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Box 13, Folder 21, Document 38

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_013_021_038.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 13, Folder 21, Document 38
  • Text: Marc h 3, 1967 Mr. Jesse Hill Atlanta Life Insuranc e Company P . 0 . Box 897 Atlanta, Georgia 30301 Dear Jesse : May I acknowledge :receipt of your letter on behalf of the Atlanta Summit Leadership Conference regarding the four deaths in Perry Homes. A thorough inve tigation is being made of thi by the Atlanta Hou ing Authority, the insurance company, the Coroner, and the Atlanta Police Department. I will follow the inve tigation clo ely to its conclusion, nd I am immediately a king for the report from the Atlanta Police Dtpartment. Sincerely, Ivan All n, Jr. IAJr:am �
  • Tags: Box 13, Box 13 Folder 21, Folder topic: Race relations | racial matters | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 13, Folder 21, Document 40

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_013_021_040.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 13, Folder 21, Document 40
  • Text: REPORI' OF ATLANTA HOUSING AUI'HORITY CONCERNING DEATH OF MRS. JESSIE MAE COLLIER AND CHILDREN AT THE PERRY HOMES HOUSING PROJECT The first information the Housing Authority received as to the above occurrence came from a telephone conversation between a maintenance mechanic at Perry Homes and the Manager on Sunday morning, February 26. The Manager, Mr. Arthur F. Smith, had been called out of church to be given the information that the tenants residing in Apartment 726, 2186 Clarrisa Drive, N. W., had been found deaq in the apartment. The police had broken into the premises late Saturday night, but had not notified any Housing Authority personnel at the time the occurrence was discovered. The Manager in turn telephoned the Executive Director and it was arranged for the Assistant Technical Director, Mr. Ernest Bathke, to proceed to Perry Homes for an on-the-spot inspection. Mr. Bathke reached the site at about two o'clock Sunday afternoon in company with the Manager, the assistant to the Maintenance Superintendent and a maintenance mechanic, who entered the apartment. The gas heater located in the living room 'is vented through a plaster partition and connected to a transite vent located underneath the stairway on a diagonal and connected at the upper end to a vent from the gas water heater, thence to a vertical vent through the roof. The transite vent had become disconnected from the pipe leading through the wall from the heater. The heater may have been exhausting fumes into the apartment at this point. The space heater appeared to be clean and in good condition and this was later confirmed by a detailed examination. The plaster immediately surrounding the opening in the partition had a broken edge rather than a smooth appearance. All other features of the gas system were in good condition. The only evidence of carbon deposit in the room was on a paper bag located on a shelf nearby the vent pipe. There was no evidence of carbon on the windows or walls within the apartment. The records of the project Maintenance Department were examined and it was determined that in line with instructions from the Central Office to all projects requiring an annual inspection of all heating equipment prior to the heating season, this apartment was inspected on October 20, 1966, and the gas space heater readied for operation. This inspection was conduct ed by a maintenance group of three persons. Everything was in order except that one glass in the f r ont of the space heater was missing and was replaced. This heating inspection routine also includes cleaning and adjusting the space heater and vacuuming the vent system where necessary. The maintenance log also shows no requests made for service in this apartment subsequent to the October 20 inspection. Since this occurrence, space heaters in all the other apartments in the project have been inspected again and are in good condition. March 8, 1967 �
  • Tags: Box 13, Box 13 Folder 21, Folder topic: Race relations | racial matters | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 13, Folder 21, Document 48

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_013_021_048.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 13, Folder 21, Document 48
  • Text: r Farch 12 , 1967 Dear Mayor Al_en , I have be n weanin_ ~o w~it e or qu it e an'l ths.nk you for allowing e an intervi concerning the Governor ' s r ~ce . I manage " A" on the :rr-irer and j n the covrse . Not onl enjo~abl e ~ but very rr ofita llile. 0 sorre ~i me l ast No •ember to mace an y was iry tr ip I am t a ktnp a c our se th i s se~ester 1 n ~u b li c speakng ·~ hich we are r e quired to mak evera l p e e c hes . This Fri day we are to make spe e c h e s on a s pe c if ic ra c i a l problem. S i n ce I li "e in the Se.st Lake community , I have chosen the community tran ition vhi c h we a re exper iencing o Our professor req uires r esearch and " s ecific supporting rlata " in p esenting our s pee ch e . I r ea lize your time i e preme l y li mited , but I ~ould greatly appre ciate i t if you could a wer a~ w question for me . What do you feel has been the c au se oft. e situation? ave you seen a~y s j gns of organized "bloclcbus t ing "? Do you feel that Atl9nto's tremendous use of the Urban Renewal nr og r a m (wh ich I pl a n to make a sr ~ech ab ou t l ater in the semester ) has affe c ted the trend? of t e n fee l that the Negroes are being blamed ( th us created more r r e ju~i c e ) for ~hings which a r e not th eir own fault . Any help that you co L-1 . give in this area 'lould be greetly appr e ci ated . Thanks again for your help on my r E- p ort . Since~ Q~ Sn eed Box~ 2 ~L~2 6 Furman Unive ? ity Gre envill e ; S oC . 2961J P . · • Congr~t ula tions on y our nice wr ite-up in the current .ewsw eek . They 0 1 vious ly got the Nation ' s t o p mayors·: �
  • Tags: Box 13, Box 13 Folder 21, Folder topic: Race relations | racial matters | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 13, Folder 21, Document 50

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_013_021_050.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 13, Folder 21, Document 50
  • Text: ATLANTA LIFE INS UR.ANGE COMPANY POST OFFICE BOX 897 A TLANTA , GEORGIA 30301 March 1, 1967 J E SS E HILL, J R . ACTU A RY Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor, City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mayor Allen: The Atlanta Summit Leadership Conference urgently requests that your office launch a full scale investigation of the deaths of an entire family of the Perry Homes Housing Project in Atlanta. Death occured Thursday, bodies were discovered Saturday. The victims were Mrs. Josie Marie Callier, a daughter age 9 and two sons, ages 6 and 7. We have r eports of possible negligence on the part of the Atl anta Housing Authority. We have reports that there have been at least 4 other incidents of a faulty gas system causing deaths of tenants. Includ ing one case where one victim reported a faulty gas condition in his apartment, before he became a fatal victim. Very truly yours, ATLANTA SUMMIT LEADERSHIP CXlNFERENCE ~ Jes Hill, Jr., Co-Chairman Alderman Q. V. Williamson,Co-Chairma n Rev. Samuel W. Williams,Co - Chairman <....) -1+ ) C'<._...,1 �
  • Tags: Box 13, Box 13 Folder 21, Folder topic: Race relations | racial matters | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 13, Folder 21, Document 52

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_013_021_052.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 13, Folder 21, Document 52
  • Text: D NEWSPAPER D RADIO p·oR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 0TV PASCHALS I CHECK THE CITY I S SKYLINE ATLANTA! A LUXURIOUS, ULTRA -MODERN, MILLION DOLLAR MOTOR HOTEL HAS RISEN TO TAKE ITS PLACE AMONG THE FINEST MOST BEAUTIFUL STRUCTURES IN THE CITY. NOW STANDING MAJESTICALLY BESIDE PASCHALS RESTAURANT AND PASCHALS' LA CAROUSEL NIGHT CLUB, IS THE ALL NEW PASCHALS' MOTOR HOTEL A 120 ROOM SEVEN STORY BUILDING THAT REPRE SENTS AN INVESTMENT OF MORE THAN TWO MILLION DOLLARS AND !HE RE.I\LIZATION OF A DREAM TI!AT BEGAN MORE THAN A QUARTER OF A CENTURY AGO. THE PASCHAL BRCITHERS DREAME D OF ONE DAY BUILDING A 'HOME "AWAY FROM HOME 1 , AN ALL S: "CQ:li 2ASSING FACILITY WHERE ONE COULD FIND FOOD, DRINK, MERRIMENT, ENTERTAINMENT, AND · - ..?L CE TO REST UP FOR MORE ALL WITHIN THE CO!--!T iNES OF ONE COMPLEX. JAMES AND ROBERT ·:1-.:, SARlrt: D EARLY IN LIFE THAT HARD WORK WAS TtlE ONLY WAY TO M.<\KE REALITIES OUT OF ...::. --~3, n:,:.: , SO THEY :~, t GA.'< 1·ivRKING .t.'.:I l:iOURS A DAY SEVEN DAYS A WEEK . Tl{ZY BEGAN WITH A SMAJL STORE AND A SPECIALTY . THEY TURNED THE SM.<\LL STORE INTO A _..,.,. ~TAJRANT AND TiiE SPECIALTY , ROBERT'S VERY SPECIAL RECIPE FOR FRIED CHICKEN, INTO A ··GO:;:. D MINE". FROM FIVE TABLES AND FORTY CHAIRS THE RESTAURANT EXPANDED TO TEN TABLES Ai'I~ EIGHTY CHAIRS. WHEN BUSINESS CONTINUED TO IMPROVE THE PASCHALS BOUGHT THE PROPERTY ACROSS THE STREET AND BUILT A MUCH LARGER RESTAUR."'- NT, THEN A COCKTA IL LOUNGE. ' 1Lr. G,\ROUSEL", THEY CALLED IT, AND SOON ITS WARM INTIMATE ATMOSPHERE WAS THE SETTING FOR _,;:i:GHTS OF GREAT JAZZ MUSIC FEATURING A CAROUSEL OF AMERICA 'S MOST RENOWNED JAZZ .. i>.TI3T S. J IMMY SMITH, CANNONBALL ADDERLY, RAMSEY LEWI S , HORACE SILVER AND '.!:HE OTHERS .:JUN:U A SPECIAL RAPPORT, A WARMTH, A FEELING OF COMPLE7E CJI1FORT WHICH t-'.IA.DE THEM LOOK 7 (1:S/A..·r n TO PERFORMING FOR LA CAROUSEL AUD IE NCE S AS MUCH AS J AZZ CONNOISSEURS LOOKED r' :.P..\.1ARD TO HEARING THEM PLAY. TODAY "LA CAROUSEL" ENJOYS THE REPUTATION OF BE ING ONE C:7 'l:TI LEADING NIGHT CLUBS FOR "LE JAZZ EXTRAORDINAIRE" IN THE SOL'TH. _,:o w CAME THE MOST AMBITIOUS PART OF THE PASCHAL BROTHERS DREAM AND THEY SOON Fc.:m ... THAT -r:.:Ii. .,ING A XCIT OR LODGE WAS MORE THAN JUST MIXING MORT ·~ i~OR BRICKS . FIRST LAND -··. -;:i TO ~ f' CHA SE D AND rHE AREA HAD TO BE REZONED. THEY NEE D£:) _. fOUGH LAND FOR A HOT.t:.:... 8IG a .OuGH TO ACC OMMODATE ALL THE PEOPLE THAT MIGHT VISIT FRIENDS A1"\ID RELATIVES IN THAT 'A.RT F TOWN; ALL THE PEOPLE WHO CAME INTO ATLANTA TO DO BUSINESS WITH THE SIX COLLEGE S ~ ~ T_IB SURROUNDING AREA; ALL THE PEOPLE ••• so HOUSE BY HOUSE, LOT BY LCIT THE PA SCHALS 30UGh '£ UP THE PROPERTY AROUND THEM. THEY OFTEN FOUND THEMSELVES TALKING WITH PEOPLE 1-JHO <>. D :... I VED THERE ALL THEIR LIVES AND wANTED IT TO BE MADE WORTH THEIR WHILE TO GO ELSEwiiER2 . MORE OFTEN THAN NCIT THEY'D PAY TWICE AS MUCH AS THE PROPERTY WAS WORTH IN ORDER TO "B'JY IT. ORIGINALLY THE PLAN CALLED FOR THE BUILDING OF 7 2 UNITS, BUT BY THE TIME CONSTRUCTION HAD BEGUN, COMMUNITY ENTHUSIASM WAS SO HIGH AND MONTHS-IN-ADVANCE .di:SERVATIONS SO NUMEROUS THAT THE PASCHALS DECIDED TO ADD TWO ADDITIONAL FLOORS, 48 ADDIT IONAL UNITS. TODAY AS THE PASCHALS LOOK AT THE Fl<.UI TS OF THE IR LABORS ·_·SEY SEE IN PASCHALS' MOT OR HOTEL EVERYTHING THEY EVER DREAME D OF AND MORE. THE RE ARE :.. 20 GUEST ROOMS AND SUITES •• ROOMS EXQUISITELY FURNISHED IN AN ULTRA MODERN DECOR •• BAmUET FACILITIES FOR 350 PEOPLE •• AN ADDITIONAL DINING ROOM TO ACCOMMODATE 160 PEOPLE •• AN INTERIOR THAT IS BEAUTIFULLY CARPETED AND LUXURIOUSLY DRAPED._.SPACIOUS ROOMS EACH WITH ALL THE CONVENIENCES: RADIO, TELEVISION, TELEPHONE, YEAR ROUND COMFORT CONDIT IONING, PRI VATE ?..:'. .TH .\ ND SHOWER, AND ROOM SERVICE. THE SM.t\LLE ST ROOM MEASURES 14 x 19 o EACH ROOM HAS ~\ •UT DOOR BALCONY AND TWO DOUBLE BEDS. AUTOMATIC ELEVATORS ARE CONVENIENTLY LOCATEJ c .'.10 VE GUESTS SWIFTLY AND SAFELY TO THEIR FLOOR DESTINATION. THERE ARE THIRTY oNdECTING SUITES EXECUTIVE SUITES AND THE BAmUET ROOM OVERLOOK A 20 x 40 FOOT ,, _v..J.'f ING POOL. TI:IE POOL AND AMPLE SUNDECK FACILITIES SHOULD PROVE A DELIGHT TO Sw L"iMERS AND NON SWIMMERS ALIKE. THERE IS A CONVENIENT SiJBTERRANEAN PARKING AREA THA:' AN EASILY ACCOMMODATE 165 CARS. 0 Sam Eckstein Advertising-2046 Peachtree Rd., N.E.-Room 308 -Atlanta, Ga.-351-4234 p R E s s R E L E A s E �F.O R IMMEDIATE RELE A SE D NEWSPAPER D RADIO 0TV PASCHALS 1 (Cont.) F PASCHALS MOTOR HOTEL IS STRATEGICALLY LOCATED AT 830 HUNTER STREET, S.W. NEAR ATLANTA'S BUSINESS, CULTURAL, RELIGIOUS, AND RECREATIONAL CENTERS. IT IS A SHORT BUS RIDE FROM DOWNTOWN ATLANTA YET FA1 ENOUGH AWAY TO ESCAPE THE HUBBUB OF A THRIVING METROPOLIS. BUT ONE NEEDN'T GO DOWNTOWN TO FIND :·:OST ANY KIND OF GOODS .:,R Sc. RVICE . NEARBY ARE GASOLINE STAT IO S, A B K, A POST ..,:S-FICE , DRUG STORE, ·_,_-,. ..;.IETY ~'. TORE, 'B ARBER Sh OP , BEAUTY PP-P.LOR , ME DICAL A_F) LAV O'F ·~·TC • c: , T!:ff. A'T'EP S AND ·;·::.;. _,., ESTATE AND INSURANCE CONCERNS. ..:· :.~TORI . ::;LURCHES AND SCi.':'.:lOLS ARE NOT FAR . ~~0 5E OUT-OF TOWNERS VISITING OR ATTENDING F•JNCTIONS AT ONE OF THE: SIX COLLEGES ThAT COMPRISE THE ATLANTA UNIVERSITY CENTER wILL FIND THE DISTANCE FROM PASCHALS f'~J 'i'OR HOTEL IDEAL. PARKS AND STAD i iJ£'.i0 RE ; _;__, 2"' WITHIN WALKING DISTANCE . AND SO IT IS THAT THE PASCHAL BROTHERS ,.AN L -, .)K WITH PRIDE AT WHAT THEY SEE : • FINE RESTAURANT WHERE FRIED CHICKEN I STILL .t'RE PARED AND WATCHED OVER BY BRO'.::'.:ER ROBERT; A NIGHT CLUB WHICH CATERS TO THE F INEST JAZZ MUSICIANS IN THE LAND; AND THEIR M.l\.GNIFICENT NEW MOTOR HOTEL, ULTRA-MODERN IN ~v.7ERY RESPECT , A FAC.LL ITY THAT CA..'N READILY BOAST OF THE MOST r.XCELL ENT OF ACCOM.""'ODATIONS, BAm UET FAC IL ITIES, AND COMFORT; AND A LOCATION THAT IS IDEAL . B ~ MORE THAN THAT THE PASCHAL BROTHERS HAVE ACHIEVED THE FEELING OF IT BEING A HOME AVJAY FROM HOME" BY THE WARM AND CORDIAL ATMOSPHERE - THE PEOPLE WHO SERVE YOU. CREATE.· ..,,:: " HECK THE CITY'S SKYLINE ATLANTA! THEN CHECK IN TO THE BIG BEAUTIFUL NEW .ASCiiALS' MOTOR HOTEL,830 HUNTER STREET, s. W. . Sam E c kst e in Advertising - 2045 Pea chtree Rd., N . E. - Room 308 -Atl anta., Oa.-351-4234 R E -..... C C R E L E A s E �
  • Tags: Box 13, Box 13 Folder 21, Folder topic: Race relations | racial matters | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 13, Folder 21, Document 58

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_013_021_058.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 13, Folder 21, Document 58
  • Text: I - ' , ..J,f Ad tl• , . l_<:u J ~_..1 I .-.. l Ad~:-!} OU~ I ,.1\/ ,_, A T E ,, t- R I _, To C 1Ty l3L~CK. ., . i l - .:,; ~- , .,..,._,.._ f;,J: C. .,...,,., Ou ,, '· ,· .... (J. •· ~,.., ..,/ . l ,. ' ~ (T ON I . S ro P· THE I rs - 'IO u c 1-f 1= Ar, N K.' /VO\/',/ (; , 1v , 1-11:.. S To f< Es / '7- -X.J--V ;J:f;J/~,c ~Jv _JJ?~ /~, v;,.~ M ~ ~ _·: I Lt L: - , 1N C:s- ro.,v , c 1,, , · l:~-:-l- - ---.------------V,0e, City Ploy L.c+~u,-,, r_ 1'1 . -,o I. c,O + t-1Ci ·/'; >fC S/-r(,c'f::;, I r-· I. f,;.q ("_·-t Y.: b c., -~ (J O 'i 1, ~· •, _ V, / ~ Ci:..• rr-; r, I 1.. : i I ..,(~ ' . ! I -~ c,·, 0 1 }·; I ( (.:-,,. j I\;,; .J. 1.,i bo N ()\ p NI 1.-- _J j { r· It_, i1.,•' C, , I ,_ ) .-( Y '· 1 I · . {' l_ l,\ :·· \.:. C I' r v-... . f)(· '···f' I (:'~ L_F: 'i o uI-< 1-] J.. Ac.. K 131-
  • Tags: Box 13, Box 13 Folder 21, Folder topic: Race relations | racial matters | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 13, Folder 21, Document 59

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_013_021_059.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 13, Folder 21, Document 59
  • Text: I ~/IA , • ~ ~ 0 .J? ') 143.215.248.55 16:03, 29 December 2017 (EST) ~1 p. ' ---;.,<-,~/ !£· ~/V~? ~ ~7/- ~y S) / J A . ~ . I )l;tJ ~ / 12_ ~ ~ l l~ L ~ /f ---7/ ' (7 ~7~ "--" ----~ , A I ~ ~( _., ~_ _ _ e£ ~ 143.215.248.55 ~/~ (}_ #~? cV tL/ ~ J ~ ~ . -- ~ < --?-"~ /~~ ~ Rr:1, ~. -f;(_ �
  • Tags: Box 13, Box 13 Folder 21, Folder topic: Race relations | racial matters | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 13, Folder 21, Document 61

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_013_021_061.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 13, Folder 21, Document 61
  • Text: ACWORTH, GEORGIA THURSDAY, OCTOBER 26 - 3 P.M. PROPERTY OF MR. E. 0. TURNER Located one mile south of Acworth on Highway 293-about 4 miles north of Kennesaw. DEVELOPED COMMERCIAL PROPERTY WITH ADJOINING HOME This is a real opportunity for you to acquire a valuable piece of highway road frontage with store buildings and a comfortable, modern home just one mile out of town and you can get it at the price you want to pay . . . at Auction!, This fine tract, irregular in shape, has a total of about 3 acres, with 350 feet on the highway and averaging 300 feet deep. There's a good business at the store and service station with comfortable living quarters in the rear. The extra store building could provide a profitable rental and you can supervise the entire operation from your own home on the adjoining property. Be sure to look this over before sale day and see how it can fit into your plans - then be at the Auction with your bid. 350-FOOT FRONTAGE MODERN HOME STORE-SERVICE STATION With Living Quarters STORE BUILDING AND STORAGE ABARGAIN BUY AT THE PRICE YOU SET! ·- . . - - - - - . - -- ~-- - �• d COMFORTA BLE, MODERN HOME Conveniently close to the store and service station is this comfortable one-story home on a nicely landscaped and fenced lot. It contains two bedrooms, kitchen, breakfast area, living room with wall-to-wall carpet. Garage and porches. Several bearing fruit trees are in the rear. View of the light, modern kitchen with built-in cabinets. No furnishings will be sold. STORE-GAS STATION WITH LIVI NG QUARTERS Presently leased, the store and gas station do a nice business with the owner advising that over 20,000 gallons of gas sold pe r month. An additional value is the convenient living qua rters in the rear of the building consisting of 3 rooms with 1 ½ baths. A meat slice r and meat sca les will be the only equipment offe red for sale. STORE-AUCTION BUILDING AND ADJOINING STORAGE BUILDING This we ll-buil t brick building, 32' x 28', has been used a s an auc tion building but could readily be conve rted to a restaurant or other comme rcial use. The small building adjoining provides good storage for any purpose. �
  • Tags: Box 13, Box 13 Folder 21, Folder topic: Race relations | racial matters | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 13, Folder 21, Document 67

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_013_021_067.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 13, Folder 21, Document 67
  • Text: Au; us t 16, 1967 i.1ayo r I van LU l en , .Jr . S t a te Capitol ,\ tlanta , i'}e or ~ia Dea r I,layor All en : On Aug ust 1 , we wrote to you co nc e r nin 3 the p os sib ility of a l ayman furnishin; test i mony to t he Com~issio~ a re nt r~cial prob le ms , b ut to date , have not rec eived a repl y . Since we a re so interested in t he sutject , we would aQpre ci ate the opportunity to prov ide data . Your s very trul y , ~~lfr Sll ; cmz 102C Willett Drive .Joh ns to wn , Penna . I �
  • Tags: Box 13, Box 13 Folder 21, Folder topic: Race relations | racial matters | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 13, Folder 21, Document 75

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_013_021_075.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 13, Folder 21, Document 75
  • Text: Commercial and Residential Installations and Repairs UNDERWOOD Licensed Electrical Contractor "More Power to You:"= ~ ~ = -~E~L~E~C~T~R~l~ C=C ~ O~M ~P~A~N!Y L =======:::::=:::==---1720 DeKalb A venue, N. E . Atlanta, Georgia 90307 379-5588 Sept.20, 1967 Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor 3700 Norl hside Drive, N.W. Allan t a, Georgia 30305 Dear Mayor Allen, It was only recently I read t his enclosed book dealing with the problem in our towns. The statemmts made the rein appalled me but, realizing this book was published by the Workers Library Publisher s ( a communist printing com_p3.ny) the statements then came to light to me as I'm sure they will to you. My concern is that a certain minority group in our society is being used and misguided by this conspiracy for the conspiracy's gain. I am sure if our city le aders were aware of what is broug ht out in this book, then you would t a ke action t o help prevent the cruelty imposed on this group by our enerey-. I appreciate your time and if I may be of help contact me. Sincerely, fa_ -r-~ John F. Underwood JFU/bu Copy of this letter sent to each alderman. �
  • Tags: Box 13, Box 13 Folder 21, Folder topic: Race relations | racial matters | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 13, Folder 21, Document 79

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_013_021_079.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 13, Folder 21, Document 79
  • Text: n TO , ~ - °f4 Da n E. Swea t , FROM: ~ ROUTE SLIP Jr. r your i nform a tion D Please r efe r co the a ttac he d corresponde n ce a nd ma ke th e n e c essa ry re ply. D Advise me th e s t a tu s o f th e a ttac h e d . F ORM 25-4 - S �
  • Tags: Box 13, Box 13 Folder 21, Folder topic: Race relations | racial matters | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 13, Folder 21, Document 80

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_013_021_080.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 13, Folder 21, Document 80
  • Text: THE SUNDAY JfJIOrT:Poffreniensc.tttfflOl't~, wlllte """1 lrt,lit) ~'-t1t11tflop~ 5 ~ 1.'11!:lteJ:i• on the deadly economics of segregation: the lime-bomb inthe core of the American city ~ GENERATION OF DESPAIR TO GET an idea of the despair lhls background Stokeley behind Amerk:a's me riots Carmichael, the apostle of Black Powe r , calls fur af;~s143.215.248.55:b~f ~~or; tl\143.215.248.55-Ja It ~:ran f143.215.248.55er~~: .Britain. ~ We are not used to think andviolentdemud. Butthe ing of America in images of current pre_dicament of 1he poverty: and evenif1re were, Nero is as 1mmodente. The the portrty which afflicts the Negrostrtionsof a city like ;~o !~j~hi\gfr~-.~~ a Detroilisof a kind so bizarre in the South, of Cil·il Rights as to make any European workers, have produced only threecom•1ctions,andnosen· experience Irrelevant. tencc()fmoretha, tenyears. The whole story takes a lot And even moderate Negro of telling. But there are IOIJ}e facts whicb can be leaders fr~I admit their ~(t~rre~ i~J:~ ~~e"~tm~i143.215.248.55 ~1 a~ea~e~: lhescopeandsubt!etyofthe h:fu!:,k;~ ., ~~uf~:nA::;fc~n a moment when Amenca s worse after all we've bee,, through.. there's something fe -Onein1hreeoftheNegroes 0a143.215.248.55; t;~on~ilie~::. :~: in most Northern cities are Je:Vs, the u.nions-the whole unemployed, or as good as 143.215.248.55 16:03, 29 December 2017 (EST)r v::143.215.248.55 16:03, 29 December 2017 (EST)c/ as H~?! ~!~ Ja~:~pbof; adrt~ ~~r~itt!b143.215.248.55 such faithin theabililyof survey); thissociety tomm·ethathe's a~dressingonlytheNegroes." - ....To.irteeayE>ars after the Supreme Court outla11,ed \1, ACCORDING1.9 Walfer l.ipp. there ls more segregatlon m theschools thane1•erbefore; ~!~~cte/ c: me~e~~:i'ir: ..nfhs! race problem as we know Ills -In aperiodofunparal!eled really theby·productof our boom, after six years on steady economic expansion, plan!ess: ~isordered, bedrag· gled, drifting democracy, medianincomesin theurban "Until we ha1·e learned to g h e t t oes (where most Negroes live)hn edecreased ~i~::b-Od;.v:~~be~~-t during the 1960s. a ·self.respecting sta~us, This is also after sel'eral guaran.tee his ch•ll liberltes, years or u n para l l e l e d and bringeducationandp!av to him, the bulk of our ta)k 16:03, 29 December 2017 (EST)e ~~ w143.215.248.55h about ' the raceproblem'w1II true. A tragic. automatic mechanism has been exposed ~~m:ind1~;.ni~\~fu:t"i~h:lolii"e in American sociely, through relation between black men which nearly every attempt to andwhitewi!lbe a dirtyone. helplhepoor-andthepoor In a clean civilisation the two are. basically, the Negroes-- racescan conduct their busi, has been transmuted into a ness together cleanly,andnot device for making the rich unti!then." richer and lhepoorpoorer The s l uggishness of The kind of irony confront- America's response lo thil ing America is that the indictment is indicated by i~ Feder,al money for the urban date. Lippmann was writing renewal programmes - running thisyearat £200million in 1919. Th at was the " Re« ~1~i: ;i~fu:i1:f:C~in~s10wft\ Summer," the Jirst or th, hot ones. More thaa middle-class housing, which long twenty race battlP~ flared IQ the slum-dwellers cannot the streets that s_ummer, afford. seven of them cxplodmg.int, The situation is one !n majorriots. ln the bl.oodte;\ which a city like Detroit can be seriously regarded as erupting in ChicJgo m Jul, " liberal" - although nn ~71:~t~hft~s Two myths IK'r,·ad* tlit 143.215.248.55li~~ou143.215.248.55p1rr:srath:fe slncethcearly firties. Against subject. The first i~ lhll. /iigh~~::::n~:~pei:::rre~faiid w143.215.248.55l~~ a:g{:~ ~;~1ineJ.ric America has been g_rappling llrith the problem ~mce the rivll war a century ago. (This ls commonly ad1·anced in Britain to demonstrate that ~ you cannot legislate the bearts o[ men.) The second lr!fihis, .thatthe upsurgeof \•1olencemthe~egroghetloes of American c1tJes owr the last rou r Jears is a new ~henomenon The central truth is that, right until the end of the &eetind 11orld war, American Government \\aS, at least ~~i~aai: ni~:U~1~ee:r~c:~yi '\l,·oodrow _Wi)son-the man Jlroudly bringing freedom to turope at the <'lose of the 6.rst world war-adual!y im· ~~:al ::~~i~~!ti~~ th1: sa~~ period,only the intervention of the Supreme Court pre· vented the imposition of for~al ~part!ieid through u m \ i:omng legislation - • 'w,dmledh!omany yemtoargulngti,at you couldn't legislate against prejudice -kn D. iiQal, 11.,1 1~,h,~111 Opptrtu1i1, C11ni11C1~ • Ernn Rooscvell's New Deal was segregationist. In the rur~l areas the A~r\cultu.ral Adjustment Adm1mstrat1on adjusted thousands of Negro sharecroppers off the land When these destitute refugees swelled the urban ghettoes, the New De al housing agen~ies turned out to have policicsrootedm the olddeal. One agen~y. the Federa!Housmg Admmistration, blocked mortgages on homes that Nesroes wanted to buy in whttesuburbs, The other, lhe United S t ate s Housing Authority, financed separate 143.215.248.55si: \it~roj~ ~vit~o~Y,bl143.215.248.55 black developments beeame merely extensions of the old ghettoes. Ell'ecth'ely, the New Deal t~hio~: ~\~:hJ:~;s0:e~\~ 1:~t:::~io~ system with sufficient stark· ness to ha\'e come to terms with the basic, eronomic nature of the Negroplightif anyone had wanted to look that hard. But the Negro emerged from the New Deal ifanythingworsethanhe had ~ ~~/143.215.248.55 segreBut in a back.handE>d way ~~r:1~: ~~! Na~lia~~:l ~i: b!h1~hab~~! Negroespinnedtheir faith for the next generation: the common front of the Negro organisations and the wh.ite labour unions. That alliance is arguably the single mo~t important reason why Amen· can rities enjoyed almost romplete racial peace for twentv.one l"ears up to 1964 As ]orig as the grouping held theNegroeshadatleastsome powerful allie~ - notably Walter Reuther's United Auto Workers-in the jobs market. ' .From the unions' point of view there was never much altruism Involved. They were simply shrel.l'd enough to see in the 1930s that. with ml\· lions uncmplovcd, the Negroes would make excellent strikebreakers unless cor· ralled. It was In Detroit, home of the United Auto Workers, that the alliance bet11·een i\"egrocsandthe unionsfinally sundrred in 1960, when the while craft unions and industrial unions rejoined fore~. andall the rraftunions old distrust of Negroes came to the fore. It was an ominous 143.215.248.55o143.215.248.55;~~ab~~e Pi:1 skilled and semi-skilled jobs, to procced.notatonc{',but merely "•,r1th all deliberate speed." As the Nes-roes h~~e learned withgrowmg bllter· ness, the court could not have handed the southern states a more ])('rfertly fashioned weapon for delay. Ten years later, sim·eying t~e rubble of the desegregation programme, a Suprl'me Court Justice 1'1S mol'l'd lo remark: "There has betn entirely too much deltbera· lion an~. not enough speed... Nor has the Government demonstrated anv m1'.lre alacrity to enforre·1he 11154 dectsion The 1964 Ciril RiahtsActwasclear: nomore [~~tr ~h:f~. st~u::iraef:~~ offab-Outl.900ofthrSouth's 2,200 school dis!ricts right 11 ot~~ Co~yresJd:~!t~t~ i ;r decided lo be lenient it was ten years since the Supreme Court dceision. but the schoolscould hal'e e1•cnmore time to ease themsel\"eS Into segregation. Th~ result goes !or to di1J1:/: ~~e Jo143.215.248.55e~~g~ s uereme Court promises of ln81hers143.215.248.55 16:03, 29 December 2017 (EST) went to integrated schools: by 1965, 5.8percent.;today only 13 per cent ~ almos! l4ye_ars since the highest court m the Jand ruleditw:is el"efj' child's right ~r'~~"r~:~ ~Ge !~ 'Thefactisthatwhile \~r !,t1:: 143.215.248.55l~~f;gr~s 1i~ce workers on the lowest rungs o£the\adder In the Negroe~' po~t·war struggle for equality, the Supreme Court judgment of ~ ~: 01:gt~nsifl!~gr;[:~io~s i~ landmark But in fact the willingness of the C~urt to temper the Constilut1on lo the times emasculated the l'ietory. A c9nstilutiona! rig;ht. the Court ~:r:~~:r :t;~:~~1,-143.215.248.55 an1 ~~u~~ 143.215.248.55-b eJ:,~rnt~ ~~e; theUrhanleague ... hm been kying to nw,efourNegroesinto asuburhhichisnot In anyghetto man's future,400,000 tenement buildings in NewYonOty hm dettrioratedorbeen demtllshtd -ld1rfCt10,j,ScMfl 1fl1ci1I W1rl,CohmfitU1i1!f$i1J At the time the Supreme !hhee \~ro!hr~~ the Court handed down the Court's cautious 1954dedsion America. confront,d the unpreredenlcddccision that \Vas handed down, the pro· shortcom1 ngsofher economic de~gregation of schools was cesses which tore Detroit 1 •part thlsmonthhadbttnon the m()1·e a lrmi: trm<' /And t~~'i'ci~tih~n1':g~nJinda book. _published by Ebon)' magattne,hsts1tasoneofthe ten best cities for Negro employment.) Building the ghelto began fh!0~e;a£.~~m ~!~~\'n~ 11'1E>turnofthel"fntun!here has been a movement of !'i"egroes from the southern farm!andstotheurbannorth· impelled most 1·1gorousl_1 by ~: !et1~~-~i{d~_mf!°J~m~~li~~ havrmo,ed northsmre 1!!40 -amillionoftheminlhelai;l tmyears. Tuo.thirdso£all adult\egroe~ inthenorthem citieswerebomrnthrsouth. Mechanisation of the farms and theuseofchem1 of racerelalionslnthatsuburb ts ir1 th~ hand~ of those children, 1nd it rnay well be 1io!pn1 Hnwe E>r, the _teneral ~itu at10n here, m contr~~t with Anthony lester �The death of Billy furr APPOINTMENTS �
  • Tags: Box 13, Box 13 Folder 21, Folder topic: Race relations | racial matters | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 13, Folder 21, Document 81

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  • Text: 14 Monday, September 11, 1967 THE CHR.ISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR • ·o etroit sifts through riot embers for racial lessons I By Ric~ard L: Strout Staff correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor Detroit Back and forth across the United St ates in this violent summer of 1967 we have · traveled now close to 9,000 miles. Some ·scenes have been idyllic; some poignant. The most shocking thing we have seen is the charred and angry scar in Detroit left by a riot which all but paralyzed the nation's fifth largest city for four da ys and took over 40 lives. On sleazy 12th Street, driving north one month later, it looks for a minute like Berlin after the bombing. Here a row of stores is gutted. Across the way plywood sheathes bandage smashed windows . A chimney rises in a burnt-out home like a cellar hole in an abandoned New England farm. Supporting I-beams still cant against sidewalls. There are pathetic scrawled appeals, "Soul Brother" meaning a Negro owner. A cast-iron radiator is held up crazily against the sky by its connecting waterpipe in what was formerly a second-story room. The room is gone. At its height the riot was like war; tanks trundled, machine guns spat at snipers, police sirens howled, fire trucks roared, arsonists laugh~d and looted. Officials looked down almost in tears on fires that seemed to cover the whole town. Here a city foug11t its own people. Cost-half-a-billion dollars. Has the lesson of Detroit been learned by the rest of the country? In this reporter 's opinion, no. The lesson is that if it can happen in Detroit in can happen anywhere. The forces of destruction an nihilism in American core cities <)re still there . Almost a model city ... Detroit was almost a model city in racial matters. There was a liberal mayor and governor, the most advanced summer program in the United States, and complete communication between officials and the supposed Negro leaders . It had two · articulate Negro congressmen and one of the biggest middle-class Negro communities in the nation. "We told ourselves it can't happen in Detroit," said Martin Hayden, chief editorial writer of the Detroit News. He speaks who wants all the facts but also feels the with the commitment of a newspaperman thing passionately as a human being. The feeling of security helped betray Detroit. Trying tactics that were successful a year b efore, police did not use firearms for a couple of hours while leaders tried t o " cool it" with bullhorns. The crowd grew. " There is no evidence that anything but an immediate and large show of force will stop a riot," says city expert James Q. Wilson of Harva rd . Compressed to oversimplification, here are three things the riot indicated t o some who lived through it. The National Guard isn't trained to handle a riot. Compared with the performance of seasoned regular Army paratroopers, who were finally called in, the guard's performance seemed to some "appalling." Second, the web of municipal life is more vulnerable t o civil disorder than ha s been supposed. The spontaneous, new-style guerrilla tactics of skip-hop, fire bombing can black out a city. Finally it is doubtful even yet if the natiol'l has much notion of what it is up against: a new, violent urban underclass set apart from the rest of the community. It is doubtful if Congress understan ds it. In a summer where 70 cities have been hit, the -House recently laughed off the President' s proposed ghetto rat-control bill, 207106. The reported mood in Washington is that new poverty funds should be withheld in or der not to "reward" violence. To an observer here it sounds a t rifle like reverse racism. Must all 520,000 Negroes in Detroit, out of a city of 1,600,000, be taught a lesson? One of the most striking things in following the ruins on 12th Street is to note how destruction stopped abruptly at the little lawns of the middle-class Negro homes on adjacent ;,venues. These property- owning Negroes have the greatest stake in law and order, as well as t he Negro shopkeepers whose businesses were sacked and gutted. The black-power m ilitants lump all whites together: "Whitey doesn't care! ~' It would seem tragic if white resentment should now lump all Negroes together and finally split the two races into warring camps. If social reform can be halted as a punishment for violence then nihilists and Communists can gleefully block it whenever they see fi t. There were whites in the Detroit mob. An editor, a state trooper, a Negro writer all told of the nightmarish carnival mood of the affair. The crowds laughed and looted. Recent United S tates census studies inclicate that the 1960 count missed many N.egroes, perhaps 10 percent. The highest loss rate wa s in young, adult males. The startling fact appears that one male in sue simply dropped out of organized society. But this invisible underclass was on hand for arson and looting. "Thi s can happen in any United States city where a sizable part of the population is unemployed and unemployable," says editor Martin Hayden. Causes are easier to find than amelioratives. The latter are probably more radical; anyway, than a nation preoccupied with Vietnam will accept. Well, I boldly offer the following proposals anyway. Law and order must be preserved; everybody agrees to that. More and more people believe that firearms· must be r egulated. The United States is the only great nation where this isn't done. Twenty-seventh in a continuing summe.r series of reports from a correspondent assigned to tour the United States, �
  • Tags: Box 13, Box 13 Folder 21, Folder topic: Race relations | racial matters | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 13, Folder 21, Document 82

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  • Title: Box 13, Folder 21, Document 82
  • Text: Cfhe King of Kings and the Lord of Lords "He brought me into the banqueting house, and his banner over me was love" SONG OF SOLOMON 2 :4 �Welcome Your Majesty The Scriptures show that the Lord is present and we wish to be among the first to unfurl His banner of Love. Our own nartional emblem, just as do the flags of other nations, tend to separate people and seems to give those of every nationality the feeling "I am better than you." But with His Majesty that is not so. To Him we are all human beings, and all are dependant upon Him for life. Signs of His presence. In Daniel 12: 1 we read "And at that time (this time) shall Michael stand up, the great Prince which standeth for the children of the people : and there shall be a time of trouble, such as never was since there was a nation." In the second chapter Dani el tells of a "stone" that was to smite that great image upon the feet and break i,t to pieces. The image represented the Genti le governments of the earth, it struck in 1914 and continues to destroy the nations, and it is to become "a great mountain (kingdom) and fill the whole earth. It cannot be stopped for it is God's kingdom. Mountain means kingdom. This is that time spoken of by the prophet Ezekiel. " They shall seek peace and there shall be non e" ( Ezek. 7 :25). From the time of Woodrow Wilson and the League of Nations until this time with United Nations and with President Johnson and many other fine men and \vomen pleading for peace, but all in vain. Our great Creator has reserved the honor of establishing peace upon the earth for His Son the Prince of Peace ( Isa. 9 :6 ). He bought that right by giving Himself as a Ransom sacrifice for Adam and his posteri,ty. Does not such a King deserve the fullest obedience and all the honor and praise possible for man to r.ender? And now let us consider the laws that shall govern His rei gn. "Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thine hea rt, soul, strength and mind: ·and the second is like unto it. Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thy self. As ye would that others do unto you, do ye even so unto them." It is love, can anyone ask for more? Let us learn to love each other And treat each man as a brother Without regard to creed or race Without regard to time or place. Today the negro is hating the white man and the white man is hatin g the negro ; one is just as wrong as the other. Won't yo u be one of those to surrend er to His Majesty and lift up his banner of Love. Th e Lord says " This is the way, walk ye in it. " "Love ye one another." �Blessings for ·All' Turn to Isaiah 25 :6 and read " And in this mountain (kingdom) shall the Lord of Hosts make unto all people, a feast of f~t things." The same prophet in chapter 35 says "Then shall the eyes of the blind be opened, and the ears of the deaf be un-stopped ." "And an hi ghway shall be there . . . And the ransomed of the Lord shall return, and come to Zion with songs of everlasting joy upon their heads." " Yea, they shall sit every man under his own vine and fig tree and none shall hurt or make him afraid." "Then shall they say Lo , this is our God, we have waited for Him'.' " Let the wicked forsake his way, and the unrighteous man his thou ghts : and let him return unto the Lord: and he will have mercy upon him, and to our God for He will abundantly pardon." We suggest that all those int~rested in this line of thought write to the Dawn, in E.ast Rutherford, New Jersey. * * * Published by one of His Majesty's least, yet a most grateful subject. Sta nley Milton Tudor Box 93 Lowell, Michigan �
  • Tags: Box 13, Box 13 Folder 21, Folder topic: Race relations | racial matters | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 13, Folder 21, Document 84

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  • Title: Box 13, Folder 21, Document 84
  • Text: . ATLANTA,GEOROIA FROM: Dan E. Sweat, Jr. 0 For your inform a tion O Please refe r co th e attached corr es pondence and -ma ke the necessa ry reply. O Advise me the status of the attached . FORM 25-4-S �
  • Tags: Box 13, Box 13 Folder 21, Folder topic: Race relations | racial matters | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
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Box 13, Folder 21, Document 91

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  • Title: Box 13, Folder 21, Document 91
  • Text: --.,. ,i::. ,a . ' "ABCD" MAIL BETTER BUSINESS S~llf~ z , \He ~icLE: .I.\/A I\) Al.LEN "es ~ ~T ~ ro"'C"'~ a. . 'I "\ A 'foe_ ,TC.\-\E-LL "&t A, ~ -W , �-- ~ -.--;!l . . �
  • Tags: Box 13, Box 13 Folder 21, Folder topic: Race relations | racial matters | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 13, Folder 21, Document 95

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  • Title: Box 13, Folder 21, Document 95
  • Text: 1~" £0'T Juil.~ 67 AC0'7 ... ( 1 ~ 12 7 0 A uw30 PD ATI..MTA 8A ,, HF'T MONOllABI..£ IVAN AU.EN JR JIIAYO,fi Th£ Of ATUH'rA ~11..A, DEM ftAYOft ALLEN.. t OAP£ T'O Tt'IE CITY. Of ATLANTA f'\JU.T EXKCTiflla THAT 1 AS AN tU.ClllCAk CI TI Z£N AR;! A$ A HVlll~N Jl[tNQ IIOlU) • m,1:rw IITH TMt. CIO~m N«) M:$P£CT ~ , . AT'..AH't'A QEOMtA. n .oet.AIQ W.J.S EXlUCfl') TO AU "f_OPU! • TOtl' D£$CfUFfIOH. 0, J.n,AHTA AS THE CITY "TOO BOSJ TO KAltlll' ff01' SOUND$ Yr.RY HOLLOW TO ME SIHCE MY DEteIAl OF' A.Cef.SS TO M FACILITJ£S 0-F Ollt o.t-' A"ft.NffA! ~I.$.Tl:Atll tNSTITtlf lOl(S IEeAU$f.. I WAS a.-.etc. M YO!.M lilE}i$ C14Alm•w AS$001'.TI.Mi OH "lfita NC Luetctt STIUT OF ffll~ I AJlf A rcu, ,.uo l!CHBVI R£'F 1,1$£ti TO i..ET Ml UT IL IZ [ n~ P1ff $! OAt. TR Auo:.~ P'.~U.. l.Tlt!! N:CAUSt I W~ IC!l l'KJTE.• Tl-EY T&D 1!1E 1 IA-J lltGT· ft].COME ,UC ftMCl,,A!!lf£.O TMAT TIit TfflA WA$ cue OF TKt L,lt#T PLAO($ c,:J.ti; 1T°l'4E' ( t- 5 1 ) er cm $OUT~ TO DEst:GRAtt 11«."Ul FA.ell. JTlrS.fl "" ,,-.Avn,14 AS A ..: �.WSIC!A.N HAYE TA.KEN ft£ THROl.Gt«iittr TNt s-Dtmi!EP.N t,:!TEO ST~ttt Uf~WlNQ t~H STAttS SOUTH CAAm.JkA At«) VI~'UWt!., IH ~t: Of TC.Sf i TATlS MA.Vt: I l!!E[_W QEUUO THE AO.CiSS TO Yl'!eA F'AC It, tTtESi! l ~A~'T rtVt!tS1'in ~'Y $tj P'Rl$£ n, fJ.f.Kj ~:r ,l,Tf_nt'!'A ft~flQ!A it-t.r~ P.~i'~)ffi'S TQ RE??If.Sf!.f:fTlt YH!. SN>THS .•t.£AttSY AD~M--iCEME~T tilt Rt.t.lf. f
  • Tags: Box 13, Box 13 Folder 21, Folder topic: Race relations | racial matters | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 13, Folder 21, Document 97

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  • Title: Box 13, Folder 21, Document 97
  • Text: For lnstanre, while Ahmeo ran s, Aaolpl:i Hitler" r oams. He is the bearded, long-haired white youth wh'J commands the Deuces, a local motorcycle club that is patterned on • California's Hell's Angels and vows allegiance to George Lincoln Rockwell's American Nazi Party. Dur ing last summer's Hough riot the Deuces, decked out in Levis, animal-skin vests and chromed Nazi helmets, roared through the ghetto . flailing with chains at Negroes. " This is probably the group around which other white gangs will rally should an outbreak occur," declares a social worker. Both Ahmed and Adolph, and the circumstances that charge their activities with danger, are known to the police and presumably to the man who sits atop the Cleveland powder keg-Mayor Ralph Locher. Yet conversation with city officia ls turns up little hope of pre· venting n ew racial violence. Rather, discussion centers on when, where a nd how it will occur. Mayor Locher, a Democrat, up for reelec· tlon next fall, tries hard to accentuate the positive. "We're progressing nicely on many fronts," he says. But his optimism evaporates when he is questioned about the possibility of r iots this summer. "No mayor can guarantee peace," he replies. Others in the Locher administration and private welfare-agency officials com e close to predicting conflict. Mrs. Lolette Hanserd, a director of the Welfare Federation , an organization coordinating the activities of the city's social service agencies, has been receiving increasing reports of black and white gangs not only organizing but arming. "If the Negroes don't stir up trouble, then some whites may be trigger-happy," she says forlornly. An SOS to Washington Most pessimi tic of all is the director of Mr. Locher·s human r elations board, Bertram ' Gardner. He fears a n outbreak this summer larger than last summer's. "I suspect that it won' t be confined to th e Negro community," he says. "I'm afraid it will extend to the white communities and downtown - not a massive movement but guerrilla warfare." White neighborhoods n ext to Negro ghettos share these fears . The Justice Department in Washington already has r eceived an appeal for help from a social worker in Murray Hill , known as "Little Italy," which has been selected by some Negroes as a target for demonstrations this summer. If this happens, warns the sorial worker, "violence could erupt." He adds plaintively: "Our experience with local law-enforcing agencies has not been as comforting as we would like." Underlying such pessimism is the feeling that much of Cleveland's attempt to deal with its racial problems has fa iled, and that those groups that might be expected to join in a leadership effort are alienated from one another. City Hall and the Federal Government are at odds. During the past 15 years or so, the city, eighth largest in the U.S. with a 1960 population of 876,050, has drawn up plans for a dozen urban renewal projects; it now surpaases all other metropolises in acreage tabbed for renewal. Yet Cleveland has been able to close the books on only one project. a pace so slow that Housing and Urban Development Secretary Weaver has begun cutting oft the city's urban-renewal money. His ·'J,,, Pl6asa Turn to Page 16, Column 2 • �·voL. CLXIX NO. 50 Racial Powder Keg Negro-White Hostility Mounting in Cleveland As City's Efforts Fail Armed Youth Gangs Growing; Mayor Blamed by Business, Established Negro Leaders CORE, Reds, Klan E ye City By MONROE W. KAlij\1IN and DAVID Sta // Re,po1·t6)"8 o/ VIENNA Tim WALL STREET JOURNAL CLEVELAND - To Ahmed, the high priest of Negro militancy here, the white man is a "bea.st" to be overcome. He predicts May 9 will be the "terrible day" that the anger of this city's black ghetto erupts into violence partly because, by his calculations, that will be the day when an eclipse of the sun darkens th e sky. , Because of his devotion to astrology, Ahmed Is dismissed by many white Cl evelanders who doubt that astrology has any value. Besides, Ahmed, whose real name is Fred Evans, was arrested last week on charges of assault· ing a police officer; he has been released on $5,000 bond. Nevertheless, Ahmed's warnings that "blood must flow" and "some must die" are gospel to a small but growing number of followers, who gather every other Thursday night to hear him or other Negro radicals conduct what they call "dialogues in black." And though these sessions m ay be a muddle of mysticism and menace, they are all too symptomatic of the tensions that make this city one of the n11tion 's leading racial trouble spots. Even to 1;ome city officials, Cleveland's Inability to make a significant start toward coping with rar ial discontent seems to foreshadow a sequel , when the weather warms, to last summer's five-day riot in the "tough Hough" :;.!um that left four dead. Fears In Washi ng1on That also is the feeling of those In Washington who kPep watch on racial developments. John A. Hannah, chairman of the U .S. Civil Rights Commission, which hPld hearings here last year, says lhe a ccounting of (Cleveland's) accomplishments is very short, and the agenda of Its unfinished business ls very long." Another civil rights specialist asserts that "what makes Cleveland different from other cities" in its potentiality for a racial explosion "is its complete lack of effective leadership" on the part of City Hall, the business community and the respon11iblP Negro organizations. Thi11 le;idership vacuum and its effects are apparent to anyone who peers behind the ' ty,,;ltlve Image " that Cleveland offirialrlom SPeks to projer.t. OntsidP organizations ranging frnm natinnal civil right~ groups to whitP·SUpremacy group.:: , a re marking ClevP!and as an arena ! or artion th1l'I sr•·1ng Within thP city, for every anti -,\ r.,I P Negro i:rroup there is an • i 1 d anti-N white g1·oup. �-~ Racial Powder Keg: Negro-White inoe· Hostility Is Mounting in Cleveland Continued From Page One reason: The " long history of negotiations with, and broken promises from, the local government." Mayor Locher accuses Mr. Weaver of unfairness. · City Hall and the Cleveland business community are at odds. The Inner City Action Committee, led by Chairman Ralph Besse of Cleveland Electric Illuminating Co ., was created after the 1966 Hough riots, to help the city cope with its racial problems. But after six months it severed relations with the mayor because " the city administration will not accept meaningful assistance and coordination." Mr. Locher · accuses the businessmen of playing politics with the well-being of the people of Cleveland. City Hall and the responsible Negro leadership are at odds. ' 'Frequently when it's most needed, the Negro leadership just isn't there," the mayor charges. Leo Jackson, a Negro city councilman, replies with equal intensity: "Lecher's a decent, honest, sincere gentleman, but you can't be a gentleman and cope with the problems of this town. You've got to be a hardfisted, practical guy who'll take risks." Established Negro leadership and the Negro community are at odds. A training progra m sponsored by the National Associa tion for the Advancement of Colored People and the Urban League has flopped badly in its aim of getting Negroes into building trades jobs. Ernest C. Cooper, the Urban League director, says: "We were in the position of preparing people to be put on shelves." With this failure , the NAACP and Urban League dropped another notch In the esteem of Cleveland's Negroes. According to one civil rights s pecialist, "The NAACP couldn't mobilize a picket line of 10 people now. The Negro community and the police are at odds. Harlell Jones, a slender Negro Identified by a grand jury as a leading figure in last summer's riots, but never indicted, and who now works as a building maintenance man In Hough, assesses the current mood of the ghetto as worse than a year ago. The reason? "Police brutality," he says. Police Chief Richard Wagner replies: "We h ave no critics west of the Cuyahoga; we cannot appease those east of the Cuyahoga." Most whites live on the west side of the Cuyahoga River, which runs through the middle of Cleveland; most Negroes live on the east side. Movement ln the Schools Still, Mr. Wagner has established a new community relations unit in the department and has opened eight new police athletic centers for slum youths. Also, there has been some movement in education. A new school board has Initiated the construction of some new schools, the opening of more kindergartens, libraries and vocational classrooma, and the creation of a supplementary education center to draw white and Negro pupils for specialized instruction. "The only bright spot I can think of ls our schools, says Alan Kandel of the Jewish 11 ,.. some authorities expect Communist operatives to be active here this year; the grand jury investigating last summer's Hough riots found evidence of Communist Party participation. Local organization is proceeding on both sides of the color line. The United Black Brotherhood (UBB), formed last fall and regarded by Police Chief Wagner as "militantly racial," is actively involved in the "dialogues in black" that present Ahmed and others to the Negro community. The supposed aim of the "dialogues" is to steer militants away from violence and toward peaceful protest. But police say the effect is to unite Negroes under the UBB banner. Lewis Robinson, identified by a grand jury as a leader in last summer's riots but never indicted, and now a participant In the "dia· logues," says of them: "We've had factional ism . Now we want to pull all these things together." He views rioting as "productive and good, a warning that drastic measures must be taken." Harlell J ones also believes Negroes should crowd into a single group for "political" purposes. He plans to strike out on his own this month to organize such a group. White Organizing An organizing drive among whites is being planned by Rob ert Annable, chairman of the Cleveland-based National Christian Conservative Society and also head of the North American Alliance of White People. Mr. Anna ble, who believes that Negroes are "culturally and intellectually inferior," will begin holding ral· lies . in May. William Murphree, vice president of the White Citizens Council of Ohio subscribes to many of Mr. Annable's beliefs and also !)!ans rallie11. The special targets of all these racial organizers, whether they admit it or not, are the youngsters of this "city of nations," most of whom live in neighborhoods that are sharply segregated along nationality as well as racial lines. Murray Hill is largely Italian, Sowinski Park largely Polish, Hough largely Negro, and so on. As the pressures of social change have mounted, what once were youth clubs have become gangs and now, say social workers and police alike, they are turning more viciously racist. "We know that white and Negro youth gangs now are clashing," says Mr. Kan· de!, "and we didn't have that before." In Collinwood, a white neighborhood next to the Negro Glenv_ille section, a young fellow in his twenties says: "When the civil rights groups said they were going to march this summer in our neighborhood, a bunch of the guys tn our club decided to form vigilante groups." The "club" he refers to is a neighborhood social club. Mrs. Hanserd of the Welfare Federation says, "We keep hearing there's a bUlldup of guns in the Collinwood area. "Ohaln Gang" Target Practice In Sowinski P!!,rk, members of the white Chain Gang recently have acquired shotguns . "They're practicing with the guns in the base · ment of one member's home, shooting at pa· per targets they can 'niggers,' " R. social worker says. "The purpose for the guns, they say, Is to defend them �he creation of a supp emen ary e uca :Ion ' ~ ., . ,o 5""" m •• e oase- to a r aw w te and egro pupils or ment of one m em ber's home, shooting at papecialized instruction. per targets they call 'niggers,' " a social work"The only bright spot I can think of 1s er says. "The purpose for the guns, they say, our schools," says Alan Kandel of the Jewish is to defend themselves against the Negroes Community Fe~eration. -when the 1·iots come again this sum m er." There are ollier activists a t work, but wl~ In another white section, on the west ern much visi ble r esult. The Businessmen s fringe of Hough, signs tacked on telephone 1out [nterrac!al _C ommittee on Community Affairs poles and painted on buildings warn " Nigger , · s conscientious but, says Mr. Cooper, a m em- this ls All ey Rat territor y keep y u t" 0 r ass ou , lb " th ' in 1 d tly in Jong range • er, ey re vo ve mos . ,, · or urge "Wallace fo r P resident." This ls the planning, not immediate a.ction. Two wood- work of the Alley Rats gang whose member s . ' pr oducts trade associations have announced workers say,. have attended m eetmgs. of th pIans t o re ha bil I·t a t e a sec ti on of H oug h , but social the project is said to be stym ied by slum e_American Nazi P a rty in Detroit and Pittslandlords who have jacked up prices. Other bwgh._ The Outlaws, a Cleveland m otor cycle public and private r eha bilitation projects club, is reported laying plans to attack the Checkere d Cher ubs, a Negro mo torcycle club. amount to a drop in the bucket. Mayor Locher, for his par t, has some plans The United Black Brotherhood, whose he expects to r eveal as election time ap- strongholds have been found by police to conproaches. He already has r epaved some slum ta in fi re bombs, has begun wi thin the past treets, installed new street lights, and hauled few weeks to instruct som e Negro youth gangs off the streets hundreds of junked cars. Soon in "guerrilla warfa re." Police Chief Wagner he hopes to start a citywide rat control pro- says the UBB has ma de contact with the gram, collect ghetto trash weekly instead of P onderosas, a 200-member group preoccupied monthly, let some contr acts for play areas until re cently with vandalism but now turnand "vest-pocket" par ks , and augm ent the ing increasingly a nt i-white. city's supply of housing inspector s, policemen A similar turn, says the police chief, has and medical personnel. been detected among other Negro gangs , 'loney Problem s such as the Delamores, the Devil's Disciples But all this costs money, and the mayor is and the Marqui s. " They' re getting away from paving his tr oubles on that score. Voters de- gang a ctivity and are forming militant racial teated a city income tax in 1965. Last year the organizations,' ' Mr. Wagner declares. ity council ena cted a tax to be effe ctive this past J a n. 1, but disgruntled citizens have forced the levy to another ballot box test, to ~e held in May or June. " If the t ax is deI feated," says Mr. Locher, " then there will have to be a severe cutback" in his plans. Anyway, the m ayor is willing to move only o far . To him some specific recomm endaions for ea sing racial tension in Cleveland Boost in Common and Preferred, dvanced by the Civil Rlghts Com mission are Creation of a N ew Pref erred 'poppycock," and he Is steadfastly Jo yal to his city officials. The Inner City Action ComTo Enable Further Diversifying , ittee, in offering to supply the city with dollar-a -year m en to unsnarl the urban r enewal I tangle , insisted on the removal of the city's By a, WALL STREET J OURNAL Sta,f! R eporter }.'ban renewal chief. The mayor refused. ST. LOUIS - Interco Inc. shareholders Mr. Locher is looking to Washington for ome new help. The White House is expected clear ed the way for further diversification of o announce soon a crash program to provide the company by voting to increase a uthorized obs for unemployed Negroes in 19 cities, and common by fou r million shares, and the exlethe mayor believes Cleveland will be one. But ing preferred by 327,060 shares in addition , r. Kandel of the Jewish Community Feder - to creating a new prefer r ed issue of one miltlon, who has been In on some of the local lion shares. Janning, is not enthusiastic. "It's too However, aside from a pending a cquisiate," he says. "They're talking about placing ,000 p eople by June, and that'll onl y three tion of Sam Shainberg Co., Memphis, Tenn ., operator of 79 junior department stores, for 1onths away." Less than two months away Is the " dooms- 410,000 shares of the present preferred, Interco tlay" pinpointed by Ahmed. He is quite correct isn 't seriously studying any possible acquisin predicting an eclipse of the sun on May 9, tions , Norfl eet H. Rand, vice chairm an of the ut authorities say the eclipse will be partial board and treasurer, said after the meeting. nd won't tum the Qleveland sky dark. And Since 1964, Interco has pursued an active hmed's forecast of revolt may be wildly diversification program. It operates 210 junio~ xaggerated . But other events scheduled for department stores, eight work and play clotheveland soon are likely to arouse racial ing factories and six retail hardware stores empers. plus its shoe manufacturing and retailin operations. "We're interested primarily in the nter Martin Luther King The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. will visit soft goods, although we'd consider any field leveiand soon to help prepare for simulta- that looked promising," Mr. Rand said. eous demonstrations this summer here and in Sales and earnings in December and Janther cities. The militant Congress of Racial uary, the first two months of the company's quality (CORE) has narrowed its search for fiscal year, showed an improvement over the summer "demons tration city" to Cleveland, similar period a year earlier, the executive akland, Calif., and Newark, N.J. A spokes- said. And th ere will be "an improvement" an here says it Is ;,quite possible" that Cleve- for the quarter ended Feb . 28 from the first and will be the final choice. period of fiscal 1966, when Interco earned " If CORE makes Cleveland its target city," $3,861,227, or $1.09 a share, on sales of $106,ays J . B. Stoner, vice chairman of the white- 639,944 , excluding results of Idaho Departmen upremacist National States Rights Party, Store Co., acquired in February 1966. ' we 'll come to Cleveland to stage peaceful Mr. Rand also predicted higher sales and ounter-demonstrations." Last summer, after earnings for the year ending Nov. 30, even States Rights Party rally in Baltimore, without a contribution from Sam Shainberg he 1966 CORE demonstration city, whites a.nd Co. On a pro-forma basis for last year, for egroes tangled in the streets. instance, Shainberg would have contributed 18 The Ku h."lux Klan is preparing for an or- cents a share, after preferred dividends, to Ina nizatlonal meeting In this city in a few terco 's reported earnings of $14,598, 000, or $3.91 •eeks . There are reports that the American a share, on sales of $469,100,000. Results of azi Party intends activity here this spring. Idaho Department Store Co. were included t t'he other end of the political spectrum, only for nine months. 1 lnterco Inc. Holders Vote Stoc k Jncreases . • ' �
  • Tags: Box 13, Box 13 Folder 21, Folder topic: Race relations | racial matters | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 13, Folder 21, Document 4

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_013_021_004.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 13, Folder 21, Document 4
  • Text: August 7 , 1967 Mr. Stanley Milton Tudor P . 0 . Box 93 Lo ell, Michigan Dear Mr . Tudor: I c rta.inly ppreciate your takin the tun to r ite me reg rding the recent CBS ne c ·st you w .o f bat ls oing on in Atlan • Regardle · of all you do and the sincere conc ern of all citizens , it i no Ill' nee that tl'ouble ill not occur. I am m t gr teful for your commendation of our efforts . Sincerely. Ivan Alle: , · Jr . Mayor IAJ'r:eo �
  • Tags: Box 13, Box 13 Folder 21, Folder topic: Race relations | racial matters | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017

Box 13, Folder 21, Document 11

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_013_021_011.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 13, Folder 21, Document 11
  • Text: July 18., 1967 Honerable Ivan Allen., Jro Mapr City Of Atlanta . City Hall 68 Mitchell street., SoV. Atlanta., Geet'fjla 3Q303, Deer Mayor Allan At a meeting held in the auditorium of the Gl'EA Bu!ldin§;--201 Ashby Street., N.v •., attended by fifty five citizens of the Nash.Bans Area., referemce was made to the fact that I., organizer of the Nash-Bans Coordinating COmmittee., had. written you two letters and have riot received a reply from elthero In one letter., an invitation was extended to yeu to appear before the ahwe named group for the purpose of describing in some detail, the manner and m.ent to which you wish the committee to cooperate and assist in the proposed Url:lan Rene:wal Development under consideration for the Nash~Bans Community. · The comnlttee represents every church ln the cotimunlty. Also, nery parent mese child is in attendance at EJ.. Ware., "English Avenus., or M.M. Betlmne Schools., is represented by the P.T .A. of each f the tbr8e Schools. In addition., Business, Fratemal, Civic and Professional Organizations are also represented. The purpose of this letter., however., ls focused on the future;. Therefore, we would appreciate a c~llllllUl:dcatlon from you indicating the earliest ~ssible date when you and other appropriate city officials C0Uld meet with this collllittee. A special meeting of the comaittee will be called i1111ediately upon receipt of a connmlt:atlon from y.u indicating your availabllf.ty to appear before lts maberso Respectfully yours., 1 EM1lkw rfjlf_. E. Mo ~ ws �
  • Tags: Box 13, Box 13 Folder 21, Folder topic: Race relations | racial matters | 1967
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: December 29, 2017