Box 3, Folder 11, Complete Folder

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Box 3, Folder 11, Complete Folder

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.
J anuary 8 , 1968
Dr . William Marine
Associate Professor
Proj e ct Co.Director
Emory University School of Medicine
Comprehensive Neighborhood He a l th Center
69 Butler ~tre~t, S . E .
Atlanta, Georgi a 30303
Dear Dr . Marine!
I will be unable to attend the inforlllational rn
on the Neighborhood H ~1th Center Program.
ting Wednesday
However, Johnny Robinson will tt · nd and will r p resent me
t your meeting . I am sure that he will have qu stions we are
int rested in and will also b able to l"epi' sent th City ' s
inter st in the program.
Sine r ly yours ,
Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor
IAJr:fy
�EMORY UNIVERSITY
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE
THOMAS K . GLENN
MEMORIAL BUILDING
69 BUTLER STREET, S. E.
ATLANTA , GEORGIA
30303
DEPARTMENT OF PREVENTIVE MEDICINE
AND COMMUNITY HEALTH
December 29, 1967
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
City Hall
68 Mitchell Street, S. W.
Atlanta, Georgia
30303
Dear Sir:
We would like to invite you to a special informational meeting
for local administrative officials and elected representatives from
the area to be served by the Comprehensive Neighborhood Health
Cent er that is being organized in South Atlanta. Funds for this
Center come from the "Neighborhood Health Center Program" of the
Office of Economic Opportunity.
The meeting will be held in our temporary quarters, 1070 Washington Street, S. W., from 4:00 to 5:30 P. M., Wednesday, January
10, 1968. The staff that has been hired to date wil l participate in
the program, including representatives from the Dental Unit, Education
Unit, Medical Unit, Mental Health Unit, and Nursing Unit. There will
be ample time to answer any questions that y ou have after our presentation.
We hope that you or a designated representative for you wil l be
able to be present at this meeting.
Sincerely yours,
143.215.248.55tU.:_
Dr. William Marine
Associate Profe ssor
Proj e ct Co- Director
Dr. Calvin A. Brown, J r.
Assistant Professor
Project Co- Director
�January 2 , 1968
Dr . William Marinr,
Associate ProfessoJ,"
Project C o -Dh•ector
Comprehensive Neighbo;rhood Health Centel'
Emory Univer sity School of Medicine
Department of Preventive Medicine and
C ommunity He 1th
69 Butl r Street, S . E.
Atlant , Ge o rgi 30303
D
r Dr. M rin
Thank you for your invitation to the January 10 meeting of
the C omprehen ive Neighborhood H alth C nt r program,
Unfortun tely_. I will be in Washington on th t d y but h ve
k d my colle gue,, Johnny Robinson, to repr sent thi o!llc .
We look forw rd to cooperating with you
important und l"t king.
nd your st ff in you:,:
Sine rely ym.u:e,.
Dan Swe t
DS:fy
�EMORY UNIVERSITY
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE
THOMAS K. GLENN
MEMORIAL BUILDING
69 BUTLER STREET, S. E.
ATLANTA, GEORGIA
30303
DEPARTMENT OF PREVENTIVE MEDICINE
AND COMMUNITY HEALTH
De cember 29 , 1967
Mr. Dan Sweat
City Hall
68 Mitche ll Street, S. W.
Atlanta, Georgia
30303
Dear Sir:
We would like to invite you to a special informational meeting
for local administrative off icials and elected representatives from
the area to be served by the Comprehensive Neighborhood Health
Cent er that is being organized in South Atlanta. Funds for this
Center come from the ' 1Neighborhood Heal th Center Program11 of the
Office of Economic Opportunity .
The meeting will be held in our t emporary quarters, 107 0 Washington Street, S. W., from 4:00 to 5:30 P. M., Wednesday, January
10, 1968. The staff that has been hired to date will participate in
the program, including representatives from the Dental Unit, Education
Unit, Medical Unit, Mental Health Unit, and Nursing Unit. There will
be ample time to answer any questions that you have after our presentation.
We hope that you or a designated representative for you will be
able to be present at this meet ing.
Sincere ly yours,
Dr. William Marine
Associate Professor
Project Co-Director
WM:CAB / a
/~~#~-4
Dr . Ca lvin A. Brown, Jr.
Assistant Professor
Project Co- Director
�February 6, 1968
MEMORANDUM
To: General Carl Sutherland
From: Dan Sweat
The attach d t 1 gr m was i-eceived today by Mayor A llen.
I m sending it to you for your information
you are inte:rest d .
DS:fy
Att chm.ent
nd action if
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101 Marietta Street, NW
VOLUME
2 NUMBER 27
Ja.nua.ry 5, 1968
FIFTH PLANNED PARENTHOOD CLINIC OPENS
The Pl:-3_nned Parenthood Association of the Atlanta Area will open
its fifth clinic a.t 1H3 Marietta. Street, N. w. on Friday, January 12th
a.t 5 p. r:n.
Mrs. Julian Freed.man, Executive Director of the program, sa.id,
"This clinic is being opened here a.t our new hea.dqua.rters office to
servG a.s a. centrally l ocated center for women who want to go to a clinic
but do not live nea.r e ither of our four other clinics. "
The new clinic will be open from 5 to 8 p. m. on Fridays.
In
~ ddition , it will se r ve a.s a. central supply center every week da.y from
2:00 to 4 : 30 p. m. f o r a.11 Planned Parenthood participants. Women may
pick u p supplies here no matter where they received their Planned
Pa r e n thood orientation .
EOA finances 80% of the total budget forthe Planned Parenthood
Association of the Atlanta. Area..
The four other Planned Parenthood clinics a.nd their opera.tiona.l
h ours a.re :
Bethlehem Community Center Clinic
9 McDonough Boulevard
Telephone:
627-0176
Monday a.nd Thursday evenings, 6 to 9 p. m.
Perry Homes Clinic
1660 Drew Drive, N. W. Apt. 756
Telephone:
355-8278
Monday a.nd Wednesday evenings, 6 to 9 p. m.
West End Clinic - John O. Chiles Homes
435 Ashby Street, S. w.
Telephone:
755-4228
Thursday evenings, 6 to 9 p. m.
Ea.st Point Clinic
South Fulton Neighborhood Service Center
2735 Ea.st Point Street
Ea.st Point, Georgia.
Te lephone:
767-7541
Tuesday evenings, 6 to 9 p . m.
The r egu l a r of f ice hours for the Planned Parenthood Association
are fr om 9 : 30 a. . m. t o 5 : 30 p. m.
Interested persons should ca.11 5236 9 9 6 fo r fu r ther · i riforma.tion .





�- 2-
~fil
AND CHILD C~R BRIEFING
Edgewood parents of children under thre e years of age are invited
to a Parent and Ch ild Center Br i efi ng Conference to be held at the
Sammye E o Coan Middle School f 1500 Boulevard Driv e 0 S o E~ e on January
10 and ll o
The Wednesday u Janua ry lO u meeti ng will be held from 7:00 until
9 ~00 p ., m ..
The Thursday 0 J anuary 11 0 meeting will be held from 9 ~00 a . m ..
u ntil 4 ~30 Po mo
. I I




































































MODEL CITIE S MEETING
Lewi s Peters ~ Chairman of the Model Cit i es Mass Convent i on 0 urges
all r es idents of the Model Citi es area to a ttend a final planning meeting
Wednesday 3 January 10 6 at 7 : 30 p Q m"u i n preparation for next Sunday 0 s
Ma ss Con vention ..
Wednesday 0 s me eting will b e he ld at the Peter J ., Bryant School , 252
Georgia Avenu e .,
Mr ,, Pe ters s aid t h e Wedn e sday night meeting will be most important
because dec i sio n s must be ma de about t he agenda for Sunday 1 s Convention e
The Mass Co nvention will be held at 3 i 30 P o m., 0 Sunday " January 14 0
at the Hoke Smith Te chn i cal School ~




· * "****************






CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENT ~
COLLEGE PARK CHI LD ,·DEVELOPM.ENT CENTER ~_
FORT MCPHERSON YOUTHS ENTERTA.lli
"A group of young peopl e 16- 17 y ea r s of age 0 sponsored by Chaplin
Webb of Fort McPherson t came to give a Christmas Party to the children
on De c ember 1 9 0 They came i n r eponse t o a .1lett er written to the Commander General by the Center 0 s Social Worker 0 Mrs ., Dorothy Yang 11 asking for
their invo lve ment i n the EOA program ~
" Rona l d Gr ego ry 0 17 u p layed Santa Claus a His mystical powers turned
the cente r into a fairytale land ~ These five young people of Fort McPherson raised the mo ney of $5 0 by putting on a play and by selling themse lve s as s lave s f o r a day9 They brought personal gifts for each child
in addition to the cand i es 8 c ook i es v c o kes and music for the party .. The
soun d of Christmas mus ic and the sight of Santa Claus no.t only delighted
the Center 0 s children 6 but also attract ed the whole population of the
neighborhood ,. There m.ust have been over 100 children and adults who talked
to Santa Glau s and. pa.rtook o f the Chr i stmas goodies ~ It was a real festive
time for the whole commun i ty around t he center o "
Reported by staff
ANT I OCH CHILD DEVELOPMENT C ~
· , CHRISTMAS • ENTERTAINMENT.'\FOR.JAt!TI OCH CHILDREN
Kinde rgarten and o l der c h ildren a tt ended the ballet 11 Nutcraker 1•1
at Mun i cipal Auditor ium q De c ember 26 ~
The- kinde r gar t en g roup a ttended a pe r fo r mance of "Trimming the Christmas Tree " at Theat e r At l anta 9 December 17 ,,
The n ursery and ~ i nder garten children attended a Christmas puppet
show at the Bowen Homes Day care Center 0 December 14 Q
�- 3-
~Q!:!BORHOOD YOUTH CORP S :
_ENROLLEE HONORED
When Frank Briley was transferred from his j ob at the Army Recruiting Office , staff members there held a special ceremony for him
and presented h i m with a Certificate of Merit ~ Lieutenant Ferdinand
B .. Elstad wrote i n h i s letter to Mr o Briley ~ " I feel that you will be
a great a sset t o any empl oyer ., Overall ., your services reflect a great
e x ample to ouhe rs and a credit to yourself and the Neighborhood Youth
Corps .. 11
ENROLLEE PARTICIPATION WEEK LI KED BY NYC'ers !
The one hundred and twen ty- five enrollees assigned to : schools
attended an Enro llee Participation Week during the two weeks their
schools were closed for Christmas ~ The weeks included speakers , studies ,
and discussions on the job market 8 i ntervi ewing and applying for a job,
r equirements for a g ood j ob u crime prevention , the mis~use of drugs , the
venereal diseases , the story of cancer and other topics. The group met
at Eagan Homes Aud itorium each day except the day they toured the Southern Be ll Telephone Company s
NYC NEWS BRIEFS
Martha Holland 6 former cafeteria a ide at the Board o ~ Education
I nstructional Cente r ., has been employed in the cafeteria at Atlanta Tech~
Shirley McKenzie i cleri cal aide at Internal Revenue, will beg in
working as a car dpunch operator at the Internal Revenue Center in Chamble ~
on January 8th "
Silvia vargas 0 NYC clerical aide from the Panama Canal Zone , assisted the Young Republicans in giving a Christmas party for children in
the central city nei ghborhood .. Silvia made three pi'nata s for the
children to break as do the children in Mexico at Christmas ~ She also
assisted in leading games $ Si lvia works in the NYC main o ffice~


































































































NEIGHBORHOOD SERVICE CENTERS :
EDGEWOOD :
INTER-AGENCY MONTHLY MEETING
Representatives from various DeKalb County agencies, interested
in the health i welfare and educational needs of the people in the Edgewood
and Kirkwood areas , held a second group meeting. December 18th , at the
Edgewood Neighborhood Ce nter ., Mr ~ Jack Sartain , of DeKalb County Health
Department 6 wa s moderator~
Empha si s was sti ll on c ommunicati on between agencies, the need f or
each to be aware of a nd understand the funct ions and proffered services
of the othersQ Plans were made f or a third meeting January 24, 1968, to
be held a t the new Sammye Coan Middle School on Boulevard Drive, No E.
GOLDEN AGERS
The Go lden Agers ' Annual Christmas Party was held in the Ce nter 1 s
con f erence room December 19th ~ A large number participated; refreshments
were served and gifts exch anged e This event is only one o f many highl i ghts of the y ear8
,,
�-4EAST CENTRAL NEIGHBORHOOD
SERVICE CENTER ~
THE GRASS GROWS GREENER !
The grass that was pla.nted on Boule vard i s growi ng nice l y ,. we wish to take
th i s time to thank Dr e Buchanan and M.r o
Watson and all of the people from Piedmont
Park that as s i sted i n the g:riound break i ng
and s owing of the seeds Q
Our thank s go out to Mrs ., Br umly and
th e members of the Hands Organizati on .,
Some of the tenants on Boulevard have made
signs and p u t out front to PLEASE KEEP OFF
THE GRASS e We have noti ced th~t these signs
h ave been ignored arid removed o Help us to
restore Boul evard 1 s beauty -- "it is our
duty !"
From the Neighborhood Obse rver
By Mrs ., Lois Winder Harris
Area Block 11 D"
SOUTH FULTON NE IGHBORHOOD
SERVICE CENTER ~
SANTA COMES TO HILLCREST
One hundred families 0 including some 450 children u living in
East Point 0 s Hillcrest Homes public hous i ng received gifts o f f ood r
clothing and t o y s for Christmas ., Numerous persons and agencies donated
the gifts .,
Volunteer workers sorted t he gifts at the Hill c rest Community
Center and distr i buted them ., Volunteers included Wendell Hendrix!' Cha irman of the Hi l lcrest Steering Committee; Robert Smith 0 Steering committee
Treasurer; Raymond Hutto and Sharman Raper " c ommittee members; Charlie
Mosbyg David McCarten and Mike Lessnew 9 VI STA workers ~ Lee Harvey 0 Don
Traylor and Denny Prerin ., t een c ommittee members ; Frank Lewi s 11 Mrs o Dot
Harvey, Mrs ., Euna Garner 11 and others a
Gifts worth more than $10 0 000 were donated b y Central Park Elementary School 11 Marines O Toys fo r Tots @ East Point Chaplai n Jack Holt 0 ;Joe
Carter of Hillcrest Supermarket 0 Capitol View Baptist Chur chQ " Big Brother
and Sister Program 11 o f Georgia state College 0 Dogwood Hills Bapti st Chu:rch_;
Columbia Avenue Baptist Churc h of Decatur {/ East Point First Ba.pti st
Chu r ch , Headland Heights Bapti st Chur ch., Chr i st the King catholi c Church 6
Sa l vation Army ., Empty St o cking Fund 0 and Warren Memorial Boys ' Club.
,._,.
�t.
L -
/
(Georgia)
OFFICE OF ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY
Southeast Regional Office
730 Peachtree Street, N.E.
Atlanta, Georgia
30308
Phone: 526-3194
NEWS for immediate release
OEO ANNOUNCES URBAN SER.VICE AWARDS
Twelve community leaders,four newspapers, a television station and the
Atlanta Chamber of Commerce were among the first to receive the recently
established Urban Service Award of the Office of Economic Opportunity,
Sargent Shriver, Director of OEO, has announced.
This honor is for those i ndividuals and organizations "whose dedicated
efforts to alleviate the problems of the poor in America's cities have helped
create a better life for our citizens," according to the award.
The individuals included: in Atlanta, Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.,
Boisfeuillet Jones, Dr. Vivian Henderson, William W. Allison, Dr. William Holmes Borde
Dan Sweat, Mrs Earl Metzger, Jr., Mrs Mattie Ansley and the late Charles O. Emmerich;
in Athens, Judge James Barrow; in Augusta, the Reverend E. O. Waldron; and in
Columbus, Virginia Barfield.
In addition to the above i ndividuals, citations also were made to the Atlanta
Constitution, the Atlanta Journal, television station WSB and the Atlanta Chamber
of Commerce; and the Athens Banner- Herald and Daily News i n Athens •
.
Mayor Allen was cited for his dynamic leadership of a progressive city during
trying times, while Bill Allison and Dan Sweat were both cited for their service
to Economic Opportunity Atlanta and to the city government and the citizens of
the Atlanta area.
Mr. Jones , who has served as Chairman of the Board of Economic Opportunity
Atl anta, Inc., was cited for his numerous civic contributions and for his
particular support of the War on Poverty.
Mrs. Metzger was named for her service with the special task force assisting
EOA in its programs around Atlanta, particularly in the Head Start Programs.
Dr. Henderson was cited for his service to the community at large and the
involvement of Clark College in poverty programs.
(MORE)
�I
Page 2 (Ga.)
Dr. Borders was named for his long leadership in Atlanta and especially
for the self-help projects which he has headed in poverty communities.
.
Mrs . Ansley has worked diligently in creating interest in resident
participation since the beginning of the War on Poverty in her neighborhood; her
most recent activity has been to spearhead the target area elections for low
income are a representation to the Neighborhood Advisory Committee.
Mr. Emmerich launched, was the first Director of Economic Opportunity Atlanta.
He -worked tirelessly from the time OED programs were first started in Atlanta until
his ur:itimely death; in a very r eal sense, he gave his life in the War on Poverty.
Judge Barrow has been active in the operation of the Athens Community High
School and adult education program financed through grants made from OED.
Reverend Waldron has been extremely active in the development of t he Community
Action Agency in Augusta , Georgia.
He worked diligently i n uniting the community,
as well as interpreting the concept of Community Action to the point that the total
community became concerned over the need to activate a program for the impoverished
of Richmond County and Augusta , Georgia .
Mrs. Barfield should be commended for her outstanding work in accomplishing
the coordination of local resources in the establishment of the MIND Center at
• a , which is an adult educat ion vehicle designed to take low-income
Columbus, Ge or gi
persons with less than an eighth·grade education and upgrade them educationally
two to four grade levels in eight to ten weeks.
In pre s enting these Urban Service Awards, Sargent Shriver said, "Arnerica 1 s
most di ffi cul t challenge is i n the city, and you met it by working in the city to
help i mprove the quality of urban life.
Awards can never repay you for this unselfish
dedication t o the welfare of your fellow man , but they do affirm our deep appreci ation f or your wor k i n behal f of t he poor."
Dr. Ralph A. Phelps, Jr., Southeast Regional Director of OEO in Atlanta, said
that all of the honor ees were nomi nat ed by OE0 1 s Regional Office on the basi s of
their efforts to help t he poor in their own communities .
Awards went t o War on
Poverty Agencie s , wor kers, volunt eer s and suppor t ers i n over JOO Americ an citie s.
�l
I
I
OFFICE OF ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY
Southeast Regional Office
730 Peachtree Street, N. E.
Atlanta, Georgia 30308
Phone: · 526-3194
NEWS for immediate release
REGIONAL DIRECTOR MAKES - PRESENTATION
The Regional Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity will present
Urban Servic·e Awards to seventeen Geo.rgia individuals and organizations at 3 o'clock
Tuesday afternoon, January 23, at Atlanta's City Hall.
Dr. Ralph A. Phelps, Jr.,
-
will make these presentations on behalf of Sargent Shriver, Director of OEO, who
announced the name~ of Georgia honorees last week.
This honor is for those individuals and organizations "whose dedicated efforts
to alleviate the proplems of the poor in America's cities have helped create a
better life for our citizens," according to the award.
The individuals in Georgia included: in Columbus,,Mrs. Virginia .Barfield;
in Athens, Judge James Barrow; in Augusta, Reverend E. O. Waldron; and in Atlanta,
Mrs. Mattie Ansley, Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr., Boisfeuillet Jones, Dr. Vivian Henderson,
William W. Allison, Dr. William Holmes Borders, Dan Sweat, Mrs. Earl Metzger, Jr.,
and the award to Charles O. Emmerich, Sr., the late Director of Economic Opportunity
Atlant~, will be accepted by his widow and son.
Receiving the awards made to organizations will be: Augustus· H. Sterne for
the Atlanta Chamber of Comme rce; Ray Moore, Jim Giltmier and Abe Gallman for ' television
WSB; Editor Jack Spalding for the Atlanta Journal; Editor Eugene Patterson for the
Atlanta Constitution; and Publish er N. S . Hayden ann Reporter Bob Ingle for the Athens
Banner - Her a ld a nd At hens Da i ly News.


·-k**


�(Georgia)
OFFICE OF ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY
Southeast Regional Office
730 Peachtree Street, N.E.
Atlanta, Georgia
30308
Phone: 526-3194
NEWS for immediate release
OEO ANNOUNCES URBAN SERVICE AWARDS
Twelve community leaders,four newspapers, a television station and the
Atlanta Chamber of Commerce were among the first to receive the recently
established Urban Service Award of the Office of Economic Opportunity,
Sargent Shriver, Director of OEO, has announced.
This honor is for those i ndividuals and organi zations "whose dedicated
effort s to allevi at e the pr oblems of t he poor in Americ a 's citie s have helped
create a better life for our citizens," according to the award.
The individuals included: in Atlanta, Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.,
Boisfeuillet Jones , Dr. ·Vi vian Henderson, Wi lliam W. Allis on, Dr. William Holmes Bord,
Dan Sweat, Mrs Earl Metzger, Jr., Mrs Mattie Ansley and the late Charles O. Emmerich;
. in Athens, Judge James Barrow; in Augusta, the Reverend E. 0. Waldron; and in
Columbus , Virg\ nia Barfield.
In additi on t o the above individual s , citations also wer e made t o t he Atl anta
Constitution , the Atlant a J ournal, t el evi si on station WSB and the Atla.Dta Chamber
of Commerce; and the Athens Ba.Dner-Herald and Daily News in Athens.
Mayor Al len was cited for his dynamic l eadership of a progressive city during
try:.ng time s, while Bill Allison and Dan Sweat were both cited for their s ervice
to Economic Opportunity Atl anta and to the city government and the citi zens of
the Atlanta area.
Mr. Jones , who has s erved as Chairman of the Board of Economic Opportunity
Atlanta; I nc ., was cited f or his numerous civi c contributions and f or his
particular support of the War on Poverty.
Mrs . Metzger was named for her service wi th the special task force assisting
EOA in its programs around Atl ant a , particul arl y in the Head Start Programs .
Dr. Henderson was cited for his service to t he community at large and the
involvement of Clark College in poverty programs .
(MORE)
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�Page 2 (G a .)
Dr. Borders was named for his long leadership in Atlanta and especially
for the self-help projects which he has headed in poverty communities.
Mrs. Ansley has worked diligently in creating interest in resident
participation since the beginning of ,the War on Poverty in her neighborhood; her
most recent activity has been to spearhead the target area elections for low
income area representation to the Neighborhood Advisory Committee.
Mr. Emmerich launched, was the first Director of Economic Opportunity Atlanta.
He worked tirelessly from the time O,EO programs were first started in Atlanta until
I
his untimely death; in a very real ~ense , he gave his life in the War on Poverty.
Judge Barrow has been active in the operation of the Athens Community High
Schoo l and adult education program financed through grants made from OEO.
Reverend Waldron has been extreme ly active i n the development of the Community
Action Agency in Augusta, Georgia.
He worked diligently in uniting the community,
as well as interpreting the concept of Community Action to the point that the total
community became concerned over the need to activate a program for the impoverished
of Richmond County and Augusta , Georgia.
Mrs. Barfield should be commended for her outstanding work in accomplishing
the coordination of local resources in the establishment of the MIND Center at
Columbus, Georgia, which is an adult education vehicle designed to take low-income
persons with less than an eighth·grade education and upgrade them educationally
two to four grade levels in eight to ten weeks .
In presenting these Urban Service Awards, Sargent Shriver said,
11
America's
most difficult challenge is in the city, and you met it by working in the ci ty to
help improve the quality of urban life.
Awards can never repay you for 'this unselfish
dedication to the welfare of your fellow man, but they do affirm our· deep appreciation for your work in behalf of the poor. 11
Dr. Ralph A. Phe lps, Jr., Southeast Regional Director of OEO in Atlanta, said
'
that all of the honorees were nominated by OEO 1 s Regional Office on the basis of
their efforts to help the poor in their own communities.
Awards went to War on
Poverty Agenc ies, workers, volunteers and supporters in over 300 American cities.
�OFFICE OF ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY
Southeast Regional Office . .
730 Peachtree Street, N. E.
Atlanta, Georgia 30308
Phone: · 526-3194
NEWS for immediate release
REGIONAL DIRECTOR MAKE~ PRESENTATION
The Regional Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity will present
Urban Service Awards to sevent~en Georgia individuals and organizations at 3 o'clock
Tuesday afternoon, January 23, at Atlanta's City Hall.
Dr. Ralph A. Phelps, Jr.,
will make these presentations on behalf of Sargent Shr-iver, Director of OEO, who
announced the names of Georgia honorees last week.
This honor is for those individuals and organizations "whose dedicated efforts
to alleviate the p~oblems of the poor in America's cities have helped create a
bett er life for our citizens," according to the award.
The individuals in Georgia included: in Columbus,,Mrs. Virginia Barfield;
in Athens, Judge James Barrow; in Augusta, Reverend E. O. Waldron; and in Atlanta,
Mrs. Mattie Ansley, Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr., Boisfeuillet Jones, Dr. Vivian Henderson,
William W. Allison, Dr. William Holmes Borders, Dan Sweat, Mrs. Earl Metzger, Jr.,
and the award to Charles O. Emmerich, Sr., the late Director of Economic Opportunity
Atlanta, will be accepted by his widow and son.
Receiving · the awards made to organizations will be: Augustus H. Sterne for
the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce; Ray Moore, Jim Giltmier and Abe Gallman for television
WSB; Edito~ Jack Spalding for the Atlanta Journal; Editor Eugene Patterson for the
Atlanta Constitution; and Publisher N. S. Hayden and Reporter Bob Ingle for the Athens
Banner-Herald and Athens · Daily News.
�EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
SOUTHEAST REGIONAL OFFICE
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30308
OFFICE OF ECONOMIC
C)llll()l~TlJNITY
January 23, 1968
Mr. Dan Sweat
Government Liaison
Office of the Mayor
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mr. Sweat:
In behalf of the Office of Economic Opportunity, it gives me
great pleasure to present you the enclosed Urban Service Award,
given for your outstanding contributions to the War on Poverty.
Because of your dedicated efforts and those of others like you,
we are making slow but certain progress in our efforts to make
every citizen of this great land self-respecting and, unless
physically disabled, self-supporting.
Please permit me to add my personal . appreciation for what you
have done and my best wishes for your continued success in this
great endeavor.
Sincerely,
R
~
h!~~,)'
Regional Director
�.-... ¥
.
,-~
THE ATLANTA CONSTITl.JI'ION has long been one of the
Television Station WSB has given strong, unusual and
staunchest supporters of OEO, with numerous signed
consistent support to a ll OEO programs, not only in
and unsigned editorials supporting all programs for
I •
its news coverage but in repeated edi torial support
the poor.
Editor Gene Patterson and editorial
from Ray Moore and his staff, and in the excel lent
cartoonist Cliff Baldowski have been typical of the
editorial cartoons of Bi ll Danie l s.
support given by all the Constitution staff.
,I
The Atlanta Journal ·has given great support to
the Office.of Economic Opportunity and its legislation,
·I
I
Judge James Barrow - Athens, Ga,
'
In recognition of 0udge Barrow's outstanding· civic
activities· in assistin~ in the format ion o f t he
Community Ac tion Agency serving a mu l ti-county area ,
and for hi s valuable ass istance in t h e operation
of the Athens Adult High School , a OEO funded adult
education program, the Urban Service Award is
presented to Judge Barrow,
particularly through editorial endorseme~t, the
-
personal c~lumns of Reese Cleghorn, and editorial
i
cartoons by L6u Eri~kson.
r
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�Father Edward 0. Waldron, Rector, St. Alban 1 s
Episcopal Church, Augusta, Georgia
Board Member - Richmond Economic Opportunity Council,
Augusta, Ga.
Dr. William Holmes Borders, Pastor of Wheat Street
Baptist Church.
In Recognition of your profound concern for the
welfare of all men, for your dedication in extending
your ministeral duties from the pulpit to the
community to meet, not only the spiritual needs of
those you serve, but their need for housing, food,
and better jobs; for your insurmountable efforts to
meet with any group, to speak fo F any person, and to
work for any cause that motivates, upgrades, and
uplifts mankind toward a better life.
In recognition of your extreme concern for the problems
of the poor in the Cit y of Aug usta and of Richmond
Count y . For your Christian dedication as you worked
unselfishly and untiringly to arouse yo ur community to
become concerned also of their impoverished brothers
in their midst until the need to activate a broadly
based anti-poverty program to provide opportunities for
these families to live and enjoy a better life was
recognized .c·{. ,.'\ l
c(~ c-c..· , ,,.
ci
f \,,; \ "
II
_,
I
l .-
- - - - ------ --- - - - -
--·- ------ - -- ·· - - .
Mr s. Earl Metzger, Jr.
In recognition of your service as a volunteer civic
worker in the interest of uplifting of your fellow
citizens and your community.
I
.!
Mrs. Mattie Ansley
uu- -J.
1
.,,
/l- I I tr ,,,, .;,i, G ,.,
i~t ,;1 e.-
Emplo yee - Atlanta Concentrated Employment
Program, Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.
In recognition of the services rendered as Director of
the "Volunteer Task For.ce 11 a training program for more
effective vol unt eer service by members of the Atlanta
Community, in the many social agencies and programs in
fi ghting the 11 War on Poverty".
In recognition of yo ur hard work and outstanding
services rendered in organizing yo ur Community in
fighting the poverty,
n
�William W. Allison, Deputy Administrator of Economic
Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.
In recognition of your keen awareness of problems,
untiring service and dedicated efforts in the
coordination of res·ources of Economic Opportunity
Atlanta, Inc., State and Local Governments and the
Atlanta Co~munity in developing and implem~nting unique
and effective approaches in fighting the" War on
Poverty" in the city of Atlanta.
Mr. Dan Sweat - Director of Governmental Liasson for
City of Atlanta
. ,i
For outstanding service in the development of the
anti-poverty program in Atlanta and for recog nition
of your effective coordination of governmental agencies
and programs with the Mayor's office to alleviate the
problems of the poor and provide for them a better
life in the City of Atlanta.
Mr. Boisfeuillet Jones
President of Woodruff
Foundation and recently appointed Chairman of
President Johnson's National Advisory Committee for
Health Facilities.
·
the
importance of these educational and employment
For outstanding and dynamic leadership as Chairman of
the Board of Econom i c Opportunity Atlanta, Inc., one
of the first funded anti-poverty programs in the
nation.
programs, and has tried to lead businessmen to understand and support them.
Mr. Sterne was president of
the Chamber last year when the organization went on
For your never ceasing dedication to Civic concern
for the city of Atlanta and your country as you seek
to make this a better world in which to live .
n
record supporting OEO and endorsing all sound efforts
to help the poor h e lp themse l ves.
�...
I
Mr. Charles 0. Emmerich
Posthumous Award
\
I n recogniti on of your outstanding and dynami c
leadership as mayor of one of the most progressive
me tropol itan cities of the South and the nation .
·I
I
You , as a lead er1 have e xhibi ted a k een and deep
awareness and concern for the citizens you serve. You
have soughl and made effective inroads into the
alleviation of problems coxi s ting within yolir city in
yo ur effort to make Atlanta a b e tter p l ace12:56, 29 December 2017 (EST)~
for all citize ns, especially those who are the l ess
fortunate.
in{U
-
-
'1) .
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor - Ci ty of Atl anta
'I
rendered by the
. .
f the valuable services
In recognition o
. h the first Exe cutive
'
1 ate Mr. Cha rles O : Emmeric
ortunity Atlanta, Inc.
Director of Economic Opp b
d s a dedicated pioneer
Mr. Emmerich will be r~memH:r:il~ go down in history
in the "War on Poverty f.
se he truly believed
as a "soldier who died or a cau
--
i
i
r
- --- --------
-

------- -·-
.
-- -- -- -- -
.-(.4-
The Athens Banner-Herald and the D·aily News have
reported regularly and accurately on OEO programs,
and on al l efforts in their covera ge area to help
the poor help themselves.
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Recognition ~
given to 'ofle~:5ea your leadersh i p
in times of stress, e spe c iall y f or your willingness t o
riskJ and
your unusual ability to lead your city
to a~ effective understand ing of the prob l ems of the
A
citi zens you serve.
f!E:
Recog n i tion must be given to the unselfish way y ou
have shared your experience and wisdom with othe r c i ties
throughout the nation who call on you .
Atlant a is i ndeed fo rtunat e to tave you as a Ma y or a nd
OEO is proud to make this award) t t('recogni t ion of
your services.
..
�t
~t
~
Mrs. Virginia Barfield, Director, Lower Chat-· !
tahoochee Community Action Agency, Inc., co- !
lumbus, Georgia
.I

• •• ••·
br. Vivian Hende rson-- Pres ident , Clark Col lege,
Atlanta, Georgia
In recognit ion of the outstanding servi c e y ou
have r endered no t only to the youth at Clark
Colleg e but for your interest in National problems and concerns--------.
In re~ognition of Mrs. Barfield's outstanding
work in accomplishing the coordination of
local resources in the establishment of the
l1J.@ Center (Mental Intellectual Development)
at Columbus, Georgia. MIND is designed to
take low income persons with less than an
8~h grade education and upgrade them educatio_nally 2 to 4 grade levels i·n 8 to
h 1
10 weeks,
w_i e also upgrading them socially and environmentally and
.
,
secures Jobs for tne (oYR~)
- - -- -----'
>
For recognition of your service as a member o f
the National Advisory Committees on Manpower
and of the Upward Bound Programs and the Pres i dent's Commiss ion on Rural Poverty .
I
I -
graduates. The Urban Service Award is presented1
to Mrs. Barfield.
I
j
l
n
I'
(~)
For the generous and graciousn ess in mak ing
your fa ciliti es of Clark College avail abl e
to the Office of Economic Opportunity for
the training of Community Ac tion Agen c y
staff and Board Memb ers.
�WOODRUFF MEDICAL CENTER
OF
..
EMORY UNIVERSITY
'
T HOMAS K. G L ENN MEM OR IAL B UILDI NG
69 BUTLER S TREET, S , E .
A T LANTA, GEORGIA
SCHOOL O F MEDICINE
30303
January 16 , 1968
Ivan Allen , Jr.
Mayor
City Hal l
At l anta, Geor gi a
~ ~
v,Mmc,Ne
M,JNITY HEALTH
30303
Dear Si r :
You and Mr . Dan Sweat were wel l repr e s ented l ast Wednesday
aft ernoon, J anua ry 10, at t he inf ormati on me eting for t he
Compr ehens i ve Ne i ghborhood Health Center pr ogr am in the Price
Area by Mr . J ohnny Robins on . Thi s program has great potential
meaning f or the f uture development of healt h care especiall y
f or t he medically i ndigent i n t he Atlant a ar ea , but it ' s
success will in l arge part be det ermine d by t he j oint participat i on of a ll ar eas of t he Atlanta community i nterest ed
in heal t h . Your offi ce could b e extremely e ffec t ive i n
motivating t he local public health and welf are a gencies,
city , county , and stat e into great er cooper ation and i nterest
i n t he pr ogram. To thi s end we would welcome t he oppor tuni t y
if you would be able to give some of your own time to help
us go into t h i s aspect of t he program i n great er det ail .
. Si ncerel y ,
~ 4 - ,:t],,.,/ ~~
Calvin A. Br own , M. D.
Pr o j e ct Co- Director
CAB/ WMM :b c
~~ M.
Marine , M.D. ,
As soci at e Professor
Proj e ct Co-Di r e ctor
�IT IS AN INVESTMENT IN THE FUTURE TO HELP FAMILIES BECOME
AWARE OF THEIR CHILDREN'S NEEDS.
-
THE KIND OF HEALTH CARE,
GUIDANCE, STIMULATION AND DISCIPLINE A CHILD RECEIVES AT
HOME DETERMINES WHAT KIND OF AN ADULT HE WILL BE.
�~/~
ROU~
TO:
FROM:
0
Ivan Allen, Jr.
For your information
~ e refer to the attached correspondence and make the
necessary reply.
D
Advise m e th e sta tus of the a ttached.
(
(;------ - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - -- - - - - - -/
F ORM 25-4
�JECVJlvOMIC 0/PIPORTUNJTY A7flANJfA
IN CORPORATE: D
IOI MARIETTA
STREET 13LD6., ATLANTA, &EOR0IA .30303
TELE?HONE 525-4-2.62
Ja~uary 2, E68
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
30303
Dear Mayor Allen:
We would like to include on our printed program for the Parent
and Child Center Briefing Conference endorsement stateme~ts from
"opinion-makers" in various fields that would be concerned with the
development of a Parent and Child Center for Atlanta. We feel that
a brief statement (one to five sentences) from you would greatly enhance our program.
We will be h~ppy to come to your office to get your endorsement
if it is not convenient for you to mail it to us in the enclosed
envelope. In order to complete the printing at our program, we will
need to have this by Monday, January 8; 1968.
Please call Miss Ann Ingram, Planning Director, at 688-6232 if
you have any questions.
Thank you so very much for your concern and cooperation .
Very truly yours,
/,U/~
Harold E. Barrett
Associate Administrator
for Community Services
HEB : jm
/
-'·
�ECOJVOMl<C OPIPORT!ffNJJtY A7flANJ!A
IN CORPORATE. P
IOI MARIETTA
STREET .8LD6., ATLANTA, &EOR0IA 30303
TELEPHONE S25-4-2 62
January 2, 1968
Invitation to Parent and Child Center Briefing Conference
We are completing plans for our Parent and Child Center Briefing Conference
to be held at the Sarnrnye E. Coan Middle School, 1500 Boulevard Drive, S. E.,
on January 10 and 11, 1968. Knowing of your. ·. inter.ese:· in such program$, we
wish to invite you to attend . The hours for the conference are:
7:00-9:00 P.M.
Wednesday, January 10.
9:00 A.M. - 4:30 P.M. - Thursday, January 11.
We are enclosing for your information a tentative agenda of conference
events and a brief statement describing the Parent Child Center idea.
We do hope that you will be able to participate in the conference for we
know that you can make a valuable contribution to its success and to the
development of a plan for the Parent and Child Center itself .
Please call Miss Ann Ingram, Planning Director, at 688-6232 or Mr. Johnny
Popwell, at 378-3643 if you have questions or suggestions about the conference.
We'll see you there'.'.
�Parent Child Center Briefing Conference
Sammye E. Coan Middle School
1500 Boulevard Drive, S. E.
January 10-11, 1968
Tentative Agenda
Wednesday, January 10 - 7:00 P.M. - 9:00 P.M.
Opening Statements
Mr. Ralph Long, Principal
Sammye E. Coan Middle School
Introductions ---------------------------- _Miss Ann Ingram, Planning Director
Parent and Child Center
Remarks ---------------------------------- Mr. T. M. Parham, Executive Administrator
Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.
Mr. J. H. Calhoun, Assistant
for Community Development, EOA
A VISIT TO THE "PCC FAIR"
(Exhibits, Displays in School Gymnasium) Informal Dis cuss ion and Re freshments
Thursday, January 11
9:00 - 11:30 A.M.
PRESENTATIONS
Presiding :
"What' s Now Being Done"
Dr. Boyd McCandless
Director of Educationa l Psychology
Emory Universit y
Infant Education Project Institute for Deve lopme nt of Human Resources,
University of Florida
Project Know How - Dr. Richard M. Dunham
Department of Human Development
Florida State Univers it y
Project Enable
�Tentative Agenda
Page 2
New School Projects - Dr. Jarvis Barnes
Assistant Superintendent for Research and Development
Atlanta Public Schools
STRETCH BREAK
11:30 - 11:40 A.M.
11:40 . A.M. - 1:00 P.M.
PANEL
"Who's Interested in the PCC"
Presiding:
Mr. Harold E. Barrett
Associate -Administrator for Community Services
Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.
Social Services - Mrs Camille Jeffers, Atlanta University School of
Social Work
Health Services - Mrs. Phylli s Siefferman
Kirkwood Health Center
DeKalb County Health Department
Recreation - Mr. Aaron Watson, Director
Sammye E. Coan Community School
Housing Nei ghborhood Facili t i es Prog ram
Regional of fic e , HUD
Employment Bure au of Work Programs
U. S. Departme n t of Labor
1:00 - 2:00 P . M.
LUNCH (School Cafeteria )
2 :00 - 3 :15 P. M.
Sma l l Group Discussions
(Group assi gnments determined by number$ given at beginning
of day - Each group will have leader, recorder, cons ultant)
3 : 15 - 3: 30 P. M.
STRETCH BREAK
3 :30 - 4:3 0 P.M.
Summary Session
Presi ding:
Mr. J ohnny Popwe ll , Direc to r
Edgewood Neighborhood Service Center
(Reports from smal l groups )
(Remar ks from Pro j ect Officer, Pro j ect Coord ina tqr, etc.)
�A STATEMENT ABOUT THE PARENT AND CHILD CENTER
PARENT AND CHILD CENTERS (FCC) are establishe d to pro v ide services for
disadv antaged families who hav e one or mor e children under the a ge of thr~e.
Many of the families will also have seve ral older children, or will be planning or e x pecting to have a bab y .
In many cases, a FCC will be linked with a comprehensive Neighborhood
Service Center, an organization which offers the residents of a spe t i i ied
geographic area access to a wide range of services and processes de s igned
. to help them out of povert y . In others, a FCC may cooperate with a center
which may be or ganized around one certain function, s uch as a Neighborhood
Health Center. Such centers ne ed not necessaril y be f und e d by OEO . Affiliation with a Neighborhood Center facilitates one of the basic objectives of
the FCC, that of bringing the whole famil y into contact with a broad range
of services.
The PCCs are funded by the Office of Economic Opportunity in cooperation
with the Department of Health, Education and Welfare , the Department of Labor,
and the Department of Housing and Urban Development.
Objectives
In general, the PCCs are established to help families to function independentl y and e ffectively and f or their children to develop to their full
potential. In more specific terms, the programs developed by the plannin~
groups should have the objectives of:
1.
Overcoming deficits in health, intellectual, social, and
emotional development and max imizing the child's inherent
talents and potentialities;
2.
Improving the skills, confidenc e , attitudes, and motiv&tions
of the pare nts as citi ze ns, parent s , and indiv iduals;
3.
Str e ng thenin g famil y org ani zation and functioning by involving
the youngest childre n, the pare nts, older childr e n in the
famil y, and r e lativ es ;
4.
Encouraging a gr e ater sense of c ormnunit y and neighborliness
amon g the families s e r ve d by th e center ;
5.
Prov iding training and e x perie nc e f o r both pro fe s s ional s and
non - profe s sional s who may the n be employ e d in wo r k with par ents
and ch ildren;
6.
Serv ing as a lo cus f or r esear ch and eva lu at i on of pr og re s s t oward
the obj ec t ives st ated above .
The Atl ant a Parent and Ch i l d Center is bei ng p l anned in th e Edgewood
Cormnu n i ty.
�February 16, 1968
M r . Albert J . Bows
Vice President and
Partner-in-Charge
Arthur Andersen & Company
Bank of Beorgia Building
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dea r Mr . Bows:
Attached is a letter from Dr. Tilman C. Cothran of Atlanta
University concerning the New Careers in Industry program.
I believe this might relate more to the Chamb r 's Task
Force on Private Employment.
I would ppreciat any suggestions or id as that you or your
colleagues might have to offer in conn ction with Di- . Cothran'
program.
Sine rely your ,
Dan Sw
DS:fy
Enclo ure
t
�February 16, 1968
M r . Albert J . Bows
Vice President and
Partner-in-Charge
Arthur Andersen & Company
Bank of Beorgia Building
Atlanta, Georgia _30303
Dear Mr . Bows :
Attached is a letter from Dr. Tilman C. Cothran of Atlanta
University concerning the New Careers in Industry program.
I believe this mlght relate more to the Chamb r ' s Task
Force on Priv t Employment.
I would
pp reci te any suggestions or ideas that you or yout'
colleagues might have to offer in conn cticm with Dr. Cothran'
progr m .
Sine rely your ,
D n Swe t
DS:fy
Ettclo u!'
�EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
OFFICE OF ECONOMIC
CJllll()l~TlJNITY
WASH I NGTON, D.C. 20506
February 14, 1968
Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor of Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Mayor Allen:
Thank you for the prompt reply to my telegram regarding the possible employment of staff personnel from
four of our Job Corps Centers.
I know that I speak for the staff personnel involved
when I say that your kind and thoughtful consideration
for their welfare, together with your prompt offer of
assistance and cooperation in an attempt to find employment for them, is deeply appreciated.
With every best wish.
�Febl"uary 6, 1968
Dr. Tilman C . Cothran, Dire ctor
M ulti-Purpose Training Center
Atlanta University
Atlanta , Georgia 30314
Dear Tilman:
Mayor A llen has asked that I answer your letter 0£ February 3
regarding the establishment of your planning committee to plan
fo'J' a New Ca:reers conference in this area .
As I mentioned to you on the telephone this morning, Johnny
Robinson has been working with the CEP people at EOA on a
New Careers application £or our Model Cities Program. He
is aware of the program and bett r informed than anyone else
in City Hall on its dvantages.
He will be av i1 ble to meet with your planning committ
to
discuss the items outlined in yolll' letter.
I would ppreciate any specific sujge tions s to your ide s
on th involv ment of the Urban Coalition in conferenc and
I will be gl d to pursue this with the rnemb ra of the Ste ring
Committ
of the Atlanta Urb n Co lition.
Sincer . ly your ,
Dan Sw
DSrfy
t
�ATLANTA UNIVERSITY
ATLANTA. GEORGIA 30314
February 3, 1968
PHONE 4 0 4 - 5 2 3 - 4 3 0 3
MULTI- PURPOSE TRAINING CENTER
Mayor Ivan Al len
Cit y Hall
Atlant a, Georgia
Dear Mayor Al len:
During the past six weeks, members of Atlanta University OEO
Multi-Purpose Training Center have received training at the Frank
Riessrnan New Careers Laboratory of New York University. We are
excited over the possibility of the new careers strategy for moving
poor people out of poverty.
Basically, the new careers idea provides an alternative avenue
to the present credentials system based on high s chool diploma and
other degrees for the achievement of professional and sld..lled positions.
The approach requires that individuals be employed in a position with
the existence of a career ladder, training and education, both in
educational institutions and on the job. For individuals who have
dropped out of the school system and who are hostile toward returning
to it, this program seems to be a major opportunity.
While the ne1-i careers approach is being tested in several major
cities throughout the country, we feel that it is advisable to make
key individuals in the Southeastern Region familiar with the approach.
Accordingly, the Atlanta University OEO Multi-Purpose Training Center
is interested in the possibility of a joint community action agencies
and industry conference on the new careers strategy. Dr. Riessrnan
has assured us of support and participation from his staff.
This letter invites you or a designated person to serve on the
planning committee for the regional conference.
The planning committee will be concerned with the following items:
1. The desirability and feasibility of such a conference;
2. The conference participants;
3. Time and place;
4. Program content; and
5. Conference follow-up procedures.
�February 3, 1968
Page 2
The new careers approach seems to be an excellent strategy for
cooperating with President Johnson 1 s request of industry to employ
hard core poor people, and for helping comrnuriity action agencies,
welfare departments, boards of education, health departments , and
other large public and private agencies, to provide career ladders
vis-a-vis deadend jobs for the poor.
Yow.~ early response to t his invitation will be appreciated
greatly~
Sincerely yours,
ff!?___g
~ad.~~
V/2~~
C. Cothran
Director Multi-Purpose
Training Center
TCC :mk
Sent to:
Mr. James Parham
Mr . W.L. Montague
Mr . Wm. Norwood
Mr. Donald Hollowell
Mr. John Dean
Mr. Clarence Coleman
�ATLANTA UNIVERSITY
ATLANTA , GEORGIA 30314
February 8, 1968
SCHOOi. OF ARTS AND SCI ENC ES
Mr. Dan E. Sweat, Jr.
Director of Governmental Liaison
City of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Dan:
Thanks for your letter of February 6th reconnnending Mr. Johnny
Robinson to serve on our planning connnittee for the New Careers
conference. I shall contact Mr. Robinson today.
In regard to the involvement of the Urban Coalition, we are considering the idea of inviting representatives from industry to
attend the conference. Frank Riessman suggested the idea in
that the Federal government is asking for greater participation
from private industry in regard to employing the hard core poor.
I am not certain that this is an area of concern for the Urban
Coalition. However, the employment of the poor is of major
concern for urban areas . The New Careers strategy has implications
for industry.
I am enclosing a copy of a paper on "New Careers in Industry" by
Riessman and Paniagua . If you feel that the steering connnittee
of the At1anta Urban Coalition would be interested in the conference, we shall be glad to work with you.
Sincerely yours,
~
TILMAN C. COTHRAN
Director
TCC:dwa
�I
NEW CAREERS IN INDUSTRY
Frank Riessman, Ph.D.
Director.
New Careers Dev<a::::.opment Center
and
Lita Paniagua
Associate Resea:cch Scientist
New Careers Training Laboratory
New Yo:rk University
Nov~mber 1967
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...
�/
INTRODUCTION
• I
"Why not say we must train a million unemployed
a year £or un£illed jobs that already exist?"
I
Bernard Asbell asks this cogent question in The New Improved
American,* an analysis of the profound technological changes taking place in the United States.
American paradox:
He was referring to a puzzling
an acute shortage 0£ workers coexistent with an
acute shortage of jobs.
-
While industry spends billions seeking out and training skilled
and pro£essional personnel, it also bears the costs 0£ a high ratio
0£ employee turnover, and helps to cover the huge losses caused
to society through massive unemployment and underemployment 0£ the
unskilled.
The solution of these problems has become an urgent
concern 0£ private enterprise in America.
A New Careers program £or industry would embody Mr. Asbell's
pract ical point 0£ view.
The p r ogram's goal:
the creation or a
r ich resource 0£ industry-oriented, highly skilled manpower, the
reduction of personnel tur nover, and the reduction 0£ unemployment
i
among t he low skilled.
Its method :
e xpansion or new approaches
t o manpowe r rec :r ui tment, t r a i n i ng and , educat ion alrea dy being
utilized by p riva t e enter prise , plus s tr uc t uring of visible oppor1
tunities £or p r omoti on , upgrading and horizonta l mobili ty £or all
I
workers.
I
A New Careers mode l £or indus try would require:


McGraw-Hill, New York,1965, p.43.


·a
�-i..l ,-
1.
Entry level positions in which workers can be immediately
productive.
j
2.
Training iinl'ilediately available and intricately connected
to these entry positions.
3.
A visible career ladder between these entry positions
and higher positions within the job hi~rarchy.
4.
Releuant training and education £or higher positions
directly available through the job.
5.
Sharp integration o.f training and education, because
education is decisive £or any major advancement.
6.
The responsibility .for packaging this training to be
undertaken by industry (or. by a subcontracted training
resource), rather than le.f ·t to the wo:i:'ker.
�NEW CAREEl~S IN INDUSTRY
Private enterprise has moved to the forefront in the search
for new designs th~t will close the gap between the shortage o:f
I
skilled manpower and the millions of joble£s.
Traditional methods of personnel recruitment are not producing
the workers industry needs fast enough and in su:f£icient numbers,
and the cost o:f the persistent e££ort to £ind adequate help is high:
The New York Times estimates the yearly volume o:f its helpwanted classified and display ads at $30 million. The Los
Angeles Times' volume in help-wanted ads -is around $34.
million.
An officer of the New York Assn. o:f Personnel Agencies estimates that 85% of all jobs listed by private employment agenciE>s in New York City include payment of the agency fee by
the employer. "Comparable high percentages of fee-paid jobs
would be found in other major cities", the officer said.
"Many agencies will not even list an opening unless the fee
is paid by the employer. It's a worker's market." (The
average fee is 10% of the first month's salary.)
A survey 0£ hiring costs paid by 17 firms in the Rochester,
N. Y. area (9 manufacturing and 8 non-manufacturing firms)
indicates a total over 3 months (June and November, 1965 and
February, 1966) of $278,000, with 2/3 of this amount reported
by the manufacturing companies, and the balance by the nonmanufacturing. Average cost per hire was $222 for manufacturers and $138 £or non-manfacturers. 1
i
Spurred by the urgency of' their requirements, business firms
invest heavily in improving the skills ' and knowledge of their
employees with educational and training programs:
"· • • In 1965 3usiness Week estimated a total amount of
$18 billion and Fortune gave a higher figure of $2~ billion
(spent by private industry in this area). More recently,
it has been estimated that industry spent $17 billion in
1 966 in this area. 11 2
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\
'
Natl . Indus tria l Con ference Boar d Record, "Hiring Cos t s ", New York,
-:J,-a_:i_u_a_r_y_,--:l-::9,-6'"'7=--.----..;._-------""---,.12NAM Re port s , Natl. ! Assn. of Manufa cture r s , June 19, 1967.
I
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" <JI
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A portion o:f these amounts was allocated to training programs
designed to tap the unutilized potential of the nation's unskilled,
I
underemployed and unemployed labor force.
Private enterprise has
also begun developing innovative techniques of recruiting and hiring
so as to bring the disadvantaged into the labor market.
All indications point to the need for accelerating the drive
to produce workers with sophisticated know-hoy.,.
11 • • • The importance o:f developing solutions to unemployment
problems is • • • significant in light of projections of job
needs to 1975 as prepared by the Bureau of Labor Statistics:
while our population will increase by 16%, the labor force
will increase by an estimated 20% to include 94.l million
workers. 11 1
11 • • • About 230,000 skilled and 350,000 semi-skilled workers
are expected to b e needed each year to replace those who
re·ti:re or die." 2
Following are some manpower needs projected to 1975 1 based on
studies that include patterns of demand and consumer purchasing,
technological development, new products and industries. 3
Millions o :f Worlcer s Needed by 1975 and Employed in 1964
Manuf a cturing
Professional 8, Technical
Technicians, draftsmen, etc.
Craftsmen, foremen, etc.
Clerical
Sales
1975
1964
23
13
1.4
11.5
17.3
14
10.7
4.5
5.6
a.5
.825
9
I
I
1Natl. Assn. o f Manu:factureres , op. C1 t.
2 cc~up8.tional Outlook Hn.ncl1)oo k 1 Bull. I 14 50 ., U. s. Dept. of Labor,
1966-67, PP• 363-364.
I
3compiled from Monthly Labor Review, March-April, 1965 1 u. s. Dept.
of Labor, reprint 2462.

\.
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/ J
In the face of such existing and :future needs, unemployment
is intolerable.
Nevertheless, the millions wl10 languish without
work continue to burden the economy and scholars, legislators,
'
civic organizations and the press consistently diagnose the frustra-
tions of the unemployed as a leading cause of social disruption.
Concern over the lack o:f work for the disadvantaged and the
ancillary social ills this causes has brought forth many proposals
£or emergency measures.
The business community has become increas-
ingly involved in the discussion and on August 2~, 1967 the Urban
Coalition (a grouping of more than 800 community and business leaders
£rom throughout the
u. s.) called £or the creation of at least one
l
million "meaningful and socially useful" jobs.
The intent 0£ the emergency measures suggested is laudable,
but such proposals do not £ocus the problem so directly as does
Bernard Asbell's apt phrase:
"Why not say we must t rain a million
unemployed a year :for unfilled jobs that already exist?"
This approach establishe s a one-to.;,one relationship between
i
industry's demand for s killed workers I and the lack o:f work :for
1 The term "meaningful" must be .def ined in two directions . From the
employer's viev.;point meanmg[..il work must supply a real need to his
organization , help him to ma..~e a prof it and not be subject to
turnover o f personnel.
From the employee's viewpoint, meaning:ful work must do more than
pay a wage. It must motivate him to ,remain on the job by giving
him a sense of achievement and digni t y, realistic opportunities
for steady advancemenjc and the assurance 0£ permanent employment
and continuing employability.
'
Socially useful work produces goods and services, promotes a higher
standard of living, provide s fisca l ~evenue , creates stability, and
.furthers the goals o.f society. Make ..:vJOrk and dead -end jobs accomplish
.few of these aims, except temporarily ,1 principally because they do
not encourage permanence; do not motivate the worker beyond achieving more than his weekly wage; do not build morale and loyaltyo
�-4-
the unemployed.
As noted above, many firms are already actively
exploring this direction.
However, most programs do not yet go
I
far beyond equipping the workers to function at the semi-skilled
and entry level.
Until now there has not been a complete step by
step linking of training and education from basic skills and knowledge to the highly skilled and middle management positions.
To fully achieve such integration it is necessary to create
I
a practical program that will develop appropriate motivation in
the unemployed or underemployed people so that they will not only
accept entry level positions, but also become via education and
training a reservoir of manpower for the middle line skilled,
administrative, technical and even professional positions.
A design for creating a New Careers program in industry for
those now unskilled would utilize the availability or training for
those thousands of openings as the incentive, the motivational
impetus to bring the disadvantaged into the labor force.
Xerox
Corporation discovered in a recent experiment that good incentives
i
can attr a ct unsuspect ed numbers of per sons re a dy and willing to wo r k:
,hen Xer o x a nnounced that skill training and basic e ducation
were available in its Project Step-Up, it found among the
applicants four times as many persons who did not need the
t raining than those who did, and was able to hire them
imme d i ately a s r egular e mploye es.I
1 Telephone interview with J . '.les t brook MacPh e r son, ACSH, Manpo wer
Resour c e s Admini s t rat o r , Xer ox Cor p. , Ro che ster , N.Y. This would
s eem t o s uppo rt a st a t ement by econ omist Char l e s Killing s worth:
"• • • it seems prcbable that impr cving employment prospects wou ld
tend t o pull more people into the labor market and • • • raise the
labor force participation rate." (Testimo ny before Senate Subcommission on Empl oyment and Ma npower Sept. 20, 1963.)
0
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�-5-
THE NfaJ CAREERS MODEL
l
As a solution to unemployment and the dire shortage of skilled
and professional f Orkers in the public sector, the New Careers
approach was introduced with the passage of the Nelson-Scheuer
Amendment in 1966.
This legislation provided for the hiring, job-
training and education of nonprofessionals by the public service
agencies in the fields of health, education and welfare.
Under its
provisions, persons hired from the disadvantaged community work as
auxiliary personnel and can receiv2 time off from their jobs for
education and training which will equip them to qualify for more
responsible positions.
All job classifications within the parti-
cipating pub lie agencies are to be "careerized", that is redefined
and restructured so that employees may move upward gradually toward
semi-professional and professional levels as they acquire experience
and the necessary high school and academic education arld credentials,
part of which can be obtained during job time.
The New York City Board of Education is developing career
lines for its teaching personnel. A program of advanced
trai ning and education v,i th released time from the job to
attend cl ass es will enable entry-level teacher aides (nonprofessionals hi red from the disadvantaged community) to
adva nce to assistant teacher, teacher inter n and certified
teacher, with more responsibilities and higher salaries at
each level. The Board has made !special arrangements with
local colleges and universi t ies so that the auxiliaries will
receive training, education and academic credit .
I
.
In the private sector a similar iNe w Car eers p r ogram c ou ld be
I
es t a b lished with funds cont r i buted b ~ government o r pr i vat e fou n da1
t ion s t o such fi rms as de sired fin a n cial ai d.
require the f o llo wi ng:
I
I
j
j
Th e model wo uld
�-6l.
Entry level positions in which workers can be immediately
productive.
2.
Training ilJlI!lediately available and intricately connected
to these entry positions.
3.
A visible career ladder between these entry positions
and higher positions within the job hierarchy.
4.
Relevant training and education for higher positions
directly available through the job.
s.
Sharp integration of training and education, because
education is decisive for -any major advancement.
6.
The employer (or a subcontracted training resource) to
be responsible £or the packaging of this training and
making it av21.ilable to the worker, rather than leaving
the respons:i.bili -.:::11 for acquiring training and education
up to the individual effort ofeach worker.
In a sense the career incentive program would be directed
toward the disadvantaged job candidate who asks,
11
,Jhy should I take
this dead-end beginning job which is boring, dirty ·and doesn't go
anywhere?"
The educational provisions would include making is possible
for the employee to acquire basic knowledge (the 3 R's), high
'
school equivalency and industry-related higher education leading
I
to academic degrees.
Education would take place, in part, during
I
working hours with time released from the job for attending classes.
The employee could adv.ance to semi-skilled , skilled or middle management and administrative positions as ,heacquired education and training provided by the company , and demdnstrated his capabilities.
I
I
Funding for firms unable to carry the full costs of partici-
'
pating in the program might be provided by government or private
I
�I
-7foundations.
Such funding would contribute toward entry level
salaries, the special training and education programs, and outside
technical assistance on such matters as setting up career line
structures, providing supportive services, etc.
l
Private enterprise would have full autonomy on all aspects
of administering su~h a proqram, including selection of personnel,
development of training methods and educational curricula, choice
of outside technical aid, if any is desired, and other components.
INDUSTRY EXPLORES NE,J GROUND IN MANPO;!ER DEV~LOPMENT
An interesting experiment in job-training with funds supplied
by government and private industry is under way at
vestern Electi:ic
Co., in Kearny, N. J.:
The u. s. Departments of Commerce, Health and Labor contributed $1 million and ten private companies contributed
$340,000 to '..Jestern Electric's pilot training project which
began operation in January, 1967. Each week 40 persons
from the disadvantaged community are enrolled for a rotating
9 week course in basic education and technical skills to
qualify for en'try jc'!)s in the metal industries.
Instruct·o rs
in basic educa~ion are supplied by the New Jersey State Dept.
of Education and technical training is imparted by experts
from the industry. Trainzes receive $41 per week while training, plus $5 per dependent. To 'd ate (Oct., 1967) 361 persons
have completed the course and 216 have been hired by 70
companies in the Newark area. A spokesman for :,Jestern
2lectric believes that the program will continue permanently,
with increasing participation by 1 private firms. He said,
" ;e're telling them 'come on in, the water's fine'"•
1 Funding arrangements might be worked ! out on a scale of 90% of the
above costs for the first year, with '. decreasing percentages in the
following years, moving on toward 0% 1at some later point.
Such a
procedure is followed . by public service agencies and government
under the New Careers Program in the public sector .
I
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�-8-
Al though the ,!es tern Electric project is limited to preparing
the trainees to qJalify only for entry jobs, this experiment might
easily be expanded to include bot~ higher skill training and education to provide the industries of the area with a more specialized
source of manpower.
Even middle-size companies can benefit from facilitating
educational opportunities to employees, as has been demonstrated
by another program in the New Jersey -area:
I
\
.Jellington Printing Industries of Trenton, N. J. has found
it practical and e~onomical to establish an educational
incentive program which covers tuition and text-book costs
(and tutoring when necGssary) for its eraployees who wish
to obtain elementary, high school and college education.
At present 10% of the 400 employees participate, and larger
enrollments are expected in the coming term. Total cost
to the company is considered "negligible". Business Manager
Nathan Mayer says:
"Some of our men have been able in only
two years to acquire a high school diploma and _go on to
college. Some who started as helpers on a machine crew two
years ago now work as foremen. The program has supplied us
with permanent, capable workers, and we plan to expand it."
11 :e put the program into effect not from a desire
ne adds:
to perform good works, but as a practical solution to our
problem of not being able to find the skilled help we need."
,Jellington Industries also decided to discard conventional
I
methods of hiring.
I
Most applicants for entry positions are under-
educated and unskilled.
Mr. Mayer says:
"We decided to adopt the
policy of hiring on a first come, fir~t served basis and to eliminate the costly and often meaningless , effort spent on interviewing
and testing.
I
Although he may be a capable, willing worker, a job
I
applicant from th", disadvantaged population may not know how to
i
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'
make a good impres,si.on in a:n intervieyv , and a poor previous work
record may indica~e only that he had t ot had sufficient motivation
�-9-
r
in the past to remain on a job.
Our assumption is that a man who
l
is willing to work can be motivated to become a permanent employee
I
and to upgrade himself for positions that are increasingly valuable
to himsel.f and to us."
Although the .!ellington employees now attend school on their
own time, the company's interest in helping them acquire an education and the visible opportunities £or promotion have motivated an
encouraging number 0£ workers to take on the often dif:ficult task
of attending classes.
It is logical to s~ppose that with time on
the job available for education a much larger number of workers
would participate.
Other companies make education available to their employees
on company time:
The DuPont Company recently completed its first experiment
in providing basic education to its under-educated employees.
Language skills wer e taught on company time to 46 veteran
employ-aes who are now e ligible to take skill-training courses
offered by GnPont. Thes e CO'l,;.rses are given to unskilled
enployecs after 'they have passed an initial period of familiarization in the firm's labor pool. Instruction is on
company time, two full days weekly. Trainees study at their
o wn pace, with ·the help of a su.pe:?:visor who answers specific
questions. After col"lplcting the training, the e.!llployces
work in the division f or which they have prepared.
Jorkers·
can upgr ade thc~selves to perform higher s k ills leading to
foreman positions by attending technical schools of their
o wn 1:ime, but with aid from the company on tuition.
The Pn::2.r0id Corpo:.:-ation of Cambridge, Mass. offers courses
to it.5 e:upl oyees ranging fr om bas~c English and conversational
Russ .L::\ .1 4~o polymer chemistry.
( There is no acade.nic credit


g1.,;1-~;·:
. .":<,C
th.ase co·;;irses. )


I


I
I~ wou.l-3 seem f~asi!:>1:e i!\ each instance to link the instruction
offered so that employees could ob-tain ,accredited education and higher
I
I
skills to qualify t ? em for positions r , quiring more education and
I
expertiseo
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�.,---·
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The programs developed by private enterprise in working with
j
the under-educated are not limited
tq
heavy or- manu£acturing
!
industries.
'
Serv~ce institutions, such as banks, have also £ound
it worthwhile to reach out to the disadvantaged £or recruiting
workers and £acilitating education to them on the job.
Chase Manhattan Bank established a job-training program
in 1964 £or high school s~udents £rom the ha~d-core poverty
areas. Many 0£ the trainees are potential drop-outs and
have police records. Students entering the program at the
junior year of high school receive 2l months 0£ basic education and instruction in banking and £inance. They attend
classes at the bank from 2 to 5 p.m. daily and are paid
$1.86 per hour. They continue to attend high school during
the morning. Aft-2r g:cadua·i:ion they are hired for entry
clerical positions. They may go on to college on their own
time, with aid ~rom the bank via its tuition refund program.
Xerox Corporation's Project Step-Up was another valuable demonstration of the response of the poor to a program that links education to employment.
Project Step-Up was created to explore the fe a sibility of
recruiting, hiring, training and giving remedial education
to persons from the underprivileged community. The program
was postulated on two basic assumptions:
I
I
1.
It is good business, one that e nhances the pro£itmaking apparatus.
2.
The company could cut a clear path for itself to a
realistic solution for one of the nation's most complex
problems: HovJ to open up skilled employment oppor tunities to the unemployed. j
Many of the trainee s had police records, b ad credit ratings
and spotty emp loym8nt hist o ries. i To qualify for training they
had to be unemployed or underempioyed, receive substantially
less than a pas s ing score on the ! company's regular employment te s ts and not have finished high school.
(~
I
The 19 week training period took place during the day-shift
working hours.. 40% of the time was for classroom instruction,
and the rest for work and informal counseling to support the
new learning and adjustment to supervision and work ruleso
Trainees were paid an hourly rate slightly below that for
l
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�-11\ ....
regular new employees and were eligible for all company
benefits. Al~ the trainees completed the program and
qualified for regular employment.
I
Foremen reported that trainees adjusted well and met
all standards. Xerox officials were impressed by the
trainees' commitment, their perseverance and their overall
reaction to the training, the work environment and to
other employees. The regular employees strongly supported
the program.
A Xerox spokesman said that the program was economical because
aside from the men who were trained, the company was able to hire
immediately four times as many applic<L,ts who did not need training.
Furthermore, he said, the company feels the program paid for itself
with the new knowledge gained as to methods of recruiting and motivating disadvantaged employees.
These techniques will now be
applied by Rochester Jobs, Inc., an organization of 70 firms in the
area which will act as a non-profit public service agency to hire,
counsel and train workers from the underprivileged community.
Many other firms in the U.
s.
have found that providing basic
education to t heir employees is a worthwhile investment and that
I
t he cos t is not high.
I
A b a sic literary program utili z i ~ g audio - visual techniques
developed by MI ND ( Met hods of In -tellectual Development ,
subsidiar y of Corn Product s, Argo, Ill.) costs $24 0 per
per son , i f admin i stered by t he f irm purchasing the service ,
or $450 if adminis t e re d b y MIND . 1 Ac a demic escalat i ons
of 4 gr a d e l e v els ean b e achieved with under - educ a t ed adult s
in 1 60 hour s of MI ND's basic educat ion p r ogram .
The c ost of e?ucat i ng a per son f , r us eful work whi ch will convert him fr om a recipient o f relief
pri s ingly low:
(
...
~t o a tax-pay e r ma y be s ur-
�-12A literary program established by the Chicago Board of
Jelfare demonstrated that teaching reading and arithmetic
skills to a person for five years costs less than his
relief checl<l for a single month.
Providing educational and specialization opportunities to upper
echelon personnel has long been an established practice in private
enterprise and many different types of models exist from the outright granting of leaves of absence and fellowships for postgraduate
study to intensive short-term courses.
National Training Laboratories reports that since 1956
more than 3,000 top and middle executives have been sent
by their companies to NTL c0nters in Maine, Florida and
Arizona to acquire proficiency in working with the complex
human problems inherent in the management process.
The American Foundation for Management Research has heavy
advanced bookings for its Management Learning Center where
companies send teams of their top executives for intensive
training in problem solving via the team approach. ·
It would seem that with the tremendous demand for managers and
professional personnel forecast for the years ahead, it would be
to the best interest of private enterprise to expand its facilities
I
for upward education a nd mobility so ,that the potential of the now
i
lesser s kille d c a n b e tapped.
A report by Sibson & Co., New York management consultants,
predicts that by 1984 there will be openings for 2 million
top e x ecu~ives as comp a r e d to sqo,ooo now.
I
,-Ji th careful though t, programs to c areer ize t h e i ndus t rial
job
I
stru cture fr om t h e production l e v e l Throug h t he management lev el,
via a lin k ing of education , s k ill t r aining and p r omot i onal op por1
tunities, cou ld we l l redound in eno rmo u s benefi ts to priv ate business
I
and society.
..,
�-13-
MO~E REALISTIC TRAINING
The high cost of personnel turn .over plagues private enterI
prise. Many firm? have attempted to solve this problem by fraction-
I
ing jobs, employing moonlighters or part time workers, all of which
solutionshave impermanence implicit in their very nature.
Part of the reason for the excessive turn over rate is the
lack of realistic advancement opportunities for the entry worker
who has no clear paths to the middle and higher level positions.
Careerizing the industry and providing career-oriented incentives
including training and education would introduce the necessary motivation both prior to the job and on the job to fill these positions
C
and recruit the necessary employees. ,
Training programs not directly tied into job opportunities have
not been entirely successful.
After trainees have been taught
skills, it has often been :found that there were no jobs available
£or those skills.
In other words, training has not been realistic.
A comment on a government-sponsored training program, recently
!
issued by the AFL-CIO Executive Councf l
illustrates this danger:
I
"The government's training program provides for training,
with payment of allowances up to · t ·wo years. Unfortunately,
the present emphasis is often on training programs for jobs
which are dead end as well as low wage. Moreover, as long
as present training allowances remain as meager as they now
are, fe w workers, especially heads of £amilies, can afford
to forego the opportunity for immediate employment even a t
loVJ wages -- :par t icularly if the~ e is no assurance o:f a
job at t he end of the training p k riod . The government ' s
p r ograms should be l inked wi t h job placement , when t r a i n I,
i n g is compl~ted . • • 11 1
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r
fr
1
1 stateme nt on t h e U b an
Se pt. 12, 1 967 ..
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It appears logical that private enterprise is especially well
I
suited to train and educate workers, since it knows exactly what
positions must be !:filled and what is needed to :fill them.
In the
words o:f the National Association o:f Manu£acturers:
"• • • we should realize that the goals of an effective
manpower policy should be to develop a more effective
American work force; to create jobs which utilize abilities,
and to match people and jobs efficiently • • • Industry has
not only the expertise to achieve superior results, but it
also has the vital interest in full utilization of human
resources."
,Jith the training unde:::taken by industry as part of a careerized program, not only would trainees be more precisely matched
I
to available openings, but would also be immediately productive
·i
I
and would know that as they im~rove their skills they can step
. I
into more rev,arding jobs.
As we have seen, many segments of a career incentive approach
already exist in the creative projects, undertaken by private enterprise.
An integrated New Careers Program for industry would pack-
age advantageously techniques for recruiting the workers and providing motivation via skill training, ~ducation and clearly structured
upgrading opportunities to create new f ources of manpower, reduc~
l
labor turnover and combat unemployment.
. .
I . f rom a New Careers proThere are a number o f additional
gains
gram in the private sector:
I
,Jorkers vtlll be able to move up cim
their o wn industri j s as well as acquir i training enabling them to
move to ot her indu+ rie s and to the p J lic sector if they so desire.
C
iNAM Reports, June
I 9,
1967.
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The program will provide new taxpayers and consumers, thus increasing aggregate
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it will reduce wel.fare expenditures.
�February 27, 1968
Mi·. Tom Cochran
Office of Economic Opportunity
1200 -19th Street, N. W.
R oom 703
Was hington, D . C. 20 506
Dea r Tom:
I want to thank you again fo r the fine show you put on for
Sargent Shriver on his visit to Atlanta.
In the three or four visits by Mr. Shriver here that I have
been involved in things have not always gone as smoothly
as they did on this visit . I am sure th t ev ryone else is
in a greement with me that your handling of the various
aspects of the visit as done v ry professionally and in a
responsible manner.
I have had several comments from th pre s noting that it
was a real relief to have a person with your attitude
organizing a visit for a high-ranking Fedel' 1 offlci 1.
Too often advance men to more h rm th n good.
Enclos dis
k y ehaln which you wer lnt rested in from
the M ayor. Let us know if we c n b of any help to you in
the future,
S incerely your ,
D an S w at
DS: fy
�Febru a ry 20 , 1968
MEMORANDUM
To : Mayor Ivan Allen , Jr .
From: Dan Sweat
Dr. Maurice Dawkins, Assistant to Sargent Sh,:iver for Civil
Rights, will meet ln your office at 10:00 a. m. Monday to discuss
a Mo del Cities proposal which might be funded through OEO.
With him will be Jack Wood, National Association Ag inst
Discrimination in Housing; Bob Saunders, Civil Right Compliance
Offic r ., OEO Regional Offic ; Johnny Robinson; Johnny John on;
nd my lf.
DS:fy
cc: Mr. Johnny John on
Mr. Johnny Robinson
�TELE l HONE
To
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Name
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Wants you to call
Returned your ca ll
f)w _ ~
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Is here to see you
Came by to see you
Left the following message:
Date:_.;J.
_ /~
'------'-/ _ _ _ _ Time _
FORM 25 • 5
-
_ /_o_: _
- fo_
�Atlanta Chamber of Commerce
P, 0, BOX 1740 -
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30301 -
PHONE 1521-08415
February 21, 1 968
Dr. Tilman c. Cothran, Director
Multi-Purpos e Trainin g C nter
Atlanta University
Atlanta, Georgia 30Jl4
Dear Dr. Cothran:
Dan Sweat referred your correspondence
on an Atlanta New Careers Conference to me for
suggestions. As you are a member of the Chamber's
Task Force tor Full Employment , you are fully
a.ware of our vital interest in unemployment . The
N w Oar ers program is an excellent one, and the
Atlanta business community would profit from
furth r exposure to it .
I hope that yo~ will continue to work
closely with Curtis Driskell in planning the
Conference and offer you both the support and
encour gement of the Chamber of Commerce in your
efforts. Please keep us informed or your
progress and let me know if I c n be of any
ssist nee.
With best wi hes,
,,
Mr. Dan E. Swe t, Jr. /
�Feb!"Wl
Mr.
bert Bom,, Pre
. tlant
d
26
].968
t
Ch'lmber of C,.,,,.,,..,...,..,
c/ Arthur Andersen &
Bank of Georgia Building


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eorg.
30303
Hr. Bo;; :
for your expreosi
or intereat in the
ta tJni
ity OEO
ti•
n~ Center · ah s to sponoor j ointl.y · th
of industry dur
the spr
o this
1r. CUrtis
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ress
t int st in the progr
o.nd vtll be an 1nval
asset during th· planniJlis .
COJU"ercru::e which the Atl
l tc:r
b.c.l;>ing to
cont
de
Since ·
CC:d

�I NFORMATION COPY - CI TY OF. AT LANTA


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Ci t y o f Atla n ta
Gwin ne tt Cou n t y
Rock d al e Coun t y
Fulton County
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Charlie Brown
165 Central Avenue , S.W .
Atla n ta, Georgia
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30303
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Charlie Brown, Chairman
Fu lton Count · Board of
Cornmissioners
57 2 - 2791
�C ITY OF ATLAN ~ -
-143.215.248.55 12:56, 29 December 2017 (EST)Jkrv
WHEREAS 1 the President of the United States and the Congress
have expressed the nati,onal will of the people through enactm~nt of the
Economic Opportunity Act and creation of the Office of Economi_c Opportunity
as a means towards eliminating the causes of poverty in this country; and
·l
WHEREAS, the Job C~rps was established as an integral and
vital part of the national 'Anti-Poverty Program, to provide disadvantaged
young men and women with a chance to acquire the skills and attitudes
needed to become useful and productive members of the community; and
WHEREAS, the Job Corps has provided a real service to the
people of this country and the pe9ple of Atlanta,, with the united efforts
of leaders in the field of commerce and organized · labor to give useful
employment to thousands of our citizens; and
WHEREAS, a Job Corps Exhibition, sponsored by leading
industrial and educational organizations opens to the public August 16, 1968
at the Regency-Hyatt House, which will tell _the dramatic story of the Job
Corps under the title "A Chance to be Somebody";
,
.,.
NOW 1 THEREFORE 1 I, Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor of the City
of Atlanta, do h e r eby proclaim the w eek of August 19 - 24 , 1968
JOB CORPS WEEK
in Atlanta and urge a ll citizens to support the c·ommendable work of the
Job Corps.
IN WITNESS W HE REOF, I
have h e r eunto se t my h and
and cau se d the Seal of the
City of Atlanta to be affixed.
·l
·i
�EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
OFFICE OF ECONOMIC
()llll()l~TlJNITY
SOUTHEAST REGIONAL OFFICE
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303
March 5, 1968
Honorable Dan Sweat
Special Assistant to the Mayo~
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Dan:
Enclosed herewith is a copy of -a letter from Jim Moore
at Ruder & Finn, together with a copy of the Proclamation
made by John Lindsay for the Job Corps display in New York
City. I believe Moore has talked with you about this, but
if ·you have any questions don't hesitate to call us.
Best personal regards always .
£fairs , Room 1130
730 Peachtree Street , N.E .
�,.
RUDER&FINN
INCORPORATED
JAMES E. MOORE
February 29, 1968
GENERAL MANAGER OF SOUTHEASTERS OPERATION S
Mr. DuPree Jordan
Office of Economic Opportunity
Southeast Regional Office
730 Peachtree Street, N. E.
Atlanta, Georgia 30308
Dear DuPree:
I have finally received a copy of Mayor Lindsay's
Proclamation and I believe that the same proclamation with
the obvious local and time changes will be fine for Mayor
Allen.
For the Governor I think we can use a very slight
rewording of this proclamation but omitting any ref~rence
to the Atlanta exhibition since his proclamation will be
for the entire state.
If you have any obj e ction to my submitting the
suggested copy to the Mayor -and the Governo_r ~ please let
me know early next week.
Best regards,
~cit e
I
/ j
I
James,.j, E. Moor e
J EM/m j
RUDER&. FI.--:N l t-:C'ORPORATED, SUITE 2015, 34 PEACIITREE STREI:T, N.W. 1 AT L,\ NTA, GE0\1GIA 1 30303, TEL. (-104) 577-1600 AND (404) 577-1601
OFl'ICES : NF.It' YORK, CII ICAC0 1 HOU STON, LOS ANGELES, ST. LO U IS, SAN FRANCISCO, WAS!IINGTON, O.C., LONDON, RO,\IE
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_:\i\l) \\"0\11·:i\ \\TfH A C H.'\ :-CE TO AC(,!l ' !HJ·: THI~ SK ILLS AND ..\ TT ITl · D t::S :\ EJ·: 1n: o
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E )~E C UTIVE OFFICE 0-F TME PRE S IDEi'JT
ATLf1, lTP., GW RGF' 3030.J
March 5, 1968
Mr. James E. Moore
Ruder & Finn Incorporated
34 Peachtree Street, N.W., Suite ~015
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Jim:
Thank you for sending us a copy- of the Proclamation made by
Mayor John Lindsay in New York for the Job Corps display there.
We are passing this along to Dan Sweat in the Mayor's office here
in Atlanta, and we can always count on the fullest cooperation
from Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. Unfortunately, as you know, the same
thing cannot be said of Governor Lester Maddox; indeed, we have
been told by our State OEO office that the Governor is very much
opposed to the Job Corps at this time and definitely would not
make any proclamation relative to such an occasion.
If we can provide any additional information or · assistance, don't
hesitat e to call on us.
Sincerely yours,
DuPree Jordan, Jr.
Public Affairs, Room 1130
730 Pea chtree Street, N.E.
,
�RUDER&FINN
I N C O R P O R A T E D
March 7, 1968
J AMES E. MOORE
GENERAi. MANAG ER OF SOU T H EASTERN OPERATJO NS
Mr. Dan Sweat
Office of the Mayor
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mr. Sweat:
DuPree Jordan has referred to you the Proclamation
regarding Job Corps Week in Atlanta. This was the Proclamation worked out for Mayor Lindsay, of New York City.
We are planning for the Exhibition 11A Chance To Be
Somebody" to open at the Regency-Hyatt House on approx imately
August 16th and to run through September 1st. I assume it
would make sense for you to declare the week of August 19th
through 24th as Job Corps Week but the dates may be set, of
course, at your discretion.
We very much appreciate your cooperation and we are
quite hopeful of having s ome importan t national figures i n
Atlanta for the launching of our Exhibition and will again
n eed to call on your office for advice in e x tending inv i t a tions to a preview showing .
Sincer ely y ours,
, / J\\.,.,t..-& \.z___,
Mo ore
~
JEM/mj
cc:
Mr. DuPree J o rda n
Mr . Edward Sullivan, Manage r
The Regency- Hyatt House
RUDER & FINN INCORPORATED, SUITE 2015, 34 PEACHTREE STREET, N .W. 1 ATLANTA, GEORGIA , 30303, T EL . ( 404) 577-1600 AND ( 404) 577-1601
OF FICES : NEW YORK, CHICAGO, HOUSTON, LOS ANGELES, ST. LOUIS, SAN FRANCISCO, WASHINGTON, D. C., LONDON, ROM E
�I
JECOlV'OMIC OPIPORTf!JNJTY A7flANJtA
IN CORPORATE. P
IOI MARIETTA STR£ET 8LDG., ATLANTA
J
&EOR0IA 30303
TELE?HONE 525-4-262
March 5, 1968
The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor
City of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Ge or gia 30303
Dear Mayor Allen:
The 1967 Amendments to the Economic Opportuni t y Ac t r equire certain
procedure s t o assure that communi t y action a gencies respon s ible
f or programs f ina nce d by the Off ice o f Economic Opportuni t y are
designated by local governments to serve this purpose.
Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc . s e rves all of . Fulton , Gwinnett
and Rockd ale Countie s and the City o f At l a nta, including that
p o rtion o f Atlanta i n DeKalb County. This s ervice i s a res ult
o f authorization b y each o f the three counties a nd t h e City o f
Atlanta contained in substantially identical resolutions of the
gover ning bodies of each o f the four jurisdictions .
As a first s t ep i n t h is procedu re, each o f t h e f our jurisdic t i ons
should complete the attached CAP Form #69 , a statement of intention
t o designate a c ommunity action agency. To c ontinu e EOA as you r
age ncy , the f orm should be completed as indicated, o r o t h erwi se
a s p r ov ide d f o r i f you desire a cha n ge.
Nex t steps will pro vide that p ol itical sub-divisions within the
three counties be advised of your intention to name EOA as the
continuing c ommunity action agency; provision f or a public hearing on the matter; a nd an opport unity f o r individual political
sub- divisions not t o participate if they s o choose. Mr . Jim Parham ,
�Mayor Allen
March 5, 1968
-2-
Executive Administrator of EOA, and other members of our staff
will work with your representative to conform to these procedures
as simply as possible.
Your continued support and cooperation will be greatly appreciated.
Sincerely,
Chairman, Board of Directors
BJ/kd
Attachment
cc:
Mr. Jim Parham
�COPY
FILE
CITY OF ATLANTA
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Iva n Alle n , Jr .
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Mayor
52 2-4463
3/6/68
�INFORMATION COPY
CITY OF ATLANTA
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3/6/68
�*NFORMATION COPY - CITY OF ATLANTA
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City of fi tl an t ?Fulton Cou n ty
Gwinnett County
Rockd a l e Coun ty
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~tr . Bobby Br i sendine
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Box 1 34
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Conyers, Georgia
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483-8701
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Mr. Bobby Brisendine
County Co~Jissioner
3/6/68

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  1. http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_011.pdf

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