Box 3, Folder 12, Complete Folder

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Box 3, Folder 12, Complete Folder

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EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
OFFICE OF ECONOMIC
WASHINGTON , D.C. 20506
CJllll(Jl~TlJNITY
March 13, 1968
Mr. Dan Sweat
Office of the Mayor
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Dan:
I sincerely appreciate that kind letter. You were so generous
with your remarks~ And really, the credit for the successful
visit should go to you and others who cooperated in a
magnificent manner to make it simply a beautiful trip. You
just don't find the "spirit" that Atlanta possesses in any
of the other large cities.
I had heard from sources here and in Atlanta that you were
the person to contact for assistance. Certainly those sources
were most accurate. And it was my pleasure to meet you -- and
to see firsthand the "proper" way a federal official should
be treated. Things could not have been better, and I, as
well as Mr. Shriver, truly appreciate your help.
Please call me when you are in Washington and we'll get
together for lunch.
Best regards,


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--


February 16, 1968
Mr . B oisfeuillet Jones
230 Peachtree Street, N . W .
Room 210
Atlanta , Georgia 30303
Dear Mr. Jones:
Attached is a copy of Ralph Phel ps ' letter to M ayo r Allen
regarding the 1967 Economic Opportunity Act Amendments .
I am sure you are well familiar with these amendments
and the requirements for action on the part of the City of
A tlanta and Economic Op portunity Atlanta, Inc.
I have only one copy of the OEO publication Organizing
C ommunities for A ction which outlines the requirements
for meeting the 1968 amendments . I am sure that you are
familier with the requirements and have a copy of the booklet.
The M ayor h s asked tha t I make sure that the City meet
lt require m ents on schedule and before recommending any
action, I would like to sit with you and d iscuss these requirem ents and your thoughts as to the City's futur role in the
E conomic Opportunity P rogram.
l w ill be avail a ble t o m et with you at your conv nience.
S incer ly your •
Dan Sw
DS:fy
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SOUTHEAST REGIONAL OFFICE
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30308
1:.XECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
OFFICE OF ECONOMIC
(Jllll(ll~TlJNITY
February 9, 1968
Q.
1k.
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor of Atlanta
68 Mitchell Street, S. W.
Atlanta, Georgia
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 : r l : : o ~ : : : : t s to the Economic Opportunity~ made


changes in the requirements for community action agencies which
conduct local anti-poverty programs under Title II of the Act.
The new amendments give state and local governments the right to
designate the community action agency to serve their areas. The
relevant government may desi gnate the ex isting CAA as the agency
to carry on the anti-poverty program after July 1, 1968. Alternatively, it may elect to designate itself or another public agency
or private non-profit organization to assume responsibility for
community action programs. As a general matter an existing
community action agency must cease operations by February 1, 1969,
i f the second alternative is chosen. In addition, all community
action a gencies--both new and old--must satisfy the revised
requirements concerning the composition of the a gency's board of
directors by July 1, 1968. By May 1, 1968, existing CAA's must
submit certification that such requirements have been met or that
they will be met prior to July 1, 1968.
The enclosed booklet exp lains the amendments and t he policies,
pr ocedures an d application forms which must be followed. It is
i mpor tant that you familiarize yourself with those policies and
pro c edur es at once , since steps must be taken ve r y quickly if
compl i ance with t he new requirements is not to result i n disruption
of vital s ervi c es t o the poor in thos e communities which a l r eady
have community action agencies.
Plea se note that the s tate or l ocal governmen t designation of a
community action ag ency and t h e accompanying app l ica t ion to OEO for
its recognition should be recei ved by OEO no t later than July 1,
1968 . Other local governments within the area to be s e rve d by the
agency must be notified of the intention to apply at least 45 days
beforehand-- that is, not later than May 15, 1968.
�-
2 -
In view of this time schedule, I cannot stress too strongly the
need for prompt attention to the enclosed booklet. Copies of the
application forms may be obtained for your use by filling out and
returning the enclosed Notice of Intention to Designate which we
would like to have by March 15, 1968. I urge you to do so as soon
as possible so that we can be of maximum assistance to you. The
name of the OEO official who has immediate responsibility for
your area is listed below. Please feel free to contact him after
you have read the enclosed materials.
Sincerely,
~ tr:r:?~,) Ralph A. Phelps, !r.
Regional Director
�May 13, 1968
Mr. B :rtrand M . Hat"ding
Acting Director
Ollie of Ecoflomic: Opportunity
Executive Offic of the Presid nt
Washington, D . C . 20506
Dear Mr. Harding:
Th nk you for yo\11' 1 tt r informing u that
<:opy of the
Summary of F d ·r l Programs fol" Fiscal Y r 1967 is b ing
nt to us.
We will look forw rd to receiving thl
r port.
Sincer ly yours ,
Iv n All n, J r .
Mayor
1A.Jr:£y
�EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
OFFICE OF ECONOMIC
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20506
CJllll(Jl~TlJNITY
IAY -
B 1968
Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor of Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgia 30301
Dear Mayor Allen:
I am very pleased to inform you that the Summary of Federal
Programs for Fiscal Year 1967 has been completed, and a copy
covering Federal outlays in your State and City is being sent
to you.
This edition is significantly expanded and improved over
previous Summaries which you have received. It now includes
Federal outlays of more than $168 billion, representing 370
programs and activities . As before, the outlays are shown in
terms of the impact on every county in the United States.
Compiled by the Office of Economic Opportunity Information
Center, the Summary is the composite effort of 31 Federal
Departments , Agencies, Boards and Connnissions. We sincerely
hope that you will find the document useful in your city's
planning and budgeting processes. The reception accorded
previous editions has been mos t encouraging and has led us
to continue our efforts to improve and refine the presentation
of this information.
Sincerely,
143.215.248.55 -
1-l.
Bertrand M. Harding
Acting Director
I
�May 20. 1968
MEMORANDUM
To: Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
From: Dan Sweat
Attached is a memo which I requested Jim P ~ham to write
giving us the facte on the Neighborhood Youth Corp Out of
School Progii- m.
I be cam v ry cone rn · d about the cuts we h ve received when
I heard that Chicago h d received 15, 000 additional NYC slots
for the umrn. r. I wUl h ve more definit tnformation on th
Chicago slots by Wedn sd y morning.
U thi is trU! I think we should mak a big compl int with
som on high in th U. S. Department of L bor. The NYC
progr m h s b · n on · 0£ our b t progr m fo~ g . tting young
peopl employed. We should not be penallz d for- our ucces
in Atlanta.
I plan to talk to om of my cont <:t in th L bor D p rtment
hington Wednesd y tt rnoon.
wh n I min W
D :fy
�MEMORANDUM
TO:
Mr. Dan E. Sweat, Jr.
Director, Governme ntal Liaison
City of Atlanta
FROM:
T. M. Parham
·/
Executive Administrator
Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.
DATE:
May 17, 1968
~Tj)
The Ne ighborhood Youth Corps (Out-of-School) program
for EOA is b e ing reduc e d by the U.S. Department of
Labor beginning with a n e w budget year beginning
July 7, 1968 from 4 4 0 slots to 330, a cut of 25%.
For the past few weeks we have been under orders
not to fill vacancies until we've reached 80% of
our currently allotted 440 slots.
Conversations with Re gional Labor Departme nt officials,
specifically Mr. Ludwin Branch, Director of the Bureau
of Work Training Program and Mr. Sam Lubin, indicate
that t his is a result of a national reduction in funds
for this program. Othe r informa tion which has come~to
me from personal contacts indicate th e possibility ·
that mon e y is b e ing shifted from on e region of the
country to anoth e r in order to provide additional youth
job opportunitie s in some of the larg e r cities. Mr.
Bill Allison on a recent trip to Chicago was informe d
that that city rec e ived 15,000 additional NYC slots
for the summe r.
I plan to check on this nex t week
whil tl in Chic a go for anothe r mee ting.
It is my furth e r unde r s tanding from th e Regional Offic e
that th e Ne ighb o r hood Youth Corps (In-School P r ogr am )
op erate d b y th e public school is exp e ct e d to b e cut
15 - 2 0"/4 for th e n ex t school y ear , howeve r, it is tru e
th a t the Atl a nta Public Scho ol s h ave b e e n a warde d
300 ext r a s lo ts for th e s umme r.
I a ssume th a t wh e n
�Mr. Dan E. Sweat, Jr ..
-2-
May -17, 1968
the summer slots expire the 15-20% cut will be imposed and the schools will have fewer jobs opportunities for youth next school year than this school year.
As I indicated to you this is one of the most practical
programs ever deve loped r egarding employment opportunities for youth.
It has not been as attractive to boys
as to girls but it has enabled many youngsters to secure
some well supervised work training experience, make
. some money, and move on to better jobs and/or advanced
edcuation.
In addition to these values, the work performed by
these youngsters has been extremely valuable to the
public agencies where they have been employed.
Unle ss there is some other program b e ing d eveloped which
will accomplish these same aims, it is extremely unwis e
to further limit our potential for job opportunities
for these young people between the ages of 16-21. As
you well know the number of youngsters looking· for ;
such opportunities has increas ed far b eyond the availability of jobs . I cannot unde rstand, without furth e r
explana tion, the line of r eas oning which p rompts this
action from Washington. It would be appreciated if
this could be called to the attention of Mayor Allen
and that h e b e asked to inquire of National Administration offici a l s why this is occurring.
TMP/gj
�CITY HALL
May 2 0, 1968
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
IVAN ALLEN, J R., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant
MRS. ANN ~:. MOSES, Execu tive Secretary
DANE. SWEAT, JR., Director of GovernmentJt liaison
MEMORANDUM
To: Mayor I van Allen, Jr .
From:
D an Sweat
Attache d is a copy of an analysis of the Atlanta Concentrate d
Em.ployment Program (ACEP ) w hi c h you w ill find interes ting.
We are attempting to follow each person through step by step
in an attempt to d e t ermine w h a t happens to each individua l.
We w ill furth er br eak thi s down into men and wome n, age
groups, etc.
We hope to find out if thos e p e rsons referred to Hoke Smith
for pre-voca tional tr a ining and basic education rema in on the
job longer than tho se who are referred directly to jobs.
Thi s i s a project of the National Alliance of Businessmen, the
Community Council, Economic Op portunity Atlanta, Inc., and
your office. I feel it is one of the most important things we
ar e attempting to do a t the present time.
DS:fy
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�CITY OF .ATLANT.A
CITY HALL
May 2 0 , 1968
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Ar ea Code 404
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assi st ant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR. , Director of Go ve rnment al Li aison
M E M ORAND UM
To:
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
From:
Dan Sweat ~
/lb LJ~hual
/'/4/4(
~
Attached is a copy of an analysis of the Atlanta Concentrated
Employment Program (ACEP) which you will find interesting.
We are attempting to follow each person through step by step
in an attempt to determine what happens to each individual.
We will further break this down into men and women, age
groups, etc.
We hope to find out if those persons referred to Hoke Smith
for pre-vocational training and basic education remain on the
job longer than those who are referred directly to jobs.
This is a project of the National Alliance of Businessmen, the
Community Council, Economic Opportunity Atlanta , Inc ., and
your office. I feel it is one of the most important things we
are attempting to do at the present time.
DS :fy
�EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
OFFICE OF ECONOMIC
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20506
(Jllll()l~TIJNITY
April 16, 1968
Mr. Dan E. Sweat, Jr.
Director of Governmental Liaison
Office of the Mayor
City of Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Dan:
Thank you very much for your assistance to Miss Wormser and I on our
recent visit in Atlanta. Your experience and insight provided us
with an invaluable overview of the operations of Federal-Local programs
in Atlanta. As mentioned, I would like to talk to you further,
particularly with regard to Community Action-Model Cities relations.
I hope to be in Atlanta again in late May and your schedule permitt.ing
I would like to see you at that time. 1 1 11 contact you later on details,
Again, thank you for your as sistance ,
Sincerely,
OfJ/fJ/ r~
Clifford J, Parker, Chief
Community Support Branch
Office of Research, Pl a ns ,
Programs and Evaluation
�April 29. 1968
Mr . William J . Higgins
916 Rosedal e Road, N . E.
Atlanta, Georgi
Dea,- Mr . Higgins :
Your letter of April 7 requesting ass i tanc u.nd r the Economic
Opportunity Act bas be n ca:refully tevlew d .
The £und6 you m ntton coming to E c onomic Opportunity Atlant
apply to Atlanta. Fulton County, Gwinnett County and Rockdal ·
County. DeKalb County has a
p I' tely dminl tered progr m .
Since you r a i,e id nt of DeK lb County, l would l." conunend
th t you contact Mr. Clyd Bi hop, Dir ctor o! th D Kalb
Economlc Opportunity Authority, Inc ., 3550 K nnlngeton Road,
D catur, G otgi , t 1 phone 284 .. 8165.
l
m
ur that Mr. Bi•hop will be gl d to provld you with
••l tGce.
Sine \" ly yotll' •
Iv
All n, Jr . .
My~
lAJr:fy
�ROUTE
FROM:
D
0
SLIP
Ivan Allen, Jr.
For y our information
Ple as e r e f e r to th e a tt a che d corre s pondenc e an d m a k e th e
n e c es s a r y repl y .
LJ
F O RM 25-4
Advi se m e th e sta tu s of th e a tt a ch ed .
��EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
OFFICE OF ECONOMIC
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20506
CJl313CJl~TIJNITY
APR 1 s 1968
Honorable Ivan Allen , Jr.
Mayor of Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Mayor Allen :
The Office of Economic Opportunity has contracted with Daniel Yankelovich,
Incorporated, New York, New York, to conduct a study of the effects of
Sections 210 and 211 of the 1967 Economic Opportunity Amendments. This
study is required by Section 233(c) of the Amendments.
Your community has been selected to be a part of the sample for this study.
We view this study as an important undertaking in providing both OEO and
local areas with information on this significant legislation. The report
on this study must be submitted to Congress before April 1, 1969.
A representative of Daniel Yankelovich, Incorporated will be contacting you
shortly to arrange for a meeting to discuss the project. Your cooperation
in this effort will be important to its success, and any assistance you can
give to the contractor will be very much appreciated. If you have any
questions regarding the study, please let me know.
Sincerely,
~~ -B~
Director
Communi t y Action Pr ogram
<
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\_)
CITY OF .ATLANT.A
CITY HALL
May 20, 1968
ATLANTA, G A . 30303
Tel. 522-44 63 Area Code 404
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LAN DER S, Admi ni strative Assistant
MRS . ANN M. MOSES , Executive Secretary
DAN E. SW EAT, JR ., Director of Governm ental Li aiso n
MEMORANDUM
To:
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
From:
Dan S weat
d5<J
Attached is a memo which I requested Jim Parham to write
giving us the facts on the N eighborhood Youth Corps Out of
School Program.
I became very concerned about the cuts we have received when
I heard that Chicago had received 15, 000 additional NYC slots
for the summer. I will have more definite information on the
Chicago slots by Wednesday morning.
If this is true I think we should make a big complaint with
someone high in the U . S. Department of Labor . The NYC
program has been one of our best programs for getting young
people employed. We should not be penalized for our success
in Atlanta.
I plan to talk to some of my contacts in the Labor Department
when I am in Washington Wednesday afternoon.
DS :fy
�MEMORANDUM
TO:
Mr. Dan E. Sweat, Jr.
Director, Governmental Liaison
City of Atlanta
FROM:
T. M. Parham
Executive Administrator
Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.
DATE:
May 17, 1968
~
The Neighborhood Youth Corps (Out-of-School) program
for EOA is being reduced by the U.S. Department of
Labor oeginning with a new budget year beginning
July 7, 1968 from 440 slots to 330, a cut of 25%.
For the past few weeks we have been under orders
not to fill vacancies until we've reached 80:,/4 of
our curre ntly allotted 440 slots .
Conversations with Regional Labor Department officials,
specifically Mr. Ludwin Branch, Director of the Bureau
of Work Training Program and Mr. Sam Lubin, indicate
that t his is a result of a national reduction in funds
fo r thi s progr am. Other infor ma tion which has come to
me f r om persona l conta cts indicate the possibi lity
that money is being shifted from one region of the
country to another in order to provide additional y outh
job opportunities in s ome of the larger cities. Mr .
Bill Al l i s on on a rec e nt trip to Chicago wa s informe d
that t h at c i t y r ece ive d 1 5 ,000 a dditiona l NYC s lots
for the summer. I p l an t o check on this next week
while_. in Chi cago for another meeting .
It is my fu r the r understandi n g f r om th e Re g i ona l Off i ce
that t h e Neighbor hood You t h Corps (In-Schoo l Program)
operated by the public school is expected to be cut
15-20:,/4 for the next school year, however, it is true
t h at the At lant a Publ i c Sc hools hav e b een awa rded
300 e x tra slot s for the s ummer. I ass ume that when
�Mr. Dan E. Sweat, Jr.
-2-
May 17, 1968
the summer slots expire the JS-20"/4 cut will be imposed and the schools will have fewer jobs opportunities for youth next school year than this school year.
As I indicated to you this is one of the most practical
programs ever developed regarding employment opportunities for youth. It has not been as attractive to boys
as to girls but it has enabled many youngsters to secure
some well supervised work training experience, make
some money, and move on to better jobs and/or advanced
edcuation.
In addition to these values, the work performed by
these youngsters has been extremely valuable to the
public agencies where they have been employed.
Unless there is some other program being developed which
will accomplish these same aims, it is extremely unwise
to further limit our potential for job opportunities
for these young people between the ages of 16-21. As
you well know the number of youngsters looking for
such opportunities has increased far beyond the availability of jobs. I cannot understand, without further
explanation, the line of reasoning which prompts this
action from Washington~ It would be appreciated if
this could be called to the attention of Mayor Allen
and that he be asked to inquire of National Administration officials why this i s occurring .
TMP/gj
�!Erf01VOMICC OP!PORTIUN/1'Y A7tlANJtA
IN CORPORATE. I!>
IOI MARIETTA
STREET 8L D G., ATLANTA, &£0R6IA 3<;:,303
TELEPHONE 525-4-2.62
May 21, 1968
TO:
FROM:
!_. ·- - - - - - - - · - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -




es::::. __






Reference our conversation regarding reductions in the Atlanta
Programs:
SUMMER HEAD STARl'
The 1967 Program provided for 3,050 participants and made available $540,409 in Federal Funds. The 1968 Program provides for 3,070
participants and made available $513,649 and within this reduced amount the
grant imposes greatly increased medical and dental care and an obligation
for child insurance without providing funds therefor. The reduction of
5% in funding with additional 20 participants and increases of medical dental and insurance costs has the effect of reducing needed support
services or other categories of cost.
FULL YEAR - DAY CARE CENTERS
The 1967 Program provided for 725 participants with Fed eral funding
of $700,000 . The 1968 Program provides for the same number of participants
but reduces funding to $605,204 (reduction $94,796) included in the $605,204
is approx imately $58,000 which was collected as Day Care Fees in 1967 and
which EOA had planned to program into the 1968 projects in addition to
Federal Funds. So actually OEO reduced Federal Fmnds from $700 , 000 in 1967
to $547,204 in 1968, a reduction of $152,796 in Federal Funds .
We were therefore unable to provi de Headquarters staff from Grant
Funds for either Head Start or Day Care. This amounts to about $65 , 000 .
Jim Par ham appar ently believes h e can get this request e d mone y later on ,
NEIGHBORHOOD YOUTH CORPS
In th e Augus t~ 1966-August , 196 7 Cont r act we started wi t h 620 s lot s
and $1,323, 910 . During mid 1967 the amoun t was re duced to $1 ,223, 910 , the
s l ot s were r~duc ed t o 550 and we were r~ qui r ed t o r un the pr ogram f ourteen
months ins tead of twelve wi t hin the r educed f unds.
The s uc c e edi ng Contr ac t October, 1 96 7 - October, 1968 we wer e
authoriz ed 44 0 s lots a nd $1 , 14 9 , 110. We are now fac ed with a reduct i on
to 330 slots and a reduction in fund ing.
�.1
Mr. Dan Sweat
Page - 2
CAP FUNDS
Our versatile funds for Program Direction and Neighborhood Service
Centers, NSC Support and other Grant 306 Funds were reduced from around
$2,900,000 in 1967 to $2,350,000 in 1968, a reduction of around $550,000.
PSJ:rw
�May 21g 1968
TO:
Dan Seat
Fru»f•
Pete Jones
Ref rence our convere tion regarding reductions in the Atl nt
Progr
StttMER HEAD START
The 1967 Program provided for 3,050 participant and made v 11~
ble $540,409 in Fed r l Fund . The 1968 Program provid • for 3,.070
p rtieip nt end mad vail bl $513 . 649 and within thi r duced amount the
grant 1mpo es gre tly incre s d medical nd dent 1 care and n oblig tion
for child inaur nee without proViding fund ther for . '!be reduction of
51 in funding with dditional 20 p rticipants and incr ases of m dical •
dent 1 and 1naur nee co ts ha th
ff ct of reducing needed upport
· ervic a or other c tegortcs of cost .
CENTERS
The 1967 Pro9r
p~ov1ded for 725 p rticip
of $700,000 . The 1968 Progr
provid
for th
am numb r of particlp ti
bue r duce funding to $605,204 (r duction 94,196) . includ din th
60S,204
i
pproxim t ly 58 1 000 which w coll ct d - Dy Car F sin 1967 and
which BOA h d planned to program into th 1968 project• in addition to
led ral Fund . So ctually 080 t due d Pd ral i upde fr
$700.000 in 1967
to 547;204 in 1968,
r dw:tlon of 152,796 in F deral Funde.
Pund
Ji
W w re th r . fore unabl to provid He dquarter, ·t ff fro Gr nt
for eith r Head t rt or Day Cr. Thi•
ounta to about $6S,OOO.
Parh appar ntl7 believ a he c n t thi r qu std money l•ter
.
In th Au8',lstt 196 •Ausu,t, 1967 Contra t we •tarted ~1th 620 11 t•
and 1~323,910. Durio mid 1967 th
unt wa• r ducad to 1.223,910. the
elota
r reduced to 550 and we
re r uir d to run th p~ogr
f urt
tht 1nat ad of twelv; w1thin th redu~ed fund1.
The u c dlng Contract October, 1967
ct b r, 1968 we were
auth te 440 •lots and 1,1 9.110. Wear n f c with a r du ti
to 330 al ta
d a~ d
ti
1
funding.
�Mr . Dan Sweat
Page - 2
CAP FUNDS
Our v ra tile funds for Program Direction and Neighborhood Servlc
Centers. NSC Support nd other Gr nt 306 Funds were reduc d from around
$2 , 900~000 in 1967 to $2,350, 000 in 1968, a reduction of a ound $550,000.
PSJ:rw
�I
understand that of the hard-core unemployed or under employed in
the poverty areas of Atlanta, that somewhere between 95 and 98% are women who
are heads of households and that these female heads of household each have an
average of four dependent children.
A large part of the employment efforts
directed by Federal, State and local sources have been aimed at job placement
of these hard-core unemployed or under employed.
Present efforts are being made toward prevocational education and
training and then job development and placement.
This presumes that once
these people are placed on·jeb,s,they will be able to become assimulated into the
main s t re am of production at a living wage .
Once the person is placed into a job such person has to provide her
own r e sources for the care of h e r dependent children.
Such citiz en faced with
ina de quat e income, poor living conditions in a poor ar e a makes h er job t r aining
and placement doomed to failure.
I f efforts to pla c e f ema l e h e ads of household into profitabl e j obs
should be a success there must firs t b e made provis ion for the c are of the
youngs t ers in pr oper and a ccept ab le conditions .
to ~accomondate some 75 0 children.
EOA now operates Day Care Cent ers
Such Day Care Centers are not loc ated in the
highly concentrated ghetto populated areas.
EOA f unded centers only scratch the
surface of the real need of such accomodation.
I feel that a major effort with
Federal financing needs to be provided to establish good child care centers so
that female heads of households can be relieved of this cost and they can then
undertake to provide wi th income from their jobs enough to cover expenses of
living and support of their homes.
If they must earn enough to support their
homes and pay for their childrens day care, they will never m:ake it.
The providing
�-2-
of Day Care at no cost would relieve the strain of mothers to the point where
they could maintain themselves and their families in an acceptable home atmospher e .
Such Day Care Centers will need to be operated on a six -day week with hours from
7 A.M. or earlier until late in the evenings which to permit the mother to enter
the children in the Day Care Centers before work and to receive the children
after completion of h e r day's work.
This will have another very desirable effect if Day Care Center
conditions were made to accomodate the children in a good atmosphere with food,
clean clothing, sanitation, etc. so that the children would come to realize
a desirabl e standard of living and be motivated in th eir very early years
toward the de si r ability of self betterment and the ne e d f or a level of education
t h at would r e sult in the el evation o f th ems e lves f rom the type o f life into
which they were born and first accustomed.
I have s een the e ffects of this in the Country of Venequela where the
children were taken at an a ge of about two years and were provide d a kinder garten
or day care t ype f acility f r om ear ly morning to late eve ning of e ach day of the
week ex cept Sunday.
Th ese children who came from homes which had dirt floors ,
no s ani tation , i mprop er food habits , with par ents with l ittl e or no education
entere d i n t o and le a rne d a new way o f l i fe which t he y appre c i a te d and en joyed .
Upon returni ng to t h eir homes i n t he eveni ngs the y saw t he gre at cont r a st
betwe en th e ir manner of living at h ome and their manne r o f livi ng in the day
c are c en te r.
Th ey voiced their dis satisfac tion with traditional plight of t hei r
pa r ent s and demande d th e bet t e r thing s of l i fe.
Thi s had an effect on t he
pa r ent s and in many cases c aused t he par ent s to make a r eal effort to i mprove
their homes and ma nne r of l iving i n or der t o be tt e r sat is fy the chi l dr e n.
these pre - s chool ye a r s of the chil dr en t hey t hems elves de te rmi ne d to have a
bet ter life t ha n did their pare nts.
Thi s motiva tion continue d into their
In
�-3-
elementary school age and then on into their high school years.
on into college.
Many continued
This definitely would not have happened had they not been
thoroughly indoctrinated into a better way of life during the very early years
of their lives.
As a result of these programs, Venequela now have a fast growing
middle class element in its population whereas previously it had only two classes the very poor and the very rich.
I believe that the main approach to solving these social problems
should be aimed at the early years of this large group of socially depressed
children.
We will never succeed by directing major attention to the adolescents
and adulcs who were born into and raised in poverty, in slums of rural and urban
areas and because of such factors will be most difficult, if not impossible to
educate, motivate and change into fully self-supporting masses.
�•
Eco·nom ·c Op port
i11ty
101 Marietta Street Bl dg . " Atlanta , Georgia 30303 o
Te l ephone
688 - 3010 .
T . M. P a rh am
Execuci,·e Administrator
May 27 , 196 8
. Mr . He rbert T . J enk i ns
Chief of Police
Atlanta Police Department
Atlanta , Georg ia 303 03
Dear Chief J enkins :
Please
., r efer to my l e tter of April 29 , 19 68 ( copy of wh ich is enclo sed
for ready reference) to which was at t a ched a list o f equipment stolen
from Economic Opportunity Atlanta Neighborhood Service Center agencies ,
during the pas t three years .
Please advise when a r epl y may be received as to what success, if any
h as bee n achieved in recover ing the missing items .
Yours truly,
j'
•• •_c'.1 i
{i_~
L}1 : }\,'/v-z_
0 . H. Gronke
Director of Purchas ing
n
Enclos ure
cc:
Mr. Dan Sweat
City Hall
1--
'
�,.
.. . _• . -
.....
. ~.
.
-:_:£.~-
.
-·~-~.
.
f ...~ lot•"'-- __..···.: . .._ ., . ~;.
.
t'-~
.....
,.-:· .. __
.... -~- ~- ..
,..;; r-""I
S1.m
. rme rh ill/L._ chan i ~svl l _lc Neighborhood Service Cent er
65 Geo gia Avcnu , Southea~ t
- , ·· -
Atl~nt a , Gcor3 i a
. ~: .
303 12
. -·
~- ~
'
·..
...
Date o f The ft
May 30 , 1966
Typc~-, ;:it er ,
Total
Cos t
_Qu~mt i_t y
Unit
Cost_
1 ea.
189 . ?5
189 .25
· 2 ca .
129. 00
25 8 . 00
1 ea .
189 . 25
189 . ?.5
oyol, HC-·13
Manual, St:Jn<lard Elite
Ser . 1fo . 330 ;]. )9
Sept . 20 , 1966
Sewi ng Hach inc ; S· nacr
rb . 60t'. n / ~use
Ser . Nos . 281219 , ?81217
E0<lc l
Sep t . 12 , 1966
Typeuriter , ?-oral, HC-13
Manua l, Staniard Elite
Ser . iio . 83 071 7:k
Ed ,.,.ei :ocd N i ehborh00
Scr.vic0 Center
17 23 Bo ulcva··<l Drive , S . E .
Atl anta , Georgia 30317
____
To t a l
e ·_nt
. . .._ o f Thc1;!;
b ..ntc
<l v G, 19%
S a win,.,. !1:::i c hin
,
Sin,,.er
Lo<l cl G04 ,;/c&sc
S m: _n l Not: ,
A.Nlt-315 1.6
-·AN4175 62
2 ea .
99 . 95
199 . 90
�Hest En Ne ghborhoo Service Center
7 25 Lauton Street , S. H.
Atl~n ta , Gco~gia 30310
Unit
D·•te o f Theft
J an . 5, 1966
1E.,scription
S(ming Ha ch:ine , · Cnr. 01.·e
p ortable , \J/ , .ttach~. ts
Ser . r' s . 2 fllL~ , 24-116

u~nt i.ty
Cost
2 ea .
107 . 00
Total
Cost
7
1':as . / Hashlng t on Ne:i.ghborhoo Service Center
2L~7 Ashby Stree t , Nori: lWCS t
Atla nta~ Georgia 30314
Unit
Dos ed.pt io.~
April 20 , 196 6
Oct . 11, 196 7
Typewd.ter , Royn l H ,-13
Manual, St anu.n-:<l El:i. tc
Se.:- . No . 8 1 36!i- i'l:. 1
Quont:itl
Cost
Totn l
Cost
1 ea.
189 . 25
189 . 25
2 ea .
l1-?.3 . 00
8l:-6 . 00
Typ e;:-n.· j_t er , I BH 13"
Elcctr c Stun nrd . 1o el
Ser . Nos . 197330, 1975540
Na!:ih/Has i:i.n"'ton. Neigh orhoo
Service Ccntc1· E};tcns i.on.
].L,J_ \1:.ilnut Street , N. 1-J .
Atlnnta , Geo::-g ia
30314Un i t .
Date of The ft
Apr il 1 , 1968
Total
Cost
Co s t
-·- -
--
95 . 95
191. 90
Se,1in3 Hnc.hine , S in3cr
pori.:able , rod.cl 33"/ H/ cnse
Ser . Ltos . EX5l}702l} , EX5Li7 9'9
?. ca .
�No rth~1cc t _-e 3 b orhood St:.:-rvi.c c Cent er
19?.i' Ho l ::. uooa Ro.::i , i:L '(T .
Al l a . t a , Gaor 3ia 30 31 8
Da t e of Thef t
D2 s c
Oct. 15, 1 96 6
.1pt 0 .E.
Q a n · it_y
1
'l'ape Rc co1·c e r , F o llcnsak
Hode l 5150 u/ acc"'ssor:Lcs
S e r . No . 51503 925
1 ea .
Uni t
Cos t
To t al
Cos t
21 6 . 5 2
216 .5 2
--
'•
J une 2, 196 7
C....mzra , ~ ocla l~ I ns t ana t ic
. A 70L~
So-,- No . 00 899 7
}Iodc l 11 0
--- - .
l ea .
7ti-. 51
71+ . 51
T e Rouse o f U. S . E.
36 Gco_ ~i a Avenue , S . E .
At l a nta , Georgia 30315
Unit
Da t e of Theft
Qu[l.n t i t z.
Phonosr cph t urnt:~b l c ,
G2r :rad , u/ pm~cr mn li fieJ:
AH 295 , u / 2 s ,zc.l:crs
Oct . 6 , 196 6
1 ca .
Cos t
95 . 00
Tot Ql
Cos t
95 . 00
I
Er,st Ccn t rnl. 118 i~hbo1·hood Se1: vicc Cen t er
Dc .... .1 · ,r S trcct , pout hens t
At l anta , Gcor3in
0312
l:.S(l
Totn l
Cos t
215 .10
215 . 10
--
lJo.tc of Tl cJ.!_
Aug . 8 , 1966
Un t
Cost
Ad<lin~ Hac1:i.nc , Victo1:
Hotlcl 17 -GJ··.5I~, 10 key
Sc:..-. 1:0 . '.'2?.9mOl:-3
l ca .
.
�Atlan ta Employment Eval u:it i on a <l Service Centc ..
1599 N~1.i orfal Dr"!.ve , S. E.
At l ant a , Georei a 30317
Unit
Cost
To t al
Cos t
1 e n.
250 . 00
250.00
Scj'.' . Ho . 25 20-550
1 ea .
215 . lO
215.10
Trans crib :1.ns lbch1.ne
'fe lefun.~,..n Houe l
Ser . Hos . 4-3 ?.0 63 7
Li-3 20629
2 e· •
250 . 00
500.00
Typem:-itc:i: , _;.c1· i n~ _on
Elcc ·r:t l J! ' HoJcl No . 25
Ser . 1Tos . ?3{~5 63, 2l:-3339
2 ca .
36!~ . 50
729 . 00
Typewrit e r , Rc:n in~ton
El ectric 17 11 1-Io<le l 25
S er . Ho . 23/:-5611-
1 ca .
3 91. 00
391. 00
Tc lcv:!.siort , R~ , 211:
porta )le , Sc1.·. do .
6 lMn t:- •20
1 ea .
131. 95
131. 95
16HH, H Lel 9?.0
Ser . N0 . 3?.0007
l ea .
367.00
367 . 00
Typc·· ::itc: ,. :rloy ~·. J., r.J.~ct::c.. c
Eo<lcl c~\c-13, 13· 1 St::n'.:'.n ·d
El ite, 11".>:~s G1~,~c:n , Ser . ;:,10 .
fJ3L: 7789
1 eo. .
375 . 00
375 . 0
Car,1..;1:.1, l ni::t:an::ttic l~o~nk
l b.:Iel Ho . 301:. TJ/ C ,' JSC
Ser . do . o,:;91~12
1 en .
D tc of. Theft

J u_y 13 , 196G
De c . 7, 1 966
Trans c ri i ns 1-fu...h i.ne
Tele:fo.nl:~n , Hod0. l
Ser . rlo . /1.32 800
Add j_nG Hac1i
.0- ,
v_c t or
Hode l 17 -33-SL, , 10 1~ y
Bcice co l or
Dec . 30 ~ 1966
Dec . 30, 1966
De c . 30, 1966
De c . 30 , 1966
Nov . 8 , 196 7
Nov. 8, 1967
· Nov . 8, 1967
Proj Gctor. , Graf l cx
1
82.73
�Atlante!. Lc~a l Aid OH :i.c8- 1839C 1 oll)'lmo
Atl2nta , Gcorzia
Date of The ft
QmmtitL
Unlt
Cos t
1 ea .
215 . 10
A<ld in.z Ha e li ne , Vict m:
10 1~cy, E0 1el 17-83-5:.
Ser . _·o . 297"-172.
EconoL ic O port·1n:i.t
Rd ., N,H .
3031 6
Total
Cos t
-215 . 10
Atlc.m~a , I n ,::. .
101 Har ictta Street , N. H.
At l anta , Gaor3ia 30303
Tota l
Cost
Unit
D t e o f The ft
De c . 8, 196 7
~De s cri1::t: io1:._
Ta pe Reco .:- ' er , Hollcm;.:i.-:
poLt a l e , ?~ dc l 4100
Ser . '6 . 713716
1 ea .
84- . 50
84 . 50
Pr ice t!e i.:3hbo:rhood Servi ce Cent er
1127 Capi tol Avcnun , S. E.
Atlan ta , GcorB i a 30315
Dntc of The ft
J an . 2 , 1967
Jan . 2 , 1967
---~
J a n. 2 , 190·1
J ;,,.n . 2, 196 7
J an . 2 , J.% 7
Total
Coct
Coc t
Typm- itcr , I tE , 13"
Ele ctr ic, Stan a r d l fu ,cl
Ser . ro . 19853 19
1 ca .
t~;.3 . 00
4-?3 . 00
1 e~.
l.50 . 00
t
S0r . Nos . 0147235 , i l 517°~
?. cu .
189 . 7.5
37C. 50
Scui n_'.j Hee 1i n0- , Sin.3 .r
p ~!:' t a ) l e , u / cncc. l b-1::! l no.
GO~~r: , Ser . :-~o . AP.'i'> 71L>6
l c ~.
l ?.9 . 00
1:?9 .00
Sc 0 r !.~13 1l1ch ' nc , S:i.n:::2r
p o:- t n:1 l c , t.7/ c a:)c E0clc J. ,lo . 60-';.
S .r . i!o . 7811 ~1
1 en .
119 . 00
119. 00
Typmn: i tcr , IBU, 17
ElP.ctr i c , S .. .:mch:::Ser . Ho . 19 i'3511
J an . 2 , 1967
Unit
De sc1· _n tion
Mode l
so. 00
Typem.·:i.tcr , Ro ·al, ~.-:m.ut 1
l ~ -1 3 1 0t~n0~~d Elit .
~,n7,o:.:e
por t nb l 0. , -r.1/ cnsc l i'3d c l H0 . SL:.
Ser . no . 03?9')9
Sc~? ns l bchin.::! ,
1 ca .
99. 95
,
99 . 95
�NAT ION AL ALLIANCE OF BU§!NES§PhIEN
415 CANDLER BUILDING
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303
Telephone 524-648 1
May 23, 1968
Mayor of the City of Atlanta

Chairman of the Fulton County Commission
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Gentlemen:
The National Alliance of Businessmen has worked closely
with Economic Opportunity Atlanta in developing means for locating
and training hard-core unemployed people.
In addition, EOA has
provided us with manpowe r and major assistance in the organization
and operation of the JOBS (Job Opportunities in the Business Sector)
program in Atlanta.
In our opinion, EOA has performed in an
exemplary manner in areas where we have had contact. We think
that it ' ought to continue in its pres e nt function and that it
ought to be the means by which the programs for the alleviation
of poverty are operated in our area.
We hope that this endorsement will be helpful to you and
will be glad to provide any further information that you might wish.
Sincerely yours,
-
BC:eh
CC:
Mr. T. M. Parham
I --
�May 30. 19~.8
Mrs. Julian D. Freedman
Executive Director
Planned Parenthood Association
118 Marietta Street, N. W.
Atlanta. Georgia
30303
Dear Mrs. Freedman:


May I acknowledge receipt of your letter of May


29th and extend my contjratulations upon the outstanding service being rendered by t h e Atlanta
Planned Parenthood Association.
1'-1.!ay I also e xpr ess foe City's appreciation for
your support of Economic Opportunity .Atlanta.
Inc.
/
Sincerely yours .
Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor
IAJr/br
CC:





..,, ,
Mr. Dan S w e a /
�Pltnnnefl
Panrera.th,ood A §sociation
of the .Atll~nla .A rea
179 A FFILIA TES in th e U. S.
I 18 Marietta Street, N. W . I Atlanta, Georgia 30303 / Telephone 523-6996
May 29, 1968
PRESIDENT
Dr. R aph ael B . L evine, Ph .D.
EXECUTIV E DI R ECTO R
Mis . J ulian D . Fr ee dman
FOUNDING PR E S ID E NT
M rs . Herbert T aylor
PAST P RES IDE N T
Dr. \V . Ve rnon S kilc:s
VICE P R E S ID ENTS
Mr.
Dr.
Dr.
Mr.
R a lph L . D ickey
C . Stedma n Gl isson
L ucil a Kl ein
R a lph McCroskcy
TREASU RER
Mr. Willi a m C. H enry
SEC RE T AR Y
M rs. Ca rl J. Bl iem
BU S I NESS AND CO MMERC E
CO MM IT TEE
Roy D. Warren, Sr .. Chai :-man
C. Pres ton B rad fo rd
Ro bert H . D u n n
E dward E lso n
George Goodwin
Mrs. A ll en S. H a rdin
D onald M. H astin gs
H erbe:t J ohnson
Virlyn B . Moo re. J r.
E dward E. N oblc
J ohn C . Spencer
H oward S. Sta rk
C harles l\! . Watt. J r.
F AMI LY P L ANN I N G CLI N I CS
B eth lehem Cente r
9 McDonou gh Blvd .. S. E .
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
City Hall
68 Mitchell Street, S,W.
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Mayor Allen:
The Atlanta Planned Parenthood Association was organized in
November 1965 with the main objective to make family planning
education and services available to the 50,000 medically indigent women in the Atlanta area. Prior to that time convenient evening and neighborhood family planning services were
almost nonexistent in Atlanta.
Only through the financial support and encouragement of EOA
was it possible to initiate our program of neighborhood services as early as January 1966 and to expand our services so
that at the present time we have seven family planning clinics
and nine family planning sessions per weekQ Between January
1966 to May 1968 we helped 3,349 new patients obtain family
planning services. This means that more than 3,000 families
have been helped to achieve satisfactory family living.
The executives and personnel of EOA have been most cooperative
in financial matters as well as with helpful advice and suggestions. In our dail y contact with residents of EOA neighborhoods we have found all of the staff at the various EOA
centers deeply concerned about the residents in their area
and unfailingly willing to cooperate in an attempt to be of
service and help,
P er ry H o mes
1660 Drew Dri ve. N. W.
W e -3 t End C linic
43 5 A sh by St reet. S. W.
We strongly reconnnend that EOA be continued as a conrrnunity
action agency for Atlanta and Fulton County.
E as t Poin t Cli nic
2i35 East Point S tree t
Sincerely,
D own town Clini c
11 6 Marietta Stree t . N. W.
.9~. ;tc;/47-
)4•·/~
/ J-1it~ -;'L
ffi,
JDF :w
cc: Mr. Terry, EOA
f
Mrs. uulian D. Freedman
Ex ecutive Director


.C:l!vc_


�r
May 31,. 1968
Mr . Boisfeu.ill t Jones
230 Peachtree Street, N. W .
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Bois£euillet:
Your memorandum on oi-ganization of the EOA Board dated
May 15, 1968, will meet our needs in the City Government
quite nic ly.
I feel that it provid s
participation.
very broad ba.se of community
It meets both th requir ments of the Gre n Am ndment
· nd the City.
Sincerely yours.
Iv nAllen, Jr.
Mayor
lAJr:fy
�CITY OF .ATLANT.A
CITY HALL
May 21, 1968
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR. , Director of Governmental Liaison
MEMORANDUM
To:
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
From:
Dan Sweat ~
Boisfeuillet and I have discussed this reorganization on
numerous occasions and the memorandum on reorganization
of the EOA board (attached ) is a result of our joint concurrence.
We feel this will satisfy all the governments involved and
certainly the vast majority of the private agencies.
DS:fy
�ATLANTA,GEORGIA
PHONE JA. 2•4463
Ivan Allen , Jr., Mayor
al1/
f~t/< -1/4)
&Ji~K
O? -
��/ECONOMIC 0/PIPORT!UNJTY A7!lANJ!A
IN CORPORATE. P
IOI MARIETTA
STREET 13LD6,, ATLANTA> &£0R0IA 30303
TELEf>HONE 525-4-2 62
May 17, 1968
The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mr. Mayor:
The attached memorandum suggests a procedure for compliance with
new requirements for selection of directors for Economic Opportunity Atlanta,
Inc., the community action agency authorized by the City of Atlanta and Fulton
County in 1964, later joined by Gwinnett and Rockdale Counties, and which you
have indicated should be continued.
The EOA Board now has nineteen appointed members, seven each by
Atlanta and Fulton County, one by the two governments jointly, and two each
by Gwinnett and Rockdale Counties. It also has fourteen members elected by
the poor, one each from the twelve Neighborhood Service Areas in Atlanta and
Fulton County, one in Gwinnett County, and one in Rockdale County.
The elected representatives of the poor comprise at least one -third of
the Board, as required. The Neighborhood organization has worked well, so
it seems wise to retain thes e fourteen area units, with one representative each,
as the basic numerical control.
The law requires that one-third of the Board be representatives of public
officials and agenci es as selecte d by them. This number would be fourteen as
related to representatives o f the poor. The memorandum suggests representation
that would provide broad coverage of the public interest, including city intere sts
such as housing, recreation and youth; county interests such as h e alth and welfare;
and other general interests such as education, e mployment, planning and relations.
The l aw a l so re qui res that other B oa r d members, up to one- third, be
repre s entatives of major private community gr oups or interests concerned with
problems of poverty as selected by the gr oups . Public officials in the respective
jurisdictions may designate which groups will be invited to select representatives.
The memorandum suggests eleven private groups most representative of such
community interests.
The law requires also that the Board be so constituted as to permit the
addition of private community gr oups who feel inadequately represented and
�-2-
successfully p e tition EOA for membership. Although no such petition is
anticipated, it would be possible to add three places to the eleven in the
category of community groups without disturbing the r e quired distribution
ratio . .
The memorandum, prepared after extensive consultation, is our best
judgment as to how the EOA Board can meet current membership requirements
and best retain the general character and individual representation established
by the respective city and county go vernme nts.
I shall appreciate your agreement or suggested changes in the memorandum in order that we may present the necessary information for Office of
Economic Opportunity approval. Following such approval, I shall wish to
consult with you further.
Sincerely yours,
/f2 . ·; _ . cJG_X
~
ne s
Chairn1/an EOA
�5 / 15/ 68
Memorandum on Reorganization of EOA Board
Modification of the selection process for repre s entation on the Board of Directors
of Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. is required by 1967 amendments to the Economic
Opportunity Act, to be effective by July 1, 1968.
The following composition of the Board would be consistent with the new requirement s
and the chartel," and by-law s of EOA:
1.
Total number of seats will be 39.
(Present number is 33.)
2.
Number of seats for representatives of the poor will be 14. (No change.)
One representative is elected by the poor in each of the fourteen
Neighborhood Service Areas into which Atlanta and Fulton, Gwinnet,
and Rockdale Counties are divided.
3.
Number of seats for chief elected officials or their repre s entative s w ill be 14 .
(Present number is 19.)
Representatives will be selected by elected officials or public agencies
as follows:
Atlanta Mayor and Board of Aldermen
F ulton County Commiss ioner s of Road s and Revenues
Gwinnett County Commiss ioner s of Roads a nd Revenue s
Rockdale County Commiss ioner of Roa d s a n d Revenue s
A tla nta Board of Education
Geo r gia Commiss ioner of Labor
Atlanta Region al M e t r opolitan Plannin g Commiss ion
A tla nta Community Re l a tions Cou nc il
4.
1
1
1
1
1
1
Numbe r of s eats for major private o r g a nizations or int e r e s t groups will be 11.
(No ne n ow s elect ed dir e ctly. )
One re p r e s e ntat i v e w i ll b e se l ect e d by eac h of the fo llowing gr oups :
( B u siness )
(Commu n ity Servic es )
(Education)
(Employment)
(Health )
(Labor)
(Planning )
(Religion)
(Social Service)
(Gwinnett Services)
(Rockdale Services)
5.
4
4
A tlanta C hamber of Commerce
A tla nta F e deral Execut ive Boa rd
Atlanta University Center Corporation
Nat i onal Alliance of Businessmen , Atlanta
Atlanta Health Planning Counc il
Atlanta Labor Council
Community Council of the Atlanta Area, Inc.
Christian Council of Metropolitan Atlanta, Inc.
Metropolitan Atlanta Community Services, Inc.
(Determined through County Commissioners)
(Determined through County Commissioner)
Representatives will be selected to serve July 1 through December 31, 1968,
with reappointment or replacement as of January 1, 1969, for a full one-year
term.
�•
2-(. ·~-

S01.!nlc:f1S- ,trnmJ t mTCE
n.A r £< , EHl~mf\ 30393
OPENING STATEMENT TO PRESS CONFERENCE ON JUNE 7, 1968,
BY WILLIAM W. SUTTLE, REGIONAL DIRECTOR,
OFFICE OF ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY, ATLANTA, GEORGIA

~---------------------------I am pleased that a compassionate and concerned federal government
has given me the .OPPORTlJNITY to ask you here this morning at the
time of my appointment as Regional Director, Southeastern Region,
Office of Economic Opportunity.
I am extremely sorry that our meeting comes at a time when the
America we love is once again b eneath a tra:;jic cloud of grief,
occasioned by the senseless slayi ng of another great patr i ot. Almost
as shocking as the dea th of Senator Kennedy is the dramatic rea liza: tion that the kind of violence that he abhorred is no longer uncommon
in our land. We all mourn his passing and pray for continued Devine
strength for his bereaved family.' Most imp<:>rtant, however, we must
renew our de termina tion that the late Senator Kennedy's dream of a
better America , where all men may live together as equals and in
p eace, sha ll not die with him.
As though it were Buckingham Palace, it might appear that during
the past several months the most exciting news to come from this
office has revolved around the "changing of the guard." Although
this is one trad ition tha t I sincerely hop e we can break, let me
assure you that much, much more has trans.pired within these walls
than the frequent change of leadersh ip would 1 indic ate. During the
twelve weeks that I have been in Atlanta as the Acting Director , I
have seen a devoted and capable staff refuse to succumb to the
pressures of b e ing undermanned and accept the OPPORWNiTY to serve
the poor of our six states in an enthusi astic manner that makes me
proud to become one of them.
Community Action Agency grant processing is further along today than
at any similar time since regionalization of this Agency, and Head
Start gran t refusals have dipped to only s even within the Region
compared to more than thirty a year ago. Hard work on the par.: of
the Atlanta OEO staff has made these things possible in spite of the
lateness of funding for the current fiscal year, the recent Emergency
Food and Medical program tha t c ast the bulk of its wo rk- load on this
�- 2 .
~,...,....
Region, and the necessity of advising with every local agency on the
changes necessary to comply with sweeping amendments made last year
to the Economic OPPORTUNITY Act of 1964.
The Job Corps staff in the Southeastern Region continues to recruit
and transport more than one fourth of all the youngsters enrolled in
this very excellent human renewal program, and they continually lead
all other regions in this vital area of activity.
318 VISTA volunteers work around the clock, seven days each week in
thirty-six projects throughout five states in the Region, living among
the poor and helping them to find better ways to utiiize the resources
available to them. 150 more will be assigned to training centers
during this summer. While these valliant men and women devote full
time to eradicating the hunger , i gnorance, disease, pre judice and
deprivation that is pover ty in America, they typify that the conc ept
of volunteerism is just as much alive in this land today as when
DeToqueville wrote about it a century ago.
The fiscal records in this office are, in my opinion, excellent and
comparable to those of any other Federal regional operation in the
country. Personnel proc edures here are being "improved and increased
·. to devote more effor t to recruiting, tra ining and caree r development.
From the
good and
bad, and
thankful
record I am sure you will agree that the re is much that is
excellent within this operation. Certainly, all is far from
as a new Regional Director there is much for which I can be
and proud.
However, accomplishments of the pas t are far from suffic i ent , and
the challenges of the future have always been -- and will certainly
continue to be -- the b eacon that guides this Region and this Agency.
I hope you have notic ed from the foregoing }ines of this statement
and from the surroundings here this mornlng that , to insure that this
Reg ion keeps our goals clear ly b efore us in Qhe months ahead, the
accen t will be on OPPORTUNITY. ACTION, not promis.es, will be our
objective. RESULTS, not excus e s, must be the products of our efforts.
The Vice President of the Unite d States, speaking last J anuary to
the Congres s of America ' s Ten Outstanding Young Men, s a id:
'~omebody in Washington can 't do it (win the War Agains t
Poverty alone), and even if he could, he shouldn't. 11
With these words, Mr . Humphr ey told his audience tha t the fights
against "hopelessness and despair " are local battles, and that until
every conc erned and socially conscious citizen is given the OPPORTUNITY
to engage the enemy at the commun i ty l eve l th e war c annot be won.
�3
No one could agree more completely with the Vice President than I do.
In framing the Economic OPPORWNITY Act of 1964, the Congre&s directed
this Agency to mobilize all available resources in the Wa r Ag_ainst
Poverty. My first introduction to the gove rnment service came as a
result of a plea that all who wished to serve might be given the
OPPORWNITY to meet the challenges facing America today. It is my
hope that all who are associated with programs within the jurisdiction
of this regional office will acc ept the challenge of tot a l resource
mobilization in every community we serve, as well as being effective
advocates for all the poor.
Recent public opinion polls show that a majority of Americans,
regardless of political persuasion, support national programs to
stamp out hard-core unemployment and to rebuild our slums. This
Agency must see that every one of these conc e rned Americans has the
OPPORWNITY t; become a part of the solutions to our social problems.
Every businessman and employer must be given the OPPORTUNITY to
help place the poor into the mainstream of economic society by
providing jobs for the hard-core un~~ployed. Already, through
efforts of the National Alliance of Business, large employers iri
major cities have shown their willingness to meet this challenge.
We must extend that same OPPORTUNITY to every community where there
are unemployed poor.
Every church and other religious group must be pointed toward the
local mission field and made aware that Christmas baskets for the needy
are far from enough. There are more than twenty million Americans,
created in His image, who need the total resources of the church to
assure that their future will not be limited by lack of OPPORTUNITY.
We have already begun to call on religious leaders throughout the
Region to stimulate greater church involvement in social programs,
and their initial response has been gratifying.
Every civic, service organization must be ch aillenged to turn from
trivial traditional projects to programs that truly serve that
community and the disadvantaged . The Atlanta Jaycees have shown
what can be done by volunteer groups with their Neighborhood Center
and related activity. I will ask these young men to travel throughout
this region to stimulate similar endeavors by every civic organization
that is willing to listen.
The public must be made aware of the problems of· our society and of
th e need for total pa rticipation in the solutions. In many instanc es
the h earts and minds of men must be changed. We can no longer afford
to ha ve the masses confus e OPPORTUNITY with the dole, to believe that
being poor is synonymous with be ing lazy, or to think th a t to be
diffe r ent is to be second- class .
The Pres id en t's CoITu-nission on Civil Diso r d e rs has stated "there can be
no higher priori ty for n a tiona l action and no higher cl a im on the na tion's
conscience" t han "a compa s sionate , massive and susta ined" attack on the
prob l ems o f deprivat i on in our soc i e t y . I fully concur , and I -h ave
�- 4 -
.
..,-,;_
,





J
faith in Ai~erica to continue to create OPPORTUNITIES from problems
and challenges. I have faith in the ability of this Agency to
stimulate the kind of massive effort that is necessary, and i am
happy to have the OPPORTUNITY to be a part of what President Johnson
described in his State of the Union Address as a "time to know the
pride and excitement and hope of being an American. 11
.
�June 11, 1968
Mr. Leo A . Schmidt
Vice President and General Manager
Training Corporation of America, Inc:.
7700 Arlington Boulevard
Falls Church, Virginia 22046
De r Mr. Schmidt:
I shall be happy to meet \Vith you to discu s the InnerCity Job Corp concept as it might rel t to Atl nta.
If you will s ugg t a time, I will be gl d to arrange for
the neces ary p rsone from the Clty to b in attendance.
Sincerely yours,
Dan Sweat
DS:!y
�-~~
TR..AI_
. . .: NI_
NG_U_OR_PO_RA_TI_ON_O
_F_AM_E_
RI_
UA_IN_U._ I
u
7700 Arlington Boulevard, Falls Church, Virginia
22046
Telephone 534-9595
Area Code 703
June 3., 1968
Mr. Dan Sweat
Federa Z Programs
Office of the Mayor
City HaU
Atlanta., Georgia 30301
Dear Mr. Sweat:
The Training Corporation of America (TCA)., an affiliate of
Westinghouse Air Brake Company (WABCO)., is an educational organization with extensive experience in developing., operating., and managing
vocational training programs for the hard-core unemployed. TCA also
has planned and evaluated a variety of educational endeavors in the
U.S. and overseas.
Recently., TCA has been discussing pre-vocational training for
Atlanta's hard-core unemployed with NAB and the Chamber of Commerce.
Briefly., we understand., through discussions with Mr. Clinton Rogers.,
that National Alliance for Businessmen has developed numerous job
commitments in Atlanta. A program can be developed which would train
the young hard-core unemployed for these jobs in a non-residential.,
co-educational center that will relate itself in a most meaningful
way with your school system. In this manner., Atlanta's industries could
fulfill their job commitments to NAB by hiring trained'hard-core unemployed.
Federal funding of such training may be available through a single
training contractor., such as TCA., in the proposed Inner-City Job Corps
Training Center program to be funded this summer by OEO. Only five
cities are to be funded. The Training Corporation of America., which
operates both OEO and Labor Department training programs., would Zike
to propose to the OEO the es tablishment of one of these centers in
Atlanta . In order to prepare such a proposal., TCA feels the city's
approval of the Inner-City Job Corps concept is essential.
ARTS & SCIENCES

BUSINESS &TECHNOLOGY
�Mr. Dan Sweat, Atlanta, Georgia, Page 2, June 3, l968
At a mutually agreeable time , we would like to discuss with you
and your staff the details of such a specialized training center for
Atlanta.
Sincerely ,
TRAINING CORPORATION OF AMERICA, INC.
~C~4~/
LEO A . SCHMIDT
Vice President & General Manager
LAS/ms
�r.
Ir,
TRAINING CORPORATION OF AMERICA INC.
_ ,_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _I
v
7700 Arlington Boulevard, Falls Church, Virginia
22046
J'
May 27, 1968
The Honorable Ivan Allen, Mayor
City of Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgia
Area Code 703
Telephone 534-9595
~
,1-
/~
D~)~~
My dear Mr. Allen:
The Training Corporation of America (TCA), an affiliate of
Westinghouse Air Brake Company (WABCO), is an educational organization with extensive experience in developing, operating, and managing
vocational training programs for the hard-core unemployed. TCA also
has planned and evaluated a variety of educational endeavors in the
U.S. and overseas .
Recently, TCA has been discussing pre-vocational training for
Atlanta's hard-core unemployed with NAB and the Chamber of Commerce.
Briefly, we understand, through discussions with Mr. Clinton Rogers,
that National Alliance for Businessmen has developed numerous job
commitments i n Atlanta. A program can be deve loped which would train
the young hard-core unemp loyed for these jobs in a non-residential,
co-educational center that wiZ Z r e late itself in a most meaningful
way with your school system. In this manner, Atlanta's industries could
fulfill their job commitments to NAB by hiring trained hard-core unemployed.
Federal funding of such training may be available through a singl e
training contractor, such as TCA, in the proposed Inner-City Job Corps
Training Center program to be funded this summer by OEO. Only five
cities are to be funded. The Training Corporation of America, which
operates both OEO and Labor Department training programs, would Zike
to propose to the OEO the establishment of one of these centers in
Atlanta. In order to prepare such a proposal, TCA feels the city ' s
approval of the Inner-City Job Corps concept is essential.
ARTS & SCIENCES

BUSINESS &TECHNOLOGY
�Honorable Ivan Allen, Mayor
- 2 -
27 May Z968
At a rrrutuaZZy agreeable time, we would Zike to discuss with you
and your staff the details of such a specialized training center for
Atlanta.
Sincerely,
TRAINING CORPORATION OF AMERICA, INC.
LEO A. SCHMIDT
Vice President & General Manager
LAS/pam
�6
7700
t
ay 2?, 1968
The Honorabl e Ivan k 'lZen, Mayor
of At l anta
At Zanta, Georgi a
Ci ty
Hy
dea,r
r.
A ZZ.en :
The Trai ning Coz,porati on of Ameriaa (TCA ) , an affi liat e of
Air Brake Company ( ~IABCO) > is an educational organi~at i on wi th ex~ensive experience in deve loping, operating, a'lfla managing
voaational t raini ng prog:r>ams f or t he hard-aore unemployed. TCA also
has pZ.annBd and eval uated a variet y of eduaational endeavors in t he
U. S. and overseas .
f-ies tinghowe
~eoentZ.y, TCA has been disausei ng pre-vocat i onal training f or
Atlant a ' s har d-core unemployed with NAB and the Chamber of Comrnerae .
Briefl y, u)e underct and, thr•ough disauesion,s , ith Mr. C'linton Rogers,
t hat Nationa l AlZianae for Bueinesmnen haa deve loped nwnerou j ob
commitments in. Atlanta . A pPogram can be deoe Zoped whioh woul d train
t he young hazid-aore unemp1.oyed f or t hese jobs in a non-residential,,
ao-BduaationaZ oenter that wiZZ relat e i t eeZf in a most meaningful
way with your eahool syst em. In t his manner, Atianta 'e industries could
f-u l fi Zl thei r job aorrmitmenta to NAB by hiring tPained hard-core unenrptoyed.
Federat funding of such training may be available through a single
training oontraotor, such as TCA, in th propo ed Inner-Cit y Job Corpe
Tz>aining Center program to be funded t his av.mmer by OEO. Only five
ci tie al'e t o be fwuled. The Training Corporation of America, which
ope1'tCXtea both 0E0 and Labor Depar'l;ment training progx,am ., would Uke
to propose to the OEO the catabliehlnent of ne of thesa ~ente~s in
Atl.anta. In order to prepare uah a proposal TCA feeZo the oity ' B
approval of the Innel'-City ob Corpe aonaept ie aesfJntial.
�Honorabl e I van Al len, Mayor
- 2 -
27 May l968
At a mu.tuaU y agreeabl e time, we woul d Zike t o die eus s with you
and your et aff the de t ails of suah a speaiaUzed training center f or
Atdlant a.
Sincere t y ,
TRAINflvG CORPORATION OP -AMERI CA, INC.
LEO A. SCHMIDT
Vi ce P'J:'esident ,-e Genera Z Manager
LAS/ pam
�· Kansas City _Industry
Taps a New Labor Source
Training the Unemployed and the Underemployed for the World of Work
Is lhe ObjectiYe of the Training Corporation of America (TCA)
0
VER 350 Kansas Citians hitherto ignored as part of our potential labor force-are discovering
a new world for them these days in
the five-floor building formerly occupied by the Missouri State Employment Office at 1411 Walnut. This
new world is a familiar one to most
of us, so familiar as to be taken for
granted, but to these - the unemployed and underemployed the
World of Work is a world that demands whole new attitudes and backto-1Jasic education.
The very location of this industrysupported effort is significant. Most
of the 350 now enrolled with the
Training Corporation of America at
1411 Walnut have visited the same
building often in the past, fruitlessly,
when it was the State Employment
Office. For these are what are often
referred to as the "hard-core" unemployed, men and women, young
and old, whom even the most strenuous effort could not place on jobs, or
k eep on jcbs. Educational deficiencies
or unrealistic approach to the world
of work or (in a few cases) a minor
police record while young have
closed the doors normally open to
any able-bodied applicant. The task
of dissolvihg this hard core, of
changing attitudes , of supplying educational deficiencies is the challenging job that TCA is tackling.
How successfully it is performing
its job is indicated by the fact that
in less than a half year, 173 people
previously considered unemployable
are gainfully employed, with nearly
25 % of them taking on-the-job
training to develop needed skills
while earning. Enrollments have increased from 177 to the maximum
desired of some 350 in late January.
"Education for Living" is the key
to the philosophy of TCA's employ-
LEARNING WHAT THE WORLD OF WORK expects of workers, a typica l
class at Training Corporation of America gets some practical pointers from
instructor Charles Royston.
ment support program. Noting that
the Department of Labor estimates
at least 10,000 people in the Kansas
City area are either unemployed or
working at jobs beneath their capacity, Edward W . Scaggs, Project
Director, points out that TCA's mission is twofold: to place these people
in good, solid employment situations
and to discover what it takes to rehabilitate a person so that he can
become a productive, self-respecting
member of society.
"Because of this twofold mission,"
Scaggs commented, "TCA is dependent on Kansas City business,
industry and labor. On the other
hand , TCA has something good and
durable to offer the Kansas City
community. Our trainees come from
all over the Kansas City metropolitan area, including Olathe, Platte
County and Wyandotte County.
They come in all shapes, colors and
ages, but their aims are the same:
they want to work, and they want a
decent wage. Our aims for our
trainees are the same as theirs: we
want them to work and we will do
all in our power to prepare them,
place them, and assist them, with
the cooperation of the employer, to
adjust to the job.
"To serve its purpose, TCA must
be known by the entire community,
and even more important, mu.st be
trusted. I believe this kind of trust
in us by business, industry and labor,
is not too much to ask. Like them,
we believe that a man should give
a day's work for a day 's pay, and
that industry must make a profit to
survive. We believe that a worker
should be qualified to do the job he's
placed on, and that if he does not
perform that job, he should be fired.
Since our beliefs are compatible, why
should we not trust one another? "
�ON-THE-JOB TR A INEE , on ce consider ed i inemp l oy able, proves good
emp l oy ee at bank j ob . Edward W .
Scaggs, TCA Pro je ct Dir ector, at
l ef t, discu sses h er p ro gr ess with
Charles Sh ew alter , Sr ., Vice Presid ent, Commerc e Trust.
Ed Scaggs is the kind of man to
inspire confidence, a big, friendly,
outgoing personality whose impact
is immediate on trainees, businessmen or visitors to the Training
Corporation's headquarters.
Visitors Are Welcomed
TCA welcomes visitors, even in
the course of setting up classrooms,
work sampling rooms and offices.
Some of the staff is always ready to
show people around-and it is obvious that they see bey ond the temporary partiti ons that a re b eing put up ,
the hand-made sign s, the confusion
Hnd n oise of co ns truction going on
around them . They ca n tell you that
TCA is a subsid iary of Melpa r , division of Wes tin ghouse Air Brake
Company, tha t it also operates the
E x celsior Sprin gs Job Corps Center
faciliti es, a n d that b oth a r e r esults
of the MDTA (Manpower Deve lopment and Training Act of 1962).
As Scaggs and his staff are quick
to point out , th eirs is n ot a cours e
in t r aining fo r job skills, but a
m ental, emotional, social con version
of the individu al trainee from an employmen t "discard " to on e w ho is
r eady a n d eager to work. Th e w ork
sam p ling L aboratories are mor e to
famili arize t h e trainees w ith the
m achines and equipment and p r ocedures in variou s phases of the
workaday world th an t o d evelop
actual skill on the machines.
Introducing the World of Work
Relieving the Relief Rolls
The first class began on August
15 , 1967 , with 177 men and women
enrolled-all classified by the Missouri State Employment Office as
unemployable , many through educational deficiencies. At the time ,
classes were held in temporary space
at 1330 Grand . It was immediately
obvious to Mr. Scaggs and his staff,
all experienced in job placement
work, that even more important than
remedying poor educational backgrounds was altering the attitude
toward work and its desirability .
Many had lost hope, many more had
unrealistic views of the kind of work
they should be doing.
Since a large percentage of the
women were on relief, or other public assistance, and many of the men,
it is obvious that getting them employed is to the community's benefit
as well as to their own self-respect.
Some of the trainees have definite
skills, but have not been able to hold
jobs through faulty understanding of
work requirements (punctuality, dependability, impatience with own
qualifications
for
advancement) .
Most, however, have had no opportunity to develop skills, since they
lacked the minimum requirements
set up by many industries, such as
a high school diploma.
TCA, industry-connected and supported, felt it could devise a more
workable training program for such
people than a government agency
might. General Motors , ITT, IBM
and other labor industries are also
involved in the program, for which
TCA was awarded a 2.2 million dollar contract for operating the Kansas
City Project by MDTA as part of the
Ten Cities project of the Department
of Labor.
Under Rucker's direction , the first
consideration is altering the attitudes
toward steady work. To most of the
community , prepared from childhood
for regular employment, the despair
and frustration of the " hard-core"
unemploy ed may be hard to understand. Implanting the attitude that
work is a necessary good-an attainable first step upward-is the positive approach on which each individual's success in the project hinges .
All trainees accepted are given an
orientation period of approximately
ten weeks, a basic introduction to
the "World of Work. " Under the direction of Joseph Rucker, coordinator of the World of Work program,
the trainees spend at least one hour
daily in classrooms. The topics
covered are significant, with every,
effort made by the leaders to individualize the approach and to involve
the entire group in discussion and
action.
Practical Basic Guidance
The World at Work classes, dedicated in every session to upgrading
the trainees' self-respect and pride
in even simplest abilities, works on
very practical -projects. Personal
hygiene and good grooming are encouraged by example, as part of successful apply ing for a job, and keeping the job.
T ypical was the class visited one
day recently , where the class worked
COUNSEL MEETI NG , typica liy informal, br ings t ogether (l.-r .) Ken Neal
(E 1_
n p loyment . A clJustment Coimse l or) . R ichard Nadeau ( Coordinator of Counse (in g), Ph y llis G . Tiffany ( Traine r Psychologist) Ruth Calata (Nurse) , and
Micha el J . K ellerman ( Psychometrist).
�y
with the teacher to suggest the best
way to write a letter applying for a
job. With fourteen trainees in attendance, the teacher skillfully
guided the class to select the kind
of job the greatest number might
expect to qualify for, and worked out
with them what the letter should
contain and in what general arrangement. The active participation was
notable, and the native intelligence
marked.
Other classes stress what are the
important things an employee is expected to do if he intends to hold a
job .permanently. Being on time,
avoiding absenteeism, getting along
with other employees and employers
are basics. Trainees are also instructed in the labor market, where
and how to look for jobs, the facts
about labor unions, and hear speakers
from both industry and labor. Occasional tours of plants are scheduled
to show working conditions and requirements.
A final key factor in the introduction to the World of Work is
money management, the proper use
of credit when earning.
chief concern is in-service training
of all personnel to handle the daily
problems of the enrollees. She
also arranges for trainees with deep
psychological problems to receive
expert help from the agencies best
fitted to handle those problems, such
as the Mental Health Clinic, or Menorah Medical Center for speech and
hearing therapy or psychological
evaluation. She also sets up special
seminars and laboratory training for
the counselors, such as with the Midwest Group for Human Resources
and a special program by Dr. Russell
Doll of UMKC on the sociology of the
disadvantaged.
Work Sampling Labs Installed
The project has its own job placement staff, in constant contact with
local labor unions, businesses and
industries, including two follow-up
counselors who check on trainees
placed when there is any problem
connected with their performance on
the job. It is their responsibility to
see that the TCA trainee justifies the
investment that is represented by his
being on the job, and to iron out any
difficulties that may or may not be
his fault.
TCA is also qualified as a prime
contractor for the Department of
Labor, authorized to write sub-contracts with industry to train people
on-the-job while enrolled in the program. As such, it offers special advantages:
1. Testing, m edical examinations,
counseling and basic education
instruction.
2. Partial reimbursement of training expenses: TCA pays up to
$25 per week to the on-the-job
employer for as much as 26
weeks.
Enrollees Receive Allowance
During the training period, which
may take up to 26 weeks where severe educational deficiencies must
be made up, the adult enrollee is
allowed $39 a week, plus car fare ,
while youth enrollees receive $20 a
week. Extra allowances are paid
where there are dependents. Obviously, good money management is
required even befor the trainee is
employed.
On graduation from the Proj ect,
and placement on a job, the work of
T CA is not ended . The employed
TCA graduate remains under observation and maintenance on the job,
for a substantial per iod until the
complet e transition is made from
student to stead y worker. A counselor is assigned to ever y trainee
w hen h e or sh e enrolls a nd maintains
close contact throughout.
Dick Nadeau, coor dinator of counseling, points out that every trainee
has at least four hours p er week of
group counseling to motivate proper
attitudes and a positive concept of
himself. In addition, trainees are
provided individual counseling on
personal problems as n eeded. For instance, the counselors work with th e
Council on Alcoholism on this prevalent problem, and have regular conferences w ith T CA's own staff psychologist, Phyllis Tiff.any, a doctorate
candidate in psychology at the University of Kansas. Mrs. Tiffany's
Active Joh Placement
3. Minimal paper work done by TCA.
SALES J OB SAMPLING L ABORATORY helps familiarize a potential
salesgirl or super market check er
with cash regis t er and other equipment , w i t h Joseph Rucker, Coordinator of the World of Work
Program, supervising.
To familiarize trainees with the
machines, tools, equipment and procedures they will find in offices or
industries, six Work S ampling Laboratories are being set u p:
1. SALES (Cash registers, adding
machines, etc., common in supermarkets, offices, stores. )
2. ELECTRICAL ASSEMBLY (The
basics only of electrical equipment a nd wiring .)
3. HEALTH SERVICES (Background materials for n ursing,
hospita l or doctor's offices.)
4. APPAREL (F a bric s and machines used in garment trade. )
5. B UILDING M AINTENANCE
(Equipment and tools for j anitorial or building supervision
work.)
6. CLERICAL (Office machines,
forms and gen eral supp lies most
commonly used.)
chiefly
4. Immediate approval of the contract.
5. Follow-up and supportive services by the TCA staff.
The Businessman's Role
With the clearly constructive work
program of TCA, it is obvious that
business should be interested. Such
men as Les Milgram, Charles Shewalter, Jr. (Commerce Trust), Max
K eith (Wilcox Electric), Phil Metzker
(KCP&L), Norm Stuckey (SW Bell),
Hank Williams (AT&T), John Erickson (Ford), Jim Hughes (GM) and
over 200 other firms have agreed
that this is either close to the solution or the actua l solution.
It does, however, make the same
demand on industry that it does on
the worker- a change of attitude
toward the ones who, for one r eason
or another, h ave been consider ed unemployable or employ able only at
certain levels.
What Ed Scaggs and industry
leaders can w holeheartedly agree
upon is that in backing TCA, the
government is finally r ealizing that
industry knows more about industry
than government does, and local industry feels that this program can
get the j ob done for industry.
�...... . .
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. . . ,.
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./
3
Economi.c Opportuni.ty Report
May 13, 1968
,."'
JOB CORPS SEEKS PROPOSALS FOR INNER-CITY CENTERS
Job Corps i.s seeki.ng proposals from local communiti.es for the new Inner-City Job Corps
Centers to be i.nitiated i.n fiscal 1969. Since initiation of the new centers depends on
whether or not Job Corps gets the funds it has requested from Congress, Job Corps headquarters has not yet contacted most ci.ti.es, but a joint task force composed of representatives of HEW' s Office of Vocational Education, the Labor Department and the Job
Corps, has been created to evaluate proposals as they are received.
The 1967 amendments to the EO Act directed OEO to "enter into one or more agreements
with state educational agencies to pay the cost of es ta.blishing and operating model com..:
munity vocational education schools and skill centers 11 • The Bureau of the Budget, in
the President's FY 1969 budget request, agreed on a program; plan of four or five such
centers. Preference will probably be. given to those cities where Job Corps had urban
centers in operation or planned, such as Baltimore (planned as a residential center for .
unwed mothers) and Detroit (planned as a Public Health Center) where Job Corps already
owns property. Baltimore has already submitted a proposal which will p_robably be
accepted and Job Corps hopes to initiate that center as soon as possible after July 1.
Eight or ten other cities have submitted proposals which are in various stages of detail
and about four of them are acceptable.
Job Corps has established no "guidelines" for the program, but will rest on the criteria
established in the legislation. This w'ill allow the ·individual co:minun·ities to have the widest
latitude for developing innovative proposals within the legislative limits, but the center
must not duplicate any existing MDTA or other manpower training programs. The principle of residency versus non-residency will probably be t·ested,·, and the schoo 1 system
should have the widest possible involvement in the project.
The 1967 EO Act amendments provided that:
"In order to determine whether upgraded vocational education schools could eliminate or
substantially reduce the school dropout problem, and to demonstrate how communities
could make maximum utilization of existing educational and training facilities, the
Director, in cooperation with the Commissioner of Education, shall enter into one or
more agreements with State educational agencies to pay the cost of establishing and
operating model community vocational education schools and skill centers. Such facilities shall be centrally located in an urban area having a high drop<::?ut rate, a large
number of unemployed youths, and a need in the area for a compiriation vocational school
and skill center. No such agreement shall be entered into unless it contains provisions
designed to assure that:
1) a job survey be made of the area;
2) the training prog ram of the school and skill center reflect the job market needs as
projected by the survey;
3) an advi sory c ommittee composed of representatives of business, labor, e duc ation,
and community leaders be formed to follow the center's activities and t o make periodic
recommendations . regarding its operation .
4 ) arrangements have been worked out with schools in the area and the administrator
of the skill center for maximum utilization of the center both during and after school
hours; and,
5) such accounting and evaluation procedures as the: Director and the Commissioner of
Education deem necessary to carry out the purposes of this project will be provided .
�June ll •. 1968
Mr . William W . Suttle , Director
Southeast Regional Office
Office of Ec onomic Opportunity
7 30 Peachtree Street
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mr . S uttl :
Congratulations on yout selection as Director of the South east Region of th Office of Economic Opportunity.
The City of Atlanta has maintained close working :rrelationships
with our local community ction agency, Economic Opportunity
Atlanta, Inc ., as well s with officials and repres ntatives of
th Office of Economic Opportunity in Washington and on the
Regional level.
We look forward to th opportunity to work tog ther with you
in an flort to achieve the laud bl go ls of OEO . I hop that
you will call on us whenever we c
be of assistanc to you.
Sine . rely your ,
Dan Sw at
DS:fy
�SOUTHEAST REGIONAL OFFICE
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30308
June 5, 1968
N
WILLIAM W, SUTTLE NAMED DIRECTOR OF OEO ' S SOUTHEAST REGION
William W. Suttle, former Presiden t of the United State s Jayce es, ha s been named
Di rector of the Southeast Region of the OEO, it was announced today by· OEO Acting Director,
Bertra nd M. Harding.
Suttle has been servi ng as Acting Regional Director si n ce March 11
of th is y ear.
In making the annou nc emen t , Mr. Harding said:
dedicate d you ng man with a sense of purpose .
11
Bill Suttle is a hard worki ng,
He has demonstra ted exce l lertt leadership
qu alities and understanding of di f f ering points of view , and a k nack for get ting things
done whi ch wi ll stand him in good stea d as he tackle s his new a s si gnment.
The OEO is
extremely for tunate to have acquired hi s talents for this diffi cult a nd demanding job.
Suttle, 34, served as Special As si stant to t he Di r ec tor of OE O, worki ng primarily
in the field of business inv.olvement in t he a nti - pov erty program f rom Augu st 19 67, until
his appo i ntment as Acting Director of OEO' s Regi o nal Office i n Atlanta.
Su ttle-~ - who calls Greensboro, Nor t h Caro li na , home -- - comp leted hi s ye a r a s
President of t h e U, S . Jaycees last J une 30 ,
He is serving currently as Chai rman of
the Board of the national organization for y oung civ i c l ea ders "
Dur i ng his year as
t he Jaycees' chief e xecutive , he t rave led wi dely in tlis countr y and overseas , a nd
tal ked with national leaders on the chal l enges fa c ing young me n today .
A l aw graduate of the University of North Carolina i n 19 8 , Suttle engaged i n
pr ivat e l aw pra cti ce in Marion , North Caro lina, fo r seven year s.
He wa s employed by
the Nor t h Carolina Natio nal Bank in Greensboro at t he time he was e l ec ted Jayc ees President .
He has s erved as Di r e ctor of the Nor t
Caro l i na Tr af f ic Sa f ety Council , a member
of the Na tional Planning Committee of the America n Red Cross and a member of the Advisory
Boar d of the Salvation Army.
Si nce c oming to OEO , Sutt le and hi s wi fe, Pat , and their t wo ch il dre n have lived
i n McLean , Virgi nia,
They wi ll be moving shortly t o Atlanta,
The OEO Sou theast Regional Office, located in At lan ta , admi nis t er s anti-poverty
programs in Tennessee, South Caro l ina, Georgia, Alabama, Missi ssi ppi and Florida .
�ATLl\rTA , GEO! GI ,.\
A RESOLU'!'.ION
BY SAM HASSELL, JR.:
RESOLUTI ON DESIGNATI NG ECUNOHIC OPPO~{TUi'JITY
ATLAVi TA, INC OR?ORi.TED, AS THE COM:i'-1UNITY ACTION
AGENCY FOR THE CITY OF ATLAN'I'A.
WHEREAS, the 1967 Amendments to the Federa l Economic
Opportunity .Act re quire tha t a politica l subdivision such a ~
The City of AtL:mta designa te a com.:nuni ty action agency to plan,
conduct, administ er , eva l ua t e , 2nd ot herwise fulfill the purpo ses
of the Economic Opportunity Act; and
WHEREAS , the ,.'\.mendments r eferred to above furt her
r equir e tha t a public hearing be conduct ed in order to provide
an opportunity for residents and org a niza tions to publicly express
their views befor e The City of Atlant a des i gna t e s such commu..nity
a c t ion agency; and
WHEREAS, the City. of Atla nta did on May 31, 1968, hold
a public he ar ing fu l' the above stc,. ted purpose ; a nd
WHEREAS , the pre ponde r anc e of expressi on a t the public
hea ring wa s f avora ble towa rd the d es i gna tion of Economic Opportunity Atlanta as the Community Action Agency .
NOW, ._THEREFOrtE, BE IT RESOLVED ths. t tr,e Boe.rd of
Ald ermen , a ct ing as the gov erning off icia l s , do hereby des i gna te
Economic Oppor tunity Atlant a , Incorpor a t ed , a pr iva te non- profit
c o:rpor.:,.tion, a s the Co:mrnuni ty Action Agency f or the City of
Atla nta .
\
! !
ADOPTED by Board of Aldermen June 17, 1 968 .
APPROVi D J un e 19, 1 968 ,
�May 30, 194,8
Mrs . Julian D . Freedman
Executive Director
Planned Parenthood Association
ll8 Marietta Street, N . W .
Atlanta, Georgia
30303
Dear Mrs . Freed.man:
May I acknowledge receipt of your letter of May
29th and extend my congratulations upon the out ..
standing service being rendered by the Atlanta
Planned Parenthood Association .
May l also express the City's appreciation for
your support of Econom.ic Opportunity Atlanta,
Inc.
Sincerely yours,
Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor
IA~r/br
CC: Mr. Dan S w e a /
I
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�PUINNED PARENTHOOD
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WORLD POPULATION
Planned Parenthood Association
of the Atlanta Area
179 AFFILIA TES in the V . S.
118 Marietta Street, N. W . · I A tlanta, Georgia 30303 / Telephone 523-6996
May 29, 1968
PRESIDENT
Dr. Raphael B . Levine. Ph .D .
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Mrs. Julian D . Fre.e dman
FOUNDING PRESIDENT
Mrs. Herbert Taylor
PAST PRESIDENT
D r. W . Vernon Skiles
VICE PRESIDENTS
Mr.
Dr.
Dr.
Mr.
Ralph L . Dick ey
C. Stedman Glisson
Lu ella Klein
Ralph McCroskey
TRE A SU R ER
Mr. Willia m C. Henry
SECRET A RY
Mrs. Ca rl J . Bli em
B U S I NESS AN D CO MM ERCE
CO MM ITTE E
Roy D . Warren , Sr., Ch airman
C . P reston B radford
Robert H . Dunn
Edward Elson
George Go odwin
M rs . Allen S. Hardin
Donald M . H asti n gs
H erbert Johnson
Vi rly n B . Moore, Jr.
Edward E . Noble
J ohn C. Spencer
H owa rd S. Stark
Ch arles M . Watt . Jr.
F A MILY PLA NN IN G CL IN I CS
Bethl ehem Cente r
9 McD onough B lvd .. S . E .
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
City Hall
68 Mitchell Street, S.W.
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Mayor Allen:
The Atlanta Planned Parenthood Association was organized in
November 1965 with the main objective to make family planning
education and services available to the 50,000 medically indigent women in the Atlanta area. Prior to that time convenient evening and neighborhood family planning services were
almost nonex ist ent in Atlanta.
Only through the financial support and encouragement of EOA
was it possible to initiat e our program of neighborhood services as early as January 1966 and to ex pand our services so
that at the present time we have seven family planning clinics
and nine family planning sessions per week Q Between January
1966 to May 1968 we helped 3,349 new patients obtain family
planning services. This means that more than 3,000 families
have been he lped to achieve satisfactory family living.
The ex ecutives and pe rsonnel of EOA have been most cooperative
in financial matters as well as with helpful advice and suggestions . In our daily contact with residents of EOA neighborhoods we hav e found all of the staff at the various EOA
c enters d ee ply conc e rned about the residents in the ir area
and unfailingly willing to cooperate in an attempt to be of
s ervic e and help.
Perry Homes
1660 Drew Drive . N . W .
West End C linic
435 Ashby Street, S. W .
We strongly r e connnend th a t EOA be continued as a connnunity
action a gency for Atlanta and Fulton County.
East Point Clinic
2735 East Point Street
Sinc e r e l y,
Downtown Clinic
I 18 Marietta Street, N . W .
JDF :w
cc : Mr. Terry , EOA
!!~q~~\~~
Ex e cu~ ~e Dir ect or
�CITY HALL
May 20, 1968
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative As sistant
MRS . ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DANE. SWEAT, JR. , Director of Governme ntal Li aison
MEMORANDUM
To:
Mayor Iv an Allen, Jr.
From:
Dan Sweat
Attached is a copy of an analysis of the Atlanta Concentrated
Employment Program (ACEP) which you will find interesting.
We are attempting to follow each person through step by step
in an atte1npt to determine what happens to each individual.
We will further break this down into men and wo1nen , age
groups, etc.
We hope to find out if those persons referred to Hoke Smith
for pre-vocational training and basic education r emain on the
job long er than those who are referred directly to jobs.
This is a project of the National Alliance of Busine ssmen, the
Community Council, Econorn.ic Op portunity Atlan ta, Inc. , and
your office. I f ee l it is one of the most important things we
are attempting to do at the present time .
DS:fy





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�CITY I-IALL
ATLANTA , GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4/4 63 Arca Code 404
May 23, 1968
IVAN ALLEN, JR ., MAYOR
R. E/\ RL LAND ER S, Ad mini str at ive Ass istant
MRS . ANN M. MOS ES , Exec uti 'le Sec retary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR ., Director of Gove rn me nta l Li aiso n
To:
Members of the Board of Aldermen
Gentle1nen:
Atta che d is a copy of a "Notic e of Public Hearing" . This
hearing has b ee n sch e dul e d for Frid a y, May 31, at 11:00 a . m.
in th e Ald e rmanic Cha 1nb e rs .
The design a tion of Ecoirnrn.ic Opportunity Atl a nta , Inc. as
th e City's offici a l com1nunity action ag e ncy will b e discuss e d
at this time .
I would lik e to urg e e a ch of you to attend this v e ry i1npod a 11t
h ea ring if your sche dul e p e nnit s .
Sinc e r e ly your s ,
~
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E nc l osure
v/1'"~2
I van A ll en , J r//
M a yo r
//
�NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
The 1967 a1nendm.ents to the Federal Economic Opportunity Act
require that a politic a l subd ivis ion such as Fulton County or the
City' of Atlanta hold a public h ear ing to provid e an opportunity for
resid ent s a ncl or ganizations in the con,munity to publicly express
their views on the ques tion of d es i gnation of a com1nunity acti on
agency.
All inter es t e d persons and orga nizations are h e reby
invited to subrn.it written c01n1ne nts and t o b e he a rd Frid a y,
May 31, 1968, a t 11:00 a , n, , in the Alclerrna nic Ch ambe r, S econd
Floor, City Hall, 68 Mitchell Stre e t, S. W.
The subj ect for cons icl e r a tion at th.is h ear i ng i s th e cle s i gnat io~1 of
'
Ec ono1nic O ppor tun ity Atlant a , I nc . as the co1nmlmity a c tion
On M a rch 15 , 1968 , both
age ncy for Atlant a and Fulton County.
governments s ub rn.itt e d t o th e Offi ce of Econon1ic O pportunity a
sta t eme nt of intent ion which was a t entativ e d ecis ion t o de s i gnate
E conorriic O pportunity Atla nta , Inc. a s th e con1n1.un Hy acti on
agency for Atlanta an d Fulton County.
,/
_____




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Conuni.ss i. oncrs of Loa d s anc1 H eve nncs
Fulton C ou11ty
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�Cl'I'Y I-IALL
ATL..6.NTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522 -4463 Area Cod e 404
May 23, 1968
IVAN ALLEN, JR ., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Adm inistrative Assistant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Exec utive Sec retary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR ., Director of Governmental li aison
To:
Mern.b e rs of th e Board of Aldermen
Gentl e 1ne n:
Attached i s a copy of a " Not i ce of Public H ear ing". Thi s
he ar ing h as b een sch e duled for Friday , M a y 31, at ll:00 a . m.
i n th e Ald e nnanic Cha n.1.b e rs .
The d e signa tion of Economic Opp o rtunity Atlanta, Inc. as
th e City's official community ac tion agen cy will b e discuss e d
at thi s time .
I would l ike to urge each of you to a tt end thi s very important
h ea ri ng if your schedul e p e rmits.
Sinc ere ly yours ,
~ ,/!-/
I van All en , J ljj;
M a yor
{I
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Enclosure
�I
1··
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
The 1967 amendments to the Federal Economic Opportunity Act
r e quir e that a politic a l subdivision such as Fulton County or the
City of Atlanta h old a public h e aring to provide an opportunity for
residents and organizations in the community to publicly express
th.cir views on the ques tion of d es ignation of a cornmunity action
agency.
All inte reste d p ers ons and organizations are hereby
invited to subn1it written con1n1.ents and to be h ea rd Friday,
May 31, 1968 , at 11:00 a , m, in tbe Aldermanic Cha1nbe r, S econd
Floor, City H a ll, 68 M.itchcll Str eet, S. W.
The subj ect for consideration at thi s hearing i s the d es _ig:n.atio~1 of
~
Econon1.ic Opportun ity Atlanta , Inc. as the co1nmlmity action
c.gency for Atlanta and Fulton County.
On March 15, 1968, both
govc rnrn.e n t s submitte d to th e Office of Economic Opportlmity a
sta t cn-1ent of intention w hi ch was a t ent a tiv e deci s ion to d e signate
Econon1ic Oppo rtun ity Atlcrnt a , Inc . a s the con1r11uniiy action
age n c y foJ· Atla nta a.n c1 F ulton County.
City of Atla n t a
Fulton County
�I'
- t •
CITY I-IALL
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522--1463 Area Code 404
May 2 3, 19 68
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. Et,RL LANDERS, Adm in istrative Assistan t
MRS. /INN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DANE. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison
To:
Members of the Board of Alderrnen
G entl en1.en:
Attached i s a copy of a 11 Notice of Public H ear ing 11 • Thi s
h earing h as b een scheduled for Frid a y, May 31, at 11: 00 a. m.
in the Aldermanic Chambers .
The d es ignation of Economic Opportunit y Atla nta , Inc. as
the City ' s official community a ction agency w ill be discusse d
at thi s time.
I would lik e to u rge each of you to a ttend this v e ry important
h ear ing if your sch edule p e rrnits.
Sinc e r e ly y o ur s ,
~v
t -1~
I van All e n , Jr/
M a yor
JAJr:fy
Enclo s u r e
fl
�'
,··
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
The 1967 a1nendrn.ents to the Federal Econo1nic Opportunity Act
require that a political subdivision such as Fulton County or the
City of Atlanta hold a public hearing to provide an opportunity for


residents and orga niz a tions in the cornm.unity to publicly express


their views on the ques tion of d esignation of a cornn:mnity action
agency.
All inte rested p e rsons and organizations are hereby
invite d to subrn.it written com.rD.ents and to be h ea rd Friday,
M a y 31, 1968, at 11:00 a. m. in the Ald e rrnanic Charnber , S econd
Floor, City Hall, 68 Mitchell Stre e t, S. W.
The subj ect for consideration at this he aring i s th e c1 esignatio!1 of
~
Econo1nic Opportun ity Atlanta , Inc. as the co1nmw1ity acti on
agency for Atlanta and FuHo:n Cotmty.
On M arch 15, 1968, both
governments sub1nitte d to th e Office of Econornic Opportunity a
sta t e ment of intention which was a t entativ e d ecis ion to designate
Economic Opportunity Atl ant a , Inc. as th e co1nnnm iiy action
agency for Atla nta and F ulton C o lU1ty.
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ol....A-Jcle r n1e n
City of AtJ ant a
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Conuniss i one r s of Hoads and R even u es
Fulton County
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CITY OF .ATLANT.A
CITY HALL
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Cod e 404
May 23, 1968
IVAN ALLEN , JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS , Admini strative Assistant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES , Executive Sec ret ary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR. , Director of Governm ental Liai son
To:
Members of the Board of Aldermen
Gentlemen:
Attached is a copy of a 11 Notice of Public Hearing 11 • This
hearing has been scheduled for Friday, May 31, at 11:00 a. m.
in the Aldermanic Chambers.
The designation of Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. as
the City's official community action agency will be discussed
at this time.
I would like to urge each of you to attend this very important
hearing if your schedule permits .
Sincerely yours,
IAJr :fy
Enclosure
�NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
The 1967 amendments to the Federal Economic Opportunity Act
require that a political subdivision such as Fulton County or the
City of Atlanta hold a public hearing to provide an opportunity for
residents and organizations in the c01nmunity to publicly express
their views on the question of d es i gnation of a community action
agency.
All interested persons and organizations are hereby
invited to submit written comments and to be heard Friday,
May 31, 1968, at 11:00 a. m. in the Aldermanic Chamber, S econd
Floor, City Hall, 68 Mitchell Street, S. W.
The subject for consideration at this hearing is the desJgnatio!J. of
?
Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. as the community action
agency for Atlanta and Fulton County.
On March 15, 1968, both
governments submitted to the Offic e of Economic Opportunity a
statement of intention which was a t entative d e cision to d esignate
Economic Opportunity Atlanta, In c . as the community action
age ncy for Atlanta and Fulton County.
c
1,,:,a-'!i::(tJo~fUUdermen
City of Atlanta
,;
nk R. Flin ,
of Roa ds and
Fulton County
�May 13, 1968
Mr . Jim Parham
Executive Administrator
Economic Opportunity Atlanta , Inc .
101 Matietta Street, N . W .
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Jim:
Attached is a copy of a letter from Ben Heineman to Mayor
Allen.
Do you have any backgl'ound information or
This is
uggestion ?
chance to push our point provided we have on •
l would appreci te any comments o.r sugg
have.
tion you might
Sincer ly you&- •
D nSw
D.S:fy
t
�THE PRESIDENT ' S COMM ISSION
ON I NCOME MAINTENANCE PROGRAMS
1016 16TH
STR EET,
WA S H I N GTON,
D.
N .
C.
W .
20036
May 10, 1968
Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor of the City of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Mayor Allen:
The President's Commission on Income Maintenance Programs was appointed
by the President on January 2, 1968, and directed to report to the President and to the public within two years on an unusually wide range of
issues relating to existing public welfare and income maintenance programs
and to propose necessary reforms.
The President gave to the Commission the following mandate: (1) to examine
and assess aspects of existing welfare and related programs; (2) to recommend constructive improvements wherever needed and indicated; (3) to examine alternative programs, however unconventional, which would promise a
constructive advance in meeting the income needs of all Americans; (4) to
examine major reforms proposed in recent years including several varieties
of minimum income guarantees; (5) to evaluate the costs and benefits of
these proposals in terms of their effects, both on the recipients and on
the economy •
This charter is broad and comprehensive. The Conmission cannot hope to
successfully accomplish its assignment without the assistance of interested
and concerned Americans. As a Mayor, you have direct experience with existing programs, and with the basic problems to which the programs are addressed.
We would like to invite your opinions or suggestions on the issues that are
cited above.
Your res ponse to this request can be a valuable contribution to the work
of the Counnission. We would be happy to receive anything you care to contribute with whatever data you are able to provide and assure you that
your reply will be carefully studied by members of the ounnission and the
staff.
..
�Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.
101 Marietta Street Bldg. • Atlanta, Georgia 30303 •
T. M. Parham
Exec uci ve Admini s trato r
June 25, 1968
Letter of Intent
Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor
City of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Sir:
We are pleased to inform you that the completion date of the
City of Atlanta contract has been officially ex tended from
June 21, 1968 to August 31, 1968.
You may proceed as outlined in the program modifications and
modified budgets on the basis of this letter of intent .
A formal contract modification will follow immediately.
Thomas M. Parham
Executive Administrator
TMP/cl
cc :
Mrs. Brid ges
Dr . Hicks
Mr . Allison
Mr . Rod ge r s
Mr. Dav is
Mr . Farrow
�Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.
101 Marietta Street Bldg. • Atlanta , Georgi a 30 303 • Telephone 688-1012
T. M. Parham
Exe curi ve Admini s tra t or
June 19, 1968
The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr o
Mayor city of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Attention:
Mr. Dan Sweat
Dear Mayor Allen:
This is to inform you that Economic Opportunity
Atlanta, Inc. has received official announcement of a
grant of $600 0 000 from the Office of Economic Opportunity
for summer program purposes o
We are pleased that $325,000 of the above amount has
been allocated to support the special summer activities
of the City Parks and Recreation Department.
Sincerely
y&;j .
~
-
(
T . M. Parham, Jr .
Ex ecutive Admin i strator
CC :
Mr . Jack Delius
TMP :rw
�EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
OFFICE OF ECONOMIC
SOUTHEAST REGIONAL OFFICE
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 303_03
CJllll(Jl~TlJNITY
June 26, 1968
Mr. Dan E. Sweat, Jrp
Director of Governmental Liaison
City of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Mr. Sweat:
Thank you for your very kind letter of June 11, 1968, and for
your good wishes with regard to my appointment as Regional Director.
I sincerely hope that my service will justify the confidence that
Mr~ Harding and so many others have placed in me.
One of the real anticipated pleasures of moving to Atlanta is the
apparent excellence of city government. I have the highest regard
for Mayor Allen and his aims and objectives. I sincerely hope that
you will let me know if this office can ever serve you.
Thanking you again for your very kind consideration, I remain
Respectfully,
�@£fie~ .o-£
LESTER MACO.OX
.ur~ ®.o-h..e1--xw-x-
J\t1m-t1a
GOVERNOR
July 10, 1968
The President
The White House
Washington, D. c.
Dear Mr. President:
Facts that cannot be denied are:
Hundreds of millions of Federal dollars are
being expended by the "Anti-Poverty" and "War on
Poverty" programs to encourage, train and finance
the bums, criminals and misfits who have brought
near chaos to our Country as they burn, kill and
wreck much of America.
These funds are going to programs of the
Communists who publicly pledge to "overcome" our
Republic and "turn our Country -upside down".
These
Federal dollars go to participants in the Communists'
civil rights movements that, under the guise of
11equality
spread Communism and disorder throughout
America on behalf of the deadly enemies of this
nation.
11 ;
I
!
Other of these Federal dollars, belonging to
the achievers of America (the law-abiding citizens
of our society) are being used to buy prime television
and radio time to encourage, entice and direct bums,
beatniks, criminals and Communists to try and find
(or make up) complaints against employers, business
firms, industry, hospitals, doctors or any level of
government.
The advertisements then advise the
bums, beatniks, criminals and Communists to come
to an· "Anti-Poverty" g,overnment paid attorney and
~

II
(
lI
I
,-
�I .
The President
July 10 1968
Page 2
together they will attack the employers, business
firms, industry, hospitals, doctors and various
levels and agencies of government.
Sir, Federal programs such as the ones described
herein must be ended. You must know that no nation
can stand, that finances its own destruction . Th ese
programs being fostered upon the American people are
a farce .and a sham, that in the guise of helping the
poor, have made a police state out of America. Sir,
with money being thrown away as outlined herein, plus
the fact that other millions go for administrative .
functions, while millions of the poor, the unde rprivileged, the helpless and the handicapped get
little or no assistance, the "War on Poverty", in
reality, is a war on liberty, free enterprise, law
and order, the right to private property and the
education, welfare, safe ty and health of the p e ople
of America.
The first and foremost responsibility of any
government is the protection of the lives and
properties of its citize ns and the "War on Pove rty"
programs are contributing to the failur e o f th e
United State s government to me e t this responsibility.
I urge that you give immediate consideration to
the formation o f a new program, that in reality will
help the poverty stricke n, the handicappe d and the
helple ss ... a nd when it i s ma d e r e a d y f o r operation,
to end the present "War on Poverty" that h e lps the
bums, the criminals, the beatniks and the Communists
to wreck and ruin this great land.
Respe ct f ully ,
LM:ero
�Econom ic Opp ort11nity Atlanta, Inc .
101 Mariett a Str.eet Bldg.
o
Acl a nta , Georg ia 30 30 3 •
Telephone 688-3010
T. M. Parh a m
E xec ut ive Admini s craco r
July 11, 1968
Superintendent Clinton Chafin
Police-Detective Departme nt
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Superintendent Chafin:
I ~min receipt of a letter dated June 3, 1968 (copy of which
was sent to you) f rom Chief of Police Jenkins in response to
my letters of May 27 and April 29, pertaining to the the ft of
office machine s a nd e quipme nt stolen from Econo.,·i c Opportunity
Atlanta Neighborhood Se r v ice Center s and agencie s.
Please advise when I may expect the information reques ted in
refer enced lett ers.
Yours ~rul y ,
([cttJ~
0. H:· Gronke
Director of Purchas ing
an
cc:
-,
Chi ef of Po lic e J e nk ins
Mr . Dan Swe a t , Ci ty Ha ll L-- ____.-
�EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
OFFICE OF ECONOMIC
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20506
CJllll(Jl~TlJNITY
July 9, 1968
Mr. Dan E. Sweat
Director of Governmental Liaison
Office of the Mayor
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Dan:
I appreciate the time you spent with me on my recent visit
to Atlanta .
My perspective on community action as it oper-
ates on-the-ground has been considerably broadened.
Sincerely,
~
Ottman
Deputy Assistant Director
Office of Research, Plans,
Programs and Evaluation
�July 5, 1968
Mrs . Louise Jon , Secretary
Sum.me rhill Council of Women
761 F r s r Str t, S . E ..
Atlant , Georgia 30315
De r Mrs . Jon. s
twas very much impl"
ed with th 1 1S11m.merhill Revue" written
by Tim A rkan aw. This would b a very good proj ect for the
Summerhill Council of Women.
1 have forwarded your 1 tter and th
cript to Mr. Jim Parham,
Ex cutive Adm.ini tr tor of Economic Opportunity Atl nt • Inc. ,
· d a ked th t he look it ovet'. As you might know. Mr . Parham
has n expert in. thi fi ld working with him.
1 am ure that th y will off r u some ugg
Sine rely yours,
Ivan All n, Jr.
M yor
IAJr:fy
cc: Mr. Jim P rham
Dear Jim:
What do you think?
Dan Sweat
tion .
�· July 1, 1968
The Honorable
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
68 Mitchell Street,SW
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mayor Allen:
-·we, the entire membership of The Summerhill Council Of
Womeri are very appreciative of- the many things you, as our Mayor,
have done for the betterment of Atlanta and all of its people~
Many wonderful projects have been started and successfully
completed under your administration, but we were especially pleased
to see you on television conducting a tour of the low-income areas
of our city with some business men, which also included our area.
We sincerely fe e l that no other Mayor or any other public
official could possibly show anymore interest in the needs of the
very poor than you are showing.
However, a fine young playwright named Tim Arkansaw has written
a folk-play entitled "SUMMERHILL REVUE~' which is designed to depict
the poverty story on stage for the general public to see. We feel
that this is a very worth while project for our city to undertske
· at this time .
We have read the play, many
groups and leaders throughout our
and all agree thG3.t the staging of
effective way to show Main Stream
outstanding ministers, civic
area have read copies 01 it,
such a revue would be a very
America how life is in the slums.
As we see it, the play is not emotional, but has plenty of
good humor, and at the same ti~e, gets the poverty message across
to the audience in the form of fine entertainment.
We have made a start, but we need help Mayor Allen. We are
sending you a copy of the script to r e ad. We hope you like it
and can think of some way to help us find a good sponsor or have
some of the city agencies sponsor it.
rt
�July 1., 1968
Second Page
We., as a group would lik e to meet with you at your convenience
to disc u ss this matt er further. The Rev. Kin Jone s of The
Trinity Methodist Church n e ar City Hall has offered us the use - of
his church for our rehe ars als.
This is very encouraging to us for a man of this statue
to offer his church to us . Of cours e , we n e ed help in many more
areas at this stage in our projectse
Sincerely yours.,
n
·] 77 ti Xi~G--l,c:_.~ , ~ / /J,,ff- U,
Mrs. Louise Jone s
SEC RET.A.RY
SUMMERHILL COUNCIL OF WOMEN
761 Fras er Stre et,SE
At lant a , Geor gia - 30315
Telephone: 688 - 0420
·c I
�July 5, 1968
MEMORANDUM
To : MT . George Bei-ry
From: Dan Sweat
Can you furnish :me with the present contribution of th
to the progr ms Otltlined in this letter?
DS :fy
City
�INSTITUTE OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
TRU S TEES
LUTHE R
GU LI CK ,
55 WEST 44TH STREET
L YLE C. F"ITCH
CHAIRMAN
NEW YORK, N.Y. 10036
RICHARDS . CHILDS; VICE C':'4AIRMAN
ALFRED C . NEAL
JOHNS. LINEN, TREASURER
OTTO L.NELSON
FRANCIS W. H . ADAMS
GEORGE S. VAN SCHAICK
JAMES FELT
BETHUEL M.WEBSTER
( 2 12) 661-2540
CAB LE: .. INSTADM IN ..
LYLE C. F"ITCI-I, PRESIDENT
July 1, 1968
The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor of the City of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mayor Allen:
As you know, federally supported programs in the poverty and
manpower training fields require some degree of local contribution.
Presently, the local contribution is a small percentage of the total and
we believe that most municipalities meet it with in-kind rather_ than cash
contributions. However, there is continuing discussion in Congress to
raise the local share. Municipalities thus would be required to assume
a greater portion in cash.
We are interested in learning, for a study we are conducting,
Atlanta's present contribution of municipal tax-levied funds to federal
programs and also your estimate of your city's capability to pick up a
greater share. In particular we are interested in the following programs:
Community Action Programs under Title II of the E.conomic Opportunity Act
(EOA); the Ne ighborhood Youth Corps under Tit l e IV of the EOA; the Work
Experience Program under Title V of the EOA; the Work Study Program under
the Higher Education Act; and Manpower Training Programs under the Manpower
Development and Training Act.
We appreciate your cooperation with this project.
Sincere ly,
~\{~+f
Assista nt Dire ctor
\
., J
�ATLANTA,GE:OROIA
ROUTE SLIP
FROM: Dan E. Sweat, Jr.
0
For your information
O
Please refer to the attached correspondence and make the
necessary reply.
O
Advise me the status of the attached.
F O R M 25- 4-S
�CITY OF .ATLANT.A
CITY HALL
July 5, 1968
A TLANTA , G A. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Admini strative Assista nt
MRS. ANN M. MOS ES , Exec utive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR ., Director of Governm ental Li aison
MEMORANDUM
To: Mr. George Berry
From:
Dan Sweat
Can you furnish me with the present contribution of the City
to the programs outlined in this letter?
DS:fy
�INSTITUTE OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
TRUSTEES
LUTHER
GULICK. CHAI AMAN
55
LYLE C . F"ITCH
RICHARD S.CHILOS, V IC E CHAIRMAN
ALFRED C . NEAL
JOHNS . LINEN , TREA SUR ER
OTTO L . NELSON
F'RANCIS W.H .A OAM S
GEORGES . VANSCHAICK
JAMES FELT
BETHUEL M. WEBSTER
WEST
44™ STREET
NEW YORK , N . Y.10036
(2 12) 661-2540
CABLE: " INSTADM IN "
LYLE C. F"ITCH , PRE SI0EN T
July 1, 1968
The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor of the City of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mayor Allen:
As you know, federally supported programs in the poverty and
manpower training fields require some degree of local contribution.
Presently, the local contribution is a small percentage of the total and
we believe that most municipalities meet it with in-kind rather than cash
contributions. However, there IB continuing discussion in Congress to
raise the local share. Municipalities thus would be required to assume
a greater portion in cash.
We are interested in learning, for a study we are conducting,
Atlanta's present contribution of municipal tax-levied funds to federal
programs and also your estimate of your city's capability to pick up a
greater share . In particular we are interested in the following programs:
Community Action Programs under Title II of the Economic Opportunity Act
(EOA); the Neighborhood Youth Corps under Title IV of the EOA; the Work
Experience Program under Title V of the EOA; the Work Study Program under
the Higher Education Act; and Manpower Training Programs under the Manpower
Development and Training Act.
We appreciate your cooperation with this project.
Sincerely ,
Howard N. Mante~
Assistant Director
�July 31, 1968
Mr. H owar d N. Mant el
As s istant D irect or
Institute of P ublic Administration
55 W e s t 44th St r e et
New York. New Yo:rk 100 36
Dea r Mr. M antel:
In reply t o you r l etter of July 1, the following information i s
submitted:
1.
We made the following expenditu l'es t o EOA:
1966
1967
1968
$ 60~000
75, 000
100,000
z.
We p rticipat in a Neighborhood Youth Corp Progtam a s a
del egat or sub• gency of EOA who administers the ovel'all
progr m . No ca h pp.l'opriation is made for this purpos .
The City ' s t ot 1 contribution ls rn- de up of supervisory time.
3.
W participate in th- Atl nta Concentrated Employm nt
Progr m (ACEP) so s . sub .. gency to EOA. The City ' s
eontrlbution to this progr mi also supervisoty 'time ,
not c · sh.
I m enclosing copy of th
stlmati d co t of th total sum.mer
pttogr
with th
ou c of lunds indlc t d. A s noted,. the EOA grant
t 325,.000 out of a ~ t al co t 0£ $1,826,469.
�Mr . Mantel
Page Two
July 31 , 1968
The City•s ability to pick up a greater share 01 funding of Federal
progi-ams is extremely limited at this time . As you probably know,
our b sic source of .-evenue in the City of Atlanta is ad valorum
tax and we have be n unable to obtain State l gielation which would
enable us to levy a aalee tax or income tax.
Sincerely youys,
1-v n Allen, J,: .
Mayor
IAJr1fy
�CITY OF ATLANTA
OFFICE OF COMPTROLLER
CITY HALL
Atlanta, Georgia
30303
July 23, 1968
CHARLES L, DAVIS
COMPTROLLER
EDGAR A. VAUGHN, JR.
DEPUTY COMPTROLLER
Mr. Dan . Sweat
Mayor's Office
City of Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Dan:
The following should be helpful in answering this inquiry:
(1)
We have made the following expenditures to E, 0, A., Inc. for its annual
support in the Community Action Programs:
$ 60,000
75,000
100,000
1966
1967
1968
The others for whom E. 0, A. is their designated agency for the administration of OEO funds have made similar appropriations,
(2)
We participate in a Neighborhood Youth Corps program as a delegate or
sub-agency of E. O. A. who administers the overall program. No cash
appropriation is made for this purpose. The city's total contribution
is made up of supervisory time.
(3)
We participate in the Atlanta Concentrated Employment Program (ACEP)
also as a sub-agency to E. 0 , A. The city's contribution to this program is also supervisory time, not cash.
I am e nclosing a copy of the e stimat e d cost of the total summer program
with the source of funds indicat ed. As noted, the E. O. A. grant is
$325,000 out of a total cost of $1 , 826 , 469. This should be checked to
s ee if the School Boards $511 , 000 has come through as planne d . I und erstand that it has not. Ev en so , th e City has appropriated funds mor e than
e qual to what was grant e d by E. O. A. fo r this pur pos e .
You migh t emphasize that the cit y general gove rnment is onl y one of many age ncies
receiv i ng E. O. A. assistanc e in the me t r opol i tan a re a . It might b e t hat E, O. A,
itself, as the des i gnated ag e nc y, should pr op er l y ans wer t his .
Very t r ul y your s ,
~
GJB :cy
-J . Be r ry
De pu ty Comp troll e r
�CITY OF ATLANTA
ECRRATION I EMPLOYMENT AND
RICHMENT PROGRAM
FOR SUHMER 1 1968
Proposed Budg t
Cost :
Per onn 1
Con ult nt
$
· nd Contract Servf.c
Trav 1
Spac
Cons
Cost and Rental
ble Supplie
ntal , Purch · e ,
Other Co t
974 , 967
3 , 000
92 , 145
263 . 205
291 , 297
_,ii:i~
143 , 430
58,425
of Equipment
Tot 1 Cost
$1,826,469
To Be Finenc d By :
ln Kind Contributions :•
City of Atl nta
Atl nt Bo rd of Education
$197 .485
290,20s
$
487,690
Gt'Mt .. In .. J\i d • Bconomt c Opportunity At lan t
325, 000
Crant Und r Titl
511 , 000
e i1tratlon 1 Fe
I of Bduca.tion Act
Additional Funds to
Atl
Cit
72,779
, Rte .
ta Boe.rd of
of Atlant
Provided by :
ucation
1.30,000
300,000
$1,826,469


Btti t d valu of pereonnel, factUttee , tc ., of th Ctty and th Atlanta


Board of
uc tton which . re allo-c t•d to th progliam to inc a
tb local
•ha
contribution fol' Grant purpo1
�EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE P R ESI DEN T
SOUTH EA ST fl EGIO ~AL OFFICE
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30308
\
AUG 2 619Si·
Thomas M. Parham, .Executive Director
Economic OPPORTUNITY Atlanta, Incorporated
101 Marietta Street Building, N. W.
Atlanta, Georgia
30303
Mr.
Dear Mr. Parham:
We have received the letter from Mr. Dan Sweat, Director of
Governmental Liaison in Ma yor Ivan Allen,
's office, to
which he appended the news article on the proposed Washington,
D. C. Police Community Relations program.
Jr.
I have discussed the status of the grant with the Research and
Demonstration Division at Office of Economic OPPORTUNITY Headquarters. We are sorry to inform you that the grant has already
been made and the monies which he was interested in obtaining
for a comparable program in Atlanta have been committeed. You
might informMr. Sweat that the Headquarters' funding office
expressed the possibility of funding other ex perimental Pollce
Relations programs showing imaginative approaches to this urban
community communication problem~ Mr. Bill Kopit of the Research
and Demonstration Division will forward to us a copy of the
Washington, D. C. Community Action Agency's proposal for your,
and Mr. Sweat's examination. It is an example of a proposal which
merited that office's attention.
Plea~e ex press to Mayor Allen's office our appreciation for his
support to Economic OPPORTUNITY Atlanta, Incorporated and his
leadership in promoting s ensitivity to a nd unde rstanding of the
problems of Atlanta's poor.
l!.
Sincerely, ·
"
- ACCENT OPPORTUNITY -
·I
I
..
,
'
�August 1, 1968
Mr. Jim Parham
Administrator
Economic Oppo rtunity Atl anta, Inc .
101 Marietta Street, N. W,
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Jim:
Attached is a newspaper article describing the difficulties which
hav arisen between OEO and the Washington, D. C. CAP agency
ov r a proposed Police .. Community Rel ations Program.
You are ware of the progr ss we have made in Atlanta in breaking
barriers of distrust between the Police and citizens . The Crime
Prev ntion program, whieh was made successful through the cooper tiv
fforta of Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc . i widely recognized for
it triumphs .
Th P olk Community Servk Oflicer pilot progiam underw y this
umm J: has lre dy d mon trated its potential value .
Th ext nsion and expan ion of these programs a well s the develop ..
ment of other m thod of polic --community communic tion are
necea ry for the futur h rmony of Atl nt n igbborhood .
It
ms tom that if OEO money i
v il bl and Wa hington, D. C.
do n 't w nt it~ we hould mak an £fort to obt in ome of it for
Atl nt • I will be gl d to as i t you in obtaining !unda in thi ar ,
if you. desire.
S hic r ly yoUS' •·
D n Sw at
DS;ly

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