Box 22, Folder 2, Complete Folder

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Box 22, Folder 2, Complete Folder

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CALL
LETTERS
FJ T
UNION
SENDING BLANK
2/3/67
CHARGE
TO
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City of Atlanta, Mayor's Office
Richard C . Leone
The White House
Washington, D. C.
Regret I will be unable to attend the Task Force meetings
on February 9 & 10 because of or~anizational meeting
of special housing commission for Atlanta .
Ivan Allen, Jr .
Mayor of Atlanta
Send lhe above message, subjecl lo lhe terms on bock hereof, which ore hereby agreed to
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�FROM
To:
ArDEE AMES
Members of Task Force
For your infonnation there
are further clippings on
the UDC proposal.
1/9/67
�HUD-28
DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT
(11 -65)
TRANSMITTAL SLIP
NAME
ROUTE TO:
ROOM


1.
BUILDI NG
Mr. Allen
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3.
4.
5.
6.
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Action
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As requl)8ted
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Sunlmne
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Approval
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Your information
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Prepare reply for signature of
REMARKS:
Attached is the travel voucher for your
trip to Washington 10/28 .
Please sign,
retain your carbon and return the origi nal
t o me.
Also att ached is a per diem claim s heet on
which you may record any time devoted to this
assignment duri ng the period 11/6- 19.
I hope the personne 1 d ocument s arrived on schedu=e.
FROM (Name)
Mary Re Carlsen
.
FPI- LK- 3-22-66- 9M P ads-6007
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DATE
11/11
�:UP" EST OC 25 66
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FAX WASHINGTON DC 25 2P EDT
MCINOMBU IYM ALLEK, MAYOR
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Iva n All e n, Jr., Mayor
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�DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT
66-77
June 27, 1966
STAND.ARDS OF CONDUCT
Several days ago you
Standards of Conduct
Reg ister on June 24,
It is important that
become familiar with
received summary informat i on on the Department's revi sed
regulatj_ons. The ret;ulatj_ons were published in the Federal
and are reproduced in the i r ent i rety in the att achment.
each employee carefully read all of the re5ulat ions and
them.
Informat i on concernj_ng reporting procedures and ot her i:mplementine; i nst ructions,
i ncluding the designation of Deputy Counselors, will be issued shortly. In
the meantime employees should give particular attent i on to the provisions of
Sections 0.735-203 through 0,735-205, and be prepared t o file a report on any
outside employment or other outside activity that requires author i zat i on, or
financ i al or other :Lnterest that i s subject to disclosure. Unless you are
occupy i ng a position subject to the provi si ons . of Subpart E of the regul at i ons,
a report will be required upon rece i pt of implement i ng instructions if you - are engaged i n any outside employment or other outside act j_v i ty that
i s subject to the prior approval provisions of Sect j_on o. 735-203( c)
and (d), and such act i vity has not been reported previ ously.
- have any unreported financial or other interests that are subject to the
disclosure requi rements of Secti on O. 735-205(a).
Employees subject to Subpart E will be given special i nstructions concerning
t he f iling of the statements of employment and financ i al j_nterests required by
o. 735-501.
If an employee ( i nclud i ng an e mployee subject to Subpart E) is engag ed i n any
outside employment or other outside act i vity or has a financial or othe r
i.nterest that now i.s prohi bited by Sect j_ ons 0,735-203(a ) and (b) and 0,735-204(aY,
and he cannot or doe s not termi nate such act i vi ty or interest by August 1, 1966,
a report on or before that date i s required, desc r ibing the steps that he ha s
taken t o conf orm with the referenced ·sections.
The attent i on of all employee s i s called to Sect i on 0.735-106, whic h provide s
that t he i nter e st of a spouse, minor child, or a blood relative who is a fulltime re sident of an employee's i mmed i ate househol d i s c ons id ered to be an
i nterest of t he employee .
Attachment
�I
DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT
Reprinted from Federal Register - 31 F. R. p 8781-85
June 24, 1966
Title 24-HOUSING AND:HOUSING
CREDIT
Subtitle A-Office of the Secretary,
Department of Housing an~ Urban
Development
PART 0-STANDARDS OF CONDUCT
Pun,uant to and in accordance with
sections 201 through 209 of Title 18 of
~he United States Code, Executive Orqer
11222 of May 8, 1965 (30 F.R. 6469), and
Title 5, Chapter I, Part 735 of the Code
of Federal Regulations, Part O is a dded
to Subtitle A of Title 24 of the Code of
Federal Regulations, reading as follows:
Subpart A-Ger. •nt Provisions
0
Sec.
Purpose.
Definitions.
Interpretation and advisory service.
0 .735-104 Notification to employees and
special Government employees.
0.735-105 Remedial action.
0.735-106 Interest of employee's or special
Government employee's relatives.
0 .735-101
0 .735-102
0.735-103
Subpart Ii-Conduct and Responsibilities of
Employees
!l.735-201 Basic principle.
o·.'735- 202 Gifts, enterta.!nment, a nd favors.
Outsid e activity.
Financial Interests.
Personal real esta te tra n sactions.
Use of Inside information.
Intermediaries and product recommendations.
0.735-208 Membership In organization.~.
0.735-209 Use of Government property.
0 .735-210 Indeb tedness.
0.735- 211 Gambllng, betting, and lotteries.
0.735-212 Gener al conduct; and conduct
prejudicial to the Government.
0.736- 203
0 .735-204
0.735-205
0.735-206
0.735-207
Subpart C-Conducl and Responsibilities of
Special Government Employees
0.735-301 Use of Government employment.'
0.735-302 Use of Inside information.
0 .735-303 Coercion.
0 .735-304 Gifts, entertainment, and favors.
0.735-305 Applicability of other provisions.
Subpart D-Miscellaneous Statutory Provisions
0.735-401
Applicable statutory provisions.
Subpc:rt E-Statements of Employment and
Financial Interests
0 .735- 501 Submission of statements.
0 .735-502 Supplementary statements.
0.735-503 I nformation not known by em-
ployees.
Information prohibited.
Review of statements.
Confidentiality of statements.
Effect or employee's statements
on other requirements.
0.735-5-08 Specifl'C provisions !or special
Government employees.
Appendix-List of Positions Subject to
Subpart E.
0.735-504
0 .735- 505
0.735-506
0 .735- 507
this part. He ~hall be responsible for
coordinating the Department's counseling> services and for assuring that counseling and interpretations on questions
Subpart A-Gener~I Provisions
of conflicts of interest and other matters
§ 0.735-101 Purpose.
covered by this part are available to desThe maintenance of unusually high ignated depnty counselors. He may
standards of honesty, integrity, impar- form ad hoc committees to evaluate the
tiality, and conduct by Government em- effe<;JJveness of the standards, or to conployees and special Government em- sider any new or unusual question arisployees is essential to assure the proper ing from their application.
performance of the Government busi,oess
and the maintenance of public . confi(b) Dep_yty fOUns~lors. Such de~tY
dence. The avoidance of misconduct
and conflicts of interest on the -part of counselors as, maY; be requj.red . shall be
Government employees and special Gov- design!\ted to gi;ve llj_\,lthoritative advice
ernment employees through informed andNUidance to current ang, prospective
judgment is indispensable to the main- employees and special Goverrwient emtenance of these standards. To accord ployees on questions of confl,icts of-interwith these concepts, this part sets forth est and on other matters covered by .this
the Department's regulations prescrib- part.
ing standards of conduct and responsibilities, and governing statements of
Notification to employees
employment ahd financial interests for § 0.735-104
attd . special Gove~ment employees.
employees and special Government
The provisions of this part and all reemployees.
visions thereof shall be brought to the
§ 0.735-102 Definitions.
attention of and made available to:
(a) Each employee and special Gov(a) "Department" means the Department of Housing and Urban Develop- ernment employee at the time of issuance and at least annually thereafter ;
ment. ..
(b) Each new employee and special
(b) "Employee" means an officer or
employee of the Department, but does Government employee at the time of em·
not include a special Government em- ployment.
ployee.
(c) "Special Government employee"
means an officer or employee of the De- § 0.735-105 Remedial action.
partment appointed to serve with or
A violat·on of this part by an employee
without compensation, for not more than or special Government employee may be
130 consecutve days during any period of cause !or remedial or disciplinary action.
365 days, ori a full-time, part-time, or Such action may include, but is not limintermittent basis, and who is retained, ited to:
design ated, appointed, or employed as a
(a) Changes in assigned duties;
special Government employee under the
(b) Divestment by the employee or
provisions of section 202 of Title 18 of special Government employee of his conthe United States Code.
flicting interest;
(d) "Person" means an individual, a
(c) Disciplinary action, including
corporation, a company, an association, separation, which may be in addition to
a firm, a partnership, a society, a joint any penalty prescribed by law; or
stock company, or a ny other organiza(d) Disqualification for a particular
tion or institution.
assignment.
(e) "outside employment" · means all
gainful employment other than the per- Remedial action, whether disciplinary or
formance.. of official duties. It includes, otherwise, shall be effected in accordance
but is not limited to, working for another with any applicable laws, Executive oremployer, the management or operation ders, and regulations.
of a private business for profit <including personally owned businesses, partnerships, corporations, and other business § 0. 735-106 Interests of employee's or
special Government employee's relaentities), and other self-employment.
AUTHORITY: The provisions of this Part O
issued under E.O. 11222 of May 8, 1965, 39
F .R. 6469, 3 CFR, 1965 Supp.; 5 CFR 785.10.f.
tives.
§ 0. 735- 103
service,
Interpretation and advisory
(a) Department counselor. The General Counsel is design ated ·counselor for
the Department and shall serve as the
Department's designee to the Civil Service Commission on matters covered b:v
For the purposes of this part, the int erest of a spouse, minor child, or a blood
relative who is a full-time resident of an
employee's or special Government employee's immediate household is considered to be an interest of the employee or
- ~ J l l l ( I M ! l l ~ ~ e• . 4.ifi..,,.;11 ..
�Subpart 8 -,-C'QRd\Jct and Responsibil.,i_ties of Employees
§ ~35- 201' Basic'principle.
(a) Each e'i'nployee must realize that
the --Government's basic and controlling
purpose in employing him is the public
interest, rather than his private or personal interest, and that he can never
have a right of tenure that transcends
the public good. He can properly be a
Government employee only as long as it
remains in the public ,interest for him
to be one. Public trust and confidence
in the integrity of the Government are
para.mount.
(b) (1) This basic principle applies
with special force and effect in the Department of Housing and Urban Development, which deals directly with important segments of the public, and whose
success depends upon public trust and
confidence in its actions. The official
actions of the Department often··have a
direct bearing upon the financial and
other interests of individuals, firms, and
institutions with which it does business.
Furthermore, the effective accomplishnient"oftnebepartmeWs ~sion is "si.gnifioa.ntly dependent u'pon a pubt\c image
that engenders confidence in the Department's integrity. Accordingly, the avoidance of any involvement that tends to
damage that image is a responsibility of
exceptional importance for all employees
who participate in or influence official
operating determinations that affect the
interests of those with whom the Department does business.
(2) If there is knowledge of an employee's involvement in or association
with circumstances reasonably construed
to reduce public confidence in the acts
or determinations of the Department,
such knowledge may be sufficient cause
for the initiation of action adverse to
the employee. Employees, therefore, are
alerted to the gravity with -which the
Department will view. any such involvement, especially if it has to do with conflicts of interest or the compromise of
integrity-whether real or only appar.ent.
§ 0.735-202
Gifts, entertain ment, and
f avors.
(a) Except as provided in paragraph
(b) of this section, an employee shall not
solicit or accept, directly or indirectly,
any gift, -gratuity, favor, entertainment,
loan, cir any other thing of monetary
value, from a person who:
(1) Has, or is seeking to obtain, cont r actual or other business or finan cial
rela tions with the Department ;
(2) Conducts operations or activities
tha t a re regula ted by the Denartment: or
(3) Has interests t h at m ay be substantially affect ed by the performance or
nonperformance of the employee's official
duty.
(b) The prohibitions of p a ragraph (a )
of t his section do not apply t o:
(1 ) The acceptance of customary business services fr om banks or other financial institutions if such services are obt ained under terms and conditions available to the general public;
<2) Obvious family or personal relationships, such as those· between the employee __aµd his _parents, children, or
spouse;· when the "circunistances make it
clear that it i~ those relationships rather
than , the busmess of the persons concerned which are the motivating factors;
(3) The acceptance of food and refreshments of nominal value on infrequent occasions in the ordinary course of
a luncheon or dinner meeting or other
meeting or on an inspection tour where
an employee may properly be in attendance;
(4) The acceptance of unsolicited advertising or promotional. material, such
as pens, pencils, note pads, calendars,
and other items of nominal intrinsic
value.
(c) An employee_ shall avoid any
action, whether or not specifically prohibited by the regulations in this part,
which might result in, or create the appearance of:
<1) Using public office for private
gain;
(2) Giving preferential treatment to
any person;
(3) Impeding Government efficiency
or economy;
(4) Losing complete independence or
impartiality; or
(5) Making a Government decision
outside official channels.
(d) An employee sha.11 not solicit contributions from another employee for a
gift, or make a donation as a gift, when
such gift is for an employee in a superior
official position. An employee in a superior official position shall not accept
a gift presented as a contribution from
employees receiving less salary than
himself.
(e) An employee shall not accept a
gift, present, decoration, or uther thing
from a foreign government unless authorized by law.
·
§ 0.73 5-20 3
Outs ide activity.
(a ) An employee shall not engage in
outside employment or other outside activity not compatible with the full a n d
proper discharge of his duties and responsibilities as an employee of the Depar tment. Incompatible activities in clude but are not limited to:
(1 ) Acceptan ce of a fee, compensa tion, gift, p a ym ent of expense, or any
other thing of m onetary value in circumsta n ces in which acceptance may result
in, or create t he appea ra nce of, a conflict of interest;
<2) Employment which tends to impair his men tal or physical capacit y to
perform h is official duties a nd responsibilities in a n acceptable manner ;
(3) Activities that may be construed
by t he p ublic to be t he official a cts of the
Department;
'
(4) Activities that establish relationships or propert y interests that may result in a conflict between his private inWl(e.s~ !l,nd ~ offici!l,l quti~I !qd,_t;J ,i-,t
2
1 -~ ~~::l!fuii>loyine~t taa.t,.rnr,y involve--'he
· use of _information secured as a resuJ.t.
· of employment in the Department to
the detriment of the Department or the
I public interest, or that may give prefer · ential treatment to any person , corpora.tiori, public agerfcy, or group.
(b) An employee shall not receive a ny
salary or anything of monetary value
from a private source as compensa tion
for his services- to the Government (18
U.S.C. 209).
(c) Full- ti.me employees and par t time employees with a regularly scheduled tour of duty must obtain the prior
approval of a designated personnel officer
before engaging in outside employment
in the following categories:
-(1) Employment related to or similar
to the substantive programs conducted
· by any part of ·the Department. This
includes but is n ot limited to the broad
· fields of real estate, mortgage lending,
property insurance, construction, construction financing, and land and real
estate planning.
(2 ) Employment tn the same professional field as t hat of t he individual's
official position.
(3 ) Employment with any person,
. firm, or other private orga nization having business eit h er directly or indirectly
with the Depe,rtment.
(4) Employment by S tate, local, or
other governmental body.
(d) No f ull-time employee or parttime employee with a regularly'scheduled
tour of duty shall maintain a publicly
listed place of business without the prior
approval of a designated personnel
officer.
(e) Except for employees subject to
the r equirements of Subpart E of this
part, approvals r equired by paragraphs
(c ) a nd (d ) of this section shall be
request ed on F orm HUD-843, Request
f or Auth orization to Engage in Outside
Employment and / or Statement of Fin ancial Interests. All . pertinent facts
regardin g t h e proposed employment,
such as the name of the employer, the
n ature of the work to be performed, and
the · amount of t ime involved, shall be
set forth .
(f) (1 ) Employees are encouraged to
engage in teaching, lecturing, and writing thm 1s n ot prohibited by law, Executive order, or this part. However,
an employee shall n ot, either for or
without compensation, engage in teaching, lecturing, or writing that is dependent on -information obtained as a result
of his employment by the Department,
except when that information has been
made available to the general public or
will be made available on request, or
when the Secretary or his designee gives
written authorization for the use of nonpublic information on the basi...; that the
use is in the public · interest.
<2) An employee may use his name
and title in connect\on with articles for
publication which b'ear upon his work
in the Department only if he obtains
the approval of a designated personnel
officer.
�(g) This section does not preclude an
employee from:
(1) Accepting bona fide reimbursem<.int, unless prohibited by law, for
actual expenses for travel and such other
necessary subsistence as is compatible
with this part for which no Government
p ayment or reimbursement is made.
However, an employee may not be reimbursed, and payment may not be made
on his behalf, for excessi\Te personal
living expenses, gifts, entertainment or
other personal benefits.
(2) Participating in the affairs of or
accepting an award for a meritorious
public contribution or achievement given
by a charitable, religious, professional,
social, fraternal, nonprofit educational
and recreational, public service, or civic
organization.
(3) Participating in the activities of
National ·or State political parties not
proscribed by law.
§ O. 735-204
Financial interests.
(a) An employee shall not :
(1) Have a direct or indirect financial
interest that conflicts, or appears to
conflict, with his official duties and responsibilities.
(2) Engage in, dfreetly or indirectly,
a financial transaction as a result of, or
prima.r ily· relying on, information ob~
taihed tgrpugh .bl~ emplo~ent by the
Dep,11.rtment.
(3) Acquire se~:urtties issued by thE:
Feder&) National Mortgage Association.
<4) Acquire ownership of. stock . or
other interest in a rental project financed
with an FHA insured mortgage as long
as the insura.nce is in force.
(5) Acquire ownership of FHA debentures or certifl.cates:of claim.
(6) Acquire interest in a cooperative
or condominium housing project financed under the National Housing Act
if the interest is not for obtaining a
home for himself or his family.
<7) · Be an' officer or · director of any
organization which is an FHA approved
mortgagee or lending institution or which
services mortgages or other securities for
the Department. An employee may hold
stock or shares in such organizations
provided his official duties are such that
the holding will not create or tend to
create a conflict of interest. The prohi-bitions of this paragraph do not apply
to Federal Credit Unions that have been
approved as Title I lending institutions.
(8) Participate directly or indirectly in
any real estate activities for speculative
purposes as distinguished from bona fl.de
investment purposes.
<b, This section does not preclude an
employee from having a financial interest or engaging in financial transactions
to the same extent as a private citizen
not employed by the Department so long
as it is not prohibited by law, Executive
Order 11222, or this part.
§ 0. 735-205
actions.
Personal real estate ll·ans-
(a) Because the OP.erations of the Department are directly· related to individual real estate transactions, all Department employees must exerci~_the utmost
care ,iJ:l the. handlµ11r..of~tmMr.Jeuons,l
real estate activitits ...."E~i:>19'.$7~ rtful
therefore .rewrt ,to a desighated ,tiersonnel offl,cer-the' folloWl,ng tiJ>es ~ tifrs~na.1
re~l esta~ transaction§ (~ the ~l'.,811Sac-·
ti6I} involves FHA md.ttga'ge l n$.Urapce,
the · report shall be fl.led at the tline the
application for such insurance is fl.led~
other types of transactions shall" be:re.:
ported at the time of cons~a,J;iah of
the-transaction) :
(1) Any purchase or sale of real property 1n which an employee has ari
interest.
·c2) Any Title I property improvement
loa~ obtained by the employee or in
which he h as a financial ihter'est. In
such case the employee must report 'the
name of the lending institutlon and ·a
description of .t he im_grovements being
financed.
(3). Any interest in a cooper.a,tive or
condominium- housing "project financed
under the National Housing. Act if jt
involves a home for himself or.Jtls".family.
(b)
a ddition to ~he repor:ting:_ re-:
quirements of paragrap)'l. Ca) of Uus, see"!{
t ion, employees shall , report ;all ·reru
estate holdings other than those held
person al residences.
Cc) Except for employees subject to
the requirements of SubPQrt E of 'this
part, reports required 'tl\'V paragraphs
(a) and (b) of this section shall be fl.led
on Form HUD-843, Request for Authorization to Engage in Outside Employment
and/or Statement of Financial Interests.
In
(b).rAn;emplqtee may~ designated to
serve as, a liaison fepreseht4tiv1:. of the
De,par.tment to a non-Federa1 or private
organization provided ·that:
0) Th'e activity ·relates 'to the work M
the Department.
.
(2) The employee does not participate
by vote in the policy determinations of
the organ~tion.
(3) The Department Is in no way
bound by any vote or action taken by the
organization.
§'°O. 735-209 Use of Government prop. erty.
An employee shall not directly or In-
directly use, or allow the use of Department property of any kind, including
property leased to the Department, for
other than officially approved activities.
An employee has a positive duty to protect and conserve Govern,ment property,
including equipment, supplies, and other
property entrusted or issued to him.
§ 0.735-210
·Indebtedness.
An' employee shall pay each just finan-
cial. obligation in a proper and ,timely
m anner , especially one imposed by law,
such as Federal, State, and local t axes.
For the purpose of this section, "just financial obligation" means one acknowledged by the employee or reduced to
judgment by a court, and "in a proper
a nd timely manner" means in a manner
which the Department determines does
not, under the circumstances, reflect adveraly..loll> tmt, C]pvernmenff as his- amS 0.di'35.:..206 Use of idlide. irdormation. }Noyar.
1J:rotthe event· of a dispute. be• Excl!pt as provided _tp §"0 .,n5..:203 (f}, t;Jv.een aru employee anll. an aJ.!Egled credino employee shall giv~ pr 'use jnside· in- tor, this sootion ckles · riot · require · the
formatio~ acquired by means of his posi~ Department to determine the l'Widity or
tion to advance any private interest, the-. amount of the disputed debt.'
particularly the priv·a te interests of himself, his family, associates, or friends. ·§ 0.'135:-211 Gambling, belting, and lotteries.
For the purpose· of this section "inside
information" means information ob- . An employee shall not participate,
tained under Government authority but while on Government -owned or leased
which has not become part of the body o! property or while on duty for the Departpublic information.
ment, in any gambling activity includ§ ·o .735-207 Intermediaries and product ing the operation of a gambling device, in
conducting a lottery or pool, in a game
recommendations.
for money or property, or in selling or
No employee shall recommend or sug- purchasing a number slip or ticket.
gest the use of any particular or identified nongovernmental intermediary to § 0.735-212 General conduct; and condeal with the Department nor shall he
duct prejudicial to the Government,
recommend any device or product tested
Ca)
Each employee shall conduct himby or for, or used by, the Department,
self in a manner that facilitates the ef- ,
except as required by his official duties.
fective accomplishment of the work of
§ O. 735-208 Membership in organiza- the Department, observing at all times
tions.
the requirements of courtesy, considera(a) An employee may not, in his offi- tion. and promptness in dealing with the
cial capacity as an officer or employee of public and with persons or firms having
the Department, serve as a member of business with the Department;
Cb) An employee shall not engage in
a non-Federal or private organization
except where express statutory authority criminal, infamous, dishonest, Immoral,
exists, or statutory language n-ecessarily or notoriously disgraceful conduct, or
implies such authority. -However, 'an other conduct prejudicial to the Governemployee may serve in an individual ca- ment.
pacity as a member of a non-Federal or
Subpart C--Conduct and Responsibilprivate organization, provided that:
ities of Special Government Em(1) His membership does not violate
the restrictions noted in § 0.735-203; and
ployees
(2) His official title or organization
connection 1s not shown on any listing § O. 735-301 Use of Government employment.
or presented in a.ny activity of the orgaA special Government employee shall
nizatior1 in such a manner as to im.,ply
tQAt 9e Ii actin& In, h~ offlci~ capa.city. not use his Government employmeo.li!M
as
3
�a purpose that is, or gives the appearance of being, motivated by the desire for
private gain for himself or another person, particularly one with whom he has
family, business, or financial ties.
§ 0. 735-302 . Use of inside information.
(a) A special Government employee
shall not use inside information obtained
as a result of his Government employment for private gain for himself or
another person either by direct action on
his part or by counsel, recommendation,
or suggestion to another person, particularly one with whom he has family, business, or financial ties. For the purpose
of this section, "inside information"
means information obtained under Government authority which has not become
part of the body of public information.
(b) Special Government employees
may teach, lecture, or write in a manner
consistent with the provisions of § 0.735203(!).
§ 0. 735-303 Coercion.
A special Government employee shall
not use his Government employment to
coerce, or give the appearance of
coercing, a person to provide financial
benefit to himself or another person,
particularly one with whom he h as
family, business, or financial ties.
§ 0. 735-304 Gifts, entertainment, and
favors.
(a ) Except as provided in paragraph
(b) of this section, a special Government
empfoyee;-w hile so employed or in- connection with his employment, .shall not
receive or solicit from a person having
'business with the Department anything
of monetary value as a gift, gratuity,
loan, entertainment, or favor for himself
or another person, particularly one with
whom he has family, business, · or
financial ties.
(b) The exceptions of § 0.735- 202(b),
which are applicable to employees, are
also applicable to special Government
employees.
§ 0. 735-305 Applicability of o ther provisions.
and conflicts of interest, as appropriate
to the employees concerned.
(c) The prohibition against lobbying
with appropriated funds (18 U.S.C. 1913).
(d) The prohibitions against disloyalty and striking (5 U.S.C. 118p, 118r).
(e) The prohibition against the employment of a member of a Communist
organization (50 U.S.C. 784).
(f) The prohibitions against (1) the
disclosure of classified information (18
U.S.C. 798, 50 U.S .C. 783); and (2) the
disclosure of confidential information
(18 u.s.c. 1905).
(g) The provision relating to the
habitual use of intoxicants to excess (5
u.s.c 640).
Ch) The prohibition against the mis).lSe of a Ooverriment vehicle (5 u.s.c.
78(c)).
m The prohibition against the misuse of the franking privilege (18 U.S.C.
1719).
(j) The prohibition against the use of
deceit in an examination or personnel
action in connection with Government
employment (5 U.S.C. 637).
(k) The prohibition against fraud or
false statements in a Government matter
(18 u .s.c. 1001).
(l) The prohibition against mutilating or destroying a public record (18
u.s.c. 2071).
'
(m) The prohibition against counterfeiting and forging transportation requests 08 U.S.C. 508).
(n) The prohibitions against (1) embezzlement of Government money or
property (18 U.S.C. 641); (2) falling to
account for public money (18 U.S.C.
643); and (3) ·embezzlement of the
money or. property of another person in
the possession of an emplo~ee by reason
of his employment (18 U.S.C. 654).
(o) The prohibition- against unauthorized use of documents relating to claims
from or by the Government (18 U.S.C.
285).
(p) The prohibition against proscribed political activities-The Hatch
Act (5 U.S.C. 1181), and 18 U.S .C. 602,
603, 607, and 608.
(a) Each special Government employe1 is subject to the provisions of Subpart E-Statements of Employ§§ 0.735-201, 0.735-208 through 0.735-212,
ment and Fina ncial Interests
and 0.735-508.
(b) Each special Government em- § 0.735-501 Submission of statements.
ployee shall acquaint himself with each
(a) Not later than 90 days after the
statute listed in Subpart D of this part. effective date of this part, each employee
occupying a position designated in the
Appendix shall submit to the reviewing
Subpart D-Miscellaneous Statutory official specified in § 0.735-505, Form
Provisions
HUD-844, Statement of Employment and
§ 0.735-40_
1 Applicable statutory provi- Financial Interests.
(b) Each employee who enters on duty
sions.
after the effective date of this part in a
Each employee shall acquaint himself position
designated in the Appendix shall
with each statute that relates to his
ethical and other conduct as an employee submit to the reviewing official specified
of ·t he Department and of the Govern- in § 0.735-505 a statement not later than
ment. The attention of each employee 30 days after his entrance on duty or
is directed to the following statutory 90 days after the effective date of this
part, whichever is later.
provisions:
(c) Additions to, deletions from, and
Ca) House Concurrent Resolution 175,
85th Congress, 2d Session, 72 Stat. Bl2, other amendments of the list of positions
the "Code of Ethics for Government in the Appendix may be made from time
to time as necessary to carry out the
Service".
'(b) Chapter 11 of Title 18, United purpcse of the law, Executive Order
States Code, relating to bribery, gra.ft, 11222, and Part 735 of the Civil Service
4
Commission Regulations (5 CFR •Part
735). Such amendments are effective
upon actual notification to the incumbents. The amended Ii.st shall be supmitted at least annually for publicatidn
in the FEDERAL REGISTER.
§ 0.735-502
Supplementary statements.
(a) Changes in, or additions to, the
information contained in an employee's
statement shall be repcrted to the appropriate reviewing official in a supplementary statement at the end of the quarter
in which the change occurs. Interim
memoranda reports shall be filed if required to meet the prior approval provisions of § 0.735-203 (c) and (d). or the
requirements of § 0.735-205(a) concerning the timely reporting of real estate
transactions. Financial interests or employment acquired during a quarter, but
dispcsed of or terminated before the end
of such quarter, shall constitute changes
or additions to be repcrted at the end
of such quarter. ·Q uarters end March 31,
June 30, September 30, and December 31.
If there are no changes or additions in
a quarter, a negative report is not required.
However, for the purpcse of
annual review, a supplementary statement, negative or otherwi&.e, is required
as of June 30 of each year.
(b) A supplementary statement shall
be submitted on Form HUD-844, and
shall be designated "Supplem entary;'.
A supplementary statement shall furnish all information required by an initial
statement and by appropriate notation,
shall indicate any changes. in, or a dditions to the information set out in the
employee's initial statement or la.st supplementary statement.
§ 0.735-503 Information not known by
e mployees.
If any information required to be in-
cluded on a statement or supplementary
statement, including holdings placed in
trust, is not known to the employee but
is known to another person, the employee shall request that other person
to submit infonnation in his behalf.
§ 0.735-50 4 Information prohibited.
This subpart does not require an employee to 1'eport information relating to
his connection with, or interest in, a
professional society or a charitable, religious, social, fraternal, r ecreational, public service, civic, or political organization
or a similar organization not conducted
as a business enterprise. For the purpose of this section, educational and
other institutions doing research and development or related work involving
grants of money from or contracts with
the Government are deemed "business
enterprises" and a.re required to be included in an employee's statement.
§ 0.735-505 Review of statements.
(a) Employees reporting directly to
the Secretary shall submit their statements directly to the Secretary for review; employees reporting directly to
the Under Secretary shall submit their
statements directly to the Under Secretary for review.
(b) Employees reporting directly to
A(lsistant Secretaries shall submit their
�I
statements directly , to ~he · appropr1~e
Assist.ant Secretary for revie-yl'; em,pJoyjes
r eporting directly to the General ~ou·~ ei
shall sut>mit their statements directJy W
th~ general Counsel for review.
·
(c ) Employees not included, "in .p aragraph (a ) .or (b) of this section shall
submit· their _statements directly to the
appropriate Deputy Counselor.
(d ) When a statement submitted under paragraph (b) or (c) of this section,
or information from other sources, indicates a conflict between the interest of
an employee and the performance of his
official duties, and when the conflict or
appearance of conflict cannot be resolved
by the r eviewing official, he shall report
the information concer ning t he conflict
or appearance of conflict to the Secretary through the Counselor. The employee concerned shall be given an opportunity to explain the: conflict· or
appearance of conflict before · any required remedial action is initiated.
(c) The Secretary or his designee may
waive the provisions of this sectioo in the
case of a special Government employee
who is not a consultant or an expert when
it is determined that the duties'. of the
position held by the special Gov~mment
employee are of a nature and at such
level of responsibility that the submission of a statement is not necessary to
protect the integrity of the Government.
For the purpose of this-parag1&p~ "81G!'s'tllt:ant..,, and '"expert" have the melmings
given those terms by Chapter -~04 pf'the
Federal Personnel Manual.
This part was approved by the· Civil
Service Commission on May 17; 1966.
Effective date. This part shall be
effective as of June 24, 1966.
§ 0. 735-506
ments.
Officers a nd employees in the following
positions are subject to the provis!,Pns of
Subpart E of this p art :
(a ) Employees p aid a t a level of the Federal
Executive Sa lary Schedule est ablished by the
Federal Executive Sa l ary Act of 1964, aa
amended, except the Secretary,_who is subj ect to sep arate reporting requirements under
section 401 of Executive Order 11222;
(b) Employees in grade GS-16 or a bove of
t he G enera l Schedule established by the
Classiftc;:a tlon Act of 1949, rui amended, Of in
com parable or high er p ositions not s ubject to
t h at Act; and
(c ) Employees in the followtng positions:
Confide ntiality
of - 81.!lte-
After the review process has been completed, the statements submitted under
§ 0. 735-505 shall be promptly forwarded
to the personnel office having custol of
the employee's official personnel file .
The statements shall be held In onfidence and retained, in) 1i.Iilitecl accef;S
files.:· Information from a sfaU!ment
may n ot be disclosed exc~t as t~e Secretary or his designee , or the c ivlr Service
Commission may determine for good
cause shown.
·
§ 0.735-507 Effect of employee's statements on other requirements.
The statements and supplementary
statements required of employees are in
addition to, and not in substitution for,
or in derogation of, any similar requirement imposed by law, order, or regulation. The submission of a statement or
supplementary statement by an employee
does not permit him or any other per son
to participate in a matter in which h is
or the other person's participation is
prohibited by law, order or regulation.
§ 0 :735-508
Specific provis ions for special Government employees.
(a) Except as provided in p~ragraph
(c) of this section, each special G overnment employee shall submit to, the reviewing official specified in § 0.735-505,
Form HUD-844-A, Statement of Employment and Financial Interests, qot later
than the time of his employment. He
shall keep his statement current throughout his employment with the Department
by the submission of supplementary
sta-tem,ents.
Cb) The provisions of §§ 0.735-503,
0.735-504, 0.735-506, and 0.735--=001 are
applicable to a special GovemmJlht employee who is required to file a statement.
ROBERT
C.
WEAVER,
Secretary of Housing and
Urban Development.
APPENDIX-LIST OF POSITION S SUBJECT TO
SUBPART E
OFFICE OF T HE SECRETARY
Deputy Director, Northwest Operations·.
Regional Counsel.
Chief, Rea l Estate Disposition, Division of
Urba n Renewal.
CJiiet, Rea l Esta t e Acquisition, Division of
Urba n Renewal.
ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR MORTGAGE CREDIT
A:i,JD F EDERAL HOUSING COM MISSIONER
Federal Hou si n g Admi n is tration
Departmental:
Director of Complia nce Coordina tion.
Director of Examination a nd Audit.
Director, Audit Division.
Director, Division of Genera l Services.
Deputy . Director, DI vision of General
Services.
Chief, Procurement a nd Property Section,
Division of Genera l Services.
Director, Community Disposition Staff.
Deputy Director, Community Disposition
Staff .
Fleid -Office Director, Community Disposition Staff.
Seici:
.
Multifa mily Housing Representf!ti~.
Director, Insuring Office.
Deputy Director, .Insuring Office.
Assistant Director (Chief of Opera tions)-.
Chief Underwriter.
Sta te Director (New York).
Assistant State Dlrec:tor.
F ederal N_aticmal M ortgage Association
Departmental :
Vice President.
Loan Ma n a ger.
Secretary- Treasurer.
Controller.
Director of Exa mina tion a nd Audit.
Field :
Agency Ma n ager.
Assista nt Agency Man a ger.
ASS I S TANT SECRETARY FOR METROPOLIT AN
DE VELOPMENT
Departmental:
Departmental:
_
Administrative Assistant ~ tl;le ~ Director, Urban
Planning Assistance
Dlrector, Low-Jnc~q,,11ow1n11, Dffi'fl!ltt'a-· Bra nch, Office of Pla nning Standards and
tlon Staff, Office 9! ptog:r,m Polfcy.
Coordina tion.
Director , Dlvisic:q at Research DevelopDirector, Division of Aca d emic Facilities,
ment, Office of Program Policy.
Office of T echnica l Services.
'
'Director, Eq'Ual Opportunity Standard s a nd
La nd and Facilities Development Adm,...ils Regulations Staff .
t ration:
Deputy Director, Compliance Divis ion.
Director, Division of Senior Citizens HoueField Sup ervisory I n vestigators, Complia n ce
lng.
Division.
Director, Division of Public F acilities
Director, Audit D ivision, Office of AdminisGrants.
tration.
Direc t or, Division of Public Fac111tles
Deputy .Director, Audit Division, Office of
Loans.
Administration.
Dlr.ector, Division of Land Development.
Field Supervisory Auditors, Audit Division,
Director, Division of College Housing.
Office of Adm).nistratlon.
Director, Fin ance Standard s Sta ff .
'D irector, n t'illslon of F inan ce and Accounts,
Deputy Director, Finance Stand ards Staff .
Office of Admlnishation. ·
Urban Tra n spor t ation Admlnlst ra tlon :
Dep uty Director, Division of F ina n ce and
Positions a t GS-15 .
Accounts, Office of Ad ministration.
Director, Division of Gen eral Services, Office
URBAN REN E WAL ADM INISTRATION
of Admlnls.tratlon.
Departm en tal :
Director, Property Managemen t and ProDirector , Demonstr ation P rogra m Branch .
curement Branch, Division of Gener a l ServDeput y Assistan t Comm issioner , Reh a biliices, Office of Administration.
t
a
tion a nd Codes.
Field:
PUBLIC HOUSING ADMIN I S TRATION
Deputy, Regional Administrator.
, Reglonai Director of Administration.
D ep artmen tal :
Director, Division of Communit y F ac111tles.
Director , Office Ser vices Branch .
Deputy Director, Division of Commu nity
Financin g Officer.
FacU!tles/
.l"!eld :
Director, Division of Urban Renewal.
Regional Director.
DeRuty_ Director, Division of Urban Re[F .R. Doc. 66---6930; F iled , J une 23, 1966;
newat,
8 :48 a .m .J
Director, Northwest Opera tlons .
5
U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFF ICE : 1966 0-223-092
�THE NATION.AL
PREPARED BY
CHICAGO • NEW YORK • WASHINGTON, D.C. • DALLAS • ST. LOUIS • OMAHA
LOS ANGELES • SAN FRANCISCO • MINNEAPOLIS-ST. PAUL
VOL. 21 - No. 11
MARCH 1967
$20.00 PER YEAR
"TREND, TREND, WHICH WAY'S THE TREND?" That's the absorbing question which is
being debated vigorously by the business and investment communities as the
economy feels its way cautiously into 1967.
The difficulties of a definitive answer to the question first stated above lie
in the apparent contradictions contained in the business· and financial news as
it unfolds day after day.
For example:
the rally in the stock and bond markets
in the month of January seemed to be saying that the doubts and uncertainties of
the year-end were really unfounded; that . 1967 was going to be another strong
year after all. And yet there was a nagging persistence to bearish bulletins
about business itself. Automobile production was down 18% in January and 21.5%
in the first half of February . Steel-making thus far in 1967 is off last year's
pace, with mills currently operating at only 70% of capacity. Durable goods
orders in January were down 5 . 1% from last year and business inventories were
disturbingly high .
Through it all the war in Viet Nam keeps requiring more and more money: President
AJohnson's messages to the Congress point up the urgency of expanding the
9perimeters of the Great Society; unemployment in January held at the low level
of 3.7% of the labor market (with many cities still below the "point-of-shortage");
and wages are continuing their trend of the past six months.
Although the rally in the bond and stock markets faltered in mid-February and
bad news once again seemed to capture the spotlight of the public's attention,
we have certainly not turned bearish. We still see no recession in the offing
(by our definition) and we still would put 1967 in the "plus" column as a whole.
BASICALLY, OUR FORECASTING FOCUS IS ON CONSUMERS. During most of the year 1966,
financial and capital factors were in bad trend. The stock markets were sagging,
the money markets were demoralized and the whole real estate sector of the
eco·nomy was dispirited.
Yet consumers were more numerous, more prosperous and
more fully employed. And business was good indeed!
In spite of the anomalous developments thus far in 1967, con~umers are in better
basic condition than they were a year ago!
In most metropolitan areas, employment
in this January was better than last year's.
In all such areas, the average
income of consumers is higher than it was at this time last year.
And it is
moving still higher!
It is true that about October 1, 1966, the chilling winds of doubt blew over the
consumers of the U.S. with the result that their willingness to spend (not their
capacity to spend) was momentarily curbed. While they waited to experience a
resurgence of their buying enthusiasm, they increased their savings.
In other
words, they rested their buying oars and took advantage of the biggest inventory
of their own goods in the history of the American family.
But they did not
chan e their fundamental habits! As spring comes --- and if their incomes hold
we think they will --- they'll get right back into the spending stream to take
~dvantage of the higher living standards which are within their grasp. And once
they do that, we'll forget about the dwindling profits in the last quarter of
1966 and the first of 1967.
COPYRIGHT 1967 •
Real Estate Research Corporation

73 West Monroe, Chicago, Ill inois 60603

Reproduction in whole or part prohibited .
�PAGE 2 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___.._
~.at MARKET LETTER
REAL ESTATE ACTIVITY NOT ONLY FAILED TO TURN AROUND in the first month of 1967,
but i t s lipped f urther into the doldrums which had marked the last months of
1966. One of the reasons that the year-to-year comparisons with the first month
of 1966 look so bad is that --- if you remember accurately --- last year started
out impressively on the strong side, at least in the major· activity factors of
local real estate markets, with sales, mortgage lending and new construction
well ahead of the previous year, in most areas.
Here is how these activity factors performed in the latest month for which
complete national figures are available (January 1967):
Real Estate Sales
Off a little less than they were in December, sales for the nation were
down 14.7% in January, with the following regional comparison with the
same month last year:
Region
Northeast - - Great Lakes - South - Central Prairie
Pacific West -
Percent Change
- - - and
- -
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Mountain - - - - - - - - - - -
8.0
15 . 7
6.2
18.4
20.1
The reasons for the slow selling pace were not much changed from those
which have prevailed in the past few months.
The sharp drop in new home
construction and completion was a major factor.
Normally the sale of a
new house results in from two to five sales of other dwelling units as
occupants play a game of "musical chairs" in the upgrading process. No
new houses; no occ~pancy shifts down the line.
In addition, the promise
of lower mortgage money rates (given
wide publicity, especially since
October) has caused many prospective
Selected NATIONAL Economic Indicators
buyers of existing houses to wait for
better terms.
VALUE OF DOLLAR (1939 = 100)
41. 54¢
INDICATOR
PRICES:
Wholesale Prices
Building Costs
Farm Product Prices
Consumer Prices
Dow Jones lndl's (as of· 2/23)
PRODUCTION, EMPLOYMENT,
INCOME:
Total Production
Manufacturing
Persons Employed
Persons Unemployed
Construction Employment
lr.dividual Income
Wages
MONETARY FACTORS:
Interest Rates
Currency in Circulation
Government Debt
Checks Cashed (Dollars)
Value of Dollar
·Data latost available for each fador.
% CHANGE
FROM A
YEAR AGO
1.5
4.2
2.7
3.3
-11.0
-
-
4.8
4.6
0.3
0.5
0.2
8.4
2.6
14.4
0.6
2.1
15.4
- 1.2
% CHANGE
FROM A
MONTH AGO
0 .3
o.o
1.2
- o.o
- 0.4
-
0.7
0.7
0.1
0.3
0.2
0.9
1.1
1.6
0.1
0.1
4.6
o.o
On the income property side, the rapid
drop in money rates acted to lower
realistic capit alization rates faster
than prospective buyers could adjust
their sights. Moreover, improved
market conditions in most space markets
(especiall y in the Northeast, Great
Lakes and South regions) caused potential sellers to scent higher occupancies and rentals --- thus causing them
to firm their ideas of value. Fina lly,
a rapidly rising stock market p roved a
lure to speculators looking fo r a f as t
return on investment.
We look for unfavor able y ear-to-ye ar
comparisons in t h e sa l es marke t s to
continue for the fi r s t q u a rt e r of this
year, after whi c h we e xpe ct me a s urable
improvement.
Mortgage Lending
The n a tiona l d e cline s ince last year in
mor tg a ge lend i ng for the late st month
�THE REAL ESTATE FORECAST AUTHORITY _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ PAGE 3
(January) was 33.5% in the number of
total dollar volume of those loans.
tinued to improve, the actual volume
highly selective and cautious nature
mortgage loans closed and 42.4% in the
While mortgage money conditions conof lending was still low, due to the
of lenders returning to the markets.
Here are the regional comparisons between the mortgage business in the
latest month and that of the same month of 1966:
Northeast Great Lakes - South - Central Prairie
Pacific West -
Number of Loans
Percent Change
Dollar Volume
Percent Change
Region
- - - and
- -
- - - - - - - - - - Mountain
- - -
- - - - - - -
50.1
43 . 1
0.4
40.6
46 . 8
-
-
-
-
-
-
29.6
26.7
22.3
29 . 7
42.1
It is obvious from the above statistics that, through the month of January
at least, the improvement in mortgage money conditions was largely
theoretical and technical rather than actual --- as far as real estate
lenders and borrowers were concerned.
As noted above, the drop of interest rates in the basic money markets during
the month of January was a little less than remarkable.
However, at the
end of that month and all during February, these trends were reversed.
Yields on treasury bills, municipals and corporates were up steadily,
week-by-week in February.
This yo-yo action of money rates in the first eight weeks of 1967 was not
reflected in the mortgage money rate situation. Reason: the supply-demand
ratio in the mortgage money markets did not parallel that in the basic
money markets. Here were the differences:
1. The savings flow into real estate-oriented institutions was
greatly improved over a year ago. On the other hand, mortgage
demand (in the kind of loans scared lenders now consider acceptable)
was disappointing.
As a result, on balance, there was more money
than there were loans.
2. In the basic money markets, demand held high and supply was not
meaningfully improved. Money lenders found that they had underpriced their commodity and took a second look at their potentials.
We see no particular "threat" in the February developments to the long-term
tr e nd of mortgage money.
1967 will continue to score improvements in this
se ct o r .
New Construction
One o f the mu ch-touted "bullish" factors cited by those who are optimistic
about 1 967 is t he belief that the ailing home-building industry will stage
a come b ack i n t he year.
So- called building stocks have shown outstanding
str e n g th on t h e n ation's stock markets as speculators have hungrily snapped
th e m up in an t i c i patio n of higher sales and earnings.
These se ntime nts hav e not only been encouraged by the statistics of housing
construction in t h e past three months (January housing starts were at a
s e asona lly adjus t ed a nnual rate of 1 , 243,000 units --- up 14.6% from
De c e mbe r and up a whopping 47% from last October' s postwar low), but by
the longe r range pros p e c ts f or a d ramati c incr ease in t h e number of young
married coupl e s starting i n 1 968 .
�PAGE 4 _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ tk 1/4Uo,u,( MARKET LET.YER
Certainly (as this Letter has pointed out for several months), the
residential markets in most local areas have gained strength in virtually
all local areas --- and are postured for a burst of new supply in many.
In our opinion, the high expectations of the building industry (like
those which have pushed savings and loan stocks skyward since last fall)
tend to exaggerate the actual prospects for building profits --- either
on the part of the developer or the materials manufacturer . The reason:
the costs of money, materials, labor and land are such that development
profits must await a higher general rental market to encourage and
support a meaningfully higher volume of new construction.
The real profits are to be made in the purchase of good, sound, welllocated and well-designed existing property which will experience sharply
enhanced earning power before a new building boom can get started.
THE BIGGEST REAL ESTATE PROFITS IN THE PAST FIVE MONTHS· have been made in real
es t a t e s t ock s. Our read ers wi ll rememb er t h at we se t up a Real Estate Stock
Index in October of 1965. On that date we assigned the figure of 100.0 to
the prices of these securities which prevailed on October 1, 1965. Here is
the record of those values, monthly, since that date:
Month
1965
1966
1967
January - - - - - - February
- - - - - - - - March - - - - - - - - - - April - - - - - May - - - - - - - - - - - - - June - - - - - - - July
- - - - - - - - August - - - - September - - - - - October - - - - - - - - - November
- - - - - - December - - - - - Even if these real estate stocks had
owner would have done better than if
on the big board.
- - -
106.9
101.5
110.l
101.4
- 108.3
- 96 . 6
95.1
93 . 3
83 .4
- 79.7
100.0
75.2
106.9
80.8
105.1
84.4
been purchased - on October 1, 1965, their
he had bought the Dow Jones Industrials
REAL ESTATE TRENDS AT A GLANCE


% CHANGE fROM A YEAR AGO


fACTOR
NATIONAL
REAL EST A TE SALES
(Number of Transactions)
MORTGAGE LENDING
{Number of Loans Closed)
(Dollar Volume)
TOTAL BUILDING
(Dollar Volume)
RESIDENTIAL {NEW)
{No. of Projects Started)
(Dollar Volume)
NON°RESIDENTIAL {NEW)
{Dollar Volume)
MARRIAGES
EVICTIO NS
NORTH EAST
REGION I
GREAT LAKES
REGION 11
SOUTH
REGION Ill
PRAIRIE
MOUNTAIN
REGION IV
PACIFIC
WES·T
REGION V
17.2
14.0
18.1
9.6
14.8
21.6
33.9
38.0
33.1
42.6
28.4
34.7
19.7
15.9
31.9
46.8
42.1
42.6
7.3
11.4
35.0
24.3
22 . 9
26.1
35.2
45.5
37.2
20.3
43.6
47.6
19.7
28.2
44 . 2
55.1
48 . 3
60 . 0
10.0
7. 7
1.8
15.0
3. 7
8.8
102.5
6.9
0.9
25.8
11. 7
1.1
9 .8
12.8
40 . 7
9.4
3.5
o.o


Fi gures are based upo n extension to Nnti0nal and Regional Leve l s of act ual rates for QUARTER ending January 31, 1967 .


�THE REAL ·ESTATE FORECAST AUTHORITY _ __ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ PAGE 5
SPECIAL RESEARCH REPORT
A LOOK AT THE "MODEL CITIES" PROGRAM
Last year, Congress passed legislation authorizing a new urban program to be
administered by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (known as HUD).
Originally known as the "Demonstration Cities Program," it was recently renamed
the "Model Cities Program" to placate Congressmen who feared their constituents
would think the bill encouraged civil rights marches and other "demonstrations!"
Since this program may have important impacts upon big-city real estate markets,
we will explore certain key aspects of it in this month's Special Research Report.
The Model Cities Program was originally devised to counteract the following
undesirable tendencies which had appeared in the Federal government's attempts
to aid cities, especially large central cities:
h
1.
An enormous number of Federal programs were being administered by many
different Federal --- and city --- departments without much coordination. A recent Office of Economic Opportunity manual lists over 250
Federal aid programs, most of which are applicable in cities ,.
2.
Funds passed out under these programs tended to be widely dispersed
over the urban landscape.
Instead of really trying to upgrade a small
area by focusing a whole battery of urban renewal, health, antidelinquency, manpower training, education and other programs on it,
the Federal government was scattering its shots too broadly . Hence
each slum received too little assistance to counteract the forces
"naturally" dominant there.
3.
Each program assisted with Federal funds tended to be the same in all
parts of a city, and often all over the country, both because one set
of Federal rules governed it and because big-city bureaucracies wanted
to adopt "uniform and equal" policies in all neighborhoods. As a
result, specific programs were often badly adapted to the peculiar
needs of non-typica l neighborhoods, especially low-income ghettos.
4.
A great deal of urban renewal assistance was designed not so much to
eliminate blight or improve the living conditions of low-income
re sidents, but to bolster the sagging economies of big-city downtown
business districts.
Thus the wealthy were the biggest beneficiaries,
and the poor were merely shifted from one slum to another.
These complex maladies demanded a complex remedy --- and that is just what the
Model Cities Program is designed to produce.
In fact , the Guidelines describing
how t o apply for a gran t to plan (but not e xecute ) this program are over 50
pages long. Henc e we can only mention their most salient features here, before
a n a l yz i ng some of their major implications.
Part ic i pation in the program by any given city involves three stages. The
pr e - application stage lasts unti l an application for a planning grant is completed
a nd approved by HUD . No Fede r al financing is available for filling out an
a pplica ti o n .
Yet it is so complex that many cities have spent months at it and
only four h ave formally filed applications (as of February 25, 1967). HUD is
like l y t o disapprove of almost everyone's application at first until it is
adjus t e d t o r easonable conformance with the many criteria described below. After
HUD a ppr o v a l is obtained, the planning stage begins. This can last from si x
to twe l ve mo nths, a n d can be financed up to 80% by HUD g rants
(though the
total a utho r ized to HUD for such planning is only $24 mil lion over two years).
Fi n ally, for those few cities receiving final approval, the e x ecution stage
a rr ives .
In thi s s t age , each city will apply for normal Federal aid for specific
�PAGE 6 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ fk "1t,attu4t MARKET LETTER
programs in the Model
can get an additional
otherwise have to put
the Model Cities Area
assistance.
City Area (such as 2/3 financing for urban renewal), and
"block grant" for up to 80% of the local share it would
up. This bonus can be used for additional activities in
which would otherwise not be eligible for Federal
The myriad specific criteria which Model City plans must meet include the
following major ones summarized from HUD's Program Guide:
1.
The program must be comprehensive. Specifically, it should contain
the following components: physical improvement, housing, transportation, education, manpower and economic development, recreation and
cultural, crime reduction, health and social services and public
assistance.
2.
The program should provide for administrative machinery at the local
level to carry out all its aspects on a consolidated and coordinated
basis. Preferably, this means direct linkage to the mayor or other
chief executive.
3.
It should make a substantial impact on the physical, economic and
social problems in the model neighborhood area.
4.
It should remove or arrest blight and decay in the selected area or
areas of the city.
5.
It should be of sufficient magnitude to contribute to the sound
development of the entire city.
6.
It should make marked progress in reducing social and educational
disadvantages, ill health, underemployment and lack of social services
necessary to se·rve the poor and disadvantaged of the area.
7.
It should provide for widespread citizen participation.
8.
It should provide maximum opportunities for employing residents of the
area in all phases of the program and enlarged opportunities for
work and training~
9.
It should contribute to a well-balanced city with a substantial
increase in the supply of standard housing of low and moderate cost.
10.
It should contribute to a well-balanced city with maximum opportunities
in the choice of housing accommodations for all citizens of all
income levels.
11.
It should contribute to a well-balanced city with adequate public
facilities, commercial facilities a dequate to service the residential
ar eas , and ease of access between residential areas and centers of
employment.
12.
I t should provide for a comprehensive plan for the r elocation of
individuals, families, business concerns and nonprofit organizations.
In addition, eac h program should requir e re-examination of local laws, be
consis tent with comprehensive metropolitan-wide planning, be initiated within
a short period of time (under five years), embody high standards of urban design ,
maintain historic sites, make maximum use of new technology, use cost- benefit
analysis, conform to civil rights requir ements , encourage maximum private
enterprise, not reduce previous local spending in the Model City area , and be
backed by adequate local resources.
�THE REAL ESTATE FORECAST AUTHORITY _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ __ PAGE 7
In setting out this extraordinarily ambitious set of requirements, HUD is like a
bachelor stating he will only marry a girl with Jacqueline Kennedy's poise,
Jayne Mansfield's figure, Grace Kelly's face, Elizabeth Taylor's allure and
Barbara Hutton's money!
In fact, he would be fortunate to get any one of these
charms, as HUD will be fortunate to get even a majority of its requirements
actually met by any given city.
Although each individual criterion seems
justified, the group taken together constitute too radical a departure from
present urban government practice to be fully achieved in any single city.
Specifically, we believe that HUD's program will encounter five major obstacles
and will have to compromise with them in many cases. These are as follows:
1.
All three of the major objectives of the Model Cities Program --coordination, innovation and specific adaptation of programs to ghetto
areas --- run counter to well-entrenched bureaucratic tendencies in
city governments. City --- and Federal --- departments used to
carrying out their own functions without much checking with each
other will resist intimate cooperation in planning their programs.
Moreover, innovation requires changing established behavior patterns,
and few things are more difficult for large bureaucracies. Finally,
the development of new programs tailored to the needs of ghetto
residents, and different from programs in the rest of the city, will
run counter to tendencies toward "equal treatment" and "uniformity"
long established in some city departments.
All three of these frictions will probably be greatest regarding bigcity schools. Many school boards are relatively free from direct
political control by city governments; hence it will be hard for
mayors to get them to change their ways to fit these criteria. Yet
schools are the most important single public institution in almost
all ghettos.
They alone have the potential power to make up for many
of the home deficiencies suffered by children from deprived families.
He nce if they are not effectively integrated into the Model Cities
Program in a city, and given part of its bonus "block grants," it
cannot really achieve its major goals. So one of the key tactics for
any city trying to make this program work must be convincing school
authorities of the need to create new programs specifically designed
for ghetto areas, including programs which use school buildings for
many kinds of non-educational activities (such as recreation, social
service distribution and adult vocational training) .
2.
Concentration of leadership efforts on one Model City neighborhood
will be necessary to make this program work; yet this contradicts the
fundam e ntal "Law of Over-Dispersion" sacred to politicians. The desire
to garn widespread political support naturally leads elected officials
t o spread the benefits of any program to all areas under their jurisdiction, even though this causes a loss of the economic benefits of
concentration. Hence city politicians will be sensitive to the charge
of focusing too much attention on the Model City neighborhood,
especially since it will be a low-tax-paying ghetto area. So they may
provide only h alf - hearted leadership in support of such concentration.
3.
Ev e n if local a r eas succeed in establishing coordination among th eir
own city departments and related agencies, there is no guarantee that
Fe d e r al age n cies will similarly cooperate in Washington. For example,
whe n a city as k s for a grant from the Department of Health, Education
and We l f ar e t hat is u r gently needed for its Model City Program, it may
find itse l f at th e e nd of the long " normal processing line" along
with a ll oth e r r equ ests, i ncludi n g those in no way associated with
Model Citi es .
�PAGE S_ _ _ __ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ fk ?tat«,,uzl MARKET LETT ER
4.
In large cities, it will be impossible to simultaneously meet the two criteria of significant impact on the city as a whole and intensive
impact in the Model City neighborhood .
If an area is large enough to
be a significant slice of the entire city, it will be too big for this
program to effect intensively, since total Model City funds are quite
limited.
5.
The housing requirement in the Guidelines is ambiguous. At one point,
it says that. the program must provide "a substantial increase in ·t11e
supply of standard housing of low and moderate cost . " But in the
next sentence, it says "The program should add to the overall supply
of low and moderate-income housing, not decrease it . " The latter
requirement is virtrially impossible, since any clearance of substandard and deteriorated units, or reduction in overcrowding, will
cause a decline in total supply of low-income housing. Even building
new public housing will probably not increase this total supply,
though it could easily increase the standard supply .
In spite of these drawbacks, the Model Cities Program is ' definitely a worthwhile experiment which could have significant long-run benefits
if it is
truly conceived of as a means of demonstrating techniques which will later be
applied on a much larger scale . Specifically, it may create an incentive for
at least some cities to do enough innovating, coordinating, concentrating
and adapting of programs to particular needs to give local governments a "shot
in the arm." But eventually this tiny shot must be followed by much larger
appropriations than those as yet made for Model Cities if the lessons learned
are to ·have any truly sizeable impact upon U.S . urban problems.
(The Special Research Report series on Change in Modern Society will be
continued in a later issue . )
-
NO QUOTATION W ITHOUT PERMISSION
-
�#
CCMMENTS ON THE AGENDA
Part I of the attached is an attempt to determine the
condition for a breakthrough in Federal policy-making on
urban problems.
priority.
The Task Force may wish to assign it top
Even if this is the case, I believe that ~art II
should remain in the agenda.
Agenda setting is, in a sense, a process of allocation
of scarce resources (Task Force and staff time).
The attached
agenda represents a rough estimate of all that can be taken
on in the time remaining.
Changes and/or additions will be ,
in effect, substitutions and should be based on altering the
implicit priorities in the present agenda.
Ri char d
.~\ I
. ,•
'I '
• .1 V
,I
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Leone
�,
3/8/67
A Proposal for Task Force Agenda
Part I
The staff of the Task Force has spent most of the past three
weeks attempting to outline future areas for investigation.
Our f~_ints
of departure have been based on Task - Force discussions concerning the
nature and location of urban ghettos; the definition and measurement of.
social deficit areas; the prospects for significant improvement in ghetto
job opportunities; the possibility of moving from programs to "flows"
(as defined in the Ylvisaker paper); and more focused research in such
areas a s housing and welfare programs.
These discussions, you will recall, were at a high level of
generality and implied further decisions about which areas should be
given intensive study- studies which hopefully would produce policy
recorrnnendations for the President.
In recent Task Force discussions and in interviews with a number
of government of~icials another, more general theme has emerged to
compete and, in a sense, out-flank the development of Task Force thinking
on the above issues.
It appears clear that this group believes that the time· has come
for a sharp break with previous Federal policy-making and prograunning
directed towards urban problems. *
The need for a new "laundry list" of
marginal adjustments and categorical .aid
programs is rejected.
,





It is
In fairness we might concede the Federal government has .only recent ly
b egun to look at....~ts role as solving urban problems as opposed to
providing welfare 'payments, more' housing etc. The fact that Feds feel
this way now is of course a mamor advance. The fact that they increasingly
a r e being held respon sible for what happens in urban areas provides some
assurance of the potential significance of our work.
�2
felt , instead, th a t
th e Pr e sid e nt mu s t a lt e r or g o outsid e t h e presen t
f r amework (or even create a new framework) for d~cision-making about
urb an problems to seek ways and means for achieving national goals in
urban areas.
The task force believes that present. activity and
predict able future activity can be reshaped and criticized productively,
but it also is convinced that such an approach offers faint promise as
a source of significant innovation in solving urban problems.
Ind eed,
the Task Force might go a step further and argue that the whole range of
ex isting Federal programs and institutions primarily des~gned to solve
urban problems have had a relatively minor impact on human and phy s ical
development in American cities.
This judgment (however qualified) is supported by the foll owi ng -admittedly over-simplified -- reasoning:
1)
While the range and size of Federal activity has increased rapidly
and while the institutions specifically charged with urban
responsibility have multiplied and grown, general economic, social
and physical trends have not altered significantly in any large city.
2)
It s eems therefore reasonable to assume th at the forces shaping thes e
t r ends a r e far more meaningful in affecting the quality of urban
1 i f e than i s th e sum total of Federal· programs focused on "urban ne eds".
3)
It appe ar s equa lly r ea s onable to conclude tha t the i nstitut i ons ,
mechanisms, and dolla rs now available for dev e l opi ng u r ban po licy
• ,'I /
at the Federal level ar e inad equa s~ ' or misori ent ed in t erms of
understanding and confronting some of the most important questions
in urban ' areas"·:· :
�3
The implications of all this for the Task Force include the
following:
1)
further infusions of Federal assistance through present or
predictable grant-in-aid programs offer little hope of significantly
altering major urban trends; therefore the Task Force should not
corrnnit a major portion of its limited resources to seeking new
devices for such increases.
Such devices, as well as adjustments
in present devices, should have a place in Task Force recommendations
only insofar as they spring from the kind of agenda ·suggested below.
2)
The search for more effective levers for influencing urban trends
is severely handicapped by the sorts of Federal apparatus and
information available for dealing with urban problems.
(E.g. see attached paper on social deficits.)
3)
The Task Force could most profitably allocate its time to assembling
some of the major social and economic questions relevant to ur ban
problems; indicating what kinds of institutions and/or devices for
policy formulation are in existence or might be created to deal with
such questions.
(It is even possible that the Task Force might
"solve" a question or two and have a basis for more specific _policy
recommendations.)
Questions might be modeled on the following:
1)
One obvious goal for Federal policy . is increasing income and, thus,
~ . .~ J
consumer demand in the ghetto.
,..,,,
' ... ~I


/


�4
(a)
Where in the Federal establishment (in HUD?).
Is there a
means for sorting out the various policy alternatives which
might be pursued to achieve this goal (e.g. negative income
tax, family allowance, jobs for the poor, etc.).
The answer to such a question would include surveying existing
sc atte red research and recorrnnendations on the several alternatives and
determining whether a basis exists already (though undiscovered) for
packaging a Federal approach to fulfilling this goal.
If this is so,
we migh t recommend some method of pulling together urban-oriented
pol icy-making on this questions.
If, as is more likely the case, there
is no sum total of effort which exhausts the alternative approach e s to
this problem our recommendations would include the need for same.
In short, the approach involves posing fundamental questions,
determining if a solution is now available, and if not, what is needed
to begin us down the road towards one.
One Task Force goal then becomes - at the most general level not simply to look for the "real" levers in this urban game (we have
neither staff, nor time, nor expertise t~ do a thorough job here) but
rath er to look for ways of elevating and . refining the level and nature
of urban policy-making.
• ·,
J
. ··. ·,.·V
I

�5
It should not be difficult to start this process by agre e ing
on an initial list of questions.
We already have some.
1)
How can we increase consumer demand in the central city?
2)
Have we systematically located and defined urban ghettos?
3)
Wh a t is needed to create the capacity to calculate social defec t s
in urba n areas?
4)
Whe re in the Federal establishment is work going forward on the
possibilities to altering the flow of entreprenurial activity to
increase the share of central city.
5)
etc.
'
·. _.: v
,.
•·.,I
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�6
?ar t II
The Task Force, it appears, is close to agreement on another
s e t of concerns which can be approached by more traditional methods,
and presumably would produce more traditional recommendations.
1)
Cha nges in Federal assistance systems
The Task Force is justified in looking at such proposals as
t ax sha ring, combining grant-in-aid programs etc., in terms o f
the ir r el a tive impace on cities.
It is clear that with a sma ll
i nput of staff resources we can contribute a city vie'W' to th i s
di a logue .
2)
Inc rea s i ng the flow and consistency of investment into lo'W'-income
housing in urban areas.
For wha t ever re ason there seems to be a "nea ter" problem.
We h ave
cons i derab le expertis e among Task Force members thems elv e s and
shou ld be abl e to a ssembl e a set o f recormnenda tions in th i s area.
I n add i t ion, wh il e there are manpower, education and other Task
f orces, our i s the only one which 'Wi ll - if it choose s - look a t
housing this year .
3)
Mode l cit ies
(a)
This program repres ents, i n a sense, the l atest in Wa shing t on
approa che s to urban pr oblems.
We mus t confr ont and ev en judge
it if we are t o justify a ma j or break with current approache s .
·. :U
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�If
7
(b)
This program also represents the latest Federal response to
the "ghetto" problem.
Given the political, social and moral
imperatives for doing something now about urban ghettos, the
Task Force should make some attempt to review and evaluate the
early directions of model cities.
(c)
This program also represents the boldest approach to altering
the system of Federal assistance and therefore is related
directly to item (1) above.
.
. ,;
· ; t
,;
'
�3/8/67
DRA}= FOR DISCUSSION
Staff paper on ~-,.o del Cities
The discussion which follows treats those problems and conflicts
which are li-ely to arise in the implementation of the Model Cities
program.
Most of them are built into the inte govenunental system in
which bdel Cities will operate without t he administrative instnnnents
to co ect or direct them.
By i mplicat ion, the questions raised in
this pape_ are suggestive of conceptual diff icul ties with the Model
Cities approach, and not of the effectiveness of those charged with its
administration.
The Model Cities prog~am is considered by many to be the most
useful instnu nt yet put int e hands of American cities by the Federal
goverrunent.
This program tests several notions:
one is that a multitude
of catego ical aids can be tied together in a single package and their
i mpact maximized in a slum neighborhood; al'lother being that a handful of
Americal'l cities can make imaginative and effective use of supplemental
fu1ds.
Model Cities represents an attractive departure from past Federal
efforts in sol ving urbal'l problems but it cannot be expected to overcome
t he barriers that those previous effor ts have helped to erect.
Consider the perspective of a well-intentioned mayor.
A relatively
small carrot has been he ld out by t he Federal government, which can be
taken and eaten if the mayor can do some things which t he Feder al government cannot:
coordinat e and maximize t he impact of a rultitude of
cat egorical aids.
He must correct a -s ituation in whi ch semi- autonomous
bureaucracies make decisions about resource allocat i on·, of t en with the
r • -· ,
�2
a1a and comfort of thei
F d -ral counterpartso
He must o;::,erate with a
b wilde.ing maze of state channeled programs whichv through rigidity and
reg essiv
id fonnulaeP eL ctivcly discriminat
.ere _re ot e
aga~nst his city.
easoi s \vhy few cities can b expected to come up
.·ith app_ications wlich, in factp meet the rigorous standards of the
guidelmes o Fi st, few cities h ve the talent:
person.riel who combine
sop: is:icated app eciation o the g antsman' s game with great p_ogrammatic
i rri.aginat ion ao not exist
be e_:pected to come
the city ov
~Tl
la ge numbers.
p wit. an application that will, favor one area of
all oth rs, someth.:.ng very unattractive to men who mus t
stm d fo _ el ction i.ri all neighborhoo So
notice

~re t hey do exist they will
In additionp on very s .o t
e mayor may have to alter p iorities which have already been
set and to which his city 1s corrun ·ttedo
This is especial:y true where
ur an renewal activity has avoided hard core slum eighborhoods wh ich
now must be incorporated into a comprehensive rene.,ral effort.
Then
there is the obvious problem of having to compete for one of seventy
slots for which the fiscal rewards are not great.
Given constraints oft: is nature, it is not surprising that cities
would not involve all the important cowmunity-,~ide agencies and citizens'
groups in preparing the initial application as required in the guidelines.
There is not time (3-1/2 months between issuance of the guidelines and
final application date) and there is not the staff to deal with suggestions
and complaintso
The city might also wonder how HUD and other Federal
agencies are to review a large nur.iber of applications in a very short
time and realistically evaluate ,t he thoroughness and comprehensiveness of
�3
eac: •
T e incentives may be, the efore, on "wi nging it" like the college
stude t
w.10
stuc y at
substitutes reputation , s avvy P and testmanship for d:i.ligen-
xam time.
T e costs of not involving mai7.y elements of t he community
planning of t e initial appl · cation are substantial.
1n.
t1 e
Such a process
would be an efficient and effective mean!; of ed 1cating t he comrr.i.mi ty P
cr:!a::ing
ari
awar ness and gaining acceptance of s ignific ant inno .1at i ons
in l )cal government .
Even wh n the planners are favorab l y dispc!: :: J ·:o
t his approach it is doubtful that they wi\ l have the time or sta :f
support to institute it.
In a real s ensep the w2yor ' s troub-e begins when his city 1s selected
as a model.
He must conduct complex negotiations with alrr.ost as many
agenc ies as th re are catego i cal a ids in his application and hope they
will
11 fund h i m at r oughly t he s am time.
If truly innovat ive , he
must secure the unlikeliest kinds of changes from the unlikeliest agenc ies
in ' .is city and at the state and Federal level 9 e. g. ~ the welfare system,
educational establishment, mortgage bankersg etc.
He may have to convince
unsympathet ic l egislators t hat legislati ve revisions of sweeping import
should be made -- he may even ask for additional funds.
a great dea
We are asking
of a c lass of political animal who seeks always to avoid or
resol ve conflict.
None of this is t o say t hat t he Federal administr ators of th-=s
program will have an ea sy t ime.
The gr eatest obs tacle is t he dependence
on the categorica l grant progr ams of other Federal agencies for ~:upport
arid funding .' Spec ifically:
�4
a.
In this p_ogram
H
i ch e hasizes flexibility, c ities must
cl:oose amongst categorical prog ams Hhich more often than not hare rigid
s tancl,~r s O confus · ng jurisdictional relations a.i7.d mysterious r drr{u~.i stra -~i ve
To play a us ful om.sbudsrnan role for the cities vis ··a vis
prrcticc:s .
tr~ -!::.e
0
other Federal agencies, HUD rust persuade under-ftmd.ed l:· :rograrn
adm_;_,'1is'· rs.to s to make subst2..r1tial allocat · ns t o other t.hol1 tra ·!~ · ic,na l
recipie.. ts.
deally t_ese agencies would also review Model Cities
applications and be able to synch onize the grant approvals with those
of HUD.
b.
Many relevant categorical prog ams, especially m HEW P
are acirninistered thro gh state governrnents with an impressive variety
of pl211s
regulations, capacities, standards and fiscal strength.
It
is difficult to i~2gine that n cessary evis · ons in these arrangements
can be e_fected in time to assist model neighbor oods.
It is equally
difficult to envis·on HUD, two levels removed from the source of difficulty,
paying a too direct role in effecting such changes.
c.
Urban renewal is probably disproportionately attractive
to citie s planning model neighbo_hood programs .
For one thing there is
250 IP.illion dollars in ear-rnarked funds which may be used by these cities
and t he ir use is controlled by the same agency administering Mode l Cities .
If other programs are to be more competitivep then ear-marked moneys
ITU.lSt
be secured and simple administrative arr3Ilgcrnents substituted to attract
~·b del City planners to them.
The 1odel Cities approach is an introduction to "consumer al location
of resources. 11 This mzans that each city is allotted money with which


·• ,',


�5
to "buy" prog ·
lS
in the combination that it sees will have t ,e greate5t
in;pact on the problems of that city.
The change t o consumer aEocatio:1
is a radical one and the prob lems cannot be
lll1
ere stimated.
___ F derally-designed progran s, the c ity i s asked t o
accepting
__
,,. . . ..._,,.
.
In~;tead of
prep., re a.n
op .i mal mix of programs based on the effectiveness of a t,ernat iv,: sy_.t :mt.s.
The fi st atterr:pt at t his approach is understandably imperfect b eca.use,:
a.
cities still must choose Lorn among exi st ing programs in ·
combinations w ich are largely pre - detennined by funding levels and
ju_isdictio al rights;
b.
p emiu~s are still attached t o particular programs by
favorable matching ratios;
c.
the discretionary supplemental moneys are small in relation
to the total outlay involved thereby limiting new· programs indicated by
systematic analys is.
The 1odel Cities program will make its great contribution by
demonst_ati.Tlg t hat the flexibility needed for experimentation is not
provided by a one-shot grant Federal money, no matter how large it is
or how few stri.Tl.gs are attached.
If the applicat ions are prepared with
diligence~ the Federal government will have a central catalogue of the
obstacles that it must deal with before real innovation can be achieved.
This catalogue would be a systematic vote by seventy cities indicating
wher e Federal legislation~ admin·strative r egulations and inter-agency
operat ions are t o be revised to be made more relevant to the needs of
America~ cities.
,.. ... ,
The Federal goven1ment should be preparing itsel f for
�6
i.11:plementing a hos t of change s that 1-·Jill be suggested by Model Citie s
applica1 t s.
This may require a new institutionalized capacity in l-IUD~
HI::.lv, Labor and other agenc ies operating urban-related programs •
. •,
r • .•,
�,
I
·I
I
I
i
A 'DRAFT PROPOSAL
THE PURPOSES AND WORK PROGRAJ.'1 OF THE
TASK FORCE ON THE CITIES
Summary Statement
It is recorrrrnended that the concept and criteria underlying
Federal urban policy move fro m program to floo:
and that the Task
Force use its time an~ equity to mark this historical divide and to
begin detailing what it means and by what policies and procedures
it might be expressed.
Background
The l a st generation of Federal activity in urban affairs has
deve loped along two line s tha t l ead to growing frustration in a
pluralistic society of increa sing mas s and priva te initiativ e :
(1) the notion tha t for every urban problem the re should be a sp e cific
program which is to b e executed pr incipa lly t hrough a public bur e aucracy ;
(2) the d ef inition of urb an prob l em s and polici es in s ta tic (mainly
ge ograph i c ) t erms.
This ur ba n wor ld is two uni verse s ap ar t fro m the kind of ana l ysi s
on wh ich th e econom ic polici es of the U. S . during this s a~e period h ave
be en conc eived and e na ct ed.
Th e l a tter have derived f r om dynami c
ana l ysis expr e ssed in terms o f na tional a ggregat e s.
Th i s econo;-nic
mod e l ha s h ad at least s ome s embl a nce of internal consi stency , and lev e r s
0•
�2
I
have been designed which make it possible to effect changes in
national economi c behavior at relevant scale.
The urban model has not even the pre tense of int erna l consistency,
and with its tiny levers exerts a force on urban development so small
that even its local effects are barely visible.
What is worse, it
involves such a massive input of politica l and admi.nistrative t a l ent
that the nation's energies and equities are dissipat~d.
Despite some lingering prejudice, it is becoming evident to many
of us that the simple multiplication of pre sent efforts and redoubling
of budg ets will not produce e quiva l ent r esults.
In the us e of the
existing urban model, we have alre ady r ea ched the point of dimi nishing
returns:
Ten times the pr e sent urban r enewa l, we lfa r e and other programs
will more like ly produc e ten time s the pre s eni frustr a tions r a ther than
some multiple of the desired urban outcome .
To s ay that the pr e s ent urb an model h as been inadequate is not to
s ay th at th e more dy nam ic mode l o f na tiona l e conomi c policy h as been
idea l.
From many points o f view -- not l eas t the urb a n -- the na tiona l
ec onomic model h a s pr oduc ed s ome indi ffe r ent and some times disastT.ous
res ults.
For one , i t h a s b een ti ed to a singl e-entry bookkeeping of
na tiona l b e nef it:
a t a lly o f Gross Nationa l Produ ce whi ch r eg i sters
pr esumed social ga ins wi t hout of f s e tting measures of soci a l cost.
More impor tant, the r e cord er s and eng ineers of a ggrega t e economi c change
h ave omitt e d any cons id eration of area - except f or an occas i onal bow
to economic r eg ions wh e n a stray member of the peer group or a dr a~a tic
accid ent of history (like the TVA) have made it resp e cta bl e .
�3
In an age of urban concentration, the failure to include area
as one dimension of national economic policy has been folly.
And
'
i
with the prospect of peace being declared, and urban development
becoming the object of increas ed public and private spending, the
need for a major policy shift is all the more urgent.
Consider four examples:
1.
The flmv of effective consumer demand into areas of
"social deficit" - Bedford-Stuyvesant; North Philadelphia, the ghettoes
of our metropolitan areas; the abandoning small towns of the Jersey
Pines, the Appalachian chain, etc.
In these areas -it is b e coming
painfully obvious that pres ent public pro gr ams (renewal; ,ve lfare ;
job training and deve lo pment) are not producing much of an effe ctive
dema nd, and that until there is such a d er.iand, there won't b e induc ed
an adequ a te economic b ase .
Thus the growing cry for the nega tive
income t ax , the guarant eed minimum income , the fa mily allowanc e , and
the "welfare dollar" (of Lloyd's Bank Revi ew , ca. Octob er 1966 ) wh ich
giv e s the poor a choic e of expenditures among essential s e rvi ces .
The Task Force wi ll not h ave to inv ent propos a ls of this sort;
but we can ( a ) sh ow h ow th ey f it int o a more dynamic urb an model;
(b) do b ad ly-nee ded di gg ing into the ir pr obable e ff ec ts , relative
advantages, and adm inistra tiv e feasibility.
�,
4
2.
deficit.
The flow of investment and enterprise into areas of social
Public programs of renewal, housing, and economic opportunity
have had discouragingly weak leverage in stimulating the economic
development of ghettoed and other declining corrnnunities.
that tax policy offers a more promising lead:
It may be
declaring areas of socia l
deficit elig ible sites for Fede ral, st a te and local tax incentive s of
various sorts for spe cifi e d kinds o f inv e stment and enterpris e .
The proposal is not new; but again, the Task Force can develop
its rationa le and explore its fe a sibility.
3.
The f low of nat iona l t ax r e sourc e s to sta t e s and mun ic ipa l iti e s,
(and to othe r qua si-public instrumentaliti e s for corrnnunity action).
The r eadi es t exampl e is the He ller Pl an, which -- along with othe r
proposa ls like the sha r ed-t ax -- ba dly n eeds r e sha ping to f it a d e cl a r ed
schedul e o f urb an needs and r eforms.
It seems cl ear the pre s ent
structure of Fede r a l gr ants pr oduce s a flow of r ev enu e s to th e l e sser
jurisd ic t i on s which i s too sma ll, too c a t egoric a l, to o i ncoher ent , and
too much i n t he c ontro l of s pe cia li z ed t e chn ici ans .
It a l so conc entrate s
on the a rt of grant sman s hip r a t he r tha n on per formanc e ; and it exa cts
sma ll change s i n b ehav i or fro m t h e bur eau c r ac i e s ra ther than ma j or
ch ange s and c onc ess ions fr om gov ernors and l eg is l a tur e s , mayor s and
c ounci l s ( e.g . , to b e e li g ibl e for a ma jor b lock gra nt from the ~d er ai
governme nt, a Sta t e mi ght b e aske d to expand and r esh a pe it s own
r ev enue s y s t em , and mak e some f undament a l changes i n i ts admini stra t i v e
structure and procedur e s ) .
�5
The Task Force might declare for an increased flm~ of Federal
revenues to the States and local governments through more generalized
I
I
grants, and begin to detail some of the more promising ways, means
and conditions.
(And now that the "growth sector" of central citi e s
se ems to be public and non-profit in character (education, health,
government, etc.), we might explore the possibility of expanding in
lien payments to those municipalities as a major reve,nue source.)
4.
The flow of nationa l resources into housing in de cl a r ed areas.
This flow has been too sma ll, too erratic, and off the geogyaphical
targets of need.
The Task Force mi ght review in the persp e ctive of
thirty years the efficacy of curr ent devic e s and (e.g. FHA 1 s)
conventional wisdom:
subsidies; etc.
mortgage insuranc e ; below-ma rket-int er es t-rate s;
There may be more powe rful levers than these, with
more consist e nt effects and ge og raphical accuracy.









There are othe r flows to c ons ider:
most important, th e flm~s of
people to and within the country I s met ropolitan areas, wi th a sp e cial
eye to the forces, inc ent ive s, etc ., which sti mu l a t e and shape thos e
flows.
For example, a low airline fare from Puerto Rico to oth er
metropolitan area s than New York might have l essened "The Puerto Rican
problem".


.


�THE WASHINGTON POST
January S, 1967
fi.lo Pv-ofit, No Jf-Jf o uses
The While House was well · advised to abandon
\he proposal for ~ national nonprofit housing
corpo r:ition to build in the slums. President Johnso n did ihe right thing. Disposing of that foredoo med idea clears the way for the more hopeful .
legislation , that, one hop es, will shortly attack the
housing shortage.
The concept of a nonprofit builder is, in itself,
an unfortunate one. It was in troduced 01iginally
to get certai n types of housin g subsidies for lowincome families through Con gress . The country
has now had quite enough experience to. know.·
.that non pro fit enterpri ses arc incap::iblc of produc- .
ing hous ing on a significant scale.
This country da°cs n ot insist up on · a non profit° ·.·
corporation to build the sup ersonic_ t ranspo rt,' oi·,·
. to develop the moon rockets. Con gress does not ··
_insist on nonp:ofit corporations in the h eav ily
subsidized shipbuilding industry, or in agriculture,
.or in. oil. Why single out housing? If we t ruly want
a massive volume of residential const ruction in
the big ci ties, then we shall have . to make it as·
profitable to build ho uses there as in the suburbs.
To make it profitable, Congress's most effe ctive
tool is the internal reven ue code. The power ·of
this method must be imm ediately visible to ::inyone who walks do wn Conn ectic ut ·A venue; if half
· a dozen obscure lines in the tax laws had b een
. written a bit diffe rently, the great office building
boom would never have h appened. The time h as
come to apply this same technique .to residential
construction in declining neighborl}oods. .
·
...
�NEW YORK T I ME S
J a nua r y 7, 196 7
s:~rc:al
~J
T h C' ::-; r-w Yo ii.'. TimC'!l
WA.J·rI~GTO::--r, J:rn . fJ - A
hi g h White Hou se sou rce said
Thursd::iy ni t t ha t the Admini~tr:ition w::is :;till seeking new
ways to lure private indust ry
into the urban r ehabi lit atio n
. fi eld in order to ex pioit new
technological meth ods of re . buildin g s lum s.
But the official. Jo.seph A.
Ca li ::rno Jr., sa id that a much , publicize pian fo r a nationwi de,
nonprofit corporatio:1 n ight not
be the best mech::inism fo · accomplishing this purpose.
Mr. Califano denied, however ,
r epeated rumors that the White
Hou.se, because o \\·ha t some
officials fel t was a premature
disclosu ·c of de:tails, had abandoned that plan .
The pla w - s f irst described
in The New York Times of
Nov. 27. It had been devc!oped
over a period of scvcr::t! months
by p ivate hou ing experts and
officials of the Department of
Housing and Urban Develop-.
ment.
Low-Interest l\for t.gages
T he main purpose of the non- 1
profit group, which would be :
called the Urba n Development '
Corporat·on, would be to lure
private mortgage money and
the private construction industry into the rehabilitation fi eld
on a large scale. The main indu cement would be long-term,
low-interest Government mortga6es.
Several Administration off icials said Thursday that U1e
plan, which reportedly never
reached President Johnson's
des:t, was viewed with consider able skepticism, in part because
it called for :i.caui ition of slum
properties by the Urban D evelopment Co rpor a tion itself .
This meant that the corporation might wind up holding a
great many s um properties for
which it could find neither buyer s nor ren ters.
' However, according to thes e
' officials, the notion of attract ' ing private enterp1·ise into the
' slum rehabil itation field j_s still
· very much alive.
· A ranking housing agency official said privately earlier this '
week th at ve rsions of the plan
were being refined t o meet
· White House obj ec ti ons. But h e
· conceded t hat the President's
Sta:e of the ,Union Message
would p1·oba bly contain no request for Congress ional action
to set up a nonprofit housin°'
grou~- _ _ _ _ _ _
7
�DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT
WASHINGTON, D. C.
20410
DEC 8
1%G
OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY
FOR DEMONSTRATIONS AND INTERGOVERNMENTAL RELATIONS
Mrs. Ann Moses
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
30303
Dear Mrs • Moses :
In reply to your questions of Bovember 29, 1966, Mayor Allen
will receive payment of $lll.10 which covers his transportation
expenses and per diem for the meeting on October 28. He will
also receive $200.00 consultant fee which covers his travel t:illle
on October 27 and the day of the meeting on October 28.
For the meeting on Bovember 28, he will be reimbursed for the
transportation costs and $16.oo per diem plus $100.00 consultant
fee. We need more details, h011ever, for preparation of the
voucher for which you sent a ticket receipt. Please have the
Mayor furnish the information on the attached form and return
it to me and I will have a voucher prepared for his signature.
I have enclosed additionaJ. forms for use in :future meetings.
You may send me the compl.eted work sheet and ticket receipt
a:rter each meeting and we will have vouchers pre]!)ared for his
signature.
Sincerely Yours,
~ argen~
Administrative Officer
Enclosures
�Department of Housing and Urban Development
HUD-75
(1-66)
TRAVEL EXPENSE RECORD
Traveler:
Mailing Address:
GOING
Taxi:
From


To
Residence or Office
Left:

St a ti on or Airport
City
Arrived:
·Time

City
Taxi:
From

St a ti on or Airport
Date
$
.
a .m.
p.m. Via _ _ _ _ __
Carrier
a .m.
p.m.
Time
To _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $ _ _ _ _ _ __
Hotel or U.S. Govt. Off.
RETURNING
Taxi:
From
$
To
Station or Airport
Hotel or U. S . Govt. Office
a.m.
p .m. Via
Left:
Date
City
a.m.
p.m.
Arrived:
Date
City
Tax i:
Carrier
Time
Time
$
To
From
Station or Airport
Residence or Office
J\w om1t _
W-a 111b~r
,Retiidtks
�Department of Housing and Urban Development
HUD-75
(1-66)
TRAVEL EXPENSE RECORD
Traveler:
Mailing Address:
GOING
Taxi:
From

Residence or Office
To _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $ _ _ _ _ _ __
Station or Airport
a .m.
Left:
p.m. Via

City
Arrived:
Date
From

Station or Airport
Carrier
a.m.
p.m.
City
Taxi:
Time
Date
Time
To _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $_ _ _ _ _ __
Hotel or U.S. Govt. Off.
RETURNING
Taxi:
From
$
To
Station or Airport
Hotel or U. S . Govt. Office
a . m.
Left :
~.m. Via
City
Date
Time
Carrier
a .m.
p.m.
Arrived:
City
Taxi:
Date
$
To
From
Station or Airport
Residence or Office
'l:rilR8J!!16PtatioR Reqa~t
1'J;.ictmber
Time
Pf Olli
�HUD-107
DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT
(6-66)
REQUEST FOR COMPENSATION FOR PER DIEM PERSONNEL
(Subait original only
at
clou of pay period)
I
DIVISION OF FINANCE AND ACCOUNTS
TO:
Date_l-2~/~1~6~/~
66- - -
Office of th Secretary
FROM:
(Office or Division)
EMPLOYEE:
(Branch)

=Iv~an=.. .A


=l=l=e=n------==-J-=-r--·._ _ _ _ _




EMPLOYED BY:
Appointment effective
.or
Contract effective
TITLE:
- - - - ~C~!lm
= a~l~t=ah=t_ _ _ _ _ __
10/27/ 66
Per diem salary$ _____1_0_0~•-0_0_____
Pay period:
From: _ _12-C..:,_/4=
· _ _ _ _ _ _ _ to _ _ _ _ _ _
1 2----'/'-1_7:...;/_66
_ _ , 19 _ _ incl.
HOURS ·woRKED
DATE
DAY
SUN
MON
TU ES
WED
HOURS
I certify that I have performed services under the above listed appointment or
contract for the hours indicated.
{Signature of Eaployee)
I certify that the employee named herein performed services for the hou r s indicated an d request that he be compensated therefor in accordance with the terms of
his app ointment or contract .
Ad.mini trative O fie .r
{Title of Supervising Officer )
(Signa t ure)
FOR USE BY PAYROLL SECTION
�DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN D.EVELOPMENT
(Submit
I.
TRAVB. ORDER - REQUEST AND AUTHORIZATION
na.•...._ft_..1....1,,_/_1/
.....',f......,._f.._--1
to Travel Sectwn at least five worJMng da111s adva'lLCe of proposed tra-oel)
,n
a.
2, OFFICIAL STATION
NAME
Atlanta, Gao
Allen, Ivan
5. TITLE
ITINERARY
BOOM a BLDCJ.
4, STATUS OF TRAVELER,
hll N
6. DIVISION Oli OFFICE
Consultant
a.
HUD-25
(11-65)
7,
D
EMPLOYEE
OfHEli
PKONB
2158h
DIR
(IMZude place of depa,rture, all stop011ers or places to be v1..sited, and place of return)
Atlanta, Gao to Washington, DoCo. and other cities within the continental
limits of the United States as directed by the Secretary
FROM:
Atlanta, Ga.
AND RETURN TO:
~
PURPOSE OF TRAVEL,
9.
to meet with various city officials and urban s pecialists on problems affecting
urban areas
10 .
MODE OF TRAVEL,
[Jc A. Common carrier except extra fare.
[3C B.
Privately-owned automobile on a mileage basis at a rate of
~J
r per mile:
fi 1. Limited to not exceed the cost of travel by common carrier including per diem.
D 2. Provided it has been administratively determined in advance that because of the nature of your duties travel
by private conveyance is necessary and more advantageous to the Government than the use of common carrier.
D 3. Travel wholly within limits of official station.
D C. Other
(Specify)
1t .
REMARKS :
12.
E FFECTIVE ON OR ABOUT:
REQUESTED
11/ 1/66
BY
16 . SIGNATURE
19 . TERMINATING ON OR ABOUT:
6/30/67
14.
N U MBER OF
D AYS
IN TRAVEL 8TATU81
RECOMMENDED
h5 days
IS .
PROGRAM :
GDS
0212
$16
FOR USE BY TRAVEL SECTION AND
D ATE
11/ 10/ 66
PER DIEM RATE
/
,
DO NOT WRITE BELOW THIS LINE TRAVEL ORD E R NO.
BY
l7 . 11
~./14~.
£:?t .~ Off"icer
~ · ,rr ui dtra ive
l?
Sh
IGNATURE
OFFICER
APPROPRIAT ION SYMBOL
ESTIMATE D
COST
MILEAGE

AUTHORIZING
H O USEHOLD EFFECTS

8670100 S&E HUD-OS 1967
S
MODE OF TRAVEL IS AUTHORIZED AS INDICATED IN ITEM 10
A or B-1 in order s t ated.
You are hereby authorized to t ravel at Gover nment expense, t o be paid from available appropriations, in accordance with
Standardized Government Travel Regula t ions as amended, Regulat ions of theb
part ment , and
conditions noted on
!this order.
1/r.
\/\A \...tl:,Qi,,
-
Executive Officer
Office of General Services
(TITLE OF A U TH O R I ZING O FFICER)
If~,
/ifilP
Grace M. Callinan
(S I GNATURE )
THE NUMBER AND DATE ON THIS ORDER MUST BE REFERRED TO ON YOUR VOUCHER
TRAVELERS COPY
~
�HU0-107
DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT
(6-66)
REQUEST FOR COMPENSATION FOR PER DIEM PERSONNEL
(Subait original only at clo,e of pay period)
TO:
FROM:
Date _ _ll_/_20_/_6_6_ _
DIVISION OF FINANCE AND ACCOUNTS
Office of SeQretary
(Office or Division)
(Branch)
Consultant
EMPLOYEE: _ _I_v_an
__
A_lle_n_J_r_._ _ _ _ _ _ TITLE:
EMPLOYED BY:
Appointment effective
.or
Contract effective
10/27/66
100.00
Per diem salary$ ____________
_
Pay period:
11/20
12/3/66 , 19_ _ incl.
From: ____________
to ____________
HOU RS_
DATE
DAY
SUN
MON
TU ES
WED
THURS
FRI
SAT
·wo RK [O
SUN
.,
MON
TUES
WED
THURS
FRI
SAT
TOTAL
HOURS
HOURS
I certify that I have performed services under the above listed appointment or
contract for the hours indicated.
(Signature of Eaploy.,.,)
I certify that the employee named herein performed services for the hours indicated and request that he be compensated therefor in accordance with the terms of
his appointment or contract .
(Title of Supervising Officer)
( Signature)
FOR USE BY PAYROLL SECTION
�r
NOTIFICATION OF PERSONNEL ACTION
STANDARD FORM SO-Rev. Decem ber 1961
U.S. Clwll Service Commission
FPM Chap. 295
6 PART
(EMPLOYEE - See General Information on Reverse)
5 0-1 26
(FOR AGENCY USE)
schedule fie., A-8
I. NAME (CAPS) LAST-FIRST-M IDDLE
ALLEN, IVAN
JR.,
I
9. FEGLI
2 I 1-<:OVERED
171
MR.
3-10 PT. DISAB.
4-·10 PT. COMP.
4. SOCIAL SECURITY NO.
03-J.5-ll
252-10-5552
IO. RETIREMENT
Excepted Appt
06- 30-67
NTE
3. BIRTH DATE
(Mo .• Dag. Year)
7. SERVICE COMP. DATE
0
5-10 PT. OTHER
3-WAIVED
2- INELIGIBLE
' " " " o;,rno,
1
2. (FOR AGENCY USE)
6. TEN URE GROUP
5. VETERAN PREFERENCE
1-NO
Z-5 PT.
"coo,
MR.- MISS-MRS.
-
I 1-CS
2- FICA
2
13. EFFECTIVE DATE
(Mo., Dag, Year)
Interorlttent
11. (FOR CSC USE)
3-FS
4-NONE
16. PAY PLAN AND
OCCUPATION CODE
5-OTHER
14. CIVIL SERVICE OR6iTHER LEGAL AUTHORITY
Public law
10-27-66
15. FROM: POSITION TITLE AND NUMB~R
8. PHYol5AL HANDICAP CODE
csc
oo,
section 15 and
Letter dated 09-09-54
17. (a) GRADE ( b) STEP
OR
OR
LEVEL
RATE
18. SALARY
I
r
\
r
t
19. NAME AND LOCATION OF EMPLOYING OFFICE
21. PAY PLAN AND
20. T O : POSITlON TITLE AND NUMBER
OCCUPATION CODE
22. (a) GRADE
OR
LEVEL
(b) STEP
23. SALARY
OR
RATE
pd $100.00
Consultant
I
24. NAME AND LOCATION OF EMPLOYING OFFICE
Damediate Of'fice of the secretary, washington, D. c.
Resideace: Atlanta, Georgia
126. LOCATION CODE
25. DUTY STATION (Ciig-countg- Slale)
washimgton,
o. c.
oB-0010-001
27. APPROPRIATION
28. POSITION OCCUPIED
29. APPORTIONED POSITION
1-<:OMPETITIVE SERVICE
FROM,
~
~- REMARKS:
I
IA. SUBJECT TO COMPLETION OF 1
TO :
I
-I 2-EXCEPTED
SERVICE
1-PROVED-1
2-WAIVED-Z
STATE
I
I
YEAR PROBATIONARY (OR TRIAL) PERIOD COM MENCING
L_J B. SERVICE COUNTING TOWARD CAREER (OR PERMANENT) TENURE FROM :
r--7
L___J
SEPARATIONS: SHOW REASONS BELOW. AS REQUIRED. CHECK IF APPLICABLE:
C. DURING
PROBATION
CJ D. FROM APPOINTMENT OF
Ineligible for hea.lth benefits. No regular tour of duty.
premium hol iday pay. No annual or sick l eave benefits.
6
MONTHS OR LESS
No overtime or
Speeial Govemment Employee
It is estimated that services will be required for approxi mately 20 days .
ibis action was approved by the Secretary
66
ers~el
31_._0_
A_TE
_ ~_Fl_~_
plPO
_~_
N_T -M-EN
-T
- AF
_ F_l_DA_V
_I_T_(A_«_..,_,._n,_o_n/g
_)_ _ _ _---'_ _ _~•34. SIGNA T
(Or olher
U
auJlienJI
R
Df.ca
lionre)
~,AC
~
NtoD
~
lrTLEO
T
32. OFFICE MAINTAINING PERSONNEL FOLDER (If differenlfrom anplogin1 q/fice)
-
Division or Personnel, washington,
33. COQ_~
HU
n.
EMPLOYI NG DEPARTMENT OR AGENCY
Ul.l DID.JD,
Of'fiee of the Secretary
1. EM LOY££ C Y
35. DA TE
J.0=25 =66
J.144
�sr~ ARWOm _
Revised
,.
D
December 19-41
gev~NrfTieE-fO EM PLOY.--.._.......
KEEP~illi D~ CUMENT FOR ~OUR RECORDS. ITIS YOUR COPY OF THE OFFICIAL
Of A PER
P10t1i'J1J UU AH Y ERJlOR TO THE ATTENTION @f YOUR S1WERVI
-
-
a sI>b:c.o_v;;q p:
I. Conditions Pertinent To A ll Types of Personn I Act'o
The pe rsonn el acti on ident ified o n the fc ce of this fo rm is sub ject lo
all app li ca bl e lows, r ul es, an d reg ula tions governin g Fed eral e mploy·
m ent and may be su bj ect to investi gati on an d app rova l by th e Civi l
·e
Servic,-_fo ~ss~n.f. ~ ~~cl~Q' m~1~or.!~fe6Jll1Cel~ fJ" o
ac cordan ce· wit h a ll le~a l req u,r~ $, o r if ba se d upon your mis·
roprtal ion er fraud ,
8bG f9T
_
- GOiJ~LSq
fo r su ch po;ifi o n,. Such a ppointments d o not confer a co mpetil iva
c ivil se rv ic e sta tus or e li g ibility for move men t to jobs in the com peli•
l ive se rvic e; th e y ma y be mode without restrictions on tenure, with a
condit io nal Or ind efin ite li mi tation, or with a d efin ite lime limi tation.
A tri a l e a~ d mqy be r~yj ~ otJb.e discfetiA~ of Iha e mploying office.
~O ~ OD I.OX!IW+~JA 50 {pA~
Ill. I nfo rmation About Tenu,e Group&
bJOAGG
Emp loye<K ore ra nked in tenure groups according to the natu re of
th eir oppoin tmeti t; tho.se with unrest ricted tenure are, placed in Gro up I,
under conditional oppoin tmen ts whi ch a uto matically lead
arc ,. J6:lAG 143.215.248.55
to
t en ure j1~ a ~
r~fl,¥,'?-<l..WJ.d w<94oul furt hGr quolificolion
voP~ mam"fi.t;~ Ji,o . P ~ntP inn~ ~ T,~m¢il i,


.s&-,ra-
r..


1'/,h $leJia ~ oup IJ~~ d l ~~ e s6rtin•g UR ~ tem porary or indafinite
ap po intm..,ls not li mited to pa el(Qct lime,.or dote ore .placed in Group
n:dory" Uf1 lo5.5 • umil .yeu or.e nelffiec olherwru, .
111 . W ithin each tenure group, ranking is deter mined by vetfJC'an praf•
119 and HI sh,,w the, comnu,n t,,,,e, of ,-.,..oll deductfons: "FEGll"
e r&ii ce, J>...-for monoo roting, oa d total Fe d e ral sec-vie • . If it shoul d
for Federal Emp loyee5 Group Life ilmlrnnce, ,.CS" for Civi l Service Rolteco me neceuory t• red uce fo rce, employee, are selecteid for sepdre •
tire ;,, ant, "F IC A" fe r Secial SecU<ity, e1eul K' ' for Fo<ei gn Servica.
lion or cha nge le lewer grade acco rdin g lo this general ran king. EinAdditional aleduction, ma y Joe mt1ae un oler the Fed er al Emplo yees
pl oy- san ing un cl...- competitive appointments and those serving und•
Hea lth Benefits pro grnm, 011d fer i111.eme l01<e,, bond$, and other pur•
excep te.i oppa inl llleftli are ran ke d se parately fo r red ucti on. ia force
,-... wfloenw by l• w,
Q('AG L
U~
I n addltion, th e g rade of the p• ~lion I• w.h ich you are officiaUy
cnsig ned may be reviewed and CCJC'.-ectetl by y• 11r e111ency personnel offi.t:e,
er b y ~ .9*/icJJ€1:1i,I, ;,,;/,. D8 • •
JAO tJOU/'SJ QI,.
rurr
~:a,-
"""'~'
IV. lnformcanon About Your
. ln~.«m~;11$~.N~'1.~ .
n•
Appointmants to 11osltions in the c .....,.eifffve service :

C
The CMI
Se rvice Acl pla cas mast po~Hi o ~ - in tbe " c:ampalitive s...-vi<:o ..
Tho
C iv il Se rvic e Commi ss io n sets qMal ificotio n r eq uirements ond control,
re cr uitment for such positions. A,• general rule, persons selected
from c · i
r.xJ'r!.JJytistp.;+tp..f~J coel¥'uil\ •0
&J~..bi'-£:X. tit'
se r>lice re 01~1' ccfreer-Yo1!~~on~I op oiillrMnts. 143.215.248.55tippoi ntm •
c,re secured through direct competition with oth e r m.!mbers of the
g e,.., ral !JV 11c -~ing sifflilor w..k In Oovarnmenl agenci es, and p. r-
Statvc /Ii_
_ If yo<J e ra separated or placed in a non pay s tatus for
r
an aJctendecf
pariod, your employing a gency will furni,h you with Stan d a rd Fo rm I
lo ii y ~ ~ ts(jgoi,
loy me nt in sura nce be nefits. If you
wer e covered by the civil sorvic• reti re me nt sy,te m or Federa l employa .Cup lifa insura nce, yo u have previou sly been furnished ce rt ifi •
cot es d escribing th eH p rograms; yo u co n re fer to such certificot• s fe r
infer mot io n re3-,rdin9 )'Our rig~ts and pouible benefits ofter separation,
gsrrc,•
ep:ru
,,.
.,
e»•·
m·t qualifi ed employe es lo be ossi!JnOd without furth er compe'iliv,. ex•
c mi n o l ~ ~ ~ t - i n the competitive s«vice. Coraer·conditi o no l
c, p poinl'ments'Uc"o';;.;'fc,raer oppointme" ts vpen completion of 3 years
of ,oiostontiolly cont inuc,us creditable -viae.
If yo u ore se pa ra ted from O career or coreer•co nditional ap pointment,
you mot hove reinstotem-,it eligi bility O
il' r,clly to an y
O 'J'
Fe de ra l activity onol may
employed witho ut f urt hsr co mpe ti tive, ex•
am1not ion ; if yo u ore a nonveteran and you mo se parated fro m •
~he rinl year folio.wing a nenlenoporory oem,..iitiv• appointrnefW oen·~---arolly ·s a probo tionorx period, .i.rinJt wloial, period o., OP.point<>« mu,t
tla,wonstrote his full compele nco and fit neu for Federal employment.
Rei nsta te men ts o re als o sub je ct la e IN'obo tion ory perio d un less o ne
was pre viou sly co mpl etad. Tro" sfen, 1"'0111otion s, chan ges to lo wer
gr ade, and reassignm ents duri ng a Jt~
ienory period era su bj ect la
core cr·condi tion.al ap po int ment y.our eli g ibility fOf' r• nstoler,-,t i, gen•
erolly limited to 3 years fro.., tho dole of se poro ti o n. If you o re sepo•
rot ed fro n o tsmporory or ex ce pt ed appointment, you heve no rai" •
·,tote mont privi leg• bo-i upon ooch - vice.
ce mpiet ic!,,
of
probotien,
Tempo rary ap pointmen ts do not c:enfer a ci vil service stotus and do
n o t le ad to a car eer o r c a re e r-conditional appo intm e nt w ithout som e
furth er e xamina tion or quol ificol ioR , l imi tad te mpo rary ap po intme nts
ore mode when l he re is no cont inu in g. need for a perso n·s se rvice, re·
go rd less of the mo!!.,rier in ~hJ ch_!'~ fiU olifie d for oppo intmenl: occe~toncc o f such o ~ m e nt wi M n ot re}nove a pe rson ' s name fr om a ci vit
Servi;;;.\rgi, te r
(;S.~C!,o latbe-"ro~or.iq,~~ iti ono l
appoi nt ment.
&ppo intments ta positions in the ex cepted service: Excepted
OPP.o intme nts ore mode to positions which ore excepted from the com·
pet,tive service' by low or other special o utho rity. Generally the em·
p loyi ng a gency set s q ual ification requi rements and cond ucts recruitment






You will be gi ven °"Y lump sum poymant that may be d ue you fo r an•
nu o l leave at th • time of separation, Refund of on appropriate portioA
of this p·o yment will be req uired if you ore reemployed in a Federal
a gency in o posi tion und er the some leave syst e m during the period
covered by such pa ymen t.
V. Availability of Further Information
Consult you r sup gisor if you hov;'...S uestions ab~~ tJ,he above stole•
o r the e nt . ~n m
ciU.A-~litr matters
co n~~rni ng your ~ ~ lrne nt~ '.:'nis , "'J(g.:\icu c;,qjfi~ oil'~ n
lion, invo lving gran ting of leave. assi gnment of du ties, and hours of
worlr. which ore generally under his con trol , If your q uest ions ore technical , your supervisor may refer you to your pers onn e l office, which will
.~nr.
,~hf'1flff~ft. ....
hove copies o f control ling civ il service re gulat io ns, as we ll a s yo ur in ..
d ividuol records, and so con best e xp lain ho w tti){y: app ly in your case,
C'~-T - T
U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFF ICE: 1966-0- 224 - 095
�'r.
STAND
7iAi~~;;
101 2-A
TRAVEL VOUCHER
1/ ,
j•
'I',,-.~-,_.,.
'i
~
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MEMORANDUM
1012-2os
,

,,---------,---------,-,----,------r-------------------· t'
DEPARTMENT. BUREAU, oR EsTAausHMENT
,, r - J
. '-"
··- 1· -- ....~ ·, ·'
vo ucHER N o .
Department. of Housin.,, & Urban nemlopaent
PAYEE 'S NA.ME
I
SCHEDULE NO.
I '
Honorable Ivan A1Jen
MAILING AD DRESS
PAID BY
·· : : : : DUW STATlDN
RES>DENCS
• o.
I
FROM (DAT E)
10/27
~-
Outstanding
10/28/ 66
APPLICABLE- TRAV JJL AUTHORIZATION (S) 1·-_A_rn_9_u_nt_ to_be_,p_p_l_ie_d ___ 1-- - -·-· ._ -_,_ .
I
NO.
D ATE


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CHECK N O .
TRAVEL ADVANCE
~
TO (DATE)
'I','.
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B:i l3 nce to rem::tin
outstand ing
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• ...
FOR TRAVEL AND OTHER EXPENSES
't
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TRANSPORTATION REQUESTS ISSUED
. . . ,. . . -..r--·,. . . ,. . , ._. . . . .

'
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MODE, CLASS
OF SERV ICE,
AND ACCOMMODATIONS •
IN ITIALS OF
CARRIER
ISSUING
TICKET
AGENT'S
VALUATION
OF TICKET
TRANSPORTATION
REQUEST NUMBER
"!P""~;--r'-~..,..... -;-r-,
... ,~.7""·---
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DATE
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APPRO VED ( S11pervisory and other appro m ls w hen 1·eq11ire1 )
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NEXT PREVIOUS VO UCH ER PAID U DER SAl\lE TRAVEL AUTHOR fr~Y
VOU CMCR N O .
0. 0 .
SYMITO I.
DATE (MO NllM- YF.AR )
,.
, .. •.•,1,-
Applied to tr,-·cl adrn nc (app,opri,tion symbQl)
N ET il'O
T RA V.ElER
ACCOUNTlI G GLASSllFJCATfON
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e Abbreviations fot Pullma'! ac ornrnodations: '.MR, m,ste r (0om; DR, d raw ing room; P. cnmpartmcnl ; BR. bed roo m: DSR . d uplex single room;
DRM, duplex roomette; SOS, single oc upancy section; LB, lower berth ; UB, upper berth; I.B--UB, lower ~nil ugpec berth; S, seat.


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T otal veri fie d co rrect for ch,rge to appropri , tion (si
l\l, roomette;
c48-16--7863 C- 2
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(DATE)
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(HOUR)
(LOCATION )
(DATE OF ARRIVAL)

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l :143.215.248.55,
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- -----,,- - - - - - ' - - - - - - - _ _ ; _ - -- - - -- - - - -- - 1- -- - - - - - - - - - '~·~d~
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SCHEDULE OF EXPENSES AND AMOUNTS CLAIMED
PREVIOUS TEMPORARY DU1Y ( Complete these blocks only if in t,·avel status i mmediately prior to period covered by this voucher and if admin·
iJtratively req11ired )
,
·
DEPARTURE FROM OFFICIAL STATION
TEMPORARY DUTY STATION LAST DAY OF PRECEDu.'\lG VOUCHER PERIOD


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...
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AUTHORIZED
MILEAGE
DATE
'I
NATURE OF EXPENSE
-:..........
c.;1._,.it:nv1e1
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_R_AT_E_-_--~----¢ - -I - -S r EEDOMErnn No. or,
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~ tu1"'91'+,-.ws--P.0 f"".t""':y----iJiAll~
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·r.-:t:f-lF.it'ft-l- --1'.tmd,a'I\'1~ w-l'bc,
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[i1nJ1,:;;i,;'~
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1Y Atlanta 6100 ffl QA Delta Airl.1tJ
"--===-- l·-
AMOUNT CLAIMED
{
Oa. 1:29 PM
Grand total
to
face of voucher
(Subtotals, to be carried for ward if necessary )
-
- ,-~--11--.~ -
- - __ ,____...,_
- -
---
- ---
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(
HU0-107
DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT
( 6-66)
REQUEST FOR COMPENSATION FOR PER DIEM PERSONNEL
(Subait original only
TO:
at
clou of pay period)
6_6 _ __
Date_ll/_7_/_
DIVISION OF FINANCE AND ACCOUNTS
Office of Secretary
FROM:
(Office or Division)
(Bran cit)
EMPLOYEE: ___I_van_
· _A_l_l_en
________ TITLE:
·Consultant
EMPLOYED BY:
Appointment effect ¾ve
'or
Contract effective
-:
.;.
.
.
Per diem salary$ --l-OOt1-w-;~o~o~------From: ---±l±l,,-.,,f6e1</~6*'6----- to _ ___.,].....
]-,.../....
] 9..,_,_,/6~6-----, 19 _ _ in cl.
p ay Period:
HOURS ·woRK[D
DATE
DAY
SUN
HOURS
I certify that I have performed services under the above listed appointment or
contract for the hours indicated.
(Signature of Eaployee)
I certify that the employee named herein performed services for the hours indicated and request that he be compensated therefor in accordance with the terms of
his appointment or contract.

~
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-

..
Administrative Offi cer
(T i tle of Superuising Officer)
(Signa t ure)
FOR USE BY PAYROLL SECTION

..
'
�'
\
DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT
WASHINGTON,
OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY
Honorable Ivan Allen
Mayor
Atlanta, Georgia
D.C.
20410
October 25, 1966
~
rV' L
Dear Mayor Allen:
The Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Develop
t, desires
to appoint you for a period of 60 days, as Consultant, $100.00 per
day under authority of Section 15, Public Law 600. · A member of the
Secretary's Staff will advise you of the days on which he desires
your services during this period of employment. When you are in an
authorized travel status, your travel expenses will be paid, and in
addition, a $16.00 per diem allowance in lieu of subsistence will
be paid.
You will serve as Consultant to advise the Secretary on Urban Development matters.
The Civil Service Commission requires that we furnish you a copy of
the Department's Standards of Conduct regulations. Please note that
they identify employees in the category to which you are being appointed as " Special Government Employee", and requires them, · at the
time of employment to supply the Department with a statement of
other employment and financial interests. The enclosed Form HUD - 844-A,
" Statement of Employment and Financial Interest," should be completed
and the original returned in the self-addressed envelope furnished
with this letter . The duplicate copy is for your records. The
information you f urnish will be accessible only to those Department
employees having official duties in connection with your appointment.
If this appointment is acceptable to you, please so indicate by
signing on the space provided on the enclosed copy o f this letter
and return it to this Office.
Sincerely yours,
D~f~
Directo r of Personnel
Enc;losures
�DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT
WASHINGTON,
D.C.
20410
November 4, 1966
OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY
Honorable Ivan Allen
Mayor
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mayor Allen:
With regard to your appointment as Consultant with the Department
of Housing and Urban Development, there are certain f~rms which
are required to be completed.
Enc.losed
and Form
Columbia
that you
you show
is Form W-4, Employee Withholding Exemption Certificate
FR-144, Certificate of Non-Liability for District of
Withholding Tax which are self-explanatory. Please note
must print your :f'ull name. It is al.so requested that
your zip code.
Please answer items 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7 on the reverse side of the
Standard Form 61, Appointment Affidavit, and sign the front in
the presence of a Notary Public.
Please return these forms as soon.as possible in the enclosed
self-addressed envelope.
Sincerely yours,
£~~
{!,
"or
~WA
Edward C. Williams ~
Chief, Employee Standards
and Examining Branch
Enclosures
�DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT
WASHINGTON,
D.C. 20410
November
4~ 1966
OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY
Jfono ble I
Allen
Mayor
Atlanta, Georgia
J)es.r
-;yor Allen:
With reg
d to your ppointment as Consultant with th
UE!lrJH..f'Llllent
o.f Housing and Urban Devel ent, there ar certain fom.s which
r~quired to be c 1 ted.
·
Enclosed is Fo:rm W-4,. Employ e ithholding Exemption Certific te
and Form R-144, Cert fie to of Non...Liabillty for District of
Columbi
i thholding
·m1cb re sel£-e,""'..,.._..,""'tory. Ple e note
that you must print yaur f"uJ.l name. It is
so requested that
you sho your zip code.
Please e.nswer items 1, 2,, 3, 5, and 7 on the reverse side of the
dard orm 61, Appointment A.ttidavit, and ign the front in
the pre ence of a otary blic.
Pl. se return the
fo
self• ·a:re s d. envelope.
soon
po sible in the enclos d
ince~ your,
lo
a
�,r
/
O RGANIZATIONS DESIGNATED UNDER EXECUTIVE O RDER NO. 10450
Compiled from Memoronda of the Atto rney Ge ne ral dote d April 2 9, July 15, Septe4, be r 28, 1953; Jonuory 22, 195 4; April 4 , Septe mber 2 1, O cto be r 20 , 1955;
Octo ber 4, 19 5 7; a nd July 18 , 195 8
CONSOLIDATED LIST-JULY 18, 1958
Th is list is prepared solely for the information o f Fedenl civi lia n officers lnd employees and for the convenience n( persons completing appl ications fo r Federal employment.
Membership in or affi liation with a designated organiu rion is one facto r to be consider ed by the departments :a nd a~encies of the Federal Government in connection .,,.ith the
cmpl9yment or retention in employment of individuals in Federa l service.
Abraham Lincoln Brigade
Abraham Lincoln School, Chicago, Illinois
Action Committee to Free Spain Now
Alabama People's Educational Association (see Communist Political
Association )
American Association for Reconstruction in Yugoslavia, Inc.
American Branch of the Federation of G reek Maritime Unions
American Christian Nationalist Party
American Committee for European Workers' Relief ( see Socialist
W orkers Party)
American Commi ttee for Protection of Foreign Born
American Committee for Spanish Freedom
American Committee for the Settlement of Jews in Birobidjan, Inc.
American Committee for Yugoslav Relief, Inc.
American Committee to Survey Labor Conditions in Europe
American Council for a Democratic Greece, formerly known as the
Greek American Council ; Greek American Committee for N ational
Unity
American Council on Soviet Relations
American Croatian Congress
American Jewish Labor Council
American League Against W ar and Fascism
American Lea11ue for Peace and Democracy
American N ational Labor Party
American N ational Socialist League
American National Socialist Party
American N ationalist Party
American Patriots, Inc.
American Peace Crusade
American Peace Mobilization
American Poles for Peace
Ameri.can Polish Labor Council
American Polish League
American Rescue Ship Mission (a project of the United American
Spanish Aid Committee )
American-Russian Fraternal Society
American Russian Institute, N ew York, also known as the American
Russian Institute for Cultural Relations with the Soviet Union
American Russian Institute, Philadelphia
American Russian Institute of San Francisco
American Russian Institute of Southern California, Los Angeles
American Slav Congress
American Women for Peace
American Youth Congress
American Youth for D emocracy
Armenian Progressive League of America
Associated Klans of America
Association of Georgia Klans
Association of German Nationals /Rekhsdeutsche Vereinigung )
Ausland-Organization der NSD AP, O verseas Branch of Nazi Party
Baltimore Forum
Benjamin Davis Freedom Committee
Black Dragon Society
Boston School for Marxist Studies, Boston, Massachusetts
Bridges-Robertson-Schmidt D efense Committee
Bulgarian American People's League of the United States of America
California Emergency Defense Committee
California Labor School, Inc., 32 1 Divisadero Street, San Francisco,
California
Carpatho-Russian People's Society
Central Council of American W omen of Croatian Descent, also known
as Central Council of American Croatian W omen, N ational Council
of Croatian W omen
Central Japanese Association ( Beikoku Chuo N ipponjin Kai)
Central Japanese Association of Southern California
Central O rganization of the German-American N ational All iance
(Deutsche-Amerikanische Einheitsfront )
Cervantes Fraternal Society
China W elfare Appeal, Inc.
Chopin Cultural Center
Ci tizens Committee for Harry Bridges
Citizens Committee of the U pper West Side (New York City )
Citizens Committee to Free Earl Browder
Citizens Emergency Defense Conference
Citizens Protective League
Civil Liberties Sponsoring Committee of Pittsburgh
Civil Rights Congress and its affil iated organizations, including:
Civil Rights Congress for Texas
Veterans Against Discrimination of Civil Rights Congress of New
York
Civil Rights Congress for Texas ( see Civil Rights Congress)
Columbians
Comite Coordinador Pro Republica Espanola
10385- 104
Comite Pro Derechos Civiles
( See Puerto Rican Comite Pro Libertades Civiles)
Committee for a Democratic Far Eastern Policy
Committee for Constitutional and Political Freedom
Committee for Nationalist Action
Committee for Peace and Brotherhood Festival in Philadelphia
Committee for the Defense of the Pittsburgh Six
Committee for the Negro in the Arts
Committee for the Protection of the Bill of Rights
Committee for W orld Youth Friendship and Cultural Exchange
Committee to Abolish D iscrimination in Maryland
( See Congress Against Discrimination ; Maryland Congress Against
Discrimination; Provisional Committee to Abolish Discrimination
in the State of Maryland)
Committee to Aid the Fighting South
Committee to D efend Marie Richardson
Committee to Defend the Rights and Freedom of Pittsburgh's Political
Prisoners
Committee to Uphold the Bill of Rights
Commonwealth College, Mena, Arkansas
Communist Party, U. S. A., its subdivisions, subsidiaries and affiliates
Communist Political Association, it,s subdivisions, subsidiaries and
affiliates, including:
Alabama People's Educational Association
Florida Press and Educational League
Oklahoma Lell&ue for Political Education
People's Educational and Press Association of Texas
Virginia League for People's Education
Congress Against Discrimination
(See Committee to Abolish Discrimination in Maryland)
Congress of American Revolutionary Writers
Congress of American W omen
Congress of the U nemployed
Connecticut Committee to Aid Victims of the Smith Act
Connecticut State Youth Conference
Council for J obs, Relief and H ousing
Council for Pan-American D emocracy
Council of G reek Americans
Council on African Affairs
Croatian Benevolent Fraternity
D ai N ippon Butoku Kai (M ilitary Virtue Society of Japan or Military
Art Society of Japan)
D aily Worker Press Club
Daniels Defense Committee
Dante Alighieri Society (between 1935 and 1940)
Dennis D efense Committee
Detroit Youth Assembly
East Bay Peace Committee
Elsinore Progressive League
Emergency Conference to Save Spanish Refugees ( founding body of the
North American Spanish Aid Commi ttee )
Everybody's Committee to Outlaw W ar
Families of the Baltimore Smith Act Victims
Families of the Smith Act Victims
Federation of Italian War Veterans in the U. S. A., Inc. (Associazione
Nazionale Combattenti ltaliani, Federazione degli Stati Uniti
d'America )
Finnish-American Mutual Aid Society
Florida Press and Educational League ( see Communist Political Association)
Frederick D ouglass Educational Center
Freedom Stage, Inc.
Friends of the N ew Germany (Freunde des N euen D eutschlands)
Friends of the Soviet Union
Garibaldi American Fraternal Society
George W ashins:ton Carver School, N ew York City
German-American Bund (Amerikadeutscher Volksbund)
German-American Republican League
German-American Vocational League (Deutsche-Amerikanische Berufsgemeinschaft )
Guardian Club
Harlem Trade Union Council
Hawaii Civil, Liberties Committee
Heimusha Kai, also known as Nokubei Heieki G imusha Kai, Zaibel
N ihoni in, Heipku Gimusha Kai, and Zaibei Heimusha Kai (Japanese Residing in America Military Conscripts Association)
Hellenic-American Brotherhood
H inode Kai (Imperial J apanese Reservists)
Hinomaru Kai ( Rising Sun Flag Society-a group of Jl!panese War
Veterans )
Hokubei Zaigo $hoke Dan (North American Reserve Officers Association )
CSC FORM 385
REVISED AUGUST 1958
�Hollywood W rit ers Mobiliza tion fo r D efense
Hungarian-Am erican Cou ncil for Democracy
Hungarian Brotherhood
Idaho Pension Union
Independent Party (Seattle, Washington)
(See Independent Peo pl e's Party)
Independent People's Part)'
( See Independent Party)
Industrial Workers of the World
Internacional Labor Defense
International Workers Order, its subdivisions, subsidiaries and affiliate s
Japanese Association of America
Japanese Overseas Central Society ( K aigai D obo Chuo Kai )
Japanese Overseas Conventi on, T okyo, Japan, 1940
Japanese Protective Associa tion ( Recruiting Organi za tion)
J efferson Schoo l of Sod a! Science, N ew York City
·
Jewish Culture Society
Jewish People's Committee
Jewish People's Fraternal Order
Ji kyoku linka i (The Committ ee for the Cri sis )
J ohnson-Forest G ro up
( See Johnsonites)
Johnsonites
( See Johnson-Forest Group)
J oint Anti -Fascis t Refugee Committee
J oint Cou ncil of Progress ive Itali an-Americans, Inc.
Joseph \X1 eydemeyer School of Soci al Science, St. Louis, Mi sso uri
Kibei Seinen Kai ( Assoc iat ion of U . S. Citizens of Japa nese Ancestry
who have returned to Ameri ca after studying in J apan)
Knigh ts of the White Camellia
Ku Klu x Klan
Ky/fhae user, also known as Kylfhaeuser Leag ue ( Kylfhaeuser Bund)
Kylfhaeuser Fellowship (Kyffhaeu ser Kameradschaft)
Kyffhaeu~er War Reli ef (Ky/fhaeuser Kriegshilfswerk)
Labor Co uncil fo r Negro Rights
Labor Research Association, Inc.
Labor Youth League
League for Common Sense
League of American Writ ers
Lictor Society ( Italian Black Shirts)
Ma cedoni an-America n Peop le· s Leag ue
Mario l\!organtini Circle
Maritime Labor Com mittee to D efend Al La nnon
Maryland Cong ress AgJi nst D iscriminati on
(See Committ ee to Abolish D iscrim ination in MarylJnd) ··.
M assachusetts Committ ee fo r the Bill of Rights
Massachusetts Minute Women for Peace (not connected with ~,.the
Minute Women of the U . S. A., Inc. )
M aurice Braverman D efense Committee
Michiga n Civil Rights Federa tion
M ichigln Counci I fo r Peace
Michiga n School of Social Science
Nlnka T ei kok u G unyuda n ( Imperial Military Friends Group or Southern Californ ia War Veterans)
Na ti ona l Assoc iation of Mexi can Amer ica ns ( also kn ow n as Asociacion
Nacional Mexico-Americana)
Nationa l Blue Star Mothers of America ( not to be confused wit h the
Blue StJ r Mot hers of Ameri ca organi zed in February 1942)
National Committee fo r Freedo m of the Press
National Committee for the· Defense of Political Prisoners
National Co mm itt ee to Wi n Amnesty fo r Smith Act Victims
Nationa l Committee to Wi n the Peace
Natio nal Conference on American Policy in China and the Far East ( a
Conference ca ll ed. by the Commi ttee for a D emocra tic Far Eastern
Policy )
National Cou nci l of Americans of Croatian D escent
National Counci l of American -Sov iet Friendship
National Federation fo r Constitutiona l Liberties
National Labo r Conference for Peace
Nationa l Negro Congress
Nationa l Negro Labor Council
Nationalist Act ion League
Nationalist Party of Puerto Rico
Nature Fri ends of America (since 193 5)
Negro Labor Victory Committee
New Committee for Publi ca tions
Nichibei Kogyo Kaisha (The Great Fujii Theatre)
North Ame rican Committee to Aid Spa ni sh D emocracy
North American Spanish Aid Committee
North Phi lade lph ia Forum
Northwest J apanese Association
Ohio Schoo l of Socia l Sciences
Oklahoma Committee to D efend Po litica l Prisoners
Oklahoma League for Political Education ( see Commu ni st Polit ica l
Association)
Original Southern Klans, Incorporated
Paci"lic Northwest Labor School, Seattle, Washington
Palo Alto Peace Club
Partido del Pueblo of Panama ( operating in the Cana l Zone)
Peace Information Center
Peace Movement of Ethiopia
People's D ra ma, Inc.
People' s Educational and Press Association of T exas (see Communist
Political Association)
People' s Educati onal Association (incorporated under name Los Angeles
Educational Association, Inc.) , a lso known as People' s Educational
Center, People' s University, People's School
People's Institute of Applied Relig ion
Peoples Programs (Seattle, Washington)
Peopl e's Radio Foundation, Inc.
People's Rights Party
Philadelphia Labor Committee for Negro Rights
Phil adelphia School of Social Science and Art
Photo League (New York City)
Pittsburg h Ans Club
Political Prisoners Welfare Committee
Poloni a Society of the !WO
Progress ive German-Americans, also known as Progressive GermanAmericans of Chi cago
Prol etari an Part y of America
Protestant W ar Veterans of the United States, In c.
Prov isi onal Committee of Citizens fo r Peace, Southwest Area
Prov isiona l Committee on Lat in American Affairs
Prov isiona l Committee to Abolish Discrimination in the State of Maryland
(See Committee to Abolish Discrimination in M aryland)
Puerto Ri ca n Com ite Pro Libertades Ci viles (CLC)
(See Comite Pro D erechos Ci viles )
Pu ertorriquenos Uni dos ( Puerto Ri cans United )
Quad Cit y Committee for Peace
Queensbridge. T enan ts Leag ue
Revo lutionary Workers Leag ue
Romanian-America n Frate rnal Society
Russian Ameri ca n Societ)', Inc.
Sakura Kai ( Patriotic Society, or Cherr y Association-composed of
veterans of Russo-Japanese W ar)
Samuel Ad ams Schoo l, Boston , Massachusetts
Sa nta Barbara Peace Forum
Schappes D efense Committee
Schneiderman-Darcy D efense Committee
Schoo l of Jewish Studies, New York Ci ty
Seatt le Labor School, Sea ttl e. \X' ash ington
Serbian-America n Fraternal Society
Serbia n V idovda n Council
Shinto T empl es (limited to State Shi nto abo li shed in 1945)
Silver Shirt Legion of America
Sl avic Co uncil of Sou thern California
Sl ovak Workers Society
Sl oveni an-American Nationa l Cou ncil
, Socialist Wotkers Party, including America n Committee fo r European
Workers' .. R~lief ,;·,. •
~
Sokoku Kai (Fat herland Society)
.
Southern Neg ro Youth Congress
Suiko Sha (Reserve O/li(ters Associ ation . Lo~ Angeles)
Syracuse Women for Peace
T om Paine School of Socia l Sc ience. Phil adelphia, Pen nsy lvania
Tom Paine Schoo l of Westchester. New York
Trade Union Committee Tor Peace
( See Trade Unionists fo r Peace )
T rade Uni oni sts for Peace
( See Trade Union Committee for Peace )
Tri-State Negro Trade Union Cou ncil
U kraini an-America n Fraterna l U n ion
Union of American Croatians
Union of New York Veterans
Uriited America n Spani sh Aid Comm ittee
United Com mittee of Jew ish Societi es and Land sma nschaft Federatio ns,
a lso known as Coordi nation Committee of Jewi h Landsmanschaften
and Fraternal Organizations
United Committee of South Slav ic America ns
U n ited D efense Council of Sou thern Ca li fo rn ia
Un ited Harl em T enants a nd Consumers Orga n izat ion
U nited May D ay Committee
U nited Negro and Allied Veterans of America
Veterans Against Di scrim in ation of Civil Rights Co ngress of New
York (see Civil Rights Congress )
Vetera ns of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade
Vi rg inia League for Peop le's Education (see Commu nist Politica l As sociation)
Voice of Freedom Committee
Walt Whitman School of Social Science, Newark. New Jersey
Washington Bookshop Association
Washington Committee for D emocratic Action
Washi ngto n Committee to D efend the Bill of Rights
Washington Commonwealth Federation
Washington Pension Union
Wisconsin Conference on Social Legislation
Workers Alliance (since April 1936)
Yiddisher Kultur Farband
Young Communist League
Yugoslav-American Cooperative Home, Inc.
Yugos lav Seamen·s Club. Inc
U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1959 0-515025
�staff [ID (1D [L [L lE Li ~ ~
DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT
July 15, 1966
66-85
STANDARDS OF CONDUCT
Staff Bulletin 66-73 advised you of impending changes in the
Department's Standards of Conduct regulations, and included a
summary of the provisions relating to outside employment and
other outside activity, as well as financial interests. The
regulations became effective June 24, and were distributed
to all employees with Staff Bulletin 66-77.
The following paragraphs provide information concerning
counseling services:
Counseling Services
Ashley Foard, Acting Director, Office of General Counsel, has
been designated Acting Counselor for the Department. In that
capacity he is responsible for coordinating the Department's
counseling services and for assuring that counseling and interpretations on questions of conflict of interest are available
to Deputy Counselors. The Deputy Counselors, in turn, are
available to employees who seek pertinent advice and guidance.
The Department's Deputy Counselors listed below have been
designated so as to provide counsel ing services i n two broad
categories:(1)
Questions of a legal nature - particularly
those concerned with interpretations or
applicability of conflict of interest laws
and Executive Orders of the President; and
(2)
Questions on other matters covered by the
Standards of Conduct regulations - particularly
those concerned with the filing of statements
of financial interests and outside activities,
and 'prior approval' requests, in addition to
other regulatory provisions .
�,/
I
FOR WASHINGTON
Employees in office of:
Deputy Counselor
(Legal } is:
Deputy Counselor
(Per sonnel) is:
Secretary;
Under Secretary; and
Officers reporting directly to
Secretary:
.c\shley Foard
Douglas E. Chaffin
General Counsel ;
Assistant Secretary for
Metropolitan Development;
Assistant Secretary for
Demonstrations and Intergovernmental Relations; and
Assistant Secretary for
Administration:
Paul R. Boesch
"
Assi stant Secretary for
Renewal and Housing Assistance
(Renewal Projects Ad!llinistrati on):
(Housing Assistance Administration):
s. Leigh Curry, Jr.
Joseph Burstein
Charles G. stern
Adolphus Prothro
Joe B. Montgomery
Robert H. Reid
Glendon D. Willey
Regional Counsel
Regional Director of
Admini strati on
Adol phus Prothro
J oe B. Montgomery*
HAA Regional Off ice :
HM Regional Counsel
Admini strative Officer
or Office Services
Supvr.
FNMA Agency Office :
Agency Counsel
Assistant Agency
Manager (Administration
Assistant Secretary for
Mortgage Credit and
Federal Housing Commissioner
(Federal Housing Administration):
(Federal National Mortgage
As sociation):
"
FOR FIELD
Employees i n :
Regional Of f i ce:
FHA Insuring Of fice (and
other FKA field offices ) :


Designated


personnel in each fflA field office will assist.
Instructions to employees vill be issued shortly, by appropriate offices, concerning
employees in positions designated in the Appendix to the regulations, reporting
procedures for other employees, and reporting unterminated prohibited activities.
It is suggested that employees retain their copies of Staff Bulletins 66-73, 66-77,
as veil as this issue, for reference purposes.
�THE WHITE HOUSE
WA S HING TO N
October 20, 1966
PERSONAL-CONFIDENTIAL
Dear Mayor Allen:
This will confirm our conversations concerning your participation
on the President 1 s Task Force on Cities which will be chaired by
Dr. Paul Ylvisaker.
As you know, the problems faced by American cities have long been
of great concern to the President. He has directed that every effort
be made by this Administration to meet the challenge and has called
upon the Congress for legislation which will enable the Administration
to make a coordinated and comprehensive attack on the problems of
the cities. · He now calls upon the members of this Task Force for
recommendations on new steps which should be taken as well as for
advice on the most effective ways to implement existing legislative
authority.
This task is as difficult and challenging as it is important, and the
President is grateful for your willingness to participate.
The first meeting of the Task Force will be held on Friday, Octobe r 28 ,
1966,
a . m . in Room 303 of the Executive Office Building ,
Washingto , D . C.
atrO
r
Sincerely,
a.
'j 5---
Spec
Honorable Ivan Allen
Mayor of Atlanta
A tlanta, Georgia
A
,
A. Califano
tant t o the President
�------ --- - \
I

ME M o·k AND U.M





TO:
FROM:
SUBJECT:
Members of the Task Force ort the Ci ties'
Paul N. Ylvisaker
DATE:
May is;
1967
Attached Draft Outline of Task Force Report
The attached draft is circulated for discussion by the
There
is noth_ing sacred or final about i,t~ but we have reached the
point and date of some finai decisions, and certainly the format
of the report is one of them. We should expect to settle on the
outline at this next meeting_,_s.o- t-h-a-ta-Ees-e.ar.ch nd writing
assignments can b par e le_g __out-to the staff - - ana::::±n-.some
cases, to Tas
orce members.
Tajk Force at its meeting in Washington, D.C. May 18-19.
who cannot
due by May
appreciate wr itten comments from those membe r s
the May 18-19 meeting, these comments to be,
atest.
.....
�Draft - 5/10/67 - Confidential
"Working at Scale
11
Report to the President of the 1966-7 Task Force on the Cities
TABLE OF CONTENTS
I.
II.
III .
Letter of Transmittal
Introduction and Summary of Recommendations
Report
A.
Urban Segregation
- The measure of the problem (and subsection on other
urban minorities)
- Recommendations
B.
Urban Youth:
Education and Employment
- (etc.)
I •~
J.
c.
The Urban Calculus in National Economic Policy
D.
Urban Fi nancial Flows
E.
Administrative Barriers
F.
Manpower in Urban Affairs
G.
Toward More Continuous and Effective Problem-Solving
H.
A Special Note on the Model Cities Program
I.
An Agenda fo r Fur ther Study
Appendices
1.
Supporting Documents and Spec ial Papers
2.
Earlier reports to the President:
Neighborhood Centers;
Urban Development Corporation: HUD Research Program, etc.
3.
List of Persons Consulted and Places Visited
�Table of Conten~s
4.
-
2 -
List of Meetings and Agenda
- Full Task Force
- Special Committees
5.
List of Task Force Members and Staff
6.
Task Force Budget and Expenditures
5/10/67
�Draft:
5/10/67
CONFIDENTIAL
Dear Mr. President,
Your Task Force on the Ci ties agre·ed early in .its deliberations that now was no longer the time merely for minor adjustments
in current programs.
The nation's urban condition demands far more.
What more it demands is not simply a matter of money.
A much
higher level of spending and investment - pri va,t e as well as public is clearly in order.
But we concur in your own expressions, and those
of your Cabinet, that money in itself is not an urban panacea.
We have attempted in the attached report to state what els e
i s involved in "working at scale" on the nation's urban problems.
We do not pretend to have all the answers, and we are not as
certain as we would like to be about those we do put forward.
We a re
a lso aware of the constraints governing your own and the nation's
respons e.
Ne vertheless , we conclude our wor k on a note o f g reat urgency.
The growing apartheid of our urban populations, ~egregating by race
and income, presents this nation with an ugly fact and an ominous
future - and possibly a threat to our security which might well overshadow that of Vietnam.
This threat may not materialize.
Yet we think it would be
folly to test .that possibility by doing no more to dispel it than
is explicit in the nature and scale · of our current urban efforts.
We submit this report to you with our deepest respect and
our very best wisheso
�Draft 5/10/67
CONFIDENTIAL
INTRODUCTION
America and its communities are changing with unsettling rapidity.
Most of this change has been healthy; and most of the ~roblems
it has caused tend to evoke their own solutions.
This country - de-
spite its transitional strains and its freely-voiced complaints - has
an immense capacity for sel1-correction.
There is always a temptation - and a pressure - to over-react:
to give equal ear to every complaint, to chase off after every problem~ and to wind up with a congeries of programs which may slow up
rather than accelerate the nation's natural and long-run capacity for
self- correction.
Evidence is accumulating that such has already happened in the
federal government's response to urban problems over the past twenty
years.
These have been years of experimentation, improvisation, and
probing.
On balance, they have been constructive.
But neither in
scale nor impact have they caught up with the dimensions and force of
the · nation's urban trends and developing problems.•
The time has come to move from experimentation over a wide front,
and in sometimes contrary directions, to an effort
a ) which is aimed at selected problems of transcending importance
b) which is of a scale large enough to make a difference:
c) which is not dissipated by conflicting policies and administrative arrangements:
d) which offer powerful incentives to state, local and private
initiative, and thereby move toward a "steady state" of continuous problem-solving;
e) which begin to erase the public's skepticism -- its growing
�Introduction
-
2 -
feeling that public programs ara not
to-bo-
taken _seriously,
that more is promised than will ever be delivered.





The
Task
Foree
presently dalf fot













believes there are seven urban· problems which
a national
etfort at scale -- p~oblems which are
not self-correcting, at lsast nbt within a sufferable length of time~
1) the segregation of race a:nd income~ ai1d' the separation of
ghettoed populations from the growth ~ectors of the- urban
economy.
2) the lack of provision for urban youth, especially educatiot
and jobs.
3) the absence of an urban competence in the determination of
national economic policy.
4) the inadequacy of financial flows to and among urban communities, and to the older, depressed areas in particular.
5) the extremely categorical approach to urban programming;
the over-centralization of detail; the multiplication of
required consents; and the disincentives to community
enterpr ise.
6 ) t he me agre f low of talent into pµb lic servi ce at s t ate and
local l e ve l s .
7) the lack of provision for l ong-range programming, and for
continuous innovation and evaluation.
�.
III A.


URBAN SEGREGATION
The crisis of our cities is first of all the _s.e g.r.egation of
race and income.
There is no urban solution of any validity· that
does not deal directly with the questions posed by this segregation.
The facts are these:
23% of the total population of our
central cities is Negro, and 35% of these Negroes have incomes in
the poverty range.
Within five years, assuming present population
trends and even allowing for current levels of ameliorative public
programs, the proportion of Negroes to central city population will
rise to 28%, with the same percentage as today remaining in poverty.
By 1978, both proportions will be 35%.
By 1983, our central cities
population Will be 44% Negro, nearly two-fifths of them poor.
These are percentages of total central city population.
But
by 1973, at l e ast 10 of our major citie s will be predomi nantly Negr o ;
by 1983, at least 20, including Chicago, Philadelphia, Cleveland ,
Detroit (etc .).
To repeat, these proje ctions show what wi ll happen if present
population trends continue a nd current governmental policies and
levels of spending remain in force.
To alter these projections significantly, quantum leaps will
have to be taken in public policy and levels of spending.
For
example, if the size of the Negro population of central cities is
...... ~
..
,
__

�to remain what it is
approximately 600,000 Negroes_.ea.ch year must
move into predominantly white suburbs.
That figure would represent
from 10-15 times the present rate of Negro out migration.
Again, if the proportion of Negroes in poverty is to be reduced
to the general poverty rate of the total population, we estimate the
costs of that enrichment (projecting current per capita costs of
special housing, educational, employment training and other programs)
at$
annually over a _____ year period.
If the nation were to decide to equalize both the Negro's
settlement pattern and his incidence of poverty, our best estimate
of total costs would be$ _________ per year over a ---~year
period.
These may seem staggering figures.
What is staggering to us
is that urban policy has been developed in this country without
attempting these calculations, yet fostering the illusion that one
o r the other - - or both -- of the two alte rnatives, enrichment and
dispe rsion, were s ome how being accomplished and at scale .
The fact is that both the rate of enrichment and the rate of
dispersion are l agging ; and the s e gra gati on o f r ace and income in
our great metropolitan areas is outstripping whatever we are now
doing to offse t it.
We of the Task Force deplore the segregation that is taking
place; and if the choice were ours, we would pay the price of simultaneously reducing the poverty and concentration rates of the Negro
population.
The prospect of Negro dominance of our central cities
we cannot regard with equanimity, although we are almost persuaded
�otherwise by some compelling arguments (a)' that the transition is
likely to be much more moderate than alarmists might portray; and
(b) that the coming of Negroes to political power might well provide
the psychological lift that community has long been awaiting.
Wnat
we still regard with distaste is the freezing of racial and class
distinctions into political boundary lines; and what we fear· is even
the remotest chance of escalating present frictions into guerrilla
and even civil war.
We therefore submit the following recommendations and alternative courses of action:
�Draft 5/10/67
CONFIDENTIAL
III B.
Urban Youth:
Education and Employment:
. Further statement on educational and employment proble·ms of
the ghetto.
But also pointing up the general problems of youth
in urban and suburban society, with the prospect of increasing
restiveness and under-employment not entirely related to race
and poverty.
III
c.
Need to integrate construction trades.
The Urtan Calculus in National Economic Policy
Elaboration of relevant trends:
the Baumol thesis re the
escalating costs of a service economy and the increasing
reliance on the public market:
the employment and urban design
implications of moving from manufacturing to services; the
importance of adding an urban competence to the Council of
Economic Advisers, Treasury, Internal Revenue, Jt. Congres -·
sional Committee, etc.
The use of economic leverages (e.g.
attainted titles) to accomplish urban purposes.
The question
of elevating HUD or part of it t o a level where it participates in economic policy decisions.
II~ O.
Urban Financial Flows
The erratic flow of resources into housing and other critical
urban functions.
The liklihood of revenue sharing and block
grants, and the importance of tying these developments into
a strategy for rationalizing and extending state and local
revenue sources.
The need for increasing consumer income
and entrepreneural incentives in the ghetto, linking these
with reforms of the welfare and tax systems.
�-
III E.
2 -
Administrativ~ Barriers:
The problem of administering 440 separate feder-a-1--programs
affecting urban communities, and the hopeful prospect of
consolidating and simplifying federal grants.
Restrictive
policies of critical agencies, including FHA.
Possible re-
commendation of neighborhood development corporation~, with
share of capital advanced from national community development
bank.
An emerging role for the States,; and reconsideration of
metropolitan planning requirements both to reduce administrative congestion and to encourage dispersal of ghetto populations.
Discussion of use of incentives, including "bounty"
device for making ghetto residents economically attractive to
local governments.
III F .
Manpower f or Urban Af fairs
Estimate of critical shortages, and mention of impr obability
of goi ng t o s cale (or even carrying out present s cale) wi thout
mas sive e ntr y o f new personne l.
Consideration of Frank
Riesman's approach through new careers f or t he poor .
Impor-
tance of s t eering new service complexes (me dical, educational,
etc.) to ghetto areas and/ or residents.
Possible use of
Negro and other minor ity s e r vicement, as rec r uits to public
and community service after their hitch has ended .
Need for
federa l ai d f or pre-ser vice and i n-service training.
III G.
Toward Continuous Problem-Solving
Ezra's treatise on ne ed for critical p ath and staging in
development p f public programs; also for built-in capacity for
innovation. ' Importance of sustained financing for experi-
�- .~--
- 3 -
mental . programs, and for evaluation going- beyond what is
provided for Model Cities, etc.
III H• . (as indicat~d in Table of Contents)
-·- - ----
�TASK. ·FORCE ON THE CITIES
MEMO TO:
Members of Task Force
FROM:
Paul Ylvisaker
SUBJECT:
Re -c a p of dates
May 1
Deadline for subcommittee outline
One copy to nick Leone
One copy to Paul Ylvisake r
Cranbury Neck Road
Cranbury, New Jersey
May 4-7
Down s-Alexander Subcommittee
S an Francisco
May 18-19
Full Task Force
Washington D.C.
May 26
Dead l ine for fin al subcommittee reports
On e copy to Dick Leone
One copy t o Paul Ylvisaker
June 8
9 & 10
Full Task Force
Washington D.C.
June 22
Fu ll Task Force
Washington D.C.
23 & 24
'\b\
April 25, 1967
J deadlines
�TASK FORCE ON THE CITIES
Sub-committees
Allen-Ylvisaker
Governmental machinery
Levi
Study of FHA
Hels te i n - Be rry
Jobs f or Ne groes, particularly in construction
Chapin
Metr opolitan di spersion -- model cities -- new towns
Downs - Alexander
Social deficit model
Si zer
Education
�,
TASK FORCE ON THE CITIES
Items for inclusion in final report:Hot summers
Guaranteed income
Relief and welfare systems
Profile of ghetto -- population by age
&
I
number
Youth of population -- median age of ghetto 10 years lower
than rest of population (Gordon to check out)
Ombudsman for the schools -- at entry-point -- 1/3 again number
of teachers
Technol o gy -- high l abor component
Soci al services vis-a-vis job creation and employme nt
Social costs of technology -- suppressing technology
COMSAT
cutting d own lab8r component
Fewer man hour s into rehabilitation than building new con s truc tion
Price of deve lopment of ghetto -- d oe sn't work without
continuous pumping fr om outside
.Ghetto population can't be taxed to provide services
Join with revenue flow of the system -- fiscal
&
tax implications
Characteristics of the ghetto not applicable to the model?
Problem o f the decayed city is where the concentrations of race
and poverty mix:
(a) measure degree of concentration of Negro population
(b)
income distribution
(c) poverty census
Where are the white poor?
Retrogressive tax system built into housing.
�II
,.
T. B . . . sic "remise
to ,:
-~~ ~-ch
··}1
is t e follm·: in°·
of t~P fedcr-1
--- --· -
i. h e. er,.,."r1 f

-
om
t


1.rl


i t a l so is 'he
, eme of nci l -.lvi-- -,-, ~ 1
~i csut i s.act i on w i th the effectivnne-- ,f
r ~elev~nt res~onse to
I ~1 :- ct , t efe . . . -,,.,
-.·i
-,_r-·crrl;:i,
.c-0 ..
,orrib e r esnonncn , ~l
th
th e ,. ., . . . _; "r
th ev m,"
be> rr1 i t0 e f'ect ivo i"I
to tli" 0-P-Portr; nnt into t½om.
7
~
'1
- - - ·01.r
G"'".
fnt,nrp
r· 0Gic•i0-'1-f.1:'1rj_-!'['
-ror-r-1 nr,- -i.bi 'litip -
·.-;ill
be :,ffecte('l -o tha t !'TIC'l'e ,.,7_t "I'P--.t5p·•
h" loo]:er! e t, loc"'ll:1r
·" ' 1f'
f'er0r2ll,r?
�II
i'.clministr7.tion to c11rc'? ~; 110. Gro . .,,t Depres r.i on fizzlec
rlown tu
11
of 1 9'> 7, mi'..n,y
ri t;
Cc.
out in t he
,bl:-i.merl the p oor n e s i gn of the,;e nro p,r a.m;-;
c onnemno~ thee .t ir e i~o, of federa l
pe nd i ng as an a id to nro s~crit., .
1111.r
B t
then ,·1h r:m 2'0v e r nrri'"'nt :-----enr1 j_n '"" re:_1, lv bec ame eno rmou s i n th0. i-rar effort
1S:!
O.L the ear l ,y
3;, JgLJ.o ' ", 1inem'"'lo.:nne t
a1 cl rece ss io n v an i shec
~~. lmo s t
inst ~ tl y , anrt the econo .. y ox0enren uivilian outnut at th e Gi'.,rae time t h~t
it nroduced h u Ge ~mo unt:-- o
mil it~r y fl OO ds ~
e ., ~.nerionc e a r a mat ic a l ly nrove,~ tha t
To mo s t
,ove rnmen t
e c onomi sts , this
c ne n d i nc; indeerl c n.n b ani:;
1
unem,,lo~ment ancl reces s ion i f u nde rt ak en on a lar ~ e enough s c a le to be
Simi l a rly,
it c;,,
Derh<'ps be a r g ue d tha t ur b an re nel·'a l ,ncl
,,nbli c 110u::;in,"; hav e f 2.ilerl to
11
so lve the low- income hol, n inc-- ,,rob l -'"'1'1 11
i.:',inl.v b8CEtl r:o they hcwe been m1r1 e rt n.ken in su c h tiny amoun t :--o
Even the
hroken familic~ in "Ublic ho11'iinP de veln,,mento ) micht be r adic,11~
if tho nro.~r"m::- ,,ere €: ;"':v r1oc1 in s c,.,l e b,y a f,,cto r
f,
0
~ l toref
sa.v, 10 to 20 , sincP
..... 'T":-'tl·• 0,v·,,,11dcc1 client'clo 1-1ouln have to be served .
It no0r11~ cri1ci.n.l fo-r the rri's k Fo r ce to an'iW er this 0u0.::-;tion ~ for trie
followinP reo~ons:
, . Innof~r ~c inadenuate s c a le a lo ne is res nonsible for any ~neffectivenc~·
nf c11Trent 'lror;ra.m-:; , i t mi _ht b e a gr o ss socinl ool ic,v error to r-,hift
cmnh.7.Si" to l ook:in
for s ome no n- exis t ent


~~r~


11
nei-1
a')'"lroa ch" vhcn the re'"',l
lftlS'Uy
neec'l l'cr-
11
of t
11"
olc'l a·, '1roacheso
/[r1t(
~r lOvt[)re~.£
h . T 1 ere is a tendency for v 2rio us feder a l age~cie~ to look for Pome
~
fi
red ·, ti vol,y inexpens iv0
11
cure" for nrbA-n .a,-hetto '1roblem s .
Jf this
te·, ,lei'CY is inrerent7_,, bound to f c il becousc ,'"'l l "cures" '"'rP c"'\"treTTJ0l 1 •
�11
co st ly, th e Prcr" i dc'1+ rhn
1
d el de l imse l f co n:' i ·1 nP-i_n
ll 6
11
oublic o o i n i on to c cccnt the
b0
che,



i,n,1ri s ed of th i s f act so he




'1
i
ill not
cure , 11 a nd s o h e c an be,o·in i"lfl le n cing
ostlines ::, of
decruat e me nn re s .
P, r s uin[; th i s r ecnonsc to the b · .sic pr e mi s e i-rnul d c a u s e t he Tas k Force
0
to i nvestig ,te th
a ch .., l '1il nt m:-irrni tu e of e a c h maj or fe err.l urban nr oe-rc.m
( s measured i n totill nna nY1nu a •l 0xnend.i t ures over, s a y , th e :12.s t 30 .ven:r s )
measure of t he
1,,,a i n s t s ome ;!'!i!!Hili!!"9-·" univcr:--e i n ,.r1 ich t 1at )ro gram mu s t o _ e rate.
?air examole,
/~.
t o t a l nub l ic ho'i. sinfl' e
r
01'1J1
it r ec" -- n,nd re s ult s in term s of uni t n built - -
mig ht be c omnar ec'l t o tot n l UoS . exT)e n<'l itur es on hous i n r; co nstruct i on, . .,_n('l_
unit~ bui lt in th e U.S .
tota l143.215.248.55:!3!:Eml!a«;: Se-:,-:,_,rnte cih.l.cuL1.t i ons mi[;ht be made i n sub-0,r e ::.s ( m . ch
..I\
2.s Hei-r York)
tJ,Ve r <'.n-e ,
Jher e th e re l ...,t ive s c -1. l e mi g ht b e m c h highe r t han ti1e 1vi.ti oY1n.l
just t o t est -rhnt J"li-, 1t h apnen if t le nat iona l effort Here r c1.ide r'1 .
S imil a r quantifica tions conld be mac'l e for he a l th pro g r a ms,
1rban r e newa l, anti- de linrruency nr o g r a ms, e tc.

el 1,r e
, ro ""
1. .. n,
Re s ults mi ~ht be~ rni l 1,r
1
to those a lr eady rnc<'le in r .ri c ltur e ,
·1here it c an b e shown th a t over /IQ~,
of ::,.l l f".rm incomP. in the 1!.S . comes
irect l y from fe der a l payment;; .
Din:'atisf..,ction
,j
th ,·rh..,t
hettor 11,..,,y:' to rlo t
Yr:t
11
1-_rc
rve rlocc" no t ncce:'~2.ri.ly :,rove there ,.re
1
in"'"·• "lerlr,ps the truth i s mere l y th a t " life i8 tour:h ."
,n 1_7ollivr ·'.lt c r n..,t iv0'1 mi.'tht
th0.
be fruitfully investi,'."rte,' by the
'1',..,_nl-: Force :
_"lror'1_nci"l: ~:..olutionn__ to nrb<'n .rrhetto ~)roblemr. .
Specifi r,:1ll_y , the
fn l. lo"ir n· , t:. ne_s of in_:ce1~t iVC'R micht be, i nvestig..,tecl :
.__J!Lttlr,ft..tJ s ,(Jn 1-r1c1111.f: /
'by ha.v,r11!J
1) f o~itlvc - rofitr norrib le~--a~thc fe~er~l ~overnmrnt cr02t~/)
.., s
i ("l'l
ificant r.iqrl:et for some r,ervic e rclev..,"lt to t1,,., n-1-ietto. r,,cl·
�4
n
+,·i v o:- to
,-, ,., 0
7.Yl:','
r E'"'
0
fina n ci ?,l
i t t -i
ry,
!1Ce ;-,t
--, l l _r, n
i n r-t i t.,1tion :-: ,
~
11
.'.'..ct badl,r" i n
. ., _ll fo r
,hP.tto '"'r


-. s ch


propert,y not in fi ll_ l COffi D i anc
.:ind h i p;her nro pe rt.y asse::;smentc for
rehabil it1.tec1 ~ro "'~ rt,,..
3) Rer1. ct ion of rcr-t--,n0
..,,,a_
er.rilation throws


,UCh 
:-ro .q:r'"'.rns


<'S
t ,..,
" tnrn- ke,y" n•" r :. cl-i to ,...,ublic hou sint:; o
A) Cr ention of ncr n is ~iv c inc ent i v e s t h r ou g h a llowing .ta~ cr0~ i ts for
investn")YJ.ts in ,...hr:t--'-o--:
':f. ~
r c rt il. in d n r1 s o f
job t · 2. in:ing.
b . Shi tin ..... the
7
oc
ro s ources to
1.
rh2.n _ '"'rCJ_blernr; ::n1oy_fr o__!!)_jJ1e __ferl0r;-,l _,,.,.overnme11t to _~or1e
pthe r _nnot.
The
l--:
_"ron:rom fo r mu l ation or the n. ll ocat i or of
oJloPinp met . oa~ of redist r ibut i ng income collector
t~a feror;, l ~o v0rnnent ~01.l
1) Givin<"'"
be means of n cc omn l inhin c t~ i s :
to
"bl_
2 ) Givir7 block,.,. 143.215.248.55r to centr l citier.
- ThP T'"'r~ Force mi~ht inve s tigate ~11 of these devices in or~0r to
-i '""'OV'"' ti 0n"?
(,,-0"1A_t
~,2-e. .
~., , +/0,,1
I
rl_
-I
ho ne cecsary to uer cu--,d~ t~ e i YJ.~titutinn~
�r
,
c1 if f'o,-,.V'
--- ·.1.0.t
lr-1
f.0 '11
the
it~ ~--- ~0 rt ,. if r ct..,,in'"' ct by th
,-(' _ ;_r ·1 l0 ilitir of t his c< evice?
1s 0 -lj
.ccir2b e
11 . _·-~1:~t/clp.!!.: S ~ r __".f_r1_iti 0.:_~-
--
ic'I- ntif
i nr
- --to··-·-rr."1-::n
-·----- t

-
,;j_de:-,re..,r! f'eclin -:; th :::.t
'.-.°.
--~~1_:r:.
.::,D_!_ _::_r~E_i2_!!lG Cc?.D be rcl a ti_v 0_l_:r_ 0,~"cib~_
ive? I n
--m0 ·~" --0,ffc-ct
~-·
-·'"'l'!1
fecln 7.1 ~o rc r n•-rient.?
.,
11 "'
so it e of th e Recmip- l y
•·
'7 1'.'"'i1rl
tiYJ.kerine- 11

ith nr er;e nt . r, '"':IC i-,i l
Ve' h :>blc
mi-ht bn n~ follo1 r :
b .v
~ ~+n
" 1_l -
"'·To .'"'rr-
lie ho,, c inr,:
' ~j;.
rent i n-
p :,;j
~t i l".,,..,. cn'l 7 i:
low- inc 0me f , mil i e::- to <1.ll ,,~, rt ~ of
i·- l l v
ne~!'er iob O""'nrt,,ni tie~ o
G~'
11
1 --~
�11
TJI •
"1 1
... _..::
l. .


-
,.,.,...,..,:-"te _ Methodr of Pl'."' o cr ,., .- .; ·., ·
·~
·-- --
I 11 four
_,_ ._ . . -
-·- -
.__. --~--.,.
of t he ror:'1O11:' ",... ·•n,- 0
"~Y on0 or t~o
? . '>nbc om .. itte cr;
·i lw·1
".1,0VC' ,...houlc b e
"lUTSU
r,
r r-ther t
n:1
~l ~e .
r;h01 1l t1
1~'"
--=-o j'M" ';
one r1 bc 0mm ·.ttc" f or r~ ch
rn- 10

tn nurr u c these f our r
r;c ,
r.nonr ec -- "'erh"'lS
or oerha os wi t h a ~ i fferent ri visi on
0f l , .bor,
" · S"'0.cific re:" 0 a r ch ..,r si."·nn,-,11--1:,... ,...J!onlr1 be defined for
.11 four r es" o:1- _f" h,y
r1~et i n~ ,...,.,naratc ly.
---


-"]vrnl cl be r,,ss i q_-nec1. to b o th c t :1f:f mer 11J cr s "..rd


'
.
Mone.v
views or fn tucl vjawc, v a ryir
~rom care to c~nc .
�March 6, 1967
Mrs . Joyce Sewe II
Executive Offices
Atlanta Marriott Motor Hotel
Cou rtland at Cain
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Joyce:
I have some d finit information on our important, confidential dignitaries
who will b staying and m eting at the Marriott next w k. I will list th m
by name, c:iddr ss, and room r quirements, and hope that you could pre•
r glster them:
Name and Addre•
Mr . H. Rolph Taylor
HUD
Wash ington , D. C.
Singl • ar,iving March 9
Ch ck out March 10
Mr. Taylor'$ Assistant
Singl - arriving March 9
Check out March 10
Mr . Paul Ylvisaker
Ford Foundation
477 Madison Av nu
N w York, N w York
Singl .. arriving rv ning of
M ch 8 - eh ck out an rnoon
of Mareh 10
Prof. & Mrs. Julian L t
Univ rs1ty of Chicago
Doubl room - arriving March 9
check out af rnoon of M ch 10
Chicago, Illinois
Mr. Ben Alexand•r
Det nse R arch Corp.
6300 Hol I lster Ave .
Golita, California
Single - Ha wi 11 arrive on D Im
186 ot 5:M> a. • on
rch 8 d
wonts to s_le p the balanc of
morning. He will check out
ch 10.
Mr. and Mr1. Edwin C. rry
Chicago Ur n L•D(4500 South Michigan ~e •
Doubt• - Arrive -,ch 8
D•-""'M ch 10
Chi go, Illinois
�Mrs . Joyce Sewell
March 6, 1967
Name and Address
Room Requirements
Mr . Stuart Chapin
University of North Carolina
Chape l Hill, North Carolina
Singfe • Late arr iva l
March 8 • check out
March 10
Mr . Anthony Downs
Real Estate Re$earch Corp .
73 West Monroe Street
Chicago, Ill inois
Singl .. Arrival March 8
Depart March 10
Mt . Ezra Ehrenkrantz
Building Systems Develop,, nt Corp.
120 Broadway
San Francisco, California
Single • Arrival March 8
Depart March 10 (I don ' t
hov flight info on h im, but
it might b an unusual time)
Mr . Richard C . L on
Washington, 0. C.
Singl - Arrive late
March 8 • d part March 10
Mr. Gordon Mac Inn s.
Singl • Arrive late
Mare,h 8 • departmMorch 10
Asst. to Mr . Leon
Washington, D. C.
This is less than w originally discussed .•• nln ins ad of 16 rooms.
Our me ting room t up will be fJne, but would still Uk to use Tara 3
for the lunch on ach day. Actually, the one o'clock lunch ttm on
Friday is xc · II nt, as th y will conclud tn m ting at the lat luncheon.
My t ntativ figure for th luncheon on Thursday will be 10 at 12:30 and
15 on Friday ot hOO o•clock.
Pl ase h Ip m ka p this confid ntial as to the me _ting. It is rf ctly
ok for the individual nam s ta appear on the hotel registration.
Sine r ly,
Mrs. Ann M. Mose•
Ex cutive er fwy
�,
·
..
ADDRESSES


 !!


Chairman
212-PL 1-2900
Home:
312-FA 4-6926
Home: 312 DO 3-5464
also:
Fishcreek, Wisc. 414-868-3026
Wash~ , D. c.
202-667~5206
404-522-4463
Horne:
404-688-2659
Mr. Ben Alexander
805-967-3456
Vice President
q DRC (Defens e Research Corporation)
6300 Hollister Avenue
__..------;-J,1,- ,i~~ -Golita, California
Horne:
8~5-969-2132
Horne:
3·12,.. BO 8-1314
or
3 fZ-3 73-23 71
Mr. Stuart Chapin
919-933-2282
Director
Urban and Regional Studies
Evergreen House
University of North Carolina
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
Home:
919-929-2353
or
919-933- 2392
Mr. Anthony Downs
31 2-FI 6- 5885
Real Estate · Research Corporation
73 West Monroe Street
Chicago, I llinois 60603
Horne:
312- DU 1-5065
or
202-2 23- 4500
Dr. Paul Ylvisaker
Director
Public Affairs
Ford Foundation
477 Madison Avenue
New York, New York 10022
609-395-1236
Vice Chairman
\Y\ (I-)
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Professor Julian Levi
Professor of Urban Studies
fl~
University of Chicago
~ Chicago, Illinois 60601
1/
Members
Honorable Ivan All en
Mayor
Atlanta, Georgia
i/4
~ s·P
.J-fn.!'Ls
Mr. Edwin C. Berry
Executive Secretary
Chicago Urban League
~./1 1y----'4500 South Mi chigan Avenue
) > ~ ~ Chicago, Illinois
60601
312-AT 5-5800
c\
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Professor John Dunlop
Professor of Economics
Harvard University
Cambridge, Massachusetts
\
\
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617-UN 8-7600
Mr. Ezra Ebrenkrantz
415-434-3830
President
Building Systems Development Corporation
120 Broadway
San Francisco, California 94111
Mr. Ralph Helstein
312-WE 9-5343
President
Packinghouse Food and Allied Workers
608 s. Dearborn Street, Suite 1800
Chicago, Illinois 60605
Dr. Theodore Sizer
617-UN 8-7600
Dean, College of Education
Ext. 3401
Harvard University
Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138
\
-
\
Home: 617-484-2958 __,
or
\ Washington, DC 202-783-00~8
· ~e:
..
415-524-5673
or
415-845-6000
\
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\
Hdme:
I
\
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3~2-PL
2-2629
\
Home:
617-864-3593
/
,,


._


_ ,.
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�ting in Atlanta,, Ga.
ch 9 ... 10
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Attendini
Mr . tf. Rolph Taylor
Assistant S er. t y HUD
Wash In
, D.. C.

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Ford Foundu t n
_ o-
• Cliff GQldman
D pt . of C
unity Affofrs
Tr ton, N. J.
York
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• Bllrf-ic>Q r
Offl of Sci· nc . and T chnology
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M(!)_,Q,\r/tv 1)
Washtnp,n., D. C .
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• Ear I Lf"D'V1'1.u
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Admin.
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E. Glodln
City Phmnt Engl
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�Task Fore Me ting in Atlanta, Ga.
MQroh 9.,. 10
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M riibers of Commissi<?h IM•O
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Mayor ivan Allen, Jr . .
Atlanta, Georgia
O thers Attending
I
Mr. rf. Ralph Taylor
·,
1
Mr. Paul Ylvisoker
Ford Foundation
1
I
1
D fense R search Corp.
GoHta, Catlfornia
Prof. Julian Levi (Mrs . L vi) I
Mr. Bi 11 Hooper
Offic of Scienc and Technology
Washington, D. C .
II
Univ rsity of Chicago
Chicago, Illinois
l-,IJ . Edwin C. Betry (Mrs.
Chteago Urbon leagv
I
Mr . Cliff Goldman
Dept. of Community Affa irs
Tr nton, N . J .
New York
Mr. Ben Al xander
'
Assistant Secretary HUD
Washington, D. C.
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Atlanta P, ople
.rry) f
R. Earl Land l'5 (Mn. Landers)
Admin . Assistant to Mayor
I
11
Chicago, lllinoi•
-. Stvart Chopin
University of North Carolina
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
\
Dan E. Sweat, Jr . ( &. Sweat)
Director of Gov rnm ntal Liai50n
1
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Co lli r E. Glod in
City Planning Engln r
Mr . Anthony Down
R 1 Esto
arch Corp.
Chicqgo, Illinois
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Planning O partm nt
Mr,. Exro Ehr nkranb
l
Ann Moses
Mayorts Office
~
Building Sy t s D lopm nt Corp.
San Ft nciaeo, Dalif.
. ·y '
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• Richard C. Le
W Jn ton, D. C.
t
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t-h . Gordon
W _ In n, D. C.
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Dunl
New Y. k, N. Y.
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Bill Bassett
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�March 7, 1967
MEMORANDUM
TO
Buzz Ryan
FROM
Ann Moses
Attached is the outline I am giving those attending the Mayor's
meeting
rch 9 • 10, for your information.
Assist nt Secretary Ralph Taylor, will NOT need hotel accommodations,
as he is ritving Friday morning for the meeting only.
We will
ve twelve people for lunch on Thursday in T ra 3 •••
We will h ve 20 people for cocktail (8:00) dinn r (8:30) Thursd y
evening th the Twelve Oaks Room. If po sible, I would like one
table, c ndles, flowers nd a speci l menu.
Umia;fyat luahh we will have
i3 for
lunch.
Bnclo ed are notes to be delivered when the p ople
rriv.
�Mrs . Joyce Sewell
Executive O ffices
Atlanta Marriott Motor Hotel
Courtland at Caln
Atlanta , Georg ia.
Dear Joyce:
I have some definite information on our Important, confidential dignitaries
who will be staying ond meeting at th Marriott n xt week. I will list them
by name, address, and room ~ qu irements, and hope that you could preregister them:
Name and Addree
Room Requirements
Mr. H. Ralph Taylor
HUD
Wash ington, D. C.
Singl • arriving March 9
Check out March I0
Sing! - arriving March 9
Ch ck out Mar<:h 10
Mr. Paul Ylvi1Gker
ford Foundation
477 Madison Aven
. New York, New York
J
rv
\Mar<;h ~
~t-affernoon
of__Morch
Mr.
Single .. He. will arrive on D lea
186 at 5;40 a.m. on Morch 8 and
wontt to sl ep ffi balanc of
morning. He will check out March 10.
Golito, California
I
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Double room ... arriving March 9
n Alexander
Re ar4-h Corp.
6300 Hol I i,ter Av•.
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Prof. & Mrs . Ju lion Lev I
University of Chicago
Chicago, Illinois
Oefe
/
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gvv~in
lee!)fflg_g!...
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Mr. and Mra. Edwin C. rry
Chicago Urban L ogu
4500 South Michig n Av nu
Chicago, Illinois
ch ck out afternoon of March 10
Double • Arriv March 8
D po,tmM rch 10
�Mrs . Joyce Sewe 11
March 6, 1967
Name and Address
Room Requirements
Mr . Stuart Chapin
Unive rsity of North Caro lina
Ch ape I Hil I , North Caro Ii na
Single ... Late arriva l
March 8 - check out
March 10
J
Mr . Anthony Downs
Rea l Estate Research Corp.
73 West Monroe Street
Chicago, Illinois
Sing le ... Arrival March 8
Depart March 10
J
Mr . Ezra Ehrenkrantz
Bui ld ing Systems Development Corp .
120 Broadway
Son Francisco, California
Sing le ,.. Arrival March 8
Depart March .10 (I don't
have flight info on him, but
it might be an unusual ti me)
Mr. RlchC1rd C. Leone
Wash ington, D. C.
Single "" Arriv late
March 8 • depart March 10
Mr . Gordon Mac Inn s
Asst. to Mr . L one
Washington, D. C.
Single • Arrive late
March 8 - d parhnMarch 10
1
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This is I n than we originally discussed ••• F)irte instead of 16 rocms.
Our meeting room set up will be fine, but would still lik to us Tara 3
for the lunch on ach day. Actua lly, th one o•clock lunch time on
Friday i5 xc II nt, as th y wi II conclud th me ting at the late lunch on .
My ten tat iv figur for th · luncheon on Thursdoy will
~ t 12: 30 and
15 on Friday at 1:00 o•<;lock.
Please h Ip me ki p this confidential as to th m ting. It is perfectly
ok for th individual names to appear on th hot I regi$tration.
Sincere ly,
Mn . Ann M. Moses
Ex cutiv S er tory
�~Ttf'f , , , - , ,
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C TYO~ .ATLANT.A ·. ~
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CITY HALL
March 8, 1967
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ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Are a Cod e 404
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
Mr. Paul Ylvisaker
Professor Julian Levi
Mr, Ben Alexander
Mr. Edwin C. Berry
Mr. Stuart Chapin
Mr. Anthony Do.wns
Mr, Ezra Ehrenkrantz
Mr. Richard Leone
Mr. Gordon Maclnnes
Mr. Lyle Carter
Mrs. Joan Dunlop
R. EARL LANDER S, Admi nistrative Assi stant
MRS . AN N M. MOSES , Executive Secre tary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR ., Director of Governm ental liaison
I am delighted that you have come to Atlanta to continue our
important deliberations. I hope you will have time to see
our beautiful city.
The following arrangements have been made, all in the Atlanta
Marriott Motor Hotel:
Thursday morning - 9:30 a.m. the me e ting will be held in the
Thornwood Room on the Ballroom Level.
Lunch will be served at 12:30 p . m. i n Ta ra Room No . 3 on the
same level . The meeting will reconvene a f te r lunch in the
Thornwood Room.
I would like fo r you to be my guests f o r dinne r Thu r sday evening
i n t he Twelve Oaks Room on the Bal l r oom Leve l . Cockta i l s wi ll
be s e rved a t 8:00 p.m . a nd dinner at 8: 30 . I should hope that
Mrs . Levi and Mrs . Be r ry wou ld j oin us a lso .
Friday morning - 9 : 30 a.m. the meet i ng wi l l conti nue in the
Thornwood Room.
~
Lunch will be served at one o'c l ock in Tara Room No. 3. I have
asked Earl Lande rs, Dan Sweat, Coll ier Gladin and Bi ll Bassett
of my staff to be with us at lunch to answer any questions regarding
Atlanta's Demonstration Cities application .
Assistant Secretary Taylor will arrive during Friday morning and
be with us through lunch.
My secretary, Mrs. Ann Moses, can be reached by telephone, 688-2659,
in case you have any questions upon your arrival.
�CITY OF A.T L.Ar'\JT.A
I.
CITY HALL
March 8, 1967
ATLANTA. OA. 30303
I
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
IVAN ALLEN, JR ., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrat ive Assistant
Mr. Paul Ylvisaker
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Eiecutive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Covernmenul Liaison
Professor Julian Levi
Mr. Ben Alexander
Mr. Edwin C. Berry
Mr. Bill Hooper
Mr. Stuart Chapin
Mr. Anthony Downs
Mr. Ezra Ehrenkrantz
Mr. Richard Leon~
Mr. Gordon Macinnes
Mr. Lyle Carter
Mrs. Joan Dunlop
Mr. Cliff Goltl~an
I am delighted that you have come to Atlanta to continue our
important deliberations. I hope you will have time to see
our beautiful city.
.

I
. I
The following arrangements have been made, all in the Atlanta
Marriott Motor _H otel:
Thursday morning - 9:30 a.m. the meeting will be held in the
Thornwood Room on the Ballroom Level.
Lunch will be served at 12:30 p.m. in Tara Room No. 3 on the
same level. The meetit:ig will reconvene after lunch in the
Thornwood Room.
I would like for you to be my guests for dinner Thursday evening
in the Twelve Oaks Room on the Ballroom Level. Cocktails will
be served at 8:00 p.m. and dinner at 8:30. I should hope that
Mrs. Levi and Mrs. Berry would join us also.
Friday morning - 9:30 a.m. the meeting will continue in the
Thornwood Room.
~
~
Lunch will be served at one o'clock in Tara Room No. 3. I have
asked Earl Landers, Dan Sweat, Collier Gladin and Bill Bassett
of my staff to be with us at lunch to answer any questions regarding
Atlanta's Demonstration Cities application.
Assistant Secretary Taylor will arrive during Friday morning and
be with us through lunch.
My secretary, Mrs. Ann Moses, can be reached by telephone, 688-2659,
in case you have any questions upon your arrival.
. l
�November 29 , 1966
Mrs. Mary R. Carl en
Administrative Officer
Department of Housing and
Urban Development
Washington, D. C .
D ar Mi s Carlsen:
Enclosed i th request for per diem for Mayor Allen,
along with airline coupon for air travel to Washington
on Sunday, Nov mbe:r 27th.
He hould b reimburse for the $80. 00 ir transportation.
and the one day per dNm.
Do 1 a sume correctly that since h is on $100. 00 p r
di m that only tran portation ie r imbu~eable?
Sincerely,
Mr • Ann Mos

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