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Box 3, Folder 14, Document 76

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_014_076.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 14, Document 76
  • Text: AGENDA FOR ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING OF COMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMISSION (Wednesday, December 14, 1966) Statement by Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor Inducts Commissioners and Installs Chairman. Statement by Chairman. Chairman Presents Vice-Mayor Massell Vice-Mayor Introduces Speaker - Mr. John Feild Chairman Calls Commission to Order for Business Session (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (£) (g) (h) Adoption of rules of parlimentary procedure. Election of officers. Establishment of powers of Executive svitttne.” Selection of monthly meeting date and time. Report of Committee on designation of Executive Director. Announcement of Committees to report at January meeting. Good and welfare. Adjournment.
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 14, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | formation of commission | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 14, Document 59

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_014_059.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 14, Document 59
  • Text: September 16, 1966 Rev. Samuel Williams g Friendship Baptist Church (go » 437 Mitchell Street, S. W. : (\ Atlanta, Georgia L Dear Rev. Williams; Attached is a copy of a draft of minutes of the September 9, 1966, meeting of the Human Relations Committee. Please mark your calendar to attend the next scheduled meeting on Thursday, September 22, at 2:00 p.m, at City Hall in Committee Room # 2. We are looking forward to this meeting. Sincerely yours, Sam Masesell, Jr. Acting Chairman Human Relations Committee SMIR ;fy Enclosure (1)
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 14, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | formation of commission | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 14, Document 86

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_014_086.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 14, Document 86
  • Text: IT. AGENDA: FOR MEETING OF COMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMISSION (January 27, 1967) COMMITTEE REPORTS: 1. Réport of Committee on Selection of Executive Director -- Reverend Samuel Williams a. Establishing of salary for Executive Director 2. Report of Committee on Obtaining Grants -- Mr. Al Kuettner " 3. Report of Programming Committee -- Miss Helen Bullard NEW BUSINESS: | ~ 1. Resolution adopted by Executive Committee establishing the monthly meeting date and time of Commission 2. _ Resolution adopted by Executive Committee respecting attendance requirements of members of Commission. a
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 14, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | formation of commission | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 14, Document 99

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_014_099.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 14, Document 99
  • Text: /f (DRAFT) 1970 PROGRAM PLAN > COMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMISSION | ; | SECTION I - LEGISLATION | The Community Relations Commission has, been operating for almost three years under the initial ordinance creating the Commis- sion. The Commission has been able in many cases to implement suc- cessfully its duties and functions "to foster mutual understanding, ~~ tolerance, and respect among all economic, social, religious, and ethnic groups in the City." The Board of Aldermen also charged the Commission with the responsibility "to investigate, discourage and seek to prevent discriminatory practices against any individ- ual because of race, color, creed, PE LgRSR Kakionel, orieii or ancestry." Here the Commission has found that the only tool it has ie Bhat of persuasion. In light of the nature of the dis- criminatory practices still existing in Atlanta, the Commission has found this tool to be inadequate. To do the job the Commis- @isn believes must be done in eliminating discriminatory practices, local legislative action is needed in the following areas: Page 2 Program Plan 1970 Draft tL - Public Accommodations. Although the 1964 Civil Rights Act has been an effective tool in elimi- nating discrimination in most businesses serving ‘the public, the law is applicable only to firms engaged in interstate commerce. Some Atlanta businesses not in interstate commerce, such as ty ‘trailer parks, skating rinks, health spas and f - ee barber shops,discriminate because of race.” In the opinion of the Commission, it is unjust for this small number of businesses to enjoy the pros- perity of this great City while the vast majority of businesses are abiding by the letter and spirit of the Federal law. The Federal remedial process is slow, cumbersome and expensive... A local public accommodations ordinance with enforcement powers through the municipal courts of Atlanta is needed. Contract Compliance. In 1967 the Board of Alder- Cob men enacted Ordinance #31-41.1 making it necessary cr bs for firms contracting with the City to have a non- cpt ‘ discriminatory hiring policy. Each supplier Ae certifies he does not discriminate but nothing else is done to enforce the ordinance. The ordinance contains no investigatory or enforcement powers. In 1969, the budget of the City of Atlanta was $207,000,000. The full implementation of this ordinance would be an important lever in ending employment discrimination in Atlanta. Page 3 Program Plan 1970 Draft 3. .Fair Employment. The 1964 Civil Rights Act covers firms with 25 or more employees. This leaves thousands of Atlanta citizens without . a “ Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's A backlog of cases in the Southeast is proof that fair employment protection. Furthermore, the more action is needed on a local level. Other - we Southern cities such as Miami and Nashville %* have found their local fair employment ordi- nances to be highly useful in combating dis- crimination. The Commission believes that Atlanta needs an ordinance with enforcement powers to cover firms with ten or more employees. In order to enforce effectively ordinances on public accommo- dations, contract compliance and fair employment the Commission needs subpoena, cease and desist, and other powers which may be | HaGendaey Bo implement these ordinances. The Commission recommends that the number ‘of Commission menbers be increased from 20 to 22, with the additional two positions being designated for young persons age 22 or ee The Commission asks that the terms for these two youth positions be rotated yearly for increased youth involvement. The youth Commissioners are to have full voting rights and powers. They ace YO to serve on an equal basis with the other Commission members. M4 ~ haa avel * : edge Page 4 , Me _ ; Program Plan 1970 Draft ; “ SECTION II - TOWN HALL MEETINGS Immediately after its creation three years ago, CRC insti- tuted a series of Town Hall meetings in disadvantaged areas. sim ag meetings gave citizens an opportunity to express their grievances be and City Hall a chance to take remedial action. CRC benefited eo ; from this program because it gave the Commission a direct tnvoiven BM, ment with the people in their neighborhoods. The oseree pene fited because they had a direct line to City Hall. ae Concurrently the office of Community Development Coordinator OF aes "was created to deal with City services in disadvantaged areas. _ . Although the CRC has had an effective working relatbonshia with we Johnny Robinson's office, duplication of effort exists. CRC's main goals are to improve human relations and to eliminate discrim- lnakiengients Town Hall meetings deal primarily with improving City services. \ The Commission recommends that the staff of the Community Development Coordinator be expanded with more City coordinators being placed in*disadvantaged areas on a year round basis and that the Community Development Coordinator's office assume the responsibility for the Town Hall meeting program. SECTION III - PUBLIC HEARINGS ’ The Ordinance creating the Community Relations Commission states in. Sec. 3.8.5.: "Pursuant to the named functions and duties of the Community Relations Commission, it is empowered to hold hearings and take the testimony of any person under oath. The Commission, after the completion . . Of any hearing, shall make a report in writing to the Mayor setting forth the facts found by it and its recommendations... At any hearing before the . Commission a witness shall have the right to be advised by counsel present during such hearings." Page 5 - , 5 Program Plan 1970 7 ' Draft ‘a The Commission has made very little use of this section of Ae \o nation, CRC will institute public hearings in such areas as . pr its charter. In an effort to get to the root cause of discrimi- public accommodations, employment discrimination, school segre- \' : gation, housing discrimination and other vital areas affecting of improved human relations in Atlanta. SECTION IV - EMPLOYMENT 1. Starting in September CRC will undertake a systematic study of minority employment and promotion in each City Hall department, the Atlanta Housing Authority, and non-professional positions in the Atlanta School System. Upon completion of this study,| the Commission will make a public report of its findings with recommendations. * ‘2. Jobs Creation-Atlanta, a joint project of the Equal Employ- ment Opportunity Commission and CRC, has been refunded for another year. Maurice Mitchell hea been employed to direct this project during 1969-70. During the last 12 months CRC has worked with 25 companies on their hiring and recruiting practices of minority | persons. The plan for the forthcoming year is to continue working with these 25 firms and to add 15 new companies. 3. ‘The Commission will work for the elimination ef discrim- ination in Atlanta labor anions, trade associations, and profes- sional organizations. geared to meet ese needs. Page 6 ate Awe Program Plan 1970 Lyon ZL - ‘ \ yw Draft : 4 Ty . Gal 5. CRC will cofsider having another workshop on minority CK vo e economic development in mid-winter. %) SECTION V - EDUCATION ' “ 1. CRC will work with the new school board to improve the quality of seleeeion for minorities and the disadvantaged and to accelerate desegregation. | 2. The CRC plans to work with he, WelaReA School System and the City Planning Department in determining how locations for new © v7 schools can assist in solving a aepErveanees problem. o 3. The Commission will make personal calls on each euitiess: president in Atlanta to urge his institution to accelerate student and faculty recruitment across racial lines. Ae ™;? SECTION VI - POLICE-COMMUNITY RELATIONS e Commission will work with the Police Department and the Urban LaboratoryJin developing training programs in police-community relations for senior officers, patrolment and new recruits. Efforts will be made to utilize outstanding sociologists, criminologists, - psychologists, psychiatrists, law enforcement officers and consultants in Atlanta and elsewhere. 2. The CRC will offer its services to the Police Department in initiating more training in human relations for the police/community services eFfivues. 3. CRC will monitor Municipal Courts and make recommendations to judges on how human relations can be improved. Page 7 Program Plan 1970 Draft ae SECTION VII - HOUSING 1. In the last nine years 22 Atlanta schools have gone from all white to virtually all Negro. The City of Atlanta Planning’ Department estimates that in 1967 and 1968 490 City blocks changed from white to non-white. After identifing one or two target ares for transition the Gonniesition will seek to marshall’ total community support..... businesses, churches, the Atlanta School Board, human saTaRione organizations, real estate brokers, and the press.....to stablize these ‘areas. The Commission will seek to develop ways na means to report and halt block-busting. 0 a \ 2. The CRC plans to gend out teams of blac | and white) staff Vv / z s and housing developments members £0 v3 ious Apartment buildi and ask fox’ housi g. iscriminat y practic will j be identified Sea dealt with. 3. The Commission will contact The Advertising Council and the Department of Housing and Urban pavelonnsnt to find out the availability of public service TV spots, ads and car-cards. The staff will then urge local media to use these public service ads ‘on open housing. 4. CRC will continue to participate actively as a member of the Herropolitan Atlanta Housing Conference which seeks to further open housing and the dispersal of low-income housing to all aaa rants of the City and suburbs. 5. There is a tremendous need in Atlanta for a centralized - agency which lists available housing at all income levels. CRC plans to talk to representatives of the American Friends Service Page 8 ! .; Program Plan 1970 , - Draft Committee, Metropolitan Fair Housing Conference and the Mayor's Housing Resources Committee to see if such a function can be assumed. SECTION VIII - PUBLIC INFORMATION 1. CRC will strive to further its public information role by working closely with all news media and having members and staff speak to church and civic groups. It is the wish of the staff to involve more intensively Commission members in public speaking roles. | The staff will make personal calls on television stations and service clubs offering a list of panelists and speakers who reflect a wide range of experience and view points in the human relations field. | 2. Special effort will be made to ChaeantPaKE on the human relations education of white and blue collar workers in Atlanta. The staff will prepare two or three stories for the 25 largest company house organs in the City. Personal calls will be made by the staff at high cooperate levels to urge the use of these mate- rials... SECTION IX - INTER-AGENCY COOPERATION 1. The Commission will invite all Atlanta professional organizations concerned with the human relations to a one day meeting at City Hall in December so each organization can outline its program plan for 1970. . 2. Throughout the year the staff will concentrate on improving communications with other human relations organizations.....working Page 9 Program Plan 1970 Draft se directly with them and through the Atlanta Chapter of the National Association of Inter-Group Relations Officials (NAIRO). SECTION X - WORKSHOPS IN HUMAN RELATIONS 1. In mid-1970 the CRC staff plans to repeat several sessions - of the Workshop in Human Relations for new City Hall employees. 2. As a follow up to the Workshops in Human. Relations, CRC plans an on-going program on human relations for City of Atlahta personnel. Each department will be asked to designate a person through which the Commission can work. | SECTION XI - REACTION TO CRISIS | CRC 's foremost function is to identify and eliminate discrim- ination in Atlanta. If this job is done, civil disorders will be minimized. However a master plan needs to be developed outlining what CRC should do in event of a racial crisis. For example: 1. The operation of Rumor Control. 2. The organization of “Interfaith Mobilization", a group of Atlanta ministers trained to act as observers and reporters at hospitals and police stations. | -3. The identification of a list of community leaders who can be called on for specific assignments. SECTION XII - RESEARCH The Board of Aldermen charged the Commission with several responsibilities including..-+.."To make studies, and to have Page 10 . Program Plan 197 2 Draft studies made, in the field of innmen eeuseions, and to prepare and disseminate reports of such studies." Due to lack of staff, the Commission has not adequately discharged this responsibility. The Commission requires a full time staff member to initiate specific studies in the field of human relations in 1970. This 1 work closely with the Community Council, the
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 14, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | formation of commission | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 14, Document 98

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_014_098.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 14, Document 98
  • Text: A SUMMARY OF THE EVALUATIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF: “ Mr. Bement (East Central) Mr. Bruce (West Central) Mr. Christenberry (Pittsburg) Mr. Isaac (Central City) Mr. Menez (Edgewood) Mrs. Snider (City Hall) Miss Sowell (Nash-Washington - Extension) Miss Woodward (West End) AUGUST 1, 1969 EVALUATIONS OF CITY SERVICES In evaluating City Services not all interns mentioned all City Services. There was divided opinion on many departments, However, the general consensus was that the City Services were not responding well enough to complaints by area residents. The Atlanta Housing Authority, according to Miss Sowell, does not respond at all. However, the Housing Code Department was commended by Mr. Christenberry and Miss Sowell. This was not the case with Mr. Menez, who feels the department is "not only inadequate, but also poorly administered". Mr. Isaac reported that the Police Department is doing well in Central City, but Mr. Christenberry, Mr. Menez, and Miss Sowell reported very poor response. Mr. Christenberry was told that the Police Department did not know to return route sheets; however, that is not believed. In most areas they have shown poor response on pick-up of junk cars. Only Mr. Isaac mentioned Public Works. He noted only one third response. The Recreation Department was commented on by Miss Woodward and Mr. Menez. Mr. Menez stated that the Recreation Department was not only hampered by lack of equipment, but its unsystematic system allows for inconsistency, Miss Woodward was more explicit, stating that recreation.""appears to suffer not in quanity but in quality''. Since this is Atlanta's third year of expanded summer recreation, she feels that "one would ee to find activities with carryover values". Further, Atlanta is loosing its best opportunity to communicate with youth in these areas. She reports that youth does not participate in other programs, such as Model Cities, E.O.A,, etc, The Sanitation Department came in for quite a bit of comment. Miss Sowell, Miss Woodward, Sed Mr. Isaac had reasonably good experiences with this department. Mostly their request.had been answered promptly. Miss Sowell stated that the quick response on the trash barrels gives tangible evidence of the City's concern. Thus this service of the Sanitation Department is invaluable. Miss Woodward ‘ Pies that there is such’ high confidence in the department and in Mr. Hulsey in West End that citizens there usually call Mr. Hulsey directly with their complaints. Not all opinions of the Sanitation Department are good. Mr. Christenberry reports poor pick-up of junk cars by this department, especially if the car has not been tagged by the City Service Coordinator. Mr. Menez feels the departments ''output uw Deanartmant caam +n wane nes J eet a en te ee hk ke ee i capacity is totally inadequate", Thus the Sanitar well on complaints concerning litter barrels and/or trash removal and poorly on removal of junk cars. The "Sidewalks Department" was commended by Mr. Isaac who stated that he has received one-hundred percent response. Miss Sowell reports Street Maintenance as being prompt in replying. However, she feels they should have informed this office that no additional paving could be done. The Traffic Engineering Department did not please Miss Sowell, Mrs. Snider, or Mr. Menez. Miss Sowell felt they should have notified the Community Development Coordinator's Office that no traffic signals were available for this year. Mrs. ~¥- So Snider noted that many times the Traffic Engineering Department replied with "will check this next week" or 'maybe next year". She felt this type of reply did more harm than good. Mr. Menez criticized ''the bureaucratic procedure in which things are done". Mr. Isaac reported answers to all five route sheets sent to Traffic Engineering. Thus of the four comments on this department, only Mr. Isaac was satisfied. RECOMMENDATIONS There were several types of recommendations which appeared often in the intern evaluations. These were concerned mainly with the City Services Coordinator, junk cars, and is, ods BE baal of a central telephone number or office. Although many recommendations were quite similar each was presented from a slightly different viewpoint. The recommendations concerning the City Services Coordinators centered around the number of coordinators and their duties. Miss Sowell, Mr. Isaac, and Mr. Bement recommend that there be one City Service Coordinator per target area. Others, such as Christenberry, Mrs. Snider, and Miss Woodward felt that “more City Service Coordinators should be hired". Mr. Christenberry suggested that since the City Service Coordinators do public relations work anyway, the ''expensive, blue-ribbon bedecked Community Relations Commission" could be abolished and the commission's money be used for more City Service Coordinators. Miss Woodward, Mr. Bement, Miss Sowell, and Mr. Christenberry also discussed possible changes in the coordinator's duties. Miss Woodward recommended making them the administrators of "Little City Halls'' and increasing the scope of their duties to include early slum detection, consumer services complaints, public relations, and general information distribution. All of this involves removing the coordinators from the E.O.A. Centers. Mr. Christenberry feels the City Service Coordinators be viewed as "inovative chaps with an overview of the whole system whose job is to better integrate existing services and develop new services as they see. fit", They should have the power to "recommend revisions in and additions to the city codes in their respective areas". Mr. Bement saw the coordinator's job as that of a 'city-man in the ghetto; touching, listening, stimulating, teaching, reporting''. Miss Sowell believes the City Service Coordinators could perform a broader coordinating function between the variou wi ga HH Qo Ca ae] ie) 0 ra a be ta ° | a D 4 — » H oO o Those were not the only recommendations pertaining to City Service Coordinators. Mr. Christenberry wants all City Service Coordinators (both present coordinators and all future ones) to spend time with experienced coordinators, learning methods of "handling 'routine' community problems", He also feels that all City Service Coordinators should have a personal knowledge of the operation of all city departments. Mr. Isaac recommended that the coordinators be publicized in the community. Mawes Sowell suggested that regular "hours of attendance" in their offices be kept by the coordinators, and that route sheets from the City Service Coordinators should received priority action (perhaps special funds could be allocated for this). Thus these inten recommendations concerning the City Service Coordinators relate ‘to their role, their number, their training, etc. There is disatisfaction not with the ideal of a City Service Coordinator, but with the reality. A large number of recommendations concerned centralization. Mr. Bement suggested the entire system be tied to one telephone number, suchas 5ll. He also suggested a central City Services Intake and Routing Office containing one or two complaint desks from each department. This would sep the Community Development Office's coordinating function by enabling departments to work together on problems not "“apropos'' to any one denertinent, Mrs. Gelder also felt a central infowmetion service for field personnel was needed, Under her plan, the Community peyvelap- ment Office could become a central coordinating agency for target area groups who might need supplies or other help and those churches, businesses, etc., who migh like to help such groups. A centralized publicized telephone number was also recommended by Mr. Isaac. Miss Woodward suggested a central complaint depart- ment similar to that of Mr. Bement,but not included as a part of the Community Development Office. In the complaint department there would be a central real-time information bank and "exceptions" crews to investigate all types of complaints. Centralization as seen by the interns, would expand the function of the Community Development Office and aid in its operation. Junk cars were the object of many of Mr. Christenberry's and Mr. Menez's recommendations. Both felt that only one department of the City should have responsibility for removal of junk cars, rather than both Sanitary and Police. Menez suggested that this single agency be the Sanitary Department. Both felt that manpower in Sanitary should be increased; Christenberry suggesting that these nS eee = be used to make "periodic sweeps through all infected areas to remove junk cars", An additional suggestion made by Mr. Christenberry was to assign personnel from the Community Development Office to work with Rex Honeycutt of Sanitary in the development of a profitable system for handling junked cars. In other words, these intern recommendations were concerned with increasing the efficiency of junk car removal. pea : : : oy Although the above are the major types of groupings of intern recommendations, there were many more. -Mrs. Snider and Miss Woodward suggested "little City Halls". Miss Woodward also suggested a social vexeavch and planning staff which would. begin slum prevention studies, a new training orientation program for summer recreation employees, plain english translations of city ordinances,new ordinances concerning consumer service violations, investigation of bribery complaints, regulation of absentee landlords, and use of volenteers for summer recreation programs. Mrs. Snider and Miss Woodward had recommendations pertaining to publicity. Miss Woodward feels the War on Poverty should be publicized to affluent Atlanta; Mrs. Snider suggested that City Hall publicize itself through direct effective action. Miss Sowell and Mrs. Snider felt thathighlevel pressure (i.e., Mayor Allen) should be used against those departments which were unresponsive to the Community Development Office. Several suggestions were made with regard to personnel, Mr. Isaac believes the intern program should be continued part-time all year. Miss Woodward suggested the pay of policemen and recreation employees be increased. She also suggested strengthening the lines between the E,O.A. Manpower Program . -7- and the City Personnel Office. Miss Sowell
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 14, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | formation of commission | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 14, Document 95

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_014_095.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 14, Document 95
  • Text: f , 5 DATE, AWvGusr7r LIGEY TO: Johnny H. Robinson _ — —_" FROM: LZ ke SACKSO ' == ; SUBJECT Wh LA GEG to Wry FL 269 COMPLAINTS Received Corrected Atlanta Housing Authority : “f Sanitation , ZF Police Aa LZ Parks ; wll A cciai neh Housing Code Division Z Lf Traffic Engineering /2> L Construction F / 7 Planning Fulton County Health Department Z _ Z ZF OTHER Fo ee Poguit, Weeks 2f wu Psousice a << _ Oma [C / g | “Gisspectpee &@ 7 Bibi Zee go MEETINGS LICKS “as Diy ae Number E.O.A., Staff ; 7 Zz CNAC “fe Area Block CRC an MISC, a STAFF (GELTINGS (Cy y Wate) — a Lisr. Chuer TOTAL Lb aE. = “ TEES : Wet. VHELTING 5 COMMENTS - OBSERVATIONS TH2- PUMBER CNL: LR OBL LA STILL Zs VPRCTER Ceete D ES Dee SOCOLISS LCL WILT INE LYTW Fon, Lens ar PND CORK FLLPLITES. JO ELE ay We (Cz & Ande es a, = = s ’ ——". z 7. . 5 : 7 LEE OOLR Sith k Ree sis, SAAS MONTY FC OF. S22 a CFS LeBLIL L2- La, ’ “2 = : CAC _ AON “i WK Oh, PETETUIE PILE MIDOF KOLL. CkOues TO THRE LTH CLED, Mes 4 7 Fe) : A | r ISD. JTOn i KILPRD LIND OLEAM typ PROJECTS. Chk li bee BOLD FOR C27 - \ ESS STW OE, 2 dinaze a OHO EbIL TS. th Gt £ES Doan S. Lf S$ LER OL (2) LAL SHOLKLAD COMPLE ZO DO SO. Cheeses sib pukow1 £0.) sy tt= AS CObD i POd00L Sieyuedw 1S Show BUF Oviaed Fuev. Onpicts pace Chit 7 (EAP. Xe
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 14, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | formation of commission | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 14, Document 97

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_014_097.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 14, Document 97
  • Text: DATE July 31 1969 TQ; Johnny H. Robinson FROM: Nathaniel Maddox SUBJECT July 1, 1969 to July 31, 1969 Atlanta Housing Authority Sanitation Police Parks Housing Code Division Traffic Engineering Construction Planning Fulton County Health Department OTHER E.O.A. Stafi . CNAC Area Biock CRC MISC, COMPLAINTS Received ' Corrected — is -. i SE 2h 39 16 Sc eer Fl cere a 11 LO 9 7 29 16 0 9) it 5 9 6 TOTAL 172 101 MERTINGS - Number e g 11 J: — TOTAL 25 COMMENTS - OBSERVATIONS Comments are on next sheet.
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 14, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | formation of commission | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 14, Document 47

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_014_047.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 14, Document 47
  • Text: ROERT T. JONES, JR. LAW OFFICES FRANCIS M. BIRD ARTHUR HOWELL EUGENE T. BRANCH JONES, BIRD &® HOWELL EDWARD R. KANE ROBERT L. FOREMAN, JR. FOURTH FLOOR HAAS-HOWELL BUILDING LYMAN H. HILLIARD . ROBERT FP JONES FRAZER DURRETT, JA. ATLANTA, GEORGIA 36205 ERT P. JO EARLE 8.MAY, JR. . ice TRAMMELL E.VICKERY RALPH WILLIAMS.JR. By aul J. OONALLY SMITH C.DALE HARMAN. May 28 3 1969 TELEPHONE 522-2506 c.DALE HARMAN PEGRAM HARRISON CHARLES W. SMITH CHASE VAN VALKENBURG RICHARD A.ALLISON F. M. BIRD, JR. PEYTON 5. HAWES, JR. RAWSON FOREMAN MARY ANN E. SEARS ARTHUR HOWELL Ill VANCE ©. RANKIN Mil CYRUS E.HORNSBY Ill RICHARD M.ASBILL AREA CODE 404 Honorable George W. Romney Chairman, Cabinet Committee on Voluntary Action c/o Department of Housing and Urban Development 451 Seventh Street, S. W. Washington, D. C. 20024 Dear Secretary Romney: I am Chairman of The Community Council of the Atlanta Area, Inc. and was among those present at the meeting held in your de- partment on last Friday, May 23. We appreciated very much the opportunity of meeting with you and Mr. Fisher and some of the ‘members of the staff which has been formed to move forward with the Voluntary Action Program. The proposal and the meeting could not have been more timely from our standpoint. Our Council and ' other organizations in the Atlanta area have been working for fourteen months on the organization of a facility to effectively and efficiently recruit, train and place volunteers. We enthus- iastically support the idea proposed by the President as we under- stand it. I enclose a Memorandum which sets out the procedure which we followed in organizing and funding an agency designed to use individual volunteers and groups to expand, supplement and enrich programs of existing public and private voluntary agencies and to stimulate the development of new and innovative projects or programs to solve specific problems in specific areas. As stated in the Memorandum, we begin our operation on June l. Again, let me say how much we appreciated the opportunity of meeting with you. I am today writing to Mr. Roger Feldman and will send him a copy of this Memorandum. We look forward to Hon. George W. Romney May 28, 1969 Page Two working with your committee. Yours very truly, 2h ee Crngindel Kove ~ Eugene T. Branch Chairman, The Community Council of the Atlanta Area, Inc. ETB: js Enclosures JONES, BIRD & HOWELL MEMORANODUM May 28, 1969 TO: | Honorable George W. Romney Chairman, Cabinet Committee on Voluntary Action FROM: Eugene T. Branch Chairman, The Community Council of the Atlanta Area, Inc. This is to review briefly the background and present status of a planned volunteer citizens service project in the metropolitan Atlanta area. This area encompasses five counties in the metropolitan Atlanta area. The project is being spon- sored by the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce, Economic Opportunity Atlanta, the Atlanta Junior League, the Community Chest, and the Community Council of the Atlanta Area, Inc. It also has the strong backing of the Office of the Mayor of the City of Atlanta. The Community Council convened the meetings of the organizations which lead to the formation of the project and the Council now serves as the umbrella organization under which the project is operated. 1. Background. The proposed project for the training and placement of volunteers arose from the realization that in the Atlanta urban area we are not likely to be able to expand ser- vices as rapidly as needed unless we effectively tap some pres-~ ently untapped resources. If we undertook to expand the exist- ing services of public and private agencies in the traditional way, it would be years before we would have sufficient funds and trained personnel to make any serious impact on our problems. ) The largest cabepned resource appears to be individuals and organizations which would like to make a contribution. Effic- iently and afgaccively channeling this resource is not an easy task but it has been done in a number of cities and it was bex lieved Atlanta has a unique oppoxtunkty to demonstrate an effec- tive use of volunteers. In the late spring of 1968, we had a meeting of organ- izations which were being flooded with calls from citizens and groups which wanted "to do something." We met with representa- tives from EOA, the Mayor's Office, the Atlanta Junior League, and the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce. From this early meeting, it was decided that we should sponsor a luncheon meeting of organizations which might be helpful in either using or recruit- ing volunteers. This larger meeting included representation from about seventeen organizations. At that meeting a Steering Committee was formed and has been functioning ever since. 2. Steering Committee Recommendations. The Steering Committee consists of representatives from the Atlanta Junior | League, the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce, EOA, Community Chest, and the Community Council of Atlanta. From time to time we have also had present representatives from the Women's Chamber of Commerce. The Steering Committee after a number of meetings reached the conclusion that the most desirable procedure was to sponsor a demonstration project to extend over a two, maybe three-year period. The project would be jointly sponsored by the Junior League, the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce, Community Chest, EOA, and the Community Council. Other interested groups would be "members." Funds for the support of the project would flow through the smiley Council and be specifically designated for is Volunteer Service project. I enclose a copy of a docu- ment entitled "A Coordinating Agency For Volunteers" and this sets out the general procedure which will be followed. This was simply an outline document from which we worked and does not purport to be a blueprint for organizing an agency for placing volunteers. In essence, the purpose of the organization is as follows: (a) Recruit and register volunteers and volunteer groups. (b) Screen such individuals and groups for placement. (c) Provide training for volunteers. This would con- sist of some classroom activity and some on-the- job training. (d) Provide leadership on the effective use of volun- teers and work with agencies and programs in which they would be used. The experience which we have had, and that of volunteer programs in most other cities, illustrates that the most dif- ficult part of the job is training agencies to use volunteers effectively. (e) Evaluation. We would provide a procedure by which we would periodically evaluate the using agency and the volunteers. The Steering Committee was divided up into various task forces. One committee reviewed applications for the job of Executive Director. One committee, with the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce, sought a suitable location for the operation. The Junior League, in conjunction with a subcommittee, undertook to recruit the Chairman of the committees which will be responsible for the various functions of the agency. It is contemplated that the project itself will be staffed almost entirely by volunteers. One of the most encouraging developments is the ex- pressed desire of the Junior League representatives to support the project not only with money but with a considerable amount of volunteer time by its members. Bs Funding The Project. The enclosed outline of the pro- ject has been revised from time to time. Of course, EOA has been added as a sponsor. Also, we have reached the conclusion that the first, and possibly second, year of the project could be adequately supported by $40,000.00 a year. The Atlanta Junior League has voted to snprort the project by a contribution of $15,000.00 during the first year and $10,000.00 during the second year. The Atlanta Chamber of Commerce has voted to provide $10,000.00 during the first year. The contribution towards the second year operation has been left open. The Community Chest is contributing $5,000.00 for the first year's operation. Local foundations are providing the balance of the funds. The Community Council has provided some staff assist- ance and will continue to do so. “EOA has also provided staff and consultant support and has pledged to continue to do so. I enclose a copy of a letter from Jim Parham dated March 12, 1969 indicating the willingness of EOA to be one of the sponsors of the project. I also enclose a copy of a letter from Mayor Allen dated April 10, 1969 expressing the City's interest in the pro-~ ject. We have communicated frequently with Mr. Dan Sweat in the Mayor's Office, and I am confident that we will be able from } ahs time to time to obtain assistance from the City. Mr. Sweat's office has been flooded with people and organizations calling to find out what sort of project or program they could work on and they have not been able to respond as they would wish. 4. Present Status of the Project. The project has been named "Volunteers Unlimited." We have had donated to us until September of 1970 a building which fits the description set out in the document entitled "A Coordinating Agency For Volunteers." The building has adequate adjacent parking, is just off an ex- pressway, is near the complex of predominately Negro univer- sities in Atlanta, and is easily located. We have employed an Executive Director who is now working on a voluntary basis but goes on our payroll on June 1. The Chairmen of the committees charged with the different responsibilities of the agency have been named:and are enlisting their committee members. We will spend about two months educating our committees on their functions and getting our building in shape for opera- tion. When we are equipped to recruit, train and place volun~ teers effectively, we will have a concentrated eeae designed to give full publicity to the purposes of the agency. The agency will be run by a Board which will encompass representation from every segment of our population.
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 14, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | formation of commission | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 14, Document 11

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  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 3, Folder 14, Document 11
  • Text: , wn Ore a? ee ive f.28 3% > A A BAS ie = of a ! ; Cah ES 4 2% Rage Six 1 % UF bel ie off f ij x 7 f : an v* Cod i 3 6 GRA NIDE: City of Atlanta ( corgia) AMOUNT: $23,000 ues To ass 3st the Bas y' 3 or pence to sta Fe yor better to develop a he city's forces to attack improve the condition of the and organize the office of - strategy and action to mob the problems of the slums people now resident there. Foundation funds will be used to pay the salary of a special assistant to the Mayor expericnced in urban affaixs, capable, with the Mayor's political leadership, of meshing the resources and energies of the disparate elements of the community in concerted action, and knowledgeable akout securing outside resources to heip with the task. This wiil be an experiment and demonstration of the value oz such a staff and function in the Mavor*®s office of a southern city with a "weak mayor" system. If the demonstration warrants such action the Mayor will attempt to establish the staff and function as a permanent feature of his office. The U.S. Conference of Mayors will obsexve the experience and report on it to other cities in similar situations. BACKGROUND ANi RAT TONALE In coping with the crisis problems of cities and, even more important, developing and implementing policy and strategy for healthy urban development that will obviate the crises, the mayor's office is the key commenc post. Only the mayor has comprehensive responsibility. Other functionaries have restricted concerns for education, housing, welfare, public safety, etc, Elected representa tives have comprehensive concern, but are limited to n policy formation through legislation. Only the mayor is concerned with policy formation and execution. Without strong and capable leadership from the mayor's Gofsies and the mobilization cf internal and external rescurces by him the inexorable forces tending to break acvg the economic and social order of the city are not * iixely to give way. City of Atlanta Page Seven (continued) What this means is that the modern 1 a oe must be a “system nelyst" and ops. ) Me must view the city as a system made up of interac. ~~ vSstems ae immpingee upon by regional and nationa wis, The trick for the mavor is to mesh these systems so that their own “rules-of~the-geme" and self-serving objectives are to the greatest dagree possible induced to serve the purposes of the general welfare and developncnt of the community. How can the moxtgage banking system bettex produce low cost housing? How can the customs , leadership patterns and aspirations of the low income Negro community best be mobilized to push constructively for uceward mobility? How can the needs of industry for skilled pexsonnel be made a force to speed up the training of unsk the resources cf federal agencies marshalled to support orceriy an egnetebee develorment? Most cities now exploit only a fraction of the outside resources potentially available to them because they don't know how to go after them or to use them efficiently. . ilLed people? How can and foundations be y B, uw All of this takes know-how. To be deployed most effectively that know=how must be in, or close to, or at the beck and call of the mayor's office. @ Atlanta is one of the beliwether cities of the south with outstanding leadership in the Mayor's office. The general climate in the city is such that well reasoned and executed policies and programs have a favorable environ- ment in which to confront the complex problems of today's cities, These circumstances make it an opportune time and place to try to improve the capacity of the Mayor's office to perform the dynamic role it should and for the experience to be visible and hopefully influential elsewhere. ape Db Tha plans for the project were de veloped jointly by the U.S. Conference of Max yore, the Southern Regional Council,
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 14, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | formation of commission | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 14, Document 42

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_014_042.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 14, Document 42
  • Text: FREDERICK D. BROWNE, President R. J. MartTIN, Chairman, Board of Trustees BOARD OF DIRECTORS 201 Ashby Street, N.W. Mrs.C. W. Pollard L. S. Molette Frank S. McClarin Leonard N. Rodgers D.L. Thomas Lawrence S. Young Henry B. Bryant J.T. Lacy Charles C. Hall Robert F. Jackson Walter Belton, Jr. James C. Reese TRUSTEES Harry §. King Earl H. Thurmond Nepoleon Williams Atlanta, Georgia 30314 522-7512 A. E. Tate, Executive Secretary August 1, 1966 Honorable Ivan Allen Mayor City of Atlanta 68 Mitchell Street, S. W. Atlanta, Georgia Dear Mayor Allen: On July 21, 1966, a meeting of community leaders was held at the Price High School Community Center that had as its major objective that of discussing problems that are prevailing in the City of Atlanta. Another major objective of this meeting was to determine if problems prevalent in the Atlanta community could be resolved without unnecessary hardships being placed on citizens of this community, After a lengthy discussion of prevailing problems and subsequent suggestions for solutions to the problems, the group assembled decided that a resolution should be passed which would request the Mayor and Aldermanic Board to establish a human relations office with direct responsibilities to aid in resolving problems that are prevailing in our city. It is the sincere desire of many citizens of the Atlanta area that such a director and such an office be commissioned as early as pos- sible so that this office can begin work on preventing burdensome problems from occurring. I am therefore sending this letter at this time to remind you to bring this matter before the Aldermanic Board. *“Invest in a Child and Make a Man’ JAMEs A. Hawes, Jr., Vice President SYLVESTER ASHFORD, Treasurer Honorable Ivan Allen August 1, 1966 Page 2 This letter comes from me simply because Mr. Bennie Smith, who called the meeting, asked me to serve as chairman of the group. I wish to thank you for your cooperation and for your efforts in seeing that this request gets to the Aldermanic Board, On the enclosed sheet will be found a copy of the resolution. Names of the persons who attended the meeting and who voted for the resolution are stipulated at the end of the resolution. With kindest personal and professional regards, I am Sincerely yours, H. E. Tate Executive Secretary HET:de Enclosure
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 14, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | formation of commission | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 14, Document 14

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_014_014.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 14, Document 14
  • Text: Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. O A 101 Marietta Street Bldg. @ Atlanta, Georgia 30303 6 William W. Allison Executive Administrator May 28, 1970 The Honorable Sam Massell Mayor of the City of Atlanta Atlanta City Hall 68 Mitchell Street, S. W. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mayor Massell: This letter is in regards to having representation of the Central Youth Council (CYC) on the Community Relations Commission. We, the representatives (Robert Scott and Michael Banks) of the Central Youth Council would like to know as soon as possible how we would go about getting an established position on the Community Relations Commission, if at all possible. Time is of the utmost importance. Yours truly, Ma tats &: Leet Robert E. Scott Chairman of the CYC ptt ¢ an - ws SPF 5 2. Z ot ey eC CF Zee ff 2a Michael Banks Central Youth Council, Representative RS/MB: dt cc: Reverend Sam Williams
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 14, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | formation of commission | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 14, Document 18

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_014_018.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 14, Document 18
  • Text: NOTICE OF PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO CHARTER OF TIE cry Or ATLANTA * NOTICE is hereby given that an ordinance has been introduced to amend the Charter and Related Laws of the City ox Atlanta to create a Community Relations Commission for the City of Atlanta, Georgia, provide for membership, define the purposes and duties of the Commission and objectives sought to be accomplished, provide for the organization and operations of the Commission. , A copy of the proposed amendment to the Charter is on file in the Office of the City Clerk-of Atlanta and the Office of the Clerk of. the Superior Court of Fulton and DeKalb Counties, Georgia, for the purpose of examina- tion and inspection by the pubiic. This day of » 1966. J. Jc Little, City. Clerk 7 me £
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 14, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | formation of commission | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 14, Document 31

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_014_031.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 14, Document 31
  • Text: September 13, 1966 DRAFT Members Present Dear : Attached is a copy of a draft of minutes of the September 9, 1966 meeting of the Human Relations Committee. Please makk your calendar to attend the next scheduled meeting on Thursday, September 22, at 2:30 p.m. at City Hall in Committee Room # 2. We are looking forward to this meeting. Sincerely yours, Sam Massell, Jr.
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 14, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | formation of commission | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 14, Document 69

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_014_069.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 14, Document 69
  • Text: im) Cloltninpibsisycode, (ayes Imiopentetar ideiiciatedmts (cictri lolz rtkchany tains = lhe elm ide iineMelhy ini Hiod Ke iQ G Bias s hi wevayiayey lSeelgeydoarniets iva) \olote Gelteyrepeiniiay Daisy ihe eines ieee Ghee inks jveoloileieaks — /AVaTal (ato) Hint alain wen Ne cin) einer tor Gelli Ct iia ANE WE Grid! OF TNS WOON! ci sWEESIiOMS On) WWARIELKs year innkedy Vinke! Inkehje) Wn) stoyhydiayss CICLIES TCUIElr HO Your CoOmmuintiy CONTENTS - 8 WN or GETTING STARTED ORGANIZING THE COMMISSION GOALS AND OBJECTIVES SELECTING COMMISSION MEMBERS STAFFING THE COMMISSION THE COMMISSION IN OPERATION HOW OTHER COMMISSIONS WORK SOURCES OF ASSISTANCE SS = pee ee 1. Getting Started What one citizen has described as the ‘‘com- fortable, self-satisfied existence’’ of a certain North Carolina town came to a sudden end in 1960. Two unrelated events caused the people of this community to raise questions about their way of life which had gone unchallenged for more than 200 years. One event forced the citizens of this com- munity to reexamine race relations in their city. The other required that they review the entire economic structure of the community. The latter event was the shutting down of Southern Railway yards in the area, throwing hundreds of workers out of work, The shutdown was damaging both economically and psycho- logically. Not only was the railroad operation the major industry in the area, but it was a symbol of industrial activity in the community. The second event had its beginning nine months earlier in a nearby community. Four Negro college students had sought service at the segregated lunch counter of a five-and-ten- cent store in the other town. Service was denied, so the students sat. Now, just as the sit-ins had spread to hundreds of cities throughout the South, they threatened this economically troubled commun- ity as it battled to overcome its economic plight. Negro students at a local college picketed the segregated movie theaters of the commun- ity, and announced that they would also con- duct sit-ins and demonstrations against other places of public accommodation which still had not desegregated. The demonstrations surprised many white citizens. They considered their community further advanced in race relations than most southern communities and saw no need for demonstrations. They feared that protests would frighten off the new industry the com- munity needed, and also bring an angry, or even violent, reaction from extremist factions. An informal biracial committee of white and Negro leaders met to consider the situation, One request that arose from the meeting was for the establishment of an official interracial commission capable of the continual handling of grievances. Presented to the city’s mayor, the request was rejected. But events were occurring which made it imperative that the city have such an organi- zation. Theater owners did agree to desegregate their movie houses. Extremists, however, were threatening to do bodily harm to any Negro entering a desegregated theater. The day the first Negroes entered the formerly all-white theaters, known extremists did show up, but failed to carry out their threat. The biracial group that had met earlier was nonetheless concerned that another confronta- tion might not be as peaceful. So the group began to meet as an unofficial human relations commission. Their first act was to convince the Negro students to suspend demonstrations while they attempted to correct further injustices in the city. With the assistance of the Chamber of Commerce and the Merchants Association, the group began calling on businessmen and urging them to integrate their facilities. Quiet negotia- tions with the Board of Education brought the beginnings of school integration. The city was well on the way to solving its major racial problems. In 1962, a national organization named the community an “All America City’’ because of its success in rebuilding its economy and for other citizen action achievements. While the human relations program was not a part of its entry in this competition, the community as- suredly would not have received this award had not its racial climate also been good. Early that same year, the mayor introduced an ordinance in city council to establish an official biracial committee. On the day the ordinance was adopted, members of the origi- nal, informal committee sat in council cham- bers and heard their names read among the charter members of the official body. That is how the Salisbury, N. C., Community Services Committee was formed. Today, it is an active force in the community. It has helped ‘ Salisbury immeasurably in resolving racial dis- putes without undue friction. hae Teper The community now has integrated all of its places of public accommodations. The com- mittee is working to promote merit employment with the continuing assistance of the Salisbury- Rowan County Chamber of Commerce and the Salisbury-Rowan Merchants Association which now have Negro members. The committee too is working with an integrated school board in trying to find a satisfactory solution to the integration of Negro teachers in the commun- ity's school system. Other communities can profit from Salis- bury’s experience without awaiting a crisis. The racial problems of Salisbury are present in every southern city, and appear in a different form in most northern communities. A commission on human relations may have the most humble of origins. One very simple beginning may be an informal parlor meeting of a group of concerned citizens, white, Negro or interracial. If members of this initial group are all of one race, they should move immedi- ately to become interracial. This interracial group should next seek to invite as participants representatives of a broad cross-section of the entire community. Another approach to formation of a human relations commission may be through the avenue of already existing organizations. Al- most any church, civic, fraternal, neighborhood or social group may provide the initiative for a commission. Several groups, or chapters of several groups, may act in concert. Many communities never progress beyond establishing an interracial committee with broad representation from all segments of its popu- lation. It remains an unofficial committee, with perhaps no more than informal approval of city fathers. Organizations such as this—and indeed those with official standing—may select a variety of names, such as ‘“‘friendly reiations council,"’ ‘community relations committee," “friendly neighbors,"’ ‘‘human relations com- mittee,"’ etc. The most commonly used desig- nation—and the one that best conveys the nature and purpose of the organization—is “human relations committee” or ‘‘commission." A group without official status can and has proved beneficial in tackling a community's human relations problems. But the most effec- tive bodies have been those constituted as official human relations commissions under local ordinance. 2. Organizing the Commission The most effective commission on human relations—one that is best suited to cope with racial problems and help improve intergroup understanding in the community—is one that is created with a firm legal basis—a municipal ordinance. This type of commission operates with a clear and unmistakable official sanction. The city council and the mayor, as representa- tives of the city, are unquestionably on record as favorable to the commission and its goals. The commission has permanency. Its members will not hesitate to tackle in a forthright man- ner the issues and currents that otherwise might lead to community dissension and racial turmoil. Commission members may speak and act with authority, without fear of reprisal or reproach. About 20 percent of the human relations commissions in existence across the nation operate under local ordinances. These include commissions in Pittsburgh, Baltimore, Cleve- land, New York, Toledo, Ohio, Erie, Pa., Des Moines, lowa, and Louisville, Ky. There are alternative, but less effective, bases for a commission. It may be created by proclamation of the mayor, with approval of the city council, It may be created solely by a mayor's proclamation or executive order, with- out formal city council approval. These types operate with some official sanctions, but ob- viously not with the strong backing of city fathers afforded under a local ordinance. Never- theless, a commission established under procla- mation offers greater potential than a private citizens group or a quasi-legal body. Cities with human relations agencies without enabling ordinances include Phoenix, Ariz., Tampa, Fla., Alton, Ill., Durham, N.C., and Richmond, Va. 3 ap ee _ = Ta — — A proper local ordinance should spell out the scope and authority of a commission on human relations. It should specify the number of members on the commission and provide for a specific term of office. The size of a commis- sion may vary according to local conditions and makeup of a community's population. General- ly, a commission can function comfortably with between five and 15 members. A larger com- mission may prove too unwieldy for obtaining a consensus. One too small may not have suffi- cient manpower to cover its chores adequately. A commission should meet periodically, at least monthly. Its meetings should be public, unless sensitive matters require a closed execu- tive session, There will be little service to the community from a commission empowered to act only when trouble is brought to its doorstep. A good human relations commission has the authority to initiate investigations into potential or actual areas of trouble and tension. Of course, much of a commission’s work will be that of quiet probing and persuasion. But it should also have the power, when necessary, to hold public hearings and to request and summon the presence of citizens. The enforcement powers of a commission naturally depend on the laws in the field of civil rights-a community has to enforce. In many communities with local ordinances ban- ning discrimination in public accommodations, housing and employment it is the commission on human relations that is charged with their enforcement. These powers should at least be as broad as the 1964 Civil Rights Act and prevailing state law. 3. Goals and Objectives The best organized commission on human relations will be ineffectual unless it sets for itself clearly defined goals and objectives. In fact these ought to be set forth in its establish- ing ordinance or charter. It should be made plain that a commission is an instrument for orderly change toward the goal of equal opportunity for all. The commis- sion must seek actively to promote this goal. — — —, It should do so by creating a climate of under- standing, cooperation and mutual respect among all citizéns. The commission should keep open the channels of communications and provide these channels when they do not exist. Much of. the racial ills of a community result from the frustrations of those without a pro- cedure for airing their grievances. A commis- sion should serve this function. It should strive aggressively to prevent violence and ease ten- sions. And it should provide the resources and research into methods for accomplishing this end. A good commission is a leader in its com- munity—not a mere follower. It is a mediator when turbulence erupts, but it should provide the groundwork that would make such media- tion unnecessary. 4. Selecting Commission Members Many an otherwise well organized and di- rected human relations commission falters be- cause its membership is not properly or care- fully chosen. The membership should reflect the composi- tion of the community. It should be representa- tive of religious groups, business interests, civil rights organizations, labor unions and civic bodies. It is wise to sound out leaders of these groups before selecting commission members. The prestige of a commission will mirror that of its members. Particularly in a young commission it is important that members be persons of respect and influence in the com- munity. It is equally important that their com- mitment to the aims and programs of the com- mission be unswerving. Selection of minority group members must be made with great care. For example, often white leaders search for Negroes who will merely reflect their own conception of the Negro community. They look for Negroes whom they trust. Their choice may not have the trust of the Negro community. A Negro who enjoys a fine status among white persons may not neces- sarily have the same standing among Negroes. Thus many, perhaps a majority of Negro citi- zens, will be alienated and communications eT ate iia tential, channels to them jammed. Certainly all ele- ments of the Negro community, including those thought of as extremist, should be canvassed for advice. The role of militant civil rights groups and even those persons sometimes looked upon as “‘extremists,"’ is of vital importance to a com- mission on human relations. Direct contact should be maintained with these groups. This does not mean that it will be necessary, or even wise, to appoint representatives of militant groups to the commission. On the contrary, it may be that such appointments would com- promise the militant’s standing with his follow- ers. He would sometimes be required to vote on issues which would be contrary to the posi- tion of his organization, preventing both the commission from functioning effectively and jeopardizing his own position of leadership. Still, militancy must be acknowledged, un- derstood and heard. It is imperative that the commission maintain the closest contact and mutual respect of these elements. It is an absolute necessity that the activists in the civil rights movement have a direct access to the commission’s listening post. For they often telegraph the direction in which the community eventually must travel and the points of trouble it is likely to encounter. 5. Staffing the Commission A commission without an adequate staff is seriously handicapped in its efforts to serve the community in the field of human relations. As a bare minimum every commission should have a_ full-time, trained professional staff member and a secretarial assistant. They should operate from a permanent office. Careful attention should be given to staff qualifications. This is an essential for a com- mission with a lone professional. He should be a college graduate, preferably with a mas- ter's degree in the social sciences or social work. He should have experience in the fields of community relations and community organi- zation. It is desirable that he be a good public speaker, resourceful in dealing with others and an effective writer. Above all, the post should never be consid- ered a political plum or a refuge for cronies. It is not necessary to limit the search within the community. Often, in fact, a likely candidate may be a staff member of a larger commission in another city. He may be willing to accept a position as director of an agency in a smaller community for the challenge of helping to or- ganize and develop such an agency. It is difficult to specify a budget for a com- mission. Obviously this depends on the size of the staff, the work it is expected to accomplish and the facilities it is given. A commission's resources are expanded, of course, by organ- ized volunteers and committees. 6. The Commission in Operation A good starting point for any commission on human relations is to learn more about the community it serves. A commission ought to be a source of expert knowledge on all matters pertaining to human relations problems in the community. It should undertake detailed sur- veys to determine the patterns of employment, housing, educational opportunities and leisure life of its minority groups. For the financially limited community, a cross-section of volunteer community organizations might provide this service. This type of research should be a continuing concern of the commission. There should be periodic dissemination of all of the material gathered through an active on-going public in- formation program. The commission should not overlook the importance of publicizing itself. Even the most elementary brochure or leaflet on its organiza- tion and function should be given wide distri- bution. Its executive director should not be a stranger before local groups, to local newspaper columns or on community airwaves. A periodic newsletter is highly effective in keeping the commission before the community and speak- ing to its citizens. A good human relations commission is well known within local government. It should not hesitate to provide advice to city fathers. It ought to see that all arms of government oper- "r at tin ett ed Tas lh tl a i eat at ate under policies and practices of nondiscrim- ination and equality of opportunity. Local gov- ernment must be a model for the rest of the community. When moments of crisis arise, the commis- sion must be prepared through advanced plan- ning. It should arrange procedures with local law enforcement officials for coping with trouble and violence. Similar arrangements should be made with the mass media. But a commission cannot merely operate a fire bucket brigade. It should develop long range programs that will minimize the chance: of serious flareups. It should lead the efforts to erase all discrimination in places of public accommodations. It should search for realistic programs for eliminating racial segregation in schools, whether under law or de facto. It should plot methods for improving the living standards of minority groups confined to the ghetto and enabling them to move freely and orderly to neighborhoods throughout the com- munity. It should make certain that discrimina- tory barriers to any citizen’s right to vote are dropped. It must encourage and push forward equal opportunities for employment for all its citizens, both in private industry and in govern- ment. In most cases, to give official sanction and direction to these efforts, a commission will find it necessary to work for local ordi- nances. Throughout all its activities, a com- mission must attempt to educate its community to an awareness of and desire to pursue these goals and objectives. 7. How Other Commissions Work Creation of human relations commissions is not a recent occurrence in our nation's history. As early as the 1920's there were committees in many Southern communities. Today there are more than 200 cities with some type of human relations agency. Here are some examples of how they have worked in some of these com- munities. New Rochelle, N.Y.—On June 21, 1964, the same day that three civil rights workers disap- peared in Philadelphia, Miss., a New Rochelle policeman clubbed a 17-year-old Negro teen- ager over the head, requiring his hospitalization for a possible concussion. The Negro com- munity became aroused over what it considered police brutality. Several thousand persons, in- cluding ‘angry teenagers, prepared to demon- strate. A critical confrontation developed be- tween the Negroes and the police department. Working swiftly, the New Rochelle Human Rights Commission opened lines of communi- cation between police and municipal officials and Negro leaders. The result: the police de- partment held a human relations course for all of its patrolmen; the hearing of the accused Officer was speeded up; New Rochelle’s City Council agreed to press the city’s business community to hire more teenagers; the housing authority began to acquire more integrated liv- ing units; and the recreation commission ex- panded its entire program. Chicago, IIl—During the summer of 1964, the Mayor’s Commission on Human Relations observed that potentially explosive conditions which had led to riots in other urban cities also existed in Chicago. Feeling the urgency of the situation, it brought together representatives of the mass media, and the top city and police department officials to explore the situation. The result: mass media cooperated fully in adopting guidelines for reporting racial inci- dents in a non-provocative manner. The police department instructed its officers in the proper handling of arrests in predominantly Negro areas. Not one case of police brutality was reported during the entire summer. Chicago remained peaceful. Louisville, Ky.—In May, 1963, the Louis- ville Human Relations Commission conducted an extensive testing campaign to determine whether public places were open to all the city’s citizens. The survey found that 35 percent of the city’s restaurants were still segregated and not likely to desegregate volun- tarily. The result: the commission helped obtain an ordinance prohibiting discrimination in places of public accommodation. rr el ee
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 14, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | formation of commission | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 14, Document 67

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_014_067.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 14, Document 67
  • Text: MINUTES HUMAN RELATIONS COMMITTEE NOVEMBER 17, 1966 ! Members of the Human Relations Committee met at City Hall on Thursday, November 17, 1966, at 10:00 a.m, with the following members present: Vice Mayor Sam Massell, Jr., Chairman Alderman Rodney Cook Alderman Milton G. Farris Alderman Richard C. Freeman Mr. Charles Hart Alderman Charles Leftwich Alderman G. Everett Millican Mrs. Eliza Paschall Mr. Benny T. Smith Alderman Jack Summers Mrs, Dorothy Bolder Thompson The meeting was called to order by Chairman Massell and the Committee considered the recommendations of the sub-committee appointed to submit nominees for membership on the Community Relations Commission. After discussion of the sub-committee's report and additional nominations by the Committee members, the following individuals were recommended to Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. for consideration: 1. Mr. James Moore, President, Atlanta Labor Council Alternate: Mr. ‘E. L. Abercrombie International Vice President Secretary=Treasurer Local 218 Laundry, Dry Cleaning and Dye House Workers International Union . Board of Directors, Atlanta Urban League 2. Rabbi Jacob Rothschild, The Temple 3. Miss Helen Bullard, Consultant, Toombs, Amisano and Wells 24h, Sa ll me le ed ta eA! Human Relations Committee Minutes November 17, 1966 Page Two 9. 10, Ls 12. Mrs. Sara Baker, Resident of Peoplestown Section Alternate: Mr. Arthur Smith, Manager of Perry Homes Public Housing Development Dr. Cleveland Dennard, Principal, Carver High School Mr. Robert Dobbs, Resident of Perry Homes Mr. C.G. Ezzard, Resident of Summerhill-Mechanicsville Section Rev. Joseph L. Griggs, Gordon Street Presbyterian Church Alternate: Mr. Edgar Schukrait, Schukraft's Florist Archbishop Paul Hallinan, Atlanta Archdiocese Alternate: The Rev. Kernan, St. Anthony's Catholic Church Mr. Charles Hart, Member of Human Relations Committee Mr. James H. Moore, Attorney Alternates: Me. irving Kaler Mr. David Goldwasser Mr. Hamilton Douglas, Jr. Mr. Mills B. Lane, C & S National Bank Alternates: Mr. Mike Cheatam Mr. J. Ben Moore Mr. W. L. Duvall Mr. Lucien Oliver Human: Relations Committee Minutes November 17, 1966 Page Three 13. Mr. Joseph Haas, Attorney 14. Mrs. Fred Patterson, Former President of United Church Women Alternates: Mrs. L. L. Austin, United Church Women Mrs. Carl J. Bliem, President, United Church Women 15. Mrs. Mary Stephens, Resident of Lakewood Section . 16. Mr. James Townsend, Editor, Atlanta Magazine Alternates: - Mr. Ray Moore Mr. Ben Perry Mr. Al Keuttner Mr. Mike Davis 17. Mrs. Dorothy Bolder Thompson, Member of Human Relations Committee 18. Rev. Samuel Williams, Member of Human Relations Committee 19, Rev. Fred Stair, Central Presbyterian’ Church Alternate: Rev. Allison Williams, Trinity Presbyterian Church 20. Mr. Robert Mitchell, Vice President of Lockheed y Alternates: Mr. Robert M. Wood, Sears, Roebuck and Company Mr. W. A. Parker, Sr., Beck & Gregg Mr. John Wilson, Horne Wilson & Company The Community Relations Commission charter provides that the Mayor shall nominate individuals to serve on this Commission to the Board of Human Relations Committee Minutes November 17, 1966 Page Four Aldermen for their approval. It also provides that the Mayor shall appoint six individuals for one year terms, seven for two year terms, and seven for three year terms and shall appoint one member as Chairman. . , It was also agreed that the names of all individuals considered for membership on this Commission be submitted to the Community Relations Commission for consideration on any advisory committees which might: be established. The Committee also voted to recommend a budget for the first year of . $30, 000 which Mr. Farris will have included in the Finance Committee report. There being no further business the meeting was adjourned sine die.
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 14, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | formation of commission | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 14, Document 85

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_014_085.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 14, Document 85
  • Text: PERSONAL DATA SHEET (Mrs.) Eliza King Paschall, 1957 Westminster Way, N. E., Atlanta, Georgia 30307 PERSONAL: Native of Charleston, South Carolina; grew up in Columbia, S. C. Widow of late Walter Paschall, WSB News Editor; former president, Atlanta Civitan Club. Mother of 3 daughters: Suzanne (Mrs. Martin Gilbert, of London); Jan - independent study in Europe; Amy - attending Druid Hills High School. EDUCATION: Graduate of Agnes Scott College, Phi Beta Kappa, with High Honor. Graduate study in Public Administration and Sociology at American University, Emory University; independent study in England, CURRENT EMPLOYMENT: (Since 1961) Executive Director of Council on Human Relations of Greater Atlanta, Inc. FORMER EMPLOYMENT: Consumer Consultant, U. S. Food & Drug Administration; American Red Cross Overseas Service, European Theatre Operation, World War II; National Youth Administration of Georgia. OFFICES HELD: President, National Alumnae Association of Agnes Scott College Alumnae Trustee, Agnes Scott College President, League of Women Voters of Georgia President, League of Women Voters of Atlanta Chairman, Council on Human Relations of Greater Atlanta, Inc. CURRENT: Board of Atlanta Urban League (7 years) Life president of Agnes Scott class Member ACLU, National Democratic Party, Atlanta Press Club National Committee for Support of Public Schools American Academy of Political and Social Science, National Conference of Christians and Jews Good Neighbor Award, 1962 Fund for Adult Education Fellowship, 1960 First Edition of Who's Who Among American Women Published articles in various journals Speakers Bureau of American Embassy, London, 1964-65
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 14, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | formation of commission | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 14, Document 50

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_014_050.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 14, Document 50
  • Text: CITY OF ATLANTA wlan ee lee April 10 : 1969 . CITY HALL ATLANTA, GA. 30303 Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404 IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison Mr. Eugene T. Branch Chairman of the Board of Directors Community Council of the Atlanta Area, Inc. c/o Jones, Bird and Howell Haas-Howell Building Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Mr. Branch: The City of Atlanta has been fortunate in having many citizens and groups volunteer their time and services to help resolve important needs in-our community. As the City has grown and the interest and concern of our citizens has increased, it has become more and more difficult to effectively and efficiently utilize volunteers in meeting the needs of the city. It is extremely encouraging to see the efforts being put forth by the Community Council, the Chamber of Commerce, the Community Chest and the Atlanta Junior League in developing a vehicle for providing orderly assignment and utilization of volunteer manpower, It is essential that there be a central point whereby community needs can be catalogued and consolidated and volunteers enlisted and trained to help fulfill these needs, I believe only through such a coordinated effort can the talents and skills of Atlanta's volunteer citizens be marshalled and utilized to the best advantage of all the people of the city. Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor IAJr:fy
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 14, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | formation of commission | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 14, Document 73

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_014_073.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 14, Document 73
  • Text: CL thw, AL KUETTNER 675 SHERWOOD ROAD, N. E. I Barpcig gi ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30324 WY, Jan. 4, 1967 The Hon. Ivan Allen, Mayor, City of Atlanta, Re: Community Relations City Hall, Commission Atlanta, Ga. 30303. Dear Mayor Allen: I am serving as chairman of a special committee in the Community Relations Commission which is investigating the funding of projects that might be initiated under the juris- diction of the Commission. I would appreciate any information from your office as to grants from foundations or other sources, now available or in prospect, for the city of Atlanta in the area of our Comuission's interest. I am not thinking here of the many funding programs that have been made to the various established organizations but those made or available direct to the city and which are not now being administered. I unierstand one such fund is a $23,000 grant from the Stern Family Fund for a "Neighborhood Involvement" program. As we get further into our work, such inquiries as that above will, of course, come from the Executive Director. I am required to make a report to the Executive Committee on Jan. 20 and would be grateful for any information prior to that time. Best personal regards. Sincerely, LAE cc: Mr. Irving K. Kaler.
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 14, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | formation of commission | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 14, Document 74

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_014_074.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 14, Document 74
  • Text: IRVING K.KALER SANFORD R.KARESH MARTIN H. RUBIN PAUL M. MtLARTY, JR. Cc.LAWRENCE JEWETT, JR. LAW OFFICES KALER, KARESH & RUBIN 1620 FULTON NATIONAL BANK BUILDING ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 January 5, 1967 Miss Faye Yarbrough c/o Office of Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. City Hall Atlanta, Georgia Dear Faye: CABLE ADDRESS: "KKATTY” ATLANTA TELEPHONE: AREA CODE 404 525-6886 The next meeting of the Community Relations Commission will take place on Friday, January 27 at 1:30 P.M. We will meet in Committee Room 2, City Hall. I appreciate very much your assenting to take the minutes of this next meeting. IKK/sf£ I look forward to seeing you at that time. Yours very sincerely, og ¢¥ yf bt. K. Kaler
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 14, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | formation of commission | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 3, Folder 14, Document 61

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_014_061.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 3, Folder 14, Document 61
  • Text: September 16, 1966 . - Mr. Benny T. Smith : \N E 209 Archcrest Drive alg’ Hapeville, Georgia Dear Mr. Smith: I regret that you were unable to attend the meeting of the Human Relations Committee on Friday, September 9. Due to an insufficient number of members to constitute a quorum, formal organization of the committee was post- poned until the next regularly scheduled meeting, This meeting has been called for Thursday, September 22, 1966, at 2:00 p,m, at City Hall in Committee Room # 2. A copy of the minutes of the last meeting is attached. Sincerely yours, Sam Massell, Jr. Acting Chairman Human Relations Committee SMI rify Enclosure (1)
  • Tags: Box 3, Box 3 Folder 14, Folder topic: Community Relations Commission | formation of commission | 1966-1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021