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Box 21, Folder 4, Document 2

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_021_004_002.pdf
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  • Title: Box 21, Folder 4, Document 2
  • Text: ~SLIP~ TO : FROM : ~ D Ivan Allen, Jr. r your inform a tion Please refer to the attach d cor_respon dence and make the necessary reply. D F ORM 25 - 4 Advi se me the s t a t s of th e atta ched. �
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 4, Folder topic: Rapid Transit | 1966-1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 4, Document 6

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_021_004_006.pdf
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  • Title: Box 21, Folder 4, Document 6
  • Text: Please distribute the attached copies to the aldermen. �
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 4, Folder topic: Rapid Transit | 1966-1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 4, Document 7

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_021_004_007.pdf
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  • Title: Box 21, Folder 4, Document 7
  • Text: RA.PID TRA.NSIT ,· PROGRESS METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY " ARTA REPORTS TO THE PEOPLE IT SERVES . . . " JANUARY 1967 VOL. 2, NO. I STATE BUDGET PROPOSES $500,000 FOR MARTA IN 1968-69 The state budget for fiscal 1968-1969, now being considered by the General Assembly, includes a request for $500,000 for the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority. This amount would be the first state funds granted to MARTA; the grant is possible under the provisions of Constitutional Amendment 14, passed in the November 1966 General Election. Governor Lester Maddox , in his budget address to the General Assembly, January 13, included the request under a section on "Development Proposals." After outlining his major programs, the Governor stated, "Other major proposals included in the budget I am submitting today include (a proposal to) . . . provide $250.000 in each of the fi scal years of the biennium to match federal and local fund s for Rapid Transit in Atlanta as soon as the Authority qualifies for Gov. L ester Maddox the assistance." The request was part of the proposed budget drawn by former Gov. Carl Sanders in conferences with then-Democratic Gubernatorial Candidate Lester Maddox and Republican Gubern atorial Candidate Howard "Bo" Callaway. Sanders called a news conference Dec. 21 to afifiounce the budget request fo r rapid transit. After announci ng the req uest for the half-million dollars, Sanders stated, "I earnestly hope that this is just the first installment of State support for the rapid transit system here in Atlanta. The "We expect to apply for federal funds of four times this amount, using the State's appropriation as the local matching funds. This $500,000 thus will become $2,500,000 with the approval of federal funds on a four to one basis." Stuart noted that "The total construction cost of the entire 66-mile system will be about $43 7 million. The basic system (North-South and East-West lines) will cost about $310 million to get into operation. It is our hope that in the next 20 to 30 years the State will be able to provide the maximum amount allowed under the law, which is 10 per cent of the total cost. If this amount is provided, and the maximum amount of federal funds are forthcoming, the amount required from the City of Atlanta and the counties of Fulton, DeKalb, Clayton , and Gwinnett will not be excessive." Others present at the news conference included Roy A. Blount, MARTA Vice Chairman; Augustus H. Sterne, President of the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce; Alvin Ferst, Chairman of the Chamber's Rapid Transit Committee; Fulton Rep. Jack Etheridge; Curtis Driskell, Director of Metropolitan Affairs of the Chamber; and King Elliott, MART A Public Information Director. problem of moving people rapidly and effectively is one that faces all of our urban areas, but it is most acute here in our Capital City." "We cannot stop improving our highways-and I might say that a fourth of Georgia's highway money has gone into the Atlanta area in the past four years-but we cannot depend upon highways alone to solve our problems." "That is why this initial State grant is so important. We are backing up our legislative support with hard cash, and now the project can really get under way." Henry L. Stuart, General Manager of MART A, responded with words of appreciation for the request, and explained, "The appropriation announced today will allow the Authority to proceed with the detailed design of portions of the rapid transit system and with some right-of-way acquisition." Gov. Cnrl Sanders, with MARTA Vice Chairman Roy A. Blount (left) and General Manager H enry L. Stuart (right) . �METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY 808 GLENN BLOG .• 12 0 MARIETTA ST .. N. W . ATLANTA. GA . 30303 • PHONE 524 , 5711 and expense, not to mention frayed nerves from rush hour traffic." "We need a rapid transit system," Atwood concludes, "to keep Atlanta on the move." "DIRECTED BY THE GEORGIA STATE LEGISLATURE TO DEVELOP A RAPID TRAIii SiT SYSTEM FOR THE S-COUNT.Y METROPOLITAN ATLANTA AREA." HOUSE COMMITTEE ASKS FULL STATE SUPPORT FOR MARTA Edited by KING ELLIOTT BOARD OF DIRECTORS OFFICERS: RICHARD H. RICH, Chairman ROY A . BLOUNT, V ice Chairman ROBERT F. ADAMSON, Treasurer GLENN E. BENNETT, S ecr etary CITY OF ATLANTA: MILLS B . LANE, JR. L. D. MILTON RICHARD H. RICH RAWSON HAVERTY CLAYTON COUNTY : EDGAR BLALOCK DEKALB COUNTY: DR. SANFORD ATWOOD ROY A. BLOUNT FULTON COUNTY : MITCHELL C. BISHOP W. A . PULVER GWINNETT COU NTY : K . A . MCMILLON COBB COUNTY (Obser ver) OTIS A. BRUMBY, JR. MARTA STAFF: HENRY L. STUART, Gen er al Manager KING E LLIOTT, Director of Public l?i formation H. N. JOH NSON, S ecr etary to General Mana ger EDUCATOR NOTES URGENT NEED FOR RAPID TRANSIT "Hover over Atlanta in a helicopter at five o'clock in the afternoon. Look at the freeways and city streets jammed with thousands of cars inching their way home, and you know Atlanta needs a rapid transit system NOW," says MART A Board member Dr. Sanford Atwood. "From the air, downtown Atlanta seems like one vast parking lot, a sea of cars surrounding lines of shiny new office buildings," says Atwood, President of Emory University. "A rapid transit system won't solve all our transportation problems, but a glance at the city from the air is a graphic lesson. There is a limit to how much land can be devoted to freeways and parking lots. T here is a limit to the patience of the commuter and the amount of time and money he is wiling to spend to get to downtown Atlanta," Atwood continues. · "A rapid transit system can save . , Dr. Sanford Atwood valuable land for more productive uses. It can save millions of wasted hours Atlantans now spend getting to and from work or recreation. In the long run , rapid transit can save the citizens of Metropolitan Atlanta and their visitors millions of dollars in time The House State and Local Government Study Committee, in its final report, recommends that the state provide the full 10 percent of the total cost of the rapid transit system. The Committee, with Rep. Wayne Snow, Jr., of Chickamauga, as chairman, filed its final report in December. Henry L. Stuart, MART A General Manager, and Rep. Jack Etheridge, MARTA Counsel, appeared before the Committee at the State Capitol Dec. 9. The two discussed the impact the system will have on the Metropolitan area and the entire state, as well as the present programs and future plans. The Committee report summarizes the testimony and makes its recommendation as follows: · "The Metropolitan Atlanta R apid Transit Authority appeared before the Committee and presented the pro· posed cost of the system for the Atlanta area. With the passage of Constitutional Amendment No. 14 at the General Election in 1966, the state is authorized to participate in the amount of 10% of the total cost of the system. T he total cost of buildR ep. Way ne Snow, Jr. ing the system over the next fifteen to twenty years will be an estimated $437 million. The Atlanta Authority is able to utilize the free information from the San Francisco Authority which is some three years advanced on the Atlanta program. T hose of us who travel to Atlanta frequently and hold considerable pride for our capital city, its progress, and its contribution to the state and the Southeast are too frequently reminded of the inadequacy of the present system of freeways and the daily drudgery endured by those who must commute at a snail's pace back and forth thereon. "We are advised that 55 % of the real property in the City of Atlanta is now non-income-producing and that the city can ill afford to give up more income-producing property to costly freeways. "We recommend that the state bear its 10% of the cost of this system as the participating counties and metropolitan Atlanta appropriate their funds." Members of the House of Representatives serving on the Committee were Wayne Snow, Jr., of the 1st District, Chairman; Lionel E. Drew, Jr., 116th; Devereaux F. McClatchey, 138th; Roscoe Thompson, 111th ; Reid W. Harris, 85th ; William M. F leming, Jr .. 106th; Roger W . Wilson, 109th ; W. M . Williams, 16th; Will iam S. Lee. 79th; Jerry Lee Minge, 13th ; Harry Mixon, 81st; and Dr. Albert Sidney Johnson, Sr., 25th. ATLANTA TO HOST TWO TRANSIT CONVENTIONS IN 1967 May 24-26-The Annual Meeting of the INSTITUTE FOR RAPID TRANSIT will be held at the Marriott Motor Hotel. The IRT is composed of members from all aspects of rapid transit. Oct. 22-26-The annual meeting of the AMERICAN TRANSIT ASSOCIATION will be held at the Regency-Hyatt House. The ATA bas as members only those operating transit systems (railroads, bus lines, rapid transit, etc.) �HUD GRANTS MARTA $369,000 An application by the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid 1:ransit authority for $369,333 in federal funds was approved m late December. The announcement of the grant was made D ec. 21 in Washington jointly by Georgia Senators Richard B. R ussell and Herman Talmadge, and by Secretary Robert C. We~ver, U. S. Department of H ousing and Urban Development. T he orant was the nation's first T echnical Studies Program Grant ~uthorized by a 1966 amendment to the Urban Mass Transportation Act. The federal funds will be matc~ed by $184,667 in local funds which are on hand or committed. Assistant Secretary Charles M. Haar noted tha~ HUD "does not regard a transportation system as something that can be superimposed on a city after all else is planned or built." H aar continued, "It is our firm conviction that transportation systems are a vital component of metropolitan development, and effective metropolitan planning must bring the people operating the system into the planning process at Charles M . Haar an early stage of deliberation." As Assistant Secretary for Metropolitan Development. H aar has an overall responsibility for HUD's programs of planning standards and coordination as well as the Urban Mass Transportation Program. "The basic purpose of the new orogr?m", Haar said, _"is to bridge the gap between federally-assisted tr~nsportat!on planning of an overall nature, and _federal!~-~ss1sted cap1!al improvements in mass transportation fac1ht1es_ and equ~pment, by providing funds for prelim_inary functional_ stud1~s of basic need, priority, and engineermg and economic feasibility." "The $554,000 program will finance the follo~ing work : completion of preliminary engineeri~g _on exten~10ns _to the North-South Line; most of the prehmmarv engmeermg on the East-West Line, and extensions to 1-285 at each end of the Line; a Rapid Transit Corridor Impact Study; and a:1 Impa.ct study of the proposed system on the Atlanta Transit System. BOARD MEMBERS MAKE FIELD SURVEY Members of the MARTA Board of Directors were shown some of the various routes under consideration for the Central, Northeast, East, and West Lines on two field trips in January. The directors were escorted on the tours _by members of the engineering consultant firm, Parsons-Brmckerhoff Tudor and Bechtel. The directors plan to tour the routes being studied for the South Line as soon as preliminary engineering reaches the staoe which would make a tour meaningful. The present development schedule calls for completion of preliminary engineering by the end of 1967. At the proper time, tours will be arranged for cTcy and county officials associated in MARTA, as well as for members of the news media. Also, as provided in the MART A Act, public hearings will be conducted to acquaint citizens with the plans and route locations before final decisions are made. In the pictures above and below , engineers are ex_p':aining_ how portions of the rapid transit system _ could f oll_ow ex1strng ra,/road lin es. The location is Southern Raz /way at P1edm o11t R oad. IS YOUR ADDRESS CORRECT? Please check the address on page 4; if it is incorrect pl~ase make corrections, and return to MARTA, 808 Glenn Bmld mg, Atlanta, Ga., 30303 Or if you would like to have RAPID TRANSi'.[ PROGRESS sent to a friend, just fill out the form_ and return 1t to MARTA, 808 Glenn Building, Atlanta, Georgia, 30303 NAME__ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ ADDRESS_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ CITY_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _STATE,_ __ _~IP_ __ (PLEASE INCLUDE ZIP CODE) �RAPID TRANSIT BRIEFS1966 ROUND-UP MARTA ACTION MONTREAL The newest rapid transit system in the western hemisphere began operations October 14, 1966. The Montreal METRO, patterned after the Paris METRO, has 16 miles of underground railway, with 26 stations, each station designed by a different architect. The METRO was built by the city thru its Public Works Department, without financial help from superior governments, at a cost of $2 13,700,000. T he trains travel on rubber tires , running on concrete tracks, and they are powered by electricity. There are 41 nine-car trains, th e usual train used during rush hours; each car will seat 40 persons, with standing room for 120 more passengers. Another line, to be opened this Spring, will take passengers to "Expo 67", the international exhibition which begins April 28. SAN FRANCISCO Contracts for more than $250 million in construction work had been awarded by the end of 1966, to build 34 miles of the 75 mile Bay Area Rapid Transit system. Contracts totalling $300 million will be let in 1967 for another 24 miles of th e system. Construction under way includes subway, aerial, and ground level sections; the four-mile underwater Trans-Bay Tube, and a three-milelong twin-bore transit tunnel through the Berkeley Hills east of Oakland. BART passenger service is scheduled to begin on some East Bay lines in mid-1969; San Francisco and Trans-Bay service will commence in early 1970. BALTIMORE The Metropolitan Transit Authority has recommended an initial $225 million phase of rapid transit construction for Metropolitan Baltimore. The initial phase is for two radial lines plus portions of a downtown inner city rail transit loop; the full system under study calls for six radial rapid lines, an inner city downtown loop, plus express and feeder buses. The MT A recommendation went to the Metropolitan Area Council for approval in early January. LOS ANGELES The Southern California Rapid Transit District has approved $2,625,000 in contracts for preliminary planning and engineering for the first phase of a rapid transit system. In its January meeting, the MARTA Board of Directors approved amendments to the contract with engineering consultants (Parsons-Brinckerhoff-TudorBechtel) to cover work to be performed under the new HUD Section 9 grant of $369,333. The General Manager was authorized to execute appropriate contract with HUD for the funds, subject to review by the Board. The Board changed the date of the February meeting because several members will be absent from the city. The next meeting will be Wednesday, February 15, at 3:30 p.m., in Room 619, the Glenn Building, instead of February 7. NEW YORK The New York City Transit Authority has ordered 400 new subway cars, and is asking for $220 million in additional funds for improvements and extensions in the 1967-68 fiscal year. Plans are being made for a· new subway tunnel under the East River between Queens and Manhattan. BOSTON The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority's Advisory Board approved a $346 million "Master Plan" for improvements and expansion. WASHINGTON, D.C. An interstate rapid transit compact was signed in November, creating the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority. WMATA will replace the National Capital Transportation Agency in September. Congress has authorized construction of a 25-mile subway and rail rapid transit system to cost $431 million. Plans call for the system to be in operation by 1972. EGYPT Experts are currently studying the city of Cairo, seeking routes for what will be Africa's first subway transportation system. The first line will run north to south along the east bank of the Nile River; a second line is planned to go under the Nile. TORONTO 14.5 miles of route is · being added to the Toronto subway system at a cost of $284 million. The new 8.5 mile Bloor-Danforth subway opened in February. R.Al?ID TRANSIT M ETROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY BOB GLENN BLDG. · 1 20MARIETTA ST . , N.W. PHONE 524-5711 (AREA CODE 404) ~1 · ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 �
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 4, Folder topic: Rapid Transit | 1966-1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 4, Document 10

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_021_004_010.pdf
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  • Title: Box 21, Folder 4, Document 10
  • Text: R.APID TR.ANSIT PROGRESS METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY JrA~ m A ~.J....ci. " "1\ .J..V.J.. REPORTS TO THE PEOPLE IT SERVES ... " OCTOBER 1966 VOL. 1, NO . RAPID TRANSIT CAR COMES TO METRO ATLANTA A scale "walk-in" model of a rapid transit car of the future will be on display in Atlanta during October and early November. The "New SCOT"-"Steel Car of Tomorrow"-developed by U. S. Steel Corporation, will be one of the attractions at the 1966 Southeastern Fair, opening in Atlanta September 29. The "New SCOT" is being scheduled for exhibit in several shopping centers in the Metro Area during the succeeding weeks. system, would transport them at speeds up to 75 miles per hour, with schedule speeds, including stops, of 45 MPH. The car is built of light-weight "sandwich" panels of steel and stainless steel, developed by U. S. Steel Corporation engineers. Each panel is made up of a steel core, resembling the structure inside an egg crate, sandwiched between sheets of steel bonded to the core with an epoxy adhesive. In the car design, panels are used both for structural side framing and floor support. The "New SCOT" is only one of many rapid transit cars and prototypes which will be carefully evaluated by MARTA and its engineers before a specific design is chosen for the local system. The MARTA-sponsored exhibit will provide the first opportunity most Georgians will have to see an example of the equipment which could be used in the system now being developed for the 5-county Metropolitan Atlanta area. The " New SCOT" will be on exhibit in Baltimore, Md., Sept. 28, and will be shipped directly to Atlanta. It is expected to be on display at the Southeastern Fair Oct. 1-8. The display, to be located just inside Gate 2 at the Fair, will be open at all regular Fair Hours. Admission is free. The model car to be seen in Atlanta is a 37-foot shortened version of a proposed 75-foot rapid transit car. The full-length car would seat 300 passengers in air-conditioned comfort, and, if used in t he Atlanta The exhibit is tentatively scheduled for the following locations after the Fair closes: Oct. 10-15, Rich's Downtown; Oct. 17-22, North DeKalb Center; and Oct. 24-29, Greenbriar. �METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY BOB GLENN BLDG . " 120 MARIETTA ST., N. W . ATLANTA. GA. 30303 · PHONE 524-5711 "DIRECTED BY THE GEORGIA STATE LEGISLATURE TO DEVELOP A RAPID TRANSIT SYSTEM FOR THE 5-COl.JNT.Y METROPOLITAN ATLANTA AREA." " Edited by KING ELLIOTT BOARD OF DIRECTORS OFFICERS: RICHARD H. RI CH, Chairnian. ROY A. BLOU N T, Vice Chairman ROBERT F. ADAM SON, Treasurer GLENN E. BENNETT, S ecretary CITY OF ATLANTA: L. D. MILTON MILLS B. LA NE, JR. RAWSON HAVERTY RICHARD H. RICH MEET THE MARTA STAFF HENRY L. STUART became General Manager, MARTA, on June I, 1966. His responsibility is the overall development of the Rapid Transit System, from engineering, to design, through construction, to operation. Stuart, operating under policies established by the IO-member Board of Directors of MARTA, acts as co-ordinator between the Board and the consulting engineering firm planning the system; various federal, state, and local governmental agencies; manufacturers and suppliers of equipment, and citizens interested in rapid transit. Stuart is the chief administrative officer. CLAYTON COUNTY: EDGAR BLALOCK DEKALB COUNTY: DR. SA NFORD ATWOOD ROY A. BLOUNT FULTON COUNTY: MITCHELL C. BISHOP W. A . PULVER GWINNETT COUNTY: K. A. MCMILLO N COBB COUNTY (Obser ver ) OTIS A . BRUMBY, JR . MARTA STAFF: HENRY L. STUART, General Manager KING ELLIOTT, Director of Public Information H . N . JOH NSON, S ecr etary to General Manager ATLANTA NEEDS RAPID TRANSIT ... NOW! "Early completion of the Rapid Transit System is the only hope for relieving the traffic problems which plague Atlanta," according to Richard H. Rich, Chairman of MARTA. Rich pointed out that one of the most important things in the economic development of any area is the ability to move people and things effectively and quickly; and, therefore, the primary purpose of a rapid transit system is to get people to and from their jobs quickly, easily, and comfortably. "Rapid Transit will not solve all of the traffic congestion," Rich emphasized. "but it will go a long Richard H. Rich way toward the solution.'.' Rich noted that State Highway Department figures show that, on a 24-hour-a-day basis, the North Freeway between 14th Street and downtown is already operating at 35% above its rated capacity. By 1975, the Highway Department estimates that this same section will have 70 % to 88% more people wanting to use it than it is designed for. By 1975 all Atlanta expressways will have more people wanting to use them than the expressways are designed to handle. "By completing our planned Rapid Transit System, we can remove tens of thousands of commuter cars from the expressways, and make it easier for those who have to drive to reach their destinations; by doing this, not only will Atlanta continue 'on the move', but traffic itself will be able to 'move'," Rich concluded. Henry L. Stuart Prior to assuming his post with MARTA. Stuart was Director of Service Control, Southern Railway System, Atlanta. He is a licensed Interstate Commerce Commission Practitioner, a Certified Member of the American Society of Traffic and Transportation. He is married, with three children, and resides at 3282 David Road in DeKalb County. KING ELLIOTT assumed his post as Public Information Director, MARTA, on August 22, 1966. He is responsible for the development and implementation of a complete public information and education program. He edits MARTA's "Rapid Transit PROGRESS," and works closely with news and other media. He will also be responsible for developing other means of telling the Rapid Transit story, thru displays, public meetings, speeches, trade shows, etc. Elliott was News Director, WSB Radio, before assuming his present position. While at WSB, he received numerous station and individual awards for excellence in news programming. He is a member of Sigma Delta Chi, national professional journalism society. King Elliott He resides with his wife and four children at 811 Brookridge Dr. N. E., Atlanta. H. N. "JOHNNY" JOHNSON, secretary to the General Manager, came to MARTA June 13, 1966, from the Lockheed-Georgia Com- - - - - - - - pany, where he held a position in the employment office. Johnson handles much of the administrative work of the office, in addition to his other duties. H. N. Johnson He was for three years Administrative Assistant to James V. Carmichael, Chairman of the Board, Scripto, Inc.; and for seventeen years was Executive Secretary to the Vice President of the Central of Georgia Railway. Johnson, who resides at 1004 Williams Mill Rd. N. E. . has a son and daughter who attend Decatur High School. �METROPOLITAN ATLANTA "Where We've Been ..." 1954-Metropolitan Planning Commission notes need for rapid transit "within a few years" 1959-MPC begins series of transportation policy studies 1960-MPC develops exploratory investigation of rapid transit as possible supplement to freeway network 1961-Expanded 5-county Atlanta Region Metropolitan Planning Commission proposes comprehensive 5-county R-T plan - Atlanta Transit System {privately-owned bus company) endorses idea of publicly-owned rapid t ransit system in own preliminary proposal, "Rapid Atlanta" -Atlanta Chamber of Commerce studies and endorses R-T 1962-General Assembly creates " Metropolitan Atlanta T ransit Study Commission" ; MATSC lets cont ract to Parsons, Brinckerhoff, Quade and Douglas to develop final plan; PBQD work, completed December 1962, is approved as "official" plan - Constitutional amendment to make rapid transit a legitimate public function passes in Fulton and DeKalb counties, but fails statewide 1963- "Committee of 100" is formed, with former Governor Ernest Vandiver as Chairman - General Assembly creates " Georgia State Study Commission" to st udy problems from state's viewpoint 1964- Rapid Transit Amendment (affecting only 5 counties in Metro Atlanta area) passes 1965- General Assembly passes " Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority Act of 1965," providing for an Interim Study Commission ; six eligible governments hold speci a l elect ion on whether to participate; only Cobb County votes not-to take part RAPID TRANSIT HIGH L I G HTS " ... and Where We Are ... " January 3, 1966-Interim Study Commission becomes "Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority" -Budget of $300,000 for 1966 is approved ($175,000 local funds, $125,000 federal funds); also, Atlanta Region Metropolitan Planning Commission has $122,000 federal grant for rapid transit planning June I-Henry L. Stuart becomes MARTA General Manager June 13-H. N. Johnson becomes Secretary to General Manager June 28-Contract is let to Parsons, Brinckerhoff, Tudor and Bechtel to up-date 1962 plan, and for preliminary planning on North-South line (Oglethorpe to Hapeville) • July-Cobb County Chamber of Commerce appoints special committee to study question of another referendum August 22-King Elliott becomes Public Information Director Sept. 13-Otis Brumby, Jr. of Marietta is appointed official "observer" for Cobb County at MARTA meetings Sept.-Work begins on application for $500,000 in federal funds for preliminary engineering on EastWest line " ... and Where We're Going ... " Nov. 8-Constitutional Amendment to allow state to participate in cost of mass transit to be voted on 1967-up-dating of 1962 study to be complete 1968-Referendum to finance system to go to voters 1972-North-South Line complete, begins operation 1975-East-West line (Avondale Estates-Adamsville) opens 1980-Entire System complete HOW FAR HOW FAST? The map at left shows the proposed routes for the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit System. The following table shows t ypical distances and travel t imes from , Stations to Transit Center, which will be located downtown south of Marietta St ., between Broad and Peachtree Streets. Station Distance Time Norcross . 18.2 miles 23 minutes Doraville . 13.6 19 10.4 15 Oglethorpe . . 7.1 11 Lenox Square. Ansley Park 3.4 6 Tenth .St reet 2.0 4 Forest Park . 12.9 16 Hapeville . 9.9 13 East Point . 6.4 9 West End . . 2.2 2 Avondale Estates 7.4 11 Decatur. . . . 6.1 9 Moreland Avenue 2.8 4 4.5 8 Hightower Road. Ashby Street . 1.6 3 Marietta . 18.3 25 Smyrna . . . 12.9 18 7.2 12 Moores Mill Road 8 Cooks . . . . . 4.7 North Druid Hills Rd. 10.3 15 �l I j ENGINEERS REVISE 1962 PLAN Engineers for Parsons Brinckerhoff-Tudor-Bechtel, MARTA engineering consultants, are in their new offices in Atlanta, revising the 1962 Rapid Transit Plan. The staff of seven is headed by John Coil, Resident Manager; Raymond K. O'Neil, Deputy Resident Manager ; and Raymond W. Gustafson, Supervising Engineer. Coil says major emphasis is being given to the railroad "gulch" area, where the Transit Center is to be located. Engineers are also working on confirmation of route locations downtown and in outlying areas. Patronage studies are continuing, along with studies of downtown distribution of passengers. This part of the work is about 20 percent completed. A library study of soils factors is also underway, and is estimated to be 50 percent completed. The revision of plans for the North-South line is expected to be completed in June, 1967; and the target date for revision of the East-West line is December, 1967. RAPID TRANSIT BRIEFS CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT on transportation of passengers goes tQ Georgia Voters in Nov. 8 General Election. The proposed amendment would declare public transportation of passengers to be "an essential governmental function," and would allow the state to allocate funds to public transportation authorities. The state is limited to "not more than 10 per cent" of the total cost, either directly or indirectly. A simple ·maJority of those voting on the amendment will be required for passage. COBB COUNTY COMMISSION appointed an official "observer" to attend MARTA meetings and report on its actions. The Commission September 13 named Otis _A. Brumby, Jr., Assistant to the Publisher of the Marietta Daily Journal, to the post. HENRY L. STUART, General Manager of MARTA, has been telling the Rapid Transit story; recent appearances include those to Atlanta Chapter of the Public Relations Society of America; Atlanta Chapter American Right of Wav Association; Atlanta Chamber of Commerce Rapid Transit Committee, and Dunwoody Lions' Club. Coming up are speeches to the Atlanta Chapter, Georgia Society of Professional Engineers, and to the Druid Hills Kiwanis Club. STATE PROPERTIES CONTROL COMMISSION heard from MARTA representatives on August 23 relating to new lease for state-owned Western and Atlantic Railroad properties. SPCC, L. & N. and Southern Railways agreed to work out details in lease which would allow subway. aerial, and station construction in downtown railroad "gulch" area. "RAPID TRANSIT PROGRESS" is name given to MARTA's newsletter, with this issue being the first one. "RTP" is expected to be published monthly, with King Elliott as editor, and will be sent free to those requesting it . . MARTA ACTION Engineer D ave McB rayer (left) discusses changes with John Coil, Ray O'Neil, and Assistant D ra ftsm a n L evem e Pa rks ~,• In the September 6 meeting, the Board of Directors approved the selection of "Arthur Andersen and Company" as auditor for the Authority. Action on appointment of fiscal agent was postponed until the October meeting. , RA.l?ID TRA.NSIT PROGRESS M E TROPO LITA N ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY BOB GL E NN B LDG. · 120 MARI ET TA ST .• N.W . PHONE 5 2 4-5711 (AR E A C O D E 4 0 4) OCTOBER 1966 ·VOL. 1. N0 . 1 · ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 �
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 4, Folder topic: Rapid Transit | 1966-1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 4, Document 11

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_021_004_011.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 21, Folder 4, Document 11
  • Text: RA.PID TRA.NSIT FI<..O METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY "~AR.TA REPORTS TO THE PEOPLE IT SERVES ... " FEBRUARY, 1967 VOL. 2 , NO. 2 HOUSE APPROVES FIRST STATE MONEY FOR MARTA The first state financial aid for rapid transit was approved by the House of Representatives Monday, Feb. 20, as the House passed and sent to the Senate the Appropriations bill for 1968-69. The Appropriations Bill allocates to MARTA $250,000 during each year of the biennium (Fiscal 1968, 69) , or a total of $500,000. The state grant, when finally approved, will be used as "matching funds" for $2 million in federal funds. The two grants will enable MARTA to begin some detail design and acquisition of some right-of-way necessary to preserve the route alignments. The state funds were included in the budget prepared by then-Governor Carl Sanders, and in the official budget submitted by Gov. Lester Maddox. A Constitutional amendment approved in the 1968 General Election allows the state to pay up to "10 percent of the total cost" of the rapid transit system. The House Appropriations Committee, with Rep. James H . "Sloppy" Floyd as chairman, conducted hearings for three weeks on the budget requests, with MARTA representatives appearing Feb. 8. Representing the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority were Henry L. Stuart, General Manager; John Coil, Resident Manager, Parsons Brinckerhoff-Tudor-Bechtel; Stell Huie, MARTA Counsel; Glenn Bennett, Secretary of the MARTA Board and Executive Director, Atlanta Region Metropolitan Planning Commission; and King Elliott, MARTA Public Information Director. Stuart discussed the creation of MARTA, the early and current work done on rapid transit, and the revision of the 1962 plan which is now under way. Stuart noted that local financial support has been excellent, and that all requests made for federal funds thus far have been approved. "Through 1967 we will have spent or committed $1.5 million to the project," he added, "and with federal funds committed, state aid for the first time, and the federal funds we anticipate getting, the total funded project will be about $5 million." "This will bring us right up to the detail design stage, and to a time of decision on the proper methods of financing the construction of the system," Stuart said. John Coil, PBTB, outlined current work under way in preliminary engineering, soil-tests, revision of the 1962 plan, and in other areas of work. Following the presentations of Stuart and Coil, members of the committee asked a number of questions; the more pertinent questions and the MARTA answers are found on page 2 and 3. R ep. Jam es H. "Sloppy" Floyd, Chairman, presides over meeting of H ouse A ppropriations Com m ittee (center back), with Vice Chairman Colquitt H. Odom at his left , and Secretary W illiam J. W iggins ; man in foreground is R ep. Jones Lane, a m ember of the com m ittee. Legislators listen carefu lly as answers are given to questions put to those appearing before the H ouse A ppropriations Committee. �METROP OLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY 808 GLENN BLDG . ' 120 MARIETTA ST . , N.W . ATLAN T A , GA . 30303 · PHONE 524-571 t "DIRECTED BY THE GEORGIA STATE LEGISLATURE TO DEVELOP A RAPID TRANSIT SYSTEM FOR THE 5 -COUNT.Y METROPOLITAN ATLANTA AREA."" Edited by KING ELLIOTT BOARD OF DIRECTORS OFFICERS : RICHARD H. RICH, Chairman ROY A. BLOUNT, Vice Chairman ROBERT F. ADAMSON, Treasi,rer GLENN E. BENNETT, S ecretary IRT CONVENTION PLANS Plans for the upcoming Atlanta Convention of the Institute for Rapid Transit are beginning to take shape. The convention, to be held at the Atlanta Marriott Motor Hotel May 24-26, will feature full audience participation in special study sessions, according to George L. DeMent, President of IRT. "We are planning another stimulating program that should be of great interest not only to IRT members, but also to many other persons concerned with metropolitan transportation and planning problems of our growing cities and urban areas," said DeMent, who is Chairman of Chicago Transit Board: CITY OF ATLANTA: L. D. M ILTON MILLS B . LANE, JR. RAWSON HAVERTY RICHARD H. RICH CLAYTON COUNTY: EDGAR BLALOCK DEKALB COUNTY: D R. SANFORD ATWOOD ROY A. BLOUNT FULTON COUNTY: MITCHELL C. BISHOP W. A. PULVER GWINNETT COUNTY : K . A . MCMILLON COBB COUNTY (Observer) OTIS A. BRUMBY, JR. MARTA STAFF: HENRY L . STUART, General M anager KING ELLIOTT, Director of P u blic Informat ion H . N. JOHNSON, S ecretary to Gen eral Manager "RAPID TRANSIT MUST HAVE TOP PRIORITY!" "The development of a rapid transit system is an absolute 'must,' and it must have a top priority if we are to solve, effectively and permanently, our transportation problems," said Mitchell C. Bishop, College Park b~sinessman and F ulton County member of the MARTA Board. Bishop, a former Director of the Division of Traffic and Safety of the State Highway Department, stated that "while we have made valiant efforts to solve our traffic problems, so far we have only been nibbling at the edges and making piecemeal attacks on our dilemma!" "Looking at the situation from an engineering standpoint," he continued, "a completed and operating rapid transit system is the framework around which we can build all other solutions to the problem of efficient and safe transportation inside this . . great Metropolitan Atlanta area. With Mitchell C. Bishop rapid transit transporting 250,000 to 300,000 persons, mostly commuters, every working day, our streets, highways, and expressways will be able to accommodate vehicular traffic and to move that traffic more efficiently." "Another interesting effect rapid transit will have and indeed is already having," said Bishop, "is a unifying effect on all the people of the state. All across the state people now refer to Atlanta as the home of 'our Braves' and 'our Falcons' ; and they take great pride in the fact that these teams belong to all Georgians. I n a similar way, rapid transit will serve not only the people in its immediate area, but will benefit all Georgia because of the improvement in ease of transportation and speed and economy of travel into and out of our capital city." "I believe rapid transit will have a tremendous effect on all of Georgia as well as this area," Bishop concluded. George L. DeMent David Q . Gaul "In addition to our IRT members, we wish to extend an early invitation to all persons working in the related fields of metropolitan planning, transportation, and government to join us in Atlanta for three days of challenging workshopstudy sessions," said DeMent. "Nationally prominent experts in the urban transportation fi~ld will present case studies which workshop participants will analyze. The findings by the participants then will be reviewed in critiques." David Q. Gaul, Executive Secretary of the IRT, says that "plans for the system proposed for Metropolitan Atlanta will also be discussed at the convention, which will highlight the tremendous resurgence of interest in and development of rapid transit in this country and Canada." LEGISLATORS' (Members of the House Appropriations Committee had a number of questions for MARTA representatives on how State aid would be used; the following are typical questions and answers from the meeting.) JAMES H. "SLOPPY" FLOYD, Chairman, House Appropriations Committee: What do you estimate the total cost of the rapid transit system ? HENRY L. STUART, MARTA General Manager : The rapid transit system that we envision to be operational in the middle of the 1980's will cost in the neighborhood of 450 million dollars. By the middle of 1970's we will have an operational system incomplete, and it will have cost approximately }50 million dollars. As Mr. Coil mentioned, these estimates are now in preparation in this order of magnitude. FLOYD: L et m e ask you this. D o the citizens in this area have to vote on som e bonds? STUART: If a tax levy is required that will raise the property taxes, referenda must be held. FLOYD : What if the citizens of this area defeat the bond? H ow will the State get their money back? STUART: Such of the money as has been spent for design purposes will not be recoverable; such of it as is in real estate will be recoverable depending upon the value of the property. FLOYD: W hat rate of interest do you think you will have to pay on 450 million? STUART: Our financial advisors are basing their plans on 4 and �SNOW JAMS TRAFFIC-RAPID TRANSIT RUNS On January 26 and 27, more than 23 inches of snow fell in Chicago, clogging the streets and freeways with stalled vehicles. Estimates vary, but the consensus is that more than 15,000 cars and trucks and 600 busses were stuck. While the street traffic was stalled, the rapid transit lines and commuter railroads kept running. "From all reports, the only reliable way of getting around the city was the elevated-subway system," Associated Press reported. An editorial in "RAILWAY AGE" noted, "When nothing else could move in Chicago, the railroads and the Chicago Transit Authority rapid-transit lines moved. If ever there was evidence of rail-transit's ability to combat overwhelming obstacles, if ever there was proof of the railroads' ability to do the job and damn the odds, Chicago was it. . .. All the CTA rapid-transit lines did was to provide in-city residents with dependable transportation while the freeways froze and hundreds of busses and thousands of cars wallowed around and foundered . . .. To thousands upon thousands of grateful people, it was enough." Snowfalls in the Metropolitan Atlanta area are usually no more than two or three inches, but street traffic usually becomes virtually impossible. The advent of rapid transit will make travel possible even in ice and snow conditions. QUESTIONS AND MAR-TA'S ANSWERS ... a quarter percent. FLOYD: Over a period of how many years? STUART: 30 Years tax free municipals. FLOYD : So after paying principal and interest you would pay about 900 million dollars? STUART: Yes sir, based on a $450 million bond issue. FLOYD : Now who is going to actually own this rapid transit system? STUART: The MARTA Act of 1965 provides that the title to the real estate and the rolling stock is vested in the Transit Authority which is an arm of the State. FLOYD: There's a rumor going around that when this thing is built the bus line might end up owning all this. ls that true? STUART: I cannot see that at all. There is no provision in the Act for that and there is no plan for it. WILSON B. WILKES, State Budget Officer: I just wanted to ask Mr. Stuart about $250,000 each year that you requested or that's been recommended for mass rapid transit. Do you plan to use this and go ahead and start buying right of way? STUART: Certain necessary right of way that is necessary to protect our alignments. WILKES: The building of a transit system itself is going to require additional tax levy, and that additional tax levy is going to require a bond election? STUART: Yes sir. WILKES: So actually you will acquire property before you do the other. STUART: Yes sir. RODNEY M. COOK, Member, House·Appropriations Committee: Will you explain to the Committee why you f eel it is necessary to purchase some of these parcels of land now? STUART: Yes, for example in Sunday's paper there was an announcement that the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers have put together a p arcel of land near the stadium for a new office building. T his office building is squarel y astride a piece of property we were studying as a possible route to the South and is going to cause us untold expense to re-engineer that South route. We must have a way to stop this, and the best way is to put up or shut up. COOK: ls not also one of the reasons you had to re-engineer because of the Life of Georgia was built on one of your routes? STUART: Yes, the Life of Georgia Building at North Avenue and West Peachtree is an example of the same thing again. (In answer to a question from a reporter later, Stuart amplified his comments on the total cost figure of "$900 million including principal and interest" as used during the committee hearing. ) STUART: One possibility on financing breaks down this way: if we get the maximum federal funds of 60%, and the maximum state funds of 10%, this is 70% of the total construction cost. This would leave 30%, or only about $ 110 million on which interest might be paid. These proportions are possible under existing state and federal legislation. �Members of th e legislative delegations from MARTA counties breakfast with m embers of the MART A Board of Directors and staff at Marriott Jan. 24. Some 17 members of the House and 7 m embers of the Senate heard MA RTA officials discuss plans and progress in the development of the rapid transit system proposed for M etropolitan Atlanta. In the picture, Henry L. Stuart, MART A General Manager, is responding to a question from a legislator. Board Chairman Richard H. Rich presided at the breakfast m eeting. MARTA ACTION : At the February meeting, the 'Board of Directors ratified the contracts sigiied by Henry L. Stuart Feb. 2; one contract defined the scope of the work to be done with the $369,333 grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; the other contract authorized PBTB engineers to start the work immediately. Jeff Wingfield, Planning Director, Atlanta Region Metropolitan Planning Commission, outlined the need for strong overall plans for downtown Atlanta, and the part rapid transit cou ld play in implementing such a plan. Henry L. Stuart, MART A General Manager (left), and Congressman Fletcher Thompson, U. S. Representative from Georgia's Fifth District, discuss some of the proposed rapid tramit lines currently under study by engineering consultants. Rep. Thompson, visiting in MARTA offices Feb. 10, said that the U. S. agencies in Washington he has talked to appear to have a high regard for the work being done by the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority. Collier B. Gladin, City of Atlanta Planning Director, discussed progress in the Community Improvement Plan project and work being done to set up a Model Cities Program. Referring to the impact rapid transit will have, he urged continued close coordination of plans and efforts to achieve orderly development of the great potential of Atlanta. The next meeting of the MARTA Board of Directors will be Tuesday, March 7, 3:30 p.m., in Conference Room 619, the Glenn Building, 120 Marietta St. , N . W. _~.,./ ~'-. / ·...""-... Hon. lvijn Allen, Jr,, M~yor City of Atl~rnt~ City Hall Atlant~, g~. JOJOl ~ I �
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 4, Folder topic: Rapid Transit | 1966-1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 4, Document 17

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_021_004_017.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 21, Folder 4, Document 17
  • Text: P·,: c l i ..,::.:,::::y F1\.\NCI. '(~ AT~.\\TA'S Rap i an s i t A t hor:. ··y .Ju y 3i , 1 6 7 -i A :'-1 ~1 E R , G E E . ' .:: , -~ I L E R A S S O C I A T E S \\'AS!iL GTO, ·- , TLA!'TA 230 Pcachtre- Str et ~ . E. Atlar-ta , G~o 5 ~~ 30303 �-I~A::C:i:NG '1 ;:: co:-:s':'~UCT_G,' OF ATLA(T.-\' S RAPIJ T.,.'c,,S::.T SYSTE:,. T:e c:::i ..:::::. cost e :::· ir.2.c--:ce ..;..: -t sys'.: i of ~eLopoli·c::i. 't:.:. ta' rapi. tra sit syste .. c:e:;:::: y by £1.:1 s o· tained f _o!n so:.:rc~s be ond t . ...ar bo:·. ca;:i generate e . ough opera-:... · n g re r- nues to cove _ op rati:1g e--~ ar. l $ E:S ce ·ch · p:.irchase of the oasic rolling stock a.--:ci op ra-:: - ! in; e t..::.pr.: .·c. b idges, statio, sand othc le .,cnts of t e f::.xed inv stme t in Metro"'1o· ::.·::an _ 00 1 • F eral an t e t ac>s, For t e c apit::l co ·cs of t. e system, ho•.1 re _ ·clanta must to t . e locc:. tte area governmen·cs to C:.:-'~ stat~ sources . u T:.is is, of cours , norma . Rapi t ansit s stems a:::-1c: basicaLy u:.:o:..::.c e,.te:c1):..·iscs CJ?crating public facilities comparable to str perforrr.ir.g essc tial public services . Alt;"cug ts and sc .oo::.s 2.. t' ey a:-e unlil'e s·'r ets z.nc s c· oo s in that they produce operating revenu · s, few sys te'.lls a _ e ab le to s:;_:iL off er:.ot..(,,. .et returns to r:ia! e any substantial cont:..·ibut.:..o the fixed. i. vcstP.ents . to b::i.sic cos-cs So; e syste.s do bett r t an ot·.e s but all s .;Le ·..:,.e cha acteristic of being public service enterprises that require direc . . . ::,u - ::.ic ' St.]por.: ~rt ey a e to ~cet public needs . le islation that set u 0 loc::.i g0ver::l .. c ,-::s to r,, etropoli ta..'11 At lan'.:a' s syste:il G. thori:::.:::- a'·e funds available foT capital cos\:s i.1 two way-. is ·co t.:ti::.izo the bonding capacity of eac:--, jt1risdiction, if sue, .'.11 ... i:~.>:...:: , or the issuance of general oblig2.tion bo.1ds ,:i os HA.:,\ .... !:R.ORCE, C:.:lll procee-1.s ,:o A AS CCIA.i .. S - "' ... J. . C ...,_,,.:) �/ (:':A.~--'-~ Io 7hc ot!:.e:r u:::-o·,ic.~ - : o--.: land ac · isi tio, ~:-id c ons truc·.::io;i c os·cs . sti?ul::t-3~ pay,n n s :Zro1 ·.::r.e -ocal gov e :..· _r.-.e _ts to ·che Am::. o:city ·::o cov :.- t:-1. -..: "-'--~c: cos~s o~ se _vicing beads~ ic '.! u::.2- SSl!e. is·o;i- _: b~ ge .,e ally class ed as _ev , t:e '.:lo,.ci.s ::,ecause t' re v~:1ucs ? l e dg d fro . loca I::1 -::~ fo::..lo·.·:ing sectio ., c :::p it::l cost The 1 _apia of V.e de:_ lying p '-r;:. ~c .:-:-iC 11 J, .e::.· secu_i·.::y ,:o'..-:c 02 t.S . sp cts o= the local :°i:canci .g o-£ t:-.0 opolita...-1 . "i::la.. ·.::a ' s r .J.pid ·ca_ sits st .. w::. :!. :. be xp~o:--d . '"::.se to be rei te _ a t ed is th::t t' e public :: aturc o:: t: e si·c c:1terprise c al s for t e uublic assl!.'11pti on of res- o:::.s::...,i :..ity for pay::.ng fo t he fixed inv est .ent . T _is pr mise has al eady be ::1 c:c:::-1 ecogni::ed locally m d indeed was as sumed in the cre at ion of MARTA t c l ·gi s lat ion providing for MART. ' s suppo:..··· an o d J.T:. ratior,s . Questic~s and Principles Three key qucstio s , ed to be pa ticula ly hig lighted i this ar.~lysis : To i·J'. at extent c an the local c..rea coun-c 0:1 _inancia help from E!ederal and s tate sources to suppler.1e t ·the funds that rr.ust be ade avail~ble from t locel government ? After the local share is ·ete::.::ined, l m· shou1d th is b· rden be ailocated among the ever al gover 1, .:;ntz.l juris ictions within t e me·tropoli tan a ·e;:? After this allocation is made en a fair and ~quitable oasis, ·,1hat would be the potential ir.,pact of t· is new 2. pen it re commitment U?On the local gove . r.ents a_~d t~xpayers? - 2HAMMER IJR .. ~P\ .. •SI~ RASS::;11. l ~,} __ �t~at .:.La ~o: ·u~ject ~o precise co_ro o~atio~. t: amo,~ ~ ci=le~ t governDe ,t 1 juris ~ tio~s A::ocating t .e locai steL ?ulton, D -'.'n.lb, C2.a to. , ob co:.m ... ies (wit~ a nossiblc b_ca - out of the City o_ Atl::u.ta -!: c::1 ·"; c co' 1ti s in whicl. it is loc,rce: ) - - c lls :..:o_ cvi ::.::-.'.; e c.lyzing gets OL t' · e · pact or _a i 4 _ru sit finru ci g upo . the bu e d:.. :..er n- local governrr.ents cal:i.s ,..o_ evaluation o p _oblc1.s oi. acco.~1;0 ating additional that a·e al~e y unde r First th prc.ct:.cc..:. ~it~in govcr . ent 1 stLuctur s i an cial pressu- . S::iecific answe s to eac' o tis sectio~ . =·. a:"h. · e~ c for::-.Jla -c,:.::·c co. si 'c rs both benefits fro! , t. · Lansi t systc:;-i a t' ere t es ight b questions will be provide 12.te.1. i , 2n explorati~ c _ pri ciples invo v 1 . orde~ to get age .eral pe _spective fo _ tr.e subsequent an lysis. Fcdeo_d .:.::d State Assistance . All of nsi t he r:1ajor rapi t .,e U~ited States built up to the present time -- in Ne\l ·ys-cc:i:~ ark, Chic2go , P i:e - cclphi~, Boston and Cleveland -- have been preponderantly ~inane d f~o~ revcnu~ sources, bot public and pr·vatc . i. It has only been in oc_: cc rt 'C.:: _s that the .~eC.:.or l government has developed a program o':f ass is tanc"" i. t:1is f~eld s~all. ~n~ t; e w.oJnt of Federal mo~ey invo ved to date h~s bee~ r~lat:..ve~y Tte w.ost recent rapid transit syste, to get under ~onstructio, 3ay Are~ f pid Transit syst m (BART) in Sx1 Francisco - - is be:.ng al~os: co.::Lj:..-.:·ce!y i:.n need fro:n state and local sources, 1vit'i ·c"he ·cu:-ren F..-:c...:;1·2.:.. fu:-ids ::-...presenting a small Laction 0.1. the tot:2.l costs f:o,.. ::r.= \,·: .i.c, :r.c.: -3H~MMEA.OR! NE. t:R Asr;c,;.1.T • .i - - 1 �reach or.c L1 0 C s:s .~~:.on collars) . f143.215.248.55 ~ clearly r -s~ Gr. -~:.'.) 1 ~:. ~~ s sou the -oca l Oc.>.. e r -~ n ed o:: ::.. i.e .. ~ ooi .t oi u·-:y C re a . , ViJ.tUJ. lly .::i.11 u . . in...'1 gov :rnr.:ents atio~al crisis . 0 ~ n r ve ,ues eac yea , oc 1 goverr, e~ts. su,p i s in most arc cievelo?e~, there' as be stc:. e gove:.-·m.:cn·cs fo _ =G a;-.c.. itional r ver.u s i c ea ing Eve e 1ands as c·d to tur re o tn.::ni:-:g ew l ocal r ev .u tote F . C _ so ces j a., i-:. . lp . It can b:::; ta.e people o~ Georgia in !',;ove::-.'.)er l 6'" app ove~ a c onstitutionc. l r.me ,.en·.: de c_ c.rinJ p1..;.bli c tr2.r s p or-::at i o:: to be an "ess :atial gove:.-:1.. ental fun c tion tax tio::: of t. e state n o-.: a p b:.ic purpose for \.,:!:ic:l t~ e nu·:; ay be exercised ar,d its public f..mcs e:x--pe .c.e .,, . Y,-,e ar;-.en ment also p- ovi ded , how v er, t~ at t:1e S·cate of Geo:rg:ia shaL :-1ct n::-01::. de -,ore hai:. 10 percent o-: the t otal cos'.:: of a pub· ic t a_ spo:::-tatio;i sy te:.:, ~::-~ctly or indirectly . ap:::,rc:,:n·iatio:1 to the Subsequem:ly, 'cl etropoli t an At · . ·ca syste hc:.d been d0·termined a-rid before loc 1 fina.,cing bee G ner 1 Ass .. b :.y ;:-. c:.c:e 2.:--. even bei re ·.:he ·.::o·.::a cos-.: or bui ldi. g t· e sy ·::e::. ::_::: ass;__;_rc . c:i.· )U:cposes of planning, it is reasonable to 2.ssune t'.at ·.:,:.::: S 2.-::.::: oi Gcor6 i.'.l. :.ri 1 contrfoute 10 percent of the c~pital costs of ~1 ·crc·::.oli ::::-: , . .::.~a-.;:u.'s systcr... _) It is quite possible, of cours , th:.t t. e le_;::.s .:..: r:ot c:.A·~·n:ove contributions i:1 -::his "agni·~udc. On :he othe... 1 ::-...: •.:i:.l a::-d, thc::c ::. · : -.- o -5 HAMMER OR ENE . .,;,L ERAG~ ._.1.:- ... _ __ �inar.. c:..al "J: .r. . :::g S . OU ld ta C c!.S Ai.loc,r.:i'"':, ..:C.:c.1g Lo cal J:.1:.:-j_sdictio.-,s . of .-.. .~~, 1 - c pi'. :al costs ··-l. govern ..vi,·.:s is e i:1 .:;2.c:· ju:r · s i ctio t;;e p2; will be ::-.ac. and - Ul · 2.v.2.ilaole . bl ,.. G3·::-:;:.·.:1::. ::.r.g -- S,. Ot.:.:'..d .. <--. .... •N ecicc :):,' vm:e 11: 0::1 ·.:::1 o e.::.c' . of t\e u::. ti 1at ly, .. CCU!'Se, 1.. r. ·s .:,,i::::c::.· o:-- not t'. .es However , a fo:.:-,r.:.:12. :::1..!s t be cievis ed for making a ia::.r lloc2.tion on t e bas is of 11nic: ···J:.is e ci ion . ig 1t ce r:1.2.c.e: . The o j cti ve s 01...:.ld be so far as pos sib e to base sh.~re -:::1 p:rop ortio.. of c..i loca·..:cd J~t e ..1.. ~ ., s ·;: .j a pr c...::11s e . be .ef" ts t1 at t sys ·cer.i wi 11 p~·ovi · e . . cc:1t::.fy t:-.e ove al - ·i:rids of ben ii s ·.:: .:..t s ·c ac' j1...:.:-isC:ic·.:::..on' s It is . ot t.o a s stem mig ,t p::oci ·ce; ·.: 1e I ·0 ··y:::o· :.e.....-. ::.s to C8 ·e:.:o1:i.ne . ow th se b r.e£::.·i:: l'!light be disLibu ed a..11d :-::eas~e · trop o ican area . system , ...s bee , able to defi .e t · ese b Up to nm·J , no rz.pi' La::sit efi. ts in a.T'ly precise way on a:i c.. _ez. - by- arc:a basis . 1." evi·e:ice o a.:.·c:. is ;;:-...~::.sta.:·able . _ 3S the over:dl va ue of :r-apid transit to a .. tropolit 2. . The cos ts of movi g peop:;.e by t:.:-ansit is consic.e..1.c."oly t;1;:.,1 by exprcssi-,ay . Reductio, of highway £md s·;:reet traffic th:rnug: r:,:.·01is::..c.- of t:-ansit facilities saves ti .. e fo-:.:- ::.n ·ivid ,als e.'1 b si. sses a.:.d ::.1c2.:1s ::.eavy savings in public c::.c:-as o~ ·.::, c ::.c.::.::..l govei..11..,e .. ts of ~ etropoli tan At lant:-1. tc~ ti~i :~Jact of adding the bu de The pu1.· pose vrn.s to cctc:.·r.,i:i.c ·c.: e po - o~ t ' e r.c, .1 raDid ·.::-ansi t sys·ce::-. ·co co~?~ex of ~,ub ;;.c services and faciliti.es 1·:1ich the local g vern.~..},:-;: car::-y . al_·e ady T:·,is fiscal study involved fo:cecas ': s of operati:r.g rever..;__;0.; .::..::- 0:~:::, e•. - di tu:::-es ::or each local gover. ment, analy · es of capital fund re ui:.·..:::: .:.:-. t ..::d proj ec'cio::-.s of economic indexes on the b:::.sis of i11hich ·che avai12.bi:.i .:y c.Z fu::ds fo:.· capital purposes rr.ig:--,t be s~ima··ed. T>.is sti.;;cy shoucd that every local gover.i.ment in MetrC>p o::.it.a.7 .' -:::.::r.·;:~ is ~.:v~ y un °8r financial pressure. Like rr.unicip.:i.l a:i.d urbi:rn coLn·.:y -9H A f,, l".1 ! R G fi .. £ N E . S I L R ;. ~ $ C : , .. T ~ .. _ __ �CJ.pit.:.:.:. 11(;8~5 fYO:i1 existing sct:~"'C CS o:..: J..""2V~I:'.l2 .. i -· ~· 1'. 1 2·.,,.,_ ·,":-rc~o f! .._ 1..,,__,i • capi -c::_ ::,uci_;e-.:s . ._) · ~.._, _ (..L.L,_. ., ......,-a f-c,c. C- - ,--r· ~- -.L l. 0 0 c.. :_· 0 .. _ ·.-io~. ._._ -.s ~r __ .- 2.T,C.S i::o:.· r. ··1·1 SC:"/2.CC:S bo'.·... oper,··,...,·_0 -• • ._.2: • a::d ""'1,--l ~.- 7 .is · s ·.:n.:e d sp::. ~3 op:::.~..istic fo : r:ccas"i:s o:.2 ::utt:'!'c -:: - .-::er ::.:;c .... t::v:::,.:;::.ditur s :for _c· :..bilita·.:::.o. t~ c .. ~-C re·cv loprr:e::-.t as w _:i. as _v so:..u~io::- of p~ ssing social p obl ~s . ... t can be as~U!'.1e , 1 o ·:ever, ~b:t ::-.e\1 so~::.-ccs a: --_~cv · ,ue t!i ... 1 :ie ::. .:.c ne - ds t· G:C hav · .::.::. ... e::dy cec!I p _ojecte  :..-.::-:0 gh ef:.:oi-'..:s ·co get . a 1 ar.d t.,~...-c :i.c ~-- voters Hill C.:.J:r:rrov out ::..-~:i::. ocu:i. s""l.::s ·::ax on·::io. fai ed - r,is o::..· 2-967 Ger,,..._--:_ KSse::,b y, there is • - 1 .:a.· \ ..__._~ receive favo abl ,:::..t legis ... utive at~ nt·on in the o .e of ·c:1e :1ew i:a.· 1c2.su::.-es . l.:..:( .... :..f ·c:1.at t:1e ., ajor goverrnner:t:s will in 2.ddi·cion have -co increase p _op.:::-·cy -10Ii A :.1 r.1 0 , G ~ k E . 1l 1 .. E ;; A Ci O C C I I, T ,. ., --- �£ "' C.IJC':J0 .1. z · . , ~ ,-·0.1.- ..,1,. ... 1 c· • .t.CC2. .... 1.....:.,--L..._1 ci ":ntl: ~~e ? ~op s :.~ion ~~ r VG7ablc vote iSSU"S . o:: :.:-_. ;:z:_· .ci::g t. ~t =a ::.d ~r~sit is ess ntia. _, o. pa_ticipa~·on in ,..,.., r ... .. , • ..; 1 ~, ..:. ..L - ·:::h broug,.t to y stc:;i B.::i.sic P _ emises of r.:,2.lys::.s 'fr.is ri::a::-:cia 2..,a ysi is c once:..'71ed on::.y four cc.l;;.·..::.3s o.c Fulto., De:'"lb, Cl::.yto. _ L do s not cove_ Cobb Cou, ty 2.•• d \•! w::. t l t. byte e 2.r as e:rr..br::c Gi;i,m t t (i. cuc:.r.g t· e C:.ty o:f i c: is :iot :;;i:..-es ntly pa=ti c i:::, ....ting i:-. t:.e .... .?-.':'A progra:i:. ·· ~1::..:..:,rzing t e financial i mpact upo, . ·.:>. e re pective loca.::. i;cve:-::-_':!2--:.1:s oi au:.._'-_._:-.::, ·~::.e r<,J.pid transit sy te:n in ~'ctrO)O ita.;7. Ac:12.!'lta &.:".. t .. i:.. c::..·) ...c · ·.:ies to· tL,derta ·e the progra ., ·..:' ..r: '-' basi c pre1 is s 1. i::1 ev.:.:..i.l;__-:::.r.;; 1 , ve 0 n Thet the =~jor share of t r.e f::.r.anc~al respo::1sibi ity i, valved in building the sys· e::: uiil be ass·..i..1;ed by t:.e local govcrni. ents, 11:ith a ·,ii ir.:~m de:?e- cience upon fi ancial help f::-o., the ol!t:,ide; --·H Ar:11,J(n,GR~EN ILl!"R A~Oc:; ~ •• 5 _ __ �'":t1.:!t -'_:he m:.ni .. ~: -~~:.,.....;c·- .::..:2. ~ . .:) ·.::-.. 2 co:~s\::.~uc·~::. o:i cf a -c -~::.lc s s~e~ cn;~j:,,.; o~ 2.~_.:..e~::.r.z t~e majo: -J:."!.:-·~ 0£ t"~~ ._;oJ.ls s~·c lo~: :."'~n~ ---·:an-- :..-c ::.:1 ·c}:c a:.... ec.; ":': ~t 2 o~i C.J' a:1d. p:.--o.;r~_: i-1il~ ·u~ ::.ciu:1::-.::..u -~h2.·~ ~\·::. ~ . . p::.:ovid(., fc_ a. e :~·::.;;:1s::.o .. c.,~ -cL.s b;is::.c y tci to S.2 -;,iles la'.:er if and 1!hc::: 2dC:.:..·;:i0n· l fu:1.C:s be c o~.,,.; ~vail~~ - e f=orn o~ - -oc al sources . lo a \·1i -::h a ap:. c ~he -£ " .2.r:ci d ·- o pred::.ct -: g ove:rrur. .. ·::s \·i::..: ccr:.::: i ·c:·a::1 it syste i. ::o _ w.. ic' ·ch y wo:...::. t:...b -- is bot; ,..,:.t' ace ·racy -ec:.sonc:.o::.e a:1 t · ense ves to :.,ave ~.ec:.d p·c:c up the ~z.jor pa::.·t oE ces a ry . t is r.ot ow much Fec.erc:.l no:·.2y : :.:;} ·c b e colile availab::.e, t:1e st2.·.:e f:..:.nds .'.:re ... i mi ' ed to a f1·actio. o::i:: t::e -.:o:=a::. cost . t::.ca:i. ·y p::iss::. ::..c t .at t syst;:;11 c c...i : . d ev.::::-::.-c• a!ly c r-;:2.i. tics :...s -::.o whc ovc~, u. ck.:'.' ·:i:--.!SC 10 - t' oe ir s o sue u::.·.:kn :..oca lly . a~e ;; -:::-:::.vsc: :i..-:. - fu'":ds rr.ig: t be . .__cc avo.i _c:.·.:,!e i~ at t rcgulatio s cdera:.. :.:un s c a,, be c uJ 2.::.::. . -.o::c - i·c -::. ed fo_ o,.:..y ·,:,,:o ,:c: t ropo lit a .. This r:ieans taking so:n..; reasonable assurmtion ab--:.:·.: ·.:h c1c..·::.'""::,:.:i-::.y o:..· Fecieral and state f, ar.sions of ad;:it::.o::al :·.0:.1 - lo c al fw .:.r.c i: ·..: is p:coj c-ced t o ·cc. 1 ·e syst ~ LS s becor::e avc!i:.r.ble, c:::.~ls :foy a flexible ::i..:~u:·.:: is ,. I,.. L fut ?e ecis..:.0~ i::; m .. de to ;:iove ~.cad w· t' ava:.la:::..lity of edera fr,e 30 - ile sys ·e:. 2.ssw. ::.ng i:1::..:r..i;::·..:.r.i c:r::..l p :-·..::.~ipation, a ot er de ci.s:.on ca:1 be made later to n:.::.c ""ys·..: ... (w:1ich would p s 0 o to the 52 - r""pid ·;:.ta: sit lines int:o C:.c!yton ar1c. Gv.1 i:::1e·..:·.: cour.tic) :.f suifi ci ci.t Fede:.·al fu.nds b co:r.c av.:1ifable to match ex ~---: e loc2::.. :::.. .. cs. L&ter, :.:Z and w .e. Cobb Cour. ·.:y C:.eci es '::o partici?ate ::..:: t:,'" _nog:.·c.;..".. , t::0 C:ecision can be made to go to ·c, e 63 - mile ii·.re - c.o nty sys--.:e:-: as fert~er iu.~cs eco~e available. As no·.:.~d earlier i, th.is report, the 52 -~nile system ,ould c s".: $!.79,C .,:,o ar,c \'/Ould ta!-cc 12 yec:.rs to b;.!ild w::. th cC::'."'.)letion sc"hed::..::2 y - 1~-K A i.1 r., !: 1 0 il i;: ti C: • S I L i: •• A .:; -, i; f ~ • .::-.-.:. T:,is c.:.: be accorr.plishe fo:r::;cr!sts a::d oL.:icial so rces . a~a cqui-.::y of a Linal allocation fo ,ule utilizing t' ese factors . L;e ::.::·.1,cr-::::.nce of t of o__ 2e::::-i ·.:: fo:.· e3.cr. e~-::2.:::-:t ·1 ic.. ,L-::::i ca7l o.::: !na:.,rr:uch as --............ ·- ...........__ _ \,,... ,- e been made o~ bo·'--h population and e plo '::l~::t :Eo:- -~·:0 y.=-2.:· 10::;3 DY ·;: __ e At lant::i Rcgio::1 , ct:ronoli ·... n ~ann.:ng Co .tnission (in cc;,;:_ -::.:.0~ -leHAMMER GREtNE Sl~1;.~ J..S~~: 1,.·~ .. _ __ �... - .... . . I.;'. ar.d e:::n::.oy.:,c:::: :Zi::;_::cs ca. oc p:..·oj cc: .::. juCg8r.: ... :-:t f .::ctoJ..~s. .1.0:..· the S;:.!T,e 3.Ssigr,i TI is is c:) . ce to c~cl _..., o. e '--·· It was det0r:::::.:-.ed t .::.·.: e::1p _oyme ·.:: s . ou::.c be give. a.:.:.oc2.:cio.: :Eur:r.u:a . l'.Y:!_'(;3.tes·..: 1:.r~::.~::·.:: year . because ·- :r..o t e~ly ::-ellccts the eco~o~ic st~ ~g~h v::~::..c~s jurisdictio.s. - -.:..:: , . ~~ ~o~ .; t~e c ose-i "1 ~~ ore in·ce:i · ist:cibuticr:s nr.o:ri.g c.:.c:-_ of --~--.. ~ yea::- (l 83) . a present (1965) ar:c - .c., J..t,..,.L.L,._v ..llocation fo ~=-cas ese three bt:;:,::.C fac'·o:::-s a:ce s ·:: fo::.-t. in te~s o. pc~cc.-:t cc ...':.,::.:-ics al 1 of -::.· . as S[:..e factors la, v:hich. ·:::.c as., gn t:. c 'o:.rr ,,... . ne ~eig' ts beco .. es t~a s also s:1own ir. ·cer;ns 0.1. ?TO - ·che pe:-cer:ta~c s. ar~ o~ to-::.al c apita: cost ~- at wou d be al oc tcd to each ·u::.-is~ictic:-i . - .LSHAMMER URfCt,E c:t~n A,$30.:1 .. _., --- I �( ( Tab ] e 1. ELEi·,Jrl'!TS I N Izr c m1 ;r+: Ll 1] ) COST i [,J GCl•: no~~ Fo·:: . lJ.A FU!z M.1\ !ff/\ C(L',TRUCTlO,i : P[RCE!-ff lJ IS'J'RlBUllON OF POl'UL1\'i lCL'., fll __ I �.. ,._ ii 6 ur2s '.:: h~.·.:selv-.;s . .. velJr 0 :1 ·..:::.~ 0-: s roo:-:-: L. • • o,in_:_o .. c1bout tl-_e On bale." e, :10·.:c\1e::· , ·c::c.: fo:.:aul· '.'iOUl .:!:~pear ·co GE: o,~si s of i ll :.cse ::cb . patro~~;e :.. 2vc!s us d by "ilfe~cn: ju i srii ctio~ r.ent p:-ospec·.:s 2.::.0 g t ransit r::. 0 • t - o:: - ,-:.:i.y elemen~s ::. s ! i ·ely -::o be hig· ly specui ~tiv8 . a: t~e po:er.tia l D • ,-1 , la . '- uCVC • _ Q') - .:sur ~e , t oft. c t~~ , it A- tc r c on si dcrin~ \!as detc ::. ., ir.ed t . ;..t a sim le _ a d more -.:si::.y cloct.:..11c t.e s t of rr.e .:.su:·c;:-,er:ts would be no~c s.:i.-::i s fa c tory . Financin~ -::he Bnsic Sy.Len /.,_3 r..:. ...-c2.-...y oted, the 0 - , ile :)asic sy -::e .. pi-onoscd 2.s the :-:1i::1i:.'~~ co, str-1ction. :)ror;rZJn fo-:::- Mctropo~i.ta:1 Atlanta v:ou::.d cost an csti .. ::i-.::c $33:::,G8G , OCO -co build . The full capital cost of -chis systerr. must co!i:2 :: _o-:-: p-:::-c-;:~_-.:.::.c -!:. ·:·.ds -- that is, fun s not generated fr-om r· pid -~~nsit system itself . as note t: ope cit i o:'. o:: :::..; earlier in ·c'1is ~c.r·:..y yca:..·s, t, c funds generated by the fa.re box ,._..ould not b,:; . 1d._.:..~ .. :r:..c::.ng even · s .. all part of the b~sic co.pi t.::d cost . C3.?2.°c ~2 c:.:- Th ,. Ko;.;L.. i..: s·.:o;: .. _.:.-.c '.:o ,.. .::i.,taL and i:·.1prove ·c:.e ~J-.y.:;ical syst ,J . - 21HAM ~,I UA[f ES l~~ A:iSti: �i I -..-. r,.,.- .; ,.: .i..(.,,..). J ..L.U. s ·st . . ,: ::.s -:o ::1&'.ze et .._ _...,,. - - .: .,4 1,,, J,.~.1,.,J_ 1,., S')Cci:Z::.c .:-cce::.ve u.t of priatic:1. ye.::.:::- to -n:rov::. c:e .' ·cio, Viill ;,ave to :rcc:.ch -:.:he level o~ a.t least ~S0J,000,000 pe any s;.:')s·ca.r,~iG.l assistance to t e c:.t::..cs a .C: ,. ___,t:.o;)Olitan .,i..:i::.-:.i:'.g o ex:_)anci::.:1g t· eir rr.ass t:ra. si·c s;ster.1s. tr. ;::.: J.TCJ.S 2.T The ::.n:cs ; se fisc::.l nrcssu::-es cau ~e d by the Viet ~w,1 •.,:etr 2.nd ot. ei- .eavy de iands upon t·-:0 ?cccrai t:.:-02.su:.ry, :-.oi;cve:;,_·, has r sul Led in a deferral of any prog:!.·a.T.,i:1g c:c t;.is =t I. .s r.opcfully antici;iated that func.s made availab::.e by Co;;.;::.·ess lor 1.ass tr.::.nspo:rtation for the two fiscal yea::.·s beginnin extc:-,c.:..:.; tirou 6r. June 30, 1970, would ue y1;,;::..:·. ~ , ::.95S, 2:.c. J._.::.y c range of $200, 00,00, o~ Pros?ects appear fairly optir.. ::..stic at t; is stage . l..> ...:-,g ·c:-.is '-stima·.:0 it m~ght :::oc:.sonably be assw;-ied that l--:. ~"· ...:oulc :.,,:. ,:,c.:;:.tiOj: ~o request ar.d receive as $25,000,000 p r :·ec.:.· ::. • ·:::-..c -22k tt M M E P. . 0 R E E ,i f: . S I l R S,,, C ~ ., ; 1 7 E .'.J - �bec1: give~ in the rn o.nti~e :::.~ a basic 55J, ::;C,,000 in ·ede::::-2.l f ·::.~S -.i~::_·,: . e a i:".::.·-::.:-:-.L:.~ . CCiUI'.teC. OT! 2.S to assu:-,1e, co;_:::.·s al ::.o'::::'.c;: ts - ' . r.e cs :-crr:ai::., i:: nrcse:--:c ::. ·vc if Vi ·::: , '2.m o _ ...nd i 70 i i seal ycc._ s. .s not unrco.son~blc of a 1,,..,:..·opr· :.::.:io:1s fo:.· :uss tr;..nspo:.·t2.·::.ion '.'i 11 co:: i ,ue. l:!:e .:. .. ·::c:."T.c.t.:..o .. c:.l si tu:i:tic. clc :.·s 1.::::,, t· c:..·2 could be a sharp i::1c::-ec.s"" ir! r. ~or~, ~heTC is pro~a ly li~"C an r. _,_ "ii:t c::c.T:cc t:::!'.: cu :.·e .-c levels of app:-opr::.c.tio:' 'cc.ere ::.s a goo c'.-:a..7cc t 1at large out lJ.ys n ig. t beco. oi 'c:.ese consider~tions, it would :::.ppear reaso, ·01.e to :::.:·.--::.ci - .Ja·ce -c..:.t a:.: ::.02.st a..,other $50, OJO, 0C0 .. ig, '.: be obtai,,ed fro;n !-'eder:::.l ~ ~:.·c.:..s lo-..· r,~:CA 1 s basic 30- .i~c syste.~;. As a conscrvJ.tive O.:!Jpro:::.ch, t:.- c.v~L~cili'.:1 cf .,;·oo,000,000 in Fed-.;::.-al ::unds ,.,ight be tc..ea :::.s ~c143.215.248.55 £isc~l plar~~ing. '.:'.1is wou~d nrovicle co,.siJ 'J >:)70 - i: - .) . • 0. 7, I 0 - II -. 2S s::; 25 C. . 'j_t, 7 5( , ) v.:..- ,.) 176 so 207 l97S - 10~ (' y 25 ~r-3 2 8 _,.,.... .... 50 30 9 320 .. 77 $100 5-'.:> -.- 10 ~33 !/ Pre:i~ina=y s~ cdu:c cf ~ceds for !a~ci nu:· chase a;-1d cc:,s·cr c '. :io. es·.:::i.b:;.ish · d by t~c cr. 1 ine rs . 2/ ~L!'.... T TCVc::1U · Jo:1cs s;_:::,por-.:ed oy locr.l gove:. ......;r:.: ur.c....:::: ::::. t::.:-.z o-z: S3 .. e.:·al oo iig::c.-c::.on bonds o~ locc..::. ,;v:.:::.:.·...:2r:.: - issued for _.,.__~ _·.:: ... ·i:::c:...,s:..: p:.irposes . no-:: d that t c ab ove sc· .ecu::.e o':. ft.:,d c:1.va:'.. iabi:L.y, c:.s -:ir<2:::.::-.::-. ..::- set forth, does not dire ctly ma·~ t. sc:,e ule of fu:1d :1ee :s . s:..;;-.:-;_y because both sets of figu:-cs are ;1..-:.ccs::::-:·:.:y ter:~:::.-.::.ve 30th · Ii L. be al tercd in the course of ·c:'..;1.e . '.\.:.s is a.,c ?- · E: .. ::.,. .:::.·:,r. T.• e: dcve o;:i,.:e.:t o:: su ' -- ::. .r~li~ir.~ry t~ole is neccss~~Y, s:o::s of ·.:he fin~ncial i!c1pact of ~·1:. '.'A o:1cr:1tions t::?on t:1e locJ.l gov ~r;:.::-:::-.t;;. Bor:<..! 1.ss1..;.es -·· ~ as needed . .: .• e ~:: c ·: e "!:!3./ ie mo:..--e ::.ss:..2s of s:na::. ler s:..zes o:::- ::0·.-·a:r iss1..:~s o _:.r_;G:· s:. :.cs -27t-.t.t.,~::R.oa er,,:; . _ .. ,.. .. _ .. _.,;.~. ;, _ __ I �lccc:.::. '.: ::.::.:-.:.s fo::..· 0 . -.-....- .... "- -., .,_:1 iall \,.... local 1.. ..... ....: It :...s ~cnts) ~c~lJ be 3J - yc~~ :.ss~~s . ?le-..:.,,1,;- oi prop2rt' ta.· levies to sup::;,:;::..··.: ·c: c obl i gat.:.on, it is c.r.-::::..-=:ip bo::.:: - ·.:o...;_ c2rry c. t. a . ' ::.rcccy b ... -..~ ~- - a ..., '• \.... \.....,.., .,::> 1,,.,..1.. ·or._'.Jly '.) C o;,..· u--, ~- s: O'.i _.._ ' ~-.: ,,,., an oca:.. g 'Jc:-:1..--:-..:::--; s . of p0r., p.:; o:-:e-' ,alf of one pe:.·cer:·· rea - assw . ci . '";}~.:: anl J.CV1;:l e ci co - 0 rapi . ' -~~---:s:. t bo;1ds iSS;.!Cd a lC.:. i;i Tz.;J le 3 on t .c fo:.1c1..'i.~~ p~..3e . g ar:mtecd r..:-.u o,.e - ··. l ca ry::..ng or p yrr.e .·:: ~'- C. l.. --l...i......... ,., ::. ccc. l Revc:!;.;e 00:-.d ~ . ~ . :;y C ri, ,. ..1..->~- ...... \..- y loc~l. gove:.."7! . e .t co .-;:r::.ci:s '-~- . pe cent in tzr st :-at tr r.sit purpos s by .,._ - ~ t. .... \,,,, local govc .L. ents are sh~·:·::: -.:ou_ ne:rcen t . rlJ..1".1MER f.E~ r.. G:t . ~ J.; ... _~ ... .... ___. �._ I . T:-:olc 3 . I - ,. ~ , ,~r~r.~·--:..J ~ • ._. •::, ..._ L _._, -..J~ ...: /,'f _~ \., '\"'~\ Pri71c:.,: :.. .'i~.0'c..::t GJ Issu.::: Of 3c::-,o.s } 96~ 1970 ~2 S, 000,CCJ '_':)7~ 35 , 000,00v $ 1,7:S,OOJ ' _, (., ~·3, 000 .. , B:25 ,OvO -, , ::.vO, v()O 1 715,00G . -1- , -!-,3CJ,GJO ..073 197..;. -o,GJ0,8JO 1975 197' 50,000,00J 3J,OOO,OOO 9 , 000,00G 1973 7,546,COO 3,0::,0,000 7,725,000 l:'..,37S,OOO '..3,:'..38,000 7 ,26i;,OOG 10,6 L!-,000 12,3~7,00G .2 ,97. ,000 l2,l~G7,000 12, .07,000 13,i'S::-,000 .3,ldS,000 1979 13,_.:;s,coo 1980 1981 2,575,0CO _2,209,000 .. 2,G99,000 1982 Li 6 , 0 CJ 16, co J .·, 1 !.1,8(4,000 11,505 , CC,'.) E, ~-04 , 000 (T·:.on level p;:y::ie·.1·..:" t:.n t i l -,.els ~:.... e ::.. . ti 0L) ]:_/ A.7.orti z ation (_;:cir.ci:Ja:. a~:d interest) cha:tg s of all 01.:tstand::.ng :.,~:,Cs for :::-2.pid tra.nsi ·..: u::1ce r ·..: e t.;o <--:.. t-)r:: ·.:::. ve 1.1et .ods of fi;ian c ing 1A ··r. ' capi ·.:.:il co::: ts . I t is noted 1 l ( ? -....,1.J-. at t . e . . . re u;:;.l cost o-.Z servicing ·· ese bo~ds d:.·o?.,, o~-.Z 77 (~ e d;: c o f t e l·s~ iss ·e) a~ ':'~,is ::.s because a 20 perc0"t sin ,ir.g fund _cserve is DTov:.-.:...::t.. :: _ ov2r -. : he ~irst five year s of .ss:..c decli1.es to a level ::::::o.... nt e~~ issuE:, u,d at l. · "' end of five y2~~s c&:r:r.:. e s a level payme ·c to r.atu. i ty . ,~. .y-:: ..:.n-::s a:-e :-;;a c in ·ci: fi r st five ye~;.·s of e::ch issue, -c:..:. .. ::;c-iod ::.s actually 29 instead o:i.: 30 years . ss2 ,_ ., 21'. t::e a..:o ·c.:.::. - T' e level :?;:y:::-:!::-..::s ~=·::.;;:.· c1. !c co. :i::1ue through 1997 at which t::.~e ·t y wou1· _9t,9 is..;_3 is ret i red an so on u, til :.i.11 i?sues ~re paid off . - 29 HAM1.tEA GRE:.P'. ~ .. 1tz;;, ...,_c~ , ;.·. �.__...... ':). .. .. ,.. - -~-.-:'\.; '- .n t~i.s 2r,aly - -a. l upon F :;_ -con :_:.:.d 0c'.:'alb c o· ,·:::ie s , t·:2.-::: . .= 1 yto::1 ::.::d Gw i:n:.::.·.: t -:: !' i ng up ·ch i s '.- ::r e o-3 ·::t.e c os ·.: o .. l y i:.: t . s y s te:";1 i s e. ·-.:a::C:.e ..i 2.e - • , t h e f a cts At::..:::-.·.:a c.rea e~u::. ::. ly c lea~ tat as - a ::louri s· :;,r,g a-:-:d c -pa:-. - ··J e c onc ..y ca·:nb l e 0£ s ..:~.:.?o:--::::... g ~ocal ·.:x payers o a,.d ~~c -;:' e \ ·: .01e ai- ..::cv::.. ce chr.·-ges - - i nc0ed the a~g:.egatc .:..:x. lor.c. c a:-rie "oy loc .:.::. ·.:::. 'c 1.....:, t2. is c9 . h •.;::::b :!.y les major " etropol::.tan areas . . ·,v :::::..·c,po::. ~,..,_e demand · tan Atlanta grows l arger, bu~ ir.c o::ic a:, a-.: '-- cor:::-11 ns :rate rate . .o..:i..~ ~::.seal ?· ospects lc...,al gover·nrr.cn fir,ance -3C - ~he Aetr0pol::..t"n . '-'--... .,._ ... ":l""il".·,... \., ..... �of -- ... , ~- ... .... u .............. ..... ... ~ '-·. C. ,..... 1 ..__ ......... ,. . . ~-- ..::.t-.;.J.. . \.,.1,. _ _;i ..... (T b .::o:.::.:---~S . ,,,... JOJ.:c._ ·~i~l l ',1 • c:.c - doct::r:o,. ·..:.) In ~ict-'-opoli t.:.. .j o:: c:.rea's ge;ic::,:a::.:.. · :. .:.~::"r b ~caus.:; ::>0·;:· "-' s rvices c.YC se vice c the ,uo.li·..:y ;::r.d c;_u~nti ty of local ts a ... e ubi.ic _c;,..:·ly suuc:r or . T:-.~ ::· nc:ncial problcr:-s of · e C::..ty of At:;intc. are partict:" arly ~cute . _ ;crtic. al i::1c-:.:-e2se in -_~-" ,me f:-o:-. cxisd.n~ sou_ces ,,:ive r su::.t di::ficu· ti s . 0~1e·.rcr. .-; l2.nta is not unli ·e o·cher .1a30:- .:::ities ::.n this r .;arc, ':"ne S".li::.1 -over o:Z ·)0·0ul2.t~o::1 a. d industry into outl.yir:~ 2.rcc:~, tre g:.cm-:::..:~g o· so:cscencc of parts o:: the cent:ca core, the ir:.creasec:. co .. .::,2·- ol -..:·.e ccr:tral c::..ty activity an fo:::: a 1 ve::. o:: .,_:.: ---'"'~:..i"t::y sc:;.·v:.ce: .:::01; :r.ensurate uit .. big ci·cy sta··us have 11 .e C , • [ n .. S : .1 ., . -.) _N A M .,1 _ A G~ N .c. .:: ~ i:::no:;.·- �1 . ... --- J .. ... . ,&.::.: ......... , ~c·.....r_ ·.:y - '.-1:. ~c ' CV " '.":UCS. 3~out : . ~ class j)U"Ji. ~eed fo C -uture tax i:-.cr-::...s c.:S ~:.C: . .;;u sou::;:-c,.; · o~ "":.·av .. u,.; · -- ::::.rs sc_vic s md G•.-1inr.e·-t fa ce t e ~· to be p~ o·.ri c-... . r 5 i;,e 1. in2: ci:1:'.. g::.·owin~ subu-;..·ban co·c... ·~i s i1 ot ' .1 .('........ C~;:.y~o. c:.lrea y ru'-'"\ - ·t .-.T,....... _,.- +-'- s ·-:1at h~-- ~r~~3L..:' c,i ou·c~yi::_; ~o~::.-~ic ~ ~:...~ge ~e~ro~olitan areas . I: is a fact of si ple arit::r:-.c·.::ic ~: . e Lcca::. prir.,c.rily t"!-1.e property ta. ) or con:p :..c-.: 2:;.y , 8'.J in the years ah ad . u~iquc si·cuatio,. This is by :10 Leans e natio:1 races, i. so-..i1·ccs of 2venu,.:; o_ .:,j·~-- .:s ..:::i.cec:., o:.:- \·Jill :iz.c t :C.c s:,...-::0 f.!.~:..~ci~: ~rob::.c·ns . E.:::0::.··.: s ·co get a sc:.fos tax for loc<.!l 3ov,:;1-:u:ie:1ts in Georgi::.. f ilec i.:.:st sess:0:1 of the Gener 1 Assc~b!y tu: ~:.e~~ w:11 conti n a to b3 ~ ~s::..3- state's cities -32ii ~ 'rl M \; i\ 0 Fl t E r. L .., I l ~ i- J. ~ ..., :: ... 1' .. _ __ �/ loc;..~ sit· ..... . 1..- .... ~ ..... _,., is b; '- • • -i ~:::, ~-, ~,. ..: ,,._ ~a~~dly incraas~ g its, i:-: ...:~.. e . oa .LC is lea:.- ly 10 -c locnl govc :r.:ci1t c~~ clen y a ·fo:..·u J -33,1 ;. L, t~ .,; Gh £ t ,. S I LE H A ~ .:; 0 .: ~ " '_. .).. C G:7.C ..... , ot:,e::.· :-::a~ o::.· u:·ba:-: ce . .-.: C;::-s . otl .:rs . servi ces, t~~; . . . ... ~-- c apo.c :. ty ·co :::,::.., seyv~ c cs; co:r.pc:.re.:! .::: . ·.::: ·c:. e ta , .. 1.\..,. .~ • �/ Rclia:-:cc- I/ _or i - ·ccc:.....c:.~-·cio ~. r,1:·.e ?Y0}_lC:." t 4' r t~X is :l_::...)D.~/ c.!"/ail::.:..',.J.,3 3.S 2. SOL!TC ~ . ·o ;;..c.dition:d 1.eg::.sls:cio, 1·:ol!.:.d. be _co_-;..::.r(o·d to tc:-".l ~ \.- fo-:."' ra id -~ ransi ·_ f:_~~:-1cit1~~. 1. ·- cui te ?8Ssibi2 tha~ the loc~: ;ovcrncc:-:ts wi:l sue eeci i::. l.:lci r cf-for ·co ge·c ..:..C.di tio!.~l sou:.. . ---~s c·:... . ..3vc::ue in L.:-:0 d3.ys a:-:~a - - a sa!es -~a:'°; a. pa Yoll ·:::..;.., 3- _ ir.co::-:8 t.:.· o :..· so~:1.::: ot'.:2:r .1e1i -ol!::..·cc -- b·c1t t~e p_ o pects at t'.e : -.. ::..:::r." c:.:.·e S? >culat.:. ve n; ·c· .e -:-=:-.:: fo:r a clefir:i'ce x.:. :12.1 cia pl:::-: ::o·· rapid t::2.n _·c .:.s irrj. e ia te . 1 2. _,:oreov~ , i :c ~ -·:l sou ces ol 1... ~,.t.:::-1u..; a:..--e .::iS. ~e i'.l\'cli l ;;.c:'..e to · - e local iovc:.·::-.::.c .·cs, ·c!1" :,roce S, sys:e2 would be $19~,vC , oo-:: , - 3:) - �,- -,-- --- -- ~ ~, ~.I·--~-- - ur.dcr t\·:o ..c-:::hoc' s of :!:ir.a.i1Cir:z: s: .:::;; or c·,)::..--.:.::::.1 riosts ?:....::. to::1 County · J ...,:(c:.lJ Cou_ ty A; Ol' t Of C~:)itc. l Co -:::s Vri1:cipc.l) 73 . St 26.S ,' l4-6, 2C, OCO lJ0.0% $ F9, 000 ,000 I. s:2,7::;s,000 =;ove::::-.::·,c, ts. Tr.is analysi ,·::. __ I I cov r ~~rce alternative ~rogr~ras mthor.:. ty J.::::.sed fi~~ncing oft e system t~=o~gh t, e t:·)0;1 pay:ncr,ts .r:•• J_ .L , •• t.:-.e loc::.::. gov0rr.:::;.;r:·.:s :Eo~ bone. aii'.or-cization, ·c. "' is~ua:::.ce of ge.-ieYal o';)lig2.tio::1 bc:::ds o1 t:·. · .;ovc:..·:;-.:;-_-.;;-_ts therr.selve- wi tr p:-oceeds ?a::.d over ,-co ..xe~ sys'.:er:1 in whic:1 both methods mig .t ,-. .~ ~~::r:' , .T. a c c, ployed . 30:1ds by ~:AR7A 'The ;;10thod of co ·. :racting be ..Hee;,_ ·,:he local_ gover::--w1e::1:s :::.:-.-:: '.<..\:":'A tc r..·oc.u.cc: fun .::,L,~ 10,139 Tota.: ,nnual 3 .,~-82 3,656 3 ,'-'19{; , ..1..::, , .... 5 3, 49-.9,691 ... 0.SO 3,332 .2 ,575 9.2~3 235 1981 8,974 3 !.2,209 1982 S,893 3,206 2,0 (These level 2.r.nual p3.yr.:ents to the co::1 p::.e·ce retirement of bonci issues begi:-,r.ing in 1997). 1979 - •l-1H ,". r,i M E h Gh t ,_ E ~ I • .:. -. J. .. ~ v .; "" , • �1 • '. .'C:J.1-G r:ul ".:0,1 1 < o9 1070 197:'.. 1972 1 73 1974 1975 1976 1077 1 78 ! 79 1980 198: 1982 1983 .7 .7 .6 1.5 2.6 2 . 4 5 . 3 3 .6 3 .6 3.2 3 .0 2.7 ~.5 2.4 2.2 ........ - . , , .JC _, ...... .I.. - .,' D8:2.lb , . 4 . .,. ,1 .9 .9 1.5 1. 3 1. 8 1.9 - .9 i. 7 1.6 i .4 1. 2 . .,j4 1 • .L 1.1 I-c is possible i.J.nd it would be c.esir::.· t>.i - I .sc::cd·..ile &n -~o.: .T~~ts  : e pea, · :..~1::c-.: ;.:-;on locc.::. :~:_:i::ycrs would be co-rros:_:)ondingly lc-s. ~cc~.:,1:::x;_,E'.) c:o:..;y:y :JA:~.=- 'TS 'i'~bl.e 6 . '.~TES, ~ .. '.:(':'_\ i:.8XD :' ;_;~"~ .t ~:illage Rai:8S F..:l to:1 Cou::1:y ..909 ~.::~ J l 7 ' - 1S72 197.S - ~.::, - .::, 2 .0 2.0 2.5 Dc::z.:.. o County . . 0 .. .0 l ,489 5,698 6 ,0:!.5 7,629 8 ,06Ll8, 526 9,033 9,570 8,459 8,973 8,893 S, 93 2,054 ..S16 3 .0 19-:'7 -_ :J,O ." 3.0 1.4 l.v 1. 6 , ·' ..L. v . o·, -:i .0 1.6 3.0 2.5 2.5 1. 3 -. ? ~ $1,081 1,15S 1,367 4,324 3.0 ~ ~~2 $ ?- , 7sc·• u.:> 2,925 De . ~a.lb Co:11:·c ' 4,098 1975 .:.903 ~'11 ~~0:1 Co~:1:y l.. l ~-4 -? . ::,- .;vo Lella:: A,,,ounts (000) 1 • ..,. ' _ J.. 1974 ~., I -:J ..\XD :,:ILLAG::: ·:--:.·rv::::s l.S • ? l.~ .) 1.::. 2.2 1.1 2,169 2,751 2,907 3, 0 7 .~ 3,257 3,453 3,0:o 3,235 3,206 3,206 c::·.cse level ::::-.m. . a..t. pay:::c::·::.:: tot: e co~ple-.:e ret::.~c~e::~ o~ bo::d issues bcginhi~ 0 i~ l~ 7~ _, - -;.j tt~ ..'iMER.GAEEl\E.:: , 1. . n ;..ss:JCI ...... �_ di\,-.·_.- 'u· :·· ~ 1. ...., • l .... _ -- ""'"Y_.,.. (., 1t 11 l . o· · 0,- · .~ -L1..- .. .i...J...,.. -t~:.iction, ·· ·,IJ V.- ow "" .. ~ . . .. V..J ..,_ i;· .~i.:2.·;: or, Coun~y \•1oul · .~O--Sc.. i2' · c .. 11 co . p~.rc:..bl8 p1·0!!.:.::ty oh· .. cr in oc;Co.l' Cou . t y wo:.! : ly y0 . J · .'.lssu. mo. ·.· c i...... r of a ~20,000 .)S . 00 01 - v:::..1.---.~, .J.S 1 g t u.t s s:o~n, 8'..::c!::.b 's :-:,:cc c.ssc · -..1c, t is a::..so t,O pe::ce::,t of I . ·;: 1.,_ in :?u ton) . t .c average pay '10;:,e o-: c.::s nea'., ·cax ir:;pz..ct ( ~975 - 7, J, o ·m ·• i:-. 8c.ch co,mty wou ld stil:'.. tc st, ·he following sc .ed l · : De:'alb . '.a.·imun raillc:.ge needed for ~--~ T bond financing 3.0 Yc::.:..·s of maxi nu:. -. ..,: 1.6 197S- 7 1 75 - 79 A..'1nual co s·c of r.1axi1au ,l r,1i.ll ge ·.:o owner of home wi ·.:h r.iar. s·c---:: ""::s, sci·:oo!s, :::,a::.·>::;, \,~'c e:-, S w~C - ~~ci 0 ~~ 8~ p~j! · c .~o2s ~O~ C~~it~ i I ~CS, c: • ..., .,_,. _.,, r -~.:.~s a ·c -~:1~ ~.1. csc~-..-t ti1·:~e:, Jo-~.: ~-.:!.\re J.c:, l.o; r~-.j~ ~ ~~--OU:ttS of C:.":~::city ~V~i~.::.~le ::or :_. . ~}i ·c::-~!1S:_'- \;~::_::_ ;:o~ j~ 1143.215.248.558 ~noug~ . 0 COV0T : ,0 ~~ ..... .1 _ .... ..__ - ·- ..... ._J . )TOjCC~2 L..._s....:Lss~ · 1::: :c:.~. _·c .. Ol.:..n. b~ d::.r~icult t SC.! wC:u::.e ·c' .8 is s1.:a:-:: e o:: GO bc:-.d.,, ·t.o the Tccui"'" e:-r.8nts o:E t} e 1~ ----~-' d:-a·,.·down chedule.  :·.:nsi t bon · nc c! · ·..:ou~-- !13.VS ·co '.)c co:,s::.c.e::.·~J as p~:-t of 1:..... g~r pL:Jl ic is ·1:es ccrJeYin ...~ ~ v~::~i~:y o::' the:-- l ca ~ go·:~T:.. ,c. t nee s . 7! c:·...; is a:, un e::3tand:::ble re:uc;;a::1cc o:: ov":.· .. ~c t - ~-d~ s :o ~o to tl c uco~1~ wit~ p ~oposa: s ~or CJ bo::: iss· cs ·coo f r cqu · ·· ly . 2. -l0ct 0 _,:~ + -- . .,;._- t.... ~-...., C:::..-ce wi l app,:ov GO bond iss;;.es :.:or apid t:-::ns it . _:-: _:.g .:·.: oI the size of _api<.. trc:i1sit :.· ec.uircn :.ts, it would::::,-:: _c... . .. possib l e to r.:eec: al! o: '.:i -:.S..: nee.is fr. ou.:l: s i ng2. .:;J ".Jc::-.: issue , ad thi s 1\·01..ld requi e s..10seque ·c vo'·es oy tr..e -"-.!o::;·c f::,r 1.-:" .ic:~ no pri or c o::uni t . ent could be :-:;.ade the K:U T co:-:c:,.·_c·.:. ~'.. ~~A GOCS ,ot, of COt.YSC, : av-:: O:vT:. ~!J:..e to levy i ts own t ax 01 property wi·.:·1i:-. thc Tc..)id ·c::-c.isit ciis·.::.·ic-.:, :.:s ~or:c. isst.·s wold 1~v t, c st tus of. GO bonds . ~=-e iss~-d, they wust be i s s ues o ' .'"\.::, ·- CJ .ocally, S:....:-. L·J.:-:c::..s c o for t. e B..:y Arca Rapid T::-ar.s::.. t Syste.i . )O:::c.::; the loc~l govcrr.m-;-:t. a.lreacl.y r:otcd, there is not in prospect~ s 1fi::.2i nt bo~-i:::; .·"uli:o:-, c.nd Je.' al'.) c ounties to .. zct th3 full :.·e u1re::-.en·cs o:: .... ~ \... 1..- ... ~ ,- ,.. ... ~- -- - t.:2sJ ~'---·::.s - ·~io .. s .s·c ~.:.:.i.. •. l un sei1 CJ.~~ci ti , ...............1 be.: 1-::c\: S, hOi·/c:\'1;;.1.' , .., .... -'- l p~rt 3St or t~~ ·.._ -1 .... - ~. ... \.,_ . . . . . . . . . .:::, .1.ro~.1 ti1is sourc-. - -.. :;H ~ 1,1 t.~ R J " ... h : ., . • • ·"' • ., S ... ; . • • .., •'.... I.., \.. �" ... .l. .... 1-::: · c:1 cc:J c:. t:,r . ~- O "\f ~ lO yec..:..s .,. $3G, ' -·,, .. , i ·1 rr 1.,.1,..;._ --: 0 is lles a.s $60,C"0,0C0 c, _ dd .:L~l:> County h::.s unuscC:: bon.diI,g ca:)c.city oi c.'.)out $30,000,JCC c..,, _ _ .. 1ar.::i..:.al::.y is i:-:c:rcc:s.:.,1g by c::.bo1.,:t $2,500,C0C, 1·.>,:;.(..;_ would acd a..10·:::1.c _ $25,CJG, o·,er Do:alb also h~s the near £utuJ.·\:;. -r~'-- . - ..... -.........v.- " c- ........ - ...... --.... ~ - J_ .i •• is ·0:-1.c - :-.c:.._:: :,.e c...:.:,.__,t that ~:..\}TA wou::.d .ccd ~~G:.:. this co~,-::y. cou:cts, ri.11.:.r.:;; o::: casL.s now beio:-e Georgia nust :..,o 0;1 ..... ,e J.sscss;;:cnt ::olls c..--.: .:CJ - -- tc.te cons1:.:::.~~1:i~:::. , ....-- ·:, ..... - ... ~ _..1 _Jvi_.:,., ,.. -· ..... . .,~ :.c ... ... _.._.,1,.J..._ .... • ,J t~e bond.:::.ng caJacitics as .~ceting othe_ eecs . -~-71-i ,.. ••• :•. .. " . (j nE t1 ... 5 I l C ri ,.. .., ... C .; I .... 7 : �ii ii .! 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( ~ iJ ~; d 1 r:: J 1/J 0 rJ ' -.. ,.J () 0 ,' ) - I (:) ·, I '/) JJ ') ' ~u J p r~ --· f, ·, ·) 1/J ,r, d Pa () >-, ', :) 11) ,, I r ! I p~ 1 ,-::· : j ,(') u ' ' ,•1 'U .~ t-: <' ) j 0 I p •r l (" I 'l I () •, J ii ,,J il •I r: J ,:) !J VJ •J ') .: () 'i c·,o •c i u) 1: J 1: () () ' 't ) C) ,t : 0 () r: ~ i ~0 •c l .i , ; j; ~·:J () 'I 1/J i:::: •, I r! U) ~~ •l ' I 'i 1: •:) .,. l <:..; 0 () J 'I (l <') 1 ') f; I I 5 >-, t') --:: ,) 'I ,J d ,. ':J () <) • ) I.) •1 I • j (j •J J �•,./ . J-c.,'.',_~ CG·_::·_·,vy l. s ~969 1970 .972 _]7-.:, ., .) :,; 1. 6) ::.20 . 6 ,-,- ~ - . .., 6, ..,, 0 7, ~ 70 -:- - l. 3 .4 l .2 __ ::, ") . . 3 _ . lvV ~-3 2.l ~.o .%2 83 2. 0 1.9 1.0 .9 -1 , ·:,.........? ,~ ,J-, . . . -: l. .:. 1 $:!.,~SO ,· ~-5 C: ..) ., = ~ v __ ._, -.·,-.20 -.. ,. 65/ ) i ~;77 . _; ·; J ,,... l._ l. 1 -J ..-7 . ::,--1 . /6 1..~ ,-.: L/,..J J 2.0 2.0 _7 _::,- . 0 7 -:. l :) 5 '\ .c . . s .<.J7: - l.G _·l.~- ·.::,).1 Cc·.·..-:·.:: :r ! , 5--.-: 1,65,. 2,26C 2, -. i 6 2 .,- . 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S . s_:,::,uvJ,00G :'..ev(;l cur::....:ntly p_ojectcd ::o-:: U·.e 1969 a:r:d ::.970 ..::..s.:::c.._ /~--s. -·-·..c.~.· s i~ 1973 and tr-ercaftcr cc~l ·~~-as .J,.-h--- .'ith an overall o tlay :.:o_ thL: th'O C(;T;:::-al gove::-nr.·,·:rts on::.y S.L: - t'.1-~, 1.l·.e; 30-!:lile :.·(;o_uircrne.,t . would nc· b .... ::c.c .. ,. , \.,.. _,_, ,:.r2 the tota::.::;, 1 .:v~. · a ~~csunt~ci e_r ier: - 1 -::>-,H ;:. t,1 ~.~ E il O R : i. ... E J 1 . l ;; ). S S .._ ; " , • ~ �i .. 1_;- .._J J • · -- <..., _, •..... \..-.·... ...... ('-" - - - ,~, ~vJU,vv J --;..- ::;,-;- ,~77, VVv., UV) , -'.-6 . 3 $13--.. . : 52 . 7 5.~. 7 Dc'.(.'.lfo Cot:. ':y 13 . 6 7 . <. c : ,,:.yto.7. Co;_~:·.·.:y G·.:i .:ie'.: ·: Co-...:.:-. ·.:y s i ·· --l...,..1 .,..............,_ ___ .....," ' 1 ., 30 - :::il\3 sy s-:: c ..~. cs o:2 i ss-:..:0 ,~·· :'T.' bo:-.d I· ~.::b l e 8 . aS cc:.:?_.~:--(=so:--;: c;:· i,OC.t...=-. CJS','.S , 30 - :,.::.:L:: A..,D 5?. - :,LLE SYS'i".:::-:S 1.· s;~;:..i:::. · (OJO; $ 25 , 000 s,J 25, 00 35,000 7.5 50 , COO 35,COO • - 7-::. I _, _·, 76 -_:,n 000 ..;. , 330 6, 95 40,000 %,000 9 , 00G o,oco .:-:;, 138 =-~,7SS ..2 , ..:. o~ 1:_,s:o 1..:;.'::.::. J 21,0G0 .2,575 2,209 12,099 12,C99 ~, l/ 0) t... .!..) S,-:.S3 2.3, lS.:i 2.932 s::.J9,ooo 6,995 3,185 -- - v v seq --~, 330 30,000 __ J...., ... \..-1.., L.-,380 .,.s o 50,J JC . . Si: -_J79 _.:,:,J - ,.., $ 2. , 8?.5 _ ,825 ""\ ') ,- 8,030 7,725 li,373 L_.Q , ._..)7~ _; > .).c.~ -; ~ 7: - $ :, S25 .s, :_55 ' 23:!.,00G S::.:-O::?S to $14,302., 000 i:~ -_9_:;~. ~d 1c·10::.s olf ~t $l4,045,COO in :.9S5 HA :,\ ~~ t c.: e �·.: . 1..::: - .. .. • ........... .... "- - - ' - ' · · · ' - - ' • - - .. .. •• r- ..:.: ./ _, . ~ ....... . l.,.j $ ::. JJ , JOJ, GJJ :::o:: e o c ost . . .r:. s-: 0 ~.. a of c.~ .r: ,-...,--. ..i..Uj.. .,_ .... , 1,.... !. ~ - . - _ ..... """I r-""lf'"\ - :..::..:::.....1:::......, 3~-\~.le ~1:.0:;. . 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  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 4, Folder topic: Rapid Transit | 1966-1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 5, Document 1

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_021_005_001.pdf
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  • Title: Box 21, Folder 5, Document 1
  • Text: RAPID TRANSIT F O G .... l!'!l!!llmllall S ~ METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY "]Y.[ARTA REPORTS TO THE PEOPLE IT SERVES ... " SEPTEMBER 1967 VOL. 2 . NO. 9 FINANCIAL PLAN OFFERED PROPOSES "HAMBURGER-A-WEEK"COST TO LOCAL CITIZEN Rapid transit can be built at a maximum cost to the taxpayer of 3 mills in Fulton County and 1.6 mills in DeKalb County, according to economic consultants of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority. The figures are contained in the final draft of a report by Hammer, Greene, Siler Associates prepared as part of the revision of the 1962 plan for rapid transit for Metropolitan Atlanta. The 1967 revision of the plan is expected to be completed in the next few weeks. The report shows that the basic 30-mile system, which· will cost about $332 million, can be built with local funds of $199 million, state funds of $33 million, and federal funds of $ 100 million. The Fulton County share would be $146,265,000 (73.5%) and the DeKalb County share $52,735,000 (26,5%). Clayton and Gwinnett Counties would not contribute to the capital construction costs until work is begun on the extensions to complete the 52-mile system when additional federal funds are expected to become available. The Clayton and Gwinnett fjnancial support would include a pro rata share of the costs of the basic system. "This report shows that the maximum cost of rapid transit in Fulton County to the owner of a $15,000 house would be $12.00; the same person in DeKalb County would pay about $6.40 maximum," MARTA General Manager said. "In Fulton County, this amounts to the price of a hamburger a week, or two or three cups of coffee a week," he told the MARTA Board of Directors at their regular meeting today. "And these amounts would be paid only for about 5 years; the rest of the time the costs would be even lower," he continued. "When Clayton and Gwinnett counties assume· their share of the costs, their rate would be a maximum of 1.5 mills, or about $6.00 a year to the owner of a $ I 5,000 house," Stuart explained. "The report of our financial consultants proposes what appears to be a practical and feasible approach to financing construction of the rapid transit system," he said. "Our final plans are taking shape and preliminary engineering is developing well. · If a successful referendum can be held in November 1968, we would begin construction in Spring of 1969. If this program develops in this manner," he stated, "we would have the first line operating about the end of 1973 and the basic 30-mile system in service in 1975. The entire 52-mile system could well be in operation before 1980, or in about the same length of time it is taking to complete the perimeter expressway. "We need to begin construction as early as possible ," he concluded, "since every year's delay costs us $18 to $20 million thru inflation and increased construction costs. The basic 30-mile system would have 24 stations and would run from Brookhaven to College Park and from Decatur to Lynhurst Drive near i-285 on the west, with a northwest stub to Northside Drive. The electrically-driven , air-conditioned cars would operate at maximum speeds of 70 miles per hour, averag(Continu ed on Page 2, Col. J) FEDERAL STATE STATE FULTON DeKALB FULTON FEDERAL $332 MILLION (30 Miles) $479 MILLION (52 Miles) �THIS MANY CARS PARKED HERE ... (Continu ed from Page 1) ing about 40 m iles per hour including station stops. Trains would run as often as every 90 seconds during rush hours. The commuter will ride to Transit Center, just a block from Five Points, in about 13 minutes from Brookhaven, 9 minutes from Decatur, and about 13 minutes from College Park. ... COULD REMOVE MANY CARS FROM HERE - • American Transit Association Convention-October 22-26, 1967, Regency-Hyatt House, Atlanta. The AT A has as members only those operating transit systems (railroads, bus lines, rapid transit, etc.) METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY 8 08 G L ENN BLOG . 120 MA R I ETT A S T . . N . W . ATLAN TA . GA . 30303 • P H O N E 52 4 -5711 0 "'DIR ECTED BY TH E GEORG I A STATE LE G I S L ATURE TO DEVE LO P A RA P I D TRAN S I T S Y STE M F OR T H E S - CO UN TY METROPOLIT A N ATLAN T A AREA ," Edited by KING ELLIOTT BOARD OF DIRECTORS OFFICERS : H. RICH, Chairman ROY A. BLOUNT, Vice Chairnian HERB ERT J . DICKSON, Treasurer GLENN E. BENNETT, S ecr etary R ICHARD CITY OF ATLANTA : L. D. M ILTON ROBERT F. ADAMSON RAWSON HAVERTY RICHARD H. R ICH CLAYTON COUNTY : EDGAR BLALOCK DEKALB COUNTY : Dn. SANFORD ATWOOD ROY A . BLOU NT FULTON COUNTY: MITCHELL C. B ISHOP W . A . PULVER GWINNETT COUNTY : K. A . MCMILL8N COBB COUNTY (Obser ver) OTIS A . BRUMBY, Jn. MARTA STAFF: H ENRY L. STUART, General Manager EARL W. NELSON, Chief Engineer K ING ELLIOTT, Director of Public Information H . N. JO HNSON, Secretary to General Manag_e r An important factor in attracting commuters from their cars to rapid transit is the "Park-N-Ride Principle," according to a noted transportation expert. George L. DeMent, Chairman of the Board of the Chicago Transit Authority , recently discussed the importance of parking facilities in connection with rapid transit stations. Referring to the new Skokie Swift extension t o the Chicago rapid transit system , he said, "The 522 Park-N-Ride spaces provided at the outer Dempster Street terminal has proved to be a major factor in the success of Skokie Swift. This Park-N-Ride is used to l 00 per cent capacity every weekday . It is obvious to the Chicago Transit Authority that the patronage of the highly successful Skokie Swift operatio n would be increased automatically if additional parking spaces could be provided at the Dempster Terminal. Similar examples could be cited for the Park-N-Ride lots along other Chicago lines." DeMent noted that "the Cleveland Transit System has given emphasis to Park-N-Ride. Seven 'Rapid' stations have been provided with 5,2 18 free parking spaces .. .Additional parking spaces soon will be provided along the airport rapid transit extension now under construction." He quoted a survey which " indicated that parking spaces are being used at a rate of 1.3 cars per day . and t hat each car carries an average of 1.2 passengers. He says further that "the Toronto Transit Commission will provide parking spaces for 3.000 cars at three stat ions along the Bloor Street subway extension now under constru ction . with (Co11ti1111ecl 0 11 Page 3. Col. 1, �CITY PLANNING AND RAPID TRANSIT The American Institute of Planners has a strong interest in the development of a rapid transit system for the Atlanta Metropolitan Area. The specific interest in MARTA and its proposed system is related to the "balance" and relationship of the transit network to the rest of the metropolitan area and to the total transportation system of the metropolitan area- as it exists and is planned. The planner is concerned with the relationships that will be an outgrowth of the system. What impact will MARTA lines have on public and private property? Which areas will be likely to develop because of a MARTA installation-a station, for instance? Will the system be sensitively related to neighborhoods and business areas, or industrial areas? How? Will the system put stations in places where other planning and development activities provide an opportunity to "multiply" the effect of the investment in transit by an investment in urban renewal, or a college, or a new business area, or a special school? Can better relationships be established between elements of the transit system and the environment? The planning profession is interested in the general and the comprehensive dimensions of the city and the metropolitan area. Therefore, the planning interest in the transit system will extend beyond the tracks and the stations, into a concern for nearby property- and, more important, property that is not so near. The planning concern for all of the Atlanta area is oriented _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1 to maximizing the livability of our "place," and deals equally with the areas impacted and not impacted. In the areas being served (giving the word "impact" a positive tone) the planner is likely to seek to make the favorable impact more favorable , more utilitarian, more significant to the area in terms of its present and future role in the city , whether this role is related to change, redevelopment, more intensive developR ichard M. Forbes ment, new uses or no change . The planning attitude about any public or private investment is based on what the facility will mean to people in their environment. What will it mean t o citizens as they travel to and from work, to recreation, to shopping? This is one level of concern. What it will mean to people at home, if they live near the transit line , is another concern. For example, will it cause an unpleasant industry to develop nearby? The planning concern reduces itself to a concern for our city, our place, our environment. The planner wishes to make Greater ' Atlanta the best possible place in which to live and work. He consequently sees t ransit as a marvelous opportunity to use a large public investment as one of the elements that will help to do that. However, transit will make a positive contribution only if it is very carefully related to each part of the area an d to other projects and plans so that the system is balanced. This relationship to the whole is o~ prime importance. Richard M Forbes, Assistant Prof essor of R eal Estate and Urban Affairs at Georgia State College, is a member of the MARTA Advisory Committee, representing the planning profession. He is a member of the A merican Institute of Planners, and other prof essional groups. (Continued froin Page 2, Col. 2) additional spaces planned for the Yonge Street Subway Ex tension just authorized. The new l 0-mile extension in South J ersey will provide nearly 5,000 parking spaces at six locations wit h provision for future expansio n. Over 16,000 parking spaces at 23 stations will be provided along the 75-mile rapid transit system being built in San Francisco. Quoting DeMent, "There is no longer a question of the need for such facilities. It is only a question of how much parking should be provided for any given rapid transit in stallation." The system being designed for the Atlanta area will include adequate parking facilit ies at suburban stations. MARTA TALKS ... AND LISTENS The story of rapid transit plans for Metropolitan Atlanta is finding interested audiences throughout this area. Between the first of June and mid-September, the MARTA directors and staff talked to some 1700 members or more than 30 civic and other groups, illustrating the MARTA story with slides or motion picture films. In addition, many other discussions were held with city and county officials, planning departments, state legislators, and citizen groups such as Chambers ofCommerce \ and Central Atlanta Progress. After the formal presentations, the meetings were generally opened for questions. In_the picture below, Henry L. Stuart, MARTA General Manager, is listening to a question being asked by a member of the Atlanta Civitan Club. A MARTA display depicting progress in the development of rapid transit was part of the fifth Annual Fall Sale at J amestown Shopping Center in College Park recently. The event was sponsored by the College Park Jaycees in cooperation with merchants at the shopping center. The MARTA display shows the location of Transit Center in downtown Atlanta, and the various lines considered for rapid transit routes. The display back of College Park Jaycee President Paul Green shows in the upper left corner a cutaway view of how Transit Center might be designed, with escalators connecting the two levels of trains with the sidewalks above . The lo wer left corner contains typical site development plans fo r the four !eve.ls of Transit Center while in the lower right corner is a map locating Transit Center in relation to downtown stree ts. The map in the upper righ t corner shows the areas in which the routes and stations will be located. Routes as planned in 196 1, 1962, and 1966-7 are variously indicate d. The display back of Joan Eschenbrenner, MARTA secretary, fea tures a large aerial photo of do wntown Atlanta and pictures of various majo r building developments now under way near rapid transit stations. The MARTA exhibit aroused many enth usiastic com ments from those who viewed it. �MARTAnswers MARTA ACTION QUESTION: Why is MARTA planning to use the old-type steelwheel and steel-rail system instead of something new, like monorail? · ANSWER: In the first place, monorail is not new or modern. As shown in the picture below, monorail has been around a long time-70 years or so. A short monorail line has bee n operating across a river in Germany since 1906. . The major reason for not using monorail, however, is simply that no monorail system has ever been a commercially successful operation in moving numbers of commuters. In recent years, short, relatively simple monorail systems have been built in Paris and Tokyo, and others have been used in World's Fairs in Seattle and New York , and at Disneyland. These small operations, however, do not meet MARTA's design requirements to transport commuters at 70 miles per hour in capacities approaching 30,000 passengers per hour. There are other problems relating to cost, engineering, construction, and route location : Both the top-supported (suspended) and bottom-supported monorail systems are more expensive to construct system-wide than the conventional steel-wheel steel rail system. The topsupported monorail requires the support structure throughout the system, whereas MARTA's plans call for only 3½ miles of aerial structure. The top-supported monorail requires a much larger tunnel for subway where subway is esse ntial. Trying to _eliminate the monorail subway brings us back to the problem MART A faced all along- where to put the route s thro ugh downtown Atlanta without using subway . There is no fe asible surfa ce route fo r either system. Mt:IGS COL Ll:::CT/ ON , Yale University Library - MON ORA IL , 1887 VER SI ON - Joe Vincent Me igs (second row, six th from right) patented this early "rno11orail " in 1873. The running wheels were tilted at 45 degree angles; horizo11tal/y -moun ted steam-driven wheels running on an up- The Board of Direc tors at its September 5 mee ting heard a report on a fi_nancial study by Hammer, Greene, Siler Associates, In c. No ac tion wa s taken on the report. No official ac tion was taken by the Board since a quorum was not prese nt. The nex t mee ting of the MARTA Board of Directors will be Tuesday, October 3, 1967, 3: 30 p.m., Room 619, Glenn Building, 120 Marietta St. , N.W. The bottom-supported system would be somewhat more expensive for grade and aerial structure than the steel-wheel steel rail system, and considerably more expensive for subway because of the larger tunnel required. If expense were not the major factor it is, the question then arises, "what would monorail give you that the conventional system would not provide?" The answer is "nothing." The monorail is slower, has higher operational costs, and does not provide as comfortable ride. During the past 70 years, engineering problems relating to monorail have not been satisfactorily resolved. These include switching, high speeds (70 to 80 MPH), sway, and other technical problems. · These and other disadvantages may eventually be resolved, but no solution is in sight. By contrast, the dual rail system solved these and many other engineering and operational problems years ago . The dual-rail system will definitely provide what is needed in this area: 70 MPH speeds, safety, comfort, and convenience at less cost than any type monorail . Using a known and proven technology means MART A will be able to bring the sy stem into operation at the earliest possible time . This is our goal. - Hemy L. Stuart, MARTA General Manager per set of rails provided propulsion. Th e Philadelphia City Coun cil visited th e 1, 11 4-foot long test track in East Cambridge, Mass., in 188 7. The revolutionary Meigs rail way did not gain acceptance, however; and the company fa iled a fe w years later. RAPID TRANSI T PROGRESS METROPOLITA N ATLA NTA RAP ID TRANSIT AUTHORITY 808 GLE N N B LD G . • 1 20 MARIET TA S T . . N.W . P HON E 52 4 - 5 711 (AR E A CODE 4 0 4) SEPTEMBE R 1967. VO L . 2, NO . 9 ~l · AT L ANTA . GEORGIA 30303 �
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 5, Folder topic: Rapid Transit | 1966-1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 5, Document 5

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  • Title: Box 21, Folder 5, Document 5
  • Text: HUIE AN D HARLAN D ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELORS AT LAW FULTON FEDERAL BUILDING ATLANTA. G EO RGIA 3 0 3 0 3 TELEPHONE W . STELL HUIE 522-1641 JAMES R . HARLAND, JR. HARRY L. CASHIN, JR. TOM WATSON BROWN RUFUS A . CHAMBERS TERRILL A . PARKER D ecember 1 9 , 1967 JAMEsH .MO RGAN , JR . The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, G eorgia 30303 D ear Mayor Allen: Enclosed please find a copy of the proposed Bill to implement the legislative program of MARTA. As we have previously indicated, we would like the concurrence of all of the particip ating governments in these suggested changes, and will, of course, not seek to have passed any of those on which the governments cannot agree. This is also true with respect to Senate Bill 1 1 1 which is presently in the House Local Affairs Committee. We have previously furnished copies of the proposed legis lation to Messrs. Earl Landers and Charles Dav is and have discussed the matter with Messrs. Charles Lokey and Jack Dougherty of the City Attorney's office. By a copy of this letter to e ach of the City Attorne ys we are furnishing them a c opy of same. W e are also furnishing a copy to Mr. Hugh Pierce and Mr. H en ry Bowden. Very truly yours, ,I )(<)-39; .:~/Jt/. . .~, HUIE AND,:tARLA~D /) W SH/ jlt Encl. cc : Mr . Mr. Mr . Mr . Hugh Pierce Henry Bow den Charles Lokey Jack Dougherty Stell Huie / ..... J �HUIE AND HARLAND The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. Page 2 December 19, 1967 P.S. For your information, also enclosed please find a copy of S.B. 111 as passed by the Senate with an additional sugg e stion added. �
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 5, Folder topic: Rapid Transit | 1966-1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 5, Document 6

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  • Title: Box 21, Folder 5, Document 6
  • Text: MINUTES OF THE TWENTY-SECOND MEETING OF THE METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY DECEMBER 5, 1967 The Board of Directors of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority held its regular meeting on December 5, 1967, at 3:30 P.M., in the Glenn Building Conference Room, Atlanta. Mr. Richard H. Rich, Chairman, presided. MEMBERS PRESENT: Robert F. Adamson (City of Atlanta) Sanford Atwood (DeKalb County) M. C. Bishop (Fulton County) Roy A. Blount (DeKalb County) Rawson Haverty (City of Atlanta) K. A. McMillan (Gwinnett County) L. D. Milton (City of Atl a nta) Richard H. Rich (City of Atlanta) MEMBERS ABSENT: Edgar Blalock (Clayton County) OTHERS PRESENT: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority H. L. Stuart, General Manager King Elliott, Public Information Director Earl Nelson, Chief Engineer H. N. Johnson, Secretary to General Manager Glenn E . Bennett, Secretary Consultants W. O. Salter, Parsons, Brinckerhoff, Quade & Douglas, San Francisco J . A. Coil, Resident Manager, Parsons, BrinckerhoffTudor-Bechtel, Atlanta R. W. Gustafson, Supervising Engineer, Parsons, Brincker hoff-Tudor-Bechtel, Atlanta Jacques Labourer , Eric Hill Associates Tom Watson Brown, Huie and Harland \ �Others Don Ingram, Central Atlanta Progress, Inc. P.A. Springer, Atlanta Traffic and Safety Council Mrs. Rachel Champagne, J. D. Wingfield, Jr., Atlanta Region Metropolitan Planning Commission The meeting was called to order by the Chairman. Minutes Upon motion by Mr. Bishop, seconded by Mr. McMi llon, the minutes of the November meeting were unanimously approveq . Financial Report Mr. Stuart presented the November 30th budget report and said most items were as projected. There were no questions and the report was accepted. Report of General Manager Mr. Stuart said the Georgia Society o f Professional Engineer s had pass e d a resolution e ndorsing the tran s it project, and expressing a desir e to e stablish a spe aker s bureau. Mr . Stuart reported on a recent trip to Louisville, to contact officials of the L. & N. Railroad and present deta ils of the transit plan. He said the new lease for the A. & W. P. Railroad contained spec if ic refer e nce as to how rapid transit should be rou ted thr ough t h e a r ea t o th e wes t o f Un i on Sta t ion. The General Manager said meetings had been held with railroads, planning groups, municipal officials, and with Fu l ton, DeKalb, and Gwinnett County Commissioners. The proposed legislative p r o gr am had been discuss e d wi th member s o f the Hou se a nd Sena t e f r om the fou r count ies . He planne d a tr ip t o Washington to d iscu ss the 1968 l egislativ e pro gram wi th Representatives Blackbur n and Thomps o n. Mr. Stuart me nt i oned a vis it on Nov e mber 28, f rom Mr. Carl Hi ll , a n assis tan t to Mr. Char l es Ha ar of HUD in Wash ington . Mr. Hill h ad been s hown the plans and reviewed progress in the design field. - 2 - �Mr. Stuart said he and Mr. Bennett would appear before the Fulton County Grand Jury on December 12. (Subsequently, Mr. Haverty was substituted for Mr. Stuart.) Mr. Rich had testified before the Rainey Sub-Committee of the Georgia House of Representatives on November 30, and requested Mr. Stuart to send a copy of his testimony to the Board members. Reports by Consultants Parsons, Brinckerhoff-Tudor-Bechtel Mr. John Coil reported that the 701 report had been distributed, and the popular summary version would be r .eady for distribution within one week. He said the engineers were continuing to update the plan and resolve questions with governments. He had been encouraged by responses from the Seaboard Coast Line Railroad and by the L. & N. Railroad. Corridor Impact Study Mr. J. D. Wingfield, Jr . , Planning Director for ARMPC, commented on the corridor impact study. He said the study was designed to examine potentials. Examples had been looked at, such as outlying stations, but most of the work had been done on developed sections of the lines. Mr. Wingfield said many of the ideas would depend upon the initiative of the elected officials to do early work so MARTA could take advantage of opportunities . He stressed that this study was not totally a "MARTA study," but pointed up the opportunities for local governments to act . Contract between Georgia Department of Industry & Trade and MARTA Copies of a proposed contract between MARTA and the Georgia Department of Industry & Trade were distributed for considera tion. The State of Georgia had appropriated $500 , 000 per y ea r to MARTA, and the Department of Industry & Trade had been de s ig nated the agency who would disburse these funds . Th e cont r act p r o v ided for appropriations to be paid quarterly in adv ance , an d provided that such funds could be used fo r direct or indire c t costs , including debt service , administr ation , operating , plan n i ng, desig n i n g , finishing , r ight -of-wa y acq uisition , and r olli ng s t oc k. - 3 - �The contract provided further that the State could appropriate real estate, in lieu of cash. It also gave the State a reversionary interest in the property of the Authority, in the same proportion as the State 1 s appropriation to MARTA. The contract required an annual audit of the books of MARTA to be sent to the State. The contract was for 50 years, and would cover subsequent appropriations as - they were made. After discussion of the contract prov isions, the following resolution was presented: BE IT RESOLVED that Henry L. Stuar t, General Manager, and Glenn E. Bennett, Secretary, be and hereby are authorized and directed to execute on behalf of this Authority a contract substantially in the form as presented to this Board, subject to approval o f counsel, with the State of Georgia, by and through its Depa rtment of Industry & Trade, for the t ra nsfe r and p a yment to thi s Author i t y o f funds appropriated and to be appropriated by the Legislature and Governor of Georgia for the purposes of this Authority; and BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED t ha t said General Manager a nd Secr e tar y b e and h e r e by a r e a uthoriz ed a nd d i rected t o execu te any and a l l f u rth er d o cuments as may be reasonably necessary to the transfer and payment of said funds; and BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that Citi zens Tru s t Company b e a nd h ere by is d esign a t e d as t he depo s i t ory f o r said f u nds a nd t h a t a l l withdrawals t h eref rom s h a ll b e only o ver t h e signatu res o f e i ther the Chairman or Vice Chairman o f the Board o f this Authority a n d either the Gen e ral Manage r o r t h e Chief Engineer o f th i s Authority. Up o n mo tio n by Mr. Mc Millan , seco nded by Dr. Atwood, the above resolution was u n animously ado pted. Appointmen t o f Audi t o r for 1 96 8 Mr. Stuart had received a proposal from Arthur Andersen Company to continue auditing services as n eeded for the year ending December 31, 1968, for a fee of $500. Mr. Bishop made a motion, - 4 - �seconded by Mr. McMillon, that this contract be renewed. motion was unanimously passed. The 1968 Budget The 1968 budget estimates were presented by the General Manager, who recommended the proposed budget for adoption. Mr. Stuart said the budget had been reviewed by the Board earlier. The Chairman asked for a breakdown and explanation of an item of $750,000 for preliminary design of the transit center. The General Manager agreed to provide an explanation of this item, and Mr. Bishop made a motion that the budget for 1968 be adopted, subject to a satisfactory review of the item questioned by the Chairman. The motion was seconded by Mr. Adamson and unanimously passed. A copy of the 1968 budget as adopted is attached hereto and made a part of these minutes. Authorization under Retainer Agreement The General Manager requested authorization for $500 to be expended under the retainer agreement, to pay for copies of the 100-scale plan and profile drawings which are being requested by the State Highway Department, the railroads, and others. Mr. Stuart showed samples of these prints, and said the engineers had been making them available at cost. Mr. Bishop made a motion, seconded by Mr. McMillan, that a sum of $500 be allocated for these prints, from the retainer agreement. The motion was unanimously passed. January Meeting It was agreed that the General Manager would poll the members as to a date in January for the regular meeting, which would not conflict with holiday plans. It was tentatively agreed that January 5 would be agreeable. Notice would be sent after the staff had checked with all members. Adjournment The meeting was adjourned at 4:45 P.M. - 5 - �
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 5, Folder topic: Rapid Transit | 1966-1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 5, Document 9

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  • Title: Box 21, Folder 5, Document 9
  • Text: METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORI TY ATLANTA, GEORGIA STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL CONDITION NOVEMBER 30 , 1967 ASSETS Ca sh in Banks : C & S National Bank First National Bank Trust Compa ny of Georgia Fulton Nati.anal Bank ·- Sec tion 9 $ 37,873.95 2 , 972 . 78 1 , 000 . 00 115 , 000 . 00 Invest ments : U" S " Treas ury Bills 9 -, 497 . 06 25. 00 Petty Cash TOTAL ASSETS $253 , 368 . 79 LIABILITIES Accounts Payable $ Payroll Taxes Withh eld and Ac cr ued Reser ves : ARMPC - Ur ban Des ign St udy A lanta Transir St udy Parsons Brinckerho ff - Tuior -Be c hte l : Se ction 9 Ma tc hi ng Re tainer Agr eemen t: Tr a _s portati n Study Publi c Informac i on S rveying TOTAL LIABlU.TIES SUR PLUS 433.65 1 , 283 . 32 8 ,333 . 00 1 , 667 . 00 $1 , 500 . 00 1,92 5 . 48 2 ,984 . 78 6 , 410 .26 8~491. 23 $] 647877, 56 �
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 5, Folder topic: Rapid Transit | 1966-1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 5, Document 18

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  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 21, Folder 5, Document 18
  • Text: METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY BUDGET REPORT OCTOBER 31, 196 7 BUDGET 1967 ACTUAL JANUARY 1, 1967 TO OCTOBER 31 1 1967 $128,281.64 $128,281.64 $ 84,030.00 23,190.00 82 , 770.00 91,800.00 18,210.00 $300,000.00 $ 5,520.00 $ 84,030.00 17,392.50 82,770.00 91,800 . 00 · 13,657 . 50 $289,650.00 $ 3,853.00 $ 95,000.00 276,000.00 $ 3 71, 000. 00 $ 90,000.00 135,402.54 597.46 $226,000.00 TOTAL INCOME $676,520.00 $519,503.00 TOTAL INCOME AND UNAPPROPRIATED SURPLUS $804,801.64 $647,784 .64 $ 68,950.00 10,500.00 $ 53,226.44 8,881.92 1,109.00 533.00 1,680.00 10,000.00 99.00 $ 92,871.00 $ 3,150.00 1,168.13 533.34 993.05 300.54 104 .00 $ 65, 207.42 $ 2,700 . 00 Unappropriated Surplus INCOME Appropriations: City of Atlanta Clayton County DeKalb County Fulton County Gwinnett County Sub-Totals Int.erest Income Federal Funds: 702 Loan Section 9 Grant Interest _- Federal Funds Sub-Totals 0 EXPENSES Staff Cos t: Salaries Expense Benefits: Social Security Guaranty Fund Health and Accident Insurance Retirement Workme n 's Compensation S~b-Totals Board Meetings Administrative and Office Overhead : Rent Communication and Postage Furniture and Equipment Supplie s Prin ting Auditor Accountant Public Information Advisor y I nsurance: Public Liab i l ity Depositor y and Forgery Fidel ity Bond Sub -Tota l s CARRIED FORWARD $ 3,000.00 2 , 000 .00 2 , 000 .00 3,600.00 1 , 000 . 00 250.00 1,000 . 00 33,000 . 00 5 , 000 . 00 $ 2 , 500. 00 1,595.84 532 .81 2, 293 . 58 623.56 250 . 00 750.00 22 , 61 5. 83 1 ,551. 95 72. 00 56 . 00 199 . 00 $ 51 , l 77. 00 55. 00 56.27 198 . 60 $ 33 , 023.44 $147 , 198.00 $100 1930.86 �METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY BUDGET REPORT OCTOBER 31, 196 7 BUDGET 1967 TOTAL INCOME AND UNAPPROPRIATED SURPLUS BROUGHT FORWARD ACTUAL JANUARY 1, 1967 TO OCTOBER 31 1 1967 $804 1 801. 64 $647,784.64 $1471198.00 $ 20,000.00 $100,930.86 $10,758.61 $ 31,250.00 $ 29,939.00 32,667.00 16,333.00 16,000.00 16,333.00 3,333.00 1,667.00 0 0 1,667.00 4,742.09 95,000.00 90,000.00 240,000.00 120,000.00 60,000.00 21000.00 $602,250.00 120,000.00 130,364.00 19,335.54 2,475.84 $430,856.47 TOTAL EXPENSES $769,448.00 $542,545.94 SURPLUS S 35,353.6{± SlQ5,238,ZQ EXPENSES Brought Forward Counsel Consultants: Atlanta Region Metropolitan Planning Commission Urban Design Study: Section 9 Matching Atlanta Transit Study: Section 9 Matching Hammer, Greene and Siler Parsons Brinkerhoff-Tudor-Bechtel: 702 Loan Section 9: Federal Matching Retainer Agreement Research and Technical Services Sub-Totals �
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 5, Folder topic: Rapid Transit | 1966-1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 5, Document 19

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_021_005_019.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 21, Folder 5, Document 19
  • Text: METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY ATLANTA , GEORGIA STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL CONDITION OCTOBER 31, 1967 ASSETS Cash in Banks : C & S National Bank First National Bank Trus t Company of Georgia Fulton National Bank - Section 9 $ 52 , 164 . 36 3,119.80 1 1000 . 00 38,333.00 Investments: U. S . Treasury Bills 102,350 . 85 Pett y Cas h 25 . 00 TOTAL ASSETS $196 , 993 . 01 LIABILITIES Ac counts Payable $ Payroll Taxes Withheld and Accrued Reserves: ARMPC - Ur ban Design St udy Atlanta Trans it Stud y Parsons Brinckerhoff-Tudor -Becht el : Section 9 Matching Retainer Agr eement : Transportation Study Public Informa ti on Surveying TOTAL LIABILITIES SURPLUS 2 , 592 .36 1 , 037.13 8 , 333. 00 1, 667. 00 70 ,364. 00 $1 , 500 . 00 2, 000 . 00 4,26 0 . 82 7,76 0 . 82 91,754 . 31 $1 05,238.7 0 �
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 5, Folder topic: Rapid Transit | 1966-1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 5, Document 21

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_021_005_021.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 21, Folder 5, Document 21
  • Text: Summary of Remarks of w. Stell Huie at MARTA meeting, Novembe r 7, 1967 - re Amendme nts to MARTA Legislation-1968 1. Section 9{c) requiring judicial review of the Authority's rate making powers should be eliminated. It is necessary that the Authority have the power to commit to bond purchasers that it can establish r a t e s suffici e nt to cover the operating cost of the system. 2. Section 10: (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) eliminate the 6% interest limitation found in 10 {d) • eliminate the requi rement that the bonds be sold by public competitive bidding found in 10 (h) . . eliminate the requirement that t he bonds be sold at par found in lO{h). amend lO(g) to provide that all "obligations" rather than just bonds will have the qualit i es of negoti able instruments. ame nd lO(p) to provi de that t he procedure o f the reve nue bond l aw as it now e x ists or may be hereafter amended will apply. ~ appears that the 1965 version which has since been amended may be referred to in the Ac t . 3. Section 13{b) must be cla rifi e d so as to eliminate any e x c e ss ive dra in of f unds b y r eason o f r elocation payme nts which may not be included in estimate s o f e n g i nee r s . I n thi s r espect we must check on the federal requirements as well as procedures and policies established f or relocat ion payments under oth e r laws . 4. Section 1 5(c) mus t be amende d so a s t o provide that after a va l idatio n p roc eeding n o c ontract may be declared v oid by reason o f any c o n f lic t o f interest. 5. Greate r fle x ib i lity t han is allowed by S e ction 17 nee ds to be added f o r bud g e t ing p u rpos e s ; howe v er it would app ear t h at t h e o nly must requiremen t here i n is that a def i cit budget should be allowed during initial year ' s operati o ns. 6. Sectio n 18 which pro vides f o r inspectio n every three years by an outside engineer is u nreas onable and wou l d be too e xpe nsive. It should be eliminated. The trust indenture securing the bonds will provide for adequate inspection for t h e interest of the bond holders. 7. Section 24 must be amended so as t o e liminate the r e quire me nt that the contracts with participating governments be approved in a referendum by submitting "the e x tent of the dollar amount or amounts involved." �8. Section 24 and Section 8(i) must be amended so as to authorize the payment of participating governments of operating subsidies if it should become necessary . 9. Section 24(e) should be amended to eliminate the last sentence which says that the authority is subject to and limited b y any local act heretofore or hereafter enacted applicable to the local governing body of any local g overnment. This language is troublesome and we don't know e x actly what it means. 10. Section 24(k) should be amended to eliminate the prohibition of the use by the City of Atlanta of "its public funds" to support rapid transit when taxes are being levied by Fulton and DeKalb counties on subjects of tax ation within the city limits. Such provision could prevent the city from g i ving us the benefit of their l a nd office without cost and cedi rig to us cert ain r i ghts-of -way a nd b e n efi t s in public s t reet~ , e tc. 11. Section 24(1) should be amended to authorize contributions and support from any municip ality in the five-county area rather than limiting it to the defined term "local government" which is limited to the City of Atlanta and the participa ting counties. 12. S e c ti on 2 (j) should be ame nde d so a s to cle a r ly a u t hor i ze t h e capitalizing of interest during construction as well as start-up costs with r e spe ct to each section of the system as it is begun. This section should also be amended so as to include the t otal cos t o f th e s y s tem as de fin e d in 2 (g ). 13 . S e c t ion 6 (i -2) should be ame nded t o e liminate the l ast sen tenc e or t o make i t clear h ow a showing t h at t h e l easing or pu r chas ing of a priva tely owned s y stem is essential to rapid transit. 14 . Se c t ion 8 (e) s hould be amende d to el i minate th e payme nt o f a ttorneys' fee s t o t ho se suing th e Author ity f o r trespas s. 15. S e c tion 12 should be amen ded so as t o provide the Autho rity wi th th e p ower o f e minent d oma in. 16. Section 2 l (d) reg a r di n g t he exemp tion o f th e Au t hor i ty f r om regu l ati on by p ub l ic s ervic e c ommissi on, etc . is a mbiguous and should be clarifi e d . 17. Section 22 should b e rewo rded so as t o allow the Au thority to e s tab lish s elf- insura nce r es e r ves. - 2 - �
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 5, Folder topic: Rapid Transit | 1966-1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 5, Document 25

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_021_005_025.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 21, Folder 5, Document 25
  • Text: November 1, 1967 Mr. Richard H. Rich, Chairman Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority 45 Broad Street, S. W. Atl nta, Georgia 30303 De r Dick: In view of the f ct that a determination will soon be made on the federal level as to whether the Urban Mass Transportation Act should be left in th Department of Hou ing and Urban Development or trans{ rred to the Department of Tr n portation, the N tion 1 League of Citie i considering th po ition it bould t k on thi matter. The Tran portation nd Communications Committee of NLC baa scheduled me ting for the la t we k of this month, at which tlme I will b asked - - s vie: chairman of the committee to m ke recommendation; and I am writing you to k for the benefit of your feeling nd reason for s m • Sine rely, s SMJr:nd cc: The Hon. Ivan Allen, Jr. V ~ Jr. �
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 5, Folder topic: Rapid Transit | 1966-1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 5, Document 39

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_021_005_039.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 21, Folder 5, Document 39
  • Text: METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY ATLANTA, GEORGIA STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AUGUST 31, 1967 ASSETS Cash in Banks: C & S National Bank First National Bank - Payroll Trust Company of Georgia Fulton National Bank - Section 9 $ 14,296 . 04 2,651.88 1,000.00 20,976.08 Investments: U. S. Treasury Bills 114,812.00 25.00 Petty Cash Accounts Receivable: Gwinnett County - 19Q7 Gwinnett County - 1966 $9,105.00 4,552.50 13,657.50 $167,418.50 TOTAL ASSETS LIABILITIES $ 12,648.37 Accounts Payable Payroll Taxes Withheld and Accrued Reserves: ARMPC - Urban Design Study Atlanta Transit Study Parsons-Brinkerhoff-Tudor-Bechtet: Section 9 Matching Retainer Agree~ent: Transportation Study Public Infor\llBtion Surveying TOTAL LIABILITIES SURPLUS 1,492.14 7,293. 00 1 ,563 . 00 82,411.00 $ 139.37 245.19 4,338.89 4,723.45 110,130.96 $ 57 , 287.54 �
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 5, Folder topic: Rapid Transit | 1966-1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 5, Document 41

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_021_005_041.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 21, Folder 5, Document 41
  • Text: METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY BUDGET REPORT AUGUS? ' 31 ·~. 1967 ·. Unappropriated Surplus BUDGET 1967 ACTUAL JANUARY 1, 196 7 TO AUGUST 31, 196 7 $128,281.64 $128,281.64 $ 84,030.00 $ 63,022.50 23,190.00 82,770.00 91,800.00 18,210.00 $300,000.00 $ 5,520.00 17,392.50 41,385.00 68,850.00 9,105: 9.9 $199,755.00 $ 3,018.77 $ 95,000.00 $371,000.00 $676,520.00 $804,801.64 $ 60,000.00 67,686.12 597.46 $128,283.58 $331,057.35 $459,338.99 $ 68,950.00 10,500.00 $ 41,380.94 7,048.24 1,109.00 533.00 1,680.00 10,000.00 99.00 $ 92,871.00 $ 3,150.00 1,088.89 400.00 758.13 300.54 104.00 $ 51,080.74 $ 2,200.00 iNCOME Appropriations: City of Atlanta Clayton County DeKalb County Fulton County Gwinnett County Sub-Totals Interest Income Federal Funds: 702 Loan Section 9 Grant Interest - Federal Funds Sub-Totals TOTAL INCOME TOTAL INCOME AND UNAPPROPRIATED SURPLUS 276,000.00 0 EXPENSES Staff Cost: Salaries Expenses Benefits: Social Security Guaranty Fund Health and Accident Insurance Retirement Workmen's Compensation Aub-Totals Board Meetings Administrative and Office Overhead: Rent Communications and Postage Furniture and Equipment Supplies Printing Auditor Accountant Public Information Advisory Insurance: Public Liability Depository and Forgery Fidelity Bond Sub-Totals CARRIED FORWARD $ 3,000.00 2,000.00 2,000.00 3,600.00 1,000.00 250.00 1,000.00 33,000.00 5,000.00 72.00 56.00 199.00 $ 51,177.00 $147,198.00 $ 2,000.00 1,254.16 117 .81 1,854.58 623.56 250.00 500.00 15,025.20 977. 35 55.00 56.27 198. 6 0 $ 22,912.53 $ 76,193.27 �METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY BUDGET REPORT AUGUST 31, 1967 BUDGET 19'67 ACTUAL JANUARY 1, 1967 TO AUGUST 31, 1967 I TOTAL INCOME AND UNA?PROPRIATED SURPLUS BROUGHT FORWARD $804,801.64 $459,338.99 $147,198.00 $ 20,000.00 $ 76,193.27 $ 8,758.61 $ 31,250.00 $ 29",939.00 32,667.00 16,333.00 16,000.00 15,293.00 3,333.00 1,667.00 0 0 1,563.00 4,742.09 EXPENSES Brought Forward Counsel Consultants: Atlanta Region Metropolitan Planning Commis~ion Urban Design Study: Section 9 Matching Atlanta Transit Stu9y; Section 9 Matching Hamm~r, Greene and Siler Parsons-Brinckerhoff-Tudor ~Bechtel: 702 Loan Section 9: Federal Matching Retainer Agreement Research and Technical Services Sub-Totals TOTAL EXPENSES 95,000.00 60,000.00 240,000.00 120,000.00 60,000.00 2,000.00 $602,250.00 $769,448.00 60,000.00 112,411.00 15,115.64 2,035.84 $317,099.57 $402 , 051. 45 SURPLUS $ 35,353.6~ $ 5Z,28Z.5~ �
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 5, Folder topic: Rapid Transit | 1966-1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 6, Document 7

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_021_006_007.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 21, Folder 6, Document 7
  • Text: - METROPOLI TAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY ATLANTA, GEORGIA STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL CONDITION J ULY 31 , 196 7 ASSETS Cash in Banks : C & S Nationa l Bank First National Bank - Payroll Trust Company of Georgia Fulton National Bank - Sec t ion 9 $ 10,729.07 2 ,33 2. 07 1 , 000 . 00 90,283 . 58 Depos i t In Transit (DeKalb Coun ty Appropria tion) 20,69 2 . 50 Investment s : U. S . Treasur y Bi lls U. S. Treasury Bills - Se ction 9 130 , 585.50 0 Pe tty Cash 25 . 00 Accounts Rec e ivable: Gwinnett County - 1967 Gwinnett County - 1966 $9, 105 . 00 4 ,552 . 50 13 , 657 . 50 $269, 305. 22_ TOTAL ASSETS LIABILITIES Accounts Payab le $ 91 , 857 .45 Payroll Taxes Wi t hheld a nd Accrued Reserves : ARMPC : Ur ban Des i g n St udy At lanta Transit Study Parsons-Brinckerho ff-Tudo r - Bechtel : Section 9 Matching Retainer Agreement : Transportation Study Public Information Surverying TOTAL LIABILITIES SURPLUS 1, 166.97 5,800 . 00 1 , 000 . 00 70,000 . 00 $ 207 . 70 696 . 30 5,82 0 .77 6,724 . 77 176,549.19 $ 92 ,756.03 I �
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 6, Folder topic: Rapid Transit | 1966-1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 6, Document 13

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_021_006_013.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 21, Folder 6, Document 13
  • Text: July 24, 1967 585 Mountain Drive, N. E. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. 204 City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mr. Allen: The Mayor and Aldermen must give serious consideration, direction support, and if necessary some financial assistance to Mr. Robert Sommerville's proposal on "Rapid Busways." The city of Atlanta, its merchants, its industries and commercial employers, will be strangled soon by automobile traffic. The continued growth and very development of our city demands the immediate implementation of the rapid busways system. This system, as proposed, will be the method for acquiring right of way and thereby will speed up the implementation of the rapid t ransit system. Please exercise your influence to see that this system is adopted. JKT/da cc: Aldermen Mr . Richard Rich Mr. Mills B. Lane �
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 6, Folder topic: Rapid Transit | 1966-1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 6, Document 20

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_021_006_020.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 21, Folder 6, Document 20
  • Text: MINUTES OF THE SEVENTEENTH MEETING OF THE METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY JULY 7, 1967 The Board of Directors of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority held its regular meeting on July 7, 1967, at 3:30 P.M., in the Glenn Building Conference Room, Atlanta. Mr. Richard H. Rich, Chairman, presided. MEMBERS PRESENT: Robert F. Adamson (City of Atlanta) M. C. Bishop (Fulton County) Roy A. Blount (DeKalb County) Rawson Haverty (City of Atlanta) K. A. McMillan (Gwinnett County) Richard H. Rich (City of Atlanta) MEMBERS ABSENT: Sanford Atwood (DeKalb County) Edgar Blalock (Clayton county) L. D. Milton (City of Atlanta) OTHERS PRESENT: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority H. L. Stuart, General Manager Glenn E . Bennett, Secretary King Elliott, Public Information Director Earl Nelson, Chief Engineer H. N. Johnson, Secretary to General Manager MARTA Advisory committee Howard K. Menhinick, Chairman, Georgia Institute of Technology H. Boyer Marx, H. Boyer Marx and Associates Richard L. Aeck, Aeck Associates , Inc. Richard M. Forbes, Georgia State College Roy J. Boston, Georgia Department of Public Health �Consultants Walter Douglas, Parsons, Brinckerhoff, Quade & Douglas, New York w. O. Salter, Parsons, Brinckerhoff-Tudor, Bechtel, San Francisco J. A. Coil, Resident Manager, Parsons, Brinckerhoff-Tudor, Bechtel, Atlanta Raymond O'Neil, Parsons, Brinckerhoff-Tudor, Bechtel, Atlanta David McBrayer, Traffic Engineer, Parsons, Brinckerhoff-Tudor, Bechtel, Atlanta R. w. Gustafson, Supervising Engineer, Parsons, BrinckerhoffTudor, Bechtel, Atlanta Robert P. Barksdale, Project Estimator, Parsons, BrinckerhoffTudor, Bechtel, Atlanta Peter Vandersloot, Manager of Planning and Scheduling, Parsons, Brinckerhoff-Tudor, Bechtel, San Francisco _ Leon Eplan, Eric Hill Associates, Atlanta Jacques L. Laboureur, Eric Hill Associates, Atlanta Lynn Howard, Eric Hill Associates, Atlanta Arden Brey, Eric Hill Associates, Atlanta W. Stell Huie, Huie & Harland, Atlanta Tom Watson Brown, Huie & Harland, Atlanta Others Hugh L. McDaniell, Cobb County Representative Robert w. Roseveare, Traffic Engineer, DeKalb County Joe Lay, Robinson-Humphrey company, Inc., Atlanta Maarten Den Hartog, Lord & Den Hartog, New York City Donald G. Ingram, Central Atlanta Progress, Inc. P.A. Springer, Atlanta Traffic & Safety Council Van Redmon, WAII-TV Remer Tyson, Atlanta Constitution J . D. Wingfield, Jr., Gayle L. Harder, Jerry A. Coursey, Mrs. Margaret c. Breland, Mrs. Rachel Champagne, Miss Claudette Parrish, Atlanta Region Metropolitan Planning Commission - 2 - �,-The meeting was called to order by the Chairman. Minutes Upon motion by Mr. Bishop, seconded by Mr. McMillon, the reading of the minutes of the June meeting was dispensed with and they were unanimously approved. Financial Report The General Manager presented the financial report as of June 30, 1967, which is attached hereto and made a part of these minutes. DeKalb County had not sent payment for the second quarter; however it was understood this would be received soon. A bill in the amount of $4,742 .09 had been received from Hammer, Greene, Siler Associates for extra work in connection with a report suggested by Washington officials of HUD. The Chairman had authorized the work subject to Board ratification, because of the timing which was important. Upon motion by Mr. Bishop, seconded by Mr. McMillan, approval of this expenditure was unanimously given. Other Business The Chairman said a managerial seminar sponsored by HUD, would be conducted at Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, from July 10 - July 21. TWo-thirds of salary and tuition would be reimbursed by HUD, and Mr. Rich recommended approval of the General Manager's attendance at this seminar. Upon motion by Mr. Bishop, seconded by Mr. Blount, unanimous approval was given. Mr. Bishop reported on a recent trip to Montreal and Toronto, and his obs ervations of the two rapid transit systems. Progress Reports General Manager Mr . Stuart r e ported on the status of all MARTA consultant contracts. This report is attached hereto and made a part of these minutes. There is an unused balance of $42,000 in the retainer agreement with Parsons, Brinckerhoff- Tudor Bechtel, which is expected to be adequate for whatever additional work might be r e quired. Th e General Manager h a d fil l e d seven speaking e ngageme n ts during the month of June . He reported briefly on a recent trip to - 3 - �Washington where he visited HUD officials , and Congressman Fletcher Thompson. Mr. Stuart said a presentation of MARTA's requirements would be made to the State Properties Control Commission on July 10. The General Manager introduced Professor Howard K. Menhinick of Georgia Tech , Chairman of the Advisory Committee to MARTA , who introduced the other members of this Committee to the Board. Consultants Parsons, Brinckerhoff-Tudor , Bechtel In response to a r eque st o f the Board o f Dire ctors, Mr. Wa lter Douglas of Parsons, Brinckerhoff, Quade & Douglas, present~d a time and action calendar for construction of the 30-mile s y stem. This schedule assumed construction could begin in January , 196 8, and Mr. Douglas pointed •out that it was only a point of re f erence, based not upon financial capabilit i es , but upon length o f time requ i red from the po int o f pract i cal design and con structi on . Mr. Salter identified the 30-mile system, and Mr. Coil presented charts showing costs involved, based on a 1968 beginning date. He reminded the Board that additional costs would accrue e ach year construction had to be dela y ed. ' Mr. Rich s uggested r emoving ac tua l dates fr om th e time and a c tion calendar, s o tha t i t would show t h e construc tion p e r i od i n number of years. Mr. Douglas said the 4½ year period was feasible and possible, but ver y optimistic. Mr. Rich commended Mr. Douglas on the presentation. Hammer , Greene , Si ler Ass o ciates Mr . Bennett reported for Hammer, Greene, Siler Associates on the status of th e e conomic stud y. He said the fi na l r eport would be submitte d wi t h in thirty d ays. The Hammer fi r m ha d r e viewed method s o f fina n cing p ropo sed i n the 1 96 2 study, and ha d i nvest i gated al l permanent meth ods , pro grams, a nd sources which might realistically be a vailable to finance capital costs. They had examined all o ther systems in the c o untry and had exp l ored all poss ib l e s our ces of f i n ance - loc al , sta t e , and f edera l . A fo rmula belie v ed t o be feasib l e and equi t able f o r all o cating costs, using we i ghted indexes o f population, pro perty tax digests, and employment for 1965 and 1985 , had been developed , as f ollows : - 4 - �City of Atlanta Fulton County outside the City of Atlanta DeKalb County Clayton County Gwinnett County 56.6 % 12.0 % 22.1 % 5.9 % 3.4 % It had been recommended by the consultant and accepted by the MARTA Board that Clayton and Gwinnett Counties would not participate in the financing of the system until lines were constructed in those counties, at which time they would begin paying their appropriate share retroactively from the beginning of the construction period. Mr. Bennett said the consultants had worked with local governments to evaluate financial capabilities in light of long-range capital demands and forecasts of ad valorem ta x digests , plus other sources of income. The next step would be meetings with the major governments to explain the report and seek support of it. Proposed New Impact Study Mr. Bennett reported on several recent meetings with HUD officials in Washington, attended by the Chairman, himself, and others. The present policy of the federal government is to help build transit facilities; it also includes the study of the economic and social impact on entire areas affected. HUD hopes to use transit as a tool to guide future growth and reshape blighted areas of cities. Washington officials had recently e x pressed interest in having MARTA study the economic impact, potentials, and issues of the system on Metropolitan Atlanta. Indication had been given that HUD would favorabl y entertain an application for funds'to support such a stud y. Mr . Be n nett recommended that MARTA be authorized to conduct such a study, and to prepare an application for federal funds , with local matching funds not to e x ceed $40,000 . The study was e x pected to take approx imately six months. It was suggested that it be coordinated by ARMPC, with Central Atlanta Progress, Inc . , and the City of Atlanta Planning Department participating, as well as outside consultants as needed . A motion was made b y Mr . Haverty and seconded by Mr . Bishop that local funds of $40,000 for the study be approved , a n d that the Gen eral Manager be autho r ized to ma k e approp r iate application to HUD . - 5 - �Atlanta Transit System - Busways Proposal The Chairman reviewed briefly the recently proposed rapid busways concept of the Atlanta Transit System. He said Mayor Ivan Allen had asked the Authority to evaluate the proposal and make a recommendation concerning it. The Chairman had instructed the staff to make an objective evaluation of the rapid busways proposal and report back to the Board. After discussion, it was the consensus of the Board that this should be done as soon as possible. Mr. Bennett announced that Messrs. Rich, Stuart, and Coil had taped a program on transit for viewing Sunday, July 9, at 10:30 P.M. on WAGA-TV. Also, the Chairman would address the Atlanta Rotary Club on transit on Monday, July 10, and Board members were invited to attend as Mr. Bennett's guests. Adjournment Upon motion by Mr. Bishop, seconded by Mr. Adamson, the meeting was adjourned at 4:45 P.M. Next Meeting August 1, 1967. - 6 - �
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 6, Folder topic: Rapid Transit | 1966-1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 6, Document 22

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_021_006_022.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 21, Folder 6, Document 22
  • Text: METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY ATLANTA, GEORGIA STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL CONDITION JUNE 30, 1967 ASSETS Cash in Banks: C & S National Bank First National Bank - Payroll Trust Company of Georgia Fulton National Bank - Section 9 $ 38,921.04 443.53 1,000.00 90,283.58 Investments: U. S. Treasury Bills U. S. Treasury Bills - Section 9 69,603.14 0 Petty Cash 25. 00 Accounts Receivable: DeKalb County - 1967 Gwinnett County - 1967 Gwinnett County - 1966 $20,692.50 9,105.00 4,552.50 34,350.00 TOTAL ASSETS $234,626.29 LIABILITIES Accounts Payable $ Payroll Taxes Withheld and Accrued Reserves : ARMPC : Urban Design Study Atlanta Transit Study Parsons , Brinckerhoff-Tudor-Bechtel: Section 9 Matching Retainer Agreement: Transportation Study Public Information Survey ing TOTAL LIABILITIES SURPLUS 1,290.67 0 5,800.00 1,000.00 100,000.00 $ 2 07. 7 0 696. 30 5,820.77 6,724. 77 114,815.44 $119. 810. 85 �
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 6, Folder topic: Rapid Transit | 1966-1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017