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Box 7, Folder 8, Document 1

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_008_001.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 8, Document 1
  • Text: ~ ~-- - - - - - - - - - - - -- MEMORANDUM TO: 41--£--- FROM: i:::1::::::0; SUBJECT: Educational Televil: Program - "Read Your Way Up" As part of our effort to inform local urban coalitions of current developments in the various program areas, we are pleased to pass on the following information. Beginning July 8, a basic course in reading skills, to be known as "Read Your Way Up", will be televised in 30 lessons of one-half hour each produced by the Manpower Education Institute and the National Broadcasting Company. There will be five weekday programs each week for six weeks. NBC is making the program available to local affiliated stations which choose to participate. Study kits for practice reading will be available at cost through TV statio~s carrying the · program or from the Manpower Education Institute, 405 Lexington Avenue, New York City. We believe "Read Your .Way Up" is an impress ive attempt to reach a large target group with a useful program. You may wish to urge your local NBC station to carry this program and to assist in local publicity efforts for this series. In addition, you may wish to consider supporting free distribution o f the reading kits to induce wider participation. If you have any questions about this program please feel fre~ to contact the Manpower Education Institute, 405 Lexington Avenue, New ·York , New York, (Area Code 212 - 867-9405) or James Kelly, Program De v e lopme nt Unit of The Urban Coalition, 1815 H Stree t, N.W., Washington, D.C., 20006, (Ar ea Code 2 0 2 638-6674). Attachment: Press Release JD:lyt ,, �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 8, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 8, Document 7

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_008_007.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 8, Document 7
  • Text: May 8 , 1968 Mi-. G orge V. Ne gu Ex cutive Directo1' South Bend Human .Relations and Fai:r Employm~nt Practices Commi sion City Hall Bu.tiding 214 North M in Stre t South Bend, Indian 46601 Dear Mr. 6 gu: M yor Ivan Allen ha sked that I r spond to your letter r que · ttng inform · tlon on Atlanta s Utb · n Co ition. I a.m s ndlng you lnfol'm · tion which should an w r your fir t two que tion . To b p rf ctly tru.thful. w h v not fo:rma.lh: d the Coalition b :yond thes initi t teps . Thi i b sic 1 · becaus th · City ol Atl nta h s op rat d for yeat.'s with informal, unatructur d coalition of gov rnment, bu in s nd <;ivll right roup • Ther ar mov und w y now to xt nd th Coalition beyond the ortlgi.nal organis tlon, but nothing ls d flnit t thi point. Sine r ly your , o ns DS:fy &'• �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 8, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 8, Document 11

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_008_011.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 8, Document 11
  • Text: March 28·, 1968 Mr. Robert L . Hal."ria 145 Lisa Lane Yellow Springe , Ohio 45387 Dear Mt. Ha1'l'iS : I am . ttaching a copY of a newspaper clipping on th formation of the Atlanta Urb n Coalition. Al o included is copy of the St t ment dopted by the Atlanta Urb -.n Coalition Ste dng Commltte at 1ts m ting on Octob a, 29, 1967. Sine r ly yo\U' * Dan Sw DS:fy Enclo ute t �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 8, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 8, Document 13

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_008_013.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 8, Document 13
  • Text: l Mar ch 28 , 1968 Mrs . Joseph Pepe Exe cutive Assistant Mayor•s U,:ban Coalition Office of the Mayo:r City of Riverside Riverside , California Dear Mrs . Pepe : I am attaching information on formation of the Atlanta Ur-ban Co lition. In nswer to yo\11' sp eific que tlons: 1. There i no budg t for the function of the U\"ban Coalition. At the pr nt tim w hav no d finite plans £011 s tting up mor formal typ organh: tion although this might b done ome tim in th f utur • 2. Th City of Atlanta does h ve a Community Relation Commi ion which was tabli h d by th City Gov rnment. Th Ch bman of the Commi . ion, R v rend Samu l Willi m , r pr nt all dvil rlghta ot"g nt ations of the community m mb r of the Atlant Urb n Coalition. 1 hope thi information might b of some v lu to you. Sincerely your , Dan Sw DS:ly t �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 8, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 8, Document 20

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_008_020.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 8, Document 20
  • Text: The Urban Coalition I Federal Bar Building West/ 1819 H Street, N. w. Washington, D. C. / 20006 Steering Committee Co-chairmen : Andrew Heiskell/ A. Philip Randolph March 8, 1968 LEGISLATIVE REPORT SENATE HEARINGS ON HOUSING BILL CUT SHORT BY CIVIL RIGHTS DEBATE: Senator John Sparkman's (D-Ala.) Banking and Currency Housing Subcommittee opened hearings March 5 on the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968 (S.3029 and H.R. 15624) but important votes on civil rights legislation kep the Subcommittee from hearing anyone other than HUD Secretary Robert Weaver. Senators quizzed Weaver on whether or not the proposed bill would meet the needs of low income families. Weaver suggested the President's 10-year program was designed to do the job and he believed the Riot Commissions proposal to accomplish the goal in only five years was unrealistic. Hearings begin before the House Banking and Currency Committee's Housing Subcommittee (Barrett, D-Pa., Chrmn.) OEO SUMMER FUNDS APPROVED BY SENATE COMMITTEE: The Senate Appropriations Committee has reported the 1968 Supplemental Appropriations bill for floor action with the inclusion of $75 million for OEO summer activities. No problem is expected in securing Senate approval. The real difficulties will be encountered in the House. CLARK SUBMITS EMERGENCY EMPLOYMENT TRAINING BILL: Senator Joseph Clark (D-Pa.) has introduced a bill to provide jobs and job training in both public and private sectors for 2.4 million hard-core unemployed during the next four years. The bill, S.3063, is similar to Senator Clark's emergency employment amendment to last year's OEO legislation which was narrowly defeated. It puts in legislative language the job opportunities in the business section (JOBS) program announced by President Johnson in his State of the Union and manpower messages . Last year the Urban Coalition led attempts to get Senate approval of the provision for public sector jobs. National Coordinators: John Feild / Ron M . Linton Telephone 293-1530 �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 8, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 8, Document 33

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_008_033.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 8, Document 33
  • Text: • ti ~ the desree to could be expanding their de livery ri.r- aervice s to their community and citizens, if the cited obstacles to such expansion did not exist (such as budgets). We would appreciate your answers to the foll owing questions aCter consulting with the he a ds a nd personnel c hie1s in the types of agencies listed below, i1 s uch a surv e y has not already been conducted. I. Assuming !!.2 .limi tati o n s i n budget s a nd f' ac i liti<~s ( i n- cl u d i n g provisions and requir e me nt s f or rec r u itin g and traini1 1g n ew pers onn e l), in which of' th e following mun i c i p a l fu nct i on s do you b e l ie v e there is a n e ed fo r at l ea st a 1 0% in c re as e i n servic e s and/or personn e l? Pl.ease an s wer j n col . 1. l f' o r IncrenSL'S ? ( ple:1s0 ch c'ck i :f n C! e d t~ x j s t s ) Ne<>d part ment or F u nction 2 l dedl Staffin g .l11creases (c 11 t. 1ir numb1·r) ti - pollution enforcement ucation nernl admin.istration alth and hospitals ghway and/or traffic dept . using codes and inspection brary •lice re creation and parks ban renewal (or rehabilitation) - includine Model Cities nitation lf'are her: (please name) {please name) .. ... J Nonprofess i on al D.t; % o f col . 2 �2 provide estimates oC ho~ many /" additio~al personnel J ould be needed to implement these increased services? here. Plausible, reasonable estimate3 are perf'ectly satisfactory _;. ·, We are not insisting on pre c ise tn- the-last-man :figures. III. In many o.f these pot e ntially expand e d departments and functions, there is always the strong probability that now pro~cs- sional personnel may not be ava i labl e Partly as a ag e nci e s means of solving t h.i.s around t h e in the · numb e rs desired. type of p t! rsonn e l coun t r y h ave r ece n t l y l> (•g un ( A) men a nd wom e n without shortage, re cru i l. and to j obs which a ctually could be performed by such me n a nd women. In oth e r n e eding mor e p er s o nn e l , t he c ould b e pr u.fcs,..ion a ] e mploy e d in n a ture fica t 1on perso n nel , in a v.1 rie 1, y o:f j t) l >s (f or cxnmple , c ertain kind s of t' 11 n ds , th.:.i. t playground a i des , column 2 migh t c on ::; i :-; t In an s we rine this qu0:-;tio n, uf pl .. : 1:-;e Lw•.> t l1t· :·H : .Jo n o t f!Xist int; Ludgetary or entra n c , · - rcqui r l' mt- 11l no iron - clad precise p ercentat~" estimat e as f .((6--. 0,/11.( . . . the ) num l H· rs t. y pt 'S /\ o f ll l' W nn:-;t1'a.i 11 Pd f, · 1· 1 l t mi.l,tlio11s . t h es e , •111ployccs ? hy ,111y Ag ,11 11, jobt> cu 11ld c on cL'i. vahly I> " per so nn el . ~.,e~.....;--1 / " ,' ( .--/- ,. .,,.,...., J ....·t -- .--- ------- - . ~nl I etc .). is requ..:· !-it,•t..l h1 · rt i -- oul y ynur l> c::; t to what proportion •., r fill e d by nonprof e s s ion a l u r han b 1• a u t i - ' mplo y ee s , h o s p1 t. al .f or 110 t (') a n d :• mc n a nd are not ri.gi d l y ln co l u mn J, wo u ld yo u .i n dic,1t.e wh,,l p , · 1·c ·1 : 11t o f cit<,•d i n d e partm e nt s only rn ,t ,jlJr n'a s o n h i r inl{ t hem is si mply the p ro lil 0 m o.f i n ad,• qu,1 tc wom e n tra in the r e eula r ly re qui re d a dv a n ce d p re p aration to perform t hos e asp e cts of "prof ess ional" and .function s omc , / I ~ .., (9 �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 8, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 8, Document 35

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_008_035.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 8, Document 35
  • Text: The Urban Coalition I Federal Bar Building West / 1819 H Street, N. w. Washington, D. C. / 20006 Steering Comm i ttee Co - chairmen: Andrew Heiskell/ A. Philip Randolph December 15, 1967 Mr. Dan E. Sweat, Jr. Director of Governmental Liaison Office of the Mayor City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Dan: Confirming your telephone conversations with John Feild and myself, we are delighted that your schedule will permit your acting as a resource person during the one-day Eastern Regional Planning Conference on mobilizing local coalitions, to be held Friday, January 12, 1968, in New York. The conference, which will draw leadership from communities in the eastern part of the country, will be held at Loeb Student Center of New York University. Our expectation is to convene a briefing session for those persons, such as yourself, playing a leadership role in the program on Thursday evening, January 11th, in New York City. Further program details will be sent to you shortly. Cordially, Christopher M. Mould Associate National Coordinator / a lt National Coordinators . John Feild / Ron M. Linton Telephone 293-1530 �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 8, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 8, Document 40

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_008_040.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 8, Document 40
  • Text: ! December 11, 1967 MEMORANDUM TO: Members of the Steering Committee Urban Coalition FROM: John Gunther, U. S. Conference of Mayors Chairman, Working Committee on Organization SUBJECT: T'ne Urban Coalition in 1968 Your Working Com.rnittee on Organi zation met and based on that meeting and subsequent discussions with individual members of the Working Committee, I submit this report. 1. The Urban Coalition should continue its efforts toward assuring an equitable share of the benefits fro m the nation's economy for the residents of our central cities. The Urban Coalition should be responsive to but independent of the individual elements of it. The Coalition should seek to facilitate the implementation of policies developed by it and others and concurred in by the Coalition. Areas of substantive concern should be education, employment, and housing, including related community facilities and services. The Coalition should encourage the formation of local coalitions to develop and implement plans for the solution of community problems. The National Coalition, through local coalitions and by direct action, should support policies to order private and public priorities to meet the pressing and long neglected needs of the central cities. 2. The Stee ring Committee is the governing body of the Coalition and it may add to its number as it deems appropriate. The Steering Committee shall select its chairman or co-chairmen from its members and shall determine the substance of the areas of the Coalition activities, establish a budget and employ a National Coordinator. 3. There shall be a Council of Local Coalitions. This Council will be made u p of t wo representatives from each local coalition and it shall select two of its members to serve on the national Steering Committee . The Council will serve in an advisory capacity to the Steering Committee . . �2 4. Each member of the Steer i n g Committ ee may designate an individual to repr esent him on the Wor king Com.mittee. The Working Committee shall select a chairman or co-chairman from its members, and may establish committees as needed to oversee the impleme ntation of decisions by the Steering Committee, and prepare proposals fo r the consideration of the Steering Committee. ·5. Areas of Coalition activity will be explored in depth by task forces established by the Steering Committee and responsible to the Steering Committee. 6. The Coalition sha ll employ such staff as its budgeted resources permit. The staff will b e under the direction of a National Coordinator who may be retained and serv e at the pleasure of the Steering Committee. The staff will provide services as necessary to the Steering Committee, the Council of Local Coalitions, the task forces and the Working Committee. 7. Staffing and funding should be planned on a one-year basis; and prior to Janu a ry l, 196~ a comprehensive review should be made to asses progress toward the objectives of the Urban Coalition and to make such recommendatiomas may be appropriate for its continuation. 0 �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 8, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 8, Document 49

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_008_049.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 8, Document 49
  • Text: ~ The urban Coalition I Federal Ba~ B,u.:rfin,<1 We:;// 1819 H Street, N. W. Washington. D. C. / 20006 Sleering___Commiltee Co-chairmen : Andrew Heiskeil / A. Phi.',:o Randolph December 8, 1967 NATIONAL COORDINATORS WEEKLY REPORT This week's report consists of the following schedule of coalition activities, the rosters of two Task Forces which have now rounded out their membership and the enclosed material on the New York Coalition and the December 18th Meeting of the Steering Committee. DECEMBER Steering Committee Meeting Detroit Task Force on Educational Disparities Meeting Detroit Tuesday, the 19th: Ad Hoc Committee on Urban Economic Council Detroit Monday, the 18th: JAJ.'1UARY Wednesday, the 10th: Task Force on Communications Luncheon New York City Friday, the 12th: Task Force on Local Coalitions Eastern Regional Conference New York City Wednesday, the 17th: Task Force on Private Employment Western Regional Conference Phoenix, Ariz. Thursday, the 18th: Task Force on Equal Housing Opportunities: National Action Conference Chicago, Ill. Monday, the 29th: (TENTATIVE) Council of Urban Coalitions Washington, D.C. Tuesday, the 30th : Steering Committee Meeting Washington, D.C. Private Employment Task Force Mid-Western Regional Conference Kansas City, Mo. FEBRUARY I j Wednesday, the 21st: ' ' . National Coordinators : John Feild/ Ron M. Linton Telephone 293 -1530 �TASK FORCE ON EDUCATIONAL DISPARITIES CO-CHAIRMEN: Roy Ash Roy Wilkins Arthur Fleming MEMBERS Walter Davis Director of Education AFL-CIO Washington, D.C. Edward Hodges Michigan Bell Telephone Company Detroit, Michigan Dr. Francis Ke ppel General Learning Corp. New York, New York Dr. Paul Briggs Superintendent of Schools Cleveland, Ohio Dr. James Redmond Superintendent of Schools Chicago, Illinois Dr . Arthu r Johns on As soc. Superinte nde nt o f Schools Detroit, Michigan Dr. Steven Wright President, Negro College Fund New York, New York Dr. Charles Brown Superintendent of Schools Newton, Mass. Dr. Elliott Shapiro Ass't Superintendent of Schools New York, New York William Saltonstall Ft. Rodman Job Corps New Bedford, Mass. Vernon R. Alde n President, Ohio University Athens, Ohio Thomas H. Eliot Chance llor , Was hington Univers ity St . Lou is , Missou r i Buell Gallaghe r President , City College New York , New York �t \ TASK FORCE ON HOUSING, RECONSTRUCTION, AND INVESTMENT CO-CHAIRMEN: Walter Reuther Joseph D. Keenan David Rockefeller MEMBERS Frank E. Mackle Mackle Builders Miami, Florida Gene Brewer President U.S. Plywood-Champion Paper New York, New York Thomas J. Watson, Jr. Chairman of the Board I.B.M. Armonk Village, New York Rudolph Peterson President Bank of America National Trust and Saving Assn. San Francisco, Calif. Mr. George H. Weyerhoeuser President Weyerhoeuser Company Tocoma, Washington Donald C. Burnham President Westinghouse Electric Corp. Pittsburgh, Pa. James Felt James Felt & Company New York, New York Paul Ylivisaker Commissioner Department of Community Affairs Trenton, New Jersey James Rouse · President Rouse Company Baltimore, Md. Honorable John Collins Mayor of the City of Boston Honorable Jerome Cavanagh Mayor of the City of Detroit Bayard Rustin Executive Director A. Philip Randolph Institute New York, New York �( ,. . .. \ NEW YORK COALITION TO UNDERTAKE IMAGINATIVE JOB TRAINING PROGRAM Mayor John Lindsay announced last week an imaginative new program to be launched by the New York Coalition with the financial backing of the Standard Oil Company of New Jersey. Under the $125,000 Standard Oil grant, the city's Police Department will train men and women from poverty areas for career employment in the private sector. The approximately 50 trainees will perform civilian work in the Department during half of their work time and attend school the other half. They will be paid about $60 a week during the sixmonths training period. Calling the new endeavor an "experimental program", the Mayor said "I am delighted that Standard Oil (New Jersey) has made this project possible. It is an excellent example of cooperation between the private and public sectors." Milo Brisco, a vice president and board member of Standard Oil (New Jersey) and the company's representative on the New York Coalition, joined the mayor in making the announcement. They said the new program, the first to be undertaken by the New York Coalition, was developed by Police Commissioner Howard R. Leary and the company.. 7he Mayor said the program is not intended to prepare trainees for employment with city government, but is aimed at preparing them to qualify for jobs in the general employment market. �( . STEERING COMMITTEE MEETING December 18, 1967 PROPOSED AGENDA I. II. III. IV. V. Minutes of previous meeting Administrative and Financial report Report of Organization Committee Report of Committee on Budget and Finance Report of Task Forces - _-Loe_ - _Ca.a:-1.ition s --Private Employment --Equal Housing Opportunities --Educational Disparities --Housing, Reconstruction, and Investment --Legislation--Policy Statement for 1968 --Communications �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 8, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 8, Document 50

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_008_050.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 8, Document 50
  • Text: December 11, 1967 MEMORANDUM TO: Members of the Steering Committee Urban Coalition FROM: John Gunther, U.S. Conference of Mayors Chairman, Work ing Committee on Organization SUBJECT : The Urban Coalition in 1968 Your Working Committee on Organization met and based on that meeting and subsequent discussions with individual members of the Working Committee, I submit this report. 1. The Urban Coalition should mntinue its efforts toward assuring an e quitable share of the benefits from the nation's economy for the residents of our central citi es. The .Urban Coalition should ·b e respons i ve to bu:c. independent of the individual element s of it. The Coalition should seek to facilitate the implemen tation of policies developed by it and others and concurred i n by the Coalition. Areas of substantive conce rn should be educa tion, employment, and housing, including related community facili tie s and services. The Coalition should encourage the format i on of local coalitions to develop and implement plans for the solu tion o f communi.t-:, problems . The National Coalition, through local coalitions and by direct action, should support polic ies to order private and public priorities to me et the press i n g and long neglected needs of the centra l cities . 2. The Steer ing Committee is the gover ning body of the Coalition and i t ma y a dd to its number as i t deems appr opr iate . The Stee rin g Committe e shall select its cha i r man or c o -chair men fr om its member s and s h all determine the substance of the areas o f the Co aliti on activ itie s, e s t abl i sh a b udget and employ a Nationa l Coordinator. 3. There shall be a Counci l o f Lo cal Coalitions. This Council will be made up of two representatives from each local coalition and i t shall selec t two o f its members to ser ve on the national Steer i n g Committee. The Council will ser ve in an advisor y c apacity to t he Steer ing Committee . �2 4. Each member of the Steering Committee may designate an individual to represent him on the Working Committee. The Working Committee shall select a chairman or co-chairman from its members, and may establish committees as needed to oversee the implementation of decisions by the Steering Committee, and prepare proposals for the consideration of the Steering Committee. 5. Areas of Coalition activity will be explored in depth by task forces established by the Steering Committee and responsible to the Steering Committee. 6. The Coalition shall employ such staff as its budgeted resources permit. The staff will be under the direction of a National Coordinator who may be retained and serve at the pleasure of the Steering Committee. The staff will provide services as necessary to the Steering Committee, the Council of Local Coalitions, the task forces and the Working Committee. 7. Staffing and funding should be planned on a one-year basis; and prior to January l, 196~ a comprehensive review should be made to asses progress toward the objectives of the Urban Coalition and to make such recommendatiorsas may be appropriate for its continuation. �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 8, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 8, Document 53

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_008_053.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 8, Document 53
  • Text: , ! ·, December 1, 1967 ~ · FINANCIAL REPORT* Accounts Payable as of 11/30/67 Bills $9,129.78 Urban America 5,316.12 Petty Cash 251. 66 $14,697.56 Funds Obligated through 1/31/68 7,141.69 Funds Exp e nded through ll/30/6i 71,398.08 Project ed Expenses, 12/1/67--1/31/68 35,972.05 $129,210.27 Donations Receive d as of 11/30/67 $50,325.05 Pledges Due by 1/31/68 74,000.00 $12 4 ,325.05 - "$ 4,885.22 CASH FLOW REPORT Cash Re c eived a s of 1 1/ 30/67 Cash Borrowe d Urban America $ 4 ,765.00 U. S . Confe r e nce of Mayo rs 16 ,64 6 . 19 $50,3 25. 0 5 Funds Exp ended Cash o n Han d 338 .16 21, 4 11.1 9 $7 1 ,736 . 24 ,. $71 , 398.08 ~Transfer of fund s between U.S. Co nference of Mayor s , Ur b an America and The Urban Coalition is undergoing audit. $7 1 ,736 . 24 �FINANCIAL REPORT, PART II Approved Budget $ 56,000 $ 18,500 $4,600 3,600 600 1,200 1,500 250 5,200 50 17,000 $ 8,500 $100,000 Projected Expenses through 1/31/67 $28,972.29 : $21,629.94 $50,602.23 + $5,397.77 $ 6,700.00 $13,419.25 + $5,080.75 Salaries (including part time & temporary help) $3,000 8,000 2,500 5,000 $ Item Expenditures through, 11/30/67 (including Accounts Payable) Program Ex2enses Conferences & Meetings $ 948.30 . r 700.00 Publications & Printing l,C38.40 1,500.00 Mailings 2,E08.95 2,500.00 Consultant Fees 2 ,123.60 2,000.00 TOTAL $ 6,719.25 Toial of Expenditures & Projected Expenses Difference L 02erating Ex2enses Office Rent Furniture Rental Equipment Rental Telephone & Telegraph Office Supplies Insurance Travel Subscriptions TOTAL $3,195.00 3,295.62 327 .13 2,433.22 1,892.54 454.00 6,510.78 74.55 -:1' 1,065.00 900.00 204.69 2,400.00 700.00 9,500.00 15.00 $18,182.84 $14,784.69 $32,967.53 -$15,967. 5 3 August Convocation $25,829.08 -$17,329. 08 Undistributed Ex2enses $ 6,392.18* -$ 6,392.18 $81,629.59 $43,114.63 $124,744.22 -$29,210 . 27 Accounts Payable not yet posted and fund transfers being audited. �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 8, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 8, Document 56

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_008_056.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 8, Document 56
  • Text: I The Urban Coalition I Federal Bar Building West/ 1819 H Street, N. w. Washington, D. C. / 20006 Steering <;ommittee Co-chairmen: Andrew Heiskell/ A. Philip Randolph November 15, 1967 Dear Steering Committee Member: At the last meeting of the Steering Committee, it was suggested that the Coalition should seriously consider taking a position in opposition to several of the Social Security Amendments already approved by the House of Representatives and now being considered by the Senate. It was suggested that the House Amendments were not only contrary to general and accepted standards of welfare aid and the trend toward raising those standards; but the Amendments, if passed, would result in local governments having to assume an increased share of the costs of the total welfare load. The Steering Committee decided that an analysis should be made of the problem and the House's position and distributed to the members. This has been accomplished and a Fact Sheet and an analysis are enclosed. We have reviewed the Fact Sheet and analysis and concur with the Legislative Committee's estimate of the House amendments as being essentially negative in nature. Testimony before the Hous e Ways and Means Committee makes it clear that segments of the Nation are anxious to reverse the increase in the number of children receiving aid. However, this concern dealt with approaching the problem at the cause s rather than limiting the aid. The main ob jective of Social Security Amendments as o r iginally introduced was to move families toward financial inde p e ndence. The Aid to Familie s with Dependent Chi l dren Program was designe d to k e ep families toge ther . We b e lie v e the r e s trictions impos e d by the House bill a re directly contrary to these two goals. N ational Coordinators : John Feil d / Ron M. Linton Telephone 293 -1530 �Steering Committee - November 15, 1967 Page Two We recommend that the Coalition oppose the House Amendments. Until the Coalition can take formal action on our recommendations, we urge you as an individual to take whatever steps you can to oppose the House Amendments. The Senate Finance Committee has ordered reported its version of the Social Security Bill, an analysis of which will be sent to you as soon as it can be made available. Sincerely, Richard J. Daley John V. Lindsay A. Philip Randolph �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 8, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 8, Document 58

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_008_058.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 8, Document 58
  • Text: • FACTS AND COMMENTS ON THE MAJOR PROVISIONS OF THE SOCIAL SECURITY AMENDMENTS OF 1967 INTRODUCTION: The following is a comparison of the Administration's proposals _ for amending the Social Security Act and the amendments to that Act passed by the House of Representatives. This analysis will be limited to major issues and policy variables i n the areas of social security, medicare, medicaid, and public assistance . Social Security and Public Assistance Background: Social Security constitutes a wage-related income insurance program to guard against loss of income due to death, disability or old age of a wage earner. Be n efi ts are the right of the wage earner, his spouse, or his children , d e p ending on the need situation of any one or combination of two or more possible beneficiaries . Benefits are paid as a matter of right and specific taxes are collected in a relatively progressive manner to fund the program. The tax does not take, nor does the benefit structure give, an amount totally adequate to meet all the financial needs gene ra ted t hrough death, disability or old- age. It does, however , provide a basic "floor of protection" on which the majority of the Ameri can people can build a financia l ly secure future . Public Assis tan ce , has neither the contributory nor the ea r ned r ight aspe cts o f s ocia l secu r ity . It is pa i d on the basis of n eed de f ined by statute and admin i strat ive r egulation . The £ ecip i e n ts o f public assistance are such beca use of the conscience of , r ath e r than their contribu t i o ns to s ociety . The r e f o r e , Fe d eral , s ta t e , and local governments have s et down a n d enforce ce r tain mode s o f b ehavior on the part of recip ients wh ich wil l preve n t the abu s e of public assistance laws and wo rk to mov e , whe nev er poss ible , r ec ip ients up from welfare to more prod uctive pla ces in soc ie t y. Philosophically, these enforced behavioral modes, or welfare ru l es, are s e t down not only to help those persons on th e welfare rolls, but also to limit the burden they place on the more fortunate, more productive members of the society. The Social Security Act deals with both the Federal social security system and the Federal contributory and management aspects of public assistance . �I. FACTS AND COMMENTS - SOCIAL SECURITY Administration Proposed 1. (H.R. 5710) House of Representatives (H.R.12680) Passed Benefit Increases General Benefit Increase of 15% Minimum benefit of $70 General benefit increase of 12-1/2% Minimum benefit of $50 Benefit increase for persons 72 and over, from $35 to $50 for singles; from $52.50 to $75 for couples. Benefit increase for persons 72 and over, from $35 to $40, for singles; from $52.50 to $60 for couples. Special minimum benefit for long-term employment--$100 minimum for 25 years work. No provision Benefits for disabled widows-82-1/2% of workers benefit for those disabled within 7 years of husband's death. Benefits for severely disabled widows age 50 and over paying from 500/4 to 71% depending on age at onset of disability. Comment: Both sets of benefit increases actuarially sound under the tax increase schedUle in the respective bills. However , the urban and suburban beneficiary po~ulation has experienced the phenomena of combined inflation, population explosion, and resultant property tax increases. One but need look at the mortgage foreclosures in reti rement areas such as Dade County, Florida, to realize the impact of this combination on persons with fixe d incomes. It has outstripped the planning a nd saving of much of the beneficiary population. Near adequate benefit increases help not only their recipients but the communities in which they live and the businesses and individuals t hose communities tax. Actuarially sound increases: (a) reduce welfare payment at the local level, (b) reduce existing welfare c aseloads, (c) prevent new processing of welfare clients , and (d) h elp maintain the aged, the disabled, and the widowed in viable economic units that are tax- paying and not tax- taking . (2) �2. SOCIAL SECURITY TAX INCREASE (INCLUDING MEDICARE} Year Present Law 1967 4.4 1968 4.4 1969- 70 1971-72 4.9 4.9 1973-75 5.4 By 1987 5.65 Comment: 3. . Administration (H.R. 5710) 4.4 (wage base $6600) 4.4 (wage base $7800) 5.0 5.0 (wage base $9,000) 5.5 (wage base $10,800) 5.8 House of R.epresentatives (H.R. 12080) 4.4 (wage base $6600) 4.4 (wage base $7600) 4.8 5.2 5.65 5.9 The Administration proposal compared with the House bill: (a) provides a more progressive tax, (b) provides a lower ultimate tax rate f or both employer and employee, (c) spreads the tax for both employer and employee in the majority of cases by taxing wages above those usually paid in industry, MEDICARE (a) Depreciation allowance - hospitals Administration (H.R. 5710 ) Require full loading in d e p r eciati on of capital and physic al plant when ing s ystem is i n a ccor d mended State p lan . costs of equipment cost accountwith r e c om- House of Representatives (H.R. 12080) No provision Comment : La ck of a prov i s ion mea ns taxpayer s (for municipal.hospitals and payers of ins urance p remi ums (for a ll hos pitals) carry the depreciation loads for medicare recipients. The Administration proposal provides both a real istic overhead loading mechanism and an i n centive to apply modern accounting and cost effectiveness techniques in an area which has long burdened c ities, employers, and o t hers who must pay for hospital services . (3) �(b) Tax Rate Administration (H.R. 5710) House of Representatives (H.R. 12080) No provision Increase tax rate by 0.1% on employer and employee above present schedule beginning 1969. Comment: The cost of the various liberalizations of medicare suggested in the House bill can not be determined until the medicare program has had time to work. Tax adjustment can be made as actual experience determi nes. II. FACTS AND COMMENTS - PUBLIC ASSISTANCE (WELFARE) Administration (H.R. 5710) House of Representatives (H. R. 12080) (a) Assistance payments No provision Re qui res states to meet full need a s the y determi ne it with some additional financial aid. Cash assistance standards must be at least 2/3 of income level s fo r medical ass i sta nce. (b) Wo r k incentives Requires states to allow $50 Requires states to allow $30 monthly income without r educ ~ mo nthly i n c ome without r educti o n i n a ss i stance . Fo r each t i on in a ssis tance f o r AFDC adul ts. additional $ 3 earned, assistance would be r educed $ 2 . (c) Community work and training Requ ires States to u se wo rk and training programs provided by Dept. of Labor for all appropriat e AFDC recipients. Requires stat es to establish community work and training programs (75% Federal matching) for v irtually al l appropriate AFDC adults and children over 16 not attending school to be administered by welfare agencies. (d) Unemployed parent program Makes permanent present provisions. (4) Covers children of unemployed fathers only. Unemployment definition requires substantial prior connection with the labor force, excludes recipients of unemployment compensation. �In addition to the above, the House bill included provisions not proposed by the Administration. These include requiring states to: (a) develop employment programs for AFDC families where appropriate; (b) provide day care for AFDC mothers working or training; (c) provide family planning services; (d) attempt to determine paternity and obtain support from the father; (e) inform courts of unsuitable homes, one criterion of which is a parent who refused employment or training; and (f) freeze the rate of child dependency due to absence of parent as of January 1967 for purposes of Federal matching. Comment : The major purpose of the House bill is to increase employment and training of welfare recipients and thereby reduce p r ogram costs . The House approach would: 1 . Combine responsibility for payment , social services, training , and j ob placement within one agency. A single agency and , more practically , a single caseworker, would have the right to wi thhold payment if a family does not take what that caseworker deems " appropri ate 11 action with regard to training , employment , famil y plan ni ng , and liv i ng arrangement. 2. Dup licate g ove r nment functions through the placement of respo ns ibi l i t y fo r train ing i n an a g ency unprepar ed to handle it. The We lfa r e Admin i s trat i on has r u n limi ted t r a i n ing prog rams for we l f ar e c li e n ts in t he past , but a l ways with a n e nro l lme nt o f less than 50 , 000 . Unde r the Hous e passed b i l l it wi l l b e ma ndatory by 196 9 for that o r gan i z ation a nd i ts sta t e counterparts to be prepare d t o handl e 500 , 000 t rainees annually. A more prac tical approach would be to add a n ew are a of emphasis to ongoing programs of the Manpower Administration of the Labor Department than to build a who l e n ew bure aucracy. - 5- �\ 3. Economic impact of Corrununity training programs. The House Ways and Means Corrunittee estimates a saving by 1972 of $130 million "for persons trained who become self-sufficient". This is 7% of the 1972 program cost, indicating a reduction in the rolls of · approximately that number of recipients. However, that same Corrunittee estimates that the 1972 cost of day-care for children whose mothers are in the work and training program will.be $470 million and that the program itself will cost another $270 million. This $695 million is more than five times the savings in welfare payments. 4. Increase in state and local costs by imposing an AFDC ceiling. Freezing proportionately the number of AFDC children eligible for Federal matching monies does not take into account either the possibility of changing economic conditions or heavy in-migration into certain states. Either occurance would result in the states being forced to bear the entire burden of increased AFDC costs. The alternatives to increased burden on the taxpayer are to make eligibility requirements more stringent or to lower benefits even further. The prime victim in either situation is the child of the AFDC family and, ultimately, the society he enters. III FACTS AND COMMENTS - MEDICAID . Administration (H.R. 5710) 1. Limitation on Federal Matching Funds No Federal matching for families whose income exceeds 150% of the highest state cash standard 2. House of Repres entatives (H.R . 12080) No Federal matching for families whose income is more than 133% of the highest cash assistance payment ordinarily made to family or AFDC Required Services No provision - maintains schedule of required services - 6- Removes graduated services requirement and allows states to provide any 7 of the 14 medical services listed in the Act. �Comment: The House amendments J aise eligibility requirements and lower service standards. By setting eligibility at cash payment levels instead of required services levels, the bill denies coverage to those marginal poor who are functioning as independent economic units except for medical care support. This increases the probability of their going on welfare roles at the time of their first medical crisis. By removing current service requirements, the bill allows elimination of such items as physician services and in-patient hospital care. This means that cities and states th3.t already offer these services are penalized for their progress by forcing them to carry the full cost of such services. Although the Federal government would save by these amendments, the cities would still have to provide adequate medical services. The reduction in Federal funds and required supplement through city funds in New York City alone would be $70 million in fiscal 1 69. Communities penalized in other progressive states would include those in California, Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Nebraska, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Wisconsin. - 7- �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 8, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 8, Document 63

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_008_063.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 8, Document 63
  • Text: MINUTES OF A MEETING OF THE WORKING COMMITTEE Washington, D. C. September 21, 1967 John Feild opened the meeting and defined the. working committee as a reviewingand coordinating body with the primary objective of insuring a steady flow of information to the national steering committee so that the steering committee will be able to make appropriate decisions at its meetings. NOTE: Steering committee will meet Monday, October 9 at 7 : 30 PM in New York at the Time-Life Building. ADMINISTRATION Office space has been secured in the Federal Bar Building West, 1819 H Street NW . (tel eph one 293-1530). John Feild and Ron Linton will conti nue as coordina tors f or t h e Coalition. Full-time staf f will consist of Olga Corey , information coor d i n a tor and a ssociat e coordina tors Mel Cotton and Chris Mould. Jim Gib son of the Po tomac I n s t i t u t e and Vernon Jo r dan o f the Southern Reg ional Coun c il will be availabl e on a part- t i me basis on loan f rom their r e s p ectiv e a gen c i es. NOTE : An administrative report will be sent to y ou before the October 9 steering commi t tee meeting . You wi l l al s o r eceiv e a ros ter wi t h name s, addr es s es and phone numb ers of a l l st eering committee member s and t h ei r repres en tativ es. · A budget fo r operat ing t h e Coalition will b e presented t o the steering commit t ee on Oct ober 9. PUBLICATIONS A ros ter of all t hose who a t tend ed t h e Conv ocat i on will be s ent out b efore the October 9 meeting: everyone who at t end ed will receiv e one. Compl ete proceedings are also being prepared and wil l also be sent t o everyone registered at the Convocation. NOTE: Because of pr i n t ing co sts, bulk cop i e s of the p r oceedings can only be supplied at cost. Please notify Olga Corey i n advance of your organization's needs. TASK FORCES Two new task f orces are being f o rmed--Loca l Coali t i ons and Communicat i ons . Co-Chairmen for Local Coaliti ons are (1 ) Mayor Joseph Barr of Pittsbu rgh , (2) a businessman to be selected as soon as possible, and (3) Arnold Aaronson, of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights. Co-Chairmen for Communications are (1) Joseph Allen, President of McGraw-Hill Publications, (2) John Johnson, President of Johnson Publications (Ebony, Jet), and (3) Harold Fleming, President of the Potomac Institute. Also, Roy Ash of Litton Industries has agreed to serve as Co-Chairman of the Task Force on Educational Disparities with Dr . Arthur Flemming and Roy Wilkins. �-2- PRIVATE EMPLOYMENT Representatives of the Co-Chairmen of the task force met with the coordinating staff. They are considering pilot meetings (probably New York, Detroit, Atlanta) at which 10-20 representatives of the local corporate structure will generate ideas and lay the groundwork for local action. The first meeting would be held early in October. Under consideration for follow-up to the local meetings is a national meeting to launch plans for assisting local private employment programs. The task force also plans to prepare a handbook for the initiation and developmen t of local task forces on private employment. LOCAL COALITIONS Cities in which local coalitions are already in the process of formation--or a re likely to be--are being identified. These cities will be contacted to send representatives to a national meeting in Chicago on October 18. At this meeting there will be presentations on the techniques of establishing and operating local coalition task forces on private employment, legislation (public service employment) and communications. Meanwhile, staff li aison from the Coalition will be available to any city coalition working in these three areas. Hopefully 50 or more local coalitions will be in op era tion by early November . NOTE: All members of working committee were asked to immediately contact their principals and urge them to contact key people in local ccmmunities who could be helpful in establishing local coalitions as emphasized in the Coalition's Statement of Principles, Goals and Commitments. PUBLIC SERVICE EMPLOYMENT The t ask force urged members of the working committee to relay to their principals th e need f or telegrams , calls and letters in support of the Cl ark- Javits bi ll . I t was explained that the Coalition's endorsement of this l egislation was t aken as a result of polling members of the steering committee as agreed at the previous meet ing . In ord er to keep procedures cl ear, the t a sk force will meet before the Octob er 9 steering committee meet i ng to draw up recommendations to the Committee for Coalition policy on pending legislation . COMMUNICATIONS The three Co-Chairmen of this task force h ave d efined their objectives as three-fold : (1 ) communicat ing to the public the meaning, goals and activities of the Urban Coalition, ( 2 ) working with other task forces in producing materials which wil l offer technical assistance and guidance in implementing coalition programs and (3) mounting a nationwide educational effort on the urgency of the urban crisis. The national Advertising Council has registered a strong interest in assisting the Urban Coalition and has scheduled a special meeting with a coalition representative to discuss how their interests, talents and energies may best be used. �-3- RECONSTRUCTION INVESTMENT AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Tas k force Co-Chairmen are meeting in New York on October 5. This tas-k force will be ·working closely with the Insurance Committee on Urban Problems which will also be working closely with local coalitions. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY Task force co-chairmen have not met yet. has expressed a desire to work with us. A task force operating in Illinois OCTOBER 9 STEERING COMMITTEE MEETING Four items have been proposed for the agenda of the October 9 meeting, which will be attended by principals and their representatives. These are: (1) recommendations on organization, (2) presentation of task force programs, (3) procedures for developing public policy positions and, (4) an administrative report. Since there will be discussion of the desirability of enlarging the present 33-member steering committee, especially to provide for some type o f participation by local coalitions, a committee was appointed to consider this question and report on October 9. This committee consists of Richard Hirsch, Chairman, Andrew Biemiller, Alfred Eisenpreis, Harold Fleming, Bayard Rustin, Wayne Smithy and Peter Tufo. It was a lso decid ed that the proposal for an Urban Economic Council would be presented to the steering committee .at the October 9 meeting. �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 8, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 8, Document 65

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_008_065.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 8, Document 65
  • Text: CITY OF ATLANTA CITY HALL August-17, 1967 ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYO_R R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant MRS. ANN M. MOSES , Executive Secretary DAN E. SWEAT, JR ., Director of Governmental Li aiso n / ./ MEMORANDUM To: Ann Moses From: Dan Sweat John Feild, U. S. Conference of Mayors, called today concerning the Urban Coalition meeting the Mayor w ill attend on Thursday, August 24. They have divided the delegates into ten 11 mobilization sessions 11 and they want a Mayor and a businessman to chair each of the ten sessions. They are very anxious that Mayor Allen chair one of the sessions along with Roy Ash, President of Litton Industries. The Mayor I s topic would concern 11 Developing Local Support and Local Coalition for the Urban Coalition 11 and the second part that Mr. Ash would take would be 11 Ways of Expanding Private Initiative in Dealing with Central City Problems 11 • These sessions will be held at 2:00 p. m. and John says that if the Mayor has to leave early and catch a plane then Mr. Ash would chair the remainder of the session. If the Mayor is in agreement, they would like his representative to be in Washington at 10: 00 a. m. Monday to develop the program content . If you talk with the Mayor in the morning , would you please discuss this w ith him so that we can let the Conference of Mayors know as early as possible Friday whether or not he will be willing to do i t. 11 DS:fy xi- J ~ · J' £,, 0 LJ._ ~ , A,d �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 8, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 8, Complete Folder

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_008.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 8, Complete Folder
  • Text: ~ ~-- - - - - - - - - - - - -- MEMORANDUM TO: 41--£--- FROM: i:::1::::::0; SUBJECT: Educational Televil: Program - "Read Your Way Up" As part of our effort to inform local urban coalitions of current developments in the various program areas, we are pleased to pass on the following information. Beginning July 8, a basic course in reading skills, to be known as "Read Your Way Up", will be televised in 30 lessons of one-half hour each produced by the Manpower Education Institute and the National Broadcasting Company. There will be five weekday programs each week for six weeks. NBC is making the program available to local affiliated stations which choose to participate. Study kits for practice reading will be available at cost through TV statio~s carrying the · program or from the Manpower Education Institute, 405 Lexington Avenue, New York City. We believe "Read Your .Way Up" is an impress ive attempt to reach a large target group with a useful program. You may wish to urge your local NBC station to carry this program and to assist in local publicity efforts for this series. In addition, you may wish to consider supporting free distribution o f the reading kits to induce wider participation. If you have any questions about this program please feel fre~ to contact the Manpower Education Institute, 405 Lexington Avenue, New ·York , New York, (Area Code 212 - 867-9405) or James Kelly, Program De v e lopme nt Unit of The Urban Coalition, 1815 H Stree t, N.W., Washington, D.C., 20006, (Ar ea Code 2 0 2 638-6674). Attachment: Press Release JD:lyt ,, �NEW YORK; N "Y" Ma y 2 8---Beginni ng July 8 ,- a. b a.s ic cour se in reading skills wi ll b e t ele•ised from c oast to c o a st in 30 lessons of one-half hour each " This th e latest o f a se ri e s o f pro j ect s initiated by the Manpower Education: Institute to enable wo r ke r s including the O unskill ed employed and the unemployed . to advan c e themselves. in the ranks of American La bor " While designed t o benef it vi ewers of all a ges 0 from school dropouts to college g r adua tes, the co~rse is be ing timed for maximum availability to the 1,000 , 000 young men and women who wi ll be participating in summer youth p r ograms including job t raining in business , industry and gov ernment offi ces " The National Broadcasting Company, cooperating as a public service , h as scheduled the program to run Mondays thr ough Fridays from 9:30 to 10 Ar. M, f o r si x weeks on Channel 4 in the metr opol i tan area a nd from outlets in other cities . It will make the program a vaila ble to other affiliated stations wherev er loca l c ommunity participati on is indica ted " This city 1 s f o rmer Commissi oner o f Labo r 0 James J . McFadden, national dire cto r o f the non - p r cfit Manpower Educa tion Institute , announce d that th e reading skill p r og ramp along with the summer youth job p r oj ec t , h ad the f ull suppo r t o f th e un ited l abo r movement, business o r gani zations a nd the city administration . Harry Van Aridale, Jr . , pres ident o f the Central Trades and Labo r Counci l , AFL-CIO is chairman of the Manpower Education Institute . The television s eries, to be k now as "Read Your Way Up", will include b asic reading skills, speed an d compr ehension in reading, word mastery; readin g for pleasure, and effe c tive use of libraries .. �READING SI p rovi d e viewing f ac i l i ties on the job to Fe :~mi t hou .... progr::1 ms . their t rainees · t > watch the half- I n Ne w Yo . . . k, where the Comme~~ ·e and Industry Associat i o n has calle d t he p r o gr a."111 t c the at tent 1 on o f 3 u900 companies r such bu siness leaders a s Equi. table L.::..re c New Yor k Telephone and Ch a s e Manhattan Bank a r e among t h e m.~ny- t h a~. wi l l no t only enable t h eir summer trainees to. view the c o lo ::· pr•_ 3ra!C1.s b ut wi ll p r o vide supplementary i.ns t r ucti o n b y s ta ff members o r other educator s. The Ci ty a dmin ist~ation h ere, wh ich is p u~tin g 1 5 , 000 youths in sum.1'1le r munici pal jobs P i s p r o v iding te l e vi s .:..·::m ,riewings · f o r all of t h.e m e xcep t those in s catte:red fie 1-:3. c.ssi ~n::r.en c.c, , as i n pa r ks. The Ci ty 1 s Ur b an Co r ps . c:msisti.ng o f 3 f 000 cc l .:'..e. g e students, will gi v e an additiona l hou r o f supp_ementa~y assistance fallowing each t .. �READIN G SKILLS " " , ·, 3 hal £ -hour TV p r og r am t'J t he tre.i ne e s i n c ity o..qeE ci eE " Mayor John V. Lindsay i s tak i ng meas ure s t c b r!ng tte benefits o f the i mp r o ved rea.ding skill s t o tho·c..sands who a:.:-€ o u ·,:.si.d e the summer job t raining p r ogr am " He has d::. rectcd the Ci ty O s H "...1:.11:,.n Re Eour ces Administra- tion to i n form all wel f are clients of the t.ele--7 i s .i.·::m. serie·s and t o notify t hem that they can obtain , free of cost , ~ r eadi ng k i t with cour se o u tlines , lesson. r eviews and supplementa.:::y r eading i nformation o The kits will be giv en out at all welfare cent ers. The p r ogram will b e made a vai l able also to patien ts in munici p a l hosp i tals, and inmates of houses of d e ten tion and o the r institutions . Ma.ny of the companies in the summer job p : : ·. Qg:!am a.re pro rid i ng the re a ding kits free to their trainee s " Indivi d ual home ·n·iewe r s may obtain the ki ts by sending $2 . 50 to Box 31 0, Grand Centra Po st Office 1 New Yo r k 10017, f o r the entire 30 lesson s . The curri culum h as been prepar ed f o r the ·Manpower Education Insti tute b y some o f the nation's leadi ng educators a nd spe ci a l ists in readi ng skills . of edu cation o f The consultan t s , headed by Dr. c -yde Weinho l d , Director t he New Jersey Department o f E:l. >J.~3. ~-i on and Robert H. Co ates , Di rector o f School District of Phila d e l phia r a = e Dr. Nila B . Smithi Di s~inguished Service Professor , Glassboro ; ta t e College; Eleanor T . Smi th , Library Services Program Officer o f the U. S. De p artme n t o f Health , Education and Welfare; Be:-ni~e A. M.o.c.Donald c Coor dinator of Adult Services, New York Public Library; ChLis Mc Hone y, Director of Education fo r the Department of the Ar my ; Gladys Alessi o f the mu.nicipal Welfare Education Department, a nd Professor Ann McKillop " �READING SKILLS , o 4 Th e p r og r am will .be given by Dr , Melv : .n H~',;,,a.z:ds f Ch a i r ma n o f the Re ading Departme_n t p and Dire ::; t or of the . Re'3_d :;_ng Improv ement Center, No r theaste r n Un i versity, and fo r mer professor at New Yo r k Univ e r sity ' s readi ng cen te r n �.,; The Urban Coalition I 1815 H Street, N.W. Wash ington , D.C. 20006 Telephone : 347-9630 CHAIRMAN : John W. Gardner CO-CHAIRMEN : Andrew Heiskell/ A . Philip Randolph • June 19, 1968 Mr. Dan Sweat, representing Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mr. Sweat: Last month I joined the national Urban Coalition staff and, I am now your principal contact with the national Coalition. I have assumed primary responsibility, along with my colleagues, for advising and rendering technical assistance to Local Coalitions in the Southeastern States. My colleagues and I have or will be visiting you in the very near future to become acquainted with your efforts and to discuss ways in which the national Coalition may be of assistance to you. Enclosed for your information is a list of the cities in our region reporting the organization of a local Coalition along with the names of the persons to be contacted in that Coalition. I look forward Director J D:cds Enclos ure to being of service to you . �The Urban Coalition 1815 H Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20006 Telephone : 347-9630 • CHAIRMAN : John W. Gardner CO.CHAIRMEN: Andrew Heiskell/ A. Philip Randolph June 13, 1968 Dan Sweat City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Dear Dan, Enclosed is an outline of some of the points I would like to discuss with you and any other community leader involved with the local coalition that you would believe it useful for me to talk to during my Jun~ 17 visit. I know that the Atlanta effort has not progressed to the point where many of the questions are relevant, but we can focus on those that are. Looking forward to seeing you around 10:00 a.m. ohn Dean Associate Di rector The Urban Coalition JD/ae Encl. �NOTE: This is an interim report on follow-up to the June 10 Policy Council meeting. MEMORANDUM ' THE URBAN COALITION ACTION COUNCIL June 14, 1968 TO: FROM: Members of-the Policy - Council John W. Gardner SUBJECT: Meeting with House _of Representatives Leadership, June 11, 1968 Andrew Heiskell, Arthur Fle mming, Clare nce Mitchell and I visited leading House members on June 11. We had conversations with Speaker McCormack, Majority Leader Carl Albert, Whip Hale Boggs, Appropriations Chairman George Mahon, Minority Leade r Ge r a ld Ford, and Ways and Means Chairman Wilbur Mills. Although we talked about all of the various objectives of the Coalition, we gave special emphasis to the desirability of sparing the crucial urban programs in the $6 billion budget cut. We also stre ss e d the severe and v e ry imme diate nee d for the 75 million dollars for the OEO summe r job programs and the 25 million dolla rs fo r He a d s t art. We receive d the following reactions from the various me mbers of Congress: The Speak e r, Mr. Albe rt, Mr. Boggs . They did not wi s h t"o ma k e any cuts in the u r b a n p r o grams a n d hoped the Ur b a n Coalition would help the m p reve n t such cuts. They offere d hope that, if the Re publican l eadership would go along, the 75 million doll a rs for jobs could b e r es tore d in the r e gular supp l eme n t a l budge t. The Se n a t e would h ave t o a d d it. Th e y f e l t t h i s c ould b e done e v e n though the Pres ide nt h as not reques t e d it . The y told u s tha t Congr ess will c u t approx imately thr e e billion d o lla rs , l e aving the r es t t o t h e Pres ide nt, a nd fe lt tha t the Pres ide nt would h ave wide discreti on to p r ovide f u nding f o r u rban pro grams. · �- 2 - George Mahon. His attitude wa~ quite negative. He said that the Kerner report had cqntributed substantially to the unrest, and furthermore, the country could not buy its way out of -riots. He felt that whatever was done on the Hill would make no difference. When we stressed the need for 75 million dollars for the OEO summer job program·, he responded tb.at he had been told by the Bureau of the Budget that there would be 40% p e rcent more jobs this year than last and that although this was not the best situation, it was "pretty good". He did not explain how the Budget Bureau arrived at its estimate. Gerald Ford. Mr. Ford said Congress would cut around three billion dollars and the r e st would be lef t to the President. He was somewhat optimistic about the 75 million dollars for OEO summer jobs and stated that possibly this could be accomplished. He stressed that it could be accomplished far more easily, howe ve r, if the President were to ask for it. He indica t e d that if it were to come back from the Se nate it was poss ible tha t it could b e sustaine d in confere nce . Wilbur D. Mills. We had a long session with Mr. Mills who state d une quivocally tha t the $6 billion could be cut without touching any o f the crucia l progra ms f or the cities and the poor. He told us th a t Congre s s would cut a r ound thre e billion dollar s and sta ted further that cuts would be made in resea rch and deve lopment and foreign aid. He indicate d that h e favor e d the OEO p r o gram, and at the same time said tha t it wa s in s ome troub l e. The r e ques t i s '2 .18 billion dollars a n d h e stated t h a t Congress probably would a p p ropria te two billion. He said further tha t all n ew 11 s tarts 11 in public wo rks would b e stopped. The hi ghway p r o gram would con t inu e ; howe v er , n o n ew dams a n d o ther s u ch public works projects woul d b e b uilt. He said that t h e Bureau o f the Budge t and the Preside nt agree with this. I n add i t ion, h e said tha t h e be l ieved the Pres i dent was fully aware of the need to provide full funding for programs that affect urban areas. �NEW YORK SEVEN-UP JOYCE, INC . DIVISION OF SIDNEY P. MUDD JOYCE ROAD NEW ROCHELLE , N.Y. PRESI DENT 10802 May The Hon. Ivan Allen, Jr. Ma y or of Atlanta Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mayor Allen: Having noted in the April 27 issue of Busine ss Week the "Who ' s who in coalition leadership," I thought y ou mi ght be interested in these first steps being taken here in New Rochelle, a suburb of New York City, toward what y ou hop e to achi e v e nationally. Ev e r y best wish f or th e f ull success of what y ou are so generously doing for all of us. Si n c e r e l y , /21~ BOTTLERS OF 7-UP, LIKE, ROYAL CROWN COLA and DIET-RI TE COLA �c/o City Manager City Hall New Rochelle, New York The University of Community Involvement offers a solid and yet dramatic way in which to me e t the challenge of the most pressing American domestic problem: Human Attitudes. The Uni versity is dedicated not to any one gr·o up alone but to black and white and poor and rich. It is a partnership between private and governmental enterprises. It focuses on youth, but through organization and mechanics it involves the entire community in progra ms which lead to open hearts and better understanding. The b a sic ing redient stems from a 19 67 summer operation of 2 separate programs a. b. Student interns in government (20-mostly middle class white) Police Partners (50-all Negro, but from varying economic strata) Thi s yea r the basic unit will be a single group of 70 youth (17 to 25) drawn from all r a c es a nd economic castes, put to work in all departments of municipal government. As a condition of employment youth will participate in extra curricular activities in a d di tion to r e ceiving departmental trai ning in goverment. Classrooms are City H all a n d the st reets a nd neighborhoods; faculty includes elected officials, Chamber of C omm e rc e , P. T. A., League of Women Vote rs, and neighborhood feudal chieftains. The me cha nics and effects of the involvement process: Y ou t h to Youth: By manda ting w eekly lunche on semina r s a nd a tte ndance at Boa rd of Educ a tion meetings, City Council sessions, Planning Bo:;i.rd, Chamb e r of Comme rce, County Board of Supervi s ors , e tc., e tc. a nd by a ssi gning the responsibility to organiz e s ome participation by the younger y outh of the poverty prog rams, this group of whit e a nd bla ck and rich and poor mix in a work-study team and b e gin to evaluate e a ch other a s huma n b eing s. Adult t o Adult : B y arranging the above programs a nd b y a rranging fo r the y outh to b e gu est s in the various ethnic neighbo r hoods at combined picnic-seminar affai rs h oste d by th e local pow er b arons the adults have visible evidence that yout h (a nd the r e fore youth' s par ents) a r e inte r ested not only in the proble m s of his own race o r c as t e but a l so in the b road probl e ms of the total community . W e s h a ll c a pitaliz e on this in itia l r eaction by drawi ng the pa r ents tog ethe r into c riti que and coff ee hou rs in City Hall. Poli ce to Commu nity: By assi g ning up t o 50 youth (mostly Negro youth) t o operate as P olic e Partners a vi t al 2-way exc han ge b egin s; the ben eficial effec t on yout h m i ght well b e outweighed by the beneficial effect upon p oli ce . The T otal Community: It i s engaged in a giving of self and substance to provide initi a l funding a nd to demonstrate to government its willingness and its readiness for c o mmit ment t o a c t i on. ·, �May 8 , 1968 Mi-. G orge V. Ne gu Ex cutive Directo1' South Bend Human .Relations and Fai:r Employm~nt Practices Commi sion City Hall Bu.tiding 214 North M in Stre t South Bend, Indian 46601 Dear Mr. 6 gu: M yor Ivan Allen ha sked that I r spond to your letter r que · ttng inform · tlon on Atlanta s Utb · n Co ition. I a.m s ndlng you lnfol'm · tion which should an w r your fir t two que tion . To b p rf ctly tru.thful. w h v not fo:rma.lh: d the Coalition b :yond thes initi t teps . Thi i b sic 1 · becaus th · City ol Atl nta h s op rat d for yeat.'s with informal, unatructur d coalition of gov rnment, bu in s nd <;ivll right roup • Ther ar mov und w y now to xt nd th Coalition beyond the ortlgi.nal organis tlon, but nothing ls d flnit t thi point. Sine r ly your , o ns DS:fy &'• �SOUTH LLOYD M . ALLE N MAY OR FAIR BEND HUMAN EMPLOYMENT RELATIONS PRACTICES AND COMMISSION 214 NORTH MAIN STREET • SOUTH BEND, INDIANA 46601 GEORGE V. • TELEPHONE 288-9161 EXT. 295 or 296 COMMISSIONERS LEO A. NEWMAN Chairman RICHARD D. BONEWITZ MRS. MILTON BUTTS WILLIAM A. HOSINSKI ARTHUR SHIREMAN JAMES W. SILVER BERNARD W. STREETS JOHN H. TIDWELL LOUIS A. TIEDGE May 2, 1968 Staff Secretary VERA BRECHTEL Dear Mayor : Your city is listed on The Urban Coalition Action Report as one which has established a local co a litiono Our Mayor - Hon . Lloyd M. Allen - has formed a Technical Advisory Committee to explore the application of the Urban Coalition concept to our city. As a member of this committee, I am seeking information from you regarding the following items : · (1) What procedure did your city adopt in planning your Coalition? Ple a se b e as specific a s possib le. (2) Wh at is the struc t ure of y our Ur ban Coa lition? (Re pre sentation , number o f p erson s involve d , e tc.} ( 3) How e ffective is it thus f ar? ( 4) Is t he re a nyt h i n g either i n t he planning o r as your Coalition is f ormed whi ch y o u would do differently on the basi s of y our experience? I am mindful of t he busy schedul e o f a l l of us in government but our city will be d e eply grate ful to you for shar ing y ou r e x p e rience with us. Thank y ou for your coope r ation. S ince rely you r s , CJ~~ (. h,n: ~ .GJorge V o Neagu, Executive Director GVN/vb ~ 7 NEAGU E XE C UTIV E DI RE CTOR CITY HALL BUILDING �EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT OFFICE OF ECONOMIC WASHINGTON, D.C. 20506 CJllll(Jl~TlJNIT May 6, 1968 Mr. Dan E. Sweat, Jr. Director of Government Liaison City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Dan: Thanks for the information last week concerning your plans for the Atlanta Urban Coalition. I am definitely interested in this and I would appreciate your informing me on your future plans or progress toward establishing a local office there. Needless to say, I was relieved when the National Urban Coalition Office here in Washington gave me Mr. Sweat's name in Atlanta to concact. I know the organization is in good hands. Let me know when you are coming to Washington and if your schedule permits, I'd like to me et with you to further discuss the matter. Or if I'm coming to Atlanta any time soon, I'll let you know and maybe we could meet there . With best wishes. s·ncerely, Tm~ �The Urban Coalition I Federal Bar Building West/ 1819 H Street, N. w. Washington, D. C. / 20006 Steering Committee Co -chairmen: Andrew Heiskell / A. Philip Randolph April 15, 1968 Mr. Dan E. Sweat, Jr. Director of Governmental Liaison Offic e of the May or City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Dear Dan: Thank you very much for forwarding the materials developed within the Atlanta city administration relative to potential implementation of the Riot Commission Report. The steps taken by Mayor Allen in this respect are a good e xample of what enlightened municipal administration might do around the country. It just add s further to that mountain of evidence that Atlanta h as an exceptiona l municipal government. I hope y ou hav e begun to recover from th e strains imposed by the ~ssassination of Dr . King. Many thanks for y our h e lp to this offic e in connection with Mr. Gardner's attendance at the fun e ral. Sincerely, Christopher M. Mould Staff Director National Coordinators : John Feild/ Ron M . Linton Telephone 293-1530 �March 28·, 1968 Mr. Robert L . Hal."ria 145 Lisa Lane Yellow Springe , Ohio 45387 Dear Mt. Ha1'l'iS : I am . ttaching a copY of a newspaper clipping on th formation of the Atlanta Urb n Coalition. Al o included is copy of the St t ment dopted by the Atlanta Urb -.n Coalition Ste dng Commltte at 1ts m ting on Octob a, 29, 1967. Sine r ly yo\U' * Dan Sw DS:fy Enclo ute t �145 Li sa Lane Ye ll ow Spri ngs, Ohio 45387 !- a r ch 4, 1968 Offi ce of t he. ayor Ci ty Hall At l anta , Georga De ar Sir : Pl ease send me any informati on t hat you may .ave on t he work or or ganizat i on of t he l ocal Ur ban Coalition i n you r community . I am a graduate student in busine ss a drri nistrat i on at t he Uni versit y of Dayton and am pre paring a term aper on t he Nati onal Urban Coa l iti on fo r a cou rse ent itled "Bu sine ss and Society . " I t is ~y ne raonal feelin g t hat it offers the g r eatest potent ial for success of any or ganization yet concei v ed . Thanking you in advance . Robe rt L. Har ris �l Mar ch 28 , 1968 Mrs . Joseph Pepe Exe cutive Assistant Mayor•s U,:ban Coalition Office of the Mayo:r City of Riverside Riverside , California Dear Mrs . Pepe : I am attaching information on formation of the Atlanta Ur-ban Co lition. In nswer to yo\11' sp eific que tlons: 1. There i no budg t for the function of the U\"ban Coalition. At the pr nt tim w hav no d finite plans £011 s tting up mor formal typ organh: tion although this might b done ome tim in th f utur • 2. Th City of Atlanta does h ve a Community Relation Commi ion which was tabli h d by th City Gov rnment. Th Ch bman of the Commi . ion, R v rend Samu l Willi m , r pr nt all dvil rlghta ot"g nt ations of the community m mb r of the Atlant Urb n Coalition. 1 hope thi information might b of some v lu to you. Sincerely your , Dan Sw DS:ly t �OFFICE OF TELEPHONE BEN H. LEWIS C ITY MAYOR H A LL 787-7551 6 March 1968 The Urban Coalition c/o Mayor's Office Atlanta, Georgia Dear Sir: The February issue of the Urban Coalition Action Report listed your city as one that had established a local Coalition. We in Riverside are seeking ideas to establish guidelines for our own newly formed Coalition. I would appreciate it very much if you would send us the following · information: 1. Have you prepared a budget? If so, what are the items you have included and what is your source of money? 2. Do you have a Human or Community Relations Council as a part o f city government? I f so, what role are its members playing in the newly formed coalition? An immediate reply is vital to me as meetings of the finan ce committ ee and executive committee are in the immediate offing. Please find enc losed a self-addressed , stamped envelope for your convenience. Thank you for your prompt attention in this matter . Sincerely, ~~ (Mrs o) Joseph Pepe Executive Assistant Mayor's Urban Coalition RP:bth �Outline for study o f local coa lition s E. C. Kepl e r Revi sed Jun e 7, 1968 Re vised June 13, 1 9 6 8 ORGAN IZATION AND STATUS i. History a. 2. How , whe n and b y whom was t h e lo c~l c o a l i tion formed '? Me mbe r s hi p a. By wh rn ~ a r e v a r i o us c ci~nuni t y e l eme n t s r ep r es e nte d ? Secu re a l i s t o f c o a l it i on mombc rs , and th e a f f il i a t i on and addres s o f c u c h rn2 mb e r . b. 3. Purpo se s a. 4, 5. Ev a l u a ti on of Coalition Memb ers h ip : Ar e t h e c o a l i t i on mc1nb ers th e r,10s t inf h w n t i a l r e p res e n t a tives o f the v a r iou - e .l. crnc ~1ts? Wh at i s th e l e v2 l o f p a rt i cip t1. ti o n by l o c o l gov e rnme nt , bu s iness , l abo r , r e l i g i o n , civ.i. l r i ghts , g h e t t o y o u th t1. nd n c i g hborh o o ::1 g ro u ps , ethn ic or g a ni zat i o n s , sc h oo l o ffici a l s , corn,nu ni t y s erv ic e organ i zat ions a n d c o n Juni cat ions med ia ? What ,:ir e t h e g oals ,rnd o bj ccb.vc's of the l oca l c o a l i t i on ? Arc Uws ' stated in 1tn-itin9? Secure a copy of th e stalcm8nt of pu~poso . St a ff a. \'lh at i s th e si ze , c o mposition , a.nd organi zation o th e p rc:;c nl. staff'? b. Wha t c. Who is the s t aff cont,1cl. person for the n at i onu.J c oa liti o n? n ar.1c , ac1drc~ss , tel cph onc nu rr.bcr . p l a n s , i f any , exist for Managemen t expansion of t h e staff? a nd Fun ~inq a. v!hat munag c mcnt 01_- a<1:.:inistrciLive probJ.cm~· , if any , h ave arise n ? U1icli urc sti ll curr nt? Ilu·:1 WL!rc th e oth e r s resolvL:<1? b. How is the l ocu l coa liti on f,Fic.1-----1'? flo\·: rr,uc h ha ~, i t rais ccl? From \·;ha l. ~;ourcca~,? ru.: aclr ~rua.t.E.' l .-, this fundi.ng? 1·:hc1t c1.re: futur0 pi:t _, -,~L c: C' c. What rnanagcrr19nt , a.cl:r:i ni s trat iv,· o r funding problC".'1S , i f a.ny , would the Jo .cJ. l coal ilir.n J jJ.,,0 tlv~ nutionc1i coali tio n to a ss i st in resol.,, jw? �6. Organization a. Who make s the basic policy d e cisions? makes impl e me nting d e cision s? Who b. What is the c omp o s ition a n d a u t hority of the policy making body (e xe c u t i v e o r stee ring committe e )? c. Wha t are th e n at u re~ , compos i tj on , and re s pons i bilit i e s of its t a sk forc e ~ (comm ittee s )? PROGRA.M AC'EI VI'rY 1, 2. 3. 4. Pri or i ti es a Oh a t are "the program p 1~io1.-i tics of the loc a l c o a l it i on? b. How we re th e se d el c!T.T•.in8c1? Ope ra t ions_ a. What programs and projects do0s th e loca l coalition h ave p resently u nc1cnh y? Ho,·1 f etr along ? t')ho is d o in g wh a t ? b. Wh a t pro grams 2rnd pro j ects 11 .::: s tlJc loca l co:, li t ion c omple t ed'? c. llO\·J co uld the n atio1 n.l co,'lli1. i oll ass i s t in deviPing, p l ann in g and i rnp l e J11,~ n ting progruins . Re l at ions with other or c anjz a tion s a. What arc the relation s b c t\\ cc n t it(! co.:.lit.ion and busincs,; groups , e . g ., , .:l\l3 , Ch,l·1J;.._'r o f Comme rc e , etc . b. How h ave oth e r org a n i za t.i.on ~; t a k e n t1 c entry of the coalition onto th e l oca J s c c~c . 1 Acco~pJishme n t s a. What hav~ th e vc.1r i OLl S l o c a l cci:, l i 1... i o n r,ro srarns and proj c.: ct s ac cor:ii.> l ·.s h e:c1 to cLt Lr ··: 1 b. What }?rogra ms, pn..--, j rl·L s o r ol her J o.:·c:1 l coa.J i t_ j o n activities ,ire o .c: s uch a i t ou t. stc:uc1i:10 n atu re th a t they a :r:e v.10rthy of c mu J.:1 l. i on i n o t her con ::n.m ii.: j es ? -2- �-'. CITIES REPORTING ORGANIZATION OF LOCAL COALITIONS May 31, 1968 ALABAMA CITY CHAIRMAN EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR CONTACT Huntsville, Ala. Dr. F~ederik S. Schultz Pres., Assn of Huntsville Area Companies Consultant Scientist General Electric Company 4040 Memorial Parkway Huntsville, Alabama 35802 20 5/8 8)-3221 Lemmon C. McMillan Executive Director Assn of Huntsville Area Companies Suite 692 State Natl Bank Bldg Huntsville, Ala 35805 205/534-0233 Ex ec. Dir. \ .. �Page Eleven MARYLAND CITY .. CHAIRMAN EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR CONTACT . Baltimore, Md. Theodore R. McKeldin 10 Light Street Suite 1035 Baltimore, Md. 301/752-6682 Walter Lively 222 St. Paul Place Baltimore, Maryland 21202 301/752-8470 Executive Director ., \ .. �Page Twenty TENNESSEE CITY Chattanooga, Tenn. CHAIRMAN EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR CONTACT Robert A. Elmore Executive Director Chattanooga Full Employ ment Committee 825 Mccallie Avenue Chattanoog a, Tenn. 61 5/267-3792 �Page Twer. -J-One VIRGINIA CITY CHAIRMAN EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR CONTACT T. H. Willcox , J r. Attorn ey a t Law Vi.rgini a Na t ' l Bank Bl! No rfolk , Va. 703 / 627 - 0611 Norfolk, Va. \ �Page Se v e r rev . 6/12/68) WASHINGTON, D. C. CHAIRMAN CITY Washington, D. c. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR CONTACT Mr . Donald F. Sullivan Executive Director The National Conference of Christians & J e ws 735 Southe rn Building Washi n gton, D. C. 2000 5 202/628-91 41 Mr. Walter McArdle President McArdle Printing Company 2319 M Street, N. W. Washington, D. C. 202/FE 3-4900 .• �The Urban Coalition I Federal Bar Building West/ 1819 H Street, N. W Washington , D. C. / 20006 Steering Committee Co-chairmen : Andrew Heiskell/ A. Philip Randolph March 25, 1968 MEMORANDUM TO: Steering Committee and Working Committee Members FROM: The Urban Coalition Office SUBJECT: CORRECTION--Executive Committee Meeting Minutes Enclosed you will find the fourth page of the Ex ecutive Committee minutes which were sent to you as an attachment to the last National Coordinator's Weekly Report . our mailers inadvertently omitted th i s page . National Coordinators: John Feild/ Ron M. Linton Telephone 293 -1 530 �MINUTES March 11th Meeting Page 4 Committee members, the Committee endorsed the proposal. (The statement of the Urban Coalition Executive Committee with regard to an OEO supplemental appropriation was sent as an attachment to the last National Coordinator's Weekly Report}. The final legislative item considered was the need for ·further action this Spring to support the passage by Congress of appropriate legislation creating a public service employment program as called for in the Coalition's Statement of Principles, Goals, and Commitments. It was pointed out that a bill for this purpose had been recently introduced by Senator Joseph Clark (D-Pa.} and that similar bills were expected shortly from Rep. James O'Hara (D-Mich.} and Senator Jacob Javits (R-NY}. The Committee then unanimously agreed to a restatement to the public of the Coalition's position on public service employment as previously expressed in a September statement supporting the then-pending Clark-Javits bill. (This statement was also an attachment to the last Weekly Report). Discussion then ensued concerning the possibility of a comprehensive public statement to be released by Chairman Gardner speaking for the Executive Committee covering housing, employment and the · OEO supplemental appropriation . After considerable discussion, it was agreed that the Chairman should issue as soon as possible a comprehensive statement combining the three separate documents agreed upon by appending a single page summar (Summary was sent as attachment to last Weekly Report} . The ne x t item of business considered was the report of the President's Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders. Mayor John Lindsay shared wi th the Commi ttee his perspective on the report as CoChairman of the Advisory Commission. Afte r hearing from Mayor Lindsay and after a brief discussion, the Committee unanimously voted to go o n record as strongly endorsing the Commission report. (A statement endorsing the report was attached to the last Weekly Repo rt}. The final action taken by the Executive Committee was to set April 8th as the date of the next meetings of the Executive Committee and of the Steering Committee. Both meetings will be in Washington--the Executive Committee meeting at 2:00 p.m. (to further consider the organizational plans of Chairman Gardner) and the Steering Committee meeting at - 4 :00 p.m. (·to receive the recommendations of the Executive Committee}. Chairman Gardner adjourned the meeting at 6:55 p.m. �The Urban Coalition I Federal Bar Building West /1819HStreet, N . W. Washington, D . c. /20006 Steering Committee Co-chairmen : Andrew Heiskell / A. Philip Randolph February 26, 1968 MEMORANDUM TO: Public Relations Representatives of Steering Committee Members FROM: Joseph H. Allen, President, McGraw-Hill Publications and Co-Chairman, Task Force on Communications and Public Support of The Urban Coalition SUBJECT: Meeting of Public Relations Representatives, March 8, 1968, New York City As you know, the members of the Steering Committee of The Urban Coalition have provided fine leadership in the Coalition's efforts to stimulate national action on the problems of the cities. We feel that the public relations directors of the organizations represented on the Steering Committee--or people who sometimes act in a public relations capacity--can make a meaningful contribution to this great effort. We think you will also find it helpful to be fully informed about Coalition activities. You are invited to attend a meeting planned exclusively for the public relations people at the Time-Life Building, Rockefeller Center, New York City, on March 8th. The meeting will begin at 4 p.m. in the 8th floor auditorium. Following the session, TimeLife will host a social hour and buffet supper. John w. Gardner has advised me that he plans to attend the meeting. This will afford us the opportunity to discuss with him the present and future activities of the Coalition. We will appreciate hearing at an early date whether you can be with us. Please leave word with Mrs. Marcia Greene at the Coalition office {202 / 293 - 1530) . National Coordinators · John Feild / Ron M . Linton Telephon e 293-1530 �The Urban Coalition I Federal Bar Building West/ 1819 H Street, N. w. Washington, D. C. / 20006 Steering Committee Co-chairmen : Andrew Heiskell/ A. Philip Randolph NATIONAL LEGISLATIVE INFORMATION FOR URBAN COALITIONS The Urban Coalition will provide leadership of local coalitions with a weekly summary of information about the status of national legislation important to solving the problems of the cities and particularly legislation bearing on the primary objectives of the Coalition. Javits-Yarborough Bill Would Increase OEO Funds: Senators Jacob Javits (R-N.Y.) and Ralph Yarborough (D-Texas) introduced a bill last week to tack $150 million for OEO onto a FY 1968 supplemental appropriations bill already passed by the House. Javits, along with Senators Edward Brooke (R-Mass.) and Fred Harris (D-Okla.) also testified in support of the measure, as did Mayor John Lindsay of New York. The Committee will meet in executive session Monday, March 4 to decide whether or not to add the extra funds. Attached is a fact sheet prepared before the Javits-Yarborough measure was introduced which gives further insight into the need for a supplemental appropriation. HUD-Agriculture Cooperation Proposed for Rural Development: '11he President's farm message (February 27) reveals a move to settle debate over responsibility for federal urban development programs in rural areas. Apparently Agriculture will not be permitted to expand its own kit of community development programs, but will coordinate other agency programs in the country's more rural areas. HUD, for example, will enter into agreements with Agriculture for Agriculture t o admi nister certain HUD programs in rural areas in accordance with HUD standards. Similar arrangements will be developed between Agriculture and other agencies. '11h e message called for increased federal assistance in providing housing a n d employment in rural areas. It recommended reducing inte r es t r ates and expanding eligibility fo r rural housing loan prog r ams a n d insur ing that rent supplements are available outs i de urba n a r eas. It a l s o p r ovided for c r edi t p rog r ams and cons truc tion loans for firm s loc a ting in rural r egions, a n d a broaden ed job tra ining. Housing and Urban Developme nt Act of 1968: Legislation to imple ment the President's Cities Message was introduced February 26 and 27: S.3029 (Sparkman, D-Ala.) and H. R.15624 (Patman, D-Texas). Hearings begin in Senator John Sparkman's Senate Housing Subcommittee March 5, National Coordinators: John Feild / Ron M . Linton Telephone 293-1530 �National Legislative Information For Urban Coalitions Page 2 and Rep. William Barrett's (D-Pa.) House Housing Subcommittee March 12. Mayor James H.J. Tate of Philadelphia, will testify before the Senate group March 7 and before the House Subcommittee March 14. Hearings will also consider riot insurance bills: The National Insurance Development Corporation Act of 1968, S.3028 and H.R.15625. Details of the 1968 program will be the subject of a forthcoming analysis. House Appropriations Subcommittee (Evins, D-Tenn., Chmn.) will open hearings March 18 on HUD FY 1969 budget requests. Several mayors representing NLC will appear March 27. �The Urban Coalition I Federal Bar Building West/ 1819 H Street, N. w. Washington, D. C. / 20006 Steering Committee Co-chairmen : Andrew Heiskell/ A. Philip Randolph March 8, 1968 LEGISLATIVE REPORT SENATE HEARINGS ON HOUSING BILL CUT SHORT BY CIVIL RIGHTS DEBATE: Senator John Sparkman's (D-Ala.) Banking and Currency Housing Subcommittee opened hearings March 5 on the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968 (S.3029 and H.R. 15624) but important votes on civil rights legislation kep the Subcommittee from hearing anyone other than HUD Secretary Robert Weaver. Senators quizzed Weaver on whether or not the proposed bill would meet the needs of low income families. Weaver suggested the President's 10-year program was designed to do the job and he believed the Riot Commissions proposal to accomplish the goal in only five years was unrealistic. Hearings begin before the House Banking and Currency Committee's Housing Subcommittee (Barrett, D-Pa., Chrmn.) OEO SUMMER FUNDS APPROVED BY SENATE COMMITTEE: The Senate Appropriations Committee has reported the 1968 Supplemental Appropriations bill for floor action with the inclusion of $75 million for OEO summer activities. No problem is expected in securing Senate approval. The real difficulties will be encountered in the House. CLARK SUBMITS EMERGENCY EMPLOYMENT TRAINING BILL: Senator Joseph Clark (D-Pa.) has introduced a bill to provide jobs and job training in both public and private sectors for 2.4 million hard-core unemployed during the next four years. The bill, S.3063, is similar to Senator Clark's emergency employment amendment to last year's OEO legislation which was narrowly defeated. It puts in legislative language the job opportunities in the business section (JOBS) program announced by President Johnson in his State of the Union and manpower messages . Last year the Urban Coalition led attempts to get Senate approval of the provision for public sector jobs. National Coordinators: John Feild / Ron M . Linton Telephone 293-1530 �The Urban Coalition I Federal Bar Building West/ 1819 H Street, N. W. Washington, D. C. / 20006 Steering Committee Co -chairmen: Andrew Heiskell/ A. Philip Randolph March 8, 1968 LEGISLATIVE REPORT SENATE HEARINGS ON HOUSING BILL CUT SHORT BY CIVIL RIGHTS DEBATE: Senator John Sparkman's (D-Ala.) Banking and Currency Housing Subcommittee opened hearings March 5 on the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968 (S.3029 and H.R. 15624) but important votes on civil rights legislation kep the Subcommittee from hearing anyone other than HUD Secretary Robert Weaver. Senators quizzed Weaver on whether or not the proposed bill would meet the needs of low income families. Weaver suggested the President's 10-year program was designed to do the job and he believed the Riot Commissions proposal to accomplish the goal in only five years was unrealistic. Hearings begin be. fore the House Banking and Currency Committee's Housing Subcommittee (Barrett, D-Pa., Chrmn.) OEO SUMMER FUNDS APPROVED BY SENATE COMMITTEE: The Senate Appropriations Committee has reported the 1968 Supplemental Appropriations bill for floor action with the inclusion of $75 million for OEO summer activities. No problem is expected in securing Senate approval. The real difficulties will be encountered in the House. CLARK SUBMITS EMERGENCY EMPLOYMENT TRAINING BILL: Senator Joseph Clark (D-Pa.) has introduced a bill to provide jobs and job training in both public and private sectors for 2.4 million hard-core unemployed during the next four years. The bill, S.3063, is similar to Senator Clark's emergency employment amendme nt to last year's OEO legislation which was narrowly defeated. It puts in legislative language the job opportunities in the business section (JOBS) program announced by President Johnson in his State of the Union and manpower messages. Last year the Urban Coalition led attempts to get Senate approval of the provision for public sector jobs. National Coordinators : John Feild/ Ron M . Linton Tel ephone 293 -1530 �The Urban Coalition I Federal B,lr Building West/ 1819 H Street, N. W. Washington, D. C. / 20006 Steering Committee Co -chairmen : Andrew Heiskell/ A. Philip Randolph January 3, 1968 MEMORANDUM TO: STEERING COMMITTEE MEMBERS FROM: JOHN FEILD SUBJECT: BACKGROUND MATERIALS FOR STEERING COMMITTEE MEETING & RON LINTON, NATIONAL COORDINATORS Attached you will find current reports from six of the seven Task Forces. Additional commentary will be made upon them at the Steering Committee meeting. Not all of the co-chairmen were available to review these summaries. In addition you will find a memo entitled "Organizational Proposal" which has grown out of reactions and discussions with individual Steering Committee members since the earlier report of the Committee on Organization was sent to you for the December meeting. National Coordinators : John Feild/ Ron M . Linton Telephone 293 -1530 �I_ January 3, 1968 MEMORANDUM TO: The Steering Committee FROM: The Task Force on Local Coalitions The Emergency Convocation, held in August, appealed to communities across the country to form counterpart local coalitions. This appeal was predicated on the knowledge that achie vement of the goals adopted by The Urban Coalition is depende nt upon the d e gre e to which active support for those goals develops in a significant number or urban communities. The Urban Coalition also r e cognized that mere l y issuing an appe al for formation of local coalitions would not be sufficie nt. The Task Force on Local c6alitions was created to assist communities in establishing coalitions. As of December 31, 1967, nineteen local coalitions had been created. A minimum of ten more and possibly as many as twenty may be formed in Janua ry 1968. An o r ganizing committee, to prepare f o r conve ning the n ewly author iz ed Na tiona l Council of Urban Coalitions, is scheduled to meet in Washington on January 29, 1968, at the Mayflower Hotel. The re sponse to the Conv oca tion call f o r c ounterp ar t c oa l i tions was o verwhelmi ng , measu red b y the volume o f reques t s from community leadership acro ss the country for organizing and programmi ng assistance . The number of s uch r equests was b e yond t h e c apa city of the small national c oord i n ating sta f f to service . The d ecisio n was there fo re made t o convene three regional conferences f o r c ommun i ty leadership i nterested in mobilizin g coalitions. To date, two such conferences have been held, one in Chicago, in Octobe r, and a second in San Francisco, the end o f No vember. The aggregate attendance at these two meetings r epresented over ninety different cities in the west and mid-west. A third conference for the eastern part of the country will be held on January 12th in New York City. �Page Two Report to the Steering Committee Our second approach to assisting communities is in the form of Guidelines, which have been carefully developed by a Task Force working group and the coordinating staff. The Guidelines, a copy of which was recently sent to each of you, have now been printed in pamphlet form. The pamphlet will serve not only to explain the nature and purpose of The Urban Coalition, but to counsel community leadership on possible approaches to community mobilization. The need for action task forces as the working arms of local coalitions has been stressed both in the planning conferences and the Guidelines. As these local task forces emerge, mutual benefit will result from working relationships with the counterpart national task forces. Once the regional conference schedule has been completed, the task force will meet to evaluate progress to date and to map plans for future action. We e xp e ct to inte nsify efforts to stimulate organizing efforts in specific communities in many of which mayoralty campaigns, this fall, precluded coalition formation. In effect, this means a shift from a wholesale to a retail approach which will have to be selective because of the very limited staff and funds now available. However, we anticipate assistance in the se mobilization efforts from all those organizations and constituencies represented on the Steering Committee and, importantly , from the ranks of already operative local urban coalitions. �January 3, 1968 MEMORANDUM TO: The Steering Committee FROM: The Task Force on Private Employment In order for the Task Force on Private Employment to implement the "Private Employment, Assistance and Investment Section" of The Urban Coalition's Statement of Principles, Goals, and Commitments, the prog r am developed by the Task Force must be practical and action-oriented. The complexity of the problem and the urgency for action have been clearly stated many times. Therefore, it is not necessary to include this information in this paper. It is generally agreed that much will depend on the commitment and action taken on the local level. Therefore, the Task Force has assigned top priority to working with local leadership throughout the country. In many cases, local employment committees will be p~rt of the total local coalition effort. The Task Force plans to undertake the following acti v ities: 1. Encourage and assist the business sector to develop specific manpower programs that will make an impact on the employment problem . These activities include recruitment, training, and placement programs . 2. Develop policies and proc e dures whereby a local employment committee may apply for direct financial assistance from the Task Force . This would be on a matching basis and be limited to a v e ry s mall number o f high ly effecti v e p r og rams. 3. Assist the bus iness se c to r t o d evelop t h e pra c ti ca l techni qu es a n d mech a ni s ms t o imp l ement p r ogram s on the l o c a l l e v e l. Th i s wou l d include th e d e v e lopme nt of a ma nual o f inst r uction and informatio n. 4. Establish a clearinghouse for information on programs and activities b e ing undertaken by the privat e sector. Case studi e s on specific programs would be developed and made avail~ble to interested companies throughout the country. �Page 2 The Task Force has already initiated action in some of the program activities. During the months of November and December meetings were held in Baltimore, Maryland, Detroit, Michigan, and Atlanta, Georgia. The conferences focused on specific topics such as organizing local employment campaigns; recruiting, training, and placement of the hard-core unemployed; reassessing under-employment; job development and upward mobility; and promotion of economic growth in the ghe_t to. Future conferences are planned in ~hoenix, Arizona for the western states and in Kansas City, Missouri for the midwestern states. In addition to the area conferences, meetings with representatives for individual communities and companies have been held. It can be expected that this activity will increase as more communities and companies become involved in local coalitions and begin to develop employment programs. It has been suggested by many participants in the conferences that the Task Force serve as a clearinghouse f or information and develop speci fi c case studies on programs being undertaken by companies. The Task Force is working very closely with the National Industrial Conference Board and the National Association of Manufacturers on this activity. Information on programs is being gathered at the prese nt time and it should be available to comp a nies in the very near future. The Ta sk Force pla ns · to invite business and l abor leaders to assist the T~sk Force on the national level. The T~sk Force is presently considering a list of individuals who have e xpre ssed an int eres t in working with th e Task Fo rce. Although the Task Fo rce does not plan to become directly involved in the c onduct and administration of programs, it wi ll develop policies and procedures by wh ich the Task Force can prov i de limited finan cial assist ance in the developme nt and implementat ion of specific programs. This activity will not only provide much needed financial assistance to local employment committees, but als o provide the Task Force a n opportunity to implement some o f the goals in the " Private Employment, Assistance and Investment" Section of the Stat ement of Principles, Goals, and Commitments, such as "Earn and Learn Centers~' recruitment, and training programs. In summary, the ma-jor activities of the Task Force will focus on broadening the commitment and involvement of the private sector on both the national and local level. It will also develop ~nd implement in cooperation with local employment committees a small number of specific programs to expand employment opportunities for the hard-core unemployed . �January 3, 1968 MEMORANDUM TO: Andrew Heiskell and A. Philip Randolph FROM: Joseph E. Allen, John Johnson, Harold Fleming SUBJECT: Report of the Urban Coalition Task Force on Communications and Public Support The co-chairmen of this Task Force have been in frequent communication both in person and by telephone. Our activities, current and prospective, are as follows: Membership of Task Force We have invited about a dozen prominent leaders in the communications field -- newspaper and magazine publishers, presidents of the major television networks, and the like -- to join with us as members of the Task Force . Acceptances to date include Mrs. Katharine Meyer Graham, Gar dner Cowles, and Arthur Ocha Sulzberger. We should -be able to report other acceptances when the Steering Committee meets on January 8. Within the next few week s, as the membership of the Task Force is completed, we will h a v e an o r ganizational meeting a t wh i ch specifi c plans and commitments will be a greed upon . Meet ing o f Inf o r mation Staffer s The Coa l ition staff h a s sugges t e d that we c onv e ne a p l anning s essio n o f info r matio n staff perso ns asso ciated wi th the various organizatio ns and busines ses represented on the Steering Committee. This group reaches a large segment of public opinion through periodica ls, n ews letters, and o ther publicatio ns, as well a s in their dea l ings with the mass med ia. A concerted strategy of public education through these channels could be an important adjunct of the work of the Coalition. We intend to hold a session of the sort proposed in the very near futureo �2 Advertising Council Campaign Joseph Allen and Harold Fleming have met several times with Bob Keim, President of the Advertising Council, and his associates to discuss the prospects for a Council campaign that would dramatize the urban crisis and urge people across the country to support and participate in local coalitions. The Advertising Council requires a permanent organization as sponsor of such a campaign, and Urban America has agreed to assume this role, including the major responsibility of raising the funds necessary to meeting the cost of materials for the campaign . An application from Urban America to the F o r d Foundation for this purpose has recently been submitte d. We very much hope that the campaign can get under way in the Spring. The American Business Press Joseph Al l e n has me t and di scus sed t h e Coa l ition's concerns with President John Babcock and the Board of Dire ctors of ABP. Subsequently, Mr. Babcock has issued a strong "action" communication to all member publications , initiatin g a major effort in support o f our common objectives . In a f o l lowup letter to his member edi tors , Mr. Babcock r epo r ts : As e xpec ted, busin e ss publica tion e ditor s a r e r e sponding to t h e challenge of solving the crisis in our cities . In f a ct, ma n y have bee n wo r king i n this area long b efo r e my memo o f Nove mber 1 4, 1967. Reaction h a s been o n t h e favo r able side b y a 1 0 t o 1 r a t i o . Thank you f or your quick and enthusiastic re s p onse. As you will remember, o ne s e rvice I felt ABP could pro vide is t o act as an "idea interchange" o n what y our fellow edito rs are publishing t o tell their respective industries, businesses, or professions what has been done to help meet this most complex problem. In looking over the first samples we received, i t seemed to me that many may have parallels that can be applied to other fields. By reporting or adapting these innovations by businesses outside his own field, each editor can provide stimulation, and crossfertilization of ideas. �3 I have asked ABP's Editorial Division Executive Committee to study the feasibility of this idea and to consider instituting a regular INTERCHANGE Bulletin. �January 3, 1968 MEMORANDUM TO: Steering Committee FROM: Task Force on Legislation SUBJECT: Legislative Program for 1968 The two major Congressional issues in the Congress this year of paramount interest to the Coalition will be: 1) 2) The Proposed Emergency Employment Program; and Hous ing for low and mode r ate income families. On the issue of the Emergency Employment Program (the Public Service Employment Program) the President has indicated that the Administration will propose appropriate legislation if adequate r esources cannot be made available i n pri vate indus t ry. Congres s man Pe rk i ns of Kentuck y, Chairman o f the House Educ a tion Committee, promptly supported such legislation and offered to introduce an appropriate bill i n the House of Representatives. The program being discussed is basica lly patterned after the recommendations made by the Coal ition in its August 1967 Convocation. Senator Cla r k o f Pennsylva nia, Chairman o f t h e Labor Committee 's Sub commi ttee on Employme n t has indi c ate d tha t h e will re intr oduce a new and improved version of the Clark -Jav its-Prouty Bill which nearly passed the Senate l a st year . Senator Clark e xpects to a nno unc e hearings on the measure befo re the end of Fe bruary. All o f t h e maj o r u rban d e v e lopment programs s u ch as p ubl ic housing , urban renewal , mass transpo r t a t i o n, e tc., must be extend ed and anti-po verty legi slatio n must als o be refu nde d. Al s o ma jor l egi s la t i v e r e commenda tions a re in t he p r ocess o f b eing f o r mulated by the Kaiser Committee o n Urban Ho using . The Task Force r e commends that the Co a l ition can mo st r e alistical ly expect t o ma k e i t self helpful in achi e ving impro ved hous ing pro grams by deferri n g any a c tion on i ts own u nti l it h as had a cha n ce t o study the Kaiser Committee Re port. But the Coalition and its me mber s s hould act immediately to mars hall s upp o rt f o r a n Emergency Emp loyment pro gram a s end orsed b y the August Convention . Th is can be d o ne most effec t i vely by communicati ng support f o r such l egi slation to members of Congress. Chairman Perkins should be encouraged to introduce an appropriate bill. Al l Senato rs s hould be urged . t o j oin Senator Cl a rk as a co-sponsor for the Clark-Javits -Pro uty Bi ll. �January 3, 1967 MEMORANDUM TO: The Steering Committee FROM: The Task Force on Educational Disparities The Task Force on Educational Disparities expects to identify special activities at its next meeting on January 8th which will relate its program activities to the local coation level. The Task Force is preparing a summary review of current efforts to eliminate educational disparities now underway across the country. After a review of this material, it is considering a two-day session of intensive discussion with individuals involved in these current efforts. From this meeting the Task Force expects to develop a plan of action on how urban coalitions can move to eliminate educational disparities. �January 3, 1968 ORGANIZATIONAL PROPOSAL INTRODUCTION The Steering Committee of the Urban Coalition will decide January 8 the future nature of the Coalition . Essential to this is a decision on the organizational structure to be utilized for reaching Coalition goals. Currently, the Urban Coalition is an ad hoc steering committee loosely related to some 1,200 individuals who attended the August Convocation. The Steering Committee has spawne d seven task forces and created a small profe ssion al staf f wh ich serves the tas k fo r ces under t h e direction of two national coordinators. Functionally, there are two elements comprising Coalition activities. One is catalytic and the other is direct action. These two elements must be reconciled in the organizational structure. PROPOSAL It is proposed that two companion structures be created: one to conduct the direct action activities, the second to undertake the catal y tic role. Ca t a lyti c Structure The organ i z a t ion al structure o f t h e catalytic element would b e a non- profit corporation directe d by a Board of Governors. It would have a mode r ate service a n d support staff headed by an e xecutive di re ctor. The t a sk forces of t he p resent Steering Committee would become the program commi t t ees o f t he non-pro f i t c orpor ati on. The o bjectives o f th is o rganization would be to identify the pro blems fo r which it would un dertake r esear ch and s tudy; deve l op so l utions and program ideas; a nd prov i de res our c e s a n d service t o l ocal c o alitio n s . The o rganizat i o n' s f u n di ng capab il ity should be substantial eno ugh to all ow i t to pro vide matching g r ants for local projects undertaken by local coalitio ns. This organization should be funded for at least a three or possibly five-year perio d at a n annual rate o f $5, 000 , 000 . St aff support would require appro ximately $5 00 , 000 . The balance would be used for matching funds to local coalitions which would conduct action projects and for supporting contracts with existing organizations to do special research projects. �( 2) Membership on the Board of Governors would be available to all of the current members of the Steering Committee. The Board of Governors would elect the officers. The president or chairman should be a person of national reputation. The Action Organization The organizational structure would be an ad hoc Steering Committee, just as now exists, with committees where required and no staff. Its funding requirements would be minimal. Staff support would come from the U.S. Conference of Mayors and the National League of Cities. Its activities would encompass taking positions on national policy matters and making efforts to insure that the national policy decisions became those of the government. �January 3, 1968 MEMORANDUM TO: URBAN COALITION STEERING COMMITTEE FROM: TASK FORCE ON EQUAL OPPORTUNITY IN HOUSING SUBJECT: TASK FORCE PROGRAM AND OBJECTIVES The organization of the Task Force on Equal Opportunity in Housing launched the program for achieving metropolitan open occupancy -in our nation's urban centers. The initial activity of the Task Force has concentrated on planning for a national action conference to be held in Chicago, January 18, 1968. Invitees will include all local coalition representatives and related individuals in housing, home finance, real estate, construction, insurance and fair housing groups. Task Force Co-Chairmen James Cook and Whitney Young, Jr. will address the opening session and the luncheon session respectively. Four concurrent workshops have been planned for the Action Conference: I. Fair Housing Legislation a. Securing federal, state and local laws b. Strengthening existing fair housing laws c. Effective enforcement d. Meaningful use of administrative powers --federal, state and local. II. Suburban housing development for low and moderate needs. III. Role of voluntary programs to achieve fair housing. Strategy of metropolitan coalition for fair housing. IV. The January 18th conference is viewed as the Urban Coalition's steppedup efforts in behalf of equal opportunity in housing. Outstanding experts on the above topics are being recruited for participatin in the workshop sessions. It is expected that attendance at the conference will approximate 300 persons. Of necessity this Task Force must relate not only to the other Task Forces in a traditional sense, but of more importance is its relation to i:he Task Force on Housing, Reconstruction and Investment since the latter includes housing as an important element in its framework. It is probable that none of the Task Forces have as much of a metro politan outreach as the Task Force on Equal Opportunity in Housing. Hence , the need to identify, mobilize and activate all of the resources beyond the central city in behalf of the Task Force's goals. �• l The Urban Coalition I Federal Bar Building West/ 1819 H Street, N. w. Washington , D. C. / 20006 Steering Committee Co -chairmen : Andrew Heiskell/ A. Philip Randolph January 16, 1968 MEMORANDUM TO: MEMBERS OF THE WORKING COMMITTEE FROM: JOHN FEILD, RON LINTON--NATIONAL COORDINATORS SUBJECT: PUBLIC RELATIONS REPRESENTATIVES MEETING We plan to have a meeting in early February in New York City with the public relations directors, or persons who act in that capacity, of organizations represented by the members of the Urban Coalition Steering Committee. This is a very important group in terms of our communication of Coalition goals to the public, but many of them do not feel well informed about our activities. Would you please, as soon as possible, send us the name and title of the individual in your principal's organization to whom we should send the invitiation? National Coordinators : John Feild/ Ron M. Linton Telephone 293 -1530 ~ ® �January 8, 1968 STATUS REPORT - LOCAL COALITIONS Cities in which a coalition has been announced and/or a steering or organizing committee is operative: Atlanta, Ga. Los Angeles, Calif. Baltimore, Md. Minneapolis, Minn. Boston, Mass. New York, N. Y. Bridgeport, Conn. Norfolk, va. Dayton, Oh io Oakland , Calif. Denver , Colo. Pas adena, Calif. Detroit, Mich. Plainfield , N. J. Fresno, Cal if . Riversid e , Calif. Gary, I n d. Saginaw, Mi ch. Huntsville, Ala. San Diego, Calif . Indianapo l i s, Ind . Stamford, Conn . Joli e t, Ill. Tacoma, Wash. Kansas City, Kans .Kans a s c ity, Mo . Washington , D. C. Winsto n - Sal em, N. C. �The Urban Coalition I Federal Bar Building West/ 1819 H Street, N . w. Washington, D. C. / 20006 Steering Committee Co-chairmen: And rew Heiskell/ A. Philip Randolph January 10, 1968 Dear Mayor: The response of the nation's cities to The Urban Coalition's August call for mobilization of community urban coalitions has been considerable. The number of communities where coalitions have been mobilized is substantial. A significant number of additional communities are known to be moving quickly through the initial organization phase. The Urban Coalition looks forward to convening in the first quarter of 1968 a national meeting of representatives from organized urban coalitions to form a Council of Urban Coalitions . The Council would not only play a role in the affairs of the national Coalition but constitute a vehicle for serving the mutual interests of member urban coalitions in information dissemination and program development. In this connection, we would appreciate from you at the earliest opportunity a status report on coalition mobilization in your community. In a ddition, it would assist us greatly if you would advise the National Coordinators of the name and address of the most appropriate person in your city with whom they can confer subsequently on coalition matters. We look forward to hearing from you. Sincerely, //·, ; I ). l,.,1'. ·" ..: 1 Andrew Heiskell Co-chairman '.( Phil / I I • . ( ._A /? p .. A'I.,.' Randolph · · / I Co- chairman . t ' /.. ~ I I 'J.-1- ' f 1 National Coordinators John Feild / Ron M. Linton Telephone 293 -1530 �• ti ~ the desree to could be expanding their de livery ri.r- aervice s to their community and citizens, if the cited obstacles to such expansion did not exist (such as budgets). We would appreciate your answers to the foll owing questions aCter consulting with the he a ds a nd personnel c hie1s in the types of agencies listed below, i1 s uch a surv e y has not already been conducted. I. Assuming !!.2 .limi tati o n s i n budget s a nd f' ac i liti<~s ( i n- cl u d i n g provisions and requir e me nt s f or rec r u itin g and traini1 1g n ew pers onn e l), in which of' th e following mun i c i p a l fu nct i on s do you b e l ie v e there is a n e ed fo r at l ea st a 1 0% in c re as e i n servic e s and/or personn e l? Pl.ease an s wer j n col . 1. l f' o r IncrenSL'S ? ( ple:1s0 ch c'ck i :f n C! e d t~ x j s t s ) Ne<>d part ment or F u nction 2 l dedl Staffin g .l11creases (c 11 t. 1ir numb1·r) ti - pollution enforcement ucation nernl admin.istration alth and hospitals ghway and/or traffic dept . using codes and inspection brary •lice re creation and parks ban renewal (or rehabilitation) - includine Model Cities nitation lf'are her: (please name) {please name) .. ... J Nonprofess i on al D.t; % o f col . 2 �2 provide estimates oC ho~ many /" additio~al personnel J ould be needed to implement these increased services? here. Plausible, reasonable estimate3 are perf'ectly satisfactory _;. ·, We are not insisting on pre c ise tn- the-last-man :figures. III. In many o.f these pot e ntially expand e d departments and functions, there is always the strong probability that now pro~cs- sional personnel may not be ava i labl e Partly as a ag e nci e s means of solving t h.i.s around t h e in the · numb e rs desired. type of p t! rsonn e l coun t r y h ave r ece n t l y l> (•g un ( A) men a nd wom e n without shortage, re cru i l. and to j obs which a ctually could be performed by such me n a nd women. In oth e r n e eding mor e p er s o nn e l , t he c ould b e pr u.fcs,..ion a ] e mploy e d in n a ture fica t 1on perso n nel , in a v.1 rie 1, y o:f j t) l >s (f or cxnmple , c ertain kind s of t' 11 n ds , th.:.i. t playground a i des , column 2 migh t c on ::; i :-; t In an s we rine this qu0:-;tio n, uf pl .. : 1:-;e Lw•.> t l1t· :·H : .Jo n o t f!Xist int; Ludgetary or entra n c , · - rcqui r l' mt- 11l no iron - clad precise p ercentat~" estimat e as f .((6--. 0,/11.( . . . the ) num l H· rs t. y pt 'S /\ o f ll l' W nn:-;t1'a.i 11 Pd f, · 1· 1 l t mi.l,tlio11s . t h es e , •111ployccs ? hy ,111y Ag ,11 11, jobt> cu 11ld c on cL'i. vahly I> " per so nn el . ~.,e~.....;--1 / " ,' ( .--/- ,. .,,.,...., J ....·t -- .--- ------- - . ~nl I etc .). is requ..:· !-it,•t..l h1 · rt i -- oul y ynur l> c::; t to what proportion •., r fill e d by nonprof e s s ion a l u r han b 1• a u t i - ' mplo y ee s , h o s p1 t. al .f or 110 t (') a n d :• mc n a nd are not ri.gi d l y ln co l u mn J, wo u ld yo u .i n dic,1t.e wh,,l p , · 1·c ·1 : 11t o f cit<,•d i n d e partm e nt s only rn ,t ,jlJr n'a s o n h i r inl{ t hem is si mply the p ro lil 0 m o.f i n ad,• qu,1 tc wom e n tra in the r e eula r ly re qui re d a dv a n ce d p re p aration to perform t hos e asp e cts of "prof ess ional" and .function s omc , / I ~ .., (9 �The Urban Coalition/ ACTION REPORT Federal Bar Building West/ 1819 H Street, N. W. / Washington, D. C. / 20006 National Coordinators: John Feild/ Ron M. Linton · January 2, 1 9 68 The Urban Coalition ends 1967 -- and the first four months of its e x istence -- with a feeling of solid accomplishment and a high degree of optimism for the future. The Washington office has been established and staffed ... Task Forces, manned by many of the . country's most talented and concerned people, are already producing effectively . .. Local coalitions have been formed , or are being or g a nized, in many critical areas ... press and public support of the con cept o f the Coalition and its goals are strong. For many peo p l e t he Coa l i tion has become a symbol of hop e; others remain s k eptica l . Everyone is waiting to see if the powerful forces represen ted in the Coalition can indeed "turn the country around" and solv e the cris i s in the cities. We think they can, and will . We can repor t that in the dead of winter the individuals who came together in a common commi tment in the heat of August have lost none o f their c oncern , determination a nd s ense of urge ncy . The hard work o f program b ui l d ing goes on . The country watches - - and wa i ts . PRIVATE EMPLOYMENT AND ENTRE PRENEURSHIP More than 200 p artic i pants met in Atlanta on December 1 3 f or a very succe ssful one-da y ses sion on pr i vate employment . Businessmen fr om eas t e rn and s outhern states had b e en i nvi t e d to e x chan g e i n f ormation and practical pr ogr a m ideas . They hea rd Gera l d L. Phillippe, chai r man of the board o f t he General Electr i c Company and co-chair man o f t he Task Force del iver a forceful address o n the r e s pons ibility of pr i v ate b u siness i n pr ovi ding jobs a nd training for the s o -cal l e d "unemployables". Other g e n eral session speak ers i n clu ded Mayor Ivan Allen, J r. of Atlanta , William Flynn , dir e ctor of t h e STEP Program for the Natio n al As sociation of Manu f actur ers , Dr. Lawre nce D. Reddick, executive d irecto r o f t he Oppor tunities Industria l ization Center Institute of Philadelphi a, and Augustus H. Stern e, president of the Atlanta Chamber of Commerc e . A s i mi lar regiona l meeting wi ll b e held in Pho e n i x, Arizo na on J anuary 17 . The mee t ing date for the r e giona l meeting in Kansas City, Mis souri has b een changed fr om January 24 to February 2 1 . PUBLIC SERVICE EMPLOYMENT AND URBAN LEGIS LATION Mi lli ons of people tuned in to President Johnson's t e l evision interview on a l l three major n etwork s on De c e mbe r 19 h e a rd t~1.e Presid ent ~ · �r National Steering Committee I. W. ABEL, President, United Steelworkers, Pittsburgh THE HONORABLE /VAN ALLEN, JR., Mayor of Atlanta ARNOLD ARONSON, Executive Secretary, Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, Washington, D.C. ROY ASH, President, Litton Industries, Beverly Hills THE HONORABLE JOSEPH M. BARR, Mayor of Pittsburgh, President, U. S. Conference of Mayors THE HONORABLE JEROME P. CAVANAGH, Mayor of Detroit FREDERICK J. CLOSE, Chairman of the Board, Aluminum Company of America, Pittsburgh THE HONORABLE JOHN F. COLLINS, Mayor of Boston THE HONORABLE RICHARD J. DALEY, Mayor of Chicago THE MOST REV. JOHN F. DEARDEN, Archbishop of Detroit GILBERT W. FITZHUGH, President, Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, New York DR. ARTHUR FLEMMING, President, University of Oregon, President, National Council of Churches, New York HENRY FORD II, Chairman, Ford Motor Company, Detroit THE HONORABLE MILTON GRAHAM, Mayor of Phoenix ANDREW HEISKELL, Chairman of the Board, Time, Inc., Chairman, Urban America Inc., New York JOSEPH D. KEENAN, Secretary, lnternat,onal Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Washington, D.C. THE REV. DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR., President, Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Atlanta THE HONORABLE JOHN V. LINDSAY, Mayor of New York GEORGE MEANY, President, AFL-C/0, Washington, D.C. J. IRWIN MILLER, Chairman, Cummins Engine Company, Columbus (Indiana) THE HONORABLE ARTHUR HAFT ALIN, Mayor of Minneapolis GERALD L. PHILLIPPE, Chairman of the Board, General Electric Company, New York A. PHILIP RANDOLPH, President, Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, New York WALTER REUTHER, President, United Auto Workers, President, Citizens Crusade Against Poverty, Detroit DAVID ROCKEFELLER, President, Chase Manhattan Bank, New York JAMES ROUSE, President, The Rouse Company, President, Urban America Inc., Baltimore RABBI JACOB P. RUDIN, Pre~ident, Synagogue Council of America. New York THEODORE SCHLESINGER, President, Allied Stores Corporation, New York ASA T. SPAULDING, President, North Carolina Mutual Insurance Company, Durham DAVID SULLIVAN, President, Service Employees International Union, Washington, D.C. THE HONORABLE JAMES H.J. TATE, Mayor of Philadelphia, President, National League of Cities JOHN WHEELER, President, Mechanics and Farmers Bank, Durham, President, Southern Regional Council ROY WILKINS, Executive Director, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, New York WHITNEY YOUNG, JR., Executive Director, National Urban League, New York JOHN FEILD, U. S. Conference of Mayors, National Coordinator RON M. LINTON, Urban America Inc., National Coordinator �The Urban Coalition I Federal Bar Building West / 1819 H Street, N. w. Washington, D. C. / 20006 Steering Comm i ttee Co - chairmen: Andrew Heiskell/ A. Philip Randolph December 15, 1967 Mr. Dan E. Sweat, Jr. Director of Governmental Liaison Office of the Mayor City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Dan: Confirming your telephone conversations with John Feild and myself, we are delighted that your schedule will permit your acting as a resource person during the one-day Eastern Regional Planning Conference on mobilizing local coalitions, to be held Friday, January 12, 1968, in New York. The conference, which will draw leadership from communities in the eastern part of the country, will be held at Loeb Student Center of New York University. Our expectation is to convene a briefing session for those persons, such as yourself, playing a leadership role in the program on Thursday evening, January 11th, in New York City. Further program details will be sent to you shortly. Cordially, Christopher M. Mould Associate National Coordinator / a lt National Coordinators . John Feild / Ron M. Linton Telephone 293-1530 �The Urban Coalition I Federal Bar Building We st / 1819 H Street, N. w. Washington, D. C. f 20006 Steering Committee Co-chairmen: Andrew Heiskell / A. Philip Randolph January 5, 1968 Mr. Dan E. Sweat, Jr. Director of Governmental Liaison Office of the Mayor City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Dan: We are looking forward to your joining us as a resource panel member on January 12, 1968 at the conference on mobilization of urban coalitions. We are conducting a briefing session for workshop chairmen and resource panel members in the Chart Room of the TimeLife Building (3 4th floor ), in New York City at 4:30 p.m. Thursday, January 11, 1968. This meeting should adjourn no later than 6:15 p.m. We would certainly hope you can join us at that time . Enclosed i s a copy of our pamphlet, Forming Urban Coalitions, which will be the principal background piece for the January 12, 1968 meeting, in case you have not previously received one . For your information, we are also enclosing a x erox copy of the program text as it went to the printer's last evening. A r oom h as been reserved in you r name f o r the evening o f Thursday , January 11th at the One Fifth Avenue Hot el. Cordially, Christopher M. Mould Associate National Coordinator CMM/alt Encls. National Coordinators : John Feild / Ron M. Linton Telephone 293 - 1530 �8:30 am Registration: 9:30 am OPENING GENERAL SESSION: Presiding: 10:30 am Ne w York University Loeb Student Center Eisner and Lubin Auditorium Andrew Heiskell Co-chairman, The Urban Coalition Welcome: Dr. Allan M. Cartter Chancellor, New York Universi~y Remarks: The Most Rev. John J. Maguire Administrator, Archdiocese of New York Add r ess: James F. Oates, Jr. Chairma o f the Boar d - Chi e f Ex ecut ive Off ice r Equ i t able Life Assurance Soc i ety of the United States MOBILIZATION WORKSHOPS All wo rkshops will dea l with the same series of t opic s . The morning worksho ps will dea l with metho d s o f o rgan iz ing l ocal coalitions. 12 :30 pm LUNCHEON SESSION: Presidi ng: 2:00 pm Eiqner and Lubin Au di tor i um A. Ph i lip Randolph Co-chairman , The Ur b a n Coalitio n Remarks : Dr. Joseph P . Sternstein Rabbi, Temple An sch e Ch esed , New York Ci ty Me mbe r , Ex ecutiv e Committee, New Yo rk Boa r d o f Rabbi s Remark s : Chri s t ian A. Herter , Jr. Chairman , New York Coalition Address : Honorable John V. Lindsay Ma yor of the City of New York MOBILIZATION WORKSHOPS The afternoon workshops will deal with the development of task force activity at the community level in counterpart to the national level task forces on specific urban problems. �-2- 4:15 pm CONCLUDING GENERAL SESSION: Eisner and Lubin Auditorium Presiding: 5:00 pm Ron M. Linton National Coordinator, The Urban Coalition Remarks: Dr. Edler G. Hawkins St. Augustine Presbyterian Church New York City, New York Former Moderator, General Assembly, The United Presbyterian Church U.S.A. Address: Whitney M. Young, Jr. Executive Director, National Urban League Adjournment �December 11, 1967 MEMORANDUM TO: Members of the Steering Committee Urban Coalition FROM: John Gunther, U.S. Conference of Mayors Chairman, Working Committee on Organization SUBJECT: The Urban Coalition in 1968 Your Working Committee on Organization met and based on that meeting and subsequent discussions with individual members of the Working Committee, I submit this report. 1. The Urban Coalition should mntinue its efforts toward assuring an equitable share of the benefits from the nation's economy for the residents of our central cities. The Urban Coalition should be responsive to but independent of the individual elements of it. The Coalition should seek to facilitate the implementation of policies developed by it and others and concurred in by the Coalition. Areas of substantive concern should be education, employment, and housing, including related community facilities and services. The Coalition should encourage the formation of local coalitions to develop and implement plans for the solution of community problems. The National Coalition, through l ocal coalitions and by direct action, should support policies to order private and public priorities to meet the pressing and long neglected nee d s of the central cities. 2 . The Steering Committee is the governing body of the Coalition and it may add to its number as it deems appropriate. The Steering Committee shall select its chairman or co-chairmen from its members and shall determine the substance of the areas o f the Coalition activities , establish a budget and employ a National Coordinator. 3. There shall be a Council of Local Coa litions . This Counci l will be made up of two representatives from each local coalition and it shall select two of its members to serve on the national Steering Committee. The Council will serve in an advisory capacity to the Steering Committee. �2 4. Each member of the Steering Committee may designate an individual to represent him on the Working Committee. The Working Committee shall select a chairman or co-chairman from its member~ and may establish committees as needed to oversee the implementation of decisions by the Steering Committee, and prepare proposals for the consideration of the Steering Committee. 5. Areas of Coalition activity will be explored in depth by task forces established by the Steering Committee and responsiple to the Steering Committee. 6. The Coalition shall employ such staff as its budgeted resources permit. The staff will be under the direction of a National Coordinator who may be retained and serve at the pleasure of the Steering Committee. The staff will provide services as necessary to the Steering Committee, the Council of Local Coalitions, the task forces and the Working Committee. 7. Staffing and funding should be planned on a one-year basis; and prior to January l, 196~ a comprehensive review should be made to asses progress toward the objectives of the Urban Coalition and to make such recommendatioraas may be appropriate for its continuation. �December 11, 1967 MEMORANDUM TO: Members of the Steering Committee Urban Coalition FROM: John Gunther, U.S. Conference of Mayor s Chairma n, Wor king Committee on Organization SUBJECT: The Urban Coalition in 1968 Your Working Committee on Orga ni zation met and based on that meeting and subse quent discussions with individual members of the Working Committee, I submit this report. 1. The Urban Coalition should mntinue its efforts toward assuring an equitable share o f the b e nefits from the nation's economy for the r e side nts of our centr a l citie s. The Urba n Coalition should b e responsive to but independe nt of the individual eleme nts of it. The Coalition should seek to facilitate the impleme ntation of policies developed by it and others and concurred in b y the Coalition. Areas of substa ntive conce rn should be education, emp loyme nt, and h ousing , including relate d community facili t i es and services . The Coa lition should encoura g e the formation of local coalitions to develop and implement plans for the solution of community problems. Thr-=; National Coalition, through local coalitions and b y dire ct action, should supp ort policie s to or d e r private and public prioritie s to mee t the pressing and long n e gle cted n eeds o f the c e ntr a l citie s. The Steering Committee is the governing body of the Coalition and it may add to its number as it dee ms appr op riate. The Steering Commi t tee shall s e l e ct its ch airman or co-chair me n from its membe rs a n d sha ll de t e rmi n e the s ubstan ce of the a re as o f the Coa l iti on a c t i v i ties , estab l i sh a budget and employ a Nationa l Coordin ator . 2. 3. There sha ll b e a Council o f Lo cal Coa l iti ons . This Coun cil will be made u p o f t wo representatives from each l o ca l c o a l ition and it shal l se l ect two o f its members to serve on the nationa l Steering Committee. The Council will serve in an advisory capacity to the Steer ing Committee . . ,. �2 4. Each member of the Ste ering Committee may designate an individual to repr esent him on the Work ing Committee. The Working Committee shall select a chair man or co-chairman from its members, and may establish committees as needed to oversee the implementation of decisions by the Steering Committee, and prepare proposals for the consideration of the Steering Committee. 5. Areas of Coa lition activity will be e x plored in depth by task forces established by the Steering Committee and responsible to the Steering Committee. 6. The Coalition sha ll employ such staff as its budgeted resources permit. The staff will be under the direction of a National Coordinator who may be retained and serve at the pleasure of the Steering Committee. The staff will provide services as necessary to the Steering Committee, the Council of Local Coalitions, the task forces and the Working Committee. 7. Staffing and funding should be planned on a one-year basis; and prior to January 1, 196~ a comprehensive review should be made to asses progress toward the objectives of the Urban Coalition and to make such recommendatioraas may be appropriate for its continuation. �! December 11, 1967 MEMORANDUM TO: Members of the Steering Committee Urban Coalition FROM: John Gunther, U. S. Conference of Mayors Chairman, Working Committee on Organization SUBJECT: T'ne Urban Coalition in 1968 Your Working Com.rnittee on Organi zation met and based on that meeting and subsequent discussions with individual members of the Working Committee, I submit this report. 1. The Urban Coalition should continue its efforts toward assuring an equitable share of the benefits fro m the nation's economy for the residents of our central cities. The Urban Coalition should be responsive to but independent of the individual elements of it. The Coalition should seek to facilitate the implementation of policies developed by it and others and concurred in by the Coalition. Areas of substantive concern should be education, employment, and housing, including related community facilities and services. The Coalition should encourage the formation of local coalitions to develop and implement plans for the solution of community problems. The National Coalition, through local coalitions and by direct action, should support policies to order private and public priorities to meet the pressing and long neglected needs of the central cities. 2. The Stee ring Committee is the governing body of the Coalition and it may add to its number as it deems appropriate. The Steering Committee shall select its chairman or co-chairmen from its members and shall determine the substance of the areas of the Coalition activities, establish a budget and employ a National Coordinator. 3. There shall be a Council of Local Coalitions. This Council will be made u p of t wo representatives from each local coalition and it shall select two of its members to serve on the national Steering Committee . The Council will serve in an advisory capacity to the Steering Committee . . �2 4. Each member of the Steer i n g Committ ee may designate an individual to repr esent him on the Wor king Com.mittee. The Working Committee shall select a chairman or co-chairman from its members, and may establish committees as needed to oversee the impleme ntation of decisions by the Steering Committee, and prepare proposals fo r the consideration of the Steering Committee. ·5. Areas of Coalition activity will be explored in depth by task forces established by the Steering Committee and responsible to the Steering Committee. 6. The Coalition sha ll employ such staff as its budgeted resources permit. The staff will b e under the direction of a National Coordinator who may be retained and serv e at the pleasure of the Steering Committee. The staff will provide services as necessary to the Steering Committee, the Council of Local Coalitions, the task forces and the Working Committee. 7. Staffing and funding should be planned on a one-year basis; and prior to Janu a ry l, 196~ a comprehensive review should be made to asses progress toward the objectives of the Urban Coalition and to make such recommendatiomas may be appropriate for its continuation. 0 �December 11, 1967 .MEMORA1'TDUM TO: Members of the Steering Committee Urban Coalition FROM: John Gunther, U. S. Conference of Mayors Chairma n, Working Committee on Organization SUBJECT: The Urban Coalition in 1968 Your Working Committee on Organization met and based on that meeting and subsequent discussions with individual members of the Working Committee, I submit this report_. 1. The Urban Coalition should continue its efforts toward assuring an equitable shar e of the benefits from the nation's economy for the re s idents of our central cities. The Urban Coalition should be responsive to but independent of the individual elements of it. The Coalition should seek to facilitate the implementation of policies developed by it and others and concurred in by the Coalition. Area s of substantive concern should be education, employme nt, and housing, including related community faciliti e s and service s. The Coalition should encourage the formation of local c8alitions to develop and implement plans for the solution of communi~y problems. The National Coalition, through local coalitions and by direct action, shoul§ support policies to order private and public priorities to meet the pressing and long n e gle cted needs of the central cities. 2. The Steering Committee is the governing body of the Coalition and i t may add to its number as it deems appropriate. The Steering Committee shall select its chairman or co-chairme n from its me mber s and shall d e termine· the subs tance of the areas of the Coaliti on activitie s, establish a budget and employ a National Coor d i n ator . 3. There shall be a Council of Loca l Coa litions . This Council will b e made u p of two r epresentative s f r om each loca l coa lition and i t s h a ll se l ect two of its members to serve on the n ationa l Steering Committ ee. The Coun c i l will serv e i n an a d vis ory capacity to the Steering Committee. �2 4. Each member of the Steering Committee may designate an individual to repres ent him on the Working Committee. The Working Committee shall select a chairman or co-chairman from its memb er s, and may establish committees as needed to oversee the implementation of decisions by the Ste ering Committee, and prepare proposals for the consider ation of the Steer ing Committee. 5. Areas of Coalition activity will be explored in depth by task forces established by the Steering Committee and responsible to the Steering Committee. 6. The Coal ition shall employ such staff as its budgeted resources permit. The staff will be under the direction of a National Coordinator who may be retained and serve at the pleasure of the Steering Com.mittee. The staff will provide services as necessary to the Steering Committee, the Council of Local Coalitions, the task forc es and the Working Committee. 7. Staffing and funding should be planned on a one -year bas is; and prior to January 1, 196~ a comprehensive review should be made to asses progress towar d the objectives of the Urban Coalition and to make such recommendatiorna s may b e appropriate for its continuation. �December 11, 1967 MEMORAJ:I.J7)UM TO: Members of the Stee ring Committee Urban Coalition FROM: John Gunthe r, U.S. Conference of Mayors Chairma n, Wor king Committe e on 0-£gani z ation SUBJECT: The Urban Coa lition in 1968 Your Wor kin g Committee on Organization met and based on that meeting and subsequent discussions with individual members of the Working Committee, I submit this report. 1. The Urban Coalition should continue its efforts toward assuring an equitable share of the b e nefits from the nation's economy for the r es ide nts of our centr al cities. The Urban Coalition should be responsive to but independent of the individual elements of it. The Coalition should seek to facilitate the · implementation of policies develope d by it and others and concurred in b y the Coalition. Areas of substantive concern should be education, emp loyme nt, and h o using, including relate d community faciliti es and service s. The Coa lition should encour age the formation of local coalitions to d e velop and implement plans for the solution of community problems. ThP. National Coalition, through local coalitions and by direct action, should support policies to order private and public priorities to meet the pressing and long negle cted n eeds o f the centra l cities. 2. The Steering Committee is the governing body of the Coalition and it may add to its number as it deems appropriate. The Steering Committee shall select its chairman or co-chairmen from its membe r s and shall d e t e rmine the substance of the area s of the Coaliti on activities , es t ablish a budge t and e mploy a National Coor dina t or . 3. The re sha l l be a Council of Loca l Coalition s . This Council will b e made u p o f t wo r epr esentatives fr om each loca l coa l i tion and it sha ll se l e ct t wo o f i t s members to serve on the nat i o nal Steering Committe e. The Council wi ll s e rve in an advisory capacity t o the Steering Committee . . . ., �2 4. Each member of the Stee ring Committee may designate an individual to represe nt him on the Wor king Committee. The Working Committee shall select a chairman or co-chairman from its members, and may establish committees as needed to oversee the implementation of decisions by the Steering Committee, and prepare proposals for the consideration of the Steering Committee. 5. Areas of Coalition activity will be explored in depth by task forces established by the Steering Committee and responsible to the Steering Committee. 6. The Coalition sha ll employ such staff as its budgeted resources permit. The staff will b e under the direction of a National Coordinator who may be retained and serve at the pleasure of the Steering Committee. The staff will provide services as necessary to the Steering Committee, the Council of Local Coalitions, the task forces and the Working Committee. 7. Staffing and funding should b e planned on a one -yea r basis~ and prior to January 1, 196~ a comprehensive review should be made to asses progress toward the objectives of the Urban Coalition and to make such recommendatioraas may be appropriate for its continuation. �(2) make a strong plea for job opportunities for all Americans through a combination of private and public pr ograms. We though·c you would be interested in comparing the President's statement with the goal contained in the Urban Coalition's Statement of Principles adopted at the Emergency Convocation: Coalition Goal The President There are some half million unemployed, hard-core unemployed, in our principal cities. We just have to go and find jobs for them . I am going to cal l in the businessmen of America and say one of t wo things have t o h appen: You have to help me go out and find jobs for these people, or we are going to have to find jobs in the Government f or them and offer every one of them a job. I think that is one thing that cou ld be done . I think that will have to be done, as expensiv e as it is . Government and business must accept responsibility -to provide all Americans with opport unity to earn an adequate income. Private industry must greatly accelerate its efforts to recruit, train, and hire the hard-core unemployed . When the pr ivate sector is unable to provide employment to those who are b oth able and willing to work, then in a free society the government must of n e c e ssity assume the responsibility and act as the employer of last resort or must assure adequate i ncome for those who are unable to work. The pre ss interpr eted the President's sta tement as an important new p o licy p o s ition on the gover nment's r esponsibilit y . At a press conference the f ollowing day, Rep . Carl D. Perkins (Ky. ), chairman of the House Educ ation a n d Labor Committee said he would s uppor t whatever bill i n the field o f employment the Pres i d ent sen d s to Congr e s s next year. Providing jobs for tho s e wh o c a n't find private employment, he said, "is the proper r ole f or g ov ernment". EDUCATI ONAL DIS PARI TIES Despite bad weather that clo sed the Detroit airport for s e vera l hours on December 18, seven members o f the Educational Disparities Ta s k Force were able to get tog ether for a schedu led meeting. They held a spirited discussion of t h e problems which exist in thi s a r e a a n d began concentration on tho s e which they felt the Coalition could effectively combat. The Ta sk Force will meet again at 2:30 p.m. on January 8 at the Mayflower Ho tel in Washington. LOCAL COALITIONS Encouragement and assistance in the formation of local urban coalitions continues to receive high priority. During December Washington �(3) D. C., Boston, Baltimore, Plainfield , N. J., Stanford and Bridgeport, Connecticut announced plans for local coalitions. Washington Mayor Walter E . Washington said in a public announcement that citizens have called for the o r ganization of a local coalition "in terms of urgency" generated by the August Emergency Convocation. He emphasized that the local effort must have the support and participation of the Virginia and Maryland suburbs. The nex t regional mobilization conference will be held in New York City on January 12 -- at New York University ' s Loeb Center. EQUAL HOUSING Plans are in progress for a National Action Session on Equal Housing Opportunities to be held in Chicago at the Conrad Hilton Hotel on January 18. The Task Force has concentrated on the completion of program development papers. COMMUNICATION AND PUBLIC SUPPORT Two we ll-i llu str ated publications a r e in the wor ks and will soon be ma iled to thos e int e r ested in t h e wo rk of the Coalition . The first is a r e p o rt, inc l uding the tex ts of major addresses , on the Mobili z at ion Confe rence hel d in Chicago o n October 17 . The second will be a similar publicatio n r e p o r tin g on the Privat e Emp l oyme nt Co nfere n ce h eld in Atlanta o n De c e mbe r 1 3. HOUSING, RECONSTRUCTI ON AND INVESTMENT Progre ss cont i nued o n the ma jor wo rking pape r being prepa r e d by t he Task Force as a guide for t h e Coalition in the deve lopme nt o f a long-ra n ge pr o gr am . STEERING COMMITTEE Unavoidab le schedu l i ng pr oble ms for sever a l o f t he principals on the S te e r ing Committee r e su lted in a p o stponement of t h e meeting sche duled fo r De c ember 18 in De troit t o J anuar y 8 in Washington , D. C. The mee t ing wi ll beg in at 7:3 0 p.m. in t he Mayf l ower Hotel . �STATEMENT ON THE OPENING OF CONGRESS by The Urban Coali t ion Janu ary 12 , 1968 As the new year begins and the second session of the 90th Congress convenes , The Urban Coalition reaffirms its call for recor,nition of the compellin g ne e ds of the people of ou r nation's cities and for imme diate and positive action to meet those needs, No lon ger can this country tolera te the serious unemployment , housing deficiencies, educat ional dispar i tie s and urban decay which pl ague ur b an America . The Urban Co a lit i on c a ll s upon Ameri c an citi ze n s to ins i st that this session of Congres s e n a c t t he l egi sl ati on n e ce s sary t o res to r e health to our cit i es, The n ati on can ~o l on ger i gnore t he in t o l erable cond it ions of life whi ch cripp l e t oo many of our f e llow citizen s and induce t he widespread di s content and d i .s orde r wh i ch have erupte d year a ft er year, warning Americ a th a t i t is not me eting its re sponsibilities t o its own peop l e. The Urban Coalition, b r oa dly re pres ent ative of American busi ne s s , l ab or , re li gion , c i vil r i gh t s and loca l government, pl e dr,es its fi rm and con tinued s upport f o r a re-ordering of nat ion al prio r ities and a commi tment o f nation al re s our ce s equal to mee ti ng t he s e r e s pons i bilities . The substantial number of communities forming counterpart Urban Coal it ion s all over the country is strong evidence that the ci tizens of our urban areas share the Urban Coalition's concern and its commitment. With the commitment of its citizens this nation has the capacity now to resolve its urban problems o �The Urban Coalition I Federal Bar Building West/ 1819 H Street, N. w. Washington, D . C. / 20006 Steering Committee Co-chairmen: Andrew Heiskell/ A. Philip Randolph January 12, 1968 NATIONAL COORDINATORS WEEKLY REPORT At a meeting in Washington the night of January 8, the CoalitiDn Steering Committee authorized the creation of an Executive Committee and charged i t with the responsibility for making an early recommendation on a permanent organizational structure for the Coalition. The 15-man Executive Committee will be composed of representatives of all groups active in the Coalition. Membership will be allocated as follows: labor, civil rights, city government--two each; church groups--three; business--four. The Co-Chairmen of the Steering Committee will also serve on the Executive Committee. Each group will select its own representatives for the Executive Committee, subject only to the condition that each person selected must agree with Coalition support of a three-point set of principles: (1) What the private sector can do on its own; (2) What the private sector can do in concert 'With government. (3) What the government must do to meet needs beyond the reach of private efforts. LOCAL COALITIONS The Task Force Committee that the proce ss o f and that there on Local Coalitions r eported to the Steering local coalitions h ave been organized, or are in b e ing organized, in 2 7 citie s (see attached list) i s acti v e i nterest in 16 other cities. Steering Committee Co- Chair ma n Andrew Heiskell commented: "I find it e x t remely encour aging that a ll sections of the country are r epre sen t ed i n the list. Thi s i s real pr ogr ess. We rave fe l t all a l ong t hat the dev e lopment o f stro n g local g r oups is of prime i mp ortance. " Indicative of the g e o graphic s pread of l o ca l c oalition s was t wo trips made during the week by the National Coord inator s t o meet with local groups. John Feild went to Fresno, California, Ron Linton to Bridgeport, Connecticut. National Coordinators : John Feild/ Ron M. Linton Telephone 293 -1530 �-2- On Friday, some 350 representatives from 82 cities in 21 states met in New York City for the third in the series of meetings on Mobilizing Local Coalitions. The interest was high, the speakers were excellent, and the overall staff consensus was that it was the best meeting held to date. Speakers included Co-Chairman Andrew Heiskell, the Most Rev. John J. Maguire, Administrator of the Archdiocese of New York, Equitable Life Assurance Society Board Chairman James F. Oates, Jr., Rabbi Joseph P. Sternstein, Christian A. Herter, Jr. Chairman of the New York City Coalition, Mayor John Lindsay, Dr. Edler G. Hawkins, AFL-CIO Legislative Representative Ray Denison, and National Urban League Executive Director Whitney M. Young, Jr. LEGISLATION The Steering Committee authorized the release of a strong statement of legislative goals of the Coalition to coincide with the opening of the new session of Congress (see attachment). The Washington Post commented in its Sunday edition: Much of the impetus for any crisis legislation will come from the civicbusiness-labor-and civil rights forces organized as The Urban Coalition, which yesterday warned Congress that "the hour is late." �r The Urban Coalition I Federal Bar Building West/ 1819 H Street, N. w. Washington , D. C. / 20006 Steering Committee Co-chairmen: Andrew Heiskell/ A. Philip Randolph December 8, 1967 Dear Friend: We have learned that the Plans for Progress is holding a National Conference on Employment for major employers in Washington, D. c. on January 24, 1968, the same date as our Midwestern Regional Conference on Expanding Employment Opportunities. Since many of the same persons would be involved in both conferences, we have agreed to reschedule our Kansas City conference from January 24, 1968, to February 21, 1968. We expect to forward further details on the program in the future . oi2- 'J;? ;;!i d;__ National Coordinator Ron M. Linton National Coordinator National Coordinators: John Feild / Ron M . Linton Telephone 293-1530 �-2- We call upon the Conf,ress, the Administration and the nation to move without delay on urban programs, The Administration's Open Housing legislation should be enacted into law now, Definite steps should be taken now to assure government-f-enerated employment to every citizen able and willing to work but unable to find private employment, The Administration's Safe Streets and Crime Control Act and Juvenile Delinquency amendments were drastically altered in the House of Representatives last year to channel the programs and funds through a state pl anninp, and allocation proce ss which would delay and frustrate their effectiveness, The original Administration version of these bills should be pas sed by the Sen a t e so a s to mount an efficient and effective attack on the root cause s of violence , crime and delinquency coupled with the development of impr oved local law enforcement, A supplementar y appropri at ion bill should be immediately introduced and enacted to f und f ully the Pr e s ident's anti- pove rtv pro p.rams as authorize d for this f i sca l year, Programs f or l ow and moderate income hous i ng, ur ban de ve lopment, model cities, mass transportation and community facilities should be extended, expanded and adequately funded now. The repressive welfare program amendments enacted last year, penalizing children born into one- parent homes and Ahifting the financinp. burden to local government, should be r epealed immediately. �-3- We know these legislative aims are more easily stated than accomplished. But we also know the needs are massive and urgent, and the hour is late. We pledge our full support for the le~islative action required and ask the help of Congress and the nation. Andrew Heiskell Co-Chairman, The Urban Coalition Chairman of the Board, Time Inc. A. Philip Randolph Co-Chairman, The Urban Coalition Vice President, AFL-CIO �f The . Urban Coalition I Federal Bar B11ilding West/ 1819 H Street. N. W. Wash ington. D. C. / 20006 St eerin_g__ Co m m itte e Co-chairm en : Ano'rew He i.:;k ell / A. Phiiip Randolph December 11, 1967 IMPORTANT NOTICE TO: FROM: Members of the Steering Committee Steering Committee Co-Chairmen The location of the December 18th Steering Committee meeting has been changed from thJ Veterans Memorial Building to the Detroit Art Institute, 5200 Woodward Avenue, Detroit, Michigan. Please use the Farnsworth Street entrance to the building. As originally plann ~d, the meeting will commence at 4:00 pm, and will be followed by a reception and a dinner hosted by Mayor Cavanagh, at the Detroit Art Institute. National Coordinators : John Feild/ Ron M. Linton Telephone 293 - 1530 �~ The urban Coalition I Federal Ba~ B,u.:rfin,<1 We:;// 1819 H Street, N. W. Washington. D. C. / 20006 Sleering___Commiltee Co-chairmen : Andrew Heiskeil / A. Phi.',:o Randolph December 8, 1967 NATIONAL COORDINATORS WEEKLY REPORT This week's report consists of the following schedule of coalition activities, the rosters of two Task Forces which have now rounded out their membership and the enclosed material on the New York Coalition and the December 18th Meeting of the Steering Committee. DECEMBER Steering Committee Meeting Detroit Task Force on Educational Disparities Meeting Detroit Tuesday, the 19th: Ad Hoc Committee on Urban Economic Council Detroit Monday, the 18th: JAJ.'1UARY Wednesday, the 10th: Task Force on Communications Luncheon New York City Friday, the 12th: Task Force on Local Coalitions Eastern Regional Conference New York City Wednesday, the 17th: Task Force on Private Employment Western Regional Conference Phoenix, Ariz. Thursday, the 18th: Task Force on Equal Housing Opportunities: National Action Conference Chicago, Ill. Monday, the 29th: (TENTATIVE) Council of Urban Coalitions Washington, D.C. Tuesday, the 30th : Steering Committee Meeting Washington, D.C. Private Employment Task Force Mid-Western Regional Conference Kansas City, Mo. FEBRUARY I j Wednesday, the 21st: ' ' . National Coordinators : John Feild/ Ron M. Linton Telephone 293 -1530 �TASK FORCE ON EDUCATIONAL DISPARITIES CO-CHAIRMEN: Roy Ash Roy Wilkins Arthur Fleming MEMBERS Walter Davis Director of Education AFL-CIO Washington, D.C. Edward Hodges Michigan Bell Telephone Company Detroit, Michigan Dr. Francis Ke ppel General Learning Corp. New York, New York Dr. Paul Briggs Superintendent of Schools Cleveland, Ohio Dr. James Redmond Superintendent of Schools Chicago, Illinois Dr . Arthu r Johns on As soc. Superinte nde nt o f Schools Detroit, Michigan Dr. Steven Wright President, Negro College Fund New York, New York Dr. Charles Brown Superintendent of Schools Newton, Mass. Dr. Elliott Shapiro Ass't Superintendent of Schools New York, New York William Saltonstall Ft. Rodman Job Corps New Bedford, Mass. Vernon R. Alde n President, Ohio University Athens, Ohio Thomas H. Eliot Chance llor , Was hington Univers ity St . Lou is , Missou r i Buell Gallaghe r President , City College New York , New York �t \ TASK FORCE ON HOUSING, RECONSTRUCTION, AND INVESTMENT CO-CHAIRMEN: Walter Reuther Joseph D. Keenan David Rockefeller MEMBERS Frank E. Mackle Mackle Builders Miami, Florida Gene Brewer President U.S. Plywood-Champion Paper New York, New York Thomas J. Watson, Jr. Chairman of the Board I.B.M. Armonk Village, New York Rudolph Peterson President Bank of America National Trust and Saving Assn. San Francisco, Calif. Mr. George H. Weyerhoeuser President Weyerhoeuser Company Tocoma, Washington Donald C. Burnham President Westinghouse Electric Corp. Pittsburgh, Pa. James Felt James Felt & Company New York, New York Paul Ylivisaker Commissioner Department of Community Affairs Trenton, New Jersey James Rouse · President Rouse Company Baltimore, Md. Honorable John Collins Mayor of the City of Boston Honorable Jerome Cavanagh Mayor of the City of Detroit Bayard Rustin Executive Director A. Philip Randolph Institute New York, New York �( ,. . .. \ NEW YORK COALITION TO UNDERTAKE IMAGINATIVE JOB TRAINING PROGRAM Mayor John Lindsay announced last week an imaginative new program to be launched by the New York Coalition with the financial backing of the Standard Oil Company of New Jersey. Under the $125,000 Standard Oil grant, the city's Police Department will train men and women from poverty areas for career employment in the private sector. The approximately 50 trainees will perform civilian work in the Department during half of their work time and attend school the other half. They will be paid about $60 a week during the sixmonths training period. Calling the new endeavor an "experimental program", the Mayor said "I am delighted that Standard Oil (New Jersey) has made this project possible. It is an excellent example of cooperation between the private and public sectors." Milo Brisco, a vice president and board member of Standard Oil (New Jersey) and the company's representative on the New York Coalition, joined the mayor in making the announcement. They said the new program, the first to be undertaken by the New York Coalition, was developed by Police Commissioner Howard R. Leary and the company.. 7he Mayor said the program is not intended to prepare trainees for employment with city government, but is aimed at preparing them to qualify for jobs in the general employment market. �( . STEERING COMMITTEE MEETING December 18, 1967 PROPOSED AGENDA I. II. III. IV. V. Minutes of previous meeting Administrative and Financial report Report of Organization Committee Report of Committee on Budget and Finance Report of Task Forces - _-Loe_ - _Ca.a:-1.ition s --Private Employment --Equal Housing Opportunities --Educational Disparities --Housing, Reconstruction, and Investment --Legislation--Policy Statement for 1968 --Communications �December 11, 1967 MEMORANDUM TO: Members of the Steering Committee Urban Coalition FROM: John Gunther, U.S. Conference of Mayors Chairman, Work ing Committee on Organization SUBJECT : The Urban Coalition in 1968 Your Working Committee on Organization met and based on that meeting and subsequent discussions with individual members of the Working Committee, I submit this report. 1. The Urban Coalition should mntinue its efforts toward assuring an e quitable share of the benefits from the nation's economy for the residents of our central citi es. The .Urban Coalition should ·b e respons i ve to bu:c. independent of the individual element s of it. The Coalition should seek to facilitate the implemen tation of policies developed by it and others and concurred i n by the Coalition. Areas of substantive conce rn should be educa tion, employment, and housing, including related community facili tie s and services. The Coalition should encourage the format i on of local coalitions to develop and implement plans for the solu tion o f communi.t-:, problems . The National Coalition, through local coalitions and by direct action, should support polic ies to order private and public priorities to me et the press i n g and long neglected needs of the centra l cities . 2. The Steer ing Committee is the gover ning body of the Coalition and i t ma y a dd to its number as i t deems appr opr iate . The Stee rin g Committe e shall select its cha i r man or c o -chair men fr om its member s and s h all determine the substance of the areas o f the Co aliti on activ itie s, e s t abl i sh a b udget and employ a Nationa l Coordinator. 3. There shall be a Counci l o f Lo cal Coalitions. This Council will be made up of two representatives from each local coalition and i t shall selec t two o f its members to ser ve on the national Steer i n g Committee. The Council will ser ve in an advisor y c apacity to t he Steer ing Committee . �2 4. Each member of the Steering Committee may designate an individual to represent him on the Working Committee. The Working Committee shall select a chairman or co-chairman from its members, and may establish committees as needed to oversee the implementation of decisions by the Steering Committee, and prepare proposals for the consideration of the Steering Committee. 5. Areas of Coalition activity will be explored in depth by task forces established by the Steering Committee and responsible to the Steering Committee. 6. The Coalition shall employ such staff as its budgeted resources permit. The staff will be under the direction of a National Coordinator who may be retained and serve at the pleasure of the Steering Committee. The staff will provide services as necessary to the Steering Committee, the Council of Local Coalitions, the task forces and the Working Committee. 7. Staffing and funding should be planned on a one-year basis; and prior to January l, 196~ a comprehensive review should be made to asses progress toward the objectives of the Urban Coalition and to make such recommendatiorsas may be appropriate for its continuation. �December 18, 1967 Report of the Committee on Budget and Finance The Committee has reviewed the financial report for the Coalition's activities from July 31, 1967 through November 30, 1967. A copy of the report is attached. It appears that the experience of the first four months of operations has produced a substantial degree of organization approximately within the projected budget approved by the Steering Committee on August 23. The Committee notes that the current and projected level of activity through January 31, 1968 will require the fulfillment of the outstanding pledges. The Committee recommends that the Coalition extend its interim budget for an additional three months through April 30, 1968 at a level of at least $50,000 to enable the Coalition and its Task Forces to complete its organizational phase. Looking beyond this, the Committee believes that the future annual budget can only be determined after the Steering Committee has determined the scope of its program. The projected budget for operations developed by the staff appears reasonable and can be increased or decreased based upon the Steering Committee actions during the next several months · as the organizational phase is completed. �• MINUTES OF THE COMMITTEE ON BUDGET AND FINANCE DECEMBER 7, 1967 New York City, N. Y. The Committee met in New York City at 2 East 37th Street at 2 P.M., December 7, 1967. Present were Mr. Asa Spaulding, Chairman, and Mr. Theodore Schlesinger. Mayor Jerome Cavanagh was unable to attend because of severe weather. Staff members present included Mr. Ron Linton, Mr. John Feild and Mr. Alfred Eisenpreis. The Chairman opened the meeting by asking for a general review of the progress being made by the Coalition and the public response to its efforts. The staff and the Committee then discussed recent activities of the Task Forces on Local Coalitions, Private Employment, Communications and Housing. In reviewing the financial report the question was raised concerning the status of the unpaid pledges and the likelihood of their being received. The staff reported that while there had been some delay, the outlook appeared favorable and it was hoped that the projected income would b e realized by the end of January. Mr. Schlesinge~ asked for clarification regarding the relationship between the Urban Coalition and Urban America and the staff reported that they were now completely separate organizations although the earlier relationship had been one of close cooperation between Urban America, the U.S. Conference of Mayors and the National League of Cities in bringing the Coalition into being. The Committee nex t turned to the question of future organization in order to evaluate the tentative future budget prepared by th~ staff. The staff reported on the current discussions, concerning futur e organization and indicated that major decisions would have to be made b y the Steering Committee con cer n i ng this in the immediate futu r e. In view of this , Mr . Sch lesin ger pr oposed and Mr. Sp a ulding agreed that it would be mor e appropr iate fo r the Committ e e at th i s stage to r e c omme n d a n i n t e rim b u dge t t han to atte mp t a ny r e c omme n dat i ons c on cern i n g a n annua l b udge t. Accor d ingly, the c ommi ttee a gr e e d t o recommend t o the Steering Committee a n interim budge t f or a thre e month perio d b e y o nd January 3 1 at a mi n imum l e v e l o f $5 0 , 00 0 with the same controls and pro c e dures guiding the operations in order that the Coalition may complete its further organization during this period . This will enable the Steering Conunittee to take into account the recommendations of the various Task Forces and to make som3 judgments concerning the scope of the program . . . �2 The committee indicated it could comment that the projected ·budget prepared by the staff appeared to be reasonable, and could be adjusted upward or downward depending upon the decisions made by the Steering Committee concerning organization. �, ! ·, December 1, 1967 ~ · FINANCIAL REPORT* Accounts Payable as of 11/30/67 Bills $9,129.78 Urban America 5,316.12 Petty Cash 251. 66 $14,697.56 Funds Obligated through 1/31/68 7,141.69 Funds Exp e nded through ll/30/6i 71,398.08 Project ed Expenses, 12/1/67--1/31/68 35,972.05 $129,210.27 Donations Receive d as of 11/30/67 $50,325.05 Pledges Due by 1/31/68 74,000.00 $12 4 ,325.05 - "$ 4,885.22 CASH FLOW REPORT Cash Re c eived a s of 1 1/ 30/67 Cash Borrowe d Urban America $ 4 ,765.00 U. S . Confe r e nce of Mayo rs 16 ,64 6 . 19 $50,3 25. 0 5 Funds Exp ended Cash o n Han d 338 .16 21, 4 11.1 9 $7 1 ,736 . 24 ,. $71 , 398.08 ~Transfer of fund s between U.S. Co nference of Mayor s , Ur b an America and The Urban Coalition is undergoing audit. $7 1 ,736 . 24 �FINANCIAL REPORT, PART II Approved Budget $ 56,000 $ 18,500 $4,600 3,600 600 1,200 1,500 250 5,200 50 17,000 $ 8,500 $100,000 Projected Expenses through 1/31/67 $28,972.29 : $21,629.94 $50,602.23 + $5,397.77 $ 6,700.00 $13,419.25 + $5,080.75 Salaries (including part time & temporary help) $3,000 8,000 2,500 5,000 $ Item Expenditures through, 11/30/67 (including Accounts Payable) Program Ex2enses Conferences & Meetings $ 948.30 . r 700.00 Publications & Printing l,C38.40 1,500.00 Mailings 2,E08.95 2,500.00 Consultant Fees 2 ,123.60 2,000.00 TOTAL $ 6,719.25 Toial of Expenditures & Projected Expenses Difference L 02erating Ex2enses Office Rent Furniture Rental Equipment Rental Telephone & Telegraph Office Supplies Insurance Travel Subscriptions TOTAL $3,195.00 3,295.62 327 .13 2,433.22 1,892.54 454.00 6,510.78 74.55 -:1' 1,065.00 900.00 204.69 2,400.00 700.00 9,500.00 15.00 $18,182.84 $14,784.69 $32,967.53 -$15,967. 5 3 August Convocation $25,829.08 -$17,329. 08 Undistributed Ex2enses $ 6,392.18* -$ 6,392.18 $81,629.59 $43,114.63 $124,744.22 -$29,210 . 27 Accounts Payable not yet posted and fund transfers being audited. �December l, 1967 PROPOSED BUDGET Budget Budget 9/1/67 - 1/31/68 2/1/68 - 4/30/68 Personnel Salaries (full time) Part-time and Consultants $56,000 $27,000 6,000 $33,000 Program Expenses 2 3, 700 $3,000 8,000 2,500 5,000 5,200 Conferences & Meetings Publications & Printing Mailings Consultant fees Travel $ l, 000 . 2,250 3,600 3,000 9,850 $ 2,230 645 306 3,600 1,000 250 50 8,081 Operating Expenses 11,800 8,500 $100,000 $4,600 3,600 600 1,200 1,500 250 50 Office Rent Furniture Equipment Telephone & Telegraph Office Supplies Insurance Subscriptions Convocation $50, ,9 31 • �The Urban Coalition I Federal Bar Building West /1819HStreet, N.W. Washington , D. c. /20006 Steering Committee Co-chairmen : Andrew Heiskell/ A. Philip Randolph December 15, 1967 Dear Friend: You are cordially invited to attend a one-day planning conference on mobilization of local coalitions to be held in New York City at Loeb Student Center of New York University on January 12, 1968. This is the third of a series of three regional conferences the Coalition is holding in response to requests from local community leadership across the country for assistance in organizing and programming local action counterparts to the national Urban Coalition. Leadership delegations from cities throughout the eastern part of the United States are expe cted to attend and participate in this meeting. While the major portion of the meeting will be devoted to workshop sessions dealing with the organization and prog rammi ng of local coalition efforts, we will have pertinent a ddresses fr om not only the se ss ion ho s t, May o r John V. Lindsay , but national leaders from business, labor, religion and civil rights. We wil l send y ou a program announceme nt shortly and will look forwa r d to see ing y ou in New York on Janua r y 1 2th. Cord ially , (( ~)w, ff~ ~ Andrew Heiskell Co- cha irma n /~L !~,_/4/7 Phiiip ' Rando lph , / LAj A. Co- ch ai rma n National Coordinators : John <=e,ld / Ron M. Linton Telephone 293 -1530 �I The Urban Coalition I Federal Bar Building West/ 1819 H Street, N. w. Washington, D. C. / 20006 Steering <;ommittee Co-chairmen: Andrew Heiskell/ A. Philip Randolph November 15, 1967 Dear Steering Committee Member: At the last meeting of the Steering Committee, it was suggested that the Coalition should seriously consider taking a position in opposition to several of the Social Security Amendments already approved by the House of Representatives and now being considered by the Senate. It was suggested that the House Amendments were not only contrary to general and accepted standards of welfare aid and the trend toward raising those standards; but the Amendments, if passed, would result in local governments having to assume an increased share of the costs of the total welfare load. The Steering Committee decided that an analysis should be made of the problem and the House's position and distributed to the members. This has been accomplished and a Fact Sheet and an analysis are enclosed. We have reviewed the Fact Sheet and analysis and concur with the Legislative Committee's estimate of the House amendments as being essentially negative in nature. Testimony before the Hous e Ways and Means Committee makes it clear that segments of the Nation are anxious to reverse the increase in the number of children receiving aid. However, this concern dealt with approaching the problem at the cause s rather than limiting the aid. The main ob jective of Social Security Amendments as o r iginally introduced was to move families toward financial inde p e ndence. The Aid to Familie s with Dependent Chi l dren Program was designe d to k e ep families toge ther . We b e lie v e the r e s trictions impos e d by the House bill a re directly contrary to these two goals. N ational Coordinators : John Feil d / Ron M. Linton Telephone 293 -1530 �Steering Committee - November 15, 1967 Page Two We recommend that the Coalition oppose the House Amendments. Until the Coalition can take formal action on our recommendations, we urge you as an individual to take whatever steps you can to oppose the House Amendments. The Senate Finance Committee has ordered reported its version of the Social Security Bill, an analysis of which will be sent to you as soon as it can be made available. Sincerely, Richard J. Daley John V. Lindsay A. Philip Randolph �Prepared by Professor Winifred Bell ANALYSIS OF PUBLIC WELFARE PROVISIONS of HR 12080 The public welfare provisions of H.R. 12080 are intended, according to the House Ways and Means Committee Report {House Report #544), to reduce welfare rolls by encouraging self-support and by reducing the incidence of illegiti~acy. The Bill is a marked departure from the Administration Bill, H.R. 5710, which began a modest· move toward implementing the recommendations of the 1966 Public Welfare Advisory Council, "Having the Power, We Have the Duty."* · The major provisions of H.R. 12080 can be divided into the following areas: WORK PROVISIONS In order to receive federal matching funds for AFDC, state agencies (1) must require that out-of-school youth over 16 and all adults in AFDC families register for employment and accept any bona fide offer of work that they are able to "engage in," even if wages fall below legal minimums; (2) must investigate the employability of every individual in the AFDC caseload at least once yearly; (3) must provide community work and training programs {Section 409 of the Social Security Act, as amended in 1962) throughout the state; and (4) must require that out-of-school youth and adults in AFDC families participate in such work and training programs when employment is not avai lable. Penalties for refusal to work or en a e in trainin without due cause: 1 AFDC payments may be denied or suspended, o r (2) payments may continue in behalf of children only {i.e. no payments to adults) if {a) they are paid to an "interes ted party" who will assure that money is spent only in behalf o f children; or {b) they are converted to vendor rather than cash payments. Some experts interpret the Bill to mean that "refusal to work" is synonymous with child neglect, and that juvenile courts might be p r essur ed to use this as the sole reason f o r a finding of neglect , which in turn, would result in the child's removal from home. This is not what the Bill says, but experience with public assistance laws and regulations shows that they are exploited in some jurisdictions to control fami lies through threat of separation . The major recommendations of the Advisory Council Report: (1) extend aid to all needy persons, irrespective of family composition, employment, etc. through one program; (2) set a national standard of assistance, adjusted only to reflect regional variations in consumer price indexes; (3) establish a legally enforceable right to certain basic social services; (4) finance the program by establishing a reasonable and equitable state share yearly, and meeting all other costs through federal funds. �( 2) Safeguards: (1) for the first time, HEW has responsibility for defining when an adult "is available" for employment, i.e . HEW must set standards (e . g. health, child care arrangements, etc.) for determining who is employable; (2) day care for children must be assured for employed AFDC mothers or those in training programs . (Federal standards for day care are provided). (3) 30 day emergency assistance can be provided when assistance is denied . Relevant facts: A number of states require that assistance be denied or discontinued whenever employment is available, and some others deny aid to ~mployable people whether or not work is available in the area. These provisions are particularly geared toward seasonal labor . The practive of encouraging AFDC mothers to work is widespread, and aid has always been denied in some jurisdictions when welfare workers consider the adult caretaker of children employable. Experience to date with work and training programs provides evidence that many older AFDC youth and adults are not readily employable (about 80 percent), and that to make labor force participation feasible, considerable dental, medical and social services, basic education, and job training are necessary. Day care is in very short supply in the U. S., and it is unlikely that such services can be organized sufficiently promptly to protect children if mothers are quickly forced into work or training. One important chronic reason for high relief rolls is the scarcity of unskilled jobs, so it is possible that H. R. 12080 can only accomplish its self-support goals if the federal government also embarks on a full employment policy, a public works program, or their equivalent. Only 12 states now have statewide community work and training programs, and there is evidence that many states will have difficulty organizing effective statewide programs quickly. ILLEGITIMACY H. R. 12080 intends to reduce the incidence o f illegitimacy by (1) reducing the coverage of absent parent families by AFDC (see p.5 for detailed discussion); (2) encouraging the removal of children from neglectful homes (illegitimacy is cited as particular evidence of neglect; (3) e x tending the circumstances in which foster home care can be reimbursed from federal funds, and increasing federal matching rates; and (4) requiring states to provide statewide family planning services to be brought to the attention of all AFDC mothers or mothers likely to become el igible for AFDC. Safeguards: planning. Mothers are not to be forced to accept family �(3) Relevant facts: The proportion of illegitimate children receiving AFDC is estimated at about 20 percent and has increased in recent years, from 14 percent in 1959. All states have protective statutes in which neglect is defined to include promiscuity and other immoral behavior of parents. Courts have insisted, typically, that a finding of neglect rests upon tangible evidence of gross neglect, and seldom view out-of-wedlock births as sufficient alone. Foster home care is expensive, and at present states pay most of the cost. They have long urged federal participation in these costs. At present, only 26 states have AFDC-foster care programs, covering only 7,900 children. Longitudinal studies show that when families are broken up by the removal of children or the imprisonment of parents for neglect, the majority do not reunite, partially because of the scarcity of social workers to help in the process. The majority of illegitimate children are supported privately, and there is no factual evidence that treating AFDC children as a special group could reduce the overall incidence of illegitimacy; nor is there any evidence that threatening to deny aid or to remove children, or carrying out the threat, reduces the incidence of illegitimacy. AFDC-UP (UNEMPLOYED PARENTS PROGRAM} H.R . 12080 establishes a federal definition of "unemployed parent" , which was previously the province of states . It includes only fathers, · requires a significant attachment to the labor force , imposes a waiting period of 30 days before unemployed fathers could apply for assistance for their families , and e x cludes all famil i es receiving unemployment compensation. Relevant facts: This definition would cause a cut-back in the caseload of all 22 state AFDC - UP p r ograms now in e x istence . At p r esent AFDC covers only about 1/5 of the families b e low the pov e r t y line of $3 , 400 fo r an u r ban fam i l y o f fou r. Th e 1966 Pu b lic Welfare Advi sory Council Repo r t s u ggested e x panding cov e r age to all needy families , irre spec t ive o f emp l o yme nt. H. R. 57 1 0 , t h e Administr ation Bill r e c omme nded mer e ly tha t AFDC- UP be made p e r manen t . NON- SUPPORT PROVISI ONS H.R . 12 0 80 requires that s tate a genci e s o rganize and i mplement programs t o establish p a t e rnity o f illegitima t e childre n and secure support from the ir fath e rs, a nd impleme nt programs to secure support from fathers of abandoned childre n in whose behalf an AFDC grant is sought or given. To this end, federal public welfare funds are to b e us e d to match the costs of n e cessary law enforcement and court services. �( 4) Relevant facts: States have previously been required to notify law enforcement officials whenever aid was requested in behalf of an abandoned child. Previously, public welfare funds have not been available to match the costs of law enforcement agencies or courts, nor has HEW felt it proper for public welfare agencies to take over law enforcement responsibilities. However, welfare workers have always been responsible for verifying and investigating the ability of relatives to support famil~es applying for or receiving AFDC, and this task commonly preoccupies a large share of the workers' time. Vigorous law enforcement does increase support payments; it also discourages families from applying for public aid; and it puts an additional emotional strain on families already severely pressured from many directions. WORK INCENTIVES H.R. 12080 requires that all states disregard all earnings of AFDC youth under 16 years of age, part-time earnings of school youth between 16 and 21, and the first $30, as well as 1/3 of the remaining portion of monthly earnings of adults, whenever agencies are determining the size of the grant for eligible families. Relevant facts: Both the ESEA (Elementary and Secondary Education Act) and the EOA provide that for persons engaged in projects funded under those Acts, and also receiving public assistance, the first $85 plus one- half of the excess over $85 monthly shall be disregarded for purposes of determining eligibility for public assistance. H.R. 5710 provided for "disregarding" $50 monthly of the earnings of children and adults, subject to a family maximum of $150 monthly. Even with this more generous amount, there is an incentive for AFDC families to engage in ESEA or EOA projects rather than to enter the regular labor force. Incentives of this type have proven effective in enabling a nd encouraging employment. The disregarding of earned income provision in H.R. 12080 is applicable only to persons who already are rece iving assistance. Thus, applicants who went to work before appiying for as sistance have all of their income and resources taken into account, while families who have a member who goes t o work from the assistance rolls have their earned income disregarded in the stated amounts. It is, therefore likely, that the provisions could discourage work among potential applicants for AFDC, thus serving to increase the caseload in two ways. �(5) SOCIAL SERVICES H.R. 12080 transfers child welfare services in behalf of AFDC families or families likely to need AFDC from Title V to Title IV of the Social Security Act, and requires that state agencies establish family planning and day care programs, as well as other services intended to enhance the capacity for self-support and to reduce the incidence of illegitimacy. Until July 1, 1969,· the Bill increases federal matching rates for such services from 75 to 85 percent. Services may be organized by public welfare or purchased from voluntary and other agencies, and still receive federal matching. · Advantages: While cost accounting problems will be legion, transferring such services to Title IV (when they are provided to AFDC families or those l i kely to need AFDC) greatly increa ses f e deral funds for statewide social service s, s i nce Title IV grants-in-aid are open-ended and have more generous matching features. However, this change will result in more services only if states are willing and able to raise their share of the cost initially, and since H.R. 12080 i mposes othe r financial burdens on the states, they may not locate fund s fo r this purpose . Purchase of s e rvice s has t he p o t ential for bringing a much wide r scope of quality s e rvice s to very poor families, assuming states can afford to meet the initial cost . Da nger s : Associating social s e r v i ces and financial aid i ncreases the l ikelihood that servic e s wi ll be us e d t o con t r o l fami l ies , f o r c e t h e m i n t o t h e l a bor mark et, etc . rather in the wide varie t y of cons t ructive ways they a re i ntended for. In August 1967 HEW announced a reorgani z a t ion which s e para ted assistance payments from social services i n line wi th the convi cti o n of ma ny e xperts that mi xing the two harmed a n d limited both . The Adv i sory Coun cil Re por t recomme nded t h a t a ll p e ople h a v e a legally ertfo r c e able right to r e c e ive c e rta in bas i c s o cia l ser vic es . The Re port was moo t o n the q uestion o f purchase o f services . Howe ver, the Co unci l c ontemp l a ted t hat s erv i c e s would be o rganize d o n a community- wide b asis, r ath er than f o r AFDC o r o t h er p oo r families as might we ll occur under H. R . 12 0 80. CEILING ON ABSENT PARENT SEGMENT OF AFDC CASELOAD H. R. 1 2 080 prohi bits the use of federa l matching f unds in beha l f of a b sent parent fami l ies* in e x cess o f the number i n state AFDC caseloads a s o f J a nuary 1967 , except a s the i nc reased cas eload reflects the increased gen eral p opu lation in states . States would still be required to assist all eligible families, but when the number exceeded the ceiling, federal matching would no longer be available. �( 6) Relevant facts: Every year more children are being raised by mothers alone, so this segment of child population is growing more rapidly than the child population, generally, or the general population. See Mollie Orshansky, SOCIAL SECURITY BULLETIN, April 1966. Cutting off federal matching shifts the expense of supporting new eligible families to the states as soon as ceilin s are exceeded (which most are by now. Unless states can promptly appropriate additional funds, two adaptations are inevitable: states will reduce their standards of need (the cut-off point that separates needy from other families) so that present funds can cover the rising caseload, or accomplish the same result by decreasing the percentage .of the standard actually paid to families; secondly, they will take steps to restrict eligibility in order to reduce families of all types in the caseload, e.g. instead of following former federal leadership by extending AFDC to school youth up to 21 years of age, they may well reduce age. Since the intent of AFDC is to support very poor families so that children can remain in school, and have a reasonable chance of securing the food, clothes, lodging, and other necessities of life that they need to grow into productive, effective adults, any shift in federal financing that limits the program without providing equivalent alternatives must be viewed in the longrange context. H.R. 12080 provides that states can shift some general assistance cases to AFDC, but statistically this number wili be insignificant as compared with the effect of the ceiling on absent parent families. H.R. 12080 is unlike most SSA amendments in providing no relief to states in terms of higher federal matching for assistance payments, and since payments are low ($36.95 per person monthly), and living costs rise, states must also make adjustments in this area unless they are to fall even further behind the inadequate levels of payment now existing. While federal matching in H.R. 12080 improves remarkably in some service areas and includes others for the first time in the open-ended AFDC reimbursement formulae, as well as covering additional children from general assistance and f o ster home situations , thus freeing some state funds, the new requirements will force many stat e s to spend money for purposes they have hitherto neglected. They may be tempted t o lower standards of need or to pay lower percentages of thei r standards unless they are among the fortunate few where decreases in child population can be anticipated. An "absent parent family" may be a family in which the father is deceased or disabled. Such families would not and do not normally p roduce additional children eligible for assistance. In the main, therefore, this p r ovision is directed toward illigitimate children and the t e rm, in this sense, becomes a legal euphemism. �( 7) To prevent this possibility, H.R. 12080 would have to include provisions to prohibit states from lowering standards of need or the percentages of their standards actually paid to families, and require that they maintain at least the present ratio of the standard to some given cost of living index. Freezing the absent father caseload will discourage states from extending age limits in AFDC for school children up to 21 years of age, providing services to more "potentially dependent" families, or otherwise following federal leadership in widening eligibility. Conversely, it may encourage them to restrict eligibility . Over the years federal leadership and the concern of the U.S. Congress have resulted in extending eligibility for assistance and services, so that family breakdown, continued dependence, and other social ills would not be encouraged by AFDC. Although some states were well in advance and others followed promptly, many lag in adopting possible extensions. Whenever definitions or other provisions cut across the entire caseload, and a ceiling is placed on the most populous type of family in the caseload, the ceiling itself will act as a strong deterrent to extending the program. Age, e x emptions of earned income, ~rvices to "potentially dependent" families all fall into this category as do other provisions. Each would serve, if adopted, to increase all types of families in the caseload. Indeed, so far as exemptions of part of earned income are concerned, it seemsinherently illogical to add a requirement that canmthelp but increase the caseload and to fix a ceiling on that caseload simultaneously. But even with the optional e x tensions, presumably Congress felt these were desirable preventive steps and wished states to follow its leadership. Since most states will now have e x ceeded the January 1967 ceiling, they may shortly be thinking of restricting , not e xtending, elibility . If this happens, the caseload may soon include few older youth, and alternative national programs will have to be devis ed to assist y outh in securing the very educati o n al and employment p r eparation that H.R. 12080 so emphasizes. It should be pointed out that there is no magic in recipient rates as of January 1967. AFDC has always covered only a fraction o f very poor children in the U.S. Nor is there any magic in the numbers of chi ldren in the AFDC caseload by reason of their dependency or family composition. Some states made great effort to relieve childhood poverty whatever its cause; others did not; some managed to be quite �( 8) selective, preferring certain types of families to others. A state like Mississippi with its high recipient rates will suffer less with the "freeze". But children in Georgia, Arkansas, South Carolina, and Texas, for instance, where recipient rates are low and the incidence of childhood poverty high, will suffer remarkably. On September 30, 1966 only Arkansas among the above stat~s had extended eligibility to children up to 21 in the event that they were in certain types of schools. The states on that date that had no immediate plan or capacity to implement either the 1964 or 1965 federal age extensions for school youth included Alaska, Arizona, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, Oregon, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, and Texas. Since such children comprise the largest share of AFDC caseloads, the amount o f money involved will be very large. �• FACTS AND COMMENTS ON THE MAJOR PROVISIONS OF THE SOCIAL SECURITY AMENDMENTS OF 1967 INTRODUCTION: The following is a comparison of the Administration's proposals _ for amending the Social Security Act and the amendments to that Act passed by the House of Representatives. This analysis will be limited to major issues and policy variables i n the areas of social security, medicare, medicaid, and public assistance . Social Security and Public Assistance Background: Social Security constitutes a wage-related income insurance program to guard against loss of income due to death, disability or old age of a wage earner. Be n efi ts are the right of the wage earner, his spouse, or his children , d e p ending on the need situation of any one or combination of two or more possible beneficiaries . Benefits are paid as a matter of right and specific taxes are collected in a relatively progressive manner to fund the program. The tax does not take, nor does the benefit structure give, an amount totally adequate to meet all the financial needs gene ra ted t hrough death, disability or old- age. It does, however , provide a basic "floor of protection" on which the majority of the Ameri can people can build a financia l ly secure future . Public Assis tan ce , has neither the contributory nor the ea r ned r ight aspe cts o f s ocia l secu r ity . It is pa i d on the basis of n eed de f ined by statute and admin i strat ive r egulation . The £ ecip i e n ts o f public assistance are such beca use of the conscience of , r ath e r than their contribu t i o ns to s ociety . The r e f o r e , Fe d eral , s ta t e , and local governments have s et down a n d enforce ce r tain mode s o f b ehavior on the part of recip ients wh ich wil l preve n t the abu s e of public assistance laws and wo rk to mov e , whe nev er poss ible , r ec ip ients up from welfare to more prod uctive pla ces in soc ie t y. Philosophically, these enforced behavioral modes, or welfare ru l es, are s e t down not only to help those persons on th e welfare rolls, but also to limit the burden they place on the more fortunate, more productive members of the society. The Social Security Act deals with both the Federal social security system and the Federal contributory and management aspects of public assistance . �I. FACTS AND COMMENTS - SOCIAL SECURITY Administration Proposed 1. (H.R. 5710) House of Representatives (H.R.12680) Passed Benefit Increases General Benefit Increase of 15% Minimum benefit of $70 General benefit increase of 12-1/2% Minimum benefit of $50 Benefit increase for persons 72 and over, from $35 to $50 for singles; from $52.50 to $75 for couples. Benefit increase for persons 72 and over, from $35 to $40, for singles; from $52.50 to $60 for couples. Special minimum benefit for long-term employment--$100 minimum for 25 years work. No provision Benefits for disabled widows-82-1/2% of workers benefit for those disabled within 7 years of husband's death. Benefits for severely disabled widows age 50 and over paying from 500/4 to 71% depending on age at onset of disability. Comment: Both sets of benefit increases actuarially sound under the tax increase schedUle in the respective bills. However , the urban and suburban beneficiary po~ulation has experienced the phenomena of combined inflation, population explosion, and resultant property tax increases. One but need look at the mortgage foreclosures in reti rement areas such as Dade County, Florida, to realize the impact of this combination on persons with fixe d incomes. It has outstripped the planning a nd saving of much of the beneficiary population. Near adequate benefit increases help not only their recipients but the communities in which they live and the businesses and individuals t hose communities tax. Actuarially sound increases: (a) reduce welfare payment at the local level, (b) reduce existing welfare c aseloads, (c) prevent new processing of welfare clients , and (d) h elp maintain the aged, the disabled, and the widowed in viable economic units that are tax- paying and not tax- taking . (2) �2. SOCIAL SECURITY TAX INCREASE (INCLUDING MEDICARE} Year Present Law 1967 4.4 1968 4.4 1969- 70 1971-72 4.9 4.9 1973-75 5.4 By 1987 5.65 Comment: 3. . Administration (H.R. 5710) 4.4 (wage base $6600) 4.4 (wage base $7800) 5.0 5.0 (wage base $9,000) 5.5 (wage base $10,800) 5.8 House of R.epresentatives (H.R. 12080) 4.4 (wage base $6600) 4.4 (wage base $7600) 4.8 5.2 5.65 5.9 The Administration proposal compared with the House bill: (a) provides a more progressive tax, (b) provides a lower ultimate tax rate f or both employer and employee, (c) spreads the tax for both employer and employee in the majority of cases by taxing wages above those usually paid in industry, MEDICARE (a) Depreciation allowance - hospitals Administration (H.R. 5710 ) Require full loading in d e p r eciati on of capital and physic al plant when ing s ystem is i n a ccor d mended State p lan . costs of equipment cost accountwith r e c om- House of Representatives (H.R. 12080) No provision Comment : La ck of a prov i s ion mea ns taxpayer s (for municipal.hospitals and payers of ins urance p remi ums (for a ll hos pitals) carry the depreciation loads for medicare recipients. The Administration proposal provides both a real istic overhead loading mechanism and an i n centive to apply modern accounting and cost effectiveness techniques in an area which has long burdened c ities, employers, and o t hers who must pay for hospital services . (3) �(b) Tax Rate Administration (H.R. 5710) House of Representatives (H.R. 12080) No provision Increase tax rate by 0.1% on employer and employee above present schedule beginning 1969. Comment: The cost of the various liberalizations of medicare suggested in the House bill can not be determined until the medicare program has had time to work. Tax adjustment can be made as actual experience determi nes. II. FACTS AND COMMENTS - PUBLIC ASSISTANCE (WELFARE) Administration (H.R. 5710) House of Representatives (H. R. 12080) (a) Assistance payments No provision Re qui res states to meet full need a s the y determi ne it with some additional financial aid. Cash assistance standards must be at least 2/3 of income level s fo r medical ass i sta nce. (b) Wo r k incentives Requires states to allow $50 Requires states to allow $30 monthly income without r educ ~ mo nthly i n c ome without r educti o n i n a ss i stance . Fo r each t i on in a ssis tance f o r AFDC adul ts. additional $ 3 earned, assistance would be r educed $ 2 . (c) Community work and training Requ ires States to u se wo rk and training programs provided by Dept. of Labor for all appropriat e AFDC recipients. Requires stat es to establish community work and training programs (75% Federal matching) for v irtually al l appropriate AFDC adults and children over 16 not attending school to be administered by welfare agencies. (d) Unemployed parent program Makes permanent present provisions. (4) Covers children of unemployed fathers only. Unemployment definition requires substantial prior connection with the labor force, excludes recipients of unemployment compensation. �In addition to the above, the House bill included provisions not proposed by the Administration. These include requiring states to: (a) develop employment programs for AFDC families where appropriate; (b) provide day care for AFDC mothers working or training; (c) provide family planning services; (d) attempt to determine paternity and obtain support from the father; (e) inform courts of unsuitable homes, one criterion of which is a parent who refused employment or training; and (f) freeze the rate of child dependency due to absence of parent as of January 1967 for purposes of Federal matching. Comment : The major purpose of the House bill is to increase employment and training of welfare recipients and thereby reduce p r ogram costs . The House approach would: 1 . Combine responsibility for payment , social services, training , and j ob placement within one agency. A single agency and , more practically , a single caseworker, would have the right to wi thhold payment if a family does not take what that caseworker deems " appropri ate 11 action with regard to training , employment , famil y plan ni ng , and liv i ng arrangement. 2. Dup licate g ove r nment functions through the placement of respo ns ibi l i t y fo r train ing i n an a g ency unprepar ed to handle it. The We lfa r e Admin i s trat i on has r u n limi ted t r a i n ing prog rams for we l f ar e c li e n ts in t he past , but a l ways with a n e nro l lme nt o f less than 50 , 000 . Unde r the Hous e passed b i l l it wi l l b e ma ndatory by 196 9 for that o r gan i z ation a nd i ts sta t e counterparts to be prepare d t o handl e 500 , 000 t rainees annually. A more prac tical approach would be to add a n ew are a of emphasis to ongoing programs of the Manpower Administration of the Labor Department than to build a who l e n ew bure aucracy. - 5- �\ 3. Economic impact of Corrununity training programs. The House Ways and Means Corrunittee estimates a saving by 1972 of $130 million "for persons trained who become self-sufficient". This is 7% of the 1972 program cost, indicating a reduction in the rolls of · approximately that number of recipients. However, that same Corrunittee estimates that the 1972 cost of day-care for children whose mothers are in the work and training program will.be $470 million and that the program itself will cost another $270 million. This $695 million is more than five times the savings in welfare payments. 4. Increase in state and local costs by imposing an AFDC ceiling. Freezing proportionately the number of AFDC children eligible for Federal matching monies does not take into account either the possibility of changing economic conditions or heavy in-migration into certain states. Either occurance would result in the states being forced to bear the entire burden of increased AFDC costs. The alternatives to increased burden on the taxpayer are to make eligibility requirements more stringent or to lower benefits even further. The prime victim in either situation is the child of the AFDC family and, ultimately, the society he enters. III FACTS AND COMMENTS - MEDICAID . Administration (H.R. 5710) 1. Limitation on Federal Matching Funds No Federal matching for families whose income exceeds 150% of the highest state cash standard 2. House of Repres entatives (H.R . 12080) No Federal matching for families whose income is more than 133% of the highest cash assistance payment ordinarily made to family or AFDC Required Services No provision - maintains schedule of required services - 6- Removes graduated services requirement and allows states to provide any 7 of the 14 medical services listed in the Act. �Comment: The House amendments J aise eligibility requirements and lower service standards. By setting eligibility at cash payment levels instead of required services levels, the bill denies coverage to those marginal poor who are functioning as independent economic units except for medical care support. This increases the probability of their going on welfare roles at the time of their first medical crisis. By removing current service requirements, the bill allows elimination of such items as physician services and in-patient hospital care. This means that cities and states th3.t already offer these services are penalized for their progress by forcing them to carry the full cost of such services. Although the Federal government would save by these amendments, the cities would still have to provide adequate medical services. The reduction in Federal funds and required supplement through city funds in New York City alone would be $70 million in fiscal 1 69. Communities penalized in other progressive states would include those in California, Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Nebraska, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Wisconsin. - 7- �September 29, 1967 TASK FORCE ROSTER TASK FORCE ON LOCAL COALITIONS CO-CHAIRMEN: PARTICIPATING REPRESENTATIVES: Arnold Aronson Lead e rship Conference on Civil Rights Joseph Rauh 1001 Connecticut Ave., N.W. Washington, D. C. Mayor Joseph Barr Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Aldo Colaritti Mayor's Office, City Hall Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Charles P . Taft , Esq. Cincinnati , Ohio Not yet designated · STAFF COORDINATOR : Chris Mould TASK FORCE ON PRIVATE EMPLOYMENT EXPANSION PARTICIPATING REPRESENTATIVES: CO-CHAIRMEN: Ger a ld L . Ph i llippe , Chai rman of the Boar d General Ele c tri c Company William C. Hart General El ectric Comp any 570 Lexington Avenue New York, New York John Wheel e r, Pr esident Me chanics and Farmers Bank Vernon Jordon Southern Regi ona l Council 5 For s yth e Stre e t , N. W. At lan t a, Ge orgia David Sulliv an , Presi dent Building Se rvice Emp loyes Int e rnationa l Un i on An t h ony Weinl ein 900 17th St reet , N. W. Wash i ng ton , D. C. STAFF COORDINATOR : Mel Cotton TASK FORCE ON RECONS TRUCTION AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT CO-CHAI RMEN: Walter Reuther, Pr esident United Auto Worke r s PARTI CIPATI NG REPRESENTATIVES: Jack Conway I nt e rnational Union Department 815 16th Street, N. W. Wa shington, D. C. �l r. Joseph D. Keenan, Secretary International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers / Thomas Hannigan IBEW 1200 15th Street, N. W. Washington, D. C. A third Co-Chairman will be designated STAFF COORDINATOR: James Gibson TASK FORCE ON EMERGENCY WORK CO-CHAIRMEN: PARTICIPATING REPRESENTATIVES: Mayor Richard J. Daley Chicago, Illinois David Stahl Mayor's Office, City Hall Chicago, Illinois Mayor John V. Lindsay New Yor k New York Jay Kri egel Mayor's Office , City Ha ll New York, New York Peter Tufo 1730 K Street , N. W. , Suite 319 Washing ton, D. C. A. Ph i lip Randolph, Pres ident Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters STAFF COORDI NATOR: Bayard Rustin A. Philip Randolph Institute 217 West 125th Street New York, New York Not ye t de signa t ed TASK FORCE ON EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITIES CO-CHAI RMEN: PARTICIPATING REPRESENTATIVES: Archbishop John F. Dearden Detroit, Michigan Ms gr. Lawrence Corcoran National Conference of Catholic Charities 1346 Conn ec ticut Avenue, N. W. Washington, D. C, Whitney Young, Jr ., Exe cutive Director National Urban League Guichard Parris National Urban League 55 East 52nd Street New York, New York Frederick J . Close, Chairman of the Board Aluminum Company of America Richard Idler Architectural Building Products Sales Alcoa Building Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania �1 1 COORDINATING STAFF: Not yet designated TASK FORCE ON EDUCATIONAL DISPARITIES PARTICIPATING REPRESENTATIVES: CO-CHAIRMEN : Roy Ash , President Litton Industries Not yet designated Roy Wilkins, Executive Director National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Clarence Mitchell Washington Bureau, NAACP 422 1st Street, S. E. Washington, D. C. Dr. Arthur Flemming, President Nationa l Council of Churches James Hamilton National Council of Churches 110 Maryland Avenue, N. E. Washington, D. C. COORDINATING STAFF: Not yet designated TASK FORC E ON COMMUNICATIONS AND PUBLIC EDUCATION CO-CHAIRMEN: PARTICIPATING REPRESENTATIVES: Joseph H. All en , President McGraw-Hi ll Public a tions Not yet de signat ed J ohn J ohnson, Pres ident J ohnson Pub l i ca t i on s Not yet de s igna te d Harold Flemi ng, Pr e si dent Potomac In s titut e Not ye t designated �The Urban Coalition I Federal Bar Building West/ 1819 H Street, N. w. Washington, D. c. f 20006 Steering Committee Co-chairmen: Andrew Heiskell/ A. Philip Randolph MEMORANDUM TO: Working Committee Members FROM: John Feild and Ron Linton, National Coordinators SUBJECT: Luncheon for Washington Representatives DATE: November 10, 1967 Steering Committee Co-Chairmen A. Philip Randolph and Andrew Heiskell feel that the Washington representatives of organizations who have evidenced an interest in The Urban Coalition ought to be fully apprised of Coalition action and programs particularly as they relate to the Washington scene. As a first step in developing a continuing relationship with Washington-based representatives of our supporters, we have invited them to a luncheon at the Statler Hilton Hotel in Washington at 11:45 on November 20th . Mayor John Lindsay will join us to discuss with our guests the range and importance of Coalition activity here in Washington. We are als.o--inv-i-t:-i-ng all the members of the Coalition Working Committee to attend tl}is luncheon. Please advise Mrs. Marcia Greene (202/293-1530) at your earliest convenience if you will or will not be able to attend. National Coordmators John Feild / Ron M. Linton Telephone 293 1530 �'-=--' ~ I • I '. Adams, David O. F. W. . Woolworth 223 Broadway New York, N. Y. 10007 Alexander, T. M., Sr., President Alexander & Company 208 Auburn Avenue, N.E. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Allegaert, John, Pres. & Chief Exec. Off. American Cyanamid Company Wayne, N. J. 07470 Allen, Joseph H., President McGraw-Hill Publication 330 W. 42nd St. New York, N.Y. 10036 Allen, William M., President Boeing Corporation P. O. Box 3707 :·7 Seattle, Washington 98124 Anderson, Ca~l E., Chmn. & Pres. E.W. Bliss ' Company (' 217,. Second Street, Northwest Canton, ~hio 44702 Ashley, J.M., V.P. - Public Relations Libbey OWens Ford Glass 811 Madison Avenue Tol edo, Ohio 43624 Ayers, Thomas G., President Commonwealth Edison Company 72 West Adams Street Chicago, Illinois 60690 Baker, Robert, Pres. American Security and Tr ust Company 15th & Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, D. C. 20005 Barnes, V.P. & -Sec., Barnard Time, Inc. Time-Life Bldg. New York, N. w. 10020 �!_ • I - -=-' .,.J Bayliss, W. H. The Upjohn Company 7000 Portage Road Kalamazoo, Michigan Beach, P. Godd, President Oscar Mayer & Co. 910 Mayer Avenue Madison, Wisconson ., 53701 I Beal, Orville E., President Prudential Insurance Co. of America Prudential Plaza 745 Broad Street Newark, N. J. Bean, Atherton, Chmn. & Chief Ex. International Milling Company, Inc. Investors Building Minneapolis,· Minnesota 55402 Beinecke, Williams., President Sperry and Hutchinson Co. 330 Madison Ave. New York, N. Y. 10017 Bensinger, B. E., Chmn. Brunswick Corporation 69 West Washington Street Chicago, Illinois 60602 Berquist , Raymond H. Director of Employee Services Colgate-Palmolive Co. 300 Park Avenue New York, N. Y. 10022 Bickmore, Lee S., President National Biscuit Company 425 Park Avenue New York, N. Y. Biesel, Robert G., Vice President Gerera1 · American Transportation 135 South LaSalle Street Chicago, Illinois 60690 I 1, �Blessing, W. G. Blaw-Knox Company Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Bogard, George T., Gen. Mg~. Community Systems Development Division General Electric Company Lincoln Tower Building, Post Office Box 1661 Louisville, Kentucky 40~01 Borth, Robert Washington Representative General Electric 777 14th Street, N. W. Washington, D. c. 20005 Brenner, Dr. Henry R., Manager of Personnel & Management Research Xerox Corporation Rochester, New York Brereton, Harmer, Vice President Eastman Kodak Co. 343 State Street Rochester, N. Y. ! Brooker, Robert E. Montgomery Ward & Company 619 West Chicago Avenue Chicago, Illinois 60610 Brooks, James A., V. P . - Employee R lations The Budd Company 12141 Charlevoix Detroit , Michigan 48215 Buck, Harry L ., Pres. I - T-E Circuit Breaker Company 1900 Hamilton St . Philadelphia , Pa . 19130 Buck, Richar d B. Carling Brewing Co. Baltimore, Md., 21227 Burck, Rob e rt H., V. P., Public Aff ai r s Braniff International .·, P.O. Box 35001 Dallas Texas, 75235 r •, r �i Burditt, John F., Chmn. & Chief. Ex. Off. ACF Industries, Inc. 750 Third Avenue New York, New York 10017 I I Burgess, Carter L. American Machine & Foundry Co. 261 Madison Avenue New York, N. Y. 10016 Burnett, Winston A. Winston Burnett Construction Co. New York, N. Y. 10027 (149 West 124th St.) Burnham Burl C., President Westinghouse Electric Corp. 3 Gateway Center Pittsburgh, Pa\1 15230 . I , Burns, .· John- L., Chmn. & Chief Ex. Cities Service Company 60 Wall Street 10005 New York, New York I .l I Caliri, Joseph L . , Sec. National Dairy Products Corp . 260 Madison Avenue New York, N. Y. 10016 Carry, Champ, Honorary Chmn. Pullman Inc . 200 S . Michigan Avenue Chicago, Ill . 60604 Castle , John T . Ma n. -Ma rk et ing & Public Relations Res,e ar ch G. E. Compan y 5 70 Lexingto n Ave . 1002 2 Ne w Yo rk, N. Y. Chapin Ro y D., Jr., Chmn. Americ a n Mo tor s Co rpo ratio n 14250 Plymouth Road Detroit, Michigan 48232 Cleary, John V., Pres. Consolidated Edison Co., N. Y. 4 Irving Place New York, N. Y. 10003 ., �Close, Frederick J., Chairman of the Board Aluminum Co. of America Alcoa Building · Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15219 Colihan, William, Jr. Young & Rubican, Inc. New_York, N. Y. 10001 Collins, Arthur A. Collins Radio ,company Dallas, Texas 75207 Comar, Jerome M., Exec. V. P. Maremont Corp. 168 N. Mich. Ave . Chicago, Ill. 60601 Conner, Hal, Special Representative Pa cific Gas and Electric Company 1 725 K. St., N.W. Wa shington, D. C. 20006 Cook, C. W. , Chairman Ge neral Foods Corp •. 250 N. Street 10602 Whi t e Pl ain s , N. Y. Copeland, Lammot du Pont, President E. I. du Pont d e Nemours & Co . , Inc. 1007 Market Street 19898 Wilmington, De l awar e Cro ss , Bert s., Chmn. & Chief Ex. Minnesota Min i n g & Manufacturing Co . 2501 Hudson Roa d St. Paul, Minnesot a 55119 Curtis, E. F., Presiden t Deeke & Co. Moline, Ill. 61265 Custer, Power D., V. P . Industrial Relations Kellogg Co. 235 Porter St. Battle Creek, Mich. 490 16 'iI I �DeHart, Donald M., Director Comm. Relations The Gillette Co. Prudential Tower Bldg. Boston, Mass. 02199 I I I ! I Devine, Gregory s., Pres. Chesapeake & Ohio Ry. Terminal Tower Cleveland, Ohio 44113 DeYoung, Russell, Chrm. of the Board The Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co. 1144 East Market Akron, Ohio Dial, Morse G., Jr., Reg. V. P. Union Carbide Corp. 777 14th Street, N. W. Washington, D. C. 20005 Dorsey, B. R., Pres. Gulf Oil Corporation Gulf Building Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania . I 15230 Drain, James A., Pres. Joy Manufacturing Company Olive r Building Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Drews, Rudolph, J . , Chmn. Foremost Dairies, Inc. 111 Pine St . San Francisco, California 15222 & Pres. 94111 Dugger, Robert W., V. P. J. I. Case Company Racine, Wisco nsin 53404 Dunlop , Robert G., Pres. Sun C>il Co. 1608 Walnut Street Philadelphia, Pennsylvania -I 19103 Edwards, • Gorgon, Pres. & Chief. Ex. National Dairy Products Corporation 260 Madison Avenue New Yor k , N. Y. 10016 �I MINUTES OF A MEETING OF THE WORKING COMMITTEE September 5th, 1967 Washington, D. C. LEGISLATION The public service employment group submitted a series of four recommendations attached. There were no reservations raised in connection with items A, B, or C. Item D raised considerable discussion. It was determined to submit item D to a poll of the Steering Committee members in the follo wing formulation: "That the Coalition seeks a one million emergency job program. The Clark-Javits Emergency Work Title is a step in the right direction and has the support of The Urban Coalition." The working committee representatives agreed to notify the national coordinators of the approval or disapproval of this position by their principals. TASK FORCES Repre s enta tives of the private employment task force have met and are now deve lop ing a pl an of action. A pl anning ses sion of the educational disparities task forc e is being arr anged. The re construction investment and housing task force is st i ll being fo rmed . The equa l hous ing opportunities task force has begun some prel i minary planni ng and will be meeting in the very near futur e . Two additional task fo r ces were proposed : a t ask fo r ce on loca l coalitions and a t a s k for ce on communications . Mr. Heis kell and Mr. Rando l ph will appoint appropriate co-chairmen . LOGISTICS AND FI NANCE The Coalition will establish off ic es i n the very near future at a centrally located bu il ding , s i nc e Ur ban Amer i ca is unabl e t o provide adequate space. Arrangements ar e cont i nuing t o provi de the approved budget of $100,000 through January 31st. • �REPORTS ON MATERIALS The first of two reports on the Convocation have already been distributed to those who attended the August 24th Convocation. The proceedings will be completed in the very near future for distribution. NEXT MEETINGS The ag enda for the next Steering Committee meeting will be discussed at th e .1ext meeting of the working commmittee which will be held on September 21s t . The date for the next meeting of the steering committee was tentatively set for October 9th at 7:30 p.m. in New York. �MINUTES OF A MEETING OF THE WORKING COMMITTEE Washington, D. C. September 21, 1967 John Feild opened the meeting and defined the. working committee as a reviewingand coordinating body with the primary objective of insuring a steady flow of information to the national steering committee so that the steering committee will be able to make appropriate decisions at its meetings. NOTE: Steering committee will meet Monday, October 9 at 7 : 30 PM in New York at the Time-Life Building. ADMINISTRATION Office space has been secured in the Federal Bar Building West, 1819 H Street NW . (tel eph one 293-1530). John Feild and Ron Linton will conti nue as coordina tors f or t h e Coalition. Full-time staf f will consist of Olga Corey , information coor d i n a tor and a ssociat e coordina tors Mel Cotton and Chris Mould. Jim Gib son of the Po tomac I n s t i t u t e and Vernon Jo r dan o f the Southern Reg ional Coun c il will be availabl e on a part- t i me basis on loan f rom their r e s p ectiv e a gen c i es. NOTE : An administrative report will be sent to y ou before the October 9 steering commi t tee meeting . You wi l l al s o r eceiv e a ros ter wi t h name s, addr es s es and phone numb ers of a l l st eering committee member s and t h ei r repres en tativ es. · A budget fo r operat ing t h e Coalition will b e presented t o the steering commit t ee on Oct ober 9. PUBLICATIONS A ros ter of all t hose who a t tend ed t h e Conv ocat i on will be s ent out b efore the October 9 meeting: everyone who at t end ed will receiv e one. Compl ete proceedings are also being prepared and wil l also be sent t o everyone registered at the Convocation. NOTE: Because of pr i n t ing co sts, bulk cop i e s of the p r oceedings can only be supplied at cost. Please notify Olga Corey i n advance of your organization's needs. TASK FORCES Two new task f orces are being f o rmed--Loca l Coali t i ons and Communicat i ons . Co-Chairmen for Local Coaliti ons are (1 ) Mayor Joseph Barr of Pittsbu rgh , (2) a businessman to be selected as soon as possible, and (3) Arnold Aaronson, of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights. Co-Chairmen for Communications are (1) Joseph Allen, President of McGraw-Hill Publications, (2) John Johnson, President of Johnson Publications (Ebony, Jet), and (3) Harold Fleming, President of the Potomac Institute. Also, Roy Ash of Litton Industries has agreed to serve as Co-Chairman of the Task Force on Educational Disparities with Dr . Arthur Flemming and Roy Wilkins. �-2- PRIVATE EMPLOYMENT Representatives of the Co-Chairmen of the task force met with the coordinating staff. They are considering pilot meetings (probably New York, Detroit, Atlanta) at which 10-20 representatives of the local corporate structure will generate ideas and lay the groundwork for local action. The first meeting would be held early in October. Under consideration for follow-up to the local meetings is a national meeting to launch plans for assisting local private employment programs. The task force also plans to prepare a handbook for the initiation and developmen t of local task forces on private employment. LOCAL COALITIONS Cities in which local coalitions are already in the process of formation--or a re likely to be--are being identified. These cities will be contacted to send representatives to a national meeting in Chicago on October 18. At this meeting there will be presentations on the techniques of establishing and operating local coalition task forces on private employment, legislation (public service employment) and communications. Meanwhile, staff li aison from the Coalition will be available to any city coalition working in these three areas. Hopefully 50 or more local coalitions will be in op era tion by early November . NOTE: All members of working committee were asked to immediately contact their principals and urge them to contact key people in local ccmmunities who could be helpful in establishing local coalitions as emphasized in the Coalition's Statement of Principles, Goals and Commitments. PUBLIC SERVICE EMPLOYMENT The t ask force urged members of the working committee to relay to their principals th e need f or telegrams , calls and letters in support of the Cl ark- Javits bi ll . I t was explained that the Coalition's endorsement of this l egislation was t aken as a result of polling members of the steering committee as agreed at the previous meet ing . In ord er to keep procedures cl ear, the t a sk force will meet before the Octob er 9 steering committee meet i ng to draw up recommendations to the Committee for Coalition policy on pending legislation . COMMUNICATIONS The three Co-Chairmen of this task force h ave d efined their objectives as three-fold : (1 ) communicat ing to the public the meaning, goals and activities of the Urban Coalition, ( 2 ) working with other task forces in producing materials which wil l offer technical assistance and guidance in implementing coalition programs and (3) mounting a nationwide educational effort on the urgency of the urban crisis. The national Advertising Council has registered a strong interest in assisting the Urban Coalition and has scheduled a special meeting with a coalition representative to discuss how their interests, talents and energies may best be used. �-3- RECONSTRUCTION INVESTMENT AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Tas k force Co-Chairmen are meeting in New York on October 5. This tas-k force will be ·working closely with the Insurance Committee on Urban Problems which will also be working closely with local coalitions. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY Task force co-chairmen have not met yet. has expressed a desire to work with us. A task force operating in Illinois OCTOBER 9 STEERING COMMITTEE MEETING Four items have been proposed for the agenda of the October 9 meeting, which will be attended by principals and their representatives. These are: (1) recommendations on organization, (2) presentation of task force programs, (3) procedures for developing public policy positions and, (4) an administrative report. Since there will be discussion of the desirability of enlarging the present 33-member steering committee, especially to provide for some type o f participation by local coalitions, a committee was appointed to consider this question and report on October 9. This committee consists of Richard Hirsch, Chairman, Andrew Biemiller, Alfred Eisenpreis, Harold Fleming, Bayard Rustin, Wayne Smithy and Peter Tufo. It was a lso decid ed that the proposal for an Urban Economic Council would be presented to the steering committee .at the October 9 meeting. �WORKING COMMITTEE ROSTER September 27, 1967 Mr. John Feild Mr. Ron Linton (202) 293-1530 Co-Chairmen Mr. Andrew Biemiller (202) 628-3870 Mr. George Meany President AFL-CIO 815 16th St., N. W. Washington, D. C. Mr. Jack Conway (202) 393-5596 Mr. David Cohen (202) 393-5581 Mr. Walter Reuther President United Auto Workers 8000 E. Jefferson Ave. Detroit, Michigan Msgr. Lawrence Corcoran ( 202) 332-2730 Archbishop John F. Dearden President National Confer ence of Catho lic Bishop s St. Aloysius 1234 Washington Blvd. Detroit, Michigan Mr. Jack Davies (21 2) 552-4415 Mr. David Rocke fe ller Pres ident Chase Manhattan Ba nk New York, N. Y. Mr . Alfred Eis enprei s ( 212 ) 679 - 0800 Mr. Theodore Schlesinger Pres ident Allied Stores Corporation 401 Fifth Avenue New York, N. Y. Mr. Walter Fauntroy (202) 387-2090 The Reverend Martin Luther King President Southern Christian Leadership Conference 330 Auburn Avenue, N. E. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Mr. John Gunther (202) 298-7535 Mr. Patrick Healy (202) 628-3440 Honorable Joseph Barr Mayor of the City of Pittsburgh City Hall Pittsburth , Penn. �WORKING COMMITI'EE ROSTER (Page 2) Honorable Milton Graham Mayor of the City of Phoenix City Hall Phoenix, Arizona Honorable James H.J. Tate Mayor of the City of Philadelphia City Hall Philadelphia, Penn . Mr. James Hamilton (202) 544-2350 Dr. Arthur Flem ming President National Council of Churches 475 Riverside Drive New York, N. Y. Dr . Roy Hamilton (617) 523-1100 Honorable John F. Collins Mayor of the City of Boston City Hall Boston, Mass. Mr . Tom Hannigan ( 202) 265-8040 Mr . Joseph D. Keenan Secretary International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers 1200 15th St ., N. W. Washing t on, D. C. Mr. Willi am C. Hart ( 212) 751 - 1311 Mr . Gerald L. Phi llippe Chairman of the Boa r d General Elec tr ic Co . 570 Lex ingt on Avenue New York, New Yor k Rabbi Richard Hir sch (2 02) 387-2800 Rabb i Ja cob Rudin Pr es i den t Synagogue Council of America 235 Fif th Avenue New York, N. Y. Mr . Richard Idler (412) 553-4555 Mr . Fr e derick Close Chairman of the Board Aluminum Company of America Alcoa Building Pittsburgh , Penn . �WORKING COMMITTEE ROSTER (Page 3) Mr. Vernon Jordan (404) 522-8764 Mr. John Wheeler President Mechanics and Farmers Bank Box 1932 Durham, North Carolina Mr. Jay Kriegel (212) 566-6934 Mr. Peter Tufo (202) 223-6694 Honorable John V. Lindsay Mayor of the City of New York City Hall New York, N. Y. Mr. Conrad Mallett (313) 963-0566 Honorable Jerome P. Cavanagh Mayor of the City of Detroit City Hall Detroit, Michigan Mr. Allen Merrell (313) 322-2687 Mr. Henry Ford II Chairman Ford Motor Company Detroi t, Michigan Mr. Clarence Mitchell (202) 544-5694 Mr. Roy Wilkins, Executive Director National Association for the Advancement of Colored People 20 W. 40th St. New York, New York Mr. Charles Moeller (212) 578-2011 Mr. Gilbert W. Fitzhugh President and Chief Executive Officer Metropolitan Life Insurance Co. One Madison Ave. New York, New York Mr. Paul Parker (612) 330-2100 Honora ble Arthur Naftalin Mayor of the City of Minneapolis City Hall Minneapolis, Minnesota Mr. Guichard Parris (212) 751-0300 Mr. Whitney Young, Jr. Executive Director National Urban League 55 E. 52nd Street New York, N. Y. �WORKING COMMITTEE ROSTER (Page 4) Mr. Joseph Rauh (202) 737-7795 Mr. Arnold Aronson Executive Secretary Leadership Conference on Civil Rights 2027 Mass. Ave., N.W. Washington, D. C. Mr. Bayard Rustin (212) 666-9510 Mr. A. Philip Randolph President Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters Room 301 217 W. 125th St. New York, N. Y. Mr. John J. Sheehan (202) 638-6929 Mr. I. W. Abe 1 President United Steelworkers of America 1500 Commonwea lth Building Pittsburgh, Penn. Mr . William Slayt on (202) 26 5-2224 Mr. Andrew Heiskell Chairman of the Board Time, Inc. Rockefeller Center New York, New York Mr. Jame s Rouse President The Rouse Co . Village of Cross Keys Baltimore, Mc: . Mr . M.A. Sloan ( 919) 682- 9201 Mr . Asa T. Spaulding Pre sident North Carolina Mutual Insurance Company Box 201 Durham, N. C. Mr. Ph i lip Sorenson ( 812) 379-6331 Mr . J . I rwin Mill er Chairman of the Board Cummins Engine Company 301 Washingt on Str eet Columbus , Indiana Mr. David Stahl (312) 744-3307 Honorab l e Richard Daley Mayor of the City of Chicago City Hall Chicago , Ill. �WORKING COMMITTEE ROSTER (Page 5) Mr. Dan Sweat (404) 522-4463 Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor of the City of Atlanta · City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Mr. Anthony Weinlein Mr. Richard Murphy (202) 2 96-5940 Mr. David Sullivan President Building Service Employees International Union 900 Seventeenth St., N. W. Washington, D. C. Not yet designated Mr. Roy Ash President Litton Industries 9370 Santa Monica Boulevard Beverly Hills, California �CITY OF ATLANTA CITY HALL August-17, 1967 ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYO_R R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant MRS. ANN M. MOSES , Executive Secretary DAN E. SWEAT, JR ., Director of Governmental Li aiso n / ./ MEMORANDUM To: Ann Moses From: Dan Sweat John Feild, U. S. Conference of Mayors, called today concerning the Urban Coalition meeting the Mayor w ill attend on Thursday, August 24. They have divided the delegates into ten 11 mobilization sessions 11 and they want a Mayor and a businessman to chair each of the ten sessions. They are very anxious that Mayor Allen chair one of the sessions along with Roy Ash, President of Litton Industries. The Mayor I s topic would concern 11 Developing Local Support and Local Coalition for the Urban Coalition 11 and the second part that Mr. Ash would take would be 11 Ways of Expanding Private Initiative in Dealing with Central City Problems 11 • These sessions will be held at 2:00 p. m. and John says that if the Mayor has to leave early and catch a plane then Mr. Ash would chair the remainder of the session. If the Mayor is in agreement, they would like his representative to be in Washington at 10: 00 a. m. Monday to develop the program content . If you talk with the Mayor in the morning , would you please discuss this w ith him so that we can let the Conference of Mayors know as early as possible Friday whether or not he will be willing to do i t. 11 DS:fy xi- J ~ · J' £,, 0 LJ._ ~ , A,d �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 8, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 8, Document 2

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_008_002.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 8, Document 2
  • Text: NEW YORK; N "Y" Ma y 2 8---Beginni ng July 8 ,- a. b a.s ic cour se in reading skills wi ll b e t ele•ised from c oast to c o a st in 30 lessons of one-half hour each " This th e latest o f a se ri e s o f pro j ect s initiated by the Manpower Education: Institute to enable wo r ke r s including the O unskill ed employed and the unemployed . to advan c e themselves. in the ranks of American La bor " While designed t o benef it vi ewers of all a ges 0 from school dropouts to college g r adua tes, the co~rse is be ing timed for maximum availability to the 1,000 , 000 young men and women who wi ll be participating in summer youth p r ograms including job t raining in business , industry and gov ernment offi ces " The National Broadcasting Company, cooperating as a public service , h as scheduled the program to run Mondays thr ough Fridays from 9:30 to 10 Ar. M, f o r si x weeks on Channel 4 in the metr opol i tan area a nd from outlets in other cities . It will make the program a vaila ble to other affiliated stations wherev er loca l c ommunity participati on is indica ted " This city 1 s f o rmer Commissi oner o f Labo r 0 James J . McFadden, national dire cto r o f the non - p r cfit Manpower Educa tion Institute , announce d that th e reading skill p r og ramp along with the summer youth job p r oj ec t , h ad the f ull suppo r t o f th e un ited l abo r movement, business o r gani zations a nd the city administration . Harry Van Aridale, Jr . , pres ident o f the Central Trades and Labo r Counci l , AFL-CIO is chairman of the Manpower Education Institute . The television s eries, to be k now as "Read Your Way Up", will include b asic reading skills, speed an d compr ehension in reading, word mastery; readin g for pleasure, and effe c tive use of libraries .. �READING SI p rovi d e viewing f ac i l i ties on the job to Fe :~mi t hou .... progr::1 ms . their t rainees · t > watch the half- I n Ne w Yo . . . k, where the Comme~~ ·e and Industry Associat i o n has calle d t he p r o gr a."111 t c the at tent 1 on o f 3 u900 companies r such bu siness leaders a s Equi. table L.::..re c New Yor k Telephone and Ch a s e Manhattan Bank a r e among t h e m.~ny- t h a~. wi l l no t only enable t h eir summer trainees to. view the c o lo ::· pr•_ 3ra!C1.s b ut wi ll p r o vide supplementary i.ns t r ucti o n b y s ta ff members o r other educator s. The Ci ty a dmin ist~ation h ere, wh ich is p u~tin g 1 5 , 000 youths in sum.1'1le r munici pal jobs P i s p r o v iding te l e vi s .:..·::m ,riewings · f o r all of t h.e m e xcep t those in s catte:red fie 1-:3. c.ssi ~n::r.en c.c, , as i n pa r ks. The Ci ty 1 s Ur b an Co r ps . c:msisti.ng o f 3 f 000 cc l .:'..e. g e students, will gi v e an additiona l hou r o f supp_ementa~y assistance fallowing each t .. �READIN G SKILLS " " , ·, 3 hal £ -hour TV p r og r am t'J t he tre.i ne e s i n c ity o..qeE ci eE " Mayor John V. Lindsay i s tak i ng meas ure s t c b r!ng tte benefits o f the i mp r o ved rea.ding skill s t o tho·c..sands who a:.:-€ o u ·,:.si.d e the summer job t raining p r ogr am " He has d::. rectcd the Ci ty O s H "...1:.11:,.n Re Eour ces Administra- tion to i n form all wel f are clients of the t.ele--7 i s .i.·::m. serie·s and t o notify t hem that they can obtain , free of cost , ~ r eadi ng k i t with cour se o u tlines , lesson. r eviews and supplementa.:::y r eading i nformation o The kits will be giv en out at all welfare cent ers. The p r ogram will b e made a vai l able also to patien ts in munici p a l hosp i tals, and inmates of houses of d e ten tion and o the r institutions . Ma.ny of the companies in the summer job p : : ·. Qg:!am a.re pro rid i ng the re a ding kits free to their trainee s " Indivi d ual home ·n·iewe r s may obtain the ki ts by sending $2 . 50 to Box 31 0, Grand Centra Po st Office 1 New Yo r k 10017, f o r the entire 30 lesson s . The curri culum h as been prepar ed f o r the ·Manpower Education Insti tute b y some o f the nation's leadi ng educators a nd spe ci a l ists in readi ng skills . of edu cation o f The consultan t s , headed by Dr. c -yde Weinho l d , Director t he New Jersey Department o f E:l. >J.~3. ~-i on and Robert H. Co ates , Di rector o f School District of Phila d e l phia r a = e Dr. Nila B . Smithi Di s~inguished Service Professor , Glassboro ; ta t e College; Eleanor T . Smi th , Library Services Program Officer o f the U. S. De p artme n t o f Health , Education and Welfare; Be:-ni~e A. M.o.c.Donald c Coor dinator of Adult Services, New York Public Library; ChLis Mc Hone y, Director of Education fo r the Department of the Ar my ; Gladys Alessi o f the mu.nicipal Welfare Education Department, a nd Professor Ann McKillop " �READING SKILLS , o 4 Th e p r og r am will .be given by Dr , Melv : .n H~',;,,a.z:ds f Ch a i r ma n o f the Re ading Departme_n t p and Dire ::; t or of the . Re'3_d :;_ng Improv ement Center, No r theaste r n Un i versity, and fo r mer professor at New Yo r k Univ e r sity ' s readi ng cen te r n �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 8, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 8, Document 4

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_008_004.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 8, Document 4
  • Text: NOTE: This is an interim report on follow-up to the June 10 Policy Council meeting. MEMORANDUM ' THE URBAN COALITION ACTION COUNCIL June 14, 1968 TO: FROM: Members of-the Policy - Council John W. Gardner SUBJECT: Meeting with House _of Representatives Leadership, June 11, 1968 Andrew Heiskell, Arthur Fle mming, Clare nce Mitchell and I visited leading House members on June 11. We had conversations with Speaker McCormack, Majority Leader Carl Albert, Whip Hale Boggs, Appropriations Chairman George Mahon, Minority Leade r Ge r a ld Ford, and Ways and Means Chairman Wilbur Mills. Although we talked about all of the various objectives of the Coalition, we gave special emphasis to the desirability of sparing the crucial urban programs in the $6 billion budget cut. We also stre ss e d the severe and v e ry imme diate nee d for the 75 million dollars for the OEO summe r job programs and the 25 million dolla rs fo r He a d s t art. We receive d the following reactions from the various me mbers of Congress: The Speak e r, Mr. Albe rt, Mr. Boggs . They did not wi s h t"o ma k e any cuts in the u r b a n p r o grams a n d hoped the Ur b a n Coalition would help the m p reve n t such cuts. They offere d hope that, if the Re publican l eadership would go along, the 75 million doll a rs for jobs could b e r es tore d in the r e gular supp l eme n t a l budge t. The Se n a t e would h ave t o a d d it. Th e y f e l t t h i s c ould b e done e v e n though the Pres ide nt h as not reques t e d it . The y told u s tha t Congr ess will c u t approx imately thr e e billion d o lla rs , l e aving the r es t t o t h e Pres ide nt, a nd fe lt tha t the Pres ide nt would h ave wide discreti on to p r ovide f u nding f o r u rban pro grams. · �- 2 - George Mahon. His attitude wa~ quite negative. He said that the Kerner report had cqntributed substantially to the unrest, and furthermore, the country could not buy its way out of -riots. He felt that whatever was done on the Hill would make no difference. When we stressed the need for 75 million dollars for the OEO summer job program·, he responded tb.at he had been told by the Bureau of the Budget that there would be 40% p e rcent more jobs this year than last and that although this was not the best situation, it was "pretty good". He did not explain how the Budget Bureau arrived at its estimate. Gerald Ford. Mr. Ford said Congress would cut around three billion dollars and the r e st would be lef t to the President. He was somewhat optimistic about the 75 million dollars for OEO summer jobs and stated that possibly this could be accomplished. He stressed that it could be accomplished far more easily, howe ve r, if the President were to ask for it. He indica t e d that if it were to come back from the Se nate it was poss ible tha t it could b e sustaine d in confere nce . Wilbur D. Mills. We had a long session with Mr. Mills who state d une quivocally tha t the $6 billion could be cut without touching any o f the crucia l progra ms f or the cities and the poor. He told us th a t Congre s s would cut a r ound thre e billion dollar s and sta ted further that cuts would be made in resea rch and deve lopment and foreign aid. He indicate d that h e favor e d the OEO p r o gram, and at the same time said tha t it wa s in s ome troub l e. The r e ques t i s '2 .18 billion dollars a n d h e stated t h a t Congress probably would a p p ropria te two billion. He said further tha t all n ew 11 s tarts 11 in public wo rks would b e stopped. The hi ghway p r o gram would con t inu e ; howe v er , n o n ew dams a n d o ther s u ch public works projects woul d b e b uilt. He said that t h e Bureau o f the Budge t and the Preside nt agree with this. I n add i t ion, h e said tha t h e be l ieved the Pres i dent was fully aware of the need to provide full funding for programs that affect urban areas. �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 8, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 8, Document 9

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_008_009.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 8, Document 9
  • Text: EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT OFFICE OF ECONOMIC WASHINGTON, D.C. 20506 CJllll(Jl~TlJNIT May 6, 1968 Mr. Dan E. Sweat, Jr. Director of Government Liaison City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Dan: Thanks for the information last week concerning your plans for the Atlanta Urban Coalition. I am definitely interested in this and I would appreciate your informing me on your future plans or progress toward establishing a local office there. Needless to say, I was relieved when the National Urban Coalition Office here in Washington gave me Mr. Sweat's name in Atlanta to concact. I know the organization is in good hands. Let me know when you are coming to Washington and if your schedule permits, I'd like to me et with you to further discuss the matter. Or if I'm coming to Atlanta any time soon, I'll let you know and maybe we could meet there . With best wishes. s·ncerely, Tm~ �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 8, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 7, Folder 8, Document 12

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_008_012.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 8, Document 12
  • Text: 145 Li sa Lane Ye ll ow Spri ngs, Ohio 45387 !- a r ch 4, 1968 Offi ce of t he. ayor Ci ty Hall At l anta , Georga De ar Sir : Pl ease send me any informati on t hat you may .ave on t he work or or ganizat i on of t he l ocal Ur ban Coalition i n you r community . I am a graduate student in busine ss a drri nistrat i on at t he Uni versit y of Dayton and am pre paring a term aper on t he Nati onal Urban Coa l iti on fo r a cou rse ent itled "Bu sine ss and Society . " I t is ~y ne raonal feelin g t hat it offers the g r eatest potent ial for success of any or ganization yet concei v ed . Thanking you in advance . Robe rt L. Har ris �
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 8, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1967-1968
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017