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Box 6, Folder 10, Document 2

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_006_010_002.pdf
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  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 2
  • Text: ATLANTA, GEORGIA ae t.0) , 7 ate ATLANTA, GEORGIA PHONE 522-4463 << ee ATLANTA, GEORGIA PHONE 522-4463 Linda Price 2 FORM 25-11
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 17

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_006_010_017.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 17
  • Text: MINUTES OF THE EIGHTEENTH MEETING OF THE METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY AUGUST 1, 1967 The Board of Directors of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority held its regular meeting on August 1, 1967, at 3:00 P.M. in the Glenn Building Conference Room, Atlanta. Mr. Richard H. Rich, Chairman, presided. MEMBERS PRESENT: Robert F. Adamson (City of Atlanta) Sanford Atwood (DeKalb County) M. C. Bishop (Fulton County) Edgar Blalock (Clayton County) Roy A. Blount (DeKalb County) Rawson Haverty (City of Atlanta) K. A. McMillon (Gwinnett County) Richard -H. Rich (City of Atlanta) MEMBERS ABSENT: L. D. Milton (City of Atlanta) OTHERS PRESENT: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority H. L. Stuart, General Manager Glenn E. Bennett, Secretary King Elliott, Public Information Director Earl Nelson, Chief Engineer H. N. Johnson, Secretary to General Manager Joan Eschenbrenner, Secretary MARTA Advisory Committee H. Boyer Marx, American Society of Landscape Architects Roy J. Boston, P.E., Georgia Society of Professional Engineers Consultants W. O. Salter, Parsons, Brinckerhoff-Tudor, Bechtel, San Francisco J. A. Coil, Resident Manager, Parsons, Brinckerhoff-Tudor, Bechtel, Atlanta Raymond O'Neil, Deputy Resident Manager, Parsons, Brincker- hoff-Tudor, Bechtel, Atlanta R. W. Gustafson, Supervising Engineer, Parsons, Brinckerhoff- Tudor, Bechtel, Atlanta Robert P. Barksdale, Project Estimator, Parsons, Brinckerhoff- Tudor, Bechtel, Atlanta David McBrayer, Traffic Engineer, Parsons, Brinckerhoff- Tudor, Bechtel, Atlanta Louis Dismukes, Eric Hill Associates, Atlanta Cc. B. Cleveland, Eric Hill Associates, Atlanta Arden Brey, Eric Hill Associates, Atlanta W. Stell Huie, Huie & Harland, Atlanta Tom Watson Brown, Huie & Harland, Atlanta Others Joseph Errigo, Urban and Community Development Assistant, Department of Housing and Urban Development, Atlanta P. A. Springer, Atlanta Traffic and Safety Council Robert W. Roseveare, Traffic Engineer, DeKalb County Jd. B. Cooley, Planning and Research Engineer, Bureau of Public Roads Norman J. Van Ness, Bureau of Public Roads George B. Pilkington, Bureau of Public Roads Gerald L. Smith, Bureau of Public Roads Joseph E. Lay, Robinson-Humphrey Company, Atlanta William M. G. Fletcher, White, Weld & Co., New York Dick Hebert, Atlanta Constitution David Nordan, Atlanta Journal Art Schultz, WSB Radio Ken Goodnight, WSB-TV Abe Gallman, WSB-TV Harvey Kramer, Intern, Fulton County Comptroller's Office Al Barr, Intern, Fulton County Comptroller's Office Bill Hayes, Intern, Fulton County Comptroller's Office J. D. Wingfield, Jr., Jerry A. Coursey, Mrs. Margaret C. Breland, Miss Claudette Parrish, Tim Urban, Atlanta Region Metropolitan Planning Commission The meeting was called to order by the Chairman. Minutes Upon motion by Mr. Bishop, seconded by Mr. Blount, the reading of the minutes of the July meeting was dispensed with and they were unanimously approved. Financial Report The General Manager presented the financial report as of July 31, 1967, which is attached hereto and made a part of these minutes. DeKalb County had sent in its second quarterly payment; Gwinnett County was the only one in arrears. Progress Reports General Manager Mr. Stuart reported on the two-week managerial seminar he attended at Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, sponsored by Kent University and the Department of Housing and Urban Development. The General Manager said Los Angeles, Seattle and Washington, D.C., were to have referenda during 1968 with regard to rapid transit. He pointed out that insufficiency of federal funds may be less important than the competition from these cities. Mr. Rich men- tioned the importance of taking steps to hold a referendum in 1968. Mr. Stuart reported on meetings with Cousins Properties regarding MARTA's requirements. Cousins Properties were about to incur cer- tain construction expenses in the Air Rights area in their efforts to provide for future rapid transit operations; these were costs that could be charged to MARTA under appropriate agreements. Mr. Stuart requested the Board's approval to continue negotiations with Cousins. Costs involved had not been determined; however, Mr. Stuart estimated them to be between $70,000 and $90,000. The Chief Engineer was to meet with representatives from Cousins Prop- erties and reach agreement as to exact costs which would be even- tually chargeable to MARTA, when funds were available. MARTA would be responsible for accrued interest as well. It was moved by Mr. Bishop and seconded by Mr. Haverty that the General Manager continue negotiations with Cousins Properties with an indication of intent on the part of the Authority, provided all requirements were met. Mr. Stuart said the proposed subcontract between Parsons, Brincker- hoff-Tudor, Bechtel and Law Engineering Testing Company for test borings had been reviewed and found to be in order. Upon motion by Mr. Bishop, seconded by Mr. McMillon, approval was given to pro- ceed with the subcontract. Mr. Rich suggested that in the future the General Manager prepare a brief write-up on each proposed subcontract prior to the Board meeting. Consultants Parsons, Brinckerhoff-Tudor, Bechtel Mr. Coil summarized the report given at the briefing prior to the Board meeting, which included parking layouts, patronage estimates, and parking lot requirements for the 64-mile system; work contem- plated in connection with the soils engineer on the central and west lines which Law Engineering Testing Company was to do; as well as the work being done in San Francisco on central line alignments affecting the I-75/I-85 connector on West Peachtree Street. Hammer, Greene, Siler Associates In the absence of Mr. Hammer, Mr. Bennett said the report on finan- cial feasibility was completed and that copies would be made avail- able to the Board very soon. "Rapid Busways" Proposal As a result of a request from Mayor Ivan Allen, the Board had directed the MARTA staff to review the rapid busways proposal made recently by the Atlanta Transit System. Mr. Stuart read the complete report of this evaluation, the summary of which is attached hereto and made a part of the minutes. In response to a question from Mr. Blalock, Mr. Stuart said the rights-of-way for rapid busways and rapid transit were not the same. The Chairman polled each Director for his reaction to the report. Mr. McMillon was emphatic in hoping that nothing would divert the Board from its efforts to bring rail rapid transit to metropolitan Atlanta. Mr. Bishop said he was concerned with the legal entangle- ments involved in the busways proposal. Mr. Haverty stated he would be interested in the rebuttal from the Atlanta Transit System with regard to the report. Mr. Adamson felt there were too many problems and that there would be a delay in rapid transit if the busways proposal were accepted. After discussion, it was moved by Mr. Blount, seconded by Mr. Bishop, and unanimously agreed that the Chairman forward to Mayor Allen MARTA's recommendation that the implementation of the "Rapid Bus- ways" concept not be attempted. Other Business The Chairman introduced the following interns from the Fulton County Comptroller's Office: Harvey Kramer, Al Barr and Bill Hayes. Adjournment The Chairman adjourned the meeting at 3:50 P.M. Next Meeting September 5, 1967.
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 25

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_006_010_025.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 25
  • Text: MINUTES OF THE FORTY-SECOND MEETING METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY JULY 1, 1969 The Board of Directors of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority held its regular meeting on July 1, 1969 at 3:30 P.M. in the Conference Room, 619 Glenn Building, Atlanta, Ga. Mr. Roy A. Blount, Vice Chairman, presided. MEMBERS PRESENT M. C. Bishop (Fulton County) Roy A. Blount (DeKalb County) S. Truett Cathy (Clayton County) Rawson Haverty (City of Atlanta) K. A. McMillon (Gwinnett County) L. D. Milton (City of Atlanta) Richard H. Rich (City of Atlanta) John C. Wilson (City of Atlanta) MEMBERS ABSENT Sanford S. Atwood (DeKalb County) John C. Staton (Fulton County) OTHERS PRESENT Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority H. L. Stuart, General Manager E. W. Nelson, Chief Engineer King Elliott, Public Information Director Edmund W. Hughes, Authority Secretary H. N. Johnson, Administrative Assistant Consultants W. O. Salter, PBO&D, San Francisco J. A. Coil and Ray Gustafson, PBTB, Atlanta W. Stell Huie, Huie and Harland Others Jan Richey, George Brown and John Miller, City of Atlanta Planning Department Andy Springer, Greater Atlanta Traffic & Safety Council Donald G. Ingram, Central Atlanta Progress, Inc. William H. Parr, Atlanta Chamber of Commerce Jerry Coursey, Atlanta Region Metropolitan Planning Commission. a Before taking up the regular agenda, Mr. Blount stated that he was presiding at the request of Mr. Rich. Mr. Blount expressed regret in behalf of the Members over the recent resignation of Mr. Rich as Chairman of the Authority. Mr. Rich had tendered his resignation to Mayor Ivan Allen on June 23rd, advising that due to the press of other essential business he felt that it was nec-— essary that he leave the Board. The meeting was then called to order by the Vice Chairman. Minutes Minutes of the June 3rd meeting had been mailed prior to the meeting. Upon motion by Mr. Bishop, seconded by Mr. Haverty, they were unanimously approved. Financial Report The Authority's financial report as of June 30, 1969 was before the Board. Mr. Stuart asked for approval of the statement in order that it might be mailed to the Local Governments, as re- quired at the close of each quarter by the MARTA Act. He pointed out that the budget was closing out for the first half witha balance of some $14,000.00 due to lesser charges to Counsel and PBTB. Financial support from DeKalb County and Gwinnett County had been assured for the balance of the calendar year. Payment from Clayton County had been received for the entire year. Meet-— ings had been held with financial officials of the City of Atlanta and Fulton County concerning their contributions for the second half of 1969. Attention was called to the Bus Lease Account finan- cial statement. Mr. Stuart stated that the apparent deficit re- flected in this account was not an "out of pocket" deficit and was due to the differential between interest and depreciation charges and that the two figures would even out within a few years. Upon motion by Mr. Bishop, seconded by Mr. McMillon, the financial statement was unanimously accepted, and Mr. Blount directed that a copy be forwarded to heads of the Local Governments and financial officers. The financial statement is attached and made a part of these minutes, Report of General Manager Mr. Stuart stated that at the June meeting the Board had authorized him to proceed with the preparation of an application to the Department of Transportation (DOT) for financial support towards a proposed technical studies work program. He stated this program had been presented to the AATS Technical Coordinating Com- mittee (TCC) at their meeting on June 19, 1969 and subsequently the TCC had passed a resolution approving the filing of the applica- tion with DOT and recommended its approval by the AATS Policy Com- mittee. BAG Report of General Manager (cont'd) After some discussion the Board agreed that before lengthy and expensive engineering and cost studies are made, various transit proposals should be analyzed and taken to public meetings to determine their general acceptance and political feasibility. The Board instructed its General Manager and Chief Engineer, working with its consulting engineers, Parsons Brinckerhoff-Tudor- Bechtel, to analyze the mass transit recommendations of the Voorhees Report and to compare them with the regional rapid transit system proposed earlier by MARTA. They are then to produce a recommenda- tion for a system which will include the best elements of both proposals. The Board asked that this analysis be completed for presentation at the MARTA Board Meeting on August 5th. Following this meeting, it is expected that this analysis will be presented to the AATS Technical Coordinating Committee, the AATS Policy Com- mittee, and at public meetings. In assigning this work to the engineers, the Board agreed that this approach is in agreement with the resolution of the AATS Policy Committee of May 22, 1969 in which MARTA was asked to develop further specific information in connection with those recommendations of the Voorhees Report involving rapid transit. Resignation of John C. Staton Mr. Blount advised the members that Mr. John C. Staton had also resigned from the Board because extensive travel commitments made it impossible for him to attend regular Board meetings. It was with regret that Mr. Staton had found it necessary to take this action since he had contributed tremendously to the rapid transit program. Mr. Blount advised that if it was agreeable to the Members he would be glad to serve as Acting Chairman of the Authority until an election could be held after the two new directors are appointed. This action was enthusiastically approved by the Members present, Report of Counsel Mr. Huie stated that several legislators had asked him if MARTA was planning to seek a new source of local funds for alloca- tion to rapid transit. He suggested that the Board consider a study of possible sources with the view of eventually recommending a specific source being earmarked for rapid transit. Adjournment Mr. Blount adjourned the meeting at 4:20 P.M. Next Meeting August 5, 1969. CD nun 4y Aegd = Be Secretary é
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 12

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_006_010_012.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 12
  • Text: aan | f va ot ¥ HUC-6-66 MINUTES OF MEETING GEORGIA HIGHWAY USERS CONFERENCE (Y v/ WV / those present were: Lad O. C. Hubert, Chairman William Dalton, Vice Chairman Charles Skinner, Vice Chairman Stephen Styron, Vice Chairman Harold Budreau A. R, Brickler W. B. Bryan Charles Clynick Tom Duncan George L. Evoy Harry Fox Elmer George Billy George Ed McGill James Golden Otis Hathcock Jack Houston George H, Jones Iverson H. Lord, Jr. Tom Patton Walter Phillips, Jr. H, Eston Reagan M, F. Smith Andy Springer H. C. Thompson W. M. (Bill) Williams Introductions: MARRIOTT MOTOR HOTEL, ATLANTA, GEORGIA June 8, 1966 Georgia Motor Club (AAA) Georgia Rural Letter Carriers Assn, Georgia Motor Trucking Assn, Georgia Hotel-Motel Assn. Turner Advertising Company Portland Cement Assn, Southern Bell Tel, & Tel, Co. Automobile Manufacturers Assn., Detroit Atlanta Journal Georgia Motor Club (AAA) Georgia Branch, Asso, General Contractors Georgia Municipal Assn, Visitor (son of member) Georgia Mobile Homes Assn, and Georgia Oilmen's Assn, Ford Motor Company Travelers Protective Assn, Georgia Assn, of Petroleum Retailers Georgia Tire Dealers Assn, National Highway Users Conference Georgia Oilmen's Assn, Georgia Automobile Dealers Assn, Atlanta Automobile Assn, Travelers Protective Assn. Atlanta Traffic & Safety Council Georgia Assn. of Petroleum Retailers State Representative, Hall County The meeting was called to order by Chairman Hubert, who introduced Iverson Lord, Regional Representative of the National Highway Users Conference, Eleventh Highway Transportation Congress: Reports of committee recommendations during the Eleventh Highway Transporta- tion Congress in Washington, D. C., held in April, were made by members who at- tended, Rapid Transit: Charles Skinner, Chairman of the Legislative Committee, explained a resolu- passed by the last Georgia General Assembly that proposed a constitutional amend- ment to allow the state to help finance rapid transit. The proposed amendment, to be voted upon in the next general election, declares public transportation of passengers for hire to be an essential governmental function, It limits the © state's participation to not more than 10% of the total cost, The resolution, as written, does not threaten gasoline tax funds, which by constitutional amendment must be used for highway purposes, HUC-6-66-2 FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Governor's Safety Committce's Testimonys State Representative W. M, (Bill) Williams, Chairman of the Governor's Com- mittee on Traffic Safety, repcrted on his committee's testimony before a U. S. House Committee hearing on preposed federal automobile safety legislation, The committee hearing was told, Williams said, that a federal agency to lead the way for traffic safety is necessary for uniformity, However, Williams added, Georgians do not want federal control; just federal leadership. The federal legislators, Williams reported, were told that a till submitted by Georgia Con- gressman James Mackay is superior to the administration measure, Williams ad- ded, however, that there are portions of the President's bill that the Georgia panel agrees with, Industry's Position on Safety Bills: James Golden of Ford Motor Company, in Atlanta, predicted that compromise legislation would come out of U. S. Congressional proceedings on federal safety standards for automobiles allowing the states to participate in setting the standards, Golden said industry wants the states to utilize their know-how in the field of safety when standards are set and that federal authorities should supervise, Golden predicted, however, that the Vehicle Equipment Safety Commission, which already has been setting standards, will not be utilized by the federal government, It is wrong to conclude that the states have done nothing in the field of auto safety, Golden said, Then he enumerated many safety features now on auto= mobiles that came about through states actions, It is also wrong to conclude that the industry has done nothing, Golden said, There would be many more deaths on the highways if industry had not been attacking the problem, he said. Other business: Chairman Hubert declared that construction of perimeter roads would be a good alternative to rapid transit, They would keep through traffic off downtown stretches, he said, and allow local traffic to flow more smoothly. He urged the conference to consider three points for future programs, They are (1) finish perimeter roads, (2) start planning more outer perimeter roads, and (3) plan for additional traffic now on freeways, including overbuilding in downtown areas and extra lanes for other portions, The Atlanta Automobile Association was approved for membership by the Con- ference »
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 13

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_006_010_013.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 13
  • Text: METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY GLENN BUILDING « ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 OFFICERS: April 18, 1966 Richard H. Rich,Chairman Roy A. Blount, Vice Chairman Glenn E. Bennett, Secretary MEMO TO: Members of MARTA Heads of Governments in MARTA Members of ARMPC FROM: Glenn E. Bennett, Secretary, MARTA SUBJECT: Report on Transit Authority Progress The Washington meeting was reported to you a week or so ago. Since then progress has been made in implementing agreements with the Department of Housing and Urban Development. 1. The 702 loan application has been revised to cover $125,000 worth of engineering. This will be used for a lump sum contract between the Authority and Parsons, Brinckerhoff - Tudor-Bechtel, to provide preliminary engineering data on the 1962 "Initial System" of 21 miles of rapid transit, roughly between Oglethorpe and Hapeville. This includes studies of existing condi- tions, preliminary designs, methods of construction, soil conditions, mapping, equipment type, typical structure, and preliminary engineering of routes and stations. Estimated time: July 1, 1966 to June 30, 1967. 2. A 701 planning study has been outlined and presented to HUD, amounting to about $187,500. This involves about $125,000 in grants from HUD and about $62,500 in Authority matching funds. A lump sum contract for about $100,000 will be made by ARMPC with Parsons- Brinckerhoff - Tudor-Bechtel for updating the entire 1962 rapid transit plans, developing new patronage and revenue estimates, operating costs, and for preparing a comprehensive report on the entire project. It will Memo to MARTA - 22 April 18, 1966 include consideration of new and proposed development in all parts of the area as it relates to transit. A lump sum contract for about $50,000 will be made be- tween ARMPC and Hammer, Greene & Siler Associates for economic and financial studies. This will include de- termination of all feasible methods of financing the system in stages, equitable formulas for cost-sharing among participating governments, proper allocations of capital costs, projections of tax digests, and the preparation of a comprehensive financial plan with ap- propriate reports. About $37,000 will be for administration, staff plan- ners, audit, travel, and ARMPC overhead chargeable to the transit project. This is an eleven-month project, probably beginning in June, 1966. The Authority will make a cost-plus contract with Parsons, Brinckerhoff - Tudor-Bechtel to cover other continuing engineering services required over and above the two federally-assisted programs. The amount of work to be done under this contract within about a year from July 1, 1966, is estimated at $100,000, al- though the extent of work required cannot be determined exactly. eke The financial position of the Authority at present is as follows: Local pledged money for 1966: S$ 300,000 Fulton County S$ 91,800 Atlanta 84,030 DeKalb County 82,770 Clayton County 23,190 Gwinnett County 18, 210 Amount expected from U. S. Government _ 250,000 $ 550,000 Memo to MARTA = 2. = April 18, 1966 Actual amounts received as of April 15: City of Atlanta $ 21,007.50 DeKalb County 20,692.50 Total $ 41,700.00 Amount disbursed for expenses to date 21,084.46 On Hand $ 20,615.54 Amount now due from local governments: City of Atlanta $ 21,007.50 Clayton County 11,595.00 DeKalb County 20,692.50 Fulton County 45,900.00 ' Gwinnett County __ 9,105.00 $108,300.00 Summary of requirements for the $300,000 local government funds: Disbursements to date for expenses of Study Commission S$ 21,084.46 Matching funds for 701 planning project 62,500.00 Non-federal engineering contract 100,000.00 Authority staff, office overhead, equipment, and items not chargeable to federal projects 116,415.54 Total $300,000.00 On April 14, the Chairman, Mr. Rich, and the Vice Chairman, Mr. Blount, reviewed the program with the Secretary, Mr. Bennett, the Legal Counsel, Mr. Etheridge, and representatives of the two consulting firms: Mr. W. O. Salter of Parsons, Brinckerhoff, Quade and Douglas; and Mr. Alan Welty of Hammer and Company. Memo to MARTA -4- April 18, 1966 Meetings have been held with the appropriate federal officials of HUD. The Chairman has sent letters to the participating governments requesting quarterly payments due on the 1966 pledges. It has been decided to call a meeting of the Authority for the first week of May. I would like to try May 3rd at 4:00 P. M. in the Glenn Building 6th floor conference room. Will MARTA members please let my office know if this is acceptable? For your information, I have been asked by Senator Harrison Williams (N. J.) to testify April 28 before the Senate Housing Sub-Committee relative to proposed new mass transit legislation.
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 8

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_006_010_008.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 8
  • Text: METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY BUDGET REPORT JULY 31, 1967 ACTUAL JANUARY 1, 1967 BUDGET TO 1967 JULY 31, 1967 Unappropriated Surplus $128,281.64 $128,281.64 INCOME Appropriations: City of Atlanta S$ 84,030.00 $ 63,022.50 Clayton County 23,190.00 17,392.50 DeKalb Gounty 82,770.00 41,385.00 Fulton County 91,800.00 68,850.00 Gwinnett County 18,210.00 9,105.00 Sub-Totals $300,000.00 $199,755.00 Interest Income $ 5,520.00 $2,792.27 Federal Funds: 702 Loan $ 95,000.00 $ 60,000.00 Section 9 Grant 276,000.00 67,686.12 Interest - Federal Funds 0 597.46 Sub-Totals $371,000.00 $128 , 283.58 TOTAL INCOME $676,520.00 $330,830.85 TOTAL INCOME AND UNAPPROPRIATED SURPLUS $804,801.64 $459,112.49 EXPENSES Staff Cost: Salaries $ 68,950.00 $ 35,420.51 Expenses 10,500.00 6,361.63 Benefits: Social Security 1,109.00 1,002.75 Guaranty Fund 533.00 400,00 Health and Accident Insurance 1,680.00 640.67 Retirement 10,000,00 300,54 Workmen's Compensation 99.00 104,00 Sub-Totals $92,871.00 $_ 44,230.10 Board Meetings $__ 3,150.00 $1,900.00 Administrative and Office Overhead: Rent $ 3,000.00 §$ 1,750.00 Communications and Postage 2,000.00 t,LOL 21 Furniture and Equipment 2,000.00 411.97 Supplies 3,600.00 1,214.78 Printing 1,000.00 623,56 Auditor 250,00 250.00 Accountant 1,000.00 250.00 Public Information 33,000,00 13,385.12 Advisory 5,000.00 977.35 Insurance: Public Liability 72.00 55.00 Depository and Forgery 56.00 56.27 Fidelity Bond 199.00 198.60 Sub-Totals 551,177.00 § 20.273,86 CARRIED FORWARD $147,198.00 S$ 66,403.96 METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY BUDGET REPORT JULY 31, 1967 TOTAL INCOME AND UNAPPROPRIATED SURPLUS BROUGHT FORWARD EXPENSES Brought Forward Counsel Consultants: Atlanta Region Metropolitan Planning Commission Urban Design Study: Section 9 Matching. Atlanta Transit Study: Section 9 Matching Parsons-Brinckerhoff-Tudor-Becktel: 702 Loan Section 9: Federal Matching Retainer Agreement Research and Technical Services Sub-Totals TOTAL EXPENSES SURPLUS ACTUAL JANUARY 1, 1967 BUDGET TO 1967 JULY 31, 1967 $804,801.64 $459,112.49 $147,198.00 S$ 66,403.96 § 20,000.00 § 7,758.61 $ 31,250.00 $ 29,939.00 32,667.00 8,000.00 16,333.00 9,800.00 3,333.00 0 1,667.00 1,000.00 95,000.00 60,000.00 240,000.00 60,000.00 120,000.00 100,000.00 60,000.00 21,859.05 2,000.00 1,595.84 $602,250.00 $292 193,89 $769,448.00 $366 , 356,46 S$_35..353.64 $92,756.03
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 26

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_006_010_026.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 26
  • Text: METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY BUDGET REPORT JUNE 30, 1969 ACTUAL JAN. 1, 1969 TO BUDGET JUNE 30, 1969 Fund Balance $ 49,720.61 $ 49,720.61 Less: Adjustment = State of Georgia 1,925.80- $ 49,720.61 $ 47,794.81 INCOME Appropriations: City of Atlanta $ 42,015.00 $ 16,974.00 Clayton County 2,898.75 2,898.75 DeKalb County 41,385.00 16,719.54 Fulton County 45,900, 00 18,544. 00 Gwinnett County 2,276.25 919.61 Sub-Totals $134,475.00 § 56,055.90 State of Georgia 20,633.05 0 Interest Income 500.00 2,728.45 Federal Funds 31,000. 00 0 TOTAL INCOME $186,608.05 $ 58,784.35 TOTAL INCOME AND FUND BALANCE $236,328.66 $100,579.16 EXPENSE Staff Costs: Salaries § 70,274.08 $ 35,974.19 Expense 8,976.92 4,199.72 Social Security 1,581.12 1,409.84 Guarantee Fund 266.66 266.66 Health and Accident Insurance 1,227.97 746, 38 Retirement 13,339.88 0 Workman's Compensation 182.00 213.00 Board Meetings 3,000. 00 1,500, 00 Sub=Totals $ 98,848.63 § 44,309.79 Administrative Costs: Rent $ 3,050.00 $ 1,551.00 Communications 2,231.47 1,105.10 Supplies 3,338.49 901.62 Insurance 361,87 509,79 Accountant 1,500, 00 375.00 Auditor 500, 00 500. 00 Public Information 3,000. 00 73.59 Attorneys Fees and Expense 25,000.00 6,044.00 Sub-Totals EXPENSES = CARRIED FORWARD $ 38,981.83 $ 11,060.10 $137,830.46 $ 55,369.89 METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY BUDGET REPORT JUNE 30, 1969 ACTUAL JAN. 1, 1969 TO BUDGET JUNE 30, 1969 TOTAL INCOME AND FUND BALANCE = Brought Forward $236,328.66 $106,579.16 EXPENSES: Brought Forward $137,830.46 § 55,369.89 Consultants on Retainer: Parsons, Brinkerhoff-Tudor=Bechtel $ 8,000.00 $ 832.55 Contracts; Atlanta Area Transportation Study $ 14,000.00 $ 12,500.00 Technical Studies 46,500.00 14,000. 00 Sub-Totals $ 60,500, 00 $ 26,500.00 TOTAL EXPENSES $206, 330.46 S 82,702.44 FUND BALANCE BALANCE $ 29,998.20 $ 23,876.72
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 45

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_006_010_045.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 45
  • Text: OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS A. F. HERNDON FOUNDER N. BH. HERNDON PRESIDENT-TREASURER E. M. MARTIN VICE PRESIDENT-SECBETARY W. H. SMITH 2ND VICE PRESIDENT GEO, W. LEE 83RD VICE PRESIDENT E. L. SIMON, FLMI . GENERAL AUDITOR P. W. PROTHROW, JR. DIRECTOR OF AGENCIES JESSE HILL, JR. ACTUAET G. E, DELORME DISTRICT MANAGER CHAS. W. GREENE DIE. FUBLIO HELATIONS DR. H. L. LANG MEDICAL DIRECTOR P. H. WILLARD DISTHICT MANAGER 148 AUBURN AVENUE, N. E. ATLANTA LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY P. ©. BOX 897 ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30301 December 5, 1969 The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mayor Allen: I am pleased to advise you of the availability of our Mr. Jesse Hill, Jr. to accept your appointment as a member of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority. We at Atlanta Life take pride in knowing that over a long period of years throughout our system in eleven states we have acquired and developed men of such capabilities needed to serve their respective communities in positions and ways to enhance their communities' growth and development. Mr. Hill is one of such persons and we are sure that in serving on this board he will help make an outstanding contribution to the betterment of our great City of Atlanta. My best wishes also to you and your family for an enjoyable holiday season. Very truly yours, A Bhs Marsch die N. B. Herndon President
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 24

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  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 24
  • Text: METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY GLENN BUILDING / ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 / AREA CODE 404 524-5711 OFFICERS: Richard H, Rich, Chairman Roy A. Blount, Vice Chairman July 8, 1969. Edmund W. Hughes, Secretary Henry L. Stuart, General Manager MEMORANDUM TO HEADS OF LOCAL GOVERNMENTS AND FINANCIAL OFFICERS. In accordance with Section 16(b) of the MARTA Act of 1965, the Financial Statement for the second quarter of 1969 is attached and made a part of the enclosed Minutes. H.'L. STUART
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 4

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  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 4
  • Text: ATLANTA, GEORGIA ROUTE SLIP ro. \Nhaw on G22, FROM: Dan E. hy Jr. [_] For your information [] Please refer to the attached correspondence and make the necessary reply. [|] Advise me the status of the attached. tad —% Wen FORM 25-4-5
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 62

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  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 62
  • Text: “MARTA REPORTS TO THE PEOPLE IT SERVES...” RAPID TRANSIT PROGRESS METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY ~ TRANSIT CHIEF HAILS ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT PLANS Paul L. Sitton, newly-named chief of the Urban Mass Transportation Administration, U. S. Department of Trans- portation, has commended Atlanta leaders for taking the initiative in developing a proposal for a rapid transit system. Sitton, a native of DeKalb County and a graduate of Emory University, was in Atlanta August 27 to meet with transporta- tion and government officials. At a news conference that afternoon, he praised Atlanta for having “a leadership that is concerned with the future.” Sitton stated, “I think a mass transportation system for At- lanta is essential for future growth and development.” On the topic of available federal funds, he noted that in other cities which are building new rapid transit facilities, “The federal government has been prepared to meet its commitment to these programs.” He commended Atlanta for having “a very well-balanced approach to transportation,” and observed that rapid transit in Atlanta would have a beneficial effect on the entire state. The text of the news conference is printed in its entirety in succeeding paragraphs. A number of local elected officials and business leaders attended the news conference to meet Mr. Sitton and to hear his comments. These included Atlanta Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.; Fulton County Commission Chairman Charlie Brown; Nelson Severinghaus, Chairman of the Atlanta Region Metropolitan Planning Commission; MARTA Vice-Chairman Roy Blount; and MARTA Directors John C. Wilson and Dr. Sanford At- wood. Georgia former Governor Carl Sanders introduced Sit- ton to the group of about 30 persons, including representatives of newspapers, radio and television. Sitton opened the news conference by explaining that he has been traveling around the country since his nomination, visiting the cities to familiarize himself with their problems in transportation and their plans for solutions. SITTON: I think Atlanta is a very unique city... . Atlanta is a center city—a central distribution area for a large part of the nation—for the Southeast. Atlanta has grown, it has de- veloped, it has looked forward to its future. In fact, Atlanta has always anticipated its future. I think the Lockner Program for highway development in this area is indicative of this. I think the high-rise office development is a recognition that Atlanta will truly be the central service city of the Southeast for governmental services, for banking, for retailing, cultural activities and other activities of this nature that make up the critical activities of a classic city of the size of Atlanta. Aristotle said that the people came together in cities to live, and they stayed there in order to live the good life. The Congress, when it enacted the Urban Mass Transit Act in 1964, recognized that there was a need for national support of pro- grams in major urban areas of our country to improve their transportation. It reflected a recognition on the part of the Congress that our urban areas are changing. They are perhaps the most dynamic part of our economy; they are, there’s no question about it. And there is a growing demand for services of an affluent society. Transportation is one of those services. The Department of Transportation is attempting to take all of the programs concerned with transportation and which re- late to our cities—highways, urban mass transportation, avia- tion, and so forth—and to weave them into a systematic pat- tern in which we can see how the central cities, or the central business districts, can best be served—how to move people back and forth to work, how to provide for recreational out- lets—all of these cannot be carried out without a significant transportation service. Atlanta to me, as I said, is a classical example of this city. I think, also, that Atlanta has a unique leadership among the cities that I’ve visited. Atlanta has a leadership that is con- cerned with its future, it is concerned with its growth, and recognizes the things that have to be done in the future, if At- lanta is to remain the cultural and business and economic center of this fast-growing section of our nation. I came here to get a briefing on the mass transit program which is under study and under consideration by the region; (continued ) At news conference, left to right, are John Wilson, MARTA Director; Roy Blount, MARTA Vice Chairman; Paul Sitton, UMTA Director; and Carl Sanders, former Governor of Geor- gia. AUG.-.SEPT., 1968 VOL. 3 — NO. 6 TRANSIT CHIEF (continued) I wanted to see how it is integrated with the total plan of the development of the area, and try to understand this as one of the major component problems that we face on a national level. I will be glad to answer any questions or discuss any issues that you may have, or specific points concerning the program that I administer. QUESTION: There seems to be one key factor in Atlanta’s rapid transit plan and that key factor is money. How far is the federal government going to participate in rapid transit? SITTON: Well, let me put it this way—the federal govern- ment between 1964 and 1967 provided over 400 million dollars in grants to support certain cities that were prepared to move ahead with development of their transportation system. We have supported the San Francisco BARTD project; we have provided for replacement equipment in Chicago, in New York, in Philadelphia—there are active projects underway in those cities. In each case, the federal government has been prepared to meet its commitment to these programs. And I think that the political response of the two parties, the recognition by the Congress and the Administration of the critical federal role is an answer to the question of the willingness of the federal government to meet the matching requirements it has set forth in the federal grant program. QUESTION: Is there enough money available now to get Atlanta off the ground? SITTON: There is not enough money available to get any one city off the ground, because you have to approach these projects in developmental stages. One Congress cannot commit itself from one term to the next. We are trying to work out long term programs of authori- 2 zations that will permit the cities to plan Paul L, Sitton and to look to the future. I feel that with the support of the cities and of our Congress, we can provide the kind of sound program that will permit the cities to proceed with the assuredness that the federal support required to sustain these programs will go ahead. At the present time, we have 190 million dollars in grants that are available for this fiscal year. I might also add that, in terms of this, we provide support under research programs looking to what the future prospects are for augmenting systems that are provided and for looking at new technology that may come along. QUESTION: From your knowledge of Atlanta and from what you've seen on your visit this time, how important is a rapid transit system of some type to Atlanta? SITTON: I think a mass transportation system for Atlanta is essential for future growth and development. With a city with the projected population that you envision in the next 20 or 30 years, one cannot see its future development taking place at the pattern that you anticipate in terms of your economic growth without providing the key service that is necessary to serve a central city like this. And this can only come about through some very effective, convenient, rapid, and viable form of mass transportation. The people of Atlanta have a choice—the choice is to move ahead with the transportation that you are planning and antici- pate the future growth of your city in a constructive and a progressive manner, taking into account what the economic growth potentials of this area are, what the population is, and by providing the services that are essential to sustain these jobs, this economy at a high level. And to provide the qualities of excellence that are necessary in our society today to provide the kind of life that our people demand and will want. The other alternative is to let “drift” take place—no planning, no prospective analysis of what will happen in the future, and permit things to proceed in a kind of a “drift pattern,” and I don’t think Atlanta will take that choice. QUESTION: How does it tie-in with the development of highway programs? SITTON: I’m glad you mentioned that, because we are working—in fact, I came from a meeting this morning out at the airport with regional highway officials from all over the United States, explaining the program, how the mass transit program ties in very closely with the highway system. It doesn’t compete with highways, it augments highways. We have high- way demands that far exceed the revenues that are available, even under existing laws, to meet those demands. What we are trying to do is to make highways more efficient in terms of moving more people who want to use their automobile along these highways, and remove the clogging and congestion that restrict the use of them at this time, and, prospectively, in the future. So, it’s an augmentation of existing forms of transporta- tion and existing services. QUESTION: If Atlanta is successful in passing a bond referendum this fall, how long will it have to wait for matching funds from the federal government? SITTON: Well, let me put it in this light—the federal government has been prepared whenever a major city has come forward with a plan and with a viable financing scheme to provide the grants that are needed. We have done this on a timely basis. And, in planning the future of this program, we are certainly taking into account the prospective demands that will be placed upon this program by Atlanta and other cities. QUESTION: Are you familiar enough with Atlanta’s plan to say whether or not it’s a well-integrated and adequate plan? SITTON: I have followed Atlanta’s plan from Washington over the past several years, primarily when I was working on the highway program, and trying to make sure that federal pro- grams at the local level were being placed as part of an inte- grated plan. I would say that in no city that I’ve been in and worked with has there been a more constructive effort on the part of all parties to bring together into a systematic ap- proach to the problem of transportation the solution that we are seeking in a balanced transportation system, The answer is, Atlanta has, as far as I've seen in Washington, a very well- balanced approach to transportation. QUESTION: Would you elaborate on a situation where one metropolitan county did not participate in the rapid transit program? SITTON: I can’t elaborate in detail, but I can point to an example where, in San Francisco, I believe, the plan is pro- ceeding without the participation of Marin County, which is across the Bay from San Francisco, and which was part of the initial system. That’s the only example I know of. The essential thing to focus upon, however, is the need for an initial core system. The need for experience, the need for trying to adjust the travel patterns. There is no question in my mind, once a system is developed and the economic benefits flow from it, that you will see a full regional participation at some point in the future. QUESTION: How would it affect the county not partici- pating? SITTON: I think it certainly would affect the county, in terms of its integration into the total system, of the total metropolitan growth and economy of the metropolitan area, Like having an arm cut off, you know, it’s lying there not very effective. QUESTION: How will rapid transit benefit the rest of the state? SITTON: That's a very good question; I’m glad you asked that. What benefits Atlanta benefits the State of Georgia. What benefits Atlanta benefits the Southeast. What benefits Atlanta benefits the nation. The benefits that grow from an efficient form of transportation service to a core area like this spreads throughout the economy. It has a very distinct “multiplier effect,” if I may use a word of BARTD, and it will have very large implications for people in other parts of the state, They come here to perform many functions and services; they rely upon Aflanta as a distribution center. All of this affects the cost of doing business. Thank you, gentlemen. (End of news conference.) MARTA REJECTS "BUCKHEAD ALTERNATE’ The proposed “Buckhead Alternate” was rejected by the Board of Directors of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority at its regular meeting September 3, 1968. After hearing a report of the Engineering and Design Review Com- mittee, presented by Mitchell C. Bishop, the Board agreed unanimously that future planning of the Northeast rapid transit line should proceed on the Southern Railroad alignment as proposed earlier. The following is the text of the EDR Committee report: REPORT OF THE ENGINEERING AND DESIGN REVIEW COMMITTEE METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY SEPTEMBER 3, 1968 SUBJECT: “Buckhead Alternate” In accordance with the decision of the Board at the August meeting, a public hearing was held Thursday night, August 15, at the gymnasium of North Fulton High School on the subject of the proposed “Buckhead Alternate” alignment for the Northeast rapid transit route. Director John Wilson pre- sided, Director Rawson Haverty assisted Mr. Wilson. Advantages and disadvantages of both lines were pre- sented by MARTA consultants at the public hearing, Among the advantages which Leon Eplan, of Eric Hill Associates, attributed to the “Buckhead Alternate” were the following: 1. Direct service to the Buckhead business district; 2. Two additional stations; 3. Better access by residents of Peachtree Road and Roswell Road; 4, Improved possibilities for orderly growth and develop- ment of the area, especially in the vicinity of stations; and, 5. Probability of greater patronage in the future. The disadvantages which were voiced included the follow- ing: e 1. The requirement for a greater number of homes, busi- nesses, and other private property for right-of-way. 2. The need for some right-of-way on, or adjacent to, property now being used for parks, schools and churches; 3, The inconvenience of major construction through estab- lished neighborhoods; and, 4. The additional cost of $48 million for the “Buckhead Alternate” over that of the railroad alignment. One thousand people attended the public hearing. About forty-five persons, other than MARTA consultants, addressed the hearing. Two of these spoke in favor of the “Buckhead Alternate”; others spoke against it, generally because of the disadvantages referred to earlier. The audience almost in its entirety supported the statements made by those opposing the “Buckhead Alternate.” They lis- MARTA Director John Wilson presides at Public Hearing on “Buckhead Alternate.” tened to the arguments favoring the Alternate alignment, but gave clear indication of their opposition to the proposed Alternate. It should be mentioned here that when the audience was given opportunity, on four different occasions, to express their opinion of rapid transit generally, they showed just as great enthusiasm for rapid transit as originally proposed as they showed opposition to the proposed Alternate. : \ = f Atlanta Alderman Douglas L. “Buddy” Fowlkes was one of about 40 persons who gave their views on the suggested alter- nate route. In addition to the comments made by the speakers, addi- tional comments were registered in writing, and several peti- tions of opposition were submitted, including the one given to this Board at its previous meeting. In addition, in response to a request from the audience, the formal record was held open until the following Thursday to allow the submission of written statements for the record. The written comments submitted reflected the same opinions in the same proportion as the spoken comments at the meeting — the majority opposing the “Buckhead Alternate.” This Authority was given the responsibility by the people of this area, and by their elected officials, to develop a pro- posal for a rapid transit system which will serve the people of this area in the best manner at the lowest possible cost. While there are advantages and benefits to the ‘“‘Buckhead Alternate,” the disadvantages and additional cost in this situation would appear to indicate the adoption of the route proposed along Southern Railway right-of-way. It is for the reasons outlined herein, that the Engineering and Design Review Committee therefore recommends that the “Buckhead Alternate” alignment be rejected and the alignment along the Southern Railway rights-of-way be adopted for further planning in the development of a proposed system of routes and station locations for the regional rapid transit system. nasium of North Fulton High School. THE INFLUENCE OF RAPID TRANSIT ON REAL ESTATE VALUES IN TORONTO G. Warren Heenan, past president of the Toronto Real Estate Board, was a principal speaker at Georgia Tech's “Con- ference on Impending Technology, Its Challenge to Livable Cities,” on May &. Heenan spoke on “The Influence of Rapid Transit on Real Estate Values in Toronto.” He observed that in many ways, the Atlanta of today is remarkably similar to Toronto in the late 1940’s when Toronto embarked on building its rapid transit system. Excerpts from Heenan’s speech are reproduced below. I have enjoyed the cultural, social and historical features, and witnessed the community pride and spirit, which have made Atlanta one of North America’s truly great cities. Metropolitan Toronto, like Atlanta, is a fabulous boomtown. In the next few minutes at my disposal, I would like to relate to you what has a happened, and the exciting developments about to take place in Toronto, as a G. Warren Heenan direct result of the existence of a bal- anced transportation system. Balanced transportation, featuring Rapid Transit as the main component, is the key to phenomenal urban growth. Above all, the one thing that all large North American cities have in common is the problem of automobile traffic congestion. More and more great cities are working toward Rapid Transit as a solution to traffic strangulation. For example, of the existing Rapid Transit cities, New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Cleveland, Chicago and Toronto, all have extensions now under construction. A number of other cities are in the advanced stages of planning entirely new systems. Amongst these are: Seattle, Baltimore, Atlanta, Los Angeles, Pittsburgh, and St. Louis. However, in spite of this spectacular pace of expansion and planning of mass transit facilities, there is more and more evidence that traffic con- gestion is strangling the growth of many of North America’s great cities because they have neglected to provide for total transportation needs. Local and state leadership must take the initiative in identi- fying transportation problems and developing solutions. The Federal Government, whose transit role has only recently been defined, can play an important supporting role in helping cities achieve balanced metropolitan transportation systems. There is no doubt that it would be a great service to your community if the real estate people and business and civic organizations continued to insist that rapid transit become the major element in the overall transportation requirements for your metropolitan area. We must look to a balanced transportation system and not fall into the trap of putting all our eggs in one basket, as has been done in Los Angeles where transportation is almost en- tirely oriented to expressways. There is only one way to prevent large cities and their sur- rounding suburbs from being strangled by traffic, poisoned by exhaust fumes and forced to devote more of their living and working space io parking lots, That is to provide inexpensive public transportation service that is frequent, fast and reliable enough to induce citizens to leave their cars at home when they go to places of work or pleasure. Mass rapid transit is about the best bargain since Peter Minuit, Governor of New Netherlands, bought Manhattan Island from the Indians for $24 worth of trinkets in the early 1600’s. The Dufchman’s investment of $24 in 30 square miles of land now has a physical value of $250 billion. j am convinced that for any major urban area, mass rapid transit as the main base of a balanced transportation system creates and enhances property values like nothing else on earth. If an urban rapid transit system never earned a dime, it would still pay for itself a thousand times over through its beneficial impact on real estate values and increased assess- ments. The greatest cities in the world have that essential com- mon facility—an efficient rapid transit complex. The major achievement in public transit in Metropolitan Toronto has been the successful creation of a subway system. As far back as 1942 it was realized that the growth and ex- pansion of Toronto would in a few years result in a transit situation which would be beyond the capacity of surface street car routes. Separation of street car and automobile traffic was the obvious solution, and the Commission began to study a rapid transit system for Toronto. In 1946, when plans were completed and the war was over, the subway project was submitted to a vote of citizens who, by a 10 to 1 majority, endorsed the construction of a subway. Construction began on a 2-track route from Union Station to Eglinton Avenue, in September 1949, and on March 30, 1954, Yonge Street Subway, the first subway in Canada, was open for business. The total length at that time was 414 miles, of which approximately 3 miles is underground and 114 miles is in open-cut. The total cost of Canada’s first subway, including right-of- way, rails, electrical distribution system, signal system and rolling stock was $67,000,000. This small investment ignited a $10 billion development explosion along the route from Front and York Streets to its northern terminal, Eglington Avenue. The appraised value of all the land and facilities in Metro- politan Toronto is now over $50 billion. $15 billion of this appreciation in physical value has been added in the last 10 years and two-thirds of this is attributable to the existence of the Yonge Street Subway. Properties along the subway route doubled and tripled and sometimes increased as much as tenfold in value. Land prices would have increased anyway, but sales at $125 to $150 per square foot near the downtown stations became commonplace, The 1952-1962 ten year increase in tax assessment in dis- tricts contiguous to the Yonge Subway line was 459% in the downtown area. The assessment increase for the rest of the city during the same period averaged 25%. On this basis, the subway has eraned enough new tax dollars to pay its annual amortization costs. Another $2 billion in building is underway and in the plan- ning stages in downtown Toronto. There is no doubt that the subway to downtown, and our new $35 million City Hall, are the catalysts speeding the redevelopment of Toronto's down- town. Each year between 2 and 3 million square feet of new office space and 5,000 apartment suites, of which 3.000 are within walking distance of the Yonge Street Subway, are being added to Toronto’s skyline. Up home, they call it boomtown Metro. That it is — with the highest per capita construction expenditures in North America. Just for comparison, here are some figures: Metro Toronto issued permits to allow $800 million in construction in 1967. This building volume compares with $451.6 million in permits last year in the Atlanta standard metropolitan statistical area. Toronto is now fourth spot in total building in North America behind Los Angeles, Chicago and New York, cities which all have more than double metro Toronto’s population. Real estate sales in Metro totalled over $1 billion in 1967 —the highest per capita volume of transfers in North America. Sales through The Toronto Real Estate Board’s Multiple List- ing Service will hit a record $400 million this year compared to $367 million last year. The City of Toronto is divided into 24 Planning Districts. A detailed “Planning District Appraisal” has been, is being or will be prepared for each Planning District. The character of each Planning District is thoroughly described in the planning reports. From these it may be discerned what type of neighbor- hoods benefit most from the subway. For example, in a five year period between 1959 and 1963, 48.5% of all high rise apartment development in the City of Toronto occurred in four Planning Districts. The Yonge Street Subway runs right through the center of each of these Planning Districts. Similarly, 90% of all office construction in the same period occurred in three Planning Districts. The Subway cuts right through these areas. In other words, two-thirds of all new development in a five year period was put in place within five minutes walk from the Yonge Street Subway. Hundreds of large residential lots, 175 feet wide and 200 feet in depth, were rezoned to accom- modate high-density apartment buildings. The apartment land boom brought as much as $4,000 per suite to speculators. — L Heenan, next to lectern, talks rapid transit with MARTA Chairman Richard H. Rich. Going rates offered to home owners were $1,000 to $2,000 per front foot. Many families who bought modest houses at $15,000 to $25,000 each, sold them to developers for $50,000 to $75,000, Downtown land is selling at upwards to $200 per square foot or at the rate of $8.7 million per acre. There is no doubt that a subway has a tremendous impact on land use and consequently on land values. Now the 8-mile crosstown leg of the $200 million project has been completed to assume a major role in Metro’s balanced transportation system. But there is no lull in subway construction activity in Metropolitan Toronto. Work on two more extensions is taking the subway into suburban districts. Total cost of the extensions will be $77 million. Now completed, the Bloor-Danforth line is over fourteen miles in length and Metropolitan Toronto is criss-crossed by a total of 21 miles of fast, modern subway lines. The city section of the Bloor-Danforth line is carrying 25,000 passengers hourly. It is expected fo step up to from 35,000 to 37,000 passengers hourly now with the opening of the extensions. The subway line is designed to carry 40,000 hourly, triple the number of passengers transported on the former street car and bus service in the Bloor-Danforth area. The proposal for a Bloor-Danforth subway line was made by the TCC in 1955. Plans were completed in 1958. Construc- tion started in 1962. Money was rolling along the tracks, even ahead of the trains. New business and higher assessments are following the transit lines like bears after honey. The east-west subway is adjacent to properties which were valued at $250 million before the project was announced. These same properties have already doubled in value to $500 million. The subway’s influence on rezoning along the line will generate $2 billion worth of office and apartment building in the next ten years. So you see, land values are directly related to public transportation. Real estate value is created by two fundamental things: people and accessibility. The more accessible any land area is, the more valuable it becomes. As a result of their lack of accessibility, many of our cities are in danger of losing their economic and cultural vitality, and all of us are paying an increasingly higher price in terms of tension, time and money just to move about. Rapid transit is a continuing program, In Toronto we do not just build a subway line and forget about it. A decision has been made and detailed planning is in progress to add a 414 mile, $87 million northern extension to the Yonge Street Subway, and acquire the right-of-way for a possible future 114 mile extension to Finch Avenue at an estimated cost of $2 to $214 million. A six-mile rapid transit line is also proposed in connection with the Spadina Expressway. I will note here that, as a general principle, is it clear that as the rapid transit system is extended further from down- town, the stations should be spaced at wider intervals, since this is the best way to achieve train speeds and traveling times from the outlying areas which are reasonably competitive with the private car. This is where the city rapid transit line should be integrated with or become a commuter train. As all the bus and auto routes leading to commuter parking stations are improved through road widening, thousands of acres of land are brought within development range. I would estimate that each mile of rapid transit brings suburban and rural land three years closer to development. The amount and intensity of new development and the volume of retail sales at a given point on the rapid transit line are directly proportionate to the passenger traffic to and from the closest subway station. I believe I can prove this theory without giving you all the figures on passenger flows at each station in Toronto. There are presently 36 stations in operation on the Toronto Subway network. The three busiest stations are Eglinton, St. Clair and Queen. Of a daily passenger traffic to all stations of 400,000 (April, 1966), the three stations handled 28 per- cent of all daily traffic into the stations. The three station areas also accounted for three-quarters of all new development in the City of Toronto over the past two years. In conclusion, I would like to say—as a guest in your country —I am deeply impressed with what I see. We truly appreciate the royal treatment we have enjoyed during our stay. Thank you for inviting us here to enjoy it. METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY BO8 GLENN BLOG. +120 MARIETTA ST. N.W. ATLANTA, GA, 30303 * PHONE 524-5711 “DIRECTED BY THE GEORGIA STATE LEGISLATURE TO DEVELOP A RAPID TRANSIT SYSTEM FORTHE 5S-COUNTY METROPOLITAN ATLANTA AREA," Edited by Kinc EuLLioTr BOARD OF DIRECTORS OFFICERS: Kov A, Heawwr, Pree Chodrman Enavan W. Huenes, Seeretars Ricnano H. Rrew, Chatrmian Hensent J. Inekson, Treasiirer CITY OF ATLANTA: Joun C. Wiison L. 1. Minrox Ricuann H. Ric Rawson Haverty CLAYTON COUNTY: S. Treeie Caray DEL ALN COUNTY: Tov A, Baws Dna. Saxrony Arwoon FULTON COUNTY: Ion C. Stara Mitcuen. €. Branor GWINNETT COUNTY: Ku AL MeMintows COMR COUNTY (Observer) tre A, Tittamy, Jn MARTA STAFF: Heany L, Steaut, Generw!l W ' Eam W, Nesson, Chief Enginevs kine Eniaotr, Me raf Public Mnfornation H.N. Jowsxson.. ddministratine dsaistane to deemeral Wenger I WASHINGTON, D. C,, PROTOTYPE GOES ON DISPLAY The prototype of the new Washington, D. C., “Metro” rapid transit car is now in the midst of a series of appearances for public inspection in the four counties and four cities which will be served by the 97-mile rapid rail transit system, scheduled to begin initial operation in 1972. The prototype has sculptured, contemporary design, featuring a polished metal exterior and tinted panoramic windows. Passengers will enter the vehicle through three, 50-inch wide double doors on each side. The interior of the car permits two-by-two seating for 82 passengers. The decor includes wall-to-wall, wool pile carpet- ing in gold and brown, with seating in black, saddle tan, and oyster white. When the Metro is completed, more than 800 cars will carry millions of commuters per year in air-conditioned com- fort at speeds up to 75 miles per hour. “The High Cost of Delay.” MARTActTion At its regular meeting July 2, the MARTA Board of Directors approved a planning study for a line in the Perry Homes-Proctor Creek area. The study was esti- mated to cost $16,000 and would take eight to ten weeks to complete. At the August 6 meeting, the Board agreed to retain the planning firm of Eric Hall Associates to continue work to coordinate MARTA’s plans with those of other public agencies and private development groups. The Board adopted a resolution calling for a public hearing on the proposed “Buckhead Alternate” route; the hearing was set for Thursday, August 15, 1968, at 7:30 p.m. at the Garden Hills Elementary School. (See page 5.) 806 GLENN BLDG. : PHONE 524-5711 (AREA CODE 404) 120 MARIETTA ST.. N.W. - AUG.-SEPT..1968,VOL.3 — NO.6 RAPID TRANSIT PROGRESS METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY BULK RATE U.S. Postage PAID Atlanta, Ga, Permit No. 705 ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 Mr. Dan E. Sweat, Jr., Director of Governmental Liaison, City of Atlasta City Hall Atlanta, Ga. 30303
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 67

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  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 67
  • Text: RAPID TRANSIT PROGRESS METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY “MARTA. REPORTS TO THE PEOPLE IT SERVES...” "4¥ 1867 VOL. II, NO. 5S Some 300 of the nation’s top transit leaders are expected to attend the 1967 Convention of the Institute for Rapid Transit to be held May 24-26 at the Atlanta Marriott Motor Hotel. An unusual in-depth program featuring national experts in urban transportation and special work shop sessions will center around the theme, “Growing Cities MOVE... With Rapid Transit,” according to George L. DeMent, IRT Presi- dent and Chairman of the Board of the Chicago Transit Authority. The Annual Conference of the Institute for Rapid Transit, which represents this industry in the United States and Can- ada, is expected to be attended not only by experts in various phases of the rapid transit field, but also by city planners, traffic engineers, public works officials, government officials and many others concerned with urban transportation problems. Henry L. Stuart, General Manager of Metropolitan At- lanta Rapid Transit Authority, stated, “We consider it a tribute to Atlanta and its growing importance in rapid transit to have such a group as the Institute for Rapid Transit to meet for its annual convention here in our city.” He con- tinued, “Atlanta is on its way to joining the rather select group of American cities which have rapid transit systems operating, and feel that the presence of so many persons concerned with transporting people will give increased im- petus to our efforts. We welcome the Institute for Rapid Transit to this great metropolitan area,” Stuart concluded, “and we are confident that all who attend the convention will find it both profitable and enjoyable. “The Annual Conference of the Institute for Rapid Transit will provide a special insight into the vital field of developing modern and efficient mass transportation systems for our growing American cities,” said DeMent. nh ee } , ir George L. DeMent Charles M. Haar nate in having a group of outstandip perts whose presentatigns will set the stage for_thé special workshop sessions in Which-all persons attend#g tion will participate,” DeMent explained. “Major cities in the United States and Canada, with ex- isting rapid transit systems, are concerned with plans for enlarging those systems. Many other cities, with prospects of great metropolitan growth, are now searching for guid- ance and expert help in planning new mass transportation systems for the future. “The 1967 Annual IRT Conference, patterned after our successful workshop conference last year at Boston College, will provide an excellent opportunity for an exchange of ideas by the experts, as well as developing further ideas in the mass transportation field,” DeMent said. After a welcoming address by Atlanta’s mayor, Ivan Allen, Jr., Charles M. Haar. Assistant Secretary for Metropolitan Development of the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development, will keynote the IRT Conference at an opening luncheon May 24. William J. Ronan, Chairman of the Metropolitan Com- muter Transportation Authority (New York), will make the first presentation for a workshop session on the afternoon of May 24. The subject of this initial workshop will be “Environmental Support.” For the second workshop session, “System Character- istics,” on the morning of May 25, the major presentation will be made by Henry L. Stuart, General Manager of Met- ropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority, and by Leo J. Cusick, Director of the Urban Transportation Administra- tion of the Department of Housing and Urban Development. As a “challenging educator,” Noah Langdale, Jr., Presi- dent of Georgia State College, will address the IRT Confer- ence Luncheon on May 25. (Continued on Page 2) att Pim, Leo J. Cusick Walter 8. Douglas IRT CONVENTION ISSUE METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY 808 GLENN BLOG.*+120 MARIETTA ST., N.W. ATLANTA, GA. 30303 +*PHONE 524-5711 “DIRECTED BY THE GEORGIA STATE LEGISLATURE TO DEVELOP A RAPID TRANSIT SYSTEM FORTHE 5-COUNTY METROPOLITAN ATLANTA AREA," Edited by Kinc Etuiotr BOARD OF DIRECTORS OFFICERS: Ricuarp H. Ricu, Chairman Roy A. Biount, Vice Chairman Rosert F. ApAMson, Treasurer GLENN E. BENNETT, Secretary CITY OF ATLANTA: Rosert F. ADAMSON L, D. Mitton Ricwarp H. Ricn Rawson HAvVerRtTY CLAYTON COUNTY: Epcar BLALock DEKALB COUNTY: Roy A. Buount Dr. SANFORD ATWOOD FULTON COUNTY: W. A. PULVER MITCHELL C. BISHOP GWINNETT COUNTY: K. A. McMILLon COBB COUNTY (Observer) Otis A. Brumey, Jr MARTA STAFF: Henry L. Stuart, General Manager Kine Et.iott, Director of Public Information H. N. Jonnson, Secretary to General Manager IRT (Continued from Page 1, Column 2) During the afternoon of May 25, the IRT Conference par- ticipants will visit the campus of Georgia Institute of Tech- nology, where they will review and study a model trans- portation system being developed by Georgia Tech’s Com- plex Systems Design class. On the morning of May 26, Walter S. Douglas, partner in the consulting engineering firm of Parsons, Brinckerhoff, Quade & Douglas, will make the presentation for the final workshop session on “Management Organization.” “For each of the workshop sessions, participants will be organized into small panels for discussion and consideration of special case studies,” explained DeMent. “At the close of each workshop session, there will be a group critique,” he said. The program for the 1967 IRT Conference was planned by the Program Committee of which the Chairman was Thompson A. Nooner, Executive Assistant to the President of General Railway Signal Company. The IRT Convention is the first of two major transit conventions scheduled for Atlanta this year. The American Transit Association will hold its Annual Convention at the Regency Hyatt House in Atlanta October 22-26. 1960 1961 METRO AREA BOOMS! The expanding economy of the five county metropolitan Atlanta area is making an increasing impact on the four counties surrounding Fulton County: Clayton, Cobb, De- Kalb and Gwinnett. Brunswick A. Bagdon, Southeastern Regional Director of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, reports that 47 percent of all non-residential construction during the first half of the 1960’s came in the four counties outside Fulton. These same counties had 71 percent of the indus- trial growth of the Metro area. The central city had 75 percent of all office construction; 56 percent of the value of stores and other mercantile build- ings was in the central city. Fulton County still has the bulk of the payroll employ- ment, but the suburban share increased from 11 percent in 1959 to 13 percent in 1965. Using the rate of employment growth as a yardstick, At- lanta’s rate is almost three times the average of the eleven other Metro areas surveyed, 32 percent compared with the twelve-area average of 12 percent rate of employment increase, Atlanta is building toward another record breaking year in construction. Building permits issued during the first four months of 1967 total more than $66.5 million in value, an increase of more than $22 million for the same period last year. “It’s obvious that the Metro area is going to continue to grow and develop,” says MARTA General Manager Henry L. Stuart, “and as jobs and population increase, and as more people move into this area, the need for rapid transit grows more and more critical. And, if what has happened in Toronto is any indication, the presence of rapid transit will cause this growth to accelerate.” The pictorial chart, from ATLANTA Magazine April 1966, across the bottom of these two pages shows evidence of the building boom in Atlanta during the 1960's. Atlanta's building boom got off the ground in 1960 and kept going with 1, Atlanta Merchandise Mart; 2. Commerce Building; 3. Geor- gia Power Building; 4. National Bank of Georgia Building; 5. At- lanta Airport Terminal Building; 6. Peachtree Towers Apartments; 7. Lenox Towers (South); 8. Landmark Apartments; 9. First Federal Building; 10. Atlanta Towers; 11. Hartford Building; 12. Peachtree Center Building; 13. Georgia Archives Building; 14. Atlanta Stadium; 13. Peachtree North Apartments; 16. First National Bank Building; 17. Lenox Towers (North); 18. Regency Hotel; 19. Life of Georgia Building; 20. Gas Light Tower; 21. The Equitable Building; 22. C & S North Avenue Building; 23. Trust Company of Georgia Building; 24. The Bronze Building; 25. University Towers; 26. Tower Apart- ments; 27. Ivey Building. 1962 1963 1964 “RAPID TRANSIT WILL KEEP ATLANTA MOVING...RAPIDLY!” “Of the many developments and changes which have taken place in and around Atlanta in the past few years, including those in progress now and on the planning boards for the future—regional shopping centers, trade areas, skyscrapers, Atlanta’s expanding airport, the expressway system (which perhaps one day will be complete, but will never be ade- quate), the Stadium with its Braves, Falcons, and Chiefs, the new Audi- torium-Convention complex, the Cul- tural Center —none will be more relevant to nor affect the daily lives of so many Atlantans as Rapid Transit,” says MARTA Director Rawson Haverty. “Any growing metropolitan area reaches a point where it must develop an alternate to automobile-highway Rawson Haverty _ transportation in and out of its central city, or movement bottlenecks and the central city deterio- rates. The central city is the magnet and service center of the metropolitan area. If it declines, the satellite business, industrial, and residential areas are not properly served, the metropolitan area as a whole declines in importance, every- one suffers, “Rapid, efficient, pleasant, and safe movement of masses of people from their homes, outlying points of business, out- lying industrial areas directly into the central, financial, busi- ness, shopping and cultural core is an essential requirement for a city’s health and prosperity,” he explains. “The March 10 issue of The Kiplinger Washington Letter is a prediction of the Seventies. If their projections are accu- rate, Atlanta can expect to increase in population from 1,211,000 in 1967 to 1,532,300 in 1973 (the year the North-South line of Rapid Transit will be ready). We in Atlanta can be glad we are well advanced in our planning for Rapid Transit and that we have definite target dates for completion. We have stepped ahead of most other metro- politan areas in this program, and when the Seventies arrive Atlanta’s citizens will, we hope, continue to be ‘moving rapidly’ while many other cities are plagued by traffic bottle- necks,” Haverty concludes. (Rawson Haverty is President of Haverty Furniture Com- panies, past president of Atlanta Chamber of Commerce and Atlanta Retail Merchants Association, President of Forward Atlanta, and has held numerous other business and civic responsibilities. ) 1965 1966 1967 STUART REPORTS PROGRESS Considerable progress is being made under the several con- tracts which have been let by the METROPOLITAN AT- LANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY, according to Henry L. Stuart, MARTA General Manager. In a quarterly report of contract studies for the period January 1 through March 31, 1967, Mr. Stuart says, “Our contractual obligations total $962,566, of which $616,709 (64%) represents the Federal portion, and $345,857 represents the local matching funds.” Stuart explains that, “The majority of funds are being spent under three major contracts: the updating of the 1962 rapid transit report; the prelimi- nary engineering on the north-south line, and the greater portion of the east-west line; and the technical studies program. The updating program, referred to as the “701” contract ($183,566), encompasses revision of the financing of the proposed rapid transit system and is about 70 percent com- plete. Another segment of this same contract updates the other parts of the 1962 report and is about 70 percent com- plete. This segment includes the re-study of the routes and station locations, which are about 90 percent complete, and patronage, revenues, and operating cost predictions 75 per- cent complete. Work on this latest segment incorporates the latest high- way statistics by the Highway Department. The “701” contract should be completed by early summer. The preliminary engineering work is being conducted under the “702” contract ($125,000). This program orig- inally encompassed only the north-south system from Ogle- thorpe to the Airport. It has been expanded to include all the preliminary engineering for the basic forty-four mile system, Doraville-Forest Park on the north-south line, and on the east-west line from the Perimeter Road (I-285) west of Hightower Road to the Perimeter Road east of Avondale Estates. Preliminary engineering involves the development of in- formation on utilities, existing buildings, highways, railroads and geology. The preliminary design of typical structures and stations and the functional layout of Transit Center and the shops and yards, and the analysis of equipment require- ments. It also includes plans for alignment of tracks and station sites, and cost estimates for construction, and pur- chase of right of way. The work is being integrated with the work under the Technical Studies Program and should be completed by the end of 1968. Henry L. Stuart Continued on page 4 1969 EQUITABLE MARTA NAMES CHIEF ENGINEER A Deputy Director of the Ohio State Department of High- ways has been appointed Chief Engineer for Rapid Transit here. Henry L. Stuart, General Manager of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority, announces that Earl W. Nelson of New Philadelphia, Ohio, assumed his new duties here April 24, 1967. Nelson was Division Deputy Director for the Ohio State Department of Highways, and was responsible for the de- sign, construction, maintenance, and acquisition of right of way for the 1400 miles of State and United States routes in his division. His duties included preparation of all con- = struction and maintenance projects, which total $70 million under con- struction as of October 1966; super- vision of all engineering and right of way acquisition; control of purchases of material and equipment; and per- sonnel responsibilities for 700 em- ployees. As MARTA Chief Engineer, he reports directly to the General Man- - “= ager, will participate in policy de- Earl W. Nelson cisions of the Authority, and will administer those policies having to do with design and engi- neering. He will review engineering work performed by MARTA consultants; and, when construction of the system begins, will supervise all construction projects. Nelson is a Registered Professional Civil Engineer in the State of Ohio. He is a graduate of the University of Ken- tucky with a Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering, and had done graduate work at the University of Cincinnati. He is a Fellow in the American Society of Civil Engineers and is a member of the Ohio Society of Professional Engineers. He was a Division Deputy Director of the Ohio Depart- ment of Highways from 1963 until his resignation to accept the position with MARTA. Prior experience includes two years as City Engineer, Steubenville, Ohio; and 13 years as Design Engineer and Project Engineer with Hazelet and Erdal, Consulting Engineers, Cincinnati, Ohio. Nelson, a native of Peru, Illinois, and his wife, Shirley, have three children: Candi 19, Mark 17, and Jeffery 9. His family will join Nelson in Atlanta at the end of the current school term. 808 GLENN BLDG. - 120 MARIETTA ST., N.W. - PHONE 524-5711 (AREA CODE 404) MAY 1967, VOL. II, NO. 5 RAPID TRANSIT \ PROGRESS \ «©» METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY STUART REPORTS (cont'd) The third major program is the Technical Studies Program ($554,000) which includes portions of the work under the “702” program. It also includes the Corridor Impact Study which will assess the probable impact of the proposed rapid transit system on the total community. The Impact Study will survey MARTA’s relationship to, and impact on, land use and related controls, public improvement planning; local, public and private development plans; urban renewal projects; and benefits to disadvantaged groups, and other public programs. A separate study under this program will examine the probable impact of rapid transit on the existing Atlanta Transit System and the privately operated bus system. A separate contract covers planning, consulting, or engineering services not covered by existing contracts ($100,000). In addition to these existing programs, MARTA’s staff is in process of developing a new application for approxi- mately two million dollars of Federal funds, using the $500,000 in State funds approved by the 1967 General As- sembly as matching funds. When Federal funds are ap- proved, this two and one-half million dollar program will cover the following: 1) title searches of selected right of way parcels 2) early acquisition of critical right of way parcels 3) a plan for relocation of uprooted persons 4) employment of Urban Planning (Architectural) 5) continued work on Atlanta Transit System impact and coordi- nation plan 6) first steps in detailed design of Transit Center 7) financial operations plan and organization 8) preservation of historical sites and structures. “As these four programs are completed we will have more and more of the detailed information required to determine the best methods for financing this system; and, to develop a specific plan to bring to the voters for their approval, prob- ably in November 1969,” Stuart said. MARTA ACTION The Board of Directors of MARTA announced the appointment of Robert F, Adamson as a director representing the City of Atlanta. Adamson was appointed by Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr., and the Board of Aldermen to fill the unexpired term of Mills B, Lane, Jr., who resigned his position as Metro- politan Atlanta Rapid Transit director because of increased pressures of his many business interests. Adamson has been Treasurer of MARTA since its organization, and will continue in this post as well as serve as its director. The next meeting of the Board of Directors has been changed to Friday, chet Peles) at 3:30 P.M, in Room 619 of the Glenn Building, 120 Marietta treet, N.W. {1007 MIOREH erie ING ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 Hon. Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Ga. 30303
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 61

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_006_010_061.pdf
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  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 61
  • Text: = NUMBER 18° @ eS @ CENTRAL ATLANTA PROGRESS, ic. OCTOBER 18, 1968 2 PEACHTREE STREET, N.W., SUITE 2740 Does Atlanta Need RAPID TRANSIT ? This_is one of the most important questions to face Atlantans in modern times. ' Response to this question will determine...... ... whether we grow or choke .... Whether we have a strong central hub or disintegrate .... Whether we go forward or bog down ..++ Whether we compete with other regional cities or not ---. in summary, whether we are to become a truly great City. BASIC PHILOSOPHY IMPORTANT A city can sprawl --- or it can develop like a wheel, with a noticeable "hub" and satellite development all around, with trafficways and corridors lihking places of residence, places of work, recreation areas, shopping and entertainment facilities. The dramatic concentration of new high-rise office buildings and apartments in central Atlanta is evidence of our commitment to the strong central-core type of city --- with other elements around the central core comprising a great Metro wheel, BUT, A STRONG HUB! ACCESSIBILITY/CIRCULATION VITAL TO THE HUB For the hub to grow --- and function efficiently --- it must be readily accessible to those seeking to reach it, and it must be operable internally. Otherwise, the growth will go elsewhere. OF COURSE, R/T WILL BE EXPENSIVE --- BUT........ so will be the cost of not doing it. in lost efficiency in accidents -- damages --- injuries --- deaths --- in loss of development opportunities and the jobs and tax base therein represented --- in loss of property values as streets choke up loss of business activity --- in trying to pay for less workable solutions (for example, some cities have found that it costs as much as $21,000 average TO ADD TO THE EXPRESSWAY SYSTEM THE CAPACITY 7 MOVE ONE ADDITIONAL VEHICLE.) THIS IS NO CHOICE BETWEEN RAPID TRANSIT OR HIGHWAYS All of both that can be built will be needed. But, it's perfectly obvious that highway constPuceion into the central core cannot continue without limit. ATLANTA MUST MOVE FORWARD -- OR BACKWARD -- IT CAN'T STAND STILL. RAPID TRANSIT IS NEEDED NOW .... DECISION NOVEMBER 5th IS THE DATE OF ..+. A VOTE "FOR" IS A VOTE "FORWARD". In Montreal, a sparkling new rapid transit system not only moves thousands of people to and from work, but has helped build an exciting new downtown. Atlanta can do likewise. In the loss of Honorable Ivan Allen, Sr., Atlanta has lost one of its great citizens --- a person whose love for Atlanta and vision for its future have left an indelible mark. We extend deepest sympathy to Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.. TELLING THE CENTRAL ATLANTA PROGRESS STORY Executive Director spoke to the Northside Kiwanis Club Oct. 4th. Will address Decatur Rotary Club on November Ist. Secretary of State of Florida, Tom Adams, visited Central Atlanta Progress on October 16th to learn of this unique participation of private enterprise in a cooperative effort to build a better City. In the current urban crisis, those central cores that do sound planning and act forcefully will move forward --- the others will falter, ; +eecensees BOD Bivens a A Cose you alsced Fir, ZZ recommend 1X pou pee. REPRINT FROM THE ATLANTA JOURNAL (By Central Atlanta Progress, Inc. 9/30/68) _ Downtown: It's Hs the Hub By TOM WALKER Atlanta Journal Real Estate Edjior Like the hub of a wheel, the down! wh core of a major cit is the axis around which its suburbs turn, Atlanta is no ex- ception. From this central point, the sprawling urban community is held together in a meaningful pattern. Without it, these outlying areas would be just so many unrelated neighbor- hoods. This is why so much con- cern is expressed in Atlanta and other cities about the health and vitality of the downtown core. In a very real sense, the strength of the én- tire urban complex depends u @ siren, tral_city, just_as extremi- ties of a human being depend upon the beat e human eart. Many agencies and individu- als—both private and govern- mental—are actively engaged in the business of keeping At- Janta's downtown strong. THE PRIVATE real estaie developers are in the forefront in this effort, with such major projects as: —Peachtree Center, an in- ternationally known develop- ment that will eventually en- compass office, entertainment and living space. —The projected “air rights” complex of office, hotel and retail buildings which Dallas developer Raymond Nasher plans to construct over the railroad tracks near the State Capitol. —The similar air rights proj- ect which Cousins Properties, Inc. of Atlanta plans over the railroad right-of-way at Spring Street and Techwood Drive. —The Georgia State College expansion plans which will make way for a school of 35,000 students by 1975 right in the heart of Atlanta. —The government center, where state, city and county agencies are housed, but which will need room for ex- pansion in the future. —Colony Square, a complex of office buildings, apart- ments, hotel, retail and res- taurant facilities on Peachtree at 14th streets. a PLUS DEVELOPMENTS connected with the Georgia Tech campus, the Atlanta Civie Center and new high- rise. medium-rise and low-rise office buildings in downtown Atlanta that are almost ton numerous to keep up with. And at some future date, de- velopments associated with the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit system will help transfigure the downtown core. These are projects or plans which have already been made public, and have ad- vanced to one or another stage of advanced planning or actual construction. But there are other dramatic plans for Friday, September 20, 1968 * ' deteriorating downtown Atlanta which are still in the formulative stage, but all of them are aimed at creating a strong, throbbing central hub for a sprawling metropolitan community. THE DOWNTOWN, = how- ever, is the center of more than just a promising future -— it is the center of some. major urban problems which: will have to be solved before the promise can be fulfilled. These includedowntown blight; ghetto and slum areas; neighborhoods, within the very shadows of gleaming new office struc- tures; transitional business districts where vacant build- : ings sit idle within a short walk of Five Points, financial center of the Southeast; cong- ested streets and clogged free- ways — among others. Coping with the future of this high-density downtown _ core requires detailed study of literally every square foot of space. In its planning “you've got to talk about feet and inches where you might be talking about miles if you're consider- ing areas farther out,’ said Robert W. ‘'Bob" Bivens, ex- ecutive director of Central At- lanta Progress (CAP). A PRIVATELY FINANCED agency, Central Atlanta Prog- ress, in effect, is the business community’s 9wn planning agency, as opposed to the pub- licly financed planning depart- ments of the City of Atlanta, the metropolitan area and the State of Georgia. As such it is unique locally, and possibly is unique among major cities of the nation. As Mr. Bivens puts it, Cen- tral Atlanta Progress is atest step in the evolutionary progress of the business com- Franky of central Atlanta TTL wal Torsnet fromm tosh cleus provided by two older organizations: the Central At- lanta Improvement Associa- tion. founded in 1941, and the Uptown Association, organized in 1960. In January of last year, CAP was organized. But Mr. Bivens explains, these organi- zations were also restructured so that, in effect, a completely new association was formed. “Tt_is nota promotional up,” said Mr. Bivens “hurt is a planning ag prise. The overall goal of CAP. said its executive director, is eee a to develop ideas that make . sense and see them through. THE AIM 1s NOT to. come up wi osals that sound great, but are impractical. The idea is to come up with sensible, practi- sals, A community which devel- ops the.latter 15 in the S| - sition to take ae a mone whic Is aVallable rom €Xxisting sources (Such a5 @ number o eral agen- cies), he sald, @ also is In r sition to intluence G. Ingram sai e want to enlist, ihe private Sector, to a Ivate enterprise a make iT oO} rocess in, ae a represents aA Ginadimensong the tiveness Ment of the business commu- a in_the procens of plan- think the will carry out the plans.” é same time, Mr. Biv- ens emphasized, CAP works closely with the public plan- ning agencies in the overall search for an answer to the question: What kind of core does a booming, metropolitan area need, and how can this be brought into reality? The central core of Atlanta is hard to define in exact terms. As conceived by Cen- tral Atlanta Progress, it is somewhat larger than the re- gion which most people proba- bly think of as “downtown.” GENERALLY, THE “CORE’' is defined as the area from Brookwood Station on the north to Atlanta Sta- . dium on the south, and within the railroad belt line extend- ing eastward beyond Boule- vard-Monroe Drive and west- ward as far as Maddox Parl and Washington Park. One reason for selecting these general boundaries is the fact that so much statisti- cal data is available from such agencies as the Census Bureau on neighborhoods that have these fixed limits. One of the fundamental problems facing the future of - downtown Atlanta is traffic— how to get there and back from outly! regions, and how to circulate within the downtown area once there. “Georgia State College is planning for a student body of 25,000 by 1975," Mr. Bivens said. “Obviously, even with rapid transit, most of these will drive cars to school. How will they get in and out? How will you separate pedestrian traffic from streets? These are some of the types of prob- lems which someone has to be thinking about right now." Said Mr. Ingram: ‘‘There is an overriding concern over just what kind of downtown area we are trying to achieve in relation to a city with a (fu- ture) population of 3 million- plus.” In short, what ought to be downtown and what can be lo- cated elsewhere in the metro- politan region: how many and what kinds of jobs, how much office space and for what pur- poses, what kind of and how much housing?—to mention just a few major considera- tions. “EXPERTS SAY, AND we agree, that all great cities have two things in ae sald Mr. Bivens. “One is exciting central core, here people want to go fo shop, for entertainment, go to the thea- ter, lo restaurants—and it is a place that is active 24 hours a day. “Second, a_ strong, middle class citize lives os to the central core, * he went on. This concentration of people provides the leadership for the downtown and patronizes what the down- town offers—without, Mr. Biv- ens notes, having to commute many miles from the suburbs. What then, should go into the central, downtown core? Mr. Bivens and Mr. Ingram listed these: —More high-rise, high-income apartments (‘‘Atlanta is really not quite ready for this now,” said Mr. Bivens, “but we ought to be thinking ahead to that day, and take steps to make it possible”). —Downtown should be the focal point of cultural activities. ("This is pretty well happening now, but we ought to strengthen it,”” he said). This includes thea- ters, restaurants and great ho- tels, among other features. —A COMPLEX OF strong re- tail establishments, which at- tract shoppers not only from the metropolitan community, but from throughout the region. —A concentration of govern- ment offices. —A concentration of financial activity. —Merchandise and trade marts, ime requisites of a oman area, said Nr. Div- ens, are that i Gas and sale, nme of the major trends in downtown Atlanta development, he said, is the large-scale com- plex, such as Peachtree Center. THE LARGE COMPLEX Tepresents a new dimension, because this type of project includes the full range of human activities from homes, to jobs to recreational facili- ties and entertainment, right in the central area. While most air rights devel- opments have been envisioned so far over railroad right-of- way, Mr. Bivens pointed out that air rights developments ROBERT W. BIVENS ‘Sensible’ Soluiions over freeways offers a broad opportunity for future develop- ment. Resourceful thinking could ions to the use of much down- utilized to its maximum aoe tal, the planners indicated. One such area is the so- called “garment district" of downtown Atlanta just south of Five Points. Obviously in a transitional state, the main questions for this and similar property would be: What land use would make the most sense here? AND ALSO IN THE slum neighborhoods—what would be the best use for land that is obviously not fit for human habitation? A dilemma here is how to bring the ghetto dweller into closer contact with his poten- tial jobs? It is literally a geo- graphical problem, since the job quite often is many miles from the needy person’s dwell- ing, and the transportation be- tween the two may be too costly, or inadequae. “We've got to work in the long haul on a sensible match of people with jobs,”’ said Mr. Bivens, “‘so that people in the cities can work to improve themselves.” This, in short, is one of the immediate problems that must be solved en route to sol- utions that are mapped out for longer-range problems. atiractive, |
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 69

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_006_010_069.pdf
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  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 69
  • Text: Sunde ’ seetene eevee Mae POEM Aid on Transit Seen by Volpe Atlanta in ‘Excellent Position’ For Federal Funds, He Says By BILL COLLINS The U.S. secretary of transportation says Atlanta will be i an excellent position” to get two-thirds of the money for a rapi ransit system from the federal government. | John Volpe, former governor | of Massachusetts and one of the | front-runners for the vice presi- | dential nod at ean the 1968 Repub- lican pyesiden- | tial convention | was in Atlanta Saturday night to address the lth annual | meeting of the. | National Con-_ | ference of State Legislative Leaders. The secretary, at a news con-| ference before his speech, ex: | plained the Nixon administra- | tion’s $10 billion, 12-year public | transportation bill and said At- | lanta ‘may get the jump ae other cities’ for funds under the | bill, if the measure is approved by Congress. He said the bill would author- ize him to make $3.1 billion available immediately upon its being signed into law. The fed- eral money would be spent over HOP Gates ee eae eae “He also said Atlanta would be | “in an excellent position”’ to get |a federal grant totaling two-| thirds of the cost of a rapid | transit system because of the planning it has done and also be- [28] ae leaders our-day conference, Vol talked about the need for feder. al-state-local government coop- cause it is one of five ‘‘center cities.” eee ee ee VOLPE POINTED OUT, how- ever, that under the proposed bill no one state could get more than 12% per cent of the total appropriation, He also told newsmen the Vietnam war is not draining | funds he has requested for his department and added, ‘The ad- ministration and the director of the Bureau of the Budget have approved the two transportation bills I have requested.” Volpe says the two measures he would like to see enacted in- clude the $10.1-billion public transportation bill and the air- port-airways bill which would provide $2.5 billion for air-traffic control and $2.5 billion for con- struction of new airports and ex- plansion of existing facilities. He said the administration is eoneerned about in-flight erashes and feels the airport- airways bill would help diminish he possibility of future colli- sions, With $2.5 billion of the air- port-airways bill, Volpe ex- slained, the federal government | would work towards develop- | ment of a fully automated sys- m G—<'r-traffie control sys- em eration in solving the problems. ——, “Much of the glamour, power and prestige that once sur- rounded state Capitols shifted to Washington in the past 25 years,”’ he said. “And when the power went to Washington, many of the tal- ented young men went also. Washington has been the mecea for} young Americans who ted to dedicate their lives to fulfillment of the American dréam,” he added. VOLPE SAID there has been a trend towards reversing the rowing dependence on the fed- eral government in the past few years “This new trend first became strongly evident under Presi- dent son,” he added. “But President Nixon has gone a Step further. He has pro- posed a program of revenue sharing between the states and Washington. And, although it is a modest beginning, it will be stepped up,’ Volpe said. nation’s
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 60

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_006_010_060.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 60
  • Text: March 21, 1969 Honorable Ivan Allen Mayor, City of Atlanta -City Hall 68 Mitchell Street, 5.W. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mayor Allen: If the mail balloting of the Atlanta Area Transportation Policy Committee for establishment of a 60-man Citizens’ Advisory Committee results in this resolution being passed, I would like to be considered for membership on this Citi- zens' Advisory Committee. My qualifications include nine years experience in the auto- motive industry, fifteen years residence in the City of At- lanta, the application of computers to the solution of busi- ness problems when I was employed by IBM, and a strong layman's interest for a number of years in traffic and transportation problems. You and I know that Atlanta is the finest city in America. Frankly, though, Mayor Allen, I feel that this all-pervasive transportation problem is the most significant cloud on Atlanta's horizon. I want Atlanta to continue to be a wonder- ful place to live for my children and grandchildren, and I know that proper traffic and transportation planning will help assure this. May we meet personally to discuss this? Very truly yours, p> rae Bernard A. McIlnany (fe Ko a Marketing Representative BAM/dd
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 55

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_006_010_055.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 55
  • Text: People who lve in the area from Westlake Ave: to bynburst COME T O RA ID RA Sl ALL residente on the Weet Sid@ of Atlanta are invited to st- Fepresentatives of the Metropolitan Atlante Rapid Transit Drive and beyond should try to come to the hearing which 7 i by held tend public hearings on the proposed rapid transit linge. Authority will discuss routes and locations of All stations. The map below shows the proposed location of the rapid tran- There will ba a detailed discussion of the West Line. end how eee By .00 F UBLIC HE RING wit stations and routes. The rapid transit system would uae it will affect this area. They will shew aerial photos. maps. WRSRESONS, MAY 2, LAE. ay SINE As P A high-speed trains, which would run as fast ae 75 miles per howe and aides to show how the raplé transit syste will look and 7 ie ae and would average more than 40 miles per hour where Lt will go. AME ZION CHURCH, 34 HIGHTOWER HD., N.W. 75 PONTOWER FO STATION | METROPOLATAN ATLANTA RAPD TRANSIT AUTHORITY WONT Lee Pua ereneTarh ade AD MET
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 56

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_006_010_056.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 56
  • Text: Dane" lat el May 5, 1969 MEMORANDUM Tc: Mr. Earl Landers From: Dan Sweat I have added some names to the map and plotter their addresses. I hope this might be of some help. DS:fy
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 9

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_006_010_009.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 9
  • Text: METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY Cash in Banks: C & § National Bank First National Bank - Payroll Trust Company of Georgia Fulton National Bank - Section 9 Deposit In Transit (DeKalb County Appropriation) Investments: U. S. Treasury Bills U. S. Treasury Bills - Section 9 Petty Cash Accounts Receivable: Gwinnett County - 1967 Gwinnett County - 1966 TOTAL ASSETS Accounts Payable Payroll Taxes Withheld and Accrued Reserves: ARMPC : Urban Design Study Atlanta Transit Study ATLANTA, GEORGIA JULY 31, 1967 ASSETS LIABILITIES Parsons-Brinckerhoff-Tudor-Bechtel: Section 9 Matching Retainer Agreement: Transportation Study Public Information Surverying TOTAL LIABILITIES SURPLUS STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL CONDITION $ 10,729.07 2,332.07 1,000.00 90,283.58 20,692.50 130,585.50 0 25.00 $9,105.00 4,552.50 __ 13,657.50 $ 91,857.45 1,166.97 5,800.00 1,000.00 70,000.00 $ 207.70 696.30 5,820.77 6,724.77 $269,305.22 176,549.19 $_ 92,756.03
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 3

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_006_010_003.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 3
  • Text: FORM 25-2 ATLANTA, GEORGIA
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 6, Folder 10, Document 11

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_006_010_011.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 6, Folder 10, Document 11
  • Text: QeaAORGLA IMIUWIVUCGHIPAIL, Crry Comousstonen J, Steve Knicut, President COLUMBUS Mayor Matcotm R. MacLean, First Vice President SAVANNAH BASIS OGIWAILCO ws Mayor Joun L. Cnomantie, Second Vice President GAINESVILLE W. Exumer Geonce, Executive Director 406 FULTON FEDERAL BUILDING: / ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 / TELEPHONE 255-0424 VE PAST June 27, 1966 1 TI ESIDENTS CITY COMMISSIONER JOHN E. YARBROUGH IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT ROME, GA. MAYOR RANDOLPH MEDLOCK STONE MOUNTAIN, GA. ac PR Mayor W. B. WITHERS ‘ PETE NII AS 3 Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. TY COMMISSIONER AR . UETT , GRIFFIN, GA. . 8 Mayor of Atlanta MAYOR B. F. MERRITT, JR. ; ae aae City Hall FIRST DISTRICT Atlanta, Georgia PRESIDENT Mayor Jack A. LEROY einer Dear Mayor Allen: DIRECTOR Mayor J. W. SNELL WRIGHTSVILLE - . * - Sea S RO Bian ET Since you have more than casual interest in rapid PRERTOENY tian transit, I thought you would like to have copy of PELHAM the minutes of the meeting of the Georgia Highway COUNCILMAN J. 6, MINTER Users Conference recently held in Atlanta. vr aeGay We are a little bit unusual in that the Georgia RICBARE BD ,'FNS Municipal Association is possibly the only state CIBECTOR ve municipal group belonging to the state or national PINE MOUNTAIN Highway Users Conference. The Association of County oe eS a eee Commissioners used to dominate this group, however, PRESIDENT POOH TEMAN PTO BROOME we have as much influence with the membership as DIRECTOR the county folks do. COUNCILMAN CLYDE J, Hicks CONYERS FIFTH DISTRICT Please let us know whenever we may be of service. ESIDENT MAYOR xe E. GREENWAY ROSWELL DIRECTOR ALDERMAN E. GREGORY GRIGGS ATLANTA SIXTH DISTRICT PRESIDENT Mavor J, GARDNER NEWMAN Gearest 7 W. Elmer George Mayor HERBERT H. JONES Executive Director McDONOUGH Yours very truly, SEVENTH DISTRICT PRESIDENT WEG/rs Mayor J. C. Woops TRION DIRECTOR MAYOR RALPH R. CLARK, JR. enclosure RINGGOLD EIGHTH DISTRICT cc: GMA Board of Directors PRESIDENT MaYOR ELTON D. BROOKS DOUGLAS DIRECTOR MAYOR JAMES T. WINDSOR, JR McRAE NINTH DISTRICT PRESIDENT Mayor DuARD B. WHITLOW CARNESVILLE DIRECTOR : Mayor Mrs. JESSIE L. GARNER “ ay . ee 4 DAHLONEGA COUNCILMAN GEORGE H. BULLOocK ALDERMAN J. J. SHoos CITY MANAGER JOHN H. MARKLAND ATHENS SAVANNAH PRESIDENT, CITY MANAGERS’ SECTION TENTH DISTRICT DIRECTOR oe ! DECATUR : - PRESIDENT eee S MAYOR WILLIAM JACiC HAMILTON ALDERMAN CECIL TURNER =», ea ‘ MaYoR JULIUS F_ BisHop STATE. _ DECATUR ATLANTA ADMIN ASSIST. R. TRAVIS HIGGINBOTHAM, : t AT LARGE . PRESIDENT. CITY CLERKS’ SECTION ATHENS MAYOR JOHN C. EDENFIELD MAYOR LEE E, CARTER ALBANY , 1 DIRECTOR THOMASTON HARTWELL : : p GEORGE A, SANCKEN, JR City ATTORNEY WILLIAM E. Smirh AUGUSTA PRESIDENT, CITY ATTORNEYS* SECTION AMERICUS
  • Tags: Box 6, Box 6 Folder 10, Folder topic: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021