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Box 3, Folder 17, Document 3

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_003.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 3
  • Text: CITY OF .ATLANT.A CITY HALL May 26, 1969 ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison MEMORANDUM To: Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. From: Dan Sweat ~ Subject: Attached letter from New York Urban Coalition on Summer NYC J obs I had a call from Washington a few days ago asking how many NYC slots we would like for this summer. We had anticipated 250. I suggested that we would be able to effectively use 675 which was the final total we reached last summer. Since that time, we have r ece ived word that 675 slots have been approved. The U. S. Department of Labor has been fair with us in my opm10n in giving us these slots. I don't really feel like we should have to h e lp fight N ew Y o r k 's battl e. The problem i s that N ew York is in a clas s all by itself and the numb e r of jobs they need staggers the imagination. You will notice the y are talking abo ut upwards to 100,000 jobs. They have 55,000 approved . Unless you jus t want to s upport a general demand for more slots, as we have done in the past, I woul d recommend no action. DS:fy �
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 15

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_015.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 15
  • Text: THE VOICE - June 290 1969-Page 11 T hernes A1id · Variatio ns By Xernona Cla_yto_re" -· -- -- - - -- - - -- --- Twci highly capable Negro male Atlantans were promoted to top positions las t week. William Allison, former deputy director of EOA (Equal Op portunity Atl anta), was promoted to Dir e ctor to succeed Jim Parham who res igned to assume a new . post, "Bill's" compete nce is commensurate with the r equirements of the job--Kelvir1 Wall has been nam ed a vice-Pres ident of the CocaCola Company and becomes the first man "of cobr" t o occupy such a seat. Mr. Wall posses s es qu alities which m·arch the occas ion . Whe n black m e n r eceive the ir deserved and ea rn ed posi t ions , each of us sh a r es thep r ide of such r ecognition for it is a comfort to know that racism do esn 't a lways " prevail. This columnise congra tulate s these two men who obvious ly have both natural and ac• .quired abilitie s II - ' -- ---- �
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 28

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_028.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 28
  • Text: c_ ... § THE ATLA!'iTA CONSTITUTION, Friday, Jun e 27, 1969 Continued from Page 1 time, but we were never dlvorced. I would like to know if I can draw his Social Security. I a m 53, have no means of support and am not able t,J work. - Mrs. A. R. If you are disabled, you can probably draw Social Security, provided that you meet the other requiremenLs. The fact that you were separated from your husband will not affect your case: Check with your local Social Security office. Can a F ulton County dog catcher Nmc onto private property to remove a dog?-L. G. F. Not if he doesn't have the permission of the owner of the - -·· \ propert .I' interested in the Rent-a-Kid program. I have a lot of work to be clone around my house, and I'd like to get some youngsters to do it:. Can you tell how I can get in touch with this program?- '.\1. C., East Point. \ To empioy one of these youngsters, you may call the Renta-Kid office at 577-5522. They are between the ages of 14 and 15 a nd perform the traditional summertime clean-up, fix up jobs. They also do baby sitting. The baby sitters get 75 cents an hour in the daytime and $1 an hour at night. The fixup, clean-up youngsters earn $1.35 an . hour. The program is spo nsored J-.y E!M. - - - '----:~ ' -- - --- -----~--- How does Georgia rank in land area among tbe Southeastern states?-Q.M., Smyrna. Georgia is the largest state east of the Mississippi River, with a total land area of 58,876 square miles. .I C L • �
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 41

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_041.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 41
  • Text: .( c:.i /~© Implementation of a summer feeding ·program . which will provide mini-meals to an estima ted 70,000 Atlanta • children before the summe r is over. bega n Monday. 1\1. Agnes J ones F:l crncntary School. located on Fair Street in southwes t Atlanta . is one of 12 Atlanta schools selec ted to serve as a food i repara tion and di stributi on point. The between-meal supplements which will be trucked \I I r1 twice c1 day to parks and p!ay- Atlan ts IS or.c Ol the lirSt pare the mini-meals a t the 12 lots. will consist of such i terns cities in the nation to take ,:chool cafetcri.a s . . as milk. sandwiches, fru its, ad vantage of the ne\v feeding breads and juice. A number of • procrram made available by West Encl supervised playlcts the US Department of Agriand recreation centers arc ·culture 's "Specia l Food Seramong the 100 to partici- vice Pro" ram for Children." pate in the program. Atlanta 's program is reported . Among those already bcin0 to be the largest in the nation. served in WC'st End arc 0:.1kAlthough USDA provides land City East. Howel l Park. most of the fun s and food for West End Park. and Commu- · this program. its actua l opernity of Hope. \1orc will be ation is the result of cooperaadded as the program gets tion and hard work by offi cials of the city , the Atlarita into full swing. Boa rd of Educa tion, lheAtlanta P:irks and Recreation Department and E conom ic .-9., port.uni ty_ A !c11i ta. -·~ sa1u Mi°keRay.--wl10- is with EOA-i!,!_!f]is coordina ting the --sm'itmer feeding program . Ray said that ·'a lthough !he program is ready to go, we are low on supplies of cardboard boxe and ~andwich bags. " He sa id he hopes local industries wiil contribute boxes and sandwich bags. Tha t way, a ll of the USDA fn n .,s could be spent on food fo r these needy children," he said. · The Campbell Foundation of Atlanta has a lready contributed $10.COO lo the summer project to help pay fo r _personnel needed to pre- .I �
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 49

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_049.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 49
  • Text: r Health f ir In Vin Ci "A stitch in time saves nine" is the word around the Vine City Foundation Medical Clinic wher a Health Fair will be held Julyl5from . 12 noon to 9 p.m. The clinic is located at 558 Magnolia ) Street, N.W. The clinic is being sponsored by Mrs. Griffin of EOA and Mrs. Helen Howard of the Vine City Foundation and both advise, "Don't check out; get , -·- a check up, Please do your thing. " Free r efreshments to everyone. For information , call 5238112. ! �
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 50

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_050.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 50
  • Text: ATLANTA DAILY WORLD* SUNDAY JULY 13, 1969 • r i I For 85 children at the ents were able to share the Bowen Homes Day Care Cent- experience. From the time er, I of IO Full-Year Head the group boarded 2 Atlanta Start Centers funded by EcTransit Chartered buses until onomic - Opportunity Atlanta, the return trip to the Center, Inc. and a component of The these children and their parGate CltyDayNursery Asents experienced one of the sociation--A DREAM came happiest days of their lives. true on July l. For many Thanks to all who respondweeks these children had ed to the Appeal. People do dreamed of a trip to SIX care about those they do not FLAGS OVER GEORGL<\. know. The Community really Thanks to hundreds of woncame through and Head Start derful people thrnughout the will label it - "L,-Kind c;onState of Georgia who se nt S tributions" - but the parents & H Green Stamps, checks and and children call it FUN, EX dollar bills and other good CfTEMENT, HAPPINESS ano wishes. say THANKS A MILLION to These children, who migftt. the hundreds of peop~e who not have had this opportunity are responsible for this at any time in the immediate "ALL EXPENSE PAID TRIP future, had a real "HOLIto SIX FLAGS O.YER GEORDAY," and 6I'le of- the tie st GIA." parts about it all-the ir par- ! �
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 51

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_051.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 51
  • Text: . - ··- -~--::.::__ .• THE ATLA~T A UHlUIRE JULY 12, 1969 EO s righ er To 15 e r Od ha on In 1968, Mrs. Miller reFor nearly I3- jears, Shalies, earns less than $2000 entered Sharon's life and . ron Dennis·• paremts, broa ye2.r. · ·. discovered that she still had· _, tbers, sist'e_r s a:mi friends _ When Mrs. Miller i it d 1 thought she was r etarded - ·· -: h ·. . v s e ~:··:.-no·t ··been ·enrolled in anf · ,: . .,.. She did not a ttend school: t e home, she not only disschool. Immediately, stie She could not taJA:. And she covered Sharon but she contacted the Bryant School could not understla:Ild what learned that her mother had for a psychological test. was said. to her. anearnestdesire to enroll the the Butler Health Center child in some school. She did he goes for a physical examination .Tod ay however: s, h h not owever, know the proper to Scho ol • and ~;and Milton A venue School for 1:-'-""YS at t e . Sw,i-Mec E OA ~rer becaprocedure. The aide recompossible acceptance. All use of the work aft,.>lrs. Bermended her mor.h.er send went favorably. I nice Miller, an EOA NeighSharon to a nearby EOA CenThe sc;hool put Sharon in an borhood Service .A ide. She ter until plans could be comage-grouping since there is found tha.t Sha.rem was not pler.ed. The mother agreed. no grading system and immentally retardedbutalmost But Mrs • Miller's work mediately Sharon became indeaf. with EOA required that she volved in physical skills, The IS-yea:r-
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 52

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_052.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 52
  • Text: / EIG S~DE Atlanta's Newspaper· Of _Distinction CIRCULATION 422-5370 ATLANTA, GEORGIA, THURSDA\_!ULY 3, 19.~.?._ 0 s y 0 An international bus filled with 40 Amerity cen~er and an urban renewal area. The tour can Field Service students Crom 25 countries will begin at 2 p.m. at the EOA center, 486 Decawill arrive at Peachtree Presbyterian Church . tur St. Shopp mg Center. ·Go. ,.' ==today, J1ily 3, at 1 p.m. Its passengers have spent a ·year as members of families and as stuBus Number 48 is one or 74 touring buses dents of local high schools In communities enroute to Washington D,C., where over 3,040 across the United States. AFS students will have a final meeting before Activities planned for the teenage visitors Include old-fashioned Fourth of July picnics. the . returning to their own countries . The end-ofyear bus trip exposes the students to more of the annual parade, and sightseeing. . United States than they would otherwise see On Saturday, because they wish to learn · from their home communities. Over 25,000 about our urban and social problems, they will .fami lies in over 650 communities host bus trip be taken on ~ tour of a pov~rty ar~a~-~-143.215.248.55:~nk students. Handling all the arrangernent.!i for the! l ·· -------- .I,I LJ , .\' . bus stop in Atlanta is Mrs. Harry L. Holloman of Sandy Springs. The American Field Service conducts International Scholarship Programs for students 16 t· 18 years of age from many nations. A nonprofit organization with no religious or political ·, aftlliatlons, It seeks to foster understanding of the . differences and similarities which exist among peoples of the world. To accomplish this ai m there are two American Field Servic~ Programs : One, Students to ' the U.S. , in 1968-69 has brought more than . 3000 students from 61 countries to live, study and join in community life in the United States. The other, Americans Abroad, in the current year has sent over 1~00 students to 48 countries overseas for an equivalent experience. In the past 21 years, over 47,000 students from 75 countries have participated in the AFS · ·programs. AFS has 40 overseas offices and 3000 volunteer Chapters throughout the U.S. 'l ( ' J., "(_ tJ;l �
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 67

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_067.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 67
  • Text: L reen@ger;.; Working pend Summer Center Ciif .EOA , ' f. ·.·. Two northside Atlanta teen-agers are spending their summer without pay keeping up with 150 actiye, noisy children. " It's hectic, but these kids ar: ·'.~1::· other kids. The re just isn't any differenc1i~ cause of color," said Wa lter DuPre, 15, 2677 Arden R oad, N.W. one of the recreation volunteers at the West End Neighborhood Service Center of Economic Opportunity Atlanf a. Inc. '. 'I never worked with kids before...sajd P aul Duke, 16. 3515 Paces Ferry Road .·,,, "'!: . ·«:1,;1~ trips and activities mean a lot to them- a nd me . It's very boring for them when they ha ve nothing to do I ·;;€fi:~~;il;i~:.;;::'~{:ti:~:;:;:, 1i;: =: what I could do. I kept getting referred from one agency to another until I got to EOA and talked . to Mrs . June Sa mmons , volunteer coordinator." Duke said he became interested in the work because of DuPre a nd because he wanted to · work with youngsters. " I've learned a lot about patience since I 've been with the center. The work has been very satisfying." The young men work five days a week in their _volunteer jobs. hBoth will miss summer vacat10ns to continue t eir work. " We plan recreation for the kids, " DuPre said. " We take them swimm ing. to the movies gJi{143.215.248.55::{;;~J:~~,I~tif;,143.215.248.55£~:\:}: ~ l, , , , ,: ~: : ~~:~:,143.215.248.55i~~"'.i'.}'.~~!f:'.:~~iI! . ::!{!~~:::!:!:~,:::,:.::::::::::::::::: 0 , ! -- -- - ---~-- --- ) ·.·. •• J �
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 70

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_070.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 70
  • Text: ,· ~,>·-- ~~-~ POVER TY AREAS ·Che·i .cups : .·: ·on :·.-. -rlealth ffe-ed Free r Th.ink. you might have emphy-· sema? Diabetes? High blood pressure? · · · These and other diseases will. be the objects of a city wide "search a nd destroy" · mission sponsored by public and private health agenci~s . . ' Called ·"Hea-Ith Fair," the project is being conducted in 10 Atlanta neighborhoods throughout the summer . The free-o f-cha rge program is designed primarily for poverty areas or areas served by a service center of E;conomic Opportunity Atlanba (EOA). .. But ,the search cer tainly isn' t restricted to t hese areas, according to a .spokesman for the Fulton County Health Department, which ls participating in the progr am. · The first neighborhood to receive the s p e c i a I medical check-ups wai-the 'ceritral City area. Some 250 persons were checked· for high blood pressure , dii:ibetes, tuberculosis, syphilis and chest diseases such as emphysema and bronchitis . - . The heal th de p a T t me n t spokesman said the proj ect , in its first year, is " just getti ng rolling. He said the project will pick up momentum as more <1.nd more persons learn of it. Mrs. Helen Howard, director of the - Vine-··-OtY:, 'Founaatfo-n; said she expects more than 1,000 to show up for the :health tests in the Nash-Washington neigh.borihood on Tuesdiay. The health de p a r t m e n .t -spokesman sa1id the progr am was " a cooperative movement" wh:ic:h depends on the neighborhood r esidents themselves for its success. IF A P ERSON is fo und to have a ny one of the ailments, be is first referred to his own physician · for medical treatm ent. A person who has no ·ram- ily doctor is referred to health agencies or Grady Memorial Hospital, the health department representative said·. Other pa rticipating agencies include the Fulton County Medical Society, the Georgia Department of Fublic H~alth, the American Red Cross, the Atlanta Tuberculo is Association, Model Cities, the Atlanta Diabetes Association and the City of Atlanta. , ~· .... .r '-~- . .'./ ,._,. ,- / / ___,, / .,, �
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 71

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_071.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 71
  • Text: Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. 101 Marietta Street Bldg . • Atlanta , Georgia 30303 • T. M. Parham Executive Administrator Boisfeuillet J ones, Chairman , Board of Directors. Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. cordially invites y ou to a special briefi ng and tour for public officials and news representatives r on Friday , January 10, 1969 at 10:00 a . m. East Central EOA Neighborhood Center 486 Decatu r St reet 6 S . E . at Boulevard (back ·· side of shopping cente,r . A bus to the neighborhood cente r will leave at 9:45 a. m. from 101 Marietta Stree t (between Spring and cone ) for those who want to leave t he ir cars downtown . An early lunch will be served at the neighborhood center for those who wish to remain after t he tour . �
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 77

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_077.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 77
  • Text: PLEASE POST PLEASE POST i) ATLANTA PUBLIC SCHOOLS PERSONNEL DIVISION ANNOUNCEMENT OF VACANCY January 30, 1969 Position: Director· Job Corps Skill Center Education: Bachelors degree required; master ' s degree preferred. Must meet State Department of Education requirements for certification in Vocational Education . Experience: Three years vocati onal teaching experience . desired . Salary Range: B.S. M.S . EDS . DR . Job Description: Plans, organizes, and directs the educational program and administrative functions of the Skill Center . Reports to the Executive Director of Vocational- Technical and Adult Education . Other Qualifications: Functional Responsibilities: Degree Degree Degree Degree Broad industrial experience $13,723 . 80 $15,360 . 60 $14,542.20 - $16,179 . 00 $15,360.60 - $16,997 . 40 $16,179 . 00 - $17,815.80 Must have extensive knowledge of the principles and methods of organization of course content, the principle~ and techniques of teaching and General school administration; knowledge of academic subjects and their place and value in a Vocational Education Program. Must have .e xceptional ability to plan, organize, and direct a school program of vocational instruction; to enlist, organize, and effectively use advisory committees. Must have considerable ability to evaluate instructional techniques, procedures, and equipment; present comments and opinions clearly and concisely; create and maintain cooperative relationships with others ; and to anticipate, to analyze, and to prepare plans to meet needs and situations. Must have ability to apply budgetary principles, and to establish effective records and report sys tems . Plans , develops and administers programs to provide educational opportunities and counseling for students . Cooperates with business , civic, and other organizations to develop curricula to meet needs and interests of students and community. Appoi nts a dvisory committee for each ma jor instructional area. Establishes procedures, i n cooperat i on with t he Job Corps and Employment Security Agencies, for the recruitment registration, and placement of students , and supervises t hes e activities. Interviews and recommends s election and placement of staff and faculty and other personnel necessary for operation of the Skill Center. Provi des inservic e training for instructors . �Supervises review and evaluation of course content and schedules, and revision as necessary to meet student and community needs. Prepares periodic budgets and determines allocation of funds within overall authorizations . Directs preparation of pamphlets, posters, news releases, and radio and television scripts to publicize and promote personnel recruitment and educational programs. Supervises collection and analysis of data from questionnaires, interviews, and group discussions to evaluate curricula, teaching methods, and community participation in Skill Center programs. Establishes procedures for preparation of records and reports; for maintenance, accountability-, and equipment, assigned to the Skill Center; and ·supervises these activities . Plans, develops, and administers physical educational program, recreational program, and student residential program. Plans work of faculty committees and di rects school safety program to include fire and emergency drills . r Statement of Interest: Interviews: RIIS/f~ Statement of Inter est should be mailed to Mrs. Ruth Satterfield, Director of Recruitment and Plac ement, Personnel Division, 224 Central Avenue, S . w. , Atlanta, 30303, no later than Friday, February 14, 1969. Applicants will be noti fied of date and time of interview. �
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 80

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_080.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 80
  • Text: February 12, 1969 M r . Louis Hertz Louis Hertz A dvertising Agency, Inc . 23 Third Street, N . W . Atlanta, Georgia Dear Lou: Sorry that we have been unable to communicate in the past several we eks . I£ p ossible~ we would like to use an EOA message on our signboards for the m onths of Ma rch a nd April and then shift to summer program advertising early in May. Mary Lu Mitchell has sketched out s ev ral id as to publicize th EOA block club movement . We are open to your uggestions and advic . Sincerely yours, D n Swe t DS :fy Endo urea �
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 83

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_083.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 83
  • Text: JOHN F. STANDRIDGE DR. JOHN W. LETSON Atlanta Public Schools VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL & ADULT EDUCATION SUPT. OF SCHOOLS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 2930 Forrest Hills Dr. S. W. Atlanta, Georgia 30315 MEMORANDUM TO: Fulton Coun.ty Delegation Advisory Committee Members Other Interested Parties FROM: John F. Standridge, Executive Director Vocational-Technical and Adult Education February 20,1969 ~-;,;t:/~ In order to meet the needs of students as well as the needs of business and industry, it is necessary to provide Vocational Education in various fields where the needs occur. More funds are needed in Vocational Education to help meet these needs. Programs which have rbeen authorized nationwide by the new 1968 Vocational Edu.cation Amendments and other Vocational Acts for the Fiscal Year 1970 amounts to $773,661,455. The President in his Budget Proposal for Fiscal Year 1970 requested only $286 , 377,455 which is $487,284 , 000 less than the authorization. Some of the programs that will be affected by this cut includes the Work Study Program, which provides needy students with part-time jobs while they are going to school. This program was completely eliminated from an authorization of $35,000,000. The Cooperative Educa tion Programs were cut from $35,000 , 000 to $14, 000,000. Programs for Students with Special Needs were completely eliminated from an authorization of $40,000,000 and Construction of Residential Vocational Schools was eliminated from an authorization of $55,000 , 000. These are just four of several programs that received cuts. However , these four programs are most significant if we are to eliminate the problems of unemployment and proverty in Atlanta and Fulton County. We are again asking your continued support of Vocational Education and that you enlist the support of Congressman Fletcher Thompson and Senators Richard Russell and Herman Talmadge requesting that they vote for the full appropriation. We understand that Congress will finalize the Budget Proposal shor tly after the first of March so time is fle eting. We must have action now! JFS : pf �
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 85

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_085.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 85
  • Text: Fe:: f' E L;j CC r.r.::;r'. £.:.:- S.F_' ur cN I:E!..!V'· 1· Y TO T'::,red, a nd of w ays in which it might b 'e made more e ffe c ti ve , That study i s· cont i nuing. However, I c a n n ow annom1ce· a number of steps I i ntend t o ta\.rtment of HEW, it will be possible to strengthen it by association with a -wide range of ot!1er early development programs within the department, and also with the research programs of the National Institutes of Health, the National Institute of lVIe ntal Health, and the National Institute of Child He2.lth and Human D e velopment. Much of our know ledge is n~w . But we are not on that ground absolved from the responsibilit y to r e spond to it. So crucial is the 1natter of early growth that w e must make a national commitment to providing , a:ll .American childr e n an oppor t unity for healthful and stimulating development during the first five years of life. In delegating Head Start to the Department of HE Vv , I ple dg e myself to that comm it m e nt. The Voca tional Education Ame nd me nts of 1968 dir e ct ed the Commissioner of Educat ion to study the Job C orps i n re lat ion to state v ocational education prog ram s. I have d ir e ct e d the Se cr eta ri es oi Labor a nd of Health, Education, and W elfare, and t:he As s i stant Se cretary of L a bor for Manpower, to work w ith the Acting Commis s i on e r o f Educati on i n p re pa r ing such a r e po r t for submi ssion to Cong r ess at t he e a r liest op po rtunit y . One of th e priority aims of the n ew A dminist ration is the deve lopment by th e Depa r tment of Labo r of a c·omp re he n siv e ma n p ower pr o gram, design e d to make ce ntrally a va ila ble to the unemployed and the underemplo y ed a full range of Federal job tra ining and plac e m ent services. Tow a r d t his e nd, it i s e s se ntial that the m any Federal manpow er pr ograms b e i n te gr a ted and c oordinate d . There fo re, a s a firs t step toward better pr ogra m manage me nt , the Job Cor ps will b e d elegated t o the Department of La b o r. For the Departm ent, this will add another i mpo rtant manpower s e r v ice component. Fo r the Job C o rpsmen , it w i ll m ake a v a ilabl e addit i ona l training and servi c e opp ortunities . From the s tandpoint of prog r a m management, it make s it possible t o c oordinate the Job Corps w i t h oth er manpow er serv ice s , espec i ally v ocatio n al educat i on, a t the point o f delive ry . T he Depart me n t of Labo r a lr eady is deeply involv ed in the recruit m e nt, counseling a n d placement of Job C o r ps me n . It refer s 80 pe r cen t of a ll male and 45 p er cent of a ll f emaie enrolle es ; it provides job market info r m ation, a n d h elps l ocate Job Corpsme n in the a r eas o f g r e a test opportunity. MORE �I - 4 - This d clc[;3tion w ill a lso be made effective on July 1, 1969; and the Departincnts of Jntcr·io r a nd l, g r i"cultu.rc will con, i nue to_ have op e rating responsibility for t!1e Jo'b Corps centers conc2 :rncd primarily with con !l e rvation. I have d ire c te d t:ha·~ p:reparati onn be made for the transfer of two other progrc:.m::: from C·E ·c: co the ::..:::partment of Eecilth, :Sdl'.cation, and Vi elfarc: Comp re h en s ive Eealt.4 Centers , which provide health service to the residents of poor nei.c:;!1borhoods, and Foster Grandparents program. In my judgment , these can be better administered at present, or in the near fut_ure , within the structure of the Department. In making these changes, I recognize that innovation costs money -and that if OEO is to continue i.ts effectiveness as an innovating agency, adequate funds must be made available on a continuing basis. Moreover, it is my intent that Com1nunity Action .Agencies can continue to be involved in the operation of programs such as Head Start ·at the local level, even though an agency other than CEO pas received such programs, by delegation at the national level. It also is my intent that the vital Community Action Frograms will be pressed forw ard, and that in the area of economic development CEO will have an i mportant role to play, in coopera tion with other agencies, · in fo ste ring community-based business development . One of the principal aims of the Administration's continuing study of the anti-poverty effort will be to improve its management effectiveness. When poverty-fund monies are stolen, those hurt most are the poor -whom the monies were meant to help. When programs are inefficiently administered, those hurt most again are the poor. The public generally, and ~he poor especially, havri a right to demand effective and efficient management • . I intend to provide it. I . expe ct that impo rtant economies will result from the delegation of the Job Co rps to the Department of Labor, a nd we shall continue to strive for g::sater efficiency, and espec ially for greater effectiveness in Head Start. A Co n centrated M.anagement Improvement Program initiated in OEO will be intensified • . Under this program selected Community Action .Agencies will be requir ed ~o take step s to devise improvements in such areas as organizat ional !ltructu re , financial and a ccounting systems, personnel training and work scheduling. Standa rds w ill be applied under the "management improvement programto evaluate the operations of Community Action Agenci es. We intend to monitor these pr ograms actively in order to ensure that they are achieving high-level effectiveness and that they are being administered on an orderly bas'is. In the past, problems have often arisen over the relationship of State, county and local gove.nments to programs administered by OEO. This has particularly been the case where the State and local officials have wanted to assume greater responsibili ty for the implementation of the programs but for various reasons have been prevented from doing so. I have assigned special responsibility for working out the se problem s to the newly-cr·eated Office of Intergovernmentc1-l Relations, under the supervision of the Vice President. I have directed the Urban .Affairs Council to keep the anti-poverty effort under constant review and evaluation, seeking new ways in which the various departments can help and bette r ways in which their efforts can be . coordinated. My comprehensive recommendations for the future of the poverty program will be made after the Urban Affair s Council's own initial study is completed, · and after I have reviewed the Comptroller ·General's study of OEO ordered by Congress in 1967 ann next month. �- 5 Meanwhile, I would stress this final thought: If we are to make the most of experimental programs, we must frankly recognize th.c ir experimental nature and frankly acknowledge whatever shortcomings they develop. To do so _is not to belittle the expe riment, but to advance its essential purpose: · that of finding new ways, b e tter ways, of making progress in areas still inadequately understood. We often can learn more from a program that fails to achieve its purpose than from one that succeeds. If we apply those lessons, then even the "failure" will have made a significant contribution to our larger purposes. I urge all those involved in these experimental programs to bear this in mind-- - and to rememcer that one of the primary goals of this Administration is to expand our knowledge of how best to make real progress against those social ills that have s o stubbornly defied solution. w·e do not pretend to have all the answers. W e are determined to find as many as we can. The men and women who will be valued most in this administration will be those .who understand that not every experiment s ucceeds, who do not cover up failures but rather lay open problem s, frankly a nd construc tively-, so that next time we will know how to do better. In this spirit, I am confident that we can pla ce our a nti -poverty efforts on a secure footing -- and that a s we continue to gain in understanding of how to master the difficulties, w e c a n m ove forward at a n a cce lerating pace. RICHARD NIXON THE WHITE HOUSE, February 18, 1969. '* #' �
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 91

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_091.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 91
  • Text: Economic Opportunity At a 101 Marietta Street Bldg . ., ,\tl,rnt a, Ge o rgia 30303 ., nc . 5 2 5-6 854 T. M. P arham Ex ec uti v e Administrat o r M9 rch 7, 1969 Mr. Dav id C. Cowl ey , Di rector Human Relations Commission Ann Arbor, Michigan Dear Mr. Cowl ey : nhis is .1.n reply to your letter of February 24, f or inf ormation - 143.215.248.55 13:10, 29 December 2017 (EST)ain~ chi ld c are plans for l ow-income arid working mothers. 1·he Community Ac tion Agen c y , Economic Opportu n ity At-l an t a , Inc._was fac e::! ., j th this di l e mma a t the ve ry be yinr1ing of th e program sin e.~ At l anta h a s a l arge n umber o f lo,.1- i nsome working m0thers who a~e h eads o f ho useho l ds. We began by going to voJ.untary agencies , c hurche s, civic organization s , etc ., which were b a sed i n l ow income ar eas and asking these organi za tions to co nsider organizing cay c are c enters f0r l ow-ii:i~ome far..c3 lies. We are now co ntra cti ng with te n (1 0) autonomous ag ~nr i e~ which are und er c ontract ~o run eleven (11) centers carina f" or 715 children b etiveen the ages of six months to nine ye ar s . ~inety per143.215.248.55t ' 90%) of the ch J.ldren are b e tween the ages o f 3-6 y 0~ . - Originally , we were ru~ning as s~r a ight day ca re ag enc i es and ch arg e d a f ee pe r f a mil _,r ~ .as-2d on f am:i.ly _income . About fifte en · p er c en t (15%) o f our i ncomP wa s d er i ve d from fe es. Twenty per c ent ( 20%) c ame f rom th e c ommun ity in the fo r m of volunt ary s er vic es o r in-kind c ontr ibu tions .. Th e rest of our income c ame from Of fice of Economic Opportunity (OEO ) fund s . It is to b e noted that we may rent at only on e f ac ility, th e r est of our hou sing is d onated. We are us i ng f a cilitie s in fi ve churche s~ t hree hou s ing pr.e j e cts, two re mo d e led h ouses a nd on e warehouse. The cost per · child i s from $75 to $90 pe r month. �Mr. David C. Cowley Page 2 March 7, 1969 About t wo and one-hal f or thre e year s ago, we were incorp ora te d into full-year, el even hou r , he a d st a rt. The ma jor c hanges were in the i mp r oved ratio of adult to child and e x te n ded medical s erv ic e s . As of Apri l 1 968 , OEO h a d us disc o nt i nue ch a r ging fees. Our pres e nt str uc tu r e c o n s ist of a c o ordinating he a dquart e rs s t a f f including a dir ec to r , assista n t dire~tor , progr a m coordinator, v ~lun t eer coordin a t o r, and p r og ram e v aluator. Ther e is , r , 0 v er a J 1 Po licy Adv i s o r y Comm itt ee co ns isting· of pare nt s , p arent xepres e nt a tives , inte res ted prof e ssion a l s and me mbe r s o f ·LLe loc al conmmnity. Each Child De v e lopme nt Center is s e par ate ly j n c o r por a ted as an autonomous a gency with its own boar d and staff . With i n the guid e lines as s e t fc rt h in the Head Start. Ma nu a l, each boa r d s et s its own pr ogram of -i n s tructio n , personne l policies , p a r e nt or gani zat io n , e t c. Each must rais e it s t wen ty pe r c ent ( 20%) c ommunity c ont ribut ion. We h ave h ad c ent ra l recruitment a 11d t ra ininc o f volu n t eers . · We _h andl e pur ch asing a n d f inan c e c entra lly th rough th e Commun i "!::.y Acti on Agency. Al s o each prog r am is r ev i ewed c entra lly f or 1 quality c o n tro a nd i mproveme nt o f o pera tio n . We h a v e ava il ed ou rse l ves exten. i ve l y o f s L :-1. :cL -!: ra i n i ng o pport.-c·,n it ies a ff orded u s t hrough OEO. We a : so : ~~u r~gu l ar i n - servi ce t ra i n i ng. We were f aced wi t h many seriou s prob ems f rom the outset, many o f wh i ch are sti ll n o r c'f' O] vcd . Because o ur l oca l boards were made up l arge l y o f thE' poor with li ttle o r n o community e xperience , many errors i n j uJgment were made i n h and l ing funds , s taff se l ec t ion , and socia l seryices. Time and experience h as h e l ped somewhat but we s t ill h ave a l ong way t o go. Another a rea o f c oncern is the lack o f q ualif i ed staff. Ou r s tate offers n o c ert i fication for pre-schoo l t eachers and there i s very li ttle t raining _through t he l ocal c o ll eges, a l though t he Atlanta Board of Education ha s i naugurated an e x tensive program of evening classes for people i n day c are on a non-credit, l ow f ee basis. Perhaps ou r greatest handicap i s ins uffic i ent funds �7 Mr. David C . Cowl ey Page 3 March 7, 1969 to att ract top quality staff and to e x tend our services. The estimate is th at 10,000 low-income children need d ay c are and we are providing for only 715. I hope our e xpe rience has been us efu l to you . in your enterprise. I wis h you wel l Yours t ruly , (Mrs .) Gl oria S. Gross Co ns ultant in Child Development ---.. GSG/ j m cc: ' I Mr . T. M. Parh ::JPMr. Dan Sweat 1 �
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 97

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_097.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 97
  • Text: April 10, 1969 Mrs . Mary Lu Mitchell C ommunity Information Officer E cononli c Opport\lllity Atlanta. Inc . 101 Mal"ietta Street, N . W . Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mary Lu! How about thinking about getting a little publicity in the A tl nta Magazine or through other media on our billboard progl'am as soon as the EOA posters are put up . I am sure a lot of people wonder what they re all about, who ' s responsible for them, etc . If we could get a little publicity for Turn r and Process P o ters, it c rt inly would not be out of ord r since they ha.ve b n so good to us . You might think of wh t w ought to like " m ini-ho rds " , " p ople po ter bo r d s " . all thes bUlbo rds ... something or II ighborhood bulletin 1' , Thanks for your h lp in dv ncef Sine rely your , D n Sweat DS :fy �
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 9

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_009.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 9
  • Text: )rn~ -A--prH- 5, 196 9 Mr. Charles Davis City Corriptr olier City Hall Atla nta, Georgia 30303 Dear Charles: RE: ABC Corps ... Casual Employees As you know, fo1·~he past 18 months or more, the Sanitation Division of the City of Atlanta has been involved in a new project under the Atlanta Concentrated Employment Program called the Atlanta Beautification Corps. In this project, so-called h ar dcore, unemployed individuals have been utilized in s pedal crews designed to collect trash and debris from sidewalks, vacant lots, playgrounds, parks, etc. in an attempt to keep these areas beautiful. ~ I I The concept of the progra:rr.. was for the City to attempt to imlentify those members of the ABC Corps who could perform in regular City functions and to assist them in finding fulltime employment. Our success has not been too great. To date, we have placed three of the former ABC workers in regular City positions at the City Garage. Because of cutbacks in Federal funding, the ABC Program is being reduced in the number of employees immediately by 25 as of Friday, May 2. Ralph Hulsey and his Sanitation people say that this program has- been successful and that the ABC workers have performed a great service to the City of Atlanta. He has indicated he is in favor o! continuing these people if possible. I It seems to me that since they have performed admirably in areas where they were badly needed by the City that we should attempt to maintain the services of these 25 people in the Sanitary Division until at leas.t the end of our summer I I I I .i I -. �• 1' I !• Mr. D a vi s P a ge T w o -A-pr il 5, 1969 ni~o/' pro g r a m pe r lod, This w ould give us an oppo r tLmity to make a fur the r effo r t to pl a c e tho se who c a n meet qua lifi c a tion s in r egular job slots. At the same time, dur ing the crucial sumn1.e r p eri od w e would have the adv a nta ge of the experie nce of the s e p e ople in helping in special neighbo r hood cle a n - up p oj c cts and othe r spe cia l requi r ements which t h e summ.er p eriod bring s . It i s my unde 1·s tanding tha t Mr. Hulsey h a s r eque s te d th a t these 25 indivi dua ls be pl a ced on a casual employe e stat u s with t h e S a nit a r y Divi s ion until Augus t 31. I hope tha t you will suppo rt thi s r econ unenda tion and give us yo u r help in h a vin g this done. Sincerely your.s, Dan S we at DS:fy ~ ., ... - - • ..a- -' �
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 13

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_013.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 13
  • Text: ,,- 13 · £ Vft ~dB a.=c.. f1i d ~' I p Cfarin,et ist VVins Guildford College near Greens = boro, North Carolina, attend= ing the ):::aste rn lvlusic Festival. Bessie and the other will have the benefit of the best Las t month, Bessie was very e xcited about going to Mayor Ivan Alle n's office to r eceive the scholarship , But the knew that it was more than just a fun-time for six week this s~mmer. . .· ·1 rip Bessie Barnett is 13 and attends Coan Midd le School. Three years ago her mother, Mrs, Anna Earnett, saw that Bessie l iked mus ic and bought her a clarine t. On a m aid's slary it was a big sacrifice to buy a 10-yE:ar- old a clarine t, Mrs . Barnette pa id a little each week ouc of her me ager s a lary -"and now it' s paid off. Bessie is .one oc si:s, E,onmic Ol2@ftunlrs. ,_.,'\tla,llt.a music scbol ar ship winne r s who left Atlanta by plane on Friday, J une 20. This summer the youngsters will be s pending s ix weeks a t who Bessie s ays is "a nice music teacher" started Bessie on the clarinet. This will be the instrume nt Be ssie will pl ay at the Fes tiva l, "I can le arn a l ot mo re now," · said Bessie. "This will help m e a l ot and I'll be able to_ improve . I'm r eally looking forwards to going t here and working with the profes s ionals ." Bessie wants to cont inue taking music through high school and college if she can. And BESSIE BARNETT he r mo ther would li ke noth~ profess ional instruc tion and the ing mo r e than that herse lf. fun and company of other ac" My mothe r comes to every complis hed musicians , performanc e," s·a id Bess i~ Miss Mary Francis Ea rly, j Thanks to EOA and a concerned, fars ighted mother, Bes sie will have a chance to '.ievel op a special ta lent . It jus t may be a turning point in he r life . (Bessie Lives at 49 Mayson A venue, N. E.) v· ~ IU/JL 1-u l / ! �
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 3, Folder 17, Document 23

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_017_023.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 17, Document 23
  • Text: ~·, -~- ., THE ATLANTA CONSTIT'UTION, Wed1_1~s ey, Ju~e .---- '-,.. 44,,000 at Playlots Get Food Supplements Here ,. nation to take advantage of this By HAROLD WARDLAW More than 44,000 underprivi- new feeding program, called leged Atlanta youngsters have " Special F o o d Services for star ted r eceivi ng between-meal Children." He added that this supplements at supervised J7,S~ is one of USDA's first ventures r eation centers, a feder al agncul ture officia l said here Tuesday . . . 1 " This is a cooperative ven' ture under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) , the Campbell Foundation, the Atlanta Board of Education, conomic O or- · and t 1e tunity Atlanta ( _._. y ot Lian a c1arks a nd Recr eation Depa r tment," Haines Presley explained in ,rn inLervie.w. He sa id Atlanta's program is the lar gest in the nation. " Estima tes indicate that as ,many as ...70,Q.00 children m ay be r eached befor e the summer is over." The between-mea l i s upplements, or " m ini-rnea1s," consist of such items as milk, sandwiches , fru its, br ead, jL1ices a nd so on. , "These m ini-mea ls are prepared al 12 Atlanta schools a nd then delivered twice daily to . Imore tha n 100 s upervised pl aylots or r ecr eation centers," P resley pointed out. But, he said, progra ms of this type could not get off the ground wi,thout help from private organizations such as the Campbell F oundation. "The fo undation has already contributed $10,000 t o the s umm r project to help pay for personnel. needed to pr epare the 'mini-meuls' at ,t he 12 school ca fc4.erias," he s a id. Presley said more 1han $500,000 has been set aside for the · ·· program by USDA. Al lanta is one· nl' ll1t• Ii, : I ,·iii,··; i,1 Iii,· in urban feeding. EOA's Mike Ray, coordinator of the summer feeding program , said "Although _the program i3 r ec>.ciy to go, we a-re low on supt . / ~ ( I plies of · cardboard boxes .a nd m ight be a·ble to contribute sandwich bags. · boxes and sandwich bags," Ray "Interest in the program has said. "That way, all the USDA been running high, and we :-: , funds could be spent on fo::.d for in hopes that local industries I these needy children." 25, �
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 17, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017