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Box 7, Folder 12, Document 1

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_012_001.pdf
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  • Title: Box 7, Folder 12, Document 1
  • Text: The Urban Coalitiog=——__, December 1969 The Urban Coalition Calls For Health Care Reforms The Urban Coalition has called for a combina- tion of national and community action to bring about sweeping medical reforms aimed at im- proving health care for all Americans, particu- larly those in the cities. In a comprehensive 76-page report prepared by its health task force, the Coalition maintained that while the United States spends a bigger proportion of its gross national product on health than any other country, its health serv- ices are inadequate. The report, Rx for Action, was prepared under the direction of Dr. George A. Silver, the Coalition’s Executive Associate for Health. According to the report, Americans spend more than $53 billion annually on a “potpourri” of public and private health programs. If these funds were spent more efficiently, the report Dr. George A. Silver, Coalition Executive Associate for Health; John W. Gardner, Urban Coalition Chairman; and Dr. Roger O. Egeberg, Assistant Secretary for Health and Scientific Affairs of HEW at press conference to announce Rx for Action. concluded, many more people would be served and better services could be assured forall. Poor health affects all Americans, regardless of income, the report said. Not only the poor, but middle income families, blue collar workers, welfare mothers, and all city residents—black, white and brown — suffer from substandard health care. Community action, according to the Coalition, can generate more immediate improvement for its citizens than almost any national effort. Local successes would also stimulate needed national reforms. The report urged the local urban coalitions that have been formed in nearly 50 cities to establish their own health task forces. But the Coalition emphasized that the study’s findings and recommendations could be used in whole or in part by any local community organization con- cerned with the quality of health care. These would include local chambers of com- merce, labor and religious groups, local bus- inessmen and women’s organizations. The same consultant and technical assistance services that the national Coalition intends to make avail- able to its local health task forces would be available to these groups. The Urban Coalition will consult with the major voluntary health or- ganizations to obtain their cooperation. The Coalition also plans to meet in a series of regional health conferences with local coali- tions and other groups. The report decried the lack of participation of the poor and the non-poor in health services planning and said that no serious effort had yet been taken to train individuals outside of pro- fessional groups in this area. “In both the long and short runs,” the report stated, “advances in the health field depend on the will of the American people.” The study emphasized that the “middle-class white community has been too infrequently rep- resented in hospital board membership and in public health bodies, or even on the boards. of voluntary agencies.” It said that the poor, specifically blacks, Mexican-Americans and Puerto Ricans, had been left out of the decision-making process. The Coalition urged more representation from these people on hospital boards, health and welfare councils, insurance bodies and public health advisory councils. Following are some of the principal findings and recommendations of the report: Malnutrition: With estimates placing the yearly cost of the consequences of malnutri- tion to the economy at-substantially more than the $3-4 billion needed to eliminate hunger, coalitions should work to make more of the proper food more readily available to the public. Environment: The well-being of the urban poor is being directly threatened by bad hous- ing and air and water pollution. Citizens groups should be formed to educate the poor on such basic matters as housing and health code re- quirements, their legal rights to services, safety practices and rat and vermin control. Access to Facilities: More local money is essential to help meet the need of the many communities for more health facilities. Trans- portation systems and emergency ambulance services could be studied to see if they are geared to the needs of the poor. Interpreters: Interpreters could be used in clinics and information centers for Spanish- speaking people. Occupational Health Clinics: Hospital boards could arrange for the development of occupa- tional health clinics to serve local industry and provide advice for health and safety programs for working people from the local community. Manpower Deficiencies: Through the system of routine volunteer assignments, medical so- cieties could undertake to supply doctors in areas where sufficient numbers.are not availa- ble. Sub-professionals could be trained to han- dle many of the duties involved in health care. The Coalition’s study emphasized that many local programs could be immediately launched without waiting for action by the Federal gov- ernment. But it also pointed out that effective local action will always have to be supplemented and strengthened by effective Federal action. The report called for a national system of financing medical care costs that .will give every American access to services without any economic barrier. Dr. Roger O. Egeberg, who is the Assistant Secretary for Health and Scientific Affairs, com- mented on the Coalition’s recommendations. He said: “The country should be grateful to the Urban Coalition for this type of analysis of the nation’s health needs, and planning for the na- tion’s health services. “The Coalition’s proposal recognizes that solving the medical needs of America is not the job of the Federal government alone, but also requires effort and change by everyone.” In compiling its Rx for Action the health task force of the Urban Coalition has laid down a battle plan for the war against poor health care in the United States. Copies are available from the Urban Coali- tion, 2100 M Street, N. W., Washington, D.C. 20037. New Members Added to Coalition Steering Committee Fourteen new members have been added to the Steering Committee of the Urban Coalition. The new additions to the Coalition’s policy-making body include businessmen, mayors, a state sen- ator and a physician. The new members announced by Urban Coali- tion Chairman John W. Gardner are: State Senator Joe J. Bernal of San Antonio, Texas. Senator Bernal, an educator and social worker as well as a legislator, is executive di- rector of the Guadalupe Community Center in San Antonio. Mayor Frank Curran of San Diego, Califor- nia, Mayor Curran is president of the Na- tional League of Cities. Hector P. Garcia, M.D., a Corpus Christi, Texas physician and a former commissioner of the U.S. Civil Rights Commission. Ben W. Heineman of Chicago, president of Northwest Industries Inc. Heinemanis chairman of the President’s Commission on Income Main- tenance. Samuel C. Johnson, president of S.C. Johnson & Son Inc. and president of the Racine Environ- ment Commitee, a local urban coalition. Mayor Eric Jonsson of Dallas. Stephen F. Keating, president of Honeywell Inc., and former chairman of thé Minneapolis Urban Coalition. ‘ Donald M. Kendall, president of Pepsico, Inc., and chairman of the National Alliance of Busi- nessmen, New York. Mayor Richard Lugar of Indianapolis. Donald S. MacNaughton, president of Pruden- tial Insurance Co. and former chairman of the Newark Urban Coalition. Mayor Jack D. Maltester of San Leandro, Cal- ifornia. Maltester is also president of the U.S. Conference of Mayors. James Roche, chairman of the board of Gen- eral Motors Corp., and member of the board of trustees of the New Detroit Committee, an urban coalition. H. I. Romnes, chairman of the board of AT&T, New York. Romnes is also vice-chairman of the Nattonal Industrial Conference Board and is a member of the Urban Coalition’s task force on education. , Martin Stone, president of Monogram Indus- tries Inc. and chairman of the.Los Angeles Ur- ban Coalition. Mr. Gardner said the Urban Coalition adds to the Steering Committee periodically to assure broad and dynamic representation from the Co- alition’s constituent elements—local govern- ment, business, labor, minority groups and re- ligion. M. Carl Holman, vice-president of the Urban Coalition for Policy and Program Development; Peter Libassi, Coalition executive vice-president; and Nicholas deB. Katzenbach, former U.S. Attorney General and chairman of the Coalition's - law and government task force discuss new approaches to the reform of the criminal justice system spelled out in the Coalition's report Taking the Blindfold off Justice. Urban Coalition Action Council Supports Welfare Reform “The time has come to discard the existing patchwork of ineffective and in many ways de- structive public assistance programs. You have the opportunity to replace them with a national system of income maintenance that will help people to help themselves but preserve indi- vidual dignity in aiding those left behind by society.” With these words, John W. Gardner, Chair- man of the Urban Coalition Action Council, be- gan his testimony last month before the House Ways and Means Committee, which is consider- ing President Nixon’s proposals to reform the nation’s public assistance programs. At the same time, Mr. Gardner said the Urban Coalition and the Urban Coalition Action Coun- cil will give the issue top priority for the months ahead. “It is of the highest impor- tance,” he said, “that such lingering myths as the one that the poor in America are people who don’t want to work—able-bodied loafers— be erased and that our public assistance pro- grams be overhauled.” In his congressional testimony, Mr. Gardner termed the Administration’s reform proposals “extremely important and on the whole well designed,” but suggested strengthening them at several crucial points. “If the proposals are accepted,” he said, “the Federal government will for the first time in history accept responsibility for providing a minimum level of payment throughout the nation and for financing it. I would have been very proud had I been able to establish that principle during my tenure as Secretary of Health, Educa- tion and Welfare. It is an historic step.” Mr. Gardner also praised the proposals for their emphasis on children, their work incentive features and their greatly broadened coverage. “Of special significance,” he said, “is the inclusion of the working poor for the first time. The complete omission of the working poor is surely one of the strangest anomalies of the present system. A society which values work should surely make some provision for the six million adults who work full-time, year-round, and yet cannot earn enough to bring themselves above the poverty line.” “The strengths of the President’s proposals,” he said, “could lead us on to an immeasurably sounder and more equitable system of income maintenance. But if the promise of the propo- sals is to be realized, they must be strength- ened at a number of points,” among them: 1. Provision should be made for “a nation- wide increase in benefits to the poverty level over a specified period of time,” with the $1,600 floor proposed by the President serving as a starting point fora phased program. 2. “Adequate provision should be made for ‘one-stop’ administration of the proposed Fed- eral-state system.” 3. While “the improved benefits for the aged, disabled and blind are a welcome step,” Mr. Gardner’s statement said, “it may be that our ultimate goal should be a single income maintenance system which provides for uniform adequate assistance for all of our impover- ished citizens, including needy individuals and couples without children.” ; 4. “Given the elasticity of its tax base, and the economies of scale and efficiency offered by Federal administration, a shift of the welfare burden to the Federal government is clearly one means of resolving the fiscal dilemmas of state and local government.” D: The work requirement provisions of the legislation “should specify job standards and wage rates for ‘suitable employment.’” Finally, he said, “I would emphasize that there must be provisions for job creation, so that the training opportunities won’t be a re- volving door into continued unemployment. The ideal solution is a public service employment program.” While Mr. Gardner praised the work require- ment proposals, he made it clear that there are limits to what can be expected of it. “Many Americans sincerely believe that people living in poverty are people who don't want to work—or people who don’t want steady work,” he said. “In other words, able-bodied loafers. That is a long way from the truth, Of the 25 million persons living below the poverty line, 15 million are either under 18°or over 65.” “Of the remaining 10 million, nine million fall within the scope of the Administration’s family assistance proposals (as being adults in poor families that include children). “Let us look at that nine million. The Admin- istration estimates that 7.9 million are already working, but earn too little to bring them above the poverty level, or are the wives of such men, or are disabled, or are women who must stay home because of very young children, “That leaves 1.1 million adults who the Ad- ministration feels can significantly help them- selves and would thus be required to register for jobs or work training—600,000 men and 500,000 mothers of school-aged children.” Mr. Gardner also emphasized that “no wel- fare program can cure underlying conditions.” “The poverty that makes a public assistance program necessary,” he said, “is rooted in a variety of historical and contemporary condi- tions; discrimination, the pathology of the urban and rural slum, inadequate education, insuffi- cient job opportunities in the locality, low pay in jobs not covered by the minimum wage, in- adequate social insurance benefits, inadequate provisions for manpower training and so on.” “If we are to get to the root of the problem we shall have to do so through education, health and nutrition programs, the creation of job opportunities, the elimination of slum condi- tions and similar measures.” Mr. Gardner’s testimony, delivered by Am- bassador George McGhee, special representa- tive of the chairman, elaborated on the position taken in late June by the full Policy Council of the Urban Coalition Action Council. Copies of Mr. Gardner’s testimony and of the Action Council booklet on welfare reform “To- ward A Full Opportunity” are available from the Urban Coalition Action Councii, 2100.M Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 20037. Coalition Begins Probe of Credit Practices to Low Income Consumers A preliminary study which examines efforts by commercial banks, credit unions and retailers -to make credit available to low-income con- sumers, has been made public by the national Urban Coalition. The study, entitled, “Con- sumer Credit and the Low Income Consumer,” was prepared after more than five months of field and research work by William G. Kaye & Associates, consultants in the area of con- sumer affairs. , A major finding showed that the poor can and do pay their bills. “The low-income consumer | may at times encounter some difficulty in pay- ing bills when due, but in the end, his perform- ance in paying his full obligation is nearly as good as his more affluent suburban counter- part,” the report said. The 105-page study formed the basis of a November meeting called by the Coalition to look at models that may be successful in ex- tending credit to the poor. The meeting was chaired by Edward C. Sylvester, Jr., former Assistant Secretary in Community and Field Services, Department of Health, Education and On arecent visit tothe Greater Miami Urban Coalition, Chairman John Gardner met with Coalition leaders. He is shown here visiting with some of the minority representatives of the Miami Coalition. Welfare, and attended by approximately 100 leaders from retailing, the poor, Federal agen- cies and the White House, banks, organized labor, social action groups, lawyers and con- sumer and credit organizations. The report will be further considered at a series of regional meetings, the first of which took place in Minneapolis, December 7-8. Mr. Kaye, former executive director of the President’s Committee on Consumer Interests, stated that “Hopefully, this report—in addition to increasing the availability of low-income- credit—will shed some light on the realities and mythologies about the performance of the low- income person in seeking, utilizing and repay- ing consumer loans and other forms of con- sumer credit.” Local Coalitions Get Fund-Raising Guidelines Fund-raising guidelines will be the subject of two national Urban Coalition conferences for local coalition chairmen, fund- -raising chair- men and executive directors. At these “how-to-do-it” sessions members of the national Coalition’s Financial Develop- _ ment Advisory Council and other experts will share their expertise in raising money—a vital ingredient behind any successful coalition pro- gram—with local leaders. The first conference, to be held in Philadel- phia in December, is for coalitions in the north- east and southeast regions. The other is planned for January for coalition representatives from the midwest and west. Conference speakers will highlight the keys to successful fund-raising: identifying community leaders; developing a “case”; organizing vol- unteers for fund-raising, and the “nuts and bolts” of solicitation. Based on these guidelines, workshops will enable coalition representatives to pinpoint areas for further guidance and to exchange experiences. The 29-member Financial Development Ad- visory Council comprises top financial devel- opment officers from colleges and universities across the country. One of its primary roles is to counsel local coalitions in organizing suc- cessful fund-raising programs. Thus far Coun- cil members have individually advised coali- tions in 13 cities. Coalition staff support for the Advisory Coun- cil and national fund-raising .efforts is pro- vided by David M. Thompson, Assistant to the Chairman; Douglas Lawson, Financial Develop- ment Officer; and Walker Williams, Associate Financial Development Officer. Newark Love Festival Salutes “The Summer Thing” Through efforts of the Greater Newark Urban Coalition, New Jersey’s largest city had a Love Festival on October 5th. A video tape replay of the event was shown on an hour-long, prime- time, NBC national telecast on November 14th. Based on a series of free, outdoor concerts first given in Harlem, the Love Festival was brought to Newark by WNBC-TV, which se- cured the help of the Harlem Festival producer, Tony Lawrence. The Love Festival was WNBC’s way of honoring Newark’s Recreation Planning Council, better known as The Summer Thing. The Newark Love Festival turned out to. be quite an autumn event. It turned on as one of the largest happenings in the city’s 302-year history. Between 70,000 and 100,000 “beauti- ful, beautiful people” attended. Not a single incident marred the massive outdoor spectacular held in Newark’s Weequa- hic Park. For six hours, rock bands, folk and soul singers, comedians and mod entertainers gave performances. Twenty thousand phono- graph records were given away. WNBC said the Love Festival was “a major community rela- tions project.” The community effort grew out of Newark Co- alition president Gustav Heningburg’s plea to New York television stations, just 10 miles away, to devote some coverage to Newark’s brighter side. The city had received consider- able adverse publicity since the 1967 riot. In response, WNBC-TV Channel 4, asked Hening- burg to suggest an activity worth televising that might offset coverage of Newark’s problems. Heningburg’s recommendation was the Reerea- tion Planning Council or The Summer Thing, a program which involves ghetto youth in recrea- tional opportunities. The Summer Thing was born in late May as Newark looked toward another long hot summer with little in the way of programs to offer out- of-school, inner-city youth. Supported by the Newark Coalition's Steering Committee, Heningburg put together a presti- gious, five-man, voluntary group of co-chair- men. It included both deputy mayors, Paul Reilly and Lewis Perkins. The representative of business and industry was Al DeRogatis, a Prudential Insurance Company vice president and former football great. John Scagnelli, a vice president of the Council of Social Agen- cies, served as delegate for more than 150 United Fund agencies and State Assemblyman George Richardson, a black legislator, repre- sented the coalition. Office space was donated by the Newark Housing Authority. One of the local manpower programs donated office equipment. The Newark Chamber of Commerce agreed to raise $234,000. The Summer Thing contacted more than 100 community organizations asking them to sub- mit their recreation proposals, Through care- ful screening and much negotiation, the co- chairmen approved 29 proposals for funding. In jess than six weeks, an office was-set up, a volunteer staff-was secured, work began on fund raising and a directory was compiled of more than 70 community-sponsored youth pro- grams, public and private. A communications center was established to which anyone could call on any given day and get a listing of recre- ational activities going on in town. The center also published a daily newsletter listing special events of the day for distribution to almost 100 points in the city. Local radio station WNJR taped and broadcasted daily events all through the summer. By the end of the summer, the Chamber of Commerce raised almost $200,000. The Engel- hard Foundation provided the first $1,000 and an additional $57,000 came from the New Jersey State Department of Community Affairs. More than 50,000 youngsters participated in The Summer Thing. By Labor Day, it was clear that partially-polarized Newark could get diverse people to work together and get things done well and fast. NBC, impressed with The Summer Thing, looked for a fitting salute. It hit upon the Love Festival concerts in Harlem that had attracted hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers. Tony Lawrence agreed to get the talent and WNBC promised to film the gala for television. The Recreation Planning Council-was asked to secure a suitable outdoor location and help attract crowds that would reflect the black/white cooperation that made The Summer Thing so meaningful to Newark. In a scant three weeks, hundreds of details had to be handled. For the first time, the New- ark police cooperated with the Black Panthers in crowd control. The city administration and participation of social agencies “was a joy to - behold,” stated Heningburg. Medical school in- terns worked with welfare mothers, hip teenag- ers manned lost and found stations with sen- ior citizens, radical students and conservative professionals joined hands to organize shuttle buses. Ideological, age, language, and racial differences seemed unimportant and for that afternoon friendship, love and pride prevailed and everybody “Gave A Damn!” Shortly after the November 14th national telecast, Gus Heningburg went down to Fayette, Mississippi to help black Mayor Charles Evers plan a Thanksgiving Day, Love Festival for his town. New Jersey Newsphotos PO Gustav Heningburg, president of the Greater Newark Urban Coalition at the Newark Love Festival. Call For Action Director Named R. Alexander Grant, the former national di- rector of recruitment for VISTA (Volunteers in Service to America), has been named as the Executive Director of “Call for Action”. “Call for Action” is a project in coopera- tion with the national Urban Coalition, and is operated by a radio station and a staff of volun- teers in a number of cities. Mr. Grant was born in Newark, N. J. in 1933. He has a B. A. from Bloomfield College and an M. A. from Montclair State College. In announcing Mr. Grant’s appointment, John W. Gardner, the Coalition’s Chairman, said the Coalition hoped to have “Call for Action” pro- grams working in 8-10 cities throughout the country by the end of the year. Under the project, individuals may etl local radio stations for referral to the proper agen- cies for help with such problems as poor hous- ing, crime, narcotics, hospital care and sanita- tion disposal. “Call for Action” was begun at radio station WMCA in New York City by Mrs. R. Peter Straus, wife of the station’s owner and co- chairman of the nationwide program. The project is now on the air in New York, Chicago, Denver and Utica. Mr. Grant’s duties will include policy for- mulation and coordination for the various “Call for Action” projects. R. Alexander Grant Grass Roots News The Greater Kansas. City Urban Coalition has inaugurated a program of tours of the inner-city to give interested citizens, particularly white suburbanites, a first hand view of inner-city housing, schools, business development and recreation facilities. Small groups travel in a modified bus, are given a running description of inner-city conditions, and told of the activities of the Urban Coalition. The tours began with the Greater Kansas City Urban Coalition board of directors and has since included members of the Real Estate Board and service clubs. The Greater Kansas City Urban Coalition has formed a women’s task force, believed to be the first such among local coalitions. The task force is involved in a project with the Welfare Rights Organization and will concentrate in the hous- ing field in 1970. The Greater Kansas City Urban Coalition is publishing a voter information booklet for the January 20 school board elections, reviewing the qualifications of the candidates and contain- ing their views on key issues. The new South Bend Urban Coalition already has received preliminary reports from five task forces and this month expects final reports out- lining action programs for 1970. The task forces are for education, housing, employment, racial attitudes and conflict, and youth. Mayor Carl Stokes of Cleveland has announced plans for a “Call for Action” program on station WERE under the coordination of the Cleveland Urban Coalition. “Call for Action” programs, now in operation in several cities, enable listeners to call volunteers at the station to register complaints about deficient city services. The Cleveland program will begin early in 1970. The Urban Coalition of Minneapolis has a new president, Phillip Harder, senior vice president of the First National Bank. He succeeds Dean McNeal, vice president of the Pillsbury Com- pany, whose term expired. The Mayor of Winston-Salem, North Carolina proclaimed the week of December 8-12 as “Family and Child Development Week” in con- junction with a project sponsored by the Day Care Association of the Urban Coalition with the co-operation of other child-related agencies. Symposiums on child development and educa- tion were held throughout the week for parents, school administrators, businessmen, represen- tatives from social service agencies and other interested groups. The housing task force of the Greater Miami Coalition has completed development of a cur- riculum for a new course offered at the Univer- sity of Miami on housing management. The 15- week course followed by on-the-job-training will open up new careers for disadvantaged per- sons in the management of housing complexes. Key feature of the plan is job commitments for those finishing the course. The El Paso (Tex.) Urban Coalition has been holding open forums each month on problems affecting the El Paso community. The forums, officially known as Area Council Meetings for Public Information, have dealt with such matters as police protection, street paving, housing, schools and public safety. The Riverside (Calif.)Coalition, under its viva- cious and energetic executive director, Mrs. Ruth Pepe, has convinced the school system that it doesn’t have to keep going to such far- away places as Arizona and Texas to hire minority teachers. Through a program set up as a result of coalition efforts five black instruc- tors have been trained and hired from within the Riverside community. The bail reform program of the RiversideCoa- lition, operating since mid-September, has re- duced the average length of jail stay from 37 to 4 days. Five coalition representatives were among the Riverside officials attending the national Coalition’s briefing on new approaches to criminal justice in New York in April; liked what they saw, convinced the Riverside police department to give bail reform a try and since its inception, nearly 60 persons have been re- leased on their own recognizance under the project. In San Ysidro (Calif.), a small, green colored stucco house has been converted into a health clinic for some 7,000 Mexican-Americans. The clinic treats about 150 persons a week and operates with one full-time nurse, Miss Jeannie Powers. The San Diego Coalition played a major role in creating the clinic and also refurbished and furnished the entire house. In San Antonio, (Tex.) the coalition has formed a group that it calls the “clearinghouse committee.” The committee is interviewing ghetto residents to determine their major grievances. This in- formation is presented to the businessmen on the coalition’s steering committee, who then take it to the city agency that can do something about the problems uncovered in the interviews. Three VISTA lawyers, working under a program co-sponsored by the national Urban Coalition began working in Denver in mid-October. They’re working on bail reform. ”Call for Action” got off to an action packed start in Denver in late October with radio sta- tion KLZ getting about 150 calls in its first week of operation. New Urban Coalitions Since the end of the summer local coalitions have sprung up all over the map. The five new- est are South Bend, Rhode Island, Wilmington, El Paso and Chattanooga. Officially the South Bend (Ind.) coalition is known as the St. Joseph County Urban Coali- tion. The local Chamber of Commerce in South Bend is staffing the coalition while the search goes on for a full-time executive director. The coalition’s chairman is Frank Sullivan, chair- man of the board of Frank Sullivan Associates, an insurance firm. Rhode Island shows there may be some ad- vantages to being small, at least in the sense of coalition. The Rhode Island coalition is the only statewide coalition. It has an executive director-designate, Anthony Agostinelli and a president, Elwood E. Leonard Jr. Leonard is president of the H & H Screw Company, and also chairman of the United Fund Drive. Wilmington (Del.) is looking for an executive director. Rodney Layton, a Wilmington attorney and vice-chairman of the United Fund in that city is chairman of the new coalition. In the west Texas town of El Paso they call the coalition the Council for Social Action be- cause that was what it was called before it be- came a local urban coalition in the beginning of September. Three weeks after it was recognized as a coalition by the national, William Pearson, E] Paso’s executive director was in Washington with 30 other local executive directors. They met with John W, Gardner. The Reverend James I. Oliver is the chairman of the coalition, which is the third in Texas. The others are San Antonio and Corpus Christi. In Chattanooga they had to wait more than two years before a coalition was actually formed. Interest in creating a coalition in that southern city began with the August 1967 convocation of 1,200 of the nation’s leaders that gave birth to the national Urban Coalition. Co-chairmen of the new Chattanooga coali- tion are John Slack, general manager of Com- bustion Engineering and Roy Noel, city youth coordinator. One of the members of the Steer- ing Committee is Mrs. Ruth S. Golden, pub- lisher of the Chattanooga Times and sister-in- law of Andrew Heiskell, chairman of the board of Time, Inc. and co-chairman of the national Urban Coalition. See page /] for complete list of established urban coalitions. Miami Case Study Last fall there were some 340 serious disturb- ances in high schools in 38 states. One of the most serious—in terms of potential consequen- ces—occurred in Dade County(Miami), Florida, where an integration dispute at Palmetto High School threatened to escalate into a black stu- dent boycott of the entire school system. Trouble was averted, however, when the school board asked the Greater Miami Coali- tion to step in, establish the facts and make recommendations. A panel of inquiry named by the Coalition did so—quickly and decisively. Its report resulted in important reforms not only at Palmetto, but at other schools in the district, prompting one newspaper editor to comment that “a major breakthrough in better race re- lations” had been made in Miami education. A case study of the episode and its aftermath will be published by the Urban Coalition this year. The study will describe the dispute, its resolution, and the key role played by the Great- er Miami Coalition. Copies will be available from the national of- fice of the Urban Coalition. “ : = Miami Coalition Panel of Inquiry members Garth Reeves, publisher of the Miami Times; Henry King Stanford, president of the University of Miami; and John Halliburton, president of the Greater Miami Urban Coalition and a vice president of Eastern Airlines. 10 What They Are Saying Frederick J. Close, chairman of the board of the Aluminum Company of America, to the an- nual meeting of the American Mining Congress: “All [urban coalitions] offer the businessman a unique opportunity to involve himself in a grass-roots, down-to-earth operation that en- ables him to apply his problem-solving abilities to problems that demand solution as much as they often seem to defy it. They help him to re- ally understand what the problems are and what it will take to get at them. In short, they give the businessman a chance to show that our sys- tem can work for everybody. It’s a chance that many more businessmen ought to take. I think they are taking a far bigger chance if they don’t.” Ambassador George C. McGhee, special repre- sentative of the chairman, the Urban Coalition, to the St. Louis Round Table: “A turn-around must be made and a start towards a reordering of the priorities which will bring up to adequate levels the basic re- quirements for our national life. In this process other public expenditures, which have hitherto enjoyed high priorities, must be reduced.” Charles W. Bowser, executive director of the Philadelphia Urban Coalition, to a conference of the National Municipal League: “The direct involvement of the corporate citi- zen in the initiation and formation of the national Urban Coalition was clear evidence that the cor- porate commitment to help was emanating from self-interest, rather than the traditional chari- table concern. This recognition of self-interest in the solution of the nation’s urban problems is, in my opinion, the most dramatic result of the urban crisis of the sixties.” Martin Stone, chairman of the board of Mon- ogram Industries Inc. and chairman of the Greater Los Angeles Urban Coalition, at com- mencement exercises of Immaculate Heart College: “Each day that we postpone reconciliation of our actions with objectives motivated by a desire to restore quality of life to our nation, we come a step closer to inevitably extremist solutions. Almost invariably we hide our heads in the sand until our problems become crises which cannot be solved without painfully ex- treme remedies.” Charles B. Wade Jr., vice president of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco and chairman of the educa- tion committee of the Winston-Salem Urban Coalition, at the First Anniversary Meeting of the Norfolk Urban Coalition: “Leadership is an attitude, an ability to size up a situation, and then make a decisive move rather than sitting back and doing something after the fact. It’s easy to find leaders after something happens, they rise to the occasion, but it’s something else to marshal people with foresight, with the ability to see an oncoming crisis and make a concrete move for the good of the community to avoid a potential problem.” Arthur Naftalin, professor of public affairs, University of Minnesota, former mayor of Minneapolis, and Coalition Steering Committee member, to the conference of the National As- sociation of Housing and Redevelopment Offi- cials: “A few months ago the housing authority submitted a request to the city council to in- crease from 250 to 500 the number of homes it might acquire under the low-rent housing pro- gram for scattered site housing and that ac- quisition be permitted citywide. The council approved the increase but refused to allow citywide acquisition, restricting the program to officially-declared renewal areas. This ac- tion struck me as a rather open act of dis- crimination and I vetoed the entire measure, risking the loss of the additional units. At this point our Urban Coalition of Minneapolis, in which many top business leaders actively Participate, called upon the council to sustain my veto and to accede to the authority’s origi- nal request. The council accepted the coali- tion’s urging and we accomplished a social gain that simply would not have been possible without the interest of key businessmen. We may be the only city in the nation in which pub- lic housing is possible on an unrestricted city- wide basis. . .” Established Local Urban Coalitions California . Fresno Los Angeles Pasadena Riverside Sacramento San Diego San Jose Stanford Mid-Peninsula Colorado Denver Connecticut Bridgeport Hartford Stamford Delaware Wilmington District of Columbia Florida Miami Illinois Springfield Indiana Gary South Bend Louisiana New Orleans Maryland Baltimore Massachusetts New Bedford Pittsfield Michigan Detroit Saginaw Minnesota Minneapolis St. Paul Missouri Kansas City New Jersey Montclair Newark Plainfield New York New York Niagara Falls Westchester County North Carolina Winston-Salem Ohio Cleveland Lima Oregon Portland Pennsylvania Erie Harrisburg Philadelphia Reading Rhode Island Tennessee Chattanooga Texas Corpus Christi El Paso San Antonio Virginia Norfolk Washington Tacoma Wisconsin Racine il MRe DAN SWEAT OFFICE OF THE MAYOR ELTY HALL ATLANTA» GA 30303 ort The Urban Coalition I 2100 M Street N.W. Washington D.C. 20037 Nonprofit Org. U.S. Postage PAID Washington, D.C. Permit No. 43234 Third Class
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 12, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Coordinators Weekly Report | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 12, Document 8

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  • Title: Box 7, Folder 12, Document 8
  • Text: Statement by MR. STEPHEN KURZMAN Special Counsel to The Urban Coalition Action Council before the Committee on Agriculture United States House of Representatives October 31, 1969 Mr. Chairman and members of this Committee: My name is Stephen Kurzman, and I am appearing on behalf of the Urban Coalition Action Council. We appreciate the oppor- tunity to appear before this Committee on the critical question of domestic food programs and their impact on continuing hunger and malnutrition in the United States. Our basic thrust here today is to urge you to act promptly and favorably on S.2547, the Senate-passed Food Stamp bill .and to go forward, beyond that measure, to consider a broad range of further objectives. The documentation is overwhelming at this point that, despite unprecedented prosperity and despite a number of well-intentioned food programs, hunger and malnutrition do continue to exist in this country. A partial listing of this documentation includes the following: Hearings, Senate Subcommittee on Employment, Manpower and Poverty, April, 1967 Hunger U.S.A., Citizens Board of Inquiry Into Hunger and Malnutrition in the United States, 1968 "Hunger in America", C.B.S. documentary, Produced by Martin Carr, May, 1968 Hearings, Senate, "Hunger and Malnutrition" before Senate Subcommittee on Employment, Manpower and Poverty, May & June, 1968 Hearings, Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs, “Nutrition and Human Needs", 12 volumes of hearings, December 1968-1969 "The Food Gap: Poverty and Malnutrition in the United States," Committee Print, Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs, August 1969 Report, Subcommittee on Food and Nutrition, President's Urban Affairs Council, March, 1969 Report of Dr. Arnold Shaefer, Director, National Nutrition Survey, U.S. Public Health Service Poverty, Malnutrition and Federal Funding Assistance Programs, "A Statistical Summary", Committee Print, Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs, September, 1969 The findings in all these studies and all these reports have electrified the Nation. Dr. Arnold Shaefer, Director, National Nutrition Survey, U.S. Public Health Service, has testified before this Committee that preliminary data from his survey indicated, "Malnutrition is a health problem in the United States, and our preliminary findings clearly indicate that there is malnutrition in an expectedly large portion of the sampled population." Shockingly, Dr. Shaefer's survey also uncovered 7 cases of maras- mus and kwashiakor which we did not believe existed in this rich country. The Subcommittee on Food and Nutrition of the President's Urban Affairs Council estimated that half of all infants from poor families in the United States are likely to suffer from under- nutrition and that there is no significant proportion of the poor who do not suffer from under-nutrition. Moreover, it estimates that half of the poor in the Southern states and a fifth of the poor in non-Southern states suffer from malnutri- tion and that "scattered evidence indicates five to ten million (persons) are suffering from severe hunger and malnutrition." Despite the crying need, documented in all of the forums cited above and beginning over two years ago, our current food programs are still not reaching three fourths of the poor, many of whom suffer extreme poverty. At present, the direct distribu- tion program is operating in 1187 counties and serving approximately 3.1 million individual recipients. Under this program, 22 commo- dities are made available to the states with a retail value of $15 per person per month. These commodities have less than adequate amounts for energy and Vitamin A according to the National Research Council's Recommended Dietary Allowances. Moreover, the average number of commodities distributed in the states is 18, which means that even those poor persons participating in this federal food program are being denied an adequate diet. The food stamp program provides a bonus for food purchases which varies with the income and family size of the recipient with an average bonus of $6.73 per person per month in food purchasing power. 3.2 million persons participate in this program. This program provides only 60% of the minimum needs of those in extreme poverty who participate. Both programs fall far below the Depart- ment of Agriculture's own economy food plan which calls for $25 per person per month or $1200 per year for a family of four -- an amount USDA admits can be utilized by only the most ingenious of the poor to gain a balanced diet. Moreover, there remain approximately 470 counties and independent cities with no food programs at all, andwhich include about 8% of the poor. In areas where food programs operate, less than one third of the poor are being reached -- around 6 million of 20 million persons living in families with less than $3000 annual income. The Census Bureau estimates that 907,000 families have an income of less than $1000, $200 less than the $1200 rock-bottom USDA requirement for food alone per year. Another 1.7 million families have incomes under $2000. It is safe to assume that Many members of these families are going hungry. A family of four with incomes of $2000 would have to spend 60% of that income on food in order to meet USDA's economy plan standards. Clearly with the costs of clothing, shelter, medicine, utilities and other fixed necessary expenses, these people cannot eat adequately. After all, the average American spends only 17.4% of his income for food. Nor are poor children being reached by the school lunch pro- gram. There are 32.5 million school children who do not have access to school lunches. The House Committee on Education and Labor says 3 and a quarter million of these children need free lunches and another 19 and a half million need reduced price lunches. In sum, current family food programs offer little assistance and fail to reach the great majority of the poor. 14 million of the poor consume food not meeting recommended dietary allow- ances and 8 million more are on diets with less than two-thirds of the recommended allowances for one or more essential nutrients. Nor are our welfare programs reaching them. Only 10.2 million of the country's 25.4 million persons living below the poverty line receive any form of welfare assistance. The Family Assistance Program proposed by President Nixon will, we hope, help to remedy this situation, but at the $1,600 per year level which has been proposed for a family of four, it is clear that improved and expanded food programs will remain an urgent need for many of these families. A graphic way of illustrating what all these studies and hearings show was presented by a witness before the Senate Agriculture Committee last May. Mr. Robert Choate, who is an expert in this field and currently a consultant to the White House Conference on Food and Nutrition, introduced the following bar graph: ; 90 - 95% of the population Population adequately served ee ee ee ee ee ee ee by private food industry 0 3 Q 6 . 2 w *| operating at a profit. > Ooco O, p of O 8 - & 3 The profit limit, ri 9 B BaD is A i | for the private | § f° AR D enterprise systema wo ovu vd Oo wv ase ie BG eee le 1'o ARHO & a He pointed out that the private food industry adequately serves 90 to 95 percent of the Nation's population. The remaining 5 to 10 percent still must eat, but lack the cash to do so adequately. The alternatives developed to provide for this 5 to 10 percent only reach a portion of the need: cooperatives, soup kitchens and charity feeding houses, home grown foods, occasional sales of damaged goods at a loss. Governmental programs have to fill the remaining gap. The largest are the Food Stamp and direct distribution commodities programs. But as the graph illustrates, a substantial gap remains. What that food gap means in human terms extends far beyond the jurisdictional lines of this or any other single Committee of the Congress. Hunger and malnutrition are in many instances the underlying causés of illness and public health problems, of inability to learn and educational problems, of unemployment, underemployment and a loss of productivity. With its action on improving and expanding Federal programs that fill the food gap, this Committee can have a profound effect on the whole range of related problems which would otherwise be left to piecemeal consideration by other Committees. Conversely, inaction by this Committee would create pressure upon the other Committees to consider the impact of food deficiences on the problems with which they must deal. - 7 - We urge this Committee to devise a strategy for closing the food and nutrition gap. We recommend a series of objec- tives which we believe should be sought by that strategy. A substantial Step toward these objectives would be taken by enactment, with some adjustments, of §.2547, the Food Stamp bill passed on September 24, 1969 by a substantial bipartisan majority of Senators. The Senate-passed bill was introduced by a bipartisan group including nine of the thifteen members of the Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs, which had held hearings throughout the country over a ten-month period. Its sponsors were Senators McGovern, Javits, Percy, Cook, Hollings, Pell, Yarborough, Mondale, Kennedy, Hart, Spong and Goodell. The following are the long-range objectives we believe the Committee should address itself to: Ls Nutrition Education and Information: There is a great need to improve knowledge among the poor, as well as among many families who are not poor, or healthful nutritional practices, of how to obtain nutritious foods and maintain a wholesome and balanced Giet. S.2547 makes a start in this direction in Section 1(10), which would afford participants: "such instruction and counseling as will best assure that they are able to use their increased purchasing power to obtain those nutritious foods most likely to insure that they receive a nutritionally adequate diet." This is an effort which should not, in our view, be limited only to food stamp recipients or only to agencies concerned with food stamps. For example, HEW and OEO programs and the agencies and institutions they fund should also be enlisted in these efforts, along with the Cooperative Extension Service. 2s Nutrition Research: More precise knowledge is needed about the extent, incidence and location of malnutrition on a continuing Badia: For example, HEW's National Nutrition Survey should be expanded so that its sample is adequate, its data are fully analyzed, and food program effectiveness is monitored and evaluated. Special consideration should be given to the particular nutritional needs of the rural poor, migrants, Eskimos, Indians and the elderly. S.2547 does not deal with this subject. a's Outreach: A full range of supportive services is needed at the local level to reach more of the Nation's urban, rural and migrant poor with existing food assistance programs. In his May 6 message to the Congress, President Nixon pointed to OEO's "unique outreach among the poor themselves." §.2547 would expand avail- ability of food stamps by permitting certain private non-profit institutions, including mobile food services, which provide meals to older persons to accept food stamps (Section 1(1) and 1(16)). It would spread awareness of the programs by authorizing the giving of instruction and counseling mentioned above at schools; retail food stores, in homes, through voluntary cooperation, in Federal, State, local or private agencies which carry out infor- mational and educational programs for consumers, and particularly through the national school lunch program and its extension Bdetion 1(10)). The cumbersome pre-certification procedure would be amended so that an affidavit is sufficient, subject to subsequent disqualification for fraud (Section 1(12) and 1(17)); this parallels the technique long authorized for the Federal income tax system. Issuance of stamps and collection of payments for them would be facilitated by authorizing use of Post Offices, banks, credit unions, the mails and other agencies. (Sections 1(11) and 1(14)(3)). Under limited circumstances, where the Secretary of Agriculture determines there is a need and no food stamp program exists, USDA would be- authorized to administer a food stamp program through a private nonprofit organization or a Federal, State or county agency approved by the Secretary. In line with President Nixon's reference to OEO's outreach capabilities, we would hope that OEO would be given a substantial role in providing the services necessary to fuller: participation of the poor in all food assistance programs -- not solely the Food Stamp Program. - 10 - 4, Private Enterprise: A principal advantage of the Food Stamp Program is that it utilizes the private food distribution system rather than creating another distribution system as required by other types of food assistance programs, particularly commodity distribution. $§.2547 would permit more of the poor to be reached by the private system by improving the current payment and value schedules, which require payment in advance on a rigid monthly basis of up to 47 percent of income to participate in the program. Free food stamps would be issued to families earning less than one-half the amount aevevntned by the Secretary of Agriculture to be necessary to purchase a nutritionally adequate diet, at this time approximately $60 per month for a family of 4, or $720 a year. In no event would more than 25 percent of a household's income be charged for stamps; again, this is still higher than the 17.4 percent of income paid for food by the average family. State eligibility requirements, which now range from $1,920 to $4,140 for a family of 4 and bear no relation to geographic differentials in food prices, would be replaced by a more equitable national minimum standard of $4,000 adjusted to take regional variations into account. As important as these changes would be, a number of other programs should also be initiated to enlist the private sector more fully in the distribution and education processes. Current governmental efforts with food companies to provide foreign developing nations with enriched and fortified foods should be extended to this country as well. Production, processing and S. PEs distribution by small food businesses in low-income areas should be encouraged by the Small Business Administration, the Department of Commerce, and OEO, especially with the aid of local development corporations. As the President's May 6 Message recommended, "an advisory committee of major food processing and food distribution companies" should be established. Di Maternal and Child Nutrition: As the President stated and as Dr. Shaefer emphasized in his testimony before this Committee, malnutrition during pregnancy and in the infant and young child can cause physical and mental retardation. The President called for special package and pilot voucher programs by HEW and these should be authorized by legislation. Participation in free or reduced-price school lunch programs should be increased by establishing national eligibility and funding standards for local school districts so that all needy children, less than half of whom now benefit from these funds, can participate. Similar emphasis on poor children should be mandated upon the special milk program. Private food companies should bring their expertise in processing and distribution to low-income area schools which lack adequate facilities for preparation of meals. Again, S.2547 does not cover these subjects. 6. Direct Commodity Distribution: New direction should be given to commodity distribution so that it supplements food stamp and school feading programs. Together these programs should ensure that low-income families have available to them a range of Foods necessary for a nutritious and well-balanced diet. National standards of eligibility, cash payments to States, grants to public om AD oe and private agencies and use of Section 32 funds for purchase of nutritional foods not otherwise available under Federal food programs, should be authorized. USDA should assist State and local agencies in outreach efforts to insure maximum partici- pation of low-income families, and distribution should be facilitated, in conjunction with OEO, HEW, and HUD, through neighborhood centers. S§.2547 makes one important advance by permitting a combination of food stamp and commodity programs under certain narrowly defined circumstances (Section 1({7)). The objectives we have outlined are not ours alone, by any means. Most were identified and recommended to the President by the Food and Nutrition Committee of the Urban Affairs Council. Many were embodied in the President's May 6 Message. Many are embodied in bills already introduced in both Houses of Congress, such as S.2789, introduced by Senator Javits and a bipartisan group of co-sponsors; S.1864, by Senator Talmadge; H.R. 13423, the Foley-Green bill; and H.R. 12222, the Administration bill introduced by Congresswoman May. i= Henognivea that these objectives will incur additional cost to the U.S. Treasury; for food stamps alone, $1.25 billion in the current fiscal year instead of $750 million under the current projections, and a similar $500,000,000 difference in fiscal years 1971 and 1972. But as Senator Hollings stated on the Sénate floor when $.2547 was passed, "This is no time to holler 'chaos' and "the end of the world is coming' over the expenditure of $500 million in the next fiscal year," particularly when compared with expenditures - 13- for other purposes. It haa been estimated that the objectives other than those relating to food stamps would cost approximately $415 million in the first year. Again, matched against other expenditures, including some $3 billion in agricultural subsidies annually, this does not appear to require a major wrenching of national priorities. The comprehensive approach to food assistance we recommend is well worth the additional cost and may well cost less than the loss of productivity and wasted lives caused by hunger and malnutrition, For the record we would like to offer a number of editorials, local news stories and columns from newspapers, both large and small, in many parts of the Nation in recent months. These indicate a growing national awareness and concern about food shortages and deficiencies and the need for expanded and improved food programs.
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 12, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Coordinators Weekly Report | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 12, Document 7

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  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 12, Document 7
  • Text: FOR RELEASE UPON DELIVERY THURSDAY A.M. NOVEMBER 13, 1969 Statement of JOHN W. GARDNER, Chairman The Urban Coalition Action Council As Presented By GEORGE C. McGHEE Special Representative of the Chairman before the Ways and Means Committee United States House of Representatives November 13, 1969 Mr. Chairman, your committee is faced with an extraordinary opportunity. The time has come to discard the existing patch- work of ineffective and in many ways destructive public assistance programs. You have the opportunity to replace them with a national system of income maintenance that will help people to help themselves but preserve individual dignity in aiding those left behind by society. The Need The need is manifest. This Committee knows all the facts and statistics of poverty. You know the cost of welfare, but you know also the great cost to society of human neglect. The child whose health needs are denied early medical attention because of poverty may suffer a lifelong handicap and become a lifelong burden to the community. The child whose attitudes and motivation are shaped by the pathology of extreme poverty may become a delinquent or derelict or addict and end up as a burden on society. The cost to society is not -to be compared with the human cost. But those who calculate social costs (and someone must) know that for society the day of reckoning always comes. It requires a lot of money to maintain jails, to rehabilitate addicts, to support the victims of early neglect. We can serve human values and social providence at the same time by making such casualties less likely. Many Americans sincerely believe that people living in poverty are people who don't want to work -- or people who don't want steady work. In other words, able-bodied loafers. That is a long way from the truth. Of the 25 million persons living below the poverty line, 15 million are either under 18 or over 65. Of the remaining 10 million, 9 million fall within the scope of the Administration's family assistance proposals (as being adults in poor families that include children). Let us look at that 9 million. The Administration estimates that 7.9 million are already working, but earn too little to bring them above the poverty level, or are the wives of such men, or are disabled, or are women who must stay home because of very young children. That leaves 1.1 million adults who the Administration feels can significantly help themselves and would thus be required to register for jobs or work training -- 600,000 men and 500,000 mothers of school-aged children. I emphasize those facts because they suggest the limits of what we may expect from the work requirement. Those who cherish the false notion that the welfare rolls are made up chiefly of able-bodied loafers could easily imagine that the present proposals will bring a sharp reduction in the rolls. If they believe that, they will end up disappointed and angry, because it won't happen. Most people who now receive welfare or would receive it under the new proposals are not candidates for the job market. As the above figures indicate, either they are already working or they are too old, too young, disabled, or mothers of young children. I need not deal at length with the well-know shortcomings of the present welfare system (or non-system). In 70% of the families receiving benefits the fathers are absent from the home. To the degree that the welfare system has helped to create such a situation it endangers the fabric of our family based society. And clearly a system in which an American in one state can receive only one eighth of that which his fellow citizen with the same need receives in another state falls far short of any reasonable standard of equity. The level of welfare benefits paid in most states clearly will not help any child to escape from poverty. We know, from official statistics, that in only two of the states do AFDC families receive aid at the $3,500 a year (for a family of four) poverty level, and in less than half (21) do they approach 75% of the poverty threshold. The average for all states and the District of Columbia is almost $1,200 below the poverty line. Before we consider how the present system might be improved, I'd like to comment on what may or may not be expected from a welfare program. The poverty that makes a public assistance program necessary is rooted in a variety of historical and contemporary conditions: discrimination, the pathology of the urban and rural slum, in- adequate education, insufficient job opportunities in the locality, low pay in jobs not covered by the minimum wage, inadequate social insurance benefits, inadequate provisions for manpower training and so on. No welfare program can cure those underlying conditions. It can only deal humanely with the consequences. If we are to get to the root of the problem we shall have to do so through education, health and nutrition programs, the creation of job opportunities, the elimination of slum conditions and similar measures. We must not, for example, imagine that the aid to the working poor contained in the present proposals is in any sense a substitute for increases in and extension of the minimum wage. All parts of the political spectrum would agree, I suppose, that in the long run an adequate minimum wage is healthier than a Federal wage subsidy. Legislative Proposals Now Mr. Chairman, I shall speak to the legislative proposals before you. The Urban Coalition Action Council believes that the President has put forward an extremely important and on the whole well-designed set of proposals. The Council also believes that the proposals could be strengthened at several crucial points. Let me begin by stating very briefly what it is about the proposals that strike us as valuable. First, we would offer a general word of praise for the emphasis on children that is at the heart of the proposals under discussion. It's about time. Second, we would emphasize that if the proposals are accepted, the Federal Government will for the first time in history accept responsibility for providing a minimum level of payment throughout the nation and for financing it. I would have been very proud had I been able to establish that principle during my tenure as Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare. It is a historic step. All the details of the present proposals fade in significance compared with that major advance in Federal policy. Third, the Coalition Action Council regards the uniform national standards of eligibility and the greatly broadened coverage as enormously helpful. Of special significance is the inclusion of the working poor for the first time. The complete ommission of the working poor is surely one of the strangest anomalies of the present system. A society which values work should surely make some provision for the six million adults who work full-time, year round, and yet cannot earn enough to bring themselves above the poverty line. Fourth, we welcome improvement and broadening in the incentive to work. In 1967 your Committee pioneered in the move to correct the disincentive to work inherent in the welfare system, and I am sure that further steps to this end must strike you as well- considered. Fifth, we applaud the proposed assistance to families with unemployed fathers living at home. Every critic of the existing system has commented on the fact that in states without provision for AFDC-UP, fathers have to leave home to make their families eligible for welfare. Mr. Chairman, those strengths of the President's proposals are great indeed. They could lead us on to an immeasurably sounder and more equitable system of income maintenance. But if the promise of the proposals is to be realized, they must be strengthened at a number of points. Can a national commitment to help impoverished families be met by a program which guarantees uniformity throughout the country only with respect to the first $1,600 of benefits for a family of four, even with the commendable inclusion of food stamps? No doubt the level was based primarily on what the Administration believes it can afford under present budget constraints. I would like to assume that the President's ultimate goal is to increase that figure until it reaches the poverty level. But he has made no provision for such an increase and, even with the proposed state participation, there is no incentive whatever for states to raise their benefit levels. Indeed, they are not required to raise them beyond the July 1969 level. If state supplementation is to be required, the legislation should provide an incentive for states to increase the supplementary benefits (e.g. by Federal matching above the $1,600 floor). As the best long-term approach, however, I urge the Congress to make provision for a nation-wide increase in benefits to the poverty level over a specified period of time. The $1,600 floor proposed by the President can serve as a sound starting point for such a phased program. Adequate provision should be made for "one-stop" administration of the proposed Federal-state system. The uniform national eligi- bility standards should help to eliminate the possibility of dis- parities in administration among the states, which is so clearly a problem in the present programs. However, under the President's proposal, if a state chose to cut its supplementary payments or to disregard Federal standards for such payments, the Federal require- ments would be very hard to enforce. It may be necessary to find a more enforceable Federal sanction, such as administrative inter- vention. The improved benefits for the aged, disabled and blind are a welcome step. It may be, however, that our ultimate goal should be a single income maintenance system which provides for uniform adequate assistance for alI of our impoverished citizens, including needy individuals and couples without children. It should probably be recognized that we are moving toward Federal assumption of the full cost of welfare programs. At a time when the nation as a whole is experiencing unprecedented prosperity, state and local governments are facing fiscal crisis. Largely dependent upon an inelastic tax base, they face inflation-linked increases in service expenditures compounded by spiraling welfare costs. Given the elasticity of its tax base, and the economies of scale and efficiency offered by Federal administration, a shift of the welfare burden to the Federal Government is clearly one means of resolving the fiscal dilemmas of state and local government. The fiscal relief offered by this shift would enable state and local governments to direct greater resources to those functions they are best fitted to finance and administer. Another point at which the President's proposals must be strengthened is the part having to do with the work requirement. The legislation should specify job standards and wage rates for "Suitable employment". If this is not done, the legislated work requirement could end up providing a steady supply of forced labor to employers who provide substandard wages and working conditions. The possibility of abuse by local employment services should be minimized by extremely careful definition of what constitutes a "refusal to work", and perhaps also by some system of Federal inspect- ion. The exemption from the work requirement granted to mothers with children under 6 and to mothers if the fathers are living in the home should be extended to mothers with children over 6. It may be quite feasible for such a mother to work, and many do. But the feasibility depends on factors that she can best judge: her own health, the health (physical and mental) of her children, the presence in the home of adequate mother-substitutes (grandmothers, aunts) and so on. No bureaucracy should want to second-guess a mother in such matters. In this connection, provisions for day care should be more explicit. Federal standards should be set. No work referral should be made unless adequate day care is provided. Responsibility for and funds for construction of day care facilities should be specified in the legislation. Finally, I would emphasize that there must be provisions for job creation, so that the training opportunities won't be a revolving door into continued unemployment. The ideal solution is a public service employment program. Mr. Chairman, that concludes my testimony. I am extremely grateful for the opportunity to appear before you.
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 12, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Coordinators Weekly Report | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 12, Document 4

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  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 12, Document 4
  • Text: By ve Edstrom Washington Post Staff Writer Of all the strategy meet- ings that took place during the week that the Office of Economie Opportunity won the battle for its life in the House, one unpublicized ses- sion is fast becoming the talk of the town, It was set up by the Lead- ership Confernece on Civil tights and took place on Capitol Hill. As 11th-hour assignments to gain Con- gressional support for OFO were about to be made, an extraordinary preeaution- ary move was taken. The representative from OEO was asked to leave the room. “We couldn't take any chances,” one civil rights legislative technician — said. “We just couldn't be sure OEO was walking down the same side of the street with us.” Despite statements hy OEO Director Donald Rums- feld that the Nixon adminis- stration stood behind its bill to keep OEO intact, there were numerous rea- sons why OEFO's chief sup- porters distrusted the ad- ministration. Backers At a news conference Dee. 8, President Nixon had ex- pressed hope that an “ac- commodation’ could he reached on the OEO legisla- tion. To many OEO supporters, this meant that some version of a substitute bill giving control of most OFO programs to the states would be acceptable to the administration. Efforts by the Nation's mayors and Urban Coalition Action Council members to fet Mr. Nixon to make a strong statement against the substitute bill failed, And labor and civil rights legislative technicians were frustrated by OFO's fallure to even come up with a head count of Republicans who could be relied on to yote against the substitute, “The only thing that makes sense is to share in- formation,” the AFL-CIO's Kenneth Young said. “But we got next to nothing from OO, “This is just the opposite of what happened in ihe last few days when we worked closely with the De- partment of Health, Educa- tion and Welfare against the it OQ WA ght ap v6 Whitten amendment to cur- tail Federal school desegre- gation powers.” The Urban Coalition Ac- tion Council's Lowell R. Beck found it highly wun- usual that there was no ov- erall administration strate- gy to guide those who were fighting for OEO. ‘Not the Alain Cog’ “T've been around here for 10 years and you usual- ly work to supplement and support administration elf- forts.” he said. “You're not the main coz in developing strategy to pass administra- lion legislation.” But those working for OLO's survival found they not only were the “main cog” in mapping out strate- ey but that some of their efforts were being seuttled by OO representatives, While the coalition af OEFO supporicrs was work- ing to kill the state-control substitute, OO was con- sulting with House mem- bers on amendments to make the substitute more palatable. “Wei were violently op- posed to perfecting the sub- stitute and history proved ~~ a lone us right,” civil rights leader Joseph L. Hauh Jr. said. “The administration was ready to settle for much less.” Therefore, the OEO repre- sentatives was asked to leave the Leadership Conference mecting on Dec. 10, because supporters of OFO felt it unwise to share their stra- tegy with the agency. ‘In The Dark’ “They let us work in the dark,” one civic jeader said. “leet sicl every time I read hew the administration pulled off a great legislative coup. “A lot of blood, sweat and tears went into this battle, but it would have been as easy as pie if we had re- ceived White House sup- port.” No one discounts the fact that Rums!eld was highly successful in preventing some of his former col- leagues in ihe House from handing most of the poverty programs over to the states when the crucial vole came on Dee, 12, But numerous other fac- tors were involved, Not to be underestimated is the faet that 58 members who had voted to scrap a strong vot- j ing rights law the previous night switehed to onpoase state control of the peverty programs. “They just didn’t want to fire two bullets in a row at the poor,” one observed said. ‘It's entirely possible that we could have won the vot- ing rights fight and fost the poverty one if the legisla- tion had been taken up in reverse.” Of equal importance was the intensive lobbying effort that the Nation’s mayors conducted against taking poverty programs away from local officials. Their effort was similar to that mounted by the Ameri- ean Bar Association when it was responsible for knock- ing out a Senate-passed amendment to give govern- nors control of legal pro- grams for the poor. And in all the hubbub over the poverty bill, scant attention was paid to the role that the governors did not play. With few exceptions, the governors did not embrace the idea of being saddled with OFQO. As one reported- ly said: “Hell, who wants to have the Statehouse blamed for OLO's problems. It's much easier to blast Washington,”
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 12, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Coordinators Weekly Report | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 12, Document 2

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_012_002.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 12, Document 2
  • Text: ! Ze THE URBAN COALITION ACTION COUNCIL 2100 M Street, N\W. * Washington, D.C. 20037 (202) 293-7625 JOHN W. GARDNER Chairman ANDREW HEISKELL A. PHILIP RANDOLPH Co-chairmen LOWELL R. BECK Executive Director December 24, 1969 The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor of the City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Ivan: Several days ago the Senate voted 53 to 35 to allow foundation funds to be used for voter registration programs, thus overriding the Finance Committee's move to prohibit the use of tax-exempt funds for this purpose. We had asked your help on this important issue, and many of you responded. Two weeks ago the federal anti-poverty program was threatened by a move in the House of Representatives to channel all federal anti-poverty funds and programs through state governors. This amendment would have had a serious impact on many urban programs. A delegation from our Policy Council called on Secretaries Finch and Shultz, OEO Director Rumsfeld, and several members of Congress to urge continuation of the present anti-poverty program. In addition, telegrams signed by each Policy Council member attend- ing last week's meeting were sent to President Nixon and each member of Congress. Local coalitions were urged to support the campaign to save OEFO. Many local coalition officials contacted their Congressmen immediately. These efforts capped the very effective work that many policy Council members and their representatives, together with other organizations, had been doing for several weeks. We are very pleased to report that on December 12 the House rejected the amendment which we opposed and voted to extend present OEO programs. The last two weeks have shown us what can be done when many work together to accomplish a common result. We are grateful to those who took part in this effort. Sincerely, John We Gardner Chairman 5>D
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 12, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Coordinators Weekly Report | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 12, Document 9

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_012_009.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 7, Folder 12, Document 9
  • Text: The Urban Coalition Perle Washington, D. C. 20006 Telephone: (202) 223-9500 CHAIRMAN: John W. Gardner CO-CHAIRMEN: Andrew Heiskell / A. Philip Randolph August 26, 1969 The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor of the City of Atlanta City Halil Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Ivan: At its last meeting the Executive Committee of the Coalition adopted a statement on the welfare reforms proposed by President Nixon. A copy is enclosed for your study. A special subcommittee, chaired by Mr. Whitney M. Young, will be meeting in September to plan further steps to implement the position of the Coalition in supporting an income maintenance program. The Executive Committee reached other key decisions on housing, public service employment, a minority contractors institute proposal, and on several administrative matters. The minutes of the meeting and supporting papers are enclosed, and I'm sure will be of interest to you. A new schedule of Steering Committee meetings for the remainder of this year and through 1970 has been adopted. The Steering Committee meeting originally scheduled for September 24 has been cancelled. The next Steering Committee meeting will be December 10 in Washington at 3:00 p.m. I look forward to seeing you at our next meeting. Sincerely, x Libassi > Executive Vice President pA l ce: Mr. Dan Sweat
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 12, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Coordinators Weekly Report | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 12, Document 14

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_012_014.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 12, Document 14
  • Text: 4 * THE NEED FOR PUBLIC SERVICE EMPLOYMENT’ The Urban Coalition Action Council “~ At the time of the original convocation that created the national Urban Coalition in 1967, the Steering Committee of that convocation stated its position on public service employment. That statement called for immediate legislative action based in part on the following principles: 1) 3) 4) 5) . 6) ; 4 "The Federal government must enlist the cooperation of government at all levels and of private industry to “assure that meaningful productive work is available to everyone willing and able to work." "To create socially useful jobs, the...program should ‘ concentrate on the huge backlog of employment needs in parks, streets, slums, countryside, schools, colleges, libraries, and hospitals..." "The program must provide meaningful jobs--not dead end, make work projects..." "Basic education, training and counseling must be an integral part of the program...Funds for training education and counseling should be made available to private industry as well as to public and private nonprofit agencies." "Such a program should seek to qualify new employees to become part of the regular work force and to meet normal performance standards." "The operation of the program should be keyed to specific localized unemployment problems and focused , initially on those areas where the need is most apparent," ™ On April, 1; 1968, in testimony before the Subcommittee on Employment, Manpower and Poverty of the Senate Committee on Labor and Public Welfare, John W. Gardner, chairman of the national Urban Coalition Action Council, reaffirmed the convocation's statement. Mr. Gardner's testimony also made public for the 4 ' : Public Service Employment : : is Page 2 first time the preliminary conclusions of a study by Dr. Harold Sheppard of the Upjohn Institute.l Dr. Sheppard was commissioned by the Urban Coalition to survey the public service needs of a sample of major cities and to examine the general problems of ‘enderéiployment and unemployment in’ this esunkey in terms of those needs. | Sheppard's study, released in final form in January of this year, dispelled some myths which have greatly influenced past thinking on unemployment and underemployment; about the poor who do not work and the much larger group of poor who do. For example, 85 to 90 per cent of the poor who do not work are ill, disabled, in school, or in the case of many women, they are unable to enter the labor market at soe Beawtiee of home respon-~ sibilities. : ‘Sheppard's analysis emphasized the critical facts about the underemployed, who he defines as those who work and are still poor. In any analysis of what constitutes the poor in this country, underemployment looms as large--if not larger--than unemployment. Sheppard found that, conaeevativele, almost five million people in this country were underemployed. This is a 6 significant figure since it includes by definition people who work and are still poor, and does not include unemployed 88 defined by the Federal government. Iuarold L. Sheppard, The Nature of the Job Problem and the Role ‘of New Public Service Employment, the Upjohn Institute, January 1969 sy a soe " Public Service Employment : - Page 3 Sheppard advanced an even more startling théory, based on Bureau of the Census statistics, on the number of. poor families in the labor force and the per cent having two ee more wage earners. Weivg this method, Sheppard concluded that in 1966 at least six million members of families worked on some basis and were poor. In addition, there were 1.3 million unrelated individuals in the labor force at the same time. Therefore, there are perhaps as many as 7.3 million men and women who are Labor’ fone6 participants 4 and yet are poor. ~He concludes that most of them are employed but . still do not earn enough to raise their-families or themselves out of poverty. | Equally significant weight must be given to the quality of the unemployed in terms of age, location, duration, etc. The quality can have serious consequences for the cities. At the time of the Sheppard study, the Office of Economic Opportunity estimated that the central cities contained nearly 1.3 million job seekers or underemployed poor persons of whom 33% were in the 16-21 age group (1966 figures). :1968 figures for Detroit show | that the unemployment rate for the city asS.a whole was 3.8%, but for 16-19 year olds it was 13.6%. Unemployment in the central elty, both white and nonWwhLte, was 11.2%. In round numbers there were almost 22,000 unemployed in Detroit between the ages of 16-19. In the central city there were 34,000 people 6f all ages unémapbeseas> In Los Angeles, 35,000 Ware betweahr 36 ana 19 and the total for-the central city was 71,000. One must conclude that the bulk 2the data for Detroit and Los Angeles are from the Supplement to the President's 1969 Manpower Report and are averages for the calendar year 1968. Data is also available for 18 other cities. P . 5 . z 4 a my aa ane YE : Public Service Employment | gee G2 © . Page 4 of the unemployed are in the central city; and if Sheppard's ‘conservative figures on underemployment are considered, there is today a strong concentration of unemployed and underemployed in the central city, and many are in the 16-19 age group. None of these figures will startle anyone. Yet, measured against achieve- ment much remains to be done. Sheppards analysis of the “needs" of the cities was done by a survey of 130 cities Wee populations of 100,000 or more. Although not done in depth, the general conclusions of the survey _ established the fact that in these pines there were at least 280 ,000 potential positions which were needed but not filled and not budgeted. Even more significant was the fact that the city representatives estimated that there were at least 140,000 of these jobs that did not require technical or professional training and could be filled by inner-city residents. Contrary to popular belief that these jobs by .definition were make work, 30 per cent were in education of which again 27% siete nonprofessional, 12.4% were in health and: hospitals of which 13.3% were nonprofessional, and 25% were in police, fire and sanitation of which over 23% | could be filled by nonprofessionals. Most people would consider these categories of work to be essential to the efficient and productive operation of a city. % G It is the conviction of the Urban Coalition Action Council that the present requirements of the cities and the unfulfilled promises of jobs can be matched. Such a program will have a positive impact on the problems of unemployment and underemployment. ar! ; oe ‘: Ee Public Service Employment oo Page 5. But it cannot be done without some Federal support for city budgets, state budgets, budgets of nonprofit institutions such as hospitals, all of which are shrinking under the pressure of rising costs. Yet the demand for service to the community remains = ‘and grows. , The private sector is playing a critical role in the employ- ment of the disadvantaged. The JOBS Program3 has had a substantial ~- impact in the communities where it has been operating for more than a year. Despite excellent organizational and promotional efforts and the dedication of thousands of individual businessmen, the private sector has not been able to attack the total problem. No one can expect the private sector alone to do the job. In fact, the private sector should not be asked to do the whole job. Not only can they not be expected to do it, they cannot do it. In June 1969 the Secretary of Labor announced that 2,370 employers agreed to hire and train 71,796 disadvantaged workers with Federal assistance. The goal is 238,000 by June 1970 ana 614,000 by June 1971. This enormous effort must be continued, but even if we recognize that a much larger group has been employed through the normal channels of companies, Los Angeles alone needs more than 71,000 job opportunities for the central city right now. Although several bills relating -to public service employ- ment were introduced in the 90th Congress, Congress has failed to act in this important area. Independent pieces of legislation and’ manpower "fall out" from other legislation considered to be 350b Opportunities in the Business. Sector, conducted by the National Alliance of Businessmen ‘ £ hi 3 : & . ° a Public Service Employment | . Page 6 public service employment-oriented are on the books. New Careers and the Work Incentive Program (WIN) are examples. Quite apart from whether the proliferation of programs, both private and public sector oriented, requires a more comprehensive approach ‘and a more efficient delivery system, present programs apparently are not reaching significant numbers of the unemployed and under- employed. The present Administration is mindful of this. The Depart- ment of Labor recently circulated for comment to interested parties a detailed program draft to be called Public Service Careers Program. The program is scheduled to be announced in early August, and one can assume that the recent draft represents the Administration's currant thinking on this subject. The draft paper ‘basically agrees with Dr. Sheppard's state- ment of the program. The Administration's analysis emphasizes that: 1) There is an increasing need for trained manpower in the public sector at all levels of government 2) Underemployment is a key problem 3) A public service program should: not ie an ‘employer of.the last resort program' nor merely another training» program i 4) The Administration proposes.to break down a wide range of barriers to employment of the disadvantaged and implement ‘pewadine of current employees 5) Federal funds will be made available for supportive seuviess, 1.4, training and remediation, transportation and day care éantvixtes, job restructuring, sensitivity 4 1 # " = = wae f * " i er al 1 “lp rm wae Public Service Employment Se. 23 Page 7 training for supervisors. Fifty million dollars in Title I-B Economic Opportunity Act monies will be requested. The Secretary of Labor has stated that the Federal annette ‘ment investment per trainee in the JOBS program is $2,915. Using three thousand dollars per person and not taking into account any additional investment that may have been made by the private sector for each JOBS trainee, the proposed Public Service Careers Program would gansvete about 16,000 jobs for the entive nation. The justification that the Labor Department uses for its limited eftorte in the public sector is the assumed need for experimentation (For example, will the hire-first train-later principle work in the public sector), and to determine whether or not such pir oueene can succeed without some form of Federal wage subsidy. Representatives of major cities have already | indicated to Department representatives that Federal wage subsidies in some form are necessary; that they face continuing deterioration of essential as well as desirable kecudaes, that budgetary pressures are such that the recruiting, training, and supplying of supportive services-is meaningless if the jobs cannot be sustained in the city system or the hospital, no matter how badly needed. 4 The Administration's analysis of unemployment and under- employment problems and the imperative and growing need for a public service manpower program supports the analysis of the Annis explains the reaction of some city representatives who, although critical of the WIN program, regard at least as realistic in this one respect for it does provide for some form of wage subsidy for two years. 4 . + - ae ~y nw " rar Public Service Employment Page 8 . . - | Urban Coalition. But the conclusions from the analyses differ. The Urban Coalition Action Council cannot support the Administration's present approach in this area, and so tneopned Assistant Secretary of Labor Arnold Weber by letter on July 25, 1969. (See attachment) - The Urban Coalition Action Council is payeudne ‘i vigorous ipeouxiut of support for meaningful public service employment legis- lation in this session of Congress. The Action Council is coordinating and cooperating with its suippoLuLng segments to pre- pare now for Senate and House hearings. The timetable in the: House calls for hearings sometime in early October. “This is the first order of business. Particularly because of the Administra- -tion's approach at the present time, we rinse undertake to prove the case for a more rapid and larger effort.in the public employ- ment field. We hope that all the varied elements in the Urban Coalition Action Council constituency and all others who have a concern about the commitment of this nation te offer job opportunities to those willing and able to work will assist us in this effort. In order to prepare carefully for the anticipated hearings, we would welcome any comments or reactions, that you might have to this proposed effort. We are particularly interested in critical reactions to the concept of public service employment as well as comments on present or proposed alternative methods in either the public or private sector for dealing with the problems of underemployment and unemployment in 1969. ~ July 30, 1969 (bs)¢ Sean ei Coll
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 12, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Coordinators Weekly Report | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 12, Document 12

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  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 7, Folder 12, Document 12
  • Text: NEWS from The Urban Coalition Action Council .1819 H Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20006 202-223-9500 (Tom Mathews) August 14, 1969 FOR RELEASE FRIDAY AM, AUGUST 15, 1969 URBAN COALITION ACTION COUNCIL STATES VIEWS ON ADMINISTRATION'S WELFARE PROPOSALS The following statement was issued on behalf of the Urban Coalition Action Council today by John W. Gardner, Council Chairman, following a meeting of the Council"s Executive Committee in Washington, D.C.: President Nixon has taken the initiative to reform America's outmoded welfare system. The Urban Coalition Action Council welcomes this major departure and commends the President for moving to correct the serious deficiencies of the current system. The President's proposals are significant on several counts: (a) They will provide assistance te the millions of - working poor who are totally ignored by the present system. _(b) They will provide income to unemployed parents who are seeking work or training, thereby keeping families together. (In most states today unemployed fathers have to desert their families to make the families eligible for aid.) (c) They remove the powerful barrier to work which is a gross defect of the present system, and introduce a positive incentive for the individual to enter the job market. (d) Though the level of support is modest, they take the enormously important step of accepting federal responsibility to place a floor under the income of those eligible for assistance. (e) They will provide national eligibility standards for those receiving federal assistance under the new program. We have strongly advocated such measures and we will do all that we can to make them a. legislative reality. If that is to come about, all who nee ecasaened for the nation's future must work together to ensure that the best program we can devise is finally written into law. To assure the ultimate success of the program, it must be strengthened in every way possible during the public debate and the legislative deliber- ations to come. Here are some of the ways in which strengthening could be accomplished: 1. The Administration proposals could be further strengthened by raising the javel of funding in order to increase the level of minimum income, to afford relief for those states and municipalities which are being crushed by the spiraling welfare burden and to include single persons and childless couples who are not now covered. 2. The plan proposed by the President exempts mothers of pre-school children from the provision requiring recipients of assistance to register for work and training. This is a step forward over the present law and should be retained. But the plan could be strengthened further if it recognized that even mothers of children over six might serve the society best by staying home and doing a good job of bringing up their children. It is a decision for the | mother, not the government, to make. All evidence indicates that the number of mothers who want .to work.exceeds our capability to provide jobs and daycare facilities. | 3. The Administration proposals can be effectively strengthened by the formulation of explicit federal standards governing work referral and wages to be paid, and hy provieiens to assure that present welfare recipients do not end up with a lower level of benefits than they presently receive. : 4, The proposals could be made more effective if they were supplemented by a job creation program. There is a danger that the new training opportunities proposed by the President will simply become a revolving door through which potential employees pass without obtaining employment. The Coalition has long advocated a public service employment program which would solve the problem, 5. Finally, the proposal should assure that the food stamp program only be phased out as cash payments approach the minimum necessary to lift a family out of poverty. The Urban Coalition Action Council looks forward to joining with other concerned citizens in the monumental task we now face of winning the public and political support necessary to assure enactment of constructive measures to meet these problems.
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 12, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Coordinators Weekly Report | 1969
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  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 12, Document 22

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  • Title: Box 7, Folder 12, Document 22
  • Text: The Atlanta Service-Learning Conference invites you to its inaugural meeting Urban Needs = Educational Opportunities at the White House Motor Inn, Atlanta June 30 -- July 1, 1969 The first in a series of meetings planned for 1969 by sponsors of the Atlanta Service-Learning Conference, including: The City of Atlanta The Atlanta Urban Corps Economic Opportunity Atlanta The Colleges and Universities of Atlanta Department of Health, Education and Welfare The Southern Regional Education Board Volunteers in Service to America The Peace Corps THE ATLANTA SERVICE--LEARNING CONFERENCE Atlanta shares with other major American cities its needs for increased services and its large population of college students - some 40,000 in the metropolitan area. In an attempt to explore ways to meet urban needs, to offer students a more relevant education, and to bring campus and community closer together, Atlanta students, city officials, higher educa- tion faculty and staff, regional and federal agency officials are jointly launching the Atlanta Service-Learning Conference. Meeting Series The meeting on June 30 and July 1 marks the opening event of the Conference. The Conference will continue for six months and will sponsor periodic meetings to consider ma- jor dimensions of the service-learning concept. Work Groups In exploring the service-learning concept, work groups will be formed to concentrate on particular aspects of the idea. These work groups, and a typical question to be posed to each of them, are listed below: Service: How can the student make a maximum contribution in his short term assignment? Learning: What learning can take place during the assignment? Curriculum: What are the implications of the service-learning idea for curricular deve- lopment? Financing: What Is an equitable distribu- tion of cost among the host agency? the college? the government? Research: How are students’ educational and career choices affected through partici- pation i service-learning programs? Methods and Programs: How should a service-learning program be designed for implementation on a large scale? Laboratory Among the work group participants will be members of the Atlanta Urban Corps and other service-learning programs which will form a practical laboratory for the Conference. Information Exchange and Results The Conference will foster the exchange of information among participants and with m- terested persons in other metropolitan areas. It is already sponsoring surveys of student manpower resources in the urban area, of the needs of the public and voluntary agency sectors for student manpower, and of present college and university programs helping to fill these needs. A wrap-up meeting and publica- tion is planned for the coming winter, when plans for continuing the examination of service- learning and extending service-learning pro- grams will be considered. Participation Participation in the Conference is open to all persons and groups interested in sharing information on service-learning programs. Jaquiries may be addressed to: Atlanta Service-Learning Conference Peace Corps, Southern Region Suite 6-70 275 Peachtree Sireet, N.E. Atlanta, Georgia 50303 Urban Needs = Educational Opportunities 9:00 9:30 11:00 12:15 2:00 5:30 7:00 9:00 11:00 12:15 2:00 4:00 5:00 5:30 Monday, June 30 Welcome by Mayor Ivan Allen A Case Study presented by the service-learning players Service-Learning in Action in Atlanta -- up-to-the-minute report Needs of Urban America luncheon address Seminars on service-learning concept and programs Social hour Educational Needs of Young People -- dinner address Tuesday, July 1 Service-Learning and National Programs, an exchange with national officials of the Teacher Corps, VISTA and the Peace Corps Workshops Service Learning Curriculum Finance Research Methods and Programs mBOO> Service by Youth luncheon address Workshops resume Workshop reports and discussion What Next? Conclusion
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 12, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Coordinators Weekly Report | 1969
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  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 12, Document 11

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  • Title: Box 7, Folder 12, Document 11
  • Text: MINUTES OF THE MEETING OF THE URBAN COALITION EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE I. Minority Contractor Institute Proposal. After the history, current status and details of the Minority Contractors Institute ‘proposal were presented and discussed, the Executive Committee approved the proposal with the understanding that an advisory committee made up of all elements of the Coalition will be formed and consulted. Attached is the proposal. II. Dates of Future Steering and Executive Committee Meetings. The attached list of dates was approved. III. Terms of Office for Steering and Executive Committee Members. At the present time Steering Committee members do not serve any fixed term. The proposal was for two-year terms to be established for all Steering Committee members and that they be eligible for reelection. The only exceptions to the two-year rule would be for those members who hold public office or are officers of private organizations. Their term of office would be limited to the term of their non-coalition position. In order to initiate this system, it was proposed that the Chairman be empowered to assign terms of office to all current Steering Committee members. The proposal was approved by the Executive Committee. A copy is attached. : IV. Nominating Committee Report. Three categories were presented Mayors, Businessmen, and Mexican-Americans. A. Mayors - Nine names representing a range of geography and party were presented. The entire list was approved with the authority to approach individuals as vacancies occur until the list is exhausted. B. Businessmen - The list was accepted with one addition from the floor. It was also suggested that some additional names representing the financial community be added. This was agreed to and additional names will be circulated. It was also proposed to enlarge business representation on the Executive Committee by three and on the Steering Committee by seven. The list of names and the enlargement of the Steering and Executive Committee was approved. ‘ s Minutes Page 2 - Urban Coalition Executive Committee In addition, the Executive Committee authorized the Chairman to approach individuals on the list as vacancies occur until the list is exhausted. Care will be exercised in aSsuring that geography and types of industry are fairly represented in the complexion of the committees. Mexican-American - Two candidates were submitted and approved by the Executive Committee. Announcements - An announcement of the nominees for the Steering Committee will be made after they have been contacted and have accepted. V. Housing. A report of the Housing Task Force was presented which outlined the principal effort the Task Force wished to take in the housing field. The report was approved by the Executive Committee, a copy of which is attached. Whereupon, at 5:25 p.m. the meeting was adjourned.
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 12, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Coordinators Weekly Report | 1969
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  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 12, Document 3

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_012_003.pdf
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  • Title: Box 7, Folder 12, Document 3
  • Text: _ NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1968 HOUSE BARS SHIRT ON POVERTY PLAN Liberals Block G.O.P. Move to Give Rule to States By MARIORIE HUNTER Special to The New York Times WASHINGTON, Dec. 12 — Democratic liberals succeeded tonight in blocking a Republi- can move that would shift control of a key antipoverty program to the states. The vote was 231 to 163. The action marked «a stunning defeat for a powerful coalition ef Republican and Southern Democrats seeking to give Governors control over the community action programs. | Earlier, Democratic leaders had sent up a loud cheer when they learned they had defeated the state-control plan by a non- recorded vote of 183 to 166, Backers of the state-control plan then made a final try, fail- ing this time on the 231-to-163 roll-cal] vote. The vbili—calling for a two- year, $2.343-billion extension of the antipoverty pro- gram virtually unchanged—then passed the House by a vote of 276 to 117. The bill now goes to conference with the Senate, which passed a similar measure earlier this fall. Throughout the day-long de- bate, Democratic liberals all but conceded that they did not have the votes to turn back the usually dominant coalition of Republicans and Southern Democrats. Yet they scored a double victory, not only blocking the state-control plan, but also suc- ceeding in retaining $295- million added in committee to the Administration’s proposed $2.048-billion’ bill. It was apparent that- many Republicans, confident of vic- tery, had decided their votes would not be needed and had; left for home before the crucial vote. ‘ ina ~ about six million poor in some For days, Democratic liberals had insisted ‘that Fresident Nixon alone held the key to the future of the antipeverty pro- gram. He had called for a sim- ple iwo-year extension of the program, without changes. However, with the House Re- publican leadership firmly com- mitted to shifting control to the states, the President did not personally seek to line up Re- publican support for a simple two-year extension. Instead, at his news confer- ence on Monday, Mr. Nixon said he hoped that his anti- poverty director, Donald Runis- feld, could take some kind of “accommodation? with critics of the program. Heeding the President's ad- vice, sponsors of the state- control plan modified their earlier propesal by permitting the director of the Office of Economic Oppertunity greater leeway in overriding vetoes of Governors over local commu- nity action programs. They also provided the O.E.0, director with several metheds of by-passing slates that failed to adequately fund local programs, Even with these modifica- tions, Mr, Rumsfeld spoke out today against the Republican substitute proposal. Exemptions Pile Up In hour after hour of debate today, several moderate Repub-| licans. and Democratic liberals stripped the state-control plan even further. The Head Start program of pre-school training for the poor was exempted from state con- ‘ trol by voice vote. The family planning program was also exempted by a vote of 75 to 26. And the House voted, 96 to 41, to exempt from state con- trol all community action pro- grams on Indian reservations. In the end, the proposed stae-control plan was limited primarily to non-Indian com- munity action programs and to Volunteers in Service to Amer- ica (VISTA). Of-all the antipoverty pro- prams: enacted five years ago under a Democratic Adminis- tration, community action has drawn the most fire, particu- larly in urban areas where the newly’ organized poor have staged rent strikes and other demonstrations. This year, the antipoverty agency has funded 969 commu- nity action programs serving 2,000 counties, both urban and rural... The community programs vary from place to place, offer- ing such aid as health services, emergency food and médical services, aid to migrant worlk- ers, legal services and consumer counseling. THE EVENING STAR Woshington, D, C. Satur rday, December 13, 1969 som Y f™ . i. eer a ee New | Life in House Vot By SHIRLEY ELDER Star Staff Writer in an upset that startled near- ly everyone involved, the House} has voted to give the Office of Economic Opportunity a two-} yvar, $2.3 billion lease on life, It was a rebut’ to House Re-) former member, OFO Director Donald Rumsfeld, and a mixed blessing for President Nixon, i The key vote came yesterday). on a motion to substitute a bill shifting most OO programs to the states. It lost, 231 to 163. The antipoverty measure then was approved, 276 to i17, and sent to a conference with the Senate, “T am pleased and darn grate- ful,” Rumsfeld said after the vote. He said he would work for continued reform within QEO and said the bill’s approval shouldn’t be interpreted es full! approval of what has gone on in this agency.” Alihouth Nixon had asked Congress for a simple two-year, $2-pillion-a-year extension of OEO, his support inrecent days was seen as less than enthusias- tic. At his press conference last Monday the President said he backed Aumsfeld bul urged him to seek an accommodation with House leaders. There was no evidence that the White House took an active role in lobbying for the bill. Rumsfeld carried the fignt in dozens of meetings with con- gressmen, frequently urging that he be given a chance to correct OEO problems on his own. Vote for Substitute | On the House floor, the oppesi- tion was led by GOP Leader Gerald R. Ford of Michigan and William H. Ayres of Ohio, the top Republican on the Education and Labor Committee. They joined forces with South-, ern Democrats behiad a substi- tute bill drafted by Reps. Albert) publican leaders, a victory for! - H. Quie, R-Minn., and faith Green, D-Ore., that would have sharply changed OLO's course. Up to the moment when House members filed down the center aisle in an unofficial “teller” vote, friends and focs of QEO alike were predicting victory for the substitute, ; Avres, who acted as floor lead- er for the Quie-Green bill, salu he knew they were losing when ‘jclusters of Republicans and con- seryativ e Democrats joined OEQ supporters. The “teller” voie was 183 to 166. Ayres called the vole & person- al triumph for Rumsfeld ani ‘isent him a felegram: “The Burasfeld Raiders rode again. | lCongratulations. Good Tuck on “ithe mess you inherited but don’t “lsay you didn’t ask for it.” Rep. Joe D. Waggonner, D-La., a leader of the Southern ‘forces, said many congressmen ‘from Border Siates broke away from the substitute bill, even though critical of OHO, because they. did not want to turn alti- poverty programs over to Ne publican governors. He men- tioned Arkansas, West Virginia, nee Florida and Kentuc- y. Ayres said he had assumed that nearly all Republicans, long JUIMLtea TO GECeNITauZzavion OL ieceral programs, would vote for the substitute. In the end, 68 Republicans voted against it. A breakdown on the key vote! ‘shows those 63 Republicans join- ing 168 Democrats against the substitute and 60 Democrats vot- ing wilh 103 Republicans for it. Both Reps. Joel T. Broyhill, R-Va., and William Scott, R-Va., voted against extending the anti- poverty program. Reps. Law- renee J. Hogan, R-Md., and Gil- |be:t Gude, R-Md., voted for it on tial passage, although Hegan voted for the earlier substitute, , Credit for the OEO victory! ais¢ must go, Waggonner said,| to OKO itself and its constituen-| cy in urban sreas where oprosi- iion to the substitute was orga- nized hurriedly over the last week, Telegrams, letters and tele- phone calls from mayors all added up. ‘‘After the pressure was on, we never had a chance,” he said, CONTINUED NEXT PAGE: CONTINUED FR. PREVIOUS PAGE: Began A Week Ago The pressure began more than a week ago when Quie and Mrs. Green unveiled their substitute bill. Debate was scheduled for the next day but Education and Labor Committee Chairman _ Carl D. Perkins, D-Ky., yanked the administration bill off the calendar to bargain for time. As yesterday’s long day of poverty talk began, OEO critics were optimistic and its defend- ers gloomy. Both Democratic whip Hale Boggs of Louisiana and Majority Leader Carl Albert of Oklahoma said they did not have the votes to win. Perkins said strong Republi- can support was essential for victory. He urged at least 55 Republicans te “come forward Jone expected that anywhere near 63 would answer the call. The tone of the debate reflect- ed the prevailing attitudes. OEO backers offfered little resistance to the substitute. A few relative- ly minor amendments were adopted. There were frequent shouts of ‘‘vote, vote” to keep the action moving. The substitute would have giv- en governors a veto over VISTA and community action programs and would have permitted states to establish separate agencies to operate the anti-poverty pro- gram, Head Start Funds The bill that passed Jeaves OEO as it is and authorizes $295 million extra for Head Start, job training and health services. The bill now goes to confer- ence with a similar Senate ver- sion passed Oct. 14 that author- izes $4.8 billion over two years. Joining in the end-of-session rush, the Senate Appropriations Committee went ahead yester- day and put nearly $2 billion into an appropriation bill for OEO even though final action on the some time next week. and support your President.” No| By Richard THE WASHINGTON POST Saturday, Dec. 13, 1969 ae) as 7 Ty 7 TT ay 2D ie ph aren ei S Ltt Lei Lue Wi L. Lyons Washington Post Staff Writer The House voted to extend the war on poverty through mid-1971 last night after rejecting—in a spectacular up- set—a proposal to give the states contro] over most anti- poverty programs. The state-control plan, supported by most pee and Southern Democrats, was defeated 231 to 163 on ; roll call vote. The House went on to pass the bill extending the life of the Office of Mconomic Oppor- tunity by a vote of 276 to 117. The bill now goes to a House- Senate conference where the major difference is a Senate amendment giving governors a veto over legal services for the poor. Rejection of the state-con- trol plan was a shock to both supporters and opponents. Its approval had been conceded in advance by almost everyone,) especially after its sponsors offered last-minute conces- sions. President Nixon had aslied for a simple extension of the present program. But when }state-control plan. At his news authorization cannot come until]: ithe bill was taken up yesier-, day after six months of ma-| neuvering, his principal sup-| port came from liberal Demvo- | crats who distrust the ability or will of the states to operate meaningful antipoverty pro- grams. Donaid Rumsfeld, director, of the Office of Economie Op- | portunity, which runs the pro- | gram, strongly opposed the ‘ence Monday night, the | 'President expressed support for Rumsfeld, but also @X- pressed hope that an “accom: modation” could be reacheci. This made it seem even more likely that some version of state control would pass the House. Several reasons were offer- ed for defeat of the state-con- trol plan. One was that the week’s delay Democrats won when the substitute was intro- duced last week allowed time for a mail and personal lobby- A\ number of conservative Democrats from states with Republican governors voted jadainst turning the program ever to them. Some Republi- can voles probably went to Rumsfeld, their former col- league, as a personal matter. And several members whol had voted against a strong: voting rights bill Thursday; switched to oppose state con-: ire}, perhaps not wishing to/ cast what could be regardedi as votes against the poor on) consecutive days. On the key vote, ecrais) and 63 voted against 168 Demoa- state conirol, while 103 Republicans and 60| Demoerats voted for it. OEO deals directly with) communities, with a minimum] of state supervision. The sub-; stitute proposal would have| - permitied governors to take} control of most of the contro-| versial programs that come| under the umbrella of commu-| ! It was chiefly a desire to get {lighter control over the local lprograms, which the poor ‘themselves help run, that mo- tivated the campaign for state control. Supporters of state control insisted that they were not/ trying to dismantle OEO, but ‘rather were trying to give au- thority to stale officials who ;have a better grasp of prob- ‘lems in their _States, ee wF ing campaign. Republicans , Kyo, ; ‘Edueation and Labor Commit-; nity action on the Jocal level. | | But when-hKep. Wwunam ti Ayres (R-Ohio), a leading cos-| ponsor of the state-controli plan, was asked by reporters if] it wouldn't take away most of | OEO’s authority, he said: | “We are only taking away | his (Rumsfeld's) canoe. lle’s stil) got his paddle.” In an effort to Te of moderate Republicans sup-| porting Rumsfeld, a former | member of the House, the! state-contro! forees offered vesterday to make concessions that would give him some} power to act if states did not! eperate cifeclive programs. | But Rep. Carl Perkins @, ehairman of the House tee and floor manager of the -adiministration’s extension bill, called the revised substitute “as destructive’ as the origi- nal state-control plan. | Speaker John W. = Me- ‘Cormack (D-Mass.) urged de- feat of the substitute, saving ithe issue was one of “money values versus human values.”
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 12, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Coordinators Weekly Report | 1969
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Box 7, Folder 12, Document 20

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_012_020.pdf
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  • Text: FOUNDATION TAX ISSUES Report of Action by House Ways and Means Committee as of Wednesday, August 6, 1969 The House Ways and Means tax reform bill, which will be debated on the House floor this week, contains several important provisions relating to foundations and their grantees. At its last meeting, the Action Council went on record.in opposition to many of -the Committee's earlier proposals. This is a report on the final action of the Ways and Manne Committee 1. Definition of Private Foundations. Private foundations have been newly defined to include groups such as the Urban Coalition and the Brookings Institution, in addition to seauee such as the Ford and Carnegie foundations. _As such they are now subject to an income tax and new limitations on their activities. 2. An annual tax of 7 1/2 per cent was imposed on net invest- ment income. ' | Explanation: The original tentative proposals had recommended a tax of 5 per cent. It is estimated that revenue increases at 71/72 per cent will produce $65 million in the first year. This is, in fact, a tax on beneficiaries of foundations rather than on foundations. The Coalition may now have to pay a tax on its next investment income. 3. Restrictions on Activities. The newly defined foundations (including the Coalition) would be prohibited from: a) Carrying on propaganda or otherwise attempting to influence Lagiatation; b) Attempting to influence legislation through attempting to affect public opinion, and chrowal private com~ munication with a member or employee of a legislative body, or with any other person who may participate in the formulation of legislation (Except through ‘making available the results of nonpartisan analysis or research). Explanation: This is 3 modification of the original tentative proposals which prohibited foundations from engaging in any activities intended to influence the decision of any governmental body. It is intended to tighten up the rules against lobbying. Under present law, a foundation may influence legislation if this is not a substantial part of its activity. The new legislation ‘would remove this test and allow no influencing of legislation. The Committee Report explains»that these provisions are designed to prohibit grassroots campaigns for the purpose of influencing legislation. Further, foundations may discuss broad policy - oat = ocho = : questions with congressmen and government agencies; they are precluded from “direct attempts to persuade congressmen and government officials to take positions on specific legislative issues." Voter Registration. Foundations would be prohibited from, engaging in voter registration drives unless grants aie made .to a 501i (e) (3) group thats .a) operates in five or more states b) receives support from five or more organizations, none of which provides more than 25 per.cent of. its support.: Explanation: The tentative proposals would have prohibited _ foundations from engaging in any voter registration activity or ‘paying for any such activity. The bill moves away from that strict view. The League of Women Voters Education Fund and the Southern Regional Council are specifically mentioned in the . Committee Report as examples of organizations which would be hibited from receiving foundation support. ® permitted to engage in voter registration. But other registration and education programs-~-now conducted by numerous smaller groups in less than five states--will be pro= e zk ke & Ok The House bill will, in all probability, be passed by the full - House this week under a "closed" rule. Floor amendments to tax ae “ee - bills generally are not permitted, and passage of the tax reform ‘bill seems assured. The Action Council and many of its cooperating groups have worked to modify the tentative proposals of the Ways and Means Committee so that the vital activity of foundations and foundation-related organizations can go forward. Our attention now turns to the Senate and the Finance Committee in particular which will begin considering tax reform proposals after the August Congressional Recess.
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 12, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Coordinators Weekly Report | 1969
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Box 7, Folder 12, Document 25

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_012_025.pdf
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  • Title: Box 7, Folder 12, Document 25
  • Text: April 24, 1969 “pe _oMr~ John W. Gardner Chairman National Urban Coalition . Ww Washington, D. C. wid H St)! a Ob AGOOE The Atlanta Chamber of Commerce is planning a special program beginning in September 1969. The purpose of Leadership Atlanta is to develop a group of identifiable young leaders; acquaint them with the basic problems and suggested solutions of the problems facing Atlanta; and encourage participation in positive community leadership. There will be approximately 50 participants in this program; 30 sponsored by business firms, and 20 chosen from outside the business community to insure participation from low income Negro groups. Areal effort is being made to insure representative membership among the participants. The sessions will be held once a month. Each one is developed by the Chamber and a different educational institution. Background reading material will be required before each session. The format will be generally as follows: 1) Address on topic 2) Supper 3) Panel or seminar involving local figures A listing of the subjects to be covered is included. The first session is scheduled for September 29, 1969. The Chamber would like for you to keynote the program with an opening address. Frank Carter, Chamber President, and I have been asked to participate in the after-dinner session and are planning to do so. Page Two Mr. John W. Gardner On behalf of the Chamber, I hope you can participate in this most worthwhile undertaking. If you would like, I will be happy to arrange other engagements for you during the day. Sincerely, Ivan Allen, Jr. TAjr:jct Enclosures
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 12, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Coordinators Weekly Report | 1969
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Box 7, Folder 12, Document 18

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_012_018.pdf
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  • Title: Box 7, Folder 12, Document 18
  • Text: At the current time Steering Committee members and Executive Committee members are elected for indefinite terms, terminated only by a wenber'ts xeeignation, death, or upon a vote of the Steering Committee to remove him from office. In order to assure the continued vitality of the Committees and an orderly process of turnover, terms of office should be. established for all members. It is therefore recommended that the Executive Committee approve the following policies and authorize the Chairman to implement them, including the incorporation of changes in the by-laws as may be necessary: 1. Except as noted in Paragraph 2, all Steering Committee members shall be nominated to serve for a term of two years and shall be eligible Lor re-election to additional terms. 2. The terms of office of members who hold public office or are officers of private organizations or businesses shall be up to two years but shall not exceed the term of their non-Coalition position. 3. The chairman and co-chairmen shall serve in that capacity for 2-year terms and shall be eligible for re-election. Executive Committee members shall be elected for a term equivalent to their term on the Steering Committee and shall be eligible for re-election. The Nominating Committee shall be established as a permanent committee of the Executive Committee. Its members shall serve for a term equivalent to their term on the Executive Committee and shall be eligible for . re-election. The size of the committee shall be fixed by the Chief Executive Officer but may not be less than five. Individuals will be elected to the Steering Committee, Executive Committee and the Nominating Committee by a majority vote of the Steering Committee which may be taken either by mail or at a regularly scheduled meeting. The Chairman is authorized to assign terms of office to all current members of the Steering Committee in accordance with the policies stated above.
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 12, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Coordinators Weekly Report | 1969
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Box 7, Folder 12, Document 5

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_012_005.pdf
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  • Text: cy JOHN W. GARDNER THE URBAN COALITION ACTION COUNCIL | ANDREW HEISKELL ‘ A. PHILIP RANDOLPH 2100 M Street, N.\W, * Washington, D.C. 20037 eo lchaitmen (202) 293-7625 LOWELL R. BECK Executive Director November 21, 1969 fu dorm Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. LL! 2d, Mayor of the City of Atlanta = we = City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mayor Allen: I am enclosing for your information recent Action Council testimony on the two closely related issues of welfare reform and food stamps. John Gardner's state- ment on welfare was presented to the Ways and Means Committee by George McGhee. In his capacity as special counsel to the Action Council, Mr. Stephen Kurzman presented our position on food stamps before the House Committee on Agriculture, I would appreciate receiving any comments you may have on the positions stated in this testimony. Sincerely, L LL, Jewell pL eae ee Lowell R. Beck S90
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 12, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Coordinators Weekly Report | 1969
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Box 7, Folder 12, Document 6

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_012_006.pdf
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  • Text: November 10, 1969 MEMORANDUM TO THE PRESS FROM JOHN W. GARDNER CHAIRMAN THE URBAN COALITION ACTION COUNCIL I wanted you to have an advance copy of my testimony before the House Ways and Means Committee on the pending welfare reform legislation. A long-standing commitment will prevent my personal appearance at the hearing on the date made available by the Committee; but the testimony will be presented by one of my asso- ciates. It is of the highest importance that we get sound legislation in this field. We are faced with an extraordinary opportunity to replace our ineffective, even destructive, public assistance pro- grams with a national system of income maintenance that will help people help themselves and give hope and dignity to those left behind by society. The Urban Coalition and the Urban Coalition Action Council will give the issue top priority for the months ahead.
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 12, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Coordinators Weekly Report | 1969
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Box 7, Folder 12, Document 26

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_012_026.pdf
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  • Text: ‘ibe au gg ost go tu lls se Jie pttn We
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 12, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Coordinators Weekly Report | 1969
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Box 7, Folder 12, Document 27

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_012_027.pdf
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  • Title: Box 7, Folder 12, Document 27
  • Text: ATLANTA, GEORGIA FORM 25-6
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 12, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Coordinators Weekly Report | 1969
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Box 7, Folder 12, Document 19

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_012_019.pdf
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  • Title: Box 7, Folder 12, Document 19
  • Text: ‘ National Minority Contractors InstI'tute Background: Historically, minority group construction contractors have been outside the mainstreah of the uinatenabion industry. Although the nation has approximately 870,000 general and specialty contractors, fewer than 2,000 or twoskenine of one percent are black- While a reliable estimate of the number of contractors among other minorities is not available, it seems safe to assume that they too have little representation. The development of minority contractors'in the past has not kept pace with the industry's growth and there is no reason to assume that without assistance the gap between minority contractors and other contractors will not continue to drastically widen. The pressing need is for a program to develop athordiy contractors and to enable them to develop the entrepreneurial skills required to sustain a major construction program. In this way, we can begin to create opportunities not only for entrance into the construction industry as general and sub-contractors, but also for the develop- ment of skilled craft job and union membership opportunities. The Proposal: To establish a National uinentey Contractors Institute which will promote and facilitate the development of minority construction contractors in the major urban areas and enhance opportunities for minority entrepreneurship and employment in this industry. Specific Goals: 1) To increase the pactioipation of minority group contractors +H the building and construction industry; 2) to multiply at all skill levels the minority group work force in that industry; and 3) to assist core city residents' partici- ‘pation in the rebuilding process in their communities. Methods: These goals will be achieved by: 1) informing relevant ; institutions of the problems of minority contractors and stimulating solutions essential for their greater participation in the con- struction industry; 2) serving as a focal point and source for getting technical assistance to local contractor associations and/or contractors; 3) providing for dissemination of information to con- tractors and exchanges of experience; 4) assisting, as needed, the National Minority Contractors Association; 5) assisting in the development of local minority contractors associations wherever the demands indicate; 6) aid in developing funding sources to provide resources necessary for local staff support and local working capital needs of association members; 7) development of manpower programs relevant to the needs of the contractors and to the communities which they serve. Operations of the Institute: The three major components will be a) Revolving Capital Fund, b) Technical Assistance, and c) Manpower. A working’ capital revolving fund will help minority contractors overcome critical financing and bonding obstacles. Technical assistance will help minority contractors develop the business and management skills necessary to soupete more effectively for a greater share of the nation's construction business. Manpower training programs will be developed -- in close cooperation with the building trades unions -- to develop and upgrade craftsmen at all skill levels. Urban Coalition role: The Coalition will assume a catalyst role in the establishment of the Institute with the goal of spinning it off as a separate non-profit organization as soon as feasible. The Coalition's effort will include fund-raising, locating private sector representatives willing to assist Institute prograns, dis- seminating information about the thebieuie, and helping identity local communities for priority attention. Organization: The Board of Directors of the Institute will reflect a partnership between minority-contractors and those committed ‘to assisting them. Staffing: The Institute staff will consist initially of a Director and a secretary. As programs reach the development and implemen- tation stage -- and as funding resources become avyatlebrs == additional staff will be added to administer the revolving capital fund, technical assistance, and manpower programs of the Institute.
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 12, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Coordinators Weekly Report | 1969
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Box 7, Folder 12, Document 31

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_012_031.pdf
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  • Text: THE URBAN COALITION ACTION COUNCIL JOHN W. GARDNER CHAIRMAN 1819 H STREET, N, W. : WASHINGTON, D.C.20006 5 July 1968 WEEKLY LEGISLATIVE REPORT (Current as of July 5, 1968) FROM: THE STAFF THE STATUS OF SUBSTANTIVE LEGISLATION The Emergency Employment and Training Act of 1968 Senate hearings have been completed. Review and action by the full Committee is expected to take place during the week of July 8th. It is expected that the extension of the Manpower Development and Training Act (MDTA) as reported by the Subcommittee will also be considered by the full Committee during the week of July 8th. STATUS OF HOUSE LEGISLATION The Select Subcommittee on Labor has completed hearings. The Committee is expected to mark-up the bill in executive session probably not before the week of ouly hSth. The MDTA extension has been reported by the full Committee and the measure will be before the Rules Committee on the 8th or 9th of July. House floor action should take place shortly thereafter. The Revenue and Expenditure Control Act of 1968 (formerly the Tax Adjustment Act of 1968) The ten percent tax surcharge and the $6 billion in budget cuts is now Public Law 90-364. The President. signed the measure on June 28th. TE! FELOANE. 99 2an-1RaAn
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 12, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Coordinators Weekly Report | 1969
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