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Box 9, Folder 5, Document 4

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_005_004.pdf
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  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 5, Document 4
  • Text: ATtANTil '-J'RBAN CORPS 30 COURTLAND STREET, N.E . / PHONE [404) 52 4-8 0 9 1 / ATLANTA , GEORGIA 30 303 July 30, 1969 Dear Intern Supervisor: As you know, we are presently planning our fall intern program and also trying to project needs for next summer. In order to support a year-round operation and adequately prepare for a large summer influx of interns, we need funds for a full-time staff. We are approaching private donors and government agencies for administrative funds, but need some proof of performance of interns from you. Will you please write a letter to us to be used for fund raising that gives a brief outline of y our opinions of the Urban Corps and the interns placed with your agency. We also welcome constructive criticism. _Your prompt cooperation will be greatly appreciated. t+ [{k~{Wfav SAM A. WILLIAMS Director SAW~ ,, JV(JLC{ ~ ~wrvk. �
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 5, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 9, Folder 5, Document 10

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_005_010.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 5, Document 10
  • Text: July 14, 1969 Mr. Le Heubner Staff Assistant to the President The White House 1600 Pennsylvani Av nue, N- W., Washi.n gton, D. C. ne - r Lee: It wa a pl aeure me ting you and having th opportunity to di cuss thing of mutual inter st. I appr ei te you ssi ting ou~ young coll ge students in making th Service L ming Com renc· su.cc • tf yo g t any idea aa to ho w c tr ngthen thi typ progt m, pl e do not he l to call on ua. In the m.eantim ., f l fre to call on us lf th re is lp you itb fi-om ~ - nd of th line. Sine r ly you.re, Dan Sw at DS;fy nything e c n �
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 5, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 9, Folder 5, Document 13

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_005_013.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 5, Document 13
  • Text: July 21. 1969 Bal~·r P titt 3399 Buford Big ay Mi u Y• l or ta t Atlanta. Der Hts P titt : Yo r 1 tter re tiug info ti children int Atl ta a bu been fo Ivan All n, Jr. tter N of • I itt ' I D al / , / /';I ,· j' /, /! lp to you, leue let ~ - I I 1 I I eor • ut �
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 5, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 9, Folder 5, Document 16

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_005_016.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 5, Document 16
  • Text: rma...cm INTERNSHIPS IlffERN'S Gat~ City y Nurs ry DEVELOFMENT - IC DEVELOPER 7 Tom King 5-5-69( ) Christin Counci l 1 Truly T Communi ty Couno11 2 Kin2 C nt ,r of A-"1;s 1 Truly n. Visiting Ifur."' Ric (2) a El.iza starne orial Pr uyt, rian ( 2) Church our,,r,n D • Mul'pby Page ( 2) (4) (2) ts Boy S 0d l C1t1 s nncni t HOUG t . Vine nt At ul ta Girl 1 s Club f'~'r-1'TV nLJ<.iKYH (8) Ja ( ... ) C l (2) C 11 Brc:. (1) Chtu-11 {10) GU' Cl (5) th (20) t C y t C 1 (3) (50) J.C. y• (-) . 0. A. Cl ( on) A Br ( LE!TER SENT - �DEVELO AA1!EI Pm!& IQ. ? LE'f'TRR CCl-ll'IE!'E ily Couns l ine Cent~ ( a.l Soe • • East :r 1- hborhoOd orvices , Inc . due :tion tJrb cloe aicn City Pl.annillf lb County eatur ( Gr s~) Rospit ~ -~ 1.Aif.rA bar of C ree ahool ] lb Ar n Fulton catur tl r tr ?1 nt V City tion Arl 'X Di I , I t All n �
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 5, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 9, Folder 5, Document 17

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_005_017.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 5, Document 17
  • Text: N E WS L E T T E R ATLANTA Edition I, May 5, 1969 URBAN CORPS 30 Courtland Street, S. E., Atlanta, Georgia, 30303 Phone - 524-8091 THE ATLANTA URBAN CORPS IS OFF THE GROUND! To those of you nho have worked closely with the program this is welco me news , and in the follo wing summary several areas of the program will be outlined to date. We hope by way of a regular newsletter we can keep you informed of progress made in the program as it develops throughout these next months and on i nto the summer. The Public Relations staff will be publishing the ne wsletter, and we will attempt to cover all areas of interest within the Urban Corps program. I I WE HAVE AN OFFICE Locate d on the s econd floor of the old city auditorium, 30 Cour t land Street, is th e ne w office of the Atlanta Urban Corps. Wi t h the gen erous help of the City the office is beginning to be equipped more adequately with desks, typewriters, fili ng c a bine t s and gen eral office supplies. Full-time staff now i nclude s four: Sam Williams, Dianne Wilson, Sue Zander and Arl en e Bi r d . Melvin McCray and Stephen Mwamba of Georgia State Coll ege al s o hav e been employed part time to develop payroll and f i nan c e pr ode dur es. Volunt ee rs hav e be en in th e offic e to help with the vo lume s o f mail a n d a pplic a tio n s, etc . whic h have begun to come in , STUDENT RECRUITMENT Our student recrui tmen t ef f or t , s o vital to t h e quality of our summer program, was begun t wo weeks ago on the campuses of the participating colleges here in At lanta. Recruitment is being handled by the College Re l ations Board, chaired by Marc Dash. The Coll ege Relations Board has been working quite effectively on the campuses and is to be commended for representing the A. U. C, well, A report submitted by Marc on Apr il 29 sho wed the following figures: �Page 2 College \ ... . Appro x . No. With One Week Remaining -Geor-gia State College Emory University Agnes Scott College Clark College Morris Brown College Morehouse College Spelman College Georgia Tech DeKalb Junior College 30 25 70 120 115 100 110 70 Total 25 bb5 4/24/69 4/28/69 5/ 1/69 4/29/69 4/29/69 5/ 1/69 4/29/69 4/28/69 4/29/69 ·. ... . . ._f, Formal recruitment c.losed on the campuses Friday, May 2. Marc Dash predicts that an overall fi gure of 1000 applications will be in hand to be reviewed for student placement. A REPORT ON FINANCE Bill Adams, Private Fund Raising Chairman, has submitted the followin g report on e fforts being made in this area of the A. U. C. In t he initial conception of the Atlanta Urban Corps , the idea of soliciting the business co mmunity for financial a s s ista n ce was co n sidered to be absolutely necessary in order to make the A. U. c. a r epre sentative student pro gram. Without finan ci al as sistanc e f r om the bu si ne ss s ector only students who could qualify f or colle ge work study money would be able to s e rve as int e rns in the A, U. C. unles s they volunteered their time . Business support will enable the Atlanta Urban Corps to i nvolv e s tu dent s fro m all l evels of i n come in th e program and also will allo w i nte r ns t o work i n a gencies that cannot afford the cost. Presentl y we ar e in t h e proc es s o f con tacting the major busin esses i n the Atl an ta a r ea. We f e el t he A. U. C. pr ovi des busin e s s t he opportuni t y t o co n tribut e t o a wor t hwhil e urban proj ect as well as to provi de t hem a n exc ell en t avenu e f or public · re l ations. Money avai labl e t o da t e can be bro ken down as f ollo ws: College Work St udy Gran t s ( approx. 220 i nterns ) $1 95,000 Southern Regional Educ atio n Bo ard 20,000 City Finance Depar t ment Gran t 9,000 Fulton County Health Depar t men t 5,500 Stern Foundation Gran t 1,000 Total $230,500 J ' .~,.,, , ·. · ,. .. ,,,... ,. ·".,14 . .- ·.-.i --... ,-; .. .. ·., .... ' .:.t: ~ ... f ' �Our goal is 300 interns, half in city agencies and half in non-city agencies such as YMCA, DeKalb County Government, etc. At present in our administrative department we need twenty-four interns. If private businesses contribute l40,000 we will be able to operate at planned capacity. Our financial effort has been greatly enhanced by the assistance of Mr. Dave Houser of Arthur J. Anderson and Co. Mr. Houser has been very beneficial in directing our approach to the business sector. BOARD OF TRUSTEES MEETS The Board of Trustees of the Atlanta Urban Corps met officially for the first time April 17, 1969 in the Wilby Room of the Georgia Tech Library. Mr. Bill Ramsay of the Southern Regional Education Board presided. Rich Speer, Student Director, spoke to the Board on the A. U. C. overall concept, followGd by an organization report given by Sam VJiJ.liams, Staff Director. R0por ts vrnre made by David Whelan, Internship Development Director and by Sam Williams and Bill Adams who both reported on the financial aspect of the program. Tara Swartsel, Secretary of t he Colle ge Relations Board, gave a short report on the work being done on the campuses by our College Relations Board representatives, and Marc Dash, Director of the College Relations Board described the actual program of student recruitment. Mr. Dennis Webb of Nall, Miller, !Cadenhead, and Dennis reported on the legal status of th e A. U. c., explaining to the Board that our charter ha s been approved by the State of Georgia and is being presented to the Internal Revenue Service for taxexempt status as a non-profit organization. BUSINESSMEN'S BREAKFAST A SUCCESS On Tuesday, April 29 at 9:00 a.m. a breakfast was given in the tea room of Rich's downtown, made possible by Mr. Harold Brocke of Rich I s and hosted by i'-'i r. Kavanagh of Ric I s personel department. Forty leading Atlanta businessmen were invited to become personall y adquainted with the A. U. C. program. Good attendance and obvious interest proved our belief I i I· ' �Page 4 that the Atla.nta business community will play a vital role in the success of our program. Mayor Ivan Allen and Georgia Tech:s past president Edwin Harrison each made opening comments on the Urban Corps, and Sam Williams, Rich Speer and Bill Adams made reports on specific areas of the Urban Corps concept. The businessmen were invited to commit themselves to the concept of the A. U. C. and if possible to make a financial commitment as well. Bill Adams is to make personal appointments to talk wi t h individual businessmen from the group soono INTF.RNSHIP DEVELOPMENT UNDERWAY In ord e r that the students who work with our program this summer serve in rel evant positions, the A. U, C. is utilizing students in the field to develop the job slots, or internships, in which students uill be placed . Twenty-five students are no w working on this development procedure, including students fro ~ Agnes Scott College, Georgia Tech, and the Atlanta University Compl ex; Dianne Wilson and Marlene Rounds are both ~orking out of the A. U. C. office on this same development program . Contacts are being made at t wenty city departments and fo r t y extra-city ag enci e s ranging from the local school bo a r ds to the Ec ono mi c Opportunity Atlao.ta program. To date so me fift y devel oped internships are in hand with an expected fi gur e of over three hundred. Wally Bloom, Extra-City Coordinator and Da vid Whelan, City Coordinator both are quite optimistic about th e success 0 f this particular aspect of the A. U. C. deve lo pmenL �~ I Y-\~<,c:'. J~ - Ii / Mr. Dan Sweat Government 1· Mayor-ts O _i a s on c·t ff i c e l Y Hall Atlanta , . Ga . I i I I i I I l I I I AY 6 ,L , ~ , ·}b ..._,-- >7Y""' " 143.215.248.55 -~ ~/_~ U .S.Pof .r '.' , t . .,.~ . . . . ~ P.B N!TE R ......___ , . 8~61/3 Ir, V 0 o( ...,t( ,: 6 '" "" �
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 5, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 9, Folder 5, Document 19

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_005_019.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 5, Document 19
  • Text: AGNES SCOTT COLLEGE College Work-Study Students Name Agency Pay Rate None Non-College Work-Study Students T. Brackin S. Dennard J. Lang J. Maulding · S. Pickard S. Tucker T. Swartsel C. Watkins M. Gordon Kennesaw Mountain Park Fulton Cou_n fy Hod c. Waddell O• . Wheeler R. Williams R. Braxton D. Hicks R. D. R. A. Ag_ency Pay Rate Atlanta Girls Club $2.20 Parks & Recreation Atlanta Youth Corps EOA YWCA Mennonite H0 use Wheat Street Baptist Church Parks & Recreation Academy Theatre Immigration Atlanta Girls Club Immigration American Cancer Society Atlanta Urban Corps Easter Seal Finance Gate City Day Nursery Fulton County Health Dept. Gate City Day Nursery 2.20 1.80 2.20 1.80 2.20 2.20 2.20 2.20 1.80 2.20 1.80 2.20 2.20 1.80 2.20 2.20 1.80 2.20 Non-College Work- Study Students J. Myles S. Prator Sanitation Sarah D. Murphy Homes Declining Students M. Comb M. Co~en J. Delay Flande rs J. Howard s. Johnson A. Jones D. Lemon A. Lovelace J. Powell R. Rynder Y. Ross R. Sis l;arie w. Smith C. Smith c. Willia,ns E. Warner V. {Ch andler w. 2.20 2.20 �OGLETHORPE College Work-Study Students Name D. Hanley J. Menez EOA Mayor's Office $2.20 2.20 Non-College Work-Study Students T. Isaac Mayor I s Office 2.50 �· Southwe stern College Work-Study Students Name F. Flowers G. Roberts Community Relations Street Theatre $1.80 1.80 �SPELM.l\.N College Work-Study Students Name R. A. P. D. M. Arnold Chapman Dozier Lewis Moore B. Quillins T. Sinkfield C. York Pay_B_ate Kirkw.:io:i Center Gate City Nursery Easter Seal Atlanta Girls Club Library Kirkwo ,:x l Center Atlanta Yo~th Council Family Counseling $2.20 2.20 2.20 1.80 2.20 2.20 2.20 2.20 · Noc1.;.College Work-Study Students L. Howard M. Kreger S. Mincey Literacy Action Fulton County Health Dept. Wheat Street Church Declining Students S. Holiday V. Smith 2 .20 . 2.20 Volunteer �UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA College Work-Study Students Name S. Berry M. Friedman Pai Rate Crime Co:nmission City Water $2.20 2.20 Non-College Work-Study Students F. Goodson J. Hotard K. Millw.:,od J. Spencer Sanitation Sanitation Atlanta Urban Corps Crime Co:nmission Declining Students W. Goldstein L. Shahid 2.20 2.20 2.50 2.50 �University of Pennsylvania College Work-Study Students Name . P. Whatley M£~T}£1_ Fulton County Health ~Rate $2.20 Non-College Work-Study Students J. Waggener Business License 2.20 �VASSAR College Work-Study Students Name M. Freeman 4.gells: Dekalb YMCA Pay R~te $1.80 �WEST GEORGIA COLLEGE College Work-Study Students Name s. K. L. D. N. M. K. s. J. R. P. s. c. L. D. s. M. E. Ball Betsill Brow:i. Cousineau Ingram Jaccino Kennedy Kieme le Mann Lynes McLaughlin Stro~hert Thurmond Tilley Turner Windom Winston Henderson fille_~ Fulton County Health Dept. Decatur YMCA Fulton County Health Dept. Fulton County Health Dept. Atlanta Public Library Fulton County Health Dept. Fulton County Health Dept. Fulton County Health Dept. Atlanta Youth C.ouncil Water Dept. Atlanta Girls Club Kirkwood Center Grady's Girls Club Atlanta Youth Council Dekalb YMCA Fulton County Health Dept. Motor Trans. Parks & Recreation Declining Students J. Neighbors Pay Rate $2.20 1.80 2.20 2.50 2.20 1. 80 1.80 1.80 .1. 80 2.20 1.80 2.20 2.20 1.80 2.20 2.20 2.20 2.20 �YESHIVA COLLEGE College Work-Study Students Name L. Shields ~ency_ Easter Seal ~_E.~te $2.20 �N0E.-College Work-Study Students Agency Pay Rate Florida Presbyterian College s. Fulton County Health Chandler $1.80 Northwestern University Emmaus House F. Hill 2.50 University o f Kentucky Water Depto J. Hill 2.20 Coppin State College Jacqueline Blackwell EOA 2.20 Randolph-Macon Decatur-Dekalb YMCA A. Luce 1 .&) University of North Carolina M~ Lawrence B. White Atlanta Service Learning Conference 2.20 Literacy Action 2.50 Wesleyan W. Millkey Finance 1. 80 Antioch College M. Berk Mayor's Of fice 2.20 Clemson T. Rogers Atlanta Urban Co rps 2.50 George Wa shington College M. Silberstein Kennesaw Mountain 2.20 North Carolina Arts School c. Walker Finance 1. 80 East Carolina · E. WitCher Fulton Planning 2.50 Berry College G. Smith Emmaus House Volunteer �Non-Colle ge Work-Study Students Name Agency Pay Rate Tulane I. Deen Atlanta Urban Corps $2.50 Vanderbilt J. Elman Sanitation Declining Students R. Westbrook University of the South E. Benjamin C. Dill Earlhar.a Colle ge A. Cherry Tuskee gee W. Johnson Smith J. Dayan Barnard A. Waller Mt. Holyoke s. Erlick 2.50 �
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 5, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 9, Folder 5, Document 20

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_005_020.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 5, Document 20
  • Text: ATLANTA VRDAN CORPS 30 COURTLAND STREET , N .E . / PHO N E [404) 525 -2662 / AT L AN TA , GEORGIA 30303 April 25, 1969 Mr. Dan Sweat Director of Government Liaso n Mayor's Office Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dan , Enclosed are our Internship Development Forms for the Mayo r 's · office internship positions this summer. Since you are so well acquainted with the pro gram, I see no need to discuss the internships peraewith you. If you will see t hat a development f orm is co mpletely filled out f or each internship in the Mayo r's o ff ice ( xerox a copy if two are the same . ) with a detail ed description of the purpo ses , obj ectives, etc. o f t he position, it wi l l be appreciated. We would like you to return these f orms to us at the A.U. C. offic e as s oo n as possible. I f you have any questions, please call the office and leav e a message for me. Thank you for your help. David Whe lan �
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 5, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 9, Folder 5, Complete Folder

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_005.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 5, Complete Folder
  • Text: September 10, 1969 Miss Sue Zander Executive Ass is tant 200 26th St . • N. W. Apartment J - 204 Atlanta, Georgia Dear Miss Zander: We are aware of the important contribution that you made to the City of Atlanta through the Atlanta Urban Corps this summer. On behalf of the City, and personally, I wish to express our grate.ful appreciation for your fine work. Sincerely, Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor lAJr:lrd �12 App2ndix A Southern Regional Education Board Resource Development Project ACADEMIC YEAR INTERNS 1968-1969 Economic Development Administration Intern, College or University, Dates Dickerson, Oscar Holloway , I,ister Al abama A & M College (10/14--2/11.:.) Grant, William Paone, J ob.21 Ur..iversity of Virginia Project Description Assigned to assist Peoples Cooperat i ve of Madison County, Alabama, through an improved record-keeping system and educational efforts to promote advantages of cooperative efforts. Assigiced to provide follow-up ass istance in dcve lop::.ng Buc}j_ngham County, Virginia, Buyers Co- op . (11/6--5/30) Everhardt, Jerry UNC-CH French, Nita Guilford He:~,ze son, John w.c.u . Participated in Pilot Study (conducted 12/6/682/8/69 ) to determine feasibility of major service-learning study in North Car olina . Part icipating i n stitutions and the SmithRichardson Foundat ion provided support for this effort. .Jolc.nson, Charly N.C.S.U. Ki ng , Gary E.c.u. Penick, George Davi d.:con Wassell, P~yllis J .C. Smith Wi~_liams, Garland Mars Hill Seninar on Economic Development Administration conducted for 12 interns by ·ch'= Departments of Poli ti cal Science and Economics of Middle Tennessee State Univer sity (1/1/69--6/30/ 69 ) Bas ic purpose of this pilot prog~am in the Teaching of Economic Deve l opment Administrat i o:r. was to intensify the l earning environment by providing an opportunity to participate direct ... l y in an actual community development effort. Rural and urban-oriented Model Cities Programs in Sm~thvi lle and Nashville provided learning context. Each intern is pr epari1g a final report and eval uation of the semj_nar . MTSU i s preparing an evaluation report on this approach to teaching Economic Development Administratic!'l. �13 Economic Development Administration (continued) Intern, College or r_Tniversity, Dates Haire, Douglas Georgia State Whelan, David Georgia Institute of Technology Zauderer, Gail Agnes Scott College Project Description Assisted with development of Atlanta ServiceLearning Program. (1/6--3/14) Goodrum, Lloyd Leich, Joan Mars Hill College (1/20--5/23) Hanzlik, Rayburn Uni versity of Virginia (2/20--5/30) Sweet, Charles Duke University (3/18--5/30) OfficE_~ Provided research assistance for Madison-Buncombe Rural Development Council, I nc ., to examine economic and social impact of t he foo:i stamp program and the commodity food program in Madison County, North Carolina. The Center f or the Study of Science , Te chnology and Public Policy of the UniversitY. of Virginia sponsored a project to survey existing resources within the university which are a lrend.y or could in t he f uture pr ovide technica l assistance t o the surroundi ng community i n dealing with commun ity problems . Examination of college Work-Study Program an~ its r e lati onshi p with SREB Servi ce-Learn5.ng Internship Model. _.· · :..:momic Oppor tunity Munsc;.1, Cs.:,~ ~. t~o::-i Un:l.v2~·:3 i ty of }!.':=;r yl and (1.o/ 1;08--,:/ 3O/ 69) Siffcy-,J , We..llac,·~ Mor ga;, St a i::-~ Cc.:ll ege (1/ 20··-7/ 4/69) With the Mar yl and Stat e Office of Economi c Opportun i ty , intern cc 1duct ed comprehensive revi ew of dimens i ons and implement a-: ions of On-the- J ob Training i n Wes t ern Mar yland . with Mor gan St at e College and De l aware Stat e Offi c.8 of Bconomic Oppor tunity, proj ect des i gned to i Jenti fy causes of st udent unre st. �Appendix B Southern Regional Education Board Resource Development Project STATISTICAL ABSTRACT Summer 1968 Project Subject Areas Participating Host Agencies Participating Universities and Colleges Intern Profile Counselor Prof ile Former Intern Status - 1966-1968 Distribution of Int erns by State and Agency 1964-1968 �1· I J.4 PROJECT SU-EJECT JI.RF.AS Summer 1968 EDA Public Adm. & Finance Econ. Analysis & Planning Coinm. Action & Social Service Tourism, Travel & Recreation Manpower Education & Training Health & Sanitation Legal Needs Housing Natural Res. Development 32 19 2 8 8 7 1 OEO TVA CJJ:A 1 3 15 8 6 l 1 3 6 5 6 3 2 Summer Summer 1968 1967 ARC TOI1AL % TCII1AL % 2 3 1 2 1 2 2 - 35 23 . 1 33 17 16 1 15 11~ 8 6 5 2 151 21. 8 11.2 10.6 10.0 9.2 5.3 3.9 3.3 1.3 6 7.1 16 19.C' 10 - 11.9 10 11. 9 14 16.S 5 .5, 5 8.3 7 11 13.1 5. 9 5 0 B4 PARTICIPATING HOST AGENCIES WITH WHOM INTERNS SERVED - Sl001ER 1968 Community Action Agencies Economic Development Districts 1}eneral Development Organizations Ste,te Office Departments Tr ibut ary Area Organizations (TVA) Regional Offices (EDA and OEO) 2!:nployment Service Off ices Model Cities Number of Agencies 1967 Agenci E:8 Repeat ing j_n 1968 1968 1967 29 26 22 15 12 27 14 16 ~- ---11 10 7 ~- 4 10 9 2 1 0 5 1 0 0 0 109 78 42 �15 PARTICI~ATING UNIVERSITIES AND co~~EGES (Summer 1968 Resource Development Internship Programs) Graduate Institutions Undergraduate Institutions Agnes Scott College Auburn University Alcorn A & M College Clemson University Alderson-Broaddus College Delta State College Arkansas A.M. & N. College Duke University Augusta College East Carolina University Berry College East Tennessee State University Carson-Newman College Emory University .Clark College Florida State University Florida Presbyterian College Florence State College Glenville State College Frostburg State College Hampden-Sidney College Furman University Knoxville College Georgia Southern College Lambuth College Georgia State College Little Rock University Louisiana State University Middle Georgia C0llege Medical College of South Carolina Pembroke State College Memphis State University Tougaloo College Middle Tennessee State University University of West Florida Mississippi State University Valdosta State College Morehead State University Wilmington College (N.C.) North Carolina State University West Liberty State College Oklahoma State University (w. Va . ) Salisbury State College \·Test Georgia College Southeastern State College (Okla.) Universi.ty of Alabama Fest Virginia Inst. of University of Arkansas Technology University of Georgia University of Houston University of Kentucky University of Maryland University of Mississippi University of North Carolina (Chapel Hill ) University of Oklahoma University of South Carolina SUWffiRY University of Southern Mississippi ! Lt,_ ,,:;, '?, Unj_versity of Southwestern Louisiana Graduat e Institutions University of Tennessee ' University of Texas Undergraduate Instit uUniversity of Virginia tions Virginia Commonwealth Universit y Virginia State College (Norfolk) Junior Colleges West Virginia University €5'"1 1 Western Carolina University - i �16 1968 SUMMER I NTERN PROFILE ACADEMIC MAJORS OF I NTERNS Soc. Science and Education Bus . & Econ . Law Ar ch . , Eng. , Plng. Humanit ies Ag . , Rec., Home Ee. Medicine Natural Scienc es EDA OTA 29 4 27 5 8 6 1 7 1 3 1 OEO TVA ARC 1968 PERCENT 1967 % 25 7 1 66 43 . 7 40 41. 7 6 3 1 1 6 0 28 .5 7.3 7.3 4.6 3 .3 2.6 2.6 31 1 43 11 11 7 5 4 4 151 32 . 3 13 .5 6 .3 00 . 00 . 3.1 3. 1 5 1 1 1 4 2 13 6 0 0 3 3 9b ACADEMIC STANDING OTA OEO TVA ARC TOTAL PERCENT EDA Sophomore ,Tunior 3enior Masters Fh , D. 1-1 . D. J. D. /Lavr a. A. Graduate 1 14 21 23 8 4 8 79 4 4 4 2 1 15 _ 1 7 2 1 7 10 11 1 4 5 5 1 -1 Ii3" -13 1 26 1 43 4o ~ I 1 12) 4) 10) 15 1 151 47. 0% 43 . 0% 10.0% PERSONAL DATA OTA OEO Male 12 35 70 Female 8 9 3 Average Age 22. 6 22 . 9 22 . 8 Aarri ed 21 29 7 Singl e '.;O 8 22 Wh:i.t e 43 38 77 Non-White 2 2 5 REASONS GIVEN BY INTERNS FOR SEEKING INTERNSHIP APPOINTMENT : 1967 1968 Relate academic theory to real world 32.7% 33 . 1% Contribute to developmental activities 22. 7 33 . 1 Research Experience 6.3 l6.1 Working with people 16,3 10 .5 Help with e: GrC!er cl10ice 18. 1 4. 8 3.6 2.4 Joh EDA TVA ARA TOTAL PERCENT 86.1 12 1 13 0 1 21 13. 9 23.1 22. 0 22.6 41..0 62 5 8 1 59. 0 89 142 94 . o 1 13 6 .o 9 FAMILY I NCCME LEVEL OF I N1I'ERNS Below $5000 5000- 7~~99 7500-9999 10, 000-15,000 15,000-over Total Responses 13 20 14 17 17 BI 16% 24.6 17. 2 21. 21. �17 COUNSELOR PROFILE Highest Degree Attained Ph.D. M.A. Other 1968 Percent 59 55 .6 34.9 9.4 37 10 106 Pos i tions Held Assistant Professor Ass ociate Professor Dept. Chairman Professor Bureau Direct or Instructor/Lecturer Otner Teaching Area 1968 Social Sciences & Education Business & Economics Agriculture, Home Ee. & Recreation Archi tect ure, Eng . & Planni ng Humanities Law Natural Sciences & Mathematics Medici ne 52 29 9 5 ..,";/ 3 3 2 32 23 ,~ _j 12 10 8 8 106 Pe:!:·c:ent 49.0 27. 3 8 r: ! ,I 4. 7 2. 8 2.8 2.8 1. 9 106 Years at University or Coll ege 1-2 years 3-5 years 6-10 _years 11-15 y ears 16-20 years 20-over years unknown 48 27 12 7 4 Average Age 20- 29 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69 y ear s year s years years years 7 1 106 Counsel ors Repeating f or Second Year : 24, or 22 . 6% 40. 8 y ee,rs 8 5l 27 13 7 106 �18 FORMER Ii~ERN STATUS - 1966-1968 (As of Dece~ber 31, 1968) Current Educational Status Graduate School Undergraduate School OTIIER TOTAL % EDA OEO TiJA 48 37 29 16 16 11 1 65 99 28.5 17.8 8 6 -2 1 1 ~, r7 J+.9 26 5 2 0 1 3 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 42 10 3 13 14 12.1 2.8 o. 8 1.4 3.7 4.o 6 CurrE>nt Em-11loyment Status Privr-tte In::lustry Public Service Education (Teaching ) F~der:=:.l Gov' t. St atP. Gov't . Local Gov 1 t. T-::.~s ou:~-::e Dev. Mili ts.::.· y 10 11 2 1 1 2 2 Unk.110-.,-~ 32 19 14 2 67 20.0 9 1 2 0 12 3.4 187 90 58 12 347 Duplicat es ( Interns who have serve(:l. in more than one internship assig nment) TOTALS 6 2 3 6 5 Intern· Evalua tion reg_uested "yes t1 or "no t1 response to followi ng 1\lould you be interested in receiving informat:'~ on concernquest ion: ing emi:,loyment positions and educational opportunities i n community or re s ource development?" 87.7% answer ed Yes 10. 7% No 1.3% N/ A - - - - - - - -- - --- - -- - --- - - --- - - -- - - - - - -- -- �, ;fi'R~J:~-LiY P.ROG-f:Alv:S - J_J~)-~.-l Sf.:8 Distribution by s ·::-ate a nd Age:1cf Ri_~ ::msorship ALA Aff',_, --·- EDA C1.1A OEO-CAP - -- 0:7-0-LS ·:,_:VA su-67 su-68 su-66 AY-66-67 su-67 AY-67-68 su-68 su-67 su-68 su-67 su-68 su-66 su-67 su-64-65 su-66 AY-66-67 S"l.i·-:'.)'7 U,:;DOL Tm'ALS: su-68 su-67 Part-time Full-time Tota ls %of Ail Interns SUIIM/':..RY: ARC EDA OEO TVA USDOL 1 3 1 ARK 2 3 2 ".) 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 FI.A GA 3 6 5 2 3 6 1 2 42 3 2 2 1 3 5 4 l 3 2 2 2 1 1 1 2 19 21 5.9 2 196 90 58 10 356 KY LA MISS 4 1 3 NC 2 3 3 3 3 6 1 2 2 1 _) 3 1 3 4 5 1 OKLA SC 1 1 1 1 4 2 2 4 T:r-;x Vl\. 1 1 2 4 3 1 4 4 1 9 4 W VA DC 2 3 3 3 1 1 1 - 3 l 1 2 3 4 l" -/ 25 28 24 79 4 5 2 3 2 5 6 5 1 11 6 5 5 6 2 1 1 1 5 1 3 0 1 0 0 8 0 19 12 39 16 5 6 11 · 16 63 1 r~ 4 82 6 11 24 1 13 42 17 5 Ll 1.1 3.6 10. 8 1.4 .4.8 23. 1 1. 7 3.1 6. 8 0.3 0 4 0 4 Tor.AL 1 1 6 4 -:> TENl\T 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 3 0 0 9 7 13 7 70 20 13 7 79 2·:· 3. 6 1. 9 21. 9 ·;- . .-; MD 19 10 15 27 43 10 10 11 14 10 10 13 10 50 306 356 �Lillk NEWS OF THE CORPS Atlanta Urban Corps Mr . Dan Sweat Government Liason Mayor's Office City Hall Atlanta , Georgia 30 Courtland Street, N. E. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Volume IV HlTERNS hA ·l fl ~ -1£!. CENTER Located in the recreation area of Trinity t·;e thodist Church , .265 Washington Street , is t he Walk- In Counseling Center directed by the the Atlanta Youth Council. The Center is a new proj ect which is dedicated to serving the immediate personal problems of the 13-21 year age group. Three Atlanta Urban Corps interns are managing the program. In an interview with Loyd Sanders , intern from Morehouse College , it was learned that Sanders , Bill Patter son (Univ. o f Indiana) , and Jo Ingle (Georgia College at Milledgeville) spend some seventy hours per week counseling young people whose problems range from general feelings of dejection and lack of personal value drug addiction and illigitimate pregnancies. As the problems of the Center's clientele vary in degrees of urgency and acuteness, Loyd, Bill and Jo have learned through sessions o f debriefing that each must be handled quite s eparately. The interns are fully aware of their own limitations in the field of counseling although all three are upper-level psycholo gy majors at their respe£tive colleges . Therefore, the Center relie s heavily on the relationship i t has est abl ished with various social service agencies which are prepared to offer professional assistance in the treatmen t of more severe cases of adolescen t problems. Loyd praised Georgia State College ' s willingness to donate professional time at a moment ' s notice . Hours of psychological testing and the like are administered by Georgia Stat e professionals who cari be at th e Center within five minutes after having_ been contacted. Great assistance has come too from Mr. John Cox, director of the Atlanta Youth Council , Nr. Lewis Dinkins , assistant to t,,,r. Cox, Mrs. Yvonne Bingham, counselor from Atlanta University , and Mr. David \'/eddi nton, director of the Walk-In Center. Of concern to Sanders and to the other t wo interns is the location of the Walk-In Center. Trinity Methodist is located under the shadow of City Hall itself, and though the Center is grateful to have the comfortable space in the Church, it seems that the Walk-In pDogram might be far more effective were it located in the area of the city were young people live and feel most natural . As Loyd pointed out , 11 Who is i;oing to just 'Walk in to 265 Was hington Street and bare their souls? 11 Sanders feels that the Center might more effectively be located in the Capitol Ho mes area. For the present ,1 .. however , the Center is operating with as much effec tiveness as these three interns can foster . A campaign is on to publicize the program so that young people can learn where they can come for personal counseling and professional help. Loyd , B811 and Jo man the Center from 11 a . m. to 11 p . m. six days per week. They find that most young people respond to th e Center ' s pro gram in the evening and t hus have geared t heir working .hours to meet the needs of the people whom they serve. If the Walk-In Center proves s uccessful in i ts initial operation it is hoped that an expansion program will result in branch offices out in the areas of the city where counseling for adolescents is so desperately needed. At the Walk-In Counseling Center are three Urban Corps interns who are applying their experienc e and educational training to a real need of the city, who are realizing their limitations and finding ways to supplement their own service capaci ties, and who are creatively planning for a more effective program. Theirs is a job of responsibility and relevancy . ATLANTA .!Lfil?Mi CORPS REPRESENTED llL NEW XQEK In a fiv e day trip to t he national of fi c e of the Urban Corps in new York City, Sam Williams, direc to r of the Atlanta Urban Corps , learne d of the operations of other Urban Corps throughout the na tion and represented our Atlanta procram reporting on its progress, its problems and successes. At th e meeting were directors from ei gh t different Urban Corps and represen tatives fro m six other cities which at present do not have Urban Corps but are considering establishing the Urban Corps program . After hearing reports from the directors of Urban Corps in cities such as New York, Boston , Dayton, Detroit, and San Francisc9 , Bo.11l concludes that the Atlanta program is unique in its empl1asis on the educational aspect of the intern experience. Only in Syracuse, N. Y. does there exist a like effort to involve an educationally sound learning experience for Urban Corps interns. In that city I s Urban Corpe program fairly succuss:fUl attempts have been made to develop �! academic cour se-c redit f or Ur ban Corps i nterns hi p experi en c e . Generall y , however , Urban Co rps i n citie s other t han Atl anta a re basic ally pro grams for s ummer emplo ymen t wi th very lit t l e emphasi s place d on educat io nal r el evan cy or s tud ent admi ni strat io n. FALL URBAN CORPS PROGRAM !l.filliQ PLANN ED Under the direction o f Dave Wh elan, the Placement and Development br anch o f t he Urban Corps is i n t he proc ess of planning i ts continuing pro gram. City and a gency s upervisors hav e expres sed gr eat s atisfac t io n wi t h t he wo rk tha t Urban Co rps i nterns have ac co mpl ished t has summer and are anxio us to employ more s tudent s throughout the year . Students may co ntinue their involvment wi th t he Urban Co rps in any of several ways . The pro gram al ways v,el co mes volunteers , t hose co mmuni ty mi nde d s tu den t s who will be abl e to find t ime duri nG t h e s chool year to devote a pa rtial work week to ci ty probl em areas . For t hose studen ts who qual ify f or Collet;e Work-St udy f unds , the Urban Co rps will be able t o f i nd both f ull- t i me and part- t i me jobs , There al s o may be funds available for a limit ed number of s tudent s who nee d t o work dur i ng t he scho ol year but who are no t eligi bl e fo r c.w.s.P. funding . Another \'Jay by whic h s tudents wi ll be able to work with t he Urban Corps pro gram beyond i t s summer 1969 schedule is through coll ege a c creditat i on of the Urban Corps i nternship pro gr am. Several col leges have already a greed t o offer course credit in the f or m of special co urses, s ociology , independent study and the l ike to t heir students who work during the s chool term wi t h the Urban Corps. Two major Atlanta school s will giv e c r edit for Urban Corps i nterns hi ps and/or r elated courses whic h will be trans f erabl e t o t he other colleges. The r e will be t hose s tu den ts v,ho will want to take a qua rter off from re gular course work and devote an en ti re three months to Urban Co rps work . Just as studen ts are urged to continue their involvement nith the Urban Corps con t i nue d prograr:: so i nstitutions are urged to involve their facult;,r memb ers and staff as advisors and consultants to both Urban Corps students and er,, ploy4n- a-genci&a . Dave indicates that if enough Urban Corps staff is available this fall there will be provisioJP.s n!ade to establish an office of co1ur.unity projects. This office will aid individual students and student g~oups in finding oor,uJunicy projects or the in-training equipment for· all·eady existing projects which stude:ets JT.iC;1t sponsor or assist. 7he expansion plans of the Urban Corps are still quite flexible and any comments or suggestions from students, faculty, and others interested in the program are welcomed. Applications for fall participation will be made avaialable in the near future. IN'rERNS A'rTEND HUNGER £NQ. MAL.l'iUTRITION HEARING Representi ng the Ur ban Corps at the Hunger and Ma l nu tri t io n Hearing July 11 and 12 we r e i nterns Ral ph Mar tin and Charli e Br own. Char l ie de scribed t he heari ng i n t erm s o f its attempts to bri ne to t h e a tt entio nc of Fu+ ton County o ffi cial s t he i nade quacies of t he county's s urplus fo od pr oGrarn . At pre sent the Food VJarehouse i s open t o t he publ i c b etwe en the hours o f 9 a . m. and 4 p .m. As Char li e pointed out, it is dur i ng these hours that the peopl e who ar~ dependen t on surplus food fo r exi stence need to be on the job. The f ood pro gram has only on e di stributi on point whic h often make s it very di ff ic ul t f or people who live i n the l a r c e met r opoli s of · Atl anta t o Get t o t he warehouse. \'/hen ask e d if th ere mi ght be other point s of !tis tribution made avai l able a11d more appropriate hours s chedul ed, o ff icial s o f the pr o gr am admitted that the fe a sibili ty o f s uc h plann i i1G had never been dis cussed . At t he he aring it was learned, too, t hat t he f ood pro s ram makes no att empt to me e t the spe ci al diet problems of i t s cus t omer s . ~efe rre d to by the offici als a s " recipi en ts ," a t erm 1,hich t o Char lie connot e s degradation , the people who depend on surplus f ood u s ually are peopl e who are s ick or undernouri s hed i n t he f irs t plac e . Several cas es were heard of peopl e who have received strict medical orders for special diets, eg. so dium di et s f or he a rt patien ts, whol e milk requirements f or cancer .patien t s , and who have been unable to mee t these diet s because of their dependency on a fo o d surplus program whic h is deaf to their needs. Charlie notes that there is no interaction at all between Grady Hospital and t he Food Warehouse whi ch could alleviate this situat ion. Another di s tnrbibg fact is that the Warehouse makes food pick-up avail abl e only once per month. Food issues wei gh 130 pounds for an average welfare fami l y t hus making transportation necessary. Cha rlie has r ecogni zed t he fact t hat taxicabs cost approximately $3 . 50 fo r an average t r i p to the warehouse, and f or each package an addi t ional $.75 is charged. For a fami l y dependent on surplu~ food , such money just fo r ~ae transpoFtat-i-on of that tee seem£ outrageous t o this intera. The Hunger and Malnutrition Hearing was sponsored by the Health, Education and Welfare Department and chaired by Mr. Maynard Jackson. Personal testimony was given by people 1·1ho Imo\'/ t he effects of hunger in Atlanta. Panels discussed the problems and directed their comments to Fulton County officials. It is hoped that from the uncovering of such inadequacies as those of the Commodity Foods program some relief will be found for the hungry people oi our city. �ATtANTil '-J'RBAN CORPS 30 COURTLAND STREET, N.E . / PHONE [404) 52 4-8 0 9 1 / ATLANTA , GEORGIA 30 303 July 30, 1969 Dear Intern Supervisor: As you know, we are presently planning our fall intern program and also trying to project needs for next summer. In order to support a year-round operation and adequately prepare for a large summer influx of interns, we need funds for a full-time staff. We are approaching private donors and government agencies for administrative funds, but need some proof of performance of interns from you. Will you please write a letter to us to be used for fund raising that gives a brief outline of y our opinions of the Urban Corps and the interns placed with your agency. We also welcome constructive criticism. _Your prompt cooperation will be greatly appreciated. t+ [{k~{Wfav SAM A. WILLIAMS Director SAW~ ,, JV(JLC{ ~ ~wrvk. �_-- \ \ \I Atlanta Service-Learning c/o Atlanta Urban Corps 30 Courtland Street, N.E. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 - - (4o4) 524~80~ ... --,------- -- -- - ) . We're pleased to enclose the report on our inaugural meeting of June 30 - July 1, 1969. Please note that the next two sessions of the Conference are scheduled for Monday and Tuesday, August 18 and 19 in Atlanta. · The session to be sponsored by the Service Work Group is to be held August 18 at Central Presbyterian Church (across from the Capitol), 201 Washington Street, Atlanta. The meeting is to begin at 10:00 a.m. and run until 5:00 p.m. The session to be sponsored by the Learning Work Group i s to be held August 19 from 1:00 to 6:00 p.m. also at the Ce ntral Presbyteria n Church. This is the only notice you will receive of these meetings. We hope you will attend and bring friends interested in an exploration of the service-learning conc ept . Both groups are planning a brief general meeting at the beginning and end of their sessions with the bulk of the time devoted to small dis cussion groups . The Conference Staff Sally Ca ntor Don Eberly Kytle Frye Babs Kaivelage Melinda Lawrence �The Atla ta .... The critical thing about the service-learning concept is the hyphen. Lee Heubner Staff Assistant to President Nixon .... When the Urban Corps interns came here in June, we discovered there was no baseball league for inner city kids and nearby facilities were closed to them. \Ve called a meeting, talked with some key people, and now have two leagues operating for 200 young men. Karl Paul Atlanta Urban Corps Intern n Co ference .... The need is to concentrate on ways of helping the young to realize the potential of their new sense of purpose and spirit for service .... It places upon our colleges and universities the obligation to examine their policies and practices and to make those adjustments necessary for the proper exercise of student participation .... Of the 35 0, 000 young people taking part in the College Work-Study Program, most have been employed on their campuses. We would like to see the ratio reversed, with the majority working off-campus. James E. Allen, Jr. Assistant Secretary for Education and lJ. S. Commissioner of Education a r port on h 8 n June 30 - July 1, 1969 �TABLE OF CONTENTS I. Introduction ..•.••••..•.•••.•.••..•..••.•....•. 1 II. Address by Dr. James E. Allen, Jr •••.••.••....• 6 III. Ina.ugura.l Meeting Summa.ries .••••••••••••••••••• 14 IV. Inaugural Meeting Work Group Reports •••••.•••.• 23 V. List of Participants •••.••••••.••••.•••••..•.•. 31 Further information on the Conference ma.y be obtained from: Atlanta Service-Learning Conference c/o The Atlanta. Urban Corps 30 Courtland Street, N.E. Atlanta., Georgia 30303 404-524-8091 �I. INTRODUCTION The Service-Learning Concept To serve and to learn ; these fundamental goals of our society are engrained in the American rhetoric. But how to serve? and how to learn? An institutionalized, bureau- cratized 20th Century America has effectively limited the answers to these questions. For "servtce to country" America legislatively requires mili- tary duty only, which many of today's young people find morally questionable. For "learning" we have complex university systems with :!.imj_ted abi- lity to respond to the individual and with oftimes old-fashioned views of what is education and what is not. However, considerable attention is currently being given to the role of uni versitie s i n service to soci ety. At one extreme, a r guments a r e heard that community involvement by an academic institution thr eatens its integrity and dra ins its r e source s. At t he ot he r end of the spe c trum of opinion i s the v iew of the unive rsity as a shaper of s oci ety with speci al social responsibi lities because of its objectivity , standar ds, and resources of knowledge . These arguments abou t campus - in- c ommunity may obscure fundamental que stions of the r ole cf the community a s an educati or.al resour ce. Can the univ ersity pe rform i ts primary func t i ons of education and t he discove ry of r;.,,,w knowl edge without an involvement in s oc i e t y ? Can educational institutions dev elop the type of manpo~er needed by a r apidly changing soc iety, both as professional s and as citizens in a democracy, without i n cludi ng the resources of socie tal experience i n t he educational process? How migh t community service, sought by many student s, best be deslgned as a learnlng experiec1ce and integrated with other. acpects of a total educational program? .i. �2 It is the thesis of the ,::onvenors of this Conference--many cf whom a.re a t the interface between education aud community--that by combining the ne eds and resources of education both will better be served. It is hypotlies i zed that the tensio~ between the practical urgent demands of community and the requirements of disciplined rational thought of education can be a very productive force for the development of society and for l earning and the advancement of knowledge. This combination of action and reflection, of experience and examina t:i.c,:-. ) this integration of service and learning can foster a style of life where education and vocation are parts of the same fabric and the gap between community and education is closed. Simply stated, then, s e r vice-learning is a n integration of the accomplishment of a needed task with educational growth. I t is clear tha t greater student involvement i n community affa irs i s coming--it i s already here in many ways bu t i t i s grouing . Student s want i t , agencies need their servi ces, colleges increasingly are encouraging it. Na.tional l egi sla t i on to supplement Peace Corps, VISTA, Teacher Corps , and o ::her programs i s under consideration in Washington: a r e we prepared t o utilize these growing opportunities productivel y f 0r all pa rties? A new approach is both ne cessa ry and pos s ible. It r equires new meaning for upracticality," new openness to change, new commitment to experiment ation, new acceptance of the ability of youth, and indeed new social institutions and attitudes • • • • t o say nothing of competent human beings who are prepared to function in the new s ociety. It is to search for these new attitudes and processes that the Atlanta Service-Learning Conference is convened. �3 Th2 Atla·,1ta Service-Learning Conference Although there is a grow:!.ng incJ.i.nati.011 to accep t t he service-lear..1.i ng concept a s a valuable element of a l earning expe·.dence, ther e is relatively l ittle un.deratandi ng of how the abstraction can be t :rauslated into a pra ct icab l e model. model. Local lea Gers recognized the urgency for develop i ng thb Consequently, the Atlan ta Service-Learning Conf erence was organized ir;. t h e s priu g of 1.969 to explore the i mplications c,f the serv:!.ce- l e arniue; conce:pt, to define the elements necessary fo r a succe 3s ful program, a.r:.d t0 structure and implement a program in the Atlanta area to s e!'.'ve as a moo.el for similar pr ograms in other urban center s. The diversi t y of the spon- s oring or ganizati ons is evidence of the broadly bas ed interes t and support a t both national and local le,.,·els for the developmen t of t h is prog!.' am. The list of sponsors includes: The Ci ty of Atlanta, The Atlanta Urban Corps , Economic Oppor. tuni ty At lanta, The Colleges and Universities of Atlanta, Depar tment of Healt h, Educa t ion , and We l f are, The Sout hern Regional Education Board , Vol un t eer s in Service to America, and The Pea ce Corps . With the a ddition of Atlanta businessmen a nd per sons f r om outs ide Atlant a , the s ponsor s ar e representati v e of the per s o~s who a re participating in the confer ence . In the o:.:gen:i.,laticmal me e t ing, the s p onsoring agen::::ies de c ided on a six-month period for t he conference during which the participants rn:l s ht. uti l i ze all avai lable resources and examine in depth se,,eral i mpor t an t aspec t s of the service-lear ni ng concept. In order to faci l i t ate this t ype of s tudy , the con fer ence has been div ided into s i~ wor k groups: namely, s er vice, learning, curriculum and i n ter- institutiona l relations , .:esear '!h, fin.nn ce, and methods and progl'.'ams . �4 Each of the work groups will meet in a number of individual s~ssions in order to study the topic, r aise pertinent questions, and suggest possible answers. During the six-·month period each work group will chair a formal session of the conference, These sessions will have the dual roles of first, allowing the host group to profit from the e.xperie:'.J.ce of the other participants and, second, giving each participant the opportunity ~o relate his area of interest and study to the complete work of the conference. Having profited from this exchange of ideas, each work group will produce a report to be submitted to a Steering Ccmmittee, composed of· work group chairmen and re~,resentatives of the sponsoring organizations. Th:ts Steering Committee will chair the final session of the CuJ ference, to be held in December, At this session the integrated report will be presented and a program will be proposed for implementation. The first session of the Conference was held on June 30 and July 1 and attended by over 300 persons. The format of t h e initi al meeting in- cluded a number of speake r s, s eminars to introduce par ~icipants to the concept of service-learning, and organi zational meetings of the work groups. The balance of this r eport contains the keynot e address by U.S. Commissioner of Education, James E. Allen, Jr., s ummari es of o t he~ speeches and discussions, and a list of participants who attended the inaugura l session. Coincide nt wit h t he l aunching of the Conference has been the creation in 1969 of t he At lant a Ur ban Cor ps , a gr oup of 220 student s ser ving ful l time throughout the summer with 15 city and 35 private non-pr ofit or ganizations i n Atlant a. Most Urban Corps memb ers are fund ed on the ba sis of 80% frrjm the f ederal College Wor k- Study Pr ogram and 20;~ f rom t he employing a gency. The Souttlern Regional Education Board under gxauts from t h e �5 Economic Development Administration, Office of Economic Opportunity and Department of Labor is providing support along with the Atlanta businessmen and foundations to cover administrative costs and stipends for interns not eligible for the Work-Study Program. VISTA has assigned 25 associate positions to operate under Urban Corps auspices. Sam Williams, director of the Atlanta Urban Corps, points to the relevance of the educational aspect of the program. Nine staff members make up the evaluation team which is responsible for developing and assuring an education dimension for each intern's summer assignment. Five professors serve as counselors to lend technical c:.nd educational assistance to individual interns and groups of interns , and one professio1m:1• ~nd three student staff members in the office plan seminars and coordina te oi:h er means of helping the interns make their summer work experiences e.,:ucationally relevant. Each student is required to present to the Urban Corps a report on his internship at the completion of his service period. Thus the Urban Cor ps, in addition to accomplishing needed tasks in the community and offering both a summer job and a relevant educational experj_ence to its members, provides a practical service-learning laboratory for the Confer ence. Through observation of the Urban Cor ps and participation of its members, the Confer ence is assured the necessary dialogue be tween theory and practice. This is the setting in which the Conference is convened. Each of a variety of perspectives has a distinct contribution t o make to the enterprise . Additional participants, assistance and information are welcome. I t i s only a beginning. But if theory and practice, students and faculty, public and private bodies int eract in the manner outlined, the Conference will have something significant to say to Atlanta and the nation by the eLd of 1969 . �II. EDUCATIONAL NEEDS OF YOUNG PEOPLE TODAY 6 Remarks by James E. Allen, Jr. Assistant Secretary for Education and U.S. Commissioner of Education None of you would be here today at this conference on service-learning if you were not aware of how different the educational needs of young people are today from those of past generations. All of you know that the needs of the new generation are defin°ed by its aspirations. And that aspiration is the edge of the great divide between the generations. For past generations,--and I mean not only the parents but the older brothers and sisters of today's young people--the touchstone was vocation. well-being. The career as a means to the economic ends of material The career as a means to the psychological ends realized in achievement, success, and prestige. Sometimes, of course, members of preceding generations thought of the career as an avenue of service to conceptions beyond the self--there are many professions with a humanitarian dimension in both theory and practice. But for most people, the furtherance of such ideals as the betterment of society was accepted as an extra-curricular activity. Something to be done after the serious business of the day, if time permitted . �7 For large and increasing numbers of young people today this sj_tuation is not only changed but reversed. It is the pursuit of goals beyond the self that comes first and the money and success that take second place, Clearly it will take a new kind of educatj_on to accommodate such a change in traditional ways of thinking about man and society. We are still in the process of identifying it, but some things we know. For example, we can be sure that an education that fits the needs of young people today must be broader than the school. Among the many artificialities the young reject is the idea that the classroom and the library are the best, if not the only, places for learning. Today's youth is as bored with four wall abstractions as it is with materialism. Today's youth want an education geared to realities more vital t han eit,her· theory or things. values. It is less interested in ideas than in Young people want their education to take them past knowledge to wisdom, and past wisdom to action--the kind of action that ca n translate their energy and their vision into new patterns of life. The "now" generation doesn't want to wai t for any of th is. finds the old hierarchies an ineffectual structuring of society. It It has no use for the protocol of power as we have known it. The new attitudes of young people toward education and the life for which it is presumably preparing them are sometimes crit:i.cized as �8 irresponsible. asking for. But it is precisely responsibility that they are Some people think youth wants to start at the top and rearrange society without bothering to find out what makes our institutions operate. In my opinion, it is the other way around. Young people want first-hand experience with our institutions to teach them their sociology. They want to learn the mechanics of social change by experimenting where it can actually happen. This is the positive side of activism. This is what has taken students out of classrooms andaway from well-paid, conventional jobs, leading them instead into the Peace Corps, Vista, and the Teacher Corps. This positive activism has moved young people past the Peace Corps, Vista, and the Teacher Corps; it has inspired them to invent their own ways of reaching people who need help. Store-front schools, street academies and many other innovative institutions testify to their enterprise. By nm,,1 it is quite clear that the activism of the 1960's is much different from that of other decades. The meaning of the difference has been captured in the words of Arthur Mendel, professor of Russian . history at the University of Michigan "Youth no longer speaks for itself; it defines an era." At the same time, in all their eagerness for a chance t o deal directly with the raw stuff of history, in the making, today's young �9 people continue to want what school in the old classroom-and-library sense of the word should and can give them. They want background against which they can measure their experience. They want an education that breaks down the old barriers between school and community without breaking down either the school or the community. This is what work-study programs are all about. There is no trend in education more promising, and the Federal Government is wholeheartedly behind it. Secretary Finch and my colleagues i n the Office of Education are convinced advocates of the work-study concept, and the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare is actively involved in promoting it. It is very much in line with President Nixon ' s emphasis on volunteer effort as the key to community renewal. The President has called for a national clearinghouse on voluntary activities, with a computerized data bank to make available information about what has been t r ied a nd wher e , how well i t work ed, and what the problems were. The student emp loyees wor king at HEW this summer will hel p assemble i nformation of t his kind on t he volunteer activi t i es of the young. As you know, HEW is r e spons ib le for administering a pr ogr am of Federal grants t o co lleges which pr ovide s s ome 350 , 000 s t udents with the opportunity t o work on or off t h e campus duri ng their co l l ege ca reer. HEW can pay ap t o 80% of the wages of t he s tuden t s as they partake of the edu~ational expe riences of working in a wide range of socially constructive projects. the social scene. The s cope of their activities is as broad as �10 Of the 350,000 young people taking part in such work-study programs, most have been employed on their campuses, but increasing numbers are employed in local government agencies, schools, hospitals and other organizations, public and private. We hope to learn from student community service activities wherever they are taking place. In Michigan, for example, we know that students are leading the way in productive volunteer activities for various segments of the population of their state . Currently, some 10,000 student volunteers on the 27 differ8nt Michigan campuses, are engaged in projects many of which they have developed on their own initiative and maintain without much fin~ncial help from government sources. As an example of the varied and numer01.1s proj ,:,cts, agriculture students from Michigan State University work together with inner city people in developing community garden cooperatives. Elsewhere in the nation we find students contributing social service to their communities. other types of There is the Memphis Area Project South which sponsors "clothes closets " for needy families. Through this project, students also collaborate in planned parenthood programs in South Memphis and help in nutrition classes for low-income people. Your own city has always been noted for its progressiveness. The fact that Atlanta is hosting the opening of the six-month conference is a fine example. It is equally encouraging to see Atlanta adopt the program of the Urban Corps as a model to meet urban needs . �11 Last summer there were 76,000 students employed in programs supported by Federal work-study funds. This summer, the Office of Education will have 225 students on its own payroll. I should like to tell you something about the projected activities of these summer employees. A goal of the summer program is to promote communication between government and the youth community. Some students will be organizing seminars for the Office staff. on topics of concern and "relevance" to students today. Such topics include curriculum reform, university administration, urban universities , and an urban extension service. Other students will be researching programs and practices of the Office as related to student and youth participation. In particular we hope they will gather and analyze information on activities in the areas of work-study and volunteer community service, in order to help us determi ne where Federal involvement might be most constructive . t~e can already begin to see the shape of some of the problems to be dealt with . One is how to get more of the students involved in work-study programs off the campus, into the communi ty. We would like to see the ratio of on- campus to off-campus work reversed, with the majority working off-campus instead of t he opposi te situation which prevails now. Another problem is how to overcome the dilemmas and disadvantages of t he work- study pr ogr am. Such as the difficulty of int egr a ting new people i nto es t abl ished or ganizat ions on a short- t i me basis. The accreditadon dilemma--it i s agree d tha t there should b e recognition of service as a part of higher educa tion, ye t some univers ities have �12 found that formal accreditation of cot!lIIlunity work turns it into a nine-to-five routine and diminishes dedication. However, other universities and colleges have developed means for granting academic credit to learning-service activities , making them integral to the academic life . These are not impossible problems. Like you, we believe that what Aristotle said is t r ue , "What we have to learn to do , we learn by do_ing . " We, too, will l earn by doing. We feel that we are opening up avenues of many kinds--between youth and the larger com.~unity, between youth and government , between the generations. We are committed to the new view of educational needs that this implies. The experience of gLoups like yours will be helpf ul to us as we try to adapt the Federal Government's role to the changes taking place i n our society . We look forward to your r ecommendations as you r eview and study the l e arning-servi ce concept i n the months ahead . I hope we ~an draw on t he r eport of your del i berations as a source of new models f or student contribu tion to community renewa l. With so much of the business of Ameri ca a nd the wor ld still unfinished, it i s hear tening indeed to obser ve t ha t per ha ps t he greates t awareness of this unfinished business exis t s in the young. The need, therefore, is to concentrate on ways of helping the young to realize the potential of their new sense of purp ose and spirit for service. This involves intens ive efforts -- far greater than yet �13 evidenced. It also places upon our colleges and universities the obligation to examine their policies and practices and to make those adjustments necessary for the proper exercise of student participation. So rather than challenging youth, it is they who are challenging us and it is, I believe, a most heartening and hopeful situation when exhortation is more needed by age than by youth. # # # # # # # �14 III. I NAUGURAL MEETING SUMMARIES Welcome by Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. Atlanta.'s Mayor Ivan Allen opened the Conference on June 30 by focusing on the problems of the cities and the effect t hat young p0ople can have on the solutions. Allen defined the foremost urban problems as race, t r ansportation, and financing of city services. He said tha.t although 11 the structure of government is capab1e of coping with these problems ••• it is the failure of man to a.dapt which prevents the solution. n "Atla.nta, 11 sa.id Mayor Allen, "welcomes the entrance into city government of a group of concerned young citizens." He concluded that if the need is going to be met, it will be met by the youthful generation "that has the concern." Service- Learning in Action in Atlanta : Cha.irman : Members: An Up-To- The-Minute Report Sam Williams, Dir ector of t he Atlanta Ur ba.n Corps Don Nel son , Georgi a Te ch Communi ty Services Coordi na.tor Don Roe, Special Assi s tant to t he President of Ci tizens and Southern National Bank Charl e s Pyl es, Associate Profess or, Polit ica.l Science at Georgia St ate College; Stern Int ern Coordinator Tara Swartsel, At l anta Ur ban Corps I nt er n Dan Sweat, De:put y Adminis t rator, Cit y of Atlanta Atlanta Urban Corps Sam Williams explained its purposes as: (1) providing students with the pra.ctical educational �15 expzrience of learning through servi,:!e to tne local cormnunity. (2) giving needed manpower to local agencies and community organizations (3) encouraging students to not only learn about urban problems but to pursue careers in urban affairs. He said that the Atlanta. Urban Corps plans to grow from 220 interns in the summer of 1969 to 1000 interns in the summer of 1970, Also, plans a.re being made for a number of internships during the forthcoming academic year. Georgia. Tech Community Services Office Don Nelson reported that the Georgia Tech community had thought that money could solve the problems of urban America. Now, he said, we are discovering tha.t we can't live in a major city and not respond with some kind of feeling or action. It's no longer a question of money but how one commits himself to what's happening around him that really counts . Dean Miller Templeton and he got together in November, 1969, and found that fifteen or twenty programs were being spons ored by Tech students,so the t wo of them formed the Community Services Coordinating Staff. Their primary objective was to coordinate the pr ojects then operating and to try to get more students and f aculty i nterested and i nvolved. In the last few months he's had troubl e j us t keepi ng up with what' s going on ! Some of t he pr ojects students are i nvolved in are : Hi gh Step, Free Universit y, Techwood Tutorial , YMCA Ins titute of Understanding and the Te ch Acti on Committee. £~£Bank Communit y Act ion Programs Don Roe r eport ed that C & S Bank instituted the "Georgia Plan", �16 a 11 peo:ple to people proC:; ram 11 , i n May of 1968. He said that it was an action program on the part of private enterprise , without government funds, to provide business opportunities to low income and disadvantaged Americans. It is based on simplicity and sincerity and on four basic assumptions: (1) Two of the fundamental principals of democracy are government by reason, not force, and the most good for the most people. (2) Everyone wants to improve his standard of living. (3) The incentive method is the best way to accomplish things. ( 4) Government steps in to f ill needs when business does not. He -said that the 1'Georgia Plan" was inagura.ted in Savannah with a. " spring cleaning" in wh ich most of the volunteers came from two local colleges, Armstrong and Savannah State. This was such a. success that in ensuing months thirteen other Georgia. cities had clean-up operations. In Atlanta., Vine City wa s the area affected. Altogether approximately 74, 800 Georgians have participated in these clean-up endeavors. he s aid , a one day clea n-up won't solve problems . is most i mportant . But , What comes afterwar ds So t he C & S Community Development Corporation was est ablished la.st winter with a. budget of one million dollars. The purpose of t his organization is to pr ovide funds f or down-payment loans so t hat first mortgage home f i nan cing can b e obt ai ned and to provide equity capital f or new busine s ses . So f ar, 1 ,000 fam ilies and t wenty businesses have dir ectly bene fitte d f r om t hese loans . The Ster n I nter ns Charle s Pyl es reported t hat three ye ars ago t he Stern Foundation approached t he American Societ y for Public Administration and said that they had $30 ,000 avail able and would l i ke to sponsor an internship program, specifically for black students in public administr ati on . �17 The challenge wa.s not met at that time, but in the summer of 1968 the Georgia. chapter decided to explore possibilities in this area. After one year of planning fifteen students from eleven colleges and five faculty advisors began a ten week work assignment . in state and local government agencies. From over forty applications, the students chosen were selected on the basis of academic achievement, written expression, personality and character references. Manpower Survey Tara. Swartsel reported that the Department of Labor is conducting a survey to find out how student manpower is being used in Atlanta. One student on each of ten campuses in Atlanta is researching to try to find out what is now available and wha.t the potential is for service-learning a.tea.ch college. When a.11 the reports a.re compiled the schools will be compared and variations will be considered. The Service-Learning Concept looks good, she said, on paper and looks like it would apply to everyone, but how can the concept be applied on all campuses without the curriculum becomi ng "gimicky" ? Curr iculum committees are jealous of cla.ss t ime. They don't want to use a. professor's time and skills and have students taking time out of the classroom unless they see definite re sults in the field work as it r elates to t he cla ssroom. She thinks t his is t he problem t he participants of the service-learning conf erence must keep :for emost i n their minds. Atl ant a 's Urban Obs ervatory Dan Sweat r eported t hat f i ve years ago Rob er t Wood, Under Secret ary of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), saw a nee d f or involvement of the academic community i n t he affairs of t he local community. The �18 mechanism he envisioned wa.s a system of urban observatories in major metropolitan areas. The passage of the 1968 Housing Act enabled HUD to assist in establishing urban observatories in Atlanta., Albuquerque, Baltimore, Kansas City, Milwaukee, Nashville, and Washington, D.C. The Atlanta Urban Observatory is based at Georgia. State College and has a close working relationship with City Hall, from which it originated. It is also in the process of developing linkages with the other colleges and universities in Atlanta. Mr. Sweat said he believed tha.t the Atlanta. program ha.s a headstart because the Urban Corps program, whose philosophy is so close to that of the urban observatory, is already in operation in Atlanta. Address by Lee Heubner Lee Heubner, staff assistant to President Nixon, addressed the Conference at the dinner session on June 30. He struck a note of caution, a note of perception and a note of hope for the participants.: Let's be sure we have projects that make sense in terms of the people being served and the person being educated. Unless we're willing to do this rigorously and precisely and uncompromisingly, I don't think the service-learning program will be as successful as .it really ought to be •..• The critical thing about service-learning is the hyphen .•.. One thing under discussion in the White House is a federally- assisted program to support the position of campus service coordinator, someone to whom the students could visit to inquire about specific opportunities in community service. Also, the service coordinator would discuss with faculty members questions regarding academic credit and curricular changes related to community service. �19 Addl'ess by William Allison Bill Allison, Director of Economic Opportunity Atlanta, spoke on June 30 on the "Needs of Urban America." are troubled times . Our He said that 1'these campuses a.re witnessing a revolutionary r esponse by young people who want to do something about the world they live in. Wha.t happens on campus cannot be separated from what happens in the larger society. " Allison urged cooperation between the academic community, government, and private agencies to solve t he problems of the cities. He expressed a faith that the nAtlant-a Service-Learning Conference is destined to spearhead the development of t his union." long ov-erdue. He sai d that the idea. of cooperation and union was "Now is the time for them to work together." Allison concluded that par ticipation is the key factor and, "service-lear ning i s one way partici pation can be r ealized. " Service-Learning and National Programs The national and i nternational components of service-l earning were highlight ed at a symposium that i ncluded Tom Houser, Deputy Director of t he Peace Corps; H. Jeffrey Binda, Exe cutive As si stant to the Director of VISTA; Paul Cromwell, Special Assistant to the Director of the Teacher Corps and Michael Goldstein, Director of the Urban Corps National Development Office. Dr. Carl Wieck of Morehouse College was the moderator. Noting that the Peace Corps had been in the service-learning business for eight years, Mr . Houser reported that "most returning volunteers say they l earned more than they gave. u Mr. Cromwell said colleges could become more relevant by working with businesses and �20 government agencies in arranging work assignments linked with classroom studies. Mr. Binda stressed the service aspect, saying it was vital, when arranging for aid to the poor and disadvantaged, to assign persons who can do the job well. Mr, Goldstein, former director of the nation's first Urban Corps in New York City, outlined the program in which college students serve with municipal agencies and are funded largely by the College Work-Study Program. The panelists agreed that experience in a service-learning program would be valuable background for entry into a long term service program. Also, it would help the participant to decide whether to apply for such a service program. Remarks by Edward DuCree and Arthur Hansen The final session of the Conference dramatically focused on the diverse and sometimes conflicting interests which must have a part in determining the nature of a service-learning program. Ed DuCree , director of Emory University's Upward Bound Program, called for the examination of goals and effects of current service programs. Quoting from Shakespeare's "Hamlet" , DuCree said the question remains, "to be or not to be. 11 he s tated . Black people want to be , to exist , Service programs which fail to help people to exist as human bei ngs are of l ittle or no use, he said , For exampl e , he said that some tutorial pr ograms i n whi ch white vol unteers teach black ch i ldren have the effect of impr ess i ng on t he childr en the value of being white rather than t eaching them t he a b e's. Dr. Hansen, Pres ident el e ct of Georgia Tech, reminded the audience of the university's traditisma.1 roles of learning and research. �i 21 Service to the community , ,·rhich became a major goal of many universities following the land-grant a.ct of a century ago, is also a legitimate goal, he said. The question is whether service per~ is a learning experience and therefore deserving of academic recognition. Hansen said he would not want to accredit service experiences until he was convinced of their learning inputs. A small demonstration decrying the effect of Georgia. Tech's expansion on nearby residents interrupted Dr. Hansen's speech and led to an extended session in which heated debate gradually gave way to some fundamental problems in the areas of service-learning and black-white relations. A partial report on the exchanges is contained in 'M r. DuCree' s reply to a participant who described the role he was playing. .Mr. DuCree said, you to be a. person." ';We don't want you to play a role; we want �22 Seminar Summaries . :Midway through the inaugural meeting, seminars were held to discuss all aspects of the service-learning concept and to assist participants in selecting a work group. The seminar chairmen were: James Austin, Georgia. .Municipal Association Robert Clayton, Spelman College Clavin Cox, the Atlanta Constitution Phillip~ Ruopp, Peace Corps Russell Williams, Atlanta University No conclusions emerged from the seminars, but among the comments and questions were the following : How is learning-by-serving different from learning-in-the-classroom? The service-learning concept may lead to a radical change in the concept of the university and education in general. Government administrators mu·s t control service-learning programs, not colleges. A consortium of colleges should run the service-learning program in Atlanta. Can cultural empathy be taught? High school students, drop-outs, and housewives should be in servicelearning programs. Urban Corps interns should receive academic credit for their learning experiences. Wha t er:iteria should be applied to matching an intern with an opening to insure th::it pot~. p e r-fht·1nnnoe ;:ind 1An.rnine; wi 1.1 be a·t a high level? These observations, t ogether with the questions posed in Section IV, will be considered by the r e spective work groups. �I' 23 IV. WORK GROUP SUMMARIES The Conference is functioning primarily through its six work groups: service, learning, curriculm and inter-institutional relations, finance,research, and methods and programs. Each work group is to marshal available resources, study in depth its assigned topic, sponsor a session of the Conference, and submit a report describing its observations and reconnnendations leading toward a comprehensive model for a continuing service-lear n i ng pr ogram. Sponsorship and dates of subsequent Conference sessions are as fol lows: Service Learning Curriculum F inance Rese arch Me t hods and Programs Steering Committee August 18 August 19 mid-Se ptember Octobe r November November December Below are summaries of the first wor k group me et ings on July 1 and some of t he questi ons each i s exploring . Service Wor k Group Chairman: Ross Coggins, Regional Dir ec t or of VISTA Ros s Coggins opened the di scus s i on by a sking t hose pre s e n t to mention what services students are now doing or could do in regard t o servicelearning. The dis c ussion of this question raised many others, most of which were left una nswered . I t will be the purpose of t his group t o answer such questions as : (1) What criteria define . relevant services and who should have priority in determining the relevance or potential learning experience of a service-type job? (2) Can agencies and colleges cooperate among themselves and with each other in the rendering of services? (3) Who is to be served: the student, the college, the agency or the people, or a combination of all? �24 (4) Are universities attuned to the needs of the community and can they accept the idea that a service career mode is vital to our society? (5) What should be the size of the service rendered, in comparison with societal needs? (6) Should service be full-time or part-time and how long should it last? (7) What services can agencies accept and what accept youth in service? (8) Does tutoring, etc., satisfy the needs of the "now generation" with their sense of urgency and need to see quick results? (9) What do students think are the major service needs and will the university allow the student to work for meaningful change in the system? kinds of agencies can Learning Work Group Chairman: Sally cantor, Atlanta Urban Corps Intern The meeting of the section on Learning was begun by a description of the Mars Hill Project, its origin and outline. One enthusiastic professor was given a grant to instigate and develop interest in the concept of servicelearning . He looked into curriculum and local service oppor tunities . with a tutorial program and then a recreational program, work for physical education, sociology, etc. It b'egan This be came the ~i e J_n The communi c1:1t.ion which is necessary for this to come about smoothly is possible in a small school. There is a problem in the structure of a large university which makes it almost impossible to integrate this kind of learning. How might this be overcome? Many segments of society are concerned with this kind of l earning taking place. Students are the l argest mass of participants . Thus the training ground for students, i.e. the university, must be changed first. There are places in the traditi onal college stl:ucture which could be changed to be more in line with this new concept. an education major. For example, in the practice-teaching part of Instead of being a. complete b l ock of time at the end of the learning period, it would be more relevant and thus valuable to have the �25 practice-teaching interwoven with the academic study, over a greater length of time. Practical experience makes theory more concrete but it requires a pl~ce to plug into the traditional curriculum. Practice-teaching is an easier area to see the possibilities; but how can this type of learnj og be given academic credit in other courses? You can learn something from anything you do if you are pGrceptive, but to be given academic credit what one is doing must be put to acaa_emic analysis. Learning is not just of one type; it consists of different processes. What kind of learning happens when one is put in a context of people and problem-solving? If the ultimate goal is being sensitive to each other, how can one avoid complete relativism? Perhaps this is only a part of the desired goal and can be fitted into the whole as a matter of degree. It would be valuable to question a.n intern to see if his learning can be classified , i f an analysis can be made of the learning possibilities . It is very important, however, that this not become Step 1, 2, 3 on how to become a successful learner. There is always the problem of how to bring out what has been, or is learned. l>e in g It is difficult to bring life-style to a conscious level where it must be for our purposes. It will be necessary to compare the goals and patterns of both traditional university-learning and service-learning. For example, a university stresses committment to truth, to principle; service stresses committment to people , to becoming involved with those a.round you. In univers ity-le13rriing , stnaent utilized t he full learning pote ntial of the service eA'J)erience. Several suggested elements of t his str uc ture were: seminars, and student reports. facu1 t )r advisors, �27 There were other questions concerning the basic structure of the program. For example: How would service-learning experiences be integrated into the existing departmental structure? On what basis would credit be given? What would be the ratio of hours worked to credit-hours received? How many credit- hours of service-learning could be counted toward graduation? What channels, such as independent study, special programs or seminars with labs, aJ.rea.dy exist which could be used as a. mechanism for giving credit for a service-learning course? Certainly the most valuable product of this initial meeting was an awareness of the complexities of the problems confronting the work group. A number of questions were raised, several others will be focused on at l ater meetings. The following questions a.re a few of those for which the curriculum work group will attempt to provide conclusion. What courses now exist as training for other forms of service which could be relevant to service-learning programs? What inter ...institutional relations now exist which could be utilized and developed for internships and program development? What effects will the service-learning experience have on student expectations in the curriculum area ? What are the potentials of a fa culty consultant ser vice? What a.re the possibilities for utilizing community members a s instructors or resource people within the classroom ? What a.re the possibilities for and problems of cross--~r editing institutions? among Finance Work Group Chairman: Presiding: William Jones, Department of Health, Education and Wel fare Charles Hamblen and Charles Moore , Department of Health , Education and Welfare The first questions raised about funding were : who, how much, and bow? It wa s stated that the program was not to be directed by the Federal gover nment , but t hat t he government should be. a source of funds , pr imarily t hrough l ez ~~sla.tion. �28 lv'T.r. Hamblen reviewed what was available through Federal programs. He said that perhaJ>s the best sources have suffered a cutback in appropriation ( the Cooperative Education Program and Education for Public Service), b~t they might be refunded in the next fiscal year. Mr. HambJ.en was asked how to go about requesting Work-Study funds. He sa.id that the application must be made by an institution by November 1st. If the institution includes a proposal for meaningful off-campus activities it will receive priority in the allocation of Work-Study funds. It was remarked that many colleges did not use a large amount of their funds or did not include descriptions of off-campus activity in their requests for funds. The funding for such a proposal would be 80% federally fund~d and 20% funded by the agency. Discussio~ then centered on the study made by 22 Republican Congressmen concerntng student unrest. Their recommendations were: 1. Don't cut off funds to institutions which have experienced student rebellions. 2. Establish a Na:tional Youth Foundation to encom:age student pa.r ti cipation in community problems. 3. Incr ease funds fo:i;- student ai q. 4. The government should expand its lines of communication wi th stu v sJai A 13 aol:ts::,ub3. lo 'I aoiaal.mmoO .8 .tJ o ... sU W ao.i:ts:>ub3. ,d:tl H lo :laemh:aq a .o .a .ac»aairlas nsUA oy ,!nstU I , q,:o nsd"lU .'la ,: ~ .cU lo a.a•Ht1ni cS d:t lo Us oo aO ,lv"loa s:tnsUA :ta !> "l sd:t aalaas'tbbs -xol n:i.UA laoO rua'l rlJ :tstU a nobu:te e lo:, o:t b :ts:>.ibni :,n s'lq ba 4 .a"l :,no:> "Ii rl:t .ciHw aui a.i bs bni e1 noUa:,ub~ ,: .d id l qJrl -r.uoY .$:>a 'I l.caolt uoY aibrusl y ,n -'1'10 s Uo:> tuod s :tn m :t :t >•llo &aeUo::, o:t sno:t bUm s ,aoltd o ym a! ,al s,:v:t JU Uo::, :tsdf eqo ylno I .n i:t yUaum Iul ala 1 a i:> as a q.m ::, .. lo '{d ga.ia 'lq .:ta m viovai n lo 1 e 9 "I eb! ri:t ba "IO at .1-s 000 ,I a 'I vo:> bu mo:> I tfaidw aUb svl ia 'I 'I l :aema"levoD la'I be, d:>'I a a 'I ta .AI JI �Southern Regional Education Board 130 Sixth Street, NW· Atlanta, Georgia 30313 · 404 872-3873 July 16, 1969 R esource D evelop ment Project Mr. Daniel Sweat Governmental Liaison Office of the Mayor City of Atlanta Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mr. Sweat: Your participation in the seminar was very much appreciated by the student interns. The tough realities of how you move people and ideas for the development of an area is a new concern for most of these students. I believe that you and Dean Stephens were able to raise some of the right issues for these students from their scattered questions. I want to personally thank you for spending the morning with us and for adding a significant dimension to the seminar experience. Robert L. Sigmon Internship Coordinator Resource Development Project RLS:ht �I July 17, 1969 Mr. Roy 0. Elrod Director Atlanta Civic Center 395 Piedmont Av nue, N .. E . Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Roy: l wa vef!y disappointed to hear that the Municipal Building nd Athletic Committe have taken an action, the effect of which i to prohibit th centr 1 staff of the Urban Corp Project from utilizing the available parking space at the M unicipal Atlditorium. I am e pecially di appointed that,, not being a re that you w re propo in . to ubmit thi question to the committee, I did not have an opportunity to di cu thla matter with th committee c - irman or members . Whil 1 can well under tand yo\lr proper concern r garding s e curity~ int rferenc • etc. , it i my f eling th t ther re som extremely important reasons why the city should do aom thing more than i b olutely r quired of u for the e· stud nta who ar doin eo much for the city. Th re outstanding youn p ople who will definlt ly be playing 1 ading p rt in thi community in th futur . It i dUficult for u to ,q,lain to them th t w re not hid bound bur aucracy when w are unwilling to accomod t them on euch a routine matter a thle one. Roy, l aincer ly hope that this h not r pr ntativ of the m nner in hich w ork tog th r to solve problems in the future. 1 d talk d to you on July 7, an ult Wld r the impr a ion th t you and 1 could work tbi ' out to I am lookln1 forward to orkin with you in th futur , nd 1 am co nl.z nt of th xc 11 ht Job you r doing t the Civic Cen r. I nt you to kno that l stand r ady and wUU.n to a iat you in nyway that 1 c n t y tim • Very truly your , Dn D ~l':je �July 14, 1969 Mr. Le Heubner Staff Assistant to the President The White House 1600 Pennsylvani Av nue, N- W., Washi.n gton, D. C. ne - r Lee: It wa a pl aeure me ting you and having th opportunity to di cuss thing of mutual inter st. I appr ei te you ssi ting ou~ young coll ge students in making th Service L ming Com renc· su.cc • tf yo g t any idea aa to ho w c tr ngthen thi typ progt m, pl e do not he l to call on ua. In the m.eantim ., f l fre to call on us lf th re is lp you itb fi-om ~ - nd of th line. Sine r ly you.re, Dan Sw at DS;fy nything e c n �July 14, 1969 Dr. James E . Allen, Jr. A s sistant Secretary for E ducation and U. S . Comrnl ioner of Education U. S. Department ot He th. Edu.cation and W lfare Washington. D . C . Dear Dr. Allen: I want to thank you in for taking the tun to come to Atlanta and support the Uort of our coll ge tud nts . The Atlanta Servic Loaming Confer nee wa your ap ~ance nd tat ment w s certaf.nly conference. l know th stud nt gr great ucc s nd hi h light of the with m • Slncer ly your • Da..n Swe t DS:fy �July 10, 19 69 r . t Mr. Lee Heubner Staff Assistant to the President The White House 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, N o W . Washington, D. C Dear Lee : Thank you very much for taking an extra effort and interest in addressing the recent Atlanta Service Learning Conference. It was mutually ~greed upon by our staff members that your talk was an excellent ynopsis of the service-learning concept and the idea 0£ college involvement in communitie . We are presently transcribing your speech and 1 will send you a copy when it is completed. Dan Sweat and Mayor Allen have both indicated their pleasure of being able to s e young enthusiasts (and liberal ) such as yourself in the White House. As we di cussed, I am sending you a list of people instrwnental in the Conf rence that you may be interested in contacting later. I only hope your next vi it to Atlanta allow u more time to relax nd enjoy some of our "eouthern hospitality." Sincerely, SAM A . WILLIAM$ Director SAW:az Encloeuri �July 21. 1969 Bal~·r P titt 3399 Buford Big ay Mi u Y• l or ta t Atlanta. Der Hts P titt : Yo r 1 tter re tiug info ti children int Atl ta a bu been fo Ivan All n, Jr. tter N of • I itt ' I D al / , / /';I ,· j' /, /! lp to you, leue let ~ - I I 1 I I eor • ut �~ J Mayor Ivan Allen A Sam Willi ms , Direc-::i" July 25 , 1969 TO: FROM: DATE: SUBJECT : Possible Viait To New York City Persuant of our rece nt dis c ussion about a pos ible vi it t o Ne w York in c onnection with the Ne w York Urban Corps , I re c eived a call fro m Mayor Lindsay offi c e inquiring about po · s i ble dates you might be available for such a visit . Mrs . Mo es gav e me severa l dates whi c h I passed along to Mayor Lindsay ' aide . Today, I received a call from yor Lindsay ' s taff, stating that they would invite you to spe lt to the New York Urban Corps intern , du.ring the fina l se sion, August 19 . All thi information will be c oming to you soon in a letter from Mayor Lindsay himself. A you suggested, thi would be n ideal time to give more e xposure to the Atlanta U r ban Corp by t king few of our interns with you. Plea e dvil!le me of your a ction after rec iving Mayor Lind ay 's letter . SW/kJJ.r / c c; D n Sweat �July 18, 1969 Mr . Andrew Glasberg Urban Corps National Development Office 250 Broadway New York City, New York Dear Andy: I am leaving Atlanta the first week of September for Harvard Business School and we n ed a Director . I ' ve been talking to M ike Goldstein about possible directors and he suggested you. I don ' t know your ogligations at pre ent, but Mike thought you had a con.tract to teach through June, 1970 . As you know , Atlanta ' s Urban Corps is progressing very well . We have cooperative re ources from area colleges, busine s donors, city government and private agencie • I have no doubts about expansion possibilities only through planning . City government is co-sponsoring an Urban Life Center with Georgia State College through a sp cial grant from Housing and Urban Develop m nt . It is a "kind' of" university relation office with promising opportunity . Th Mayor ' s a sistant say that if_ a deci Jpn'\ was made to hire a per on of your caliber that you could po sibly be a professor in the Urban Life Center as w 11 as direct the Urban C o rps . If you ar intere ted, could you please about arranging a vi it? Director SAM:dl rf.c: M yor's Office .. Dan Sweat nd me r ume and call m e �rma...cm INTERNSHIPS IlffERN'S Gat~ City y Nurs ry DEVELOFMENT - IC DEVELOPER 7 Tom King 5-5-69( ) Christin Counci l 1 Truly T Communi ty Couno11 2 Kin2 C nt ,r of A-"1;s 1 Truly n. Visiting Ifur."' Ric (2) a El.iza starne orial Pr uyt, rian ( 2) Church our,,r,n D • Mul'pby Page ( 2) (4) (2) ts Boy S 0d l C1t1 s nncni t HOUG t . Vine nt At ul ta Girl 1 s Club f'~'r-1'TV nLJ<.iKYH (8) Ja ( ... ) C l (2) C 11 Brc:. (1) Chtu-11 {10) GU' Cl (5) th (20) t C y t C 1 (3) (50) J.C. y• (-) . 0. A. Cl ( on) A Br ( LE!TER SENT - �DEVELO AA1!EI Pm!& IQ. ? LE'f'TRR CCl-ll'IE!'E ily Couns l ine Cent~ ( a.l Soe • • East :r 1- hborhoOd orvices , Inc . due :tion tJrb cloe aicn City Pl.annillf lb County eatur ( Gr s~) Rospit ~ -~ 1.Aif.rA bar of C ree ahool ] lb Ar n Fulton catur tl r tr ?1 nt V City tion Arl 'X Di I , I t All n �N E WS L E T T E R ATLANTA Edition I, May 5, 1969 URBAN CORPS 30 Courtland Street, S. E., Atlanta, Georgia, 30303 Phone - 524-8091 THE ATLANTA URBAN CORPS IS OFF THE GROUND! To those of you nho have worked closely with the program this is welco me news , and in the follo wing summary several areas of the program will be outlined to date. We hope by way of a regular newsletter we can keep you informed of progress made in the program as it develops throughout these next months and on i nto the summer. The Public Relations staff will be publishing the ne wsletter, and we will attempt to cover all areas of interest within the Urban Corps program. I I WE HAVE AN OFFICE Locate d on the s econd floor of the old city auditorium, 30 Cour t land Street, is th e ne w office of the Atlanta Urban Corps. Wi t h the gen erous help of the City the office is beginning to be equipped more adequately with desks, typewriters, fili ng c a bine t s and gen eral office supplies. Full-time staff now i nclude s four: Sam Williams, Dianne Wilson, Sue Zander and Arl en e Bi r d . Melvin McCray and Stephen Mwamba of Georgia State Coll ege al s o hav e been employed part time to develop payroll and f i nan c e pr ode dur es. Volunt ee rs hav e be en in th e offic e to help with the vo lume s o f mail a n d a pplic a tio n s, etc . whic h have begun to come in , STUDENT RECRUITMENT Our student recrui tmen t ef f or t , s o vital to t h e quality of our summer program, was begun t wo weeks ago on the campuses of the participating colleges here in At lanta. Recruitment is being handled by the College Re l ations Board, chaired by Marc Dash. The Coll ege Relations Board has been working quite effectively on the campuses and is to be commended for representing the A. U. C, well, A report submitted by Marc on Apr il 29 sho wed the following figures: �Page 2 College \ ... . Appro x . No. With One Week Remaining -Geor-gia State College Emory University Agnes Scott College Clark College Morris Brown College Morehouse College Spelman College Georgia Tech DeKalb Junior College 30 25 70 120 115 100 110 70 Total 25 bb5 4/24/69 4/28/69 5/ 1/69 4/29/69 4/29/69 5/ 1/69 4/29/69 4/28/69 4/29/69 ·. ... . . ._f, Formal recruitment c.losed on the campuses Friday, May 2. Marc Dash predicts that an overall fi gure of 1000 applications will be in hand to be reviewed for student placement. A REPORT ON FINANCE Bill Adams, Private Fund Raising Chairman, has submitted the followin g report on e fforts being made in this area of the A. U. C. In t he initial conception of the Atlanta Urban Corps , the idea of soliciting the business co mmunity for financial a s s ista n ce was co n sidered to be absolutely necessary in order to make the A. U. c. a r epre sentative student pro gram. Without finan ci al as sistanc e f r om the bu si ne ss s ector only students who could qualify f or colle ge work study money would be able to s e rve as int e rns in the A, U. C. unles s they volunteered their time . Business support will enable the Atlanta Urban Corps to i nvolv e s tu dent s fro m all l evels of i n come in th e program and also will allo w i nte r ns t o work i n a gencies that cannot afford the cost. Presentl y we ar e in t h e proc es s o f con tacting the major busin esses i n the Atl an ta a r ea. We f e el t he A. U. C. pr ovi des busin e s s t he opportuni t y t o co n tribut e t o a wor t hwhil e urban proj ect as well as to provi de t hem a n exc ell en t avenu e f or public · re l ations. Money avai labl e t o da t e can be bro ken down as f ollo ws: College Work St udy Gran t s ( approx. 220 i nterns ) $1 95,000 Southern Regional Educ atio n Bo ard 20,000 City Finance Depar t ment Gran t 9,000 Fulton County Health Depar t men t 5,500 Stern Foundation Gran t 1,000 Total $230,500 J ' .~,.,, , ·. · ,. .. ,,,... ,. ·".,14 . .- ·.-.i --... ,-; .. .. ·., .... ' .:.t: ~ ... f ' �Our goal is 300 interns, half in city agencies and half in non-city agencies such as YMCA, DeKalb County Government, etc. At present in our administrative department we need twenty-four interns. If private businesses contribute l40,000 we will be able to operate at planned capacity. Our financial effort has been greatly enhanced by the assistance of Mr. Dave Houser of Arthur J. Anderson and Co. Mr. Houser has been very beneficial in directing our approach to the business sector. BOARD OF TRUSTEES MEETS The Board of Trustees of the Atlanta Urban Corps met officially for the first time April 17, 1969 in the Wilby Room of the Georgia Tech Library. Mr. Bill Ramsay of the Southern Regional Education Board presided. Rich Speer, Student Director, spoke to the Board on the A. U. C. overall concept, followGd by an organization report given by Sam VJiJ.liams, Staff Director. R0por ts vrnre made by David Whelan, Internship Development Director and by Sam Williams and Bill Adams who both reported on the financial aspect of the program. Tara Swartsel, Secretary of t he Colle ge Relations Board, gave a short report on the work being done on the campuses by our College Relations Board representatives, and Marc Dash, Director of the College Relations Board described the actual program of student recruitment. Mr. Dennis Webb of Nall, Miller, !Cadenhead, and Dennis reported on the legal status of th e A. U. c., explaining to the Board that our charter ha s been approved by the State of Georgia and is being presented to the Internal Revenue Service for taxexempt status as a non-profit organization. BUSINESSMEN'S BREAKFAST A SUCCESS On Tuesday, April 29 at 9:00 a.m. a breakfast was given in the tea room of Rich's downtown, made possible by Mr. Harold Brocke of Rich I s and hosted by i'-'i r. Kavanagh of Ric I s personel department. Forty leading Atlanta businessmen were invited to become personall y adquainted with the A. U. C. program. Good attendance and obvious interest proved our belief I i I· ' �Page 4 that the Atla.nta business community will play a vital role in the success of our program. Mayor Ivan Allen and Georgia Tech:s past president Edwin Harrison each made opening comments on the Urban Corps, and Sam Williams, Rich Speer and Bill Adams made reports on specific areas of the Urban Corps concept. The businessmen were invited to commit themselves to the concept of the A. U. C. and if possible to make a financial commitment as well. Bill Adams is to make personal appointments to talk wi t h individual businessmen from the group soono INTF.RNSHIP DEVELOPMENT UNDERWAY In ord e r that the students who work with our program this summer serve in rel evant positions, the A. U, C. is utilizing students in the field to develop the job slots, or internships, in which students uill be placed . Twenty-five students are no w working on this development procedure, including students fro ~ Agnes Scott College, Georgia Tech, and the Atlanta University Compl ex; Dianne Wilson and Marlene Rounds are both ~orking out of the A. U. C. office on this same development program . Contacts are being made at t wenty city departments and fo r t y extra-city ag enci e s ranging from the local school bo a r ds to the Ec ono mi c Opportunity Atlao.ta program. To date so me fift y devel oped internships are in hand with an expected fi gur e of over three hundred. Wally Bloom, Extra-City Coordinator and Da vid Whelan, City Coordinator both are quite optimistic about th e success 0 f this particular aspect of the A. U. C. deve lo pmenL �~ I Y-\~<,c:'. J~ - Ii / Mr. Dan Sweat Government 1· Mayor-ts O _i a s on c·t ff i c e l Y Hall Atlanta , . Ga . I i I I i I I l I I I AY 6 ,L , ~ , ·}b ..._,-- >7Y""' " 143.215.248.55 -~ ~/_~ U .S.Pof .r '.' , t . .,.~ . . . . ~ P.B N!TE R ......___ , . 8~61/3 Ir, V 0 o( ...,t( ,: 6 '" "" �ATLANTA VRBAN CORPS 30 COURTL A ND STREET, N .E . / PHONE [404] 524-8091 / ATLANTA , GEORG I A 30303 MEMORANDUM TO : FROM: Date - July 3, 1969 Dan Sweat Sam Williams<--? SUBJECT: Black Students1 Involvement in the Urban Corps Pursuant to the meeting that you, Johnny Robinson and I had July 2, 1969, the following is a list of interns assigned to the Office of the Mayor and their race. Jon Martin James Bruce Tommy Issac Dan Christenberry Mary Woodward Walter Bloom ~er Dave Whelan Resna Hammer Inmond Deen Dianne Wilson Margaret Gerber Ken Mill wood Tara Swartsel Tim Rogers Dawn White Bettye Underwood Di ane Lovejoy Mac Rabb Patty Harwell Margie Langford Janice Foster Steve Mwamba Tom Flennning Joe Menez Mennie Berk White White White White White White --w:h-4'-tce White Non-White White Non-White White White White White Non-White Non-White Non-Wllite Wllite White Non-White White Non-White White White White In addit ion, you will find attached a list by college of all Urban Corps interns. Although I have no exact r acial census, I estimate roughl y 45% of our 219 interns are non-white. �Page 2 July 3, 1969 Additional students were offered intern positions in the Mayor's Office but declined. They are · Kenneth Martin Richard Scholes Lew Holland Melvin Mccrary Arlene Bird Non-White White Non-White ~ on-White White If you need the address or telephone number of these students, I can furnish them on request. cc : Johnny Robinson �AGNES SCOTT COLLEGE College Work-Study Students Name Agency Pay Rate None Non-College Work-Study Students T. Brackin S. Dennard J. Lang J. Maulding · S. Pickard S. Tucker T. Swartsel C. Watkins M. Gordon Kennesaw Mountain Park Fulton Cou_n fy Hod c. Waddell O• . Wheeler R. Williams R. Braxton D. Hicks R. D. R. A. Ag_ency Pay Rate Atlanta Girls Club $2.20 Parks & Recreation Atlanta Youth Corps EOA YWCA Mennonite H0 use Wheat Street Baptist Church Parks & Recreation Academy Theatre Immigration Atlanta Girls Club Immigration American Cancer Society Atlanta Urban Corps Easter Seal Finance Gate City Day Nursery Fulton County Health Dept. Gate City Day Nursery 2.20 1.80 2.20 1.80 2.20 2.20 2.20 2.20 1.80 2.20 1.80 2.20 2.20 1.80 2.20 2.20 1.80 2.20 Non-College Work- Study Students J. Myles S. Prator Sanitation Sarah D. Murphy Homes Declining Students M. Comb M. Co~en J. Delay Flande rs J. Howard s. Johnson A. Jones D. Lemon A. Lovelace J. Powell R. Rynder Y. Ross R. Sis l;arie w. Smith C. Smith c. Willia,ns E. Warner V. {Ch andler w. 2.20 2.20 �OGLETHORPE College Work-Study Students Name D. Hanley J. Menez EOA Mayor's Office $2.20 2.20 Non-College Work-Study Students T. Isaac Mayor I s Office 2.50 �· Southwe stern College Work-Study Students Name F. Flowers G. Roberts Community Relations Street Theatre $1.80 1.80 �SPELM.l\.N College Work-Study Students Name R. A. P. D. M. Arnold Chapman Dozier Lewis Moore B. Quillins T. Sinkfield C. York Pay_B_ate Kirkw.:io:i Center Gate City Nursery Easter Seal Atlanta Girls Club Library Kirkwo ,:x l Center Atlanta Yo~th Council Family Counseling $2.20 2.20 2.20 1.80 2.20 2.20 2.20 2.20 · Noc1.;.College Work-Study Students L. Howard M. Kreger S. Mincey Literacy Action Fulton County Health Dept. Wheat Street Church Declining Students S. Holiday V. Smith 2 .20 . 2.20 Volunteer �UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA College Work-Study Students Name S. Berry M. Friedman Pai Rate Crime Co:nmission City Water $2.20 2.20 Non-College Work-Study Students F. Goodson J. Hotard K. Millw.:,od J. Spencer Sanitation Sanitation Atlanta Urban Corps Crime Co:nmission Declining Students W. Goldstein L. Shahid 2.20 2.20 2.50 2.50 �University of Pennsylvania College Work-Study Students Name . P. Whatley M£~T}£1_ Fulton County Health ~Rate $2.20 Non-College Work-Study Students J. Waggener Business License 2.20 �VASSAR College Work-Study Students Name M. Freeman 4.gells: Dekalb YMCA Pay R~te $1.80 �WEST GEORGIA COLLEGE College Work-Study Students Name s. K. L. D. N. M. K. s. J. R. P. s. c. L. D. s. M. E. Ball Betsill Brow:i. Cousineau Ingram Jaccino Kennedy Kieme le Mann Lynes McLaughlin Stro~hert Thurmond Tilley Turner Windom Winston Henderson fille_~ Fulton County Health Dept. Decatur YMCA Fulton County Health Dept. Fulton County Health Dept. Atlanta Public Library Fulton County Health Dept. Fulton County Health Dept. Fulton County Health Dept. Atlanta Youth C.ouncil Water Dept. Atlanta Girls Club Kirkwood Center Grady's Girls Club Atlanta Youth Council Dekalb YMCA Fulton County Health Dept. Motor Trans. Parks & Recreation Declining Students J. Neighbors Pay Rate $2.20 1.80 2.20 2.50 2.20 1. 80 1.80 1.80 .1. 80 2.20 1.80 2.20 2.20 1.80 2.20 2.20 2.20 2.20 �YESHIVA COLLEGE College Work-Study Students Name L. Shields ~ency_ Easter Seal ~_E.~te $2.20 �N0E.-College Work-Study Students Agency Pay Rate Florida Presbyterian College s. Fulton County Health Chandler $1.80 Northwestern University Emmaus House F. Hill 2.50 University o f Kentucky Water Depto J. Hill 2.20 Coppin State College Jacqueline Blackwell EOA 2.20 Randolph-Macon Decatur-Dekalb YMCA A. Luce 1 .&) University of North Carolina M~ Lawrence B. White Atlanta Service Learning Conference 2.20 Literacy Action 2.50 Wesleyan W. Millkey Finance 1. 80 Antioch College M. Berk Mayor's Of fice 2.20 Clemson T. Rogers Atlanta Urban Co rps 2.50 George Wa shington College M. Silberstein Kennesaw Mountain 2.20 North Carolina Arts School c. Walker Finance 1. 80 East Carolina · E. WitCher Fulton Planning 2.50 Berry College G. Smith Emmaus House Volunteer �Non-Colle ge Work-Study Students Name Agency Pay Rate Tulane I. Deen Atlanta Urban Corps $2.50 Vanderbilt J. Elman Sanitation Declining Students R. Westbrook University of the South E. Benjamin C. Dill Earlhar.a Colle ge A. Cherry Tuskee gee W. Johnson Smith J. Dayan Barnard A. Waller Mt. Holyoke s. Erlick 2.50 �ATLANTA VRDAN CORPS 30 COURTLAND STREET , N .E . / PHO N E [404) 525 -2662 / AT L AN TA , GEORGIA 30303 April 25, 1969 Mr. Dan Sweat Director of Government Liaso n Mayor's Office Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dan , Enclosed are our Internship Development Forms for the Mayo r 's · office internship positions this summer. Since you are so well acquainted with the pro gram, I see no need to discuss the internships peraewith you. If you will see t hat a development f orm is co mpletely filled out f or each internship in the Mayo r's o ff ice ( xerox a copy if two are the same . ) with a detail ed description of the purpo ses , obj ectives, etc. o f t he position, it wi l l be appreciated. We would like you to return these f orms to us at the A.U. C. offic e as s oo n as possible. I f you have any questions, please call the office and leav e a message for me. Thank you for your help. David Whe lan �....--------------------~-------------------------· ATLAN TA URBAN In te rn ship Assignme nt Form CORPS r Date Urban Co rp s Rep res e nt at iv e Name of Host Org aniza ti o n Or g an i z at i o n a I Unit o f Proposed Assignment Address Assi gnment Locat ion ( : f differ en t f rom above) Perso n Respons ibl e for Intern s hip Tit I e ____________________ Function of Organizational Unit Teleph o ne No. ____________ Int e rnship Project Title (Outline o n Revers e Si de) Begi nni ng Date '-- Full Tim e Ending Dat e Part Tim e Special Assig nm ent Cond iti ons Approx. Hours Per Week Experience, Sk ills, Training or Other Qualificati o ns Desired: Intervie w Req ueste~: Name of I nt e rvie wer Location Phone-----------Req uest for assignment of an Atlanta Urban Corps intern in the descr i bed position on the reverse side is hereby approved . I hereby certify that the assignment of an Atlanta Urban Corps intern into thi s position wi I I not result in the displacement of a regular worker or imp air existing contracts for servic es. S i gna - ure Title Date �Project Out Ii ne De sc ribe briefly in terms of how the task serves the purposes of the organization: Specific objectives of internship project: Planned orientation and approaches: To Be Completed By Atlanta Urban Corps Educational Counselor -------,-N,-a_m_e________ Title Technical Representative Name Phone Address Phone Address Intern ---------,N~a_m_e___________ Address Titl e Co ll ege Ph o ne Approved For Atlanta Urban Corps _______________ Signature Date �ATLANTA VRBAN CORPS 30 COURTLAND STREET . N .E . / PHONE [404] 525 -2662 / ATLANTA , GEORGIA 30303 May 13, 1969 Mr. Dan Sweat Director of Governmental Liaison City of Atlanta 68 Mitchell Street, S. W. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mr. Sweat: We have received your completed Internship Assignment Forms and will contact you very soon regarding placement. Thank you for your interest in the Atlanta Urban Corps. ? Jl y, "- J ~--- DAVID WHELAN, Coordinator Internship Development DW : sz �July lS, 1969 Mr . Charles L. Davis Director Department of Finance City of Atlanta Dear Charles: I have your letter of July 10, 1969 in which you indicat that you have disburs d $?50 to Mr. Mark Da h through the regular payroll procedure. A you know, thi di bur em nt wa requ st d to be in the form o£ an education 1 stipend. It is our request that the remaining three p yment of $250 ch be di bursed directly from the remaining fWld of the Stern Family Grant, which is now deposited in Account T.A-25-62-310. You ha.v one mi cellaneou request in hand, nd you are requested to make this di burs ment from thifJ ppropri tion. Soon the Urban Corps Project Dir ctor will forward to u · th paym nts to be made lrom the T -25- 62-310 account. Many thank• for your a aiatance and copP r tion. V ry truly yo\1r , n Sw DS:je · t rem ining two �
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 5, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 9, Folder 5, Document 3

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_005_003.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 5, Document 3
  • Text: Lillk NEWS OF THE CORPS Atlanta Urban Corps Mr . Dan Sweat Government Liason Mayor's Office City Hall Atlanta , Georgia 30 Courtland Street, N. E. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Volume IV HlTERNS hA ·l fl ~ -1£!. CENTER Located in the recreation area of Trinity t·;e thodist Church , .265 Washington Street , is t he Walk- In Counseling Center directed by the the Atlanta Youth Council. The Center is a new proj ect which is dedicated to serving the immediate personal problems of the 13-21 year age group. Three Atlanta Urban Corps interns are managing the program. In an interview with Loyd Sanders , intern from Morehouse College , it was learned that Sanders , Bill Patter son (Univ. o f Indiana) , and Jo Ingle (Georgia College at Milledgeville) spend some seventy hours per week counseling young people whose problems range from general feelings of dejection and lack of personal value drug addiction and illigitimate pregnancies. As the problems of the Center's clientele vary in degrees of urgency and acuteness, Loyd, Bill and Jo have learned through sessions o f debriefing that each must be handled quite s eparately. The interns are fully aware of their own limitations in the field of counseling although all three are upper-level psycholo gy majors at their respe£tive colleges . Therefore, the Center relie s heavily on the relationship i t has est abl ished with various social service agencies which are prepared to offer professional assistance in the treatmen t of more severe cases of adolescen t problems. Loyd praised Georgia State College ' s willingness to donate professional time at a moment ' s notice . Hours of psychological testing and the like are administered by Georgia Stat e professionals who cari be at th e Center within five minutes after having_ been contacted. Great assistance has come too from Mr. John Cox, director of the Atlanta Youth Council , Nr. Lewis Dinkins , assistant to t,,,r. Cox, Mrs. Yvonne Bingham, counselor from Atlanta University , and Mr. David \'/eddi nton, director of the Walk-In Center. Of concern to Sanders and to the other t wo interns is the location of the Walk-In Center. Trinity Methodist is located under the shadow of City Hall itself, and though the Center is grateful to have the comfortable space in the Church, it seems that the Walk-In pDogram might be far more effective were it located in the area of the city were young people live and feel most natural . As Loyd pointed out , 11 Who is i;oing to just 'Walk in to 265 Was hington Street and bare their souls? 11 Sanders feels that the Center might more effectively be located in the Capitol Ho mes area. For the present ,1 .. however , the Center is operating with as much effec tiveness as these three interns can foster . A campaign is on to publicize the program so that young people can learn where they can come for personal counseling and professional help. Loyd , B811 and Jo man the Center from 11 a . m. to 11 p . m. six days per week. They find that most young people respond to th e Center ' s pro gram in the evening and t hus have geared t heir working .hours to meet the needs of the people whom they serve. If the Walk-In Center proves s uccessful in i ts initial operation it is hoped that an expansion program will result in branch offices out in the areas of the city where counseling for adolescents is so desperately needed. At the Walk-In Counseling Center are three Urban Corps interns who are applying their experienc e and educational training to a real need of the city, who are realizing their limitations and finding ways to supplement their own service capaci ties, and who are creatively planning for a more effective program. Theirs is a job of responsibility and relevancy . ATLANTA .!Lfil?Mi CORPS REPRESENTED llL NEW XQEK In a fiv e day trip to t he national of fi c e of the Urban Corps in new York City, Sam Williams, direc to r of the Atlanta Urban Corps , learne d of the operations of other Urban Corps throughout the na tion and represented our Atlanta procram reporting on its progress, its problems and successes. At th e meeting were directors from ei gh t different Urban Corps and represen tatives fro m six other cities which at present do not have Urban Corps but are considering establishing the Urban Corps program . After hearing reports from the directors of Urban Corps in cities such as New York, Boston , Dayton, Detroit, and San Francisc9 , Bo.11l concludes that the Atlanta program is unique in its empl1asis on the educational aspect of the intern experience. Only in Syracuse, N. Y. does there exist a like effort to involve an educationally sound learning experience for Urban Corps interns. In that city I s Urban Corpe program fairly succuss:fUl attempts have been made to develop �! academic cour se-c redit f or Ur ban Corps i nterns hi p experi en c e . Generall y , however , Urban Co rps i n citie s other t han Atl anta a re basic ally pro grams for s ummer emplo ymen t wi th very lit t l e emphasi s place d on educat io nal r el evan cy or s tud ent admi ni strat io n. FALL URBAN CORPS PROGRAM !l.filliQ PLANN ED Under the direction o f Dave Wh elan, the Placement and Development br anch o f t he Urban Corps is i n t he proc ess of planning i ts continuing pro gram. City and a gency s upervisors hav e expres sed gr eat s atisfac t io n wi t h t he wo rk tha t Urban Co rps i nterns have ac co mpl ished t has summer and are anxio us to employ more s tudent s throughout the year . Students may co ntinue their involvment wi th t he Urban Co rps in any of several ways . The pro gram al ways v,el co mes volunteers , t hose co mmuni ty mi nde d s tu den t s who will be abl e to find t ime duri nG t h e s chool year to devote a pa rtial work week to ci ty probl em areas . For t hose studen ts who qual ify f or Collet;e Work-St udy f unds , the Urban Co rps will be able t o f i nd both f ull- t i me and part- t i me jobs , There al s o may be funds available for a limit ed number of s tudent s who nee d t o work dur i ng t he scho ol year but who are no t eligi bl e fo r c.w.s.P. funding . Another \'Jay by whic h s tudents wi ll be able to work with t he Urban Corps pro gram beyond i t s summer 1969 schedule is through coll ege a c creditat i on of the Urban Corps i nternship pro gr am. Several col leges have already a greed t o offer course credit in the f or m of special co urses, s ociology , independent study and the l ike to t heir students who work during the s chool term wi t h the Urban Corps. Two major Atlanta school s will giv e c r edit for Urban Corps i nterns hi ps and/or r elated courses whic h will be trans f erabl e t o t he other colleges. The r e will be t hose s tu den ts v,ho will want to take a qua rter off from re gular course work and devote an en ti re three months to Urban Co rps work . Just as studen ts are urged to continue their involvement nith the Urban Corps con t i nue d prograr:: so i nstitutions are urged to involve their facult;,r memb ers and staff as advisors and consultants to both Urban Corps students and er,, ploy4n- a-genci&a . Dave indicates that if enough Urban Corps staff is available this fall there will be provisioJP.s n!ade to establish an office of co1ur.unity projects. This office will aid individual students and student g~oups in finding oor,uJunicy projects or the in-training equipment for· all·eady existing projects which stude:ets JT.iC;1t sponsor or assist. 7he expansion plans of the Urban Corps are still quite flexible and any comments or suggestions from students, faculty, and others interested in the program are welcomed. Applications for fall participation will be made avaialable in the near future. IN'rERNS A'rTEND HUNGER £NQ. MAL.l'iUTRITION HEARING Representi ng the Ur ban Corps at the Hunger and Ma l nu tri t io n Hearing July 11 and 12 we r e i nterns Ral ph Mar tin and Charli e Br own. Char l ie de scribed t he heari ng i n t erm s o f its attempts to bri ne to t h e a tt entio nc of Fu+ ton County o ffi cial s t he i nade quacies of t he county's s urplus fo od pr oGrarn . At pre sent the Food VJarehouse i s open t o t he publ i c b etwe en the hours o f 9 a . m. and 4 p .m. As Char li e pointed out, it is dur i ng these hours that the peopl e who ar~ dependen t on surplus food fo r exi stence need to be on the job. The f ood pro gram has only on e di stributi on point whic h often make s it very di ff ic ul t f or people who live i n the l a r c e met r opoli s of · Atl anta t o Get t o t he warehouse. \'/hen ask e d if th ere mi ght be other point s of !tis tribution made avai l able a11d more appropriate hours s chedul ed, o ff icial s o f the pr o gr am admitted that the fe a sibili ty o f s uc h plann i i1G had never been dis cussed . At t he he aring it was learned, too, t hat t he f ood pro s ram makes no att empt to me e t the spe ci al diet problems of i t s cus t omer s . ~efe rre d to by the offici als a s " recipi en ts ," a t erm 1,hich t o Char lie connot e s degradation , the people who depend on surplus f ood u s ually are peopl e who are s ick or undernouri s hed i n t he f irs t plac e . Several cas es were heard of peopl e who have received strict medical orders for special diets, eg. so dium di et s f or he a rt patien ts, whol e milk requirements f or cancer .patien t s , and who have been unable to mee t these diet s because of their dependency on a fo o d surplus program whic h is deaf to their needs. Charlie notes that there is no interaction at all between Grady Hospital and t he Food Warehouse whi ch could alleviate this situat ion. Another di s tnrbibg fact is that the Warehouse makes food pick-up avail abl e only once per month. Food issues wei gh 130 pounds for an average welfare fami l y t hus making transportation necessary. Cha rlie has r ecogni zed t he fact t hat taxicabs cost approximately $3 . 50 fo r an average t r i p to the warehouse, and f or each package an addi t ional $.75 is charged. For a fami l y dependent on surplu~ food , such money just fo r ~ae transpoFtat-i-on of that tee seem£ outrageous t o this intera. The Hunger and Malnutrition Hearing was sponsored by the Health, Education and Welfare Department and chaired by Mr. Maynard Jackson. Personal testimony was given by people 1·1ho Imo\'/ t he effects of hunger in Atlanta. Panels discussed the problems and directed their comments to Fulton County officials. It is hoped that from the uncovering of such inadequacies as those of the Commodity Foods program some relief will be found for the hungry people oi our city. �
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 5, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 9, Folder 5, Document 7

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  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 9, Folder 5, Document 7
  • Text: I } July 10, 1969 Dr . James E. Allen, Jr . Assistant Secretary for Education & U. S . Conunissioner of Education Dep rtment of Health, Education & Weliare Washington, D. C. Dear Dr. Allen: On behalf of the 225 intern of the Atlanta Urban Corps , I thank you for addressing the recent Atlanta Service Learning Conference. Your interest and presence indicated to college students that the national leadership of higher education is indeed in tune with their concern. Your statement about college work- tudy funding and the reversal of off-campus expenditures is, in my opinion, a mild tone to college involvement in community action. I only hope that colleges will encourage thorough planning by off-campu agencies to develop m aningful progr-ams for student involvement. If our project can be of any help to you for material or ideas, please let me know. 1 am •ending under eparate cover a 1,000 p ge re e rch book on community-colleg program in twelve cities which 1 compiled _oQAl__,~ce Dir ctor on Youth and the Federal Government for President SAM A. WILLIAMS Director SAW:sz �I l .'It ,as.CIA .:i es.en.st .'la ao.i:t ::,.ub:3: -iol y,: ~'!:> v sJai A 13 aol:ts::,ub3. lo 'I aoiaal.mmoO .8 .tJ o ... sU W ao.i:ts:>ub3. ,d:tl H lo :laemh:aq a .o .a .ac»aairlas nsUA oy ,!nstU I , q,:o nsd"lU .'la ,: ~ .cU lo a.a•Ht1ni cS d:t lo Us oo aO ,lv"loa s:tnsUA :ta !> "l sd:t aalaas'tbbs -xol n:i.UA laoO rua'l rlJ :tstU a nobu:te e lo:, o:t b :ts:>.ibni :,n s'lq ba 4 .a"l :,no:> "Ii rl:t .ciHw aui a.i bs bni e1 noUa:,ub~ ,: .d id l qJrl -r.uoY .$:>a 'I l.caolt uoY aibrusl y ,n -'1'10 s Uo:> tuod s :tn m :t :t >•llo &aeUo::, o:t sno:t bUm s ,aoltd o ym a! ,al s,:v:t JU Uo::, :tsdf eqo ylno I .n i:t yUaum Iul ala 1 a i:> as a q.m ::, .. lo '{d ga.ia 'lq .:ta m viovai n lo 1 e 9 "I eb! ri:t ba "IO at .1-s 000 ,I a 'I vo:> bu mo:> I tfaidw aUb svl ia 'I 'I l :aema"levoD la'I be, d:>'I a a 'I ta .AI JI �
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 5, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 9, Folder 5, Document 8

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  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 9, Folder 5, Document 8
  • Text: Southern Regional Education Board 130 Sixth Street, NW· Atlanta, Georgia 30313 · 404 872-3873 July 16, 1969 R esource D evelop ment Project Mr. Daniel Sweat Governmental Liaison Office of the Mayor City of Atlanta Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mr. Sweat: Your participation in the seminar was very much appreciated by the student interns. The tough realities of how you move people and ideas for the development of an area is a new concern for most of these students. I believe that you and Dean Stephens were able to raise some of the right issues for these students from their scattered questions. I want to personally thank you for spending the morning with us and for adding a significant dimension to the seminar experience. Robert L. Sigmon Internship Coordinator Resource Development Project RLS:ht �
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 5, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 9, Folder 5, Document 9

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  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 9, Folder 5, Document 9
  • Text: I July 17, 1969 Mr. Roy 0. Elrod Director Atlanta Civic Center 395 Piedmont Av nue, N .. E . Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Roy: l wa vef!y disappointed to hear that the Municipal Building nd Athletic Committe have taken an action, the effect of which i to prohibit th centr 1 staff of the Urban Corp Project from utilizing the available parking space at the M unicipal Atlditorium. I am e pecially di appointed that,, not being a re that you w re propo in . to ubmit thi question to the committee, I did not have an opportunity to di cu thla matter with th committee c - irman or members . Whil 1 can well under tand yo\lr proper concern r garding s e curity~ int rferenc • etc. , it i my f eling th t ther re som extremely important reasons why the city should do aom thing more than i b olutely r quired of u for the e· stud nta who ar doin eo much for the city. Th re outstanding youn p ople who will definlt ly be playing 1 ading p rt in thi community in th futur . It i dUficult for u to ,q,lain to them th t w re not hid bound bur aucracy when w are unwilling to accomod t them on euch a routine matter a thle one. Roy, l aincer ly hope that this h not r pr ntativ of the m nner in hich w ork tog th r to solve problems in the future. 1 d talk d to you on July 7, an ult Wld r the impr a ion th t you and 1 could work tbi ' out to I am lookln1 forward to orkin with you in th futur , nd 1 am co nl.z nt of th xc 11 ht Job you r doing t the Civic Cen r. I nt you to kno that l stand r ady and wUU.n to a iat you in nyway that 1 c n t y tim • Very truly your , Dn D ~l':je �
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 5, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 9, Folder 5, Document 11

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  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 9, Folder 5, Document 11
  • Text: July 14, 1969 Dr. James E . Allen, Jr. A s sistant Secretary for E ducation and U. S . Comrnl ioner of Education U. S. Department ot He th. Edu.cation and W lfare Washington. D . C . Dear Dr. Allen: I want to thank you in for taking the tun to come to Atlanta and support the Uort of our coll ge tud nts . The Atlanta Servic Loaming Confer nee wa your ap ~ance nd tat ment w s certaf.nly conference. l know th stud nt gr great ucc s nd hi h light of the with m • Slncer ly your • Da..n Swe t DS:fy �
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 5, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 9, Folder 5, Document 15

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_005_015.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 9, Folder 5, Document 15
  • Text: July 18, 1969 Mr . Andrew Glasberg Urban Corps National Development Office 250 Broadway New York City, New York Dear Andy: I am leaving Atlanta the first week of September for Harvard Business School and we n ed a Director . I ' ve been talking to M ike Goldstein about possible directors and he suggested you. I don ' t know your ogligations at pre ent, but Mike thought you had a con.tract to teach through June, 1970 . As you know , Atlanta ' s Urban Corps is progressing very well . We have cooperative re ources from area colleges, busine s donors, city government and private agencie • I have no doubts about expansion possibilities only through planning . City government is co-sponsoring an Urban Life Center with Georgia State College through a sp cial grant from Housing and Urban Develop m nt . It is a "kind' of" university relation office with promising opportunity . Th Mayor ' s a sistant say that if_ a deci Jpn'\ was made to hire a per on of your caliber that you could po sibly be a professor in the Urban Life Center as w 11 as direct the Urban C o rps . If you ar intere ted, could you please about arranging a vi it? Director SAM:dl rf.c: M yor's Office .. Dan Sweat nd me r ume and call m e �
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 5, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 9, Folder 5, Document 18

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_005_018.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 5, Document 18
  • Text: ATLANTA VRBAN CORPS 30 COURTL A ND STREET, N .E . / PHONE [404] 524-8091 / ATLANTA , GEORG I A 30303 MEMORANDUM TO : FROM: Date - July 3, 1969 Dan Sweat Sam Williams<--? SUBJECT: Black Students1 Involvement in the Urban Corps Pursuant to the meeting that you, Johnny Robinson and I had July 2, 1969, the following is a list of interns assigned to the Office of the Mayor and their race. Jon Martin James Bruce Tommy Issac Dan Christenberry Mary Woodward Walter Bloom ~er Dave Whelan Resna Hammer Inmond Deen Dianne Wilson Margaret Gerber Ken Mill wood Tara Swartsel Tim Rogers Dawn White Bettye Underwood Di ane Lovejoy Mac Rabb Patty Harwell Margie Langford Janice Foster Steve Mwamba Tom Flennning Joe Menez Mennie Berk White White White White White White --w:h-4'-tce White Non-White White Non-White White White White White Non-White Non-White Non-Wllite Wllite White Non-White White Non-White White White White In addit ion, you will find attached a list by college of all Urban Corps interns. Although I have no exact r acial census, I estimate roughl y 45% of our 219 interns are non-white. �Page 2 July 3, 1969 Additional students were offered intern positions in the Mayor's Office but declined. They are · Kenneth Martin Richard Scholes Lew Holland Melvin Mccrary Arlene Bird Non-White White Non-White ~ on-White White If you need the address or telephone number of these students, I can furnish them on request. cc : Johnny Robinson �
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 5, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 9, Folder 5, Document 21

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_005_021.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 9, Folder 5, Document 21
  • Text: ....--------------------~-------------------------· ATLAN TA URBAN In te rn ship Assignme nt Form CORPS r Date Urban Co rp s Rep res e nt at iv e Name of Host Org aniza ti o n Or g an i z at i o n a I Unit o f Proposed Assignment Address Assi gnment Locat ion ( : f differ en t f rom above) Perso n Respons ibl e for Intern s hip Tit I e ____________________ Function of Organizational Unit Teleph o ne No. ____________ Int e rnship Project Title (Outline o n Revers e Si de) Begi nni ng Date '-- Full Tim e Ending Dat e Part Tim e Special Assig nm ent Cond iti ons Approx. Hours Per Week Experience, Sk ills, Training or Other Qualificati o ns Desired: Intervie w Req ueste~: Name of I nt e rvie wer Location Phone-----------Req uest for assignment of an Atlanta Urban Corps intern in the descr i bed position on the reverse side is hereby approved . I hereby certify that the assignment of an Atlanta Urban Corps intern into thi s position wi I I not result in the displacement of a regular worker or imp air existing contracts for servic es. S i gna - ure Title Date �Project Out Ii ne De sc ribe briefly in terms of how the task serves the purposes of the organization: Specific objectives of internship project: Planned orientation and approaches: To Be Completed By Atlanta Urban Corps Educational Counselor -------,-N,-a_m_e________ Title Technical Representative Name Phone Address Phone Address Intern ---------,N~a_m_e___________ Address Titl e Co ll ege Ph o ne Approved For Atlanta Urban Corps _______________ Signature Date �
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 5, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 9, Folder 5, Document 2

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_005_002.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 9, Folder 5, Document 2
  • Text: 12 App2ndix A Southern Regional Education Board Resource Development Project ACADEMIC YEAR INTERNS 1968-1969 Economic Development Administration Intern, College or University, Dates Dickerson, Oscar Holloway , I,ister Al abama A & M College (10/14--2/11.:.) Grant, William Paone, J ob.21 Ur..iversity of Virginia Project Description Assigned to assist Peoples Cooperat i ve of Madison County, Alabama, through an improved record-keeping system and educational efforts to promote advantages of cooperative efforts. Assigiced to provide follow-up ass istance in dcve lop::.ng Buc}j_ngham County, Virginia, Buyers Co- op . (11/6--5/30) Everhardt, Jerry UNC-CH French, Nita Guilford He:~,ze son, John w.c.u . Participated in Pilot Study (conducted 12/6/682/8/69 ) to determine feasibility of major service-learning study in North Car olina . Part icipating i n stitutions and the SmithRichardson Foundat ion provided support for this effort. .Jolc.nson, Charly N.C.S.U. Ki ng , Gary E.c.u. Penick, George Davi d.:con Wassell, P~yllis J .C. Smith Wi~_liams, Garland Mars Hill Seninar on Economic Development Administration conducted for 12 interns by ·ch'= Departments of Poli ti cal Science and Economics of Middle Tennessee State Univer sity (1/1/69--6/30/ 69 ) Bas ic purpose of this pilot prog~am in the Teaching of Economic Deve l opment Administrat i o:r. was to intensify the l earning environment by providing an opportunity to participate direct ... l y in an actual community development effort. Rural and urban-oriented Model Cities Programs in Sm~thvi lle and Nashville provided learning context. Each intern is pr epari1g a final report and eval uation of the semj_nar . MTSU i s preparing an evaluation report on this approach to teaching Economic Development Administratic!'l. �13 Economic Development Administration (continued) Intern, College or r_Tniversity, Dates Haire, Douglas Georgia State Whelan, David Georgia Institute of Technology Zauderer, Gail Agnes Scott College Project Description Assisted with development of Atlanta ServiceLearning Program. (1/6--3/14) Goodrum, Lloyd Leich, Joan Mars Hill College (1/20--5/23) Hanzlik, Rayburn Uni versity of Virginia (2/20--5/30) Sweet, Charles Duke University (3/18--5/30) OfficE_~ Provided research assistance for Madison-Buncombe Rural Development Council, I nc ., to examine economic and social impact of t he foo:i stamp program and the commodity food program in Madison County, North Carolina. The Center f or the Study of Science , Te chnology and Public Policy of the UniversitY. of Virginia sponsored a project to survey existing resources within the university which are a lrend.y or could in t he f uture pr ovide technica l assistance t o the surroundi ng community i n dealing with commun ity problems . Examination of college Work-Study Program an~ its r e lati onshi p with SREB Servi ce-Learn5.ng Internship Model. _.· · :..:momic Oppor tunity Munsc;.1, Cs.:,~ ~. t~o::-i Un:l.v2~·:3 i ty of }!.':=;r yl and (1.o/ 1;08--,:/ 3O/ 69) Siffcy-,J , We..llac,·~ Mor ga;, St a i::-~ Cc.:ll ege (1/ 20··-7/ 4/69) With the Mar yl and Stat e Office of Economi c Opportun i ty , intern cc 1duct ed comprehensive revi ew of dimens i ons and implement a-: ions of On-the- J ob Training i n Wes t ern Mar yland . with Mor gan St at e College and De l aware Stat e Offi c.8 of Bconomic Oppor tunity, proj ect des i gned to i Jenti fy causes of st udent unre st. �Appendix B Southern Regional Education Board Resource Development Project STATISTICAL ABSTRACT Summer 1968 Project Subject Areas Participating Host Agencies Participating Universities and Colleges Intern Profile Counselor Prof ile Former Intern Status - 1966-1968 Distribution of Int erns by State and Agency 1964-1968 �1· I J.4 PROJECT SU-EJECT JI.RF.AS Summer 1968 EDA Public Adm. & Finance Econ. Analysis & Planning Coinm. Action & Social Service Tourism, Travel & Recreation Manpower Education & Training Health & Sanitation Legal Needs Housing Natural Res. Development 32 19 2 8 8 7 1 OEO TVA CJJ:A 1 3 15 8 6 l 1 3 6 5 6 3 2 Summer Summer 1968 1967 ARC TOI1AL % TCII1AL % 2 3 1 2 1 2 2 - 35 23 . 1 33 17 16 1 15 11~ 8 6 5 2 151 21. 8 11.2 10.6 10.0 9.2 5.3 3.9 3.3 1.3 6 7.1 16 19.C' 10 - 11.9 10 11. 9 14 16.S 5 .5, 5 8.3 7 11 13.1 5. 9 5 0 B4 PARTICIPATING HOST AGENCIES WITH WHOM INTERNS SERVED - Sl001ER 1968 Community Action Agencies Economic Development Districts 1}eneral Development Organizations Ste,te Office Departments Tr ibut ary Area Organizations (TVA) Regional Offices (EDA and OEO) 2!:nployment Service Off ices Model Cities Number of Agencies 1967 Agenci E:8 Repeat ing j_n 1968 1968 1967 29 26 22 15 12 27 14 16 ~- ---11 10 7 ~- 4 10 9 2 1 0 5 1 0 0 0 109 78 42 �15 PARTICI~ATING UNIVERSITIES AND co~~EGES (Summer 1968 Resource Development Internship Programs) Graduate Institutions Undergraduate Institutions Agnes Scott College Auburn University Alcorn A & M College Clemson University Alderson-Broaddus College Delta State College Arkansas A.M. & N. College Duke University Augusta College East Carolina University Berry College East Tennessee State University Carson-Newman College Emory University .Clark College Florida State University Florida Presbyterian College Florence State College Glenville State College Frostburg State College Hampden-Sidney College Furman University Knoxville College Georgia Southern College Lambuth College Georgia State College Little Rock University Louisiana State University Middle Georgia C0llege Medical College of South Carolina Pembroke State College Memphis State University Tougaloo College Middle Tennessee State University University of West Florida Mississippi State University Valdosta State College Morehead State University Wilmington College (N.C.) North Carolina State University West Liberty State College Oklahoma State University (w. Va . ) Salisbury State College \·Test Georgia College Southeastern State College (Okla.) Universi.ty of Alabama Fest Virginia Inst. of University of Arkansas Technology University of Georgia University of Houston University of Kentucky University of Maryland University of Mississippi University of North Carolina (Chapel Hill ) University of Oklahoma University of South Carolina SUWffiRY University of Southern Mississippi ! Lt,_ ,,:;, '?, Unj_versity of Southwestern Louisiana Graduat e Institutions University of Tennessee ' University of Texas Undergraduate Instit uUniversity of Virginia tions Virginia Commonwealth Universit y Virginia State College (Norfolk) Junior Colleges West Virginia University €5'"1 1 Western Carolina University - i �16 1968 SUMMER I NTERN PROFILE ACADEMIC MAJORS OF I NTERNS Soc. Science and Education Bus . & Econ . Law Ar ch . , Eng. , Plng. Humanit ies Ag . , Rec., Home Ee. Medicine Natural Scienc es EDA OTA 29 4 27 5 8 6 1 7 1 3 1 OEO TVA ARC 1968 PERCENT 1967 % 25 7 1 66 43 . 7 40 41. 7 6 3 1 1 6 0 28 .5 7.3 7.3 4.6 3 .3 2.6 2.6 31 1 43 11 11 7 5 4 4 151 32 . 3 13 .5 6 .3 00 . 00 . 3.1 3. 1 5 1 1 1 4 2 13 6 0 0 3 3 9b ACADEMIC STANDING OTA OEO TVA ARC TOTAL PERCENT EDA Sophomore ,Tunior 3enior Masters Fh , D. 1-1 . D. J. D. /Lavr a. A. Graduate 1 14 21 23 8 4 8 79 4 4 4 2 1 15 _ 1 7 2 1 7 10 11 1 4 5 5 1 -1 Ii3" -13 1 26 1 43 4o ~ I 1 12) 4) 10) 15 1 151 47. 0% 43 . 0% 10.0% PERSONAL DATA OTA OEO Male 12 35 70 Female 8 9 3 Average Age 22. 6 22 . 9 22 . 8 Aarri ed 21 29 7 Singl e '.;O 8 22 Wh:i.t e 43 38 77 Non-White 2 2 5 REASONS GIVEN BY INTERNS FOR SEEKING INTERNSHIP APPOINTMENT : 1967 1968 Relate academic theory to real world 32.7% 33 . 1% Contribute to developmental activities 22. 7 33 . 1 Research Experience 6.3 l6.1 Working with people 16,3 10 .5 Help with e: GrC!er cl10ice 18. 1 4. 8 3.6 2.4 Joh EDA TVA ARA TOTAL PERCENT 86.1 12 1 13 0 1 21 13. 9 23.1 22. 0 22.6 41..0 62 5 8 1 59. 0 89 142 94 . o 1 13 6 .o 9 FAMILY I NCCME LEVEL OF I N1I'ERNS Below $5000 5000- 7~~99 7500-9999 10, 000-15,000 15,000-over Total Responses 13 20 14 17 17 BI 16% 24.6 17. 2 21. 21. �17 COUNSELOR PROFILE Highest Degree Attained Ph.D. M.A. Other 1968 Percent 59 55 .6 34.9 9.4 37 10 106 Pos i tions Held Assistant Professor Ass ociate Professor Dept. Chairman Professor Bureau Direct or Instructor/Lecturer Otner Teaching Area 1968 Social Sciences & Education Business & Economics Agriculture, Home Ee. & Recreation Archi tect ure, Eng . & Planni ng Humanities Law Natural Sciences & Mathematics Medici ne 52 29 9 5 ..,";/ 3 3 2 32 23 ,~ _j 12 10 8 8 106 Pe:!:·c:ent 49.0 27. 3 8 r: ! ,I 4. 7 2. 8 2.8 2.8 1. 9 106 Years at University or Coll ege 1-2 years 3-5 years 6-10 _years 11-15 y ears 16-20 years 20-over years unknown 48 27 12 7 4 Average Age 20- 29 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69 y ear s year s years years years 7 1 106 Counsel ors Repeating f or Second Year : 24, or 22 . 6% 40. 8 y ee,rs 8 5l 27 13 7 106 �18 FORMER Ii~ERN STATUS - 1966-1968 (As of Dece~ber 31, 1968) Current Educational Status Graduate School Undergraduate School OTIIER TOTAL % EDA OEO TiJA 48 37 29 16 16 11 1 65 99 28.5 17.8 8 6 -2 1 1 ~, r7 J+.9 26 5 2 0 1 3 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 42 10 3 13 14 12.1 2.8 o. 8 1.4 3.7 4.o 6 CurrE>nt Em-11loyment Status Privr-tte In::lustry Public Service Education (Teaching ) F~der:=:.l Gov' t. St atP. Gov't . Local Gov 1 t. T-::.~s ou:~-::e Dev. Mili ts.::.· y 10 11 2 1 1 2 2 Unk.110-.,-~ 32 19 14 2 67 20.0 9 1 2 0 12 3.4 187 90 58 12 347 Duplicat es ( Interns who have serve(:l. in more than one internship assig nment) TOTALS 6 2 3 6 5 Intern· Evalua tion reg_uested "yes t1 or "no t1 response to followi ng 1\lould you be interested in receiving informat:'~ on concernquest ion: ing emi:,loyment positions and educational opportunities i n community or re s ource development?" 87.7% answer ed Yes 10. 7% No 1.3% N/ A - - - - - - - -- - --- - -- - --- - - --- - - -- - - - - - -- -- �, ;fi'R~J:~-LiY P.ROG-f:Alv:S - J_J~)-~.-l Sf.:8 Distribution by s ·::-ate a nd Age:1cf Ri_~ ::msorship ALA Aff',_, --·- EDA C1.1A OEO-CAP - -- 0:7-0-LS ·:,_:VA su-67 su-68 su-66 AY-66-67 su-67 AY-67-68 su-68 su-67 su-68 su-67 su-68 su-66 su-67 su-64-65 su-66 AY-66-67 S"l.i·-:'.)'7 U,:;DOL Tm'ALS: su-68 su-67 Part-time Full-time Tota ls %of Ail Interns SUIIM/':..RY: ARC EDA OEO TVA USDOL 1 3 1 ARK 2 3 2 ".) 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 FI.A GA 3 6 5 2 3 6 1 2 42 3 2 2 1 3 5 4 l 3 2 2 2 1 1 1 2 19 21 5.9 2 196 90 58 10 356 KY LA MISS 4 1 3 NC 2 3 3 3 3 6 1 2 2 1 _) 3 1 3 4 5 1 OKLA SC 1 1 1 1 4 2 2 4 T:r-;x Vl\. 1 1 2 4 3 1 4 4 1 9 4 W VA DC 2 3 3 3 1 1 1 - 3 l 1 2 3 4 l" -/ 25 28 24 79 4 5 2 3 2 5 6 5 1 11 6 5 5 6 2 1 1 1 5 1 3 0 1 0 0 8 0 19 12 39 16 5 6 11 · 16 63 1 r~ 4 82 6 11 24 1 13 42 17 5 Ll 1.1 3.6 10. 8 1.4 .4.8 23. 1 1. 7 3.1 6. 8 0.3 0 4 0 4 Tor.AL 1 1 6 4 -:> TENl\T 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 3 0 0 9 7 13 7 70 20 13 7 79 2·:· 3. 6 1. 9 21. 9 ·;- . .-; MD 19 10 15 27 43 10 10 11 14 10 10 13 10 50 306 356 �
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 5, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 9, Folder 5, Document 6

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_005_006.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 5, Document 6
  • Text: The Atla ta .... The critical thing about the service-learning concept is the hyphen. Lee Heubner Staff Assistant to President Nixon .... When the Urban Corps interns came here in June, we discovered there was no baseball league for inner city kids and nearby facilities were closed to them. \Ve called a meeting, talked with some key people, and now have two leagues operating for 200 young men. Karl Paul Atlanta Urban Corps Intern n Co ference .... The need is to concentrate on ways of helping the young to realize the potential of their new sense of purpose and spirit for service .... It places upon our colleges and universities the obligation to examine their policies and practices and to make those adjustments necessary for the proper exercise of student participation .... Of the 35 0, 000 young people taking part in the College Work-Study Program, most have been employed on their campuses. We would like to see the ratio reversed, with the majority working off-campus. James E. Allen, Jr. Assistant Secretary for Education and lJ. S. Commissioner of Education a r port on h 8 n June 30 - July 1, 1969 �TABLE OF CONTENTS I. Introduction ..•.••••..•.•••.•.••..•..••.•....•. 1 II. Address by Dr. James E. Allen, Jr •••.••.••....• 6 III. Ina.ugura.l Meeting Summa.ries .••••••••••••••••••• 14 IV. Inaugural Meeting Work Group Reports •••••.•••.• 23 V. List of Participants •••.••••••.••••.•••••..•.•. 31 Further information on the Conference ma.y be obtained from: Atlanta Service-Learning Conference c/o The Atlanta. Urban Corps 30 Courtland Street, N.E. Atlanta., Georgia 30303 404-524-8091 �I. INTRODUCTION The Service-Learning Concept To serve and to learn ; these fundamental goals of our society are engrained in the American rhetoric. But how to serve? and how to learn? An institutionalized, bureau- cratized 20th Century America has effectively limited the answers to these questions. For "servtce to country" America legislatively requires mili- tary duty only, which many of today's young people find morally questionable. For "learning" we have complex university systems with :!.imj_ted abi- lity to respond to the individual and with oftimes old-fashioned views of what is education and what is not. However, considerable attention is currently being given to the role of uni versitie s i n service to soci ety. At one extreme, a r guments a r e heard that community involvement by an academic institution thr eatens its integrity and dra ins its r e source s. At t he ot he r end of the spe c trum of opinion i s the v iew of the unive rsity as a shaper of s oci ety with speci al social responsibi lities because of its objectivity , standar ds, and resources of knowledge . These arguments abou t campus - in- c ommunity may obscure fundamental que stions of the r ole cf the community a s an educati or.al resour ce. Can the univ ersity pe rform i ts primary func t i ons of education and t he discove ry of r;.,,,w knowl edge without an involvement in s oc i e t y ? Can educational institutions dev elop the type of manpo~er needed by a r apidly changing soc iety, both as professional s and as citizens in a democracy, without i n cludi ng the resources of socie tal experience i n t he educational process? How migh t community service, sought by many student s, best be deslgned as a learnlng experiec1ce and integrated with other. acpects of a total educational program? .i. �2 It is the thesis of the ,::onvenors of this Conference--many cf whom a.re a t the interface between education aud community--that by combining the ne eds and resources of education both will better be served. It is hypotlies i zed that the tensio~ between the practical urgent demands of community and the requirements of disciplined rational thought of education can be a very productive force for the development of society and for l earning and the advancement of knowledge. This combination of action and reflection, of experience and examina t:i.c,:-. ) this integration of service and learning can foster a style of life where education and vocation are parts of the same fabric and the gap between community and education is closed. Simply stated, then, s e r vice-learning is a n integration of the accomplishment of a needed task with educational growth. I t is clear tha t greater student involvement i n community affa irs i s coming--it i s already here in many ways bu t i t i s grouing . Student s want i t , agencies need their servi ces, colleges increasingly are encouraging it. Na.tional l egi sla t i on to supplement Peace Corps, VISTA, Teacher Corps , and o ::her programs i s under consideration in Washington: a r e we prepared t o utilize these growing opportunities productivel y f 0r all pa rties? A new approach is both ne cessa ry and pos s ible. It r equires new meaning for upracticality," new openness to change, new commitment to experiment ation, new acceptance of the ability of youth, and indeed new social institutions and attitudes • • • • t o say nothing of competent human beings who are prepared to function in the new s ociety. It is to search for these new attitudes and processes that the Atlanta Service-Learning Conference is convened. �3 Th2 Atla·,1ta Service-Learning Conference Although there is a grow:!.ng incJ.i.nati.011 to accep t t he service-lear..1.i ng concept a s a valuable element of a l earning expe·.dence, ther e is relatively l ittle un.deratandi ng of how the abstraction can be t :rauslated into a pra ct icab l e model. model. Local lea Gers recognized the urgency for develop i ng thb Consequently, the Atlan ta Service-Learning Conf erence was organized ir;. t h e s priu g of 1.969 to explore the i mplications c,f the serv:!.ce- l e arniue; conce:pt, to define the elements necessary fo r a succe 3s ful program, a.r:.d t0 structure and implement a program in the Atlanta area to s e!'.'ve as a moo.el for similar pr ograms in other urban center s. The diversi t y of the spon- s oring or ganizati ons is evidence of the broadly bas ed interes t and support a t both national and local le,.,·els for the developmen t of t h is prog!.' am. The list of sponsors includes: The Ci ty of Atlanta, The Atlanta Urban Corps , Economic Oppor. tuni ty At lanta, The Colleges and Universities of Atlanta, Depar tment of Healt h, Educa t ion , and We l f are, The Sout hern Regional Education Board , Vol un t eer s in Service to America, and The Pea ce Corps . With the a ddition of Atlanta businessmen a nd per sons f r om outs ide Atlant a , the s ponsor s ar e representati v e of the per s o~s who a re participating in the confer ence . In the o:.:gen:i.,laticmal me e t ing, the s p onsoring agen::::ies de c ided on a six-month period for t he conference during which the participants rn:l s ht. uti l i ze all avai lable resources and examine in depth se,,eral i mpor t an t aspec t s of the service-lear ni ng concept. In order to faci l i t ate this t ype of s tudy , the con fer ence has been div ided into s i~ wor k groups: namely, s er vice, learning, curriculum and i n ter- institutiona l relations , .:esear '!h, fin.nn ce, and methods and progl'.'ams . �4 Each of the work groups will meet in a number of individual s~ssions in order to study the topic, r aise pertinent questions, and suggest possible answers. During the six-·month period each work group will chair a formal session of the conference, These sessions will have the dual roles of first, allowing the host group to profit from the e.xperie:'.J.ce of the other participants and, second, giving each participant the opportunity ~o relate his area of interest and study to the complete work of the conference. Having profited from this exchange of ideas, each work group will produce a report to be submitted to a Steering Ccmmittee, composed of· work group chairmen and re~,resentatives of the sponsoring organizations. Th:ts Steering Committee will chair the final session of the CuJ ference, to be held in December, At this session the integrated report will be presented and a program will be proposed for implementation. The first session of the Conference was held on June 30 and July 1 and attended by over 300 persons. The format of t h e initi al meeting in- cluded a number of speake r s, s eminars to introduce par ~icipants to the concept of service-learning, and organi zational meetings of the work groups. The balance of this r eport contains the keynot e address by U.S. Commissioner of Education, James E. Allen, Jr., s ummari es of o t he~ speeches and discussions, and a list of participants who attended the inaugura l session. Coincide nt wit h t he l aunching of the Conference has been the creation in 1969 of t he At lant a Ur ban Cor ps , a gr oup of 220 student s ser ving ful l time throughout the summer with 15 city and 35 private non-pr ofit or ganizations i n Atlant a. Most Urban Corps memb ers are fund ed on the ba sis of 80% frrjm the f ederal College Wor k- Study Pr ogram and 20;~ f rom t he employing a gency. The Souttlern Regional Education Board under gxauts from t h e �5 Economic Development Administration, Office of Economic Opportunity and Department of Labor is providing support along with the Atlanta businessmen and foundations to cover administrative costs and stipends for interns not eligible for the Work-Study Program. VISTA has assigned 25 associate positions to operate under Urban Corps auspices. Sam Williams, director of the Atlanta Urban Corps, points to the relevance of the educational aspect of the program. Nine staff members make up the evaluation team which is responsible for developing and assuring an education dimension for each intern's summer assignment. Five professors serve as counselors to lend technical c:.nd educational assistance to individual interns and groups of interns , and one professio1m:1• ~nd three student staff members in the office plan seminars and coordina te oi:h er means of helping the interns make their summer work experiences e.,:ucationally relevant. Each student is required to present to the Urban Corps a report on his internship at the completion of his service period. Thus the Urban Cor ps, in addition to accomplishing needed tasks in the community and offering both a summer job and a relevant educational experj_ence to its members, provides a practical service-learning laboratory for the Confer ence. Through observation of the Urban Cor ps and participation of its members, the Confer ence is assured the necessary dialogue be tween theory and practice. This is the setting in which the Conference is convened. Each of a variety of perspectives has a distinct contribution t o make to the enterprise . Additional participants, assistance and information are welcome. I t i s only a beginning. But if theory and practice, students and faculty, public and private bodies int eract in the manner outlined, the Conference will have something significant to say to Atlanta and the nation by the eLd of 1969 . �II. EDUCATIONAL NEEDS OF YOUNG PEOPLE TODAY 6 Remarks by James E. Allen, Jr. Assistant Secretary for Education and U.S. Commissioner of Education None of you would be here today at this conference on service-learning if you were not aware of how different the educational needs of young people are today from those of past generations. All of you know that the needs of the new generation are defin°ed by its aspirations. And that aspiration is the edge of the great divide between the generations. For past generations,--and I mean not only the parents but the older brothers and sisters of today's young people--the touchstone was vocation. well-being. The career as a means to the economic ends of material The career as a means to the psychological ends realized in achievement, success, and prestige. Sometimes, of course, members of preceding generations thought of the career as an avenue of service to conceptions beyond the self--there are many professions with a humanitarian dimension in both theory and practice. But for most people, the furtherance of such ideals as the betterment of society was accepted as an extra-curricular activity. Something to be done after the serious business of the day, if time permitted . �7 For large and increasing numbers of young people today this sj_tuation is not only changed but reversed. It is the pursuit of goals beyond the self that comes first and the money and success that take second place, Clearly it will take a new kind of educatj_on to accommodate such a change in traditional ways of thinking about man and society. We are still in the process of identifying it, but some things we know. For example, we can be sure that an education that fits the needs of young people today must be broader than the school. Among the many artificialities the young reject is the idea that the classroom and the library are the best, if not the only, places for learning. Today's youth is as bored with four wall abstractions as it is with materialism. Today's youth want an education geared to realities more vital t han eit,her· theory or things. values. It is less interested in ideas than in Young people want their education to take them past knowledge to wisdom, and past wisdom to action--the kind of action that ca n translate their energy and their vision into new patterns of life. The "now" generation doesn't want to wai t for any of th is. finds the old hierarchies an ineffectual structuring of society. It It has no use for the protocol of power as we have known it. The new attitudes of young people toward education and the life for which it is presumably preparing them are sometimes crit:i.cized as �8 irresponsible. asking for. But it is precisely responsibility that they are Some people think youth wants to start at the top and rearrange society without bothering to find out what makes our institutions operate. In my opinion, it is the other way around. Young people want first-hand experience with our institutions to teach them their sociology. They want to learn the mechanics of social change by experimenting where it can actually happen. This is the positive side of activism. This is what has taken students out of classrooms andaway from well-paid, conventional jobs, leading them instead into the Peace Corps, Vista, and the Teacher Corps. This positive activism has moved young people past the Peace Corps, Vista, and the Teacher Corps; it has inspired them to invent their own ways of reaching people who need help. Store-front schools, street academies and many other innovative institutions testify to their enterprise. By nm,,1 it is quite clear that the activism of the 1960's is much different from that of other decades. The meaning of the difference has been captured in the words of Arthur Mendel, professor of Russian . history at the University of Michigan "Youth no longer speaks for itself; it defines an era." At the same time, in all their eagerness for a chance t o deal directly with the raw stuff of history, in the making, today's young �9 people continue to want what school in the old classroom-and-library sense of the word should and can give them. They want background against which they can measure their experience. They want an education that breaks down the old barriers between school and community without breaking down either the school or the community. This is what work-study programs are all about. There is no trend in education more promising, and the Federal Government is wholeheartedly behind it. Secretary Finch and my colleagues i n the Office of Education are convinced advocates of the work-study concept, and the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare is actively involved in promoting it. It is very much in line with President Nixon ' s emphasis on volunteer effort as the key to community renewal. The President has called for a national clearinghouse on voluntary activities, with a computerized data bank to make available information about what has been t r ied a nd wher e , how well i t work ed, and what the problems were. The student emp loyees wor king at HEW this summer will hel p assemble i nformation of t his kind on t he volunteer activi t i es of the young. As you know, HEW is r e spons ib le for administering a pr ogr am of Federal grants t o co lleges which pr ovide s s ome 350 , 000 s t udents with the opportunity t o work on or off t h e campus duri ng their co l l ege ca reer. HEW can pay ap t o 80% of the wages of t he s tuden t s as they partake of the edu~ational expe riences of working in a wide range of socially constructive projects. the social scene. The s cope of their activities is as broad as �10 Of the 350,000 young people taking part in such work-study programs, most have been employed on their campuses, but increasing numbers are employed in local government agencies, schools, hospitals and other organizations, public and private. We hope to learn from student community service activities wherever they are taking place. In Michigan, for example, we know that students are leading the way in productive volunteer activities for various segments of the population of their state . Currently, some 10,000 student volunteers on the 27 differ8nt Michigan campuses, are engaged in projects many of which they have developed on their own initiative and maintain without much fin~ncial help from government sources. As an example of the varied and numer01.1s proj ,:,cts, agriculture students from Michigan State University work together with inner city people in developing community garden cooperatives. Elsewhere in the nation we find students contributing social service to their communities. other types of There is the Memphis Area Project South which sponsors "clothes closets " for needy families. Through this project, students also collaborate in planned parenthood programs in South Memphis and help in nutrition classes for low-income people. Your own city has always been noted for its progressiveness. The fact that Atlanta is hosting the opening of the six-month conference is a fine example. It is equally encouraging to see Atlanta adopt the program of the Urban Corps as a model to meet urban needs . �11 Last summer there were 76,000 students employed in programs supported by Federal work-study funds. This summer, the Office of Education will have 225 students on its own payroll. I should like to tell you something about the projected activities of these summer employees. A goal of the summer program is to promote communication between government and the youth community. Some students will be organizing seminars for the Office staff. on topics of concern and "relevance" to students today. Such topics include curriculum reform, university administration, urban universities , and an urban extension service. Other students will be researching programs and practices of the Office as related to student and youth participation. In particular we hope they will gather and analyze information on activities in the areas of work-study and volunteer community service, in order to help us determi ne where Federal involvement might be most constructive . t~e can already begin to see the shape of some of the problems to be dealt with . One is how to get more of the students involved in work-study programs off the campus, into the communi ty. We would like to see the ratio of on- campus to off-campus work reversed, with the majority working off-campus instead of t he opposi te situation which prevails now. Another problem is how to overcome the dilemmas and disadvantages of t he work- study pr ogr am. Such as the difficulty of int egr a ting new people i nto es t abl ished or ganizat ions on a short- t i me basis. The accreditadon dilemma--it i s agree d tha t there should b e recognition of service as a part of higher educa tion, ye t some univers ities have �12 found that formal accreditation of cot!lIIlunity work turns it into a nine-to-five routine and diminishes dedication. However, other universities and colleges have developed means for granting academic credit to learning-service activities , making them integral to the academic life . These are not impossible problems. Like you, we believe that what Aristotle said is t r ue , "What we have to learn to do , we learn by do_ing . " We, too, will l earn by doing. We feel that we are opening up avenues of many kinds--between youth and the larger com.~unity, between youth and government , between the generations. We are committed to the new view of educational needs that this implies. The experience of gLoups like yours will be helpf ul to us as we try to adapt the Federal Government's role to the changes taking place i n our society . We look forward to your r ecommendations as you r eview and study the l e arning-servi ce concept i n the months ahead . I hope we ~an draw on t he r eport of your del i berations as a source of new models f or student contribu tion to community renewa l. With so much of the business of Ameri ca a nd the wor ld still unfinished, it i s hear tening indeed to obser ve t ha t per ha ps t he greates t awareness of this unfinished business exis t s in the young. The need, therefore, is to concentrate on ways of helping the young to realize the potential of their new sense of purp ose and spirit for service. This involves intens ive efforts -- far greater than yet �13 evidenced. It also places upon our colleges and universities the obligation to examine their policies and practices and to make those adjustments necessary for the proper exercise of student participation. So rather than challenging youth, it is they who are challenging us and it is, I believe, a most heartening and hopeful situation when exhortation is more needed by age than by youth. # # # # # # # �14 III. I NAUGURAL MEETING SUMMARIES Welcome by Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. Atlanta.'s Mayor Ivan Allen opened the Conference on June 30 by focusing on the problems of the cities and the effect t hat young p0ople can have on the solutions. Allen defined the foremost urban problems as race, t r ansportation, and financing of city services. He said tha.t although 11 the structure of government is capab1e of coping with these problems ••• it is the failure of man to a.dapt which prevents the solution. n "Atla.nta, 11 sa.id Mayor Allen, "welcomes the entrance into city government of a group of concerned young citizens." He concluded that if the need is going to be met, it will be met by the youthful generation "that has the concern." Service- Learning in Action in Atlanta : Cha.irman : Members: An Up-To- The-Minute Report Sam Williams, Dir ector of t he Atlanta Ur ba.n Corps Don Nel son , Georgi a Te ch Communi ty Services Coordi na.tor Don Roe, Special Assi s tant to t he President of Ci tizens and Southern National Bank Charl e s Pyl es, Associate Profess or, Polit ica.l Science at Georgia St ate College; Stern Int ern Coordinator Tara Swartsel, At l anta Ur ban Corps I nt er n Dan Sweat, De:put y Adminis t rator, Cit y of Atlanta Atlanta Urban Corps Sam Williams explained its purposes as: (1) providing students with the pra.ctical educational �15 expzrience of learning through servi,:!e to tne local cormnunity. (2) giving needed manpower to local agencies and community organizations (3) encouraging students to not only learn about urban problems but to pursue careers in urban affairs. He said that the Atlanta. Urban Corps plans to grow from 220 interns in the summer of 1969 to 1000 interns in the summer of 1970, Also, plans a.re being made for a number of internships during the forthcoming academic year. Georgia. Tech Community Services Office Don Nelson reported that the Georgia Tech community had thought that money could solve the problems of urban America. Now, he said, we are discovering tha.t we can't live in a major city and not respond with some kind of feeling or action. It's no longer a question of money but how one commits himself to what's happening around him that really counts . Dean Miller Templeton and he got together in November, 1969, and found that fifteen or twenty programs were being spons ored by Tech students,so the t wo of them formed the Community Services Coordinating Staff. Their primary objective was to coordinate the pr ojects then operating and to try to get more students and f aculty i nterested and i nvolved. In the last few months he's had troubl e j us t keepi ng up with what' s going on ! Some of t he pr ojects students are i nvolved in are : Hi gh Step, Free Universit y, Techwood Tutorial , YMCA Ins titute of Understanding and the Te ch Acti on Committee. £~£Bank Communit y Act ion Programs Don Roe r eport ed that C & S Bank instituted the "Georgia Plan", �16 a 11 peo:ple to people proC:; ram 11 , i n May of 1968. He said that it was an action program on the part of private enterprise , without government funds, to provide business opportunities to low income and disadvantaged Americans. It is based on simplicity and sincerity and on four basic assumptions: (1) Two of the fundamental principals of democracy are government by reason, not force, and the most good for the most people. (2) Everyone wants to improve his standard of living. (3) The incentive method is the best way to accomplish things. ( 4) Government steps in to f ill needs when business does not. He -said that the 1'Georgia Plan" was inagura.ted in Savannah with a. " spring cleaning" in wh ich most of the volunteers came from two local colleges, Armstrong and Savannah State. This was such a. success that in ensuing months thirteen other Georgia. cities had clean-up operations. In Atlanta., Vine City wa s the area affected. Altogether approximately 74, 800 Georgians have participated in these clean-up endeavors. he s aid , a one day clea n-up won't solve problems . is most i mportant . But , What comes afterwar ds So t he C & S Community Development Corporation was est ablished la.st winter with a. budget of one million dollars. The purpose of t his organization is to pr ovide funds f or down-payment loans so t hat first mortgage home f i nan cing can b e obt ai ned and to provide equity capital f or new busine s ses . So f ar, 1 ,000 fam ilies and t wenty businesses have dir ectly bene fitte d f r om t hese loans . The Ster n I nter ns Charle s Pyl es reported t hat three ye ars ago t he Stern Foundation approached t he American Societ y for Public Administration and said that they had $30 ,000 avail able and would l i ke to sponsor an internship program, specifically for black students in public administr ati on . �17 The challenge wa.s not met at that time, but in the summer of 1968 the Georgia. chapter decided to explore possibilities in this area. After one year of planning fifteen students from eleven colleges and five faculty advisors began a ten week work assignment . in state and local government agencies. From over forty applications, the students chosen were selected on the basis of academic achievement, written expression, personality and character references. Manpower Survey Tara. Swartsel reported that the Department of Labor is conducting a survey to find out how student manpower is being used in Atlanta. One student on each of ten campuses in Atlanta is researching to try to find out what is now available and wha.t the potential is for service-learning a.tea.ch college. When a.11 the reports a.re compiled the schools will be compared and variations will be considered. The Service-Learning Concept looks good, she said, on paper and looks like it would apply to everyone, but how can the concept be applied on all campuses without the curriculum becomi ng "gimicky" ? Curr iculum committees are jealous of cla.ss t ime. They don't want to use a. professor's time and skills and have students taking time out of the classroom unless they see definite re sults in the field work as it r elates to t he cla ssroom. She thinks t his is t he problem t he participants of the service-learning conf erence must keep :for emost i n their minds. Atl ant a 's Urban Obs ervatory Dan Sweat r eported t hat f i ve years ago Rob er t Wood, Under Secret ary of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), saw a nee d f or involvement of the academic community i n t he affairs of t he local community. The �18 mechanism he envisioned wa.s a system of urban observatories in major metropolitan areas. The passage of the 1968 Housing Act enabled HUD to assist in establishing urban observatories in Atlanta., Albuquerque, Baltimore, Kansas City, Milwaukee, Nashville, and Washington, D.C. The Atlanta Urban Observatory is based at Georgia. State College and has a close working relationship with City Hall, from which it originated. It is also in the process of developing linkages with the other colleges and universities in Atlanta. Mr. Sweat said he believed tha.t the Atlanta. program ha.s a headstart because the Urban Corps program, whose philosophy is so close to that of the urban observatory, is already in operation in Atlanta. Address by Lee Heubner Lee Heubner, staff assistant to President Nixon, addressed the Conference at the dinner session on June 30. He struck a note of caution, a note of perception and a note of hope for the participants.: Let's be sure we have projects that make sense in terms of the people being served and the person being educated. Unless we're willing to do this rigorously and precisely and uncompromisingly, I don't think the service-learning program will be as successful as .it really ought to be •..• The critical thing about service-learning is the hyphen .•.. One thing under discussion in the White House is a federally- assisted program to support the position of campus service coordinator, someone to whom the students could visit to inquire about specific opportunities in community service. Also, the service coordinator would discuss with faculty members questions regarding academic credit and curricular changes related to community service. �19 Addl'ess by William Allison Bill Allison, Director of Economic Opportunity Atlanta, spoke on June 30 on the "Needs of Urban America." are troubled times . Our He said that 1'these campuses a.re witnessing a revolutionary r esponse by young people who want to do something about the world they live in. Wha.t happens on campus cannot be separated from what happens in the larger society. " Allison urged cooperation between the academic community, government, and private agencies to solve t he problems of the cities. He expressed a faith that the nAtlant-a Service-Learning Conference is destined to spearhead the development of t his union." long ov-erdue. He sai d that the idea. of cooperation and union was "Now is the time for them to work together." Allison concluded that par ticipation is the key factor and, "service-lear ning i s one way partici pation can be r ealized. " Service-Learning and National Programs The national and i nternational components of service-l earning were highlight ed at a symposium that i ncluded Tom Houser, Deputy Director of t he Peace Corps; H. Jeffrey Binda, Exe cutive As si stant to the Director of VISTA; Paul Cromwell, Special Assistant to the Director of the Teacher Corps and Michael Goldstein, Director of the Urban Corps National Development Office. Dr. Carl Wieck of Morehouse College was the moderator. Noting that the Peace Corps had been in the service-learning business for eight years, Mr . Houser reported that "most returning volunteers say they l earned more than they gave. u Mr. Cromwell said colleges could become more relevant by working with businesses and �20 government agencies in arranging work assignments linked with classroom studies. Mr. Binda stressed the service aspect, saying it was vital, when arranging for aid to the poor and disadvantaged, to assign persons who can do the job well. Mr, Goldstein, former director of the nation's first Urban Corps in New York City, outlined the program in which college students serve with municipal agencies and are funded largely by the College Work-Study Program. The panelists agreed that experience in a service-learning program would be valuable background for entry into a long term service program. Also, it would help the participant to decide whether to apply for such a service program. Remarks by Edward DuCree and Arthur Hansen The final session of the Conference dramatically focused on the diverse and sometimes conflicting interests which must have a part in determining the nature of a service-learning program. Ed DuCree , director of Emory University's Upward Bound Program, called for the examination of goals and effects of current service programs. Quoting from Shakespeare's "Hamlet" , DuCree said the question remains, "to be or not to be. 11 he s tated . Black people want to be , to exist , Service programs which fail to help people to exist as human bei ngs are of l ittle or no use, he said , For exampl e , he said that some tutorial pr ograms i n whi ch white vol unteers teach black ch i ldren have the effect of impr ess i ng on t he childr en the value of being white rather than t eaching them t he a b e's. Dr. Hansen, Pres ident el e ct of Georgia Tech, reminded the audience of the university's traditisma.1 roles of learning and research. �i 21 Service to the community , ,·rhich became a major goal of many universities following the land-grant a.ct of a century ago, is also a legitimate goal, he said. The question is whether service per~ is a learning experience and therefore deserving of academic recognition. Hansen said he would not want to accredit service experiences until he was convinced of their learning inputs. A small demonstration decrying the effect of Georgia. Tech's expansion on nearby residents interrupted Dr. Hansen's speech and led to an extended session in which heated debate gradually gave way to some fundamental problems in the areas of service-learning and black-white relations. A partial report on the exchanges is contained in 'M r. DuCree' s reply to a participant who described the role he was playing. .Mr. DuCree said, you to be a. person." ';We don't want you to play a role; we want �22 Seminar Summaries . :Midway through the inaugural meeting, seminars were held to discuss all aspects of the service-learning concept and to assist participants in selecting a work group. The seminar chairmen were: James Austin, Georgia. .Municipal Association Robert Clayton, Spelman College Clavin Cox, the Atlanta Constitution Phillip~ Ruopp, Peace Corps Russell Williams, Atlanta University No conclusions emerged from the seminars, but among the comments and questions were the following : How is learning-by-serving different from learning-in-the-classroom? The service-learning concept may lead to a radical change in the concept of the university and education in general. Government administrators mu·s t control service-learning programs, not colleges. A consortium of colleges should run the service-learning program in Atlanta. Can cultural empathy be taught? High school students, drop-outs, and housewives should be in servicelearning programs. Urban Corps interns should receive academic credit for their learning experiences. Wha t er:iteria should be applied to matching an intern with an opening to insure th::it pot~. p e r-fht·1nnnoe ;:ind 1An.rnine; wi 1.1 be a·t a high level? These observations, t ogether with the questions posed in Section IV, will be considered by the r e spective work groups. �I' 23 IV. WORK GROUP SUMMARIES The Conference is functioning primarily through its six work groups: service, learning, curriculm and inter-institutional relations, finance,research, and methods and programs. Each work group is to marshal available resources, study in depth its assigned topic, sponsor a session of the Conference, and submit a report describing its observations and reconnnendations leading toward a comprehensive model for a continuing service-lear n i ng pr ogram. Sponsorship and dates of subsequent Conference sessions are as fol lows: Service Learning Curriculum F inance Rese arch Me t hods and Programs Steering Committee August 18 August 19 mid-Se ptember Octobe r November November December Below are summaries of the first wor k group me et ings on July 1 and some of t he questi ons each i s exploring . Service Wor k Group Chairman: Ross Coggins, Regional Dir ec t or of VISTA Ros s Coggins opened the di scus s i on by a sking t hose pre s e n t to mention what services students are now doing or could do in regard t o servicelearning. The dis c ussion of this question raised many others, most of which were left una nswered . I t will be the purpose of t his group t o answer such questions as : (1) What criteria define . relevant services and who should have priority in determining the relevance or potential learning experience of a service-type job? (2) Can agencies and colleges cooperate among themselves and with each other in the rendering of services? (3) Who is to be served: the student, the college, the agency or the people, or a combination of all? �24 (4) Are universities attuned to the needs of the community and can they accept the idea that a service career mode is vital to our society? (5) What should be the size of the service rendered, in comparison with societal needs? (6) Should service be full-time or part-time and how long should it last? (7) What services can agencies accept and what accept youth in service? (8) Does tutoring, etc., satisfy the needs of the "now generation" with their sense of urgency and need to see quick results? (9) What do students think are the major service needs and will the university allow the student to work for meaningful change in the system? kinds of agencies can Learning Work Group Chairman: Sally cantor, Atlanta Urban Corps Intern The meeting of the section on Learning was begun by a description of the Mars Hill Project, its origin and outline. One enthusiastic professor was given a grant to instigate and develop interest in the concept of servicelearning . He looked into curriculum and local service oppor tunities . with a tutorial program and then a recreational program, work for physical education, sociology, etc. It b'egan This be came the ~i e J_n The communi c1:1t.ion which is necessary for this to come about smoothly is possible in a small school. There is a problem in the structure of a large university which makes it almost impossible to integrate this kind of learning. How might this be overcome? Many segments of society are concerned with this kind of l earning taking place. Students are the l argest mass of participants . Thus the training ground for students, i.e. the university, must be changed first. There are places in the traditi onal college stl:ucture which could be changed to be more in line with this new concept. an education major. For example, in the practice-teaching part of Instead of being a. complete b l ock of time at the end of the learning period, it would be more relevant and thus valuable to have the �25 practice-teaching interwoven with the academic study, over a greater length of time. Practical experience makes theory more concrete but it requires a pl~ce to plug into the traditional curriculum. Practice-teaching is an easier area to see the possibilities; but how can this type of learnj og be given academic credit in other courses? You can learn something from anything you do if you are pGrceptive, but to be given academic credit what one is doing must be put to acaa_emic analysis. Learning is not just of one type; it consists of different processes. What kind of learning happens when one is put in a context of people and problem-solving? If the ultimate goal is being sensitive to each other, how can one avoid complete relativism? Perhaps this is only a part of the desired goal and can be fitted into the whole as a matter of degree. It would be valuable to question a.n intern to see if his learning can be classified , i f an analysis can be made of the learning possibilities . It is very important, however, that this not become Step 1, 2, 3 on how to become a successful learner. There is always the problem of how to bring out what has been, or is learned. l>e in g It is difficult to bring life-style to a conscious level where it must be for our purposes. It will be necessary to compare the goals and patterns of both traditional university-learning and service-learning. For example, a university stresses committment to truth, to principle; service stresses committment to people , to becoming involved with those a.round you. In univers ity-le13rriing , stnaent utilized t he full learning pote ntial of the service eA'J)erience. Several suggested elements of t his str uc ture were: seminars, and student reports. facu1 t )r advisors, �27 There were other questions concerning the basic structure of the program. For example: How would service-learning experiences be integrated into the existing departmental structure? On what basis would credit be given? What would be the ratio of hours worked to credit-hours received? How many credit- hours of service-learning could be counted toward graduation? What channels, such as independent study, special programs or seminars with labs, aJ.rea.dy exist which could be used as a. mechanism for giving credit for a service-learning course? Certainly the most valuable product of this initial meeting was an awareness of the complexities of the problems confronting the work group. A number of questions were raised, several others will be focused on at l ater meetings. The following questions a.re a few of those for which the curriculum work group will attempt to provide conclusion. What courses now exist as training for other forms of service which could be relevant to service-learning programs? What inter ...institutional relations now exist which could be utilized and developed for internships and program development? What effects will the service-learning experience have on student expectations in the curriculum area ? What are the potentials of a fa culty consultant ser vice? What a.re the possibilities for utilizing community members a s instructors or resource people within the classroom ? What a.re the possibilities for and problems of cross--~r editing institutions? among Finance Work Group Chairman: Presiding: William Jones, Department of Health, Education and Wel fare Charles Hamblen and Charles Moore , Department of Health , Education and Welfare The first questions raised about funding were : who, how much, and bow? It wa s stated that the program was not to be directed by the Federal gover nment , but t hat t he government should be. a source of funds , pr imarily t hrough l ez ~~sla.tion. �28 lv'T.r. Hamblen reviewed what was available through Federal programs. He said that perhaJ>s the best sources have suffered a cutback in appropriation ( the Cooperative Education Program and Education for Public Service), b~t they might be refunded in the next fiscal year. Mr. HambJ.en was asked how to go about requesting Work-Study funds. He sa.id that the application must be made by an institution by November 1st. If the institution includes a proposal for meaningful off-campus activities it will receive priority in the allocation of Work-Study funds. It was remarked that many colleges did not use a large amount of their funds or did not include descriptions of off-campus activity in their requests for funds. The funding for such a proposal would be 80% federally fund~d and 20% funded by the agency. Discussio~ then centered on the study made by 22 Republican Congressmen concerntng student unrest. Their recommendations were: 1. Don't cut off funds to institutions which have experienced student rebellions. 2. Establish a Na:tional Youth Foundation to encom:age student pa.r ti cipation in community problems. 3. Incr ease funds fo:i;- student ai q. 4. The government should expand its lines of communication wi th stu
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 5, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 9, Folder 5, Document 14

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_005_014.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 5, Document 14
  • Text: ~ J Mayor Ivan Allen A Sam Willi ms , Direc-::i" July 25 , 1969 TO: FROM: DATE: SUBJECT : Possible Viait To New York City Persuant of our rece nt dis c ussion about a pos ible vi it t o Ne w York in c onnection with the Ne w York Urban Corps , I re c eived a call fro m Mayor Lindsay offi c e inquiring about po · s i ble dates you might be available for such a visit . Mrs . Mo es gav e me severa l dates whi c h I passed along to Mayor Lindsay ' aide . Today, I received a call from yor Lindsay ' s taff, stating that they would invite you to spe lt to the New York Urban Corps intern , du.ring the fina l se sion, August 19 . All thi information will be c oming to you soon in a letter from Mayor Lindsay himself. A you suggested, thi would be n ideal time to give more e xposure to the Atlanta U r ban Corp by t king few of our interns with you. Plea e dvil!le me of your a ction after rec iving Mayor Lind ay 's letter . SW/kJJ.r / c c; D n Sweat �
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 5, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 9, Folder 5, Document 1

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_005_001.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 9, Folder 5, Document 1
  • Text: September 10, 1969 Miss Sue Zander Executive Ass is tant 200 26th St . • N. W. Apartment J - 204 Atlanta, Georgia Dear Miss Zander: We are aware of the important contribution that you made to the City of Atlanta through the Atlanta Urban Corps this summer. On behalf of the City, and personally, I wish to express our grate.ful appreciation for your fine work. Sincerely, Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor lAJr:lrd �
  • Tags: Box 9, Box 9 Folder 5, Folder topic: Urban Corps | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017