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  • Tags = Folder topic: Civil Rights bill | 1963 | 1967, Box 16

Box 16, Folder 3, Complete Folder

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_016_003.pdf
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  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 16, Folder 3, Complete Folder
  • Text: TROUTMAN , SAMS,SCHRODER & LOCKERMAN 1600 W ILLIA M-O LI VER BUILDING DAN MACDOUGALD (•ee3-L Q S3) HENRY B. TROUTMAN ROBERT S . SAMS WILLIAM H . SCHRODER A LLEN E . LOCKERMAN T .M. SMITH HENRY B . TROUTMAN , JR . T . M.SMITH , JR . TENCH C.COXE HAROLD C. M~KENZIE,.JR. ROBERT L . PENNINGTON MILTON A . CARLTON, .JR. GERALD P . THURMOND JOHN D . M4=LANAHAN W IL L I AM H. SCHRODER, JR . ATLANTA , GEORGIA 30303 TELEPH ON E September 8, 1966 JACKSON 2-7480 AR E A CODE 404 CABLE A D DR ESS MAESTRO A TLANTA Hono Ivan Allen, Jro Mayor, City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Ivan: Congratulations on your courageous handling of the inexcusable demonstration last Tuesdayo You would be amazed at the number of people who have expressed to me their admiration of your courage., ,t,I~ ~ A AEL: jh en 0 y ~ rm an �T OR E S INCORPORATED OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT September 7 , 1966 POST OFFICE BOX 4358 ATLANTA 2,GEORGIA TELEPHONE 767-74 11 AREA CODE 404 Honorable I van Allen 3700 Northside Drive, N. W. Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mayor: J ust a short note to tell you that my associates who saw or read aoout your actions yesterday join me in congratulating and thanking you for the outstanding courage demonstrated by you. You stood ten feet tall in our eyes and we are all very pruud of you , because of your devotion and courage beyond the call of duty. Sincerely, Carl J . Reith CJR:wc �GEORGE S. CRAFT P . 0. Box 4418 ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30302 �----- ------ -- I -- TELEPHONE 351-4430 MACDOUGALD-WARREN, INC. NORTHSIDE DRIVE, N . W. P . 0 . Box 19695 STATION N ATLANTA,GA.30325 A5PHALT PAVING • READY-MIXED CONCRETE Sept. 8, 1966 Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr., City Hall, Atlanta, Gao Dear Ivan: Having now been a citizen of Atlanta for almost twenty years, I felt sure that the national groups which are interested in accomplishing their own aims with no respect for law and order could not effectuate a riot in this city. I have been greatly disappointed that you had to face the disturbances caused by just a few radicals which tends to overthrow all the fine work that has been done in the negro cormnunity. Your handling of the problem Tuesday could not have been better. We all realize that you acoamplished by your own actions the only possible physical control of the rioters to prevent another "Watts"o Your action will stand in my memory as an act far beyond the call of duty but, I am sure no one can describe what your duty or mine is in such a caseo We all appreciate your fine handling of the situation. EJK/p �7 JOSEPH A. LOGAN 1819 PEACHTREE ROAD, N. E. ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30309 September 9, 1966 Dear Mayor Allen, Though I have not in the past agreed with many of your political stands, I hasten at this time to extend to you my sincere appreciation for your extremely courageous and dedicated behavior during the awful hours of the riot on Tuesday evening. Without the le a d ership which you e xhibite d, tha t t erri fy ing s ituation could and probably would have resulted in a much greater tragedy. You have the heart-felt gratitude of my f amily a nd me. Honorable Ivan Allen Mayor of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia �) TRINITY 6-1501-02 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES, Inc. ALL TYPES OF BUSINESSES HANDLED 'Business establishments and ~al estate 976 Piedmont Avenue, N. E. • • Atlanta 9, Georgia Sept . 8, 1 966 INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY • BUSINESS COUNSELING FOR PURCHASERS • PLANT LOCATIONS • BUSINESS ANALYSIS • Hon . Ivan Allen Jr . Mayo r C ty T.a l t18n ti 3-8. . MANAGEMENT • Dear ~-l:ayor; INVESTMENT PROPERTY • FINANCING • LEASES • I want to tell you how much I appreciate your very fine efforts in handling t he r a ce troubles this week . I think ev ery citizen i n Atlan t a and the country should b e proud of you and your leve l headed approach to the problem • PARTNERSHIPS • NEW VENTURES • RETAIL PROPERTY You have shown people that leadership of the right kind can result in quelling disturbances of t his nature . It is unfortunate that a very few radicals can cause so much strife . So many people blame the entire ne gro race for the actions of a very small minority , who live by stirring up strife . Again congratulation to you on s uch a fine job. It is rewar ding to be a citizen of a city where we have this kind of leadership • • T~ Meml,er Atlanta Real Estate Board �Atlanta Biltmore Atl ant a , Georgi a September 8 , 1966 Dear Mr . Mayor: I do not want the sun to go down this day without my express i ng to y ou the profound admiration I have f or the manner i n whi ch you met Wednesday ' s u p- he v a l. Surely you must be aware by now of the war m outpouring t hat your conduct has brought forth f rom the public . Thi s was s o evident a t the Fulton County Democra tic dinner l as t night t hat I wi shed you too could have been ther e to see and feel it . In g r a titude, Sincerel y , The Honor able Ivan Allen , Mayor City Hall Atlanta , Georgia �R. A. SIEGEL 2783 WYNGATE ROAD. N. W. • ATLANTA 5. GEORGIA September 8, 19 66 Dear Ivan: All of us w ho enjoy the be nef it of your leadership in the City of At lanta should expre ss our inde btednes s to you for the courageous action you took during the disturbance on Tuesday evening. I am just real proud that I know you! You have certainly done a wonderful job this w eek a nd w e ha ve e very re as on to be proud of the leaders hip in our community. I wanted you to know it and I wq:nted to congratulate you. Thank you so much. Be st regards . RAS/ jm Mayor Iva n Alle n City Ha ll Atlanta , Ge org ia / �PRIVATE WIRES TO PRIN CIPAL C ITIES TELEPHONE JACKSON 4 - 0691 CO-MANAGERS RALPH HARRIS GOODBODY & Co. BARNARD MURPHY ESTABLISHED 169 1 MEMBERS SUITE 1414 FULTON NAT'L . BAN K BLDG. NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE AND OTHER PRINCIPAL STOCK J. N. HOM E OFFICE 2 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 4 , N. Y. CA BL E A DDRE SS ' ACCURATE" 5 5 M A R I ETTA S T R E ET, N. W. AND COMMODI T Y ExCHANGES ATLANTA, GA . 30303 September 7, 1966 Mr. Ivan Allen, Jr. 3700 Northside Drive, N. W. Atlanta, Georgia 30305 Dear Ivan, I just wanted to take a moment to congratulate you on the masterful way in which you handled the most trying situation on Tuesday, September 6th. I feel the courage you displayed should have a deterring effect upon further troubles. It made me proud of y ou as the Mayor of Atlanta and of Atlanta, itself. Congratulations ! Yours sinc erel y, /1~ N. Barnard Murphy, Jr . NBM : j 1 �LOUIS MONTAG EUGENE CALDWELL JOHN N . WALL, JR . ANTHONY MONTAG SOLON P. PATTERSON MONTAG & CALDWELL IN V ESTMENT COUNSEL IID0-13 F I RST N A TIONAL B A NK B UI LDING ASSOC I A TES MINER L . RICHARDS ENGLI S H THORNWELL JAMES 0 . F'ATTERSON DAVID M . WILDS FRANCES SULLIVAN CAROLINE SELDEN ATLANTA 3, GEORGIA September 9, 1966 The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Dear Ivan: Congratulations on the outstanding leadership you displayed during the recent disturbance. You made me proud of you and of our fine city. Be st r e g ards. Sinc e r e ly, IP{}ft(;7 Eug<;;;;JCt ldw e ll EC: e j 522 - 02 10-0216 �GEORG IA INSTITU T E O F T ECHNOLOGY ATLANTA , GEORGIA 30332 OFFICE OF THE VICE PRESIDENT FO R A C A DE M IC A FFA I R S September 9, 1966 The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mayor Allen: A new measure of excellence was established yesterday through your firm, courageous, and fair handling of the disturbances in the Stadium area. Thank you, Mr. Mayor, for showing Atlanta and the entire country what true, responsible leadership is. Atlanta's greatness is in good hands. f e~y,./ ~ E. A. Trabant Vice President for Academic Affairs EAT:rw �PARSONAGE 377-6212 OFFICE JACKSON 2-9322 Inman :f)ark methodist (thurch 1015 EDGEWOOD AVENUE, N . E . ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30307 September 9, 1966. Mayor Ivan Allen, J r. , The City Hall Atlanta , Ga . Dear Mr . Mayor, As one of the ministers of the city of Atlanta, let me congr atulate you on your forthrightness and courage i m meeting t he situati on that arose in the Capitol Avenue Ormond Street are a on Tuesday afternoon this week . Ther e i s just no excuse for s uch r ioting as was precipitated by the "Snick" leadership. I have s omet imes wondered if policemen are not t oo quick to use their guns, which was t he excuse used in thi s . inst ance . And I have not al ways been i n agreement with certain stands t hat you have t aken wit h r espect to our city. But I have appreciated t he manner in whic h all along you have tried to work t o help the Negr o peopl eo We need courageous l eadership in this f i el d, and you have shown courage again and again. You certainl y acte d with c ourage last Tuesday o I commend you from the bottom of my heart ..about that. The reluctance of the white mind to welcome a new day in race relationships is deplorable, and l ays itsel f l iable to just such as the radical leadership perpetrated on l ast Tuesday. But we don ' t need the Stokely Carmichaels and those of his ilk who foster such actions and attitudes. They do not help the Negro. They hurt him. Thank you, Mayor Allen, that you moved unhesitatingly and with such courage to t ry to halt an angry situation. We sincerely hope that we may have no more of what Mr . Carmichael and his gang stirred up that afternoon. Gratefully and cordially yours, tif4 L. F. VanLandingham, Pastor Inman Park Methodist Church �A. G. SMITH, Pres ident CHAS. H. SMITH, Y.-Pres. Phone JAckson 2-4270 REAL ESTATE LOAN COMPANY 710 ATLAN TA FEDE RA L SAYINGS BUILDING 22 MAR IETTA STREET, N. W. ATLANTA 3, GA. Sep tember 9, 1966 Honorabl e Ivan Al l en, J r. Mayor, City of At l anta Ci ty Hal l Atlanta, Ge or gia 30303 Dear Ivan: Shor t l y after you be came our mayor, we recall t he tra gic event t ha t caused you t o set a s id e your own personal grief and f eel i ng s of loss and f ly oversea s to a ttend t o the busine ss of be i ng Mayor of Atlan ta. Therefore we wer e not at a ll surpr is ed, but merely pr oud when you again were f ound attend i ng to the job a s Mayor during t he race melee the other ni ght. This time you a cted without regard t o your personal sa fety and s e curity . Many of us wondered what our pa r t s s hould have been in this , Ivan , but , not knowi ng, had to a llow you to take the fie l d alone i n defence of the name and good repu t a t i on of our great city . Your pre s ence at the site until there was no further cause for fear allowed the rest of us to accept the situation with confidence that what did result would result - the law supported and order restored . We want you t o convey our thanks t o our fine police force who themselves could have been more secure in failing to retain constant control of the many and varied facets of such a situation. We all glorit~and are proud of the many compliments now given to you and them by su ch national figures as the Vice Pre sident. If in any of the worki ngs t hat will be required to prevent the influence of SNCC from again being effective in our city, please d o not hesi tate to call upon me in whatever fas hion you think I might be able to serve. ~ ly~ Charles H. Smith �WILLIAM C . BARTHOLOMAY ATLA N T A STADIUM A TL A NTA, GEORG IA 3 031 2 September 8, 1966 Personal & Confidential Dear Ivan: I just want to tell you how proud I am in regard to the magnificent manner in which you handled developments this week. For goodness sakes though don't take unnecessary personal risks since we live in a rather crazy world and anything could happen. With best regards. 4·u) Cordially, Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. City Hall Atlanta, Georgia (Dictated by phone) �ESTA B LISHE D 1862 MITCHELL A T HAYNES STS., S. W. ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 THE REVEREND SAMUEL W. WILLIAMS PASTO R R E S I D E N C E CHURCH OFFICE , MURRAY 8-0206 PLAZA 5-2·3 52 September 8 , 1966 Honor able Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor , City of At lanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mayor Allen: The members of Friendshi p Baptist Church in regular business se ssi on on Wedne sday night, Sept ember 7 , 1966 , unanimously voted to express t o you their deep and sincere appre ciati on for the courageous leadership you gave the city in t he crisi s it faced on Tuesday. We join other responsible citizens in deploring violence and all efforts on the part of any person or group of persons deliberate l y to stir up troubl e . As a congregation we stand for the order and progre ss of our city. We l ook with di sfavor, however, upon those continuing conditions whose existence provide the breeding grounds for disorder. This people committed as we are to the Judeo-Christian way of life pledge our full support to you and ot hers who will work to make this city a just one. Atlant a can become truly great with all of us sharing in the effort to make her so. By order of the church, ' '.-~ ~~ (Mrs.) Leila M. Terr{ ' Church Clerk ~ \ t > ·W~ - The Rev. Dr. Samuel Pastor SWW:r w. Williams �ATLAS FINANCE COMPANY, INC. \ \ EXECUTIVE OFFICES 262-264 SPRING STREET, N. W. ) ROBERT R . SNODGRASS ATLANTA , GEORGIA 30303 MAILING ADDRESS PRESIDENT JACKSON 4-8617 POST OFFICE BOX 1095 A TL AN T A, GEORGIA .30301 September 9, 1966 The Honorable Ivan Al len,Jr. Mayor of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia My dear I van: Mildred and I h ave just returned from a vacation trip up in Northern Michigan. We we re saddened by the unpl easantness here in Atlan t a, but were tr emendously and favorably impressed with the excellent and precise manner in which you handled the situation. It was our impr ess i on that the na tional media -press, television, and radio -- dealt ve r y kindly with the magnificent manner in which you handled the situation. We were proud of you, my friend; very proud of you. Mos~ RRS:g LrfR. ely, odgrass �L16:22, 29 December 2017 (EST) l'\_~<11.il'i. G . CONNER HENRY DIRECTOR LABORATORIES: ~ OJ ~~Ell$143.215.248.55 16:22, 29 December 2017 (EST) DAN L . HENRY ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR clonsul/iizcr and.._.Yhza/baca /J . /_ JOHNSON C Ol.UMBUS COUNCILMAN G EORG E BULLOCK A THENS AL!llERM'A N CECIL TURN ER MAYOR JOHN C. EDENFIELD "IHOMASTON A."tLAN,TA ALDERMAN J. J . S AVANNAH SHOOB MAYOR AUBREY E . GREENWAY ROSW E.LL MAYOR W. A. B OWEN STATEsBORO CITY MANAGER GEORGE D . ADKINS PRESIDENT, CITY MANAGERS' SECTION THOMASVILLE CITY CLERK R . L . HUDGINS P R ESIDE NT, C I TY CLERKS' SECTrON D ECATUR C ITY A TTORN E Y JULIAN W EBB PRESIDENT, C ITY ATTORNEYS ' SECT ION DONALSONVILLE �LAW OFFICES HENRY J. MILLER ALEX P. GAINES PHILIP H . ALSTON,JR. ALSTON , MILLER & WM. B . SPANN , JR . GAINES TWELFTH FLOOR CITI ZENS & SO UTHERN NATIONAL BANK BUILD I NG FRANCIS SHACKELFORD MARTIN H . PEABODY JAMES L. ALSTON JAMES E . THOMAS ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 DANIEL B . HODGSON HEWITT H . COVI NGTON JOHN L . MOORE , JR. EDWARD P . ELLI S LLOYD T . WHITAKER ROBERTS. BEAUCHAMP L. NEIL WILLIAMS, JR. 524 - 3241 CAB LE - ' ALSIB'" ROBERT C . A LSTON (1 873 - 19 38) ARNOLD C. MOORE PHILIP H . ALSTON JOHN R . CRENSHAW MICHAEL H . TROTTER (1880 - 1982) September 8, 1966 MICHAEL A . DOYLE RONALD L. REID CARL H . COFER, JR . JOHN K . TRAIN (IJ B . HARV EY HILL, JR . ROBERT G . HOLT ROBERT G . EDGE PAUL R . ERVIN , JR . OF C OUNSEL WM. HART SIBLEY C . O . J OHNSON ROBERT L . DODD , JR. Dear Ivan: We are all very proud of you. Best Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr . Mayor of the City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia reg~ �JA. 5-4462 THOMAS H. READ. PRESIDENT READ CONCESSIONS COMPANY 30 COURTLAND ST.. S. E. ATLANTA, GA. 30303 September 8, 1966 Bono Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mr. Mayor: You were magnificent during our recent unpleasantness, and I want you to know you have my greatest admiration. Cordially yours, tt~omas Ho R ~ THR:man -,;: �1174 Zimmer Driv e , N. E. Atl anta, Georgia September 8, 1966. Dear Ivan: Th er e are ma ny r eason s why I value your friendship so highly. Foremost among th ese, of cours e , is th e f a ct tha t your fath er was one of my staunchest supporters during the many years I was with th e Atlant a Retail Merchants Association. He was a g reat encourageme nt to me a nd s tood behind me in everything I did. I shall r ememb er al wa ys tha t you cancell ed an out-of-town engagement to be th e speaker at th e t es timonial g iv en Reba and me by the Ass ociation shortly b efor e my r etir ement. That a lone would endear you to me for ev er. Th en you ha d the vision and courage to g iv e At l anta Bi g Ba s eball is my favorit e sport, a nd League Baseball a nd Football. it is wonderful to ha ve the opportu nity to see right here in Atlanta a ll of th e best baseball play ers in th e world. And when Atl anta g ets into a World Seri es , as I beli eve s h e will within the next f ew year s, I just hop e I shal l be fortuna t e enough to s ee some of tho se games . Just r e c ently you ha v e co ndu ct ed yours elf magnificently in conn ect ion with the Fir emen's Strik e; and what now a pp ears to have been a Castro- inspir ed riot, throug h some hot-h eaded revolutionar i es in our midst. Well, there are many ot her reas ons, a nd I just felt, in a time of great stress , that you should be told your fri ends are st a ndi ng solidly behind you in your efforts to make our beloved Atla nt a a bea con-light city f or all to see. Cordially & Sincer el y k- L. L. Austin. �THOMAS F. CHOYCE A TTO RN EY AT LAW SU ITE 111 4 • WILL I AM O LI VE R ATLANTA, GEORGIA T E 1-E P HONE B UILD ING 30303 524-7 73 1 September 8, 1966 PERSONAL The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor of the City of Atlanta % City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Sir: I think that you have run a remarkable show with respect to both the firemen situation and the recent near riot . Please let this act as my way of expressing my personal pride in being connected with your administration . Sincerely yours , .Jt_ d-~ Thomas F . Choyce �This l etter ,-ra.s s ent t o the Atlanta Journal and Atlanta Cons titution today . ep r 19, 1966 To th &iitor: It 1 by au APFRBX!IATIO D I in ho etJa' giving~ t citifl ns of A ted ~ of th illu tr1 n IV ) ma,,or. ( u ll.iJ',lg po ibl r1o ti ted by ALIE He &mu:'~V nt to their f t or A bil top to ing jo tl riotins S O n. into it • t �0LD FUDD" P . Oo BOX 4541 , ATL.NTA , GEORGIA. 11 30302 Atlanta , Ga , Septo 19 ., 1966 . Hayor Ivan Allen Jr. 11 Ha ll , · Atla nt a , Georgia o %City Dear Hr . Alle n., J us t t o l e t you know t ha t you have my p ersona l admir ati on and approva l of yo ur han dl i n~ of t he r e ce nt rac i al di st urban ce s i n our ci ty . As one of your very f ir s t s uppor t ers for t he of fic e of mayor I was on e of t he small number of ci t izen s t ha t wer e not s urprised a t your displ ay of couraee whe n t he ch ip s were down ., as i t was what I had anti cipat ed fr om a fie l d gr ade officer,( Ma jor ) from our war . a. wor l d war 2, and this was what di cated my writing a let ter to the edit ors t hat appeared in t he At lant a J ournal of Sept . 15t h is s ue in support of your act io n. Your acti on as you kn ow has attracted national attention, and you may be pressured to accept 2nd spot on a national ticket o I still have your l ot ter t el l ing me that you only wish d to be mayor of Atlanta , and did not want any national office . I thought your decision wi3e at the time , and still t hi nk you would hove more political influence as mayor of a great city than as a nveep" on any ticket nationall y , altho it seems obvious t o me t hat "Bobby" Kennedy is giving you serious consideration as a possibl e runni ng n1ate IF he should head a national ticket f or the Democratic Party, as you'd be a natural .for him despite the difference in your ages , looking at it from the practical view that the Kennedy money can take the N. East , Ohio , Illinois and the far West ( California ) but no amount of mone~ can carry the South for Bobby Kennedy l Texas woula at least split 0-50 for him, the anti - LBJ vote o • • • as I see it a If offered such a deal and you wish to try it in the future, my offer of help for you is still open and I still have a heavy political following in most of the States . We were unable to put Sam Yorty over in California BUT it was a close one •••• and make no mistake about it Sam Yorty is a good man . He was, in our war, Capt~ Sam Yorty, Air Corp, attached to the 3rd ~ o n Leyte in the Pacifica o •• but I agree uith the majority of the people of our city that Atlanta needs your proven leadership, most especially during these trying times of racial unrest along with rapid economic ero,-,th• and I hope that even tho offered such a post y~ l chose to remain in Atlanta, C~ Sincerelyi Edgar P. Scott, ,., ~ ,,0 . Box 451.~l , Atlanta, Gaa �1492 South Gordon Street, S.W. Atlanta, Georgia September 12, 1966 Mayor Ivan Allen City Hall Atlanta, Georgia We are very proud, Mayor Allen - - - - - - - - - - - - - - of the wonderful spirit which you showed to Atlanta, Georgia, and yes, even the entire country during the recent riot in the Negro community\ As maey of us feel, we are moving too slowly in the slum clearances, both for Negroes and Whites, but I also realize this problem cannot be solved overnight, and to a degree, we will always have problem areas in housing especially. I do feel, hoever, that anyone, whether he be Negro or White, who fails to obey the laws of our cities, states, and Federal government, should be punished. I felt that you were the person for the job as Mayor, I voted for you, I have not always agreed with your thinking on every subject, but I do pledge my full support to a man as yourself, who will take the stand and back law and order in our City, as you did the other night. May you have many years in which to serve our City, as I feel that your leadership in our great City of Atlanta has been a 11 booster 11 for Atlanta, Georgia, and even the Southl Sincerely yours, ~ -~~ ;??,~ {Mrs.) Bobbie M. Sledge 1492 South Gordon Street, S.W. Atlanta, Georgia �GRIZZARD ADD HAAS SUITE 30!5, CARNEGIE BUILDING TELEPHONE !52!5-4821 Funo RRISmri CRIDPRlriOS • SPECIAL PRomonons 133 CARNEGIE WAY , N ,W. ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 September 16, 1966 Honorable Ivan Allen , Jr. Mayor, City of Atla nta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Dear Ivan: I am very, very proud of you. My delay i n writin g this i s because I had hoped to say it in person. But a heavy schedule at the office and heavy responsibilities at home keep me tied up. We are all so proud of your personal courage, your magnificent leadership and your unbelievable patience. I have always believed that when England was at its greatest , it was due largely to the fact that the privileged class believed in and prac t iced the spirit of "Noblesse Oblige". When you and Louise paid the condolence call on the negro mother, it occured to me that your example and this same spirit will lead Atlanta to greatness too. Leonard j oins me i n adm iration and warm regards to both of you. Please take care of yourself and call on me whenever I can help. Since rely, Mrs. Leonard Haas P.S. Please tell George that we admired his courage too. �...... . . - U.S. News & World Report Exclusive Interview- A NEGRO BUSINESSMAN SP A S HIS MIND Witt racial demonstrations, now spreading ocrou a,e nation, solve the Negro's problems? Is the N gro actually a "second-class citizen"? If so, who is to blame-the white man? You g t unexpected answers to these and other questi0ns from a leading Negro busine~sman. he is S. B. Fuller, intervi~wed in Chicago by a member of the staff of "U.S. New!> & World Report." His conclusions: A Negro, like anybody els~, can get ahead only by hard work and enterprisa. .<\t CHICAGO of opr ,rlumty clo lo U,e Jll Ill > 'I n ( PHI ht l .. 111 · \\'orl l .ltt>pm·t. Ju , l) S EV.'i & W R,O REP RT Asnu,1 19 19 �Mr Fuller ,nsp cts Born of poor parents in Louisiana, Mr fuller went to ~,honl only 0\ for OS the si,:th grade. Moving to Chicago as o roung r,,o 1, he started the fuller Product! Company 1n l 93.5 on capital of $2 5. Today its g10H soles coine to more thori IO million d1Jllo1s a year. While h oppose~ the vi~ s rind toc. ,cs bc1 ,g used b)· militant' Negro s, Mr. Fu"ier descr·bes h111Hclf os on "integrotion15t' -pointing out thnt S 8. ful er ut !i8, hos reached o level of b,isint'U s ~ Ce$ o toined bv ' w ncn- while or Ne91(), In odditi n to the Fuller f'rod ~ Co ,pony, wh•ch produces o no•,ooolly known line of co,fl' trcs ond all, .d produc,s, he controls t'igh ol r co• orolton A'Tlong them i~ o de rntment ~tc-re 1n Chi ago, or ol tote tr.i ;n ew York, ur "Couri , ' choin of ne paper serving Negro readers 111 (h rogo N "" V rk Deir nd Pithb p rations at his cosmetics plant ,n Chicago 0 non-1 ot h1\ mployes ,.,,e w!ii:e, iijh. ti I , , 11• j) I p, I I ' f11,d u '\1 11 f l..11 h ( ,.;IOI' I 1,Jlt t 11\,! ~uH1 frn tit • 'I 1 (!1•111 Ill \r,tlll 1 ti1 ·~ ' p, op \ l t•, . , \ 'Ji 1 l•t ., 11 , 1, a'I 1 )l1 d , ,.,, \ I I l ,\a1,011t\ f I I I< O -\r • 1111' !\lad, 111 iirn 11, II 1·1 p111 I ir. tin• 1111 l' t' .I \ t •ro ')JII .\ I I ti C ' h h Ill ll,n~ ,,, 1I • llll 11d -~ m I (,I ltll'tl 1 .tt l I, Ii, l' i.11 It, ]1o1 I ( " I', I 11 th, t ,. I 111 I, l1111,.. l 11 \ II I· pt t,, I I },t ,I I ' I II 1t rt~• C ti ' .. d i I, I ti I t 1• • I , I r H fI 111, II\ ' l!:,ll 11 , ,.. t ( I h.. , m H 11 1 , , t( 1rout ir1111 d (1 11 :11 , I prt •, 59 EWS J W Rl0 RfPORl, A,,g• I IY, l9t-3 �INTERVIEW With a Negro Businessman • • • 11 Negroes. must learn to risk their capital 11 Q \ h t rnuld be your 111h ice. today to a voung ~t'gt'O comim:; nut uf ,chool? ft' 11l II oti l'I du I t!.t \ I I , , 1·, p r jl 111 thool ,1,,J ~d ,1 ![O(',l ,•du, ,1t1011. It' 1101 ilp t,1 th, tea, hl'r to S('(' tl,at lu c,t.b it. It•, 1 1p t I tl,L stud, nt \ h,•11 .1 ,·~:,, ch1ld ww~ to ,·lwol, 1·,l ll.1 .t ICl I tr,tll ' I h, \\ nrk ·1 ht·1,, 11111 Ii,• L' I',\( C SC"lt N l ! '.:i, lOMMt I II t J O I NT COM/Ill I 11 ! ( , f l , \ I 1MI ( I tJEHGY OL-M\)C f1A l ll i 1L\{Yt"llMt,1IIIL L O LMOC.IU\r1l. ,.,il.1 l-!JrH.i l Of,H.•1!Tl f. 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  • Tags: Box 16, Box 16 Folder 3, Folder topic: Summerhill riot response | Atlanta | favorable | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 16, Folder 5, Document 147

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_016_005_147.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 16, Folder 5, Document 147
  • Text: �Several hundred demonstrators were forced to stand on Dexter Ave1me in front of the State Capitol at Montgomery. On the night of March 10, 1965, these demonstrators, who knew that once they left the area they would not be able to return, urinated en masse in the street on the signal of James Forman, SNCC ExecJJtiVe Director. "All right," Forman shoute<)l, "Everyone stand up and relieve yourself." Almost everyone did. Some arrests were made of men who went to obscene extremes in exposing themselves to local police officers. �The True SELMA Story Albert C. (Buck) Persons has lived in Birmingham, Alabama for 15 years. As a stringer for LIFE and managing editor of a metropolitan weekly newspaper he covered the Birmingham demonstrations in 1963. On a special assignment for Congressman William L. Dickinson of Alabama he investigated the Selma-Montgomery demonstrations in March, 1965. In 1961 Persons was one of a handful of pilots hired to support the invasion of Cuba at the Bay of Pigs. His story on this two years later led to the admission by President Kennedy that four American flyers had died in combat over the beaches of Southern Cuba in an effort to drive Fidel Castro from the armed Soviet garrison that had been set up 90 miles off the coast of the United States. After interviewing scores of people who were eye-witnesses to the Selma-Montgomery march, Mr. Persons has written the articles published here. In summation he says, "The greatest obstacle in the Negro's search for "freedom" is the Negro himself and the leaders he has chosen to follow. CONTENTS Page 2 Black Kni_g ht of the Civil Rights Movement In ten short years Martin Luther King has risen to a · position of leadership and political influence never before approached by a Negro in America. Many people in both races today question his associations and his ultimate goals. Down what road ,is King leading his race in the United States - is it toward freedom, or is it back into slavery? Sex and Civil Rights - The True Selma Story Page 4 Was the widespr.ead misbehavior prevalent on the Selma-to-Montgomery march onlyto-be-expected youthful protests against established mores, or was it an integral part of the planned demonstration, calculated to provoke and to incite. Here are sworn statements of eye-witnesses. Bayard and Ralph, Just a Couple of the Boys Page 13 In a so-called Christian movement morality would seem to play an important part. Here are the unsavory police and court records of the leaders of the civil rights movement. How "Images" Are Created Page 16 A photograph, which stops a split-second of action, can say anything an editor wants it to say. Here is the story, by a LIFE "stringer" of how the Birmingham " image" was created. Page 20 Martin Luther King and Communism The complete files of a Communist front organization were taken in a raid in New Orleans. These files are a documented record of more than 25 vears of subversive activity, mostly in the field of civil rights. They offer conclusive· evidence of Martin Luther King's Jong and intimate association with known Com1:11unist Party mem~ers working in an organization which was set up by the Commumst Party of the Uluted States· for the express purpose of subverting the civil rights movement in the South. Copy rig ht I 965 - Esco Publ ishers, Inc. - Birmin gham, A labama �Black Knight Of The Civil Rights Movement Selma and Montgomery, Alabama, were visited in March, 1965 by thousands of sincere people who believed that they participated irt a holy crusade for human dignity and civil rights. Among these thousands were priests, nuns, ministers and reU::ious leaders from throughout the nation. They came, they believed, to bear witness to Christ's admonition that "In as · much as ye have done it unto one of the least of th~se my bretheren, ye have done it unto me." * ·~ * * Selma, however, was neither inspired nor created by these well motivated and sincere thousands. The fact that they believed they were right, the fact that a civil rights cause, per se, which inspired their presence in Selma may be just, the fact that their motives were beyond reproach, does nothing to mitigate the fact that they were misguided. Selma and Montgomery were targets chosen by the leaders of civil rights organizations in a long range campaign to exploit the travails of a minority group in this country. The leadership, the direction and the control of the civil rights movement is in the hands of those who organize and run the communist conspiracy to subjegate the entire world. This conspiracy we recognize as a threat to the peace and security of the worldand we fight hard against it all over the world. It is also a threat to the peace and security of this nation, and it operates among other places here in this country behind the cover of the civil rights movement. It is a· good cover. Dr. Martin Luther King, head of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference , one of the sponsors of the TWO Selma - Montgomery demonstration, has even persuaded the President of the United States to parrot the catch-phrase "we shall overcome" before a joint session of the U. S. Congress. King has been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. Any attack on King today is ·almost automatically assumed to be an attack on the Negro's search for justice, freedom and equality. The truth is, however, Martin Luther King is .tied directly to a communist conspiracy whic_h is aimed at destroying every vestige of human dignity, individual freedom and, incidentally, civil rights. .,. * * * * W h e n an Alabama Congressman, William L. Dickinson, attacked tl:ie moral degeneracy which characterized_ the behavior of a hard-core element of demonstrators who participated in the Selma-to-Montgomery march, he was, himself, widely attacked for his protest. When he said that men dressed as clergymen participated in these activities, he was attacked for smearing the church. He was called a liar and accused of spreading "garbage." The "garbage" was not of the Congressman's making, but it was there . It was there by design. It was an integrnl part of the whole operation, and it was calculated to incite and to provoke. These are not s i m p 1y youthful protestors against established mores. These are professional and semi-professional agitators who know what they are doing. If they, and the insufferable indignities they inflict on the decent people in the communities where they appear, were not desired in the civil rights movement it would take only a word from Dr. King to have them removed. Dr. King did not give the word in Selma. Nor will he in Boston, Washington, San Francisco or wherever he decides to strike next. People in towns and citi!l,', which are future targets for King and his "movement" should prepare themeselves for the debauchery, drunkeness and open, promiscuous sexual activity which occurred in Selma and Montgomery. ~ * )c What the people of the United States must learn is that no honest person in the South today will deny that Negroes in this country have been the victims of prejudice, discrimination and injustice. No honest person in the South today will deny the Negro's right to full citizenship, equal opportunity and an end to personal indignities they have been subjected to in the past because of tl}eir race and color. And no one in the United States today should fail to recognize that because the Negro's cause is just and his protest legitimate, both he and the white Southerner are particularly attractive victims for those who would use this cause, and this protest, for their own divisive purposes. Dr. Martin Luther King is one of these. This black knight sits astride the white horse of the civil rights movement. And Dr. King, if he is not checked will ride ' it to its death. ~** " Non-violence" is not Dr. King's weapon. Non-violence would actually destroy King-if he allowed it to prevail. Violence is King's weapon. He must have it. Violence and civil disorder are King's meat and bread. It is what sustains him. He uses it to divide the South �from the rest of the nation. And in his efforts he has had a big assist from the national press and other communications medja. Today, almost anywhere in the world, the name " Birmingham" automatically calls to mind vicious police dogs, thug cops, bombs, and firehoses mowing down innocent Negro children on the city streets. This " image" is as phony as a three-dollar bill. In Birmingham, and Alabama, there are violent uncontrollable elements of society. These are not peculiar to Alabama. There are large prison populations in every state in the Union which attest to the fact that there are violent and uncontrollable members of society in every state . The problem is one which involves frailties of human nature, uncontrollable itself. It is not a problem created by some ba.sic bestiality confined to members of the white race who live below the Mason-Dixon Line. According to the results of recent polls only. a small percentage of people in the United States outside the South believe that Negroes can register to vote in the South. Martin Luther King says Negroes can't register and, unfortunately, most of the nation's press media goes right along with him in support of his "voter registration drive" - without attempting to learn the facts . The truth is King's drive in Selma and the Black Belt counties of Alabama is a drive to register every illiterate in the statewhich happens to be a violation of the laws of the State of Ala bam a, just as it is a violation in many other states outside the South. King is already beginning to talk Martin Luther King and James Forman, Executive Director of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee during the Selma-Montgomery demonstrations. The hand at the right is that of a demonstrator who is attempting to unfurl for clearer identification the United Nations flag. Many people object to King's use of the United Nations flag in his demonstrations as reflecting his new emphasis on the civil rights movement as a world-wide "class struggle." about the civil rights movement as a part of a world-wide " class struggle ." He also suggests -we should pull out of Viet Nam . Next he will probably have something to say about the Dominican Republic and Cuba. When he does, it's a safe bet that his recommendations will follo w a line which serves best the interests of the communist conspiracy . But then why not ? For years King has been on intimate terms, and has worked closely, with people and organizations dedicated to the communist cause . The churches and churchmen, (the biggest single threat to communist ambitions throughout the world ) when they lend their support to King, should consider carefull y the garden path down which they are being led . In a time of much physical insecurity a nd spiritual uncertainty, clergymen must often feel a sense of inadequacy to meet the growing demands of their calling. The place to correct this, however , is at home- not in the ranks of King's marchers in Selma, Alabama. In Montgomery, late in February, 1964, Nobel Peace Prize winner Martin Luther King had this to say: "To the State of Alabama and its people , you had better fasten your seat belts. There will be no peace or tranquility until the Negro has had his conquest. .. " In Birmingham, in the summer of 1963, Martin Luther King was asked by a young white man (one of King's supporters who feared for his physical safety in forthcoming planned demonstrations) if he, King, thought it would be necessary for him to take an active part in the planned demonstrations. Dr. King said it ·was not necessary. "You don 't have to demonstrate," King said. "We ·don 't want you to. We have enough idiots out there to take care of all that ." ,:, For sheer hypocrisy there has been nothing equal to Dr. Ma rtin Luther King since Judas Iscariot. THREE �NO BOOZE? N B C commentator Charles Quinn testified at length on the Huntley - Brinkley program that .there had been no drinking in evidence on the Selma-to-Montgomery march . Quinn said that he had accompanied the marchers all the way. The only evidence he saw was one beer can -and that was his own. Not that it makes all that much difference, but just to keep the record straight, and Mr. Quinn along with it, the pictures on this page were taken at the Montgomery Municipal Airport on the night of March 28 (following the ,departure from Montgomery of thousands of demonstrators who had gathered in front of the State Capitol earlier in the · afternoon . The case of Scotch W hi s k e y, incidentaliy, was empty. SIX �? Here, however, for those who are willing to accept the kind of evidence which 1s accepted in our courts, are some of the affidavits of people who were on the spot and have taken oath that what they state is the truth. AFFIDAVIT My name is Mrs . Nettie Adams, and live at 3555 Prince George Drive in Montgomery, Alabama. I am now and have been a member of the City Police Department of Montgomery for over five (5 ) years. On March 15 , 1965, at about 9:30 P.M., my husband and I were returning home from my mother's home at 622 South Hull Street. We knew that there had been some trouble with demonstrators at High and Jackson Streets. We took Adams Street to avoid this, but as we approached Adams· and Ripley Streets, we noticed a crowd of people. We stopped to see what was going on. There were white" and Negro people all over the Ripley Street side of St. Margaret's I ? ? Hospital and across the street, between Price's Drug Store and Powell Electric Company. They were all kissing and hugging. This one particular couple on St. Margaret's lawn was engaged in sexual relations, a· white woman (a skinny blonde ) and a Negro man. After they were through, she wiggled out from beneath him and over to the man lying to the left of them on the lawn and started kissing and caressing his face . At this point, a detective's car pulled up nex.t to the group over by Price's Drug Store, and my husbartd said, "Let's get out of here; this is no place for a man to have his wife." We left immediately. * The day they marched on the Courthouse, the policewomen had to work traffic downtown, and after a few hours my husband came down and he ,and I went into Chris' Hog Dog Stand for a coffee break. When we came out, two of the other ladies went in for a break. Just as they went inside, a group came from the Courthouse, hollering and carrying on, saying, "We are Communists and we belong to the John Birch Society." They stopped in front of Chris' and this red-haired woman and Negro man started making love and embracing one another, as if they wanted someone to try and stop them . I stayed there because I was afraid they were going in Chris' and I wanted to be able to call for help. I didn't want our two policewomen or anyone to get hurt. On March 31, the day they had the funeral to place the ten coffins on the Capitol steps, I was placed at the intersection of Wilkerson and Montgomery Streets to hold the traffic . As they passed me, they started laughing real loud and some of them hollered, "She's a segregationist, you can tell ; she just looks like one." At one time during the day, before the parade started, there was a crowd gathering on the Dexter Avenue Bap-tist Church steps and in front of the church. A Negro boy· was lying backwards across the hood of a SEVEN _I �The interesting thing about the human race is that it comes in so many different sizes and shapes. Here is a good cross section at Montgomery in the persons of some of the demonstrators who took part in the mar ch from Selma. The boots are not recommended hiking equipment. EIGHT �car parked in front of the church and a white girl was leaning over him from the other side of the car, kissing him about the face . About 5:30 that evening, March 31, a group of Negroes coming from the demonstration was in the second block of Dexter Avenue. They started yelling all together, " Them white sons of bitches , we will cut their asses off." I called for a patrol car. They were headed for the first block of Dexter, and just as they got to the corner they started singing r eal loud, " We Shall Overcome," and " We Want Our Freedom, and We Want It This Year." The officer working the first block of Dexter, M. E . Furr, noticed them and began to follow them. They split up. He followed a group of four into H. L. Green's and back out. By this time, the patrol car was there and we approached them and told them they were under arrest. There were three (3) juveniles and one adult, Babette Hadley, 26 years old, who lived on Ludie Street in Montgomery. Babette Hadley started fighting Officer Rodgers, saying that she wasn 't getting in that damned car ; he would have to kill her first and she was ready to die for the cause. She had an umb rella and was swinging it at him. He took it away from her and put her in the car . After she got to jail, they discovered that she was drinking. I called the jail to see if she had made . bond or if I would have to go to court the next morning. I talked with Security Officer Lawr ence who said that she had not made bond'. I told him that it looked as though I would be in court the next morning. He said, " Yes, if she sobers up enough." I stated that I had not known that she was drinking, since I had been warned by my supervisors not to get close and risk getting hurt, but that I knew that she was acting strangely. He said that she was drunk. I called Chief Lackey, because I knew that he had been tied up at the Capitol that day and probably did not know about this arrest. He said that he didn 't know about it and would call the jail. I later called the jail and .talked with Sgt. Grady Arnette. He told me that Chief Lackey had called and that she had quieted down and made a phone call , and that she would probably make t: wnd . I asked him if she was drunk, a nd he told me that she was dri nking quite a bit. She didn't i;nake bond and was charged with disorderly conduct and fined $25 and costs in court the next morning. I also worked at the jail two nights when we had to make quite a few arrests . I shook down the women pris- oners, and most of them had no underpants on . (sl NETTIE ADAMS Sworn to and subscribed before me this 3rd day of April, 1965. (s l Albert Marvin, Sr. Notary Public My commission expires 1-18-67.  :j: * *· * AFFIDAVIT My name is ------------------------· I am a Negro thirty-two years old and a lifelong resident of Montgomery, Alabama . I live at._ _____ _______________ Street in Montgomery. I am employed at ------------------· During a three-day period which I believe to be around March 8, 9, and 10, 1965, a great many people began to arrive in Montgomery to demonstrate here and to get ready for the march from Selma to Montgomery. During this period, I was frequently in and around the Ben Moore Hotel , a Negro hotel at 902 Highland Avenue, which was headquarters of the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee on the corner of J ackson and High Streets. Many of the outside demopstrators stayed at the Ben Moore Hotel and in the neighborhood . One man whom I saw freque_ntly during this period was dressed as a priest. I was later told by a SNCC staff worker, whose name was Randy, that this priest's name is Lennon Sweat, and that he is from Philadelphia. When I saw him he was usually drinking wine or whiskey in company with Negro boys and girls . On one occasion, I saw him go into the back room at SNCC headquarters with a Negro girl. I saw them begin to take their clothes off. I did not see what they did. Later the girl told me that this priest, Sweat, had paid her · $12. I, myself, had seen this priest hand the girl some money before they went back . SNCC headquarters. was located in a building with a large room up front which was used for an office. Off this room , in back, was a smaller room in which were about twelve to fifteen canvas cots. During the period l am talking a bout, men and women .u sed this room fo r sex freely and openly and without interfe rence. On one occasion, I saw J ames F orman, Executive Director of SNCC, and a red-haired white girl whose name is R achel, on one of the cots together. They engaged in sexual inter course, as well as an a bnormal sex act which consisted of each of the two manipulating the other's private parts with their mouths simul taneously. Forman and the girl, Rachel, made no effort to hide their actions . During this same period, March 8, 9 and 10, a large number of young dem- onstrators of both races and sexes occupied the J a c k s o n Street Baptist Church for approximately forty - eight hours. These were not members of the church, or at least most of them were not, but people who had come from out of town. J would estimate that there were at least two hundred involved. In spite of pleas from the minister and other members of the church, these people would not leave. I saw young boys and girls drinking beer and whiskey in the church and having wild parties in general. They left the bottles and cans all over the church. I saw numerous instances of boys and girls of both races hugging and kissing and fondling one another openly in the church. On one occasion, I saw a Negro boy and a white girl engaged in sexual intercourse on the floor of the church. At this time the church was packed and the couple did nothing to hide their actions. While they were engaged in this act of sexual intercourse, other boys and girls stood around and watched, laughing and joking. This statement, which I make freely and of my own accord, and which has been read back to me, represents incidents which I have personally witnessed . Subscribed and sworn to this day of April , 1965. Signed. Notary Public. ~: AFFIDAVIT My name is James Duke. I am a Captain in the Sheriff's Office of Montgomery County, Alabama, and I reside at 516 Forest Hills Dr., Montgomery, Alabama . On March 10, 1965, at approximately 1 : 20 p.m., I , in my official capacity as a Captain of the Sheriff's Office, along with other law officers of the City of Montgomery and the State of Alabama, was on duty on Dexter Avenue in Montgomery, Alabama. in the block as it ends at the front door of the Alabama State Capitol Building. A group of demonstrators arrived and were prevented from going any fur ther in their march to the State Capitol than this particular block. ·T hese demonstrators, numbering more than two hund red were told to leave and disperse but the; sat down and laid down in the s treet. For the next few hours a gond many of the demonstrators began to drift away,, singly and in small groups. By 8:00 p.m . that night some 100 were left. The group was composed of a racially mixed crowd of both sexes, and included adul ts as well as juveniles . At approximately 8:00 one of the leaders, a colored man whose name I can not recall but NINE.: __ j �It's fifty miles from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama . The road is paved, and hard, all the way. This group of marchers looks as if they had walked every inch of the way. whom I believe myself a ble to .identify from existing photos if necessary, stood and announced in a loud voice to the crowd " E veryone sta nd and relieve your s e Iv es. " Practically the entire crowd in every mi xture of a ge, sex, and color rose and a large number exposed themselves atid urinated in the streets. I would li ke to point out tha t thi s area is within the Sta te Capitol compl ex and at the hea d of the ma in street of Montgomery, Ala bama , a nd is fair ly well lighted. Urine began to course clown the street in sma ll streams a nd into the gutters a nd ran almost to the next block. Two colored men were arrested fo r indecent exposure for pa rticula rly lewd a nd offensive exposure of their pri vate parts. The demo nstrators foun d it necessary to ta ke their placards and signs to sit on after this conduct. The resu lting odor became so offensive in a few hou r:; that we had to get up-wind in order to Escape the smell. I might acid that I saw kissing, hugging, a nd fond ling between mi xed sexes a nd races . At a roun d 1: 35 a .m. on Ma rc h 11 , 1965, more tha n 12 hours after their a rr iva l, a cold dnzzling ra in bega n a nd the entire crowd dispersed. TEN (s ) JAMES DUKE Sworn a nd subscribed to before me, George W. Dean, Jr., a Notary in and for said State and County, thi s ·5th day of April , 1965. STATE OF ALABAMA, COUNTY OF DALLAS: Befor e me, undersigned a uthority , in a nd fo r sa id State a nd County, persona lly ai:; peared Ha rold Sewell and being by me first duly sworn on oath, deposes a nd says: On Marc h 5, 1965 , a nd severa l days thereafter , my waitress in our dining room did ser ve several mixed drinks to priests a nd mi nisters in our restaurant . Thi s was a mixed group of Negroes a nd whites from out of tow n. Over about two and one ha lf hour period , this gr oup was louder tha n the ordina ry with their conve rsation. Thi s is a true statement to the best of my knowledge . (sl HAROLD SEWELL Swo rn to a nd subscribed befo re me this the 7th cl ay of April , 1965. (sl ,JUD ERNEST HEWSTON. JR. No ta ry P ublic. AFFIDAVIT My name is Cecil H. Atkinson, and I reside on Allenville Road in Prattville, being employed with the Continental Gin Company in Prattville. I do hereby swear under oath and under penalty of perjury that the followin g facts are true a nd accura te in every respect to my own persona l knowledge: My wife and I drove to Selma on Sunday , the day the m arch was to begin . We saw many people taking pictures of the church , a nd it appeared that everything was very order ly and ni ce. We tried to drive by Brown 's Chapel where the Negroes were assembled, but the street was blocked off. We pa rked at the corner of Broa d a nd Water Streets a nd sat a nd waited for the ma r ch to begin. At approxima tely 11 a. m ., we obser ved a n a m bulance arri ve at Brown's Chapel and depart shortly t hereafter, going toward Montgom ery, with sirens a nd blinking red lights in operation . The peop le in the car next to ours were ve ry dist ressed about the condition of the nuns who were tak ing part in the march. These people were Episcopa lians a nd fro m St. Louis. Missouri, �,. and had heard that some of their own church people were taking part in the march. The general appearance of the marchers was disgraceful, m o s t of the marchers which we saw were Negroes, but the white men a nd women who were mixed in with them were holding hands and arms with them. We watched for King to come by, but never did see him walk by. When he came by he was riding in a station wagon, and the station wagon rode along with the marchers and I observed King getting out of it several times. Between Selma and the first stop I observed both men and women relieving themselves in public, all together and making no a ttempt to conceal themselves at a ll. At the rest stop, I saw King sitting by the side of the road. A man walked up .to him and ha nded him a slip of paper , which seemed to concern King greatly. He said, " We'll take care of this at the next rest stop. " At one point I observed a young beatnik-type man with his collar turned around to r esemble a priest. He told me that it was "the way to get a long." Another told me that he had been offered $15 a day, 3 meals a day, and ail the sex he could handle if he would come down and join in the demonstration from the North. It appeared that the demonstrators were making every effort to stir up some sort of trouble. At one point, one of the marchers said to me, " Get out of the way, you white bastard." They were making other similar remarks to others sta nding a long the street. (s l CECIL H. ATKINSON Subscribed to and sworn before me this 10th day of April, 1965. (s) Chauncy D. Wood Notary Public, State at Large Expiration date Nov. 17, 1965. * AFFIDAVIT I , Lionel Freema n, a Captain in the Alabama State Troopers, in Huntsville, Alabama, do swea r and affirm, under oath, and under penalty of perjury that the following events happened or actually occurred in my presence and to my own personal knowledge while on duty out of Huntsville in Selma, Alabama, from March 9th through March 16th: During the march, or attempted march, from Selma to Montgomery on March 9, 196~, myself and the men under my command were stationed along the north side of the road just east of Pettus Bridge. While the march was stopped in the highway, one of the white beatniks, with a goatee, told one of my troopers who was standing only a few feet from me that he was being paid $10 per day, 3 meals, and all the Negro p - - - he wantea." This same beatnik was observed for the next eight (8) days in Selma acting as some sort of leader around Sylvan Street, where the street · demonstration was going on. He was in the company of a white girl part of the time and a Negro girl part time. The next time I saw him after The student Non-violent Coordinating Committee, one of the organizations sponsoring the march from Selma to Montgomery, works on campuses throughout the nation to influence students and young people to become active in the civil r ights movement and in participating in demonstrations. Here are some of the students_ who participated in the demonstrations in Alabama last March. The undergraduate in the center carries a school sweater with the letter "H" emblazoned on it. Perhaps he is a Harvard undergrad. ELEVEN �L Selma was when he came up Dexter Avenue on March 18th . While at the Sylvan Street "Berlin Rope, " I and many others observed smooching and lovemaking between Negroes a nd whites. A n e w s reporter called me over to the side of the street and pointed to a couple just to the rear of the group sta nding in -the street, a mixed couple, were in the act of having sexual relations. About this time, a priest broke it up and had the couple come up to the " Rope." It didn't seem to bother any of the three and soon were all gone from the front of the line. On Saturday, March 13, they had an extra la rge crowd of both white and Negroes in the streets. They atte!IJpted to scatter and go around the blockade. One Negro who was standing beside a priest, a nd both standing about three feet from a line of Troopers , made several attempts to provoke a Trooper into hitting him . The Negro waved three dollar bills in the Trooper's face and then dropped them , saying " Why don't you pick them up, I know you need it. " During this time, the priest just grinned. The Negro man then said "I'll sleep with a white woman tonight." The priest seemed to think this was real funny . The priest and Negro would whisper back and forth a nd then laugh out loud . I ove rheard three beatniks talking, saying that they had been in Clevela nd, Berkley, California and Harlem, and had come directly to Selma to join in the demonstrations there. On the afternoon of March 8th, at about 6 p.m ., as we were turning onto U. S. 80 a t the intersection of Alabama 21 , which is in downtown Selma , I , along with 30 of my men saw two men dressed as priests a nd four young Negro girls walk across U . S. 80. The priests were holding ha nds with two Negro girls each . The Rev. Reeb was beaten about two or three hours later. One tall priest was observed for several days around Sylvan Street, always in the compa ny of a Negro girl of a bout sixteen years of age . Anytime you saw one you saw the other , a nd usually they were holding ha nds . .They were in the m arch to the Courthouse in Selma on Monday, March 15. They went to a nd from the County Courthouse in Selma on Monday, March 15. They went to a nd fro m the County Courthouse holding hands. On the night of March 16, at 10 p.m ., a group of thirty-fou r (34 ) men, mostiy dressed as priests, came from a Negro church in Montgomery to the fro nt of the Capitol. They st a t e d that they wa nted to get on the Capitol step3 to hold a " P rayer-Service. " They were to ld TWELVE that they could hold their service on the walk but not on the steps. They stayed until 3 a .m., insisting that they be allowed up on the Capitol grounds. After about thirty minutes , the news media were told to get out of the street and they moved across the street. Some of the men claiming to be priests cursed like sailors during these five hours . At 3 a.m ., when they started to leave, two photographers, apparently in their employment, c a m e running across the street. One of the men dressed as a priest said, " You stupid son-of-a-bitch , after all this time here you didn't get a picture of us saying a prayer on the bottom step." They were allowed to kneel on the bottom step in attempt to get rid of them. During the eight days in Selma, several newspaper men who were allowed to go to the rear of the demonstration crune back up to the front and told us they observed white and Negro couples in_the act of sexual relations . They told us that they had sent the story and pictures home to their papers. One told me that the only thing he recognized about his story when it was printed was his name . He had asked to be allowed to leave the Selma area but was refused by his paper . A Jewish rabbi who was on the five hour stand at the Capitol was contacted by a Trooper in a barber shop the next day . The rabbi stated that the leaders had lied to him . He stated that, " They told m e we'd only be at the Capitol for ty-five minutes at the moi;;t, but after getting there they wanted. to remain all night." He said further, " They want (Continued on Page 28 ) - ~~is gentleman marched all the way from Sel!'1a to Montgomery-accommodating l,1mself to the u~s_eas~nably hot weather. He 1s a Canadian student who took advant~ge of the civil rights march to accomplish some research for the Ph.D. he is workmg on. �nstration l told us couples 1'hey told and pieOne told icognized nted was allowed was rethe five ontacted the next leaders , "They Capitol mt after remain ey want Bayard and Ralph Just A Couple Of The Boys ,, wdating ook ad>. he is Negroes in Birmingham were asked to kneel as Martin Luther King and Ralph Abernathy walked past during demonstrati.ons in Birmingham in 1963. Assistants preceded the two Negro !eaders with exhortations, "Here he comes. Here comes the King of Kings." W h e n the march from Selma to Montgomery started on Sunday, March 21, it was joined by clergymen and church leaders from across the land. They had come to join a crusade for human dignity and civil rights. They, and thousands of others, believed that their participation in this massive demonstration helped to dramatize a long overdue protest by Negroes against injustice, discrimination, suppression of their constitutional rights as citizens, and a denial of their fundamental dignity as human beings. For many it was an exalted and emotional experience without parallel in their lives. Perhaps it is only natural, therefore, that when voices are raised in protest against these demonstrations. They seemed to be raised in · defense of " police brutality," discrimination, suppression of human rights and denial of civil liberty. This is not true. Churchmen, who have been called to devote their lives to the teachings of Christ, may· want to ask themselves this question : If their efforts over the past 2,000 years have been inadequate to the task of eliminating man's inhumanity to man, how do they think marching from Selma to Montgomery is going to get the job done? Whatever the answer, the fact is there remains a faint and distasteful residue of doubt in many minds concerning the propriety of · the widespread participation by clergymen in the SelmaMontgomery activities. For many, no doubt, Selma was a form of self-expression, an outlet for their own frustrations-which is entirely understandable. What they fail to understand , however, is that their presence and participation in Selma not only adds substance a n d dignity to the civil rights cause itself, but also to those who use the cause, and the cloth, for basically evil purposes of their own. Two ,of these are Bayard Rustin and Ralph Abernathy, the one a homosexual who solicits on city streets. whose life's work is the subversion of the moral fibre of the youth of America, and who led Martin Luther King from obscurity to a position of such eminence in the eyes of many of his followers that they actually kneel when THIRTEEN �he walks past. The other is a minister, the "dear and abiding friend " of Martin Luther King and his most intimate associate in the civil rights movement, and a man who hides behind the cloth to seduce a 15-year-old member of his church congregation. One of the men who sat with Martin Luther King on the stand at the Capitol in Montgomery is Bayard Rustin . Rustin was an organizer for the Communist Party for 12 years. Later he became head of the War Resistors League , the U. S. branch of War Resistors International. The efforts of this world-wide organization are devoted entirely to persuading and assisting young men to avoid military service to their governments - which activity, if not a direct attempt to overthrow the government, is at least an indirect effort which, if successful, will accomplish the same purpose. Rustin had already reached a posi-~ 2.8;8.•A .{!?ex P.-rvorsion . tion of prominence in his chosen field of subversion in 1955 when he was called on to go to Montgomery anrl lend assistance to an obscure young Baptist minister who had organized a bus boycott in that city. Just who ".called upon" Rustin for this assignment is not clear. Rustin did leave New York and for three years ga\·e counsel ·and advice to Martin Luther King. There is a widely held misconception that Bayard Rustin rose to eminence through his efforts as Martin Luther King's executive secretary. Exactly the opposite is true . Rustin made King. Bayard Rustin is a homosexual with a long police record. In this enlightened age we are neither surprised nor concerned with a person's private sex practices. When they cease to be private, however, they become offensive and call into question a person's mental balance and standards of values. This .J\aPOH.T Wbere Co:nn11rt 4'd r\1IJ1'C Da y Co cn rn l1 t•d-- L·~~ ... 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J ·:_,. • . ff1cr.r ·• lf"l,..; o •..: ·l J1ti ·e 1 (!;ant.) l 11cor n •. 0 t)., ., '! 1-21-s~ r, Pasadena, California p.olice report on arres t of Bayard Rustin and two men at 2:30 a.m .. January 21, 1953. FOURTEEN sort ·of thing was widely in evidence th r o u g ho u t the Selma-Montgomery demonstrations. Small wonder-if Rustin 's influence can be seen here. Rustin himself was jailed in Pasadena , California for soliciting two men .on the street and then engaging in a homosexual act while parked in a car on one of the city's main thoroughfares. The Pasadena Police report of this incident is reproduced on page 14. We are not concerned with Ralph Abernathy's private sex life. It should be an entirely private and personal matter. However, when a person's standards of personal behavior are such that he can be found being chased down Dexter Avenue in Montgomery, Alabama by an outraged husband with an axe in his hand; and we learn further that this person seduced the wife of the outraged husband when she was a 15year-old member of his church congregation, and that he has continued to annoy her ever since-then there would seem to be ligitimate cause for concern about the man's moral character and personal standards, particularly if he is one of the leaders of what purports to be a Christian movement. Such a man is Ralph Abernathy. Here is a transcript from the trial of Edward Davis, a s c h o o 1 teacher in Butler County, Alabama . This is case number 8741, State vs. Davis, in the Circuit Court of Montgomery County, Alabama , November Term, 1958, before Judge Eugene W. Carter. Davis was tried and acquitted on a charge of assault with attempt to mur der . Followi?~ is a transcript of the testimony of V1v1an McCoy Davis. It is not pretty reading but it should be instructive to any who are interested in knowing in what direction the civil rights movement may be moving. * VIVIAN McCOY DAVIS , having been duly sworn, was examined and testified as follows: Direct Examination BY MR. KNABE: Q. This is Vivian Davis? A. Yes, I am. Q. And what was your name before you became Davis? A. Vivian McCoy. Q. Did you see the girl who was on the stand just befo re you got on ? A. Yes, I did. Q. Now, who was she? A. Ber nice Cooper Davis. Q. Could you speak louder so these gentlemen over her can hear it ? A. Bernice Cooper Davis. She was Bernice Cooper at that time. �he walks past. The other is a minister, the " dear and abiding friend" of Martin Luther King and his most intimate associate in the civil rights movement, and a man who hides behind the clotll to seduce a 15-year -old member of his church congregation . One of the men who sat with Martin Luther King on the stand at the Ca pitol in Montgomery is Bayard Rustin . Rustin was an organizer for the Communist Party for 12 years. Later he became head of the War Resistors League, t he U. S. branch of War Resistors International. The efforts of this world-wide organization are devoted entirely to persuading and assisting young men to avoid military ser vice to their governments - which activity, if not a direct attempt to overthrow the government, is at least an indirect effo r t which, if successful , will a ccomplish the same purpose. Rustin had a lready reached a posi--~ 28_S-A _(~ex ~rvora1on_ c...•1- .,, r,, ..... tion of prominence in his chosen field of subversion in 1955 when he was called on to go to Montgomery and lend assistance to an obscure young Baptist minister who had organized a bus boycott in that city. Just who "_called upon " Rustin for this assignment is not clear . Rustin did leave New York and for three years gave counsel ·and advice to Martin Luther King. There is a widely held misconception that Bayard Rustin rose to eminence through his efforts as Martin Luther King's executive secretary. Exactly the opposite is true. Rustin made King. Bayard Rustin is a homosexual with a long police record . In this enlightened age we are neither surprised nor concerned with a person's private sex practices. When they cease to be private, however, they become offensive and call into question a person's mental balance and standards of values. This .RaPOtl.T Ua7 Comi:1J1tad•. i'J.i"1-. ( F1ru,t Uat11 Co:m::m.,_ t>au, R;,1,oo r hd \'ktha ( Pc.nu11) lfia AJdr ... n-. /.4dr..... Re~rted Tu fl•t1<> r1 ,.11 u,. n~a. 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CAt.C. . t .)f' 1·,1 ,r r \•,·.,1cbL .~o;,n~ l /, Ag• 4{) ~'o d » .. ,a. !!i..: r. o DuHJ l:yol,J)l r J l ue w,t 1 hl _1 47, .v .. Z'.5, nu1td Lad. ...... . Tatoo.o, ....o.Ct ! , o......,.... tabor u.:.·-=-~ {~.:i.,!.1.4.,1·:J. Lo.;.4]. .. l,;....shtru.ld.eir.o) ..:'l.P.a.ar 1 nd tir!st-8AAl6 ;·..:.. ti. !lJ.._; l'i ;!~t fc .',,'lr' ., ___ ,•.,,,,1' --~. 9 :.t;• d !1 U tl c; nt· !nerJ. [,.';f_,:•P.;·n r var '" of tt1::J Vn~."'C 8 f"'o!:O i{t°iC8;' 1 a t,natlo to ..iethrdJr10 t ... P.u· .on e ...,,; 13'. toot) ora • 'oni!Jon,  .:v? !' •. ,,.,Lo .. ~ • . n,. ·,o · ~-J~ut,h ar.~ 01:. o :.Jt ,t c. th.~t ho i.lll,' ln.~rh.1., t:.l• a/ ·• Cori!os •.,u; .) Jot., l C1 ~ . J · !.1 , , J, e ) (~on~. ) Pasadena, California police report on arrest of Bayard Rustin and two men at 2:30 a.m .. January 21, 1953. FOURTEEN 1 sort ·of thing was widely in evidence th r o u g ho u t the Selma-Montgomery demonstrations. Small wonder-if Rustin's influence can be seen here. Rustin himself was jailed in Pasadena , California for soliciting two men .on the street a nd then engaging in a homosexual act while parked in a car on one of the city's main thoroughfares. The Pasadena Police report of this incident is r eproduced on page 14. We are not concerned with Ralph Abernathy's private sex life. It should be an entirely private and personal matter. Howeyer, when a person's standards of personal behavior are such that he can be found being chased down Dexter Avenue in Montgomery, Alabama by an outraged husband with an axe in his hand; and we learn further that this person seduced the wife of the outraged husband when she was a 15year-old member of his church congregation, and that he has continued to annoy her ever since-then there would seem to be ligitimate cause for concern about the man's moral character and personal standards, particularly if he is one of the leaders of what purports to be a Christian movement. Such a man is Ralph Abernathy. Here is a transcript from the tria l of Edward Davis, a s c h o o I teacher in Butler County, Alabama. This is case number 8741, State vs. Davis, in the Circuit Court of Montgomery County, Alabama , November Term, 1958, before Judge Eugene W. Carter. Davis was tried and acquitted on a charg~ of assault with attempt to murder. Followi~g. is a transcript of the testimony of V1 v1an McCoy Davis. It is not pretty reading but it should be instructive to a ny who are interested in knowing in what direction the civil rights movement may be moving. VIVIAN McCOY DAVIS, having been duly sworn, was examined a nd testified as follo ws: Direct Examination BY MR. KNABE: Q. This is Vivian Davis? A. Yes, I am . Q. And what was your name befo re you became Davis? A. Vivia n McCoy. Q. Did you see the gir l who was on the stand just before you got on? A. Yes, I did. Q. Now, who was she? A. Bernice Cooper Davis. Q. Cou ld you speak louder so these gentlemen over her can hear it? A. Bernice Cooper Davis. She was Bernice Cooper at that time. Q. Now, you say at that time, what : time do you mean ? A. When she was living with me. Q. Did she used to live with you ? A. Yes, she did. Q. Did she know Abernathy at that time? A. Yes , sir, she did . Q. Did Abernathy know her ? A. I am sure he did . He come to our house and he was acquainted with her. Q. Now, did Abernathy date you al any time? A. Yes, sir, he did. Q. Did he ever have physical or sexual relations with you ? A. Yes, sir. Q. Did he have normal relations or abnormal relations ? A. Both. Q. Both? A. Yes, sir. Q. Now , did you ever tell him that you wa nted him to stop getting in touch with you ? Bayard Rustin in New York where he directs activities of the War Resistors League, an organization whose only purpose is to persuade and aid young men to avoid A. Yes, sir, I did. military service to their country. Q. Now, when was the last time ? Let us just take the summer of 1958. that he contacted you or that you got band went outside. Apparently Rev. I believe your husband went off to in touch with Abernathy? Abernathy went outside and I star ted school , did he not? A. He contacted me during the sumout the door . His wife and myself, we A . Yes, sir, he did . mer of '58 when he was in town this were inside talking, a nd they were on Q. Now, before he went off to school past June, July and August. the outs ide, a nd when I started out he were you with him a t any time when Q. Now , when is the last time he was ta lking to Rev. Abernathy and I he h~d a conversation with Abernathy? contacted you before this occurrence·, A. Yes, sir . looked a nd went back inside. A. He contacted me on August 29th. Q. Ca n you tell us where that ocQ. Did you come up to them as curred? Q. That is the day . . . they fini shed their conversation ? A. That is the day that this incident A. It occurred at his house, a nd it A. No, I didn 't. occur red. The incident took place. occurred in-out at Loveman's in NorQ. And did you talk to a nybody mandale. Q. Now , about what time of day did while they were talking, or did you he contact you? Q. You say that there was a time just stay inside? A. He called me approximately at out a t Lovema n's ? A. I was inside ta lking to his wife, two o'clock in the afternoon. A. Yes, sir, it was. a nd she went outside. Q. And now, what went on in that Q. Was it inside of Loveman's or Q. Now, a t the time that he marconversation ? out in front ? ried; that is Aberna thy, I believe you A. It was out in front. A. He called and said he had been were in the wedding, were you not? Q. Now, who was there at tha t trying to get in touch with me, and A. Yes, sir, I was . time? asked me where I had been and I told Q. Who asked you to be in the wedhim I had been out of town, and at A. His wife. ding, did he ask you or did his wife Q. And by his wife you mean Rev . as k yo u? that time I told him, I asked him Aherna thy's wife? kind ly not to call me again. And I A. He asked me first. A. Rev . Abernathy's wife. said , "I told you , I told my husband. Q. Did yo u know his wife ? Q. Abernathy's wife and Abernathy and he had told you also that I told A. No, I didn't. and who else? him," and at that time I hung up in Q. Did she 1i v e here in MontA. And my husband. his face. go mery ? Q. Edward and yo u? 0. And what happened after that? A. No , she did not. A. Yes , sir. A. My husband was at a meeting. Q. Now, when he first started going Q. You four ? with you and having these r elations Q. Your husba nd was not home at A. Yes , sir . that time? coth proper a nd improper, how old Q. Were you all sta nding together were you ? A,. No, he was not at home. ta lking? A. I was fiftee n. Q. And when did he come home? A . No. Q. F iftee n at that time ? A. He came home a bout fifteen Q. Well , how were you arranged? A . Ye , sir. minut-es after , about two-fifteen. A. Well , we met up in the store and Q. Now, after this conversation that Q. Then what did you and your hushe spoke, and I went over to look at band do ? · occurred out in front of Loveman 's in some women's apparel and my husMontgomery when was the next time l Continued on Page 25 1 FIFTEEN �How 'IMAGES' Are BY ALBERT C. PERSONS Almost anywhere in the world today the name "Birmingham" calls to mind vicious police dogs, thug cops, bombs that explode in the night and fire hoses mowing down innocent Negro children in the streets. If this were a true "image" of Birmingham then it would almost have to go without saying that the general populace (some 600,000 ), who are responsible for the city's government and actions of city off.icials , is some kind of breed apart from the rest of the human race. Since this is not true , it follows that the world-wide image of Birmingham must be the artificial creation of some outside agency. More than any other one, single thing, the Birmingham image is a product of two publications with worldwide readership numbering in the ten's of millions . They are LIFE and TIME. I worked for LIFE during the period of the Birmingham civil rights demonstrations in the Spring of 1963. In the May 10, 1963 edition of TIME their story covering the Birmingham demonstrations carries this descriptive passage: ". . . furious , the Commis- sioner mbrowski say: "The 6th Annual Conference of the Southern Christian Leadership .Conference, Birmingham, Alabama, September 25 to 28, 1962·. Martin Luther King, Jr. responding to Anne Braden' speech; in background AB, Carl Braden, JAD." TWENTY movement has been grossly and solidly infiltrated by the Communist Party. Those persons in the civil rights movement who deny this, deny overwhelming evidence that it is so. Tfie evidence c I e a r 1 y shows that Martin Luther King has very closely c:;onnected his organization, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, with the Southern Conference Educational Fund. This has been going on for years. By thus connecting himself with the Communists, Martin Luther King has cynically betrayed his responsibilities as a Christian minister and the political leader of a large number of people. "The Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee, from all the evidence, is substantially under the influence of the Communist Party through the support and management given it by the Communists in the SCEF. However the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee may have started, it is now getting strong financial aid from the SCEF and its policies are · substantially influenced by the SCEF. Many innocent students have been and are now being recruited by the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee to unknowingly carry out the instructions and policies of the Communist Party, dictated to Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee by the SCEF." W ha t is the "conclusive evidence" that this committee gathered, and what is the Southern Conference Educational Fund itself? The evidence comes in part from hearings of the U. S. House Committee on Un-American Activities and of the Senate Internal Security Committee. But most of the evidence concerning the Southern Conference Educational Fund and its connections with civil rights comes from the files of the SCEF itself-files which were taken in a raid on SCEF Headquarters in New Orleans. These files and records are a completely documented recor d of �over twenty-five years of successful subversive aetivity, primarily in the field of civil rights. The Southern Conference Educational Fund is the new name for the Southern Conference for Human Weifare. The Southern Conference for Human Welfare was conceived, set up, and financed by the Communist Party in 1938 as a mass organization to promote Communism throughout the Southern States. It was exposed as a Communist front a few years later by a government committee and simply changed its name-continuing in business as the SCEF with the same old address, same telephone number, substantially the identical leadership, and it conlinued to print the same official organ, "The Southern Patriot" which was cited as a subversive "publication by the U. S. Government. At a hearing of the Louisiana Joint Committee on Un-American Activities Dr. William Sorum, New Orleans physician, for six years an active member of the Communist Party, testified as follows: Q - I believe you also testified in 1957 (before the Senate Internal Security Committee ) while you were in the Communist Party, you were told to work in the Southern Conference for Human Welfare, is that correct? A - That's right, it was one of the main organizational outlets, and it was considered one of the most important things that we ·had. When the Southern Conference for Human Welfare had their national m e e t i n g down here, about 12 of the top Communists in the South were here . . . " These are some· of the people who direct the activities of the Southern Conference Educational fund : Fred Shuttleworth , was responsibie for the formation of the Montgomery Improvement Association which gave Martin Luther King his start on the road to prominence in the civil rights movement. At one time the resignation of some of the leaders of the Montgomery Improvemen·t Association followed a disclosure of discrepancies in the organization's books amounting to approximately $100,000. In 1941 Shut: tiesworth was arrested and pied guilty in District Court in the State of Alabama to the illegal distillation of whisa key, commonly known as moonshining. Fred Shuttlesworth is currently vicepresident of Martin Luther King's Southern Christian Conference. He is also president of the Southern Conference Educational Fund. Aubrey Williams, deceased: Williams was president of SCEF before Shuttlesworth. In April 1954 at hear-· _ ings held in New Orleans by the Senate Internal Security Committee he ·was identified as .a Communist Party member by one witness who had been in the party, and was identified by another witness at the same time as one who had accepted Communist Party Discipline. William Howard Melish: Melish was a minister and has been identified in sworn testimony as a Communist Party member. Melish is on the staff of the SCEF as the Eastern representative of the organization, primarily as a solicitor of funds in the New York area. Benjamin Smith : Smith is an attorney in the city of New Orle·ans. He was treasurer of the SCEF and was a member of the board of directors of the National Lawyers Guild-which has been cited by the U. S. Government as the "foremost legal bulwark of the Communist Party, which has rallied to the defense . of Communist law-break- z ~- .. 0 C a, ?"" >-< g !" o. :::.::, D LTI z ~ z > cn t"4 , C, '1 .. a, , ,.n f 10 '1 a: m 0 a.. - .. C: ~ ~• : • '< .... i fi: -••- g·. •• .... r-!.: c:- Ill .... ... . .. . .. • i!.: •••• . . t--··· . -~ ··· -g, ~-: . • -~ • .... ! r--~ ~ ' .,, ... ... : ~:. : D - D • ...,:, '1 • I ,,. • ~ .. •.•. _,! ~ • • -n • c: • ~ . , , . ,., .... . i" . 0. ~ •• D 1 S. C. L. C. . 3 .:zz IT' . J n0 a'II ,.. C ,; . , I DEPOSIT ONLY =r "' z P> g =! V·,\ 1 ))dX:,1 ';}-< ,." r/.., : i·.: VI iI o tTl ers, and violators of the Smith Act, and has never failed to rally to their defense." Smith is registered with the U. S. Justice Department as a representative of semi-official agencies of the Communist C u b a n Government. Smith's picture appeared in the March 11, 1962 edition of "The Worker, " official publication of the Communist Party of the _ United States. The accompanying article described his presentation of an award by the National Lawyers Guild for his "anti-bias struggle in the South." Dr. James A. Dombrowski: Dombrowski was identified as a Communist at hearings of the Senate Internal Security Committee by Paul Crouch and John Butler. Crouch held many major positions in the Communist Party. According to his own testimony he was at one time head of the Communist Party's department for infiltration of the Armed Forces. He was a representative of the Communist Party of QQ •• .. • fi• ~ .... .• -~ • J·. :_,,_.••· •• ,; ' /~ ,~., . ~- 11>-__ •• • •• ,.._-~ 1, . 1"' . ":i l .-:. -· ~ S · 0 ..... ..,. - I T' ...,:, ...,:, r .. 1· ;- e0 ' ~~ ~ l• I I % ~ ~ ,.. ~ . ,. "./'. le IE ,.,....., Je: ' -"' ~~ ~!. ~ ...... c.n w I L Check paid to Martin Luther King by SCEF. Check is signed by James Dombrowski and Ben Smith and endorsed on the back by King. TWENTY-ONE �the United States to the E xecutive Committee of the Communist Internationale in Moscow, and he was a member of the commission in Moscow to draft plans to infiltrate and subvert all of the armed forces of the world. Crouch testified that he was one of three Communists who had originally planned the Southern Conference for Human Welfare to set up in the South a mass "organization through which the Communist line could extend over · all of the South, and through which intellectuals, professionals and ministers could be brought within the scope of the Communist Party influence. Mr. Crouch was asked about James Dombrowski in connection with the Communist Party. He said thi_s : "I should like to add for the record that Dr. Dombrowski told me on several occasions that he ·preferred to be called a 'Left Socialist' r ather than a Commu- ~ nist ; that he could serve the Revolutionary movement better under the Socialist label than he could under the Communist label. " Then the question was, "Was that a customary practice of the top - fli g ht operators ?" Mr. Crouch says, " Yes, sir." At another place in the record of· this hearing the witness named John Butler swore that, " James A. Dombrowski had been a party member ." He was introduced by another party member, Alton Lawrence. At that time John Butler was in the Communist Party himself. Butler swears that Lawrence told him that Dombrowski was one of the upper ten Communists in the United States. On page 25 of his Doctoral thesis, written at Columbia University, Dombrowski says : "Proletarians who have suffered at the hands of ruthless power in an industrial system, and who have ,rut1p,- -~ mg, Jr. ~ ...... ~GUpmlf 401143.215.248.55 16:23, 29 December 2017 (EST) ~ .....Jia August 16, 1960 Dear Jim: This is just a note to acknowledge r e ceipt or y our letters or recent date. We, too, were more than happy- to have you in our home. The f e, llows hip was very , rewarding. I \d.11 expect to hear from you when Bi s hop Love returns to the country. At that ti me we can set the date for an Atlanta meting . Ver y s inc e r ely yours, Dr . James Dombrowski Southern Conferenc e Educ ati ona l Fund, Inc. 822 Perdido Stre~t Rew Orleans 12, · Louilliana MLK:mlb TWENTY-TWO tried all of the avenues of moderation and of moral suasion, conclude that such power will continue to utilize its control of society to increase its advantage until fin al justice can only be achieved by a violent revolution, in which the sources of power are brought under the control of the workers ." On page 189 of his thesis Dr . Dombrowski says : " Thus it is the first duty of all . religious people to destroy Capitalism without regard for their own welfare." Dr. Dombrowski is the Director of the Southern Conference Educational Fund. and has been since its inception as the Southern Conference fo r Human Welfare in 1938. Carl and Anne Braden: The Bradens are both field organizers for the SCEF, Carl Braden is also editor of " The Southern Patriot. " They were both identified as Communist Party members by Alberta M. Ahearn, who was an FBI informer surfaced for the purpose of testifying against the Bradens. She testified that she was r ecruited into the Communist Party by Anne Braden. Carl Bradden was convicted of sedition and received a 15year sentence in Kentucky. He served several months on this sentence, and it was voided under the old Nelson Case decision of the U. S. Supreme Court which voided State Sedition Laws. Sub'. sequent to this Braden served a year in the Federal Penitentiary for contempt of Congress for refusing to a nswer questions of the House Committee on Un-American Activities. In the files of the SCE F , all taken in the raid on their headquarters in New Orleans, there is a voluminous correspondence, stretching over a period of many years , between leaders of the SCEF and leaders of civil r ights organizations. Here is an excerpt from a letter from Martin Luther King to Anne Braden . King writes : "It was certainly good to have Carl in Columbia last week. He added a great deal to the meeting. I hope both of you will fi nd it possible to become permanently associated with the Southern Chr istian Leadership Conference. . ." In a letter to J ames Dombrowski Martin Luther King writes: " This is just a note to acknowledge receipt of your letters of r ecent date. We, too, were more than happy to have you in our home. The fellowship was very rewarding." In the SCEF fi les there is correspondence between Dombrowski and King and Wyatt Tee Walker (King's Executive Secretary l concerning the layout of a full page new paper ad �the United States to the Executive Committee of the Communist Internationale in Moscow, and he was a member of the commission in Moscow to draft plans to infiltrate and subvert all of the armed forces of the world. Crouch testified that he was one of three Communists who had original!v planned the Southern Conference for Human Welfare to set up in the South a mass " organization through which the Communist line could extend over · all of the South, and through which intellectuals, professionals and ministers could be brought within the scope of the Communist Party influence. Mr. Crouch was asked about James Dombrowski in connection with the Communist Party. He said this : "I should like to add for the record that Dr. Dombrowski told me on several occasions that he ·preferred to be called a 'Left Socialist' rather than a Commu- nist ; that he could serve the Revolutionar y movement better under the Socialist label than he could under the Communist label." Then the question was, " Was that a customary practice of the top - f Ii g ht operators?" Mr. Crouch says, "Yes, sir." At another place in the record of· this hearing the witness named John Butler swore that, "James A. Dombrowski had been a party member." He was introduced by another party m ember, Alton Lawrence. At that time John Butler was in the Communist Party himself. Butler swears that Lawrence told him that Dombrowski was one of the upper ten Communists in the United States. On page 25 of his Doctoral thesis, written at Columbia University, Dombrowski says: "Proletarians who have suffered at the ha nds of ruthless power in an industrial system, and who have ~ ~utlpt: -~ing, Jr. ~---~GUpard, 407143.215.248.55 16:23, 29 December 2017 (EST) ~Lq;a Aug ust 16, 1960 Dear J'im: Thia is just a note to acknowledge receipt or your letters or recent da te. We, t o o, were more than happy to have you 1n our home. very, :rewardlng. The fe,llowship was I will expect to hear f r om you when Bishop Love returns to the count r y. At that time we can set the date ror an Atlanta meet i ng. Very s incerel y you.rs, Dro Jame I Dombrowski Southern Conference Educational Fund p Inc 822 Perdido St~~t Rew Orleans 12,· Louisiana JIU:Jlilb TWENTY-TWO 0 tried all of the avenues of moderation and of moral suasion, conclude that such power will continue to utilize its control of society to increase its advantage until final justice can only be achieved by a violent revolution, in which the sources of power are brought under the control of the workers." On page 189 of his thesis Dr . Dombrowski says : "Thus it is the first duty of all religious people to destroy Capitalism without regard for their own welfare." Dr. Dombrowski is the Director of the Southern Conference Educational Fund. and has been since its inception as the Southern Conference for Human Welfare in 1938. Carl and Anne Braden : The Bradens are both field organizers for the SCEF, Carl Braden is also editor of " The Southern Patriot." They were both identified as Communist P arty members by Alberta M. Ahearn, who was an FBI informer surfaced for the purpose of testifying against the Bradens. She testified that she was recruited into the Communist P arty by Anne Braden. Carl Bradden was convicted of sedition and r eceived a 15year sentence in Kentucky. He served several months on this sentence a nd it was voided under the old Nels~n Case decision of the U. S. Supreme Court which voided State Sedition Laws. Sub'. ~equent to this Braden served a year m the Federal P enitentiary for contempt of Congress for r efusing to a nswer questions of the House Committee on Un-American Activities. In the files of the SCEF all taken in the raid on their head~uarters in New Orleans, there is a voluminous correspondence, stretching over a period of m any years, between leaders of the SCEF and leaders of civil rights organizations. H_ere is an excerpt from a letter from Martin Luther King to Anne Braden. King writes: "It was certainly good to have Carl in Colum bia last week. He added a great deal to the meeting. I hope both of you will find it possible to become perm anently associated with the Southern Christian Leadership, Conference. . ." In a letter to J ames Dombrowski Martin Luther King writes : "This is just a note to acknowledge receipt of your letters of recent date. We, too, were more than happy to have you in our home. The fellowship was very rewarding." In the SCEF files there is correspondence between Dombrowski and King and Wyatt Tee Walker (King's Executive Secretary) concerning the layout of a full page newspaper ad which was a joint project of SCEF, SCLC, and SNCC. A letter from James Farmer, National Director of CORE says: "Let me acknowledge w i t h pleasure the good wishes which you extend on behalf of the Southern Conference Educational Fund, and to assure you that they are reciprocated. It is a good fight we are in, and one which will call forth all the dedication we can muster." A letter from Dombrowski to the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee discusses the pattern of placing SNCC personnel on grants from the SCEF, paid not to the students themselves, but to SNCC, allowing the SCEF to control the field workers and organizers of the SNCC without their being any way identified w i t h the SCEF. J am es Forman, E xecutive Director of the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee wrote to Dombrowski as follows : ' 'We sincerely thank you for the last installment on the grant to Robert Zellner made by the Southern Conference Educational Fund. May we take this opportunity to thank you for the other services rendered to the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee by SCEF. The cooperation we have re c e i v e d has made it possible to carry on a program despite m any obstacles we have encountered this past year . Specifically, your efforts in raising money fo r the McComb students a nd members of our staff will long be r emembered. The fact that SCEF has made available to us certain channels of communication has been vitally important to the movement in general. It is our hope that our actions further advance the cause for which we are all working." In one eighteen month period, from December, 1961, to June of 1963, the Southern Conference Educational Fund gave the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee over ten thousand, three hundred dollars ($10,300 >. The Student Non-violent Coordinating Comm ittee has been the spearhead of violence used as a tool of the SCEF and the Communist Conspiracy throughout the United States, particularly in the South. F BI Director J . Edgar Hoover has said that Communist " front organizations exist not only in isolation, but as a pa rt of a vast, interlaced front system." To all but the dedicated, fulltime a nti-Communist these interlocking conections b e come quite overwhelming in their complexity. This, of course, is by design, not by accident. 4000 ...... ~ ' ~~ - Jt.uOU ,·; ;r143.215.248.55.. ~ 5 &p L.. U 1.-. I.QaJlfr~ .~f."~~i.-1/"°'\, '!"tN> lnu4,Ctl',.! H t 7 r:. ..,, ~ • ,:o, .: • .: .. ;-'• S0-:0 :1,:· :q~~ • • ..,. S2:,0.u:; Nl,f~rr.J:W-,n,;_ I'._..~.~ -143.215.248.55- WRTT'l'l1'"Y NAT IONAi . " ~ ' ..... o.:s.......-.. ~,,,.,. ... " 18 6.2 . • • I ,~· li: . ~ - ,~ .,,,t - - '"' /. I 1r , - ·-_-.. - _- _,00000 i 5000_, Checks from the SCEF to the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee. One of the interlocking connections of SCEF with another Communist organization will serve as a n example of how it works. The Fair Play for Cuba Committee, itself intertwined at the top level of leadership with the militantly revolutionary Socialist Workers P arty, has close connections with SCEF. In May, 1961 the Senate Internal Security Committee established that Carl Braden was one of the main speakers at a ba nquet in New York given by the Fair Play for Cuba Committee on April 28. 1961. His expenses had been pa id to come to the banquet from wherever he was at the time. In ad- dition to this, and more important, the Senate Committee established that Carl Braden is one of the national directors of the Fair Play for Cuba Committee. Both Fair P lay for Cuba Committee a nd the SCEF publicly supported a man , Robert Williams. who fled the United States to escape prosecution for kidnapping in North Carolina. He went to Ct1ba and set up a powerful broadcasting station from which he beamed violent exhortations to Southern Negroes to use razors and lye bombs against Southern whites.. Robert Williams is now in Communist China . A half page book re\'iew in TWENTY-THREE �~ .. . \. · ' 100062 -, OCT 1 1954 LOUISVIUX' ,__ CARL BRADEN ANNE BRADEN "The Southern Patriot" commented favorably on Williams' book "Negroes with Guns," another vicious piece of inflamatory propaganda. The review was written and si g ned by Anne Braden. In the SCEF files were two letters from and to an identified Communist, Corliss Lamont. One letter is from Lamont to Dombrowski enclosing a check for $1,000 to the defense fund of the SCEF. The other is from Dombrowski to Lamont asking for additional contributions to help with printing costs for a pamphlet defending Braden who had been sentenced to a year in the Federal Penitentiary. It is interesting to note that Lee Harvey Oswald, the assassin of President Kennedy, is reported to have made the statement that the Fair Play for Cuba Committee literature that he handed out in New Orleans came to him from Corliss Lamont. The planned program of the Communist Party to use the racial issue to further its goal of revolution in the United States is definitely being carried out. The SCEF is an obvious and effective part of that program , Through the operations of the SCEF the leadership and influence of known Communists is transmitted into civil rights organizations. Obviously everyone in the civil rights movement is not a Communist, but the act of Communist infiltration of the movement is a fact, and not conjecture. Through its manipulation and control of the civil rights movements Communist p r e y upon one of the best human motivesidealism toward a better wor ld. Their programs are particularly effective with better educated and more cultured people, who see that there are, TWENTY-FOUR POLICE . ---DIV. --~-- - JAMES A. DOMBROWSKI in fact, some things wrong in our society but are unable to see the proper remedies for the problems. These victims simply refuse to recognize and accept certain obvious facts , and delude themselves as to the true nature of all manner of people and organizations that seek to exploit them. As far as Martin Luther King and other leaders of the civil rights organizations are concerned, it is impossible to accept the proposition that they, too, are unwitting dupes of an obvious Communist conspiracy within the civil rights movement. King and Forman, whose respective organizations sponsored the march from Selma to Mont- BENJAMINE. SMITH gomery know that Carl Braden, who was on the march, is a Communist of long standing. They know that Anne Braden; James Dombrowski, Aubrey Williams, et al are Communists. They have worked with these people and accepted all manner of assistance from them for years. Yet, last summer in Mississippi Martir. Luther King made a public statement that there are more Eskimos in Florida than there are Communists in the civil rights movement. " FBI Director J . Edgar Hoover says " Marti11 Luther King is one of the most notorious liars in the country." What do you think ? I have heard from many people that the Conference, perhaps because of necessity, was devoting itself to the raisin g of funds instead of concentratin g on tne real Job. I tried workin i; with American. communists , as. you know, and have lon g since given up trying . I can not work with any one who is not completely honest and American communists are not honest . I kno w tnat often they work for tne same objectives, and do good work , but that does not alter my opinion. Very s i nce r ely your s , Even Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt, a noted liberal, couldn't stomach the SCEF after she discovered who was behind it. Reproduced above is a part of a letter written to James Dombrowski, a known Communist. �Bayard and Ralph - Jus.t A Couple Of The Boys Continued from Page 15) A. We went out on a picnic. Q. And did you during that picnic ...., . ~. · 100062 -· OCT l 1954 mv. POLICE ---...-~ ' LOUlSVllµ - CARL BRADEN ANNE BRADEN "The Southern Patriot" commented favorably on Williams' book "Negroes with Guns, " a nother vicious piece of inflamatory propaganda . The review was written and s i g n e d by Anne Braden. In the SCEF files were two letters from and to an identified Communist, Corliss Lamont. One letter is from Lamont to Dombrowski enclosing a check for $1,000 to the defense fund of the SCEF. The other is from Dombrowski to Lamont asking for additional contributions to help with printing costs for a pamphlet defending Braden who had been sentenced to a year in the Federal Penitentiary. It is interesting to note that Lee Harvey Oswald, the assassin of President Kennedy, is reported to have made the statement that the Fair Play for Cuba Committee literature that he handed out in New Orleans came to him from Corliss Lamont. The planned program of the Communist P a rty to use the racial issue to fu rther its goal of revolution in the United States is definitely being carried out. The SCEF is an obvious and effective part of that program. Through the operations of the SCEF the leadership and influence of known Communists is transmitted into civil rights organizations. Obviously everyone in the civil rights movement is not a Communist, but the act of Communist infiltration of the movement is a fact, and not conjecture. Through its manipulation and control of the civil rights movements Communist p r e y upon one of the best human motivesidealism toward a better world. Their programs are particularly effective with better educated and more cultured people, who see that there are, TWENTY-FOUR JAMES A. DOMBROWSKI in fact, some things wrong in our society but are una ble to see the proper remedies for the problems. These victims simply refuse to recognize and accept certain obvious facts, and delude themselves as to the true nature of all manner of people and organizations that seek to exploit them. As far as Martin Luther King a nd other leaders of the civil rights organizations are concerned, it is impossible to accept the proposition that they, too, are unwitting dupes of an obvious Communist conspiracy within the civil rights movement. King a nd Forman, whose respective organizations sponsored the ma rch from Selma to Mont- -~IC BEN.JAMIN E . SMITH gomery know that Carl Braden, who was on the march, is a Communist of long standing. They know that Anne Braden,- J ames Dombrowski, Aubrey Williams, et al are Communists. They have worked with these people and accepted all manner of assistance from them for years. Yet, last summer in Mississippi Martir. Luther King m ade a public statement that there a re more Eskimos in F lorida than there are Communists in the civil rights movement. " FBI Director J . Edgar Hoover says "Martin Luther King is one of the most notorious liars in the country." What do you think? V - I U . C?O'n'_._ NYDK P AIUC,. ~ CO. I have heard from -many peopl e that t he Conference , perhaps be cauAe of necessity, was devot ing i tself t o the rai sing of funds i ns t ead of concentr ating on the real Job . I t rie d workin~ wit h Ameri can. communis t s, as. you know, and have l ong since given up trying . I can not work with any one who is not complet.ely honest and American communists are not hones t . I know that of t e n they work for the same objectives, and do good work but that does not alter my opinion, ' Very sincerely yours, Even IV"trs. Eleanor Roosevelt, a noted liberal, couldn't stomach the SCEF after she discovered- who was behind it. Reproduced above is a part of a letter written to James Dombrowski, a known Communist. any time during the afternoon tell him about this call? A. Yes, I did. Q. Now, referring to that time, prior to ,fogust the 29th, when is the last time before that he called you? A. He p h o n e d me approximately about the 4th of August, I imagine. Q. And at that time what was your conversation? A. He asked me what was going on b e t w e e n me and my husband, he wanted to know, and how I had been getting along, and why can't I see him. Well, I didn't want to discuss with him those things because I had asked him not to contact me again and I didn't have any further use to talk to him. Q. I show you a picture that is marked for identification the Defendant's Exhibit No. 4 and ask you if you recognize that picture? A. Yes, I do. Q. What is that a picture of? A. That is a picture of a house, and that is the house that we went to. Q. Is that house located in the City of Montgomery? A. Yes, it is. Q. Do you know about where it is located? A. Yes, I do. Q. And where is it located? A. It is located on Clark Street. Q. Now, t he n, you say you went there? Who went there? A. Rev. Abernathy and myself. Q. Did he take you or did you take him? A. He took me. Q. I see. And now what happened at that house? A. That is where these affa irs took place. Q. That is where all three . . A. That is right. Q. All of these affairs you mentioned took place? A. That is right. Q. And at that time how old were you? A. Fifteen. Q . And at that time you were a member of his church? A. Yes, sir. Q. Do you know who was in charge of the house at that time? A. A lady by the name of Mrs. Davis. Q. Do you know whether that is Mrs. C. D. Davis, or not? A. I am pretty positive. Q. Is she a little woman, middle sized woman, or what? A. She is large. Q. You recognize this picture? A. Yes, I do. Q. What is that picture of? A. That is a picture of a convention in Birmingham that I attended. Q. Where did you get this picture? A. I received that picture from him on the night we went out in Birmingham. Q. The night you went out in Birmingham? A. Yes, sir. Q. Now, tell us what happened that night when you went out in Birmingham. A. On the night we went out in Birmingham I was on my way home, Rosemond Lowe and myself, we were asked to go out on a dinner date with the Rev. Abernathy and the Rev. James Dixon. That night they came and picked us up at the house where we were living, and we went to the Afro Club in Birmingham. Q. Afro Club? A. That is right. Q. Where is that located? A. It is in some part of Birmingham. Q. Go right ahead. Now, what happened then? A. We went in and we had a couple of beers. Q. Now, that was the time when you were in Birmingham ? A . Yes. Q. And you say that Abernathy was wi th you at that time? A. Yes, sir. Q. Now, when you came back from Birmingham did he very shortly after that or immediately after that get in touch with you again? A. No. He asked me to . go out to a tea with him that night. This all was the night we got in from Birmingham. Q. The night when you got in from Birmingham, that was when you were fifteen years old? A. Yes . Q. He asked you to go out to a tea with him ? A. Yes, sir. Q. All right. Now. what happened then, did you go? A. Well , I thought it was supposed to have been a tea, he said it was to have been a tea. and he and Rev. James Dixon and Walter Parker came by to pick me up. Walter P arker came up to the door for me, and we put him out at the Derby Supper Club. Q. You say Walter P arker came to the door to get you? A. That is right. He and his girl friend was in the car . Q. And you went with them and got in the car and Abernathy was already -in the car? A. Yes, he was. Q. All r ight. And then you and Abernathy after that? A. We went over , Walter Parker and Walter Parker's girl friend, and Rev. James Dixon and we went over and put Walter Parker and Gloria Thompson out at the Derby Supper Club, and then he went over to Rosemond Lowe's and picked her up. She was ill at the time and couldn't go. So in turn he took Rev. Dixon home and we rode out on the Atlanta Highway, and I haven't seen him since. Q. How late did you stay out that night? A. It was ten-thirty about. Cross Examination BY MR. THETFORD: Q. Vivian, you say Bernice is named what now? A. Bernice Cooper Davis. Q. Now, is she kin to this defendant? A. No, she isn't. Q. Is she related to him, or is her husband any kin to him? A. No, sir. Q. Now, you testified, I believe, that - I don't know whether you did testify -when did you fir st knew Rev. Abernathy, what year? A. It was '52 or '51, I imagine, when he came to the First Baptist Church. I am not sure what year it was he came there. But the first time he made approaches to me was in Birmingham in ' 52, July of '52. Q. Now, how old were you in 1952? A. I was fi fteen then at that time. Q. Fifteen? A. Yes, sir. Q. Now, you testified that you had intercourse or sexual relations with Rev. Abernathy on several occasions? A. Yes, sir. Q. When and where did you first have relations with him? A. At the house on Clark Street. Q. The house where? A. On Clark Street. Q. House on Clark Street? A. Yes. sir. Q. ls that the house that you A. That picture I just testified. the first picture I identified. TWENTY-FI\ E �Q. Is that the picture you pointed out? A. Yes, sir, it is. Q. Do you remember what month that was in? A. It was in August of '52. Q. August of '52? A. Yes, sir. Q. Now, did he come to your house and get you? A. No. Q. Did you meet him there? A. No. Q. How did you happen to get there? A. He called my mother and asked her to let me do some typing for him, which was the ·excuse, and I went up to the church, and in turn we went over there , on Clark Street. Q. You and he went together? A. That's right. Q. How did you go? A. In his car. Q: An9- he parked his car in front of this house? A. No, he didn't. Q. Where did he park it? A. He parked it in the driveway. Q. In the driveway? A. Yes, sir. Q. And then the two of you went in the house? A. That,s right. Q. Was there anybody in the house at home? A. Yes, there was. Q. Who was there? A. Mrs. Davis. 'Q. What is her first name? A. I said Mrs. Davis. It is C. 0 . Davis. Q. Well, what did you and Reverend Abernathy tell her? A. Well, he had already made the reservations. Q. Made the r eservations. A. Advance notice. Q. What do you mean by advance notice? A. He had already contacted her. Q. He had already contacted her? A. Yes, sir, he had. Q. Did he say anything to her when you walked in, did he knock on the door ? A. Yes, he did. Q. And when you walked in what happened then, what did he say to her? A. He asked her how was she getting along. Q. What did she say? A. She said she was fine. Q. Then what did he say? A. Well, he just told her that he came there, he had brought me over there. TWENTY-SIX Q. He brought you over there? And he introduced me to her. Q. He introduced you to her? A. Yes, sir. Q. All right. What did you all do then? A. We went in the room. .Q. Living room, bedroom? A. No. Bedroom. Q. In the bedroom? A. Yes, sir. Q. Now, did you know what you were going over for ? A. Yes, sir. Q. Well, when did he first ask you to go over there and have intercourse with him? A. He asked me the night we went out when we came from Birmingham fo this so-called tea, but I didn't go and we went out riding. Q. He asked you would ·you have intercourse with. him when you went out riding, you tell us, on the Atlanta Highway? A. Yes, sir. He wanted to take me over there then. Q. He wanted to take you over there then? A. He wanted to take me on Clark Street that night but I didn't go, and in turn we went out on the Atlanta Highway riding. Q. Did you have intercourse with him out on the Atlanta Highway? A. No, sir, I didn't. Q. Then did he ask you that night to go to the house --on Clark Street with him? A: He asked me that same night to go to the house on Clark Street. Q. Well, what did you tell him? A. I told him no. Q. All right. When did you tell him you would go? A. Well, I didn't tell him I would go that night. It was three times during that month. Q. Do you mean he asked you three times during that month? A. No, he didn't. On several occasions on the telephone and several times coming to my house asking me. Q .. Asked you to go with him to this house on Clark Street. A. Yes, sir, he did. And finally we got together, and he called my mother and asked her could I do some typing for him, and which was an excuse. Q. So you and he went in the bedroom? A. Yes, sir. Q. And you knew what you were going in there for? A. I guess so. A. Yes. Q. And did both of you get undressed? A. Yes, sir. Q. Get in bed? A. Yes, sir. Q. Did you have normal sexual relations with him on that occasion? A. Well, he did, yes. Q. What? A. Yes, sir. Q. How long were you at the house on this occasion? A. About an hour, or an hour and a half, something like that. Q. And then did he take you back to the church, or where did he take you? A. He didn't take me back to the church, he took me - I got out of the car to the corner of Union and Alabama. Q. Now, how close is that to your house? A. My house is the second from the cqrner, the second house from the corner. Q. Let you out around the corner from your house? A. Yes, sir. Q. Let me ask you this. Were you, going with the defendant at that time? A. Yes, I was. Q. In 1952? A. Yes, sir. Q. When did you get married? A. I got married in December of '55. Q. That is three years later? A. About that. Q. Two years later? A. Yes. Q . All right. Now, you testified that you had a norm al intercourse sometime in August at this house on Clark Street. That was the first time? A. Yes, sir. Q. Did you go back to that house again? A. Yes, sir, I did. Q. When? A. That same month, in August. I went there three times that August. Q. You went there three times that August? A. Yes, sir. Q. Went into the same house? A. Same house. Q. Was he expected, were both of you expected by the owner of the house each time? A. I imagine so. He had always called her to tell her that we were coming. Q. Each time? A. Yes, sir. Q. In other words, she didn't seem surprised to see you? �l A. No. sir. she didn't seem to be surprised. Q. Did she know who you were? A. Yes. sir. she did. They were very close frie nds. Q. Now you say that you have had both normal and abnormal intercourse ? A. Yes. sir. Q. Where did you have the abnormal intercourse with him '? A. The three occasions. Q. On all three occasions ? A. Yes, sir. Q. Well, now, what do you mean by abnormal sexual intercourse? A. Pervertedness. He u s e d his mouth . Q. He used his mouth ? A. Yes, sir, he did . Q. On your private parts ? A. Yes , sir. Q. Now, did he do that, you say on each of the three occasions? A. Yes , sir. Q. Well, was tha t after he had . a normal intercourse with you ? A. No, sir, it was before. Q. It was before he had a normal intercourse ? A. That's right. Q. In other words , each time he used his mouth on you before and then had a nor mal intercourse ? A. That 's right. Q. Now, that happened three times in August of 1952? A. Yes, sir. Q. Now, has he ever had intercourse with you since then? A. No. Q. None whatever? A. No, I ha ven't. Q. Have you ever been out with him alone since August of 1952? A. No , I haven't been out with him . Q. You haven't been out with him ? A. No, .sir. Q. Now, when did you first tell your husband about this? A. I told my husband about it approximately a year after we were married. Q. About a year after you were married, I believe you told us, you would say in 1906? A. That is right. I remembe r vividly we went to New Orleans on a second honeymoon. Q. Well , now, according to your testimony did Rev. Abernathy start running after you again, telephoning you again ? A. He hasn 't ever stopped. Q. He hasn 't ever stopped? A. No, sir. He has been to my house. He came there in '52 and came there in '54 when Bernice Davis Cooper Charles Moore, LIFE photographer, holds ankle which has just been struck by a brick hurled at him by one of the mob in Kelly Ingram Park off to the right of picture. On Moore's left is LIFE correspondent Mike Durham. In the background is the three-story hotel from which a piece of concrete block was hurled almost tearing off one side of a Birmingham fireman's face. L~rge pieces of brick and' concrete block can be seen in the street in · this picture. They have all been hurled by Negroes at police officers and reporters, who were the only whites allowed in the area. Most of the injuries received during the deµ10nstrations in Birmingham were by police officers and' firemen. 1, was living with me, and she was in bed one night, her mother was in Washington, and he came by and I was ordering him out of the house and she awakened and found him there, and he had his arms around me. Q. And that was what year ? A. And that was in '54 or '53 - '53 because she went to Washington both times twice, a nd during that period he was coming by here a nd he would come down there a nd try to get me to go out with him, but I told him that I had made the mistake, and I realized the mistake and that I didn't intend ever to go out with him again. Q. All r ight. Now, let's get down to the picnic that you a nd your husband went on. You went out and got drunk, didn't you? A. Yes , sir . Q. And you got real drunk , didn't you? Q. · I was n't out. (Objected to . Objection overuled ) Q. How much beer did you drink out there on the picnic? (Objected to . Objection sustained l Q. Where did he get that pistol he pu lled on Rev. Abernathy? A. Well , I don' t know. Q. Where did the hatchet come from? A. I don 't know. Q. Have you ever seen this pistol before? A. No, I have n't ever seen it until - it was in the car pocket. Q. It was in the car pocket? A. It was in the car. My husband tra veled , you see. Q. Did he ha ve a license to carry it? A. Wen; I don't know. (Objection sustained .) Q. Have you ever seen that hatchet before ? A. No . Q. Never have seen it? A. No, sir. I saw it in Police Court. Q. You had never seen it before that ? A. No , I haven't seen it either. Q. I ask you if that is the pistol, you know that is his pistol don 't you ? A. Yes, sir. He traveled, and he ha d it in the car pocket. Re-Direct Examination BY MR. KNABE : Q. You tell the jury there when you reached the age of fifteen you haven 't had anything to do with Rev. Abernathy ? A. No, I ha ven 't. Q. You haven't been with him in public since ·then including August 29th , 1958? A. No, sir, I haven't. -0I hereby certify that the proceedings and evidence are contained fully and accurately in the notes of testimony taken by me upon the trial of the above case , and that this transcript is a true copy a nd correct c6py of the same. W. Ha lowell Lewis Official Court Reporter Fifteenth Judicial Circuit of Alabama -0Edward Davis was acquitted for chasing and striking Rev. Abernathy with the hatchet. He and his wife now live in Montgomery. TWENTY-SEVEN �l Sex and Civil Rights (Continued from Page 12) bodies and blood in the street, our bodies " and "I am going home today and t~II everyone how I've been lied to." (s) LIONEL FREE¥AN Subscribed to and sworn before me this 5th day of April, 1965. (s l George N. Dean, Jr. Notary Public. ,,, My commsision expires ____ , 19____ _ ... ,:, AFFIDAVIT I, Samuel M. Carr, a First Lieutenant in the Alabama National Guard, Battery C, 117th Artillery, Alabama do hereby swear under oath and under penalty of perjury the following facts are true and accurate in every respect to my own personal knowledge : The National Guard unit of which I am a member was activated on March 20, 1965. We were assigned the task of guarding camp sites of the Negro Voter-Protest Marchers on their march from Selma, Alabama to Montgomery, Alabama. This duty we commenced to perform on Tuesday, March 23 , 1965 at 1: 00 PM picking up contact with the marchers on HiWay 80. I hereby further swear and attest that during such time of duty with my National Guard unit I personally saw one case of sexual intercourse between a young white boy and a Negro girl. I further swear and attest that I saw occasions of public urination in and near the camp sites. I further solemnly state that many of the Negro marchers, most especially the young ones, made remarks and statements to members of the National Guard which were, in my opinion, for the purpose of inflaming the emotions of said members of the Guard. (s l SAMUEL M. CARR 1/ Lt Battery C 117th Artillery Subscribed to and sworn before me this 3rd day of April, 1965 . (s l J . D. Smyth, Jr . Notary Public Alabama, State at Large My commission expires 5-20-68 .,. .,. STATE OF ALABAMA , COUNTY OF DALLAS Before me, undersigned authority, in a nd for said State and County, personally appeared J . E. Crowder and being by me first duly sworn on oath , deposes and says: I, J ames E . Crowder , Selma Police Department, do make the following TWENTY-EIGHT The picture above was taken a few minutes before the 11icture at the lower right. Annie Lee Cooper, 265-pound bouncer at a Selma motel landed a surprise right to the eye of Dallas County Sheriff Jim Clark. Then she snatched a billy club from Deputy Sheriff Leo Nichols. She hung onto the billy club club for dear life and with both hands as shown above. With effort Sheriff Clark managed to wrest the club away from Mrs. Co.oper. Two deputies got handcuffs on her. The oicture at the lower right is a part of this action. Newsweek described it differently. Newsweek "With that, Mrs . Cooper wheeled on Sheriff Clark - eleven · years her junior and six and one half pounds lighter - and landed a solid _ . , right on his eye. Whiie three deputies helped wrestle her to the ground, Clark scrambled astride her stomach and brought his billy down on her head with a resounding crack"-Newsweek, F ebruary 8, 1965 statement. I saw several Negro males, that I know by sight, in a drunken condition . One Negro was there most of the time and was drunk every time that I saw him . The others came and we nt at intervals. I also saw a short Negro in a green sweater come to the front of the line stretched across the street �on three different occasions and rub up against \\·hite girls. feeling their breasts and other parts of their bodies and then taking them off to the rear of the crowd and on to different apartments. One of the white girls was a short fat girl with a white sweat shirt on: a nother was a medium tall girl. wearing a green coat and carrying a camera bag. This second girl also made several passes at some of the other Negro men on the front line on other occasions. I do not remember what the third white girl looked like that the short Negro carried off as I only saw her that one time. On · one occasion I saw a white man and a Negro female laying side by side beneath a blanket in the middle of the street just before daylight. There was a good deal of movement by both parties beneath the bla nket. The \rhite man, the day before. was wearing a priest robe. The next day he \l"aS wearing a sweat shirt and dungaree pants. That man is still in town or was on Saturday, March 3, 1965. (SI J. E . CROWDER Sworn to and subscribed before me this the 7th day of April 1965. (sl Jud Ernest Hewston Notary Public My commission expires: 7-18-67 the street in front of Brown's Chapel. We noticed a big, heavy set Negro male near a small tree in front of the Parsonage: he was talking to a white female. They were talking, laughing and slapping each other on the back. They moved in closer to the tree, he had one hand hanging on a limb; she would move in very close to where she would rub on his legs and stomach. He was acting like he had ants in his pants. He would put his hands in his pocket attempting to control his sexual impulses. Finally they locked lips together as if they were sucking each other's tongue, this lingered for 2 or 3 minutes; he then took her by the arm and they walked down the sidewalk towards the Baptist Church. (sl V. B. Bates Sworn to and subscribed before m e this the 5th day of April, 1965. (sl Jud Ernest Hewston Notary Public My commission expires 7-18-67. AFFIDAVIT Personally appeared before me, the undersigned Notary Public, Richard Perrino Emmet, who by me being first duly sworn, deposes and says as fol* .,. * * * lows : STATE OF ALABAMA, My name is Richard Perrino Emmet. COUNTY OF DALLAS I presently serve as Judge of the 15th Judicial Circuit of the State of Alabama. Before me, undersigned authority, in and for said State a nd County, personI formerly presided over the Family ally appeared V. B. Bates and being by . Court of Montgomery, Alabama. The Family Court is charged with the reme first duly sworn on oath, deposes and says: sponsibility of ha ndling all juvenile matters. All boys and girls who have I, V. B. Bates, Deputy Sheriff of not reached their 18th birthday are conDallas County, Alabama was assigned s idered juveniles. to special duty of observation in the During the recent disturbances in area of Sy I v an Street and Brown's Montgomery, the present Family Court Chapel during the preparation of Civil Judge was called out of town and inasRights March to Montgomery, Alamuch as I had formerly presided over bama. the Court, I assisted in handling all What I state here is what I actually demonstrators who feJI in the juvenile saw from a distance of 40 feet and less. category. To begin with I saw white females Several white females still seniors in from other counties, other states I behigh school from various northern cities lieve, building up their sexua l desires were taken into protective custody. with Negro males. After a few minutes Their parents were notified and they of necking a nd kissing, the Negro male were released to their parents. Several would lead them off into the Negro college freshmen were also taken into housing project. I watched this proprotective custody who were 17 years cedure ma ny. ma ny times. of age or under. On a nother occasion , I saw a white One white female from the midwest male meet a Negro ma le on the front who is attending college in Florida as porch of Re\·. Lewis' parsonage : they a na tiona l merit finalist was taken into embraced a nd kissed each other mouth custody when she was found with three to mouth . Negro men at night on the grounds of the State Capitol in a state of partia l On Friday afternoon before the Sundisrohement. day of the ma rch to Montgomery. Officer He\rston a nd I 1rere pa rked across I contacted her fa ther, a minister in a mid-western community, informed him of the circumstances in w h i c h his daughter was found, that she was in Montgomery unchaperoned and apparently with no place to stay. He informed me that he had e ncouraged his daughter to come to Montgomery and that she was there with his approval. He did not seem to be shocked __upon learning the circumstances of his daughter's apprehension. (sl RICHARD PERRINO EMMET Subscribed to a nd sworn to before me this 5th day of April, 1965. (sl Walter E. Graham Notary Public, State at Large My commission expires January 21, 1967. ~ ~= (Letterhead) STATE OF ALABAMA DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY Grove Hill, Alabama STATEM~NT TO: Major John W. Cloud Commander, Ala. State Troopers FROM: Lt. J. L. Fuqua DATE :. 2 April, 1965 SUBJECT: Observed Obscenities during Recent Selma and Montgomery Racial Problem This writer was in Selma from March 8 until March 16 and then in Montgomery until March 29. During the time I was in Selma I was assigned to the 10PM to 6AM shift and stayed in the vicinity of the Brown Chapel Church. One night about 200 demonstrators were singing in the street while I observed a limp wrist white male standing in the front row with a blanket over his shoulder and a black male's shoulder. This whfte man had his arm around the Negro and at one time he kissed the Negro in the mouth with a Jong lingering kiss. A few minutes later these two men walked out of the line together, arm in arm, tqward the church. On another occasion in Selma Lt. Jeffries and myself were making a round around the blocked off area of the church and we stopped a 1957 Ford driven by John Calhoun, a Negro man from Montgomery. There was another Negro man in the front seat and a Negro man and a white girl about 24 years old in the back seat. The girl tried to conceal her race by pulling a coat over her head. This writer got both of these people out of the car, the white girl and the Negro man and observed their appearance. The Negro TWENTY-NINE �l man's pants were unzipped in the front and the girl had on dungaree pants. They were unzipped · on the side. The girl said she was from California. On several occasions I saw white girls rubbing up against Negro men and kissing them on the street in this demonstration. I also saw Negro men feel the breast and butt of white girls, making no attempt to hide this but rather appearing like they wanted everyone to see them. I noticed prophylactics on the ground near the church several different times.
  • Tags: Box 16, Box 16 Folder 5, Folder topic: Summerhill riot response | Atlanta | favorable | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 16, Folder 1, Document 7

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_016_001_007.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 16, Folder 1, Document 7
  • Text: LOUIS MONTAG FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING ATLANTA 3, GEORGIA — September 14, 1966 Dear Ivan, This is simply to express my feeling of both admiration and appreciation in the light of your recent actions of courage and love for our city. I hope that you will not again have to expose your- self to these hazards, but commend you on all that you have done and will continue to do to make our town a better place to live in. I thought you might be interested in the enclosed article appearing in the University of Pennsylvania Gazette, July issue. It deals with the problems of cities similar to ours and points the way towards some broad avenues of solution. Seems like every- one talks about the slums, but few people know soundly what to do about them. I am not a student of social studies, but it does seem to me that we are treating symptoms rather than diseases. If there is any small part in this effort in which I may be helpful don't hesitate to call on me. Best to Louise. Cordially, Sau The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. 3700 Northside Drive, N. W. Atlanta, Georgia
  • Tags: Box 16, Box 16 Folder 1, Folder topic: Summerhill riot response | Atlanta | favorable | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 16, Folder 2, Document 5

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_016_002_005.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 16, Folder 2, Document 5
  • Text: HAL L. SMITH ATLANTA, GEORGIA September 9, 1966 Mayor Tvan Allen, Jr, City of Atlanta Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Ivan: As a friend and as a citizen, I want to tell you how proud I am of you and the manner in which you handled the recent disturbance on Capitol Avenue. Your courage, good judgement and patience demonstrated again the splendid leader- ship you are furnishing our community. I was pleased that the radio and press gave you strong support and thet you had recognition nationally from Vice President Humphries and the President of the United States. It was also gratfying to note the support you received from all segments of our population. Your stand for law and order, and yet recognizing the legitimate needs of some of our less fortunate citizens, is certainly commendable, You and all those associated with you in the handling of the incident are certainly due the heartfelt thanks of the citizens of our community. Please do not feel that this letter requires a reply. I just wanted to express my respect and admiration for you in the job you are doing as the Mayor of our City. With warmest regards, Sincerely, A
  • Tags: Box 16, Box 16 Folder 2, Folder topic: Summerhill riot response | Atlanta | favorable | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 16, Folder 2, Document 1

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_016_002_001.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 16, Folder 2, Document 1
  • Text: AW 16TH ANNUAL NATIONAL CONVENTION T R AMERICAN WOMEN IN RADIO & TELEVISION MARRIOTT MOTOR HOTEL, ATLANTA, GEORGIA, MAY 3-7, 1967 PRESIDENT'S RECEPTION MIMI HONCE SIFTS DOT KIRBY REGISTRATION MARGARET KILIAN PROGRAM JEAN MORTON HOSPITALITY LILLIAN LEE AWRT BANQUET ea EaE —— DEBORAH PULLIN HOSTS INFORMATION ARRANGEMENTS ADVERTISING DORA COSSE AWILDA LINDSEY HELEN GORE TRANSPORTATION PAT McKEMIE PRINTING SIPLIAITL & POST CONVENTION TY SUITES PUBLICITY ATLANTA DAY MOSER ALITY 38 JANE TUGGLE LOIS HANEVOLD AUDREY JONES ALYSE AYERS MARIE DODD peewee ern kl isco seni fe tea 7 ao Aha ev 2k aL
  • Tags: Box 16, Box 16 Folder 2, Folder topic: Summerhill riot response | Atlanta | favorable | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 16, Folder 1, Document 38

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_016_001_038.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 16, Folder 1, Document 38
  • Text: MAX ALTERMAN Vice President September 9, 1966 Mayor Ivan Allen City of Atlanta City Hall 68 Mitchell St., S. W. Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mr. Mayor: I find that I must take this time from a busy schedule to tell you how proud I, my family and my friends were of you on the occasion of Atlanta's recent troubles. Mr. Mayor, your display of courage and restraint were in the highest "American Tradition". All Atlanta is proud of you in these troubled times and wish you every success in steering this great city down the road to understanding and prosperity. Tf I, or any of my associates, here at Big Apple can ever be of any assistance to you, we would consider it not only a pleasure, but also a privilege to help. Most sincerely, ALTERMAN FOODS, INC, Wher W0l-_$_~ Max Alterman, Vice President MA: jc 933 LEE STREET «+ ATLANTAIO, GEORGIA = PLAZA 8-6741
  • Tags: Box 16, Box 16 Folder 1, Folder topic: Summerhill riot response | Atlanta | favorable | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 16, Folder 2, Document 6

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_016_002_006.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 16, Folder 2, Document 6
  • Text: SAS LOUD ARSE Sa iat IRGC A SW IS gcse MAS Seta Ata a caida ott DMS ahaa CN dcdaatalia HAL L. SMITH ATLANTA. GEORGIA entemher 9, 1966 Chief Herbert T,. Jenkins tlanta Police Department Atlanta, Feorgia Dear Chief Jankins: I want to take this occasion to commend you and the Atlants Police Department for the splendid manner in which you all handled the recent disturbance on Capitol Avenue. The restrain, wisdom and courage displayed by your organization in the face of a very Gifficult situation was commendable. The results achieved, proves arain the value of mood leadership and training and for this you are to be canerntvulated, As a citizen, I am very proud of tie Atlinnta Police Department. With warvest vrersonal rerards. Sincerely, i at Z| MG ih "ee ~ Sm th CC: Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
  • Tags: Box 16, Box 16 Folder 2, Folder topic: Summerhill riot response | Atlanta | favorable | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 16, Folder 2, Document 4

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_016_002_004.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 16, Folder 2, Document 4
  • Text: © apt latthews, N. C. 28105 wd Wst rwwuate, Wy Atlocka, 30 Sos Yea, Mag Al | ddl le al motion wo b whol Hest ML Wn Hood nc latkns, a “Wal tams be Loy Kom bun deans m Yns\ud. and ous iat mond +> Atlouds . Wha “ MWuh. Me adasly mm WMpanuon fat the tion Cowes 9 You Ott t ols wi Aenea {nat run ree — . ‘cen Tok 4a ues wil cml dem his, Had, idle etude pvt yan (ads mt Wain bi Umut D AU of a Wi qn Mal tin Oothe baels. Wwe WM thes N+ loertn Unig. wd 7 i hg ht Wovrd hwte. a Nit
  • Tags: Box 16, Box 16 Folder 2, Folder topic: Summerhill riot response | Atlanta | favorable | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 16, Folder 1, Document 22

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_016_001_022.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 16, Folder 1, Document 22
  • Text: “oF anc ke oes 7S eee ai Ot eet fo Si ok Wt fe eis oe. bficet- M20 Le. -72. pent? Qe g JGrHa A202 2 Kerth Kab Mpa RE LaLa he ee Haw ppc see ( neere.) offerte Uhaen Morria 7 Si Vy azd f L Ne esecd 3 BALD uot 4. 2 Phere t feel we \ ee eT a O tee es 4 Sich Avo) yet A- Cea ini ee ae? (hadi ieee fer 2 the pee z Lt pew Maccanhle; pe: wohereell ‘a <-- Gh ocean Phar fone EZ, : at Pie ays wie. ae So DL 9 Meet yi Cowen ed Pail ss idl teks ee ee oe apap =*07e* « 7a" oa **
  • Tags: Box 16, Box 16 Folder 1, Folder topic: Summerhill riot response | Atlanta | favorable | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 16, Folder 1, Document 34

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_016_001_034.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 16, Folder 1, Document 34
  • Text: Suite 522 Pulton Federal Building P. L.Bealy Smith, C.L.U. Atlanta,Georgia General Agent for Georgia JA 2-5455
  • Tags: Box 16, Box 16 Folder 1, Folder topic: Summerhill riot response | Atlanta | favorable | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 16, Folder 1, Document 25

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_016_001_025.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 16, Folder 1, Document 25
  • Text:
  • Tags: Box 16, Box 16 Folder 1, Folder topic: Summerhill riot response | Atlanta | favorable | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 16, Folder 2, Document 36

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_016_002_036.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 16, Folder 2, Document 36
  • Text: | dé _ nd a 4 7 7 : = “ over /() vears 1 Osa ae es ON _ IN ENVELOPES on POST OFFICE BOx 1267 ATLANTA ENVELOPE COMPANY ALANYA, BKORG SOUH DIVISION OF NATIONAL SERVICE INDUSTRIES. INCORPORATED TELEPHONE: 351-5011 September 8, 1966 Mayor Ivan Allen City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mister Mayor: I had hoped to be among the first to express appreciation to you for your leadership in our time of stress, The Vice President and many others have been ahead of me, but I still want you to know how I feel. Your courage and your decisiveness epitomize the best qualities we seek in civic leadership. Typical of your entire public career is the manner in which you faced our problems head-on this week. I recall your similar quick action when our community witnessed a tragic accident in Paris. You have a remarkable talent for moving into the center of problems rather than waiting for them to go away. I like this quality in you. Our town is fortunate to have you as its spokesman and leader. You deserve the fullest backing possible and the gratitude of every good citizen of our community. You have both my thanks and my support. It's a personal comfort to know you're "'in charge. '' God bless you. David Goldwasser HOME OFFICE SALES OFFICES: BIRMINGHAM / CHARLOTTE / CHATTANOOGA / COLUMBIA / JACKSONVILLE 1700 NORTHSIDE DRIVE, N.W. KNOXVILLE / LOUISVILLE / MACON / MIAMI / MOBILE / MONTGOMERY ATLANTA NASHVILLE / SHREVEPORT / TAMPA
  • Tags: Box 16, Box 16 Folder 2, Folder topic: Summerhill riot response | Atlanta | favorable | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 16, Folder 2, Document 37

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_016_002_037.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 16, Folder 2, Document 37
  • Text: Carriage House H & W Enterprise +4 Terminal Station 69 Spring St., S.W. Atlanta 3, Georgia Sept. 8, 1966 1326 16th St; Meridian, Misse Dear Mayor Allen, We talked with my sister, who lives in Atlanta, this morning. She was praising you, for the coruageous stand you have taken, in regard: to the Atlanta racial disturbance. She said all Atlanta is so proud of you this morning, but may I add to this Mayor Allen, that not only Atlantans are proud of you, but @ll of us, who are still True Americans, are Grateful, for the fine job you are doing. We, as never before, need more God Fearing men, like you, to Prove to thowe who are doing wrong, that Right still pervails over wrong. My sister and her husband, Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Harrison have the Carriage House Restaurant, in the Terminal Train Statione Maybe, you already know them, but if you don't, go by there someday or evening, and tell them that I, Kathleen LaBelle, said to treat you to the best steak in the house, which would make tiem very happy. I will continue to Pray for God to Grant you Divine Wisdom to Serve your people Rightously, and to continue to set a shining example, by which other states may follow, because if we lose our Freedom, we have lost Everything. May God Bless and Protect You and All your loved ones, Sincerely, pape Weise Kota a Mree Kathleen LaBelle
  • Tags: Box 16, Box 16 Folder 2, Folder topic: Summerhill riot response | Atlanta | favorable | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 16, Folder 2, Document 28

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_016_002_028.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 16, Folder 2, Document 28
  • Text: The Executive Committee FAVORABLE = ATLANTA Dr. and Mrs. Sidney Q. Janus (Sidney & Leah) Grand Jurors Association of Fulton County, Inc. first National-North Ave. Building P.O. Box 7532 Station C Atlanta, Georgia 30309 Atlanta, Georgia 30308 The Membership Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Haas(Leonard & Be) West End Jaycees Grizzard & Haas Suite 306 133 Carnegie Way, N.W. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Mr. Jack J, Rushin(Jack) 377 Techwood Dr., N.W, Atlanta, Georgia 30313 Miss Fay E, Mewborn (Fay) P. 0. Box 10903 Atlanta, Georgia 30310 Mrs. Roy Judson Duer P. O. Box 18604 Lenox Square Station Atlanta, Georgia 30326 Mr. Edgar P,. Scott P, O. Box 4541 The First National Bank of Atlanta Atlanta, Georgia 30302 P, 0. Box 4148 Atlanta, Georgia 30302 Reverend William L. Self Wieuca Road Baptist Church 3626 Peachtree Road, N.E. Atlanta, Geopgia 30326 Me, Robert M. Holder, Jr. (Bob) President Holder Construction Company 1926 Fulton National Bank Bld¢. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Mr, Arthur M, Kaplan Suite 676 1375 Peachtree St., NE. Atlanta, Georgia 30309 Reverend D, C. Coleman Campbell Chapel A.M.E. Church 1600 East 22nd Avenue Denver 5, Colorado Mr. L. D, Keith, Sr. 2746 Dale Creek Drive, N.W. Atlanta, Georgia 30318 Mrs, Marie Pullin 1886 Adler Cts, Be Es Atlanta, Georgia 30317 Mp. Arthur L. Harris (Arthur) Viee Pregident and Director Mead Packaging Atlanta, Georgia Mr, Louis Montag (Louis) First National Bank Building Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Mrs. Bobbie MN. Sledge 1492 South Gordon Street, S.W. Atlanta, Georgia
  • Tags: Box 16, Box 16 Folder 2, Folder topic: Summerhill riot response | Atlanta | favorable | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 16, Folder 2, Document 23

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_016_002_023.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 16, Folder 2, Document 23
  • Text: | Fone Mh nti Ms, 335 North Side oa SW, Se ge GALLE eh Guphe these rhs lean thas) eB, law. ted Bee pilowt? pind [ip Phat Lite an tiie ha fe Peat le, dar Ge i aebee® Stuy Iho Mees May we teamayeg Ce hat me ; srndhacs pues L denen ehih fiche frase P00 perk pee kat Lar C =a) / De reek a Datrs dgacnet auch) iP St vigts Lhe Degree to cept cl * taguat Thad Word, pope yong aw) Prep al Qe f -tiholie sak ee ti, Hi gt Lecrr_ Bah mora a ate 2. gs eon ae pi By Jowak Moskoy Le0s ee A the Reepbad ark. D useilh Whede ind ids bil 2 rotfarv | ie Nssoek Tay & Watt and. 2 : Ge al Be Wiel ork (aseiy SELF ams Ltd fod Te Gans aie ted Chabert and Miah Thon eo, fe bx Abrei\Oit 2s aed The Wid, Of Mok I Mrs td. ZI bef ciel ‘el An the, Lee eaefleass i alee 9 hw ere Bs OS fate 7 ara Frade, (Be. Mead.
  • Tags: Box 16, Box 16 Folder 2, Folder topic: Summerhill riot response | Atlanta | favorable | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 16, Folder 2, Document 33

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_016_002_033.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 16, Folder 2, Document 33
  • Text: Move Georgia Forward with Ellis Arnall for Governor September 8, 1966 The Hon. Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor, City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Geargia Dear Mr. Allen: Out-of-town visitors havecoften asked me why Atlantan's have such fierce civie pride - sometimes this is hard to explain - we have it - we don't know exactly why - it's like trying to explain why you like a great symphony or the feeling you get from looking at a great painting and somehow knowing all is well. On Tuesday of this week you’put this pride in sharp focus. In the ugliness of the whole sordid mess, your demonstration of leadership and bravery was a moment of triumph for all good citizens of Atlanta. Thank you, Mr. Mayor. inc c ly, / rg . Ze Mt ( y \ AAA Aft Trma McAulay a: Arnall for Governor Headquarters: Atlanta American Motor Hotel « Spring St. and Carnegie Way « Atlanta, Ga. Phone 524-8435
  • Tags: Box 16, Box 16 Folder 2, Folder topic: Summerhill riot response | Atlanta | favorable | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 16, Folder 2, Document 25

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_016_002_025.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 16, Folder 2, Document 25
  • Text: [Fel Cee Ae Atlee J fio: Sep I, )Fb A Joa U (Qitew,}r vs Viuectha cde de. NW Oa aA ; ao fYearv Mar es . the. m Ane ake put e ms bene Maur pprcced t at: bow - an wd) ch The Cow de ptt. pu oT weg Ti we of Ttewday bad ‘ jake A OL LrMFere Ak i. —, Rave. pede Me Nid Cu. Lo, oy er Wass ah ‘Dux a OAL ff & ion bravery 4 teat ae ody ti 1D “at Ue LAY AMAA dip 5 4 Cpnmeiun HA, 3S bah Netnale arr The, the / Aha din eLD UN Lidl LO (tcc, Any Q Drular ALLS, Piracmadsy Ah ph, ets Muda tiudig ed) AA-praler, - A A, dreal ; aka CHL MLA, te th,. great ecla 7 Ctl aunty Aud Pit ple impencal. ah pasta ads Ant d bad. Mews wd Heep ba > 4A oy, ( y Urea g 2 ba, Mechelen hate | 4,
  • Tags: Box 16, Box 16 Folder 2, Folder topic: Summerhill riot response | Atlanta | favorable | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 16, Folder 2, Document 29

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_016_002_029.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 16, Folder 2, Document 29
  • Text: FAVORABLE = ATLANTA Mrs, Frances Hargrett (Frances) 355 Hillside Dr., N.W. Atlanta, Georgia 30305 Mr, John J. Partridge E. R. Partridge, Inc. Pryor and Mitchell Streets Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Mr. Julian S, Carr ( Julian) 1600 First Federal Building Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Mr. Pollard Turman (Pollard) President J. M. Tull Metals Co., Inc, Pe O, Box 4628 Atlanta, Georgia 30302 Mr. E. D,. Lord Life Insurance Company of Georgia Atlanta, Georgia Mr, Alan F, Kiepper (Alan) County Manager Fulton County Georgia County Administration Building Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dean George FE, Manners (George) Georgia State College School of Business Administration 33 Gilmer St., S. E. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 The Kiwanis Club of Atlanta, Cascade Heights 2312 Sewell Road, S. W. Atlanta, Georgia 30311 WAOK Council of Women Mrs. Louise Watley, President 110 Edgewood Ave., N.E,. Atlanta, Georgia 30303
  • Tags: Box 16, Box 16 Folder 2, Folder topic: Summerhill riot response | Atlanta | favorable | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 16, Folder 2, Document 21

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_016_002_021.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 16, Folder 2, Document 21
  • Text: HOG: . Wikia Z WE wt, ce AL Ke, shang. a& FO0Z29 Ae: limon AG6E6 Tle Morerratle Lown alkene Cc 3 Ha kf T hie: Dar. MMe, 2] tit~ ir ign ih ed w) * tnd The iL Treo abe Maat cob, lox dG, TV only ah pil ord Os any? an brow tht PF Aviw 4 / ra g de katf, ( Me Ate jee a a Cw 7: pet tbat ee de Uez: "font , Oundk the ace re aa Se hy a wie cme of oe a Vatetie men wept, 43 mores Atha tes Art abrags pm i ay
  • Tags: Box 16, Box 16 Folder 2, Folder topic: Summerhill riot response | Atlanta | favorable | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 16, Folder 2, Document 13

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_016_002_013.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 16, Folder 2, Document 13
  • Text: ATLANTA FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION ATLANTA, GEORGIA JAMES P. BROWN VICE PRESIDENT September 20, 1966 The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor of the City of Atlanta 68 Mitchell Street, S. W. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Ivan: I find my words are inadequate to express my admiration for you in your great leadership of the city I love. If there is anything I can do for you, please call upon me. Sincerely, James P. Brown JIJPB:k
  • Tags: Box 16, Box 16 Folder 2, Folder topic: Summerhill riot response | Atlanta | favorable | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021