Search (41 results)

Applied Filters (Reset)

  • Tags = Box 21 Folder 35

Filters

Result Types

Item Types

Tags

Featured

Box 21, Folder 35, Document 5

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_021_035_005.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 21, Folder 35, Document 5
  • Text: ATLANTA,GEORQIA ROUTE SLIP TO: ~PA~¥~~-=---=---- FROM : Dan E. Sweat, Jr. D For your information D Please refer to the attached correspondence and make the necessary reply. D Advise me the status of the attached. FORM 25- 4-S �
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 35, Folder topic: Summer program | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 35, Document 6

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_021_035_006.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 21, Folder 35, Document 6
  • Text: CITY HALL October 1~, 1967 ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmenta: liaison . MEMORANDUM To: Dr. John Letson, School Superintendent Mr. Jack Delius, General Manager, Parks Department Miss Virginia Carmichael, Recreation Director, Parks Department From: Subject: Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. Transfer of Summer Recreation Programs to School System Each summe r f o r the last several years, it has b e come increasingly more apparent that the de ve lopment and implementation of comp re hensive recreation programs in low income sections of the City of Atlanta is absolutely essential for the reduction of obvious factors which cause problems of juvenile delinquency and social disorders. The large-scale special recreation program this summer pro ve d conclusively the v alue of such an all-out coordinated effort. More than 125, 000 youngste rs from disadv ant a g e d commun iti e s took part in programs prov ided by 33 agencies through th e recr e ation funds made available by th e Office of Economic Opportunity, the City of Atlanta and the local ag e ncies . It was the first summer many of these boys and girls had been afford e d the opportunity to p a rticipate in sup e r v is e d r e cr e ation acti v ities.· The fact that Atlant a' exp e ri e nced a summe r of calm w ith a minimum o f frictions w hich plagued other citie s spe aks we ll for this summe r's acti v ity . �Page Two October 18, 1967 The truth of the matter is that anyone who wished to participate in organized recreation in Atlanta this year could do so within his own neighborhood. All this has strengthened my firm belief that a well planned, adequately financed and staffed summer program of recreation is vital to the supervision of our young people during the long vacation period. In order to plan, finance, and operate the desired program, every existing public facility and resource must be utilized to the maximum. All available federal aids as well as private assistance must also be incorporated into such a program. There are at present 121 elementary and 26 high schools in the City School System. All of the eleme ntary schools and all of the high schools have playgrounds or areas suitable for outdoor play adjacent to the schools. There ar e 15 gymnasiums and two sports stadiums include d in the facilities of the school system. In addition, almost all schools have auditoriums, cafeterias and other tools which should be utilized in a comprehensive summer program of recreation. The public elementary and high school is the one community facility which most directly affects the lives of the greatest number of people in a community. Virtually all youngsters between the ages 6 - 18 are unde r the supervision of teachers, cQaches and/or other school officials for nine months of the year. It seems to me that a summer recreation program which is orie nted to the school facilities would pro v ide for an orde rly and m e aningful e x tension of supe rvision for a full twelve months. To place dir e ct responsibility for summe r recreation w ith the schools w ould ena ble school officials to b e tt e r coordin at e y e ar-around school and youth activities . _Summe r school, spei!ial e nrichme nt p r ograms a n d other programs conducte d by the schools in the summer could b e a part of an overall t w elve month school plan, including r e creation . The purpos e of this m e morandum is to request that the Park s a n d Recr e a t ion D e pa r tme nt and th e School D e partme nt discuss th e feasibilit y of t r a n s fe r of sp e cial summe r re creation p r ograms - �.... Page Three October 18, 1967 particularly in low income areas - to the School Department. The special committee now preparing a five -year plan for public recreation in the City of Atlanta might also be asked to consider the potentialities of this proposal. IAJr:fy L �
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 35, Folder topic: Summer program | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 35, Document 8

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_021_035_008.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 21, Folder 35, Document 8
  • Text: CITY OF ATLANTA August 22, 1967 CITY HALL ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental liaison Dear Fellow Citizen: A~cording to the school system records, I see that you may not be planning to return to school this fall. I hope that this is not the case. As chairman of the Metropolitan Atlanta Youth Opportunity Campaign, I am interested in you and your future. Our City needs you. But even more, your education is improtant to you and the skills you can develop. To stop school now is a cruel form of self-punishment. If you get a skill or receive a high school diploma, it will not only mean more money in your pocket, it will mean a better life for you. If you are not interested in going to regular academic day classes, you can attend ever.ing or day vocational - technical classes or go to evening academic or evening training classes. For your own good -- for money in your .pocket -- it is necessary that you learn a skill or get a high school diploma. There are many jobs available right now if you have the skills needed to do them. I urge you to reconsider your decision to quit school: they may be, should not keep you out of school. If you need you need answers about the school programs you can get, call System . at 761-5411, Ext. 220 or the Atlanta Youth Council at Problems, whatever help or guidance or if the Atlanta School 522-4463 1 Ext. 437. No matter what you may now feel about continuing school ,' I strongly urge you so seriously consider one of the vocational or academic programs available to you. Think of yourself and take advantage of the opportunities available to you. To quit is to be left behi nd. By the way, the Atlanta Braves and I would like to invite you to be our guest at a special "Back-to-School" game to be held on Labor Day, Monday, September 4. Two tickets for the night game with Pihi adelphia are enclosed and I hope that you and a friend will attend. ruly, IA:psh Enclosures (2) Mayor I van Allen, Jr. Metropolitan Atlanta Opportunity Campaign �
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 35, Folder topic: Summer program | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 35, Document 18

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_021_035_018.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 21, Folder 35, Document 18
  • Text: THE ATLANTA AND FULTON COUNTY CONHUNITY SCHOOL PROGR;\1,f I . I. The Atlanta and Fulton County Public Schools for the past I: twenty-one months have been engaged in a sound and practical endeavor which .I attempts to provide an educational opportunity for the entire cormnunity . I :' Thirteen schools have participated in the program by extending the hours 1: ! J of the school day until ten o'clock in the evening and offering activities · on Saturdays. With advice from a citizens council, the activities offered provide an opportunity for each member of the family to improve himself or fulfill his leisure time with,wholesome recreational activities. ·1 Each of the schools with one exception is located in an indigent cormnunity where the school has the potential to compensate for the environmental and ·educational deficiencies that have existed for so many years: Although each community school has attempted to develop a program which would serve the needs of the cormnunity, there were several problems prevalent which were cormnon to each community. Some of the pr,oblems most cormnon were: I 1. The image of the school was not a positive one. 2. Delinquency was common. 3. The dropout rate was alarming. 4. The male image was lacking in many homes. S. Parents hesitated to participate in school programs. 6. Health problems were existent. 7. Recreational programs and playgrounds were sadly lacking. 8. The initiative on the part of the people to do anything • I 1 ' .i I about it was missing. Several other factors influence,d the need for cormnunity education J i: which would establish effective cormnunications and open the doors of the school to the residents of the cormnunity. In each community the educational level c,f the people was quite low and their experiences in school had been unsuccessful. Many adultsneeded to master the basic skills to help them- selves and to keep up with their children. · Other adults had not had the opportunity to complete high school and others had vocational interest which had never been satisfied. All of the social ills were prevalent in the community without a conserted effort to eliminate them. �-2i l. i With an awareness for the existing problem, the two boards of I . i: I . education implemented the Cormnunity School Program in July of 1965. Some of the purposes for implementing this program include the following: 1. To provide opportunities for school age children to participate in educational activities other than during the regular school day. This includes use of libraries; enrichment, supervised study and recreational programs during the afternoons, evening and on Saturdays, fifty-two weeks a year.  ;. I ; 2. To provide opportunities for adults to participate in similar programs, including some pre-vocational activities, l I : and an opportunity to improve certain saleable skills. 3. To provide an academic program for adults ranging from basic education for the illiterate and semi-illiterate to completion of high school. 4. To make the school available for all the people in the community for programs which would develop and enhance their individual, family and cormnunity lives. 5. To provide leadership which will serve as the catalytic agent to put unity in the cormnunity by bringing people together to solve their problems. Funds made available through Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. made it possible for programs to be started in the target areas in which cormnunity action programs were focusing attention. j I· I ! These funds will be exhausted on May 31, 1967 and will not permit the operation of the SUIIIlller Program for the youth unless other financial support can be derived. Proposed Summer Program 1967 Based on the experiences of ou'r summer program ~966, we anticipate . h wi' 11 invo . 1vet h e yout h in . eac h o f our TW.~ V2- cormnun1t1es · · . a program wh ic thi:Pt-e~ With the total school facilities at our disposal, recreational and enrichment activities will be offered throughout the summer months. Some of the enrich- ment activities for boys and girls will include: •. 0 �. -3' i : !: • j Creative Dancing Reading for Fun Arithmetic for Fun Cookouts Knitting Beauty and Charm Wood Shop Science Music (band) Arts and Crafts Typing For Fun Archery Ceramics Junior Homemaking Speech and Drama Doll Haking Camping Trips Leather Craft .. i I . ! ' . Recreational activities will provide the following opportunities: li . Pee Wee Baseball Gymnastics Tennis Weight Lifting Softball Track and Field Soccor ·; ' . ' Bicycle Hikes Sw:inrrning Basketball Baton and Cheerleading Judo Volleyball Teen Dances Under the direction of the Assistant Principal for the Connnunity I . j 1 School, the preceding activities will be possible in twelve of our connnunity schools affected by federal funding. A request to fund the operation of these schools under Title I has been made while six .additional schools seek local support for their existence this sunnner. For the continuation of the connnunity school $59,000 has been requested while the local support for six additional sites would total $18,000. These eighteen centers would provide a vital contribution to the recreational needs in our inner city co~unities. I . last summer over two thousand children and youth took part each day in the program at one particular school. i Ii '. l .' ) ' It would be possible for each school to acconnnodate approximately one thousand youth daily in the recreational and enrichment activities . . The connnunity schools stand ready to accept this challenge . The Future The continuation of the Connnunity School Program in Atlanta is vital .t o the continued growth and development of our city. The school has the potential to improve the citizens of each community and in turn, help each community become the best possible. We are hopeful that we can look forward to many successful years of connnunity education with September, 1967 beginning our third. goals , Financial assistance is necessary to accomp~ish these �
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 35, Folder topic: Summer program | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 35, Document 32

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_021_035_032.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 21, Folder 35, Document 32
  • Text: Fight Poverty, Slum ArelCis To E©Jse-Crome==McGovern By DAVID NORDAN The new director of the revised Metropolitan Atlanta Com-mission on Crime and Juvenile Delinquency has called on Atlantans to help alleviate poverty and slum conditions which he said are at the root of the city's crime problem. Sears Roebuck for donating four of opportunity, poor health and · portable swimming pools for the 50 forth." areas and urged the Kiwanians "Remove these conditions," he to consider financing the filtering system for at least one of said, " and you will r educe crime." · the pools as a project. "The crime problem is a portrait of a failure on the part of society," Mr. McGovern said. James L. McGovern, an FBI "It breeds not in a vacuum but veteran who was named to head in a cess pool- poverty, the lack the commission in January, said that any crime fighting efforts are futile unless these conditions are altered. He made his remarks at a meeting of the Atlanta Kiwanis Club which he urged to join with other civic groups to help provide r ecreational facilities in areas of the city where riots occurred last summer. Mr. McGovern reported that 21 play lots were erected in deprived areas of the city after the outbreaks last year but that the Atlanta Parks Department does not have a budget large enough to maintain and improve them. HE SAID the recreational areas were built with the help of federal funds, but the funds are not available this year. The commission director cited MR. McGOVERN said he spent 26 years with the FBI, but that only recently, after becoming director of the crime commission, did he really become fully aware of the importance of preventive measures in fighting crime. He lauded the work of the parent of the Metropolitan Commission, the Atlanta Crime Commission, which he said delivered the same conclusions as the P r e s i d e n t's Commission on Crime and Delinquency several months before the national study group made its r eport. He also urged the Kiwanians, almost 100 percent employers, to reconsider hiring policies and not arbitrarily r efuse to employ a man who has a criminal record. He said they and other citizens could do much to comba t I crime individually through small efforts such as locking automo- 1 biles, doors, reporting offenses to police and m aking themselves available to police as witnesses when needed. I �
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 35, Folder topic: Summer program | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 35, Document 33

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_021_035_033.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 21, Folder 35, Document 33
  • Text: ClulJs' Aid / Aslieil .for I Recreatio1i "We're entering the summer. You are aware of the conditions last summer, and the unrest," McGovern told the club. "You have a vested interest in eliminating the conditions and. the federal money that was m a d e available on an emergency basis last year is not available this year." The new crime commission official who was an agent of the Federai Bureau of Investigation for 26 years, added, "We tend to think of crime only in terms of the courts and law enforcement agencies, rather than as a portrait of the failure of society, a lack of employment opportunity and education, of di·sease and misery." "Every survey I've e\·er read recognizes crime breeds in depressed areas," he said. "To eliminate it, we must eliminate depressed conditions. We must also have adequate enforcement by qualified personnel and we must pay for it. Anything that is going to bring crime u n d e r control is going to cost money. It's a community problem and every member of the community must give his support-both services and financial." He also urged the club members as employers to consider whether their employment practices should '·arbitrarilv" eliminate all with past crin1inal records and urged them to "become individual crime prevent- . ers." 1 Crime Panel Chief Talks .to Kiwanians The executive director of the Metropolitan Atlanta C r i m e . Commission appealed to civic )\~·~· TI"~;1:·,'~W clubs Tuesd~y '(143.215.248.55;~.~\Jj~··'~f¼J ;~nle:po 143.215.248.55 16:56, 29 December 2017 (EST): ',D' ";.~{$ other ?<.t.r_"°":x summer · f:~ f:i·jf i recrea tion pro; . ~ ii:'; •· grams for . ' ..., ""t{::/ youngsters in 1 ~ \;:;f{~1sl~: :eea:. \N.' lL_ /J McGovern, hea ds L. who the ' 'il!~c.;';•ern 1 p e r m a n ent metropolitan comm1ss1on that grew out of the Atlanta Crime Commission's lengthy study and report last year, said the City Parks department will attempt to operate the play lots out of the regular budget if no federal funds can be found, but said that city funds are not adequate for the program. He told the Atlanta Kiwanis Club that Sears Roebuck and Co. had donated four portable pools for the summer program, and urged them to consider financing a $170 filter system for one of the pools as a club project. McGovern said that if they will support the program , there are enough civic clubs in Atlanta if each took a small project, t~ provide playground equipment for some of the lots and provide chartered buses for special trips, such as to the zoo. ,i \ •. �
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 35, Folder topic: Summer program | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 35, Document 39

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_021_035_039.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 21, Folder 35, Document 39
  • Text: . ~1.: \ ~'f,~· 1~~emoto: }~;/ ~ L /\iP 6t"' / Q:\ F~om: April 4, 1967 Dan Sweat PB Regarding meeting ~sterday with FEB, I discussed the possibilities with Jack and Virginia and here are the areas of agreement: (Memo from Jack will follow) 1. They will prepare Operation Champ program for submission to HEW for possible funding under family yand children services. Jack will contact you for names and titles of contacts. 2. I will ask Community Relations Commission and Community Council to provide feed-back that will be pertinent to the need for above program during summer of 1967. Please advise if you want me to do this. 3. Since personnel and equipment are the big needs to operate the Neighborhood Playlots effectively, Jack and Virginia will review: a. Their personnel requ irements to determine if they can use additional personnel through NYC, etc. I don't think we can get summer help through AIEP (USEP) since this program is to develop mong-term job opportunities. b. Their equipment need s for such items as portabl e ise chests, portable shelters (tarpaulins), etc., that are needed on Playlots. 4. They will explore how Playlot progra m can be further enhanced to provide more of a day-camp experience, w1th mo re a rt s , c raft s , et c . In connect 1 on with this , I am contacting Boy Sc outs, Girl Scouts and Camp Fire Girls and asking each to develop a schedule to have a team visit each Playlot one or more times during the summer for the purpos _ of talking to boys and girls about their prog rams and putting on meaningful demonstrations of opportunities available in their programs . They seem interested in doing some thing like this. 5. They seem enthusiastic about possibly having a summer development program at the undeveloped Allatoona site to: a. Be~in preparing this site for use as a campsite in b. Provide emp loyment opportunities through the NYC (here again I doubt if the AI EP could be used here, unless the jobs lead on to something more perma nent). c. In addition, by providing outdoor employment, this could be a meaningfu l camping substitute for these young people. 1908. �
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 35, Folder topic: Summer program | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 35, Complete Folder

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_021_035.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 21, Folder 35, Complete Folder
  • Text: ATLANTA, GEORGIA FROM: Dan E. Sweat, Jr. ~ your information 0 Please refer to the attached correspondence and -make the necessary reply. D Advise me the status of the attached. FORM 25-4-5 �ATLANTA, GE:O R OIA ROUTE SLIP TO:h.CD4~ FROM: Dan E. Sweat, Jr. ~ F o r your information 0 Please refer to the a ttac he d correspondence and -make the n ecessary reply. D Advise me the status of the attach ed . FOR M 25- 4-S �ATLANTA,GEO .. GIA ROUTE SLIP TO: - -M ~Iac.-;;y~o-r_I~-~r~a~n~ A ~J~J~e~n~,~J-r_,~- - - - - - - - - - - - - - FROM : J.H.Robinson [xJ For your informa tion 0 Please refer to the a ttached correspondence and ma ke the necessary reply. D Advise me the s tatus of the attac hed . FORM 25 -4- R �2 Year Progress Report 101 MAR!El'TA STREET , N . W, , ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 ., . T ELEP HONE: AREA CODE ( 404) 525-4262 C. 0. Emmerich Ex e cutiv e Adminisbrator OPPORTUNITY IN ATLANTA '. Durin g the p as t t wo y e a r s Atl a nt a's Community Acti on Erogr am h as move d with grea t spee d . Th o u sands of citi zen s and ma ny agen ci e s a nd organizati on s have partici pa te d in pl a nn in g , deve lopin g a nd fin an c ing th is multi- servic e opportun i ty pr.ogra m fo r Atl a nta's low- inco me citizens. In two years: 14 Multi-service Neighborhood Service Centers have been es tab Ii shed, More than 20,000 adults and youths have been placed in jobs and job training, Nearly 39,000 individuals have participated in basic, remedial and enrichment education courses, and More than 55,000 individuals have received family services. Due to Cong res s iona l red uctio n s i n the 1967 Economi c Opportuni ty budge t for the na tion, Atla nt a's progra m h as s uffered a 40% r,edu ction in £unds p lu s the de letio n of s i x services. E .O .A. is now seeking loca l reso ur ces co he lp restore these vita l services and re bui ld its program. E.O .A. s ervices can be d ivided i nt o s ix ca cegor,ie s : OPPORTUNITIES FOR: A. Neighborhood Services through 14 Neighborhood Service Centers 8. Employment and Job Training C. Education D. Social Services E. Research ... J anuary, 19 67 and : F. Discontinued Programs Each proj ec t or conbracled se rv ic e of E. 0 . A . is su,ppo,ted by a citizens adv isory counc i l of w hioh at leaJs t J/ 3 mus t be peoe le servec/J by th e program . . ' . A. OPPORTUNITIES FOR NEIGHBORHOOD SERVICES 1. NEIGHBORHOOD SERVICES ORGANIZATION (Not e : All figur es in this repor rep resen t up to two ye ars work, de pending on how long th e rP rojec ha.s been es tab lis hed.) All E .O.A. servic es a re brought co low-inc ome fa mili es th ro ug h 14 Ne ig hb o rhood Service Ce ocer,s locate d in p over.cy ar.eas. A s ma ll s ta ff loca ted a t 101 Marietta St r,eet , N. W. , p la ns an d d irec ts th e progra m a nd coo rdi na tes services with loca l age ncies . All 14 Cen te rs were es ta bli s hed du rin g th e firs t cwo year,s. Scaff membe rs a t th ese ce nt e rs have condu cted 33, 049 i nte rv iews. H eadqua rc er,s : 101 Ma ri e tta Str,ee c, N. W., Telephone 525-4262, Mr. H aro ld E. Barr e tt , Dirsector. CENTERS IN OPERATION ATLANTA AND FULTON COUNTY ~¥ ' �East Centra l Neighborhood Service Center 486 Dec atur, Street, S. E. Mt. Geonge Dodd , iDiue ctor Telephone: 577-17 ~5 Edgewood Neighborhood Service Center 1723 Boulevard Duive , S.E. Mr. Sa muel Russell , Diirecto r, Telephone : 378-3643 NASH-Washington Neighborhood Ser. Cen . 247 Ashby Stteet , N . W. Mr. William A. Fowlkes, Ditector, Telephone: 52 4-2084 North Fulton Neighborhood Service Center 27 Oak Street , Roswell , Georgia Mr. J . W. Stone , Director Teleph one : 993 -3795 No rthwest (Perry Homes) Neighborhood Service Center 1927 Holl ywood Ro ad, N. W. Mr. Robert Btaonin g, Director TelephoAe: 799-9322 Pittsburg Neighborhood Service Ce nt e r 993½ 1 le Da niel Street, S. W. Ir. Levj Tetrill , Directo r Telephone: 523 -1 511 Price Ne ighborhood Serv ic e Ce nte r 1127 Capitol Avenue, S. E. Mr. Geoffrey Heard, Acting Diuector Te lephone: 522-5792 So. F ulton Neighbo rhoo d Se rvi ce Ce nter 2735 East Point St. , East Point, Georgia Mr. Clint Rodgers, Director T e lephon e: 767-7541 Sum mer hi lt-Mechanic s vi lie Ne ighbo rhood Servi c e Center 65 Georgia Ave nue , S. E . Mrs. Omie Dixon, Acting Director Telephone: 577-1351 Gwinnett County Offi c e Pike and Clay ton Stree t s Lawrenceville , Geo rgia Mr. Gene Johnson , Coordinator, Telephone: 963 -9700 Ro c kdale-Co nyer s Office 929 Commercial St. , Conyers , Georgia Mr. Sidney Herring , Coordinator Telephone: 483 -9512 ELECTIONS: One of the most important opportunities E .O.A . offers is that of resident participation. For the fiust time low-income citizens ha ve come together in neighborhood orga niz a tions , block clubs and adv isory councils to consider their need s and to assi s t E.O .A. in planning programs to help meet the se needs. There have been 2,672 nei ghborh ood meetings . Average monthly attendance for a ll E.O .A. advi s ory committees is 2, 250 peop le. In 1966 elections were held for the first time to choose representatives of low-incom e ar eas to serve on neighborhood and city-wide E.O.A. advisory committees . New Elections for 1967 represe nta ti ves have just been completed in 11 Neigh borh ood Center areas . (N. Ful ton is s t ill being organized) . 194 lowinc o me neigh borhood block organizations a nd 11 ,528 people have participated in the 1967 elections . More than 500 lowincome citizens are serving a s bl ock cap t ai ns and elected represent a tives . We s t End Nei ghborhood Serv ic e Cent er 725 L awton Street , S. W. Mr . Jame s Hester , Director Telephone: 753 -6101 Each block organi zation chose one representative to serve on its Neighborhood Center's advisor y comm i ttee . THE CITIZENS EIGHBORHOOD ADVISORY COUNCIL. Each CNAC selected three representatives to serve on a city-w ide committee , THE CITIZE NS C ENTRAL ADVISORY COUNCIL , plu s one repre s entative to serve on the E .O.A . BOARD OF DIRECTORS. This gives 12 repres entatives of the po or , 1 3 of the total members hip . o n the Bo a rd o f Directors. ADJOINING COUNTIES J. H. Calh oun . As s i s ta nt Directo r for Communitr De vel opment , 10 1 Marietta St ., N. W. , T e leph one : 525 -4262. West Central Neighborhood Se rvice Center 2193 Verbena Street, N- W. Mr. A. A. Frnmholtz , Director Telephone: 799-0331 �,•tk~~.i •'•'~· i~t,t' >• I I ' -. ' f' ' ,• ,,._: • I ', \.,,1 1-~li ,,,, ""· • I -,~-j' f /.,... '- , j I ,e. d • ..., ' ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY F•82 ATLANTA, INC. F•79 Neighborhood Serv ice Areas ---, A. WEST END G. EDGEWOOD B. NASH-WASHINGTON H. NORTHWEST (P. H.) C. PRICE I. D. J. CENTRAL CITY SOUTH FULTON WEST CENTRAL E. SUM-MEC K. F. NORTHEAST L. NORTH FULTON PITTSBURG (Gwinnett County ond Rockdale County areas not shown on map) �r, NEIGHBORHOOD AIDES: E. o. A. has tr ained and e mploy ed indigenous residents of low-income neighborh oo ds to assis t wi th center , age ncy a nd c ommun ity work. Aides have vis ited ove r 10 3,225 homes i n doo r-to-door c ase- find i ng a nd have ser ved over 37, 049 ind ividua l s on a conti nu in g basis . 4. NEIGHBORHOOD YOUTH CORPS (In-School) ..... '. .. •· ,. ' , ',,. 2. VISTA (VOLUNTEERS IN SERVICE TO AMERICA) '-./ .4, ,, .• 0 . A dome s t i c P eace Corps pro vidi ng a 1de s , teache r s , co un s e l ors a nd a dv isors for, th e War on P o ve rty . Hea dq ua rte r s a t 01 Ma rie tta Stre e t , N. W. , Mr. Da v id Damman n , Dinec tor , VIST A Volunteens , Te l ephone: 525 -4262 . I I••-~ ACTION : 5 Vo lunte e r s ha v e been a ss ign ed to Atla nta fo r, one y ear. 25 of th e s e a re pres e ntl y work in g i n E. O .A . tanget a re a s . 1"h e o th er 29 a re e xp e cted during th e next few mo nth s. 11. as t year Atl a nt a h a d 32 Vl ST A Vql un teers . B. OPPORTUNITIES FOR EMPLOYMENT AND JOB TRAINING r " '- . ' '* • 3. EMPLOYMENT SERVICE On e Manp ower Coun se lor, is l oc a te d in ea ch Ne i ghborh ood S ervi ce C en ter to pnov id e jo b p la c ement a nd referral s to oth er, se r vices. Adm ini s te re d by Georg ia Sta te Empl oy me nt Service , 101 Marietta Sn eet , N . W. , Telep hone: 525-4262 . Ma np ower P rog ra m Spec i a list , Mr. Don Brya nt . ACTION : 33,627 i ndiv idu a ls h ave rece ived e mp lo yme nt c oun se lin g. 87% of th ese we re un emp l oy ed a t th e time of coun sel in g a nd mos t of th e remaining 13% we re under-empl o yed. 6, 16 1 ind ividu a ls have beem p la ced in job s . Hundr eds o f othe rs h a ve bee n pl a c e d in E .0. A. tra mm g programs for yo ut h s. Th e r, e mai nd e r a re receiv in g tr,a ining , educ atiio n , co un s eling o r oth e r s e rivice s in preparat ion for empl oyme nt o r a re m the proce ss of bein g p la ced. >11~ ·I,,. (;1,~ ~-' ,1, T rain in g a nd empl oy me nt of tow- i ncome high ,s ch oo l y outh s in the .t} tl a m a F ul ton Co unty Sch ool Systems to pro vide wori k experience a nd mon e y to e nable them to nem a in in sch oo l. /4. dminis tered by t he Atla nt a a nd Fulton C ounty Bo ar-ds of Ed uc a tion a t 10 1 Mari e tta Stre e t , N . W. , T e) epb o ne : 525 -1886; Mns . Alice Washin g ton , Coo rdi nato r. ACTION: 650 s tude nt s now e mpl o yed in th e pub li c s chools . Mo re t han 2, 500 yo uth s hav e p a rt ic i pa ted si nc e th e beginni ng . 5. NEIGHBORHOOD YOUT H CORPS (Out-of-School) A job tra in in g and e mpl oy me nt pro gram £o r out-of-sc hool un e mplo ye d yo uth s aged 16 th ro ugh 21. 57 ubli c a nd non-prnfi t Atl anta a genc ies pro vide 150 wo rk lcx:atio n s and 620 pos itions. Return t o s ch oo l is e n co l!l raged. Ofiface a t 68 Spri ng S treet , N . W. " Telephone : 577-1 904 , Mr. He nry F a c e , Dire ct or, . ACTION: 62 0 posi ti on s, an e avail a ble . 6 10 yo u th s a re em pl oy e d . 3-;'5 have returned to s ch oo l. 224 have acNearl y c epted full -time e mplo yme nt . 3, 000 y ou ths have part ic i pa ted since the beginning . 6. YOUTH OPPORTUNITY CENTER Opera ted by the Georgia S ta te Employment Serv ic e to conc e ntriate on the employ ment ne eds of y outh s aged 16' th ro ug h 21, with e mpha sis o n co unsel ing , tes tin g , a nd re ferral t o other agen cie s for remedia l edl'lcat ion or tr aining . 522 Wes t Pe a chtree Street . Mr. A . \\, _ Seag ers , Dire c tor . T e lep hone : 8 -09 ~L ACT ION : 82, 000 have been ii nter\(ie w ed. 5, 735 yo uths hav e b eer.J p~ace a in full -time jo b s . 30,000 ha ve been re " fe rred to jo b s a nd ot her agen c ies . '"' \ . �7. SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTER ' . tere d by Senio r Citizen Serv:i c e-s of Mettop olita n Atla nta, Inc. , 120 Marie tt a Stree t, N. W. , Room 7 19 , Te lephone : 577 -2474, Mrs. Caro lyn F r ench , P roj ec t Director. ,, ' ~ .. f<,._ A center co s creen prospec ti v e l oan appliic atio n s a nd to pro vide assis ta nc e in the man a g e ment and de ve lopment of sm a ll busi ness e s . 101 Mariett a Street , N . W. , Te lephone: 577 -33 15 , Dr. Merl e C . P a tterson , Director. ACTION : 850 individual s ha ve been inter vie wed or counseled. 33 loans to talli ng $ 322,000 hav e been approv e d and gra nte d . 3 eight-week semi na r s ha ve bee n c onducted in l ow-income n ei ghborho ods . 8. COLLEGE WORK STUDY PROGRAM P art time empl oyme nt t o ke e p youth s from l ow-in come fa milies in c ollege.. ACTION : Program approved fo r eigh t co lleges : Clark College, 60 pre s eml y . I l em pl oy ed , 60 previousl y emp loye d , no position s available ; Emory University, 69 pre s ently employ ed , 14 pre viously employed , 20 avai lable pos1tions ; Georgi a State College, 25 presentl y e mpl oy ed, 21 prev iously employ ed, 12 pos ition s avada bl e; Georg ia Institute of Technologr, 28 presently emplo ye d , 10 previously empl oy ed , 30 po s i t ion s ava il able ; Morehouse College, 201 pre s ent.Ly employed , 192 pre vious ly empl oy ed , 15 positions availa ble ; Morr i s Brown College, 134 presently employed, 125 previously employ e d , no po s ition s avail able ; Og lethorpe Univers ity, 35 pre se ntly employed, 20 previous ly employ ed , no positions available; a n d Spelman College, 40 presently employed , 100 pre viously employed , no posit.ions available . 9. FOSTER GRANDPARENTS DEMONSTRATION PROJECT A program to provide children in ins titution s with adult affection and comnion s hip while al s o giving older citize n s a cha nce to be employ ed in a us eful , person a lly sati s fying job . Adminis - ACTION : 36 men and wo men , plus 4 s ubs ti tutes, tra in ed a nd serv in g a t Grady Hospita l (3 0), F ul to n C ounty J uveni le Court (4) a nd Catrie-Stee le :Pitt s Hon:i e (2). ' '• '• ' 1,1 10. EMPLOYMENT FOR THE OLDER WORKER (50 plu s) ••• An i ndepe nde nt program admin is t'ened by th e Go lde n Age Emp loyment Serv ice of the Atlan t a Se c t ion , Nati on al Co uncil of Je wis h Women , 793 Piedmont Ave nue , 1N. E . , Te leph on e: 875 -944 3, Mrs . Naomi Met zger , Exe cutive Dir:.e c to r. ACTION : 969 indiv id ua l s ha ve bee n pl a ced in jobs. There ha ve be en 1,740 jo b applic at ions and 3, 028 reque s ts fo r app licants from busin e s ses. ,. 11. MDTA The Ma npower Dev elopmen t a nd Tr a ining Act of 196 2 pFovides jo b traJnin g for ne e ded ski ll s . Ad mini s tered by th e Gemg ia State Employ me nt Seuvic e and he Atla nta Boa rd of E duc a ti on . Office s at Atl a nt a Indu s tria l E mployment Offi c e , 61 Trinity Avenue , S. W. , T e leph one : 524 -24 11. ACTION : 5, 104 in di v idua l s ha v e been tra ined. A new Contract has bee n re ceived to tra in 200 peo ple be twee n F ebruary 13, 1967 a nd March 31 , 1968 in group s o f 45 in 8 oc 12 week train ing programs . Anoth e r 100 experienced bu une mp loyed workers will rec eive On 'il;he Jo b tra in in g . MOTA classes wi.rn tra in fot s uch jobs as hos tess, waitress, waiter , bus boy , bus g:id, chef , short order grill man , specialist cook , combinatjon cook , salad girl , kitchen helpeu and snack bar hoste ss. Additiona l training contracts are expected soon . Classe s now in progress are welding (20), bfrick layiing (20), production machine ( 20), de s ign technician at Lock - ' '• ',,, ,; �~ . ( ' ' heed (20), licensed pnactical nur:se (40), re fr esher course for regiscened nurses (20) . I 12. PROJECT HI RE (Help I nitiate Renewed Employment) An eml?loyment service for the o lder worker (50 and above) . Administered by the Georgia Sta te Employ ment Service . 136 Marietta Street, N. W. , Su.ice 200, Teleph one: 524-6844 , Mr,s. Mal L. Dna ke , Dire c tor. "' ACTION : Program has been operating under t he auspi c es of Georgia State Employment Service since August 1 , 1966. (For,merly under auspices of Golde n Age Emp loyment Service.) 217 individuals h ave been p laced , 761 have been counse led , 684 have been re ferred to jobs. 13. MEN ' S JOB CORPS J ob tra iAin g for out-of-school , un· employ ed boys aged 16 through 21. E.O . A . is resp on s ible for recruiting and sc reeni ng Job Corps applicants for At· lama , Fulton , Cobb , Clayton, Fayette, Douglas , DeKalb , Rockdale a nd Gwinnett Counties . He adq ua rters at 118 Marietta Street , Telephone : 577 -2855 , Mr. Sam Bax tt:r , J ob Cor,p s Coordin a tor. ACTION : 1, 210 boy s sen t to train ing centers throughout the country . 87 proce ssed appLicant s awa itin g assignments . 6 1 boys have grad u ated . A new recruitin g quota of 1,400 boys has been recei ved . 14. WOMEN 'S JOB CORPS Job training for o ut-of- s chool , unemployed girls aged 16 through 21. Recruitin g handled by WICS , 136 Mar:ietta Street, N. W. , 3rd Fl oor , Telephone : 524-540 3, Mrs . Je a n Wea ver , Project Director. ACTION : 75 girl s are in training centers through out the Unit ed St ate s . 16 have graduated . 15. ATLANTA EMPLOYMENT EVALUATION AND SERVICE CENTER A centralized service , the first of its kind in the country , to diagnose and evaluate work potential and tra ining needs of difficult cases a nd to follow up job progr.ess. It serve s all agencies cooperating m E.O. A. programs. The Vocational Reh a bilita ti on Division operates the Center at 1599 Memorial Drive , S.E. , Telephone: 378 -7591 , Mr. Cantey Gordon , Director. .. I I ~ ACTION : Opened May 2, 1966. 1, 008 c ases have been referred to th e Centers. 621 admitted for evaluation. 249 persons have been evaluated . 132 already plac ed in jobs . I I I C. OPPORTUNITIES FOR EDUCATION .~ 16. COMMUNITY SCHOOL PROGRAM . An education program t o serve the entire fa mily usin g neighborhood public school facilities around the clock . Adminis tered by the Atlanta Board of Educa tion , Instructional Servi ces Building , 2930 Forrest Hill s Drive , Telephone: 76 1-54 11 , Mr. Alan Koth , Dire ct or. ' ACTION: 20,964 ha ve been enroll ed in 12 schools. Approxima tely 10 ,000 more have participated in programs . The Community School budget has been reduced 82 % bec ause of Congre s s ion al budget cuts . Brown High School, 764 Pee p les Street. S. W., Telephone: 758-5050 , E d New by , Assistant Principa l. Price H igh School, 167 0 C a pitol Avenu e , S. W. , Te lephone: 622- 80 24 , Carl Hu bbard , Assistant Princip al. Wash ington High School , 45 White House Drive , S. W. , Teleph one : 755 -77 21 , J oe Drape r , As si sca nt Pr incipa l. South Fulton High School, 605 South Baya rd Street , E as t Point , Georgia , T ele ph one : 76 1-3584 , Harold Madison , Assis ta nt Prin ci pa l. �r I ' Archer High School, 2250 P erry Boulevard , N . W., Telephone : 794-1567 , Arvella L. Farmer , Assista nt Principal. Howard High School, 551 Houston Street, N. E . , Telephone : 522-5096 , Bennie C. Wil liams , Assistant Principal. Park s Jr. High School , 1090 Wi ndsor Street , S. W. , Telephone: 7 53 -6125, Robert J. Still , As sistant Principal. West Fulton High School , 1890 Bankhead Avenue , N . W. , Telephone : 799-31 77 , E . C. Norma n , Assistant Principal. Bethune Elementary School, 198 Norths i de Driv e , N . W. , Telephone: 524-6854, Norri s L. Hogan , Assi s ta nt Principal. Capitol Avenue Elementary School , 81i Capitol Avenue , S . W., Teleph one : 5238696 , Oba diah Jordan , Jr. , Assis ta nt Prin cipal. We sley El ementary School, 186 We s ley Avenue , N . E . , Teleph one: 378-4393 , Aaron L. Wat son , Assi s ta nt Principal. COMMUNITY SCHOOLS FINANCED BY NON-EOA FUNDS Dykes H igh School, 4360 P ower s F erry Road, N . W. , Telephone : 255 -5236 , J ack Glasgow, Assistant Principal. Grant Park El ementary School, 75 0 Kalb Avenue, N. E . , Telephone: 627-5741, James Chk-Vers, Assistant Principal. 17. PROJECT HEAD START An enrichment program for culturally deprived pre-school c hildren operat ed by the Atlanta School Sys te m and seven private agencies . An applicati on is now being prepared for an 8 week program for 3,000 children to be held next summer. 5,989 c hildren have a ttended in 2 s ummers . Atlanta Board of Education , Instructional Servic..es Building, 2930 Forrest Hill s Drive , Telephone: 76 1-5411, Mis s Frances Cox , Director. 4,609 have a ttended in 2 summers. Rockdale County's Head Start Program 40 attended last s ummer . I Gwinnett County' s Mead Stan Program - ,. 240 attended last summer. Wheat Street Day Nurser:y' s Mead Start Program - 200 have a ttended i n 2 summers . ' { F ree For AH Day Nursery 's Head Start Program - 260 have attended in 2 summers . Hinsley Temp le Day Nurser:y's Hea d Start Program - 120 have a ttended in 2 ~I summers. ~ I Berean Junior: Academy's Head Sta rt .~ t Program - 240 have a ttended in 2 s ummers . ., 18. ADULT BASIC EDUCATION In s truction in reading and wri ting for adtdts over 18 yea rs of age who are unable t o function on an eighth grade educational level , to improve their: employment potenti al. Administered by vhe Atlanta Board of Educa tion , 2930 Forrest Hill s Drive, Telephone: 76 1-5411, Ext. 206, Mr. Alan Koth a nd Dr. Cuntis Hen s on , Coordinator s . ACTION: 48 classe s for 900 parti1, 27 3 p eople c ipa nt s a re in s e ss ion. have already pa rticipated. 19. UPWARD BOUND A pro ject to re duc e th e drop -out rate of 11th a nd 12th gra ders with a bility by pro viding remedi a l a nd interest cl as se s and encouragin g them to s et goa ls for further education a ft er high s ch ool. ACTION : Morehouse College, 223 C hestn ut Stree t , S . W. , Te lephone: 577- 150 5, Dr. Ar thur Ban ks , Director. 150 enro ll e d a t pr esent , 228 las t year. Emo ry University, Emory Universi ty Campus , Emory Uni versity, Te leph one: 377-24 11 , Ext. 7546, Mr. Louis Becker:, Director. 49 e nrolled at present, 50 last year. Morri s Brown Coll ege, 642 Hunter St., N. W. , Telephone : 577 -2628, Mrs. Vivian McGee , Director. 91 enrolled at present , 100 last year. �r..,. ' ..,.. 1 " ~... - ~ - - - ~ ... -·-..-....,..,11""'-........,..-._..,.....'!'T"T'Tl~;>:1"'"1l'I!'--...:,;;~-...---, I' During the winter , s tud e nts par t1c1pate in Saturday morning cl asses a t the colleges and a re tutored by f.?rogram assis ta nts. During the summer , s tude nts live a nd s tudy on the college campuses . Morris Brown a nd Morehouse held 8 week programs a ncl J;: mory held a 6 week pr,ogram last s ummer. SimilaF programs a re pla nned for next year. I Three years ago , a pre-coLlege demon s tration project , one of six in the country, was conducted by Moreh ouse Co llege for 370 s tudents. Results from chis project helped pave th e way for the na tionwide program , Project Upwa rd Bound. I f ~-'I'\ I D. OPPORTUNITY FOR SOCIAL SERVICES 20. SOCIAL SERVICES Social Ser, vice Supervisor, s a nd sta ff are located in each Neighborhood Service C enter to provide help w ich hea lth , education a nd famil y problems. ACTION: Counselors ha ve held 33 ,049 interviews at the Neighborh ood Servic e Cente rs. 21 . DAY CARE SERVICE Sup e rvi s e d c a re for children in ord er to re lease pare nt s fo , jo b tFa inin g a nd ,job opportuni ti es . 10 pro,j eccs are rn o p erat ion c a nng for 7 10 ch~ldre n . An t ioch ...North Day Ca re Ce nter (50) 540 K e nnedy Street , N . W., Tel e phone: 523 -4861 . Mr s . Mary Ray , Direc t or. Bowen Homes D ay Care C e nt e r (G a te C ity Association) (100) - 1060 Wi l kes Cir,cle , N .W. , Tel e phone: 799 -11 70 , Mrs. Fnance s Wy att, Direc tor. Co ll ege P a rk C i vic & E duc a tiona l Cen fil (35) - 407 Wes( Harvard Strieec, C ollege P a rk , Geo,gia , Telephone: 766-4456 , Mrs. Elois e Thoma s , Director. C hildren ' s C enter o Metropolitan .A clanca Eamily D a y Car.e (35) - 725 L a wto n Street , S. W., Telephone : 75 3-6101 , Mrs. Dori s Ha rtle y , Cas e Worker . East J? oinc Child Care Center (24) H 47 Calhoun Avenue , East P oint , Georgi a , Telephone: 767-4404 , Mrs. · De Vern Howell , Directo r. . South Side Day Ca re Cen ter (120) - 80 2 I/P ryor Street , S.W . , Telephone: 577-2640 , Mr. Hlenry J.. Furlow, Directo . Grady Homes 1':Iomes Tenant Bell Stree t , S. Mr,s . Elizabeth Day Care Center (Grady: Associ a tion) (90) - 100 E. , Telephone : 522-1595, R. Carcei; , Di r,ector. Gate Ci ty at St . Paul ' s (Gate C i ty Association) (36) - . 15 40 P ryor Ro ad , S. W. , Tele phone: 622-97 11 , Mrs . Barbar,a Marcin , Direc tor. Fort Street K iddie Korner 000 ) - 572 !Boulevard , N.E . Telephone: 876-9 279 Mis s Yhonn a Career , Directo r . Tabern a cle Ba pt.ist CbuF..C ( 120) - 47 5 Boulevard , N. E., Tele ph on e: 8 76-1779 Mrs. Mattie Bruce , Di rector. 22. LEGAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM ':;J M)'W A centra l Legal A s sis t ance C e nte r £ina nc ed by E.O .A. , is pre s ently ope.,rating in the F ulton Co un ty C ourt ffi ous e . 2 additio nal c enters a re planned for lowinc ome neighborhoods. All lega l c as e s fo r E.O .A. target are as will be r,eferne d to ome of th ese thr,ee centers . The progr,am wi ll handle civil ca ses a d provide representa tion a nd coun s e li ng fo.Ir preliminary criminal hea rin gs . Admi n i s tere d by the Legal Aid Soci ety: of Atlan· ta , 136 Pry or St., S.E. T e l. 524-5811 Mrs . Nancy Cheves , General Coun s e l. ACTION : Under the pre viou s E .O . A. Lega l As sis ta nce Progra m, Lega .A id la wyers work ed i n Ne ighborhood ervice Centers part- ti me . L egal A'd lawyers s erved a tota l of 17, 324 cases a nd dosed 2,376 court cas e s. 23. CRIME PREVENTION ff Po lice work in e a ch Neighborhood Ser vi ce C ente r to become friends with re s id en ts and hel uhem with t heir, probl e ms . T hi s progra m was developed by nh e Atla nta Police Depart ment following �~~lll'IP.lm,:;-1'.lra~~-T...,.;.-;,--~~--,,,..,a,i~'"~""'P:•"'f!!llllll""'"""'._,.,,_.:,,..,~-..,.,.,,'t.~,--· ;:, t llj l I t a rec ommendatio n o f th e Ctime Co mmi s sion. It is th e first program 0£ i t s kind in th e c ountry . Atlanta P olic e Department , 82 Dec a tur Street , Tel e phone: 522-7363 , Lt. C. E. Wrig ht and Lt. C. Dixon , Offi cer s in C harge . ACTION: Sin c e Ja nua ry, 1966, poli c e officers have been worki ng in E . 0 . f · _ eighborhood Service C ente rs . T hey have communicacred with ov er 90, 000 people . These off ic ers a ttended 176 me e tings on o ff-duty tim e , go t 306 drop outs back .in school and h e lped 58 har,d sh ip cas es . Th e y supervise numer;ous yo uth act1v1t1es an d d ubs a nd get youths i nvolved in Neighbo rhood Yo uth Corps, Job Corps , Communi ty Schoo) and Req:eation Programs . 11he office,rs and their Centers a re : Officer Gambell , NASH-Washington ; Offace.r Lyons , Price and Sum-Mee; Officer. Cardell , Central City; Officer J ob nson , Northwes t ( Perty Homes); Officer Nello ms, Edgewood ; Officer Graham, Northeast; O{f~cer Owens, West End. 24. PLANNED PARENTHOOD Fam,ily planning servic e administereel by the p Qanned Parentb ood .Associatio n of the Atlanta Area, 31 08 Piedmont Rioad , N. E . , Telephone: 233-4493 , Mrs. J ulian Freedman Acting Director. ACTION : Over 2,193 individua l s served . 3 Family '.Planning Clin ics in operation: Be~hlehem Community Center Clinic , 9 McDonough Boulevard , Telep hone: 627-0176 (Mo nda y evenings),; PeFI;y Homes Clinic,, 1660 Drew Drive, N . W., Apartment 756, Telepho ne: 355 '8 278 (Wednesday evenings); and John 0 . Ohiles Homes, 435 Ashby £tree S . W., Te~ephone: 755-4228, (Thursday even ii;igs) . 25. MUL Tl SERVICE CENTERS FOR THE AGED ,. Recreation, social services and day eare for families Living in the three High - ···- •• "I·~·' J . •/, '-' •:, • , , ., rise ap artment buildin g s for · the a ged built by the Atla nta Publi c Hou s· ng Authori ty. f:.t: ,, ' Pro gram adminis tered by Senior C itizen Services of Metropolita n Atlanta , foe . , 120 Ma rietta Stre et , N . W. , T e le ph one : 77-3828 , Mr. A . . Horvath , Di rect or . ·~-' ·, wt -~ ,.. ' ~I I .If,~ ',:1 • ~',.,• "' I ACTION : A r:oca l of l , 794 famil y uni t s aue being serv ed in the A ntione Graves C e nter , 126 Hilli ard Street , N. E . , Telephone : 577 -li9 0; the J oho 0. Chi les Cent er;, 43 5 As hby Street , S. W., Teleph on e : 753-4084; and the P almer Hous e , 43 0 T ech wood Drive , N . W. , Te lephone: 873-3453 . he ,A tla nta tlepartmen t o arks and Recrea tion i s providi ng r,ec.reatio n speciatiists under contract to provide co mpreh ensiv e rec rea tio n progra ms. T h e Fl!l lton Cou nty Departmer;ic of Family a nd Children Seuvices provides a fuU-cime rep resentative i n ea c h Cen t er by agi;.ee menc. The Fulton County I?ubl~c Rea.1th Departmen t provides a health ma intena nce program i n each Cen ter by agreement . 26.PROJECT ENABLE Gr.o l!lp education ,fo low-inc ome parents to i.ncuea se motivacion for se lf -hel p . Commun ity a nd pensooal problems ate identified a nd become th e ta rget for a c tion. Administered by the Atlanta Ur. ban League, Inc . , 239 Auburn Avenue , N.,E . , Mrs. Lillian Clark Director , Telephone: 52 2-8839 . ACTION : Seven groups wi th a tota l o 167 parents have comp l e rred their dis c ussio ns . There have been 238 referra ls to other agei;i ies fo r ~e~p . 1,069 people have been interviewed . A. leadership traiQing phase wiU s ta!t soon . 27. VOLUNTEER TASK FORCE A pro<>:.im co provide tnaining and supervisio n of local volu nteers who supplement services of the E.0 .A. professional staff. VoJuoceens a re drawn from all a reas oF the c ~cy, inclrudin . 0 . .A. .' �target areas. Administered by the Community Council of the Atlanta Area, Inc . , Glenn [B uilding , 120 Marietta Strieet, N. W. , Jfelephone: 577-2250 , Mrs. Elinor Metzger, Director. ' ...... ACTION: 46 volunteers trained and ser,ving. Volunteers are placed in Neighborhood Service Centeris, Community Schoo.lis , Communiuy Centers , Planned Parench,ood Centers , St. Joseph's Hospital, Senior Citizens Centers , and Day Care Centers. Volunteer,s include both men a nd women. lnte ues ced persons shou ld call the above number. New class of 33 co s tart in January will las e 6 weeks (4 weeks cl ass es plus 2 weeks on-job-training). Next cl ass starics March 20th. E. RESEARCH PROGRAMS Training and work e xperience for 500-700 hard-core , unempl oyed ouc-0£school yo uths per year, in workshop situations . Administered by BE.ES-BIZ , Inc. , a non-profit , private organization. 570 Peachtree Street, Telephone: 8735653 , Mr. Joseph Minecci , Director. ACTION : 233 were enrolled during the program. 31. PROJECT UP-LI FT Job training for, unemployed parents of dependent children operated by Fulton County Department of Family a nd Children Services at 50 Whitehall Street , Mrs . Willie Thompson , Director , Telephone: 572-2155. ACTION : Program will end by February 28th. 227 individuals are now in training. 387 have completed the course . 28. EVALUATION PROGRAM An eighteen month evaluation of Atlanta's Community Action Program. Administered by Emory Universi ty , Telephone: 377-2411 , Exe. 517, Dr. John Doby , Di.rector; Dr. Fred R. Crawford , Principa l Inve stigator. ACTION : Prelimin a ry research underway. 29. ELECTRONIC DATA PROCESSING PROGRAM E.O.A. was selected for a n O .E .O . Pilot study to design and implement a data processing system to a utoma te ac counting a nd fin a nc ial wo rk. The pro ject de s igned procedures for da ta ga therin g from the Neighborhood Service Centers. Administered by Electronics Data Systems Corpora ti on, Room 8 17, 101 Marietta Street, N . W. , Te lephon e: 525 4262, exr.5 8, ·Mr. Davis Ham lin , Director. ACT ION : E .O.A.'s bud getary and payroll acco untin g department is now automated a nd usin g computers . F. DISCONTINUED PROGRAMS 30. BEES- BIZ 32. PUBLIC HEAL TH Public Health Nurses for Neighborhood Service Centers . Administered by Fulto n County Department of Public Health , 99 Bueler Street, S . E. , Telephone: 572-2927 , Mrs . Gla d ys L. Garland , Coordinator. \· ACTION : 4 nurses worked with the Neighborhood Service Ce nters . 33. HOMEMAKER SE RVICES Substitute h omemakers assumed re sponsibility for households in low-income areas during emergenc y situa ti ons. Ad ministered by Visiti ng Nurse Associa tion of Atla nt a , 1270 Techwood Drive. Telephone: 873-2683, Mrs. Mary Caldwell , Coordinator. ,, '¥ ·rt ,.. ACTION : 28 homemakers served 522 homes , a nd made 13,436 visits . 34. RECREATION CONDUCTED BY NEIGHBORHOOD SERVICE CENTERS ACTION : The Recreation Technician and staff of the Neighborhood Service Ce nter s organized and supervised sports , tutorial program , children' ac - ,, ..., �II t1v1t1es , swimming, basketball , baseball , teen clubs and adult activities in lowincome a reas. s ummer of 1966 . Plans for 1967 indefin ite. 38. MEDICARE ALERT 35. SUMMER RECREATION E.O.A. fin a nced summer recreation in 1966. Total attendance was 277 ,000 . The programs were administered by the City of Acla nta, (Parks a nd Recrea tion Department) , 10 United Appeal agencies a nd 3 priva te agencies. Agencies a nd depa rtments w ere: Atla nta Parks a nd Recreation Dept . Butler Street YMCA Wesley Ho use Centers Sal va tion Army Warren Memorial Boys' Club Wes t End Boys ' Club Grady Homes Boys ' Club George Washin gton Carver Boys' Club Atla nta Co uncil of Camp Fire Girls Grady Homes Girls ' Club Apt Academy Atlanta Urban League Vine City Council 36.HOME MANAG EMENT TRAININ G E.O.A . Home Ma nage ment Techn icians a nd a ides working in Neighborhoo d Service Center s taugh t residents c ooking , sewing , housekeeping, bud ge ting , child care , hygiene, consu mer buyi ng , and facts about loans and installment buying . G. OTHERS 37. SUMMER SCHOOL PROGRAM A program to provide schol arsh ips fo r primary and s econdary students foom under-pri viledged home s to allow them to attend s ummer school. Admini stered by the Atla nta and Fulton C ounty Boards of Education. Dr. John Ma rtin , Ass i s tant Superintendent for Instruction , 2930 Forr e s t Hill s Dr. , Telephone: 761-54 11. ACT ION : 6, 500 youths attended the E.O .A . fi nanced program during the s umme r of 1965 . Program did not operate A two month proguam. 10,697 citizens 65 y ears and o lde r were contac ted . 110 paid workers, o l der people from l owin come areas , and 117 voluntee rs explained heal th and hospital be nefits available under the new Medicare legislation and helped people app ly before the March 31, 1966 deadline. SUMMARY EOA ADMINISTERED PROGRAMS Multi-SeFv.ice Neighborhood Centers Neighborhood Youth Corps ( our-of-school progra m) Sma ll Bu s ine ss Devel o pment Center Men's Job C orp s (Recruitin g ) VISTA (Volunteers in Se rvice to America) Placement and Supervision Medicare Alert EOA PROGRAMS CONTRACTED TO OTHER AGENCIES Community Schools (Atl a nt a P ub l ic Sch oo ls) Head Sta rt Project s (Atlant a Public Schools and 7 pri va te org a ni za tion s ) Day Care Center s (private organizations) Summ er Recreation Program s (Ci ty o f Atla nta, 10 Uni ted Appeal Agencie s , 3 ot h ers) P roject BEES- BIZ (pri va te no n-profit organization) Manpower Pl ace ment Cente rs (Georgia State Employ ment Service) Emp loyment Evaluation and Service Center (Voca tion a l Rehabili ta tion) Lega l Service (Lega l Aide So ciety ) Plan ned Paren th ood (P la m1ed Parenthood Association of Atla nt a) Mult i-Service Ce nters fo r th e Aged (Senior C iti ze ns of Metropo lit a n Atl an t a, Inc.) Volunteer Task Force (Community Counc il ) Fos ter Grandparents (Senior Citizen s of .· ~,.. ,I, . ., . •-, r �,r ,., Metropolitan Atla nta, fnc .) Neighborhood Youth Corps (fn-School) (Atlanta and Fulton County Public Schoo ls) Project nable (Urban League) Public Health Services (Fulton County Health Department) Homemaker Services (Visitin g iNmse Association of Atlanta) Summe School (Atlanta ublic Schools) COOPERATING INDEPENDENT PROGRAMS Ii ,." ..• I . . r Proj ct 'Upl,i£c (F ulton County Department of, Family and Childrien Services) Youth Opportunity Center (Sta te £mployment Service) Col lege Work Study Programs (8 colleges) J?rojec t Upward Bound ( 3 co ll eges) Womens' Job Corps (WICS - Women in Community Service) Cr.ime Prevention (Atlanta Police Dept.) Manpower Developmen t and ]i'r;aining Act ofr 196;1 (Georgia tare Employment Ser,v.ice and Atlanta Board 0£ Education) Project Hir,e (Help Initiate Renewed Employ ment) (Georgia Scace Employment Service) Golden Age Employment Service ( Atlanta Secti on Na tion a l Council 0£ Jewis Wo men) Adu le- B as ic Educati o n (Atl a nta Boa rd of. E duca ti on~ N o longer; in operation 1966 E.O.A. BOARD OF Mr. Bo i sf.e uillet Jones , Chairm an Mrs . W. H. . (L uc y) Aiken Mr. Har,old Ben son Mrs . A. L . Benton Mr. Wi lli am L. Ca~loway Mr. Rober,t Dobbs Mr . George L. Edwards, Mr. Melvin Grantham Mr . John W. Greer Rev . Joseph L. Gr,,igg Mr . John S . Herndon Mt. Jesse Hill Rev . M. L. King , Sr. - ' I ,...,... ' Dr. J oho W. L ecsoa, Mr,. W. M. Montague , Sr. Mr. Carl P lunkecc Mr. 1ulian Sharpt;on M . A. H. Sterne Mr. Erwin Stevens MFs. Nancie Stowers Dr,. Paul D. West Mrs . LeKoy (Ann) Woodward Mrs . Mamie Wynn ' Note: The 196i EOA Board ofr Directors wim be expanded to 36 members , including 12 represen tatives of thos @ served by EOAi (one elected by each Neighborhood Advisory Council) , 12 representatives appointed by public age ncies whic hi serve the poor , and 12 represen;tat,i ves ai;ipointed by other commun ity grioups . The re presentatives ofr chose served by EOA have already been elected . They are mar,ked ** below. 12 CITIZENS NEIGHBORHOOD ADVISORY COUNCILS ( 1967) C entral City Mrs. Doroth y Buown Mrs. Katie Brown Mrs. He len Tayl or Mrs. Annie ack son Mr. Harold Ra ine s &tr. L . L . Turner Mrs. Ros ie f-:loJc Mr. T ommy Gri tfin Mr. Spen ce r Blou nt Mrs . Betty Pool Mr. Jam e s Aus tin Mrs . Nora Keyros Mus . Eve ly n Brown Mr;. Alonzo Watson Center Director Nom i nees: Mrs. Ethel Cox Mrs . Bertha Jackson Mrs . Oneda Seay Mr . B . A. (Kitchens Mr. D. A. Coley Eas t Cent ral Mrs . Mrs . Mr s . Mr - . **Mrs . Annie B . Chamber s Beatric e Wil s on ather.ine Gane Margaret Gr ;;at Sustie LaBord �Mrs . Grace Pullum Mrs . Petronia Hall Mrs. Clide Anderson Mrs. Ruby Whitfield Mrs. Ida Hermon Mrs. Pearl Williams Mrs . Willie Lewis Miss Doris Mathews Mrs. Johnnie Mosley Mr. Lewis Holmes , Sr. Mr. James Gilbert Mr. Emmitt Sowell Mrs. Fannie Woods Center Director Nominees: Mrs. Annie L. Hill Lt. L arry RePass Mrs. Mildred Perry Rev. Clarence Maddox Edgewood Mrs. Ruby N. Heard Rev . W. C. Hill Mr. Lorenzo John son Mrs. Dorothy Harris Mr. J ul ius White Mrs . Mary Mobley Mrs . Fletch er Walk er Mr. Columbus Maddox Mr. Leroy Dobbs Mrs. Maggie McMullen Mr s . Lizzie Stephens Mr. Thomas Carlton Mrs. Chari ty Smith Mrs . Cleta Mitchell Mrs . M. B. White Mrs . Mi11 ie Acree Mrs. Dorothy Adam s Mt . F red Co x M . IRoss Douthard , al ternate C enter Direc tor Nominees: Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. Rufus Favons Charles Turner J ohn Gaither J ohn Cos by NASH-Wa shington Mts . Ruby McDowell Mrs . Dornth y P yrom Mrs . Do ri s Davis Mrs . Annie Sewel] Mrs . Mary Avery Mr. Ot is Cochtan Mr. James Marsh all Mrs . Joyce Burn ey Mrs. Mrs. Mrs . Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Margaret Knight Alice Dixon Parialee FaulknGeneva Mack Lillian Hunt Elizabeth Harvey Jessie Miller Katie Jones C. M. Wolfe Carrie Porter Cynthia Hampton Verna Kirkland Center Director Nominees: Mrs. Dorothy Bolden Thompson Mrs . Maggie Moody Mr. Jame s Gardner Dr. Elsie Edmondson North Fulton Being organized Northwest - Perry Mrs. Ruby Hawk Mr. John Sla ton Mrs. F lo ssie Zac kery Mrs. Shirley Dowdell Mrs. Odessa Wheeler Mrs. Arie Shelm on Mr. R ay mond Morr,is Mr. Richard Feagin Mrs . Loretta Gres ha m Mrs . Vera McCoy Mrs. Margie Freeman Mrs. Bernice Hou seworth Mrs . Delores Mitchell Mr . Jessie Gascon Mrs . Garaldine Hughes Mrs . Barba ra Davis Rev. David Middlebrook Center Director Nominees: Mr. Robe rt Dobbs Mr. Bob Shaw Mrs. J osie Wynn Mr. Carey F l eming Pittsburg Mrs . Mrs. Mrs . Mrs . F lorence Alexan der Nettie Bl anton C arrie Wright Anni e Evan s �I I:' Mrs . Rosa Hammonds Mr:. John Tolbert Mrs . Marion Hood Mr. N. HI. Scott Mrs . Mammie Fleming Mr. Clarence Smith /** Mrs. Beatrice Garland Mrs. H. H. Dyer Mr. Ben Jen kins Mrs . Willie P. Tbonncon Mrs . Leonie Mester Center Director Nominees: Mrs. Sl ini a Sears Mrs . Sallie Billin gs le y Rev . Calvin Mouscon Price Mrs . Christine Bea s on Mrs. Mary F uller Rev . L. W. Hope , Sr. Mrs . Gra ce Ba r:k s dale Mrs . Olli e P owell Mrs. N eerie Bennett Mr s . Lois Wil li a ms Mr. Cha rles Da ndeo Mrs . Lena Owe ns Mr. Melvin 'B a rn es Mrs. C. M. Martin Mns . Mary F. O'Neal Rev . H . F . Gne e n Mrs. E ula ne Hous eworth Mrs . Evelyn Ba ttle Mrs . France s Th o mpson Mrs . Arthur Williams Mrs . Ru th Coffer Mr. George Bru mfi eld Mr. Gabrie l McCrary Center Director Nominee s: Mr. He nry Ph ipps Mrs . Loui se Watl ey Mr. Robert Barnes Mr. Wil liam Merritt South Fulton Mrs . Mary Lemons Mrs . Lucy Willi s Mr. J ohn Walton , Jr. Mrs . Louvenia Will iams Mrs . Alyce Price Mr. Ronald Bridges Mrs . Julie Chaney Mr. William John s on Mrs . Myrtic e Rowe / **Mr. W. T. Brooks Mrs . Susie Perkins Center Director Nominees: Mrs. Elizabeth Huggins Mr. Al fredo Callejas Mr. Milo Fisher Summerhill -Mechanicsvil Ie Rev. J . B. Mai;cin Mrs. Rosa Burney Mr. Edward J oho so n Re v . L. C. Clack Mr. Lewis Peters Mrs . Alice Hudson Mr. J oho Gresha m Mrs . Curtis McWorcher Mr. Hudson Whitsett Mrs. Evelyn Burri ss Mr s. Ann L. Childs Mr . Andrew Broo ks Mr s. Annie By rd Mr s . Li zz i e J e nnings Mr . Edward Moody Mr. Edward Grimes Mr. C. L. Walton Mrs. Elizabeth Anderson Mrs . Dori s Gaston Mr s . Mattie a n s l ey Center Director No minees: Mrs . Mrs . Mrs . Mrs . Gu ssie L ewi s Ca therine Co lbert Leila Hancock A. L. Benton ( e l e c ted in 1966 fo r 2 year term co Board) West C entral Mr s . Doro thy Patterson Mr s . Leola Perry Mr. Walter Burton Mr. Wilkie A . Jordan Mr . Nathaniel Walker Mr . Lewis Evans Mrs . Mary Hall / **Mr. Edward Yo ung Mrs . Laura Willis Mr. John Dixon Mr. Elisha Piers Mrs . Corine Smith Mrs . Frankie Kendri ck Mi ss Nedra L. Reid Rev . K. M. Dunlap Mrs . Nellie Price Mrs. E velyn Perdu e Re v . R . Johnson �IC enter D irect o r Nom inees: fr s . WilJie Perki os Rev . Elli s L. Green ".\fr. Charl e s B. Ha rt, J r. West End Mr. B. F. Wa ldorn Mr. Ben Bens on \ !rs . Peg Brady ,\,fr. Willi am Killings wor th Mrs . Emma Jordan Mr. A. R. Phil lips Mr. F red Youn g Mrs . Gertrude McLennan Mrs . E l izabeth God bee Mrs . Maxine Abbo tt Mrs . Edna Mayo Mr . Roy Harwell Mr. Alvi n Barne r .\,!rs . Bertha Stewart .\1rs . Roxie Lipford Mr. R . C. Chinn M,s . Lucy Cas tell Mrs . D. L. Stovall Mr. Coleman Smith .\1rs . Beatrice Henderson ,\,!rs. M. U. Barnette \Jr. J. C. Dietrich ,\,!rs . Sue Bradley Mrs . C. B . Cole Mr . Jack Bagwell '-Ar. Robert Rice .\Jr . F . H. Pound \!rs . Gene John son Mrs . Ann Miller Mr . Roswell Jackson .\frs. Mary Chandler \!rs . Mary Morton C enter D irector Nominee s: ~\fr . H. D. Wi ley .\,lrs . George Longino • \lrs . Mam i e Wvnn .\!rs . Gladys Bradley Rev . Carol Tinsley l CITIZENS CENTRAL ADVISORY COUNCIL (1967) Executive Administrator Nominees !rs . Annie Laurie Pace .\ fr . Ralph Long Rev R . B Shorts Mr. Robe rt Blount M, s . L e nnie He s te r Mrs. Mary Morton TECHN ICAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE Mr. James H. Aldredge Miss Dori s Alexa nder Honorable Iva n Allen , gr. Dr. Wa llace M. Als ton Mr. Harold N . Arnold Dr. Sa nford At wood Dr. Warren D. B ache li s Dr. P aul R . B eall Mr . Duane W. Beck Mr. G lenn E. Bennett Mi ss Catheri ne Boling Dr. J a mes J? . Brawle y Dr. R ufus E . C le men t Mr . C larence D. Cole man Mr. J ack C. Deliu s Mr. Wellborn R . Ell i s Mr. Arn o ld D. Elli son Mr. R ic ha rd Forbe s Mr. J a mes F urniss Mr. Collier B . Gladin M, . Herma n B . Guinn Mr . Joseph F . Haas Dr. James F . Ha c kney Arch bi s hop P aul J. Ha !Jina n Dr. Edwi n Harri son Mr. Richard C. Hicks Miss Re becca Ho ll ings worth Honorable Lloyd Elmo Holt Mr. William S. Howland Mr . William E . Inmon Mr. John H . J aco bs Dr. A. P . Jarrell Mr. Herbert T . Jenkin s Mr. Ma lco lm D. Jone s \fr . A Ia n F. K iepper; Mc John F . Kiser Mr. R . Earl L anders Dr . Noah Langdal e , Jr. Dr. John W. Letson Major George Marsha ll Dr. Albert E . Man ley Mr. Sam Mas se ll, Jr . Dr. Benjamin E. Mays Mrs . Frances McKay Mr . J . 0 . Moore Mr. Jack P . Nix �~ ~~TT,:-~T.~----- Mr. A. B. Padgett Mr. J . W. Pinkston Dr. Claude Purcell Mr. William Ray , Jr. Mr. M. B . Satterfield Mrs . Bruce Schaefer Mr. Opie Shelton Mr. Robert E. Shrider Mr. Robert Sommerville Mr. Douglas W. Str,onbehn Dr. Herman L . Turn er Dr. John Venable Dr. Paul 0. West Rev. Samue l W. Williams Mr. Marion Williamson Mr. John C. Wilson ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY ATLANTA, INC. Mr. C. 0. Emmerich Executive Director Mr. Harold E. Barrett Associate Administrator for Operation s (and Director o f Neighborhood Services Organization) ,Ir Mr. William W. Allison Assoc iate Admini s trator for Pla nning ~ u z .• { Mr. William G. Terry Associat e Administrator for Genetal Services (and Director of Meti t System) ~ I,' IZ < .-, I \ • Mr. Luther A. Mclendon, Jr. Director of Finance .. ' ' I ,7. . • t ! } ..J I- < >I- ci OM ..Jo a:i I- M 8 w< w i:, 0:: 0:: t-o .,,w <<.!> Mrs. Wade T. Mitchell Director of Information II- <- Wl- -z a::< <...J ,;;l- o< l �ATLANTA,GEORQIA ROUTE SLIP TO: ~PA~¥~~-=---=---- FROM : Dan E. Sweat, Jr. D For your information D Please refer to the attached correspondence and make the necessary reply. D Advise me the status of the attached. FORM 25- 4-S �CITY HALL October 1~, 1967 ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmenta: liaison . MEMORANDUM To: Dr. John Letson, School Superintendent Mr. Jack Delius, General Manager, Parks Department Miss Virginia Carmichael, Recreation Director, Parks Department From: Subject: Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. Transfer of Summer Recreation Programs to School System Each summe r f o r the last several years, it has b e come increasingly more apparent that the de ve lopment and implementation of comp re hensive recreation programs in low income sections of the City of Atlanta is absolutely essential for the reduction of obvious factors which cause problems of juvenile delinquency and social disorders. The large-scale special recreation program this summer pro ve d conclusively the v alue of such an all-out coordinated effort. More than 125, 000 youngste rs from disadv ant a g e d commun iti e s took part in programs prov ided by 33 agencies through th e recr e ation funds made available by th e Office of Economic Opportunity, the City of Atlanta and the local ag e ncies . It was the first summer many of these boys and girls had been afford e d the opportunity to p a rticipate in sup e r v is e d r e cr e ation acti v ities.· The fact that Atlant a' exp e ri e nced a summe r of calm w ith a minimum o f frictions w hich plagued other citie s spe aks we ll for this summe r's acti v ity . �Page Two October 18, 1967 The truth of the matter is that anyone who wished to participate in organized recreation in Atlanta this year could do so within his own neighborhood. All this has strengthened my firm belief that a well planned, adequately financed and staffed summer program of recreation is vital to the supervision of our young people during the long vacation period. In order to plan, finance, and operate the desired program, every existing public facility and resource must be utilized to the maximum. All available federal aids as well as private assistance must also be incorporated into such a program. There are at present 121 elementary and 26 high schools in the City School System. All of the eleme ntary schools and all of the high schools have playgrounds or areas suitable for outdoor play adjacent to the schools. There ar e 15 gymnasiums and two sports stadiums include d in the facilities of the school system. In addition, almost all schools have auditoriums, cafeterias and other tools which should be utilized in a comprehensive summer program of recreation. The public elementary and high school is the one community facility which most directly affects the lives of the greatest number of people in a community. Virtually all youngsters between the ages 6 - 18 are unde r the supervision of teachers, cQaches and/or other school officials for nine months of the year. It seems to me that a summer recreation program which is orie nted to the school facilities would pro v ide for an orde rly and m e aningful e x tension of supe rvision for a full twelve months. To place dir e ct responsibility for summe r recreation w ith the schools w ould ena ble school officials to b e tt e r coordin at e y e ar-around school and youth activities . _Summe r school, spei!ial e nrichme nt p r ograms a n d other programs conducte d by the schools in the summer could b e a part of an overall t w elve month school plan, including r e creation . The purpos e of this m e morandum is to request that the Park s a n d Recr e a t ion D e pa r tme nt and th e School D e partme nt discuss th e feasibilit y of t r a n s fe r of sp e cial summe r re creation p r ograms - �.... Page Three October 18, 1967 particularly in low income areas - to the School Department. The special committee now preparing a five -year plan for public recreation in the City of Atlanta might also be asked to consider the potentialities of this proposal. IAJr:fy L �C TY OP .ATL~'TA CITY HALL August 21, 1967 ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assis tant MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison " MEMORANDUM . To: Mr. Jack Delius Miss Virginia Carmichael From: Dan S we.9-t Subject: · ~m~ ov1e - President's Commission The President's Commission on Youth Opportunity will have a photo grapher in on Wednesday to shoot pictures of the Atlanta program. The movie is actually being put together by International T e l ephone and Telegraph. l Neal Gr ego ry, from the Vice Preside nt's Offic e , requested that we assist the photo g rapher in getting the necessary shots and that if we had any color slides to be made available to the producer . for pas sible inclusion in the movie it would be h elpful. Neal had attempted to call Virginia but this was the time that she was in New York at the Summer Games . . They will l e t one of u~_ know who the photographer will be and . what time h e is expected i n. DS:fy cc: Mayor Ivan All e n, Jr . . .· . �CITY OF ATLANTA August 22, 1967 CITY HALL ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental liaison Dear Fellow Citizen: A~cording to the school system records, I see that you may not be planning to return to school this fall. I hope that this is not the case. As chairman of the Metropolitan Atlanta Youth Opportunity Campaign, I am interested in you and your future. Our City needs you. But even more, your education is improtant to you and the skills you can develop. To stop school now is a cruel form of self-punishment. If you get a skill or receive a high school diploma, it will not only mean more money in your pocket, it will mean a better life for you. If you are not interested in going to regular academic day classes, you can attend ever.ing or day vocational - technical classes or go to evening academic or evening training classes. For your own good -- for money in your .pocket -- it is necessary that you learn a skill or get a high school diploma. There are many jobs available right now if you have the skills needed to do them. I urge you to reconsider your decision to quit school: they may be, should not keep you out of school. If you need you need answers about the school programs you can get, call System . at 761-5411, Ext. 220 or the Atlanta Youth Council at Problems, whatever help or guidance or if the Atlanta School 522-4463 1 Ext. 437. No matter what you may now feel about continuing school ,' I strongly urge you so seriously consider one of the vocational or academic programs available to you. Think of yourself and take advantage of the opportunities available to you. To quit is to be left behi nd. By the way, the Atlanta Braves and I would like to invite you to be our guest at a special "Back-to-School" game to be held on Labor Day, Monday, September 4. Two tickets for the night game with Pihi adelphia are enclosed and I hope that you and a friend will attend. ruly, IA:psh Enclosures (2) Mayor I van Allen, Jr. Metropolitan Atlanta Opportunity Campaign �HELP THEM HELP TJ.lfMSELVE-S YOUTH OPPORTUNITY CAMPAIGN 1967 FOR GREATER ATLANTA ATLANTA YOUTH COUNCIL, 68 MITCHELL ST., S. W., ATLANTA 30303 Telephone 522-4463, Ext. 437 May 16, 1967 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE (#Rl) ATLANTA TO EXPAND PLAYLOT PROGRAt,,1 FOR 1967 (First of a series of announcements on summer recreation programs) The Neighborhood Playlot program, begun last summer by the City of Atlanta Parks and Recreation Department, will be more than doubled for summer 1967. This announcement was made today by Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr., who stated: "We are convinced that the Playlot program was our single most successful NevJ effort in providing meaningful recreation opportunity for our boys and girls last summer. The Playlots were available to large numbers of children within easy walking distance of the ir homes, a( opportunity for pFe schoel children the ~f ~~r~ d J) ried types of r ecreation /£ t bo i i ' ~ h Q gJ.QBIQR t an;r sna de s under experience d personnel with outstanding assistance and support f rom youth and adults f rom the ne i ghbor hoow themse lves ." This announcement from Mayor Allen came a s the f irst in a series of inf ormation r eleases on programs to be operated by public and private agencies in the yout h recreation f i eld , with the coordinat i on of t he Youth Opportunity Campai gn f or 1967. .,f;~ y The Pl aylot program , begun last J une paPtiaJ.4 with f unds from the Office of Economic Opportunity , included nine s i tes at t he cl ose of last summer. These were \~ located in low-income neighborhoods , often on vacant lots which 1leased for token rental , cleared, equipped and staffed by t he Parks and Recreation Department. and - volunteers. �(#Rl-2) An average of 750 children participated in the Playlot program each of ~~ ()}: ffi.w,-,( days last summer, and that number is expected to reachJ ~ f' r [fl~ program i s expanded tox ~ ) _ .c../J sites for 1967. Of ~ 2---- e z,~ sites, 2 9 000 1as .3 .:t,wo the have buildings ~ which will insure all-weather oper ation. ~ t - The City has been acquiring these lots for t h= last several months and is · comp1 et.ion · "{f:A nearing of the initial development stage . The Playlots will be equipped with water fountains, portable toilets, climbing ~owers, swings, slides, sand boxes, '~ ) basketball goals and nets and games and athletic equipment of many types. The Playlots will be open from ___a.m. until ---·n ~ .£,;,~ from June _ __until September p.m., six daysn ~.~ 143.215.248.55 ~~ r..,p.-rr '"'-" Many of t he lots will be lighte~ and these will remain open until ___y.m. and childr en encouraged to return during the evening hours and bring their parents to participat e in games of interest to adults as well as children . "'.,·/\1~) .:A-ll of the Playlots will be provided with sprinkler heads which transform a water hydrant into a cool shower treat for hundreds of children. at: v ./ v l. 2. 3. 4. V v 11/ v v v I/ v v' I,, s. 6. 7. s. 9. 10 . ll. 12 . 13. 14. Rhodes Street between Sunset & Vine Merritts and Bedford Wylie and Tye Connally St. near Richardson St. Gilliam Park on Wade 373 Thurmond Street Magnolia and Maple McDaniel at Georgia Ave. Haygood and Crew St. 255 Dodd Avenue (House) Windsor near Richardson St. Park Ave. and Lansing, S.E. Arlington Cir ., N.W . 533 Centra~ Av_e. _ , s.w. Ladd St . off Oakland, N. W. 1 96 Savannah St ., S.E. (House ) i/ 18 . 141 Walnut St . , N. E. (l /2 House) /19 . Harper Park Site - Pool e Creek Rd ., S.E. /~Daniel ~anton P_ark ~ite., ( Mc3:rt in-Boynton, S . E .) -Y21. Perry Blvd. and Lively v 22 . Huff Rd. near Booth , N. W. ~ , f. V--- 23. Butler and Vernon Pl. , N.E. / 24. University & Hubbard , S.E • .,, .,25. Vernon a~d Fort, N. E. -V ~6 e Habershal-at Perry Blvd. Daniel between Edgewood & DeKalb Ave. ,,,,,- 1 6. i/17. V27. Playlots are located �(#Rl-3) The first four sites listed above will have portable swimming pools, donated 1'i () by the Rich Foundation and valued at $28, (for the four). They are steel support:;~lt;:u,J-- properly drained and will include showers and other necessary equipment. Supervise/ - - . . . . . . on wi·11 b e avai"labl e f rom _ a .m. unti·1 _y.m., swimming and swimming instructi days a week. 1 ~ Tentative plans are to relocate these fp ools in nearby school basements during the winter months, thus providing year-round swimming opportunity in these four areas. The cost of equipping and operating one Playlot for the summer is estimated at $3,700. A portion of this cost will be funded by a grant assured from the Office of Economic Opportunity. ThS~ ill bear the remaining cost. At the same time, the City hopes to acquire another -...playlo~ sites before the ~nd of the summer and also introduce some innovations in its existing Playlot program •. ~ ( 1. Provide noon-time snacks to hundreds of 0 ~ vl t&_§;. hildren who would otherwise do without the recreation programs possible - 2. portable etc. isolated small neighborhoods could be 3. near them. 4. Possibly 5. And most hours on Sunday afternoons. expand permanent year-round program. hoped that contributions, loan of physical facilities and volunteered time from private citizens, business f irms, religious and civic organizations will enable the City to add these innovations and enrich the recreation opportunities available to thousands of young Atlantfans. Interested parties are asked to contact the Youth Opportunity Campaign at 522-4463 , extension 437. As an important phase in the Youth Opportunity Campaign for 1967, a simple directory of summer learning, recreation and camping opportunities for youngsters, deigned for each quadrant of the City, will be distributed through the Atlanta schools, recreation centers, private agencies and Neighborhood Centers prior to the close of school. �CITY OF .ATLANTA IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Sec retary DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governm ental Li aison NEWS RELEASE CITY HALL ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 Special News Release Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. John Cox, Executive Director, Atlanta Youth Council Jack Delius, G e neral Manager, Atlanta Parks and Recreation Department For Immediate Release May 17, 1967 Atianta to Expand Playlot Program for 1967 (First of a Series of Announcements on Summer Recreation Programs) The Neighborhood Playlot program, begun last summer by the City of Atlanta Parks and Recre~tion Department will be more than doubled for summer 1967. This announcement was made today by Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr., who stated: We are convinced that the Playlot program was our single most successful new effort in providing meaningful recreation opportunity for our boys and girls last summer. The Playlots were available to large numbers of children within easy walking distance of their homes, and they offered varied types of recreation opportunity for children of all ages under experienced personnel with outstanding assistance and support from youth and adults from the neighborhoods themselves. 11 11 This announcement from Mayor AHen came as the first in a series of information releases on programs to be operated by public and private agencies in the youth recreation field, with the coordination of the Youth Opportunity Campaign for 1967. The Playlot progra~, begun last June and financed substantially with funds from the Office of E conomic Opportunity, included nine sites at the close of last summer. These w e re located in low-income neighborhoods, ofte n on vacant lots which were leased for token rental, cleared, equipped and staffed by the Parks and Recreation Department and neighborhood volunteers. An average of ?St>' children participated in the Playlot program each of 66 days last summe r, and that number is expected to reach at leas t 2,000 per day as the pr ogram is expanded to more than 25 sites during the summer of 1967. Of some 26 sites that have already been selected, three have buildings which will insure all-weather operation. T he City has been locating these lots during the last sev eral months and is nearing com ple tion of the initial development of most of the Playlots. The amount and type of e quipme nt on e ach site will vary according to the size of the lot, but e quipment will include water fountains, portable t oilets, climbing towers, swings, · slides, s a n d boxes, basketball goals and nets, and games and athletic equipment of many t ype s. The Playlot s will b e ope n from 10 a. m. until dark, six days a week, from June 1st throu gh L a bor Da y, S e pte mber 4th. With the advent of Daylight Savings Time , recre ation p rogra ms can be continuous until 9 or 9:30 p. m. during the summer and children will be encoura ged to return during the e v ening hours and bring their parents to p a r ticipate in games of interest to adults as well as children. Most of the Pla ylot s w ill b e provi d e d with sprinkle r h e ads which transform a water hydrant into a cool shower treat for hundreds of childre n. Playlots are a l ready developed or hav e b een planned at the following locations: �l Page Two May 17, 1967 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12 . 13. 14. 15 . 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. Rhodes Street between S unset and Vine Merritts and Bedford Wylie and Tye Connally Street near Richardson Street Gilliam Park on Wade Avenue 373 Thurmond Street M agnolia and Maple McDaniel at Georgia Avenue Haygood and Crew Street 255 Dodd .Avenue (Indoor Facilities) Windsor near Richardson Street Park P..venue a nd Lansing, S. E. Arlington Cir.cle, N. W . 533 Central Avenue , S. W. Ladd Street off Oakland, N. W. 196 Savannah Street, S. E. (Indoor Facilltjes) 141 Walnut Street, N. E. (Indoor Facilities) Harper Park Site - Poole Creek Road, S. E. Daniel Stanton Park Site (Martin-Boynton, S. E.) Perry Boulievard and Lively H uff Road near Booth, N. W. Butler and Vernon Place, N. E. University and Hubbard, S. E. Vernon and Fort, N. E. Habershal at Perry Boulevard Daniel between Edgewood and DeKalb Avenue The first four sites above will have portable swimming pools, made possible by a $28, 500 donation from the Rich Foundation. The pools are steel supported, filtered, properly drained and will include showers and other necessary equipment. Supervis ed swimming and swimming instruction will be available seven days a week, from 10 a. m. until 7 p. m. on weekdays and from 1 p. m. until 7 p. m. on Sundays. Tentative plans are to relocate thes e pools in school basements during the winter months, thus providing the schools with an opportunity for yearround swimming instruction. The cost of equipping and operating one Playlot for the summer is estimated at $3,700. A portion of this cost will be fund e d by a grant assured from the Office of Ec;onomic Opportunity. The City will b ear the remaining cost. At the same time, the City hopes to acquire additional Playlot sites before the end of the summer and also introduce some innovations into the existing Playlot program. It is hoped that contributions , loan of physical facilities and volunteered time from private citizens , business firms, religious and civic organizations will enable the City to enrich the re creation opportunities available to thousands of young Atlantans. Interested parties are asked t o contact the Youth Opportunity Campaign at 522-4463, Extension 437 • .As an important phase i n the Youth Opport unity Campaign for 1967, a simple dire ctory of summer learning , recreation and camping opportunities for youngsters, designed for each quadrant of the City, will b e distributed through the Atlanta schools , recreation centers, p r ivate agencies and neighborhood centers prior to the close of school. # # # �CITY OF ATLANT.A CITY HALL May 15, 1967 . ' ATLANTA. GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison Honorable Richard H. Russell United States Senate Senate Office Building Washington, D. C. Dear Senator Russell: RE: Telephone conversation May 15, 1967, on Summer Recreation with Bill Jordan Enclosed is a rundown on the City of Atlanta's 1967 special sununer recreation needs in low-income neighborhoods which I discussed with Mr. Jordan in your absence this morning. You will note that the proposed 1967 summer r ecreation program budget sheet lists those projects which would b e operated by the City Government, through its Parks and Recreation Department, the Atlanta Public Schools, United Appeal .~gencies, the Economic Opportunity Atlanta Neighborhood Service C enters, and the Fulton C ounty programs. This $570, 119 total r e presents merely those extra summer activities which are urgently needed in the slum areas over and above thos e programs and activities which the City and the various agencies are able to do within the limits of their regular budgets. The amounts shown for the various United Appeal agencies under the "1966 Budget" column are listed to show what these agencies spent through the special summer program last year. Since EOA had not received any specific proposals from these particular agencies for this sununer 's program, these amounts were merely include d ih anticipation that these agencies would do at least as much as the y did in 1966. �Senator Russell Page Two May 15, 1967 You will note in the other attachments that we have worked very diligently with other public and private agencies as well as the business and civic community in enlisting community-wide support for our summer recreation and employment program. We have received some help through the Rich Foundation, Sears Roebuck, the Atlanta Labor Council, and other private business and civic organizations. We have also drawn funds from other critically needed programs in order to increase our activities in the disadvantaged communities. With the $570, 119 we have requested as a part of the $75,000,000 special summer appropriation requested from the Congress, we 'feel that we will be able to carry on a reas"Onable summer program for more than 160,000 young people and adults who are not economically able to provide their own. We hope that you will lend your support to this appropriations request for the City of Atlanta and other cities throughout the state and nation. Sincerely yours, Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor IAJr:fy �PROPOSED 1967 SUMMER RECREATION PROGRAM .. ! April 26, 1967 I I Ij SPONSOR 1. Operation CHAMP Neighborhood Playlot Program Senior Citizens Wilderness Camp $ 89, 340 106,680 67,758 96,000 Atlanta Public Schools a. 3. (1966 Budget) City of Atlanta a. b. c. d. 2. AMOUNT Community Schools 60,000 United Appeal Agencies a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h. Metropolitan Boys Clubs Atlanta Urban League Butler Street YMCA Camp Fire Girls Grady Homes Girls Club Vine City Council Wesley House Centers Salvation Army 4. Neighborhood Services 5. County Programs 63,043 ($13,000) ($14, 000) ($ 7, 311) ($ 6, 55 3) ($ 3, 434) ($ 4, 000) 5,000 24,000 ,/ 10,000 TOTAL $521,821 GRAND TOTAL $570,119 $48,298 �CITY HALL April 14, 196 7 ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code ~04 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Ex ec ut i•1e Secretary DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison MEMORANDUM To: Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. From: Dan Sweat Subject: Your Meeting with Vice President Humphrey Cliff Henry of the U. S. Conference of Mayors telephoned me Thursday and said that the Vice President had invited the mayors of ten cities to meet with him in Washington to discuss summer · recreation needs. The Conference of M&.yors had been asked to provide information to the Vice President's Office which would show: 1. The number of new programs scheduled by these cities for the ghettos during summer 1967. 2. How much additional local money is going into these programs. 3. How much federal money is going into these programs. 4. How much additional money is needed in order to carry out the desired program_during the summer months in these areas. The following information was furnished to Mr. Henry for the consolidated report: 1. It is difficult to place a number on the programs w e anticipate . However, we ·told Mr. Henry we would carry out a Playl ot Program, which has been expanded from 7 to 21 Playlots, and that we hope to have a similar program to last year's O peration Champ provided we utilize school grounds and the larger parks . . ..;- ' �Mayor Allen Page Two April 14, 1967 ) ,. ..I · . for activities.. We hope to continue our recreation program with the elderly in the h i gh ris e public housing project and also add to the Community School recreation program during the swnmer. . l • · 2. We explained that we are providing $61,350 for the 'Playlot Program by taking from other parks programs. $48,000 had to be made up· as a result of funds cut by OEO from last year's Playlot Program. Last summer we received $145,000 from OEO for recreation programs. We have none of this at present. 3. At the present time we have no assurances of any federal money although we have applied for funds under Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act for Community School recreation during the summer and Wf;. are looking for other sources of federal money. 4. To carry on the desired pro g ram for the summer we need a total of $418, 778. This would include funds for th e Playlot Program, the Sununer Recreation Program (Operatfon Champ), recreation for the elderly, Community School recreation, and funds to operate our proposed Wilderness Camp at Lake Altoona. .. ·,. The Wilde rness C a m p i s one of the most imagin a tive propo sal s w e have and would certainly fit into the overall concept of youth opportunity and recreation being pushed by the Vice Pre sident. We would a n t icipate utilizing some 800 boys durin g th e surnrne r months (100 e ach w e ek) to h e lp b e gin de v e loping our Altoona P ark prope r ty ac cordi n g to our m as t e r pla n. The y w oul d b e p a i d for a h alf d a y each d a y a·n d would ge t instr uction in wil dlife , camping, hiking, be qualified as Red Cross s~immers, etc. We think $96, 000 w ould allow us to run an adequate camp at Altoona for two months d u ring the s umm e r. I am attaching a Summary of Atl anta ' s Youth O pportunit i e s Campai gn and Summe r Recreat i on Pr o gra m for 1967. I am furni s hing you with ..,. . �;' I Mayor Allen Page Three April 14, 196 7 ' !: ' . I extra copies of this and the attzi.chments which I am sure you will want to leave with the Vice Prc:sident and his staff. Cliff Henry of the Conference of Mayors, who will probably be at the session, also would like some copies. A real interest seems to be stirring in the private secto·r with regard to youth opportW1ity, especially in employment and recreation. The attached newspaper clippings indicate some of this, especially the Jaycees effort in Summerhill-Mechanicsville with which you are familiar, and most recently the efforts of the Juvenile Delinquency Sub-Committee of the Metropolitan Commission on Crime and Juvenile Delinquency in cooperation with the Atlanta Youth Council (see Mr. McGovern's remarks in recent address to Kiwanis Club). A lot of this appeal is being made on the premise that funds previously available from the Federal Government may not be available this summer and that more and more we must condition ourselves to greater financial and personal involvement and commitment at the local level. Certainly we would not want any announcement of emergency fed e ral grants to stifle this local initiative, therefore, this partnership idea with the private section should be a positive part of our .~pproach and plans. For example: The $59,000 grant requeste d under Title I to fund Co~munity . School s for summer 1967 will provide programs in 12 sch~ols. Programs are actually needed in 6 additional schools, and efforts are being made now to secure local support from the private sector to help in this effort. The Neighborhood Playlot Program cannot stand still at 21 Playlots and even if the $106, 680 sho uld b e forthcoming to fund this program, its e x panding needs will require help from the private sector. We are making an appeal to h e lp in providing needed equipment, noon time snacks, porta ble swimming pools, etc., for this program, an:d there are strong indications that the private sector will respond. i: .. I �Mayor Allen Page Four April l ·~, 196 7 '. The Wilderness Conservation-Recreation Proposal would depend greatly upon the help and material support of public and private agencies, business, civic clubs, etc., in providing necessary equipment and consultant assistance. Private citizens, groups, churches, etc., are indicating an evergrowing awareness of the tremendous need for more and better youth programs, in hard-core slum areas and in the mor·e affluent neighborhoods, as indicated by the project of the Wieucca Road Baptist Church (see clipping). To sum it up, we do not want to give the impression that we expect Washington to solve all our problems nor do we want local support to be squelched by the sudden availability of emergency federal funds. We need help from both directions. In conclusion, we should make a strong appeal that if help is forthcom_ing, let it come soon, while there is time to plan, to recruit personnel and to develop maximum cooperation between the various agencies involved and the private sector. DS:fy ., ' 'I I 1: �., . SUMMARY OF ATLANTA'S YOUTH OPPORTUNITIES CAMPAIGN AND SUMMER RECREATION PROGRAM FOR 1967 For the third straight year and at the suggestion of the President, the City of Atlanta has formed a Youth Opportunity Campaign Task Force, this year spearheaded by the new Atlanta Youth Council. Rather than confine itself to summer job opportunities, as important as these are, Atlanta's Youth Opportunity Campaign for summer 1967 is intensely concerned with a number of areas that we conside·r of tremendous importance to our youth. Our overall program concerns itself with employment, education, recreation and health. The summer opportunity campaign is already underway and will consist of: I • 1. Intensive recruitment through high school counselors for · summer job applicants; 2. Recruitment for volunteers to work in Head Start Programs; 3. Dissemination of information on summer recreation opportunities of all types; and 4. Emphasis on the importance of summer school in a youngster's summer plans. Of the foregoing four points of our local program, the two most important are summer job opportunities and summer recreation opportunities. We are · planning a real thrust into the private sector to achieve a 10% - 20% increase in the number of summer job opportunities available and we are already receiving considerable local support for this effort. The second important phase of our campaign is summer recr_eation opportunities and here we are acutely aware of difficiencies which exist in hard-core slum areas of our community. During the summer of 1966', through funds made available through OEO, we were able to mount three major recreatioh programs: 1. .! The Neighborhood Playlot Program in which we cleared and put into operation seven neighborhood playlots, which served an average of 89 children per lot p e r day through the summer months at a total cost of $41, 422. �Page Two I ' 2. An intensive summer recreation program - "Operation Champ" providing excursion and enrichment type recreation opportunities to 89, 000 participants throughout the summer months at a total cost of $89, 340. Probably the most dramatic phase of Operation Champ was an intensive swimming program which was continued on into the schools for two weeks after the new school year began and which was made possible partially through an additional grant of $25, 000 · which was made available to us. Under this program 3, 329 children received swimming instructio,n from qualified teachers and some 600 were certified at various levels of proficiency. 3. Equally important was which we conducted in the elderly throughout of 36, 000 citizens at a ,. l j l ' I the recreation program for senior dtizens three high rise public housing comple x es for the summer and which had a total attendance total cost of $14, 509. In recent months under the auspices of the City of Atlanta Community Improvement Program a survey has bee:ri made on recreation resources available to the blighted areas of Atlanta. The first draft of this survey has been made available to us and it pinpoints where our needs are. The foremost conclusion that we draw from these findings is the urgency of repeating and expanding those programs we had last summer and adding to them some new recreational programs which are badly needed. Since last summer our Neighborhood Playlot"Program has expanded from seven playlots to a potential twenty-one which we hope to have in operation for summer 1967. The estimated cost of operating our Neighborhood Playlot ______Pr_ogragi so that it offers a real "day camp" opportunity for 1, 869 children · each day throughout the summer will be $106, 680. To repeat the Operation Champ Program with its wide range of enrichment opportunities for children from slum areas, we anticipate a cost of $89,340 . In addition we feel that we cannot fail to n;ieet the very real recreation and a vocational needs of our senior citizens . · It must be pointed out that these n eeds do not end w ith the close of summer' as senior citizens are not r eturning to school and other activities. Therefore, w e feel that the senio r citizen p r ogram must be on a year - :roun:d bas i s or it ends in disappointments at the end of the summer. We w ould like to operate this program on a year round bas i s at an estimated cost of $67 , 758. �! ,- .. Page Three I . I ' ! For some time we have hoped to develop a conservation-recreation summer camp for the youth of Atlanta. The main object of this project would be to provide constructive athletic camping and vocational opportunity £qr young men ages 16 through 21. We feel that a golden opportunity is at hand for _this project and that the project could be expanded to accomplish two other important purposes: 1. To provide a part-time employment opportunity in conjunction with the valuable outdoor experience as a part of our summer j_ob opportunity program; and 2. To begin preliminary clearing and development of a 450 acre wooded site which the City of Atlanta leases 45 miles northwest of Atlanta and which we hope by summer 1968 to put into operation as a regular camping facility. We envision this project would be along similar lines to successful CCC programs of the past in both administration and philosophy, and that it would be under the direction of a trained professional in forestry or some similar field. We anticipate that we can accommodate 100 boys per week for a total of 800 boys for an eight week summer period. The estimated cost of operating this camp would be $96,000 for 1967. We would like to point out that this figure does not include all of the equipment and material necessary, but we would hope to get wide-spread support from the private sector in the procurement of necessary e·quipment and consultant personnel. I I ·1 • J : I ' ' ' .. I _ 'I l ! I i Another very important phase of our overall recreation hopes for this summer - hinges on continuation of our community schools as recreation r esources . Our community school program has requested $59,000 under Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act for the operation· of nineteen community schools this summer. While in no way duplicati_ng programs offered through our regular City P ·a rks and Recreation Department, but rather working closely in conjunction in order to achieve the maximum potential of both, the community schools would offer a wide range of athletic and enrichment type programs for ' both boys and girls of elementary and high school ages . ' Total cost of r ecreation needs for 1967 - $418, 778. ! i ! 0 �'I ' i I ' ! l FACT SHEET YOUTH OPPORTUNITY CAMPAIGN 1967 I .I' i, I l I l! I I i : The Atlanta Youth Council is serving as the task-force for this campaign . Rather than confine this year's campaign to summer employment only, both at the suggestion of the Vice President and because the logic of his suggestion was already apparent to many here in Atlanta, our program will include employment, education, recreation and in a secondary way, health. A. Because the schools provide the id e al vehicle for selling this program to high school age youth, we have developed this program through the high school counselors. I. April 26: Memorandum w ill go to counselors and principals of 26 high schools outlining the program and asking for their enthusiastic support. 2. May 1: Kit going to each school will contain: a. Abbreviated employment application forms for summer jobs through the State Departme nt of Labor's Youth Opportunity Center, together with return envelopes for transmitting completed _a pplications back to the Center. This early recruitment will help eliminate the logjam that occurs at the Center w hen school is out; it will give the less motivated youth the guidance of the counselor in taking this important first step; and it will put summer paying jobs in perspective with other types of summer opportunity. b. Colorful posters for display throughout schools will feature a message appealing to this age group. c. Sun-burst design lapel buttons w hich use a "teaser approach" to g e nerate interest in Youth Opportunity Week . They· simply say "I Am" in response to the s logan "B e a Summe r Sw ing'e r " , which appears on the poster and other mat e rial. _ d. C omic book s d ev elope d b y U . S . Depa r tment of Labo r as par t of the Y outh Opportuni ty C a mpai gn k i t . ,. I I 1 i 1 I 3. M a y 4: C omi c . book s w ill be d i st rib ut e d th r o ugh juni o r a nd senior h o me -r ooms a n d s tr on g anno un c ement mad e of Y o uth O pp o rtunit y We e k , M a y 8 - _15. " 4. · -Mai 8 : Empl oyment applic a ti on fo r ms ~ilI be · made· 0 �l. ! iI ., Page Two 'i I available through junior and senior home-rooms and students urged to consider the whole range of summer opportunity - paying jobs, volunte er work with Head Start programs, summer school and recreation programs - and d i scuss these w ith the counsel or. Counselors w ill have informati on on summer school and basic recreation programs and will refer volunteers to the Head Start volunteer recruiters. ! I : j : I I 1 I • . I i I ! i ' I j.j Since m a ny youth who need to be r e ache d by this program are school drop-outs , thi s information w ill a l s o be dissemi nate d through the Neighborhood Service Centers and City recreation centers. .; . News media w ill be provided with full in_f ormation, suggestions for special programming,public serv ice announcement tapes and slides. B. The camp aign will m ake a strong a p p eal to the priva t e secto r to provide summer jobs - 10% to 20% more than summer 1966. 1. I' I A mail c a mpaign to 13, 000 employe rs in the m e tro area will consist of: l I 2. C. a. Initi al m a iling fr om Sta t e D epartment of L a bor b. Mailing from Atlanta Youth Council c. Mailing fro m Y o uth Oppo r tuni t y C e nter, o ffering inc e ntive o f a Braves b ase b all ti cke t (similar to 1966 pro gram) for each summer job mad e a v a ila ble to youth News r e l ease s w ill g o to A tlant a C hambe r of C omme r ce , b us i n ess and civi c ass oc iat ions , n e ws me dia , . e t c. , s p elling out t h e w h ol e c ampa ign but making special appeal t o empl oye r s . Three con c urr e n t s u rveys are invento rying our recreat i on res o urces and prelimina ry findings indicat e urg e n t nee d for ex panded recreation o pport unitie s . The s e surv eys are: 1. CIP ove r a ll R ec r eat i on Surve y, now in fir s t d raft for m. ~I • �Page Three 2. Inter-Agency group self-survey - Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts, Campfire Girls, Girls Clubs, Boys Clubs, YMCA, YWCA, etc. - now being compiled. 3. Church-related recreation survey being conducted by Atlanta Youth Council. I; I . . I / ' I. j '. i i '. I. I D. Through ne w s media special programming, etc., we hope to continue the initial motivation of a summer opportunity campaign throughout the summer in as many w ays 'a s possible. j; ,/ �\ :· _.;->,:.·, .., . ,. J ·;: . . . . · ' .. -. . -;,,,· _ •. · , - - -1 : ' . . . ·.-- --- - -· · .. _. ___ ·__ _______ ------ - - ---- --- ---· - ._· ________ , __ _ .. --- -- .- - · _ - _: - - - ------- ---------- _ -- -··-·- . · ·· ···· · ····· ·· ·-· -- - -· ·-· ··- -- -- ···· - - ·-- - - -- ---·--· ---···· · ·· ·· ··- · ··· --- ······- -- - ---------····-- -- -- --- - - - -------- --·- ---- · . . .... ...... . . ..... I,, - · .• ---···-- --- ---------------. ---- -- -· . . -- . _. .. - -· -: · -- - -----· - -- -=------ - -- ···-- ... - ·. -·--- -. •· . . . . ··-····· FUN'])$ , I I -rHFJ-r . -·--- ··-··-- · _ .____ __ . _:.. ____ _ _OF /967 . 'T'"IIG' SU/111€£ Wt;RE O?!ERArE)) ])venJG . . ...., ~ Or /~~&> /ti/ l17t.J;Nrl) t GECJl?GI/J - - ·- i j .'. . .. .-·· -- ... ... -- . . .. - ' .. ...:... NEIG/180/ZlltJO'l> "Ir-"' . - -··· -- - - -- - ___ L -· --- - - - - -- - -·- PL/JYLO-r 7'ROG-l?f)M · i' ' ' 5UMM£e -· ... .. - -- -·····-·· -- ... . .. . .. . .. .. . . .. . . .. R&Cl?£A7ION PROGRFJIIJ . ... ,1, 7S:J . ·-··· S~NIOR -- -· . - · · ·· - ----- - - -- -- . ~t:,3, 7? 8' . ,. I. I' I ' i: I . 1! ' I II · ~t. ~~ j . . UN'bre Ij :: ·:po 1'1-/!>N '. ' ' Ne1GH'Et?/?Hoo'l:> -rH1;. I: -ro 7 . rteOM Tt, 'Pl-"1YLC7 PJ?()GR/1/,1.J tue /IJC/'cEP,Sf;. -r11tt Nt1l1'BER OP 'Pl-AYL07:S .R PPIZOXl/.1Pi1Ef-Y ~I , AI-L ilJ }/AR.l>- I. C.0Re POYlZR7Y N&.IGl/r:JOgH()OJ>S, Ir ,:°VN1>S ~~/;. IJVIU/.ll'BL!E . ··-- ---·- --· - .... --------- . --- -----=- ------------- -:._ - . ··- ---- --·- ,. . ~ ~,. . fl - -.... -.... tr\o -- ,--,\ -·- . .. . . .. · ·· ~- · . . --- . ... - - .. ... . . .. . ····- ..:.____., _:_ _________..,.. ___..:__ __ ~01:Y_.h ·--,-- ----··- _ lC C RO · r;.;:no -_-_----r,""'._T _ �.· .:! ·._; ·,·: . ..• . :,. . ..... J. · . ···,:· • . . . . • •·•'I·'.;; · I . ! I --··-· ·---- ·-······· ...... - -· · ·-· .. ~. ... :... _. ·-· ... ..· '. . -·- . . . - -· .. - . . -- ......... -· ... - .. . . ·.. ···: . .. ·. . ·- Fote . r11& Sv;1t11;1c t?r ( 7  ; • I Sf>t-A/2 I I I i' .! .- . .. .. . . ... . ~- . . . ·... -· ·-· --- -- .. . -- . .. I /Jl/i() rJ/-t.()V.J/JNC/;. . ··-· . - ····· . . .. . .. - · .. .... . ... - 4, 6.Stf. ~o __ ... ___ -·- ---·- ..... .. .. _. _ ·-· · ___ ~- . __ ·- ·- _ -~ - _ -·· _. _ .R·C/4,. OtJ f 8, t PVl2CIIASE. t?r Et;>lllrM/;l)T . /1FICH/tJERY, - Jf, Bgs. ~1 . . .. .. .... ... ... . G()tlJPMt:.tJTJ f .. . . - · ..... - ---·--- . 1111- s, ts~. /II- GRt>UIJ'J:>$ Rt1PIUR. - - . r1. -· ·-. -· ·- .. ... ·-·--··--· - . ... ... .... ......·-____ --· .. --· .. ~·-··--- ... _·. ··-·-· . 11 1/-1, 'I:?~ .~s ' l' . l. j; ····-·· .. ·-·- - ·-- -- .... ··· · ·- ..... .. .. .. . . · -- --· PRoPo-S&?> . -- ---· ····---······-·- . ... -----·-·- 1JVJ,G-t.r.T ( ,:I./ . .. -· - ·· PoR ·Sv1111~e, /9t,7 Pt./'JY t-o7S) . # .. . .. - ' .. .. -· · ~$', 000.tJ() Sn1..11R11Js IJv-r-o .. . . . '/-50. IJI-J.()WAJJC!Z ' . l. /?ENTAI-S I • .. . C>P~~A1/A)~ I . I 00 ·-· _.... --·--· . ____ -·····-- · II/-, ooo. oo 'lco. oo TR~/IJS?OR1/JT/tJIJ I Svr?t..l ES . • 1 · .: . - . ·- . - -· .... -·· _ · . . -· ___.. . - - -- · llf, 6So. oo R&NTIU. { r'V£CHFJS£ t)p Ef VIPl1E.Nt /7, SEO. oo MACI-/INEIZY. E()Vll'i1EA!i, tj //1 G,~OWJ/)5 REP/UR 300.00 .... ··-··· ... -.. # . - -· .... .~.. . . ........ - -- - 13/. t:,C, . . . . .. • . - .. - -·- ---·----~-- ·- -· /9~(p 1R~I\IS'P()R1"AilOIJ .. .. ---· -- - . ______. ·- ----- · ·-···--- -- ·-· "-- -·-- ·-- ReN-r/1/.. . -- ---·· PUJC/l-OTS) OPe£'1"TING- Svr>Pt-/ES ·----- --- . ··- t143.215.248.55· .· ..~.·_· ·.. ····-·:_: _ ···- __ ..~ --· ····-··- --··- - -- ·- . ·-- -··-:: ·. -·~-- ~/;,- ~3~. 1:l . _. __ ..·-- -·· . /<~N71U--S 1 J . -- ..... ---- -- -- . --·-- - ·- . . _ ... _.rJC1'VA /... ~X?CN'J>/TV.ettS . FROl-1 Gl?/J/Jt .rv1JPS _ -·- ·- --~ -- ... i. . .. ... .. . ·-----·- ·· -· -··· _.. 1or:,, lfo. oo . ... ··. ~ .... ·······-·-----··-··· r JCOPYI , ----7 __ ·._ r---1 .. s~· -_·. ' ----- -··.. .. -·-·--·----· �: ,. : . .. ·. i . • I I I ' I ,: . -- - -· ...... SVM/VJ~R . .. - ··- .....•... - ··-····- --· ··-- .. '. .: . .. ·· ·····-·- - .... f/1 . . .. . -···· ····- -·- ··-· --- ·· - ·----· -· .. . • .• • . - ·- . . . ---------------··· - ---- -- --- ---· - ---- -- - --- - ·. . ·· - · . . -# •• . . . : - • • .c •• • . . . f/t>'J. ~t, · ·. -· - ··. ·· .-· ..ll, (,85 .t?O . .... -· ·- ···- · - - ··--·: ·- ·-· ······- ·-·- -· ··· ··- R~Ni/JI- ~r £t;Vl?l1EtJ7 . . .. .: ...... Sll??L11::s f,lo5'i. 81 /tJI ~tis '-U -. ~ 'It/, ~ 87. ~s 'SAi-AR 1e.s ........ . __ S', 15'/. 7'1 .SPec11u. PROJ"£Cr ~X?!f.Nb/tVRt:.S Sp11c1; . f tos-r ' f<£N,At- ! 1; -- · ·- - ·· ····· · -.- ·······--·-· ·· ··- .. ···- ·-···. ·--··· -···:-·· - . ······-·- -··. ···-·.# I &J, 339. OS" I 1 . ·-·· . . . '. -· ,•· . . .... . : . - .. · ·-· ... ..:.. .. ..-:, . ....: .... --- ···· · -- .. \ ,. . . - - .. . . --- .... - .. . . . - .. · -- - _ ... -· - . ..... --···· -- --· .. . -~-.. . .. . . .. .. . -· - -- ~ . -- · · · - . -- - ---- - ··- ·- ·· . . .. -- ... --- ·---··· . - · ·· · - .. - - · - . -- . ·---. -- -.-- ·---- .. - -- - -- --- . - -- - ... . -· - ·· ··-·-- . . · ~... 1 r. o r>Y ;,....,-_ _ --- .- .• . · . .. . · ·. _rtl,•:,- ,--- __. ,._ . XC RO · -- ·- - - - ··- - -- - --- -- - . .. . ··· · · ···· -··- ·- · · ·· r·.~ .... . . .. - -- ' �. ·- : .;·~ .·.: . I. I I . ·.·; · . • . f?~c"R.t::.ATrorJ Foe TH~ PfcoG Z AM Ft-:bERl-'t' . .: ... · .. . ----------'-----'-...::C...----""'-_;;,_-------IN HtGII-R1s£ Pu7st..1c Hoo-s1NG CEAJr1:t._r2s .. . --· -···· - --- -- - ----·- ... ---·------, ···-· ·- - --· -· -·- ·· . ... -· ·- ·· - ···-··- ···-- - ... . ·-· ---····--- - --- . ·-· ·- - - ··-----·- - - - ····. ----: ---·- - . .· ·. - - ·. . . . . .. ·· ·-·- - ·--··- . ... ··-···· -·· · .... ···-·-·-····· . . --·· · -· ·· -···-···- - \ ·· ··· - ··-· - ·· . . - -- ·- -··- • ·····- ·- -·- - . .# . !· TRAVct.. IRFJ/./S-P0/21//1/0N -~ .· . : - _... ·- . . .. . .. ... . . CorJ:sv1,1fJ'£:1,.t::. Svp;::,1-1e~ ······ · ·-·. ··-.- . - -····.. '....... . .. .. .. . ~~v1P11€1.rr ANl> GAMG~ A"l>MINISTRATIVE ·•• ···•· ·· .. ..... -··· . . · .. 9~o . . ·. 3 6'7(., · . . , 8, PS~ ---.. ············ -· · ·-· - -· 1· .... ........·-- ·....... ··-········- .... . ,(I iI · .. ~ 63 . . I, //:'<, -- . . · · · ··· ·· ···· ·· ··· · ······- · · ... .. . .. .... . . . . /;'>(?£NS'/E. ·-- .·· .3, S'iS .. . : . . ··- - · · ·- · ··· . .. .... . . . .. . . .. .- . . . .... . .. . ·· · - ..· ···:· ·-- ·- · - -.. ·· · ··-- I j Tl/IS .... .. _-- ..... . : IS ,t,tJ IINNV/1 /.. Pf?OG~,q,4 ~ aovc1es ··- . - . - - .. ····- - - I • --- . . . r111s . ·-·--.... .. ·-. -·- .. --__ .. • • • • o - - --- ... -- - - ··-··· --- .. - . "' . - ···•" .. ·-· • - - ·-· ·- •• " ·- - -- - ·- • . ·- . . .. --,··-·· ....... . . . - -~ f • - •Io - •' - ••.,• • . . - . ·- -·- - - -- - -·· -· - - ----- - ··--- •• - - • • . l,. •. . . . - ·-· ... - . -- .. ······-- -- -·- -·- ···----- - ··- . -· ·· - · - ·· -- • •- • . . . .- . ·, . - ··- . . - ······- - ·- ·· ·- · ·---·- - - ·· --· ··-- ·- -- - -- ...·, --- ·-- · -··-- ------- - · · - -··· - · ··-·· · -· - --- -. ······· ···- .. - • - ·- -· -- -· • .. -- - - - -- --··- ·· - -- . --- --- . . •· .. ·- . - . - . . . -. .. . - . i!VbGc-r pc,e1P1> o,: ~NE. YeA,e • • ! ~Nt) - • • • • - • -·-··- . . .. . . .. ,., . , -- --· - ----- - ·-· ---- . • • •• • • • •• • • - • • •• • •• . -. - --·-- . - . . - ·. . .. - · -···--- - ·-·-·- -- ·· - · · · ---- -- -·- - --· -.. · ·- - ·- -- -·. -- - --- ·- . - . .... . . . -- -_·.... ..... . . ..... .. ...·.. · .... !,· A1-1-owJ:J1Jc£.s . ... 3/-3, 3~:2.., EMPJ.-Ot/~E . 'llCNE Frrs .. . -· ... ..... . ·····~··-···- ·-·-··· -~ ...:.. ...~~·-' · -~ S, I. . -· ·· -· . ·· - -· - ·- -·- -·- -········ - - --·- . 1. - . - -- ·----·- · - - -·. ·.· ··· -- .. - . .. .. . . -- . . -- - • �··. TME COMMUNiTV sc,-!OOL where krnmq 't livinq meet h'mq wh'LCh concernsITStheCONCERN: l h [d [ welfare of its c i ren and fami ies . even;t OUTDOOR EDUCATION conser-'vatwn. comm · t·ton. n t t .l.f. _b.e.a.u.t·f .l . ..Lea h ome ubeauttfi.cafLon . com.rnu.nlf'1 't school pa,k and. -rec,Pafion e_lanninq commu.m_t'f..,.schoo~ fund-ral..sLnq pro;ect-s commu.ntiCf cou.nclls · field trips ,. HOBBY AND INTEREST GROUP.S . bir-d watchers- rock hounds qarden clubs chess a.nd check~rs · · · flower arranqers . stamp collectors · s ortsmen's clubs ollce- al clu.bs hers· frat hers· clubs boost-e r:S clubs service club ,·ambor-ees INDUSTRIAL., HOME_ART~ . auto mechanics electronics homemaking business ect.ucati.on commu.n.itlj healt:h 12.arent education hatr dressLnq charm schools CQU NSEU NG- :LG.1.!.W.AtiC..E.. home caffs '-{OUf h ore-school P.roqra,m .sen ior citizens, proqra.ms . urork proqra..rrl..S 1 I,'-,.--'\,' · PTA. p,roqrams dent~l care f?.rograms · for u.nderpnvileqed + accelerafed . conPerences-works hops-cl inics �THE ATLANTA AND FULTON COUNTY CONHUNITY SCHOOL PROGR;\1,f I . I. The Atlanta and Fulton County Public Schools for the past I: twenty-one months have been engaged in a sound and practical endeavor which .I attempts to provide an educational opportunity for the entire cormnunity . I :' Thirteen schools have participated in the program by extending the hours 1: ! J of the school day until ten o'clock in the evening and offering activities · on Saturdays. With advice from a citizens council, the activities offered provide an opportunity for each member of the family to improve himself or fulfill his leisure time with,wholesome recreational activities. ·1 Each of the schools with one exception is located in an indigent cormnunity where the school has the potential to compensate for the environmental and ·educational deficiencies that have existed for so many years: Although each community school has attempted to develop a program which would serve the needs of the cormnunity, there were several problems prevalent which were cormnon to each community. Some of the pr,oblems most cormnon were: I 1. The image of the school was not a positive one. 2. Delinquency was common. 3. The dropout rate was alarming. 4. The male image was lacking in many homes. S. Parents hesitated to participate in school programs. 6. Health problems were existent. 7. Recreational programs and playgrounds were sadly lacking. 8. The initiative on the part of the people to do anything • I 1 ' .i I about it was missing. Several other factors influence,d the need for cormnunity education J i: which would establish effective cormnunications and open the doors of the school to the residents of the cormnunity. In each community the educational level c,f the people was quite low and their experiences in school had been unsuccessful. Many adultsneeded to master the basic skills to help them- selves and to keep up with their children. · Other adults had not had the opportunity to complete high school and others had vocational interest which had never been satisfied. All of the social ills were prevalent in the community without a conserted effort to eliminate them. �-2i l. i With an awareness for the existing problem, the two boards of I . i: I . education implemented the Cormnunity School Program in July of 1965. Some of the purposes for implementing this program include the following: 1. To provide opportunities for school age children to participate in educational activities other than during the regular school day. This includes use of libraries; enrichment, supervised study and recreational programs during the afternoons, evening and on Saturdays, fifty-two weeks a year.  ;. I ; 2. To provide opportunities for adults to participate in similar programs, including some pre-vocational activities, l I : and an opportunity to improve certain saleable skills. 3. To provide an academic program for adults ranging from basic education for the illiterate and semi-illiterate to completion of high school. 4. To make the school available for all the people in the community for programs which would develop and enhance their individual, family and cormnunity lives. 5. To provide leadership which will serve as the catalytic agent to put unity in the cormnunity by bringing people together to solve their problems. Funds made available through Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. made it possible for programs to be started in the target areas in which cormnunity action programs were focusing attention. j I· I ! These funds will be exhausted on May 31, 1967 and will not permit the operation of the SUIIIlller Program for the youth unless other financial support can be derived. Proposed Summer Program 1967 Based on the experiences of ou'r summer program ~966, we anticipate . h wi' 11 invo . 1vet h e yout h in . eac h o f our TW.~ V2- cormnun1t1es · · . a program wh ic thi:Pt-e~ With the total school facilities at our disposal, recreational and enrichment activities will be offered throughout the summer months. Some of the enrich- ment activities for boys and girls will include: •. 0 �. -3' i : !: • j Creative Dancing Reading for Fun Arithmetic for Fun Cookouts Knitting Beauty and Charm Wood Shop Science Music (band) Arts and Crafts Typing For Fun Archery Ceramics Junior Homemaking Speech and Drama Doll Haking Camping Trips Leather Craft .. i I . ! ' . Recreational activities will provide the following opportunities: li . Pee Wee Baseball Gymnastics Tennis Weight Lifting Softball Track and Field Soccor ·; ' . ' Bicycle Hikes Sw:inrrning Basketball Baton and Cheerleading Judo Volleyball Teen Dances Under the direction of the Assistant Principal for the Connnunity I . j 1 School, the preceding activities will be possible in twelve of our connnunity schools affected by federal funding. A request to fund the operation of these schools under Title I has been made while six .additional schools seek local support for their existence this sunnner. For the continuation of the connnunity school $59,000 has been requested while the local support for six additional sites would total $18,000. These eighteen centers would provide a vital contribution to the recreational needs in our inner city co~unities. I . last summer over two thousand children and youth took part each day in the program at one particular school. i Ii '. l .' ) ' It would be possible for each school to acconnnodate approximately one thousand youth daily in the recreational and enrichment activities . . The connnunity schools stand ready to accept this challenge . The Future The continuation of the Connnunity School Program in Atlanta is vital .t o the continued growth and development of our city. The school has the potential to improve the citizens of each community and in turn, help each community become the best possible. We are hopeful that we can look forward to many successful years of connnunity education with September, 1967 beginning our third. goals , Financial assistance is necessary to accomp~ish these �II' i ' CONMUNITY SCHOOLS i' i' i ' !; 1' I ' ·. : i . ' ' . Archer Comrmmity School 2250 Perry Blvd., N. W. Arvella L. Farmer, Assistant Principal 794-3256 Bethune Community School 220 Northside Dr., N. W. Norris L. Hogans, Assistant Principal 52'1-6854 Brown Community School 765 Peeples St., S. W. Capitol Avenue Community School 811 Capitol Ave., S. W. Edward Newby, Assistant Principal 758-5050 Obadiah Jordan, Assistant Principal 523-8696 Dykes Community School 4360 Powers Ferry Rd., N. W. Jack Glasgow, Assistant Principal 255-8696 James Chivers, Assistant Principal 627-5741 Grant Park Community School 750 Kalb St., S. E. Howard Community School 551 Houston St . , N. E. Parks Community School 1190 Windsor St., S. W. Robert Still, Assistant Principal 753-6125 Price Community School 1670 Capitol Ave., S. E. Carl Hubbard, Assistant Principal 627-1331 South Fulton Community School 605 South Bayard, East Point, Ga. Harold }fadison, Assistant Principal 761-3584 Joseph Draper, Assistant Principal 755-7721 Washington Community School 45 White House Dr., S. W. Wesley Community School 187 Wesley Ave., N. E. West Fulton Community School 1890 Bankhead Ave., N. W. Bennie Williams, Assfatant Principal 522-5096 . Aaron Watson, Assistant Principal . 378-4393 E. ·c. Nonnan, Assistant Principal 799-3177 .. . I , SUGGESTED SITES FOR SUMMER RECREATION PROGRAM ' I j i ' ! I I j j I; I Murphy High School Roosevelt High School Sylvan High School Turner High School Ba s s High School '; ' '. 0 1 Keef e High School jw-4/13/67 , ..:.- �, fight foverllJ, s~~m.Are©JS To IE~se Cn-ime--}AtGoven1 . . I I 1 ! I ·I ! By DAYID NORDAN The new director of the revised Metropolitan Atlanta Commission on Crime and Juvenile Delinquency has called on Atlantans to help alleviate poverty and slum conditions which he said are at the root of the city's crime problem. . . . . . .. - . . . . . .. . ISears Roebuck for donatinP- four "The crime problem is a portrait of a failure on the part of society," Mr. McGovern said. James L. McGovern, an FBI "It breeds not in a vacuum but veteran who was named to head in a cess pool-poverty, the lack the commission in J anuary, said that any crime fighting efforts are futile unless these conditions are altered. I j: Mr. McGovern reported that 21 play lots were erected in I ' I I 'j 1\IR. l\IcGOVEHN said he spent 26 years with the FBI, but that only recently, after becoming director of the crime commission, did he really become fully aware of the importance of preventive measures in fighting crime. He lauded the work of the parent of the ?lfetropolitan Commis. sion, the Atlanta Crime Com. mission, which he said delivered the same conclusions as the Pr e s i d e n t's Commission on Crime and Delinquency several months before the national study group made its report. He made his remarks at a meeting of the Atlanta Kiwanis -. Club which he urged to join with other civic groups to help provide recreational facilities in areas of the city where riots occurred last summer. I I of opportunity, poor health and · portable swimming pools f~r the ~o forth ." . areas and urged the Kiwanians to consider financing the filter- "Remove these conditions," he ing system for at least one of said, "and you will reduce crime." · the pools as a project. I He also urged the Kiwanians, almost 100 percent employers, to reconsider hiring policies and , not arbitrarily refuse to employ I a man who has a criminal rec-,1 ord. I deprived areas of the city after the outbreaks last year but that the Atlanta Parks Department does not have a budget large enough to maintain and improve them. . . He said they and other citizens could do much to combat I crime individually through small i efforts such as locking automo-, biles, doors, reporting offenses ! to police and ma!i.ing themselves 1 available to police as witnesses 1 when needed. HE S AID the recreational areas were built with the help of federal funds, but the funds are not available this year. I The commission director cited .,. �.Clubs' Aid / A§lied .for Crime Pa:1.cl C~1icf I Talks to l\.lwamans : The executive director of the Metropolitan Atlanta C r i m e . Commission appea led to civic ,:;'; ~_..,':'v.{-7:_':-;] clubs Tuesday /)',' '·.::. _· / . :·:] to help equip ,·",¥ -,, ,. -' ,, · 1 and support ~??.:- :r.-'"r.···, :";-:}:• , play lots and '-,\,,'--rq;~~t~;~;fr other summer ·/\.: ·· _:: f 'S ··-----·--· --- --------- --- --· . .... - ··- - --. . - NEE1>E1> REC!eEIJilON /9t>7 .. .. ... .... ... . OF To OP51c/l7"E . t#/5 SVMM€12 Or WtrR.E '~"t, ··· - . · . ·- - -------- ···- -~ .. ·-- - ---... -- . - . .... . -ro-r11L ' CIT/Z.t;NS . rl/N1>S " . UN"l>E~ '];>o -rH£ 7'1-./·) N r/eOM C(),ee . /J7tJ/Nr/J, G6o~GI/J /1'/ ~ -ro 7 . - -- . ----- -- --- ---· - ,ao 'PROGRFJM PROGl?AM ~C:,3, 7? ll Nee'bE'l:> . Ne.1GH'Et>l?Hof/b '/>L11YL~T We PetJGel1M ,1 /A/C!ZG/JS/!. -r111t NI./M'!J/512 OF PLIP/l.OT:S Tt, POYER,~ . --- C>?ERA,€1> ])ve,NG / OC,, S~NIOR - -rHe SAM!:- · ·- -· . SVMMEe . Recrcr;A,10/J -·· . FOle . 711& SVMM!ZR. PRoGR/71'//S -rHFrr .. IJPP/ZOXIMP/775l.Y _I , A/..L tlJ }/AR.l>- NelG/f'BORHt>OJ>S ~ IF PUNbS /J~e /JVIJILIIBLE • . ... . . . . .~-...r~ . ... _, . . . . . ....... ~ h . . .--- -..... ~~ . . .. --- �• j l- .-, · . · ,; : .. .1: : ' FR01-1 GR11AJ-r rvAJ~:s _ __ ___ _ __ . fJc-rvAL . ~x-PeN':P1rvJZt5S . .. Fote /9C,(p r11E .Sv11t1Ete t?P ( 7 Pl-Pi 'I LOTS) . · .: ,_. _ . _. ____________ ________.. .. ____ . . . ____ ____________ . _____ __ /'7, !SR. 7:Z tri, 13/. 1/cllN:S7't?.e-rA7IO/J ... . . _____ ··-· ·-·---- ----···-· : __________ ____'v_______________ /lllPMt;IJT /1flCH/NeR'r', 4, ,.s'f. ~o E~l/JPMENT~, s e G-Rt>UN'J>S Rt!PP!/1! I -. ·- ···. -· . . t,5;).,. /If. I . - -· ....... _ ,. ........ _.... . ... ___ ..11 If/, If.{(~,$$ -ro,IJ/.. PRoPo'Se"l> 1JVJ)G-~T ( -'.I Poe SVMl1~e, /9~7 PtJJl/l-D7S) ooo.e:;o If. 8', .$,t:,/,.l} R / /t$ IJl/-ro . ,. '/-5 0, IJ1,.1-owANce l'1-, TRt:UVS7't?R-rlJT/()IJ 000. 00 9r;o. oo /!EIVTAL.S ()PEteA,oJ6 RetJr~t. .f 00 SurrL / ES II/-, 6So. oo . _. _ ·-- /7, 3110. PVteCHf'SE ()F c(?VIPt1ENr E ~Vtl'MEN"r, tf GtetJV/Jl>S MACHINERY, ···- ··-··-··-·· -- -l ,-,~---I II, REPAIR ' 00 .3 00.00 ·_ # . __ I OC, ,€,fo.oo - -- ~ ~ - , ---- r.:::-no' - r '~~ -, ',, y . 0 �' • -; • ', '· . .. •' • . .• I ' ' ··- . . .. . SVMME'R .... ( O'P~Rn-r10N CH'1M?j l£XPeN~1rvR~s IJC,VIJJ- "P~oGRIU'.// . l'5 l9t,C, IN -r.eANS'PO~'TFJ-rlON _ ····-- ... ... · ·-- --- -·-· ·· ___ : __·___ --·--··-·· ··-· - · ___ f,t,51. 81 FVRCl!Ftse /IN:!> REtJ,n1- ~;:: E'tpv1P11E1J-r CoNSVMABLc . Io, ~ 115- 'I{, Sl/'PPL/£S 'II/, ~07. ~s $1-tLAR//:.S .. 5, 1S? . 7'! Spe-c,1,1- PRo:recr ~xpetJbrrvret:.s Spt:,C,{t tos-,- f RENTAi- . ... --· - ····- ·-·· - -··--- .. II THIS PRCGl?IJ M ' l-OCATl b t./5 IN wns or--a~n-re"b H /!IRb-CORE PoVttl?.7'1./ ~,.ro.'~ . \ ~ rCOPY~ &'1, .339. ()5 'ss ex 157/NG- ON . - r~ /ERL't PRoG~A M f?E"CR.i;.ATIOIV ... . IN ·.: • ,.• l-/1GII-R1s£ -PuEt..1c .. -- ···-···-----····· -·- ... ... ---·- -·· ·- -· ··---· ···-·· .. . ·-·- · Holl$tNG .. -·--------- C~IJ,E.R-s . .. - · ... -·· I tl-f3, 8~~ SALF>tell5'S . EMPJ-o't'~E TR,c, Ve 1- ··· -·- ·---·-····· 5, ~63 . ... . . _ . . _I, 9;;. o . "!lt"IJEF/iS . . ·-· _ - · - · - ··· ·· ·····-·-- IJ t-1-tJWFJAJCE. s . 3, TR11,vSPOl21A1l(),J CorJSCIMfl'BI-E:. ->CIPf'/...leS ·-- .. ··-· .. . . I, 11:z- 3 ,,,, Elj)lllPMc1.rr AN"l> GAM£~ .. .. . /;'J11,e11x1:> J? .. · · ········ -·.... r '. . / ER O~ 1r.Q f1Y PROGRltM or /tN1) 7'/IIS ~NE. YaA.e . ~ .... -,--r.o"~i.,-, ]JVJ>GG-r �Tii E COMMUN ITV SCHOOL vkre lmrnmq 't li-uinq meet ·.·. even;th'mq wh.LCh· concernsITStheCONCERN: J h [d f welfare of i(s c i ren and faml .ies OUTDOOR EDUCATION conser-vatwn.. commun
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 35, Folder topic: Summer program | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 35, Document 1

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_021_035_001.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 21, Folder 35, Document 1
  • Text: ATLANTA, GEORGIA FROM: Dan E. Sweat, Jr. ~ your information 0 Please refer to the attached correspondence and -make the necessary reply. D Advise me the status of the attached. FORM 25-4-5 �
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 35, Folder topic: Summer program | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 35, Document 4

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_021_035_004.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 21, Folder 35, Document 4
  • Text: 2 Year Progress Report 101 MAR!El'TA STREET , N . W, , ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 ., . T ELEP HONE: AREA CODE ( 404) 525-4262 C. 0. Emmerich Ex e cutiv e Adminisbrator OPPORTUNITY IN ATLANTA '. Durin g the p as t t wo y e a r s Atl a nt a's Community Acti on Erogr am h as move d with grea t spee d . Th o u sands of citi zen s and ma ny agen ci e s a nd organizati on s have partici pa te d in pl a nn in g , deve lopin g a nd fin an c ing th is multi- servic e opportun i ty pr.ogra m fo r Atl a nta's low- inco me citizens. In two years: 14 Multi-service Neighborhood Service Centers have been es tab Ii shed, More than 20,000 adults and youths have been placed in jobs and job training, Nearly 39,000 individuals have participated in basic, remedial and enrichment education courses, and More than 55,000 individuals have received family services. Due to Cong res s iona l red uctio n s i n the 1967 Economi c Opportuni ty budge t for the na tion, Atla nt a's progra m h as s uffered a 40% r,edu ction in £unds p lu s the de letio n of s i x services. E .O .A. is now seeking loca l reso ur ces co he lp restore these vita l services and re bui ld its program. E.O .A. s ervices can be d ivided i nt o s ix ca cegor,ie s : OPPORTUNITIES FOR: A. Neighborhood Services through 14 Neighborhood Service Centers 8. Employment and Job Training C. Education D. Social Services E. Research ... J anuary, 19 67 and : F. Discontinued Programs Each proj ec t or conbracled se rv ic e of E. 0 . A . is su,ppo,ted by a citizens adv isory counc i l of w hioh at leaJs t J/ 3 mus t be peoe le servec/J by th e program . . ' . A. OPPORTUNITIES FOR NEIGHBORHOOD SERVICES 1. NEIGHBORHOOD SERVICES ORGANIZATION (Not e : All figur es in this repor rep resen t up to two ye ars work, de pending on how long th e rP rojec ha.s been es tab lis hed.) All E .O.A. servic es a re brought co low-inc ome fa mili es th ro ug h 14 Ne ig hb o rhood Service Ce ocer,s locate d in p over.cy ar.eas. A s ma ll s ta ff loca ted a t 101 Marietta St r,eet , N. W. , p la ns an d d irec ts th e progra m a nd coo rdi na tes services with loca l age ncies . All 14 Cen te rs were es ta bli s hed du rin g th e firs t cwo year,s. Scaff membe rs a t th ese ce nt e rs have condu cted 33, 049 i nte rv iews. H eadqua rc er,s : 101 Ma ri e tta Str,ee c, N. W., Telephone 525-4262, Mr. H aro ld E. Barr e tt , Dirsector. CENTERS IN OPERATION ATLANTA AND FULTON COUNTY ~¥ ' �East Centra l Neighborhood Service Center 486 Dec atur, Street, S. E. Mt. Geonge Dodd , iDiue ctor Telephone: 577-17 ~5 Edgewood Neighborhood Service Center 1723 Boulevard Duive , S.E. Mr. Sa muel Russell , Diirecto r, Telephone : 378-3643 NASH-Washington Neighborhood Ser. Cen . 247 Ashby Stteet , N . W. Mr. William A. Fowlkes, Ditector, Telephone: 52 4-2084 North Fulton Neighborhood Service Center 27 Oak Street , Roswell , Georgia Mr. J . W. Stone , Director Teleph one : 993 -3795 No rthwest (Perry Homes) Neighborhood Service Center 1927 Holl ywood Ro ad, N. W. Mr. Robert Btaonin g, Director TelephoAe: 799-9322 Pittsburg Neighborhood Service Ce nt e r 993½ 1 le Da niel Street, S. W. Ir. Levj Tetrill , Directo r Telephone: 523 -1 511 Price Ne ighborhood Serv ic e Ce nte r 1127 Capitol Avenue, S. E. Mr. Geoffrey Heard, Acting Diuector Te lephone: 522-5792 So. F ulton Neighbo rhoo d Se rvi ce Ce nter 2735 East Point St. , East Point, Georgia Mr. Clint Rodgers, Director T e lephon e: 767-7541 Sum mer hi lt-Mechanic s vi lie Ne ighbo rhood Servi c e Center 65 Georgia Ave nue , S. E . Mrs. Omie Dixon, Acting Director Telephone: 577-1351 Gwinnett County Offi c e Pike and Clay ton Stree t s Lawrenceville , Geo rgia Mr. Gene Johnson , Coordinator, Telephone: 963 -9700 Ro c kdale-Co nyer s Office 929 Commercial St. , Conyers , Georgia Mr. Sidney Herring , Coordinator Telephone: 483 -9512 ELECTIONS: One of the most important opportunities E .O.A . offers is that of resident participation. For the fiust time low-income citizens ha ve come together in neighborhood orga niz a tions , block clubs and adv isory councils to consider their need s and to assi s t E.O .A. in planning programs to help meet the se needs. There have been 2,672 nei ghborh ood meetings . Average monthly attendance for a ll E.O .A. advi s ory committees is 2, 250 peop le. In 1966 elections were held for the first time to choose representatives of low-incom e ar eas to serve on neighborhood and city-wide E.O.A. advisory committees . New Elections for 1967 represe nta ti ves have just been completed in 11 Neigh borh ood Center areas . (N. Ful ton is s t ill being organized) . 194 lowinc o me neigh borhood block organizations a nd 11 ,528 people have participated in the 1967 elections . More than 500 lowincome citizens are serving a s bl ock cap t ai ns and elected represent a tives . We s t End Nei ghborhood Serv ic e Cent er 725 L awton Street , S. W. Mr . Jame s Hester , Director Telephone: 753 -6101 Each block organi zation chose one representative to serve on its Neighborhood Center's advisor y comm i ttee . THE CITIZENS EIGHBORHOOD ADVISORY COUNCIL. Each CNAC selected three representatives to serve on a city-w ide committee , THE CITIZE NS C ENTRAL ADVISORY COUNCIL , plu s one repre s entative to serve on the E .O.A . BOARD OF DIRECTORS. This gives 12 repres entatives of the po or , 1 3 of the total members hip . o n the Bo a rd o f Directors. ADJOINING COUNTIES J. H. Calh oun . As s i s ta nt Directo r for Communitr De vel opment , 10 1 Marietta St ., N. W. , T e leph one : 525 -4262. West Central Neighborhood Se rvice Center 2193 Verbena Street, N- W. Mr. A. A. Frnmholtz , Director Telephone: 799-0331 �,•tk~~.i •'•'~· i~t,t' >• I I ' -. ' f' ' ,• ,,._: • I ', \.,,1 1-~li ,,,, ""· • I -,~-j' f /.,... '- , j I ,e. d • ..., ' ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY F•82 ATLANTA, INC. F•79 Neighborhood Serv ice Areas ---, A. WEST END G. EDGEWOOD B. NASH-WASHINGTON H. NORTHWEST (P. H.) C. PRICE I. D. J. CENTRAL CITY SOUTH FULTON WEST CENTRAL E. SUM-MEC K. F. NORTHEAST L. NORTH FULTON PITTSBURG (Gwinnett County ond Rockdale County areas not shown on map) �r, NEIGHBORHOOD AIDES: E. o. A. has tr ained and e mploy ed indigenous residents of low-income neighborh oo ds to assis t wi th center , age ncy a nd c ommun ity work. Aides have vis ited ove r 10 3,225 homes i n doo r-to-door c ase- find i ng a nd have ser ved over 37, 049 ind ividua l s on a conti nu in g basis . 4. NEIGHBORHOOD YOUTH CORPS (In-School) ..... '. .. •· ,. ' , ',,. 2. VISTA (VOLUNTEERS IN SERVICE TO AMERICA) '-./ .4, ,, .• 0 . A dome s t i c P eace Corps pro vidi ng a 1de s , teache r s , co un s e l ors a nd a dv isors for, th e War on P o ve rty . Hea dq ua rte r s a t 01 Ma rie tta Stre e t , N. W. , Mr. Da v id Damman n , Dinec tor , VIST A Volunteens , Te l ephone: 525 -4262 . I I••-~ ACTION : 5 Vo lunte e r s ha v e been a ss ign ed to Atla nta fo r, one y ear. 25 of th e s e a re pres e ntl y work in g i n E. O .A . tanget a re a s . 1"h e o th er 29 a re e xp e cted during th e next few mo nth s. 11. as t year Atl a nt a h a d 32 Vl ST A Vql un teers . B. OPPORTUNITIES FOR EMPLOYMENT AND JOB TRAINING r " '- . ' '* • 3. EMPLOYMENT SERVICE On e Manp ower Coun se lor, is l oc a te d in ea ch Ne i ghborh ood S ervi ce C en ter to pnov id e jo b p la c ement a nd referral s to oth er, se r vices. Adm ini s te re d by Georg ia Sta te Empl oy me nt Service , 101 Marietta Sn eet , N . W. , Telep hone: 525-4262 . Ma np ower P rog ra m Spec i a list , Mr. Don Brya nt . ACTION : 33,627 i ndiv idu a ls h ave rece ived e mp lo yme nt c oun se lin g. 87% of th ese we re un emp l oy ed a t th e time of coun sel in g a nd mos t of th e remaining 13% we re under-empl o yed. 6, 16 1 ind ividu a ls have beem p la ced in job s . Hundr eds o f othe rs h a ve bee n pl a c e d in E .0. A. tra mm g programs for yo ut h s. Th e r, e mai nd e r a re receiv in g tr,a ining , educ atiio n , co un s eling o r oth e r s e rivice s in preparat ion for empl oyme nt o r a re m the proce ss of bein g p la ced. >11~ ·I,,. (;1,~ ~-' ,1, T rain in g a nd empl oy me nt of tow- i ncome high ,s ch oo l y outh s in the .t} tl a m a F ul ton Co unty Sch ool Systems to pro vide wori k experience a nd mon e y to e nable them to nem a in in sch oo l. /4. dminis tered by t he Atla nt a a nd Fulton C ounty Bo ar-ds of Ed uc a tion a t 10 1 Mari e tta Stre e t , N . W. , T e) epb o ne : 525 -1886; Mns . Alice Washin g ton , Coo rdi nato r. ACTION: 650 s tude nt s now e mpl o yed in th e pub li c s chools . Mo re t han 2, 500 yo uth s hav e p a rt ic i pa ted si nc e th e beginni ng . 5. NEIGHBORHOOD YOUT H CORPS (Out-of-School) A job tra in in g and e mpl oy me nt pro gram £o r out-of-sc hool un e mplo ye d yo uth s aged 16 th ro ugh 21. 57 ubli c a nd non-prnfi t Atl anta a genc ies pro vide 150 wo rk lcx:atio n s and 620 pos itions. Return t o s ch oo l is e n co l!l raged. Ofiface a t 68 Spri ng S treet , N . W. " Telephone : 577-1 904 , Mr. He nry F a c e , Dire ct or, . ACTION: 62 0 posi ti on s, an e avail a ble . 6 10 yo u th s a re em pl oy e d . 3-;'5 have returned to s ch oo l. 224 have acNearl y c epted full -time e mplo yme nt . 3, 000 y ou ths have part ic i pa ted since the beginning . 6. YOUTH OPPORTUNITY CENTER Opera ted by the Georgia S ta te Employment Serv ic e to conc e ntriate on the employ ment ne eds of y outh s aged 16' th ro ug h 21, with e mpha sis o n co unsel ing , tes tin g , a nd re ferral t o other agen cie s for remedia l edl'lcat ion or tr aining . 522 Wes t Pe a chtree Street . Mr. A . \\, _ Seag ers , Dire c tor . T e lep hone : 8 -09 ~L ACT ION : 82, 000 have been ii nter\(ie w ed. 5, 735 yo uths hav e b eer.J p~ace a in full -time jo b s . 30,000 ha ve been re " fe rred to jo b s a nd ot her agen c ies . '"' \ . �7. SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTER ' . tere d by Senio r Citizen Serv:i c e-s of Mettop olita n Atla nta, Inc. , 120 Marie tt a Stree t, N. W. , Room 7 19 , Te lephone : 577 -2474, Mrs. Caro lyn F r ench , P roj ec t Director. ,, ' ~ .. f<,._ A center co s creen prospec ti v e l oan appliic atio n s a nd to pro vide assis ta nc e in the man a g e ment and de ve lopment of sm a ll busi ness e s . 101 Mariett a Street , N . W. , Te lephone: 577 -33 15 , Dr. Merl e C . P a tterson , Director. ACTION : 850 individual s ha ve been inter vie wed or counseled. 33 loans to talli ng $ 322,000 hav e been approv e d and gra nte d . 3 eight-week semi na r s ha ve bee n c onducted in l ow-income n ei ghborho ods . 8. COLLEGE WORK STUDY PROGRAM P art time empl oyme nt t o ke e p youth s from l ow-in come fa milies in c ollege.. ACTION : Program approved fo r eigh t co lleges : Clark College, 60 pre s eml y . I l em pl oy ed , 60 previousl y emp loye d , no position s available ; Emory University, 69 pre s ently employ ed , 14 pre viously employed , 20 avai lable pos1tions ; Georgi a State College, 25 presentl y e mpl oy ed, 21 prev iously employ ed, 12 pos ition s avada bl e; Georg ia Institute of Technologr, 28 presently emplo ye d , 10 previously empl oy ed , 30 po s i t ion s ava il able ; Morehouse College, 201 pre s ent.Ly employed , 192 pre vious ly empl oy ed , 15 positions availa ble ; Morr i s Brown College, 134 presently employed, 125 previously employ e d , no po s ition s avail able ; Og lethorpe Univers ity, 35 pre se ntly employed, 20 previous ly employ ed , no positions available; a n d Spelman College, 40 presently employed , 100 pre viously employed , no posit.ions available . 9. FOSTER GRANDPARENTS DEMONSTRATION PROJECT A program to provide children in ins titution s with adult affection and comnion s hip while al s o giving older citize n s a cha nce to be employ ed in a us eful , person a lly sati s fying job . Adminis - ACTION : 36 men and wo men , plus 4 s ubs ti tutes, tra in ed a nd serv in g a t Grady Hospita l (3 0), F ul to n C ounty J uveni le Court (4) a nd Catrie-Stee le :Pitt s Hon:i e (2). ' '• '• ' 1,1 10. EMPLOYMENT FOR THE OLDER WORKER (50 plu s) ••• An i ndepe nde nt program admin is t'ened by th e Go lde n Age Emp loyment Serv ice of the Atlan t a Se c t ion , Nati on al Co uncil of Je wis h Women , 793 Piedmont Ave nue , 1N. E . , Te leph on e: 875 -944 3, Mrs . Naomi Met zger , Exe cutive Dir:.e c to r. ACTION : 969 indiv id ua l s ha ve bee n pl a ced in jobs. There ha ve be en 1,740 jo b applic at ions and 3, 028 reque s ts fo r app licants from busin e s ses. ,. 11. MDTA The Ma npower Dev elopmen t a nd Tr a ining Act of 196 2 pFovides jo b traJnin g for ne e ded ski ll s . Ad mini s tered by th e Gemg ia State Employ me nt Seuvic e and he Atla nta Boa rd of E duc a ti on . Office s at Atl a nt a Indu s tria l E mployment Offi c e , 61 Trinity Avenue , S. W. , T e leph one : 524 -24 11. ACTION : 5, 104 in di v idua l s ha v e been tra ined. A new Contract has bee n re ceived to tra in 200 peo ple be twee n F ebruary 13, 1967 a nd March 31 , 1968 in group s o f 45 in 8 oc 12 week train ing programs . Anoth e r 100 experienced bu une mp loyed workers will rec eive On 'il;he Jo b tra in in g . MOTA classes wi.rn tra in fot s uch jobs as hos tess, waitress, waiter , bus boy , bus g:id, chef , short order grill man , specialist cook , combinatjon cook , salad girl , kitchen helpeu and snack bar hoste ss. Additiona l training contracts are expected soon . Classe s now in progress are welding (20), bfrick layiing (20), production machine ( 20), de s ign technician at Lock - ' '• ',,, ,; �~ . ( ' ' heed (20), licensed pnactical nur:se (40), re fr esher course for regiscened nurses (20) . I 12. PROJECT HI RE (Help I nitiate Renewed Employment) An eml?loyment service for the o lder worker (50 and above) . Administered by the Georgia Sta te Employ ment Service . 136 Marietta Street, N. W. , Su.ice 200, Teleph one: 524-6844 , Mr,s. Mal L. Dna ke , Dire c tor. "' ACTION : Program has been operating under t he auspi c es of Georgia State Employment Service since August 1 , 1966. (For,merly under auspices of Golde n Age Emp loyment Service.) 217 individuals h ave been p laced , 761 have been counse led , 684 have been re ferred to jobs. 13. MEN ' S JOB CORPS J ob tra iAin g for out-of-school , un· employ ed boys aged 16 through 21. E.O . A . is resp on s ible for recruiting and sc reeni ng Job Corps applicants for At· lama , Fulton , Cobb , Clayton, Fayette, Douglas , DeKalb , Rockdale a nd Gwinnett Counties . He adq ua rters at 118 Marietta Street , Telephone : 577 -2855 , Mr. Sam Bax tt:r , J ob Cor,p s Coordin a tor. ACTION : 1, 210 boy s sen t to train ing centers throughout the country . 87 proce ssed appLicant s awa itin g assignments . 6 1 boys have grad u ated . A new recruitin g quota of 1,400 boys has been recei ved . 14. WOMEN 'S JOB CORPS Job training for o ut-of- s chool , unemployed girls aged 16 through 21. Recruitin g handled by WICS , 136 Mar:ietta Street, N. W. , 3rd Fl oor , Telephone : 524-540 3, Mrs . Je a n Wea ver , Project Director. ACTION : 75 girl s are in training centers through out the Unit ed St ate s . 16 have graduated . 15. ATLANTA EMPLOYMENT EVALUATION AND SERVICE CENTER A centralized service , the first of its kind in the country , to diagnose and evaluate work potential and tra ining needs of difficult cases a nd to follow up job progr.ess. It serve s all agencies cooperating m E.O. A. programs. The Vocational Reh a bilita ti on Division operates the Center at 1599 Memorial Drive , S.E. , Telephone: 378 -7591 , Mr. Cantey Gordon , Director. .. I I ~ ACTION : Opened May 2, 1966. 1, 008 c ases have been referred to th e Centers. 621 admitted for evaluation. 249 persons have been evaluated . 132 already plac ed in jobs . I I I C. OPPORTUNITIES FOR EDUCATION .~ 16. COMMUNITY SCHOOL PROGRAM . An education program t o serve the entire fa mily usin g neighborhood public school facilities around the clock . Adminis tered by the Atlanta Board of Educa tion , Instructional Servi ces Building , 2930 Forrest Hill s Drive , Telephone: 76 1-54 11 , Mr. Alan Koth , Dire ct or. ' ACTION: 20,964 ha ve been enroll ed in 12 schools. Approxima tely 10 ,000 more have participated in programs . The Community School budget has been reduced 82 % bec ause of Congre s s ion al budget cuts . Brown High School, 764 Pee p les Street. S. W., Telephone: 758-5050 , E d New by , Assistant Principa l. Price H igh School, 167 0 C a pitol Avenu e , S. W. , Te lephone: 622- 80 24 , Carl Hu bbard , Assistant Princip al. Wash ington High School , 45 White House Drive , S. W. , Teleph one : 755 -77 21 , J oe Drape r , As si sca nt Pr incipa l. South Fulton High School, 605 South Baya rd Street , E as t Point , Georgia , T ele ph one : 76 1-3584 , Harold Madison , Assis ta nt Prin ci pa l. �r I ' Archer High School, 2250 P erry Boulevard , N . W., Telephone : 794-1567 , Arvella L. Farmer , Assista nt Principal. Howard High School, 551 Houston Street, N. E . , Telephone : 522-5096 , Bennie C. Wil liams , Assistant Principal. Park s Jr. High School , 1090 Wi ndsor Street , S. W. , Telephone: 7 53 -6125, Robert J. Still , As sistant Principal. West Fulton High School , 1890 Bankhead Avenue , N . W. , Telephone : 799-31 77 , E . C. Norma n , Assistant Principal. Bethune Elementary School, 198 Norths i de Driv e , N . W. , Telephone: 524-6854, Norri s L. Hogan , Assi s ta nt Principal. Capitol Avenue Elementary School , 81i Capitol Avenue , S . W., Teleph one : 5238696 , Oba diah Jordan , Jr. , Assis ta nt Prin cipal. We sley El ementary School, 186 We s ley Avenue , N . E . , Teleph one: 378-4393 , Aaron L. Wat son , Assi s ta nt Principal. COMMUNITY SCHOOLS FINANCED BY NON-EOA FUNDS Dykes H igh School, 4360 P ower s F erry Road, N . W. , Telephone : 255 -5236 , J ack Glasgow, Assistant Principal. Grant Park El ementary School, 75 0 Kalb Avenue, N. E . , Telephone: 627-5741, James Chk-Vers, Assistant Principal. 17. PROJECT HEAD START An enrichment program for culturally deprived pre-school c hildren operat ed by the Atlanta School Sys te m and seven private agencies . An applicati on is now being prepared for an 8 week program for 3,000 children to be held next summer. 5,989 c hildren have a ttended in 2 s ummers . Atlanta Board of Education , Instructional Servic..es Building, 2930 Forrest Hill s Drive , Telephone: 76 1-5411, Mis s Frances Cox , Director. 4,609 have a ttended in 2 summers. Rockdale County's Head Start Program 40 attended last s ummer . I Gwinnett County' s Mead Stan Program - ,. 240 attended last summer. Wheat Street Day Nurser:y' s Mead Start Program - 200 have a ttended i n 2 summers . ' { F ree For AH Day Nursery 's Head Start Program - 260 have attended in 2 summers . Hinsley Temp le Day Nurser:y's Hea d Start Program - 120 have a ttended in 2 ~I summers. ~ I Berean Junior: Academy's Head Sta rt .~ t Program - 240 have a ttended in 2 s ummers . ., 18. ADULT BASIC EDUCATION In s truction in reading and wri ting for adtdts over 18 yea rs of age who are unable t o function on an eighth grade educational level , to improve their: employment potenti al. Administered by vhe Atlanta Board of Educa tion , 2930 Forrest Hill s Drive, Telephone: 76 1-5411, Ext. 206, Mr. Alan Koth a nd Dr. Cuntis Hen s on , Coordinator s . ACTION: 48 classe s for 900 parti1, 27 3 p eople c ipa nt s a re in s e ss ion. have already pa rticipated. 19. UPWARD BOUND A pro ject to re duc e th e drop -out rate of 11th a nd 12th gra ders with a bility by pro viding remedi a l a nd interest cl as se s and encouragin g them to s et goa ls for further education a ft er high s ch ool. ACTION : Morehouse College, 223 C hestn ut Stree t , S . W. , Te lephone: 577- 150 5, Dr. Ar thur Ban ks , Director. 150 enro ll e d a t pr esent , 228 las t year. Emo ry University, Emory Universi ty Campus , Emory Uni versity, Te leph one: 377-24 11 , Ext. 7546, Mr. Louis Becker:, Director. 49 e nrolled at present, 50 last year. Morri s Brown Coll ege, 642 Hunter St., N. W. , Telephone : 577 -2628, Mrs. Vivian McGee , Director. 91 enrolled at present , 100 last year. �r..,. ' ..,.. 1 " ~... - ~ - - - ~ ... -·-..-....,..,11""'-........,..-._..,.....'!'T"T'Tl~;>:1"'"1l'I!'--...:,;;~-...---, I' During the winter , s tud e nts par t1c1pate in Saturday morning cl asses a t the colleges and a re tutored by f.?rogram assis ta nts. During the summer , s tude nts live a nd s tudy on the college campuses . Morris Brown a nd Morehouse held 8 week programs a ncl J;: mory held a 6 week pr,ogram last s ummer. SimilaF programs a re pla nned for next year. I Three years ago , a pre-coLlege demon s tration project , one of six in the country, was conducted by Moreh ouse Co llege for 370 s tudents. Results from chis project helped pave th e way for the na tionwide program , Project Upwa rd Bound. I f ~-'I'\ I D. OPPORTUNITY FOR SOCIAL SERVICES 20. SOCIAL SERVICES Social Ser, vice Supervisor, s a nd sta ff are located in each Neighborhood Service C enter to provide help w ich hea lth , education a nd famil y problems. ACTION: Counselors ha ve held 33 ,049 interviews at the Neighborh ood Servic e Cente rs. 21 . DAY CARE SERVICE Sup e rvi s e d c a re for children in ord er to re lease pare nt s fo , jo b tFa inin g a nd ,job opportuni ti es . 10 pro,j eccs are rn o p erat ion c a nng for 7 10 ch~ldre n . An t ioch ...North Day Ca re Ce nter (50) 540 K e nnedy Street , N . W., Tel e phone: 523 -4861 . Mr s . Mary Ray , Direc t or. Bowen Homes D ay Care C e nt e r (G a te C ity Association) (100) - 1060 Wi l kes Cir,cle , N .W. , Tel e phone: 799 -11 70 , Mrs. Fnance s Wy att, Direc tor. Co ll ege P a rk C i vic & E duc a tiona l Cen fil (35) - 407 Wes( Harvard Strieec, C ollege P a rk , Geo,gia , Telephone: 766-4456 , Mrs. Elois e Thoma s , Director. C hildren ' s C enter o Metropolitan .A clanca Eamily D a y Car.e (35) - 725 L a wto n Street , S. W., Telephone : 75 3-6101 , Mrs. Dori s Ha rtle y , Cas e Worker . East J? oinc Child Care Center (24) H 47 Calhoun Avenue , East P oint , Georgi a , Telephone: 767-4404 , Mrs. · De Vern Howell , Directo r. . South Side Day Ca re Cen ter (120) - 80 2 I/P ryor Street , S.W . , Telephone: 577-2640 , Mr. Hlenry J.. Furlow, Directo . Grady Homes 1':Iomes Tenant Bell Stree t , S. Mr,s . Elizabeth Day Care Center (Grady: Associ a tion) (90) - 100 E. , Telephone : 522-1595, R. Carcei; , Di r,ector. Gate Ci ty at St . Paul ' s (Gate C i ty Association) (36) - . 15 40 P ryor Ro ad , S. W. , Tele phone: 622-97 11 , Mrs . Barbar,a Marcin , Direc tor. Fort Street K iddie Korner 000 ) - 572 !Boulevard , N.E . Telephone: 876-9 279 Mis s Yhonn a Career , Directo r . Tabern a cle Ba pt.ist CbuF..C ( 120) - 47 5 Boulevard , N. E., Tele ph on e: 8 76-1779 Mrs. Mattie Bruce , Di rector. 22. LEGAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM ':;J M)'W A centra l Legal A s sis t ance C e nte r £ina nc ed by E.O .A. , is pre s ently ope.,rating in the F ulton Co un ty C ourt ffi ous e . 2 additio nal c enters a re planned for lowinc ome neighborhoods. All lega l c as e s fo r E.O .A. target are as will be r,eferne d to ome of th ese thr,ee centers . The progr,am wi ll handle civil ca ses a d provide representa tion a nd coun s e li ng fo.Ir preliminary criminal hea rin gs . Admi n i s tere d by the Legal Aid Soci ety: of Atlan· ta , 136 Pry or St., S.E. T e l. 524-5811 Mrs . Nancy Cheves , General Coun s e l. ACTION : Under the pre viou s E .O . A. Lega l As sis ta nce Progra m, Lega .A id la wyers work ed i n Ne ighborhood ervice Centers part- ti me . L egal A'd lawyers s erved a tota l of 17, 324 cases a nd dosed 2,376 court cas e s. 23. CRIME PREVENTION ff Po lice work in e a ch Neighborhood Ser vi ce C ente r to become friends with re s id en ts and hel uhem with t heir, probl e ms . T hi s progra m was developed by nh e Atla nta Police Depart ment following �~~lll'IP.lm,:;-1'.lra~~-T...,.;.-;,--~~--,,,..,a,i~'"~""'P:•"'f!!llllll""'"""'._,.,,_.:,,..,~-..,.,.,,'t.~,--· ;:, t llj l I t a rec ommendatio n o f th e Ctime Co mmi s sion. It is th e first program 0£ i t s kind in th e c ountry . Atlanta P olic e Department , 82 Dec a tur Street , Tel e phone: 522-7363 , Lt. C. E. Wrig ht and Lt. C. Dixon , Offi cer s in C harge . ACTION: Sin c e Ja nua ry, 1966, poli c e officers have been worki ng in E . 0 . f · _ eighborhood Service C ente rs . T hey have communicacred with ov er 90, 000 people . These off ic ers a ttended 176 me e tings on o ff-duty tim e , go t 306 drop outs back .in school and h e lped 58 har,d sh ip cas es . Th e y supervise numer;ous yo uth act1v1t1es an d d ubs a nd get youths i nvolved in Neighbo rhood Yo uth Corps, Job Corps , Communi ty Schoo) and Req:eation Programs . 11he office,rs and their Centers a re : Officer Gambell , NASH-Washington ; Offace.r Lyons , Price and Sum-Mee; Officer. Cardell , Central City; Officer J ob nson , Northwes t ( Perty Homes); Officer Nello ms, Edgewood ; Officer Graham, Northeast; O{f~cer Owens, West End. 24. PLANNED PARENTHOOD Fam,ily planning servic e administereel by the p Qanned Parentb ood .Associatio n of the Atlanta Area, 31 08 Piedmont Rioad , N. E . , Telephone: 233-4493 , Mrs. J ulian Freedman Acting Director. ACTION : Over 2,193 individua l s served . 3 Family '.Planning Clin ics in operation: Be~hlehem Community Center Clinic , 9 McDonough Boulevard , Telep hone: 627-0176 (Mo nda y evenings),; PeFI;y Homes Clinic,, 1660 Drew Drive, N . W., Apartment 756, Telepho ne: 355 '8 278 (Wednesday evenings); and John 0 . Ohiles Homes, 435 Ashby £tree S . W., Te~ephone: 755-4228, (Thursday even ii;igs) . 25. MUL Tl SERVICE CENTERS FOR THE AGED ,. Recreation, social services and day eare for families Living in the three High - ···- •• "I·~·' J . •/, '-' •:, • , , ., rise ap artment buildin g s for · the a ged built by the Atla nta Publi c Hou s· ng Authori ty. f:.t: ,, ' Pro gram adminis tered by Senior C itizen Services of Metropolita n Atlanta , foe . , 120 Ma rietta Stre et , N . W. , T e le ph one : 77-3828 , Mr. A . . Horvath , Di rect or . ·~-' ·, wt -~ ,.. ' ~I I .If,~ ',:1 • ~',.,• "' I ACTION : A r:oca l of l , 794 famil y uni t s aue being serv ed in the A ntione Graves C e nter , 126 Hilli ard Street , N. E . , Telephone : 577 -li9 0; the J oho 0. Chi les Cent er;, 43 5 As hby Street , S. W., Teleph on e : 753-4084; and the P almer Hous e , 43 0 T ech wood Drive , N . W. , Te lephone: 873-3453 . he ,A tla nta tlepartmen t o arks and Recrea tion i s providi ng r,ec.reatio n speciatiists under contract to provide co mpreh ensiv e rec rea tio n progra ms. T h e Fl!l lton Cou nty Departmer;ic of Family a nd Children Seuvices provides a fuU-cime rep resentative i n ea c h Cen t er by agi;.ee menc. The Fulton County I?ubl~c Rea.1th Departmen t provides a health ma intena nce program i n each Cen ter by agreement . 26.PROJECT ENABLE Gr.o l!lp education ,fo low-inc ome parents to i.ncuea se motivacion for se lf -hel p . Commun ity a nd pensooal problems ate identified a nd become th e ta rget for a c tion. Administered by the Atlanta Ur. ban League, Inc . , 239 Auburn Avenue , N.,E . , Mrs. Lillian Clark Director , Telephone: 52 2-8839 . ACTION : Seven groups wi th a tota l o 167 parents have comp l e rred their dis c ussio ns . There have been 238 referra ls to other agei;i ies fo r ~e~p . 1,069 people have been interviewed . A. leadership traiQing phase wiU s ta!t soon . 27. VOLUNTEER TASK FORCE A pro<>:.im co provide tnaining and supervisio n of local volu nteers who supplement services of the E.0 .A. professional staff. VoJuoceens a re drawn from all a reas oF the c ~cy, inclrudin . 0 . .A. .' �target areas. Administered by the Community Council of the Atlanta Area, Inc . , Glenn [B uilding , 120 Marietta Strieet, N. W. , Jfelephone: 577-2250 , Mrs. Elinor Metzger, Director. ' ...... ACTION: 46 volunteers trained and ser,ving. Volunteers are placed in Neighborhood Service Centeris, Community Schoo.lis , Communiuy Centers , Planned Parench,ood Centers , St. Joseph's Hospital, Senior Citizens Centers , and Day Care Centers. Volunteer,s include both men a nd women. lnte ues ced persons shou ld call the above number. New class of 33 co s tart in January will las e 6 weeks (4 weeks cl ass es plus 2 weeks on-job-training). Next cl ass starics March 20th. E. RESEARCH PROGRAMS Training and work e xperience for 500-700 hard-core , unempl oyed ouc-0£school yo uths per year, in workshop situations . Administered by BE.ES-BIZ , Inc. , a non-profit , private organization. 570 Peachtree Street, Telephone: 8735653 , Mr. Joseph Minecci , Director. ACTION : 233 were enrolled during the program. 31. PROJECT UP-LI FT Job training for, unemployed parents of dependent children operated by Fulton County Department of Family a nd Children Services at 50 Whitehall Street , Mrs . Willie Thompson , Director , Telephone: 572-2155. ACTION : Program will end by February 28th. 227 individuals are now in training. 387 have completed the course . 28. EVALUATION PROGRAM An eighteen month evaluation of Atlanta's Community Action Program. Administered by Emory Universi ty , Telephone: 377-2411 , Exe. 517, Dr. John Doby , Di.rector; Dr. Fred R. Crawford , Principa l Inve stigator. ACTION : Prelimin a ry research underway. 29. ELECTRONIC DATA PROCESSING PROGRAM E.O.A. was selected for a n O .E .O . Pilot study to design and implement a data processing system to a utoma te ac counting a nd fin a nc ial wo rk. The pro ject de s igned procedures for da ta ga therin g from the Neighborhood Service Centers. Administered by Electronics Data Systems Corpora ti on, Room 8 17, 101 Marietta Street, N . W. , Te lephon e: 525 4262, exr.5 8, ·Mr. Davis Ham lin , Director. ACT ION : E .O.A.'s bud getary and payroll acco untin g department is now automated a nd usin g computers . F. DISCONTINUED PROGRAMS 30. BEES- BIZ 32. PUBLIC HEAL TH Public Health Nurses for Neighborhood Service Centers . Administered by Fulto n County Department of Public Health , 99 Bueler Street, S . E. , Telephone: 572-2927 , Mrs . Gla d ys L. Garland , Coordinator. \· ACTION : 4 nurses worked with the Neighborhood Service Ce nters . 33. HOMEMAKER SE RVICES Substitute h omemakers assumed re sponsibility for households in low-income areas during emergenc y situa ti ons. Ad ministered by Visiti ng Nurse Associa tion of Atla nt a , 1270 Techwood Drive. Telephone: 873-2683, Mrs. Mary Caldwell , Coordinator. ,, '¥ ·rt ,.. ACTION : 28 homemakers served 522 homes , a nd made 13,436 visits . 34. RECREATION CONDUCTED BY NEIGHBORHOOD SERVICE CENTERS ACTION : The Recreation Technician and staff of the Neighborhood Service Ce nter s organized and supervised sports , tutorial program , children' ac - ,, ..., �II t1v1t1es , swimming, basketball , baseball , teen clubs and adult activities in lowincome a reas. s ummer of 1966 . Plans for 1967 indefin ite. 38. MEDICARE ALERT 35. SUMMER RECREATION E.O.A. fin a nced summer recreation in 1966. Total attendance was 277 ,000 . The programs were administered by the City of Acla nta, (Parks a nd Recrea tion Department) , 10 United Appeal agencies a nd 3 priva te agencies. Agencies a nd depa rtments w ere: Atla nta Parks a nd Recreation Dept . Butler Street YMCA Wesley Ho use Centers Sal va tion Army Warren Memorial Boys' Club Wes t End Boys ' Club Grady Homes Boys ' Club George Washin gton Carver Boys' Club Atla nta Co uncil of Camp Fire Girls Grady Homes Girls ' Club Apt Academy Atlanta Urban League Vine City Council 36.HOME MANAG EMENT TRAININ G E.O.A . Home Ma nage ment Techn icians a nd a ides working in Neighborhoo d Service Center s taugh t residents c ooking , sewing , housekeeping, bud ge ting , child care , hygiene, consu mer buyi ng , and facts about loans and installment buying . G. OTHERS 37. SUMMER SCHOOL PROGRAM A program to provide schol arsh ips fo r primary and s econdary students foom under-pri viledged home s to allow them to attend s ummer school. Admini stered by the Atla nta and Fulton C ounty Boards of Education. Dr. John Ma rtin , Ass i s tant Superintendent for Instruction , 2930 Forr e s t Hill s Dr. , Telephone: 761-54 11. ACT ION : 6, 500 youths attended the E.O .A . fi nanced program during the s umme r of 1965 . Program did not operate A two month proguam. 10,697 citizens 65 y ears and o lde r were contac ted . 110 paid workers, o l der people from l owin come areas , and 117 voluntee rs explained heal th and hospital be nefits available under the new Medicare legislation and helped people app ly before the March 31, 1966 deadline. SUMMARY EOA ADMINISTERED PROGRAMS Multi-SeFv.ice Neighborhood Centers Neighborhood Youth Corps ( our-of-school progra m) Sma ll Bu s ine ss Devel o pment Center Men's Job C orp s (Recruitin g ) VISTA (Volunteers in Se rvice to America) Placement and Supervision Medicare Alert EOA PROGRAMS CONTRACTED TO OTHER AGENCIES Community Schools (Atl a nt a P ub l ic Sch oo ls) Head Sta rt Project s (Atlant a Public Schools and 7 pri va te org a ni za tion s ) Day Care Center s (private organizations) Summ er Recreation Program s (Ci ty o f Atla nta, 10 Uni ted Appeal Agencie s , 3 ot h ers) P roject BEES- BIZ (pri va te no n-profit organization) Manpower Pl ace ment Cente rs (Georgia State Employ ment Service) Emp loyment Evaluation and Service Center (Voca tion a l Rehabili ta tion) Lega l Service (Lega l Aide So ciety ) Plan ned Paren th ood (P la m1ed Parenthood Association of Atla nt a) Mult i-Service Ce nters fo r th e Aged (Senior C iti ze ns of Metropo lit a n Atl an t a, Inc.) Volunteer Task Force (Community Counc il ) Fos ter Grandparents (Senior Citizen s of .· ~,.. ,I, . ., . •-, r �,r ,., Metropolitan Atla nta, fnc .) Neighborhood Youth Corps (fn-School) (Atlanta and Fulton County Public Schoo ls) Project nable (Urban League) Public Health Services (Fulton County Health Department) Homemaker Services (Visitin g iNmse Association of Atlanta) Summe School (Atlanta ublic Schools) COOPERATING INDEPENDENT PROGRAMS Ii ,." ..• I . . r Proj ct 'Upl,i£c (F ulton County Department of, Family and Childrien Services) Youth Opportunity Center (Sta te £mployment Service) Col lege Work Study Programs (8 colleges) J?rojec t Upward Bound ( 3 co ll eges) Womens' Job Corps (WICS - Women in Community Service) Cr.ime Prevention (Atlanta Police Dept.) Manpower Developmen t and ]i'r;aining Act ofr 196;1 (Georgia tare Employment Ser,v.ice and Atlanta Board 0£ Education) Project Hir,e (Help Initiate Renewed Employ ment) (Georgia Scace Employment Service) Golden Age Employment Service ( Atlanta Secti on Na tion a l Council 0£ Jewis Wo men) Adu le- B as ic Educati o n (Atl a nta Boa rd of. E duca ti on~ N o longer; in operation 1966 E.O.A. BOARD OF Mr. Bo i sf.e uillet Jones , Chairm an Mrs . W. H. . (L uc y) Aiken Mr. Har,old Ben son Mrs . A. L . Benton Mr. Wi lli am L. Ca~loway Mr. Rober,t Dobbs Mr . George L. Edwards, Mr. Melvin Grantham Mr . John W. Greer Rev . Joseph L. Gr,,igg Mr . John S . Herndon Mt. Jesse Hill Rev . M. L. King , Sr. - ' I ,...,... ' Dr. J oho W. L ecsoa, Mr,. W. M. Montague , Sr. Mr. Carl P lunkecc Mr. 1ulian Sharpt;on M . A. H. Sterne Mr. Erwin Stevens MFs. Nancie Stowers Dr,. Paul D. West Mrs . LeKoy (Ann) Woodward Mrs . Mamie Wynn ' Note: The 196i EOA Board ofr Directors wim be expanded to 36 members , including 12 represen tatives of thos @ served by EOAi (one elected by each Neighborhood Advisory Council) , 12 representatives appointed by public age ncies whic hi serve the poor , and 12 represen;tat,i ves ai;ipointed by other commun ity grioups . The re presentatives ofr chose served by EOA have already been elected . They are mar,ked ** below. 12 CITIZENS NEIGHBORHOOD ADVISORY COUNCILS ( 1967) C entral City Mrs. Doroth y Buown Mrs. Katie Brown Mrs. He len Tayl or Mrs. Annie ack son Mr. Harold Ra ine s &tr. L . L . Turner Mrs. Ros ie f-:loJc Mr. T ommy Gri tfin Mr. Spen ce r Blou nt Mrs . Betty Pool Mr. Jam e s Aus tin Mrs . Nora Keyros Mus . Eve ly n Brown Mr;. Alonzo Watson Center Director Nom i nees: Mrs. Ethel Cox Mrs . Bertha Jackson Mrs . Oneda Seay Mr . B . A. (Kitchens Mr. D. A. Coley Eas t Cent ral Mrs . Mrs . Mr s . Mr - . **Mrs . Annie B . Chamber s Beatric e Wil s on ather.ine Gane Margaret Gr ;;at Sustie LaBord �Mrs . Grace Pullum Mrs . Petronia Hall Mrs. Clide Anderson Mrs. Ruby Whitfield Mrs. Ida Hermon Mrs. Pearl Williams Mrs . Willie Lewis Miss Doris Mathews Mrs. Johnnie Mosley Mr. Lewis Holmes , Sr. Mr. James Gilbert Mr. Emmitt Sowell Mrs. Fannie Woods Center Director Nominees: Mrs. Annie L. Hill Lt. L arry RePass Mrs. Mildred Perry Rev. Clarence Maddox Edgewood Mrs. Ruby N. Heard Rev . W. C. Hill Mr. Lorenzo John son Mrs. Dorothy Harris Mr. J ul ius White Mrs . Mary Mobley Mrs . Fletch er Walk er Mr. Columbus Maddox Mr. Leroy Dobbs Mrs. Maggie McMullen Mr s . Lizzie Stephens Mr. Thomas Carlton Mrs. Chari ty Smith Mrs . Cleta Mitchell Mrs . M. B. White Mrs . Mi11 ie Acree Mrs. Dorothy Adam s Mt . F red Co x M . IRoss Douthard , al ternate C enter Direc tor Nominees: Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. Rufus Favons Charles Turner J ohn Gaither J ohn Cos by NASH-Wa shington Mts . Ruby McDowell Mrs . Dornth y P yrom Mrs . Do ri s Davis Mrs . Annie Sewel] Mrs . Mary Avery Mr. Ot is Cochtan Mr. James Marsh all Mrs . Joyce Burn ey Mrs. Mrs. Mrs . Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Margaret Knight Alice Dixon Parialee FaulknGeneva Mack Lillian Hunt Elizabeth Harvey Jessie Miller Katie Jones C. M. Wolfe Carrie Porter Cynthia Hampton Verna Kirkland Center Director Nominees: Mrs. Dorothy Bolden Thompson Mrs . Maggie Moody Mr. Jame s Gardner Dr. Elsie Edmondson North Fulton Being organized Northwest - Perry Mrs. Ruby Hawk Mr. John Sla ton Mrs. F lo ssie Zac kery Mrs. Shirley Dowdell Mrs. Odessa Wheeler Mrs. Arie Shelm on Mr. R ay mond Morr,is Mr. Richard Feagin Mrs . Loretta Gres ha m Mrs . Vera McCoy Mrs. Margie Freeman Mrs. Bernice Hou seworth Mrs . Delores Mitchell Mr . Jessie Gascon Mrs . Garaldine Hughes Mrs . Barba ra Davis Rev. David Middlebrook Center Director Nominees: Mr. Robe rt Dobbs Mr. Bob Shaw Mrs. J osie Wynn Mr. Carey F l eming Pittsburg Mrs . Mrs. Mrs . Mrs . F lorence Alexan der Nettie Bl anton C arrie Wright Anni e Evan s �I I:' Mrs . Rosa Hammonds Mr:. John Tolbert Mrs . Marion Hood Mr. N. HI. Scott Mrs . Mammie Fleming Mr. Clarence Smith /** Mrs. Beatrice Garland Mrs. H. H. Dyer Mr. Ben Jen kins Mrs . Willie P. Tbonncon Mrs . Leonie Mester Center Director Nominees: Mrs. Sl ini a Sears Mrs . Sallie Billin gs le y Rev . Calvin Mouscon Price Mrs . Christine Bea s on Mrs. Mary F uller Rev . L. W. Hope , Sr. Mrs . Gra ce Ba r:k s dale Mrs . Olli e P owell Mrs. N eerie Bennett Mr s . Lois Wil li a ms Mr. Cha rles Da ndeo Mrs . Lena Owe ns Mr. Melvin 'B a rn es Mrs. C. M. Martin Mns . Mary F. O'Neal Rev . H . F . Gne e n Mrs. E ula ne Hous eworth Mrs . Evelyn Ba ttle Mrs . France s Th o mpson Mrs . Arthur Williams Mrs . Ru th Coffer Mr. George Bru mfi eld Mr. Gabrie l McCrary Center Director Nominee s: Mr. He nry Ph ipps Mrs . Loui se Watl ey Mr. Robert Barnes Mr. Wil liam Merritt South Fulton Mrs . Mary Lemons Mrs . Lucy Willi s Mr. J ohn Walton , Jr. Mrs . Louvenia Will iams Mrs . Alyce Price Mr. Ronald Bridges Mrs . Julie Chaney Mr. William John s on Mrs . Myrtic e Rowe / **Mr. W. T. Brooks Mrs . Susie Perkins Center Director Nominees: Mrs. Elizabeth Huggins Mr. Al fredo Callejas Mr. Milo Fisher Summerhill -Mechanicsvil Ie Rev. J . B. Mai;cin Mrs. Rosa Burney Mr. Edward J oho so n Re v . L. C. Clack Mr. Lewis Peters Mrs . Alice Hudson Mr. J oho Gresha m Mrs . Curtis McWorcher Mr. Hudson Whitsett Mrs. Evelyn Burri ss Mr s. Ann L. Childs Mr . Andrew Broo ks Mr s. Annie By rd Mr s . Li zz i e J e nnings Mr . Edward Moody Mr. Edward Grimes Mr. C. L. Walton Mrs. Elizabeth Anderson Mrs . Dori s Gaston Mr s . Mattie a n s l ey Center Director No minees: Mrs . Mrs . Mrs . Mrs . Gu ssie L ewi s Ca therine Co lbert Leila Hancock A. L. Benton ( e l e c ted in 1966 fo r 2 year term co Board) West C entral Mr s . Doro thy Patterson Mr s . Leola Perry Mr. Walter Burton Mr. Wilkie A . Jordan Mr . Nathaniel Walker Mr . Lewis Evans Mrs . Mary Hall / **Mr. Edward Yo ung Mrs . Laura Willis Mr. John Dixon Mr. Elisha Piers Mrs . Corine Smith Mrs . Frankie Kendri ck Mi ss Nedra L. Reid Rev . K. M. Dunlap Mrs . Nellie Price Mrs. E velyn Perdu e Re v . R . Johnson �IC enter D irect o r Nom inees: fr s . WilJie Perki os Rev . Elli s L. Green ".\fr. Charl e s B. Ha rt, J r. West End Mr. B. F. Wa ldorn Mr. Ben Bens on \ !rs . Peg Brady ,\,fr. Willi am Killings wor th Mrs . Emma Jordan Mr. A. R. Phil lips Mr. F red Youn g Mrs . Gertrude McLennan Mrs . E l izabeth God bee Mrs . Maxine Abbo tt Mrs . Edna Mayo Mr . Roy Harwell Mr. Alvi n Barne r .\,!rs . Bertha Stewart .\1rs . Roxie Lipford Mr. R . C. Chinn M,s . Lucy Cas tell Mrs . D. L. Stovall Mr. Coleman Smith .\1rs . Beatrice Henderson ,\,!rs. M. U. Barnette \Jr. J. C. Dietrich ,\,!rs . Sue Bradley Mrs . C. B . Cole Mr . Jack Bagwell '-Ar. Robert Rice .\Jr . F . H. Pound \!rs . Gene John son Mrs . Ann Miller Mr . Roswell Jackson .\frs. Mary Chandler \!rs . Mary Morton C enter D irector Nominee s: ~\fr . H. D. Wi ley .\,lrs . George Longino • \lrs . Mam i e Wvnn .\!rs . Gladys Bradley Rev . Carol Tinsley l CITIZENS CENTRAL ADVISORY COUNCIL (1967) Executive Administrator Nominees !rs . Annie Laurie Pace .\ fr . Ralph Long Rev R . B Shorts Mr. Robe rt Blount M, s . L e nnie He s te r Mrs. Mary Morton TECHN ICAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE Mr. James H. Aldredge Miss Dori s Alexa nder Honorable Iva n Allen , gr. Dr. Wa llace M. Als ton Mr. Harold N . Arnold Dr. Sa nford At wood Dr. Warren D. B ache li s Dr. P aul R . B eall Mr . Duane W. Beck Mr. G lenn E. Bennett Mi ss Catheri ne Boling Dr. J a mes J? . Brawle y Dr. R ufus E . C le men t Mr . C larence D. Cole man Mr. J ack C. Deliu s Mr. Wellborn R . Ell i s Mr. Arn o ld D. Elli son Mr. R ic ha rd Forbe s Mr. J a mes F urniss Mr. Collier B . Gladin M, . Herma n B . Guinn Mr . Joseph F . Haas Dr. James F . Ha c kney Arch bi s hop P aul J. Ha !Jina n Dr. Edwi n Harri son Mr. Richard C. Hicks Miss Re becca Ho ll ings worth Honorable Lloyd Elmo Holt Mr. William S. Howland Mr . William E . Inmon Mr. John H . J aco bs Dr. A. P . Jarrell Mr. Herbert T . Jenkin s Mr. Ma lco lm D. Jone s \fr . A Ia n F. K iepper; Mc John F . Kiser Mr. R . Earl L anders Dr . Noah Langdal e , Jr. Dr. John W. Letson Major George Marsha ll Dr. Albert E . Man ley Mr. Sam Mas se ll, Jr . Dr. Benjamin E. Mays Mrs . Frances McKay Mr . J . 0 . Moore Mr. Jack P . Nix �~ ~~TT,:-~T.~----- Mr. A. B. Padgett Mr. J . W. Pinkston Dr. Claude Purcell Mr. William Ray , Jr. Mr. M. B . Satterfield Mrs . Bruce Schaefer Mr. Opie Shelton Mr. Robert E. Shrider Mr. Robert Sommerville Mr. Douglas W. Str,onbehn Dr. Herman L . Turn er Dr. John Venable Dr. Paul 0. West Rev. Samue l W. Williams Mr. Marion Williamson Mr. John C. Wilson ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY ATLANTA, INC. Mr. C. 0. Emmerich Executive Director Mr. Harold E. Barrett Associate Administrator for Operation s (and Director o f Neighborhood Services Organization) ,Ir Mr. William W. Allison Assoc iate Admini s trator for Pla nning ~ u z .• { Mr. William G. Terry Associat e Administrator for Genetal Services (and Director of Meti t System) ~ I,' IZ < .-, I \ • Mr. Luther A. Mclendon, Jr. Director of Finance .. ' ' I ,7. . • t ! } ..J I- < >I- ci OM ..Jo a:i I- M 8 w< w i:, 0:: 0:: t-o .,,w <<.!> Mrs. Wade T. Mitchell Director of Information II- <- Wl- -z a::< <...J ,;;l- o< l �
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 35, Folder topic: Summer program | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 35, Document 12

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_021_035_012.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 21, Folder 35, Document 12
  • Text: PROPOSED 1967 SUMMER RECREATION PROGRAM .. ! April 26, 1967 I I Ij SPONSOR 1. Operation CHAMP Neighborhood Playlot Program Senior Citizens Wilderness Camp $ 89, 340 106,680 67,758 96,000 Atlanta Public Schools a. 3. (1966 Budget) City of Atlanta a. b. c. d. 2. AMOUNT Community Schools 60,000 United Appeal Agencies a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h. Metropolitan Boys Clubs Atlanta Urban League Butler Street YMCA Camp Fire Girls Grady Homes Girls Club Vine City Council Wesley House Centers Salvation Army 4. Neighborhood Services 5. County Programs 63,043 ($13,000) ($14, 000) ($ 7, 311) ($ 6, 55 3) ($ 3, 434) ($ 4, 000) 5,000 24,000 ,/ 10,000 TOTAL $521,821 GRAND TOTAL $570,119 $48,298 �
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 35, Folder topic: Summer program | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 35, Document 19

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_021_035_019.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 21, Folder 35, Document 19
  • Text: II' i ' CONMUNITY SCHOOLS i' i' i ' !; 1' I ' ·. : i . ' ' . Archer Comrmmity School 2250 Perry Blvd., N. W. Arvella L. Farmer, Assistant Principal 794-3256 Bethune Community School 220 Northside Dr., N. W. Norris L. Hogans, Assistant Principal 52'1-6854 Brown Community School 765 Peeples St., S. W. Capitol Avenue Community School 811 Capitol Ave., S. W. Edward Newby, Assistant Principal 758-5050 Obadiah Jordan, Assistant Principal 523-8696 Dykes Community School 4360 Powers Ferry Rd., N. W. Jack Glasgow, Assistant Principal 255-8696 James Chivers, Assistant Principal 627-5741 Grant Park Community School 750 Kalb St., S. E. Howard Community School 551 Houston St . , N. E. Parks Community School 1190 Windsor St., S. W. Robert Still, Assistant Principal 753-6125 Price Community School 1670 Capitol Ave., S. E. Carl Hubbard, Assistant Principal 627-1331 South Fulton Community School 605 South Bayard, East Point, Ga. Harold }fadison, Assistant Principal 761-3584 Joseph Draper, Assistant Principal 755-7721 Washington Community School 45 White House Dr., S. W. Wesley Community School 187 Wesley Ave., N. E. West Fulton Community School 1890 Bankhead Ave., N. W. Bennie Williams, Assfatant Principal 522-5096 . Aaron Watson, Assistant Principal . 378-4393 E. ·c. Nonnan, Assistant Principal 799-3177 .. . I , SUGGESTED SITES FOR SUMMER RECREATION PROGRAM ' I j i ' ! I I j j I; I Murphy High School Roosevelt High School Sylvan High School Turner High School Ba s s High School '; ' '. 0 1 Keef e High School jw-4/13/67 , ..:.- �
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 35, Folder topic: Summer program | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 35, Document 20

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_021_035_020.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 21, Folder 35, Document 20
  • Text: , fight foverllJ, s~~m.Are©JS To IE~se Cn-ime--}AtGoven1 . . I I 1 ! I ·I ! By DAYID NORDAN The new director of the revised Metropolitan Atlanta Commission on Crime and Juvenile Delinquency has called on Atlantans to help alleviate poverty and slum conditions which he said are at the root of the city's crime problem. . . . . . .. - . . . . . .. . ISears Roebuck for donatinP- four "The crime problem is a portrait of a failure on the part of society," Mr. McGovern said. James L. McGovern, an FBI "It breeds not in a vacuum but veteran who was named to head in a cess pool-poverty, the lack the commission in J anuary, said that any crime fighting efforts are futile unless these conditions are altered. I j: Mr. McGovern reported that 21 play lots were erected in I ' I I 'j 1\IR. l\IcGOVEHN said he spent 26 years with the FBI, but that only recently, after becoming director of the crime commission, did he really become fully aware of the importance of preventive measures in fighting crime. He lauded the work of the parent of the ?lfetropolitan Commis. sion, the Atlanta Crime Com. mission, which he said delivered the same conclusions as the Pr e s i d e n t's Commission on Crime and Delinquency several months before the national study group made its report. He made his remarks at a meeting of the Atlanta Kiwanis -. Club which he urged to join with other civic groups to help provide recreational facilities in areas of the city where riots occurred last summer. I I of opportunity, poor health and · portable swimming pools f~r the ~o forth ." . areas and urged the Kiwanians to consider financing the filter- "Remove these conditions," he ing system for at least one of said, "and you will reduce crime." · the pools as a project. I He also urged the Kiwanians, almost 100 percent employers, to reconsider hiring policies and , not arbitrarily refuse to employ I a man who has a criminal rec-,1 ord. I deprived areas of the city after the outbreaks last year but that the Atlanta Parks Department does not have a budget large enough to maintain and improve them. . . He said they and other citizens could do much to combat I crime individually through small i efforts such as locking automo-, biles, doors, reporting offenses ! to police and ma!i.ing themselves 1 available to police as witnesses 1 when needed. HE S AID the recreational areas were built with the help of federal funds, but the funds are not available this year. I The commission director cited .,. �
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 35, Folder topic: Summer program | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 35, Document 25

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_021_035_025.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 21, Folder 35, Document 25
  • Text: CITY OF .ATLANT.A CITY HALL ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Cod e 404 April 20, 1967 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR R. EARL LANDERS , Adm ini strative Assistant MRS , ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary DAN E. SWEAT, JR ., Director of Govern mental Liai son TO: Mayor I van Allen, Jr . FROJ.'i : Johnny H. Robins on s1rnJECT : Meeting VJith Area O Community Club (Boulevard Area) The meeting revolved around the idea of better police prote ction for this area . The citi zens of this area were c ompl aining about the way the teen - agers were conductinp; themselves in this neighborhood, by doing such things as loafinr,, gambling on the street, loud cursing, mugging and robbing . It was explained to them that they had a responsi bility to the community by assisting the ? olice Department in preventing these kind of things by tryin to work with the parents of these kids in an effort to curtail this situation . Lieutenant Perry and Officer Grah am assured them that they would offer all the ssistance they could, but the idea of a walkinr, police man at this ti,.1e would be impossible, due to the shortage o-'- manpower . The conclusions the citizens reached are as fol lowing : 1. To inform the police o fic ial s when ,r ups were loafing on the str2et during schoo l hours . 2 . Try to work with parents of these tecn- azers by pointing up their re sponsibilities to them . 3. Assist the E.O. A. Center in recruiting those 16 - 21 years of age for Hci f:".hl.Jorhood Youth Corps and Job Corps . �
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 35, Folder topic: Summer program | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 35, Document 26

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_021_035_026.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 21, Folder 35, Document 26
  • Text: SUMMARY OF ATLANTA'S YOUTH OPPORTUNITIES CAMPAIGN AND SUMMER RECREATION PROGRAM FOR 1967 For the third straight year and at the suggestion of the President, the City of Atlanta has formed a Youth Opportunity Campaign Task Force, this year spearheaded by the new Atlanta Youth Council. Rather than confine itself to summer job opportunities, as important as these are, Atlanta's Youth Opportunity Campaign for summer 1967 is intensely concerned with a number of areas that we consider of tremendous importance to our youth. Our overall program concerns itself with employment, education, recreation and health. The summer opportunity campaign is already underway and will consist of: 1. Intensive recruitment through high school counselors for summer job applicants; 2. Recruitment for volunteers to work in Head Start Programs; 3. Dissemination of information on summer recreation opportunities of all types; and 4. Emphasis on the importance of summer school in a youngster I s summer plans. Of the foregoing four points of our local program, the two most important are summer job opportunities and summer recreation opportunities. We are planning a real thrust into the private sector to achieve a IO% - 20% increase in the number of summer job opportunities available and we are already receiving considerable local support for this effort. The second important phase of our campaign is summer recreation opportunities and here we are acutely aware of difficiencies which exist in hard-core slum areas of our community. During the summer of 1966, through funds made available through OEO, we were able to mount three major recreation programs: 1. The Neighborhood Playlot Program in which we cleared and put into operation seven neighborhood playlots, which served an average of 89 children per lot per day through the summer months at a total cost of $41, 422. �Page Two 2. An intensive summer recreation program - "Operation Champ 11 providing excursion and enrichment type recreation opportunities to 89, 000 participants throughout the summer months at a total cost of $89, 340. Probably the most dramatic phase of Operation Champ was an intensive swimming program which was continued on into the schools for two weeks after the new school year began and which was made possible partially through an additional grant of $25,000 which was made available to us. Under this program 3, 329 children received swimming instruction from qualified teachers and some 600 were certified at various levels of proficiency. 3. Equally important was which we conducted in the elderly throughout of 36, 000 citizens at a the recreation program for senior citizens three high rise public housing complexes for the summer and which had a total attendance total cost of $14, 509. In recent months under the auspices of the City of Atlanta Community Improvement Program a survey has been made on recreation resources available to the blighted areas of Atlanta. The first draft of this survey has been made available to us and it pinpoints where our needs are. The foremost conclusion that we draw from these findings is the urgency of repeating and expanding those programs we had last summer and adding to them some new recreational programs which are badly needed. Since last summer our Neighborhood Playlot Program has expanded from seven playlots to a potential twenty-one which we hope to have in ope ration for summer 1967. The estimated cost of operating our Neighborhood Playlot Program so that it offers a real "day camp 1 ' opportunity for 1, 869 children each day throughout the summer will be $106,680. To repeat the Operation Champ Program with its wide range of enrichment opportunities for children from slum areas, we anticipate a cost of $89, 340. In addition we feel that we cannot fail to meet the very real recreation and avocational needs of our senior citizens. It must be pointed out that these needs do not end with the close of summer, as senior citizens are not returning to school and other activities. Therefore, we feel that the senior citizen program must be on a year-round basis or it ends in disappointments at the end of the summer. We would like to operate this program on a yearr ound basis at an estimated cost of $67,758. �Page Three ., ' For some time we have hoped to develop a conservation-recreation summer camp for the youth of Atlanta. The main object of this project would be to provide constructive athletic camping and v ocational opportunity for young men ages 16 through 21. W e feel that a golden opportunity is at hand for .this project and that the proj e ct could be expanded to accomplish two other important purposes: 1. To provide a part-time employment opportunity in conjunction with the valuable outdoor experience as a part of our summer job opportunity program; and 2. To begin preliminary clearing and development of a 450 acre wooded site which the City of Atlanta leases 45 miles northwe st of Atlanta and which we hope by swnme r 1968 to put into operation as a regular camping facility. We envision this project would be along similar lines to successful CCC programs of the past in both administration and philosophy, and that it would b e under the direction of a trained professional in forestry or some similar field. We anticipate that we can accommodate 100 boys per week for a total of 800 boys for an eight week s ummer period. The estimated cost of .operating this camp would be $96,000 for 1967. We would like to point out that this figure does not include a ll of the e quipment and mate rial necessary, but we would hope to get wide -spr ead support from the private sector in the procurement of necessary e ·q uipment and consultant personnel. Another very important phase of our overall recreation hopes for this summe r hinge s on continuation of our community schools as r ecre ation r esour ces . Our community school program has reque sted $59,000 under Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act for the operation of nineteen community schools this swnmer. While in no way duplicating programs offered through our regular City Parks and Recreation D e partment, but rath e r working closely in conjunction in order to achieve the maximum pote ntial of both, the community schools would offer a wide range of athletic and e nri c hment typ e programs for both boys and girls of e lementary and high school ages. Total cost of recreation n ee ds for 1967 - $418,778. ~· �
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 35, Folder topic: Summer program | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 35, Document 29

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_021_035_029.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 21, Folder 35, Document 29
  • Text: Tii E COMMUN ITV SCHOOL vkre lmrnmq 't li-uinq meet ·.·. even;th'mq wh.LCh· concernsITStheCONCERN: J h [d f welfare of i(s c i ren and faml .ies OUTDOOR EDUCATION conser-vatwn.. commun
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 35, Folder topic: Summer program | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 35, Document 31

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_021_035_031.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 21, Folder 35, Document 31
  • Text: COMHUNITY SCHOOLS Archer Commw1i ty School 2250 Perry Blvd., N. W. Arvella L. Farmer, Assistant Principal 794-3256 Bethune Cormnunity School 220 Northside Dr., N. W. Norris L. Hogans, Assistant Principal 52 ,1 -6854 Brown Community School 765 Peeples St., S. W. Capitol Avenue Community School 811 Capitol Ave., S. W. Edward Newby, Assistant Principal 758-5050 Obadiah Jordan, Assistant Principal 523-8696 Dykes Community School --: 4360 Powers Ferry Rd., N. W. Jack Glasgow,,Assistant Principal 255-8696 Grant Park Community School 750 Kalb St., S. E. Howard Community School 551 Houston St., N. E. James Chivers, Assistant Principal 627-5741 Bennie Williams, Assistant Principal 522-5096 Parks Community School 1190 Windsor St., S. W. Robert Still, Assistant Pri~cipal 753-6125 Price Community School 1670 Capitol Ave., S. E. Carl Hubbard, Assistant Principal 627-1331 South Fulton Cormnunity School 605 South Bayard, East Point, Ga. Harold Madison, Assistant Principal 761-3584 Washington Community School 45 White House Dr., S. W. Joseph Draper, Assistant Principal 755-7721 Wesley Community School 187 Wesley Ave., N. E. Aaron Watson, Assistant Principal 378-4393 West Fulton Community School 1890 Bankhead Ave., N. W. E. ·c. Nonnan, Assistant Principal 799-3;1.77 SUGGESTED SITES FOR SUMMER RECREATION PROGRAM Murphy High School Roosevelt High School Sylvan High School Turner High School Bass High School 0 1 Keefe High School ' jw-4/13/67 ' �
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 35, Folder topic: Summer program | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 35, Document 36

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_021_035_036.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 21, Folder 35, Document 36
  • Text: School vacation is but eight weeks away, so it is heartening to learn that this year Atlanta isn't likely to be caught flat-footed in providing recreation for children in poverty neighborhoods. We remember that last summer a crash program was needed after schools were out and that it wasn't until well into the summer before even minimum recreation programs were under way in many of these areas. But this year we've got a head start. City Parks Director Jack Delius plans to operate 21 "playlots," three times as many as last summer. However, he is going to have a hard time staffing these small playgrounds and operat- .. ing other programs becau~e federal antipoverty funds that helped support them last year have run out. If these funds aren't restored, the problem addresses itself to local . government, churches, private businesses and 1 civic groups. Already there are encouraging signs that 1 our c:ommunity will answer this challenge. More churches are giving money and time to impoverished neighborhoods. The Rich Foundation made a generous contribution for < portable swimming pools. The Atlanta Variety Club has opened an area at Lake Allatoona for use by slum children. Other groups are helping and more help will be needed. �
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 35, Folder topic: Summer program | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 35, Document 37

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_021_035_037.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 21, Folder 35, Document 37
  • Text: Atlanta I s Urban Beautification Program Summary Total Cost of Activities - 1967 Grant ~equested • $1,696,750.00 762,891.00 Application filed March 31, 1967. Letter of Consent authorizing the City to make expenditures for any activity identified in its Urban Beautification Application received April 3, 1967. Main points of five year Urban Beautification Program, 1967-1971: 1. Renovation and development of twe nty six parks. Special emphasis was placed on park playgrounds and spray pools in or adjacent to poverty areas. 2. Private downtown street beautification programs will be executed by Central Atlanta Progress, Inc. and the Peachtree Center Association. 3. Street tree planting proposals are included for most of Atlanta's major thoroughfares as well as code enforcement areas. 4. The Atlanta Housing Authority will plant street trees and shrubs for screening at Capitol Homes, Grady Home s, Carver Homes and Perry Homes. 5. Development of two Civil War memorial sites will be built to commemorate the Battle of Ezra Church and the Battle of Atlanta. These will be similar to the Peachtr ee Battle M emorial on Collier Road. 6. Lands cap e development and ground s renovation around public buildings , such as C ity Hall, Fire Stations, Libraries, Reservoirs and Pumping Stations is also included in the program 7. The School Department w ill initiate a n ew program of landscape renovation which will eventu ally improve the g r ounds of every school in the Atlanta Public School Sys t e m. 8. The Tree O r dinanc e , a propose d Underground Utility O r dinance and Sign and Billboard O rdinance are included in the Urban Beautification P rogram to encourage the r e moval of ugly featur e s which would impair the City's Urban B e autific ation Prog ram. 9. T h e City will b e res p ons ible fo r the increase d maint enance c ost of t he Beautification Program as w e ll as developing a maintenance program. �
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 35, Folder topic: Summer program | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 21, Folder 35, Document 7

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_021_035_007.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 21, Folder 35, Document 7
  • Text: C TY OP .ATL~'TA CITY HALL August 21, 1967 ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assis tant MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison " MEMORANDUM . To: Mr. Jack Delius Miss Virginia Carmichael From: Dan S we.9-t Subject: · ~m~ ov1e - President's Commission The President's Commission on Youth Opportunity will have a photo grapher in on Wednesday to shoot pictures of the Atlanta program. The movie is actually being put together by International T e l ephone and Telegraph. l Neal Gr ego ry, from the Vice Preside nt's Offic e , requested that we assist the photo g rapher in getting the necessary shots and that if we had any color slides to be made available to the producer . for pas sible inclusion in the movie it would be h elpful. Neal had attempted to call Virginia but this was the time that she was in New York at the Summer Games . . They will l e t one of u~_ know who the photographer will be and . what time h e is expected i n. DS:fy cc: Mayor Ivan All e n, Jr . . .· . �
  • Tags: Box 21, Box 21 Folder 35, Folder topic: Summer program | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017