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  • Tags = Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Coordinators Weekly Report | 1969, Box 7

Box 7, Folder 10, Document 2

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  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 10, Document 2
  • Text: April 28, 1969 Mr. Duane Beck Executive Director Community Council of the Atlanta Area, Inc. 1000 Glenn Building 120 Marietta Street, N. W. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Dear Duane: Attached is a copy of a draft position paper establishing the National Urban Coalition's role in health, I would appreciate any comments you or your colleagues may have. Sincerely yours, Dan Sweat
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 10, Document 8

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_010_008.pdf
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  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 10, Document 8
  • Text: Statement by JOHN W. GARDNER, Chairman The Urban Coalition Action Council before the Subcommittee on Employment, Manpower and Poverty Committee on Labor and Public Welfare United States Senate April 23, 1969 Mr. Chairman, we are pleased to be here on behalf of the Urban Coalition Action Council. The Action Council brings together various leaders from segments that do not normally collaborate for the purpose of reaching agreement or solutions to our nation's domestic problems. We are here today to discuss poverty in the United States. By current Social Security Administration criteria there are 22 million poor people in the United States. The number has declined from 39 million in 1959. To lift 17 million people out of poverty in 10 years is a considerable achievement, worth bearing in mind in these days of discouragement. It should give us courage and confidence to tackle the remaining task. To let the achievement lead to a slackening of effort would be the worst kind of folly. Twenty-two million poor people represent a tremendous amount of human misery and deprivation. -?2- In his excellent paper entitled "Who are the Urban Poor?" Anthony Downs offers some highly relevant data. Of the urban poor, -- the majority are white -- almost half are in households that cannot be expected to be self-supporting: the aged, the disabled, the mother with infant children -- forty-one per cent are children under 18 -- nearly one-third are in households headed by employed men whose earnings are below the poverty level. It is worth reminding ourselves that the poverty remaining after decades of unprecedented affluence is not like the poverty that was once widespread in this country. It is the hard-core that remains. It is not the genteel, threadbare but benign poverty of the 19th Century clergyman or teacher. It is poverty . at its most stubborn, poverty rooted in the social disintegration of urban and rural slums, poverty linked to severe cultural deprivation, poverty complicated by illiteracy, physical handicap, advanced age, or mental retardation. In such poverty, hunger and malnutrition warp the normal course of child development; physical ailments go untreated and turn into lifelong handicaps; children are never exposed to the stimulation that would ensure their intellectual development; the environment breeds hopelessness and lawlessness. It is a world of victims and it breeds victims. An individual born into such an environment does not--cannot-- enjoy the opportunity we regard as the birthright of every American child. If our commitment to the values we so proudly Sei Bee profess doesn't move us to right that wrong, our self-interest should. Out of all proportion to their numbers in the population, the children of poverty become, in later life, economic burdens on the rest of the community. If we are unwilling to spend the money to cure the problem at its source, we spend the money later anyway--in the social cost of crime, narcotics addiction, social unrest, mental illness, lifelong physical handicap and so on. The attack on poverty must be far broader and more varied than is generally recognized. We have to begin with management of the economy and with attention to economic growth and full employment. Back of everything we seek to accomplish is the economic strength of the nation. That strength makes our social programs possible. It provides the jobs and pay checks that enable most Americans to eat well, keep their children healthy and function as independent citizens living their lives as they please. We often fall into the habit of talking about our economy as one thing and our social programs as a completely different subject. They are the same subject. Economic growth is our main social program. The freest and best money a man receives is the money in his pay envelope. The best program for creating independent and confident citizens is a vital, full-employment economy. Thereforé we must expect the Administration and the Congress to use the tools of monetary and fiscal policy to avoid inflation or recession, to facilitate capital growth -4- where possible, to expand job opportunities and job training, to seek wage-price stability, to encourage the development of new products and services and the advancement of science and technology, to foster increased productivity, and to protect natural resources, . The attack on poverty also calls for adequate programs of income maintenance--unemployment insurance, social security, public assistance, and probably new forms to come. These programs have not been surrounded with the glamour that has touched some other aspects of the attack on poverty; indeed the public assistance programs have been the subject of widespread hostility. But it is a plain fact that most of the poor are too old or too young or too sick or disabled to enter the job market. No matter how brilliantly we pursue remedial programs, there will always remain a large number who can only be aided by providing cash income. A comprehensive attack on poverty also requires that we rehabilitate the victims of poverty and eliminate the urban and rural slums where poverty is bred. To help the individual we must have adequately funded programs of education, job training, health care and social services. To change the environment involves massive urban efforts, such as the programs called for in the Housing Act of 1968; as well as regional and rural development activities such as the Appalachian Program. In short, the total effort to deal with poverty reaches into aveey domestic department of government. As you know, the Office of Economic Opportunity has controlled something less than -5- 8% of all federal antipoverty funds expended during its life. Agencies with far more resources at their disposal are concerned with. housing, manpower, health and other needs of the poor. If we do not adequately fund those broader programs, the attack on poverty will be crippled. 1 would place particular emphasis on -- modernization of the existing welfare program, including Federal support of national welfare Standards, and hopefully, early consideration of a more thoroughgoing revision of the national income maintenance system -- a stepped-up training program with built-in incen= tives, better tailored to the needs of the several categories of poor, e.g., the welfare mothers, the unskilled teenager, the employed low earning family head -~- Job creation--an expanded JOBS program to increase private employment, and a public service employment program -- education, health and nutritional programs to counter the effects of poverty on the considerable number of children growing up in poor families. We must begin to think in terms of much higher levels of funding in areas affecting the poor. Actual appropriations generally are significantly below authorized appropriations, We often hear that poverty programs are failures; that they do not work. And yet, they seldom are given the necessary funds or =6§= the long-range commitment to insure their success. Some examples will show the glaring disparities between authorizations and appropriations. The Model Cities program-- intended as a coordinated attack on blight and treating social as well as physical problems--was given $625 million last year although more than $1 billion was authorized. This year only $675 million has been requested, with an authorized amount of $1.3 billion. The home ownership and rental assistance provisions of the Housing and Urban Development Act called for $150 million the first year, and only $50 million was appropriated. These funds have been fully committed for several months, and many are beginning to question seriously the government's commitment under the Housing Act. The Nixon Administration is requesting full funding for these programs and Congress must act on this request if the Housing Act is to meet its promise. The Office of Economic Opportunity has consistently failed to secure full appropriations. And in education and health, there has been a noticeable failure to spend the amounts necessary to have an impact on poverty. Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, which provides federal funds to school districts that have special projects for dis- advantaged children, received an authorization of $2.726 billion yet it was allowed only $1.123 billion in appropriated funds. And so the story goes. It is unrealistic to believe we can - solve our nation's problems if we do not provide even the authorized funds after long and studied debate over proposed solutions. And now let me turn specifically to extension of the Economic Opportunity Act and the Office of Economic Opportunity. Mr. Chairman, in preparation for this testimony, I reviewed the history of the Office of Economic Opportunity since 1964, and I must say that I am impressed with the role that this Committee has played. The Committee has shown concern and insight. It has worked hard to educate itself and to serve as an advocate for the poor. It is easy to criticize the hectic early years of the OEO. But when the smoke clears away, I believe that history will record significant achievements. The OEO's vigorous efforts stirred a concern for the victims of poverty that made possible a mobilization of resources reaching far beyond the agency itself. Programs in behalf of the poor in every other domestic department benefitted by the generative force of this new effort. Beyond that, the OEFO has injected an element of innovation into a number of programs addressed to the problems of the poor; it has identified and fostered community leadership among the poor and among minorities; and it has enabled many of us to gain valuable insights into the impact of institutional inadequacies on the lives of the poor. Looking to the future, I want to speak very briefiy of three themes which were prominent in the early conception of OEO's function: innovation, community participation and coordination. The innovative approach must continue to characterize the OEO. The infusion of "research and development" techniques into social program areas should be firmly supported and expanded. The innovative approach is well illustrated in the delivery of services to the poor. Breaking out of the mold of traditional agency patterns, the best poverty programs have shown that legal and health services, pre-school education, multi-service program integration in neighborhood centers and other techniques could in fact reach persons long considered unreachable. It is not generally recognized that the innovative activities of OEO had a far-reaching impact on the old-line departments. The latter would be loath to admit it, but many programs undertaken by the old-line departments between 1965 and 1968 were influenced by the philosophy of the OEO. At the heart of the controversy surrounding the OEO has been the question of public power for the poor. The "War on Poverty" provided the first major tools with which the poor could seriously affect some policies and programs at both the national and the local levels. It is true that in a typically American burst of enthusiasm, the OEO went at this task with a maximum of energy and a minimum of reflection. But perhaps such things can only be accomplished in a burst of enthusiasm. I am thoroughly familiar with the problems, inconsistencies, tensions and mistakes that have arisen from application of the requirement for "maximum feasible participation." But we are more skillful in handling those problems today than we were two years ago, and we are still learning. It was wise to seek to give a voice to the poor, particularly wise in the case of minority groups (because of their systematic prior exclusion). I believe that we will move toward increasingly sound and effective forms of citizen participation. | Even today, as my own staff moves about the country helping to organize local urban coalitions and seeking the cooperation of leaders from the black community, we find that many of the ablest local leaders we can recruit for our purposes are men and women who had their first taste of leadership in the Community Action Programs. I have emphasized that the attack on poverty, broadly conceived, reaches into every domestic department. Such multifarious activity cries out for coordination, and of course the OEO was placed in the Executive Office of the President to accomplish just that. As we all know, it never did, partly because its energies went into operating new programs, and partly because coordinating Cabinet members is a difficult task at best, OEO's achievements in coordination have not been altogether negligible. It has worked out checkpoint procedures through which federal agencies, grantees, state agencies and local communities engage in mutual consultation before grants are made. And it has developed joint projects such as those involving displaced farm workers in the Mississippi Delta, Indians, and migrant workers. But much, much more is needed. I believe that my views on the coordination of domestic programs are fairly well known. PR I do not accept the widely shared notion that Cabinet members Cannot be coordinated. They can be. The first requirement is unflinching determination on the part of the President to bring about that result. The second is a suitable instrumentality (and I may say parenthetically that the Economic Opportunity Council, properly used, would have been quite adequate to the purpose). The third requirement is that the instrumentality must be headed by a man of stature, implicitly trusted by the President. There is a serious question as to whether OEO can ever fill this coordinating function so long as it is an operating agency -- and therefore, in a sense, a competitor of the departments it hopes to coordinate. So we may have to look to President Nixon's new Urban Affairs Council to accomplish the desired result. It will do so only if the President himself takes an active interest in it, and only if a strong and substantial professional staff is provided to plan, evaluate, sift priorities, develop alternative courses of action and make recommendations to the President. While we're on this subject I want to say a word about rural poverty, because it involves the question of coordination. We will not solve one most pressing urban problems as long as widespread rural poverty exists. The heavy migration from rural America to the blighted areas of our major cities clearly shows how bad economic and social conditions are in rural areas; despite the privations felt by the urban poor, dshononlains urban conditions continue to represent a substantial improvement over life for the poor in rural communities. With improving agricultural technology, ever more persons will have to find employment outside agriculture. Already the great majority of the rural poor are not in any way involved in farming. Industrial development in rural areas should be vastly expanded wherever sufficient potential exists. States are uniquely situated to combat rural poverty. Programs of economic and community development in rural areas frequently require multi-county planning and coordination. Federal funds, including CAP funds, should encourage the development of state-coordinated demonstrations in rural areas -- perhaps several in each state -- with special emphasis on economic development and on training of administrative and program personnel for all phases of community development, from public administration to staff for social welfare agencies. Such demonstrations should extend to education, health, industrial development, transportation and all other relevant fields. Obviously, programs of that scope are not the appropriate primary function of the Department of Agriculture alone; rather, there should be a coordinated attack by the Departments of Agriculture, Labor, Housing and Urban Development, Transportation, Health, Education and Welfare, and the Economic Development Administration. The OEO might conceivably be the instrument for accomplishing such coordination although -- as indicated earlier -- its capacity to operate and coordinate at the same time remains in doubt. 29> | In the final analysis, substantial economic development is the key to ending rural poverty. There is at present no federal policy guiding the application of the nation's - considerable potential in this area. Resources of the Economic Development Administration can be brought to bear only where the most severe conditions already exist, and even then there is virtually no coordination between the Economic Development Administration and major federal agency procurement and contracting functions. There has been much discussion of whether the various OEO programs should be moved to the regular departments. I believe that some definitely should be transferred under carefully drawn conditions. I confess that I am equally impatient with those who are totally hostile to the OEFO and those who want to preserve it under glass, utterly unchanged. I need not remind this Committee that about 40% of the funds appropriated under the Economic Opportunity Act have always gone into programs delegated among various federal agencies. The great bulk of these funds has gone into a series of work and training programs, and they have been the basis for much innovation within the receiving agencies. I am keenly conscious of the problems involved in transfer. For example, federal departments presently function heavily through state agencies; they do not, in the main, have strong relationships to local leadership and organization. If the departments receive programs from OEO they must continue to foster the new constituencies developed around the programs ie PF ces at the local level, and Congress must encourage them to do so. Similarly, they must protect the innovative values of the transferred programs. If these programs cannot survive in the regular agencies as the latter are presently organized, then there is something gravely wrong with the regular agencies, something that should be corrected forthwith. To insure an appropriate outcome, it seems advisable that, at least initially, delegation should be favored over outright transfer. Transfer should occur only as the regular agencies prove their capacity to nurture the delegated programs. - 14 - I have been asked my views on how many years the present legislation should be extended. I do not have fixed views on that subject, provided that two principles are observed. The first is that every program should be open to periodic revision as experience is gained. The second is that the nation should exhibit an unwavering commitment to fight the poverty battle continuously, this year and next and the year after, never relenting until the job is done. It is not an off-again-on- again kind of problem and it doesn't merit that kind of answer. In closing, gentlemen, let me revert again to the totality of the government's effort in combatting poverty. I am firmly convinced that more billions must be poured immediately into the broad spectrum of housing, education, health, manpower development, and other federal programs which make up the broader anti-poverty package. Millions are still hungry, or live in inadequate housing; the majority of poor heads of households work fulltime; health services are still inaccessible to millions; school systems and entire cities across the country are facing bankruptcy while providing minimal services to needy citizens. We can and must deal with those problems at once.
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 10, Document 23

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_010_023.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 7, Folder 10, Document 23
  • Text: THE URBAN COALITION ACTION COUNCIL JOHN W. GARDNER CHAIRMAN 1819 H STREET, N. W. WASHINGTON, D.C, 20006 Community Self-Determination Act of 1968 Senate Democratic Version S. 3875 Senate Republican Version S. 3876 House Democratic Version H. R. 18976 House Republican Version H. R. 18460 Title I (All Title references are to S. 3875) Title I creates a National Community Corporation Certification Board (NCCCB) and outlines the procedure and purpose of individual Community Development Corporations (CDC's). The NCCCB acts much like the National Labor Relations Board in its union certification procedure. It will be com- posed of five members, and its primary functions will be the issuance of corporation charters, conducting and supervising referenda, service as counsel to the CDC's and as an information center for parties interested in forming CDC's. A National Advisory Commission advises the NCCCB but does not have direct impact on the latter's specific activities. Section B of Title I states the structural outline of a local CDC. This is the heart of the Act. It would have a broad social improvement purpose as well as the promotion of business activity. CDC's operate in areas in which the 16-year and up population ranges from 5,000 to 300,000. The geographic area within which a CDC would operate is designated by the applicants for a CDC charter. Any resident within the designated area may be a shareholder of the corporation, but the Act requires that a minimum of 10 per cent of the 16-year-old and up popula- tion residing within the area hold stock in the CDC. The shares would have a par value of $5, and each shareholder would have one vote in corporate matters, notwithstanding the number of shares the shareholder actually holds. The functions of a CDC fall into six categories. First, neighborhood services and community improvement, including but not limited to public welfare programs, day care centers, TELEPHONE: 202 293-1530 hes consumer education, job placement, legal aid, etc. Second, it would own stock in businesses in the CDC area. Third, it would sponsor, own, or manage housing facilities within the CDC area. Fourth, it would be an advocate planner for neighborhood and community renewal projects. Fifth, it would serve as a representative of various community interests in other areas of public policy and concern. Sixth, it would encourage various other elements of the community such as business, labor, religion, and so forth, to become active in voluntary community self-help efforts. A CDC would be financed by earnings from affiliated businesses, grants from community development funds, foundations, trusts, etc., and from contracts with privately owned businesses, government agencies, and other entities for specified services or products. The CDC would have nine directors and two additional directors for each 10,000 shareholders of the corporation in excess of 25,000. The directors of the corporation would select the executive officers as well as the Business Management Board. The latter's primary function is to provide overall management expertise and assistance to those affiliated busi- nesses owned by the CDC. The full area of responsibility of the members of the BMB would be spelled out in the CDC charter but would be phrased primarily to afford the BMB maximum lati- tude to manage CDC owned businesses and allow for the purchase of other enterprises. CDC's can be organized by any five or more residents of a specific area covering a population range from 5,000 to 300,000, 16 years and older. For any designated area to be eligible for a CDC, however, the rate of unemployment must be higher than the national average or the median family income be proportionately lower than the national average. After applica- tion is made for a CDC charter, a 60-day period must elapse so as to allow any other interested group within the same area, or an overlapping area, the opportunity to organize its own CDC. Before the NCCCB will grant a final charter to a group of applicants, the applicants must have received pledge cards for the purchase of stock from a minimum of 5 per cent of those eligible to purchase stock within the designated area of operation. This insures a minimum level of community support. If the applicants cannot obtain pledge cards from the minimum 5 per cent, the charter application is rejected. Once the pledge cards are received from 5 per cent of the population, a conditional charter is issued. At that point, the CDC has 45 days in which to obtain additional pledge cards covering 10 per cent of the area's population. Five hundred people must have paid in at least $5,000 for CDC stock. During the =3= 45-day period the pledge money is kept in escrow pending further action toward issuance of a final charter. During the period in which a CDC attempts to raise the minimum level of funds, an additional determination is being made which indicates the relative economic need of the area in question. A Development Index is figured for the area. The Index is the lesser of two ratios: First, the ratio of the national rate of unemployment to the area's unemployment rate x 100, or second, the ratio of the nation's median family income to the area's median family income x 100. If the Development Index of a conditional chartered CDC is found to be 90 or above, the charter is dissolved because the CDC is con- sidered too close to the national average of 100. A special bonus is afforded those rural areas from which outmigration is con- tributing directly to specific urban tensions. If only one conditional CDC is left within a given area, a vote is then held in which a majority of those voting must approve the appli- cants. If a majority of those voting do approve, the final charter is granted; if a majority disapprove, the charter is dissolved. In the case of competing CDC's within a given area, referenda are held for each competitor, starting with those representing the geographic area encompassing the highest level of population. If none of the competitors within the largest given area are accepted, a vote is held for those CDC's competing in the next smallest geographic area, etc., until such time as one CDC is approved by the requisite majority of those voting. At least 10 per cent of the eligible voters must actually cast a ballot for any referendum to be valid. Once a CDC is established, a one-time seed money grant is made to the corporation in an amount equal to its current paid-in capital. Title II Title II provides for the establishment of Community Development Banks (CDB's), which are organized by CDC's. CDB's operate in an area of 25,000 or more people, 16 years and up, and concentrate on financial services to the area in question. They provide both business financing and consumer credit to individual CDC shareholders. Equity capital is obtained through the sale of stock to 1) the Secretary of the Treasury (Class A), 2) any groups or individuals other than the Federal Government and CDC's (Class B), and 3) stock sold only to CDC's (Class C). =4= Class A stock would be nonvoting and repaid by a franchise tax on the CDB's net earnings. Class B stock would be non- voting but receive dividends. Class C stock would not receive dividends. The latter point is made so that the CDB becomes a necessary financial mechanism for the establishment and pro- liferation of CDC activities but does not become a source of income. Income bonds would be issued to the public to provide additional equity and debt capitalization. CDB net earnings would be first applied to make up any bad debts and restore any impaired capital. The payment of stock dividends is a lessor priority. Loans are made to the following individuals and busi- nesses: 1) cbDC shareholders for normal consumer credit; 2) a small business, 75 per cent of which is owned by resident CDC shareholders; 3) a small business, less than 75 per cent of which is owned by CDC shareholders, so long as the CDC in whose area the business is located is given the right of first refusal when the business is sold; 4) a subsidiary of a CDC, 51 per cent of which is owned by CDC shareholders; 5) outside corporations with turnkey contracts with a CDC; 6) cooperatives, 75 per cent of whose members are CDC shareholders; and 7) nonprofit housing sponsors operating within the community serviced by the CDB. An applicant for a business loan must have a minimum level of business experience and expertise, or have contracted with a company or service to obtain the necessary business training. Loans of up to 90 per cent of the required capital may be made on terms of up to 20 years for repayment. Housing sponsors can receive money for "front-money" or construction loans, Unorthodox and high risk ventures are encouraged as long as they would yield significant community benefits. Participation loans are encouraged. The primary purpose of a CDB is to channel capital to business ventures. Its secondary purpose is to provide normal banking services to people in impoverished areas. Title III Title III creates a United States Community Development Bank, which would serve as a secondary financial institution and as a source of technical, financial, and managerial expertise to CDB's. It would serve also to promote economic development in those poverty-stricken areas where no CDB's exist. The USCDB would have the same relationship to CDB's as a federal inter- mediate credit bank has to local commercial banks. The USCDB would have the same relationship to those areas not serviced by CDB's as the World Bank has to underdeveloped countries. Although not an instrumentaility of the Federal Government, the President would initially appoint the incorporators and first directors of the USCDB. Eventually CDB's holding stock in the USCDB would name some of the directors. Capitalization would be provided through stock sales. The Secretary of the Treasury would hold nonvoting, non- paying, Class A stock purchased through funds provided by a Congressional appropriation. Class B stock would be held by anyone other than the Federal Government, CDB's being eligible to purchase such stock. The USCDB is authorized to issue bonds, debentures, and other certificates of debt up to 5 times its paid-in capital and surplus. Its primary functions are to provide secondary banking services to CDB's through discounts, loans, notes, advances, and so forth, and to make loans for business and community facilities or public development facilities in low-income "investment areas," designated by the Secretary of Labor. It provides interim construction financing for facilities which it may also plan, initiate, own, and manage until such time as the facilities are purchased. It provides management assistance to CDB's as well as other borrowers and generally creates new investment opportunities by bringing together facilities, capital, and management. A CDB may establish branches. USCDB earnings are to be applied in the following order: 1) restoration of any capital impairment, 2) creation and maintenance of a surplus account, 3) payment of a franchise tax with reference to the amount of Class A stock held by the Secretary of the Treasury, 4) establishment of contingency reserves, -6- 5) dividends on Class B stock up to 6 per cent of earnings, and 6) retirement of Class A stock held by the Treasury. Title IV Title IV authorizes certain Federal tax advantages for CDC and turnkey corporations. All tax advantages granted to CDC's are applicable until the Development Index for the designated CDC area reaches the national average for five years. Title IV would amend the Internal Revenue Code to permit each corporation in a group of CDC subsidiary corpora- tions to retain its individual surtax exemption and pay its regular corporate tax on anything over the $25,000 at a 22 per cent rate rather than 28 per cent. Tax rates and surtax exemptions are liberalized depending upon the area's Development Index, with provisions for greater tax advantages to those CDC's operating in areas with the lowest Development Index. In addition, the Internal Revenue Code is amended to attract turnkey companies into the CDC area. Turnkey companies can take advantage of rapid amortization schedules for its facilities. Again, the rate of amortization depends on the rate of the Development Index with the shorter periods of amortization being made available to those companies which invest in the poorest areas. A 10 per cent tax credit on wages and salaries of CDC shareholders employed in the turnkey facility is granted to the turnkey company. This is called a human investment tax credit. The 10 per cent figure compares with the 7 per cent investment credit on machinery investment, though is higher because of the impermanence of the investment in human skills. It is argued that the credit must be higher to induce the turnkey corporation to involve itself in impoverished areas. The turnkey company is not required to pay capital gains tax on the sale of a turnkey facility if the sale profits are reinvested in another turnkey operation or in Class B stock of a CDB. A turnkey corporation would be entitled to a sustained profitability tax credit equal to 15 per cent of the profits generated from turnkey operations for five years after the sale of a facility to a cDC. This latter provision presumably guarantees the development of the strongest financial operation the turnkey company can encourage. faitle V If a CDC is not a dividend-paying corporation, it can be treated as a CAP agency under the Economic Opportunity Act. The Small Business Administration is authorized to make grants to CDC's of up to 90 per cent of the cost of technical and management assistance and training programs. The grants may be made for a number of programs, some of which are as follows: 1) 3) 4) 5) 6) 7) aT the identification and development of new business opportunities, joint ventures, and turnkey agreements; Marketing surveys; planning and research for business development; plant design, layout, and operation; marketing and promotional assistance; business counseling, management training, and legal and other related services with specific emphasis on management training, using the resources of private business; encouragement of subcontracting to CDC's for establishing business and cooperative efforts to train and upgrade CDC personnel. APPENDIX S. 3875 Sponsors: Senators Nelson (Wis.), Bayh (Ind.), Harris (Okla.), Hartke (Ind.), Church (Idaho), Mondale (Minn.), Hart (Mich.), Magnuson (Wash.), Metcalf (Mont.), Moss (Utah), Pell (R. I.), Randolph (W. Va.), Ribicoff (Conn.), Williams (N.J.), Young (Ohio), Muskie (Me.), Tydings (Md.) and McGovern (S. D.). S. 3876 Sponsors: Senetors Percy (Ill.), Baker (Tenn.), Boggs (Del.), Brooke (Mass.), Case (N.J.), Fong (Hawaii), Griffin (Mich.), Javits (N.Y.), Jordan (Idaho), Kuchel (Calif.), Pearson (Kans.), Prouty (Vt.), Scott (Pa.) and Tower (Tex.) H. R. 18976 Sponsor: Rep. Fraser (Minn.) H. R. 18460 Sponsors: Reps. Goodell (N.Y.), Curtis (Mo.), Widnall (N.J.) and Taft (Ohio) Although there are at least three versions of the Community Self-Determination Act, the differences are in form only. Whatever structural differences are found in the bills are primarily because of political reasons. In short, familiarity with the concepts and proposals of any one bill will be equivalent to an examination of all of the bills.
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 10, Document 36

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_010_036.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 10, Document 36
  • Text: THE URBAN COALITION ACTION COUNCIL JOHN W. GARDNER CHAIRMAN 1819 H STREET, N. W. October 4 - 196 8 WASHINGTON, D.C, 20006 WEEKLY LEGISLATIVE REPORT Education, Labor-~and Antipoverty Funds. Congress has cleared the final appropriations for the HEW and Labor Departments and the Office of Economic Opportunity, the antipoverty agency. The antipoverty appropriation was the largest Congress has ever approved, but funds for schools attended by educationally deprived children were below last year's appropriation. The House narrowly defeated a Southern-bhacked provision that would have encouraged resistance to desegregation of schools. The Urban Coalition Action Council joined other organizations and HEW in working for defeat of the segre- gation provision. Program Budget House Senate Final Below Budget (in millions of dollars) Title. =z Education Php 200. Pi OTS $1,200. ‘$2,123, 8 .+77. Teacher Corps Sle 2 ee S12 20.9 =1'0 53 Dropout Prevention 30. 0 20. 54 ~25. Bilingual Education 30. 0 10: aD 22529 OEO Antipoverty 2; £80. 1 873% 2,088. 1,948. =232'. Manpower Training, Labor Department 223% 400. 400. 400. vi33 The Title I funds for schools teaching educationally de- prived children -- an important program for schools in big cities -- were $68 million less than last year's appropriation and allowed the schools only 2?2% of the amounts they received for the past school year. Congress also gave advance authority for appropriations in fiscal 1970 but limited the funds to 90% of the amount received this year. This was intended to help TELEPHONE: 202 293-1530
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 10, Document 33

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_010_033.pdf
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  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 10, Document 33
  • Text: APPENDIX B November 7, 1968 MEMORANDUM TO : Steering Committee FROM : Local Coalition Task Force SUBJECT: Report on the Organization and Hotablisnnent of Local Urban Coalitions In the national statement of goals, principles and commitments adopted by the Emergency Convocation, the Steering Committee called for the establishment of local urban coalitions through- out the country. The Task Force on Local Boal itious has been assigned the responsibility of overseeing developments and progress of these local coalitions. | At its meeting on October 17, the Task Force heard reports from ne Local Coalition Division staff on its activities. While most of the staff has been on board little more than three months, visits have been made to all of the cities where coalitions were reported to have been re some state of organiza- tion or existence. In addition, the staff has been to 72 cities where interest has been expressed by one element or another in establishing a coalition. The staff reported the status of coali- tions as follows: a. Applying the tough new standards established by the Task Force, one-third of the original coalitions (11 of 34) failed to meet the latina eel seeds b, The remaining 23 coalitions are proceeding with staff Report on the vgundeati oh ahd Establishment of Local Urban Coalitions 3 ; 3 2 assistance to organize task forces, develop programs and engage in fund-raising. C. Sixteen strong new coalitions, meeting Task Force standards, have been established giving us a total of 39. ad. Thirty-two additional priority cities have been identified and are the focus of staff organizing efforts. | The staff is moving forward steadily establishing new coalitions and strengthening those we already have. However, the staff is encountering significant impediments to their organization efforts. De There has been a clear and noticeable shift in national public opinion. The sense of urgency concerning the urban crisis which existed in 1967 and early 1968 has diminished. There is greater reluctance to engage public and private resources at the local level in a coalition movement, particularly at this time. A quiet summer has contributed to this shift of ipinion, but so bac has the political campaign. 2 There is occasional lack of support from the top leadership necessary to form a coalition. While business, labor and mayors in many communities are providing leadership and support, the staff has been encountering reluctance by key individuals of one or more of these elements to the establishment of coalitions in some cities. Report on the Organization and Establishment of Local Urban Coalitions 3 The Seeeeniistinent of quality coalitions takes on special importance Since the national credibility of the Urban Coalition in part will be determined by the role, image and status of the local urban coalitions. To be effective, local coalitions must have as their active members the most influential and highly regarded leaders of each of the various elements. | Despite the best efforts of the staff, it is not always possible to engage the attention and support of these key individuals without the direct, personal involvement of Steering Committee members. Where national Steering Committee members have become involved whether by a telephone call, letter, visit, or the convening of a meeting, the organizing effort has moved far more rapidly and has attracted key leaders. RECOMMENDATION: For these reasons we wish to recommend with the denoet urgency that the Steering Committee adopt a resolution calling on each member to accept increased responsibility for the organization of focal coalitions and when called upon to do so to be of gegbevones in the following ways: a. Advise the staff of key leaders in priority cities who are known to Steering Committee meiieere and who could be instrumental in the establishment of a coalition. b. At the request of the staff, write or telephone individuals urging their support of a coalition. a Report on the Organization and Establishment of Local Urban Coalitions 4 Cc. Accept speaking engagements in local communities on behalf of the organizing effort. d. Advise the staff on general strategies to be followéd in particularly difficult situations. | e. In public appearances and speaking engagements, identify with the Urban Coalition and urge support for the local coalition movement. In order to help meet immediate organizing needs of the coalition, Steering Committee members are requested to list on the attached list the names of one or two key individuals in the cities who are known to Steering Committee: members and: who could be instru- mental in the establishment of a coalition. The staff will call on these individuals to enlist their support and cooperation. Steering Committee members may leave the attached form following the meeting. Attachment
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 10, Document 37

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_010_037.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 10, Document 37
  • Text: THE URBAN COALITION ACTION COUNCIL JOHN W. GARDNER CHAIRMAN 1819 H STREET, N. W. September 27, 1968 WASHINGTON, D.C. 20006 WEEKLY LEGISLATIVE REPORT Housing. Final action on appropriations for the HUD Department was taken September 25 when the Senate agreed to the disappointingly low figures for key housing programs Without dissent. (For figures, see September 20 Legislative Report. ) HUD Under Secretary Robert C. Wood September 25 said decisions would be made within a week on whether to make across-the-board reductions or selective cuts in HUD pro- grams. Congress cut the Department's requested funds by one-third -- from $3.1 billion to $2.1 billion. Wood, in an interview with editors of Housing and Urban Affairs Daily, singled out four programs where the Congressional cuts especially hurt. These were: Urban renewal grants. As these are for the next fiscal year, fiscal 1970, more funds may be sought next year. Model Cities, for which $625 million instead of $1 billion was approved. Urban information and technical assistance -- a small program to help states and cities carry out urban projects. Congress refused to grant any of the $5 million requested for the program. Fair housing enforcement, for which all funds were denied on grounds HUD already had sufficient personnel working in the civil rights field. The $9 million the Senate had provided would have enabled HUD to hire about 690 investigators across the country to enforce the new fair housing requirements written into law in April. Several organizations have protested the denial of funds to enforce the fair housing act and there is a possibility that HUD will ask Congress to reconsider its action. This . hinges, however, on a decision the Administration must make soon on whether to.send requests for supplemental appropri- TELEPHONE: 202 293-1530 2 S>@ ations to Congress this fall. Although that is the usual procedure late in the session, the economy mood in Congress May be so strong just before elections that the Administration will not ask for additional money. The major new programs in the 1968 housing law will be delayed at least six months if no supplemental appropriations are requested from or voted by Congress. HUD Personnel. Another factor that might delay the new housing programs is the Congressional directive in June that HUD, and all other federal agencies, cut back on their per- . sonnel. HUD had hoped to add 1,600 employees this year. Instead, it will have to reduce its staff by 900 -- not by firing employees but by filling only 7 out of 10 vacancies that develop as employees resign or retire. Senator John Sparkman (D Ala.), chairman of the Senate's Housing Subcommittee, tried unsuccessfully September 23 to win Senate approval of an exemption for HUD from the personnel cutback. Unfortunately, exemptions for other agencies were tacked onto Sparkman's amendment and the major sponsor of the personnel cutback, Senator John Williams (R Del.), fought the amendment bitterly. It was defeated, 23-37. = It is anticipated that another attempt will be made to exempt HUD from the severe personnel limitations before Congress adjourns. Education, Labor and Antipoverty Funds. Final appropri- ations for education, manpower training and antipoverty pro- grams will be announced September 30. Members of the House and Senate Appropriations Committees compromised their differ- ences in a September 26 meeting but withheld announcement of the sums agreed upon. The differences in key appropriations were listed in Appendix B of the September 13 Legislative Report. Head Start. Members of the House and Senate education committees, meeting in conference on the vocational education bill, have agreed to drop an amendment by Senator Peter Dominick (R Colo.) that would have transferred the Head Start program to HEW's Office of Education. The program will con- tinue to be run by the independent antipoverty agency, the Office of Economic Opportunity. Under the final version of the vocational education bill, the President is asked to have a study made of how Head Start can best be administered and to report to Congress next spring.
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 11, Document 3

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_011_003.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 11, Document 3
  • Text: The Urban Coalition esi onaae Washington, D.C. 20006 Telephone: 347-9630 CHAIRMAN: John W. Gardner CO-CHAIRMEN: Andrew Heiskell / A. Philip Randolph August, 1968 We need your help: The Urban Coalition and local Urban Coalitions in 33 American cities join in asking your support for the campaign, "Crisis In Our Cities", prepared by the Advertising Council for Urban America. This fine example of advertising in the public service, coupled with related campaigns, represents the largest single effort yet attempted to use the power of mass advertising to meet the growing problems of cities and people which threaten to destroy our way of life. No domestic crisis has equaled the gravity of the one which now confronts us and never has there been a more important opportunity to turn the nation's communications resources to better purpose. I urge you to give to this campaign the full and continuing support of your organization. The stakes, for all of us, have never been greater. Sincerely, eh John W. Gardner Chairman
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 11, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 10, Document 28

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_010_028.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 7, Folder 10, Document 28
  • Text: Mi _» WESTERN UNION fe" A TxYg318 22 = TxZ2_- POB TX WASHINGTON DC 20 NFT THE HON IVAN ALLEN JR MAYOR OF CITY OF ATLA CITY HALL ATLA AT ITS NOVEMBEC4S MEETING, THE MEMBERS OF THE STEERING COM“ITTES @GREED THAT THEY SHOULD SEEK AN EARLY OPPORTUNITY TO TAL® @ITH THE PRESIDENT-€LECT. INITIAL CONTACT HAS NOW REEN MADE arr: MR NTXONS AIDES HAVE STRONGLY URGED THAT WE LIMIT OUR DELE*. TION TO 10 PEOPLE. AS A MATTER OF COURTESY, WE HAVE AGREED To 02 ‘SO. ACCORDINGLY, UNLESS ANYONE ORJECT, I SHALL TRY TC PUT TOGETHER A 10-MAN DELEGATION THAT FAIRLY REPRESENTS ALL ELEMENTS WITHIN THE STEERING COMMITTEE. I HOPE THIS MEETS WITH YOUR APPROVAL. | JOHN W@ GARDNER CHAIRMAN THE URBAN COALITION. = iyi R2-s+. al . -_- ooo | ( 1270 (1-51)
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 11, Document 8

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_011_008.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 7, Folder 11, Document 8
  • Text: THE AEROSPACE EDUCATION FOUNDATION cordially invites you to participate in THE NATIONAL LABORATORY for the ADVANCEMENT OF EDUCATION Washington, D.C ® November 18-20, 1968 R.S.V.P. Dr. Leon M. Lessinger Registration Card Enclosed President
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 11, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 10, Document 43

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_010_043.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 10, Document 43
  • Text: a a Crisis in our a a Cities A Public Service Campaign of THE ADVERTISING COUNCIL Side 2 ; \ 1968 W4LH-1503 a 3343 ' \ J t 1. Time “. _ __-30 Seconds 2. Here, Kitty =~ +30 Seconds 3. Split Level 30 Seconds 4, 1930's 20 Seconds 5. Rats 20 Seconds Volunteer Agency ~CHUM, MacLEOD & GROVE, INC oN Py Urban Ce | Crisis in our Cities A Public Service Campaign of THE ADVERTISING COUNCIL Side 1 _. W4LH-1502 A 1. Father 60 Seconds 2. Mother 60 Seconds 3. Veteran 60 Seconds 4. Year 2000 60 Seconds 5.-Affluent Society 60 Seconds Volunteer Agency KETCHUM, MacLEOD & GROVE, INC. Urban Amernca ee ee a a Crisis in our B_G Cities A Public Service Campaign of THE ADVERTISING COUNCIL Side 2 W4LH-1503 f 3 \ , f 1. Time men 30 Seconds 2. Here, Kitty 30 Seconds 3. Split Level 30 Seconds 4. 1930's 20 Seconds 5. Rats 20 Seconds Volunteer Agency KETCHUM, MacLEOD & GROVE, INC. airs oes. Urban = c America ¢ te Inc Sune
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 10, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 11, Document 25

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_011_025.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 7, Folder 11, Document 25
  • Text: DATE 4 2 GUEST Mayor John V. Lindsay Dr. W. A. Criswell Eldridge Cleaver H. W. Glassen Ralph McGill Nee GRHa CALL GUEST LINEUP FOR THE MONTH OF JULY GUEST'S TITLE Mayor of the City of New York President, Southern Baptist Black Panthers and Author of “Soul On Ice” President, Nat'l Rifle Assoc. Publisher of Atlanta Constitution July, 1968 ISSUE What Happened to the Kerner Report? Is the Southern Baptist Church racist anymore? Black Panthers and Black Power Can Laws Prevent Gun Deaths? The South, Race and Tomorrow a ok ok oe oe ok oe ok oi oe 2 oe a oe oe oie oo oo oo oi oe oo oe oo oe oo ok oe oo oe oe oO oo Oe oe 2 ee fe ee SE ee ee or ee oe 2 2 ok oe Oo 2 oO 2 EE OO 8 o 10 site 1 Steven J. Ledogar William Lederer F. Edward Hebert Colonel Corson John Mecklin Vietnam Working Group State Dept. Author of "Our Own Worst Enemy" Congressman - Louisiana Author of "The Betrayal” FORTUNE Editor What are we doing in Vietnam? The Deaf and Dumb American Vietnam: A Hawk's-Eye View! The Other War and How we're losing it. Vietnam, A Balanced View. FE ok ok ae ok a a a A a A A EK A CE OR oR aE 2 KS EE EE IC EO CS AE SCE 2 C2 SCE DI I SC CE OE IC ED SE SEE A ES ICI CE I 2 SE SI aI 2 2 I 9 2K aK 2 a a 3k a OK 3 Fp oR et fe OO mo -' om UI Bill Cosby James Baldwin John Conyers, Jr. Winton Blount Rev. A. D. King Comedian Author Congressman —- Michigan Pres. U.S. Chamber of Commerce Bro. of the late M. L. King, Jr. Humor and the Black Bag The Christian Black Betrayal The New Black Politics No Riots Allowed Is St. Petersburg Another Memphis? Te 2 SR AO OO OK OK A RO OR KE 2 OE a IE EE AE ER OK oR oe 2 KO 2 KD 2 EE 2 EE OO a CE 9 2 ICC 9 2 oo a a 2 ae 2 2 2 a 2 a a a a aK aE ho bo ¥ NM NM hb olob ww oF Rev. Jessie Jackson Chester Lewis Roy Innis Robert Sonny Carson Ron Karenga Director of "Operation Bread Basket" - SCLC The Young Turks, NAACP Acting Nat'l Director of CORE Brooklyn CORE Leader President of "US" Organization What's Next for SCLC? . The New Militancy in the NAACP Has CORE Gone "TOM"? What's the future of CORE? Cool It Baby! BE IO CIC OR oro Gogoi soio GR a a iok ak acai ak ak kak aka ak ak ak ok ok ak ak ak ak ak ak a ak ak ake ak 2 ake ak ake ak ak ae ae a ak a ak ak as a ai 29 30 31 Saul Alinsky Dick Gregory Morris B. Abrams Exec. Director of Industrial Areas Foundation Comedian Pres. American Jewish Committee and Pres.-elect Brandeis Univ. How to make Black Power work for Black People. The Red Man's Got It Worse than the Black Man. Violence may be American, but it isn't any good... A A EO OE OO OO OE ESE OE OR OR OR OR CAR ok RR OK IR RO IC I RCE IC SIC Ie 2 SOR RC ARC aR. a aR a a ACO a aC 3 ak a ac a ae a i 2 2 2 9 a a a ko 2 ak oak ak ak ok ok ak ok ok ok ~July 24th - Scheduled guest changed due to Cleveland riots. Guest: Issue: Rev. Ralph Cousins - Chairman of Communications Network of Cleveland Council of Churches Crisis in Cleveland
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 11, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 11, Document 23

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_011_023.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 11, Document 23
  • Text: (il A NATIONAL RADIO OPT CALL IN SHOW ON VITAL ISSUES NELSON PRICE, Executive Producer : BEN LOGAN, Producer 475 Riverside Drive, Suite 420, New York, New York 10027 Telephone: 212/663-8900 EDWARD M. JONES, Director of Programming DEL SHIELDS, Host FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE NATIONWIDE CALL-IN SHOW TO "TELL IT LIKE IT 16" On ( yf ) joins the growing list of radio stations Date Station carrying the new national call-in program NIGHT CALL. Produced by TRAFCO, the Television, Radio & Film Commission of the United Methodist Church, NIGHT CALL will be heard Monday through Friday from ( ) on ¢ | ; ). The program Time Station and Frequency format is simple: host Del Shields and a guest - which includes such people as Dr. Ralph Abernathy, Former Maryland Governor Theodore McKeldin and Stokely Carmichael - plus an open phone line whereby any- one in the United States may call collect and speak directly with a guest. And they do -- from San Diego and Boston, Memphis and Minnea- polis, New York and Seattle, South Bend and Winston-Salem---and now £rom ( Ie -more=- Released in cooperation with the Broadcasting and Film Commission, National Council of Churches, and the National Catholic Office for Radio and Television (NCORT) Produced by TRAFCO/ Television, Radio and Film Commission of The United Methodist Church, Harry C. Spencer, General Secretary, Page 2 of 2 The purpose of NIGHT CALL is to help people find reconciliation, to move towards solutions to problems through understanding. NIGHT CALL offers persons of widely differing views and backgrounds the chance to speak, to be challenged, to ask questions, to discover new views and truths. Listeners to NIGHT CALL have heard Ralph Abernathy warn that if racial problems are not solved through non-violent channels, "'. There are other forces who are going to lead people down a more vio- lent path." They have heard Stokely Carmichael say he has not given up hope of Blacks and Whites living together, but '...Since the White man has . the power to destroy me, I am prepared for him." They have heard what Baltimore is doing to solve racial problems, and how a Los Angeles job program has reduced tension in Watts. Other NIGHT CALL guests include H. Rap Brown, Jackie Robinson, New York Mayor Lindsay, Cleveland Mayor Stokes, Ralph McGill, Bill Cosby, H. W. Glassen, President of
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 11, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 11, Document 24

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_011_024.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 7, Folder 11, Document 24
  • Text: DATE “Io uh W& GUEST Rev. Ralph Abernathy Harvey Wheeler Theodore R. McKeldin Stokely Carmichael Rev. John Adams NIGHT CALL GUEST LINEUP FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE GUEST'S TITLE Acting President of SCLC Co-Author FAILSAFE Baltimore Urban Coalition Former Chairman SNCC Liaison to Poor People's Cantpaign June, 1968 ISSUE American Poverty A Moral Equilvalent to Riots Savinr our cities Racial Violence Poor People's Campaign ~{NCC) BOGOR IGG OR ICG aC GI I a a akc akc a 2 2 ac ak 2k akc ak ak a ak ak Aco ak ak ok akc a 2 fea afc aS a Safe Sa a a aS af 2S 2 ok 9 2 oe ae ae ae akc a ok ak a a 2 akc aka akc akc ak a okt ak ok akc ae ak akc aie ok ak 10 Lt 2 13 14 Rev. Dean Kelly Rev. Andrew Young H. C. McClellan Michael Halberstam William Hedgepeth Director for Civil and Religious Liberty - NCC Vice President - SCLC Council for Merit Employment Psychologist - Washington, D. C. Sr. Editor LOOK Magazine . Religious Obedience and Civil Disobedience Poor People's Campaign Jobs for Minority Groups Are you guilty of murding Martin L. King? America's Concentration Camps - Reality or Rumor? FIGS GRIGG GIG CCI I SCSI a a a ok 2k a 2k ok ak a oi a ak a ofc akc ak ok akc a of akc aca oc ac ae akc ai oie a AC os ok a ok akc ok aK ok ok ak a ok ok a oka ao a a 2 ak a a ae a a ok ak oe id 18 19 20 21 Dr. Robert E. Fitch Honorable Julian Bond Gen George M. Gelston Juan Gonzales Dr. Margaret Mead Professor of Ethics - Pacific School of Religion House of Representatives - Georgia Adjutant General of Maryland National Guards : Students for a Democratic Society (SDS - Columbia University) Anthropologist - Museum of Natural History Morality in the United States. The Negro and Politics. Your Property or their lives? What do the rebellious students want? Bravery Without Guns FEC OG GCC ICC A GI I I I ICR a a aI ack aC akc a ak ae akc ak ai ak ai aka ak a akc af 2 af af 2 2k ae a2 Fa ae a a ak a akc afc ak a ak a ak ak ak ok ak ok ak 27 28 John Gardner Dr. Truman H. Rap Brown Jackie Robinson Dr. Kenneth Clark President of the Urban Coalition Vice President - Columbia University Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) Special Asst. to Gov. Rockefeller Professor at City College Revolt of the Moderate Who's going to run the universities? Black Power Is the Church a joke? Is Integration out of date? ae fe 2 9 9 2G a ee oie fe oe fs og oe oe oe os ok oe oe 2 ok 26 a ok 2c iC ok ob ae oi oe ae akc a oie ae ao oie oc oie oft ofc ac fe okt os aS ok oe oft afk ofc of of ofc a af oc oc og oft oe ic afc ae a ak os oc oie ois ae ac ic akc aie as fe fg oS fe 2s ie og a fe i is oft 2 fe ke ie fe 2 2 fe 2s 2g a i os ac ak a ae it fe oie ie oie ae aE
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 11, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 11, Document 30

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_011_030.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 11, Document 30
  • Text: MN; ca OI aka NELSON PRICE, Executive Producer BEN LOGAN, Producer 475 Riverside Drive, Suite 420, New York, New York 10027 Telephone: 212/663-8900 EDWARD M. JONES, Director of Programming DEL SHIELDS, Host STATION RELATIONSHIPS Origination: NIGHT CALL originates in New York at 11:30 p.m, Eastern Time. The program is brought to your community by broadcast lines. Cost of broad- cast lines to your telephone company test board is borne by the producer. The loop and bridging costs from the telephone company to station are borne by the station, Charges: There are no program charges. Production costs are the responsibility of the producer. Station There will be three 70 second breaks--one each Cutaways: quarter hour-- during the one-hour broadcast: a 10 second station ID and 60 seconds for local commercials. Revenue from commercials is the station's, The choice and responsibility for such advertising rests with the station, Public Public service spots will be fed down the network Service line for the stations which want a completely Spots: packaged program. 7 Second NIGHT CALL will be fed live to the stations with Delay: no delay. There are two reasons why the show is not delayed nationally: a. The producer cannot assume this responsi- bility legally for the station; therefore, no attempt to do so is made, b. Acceptable air expression changes from market to market. What is acceptable in Chicago may be unacceptable in Sioux City. (Page 1 of two) Released in cooperation with the Broadcasting and Film Commission, National Council of Churches, and the National Catholic Office for Radio and Television (NCORT) Produced by TRAFCO/ Television, Radio and Film Commission of The United Methodist Church, Harry CG. Spencer, General Secretary, Producer Precautions: Station Identification on the Network: Audience Callers: Test Signal: Emergency Number : Regular Phone Number : The producer does have several precautions against abuse on the air: a. The calls are screened before being placed on the air. b. The host has override capability over both telephone lines. When the host speaks, the gain automatically lowers on the audience and guest lines. c. NIGHT CALL permits any point of view to be expressed. Ideas are attacked but persons are not. This basic respect for persons has effectively negated the bigot in the past. d. The audience caller can be taken off the air at the flip of the switch by the host. Participating stations are identified on the air when a listener calls in from that station's listening audience. NIGHT CALL accepts calls collect from listeners anywhere in the country. This cost is the responsibility of the producer. A program test signal with time checks will be sent down the line 15 minutes prior to starting time each night. To contact the producer during or near show time, call: 212/ 749-5400. In case of a line problem, call your local telephone company. The producer may be reached during office hours at: 212/ 663-8900. (Page 2 of two)
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 11, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 11, Document 22

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_011_022.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 7, Folder 11, Document 22
  • Text: LNG TIME SCHEDULE A NATIONAL RADIO ‘a ELEPHONE CALL IN SHOW ON VITAL ISSUES NELSON PRICE, Executive Producer BEN LOGAN, Producer 475 Riverside Drive, Suite 420, New York, New York 10027 Telephone: 212/663-8900 EDWARD M. JONES, Director of Programming DEL SHIELDS, Host CLOCK TIME LAPSED TIME TIME TO GO 11:30 PM 00:00 59:30 Standard cartridge tape opening establishing show and host with phone number. Guest is intro- duced by host and topic is established. Guest quizzed by host with audience calls taken at liberty. 11:43:30 13:30 46:00 Host gives break cue: "Stay tuned to the ‘Night Call' Net- work," followed by cartridge tape concluding with cue words, "...after station identification." 11:43:50 13:50 45:40 Stations cut for local commercial and Station I.D. OR stations take PSA fed down line (60 seconds) and then break for Station I.D. (10 seconds). 11:45:00 15:00 44:30 Cartridge tape standard re-intro with sound and telephone numbers (212 749-3311 or 212 866-5010). Host restates issue and re- identifies guest and call-in number. Host interviews guest and moves to callers as available. 11358330 28:30 31:00 | Same as 11:43:30 Lis: 56250 28:50 30:40 Same as 11:43:50 12:00:00 30:00 29330 Same as 11:45:00 12:3 13's. 30) 43:30 16:00 Same as 11:43:30 and 11:58:30 V2 s L250 43:50 14:30 Same as 11:45:00 etc. P2215,:06 45:00 14:30 Same as 11:45:00 etc. . 12:28:50 58:50 1:40 Host wraps up show, announces next night's issue and guest; followed by cartridge tape credit, with sound trailing out. 12:29:30 59.230 0:00 Show END. (revised 7/68) Released in cooperation with the Broadcasting and Film Commission, National Council of Churches, and the National Catholic Office for Radio and Television (NCORT) Produced by TRAFCO/ Television, Radio and Film Commission of The United Methodist Church, Harry C. Spencer, General Secretary,
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 11, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 11, Document 10

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_011_010.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
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  • Title: Box 7, Folder 11, Document 10
  • Text: Postage ‘ Will Be Paid No Postage Stamp ‘=: Necessary By Addressee Mf Mailed in the || 2, United States 433 : n ccm BOOS N ESS; ROE TROY CARD First Class Permit No. 35590 Washington, D.C. THE WASHINGTON HILTON Connecticut Ave, at Columbia Road N.W. Washington, D.C. 20009 Att. Front Office Manager 9/67 TEL. Area Code 202 483-3000 GUEST ROOM RESERVATION REQUEST Name Address A.M. Arrival Dates scsiisetewegg 1ssttssia. eee Seagate HOUT yi Oe AM. Departure Date............. Hfiesee HOUS P.M MEDIAN RATE UNDERLINED PLEASE CIRCLE RATE DESIRED If rate requested is not available next available rate will be assigned .... SINGLES 18 19 20 21 22 24 ...DOUBLES 23. 24. 25 26 = 23 24° 25). 26 ..CABANAS .... 25 single 30 double .-- SUITES ALL RATES PLUS 5% D. C, SALES TAX Reservations must be received not later than two weeks prior to opening date of meeting. ROOMS WILL BE HELD ONLY UNTIL 6 P.M. ON DATE OF ARRIVAL, UNLESS GUARAN- TEED. AEROSPACE EDUCATION FOUNDATION National Laboratory for the Advancement of Education NOVEMBER 18 - 20, 1968
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 11, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 11, Document 9

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_011_009.pdf
  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 11, Document 9
  • Text: Reservation/Registration Form THE NATIONAL LABORATORY FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF EDUCATION Please Print November 18-20, 1968 ° Washington, D. C. Early Reservation/Registration (Honored Only Before October 1, 1968) NAME [J Check Enclosed or Bill Me Later TITLE al Special haerOti ah teers 5 ose $50.00 Regular Registration CRO ARIZATION EI Foll"Gonterence: atcacclecwt ton’ $60.00 ADDRESS Ely First-Dayt@nly)c cc iectss ote ce $25.00 Elssecond DayOnly sepaters ss grtres $25.00 CITY & STATE El. Third) DaysOnl¥ 4 shih c.aiete etree $25.00 Make checks payable to Aerospace Education Foundation BUSINESS REPLY MAIL No Postage Stamp Necessary If Mailed in the United States Or Any U.S. Military Post Office Postage Will Be Paid By — THE NATIONAL LABORATORY FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF EDUCATION c/o Aerospace Education Foundation 1750 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, D. C. 20006 FIRST CLASS PERMIT NO. 4623R Wash., D. C.
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 11, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 11, Document 11

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  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 11, Document 11
  • Text: 1815 H Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20006 Telephone: 347-9630 — CHAIRMAN: John W. Gardner CO-CHAIRMEN: Andrew Heiskell / A. Philip Randolph September 6, 1968 The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr. Mayor of the City of Atlanta City Hall Atlanta, Georgia 30303 P Dear Mayor Allen: i Enclosed for your information as a member of the Steering Committee, is a schedule of the meeting planned for November. We hope you will note the date and make every effort to attend. In connection with the Coalition's media } relations and potential publications, we would appreciate your furnishing us with your current biographical data and your photograph. Sincerely, ; Christopher M. Mould Executive Assistant : to the Chairman Enclosure
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 11, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 11, Document 31

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  • Title: Box 7, Folder 11, Document 31
  • Text: A, COMMURICATIONS RESOURCE FOR "T ESE CRisis _N THE NAT I ON" NIGHT PALL A National Radio Call-in Program Available for Broadcast in i.) Comaunity Produced by Television, Radio and Film Commission The, Unit ,, Methodist Church “a ee ycs Suite 420 "Panty New York 10027 ste ie i Released in .coopepation with the Wational Council of Churches The Wat iogad Catholic Office for Racio and Television e Age: an Jewish Committee ih >» Erdan Copl tion Augu.., 1968
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 11, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Miscellaneous | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021

Box 7, Folder 12, Document 1

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  • Result Type: Item
  • Item Type: Text
  • Title: Box 7, Folder 12, Document 1
  • Text: The Urban Coalitiog=——__, December 1969 The Urban Coalition Calls For Health Care Reforms The Urban Coalition has called for a combina- tion of national and community action to bring about sweeping medical reforms aimed at im- proving health care for all Americans, particu- larly those in the cities. In a comprehensive 76-page report prepared by its health task force, the Coalition maintained that while the United States spends a bigger proportion of its gross national product on health than any other country, its health serv- ices are inadequate. The report, Rx for Action, was prepared under the direction of Dr. George A. Silver, the Coalition’s Executive Associate for Health. According to the report, Americans spend more than $53 billion annually on a “potpourri” of public and private health programs. If these funds were spent more efficiently, the report Dr. George A. Silver, Coalition Executive Associate for Health; John W. Gardner, Urban Coalition Chairman; and Dr. Roger O. Egeberg, Assistant Secretary for Health and Scientific Affairs of HEW at press conference to announce Rx for Action. concluded, many more people would be served and better services could be assured forall. Poor health affects all Americans, regardless of income, the report said. Not only the poor, but middle income families, blue collar workers, welfare mothers, and all city residents—black, white and brown — suffer from substandard health care. Community action, according to the Coalition, can generate more immediate improvement for its citizens than almost any national effort. Local successes would also stimulate needed national reforms. The report urged the local urban coalitions that have been formed in nearly 50 cities to establish their own health task forces. But the Coalition emphasized that the study’s findings and recommendations could be used in whole or in part by any local community organization con- cerned with the quality of health care. These would include local chambers of com- merce, labor and religious groups, local bus- inessmen and women’s organizations. The same consultant and technical assistance services that the national Coalition intends to make avail- able to its local health task forces would be available to these groups. The Urban Coalition will consult with the major voluntary health or- ganizations to obtain their cooperation. The Coalition also plans to meet in a series of regional health conferences with local coali- tions and other groups. The report decried the lack of participation of the poor and the non-poor in health services planning and said that no serious effort had yet been taken to train individuals outside of pro- fessional groups in this area. “In both the long and short runs,” the report stated, “advances in the health field depend on the will of the American people.” The study emphasized that the “middle-class white community has been too infrequently rep- resented in hospital board membership and in public health bodies, or even on the boards. of voluntary agencies.” It said that the poor, specifically blacks, Mexican-Americans and Puerto Ricans, had been left out of the decision-making process. The Coalition urged more representation from these people on hospital boards, health and welfare councils, insurance bodies and public health advisory councils. Following are some of the principal findings and recommendations of the report: Malnutrition: With estimates placing the yearly cost of the consequences of malnutri- tion to the economy at-substantially more than the $3-4 billion needed to eliminate hunger, coalitions should work to make more of the proper food more readily available to the public. Environment: The well-being of the urban poor is being directly threatened by bad hous- ing and air and water pollution. Citizens groups should be formed to educate the poor on such basic matters as housing and health code re- quirements, their legal rights to services, safety practices and rat and vermin control. Access to Facilities: More local money is essential to help meet the need of the many communities for more health facilities. Trans- portation systems and emergency ambulance services could be studied to see if they are geared to the needs of the poor. Interpreters: Interpreters could be used in clinics and information centers for Spanish- speaking people. Occupational Health Clinics: Hospital boards could arrange for the development of occupa- tional health clinics to serve local industry and provide advice for health and safety programs for working people from the local community. Manpower Deficiencies: Through the system of routine volunteer assignments, medical so- cieties could undertake to supply doctors in areas where sufficient numbers.are not availa- ble. Sub-professionals could be trained to han- dle many of the duties involved in health care. The Coalition’s study emphasized that many local programs could be immediately launched without waiting for action by the Federal gov- ernment. But it also pointed out that effective local action will always have to be supplemented and strengthened by effective Federal action. The report called for a national system of financing medical care costs that .will give every American access to services without any economic barrier. Dr. Roger O. Egeberg, who is the Assistant Secretary for Health and Scientific Affairs, com- mented on the Coalition’s recommendations. He said: “The country should be grateful to the Urban Coalition for this type of analysis of the nation’s health needs, and planning for the na- tion’s health services. “The Coalition’s proposal recognizes that solving the medical needs of America is not the job of the Federal government alone, but also requires effort and change by everyone.” In compiling its Rx for Action the health task force of the Urban Coalition has laid down a battle plan for the war against poor health care in the United States. Copies are available from the Urban Coali- tion, 2100 M Street, N. W., Washington, D.C. 20037. New Members Added to Coalition Steering Committee Fourteen new members have been added to the Steering Committee of the Urban Coalition. The new additions to the Coalition’s policy-making body include businessmen, mayors, a state sen- ator and a physician. The new members announced by Urban Coali- tion Chairman John W. Gardner are: State Senator Joe J. Bernal of San Antonio, Texas. Senator Bernal, an educator and social worker as well as a legislator, is executive di- rector of the Guadalupe Community Center in San Antonio. Mayor Frank Curran of San Diego, Califor- nia, Mayor Curran is president of the Na- tional League of Cities. Hector P. Garcia, M.D., a Corpus Christi, Texas physician and a former commissioner of the U.S. Civil Rights Commission. Ben W. Heineman of Chicago, president of Northwest Industries Inc. Heinemanis chairman of the President’s Commission on Income Main- tenance. Samuel C. Johnson, president of S.C. Johnson & Son Inc. and president of the Racine Environ- ment Commitee, a local urban coalition. Mayor Eric Jonsson of Dallas. Stephen F. Keating, president of Honeywell Inc., and former chairman of thé Minneapolis Urban Coalition. ‘ Donald M. Kendall, president of Pepsico, Inc., and chairman of the National Alliance of Busi- nessmen, New York. Mayor Richard Lugar of Indianapolis. Donald S. MacNaughton, president of Pruden- tial Insurance Co. and former chairman of the Newark Urban Coalition. Mayor Jack D. Maltester of San Leandro, Cal- ifornia. Maltester is also president of the U.S. Conference of Mayors. James Roche, chairman of the board of Gen- eral Motors Corp., and member of the board of trustees of the New Detroit Committee, an urban coalition. H. I. Romnes, chairman of the board of AT&T, New York. Romnes is also vice-chairman of the Nattonal Industrial Conference Board and is a member of the Urban Coalition’s task force on education. , Martin Stone, president of Monogram Indus- tries Inc. and chairman of the.Los Angeles Ur- ban Coalition. Mr. Gardner said the Urban Coalition adds to the Steering Committee periodically to assure broad and dynamic representation from the Co- alition’s constituent elements—local govern- ment, business, labor, minority groups and re- ligion. M. Carl Holman, vice-president of the Urban Coalition for Policy and Program Development; Peter Libassi, Coalition executive vice-president; and Nicholas deB. Katzenbach, former U.S. Attorney General and chairman of the Coalition's - law and government task force discuss new approaches to the reform of the criminal justice system spelled out in the Coalition's report Taking the Blindfold off Justice. Urban Coalition Action Council Supports Welfare Reform “The time has come to discard the existing patchwork of ineffective and in many ways de- structive public assistance programs. You have the opportunity to replace them with a national system of income maintenance that will help people to help themselves but preserve indi- vidual dignity in aiding those left behind by society.” With these words, John W. Gardner, Chair- man of the Urban Coalition Action Council, be- gan his testimony last month before the House Ways and Means Committee, which is consider- ing President Nixon’s proposals to reform the nation’s public assistance programs. At the same time, Mr. Gardner said the Urban Coalition and the Urban Coalition Action Coun- cil will give the issue top priority for the months ahead. “It is of the highest impor- tance,” he said, “that such lingering myths as the one that the poor in America are people who don’t want to work—able-bodied loafers— be erased and that our public assistance pro- grams be overhauled.” In his congressional testimony, Mr. Gardner termed the Administration’s reform proposals “extremely important and on the whole well designed,” but suggested strengthening them at several crucial points. “If the proposals are accepted,” he said, “the Federal government will for the first time in history accept responsibility for providing a minimum level of payment throughout the nation and for financing it. I would have been very proud had I been able to establish that principle during my tenure as Secretary of Health, Educa- tion and Welfare. It is an historic step.” Mr. Gardner also praised the proposals for their emphasis on children, their work incentive features and their greatly broadened coverage. “Of special significance,” he said, “is the inclusion of the working poor for the first time. The complete omission of the working poor is surely one of the strangest anomalies of the present system. A society which values work should surely make some provision for the six million adults who work full-time, year-round, and yet cannot earn enough to bring themselves above the poverty line.” “The strengths of the President’s proposals,” he said, “could lead us on to an immeasurably sounder and more equitable system of income maintenance. But if the promise of the propo- sals is to be realized, they must be strength- ened at a number of points,” among them: 1. Provision should be made for “a nation- wide increase in benefits to the poverty level over a specified period of time,” with the $1,600 floor proposed by the President serving as a starting point fora phased program. 2. “Adequate provision should be made for ‘one-stop’ administration of the proposed Fed- eral-state system.” 3. While “the improved benefits for the aged, disabled and blind are a welcome step,” Mr. Gardner’s statement said, “it may be that our ultimate goal should be a single income maintenance system which provides for uniform adequate assistance for all of our impover- ished citizens, including needy individuals and couples without children.” ; 4. “Given the elasticity of its tax base, and the economies of scale and efficiency offered by Federal administration, a shift of the welfare burden to the Federal government is clearly one means of resolving the fiscal dilemmas of state and local government.” D: The work requirement provisions of the legislation “should specify job standards and wage rates for ‘suitable employment.’” Finally, he said, “I would emphasize that there must be provisions for job creation, so that the training opportunities won’t be a re- volving door into continued unemployment. The ideal solution is a public service employment program.” While Mr. Gardner praised the work require- ment proposals, he made it clear that there are limits to what can be expected of it. “Many Americans sincerely believe that people living in poverty are people who don't want to work—or people who don’t want steady work,” he said. “In other words, able-bodied loafers. That is a long way from the truth, Of the 25 million persons living below the poverty line, 15 million are either under 18°or over 65.” “Of the remaining 10 million, nine million fall within the scope of the Administration’s family assistance proposals (as being adults in poor families that include children). “Let us look at that nine million. The Admin- istration estimates that 7.9 million are already working, but earn too little to bring them above the poverty level, or are the wives of such men, or are disabled, or are women who must stay home because of very young children, “That leaves 1.1 million adults who the Ad- ministration feels can significantly help them- selves and would thus be required to register for jobs or work training—600,000 men and 500,000 mothers of school-aged children.” Mr. Gardner also emphasized that “no wel- fare program can cure underlying conditions.” “The poverty that makes a public assistance program necessary,” he said, “is rooted in a variety of historical and contemporary condi- tions; discrimination, the pathology of the urban and rural slum, inadequate education, insuffi- cient job opportunities in the locality, low pay in jobs not covered by the minimum wage, in- adequate social insurance benefits, inadequate provisions for manpower training and so on.” “If we are to get to the root of the problem we shall have to do so through education, health and nutrition programs, the creation of job opportunities, the elimination of slum condi- tions and similar measures.” Mr. Gardner’s testimony, delivered by Am- bassador George McGhee, special representa- tive of the chairman, elaborated on the position taken in late June by the full Policy Council of the Urban Coalition Action Council. Copies of Mr. Gardner’s testimony and of the Action Council booklet on welfare reform “To- ward A Full Opportunity” are available from the Urban Coalition Action Councii, 2100.M Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 20037. Coalition Begins Probe of Credit Practices to Low Income Consumers A preliminary study which examines efforts by commercial banks, credit unions and retailers -to make credit available to low-income con- sumers, has been made public by the national Urban Coalition. The study, entitled, “Con- sumer Credit and the Low Income Consumer,” was prepared after more than five months of field and research work by William G. Kaye & Associates, consultants in the area of con- sumer affairs. , A major finding showed that the poor can and do pay their bills. “The low-income consumer | may at times encounter some difficulty in pay- ing bills when due, but in the end, his perform- ance in paying his full obligation is nearly as good as his more affluent suburban counter- part,” the report said. The 105-page study formed the basis of a November meeting called by the Coalition to look at models that may be successful in ex- tending credit to the poor. The meeting was chaired by Edward C. Sylvester, Jr., former Assistant Secretary in Community and Field Services, Department of Health, Education and On arecent visit tothe Greater Miami Urban Coalition, Chairman John Gardner met with Coalition leaders. He is shown here visiting with some of the minority representatives of the Miami Coalition. Welfare, and attended by approximately 100 leaders from retailing, the poor, Federal agen- cies and the White House, banks, organized labor, social action groups, lawyers and con- sumer and credit organizations. The report will be further considered at a series of regional meetings, the first of which took place in Minneapolis, December 7-8. Mr. Kaye, former executive director of the President’s Committee on Consumer Interests, stated that “Hopefully, this report—in addition to increasing the availability of low-income- credit—will shed some light on the realities and mythologies about the performance of the low- income person in seeking, utilizing and repay- ing consumer loans and other forms of con- sumer credit.” Local Coalitions Get Fund-Raising Guidelines Fund-raising guidelines will be the subject of two national Urban Coalition conferences for local coalition chairmen, fund- -raising chair- men and executive directors. At these “how-to-do-it” sessions members of the national Coalition’s Financial Develop- _ ment Advisory Council and other experts will share their expertise in raising money—a vital ingredient behind any successful coalition pro- gram—with local leaders. The first conference, to be held in Philadel- phia in December, is for coalitions in the north- east and southeast regions. The other is planned for January for coalition representatives from the midwest and west. Conference speakers will highlight the keys to successful fund-raising: identifying community leaders; developing a “case”; organizing vol- unteers for fund-raising, and the “nuts and bolts” of solicitation. Based on these guidelines, workshops will enable coalition representatives to pinpoint areas for further guidance and to exchange experiences. The 29-member Financial Development Ad- visory Council comprises top financial devel- opment officers from colleges and universities across the country. One of its primary roles is to counsel local coalitions in organizing suc- cessful fund-raising programs. Thus far Coun- cil members have individually advised coali- tions in 13 cities. Coalition staff support for the Advisory Coun- cil and national fund-raising .efforts is pro- vided by David M. Thompson, Assistant to the Chairman; Douglas Lawson, Financial Develop- ment Officer; and Walker Williams, Associate Financial Development Officer. Newark Love Festival Salutes “The Summer Thing” Through efforts of the Greater Newark Urban Coalition, New Jersey’s largest city had a Love Festival on October 5th. A video tape replay of the event was shown on an hour-long, prime- time, NBC national telecast on November 14th. Based on a series of free, outdoor concerts first given in Harlem, the Love Festival was brought to Newark by WNBC-TV, which se- cured the help of the Harlem Festival producer, Tony Lawrence. The Love Festival was WNBC’s way of honoring Newark’s Recreation Planning Council, better known as The Summer Thing. The Newark Love Festival turned out to. be quite an autumn event. It turned on as one of the largest happenings in the city’s 302-year history. Between 70,000 and 100,000 “beauti- ful, beautiful people” attended. Not a single incident marred the massive outdoor spectacular held in Newark’s Weequa- hic Park. For six hours, rock bands, folk and soul singers, comedians and mod entertainers gave performances. Twenty thousand phono- graph records were given away. WNBC said the Love Festival was “a major community rela- tions project.” The community effort grew out of Newark Co- alition president Gustav Heningburg’s plea to New York television stations, just 10 miles away, to devote some coverage to Newark’s brighter side. The city had received consider- able adverse publicity since the 1967 riot. In response, WNBC-TV Channel 4, asked Hening- burg to suggest an activity worth televising that might offset coverage of Newark’s problems. Heningburg’s recommendation was the Reerea- tion Planning Council or The Summer Thing, a program which involves ghetto youth in recrea- tional opportunities. The Summer Thing was born in late May as Newark looked toward another long hot summer with little in the way of programs to offer out- of-school, inner-city youth. Supported by the Newark Coalition's Steering Committee, Heningburg put together a presti- gious, five-man, voluntary group of co-chair- men. It included both deputy mayors, Paul Reilly and Lewis Perkins. The representative of business and industry was Al DeRogatis, a Prudential Insurance Company vice president and former football great. John Scagnelli, a vice president of the Council of Social Agen- cies, served as delegate for more than 150 United Fund agencies and State Assemblyman George Richardson, a black legislator, repre- sented the coalition. Office space was donated by the Newark Housing Authority. One of the local manpower programs donated office equipment. The Newark Chamber of Commerce agreed to raise $234,000. The Summer Thing contacted more than 100 community organizations asking them to sub- mit their recreation proposals, Through care- ful screening and much negotiation, the co- chairmen approved 29 proposals for funding. In jess than six weeks, an office was-set up, a volunteer staff-was secured, work began on fund raising and a directory was compiled of more than 70 community-sponsored youth pro- grams, public and private. A communications center was established to which anyone could call on any given day and get a listing of recre- ational activities going on in town. The center also published a daily newsletter listing special events of the day for distribution to almost 100 points in the city. Local radio station WNJR taped and broadcasted daily events all through the summer. By the end of the summer, the Chamber of Commerce raised almost $200,000. The Engel- hard Foundation provided the first $1,000 and an additional $57,000 came from the New Jersey State Department of Community Affairs. More than 50,000 youngsters participated in The Summer Thing. By Labor Day, it was clear that partially-polarized Newark could get diverse people to work together and get things done well and fast. NBC, impressed with The Summer Thing, looked for a fitting salute. It hit upon the Love Festival concerts in Harlem that had attracted hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers. Tony Lawrence agreed to get the talent and WNBC promised to film the gala for television. The Recreation Planning Council-was asked to secure a suitable outdoor location and help attract crowds that would reflect the black/white cooperation that made The Summer Thing so meaningful to Newark. In a scant three weeks, hundreds of details had to be handled. For the first time, the New- ark police cooperated with the Black Panthers in crowd control. The city administration and participation of social agencies “was a joy to - behold,” stated Heningburg. Medical school in- terns worked with welfare mothers, hip teenag- ers manned lost and found stations with sen- ior citizens, radical students and conservative professionals joined hands to organize shuttle buses. Ideological, age, language, and racial differences seemed unimportant and for that afternoon friendship, love and pride prevailed and everybody “Gave A Damn!” Shortly after the November 14th national telecast, Gus Heningburg went down to Fayette, Mississippi to help black Mayor Charles Evers plan a Thanksgiving Day, Love Festival for his town. New Jersey Newsphotos PO Gustav Heningburg, president of the Greater Newark Urban Coalition at the Newark Love Festival. Call For Action Director Named R. Alexander Grant, the former national di- rector of recruitment for VISTA (Volunteers in Service to America), has been named as the Executive Director of “Call for Action”. “Call for Action” is a project in coopera- tion with the national Urban Coalition, and is operated by a radio station and a staff of volun- teers in a number of cities. Mr. Grant was born in Newark, N. J. in 1933. He has a B. A. from Bloomfield College and an M. A. from Montclair State College. In announcing Mr. Grant’s appointment, John W. Gardner, the Coalition’s Chairman, said the Coalition hoped to have “Call for Action” pro- grams working in 8-10 cities throughout the country by the end of the year. Under the project, individuals may etl local radio stations for referral to the proper agen- cies for help with such problems as poor hous- ing, crime, narcotics, hospital care and sanita- tion disposal. “Call for Action” was begun at radio station WMCA in New York City by Mrs. R. Peter Straus, wife of the station’s owner and co- chairman of the nationwide program. The project is now on the air in New York, Chicago, Denver and Utica. Mr. Grant’s duties will include policy for- mulation and coordination for the various “Call for Action” projects. R. Alexander Grant Grass Roots News The Greater Kansas. City Urban Coalition has inaugurated a program of tours of the inner-city to give interested citizens, particularly white suburbanites, a first hand view of inner-city housing, schools, business development and recreation facilities. Small groups travel in a modified bus, are given a running description of inner-city conditions, and told of the activities of the Urban Coalition. The tours began with the Greater Kansas City Urban Coalition board of directors and has since included members of the Real Estate Board and service clubs. The Greater Kansas City Urban Coalition has formed a women’s task force, believed to be the first such among local coalitions. The task force is involved in a project with the Welfare Rights Organization and will concentrate in the hous- ing field in 1970. The Greater Kansas City Urban Coalition is publishing a voter information booklet for the January 20 school board elections, reviewing the qualifications of the candidates and contain- ing their views on key issues. The new South Bend Urban Coalition already has received preliminary reports from five task forces and this month expects final reports out- lining action programs for 1970. The task forces are for education, housing, employment, racial attitudes and conflict, and youth. Mayor Carl Stokes of Cleveland has announced plans for a “Call for Action” program on station WERE under the coordination of the Cleveland Urban Coalition. “Call for Action” programs, now in operation in several cities, enable listeners to call volunteers at the station to register complaints about deficient city services. The Cleveland program will begin early in 1970. The Urban Coalition of Minneapolis has a new president, Phillip Harder, senior vice president of the First National Bank. He succeeds Dean McNeal, vice president of the Pillsbury Com- pany, whose term expired. The Mayor of Winston-Salem, North Carolina proclaimed the week of December 8-12 as “Family and Child Development Week” in con- junction with a project sponsored by the Day Care Association of the Urban Coalition with the co-operation of other child-related agencies. Symposiums on child development and educa- tion were held throughout the week for parents, school administrators, businessmen, represen- tatives from social service agencies and other interested groups. The housing task force of the Greater Miami Coalition has completed development of a cur- riculum for a new course offered at the Univer- sity of Miami on housing management. The 15- week course followed by on-the-job-training will open up new careers for disadvantaged per- sons in the management of housing complexes. Key feature of the plan is job commitments for those finishing the course. The El Paso (Tex.) Urban Coalition has been holding open forums each month on problems affecting the El Paso community. The forums, officially known as Area Council Meetings for Public Information, have dealt with such matters as police protection, street paving, housing, schools and public safety. The Riverside (Calif.)Coalition, under its viva- cious and energetic executive director, Mrs. Ruth Pepe, has convinced the school system that it doesn’t have to keep going to such far- away places as Arizona and Texas to hire minority teachers. Through a program set up as a result of coalition efforts five black instruc- tors have been trained and hired from within the Riverside community. The bail reform program of the RiversideCoa- lition, operating since mid-September, has re- duced the average length of jail stay from 37 to 4 days. Five coalition representatives were among the Riverside officials attending the national Coalition’s briefing on new approaches to criminal justice in New York in April; liked what they saw, convinced the Riverside police department to give bail reform a try and since its inception, nearly 60 persons have been re- leased on their own recognizance under the project. In San Ysidro (Calif.), a small, green colored stucco house has been converted into a health clinic for some 7,000 Mexican-Americans. The clinic treats about 150 persons a week and operates with one full-time nurse, Miss Jeannie Powers. The San Diego Coalition played a major role in creating the clinic and also refurbished and furnished the entire house. In San Antonio, (Tex.) the coalition has formed a group that it calls the “clearinghouse committee.” The committee is interviewing ghetto residents to determine their major grievances. This in- formation is presented to the businessmen on the coalition’s steering committee, who then take it to the city agency that can do something about the problems uncovered in the interviews. Three VISTA lawyers, working under a program co-sponsored by the national Urban Coalition began working in Denver in mid-October. They’re working on bail reform. ”Call for Action” got off to an action packed start in Denver in late October with radio sta- tion KLZ getting about 150 calls in its first week of operation. New Urban Coalitions Since the end of the summer local coalitions have sprung up all over the map. The five new- est are South Bend, Rhode Island, Wilmington, El Paso and Chattanooga. Officially the South Bend (Ind.) coalition is known as the St. Joseph County Urban Coali- tion. The local Chamber of Commerce in South Bend is staffing the coalition while the search goes on for a full-time executive director. The coalition’s chairman is Frank Sullivan, chair- man of the board of Frank Sullivan Associates, an insurance firm. Rhode Island shows there may be some ad- vantages to being small, at least in the sense of coalition. The Rhode Island coalition is the only statewide coalition. It has an executive director-designate, Anthony Agostinelli and a president, Elwood E. Leonard Jr. Leonard is president of the H & H Screw Company, and also chairman of the United Fund Drive. Wilmington (Del.) is looking for an executive director. Rodney Layton, a Wilmington attorney and vice-chairman of the United Fund in that city is chairman of the new coalition. In the west Texas town of El Paso they call the coalition the Council for Social Action be- cause that was what it was called before it be- came a local urban coalition in the beginning of September. Three weeks after it was recognized as a coalition by the national, William Pearson, E] Paso’s executive director was in Washington with 30 other local executive directors. They met with John W, Gardner. The Reverend James I. Oliver is the chairman of the coalition, which is the third in Texas. The others are San Antonio and Corpus Christi. In Chattanooga they had to wait more than two years before a coalition was actually formed. Interest in creating a coalition in that southern city began with the August 1967 convocation of 1,200 of the nation’s leaders that gave birth to the national Urban Coalition. Co-chairmen of the new Chattanooga coali- tion are John Slack, general manager of Com- bustion Engineering and Roy Noel, city youth coordinator. One of the members of the Steer- ing Committee is Mrs. Ruth S. Golden, pub- lisher of the Chattanooga Times and sister-in- law of Andrew Heiskell, chairman of the board of Time, Inc. and co-chairman of the national Urban Coalition. See page /] for complete list of established urban coalitions. Miami Case Study Last fall there were some 340 serious disturb- ances in high schools in 38 states. One of the most serious—in terms of potential consequen- ces—occurred in Dade County(Miami), Florida, where an integration dispute at Palmetto High School threatened to escalate into a black stu- dent boycott of the entire school system. Trouble was averted, however, when the school board asked the Greater Miami Coali- tion to step in, establish the facts and make recommendations. A panel of inquiry named by the Coalition did so—quickly and decisively. Its report resulted in important reforms not only at Palmetto, but at other schools in the district, prompting one newspaper editor to comment that “a major breakthrough in better race re- lations” had been made in Miami education. A case study of the episode and its aftermath will be published by the Urban Coalition this year. The study will describe the dispute, its resolution, and the key role played by the Great- er Miami Coalition. Copies will be available from the national of- fice of the Urban Coalition. “ : = Miami Coalition Panel of Inquiry members Garth Reeves, publisher of the Miami Times; Henry King Stanford, president of the University of Miami; and John Halliburton, president of the Greater Miami Urban Coalition and a vice president of Eastern Airlines. 10 What They Are Saying Frederick J. Close, chairman of the board of the Aluminum Company of America, to the an- nual meeting of the American Mining Congress: “All [urban coalitions] offer the businessman a unique opportunity to involve himself in a grass-roots, down-to-earth operation that en- ables him to apply his problem-solving abilities to problems that demand solution as much as they often seem to defy it. They help him to re- ally understand what the problems are and what it will take to get at them. In short, they give the businessman a chance to show that our sys- tem can work for everybody. It’s a chance that many more businessmen ought to take. I think they are taking a far bigger chance if they don’t.” Ambassador George C. McGhee, special repre- sentative of the chairman, the Urban Coalition, to the St. Louis Round Table: “A turn-around must be made and a start towards a reordering of the priorities which will bring up to adequate levels the basic re- quirements for our national life. In this process other public expenditures, which have hitherto enjoyed high priorities, must be reduced.” Charles W. Bowser, executive director of the Philadelphia Urban Coalition, to a conference of the National Municipal League: “The direct involvement of the corporate citi- zen in the initiation and formation of the national Urban Coalition was clear evidence that the cor- porate commitment to help was emanating from self-interest, rather than the traditional chari- table concern. This recognition of self-interest in the solution of the nation’s urban problems is, in my opinion, the most dramatic result of the urban crisis of the sixties.” Martin Stone, chairman of the board of Mon- ogram Industries Inc. and chairman of the Greater Los Angeles Urban Coalition, at com- mencement exercises of Immaculate Heart College: “Each day that we postpone reconciliation of our actions with objectives motivated by a desire to restore quality of life to our nation, we come a step closer to inevitably extremist solutions. Almost invariably we hide our heads in the sand until our problems become crises which cannot be solved without painfully ex- treme remedies.” Charles B. Wade Jr., vice president of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco and chairman of the educa- tion committee of the Winston-Salem Urban Coalition, at the First Anniversary Meeting of the Norfolk Urban Coalition: “Leadership is an attitude, an ability to size up a situation, and then make a decisive move rather than sitting back and doing something after the fact. It’s easy to find leaders after something happens, they rise to the occasion, but it’s something else to marshal people with foresight, with the ability to see an oncoming crisis and make a concrete move for the good of the community to avoid a potential problem.” Arthur Naftalin, professor of public affairs, University of Minnesota, former mayor of Minneapolis, and Coalition Steering Committee member, to the conference of the National As- sociation of Housing and Redevelopment Offi- cials: “A few months ago the housing authority submitted a request to the city council to in- crease from 250 to 500 the number of homes it might acquire under the low-rent housing pro- gram for scattered site housing and that ac- quisition be permitted citywide. The council approved the increase but refused to allow citywide acquisition, restricting the program to officially-declared renewal areas. This ac- tion struck me as a rather open act of dis- crimination and I vetoed the entire measure, risking the loss of the additional units. At this point our Urban Coalition of Minneapolis, in which many top business leaders actively Participate, called upon the council to sustain my veto and to accede to the authority’s origi- nal request. The council accepted the coali- tion’s urging and we accomplished a social gain that simply would not have been possible without the interest of key businessmen. We may be the only city in the nation in which pub- lic housing is possible on an unrestricted city- wide basis. . .” Established Local Urban Coalitions California . Fresno Los Angeles Pasadena Riverside Sacramento San Diego San Jose Stanford Mid-Peninsula Colorado Denver Connecticut Bridgeport Hartford Stamford Delaware Wilmington District of Columbia Florida Miami Illinois Springfield Indiana Gary South Bend Louisiana New Orleans Maryland Baltimore Massachusetts New Bedford Pittsfield Michigan Detroit Saginaw Minnesota Minneapolis St. Paul Missouri Kansas City New Jersey Montclair Newark Plainfield New York New York Niagara Falls Westchester County North Carolina Winston-Salem Ohio Cleveland Lima Oregon Portland Pennsylvania Erie Harrisburg Philadelphia Reading Rhode Island Tennessee Chattanooga Texas Corpus Christi El Paso San Antonio Virginia Norfolk Washington Tacoma Wisconsin Racine il MRe DAN SWEAT OFFICE OF THE MAYOR ELTY HALL ATLANTA» GA 30303 ort The Urban Coalition I 2100 M Street N.W. Washington D.C. 20037 Nonprofit Org. U.S. Postage PAID Washington, D.C. Permit No. 43234 Third Class
  • Tags: Box 7, Box 7 Folder 12, Folder topic: Urban Coalition | Coordinators Weekly Report | 1969
  • Record Created: April 18, 2017
  • Record Updated: April 29, 2021