Box 3, Folder 13, Complete Folder

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Box 3, Folder 13, Complete Folder

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WASHINGTON vl'l--The federal government is hav.ing iliuble
.. giving away $1.5 mill io'n to finance an experiemcnt in breaking
down barriers between police and Negroes in slum sections of the
· nation's capital.
The problem: Negroes oppose of the program are insisting on
the project. ·
more neighborhood control over
The snarl · underscores the the police in the service centers.
deep distrust that both sides But a top OEO spokesman says
agree already divides Negroes the main reason for their refrom the police in a city marked sistance is simply "they don't
want to fund the fuzz." ·
by recent riots and frequent
shooting incidents. Four police- Gerson M. Green, the energetmen .and six Negroes have ·been ic young OEO official who is
killed in recent confron tations. trying to spearhead the police
"Police are increasingly seen experiment, believes law and
as an occupying force in hostile order is necessary to reversal of
· territory," top Washington po- poverty in the ghetto, but thinks
lice officials admit in a pream- it cannot be achie\'ed unless the
ble to the antipoverty proposal. police can secure the cooperation of the neighborhood comTo try to ease this tension, the
munity.
Office of Economic Opportunity
wants to give police $1.5 million Two out of three r esidents of
to set up a series of storefront Washington are Negroes. Four
out of five policemen are white.
·centers in the Negro ghetto.
Police would provide around- Patrick V. Murphy, the city's
the-clock ,emergency services director of public safety, says,
for neighborhood r esidents in "Police have come to occupy
·need. Citizens' councils . would the role of a coercive, adverhelp run the centers . Ghetto sary force esp~cially in Negro
·1
teen-agers would be enlisted in in,ner-city areas .
youth patrols.
Murphy-has taken the leader-,
"You would have a paid net- ship iri pushing Green's, experi- '
work of police informers," ob- ment. The proposal w:,.s unjects Wilbert Williams, a Negro veiled a month ago at a news
conference by Murphy and Wal-·
leader.
Williams and other opponents ter Washi.ngtcn, the city's appointed Negro mayor.
Under a 1967 · change L, the
law, the OEO's local antipoverty wing, the United P lanning
Organization, can veto an experimental program iri its province. To OEO's surprise, it did
so.
Williams, a member of the
UPO board and head of its advisory council cf the poor, led the
attack. Among other things,
Williams argues the hardpinched
antipoverty
money
should be spent on programs
that visibly help.the poor, not on
• the police.
Wiley A. Branton. UPO's executive director, says his organization wasn't consulted in the
planning and argues ghetto residents will hardly embrace a police progr am that is being imposed on them.
"The distrust is a deep-sealed
thing," says Branton.
The squabble has settled into
an exchange of memorandums,
disputes over technicalities,
counterproposals and countercharges, and an OEO argument
thait UPO didn't ha\·e enough
board memb:?rs present to
make its veto legal. At any rate,
OEO can override the veto, and
probably will do so if it can't
reach a compromise with UPO.
The bil'th pangs hardly poit t
to any assurance of success for
the experiment in improving relations between police and the
poor. But an OEO spokesman
stresses the need for the project
with the simple argument:
~No~1ing else has wo~·ked~'--· I
l
\
f
'l
·l
�September 4 , 1968
MEMORANDUM
To: Mayor Ivan Allen. Jr .
From; Dan Sweat
Attached is a memorandum f:rom Jim Parha.zn outlining the cutback
in Federal funds for our training prog:rams .
We have been in contact with Bill Norwood., Regional Manpower
Administrator,, and he has no objection to our contc;1.cting Stanley
R othe·nburg, the Manpower Administrator !or W illard Wirtz .
The;re is a pretty good indication that some big city mayors have
called Rothenbuirg about cutbacks in their programs and have gotten
favorable ,:esults . Jim and I feel that it would be very helpful if
you would telephone Rothenbarg and express your concern that the
one million dollar cutback will seriously affect the City 's ability to
maint in our momentum in cutting down on hard - core unemployment.
If you · lk to him it. might lso b helpful to tell him your suppoi-t
Sam Caldwell's 'i'equest £011 the Labor Department to waive free~
which h e existed on conducting power sewing m chine training
courses. Ther is · giteat d mand for powe~ sewing ma.chin
operators in the Atlanta i--e
nd Caldwell has been att mpting to
get th ban liit"ed on tr . ining people !o~ this employment. H ·nd
R oth nburg i- - pretty good fri .nda and lt migh be another plus U
we support Sam ln thi :reg · rd.
Seer· t ry R othenbus-g's numbet' ls 202 .. 961 ... 5464.
er - t ry i Mi& J;;ul M. Bul'ton.
His p i,sonal
�i
Ii ,·
MEMORANDUM


TO:
~"- ~rt_ur-
FROM:
.
·
'am·
·
T. M. Jim
Parh am, Executive
A inistrator
~
Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.
~,
RE:
ACEP (Atlanta Concentrated Employment Program)
DATE:
September 3, 1968
j}
We are alarmed about continued reductions in second year
funds for ACEP. As of now we are told by regional U.S.
Labor Department officials that we must take a one million
dollar cut in federal funds budgeted for ACEP for the
period September 1, 1968 thru August 31, 1969:
Year
Federal Funds
9/67 - 8/68
$3,980,531
9/68 - 9/69
$2,96 7 ,789
We learned ma ny lessons in our first CEP year and h a d projected a modified program for the second year which incorporated many of these l es sons. These continued reductions in
fund s , however, have r e quire d alter ations in our second ye ar
proj e ctions f or tr a in i ng and employmen t opportuni t i es :
Program
Compone nt
Original Plans
for 2nd Year
New Career s
Youth Jobs
At l a n ta Be autific a tion Corps
Skill s Tr aining
Direct P l a c eme nts
TOTAL
Reduced
Plans
300
2 50
100
150
150
60
500
600
300
600
1 ,75 0
1 ,260
�-2-
. If you don't count direct placements (since this involves
little or no training investment), we are left with only
·660 training opportunities for this large disadvantaged
area which includes our total Mode~ Cities community.
I
In addition to these reductions in potential training
opportunities, these fund cuts have seriously diminished
the ability of certain program components to be staffed at
a level to give close, individual attention to the multiple
problems of CEP clients. Of particular significance is the
vital counseling and follow-up activity of Employment Service
personnel.
Even if the amount of funds available had not been reduced
it had been the concensus of planners (including business,
representatives of the poor, employment service, the schools,
U.S. Labor, and EOA) that the number of persons served should
be reduced and the length of training increased. This conclusion was the result of the first year's experience that
the socially and educationally crippled people enrolled in
CEP could not be upgraded in a brief training program. With
this substantial reduction in funds, however, the number of
training opportunities is drastically reduced and the potential impact of the program watered down significantly. Any
action which has this result is a danger to us and should
avoided if possible.
TMJP/gj
�September 6 , 1968
Mrs . Judson Moses
Ex cutive Secretary
Office of the Mayor
City Hall
Atlant, Georgia 30303
Dear Ann;
In a private conversation last week Mayor Allen
agreed to dedicate the Edge~,ood Parent and Child Center,
112 Rodgers Street, N.E. on Saturd y, October 5. I w
to check for the hour and let him know. The time is now
set for 4:00 P.M~ on thnt date.
I will be in touch with your office later r lativ to
his remarks. I trust that no int rim plans will prev nt
his making thi appearance for us.
We appreciate his ~ver re -dy willingn ss to
ssist us.
Sine rely your ,
T. M. Jim Puham
x cutiv
TMvP/gj
cco
Ann Ingram, Di~ _ctor
Edg wood Par nt and Child Cent r
Mi
• D
n
• Sw
t, J~. /
A
inistrator
�l

�Economic. Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.
101 Marietta Street Bldg. • Atl a nta , Georgia 30303 . •
Telephone 688-3010
. T. M. Parham;
Executive Admini s trat o r
September 24, 1968
City of Atlanta
Department of Police
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
ATTN:
Superintendent, Clinton Chafin
Dear Mr. Chafin:
Please refer to my letter of August -9, 1968 to which was attached
a copy of serially numbered items reported missing and stolen from
Neighborhood Service Center agencies of Economic Opportunity A~lanta,
Inc.
Attached herewith is an additional listing of items reported stolen
subsequent to preparation of the list referred to above.
Please advise whether the City of Atlanta Police Department has
had success in recovering any of the · items listed.
The loss of equipment now e xceeds $10,000.00, and as stated in my
previous corresponden~e Economic Opportunity Atlanta has no insurance
to cover these .lo sses, coupled with a _ limited bud get for replacement,
we are most desirous of reco~ering these -items.
Please call me at 688-3010 if you require additiona l information.
Yours truly,
i(({LjT__
0. H. .Gronke
Director of Pur chasing
n
Enclosure
cc:
Chief of Police J enkins
~
Mr. Dan Sweat
�r
WHEREAS, the Pre s ident of the Unite d State s and the Congre ss
have ex pressed the national w ill of the peop l e through ena ctmen t of
the Economic Opportun ity Act and creation of the Of fice of Economic
Opportunity as a means towar ds eliminating the c aus es of poverty in
this country; and
WHEREAS, the Job Co r ps was established as an integral and
vital part of the nationa, Anti-Poverty Prog ram, to p r ovide disadvantaged
young men and women with a change to acq uire the skills and attitudes
needed to become useful and productive members of . the conunun ity; and
WHEREAS, the Job Corps h as provid e d a real service to the
people of this country and the people of Atlanta , with the united effo rt s
of leaders in the field of comrre r ce and or ganize d labo r to give us eful
employ-ment to thousands of our citizens; and
WHEREA S, a Job Co r ps Exhibiti on, spons o re d by leading
industr i a l and educ ational o rganizati ons opens to the public August 22,
1968 at the Fir st National B ank Building, which will t e ll the dramatic
story of t he Job Co r p s u n de r the title 11A Ehance to b e Somebody 11 ;
NOW, T HEREFORE, l, Ivan Allen, J r ., Mayo r of the City of
Atlanta, do hereby proclaim the p er iod o! Aug ust 22 - Septerr.he r 6,
1968
.,
JOB CORPS . WEEK
in Atlanta and urge all citizens to support the commendable work of .
the Job Co rps .
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I haveE:.
hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal!
of the City of Atlanta to be affixed.
Ivan A ll e n , J r .
Mayor
-
�JOB CORPS EXHIBITION - ATLANTA
First National Bank of Atlanta
Plan for Opening Ceremonies
Thursday, August 22·, 1968
1.
Official party (in order of appearance):
Daniel Sweat, representative of Mayor's Office
Arthur Harris, President, Scripto, Inc.
Douglas Smith, Vice President, First National Bank
David Oestreich, Associate Director of Job Corps,
Washingtm, D. C.
William Suttle, Regional Director of Office of Economic
Opportunity
Jim Parham, Director of Economi~ Opportunity - Atlanta
Miss Betty Patterson, United Air Lines and Job Corps
graduate
2.
Official party enter via Broad Street entrance of First
National. Program will begin at 6:00 P.M.
3.
A "platform" area has been enclosed on the banking floor
Broad Street side, a lectern with - amplifier will be available
for speakers:
4.
Program:
a. Mr. Sweat will serve as M.C. with opening remarks and
present Job Corps proclamation.
b. Mr. Harris will be introduced by Mr. Sweat for remarks.
c. Mr. Smith to be introduced by Mr. Sweat for remarks.
d. Mr. Oestreich to be recognized by Mr. Sweat.
,-J-f:. Mr. Suttle to be introduced by Mr. Sweat for remarks.
f. Mr. Parham to be recognized by Mr. Sweat.
g. Mr. Harris to recognize Miss Patterson and officially
open exhibition in closing remarks.
~~
5.
Off ' cial party to remain in platform area for photographs.
A ience proceeds to display area and/or First National dining
oom (second floor) for refreshments.
w~
F~ ·:
fM SMiJA.
~tiu-+r:~Iw'-
�SOUTHEAST REGIONAL OFFICE
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303
EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
OFFICE OF ECONOMIC
CJllll(Jl~TlJNITY
August 14, 1968
Mr. Dan Sweat
Director of Governmental
Liaison
Office of the Mayor
68 Mitchell Street, SW
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mr. Sweat:
This office appreciates your willingness to serve
as Master of Ceremonies at the reception for the
opening of the Job Corps art exhibition "A Chance
to be Somebody" to be held in the lobby of First
National Bank Building, Atlanta, Georgia, Thursday
August 22, 1968 at 6:00 PM.
A copy of the program will be sent to your office
as soon as final arrangements are completed.
We were deeply grateful for the participation of
the Mayor's Of f ice in
our program, and your pe rsonal
..-contribution to this effort.
,,·
ACCENT OPPORTUNITY
�JOB CORPS EXHIBITION
Atlanta, Georgia
August 22, 1968
Suggested Remarks:
Mr. Dan Sweat, Mayor's Office
Ladies and gentlemen, I bid you welcome to ceremonies introducing
another nationally acclaimed community program to Atlanta.
In
pictures and words, a timely and unique social program is described
J'j flJ.h'-- .M'
ft,.t~-~
that already
~
-a,e--W&Fk:-
in our
11i,'
tiC-
eorgia area.
Its importance is recognized in the following proclamation issued
by our Mayor.
(Read proclamation or excerpts)
Job Corps has an important story to tell.
It is a story that has
been told through this Exhibition in New York and in Chicago.
In
fact, only ten cities of the nation have been selected as e xhibition
points, so Atlanta is in elite company.
Thanks go to Scripto, Inc., as our towns sponsor -- one of several
leading national corporations bringing this graphic report to
business centers of the United States.
This is another forward step for Scripto , long associated with
c ommunity p r ogr ess .
We are delighted that Arthur Harris , Pr esiden t
of Scr ipto , has r etur ned from Paris in time to pers on a l ly tel l y ou
about this effort.





�Mr. Sweat
(After Mr. Harris):
Thank you, Mr. Harris, our city applauds your
. & .
efforts in the arts and your high sense of
public service.
Another good,business citizen of Atlanta
has provided the stage for this show in one
of the finest public locations available.
May I present Mr. Douglas Smith, Vice President
of 'I1he First National Bank, our host for the
evening .
.Srvti °1--h
(After Mr. &we-at ):
Thank you, Sir.
Behind this e xhibition and Job Corps recognition
are several creators and administratorsq whom
you must meet.
'I1hey share the real, very
real, assignment of maming this program work im
terms of producing successful young people.
+ ke
ailBITION


t.tlant.a, Georgia


.u9u t :a:l . 1968
Rem rkas
t
..iug
rria
Mr.
(Mr. Harrie ov • to l etern, following cloa of
hi i~trod ction by Mr.Ono at of tb M yor•s
office)
I
ple • d to h
for l
r our buain aa. and busin as nationally pr i
d rabip in a new, pr
i•ing v
of gover111nent n4 bu.sin se.
exhibit, I beli
• Atl nt
~ure combining the r sou~c •
citi
11th
t f
the gre t
h
el ct d for this
ili
ity with th
of the great et r eorda ot progresa in solving
a .nd an
probl
Of
d
th
The pr bl
is th•~ cl
hope for auec •• in thia
th
their eke
v uea
Thia
•.
hibit 1•
ff
t
re
u•t
ely artietio
t, ia •art to l
• • t.
r
iv
ua ti
mfr

1
ard thruat end th
i
Aller
nd

•pirationa --
ic di• lay.
otogr
le.

• t

t. ctoc
ea
t
•• of re

the
ly
1

of th
n
, 1• Job Cor
ic re-port of p~ogre••
9ra
, !or
d it•• only
uaine
ing created though
tr ininq to au 1>0rt
th
d,
an• to thie g
The
not •imply eother
in
orld
ti l to
·11t
t
in

MO
�Page 2
Cuggasted Romarluu (Continu~)
Job corps ha
·
a ory tot ll.
n doing poaitiv
11'1
country which ar
.r and th
·
Mr. Arthur Harri
~
ar
things.
two vet problem
r cogniz d in
n, and more and more citizena,
conce1-n d with th
Job corpa ia on
concmic Op
f\lt\lr
n e •citing
confront' )g
ur
v ry O?in,ion poll -- th
g i.nat pov rty.
war
It has
The Job Corpa
r
b c
Vi t N.
ing incr
ingly
aecond -- poverty_
of th
rtunity.
jor national progr
It'
s of th
of
Offic
goal is to h ult the poverty cycl
of
gene.rations. which is proving ao eo t.ly to thie country.
Job corp• ie d dieted to tr ining •tot lly failed~ 16 t
old
a
long with bu in
and eatabliehin9 th
in •ooiety as product.iv, t
J<
21 y ar
p ying
citiz na.
Thia ia truly a
th
new deign
neloua e hibit.
oet int rat
You will
nd gr phic t chniquea nn4 the a
tor pr• nt.ing info
emii.bit in Atlant ha
tion.

, th
evic •
Job Co.r.-p•
bua'n e -lik, good citicenabip point
th~ ia vit•l to all of u.
role in brin in9 th.1
A you "ill ao
io-visu l
scripto 1• indeed proud to play
xbibit to
tlant.
in
�.L
Page 3
Remarks by Mr. Harris -
(Continued)
Gentlemen (to those on platform) thank you very much for the
important roles you have taken in this Atlanta Exhibition.
Before closing, may I introduce one, very special and attractive
guest.
She is the feminine touch for this parade of men.
Miss
Betty Patterson represents a spectacular, Job Corps success story.
She is a native of Macon, Georgia~ as her publicity throughout
Atlanta has noted, and her Job Corps training led to a glamorous
career as a United Air Lines stewardess.
I know you will want to meet her during the evening.
Betty, will
you please stand.
It is my pleasure to invite the audience, officially and personally,
now to enjoy the opening of the 1968 Job Corps Exhibition,
nA
CHANCE TO BE SOMEBODY•, and express my hope that the entire
city will be our guest and the First National 1 s guest to visit
the display many times during it's Atlanta stay.
(Official party exits platform)
Thank you!
�FROM:
James E. Moore
RUDER & FINN INCORPORATED
2015 Bank of Georgia Bldg.
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
404 - 577-1600
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
MAYOR ALLEN PROCLAIMS JOB CORPS WEEKS
Proclamation Ceremony Opens Job Corps Exhibition
in First National Bank Building Lobby
Atlanta, Aug. 23 --- Mayor Ivan Allen has proclaimed August 23 to September
6 as
11
Job Corps Weeks 11 in Atlanta.
The official proclamation was presented at
6:00 P.M. on Thursday, August 22, at the First National Bank Building lobby during
the preview of a national multimedia exhibition about Job Corps entitled
11
A Chance
to be Somebody. 1 1
Citing Job Corps as
program 11 which
11
11
an integral and vital part of the national antipoverty
has provided a real service to the people of this country and
the people of Atlanta 11 , the Mayor urges all citizens
11
to support the commendable
work of the Job Corps. 11
The proclamation also refers to the exhibition and its sponsorship by 16
leading industrial and educational organizations.
Job Corps, a program of the Office of Economic Opportunity, offers basic
education, job training and opportunities for personal development to 16 to 22
year olds who are undereducated, underprivileged, underemployed or unemployed.
Enrollment is voluntary, and residence in Job Corps Centers an important feature .
The Job Corps story is told in
11
A Chance to be Somedody 11 through photos,
audio tapes, film and original paintings by Corps members .
Atlanta is made possible by Scripto, Inc .
The showing in
It opens on August 23 in the lobby
of the First National Bank Building to run through September 6.
free .





Admission is
�MR. WILLIAM
BRISTOL JOB CORPS
BRISTOL, TENNESSEE
DEAR DAVID:
I WERE VERY GLAD TO HEAR FROM YOU AND TO FIND OUT THAT
ATLANTA HAS NOT CHANGED MUCH.
ALTHOUGH WE ARE HAVE RAIN
WEATHER ALMOST EVERY DAY.
I AM TRYING TO IMPROVE MYSELF.
I AM WORK THREE DAY A WEEK.
MY HOURS IS FROM 5 TO 6:30 P.M. AND SOMETIME ON WEEK-END.
AM IN SCHOOL FROM 8 TO 5 P.M. AND IMPROVE SOME.
I WANT TO INFORMED YOU ARE THE PROGRESS WHICH WE ARE HAVE.
ON AUGUST 29, THE GOVERNOR ARE BRISTOL, TENNESSEE, WILL BE
OUR GUESS.
YOURS TRULY,
Route # 4, Box 334
Bristol, Tennessee
Mar c h 24, 1966
I
�l
MR. DAVID A. DAMMANN
ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY ATLANTA, INC.
101 MARIETTA STREET BUILDING
ATLANTA, GEORGIA
DEAR MR. DAMMANN,
SINCE JUNE 21, 1965, I HAVE BEEN IN THE JACOBS CREEK JOB CORPS
CENTER.
I AM ENJOYING THE TEACHING AND WORK THAT IS BEING
CARRIED ON HERE.
MR. DAMMANN, I HAVE BEEN LEARING STOCK WORK IN CARING FOR THE
FOOD SUPPLIES.
I HAVE ADVANCED TO ABOUT LEVEL SIX IN READING AND
TO ABOUT LEVEL SIX IN MATH.
I HAVE NOT FINISHED THE PROGRAM.
MR. DAMMANN, I WOULD LIKE TO KNOW IF YOU COULD GET ME A JOB
AS A STOCK WORKER AT EITHER THE A
&
P WAREHOUSE OF THE BIG
,.,..
APPLE WAREHOUSE.
IF ANY OTHER JOBS ARE AVAILABLE LET ME KNOW.
THANK YOU.
SINCERELY,
CORPSMAN, JOB CORPS
�CITY OF .ATLANT.A
September 4, 1968
CITY HALL
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative As sistant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison
To:
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
From:
Attached is a memo andum from Jim Parham outlining the cutback
in Federal funds fo our training programs.
We have been in ont ct with Bill Norwood, Regional Manpower
Administrator,
he has no objection to our contacting Stanley
Rothenburg, th l Manp wer Administrator for Willard Wirtz.
ind
There is a pr tty good i dication that some big city mayors have
called Rothe· burg about utbacks in their programs and have gotten
favorable r sults. Jim a d I feel that it would be very helpful if
you would elephone Rothenburg and,. . express your concern that the
one milli n dollar cutback will seriously affect the City 1 s ability to
maintain our momentum in cutting down on hard-core unemployment.
If you t lk to him it might also be helpful to tell him your support
Sam C ldwell Is request for the Labor Department to waive a freeze
whicht as existed on conducting power sewing machine training
cours s. There is a great demand for power sewing machine
opera ;Grs in the Atlanta area and Caldwell has been attempting to
get the ban lifted on training people for this employment. He and
R othenburg are pretty good friends and it might be another plus if
we support Sam in this regard .
Secretary Rothenburg 1 s numbe r is 202-961-5464 .
s e cr e tary is Miss Eula M . Burton.
DS :fy
His personal
�I
MEMORANDUM
TO:
FROM:
T. M. Jim Parham, Executive Administrator ·
./)
Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.
~
RE:
ACEP (Atlanta Concentrated Employment Program)
DATE:
September 3, 1968
We are alarmed about continued reductions in second year
funds for ACEP. As of now we are told by regional U.S.
Labor Department officials that we must take a one million
dollar cut in federal funds budgeted for ACEP for the
period September 1, 1968 thru August 31, 1969:
Federal Funds
Year
9/67 - 8/68
$3,980,531
9/68 - 9/69
$2,967,789
We learned many lessons in our first CEP year and had projected a modified program for the second year which incorporated many of these lessons. These continued reductions in
funds, however, have required alterations in our second year
projections for training and employment opportunities:
Program
Component
Original Plans
for 2nd Year
New Careers
Youth Jobs
Atlanta Beautification Corps
Skills Training
Di r ect Plac ements
TOTAL
Reduced
Plans
300
250
100
150
150
60
500
600
300
600
1 , 750
1 , 260
�-2-
If you don't count direct placements (since this involves
little or no training investment), we are left with only
660 training opportunities for this large disadvantaged
area which includes our total Model Cities community.
In addition to these reductions in potential training
opportunities, these fund cuts have seriously diminished
the ability of certain program components to be staffed at
a level to give close, individual attention to the multiple
problems of CEP clients. Of particular significance is the
vital counseling and follow-up activity of Employment Service
personnel.
Even if the amount of funds available had not been reduced
it had been the concensus of planners (including business,
representatives of the poor, employment service, the schools,
U.S. Labor, and EOA) that the number of persons served should
be reduced and the length of training increased. This conclusion was the result of the first year's experience that
the socially and educationally crippled people enrolled in
CEP could not be upgraded in a brief training program. With
this substantial reduction in funds, however, the number of
training opportunities is drastically reduced and the potential impact of the program watered down significantly. Any
action which has this result is a danger to us and should
be avoided if possible.
r
TMJP/gj
�MEMORANDUM
TO: ~
- ~
FROM:
.
.
.
T. M. Jim
Parh am, Executive
Adm'inistratofrr
Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.
<
RE:
ACEP (Atlanta Concentrated Employment Program)
DATE:
September 3, 1968
l)
we·are alarmed about continued reductions in second year
funds for ACEP. As of now we are told by regional U.S.
Labor Department officials that we must take a one million
dollar cut in federal fund~ budgeted for ACEP for the
period September 1, 1968 thru August 31, 1969:
Year
Federal Funds
8/68
$3,980,531
9/68 - 9/69
$2,967,789
9/£57
We learned many lessons in ~ur first CEP year and ~ad projected a modified program for the second year which incorporated many of these lessons. These continued reductions 'in ·
funds, however, have required alterations in our second year
projections for training and employment opportunities:
Program
Component
Original Plans
for 2nd Year
New Careers
Youth Jobs
Atlanta Beautificaj:.ion Corps
Skills Training
Direct Placemen t s
TOTAL
Reduced
Plans
300
250
100
150
150
60
500
600
300
600
1,750
1,260
�\
-2If you don't count direct placements (since this involves
little or no training investment), we are left with only
660 training opportunities for this large disadvantaged
area which includes our total Model Cities community.
In addition to these reductions in potential training
opportunities, these fund cuts have seriously diminished
the ability of certain program components to be staffed at
a level to give close, individual attention to the multiple
problems of CEP clients. Of particular significance is the
vital counseling and follow-up activity of Employment Service
personnel.
Even if the ·amount of funds available had not been reduced
it had been the concensus of planners (including business,
representatives of the poor, employment service, the schools,
U.S. Labor, and EOA) that the number of persons served should
be reduced and the length of training increased. This conclusion was the result of the first year's experience that
the socially and educationally crippled people enrolled in
CEP could not be upgraded in a brief training program. With
this substantial reduction in funds, however, the number of
training opportunit~es is dra s tically reduced and the po t ential impac t o f the program wate r e d down significantly. Any
action which has this r e sult is a dange r to us and should
be avoided if possible.
T~JP/gj
.
,
�'
Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.
101 Marietta Street Bldg. • Atlanta, Georgia 30303 •. Telephone 688-1012
T. M. Parham
Executive Administrator
September 3, 1968
Mr. William U. Norwood, Jr.
Regional Manpower Administrator
U.S. Department of Labor
1371 Peachtree Street, N.E.
Room 626
Atlant·a , Georgia 30309
Dear Mr. Norwood:
I have several concerns about the ACEP program which
I wish to register with you.
(1)
The continued reduction - in projected
federal funds for our second CEP year
is alarming in that it diminishes
employment· training resources in a
vital area of our City. Our projected
reduction now totals approximately one
million qollars compared to the first
year budget.
(2)
We need mor e training opportunities in
new careers, special impact, youth
opportuni ties , and skills training.
·Present projections are for a total of
660 such slots. This is far below our
original second year projections o f
1150 and dilut es significantly the
potential impact o f ACEP.
�\
Mr. Norwood
-2-
(3)
We wish to include the East Central
target area in our second year program
and ask that serious consideration be
given to this request.
(4)
We feel a greater voice should be
provided in the selection and planning
of skills training courses for ourselves,
our business advisors, · and our representatives of the poor. Recent adjustments
of program planning procedures seem to have
diminishe_d this possibility aft er we worked
very hard to develop interest i n these
groups.
(5)
We need an expanded Employment Service
effort within ACEP to include a strengthened
recruiting and follow-up activ i ty. Budget
reductions have forced eliminat ion of vital
staff positions in this area.
TMJP/gj
cc:

I
September 3, 1968
Mr. Boisfe uillet Jone s
Dr. Ch a rl es A . Hi cks
Mr. W. o. Br ooks
Honorabl e Sam Ca ldwe ll
Mayor I v an All en ~
Dr . John W. Le t s on
�Economic Op·p ortunity Atlanta, Inc.
101 Marietta Stree t B ldg . • Atlant a, Georgia 30 303 • Telephone 6 88-1012
T. ~I. Parh a m
E xecu cive Admi n is cra cor
September 27, 1968
Honorable Mil.ton G- Farris, Chairman
Finance Co.'.lllllittee
Board of Aldermerr
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mr. Farris:
Economi.c Opport:unity Atlanta, Inc. is requesting that the City of Atlanta
in 1969 increase i ts support of the local antipoverty program from $100,000
to $125,000.,
The cash all.ocation from the City of Atlanta is used to help meet the
non-federal. share of twenty per cent which is required by OEO. During 1968,
federal grant s available to EO~ have totaled $12,889,720, requiring $2,075,049
in non-federal share. The great majority of grant funds available are spent
within the C:ity, and during the year, contracts totaling $1,713,383 have been
made directly with City departments;
Parks and Recreation
San itation
Atl anta Public Schools:
(1) Summe~ Head Start
(2) Manpower Training
$329,063
$168,670
$356,524
$85 9,126
As can. be seen, the City government receives a d irect return fro~ its
investment i n EU\ ,. a s well as the indirect gains accruing from the improved
lives of its: cit iz:e ns as they benefit from the many p rogram activities.
In t h e·, pas t,. much of our non-federai share ha·s b een developed t hr ough
in-kind contribu tions of space, equipment, and services . However, new
regulations f r om OEO demanding much more detailed j lllls tification of in- kind
claims has ma de i t more d ifficult to meet requiremeimts in this way, and
availability of loca l cas h is going to be increasingly important if the
community i s to t ake fu ll advantage of f ederal programs .
The EO\ . Board 7 staff , a nd resident participants are very appreciative
of the suppor t gi.ven t his program by City government. We have worked closely
�Honorable Milton G. Farris
Page 2 _
September 27, 1968
with the Mayor's office, the Crime Prevention Department, and the Parks
Department to help maintain community stability. We are directly assisting
City efforts in planning, employment, housing, and community relations,
and we look forward to greater effort in . 1969 /
'
,
Sin~:'J1y
you~s, /

/
/ n_, . _j ( l -L-/ 0.(_, ~
Parham
tive Administrator
TMJP/gd
CC:
BCC:
I-tr. Boisfeuillet Jones
Mr. Dan Sw~at
Mr.. W11 liam Terry
-
�525-4266
Octob
Mi
1:1
Suz nn
~
16t- 1968
. tin
1418 Mt . V rnora Road
Dunwoody , Georgi 30338
1>
tin:
l'
You~ r
st for tnfo-rmation r
Start w r f•r~
t~
I
our
Tba
in.terp t ln
you fo'r J
(Mr . ) Glort•
Dll!'ector of
.C/lJ
Cit:


rti
t
ti

Gl'OI
Start
�EFFECTIVE DATE
SUPPLEMENT AL AGREEMEi'IT





9/1/68
REQUISITION NO./PURCHASE AUTHORITY
CONTR A CT/AGREEMENT NO.
Subcontractor
CEP67-15

TO:
(Contractor's/ Sponsor's name and address)°
NO. OF PAGES
7
1
MODlflCATION NO.
7
ISSUED BY:
Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.
Atlanta Concentrated Employm~nt Progr am
101 Marietta Street Building·
.
.
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
City of Atlanta
Atlanta Beautification Corps
City Hall, 260 Central Avenue,
Atlanta, Georgia
PAGE NO.
s. w.
ACCOUNTING AND APPROPRIATION DATA
CHANGES HEREIN HAVE THE FOLLOWING EFFECT ON FEDERAL GOVERNMENT FUNDS IN THIS CONTRACT/AGREEMENT:
[xj
INCREASED BY $
132, 69b
DECREASED BY $
0
UNCHANGED.
THE ABOVE-NUMBERED CONTRACT/AGREEMENT IS MODIFIED AS FOLLOWS:
General Intent:
Tre purpos.e of this modification is to extend the termination date of this
subcontract to March 31, 1969.
Modifications:
The termination date of September 14, 1968 as specified in Modification #6
is hereby resdnded and the date of Nar':h 3lt 1969 is substituted therefor.
1)
OFMS Summary:
The attached budge ts to represent the newlevel of funds available to your age nc y
through March 31, 1969. However, - due to changes in Department of Labor regulations
some adjustments to individual line items may be necessary, but the total funds for
the budget wi 11 remain unchanged.
·
!
..
'
Except as here by modified, all terms and conditions of said contract/agreement as heretofore modifi e d remain
unchanged and in full force and effect. This Supplemental Agreement is entered into purs uant to the authority of
(IF APPLICABLE) ·
.
ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY ATLANTA, I NC.
BY
D A TE
____ _.,,I,.,v'-"a=n.,.,_._.A
.,_,lli.n_.I~-- - - TYP ED N AM E
Mayor , Ci ty o~-f~A~t- l_a~n~t.= - , - - -- n





'
TLE
Thomas H. Parh am
TYPED -NAME
J r.
Execut i ve Adminis tr a t or
TITLE
�:, }~c:-1. t:, s
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RESOLUTION
BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE
WHEREAS, the City of Atlanta, for the past has engaged
in an Atlanta Beautification Corps Project as a delegate agency
to Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. under the Atlanta Concentrated Employment Program; and
WHEREAS, this program has provided financial assistance
to employ sixty persons from the economically disadvantaged areas
of the city so that they can be given meaningful work experience;
and
WHEREAS, the initial term of the agreement with ~conomic
Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. has expired and the City has applied for
funds to extend the program for one additional year.
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE MAYOR AND BOARD
OF ALDERMEN OF THE CITY OF ATLANTA that the Mayor be and is hereby
authorized to execute an agreement with ~conomic Opportunity Atlanta,
Inc. providing f or one year extension to the Atlanta Beautification Corps Project.
'
�RESOLUTION
BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE
\
)
A r esolution a~thorizing the Mayor to
execute an agreement with Economic
Opportunity Atlant a , Inc. Providing
f or one y ear extension to the Atlanta
Beautification Corps Project.
I,
...·..
.t,.
,
~: . ~') (;'I
r,e2lem Of
Au::rner:N
SEP 1 6 196~ ·.
�Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.
101 Ma rietta Street Bldg. • Atlanta, Georgi a 30 30 3 •
T. M. Parh a m
Exec uti ve Adm in is tra t o r
October 25, 1968
I
Mr. Dan Sweat, Director
Governmental Liaison
. City Hall Comptroller
68 Mitchell Street, S .W.
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Mr. Sweat
pear
Enclosed is a cooperative agreement in duplicate betw e en the Neighborhood
Youth Corps Sponsor, Economic Opportunity Atlant a , Inc. and y our a gency for the
fiscal year of 1968-69. Renewal of this agreement will be determin e d by the
Sponsor and will be based on funding of the program for another fiscal year.
Forms are ~ttached to be completed on each Ne ighborhood Youth Corps work
clas~ifi~ation within your agency. Please compl e t e the work cl a ssification
forms and return with the original copy ~f the sign ed agr e eme nt.
If you have any questions reg ~rding this agreement, pl e as e contact me
at 688-6232.
Since re l y ,
e~~
Charl es K. Pie rc e , Director
Neighborhood Youth Corps
Out-o f- School Program
CK;P :wµ1b
Enc losu r e
~
y ;,~
\
�CITY OF ATLANTA
OFFICE OF COMPTROLLER
CITY HALL
Atlanta, Georgia
39303
CHARLES L. DAVIS
COMPTROLLER
EDGAR A. VAUGHN, JR .
No vember 1, 1968
DEPUT Y COMPTROLLER
MEMORANDUM TO:
Mr. Dan Sweat
FROM:
Mr. Charles L. Davis
Attached are the completed cooperative agreements between the
Neighborhood Youth Corps Sponsor, Economic Opportunity Atlanta,
Inc. and the City of Atlanta
�ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY ATLANTA, INC. PROGRAM SUMM ARY
FISCAL 1969
Form Number and
Project Title
P.A. 01 - CAA
A d ministration
P.A. 07 - Neighborhood
Service Systems
Administration
P.A. 08 - Community
Organization
T otal Cost
N o n-Fe d eral
Share
Federal
Share
Descrip tion of Program
$ 4 96,043
$61,587
$ 434,456
1,296,905
455,619
841,286
The Neighborhood Service Centers are
the delivery system for services of the
C o mmunity Action A g ency. This program accounts provide for t h e effectiv e
administration of the Neighborhood
Services Center Pr oject and includes
activities such as implementation,
staffing, planning, supervision, training ,
coordination, evaluation, and the
mobilization of people in order that
the objectives of NSC are achieved.
360, 130
C ommunity Organization se e k s t o
involve pe ople of a common area in
understanding their problems, and
attempts to giv e these pers on s ho p e
i n meeting problems tog ether for
community stability w here mutual
contributions will achieve the desired
benefits w i t h a sense of w o r th and
usefulnes s .
360, 130
The Administrative Unit of this CAA
is designed to provide direction for
all phases of EOA ' s programs in
achieving goals. This inv olves the
responsibility and accountability of
all funds; managerial support relativ e
to personnel services; community
relations; program development and
evaluation · and the coordination of EOA
services with other agencies.
�Non-Federal
Share
Form Number and
Project Title
Total Cost
Federal
Share
Description of Program
P.A. 11 - Job De velop ment and Placement
120, 361
120,361
This program is d esigned to develop
meaningful jobs and to place approximately 4, 000 unemployed and underemployed male and female heads of
household and youth dropouts in the
fourteen traget areas of this CAA and
to increase training opportunities for
these individuals.
P.A. 14 - Foster
Grandparents
113,764
25,033
88,731
The purpose of this program is to employ
impoverished older persons in a service
role to institutionalized children who are
deprived of a close, affectionate relationship with mature adults. This project,
is, in fact, dual in both purpose and
benefits. For the older person whose
income is both fixed and limited, it
provides an income to meet the basic
needs of food, shelter, medical care and
other items peculiar to their needs.
P.A. 19 - Day Care
(West End Child
Development Center)
164,017
114, 242
49,775
The purpose of this program is to provide a comprehensive program of child
development activities for fifty children
between the ages of three and eight.
Older persons will be recruited, trained
and placed in groups of 15 each for a
three months period, e. g. , four groups
of 15 each completing 4 weeks of class room inst-ruction and 8 weeks of field
placement before employment for a
total of 60 persons.
�Form Number and
Project Title
Total Cost
P. A. 2 3 - Full Ye a r
Head start
765,741
Non-Federal
Share
160,031
Federal
Share
605,710
Seven centers - The purpose of this
project is to give full year, all day care
to children so that parents can train for
jobs or take jobs free of the anxiety
for the children while they are at wo rk.
Also, for the improvement of the child's
physical and dental health so that they
can grow and learn to their best
capacities. Priority is given to the most
culturally deprive d children and to families
in greatest need.
This program will serve 3, 050 low
income children, ages 4, 5, and 6 who
will be attending school in the fall for
the first time, for 4 to 6 hours, 5 days
a week d uring an eight week period in
the summer of 1969.
P.A. 24 - Summer
Heads tart
P.A. 4 7 - Family
Planning
Description of Program
151, 115
30,223
120,89 2
Nine family planning clinics located in
target areas w ill be available to low
income residents in orde r to acquaint
the medically ind igent so that they too
will know that family planning services
are available, and to provide such
services at a time that is convenient ,
at a place that is accessible, and at a low
cost or no cost.
�Form Number and
Project Title
Total Cost
P.A. 51 - General
Services - Social
Service Counseling
4 09,532
P.A. 52 - Consumer
Action
P .A. 54 - Emergency
Financial Assistance
86,294
7, 335
Non-Federal
Share
34,069
Federal
Share
Description of Program
409,532
Social Service Counseling - This program deals with the continuous
counseling of indigent persons to help
them develop an appreciation of themselves, as well as an appreciation of
their own skills and abilities and to
link these persons with available
resources. Further, this account will
attempt to help residents develop programs to meet their needs within the
Center and other agencies in the develop
ment of new services.
52,225
Within the East Central and Northwest
target areas, this program will
addre ss problems facing the lowincome consumer such as explorative
pricing practices on the p art of neighborhood grocers and slum landlords ;
incidence of home management problems
reflected through the lack of budget
control, meal planning and a feeling of
family well-being an d small business
ventures designed to serve with ownership being vested in the poor.
7,335
This emergency financial assistance
program proposes to make limite d funds
available to participants of the CAA' s
projects for critical purposes such as
transportation to and from a new job until
the first pay has been earned; transportation to hospital or doctor in times of
emergency; lo dg ing ; food; housing relocation
and emergency financial loans.
�Form Number and
Project Title
Total Cost
P.A. 57 - Legal Services
647,261
Non-Federal
Share
126,014
Federal
Share
521,24 7
This pr og ram offers l egal r e pres entation
for indigent citizens to educate them in
the functio n s of the law. The program
w ill furnis h legal a dvice , prepare docu me nts, negotiate legal controversies,
represent clients in court, and counsel
indigent p eople re garding the legal process
o f the law . The program operates out o f
five offices a nd proposes t wo additional
centers fo r the upcoming yea r.
S umm er recreation has three major
emphasis - employment for r es ide nts
in target areas, recreation f or the total
fa mily environment, a nd cultural activ ities.
This program i s designed to serve 60, 000
youth and their families.
P . A. 59 - S p ecial
Projects - Sum.mer
Recreation
P.A. 60 - Recreation
Description of Program
16,427
16,427
This r ec reation program is de signed to
meet the recr eational, social, cultural,
and aesthetic need s of the yo ung adult
and te enager in the fourteen target areas
of the CAA. Further, this p rogram
attempts to broaden th e scope of
recreation to encompass understanding,
gui d ance , and d irection.
�Form Number and
Project Title
Total Cost
P.A. 65-Senior
Opportunities and
Services (Multi Service
Centers for the Elderly)
229, 969
P.A. 76 - General
Technical Assistance
to Communities
(CMIP)
TOTAL
Non-Federal
Share
127, 103
45,000
$4 , 909,89 4
Federal
Share
102,866
45,000
$ , 1 33, 921
$3,775,973
Description of Program
The purpose of this project is to create
an environment which enables deprived
older people to fulfill their potential
rather than becoming a burden to the
community - contributing to the community
and becoming a source of strength in the
community. Three high rise units are
now operating with a total of 690 units of
families and single persons 65 years and
older being served.
The purpose of this program is to
develop effective and functional
management which will provide leadership and direction to the acti vi ties of
community action programs and
projects within the organization so
that the goals and objectives of serving
indigents and alleviating poverty are
re a;:lized. Management, therefore, will
address the elements of operation,
control, and coordination.
�----·
Form Number and
Project Title
P.A. 01 - CAA
A dministration
P . A. 07 - Neighborhood
Service Systems
A dministration
P. &. 08 - Community
Orga nization
-
-
T otal Cost
Non-Federal
Share
$4 96,043
1, 296,90 5
360 , 130
Federal
Share
$434,456
Description of Program
The A d ministrative Unit of this CAA
is designed to prov.i de dire ction for
all phases of EOA ' s programs in
achieving goals. This involves the
responsibility and accountability of
all funds; manage1"ial support relative
to personnel services; community
relations; prograrn development and
evaluation and the coordination of EOA
services with other agencies.
455 ,6 19
8 41 , 286
The Neighborhood Service Centers are
the delivery system for services of the
Community A ction Agency. This pro ..
gram accounts provide for the effective
administration of the Neighborhood
Services Center Project and includes
activities such as implementation,
staffing,, planning, supervi$ion. training,
coordination.; evaluation, and the
mobilization of people in order that
the objectives of NSC are achieved .
_,..
360;, 130
Community Organization seeks to
involve people o{ common area in
understanding theil' problems, and
attempts to give thes persons hop
in meeting problems together for
community stability here mutu 1
contributions will achiev the de ired
benefits with a s nse of worth and
usefuln ss.
�Non.Federal
Share
Form Number and
Project Title
Total Cost
P . A. 11 - Job Develop ..
ment and Placement
120 , 361
P.A . 14 - Foster
Grandparents
113 , 764
25.033
88,.731
The pu.rpose of this program is to employ
impoverished older persons in a service
role to institutionalized children who are
deprived of a close , affectionate relation .
ship with mature adults. This project,
is, in fact,, dual in both purpose and
benefits. For the older person whose
income is both fixed and limited, it
provides an income to meet the basic
needs of food, shelter,. medical care and
other items peculiar to their needs.
P.A
164, 017
114'"242
49,775
The purpose of this program is to provide a comprehensiv program of child
development activities for fifty child ren
between the ages of three and eight.
Older persons will be recruited, trained
and placed in groups of 15 each for
three months period , e.g .• four groups
of 15 each completing 4 weeks of cl s ..
room instruction nd 8 w eks of field
placement before employment for
total of 60 persons.
J.9-DayCare
(West End Child
Development Center)
Federal
Share
Des c ription of Program
120, 361
This pro gram is designed to develop
meaningful jobs and to place approximately 4 , 000 unemployed and underemployed male and female heads of
househol d and youth dropouts in the
fourteen traget areas of this CAA and
to increas .e training opportunities for
these individuals .
�Form Number and
i:>roject Title
T otal Cost
P . A . 23 ... Full Year
Head start
765,741
Non-Federal
Share
160,,031
Federal
Shq.re
605s710
Planning
Seven centers - The purpose of this
project is to gi~e full year, all day care
to children so that pa1"ents can train for
jobs or take jobs free of the anxiety
for the children while they are at work .
Als o, for the improvement of the child ' s
phys ical and dental health so that they
can grow and learn to their best
capacities . Priodty is given to the most
culturally deprive d children and to familie:
in greatest need .
This program will serve 3 , 050 low
income c hildren, ages 4 , 5 ,. and 6--who
will be attending school in the fall for
the first time , for 4 to 6 hours, 5 days
a week during an eight week pe:riod in
the summer of 1969.
P . A . 24 - Summer
Heads tart
P.A . 47 - Family
Description of Program
151, 115
30, 223
·120,892
Nine family planning clinics located in
target areas will be available to low
income residents in order to acquaint
the medically indig nt so that they too
will know that family planning services
t'e available,- and to provide such
services at time t t is convenient,.
at a place that is acces ible, and at a lo
co t or no cost.
�Fo,:-m Number and
Project TitW
Total Cost
P.A. 51 - General
Services - Social
Service Counseling
409.532
P.A . 52 - Cons urn.er
Non-Federal
Share
Federal
Share
409 , 532
86 , 294
34,, 069
7.335
---
52 , 225
Action
P.A. 54 .. Emergency
Financial A s al tance
7,. 335
Description of Program
Social Service Counseling - This pro.
gram deals with the continuous
counseling of indigent persons to help
them develop an appl"eciation of them selves, as well as an appreciation of
their own skills and abilities and to
link these person.s with available
resour c es . Furtherf this ac c ount will
attempt to help residents develop pro g:rams to meet their needs within the
Center and other agendes in the development of new services.
Within the East Central and Northwest
target areas , this pTogram will
address problems facing the low.
income consumer such as explorative
pdcing practices on the part of nei:gl?-borhood g'i'ocers and shun landloi-ds;
incidence of home ~gement problerns
reflected through the lack of budget
control . meal planning and a feeling of
family well-being and sm.all business
ventures designed to serve with ownership being vested in th poot".
Thia emergency financial assl tanc~
program propose to make limited funds
available to pa:rticipants of the CAA.'s
projects for critical purpose sueh :'a
transportation to and from new job u.ntil
the first p y h s be n e rn d~ transportation to hospital or d octor in time~ of
mer.gency; lodging; food; housing relocati
1
and ,emergency financi I loans.
�Form Number and
Project Title
Total Cost
P . A. 57 • Legal Services
647,261
Non-Federal
Share
Federal
Share
521., 247
This program offers legal representation
for indigent citizens to educate them in .
the functions of the law, The program
will furnish legal advice, prepare documents, negotiate legal controversies.,
represent clients in 0.eurt,, and counsel
indigent people regarding the legal proces
of the law. The program operates out of
five offices and proposes two additional
centers for the upcoming year .
Summer recreation has three major
emphasis - employment for residents
in target areas, recreation for the total
family environmenti and cultural activitie
This program is designed to serve 60,, 000
youth and their families.
P., A . 59 - Special
Projects ... Summer
Recreation
P . A . 60 - Recr·e ation
Description of Program
16.427
This recreation program is designed to
meet the recreational,... social, cultur l;
and aesthetic needs of the young adult
and teenager in the fourteen 1,:a:rget areas
of the CAA. Further, this program
attempts to bt"oaden the scope of
recreation to encomp ss understanding,
guidance , and dir ction.
�Form Number and
Project Title
T otal Cost
P . A . 65 - Senior
O pportunities and
Services (Multi Service
Centers for the Elderly)
229, 969
P . A . 76 • General
Technical Assistance
to Communities
(CMIP)
4 5,000
N on-Federal
Share
127.103
Federal
Share
102. 866
4 5.000
Description of Program
The purpose of this project is to create
an environment which enables deprived
older people to fulfill their potential
rather than becoming a burden to the
comm.unity - contributing to the communit:
and becoming a soull'ce of strength in the
community. Three high rise units are
now operating with a total of 6B0 units of
families and single per-sons 65 years and
older being served.
The purpose of this program is to
develop effective and functional
management which w ill provide leader ...
ship and direction to the activities of
community action p:tograms and
projects within the organ ization so
that the goals and objectives of serving
indigents and alleviating poverty are
reW.ized. Management, therefore. will
address the elements of operation,
control, and coordination.
�ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY ATLANTA, INC. PROGRAM SUMMARY
FISCAL 1969
Form Number and
Project Title
P.A. 01 - CAA
Administration
P.A. 07 - Neighborhood
Service Systems
Administration
Total Cost
Non-Federal
Share
Federai
Share
$496,043
$61., 587
$434,456
1,296,905
455,619
841,286
Description of Program
The Adrninistrative Unit of this CAA
is designed to provide direction for
all phases of EOA's programs in
achieving goals. This involves the
responsibility and accountability of
all funds; managerial support relative
to personnel services; community
relations; program development and
evaluation ; and the coordination of EOA
services with other agencies.
The Neighborhood Service Centers are
the delivery- system for services of the
Community Action Agency. This program accounts provide for the effective
administration of the Neighborhood
Services Center Project and includes
acti vi ties such · as implementation,
staffing, planning, supervision, training,
coordination, evaluation, and the
mobilization of people in order that
the objectives of NSC are achieved.
.~ .
P.A. 08 - Community
Organization
360, 130
360,130
Community Organization seeks to
involve people of a common area in
understanding their problems, and
attempts to give these persons hope
in meeting problems together for
community stability where mutual
contributions will achieve the desired
benefits with a sense of worth and
usefulness,
�Form Number and
Project Title
Total Cost
P.A. 11 - Job Development and Placement
120,361
P.A. 14 - Foster
Grandparents
113, 764
Non-Federal
Share
Federal
Share
Description of Program
120,361
This program is designed to develop
1neaningful jobs and to place approximately 4, 000 unemployed and underemployed male and female heads of
household and youth dropouts in the
fourteen traget areas of this CAA and
to increase training opportunities for
these individuals.
25,033
88,731
The purpose of.this program is to employ
impoverished older persons in a service
role to institutionalized children who are
deprived of a close, affectionate relationship with mature adults. This projec_t ,
is, in fact, dual in both purpose and
benefits. For the older person whose
income is both fixed and limited, it
provides an income to meet the basic
needs of food, shelter, medical care and
other items peculiar to their needs.
114,242
49, 775
The purpose of this program is to pro .;, .
' vide a comprehensive program of child
· development activities for fifty children
between the ages of three and eighL
Older persons will be recruited, trained
and placed in groups of 15 each for a
three months period, e. g . , four groups
of 15 each completing 4 weeks of class room instruction and 8 weeks of field
placement before employment for a
total of 60 persons.
.,.
P.A. l 9 - Day Care
(West End Child
Development Center)
164,017
.(:,
/
�Form Number and
Project Title
Total Cost .
P.A. 23 - Full Year
Head start
765,741
Non-Federal
Share
160,031
Federal.
Share
605,710
Seven centers - The purpose of this
project is to give full year, all day care
to children so that parents can train for
jobs or take jobs free of the anxiety
for the children while they are at work.
Also, for the improvement of the child.' s
physical and dental health so that they
can grow and learn to their best
capacities. Priority is given to the most
culturally deprived children and to families
in greatest need.
This prograhl will serve 3, 050 low
income children, ages 4, $, and 6 who
will be attending school in the fall for
the first time, for 4 to 6 hours, .5 days
a week during an eight week period in
the summer of 1969.
P.A. 24 - Summer
Head start
P.A. 47 - Family
Planning
Description of Program
151, 115
30,223
120,892
Nine family planning clinics locate d in
tar get areas will be available to low
income residents in order to acquaint
' the medically indige nt so that they too
will know that family planning services
are available, and to provide such
services at a · time that is convenie nt,
at a place that is accessible, and at a low
cost or no cost.
,,
·t
�Form Number and
Project Title
Total Cost
P.A. 51 - General
Services - Social
Service Counseling
409,532
P.A. 52 - Consumer
Action
86,294
Non-Federal
Share
Federal
Share
409,532
34,069
52,225
-~
P.A. 54 ..: Emergency
Financial Assistance
7,335
7,335
Description of Program
Social Service Counseling - This program deals with the continuous
counseling of indigent persons to help
them develop an appreciation of themselves, as well as an appreciation of
their own skills and abilities and to
link these persons with available
resources. Further, this account will
attempt to help residents develop programs to meet their needs within the
Center and other agencies in the develop
ment of new services.
.
Within the East Central and Northwest
target areas, this program will
address problems facing the lowincome consumer such as explorative
pricing practices on the part of neighborhood grocers and slum landlords ;
incidence of home management problems
reflected through the lack of bud g et
.,...
control, meal planning and a fe e lin g of
family well-being and small business
' ventures designed to serve with ownership being vested in the poor.
This emergency financial assistance
program proposes to make limite d funds
available to participants of the CAA' s
projects for critical purpos e s such as
transportation to and fron~ a new job until
the first pay has b e en earned; transportation to hospital or doctor in tin~e s of
emergency; lodging; food; housing relocat ~on
and emergency financial loans.
�Form Number and
Project Title
Total Cost
P.A. 57 - Legal Services
647,261
Non-Federal
Share
126,014
Federal
Share
521,247
This program offers legal representation
for indigent citizens to educate them in
the functions of the law. The program
w ill furnish legal advice, pre par e documents, n ~ gotiate legal controversies,
represent clients in court, and counsel
indigent people regarding the legal process
of the law. The program operates ou:t of
five offices and proposes two additional
centers for the upcoming ye ar.
Summer recreation has three m ajor
emphasis - · employment for residents
in target areas, recreation for the total
family environment, and oultural activities.
This program is designed to serve 60, 000
youth and their families.
P. A. 59 - Special
Projects - Summer
Recreation
P.A. 60 - Recreation
Description of Program
16,427 ·
16,427
This recr eation program is designed to
meet the recreational, social, cultural,
and aesthetic needs of the young adult
and teenager in the fourteen target areas "'
,· of the CAA. Further, this program
attempts to broaden the scope of
recreation to. encompass understanding,
guidance, and direction.
�Form Number and
Project Title
Total Cost
P.A. 65 - Senior
Opportunities and
Services (Multi Service
Centers for the Elderly)
229,969
P.A. 76 - General
Technical Assistance
to Communities
(CMIP)
Non-Federal
Share
127, 103
Federal ·
Share
102,866
45,000
45,000
Description of Program
The purpose of this project is to create
an environment which enables deprived
older people to fulfill their potential
rather than becoming a bur d en to the
community1 - contributing to the community
and becoming a source of strength in the
community. Three high rise units are
now operating with a total of 650 units of
families and single persons 65 years and
older being served.
The purpose of this program is to
develop effective and functional
management which will provide leadership and direction to the activ ities of
community action program\ and
projects within the organizat ion so
that the goals and objectives of serving
indigents and alleviating poverty are
realized. Management, therefore, will
address the elements of operation,
control, and coordination.
,;.
., '
TOTAL
$4,909,894
$1,133,921
$3,775,973
-~
�Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.
101 Marietta Street Bldg. • Atlanta, Georgia 30 303 •
T. M. Parham
Execut i ve Administrator
November 19, 1968
Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor
City of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mayor Allen:
I am submitting to you a copy of Economic Opportunity Atlanta's
1969 refunding application.
As a part of this process we would like for you to review the
proposal. A checkpoint form is enclosed for your signature
once the review is completed.
We would appreciate an early reaction to this request.
T. M.
Parham
Ex ecutive Administrator
TMP : jjj
�CG-0306-C/ll
ITEMIZATION OF NON-FEDERAL SRA.RE
Agencies
1. Butler Stree t YMCA
2. The Atlanta Urban League
3. Centr al YWCA
4. Royal Knights Foundation, Inc.
5. Errnnus House
6. Metropolitan Boys Clubs, Inc.
7. Central YMCA
8. WAOK Program
9. Wesley House
10. City of Atlanta (See Atta chment)
11. Atlanta Girls Club
12. Boy Scouts
13. Girl Scouts Council
14. Grady Homes Gi rl s Club
15. Vine City Foundation
16. Northwes t Perry NSC
17. Nash-Washing t on NSC
18. Gwinnett County NSC
19. West End NSC
20. East Central NSC
21. Pittsburgh NSC
2:'. . South Fulton NS C
23. Centra l City NS C
24. Price NSC
25. North Fulton NSC
26. Edgewood NSC
27. Sum-Mee NSC
28. We st Centra l NSC
29. Rockdal e NS C
3b ,



.s clot 5 iic, IC'o1 tl/c/1




J/4
/4r ~
IJ
�MEMORANDUM
TO :
Mr . Harold Barrett
FROM:
Duke Harrison
SUBJECI':
Number of Youth Assistant& and NYC Employees by Centers
JU4' ~, 1968
Edgewood
a youth assistants
3 NYC
Central City
6 youth
Si tents
NYC
F.aat Central
7 youth a
i tants
26 NYC
We t Central
8 youth
71
Price
NYC
6 youth assistant
10 NYC
wst End
~
ll youth a Si tent
NYC
Gwi-noett Count)'
6 Youth A Si tant
l NYC
c.
5 youth as latent
ll NYC
�Rockdale-Conyers
4 youth assistants
S tentative NYC
Pittsburgh
4 youth assistants
16 NYC
Nash-Washington
9 youth assistants
7 NYC
South Fulton
28 youth assistants
10 NYC
North Fulton
6 youth assistant
4 NYC ( Roaw ll Recreation Center)
Northwe t
7 youth a istant
25 NYC
SUB-TOTAL
SUB-TOTAL
.110-)'."•duth Assts •
255
NYC's
TOTAL
/Vf/-e_ Cjt1~/~
6f
Q) (0 ?
J65
f'AR-1-Fi j(}ds . ;t). L( <!... ' fYl cl tl)@ '1,
a),F,RG' /l/P /'-
uJ(J) Ii I~<-/~ AJ '
~
_6J//4e4 f-,~;,<l
e,q f11 € f-rt () Al ,/.1'1 I, 0 n.
.;:f{,,/J/~le7Z
�Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.
101 Marietta Street Bldg. • Atla nta, Georgia 30 30 3 • T elephone 688-101 2
T. M. P a rh a m
Exe c uti ve Adm ini s trator
December 11, 1968
The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor of the City of Atlanta
City Hall
At lanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Mayor Allen:
This is to advise you that Economic Opportunity
Atlanta will have an "on-site" evaluation b y teams from
OEO and U. S. Labor during t he week of De c embe r 16-20.
You may be called for an interview by some member
of the teams.
Parham
Admini strator
TMJP/gj
�Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.
101 Marietta Str eet B ldg.
• Atl a nta, Georgia 3030 3 • Teleph one 688-101 2
T. M. Parh am
Exec utive Administ rato r
MEMORANDUM
TO:
Mr. Dan Sweat
FROM:
T. M.
DATE '
December 11, 1968
EOA will have "on-site evaluation" by teams from OEO and U. S . Labor
during the week of December 16-20 .
OEO will be looking at the total CAP program.
U.
s. Labor will be looking at the ACEP program.
You may be called for an interview by some member of the team.
TMP/gd
�A RES OLUTIO N
BY SAM HASSELL , J R . :
RESOLU'l'I ON DESIG NAT I NG ECU.NOMIC OPPO~'I'UNITY
A'.l'LJJ ;TA, INC OR?ORATED, AS THE COM?1UNITY AC'.I'IOi-J
AGENCY FOR THE CITY OF ATLANTA .
1
WHEREAS, the 1967 Amendments to the Federal Economic
Opportunity Act re quire tha t a politica l subdivision such a s
The City of Atlanta designa te a community action a gency to plan ,
conduct, administer, eva luate , 2nd otherwise fulfill the ~urpos es
of the Economic Opportunity Act; and
WHEREAS, the A..rnendments referred to above furt her
require tha t a public hearing be conducted in order to provide
an opportunity for residents and orga nizations to publicly expres s
their views before The City of Atlanta designa tes such communi ty
action agency; and
WHEREAS, the City of Atla nta did on May 31, 1968, hold
a public he aring for the above sta ted purpose; and
WHEREAS, the preponderance of expression at the public
hearing was favorable towa rd the d e signa tion of Economic Opportunity Atlanta as the Community Action Agency.
NOW, THEREFORE , BE IT RESOLVED tha t the Bo ard of
Aldermen, acting as the governing officia ls , do hereby de signate
Economic Opportunity Atl anta, Incorpor 2ted, a private non-profit
corpora tion, as the Community Action Ag ency for the City of
Atlanta.
�.
~FED
l
BY SAM MASSELL, J R. :
RESOLUTION DESIGNATING ECONOMIC
OPPORTUNITY ATLANTA, I NCO~PORATED, AS THE COMMUNITY ACTION
AGENCY FOR THE CITY OF ATLANTA •
..

.
\1

.I
.
f
~
rl'f
, D Of ALDERMEN
JUN 1 7 ~('\68
' :., i.
,,i.·'
�December 12, 1968
Mr. John F . Stand1'idge
Exeeutive DlJ"ector
Vocational-.Technical and Adult Education
Atlanta Public Schools
2930 Forrest Hills Drive . S . W .
Atlanta,_ Georgia 30315
Dear John:
Thank you for the invitation to attend the Job Corps Skill Centel'
meeting on the 19th of December.
t
regJtet v ry much that l will b
_chedullng conflict.
unable to attend beeause of a
1 m extr mely int ,r; ·ated in ny propo~al fos, the d v lopm nt
of a Job Corps facility such as this_ and will be h ppy to lend
whatev r h lp I e n to such project.
Sincer ly yours ,
Dan Sw · t
DS:fy
I
I
�JOHN
OR. JOHN W. LETSON
SUPT. OF SCHOOLS
Atlanta Public Schools
VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL & ADULT EDUCATION
F.
STANDRIDGE
DIRECTOR
2930 Forrest Hills Dr. S. W.
Atlanta, Georgia 30315
MEM O RAN DUM
TO:
FROM:
December 11 , 1968
Mr. Dan Sweat
Mayor 1 s Office
John F. Standridge, Executive Director
Vocational-Technical and Adult Education
We would like f or you to attend a meeting in Room Bl at the Atlanta A.rea
Technical School Thursday at 2:00 p.m ., December 19, 1968, for the purpos e
of discus sing with us a proposal for a Job Corps Skill Center here in
Atlanta.
Your na.me was r ecommended as one who is vitally interested in a program of
this type and we wa1°t y ou to share your ideas with us in the f :i.r~al development
of t hi s program .
We ho pe that you will be able to attend.
JFS :pf
cc: Dr. J.W . Letson
Dr . J.P. Nix
Mr G W. Mul ling
�MAJORITY MEMBERS:
MINORITY MEMBERS:
CARL D. PERKINS, KY . , CHAIRMAN
WILLIAM H. AYRES, OHIO
ALBERT H. QUIE, MINN .
JOHN M. ASHBROOK, OHIO
ALPHONZO BELL. CALIF.
OGDEN R, REIO, N.Y.
EDWARD J, GURNEY, FLA.
EDITH GREEN, OREG.
FRANK THOMPSON, JR. , N.J.
JOHN H. DENT, PA .
ROMAN C, PUCINSKI , ILL,
DOMINICK V. DANIELS, N,J ,
JOHN BRADEMAS, IND,
JAMES G , O'HARA, MICH.
HUGH L. CAREY, N.Y.
AUGUSTUS F. HAWKINS , CALIF,
SAM GIBBONS, FLA.
WILLIAM O. FORD, MICH.
WILLIAM D, HATHAWAY, MAINE
PATSY T , MINK, HAWAII
JAMES H. SCHEUER, N.Y.
LLOYD MEEDS, WASH.
PHILLIP BURTON, CALIF.
CARL ALBERT, OKLA ,
CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION AND LABOR
2181 RAYBURN HOUSE OFFICE BUILDING
WASHINGTON, D.C.
20515
JOHN N. ERLENBORN, ILL.
W ILLIAM J . SCH ERLE, IOWA
JOHN OELLENBACK, OREG.
MARVIN L. ESCH, MICH.
EDWIN D, ESHLEMAN, PA.
JAMES C. G ARO NE R, N . C.
WILLIAM A. STEIGER, WIS.
JAMES M. COL.LINS, TEX.
TELEPHONES:
MAJORITY-22!- -'!127
MINORITY-225-3725
December 16, 1968
Dear Sir:
The Committee on Education and Labor of the House of Representatives is
gathering information on the operation and effectiveness of vari ous programs
to reduce unemployment and poverty . The Committee will be concerned with the
continuation of the Economic Opportunity Act and the programs included in that
Act such as the Neighborhood Youth Corps, the Concentrated Empl oyment Program
(CEP), Job Opportunities in the Business Sector (JOBS), Operation Mainstream,
New Careers, Community Action, the Job Corps, and Headstart .
As Chairman of the Committee on Education and Labor, I would like to know
whether these programs are accomplishing their objectives and how well they
are working locally. While national statistics are important, there is no
substitute for the evaluations of those who are closest to the scene, and so
I am seeking your help.
One or more of the economic opportunity programs is operating in your
community and sho r t que s tionnai r es referr ing to those which are in your communit y and about which you may have knowledge a r.e enclosed.
I ask t ha t you give suff i cient time to you r response s to make them as
compl et e as pos si bl e. I t would be most useful i f, in addition to che cking the
box whi ch be st summarize s your ob servat i ons, you would al s o pr ov i de your own
comments i n the spac e s pr ov i ded on the quest ionnaires .
By giving us the bene fi t of you r j udgment and experience, you will be
rendering a service to the Congress and t o t he c ountry. I t hank you i n advance
f or yo ur help and a pp reciate your continuing e ffo r ts on behal f of the poor.
Si nce rely,
/)
~
.--.··--
o A) .
~ ~ f> b .VJ~,r
Carl D. Perkins
Cha i rman
CDP :mw
�I
QUESTIONNAIRE CONCERNIN G COMMU N ITY ACTION PROGRAM
1.
Has the local Con~munity Action Pro g ram made a positive contribution tow ards
solving the proble ms of poor p e opl e and improving the gr e ater comn~unity in
which it functions?
Very much
Somewhat
Not at all
Unknown
A very valuable resource to local government.
Additional Comme nts:
The CAP, with ten Neighborhood Service Centers within the City, has been
a bridge of communication between the poor and the larger community and
has sought constructive approaches to the problems of the poor.
2.
Has the local Com1nunity Action Program been effective in stimulating the
participation of the poor in co1nmunity activities that affect their lives?
Very much
Somew hat
Not at all
Unknown
This has been one of the strongest contributions of A tla:n ta' s CAP.
Additional Comments:
City Hall utili ze s the CAP neighborhood organization s for planning for hou s ing ,
Model Cities , land u se and for d e c entr a liz ing municipa l servic e s.
3.
Has the local Community Action Program been responsible for increasing
the services available to the poor?
I'
Very much
Somewh a t
Not at all
Unknown
The City utilizes the EOA-CAP to e x t end and e x pand city se rvic e s
to th e poor.
Additional Comme nts:
Through it s ow n serv i ces , and through e x p a nd e d s e r v ic e of othe r lo cal publi c
and priva t e agen cies , the CAP h as di rectly a nd indi r e ctly a ffec t e d a n i n cr eas e
in services for the poor.
4.
H as th e Comm u n ity A c tion P ro g r a m impr ove d commu n ic a t ions b e t ween the
poor and t h e other secto r s of the community (b usiness , g ov'e rnme nt,
e ducation )?
/
~
Ve r y muc h
S o mewh a t
N o t at a ll
Unknown
V
Additional Comme n ts :
The C A P h as been es p e cially valua bl e i n thi s_ res p ect . R ecent exampl es
include assignment of · s t a ff to h e lp c o or dinate th e N ational A lliance of
Businessme n effort , bringing to gethe r dissident elements in a dis·pute
a t a tar g et - area h igh sch o ol , s ervi n g as a v e h icle t o bring t ogether
complaining tenant s a nd public housin g o ffi ci a ls .
�Page 2
QUEST1'1NNA IRE CAP
5.
Has the local Communi ty Action Program help e d to increase the lev e l of
resources which public and private institutions are contributing to thi
loca 1 War on Poverty~.,,
Very much
Somet,i hat
Not at ali
Unknown
Additional Co~men ts:
Activities of CAP have stimulated increased interest from foundations,
civic groups, and government .
6.
Has the local Community Action Program increased the will and the ability
of the poor to help themselves?
Very much
Somewhat
Not at all
Unknown
Additional Comments:
Poor have been helped to see that government will respond to th~'i r
needs, and many leaders have been developed who are now able· to articulate
and express the needs of the poor.
7.
Has the local Community Action Program hel_ped the non-poor to understand
better the problems of poverty and the need for local efforts to overcome
these problems?
/
Very much
Somewhat
Not at all
Unknown
Additional Comments:
Local support in Atlanta has been the best in the Nation, and much credit
eelongs to t he excellent interpretive effort made by the CAP. A current
example involves the designation of a week in January, 1969 as
"START NOW ATLANTA" week, prmzlaimed by the Mayor, and designed by the CAP
as a way to generate interest and activity: in the 11 non-poor 11 community.
How would you evaluate the effectiveness of each of the following programs?
8.
"
1.
HEADSTART:
Very effective
Somewhat effe ctive
Not a t all effective
Unknown
/
�QUE STI0}1NA IRE CI\P
Page 3
I
'
What pe rcen tage of the to ta l po t en t i a l enr ollment for this progr am
Unfor tunat ely only about 10%
is being me t in your commun ity?
Additioha l Comme nt s:
Thi s can be t he bes t long -range eff ort t o prevent pover ty, but it is
mamper ed by i nsufficient funds .
2.
LEGAL SERVICES PRO GRAM :
Very e ffective
X
Somewhat effective
Not at all effective
Unknown
What percentage of the total potential enrollment for this program
20%
is being met in your community?
Additiona l Commen ts :
Legal Aide keeps i ssues i n t he cour troom and of f the s t reet s . It
has been very hel pf ul in combatt ing ana chronistic welfare regulii ons
and bringing attention t o l andl ord-t enant a nd s eller-purc haser
laws which ar e i ni quitous t o t he i nter es t of t he poor.
3.
,_1·
HEALTH CENTERS:
X
Ve ry e f fe ctiv e
Somewhat effective
Not a t all e f f e ctive
Unknown
What pe rcentage of the tota l pot ential enrollme nt for thi s pro gram
20%
i s being met in you r community?
Additiona l Comments:
Comprehens ive Healt h Cent er rnakks the first r eal breakthrough
in developing new forms of delivery for heal t h servic es to t he
poor. ·
4.
NEIGHBORHOOD SERVI CE CENTERS:
Ve ry effective
X
Somewhat effec t ive
·Not at a 11 effective
Unknown
What percentage of the total potential enrollment for this progr am
is being me t in your communi t y?
75%
Additional Co~~:
These centers are a base for operations and meetings. They have
been used for almost every conceivable kind of acti.vity designed
to bring help and/or growth to the target areas served.
�I
Page 4
QUE ST IONN.'\ IRE CAP
5.
COMMUNITY A CT ION EMPLOYHE NT 1:'ROGRANS:
Very effective
Somewhat effective
X


Not at all effective
Unknown
What percentage of the total potential enrollment for this program
is being met in your community?
10%
Additional Comments:
Employment programs constantly run into difficult obstacles,
such as the shortage of good paying jobs for women, the shortage
of day care resource s , the difficilty of re-training the educational ly
crippled male and moving him beyond the low-wage , low-status jobo
6.
7.
Do you know of any better way to reach the hard core unemployed
than we are now doing under present programs?
(1) Further loosening of "red tape" which discourages businesses
from participation in government sponsored "on-the-job training 11
programs.
(2) For men and women with very low potential for training and/or
retraining, we need a "public works 11 type program. (Wi~.hin our CEP
we have an Atl. Beautifiaation Corps :w±±Y.r which exemp].if·ies what we need
Do you feel we are assigning proper priorities to the most urgent but it is
problems of the poor? If not, pleas e indicate which problems you only a
feel deserve the highest priorities.
small pro(l) Jobs (including public wovks)
gram for 60 per(2) Child De,'elopment
sons.)
(3) Community Acti on
Name
Project
D rector of Governmentjl
Address
Office of the Mayor
1aison
_Atlanta, Georgia
Affiliation with Community Action
Mayor's liaison representative to CAP agency
•'
�r
NEIGHBO RHOOD YOUTH CO RP S PROG RAMS
I,
I
(IN-SCHOOL, OUT-OF -SCJ-IOOL, and SUMMER)
The Neighb~rhood Youth Corps progra~s offer work to dropouts and
students of poor families, in the range of $1.25 to $1.60 per hour.
1)
Is NYC needed in your community?
Very Much___X_________
Somewhat
Not at all

Unknown
Additional Co~me nts:
Provides dire ct work expcEience for the group which has the highest
unemployment r ate in our c ommuhity .
2)
Have the services per formed by NYC enrollees been of value to the
corr,m unity?
Very much____X_________
Somewhat _____________
Not at all____________
Unknown_____________
Additional comme nts:
Host agencies complain bitterly if their alloca.tion of NYC enrolle,es is cut.
We have more requests for NYC workers than lie can fill.

3)
If your community has an NYC out-of-school program, does the project
make a strong effort to prepare enrollees and place them into regular
employment?
Strong effort__x________
Moderate
--- ----- -----
No
out-of-school program____
No effort____________
Unknown_ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ __
Additional comments: Many examples of movement from NYC to permanent employment,
but some youigs t ers are so badly crippled edl~ati onally and socially, they need
a stronger counselli ng a nd tra i ning eff ort ha~ NYC -'i s ·currentl.x_-?ble to give.
NAME
] 1 11 /L/
,
. J....,,_ ,___)
I)
ADDRESS
,..
D irect or of Gov e rnme nta l Liais on
Office of the Mayo r, i\tl anta , Ge or gi a
NYC AFFIL IATION ? M ayor~s lia i son represent a t ive
to CAP age ncy
NYC (out of sc hool) a llocat i on has been gradually reduced over the pas t
two y ears. We fee l this program has gr eat pract ical value a nd tremendous
implica tions for future development of youth, and rather tha n being reduced,
it should be expanded and s t r e ngthe ned.
�Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.
101 Mari etta Str ee t Bl dg . • Acl a nca , Georgia 30 30 3 •
T. M. P a rham
Exec uti v e Ad mini s t rato r
December 18 , 1968
TO ATLANTA CIVIC LEADERS:
People must constantly ask you, as they ask me, "What
can I do?" and "How can I find out what's going on?"
Because so many are asking these questions , we have
tried to provide new ways for them to learn first hand
about Atlanta's needs and to become personally involved
as volunteers.
In January many civic, religious and social groups
will join EOA in a START NOW ATLANTA campaign to alert
citizens to Atlanta's needs. The week of January 12 will
be proclaimed START NOW ATLANTA week .
I hope that y our organization will be able to participate by planning special programs, visiting Atlanta's
slums as guests of poor people, or by volunteering as a
group or as ind i viduals .
I am enclos i ng brief background ma terial plus
information abo u t two p r ograms which will be introduced
during START NOW ATLANTA week.
Please l et me know i f I c an suppl ~ othe r information.
Jim Pa rham
Admi ni s tra t o r
�Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.
101 Marietta Street Bldg . • At la nt a, Georgia 30303 •
T. M. Parham
Ex ec uti ve Administra tor
TWO NEW EOA PROGRAMS FOR ATLANTA ' S CITIZENS
Because so man y: people ask "What can I do, " and "How can I
find out what ' s going on," EO A is offering two programs to help
them learn first hand end to be~bme inv6lved.
The week of January 12 will be proclaimed START NOW ATLANTA
wee~to alert citizens to the cit y' s needs and to introduce the
two programs .
l .
FIND OUT
One program is run by pov ert y area resider.ts who want to show
other Atlanta n s what progress t h e y have made in t r1eir neighborhoods
and what obstacles they still face.
Twenty-two residents have
volunteered to lead tours through their neighborhoods.
They call
themselves V. I. P. ' s or Vol un teer I nf ormation People, and are
members of EOA neighborhood self help groups in 14 low income areas
served by EOA neighborhood centers.
One of the V. I. P. ' s described their purpose this way:
if we I re tired of them pe o ple coming through here
shaking their heads about the rats and garbage
and nasty shacks and not seeing us .
Since we
learned how, we 1 ve did more for ourselves than
an y one have did for us and we're going to do
more.
we're people too .
Some of us have a lot
of talent.
After we get off our jobs, we spend
most of our hours work i ng to make our neighborhoods
better. We want to talk with people who come
t h ro u gh here.
Ma y be if we work with eacn oth er
we can get rid of this load.
It ain ' t good for
none of us . "
Groups or individuals interested in scheduling visits to
poverty areas should call 525-4262 .
For further information contact:
Mrs. Mary Lu Mitchell
Director of Pub lic Information
Economic Opportunit y Atlant a, I nc .
101 Marietta Street, N. W.
Atlanta , Ge or g ia 30303
Telephone: 525 - 4 262
�~ - - -- --
- - -- --
-
-
- - - -- - --
- --
-
-
- --
-
,,
- 2-
II.
VOLUNTEER
The other program prov ides new v olunteer jobs for Atlantans
who want to help po v erty area residents remove the obstacles t h e y
still face.
In t h e past volunteers h a v e been used to supplement professional staffs.
This rich resource of skill, enthusiasm and
ability has not been full y u ti liz ed.
EOA will offer sensiti v ity training and coordination for:
1.
Vo lunteers wno want spec if ic assignments at agencies
or centers.
2.
Volunteers who are innov ati ve eno u g h to develop
t h e ir own programs.
3.
Volunteers who wa n t to work in partnership wi t h
block groups in a low in come area.
4.
Volunte e rs wh o wa n t to work wi t h t h eir own friends
and neighbors in c hanging attitu des a nd stu d y ing
specific probl ems .
The first training program wil l be condu cted by th e Mult iPurpose Training c enter on Januar y 22 ,23, and 24.
Groups or indi vi duals interested in vo lunteering s hou ld ca l l
525-4 2 62.
F or further information contac~:
Mrs. June Sa mmons
Vol un teer coordinator
Economic Oppor tunity Atlan ta , Inc.
101 Marietta stree t , N. w.
Atlanta, Georgia
30303
Telephone: 525-42 6 2
�Backgr.:::; ,rnd intormation for:
START .NOW ATLANTA
Atlanta, the capital of the Southeast, is known for its
growing economy, beautiful homes and fine universities. For most
of its citizens Atlanta offers growth, vitality and prosperity.
But for 160,000 Atlantans this is not true. They live in
40,000 unfit dwellings in neighborhoods with names such as Vine
City, Cabbagetown, Lig h tning, Summerhill, Mechanicsville and
Buttermilk Bottom, only minutes from downtown Atlanta, but decades away from the mainstream of Atlanta's progress.
The social, economic and ethnic character of Atlanta 1 s population is undergoing profound change. Middle-class families are
moving to the suburbs, leaving behind in the central city area an
increasingly large concentration of unemployed, underemployed,
poorly educated, low-income families.
Some of the residents of the central city are long-time hard
core slum dwellers. Added to this group are thousands of rural
"in-migrants" who move to Atlanta yearly from surrounding states.
Crowded into deteriorating housing and alien surroundings, the
newcomers from deprived rural areas join the residents of the central
city in a lonely, miserable existence characterized by restricted
opportunities and despair. Most are unskilled. Many are illiterate, lacking the most basic skills in reading, writing and
arithmeti~. Many are unable to fill out job applications , read
street or bus s igns, or follow written work instructions. F inding
no work and little hope, the family unit disintegrates as individuals break and flee or fathers move out to allow their families
to qualify f or public assistance. Desertion, divorce, crime, delinquency, unemployment and dependency . follow.
Who are the poor in Atlanta?
They are young men , like the 21 y ear old holding two jobs,
neither pa y ing more than $1.25 an hour, to support h is wife and
four chi ldren. A loan company is now thr e aten i ng to garnishee his
wages because he missed payments on m9ney borrowed to buy Christmas
toys for his children. One of his ch i ldren had pneumoni a. Tremedicine and additional coal to heat his room~ took all he had .
The poor are wome n, like the 33 ye ar old mother supporting
three ch i ldren.
She ea rns $2 8 .00 a week and pa ys $1 2. 00 a week
rent on th ree rooms. She must
lea ve her children alone at home
while s h e works because there are no free da y care centers near
her neighborhood.
The poor are old, like the 76 yea r old man l ivin g a lone i n
one room, ex±sting on canned tomato juice and wieners which a
neighbor brings every six or seven weeks. He is paralyzed. No
one else ever comss to see him.
The poor are parents, l ike the mother and father struggling
to feed eight chi ldren . The fa ther drove a garbage truck for a
private firm where his take home pay was $58 . 00 a week. Sometimes
he slept in the truck when he mi ssed the one ride that took him
near his home, some 18 miles away . One night a policeman came there
to tell him that his 8 month old daughter had died of malnutrition
�-2-
that afternoon. The ma ~ is ~ow blind. He ~o lon ger watches his
oldest son draw beautiful pictures --- a son who will never have
a chance to dev elop this talent because he must quit school and
feed his famil y .
Who are the people living in Atlanta ; s slums?
A study of 4 7 ,000 people, 1 6 t h rough 75 years of age, living
in poverty neighborhoods served by EOA centers, found that:
More than 2/3 of all unemployment in t h e Atlanta Metropolitan
area is concentrated in these low-income areas.
77%
52%
82%
57%
7%
12%
11%
22%
earned less than $3,000 a y ear.
of all hou seholds were headed b y women.
were Negroes.
of the adu lts d id not g raduate from high school.
h ad n o formal ed ~cation .
needed medical aid to remove a work handi cap.
claimed no job skill , or only farm work as exper ience.
of the whites and 25% of t h e Negroes were seeking work.
Of t~ose seekin g work,
75% were women.
65% of all seeking work were Negro women.
34% of the white women and 30% o f the white men desired
additional vocational trainin g .
75% o f the Negro women and 6 1% o f the Negro me~ wanted
add i tional vocatio~al training.
The need for jobs, or better jobs, isa major topic of conversation in Atlanta's slums. The EOA centers are in daily contac t
with thousands who do not earn e nough to support th e ms e l ve s and
the ir famil ies b e ca u s e t hey ar e un e mploy ed, und e remploy e d or und e rpaid. Sev enty -two percen t of all people coming to EOA ne ighborhood
centers want jobs , t h ough most need many other EOA services before
they are prepared for stea dy e mployment . ~
At th e s ame t i me, Atlanta employe rs beg for people with the
skills th ey ne e d to run th e ir bus i n es ses.
Un e mp l oyment was t e s bo t h h uman a nd e conomic
pote nt i al. At
the lowest lev el, each man-y ear of unemploy ment costs t he economy
at least _$2,500-.~3,000_ in lost wages or products. I f the per capita
income o f t he h ard core un e mploy ed in Atlanta could be ra i sed just
$100 e ach ye a r durin g a working l ife time, th ere wou l d be an a d d iti ona l $28 mi l lion i n jected i nto t h e economy .
If t h a t in come c o u l d be
rais e d to t h e i n c ome l eve l of t h e ave r age Atl anta n, Atlanta b u sine s s
wou l d b ene f it f rom an a d ditiona l $4 5 0 mi ll ion o f purch as i ng powe r .
Tr. e se ar e just the extra - earning bene fits. Add to th i s t h e
mill ion s s aved on welfare (be t ween $75 ,000 - $ 100 , 0 00 to suppor t
a fami l y durin g a l i fe t ime ) , u n e mp l o ymen t p a y ments, crime ( some
$ 2 , 50 0 p e r y e a r to k eep a man in ja i l), an d hund red s of agen c ie s ,
serv ices and programs a i med at d e aling wi th or elimi n a t ing th e se
�prob l ems , and t h e figure would probab l y double or trip l e .
Part of the cit v 's recent Commun it y Improvement Prog ram
s tud ,, dea l t wit h ~1 o b s -- :-,ow ma ri \' t :1ere a re L "' certa i~-: c a t egar ie s a , d pro j ectioc, s of ~,.;b at t '. - _ e si L :a tio n will b e i n t l-: e
y ear 1983 if prese n t tre nds continue .
For examp l e , by
fo u r of e v er y ten n e w j o bs will be
in t he Cit y of Atlanta .
i f present tre n ds con ti n~ e , t h ese new jobs will b e divided
amo::g g o v er :-: me n t , fi 11 a ;~ ce, i"s c.1 ra,-,ce a u d re a l estate - w;, i te
c o lla r jobs .
None of the new jobs will be in manufactur i ng or i n who l e s al e t r ade and dis t ri bu tio '- .
It is necessar y to look a t po p u l at ion fi gu res f rom t h e same
re por t to see h ow t h ese trends will affect Atlunta .
By 1983 the Ne g ro popu lation will i n crease b y 62 percen t,
the whi t e pop u .::.ation b y four percent . Well ove r "alf bf tlle cit y ' s
population will be Negro an d more t han half of t he Neg r o p opu l ation
wil l be under ?O or o v er 54 .
Over 40 perce n t of t h e Negro fami li es
livi Dg in t h e city i n 198 3 are expected to ~ ave annual f~mil y in come s b elow $ 5 , 000 .
1
TO SUM UP , t h ese CIP f i g ures s h ow t h at:
FlRST , Job growth will be i n wh ite co l lar o ccupatio ~s.
NEXT, pop ul ation will cons i st of people unqua l ified for
~h i t e c o lla r jobs, by c u rre ~ t s t and ar d s .
NEXT, d own t o wn ret a ilin g wil l h e sup p o rt ed ~ ~· a pr epo n d e ra nce of fami lies wi t 1: po v erty - le v el i .·c:nnes,
and
f'I~~ALLY , Atlar;ta · s g ro wt. ~, p o L_e11 tia l wil.]. o e impossi b le
to realize unless established trends are c hanged.
This g ap between ric h and poor is affecting Atlanta at ever y
le v e l .
The extent of the gap comes as a shock to most.
A recent study of social blight in Atlanta b y- our Communit y
Council s how s the disparity clearly .
Th e Council found tha t if ~-o·-1. live i ,_ o .:.e of Atlar, ta • s u p p er
in c ome areas y ou share an acre with six others; if y ou live in a
downtown slum y ou share an acre with 56 others.
The council found that a baby born to sl u m pare ~ t s ~ as o ~ l y
h alf t 'J e c 1:' a n ce of s u r v i vi u g as an infant in the highest income
areas .
The tuberculosis rate is five times higher among slum adults
than for ad u lts on the Northside.
Th e same trend follows in juvenile delinque n c y accordin g to
t h e Co ur; cil .
In Vine Cit y t he juv enile arrest rate is si x times
higher than in Buckhead.
J uv e n ile pr ob lems ~re complex.


'~" : · ·;c=:t :,,· se v ere deprivation, children represent one of the


greatest tragedies of poverty .
The c y cle of pub l ic dependenc y
and failure repeats itself a s the y grow up little bet ter equipped
than their pare ~ ts t o cope wit ~ t ~e dema nd s of urban lif e .
~
�-4-
Man y of th e c hildren li ve in broken homes. One ou t of four
children in At lanta live with only one parent.
In ou r slums the
figure would be mo re like one - ha lf t o two -thirds . Mo st of t hes e
parents work.
Tho se who e a rn l ittle cannot a fford da y care and
the EOA and United Appeal centers for poor children can handle only
i,200~ The rem a ining 12,00 0 c h il d ren h av e n o w~ ere t o go .
Often
they are left alo n e at home or i n tne str eets because p a rents
have no alternati v e. Troub le is ne ve r far away . One out of six
Atlanta y ouths wi ll b ecome j uv enile delinquents with in one y ear.
The school li v es of these children are marked b y poor attendance, low achieve ment and fail u re.
Th e y come from homes without
books, pencils or pri va cy. No a d J l ts are ~ailable to g u i d e and
encourage t he c n ildren.
The y are dulled by low protein diets.
Obviously the y cannot benefit from e v en t h e bes t education, if
available, unless some of t hese ~ eed s are co rrected.
I t mu st b e stre sse d t ~at p oor p are~t s care v er ~· de e pl y about
their c hildre n . Bu t t n e y can onl y d o what is pos s i b le, a nd that
is not muc r..
These are s o me of the serious and tr agic pro o lems confronting us.
Th e city go v ernment, Churches,United Appeal agencies and
other pu b lic and private agencies perform hundreds o f v i ta l services.
Th e ~' do a n ou tstandin g job .
The Nat ion a l Al liance of Bus in essmen u~ de r A . H. Stern e, t h e
Ch amb er of Commerce, t h e J aycees, and pri va te business are making
tremendous progress in opening jobs, changin g attitudes, and
training the unemplo y ed so the y can .b ecome part o f Atla n ta .
I n 1 96 4 the city and co un t y go v ernments pa v ed t h e way for
Atlanta to recei v e an t i - poverty f unds . Because o f t heir quick
action Atlanta recei v e d on e of t~ e first u r b a ~ g r a~ts u nder th e
Eco n omic Oppo rt unity Act of 19 6 4.
From t he ~eg i ~~ i ~g . Atlan ta ' s
antiJpov erty agenc y , Econ omic Opportun ity -Atl anta, o r EOA , ha s
been one of the outstanding programs in the c o un try . Mayor Allen
praises EOA ' s contrib u tion to the city and credits it with h elpin g
keep Atlanta peacefu l l a s t s u mme r.
Led b:/ Boisfe u illet Jo:-1 es as C~ airma ::. of t :-:. e Boa r d a :--"d J im
Par h am as Exec u ti v e Ad mi n istrator, EOA nas he lped th ousand s lift
themselv es out of pov erty .
.... During the past 12 months more t ha n 5,000
people h ave been placed on jobs b y e mp l o y ment
couns el ors in the 14 EOA neig hbo r hood centers ...
330 school dropouts were employ ed t h r ough the
Neighborhood Yo u t h Corps ... 80,000 :-:.o ~ rs of parttime wo rk were available for y ouths last summer
. .• 1 , 100 boys have been recruited for Job Corps
traini ng ... l,048 people h a v e rec ei ved emp lo y ment
�-5-
training . ..
... Twelve EOA day care centers have provided two-thirds
of all available "public" day care slots in Atlanta
(800 of approximately 1200JEOA neighborhood centers
helped poverty residents develop youth centers in
five neighborhoods with sparse recreational facilities . • . 2,300 children benefited from Head start .
... Legal services supported with Economic Opportunity
funds have successfully challenged antiquated welfare
regulations and given a new degree of equity to the
poor in their dealings with those who exploit their
ignorance ... the Comprehensive Health Center is providing preventi ve medical se r vi ces to 28,000 residents of one inn er-city slum ... Planned Parenthood
with a large share of
funds
from EOA is h elping
7,500 women t h roug h nine centers . .. Seni or Citiz en
Services, largely through EOA support, provides
counseling, recreat ion, training and tra nsportation
to 2,500 aged participants monthly. . . 4 0 senior
citizens work in the Foster Grandparents program
providing tender lov.ing care to c hildren at Grady
Hospital , t he Fulton Juvenile court and Carrie Steel
Pitts Home .
. . • Aides in 14 EOA neighborhood service ce.n ters have
contacted 25,596 poor persons during t h e past 12
months .. • 15,7 6 3 requests were received for social
services .. • total attendance at mor e than 2,000 neighborhood meetings during the past 12 months was 124,
260 and provided a badly n eeded means of expression
and communication for t h e poor . .• count less acts of
kindness have he lped relieve- immed iate distress.
The anti-poverty program ha s don e much more .
I t h as demon strated th e success of the first really new idea in social welfare
since 177 6. That new idea a mounts to one little preposition, but
it has revoluti6nized old methods . In stead o f doing things FOR
and TO poor people, EOA has shown t h e success o f workin g WITH people
to help them solve their own problems . EOA is not another ha ndout program .
It simply offers opportunities for education, training, and services. And mo st i mportant of all, the poor help plan
e very program.
Some 200 neighborhood b lock clubs and their elected repr esentativ es to EOA commi ttees attest to the success of this idea. Since
19 64 the poor in Atlanta have spent mo re voluntee r hours t rying to
i mprove th e ir l ives than a ll other volunteers together.
The i mportance they attach to this n ewopportunity was shown l ast year when
12,000 poo r people, most of whom had never voted, came to crowded
�groce r y s tor es. ;__.a r .ce r s ,·,ops a11d ne ig, 1oo r 11ood ga t. n er in g places
to vo te for their representative s t o EOA committees .
Of c ou rse , n o one a r gues t h at th ese pr og rams n a v e o een
totall y s u ccessf li l.
Muc n na s oe en learne d , ~ : t we still face
to ugh probl ems s ucri as devel oping addi tional i~adership among
the poor . mot i va ting t he ha rd core unemplo yeL!, stretch ing limited dollars a nd u s ing t n em most effectivel y , c~an g ing detrimental policies an d law s , c ha nging per sonal a ttitudes and involv ing more of Atlanta 's cit izens in these effor ts _
Du ring EOA ' s past four y e a rs, $3 0 , 000,000 in federal mone y
ha s been made a va ilable t o h elp li ft thousands of Atlantans o u t
of pov erty.
On l y appro xima te l y $500 , 000 :,as oeen al located b y
o u r city and coun t y g ove rnments.
Fur t h er progress in sol v ing
Atlanta ' s problems will depend o n t h e interest of Atlanta ' s
citize n s.
Th e week of J·an u a .r y 1 2 .. a s k, een proc la imed ST.AR'!' NOW A'l'LA N'rA
week to ·..;. r g e At.lan t a;. ' s t o .:..ean~ a,.:,G,_: t.: o ... r ci ·t:.:- ' s pro cl ems, wh at
t r1e poor ·:-,a v e d o:ne for t :.e mse l. ,, es and w .at we ca c, do to :. elp
t n em.
BOA is read y t o l en ci a :.a nci .
'-.., roups or indi vi d u als wh o want
to v isit p overt y areas a s g u ests 0 £ p oo r peopl e or wno wa nt to
vo l u nteer in new wavs can do s o b y ca ll ing EOA at 5 2 5- 4262 .
�CITY OF A.TLANTA.
CITY HALL
ATLANTA, G A. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
IVAN ALLEN , JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Admini strative Assist ant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secret ary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison
MEMORANDUM
TO:
Dan Sweat
FROM:
J. H. Robinson
SUBJECT:
Meeting of the E. 0. A. Citizens Central Advisory Council
DATE: 12/23/68
r
( .
I
Dan, you will find enclos e d copie s of thing s that we r e
discussed that took place December 17, 1968 in the
Ald ermanic Chamber.
JHR :bt
�MEETING OF THE EOA
CITIZENS CENTRAL ADVISORY COUNCIL
CITY HALL~. ATLANTA, GEORGIA
DECEMBER 17, 1968
Svggested Agenda
I
II
III
IV
V
VI
Devotions
Adoption of Agenda
Minutes of the Last Meeting
Recommendations from Sub-Committees:
A.
Manpower
B.
Social Services
C.
Housing
D.
Education
E.
Health
F.
Transportation
G.
Home Management
H.
Follow-Through
Other Business
Adjournment~ Mizpah
�Legislative Re comme ndations of the Manpower Sub-Connnittee
c.c.A.c.
We recommend that both the State and City
A.
B.
C.
Establish a Public Employment Program which includes the following
features:
1.
Public work and beautification program for limited skilled,
unemployed persons in urban communities.
2.
New Care~rs programs in public departments.
3.
Establishment of sub- professional job categqries in the State
Merit System.
4.
Create a public advisory cormnittee to the Department of Labor .
Establish a Sk~lis Center designed to offer training, evaluation, and
placement to the unemployed in the urban centers of the State. Such
a center would :
1.
This center would accept persons with no prerequisites based on
education, training, income, etc.
2.
The center would have an advisory committee representing enrollees,
business, education, labor and community action programs.
3.
Such a center would deal specifically with the unemployment problems
of females by offering training, providing day care and developing
job placements for them.
Enforce nondiscrimination of all (city) state contracts set by any
department.
/
�RECOMMENDATION - SOCIAL SERVICES
SUB-COMMITTEE CCAC
December 16, 1968
The impending freeze of federal funds for Aid to Families with Dependent Children payments, effective July 1, 1969, will require
action by the State of Georgia.
We therefore urge our legislators
to make provisions for funds to make up for this lack of federal
assistance in this as well as any other area.
I
�Dec ember, 1968
I.
II.
The Department on Family and Children Services is called upon adjust
welfare grants so as to remove inequities in housing and maintenance.
This . adjustment will require legislative action:
A.
The Georgia State Legislature is called upon to increase the
standard budget allowance for shelter in Depar tment of Family
and Children Services grants throughout the state, and to
allocate the money necessary to fund these gran ts.
B.
Reasonable investiga tion of pr es en t system of paymen ts to determine basis for adjustm~nt.
The state laws should be awEnded to provide :
A.
Tenant participa.tion in :
1.
Policy~making, by enlargemen t of local housing authority
gover·ning bodie s to a llow for the tenant membership - Reduce
terms office from te n to thre e years.
2.
Manag ement
a.
Development of respe ct for te na nt organizations in an
advisory capacity; prohibition of turning off utilities
for non ~payme nt of rent.
b.
Establi shment of tenan t-review board to hear and investigate
complaints, recoromending disciplinary action in repetitious
cases; di sc iplinary a ction agai nst management upon 10 or more
written complaints filed with the tenan t association.
c.
App ointment of t enants to the ne x t vacancies from a
de mocra tically selected list of nominees.
d.
Appointment of resident pr oj e ct managers with authority
to ac t.
.,
B.
Democratic e l ections of officers in tenant assoc i a tions .
C.
Requireme nts for h ealth a nd s a nit a ti on to mee t the original goals
of pub lie housit!g f or te nan t f am:: l i es at the e xpense of the housing
authority and no i ncr ea s e i n r e~ts .
D• . Reorgani zat i on of evicti on proc edures to:
1.
2.
Allow si x days ins t ead of pre s ent four.
Removal of r equiremen t fo r doubl e i ndetD..nit y bond s where
�- 2 -dispossessory warrants are contested in court.
IV.
3.
Require that receipts be furnished tenants for all charges
including: warrant fees, utility bills, repairs, etc.
4.
Removal of Section 9-A and like provisions making
evictions purely discretionary with managers.
The officials and staff of public housing authorities are c~lled
upon to work for th e social goals recommended by the Housing
Assistance Administration March 22, 1968, including also:
A.
Respect for tenants as individuals and human beings .
B.
Sarne regulations and codes for public housing as exist for
private housing.
C.
Uniform requirements in regard to rules and elimination of
dues except as established by tenant associations.
D. Arrangement of office hours and facilities to suit convenience
of most tenants.
·
E.
Public announcements and advertising in regard to vacancies,
changes and possibilities for transfers, as well as, itemized
financial reports by housing authorities .
F.
Raising minimum income requirements for youth family members
to $600 before inclusion as family income for rent adjustments.
G.
Rents not to be increased on the basis of a child's income
for one year after high school graduation on the assumption that
he will be saving for future educational expenses.
I
�Citizens Central Advisory Council
Legislative Recommendation
of the
Education Sub-Committee
December 17, 1968
I.
The Georgia State Legislature is called upon to pass the following
amendments:
A.
At present the board of education candidate's fee is $900.00.
This large fee eleminates the possibility of grass root people
becoming candidateso
We recommend that the board of education candidate's fee be
r~duced to $25.00 in order to insure the possibility of all
persons being fostered the opportunity to run in the election.
B.
Several months ago the Department of Health, Education and Welfare
evaluated the school system of the United States and Georgia
rated forty-ninth.
In order to dissolve the education lag in Georgia, training
must start at an early ageo We therefore reccomend compulsive
kindergarten throughout the state.
C.
All tea~hers be placed in their major area of training.
D.
Funds be withheld until local boards of education comply with
the State Board of Education's requirementso
E.
Representatives to Boards of Education be elected by wards and areas.
F.
Textbooks be selected by the area ' superintenpent with advice of
community advisory committees.
�Recommendations from Health Sub-Committee
CCAC
1.
That Fulton County start a visiting nurse service for the many
elderly and bedfast who cannot get to Grady Hospital.
2.
That some decentralization of the health services now available
at Grady be undertaken to make them more accessible to people and
to attempt to ease the overcrowding there.
3.
Enforce the city code which requires that ambulances be staffed by
a doctor, a registered nurse, or a person with Red Cross First Aid
training. Extend the code to cover the couµties which do not have
these requirements.
I
�Citizens Central Advisory Council
Legislative Recommendations
of the
Transportation Sub-Committee
December 9, 1968
I.
The Georgia State Legislature is callgd upon to pass the following:
A.
Increase representation on the Rapid Transit Board.
B.
Revise the Rapid Transit program to meet the needs of the people.
C.
Offer new referendum to vote on rapid transit.
D.
Permit sale of stock to raise funds instead of increasing property
tak.
E.
Consider a payroll tax for rapid transit.
F.
Supply transportation for special schools (Headstart, Follow-Through,
and other schools that deal with mentally and physically retarded
children.)
I
�Reconnnendations from the Home Management Sub-Committee
CCAC
1.
we · ask that the State of Georgia establish a consumer protection agencY.
to gather facts and evidence against merchants of all types who
knowingly cheat and swindle customers with inferior merchandise, foods,
and hidden or unfair credit practices . That this agency make this
information available to consumers and use it, too, to advise Georgia
lawmakers of needed changes in state laws.
2.
That a law be passed requiring full, total, itemized and final credit
costs be written out immediately above the place where the consumer
must sign contracts, fbr loans, services, or goods. That these costs
also be read a1~ad to the buyer before he signs the contract.
I
�.
,,, .
Citizens Central Advisory Council
Legislative Recommendations
of the
Follow-Through Sub-Committee
December 10, 1968
I.
The Georg~a State Legislature is called upon to pass the following:
A.
Provide the Atlanta School System with an increase in
transportation allotment per child in order that the
children attending Headstart, Follow-Through and schdbls
dealing with the mentally and physically retarded can
travel to and from school safely.
I
�Citizens Central Advisory Council
Legislative Recommendations
of the
Follow-Through Sub-Committee
December 10, 1968
I.
We recommend to the Atlanta Board of Education that:
A.
Cross-walks be placed at strateg~c points withiri the FollowThrough school areas for the protection of the children.
B.
Patrol ladies be provided for these cross-walks; also these
ladies be hired from the target area of the connnunity.
�MANPOWER SUB-COMMITTEE RECO~.MENDATIONS
Although the nation in general and Atlanta in particular is
experiencing relatively high employment, the hard core poor, i.e.
the chronically unemployed require immediate and direct assistance.
These unskilled men and women who are currently unproductive and
therefore impose a heavy drain on welfare and other dependency
programs would prefer to be , ·e mployed and productive if given the
necessary training and/or work.
Therefore, we call upon our state representatives and city
officials to enact legislation which will:
A.
B.
c.
Establish a Public Employrne nt Program including the following
featur es :
1.
Public work and beautification program for limited s ki lled,
unemployed persons in urban communities.
2.
New Ca reers progrqms in public depar tments .
3.
Establishment o f sub p r ofess ional job categori e s in the
State Merit System.
4.
Cre a t e a public advi s ory committee to th e Department of
Labor.
Establi s h a Skills Center d es igned to offer training, eva luation,
and plac eme nt to the unemployed in the urban centers of the
St ate .
1.
This center would acc e pt p e rsons with no prerequisites
b ased on e du cation , training, income , e tc.
2.
The c ente r would ha ve a n advisory committee repres e nting
enrollees , business, education, l aboP and community action
progr ams .
3.
Such a c e nt e r wou ld d ea l spe cifica lly with the unemployme nt
probl em o f fem a l es b y offeri ng tr a ining, provi d ing day c are
and deve loping job placeme nts for them .
Enfo rce n ondi s cr iminat ion in a ll (city) and state contracts
l e t b y any d e p ar tme nt.
�---
-
SOCIAL SERVICES SUB-COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS
The most serious problem facing the poor in Atlanta and
throughout the state is the impending freeze of welfare assistance. The level of assistanceis already too low.
It
should be raised. But if it must remain at this low level,
at least continue this sole support for mothers with dependent children.
The Congressmen from Georg~a are urged to work for the
repeal of those provisions which would freeze AFDC at current
levels.
The proposed tax revision pos es a real threat to the
families o f th e poor throughout the state ..
The general sales and use of tax is the most regressive
tax .
It take s a far larger p e rce ntage of the poor man's
income than a rich man's, simply b ecause the poor man spends
a g reat d eal of his income on n e c ess ities .
If the General Assembly increas es the taxes wh ich ar~
regres~ive in·. nature, los s of purchas ing power would be a
crippl ing blow to the already low standard of living of t he
poor family .
We urge the Ge orgia Assemb l y to reject any pla n s which would
increase the tax burden of the poor in our state.
�!.
HOUSING SUB-COMM ITTEE RECOM!\ffiNDATIONS
The_Housing sub-committee of the Central Citizens Advisory
Council is concerned about the problems of welfare recipients
in public housing and public housing conditions in general.
This committee has studied these problems, met with welfare and
housing officials to discuss them and still has found no relief.
The minimum standards for welfare grants and the allowance for
shelter must
e increas ed .
- - b-I.
The Department of Family and Children Services is called
upon to adjust welfare grants so as to r emove inequities
in housing and maintenance. This adjustment will require
legislative action:
A.
The Ge orgia State Legislature is c alled upon to increas e the standard budget allowance for shelter in
Department of Family and Children Services grants
throughout t he state, and to allocqte the money nec essary to f und these grants.
.
We request and inve stiga tion bv the Le gisl ature o f
the present system of p ayments to d e termine basi,s for
adjustment.
.
B.
II.
The state laws should be ame nded to provide :
A.
Tenant participation in:
1.
We recommend that Tenants serve on policy-making
boards. Also we recomme nd the reduction o f the
terms of office of the housing authority membe rs
fr om ten to three y e ars .
2.
Management
a.
Developme nt of respe ct for tenant organizarions
in an advisory c a p a city ; prohibition o f turning
o ff utilitie s f or non-payme nt of r e nt.
b.
Establishme nt of t e nant-review board to 'hear
and investigate complaints, recomme nding di s ciplina r y a ction in r e p e titious c ases ; disc iplina r y act ion aga i ns t ma n agement u pon 10 or
more wr itten comp l ain ts f il e d wi t h th e ten ant
a ss ociat i on.
c.
Appointmen t o f t e n a n ts to the . n ext v acancies
on boar d s from a d emocrati cally se l ected
�-2-
list of nominees.
d.
III.
Appointment of resident from tenants as project managers.
B.
Requirement s for health and sanitation to meet the
original goals of public housing for tenant families
at the expense of the housing authority and no increas e in rents.
-C.
Reorganization of eviction procedures to:
1.
Allow six days instead of present four
2.
Removal of requirement for double indemnity bonds
where dispossessory warrants are contested in
court.
3.
Require that r e ceipts be frunished tenants for
all charges including: warrantees , utility bills,
repairs, etc .
4.
Removal of Section 9-A and like provision~ making
evictions purely discr etionary with managers.
The o fficials and staff o f p ublic housing authorities are
called upon to work for th e social goals r e comme nde d by
the Housing Assistance Administration March 22, 1968, including also:
A.
Respect for t enant s . as individua l s and human b eings .
B.
Same regulations and codes for public housing as exist
for private housing.
C.
Uniform requirements in regard to rul es and e limination
of dues except as e s tablished by tenant associations.
D.
Arrangement of of fice hours and facilities to suit
convenience of most tenant s .
E.
Public announcements and adve rtis i ng in r egard to
vacancies , cha n ges and possibilities for transfer s ,
as we ll as , itemiz e d fi n a n c ial r epor ts by h ousing
authorities.
�-3-
F.
Raising minimlli~ income requirements for youth family
members to $600 before inclusion as family income
for rent adjustments.
G.
Rents not to be increased on the basis of a child's
income for one year after high school graduation on
the assumption that he will be saving for future
educational expenses.
�EDUCATION SUB-COIVll\1I TTEE RECOM.iYlENDATIONS
The Educati on Comm ittee of t h e Cen tral Citizen s Ad v isor y
Council has disc u ss ed many issues o v er the past year . We
ar e concerned that the rece n tl y passed Schoo l Board Issue be
carefully inspected and mon it o r ed t o se e t ha t the highe st
prioriti e s will be th os e ar e as in g reate st n e ed . We i n te nd
to watch the Schoo l S -y stem
on this Bo ard Issue.
I

Futh ermore, we r ecolme nd :
1.
I
The Geo rgia State Legisl a t u re is called to pass the
i:ollowing amendr'.le n ts:
1, .
At pres ent t h e b oard of e d uca tion candidate's fee
is $900.00 .
This lar g e f ee eliminates the p ossib .:.. .ity
o f grass r oo t peop l e be ~om i n g c a n d idat e s.
We r ec ommend that t he board of educ a tion ca n di da t e 's
fee b e re duce d to $25.00 in or d e r to ins u re the
possibil i ty of all person s be i ng f o ster ed th e opportuni t y
t o run in th e election .
, b.
Several month~ ago the Depar t me nt o f Health , Education,
and Welfare e v a l uated t he s ch o o l s y st ems of t1, Uri .i t ed
S t ates and G~or g ia r ated fo r ty- n i n t h.
0
I n ~ r~e r t c } issolve the educa tion ~a g in Ge o rgia,
t r ai n ing me ;~ start at a~ e arly a ge. We t here f ore
rLc omm enO col pulsory- ·Kindergard n th r oughout tha State .
c.
All t e 22h2- ~ ,b ? ~l ~ ~ed i n their major a rea of train i ng.
I
I
d.
e.
f.
Funds be wi thhe ld unti l loca l bodrds o f edu c at i on comp l y
wi t h the Stat e Board of Eau c ation' s r equir2ment s .
. . I
.
Representat i ves to Boards of Edu c a t i o n be ele c ted by
wards an6 are.as.
Te x t b o oks be s e lect ed by the area s uper i ntendant with
a dv i ce of community advi s ory committees.
I
�HEALTH SUB-COMMITTEE RECO.MJ.'1ENDATIONS
The most critical problem facing many of the poor is the
absence of health services. Before an individual can hold a
job or keep one he or she must have good health. Our older
people require better health services and the very young in
poor families. Existing health services meet only a fraction
of the need of poor people.
We recommend:
1.
That Fulton County start a visiting nurse_service for
the many elderly and bedfast who cannot get to Grady
Hospital.
2.
That some d e c e n t ralization of the h e alth services
now availabl e at Grady b e unde rtak e n to mak e them
more accessible to people and to attempt to ease
the ove rcrowding there.
3.
Enfor c e the city code which r e quir e s that ambulance s
b e staf fed b y a doctor, a r egis tered nurs e , or a p e rson wi t h Re d c~6ss First Aid tra ining. Extend the
code to cov er the counti e s which do not have requirements.
�TRA..~SPORTATION SUB-COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS
The poor recognize as does the general public the need for
transportation. In fac~, the poor lives with this recognition
each day as we leave our homes in the early hours of the morning
and return lat e in the evening. It is we who are forced to use
public transportation and who are sometimes prevented from seeking
better jobs because of the lack of transportation. We want better
transportation, even Rapid Transit, if it planned in such a way
th at our needs a r e met just like the other groups i~ the a re a .
1.
The Ge orgia St ate Legislature is c alled upon to pass the
following:
a.
Increase representation on the Rapid Transit Bo ard .
b.
Revise the Rapid Transit program to mee t the needs o f
the poor p e ople .
c.
Offer new referendum to voters on rapid transi't.
d.
P2 rmit sal e s of s t ock to r a is e fun ds instead of
increasing property tax .
e.
Consider a p ayroll tax for Rapid Transit.
f.
Supply tr ansp or t ation for special schools (He adst a rt ,
Follow-Through, and othe r schools that de a ls with
me nt a lly i l l and physically r e t ard e d childr e n ) .
�HOME MANAGEMENT SUB-CO~t~ ITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS
The Poor are often the prey of unscrupulous merchants or
salesmen. Exorb1tant interest rates on items purchased or
inferior quality 6f goods and services are frequently found
in our low income n e ighborhoods. These practices must be stopped.
1.
We ask that the State of Georgia establish a consumer
protection agency to gather facts and evidence against merchants of all types who knowingly cheat and swindle customers with inferior merchandise, foods, and hidden or unfair
credit practices. _That this age ncy make this informa tion
avail ab le to cons ume rs a nd u se it, too, to advis e Ge or gia
Lawmak e r s of needed change s in state laws.
2.
That a law b e passed r e quiring full, total, itemized and
final c red it costs b e written out imme diately above the
place wh e r e t he consumer ·mu st s ign cont racts, for loans,
s e rvic es , o r goods . That th ese cos t s al s o b e r ead al oud
to th e buy er b e fore h e signs the contract.
.J
�FOLLOW-THROUGH SUB-COMMITTEE RECO.MivIBNDATIONS
I.
The Georgia State Legislature is called upon to pass the
following:
A.
Provide the Atlanta School System with an increase
in transportation allotment per child in order that
the children attending Headstart, Follow-Through
and schools dealing with the mentally and physically
retarded can travel to and from school safely.
B.
Cross-walks be placed at strategic points within the
Follow-Through school areas for the protection of
th e children.
C.
Patrol ladies be provided for these cross-walks;
also th ese ladies be hired from the target area of
- the community.
�r
1
Econo m ic 'Op·portunit)l A tlanta,
jg_~-- ~
101 \ b.r ie cca Screec Bldg.
• ,-\.cla~ca, Georgia 3030 3 • T elephone 688- 101 2
T . \ !. P arh ar.c
E xeci..;c i ·: e .-\.Jninis : :-.=.::: u :
November 8 , 1968
'
ME. Boisfeu i llet Jone s
Chairman
EOA Board of Directors
210 Peach tre e Center Building
230 Peachtr e e Street, N . W.
Atlanta , Ge orgia 30303
Dear Mr. J ones :
A ttac:1 '.::d 1s a sheet f :.:-om t11e week ly Economic Opportunity
Report fo ~ t h i.~ w~~k no t i ng ~h at Mr . Dav id-Ro c k fe lle r is
urging busi~c~J t o l,bb f or
Con sidering t ~e r esu lt s
this week , it wo d s e e m adv i s a b l e th t
bus i nes s comrnu _ i t y -.,/ho b e l ieve th at " wa r on pove rty " prog rams
h ave had po t i ve effec ts s hou l d o w beg i n a n e f fo t t o s tress
the d es i rability of the i r c ontintance . Such an e fort would
no t h ave to be a blan~et e n dors ement o f a ll c ur . ent ac t ivities
b ut ~ crnld e 1;1phas ize t;1e ma i n ~hr u st of c~eat i
opportunity and
re~ ing un necessary obs ta c les to s o cia l _~ nd -~uman gr owth .
• As y ott knc ·,..rriE.se p r og·rams h a ·,le in t h e past f o ur years
brought thirty mi l lion dol l ars in fed era l gra:,t s to the At_anta
co!11.r.'lunity . Our socia l prob l ens have not been e limin ated but
many need ed programs , too costly for l ocal resou rce s , have been
made possible :
... SJOO j ob pla cements ha ve been made during
t he past twe l ve months through EOA Ce n ters .. .
330 Neighborhood Youth Corps slots were availa b l e fo r school dropouts .. . 8 0, 000 hours of
o.


�I
I
Mr. Boisfeuillet Jones
-2-
November 8 , 1968
part- cime work were a v ailable ~or youngsters
in t he summer prograrn ... 1100 boys hav e been recrui ted this y ear for J ob Corps enr ollment ...
1048 persons were enrolled in ACEP training
programs ... EOA staff positions prov ided 350 jobs
for reside nts of target neighborhoods .
I
... OEO-EOA \funds supported twelve day care
centers pr 9viding t wo - thirds of all available "public" da.Y car e slots available in the
c om.uunity (800 of approximately 1200) ... EOA
Neighbo·rho~d Centers helped de v elop five youth
c enters in neighborhoods with sparse recreational
facilities . . . a number of low income youngsters
"b.e1ve been g 'iven otherwise unattainable educa.tional
opportunit y ; through th~ Upward Baun~ Program ...
2300 children recei ve d the benefits of Summer
Head St art Progra ms .
I
· e s h a v e success ... OEO-EOA suppor
te d 1 ega 1 ser v ic
full y ch a lle nged antiquated welfare regulations
and gi ven a ne w d eg ree of equity· to the poor in
their deali ngs wi th thos e who exploit their
i a no rance .. ~the Comoreh e ns ive Health Center will
provide a badly n ee ded ~xper i me nt jn deliv e r y of
preven tive Jed ical s e r v ices to 28,000 resi dents
of an inn~r city slurn . .. the Emp loyment Eva lua t ion
Center, now operated by Georg ia Vocational Re habili tation Agency and a valuable part of the
city's e m~ l Q ab ili ty effort , got its start with
a two million dollar grant fro m 020 .. . Planned
.?arentnoo
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. \ s er v ing
.
7500 women i. n nine
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c en ters
with a l arge share of t he fun ds from EOA ...
Seni or Citi zens Serv i ce , largeli ~h rough EOA
supp ort , pro~ id es counselling, r ecreat io~. train~
ing, and tr ahsportat ion to 250 0 a g ed participants
monthly ... fo~ty senior citizens work in ~he Fo s t er
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Mr. Boisfe uillet Jc~es
Nover;i.ber 8 , 1 968
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Gra ndpare~ts P=ogra2 providirg te~der lo v ing
care to children at Gracy Hospital , the F u lton
Juvenile Court , and Carrie Steel ?itts Horae .
... Aides i n fo u rteen Neighborho od Service
Centers cont a ctei 35,596 ?ersons ~uring the
pas t t ~elve mo~ ths .. .. 15, 763 new reque sts
were recei ved ~or ~ocial se r v ice 2s s istanc e .
tota 1 2 t te:--J:::.2.r..::e 2 t r-.ore than 2000 cor:i..cc\u n i t y
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e xpr. e ss i c;:-: a:-:d co;-:-_--:1un i ca ti on f or the poor ...
co untle ss= ~~ = of k i ndness h a ve hel8ed re li eve
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Of . c ourse , no on~ argues that these ·prcgrams have· been cer -fect ec.
Mu .:::1 h::,s bee::-: lea r:--,ed , n ut ,,_ce a re -== ti 11 grao8 l ir.c c.a i l ,·
with such to ug~ questions as develc9ing l ea~2 rship anong ~he
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the hard core cnecploye ~. stretch ing li mite~ do ll ars and u si~g
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is that many t~ings, tangible and intang i~le, have bee~ ac:1.ie ~ ed
that h2. 1e :-r.2:.::: e t h is co:-f'.r:-__:nity a better pl22-2 to li ve .
It is
har d to i:-::-,a; i:1 2 soins bac~ to 2 tiwe when s~ch prosra r:i. s were
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no t p ass i:::i le , bet:. l r :::;ecerc. l f uncir.g ls s ev2::-e ly C.lE\L. is1'..ec.
the prosrans ~i ll be irapossible to contin u e _ Durins these f our
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b een alloc 2 c2c ~ y cic y a~d co un t y go v er w7 2n~s .
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T. M.
J i m P arh am
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Ex ecu ti ve A~.in istra tor
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A.E. St e r n e
Mr. Brad l e y Cur ~ey
Mr. Al bert J. Bcws, Jr.
~r. Curt is Dri s~ e ll
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  1. http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_013.pdf

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