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Box 3, Folder 11, Document 27

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_011_027.pdf
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  • Title: Box 3, Folder 11, Document 27
  • Text: NEW CAREERS IN INDUSTRY Frank Riessman, Ph.D. Directox New Careers Development Center and Lita Paniagua Associate Research Scientist New Careers Training Laboratory New York University November 1967 INTRODUCTION "Why not say we must train a million unemployed a year for unfilled jobs that already exist?" Bernard Asbell asks this cogent question in The New Improved American,* an analysis of the profound technological changes tak- ing place in the United States. He was referring to a puzzling American paradox: an acute shortage of workers coexistent with an acute shortage of jobs. While industry spends billions seeking out and training skilled and professional personnel, it also bears the costs of a high ratio of employee turnover, and helps to cover the huge losses caused to society through massive unemployment and underemployment of the unskilled. The solution of these problems has become an urgent concern of private enterprise in America. A New Careers program for industry would embody Mr. Asbell's Practical point of view. The program's goal: the creation of a rich resource of industry-oriented, highly skilled manpower, the reduction of personnel turnover, and the reduction of unemployment among the low skilled. Its method: expansion of new approaches to manpower recruitment, training and education already being utilized by private enterprise, plus structuring of visible oppor- tunities for promotion, upgrading and horizontal mobility for all workers. A New Careers model for industry would requires “veGraw-Hill, New York ,1965, p.43. le wi im Entry level positions in which workers can be immediately productive. Training immediately available and intricately connected to these entry positions. A visible career ladder between these entry positions and higher positions within the job hierarchy. Relevant training and education for higher positions directly available through the job. Sharp integration of training and education, because education is decisive for any major advancement. The responsibility for packaging this training to be undertaken by industry (or by a subcontracted training resource), rather than left to the worker, EW CAREERS IN INDUSTRY Private enterprise has moved to the forefront in the search for new designs that Will close the gap between the shortage of skilled manpower and the millions of jobless. Traditional methods of personnel recruitment are not producing the workers industry needs fast enough and in sufficient numbers, and the cost of the persistent effort to find adequate help is high: The New York Times estimates the yearly volume of its help- wanted classified and display ads at $30 million. The Los Angeles Times' volume in help-wanted ads is around $34 million. An officer of the New York Assn. of Personnel Agencies esti- mates that 85% of all jobs listed by private employment agen- cies in New York City include payment of the agency fee by the employer. "Comparable high percentages of fee-paid jobs would be found in other major cities", the officer said. "Many agencies will not even list an opening unless the fee is paid by the employer. It's a worker's market." (The average fee is 10% of the first month's salary.) A survey of hiring costs paid by 17 firms in the Rochester, N. Y. area (9 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing firms) indicates a total over 3 months (June and November, 1965 and February, 1966) of $278,000, with 2/3 of this amount reported by the manufacturing companies, and the balance by the non- manufacturing. Average cost per hire was $222 for manufacture ers and $138 for non-manfacturers. Spurred by the urgency of their requirements, business firms invest heavily in improving the skills and knowledge of their employees with educational and training programs: ". »« » In 1965 Business Week estimated a total amount of $18 billion and Fortune gave a higher figure of $24 billion (spent by private industry in this area). More recently, it has been estimated that industry spent $17 billion in 1966 in this area."2 1 Natl. Industrial Conference Board Record, "Hiring Costs", New York, January, 1967, 2NAM Reports, Natl. Assn. of Manufacturers, June 19, 1967. =25 A portion of these amounts was allocated to training programs designed to tap the unutilized potential of the natinn's unskilled, underemployed and unemployed labor force. Private enterprise has also begun developing innovative techniques of recruiting and hiring so as to bring the disadvantaged into the labor market. ' All indications point to the need for accelerating the drive to produce workers with sophisticated know-how, ",. . « The importance of developing solutions to unemployment problems is. . . significant in light of projections of job needs to 1975 as prepared by the Bureau of Labor Statistics: while our population will increase by 16%, the labor force will inerease by an estimated 20% to include 94.1 million workers "1 ",. . « About 230,000 skilied and 350,000 semi-skilled workers are expected to be needed each year to replace those who retire or die."2 Following are some manpower needs projected to 1975, based on studies that include patterns of demand and consumer purchasing, technological development, new products and industries. 3 Millions of Workers Needed by 1975 and Employed in 1964 1975 1964. Manufacturing 23 17.3 Professional & Technical 13 8.5 Technicians, draftsmen, etc. 1.4 »825 Craftsmen, foremen, etc. 12S 9 Clerical 14 10.7 Sales 5.6 4.5 INatl. Assn. of Manufactureres, op. cit. 2Q0ecupational Outlook Handbook, Bull. 1450., U. S. Dept. of Labor, 1966-67, pp. 363-364. “compiled from Monthly Labor Review, March-April, 1965, U. S. Dept. of Labor, reprint 2462. =3= In the face of such existing and future needs, unemployment is intolerable. Nevertheless, the millions who languish without work continue to burden the economy and scholars, legislators, civic organizations and the press consistently diagnose the frustra- tions of the unemployed as a leading cause of social disruption. Concern over the lack of work for the disadvantaged and the ancillary social ills this causes has brought forth many proposals for emergency measures. The business community has become increas-= ingly involved in the discussion and on August 24, 1967 the Urban Coalition (a grouping of more than 800 community and business leaders from throughout the U. S.) called for the creation of at least one million "meaningful and socially useful" Fe The intent of the emergency measures suggested is laudable, but such proposals do not focus the problem so directly as does Bernard Asbell's apt phrase: "Why not say we must train a million unemployed a year for unfilled jobs that already exist?" This approach establishes a one-to-one relationship between industry's demand for skilled workers and the lack of work for tone term "meaningful" must be defined in two directions. From the employer's viewpoint meaningful work must supply a real need to his organization, help him to make a profit and not be subject to turnover of personnel. From the employee's viewpoint, meaningful work must do more than pay a wage. It must motivate him to remain on the job by giving him a sense of achievement and dignity, realistic opportunities for steady advancement and the assurance of permanent employment and continuing employability. Socially useful work produces goods and services, promotes a higher standard of living, provides fiscal revenue, creates stability, and furthers the goals of society. Make-work and dead-end jobs accomplish few of these aims, except temporarily, principally because they do not encourage permanence; do not motivate the worker beyond achieves ing more than his weekly wage; do not build morale and loyalty. the unemployed, As noted above, many firms are already actively exploring this direction, However, most programs do not yet go far beyond equipping the workers to function at the semi-skilled and entry level. Until now there has not been a complete step by step linking of training and education from basic skills and know- ledge to the highly skilled and middle management positions. To fully achieve such integration it is necessary to create a practical program that will devélas appropriate motivation in the unemployed or underemployed people so that they will not only accept entry level positions, but also become via education and training a reservoir of manpower for the middle line skilled, administrative, technical and even professional positions, A design for creating a New Careers program in industry for those now unskilled would utilize the availability of training for those thousands of openings as the incentive, the motivational impetus to bring the disadvantaged into the labor force. Xerox Corporation discovered in a recent experiment that good incentives can attract unsuspected numbers of persons ready and willing to work: hen Xerox announced that skill training and basic education were available in its Project Step-Up, it found among the applicants four times as many persons who did not need the training than those who did, and was able to hire them immediately as regular employees,1 1Telephone interview with J. ‘jestbrook MacPherson, ACSiJ, Manpower Resources Administrator, Xerox Corp., Rochester, N.Y. This would seem to support a statement by economist Charles Killingsworth: ",. 6 e it seems prcbable that imprcving employment prospects would tend to pull more people into the labor market and. . ~« raise the labor force participation rate." (Testimony before Senate Sub- commission on Employment and Manpower, Sept. 20, 1963.) =Sia THE NEW CAREERS MODEL As a solution to unemployment and the dire shortage of skilled and professional workers in the public sector, the New Careers approach was introduced with the passage of the Nelson-Scheuer Amendment in 1966, This legislation provided for the hiring, job- training and education of nonprofessionals by the public service agencies in the fields of health, education and welfare. Under its provisions, persons hired from the disadvantaged community work as auxiliary personnel and can receive time off from their jobs for education and training which will equip them to qualify for more responsible positions, All job classifications within the parti- cipating public agencies are to be "careerized", that is redefined and restructured so that employees may move upward gradually toward semi-professional and professicnal levels as they acquire experience and the necessary high school and academic education add credentials, part of which can be obtained during job time, The New York City Board of Education is Geveloping career lines for its teaching personnel. A program of advanced training and education with released time from the job to attend classes will enable entry-level teacher aides (non- professionals hired from the disadvantaged community) to advance to assistant teacher, teacher intern and certified teacher, with more responsibilities and higher salaries at each level, The Board has made special arrangements with local colleges and universities so that the auxiliaries will receive training, education and academic credit. In the private sector a similar New Careers program could be established with funds contributed by government or private founda- tions to such firms as desired financial aid, The model would require the following: nO i Entry level positions in which workers can be immediately productive. 2. Training immediately available and intricately connected to these entry positions, 3. A visible career ladder between these entry positions and higher positions within the job hierarchy. 4. Relevant training and education for higher positions directly available through the job. Se Sharp integration of training and education, because education is decisive for any major advancement, 6. The employer (or a subcontracted training resource) to be responsible for the packaging of this training and making it available to the worker, rather than leaving the responsibility for acquiring training and education up to the individual effort ofeach worker, In a sense the career incentive program would be directed toward the disadvantaged job candidate who asks, "Why should I take this dead-end beginning job which is boring, dirty and doesn't go anywhere?" The educational provisions would include making is possible for the employee to acquire basic knowledge (the 3 R's), high school equivalency and industry-related higher education leading to academic degrees. Education would take place, in part, during working hours with time released from the job for attending classes, The employee could advance to semi-skilled, skilled or middle manage-~ ment and administrative positions as heacquired education and train-= ing provided by the company, and demonstrated his capabilities, Funding for firms unable to carry the full costs of partici- pating in the program might be provided by government or private =7= foundations. Such funding would contribute toward entry level salaries, the special training and education programs, and outside technical assistance on such matters as setting up career line 1 structures, providing supportive services, etc. Private enterprise would have full autonomy on all aspects of administering such a program, including selection of personnel, development of training methods and educational curricula, choice of outside technical aid, if any is desired, and other components. INDUSTRY @XPLORES NE.J GROUND IN MANPO'JER DEVELOPMENT An interesting experiment in job-training with funds supplied by government and private industry is under way at Jestern Electiic Co., in Kearny, N. J.: The U, S. Departments of Commerce, Health and Labor contri- buted $1 million and ten private companies contributed $340,000 to Western Electric's pilot training project which began operation in January, 1967. Each week 40 persons from the disadvantaged community are enrolled for a rotating 9 week course in basic education and technical skills to qualify for entry jcbs in the metal industries. Instructors in basic education are supplied by the New Jersey State Dept. of Education and technical training is imparted by experts from the industry. Trainees receive $41 per week while train- ing, plus $5 per dependent. To date (Oct., 1967) 361 persons have completed the course and 216 have been hired by 70 companies in the Newark area, A spokesman for ‘Jestern Glectric believes that the program will continue permanently, with increasing participation by, private firms, He said, "le're telling them 'come on in, the water's fine'", lrunding arrangements might be worked out on a scale of 90% of the above costs for the first year, with decreasing percentages in the following years, moving on toward 0% at some later point, Such a procedure is followed. by public service agencies and government under the New Careers Program in the public sector, -3—_ Although the jJestern Electric project is limited to preparing the trainees to qualify only for entry jobs, this experiment might easily be expanded to include both higher skill training and educa- tion to provide the industries of the area with a more specialized source of manpower. Even middle-size companies can benefit from facilitating educational opportunities to employees, as has been demonstrated by another program in the New Jersey area: lellington Printing Industries of Trenton, N. J. has found it practical and economical to establish an educational incentive program which covers tuition and text-book costs (and tutoring when necessary) for its employees who wish to obtain elementary, high school and college education, At present 10% of the 400 employees participate, and larger enrollments are expected in the coming term. Total cost to the company is considered "negligible". Business Manager Nathan Mayer says: "Some of our men have been able fin only two years to acquire a high school diploma and go on to college. Some who started as helpers on a machine crew two years ago now work as foremen, The program has supplied us with permanent, capable workers, and we plan to expand it," He adds: "'e put the program into effect not from a desire to perform good works, but as a practical solution to our problem of not being able to find the skilled help we need," ‘lellington Industries also decided to discard conventional methods of hiring. Most applicants for entry positions are under- educated and unskilled. Mr. Mayer says: "We decided to adopt the policy of hiring on a first come, first served basis and to elimi- nate the costly and often meaningless effort spent on interviewing and testing. Although he may be a capable, willing worker, a job applicant from the disadvantaged population may not know how to make a good impression in an interview, and a poor previous work record may indicate only that he had not had sufficient motivation -O= in the past to remain on a job, Our assumption is that a man who is willing to work can be motivated to become a permanent employee and to upgrade himself for positions that are increasingly valuable to himself and to us." Although the ‘Jellington employees now attend school on their own time, the company's interest in helping them acquire an educa- tion and the visible opportunities for promotion have motivated an encouraging number of workers to take on the often difficult task of attending classes. It is logical to suppose that with time on the job available for education a much larger number of workers would participate. Other companies make education available to their employees on company tima: The DuPont Company recently completed its first experiment in providing basic education to its under-educated employees, Language skills were taught on company time to 46 veteran employees who are now eligible to take skill-training courses offered by DuPont, These courses are given to unskilled employees after they have passed an initial period of fami- liarization in the firm's labor pool, Instruction is on company time, two full days weekly, Trainees study at their own pace, with the help of a supervisor who answers specific questions, After completing the training, the employces work in the division for which they have prepared, Jorkers can upgrade themselves to perform higher skills leading to foreman positions by attending technical schools of their own time, but with aid from the company on tuition, The Polareid Corporation of Cambridge, Mass. offers courses to its enployees ranging from basic English and conversational Russiaa to polymer chemistry. (There is no academic credit Giv«i: Tar these courses, ) It would scem feasible in each instance to link the instruction offered so that employees could obtain accredited education and higher skilis to qualify them for positions requiring more education and expertise, -10=- The programs developed by private enterprise in working with the under=educated are not limited to heavy or manufacturing industries, Service institutions, such as banks, have also found it worthwhile to reach out to the disadvantaged for recruiting workers and facilitating education to them on the job. Chase Manhattan Bank established a job-training program in 1964 for high school students from the hard-core poverty areas. Many of the trainees are potential drop-outs and have police records. Students entering the program at the junior year of high school receive 21 months of basic educa- tion and instruction in banking and finance, They attend classes at the bank from 2 to 5 p.m, daily and are paid $1.86 per hour, They continue to attend high school during the morning. After graduation they are hired for entry clerical positions. They may go on to college on their own time, with aid from the bank via its tuition refund program. Xerox Corporation's Project Step-Up was another valuable demon- stration of the response of the poor to a program that links educa- tion to employment, Project Step-Up was created to explore the feasibility of recruiting, hiring, training and giving remedial education to persons from the underprivileged community. The program was postulated on two basic assumptions: 1. It is good business, one that enhances the profit- making apparatus. 20 The company could cut a clear path for itself to a realistic solution for one of the nation's most complex problems: How to open up skilled employment oppor= tunities to the unemployed, Many of the trainees had police records, bad credit ratings and spotty employment histories,’ To qualify for training they had to be unemployed or underemployed, receive substantially less than a passing score on the company's regular employe ment tests and not have finished high schcol, The 19 week training period took place during the day=shift working hours, 40% of the time was for classroom instruction, and the rest for work and informal counseling to support the new learning and adjustment to supervision and work rules, Trainees were paid an hourly rate slightly below that for ee Tse regular new employees and were eligible for all company benefits, All the trainees completed the program and qualified for regular employment, Foremen reported that trainees adjusted well and met all standards, Xerox officials were impressed by the trainees' commitment, their perseverance and their overall reaction to the training, the work environment and to other employees, The regular employees strongly supported the program, A Xerox spokesman said that the program was economical because aside from the men who were trained, the company was able to hire immediately four times as many applicants who did not need training. Furthermore, he said, the company feels the program paid for itself with the new knowledge gained as to methods of recruiting and moti- vating disadvantaged employees. These techniques will now be applied by Rochester Jobs, Inc., an organization of 70 firms in the area which will act as a non-profit public service agency to hire, counsel and train workers from the underprivileged community. Many other firms in the U. S. have found that providing basic education to their employees is a worthwhile investment and that the cost is not high. A basic literary program utilizing audio-visual techniques developed by MIND (Methods of Intellectual Development, subsidiary of Corn Preducts, Argo, Ill.) costs $240 per person, if administered by the firm purchasing the service, or $450 if administered by MIND. Academic escalations of 4 grade levels e@an be achieved with under-educated adults in 160 hours of MIND's basic education program. The cost of educating a person for useful work which will cone vert him from a recipient of relief nto a tax-payer may be sur- prisingly lows -l2- & literary program established by the Chicago Board of lelfare demonstrated that teaching reading and arithmetic skills to a person for five years costs less than his relief check for a single month, Providing educational and specialization opportunities to upper echelon personnel has long been an established practice in private enterprise and many different types of models exist from the out- right granting of leaves of absence and fellowships for postgraduate study to intensive short-term courses, National Training Laboratories reports that since 1956 more than 3,000 top and middle executives have been sent by their companies to NTL centers in Maine, Florida and Arizona to acquire proficiency in working with the complex human problems inherent in the management process. The American Foundation for Management Research has heavy advanced bookings for its Management Learning Center where companies send teams of their top executives for intensive training in problem solving via the team approach, It would seem that with the tremendous demand for managers and professional personnel forecast for the years ahead, it would be to the best interest of private enterprise to expand its facilities for upward education and mobility so that the potential of the now lesser skilled can be tapped, A report by Sibson & Co., New York management consultants, predicts that by 1984 there will be openings for 2 million top executives as compared to 500,000 now. Jith careful thought, programs to careerize the industrial job structure from the production level through the management level, via a linking of education, skill training and promotional oppor-= tunities, could well redound in enormous benefits to private business and society. =-13— MORE REALISTIC TRAINING The high cost of personnel turn over plagues private enter- prise, Many firms have attempted to solve this problem by fraction-~ ing jobs, employing moonlighters or part time workers, all of which solutionshave impermanence implicit in their very nature. Part of the reason for the excessive turn over rate is the lack of realistic advancement opportunities for the entry worker who has no clear paths to the middle and higher level positions, Careerizing the industry and providing career-oriented incentives including training and education would introduce the necessary moti- vation both prior to the job and on the job to fill these positions and recruit the necessary employees, Training programs not directly tied into job opportunities have not been entirely successful, After trainees have been taught skills, it has often been found that there were no jobs available for those skills, In other words, training has not been realistic. & comment on a government-sponsored training program, recently issued by the AFL-CIO Executive Council illustrates this danger: "The government's training program provides for training, with payment of allowances up to two years. Unfortunately, the present emphasis is often on training programs for jobs which are dead end as well as low wage. Moreover, as long as present training allowances remain as meager as they now are, few workers, especially heads of families, can afford to forego the opportunity for immediate employment even at low wages == particularly if there is no assurance of a job at the end of the training period, The government's programs should be linked with job placement, when train- ing is completed, . ."L 1 statement on the Urban Crisis, mimeographed, washington, D.C.,; Sept. 12, 1967. | | milan It appears logical that private enterprise is especially well suited to train and educate workers, since it knows exactly what positions must be filled and what is needed to fill them, In the words of the National Association of Manufacturers: ", . « we should realize that the goals of an effective manpower policy should be to develop a more effective American work force; to create jobs which utilize abilities, and to match people and jobs efficiently. . . Industry has not only the expertise to achieve superior results, but it also has the vital interest in full utilization of human resources," ith the training undextaken by industry as part of a career-= ized program, not only would trainees be more precisely matched to available openings, but would also be immediately productive and would know that as they improve their skills they can step into more rewarding jobs. As we have seen, many segments of a career incentive approach already exist in the creative projects undertaken by private enter= prise. An integrated New Careers Program for industry would pack- age advantageously techniques for recruiting the workers and pro-= viding motivation via skill training, Leunetven and clearly structured upgrading opportunities to create new Lacrdes of manpower, reduce labor turnover and combat unemployment. There are a number of additional Laiea from a New Careers pro- gram in the private sector: workers will be able to move up on their own industries as well as acquire training enabling them to move to other industries and to the public sector if they so desire, 1iNAM Reports, June 19, 1967. -15= The program will provide new taxpayers and consumers, thus increas- ing aggregate demand; it will reduce welfare expenditures, FR,LP: jet
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 11, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | Inc. | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 11, Document 25

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_011_025.pdf
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  • Title: Box 3, Folder 11, Document 25
  • Text: 7 ATLANTA UNIVERSITY 2 ul fo ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30314 kv WV > fh 7 a A ~ February 3, 1968 4 404-523-4303 MULTI-PURPOSE TRAINING CENTER PHONE Mayor Ivan Allen City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mayor Allen: During the past six weeks, members of Atlanta University OEO Multi-Purpose Training Center have received training at the Frank Riessman New Careers Laboratory of New York University. We are excited over the possibility of the new careers strategy for moving poor people out of poverty. Basically, the new careers idea provides an alternative avenue to the present credentials system based on high school diploma and other degrees for the achievement of professional and skilled positions. The approach requires that individuals be employed in a position with the existence of a career ladder, training and education, both in educational institutions and on the job. For individuals who have dropped out of the school system and who are hostile toward returning to it, this program seems to be a major opportunity. While the new careers approach is being tested in several major cities throughout the country, we feel that it is advisable to make key individuals in the Southeastern Region familiar with the approach, Accordingly, the Atlanta University OEO Multi-Purpose Training Center is interested in the possibility of a joint community action agencies and industry conference on the new careers strategy. Dr. Riessman has assured us of support and participation from his staff, This letter invites you or a designated person to serve on the planning committee for the regional conference, The planning committee will be concerned with the following items: 1. The desirability and feasibility of such a conference; 2. The conference participants; 3. Time and places h. Program content; and 5. Conference follow-up procedures. atanee Yea February 3, 1968 Page 2 The new careers approach seems to be an excellent strategy for cooperating with President Johnson's request of industry to employ hard core poor people, and for helping community action agencies, welfare departments, boards of education, health departments, and other large public and private agencies, to provide career ladders vis-a-vis deadend jobs for the poor. Your early response to this invitation will be appreciated greatly. Sincerely yours, 5 i] 4 2 p Tilman C, Cothran Director Multi-Purpose Training Center TCC z:mk Sent to: Mr, James Parham Mr. W.L. Montague Mr. Wm. Norwood Mr. Donald Hollowell Mr. John Dean Mr, Clarence Coleman
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 11, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | Inc. | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 11, Document 37

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_011_037.pdf
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  • Title: Box 3, Folder 11, Document 37
  • Text: ~ ae " HAVE E XP tESSED THE x ATION: AL. WH. 1. OF THE E: KOPT. E “THROT GU ENAC TME NT or THE ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY ACT AND CREATION OF THE OFFICE OF ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY AS A MEANS TOWARDS ELIMINATING THE CAUSES OF POVERTY IN THIS COUNTRY, AND i THE JOB CORPS WAS ESTABLISHED AS AX INTEGRAL AND VITAL PART OF THE NATIONAL ANTI-POVERTY PROGRAM, TO PROVIDE DISADVANTAGED YOUNG MEN AND WOMEN WITH A CHANCE TO ACQUIRE THE SKILLS AND ATTITOCDES NEEDED TO BECOME LCSEREFUL AND PRODUCTIVE MEMBERS OF THE COMMUNITY; AND THE JOB CORPS HAS Reda h i VAL SERVICE TO THE PEOPLE OF THIS COUNTRY AND THE PROPLE OF ', WIT THE UNITED EFFORTS OF LEADERS IN THE _ FIELD OF COMMERCE AND ORGANIZED LABOR TO GIVE USEFUL EMPLOYMENT TO THOUSANDS OF OUR CITIZENS; AND A JOB CORPS EXHIBITION, SPONSORED BY LEADING INDUSTRIAL AND EDUCATIONAL b,1Ve8 ORGANIZATIONS OPENS TO THE PUBLIC 3 : x August | CEXEER-OL-FHE-TIME-AND-LIEK-BEHSDING-NEM-YORK-CERY, WHICH WILL TELL THE Qe he PRAMATIC eens OF THE JOB CORPS UNDER THE TITLE"A CHANCE TO BE SOMEBODY,’ Regency - \van Ariane oh Tou ‘MAYOR OF THE CITY OF NEA SORE, DO HEREBY PROCLAIM Byatt Howge THE WEEK OF SON CARO 21956, AS Praqust 14-34 1408 "TOH CORPS WEEK" PtoR SY TA IN 3424 -LORIK-ErFPY AND URGE ALL CITIZENS TO SUPPORT THE COMMENUABLE WORK OF THE TOB CORPS IN WITNESS WHEREOF THAVE HERELNTO SET MY HAND AND CAUSED THE SEAL. OF THE CITY OF MEM—YORK TO TE APPRISED, ON fate { “MAYOR, THE CITY ee U «.
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 11, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | Inc. | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 11, Document 14

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  • Title: Box 3, Folder 11, Document 14
  • Text: WOODRUFF MEDICAL CENTER - Q EMORY UNIVERSITY . THOMAS K. GLENN MEMORIAL BUILDING d 69 BUTLER STREET, 5S. E. ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 d SCHOOL OF MEDICINE January 16 ; 1968 DE NT Oo a ENTIVE MEDICINE AND NITY HEALTH ww F Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Sir: You and Mr. Dan Sweat were well represented last Wednesday afternoon, January 10, at the information meeting for the Comprehensive Neighborhood Health Center program in the Price Area by Mr. Johnny Robinson. This program has great potential meaning for the future development of health care especially for the medically indigent in the Atlanta area, but it's success will in large part be determined by the joint parti- cipation of all areas of the Atlanta community interested in health. Your office could be extremely effective in motivating the local public health and welfare agencies, city, county, and state into greater cooperation and interest in the program. To this end we would welcome the opportunity if you would be able to give some of your own time to help us go into this aspect of the program in greater detail. Sincerely, age: Fa fin fh : Calvin A. Brown, M.D. illiam M. Marine, M.D., M.P.H. Project Co-Director Associate Professor Project Co-Director CAB/WMM:be
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 11, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | Inc. | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 11, Document 5

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_011_005.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 3, Folder 11, Document 5
  • Text: February 6, 1968 MEMORANDUM To: General Carl Sutherland From: Dan Sweat The attached telegram was received today by Mayor Allen. I am sending it to you for your information and action if you are interested, DS :fy Attachment
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 11, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | Inc. | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 11, Document 23

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_011_023.pdf
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  • Title: Box 3, Folder 11, Document 23
  • Text: EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT OFFICE OF ECONOMIC WASHINGTON, D.C. 20506 OPPORTUNITY vabrwzy 1h, 196 Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor of Atlanta Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mayor Allen: Thank you for the prompt reply to my telegram regard- ing the possible employment of staff personnel from four of our Job Corps Centers. I know that I speak for the staff personnel involved when I say that your kind and thoughtful consideration for their welfare, together with your prompt offer of assistance and cooperation in an attempt to find employ- ment for them, is deeply appreciated. With every best wish. Sincerely, x |\ 7 | VK We Kelly Director \ Job Corps ~
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 11, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | Inc. | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 11, Document 30

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_011_030.pdf
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  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 11, Document 30
  • Text: re eek sail HONE WESSAGE re WYS | / Name ‘ f= &o- Cit Telephone No. JAG = wda Pages ) eT Wants you to call [|] Is here to see you [_] Returned your call [-] Came by to see you (_]_ Left the following message: De Pouts, Mlawkiw wee, te ww Bun m% Danco nk tx. wots & op ie te tale Mins Seg hom. woh ype the Chasgs, Gpbaas f, Gn Charente. Cplermin thom ux rb. 4 Gadd [phe rnsan fitte Wh, Jlationwl? Chasoniatw = DZ Dates EE: p2 Time 40-#o a. a Tey 4 oe By FORM 25-5
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 11, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | Inc. | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 11, Document 42

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_011_042.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 11, Document 42
  • Text: INFORMATION COPY - CITY OF ATLANTA Bogs om, 1 APpetr a i } OFFICE OF ECONDMIG CPFORTUNITY EXECUTIVE OF FICE GF THE PRESIOEN WAS Ton, OC Upon subm t cate OFO will pr eae foctacPana: out such cech 1 > « te =“). Y z 5 Coxe ub i 3 belo be ewe @S Prev c ire te bin Cc 1. Ac the present time we expege to designate and seek OEO recognition of: Ko] The existing communis; action agency as the CAA fae our communicy. (] A new public or privare non-profic agency as che CAA. {] Our own g ment as the CAA a) Ye r 1 pref ry decisions, 6 i tiles te Hase aon ee Fae bh _ * r a * e c ‘ fc oc ag o f 3. Oclter jurisdictions that we are requesting to juin us in designating the CAA include: J€Lty of Atlanta Fulton County Rockdale County NAME OF S Gwinnett County Fri re ec aaeaea 7 wi Gwinnett County Courthouse Lawrenceville, Georgia 963-4687 Tyee b —.5 = —- eur eooit ~- i ep=sna7 =f pat W. Ray Morgan, Chairman 3/6/68 Gwinnett County Commissioners Ji] began
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 11, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | Inc. | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 11, Document 13

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_011_013.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 11, Document 13
  • Text: THE ATLANTA CONSTITUTION has long been one of the | staunchest supporters of OEO, with numerous signed and unsigned editorials supporting all programs for the poor. Editor Gene Patterson and editorial cartoonist Cliff Baldowski have been typical of the support given by all the Constitution staff. The Atlanta Journal has given great support to the Office of Economic Opportunity and its legislation, particularly through editorial endorsement, the " personal columns of Reese Cleghorn, and editorial cartoons by Lou Erickson. Television Station WSB has given strong, unusual and consistent support to all OEO programs, not only in its news coverage but in repeated editorial support from Ray Hoare and his staff, and in the excellent editorial cartoons of Bill Daniels. Judge James Barrow - Athens, Ga. In recognition of Judge Barrow's outstanding: civic activities in assisting in the formation of the Community Action Agency serving a multi-county area, and for his valuable assistance in the operation of the Athens Adult High School, a OEO funded adult education program, the Urban Service Award is , presented to Judge Barrow. Dr. William Holmes Borders, Pastor of Wheat Street Baptist Church. In Recognition of your profound concern for the welfare of all men, for your dedication in extending your ministeral duties from the pulpit to the community to meet, not only the spiritual needs of those you serve, but their need for housing, food, and better jobs; for your insurmountable efforts to meet with any group, to speak for any person, and to work for any cause that motivates, upgrades, and upLifts mankind toward a better life. Mrs. Earl Metzger, Jr. In recognition of your service as a volunteer civic worker in the interest of uplifting of your fellow citizens and your community. In recognition of the services rendered as Director of the "Volunteer Task Force" a training program for more effective volunteer service by members of the Atlanta Community, in the many social agencies and programs in fighting the "War on Poverty". Father Edward 0. Waldron, Rector, St. Alban's Episcopal Church, Augusta, Georgia Board Member - Richmond Economic Opportunity Council, Augusta, Ga. In recognition cof your extreme concern for the problems of the poor in the City of Augusta and of Richmond County. For your Christian dedication as you worked unselfishly and untiringly to arouse your community to become concerned also of their impoverished brothers in their midst until the need to activate a broadly based anti-poverty program to provide opportunities for these families to live and enjoy a better life was recognizedetayd actor phshed Mrs. Mattie Ansle ATlanta Ge eee sey . Lote! eee Employee - Atlanta Concentrated Employment Program, Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. In recognition of your hard work and outstanding services rendered in organizing your Community in fighting the poverty, William W. Allison, Deputy Administrator of Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. © In recognition of your keen awareness of problems, untiring service and dedicated efforts in the coordination of resourees of Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc., State and Local Governments and the Atlanta Community in developing and implementing unique and effective approaches in fighting the " War on Poverty" in the city of Atlanta. Mr. Boisfeuillet Jones _ President of Woodruff Foundation and recently appointed Chairman of President Johnson's National Advisory Committee for Health Facilities. For outstanding and dynamic leadership as Chairman of the Board of Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc., one of the first funded anti-poverty programs in the nation, For your never ceasing dedication to Civic concern for the city of Atlanta and your country as you seek to make this a better world in which to live. Mr. Dan Sweat - Director of Governmental Liasson for City of Atlanta For outstanding service in the development of the anti-poverty program in Atlanta and for recognition of your effective coordination of governmental agencies and programs with the Mayor's office to alleviate the problems of the poor and provide for them a better life in the City of Atlanta. & | A.A. fe) Slee The Atlanta Chamber of Commerce has recognized the importance of these educational and employment programs, and has tried to lead businessmen to under- stand and support them. Mr. Sterne was president of the Chamber last year when the organization went on record supporting OEO and endorsing all sound efforts to help the poor help themselves. Posthumous Award Mr. Charles 0. Emmerich Posthuno’s —_——— mr In recognition of the valuable services rendered by the late Mr. Charles 0. Emmerich, the first Executive i i ity Atlanta, Inc. Director of Economic Opportuni ; Mr. Emmerich will be remembered as 4 dedicated pioneer in the "War on Poverty". He will go down in een as a "soldier who died for a cause he truly believe inf' The Athens Banner-Herald and the Daily News have reported regularly and accurately on OEO programs, and on all efforts in their coverage area to help the poor help themselves. bel beg > ~ + Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor - City of Atlanta In recognition of your outstanding and dynamic leadership as mayor of one of the most progressive metropolitan cities of the South and the nation You, as a leader,have exhibited a keen and deep awareness and concern for the citizens you serve. have sought, and made effective inroads into, the alleviation of problems 2xisting within your city in your effort to make Atlanta a better place Seexhive, for all citizens, especially those who are the less fortunate. You GveR) . Recognition wiate se given to yowséess your leadership in times of,stress, especially for your willingness to risks, and your unusual ability to lead your city to aft effective understanding of the problems of the citizens you serve. A Recognition must be given to the unselfish way you have shared your experience and wisdom with other cities throughout the nation who call on you. Atlanta is indeed fortunate to have you as a Mayor and OEO is proud to make this award, in recognition of your services. \ \ » Mrs. Virginia Barfield, Director, Lower Chat— tahoochee Community Action A genc Inc., i lumbus, Georgia = is In recognition of Mrs. Barfield's outstanding work in accomplishing the coordination of local resources in the establishment of the MIND Center (Mental Intellectual Development) at Columbus, Georgia. MIND is designed to take low income Persons with less than an 8th grade education and upgrade them educa- tionally 2 to 4 grade levels in 8 to 10 week while also upgrading them socially and en- o vi Fonmentally, and secures jobs for the ( R) oye bk os = 7
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 11, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | Inc. | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 11, Document 8

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_011_008.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 11, Document 8
  • Text: (Georgia) OFFICE OF ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY Southeast Regional Office 730 Peachtree Street, N.E. Atlanta, Georgia 30308 Phone: 526-3194 NEWS for immediate release OEO ANNOUNCES URBAN SERVICE AWARDS Twelve community leaders,four newspapers, a television station and the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce ah among the first to receive the recently established Urban Service Award of the Office of ecnande Uesortund ie: Sargent Shriver, Director of OEO, has announced. This honor is for those individuals and organizations "whose dedicated efforts to alleviate the problems of the poor in America's cities have helped create a better life for our citizens," according to the award. The individuals included: in Atlanta, Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr., Boisfeuillet Jones, Dr. Vivian Henderson, William W. Allison, Dr. William Holmes Borde Dan Sweat, Mrs Earl Metzger, Jr., Mrs Mattie Ansley and the late Charles 0. Emmerich; in Athens, Judge James Barrow; in Augusta, the Reverend E. 0. Waldron; and in Columbus, Virginia Barfield. In addition to the above ingividuals, citations also were made to the Atlanta Constitution, the Atlanta Journal, television station WSB and the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce; and the Athens Banner-Herald and Daily News in Athens. Mayor Allen was cited for his dynamic leadership of a progressive city during trying times, while Bill Allison and Dan Sweat were both cited for their service to Economic Opportunity Atlanta and to the city government and the citizens of the Atlanta area. Mr. Jones, who has served as Chairman of the Board of Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc., was cited for his numerous civic contributions and for his particular support of the War on Poverty. Mrs. Metzger was named for her service with the special task force assisting EOA in its programs around Atlanta, particularly in the Head Start Programs. Dr. Henderson was cited for his service to the community at large and the involvement of Clark College in poverty programs. (MORE) Page 2 (Ga.) Dr. Borders was named for his long leadership in Atlanta and especially for the self-help projects which he has headed in poverty communities. Mrs. Ansley has worked diligently in creating interest in resident participation since the beginning of the War on Poverty in her neighborhood; her most recent activity has been to spearhead the target area elections for low income area representation to the Neighborhood Advisory Committee. Mr. Emmerich launched, was the first Director of Economic Opportunity Atlanta. He- worked tirelessly from the time OHO programs were first started in Atlanta until his untimely death; in a very real sense, he gave his life in the War on Poverty. Judge Barrow has been active in the operation of the Athens Community High School and adult education program financed through grants made from OKO. Reverend Waldron has been extremely active in the development of the Community Action Agency in Augusta, Georgia. He worked diligently in uniting the community, as well as interpreting the concept of Community Action to the point that the total community became concerned over the need to activate a program for the impoverished of Richmond County and Augusta, Georgia. Mrs. Barfield should be commended for her outstanding work in accomplishing the coordination of local resources in the establishment of the MIND Center at Columbus, Georgia, which is an adult education vehicle designed to take low-income persons with less than an eighth’grade education and upgrade them educationally two to four grade levels in eight to ten weeks. In presenting these Urban Service Awards, Sargent Shriver said, "America's most difficult challenge is in the city, and you met it by working in the city to help improve the quality of urban life. Awards can never repay 70 for this unselfish dedication to the welfare of your fellow man, but they do affirm our deep apprecia- tion for your work in behalf of the poor." Dr. Ralph A. Phelps, Jr., Southeast Regional Director of OEO in Atlanta, said that all of the honorees were nominated by OEO's Regional Office on the basis of their efforts to help the poor in their own communities. Awards went to War on Poverty Agencies, workers, volunteers and supporters in over 300 American cities. HRY
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 11, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | Inc. | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 11, Document 6

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_011_006.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 11, Document 6
  • Text: [21126 EVDAA VORhe2¢2 SERSO1S, MSC RAAUIJHZ RUEVEGLO FM WILLIAM P KELL /OEHOS TO RUEVDASZ1/ HONO BT DUE TO A CHANGE CENTERS OPERATED Ii BY PRIVATE ENTER EV12337 048 O082¢2021-UUUU--RUEVDAA. Y DIR JOB CORPS OFC OF ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY WASHDC 5 ; ; + uy je iy z to RABLE TVAN ALLEN JR MAYOR OF ATLANTA ATLANTA GA NV PROGRAM DIRECTORs JOB CORPS IS CLOSING FOUR URBAN PRISE. DUE TO THIS Beteseerers- FOR DECISIONs 1674 CONTRACTOR EMPLOYEES WILL BECOME AVATLASLE EMPLOYMENT BY MARCH 1+ ONLY SOME OF THEM WILL BE RETAINED BY THEIR PRESENT EMPLOYERS. THESE STAFFS ARE MADE UP OF PROFESSIONAL» MEDICAL, CLERICAL» SKILLED YOUR HELP IN OUR EMPLOYMENT. AR ORGANIZATIONS THR REPRESEN ATIVE OF LISTED BELOW WITH wit PAGE TWO RUEVEGLO ING red TOWARD REVIEW CONSIDERATION DESERV ING pDeie NAME & LOCATION Gr CENTER RODMAN NEW BEDFORD MASS LINCOLN LINCOLN NEBR MCCOY SPARTA WISC CUSTER BATTLE CREEK MICH TOTALS NNNN £21126 eVDAA PLEASE WIRE, ME AS REPRESENTATIVE TO ME NAME AND TELEP A MEMBER OF MY ST & ABOVE CENTERS CRAFT AND SEMI-SKILLED WORKERS. I ‘EARNESTLY SOLICIT EFFORTS TO ASSIST THESE PEOPLE IN FINDING OTHER & SOLICITING SUPPORT FROM BOTH PRIVATE AND PUBLIC OUGHOUT THE COUNTRY. I AM SUGGESTING THAT A YOUR PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT VISIT THE FOUR LOCATIONS A VIEW 048 THE PERSONNEL RESUMES, INTERVIEBINGs AND GIVING EMPLOYMENT FOR VACANCIES WITHIN YOUR CITY OF THESE NUMBER 2 TYPE OF EMPLOYEES AVAILASLE SKILLED SEMI- PROF MED CLK CRAP T SKILLED TOTAL e888. Se eee Se ee ae ee ee ee eee = = —— = ee ee 47 19 70 15 69 87 127 210 21 60 20 145 456 668 55 232 155 562 1674 SENDING YOUR EMPLOYMENT THE ABOVE LOCATIONS. WIRE INTEREST IN ALL FOUR OF TO YOUR ANY OR ¥ HONE NUMBER OF YOUR PERSONNEL REPRESENTATIVE 4ND Q7F WILL ARRANGE ITINERARY 4ND VISITING DATES AT » YOUR COOPERATION WILL BE MUCH APPRECIATED. COWPis! viiod Goew t3 COMPISMATION G7 : Wd yytv se a a =< oapeuniii —_ a 5 £43. 0x6 se Be Lee a ool +3 P £21126 EVDAS 154613 £13013 MSCEV124254 Hh rs - Db fi ie Y — eo f Ce J 4 Ee . 7 . fra pe RAAUIJAZ RUEVEGLOOT6 032202 1-UUUU--RUEVDAA. ele SVC SMM RUEVEGLOO43 0322021 AT END OF IS REPEATED PLEASE DELETE THE LAST THREE WORDS OF LINE TWO IN ORDER THAT "DUE TO THIS" WILL APPEAR ONLY ONCE IN MSGe ALSO TIME IN HEADER SHOULD NNNN (21126 READ 0332021 VICE 0322021- EVDAA LINE TWO OF TEXT "DUE TO THIS" —— | aan a re
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 11, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | Inc. | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 11, Document 18

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_011_018.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 11, Document 18
  • Text: ECGNOMIC OPPORTUNITY ATIANTA INCORPORATED /O!l MARIETTA STREET BLDG. , ATLANTA, GEORG/A 30303 TELEPHONE $25-4262 January 2, 1°68 Invitation to Parent and Child Center Briefing Conference We are completing plans for our Parent and Child Center Briefing Conference to be held at the Sammye E. Coan Middle School, 1500 Boulevard Drive, S. E., on January 10 and 11, 1968. Knowing of your interest: in such programs, we wish to invite you to attend. The hours for the conference are: 7:00-9:00 P.M. - Wednesday, January 10. 9:00 A.M. - 4:30 P.M. - Thursday, January 11. We are enclosing for your information a tentative agenda of conference events and a brief statement describing the Parent Child Center idea. We do hope that you will be able to participate in the conference for we know that you can make a valuable contribution to its success and to the development of a plan for the Parent and Child Center itself. Please call Miss Ann Ingram, Planning Director, at 688-6232 or Mr. Johnny Popwell, at 378-3643 if you have questions or suggestions about the con- ference. We'll see you there!!
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 11, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | Inc. | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 11, Document 31

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_011_031.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 11, Document 31
  • Text: Atlanta Chamber of Commerce P., ©. BOX 1740 — ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30301 — PHONE 521-0845 February 21, 1968 Dr. Tilman C. Cothran, Director Multi-Purpose Training Center Atlanta University Atlanta, Georgia 30314 Dear Dr, Cothran: Dan Sweat referred your correspondence on an Atlanta New Careers Conference to me for suggestions, As you are a member of the Chamber's Task Force for Full Employment, you are fully aware of our vital interest in unemployment, The New Careers program is an excellent one, and the Atlanta business community would profit from further exposure to it, I hope that you will continue to work closely with Curtis Driskell in planning the Conference and offer you both the support and encouragement of the Chamber of Commerce in your efforts, Please keep us informed of your progress and let me know if I can be of any assistance, With best wishes, Very truly yours, bert J. ‘Bows ces; Mr, Dan &, Sweat, Jr. a
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 11, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | Inc. | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 11, Document 24

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_011_024.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 11, Document 24
  • Text: February 6, 1968 Dr. Tilman CC. Cothran, Director Multi-Purpose Training Center Atlanta University Atlanta, Georgia 30314 Dear Tilman: Mayor Allen has asked that I answer your letter of February 3 regarding the establishment of your planning committee to plan for a New Careers conference in this area. As I mentioned to you on the telephone this morning, Johnny Robinson has been working with the CEP people at EOA ona New Careers application for our Model Cities Program. He is aware of the program and better informed than anyone else in City Hall on its advantages. He will be available to meet with your planning committee to discuss the items outlined in your letter. I would appreciate any specific sufgestions as to your ideas on the involvement of the Urban Coalition in a conference and I will be glad to pursue this with the members of the Steering Committee of the Atlanta Urban Coalition. Sincerely yours, Dan Sweat DS:fy
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 11, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | Inc. | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 11, Document 15

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_011_015.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 11, Document 15
  • Text: IT IS AN INVESTMENT IN THE FUTURE TO HELP FAMILIES BECOME AWARE OF THEIR CHILDREN'S NEEDS, THE KIND OF HEALTH CARE, GUIDANCE, STIMULATION AND DISCIPLINE A CHILD RECEIVES AT HOME DETERMINES WHAT KIND OF AN ADULT HE WILL BE,
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 11, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | Inc. | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 11, Document 34

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_011_034.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 11, Document 34
  • Text: te CIry OF ATLANTA Office of Ue Mayor WHEREAS, the President of the United States and the Congress have expressed the national will of the people through enactment of the Economic Opportunity Act and creation of the Office of Economic Opportunity as a means towards eliminating the causes of poverty in this country; and WHEREAS, the Job Corps was established as an integral and vital part of the national Anti-Poverty Program, to provide disadvantaged young men and women with a chance to acquire the skills and attitudes needed to become useful and productive members of the community; and WHEREAS, the Job Corps has provided a real service to the people of this country and the people of Atlanta, with the united efforts of leaders in the field of commerce and organized labor to give useful employment to thousands of our citizens; and WHEREAS, a Job Corps Exhibition, sponsored by leading industrial and educational organizations opens to the public August 16, 1968 at the Regency-Hyatt House, which will tell the dramatic story of the Job Corps under the title ''A Chance to be Somebody"; - NOW, THEREFORE, I, Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor of the City | of Atlanta, do hereby proclaim the week of August 19 - 24, 1968 JOB CORPS WEEK in Atlanta and urge all citizens to support the commendable work of the Job Corps. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the City of Atlanta to be affixed. —- Ivan Allen, Jrf/__. Mayor
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 11, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | Inc. | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 11, Document 36

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_011_036.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 11, Document 36
  • Text: RUDER & FINN INCORPORATED JAMES E. MOORE February 29, 1968 GENERAL MANAGER OF SOUTHEASTERN OPERATIONS Mr. DuPree Jordan Office of Economic Opportunity Southeast Regional Office 730 Peachtree Street, N. E. Atlanta, Georgia 30308 Dear DuPree: I have finally received a copy of Mayor Lindsay's Proclamation and I believe that the same proclamation with the obvious local and time changes will be fine for Mayor Allen. For the Governor I think we can use a very slight rewording of this proclamation but omitting any reference to the Atlanta exhibition since his proclamation will be for the entire state. If you have any objection to my submitting the suggested copy to the Mayor and the Governor, please let me know early next week. Best regards, James /E. Moore JEM/mj RUDER & FINN INCORPORATED, SUITE 2015, 34 PEACHTREE STREET, N.W., ATLANTA, GEORGIA, 30303, TEL. (404) 577-1600 AND (404) 577-1601 OFFICES: NEW YORK, CHICAGO, HOUSTON, LOS ANGELES, ST, LOLIIS, SAN ERANCISCO, WASELINGTON, D.C., LONDON, ROME
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 11, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | Inc. | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 11, Document 41

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_011_041.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 11, Document 41
  • Text: FILE COPY - CITY OF ATLANTA ae Our own government asthe CAA, y a J mere r o [_} We have r “ peeli dec 2. The tercitory to be covered che CA X] The same area; 3. Other jurisdictions that we are requesting to join us in Seite eo ean Sy | Gwinnett County Rockdale County ‘City of Atlaz MAME OF STATE OR LOCAL ita W oewcue Mayoz Ivan Allen, Jr. NAME OF PEASOY TO COMTAG City Hall ABDRESS Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor ugzency as the CAA. : ; 5 me e and see: OQEO recognition of: as the CAA for our community. BATE aS s below wi viewed e applica ms. ex en ng we CAA inclad 522-4463 3/6/68 "
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 11, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | Inc. | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 11, Document 43

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_011_043.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 11, Document 43
  • Text: INFORMATION COPY - CITY OF ATLANTA oF CI Bia ik: © \ ' e ir E City of Atlanta _ Fulton County Gwinnett County Rockdale County Mr. Bobby Brisendine Box 134 Conyers, Georgia Mr. Bobby Brisendine County Commissioner I | | avis f mat t 1 tf k on c l ry Ss c 483-8701 Zhe oa ZA Z, 3/6/68
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 11, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | Inc. | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 11, Document 20

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_011_020.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 11, Document 20
  • Text: A STATEMENT ABOUT THE PARENT AND CHILD CENTER PARENT AND CHILD CENTERS (PCC) are established to provide services for disadvantaged families who have one or more children under the age of three. Many of the families will also have several older children, or will be plan- ning or expecting to have a baby. In many cases, a PCC will be linked with a comprehensive Neighborhood Service Center, an organization which offers the residents of a spacified geographic area access to a wide range of services and processes designed .to help them out of poverty. In others, a PCC may cooperate with a center which may be organized around one certain function, such as a Neighborhood Health Center. Such centers need not necessarily be funded by OKO, Affili- ation with a Neighborhood Center facilitates one of the basic objectives of the PCC, that of bringing the whole family into contact with a broad range of services. The PCCs are funded by the Office of Economic Opportunity in cooperation with the Department of Health, Education and Welfare, the Department of Labor, and the Department of Housing and Urban Development. Objectives In general, the PCCs are established to help families to function in- dependently and effectively and for their children to develop to their full potential. In more specific terms, the programs developed by the planning groups should have the objectives of: Ll, Overcoming deficits in health, intellectual, social, and emotional development and maximizing the child's inherent talents and potentialities; 2, Improving the skills, confidence, attitudes, and motivations of the parents as citizens, parents, and individuals; a5 Strengthening family organization and functioning by involving the youngest children, the parents, older children in the Family, and relatives; 4, Encouraging a greater sense of community and neighborliness among the families served by the center; Sy Providing training and experience for both professionals and non-professionals who may then be employed in work with parents and children; 6. Serving as a locus for research and evaluation of progress toward the objectives stated above. The Atlanta Parent and Child Center is being planned in the Edgewood Community,
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 11, Folder topic: Economic Opportunity Atlanta | Inc. | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021