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Box 19, Folder 15, Document 16

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_015_016.pdf
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  • Title: Box 19, Folder 15, Document 16
  • Text: Re 1d ntial Voe School MILWAUKEE SENT NEL. PAGE 1, PART 2 THURSDAY, APR. 14, 1966 / George A. ParKinson, director of the Milwaukee vocational school, recommended Wednesday that Milwaukee apply fot a federal grant to establish a residential vo. cational school which would be much like a college campus. The school would- include dormitories and classroom space for approximately 1,500 students between 15 and 21 years of age. · The total cost of construction and equipment, estimated at approximately five mil- lion dollars, w o u 1 d be continued in the , vocational financed by the federal gov- school budget with costs for ernment, under Parkinson's outside students covered by proposal. their communities. Preliminary grant1, of $100 . Parkinson said that "high 000 for planning and archite~tural services for the school ranking _officials" in the buare included in the 1967 fed- reau of vocational and adult eral .fiscal bud.g et, he said. education in the federal deParkinson said that under partment of health, educathe present_ law the govern- tion and welfare (HEW) sugment will finance all opera- . gested that Milwaukee would tions of the school. However, be an "ideal place" for such after a number of years, fed- a school. The vocational education eral participation in the project might dec~ease, he said. act of 1963 authorizes apThen the proJect would be propriations for construction, I City April Traffic Hits New High I Milwaukee's downtown traf. lllonthl count of traffic on the Y freeway taken ]a t tions t his month and can only ast-West . ' . s be relieved 'through greater use Week, taJ11ed 9~,000 vehicles of mass transit, Martin E. in a 24 hour period. Bruening, city traffic engineer, Th· rPassed the previous said Wednesday. high i~f 000, set last August. · d owntown trafBruening said a reg u la r Brue ·ng' said ni fie is risirlg b Y "leaps and fie load has hit record propor- £ s:o Council Urged lio I' Buy 1 , 025 V0teMach•tnes bounds" this year. I> r . 0 u 5 24 hour traffic counte v 10 the East-West freeway s O 79,938 vehicles this Janua~e_r:z,538 in February and 88,974 ~ n r,,tarch. · 100 Many Cars" "Just . A.Ith h there 1s much const~UCti~~g dO~town, Br~ening s~1d, th traffic overload 1s due s1ni e ••too many cars " The city election commission Ply to · Wednesday recommended that ."it's like ttYin~ tto pour three low bids for the sale or lease Pints of milk in a quar t of 1,025 voting machines to bottle," he saidMilwaukee be accepted by the 13 r . 11 g suggested three central board of purchases. soiu/ en 1 ions: of "f The commission's recommen- • Gr ter use reeway dation, however, was contin- flyers ,;a articularly by those gent upon a city attorney's of- Who kp downtown. . . .L or fice review to mak e cert am 4,e • at.ed s y s t e m of machines satisfy all legal re- Parit~ gradtl to "weed out the an.d 1ng fees . ,, quirements. ay parkel · Andrew L. Lehrbaumme_r, • l' ·f11ate cl o sin g of city purchasing agent, and Wil- Wisc0he _ult~"'- from N. 8th st. liam J . O'Malley, secretary of east t nsin btlt rnass transit and this sign pos t e d b y some pran kster at the. commission, said . that the deJive~ all th8 turn-off road to the Stadium. choice between outright pur- 13 Yaid in an inte chase or lease of the machines vie,:Uening 5 rorists c o rn i n r-Sentinel Photo - - - - - - - would be the task of the com- dow that 010 ilY cannot g ° w Motorists traveling on the East-West expressway Wednesday were greeted with C'.,y to A,·d State Dr,·ve 0 n 8 ars' 8 ack Sa Ie$ Tax mon council. . 0 tpoinu;t~:ne :~ e Ct "J)Ortaf ; rta.1 serv1.:.,, .. v· Lehrbaummer Tuesday acF .,, flyers Help cepted bids from the Shoup lie r~eW\ East-West freeVoting Machine Corp., Bala- way said th would have surCynwyd, Pa., and the Automat• passe~lreadYrated ca_pacity of ic Voting Machine Corp., James- 5,00o its per hOUr m one di. town, N. Y. reqio c~rs sh hours except for The city of Milwaukee hAS ' Local I i c ens in g boards 1in Mtlwaukee. sub1ect to coun- He rejected a bid from In- the fti. m r~/ flyers frorn the M reewo. · enter, w re ~d to rip ·i, a . thrnt1ghout th~ state have been di appro ·al Two Bids Accepted Urged equipment and operation of these schools. Sites for seven such institutions were 'selected two years ago by the commissioner of vocational education. These sites have now been discarded and new sites will ~e selected this spring, Parkmson said. Members of the Milwaukee board of vocational and adult education will vote on the recommendation Apr. 22. Parkinson said the school would be exclusively for those students whose home environ- ment is not conducive to study. He said that students would probably have to be recommended for admission by the welfare department of their county. Parkinson stressed that the students would not necessarily be "problem" children, but persons from homes where the parents were the problem or other distractions are present. The school would be seL up on a regional basis with students from several states coming to Milwaukee for training. �---,- 12,721 See Braves Bow Again, 6-0 Bucs Win On Law's 4-Hitter Sentinel SPORTS By RED THISTED PAGE 2, PART 2 Sentinel Staff Writer Atlanta, Ga.-It was an unproductive night !or the Braves here Wednesday as they gave a sad sack performance in bowing for the second straight time to the Pittsburgh Pirates. This time they were b lanked on four hits, 6-0, and there was positively nothing for the 12,· 721 fans to cheer about. Bolin Blanks Cubs, 4-0 San Francisco, Calif. - A' - THURSDAY, APR. 14, 1966 Bob Bolin shut out Chicago on Astros Rout Koufax, 7-6 four hits Wednesday night as the San Francisco Giants carved out a 4-0 victory over the Cubs. The f I a m e throwing right hander with the easy motion struck out nine and walked none. Only three times did the Cubs get a man past first and only once got more than one man on base. 4 ' -- i �Complete Coverage of Braves Decision MILWAUKEE SENTINEL EXTRA IN FIFTIES Partly cloud y west, fair east Thuriday. Highs mostly in the f ifties, lower near the lake. Maps, tables, page 2. FINAL 34 PAGES--3 PARTS THURSDAY MORNING, APRil, 14, 1966 ROLLER: EXPAND IN '67 OR BRAVES HERE IN '66 By WlLIJAM JANZ Circuit Judge Elmer W. Roll· er Wednesday night ordered the Braves back from Atlanta this season unless the National league expands and grants this city a franchise for 1967. He gave the league until May 16 to sub m It a written plan for expansion. He said ex· pansion was feasible in the National league and that Milwau- kee can support major league ba1>ebaU. The stay will expire on May 18 if no expansion plan is sul). mitted. the court said. If the plan is unsatisfactory, the stay wi11 be lifted, the judge said, and the court will take-- over supervision of Braves games here or appoint a board or commission to do so. He also fined each of the defendants, the Braves, the league and its other clubs, SS,000 for violation of state antitrust laws. The historic decision was announced after the judge and his staff had worked 36 straight hour~ to complete the 175 page document. At the decision, near pandemonium broke out in the courtroom, filled with 150 persons, including many newsmen who raced through the courtroom to telephones. 111111111111111111 1111 11 1111111111111111111 11 111111 11 111 11111 111 111 111111111 111 11 1111 Ready Lloyd Larson Group To Run Club, ~h!u:!~ ~1 with an earlier decision by a superior court in Fulton oount_v, Ga., which ordered the Braves to play their games in Atlanta. Judge Roller, County Judge Marvin, Holz and several court reporters started their marathon session in chambers around 9 a.m. Tuesdav. The decision was passed out to Turn lo Page 9, Col. I By J OE PECOR Someone yelled, "He's ordered the Bravei; back to MUwaukee!" By GORDON GOTnJEB "We •.re rea.dy, wi\lin~ and Then it was wild .. 1~;e: M~:;u: l;si:;..:~:::~n::ht n::r;;,~ Jn fact, leaTfles~ r TIMES hlrdiy-10:30, U0 • -·~t~:w.:.,./:i HJ .. OdOR •.. " .I'.~ 'C -·~d~ ,i,. r;h;~,. Ja1Jool11',S•ntlncl A. ~BST 1111, S1.15, IEATRE $1.50, $2 ~ , Sale U Door EVER MADE!" I OR BY MAIL Ill IDoySe1.-s ..... TH SIDE urt Theatre iltl W. P"OlldduLac,,U. 'mohs as INGING NUN" lior,andl,l~r GARSON MOOREHEAD ers at 8:45 a.m. Tuesday 11601 W. Lincoln av., West in Washington said they knew of no basis for such an action. and worked until the decision Allis. ATANTA KEPT IT QUIET From Sentinel Wire Services found out it was not on file. I know I'll need some proor of my age when I file for my social security benefits. Any suggestions? A. B., Milwaukee. A. :;~p~!~J1 ~~ \1~~i OMEGA Watches H HOUR WATCH IIEBVlCZ ~ '~~.~.;~p N111¥.(74Ulf ~;ir~:::::::::~:,::::·:::::_:,';:·:: ~:: ~li;ig1:l~1t~;l;; OPEN MON., THURS. and FRI. Iii 9 'I Did the Best I Could' World in Brief N. Water Q, :~e:~1:t~ t=~o gne~ The judge thanked everyone for bearing with him during delays in announcing the decision. Judge Roller said he wanted to announce the decision Tuesday before the Braves opening game in Atlanta, but it wasn't ready, he explained. The 64 year old jurist said he plans to "sleep a little later tomorow. "Then I might take a couple of clays off to visit my brother," he said. He admitted that he had felt some pressure from "mostly baseball fans" d u ring and after the trial. "I got the nicest letters from people in Atlanta. I don't wish them any bad luck," he said. •i~'.;- 5 5 w, "'" t:1:~· NRO~cl _Miu Top .. s4495 ,:;:::nM~:i.1!0~ .,, ... s5500 Oct.son T•blu ~:C~ux~ SwiYcl Ch.in, .... 1~H1._1 T•blc1, ........ s3300 s1695 s399s 2714 W . CENTER ST. Sears Save at Sears • . • Headquarters for All Types of Fencing You Can Count on l Js ... Quality Cost~ No Morp at SPar~ ~~,:f~.~t~ LAST 3 DAYS! IHGITUP" IRDHERS" Ive-In ii~iia~ ~iu;~- Mi~ Save 8 15.07 011 This 40 Gallon Gas Water Heater Regular 8 79.95 Now Only 64 8 ~ Chain Link Fencing NO MONEY DOWN Surround your home and property with the kind of year after year protection only steel fencing provides. Complete galvanizing leaves no surfaces to rust. Neat diamond pattern en h ances the beau t y of a n y yard, harmoni zes with any styl e of architecture. 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Available at All Sears Stores I I . ,..... ,_. · - · · ·,. . -~ "· · '· -~ Open Every Day at 9 a. m.; Open Tuesday a ud Satu rday 'til 5:30 p.m. SHOP AT SEARS AND SAVE a • ... ,rd 1"" .i.. "' ...., ,,..,, ._,....~. --~ ••• ~ .. ~. ........ a eedSears ·"""" """"I"'"""'" ...... """ 1o,!!",£i.f;;::., ir:,cu:t · ;on:~r;::k s'::l l""'~-:::::;_~,.. 1 =~:-,"'I~!;':.. st·r 18 0 or su.u, 1ouuc1t AND co. �CONCLUSIONS OF LAW What Judge Roller Said The conclLtSions drawn by Circuit Judge Elmer W. Roller in his decision in the Braves case: SOME SNOOZED, OTHERS WAITED IN JUDGE ROLLER'S COURTROOM FOR THE VER~Y.,_.iP1>oto ., Excerpts From Decision Excerpts from the decision ha n de d down by Circuit Judge Elmer w. Roller: . . . Concededly the case is novel, but that does no t mean that it can possess no legal merit. I presents unusual and perplexing questions which arise from a business which in modus operandi occupies an unusual pos.itlon in the economy of the nation. The question is hardly whether an identical factual situation has b e e n adjudicated but ratt.er whether the facts presented here constitute a violation of the S~te·s Antitrust I aw s within applicable principles of law. The tenn, organized baseball refers to "the many professional clubs a n d leagues which have subjected themselves to the jurisdiction of the Commissioner c:,f Baseball and have contracted with one another to abide by certain rules and regulations." •.. The claim that organized baseball is a monopoly is fully supported in the record. Its economic control is achieved principally by agreements, viz., (a) the Constitution and Rules of t h e National League of Professional Baseball Clubs . (b) the National Le a g u e Agreement to which ea c h Major League and all member clubs are parties, and (c) the Major League Rules, promulgated pursuant to the agreement and binding upon both Leagues, their member clubs and players. ... The reserve clause Is good for the whole life of the ballplayer. The effect of the Uniform Player's Contract and the Major League Rules by which the player agrees in his contract to be bound are: (I) A player wishing to p 1a y professional baseball must sign a contract with a professional baseball club: (2) The terms of that contract commit the player to being reserved for a period during a term for which he is not under contract and to an indefinite number of renewals of his contract; (3) A player who fails to contract, who violates his contract or reservation may be placed on the restricted or disqualified list and be ine 11 g i bl e to play for any league in organized baseball. . . . The interrelated rules and agreements created a monopoly of the market (territorial franchises) and over the raw material of the business (the right to the services of baseball players). From the very outset of the case the court has been met with a continuing challenge to its jurisdiction. Defendants assert that because of the unique nature of the 12,721 SEE BRAVES LOSE The Pittsburgh Pirates defeated the Braves before only 12,721 persons in Atlanta Wednesday night, 6 to 0. The stadium in Atlanta has 51,377 seats. Details in sports section. baseball business, because of its national scope and character, it requires a uniform, national system of regulation. . . . Their jurisdictional objections rest on the fed· era! decisions holding that organized professional baseball is not within the scope of the Sherman Antitrust Act, and in progression t he y maintain that the business is not amenable to state law. . . For reasons previously considered. the court was and is of the opinion that the f e de r a 1 decisions are not conclusive of this In seeking to recover a forfeiture the State has a pecuniary interest in the lawsuit and is the real party in interest and, in the court's o p i n i o n, If the injunctive remedy was the sole relief sought the State would be the real party in interest in bringing the action to en· force the antitrust laws in its sovereign and governmental capacity as the statute directs. The possibility that the County of Milwaukee or private citizens may incidentally be benefited by this action does not nullify the State's real party in interest status or convert the action to a private lawsuit between individuals. From a review of the record the court concludes that the financial success of a Major League baseball operation in a community and the determination of whether the economic situation in such com• munity is such that It can and will support the continued operation of baseball can be made only on the basis of and in terms of a reasonable period of time. Mr. Lou Perini moved the Braves to Milwaukee in 1953. He continued to own the Braves until November 26, 1962, when the club was sold to its present ownership. Mr. Perini had acquired the club in 1945. It was in very bad financial straits. He paid very little for it other than to assume certain liabilities in the amount of $305,000 and to pay for the organizational costs in the amount of $6,508. Consequently the total purchase price was $311,508. . . . Although the record does not reveal the exact measure of the financial success of the Perini operation in Milwaukee, there is sufficient evidence to conclude that it was exceedingly lucrative. ... The court is satisfied that the effect upon Braves' attendance by the introduction of Major League baseball in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area was infinitesimal. Likewise the contrast presented by the argument that Milwaukee's contribution to the League's tow attendance d r opp e d from 20 per cent for the period of 1953 to 1960 to 8 per cent in 1961 to 1964 is misleading. It Ignores the fact that the team's standing had never been below s e c o n d place during the first period and it was in fourth and fifth and sixth place in the second period. It ignores the fact that the league was expanded to ten teams and that two competitive t e a m s were transferTed to the populous areas of Los Angeles and San Francisco. The Court has already noted the reasonable explanation for the failure of local residents to invest substantially in the Braves stock. There is also some evidence that stock offered by Perini at $12.25 a share in 1961 had dropped to $3.375 in 1962 which fact may well have been reflected in the attitude of local investors in 1963. There is no doubt that there were some differences and problems concerning both the lease and sale of television rights. However, there is evidence that in July of 1964, County Executive John Doyne inquired of Mr. {William C.) Bartholomay whether the r e was anything that the Braves wanted changed in the lease. At that time the lease had one year to run. Doyne testified that Bartholomay stated that the contract was satisfactory. This is confirmed by Mr. McHale's testimony to the extent that he stated that they were satisfied with the percentage rentals, but for them to at· tempt to change several annoying problems would create bad public relations. ... The record does not justify giving serious consideration to the claim of problems with reference to the lease. Some concern was expressed relative to an un· favorable political climate in Milwaukee by several of the members of the National League. . . . All was directed towards Mr. (Eugene H.) Grobschmidt except for one other instance. Some of the statements of the Chairman of the County Board were brash and offend· ing and in one instance constituted a "low blow," as the p r e s s aptly described it. There is no proof in the record that the statements of Mr. Grobschmldt evinced or created a political situation... Now In regard to an unfriendly press. P e o p I e in baseball, like people in any other public business, cannot (and indeed the record herein indicates that they do not) expect to be without the critical com· m e n t of an independent press. There are two daily newspapers in Milwaukee, one is a morning paper, the other an evening paper. The record in this case demonstrates that Major League baseball was covered favorably by the newspapers in Milwaukee. . . . Neither can it be said in the face of these circumstances that the c iv i c leaders of Milwaukee and Wisconsin did not lend their full measure of support to the team. The record will not support a conclusion that the public officials were unfriendly to the Braves. During the decade between 1950 and 1960, Milwaukee has grown faster than any of the older, well-established Major League areas of the northwest and midwest; only the western cities and Washington, D. C. have exceeded its rate ot growth. Projections for the 1960-1980 period for Milwaukee range from 0.8 to 2.1%. . . . Wisconsin's growth rate during 1960-1980 is ex- pected to grow faster than most states in which there are Major League teams. The several owners whose depositions were read upon this trial are substantially in agreement that the Major Leagues will expand. They assert, however, that expansion is not feasible at the present time. They say there is a shortage of players. 1lle Court is satisfied, however, from the testimony of former Commissioner Ford C. Frick, Mr. William L. (Bill) Veeck, Mr. (Bobby) Bragan, field manager of the Braves, and also from the testimony of Mr. (Warren) Giles and Mr. (Walter) O'Malley, that there are sufficient baseball players to stock a team in Milwaukee. I. The defendant corporations have violated Section 133.01 of the Wisconsin Statutes (1963) in the following respects: a. Having agreed among themselves to control and allocate professional baseball players, to assign to the respective corporate defendants exclusive territorial rights and privileges respecting the exhibition of professional Major League baseball games, and to limit the number of members in the National League of Professional Baseball Clubs of which the defendants are all the constituent members, they have now agreed to transfer the site of Major League baseball exhibitions from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to Atlanta, Georgia, with the result that trade and commerce within the State of Wisconsin have been substantially restrained. b. They have combined and conspired among themselves to monopolize the business of Major League professional baseball within the State of Wisconsin. 2. The National League of Professional Baseball Clubs Is and has been the means and instrumentality by which the corporate defendants have engaged in the practices referred to in Paragraph 1 hereof. 3. By means of the practices outlined In Paragraph l hereof the corporate defendants and their counterpart members of the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs have acquired monopolistic control of all available ball players of Major League caliber with the result that the granting of per· mission from one of the said leagues in the form of a franchise to operate a Major League baseball team is necessary for any person to engage in the business of professional Major League baseball. 4. The corporate defendants' monopolistic control of Major League professional baseball requires the defendants to exercise reasonable control and to follow reasonable procedures In the issuance ot memberships in the National League of Professional Baseball Clubs and in the definition of sites for baseball exhibitions and as respects the transfer of memberships. 5. The transfer by the corporate defendants of the franchise in the National League of Professional Baseball Clubs from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and the refusal to issue a replacement franchise allowing the exhibition of Major League baseball in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, was an unreasonable exercise of the monopolistic control of the business of Major League professional baseball and was in violation of Section 133.0J, Wisconsin Statutes. 6. The refusal of the National League and the failure of the American League to issue a franchise to Milwaukee county or the Milwaukee Brewers Baseball Club, Inc., was a concerted refusal to deal in restraint of trade and commerce within the State ot Wisconsin in violation of Section 133.01, Wisconsin Statutes (1963). 7. This court hu jurisdiction over all of the parties and of the subject matter hereof. 8. The State of Wisconsin is the real party in interest in this action. The Attorney General and the Corporation Counsel of Milwaukee County were authorized to bring this action under the statutes of the State of Wisconsin, Teams, Inc., the Greater Milwaukee Committee and other private citizens in Wisconsin were entltled to inform the Attorney General of alleged violations of Section 133.01, Wisconsin Statutes (1963). 9. That by reason of said violation of Section 133.01 aald defendants and each of them has incurred a forfeiture provided by Statute. 10. That the plaintiff is entitled to judgment against said defendants and each of them in the sum of SS,000 with costs and disbursements. 11. That the plaintiff Is entitled to the JnjuncUve relief prayed for in its complaint. 12. That the defendant Milwaukee Braves, Inc., now known as Atlanta Braves, Inc., and all other defendants herein, shall be and they are hereby restrained and enjoined from playing the home championship schedule of the defendant Milwaukee Braves, Inc., now known as Atlanta Braves, Inc., in any city or place other than in the County of Milwaukee, State of Wisconsin, at County Stadium; provided that: I.) This order shall be stayed, under the continuing jurisdiction of the Court to the 18th day of May, 1966, and may thereafter be extended in the event that the defendants shall, prior to 12:00 o'clock noon, C.S.T., on the 16th day of May, 1966, submit to this Court a written plan or plans for expansion of the defendant National League of Professional Baseball Clubs so as to permit Major League baseball to be played at County Stadium with the City of Milwaukee a1 its "home," effective with the playing season for the year 1967: 2.) Such expansion shall contemplate the granting of a National League fra~1.hise to the County of Milwaukee or to such qualified third parties as shall be interested In acquiring a National League franchise, and will advise the Court of such fact. 3. ) The Court reserves jurisdiction in connection with any such plan or plans untH the same may be consummated between the ultimate parties. 4.) So that there will be no misunderstanding, the stay herein granted will expire at 12:00 o'clock noon, C.S.T., on May 16th, 1966, if no such plan is submitted within said time. Likewise, the stay, or any extension thereof granted on the strength of any plan submitted, will be terminated by the Court in the event the Court concludes that the plan is unsatisfactory. 5.) The defendant. Milwaukee Braves, Inc., now known as Atlanta Braves, Inc., will perform its home games In the County of Milwaukee under the supervision ot the court and such board or commission hereinafter appointed by the court. LET JUDGMENT BE ENTERED ACCORDINGLY. BY THE COURT: (Signed Elmer W. Roller) Circuit Judge Dated; April 13th, 1966. No formal agrttment is necessary to constitute the unlawful conspiracy, nor is it material to prove that the ultimate object of the combination Is to restrain trade, if it in fact does unreasonably do ,~ . . . Even if the shutdown of baseball in Milwaukee was not intended to restrain trade, the decisions to transfer, not to expand, and to refuse to deal with the Milwaukee market would nevertheless be illegal efforts to protect and extend the power of an existing monopoly. Even if Organized Baseball is a self-regulating monopoly enjoying some kind of privileged position under the antitrust laws, actions charged are nevertheless actionable restraints of trade and abuse cl monopoly power. The violation here concerns the abuse by the monopoly of its power in a manner which will have the effect to re-strain trade and commerce within this State. The assumption of the reasonableness of the agreements by w h I c h ocganlzed baseball maintains its internal control, as those agreements affect people within the structure of Organized Badeball, do not sanction the monopoly to restrain trade and commerce outside of baseball. . . . The Sherman Act provides that the several district courts of the United States are invested with jurisdiction to prevent and restrain violations of the Sherman Act. . .• A recurring defense argument and, in fact. an affirmative jurisdictional defense is that the action by the State of Wisconsin attempts to compel the defendant to continue to do business in the State in violation of the Federal Constitution. Defendants ask in what posi• tion does the state find itself in attacking the monopoly and then asking for it to come back to the state? In the court's opinion the plaintiff presents a legally adequate answer to that defense. Plaintiff states that there are two solutions to the question. One is to dissolve the monopoly, void the uniform player contract and re-establish competition. The other is to let baseball continue to enjoy the internal monopolistic prerogatives which it deems necessary for the continuance of top level competition in Major League baseball but to require them by court decree to respond in a responsible and reason- Willard Stafford, ,peci.,I counsel for the state of Wisconsin in the antitrust suit against the Braves and the National league, showed his feelings Wednesday night after reading highlights of the decision of Circuit Judge Elmer Roller. -UPI able manner in matters pertaining to the transfer and allocation of franchises. The state asserts that it has elected the latter course which presents two primary factua l issues: (a) whether the decision of the owners, the National League, made in October and November of 1964, was a responsible and reasonable decision or was arbitrary or even capricious and whether the refusal of the league to deal, to grant an expansion franchise was arbitrary, (b) whether or not the self-regulated monopoly has accorded all interested parties due process. Findings of Foci Milwaukee County is unable to secure as a tenant for Milwaukee County Stadium a Major Le a g u e professional baseball team playing its home games on the championship schedule in Milwaukee County Stadium. The termination of the exhibition of Major League baseball games in Milwaukee County Stadium prevents the sale at Major League professional games in Milwaukee County Stadium of substantial amounts of food, beverages and merchandise. The termination or the exhibition of Major League baseball games in the Milwaukee County Stadium restrains and prevents the sales of commodities and services by restaurants, hotels, motels, taxis and other transportation facilities to spectators who would attend Major League professional games at Milwaukee County Stadium. The termination of t.he exhibition of Major League professional baseball games at Milwaukee County Stadium prevents the Milwaukee newspapers, radio stations and television stations from print· ing, broadcasting and telecasting Major League professional baseball games at Milwaukee County Stadium. The termination of the exhibition of Major League baseball games at Milwaukee County Stadium eliminates the competition for spectators which heretofore existed between the Milwaukee County Stadium and Wrigley Field and Comiskey Park in Chicago, Illinois. The termination of the exhibition of Major L e a g u e baseball games at Milwaukee County Stadium eliminates the competition which heretofore existed between television and radio stations located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and Chicago, Illinois, for the Major League audience in Southern Wisconsin and Northern Illinois. In the absence of a Majo r League baseball club playing its home championship schedule of games in Milwaukee County Stadium, the State of Wisconsin, County of Milwaukee, and City of Mllwaukee will be deprived or substantial tax revenues previously levied upon the sales of food. beverages and souvenirs at the exhibition of Major League baseball games at Milwaukee County Stadium. The termination of the exhibition of Major League baseball games in Milwaukee Pho!o br Ra.Loh Sehauer County Stadium will deprive the public, within commuting range of said Stadium, of the economic and recreational benefits of the exhibition or Major League professional championship baseball games at Milwaukee County Stadium. The defendants and the American League and its member clubs, the National Association of Professional Baseball Leagues, the member leagues and member clubs of the aforementioned National Association, have an economic monopoly over the exh i bi tio n of professiona l baseball. The Constitution of the National League grants unlimited power and discretion to determine the location of a franchise; provides it no objective standards for determining whether or not to grant a request for a transfer of a franchise, and contains no rules of procedure which would accord the city, county or state from which any such proposed transfer would be made, an opportunity to be heard. During the period 1953-1962 the National League Baseball Club of Milwaukee, Inc., the corporate predecessor of d~ fendant Milwaukee Braves, Inc., eamed more than $7,500,000 before taxes fro m baseball operations. In 1962 the Braves' franchises, player contracts and other assets carried on the books at approximately $322,000 were transferred from Nation a I League Baseball Club of Mil· waukee, Inc., ultimately to defendant Milwaukee Br aves, Inc., for $6,218,480. As a result of said transfer, National League Baseball Club of Milwaukee, Inc., realized gain of approximately $5,583,000 give or take $1,000,000. During the above period salaries of $-445,000 were paid to the Perini family and dividends ot $300,000 were paid to the Perini Corporation. Over the five year period 1960-1964 on a cash basis the Braves and their corporate predecessors realized total income of $836,900. The Braves reported to their share-holders net losses of $43,378 in 1963 and $45,270 in 1964. Net income from operations was reported as $82,393 in 1953 and $104,730 in 1964 . These net Income figures were reduced by interest expense on funds borrowed t.o purchase the Braves of $125,771 and $150,000 respectively tn arriving at the net loss figures. In 1964 $48,800 of expense in connection with relocation of the franchise were charged against income. Had scouting expenses been capitalized as were player acquisition a n d development costs as sound accounting methods would require, the Braves would have shown a net income of approximately $170,000 in 1963 and $151,000 in 1964. The Braves net receipts from the sale of radio and television broadcasting rights compare favorably with the net receipts of the defendant clubs that submitted figures to this court. During the period from 1953 through 1965, the Mil· waukee Braves, Inc. and its corporate predecessors had a total home paid attendance of 19,551.163. This was greater than any club in either Major League with the exception of the defendant, Los Angeles (Brooklyn) Dodgers. The average annual attend· ance for this period in Mil· waukee was over 1.5 million. This average was the second highest of any club in either league. The attendance level was 31 % more than the average of teams in the defend· ant National League and 52% higher than the average for teams in the American League. Milwaukee home attendance increased from 773,· 818 in 1962 to 910,911 in 1964, despite the rumored relocation of the franchise to Atlanta, Georgia. The level of Attendance in 1965 was not representative, due to the fact that the franchise was to be relocated In Atlanta, Georgia for the 1966 season. The Braves were financially successful during the time It operated a National league baseball club in Milwaukee. Milwaukee has the demographic economic and population characteristics necessary to support a Major League baseball club. Milwaukee has the ability to reasonably support a Major League team. . . . . Expansion ot the National League is feasible. �Thursday, April 14, 1966 iv•10Ia f e d Sfa f e l aws the Braves for not promoting interest in attendance during I 1965. after announcing the team would move. Braves officials and some Milwaukee, Wis., to Atlanta, other baseball e:,i;ecutive~ BRAVES r:iid Continued From Page I ~~i~nt~~ 143.215.248.55:16:45, 29 December 2017 (EST)~I ha-:re Orporation Counsel > bring this acUon in. Teams, Inc., the private citizens In Attorney General WilJConsln Statutes ~:;i5amen about 8:45 p.m. Wed-~~ ;!i:n!~~e zed the press m Mil· fo;;i;eau::~es leaving here, Sox. y. . of Wisconsin have been sub- However, Judge Roller said, the state will be deprived of The Braves hav~ repo:ted subJudge Roller said the defend- tantially restrained ., the de- "The re c O rd in this case th d t' al stantlal losses m Milwaukee th!st1~!g:r1=~~1y"}:'! ~ ~a~t143.215.248.55te~;;: :ision _said. , ' de:~~SY!~: :~~r:jr:v~er:t~e ~nef~~:;143.215.248.55i~rea ion championship schedule of the The Judge said the defendants' ha th 1 1 MJ "Although the record does the depreciation of the player defendant Milwaukee Brave s, "monopol istic _control of major by ke n,,ewspapers n · not reveal the exact measure contracts and the costs of play- iection 133.01 said d a forfeiture pro- ~e~i~: f~~f143.215.248.55 16:45, 29 December 2017 (EST)::~n~s~a~x:r: kee, state of w J s con s In, at cise reasonable control." County Stadium.... " He added that the transfer of If no expansion plan is. sub- the Milwaukee franchise and ~he mitted by May 16, the JUdg~ ~fusal t~ re~lace that franchise pnent against said f ~.000 with costs =~:i143.215.248.55 ~o~~ 143.215.248.55 16:45, 29 December 2017 (EST) ii143.215.248.55 16:45, 29 December 2017 (EST) 143.215.248.55n~; ~~a~if!143.215.248.55 ~~r1~f 16:45, 29 December 2017 (EST)~ ~~c:143.215.248.55 16:45, 29 December 2017 (EST)ee ~en~_ev;~i~!~ ~~! ~:18:!; w~ue C:dded, "P~ple In basebait., like people m any ot~er there is sufflcient evidence ~ pubhc busmess, cannot ,ca nd IR• conclude that it was exceeding~e:'s ~or: 0 hne~~tex~~ ly lucrative," the judge said. to be without ythe critical com- When Lou Perini, who brought t e fnjuncilve relief 143.215.248.55dt~; ~~.;' c:uo~dH:esa%rr;:~ ~~t!h:xec;;Ise ;~h~~o~~:i~s~f~ ment of an Independent press. ~~5~1 ~1 l~ s, Inc., now known ~~:n Ci~ defendants herein, tnd enjoined f rom of the defendant lanta Braves, Inc., mty of Milwaukee, IVided that: ontinuing jurisd!c1y, 1966, and may It the defendants m the 16th day of plan or plans for ue of Professional 11,le baseball to be r Milwaukee as Its for the year 1967; he granting of a f Milwaukee or to lerested in acqui r• advise the Court ,nnection with any consummated t,e.. '-CCORDINGLY. Y 1HE COURT: Elmer W. Roller) Circuit Judge .. ultimately to delwaukee Br aves, ,218,480. As a re. transfer. National eball Club of Mil!., realized gain of ly $5,583,000 give 1,000,000. During period salaries of rere paid to the y and dividends of ire paid to the Petion. five year period n a cash basis the I their corporate 1 realized total $836,900. The rted to thei r sharelosses of $43,378 t S45,270 in 1964. from operations ~d as $82,393 in 1104,730 In 1964. icomefigureswere interest expense borrowed to purraves of $125,771 M) respectively In the net loSll fig64 $48,800 of exmectlon with relo1e franchise were linst income. Jng expenses been is were player acn d development IOund accounting )uld require, the lld have shown a of approximately 1963 and $15 1,000 res net receipts ale or radio and roadcasting rights vorably with the of the defendant submitted figures t. he period rrom h 1965, the MUlVes, Inc. and its ?redecessors had e paid attendance 3. This was great· y club in either ue with the exhe defendant, Los -ooklyn) Dodgers. e annual attend(is period in Mil' over 1.5 million. e was the second my club in either , attendance level 1ore than the avms in the defend· 1 League and 52% the average for the Ame r ican waukee home at-:reased from 773,lo 910,911 in 1964, rumored reloca• franchise to At· gla. The level of in 1965 was not ve, due to the b.e franchise was .ated in Atlanta, the 1966 season. ~ were rinancialtl during the time a National league tb in Milwaukee. has the demogramic and popula.eristics necessary a Major League b. Milwaukee has o reasonably sup. League team. !:xpansion of the ague is feasible. !:,'-! ~:~~;' ~:~ ~=~~ ~~!a~r:~~i~. that the ~C:ju!ai:feir~f:~~n bir~:~:e r;ria~:a!~~a~~:.n~:t..143.215.248.55 rnro~1~:~~:s a:~ ~t:p~~:~ state. t: ~~ 11~a~:;::1~~d sa~~: th at case. Judge R O 11 er s~:;:· Roller said the refusal ~~i!fd c:rJci~!inl~~e~S:ly c~: ~hi!~o~:ui!:~r~t:e~":;r; .. d f1~a "The defendant, Milwaukee of both the National and Am~ri- fects attenda_nce, but tha~ some degree and the a~tendance re- baseball 1s_ a monopoly.,1s fully 143.215.248.55:: ~/~h~c143.215.248.55 ~i~~f143.215.248.55n; a~~Jeres::~s17~; :143.215.248.55 16:45, 29 December 2017 (EST)f~~.. 0 hra!°s" ~ : ~ s~::~nf::;:::~rt deci- 1 ~!neil3iaef:~e~;:n~; iveesg!:;~ ·i~ Milwaukee under the supervl- waukee Brewers Baseball Club, you. 143.215.248.55-i 143.215.248.55sa~n~ the deci&on. ~~n (~~ -143.215.248.55orMit ov~:t~Jh~~e~~a~oP143.215.248.55 16:45, 29 December 2017 (EST)f~n~ sions have upheld baseball in ,/ran~ec:r:::1~\0!nt~~: ·;;a:C:t143.215.248.55:~ u~~d fi~g~ 143.215.248.55tsth~ .. ~: f:!:~1 ~: after a ppointed by the court." co~men:e within the sta te of The Mtl"."aukee ~entmel) a nd there was a public offering of cisions are not conclusive of t:~ W~:o:::: ~= 143.215.248.55 ::;~;i:;:~; to" i~~s;!e~h~avs~t:o;f a~aj~ :it~~a;t~~S:an~·:~%5f~Y1~: ci!~c al:d~:s"r:~t ~ 143.215.248.55 t~fJ =f.?UP who were not local league baseball exhibitions from the judge said. He also blamed not supl?Ort the team, Judge He referred to William C. - - -- - - - -- - - - -- - - R~_J~e sa:~rd will not support !;!~r:~in.head ot th e Braves By SUE KAUFMAN "Before J made this trip I had decided that college had n~thlng to offer me ... I was going to get married." That's what Sandra Mc- s::~ ~~,:~·:i~e:~~ a conclusion that the public of- "None of the Bartholomay ficials ~ere unfriendly to the grou~ had any e:,i;tensive experlBraves, he stated. ence m baseball nor had demonJudge Roller said that if the strated any ability as baseball league desired to go to Atlanta entrepreneurs," he said. "All and offer baseball to the south- that was being offered to the The pupils visited the Oshkosh campus Tuesday morning and 143.215.248.55 16:45, 29 December 2017 (EST)e;os~~t.;u~d~y ~~nhti in college dormitories after attending discussion and information sessions. "The girls in the dorm were 1 s ljiiiiii,jii·ii·ii·ii•iilii..ii•iiliillii!'ii-ii•ii•ii•ii•ii•ii,iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiij _ { ' ~ 1 _. ~ ' s I ave on por swear I - -- an Dressmaking Supplies' d ,--------, 0- Thr~ T ..... to I P.•-: •nd a.t.. , •·•- to • p...._ r rL Mal] Ordffa Profflptly FIiied • SPECIAL P URCHASE ON DRESSMAKING SUPPLIES • • • These low priCNI m ay never be offered again because we bought close-ou t lots at distress Meri• !ice prices. S tock up now! -·,'",m""",•.,..,.'!',~..--P---------p---~,O~&QuA~ ZIPPERS f!r.:i~¾,fi_=!'J.a.ndi. 5~ TO Uc. uch . · · · · ······ t.arse spooi. of ara.nd Na1na THREAD !;!:._to UH ,,.rd ... §Qc BUTTONS PERCALE Pearl, lone, Plastic:, 1c Metal, Leather o.~zmillion &uuon,. V, lue, to S9c and nnalQ,..lllr - TJUTETJl V,luu to 95c. .... 35· - Yar4 ~-~~'.::·.r="" •-4 Lolli Worry of Slipping or Irritating? misses' sizes. Shop early for best selection. ~~ • • t es TOur Dlsslpa f ear of Co ege Part 1, Page 9 !~~f~:·n11 Ptn SPECIAL PURCHASE-SPORTSWEAR Skirts, stretch slacks, blouses, sweaters, ½ PRICE shorts. All f irst quality. J unior and t sta-r:e!s ~~:i~:s~tsla:~l~,~~d that the attendance ~e:1:~;~!~~rs:::ri~1; B;:\:::\oted, "It is said ru;a::;;· had objected to the they combined and conspired at Braves home games from the cordial treatment he re- that there was a lack of enthusi- jurisdiction of the court, among themse~ves to monopo-1953 through 1965 was 19·551 •· ceived when he tried to con-asm on the part of those per- However. the Judge said the 0 i~ g p~~;~:tina~f ba:~1~ B~C:,~~d f~:~~eth!:e143.215.248.55a\ ~eare:P (aih: =~iei143.215.248.55e!h!:143.215.248.55n! ~s:~ j16:45, 29 December 2017 (EST)0 8 within the state of Wisconsin," Los Angeles durmg that period. Braves· franchise in Milwau- knowledge or the Individuals he ruled. Rumors of the Braves moving kee." comprising the BartholoADVERTISEMENT itanding, the stay , noon, C.S.T., on nitted within said thereof granted on be terminated by !fl that the plan is c., now known as me games in the 1 of the court and lppointed by the Impair the continued development ot the quallty of the team." . The state m the long trial ~'!;ri~S::n~~ 1~:tic Judge Roller also noted that ship in 196 2 to a Chicago based Ing this power against the would do the same in the event control of the b~smess of maio.~ MILWAUKEE SENTINEL eastern part of the country, It selected Milwa~ee. business- ui~e party In l~terest in thel Apr. 6._ He orginally ~nnounced lan early ruling was out of the could have awarded a new men was a minonty interest In suit Baseball said the s t a t e that hu1 decision might come question. franchise to Atlanta. the operating companr--4 frac· was not a party In interest last weekend, but as he waded Meanwhile, the Braves opened He said there were enough tlonal ti:iteres\ I whtc~ ~ad Judge Roller worked on his through the mountain of trial thei r season against the Pittsplayers available for a newr143.215.248.55oen di stasteihe~the:we~ruling almost day and night test! many which ra n 7,000burge Pirates in Atlanta (Ga.) team, including a new team mino:rti ~!:'.frs of the White since the 38 day trial ended pages, it became apparent that Tuesday night. ~:t !as ! =143.215.248.55 FALSE TE ETH UCH Pu 7143.215.248.55A\~~&\! 61c • ond LESS! FASHION FABRICS SHOP beembilrruledb}'l • Manhattan Bullding • 617 N. 2nd 14 8th Floor J::.._Sou,f'.,,or shop all over town ~~2~e;143.215.248.55 16:45, 29 December 2017 (EST)· .;}ifl~e ~fr~t; , sC.h:r:oar~~ Milwaukee public school sys- Division senior said. tern guidance counselor, Wed- Each girl and boy on the tour nesday, was assigned a college "room"But now I've changed myl mat~" for the night at. the unimind ... I want to go to cql- vers1ty. lege," Miss McCi:eary said. to~J";es143.215.248.55 16:45, 29 December 2017 (EST)rit~!a~l~~;~t ';;~~ The tr(p to which the young essary to be a brain to stay in Negro g1~l referred _was made college," said Spencer Coggs. ~y 40 Milwauke~ high school 2907 N. 2nd st., another North JU~lors .and semo:-i (? three Division senior. "This guy said Wisconsin State university cam- what it really takes is hard pus~hkosh, Stevens Point work " and Whitewater. Co~gs is planning to major In The pupils had been chosen English and is considering Oshf rom five Milwaukee_high koshStateat present. sch~ls. The trip was designed The pupils from North and fo r d1sad_vantaged stud~nts who. West Division, Lincoln, Rufus were believed to be u~ii:tfonned · King and Riverside high schools as to the opportumtles pre-, visited the Whitewater campus 5ef!ted .by the Wisconsin state Wednesday. Unlike Stevens umvers1ty system. !Point and Oshkosh, the campus Most of the 40 students were there was deserted, beca~se Negroes. students are on Easter vacation. The group left Milwaukee by The tired pupils returned to bus Tuesday, accompanied by Milwaukee late Wednesday afJohn Bussone, guidance coun- ternoon to begin t<;i sift thr?ugh selor and math Instructor at the bundles of ~nformat10nal Lincoln hig h school, and Mrs. books and bulletms they re. Scott. ceived during their tour. with this all-purpose charge card Think of t he conve nience. Shop where you'd like to shop. Save on all t he special sa les, no need to have ca sh . Just say "charge if' with you r new First Wisconsi n Charge Card. Yo u'll get on ly on e monthly bill for wh atever yo u buy. Ma ke just one pa yment . If you pay within 2 5 days it's all free. Should you decide to m ake budget payments, you ca n for an addi tional charge (and your unpaid balance is even cove red by life insu rance) M ake sure you enjoy th is easier way. App ly for yo ur First Wisconsin Charge Ca rd , today. FIRST WISCONSIN CHARGE CARD 10 1 4 5 8 3 FWCC JAMES TURNER 0000 mtt.1 • 3 67 IUIJfCT TO Tlll~S 0" lliV111H SIDI MAIL THIS COUPON TODAY ... and get yours now I (~ don·t rnn h1v. to b. • ~nk custo"*) FlflST WIS CONIIJI CHAflGE CAllD 11'. 0 . •011I0101 MHw•uk..., M acon.In 13101 I Yes, I would like to hav& an application fo r a First Wisconsin Charge Card. I understand that this costs me no thing and that there is no other obligation, I ..................... . Name .••• ,, •• .. •••• . •••••••.•...••• . •.••••••••••.••• ~ Address ••.•••• , . , .• ,, .. .•••• , ••••.• ,, ••• , ••••••.••• · CUSHION YOUR WALK· City •••••• • , ••••.•...•••..••••. . ••• ••• Ztp •••••••• ••• • MEN'S FINE QUALITY SLIP-ONS OXFORDS or Cushion Insoles • TopQuall t,- by U.S. Mtr. ~~;:\ s9g1 at Thi5 l= LOW Pric::e I lm!1HlitPI lnli!IWNill •• WE MEASURE THE FOOT .. . • • • ·-~-h~k • 6621 W . Fond du L,c Av. • 710 1 W, • S. 7th ancl W. Greenfitld , , • S. 27th,nclW. N,tional II • • • • • • • • •=- • • • •~ -=a=a • • (In FIRST WISCONSIN NATIONAL BANK OF MILWAUKEE Greenfield Av. . I • -., • LH'S ,in FAMILY SHO E STORES Shoppins Center) • • • �
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 15, Folder topic: Atlanta Braves | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 19, Folder 1, Document 32

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_001_032.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 1, Document 32
  • Text: of ‘he 35} vo 's of le jut aTY puilt how , the rmal Negroes’ Place Dear Sir: If there was ever a race of people in the history of man that should be thankful that their lot in life was improved by the people of another race it is the American Negro. Some 250 years ago they were savages in the jungles of Africa. There were other civilizations that had prospered on lands that were far less fair to the provis- on of a livelihood for man than the luscious and arable lands of Africa. Yet, while civilization was following its tortuous pace in these countries, the savages *rett fin the Dark Continent were prac- ticing cannibalism. Misguidedly, some of these white people, thought that blacks, living as savages and as cannibals, were animals, and they took them as slaves, Perhaps, that is the best thing that could have happened to them, for otherwise, they, as a race would never have known ne benefits of this great coun- y. My colored friends, while your ancestors were savages and no doubt doing what was right by their customs of the day, eating each other, the forefathers of this country were preparing those great documents of hu- man liberty, the Declaration of). Independence, the Constitution, and the Bill Of Rights, Does that mean anything to you? Cannot you understand that there is a path of history, the history of man’s efforts to find a basis of law whereby one can live in peace with the other? Cannot you understand that the documents mentioned above are the nearest to perfection that have ever been achieved? Do you not understand that to de- stroy these laws is to destroy the very source of those things you say that you want - even those things that you are now oeginning to demand as belong- Ing to you. True, the implementation of the law is not perfect, There are many instances where peo- ple of all colors have been dealt unfairly by the law — also by The Readers’ Forum law. But, what if there were no law? What then? Do you want to revert to savagery? There is law or there is savagery] So now you have set yours selves on a path of violence to take what you have been led to believe by your power-hungry leaders belongs to you. The first question of course is to you? Did you build it? Could you build it? Could you run it? Its just that simple; if you can- not answer yes to all _ three questions then the final quesHon is “How would you live - that is, if you had to depend on your- self?”’ If you had no law, as your Jeaders are now teaching you, do you intend to live in sava- gery? Shall you have cannibal- ism? Maybe that is the way you intend to live, for-as long as the strong last, after you have destroyed everything, as you did in Watts and are doing in Chicago. Rather than face such a dis- heartening outlook, I should think that it would be wise to be thankful for the priviledge that you have to live in this great country - the only country in the world where a man has a free-| no other answer, Either there isj{s still the country of the mo how can you say that it belongs): Once one recognizes that this country, in spite of all its in- equalities by today’s standards, individual freedom and there the best country in which to live then an effort on the part o: that one will be made to pr serve his position in the world, fter all, there is no other place to go. Orangeburg, S. C. The Principles Dear Sir: It is most interesting to read the statement that William M. Garrett, a Democratic candidate for. the office of state treasurer, sent to Governor McNair and ithe press on Friday. Garrett urged the governor to use “‘ev- ery means within your power to allow our Republican opposition to place a nominee on the gen- eral election ballot. Can we, as Democrats, say “the people’ had .an opportunity to choose? I feel every voter should be afforded freedom of choice at the polls.’’ Prior to this statement we have had no Wade Hampton, Ben Tillman, Cole Blease or “Cotton Ed’’ Smith to voice the dom of choice, a wrreans - men who administered the J. 0, Allen] Gq F0lu yee F: sentiment of the people. Anyone will have to admit that it took a great deal of moral courage in this man who mag ‘risk political defeat rather than ‘surrender a shredofprinciple. Mr, Bernard Baruch’s father, . Dr, Simon Baruch, addressing the convention of the S, C. Med- cal Society, of which he was resident, in 1873, quoted an yArabian sage: ‘What good coms es from Ali’s sword, if it be ~ sheathed; What good from Sadi’s 5 tongue, if it be silent.’’ If we do not adhere to theprine * ciples of this man, we can well say; ‘Here lies a decent people s ‘who wanted love, not empire, — and got neither; who tried to \ trade power for popularity and lost both.”’ We might also say that here : lies a nation of advertisers who - ‘knew how to change the cone > sumers taste in cigarettes, but ‘were themselves manipulated on T .all issues that really mattered ito their salvation. | Every voter would do well to read and reread this statement, it is not the statement of a po- .? litician, but of a man of true , principle. , \- G. A White — Spartanburg, S. C, iT APFN HOUSE TODAY 1
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 1, Folder topic: Summerhill riot | non-favorable or radical attitude | outside Georgia | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 19, Folder 1, Document 1

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_001_001.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 1, Document 1
  • Text: AL TIME at point of origin. Time of receipt is LOCAL TIME ac point of destination WA350 PD WASHINGTON DC 9 4O0P EDT MAYOR IVAN ALLEN CARE CITY HALL ATLA DONT FOOL YOURSELF BY THINKING THAT PUTTING STOKELY CARMICHAEL A BEHIND BARS WILL ELIMINATE RIOTING IF HE IS SENT TO JAIL FOR af IF HE IS NOT RELEASED IMMEDIATELY YOU AND THIS COUNTRY WILL yi SEE SUCH UBIQUITOUS RIOTING THAT HAS YET TO BE EVEN IMAGINED. xt 2 BY THINKING THAT KING CAN CONTROL THE BLACK MASSES IS TRULY \ ¥ WISHFUL THINKING. WHEREVER HE HAS TRIED TO PUT DOWN RIOTING \ HE HAS BEEN TOLD IN DEFINITE FOUR LETTER WORDS TO GET OUT. Ww TODAY, RIGHT NOW, THERE IS NO ONE, AND I MEAN NO ONE, WHO EVEN COMES CLOSE TO BEING HEARD STOKELY. ELIMINATE HIM AND YOU UNCHAIN THE LAST CHAIN LEFT THAT IS HOLDING BLACK PEOPLE BACK. RELEASE MR CARMICHAEL FOR BLACK POWER WILL TRULY SHOW TSELF e BLACK PEOPLE DO NOT WISH TO RIOT BUT IF IT IS NECESSITATED Srl = Crass or SERVICE , This is a fast message unless its deferred char- acter is indicated by the proper symbol, W. PL MARSHALL CHAIRMAN OF THE Boarp TELEGRAM WESTERN UNION RW, McFALL PRESIDENT i SYMBOLS * DL = Day Letter NL=Night Letter tre 7 rernational Letter: Tel cEran, ify ‘The filing time shown in the date line on domestic telegrams is LOCAL TIME arc point’'of origin, Time of receipe ts LOCAL TIME ar point of destination IT DOES OCCUR ELONA EVANS (25 )e SF1201(R2-65) WAS50P2
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 1, Folder topic: Summerhill riot | non-favorable or radical attitude | outside Georgia | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 19, Folder 1, Document 23

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_001_023.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 1, Document 23
  • Text: Be tne Boss of Atlante, stanc up for your rights. This is the best picture 1 have seen oi Carmicheal - he has his mouth 'SHUT' for a Change. They need him back in Trinigad \ CONSTITUTION 2%: 7am, 62 3 p.m. 79 Vi p.m. 67° 8 a.m. 64 4np.m. 80 eee 65 » South’s Standard Newspaper emcns coal” Aereueal ; Ham. 75 7 p.m. 74 * Unofficial SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 1966 60 PAGES, 3 SECTIONS x*kkx — Ten Cents Snick Asks U.S. Court = = D GQ eral Against Riots Also Wants Allen Pea “njoined from Acting By BILL SHIPP ‘» Carmichael and Snick late Friday asked the federal *lare unconstitutional Georgia’s anti-riot and insur- ‘d the city’s disorderly conduct ordinance. a re ra city’s disorderly conduct ordi- that “a | RACE, ae spointed |, It said these statutes are se, | Void and illegal on their face’ ~ g|in that they violate the “funda- -.|mental guarantees of free speech, press, assembly, and the “wht to petition the government adress of grievances,” ‘d Moore Jr, of Atlan- "counsel for Snick, | Sol, n Sol. To Rule State’s Laws A a
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 1, Folder topic: Summerhill riot | non-favorable or radical attitude | outside Georgia | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 19, Folder 1, Document 7

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_001_007.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 1, Document 7
  • Text: TROT IH R a N { Coo =. b cake fm Gy ~ Ww. P. MARSHALL a fy iP L G ( at RA /\ wee AIRMAN OF —E BOARD ttl gow DT VL 4 IVIL Jace line on: domestic ite is LOCAL ‘TIME at point of origin, Tims A‘A WA480 PD 8 EXTRA WASHINGTON DC 9 914P EDT MAYOR IVAN ALLEN ATLA THE ARREST OF STOKLEY CARMICHAEL, THIS IS AN OUTSTANDING EXAMPLE OF WHITE SUPPRESSION OF BLACK PEOPLE AND THEIR REPRESENTATIVES THRU THE WHITE POWER STRUCTURE THERE WILL ALWAYS BE STOKLEY CARMTCHAELS AS LONG AS THERE ARE WHITE LIKE YOU JERRY A MCGUFFEY WASH DC SNCC 107 RHODE ISLAND AVE NW (38 )e CTIMRE ANN DRUMMOND Gae@265e = DAFST 135A SEP 10 = DA 1235p (2) MRS BETTY ACBINSOR PL 52387 ~ DaFS 11394 SEP 16 © ba 1230p Seals 2 wl 6) 12>) Lv prt I) \e hy u fy ae: Sp
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 1, Folder topic: Summerhill riot | non-favorable or radical attitude | outside Georgia | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 19, Folder 1, Document 16

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_001_016.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 1, Document 16
  • Text: r SYMBOLS ‘ dace line on domestic telegrams is LOCAL TIME at point of origin. Time of receipr is LOCAL Tl 337A EST SEP 10 66 ABI16 SYA029 SSF156 SY NB193 NL PD NEW YORK NY 9 MAYOR ALLAN CITY HALL ATLA I AM APPALLED AT THE NEWS OF THE ARREST OF STOKLEY CARMICHAEL FOR INCITING RIOTS IN ATLANTA YOU HAVE RIOTS IN YOUR CITY BECAUSE OF THE INBALANCE OF POWER BETWEEN NEGROES AND WHITES BECAUSE YOU HAVE DIRTED SEGREGATED SLUMS AND BECAUSE NEGROES ARE NOT FREE UNTIL EVERY MAN IS FREE THERE IS NOT MAN THAT IS FREE I DEMAND A RELEASE OF STOKLEY CARMICHAEL TRACY BATTEAST~ ; 2 hin [WJ ,\yh hun ave (2) UL (G Ay C07 sud " }yyv aul | fe Vv SF1201(R2-65) 17) WHS ANN ORUMMOND 066"2659 = DaFSITIESA GIP 1O=DA) (2) WS LETTY AU GINGON PL 593583 + DAPSTTSGa ere me Hate
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 1, Folder topic: Summerhill riot | non-favorable or radical attitude | outside Georgia | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 19, Folder 1, Document 19

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_001_019.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 1, Document 19
  • Text: UR AN UNIO) N ae R, W, McPALL The gine ing time shown in the date line on domestic telegrams is LOCAL TIME at point of origin: Time of receipt is LOCAL TIME et point of destination 6234 EST SEP 10 66 AAS DEBO44 DE LLUO14 NL PD 2 EXTRA DETROIT MICH 9 MAYOR . CITY OF ATLANTA ATLA REGARDING LOUIS CARMICHAEL WHO IS IN JAIL IN ATLANTA AT THIS TIME I BELIEVE HE IS MENTALLY ILL AND SHOULD BE REFERRED FOR PSYCHIATRIC TREATMENT I AM AFRAID IF HE IS ALLOWED TO CONTINUE HE WILL ENDANGER THE LIVES OF MANY MRS MAMIE TOLBERT 2497 CLEMENTS. (2) yf iy /) 14 Q> j (1) 80 ANN DRUMMOND 66092699 — Dah gITisa Ore 1oepar* (2) wre OETTY AU S80G0H FL $9396) ~ OM S1ESSA HOP he BATE. SF1201(R2-65)
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 1, Folder topic: Summerhill riot | non-favorable or radical attitude | outside Georgia | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 19, Folder 1, Document 8

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_001_008.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 1, Document 8
  • Text: The fil ng time shown in the date line. on domestic telegrams is LOCAL TIME ar p OF ON Ein. Limgrtar receipe 1s LLL ae destina 1117P EST SEP 9 66 AE555 “-A-A WA4S PD WASHINGTON DC 9 903P EDT IVAN ALLEN pas CI TV KGL PERSECUTION OF STOKELY CARMICHAEL UNWORTHY OF THE CITY OF ATLANTA NANCY PRESTON (23 e SF'1201(R2-65) 946 SEP 10 AM Jp 4! RC AT_ANTA @,
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 1, Folder topic: Summerhill riot | non-favorable or radical attitude | outside Georgia | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 19, Folder 1, Document 33

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_001_033.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 1, Document 33
  • Text: Be idk. / 2925 WW oh Lnsod Od Ahn ae
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 1, Folder topic: Summerhill riot | non-favorable or radical attitude | outside Georgia | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 19, Folder 1, Document 29

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_001_029.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 1, Document 29
  • Text:
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 1, Folder topic: Summerhill riot | non-favorable or radical attitude | outside Georgia | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 19, Folder 1, Document 52

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_001_052.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 1, Document 52
  • Text: _ hawon lhe ( 7G ~ J—&e hhear Japan — /lA One pitti Ce Ale feet Lthals? Ufa xthe Jugrads ir. Ups seer siit. the Pie WL of Ccitt ght, by ut ee Ctar es Bex Tie saa duc a Les (Yliy, Lanterheiuy plate Glass. Yertlene. Dersohe: Dibrukt gd SLY, q , Crt Att Wo. at SY bi Let Mg, thal: the LV - hort 4ad Oitrtl Are ht, Law yosad Ad ‘Leak, Pp ae Can ula C7} asia a bewbog, Bik gh a While nou de Liphubeiae jdemmtpaat W passof phat ) ee Y lor tn the Hueg Whcl no A Tharigh Ahern Adawth @ ) L0H Le arrsetidl the Lh federal Cast Lo arvistetr Lobe — coophuel? Whils Nerbetg the avtedy Ld A. 1 td charge Wi Mth pr Tery jbarcTabig. V2 eget JU4 Losiuple LLY Chetge here ipl - | hk AL Jibs Y bd. Aufpbe, al 28 C- ; PHEW Melee af dishus 2st hhh oa int, Na Ave tein eee tds a. 14, ee Maa AL y. Ale ALG y Aa Bef My wees 7 ie chit dese Le Brt4Y pyr Bel. 44 IU dé S, fp flowy Eo oe oe vil Aid Mee Lanrd< ae stl tte pice: f-etple DA Y fistful fuuy “TL tls the toe Llihle gy Ait e.g ih a Mt ps MH fad QC Cue, ~ wv Meyer hes howe a yypeiler Ih tow titan Meck AR iA Seg See 1 ee ony ie niieaies fe . S Alipsey hee ae “y —. Day G CA. fan. hac if WL. oh ae we, Ob Lut the Flare” “¢ aA Muda va ee tea Wigan ae fe ie eeY ? Ad ta Atk Athans pe, LM Syed f Dat fen, Brrgitrer Le Fea bereirg Monclop JU tachaiyypes L Yneerh.. a in’, eartiijan. jah Aung phat why Lhegls About thy horn he Or a ea ge Ms o4f V fa, ad Abb te Horch al rang Te ry Warr Oath 4ar Lina, Abu aif f Ma-- ferraw, ee we Bhaigbh aud pAvy AE y Wark f ff: Pere. Ap “y Ven 2tgtl/” el Di Ate Ye b f fuel githu. “ae vf fn a. Pris am At Cte, Gu Gt bores All “hag ge 7h Meu /0 20. a thang Ae
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 1, Folder topic: Summerhill riot | non-favorable or radical attitude | outside Georgia | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 19, Folder 1, Document 49

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_001_049.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 1, Document 49
  • Text: September 9, 1966 Mayor Alien of Atlanta, Georgia Honorable Sirs: We saw the Black Power raid on your city, etce Enclose somexdat data sent to me so I pass it on to your, Know the truth end the t truth shall set us free. It would be the patriotic thing to do to celebrate Constitution Day, the 17th, by a big march of white and also the colored people with strong band music with a ery of "Back to our Constitution under God," and we'll be set free. Uited Nations under the world gangsters have taken us over, therefore we must get out of the United Nations and stop this vicious take-over now. United we stand, divided we f we fall. God help us all} Sincerely A patriot and friends. P.S.) Make an appeal to Congress to repeal the Federal Banking Law i 13, then we would have our economic freedom back again. (Men we would beat the enemies at their own Sito BK he ope aed » /He
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 1, Folder topic: Summerhill riot | non-favorable or radical attitude | outside Georgia | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 19, Folder 1, Document 38

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_001_038.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 1, Document 38
  • Text: Sony certo) = = OT ~ 4 Wy Bi Caw ted BOY Elia? Y] } V7 ECT ERR Wi Vay | 3 — | q a . \ Fike, { \) Sy FY det tees UR W. P. MARSHALL ‘ | : EAL! £ JC i VU CHAIRMAN OF THE Boarp A Bs Bs a shown in the date line on domestic telegrams is LOCAL TIME at point of origin. Time of receipe is LOCAL TIME at point of destination 9A EST SEP 9 66 AAOTT A A WA027 PD WASHINGTON DC 9 210A EDT MAYOR IVAN ALLEN, DLR IMMY 3700 NORTHSIDE DR ATLA I AM WHITE - ARREST OF STOKLEY CARMICHAEL TOTALLY UNJUSTIFIED. RELEASE IMMEDIATELY OR COUNTRY WILL UPROAR CAROL COSITORE 1334 FORT STEVENS DRIVE NORTHWEST WASHINGTON De SF1201(R2-65)
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 1, Folder topic: Summerhill riot | non-favorable or radical attitude | outside Georgia | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 19, Folder 1, Document 43

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_001_043.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 1, Document 43
  • Text: “A WASHINGTON ‘§ i gy ee py ante cen tena oo ae alli iniliaaiaas oe
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 1, Folder topic: Summerhill riot | non-favorable or radical attitude | outside Georgia | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 19, Folder 1, Document 39

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_001_039.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 1, Document 39
  • Text: sania i ee
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 1, Folder topic: Summerhill riot | non-favorable or radical attitude | outside Georgia | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 19, Folder 1, Document 55

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_001_055.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 1, Document 55
  • Text: af Fs 4) 49
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 1, Folder topic: Summerhill riot | non-favorable or radical attitude | outside Georgia | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 19, Folder 1, Document 50

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_001_050.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 1, Document 50
  • Text: a i ] 4 “a
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 1, Folder topic: Summerhill riot | non-favorable or radical attitude | outside Georgia | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 19, Folder 1, Document 66

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_001_066.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 1, Document 66
  • Text:
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 1, Folder topic: Summerhill riot | non-favorable or radical attitude | outside Georgia | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 19, Folder 1, Document 41

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_001_041.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 1, Document 41
  • Text:
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 1, Folder topic: Summerhill riot | non-favorable or radical attitude | outside Georgia | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021

Box 19, Folder 1, Document 100

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_001_100.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 19, Folder 1, Document 100
  • Text: AFFAIRS OF STATE King Shunting By CHARLES M. HILLS Clarion-Ledger Staff Writer U.S. Sen. James 0. Eastland appearing at the Neshoba Coun- ty Fair here a few days ago, told a large audience that the Negro leader, Martin Luth- er King, “has not gone over in the North and they are shunt- ing him back South.” The statement came on the heels of announcements that King is bringing his annual con- vention of the Southern Chris- tian Leadership Conference to Jackson, Aug, 7 - 8. Sen. Eastland, considered the leading anti - liberal in the Con- gress, cautioned the citizens of this area to pay as little atten- tion to the rabble - rousings of King as possible. It has been noted that every- where that the “non -. violent’ King goes up north, death and destruction have sprouted. Sen, Eastland told the Nesho- ba audience that even liberal solons in Washington “saw through” the shooting incident of James Meredith several ‘weeks ago, and “the result was a break-through for the conserv- ative cause. “The man with the rifle, an expert marksman according to his military record, called three times for attention of Meredith in order that the cameramen could focus,’ Eastland noted, “Ves, aa peut even sa ie through that, when an exp Sones used birdshot to So much for the Hastland statement ... we are attracted to the New. York Times via the St. Louis Post Dispatch this week, “oe GIFTS CUT The Post Dispatch, quoting the New York paper, reprints the following which should show a turn of affairs up The Northern Liberals, fear- ful of extremism, are cutting back sharply on contributions to the more militant civil rights organizations. The big drop in donations from the liberal community is verified by top officers and former leaders of the Congress of Racial Equality, the Stu- dent nonviolent co-ordinating committee, popularly called Snick, and the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s Southern Christian Leadership Confer- ence. Money from white persons in the past has been the life- blood of their campaigns. a ficers of those organizations and In a series of interviews, eivil rights donors gave three | being shifted from CORE and Gets that contributions fell signifi- cantly after a CORE officer at Mount Vernon, N. Y., denounced Jews in general at a public meeting in February. Lynch says that about 80 per cent of his group’s financial support has come from the white community “and you could say that Jewish contri- hey have been predomi- nant.” RESIGNATIONS Former high - ranking na- tional officers of CORE recent- ly resigned but sill in close touch with the situation, say that contributions to it this year are running only little bet- ter than half of the $810,000 to- tal of the previous fiscal year, Lynch denies such a severe drop but does not disclose the figures, He concedes that the deficit is between $200,000 and $250.000. Former CORE leaders put it as high as $350,000. Ivanhoe Donaldson, new di- rector of the New York office of Snick, which operates primari- ly in the South but has frankly depended on white northern fi- nancial help, says “our contri- butions are 40 to 45 per cent Jess than we normally have at this time of year.” He says that the Student Com- mittee is no longer supported “by those liberal whites who believe in integration in the South but not New York or Chi-|: cago.” Today the organization has the help of the radicals, he says. The Student Committee talks of about $650,000 in in¢ome in the fiscal year 1965, The Student Committee charges the Northern press with __ distortions about the meaning of “black power,” causing libs” erals to worry about “racism” and “black nationalism,” — The Rev. Dr. King's confer- .@, ence says that 70 per cent of %, its financial help has come)! from white liberals but that| contributions dropped from $1,-| J 500,000 in the fiscal year 1965 There are indications that mueh money from whites is — Snick to more conservative rights groups or to educational and legal defense organizations benefiting the Negro. Civil Rights leaders and do- hors report a general slacken- ing in Northern interest after|. the enactment of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and last year’s voting rights law, A long - time CORE national executive, who wants his name withheld: sims un that ntti. < snow a turn of affairs up. North... The Northern Liberals, fear- ful of extremism, are cutting back sharply on contributions to the more militant civil rights organizations. ‘ The big drop in donations from the liberal community is verified by top officers and former leaders of the Congress of Racial Equality, the Stu- dent nonviolent co-ordinating committee, popularly called Snick, and the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s Southern Christian Leadership Confer- ence. Money from white persons in the past has been the life- blood of their campaigns. In a series of interviews, of- ficers of those organizations and civil rights donors gave three main reasons for the drop in financial support: (1) Concern over CORE and Snick attitudes that are de- scribed by mnay persons as “black racist,” anti-Semitic or . “extreme.” (2) Worry or disgust about bitter attacks, primarily by CORE and Snick, on United States intentions and on ‘‘moral- ity” in Viet Nam and on the military draft. (3) A decline of enthusiasm now that the Northerner is be- ing jostled by civil rights mili- tancy in his own backyard. BLACK POWER Both CORE and the Student Committee have recently em- phasized demands for “black power” in political and eco- nomic life. The Rev. Dr. King demands a ‘“‘militant thrust forward”? by Negroes but de- plores use of the term “black power” as implying black na- tionalist ideas. His organization reports contributions down by more than one third in the fis- cal year ending, June 30. The Rey. Ralph D. Abernathy, vice president and treasurer of the Leadership Conference, says that “black power” de- mands and allegedly racist at- titudes of CORE and Snick have seriously affected the King or- ganization because many whites do not differentiate among the organizations. Lineoln Lynch, associate na-. tional director of CORE, says ~ a = “TT ¥ es ap a CULTET= ence says that 70 per cent of its financial help has come from white liberals but that contributions dropped from $1,- 500,000 in the fiscal year 1965 to less than $1,000,000 in 1966. There are indications that much money from whites is being shifted from CORE and Snick to more conservative rights groups or to educational and legal defense organizations benefiting the Negro. SLACKENING INTEREST Civil Rights leaders and do- Nors report a general slacken- ing in Northern interest after the enactment of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and last year’s voting rights law. A long - time CORE national executive, who wants his name withheld, sums up that atti- tude: “Bull Connor and his po- lice dogs were such easy tar- gets to hate a few years ago,” He referred to Eugene Con- hor, who used dogs to check demonstrators when he was Birminghan police commission- er Many observers and leaders of the civil rights struggle be- lieve that it is too early. to as- sess the full impact of the new “black power” slogan. But they point to other related factors, described as “racist” or “ex- tremist,” attitudes as having a depressing effect for many months. Kivie Kaplan, the retired white industrialist who is presi- dent of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, said recently: “I know one big contributor who tore up his check when Snick started that ‘Black Panter’ political |’ party in Alabama.” He referred to a new all-black party in one Alabama county. Another, Joseph Willen, exec- utive director of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies, has Switched his support to the Na- tional Urban League and to the scholarship, education and de- fense fund for racial equality, Set up friends and staff people | of CORE in 1962, but separate | in operation. CORE, he says, has apparent- ly decided not to be an inter- racial group any longer, “and the opposite of that is racist.’ | He speaks of a Negro attack “on their neighbors, the Jews.’ 1 Theos Ronee es PRA 1 | € (
  • Tags: Box 19, Box 19 Folder 1, Folder topic: Summerhill riot | non-favorable or radical attitude | outside Georgia | 1966
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 30, 2021