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Box 6, Folder 10, Document 2

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_006_010_002.pdf
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  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 2
  • Text: . -~· .. J . , @143.215.248.55 15:21, 29 December 2017 (EST) ' ATLANTA, GEORGIA PHONE 522-4463 ~ Liada P,icc µ . L• ) - ( / / '---7 ~ N~~--~C ~ 58{ Cc_ } ~ -_ l u ruw "'303 l 'r- ( ~ ~ ~ T & '-- ~ ) FORM 25- 11 fJ ~ ~ ..,~-,) ~ ~ �ATLANTA , GEORGIA PHONE 5 22-4463 < Linda Price // )___,, (1 ~ · C-e, ~ 4J ~ ~ ( I (,,, ~ ~ ~ ~ / J ~ ~ ~ ~4. ~ ~ ~/ ( 1 1 c/' " r) ' 0' " ,s- " (y-----~ 0 1 _ __}- - �ATLANTA , GEORGIA PHONE 522-4463 Linda Price 0 FO R M 25- 11 �
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 4

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_006_010_004.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 4
  • Text: ATLANTA, GEO AG IA ROUTE SLIP ~ \~ TO : ---v-143.215.248.55----t-~{b.._~~---------""---=--==---------FRO M: Da n E . Sw a t , Jr. D For y our informa tion 0 Please r e fe r to the a ttac h ed c o rres ponde nc e a nd ma k e th e necessary re ply . 0 Adv ise me the s ta tu s o f the a ttac he d . t F O R M 25-4-S �
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 8

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_006_010_008.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 8
  • Text: METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY BUDGET REPORT JULY 31, 1967 BUDGET 196 7 Una ppro pri ated Sur plus ACTUAL J ANUARY 1, 1967 TO JULY 3 1 , 196 7 $128 ,2 81.64 $ 128,2 81.64 Appr opriations: City of At l anta Clayton Co un ty DeKalb Coun t y Fulton County Gwinnett County Sub-Tota ls $ 84,030 . 00 23 ,1 90 . 00 82 ,77 0 . 00 91,800 . 00 18,210 . 00 .§..300, 000 . 00 $ 63,022. 50 17,392.50 41,385.00 68,850.00 9,105 . 00 $1 99,755.00 Int erest Income $ INCOME 5,520 . 00 $ 2,7 92 .27 Federal Funds: 702 Loan Section 9 Grant Interest - Federal Funds Sub-Totals _$,371, 000. 00 $ 60,000 . 00 67,6 86. 12 597.46 $128,2 83 . 58 TOTAL INCOME $6 76, 520.00 $33 0 , 830.85 TOTAL INCOME AND UNAPPROPRIATED SURPLUS $804,801.64 $45 9,112 . 49 $ 95,000 . 00 276,000 . 00 0 EXPENSES Staff Cost: Sala ries Expenses Benefits : Socia 1 Sec- r ity Gua ranty Fund Health and Accident Insurance Retirement Workmen's Compensation Sub -To tals $ 68, 950 . 00 10,500.00 $ 35,~20.51 6,361.63 1,109.00 533 . 00 1,6-8 0, 00 10,000 . 00 99 . 00 $ 92,871.0 0 1 ,002 .7 5 400.00 640 , 67 300 . 54 104.00 $ 44,23 0 . 10 Board Meetings $ 3,150.00 $ 1, 900 . 00 $ 3,000 .00 2,000 . 00 2,0 00 . 00 3,600.00 1 ,000 .00 250 . 00 1,000.00 33,000.00 5,000 . 00 Administrat i ve and ffice Overhead : Rent Communicati ons and Postage Furniture and Equipment Supplies Printing Auditor Accountant Public Information Advisory Insurance : Public Liability Depository and Forgery Fidelity Bond Sub - Totals 72.00 56 . 00 199.00 51,177.00 $ 55.00 56 . 27 __ _l28.60 .§. 20,273.86 CARRI.ED FORWARD -~147, 198. 00 $ 66,403.96 $ 1, 750 . 00 1,101.21 411 . 97 1,214 .7 8 623 . 56 250.00 250.00 13,385.12 977. 35 �METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY BUDGET REPORT JULY 31, 1967 BUDGET 1967 TOTAL I NCOME AND UNAPPROPRIATED SURPLUS BROUGHT FORWARD ACTUAL JANUARY 1, 1967 TO JULY 31, 196 7 $804,801.64 $459,112.49 Brought Forward $147,198 . 00 $ 66,403.96 Counse l Consultant s: Atlanta Region Metropolitan Planning Commission Urban Design Study: Secti on 9 Match i ng _ Atlanta Transit Study : Section 9 Matching Parsons-B rinckerhoff - Tudor - Be cktel: 702 Loan Section 9 : Federal Matching Retainer Agreement Research and Technica l Servic es Sub-Totals $ 20,000.00 $ $ 31,250 . 00 $ 29,939.00 32,667 . 00 16 ,3 33.00 8,000.00 9,800.00 3 , 333.00 1,667.00 95 ,0 00.00 0 1,000 . 00 60,000.00 240,000.00 12 0,000 . 00 60,000.00 2,000.00 $602,250.00 60,000 . 00 100,000 . 00 21,8 59 . 05 1,595 . 84 $292,193 . 89 TOTAL EXPENSES $769,448.00 $366,356 . 46 SURPLUS s 3~, 353. Q~ s EXPENSES 7,758 . 61 22 ,Z56, Q3 �
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 12

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_006_010_012.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 12
  • Text: HUC-6-66 MINUTES OF MEETING GEORGIA HIGHWAY USERS CONFERENCE MARRIOTT MOTOR HOTEL, ATLANTA, GEORGIA June 8, 1966 r bhose present were: o. C. Hubert, Chairman William Dal ton, Vice Chairman Charles Skinner, Vice Chairman Stephen Styron, Vice Chairman Harold Budreau A. R. Brickler W. B. Bryan Charles Clynick Tom Duncan George L. Evoy Harry Fox Elmer George Billy George Ed McGill James Golden Otis Hathcock Jack Houston George H. Jones Iverson H. Lord, Jr. Tom Patton Walter Phillips, Jr. I:I. Eston Reagan M. F. Smith Andy Springer H. c. Thompson W. M. (Bil l) Williams Georgia Motor Club (AAA) Georgia Rural Letter Carriers Assn. Georgia Motor Trucking Assn. Georgia Hotel-Mot~l Assn. Turner Advertising Company Portland Cement Assn. Southern Bell Telo & Tel. Co. Automobile Manufacturers Assn., Detroit Atlanta Journal Georgia Motor Club (AAA) Georgia Branch, Asso. General Contractors Georgia Municipal Assn. Visitor (son of member) Georgia Mobile Homes Assn. and Georgia Oilmen's Assn. Ford Motor Company Travelers Protective Assn. Georgia Assn. of Petroleum Retailers Georgia Tire Dealers Assn. National Highway Users Conference Georgia Oilmen's Assn. Georgia Automobile Dealers Assn. Atlanta Automobile Assn. Tr avelers Protective Assno Atlanta Traffic & Safety Council Georgia Assn. of Petroleum Retailer s State Representative, Hall County Introductions : The meeting was called to or der by Chairman Hubert, who i nt r oduced Iver son Lord, Regional Repr esentative of the National Highway Users Conference . Eleventh Highway Transportation Congress : Reports of committee re commendat i ons during t he Elevent h Highway Transport ation Congress in Washington, D. c., held in April, were made by members who attended. Rapid Transit: Charles Skinner, Chairman of the Legislative Committee, explained a resolupassed by the last Georgia General Assembly that proposed a constitutional amendment to allow the state to help finance rapid transit. The proposed amendment, to be voted upon in the next general election, declares public transportation of passengers for hire to be an essential governmental function. It limits the · state's participation to not more than 10% of the total cost. The resolution, as written, does not threaten gasoline tax funds, which by constitutional amendment must be used for highway purposes. �I ~- HUC-6-66-2 FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Governor' s Safety Commit t ee I s Tes t imony.~ State Representativ-e W. M Bi ll) Williams ., Chairman of the Governor's Commit tee on Traffic Safety, repcr ·~ed en his commit tee's -t",estimony before a u. s. House Committee hearing on proposzd federal automobile safet.y legislation. 0 ( The committee hearing was told, Williams said, that a federal agency to lead the way for traffic safe t y is necessary for unifo~mity . How2ver, Williams added, Georgians do not want fo dGral con-::.rol; just federal l e adership. The federal legislators, Williams reported, were told that a cill submitted by Georgia Congressman James Mackay is superior to the administration measure. Williams added, however, that there are portions of the President's bill that the C~orgia panel agrees with. Industry's Position on Safety Bills: James Golden of Ford Motor Company, in Atlanta, predicted that compromise legislation would come out of u. s. Congressional proceedings on federal safety standards for automobiles allowing the states to participate in setting the standards. Golden said industry wants the states to utilize their know-how in the field of safety when standards are set and that federal authorities should supervise. Golden predicted, however, that t he Vehicle Equipment Safety Corrnnis s ion, which a lready has been setting standards, will not be utilized by t he fede r al gover nment. It is wrong to conclude that the s tates have done nothing in the field of auto safety, Golden said. Then he enmnerated many safety features now on automobiles tha t came about through states actions. It is also wrong to conclude that the industry has done nothing, Golden . said . Ther e would be many more deaths on the highways if industr y had not been attacking t he problem, he said. Other bus ine s s : Chairman Hube r t de clar ed that constr uction of per imeter r oads would be a good alternati ve to r apid t rans it . They would keep thr ough traffic off downtown s tretches, he s aid, and all ow l ocal t raffi c to f l ow mor e smoothly. He urged the conference t o cons ider three points f or f uture programs . They are (1) f i nish perimeter roads, ( 2) start pl anning mor e oute r perime te r r oads, and ( 3) plan f or additi onal traffic now on freeways, including overbuilding in downtown areas and extra lanes for other portions. The Atlanta Automobile Association was approved for membership by the Conference. �
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 13

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_006_010_013.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 13
  • Text: METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORI TY GLENN BUILDING • A TL ANT A , GEOR GI A 30303 OFFICERS : April 18, 1966 Richard H. Rich,Chairman Roy A. Blount, Vice Chairman Glenn E. Bennett, Secretary MEMO TO : Members of MARTA Heads of Governments in MARTA Members of ARMPC FROM : Glenn E. Bennett, Secretary, MARTA SUBJECT : Report on Transit Authority Progress The Washington meeting was reported to y ou a week or so ago . Since then progress has been made in implementing agreements with the Department of Housing and Urban Development. 1. The 702 loan application has been revised to cover $125,000 worth of engineering. This will be used for a lump sum contract between the Authority and Pa rsons , Brinck erhof f - Tudor-B e chtel, to provide preliminary engineering data· on th e 1962 "Initial Sy stem" of 21 mil e s of rapid transit, roughl y b e tween Oglethorpe and Hapeville . Th is includes studies of e x isting c onditions , preliminary designs , methods of construction , soil conditions , mapping , e quipment t ype , t y pical structure , and preliminary e ngine e ring of rout e s and st a tions . Estimated time : J ul y 1 , 196 6 to J u ne 30 , 196 7 . 2. A 701 planning study h a s b e en outlined a nd p r ese nted to HUD , a mounting to about $1 8 7 , 500 . Th is invol ve s ab ou t $ 1 25 , 000 in gr ants fr om HUD and ab ou t $62,5 00 in Autho r ity ma t chi ng f und s . A lump s um c o n t rac t fo r about $100 , 0 0 0 wi ll be ma d e by ARMPC with Pa r son s Brinckerh o f f - Tudo r- Bech t e l fo r u p d a ting t h e entire 1962 r a p i d tran si t p l ans, devel oping new patr o nage and revenu e es t imate s , opera t i ng c o sts , and for preparing a comprehe n sive report on the entire project . I t will �Memo to MARTA - April 18, 1966 2 - include consideration of new and proposed development in all parts of t h e area as it relates to transit. A lump sum contract for about $ 50 , 000 will be made between ARMPC and Hammer , Greene & Siler Associates for economic and financial studies. Th is will include determination of all feasible methods of financing the system in stages , equitable formulas for cost-sharing among participating governments , proper allocations of capital costs, projections of tax digests, and the preparation of a comprehensive financial plan with appropriate reports. About $37, 000 will be for admi nistration, staff planners , audit , travel , and ARMPC overhead chargeable to the transit project. Th is is an eleven-month pro j ect , probably beginning in J une, 1966. 3. Th e Authority wi l l make a cost - plus contract with Parsons , Brinckerhoff - Tudor- Becht el to cover other continuing engineering services required ov er and above the two federall y- assisted programs. The amount of work to be done u nder this contract within about a year from J ly 1 , 1966 , is estimated at $1 00 , 000 , although the extent of work required cannot be determined e xa ctly . The financial position of t h e Authority at present is a s follows ~ Local p ledged money for 1966 ~ $ 91 08 00 Fu lton Cou nty Atlanta DeKa l b County Clayton County Gwinnett County Amount e xp ected from $ 3 0 , 000 30 8 2 , 77 23 , 190 18 , 210 84 , u. S . Go v ernment _e.0 , 000 $ 550 , 000 �Memo to MARTA - April 18, 1966 3 - Actual amounts received as of April 15 : City of Atlanta DeKalb County $ 21 , 007.50 20,692.50 $ 41,700.00 Total Amount disbursed for expenses to date 21,084.46 $ 20 , 615.54 On Hand Amount now due from local governments ~ City of Atlanta Clayton County DeKalb county Fulton County · Gwinnett County $ 21,007.50 11 , 595.00 20,692.50 45,900.00 9,105.00 $108,300.00 Summary of requirements for the $ 3 00, 000 local government funds : Disbursements to date for expenses of Study Commission Matching funds for 701 planning project $ 21 , 084.46 62,S0Q.00 Non-federal engineering contract 1 00,000.00 Authority staff , office o verhead , equipment, and items not chargeable to federal projects 116 , 415.54 Total $ 300 , 000.00 On April 14 , the Ch airman , Mr. Rich , and the Vice Chairman , Mr . Blount , reviewed the program with the Secretary, Mr . Bennett , the Legal Counsel , Mr . Etheridge , and representative s of the two consult i ng firms ~ Mr. W. O. Salter of Pa rs ons , Brinckerh off , Quade and Douglas ; and Mr . Alan Welty of Hammer and Company. �Memo to MARTA - 4 - April 18, 1966 Meetings have been held with the appropriate federal officials of HUD. The Chairman has sent letters to the participating governments requesting quarterly payments due on the 1966 pledges. It has been decided to call a meeting of the Authority for the first week of May. I would like to try May 3rd at 4:00 P. M. in the Glenn Building 6th floor conference room. Will MARTA members please let my office know if this is acceptable? For your information, I have been asked by Senator Harrison Williams (N. J.) to testify April 28 before the Senate Housing Sub-Committee relative to proposed new mass transit legislation. �
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 17

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_006_010_017.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 17
  • Text: MINUTES OF THE EIGHTEENTH MEETING OF THE METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY AUGUST 1, 1967 The Board of Directors of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority held its regular meeting on August 1, 1967, at 3:00 P.M. in the Glenn Building Conference Room, Atlanta. Mr. Richard H. Rich, Chairman, presided. MEMBERS PRESENT: Robert F. Adamson (City of Atlanta) Sanford Atwood (DeKalb County) M. C. Bishop (Fulton County) Edgar Blalock (Clayton County) Roy A. Blount (DeKalb County) Rawson Haverty (City of Atlanta) K. A. McMillan (Gwinnett County) Richard ·H. Rich (City of Atlanta) MEMBERS ABSENT: L. D. Milton (City of Atlanta) OTHERS PRESENT: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority H. L . Stuart, General Manager Glenn E. Bennett, Secretary King Elliott, Public Information Director Earl Nelson, Chief Engineer H. N. Johnson, Secretary to General Manager Joan Eschenbrenner, Secretary MARTA Advisory Committee H. Bo y er Marx, American Society of Landscape Architects Ro y J . Boston , P.E. , Georgia Society of Professional Engineers �Consultants W. 0. Salter, Parsons, Brinckerhoff-Tudor, Bechtel, San Francisco J. A. Coil, Resident Manager, Parsons, Brinckerhoff-Tudor, Bechtel, Atlanta Raymond O'Neil, Deputy Resident Manager, Parsons, Brinckerhoff-Tudor, Bechtel, Atlanta R. W. Gustafson, Supervising Engineer, Parsons, BrinckerhoffTudor, Bechtel, Atlanta Robert P. Barksdale, Project Estimator, Parsorts, BrinckerhoffTudor, Bechtel, Atlanta David McBrayer, Traffic Engineer, Parsons, BrinckerhoffTudor, Bechtel, Atlanta Louis Dismukes, Eric Hill Associates, Atlanta C. B. Cleveland, Eric Hill Associates, Atlanta Arden Brey, Eric Hill Associates, Atlanta W. Stell Huie, Huie & Harland, Atlanta Tom Watson Brown, Huie & Harland, Atlanta Others Joseph Errigo, Urban and Community Development Assistant, Department of Housing and Urban Development, Atlanta P.A. Springer, Atlanta Traffic and Safety Council Robert W. Roseveare, Traffic Engineer, DeKaib County J. B. Cooley, Planning and Research Engineer, Bureau of Public Roads Norman J. Van Ness, Bureau of Public Roads George B. Pilkington, Bureau of Public Roads Gerald L. Smith, Bureau of Public Roads Joseph E. Lay, Robinson-Hwnphrey Company, Atlanta William M. G. Fletcher, White, Weld & Co., New York Dick Hebert, Atlanta Constitution David Nordan, Atlanta Journal Art Schultz, WSB Radio Ken Goodnight, WSB-TV Abe Gallman, WSB-TV Harvey Kramer, Intern, Fulton County Comptroller's Office Al Barr, Intern, Fulton County Comptroller's Office Bill Hayes, Intern, Fulton County Comptroller's Office J . D. Wingfield, Jr . , Jerry A . Coursey, Mrs. Margaret C . Breland, Miss Claudette Parrish, Tim Urban, Atlanta Region Metropolitan Planning Commission - 2 - �The meeting was called to order by the Chairman. Minutes Upon motion by Mr. Bishop, seconded by Mr. Blount, the reading of the minutes of the July meeting was dispensed with and they were unanimously approved. Financial Report The General Manager presented the financial report as of July 31, 1967, which is attached hereto and made a part of these minutes. DeKalb County had sent in its second quarterly payment; Gwinnett County was the only one in arrears. Progress Reports General Manager Mr. Stuart reported on the two-week managerial seminar he attended at Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, sponsored by Kent University and the Department of Housing and Urban De velopment. The General Manager said Los Angeles, Seattle and Washington, D. C., were to have referenda during 1968 with regard to rapid transit. He pointed out that insufficiency of federal funds may be less important than the competition from these cities. Mr . Rich mentioned the importance of taking steps to hold a referendum in 1968. Mr. Stuart reported on meetings with Cousins Properties regarding MARTA ' s requirements. Cousins Properties were about to incur certain co n struction e x penses in the Air Rights area in their efforts to pro v ide for future rapid transit operations ; these were costs that could be charged to MARTA under appropriate agreements . Mr. Stuart requested the Board's approval to continue negotiations with Cousins . Costs involved had not been dete r mined ; howeve r, Mr. Stuart estimated them to be between $70 , 000 and $90 , 000 . The Ch ief Engineer was to meet with r epresentatives from Cousins P r ope r ties a n d r each ag r eement as to exact costs which would be eventuall y c h a rgeab le t o MARTA , when f u n ds we r e a v a i lab le . MARTA wo u l d be r es p o n sible for accr ued i nte r est as we l l . I t was mo v e d by Mr. Bis h o p a n d seconded b y Mr. Have r t y tha t th e Gen e r al Ma nag er continue n e gotiatio n s with Cousin s P r o p e r t i es with a n indi c a tion of inte nt o ~ the part of t he Au t ho r ity , p r o vide d a ll r e quir e me nt s were met . - 3 - �Mr. Stuart said the proposed subcontract between Parsons, Brinckerhoff-Tudor, Bechtel and Law Engineering Testing Company for test borings had been reviewed and found to be in order. Upon motion by Mr. Bishop, seconded by Mr. McMillan, approval was given to proceed with the subcontract. Mr. Rich suggested that in the future the General Manager prepare a brief write-up on each proposed subcontract prior to the Board meeting. Consultants Parsons, Brinckerhoff-Tudor, Bechtel Mr. Coil summarized the report given at the briefing prior to the Board meeting, which included parking layouts, patronage estimates, and parking lot requirements for the 64-mile system; work contemplated in connection with the soils engineer on the central and west lines which Law Engineering Testing Company was to do; as well as the work being done in San Francisco on central line alignments affecting the I-75/I-85 connector on West Peachtree Street. Hammer, Greene, Siler Associates In the absence of Mr. Hammer, Mr. Bennett said the report on financial feasibility was completed and that copies would be made available to the Board very soon. "Rapid Busways" Proposal As a result of a request from Mayor Ivan Allen, the Board had directed the MARTA staff to review tqe rapid busways proposal made recently b y the Atlanta Transit System. Mr. Stuart read the complete report of this evaluation, the summary of which is attached hereto and made a part of the minutes. In response to a question from Mr. Blalock , Mr. Stuart said the rights-of-way for rapid busways and rapid transit were not the same. The Chairman polled each Director for his reaction to the report. Mr. McMillan was emphatic in hoping that nothing would divert the Board from its efforts to bring rail rapid transit to metropolitan Atlanta. Mr. Bishop said he was concerned with the legal entangle ments involved in the busways proposal. Mr. Haverty stated he wouid be interested in the rebuttal from the Atlanta Transit System with regard to the report. Mr. Adamson felt the ~e were too many problems - 4 - �and that there would be a delay in rapid transit if the busways proposal were accepted. After discussion, it was moved by Mr. Blount, seconded by Mr. Bishop, and unanimously agreed that the Chairman forward to Mayor Allen MARTA's recommendation that the implementation of the "Rapid Busways" concept not be attempted. Other Business The Chairman introduced the following interns from the Fulton County Comptroller's Office: Harvey Kramer, Al Barr and Bill Hayes. Adjournment The Chairman adjourned the meeting at 3:50 P.M. Next Meeting September 5, 1967. - 5 - �
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 24

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_006_010_024.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 24
  • Text: M ETROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHO RITY GLENN BUILDING / ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 / AREA CODE 404 524-5711 OFFICERS: RichQrd H. Rich, Chairman Roy A. Blount, Vice Chairman July a, 1969 . Edmund W. Hughes, Secretory Henry L. Stuart, General Monogor MEMORANDUM TO HEADS OF LOCAL GOVERNMENTS AND FINANCIAL OFFICERS . In accordance with Section 16(b) of the MARTA Act of 1965, the Financial Statement for the second quarter of 1969 is attached and made a part of the enclosed Minutes. H. · L. STUART �
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 25

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_006_010_025.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 25
  • Text: MINUTES OF THE FORTY- SECOND MEETING METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY JULY 1 , 1969 The Board of Di r ectors of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority held its regular meeting on July 1, 1969 at 3:30 P . M. in the Conference Room, 619 Glenn Building, Atlanta , Ga . Mr . Roy A . Blount , Vice Chairman , presided . MEM BERS PRESENT M. c. Bishop (Ful ton County) Roy A. Blount (DeKalb County) s . Truett Cathy (Clayton County) Rawson Haverty (City of Atlanta) K. A. McMillon (Gwinnett County) L. D. Milton (City of Atlanta) Richard H. Rich (City of Atlanta) John c. Wilson (City of Atlanta) MEMBERS ABSENT Sanf ord s. At wood (DeKalb County) John c . Staton (Fulton County) OTHERS PRESENT Me t r opolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority H. L. Stuart , General Manager E. w. Nelson, Chief Enginee r King Elliott , Public Information Director Edmund w. Hughes , Auth ority Secretar y H. Ne Johnson , Administrative Assistant Consultants w. o. Sa l t er , P BQ&D, San Franc i sco Je A. Co i l and Ra y Gus tafson , PBTB , w. Stell Hui e, Hu ie and Ha r land Atlant a Others Jan Richey, Georg e Brown and John Mil l er , City of Atlanta Planning Department Andy Springer , Great er At lant a Traffic & Safety Council Dona l d G. Ingram , Central Atlanta Pr ogress , Inc e William H. Par r , Atlanta Chamber of Commerce Jerry Cour sey, Atlanta Region Met r opolitan Planni ng Commissiono - 1 - �I Before taking up the regular agenda, Mr . Blount stated that he was presiding at the request of Mr . Rich. Mr. Blount expressed regret in behalf of the Members over the recent resignation of Mr. Rich as Chairman of the Authority. Mr. Rich had tendered his resignation to Mayor Ivan Allen on June 23rd, advising that due to the press of other essential business he felt that it was necessary that he leave the Board. The meeting was then called to order by the Vice Chairman . Minutes Minutes of the June 3rd meeting had been mailed prior to the meet ing . Upon motion by Mr . Bishop , seconded by Mr . Haverty, they were unanimously approved . Financial Report The Authority's financial report as of June 30, 1969 was before the Board. Mr. Stuart asked for approval of the statement in order that it might be mailed to the Local Governments, as required at the close of each quarter by the MARTA Act. He pointed out that tbe budget was closing out for the first half with a balance of some $14,000.00 due to lesser charges to Counsel and PBTB . Financial support from DeKalb County and Gwinnett County had been assured for the balance of the calendar year. Payment from Clayton County had been received for the entire year. Meetings had been held with financial officials of the City of Atlanta and Fulton County concerning their contributions for the second half of 1969. Attention was called to the Bus Lease Account financial s tatement . Mr. Stuart stated . that the apparent deficit reflected in this account was not an "out of pocket" deficit and was due to the differential between interest and depreciation charges and that the two figures would even out within a few years. Upon motion by Mr . Bishop, seconded by Mr. McMillan, the financial statement was unanimously accepted , and Mr. Blount directed that a copy be forwarded to heads of the Local Governments and financial officers. The financial statement is attached and made a part of these minutes. Report of General Manager Mr . Stuart stated that at the June meeting the Board had authorized him to proceed with the preparation of an application to the Department of Transportation (DOT) fo r financial suppo rt towards a proposed technical studies work progr am . He sta t ed this program had been presented to the AATS Technical Co o rdinating Committee (TCC) at their meeting on June 19 , 1969 and subsequently the TCC had p a ss ed a resoluti on a pproving the filing of the appl icat ion with DOT and recommended its appr oval by the AATS Policy Committee. · - 2 - �Report of General Manager (cont ' d) Afte r some discussion the Board agreed that before lengthy and expensive engineering and cost studies are made , various transit proposals should be analyzed and taken to public meetings to determine their general acceptance and political feasibility . The Board instructed its General Manager and Chief Engineer , working with its consulting engineers, Parsons Brinckerhoff-TudorBechte l, to analyze the mass transit recommendations of the Voorhees Report and to compare them with the regional rapid transit system proposed earlier by MARTA. They are then to produce a recommendati on for a s y stem which will include t he best elements of both proposals e The Board asked that this analysis be completed for presentation at the MARTA Board Meeting on August 5th. Following this meeting , it is expected that this analysis will be presented to the AATS Technical Coordinating Committee , the AATS Policy Committee , and at public meetings. In assigning this work to the engineers, the Board agreed that this approach is in agreement with the resolution of the AATS Policy Committee of May 22, 1969 in which MARTA was asked to develop f u r ther specific information in connection with those r e commendations o f the Voorbee s Report involving rapid transit. Resignation of John C. Staton Mr. Blount advised the members that Mr. John c. Staton had also resigned from the Board because extensive t ravel commitments mad e it impossible for him t o attend regular Board meeting s e I t wa s with regret that Mr . Staton had found it necessary to take this action since he had contributed tremendously to the rapid transit p r ogram .. Mr e Blount advised that if it was a g reeabl e to the Members he would be glad to serve as Acting Cha irman of the Authority unt il an e lecti on c o uld be held after the two new directors are appointed . This action was enthusiastically approved by the Membe rs present. Report of Counsel Mr o Huie stated that several legislator s had asked him if MARTA was plann i ng to seek a n e w sour ce of loc al f unds f o r a llocation to rap id transit . He s ugg est ed tha t the Board c onsid er a study of possible s ources with the view of eventually r ecommending a speci fi c source b eing earmar ked for rapid t r ansit . Ad jou rnme n t Mr . Blount adj o u rned the meeting at 4:20 P . M. Next Meeting August 5 , 1969. 3 - �
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 26

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_006_010_026.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 26
  • Text: METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORI'IY BUDGET REPORT JUNE 30, 1969 BUDGET Fund Balance Les s : Adjustment _- State of Georgia ACTUAL JAN. 1, 1969 TO JUNE 30 1969 $ 49,720.61 $ 49,720.61 $ 49 2 720.61 1 925.80$ 47,794.81 Appropriations: City of Atlanta Clayton County DeKalb County Fulton County Gwinnett County Sub - Totals State of Geor gia Interest Income Federal Funds $ 42,015.00 2,898.75 41,385. 00 45,900.00 2,276-.25 $134 , 4 75 • 00 20,633.05 500 . 00 31,000.00 $ 16,974.00 2,898.75 16,719.54 18,544.00 919 . 61 $ 56,055 . 90 0 2,728.45 0 TOTAL INCOME TOTAL INCOME AND FUND BALANCE $186,608.05 ~2.J6,,J28.6'1 $ 58,784 . 35 ~l06,!2Z2 .l6 $ 7 o, 274 . 08 8,976.92 1,,581.12 266.66 1,227 . 97 13,339.88 182 . 00 3 , 000 . 00 $ 98,848 .63 $ 35,974.19 4,199.72 1,409.84 266.66 746 .38 0 213.00 1,500.00 44,309 . 79 $ $ 3,050 . 00 2,231.47 3,338 . 49 361. 87 1,500. 00 500. 00 3,000.00 25,000 . 00 $ 38,98 1. 83 $ $137,830.46 $ 55,369.89 INCOME EXPENSE Staff Costs: Salaries Expense Social Secur ity Guarantee Fund Health and Accident Insurance Retireme nt Workman 's Compensation Board Meetings Sub - Totals Administrative Costs: Rent Communications Supplies Insurance Accountan t Auditor Public Information Attorney s Fees and Expense Sub - Totals EXPENSES - CARRIED FORWARD 1,551.00 1,105.10 9 01. 62 5 09 . 79 37 5. 00 5 00 . 00 7 3. 59 6,044 . 00 $ ll, 060.10 �METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY BUDGET REPORT JUNE 30, 1969 BUDGET ACTUAL JAN. 1, 1969 TO JUNE 30 1969 TOTAL INCOME AND FUND BALANCE• Brought Forward $236,328.66 $106,579 . 16 EXPENSES: Brought Forward $137,830.46 $ 55,369.89 Consultants on Retainer: Parsons, Brinkerhoff-Tudor-Bechtel $ Contracts : Atlanta Area Transportation Study Technical Studies Sub-Totals $ 14,000. 00 46,500.00 $ 60,500.00 $ 12,500.00 14,000. 00 $ 26,500 . 00 TOTAL EXPENSES $206,330.46 $ 82,702 . 44 FUND BALANCE BALANCE $ 29,998.20 $ 23 , 876 . 72 8,000.00 $ 832 . 55 �
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 45

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_006_010_045.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 45
  • Text: P. W. PHOTBROW, .JR, 0.l'FIC-Jll
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 55

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_006_010_055.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 55
  • Text: COME TO RAPID TRANSIT PUBLIC HEARING All residents on the West Side of Atlanta are i n vited to atte n d public hea r ings on the p r oposed rapid transit lines . The map below shows the p r oposed location of the i-apid tran sit stations and routes . The rapid transit system would use high- speed trains , which wou l d ru n as fast as 75 mi les per hou r and would average more than 40 miles per h our . Representative s of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid T ransit Authority will discuss ro u tes and locations of all stations . There will be a detailed discussi o n of the West Line, and how i t wi l l a f fect this a rea . They will show aer i a l pho t os, maps, and s lides to sho w how the rap i d tr a nsi t sys t em wi ll look and where it will go. People who live i n t he area from Westlake Ave nue t o L ynh u rst Drive and beyond should t ry t o com e t o th e h ea rin g wh ich will be held WEDNESDAY, MAY 22, 1968 at 8 :0 0 P. M. at the AME ZION C HURCH , 38 HIGHTOWER R D. , N. W. �
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 56

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_006_010_056.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 56
  • Text: May 5.: 1969 MEMORANDUM T o : Mr. Ea r l Landers From : Dan Sw at 1 ha-ve added ome n mes to the map and plott r th ir addres es . I hope this might be of some h lp. DS;fy ,. �
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 60

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_006_010_060.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 60
  • Text: Maroh 21, 1969 nonorable Ivan Allen Mayor, City of Atlanta · City llall 68 Mitchell Street, s.w. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear f.layor Allen: If the mail balloting of the Atlanta Area Transportation Policy Committee for establishment of a 60-man Citizens' Advisory Committee results in this resolution being passad, I would like to be considered for member3hip on this Citizens• Advisory Committee. My qualifications include nine years experience in the automotive industry, fifteen years residence in the City of Atlanta, the application of computers to the solution of business problems when I was employed by IBM, and a strong lay1uan' s interest for a number of years in traffic and transportation problems. You and I know that Atlanta is the finest city in America. Frankly, though, Mayor Allen, I feel that this all-pervasive transportation problem is the most significant cloud on Atlanta's horizon. I want Atlanta to continua to be a wonderful place to live for my children and grandchildren, and I know that proper traffic and transportation planning will help assure this. May we meet personally to discuss this? Very truly yours, Bernard A. Mcllhany Marketing Representative BAM/dd �
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 61

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_006_010_061.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 61
  • Text: ~ r ~ ReLC. .A.P. NUMBER rn · CENTRA L ATLANTA PROGRESS, me. Do.es Atlanta Need RAPID TRANSIT This is one of the most important questions to face Atlantans in modern times. OCTOBER 18, 1968 2 PEACHTREE STREET, N.W., SUITE 2740 7 THIS IS NO CHOICE BETWEEN RAPID TRANSIT OR HIGHWAYS All of both that can be built will be needed. Response to this question will detennine ..... . But, it's perfectly obvious that highway construction into the central core cannot continue without limit. whether we grow or choke whether we have a strong central hub or disintegrate ATLANTA MUST MOVE FORWARD -- OR BACKWARD -- IT CAN'T STAND STILL, whether we go forward or bog down whether we compete with other regional cities or not in summary, whether ·we are to become a truly great City. RAPID TRANSIT IS NEEDED NOW . ... NOVEMBER 5th IS THE DATE OF DECISION .... A VOTE "FOR" IS A VOTE "FORWARD". BASIC PHILOSOPHY IMPORTANT A city can sprawl --- or it can develop like a wheel, with a noticeable "hub" and satellite development all around, with trafficways and corridors lihking places of residence, places of work, recreation areas, shopping and entertainment facilities. The dramatic concentration of new high-rise office buildings and apartments in central Atlanta is evidence of our commitment to the strong central . core type of city --- with other elements around the central core comprising a great Metro wheel. BUT, A STRONG HUB! In Montreal, a sparkling new rapid trans it system not only moves thousands of people to and from work, but has helped build an exciting new downtown. Atlanta can do li kewi se . ACCESSIBILITY/CIRCULATION VITAL TO THE HUB For the hub to grow --- and function efficie ntly it mu st be readi ly access i bl e t o t hose seeki ng t o rea ch it, and i t must be operable internally. Otherwise, the growth will go elsewhere. OF COURSE, R/T WILL BE EXPENSIVE --- BUT ... . ... . so will be the cost of not doing it. TELLING THE CENTRAL ATLANTA PROGRESS STORY in lost efficiency in accidents -- damages In the loss of Honorable Ivan Allen, Sr., Atlanta has lost one of its grea t citizens --- a person ,hose love for Atlanta and vision for its future have left an indelible mark. We extend deepest sympathy to Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr .. Executive Director spoke to the Nort hs ide Kiwanis Clu b Oct. 4th. injuries deaths in lo ss of development opportunities and the jobs and tax base t here in represented in los s of property values as streets choke up Will address Decatur Rotary Club on November 1st. Secretary of State of Florida, Tom Adams, visited Centra l Atlanta Prog ress on Octo ber 16t h to learn of this un ique particjpation of priv~te enterprise in a cooperative effort to build a better City . in loss of business activity in tryi ng to pay for less workable so lu tions (for ex ampl e, some ci ties have found that it costs as mu ch as $2 1, 000 average TO ADD TO THE EXPRESSWAY SYSTEM THE CAPACI TY TO MOVE ONE ADDITIONAL VEHI CLE. ) - In the current urban cr i sis, those centra l cores tha t do sound planning and act forcefully wi ll move forward the othe rs will falter. Bob Bivens �REPR INT FROM THE ATLANTA JOURNAL (By Ce ntra l At l anta Progress, In c. 9/30/68 ) Downtown: I 's the By TOM WALKER At la nta Joar na l Re a l E:i late Ed t111 r Like the hub of a wheel 1 the downtown core of a ma10r city is the axis around which its suburbs turn. Atlanta is no excepuon . From th is central point, the sprawling urba n community is held together in a meaningful pattern. Without it, these outlying areas would be just so many unrelated neighborhoods. This is why so much concern is expressed in Atlanta and othe r cities about the hea lth and vita lity of the downtown core. In aver real sense the siren o e eniire ur ban complex depends llpon the sfrenglh of the ce~ ,tral city. just as the extremities of a human being depend upon the beat of the human hea,rt. Ma ny agencies and individuals-both private and governmental-are actively engaged in -the business of keeping Atlanta'5 downtown strong. THE PR IVATE real estate developers are in t he forefront in this effor.t, with such major projects as: - Peachtree Center, an In-lel'llationally known deve lopment that will eventually en- · compass office, enterta inment and living space. -The projected " air rights" complex of office. hotel and retail bui ldings which Dallas deve loper Ray,nond Nasher plans to construct over the railroad tracks nitar the Sta te Capitol. - The sim il ar air rig11ts project which Cousins Properties, Inc . of Atlanta plans over the railroad right-of-way at Sprin g Street and Techwood Drive. - The Georgia State College ex pansion plans which will make way for a school of 25,000 students by 1975 right in the hearit of Atlanta . -The government center, where stale. city and county agencies are housed. but which will need room fo r expansion in the future . - Colony Square, a complex of office bu ildings, apartments, hotel, retail and restaura nt Facilities on P eachtree ' at I Hh streets. P L US DEVELOPMENTS connerted with the Georgia Tech campus. the Atlanta Civic Center and new highrise. med ium -r ise and Jow~ise office buildings in downtown Atlanta that. are almost too numerous to keep up with . And at some future date. developments associated with the Metropolitan At I a n ta Rapid Transit system will help transfi gure the downtown core . These are projects or plans which have already been made public. and have advanced to one or another stage of advanced planning or actual construction. But there are other dramatic plans for downtown Atlanta which are Hu The rime re uisites of a down own area, sa1 r. tven\ are that 1t be alfracLlve 1 : eas_ to ~el around ffi, and safe. One o the maior trends in downtown Atlanta development, he said, is the large-scale complex, such as Peachtree Center . Business News and Rea 1·Estate· Frido y, Septem be r 20, 1968 still in the formulative stage, but all of them are aimed at creating a stron~. throbbing central hub (or a sprawling metropolitan community . THE DOWNTOWN, however, is the center of more than just a prom ising future - it is the center of some. major ur ban problems which· will have to be solved before the promise can be ful filled . These include d o w n to w n blight ; ghetto and slum areas: deteriorming neighborhoods, within the very shadows of gleaming new office structures ; transitional business districts where vacant buildings sit idle within a short walk of F ive Poi nts , fin anci al center of the Southeast ; congested streets and clogged freeways - among others. Coping with the future of this high-density downtown core requires detailed study of literally every square fool of space . In its planning " you've got to ta lk about feet and inches where you might be lalk in1; about miles if you're considering areas Carther out,' ' sairi Robert W. " Bob" Bivens. executive director of Central Atlan ta Progress (CA P). A PRIVATELY FINANCED The overall goal of CAP, said its executive director. ,s 1'to develop ideas that make sense and see them through.11 THE AIM IS NOT to come up with "me in the skv" nr2: posats that sound great, but are 1mpract1cal. The tdea 1s to come up with sensible, practica l proposals. A community which develops the .la!ter 1s m the best position to take advanta~ of mone which 1s ava1able rom ex1s m sources sue as a num er o e era agencies) , he sa1d 1 and also 1s m 6e!!er 9*s1t1on lo mlluence priva te evelopers. Associate Drrector Donald G. Inirram said : ,1We want to enllsF the pnvate sectbf I tD make ir1vate enleronse a earl of he ~rocess of fmd mg solutions . T 1s refu resents a iiewC!imens1on: I e mvolvement of the busmess community in the process of olannmg. II they are mvol ved , we th ink they wilt carry out the ~ " ""Aflhe same time, Mr. Bivens emphasized, CAP works closely with the public planning agencies in the overall search for an answer to the question : What kind of core dqes a booming. metropolita n area need, and how can th is be brought into reality? The central core of Atlanta is hard to deline in exact terms. As conceived ~ Central Atlanta Progress. it is somewhat lar~er than .!;!'•, _region which most people proba- · bly think of as " downtown." agency, Central Atlanta Progress , in effect. is the business community's own planning agency. as opposed to the publicly fi nanced planning departments of the City of Atl anta . the metropolitan area and the · St.ate of Georgia . GE NE R A LL Y, THE As such it is unique "locally, "CORE' ' is defin ed as the and possi bly is unique among area from Brookwood Station major cities of the nation. on the north to Atlanta StaAs Mr. Bivens puts it. Cen. dium on the south , and within tral Atlanta P rogress is th11 the railroad belt line extendlatest step in the evolutionary ing eastward beyond Bouleprogress of the business comvard-Monroe Drive and westmunity of central Atlanta. ward as f;rr as Maddox Parlt It was formed from the nuand Washington Park. cleus provided by two older organizations: the Central Al· One reason for selectinl! · lanla Improvement Associathese general boundaries is tion. founded in 194 1, and the the fac t that so much statistiUptown Association. organized cal data ts available from in 1960. · such agencies as the Census Bureau on neighborhoods that In .January of last year, have these fixed limits. CAP was organized. But .Mr. One of the fundamenta l Bivens explains, these organiproblems facing the future of . 1.ations were also restructured downtown Atlanta is trafficso that, in effect, a completely how to get there and back new association was formed . from outlying regions, and " It is not a rnromotional how to circulate within the ~roup. " sa id Mr. ivens, " but downtown a~ once there. I IS a Blanmng agency, Wtffi e x per I e need. mof•_ssional 1anners who have a strong ackground m pri vate enter- 6 rn, 1- D " Georgia State College is planning for a student body of 25,000 by 1975," Mr. Bivens said. " Obviously, even with r apid transit, most of these will drive cars to school. How will they get in and out? How will you separate pedestrian traffic from streets? These are some of the types of problems which someone has to be thinking about right now. " Said Mr. Ingram : " There is an overriding concern over just what kind of downtown area we are trying to achieve in relation to a city with a ( fu. ture) population of 3 millionplus. " In short, what ought to be downtown and what can be located elsewhere in the metropolitan region: how many and what kinds of jobs, how much office space and for what purposes, what kind of and how much bousing?-to mention just a few major considerations. " EXPERTS SAY, AND we agree, that all great cities have two things in common.11 said Mr. Bivens. "One IS an exciting central core, where people want to go to shop, for entertainment, go lo the theater, to restaurants-and it is a place that is active 24 hours a day. "Second, a stronf, . middle class citiz:WX 11ves ose to the c central core, he wen£ on. I his concen!rabon of people provides the leadership for U1e downtown and patronizes what the downtown offers-without, Mr. Bivens notes, having to commute many miles fro m the suburbs . What then, should go into the central, downtown core? Mr. Bivens and Mr . Ingram listed these: -More high-rise, high-income apartments ("Atl anta is really not quite ready for this now," sa id Mr. Bivens , " but we ought to be thinking ahead to that day, and take steps to make it possible" ). -Downtown •should be the focal point of cultural activities. ( "This is pretty well happening now, but we ought to strengthen it, " he said). This includes theaters, restaurants and great hotels, among other features. -A COMPLEX OF strong retail establishments, which attract shoppers not only from the metropolitan community, but from throughout the region. -A concentration of government offices. -A concentration of financi al activity. - -Merchandise and t r a d e marts. THE LARGE COMPLEX represents a new dimension, because this type of project includes the full range of human activities from homes , to jobs to recreational facilities and entertainment, r ight in the central area. While most air rights developments have been envisioned so far over railroad right-ofway , Mr. Bivens pointed out that air rights developments ROBERT W. Bl\, ENS 'Se nsib le' Solm in ns over freeways offers a broad opportunity for future development. Resourceful thinkin so ua so come u w1 10ns o e use o muc owntown l~nd that 1s currently not utilize to its maximum potential, the planners md1cated. One such area is the socalled "garment district" of downtown Atlanta just south of Five Points. Obviously in a transitional state, the main questions for this and sim il ar property would be: What land use would make the most sense here? AND ALSO IN THE slum neighborhoods-what would be the best use for land that is obviously not fit fo r human habitation? A dilemma here is how to bring the ghetto dweller into closer contact with his potential jobs? It is literally a geographical problem, since the job quite often is many miles from the needy person's dwelling, and the transportation between the two may be too costly, or inadequae. " We've got to work in the Jong haul on a sensible match of people with jobs," said Mr. Bivens, "so that people in the cities can work to improve themselves." This, in. short, is one of the i m m e d i a t e problems that must be solved en route to solutions that are mapped out for longer-range problems. �
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 62

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_006_010_062.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 62
  • Text: RAPID TRANSIT ESS METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY " MA-C:::,r""nA ..1,;;v.L~ REPORTS TO THE PEOPLE IT SERVES .. . AUG •. SEPT., 1968 3 N O . 6 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _....,__,....,.,.,.....,__,...,,.._,._m,::::z::,l!Cll____...,,_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ v o L. TRANSIT CHIEF HAILS ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT PLANS Pa ul L. Sitton, newly-named chief of the Urban Mass Transportation Administration , U. S. Department of Transportation, has commended Atlanta leaders for taking the initiative in developing a proposal for a rapid transit system. Sitton , a native of DeKalb County and a graduate of Emory University, was in Atlanta August 27 to meet with transportation and government officials. At a news conference that afternoon , he praised Atlanta for having "a leadership that is concerned with the future. " Sitton stated, "I think a mass transportation system for Atlanta is essential for future growth and development." On the topic of available federal funds , he noted that in other cities which are building new rapid transit facilities , "The federa l government has been prepared to meet its commitment to these programs." He commended Atlanta for having "a very well-balanced approach to transportation," and observed that rapid transit in Atlanta would have a benefici al effect on the entire state. The text of the news conference is printed in its entirety in succeed ing paragraphs. A number of local elected officials and business leaders attended ' the news conference to meet Mr. Sitton and to hear his comments. These included Atlanta Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.; Fulton Cou nty Commission Chairm an Charlie Brown; Nelson Severin ghaus, Chairman of the Atlanta Region Metropolitan Planning Commission ; MARTA Vice-Chairman Roy Blount; and MARTA Directors John C. Wilson and Dr. Sanford Atwood. Georgia former Governor Carl Sanders introduced Sitton to the group of abo ut 30 persons, including representatives of newspapers, radio and television. Sitton opened the news conference by explaining that he has been traveling around the country since his nomination, visiting the cities to fami liarize himself with their problems in transportation and their plans for solutions. SITTON: I think Atlanta is a very unique city .. .. Atlanta is a center city-a central distribution area for a large part of the nation-for the Southeast. Atl anta has grown, it has developed, it has looked forward to its future . In fact, Atlanta has always anticipated its future. I think the Lockner Program for highway development in this area is indicative of this. I think the high-rise office development is a recognition that Atlanta will truly be the central service city of the Southeast fo r governmental services, for banking, for retailing, cultural activities and other activities of this nature that make up the critical activities of a classic city of the size of Atlanta. Aristotle said that the people came together in cities to live, and they stayed there in order to live the good life. The Congress, when it enacted the Urban Mass Transit Act in 1964, recognized th at there was a need for national support of programs in major urban areas of our country to improve their transportation . It reflected a recognition on the part of the Congress that our urban areas are changing. They are perhaps the most dynamic part of our economy; they are, there's no question about it. And there is a growing demand for services of an affluent society. Transportation is one of those services. The Department of Transportation is attempting to take all of the programs concerned with transportation and which relate to our cities-highways, urban mass transportation, aviation , and so forth-and to weave them into a systematic pattern in which we can see how the central cities, or the central business districts, can best be served-how to move people back and forth to work, how to provide for recreational outlets-all of these cannot be carried out without a significant transportation service. Atlanta to me, as I said, is a classical example of this city. I think, also, that Atlanta has a unique leadership among the cities that I've visited. Atlanta has a leadership that is concerned with its future, it is concerned with its growth, and recognizes the things that have to be done in the future, if Atlanta is to remain the cultural and business and economic center of this fast-growing section of our nation . l came here to get a briefing on the mass transit program which is under study and under consideration by the region ; ( continued) At news conference, left to right, are John Wilson, MART A Director; Roy Blount, MART A Vice Chairman.; Paul Sitton, UMT A Director; and Carl Sanders, former Governor of Georgia. �TRANSIT CHIEF (continued) I wanted to see how it is integrated with the total plan of the development of the area, and try to understand this as one of the major component problems that we face on a national level. I will be glad to answer any questions or discuss any issues that yo u may have, or specific points concerning the program that I administer. QUESTION: There seems to be one key factor in Atlanta's rapid transit plan and that key factor is money. How far is the federal government going to participate in rapid transit? SITTON: Well, let me put it this way-the federal government between 1964 and 1967 provided over 400 million dollars in grants to support certain cities that were prepared to move ahead with development of their transportation system . We have supported the San Francisco BARTD project; we have provided for replacement equipment in ~Chicago, in New York, in Philadelphia-there are active projects underway in those cities. In each case, the fede ral government has been prepared to meet its commitment to these programs. And I think that the political response of the two parties, the recognition by the Congress and the Administration of the critical federal role is an answer to the question of the willingness of the federal government to meet the matching requirements it has set forth in the federal grant program. QUESTION: Is there enough money available now to get Atlanta off the ground? SITTON : There is not enough money available to get any one city off the ground, because you have to approach these projects in developmental stages. One Congress cannot commit itself from one term to the next. We are trying to work out long term programs of authorizations that will permit the cities to plan Paul L. Sitton and to look to the future. I feel that with the support of the cities and of our Congress, we can provide the kind of sound program that will permit the cities to proceed with the assuredness that the federal support required to sustain these programs will go ahead . At the present time, we have 190 million dollars in grants that are available for this fiscal year. I might also add that, in terms of this, we provide support under research programs looking to what the future prospects are for augmenting systems that are provided and for looking at new technology that may come along. QUESTION: From your knowledge of Atlanta and from what you've seen on your visit this time, bow important is a rapid transit system of some type to Atlanta? SITTON: I think a mass transportation system for Atlanta is essential for future growth and development. With a city with the projected population that you envision in the next 20 or 30 years, one cannot see its future development taking place at the pattern that you anticipate in terms of your economic growth without providing the key service that is necessary to serve a central city like this. And this can only come about through some very effective, convenient, r apid, and viable form of mass transportation. The people of Atlanta have a choice-the choice is to move ahead with the transportation that you are planning and anticipate the future growth of your city in a constructive and a progressive manner, taking into account what the economic growth potentials of this area are, what the population is, and by providing the services that are essential to sustain these jobs, this economy at a high level. And to provide the qualities of excellence that are necessary in our society today to provide the kind of life that our people demand and will want. The other alternative is to let "drift" take place-no planning, no prospective analysis of what will happen in the future, and permit things to proceed in a kind of a "drift pattern," and I don't think Atlanta will take that choice. QUESTION: How does it tie-in with the development of highway programs? SITTON: I'm glad you mentioned that, because we are working-in fact, I came from a meeting this morning out at the airport with regional highway officials from all over the United States, explaining the program, how the mass transit program ties in very closely with the highway system. It doesn't compete with highways, it augments highways. We have highway demands that far exceed the revenues that are available, even under existing Jaws, to meet those demands. What we are trying to do is to make highways more efficient in terms of movi ng more people who want to use their automobile along these highways, and remove the clogging and congestion that restrict the use of them at this time, and, prospectively, in the future . So, it's an augmentation of existing forms of transportation and existing services. QUESTION: If Atlanta is successful in passing a bond referendum this fall, how long will it have to wait for matching funds from the federal government? SITTON : Well, let me put it in this light-the federal government has been prepared whenever a major city has come forward with a plan and with a viable financing scheme to provide the grants that are needed . We have done this on a timely basis. And, in pl anning the future of this program, we are certainly taking into account the prospective demands that will be placed upon 'this program by Atlanta and other cities. QUESTION: Are you familiar enough with Atlanta's plan to say whether or not it's a well-integrated and adequate plan? SITTON: I have followed Atlant~'s plan from Washington over the past several years, primarily when I was working on the highway program, and trying to make sure that federal programs at the local level were being placed as part of an integrated plan. I would say that in no city that I've been in and worked with has there been a more constructive effort on the part of all parties to brmg together into a systematic approach to the problem of transportation the solution that we are seeking in a balanced transportation system. The answer is, Atlanta has, as fa r as I've seen in Washington , a very wellbalanced approach to transportation. QUESTION: Would yo u elaborate on a situation where one metropolitan county did not participate in the rapid transit program? SITTON: I can't elaborate in detail, but I can point to an example where, in San Francisco, I believe, the plan is proceeding without the participation of Marin County, which is across the Bay from San Francisco, and which was part of the initial system. That's the only example I know of. The essential thing to focus upon, however, is the need for an initial core system. T he need for experience, the need for trying to adjust the travel patterns. There is no question in my mind, once a system is developed and the economic benefits flow from it, that you will see a full regional participation at some point in the future . QUESTION: How would it affect the county not participating? SITTON: I think it certainly would affect the county, in terms of its integration into the total sys tem, of the total metropolitan growth and economy of the metropolitan area. Like having an arm cut off, you know, it's lying there not very effective. QUESTION: How will rapid transit benefit the rest of the state? SITTON: That's a very good question; I'm glad you asked that. W hat benefits Atlanta benefits the State of Georgia. What benefits Atlanta benefits the Southeast. What benefits Atlanta benefits the nation. The benefits that grow from an efficient form of transportation service to a core area like this spreads throughout the economy. It has a very distinct "multiplier effect," if I may use a word of BARTD, and it will have very large implications for people in other parts of the state. T hey come here to perform many functions and services; they rely upon Atlanta as a distribution center. All of this affects the cost of doing business. T hank you, gentlemen. (End of news conference.) MARTA REJECTS "BUCKHEAD ALTERNATE" The proposed " Buckhead Alternate" was rejected by the Board of Directors of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority at its regular meeting September 3, 1968. After hearing a report of the Engineering and Design Review Committee, presented by Mitchell C. Bishop, the Board agreed unanimously that future planning of the Northeast rapid transit line should proceed on the Southern Railroad alignment as proposed earlier. . The following is the text of the EDR Committee report: REPORT OF THE ENGINEERING _AND DESIGN REVIEW COMMITTEE METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY SEPTEMBER 3, 1968 SUBJECT: "Buckhead Alternate" In accord ance with the decision of the Board at the August meeting, a public hearing was held Thursday night, August 15, at the gymnasium of North Fulton High Sc?ool on the subject of the proposed "Buckhead Alternate" ahgnment for the Northeast rapid transit route. Director John Wilson presided Director Rawson Haverty assisted Mr. Wilson. Advantages and disadvantages of both lines were presented by MARTA consultants at the publ!c he~ring. A~ong the advantages which Leon Epl an, of Enc Hill Ass?ciates, attributed to the " Buckhead Alternate" were the followmg: J . Direct service to the Buckhead business district ; 2. Two additional stations; 3. Better access by residents of Peachtree Road and Roswell Road ; 4. Improved possibilities for orderly growth and development of the area, especially in the vicinity of stations; and, 5. Prob ability of greater patronage in the future. The disadvantages which were vo iced included the following: 1. The requ irement for a greater number of homes, businesses, and other private property for right-of-way. 2. The need for some ri ght-of-way on, or adj acent to, property now bein g used fo r parks, schools and churches ; 3. The inconvenience of major construction through established neighborhoods; and, 4. The additional cost of $48 million for the "Buckhead Altern ate" over th at of the railroad alignment. One thousand people attended the public hearing. About fort y-five persons, other than MART A consultants, addressed the hearin g. Two of these spoke in favo r of the "Buckhead Alternate"; others spoke against it, generally because of the disadvantages referred to earlier. The audience almost in its entirety supported the statements made by those opposing the "Buckhead Alternate." They lis- tened to the arguments favoring the Alternate alignment, but gave clear indication of their opposition to the proposed Alternate. It should be mentioned here that when the audience was given opportunity, on four different occasions, to express their opinion of rapid transit generally, they showed just as great enthusiasm for rapid transit as originally proposed as they showed opposition to the proposed Alternate. MART A Director John Wilson presides at Public Hearing on "Buckhead A lternate." About 1,000 persons attended tile hearing, held in the gymnasium of North Fulton High School. Atlanta Alderman Douglas L. "Buddy Fowlkes was one of about 40 persons who gave th eir views on the suggested alternate route. In addition to the comments made by the speakers, additional comments were registered in writing, and several petitions of opposition were submitted, including the one given to this Board at its previous meeting. In addition, in response to a request from the audience, the formal record was held open until the following Thursd ay to allow the submission of written statements for the record. T he written comments submitted reflected the same opinions in the same proportion as the spoken comments at the meeting - the majority opposing the "Buckhead Alternate." This Authority was given the responsibility by the people of this area, and by their elected officials, to develop a proposal for a rap id transit system which will serve the people of this area in the best manner at the lowest possible cost. While there are advantages and benefits to the "Buckhead Alternate," the disadvantages and additional cost in this situation would appear to indicate the adoption of the route proposed along Southern Railway right-of-way. It is for the reasons outlined herein, that the Engineering and Design Review Committee therefore recommends that the "Buckhead A lternate" alignment be rejected and the alignment along the Southern Railway rights-of-way be adopted for further pl anning in the development of a proposed system of routes and station locations for the regional rapid transit system. • �THE INFLUENCE OF RAPID TRANSIT ON REAL ESTATE VALUES IN TORONTO G . W arren H eenan, past president of the Toronto Real Estate Board, was a principal speaker at Georgia Tech's "Conference on Impending Technology , Its Challenge to Livable Cities," on M ay 8. Heenan spoke on "The Influ ence of Rapid Transit on Real Estate V alues in Toronto." H e observed that in many ways, the A tlanta of today is remarkably similar to Toronto in the late 1940's when Toronto embarked on building its rapid transit system . Excerpts from Heenan's speech are reproduced below. I have enjoyefi the cultural, social and historical features, and witnessed the community pride and spirit, which have made Atl anta one of North America's truly great cities. Metropol~tan Toronto, like Atlanta, is a fabulous boomtown. In the next few minutes at my disposal, I would like to relate to you what has happened, and the exciting developments about to take place in Torontq,, as a G. Warren Heenan direct result of the existence of a balanced transportation system . Balanced transportation, featuring Rapid Transit as the main component, is the key to phenomenal urban growth. Above all , the one thing that all large North American cities have in common is the problem of automobile traffic congestion. More and more great cities are working toward Rapid Transit as a solution to traffic strangulation. For example, of the existing Rapid Transit cities, New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Cleveland, Chicago and Toronto, all have extensions now under construction. A number of other cities are in the advanced stages of planning entirely new systems . Amongst these are: Seattle, Baltimore, Atlanta, Los Angeles, Pittsburgh, and St. Louis. However, in spite of this spectacular pace of expansion and planning of mass transit facilities, there is more and more evidence that traffic congestion is strangling the growth of many of North America's great cities because the y have neglected to provide fo r total transportation needs . Local and state leadership must take the initiative in identifying transportation problems and developing solutions. The Federal Government, whose transit role has only recently been defined, can play an important supporting role in helping cities achieve balanced metropolitan transportation systems. There is no doubt that it would be a great service to your community if the real estate people and business and civic organizations continued to insist that rapid transit become the major element in the overall transportation requirements for your metropolitan area. We must look to a balanced transportation system and not fall into the trap of putting all our eggs in one basket, as has been done in Los Angeles where transportation is almost entirely oriented to expressways. There is only one way to prevent large cities and their surrounding subu rbs from being strangled by traffic, poisoned by exhaust fumes and forced to devote more of their living and working space to parking lots. That is to provide inexpensive public transportation service that is frequent, fast and reliable enough to induce citizens to leave their cars at home when they go to places of work or pleasure. Mass rapid transit is about the best bargain since Peter Minuit, Governor of New Netherlands, bought Manhattan Island from the Indians for $24 worth of trinkets in the early 1600's. The Dutchman's investment of $24 in 30 square miles of land now has a physical value of $250 billion. I am convinced that for any major urban area, mass rapid transit as the main base of a balanced transportation system creates and enhances property values like nothing else on earth. If an urban rapid transit system never earned a dime, it would still pay for itself a thousand times over through its beneficial impact on real estate values and increased assessments. The greatest cities in the world have that essential common facility- an efficient rapid transit complex. The major achievement in public transit in Metropolitan Toronto has been the successful creation of a subway system. As far back as 1942 it was realized that the growth and expansion of Toronto would in a few years result in a transit situation which would be beyond the capacity of surface street car routes . Separation of street car and automobile traffic was the obvious solution, and the Commission began to study a rapid transit system for Toronto. In 1946, when plans were completed and the war was over, the subway project was submitted to a vote of citizens who, by a 10 to 1 majority, endorsed the construction of a subway. Construction began on a 2-track route from Union Station to Eglinton Avenue, in September 1949, and on March 30, 1954, Yonge Street Subway, the first subway in Canada, was open for business. The total length at that time was 4½ miles, of which approximately 3 miles is underground and 1½ miles is in open-cut. The total cost of Canada's first subway, including right-ofway, rails, electrical distribution system, signal system and rolling stock was $67,000,000. This small investment ignited a $10 billion development explosion along the route from Front and York Streets to its northern terminal, Eglington Avenue. The appraised value of all the land and facilities in Metropolitan Toronto is now over $50 billion. $ 15 billion of this appreci ation in physical value has been added in the last 10 years and two-thirds of this is attributable to the existence of the Yonge Street Subway. Properties along the subway route doubled and tripled and sometimes increased as much as tenfold in value. Land prices would have increased anyway, but sales at $ 125 to $150 per square foot near the downtown stations became commonplace. The 1952-1962 ten year increase in tax assessment in districts contiguous to the Yonge Subway line was 45% in the downtown area. The assessment increase for the rest of the city durin g the same period averaged 25% . On this basis, the subway has craned enough new tax dollars to pay its annual amortization costs. Another $2 billion in building is underway and in the planni ng stages in downtown Toronto. There is no doubt that the subway to downtown, and our new $35 million City Hall, are the catalysts speeding the redevelopment of Toronto's downtown. Each year between 2 and 3 milli on square fee t of new office space and 5,000 apartment suites, of which 3,000 are within walking distance of the Yonge Street Subway, are being added to Toronto's skyline. Up home, they call it boomtown Metro. That it is - with the highest per capita construction expenditures in N orth America. Just for comparison, here are some figures: Metro Toronto issued permits to allow $800 million in consiruction in 1967. This building volume compares with $45 1.6 million in permits last year in the Atlanta standard metropolitan statistical area. Toronto is now fourth spot in total building in North America behind Los Angeles, Chicago and New York, cities which all have more than double metro Toronto's population. Real estate sales in Metro totalled over $1 billion in 1967 - the highest per capita volume of transfers in North America. Sales through T he Toronto Real Estate Board's Multiple Listing Service wi ll hit a record $400 million this year compared to $367 million last year. The City of Toronto is divided into 24 Planning Districts. A detailed "Planning Di strict Appraisal" has been, is being or will be prepared for each Planning District. The character of each Planning District is thoroughly described in the planning reports . From these it may be discerned what type of neighborhoods benefit most from the subway. For example, in a five year period between 1959 and 1963, 48.5 % of all high rise apartment development in the City of Toronto occurred in four Planning Districts. The Yonge Street Subway runs right through the center of each of these Planning Districts. Similarly, 90 % of all office construction in the same period occurred in three Planning Districts. The Subway cuts right through these areas. In other words, two-thirds of all new development in a five year period was put in place within five minutes walk from the Yonge Street Subway. Hundreds of large residential lots, 175 feet wide and 200 feet in depth, were rezoned to accommodate high-density apartment buildings. The apartment land boom brought as much as $4,000 per suite to speculators. H eenan, next to lectern, talks rapid transit with M ARTA Chairman Richard H . Rich. Going rates offered to home owners were $ 1,000 to $2,000 per front foot. Many fa milies who bought modest houses at $ 15,000 to $25,000 each, sold them to developers for $50,000 to $75 ,000. Downtown land is selling at upwards to $200 per square foot or at the rate of $8.7 mill ion per acre. . There is no doubt that a subway has a tremendous impact on land use and consequently on land values. Now the 8-mile crosstown leg of the $200 million project has been completed to assume a major role in Metro's balanced tra nsportation system. But there is no lull in subway construction activity in Metropolitan To ronto . Work on two more extensions is taking the subway into suburban districts. Total cost of the extensions will be $77 million . Now completed, the Bloor-Danforth line is over fo urteen miles in length and Metropolitan T oronto is criss-crossed by a total of 21 miles of fast, modern subway lines . The city section of the Bloor-Danforth line is carrying 25,000 passengers hourly. It is expected to step up to from 35,000 to 37,000 passengers hourly now with the opening of the extensions. T he subway line is designed to carry 40,000 hourl y, triple the number of passengers transported on the fo rmer street car and bus service in the Bloor-Danforth area. T he proposal for a Bloor-Danforth subway line was made by the TCC in 1955. P lans were completed in 1958 . Construction started in 1962. Money was rolling along the tracks, even ahead of the trains. New bus iness and higher assessments are following the transit lines li ke bears after honey. The east-west subway is adjacent to properties which were valued at $250 million before the project was announced . These same properties have already doubled in value to $500 million. The subway's influence on rezoning along the line will generate $2 billion worth of office and apartment building in the next ten years. So you see, land values are directly related to public transportation. Real estate value is created by two fund amental things: people and accessibility. T he more accessible any land area is, the more valuable it becomes. As a result of their lack of accessibility, many of our cities are in danger of losing their economic and cultural vitality, and all of us are paying an increasingly higher price in terms of tension, time and money just to move about. Rapid transit is a continuing program. In Toronto we do not just build a subway line and forget about it. A decision has been made and detailed planning is in progress to add a 4½ mile, $87 million northern extension to the Yonge Street Subway, and acquire the right-of-way fo r a possible fu ture I ¼ mile extension to Finch Avenue at an estimated cost of $2 to $2½ million. A six-mile rapid transit line is also proposed in connection with the Spadina Expressway. I will note here that, as a general principle, is it clear that as the rapid transit system is extended further from downtown, the stations should be spaced at wider intervals, since this is the best way to achieve train speeds and traveling times from the outlying areas which are reasonably competitive with the private car. This is where the city rapid transit line should be integrated with or become a commuter train. As all the bus and auto ro utes leading to commuter parking stations are improved through road widening, thousands of acres of land are brought within development range. I would estimate that each mile of rapid transit brings suburban and ru ral land three years closer to developmen t. The amount and intensity of new development and the volume of retail sales at a given point on the raP.id transit line are directly proportionate to the passenger traffic to and from the closest subway station. I believe I can prove this theory without giving you all the figures on p assenger flows at each station in Toronto. There are p rese ntly 36 stations in operation on the Toronto Subway network. T he three busiest stations are Eglinton, St. Clair and Queen. Of a daily passenger traffic to all stations of 400,000 (April, 1966), the three stations handled 28 percent of all daily traffic into the stations . The three station areas also accounted fo r three-quarters of all new development in the City of Toronto over the past two years. In conclusion, I would like to say - as a guest in your coun try - I am deeply impressed with what I see. We truly appreciate the royal treatment we have enjoyed during our stay. Thank you for inviting us here to enjoy it. M E T ROPO LITAN ATLANTA RA P ID T RA NSIT AU T H O RITY 8 0 8 GLENN BLDG . • 120 MARIETT A ST ., N.W . ATLANTA. GA . 30 30 3 ' PHONE 524-57 11 " D IR ECTED BY TH E GEO RGI A S TATE LE GI SL A TU RE TO DEV E L O P A RA P ID T R AN S I T SY S T E M FOR THE 5 -COUNTY M ET R O PO LI TAN ATLANTA AREA , " Edited by KIN G ELLIOTT BOARD OF DIRECTORS OFF I CERS , H1c11Anu H. R 1c 11 , Ch air111m1 HEHll EIIT J. DICK SON. HoY A. Tr t•asurer B LOUNT, E 1n1 UND \\ ' . V ice Chairman Huc 1-1Es, Sccretar _, CIT Y OF ATL A NTA , Jou :,., c. L. D. :\Ill.TON H.AW SON HA\' ERTY WILSON R1ouno H. R1 cH CL\ YTON COU:°'IT\', s. TIIUE TT CATII \' DE!~ALIJ COL' NT \', RoY A. 81.ou NT Du. S A NFono ATw ooo FL 1 LTO N COU NTY: JOH N C. \J I TCH ELL STATON C. 81 :iHOl' G WI NNETT CO l ' '\'l'Y, K. A. l\I cl\ llLLON COBB COL' :°'ITY \0h,crvcrl OT I !' :\. BIIL;\IIIY, Jn_ IIAHTA STAFF, H 1::;,. 11 y L. STIIAHT . Getlt'f(I/ .1/111,r1pr>r EAIII. W. NELS O:-- . Chit'/ Et1gi11ccr KIN, : ELLIOlT, Director oj Public /11/ ormatiun H. N . J o11 :-.so:,;. Aclm i11 i.HHlli1·t· .-l ss i.~tant 1,, G et1a(l/ .11 ,uwga �WASHINGTON, D. C., PROTOTYPE GOES ON DISPLAY The prototype of the new Washington, D. C., "Metro" rapid transit car is now in the midst of a series of appearances for public inspection in the four counties and four cities which will be served by the 97-mile rapid rail transit system, scheduled to begin initial operation in 1972. The prototype has sculptured, contemporary design, featuring a polished metal exterior and tinted panoramic windows. Passengers will enter the vehicle through three, 50-inch wide double doors on each side. The interior of the car permits two-by-two seating for 82 passengers. The decor includes wall-to-wall, wool pile carpeting in gold and brown, with seating in black, saddle tan, and oyster white. When the Metro is completed, more than 800 cars will carry millions · of commuters per year in air-conditioned comfort at speeds up to 75 miles per hour. "The High Cost of Delay." MARTACTION At its regular meeting July 2, the MARTA Board of Directors approved a planning study fo r a line in the Perry Homes-Proctor Creek area. The study was estimated to cost $16,000 and would take eight to ten weeks to complete. A t the August 6 meeting, the Board agreed to retain the planning fi rm of Eric H all Associates to continue work to coordinate MARTA's plans with those of other public agencies and private development groups. The Board adopted a resolution calling for a public hearing on the proposed "Buckhead Alternate" route; the hearing was set fo r Thursday, August 15, 1968, at 7: 30 p.m. at the Garden Hills Elementary School. (See page 5.) RAPID TRANSIT BULK RATE PROGRESS PAID M E T R OPO LITA N ATLAN TA R A P I D T RA N S IT A U T H O RIT Y BOB GLENN BLDG . · 1 20 MAR I ETTA S T . . N . W . PHON E 52 4 -5 7 1 1 ( AREA CO D E 404 ) A U G. - SE P T .. 1 96 B , VO L . 3 - · AT L AN T A , GE O RG I A 3 0 3 0 3 NO . IS Mr. Da~ E. Sweat , Jr,, Direc tor of Gover :imcntal Lla ~so :1 , Ci ty of At. a , ta City Hall Atla:ita , Ga. ~ 10 30303 U.S. Postage Atlanta, Ga . Permit No. 705 �
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 67

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_006_010_067.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 67
  • Text: I RAPID TRANSIT METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY "MA-c::::, r-n A ..1,;;v.L..ci REPORTS TO THE PEOPLE IT SERVES ... " M A Y - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - VOL. 1 I I, 9 6 7 NO. 5 IRT CONVE ES IN ATLANTA, 'MAY 2 _ Some 300 of the nation's top transit leaders are expected to attend the 1967 Convention of the Institute for Rapid Transit to be held May 24-26 at the Atlanta Marriott Motor Hotel. An unusual in-depth program featuring national experts in urban transportation and special work shop sessions will center around the theme, "Growing Cities MOVE ... With Rapid Transit," according to George L. DeMent, IRT President and Chairman of the Board of the Chicago Transit Authority. The Annual Conference of the Institute for Rapid Transit, which represents this industry in the United States and Canada, is expected to be attended not only by experts in various phases of the rapid transit field, but also by city planners, traffic engineers, public works officials, government officials and many others concerned with urban transportation problems. Henry L. Stuart, General Manager of Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority, stated, "We consider it a tribute to Atlanta and its growing importance in rapid transit to have such a group as the Institute for Rapid Transit to meet for its annual convention here in our city." He continued, "Atlanta is on its way to joining the rather select group of American cities which have rapid transit systems operating, and feel that the presence of so many persons concerned with transporting people will give increased impetus to our efforts. We welcome the Institute for Rapid Transit to this great metropolitan area," Stuart concluded, "and we are confident that all who attend the convention will find it both profitable and enjoyable. "The A nnu al Conference of th e Institute for Rapid Transit will provide a special insight into the vi tal field of developing modern and efficient mass transportation systems for our growing American cities," said DeMent. "We are fo n te in having a group of outstand' experts whose pres . t · ns will set the stage for special workshop sessions in · ersons at · the convention will participate," DeMent exp ame . "Major cities in the United States and Canada, with existing rapid transit systems, are concerned with plans for enlarging those systems. Many other cities, with prospects of great metropolitan growth, are now searching for guidance and expert help in planning new mass transportation systems for the future . "The 1967 Annual IRT Conference, patterned after our successful workshop conference last year at Boston College, will provide an excellent opportunity for an exchange of ideas by the experts, as well as developing further ideas in the mass transportation field ," DeMent said. After a welcoming address by Atlanta's mayor, Ivan Allen, Jr., Charles M . Haar, Assistant Secretary for Metropolitan Development of the United States Department of Hou sing and Urban Development, will keynote the IRT Conference at an opening luncheon May 24. William J . Ronan , Chairman of the Metropolitan Commuter Transportation Authority (New York) , will make the first presentation for a workshop session on the afternoon of May 24. The subject of this initial workshop will be "Environmental Support." For the second workshop session, " System Characteristics," on the morning of May 25 , the major presentation will be made by Henry L. Stuart, General Manager of Metropolitan Atlanta R apid Transit Authority, and b y Leo J. Cusick, Director of th e Urban Transportation Administration of the Department of Housing and Urban Development. As a "challengi ng ed ucator," Noah Langdale, Jr., President of Georgia State College, will address the IRT Conference Luncheon on May 25. (Continued on Page 2) ~ /_ George L. DeMent Charles M. Haar Leo J. Cusick Walter S. Douglas IRT CONVENTION ISSUE �METRO AREA BOOMS! METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY 8 0 8 GLENN BLDG .· 120 MARIETTA ST . , N . W . ATLANTA. GA . 30303 • PHONE 524-5711 " DIRECTED BY THE GEORGIA STATE LEGISLATURE TO DEVELOP A RAPID T RANSIT SYSTEM FOR THE S-COUNTY MET ROPOLITAN ATLANTA AREA ," Edited by KING ELLIO'.IT BOARD OF DIRECTORS OFFICERS: H . RICH , Chairman Roy A. BLOUNT, Vice Chairman ROBERT F. ADAM SON, Treasurer GLE NN E . BENNE'.IT, Secretary RICHARD CITY OF ATLANTA : ROBERT F. ADAMSON L. D. MrLTON RI CHARD H . RICI-I RAWSON HAVERTY C LAYTON COUNTY: EDGAR BLALOCK DEKALB COUNTY: ROY A. BLOUNT DR. SA NFORD ATWOOD w . A. FULTON COUNTY : PULVER MITCHELL C. BISHOP GWINNETT COUNTY: K. A. MCM ILLON COBB COUNTY (Observer) OTIS A . BRUMBY, JR MARTA STAFF : HENRY L. STUART, General Manager KI NG ELLIOTT, Director of Pnblic Information H. N. JOH NSON, S ecretary to General Manager IRT (Con tinued from Page 1, Column 2) During the afternoon of May 25, the IRT Conference participants will visit the campus of Georgia Institute of Technology, where they will review and study a model transportation system being developed by Georgia Tech's Complex Systems Design class. On the morning of May 26, Walter S. Dougl~s, partner in the consulting engineering firm of Parsons, Bnnckerhoff, Quade & Douglas, will make the presentation for the final workshop session on "Management Organization." "For each of the workshop sessions, participants will be organized into small panels for discussion and consideration of special case studies," explained DeMent. "At the close of each workshop session, there will be a group critique," he said. The program for the 1967 IRT Conference was planned by the Program Committee of which the Chairman was Thompson A. Nooner, Executive Assistant to the President of General Railway Signal Company. The IRT Convention is the first of two major transit conver.tions scheduled for Atlanta this year. The American Transit Association will hold its Annual Convention at the Regency Hyatt House in Atlanta October 22-26. 1960 1961 The expanding economy of the five county metropolitan Atlanta area is making an increasing impact on the four counties surrounding Fulton County: Clayton, Cobb, DeKalb and Gwinnett. Brunswick A. Bagdon, Southeastern Regional Director of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, reports that 4 7 percent of all non-residential construction during the first half of the 1960's came in the four counties outside Fulton. These same counties had 71 percent of the industrial growth of the Metro area. The central city had 75 percent of all office construction; 56 percent of the value of stores and other mercantile buildings was in ,the central city. Fulton County still has the bulk of the payroll employment, but the suburb an share increased from 11 percent in 1959 to 13 percent in 1965. Using the rate of employment growth as a yardstick, Atlanta's rate is almost three times the average of the eleven other Metro areas surveyed, 32 percent compared with the twelve-area average of 12 percent rate of employment increase. Atlanta is building toward another record breaking year in construction. Building permits issued during the first four months of 1967 total more than $66.5 million in value, an increase of more than $22 million for the 'same period last year. "It's obvious that the Metro area is going to continue to grow and develop," says MARTA General Manager Henry L. Stuart, "and as jobs and population increase, and as more people move into this area, the need for rapid transit grows more and more critical. And, if what has happened in Toronto is any indication, the presence of rapid transit will cause this growth to accelerate." The pictorial chart, from ATLANTA Magazine April 1966, across the bottom of these two pages shows evidence of the building boom in Atl an ta during th e 1960's. Atlanta's building boom got off th e ground in 1960 and kep t going wit!, 1. Atlanta Mercl, andise Mart; 2. Comm erce Building; 3. Georgia Pow er B uilding; 4. National Bank of G eorgia Building; 5. Atlanta A irport T erminal Building; 6. Peachtree Tow ers Apartments; 1. L enox T owers (South ); 8. Landmark Apartments; 9. First Federal Building; 10. Atlanta T owers; 11. Hartford Building; 12. Peachtree Center Building; 13. Georgia A rchives Building; 14. Atlanta Stadium ; 15. Peachtree North Apartments; 16. First Na tional Bank Building; 17. L enox T owers (Nortl,); 18. R egency H otel; 19. Life of Georgia Buildin g; 20. Gas Light To wer; 2 1. Th e Equitab le Building; 22. C & S Norri, Avenue Building; 23. Trust Company of G eorgia Building; 24. Tl, e Bronze Buildin g; 25. University Tow ers; 26. Tower Apartm ents; 27. I vey Building. 1962 1963 1964 "RAPID TRANSIT WILL KEEP ATLANTA MOVING ... RAPIDLY!" STUART REPORTS PROGRESS "Of the many developments and changes which have taken place in and around Atlanta in the past few years, including those in progress now and on the planning boards for the future-regional shopping centers, trade areas, skyscrapers, Atlanta's expanding airport, the expressway system (which perhaps one day will be complete, but will never be adequate) , the Stadium with its Braves, Falcons, and Chiefs, the new Auditorium-Convention complex, the Cultural Center - none will be more relevant to nor affect the daily lives of so many Atlantans as Rapid Transit," says MARTA Director Rawson Haverty. "Any growing metropolitan area reaches a point where it must develop an alternate to automobile-highway Rawson Ha verty transportation in and out of its central city, or movement bottlenecks and the central city deteriorates. The central city is the magnet and service center of the metropolitan area. If it declines, the satellite business, industrial, and residential areas are not properly served, the metropolitan area as a whole declines in importance, everyone suffers. "Rapid, efficient, pleasant, and safe movement of masses of people from their homes, outlying points of business, outlying industrial areas directly into the central, financial, business, shopping and cultural core is an essential requirement for a city's health and prosperity," he explains. "The March 10 issue of Th e Kiplinger Washington Letter is a prediction of the Seventies. If their projections are accurate, Atlanta can expect to increase in population from 1,211 ,000 in 1967 to 1,532,300 in 1973 (the year the North-South line of Rapid Transit will be ready) . We in Atlanta can be glad we are well advanced in our planning for Rapid Transit and that we have defi nite target dates for completion. We have stepped ahead of most other metropolitan areas in this program, and when the Seventies arrive Atlanta's citizens will, we hope, continue to be 'moving rapidly' while many other cities are plagued by traffic bottlenecks," Haverty concludes. - (Rawson Haverty is P-resident of Haverty Furniture Companies, past president of Atlanta Chamber of Commerce and Atlanta Retail Merchants Association, President of Forward Atlanta, and has held numerous other business and civic responsibilities.) 1965 1966 Considerable progress is being made under the several contracts which have been let by the METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY, according to H enry L. Stuart, MART A General Manager. In a quarterly report of contract studies for the period January 1 through March 31, 1967, Mr. Stuart says, "Our contractual obligations total $962,566, of which $616,709 (64 % ) represents the Federal portion, and $345,857 represents the local matching funds." Stuart explains that, "The majority of funds are being spent under three major contracts: the updating of the 1962 rapid transit report; the preliminary engineering on the north-south line, and the greater portion of the east-west line; and the technical H enry L. Stuart studies program . The updating program, referred to as the "701" contract ($183,566), encompasses revision of the financing of the proposed rapid transit system and is about 70 percent complete. Another segment of this same contract updates the other parts of the 1962 report and is about 70 percent complete. This segment includes the re-study of the routes and station locations, which are about 90 percent complete, and patronage, revenues, and operating cost predictions 75 percent complete. Work on this latest segment incorporates the latest highway statistics by the Highway Department. The "70J " contract should be completed by early summer. The preliminary engineering work is being conducted under the "702" contract ($125 ,000). This program originally encompassed only the north-south system from Oglethorpe to the Airport. It has been expanded to include all the preliminary engineering for the basic forty-four mile system , Doraville-Forest Park on tl1e north-south line, and on the east-west line from the Perimeter Road (I-285) west of Hightower Road to the Perimeter Road east of Avondale Estates. Preliminary engineering involves the development of information on utilities, existing buildings, highways, railroads and geology. The preliminary design of typical structures and stations and the functional layout of Transit Center and the shops and yards, and the analysis of equipment requirements. It also includes plans for alignment of tracks and stati on sites, and cost estimates for construction, and purchase of right of way. The work is being integrated with the work under the Technical Studies Program and should be completed by the end of 1968. Continued 1967 1968 1969 0 11 page 4 -4s,L---~~----L---__:'.:_:~::__---l----~~=----+----=-=--=-=-----+----__:__----t----------t--:::::::::::::::::--t---------,--------,---------r_40.!--- - - - - - ~ ~ - - - - : ;0._----+--------+----------1-------,------ -,___.~ m EQUITABLE 0 --i- -i = �STUART REPORTS (cont'd) MARTA NAMES CHIEF ENGINEER The third major program is the Technical Studies Program ($554,000) which includes portions of the work under the "702" program . It also includes the Corridor Impact Study which will assess the probable impact of the proposed rapid transit system on the total community. The Impact Study will survey MARTA's relationship to, and impact on, land use and related controls, public improvement planning; local, public and private development plans; urban renewal projects; and benefits to disadvantaged groups, and other public programs. A separate study under this program will exa mine the probable impact of rapid transit on the existing Atlanta Transit System and the privately operated bus system. A separate contract covers planning, consulting, or engineering services not covered by existing contracts ($100,000). In add ition to these existing programs, MART A's staff is in process of developing a new application for approximately two million dollars of Federal funds, using the $500,000 in State funds approved by the 1967 General Assembly as matching funds. When Federal funds are approved, this two and one-half million dollar program wil l cover the following: A Deputy Director of the Ohio State Department of Highways has been appointed Chief Engineer for Rapid Transit here. Henry L. Stuart, General Manager of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority, announces that Earl W . Nelson of New Philadelphia, Ohio, assumed his new duties here April 24, 1967. Nelson was Division Deputy Director for the Ohio State Department of Highways, and was responsible for the design, construction, maintenance, and acquisition of right of way for the 1400 miles of State and United States routes in his division. His duties included preparation of all construction and maintenance projects, which total $70 million under construction as of October 1966; supervision of all engineering and right of way acquisition; control of purchases of material and equipment; and personnel responsibilities for 700 employees. As MARTA Chief Engineer, he reports directly to the General Manager, will participate in policy deEarl W. Nelson cisions of the Authority, and will ~dminister those policies having to do with design and engineering. He will review engineering work performed by MARTA consultants; and, when construction of the system begins, will supervise all construction projects. Nelson is a Registered Profess ional Civil Engineer in the State of Ohio. He is a graduate of the University of Kentucky with a Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering, and had done graduate work at the University of Cincinnati . He is a Fellow in the American Society of Civil Engineers and is a member of the Ohio Society of Profess ional Engineers. He was a Division Deputy Director of the Ohio Department of Hi ghways from 1963 until his resignation to accept the positi on with MARTA. Prior experience includes two years as City Engineer, Steubenville, Ohio; aAd 13 years as Design Engineer and Project Engineer with H azelet and Erda! , Consu lting Engineers, Cincinnati , Ohio. Nelson, a native of Peru , Jllinoi s, and hi s wife, Shirley, have three children: Candi 19, Mark 17, and Jeffer y 9. His family will join Nelson in Atl anta at th e end of the current school term. 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) title searches of selected ri ght of way parcels ea rl y acqu isition of critical right of way parcels a plan for relocation of uprooted persons employment of Urban Plannin g (Architectural) continued work on Atlanta Transit System impact and coordination pl an 6) fir st steps in detailed design of Transit Center 7) fin anci al operations pla n and organization 8) preservation of histor ical si tes and st ructures. "As these four programs are completed we will have more and more of th e detailed information required to determine the best methods for fin ancing this system; and , to develop a specific plan to bring to th e voters for their approval, probably in November 1969 ," Stuart said. MARTA ACTION Th e Boa rd o f Di rec to rs of M ARTA a nn o un ced the appo intm en t of R obert F. Ad amson as a directo r represent ing the City of Atlant a . Ad amson was appo int ed by M ayo r Ivan All en, Jr., and th e Boa rd of Aldermen to fill the un expired te rm of Mills B. Lane, Jr" who res igned h is positio n as Me tropolit an At la nt a Rapid Transit d irector beca use of increased pressures of his many business interests . Ad amson has been Treasurer of MARTA si nce its o rgani za tion, and wi ll continue in this post as well as se rve as its directo r. The next meetin g of the Boa rd of Directo rs has been ch anged to Fr iday, June 9, 1967 a t 3 :3 0 P.M . in Room 619 of the Gl enn Buildin g, 120 Marietta Street, N.W. RAPID TRANSIT PROGRESS IQQ TH \ MO REH I 8h METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY 808 GLENN BLDG . · 120 MARIETTA ST ., N.W. PHONE 524-5711 (AREA CODE 404) MAY 19 6 7 . V O L. II, N O. · ATLANTA. GEORGIA 30303 5 Hon. Tva~ Allen, Jr., Wayar City of Atlanta City ff.all Atl ~ l nta, Ga. 30-Y03 �
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 69

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_006_010_069.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 69
  • Text: Aid Jo~Coy;;n ,i;it Seen by Volpe Atlanta in 'Excellent Position' For Federal Funds, He Says B By BIU, COLLINS he U.S. secretary of transportation s;ys Atlanta will be in eXCfilJlent position " to get two-thi rds of the money fo r a rapid 1t system from the ferleral govern ment. . John Volpe, former governor of Massachusetts ,and one of the front- runners for the vice presiaential nod at the 1968 Ri;pubUca n w esiden- ' tial convention . was in Atlanta ~. ;a i S aturday night .,. to address the llth a n n u a 1 neeting of the "THE OTHER $2.5 biUic · National Co n-" "".0 uld be used to help build 9( ference of State .. ~1rports an d expand 2 700 aii t e g i s I ative f1elds around the c~un try J oh ,{ Volpe Leaders. V The secretary , at a news conoltsaid. ' T ' secretary sa id the Nixo ference before hi s speech, exadm nJstration !hopes to restrid plained the Nixon administrat~e umber of incoming fl ight. tion 's $10 bi ll ion, 12-year public a_ e of the nation's busies transportJa tion bill and said Atf~;por_ts iand to better contro lanta " may get the jump on . fl!ghts at 22 other airports other cities" for funds under the me1ud111g Atlanta 's bill , if the measure is approved I_n his re marks ~ the 800 le isby Congress. Iat1 ve leaders attending 1h He sa id the bill would authorfour-day c o n f e re n c e V l ize him to make $3.1 biJJion talked abou t the need fo~ fe~e~~ available immedi ately upon its al-sta te-local government coopbeing signed into law . The federal money would be spent over five ye;.;;;a;;; .cs:..:..·- - .,.._ _ _ ___ Heafso said Atl anta would be "in an excellent positi on" to get a fede ral grant totaling twothirds of the cost of 1a rapid tra nsit system because of the plann ing it has done and also because it is one of ~~r ~ s." 1 VOLPE POINTED OUT, however, that under the proposed I bill no one state could get more thia n 121/2 per cent of the total ' appropriation. He also told newsmen the Vietnam war is not draining funds he has requested for his department and added, "The administration and the director of the Bureau of the Budget have approved the two transportation bills I ha ve requested." Volpe sa ys the two measures he would li ke to see enacted include the $10.1-billion publi c ttansportation bill and the airport-a,irways bill which wouid rovide $2.5 billion for air-tra ffi c control and $2.5 billion for construction of new airports and exlansion of existi ng fa 'lities. He said the ,administration is on c e r n e d about i11-flight rashes and ff!els the airportairways bill would help diminish e possibility of future colliions. With 2.5 i lion o the airrt-airw.1ys bi ll , Volpe exlained, the federal ,government uld work towards developent of II fully automated · s- em m. · ic control sys- eration in solving the nation's I problems. ' 'Much of the glamour, power and prestige that once surrounded state Capitols shifted to Washington in the past 25 years " he said. "And when the power went to Washington, ma ny of the talented young men went also. W~ hi ngton has been bhe mecca fo young A m e r i c a n s who w _ted to dedicate their li ves to fu 11lment of the American dr m," he added. 1 VOLPE SAID there has been ! a trend rowards reversing the I growing dependence on the fed;~!;sigovernment in the past few "T s new trend fi rst became stron ly evident under President ohnson," he added. ·'But President Nixon has gone a step furthe r. He has proposed a program of revenue sharing between the states and Washington. And, although it i a modest beginning, it will be -_!:pped up," Volp said. �
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 3

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_006_010_003.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 3
  • Text: .• ' .. .. @~o/~~ ATLANTA,GEORGIA PHONE JA. 2:4453 Ivan Allen ' Jr ·, Mayor /14fA 7) 9,7 ~ f/tul( 3(03ljL' ---·-- FORM 25 . 2 y~ �
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 9

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_006_010_009.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 9
  • Text: • METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY ATLANTA, GEORGIA STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL CONDITION JULY 3 1 , 196 7 ASSETS Cash in Banks: C & S Nationa l Bank First National Bank - Payroll Trust Company of Georgia Fulton National Bank - Section $ 10,729.07 2,332.07 1,000.00 90,283.58 9 Deposit In Transit (DeKalb County Appr o priation) Investments : U. S . Treasury Bills U. S. Treasury Bills - Sec tion 20,692 . 50 130 , 585.50 0 9 Pett y Cash 25. 00 Accounts Receivab le : Gwinnett County - 1967 Gwinnett Count y - 1966 $9,105.00 4,552.50 13,657 .5 0 TOTAL ASSETS $269,305.22 LIABILITIES Account s Payable $ 91,857 .45 Payroll Taxes Withhe ld and Accrued Reser ve s : ARMPC : Ur ban Design Study Atlanta Transit Study Parsons - Brinc kerhoff - Tudor - Bechte l : Sect i on 9 Matching Retainer Agreement : Transpor tati on Study Publ ic Information Surverying TOTAL LIABILITIES SURPLUS 1,166 . 97 5 , 800.00 1,000 . 00 70,000 . 00 $ 207. 70 696 . 30 5 ,820 . 77 6,724.77 176,549 .19 $ 92,756.03 ... �
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 11

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_006_010_011.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 11
  • Text: @,Jlfl@~@,Il£. CITY COMMISSIONER J. STEVE KNIGHT, COLUMBUS ~&~Il©Il~£IL:, MAYOR MALCOLM SAVANNAH R. MACLEAN, MAYOR JOHN L. CnoMARTm, GAINESVll.LE W. 406 FULTON FEDERAL BUILDING• / ATLANTA . GEORGIA 30303 ELMER GEORGE , / President First Vice President Second Vice President Executive Director TELEPHONE 255 -0424 June 27, 1966 ACTIVE PAST PRESIDENTS CITY COMMI SS IONER JOHN E. YARBROUGH IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT ROME, G A. MAYOR RANDOLPH MEDLOC K STONE MOUNTAIN , GA . MAYOR W . B . WITHERS MOULTRIE , GA . Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia CIT Y COMMISSIONER CARL E. PRUEnGRIFFIN, GA . MA YO R B . F . MERRITT. JR . MACON, GA. FIRST DISTRICT PRESIDENT MAYOR JAC K A . LERO Y Dear Mayor Allen: AILEY DIRECTOR MA YOR J . W . S N ELL WRIGHTSVILLE SECOND Since you have more than casual interest in rapid transit, I thought you would like to have copy o f the minutes of the meeting of the Ge.orgia Highway Users Conference recently held in Atlanta. DISTRICT PRESIDENT' MAYOR W . P. HENRY PELHAM DIRECTOR COUNCILMAN J. C . MINTER CAIRO THIRD DISTRICT We are a little bit unusual in that the Georgia Municipal Association is possibly the only state municipal group belonging to the state or national Highway Users Conference. The Association of Count y Commissioners used to dominate this group , however , we have as much influence with the membership as the county folks do. PRESI DEN T RI C H A RD B . R AY PERRY DIRECTOR M AYOR 0 . E . WHIT E PINE MOUNTA IN FOURTH DISTRICT PRES IDEN T C OUNCILMAN LINTON BROOME DORAVILLE DIRECTOR C OU NCILMA N CL YDE J . HI CKS CONYERS FIFTH Please l e t us know whenever we may be of service. DISTRICT PRESIDENT MAYOR AUBREY E . GREENWAY ROS W ELL DI RE CTO R ALDER MAN E . GREGORY GRIGGS A TLANTA SIXTH ~ly, DISTRICT PRESIDENT MA Y OR J . GA RD N E R NEWMAN LAGRANGE W. Elme r George Executive Di rector DIRECTOR MA Y OR HERBERT H . JONES Mc DONOUGH SEVENTH DISTRICT WEG/rs PRESI DEN T M AY OR J . C . WOODS TRION encl o sure DIREC T OR MAY OR R A LPH R . CLARK , JR . RINGGOLD EIGHT H cc : DISTRICT PRESIDE N T MA Y OR ELTON DOUGL AS 0 . GMA Board of Directors BROO K S D I R EC TOR MAYO R J AME S T . W I ND S O R . JR . Mc R AE NI N TH DI S T R ICT PR E S I DEN T MAYOR 0U AR D B . WHITLO W CARNE S V ILLE DIRECTOR MAYOR M RS . J E S S I E L. G A RNER DAHLONEGA TENTH DI S T R ICT PRES I DENT MAYOR JULIUS F . B ISH OP ATHENS DIRECTOR GEORGE A. S ANCK EN , JR . AUGUSTA D I RECTOR S STA TE COUNCILM A N GEORGE H . BULLOCK ATH E NS ALDERM A N J . J . S H OOS S AV ANN AH MA Y OR WILLI A M J A C K HAMILTON A LD ERM AN C E CIL T UR N ER A TL ANTA DE C AT U R A1' L A R G E M AY OR JOHN C . E D EN F IELD T HOMA S T ON M AYO R L EE E . C AR T ER HARTWELL CITY M A N A GER JOHN H . MAR K LAN D P RE S ID EN T . C I T Y M AN AGER S " SEC TION D ECA TU R AD M I N . AS S I S T . R . TR A VIS HI G G I NB O T H AM PRESIDENT. CITY C L E R K S ' SECTI O N AW B ANY C ITY ATTORNEY W ILL I AM E . S MITH PR E S I DENT , C IT Y ATT O RNEYS' SECTION AMERIC U S �
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017