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Box 7, Folder 10, Document 2

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_010_002.pdf
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  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 10, Document 2
  • Text: April 28~ 1969 Mr. Duane Beck Exe cutive Dil'ector Community Council of the Atlanta Area, Inc. 1000 Glenn Building 120 Marietta Street, N. W . Atlant , Georgia 30303 De r Duane: Attached i a copy of a draft position paper establishing the National Urban Coalition's role in he 1th. I would appreci ny comments you or your coll hav . Sine · rely your , Dan Sw at DS:!y gues m y �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 10, Document 7

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_010_007.pdf
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  • Title: Box 7, Folder 10, Document 7
  • Text: THE UlfBAN COALITION ACTION COUNCIL 1819 H Street, N .W . • Washington , 0 . C. 20006 (202) 293-1530 JOHN W . GARDNER Chairm an AN DREW H EISK ELL A. PHILIP RANDOLPH Co -chairm en LOWELL R. BECK Executive Director April 25, 1969 Mr. Dan Swe:et Office of the Mayor of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mr. Swert: Mr. John Gardner and Mr. J. Irwin Miller testified yesterday before the Senate Subcommittee on Employment , Manpower and Poverty. At the request of the subcommittee chairman, they were the lead-off witnesses. They stressed the importance of significantly expanding antipoverty efforts in both urban and rural communities. We believe you will be interested in their prepared statements. Sincerely, /4L-ULI!. ~~ Lowell R . Beck �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 10, Document 8

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_010_008.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 10, Document 8
  • Text: Statement by JOHN W. GARD NER, Chairman The Urban Coalition Action Council before the Subcommitte e on Employment, Manp ower and Poverty Committee on Labo r and Public Wel f are United States Se nate April 23, 1969 Mr. Chai rman, we are pleas e d to b e h ere on behalf of the Urba n Coa lition Ac t ion Council. The Ac t ion Council brings to g ether v a rious l e ad e rs f r o m s e gments t hat do no t n orma lly coll a bo r ate for the purpose o f r eaching a gree me n t or s ol ut i ons t o ou r n ation ' s dome stic pro b l e ms. We a r e h ere tod a y t o disc u s s poverty i n the Un i t ed S t ate s . By cu rr e nt Soci a l Secur ity Administration c r i t eria th ere are 2 2 milli o n poor p e op l e i n the Un ite d St at e s . ha s d e c l ine d from 3 9 millio n in 1 959 . The numb e r To l ift 17 mi llion p e o ple out o f pover t y i n 1 0 y e ars is a cons i der a b l e ach i eveme nt, worth b earing in mind i n th ese d ay s of d i scou rageme nt. It s houl d g ive u s cou rag e and co n f i d e nc e t o tac k l e the rema i ni n g t a s k. To le t the a c hi e vem e n t l e ad t o a s l a cke n ing o f effo r t would b e t h e worst ki nd o f fo lly . Twe n ty- t wo millio n p o or peop l e repr ese nt a t reme ndous amount o f human misery a nd depriv ati o n. �i -2In his excellent paper entitled "Who are the Urban Poor?" Anthony Downs offers some highly relevant data. Of the urban p oor, the majority are white almost half are in households that cannot be expected to be self-supporting: the aged, the disabled, the mother with infant children forty-one per cent are children under 18 nearly one-third a re in househ olds h e aded by employed men whos e earni ngs are below the poverty leve l. It is worth r eminding ourselves that the poverty remaining after dec ade s of unp recede nted a fflu ence is riot like the poverty th a t wa s once widespread in thi s count ry . that rema ins. It is the h ard-core It is not the g e ntee l, thre a dbare but benign poverty of the 19th Century clergyman or t each er. It is poverty at its mo s t stub bor n, pov erty rooted in th e s oci a l d i sintegration of urban a nd rura l s lums , poverty linked to s evere cultu ra l deprivation, poverty complicated by illite racy , phy ~ica l handicap, advanc e d age , or me nta l r e t a r dation. In s uch p overty , hung er a nd ma lnutri t i on warp t h e no r ma l course of c hi ld develo pme nt; p hysica l ai l me nt s go untreat ed and turn into li fe long h a ndic ap s; child re n are n ever exposed t o the s timu l a tion t hat would e n s u re t heir in te ll ec t ual deve l opme nt; the enviro nment breed s h opelessness a n d l aw l essness. It is a wor l d of v i c tims and it breeds v i c t ims. An individual born into s u c h an environment does not--cannot-enjoy th e opportunity we regard as t h e birthr i ght of every American child. I f o u r commitment to the values we so proudly �-3~ profess doesn't move us to right that wrong, our self-interest should. Out of all proportion to their numbe r s in the population, the children of poverty become, in later life, economic burdens on the rest of the community. If we are unwilling to spend the money to cure the problem at its source, we spend the money later anyway--in the social cost of crime, narcotics addiction, social unrest, mental illness, lifelong phy sical handicap and so on. The attack on poverty must be far broader and more varied than is generally recognized. We have to begin with management of the e conomy and with attention to economic growth and full emplo yme nt. Back of every thing we seek to accomp l ish is the economic strength of the n a tion. That strength mak es our social programs p ossible . It provides the jobs and pay ch ecks that enable most Americans to e a t well, keep their childr en healthy and funct i on as ind ependent citizens living thei r lives as they please. We often fa ll into the h abit of t alking about ou r economy as one thing and our socia l p r ograms as a completely d i fferent subj e ct. They are th e same subject. main social program. Economic growth is our The freest and best money a ma n receives is the mone y in his pay envelope. The bes t program for creating i ndependent and confident citi ze ns is a vital, full-employment economy. Therefo r~ we must expec t the Administration and the Congr ess to use the tools of monetary and fisca l policy to avoid inflation or recession, to facilitate capital growth �-4where possibl e , to e xp and job o pportunities and job t r ai n ing, to seek wag e -price stability , to encour a ge the development o f new products and s~rvices and the adv ancement of science and technolog y , to foster increased prod ucti vi t y , and to protect natural resources. ,. The a ttack o n pov erty also calls for adequate progr a ms of income mainte n a nce - -unemp loyme nt insur a n ce, social secu r i ty , public assistance, and probabl y new forms t o come. These prog r ams hav e no t be e n surrounde d with t h e glamou r that has touched some othe r aspects of t he attac k o n p over t y ; ind e e d t h e publ i c assis t ance pr o gram s h av e be e n the su b j e ct of widespr e ad ho st i lity. But it is a p l ai n fa ct th a t mos t o f t he p oo r a re too ol d or t o o young or t oo si c k o r disab l ed t o enter t h e j ob marke t . No ma t ter how bri l liant l y we pursue reme di a l prog rams , t h ere wil l a l way s remain a large numb er wh o can only be aid ed by providing c ash i ncome. A comprehen s ive attack on poverty a lso requir e s that we rehabili ta te the victims of poverty and e liminate the urban and rural slums where poverty is bred. To h e l p t he indi v i dua l we mus t h ave adequate l y funded programs of educat ion, job training, he al t h care and social services. To ch ange the environment involves massive urban efforts f suc h as the programs called for in the Housing Act of 1 968 ; as well as region a l and rural development activities such as the Appalachian Program. In short, the total effort to deal with poverty reaches into every domestic department of government. As you know, the Office of Economic Opportunity has controlled something less than �I . -58% of all federal antipoverty funds expended during its life. Agencies with far more resources at their disposal are concerned with. housing, manpower, health and other needs of the poor. If we do not adequately fund those broader programs, the attack on poverty will be crippled. 1 would place particular emphasis on modernization of the e x isting welfare prog r am, including Fed e ral support of national welfare standard s , and hopefull y , early consideration of a more thoroug hgoing revision of the national income maintenance s y stem a stepp e d -up training p r o g ram with built-in incentives, bett e r t ai lor ed to the n eeds of the s e ver a l c a t ego rie s of poo r , e.g ., t he we l fare mothe rs, the uns ki l led t eenager, t he employed l ow earning family he ad Jo b creat i on--an exp a nded JOBS program t o i n c re a se p r i vate emp lo yme nt, a nd a publ ic serv i ce emp loyment p rog ram educa tion , h e alth a nd nutritio na l progr am s to c ounter the e f fec ts of pov e r ty on th e con s i dera bl e number o f ch i ldr e n g r o wi ng u p in poo r f amili e s. We mu s t beg in to t h ink i n terms of mu ch hi ghe r l e v e l s o f fu nding in are as affec t ing t he poor . Actua l appro priat io ns ge ne ra l ly are significant l y be l ow a u t ho rized appropriat i ons, We o ften h ea r t ha t pover t y programs are failures; t hat t h ey d o not work. And yet, they se l dom are given the necessar y funds or �-6the long-range commitment to insure their success. Some examples wi ll show the glaring disparities between authorizations and appropriations. The Model Cities program-- intended as a coordinated attack on blight and treating social as well as physical problems--was given $625 million last year although more than $1 billion was authorized. This year only $675 million has b ee n requested, with an authorized amount of $1.3 billion. The home o wne r ship and rental assistance provisions of the Housing and Urb a n Development Act called f or $150 million the first year , and onl y $50 mi llion was appropriated. These funds have been fully committ e d f o r several months, and many are beginning to quest io n serious l y t he gove r nment I s c o1mn i tme nt under the Ho u s in g Act . The Nix on Adm in istratio n is re questin g full fu nding for th e se prog ram s a nd Congress must act o n this reque st i f the Ho u s ing Act i s to meet i ts p r omise. Th e Off i c e of Economic Oppo rt u ni t y has consistently failed t o sec ur e full appr o pr i at io ns. And in educ a tion and he a l th, the re h as bee n a no t ice a ble f a ilure to spend the amoun t s n e c e s sary to have a n imp act o n pove rty. Title I of the Element ary and Se c onda r y Educ a tion Act, which pro v ides fede r a l funds to s chool d i stri ct s tha t have sp eci a l pro j ec t s f o r disadv an t age d ch i ld ren, r e c e i ved a n author i za tion of $2. 7 2 6 bi lli o n yet i t was a llowed o nly $1.1 2 3 b illion i n a p propr i ated f unds . And so the story goes . It i s u nreal i stic to believe we c an s ol ve ou r nation ' s problems i f we do not prov i de even the auth orized funds after long and studied debate over proposed solutions. �- 7 - And now let me tu r n specifically to e x tension of the Economic Opp o r tun ity Act a nd the Offi ce o f Economic Opportunity. Mr. Chairman, in preparation for this testimony , I revi ewed the history of the Office of Economic Opp or tunity since 196 4 , a nd I must s a y that I am impre ss e d with the role that t h is Committe e ha s pl a y e d. and in s i g ht. The Committee has shown concern It h a s worked h a rd to educa te itsel f a nd to se rv~ as a n advo cate f or t h e poor. It is e a s y to critici ze the hectic e a rly years of the OEO. But wh en the smo ke cl ears away; I b el i eve th a t history wil l r eco r d si gnif i cant achievement s . The OEO ' s vigor o us efforts stirr ed a concern for the victims of poverty tha t made p o ssible a mobilizat i on of resources r eaching far beyond t he agen c y its e lf. Programs in beha l f o f the poor in every othe r dome s tic d e p artme nt be n ef itte d by the g enera tive f o rce of t his new e ff ort. Beyond that, the OEO has inj ec ted a n ele ment o f innovation into a numbe r of programs addressed t o the problems o f th e poor; it has ide nti fied and f o stered community l eadership a mong the poor and among minorities; a nd it h as enabled m~ny of us to ga in valuable insight s into the imp a ct o f insti tutional inade quacies on the li ves o f the poor. Looki ng to the f uture , I want to speak very briefly of thr ee themes which were p romine nt in the ear l y concepti on o f OEO' s function: innova tion, community parti cipation and coordination. The i nnov at ive approach must continue to characterize the OEO. The infusion of " research and development" t e chniques �- 8 - into social program areas should be firmly supported and expanded. The innovative approach is well illustrated in the delive r y of services to the poor . Breaking out of the mold of traditional agency patterns, the b es t poverty programs h ave shown that legal and heal th services, pre-school education, multi- service progr am integration in n e ighborhood centers and other te chni ques could in fa ct reach p ers ons long con s i dered unre achab le. It is not gene rally reco gn i zed th a t t he innova ti ve activi ties o f OEO had a far- r each i ng imp a ct on the old- l ine departme nts. The latter would b e loath to admi t it , but many p r ograms undertake n by the old -l ine departme nts betwee n 1 965 and 1 96 8 we r e inf l uenced by t he philosophy of the OEO. At th e h eart of th e controversy surrounding the OEO has b een th e ques tio n of public power for the poor. The "War o n Poverty " provi ded t h e first ma jor t ools wi th which the poor could seri ously affec t some po lic ies and programs at both the national and th e local l evels. It is t r u e that in a typic a lly Ame ric a n burst o f e nthusiasm, the OEO wen t at this task with a maximum of energy and a minimum o f reflect i on. But perhaps su c h things c an only be a ccomplished in a burst of enthusiasm. I a m thoroughly fami li ar with the problems, inconsistencies, ten s ions and mi stakes that h a ve arisen fro m appl icati on of the requirement for "max imum feasible participation." But we are more skillful in handling thos e prcblems today than we were two y ears ago, and we are still learning. ,, It was wise to seek �- 9 - to give a voice to the poor, particularly wi se in the case of minority groups (because of their systematic prior exclusion). I believe that we will move towa rd incr easing l y sound and effective f o rms of citizen pa rt icipation . Eve n today, as my own staff mo~es about the country helping to organize local urb a n co a litions and se e king the cooperat ion of le aders from the bla ck community, we find that many of th e ablest local lead e r s we can r e cruit for our purposes ar e me n and wome n who had t hei r first tast e of leadership in th e Community Action Programs . I h ave emphas i z e d th at the attack on poverty , broad l y con ceived, r eaches into every dome s tic d e partme nt. Such multif a rious a cti v ity cr i e s out for coord inat ion, and of cour s e the OEO was p l a ced in th e Ex ecut ive Offic e of the Preside nt to ac c ompl i sh jus t t h at. As we all know, it n eve r di d , p a rtl y b e c a u s e it s energ i e s went in to op er a ting new prog r a ms, and p art l y b ecaus e coord in at ing Ca bine t me mb e rs is a difficult t ask a t b es t . OEO' s achievemen t s in coord i na t i o n hav e not b ee n alto ge th er neg l ig i b l e. I t h as wo r k ed out che c kpo i nt pro ced ur e s th r ou g h which federal agencies , grantees, st ate agenc i es and lo ca l c ommunities engage in mutua l consu l tati o n before grants are made. And i t has developed joi n t projects such a s th ose i nvolv i ng displaced farm workers i n th e Mississipp i De l ta, I ndians, and migrant workers. But much, much more is needed. I believe that my views on the coordination of domestic programs are fairly well known. �- 10 \ I do not accept the widely sh a r e d notion that Cabinet membe rs cannot be coordinated. The y can b e . The first requireme nt is unflinching de termination on the part of the Preside nt to bring abo ut that r es ult. The second is a suitable instrume ntality (and I may say p are ntheti ca ll y th a t the Economic Opportunity Council, properly u sed , wou ld h ave bee n quite a dequat e to the · purpo se ). The t hird requir eme nt is that th e instrumen tali ty must b e h eaded by a ma n o f stature, implicitly t~ust ed by the Pres ident . There i s a serious quest i on as to wheth er OEO can ever fill t his coordi nat ing function so long as i t is an o p er a t ing ag ency -- and th eref ore, in a se ns e, a compe titor o f th e departme nts it hopes to coo rdinate. So we may h ave to look to Preside nt Nixon ' s n ew Urba n Affairs Council to accomplish the d e sired result. It will do so onl y if the President hims e l f takes an active inter es t in it , and o n l y i f a s trong and subst ant i al professional staff is prov ided to pl a n, ev a luate, sift p r i or iti e s , develop a lterna tive cour ses of action and make recommenda t i ons to the President. Whil e we 're on t his s u b j ec t I wan t to say a word abo ut rural poverty, because it involves the question of coordination. We wi ll not solve our most pressing urban prob l ems as long as widespread rural poverty exists . The h eavy migration from rural America to the blighted areas of our major cities clearly shows how b ad economic and social conditions are in rura l areas; de spite the privations felt by the urban poor, dehuman izing urban conditions continue to represent a substantial improvement �- 11 - over life for the poor in rural communities. With improving agricultur a l technology, ever more per~ons will have to find employ ment outside agricultur e . Already the great majorit y of the rural poor are not in any way involved in farming. Industri a l de v elopme nt in rural ar e as should be vastly e xpande d wh e r eve r suffici e nt potential e x ists . State s a r e unique l y situated to combat rural poverty . Programs of eco n omic a nd co~munity d e vel opme nt in rural ar ea s frequently require multi - coun ty planning a nd coordination. Federal funds, includin g CAP fun d s, shoul d encour a g e the deve lopme nt of s ta te -coo r d ina t ed d e mon st r ati ons in rur a l ar eas -- p e r haps s evera l in each s t at e -- with s pe cial emp hasi s on economi c deve l opment and o n tr a i n ing o f admi ni s t rat i ve and pro gram personne l for a ll ph a s e s o f community d evelopment , fro m pub l ic admini s tr a tion t o staff for socia l we l fare agencies. Such d emonstrations should extend to educ a tion, h ealth, i ndustrial d eve lopment, tra n sportation and al l o th er re l evant fie l ds . Obviousl y , programs o f th a t scope are not t h e a ppr opr i a t e primar y function of the De p ar tment of Agri cultur e a lo ne ; rath er , th ere shoul d be a coordinated attack b y the Dep artmen t s o f Agricult ure, Labor, Hous i ng and Urban Development, Transportation, Health, Education a nd We lfare, and the Economi c Development Administratio n. The OEO mig h t conceivably be t he in strumen t for accomplishin g such coordination a lthough -- as indica ted earlier -- its capacity to oper ate and coordinate at the same time remains in doubt. �-12- In the fin a l analys i s , subst a ntial economic d evelopment is the key to e nding rur a l poverty . There is at p res e nt no fed e ral policy g uiding the app licati o n o f the nation's con s ide r a ble potenti a l in this are a . Re sources of the Ec onom{c Deve lopme nt Admi nistr a tion c an be broug ht to b ear only where the most s e v e r e cond iti ons alre ady e x ist, a nd even then there is virtually n o coord i nat i on be t wee n the Ec onomic Deve l opment Ad mi nis t r a t i o n and ma jor fede r a l age ncy p r ocur e me n t a n d cont racting f u nct i ons . There h a s been much d i scu ss i o n o f wh e ther t he v ariou s OEO p r ograms s hou ld be move d to the regular departme nts . I be lieve that some definitely shoul d be t ransferred under c arefully d rawn cond iti ons. I con fess t ha t I am equal l y i mpat i ent with thos e who are tot a lly ho s til e to the OEO and tho se who want to preserve it u nder g l ass, utterly uncha nged . I need not remind th i s Committee that about 40 % of the funds appropriated u nder th e Economi c Oppor tunity Act have a l ways gone i nto programs delegated among variou s federa l age n cies. The great bulk of these funds h as gone into a series of wo rk and training programs, a n d th ey have been the basis for much innovation wi th in the receiving agencies . I am keenly conscious of the problems involved in transfer. Fo r example , federal departments presently function heavily through state agencies; they do not, in the main, have stron g relationships to local l eadersh ip and organization. If the departme nts receive programs from OEO they must continue to foster the new constituencies developed around the programs �- 13 - at the local level, and Congress must encourage them to do so. Similarly, they must protect th e innovative values of the transferred programs. If these programs cannot survive in the regular agencies as the latter are presently org anized, then th ere is something gravely wrong with the regular agencies, something that should be corrected forthwith. To insure an appropriate outcome, it seems advisable that, at least initi al l y , delegation should be favored over outright transfer. Transf er should occur only as the regular agencies prove their capacity to nurtur e the delegated programs. �- 14 - I have been asked my v i ews on how ma ny years the present legislation should be extended. I do not have fixed views on that sub j e ct, provided th at two princi ples are ob se rved . The first i s that eve ry program should be open to pe r iodic r evision as experience is ga ine d . The s e cond is that the nation s hould exhi bit an unwaveri ng commitment to fight the poverty battle continuously , thi s yea r a n d nex t and the year after , never relenting until t h e j ob is d one . It is not an of f- aga in - on - again kind of prob l e m and it do e sn 't me rit tha t kind of answer. In c losing , gen tl emen , let me reve r t again to the tota li ty of the gover nme nt's effort in combatting p overty. I am firmly convinced t h at mo re billions mu st b e p o ure d i mmed i ate ly into th e broad s pectrum of hou s in g , edu ca tion , h ea lth, ma n p owe r d eve l opment , a nd othe r federa l pro grams which make up the broader anti-poverty package. Millions are st il l hu ngry, or live in i nadequate ho us i ng ; the ma j ority of p oo r head s o f households work ful l time ; hea l t h services are still i naccessib l e to millions ; school systems and entire ci t ies across the country are facing bankruptcy whi l e provi ding minima l services to needy citizens. We can and must dea l with those p roblems at once. �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 10, Document 23

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_010_023.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 10, Document 23
  • Text: ~-·-* THE URBAN COALITION ACTION COUNCIL JOHN W. GARDNER CHAIRMAN 1619 H STREET. N. W. WASHINGTON, D. C. 20006 Community Self-Determination Act of 1968 Senate Democratic Version s. 3875 Senate Republican Version s. 3876 House Democratic Version H. R. 18976 House Republican Version H. R. 18460 Title I (All Title references are to S. 3875) Title I creates a National Community Corporation Certification Board (NCCCB) and outlines the procedure and purpose of individual Community Development Corporations (CDC's). The NCCCB acts much like the National Labor Relations Board in its union certification procedure. It will be composed of five members, and its primary functions will be the issuance of corporation charters, conducting and supervising referenda, service as counsel to the CDC's and as an information center for parties interested in forming CDC's. A National Advisory Commission advises the NCCCB but does not have direct impact on the latter's specific activities. Section B of Titl~ I states the structural outline of a local CDC. This is the heart of the Act. It would have a broad social improvement purpose as well as the promotion of business activity. CDC's operate in areas in which the 16-year and up population ranges from 5,000 to 300,000. The geographic area within which a CDC would operate is designated by the applicants for a CDC charter . Any resident within the designated area may be a shareholder of the corporation, but the Act requires that a minimum of 10 per cent of the 16-year-old and up population residing within the area hold stock in the CDC. The shares would have a par value of $5, and each shareholder would have one vote in corporate matters, notwithstanding the number of shares the shareholder a ctually holds. The functions of a CDC fall into si x categories. First , neighbo r hood services and community improvement , including but not limited to public welfare programs , day ca r e centers , T E LE PH ON E : 20 2 29 3 -153 0 �-2consumer education, job placement, legal aid, etc. Second, it would own stock in businesses in the CDC area. Third, it would sponsor, own, or manage housing facilities within the CDC area. Fourth, it would be an advocate planner for neighborhood and community renewal projects. Fifth, it would serve as a representative of various community interests in other areas of public policy and concern. Six th, it would encourage various other elements of the community such as business, labor, religion, and so forth, to become active in voluntary community self-help efforts. A CDC would be financed by earnings from affiliated businesses, grants from community development funds, foundations, trusts, etc., and from contracts with privately owned businesses, government agencies, and other entities for specified services or products. The CDC would have nine directors and two additional directors for each 10,000 shareholders of the corporation in e x cess of 25,000. The directors of the corporation would select the executive officers as well as the Business Management Board. The latter's p r imar y f unction i s to p r ovide ove rall manage me nt exp e rtis e and a s sistance t o thos e af filiated businesses owned . by the CDC. The full area of responsibility of the members of the BMB would be spelled out in the CDC charter but would be phrased primarily to afford the BMB max imum latitude to manage CDC owne d busine ss e s and allow fo r the purchase o f othe r e nterp ris e s. CDC' s can be orga ni zed b y a ny fi v e o r more re side nts o f a speci f ic area covering a population range from 5,000 to 300,000, 16 years and older. For any designated area to be eligible for a CDC, howe v e r, the r a t e o f unemploy me nt must be h igher than the n a tional ave r age or t h e med i a n family in c ome b e propor t i ona t e l y lowe r th a n the national a v e r age . Af t e r a ppl ication is made f o r a CDC c h arte r , a 6 0 -day period mu st e l apse so as to allow any other interes t e d group within the same area, or an o ve rl a pping are a, the opp ortunity to o rganize its own CDC . Before the NCCCB will grant a f inal c h a rter to a g r oup of a ppl icants , the a pp l i c a n ts mu st h ave received ple d ge car ds f o r the p u rchase of stock from a min i mum of 5 per ce n t of t ho se eligible to purchase stock within the designated area of operation. This insures a minimum l eve l of community support. If the applicants cannot obta in pledge cards from the minimum 5 p er cen t, the char t er appl i cati o n i s rejec t e d . Once the p l edge cards are received from 5 per cent of the population, a conditional charter i s i ssue d. At that p o int, the CDC has 45 days in which to obtain additional pledge cards covering 10 per cent of the area's population. F ive hundre d peop l e must have paid in at l east $5,0 00 f o r CDC stock. During t h e �-3- 45-day period the pledge money is kept in escrow pending further action toward issuance of a final charter. During the period in which a CDC attempts to raise the minimum level of funds, an additional determination is being made which indicates the relative economic need of the area in question. A Development Index is figured for the area. The Index is the lesser of two ratios: First, the ratio of the national rate of unemployment to the area's unemployment rate x 100, or second, the ratio of the nation's median family income to the area's median family income x 100. If the Development Index of a conditional chartered CDC is found to be 90 or above, the charter is dissolved because the CDC is considered too close to the national average of 100. A special bonus is afforded those rural areas from which outmigration is contributing directly to specific urban tensions. If only one conditional CDC is left within a given area, a vote is then held in which a majority of those voting must approve the applicants. If a majority of those voting do approve, the final charter is granted; if a majority disapprove, the charter is dissolved. In the case of competing CDC's within a given area, referenda are held for each competitor, starting with those representing the geographic area encompassing the highest level of population. If none of the competitors within the largest given area are accepted, a vote is held for those CDC's competing in the next smallest geographic area, etc., until such time as one CDC is approved by the requisite majority of those voting. At least 10 per cent of the eligible voters must actually cast a ballot for any referendum to be valid. Once a CDC is established, a one-time seed money grant is made to the corporation in an amount equal to its current paid-in capital. Title II Title II provides for the establishment of Community Development Banks (CDB's), which are organized by CDC's . CDB's operate in an area of 25,000 or more people, 16 years and up, and concentrate on financial services to the area in quest ion . They provide both business financing and consumer credit to indi vidual CDC shareholders. Equity capital is obtained through the sale of stock to 1) the Secre tary of the Treasury (Class A), 2) any groups or individuals other than the Federal Government and CDC's (Class B), and 3) stock sold only to CDC's (Class C). �-4- Class A stock would be nonvoting and repaid by a franchise tax on the CDB's net earnings. Class B stock would be nonvoting but receive dividends. Class C stock would not receive dividends. The latter point is made so that the CDB becomes a necessary financial mechanism for the establishment and proliferation of CDC activities but does not become a source of income. Income bonds would be issued to the public to provide additional equity and debt capitalization. CDB net earnings would be first applied to make up any bad debts and restore any impaired capital. The payment of stoc~ dividends is a lessor priority. Loans are made to the following individuals and businesses: 1) CDC shareholders for normal consumer credit; 2) a small business, 75 per cent of which is owned by resident CDC shareholders; 3) a small business, less than 75 per cent of which is owned by CDC shareholders, so long as the CDC in whose area the business is located is given the right of first refusal when the business is sold; 4) a subsidiary of a CDC, 51 per cent of which is owned by CDC shareholders; 5) outside corporations with turnkey contracts with a CDC; 6) cooperatives, 75 per cent of whose members are CDC shareholders; and 7) nonprofit housing sponsors operating within the community serviced by the CDB. An applicant for a business loan must have a minimum level of business experience and exper tise, or have contracted with a company or service to obtain the necessary business training. Loans of up to 90 per cent of the required capital may be made on terms of up to 20 years for repayment . Housing sponsors can receive money for "front-money" or construction loans. Unorthodox and high risk ventures are encouraged as long as they would yield significant community benefits. Participation loans are encouraged. �7 -5The primary purpose of a CDB is to channel capital to business ventures. Its secondary purpose is to provide normal banking services to people in impoverished areas. Title III Title III creates a United States Community Development Bank, which would serve as a secondary financial institution and as a source of technical, financial, and managerial expertise to CDB's. It would serve also to promote economic development in those poverty-stricken areas where no CDB's exist. The USCDB would have the same relationship to CDB's as a federal intermediate credit bank has to local commercial banks. The USCDB would have the same relationship to those areas not serviced by CDB's as the World Bank has to underdeveloped countries. Although not an instrumentaility of the Federal Government, the President would initially appoint the incorporators and first directors of the USCDB. Eventually CDB's holding stock in the USCDB would name some of the directors. Capitalization would be provided through stock sales. The Secretary of the Treasury would hold nonvoting, nonpaying, Class A stock purchased through funds provided by a Congressional appropriation. Class B stock would be held by anyone other than the Federal Government, CDB's being eligible to purchase such stock. The USCDB is authorized to issue bonds, debentures, and other certificates of debt up to 5 times its paid-in capital and surplus. Its primary functions are to provide secondary banking services to CDB's through discounts, loans, notes, advances, and so forth, and to make loans for business and community facilities or public development facilities in low-income "investment areas," designated by the Secretary of Labor. It provides interim construction financing for facilities which it may also plan, initiate, own, and manage until such time as the facilities are purchased. It provides management assistance to CDB's as well as other borrowers and generally creates new investment opportunities by bringing together facilities, capital, and management. A CDB may establish branches. USCDB earnings are to be applied in the following order : 1) restoration of any capital impairment , 2) creation and maintenance of a surp lus account, 3) payment of a franchise tax with re f e r e n ce to the amount of Class A s t ock h e l d b y t he Secretary of the Treasury , 4) establishment of contingency rese rves , �-65) dividends on Class B stock up to 6 per cent of earnings, and 6) retirement of Class A stock held b y the Treasury. Title IV Title IV authorizes certain Federal tax advantages for CDC and turnkey corporations. All tax advantages granted to CDC's are applicable until the Development Inde x for the designated CDC area reaches the national average for fi v e years. Title IV would amend the Internal Revenue Code to permit each corporation in a group of CDC subsidiary corporations to retain its individual surtax exemption and pay its regular corporate tax on any thing over the $25,000 at a 22 p er cent rate rather than 28 per cent. Tax rates and surtax exemptions are liberalized depending upon the area's Development Inde x , with provis i ons for greater tax advantages to those CDC's operating in areas with the lowest Development Inde x . In addition, the Internal Revenue Code is amended to attr act turnkey companies into the CDC area. Turnke y comp a nies can tak e advantage of rapid amortization schedules for its facilities . Again, the rate of amortization depends on the rate of the Development Index with the shorter periods of amortization being made available to those companies which inv est in the poorest areas. A 10 per cent tax credit on wages and salarie s o f CDC shareholders e mploy ed in the turnk ey facili~y is granted to the turnke y company . This is called a human investment tax credit . The 10 p e r cent figure comp ares with the 7 per cent investment credit on machinery investment, though is higher b e cause of the impermanence of the inve stment in human skills . It is a r gue d that the credit must be highe r to induce the tu r n k e y corporation to i nvolve its e lf in impover ished are a s . The turnkey comp any is not r e quire d to pay c apital gains tax on th e s a le of a turnkey fa c ility if t h e sale p rofits are rei n v e ste d in another turnkey o pe r a tion or in Class B stock o f a COB . A tu rnkey co r porati o n would b e e ntitled to a sustai ned profita bility t a x credit eq u a l to 15 pe r c ent o f the profit s g enerated fr om t u rnkey o pera t i o n s fo r f i v e ye ars af te r t he sa l e of a faci l ity to a CDC . Th is latte r p r o vi sion p r e sumably gu a r antee s th e de v e lopme nt of the stronge st fi n an cia l operat i on th e t ur nk e y c omp a ny can en c o u rage . Title V If a CDC is no t a d i v idend-p a ying c o rp o ration , it can be treated as a CAP agency under t he Ec o nomic Opportunity Act . The Sma ll Busines s Admi n istration is a uthorized to make grants to CDC ' s o f up to 9 0 per cent of th e cost of technical and management assis t ance and training programs . The grants may be made for a number of programs , some o f which are as follo ws : �-7- 1) the identification and development of new business opportunities, joint ventures, and turnkey agreements; 2) marketing surveys; 3) planning and research for business development; 4) plant design, layout, and operation; 5) marketing and promotional assistance; 6) business counseling, management training, and legal and other related services with specific emphasis on management training, ·using the resources of private business; 7) encouragement of subcontracting to CDC's for establishing business and cooperative efforts to train and upgrade CDC personnel. �A P P E N D I X S. 3875 Sponsors: Senators Nelson (Wis.), Bayh (Ind.), Harris (Okla.), Hartke (Ind.), Church (Idaho), Mondale (Minn.), Hart (Mich.), Magnuson (Wash.), Metcalf (Mont.), Moss (Utah), Pell (R. I.), Randolph (W. Va.), Ribicoff (Conn.), Williams (N.J.), Young (Ohio), Muskie (Me.), Tydings (Md.) and McGovern (S. D.). S. 3876 Sponsors: Senators Percy (Ill.), Baker (Tenn.), Boggs (Del.), Brooke (Mass ·.), Case (N.J.), Fong (Hawaii), Griffin (Mich.), Javits (N.Y.), Jordan (Idaho), Kuchel (Calif.), Pearson (Kans.), Prouty (Vt.), Scott (Pa.) and Tower (Tax.) H. R. 18976 Sponsor: Rep. Fraser (Minn.) H. R. 184 60 Sponsors: Reps. Goodell (N.Y.), Curtis (Mo.), Widnall (N.J.) and Taft (Ohio) Although there are at least three versions o f the Communi ty Self-Determination Act, the differences are in fo rm only. Whatever structural differences are found in the bills are primarily because of political reasons. In short, familiarity with the concepts and proposals of any one bill will be equivalent to a n e xamination of all of the bills. �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 10, Document 28

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  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 10, Document 28
  • Text: ~:;,. ,!E15:31, 29 December 2017 (EST)AS•x15:31, 29 December 2017 (EST) THE HON IVAN ALLEN JR MAYOR OF CITY OJ" ATLA CITY HALL ATLA AT ITS NOVEMBEC13 NE£TING, THE lilE"BEAS or TME STEERING c c-..:. iTTE[ IGR£EO ntAT THEY St-lOULD S£E1C AN EARLY OPPORTUIIITV TO TAUi' ·,' 1 TH TI£ PAESIOENT-£l£CT • INITIAL CONTACT HAS N~ !£EN NOE At£· Pit N!X~ AIDES HAYE ST1U)NGLY URGED THAT VE LI~IT OUR OELf :'. - TION TO 10 PEOPLE. AS A fllATTEA OF' COURTESY, VE HAY£ AGREED TO Cv SO. ACCOAOIN'3LY, UNLESS ANYONE" 01\JECT, t SHALL "TRY TO PUT TC,GETHER A 1o-f'LtJ'W OEL£GATION THAT FAIRLT REPRESENTS ALL ELtt£.NTS VHi-i lN TH£ STEER INC COlll'JITTEE. I HOPE THIS !'IEETS VITH YOUR APPROVAL• JOHN V GARONER CHAIR~N Tt£ URBAN COALITION. ~--. - ·.,. .•/' . •, ' 1270 C1 - !!511 i �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 10, Document 33

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  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 10, Document 33
  • Text: APPENDIX B .November 7, 1968 MEMORANDUM TO Steering Committee FROM Local Coalition Task Force SUBJECT: Report on the Organization and Establishment of Local Urban Coalitions In the national statement of goals, principles and commitments adopted by the Emergency Convocation, the Steering Committee called for the establishment of local urban coalitions throughout the country. The Task Force on Local Coalitions has been assigned the responsibility of overseeing developments and progress of these local coalitions. At its meeting on October 17, the Task Force heard reports from the Local Coalition Division staff on its activities. While most of the staff has been on board little more than three months, visits have been made to all of the cities where coalitions were reported to have been in some state of organization or existence. In addition, the staff has been to 72 cities where .interest has been expressed by one element or another in establishing a coalition. The staff reported the status of coali- tions as follows: a. Applying the tough new standards established by the Task Force, one-third of the original coalitions (11 of 34) failed to meet the minimum criteria . . b. The remaining 23 coalitions are proceeding with staff ' �Report on the Organization and Establishment of Local Urban Coalitions 2 • assistance to organize task forc~s, develop programs and engage in fund-raising. c. Sixteen strong new coalitions, meeting Task Force standards, have been established giving us a total of 39. d. Thirty-two additional priority cities have been identified and are the focus of staff organizing efforts. The staff is moving forward steadily establishing new coalitions and strengthening those we already have. However , the staff is encountering sign~ficant impediments to their organization efforts. 1. There has been a clear and noticeable shift in national pubiic opinion. The sense of urgency concerning the urban crisis which existed in 1967 and early 1968 has diminished. There is greater reluctance to engage public and private resources at the local level in a coalition movement, particularly at this time . A quie t summe r has contributed to thi s shift of ipinion, but so too has the political c a mpaign. 2. There is occasi onal lack of support from the top leadership ,n ecessary to form a coalition. Wh ile busi nes s , labo r and ma yor s in many communities are providing leadership and support, the staff has b een encountering reluctance by key individuals o f one or more o f these e l e me nts to the establishment o f coalitions in some cities. �Report on the Organization and Establishment of Local Urban Coalitions 3 The establishment of quality coalitions takes on special importance since the national credibility of the Urban Coalition in part will be determined by thi role, image and status of the local urban coalitions. To be effective, local coalitions must have as their active members the most influential and highly regarded leaders of each of the various elements . .. Despite the best efforts of the staff, itjs not always poss1ble to engage the attention and support of these key individuals without the direct, personal involvement of Steering Committee members. Where· national Steering Commit tee members have become involved whether by a telephone call, letter, visit, or the convening of a meeting, the organizing effort has moved far more rapidly and has attracted key leaders. RECOMJvlENDATION: For these reasons we wish to recommend with the utmost urgency that the Steering Committee adopt a resolution calling on each member to accept increased responsibility for the organization ·,. of local coalitions and when called upon to do so to be of _ assistance in the following ways: a. Advise the staff of key leaders in priority cities who are known to Steering Committee members and who could be instrumental in the establishment of a coalition. b. At the request of the staff, write or telephone individuals urging their support of a ~oalition. �Report on the Organization and Establishment of Local Urban Coalitions c. 4 Accept speaking engagements in local communities on behalf of the organizing effort. d. Advise the staff on general strategies to be followed in particularly difficult situations. e. In public appearances and speaking engagements, identify with the Urban Coalition and urge support for the local coalition movement. In order to help meet immediate organizing needs of the coalition, Steering Committee members are requested to list on the attached list the name s of one or two key individuals in the cities who are known to Steering Committee· members and who could be instrumental in the establishment of a coalition. The staff will call on the se individuals to enlist their support and cooperation. Steering Committee members may leave the attached form following the meeting. Attachment �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 10, Document 36

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  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 10, Document 36
  • Text: THE URBAN COALITION ACTION COUNCIL -. JOHN w: GARDNER CHAIRMAN October 4, 1968 1819 H STREET, N . W , WASHINGTON, D . C . 20006 WEEKLY LEGISLATIVE REPORT Education, - Labor ' and Antipoverty Funds. Congress has cleared the final appropriations f6r the HEW and Labor Departments and the Office of Economic Opportunity, the antipoverty agency. The antipoverty appropriation was the largest Congress has ever approved, but funds for schools attended by educationally deprived children were below last year's appropriation. The House narrowly defeated a Southern-backed provision that would have encoura g e d resistance to desegregation of schools. The Urb a n Coa lition Action Council joined other organizations and HEW in working for defe a t of the segregation provision. · Program Budget House Senate Final Below Budge t (in million s o f dollars) Title I Education $1,200. $1,073. $1,200. $1,123. $ -77. Teache r Corp s 31. 2 Dropout Preve ntion 30. 0 20. 5. -25 .. Biling u a l Education 30. 0 10 . 7.5 - 22.5 OEO Antipoverty Manpower Training , Labor De p artment 15. 31.2 20.9 -10.3 2,180. 1,87 3. 2,08 8. 1,9 48 . - 23 2 . 413. 400. 400. 400. - 13. Th~ Title I f unds for sch ools teaching edu cationa l ly deprived childre n -- an important program for schools in big cities -- were $68 mi llion l ess th a n l as t year's appropriation and a llowed the schoo l s on l y 32 % of the amounts t hey received for the past school year. Co:1gress also gave advance au t hority for appropriations in fisca l 1970 but limited the f unds to 90 % of the amo unt received this yeai. This was inte nde d to h e l p TELEPHON E: 202 293·153 0 �- 2 - schools plan their programs before the opening of schools next fall. The Teacher Corps appropriation was the largest Congress has allowed so far, and the funds for teaching bilingual children and for preventing school dropouts were the first made for these purposes. The antipoverty a ~p ropriation, which was not earmarked for any specific OEO programs, was $170 million more than Congress allowed last year. Funds for OEO have risen each year since the first appropriation in fiscal 1965. The Labor Department's manpower app ropriatipn was only $1.5 million above last year's fiscal 1968 figure but some manpower training programs, such as JOBS and Concentrated Employment, are financed from OEO appropriations. Funds Exempted from Budget Cut. HEW's education funds will be exempted from the o ver-all $6 billion spending reduction requi r e d under the tax surcharge-budget reduction law if Congress has its way. A section o f the vocational education bill (HR - 18366) that Congress sent to the President October 3 exempts education appropriations from the $6 billion reduction in s pending and th e $10 billion r eduction in obligations (.committed money ) vote d for all Government agencies in June. However , the Preside n t still retains authority to hold down spe nding on any education program no matter what amount Congress may have appropriated. Segregation Amendment. The key part of the Southern provision opposing d e s e grega tion of school s prohibited HEW from "forcing " childre n to attend any particular school ag a inst the choi c e of the i r pa rent s . The provis ion was sponsored by Mississippi Rep. J amie L. Whitten (D), a hi gh ranking member o f ' the Appropriations Cammi ttee. The Senate amended this provision by adding language th at prohibited forc e d atte ndance at a particular school "in o rde r to overcome racial imbal a nc e ." Thi s phrase v!as a l ready a p art o f c i v il rig h ts l a w . It allowed the Government and the courts to put an end to freedom of choice " school plans that we re p e rpe tuating racinl discrimina tion. Whe n me mbers of the House a nd Se n ate Appro pr i a tion s Committees me t in conf e rence on th e Labor-HEW appro pr i ation bill, Sou t h erne rs h ad a ma jo r ity o f the v otes a nd they stru ck from the bill the Se nate lang u age limiting the prohibition to pl a n s to overcome racia l i mba l a n ce . In effect, ·w hit te n' s p u rpose was achi eve d . �- 3 - Action Counc il Chairman John W. Gardner wrote Rous e Speaker John W. McCormack (D Mass .) and the Republican leade r, Rep. Gerald Ford (Mich.), October 2, asking them to help defeat the Whitten amendment on the House floor. He said the amendment "ra.ises the real threat of resegregation in many Southern school districts" and "implicitly sanctions racially dual school s ystems ." On a clos e , 167-175 vote Octobe r 3, the House rejected the Appropriations Committees ' recommendation and adop t ed the Senate language nullifying Whi tten's amendment. This wi ll enable HEW to continue to withhold funds from school d istricts that are not making re~l progress toward desegregation. New Housing Funds . The President sent to Congress Oc tober 3 a request f or supplemental · appropriations that included funds to begin some of the programs in the n ew Eousing Act and to administer the fair housing law . These were his housing proposals: Home Ownership Contract ~uthority $75 million Rental Housing As sistance 75 million Grants for Tenant Services 15 million Planned Ar e a wide De v e lopment 5 million Low and Mode rate -Income Spons or Fund 5 million Fair Housing Program 8 mi llion Flood Insurance Administration 1.5 million The Hou se is exp e cte d to t a k e u p the supp l ement a l appro priation bill Oc t o be r 7 or Oc t obe r 8 and the Se n a t e will a ct shortly thereaft e r . HUD Pe r s onne l. Another attemp t i s e xpe cte d t o b e made next week in t h e Sen a t e to exempt the De par t me nt o f Housing a n d Urban De ve lopmen t f rom th e cutback i n p erso n n e l r e qu ire d by the tax surcharge- budge t reduction law. For the e ff ect the law now has on a dministration of the new housing p rograms, see the Se ptember 27 Le gisl a t i ve Re po rt of the Ac t ion Council. �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 10, Document 37

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  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 10, Document 37
  • Text: THE URBAN COALITION ACTION COUNCIL JOHN W. GARDNER CHAIRMAN 1819 H STREET. N . W. WASHINGTON. D. C . 20006 September 27, 1968 WEEKLY LEGISLATIVE REPORT Housing. Final action on appropriations for the HUD Department was taken September 25 when the Senate agreed to the disappointingly low figures for key housing programs without dissent. (For figures, see September 20 Legislative Report.) HUD Under Secretary Robert C. Wood September 25 said decisions would be made within a week on whether to make across-the-board reductions or selective cuts in HUD programs. Congress cut the Department's requested funds by one-third -- from $3.1 billion to $2.1 billion. Wood, in an interview with editors of Housing and Urban Affairs Daily, singled out four programs where the Congressional cuts especially hurt. These were: Urban renewal grants. As these are for the next fiscal year, fiscal 1970, more funds may be sought next year. Model Cities, for which $625 million instead of $1 billion was approved. Urban inf ormation and technical assistance -- a small program to help states and cities carry out urban projects. Congress refused to grant any of the $5 million requested for the program. Fair housing enforcement, f or which all funds were denied on grounds HUD already had suffici e nt p e rsonne l working in the civil rights fi e ld. The $9 million the Senate had provided would have enabled HUD to hire about 690 investigators across the country to enforce the new fair housing req uirements written into law in Apri l . Several organizat ions h a ve p rotested the denial o f funds to e nfo r ce the · fa i r housing act and ther e is a poss i bility that HUD will ask Congress to reconsider its acti on. This . h inges, h owever, on a d ecision the Ad mi n i s t rat ion mu s t ma ke soon on whether to send requests f o r .supp l emental appropri- T !;,LE PHON E : 2 02 293-153 0 �- 2 ations to Congress this fall. Although that is the usual procedure late in the session, the economy mood in Congress may be so strong just before elections that the Administration will not ask for additional money. The major new programs in the 1968 housing law will be delayed at least six months if no supplemental appropriations are requested from or voted by Congress. HUD Personnel. Another factor that might delay the new housing programs is the Congressional directive in June that HUD, and all other federal agencies, cut back on their personnel. HUD had hoped to add 1,600 employees this year. Instead, it will have to reduce its staff by 900 -- not by firing employees but by filling only 7 out of 10 vacancies that develop as employees resign or retire. Senator John Sparkman (D Ala.), chairman of the Senate's Housing Subcommittee, tried unsuccessfully September 23 to win Senate approval of an e x emption for HUD from the personnel cutback. Unfortunately, exemptions f or other age nc i es were tacked onto Sparkman's amendment and the major sponsor of the personnel cutback,. Senator John Williams (R Del.), fought the amendment bitterly. It was defeated, 23-37. It is anticipated th a t anothe r attempt will be made to e x empt HUD f rom the seve r e personne l limitations before Congress adjourns. Education, Labor and Antipoverty Funds. Final appropriations f or e ducation, manpower training a nd antipoverty programs will be announc e d Sept e mbe r 30. Me mbers o f t he House and Senate Appropriation s Committees comp romi sed t heir d iffere n ces i n a Sept ember 26 mee ting b ut wi t hheld a nnounc e ment o f the sums agreed upon. The differences in key appropriations were listed in Appe ndix B of the Septembe r 13 Leg i slative Repor t . Head St art . Members o f the House and Sen a t e e duc ation committees, meeting in conference on the vocational e ducation bi ll , h a ve a g ree d t o d rop an amendmen t b y Sen ato r Pete r Domini ck (R Colo . ) that would hav e t r a n s f e rred the Head Start pro gram t o HEW' s Office o f Edu cat i o n. The pro gram wi ll c o ntinue to be r u n by the independent antipovert y agency, the Office of Economic Opportunity. Under the final version of the vocational education bill, the President is asked to have a study made of how Head Start can best be administered and to report to Congress next spring. �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 10, Document 43

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  • Title: Box 7, Folder 10, Document 43
  • Text: Crisis • 1nour Cities A Public Service Campaign of THE AD\(ERTISiNG °COUNCIL Side 2 W4LH-1503 ( 0 \ '\ 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. '-""" -~ _I Time -- ~ 30Seconds Here, Kitty 30 Seconds Split Level 30 Seconds 1930's 20 Seconds Rats 20 Seconds Volunteer Agency ~CHUM, MacLEOD & GROVE, INf" 1968 331/J �Crisis • 1nour Cities A Public Serv[_c::~ Campaign of THE ADV,ERTISING COUNCIL Side 1 W4LH-1502 0 1968 331/J 1. Father 60 Seconds 2. Mother 60 Seconds 3. Veteran 60 Seconds 4. Year 2000 60 Seconds 5;-- Aff!u ent Society 60 Seconds Volunteer Agency KETCHUM, MacLEOD & GROVE, INC. �Crisis • 1nour Cities A Public Service Campaign of THE ADV£RTIS-iNG"coUNCIL I Sfde 2 f W4LH-1503 \ 0 ~ / .30 Seconds 1. Time 30 Seconds 2. Here, Kitty 3 . Split Level 30 Seconds 20 Seconds 4 . 1930's 5. Rats 20 Seconds Volunteer Agency KETCHUM, MacLEOD & GROVE, INC. - oI""D " s,,° " 4 <'o u Hc.'"" 1J. Urban America Inc . 1968 331/3 �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 10, Document 14

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_010_014.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 7, Folder 10, Document 14
  • Text: Systetns, Inc. ADMINISTRATI VE OFFIC ES 606 STATE ST. · L AWRENCEVILL E . ILL. 62439 · TEL. 943-3311 Manaqement. Actuarial and Pension Consultants 38 SOUTH DEARBORN · March 17, -1969 Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Mr. Mayor, I would like to call your personal attention to the seminar described in the enclosed brochure. In view of your involvement with THE URBAN COALITION, I believe you will want to attend or send someone to report to you on the conference. I'm tired of going to conferences on Negroes and youth where all we have is white adult speakers and a couple of name Negroes. I and about Negroes want to hear about youth from youth from Negroes. The rules for this conference were that it had to provide direct interaction between adults and white youth and black youth. It is the youth that make the program good. For the first time, business and educators and students will be in one program o this subject . '(77 IP ~ President ES: mt Enc. Roon y 372·4648 CHICAGO. ILLINOIS �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 10, Document 17

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  • Title: Box 7, Folder 10, Document 17
  • Text: The Urban Coalition 1819 H Street , N.W. Washington , D. C. 20006 Telephone : (202) 223-9500 CHAIRMAN: John W. Gardner CO-CHAIRMEN: Andrew Heiskell / A. Philip Randolph March 11, 1969 Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Ivan: On behalf of Joseph Keenan, Walter Reuther, and David Rockefeller, I wish to thank you for sending your representative to the February 26 meeting of community development officials called by the Urban Coalition Task Force on Housing, Reconstruction and Investment. The meeting explored the potential for increasing the volume of construction of low- and moderate-income housing through the pooling of a portion of low-income housing starts by several cities -- the pooled market to be supplied by large-scale, efficient developers and builders. The discussion was very productive, and the consensus of the meeting was that the Housing Task Force should move rapidly in concert with mayors, governors, and the Department of Housing and Urban Development to refine the concept into a specific working proposal. We- are now proceeding with this tas k and Messrs. Keenan, Reuther, and Rockefeller will be taking an opportunity to present the proposal to you in the near future. Sincerely, M John W. Gardner Chairman JWG:bc �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 10, Document 34

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_010_034.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 7, Folder 10, Document 34
  • Text: <'. STEERING COMMITTEE MEMBERS ARE REQUESTED TO LIST LEADERS IN THE FOLLOWING CITIES: Buffalo, New York 1. 2. Cincinnati, Ohio 1. 2. Corpus Christi, Texas Forth Worth, Texas Kansas City, Missouri/Kansas 1. 2. 1. '-------- 2. 1. 2. Little Rock, Arkansas 1. 2. Madison, Wisconsin Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania St. Louis, Missouri 1. 2. 1. 2. 1. - - - - - -- - - - - -- - 2. San Antonio, Te x as 1. 2. Se a ttle , Washington Utic a , New Yo rk 1. 2. - - - -- - - - - - -- - - 1. 2. - - - - - - -- -- - - -- Signature Steering Committee .Member ,I., -.- --- - �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 10, Document 1

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_010_001.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 7, Folder 10, Document 1
  • Text: April 28 , 1969 MEMORANDUM To : Col . Malcolm Jones From: Dan Swea Attached is a copy of a draft position p per establishing the Nation l Urb n Coalition's role in hou ing. I would OS :fy ppreciat any comments you may hav • �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 10, Document 5

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_010_005.pdf
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  • Title: Box 7, Folder 10, Document 5
  • Text: C C A A ommunity ouncil o:f the t anta rea inc. EUGENE T. BRANCH. CJrnirm,m of thit ffr,,ll,1 of T)lrr.·,.: tor.\ CECIL A LEXANDER. Fii't! Chairm,m JOHN IZARD. Vice Chai rm, w MR S . THOMAS H . GIBSO N. S,:cr
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 10, Document 26

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_010_026.pdf
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  • Title: Box 7, Folder 10, Document 26
  • Text: FROM: Ivan Allen-, Jr. D For your information D Please refer to the atta ched corre s pond e nce a nd make the necessary reply. D FORM 25-4 A d v i s e me th e s t a tu s of the a tta ch ed . �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 10, Document 4

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_010_004.pdf
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  • Title: Box 7, Folder 10, Document 4
  • Text: duanc w beck �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 10, Document 9

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_010_009.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 10, Document 9
  • Text: Statement by J. Irwin Mi ll er , President, Cummins Engine Company and Membe r, Policy Council, Urban Coalition Action Council before the Subcomi71itte e on Employme nt , Manpower and Poverty CoITLrnittee on Labor and Publ ic Welfare U.S. Se nate April 23, 1969 Mr. Chai rman: I appreciate the o pport unity to ap p ear wi th Mr. Gardner on behalf of th e Urban Coali tion Ac t ion Council in support of extension and adequate funding of t he Economic Opportu nity Act. I endorse Mr. Gardner's statement, particularly his conclusions and proposed Congress i ona l action. There are two points ma d e by Mr. Gardner to wh ich I wish to call s pe cial at t e ntion. The first conce rns the fact th a t we -- business, l a bor , mayors, religion, minority and ci v ic groups - - r e presen t a broad -b as e d n at ion a l coa l i tion of norma ll y diverg en t i n t e rest s . The Urban Co a l i tion Action Council was fo rmed b e c a us e of our conce rn with the futur e of t his incre a s ingl y ur baniz ed so ci ety, and th e l e gislation ne e d e d to me e t t he challe nge s of such a soci e t y . The Economic Opportun i ty Ac t i s one of the l e g is la tive too ls mee ting thos e chall e n ge s . Notw ith stan ding our divers ity o f v i ews on many issue s we r e co gn i ze t he rol e th e Eco nomic Opp o r t un ity Ac t h a s play e d not only in mater ia l l y imp ro v in g , but in gi v ing sub s tan r ~ to th e lives of ma n y of th e po o r a n d d i s advantage d citi zens in our s o cie t y. There shoul d b e no tho u gh t g i ve n to cut t ing ba c k , re t renchi n g o r limiti ng the as si s t ance the Fede r a l governmen t c a n p ro v i de through l eg i s l ati o n s uch a s th is . In s t ead, t he Fede r a l governmen t . sh o u l d be ge nu inely concerned t o make cert ain th e f un ding i s e no ugh to d o the j ob within r.easonab l e t i me. �- 2 - Th e s eco nd po i nt I wi sh t o make , and a g a in one Mr . Ga rdne r d eve loped i n hi s testimony, concerns the ro l e of com..rnun i ty a c t ion in the overal l ant i poverty effort . It seems t o me essen t ial that t he Congress give full support i n t his problem The poor and d i sadvantaged t o l o cal community i nvo l vement. are more concerned today than ever before in gaining an effect i ve role in determining their own destiny. They no longer see themselves as helpless a n d powerless before the u nyielding and unchanging institutiona l forces of our society. They now h ave a dire ct and significant i mpa ct on these i nstitutions. Although not all view this impact in the same way , I p ersonally beli eve th at greater invo lvemen t by the disadvantaged in social action programs is nec essary, and that resul ts to date have been favorable. concept should be encouraged. Expansion o f this There is also no question in my mind but th at community action programs, fostered and nurtured by community action agencies, wil l turn out to have been th e forerunners of a much wider range of community involvement by the poor. For this we have the Economic Opportuni ty Act largely to thank. I j oin Mr. Gardner in urging Congress to continue its support of this legislation by giving it not only the ex~ended life it deserves, but the funds, i n the form of appropriations, it needs to prosper. �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 10, Document 10

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  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 7, Folder 10, Document 10
  • Text: AN ADVERTISING COUNCIL CAMPAIGN IN SUPPORT OF THE URBAN COALITION Summary: The Urban Coalition proposes a national advertising campaign to promote better understanding of ·the problems of the cities and the people who live there, and also to go the next step toward causes and the possible solutions. The campaign would seek to maintain the momentum of the Advertising Council's massive "Crisis In Our Cities" campaign of 1968. (The Advertising Council estimates total space and time donated to this campaign was worth approximately $12,000,000.) Importantly, however, the proposed 1969 campaign would indicate the potential for meaningful action by a concerned and informed citizenry. The campaign-would stress the many resources, federal, state and local, available to a community. However, on the presumption that an effective grass roots attack on local problems is not possible unless the important leadership elements in the community are together, the campaign would cite the potential of an Urban Coalition to help achieve coherent dialogue and to help set goals and priorities. The campaign would be timed to begin in the Summer of 1969 and would run one year. The Advertising Council would donate agency services and media time . space. The Urban Coalition requests $128,000 for production costs and $22,000 for support material. ·-" . �... . - 2 - AN ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN As the year 1969 opened, discussion of the "urban crisis had reached an almost unprecedented scale. Magazines, newspapers, radio and television devoted columns of editorial space and hours of prime time to the problems of the cities. Now, however, it is the position of the Urban Coalition that the time has come to lead the discussion to a new plateau and to begin the process of education toward a larger citizen involvement, or at least understanding of the solutions of that crisis. A national advertising campaign must be a major part of this educational effort. Progress has been made in some areas. In almost no areas is that progress enough or has it come rast enough to lead any informed. person to believe that the crisis is anything but heightening. The crisis must be met at all levels--federal, state, and local, and it must be met both nationally and locally increasingly by the private sector as well as the public sector. It is the mobilization of the private sector, particularly at the local level, that is the special concern of the Urban Coalition and urban coalitions already established in 42 U.S. cities. The Urban Coalition, at this point in our nation's history, seems to be the single organization or movement dedicated to assisting in the re-establishment of coherent local communities. Today the typical American community is split into a variety of different worlds that are often wholly out of touch with one another. The suburbs are out of touch with the central city. Business, labor, and the universities are three wholly separate worlds. City Hall is usually out of touch with the ghetto and often out of touch with the ablest and most influential people in the city. The most ominous rifts, of course, are the rifts involving various minority communities, most commonly the black community, but in some parts of the country the American Indians or Mexican-American community. Nothing is more clear than that no major city can or will solve its problems without first repairing some of those devastating gaps in communication. Obviously, no single advertising campaign can accomplish this kind of repair. The reconstruction must be fo r ged slowly and carefully by citizens working together to under stand a n d solve the i r problems . But this proposed advertising c amp a i gn , we t h i n k, can increase public unde r standing of a n impor tant r esour ce t o he l p mak e a beginning . �- 3 - AN ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN The Urban Coalition was formed to re-establish communication. But to fulfill its potential, it must be used. And before it will be used, it must be understood. It is important to emphasize the importance of the coalition principle. Some people think of the Coalition as just another organization tackling the rough urban problems of the day. But it is unique. The distinction is that it brings together segments of American life that do not normally collaborate in the solution of public problems. Because of the need for such collaboration at the local level, the national organization has helped to form local coalitions. There are now local coalitions in 42 cities and organizational efforts are underway in approximately . 30 others. As . in the case of the national, each local organization .includes representatives from a variety of leaderwhip segments in the community--the mayor, business, labor, minority groups and religion. The participation of other relevant elements is encouraged--the universities, the schools, the press, the professions. There are many substantive problems of the cities.-"'."'"fiscal and grivernmental pro~lems, housing, jobs, education, health services, economic development and . so on. The Urban Coalition is interested in all those problems, but it is not free to choose the particular problems to which it . must give its attention. There are priorities which . are thrust upon us all. There are issues so e xplosive that if they are ignored, we shall be overtaken .by events--and then every problem on the list will be infinitely harder to solve. The goal that takes precedence over all others is to begin to heal those rifts that are now making many American cities quite incapable of any kind of healthy problem solving. Those rifts can be healed. We can heal them through the process of coalition, if the most influe-ntial citi z ens in the community will _lend their . strength and their presence, if all significant elements in the community a re fairly represented and if all concerned are unsparingly honest i n facing the toughest issues . In a number of American cities today those condi tions are be i ng met in local urban coalitions -- the most influen tial cj, t.i zens have. ste p ped fo rwa r d , al l s ignif i cant elements in t h e .community a r e r e pre s e nt ed a nd t he toughest issues a r e be i ng f aced . The Propos e d 196 9-7 0 Urba n Coali t i o n Adve rti s ing Camp a ign The foregoing has b e en a n a tte mpt t o d emons t rate the n e ed a nd the potential of the Urb a n Coa liti o n. What follows is a d e scription of a specific multi-medi a a dver~i s ing cam~ai~n.designe d to make the Coalition known and understoo d by a significant segment of ' ~he .American public so that it will be used. ,. �- 4 - AN ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN OBJECTIVES The first and foremost objective of the 1969-70 campaign is to establish the Urban Coalition as the focal point of effort by local business and community groups in solving the crisis in the cities. The main thrust of the campaign will be to tell in detail the Urban Coalition story: the coalition principle of collaboration of all concerned groups in tackling specific problems; its stress on local initiative and effort; its record of success. A second, and equally important, objective is to convince both business and community leaders--as well as the general public-that the problems don't stop just because the riots are dispersed or contained; that is, we must counter any idea that the crisis has passed, or any let-City-Hall-do-it attitude. The third objective is to create the advertising materials in such a way that, in addition to their use by the Advertising Council in national media; they can also be used by Urban Coalition groups in local media to assist with the national campaign, for organization and support of new or existing Urban Coalitions. AUDIENCE The primary target audience includes the broad spectrum of opinion leaders--from corporation presidents to black student militants to garden club members--from whose ranks the Urban Coalition draws active participants. The second audience includes those among the general public whose understanding and support can assist the efforts of the Urban Coalition groups. MEDIA Major mass audience magazines Major market newspapers Pacesetter publications (i.e., HARPERS, THE ATLANTIC, SATURDAY REVIEW, etc . ) Business press Network TV and radio . ,, �.. ~ - 5 - AN ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN CAMPAIGN 3-b/w ads suitable for newspaper and magazines 3-adaptations for use by local Urban Coalitions 3-b/w ads special for Business Press campaign 1-"car card" for transit adve rtising 1-24 sheet billboard ad 2-:60 TV commercials, with :30, :20, and :10 adaptations 2-radio cornmerc ials COSTS* Magazines and newspape rs Company publications Business Press 24 sheet billboard ads $18,000 2,000 13,000 9,000 car card transit ad 1 1 ,000 Tele vision spot s 70,000 Radio spots 5,000 All purpose support k it fo r use by local o r g anizations a nd coal itions to s t i mulat e placement 12,000 Response booklet "What Can I Do?" 10,000 Estimated b y s t aff of the Advertis ing Coun ci l Those o f us invo lved in the f o r ma t ion and o peration o f the Urban Coalitio n b e lieve it rep resents a grea t re source f o r the American cit y. We believe i t is a r esour ce which s h ould be u nd ers t ood b y as many c o ncerned cit izens i n as many American communi t ies a s ~ossible. It is for this reaso n that we propo se this advertising campaign and ask you r suppo rt in prov iding funds for o perating and support costs. The Advertising Council estimates that these costs will amount to $150, 000 . The Council estimates that this investment will result in the dona t ion of $2 0 , 000 ,00 0 worth of time and space by the media. Attachments: Advertising Council reprint on Crisis in Cities List of local ~oalitions and officers Annual Report of the Urban Coalition �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 10, Document 12

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  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 7, Folder 10, Document 12
  • Text: House Will Act Soon on Bill Continuing Urban School Aid A bill extending for five years the most important federal program for urban schools -- the Elementary and Secondary Education Act -- is ready for debate in the House. ·The Education and Labor Committee of the House approved the bill (HR 514) March 18. The cities look to Title I of the Act for money to support compensatory programs for their disadvantaged children. Title I distributes federal appropriations directly to school districts that have large numbers of children from low-income families, urban and rural. In reporting the bill to the House the Education Committee over rode the request of HEW Secretary Robert H. Finch for only a twoyear extension of the Act. He said the Nixon Administration needed time to study proposed changes in the Act and in the meantime, a two-year extension through June 1972 would provide adequate continuity for present programs. Most committee Republicans supported Finch's request and promised to fight the fiveyear extension when the bill is debated in the House. Two changes affecting urban schools were recommended by the committee. One would make about $ 300 million more a yea r available to school districts in which there is considerable public housing. The other amendment calls for participation by pa r ents and communi ty groups in the planning of Title I school projects. I nad equate Fund ing Throu ghout the commit tee hearings on HR 514, the bi ll ' s spons o r, Commi t t e e Cha irman Car l D. Perkins (D Ky.), pointed out the n eed f o r l arge r a p p r o pri a t ions for Title I of the Act . Hi s c omContinue d on Pa g e 2 ACTION COUNCIL LETTER LEGISLATIVE BULLETIN OF THE URBAN COALITION ACTION COUNCIL March 25, 1969 -- Vol. I, No. 3 States Hold Back Anti-Crime Funds from Cities, Report Says Where are crime problems the most serious? Under the Omnibus Crime Control Act of 1968, American Samoa gets $3.54 per capita and Vermont 31¢ per capita, while New York and California receive 7¢ per citizen. Similarly, a rural Georgia county gets 14¢ per capita while the metropolitan Atlanta region receives less than 3¢. These are figures produced in a study of the Crime Control Act in operation, released by the National League of Cities March 18. When Cong r e ss pass e d the Ac t last year, it directed that most of the funds go to the states in block grants, to be distributed according to plans drawn up by a state agency. Urban groups urged in vain that most of the money go directl y to the 370 cities with population ove r 50 , 000 , where c r ime is t he most prev ale n t . The League of Cities r epo rt say s that i n s t ead of focu s ing dollars on t h e prob l e ms o f crime i n the s t reets , pla nn i ng f u nd s a r e thi n l y spread a mo n g r ural a nd urb a n a r eas and "di ss ipated" among t hre e levels o f b u r e aucr a cy. The Action Council Letter reports legislative developments 1n the urban field . It is published by the Urban Coa lition Action Council, which seeks needed urban legislation . �Continued from Page 1 mittee is responsible for authorizing the education programs, but the amount of money that actually goes out to the schools is determined primarily by the separate Appropriations Committees of the House and Senate. Under the present law about $2.5 billion a year is authorized for Title I grants but Congress has appropriated only $1.1 billion. In fact, last year's appropriation was $68 million less than the previous year's, while the number of children eligible for the programs was increasing, and so were education costs. Rep. Perkins has pointe d out that in the f irst three years of Title I, the appropriations per child have decreased from $210 to $170. Some school superintendents told the House committee that an effective, comprehensive program for disadvantaged children would need $600 per child. A new federal program to help local school districts prevent teenagers from dropping out of school has proved popular. In fact, 356 proposals h ave been submitted t o the Off ice o f Education, of which only 5 can be funded. There is $30 million authorized for drop-out prevention programs, but Congress has appropriated only $5 million. The f unds will be granted for innovative plans that show unusual promise of success in pre venting drop-outs. The budget submitted by Pres ident Johnson before leaving office proposes $24 million for the program in the nex t fiscal year. The 356 proposals submitted to the Office of Education would cost $68 million. HEW estimates that of children who entered 9th grade in 1967, 23%, or 900,000, will drop out before graduating from high school. Rep. Ca rl D. Perkins (D Ky.) and his Education and La_bor Comm ittee are moving ahead with elementary educat ion, school lunch and poverty leg islation. Bill to Improve School Lunch Program Is Passed by House For the second year in a row, the House is trying to increase the number of needy children who get free or reduced-price lunches through the school lunch program . As it did last year, the House passed without opposition March 20 a bill (HR 515) to require all states to put some of their tax money into school lunches . Presently, some states contribute nothing to the program, requiring the children and local schools to put up all of the money needed to match federal funds on a 3 to 1 basis. Last year, spurred by publication of a report by the private Committee on School Lunch Participation showing that less than 2 million of some 6 million needy school children got reduced - price lunches (see chart), the House �Free School Lunches Free lunches I ( doily a ve rage) Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Ka nsas Kentuck.y Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana 3 Neb raska Neva da New Hampshire Ne w Je rsey New Me xico New York North Caroli na North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Ore gon Pe nnsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyomi ng Total 77,000 7,000 25,423 70,2 13 0 13,533 4 ,9 14 2, 180 16,759 117,550 107,847 4 ,752 1,880 29,285 15,939 8,656 8,564 80,00 69,260 6 ,480 10 ,294 24 ,911 60,000 10,000 34 ,671 30,000 (3) Needy childre n 2 not rece iving free lu nch 165,5 22 976 39,348 146,219 0 51 ,833 34, 129 4,368 0 105,249 230,273 9,583 12,764 230,757 134,061 113,650 85,640 __2-_Ql , 9 45 13 1,830 38,520 44,711 52,581 129,900 124 ,111 220 ,232 95,159 '(3) 8, 180 1,750 3,245 7,010 32,432 400,000 163,607 3, 185 33,486 25,000 3 ,61 4 8 ,781 3,488 117,38 2 7,200 71 ,100 88,000 14,641 2,600 6 ,787 10 ,000 30,525 11 ,000 752 54,456 4,750 4 ,969 52,835 30,281 200,000 324,068 22,901 9 1,571 72,779 42,714 247,491 16,886 179, 174 25,656 154, 129 3 15,2 16 3 ,559 12,696 182,213 40,000 72,547 11 4,922 5,3 17 1,890,876 4,674,491 I Numb er of free or reduci'd· price lu nches. 2 Need., chddren were those of O#"·" 5 to 17. from hnm e.-. wit h les,fi than °J.000 annual 111com P. .1 No figure" were a vailable from stal e ,o;chool lunc·h authnrit1 e.-.. whn !;upplied information for the surney. Howet:er, a citiuns Committee on School lunch Partici{XJt1011 April 16 r eport Pd that M ontana had J6.9iH ...dwnl-aJ.fP ch ildren from familie.,; earnin,: $2,()(J() a \'ear or r P<·eiuinµ welfare aid. f Jnl ,· 6, /60 reu•if.Jed free or redu<.·ed -pr,ce lunch e.-. SOURCE : House Education a nd Labor Committee survey (H Rept 1590), June 26 , 1968 . passed a bill similar to HR 515. More importan tly, the House also passed a bi ll to add $ 1 00 million a year for meals for nee dy ch i ldr en. The Senate p a ssed neit her bill, but it d id agree t o app r o priate an extr a $ 45 million for free lunches. This year, the House Educat i on and Labor Commi ttee, which sen t HR 51 5 to the House floor , a l s o expec ts to approv e a gain the $ 100 mi ll ion free -lunch bill (HR 51 6). Wh a t wi ll b e d o ne by t he Senate Agriculture Committee, which h as jurisdiction over the schoo l lun ch pro gram, remains to be seen. Congressional Hearings Poverty -- The House Educ atio n and Labor Commi ttee has begun hearings on the Office of Economic Opportunity and its antipoverty programs. Chairman Carl D. Perkins (D Ky. ) has introduced HR 513, to extend the programs f o r five years and authorize $ 2,18 0 , 0 00,000 for the m in the fiscal y ear that begins July 1 . For the c u rre nt y ear Congress a ppropriate d $1 ,9 4 8,000,000. Ho s pitals -- Hearings on the Hill -Burton Act , held by the Publ ic Hea lth Subcommittee of the House I nter state a nd Fo re i gn Commerce Committee, are b egin ning . Two main bills are b e fo re the Sub c ommittee . HR 6797, introduced by Committee Chairman Ha r ley O. Staggers (D W.Va. ) , propo ses ma j or i nc reas e s in fund s f or h ospital con- �struction and modernization, with priority to be given, in part, to outpatient facilities in low-income metropolitan areas. The other bill, HR 7059, sponsored by high-ranking members of the Health Subcommittee, authorizes less money than Staggers' bill and does not single out urban medical needs. Medicaid, WIN Regulations Chairman Russell B. Long (D La.) of the Senate Finance Committee has said his committee intends to take "a good hard look" at regulations issued in January concerning Medicaid, welfare eligibility, the work incentive program (WIN) and others. Some of these, Long said, "run counter to Congressional intent." No plans for hearings have been announced. The regulations were issued by the Administrator of HEW's Social and Rehabilitation Serv ice, Mary E. Switzer. Long made his statement in introducing a bill to make the ne x t Administrator's appointment subject to confirmation by the Senat e . The Senate passed the bill (S 1022) March 4 and sent it to the House Ways and Means Committee. Minority Business Enterprise Coordination Is Estab lished President Nixon signed an e x ecutive order March 5 that established an Office of Minority Business Enterprise in the Department of Commerce. The office is to stimulate business ownership by minority groups and coordinate -- but not take over -- existing government programs. Secretary of Commerce Maurice H. Stans estimated there were 116 programs in 20 government agencies concerned in one way or another with helping minority enterprise. Directors of the new office were named March 13. The director is Thomas F. Roeser, who has been director of public affairs for the Quaker Oats Co. and before that, press secretary for Rep. Albert H. Quie (R Minn.). The deputy director is Abraham S. Venable, a graduate of Howard University and formerly a conciliation specialist in black-white relations for the Community Relations Service, which was a Commerce Department agency until moved to the Justice Department. In announcing the new office, Hearings Available -President Ni xon said: "Black, Congressional hearings on Mex ican-American, Puerto Ricans , t wo subjects of growing importance Indians and others must be increasingly encouraged to ente r the i n the urba n field -- income main~e na~ce ~nd the r ol e of financial field of business , both in the institu tions -:-=--w_ere _held-l at.e- in ---~ re as-whe-re they now l i v e- a nd i.n the last session of Con g r ess . the larger commercial community -Summar ies of these hea r ings , a s and not only as workers but also well as the Action Council ' s pamas managers and owne r s " ph let briefly rev iewing Urban Af · 1 fa i rs Legislation i n the 90th The Urban Coalition Action Counci l Co ngre s s , a r e a v a ilable without charge to anyone who wi shes to 1819 H St., N.W. write f o r t h em t o the Ac t ion Washingto n, D.C. 20006 Counci l . Tel : 202 293-1 530 The s umma r iz e d h e arings are: Chairman : Jahn W. Gardn er Financial Institution s and Co-Cha irmen , An drew Heiskel l A. Phil ip Ra nd olph the Urban Cri s i s . He arin gs by the Exec utive Di re ctor , Lo we ll R. Beck Senate Banking and Curr e ncy ComLegis lative Assoc iates: Joh n P. Lagomarcino Ro nald J . James mittee. Assi stant for Legis lat ive Information , Income Mainte nanc e . He a rings · Georgianna F. Rathbun by the Joint Economic Committee. ~ 31 �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 10, Document 13

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_010_013.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 10, Document 13
  • Text: The Urban Coalition 1815 H Street, N.W. Wash ington , D.C. 20006 Telephone : 347-9630 CHAIRMAN : John W. Gardner CO -CHAIRMEN: Andrew Heiskell/ A . Philip Randolph March 18 , 1969 The Honor able Ivan Allen , J r . M yor of the City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Ivan: During the last year t he Urban Coalition has grown rapidly in both numbers of staff and the programs and activities we are cur rently carrying out . The time when I could singlehand dly manage both the external and internal affairs of the Coalition has long sine passed. For this reason, I have instituted several internal changes which I believe will significantly improve our capacity to c rry out our responsibiliti s during the forthcoming year. Th se changes include tho following: 1 . I have ppointed Peter Libassi, formerly Vice President for Local Coalitions, to be th Executive Vice Pr sident of the Urban Coalition . 2. I have revised th internal proc du:res by which polici sand progr is were developed by e~tablishing Policy Committee which I will chair. The oth r embers of the Poiicy Coromitt will be C rl Hol n, Vice President for Policy and Progir D v lopment, and Pet r Liba-s si .Sincerely, John w. Gardner Ch inn n cc: Mr. Dan Sweat �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017