ,'<'Pryor ,'<'Richardson Street Center Stadium Walker Park Washington-Ryder '"'Wesley Windsor-Ri chardson Target Areas - 20 Tota l 22 Swimming Pools The f ollowing are opened dai ly for those wishing to swim. Lessons are scheduled from 10: 00 A.M. - 12:00 Noon, Monday - Friday for individua ls who come t o the parks and register. Adams Cand ler Chastain Memor ial Garden Hills J oyland South Bend Washingt on Wesley Avenue John i'. , Wh ite These pools are opened dai ly. 10:00 A. M. - 3:00 P.M. , Monday - Friday: Gun Club Maddox Mozley Lessons are offered to groups from �-22Oakland Piedmont Pittman · . .• l PORTABLE POOLS Area I Marvin Billups Thurmond Street Magnolia & Maple (moved from Rhodes) Ladd Street (new-if available) /i.rea I I Mollie Wagoner Georgia Avenue - McDanie l Plunket town Thomasville Area I II Pending Bu t ler Hanover - Renfroe .Sampoon East (moved from Wylie-Tye ) Bedford Pi ne (moved from Nerritts ) Irwin St r ee t (new - if available) /:..rea I V David Knowlton Verbena Street Perry - Habershall Ar l ington Circ l e (new - if available) !1.rea V Eddie McLemore Li tt l e Street (moved fr om Connally ) Haygood - Crew Washington - Ryder Wa l ker Park (new - if avai l ab l e ) Rec r ea tion in the El ementary Schools Recreat i ona l and enrichment pr ograms will be sponsored at some of t he At l anta Sch ools by the City Parks and Recreation Depa rtment. The program wi ll consist of a variety of recreationa l activ ities and enrichment programs such as: arts and crafts, drama, singing for fun, entertai~,ment, fie l d trips, swimming, etc. The recreation program in the fo llowing schools will bogin June 9, 1969 and terminate August 23, 1969: �-23- Area I I II II II III III III IV IV V V V V V I III IV V V School Craddock Hardnett Blair Village Gilbert Harper But l e r Forrest Hill Scott Walter 1.iJ hite Cook Hubert Johnson Pryor Toomer Hashington Grady West Fulton Bass Murphy Saturday Daily Hours L} :00 L:-:00 4:30 4 : 30 4:30 4:00 /+ :00 L~ :00 4:00 L} :00 1:00 12:00 12:00 12:00 12:00 4:00 L~ : 00 4:00 12: 00 12:00 P.M.-9:00 P.M. -9: 00 P.M.-9: 30 P,M.-9:30 P. M.-9: 30 P;M.-9:00 P.M. - 9 :00 P.M.-9:00 P.M.-9:00 P.M.-9 : 00 P, M.-9 : 00 P .M. - 8 :00 P.M.-8:00 P,M.-3: 00 P. M.-8 :00 P.M.- 9 :00 P . M. -9 :00 P. M.-9: 00 P.M.-8 : 00 P . M. - 8 :00 P.M. P.M. P,M. P.M. P.M. P. M. P.M. P. M. P.M. P.M. P.M. P.M. p . M. p .M. p . M. P.M. p .M. p . M. P. M. P. M. 1: 00 1:00 9:00 9 :00 9 :00 9: 00 9:00 9:00 1 : 00 1:00 1:00 12:00 12:00 12:00 12:00 1: 00 9:00 1 :00 12 : 00 12:00 P.M.-6 :00 P .M. -6 :00 A.M.-9:00 A.M.-9:00 A.M.-9: 00 A.M.-1:00 A.M. -1 :00 A.M.-1:00 P .M.-6: 00 P .M. -6 :00 P . M. -6 :00 P.M.-8 :00 P. M.-3: 00 P.M. - 8: 00 P, M.-3: 00 P.M.-6 :00 P. M.-6 :00 P.M.-6:00 P. M.-8 :00 P.M.-8 :00 P.M. P.M. p .M. P.M. P.M. p .M. p .M. P.M. p .M. p .M. p .M. P.M. p .M. P. M. P. M. P. M. p . M. P. M. P. M. P.M. �Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. Another large recreation component for 1969 will be the EOA Recreation Program, This program will operate through the 14 Neighborhood Service Centers of EO.i\ . I't will cover most of the poverty areas in f,tlanta and the Metropolitan Area, These programs are as follows: EOA Central City Neighborhood Service Center will operate a summer recreation program. locations: This will be operational in the following Central City Youth Center, Salvation Army Red Shield facility, area playlots and the neighborhood service center. Youth will be employed as assistants for the program. These youth will be recruited. from the Central City target areas. The following activities are planned: Field trips, dances, sports, counseling, employment referral, arts and crafts. Activities will also be offered t o young adults in the evenings. This program is de• signed to meet the demands of all age levels in target area. EOA East Central Neighborhood Service Center will offer programs involved in employment, cultural, and recreaticnal activities, Referral and program assistance will be gi ven to other agencies operating programs i n the target areas of East Central. The program will consist of sports, r e creation activitie s , youth center , cul t ur al ac tivities, arts and cra f ts, and f i eld t ri ps. Youth wi ll be employed t o assist in t hese projects. These yout h wi ll be r ecr u ite d fr om the EOA t arge t areas . EOA Edgewood Neighbor hood Ser vice Ce nt er wi ll organiz e a r e creation, cu l tural and empl oyment pr ogram. Programs wi l l include recreati onal sports, dancing classes (balle ts), tours, drama experience, trips �-25to the then.ters, plays, musicals. skating, anc! horseback riding. Other activities are bm;1 ling, Other aspects of the program includes referral to other programs offered in the t a rget areas, coordination of resident camping and day camp programs, establishment of a target area youth council. L campmobile will also tour the areas of high population on a weekly schedule. Youth and young adults wi ll be employed to assist and direct these l)rograms in the target areas of EO.'.,.• EOA Gwinnett Coun ty Ne ighborhood Service Cen ter will organize r ural and semi-rura l recreational spor ts, league plan, playlots, field trips, camping, sewing, personal hutiene, water and heating, safety, first aid, drama, musical activities. councils wi ll be organi zed to assist i n these programs. project will be operated in the EOil. target a r eas. Youth Thi s Youth and young adults will be employed t o assist and direct these programs. EOA Nt~ H~Washington Neighborhood Ser vice Center will organi ze recr eat i on, cultur al/educati onal , and employment programs. Pr o - grams wi ll include sports , clinics, dances, dram.a, t he ater, and organizat i on of youth c ounci ls . Youth and young adu l t s wi l l be hired t o as s i s t and direct thes e programs. The pr oj ects uill be located and operated in the EOA target areas . EO/\. North Fulton Neighb orhood Service Ce nte r will organize rural and semi-rural programs f or youth and young adults. Programs will include recreational sports, indoor and out-of-door activities, arts and crafts, fishing, bicycling, trips and tours, and organization of youth council. Youth and young adults will be employed �-26- to assist and direct these programs. These programs will be in the target areas of Eo:·t , E01\ Northwest (Perry Homes) l'eighborhood Service Center will organize recreation, education, and employment programs. Programs will in- clude recreation , sports, art , ar ts and crafts, music trai ning, drama, teenage clubs, tJa ll of Pr ide (paintings of famous heroes for ar t part i cipants) , and all types of r ecreational acti vities. way house will be established for school drop-out s. h half- This project will a ttccpt t o h~vc youth r e turn to school via sports, education, and counseling. Yout h and young a dults will be employed to assist and direc t the many varied programs offered, All programs will be conduc ted i n the EOA t a rge t a reas. EOA Pittsburgh Neighborhood Service Center will organize recreat ion, counseling, a nd employment programs. Pr ograms offered will be re- crea t i oruil spor t s , ar ts and crafts, cult ural tours, youth councils , expa nding a ctivi t i es, and program referral. Youth and young adult~ wi l l be employed t o assis t and di r e ct these programs offered. These pr ograms wi ll serve in the t arget areas of EOA. EOA Price Neighbor hood Servi ce Center wi ll or ganize recrea t i onal, cultura l and e ducationa l programs. Activ ities offered wi ll be re- creational sports, boxing , bowling , swirmning, league spor ts, t rips, arts and c rafts, drama , danc ing, ba llet l essons, campi ng t rips , baseball c linics , and pr ogram r eferral. Yout h and young adults wil l be employed to assist in t hese programs. Programs wil l be operated in the target ureas of EOt .• EOA South Fulton Neighborhood Se rvice ~e nter will organize a recreation and employment program for youth in the rural and semi- �-27- rural South Fulton target areas of EOi.\ . The activities will include recreational sports, arts and crafts, playlots, pro3ram referrals, employment and employment referral, personal hygiene and grooming, cultural activities, drama and field trips. The youth recruited for these programs offered by the Neighborhood Service Center would not have any extensive surrnner programs were it not for t he EO!. Neighborhood Service Center and volunteer residents of South Fulton. Youth and young adults will be employed to direct and assist the many varied programs offered by the Neighborhood Service Center. EOA Summerhill-Mechanicsville Neighborhood Gervice ~enter will organize surrnner recreational, educational, and employment programs, educational programs, dance, arts, tutorial project, sports, leagues, trips, dances, economic workshops, scouts, boys and girls and teenage referral. Youth will be employed in these programs to assist the professionals. This program will be in the EOf.. target aree.s. EOA West Central Neighborhood Service Center will organize a recreational, educational program for the Neighborhood Service Center target areas. Programs offered will include recreation, sports, arts and crafts, tours, cultural and educational activities, employment referral and counseling. Youth and young adults wi.11 be employed to assist in program activities offered by the Neighborhood Service Center. Volunteers will be organized to assist in programs not fully staffed due to lack of funds. This program will operate during the twelve weeks of the local school vacation in the EOt. target areas. EOA We st End Neighborhood Se rvice Center will conduct a recreational, educational, cultural and employment program. Programs will include �-28sports, playlots, arts and crafts, cultural activities, record hops, outing, teen town, art workshops, field trips, referrals to other agency programs. Employment referrals~ youth cent ers, and counseling and still other aspects of the program. Partici- pants will be recrui ted from the target areas of West End Neighborhood Service Center. Youth will be employed to assist i n t he operation of these projects. These projects will operate in EOA target area. EO/i. Rockdale-Conyers Ueiehborhood Service Center will organize a rural and semi-rural recreation project. The EOA Neighborhood Service Center will be the only agency providing r ecreation in the county. The program consists of a youth center, use of a school, and playlots. This program will also provide recreation sports, night activities for teenagers , dances, leagues (baseball) , tutorial program, camping , trips, and counseli ng. Youth and young adults will be hired to assist the professionals in these projects. Community Chest c, Other 1:.genc i es In addition to the specia l recrea tional activities to be undertaken by EOL He ighborhood Service Centers, EO/', has cont racted wi th sever al ot her private age nc i es for r ecr eat iona l ser vices in the tar ge t a rea s lis ted below. The :\.t l anta Gir ls ' Club , Inc ., wi ll oper ate e xpanded pr ograms at three clubs. The Gir ls ' Club wi l l offe r sports, c ounse ling, coed programs, homemaking , r es ident camp ing, trips and outings, arts and crafts , educational and cultural activities , recruit girl s from the target areas of EOL. The program will Ten young girls 14-21 �7 -29will be hired to assist the professionals during the summer. The hours at these clubs will also be extended. The Atlanta Area Boy Scouts will recruit 150 non-scouts and 150 youth who a re non-scout members to Day Camping two days per week for five weeks . Transportation wil l be provided, m8als and equi_p- ment to insure the youth having a good experience . This camp is a resident camp and offers more than the normal day camp program. Youth recruited will be in t he age r8nge of 11-13 . Recruitment will be made via the EOA Service Cel!ters i n the target areas. A youth (16-21 ) will be hil.-ed for every 10 boys attending camp. The Butler Street YMCA will ex pe.nd its norII'.al progr ams during the summer months . The~1 will a lso employ 100 area youth a s lock.er room attendants, program assistants, and send 300 youth to resident camp. Part of the day would be in re pairing building , cutting trees, grass, etc. for recreation. The .reoninder of the day wi ll be used Youth will a lso be hired as kitche n helpers, junior l eaders, and assistant cabin counselors. fl t een program will be operat ed during t he evening hours for dances, pool, swinnning, movies, field trips , ycuth forum discussions, and lectures. Other facilities being u ti l ized by the Butler Stree t YMC~ will be the Sumrr.er hill 'll1CA Branch, Perry Home s YMCL and the Butler Street Re sid ent Camp, ll.llatoona. The Grady Homes Girls' Club, Inc. wil l expand their program in the conmrunity in hours of operation, 500 add i tional gi rls, and employment of youth ( gir ls) 14-21 , from the community being s erved. grams wili be normal Gir ls 1 Club activities. Pro- f,n expanded day camp will be operated for gir ls 6 .,14 years of age from 9 :00 A.M. to 3 :00 P .M. and youths (g~_r l s) employe d as program assistants. The �-30Day Camp will offer outings, etiquette, dramatics, films, record hops , and plays by the participants will be from the EOll. target areas. The Metropolitan ll.tlanta Boys' Clubs will operate six clubs in the target areas of EOA. The clubs wi ll expand their hours during the sunnner months from 9: 00 l1. . M. to 10: 00 P. M. six days per week. In addition, the Boys' Club will hire 62 youth to a ssist the professional staff. The Boys' Clubs will expand thei r programs in areas of spor ts, counseling, education, workshops, and normal Boys' Clubs programs for disadvantaged poor youth. The Metr opolitan YMCA of Atlanta and The Southea stern YMC~ will conduct a r ecreational program i n swimming. will be to teach youth to swim. The Swimning Program The normal YMCA program will also be expanded during the sunnner months. n-ie Northwest Georgia Girl Scout Council will ope r a t e day camps for girls which will include sports, hea lth and safety, citizenshi p , i nte r national scout program, arts, cooking , outdoor living, s e l f government, housekeeping, ri1oney management, family re l a t i ons , na ture and natura l scie nce. I n a ddit i on , 32 girls wi ll be t ake n t o re s ident camp (age s 10- 15 ) f or a two week period. This program will be operated in t he target areas of EOA. The Roya l Knights Foundati on, Inc. , will organize recreational programs f~r you th in the Vine City L\rea. The program wi l l be sports, trips, counseling, indoor and outdoor activities, day camp, teenage program --until 9: 00 P.M. , boxing, employment referral and pool. Youth will be employed to assist i n the programs. This pro- ject will operate i n the N.1'.SH-Washington EOJ.\. area. The YMCL\ of �-31Atlanta will operate expanded prograns for girls in the poverty areas of At lanta. Program activities will include preparin8 girls to pro- perly seek employment, how to dress .'.:!.nd act during an interview, how to answer an e:mployer, ·· fi lling out applications, refe:rences, what relat ions of employer and employee should be, and introductions to new job openings. A phase of the project will also be in working, training, office filing, business machines, and cash registers. '.nether progrQm offered will be a training program for girls to work with children in Heads t ar t programs. .A operated prior to the summer operation. sur.nner day camp ·will be Twelve young girls will be given in-service training to a ssist the professiona ls during the da y camp operations. L i.o ther program will be an enrichment (cultural a nd tutorial) , drana, sewing and grooming program with group discussions in history and contributions of famoun /imer icans. These programs will be operated in the EO/\. target area s. The U.S. Army Youth Opportunity Program is a spe cia l project opera ted by the U.S. Army. 'TI1is program operates t o assist disadvantaged youth in the EO,:\ East Central Neighborhood Service Center area of At l anta. I t wi ll operate year round and wi ll serve about 100 youth. The project offers recreation, sports, indoor activities, ganes, trips, tours, charn classes, movies , sewing, reading, music, arts a nd crafts, drama, health educa tion a nd driver education. youth recruited and referred by the /:..ges of EOI\. Ea st Centra l Nei ghborhood Service Ce nter t o this project a re 11- 18 boys a nd gir ls. The only cha nge i n the sur:u:ner of f ered will be more outd oor activ it ies. The Vine City Founda tion wi ll . h ire youth a s rec reation organizers to r ecrui t youth for you t h progrnn s that be s t fit their nee ds. Pro-- �-32grruns will also be organized by youth in the following areas: creation, tutorial, and cultural. re- A group dynamics program will be organized by hard core youth and supervised by the Vine City Foundation staff. Four hard core youth will be hired to work in this project. The WAOK Ra dio Station will conduct street dances, record hops for youth during the suP..10.er months. Ten youth will be hired as Disc Jockeys to conduct their prograr.ts. WJ.'..OK will conduct its program in the target a rea s of EOA. The Wesley Community Center and Bethlehem Center will c onduct a n expanded summer recreational program. Trips, outings, crafts, camping , and gar:ies indoor and outdoors are sane features of the prograra . main feature of this project is snall group participa nts. will be recruited fr or.i the EO/\. tar get areas of ,'\.tlant a . The The youth The program will a lso be operated in an EOn tar get area. Corm:1Unity Chest L'..gencies (Re gular Surrnner Programs) Most of the Cor.ununity Che st Agencies and other group service a ge ncies will conduct on-goi ng progr ams during t he sufJille r. Such progr ams wi ll be ava il- able to childr e n and youth through out the metropolitan a rea . The a ctivities of t he sa pr ogr ar.ts wi ll be generally available t o regular members of such agencie s . In a dd it ion , the se agenc i es have i ndi cat ed t hat t hey wi ll make e ffor t s to expand their regu lar programs and ext end t hem t hrou gh ou t the Summe r Vacation Period. These agencies are l isted a s f ol lows: 1. 2. 3. Campfire Gir ls /\.tlanta Girls Club, Inc. Bethlehem Community Center ~- o Boy Scouts �-335. 6. 7. 8. 9~ 10. 11 . 12 . Bu tler Stree t YMCA Grady Homes Girls Club At lanta Boys Club Gir l Scout s Savannah Stree t Neighborhood House Wesley Hous e Centers Me t r opol itan YMC~ Me t ropolitan YWCA DeKalb County EOli.- RecrGnt i on Depar t men t The DeKalb County EOh and Recrea t ion Depar tment have pool ed their resources in efforts to prov ide additional service s to DeKa lb County ' s You th dur i ng t he surmner months. Sever a l programs are pl anned t o effec t a more comprehensive surmner program . The areas planned for are a s follows : filea Location Supervisors Chamblee Dorav ille Church lot at Peachtree Industrinl Road 1 - $900 plus 3 NYC workers Clarkston The end of Clark Street 1 - $900 plus 3 NYC workers Tucker Peters Road 1 - $900 plus 3 NYC worke rs Washington Park Tobie Grant Park To be prov ided by DeKa lb Recreation Department 3 NYC workers nee ded Redan Rednn Elenentary School 1 - $900 plus 3 NYC workers Lithonia Bruce Stree t Element a ry or Lithonia High School 1 - $900 plus 3 NYC workers Bouldercrest Boulder cre s t Elementary Schoo l 1 - $900 plus 3 NYC workers Mil l er Grove Mi ller Grove Bap tis t Church 1 - $900 pl us 3 NYC workers Stone Mountain Stone Mountai n Par k Stillhous e 1 - $900 pl us 3 NYC workers �-1 The YMCL\ will handle this aren 3 NYC workers needed Oakhurst Lynwood Park Lynwood Park Eler.1entary School 1 - $900 plus 3 NYC workers Oglethorpe f'l.partments 08lethorpe f'l.partments 1 - $900 plus# NYC workers County Linc To be provided by DeKalb Recreation Departraent 3 NYC workers needed DeKalb l1emorial Park 1 - $900 Check with YMCL\ to see if they can operate it $9,900 Total amoun ts needed: ~tlanta Junior Chamber of Commerce L\nother privately spons ored summer program will be the various activitie s of the At lanta Junior Chamber of Commerce. There proGrams will be : Vacation Days, a series of daily r e creational and educational fie l d trips for younger chi l dren from several poverty areas; The Little Street Community Center, a multi-purpose recreation fac ility l ocated in the Sur.merbill neighborhood . Several Metropolitan Public Recreati on de partments wi ll be offering special programs during the summer . These i nc lude College Park, Ea st Poi nt, DeKalb,County , Cl ayton County and Fulton County . Communi ty Schools The L\t l anta c oE1munity schools will offer a ctivities for children, you th , and a dults in each of t he communities listed below : �-35- Elementary Schools High Schools Bethune Bryant Capitol Avenue Coan Middle Cooper Street Gideons Grant Park Jerome Jones M. Agnes Jones Ware Archer Brown Dykes Howard Parks, Jr. Price Smith Special enrichment and recreational activities will be planned according to the interest of the community participants. Some of the activities might include: Archery Ceramics Cooking for Fun Creative Crafts Creative Dramatics Creative Writing Gymnastics Judo Modern Dance Photography Puppetry Quiet Games Sewing Softball Tab le Tennis Tailoring Track and Field Typin::; The enrichment activities will be scheduled for an eight-week period be ginnigg June 9, 1969 and ending A~gust 2, 1969. The recreational activities will begin at the sane time but will be extended until ~UGUSt 23, 1969. The EO~ Recreation Pr ogram is cooperati on with Parks and Recreation Department and the Community Chest will provide widespread distribution of programs activi ties • •mother significant factor of the 1969 Recrea tion pro3ram i s that it will cover the areas of unmet and new needs as identified by the Technical Executive Corrnnittee dur ing the planning process. Morehouse College Morehouse Col le ge wi ll sponsor a Summer Sports Program for dis advantaged youth. This program is funded by the National Collegiate .l\.thletic �-36Association for approximately $35,000. Two hundred fifty youth will participate in this program, most of which will live in close proximity to Morehouse College. The program will provide a hot lunch. It also provides youth with training in the various athletic skills. EOn, Parks and Recreation, The Community Chest and the Youth Coun~il will refer youth to the project. The project will operate four hours a day (9:30 - 1:30) for six weeks. The Youth Opportunity Recreation Program as presently planned shows nruch potential and improvement over 1968. program ever. Hopefully 1969 will have the best �l CAMPING Mr. Frank Player, Jr. - Chairman Mr. Charles Green - Co-Chairman In 1968, only 5% of the inner city poor youth participated in resident campi ng activities. In order to prevent the scarcity of camping opportunities for poor youth from reoccuring in 1969, a Camping Sub-Committee was created in January, 1969 to deal with the problem of resident camping opportunities and cnmperships for poor youth. The camping sub-committee has sent camping questionnaires to all groups which operate resident and/or day camps. The purpose of the question- naire is to find out how agencies utilize their camps and camperships to benefit poor youth. Several of the agencies have indicated that they will provide camping opportunities for poor youth. These are as follows: RESIDENT l\GENCY LOCLi.TIONS Camp Fi re Girls Camp Camp Camp Camp Camp We s l ey House - - -CAMP Toccoa Eluta- Mt. Par an Rd.• Tawasi•Mathis Da iry Farm Cobb- Mt. View Comm. Cen . Wohelo•Mt. Gilead 464 295 Camp Wesley, Fairburn Bethlehem Cent er 275 Bert Adams (Hon. Scout ) Camp Orr 420 Salvation .1rmy Camp Grandview 300 Boys Club Camp Kiwanis 600 Grady Girls Club Friendship Day Camp Herndon Day Camp Carver University Day Camp John Hope Bowen Day Camp Perry Day Camp Grady Metropolitan Boy Scouts -37- ~'i DAY CL\MP 150 80 800 �-38Kirkwood Community Camp Calvin Church's Christian :camp Michael Center YWCA (72 Edgewood) Cc.np High lnnd I-Ii - neighbor 75 1.:-5 7 80 YWC.l\. (599 Tatnall) Phyllis Wheatley & 1\ tlanta Parks Recreation Lake .L\l toorra, Ackw'Orth, Ga. Wilderness-Barton County 1.:-00 350 /'. tlanta Presby. Camp Calvin, Route 2 , Calvin 138 Butler St. YMCA Lake Altoona Eastside Day Camp--22 Butler L,, OO Girl Scouts Girl Scouts (City) Day Camps Girls Club (City) Jaycees Camp Timber Ridge, Mableton Camp Pine Acres-/i.ckworth, Ga. Camp Gazelle Dew-/'.rmuchee, Ga. 200 800 616 Stone Mountain Washington Park Dunwoody Fairburn-Kiwanis Club Lake Spivey Jones Chastain Park Fairwood 2,900 Donnelly /'. venue Grant Park Techwood Project-116 Pine Tri-Cities-Bachelor Camp Wesley 225 Lake L\.ltoona 300 (overnight ) 900 In addition, t he Camp ing Sub-Committee has contacted every service club and civic group in the Metropolitan Area asking them to increase the number of camperships they are providing t o agencies. The Thomas Beverage Company, the local who lesaler for the Schlitz Brewing Company is sponsoring a unique camping-incentice program. will provide 30 youth with Camperships for one week as a beginning. This program �iii EDUC11.TION Dr. Hi lliard Bowen - Chairman Mrs. Mary Sanford - Co-Chairman The major Youth Opportunity Program educational activities will be operated by the various school systems. Objectives: 1. To provide needed remedial and tutorial programs for youth; 2. To provide vocational information and educational activities needed by youth to enter the labor force; 3. To allow creative and innovative educational programs not possibl~ during the winter months; 4. To offer programs and courses not genera lly available to poor youth during the regular school year. Special Goals: 1. To provide surmner remedial programs for 2,000 students; 2. To provide vocational, technical and occupationa l information for 2,000 students; 3. To provide tutoria l services for 1 , 400 students; 4. To provide enri chment and advance programs for 1,000 s tudents; S. To launch an inte nsive back- to-school campaign to ge t 2, 000 s tudent s to retur n to s chool . The Atla nta School System h~s a lready i ndica ted that it will c oncentrate only on e ducationa l a cti v i t ie s i n the summe r 1969. In addition, the Atlanta Schoo l System has indicated t hat one experiment a l pr ograms will be undertaken this sunnner, which wi l l uti l ize students in curriculum planning activities. In addition to obtaining the above c ommitment, the educational subcommittee has also contacted parochial and private schools. The committee was informed by such schools that they will not be operating any summer programs, but they might let agencies utilize their facilities for special educational activities. -39- �-40Atlanta Public Schools 'nle Atlanta Public School System has indicated that there will not be tuition charge for students attending regular elementary summer school or the fourth quarter sessions of high school. Summer school programs will be offered at the following elementary schools: Area I .i\rea IV Bethune Carter Couch English ./\venue Hardnett Harris Herndon M.A. Jones Lee-Rusk Luckie Ware !inderson Park Grove Park Kimberly Peyton Forrest Towns Venetian Hills Walter White Williams Area II .i\rea V Gideons Gilbert Guice Harper Perkerson Sloter Capitol Avenue Coan Cooper East Lake Hubert Milton Avenue Pryor Reynolds Slaton D. H. Stant on Toomer Wesley Grant Park Primary Area III Fi nch Goldsmith Hil l John Hope Jacks on Morni ng side Pitts Rivers Whittaker EMR programs will be offered at those schools designated by an asterisk .. �In addition to summer school, Head Start programs will also be offered. These programs will be offered in the following schools: t..rea I Lee-Ruck Luckie Ware Bethune Ca rter English Avenue Primary Hardnett l1.rea II Harper Slater Dobbs Gideons Gilbert Area III John Hope Pitts Goldsmith Hill .£\rea IV Mayson Williams Anderson Park Carey Grove Park .£\rea Capitol i\venue Cook Cooper Grant Pa rk Primary V Pryor Slaton Toomer Wesley �-42SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES A number of special programs in addition to the regular summer programs will be offered at schools throughout the city. Students interested in these programs but who attend other schools may enroll .as space permits. J\.rea I Bethune Carter English l\.venue Hardnett Harris Herndon M.A. Jones Lee-Rusk Ware Band, 1\rt, and Choral Music Spanish, Typing, and Band Band, Typing, Sewing, and Woodshop Choral Music Music and Art Art, Band, and Typing E.I.P. Projects l\.rt, Music, Speech E. I. P. Projects Area II Gideons Gilbert Guice Harper Perkerson Slater Art, Instrumental Music, Physical Education,Typing Art, Physical Education, Vocal Music 1\rt, Physical Education, Vocal Instrument Music !\.rt, Typing, Physical Education, Vocal Instrumental Music Art, Typing, Vocal and Instrumental Music J\.rt, Physical Education, Vocal and Instrumental Music, Typing ,\rea III Finch Goldsraith Hill John Hope Jackson Morningside Pitts Rivers Vocal Music, Typing Vocal Music Typing, Vocal Music Drama, Vocal Music Dancing Class, Vocal Music Typing, Vocal Music Vocal Music J\.r t, Drama, Speech Therapy, Vocal Music �-43SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES (CONTINUED) Area IV Instrumental Music ••• Individual, small ensemble, and group instrument will be offered for band and string instrumentalists. Classes will be for beginning, intermediate, and advanced students. <' Anderson Park Cascade Continental Colony Kimberly Towns Instrumental Music Instrumental Music Band Creative i\rts, Instrumental Music Creative i\rts, Instrumental Music Area V i\rts and Crafts, Instrumental and Vocal Music, and Speech Therapy will be offered in all sunnner schools in this area. Coan Middle School will offer: Guitar Home Economics Indus trial 1\rts a course that involves music and mathematics (5-8 grades) (5-8 grades) A special course in model cars tha t includes experiences in language arts and 1Tlll.thematics. Pryor Street will offer: Ceramics Home Economics (Sewing, Cooking a nd Home Decoration) Dramatics Public Speaking Typing �-44HIGH SCHOOLS All high schools will operate the fourth quarter schedule beginning June 4, 1969 and ending August 15, 1969. Special Opportunities Listed below arc courses other than regula r quarter offerings which will be available a t specified high schools. Students in any school may rP Bi Bter for these cours es. Arts and Cra fts •• • Dougl a ss Hi gh School of fe r s Arts and Crafts for students adults. 5 quarter hours AviaUon,,.Primarily a fl i ght training program taking advantage . of the best flying s eas on wi th re lated ground school. The beginni ng stude nt will have a n opportuni ty to get in a s much flyi ng a s poss i ble while star ting the regular erounc school. The adva nced s t udent may continue worki ng toward Pilot Cert i fic a t e requirements . Cost of flying : $11.00 per hour , Cessna 150 , Link tra iner time may be avai l ab le at a reasonable cost of $5.00 per hour . For a dd iti ona l i nformation call Mrs . Ge orgia Kingdom a t 755-2231. Grady ~ Price - Washington 15 quar t e r hours Computer Progr am (APL) .•• A course in basic Computer Techni ques will be offered a t Washi ngt on High School . 5 quar ter hours Cla ss Piano .• • nn opp ortunity to study the piano a nd to l ear n to pla y s i mple nrusic will be offered a t Smi th Hi gh School. 5 quarte r hours Dance • •• Mode r n Dancing wil l be a par t of t he 4th quar t er a ct i vities a t Washi ngton High School . 5 quarte r h ours Drive r and Traffic Safety Educat ion, • • Driver a nd Traff ic Sa fe ty Education consists of two closely articulated phases: (1) Classroom instruction ( Driver Education 301 ) in driver and traffic safety education cohsists of t hirty hours of instruction dealing with driver, the vehicle, the roads, other users of the roadway, traffic laws, insurance, and defensive driving . (2) Practice driving (Driver Education 302) refers to six hours of incar instruction in the skills necessary f or safe driving. �-45Driver and Traffic Safety Educat::.on (continued) . •. Practice driving for those pupils who have corapleted the classroom work will be available a t all of the high schools ope rating the 4 t h quarter , providing enrollment is sufficient to warrant the course " Student&, not t a king other subjects, may reque s t to be s cheduled fo:i: either t he first f ive weeks or the last five weeks of t h e L'.-t'h qu a rter. S tud e.nt taking other ;: ,;.b j e ~ts will be scheduled to d1:ive at reg~l m·: inter vah, during the 10 -,week period . The complete program, con:3 i s ting of the clas s r oom phase a nd practice r~r i:uj_ng, will be offered cit p:zk~ and £2..uB_lass_. Engl:i.sh as a Second Lc1.n gun8e •. • Thj_s c O!Jrse wi ll be of ferecl on the high school level for no c re~i t t o t Los e s tuclentn of :forc=>i.gn b ackgr ound tvho are I1aving d i f ficult y 5.n t:1.0:t :.· c l.ao oeG becau se: of a de f:i. c i er:..::y i n English. QE~dY..non credit. Health Occ.upationnl __':[rain:be -~ -~fl.!,.• , 'ilii& c ou:::-se wi ll b e offere d .:1t Douglass High School. Thie wi U :i.ncl1.1ce (a) Work S tL:: 1c1.·.: cn iu t h~s e , '.l!'.'t; ['.r". u t iliz~.nc the f i:. :_; h :-F ~1.: n.n t:.:. 5. Assignme nt of a coor dina t or t o cooperate fully wi th Ci ty Services Coor dina tors in a nsweri;:ig compla ints and grievance s that come under the jurisdi ction of the Fire De partme nt �-82PUBLICITY Mr. Zenas ~eo..ro - Chairman Liller, Neal, Battle and Lindsey, Public Relations firm has agreed a3ain this year to serve as publicity consultant for the Youth Opportunity Pro3ram. The plan is as follows: 1. To secure a part-time public relations intern be13innin3 May 4, who will become full-time July 10, 1969. Under the close supervision of Liller, Neal, Battle and Lindsey, the intern will operate a Mock Public Relations L'\cency to provide service for participating acencies in the YOP. The intern 1 s initial activities in the YOP will include: developing a brochure, contacting the News Media, developing materials for Nl\B, YOP, and Rent-A-Kid programs, setting up an effective referral and information system
  • Tags: Box 2, Box 2 Folder 25, Folder topic: Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 2, Folder 25, Document 1

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_002_025_001.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 2, Folder 25, Document 1
  • Text: Metropolitan Atlanta Youth Opportunity Program SUMMER 1969 AN INVENTORY OF CHILDREN AND YOUTH ACTIVITIES IN SOUTHWEST ATLANTA Compiled By The Metro-Atlanta Youth Opportunity Council \ MAYO.R IVAN ALLEN, JR. Honorary Chairman CLARENCE E. ELSAS General Chairman MRS. CARRIE 8. WRIGHT . Vice General Chairman JOHN COX ' Executive Secre.tary For Further Information Call- 522-4463, Ext. 437 Printed By Atlantcs Puhllc Schools Atlanta Area Techn/c11I School li>epartment of Graphic Arts �YOtmt OPPORTUNITIES PROGRAM GENERAL INFORMATION I. II. General information concerning Youth Opportunity Program in recreation and educa tion--please call: A. Youth Opportunity Center 522 W. Peachtree St., N.W. 875-0971 B. Youth Council 68 Mitchell Street 522-4463, ext. 437 C. E.O.A. 101 Marietta St., N.W. 52S-4262 D. C011111Unity Council 120 Marietta St., N.W. . S77-2250 E. City Parks 260 Central Ave., S.W. 522-4463 F. Conaunity Chest 167 Walton St., N.W. 525-3487 B. full-time youth (16-21) Youth Opportunity Center 522 W. Peachtree St., N.W. C. ( 875-0971) part-time (Rent-A-Kid office nearest you) 1. Bedford Pine 547 Hunt St., N.E. 523-5431 2. Grant Park 645 Grant St., S.E. 688-0871 3. West End 1040 Fair St., S.W. 758-8326 4. Forest Park 4871 College St. Forest Park, Ga. 366-0516 5. Conyers 929 Conmercial St. Conyers, Ga. 483-9512 6. Techwood 840 Marietta St., N.W. 873-6759 7. Northwest Perry 1927 Hollywood Rd., N.W. 799-9322 8. Dixie Hills 2193 Verbena St ,,, N.W. 799-0331 9. Kirkwood 1723 Blvd. Dr., S.E. 378-3643 Headquarters 136 Marietta St., N.W. 10. Atlanta Urban Corps (C~Jlege Students Only) 30 Courtland Street, N.E. (524-8091 1. IV. Recreation EMPLOYMENT: A. III . & Public Employment: a. City of Atlanta ·Personnel Department 522-4463, ext. 267 b. Fulton County Personnel Department 572-2383 c. DeKalb County Personnel Department 371-2331 EDUCATION: 224 Central Ave. 761-5411 A. Atlanta Public Schools B. DeKalb County Bd. of Education 443-2311 C. Fulton County Bd. of Educatic,n 572-2161 RECREATION: A. Atlanta Parks & Recreation Dept. 260 Central Ave. B. E.O.A. 101 Marietta St ~ 525-4262 C. Coumunity Chest 167 Walton St. 52S-3487 D. Deltalb Recreation & E.O.A. 522-4463, at . 31.1 284-2288 -1- �E. V. Call Clty Recreation Dept. in your ar~# CHURCH PROGRAMS (Bible schools, retreat,, etc.) A. Atlanta Christi.an CoUneil B, Yotir c:lenOPd.natioiial bcxiy 524-1167 1, Methodist J:V. VIL 522-9065 2, 'Presbyterian 3, Baptist 525-7796 4. Catholic 523-4614 5. EpiscopaU.a• 261-2796 6. Christian 261-4132 'PER.5-0NAL SOCiAL }'R.OBLE?,f.S A~ Youth Council 522-4463, ext. 437 B4 Communtty Rel4tions CoJr,u4~~ion 522-4463, ext. 433 C.. Community Chest 525-3487 DA Crime Prevent ion Bureau 522-7363 E .. O.A.--For -additional information concerning recreationa, educational, and emplo~ent opportunities, contact your local Neighborhoo.d Service Center: NOIE: 1. West End N,S.C. 727 Lawton St. 753-6101 2. Nash-Washington N.s.c. 247 Ashby St. 524-2084 3. Price N . S • C. 1127 Capitol Ave. 522-2792 4. So. Fulton N~S.C. 2735 E. Point St. East Point, Ga. 767-7541 5. Central City N.S.C. 840 Marietta St. 873-6759 6. Northwest Perry & Bowen Homes , N1. s.c. 1927 Hollywood Rd. 799-9322 7. East Central N.s.c. 486 Decatur St. 577-1735 8. Summerhill-Mechanicsville N.s.c. 65 Georgia Ave. 577-1351 9. Gwinnett Connty Office 147 Clayton St. Lawrenceville, Ga. 963-1808 10. Rockdal e- Conyers Office City Hall Conyers, Ga. 483-9512 11. Edgewood N.s.c. 1723 Blvd. Dr. 378-3696 12. North Fulton N.s.c. 27 Oak St. Roswell, Ga. 993-3795 13. Pittsburgh N.s.c. 933\ McDaniel St. 523-1577 14. West Central N.s.c. 2193 Verbena St. 799-0331 Youth are urged and should feel free to take the initiative to make initial contacts with businesses for a job. CIT'l OF ATLANTA --- Fire Dept. 'lbe fire Department will conduct upon request fire prevention programs and activities. 'Jhese include : talks, demonstrations, film, literature, visitt: to local fire stations and street showers. Through the Parks Dept • . Call: 523-6952 -2- �OPPORTUNITIES FOR LEARNim ATI.ANTA PUBLIC SCHOOLS IN SotmlWEST ARFA HIGH SCHOOLS Atlanta for the first time, is offering its fourth quarter program for all hiRh schools, from June 4th - August 15th. A regular schedule of courses will be offered plus make-up work. In addition, special opportunities will be offered at several ochools. Washington High -- 758-8871 Special programs are: Aviation, computer programming, dance, russian and advisor vocational programs in food, shop, welding, auto mechanics, mechanical drawing, drafting, architecture, engine repair, auto ~~dy repair and painting. ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS Hardnett Harris M. A. Jones Lee-Rusk Kimberly Peyton Forest Venetian Hills Capitol Ave. Gideon Gilbert Derkerson Slater Cooper Pryor Elementary school p,rogracs will emphasize improving skills in language and arithmetic; eru::ichment and special programs include arts and crafts, instrumental and vocal music, speech therapy, dramatics, physical education, typing, m,m., dancing. Fror.:i. June 17-July 25. 8:30 - 11:30 - Monday - Friday CCM1UNITY SCHOOLS Comta11nity schools will offer special activities for children, youth or adults in the COI:lillUnity. Enrichment and recreational activities will include ceramics, cooking, dramatics, creative writing, judo. gymnastics, sewing and typing. The coomunity schools in your area are: Bryant, Capitol Ave., Cooper St. Gideon, M.A. Jones, Brown, Parks Jr. High. Enrichment activities will begin June 9 and will operate through Aug. 2. Recreation activities will also begin June 9 but will extend through Aug. 23. HEADSTART If your child h3s never been to school, and will be attending for the first time in September, check with your neighborhood service center (EO\) to see if he is eligible. If your child is eligible the following schools will operate Headstart programs: Hardnett Gideon Gilbert Lee-Rusk Capitol Ave. Cooper Pryor ATLANrA PUBLIC LIBRARY Adair Park Atlanta University West End (EM) Fulton County Schools Fulton County Board of Education will be operating regular summer terms at High Schoo ls and Elementary Schodls including Pre-School in the following locations: High Schools Elementary 4-7 Milton High North Springs Russell High College Park Campbell Roswell Guy Webb Harris St. North Ave. M. P. Word Avery Quillian - 1- Pre-School & Remedial Reading Dodd Roswel 1 Cedar Grove Central Park Beavers College St. East Point Fairburn Palmetto �OPPORTUNITIES FOR RECREATION Supervised recreation programs, 1nstruction, and athletic leagues are available at the following locations th1oughout the summer for all ages. Activities include swinming, tennis, softball, baseball, basketball, track, volleyball, gymnastics, art and crafts and many, many more. CITY OF ATIANTA. PARRS AND RECREATION DEPT. Perks, Recreation Centers, Playgrounds and Playlots. Howell Park Mary Coleman Dodd Ave. 941 McDaniel Ira Mozley Park Adams Pryor West End Park Adamsville Richardson St. Center Perkerson Benthill Walker Park Adair West Manor Washington-Ryder Windsor-Richardson J. A. White ( Swimning) ( Swimning ) J oyland (Swimming) Wilson Ave. Pittman ( Swimming ) .Oakland City ( Swimning ) PARK~ D&ARTMENT RECREA~ION. ACTIVITIES OPERATED IN SCHOOLS Schools Daily Hours ,.m. - Saturday -»~oo Harnett Elem 4:00 Gilbert Elem 4:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. 9:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. 12:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. 12:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. 4:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. 1:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. Pryor Elem. Washington High 9:00 p.m. p.m. • 6:00 p.m ,COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES Morehouse College -- 223 Chestnut - W. Fair They will operate a comprehensive s,~r recreation program in cooperation with YOP and Comnunity Chest agencies and E~ in NSC in the area. It will consist of sports education and instructional programs. Boys (12-14 years): Basketball, softball, swinaing, track and field eventa. Girls (12-14 years): Swi11111ing, gym, tennis, etc. Dates: June 15-July 25. Ages for both groups--12-14. SPECIAL StHIER RECREATION (EOI\ Expansion Program) For youth of all ages from EOA. target area. crafts, tours, dancing, Youth Council. Program will include sports, arts and Neighborhood Service Center (EM) Pittsburg NSC (EOA.) 993\ McDanile St., ~.E. -- 523-1577 Price NSC (EOt\) 1127 Capitol Ave., s.w., -- S22-5792 Program will include: sports, boxing, bowling, swinming, trips, arts and craits, drama, dancing, camping, baseball, clinics. South Fulton NSC (EOA.) 2735 East Point St. -- 767-7541 Programs will 'include: sporte, .!lt:ts and crafts, drama, trips and tours. West End NSC (EM) 727 Lawton St. S.W~ -- 7S3-~101 Program will include: aporcc~ -.,laylot activity, arts and crafts, field trips, record hops. -2- �Northwest Ga . Girl Scout Council - 40 16th St. - 876-0734 Day camp for girls Resident Camp for girls Activities will include sports , :citizenship, scouting, arts , cooking, housekeeping, money management, nature and natural science. YWCA - At lanta - 72 Edgewood Ave., N.E. 524-3416 Activit ies include employment counseling, grooming, work training, day camp, drama, sewing and group discussion. REGUIAR SUMMER PROORAM Atlanta Girl s Club 1191 Donneliy Ave., s.w. 758-1467 Call about program in your area Girls 6-18 (fee) Grady Homes Girls Club Centers: Carven Conm. Branch, 73 Meldon Ave.,# 539Cooper St. and John Hope Homes, 527 Roach St. s.w. Activities include: arts and crafts, homemaking, swim:ning, dancing, Gi~ls 6-18 (fee) Bot Scouts - 167 Walton St. N.W. - 523-7805 Ca 1 for scouting activities in -your community (fee) Butler Street YMCA - 524-0246 22 But l er St., N.~. Activit i es: Resident and Day Camp Swiuming, arts and crafts, movies, karate, softball, basketball, worship, table games, music, educational trips. Ph~l l is Wheatley Braach YWCA 59 Tatnall s.w. Activities: Arts, crafts, games, basketball, trips, etc. Atlanta Girls Club 1191 Donnelly Ave., 758-1467 s.w. Emmons House. S.W. 1017 Capitol Ave. Act ivities: field trips, dancing, singing, swimmins, reading program, drama, art, 3rd through 7th grades. June 23 - Aug. 8. 525-5948 Bethlehem Com:nunity Center Activities: general playground activities - active and quiet games, athletic games, tutori ng, arts, music, drama. Ages 3 years t o 21 years. Mid June - Mid August. 622-0912 Lucille Ave. Baptist Center Activities: teen clubs, recreation, folk singing, spiritual movies, tutoring. 755- 1389 Oakhurst FroJect Act ivities: general playground activities, tutorial proeram, remedial reading, pr~• school activities, arts, crafts, music. Ages 5-18 378- 3677 Wesley Community Center (Rebecca St. Center) 342 Richardson St. s.w. 688- 1482 (fee) camp Fire Girls, 525-7636 167 Walton St., N.W. Program for Girls 7-18 (fee) Butler Street YMCA 524-0246 22 Sutler St. Program for boys and girls 6 and above (fee) -4- �C
  • Tags: Box 2, Box 2 Folder 25, Folder topic: Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 2, Folder 25, Document 7

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_002_025_007.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 2, Folder 25, Document 7
  • Text: ~ Liller Neal Battle & Lindsey, Inc. Atlaota Richmood Tampa New Yock I' YOUTH OPPORTUNITY COUNCIL Review of Public Service Material Available May 29, 1969 �~ Liller Neal Battle & Lindsey, Inc. Atlaota R;chmood Tampa NewYo,k YOUTH OPPORTUNITY CDUNCIL Review of Public Service Material Available THEME The theme for the 1969 campaign is "Make Your Summer Count." This has been adapted in a number of ways for use in print and broadcast materials, as outlined below, TELEVISION Three television spots have been filmed featuring the Atlanta Braves' Sonny Jackson. Ba s ic copy approach i s to impress upon Atlanta youth the fact that ther e ar e a multi tude of activiti e s avail abl e . We anticipate featuring a telephone number in each spot, giving the hours when the number can be reach ed ; in an effort to encourage kid s t o get infor mat i on immediate ly. The 1O-second spot will feature Sonnr Jackson, the tel ephone number , and the "Make Your Summer Count" logo. We will also prepare a 2O-second spot wi th the same basic elements. We are hopeful of preparing a 3O-second television spot which will also fea t ure news6l ips of some of the activi t ies t aking pl ace l ast year in co njunction with Sonny Jackson. �• ~ Liller Neal Battle & Lindsey, Inc. Atlaota Richmood Tampa New Yo,k - 2 - ' Station I.D.'s will be made available to each of the four Atlanta tele~ision stations. While no definite commitment can be made by any of the stations as to the use of tHe I.D.'s or the television spots, Liller Neal Battle & Lindsey will be contacting station representatives to outline the program and elicit whatever commitment can be made by the stations. Liller Neal Battle & Lindsey will also be following up with stations in this area. RADIO A musical jingle has been prepared for use by Atlanta area radio -stations. The basis of these radio spots is the theme set to music with a 45-second music-under segment. Information from various agencies will be funneled into John Cox's office, well in advance, and this will be condensed and sent to cooperating radio stations at · least one week in advance of all activities. The stations will then promote these various activities in conjunction with the musical jingle •. These will be rotated through their schedules, and hopefully, a majority of the activities will be promoted on the air each week. There is also a shorter version of this musical jingle which will be used in the same manner. A very brief "radio I.D. will also be supplied to the stations which will simply be the theme itself, At the outset of the radio campaign, Liller Neal Battle & will also be contacting radio stations to outline the program. Lindsey �~ Liller Neal Battle & Lindsey, Inc. '"'" R;chmoad Tampa New Yock - 3 - Copy will be supplied to radio stations by Liller Neal Battle & Lindsey to be used in conjunction with the theme and the announcements at the outset of the program. This will be done in an effort to apprise listeners of the. programmed announcements throughout the summer, indicating to them that the theme and the music mean now is the time to listen for upcoming activities. It is extremely important that all agencies cooperate in this effort by channeling information into John Cox's office well ahead of time. Stations are deluged with requests to promote activities (for example, WSB-TV actually promoted well over 350 different public service organizations in the last year). The agency will be promoting the fact to individual radio and television stations that this weekly run-down from John Cox's office will cover a majority of activities taking place throughout the summer. There is no question but that each of the various agencies involved can benefit tremendously from this overall effort. NEWSPAPER We are now preparing recommended public service newspaper ads for various publications in the metro Atlanta area. This will be basically broken down into two communications objectives. The first will be to reach the parents of children who can participate in the many programs and the children themselves. Secondly, there will be messages directed to the entire community indicating that Atlanta does care, there are a multitude of programs going on during the summer, and that there are many ways that the average citizen can cooperate in making the programs an even bigger success. �- r- ~ Liller Neal Battle & Lindsey, Inc. Atlanta Richmond Tampa New York - 4 - All print advertising will carry the "Make Your Summer Count" logo, and these logos are now available to the various agencies participating in the program for use in their own materials. �
  • Tags: Box 2, Box 2 Folder 25, Folder topic: Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 2, Folder 25, Document 8

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_002_025_008.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 2, Folder 25, Document 8
  • Text: NOW NEWSFROM VI C E PRESJDEMT SPIRO T . AGMEW, CHAIRMAM VOL. II, NO. 40 ON YOUTH OPPORTUNI 801 • 19th STREET, H.W., WASHIHGTOM, D.C. Tel : 202/382-1534 DECEMBER 12, 1969 36 VO LUNT ARY AGENCIES IN CLEVELAND PROVIDE J O BS FOR DISADVANT A GED YOU T H For the s econd consecut i ve y e ar, member voluntary a g encies of Cleve land' s Welfar e F e deration participate d durin g 19 6 9 in a summer jobs pro g ram for n e arly 500 disadvantag ed youth. The 36 participating a gencies pro v id e d w ork s tation s and super v 1s 10n for youth w ho w ork e d as day and m u si c cam p aid es , phys ical therapy assistants, and outreach workers. One hundr e d a nd thirty - e ig ht of the j obs we re financ e d directly fro m a ge ncy bud get s, an inc r e as e o f n early 100 per c e nt fro m 196 8. The program was c oor dinate d b y C l eveland I s Manpower P lanning and D e velopm ent Commi s sion . Additional information is available fr o m the We lfare Federation, 1001 H u ron Road, Cl e v e land , Ohio, 44115. 3 1 DE TR O IT HIG H SCHOO L ST UDE N TS PROVIDED P U BLIC RELATIO NS T RAININ G Thirt y- a n e D etr o it high s c h ool stu d ents parti c ipate d this s pr ing m a four- week tr a ini n g pr o gr a m in public re 1 a t ions. H eld at Way ne St a te University, the project was designe d to trai n youth for s u mmer jobs as c ommunication aides at 17 n e ighbo r hood centers. Students received instruction in n e ws release writing, interviewing, poster and handbill design, and l ettering. To suppl ement classr o om ses sions, field trip s were made to anew spa per, radio and television s tations, an advertising firm, and a printing company. Professional public relations p ersons w orke d w ith e ach student m an advi sory capacity dur ing the training program and made periodic vis its to the job sites dur ing the summer. The project was funded by the D e troit Pub 1 i c Schools In -School Neighborhood Youth Project and United Community Services. C ITY BRIEFS -- Alfred Collins, a second-year participant in a photographic workshop sponsored by the Chicago Co mm i tt e e on Urban Opportunity in conjunction with t h e President 's Council on Youth Opportunity, recent 1 y received an award for being one of the winner s in a national photography contest. -- A group of inner-city students in Washington, D.C., has organized a 11 Teen Corps 11 which will sponsor employment clinics to help youth learn how to obtain and hold a j ob. �-2POST OFFICE I BIG BROTHER I PROJECT CUTS JOB DROPOUT RATE A "big brother" program to help young employees in the summer jobs program of the U.S. Post Office Department cut the job dropout rate from more than 20 per cent in 1968 to less than 10 per cent nation w ide this past summer. More than 1, 800 fu 11-t i me employees volunteered to act as co u n s e 1 ors to the approximately 7,900 disadvantaged youth hired this summer, a ratio of almost one to five. In Washington, 53 v o 1 un teer s worked with 253 youth and k ept all but nine on the job from June to September - - a loss of about 3 . 5 per cent. Encouraged to solicit potential s ummer employees from dis advantaged communities, volunteers helped youth through the ce r tification process and arranged for adv ance vouchers for those youth who ne e ded money for car fa r e, lunches , and clothes for work . Counselors also organized a ft e r - work activities and helped youth deal w ith personal difficulties as necessary. The Post Office r e laxe d work pressures upon counselor s so they could spend more time w ith the four or five youth working along side them . JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL YOUTH AIDED BY DES MOINES 'NEW HORIZON' PROGRAM A w o rk pr o gr am d e si g ned to encour age 14 and 15- year-o ld youth to remain in scho ol ha s been developed in Des Moines b y C ommun i ty Improve ment, In c. , in c ooperat io n w it h the public s c hool s . The "New Horiz o n s" w o rk-stu dy program b egan as a thre e -year demonstration pr oj ect with y o uth enro lle d from the seventh thr ough the n i nth gr ade in two targ et area junio r h igh s chools. The p r o gram now operates int hr e e hig h s c ho o ls and serve s m o re t h a n 40 0 youth . Students enro lled i n 11 N ew Hori z ons II a ttend s chool in the morni n gs and hold part-time job s i n the a fternoon for up to t h ree hours a day. Northwestern B ell T elephone, Equitable L ife Insurance Company, and several city offi c es provide work sites , supervision, and s alar ies f or the youth. 51 STUDENTS ENR O L L ED IN MINNEA P OLIS URBAN CORPS Du r in g the summer of 19 69, 51 student inte rns re p rese nting 23 co 11 e g e s a nd univers iti es in nine states, participated in the Minneapo l is Urban Corps program . Students performed a variety of tasks during the summer including writing technical articles for the Wate r Works Departme n t, researching robbery t re nds fo r the Poli ce "D e pa r tme nt, an d surve ying all Minneapolis b o a r d in g homes in an e ffo r t to he 1 p rev ise ordinances governing t h em. In addition to the ir regula r dut i es, students als o attended a weekly "Sympo sium on Urban Affa irs II w hich focused on critic al urban problems. A report on the Minneapolis project, including an e v a 1 u at ion by interns and city pe r son n e 1, is av a i 1 ab 1 e from Michael B . Goldstein, Director, Urban Corps National Development Office, 250 Broadway, New York, New York, 10007. �- 3C A R E ER DEVELO PME N T A W ARDS ENCOURA GE VO C A T IONAL TRAINING An educat i o n a l a s s is tanc e pro g r am to encourage and help stud e nts wit h inte r ests and t a lents in n on - academic fields is e nterin g it s second ye a r in Princet o n , N. J . The Career D e ve l opmen t Aw ards Pro g ram (CDA) is designed to p r o v ide s chola r s hips for ta lente d yout h w ho r e qu i r e fin an c ial a s sistance fo r furt h er voca t io n a 1 tr ainin g. It is al s o conc e rn e d w ith t h e stud e nt who pl ans t o a t t en d co llege a nd has t h e r e source s to do so , b ut whose ca re e r g oa l s might best be served by t e chnical-vocational t ra i n ing after s e c ondary school. L a un c he d b y a n ad v isory c o mmitt ee fr o m the P r inc e ton ar e a ; the progr a m i s s p o ns or ed b y t h e Educat i on a 1 Testing S ervi c e, a n d is privately finan c ed through l ocal fund - r ais in g. Student s inter e ste d in the a w ard s program w e re r equ ir e d to submit application s a nd b e inte rv ie we d by an eig h t - membe r se l e ction committee made up of l o cal b us in e s s people . During the first ye a r of t h e pr oj e c t, 15 · s t u d ent s receive d the career awards and their plans r a nged from tw o - y e ar s e c r etaria l course s to a six-month computer programming cou r s e . Additional information on the Career D evelopm ent Awards P ro gram is available from the Education al Tes ting Servic e , Princeto n, N. J., 08540. TITLE ONE TASK FORCE LAUNCHED BY U.S. OFFICE OF EDUCATION A 15-member intradepartmental task force to l ook into the operations of Title I of the Elementary and Se cond a ry Educati on Act ha s been named by Dr . Jame s E. Allen, Jr. , Commissioner of Edu c ation in the U.S . Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. Among the i ssues the task force will examine a re in ternal management of Title I in the U.S. Office of Education, criter i a and guidelines, technical assistance and evaluation, and T itle I relationship s with other U .S. Offic e of Education programs and how they can work together to serve disadvantaged children . T it 1 e I, ESEA, is the largest Fed er al aid-to-education program. _ It is specifically des i g n e d for education a 11 y dis advantaged children. During the last school ye ar, Title I served nearly eight mi 11 ion children in about 16,000 school districts across the Nation. NOW - - AND THEN .... "Strengthening the Neighborhood Youth Corps," a report on a study of spec i a 1 services provided NYC enrollees, is available from the United Neighborhood Houses, 114 East 32nd Street, New York, N . Y., 10016 (75¢). �- -4SUMMER HIGHWAY JOBS FOR GHETTO YOUTH REACH NEW HIGH IN 1969 A 127.4 per cent increase over 1968 in the number of dis advantaged youth hired to work on the Federal-State highway program has been reported for th e 1969 Summer Youth Opportunity Campaign of the Department of Transportation I s Federal Highway Administration. Now in its fourth ye a r, the Federal Highway Administration program is designed to obtain summer employment for youth with both private contractors and State highway d e partments. A total of 44, 596 youth were reported hired across the Nation last summer, a 45 per cent increase over the 30, 57 3 hired in 1968. Of · these, 27,260 were disadvantaged youth. The District of Columbia ranked first in providing jobs to the dis advantaged, hiring 4, 700 youth. Other states int he top five were Illinois, 2,151; Texas, 1,845; Ohio, 1,603; and Kansas, 1,548. In most instances, the youth were hired as laborers. However, a wide range of jobs was provided. Among the developments in the prog ram were: The N e w Mexico State High w a y Commission assi gned youth to materials and testin g jobs, photogrammetry, brid ge design, and spe cial services. In Wyoming, various unions waived initiation fees as inducement to youth who wanted to work in hi ghway construction. ,:, In T e nnessee, disadvantaged youth worked on landscaping and maintaining the trees and shrubs planted alon g the highway . They re ceived training and close supervision in tree - trimming, mulching, planting, fertilizing, and pest control. ,:, New J er sey carried on are c r u it men t campai gn int he g hetto areas of Newa r k and Trenton . For most of the youth re cr uite d , it w as the first job they had ever had. GSA oc 10 . s9e s PRESIDENT 'S COUNCIL ON YOUTH OPPORTUNITY WASHINGTON, D. C. '. 20006 OFF ICIAL BUS l ·N ESS PRINTED MATTER POSTAGE AND PR ES I DE NT' S F EES PAID COUNCIL ON YOUTH OPPORTUNITY D OF F �
  • Tags: Box 2, Box 2 Folder 25, Folder topic: Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 2, Folder 25, Document 3

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_002_025_003.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 2, Folder 25, Document 3
  • Text: MAKE YOUR SUMMER CO~NT �
  • Tags: Box 2, Box 2 Folder 25, Folder topic: Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 2, Folder 25, Document 6

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_002_025_006.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 2, Folder 25, Document 6
  • Text: SY "i,l",f¥036 .,-w,.:5 i11L5 DB GOVT ?OB VASHI!,JTOt-l DC 20 NF'i HOi' ORA.F.il.E IVJI.~ 6-.t.LEN, JRu l'iA YO~ 0~ ATLA.,-tTlt C H'I'. HALL A.'n.~ AS CHA!R!'IM~· Of TH£ PRr."5lOENT' CC1l*'(;!l ~ YOU'TH OPPOATW!TY, l.t-' ;,u:_;,5([! TO AM>,!OUNCE THAT urnrn f\Jt-0$ A.RE EEING "IAOE AVt1-!LAH£ HY TI-lE Df.P.l.R.1¥.ft..lT$ Cr' TRA"'1SPO¼'HATIOI', .f..ND ~iO-lJS.IMl ,U,[) VT< [!AN Dfi\!tlOW.ENi' 10 'HELP C nre:s fxf'AND TP.ANSPCRTA TION r tr-.: 1, SUPf>ORT fF YOU"fH ~CG.RA!"!S OP(RATE ON A THC PROORA"', wru.. PERCENT LOC~l 1-rATCH!NG THI$ $U-ffi\:ER. PERCENT ff.OtllAL TC 25 B SIS A."iG 'iill E£ OPtRATEC JOlNTU BY Tl-!( N.41.TlOP-IAl LEAGUE or ctn.Es llND u .. s. CONf'tREI-CE: og.- MA'fOAS. YOUR YOU'TH COORClNATOR 'i il l.. $H(>l'nL'f Rf CEi.V€ DE TAltf.:D INF"O" MATT.CN fl-"ROK TH£ P fH)G~i',l"i ADl'l1NISTRAT~q ~, o>ili' 1270 ( 1- 5 1 ) t;.: ~ e 1. Q t}, . ,!. _ __~e~J:. JL.-- _ __ 1- .l. �
  • Tags: Box 2, Box 2 Folder 25, Folder topic: Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017