Box 3, Folder 14, Complete Folder

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Box 3, Folder 14, Complete Folder

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ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY ATLANTA, INC.
101 MARIETTA STREET BLDG.
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303
Miss Ann Ingram
Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.
101 Marietta Street Building, N. W.
Room 600
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
�\ \
EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
OFFICE .OF ECONOMIC
WASHINGTON , D.C. 20506
Clllll(JI I lJNITY
July 11, 1968
Mr. Dan Sweat
Director of Governmental Liaison
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Dan:
Attached you will find a brochure which will give you
some idea of the Job Corps art exhibition entitled
"A Chance To Be Somebody". As I mentioned on the
phone, the exhibition began January 18 in New York
City at the Time-Life Building. After New York, the
exhibition hit Chicago, Minneapolis , Omaha , St. Louis.
And the schedule reflects that it will hit Atlanta
around August 15 . After Atlanta, it goes to Houston,
Los Angeles (with a show in Los Angeles and one in
the Watts section), Portland and Cleveland.
It is my understanding that Sc.ripto is the Atlanta
sponsor. And Mary Lou has the "scoop" on the whole
thing. Of course, Scripto will decide how many they
will invite to the opening but they invited 1500 in
New York. It was a swinging affair.
You mentioned the poor being invited on the phone. We
hope to in some way establish an ongoing program for
all segments of the Atlanta population to view the
exhibit while it is in the city. It will be there through
Labor Day . The opening is one way that we can pull in
the busines smen , civic leaders, art community, etc., so
that they can possibl1 have ideas about bringing other
people in after the opening.
I know that you will be contacted ab ou t this soon . And
I hope you can do what you can to make this opening a
success. 1 1 11 be down before too long and hope to see
you then.
Best regards always,
9~
��vocational skills
Job Corps vocational instruction is planned in steps so a Corps member can
enter employment after each level of training. However, each member is
urged to train in as many skill levels as possible to increase his employment
potential. Here are vocational skills taught by Job Corps.
AUTOMOTIVE
BUILDING SERVICES
CLOTHING SERVICES
COMPUTER OPERATIONS
COSMETOLOGY
CONSTRUCTION
EDUCATION & SOCIAL SERVICES
ELECTRICAL/ ELECTRONICS
FOOD SERVICES
GRAPHIC ARTS
HEALTH SERVICES
HEAVY EQUIPMENT
LANDSCAPE/ NURSERY
MACHINE TRADES
OFFICE & CLERICAL
OFFICE MACHINE REPAIR
RETAIL SALES
Here are sample comments received from employers:
INLAND STEEL CO., East Chicago, Indiana : Job Corps graduates currently
on our rolls have demonstrated good work abilities and habits. They · are
most cooperative and industrious, and reflect only credit on their training
in the Job Corps.
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS, INC., Attleboro, Massachusetts : We have but one
regret in hiring John- we wish we hired ten more like him . John is extremely well regarded and mixes very well with his associates.
Job Corps is the Office of Economic Opportunity's voluntary program of
human renewal and work readiness. To accomplish its purpose , Job Corps
seeks lo comp ensate youngsters for a childhood spent in social , economic,
and educational deprivation .
Job Corps teaches basic reading and mathematics skills to youth who
cannot read a simple sentence or solve a second -grade arithmetic problem .
Job Corps offers guidance to young men and women who genera Ily have
come from broken homes, with little in the way of adult supervision or
control.
Job Corps offers medical and dental care for its members-the majority
of whom have had no previous contact with a doctor or dentist.
Job Corps teaches vocational and employment skills to youth who not
only have never held jobs, but who also lack the ability to find jobs.
Job Corps teaches the importance of respect and responsibility to youth
who have become bitter and hostile as a result of their deprivation .
Job Corps shows young people that differences and problems are better
resolved by democratic processes than by viol ence.
Job Corps provides the alternative of productive and responsible citizen~h_ip for thousands who might otherwise have· known continued poverty ,
illiteracy, unemployment, and delinquency.
program
1. Untitled/ L~RRY ANGEL/ Honolulu , Hawaii/Vocation: Art
2. H1eroglyph1cs/ ARTHUR ARNOLD/ Pacific Grove, California
.
Vocation : Forestry
3. Untitled/ STUART ASHKANAZY/ Miami , Florida
. .
.
Vocation : Office Machine Repair
4. Sti ll Life/ MYRA BARNETT / Pittsburgh , Pennsylvania
Vocation: Key Punch Operation
5. Untitled/VI NC ENT CASCIO/ Boston , Massachusetts
Vocation : Clerical Skills
continued
STANDARD OIL COMPANY OF OHIO, Cleveland : If Miss P. is in any way
indicative of your training and the type of student Job Corps can produce,
you are to be commended . You are doing a very necessary and excellent job .
ST. MARGARET HOSPITAL, Kansas City , Kansas : J. is doing quite well.
Her job knowledge is good , her relationship with co-workers excellent. She
is neat and anxious to cooperate . If you have other trainees like J., I would
like to- hire tflem .
IBM, San Jose, California : We have employed 23 Job Corps graduates and
in general are quite satisfied . We feel that Corpsmen make good employees
and have a very good attitude toward their work and learning.
NATIONAL RESTAURANT ASSOCIATION, Chicago : The 16 boys we re ceived from Job Corps have all been placed in food service positions in
Chicago and suburban areas . All employers, as well as fellow workers,
show complete satisfaction with the boys' ability and eagerness to learn .
UNI -ROYAL INC ., Joliet, Illinois: Our experience in employing Job Corps
graduates has been excellent. They have made steady progress and in some
cases received promotions. They have impressed me with their cooperation
and willingness to abide by company rules and policies , and their desire to
succeed . They have intense loyalty to the Job Corps and show a determination to make good so the road might be easier for other graduates.
�vocational skills
Job Corps vocational instruction is planned in steps so a Corps member can
enter employment after each level of training. However, each member is
urged to train in as many skill levels as possible to increase his employment
potential. Here are vocational skills taught by Job Corps.
AUTOMOTIVE
BUILDING SERVICES
CLOTHING SERVICES
COMPUTER OPERATIONS
COSMETOLOGY
CONSTRUCTION
EDUCATION & SOCIAL SERVICES
ELECTRICAL/ ELECTRON I CS
FOOD SERVICES
GRAPHIC ARTS
HEAL TH SERVICES
HEAVY EQUIPMENT
LANDSCAPE/ NURSERY
MACHINE TRADES
OFFICE & CLERICAL
OFFICE MACHINE REPAIR
RETAIL SALES
Job Corps is a unique partnership of Federal, state, and local governments, of private enterprise , trade unions, universities, social agencies,
and community groups. The 93 Job Corps conservation centers are operated
on public lands by the U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Interior, and
by four states. The 28 urban and 3 special centers, located generally at
unused military bases or leased private facilities , are operated under
contract by 18 large companies , seven universities, Alpha Kappa Alpha
Sorority, The Texas Educalional Foundation , Inc., and the Young Women's
Christian Association . Job Corps trainees are helped to find jobs by the
U. S. Department of Labor, and the state employment services. Two
voluntary agencies, Women In Community Service (WICS) and Joint
Action for Community Service (JACS), help trainees adjust to community life and stick with their jobs. WICS also recruits for Job Corps,
as does the AFL-CIO .
1. Untitled/ LARRY ANGEL/ Honolulu , Hawaii/Vocation: Art
2. Hieroglyphics/ ARTHUR ARNOLD/ Pacific Grove, Californi a
Vocation: Forestry
3. Untitled/ STUART ASHKANAZY/ Miami, Florida
Vocation : Office Machine Repair
4. Still Life/ MYRA BARNETT/ Pittsburgh , Pennsylvania
Vocation : Key Punch Operation
5. Untitled/VINCENT CASC IO/ Boston , Massachusetts
Vocation : Clerical Skills
u
continued
Youngsters enter a residential, educational, and work-skill training
program that is without parallel in American education . At the 124 Job
Corps centers, the program includes : individual tutoring and counseling,
both formal and informal; trained staff to supervise and help enrollees 24
hours a day and on weekends; special new self-instructional materials to
help enrollees move along at their own speed; modern equipment, donated
by business firms, to teach modern vocational skills.
who comes to Job Corps?
Young men and women between the ages of 16 and 22, who are out of
school, unable to find an adequate job, and in need of a change of environment to become useful and productive citizens-these are the young people
who come to Job Corps.
Six of every 10 come from broken homes; 63 percent from homes where
the head of the household was unemployed; 60 percent live in substandard
housing; 64 percent have been asked to leave school; 80 percent have not
seen a doctor or dentist in 10 years. Only about 60 percent ever helcj a job,
full or part-time, and their average annual salary was $639. More than half
of the male recruits of draft age are unfit for military serv.ice for educational
or health reasons.
A youngster entering Job Corps has a reading and math ability of about
fifth grade, on the average, even though he or she has completed nine years
of school. More than 30 percent of new enrollees cannot read or write.
Most enrollees have never slept between sheets, never shared a bedroom
with only one other. Some have never had electric lights. Almost all have
developed an acute resistance to conventional schooling.
For every 10 months spent in Job Corps, the average youngster gains one
and one-half grade levels in reading, and almost two grade levels in
mathematics. Similar gains are made in vocational training.
Job Corps members grow accustomed to early rising, to regular hours,
to daily exercise and sports. They learn how to get along with all kinds of
people- both in Job Corps, and outside. They develop good work habits
and a new sense of responsibility . They find direction, a "way to go."
Job Corps is the Office of Economic Opportunity's voluntary program of
human renewal and work readiness . To accomplish its purpose, Job Corps
seeks to compensate youngsters for a childhood spent in social , economic,
and educational deprivation .
Job Corps teaches basic reading and mathematics skills to youth who
cannot read a simple sentence or solve a second-grade arithmetic problem .
Job Corps offers guidance to young men and women who generally have
come from broken homes, with little in the way of adult supervision or
control.
Job Corps offers medical and dental care for its members- the majority
of whom have had no previous contact with a doctor or dentist.
Job Corps teaches vocational and employment skills to youth who not
only have never held jobs, but who also lack the ability to find jobs.
Job Corps teaches the importance of respect and responsibility to youth
who have become bitter and hostile as a result of their deprivation.
Job Corps shows young people that differences and problems are better
resolved by democratic processes than by violence.
Job Corps provides the alternative of productive and responsible citizenship for thousands who might otherwise have· known continued poverty ,
illiteracy , unemployment, and delinquency.
program
what happens in Job Corps?
where do they go from Job Corps?
In its first three years, Job Corps has touched the lives of 165,000 young
people . Otthe 124,000 who have gone through the program , 70 percent are
making constructive use of the education and training they received in
Job Corps. Over 69,000 have taken jobs, earning an average of $1.70 an
hour; 10,600 have gone back to school or on to college; and 8,800 are
serving in the armed forces .
Among the present employers of Job Corps trainees are Campbell Soup,
Western Electric, Chrysler, Ford, Avco, Lockheed , Sears, Honeywell ,
General Electric, Liberty Mutual, United Air Lines, DuPont, Cessna Aircraft, Continental Baking, Safeway, Burroughs, IBM, ITT, Consolidated
Edison, AMPEX, General Motors, Uni-Royal.
These paintings are by-products of what many consider the most significant
function of Job Corps : setting free the individual's basic ability to learn . They are
by Corps members from all over the country, young men and women training for
many different kinds of jobs.
To become independent and responsible citizens in today's society , Corps
members must first learn to understand and appreciate themselves and the
world about them . In Job Corps they have this chance through a broad spectrum
of learning experiences, including art. An elective activity, Job Corps' art
program has helped develop bright new confidence in thousands of young people
by giving them their first sense of accomplishment. This exhibition is tangible
proof of what can happen when creative and learning capabilities are unlocked .
Sixteen of the private organizations which operate Job Corps centers under
contract to OEO have made this ~xhibition possible.
They are:
Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority
Avco Corporation
Brunswick Corporation
Burroughs Corporation
Delta Education Corporation
General Learning Corporation
International Business Machines Corporation
International Telephone & Telegraph c·orporatlon
Northern Natural Gas Company
Packard Bell Electronics Corporation
Philco-Ford Corporation
Radio Corporation of America
Training Corporation of America
U. s. Industries, Inc.
Westinghouse Electric Corporation
Xerox Corporation
�contributions to the nation
Even while training, Job Corpsmen are contributing to national betterment.
In improving the Nation's forests, parks, and grasslands, they have performed conservation work worth $38,000,000 to the Nation. Corpsmen have
built and maintained 4900 miles of roads, thousands of picnic tables,
fireplaces and parking spaces. They have developed and improved 76 miles
of fishing streams and 16,500 acres of fish and wildlife habitat. They have
planted 15,900 acres of trees and shrubs, and improved and reforested
12,800 acres of timber.
Forty-four young men at a Job Co,ps center near Oakland, Calif.,
all found Jobs in the same company last week-as U.S. Army
paratroopers. T he 44, nearly all from poor f amilies, volunteered as a
unit, and have been assigned to a special platoon at Fort Lewis,
W ash.,jor basic training. Probably because of their stint at the Job
Corps center, they averaged several points higher than the norm on the
induction test. W ithout that added education, said R ecruiting
Sergeant Darryl Adkins-himself a veteran paratrooper- only one
out of four might have qualified for the airborne elite.
-from T I M E, November 3, 1967
In time of disaster and danger, Corpsmen have labored around the clock
- fighting fires, restoring flood-damaged areas, assisting in tornado clean up, and conducting search and rescue missions.
service to lo~al communities
Corpsmen and women also volunteer their leisure time and services in
dozens of projects that benefit their host communities. They work with the
handicapped, sponsor Little League baseball teams, donate evening time
at homes for the aged. Some work with retarded youngsters, others shop for
elderly people of the neighborhood. Several women's centers operate
nursery schools for local children.
Corps members paint ambulances and community recreation centers,
construct wheelchair tables for paraplegics at veterans hospitals, build
furniture for youngsters enrolled in Head Start,-collect and repair toys for
needy children.
All Job Corps centers contribute to such public causes as the March of
Dimes, the American Red Cross, United Fund, the Muscular Dystrophy
Association , United Cerebral Palsy, the Salvation Army.
contribution to public education
What Job Corps has learned about educating the school dropout is being
applied in public school systems across the Nation, with the aim of helping
to keep troubled youngsters in school as long as possible.
I have virited over 25 Job Corps Centers and know the tremendous
value this program is to the under-privileged y outh of our_country. I
would like to personally help make this, their "last chance," a
success.
- Archie M oore, former boxing champion
The interchange of teaching methods and materials between Job Corps
and the public schools began in the summer of 1966, when 21 teachers from
Seattle, Simi Valley(a Los Angeles suburb), Detroit, and Washington, D.C.,
took up year-long posts as staff members in four Job Corps conservation
centers. At year-end, the teachers returned to their school systems to
introduce Job Corps methods -and materials in-local classrooms.
During the 1967-68 school year, 17 teachers from 11 urban school systems
are teaching and learning in Job Corps centers.
how to help a Job Corps trainee get a job
If you are interested in employing a young man or woman trained by
Job Corps, or if you want to help one of these young people find a job_and
hold on to it- wnte or call one of the seven Job Corps Regional Offices :
Office of Economic Opportunity
Great Lakes Region
623 South Wabash Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60605
Telephone : (312) 353-4775
Office of Economic Opportunity
Southeast Region
730 Peachtree Street , N.E.
Atlanta, Georgia 30308
Telephone: (404) 526-3178
continued
6. Canyon/ I NEZ CLAY/ Justice, West Virginia/Vocation : Retail Sales
7. Nature Print/NANCY CLAY/ Justice, West Virginia/ Vocation : Retail Sales
8. Purple Fish/ JAMES CRAWFORD/ Leavenworth. Kansas
Vocation: Food Preparation and Service
9. Abstract/ ALMA DANIELS/ Seattle, Washington/Vocation : Data Processing
10. Landscape/ ROBERT DAVIS/ Baltimore, Maryland
Vocation : Auto Mechanics
11. Daughter of the Sun/ BARBARA DEAN/ Newark, New Jersey
Vocation: Clerical Skills
12. Landscape/ RICHARD DUNBAR/ Springfield, Ohio/ Vocation: Clerical Skills
13. Girl with Long Hair~ Maurice Dupont/ Seattle, Washington
14. Untitled
Vocation: Photography
15. Abstract/ RAUL ES REMERA/ San Juan. Puerto Rico
Vocation : Food Preparation and Service
16. Brothers/ GEORGE FINK/ Kirkland , Washington/ Vocation : Art .
17. Still Life/ PAUL FLOYD/ Decatur, Alabama/ Vocation: Electronics
18. Nature Print l JOH NETT A FORREST/ Baltimore, Maryland .
.
19. Nature Print I
Vocation: Secretarial
20. Free Form/ RHONDA K. FRAME/ Birch River, West Virgi nia
Vocation: Retai I Sales
21. Still Life/ EDDY FRI ZZELL/ Kansas City, Missouri/Vocation : Auto Mechanics
22. Still Life/ ROSS FRYE/ Washington, D.C./Vocat1on : Data Processing .
23. Abstract/ MAX GARCIA/ Colorado Springs, Colorado/ Vocation: Surveying
24. Untitled/ BETTY HALTON/ Chicago, Illinois/ Vocation : Offset Pnntmg .
25. Untitled/ JAMES KENNEDY/ Berkeley, California/ Vocation: Clerical Skills
26. Abstract/LESLEY LAREAU/ Haleiwa, Hawaii/Vocation : Cleri"cal Skills
27. Guitar Player/ ROBERT LI NDSEY/ Birmingham, Alabama
Vocation: Auto Mechanics
28. Prehistoric Birds/ PAUL McCASKILL/ Perrine, Florida/Vocation: A_rt
29. Untitled/ JAMES PARKS/ Bluff City, Tennessee/Vocation: Electronics
30. Sand Casting/ LOUISE PAUL/ Williamsburg, Kentucky
Vocation: Nursing Assistant
�Office of Economic Opportunity
Mid-Atlantic Region
1832 M Street, N.W.
Washington, D. C. 20506
Telephone: (202) 382-1235
Office of Economic Opportunity
Northeast Region
72 West 45th Street
New York, New York 10036
Telephone : (212) 573-6388
Office of Economic Opportunity
Southwest Region
314 West Eleventh Street
Austin, Texas 78701
Telephone : (512) GR 6-6411, Ext. 6384
Office of Economic Opportunity
North Central Region
215 West Pershing Road
Kansas City, Missouri 64108
Telephone : (816) 374-3661
Office of Economic Opportunity
Western Region
100 McAI lister Street
San Francisco, California 94102
Telephone : (415) 556-8844
The W eber B asi,z and Clearfield Centers have expressed a willingness to be of assista,zce a,zd to participate in community events. L ast
T hanksgiving there were more invitations to the boys than there
were boys to accept.
- Preside nt, Greater O gden (Uta h )
C ha mber of Commerce
I could have my Ph.D. , and it wouldn' t mean as much to me as
- R esiden t worker in a J ob Corps Center
two months here.
31. Abstract/VELM A POWELL/ Detroit, Michigan/ Vocation: Secretarial
32. Ink Print/PAULETTE PRENTICE/ Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Vocation: Data Processing
33. Christmas/BILLY ROBINSON/ Little Rock, Arkansas/ Vocation: Electronics
34. Slums/ EDWARD SANTIAGO/ New York, New York
Vocation: Medical Assistant
35. Felt Design/ JOE ANN SHORT/ Phoenix, Arizona/ Vocation : Cosmetology
36. Abstract/BILLY SMITH/ Berkeley, California/Vocation : Clerical Skills
37. Pharaoh/ RI CARDO THOMAS/ Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Vocation: Clerical Skills
38. Free Form/ JEANETTE TODD/ Atlanta, Georgia/ Vocation: Clerical Skills
39. Untitled I CLIFFORD van MILLER/ Wilmington , Delaware
40. Untitled I
Vocation: Art
41. Collage/ JOHN WALULI K/ Hollywood, California/ Vocation : Auto Mechanics
42: Dolmens/ JAMES WOOLFORK/ New Brunswick, New Jersey
Vocation : Clerical Skills
43. Untitled/ CLASS PROJECT/ Parks Job Corps Center
Pleasanton, California
�A
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NAME AND /OR DIVIS ION
BUILDING, ROOM, ET C.

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5.
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D IMMEDIATE ACTION
D INITIALS
D NECESSARY ACTION
D NOTE AND RETURN
D PER OUR CONVERSATION
D PER TELEPHONE CONVERSATION
YOUR INFORMATION
APPROVAL
AS REQUESTED
CONCURRENCE
CORRECTION
FILING
FULL REPORT
D
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READ AND DESTROY
RECOMMENDATION
SEE ME
SIGNATURE
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THE SIGNATURE OF
REMARKS
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~ -143.215.248.55
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NAME AND / OR DI VISION
BUILDING, ROOM, ETC.
TELEPHONE
GS A A TL A NT A G A 66 - 3 4 33
I
DATE
EO A• ADM• 2
�EOA FINANCE STATEMENT
FOR YEAR 1968
STATUS AS OF NOVEMBER 30, 1968
I
Program Direction
GRANT NO.
PERIOD
306/C
1/68- 12/68
306/C 16
6/68- 5/69
MANAGEMENT IMPROVEMENT
Management Improvement
Nash- Washi ng ton
l1 rice
Centra l City
N. W. Perry
Edgewood
2 ,2 32
435 , 970
52 , 943
~
541, 681
- 062 , 794
--2.Ll.QQ
-1§.,_QQQ
451,738
- 02 , 232
, 18,000
453 , 970
37 000
89 , 943
120 , 747
146 ,317
159 , 778
145 , 014
187,889
72 , 1 91
144,463
133 , 609
155 , 502
148 , 199
137,598
61,675
50,799
16, 840
32,910
6 , 868
23,979
31 ,603
31,187
18 , 511
18 , 042
24,540
8,653
27 , 000
12 ,440
10, 81 9
109 , 126
127,519
126 , 137
110,128
164,514
120, 305
121,922
124,359
134,190
120,906
120,685
51,557
36,929
17, 498
29,994
14 ,178
34, 232
31,867
38 , 149
14,539
33,545
22 , 749
4,533
24,708
17,064
12,227
11, 621
18 ,7 98
~
~
272 , 536
385 , 877
137,587
179,227
166,646
168,993
219,492
103 ,378
162 , 974
151,651
180,042
156,852
164,598
74,115
61 , 618
60 326
1, 987,49 9
2,100 , 840
- 040 , 432
40 ,2 99
37 , 477
21, 225
75 ,4 71
65 , 251
76 , 291
115 ,041
88,40:
45 30
(1)18,801
200
11 , 300
13 , 739
10, 539
8 , 341
22 ,000
25 , 213
41 , 337
23 , 270
31,881
14 ,425
18,801
200
51,732
54, 038
48 , 016
29,566
97 , 4 76
90,469
117, 627
138 , 311
120 , 282
59 732
605, 204
605 ,204
221 , 046
202,945
"
"
"
"
"
"
"
"
Pitts burgh
"
North Fulton
"
"
Rockda l e
"
Gwinne tt
SUB- TOTAL
TOTAL GRANT
"
"
"
"
"
"
,,"
"
"
"
"
Cl!ILD DEVELOPMENT
"
"
"
Administra t ion
"
"
'
"
St. Paul
College Park
East Point
. Fort Street
Grady Homes
"
"
"
"
"
Bowen Home s
Souths i de
Tabernacle
Vine City
"
"
"
SUll- TOTAL
TOTAL GRANT
NSC SUPPORT
"
Program For Aged
Pl anned Par enthood
Vocat i ona l Re habili ta t i on
Employment Security Agency
"
"
"
"
West End Child Development
SUB TOTAL
TOTAL GRANT
HISCELLANEOUS PROGRAMS
310
028
051
022
021,
026
Fo s ter Grandparents
Legal Assistance
"
Summer Recr e at ion (1968)
Summer Head s t art (1 968 )
SUB- TOTAL
TOTAL GRANT
GRAND TOTAL : 306/G GRANT - 19~8
"
OTHER CAP PROGRAMS
Full Year Re c . (1967 Carry-Over)
Parent - Child Center
Evaluation Center
Comprehensive Health - EOA
Comprehens i v e Health .. Fulton
Compreh ensive Jleal th - Emory
"
"
306/B & C
8100 A/1
669920
8933 B/1
"
"
5/68 -1 2/ 68
"
"
9/67 - 3/68
1/1-4/68
8/67- 10/69
"
"
SUB - TOTAL
TOTAL GRANT
GRAN D TOTAL OEO GRANTS 1968,
1967 CARRY-OVER & DAY CARE FEES
604 , 475
~
--11.,ill
1 , 510 ,188
306 , 716
126 , 624
157,513
140 , 315
144 , 360
196,381
158,454
136 ,461
157,904
156,939
125,439
145,393
68 ,621
49,156
53 344
1,816,904
34 , 241
- 034,342
36,741
31, 380
17,619
5 7, 720
59 , 307
69 , 619
98,466
77 , 588
--1Q..111
18 , 801
3,764
6, 545
9, 069
6,093
7,725
6,003
10,710
30 , 304
4 , 238
23, 724
_Lill
53,042
3,764
40,887
45 , 810
37 ,473
25,344
63, 723
70, 017
99 , 923
102 ,704
101,312
37 489
826 , 250
808 ,149
547 , 336
134 ,;15 2
681,488
102 ,866
120 ,430
120 ,892
38,3 25
11,852
-030,21,0
-049 775 --1Ll..§l
315 , 625
172, 417
315 , 625
170,417
223 , 296
159 , 21 7
11, 85 2
30 , 240
63 437
488,042
486 ,042
95 , 038
108,467
5,870
23,737
37,666
270, 77 8
91 , 030
18,901
- 0___L_§fil
111, 614
88, 731
24,105
54 , 756
271,93 9
48 7,690
620, 000
516,649
180 894
747 , 445
1,497,319
747 , 445
1,497, 319
4,674,792 1,569, 478
112 , 836
326 ,695
1,107,690
697 543
2 , 244 , 764
2 , 244 , 764
6 , 244 , 270
82 , 498
247,927
600,201
498 ,7 72
1 , 42 9,398
13,329
22 ,085
807 , 697
174 190
1,017,301
62 , 166
231, 250
230, 065
31,556
117,7 98
4,105,152
4 , 777,987
4 , 777 , 987
62,166
75,301
23 0,065
9 , 856
52 , 520
796 968
1 , 226 , 876
1,714 ,963
1, 714 ,963
-o-
-o-
62,166
185,000
230,065
31 , 556
117 , 798
4,105,152
4,731 ,737
4 , 731, 737
46 , 250
-0-0-0-
·-o-
46 , 250
46,2 50
CEP 67-15
R3-8097- ll
NYC - 1967-68
NYC - Summ,e r
081
083
,I
Job Corps Recrui tment
Job Corps Gate House
TOTAL DPL
ARTS & HUMANITIES
All Arts Program
GRANT TOTAL ALL PROGRAMS
NOTE:
-o-
33, 641
34 , 886
23 , 375
(48,1 14:
22,5~1
9,250
21,312
27,2 93
16,913
10,118
13,870
___Llll
204,775
(34 ,241;
- 06,090
3,558
6,097
3,606
17,756
5 , 949
6,671
16 ,575
10 , 813
14 994 ,
-
-,,,.., ,oo·c,~
7 ,8'.! ::;
186, 068
127 , 368
5 , 870
23 , 737 I"'
39,349
382,392
12, 425
5, 98~·
6 , 503
12 1-0Si
44,84 7
6 , 23 :;
24 , 012
95,827
270,01 2
1 , 407 , 898
6 72 962
2,446 , 699
17, 877
67, 921
62,166
75 , 301
230 ,065
9, 856
52 , 520
796 968
1, 226 , 876
- 0109, 69S
- 021 , 70[:
65 , 27f
3 308 18i.
3,504 , 861
19,7 9~·
/,./7Z..,cu.f
-0-
-o- 0-o- 0- 0-0-
9 ,406 , 529 1,615,728 :11,022 , 257
C0;1TRACTS WI TH EOA
ACEP Programs
FEDERAL
UNEXPE,DED
433 ,738
,,"
"
"
"
"
Wes t Centra l
Sum-Mee
052
095
350
230
...
549 , 475
1 /68- 12/68
"
East Central
077
078
086
088
089
.
T nTS
T "~AT
62 ,794
306/C
"
"
South Fulton
L,
"" -~~ "
Tn T n
-
NEIGHBORHOOD SERVICE CENTERS
West End
Ant i och
T MAT
'C"T;'T\1,'n IT
486 ,681
TOTAL GRANT
01,3
01,11
01,5
01,6
047
048
071,
075
141
EXPENDED TO l l /30 'so
BUDGETED
PROGRk'1
COMMUNITY ACTION
OE0-2885
B-89- 4621
6/67-9/68
10/67-10/68
1/68- 12/68
6 /68-6/69
6/68- 8/68
(1) Auth orizecl use o le Local Cos ts
4 , 315 ,473
1, 347,100
124,052
71 , 071
45 960
5,903,656
2 , 648 ,All
1, 168, 634
124, 052
63 , 274
13,466
4,018 ,037
36,982
58,745
21,763
14,860 , 736 2,030 , 682 16, 891, 4T'8
21,763
9,476 ,114
3 , 980 , 531
1, 210 , 830
124,052
71,071
_ _1,5 , 960
5 ,432,1,44
334 , 942
136,270
- 0-0-
-o-
471 , 212
967-68 fro~ Day Care Fees .
I
240,271
98 , 139
-o- 0-
-o338 , 410
2 , 888 , 882
1,266,773
124,052
63 , 274·
13 466
4,356,447
22,082
43,845
1,93 2 , 507 11,408,621
1 , 331, 92(1
,,
42,1 96
- 07, 797
32 49l
l ,414,40i
- 05,384,622
�-f
WHAT D0ES THE DEPARTI!ENT OF FH;A.t'\CE DO?
Funds for EO A in 1968 amounted to $14,8~7,150 in Federaf plus
approx i matately $200,000 available in Local Cash.
Of the Federal Cash,
$21,763 came fro m the Natio nal Coun~il on Arts and Huma nities, $5,315,411
from the Departme nt of Labor ard $9,559,976 from _~EO,
EOA will have do ne
the detailed payroliing, purchasing and ac~ounting for si~ ty-eight
projects and wilL hav e fund~d forty-fopr De legate Age ncy Projects _ during
1968 .
.EOA Finance do e s th e payrolli~g, purchase of supplies, detail
accounting and 0t~ r [inanci ~~ op~ ri~ :0ns inv olving $7,266,925.
Fina nc e
0
funded through ~e l eg ~te Age~ c {e ~ EDA ~~ogr ams totalling $7,630,225.
Finance
payrolls th e ~cr ~G1ne ~ 5- Head~uart2rs--four t e en Neighb or h ood
Servic e Cent ers -- 5~\ e ~
End Ch ild Cent er .
-
J Care Ce n t er s --th~ Pare nt-Child Center and West
'.!.' h is _;_uvo l v es 513 eEtp l oyees . p2, id fro m CAP fu nds -- 14
st a f f and 267 e n r oll e 2s f r om XYC f un ds -- 99 st a ff a nd 73 enroll ee s f ro2
AC EP fu nds .
During t h e s 1_;:;i;-ner mon t h s, Fi nan c e payr oll ed aro und 810 er:-.pL:;y ees
in th e Surr:,e r Rec rea ti on P r ogram a nd 98 emFloyee s. i n Sum:;1er He 2d st ar t.
Th e re
are oc c a s i on s whe n our payro ll st a f f a re c alle d upon t:o do th e i o.po s si b l e ,
for e xa ~? l e :
-Duri nt J u l ; a nd Aug ust , we wer e i ns t ru c t Ld t o payro ll a n
ad di tio nal 500 ~;ye enro ll e e s .
\•Te
di d it.
Op er at i on , y ou t hi nk o;:i l y of f -__'. '.pa y. <:hec½.' '.
produ c t ".
loc a tions .
c ompu t e r.
1:'nec1 you d-\i:,~~ of a Pay roll
T1e p2y chE ck i s o:.-i l y t h e " e::d -
Thi n~, -2.g a i n -- ti me s hee ts 2 re f ed i nt o Pay,:o ll fr o:.. a.ro u:.-id 2 00
Ea ch na~e , t i o 2 - ear~ed , l eave t e ~e n , e tc . mu st ~e fed i n to a
Defuction s f or Fe~2r 2l e~d St a t e I;:ic o~e Ta~ - - FI CA -- ~e tir ~-
me nt -- Gr oup I ns ura~ ~e - - Chari ty , etc. must b e deduc t ed .
c he c',. : s t ub a:.-id v i sual i ze 211 t he c 2. lc u l ated de t ai l.


~ 3/


-~
Look at your pa; -
Mu lti p l y yo . 1 r " p2y - st u;:i "
1
No~.; -- p.';?.y r ol l ,:or~ i 5~:. ' ::-
�-2-
-
finished.
_Quarterly, we make payments of your FIT and SIT deductions to
Uncle Sam and the State and then pay to Uncle ·sam your FICA along with EOA's
contribution by listing each employee, his name, Social Security number,
your earnings, etc.
At the end of the year, we prepare your W-2's for your
Income Tax Returns and simultaneously report to Uncle Sam and the State.
-
Also, think what happens in Payroll when you are hired:
A file maintenance
has to be completed on each individual - name and address, date employed,
location, sex, marital status, date of birth, Social Security number, Budget
Account, Base Code, rate of pay, pension and number of withhold exemptions.
Every Persor..;.t2l Ac-Liem Salary I!lcrease , Name Change, Change of Address,
Termination, etc, causes a change rea ction in payrolling.
Also :vhen "Tvi.l t 9.ke a day's leave or work an hour overtime or on Compensatory Time, ~hist .uses individual acti ons in payroll.
Our payroll
girls do a tremendous ~t~, wi th almost no complaint.
Most important, p&y
checks are always ready
Payrolling is one of
on payday.
Errors are nil.
many Finance operations.
Finance issues around 60,000 checks a year.
of:
Each check is the result
Payroll; Travel; Rent; Purchase; Telephone Bill; etc.
Before a check
is issued, there must be a voucher with supporting documentation which must
. be thoroughly audi t e d so as to be cert a in t hat it is calcul ated correct l y ,
coded against a Budget Line It em , and is prope r in all resp e cts.
·-=-- -· --
• •
- · ·,
Financ e s
• :. . ~-
..,_,.
r•
,_._.._..._,_~'!:!'- t ~ I .••
"Jtr..
':'"C.._ •
.u,.-.,.~-

Purcha sing Depar t men t wi ll have this year iss~ed 1,600
Purchas e Order s -- 440 Servic e Orders and -- 400 orde rs to GSA, which wi ll
involve around 17,000 line items .
Purchasing ge ts the requisition;
estab lishes th e method of procurement ; gets bids from suppliers ~vhere
appropr i a t e; and then issue s the procuring document .
Later Purchasing starts
hound i ng you for th e r eceiving report and the vendor for the i nvoice.
When
�-3received, Purchasing verifies these documents and then passes on to
Fiscal for payment.
Frequently in the process, Purchasing 'haggles" with
the Supplier to expedite what you want and then later the Supplier '"haggles 11
Purchasing for payment.
At that point, Purchasing starts "haggling" you,
The receiver, for your Receiv~~g Report.
Along with this, Purchasing dis-
tributes internal mail; sends things through postal mail or arranges for
your shipments.
Ir does a big business of x erox , off-set reproduction and
collation; It stocks and issues your office supplies; and keeps track of
about 6,500 items of capital equipment.
It arranges your lease, moves you -- gets
building renov ations done - - f~e~s , t.·'. 1 d:i.ng insurance liability -- insures
your officia::. ve:1icle after ~iavi.ng lea3ed it -- gets your typewriter repaired
--:::
--=---------
arranges for y0uc ~el F~n ~~e and utilities an ~ arranges many, many other things
with which you h av <:: ~a c-·_lity to do your job of operations such as pest control
janitorial service-·- anj that city bus to take VIP's on an inspection tour.
Yes, Purchasing has a t e rrific job of servicing you and we in Finance are
proud of the job it does.
Finance do es th e a ccoun ting for EOA .
Our ftccountin g Division gets
the money in "hunk s" and puts it in the bank . · Accounting then proce e ds to
account for the ' 1ou t -g o" p enny by penny ,
Accounts must ex c ercise controls.
When a requisition is r e c e i v ed, Accounts dete rmin e s that th ere is mone y to
pay for the purchase a nd wh en p urch ased it must h av e re co1 d of th e obli gation.
Each rec e ipt, ob l iga t ion and expend it ure must be rec orde d.
During 1968 ,
we had 2,1 60 Distr i bution Ledger Ac counts with co r r e s pondi ng a ccoun ts i ~
s ~x Genera l Le dgers.
Can you imagine th e vol ume of de t a il in ent e ri ng i nto the
Di s tri bu t ion Ledger Ac counts , th e budge t s , obl iga tion s, exp end tture s and resulting
unob li gated b a l ances for each and every transacti on and r equi ring abso l u t e
a ccuracy in the process.
Kind or Local Support.
Al so entered in detai l is every ·
EOA us es a mini mum of a
11
11
c rumb 11 of In-
Double-Entry" Accounting
System, ,vhich means that every entry in the Distribution Ledger is also
�I
-4-
entered in General Ledger and the t wo ledgers must balance.
So lets in-
vision some 12,000 entries each month in the "Distribution Ledger 11 that
must match up in dollar value to corresponding entri e s in the ;'General
Ledger".
Get the picture for accuracy perfection?
of checks and balances.
Yes, we have all sorts
For ex ample, it is essential that our bank accounts
have accumulative deposits and withdrawals.which agree with our records of
expenditures.
At the end of each month, our Accountants must come-up with

/
/
/
/'
I
Financial and Budget Reports to show management-~ and you -- how we stand
rnoneywise.
There are 107 sheets in the Budget Report which involve _about
3,638 line i terns.
OEO and the Department of Labor, our auditors and a fe-.:.1
I
others a. ..:e interested . too 1and Finance must produce reports which agree wit i,
l
their figures.
You get copies of some o~ these monthly reports. _ Try ann
!
visualize the many recbrde ~ transactions. which are ei:itailed in the cornpil a tio ;:.
of these reports.
I
You really can't -- but try.
To compound this a little,
we should let you know that Finance must us e a different Accounting System
i
I
to satisfy CAP, NYC and ACEP and th a t OEO, NYC and ACEP periodicall y change
I
their systems, and th~n -- we must ch ange ours.
Our Internal Audit j econciles all accounts and for one thing they . hav e
to look at thos e 60,000 ch e ck s which we r e issued and be sure none were
"hiked", that they wer e endtrse d and s ev er a l other things.
your check, Fin anc e h as to
When you los e
ut :.? "s t op orde r" at the bank befor e we can
issue you a rep l acemen t ch e k &nd t hen -- to make c e rt a in s omeone doe s n 't
i
fin d and coll ect on t he ch e ck yo u lo s t.
Aud it mu st rev i ew t he "In-Kind " yo u
repo r t and t hen be sure i t ts cred i ted to your pro j e c t.
has b een known to prod you
i
I n the pr oc ess , Audi t
lit t l e to get your I n-Kind " in " .
Aud it a l s o
takes a lo ok at Delegate Agtncies ' ac c ounts j ust t o make s ure they are liv i ng
r i ght.
Aud i t rides herd on Pe t ty Cash , Emergency Assi st ance and other escrow
funds that are made av ailable to units outside Finance.
s uch accounts.
We have about 43 of
Each must be carefu l ly analyzed and reimbursed each month by
I
�I
-5-
I
Internal Audit.
This year Audit is supervising the Employe es Credit Union,
reconciles our bank accounts to t .h e General Ledger, monitors the Retireme nt Fund
and handles Clearances for indebtedne ss for final pay settlement to departing
employees.
The Fiscal Officer do e s the pay ing of all the bills.
vouchers are carefully ex amined and checks drawn for payment.
Here, all the
Most payments
are run through Data Proc'essing but a large number of checks are handdrawn.
Most checks are ~un thro J [oh the check signing machine,
Fiscal maintains a
/
careful vigilance on blan
fraud and embezzl ement.
ch e ck s and the check si gning machine to guarante e a gai n st
I
Did you know that in the history of EOA there h c".S been
I!
0nly one instan ce of fraud (a long time a go ) which involved around $400.8 0 a nd
that amount was imme diately recover e d_.
Even an att empt to f raud would r ~~u i ~s
!
'
the conspir a cy of four key p eo ple and in Finance, th.at is 100% unlikely.
Evc1.
I
if it should h appen, such fraud would be i mme diat e l y discove red und e r our
I
system of che ck s and b a lan c e s.
Fisc a l will vouch er and p ay aroun d 7,000 bi lls
this y e ar for such it ems a ~ suppli e s, serv ic e s, Tr av e l Vouche rs, rent, tel e phone, utiliti e s, e quipmen ~, e tc.
for Progr amming .
.I
Our Budge t
cap ab ility o f more assu.ranct
are a s prov i ded by budge ts
F iscal a lso assis t s in pre p a r a t i on of budgets
Control is b e i ng refine d ,and we will soon have
to Management t hat obl i ga ti ons and expend itur es
1
s appr oved and mod ifi ed by Manageme nt.
als o c ontr ol s the Key Pun ch l operati ons for Da t a Proc e s sing .
Fisc a l
Our Fi s c a l
Op e r ation assur es th e Director of Fi n anc e and EOA Manag emen t t hat eve r y nicke l
\I
o f di s burs ement i n it s day t o day op eration is prop e r i n a ll re s p e cts and we
c an a ll s l e e p we ll every ni1\ht in t his kn owl edg e.
Fi nanc e is n ow h andl· ng a l l Insurance and Emp loyee Ret ir emen t .
inh eri t ed this in Septemb er , 1968.
We
Si nce t ha t time EOA emp l oy ee s h ave
en j oyed a much i ncreased Group I nsur anc e and Ho s pi t a l Benefit Pl an.
Re c ords
h ave been b rought up-to-date find you are a ssured o f c overage . . New bookl ets
�-6o_f your coverage are now being made available to you.
are being processed on the date received.
All claims received
The Retirement Fund has been
audited for the ~irst time -- Retirement r e cords are current and up-to-date.
Many old accounts have been settled.
The evaluations for each six -months
period have been establishe d for the periods since 1965 thro4gh 6/30/68
and we expect to hav e made t h e " 12/31/68 evaluation prior to 1/31/69.
Each employee
has an up-to-date card record which shows the employee contribution, EOA contribution, number of units credited and the value of such units.
We also
handle Workmen's Compensation claims for employees and enrollees totalling
from 1,000 tr
2, sno
parsons.
The for e 6 0i n1s gives yu u a
What •:loe8
i'.h8
11 b&ll-park 11
view of what Finance does.
))irector of Finance do 11
Well, he attends a lot of
meetings -- has~ l ot
L
visitors -- writes a lot of reports (such as this
one) -- and must k e ep cl os P. l y knowl edgeabl e of all those things going on ·in
Finance and in EOA a 8 t h ey r e l a te to Financ e .
His main concern is effort to
see that peopl e in Financ e ge t de ser v ing reco gnition for the terrific job
they do for EOA and for th e peopl e who work in EOA.
This report, which is
lacking in much de tail in the way of a compl e t e r eflection of all those
things don e by Financ e ,
j g
wr itt en in ap pr e c ia tion and commendation of th e
Department of Finance St a f f .
-0Novemb er 26 , 19 68
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2


s:Z
�MACHEALTH
Minutes
The December 11, 1969 meeting of MACHealth was held in the Planned Parenthood Board Room, 1st Floor, Glenn Building, after last-minute cancellation
of Room 619.
Those present:
Members
Alternates
Staff
Mr. Linwood Be ck
Hon Wm. H. Breen, Jr.
~ev. E. B. Broughton
Mr. Jack Cofer
Mr. Gary Cutini
Mr. Drew Fuller
Mr. James Gardner
Mrs. Henry Mae Glenn
Mrs . Mandy Griggs
Dr. Quillian Hamby
Miss Sue Jockers
Mrs. Linden Johnson
Mrs. Evangeline Lane
Mrs. Gladys Lovett
Mr . Wi lliam Pinkston,Jr.
Mr~. Ruth Robinson
Mr. Nelson Severinghaus
Dr. Luther Vinton
Mr . Lyndon A. Wade
Dr. Robert E. Wells
Dr. Luther Fortson
Mr. Flay W. Sellers
Mr. Bill Thompson
Mr. A. B. Padgett
Mrs. Merle Lott, R. N.
Mr, Henry Montfort
Dr. Raphael B. Levine
Mr. A. F. Branton
Mrs. Harriet Bush
Miss Rebecca Dinkel
Mr. Frank A. Smith
Mrs. Gayle Matson
Mrs. Lou Ashton
Mrs. Harriet Bush passed out questionnaire s pertaining to Public Health and
asked that they be filled in and ret urned to her.
Mr. A. B, Padgett reported results of site team visit of December 2. He
said that there had been a rather lengthy visit with the site team, 9:00
A. M. - 1: 00 P. M. The team had many questions. Mr. Padgett said that
friends had reported that the team seemed favorably impressed with the
answers to questions they raised and there was no apparent reason why
they would not go ahead with their recommendations for funding at the
January 26 meeting. This, of course, means that there will be no funding
January las was hoped and it will necessitate shifting some items on
the timetable. Mr. Padgett called on Dr. Levine for an explanation of what
this means.
Dr. Levine added that the site team did not at any time appear antagonistic.
Thay had legitimate questions and wanted answers and were determined to
probe until they got the answers. He said that he thought the group was
satisfied that MACHealth was the right kind or organization in regard to
MACLOG and CCAA. Dr. Levine said he felt that they were convinced that the
systems approach was an excellent way for the council to have more information,
therefore, decision would be somewhat easier to arrive at in this way rather
than using the current standard techniques of attacking one problem at a time
�Page 2 - Minutes
and ignoring the interrelationshipr. of the problems.
Mr. Padgett added that people on the council will have an opportunity to have
explained to them any questions that they may have regarding the systems
approach which they do not understand clearly.
Dr. Levine discussed the impact of the delay in funding. He pointed out the
fact that there were a number of things which needed attention now and there
was no money with which to engage additional staff an~ this ·would necessitate
going ahead with inadequate manpower in many instanc~s until April 1 at which
time MACHealth should become an agency on its own. At the recommendation of
the Regional Health Advisory Committee, MACHealth applied for an extension
grant to continue in the organizational phase for an additional three to six
months. Under this grant, urgent items can be done. Dr. Levine mentioned
the need for bringing a facilities review committee into existence by
February.
Dr. Levine introduced the new organization liaison planner, Miss Rebecca
Dinkel, and reported that she was doing an excellent job.
Dr.Levine also reported the illness of Mrs.Loretta Barnes, Secretary pro tern,
and told the group that Mrs. Barnes expected to leave the hospital about
December 12.
Dr. Levine asked the Nominating Committeee and the Council to begin thinking
of logical candidates for the permanent offices: president, 5 vice presidents,
and secretary. He point ed out the need for a slate to be presented before the
end of December. He also said there could be nominations from the floor at
the meeting in January. He said the nominating committee would be glad to
hear from any individual on MACHealth who might have a logical nominee in mind
for one or more of the offices.
Mr.Padgett stated that the Community Council has been looked to by State
Department of Public Health as a review agency for requests for federal
funding and federal approval. He said that the Board of Directors of the
Community Council agreed to turn this responsibility over to MACHealth as soon
as we are ready . Nelson Severinghaus moved that MACHealth accept that
responsibility as soon as possible. The motion passed unanimously. Dr.
Levine added that any person who would like to be on this committee should
mention it to the Chairman pro tern. He also pointed out that a mental health
committee needs to be set up qui te soon . He urged members to participate
diligently in committee work.
Dr. Levine brought t he group up to date on the matter of Cobb County, the
misund e rstanding through the press, etc. He stated that MACHealth is the
official agency for review of all health projects involving federal government
and it would redound to Cobb County's benefit to be a member in good standing
of MACHealth. The council will be giving a good deal of technical assistance
which will be made available to participating members, but cannot be made
available to non-participating members.
�Page 3 - Minutes
Cobb County's holding out, said Dr, Levine, will probably mean about a
10% cut in the budget, with some reduction in staff. Dr. Levine says that
he feels sure that Cobb will come in eventaully. He said that there is a
commitment in the budget for 1970 from all counties except Cobb. $149,000
must be raised locally to match federal funds. Counties have committed
just under $100,000. It is hoped that $37,000 can be raised from private
sources such as foundations, and $112,000 f.rom . .ccimties..·.Dr.. ;: .·Levine · said -that
even if Cobb decides not to come in, it is expected that participation from
other Cobb County agencies will prevent Cobb from being left out of the
budgetary picture altogether.
Mr. Severinghaus asked if the City of Atlanta was included in the budget;
Dr , Levine answered that so far no way had been devised to get city money
contributions into the picture. Counties are asked to contribute on a percapita basis, which includes cities within the county, He said that there is
no a priori reason why the cities should not be involved. They have an impact on health and receive benefits from health, too.
Dr. Levine reported that the MACLOG incorporation was ratified in November.
Miss Rebecc~ Dinkel reported her efforts to get through to Cobb County through
the Chamber of Commerce. She said that Messrs. Gilbert and Graham had
suggested a "cooling off" period, then beginning a new education campaign in
Cobb County about MACHealth.
1•
Dr. Levine br i efed the group about the work, that the emergency health
services task force has been doing. He said that an application for a study
is almost ready to be submitted by Georgia Tech. He said that the application must be submitted by December 20 and that the project was very closely
coordinated through a task force of MACHealth. The question of local
matching money and whose responsibility it will be to raise it was brought
up. Dr, Levine reported that several members of the task force had ideas
of where the money would come from and prospects for raising the money look
good . Mr . Pinkston suggested that the board take no official action on
this matter until more is known about funding, etc.
Dr.Levine asked if there would be any objections to stating in the applicati on
t hat the group expects to stay within the framework of the MA CHea l th guide lines.
Mr. Padgett suggested that the applic ation state that the task force is
working hand in glove with MACHealth. There were no objections to this
statement. Gary Cutini urged that caution be used in endorsing projects
in order to avoid duplication and fragmentation. Mr. Padgett agreed that
MACHealth's main objective was coordination.
There being no further business, the meeting adjourned at 1:30 P. M.
/ia
�EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
OFFICE OF ECONOMIC
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20506
(Jllll(Jl~TIJNITY
January 10, 1967
Mro Al Kuettner
675 Sherwood Road, NoEo
Atlanta, Georgia
30324
Dear Mr. Kuettner:
Thank you very much for your letter of December 16, 1966. Although it
is true that the Office of Economic Opportunity has some money available
for research and demonstration programs in housing, none of it has been
earmarked for any specific cities. The work done by the National Committee against Discrimination in Housing was undertaken some time ago,
before there was any clear idea of what our appropriation for this fiscal
year would be. When our appropriation was reduced, it was impossible to
fund all programs which had been considered, and no further action was
possible on the one you mention.
With its limited funds for housing demonstrations, our office has concentrated on the development of city-wide and neighborhood corporations as
an experiment in new delivery mechanisms for low-cost housing. We have
also encouraged a wide variety of housing services programs through community action agencies. We would, of course , be happy to discuss any
proposal you might have, either on an informal basis or on the basis of
a formal submission. May I suggest that you contact your local connnunity
action agency or other housing groups to see what your next step might be.
Thank you for your interest in our program.
Richards . Granat
Director
Housing Programs
�CITY OF A.TLANTA.
CITY HALL
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522-44 63 Area Cod e 404
January 13, 1967
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Admin istrative Ass istant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison
Mr. Al Kuettner
675 Sherwood Road, N. E.
Atlanta, Georgia 30324
Dear Al:
Mayor Allen has asked me to answer your letter of January 4
regarding grants which have been made to the City which would
be of concern to the Community Relations Commission. I
have b e en out of tow n and I am sorry that your letter has not
b e en answer e d sooner.
The only current grant that I know of which might be of
interest to you would be the $23, 000 grant from the Stern
Family Fund. Attached is a copy of the announcement put
out by the Stern .Family Fund which I think e x plains the intent
of the gra nt .
W e have e mploye d J ohnny Robinson to dir e ct this demonstration
proj e ct and Johnny is now located in Room 1204 in City Hall .
W e ar e in th e proc e ss of compl e ting a compr e h e nsive outline
of th e pr oj e ct fr om th e e x ecuti on standpoint a nd I w ill make
this a v aila bl e to you in th e n ext fe w d a ys .
Pl e as e call m e if you nee d any furthe r information .
/'
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To assisi.: t .l.c :-.:....y...:,.: o i ~\ ·;: __ 2_ ·ca to s'caf::'.:
ize the office of ·:.::-~2 :1.• •.:.~_.. o:: :)c-'-·ter to d e velop a
s;:: :.:-;:it c 9y a n d act · on to mobil i ~e ::~-- ~ c :..t:y ~ s £m:-c""s to a ·i.: acK
t . ..: p•·oblems of t .he s 1 uP.1s and ir ,;,:.:o ·e ·: :he conci:.tion of the
pc p l e now residen~ ther0.
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?o~~dation funds w·11 be use d to p~y ~ ~ c s ala ·y of~ s~~c:a l
a~sis~~n ~ to the Mayor e >~c ~ icn c cd ii u·oan affai-s,
c 2.:?:.ble 1 ·w ith the Mayo_ D s ~ o - itical ·. sac,~::.·s.1ip, o f mes·ning
t.: .e resouz-ces and ener9i cs o ~ -::- :. d.i s9u.··2.te elements of
·:::10 c rc,munity in c once·rted c-c io:1 1 anr: know edge2.ble a uout
sc~uri~g outside resources ~o h el~ wi t h the ta ska
':!:- .is will be an experime.1.·'· :::..:::1c1 dc.~o:'). s·;;:,:-c::r::.ion of the v a :..u e
o~ sue a staff and functio n ~n t~2 ~uyor 0 s off ! ce of a



o t.:.t.he :.n city with a 11 wca;~ m:.~· o r' 1 :.:;::_rs temo If the




c. _:-.1 .ons . · :.:-at ion warrants s u c ·1 ~c ti o.1 -c:~ e ;(uyor wi l l a·::.-i.: er:i:_::,c
.:o establi.sh the staff and :.ct!.1c t.io n '1 s a pe:rn .:i.ncnt fe a·;..c.:-e
oi: r: i s office.. md~ Uo So Conf,:, z-cnce of .Mayors ·w ill ob s e::vc
-::.;: · experience and report on it to oth er cities in sirnilc1r
sit.uat ionso
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In coping ·1,J.:.t:.1 th~ c:.: · s is p robl e r:1s 0£
ci·c.- es and, even more import~:·.·:.:, .:,~'78 oping z.n d im_?l2mcnt :..ng
p ol i cy 2..nd strategy for hea.,_·:.:.:1y u::·1x::n d c velop:nen .._ the:·::. \·Ji_l
ob'Jiate the crises. t.he mavo:: cs o:.::Eicc is t.hc , cv cc;-:·~.:::.1.d
po ::;'- .. Only the mayor h a s c c~ ... ::-c.}12;. sive :rcsp on s i b i li·ty.,
Other f u nctionaries have r est~i c tcd concerns fo= e duc~tio . ,
ho~8i~S 6 welfare 0 public s2 ·~ety, ctcg Elec t e d =cp~cser~a t i v -- s ·.. a ve comprehensive conce::cnu ·1 ,-:.:.-:.:. u.re l .imit.ed to
r,olic y f ormation through lcgi.3lz::..:.i0:.10 Only ·::he mayor is
01 c e:r-nQd with policy fo n nat:i.on ~c} C:}:ccut iono
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wconomic and socic..l
l~.~ly ~o give wayo
D::L~ .·:
of t.'1c cit::_r nre no~
�Pag e Sevc
City o f Atlanta
(conti ued)
1fua l.. thi s m2an.s i s ·':i"'.c:.'c t.~. G r.-:.odc:.:-;·i mayor must be a "::;ys t.c
an2. y st II a nd o ~ _ ·
-: nr.~.::; c. vim-1 t:.. e ci·ty v.s a sy::;·ccr.t
made up of i nte~~· s t 0~s ~nd imp inge d u~on by
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to mesh t hese syst ei"i s ....,~- ·i:~1a·:: tl·icir own rules--o f-·chc- 2 . e"
and sel f - s2:. \1ing obj ec·c. ~.vcs 2.:-:-c ·to ·the g r eat.est degree
poss · ble induced to ssrvc -'·he:: pi.;.Ypo e s 0£ the gcne:c2. l
w lfare and devel o:::. ..:·;:;. or t he corr.znunity .
I- ow c.:1n t . c
mortgage banking s ys'c em be:tt ·-: p::-oe.uce low cost h o using?
- ow c2n the c u s ·to s # le c:crs1:ip pa:i.: ·tern s and a sp i :catio_J.s
o f the l ow income clegro cornmu. i~~ bes~ be mob i lized to
v.sh constru ctively fo'.!:" u;~":72--d n~obi lit~, ? How c ar. ·che
nco2ds o f indust r y fo·· s1 : : :i.:Llec1 pc:.:sonne .. be made a ::.:-:;...:-ce
to speed up the t raining of unskilled peo_le? Hew can
the reso urces c f fe de:c2l .::.g<cmcics u. .. d fo undat · on s ::ie
ma=sh alled to supper~ orCc=ly a~d equitable devclo~~en~?
Mosi: cities nmv exp l oit on.ly 2. L.c=.c·tion of the o u·· side
resources · potentially ava:i_lable "i:.o them because they
do n ~t know how t o go after th8m o;c t o use ther.-i ef:Eicie.1tly o
All o f this takes know-l~Oh'o To be deployed mos·;: effective y
that know-how must be in! or clo se t. o, or at t he bee!<.: and
c all o f the mayo~ 0 s o f£icco
At lanta is one of the bcllwo·th-2r cities of the south with
ou t standing leadership in the ~ayo~~ s office. The general
cl imate i n the city is such t~at we!l rcasonEd and
executed p olicies and programs h~vc a favorable cnvi~onment in which to con front ti1e complex probl ms of today O s
cities ..
The se ci rcumst ances make it an opportune time and Jlace
to try to improve the cc\_;>acity of the Mayor O s off ice to
perform the d ynamic role .:.t should and for the cxp2ricncc
to be visible and hopefully in:1~lucntial el.scw~1el.'.'eo
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�ATTACHMENT B
COMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMISSION
REPORT OF PROGRAM COMMITTEE
Helen Bullard,
Chairman
PREFACE
The Program Committee would like to list the premises on which the program
is based, since in our opinion it was not possible to suggest program in a
vacuum but rather to suggest program in terms of the implementation; in
other words, when we suggested the following program we considered whether
or not in our opinion it was feasible within the framework of limited staff,
budget, and other facilities.
We propose the following as a summary of the philosophy of the Program
Committee of the Commission:
1.
That the Commission make accessibility one of its prime objectives.
2.
· That as far as possible the work of the Comm.is sion be in the area of
prevention.
3.
That the Commission avoid duplicating any function that is already the
province of an e stablished agency or group and that its efforts be
c h a nne l e d in the area s of impl e m e nting r athe r than duplication .
4.
Tha t t h e p r og ra m of t h e Commission remain fl exible and within t h e
capab ilitie s of the C ommission.
5.
That the Commiss ion rec o gnize the re s p o n sib ility of a creati ve approach
t o solv ing problems of our C o mmuni ty and its re s pon s ibility t o encourage
the i nvolve m ent of th e citizens of the entir e City.
�6.
That the Commission's program include for consideration and possible
implementation the suggestions from the citizens themselves.
That
the Commission then becomes, with the approval of the Mayor and the
Board of Aldermen, the spokesman for the City of Atlanta.
PROGRAM I
The Program Committee proposes the following areas for immediate action
(the se areas were included in the ad hoc committee I s r e port as b e ing the
most obvious areas for survey of services and facilities):
a.
Blue Heaven (Location:
Decatur Street - Atlanta DeKalb area)
b.
Cabbage Town (Location: Fulton Bag and Cotton Mill)
c.
M e chanicsville
d.
Summe r Hill (Location: Off G e or g i a Avenue , behind the C a pitol)
e.
Vine City (Location: Vine Street and Magnolia)
f.
Lighting
g.
Scotts Crossing
(othe r suggestions)
h.
i.
j.
and such other areas as may be d e t erm i n e d b y th e Commi ssion o r requested
by the neighborhood organizations or individ uals.
The purpose of this investi -
gation is to make recommendations to the Mayor and t h e Board of A l dermen
r e garding the furnishing of necessary services and facilities within the control
- 2 -
�of the City of Atlanta which shall standardize the services furnished in the
above mentioned areas with all the other areas of the City of Atlanta.
As a basis for such information and recommendations, the Program Committee
urges that this program be given first priority;
that the information be obtained
by holding public hearings in the suggested areas to which the public, neighborhood organizations and other interested individuals will be invited.
We suggest
that this be a simultaneous project and that the Commission be set up in teams ·
and a ss igned to specific areas and that each team designate one member as a
secretary for the purpose of filing a joint report to the entire Commission.
In
areas where there i s not unanimous agreement within the team, we suggest a
m inority repo rt also be filed.
PROGRAM II
For purposes of gaining information we suggest that the following people who
a r e concerned with the community relations in the various areas and disciplines
be invited to appe a r befo re the entire Commi ssion for the following purposes :
a.
To outline for t he community their present method of operation.
b.
To p roject plans for the future.
c.
To analyze what they consider their greatest problems, and
d.
To make whatever recommendations they care to to the Community
Relations Commi ssion.
We suggest the following a r ea s of concern:
1.
A meeting of all agencies dealing with community problems.
- 3 -
�2.
EDUCATION - Dr. John Letson, Superintendent of Atlanta Schools
3.
EQUAL OPPORTUNITIES - Mr. Charles O. Emmerich - Director
of the E. 0. A. Program
4.
JOB OPPORTUNITIES within the City Government - Col. Carl Sutherland,
Director of Personnel, City of Atlanta
5.
RECREATION - Mr. Jack Delius - Director of Parks Department,
City of Atlanta
6.
HOUSING a.
Atlanta Housing Authority, Mr. M. B. Satterfield
b.
Mayor's Committee on Housing, Dr. Sanford Atwood and
Dr. Benjamin Mayes
7.
LAW ENFORCEMENT - Chief Herbert Jenkins, Atlanta Police Departmmt
8.
WELFARE - Mr. Welborn Ellis - Director of Fulton County Welfare
Department
9,
10.
HEALTH - Fulton County Public Health Department, Dr. James F. Hackney
In addition to the above official agencies, we would like to recommend that
the Committee that is assigned to work with ministers be asked to select
from the churches the significant churches in terms of community program.
We think it would be helpful to have such programs explained so that other
churches might be encouraged to similar or other community programs.
(We are thinking partly in terms of clinics, counseling services, etc . )
- 4 -
�TIME TABLE
I.
Public hearing of concerned citizens from various neighborhoods through. out the City.
room #2.
2.
Place:
Purpose:
City Hall - February 16,
7:30 p. m. - Committee
to begin to pinpoint problems of the City.
Meeting with agencies who are concerned with community relations.
Purpose:
to ask each agency to define their areas of operations and
program, and to get their ideas as to the problems of the Atlanta Community.
Suggest that the agencies be asked to file a brief with the Commission in
addition to their verbal reports.
Time:
Thursday, February 23, 7:30
p. m. - City Hall.
3.
Public meeting in areas suggested by ad hoc committee (committees of
not more than three persons to each area) be appointed by the Chairman
of the Commission and such meetings begin the first week in March, with
area meetings being held simultaneously;
that the entire Commission be
called into extra session for reports and to formulate recommendation s.
4.
That the heads of agencies suggested in Program I I be contacted as to
their earliest availabilities for meeting with the Commission.
- 5 -
�ADDITIONAL PROGRAMS
( FOR DISCUSSION)
I.
Compiling of a simplified directory of community services - Check with
C. P. C. as to the status of their directory.
2.
Project involving newcomers into Atlanta - See what C. P. C. has done
on this.
3.
Establishing Speakers' Bureau.
4.
Forming of an Advisory or Auxiliary Committee, for the Commission,
names to be selected from proposed names for the Commission itself or
by other means.
5.
Internship program for students either in the field of social work,
education, health, etc.
6.
Prog r am to involve more groups and individuals for working with problems
involving the entire City .
- 6 -
�June 8, 1970
Mr . Robert E . Scott, Chairman
Mr . Mi chael Banks , Representative
Central Youth Council
E c onomic Oppo rtunity Atlanta~ Inc .
101 Marietta Street Building
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Gentlemen :
This is to acknowledge your letter requesting representation for the
Central Youth Council on the C~munity Relati ons Commission. The
Board of Aldermen at it next meeting will con ider an oi-dinance to
amend the City Charter to provide for the addition of two student
members on the Community Relations Commission.
We hope that the Aldermen will provide the e po ition to be filled
by young citizens of Atlanta. I will certainly consider your :reque t
if and when I am called upon to make the e appointments.
Sincer ly,
Sam Ma
SM :sdm
co: Rev. Sam Willi m
11
�Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.
101 Marietta Str eet Bldg.
William
w.
11
Atlanta, Georgia 30303 •
Allison
Executive Administrator
May 28, 1970
The Honorable Sam Massell
Mayor of the City of Atlanta
Atlanta City Hall
68 Mitchell Street, S. W.
Atlanta, Georgia
30303
Dear Mayor Massell:
This letter is in regards to having representation of the Central Youth
Council (CYC) on the Connnunity Relations Connnission.
We, the representatives (Robert Scott and Michael Banks) of the Central
Youth Counci l would like to know as soon as possible how we would go
about getting an established position on the Connnunity Relations
Connnission, if at all possible.
Time is of the utmost importance.
Yours truly,
Robert E. Scott
Chairman of the CYC
~7143.215.248.55
Mfchae 1 Banks
Central Youth Council, Representative
RS/MB:dt
cc :
Reverend Sam Williams
�c,,e-c ..... .. .
Th e 1-\1- la nta Co mmunity Re loti ons Commi ss ion he ld a tow n ha ll n·,2e ting for
the re sid ents in the Pe c!c hfre :::,- Tenth Stc0et areci in on e ffort to .beg in som e kind of
.
.
dialogu e betwe e n t he youns_1 peo p le , long -li me res ic.!ents, a nd prope rty owners and
to de term ine v,heth e r J-h e ci ty ~erv i(: es and reso urc es are adequa le for thc1J- area .
The are as of conc ern see med to 62 cs fc:ill o,vs:
Priority Numbe r l:
Jo bs
Pri orit? l'-lu mbe r 2:
Hous ing
Priorif-y l'-lu,-;.be r 3:
Drug traffic and drug haz ards
PrioriJ-y !'-lumber 4: _Th e ne ed for a c omrnun if-y house thal· wou ld al so house
health fo c ili t ies one! provid e Foi· co(Jnse li ng.
Priority h! u:11: ,er 5:
Th e need J·o mak e p la ns for o pro jected influ;-: of
vocati o n Hip pies from oth e r cit ies
· Priority Nu mbe r 6:
Th e nee d for po lice potro lli ng lh e d ist ri ct viithoL1t
harassme nt of th e res ide nl s
Pri or ity t'--lu mber 7:
N e ig hborhood c leonup fa c iliti es
(N eeJ fo r more str ee t gmboge c ons)
Priorily Numbe r 8:
The need for
a
c e nt er to c ope w ith th e prob lem s of
runowoy p eop le
./
,•
. .
Th e Cornrnu1]ily Re lat io ns Commission is. concerned with th e Te nth Stre et area
.1:
.
in th e sam e way ih a l· il ha s con c erned itse lf with oth e r ne:flhbor hood areas in !·he c ity.
However , we re oli ze tha t the prob lems in thi s arna are mad ~ more compl ex by th e
presence of drug s and th e confli~l betwee n !·he life sl·yl es of th e lo ng-·t irn e res id e nts
a~d th e yo uns;cr res ide nt s.
Th e Comm iss ion app lauds th e e fforts by lh e y oung peop le
in hand li ng th e drug prob lem and for using th e ir own pressu res to rid th e ne ighborh ood
of chug pushers a nd to keep new d,ug pu shers fro m corning info I he area .
O bv ious ly Atl anta has no d es ir e or inc linoti o n to ma ke th e city into a po li cz
cHy by prohibif·in9 anyone fr om ch oos ing to come to At lanta to li ve or to e xist .
However , th e Cornmhsic,n does urg e that wha ~evc r mea ns arc a va i lob le he 1_1sed
[O
get
informat ion to Hi ppi es in oth er arecs as to t he lock of job opporl uni t ies t hat ex ist a!l
over J\1- lcrn: o a~ we ll a s th e io~k of h:->us ing for the cx is:·ing popu latfon.
We urge
tLa f !his ir1 fo,n,c1r ion he dissir.1 inC1! ed os we ! I r:·s th ~--irif.:,r:·:,o fia:1 that the c ity gov~;·nn.2 r,t
int ends to use ,ve~y resource it has and eve n to usi ng wha tever o:Jts ide oge nc..ics c:r ~"'
avai labl e in a hugh crc1-:: kdo,,vn po licy on the so le of n~rcotics th roug hou t 1·he cily .
Tl ,e Commi ss ion 0e liE:Vcs thcit th '2:nf·s h::Ju!cl be no r ,isu ncle rs~a11cl inJ ci"s to th e cli mo l·e o f
L
1
�opini on .in regard to t he imp lemen tot ion of the ci ty gove rnment itse lf, its po lic e
.
.
depar tme nl ond a ll other a genc ies in po lici ng o f th e overa ll city. We ti.ink it is
only fai r to te ll you ng peop le v.; hat to expec t if !h ey ar ri ve in Atlan ta w ith out a
job and with out visi b le meo ns of su ppo rt.
.


.


Up unf-i : now coex iste nce in th e area ha s -~ee n made poss ibl e by con ce rn ed
citi ze ns, by ch u,c hes , by ind ivi·J uu l members of t he med ical profess ion, which
includ es psychi atr is ts . We are ~Jrateful ior the conc erned peop le a nd orga ni z ati ons .
· As ind ivid ua ls and as. a ci ty comm iss ion we wi ll con l·inue to wo rk wi1·h th e
commu nity in a tl' emp ting to fu rth e r a peac eful, c reat ive comm unity .. We in no
,vay subsc ri be to f·he J·heory for t hi s comm unity or ciny comm unity in Amedeo th a t
if y ou ignore prob lems they will go away . The gr im lesso n of other citi es whic h
subscri be !·o thi s phil os_o phy has bee n heeded .
Stree !· area on Jun e
.{;-td
We -in te nd to re!urn to th ~ Te nt h
to make a report , to make suggeslio ns , cmd to list e n to
th e res ide nts . In th e mea nlirn e , th ere are c erta in recommenda ti ons which 'Ne wou ld
li ke to make now a nd whi c h we be li ev e wou ld be suPi=:::n ted by th e ma jority of t he
peop fe in the c omm un ity .
I
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LAW
O F"F"ICES
KALER, KARESH & RUBIN
1820 FULTON NATIONAL BANK BUILDING
CABLE ADDRESS:
IRVING K . KALER
SANFORD R. KARESH
MARTIN
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303
" KKATTY" ATLANTA
December 23, 1966
AREA CODE 404
525-6886
H. RUBIN
TELEPHONE;
PAUL M . M'?LARTY, JR .
C. LAWR ENCE JEWETT, JR.
Hon. Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor, City of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mayor Allen:
I know you have received the letter from
Mr. Lucien Oliver resigning from the Community Relations Commission. I recommend that you appoint an
outstanding businessman to succeed Mr. Oliver. There
are a number of successful and prominent businessmen
who I am convinced will add great strength and balance
to this program.
Yours very sincerely,
~t.i143.215.248.55n
Community Relations Commission
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Hon. Sam Massell, Jr .
Vice-Mayor, City of Atlanta
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OFFICE OF CLEl{K 01•' llOAlW OF ALDEHMEN
CITY. OF A'l'LAN'l'A, GEORGIA
AN ORDINANCE TO AflliNO THE CllARTER
BY: SAH NASSELL, JR., C!IARIMAN ALDERMANIC IIUrli\.N RELATIONS COMMITTEE
AN ORDINAi'iCE TO AflENO TIIE CIIARTErt OF THE CITY OF ATLAF,TA
TO CREATE A CO::-J~iUNITY RELATlONS CO)ff,!J.SSION FOR TIU~ CITY
OF ATLAJ.\JTA, GEORGIA, PROVIDE FOR l1EMBERSUIP, DEFINE THE ·
PURl~os~s AND DUTIES OF THE COMMISSION AND OBJECTIVES
SOUGHT TO BE ACCOMPLISHED, PROVIDE FOR 'fl-IE ORGANIZATION AND
OPERATIONS OF THE COMMISSION.
BE AND IT IS HEREBY ENACTED BY THE .MAYOR AND BOARD OF ALDER.MEN OF
'THE . :
· CITY OF ATLANTA AS . FOLL~-lS:
· Section l. There is .h ereby' created a Community Relations Commission for
the .City of Atlanta, Georgia; to be known as the Community Relations Commission.
The Commission shall be composed · of twenty members~ serving without compens a tion,
all bonafide adult residents and representatives of all segments of the City of
Atlanta, Georgia, to be appointed qy the Mayor with approval of the Board of
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Aldermen, one of whom shall be designated by the Mayor as its chairman at the
organizatio.nal meeting and at each annua l mee ting therea f ter. Seven members of
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said Commission shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of business. Of
the twenty members first appointed, six shall be appointed for on~ year, seven
for two years and seven for three years; ther eafter all appointments to the Commission
shall be for a term of three years. Any member may be removed by the Mayor for
failure to attend meetings or inattention to duties. In the event of death, res i g-
serve £or the unexpired period 0£ the time for which such member . .has been appointed
provided, however, that all members shall continue in office until their succe ssors
shal l have be en appointed.
SECTION 2.
The Commission, at it s organizationa l mee ting and each
annual meeting thereaft~r, shall elect from its membership a vice-cha i r~u n; a
second vice -chairman; and a secretary • .The ch a irman, vi~e-chairma n, s econd vice chair ma n, a nd s ecre tary shall have and perform s uch duties as are co~.monly associated
with t heir r es pective t itles. The office rs o f the Commission s hall be <ind co~scituce
the exe cut i ve commi t tee o f t he Commis sion wh ich shall exerci s e s uch powers oi the
Commission between i t s regular meetings as may be authorized by the Commissio,,. The
. Commission sha ll be further authori zed to appoint and fix the membersh i p of such
numbe r of otonding and temporary commi t t ees as it may find exped i ent f or the per formance of its duties,
SECTI ON J. The c·ommunity Rc l .1tion s Conuni ss ion ·sha ll mee t :.it lc.:1st o,1ci:?

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each mo nth at such time .:ind place .:w shall be fixed by the Commission by its
standing r u l~s . Special meetings shall be called by the chairman> or if°\ his absence
by the rank i ng vic~-chairman, or on the written request of any two members of the
execut ive c o nmittec·, or upon the written request of a majority (ten members) of
sail Commiss i on. All such requests sh.:1ll st.:1tc the purpose or purposes for which
such s pe cia l meeting is to be
called, and shall be filed . with the iccretary at
least twent y -f our hours before the time of the special meeting so-called and
authorized. Such req~est and call for a special meeting shall be read at the meeting
and entered i n the minutes, and no business shall be transacted except that stated
in the reque s t for such
special meeting. The Commission shall prepare .its own
agenda for a l l meetings and establish its own rules of order or ·adopt Robert's
Rule of Orde r for the conductof their meetings.
SECTION 4.
The functions, duties and po~ers of the Commission shall be:
(a) · To foster mutual understanding, tolerance, and respect
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among all economic, social, religiouus, and ethnic groups
in the City.
(b)
To help make it possible for each citizen, regardless of
· race, color, creed, religion, national origin or ancestry,
to develop his talents and abilities wi thout limitation.
(c)
To aid in permitting the City of Atlanta to bcnc;ic from
the fullest realization of its human resources.
(d)
To investigate, discourage a11d seek to prevent discriminatory
practices againit any individual· because of race, color,
creed, religion, national origin 00r ancestry.
(e)
To attempt to act as conciliator in controversies involving
human relations,
(f)
To cooperate with the Federal, State, and City agcncibs in
dev~loping harmonious hum3n relations.
(g) · To coopenate
in th e development of educational programs
dedicated to the improvement of human rel.:1tio ns ,~i::l,, and to
enlist the support o f , civic leaders; civic, rcli s io~s ,
veterans, labo1.·, industri a l, co:iuncrcial nn<l clccmosyn:.ry
groups; and privat e a gc nc i co cncaged in the inculcnti0n of
ideals of tolerance, mutual rc::pec t and u·n dcrst~rndin~;.
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(h)
To make studien, and to h.:ivc studies made, . in the
field ·of human relation::;, and to prepare and disoemtnacc
reports of such ntudies.
(i)
To rcconwcnd to the Mayor and Board of Aldermen sue~
ordinances as will aid in carrying out the purposes of
this ordinance.
(j)
To subm{t'an annual report to the MayQr and Board of
Aldermen.
(k)
To accept grants and donations on behalf of the City
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from foundations and others for the purpose of carrying
out the above listed functions, subject to the approval
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of the Mayor and Doard of Aldermen.
SECTION 5.
Pursuant to the named functions and duties of the Community
Relations Commission, it is empowered to hold hearings and take the testimony .of
any person under oath. · The Commission, after the completion of any hearing, shall
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make a report in writing to the Mayor setting forth the facts found by it and its
recommendations. At any hearing before the Commission a'witness ·shall have the
right to be advised by Counsel present during such hearings.
SECTION 6.
The Commission shall, with the approval of the Nayor and
Board of Aldermen, employ an executive director, and the Mayor and Board of Alder.:nen
shall fix his compen~ation. the exec~tive direGtor shall be a person with training
and experience in inter-group
and inter-racial relations. The executive director
shall coordinate the activites o.f the Commission and its staff. He may, with the
Mayor's approval and within the limits o f the budget of the Commissior., employ
su ch staff as he needs, and the ex~cutivc _dircctor shall .fix the compensation of
such staff, subject to the approval of the Personnel Doard of the City.
SECTION 7.
The Commission shall prepare annually a budget for the
ensuing fiscal year , and shall submit s uch budget to the Mayor and Board o ~ Aldermen
of their approval. Except for the initial year, the Coli'UTlission .shall prc?arc and
submit each budget no later than September 30 of each year. All Bud£etary e~pen~~tures
shall be authorized by the Commission .
SECTION 8.
In the event th at private funds are made avail ab:c f 0r
special projects, s ur veys, and educntional programs, the Hayor is a utl.01·i~c d, up on.
recommendation of the Commission, to enter into such contract or cont1·acts with
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private in<liviJuals, associations, or nr oup G desir ing to promo~e the purpose of
said Commission by furnishing fonds fo r sai<l purpose::;.
SECTION 9.
The scrvic~s of dll other departments of The C~ty of
Atlanta shall be made available to the C~1~ission upon its request for cu6h
services subject to· the ability and capacity of said Department to render sa.me.
Infonnation in the possession of any department, boa.rd, or agency of. the City of .
Atlanta shall be furnished to the Commission upon its request, and to the extent
permitted by law, subject to the ability and capacity o_f the dpcartr.ient to furnish
it. , Upon the refusal by any director or head of any department; _board, or agency
of the City to furnish any informa.tion which has been requested by the Comrniss ion,
the matter shall be referred to the :Mayor who shall determine whether such information
shall be furnished to the Commissio.1, and the decision of the Mayor shall be finaL-·
SECTION 10.
The Nayor is authorized to allocate adequate office space_
and to proviqe the necessary facilities in the City Hall for said Corr..-nissi on if
the office space and fa~ilities are available. If office space and facilities are
not available in the City Hall, then the MayoF is authorized to secure adequate
office space and to provide the necess ary facilities as convenient to the City
Hall as possible.
SECTION 11.
If any section of this ordinance be held-to be unconstitu-
tional or otherwise _invalid by any Court of ·competent jurisdiction, then such section
~hall be considered
sppijrntely and npijrt from th~ remaining provision of this
ordinance, said section to be complet e ly separable from the remaining provisions
of this ordinance and the remaining provisions of this ordinance shall remain in
f ul l for ce and effect.
SECTION 12. The provisions of thi s ordinanc·e shall be included and
incorporated in the Charter and Related Laws of the City

Atlanta, as a n add ition
thereto .
SECTION 13.
That a copy of thi s proposed ame ndment t o the Ch-1rtcr .: rnd
Related Laws of the City of Atlanta shall be f iled in the Office of the Ckr:, of the
Mayor and Board of Aldermen and in the Of fi cc of the Cl erk of the Supc~:ior Cou-:.:t of
Fulton County and that the "Notice o f Propos ed .i\mc ndmc nt to the Chart01.· :: ml Rcl;1l: eci
Laws of the City o f Atlanta 11 , .:ittached here t o, marked
"Exhib it A" an,: r.,adc :.. p,1r t
of this ordinance, be published once a wee k for tl1rcc weeks in a ncw~~- r ~r , o i
general
circulation in the City of Atlan t a or t he off icial orsnn of t ul t on County
and that a copy of said advertisement be nttachcd to tl1is ordinance prior co i ts
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final adoption by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen. ·
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SECTION 14.
That all ordin~rncen and parta . of orclinancea in cqnflict
herewith arc hcrcbi repealed.
ADOPTED
By . Board of Aldermen November 7, 1966
APPROVED
.J,.
A true copy,
Clerk
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November 8, 1966.
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NOTICE OF PROPOSED Ai'-1EI'.1}MENT TO
CHARTER OF TIIE CITY OF ATLANTA
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NOTICE is hereby given that .'..l_n ordinance hc:1s bcc:n
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introduced to amend the Charter and Related Laws of the City '
of Atlanta to create a Conununity Relations Commission for the
City ·of Atlanta, Georgia,_ provide for membership, define the
purposes and duties of the Commission and objectives sought to
be accompl~shed, provide for the organization and oper~tions of
the Commission.
A copy of the proposed amendment to the Charter is
on file ~n the Office 6£ the City Clerk -of Atlanta and
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the Office of the Clerk of. the Superior Court of Fulton
and DeKalb C6unties, Georgia, £cir the purpose of examination and inspection by the public.
This
day of_________....,..,....,.....,,.> 1966.
J. J. Little , City. Clerk
City of Atlanta
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�O c tober 14, 1966
To :
Alderman Rodney Cook
Mr . Bennie T . Smith
M1·s . Dorothy B . Thompson
Rev . Samuel W . Williams
From: Eliza Paschall
A meeting of the sub - committee formed to submit
recommendations concerning membership of the
Community Relations Commission has been scheduled
for Thursday, October 20 , at 3 : 30 p . m .
This meeting will be held in the offices of the Greater
Atlanta C ouncil on Human Relations at 4 Forsyth Street
in Room 209 .
Please make every effort to be present at this important
meeting .
EP:fy
cc: Mr . Sam Ma
11, Jr.
�MINUTES
HUMAN RELATIONS COMMITTEE
SEPTEMBER 29, 1966
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Members of the Human Relations Committee met at City Hall on Thursday;
September 29, 1966, at ll:00 a. m. with the following members present:
Alderman Rodney Cook
Alderman Richard Freeman
Mr. Charles Hart
Alderman Charles Leftwich
Vice Mayor Sam Mas sell, Jr., Acting Chairman
Alderman Everett Millican
Mrs. Eliza Paschall
Mr. Bennie T. Smith
Rev. Samuel W. Williams
Also present were:
Mr. Dan E. Sweat
Director of Governmental Liaison
Mr. Jim Pilcher
City Attorney's Offic e
The meeting was called to orde r by Mr. Mas sell and the first order of
business was the election of officers for the Committee. Upon motions
duly made, seconded and pass e d, the following officers were elected:
Mr. Sam Mas sell, J r ., Chairman
Rev. Samuel W . Williams, Vice Chairman
The Committee the n reviewed the draft ordinance for the establishme n t
of a human relations commission and the following actions w e re taken :
Section 1 : Upon m oti on duly made, seconded and p asse d, i t was agreed
t he c o mmission should be called the Community Relations Commission.
U pon motion d uly made, sec on d ed and p a s se d , i t wa s agree d tha t seven (7 )
members of the total of twenty (2 0) members shoul d constitute a quorum
rather than ten (10) members as called for in the draft.
It was agreed that the phras e "member s hip shall include representation
of all segments of the City" be included in this section.
�I .
Page Two·
Section 2:
Approved as submitted.
Section 3:
Approved as submitted.
Section 4: Upon motion duly made, seconded and unanimously passed,
sub-section (d) was amended to read as follows: "To investigate, discourage
and seek to prevent discriminatory practices against any individual because
of race, color, creed, religion, national origin or ancestry."
l
1.
Section 5: The first sentence was amended to read as follows: "The
commission shall, with the approval of the Mayor and Board of Aldermen,
employ an executive director, and the Mayor and Board of Aldermen
shall fix his compensation. "
The last sentence was amended to read as follows: "He may, with the
Mayor's approval and within the limits of the budget of the commission,
employ such staff as he needs, and the executive director shall fix the
compensation of such staff subjec~ to the approval of the Personnel Board
of the City of Atlanta. "
Section 6:
Approved as submitted.
Section 7:
Approved as. submitted.
Section 8: The first sentence was amended to .read as follows: "The
,
services of all other departments of the City of Atlanta shall be made
available to the commission upon its request for such services subject
to the extent of the personnel that they have. 11
The second sentence was amended to read as follows: "Information in
the possession of any department, board, or agency of the City of
Atlanta shall be furnished to the commission upon its request, and to
the extent permitted by law and based on the ability of the department,
board or agency to provide such information. "
S e ction 9: This section was amended to read as .follows: "The Mayor
is authorized to allocate adequate office space and to provide the necessary.
facilities in the City Hall for said commission if the office space and
facilities are available or to secure space as convenient to the City
Hall as possible. 11
Section 10: Approved as submitted.
�i
Page Three
Section 11: Approved as submitted.
Upon motion duly made, seconded and passed, it was agreed to add a
separate section (Section 12) to the ordinance to provide subpoena power
for investigative purposes. The wording of this section will be left to
the City Attorney's Office.
There being no further discussion on this matter, it was agreed that the
ordinance, as amended, be submitted to the Board of Aldermen at their
regular meeting on Monday, October 3. In order for this commission to
be a charter commission, it will be necessary for the ordinance to be
submitted to the Board of Aldermen three times.
The Resolution establishing the Human Relations Committee called for
the Committee to submit recommendations concerning membership of
the Commission. · Mr. Mas sell appointed the following committee to
submit such recommendations to the H,uman Relations Committee for
consideration :
Mrs. Eliza Paschall, Chairman
Alderman Rodney Cook
Mr. Bennie T. Smith
. Mrs. Dorothy B. Thompson
Rev. Samuel W. Williams
Con c e rning the matter of the budge t of the Commission, Alderman Millican
sugge sted this not be set until the p e rmanent Commission is appointed
so th at it can consider the budgetary requirements. Alderman Leftwich
and Alderman M i llican we r e appointed as a committee of t w o to bring the
m a tte r to the attention of the Comptroller and the Finance Commit tee of
the Boar d of Aldermen that at a future date a r~quest for funds for this
Commission will be forthcoming.
In revi ewi ng t he m in'4t e s of the pr evious me e tin g , it
Aldermen Cock, Freeman
lUH.i
Wi:l,t,
n o t e d t hat
Millican and Mr. Benni~ Smith should
be add e d t o the list of m e mbe r s p re s e nt . · It w as asked that the m inu tes
be correcte d t o include these n ame s .
Mr. Hart inquired if this committee coul d make r ecommendati on s to the
department heads and, if so, suggested the B o ard of Education be asked
to work with Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. to es tablish a program t«;>
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keep the school libraries open in the evenings. This was discussed but
it was felt this could be more effectively handled under the direction of
the permanent Commission.
There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned. The next
meeting will be scheduled after Mrs. Paschall's committee completes
its re commendations.
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�MINUTES
HUMAN RELATIONS COMMITTEE
SEPTEMBER 29, 1966

Members of the Human Relations Committee met at City Hall on Thursday;
September 29, 1966, at ll:00 a. m. with the following members present:
Alderman Rodney Cook
Alderman Richard Freeman
Mr. Charles Hart
Alderman Charles Leftwich
Vice Mayor Sam Mas sell, Jr., Acting Chairman
Alderman Everett Millican
Mrs. Eliza Paschall
Mr. Bennie T. Smith
Rev. Samuel W. Williams
Also present were:
Mr. Dan E. Sweat
Director of Governmental Liaison
Mr. Jim Pilcher
City Attorney's Office
The meeting was called to order by Mr . Mas sell and the first order of
business was the election of officer s for the Committee. Upon motions
duly made, seconded and passed, the following officers were elected:
Mr. Sam Mas sell, Jr., Chairman
Rev. Samuel W. Williams, Vice Chairman
The Committee then reviewed the draft ordinance for the establishment
of a human relations commission and the following actions were taken:
Section 1: Upon motion duly made, seconded and passed, it was agreed
the commission should be called the Community Relations Commission.
Upon motion duly made, seconded and passed, it was agreed that seven (7)
members of the total of twenty (20) members should constitute a quorum
rather than ten (10) members as called for in the draft.
It was agreed that the phrase " membership shall include representation
of all segments of the City" be included in this section.
�Page Two·
Section 2:
Approved as submitted.
Section 3:
Approved as submitted.
Section 4: Upon motion duly made, seconded and unanimously passed,
sub-section (d) was amended to read as follows: "To investigate, discourage
and seek to prevent discriminatory practices against any individual because
of race, color, creed, religion, national origin or ancestry."
Section 5: The first sentence was amended to read as follows: "The
commission shall, with the approval of the Mayor and Board of Aldermen,
employ an executive director, and the Mayor and Board of Aldermen
shall fix his compensation. "
The last sentence was amended to read as follows: "He may, with the
Mayor's approval and within the limits of the budget of the commission,
employ such staff as he needs, and the executive director shall fix the
compensation of such staff subject to the approval of the· Personnel Board
of the City of Atlanta. "
Section 6:
Approved as submitted.
Section 7:
Approved as submitted.
Section 8: The first sentence was amended to .read as follows: "The
services of all other departments of the City of Atlanta shall be made
available to the commission upon its request for such services subject
to the extent of the personnel that they have,"
The second sent ence was amended to re ad as follows: "Information in
the possession of any department, board, or agency of the City of
Atlanta shall be furnished to the commission upon its request, and to
the extent permitted by law and based on the ability of the department,
board or agency to provide such information, "
Section 9: This section was amended to read as follows: "The Mayor
is authorize d to allocate adequate office space and to provide the neces·s ary.
facilities in the City Hall for said commission if the office space and
facilities are available or to secure space as convenient to the City
Hall as possible. 11
Section 10: Approved as submitted.
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Page Three
Section 11: Approved as submitted.
Upon motion duly made, seconded and passed, it was agreed to add a
separate section (Section 12) to the ordinance to provide subpoena power
for investigative purposes. The wording of this section will be left to
the City Attorney's Office.
There being no further discussion on this matter, it was agreed that the
ordinance, as amended, be submitted to the Board of Aldermen at their
regular meeting on Monday, October 3. In order for this commission to
be a charter commission, it will be necessary for the ordinance to be
submitted t o the Board of Aldermen three times.
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The Resolution establishing the Human Relations Committee called for
the Committee to submit recommendations concerning membership of
the Commission. · Mr. Massell appointed the following committee to
submit such recommendations to the Human Relations Committee for
consideration:
Mrs. Eliza Paschall, Chairman
Alderman Rodney Cook
Mr. Bennie T. Smith
Mrs. Dorothy B. Thompson
Rev. Samuel W. Williams
Concerning the matter of the budget of the Commission, Alderman Millican
suggested this not be set until the permanent Commission is appointed
so that it can consider the budgetary requirements. Alderman Leftwich
and Alderman Millican were appointed as a committee of two to bring the
matter to the attention of the Comptroller and the Finance Committee of
the Board of Aldermen that at a future date a request for funds for this
Commission will be forthcoming.
In reviewing the minutes of the previous meeting, it was noted that
Aldermen Coe,k 1 Freema.n and Milliean and Mr. Bennie Sn<tith should
be added to the list of members present,
be c or rected to include these names.
It was asked that the minutes
Mr. Hart inquired if this committe e could make recommendations to the
department heads and, if so, suggested the Board of Education be asked
to work with Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. to establish a program to
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Page Four
keep the school libraries open in the evenings. This was discussed but
it was felt this could be more effectively handled under the direction of
the permanent Commission.
There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned. The next
meeting will be scheduled after Mrs. Paschall's committee completes
its recommendations.
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�ATLANTA,GEOROIA
ROUTE SLIP
TO: _
_,M
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'""1""a=s.,__s=e....ll...________________
FROM: Dan E. Swea t ,
Jr.
0
For your information
O
Please re fe r to the attached c orrespondence and ma ke the
nece s s a ry reply.
O
Advise me the s ta tus o f the a tta ch e d.
Attached is a copy of a draft of the
minutes of the last meeting of the
Human Relations C ommittee !or your
approval.
After you have had an
opportunity to review the minutes , let
me know if you would like for my office
t o m ake copies of the minutes and send
them out.
Da n Sweat
FOR M 25- 4- S
�I'
MINUTES
HUMAN RELATIONS COMMITTEE
SEPTEMBER 29, 1966
Members of the Human R e l a tions C o mmittee met at City Hall on Thursday,
September 29, 19 66 , at ll:00 a. m. with the following members present:
Aldennan Rodne y C o ok
Alderman R i chard Freeman
Mr. Charl e s H a rt
Alderman Charles L e ftwich
Vice Mayor Sam M a s sell, Jr., Acting Chairman
Alderman Everett Millican
Mrs. Eliza Paschall
Mr. Bennie T. Smith
Rev. Samuel W. Williams
Also present were:
Mr. Dan E. Sweat
Director of Governmental Liaison
Mr. Jim Pilch e r
City Attorney's Office
The meeting was call e d to order by Mr. Mas sell and the first order of
busine ss was the election of officers for the Committee. Upon motions
duly made, seconded and passed, the following officers were elected:
Mr. Sam Mas s e ll, Jr., Chairman
R e v. Samuel W . Williams, Vice Chairman
The C ommitte e th e n revi e we d th e draft or d inanc e for the establis h m e nt
of a human r e lati ons commission and the following actions we r e take n:
S e c t i on 1: Up on motion duly m a d e, s e con d e d a n d p asse d , it was ag r ee d
the commi ssi on s ho uld b e c a lle d t h e Community R e l ati ons Commi s sion.
U pon m oti on d uly ma d e, s e con ded a nd p assed, it wa s agreed t h a t seven (7)
member s of the tot al o f twenty (2 0) members sh oul d c onstitute a quorum
rather than ten (10) memb er s as call e d for i n th e draft.
It was agreed that the p h ra s e " membership shall include representation
of all segments of the City " be included in this section.
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Page Two
Section 2·
Approved as submitted.
Section 3:
Approved as submitted.
Section 4: Upon motion duly made, secon ded and unanimously passed,
sub-section (d) was amended to read as follows: 11 To investigate, discourage
and seek to prevent discriminatory practices against any individual because
of race, color, creed, religion, national origin or ancestry. 11
Section 5: The first sentence was amended to read as follows: 11 The
cormnission shall, with the approval of the Mayor and Board of Aldermen,
employ an exe cutive director, and the Mayor and Board of Aldermen
shall fix his compensation. 11
The last sentence was amended to read as follows: 11 He may, with the
Mayor I s approval and within the limits of the budget of the commission,
employ such staff as he needs, and the e xecutive director shall fix the
compe nsation o f s uch staff s ubject to the approval of the P e rsonne l B o ard
of the City of Atlanta. 11
S e ction 6:
Approved as submitte d.
S ect i on 7:
Approved a s s ubm itte d.
Section 8: The first sentence was
services of all other departme n ts
available to the commission upon
to the e x t ent o f the p e r s on n e l t hat
ame nded to read as follows: 11 The
of the City of Atlanta shall be made
its r e que st f or such servic e s subje c t
the y h ave . 11
T he second sent en c e was amende d t o rea d as fo llows : 11 Information i n
th e poss e ssion of any department, board, or a ge ncy of the City of
Atlanta shall b e f u rnishe d to t h e commi ssion u pon its r e quest , a nd to
t he extent p ermitted by law a nd based on the abili ty of the depa rtment,
b oard o r agenc y to provid e s u c h i n formation . 11
Section 9: This section was amended to read as follows: "The Mayor
is aut horize d t o a llo cate ade quate offic e space an d to p r o v i de the necessary
facilities in the City Hall for s aid c ommi s s ion if t he offi ce space and
facilities are avai labl e or to secu re space as c o nveni ent to the City
Hall as possible. 11
Section 10: Approved as submitted.
�Page Three
S ection 11: Approved as submitted.
Upon motion duly made, seconded and passed, it was agreed to add a
separate section (Section 12) to the ordinance to provide subpoena power
for investigative purposes. The wording of this section will be left to
the City Attorney 1 s Office.
There being no further discussion on this matter, it was agreed that the
ordinance, as amended, be subn1itted to the Board of Aldermen at their
regular meeting on Monday, Octob er 3. In order for this commission to
be a charter commission, it will be necessary for the ordinance to be
approv:ed by the Board of Aldermen three times.
Si-l-b°'" ;
nu 4--o
The Resolution establishing the Human Relations Committee called for
the Committee to submit recommendations concerning membership of
the C ommission. Mr. Mas sell appointed the following committee to
submit such recommendations to the Human Relations Committee for
consideration:
Mrs. Eliza Paschall, Chairman
Alderman Rodney Cook
Mr. Bennie T. Smith
Mrs. Dorothy B. Thompson
Rev. Samuel W. Williams
C oncerning the matter of the budget of the Commission, Alderman Millican
suggested this not be set until the permanent Commission is appointed
so that it can consider the budgetary requirements. Alderman Leftwich
and Alderman Millican were appointed as a committee of two to bring the
matter to the attention of the Comptroller and the Finance C ommittee of
the Board of Aldermen that at a future date a request for funds for this
Commission will be forthcoming.
In r evi ewin g the minutes of the pr e vious meeting, it was noted that
Alde r men Cook, Fre e man and Millican and Mr. B ennie Smith should'
be added to the list of m embers present. It was asked that the minutes
b e c o rrec t ed to include these names.
Mr. Hart inquired if this committee could make recommendations to the
department heads and, if so, suggested the Boar d of Edu cati on be asked
to work with Economic Opportunity Atlanta, I nc. to establish a program to
�Page Four
keep the school libraries open in the evenings. This was discussed but
it was felt this could be 1nore effectively handled under the direction of
the permanent Commission.
There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned. The next
meeting will be scheduled after Mrs. Paschall's committee completes
its recommendations.
�October 4 , 1966
Mr . Raphael B . Levine
Pres i dent of the Boa rd of Tr u stees
Unitar i an Universalist Congregati on of Atlanta
1911 Cliff Valley Way , N . E .
Atl anta, Georgia 30329
Dear Mr . Levine :
Thank you for your letter of September 15 recommending
the establishment of a Mayor 's Aldermanic Council on Human
Relations .
The establishment of such a Council has been recommended
to the Board of Aldermen and passed first reading by the
full Aldermanic B o rd on 1onday afternoon.
I am sure that uch a Council can be very useful in helping
to resolve many of the crucial problems facing Atlan ta .
Sincerely yours ,
I v an Allen, Jr .
Mayor
IAJr:fy
�UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CONGREGATION OF ATLANTA
EUGENE PICKETT, MINISTER
September 15, 1966
The Mayor of the City of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
My dear Mr. Mayor:
I wish to express, on behalf of the Board of Trustees, UnitarianUniversalist Congregation of Atlanta, our concern over the recent
events which have seriously disturbed the interracial climate in
Atlanta. We feel that the time is due, and past due, for some really
constructive action to be taken in this area- -action which only the
City Government is in a position to implement.
At the same time, we want to commend the obvious solicitude with
which you and other leaders in Atlanta have grappled with the immediate problems raised by the shooting incident, the personal
bravery shown by yourself and the police force, and the rapidity
with which the murder suspects were apprehended.
It is becoming daily more apparent that meaningful and constant communication among the various factions involved in our city's dilemma
is a crucial ingredient to its solution. We believe that the most
useful single action which could be taken at this time is the establishment of a Mayor's Aldermanic Council on Human Relations, which
would be empowered to call to its meetings not only concerne d citizens
in the various private organizations, but also ranking officers in all
branches of the City Government. Such a council should have quasiofficial status, and should have the ear of the Mayor and the Alder manic Board at all times . Of the essence in the usefulness of such a
Council would be the fact that its recommendations would be taken seriously .
1911 CLIFF VALLEY WAY NE
ATLANTA GEORGIA 30329
TEL : 634-5134
�Members of this Congregation, and of our Denomination generally,
have worked unceasingly since our beginnings in the field of civil
rights and of human wellbeing generally. We have accepted both
hard work and danger--as in the case of James Reeb in Selma. We
are especially concerned, therefore, that outbreaks of violence and
and intransigence on both sides of the issues might jeopardize much
that has been won in the cause of better understanding and equality
of opportunity. We urge, with all vigor and earnestness, that a
major step such as the Mayor's Council suggested, be established
immediately, and that leaders of all factions give it their unqualified
support.
Very truly yours,
Raphael B. Levine
President
c/c Samuel Williams
Samuel Mass ell
Atlanta Constitution
�·--'"--'--'~ - ~ - -- - -·- -
'··'-'
·
-- . --
- - - - - ------· - -- - - -----
MINUTES
HUMAN RELATIONS COMMITTEE
SEPTEMBER 22, 1966
Members of the Human Relations Comn1ittee met at City Hall on
Thursday, September 22, 1966, at 2:00 p. m. with the followin g members
present:
Mr. Charles Hart
Alderman Charles Leftwich
Vice Mayor Sam. Mas sell, Jr.
Acting Chairman
Mrs. Eliza Paschall
Mr. L. D. Simon
Mrs. Dorothy Bolder Thompson
Mr. Dan E. Sweat, Director of Governmental Liaison for the City of
Atlanta, was also present.
Since a quorum was not present at this meeting, it was decided to again
postpone business of the Committee until the next 1neeting.
Mr. Massell requested the City A ttorney to prepare a draft ordinance
for the establishment of a Human Relations Commission. Copie s of
this draft were distribute d to th e members alon g with copies of
information prepared by Mrs. Paschall on Human Relations C ommissions
of other cities comparabl e to Atlanta. Mr. Massell s tressed the
importance of reviewing the ordinance be fore the next meeting and
agreed to mail copies to those members not present.
The meeting was adjourned at 2: 30 p. m. with the next meeting schedul ed
for Thursday, September 29, 1966, at 11:00 a. m.
-- ,
�1-·~k--··- - ·-- - --- -··- -·
MINUTES
HUMAN RELATIONS COMMITTEE
SEPTEMBER 9, 1966
Members of the Human Relations Committee met at City Hall on
Friday, September 9, 1966, at _2 :30 1 p. m. with the following members
present:
A ld - n ,1c.1 n Milton Farris
Mr. Charles Hart
Vice Mayor Sam Mas s e ll, Jr., Acting Chairman
Alderman G. Eve r e tt Millican
Mrs. Eliza P a schall
Mrs. Dorothy Bolder Thompson
Rev. Samuel Williams
Mr. Dan E. Sweat, Director of Governmental Liaison for the City of
Atlanta, was also p,resent.
The meeting was called for the purpose of formal organization of the
committee. However, due to the fact that a quorum was not present,
it was agreed to postpone this f or a future me e ting. The g roup then
discussed the role of the commi tte e a n d possible activitie s and programs
to be accomplished.
Some of the sugge ste d programs or improveme nts include d :
(1)
Alderman Farris sugge sted a n ordinance by the Board of
Alde rme n prohibiting building of h ous es on unpave d s t r eets .
(2)
The group disc u ssed a demons t ration proj ect whereby a
small area (pe rhaps a city block) in disad vantaged neigh borhoods could b e comple t e ly cle a re d a nd inexp e nsive
but s ub s t anti al s i ngle fami l y d w e lling s built b ack a s r ent a l
p:rqperty q:r a~ pu:ri;;hg,;=rn p:rope:rty, .A$ one i:!:rea is
completed the program would then move to another area
rather than taki ng in the large sections as under the present
urban rene w a l programs .
(3 )
Mr. Massell suggested that a listing of problems and a
schedule of priority of needs be compile d and suggested
the Atlanta Chapter of the N ational Ass ociation for InterGroup Relations Offic~als be contacted to obtain their
recommendations.
�,._ .........~ ..
- ------ - ···
Page Two
(4)
(5)
The group discussed the value of a survey of the re si~ents
of the disadvantaged areas to determine what they feel are
tJ1cil· ~rc..'atcst needs and problen1s. There were many
s uggestions as to how to conduc;:t such a survey including:
a.
A professional survey
b.
A survey carried out by amateurs (such as the EOA
Neighborhood Aides) as the people might discuss
their problems more freely with this group than
with professional persons
c.
Community meetings with members of the Board
of Aldermen
It was suggested that a fulltime staff and budget be recommended
as part of a permanent Human Relations Commission. It was
agreed that the City should have one person responsible for all
needs and activity in this field.
Sinc e most of the discussion c entered around the problems of housing,
it was suggested that Federal authorities from the D e partment of
Housing and Urban D evelopment be asked to attend the next meeting
to explain their -programs and the services this department can render
in solving this problem.
Mrs. Paschall agreed to review the material and information obtained
from the U. S. Conference of Mayors and the Civil Rights Commis sion
on Human Relations Commissions of other cities and prepare a brief
summary for the members of the co1nmittee.
The meeting was adjourned at 3:40 p. m. with the next meeting scheduled
for Thiu;§gey, $~pt~mb~r ii~ 1966, ~t i:o o p~ m !
�/
_ ,,,,/

I~
--•I U
'/'
I T I E.:. ARY
B ·i e fing a nd Bus Tour
S pe c ial Committee to S u rvey
S e rvic es to Slum A r e s
Wedne s day , August 10, 1966
2 :00 P .M .
Corn m i tt e 2:' oom N o. 4
C i y Hall
A t lant a, G e o r g i a
2 ; 0 0 P oMo
I
C a ll to
Q _ d e:.
- May or Ivan A ll e n
II
E xplana-'-ion of Res o l u tion - M ay o_r A llen
III
I ntrodu c t i on o f C omm itt ee M embe :. s - Mayo _ A lle n
(Al dermani c
Me m bers}
Milton F a rris, C h ai rman, Finan c e C ornmitte e
C ha r les L eftwich, C hai r m an, P arks Commi tte e
R i cha r d F reeman, C hairman, P olice C ommi tte e
Ja c k Summers , C hai rman , Publi c Works N o. 1 Corn ___i t tee
G. E verett M i lli c an C hair man, Public Wo _ks No. II C omm : te e
R odney Coo , 'C hai r m an, U rban Renewal Poli c y C o ___ m it'-ee
Jo n Fla nige n , C hairma n , Zoning C ommit t ee
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M rs . Dor ot h y Bol d e r Thomps oni 1'-i~
·
Mr . L. D . Simon i ol.3 ~ ~
, ~ . E. .,
· _
,
Mr. B e nny T. Smith , 2.cA ~ ~ ~
'-L i ~~ , ~
Mr . C ha rle s Hart , 9 0 1 ~ rn. ~
7 9 1 -1CJO,j)
M rs. Eliza Pas c all ,~ ~ <ltl . CRJc.,_"CJ. (1,- lsL,r,.-c..._, ~
--,___.,_ ~ ..jQ.U')tt-- ~ · 3a.3o.3
Re v. Sam W i lliams , · ;v...;,,__~
<-{- 3 , )'\l(h:.R&.t_ ~ , $ . LV .
•_ e0
(Summit
Memb e rs}
.Je , (
¥ ~ ~.
IV
I n:: ro duction of E a rl Landers, Admin istr ative A s st. - Mayo r _ 11 n
V
Departme nt Heads or ce sig n ated r e pr ese n t ative s each to g ive
5 - minute b,._ i e fi ng on n atur e and e xtent of s e _vices provid e d by
the ir depar t m ent. E a rl Land er s ·o i nt roduce departmental spo_-esmen.
Jerry C offe l , Planning Department:
Mr . Coffel will lo c ate areas of immedi ate c o __ c ern O!l map
and explain the D epartmen-'-!s p r o g r e s s on p r epa r ation of surv y
and planni ng a:,plicati ons . He will a l s o expl a i n 1:.a _c.out
n 1ate r ials des c : :.- i b i ng each a:..·ea, a long with individua l m aps .
(1)
�(2) Ray Nixon, Const- uction Departrnent
3) Bill Wofford, Inspections De pa r t ment
(4) J a ck Delius ~ P a rks D epc.r tment
(S) Bob S p e e _ , S a nitary De partment
( 6) Karl B e vins , Traffic Enginee _ ing De pa rtment
(7) Capt, Morris Redding, Police Departrnent
VI
Mr. Landers introduce Earl Metzger, who will not speak bu·:: who
will rn.al-:e the tour to answe _ questions on Urb n Renewal an
Public =-fousingo
VII
2: 5 p. m.
VIII
2:45 - 4:: 30 p. m.
Board bus in front o _ City Hall.
Tour of following areas:
Vine City
Blue Heaven
Cooper-Glenn
C abbage Town
Summerhill
Mayo _ Allen will handle' mike and answer questions or call en
appropriate department representative fo:. answer.
J e rry Coffel will direct driver along tour route and assist Mayor
Allen by pointing out locations, city parks, play lots and other points of
impo_ tance .
Helen Mey ers o:.:: the Planning Department will record sugges ions
and r commendations during the course of the tour .
4: 30 p. m .
-
Tour ends at City Hall.
�September 13, 1966
Mr . Sam Massell, Jr.
President of the Board of Aldermen
40 Pryor Street, S . W .
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Sam:
Attached is a draft letter to go to members of the Human
Relations Committee who were not present at the last
meeting .
There is also a draft to be sent to those who were in
attendance along with a copy of the minutes of the last
meeting.
If you will make any corrections or additions to the proposed
letters and minutes and have someone return them to my
office , we will get them out to the Committee members
immediately.
Sincerely yours,
Dan Sweat
DS:fy
E nclosures (3)
�S e p te mber 13, 1966
DRAFT
M e mbers Not Present A t Mee tin g
Dear


I regret t hat you were unable to att end the meeting of the
Human Relation s C ommittee on Fr i day , September 9 .
Due t o an insufficient number of members to constitute a
quo r um, formal organizati on of the Committee was postponed until the next regularly scheduled meeting. Thi s
meeting has been called for Thursday, September 22 , 1966 ,
at Z: 30 p . m . at City Hall in Committee Room # 2 .
....\-~Q... l ~
A copy of the minutes of Friaay •s meeting is att ched .
Sincerely yours,
Sam Mas sell, Jr.
�September 13, 196 6
DRAFT
Members Present
Dear


Attached i s a copy of a draft of m inutes of the September 9,
1966 meeting of the Human R e lations C ommittee .
Please makk your calendar to attend the next scheduled
meeting on Thursday , September 22, at 2 : 30 p . m . at City
Hall in Committee R o om # 2.
W e are looking forward to this meeting .
Sincerely yours ,
Sam Mas sell , Jr .
�HUMAN RELATIONS COMMITTEE
Member s of t he Human Re l a tions C ommittee met at City Hall
on Fri day, September 9, 1966, at 2:30 p . m . w ith the following
members present :
Alderman M ilton Farri s
Mr . Charle s Hart
Vice Mayor Sam Mas sell , Jr . , Acting Chairman
Alderman G . E v erett Millican
Mrs . Eliza Paschall
Mrs . D o rothy B ol der Thompson
Rev. Samuel Williams
M r. Dan E . Sweat, Dire ctor of Governmental Liai son for
the City of Atlanta, was also present.
The meeting was called for the purpose of organi zation of
the committee.
However , due to the fact that a quorum was not
present, it was agreed to postpone this for a future meeting .
The
group then discussed the role of the committee and possible
ctivities and programs to be accomplished.
Some of the suggested programs or improvements included:
(1) Alderman Farris suggested an ordinance by the Board
of Aldermen prohibiting building of houses on unpaved atre ts.
(2) The group discussed a demonstration project whereby
a
mall area (perhaps a city block) in the di advantaged neighborhood
could be completely cl are d and inexpen ive but substantial singl
f mily dwellings built back as rental property or as purchase
--
�- 2 -
property.
As one area is c ompleted the program would then move
to another area r a ther than taking in the l a r ge s e~tions as und er the
pre sent urban renewal programs .
(3) M r. Ma ssell suggested that a listing of pr oblems and a
schedule of prrority of needs be compile d and suggested the A tlanta
Chapter of the National Asso cia tion for Inter-Group Relations
Offi cials b e contacted to obtain their recommendations .
(4 )
T he group d iscus sed the value of a survey of the residents
of the d isadvantaged areas to determine what they feel are their
greates t needs and p r oblems .
There were many suggestions as to
how t o conduct such a survey including:
a)
A p rofessional sur ve y
b)
A survey ea1·ried out by amateurs (s uch as the
EOA Nei ghborhood Aides ) as the p ople might
discuss their problems more freely with this
group th n with professional persons
C omm.unity meetings with members of the Boa.1·d
c)
of Aldermen
(S) It wa
r commended
sugg oted th t
full time staff and budget be
s p rt of a permanent Human Relations Commission.
It w s · greed th t the City should h ve one p r on responsible for
all n
ds
nd
ctivity in thi
f
ld.
The p eopl
of th se communiti
�- 3 -
would then know where to go with their problems and have confidence
that their needs will be handled by this office.'
Since most of the discussion centered around the probl ems of
housing, it was suggested that Federal authoritie s from the Department
of Housing and Urban Development be asked to attend the next meeting
to explain their programs and the services this department can render
in solving this problem.
Mrs . Paschall agreed to review the material and information
obtained from the U. S. C onference of M a yors and the Civil Rights
Commission on the Human Relations C ommissions of other cities
and prepare a brief sununary for the memb rs of the committee .
The meeting was adjourned at 3: 4 0 p. m . with the next meeting
cheduled for Thursday, September 22, 1966, at 2: 30 p . m.
�•
r
CITY OF .ATLANT.A
CITY HALL
August 29, 1966
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
IVAN' ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Admini strative Assistant
MRS . ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR ., Director of Governmental liaison
To:
Alderman Rodney Cook
Alderman Milton Farris
Alderman John Flanigen
Alderman Richard Freeman
Mr. Charles Hart
Alderman Charles Leftwich
Alderman G. Everett Millican
Mrs. Eliza Pascall
Mr. L. D. Simon
Mr. Benny T. Smith
Alderman Jack Summers
Mrs. Dorothy Bolder Thompson
Rev. Samuel Williams
The committee of Aldermen and citizens to evaluate
services in Atlanta slum areas will hold its second
meeting on Friday, September 9, at 2 :3 0 p. m. in
Committee Room# 2 in City Hall.
At this time a report of the results of the summer
improvement pro g ram in three target neighborhoods will
be presented to th e committee.
I hope that you will make
Ivan All en, Jr .
Mayor
I A J r :fy
�CITY OF .ATLANTA
CITY HALL
ATLANTA. GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
August 29, 1966
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assi stant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison
To: All Persono Responsible for
Summer Slum Program
From: Ivan Allen, Jr.
Our summer Neighborhood Improvement Program in four of
the City's major slum areas has certainly produced significant
results.
It is important that we evaluate the success of this program to
determine future courses of action. Would you please compile
the results of the summer program in your particular department
or agency for the period through August 31 and forward it to my
office as soon after the 31st as possible?
Thanks again for the co ope ration and good work.
lAJr:fy
�CITY OF .ATLANTA
CITY HA,L L
August 26, 1966
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant
MRS . ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison
MEMORANDUM
To:
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
From:
Dan Sweat
~
A meeting is being set for
services to slum areas on
2:30 p. m.
tigate
t
I would recommend that we analyze an attempt to
evaluate our summer slum program effective August 31
and present a report to this committee at their meeting
and ask them to make recommendations or suggestions
for continuation and expansion of the program into other
areas on a year-round basis.
DS :fy
�I
WESTERN UNION
1057A EST ~UQ 1 66 AH110
A PU<, PO 10 EXTRA An..ANTA GA t 1015A EST
HONORA13LE IVAN ALLEN MAYC-R
ATt.A
THE E:XEOOTIVE fX¥.!l!ITTEE OF C£m-fl:At., CITY' NEI~SORHOOC SEf\V.!CE
CENTER WOUt.O l.tKE 10 REOOfflENO THAT A Hll'lAN RELATIONS Cct-lMISSION
VITH POWER,
A
PAID STAFF ANO GRASS ROOTS REPRESENTATION BE
APPOINTED FOR THE P~POSE Of' ACTING UPON MATTERS WHICH NEED
ATTENTION IN THE N£IGHBORHOOOS
MRS N B COAN CHAlMAN CEHTRAL CITY CITIZENS NEIGHBORHOOD
ADVISORY CO~CIL HRS BERTtiA .JACt<SON fl!AS ETMEL co·x ANO O A COOLEY
~~: t ~ I ~ OPPORTUNITY
..... -lfll:." '-.
1 270
( 1-5 1 )
Of
ATl.AHTA
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�T his is a fast message
u nless its defe rred character is inc;Hcatcd by the
p roper symbol.
WE TERN UNION
W . P. MARSHALL
CHAIR MA N
OF' THE B O A. RD
TELEGRAM
R . W. McFALL
PRESIDENT
R
The fi ling time shown _in the Jltc line on domestic tclel'rams is LOCAL T IM E at point of origin. Time of recc1rt is LOCAL T IM ,"' r,r>1nt oi Jc· instio
522P EST JUL 29 66 AE353
-A LLW219 PD ATLANTA GA 29 432P EST
. MAYOR IVAN ALLEN
CITY HALL ATLA
THIS IS TO ADVISE THAT THE NEIGHBORHOOD ADVISORY COMMITTEE
OF' THE WEST Ef\O NEIGHBORHOOD SERVICE CENTER, OF ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY
ATLANTA, IS IN ACCORD WITH THE PROPOSAL FOR YOU AM:> THE ALDERMANIC
BOARD TO APPOINT A HUMAN RELATIONSHIP COMMISSION FOR THE PURPOSE
OF ACTING UPON MATTERS WHICH NEED ATTENTION IN NEIGHBORHOODS
FRAt«;ES MCKEE CHAIRMAN
(20).
SF1201 ( R2-fi.';)
D
�r- - ------
ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY ATLAN TA, INC.
C, O, EMMERICH
ADMINISTR A TOR
PRICE NEIGHBORHOOD SERVICE CENTER
1127 CAPITOL AVENUE, S. E
0
July 28, 1966
The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor, City of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
30303
Dear Mayor Allen:
The Price Citizens Neighborhood Advisory Council would like for
you to use the power and influence of your office in urging the
approval of the recent proposal submitted by a citizens group. This
proposal would pennit the Mayor and Board of Aldennen to appoint a
Human Relations Connnission, with power and a paid staff, for the
purpose of acting upon matters which need attention in the various
neighborhoods and that "grass roots" representation be included in
the appointments.
The Price Citizens Neighborhood Advisory Council is composed of
twenty-four members, representing approx imately twenty-one thousand
"grass roots" residents of the South Atlanta area.
We sincerely believe that the above mentioned commission would
be another milestone in the great "Forward Atlanta Movement".
Sincerely yours,
~y~~
~ ,
Chairman
LW/ a
�THE FOLLOWING RESOLUTION WAS PASSED UNANIMOUSLY BY THE NASH-WASHINGTON
E.O.A. CITIZENS NEIGHBORHOOD ADVISORY COUNCIL (CNAC) ON JULY 28, 1966:
R E S OL UT I ON


"Be it resolved by the NASH-Washington CNAC that the Atlanta Mayor and
Board of Aldermen be urged to appoint a Human Relations Connnission, with
power and a paid staff, for the purpose of acting upon matters which need
attention in the neighborhoods:
Be it further resolved that 'grassroots' representation be included in the
appointments.,"
Signed:
Erwin Stevens, Chairman
Abe Wheeler
Mrs., Maudie Wheeler
Mrs ., Beatrice s. Moore
Mrs., Alice Kinsey
Mr. J., E., Owens
Mrs., Mill Mabry
Mrs. Eunice Ivey
Mrs., Laconia Lane
Mrs. Mary B., Thomas
Mrs., Yancy Green
Mrs., M., L. Moody
Mrs. Alvenia Davis
Mrs., Georgia Morrison
Mrs., R. L. Pye
Mrs., Marguerite Johnson
Mrs. Elizabeth Barker
Mrs. Parialee Faulkner
The Technical Advisory Connnittee of the NASH- Washington Center which met on
the same date , adopted a similar resolution.
Signed :
Malcolm Dean, Chairman
T., J ., Crit tenden
w.. N., Harp er
Sims G. Gordon
�Sum-Mee Neighborhood Service Center
65 Georgia Avenue, S. E.
Atlanta, Georgia
30315
August 1, 1966
The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor of the City of Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Sir:
We, the members of the Citizens Neighborhood Advisory Council
of the Sunnnerhill-Mechanicsville area, are deeply concerned
about the recent demonstrations reflecting the need for more
recreational facilities. We believe that the recommendations
proposed by the citiz~ns group convened by Mr. Bennie Smith on
Thursday, the 27th of July would be effective steps toward
removing the causes of an unrest.
We, therefore, go on record in support of the following:
I o That the May~r and Board of Aldermen be urged to
appoint a Human Relations Commission, with power
and a paid staff, for the purpose of acting upon
matters which need attention in neighborhoods and that
"grass roots" representation be included in the
appointments.
II.
That all leaders be asked to use their influence
to suspend demonstrations until the Mayor and
Board of Aldermen could act on the recommendation,
Monday, August 1, 1966 .
Very truly yours,
Mro Lewis Peters, Chairman
Citizens Neighborhood Advisory
Council
Mrs o A L Benton
Mrs. Rosa Burney
Mrs . Annie B Byrd
Mrs. Myrtle L Crew
Mr. Henry Cantrell
Mrs. Bennie Farley
Rev Ike G Powell
Mr . Andrew Jackson
Mrs. Lei la Hancock
Mr. Robert Hewel l
Mrs. Ann L Childs
Mrs. Ruby Yancey
Mrs. Sarah Houston
Mr ED James
Mrs. Sarah Baker
Mrs. Doris J ennings
Mrs. Guss i e Lewis
Mrs. Lillian Love
Mr . J A Manus
Mr. Edward Moody
Mr . Willie Richie
Miss Elizabeth Bibb
�Sum-Mee Neighborhood Service Center
65 Georgia Avenue, S. E.
Atlanta, Georgia
30315
August 1, 1966
The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor of the City of Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Sir:
We take this opportunity to express our support for the recommendations made by the citizens group convened by Mr.
Bennie Smith on Thursday, July 27th. Our members have been
polled and we are authorized to attach our names to the
following recormnendations:
I.
II.
That the Mayor and Board of Aldermen be urged to
appoint a Human Relations Commission, with power
and a paid staff, for the purpose of acting upon
matters which need attention in neighborhoods and
that "grass roo t s" representation be included in
the appointments.
That all leaders be asked to use their influence
to suspend demonstrations until the Mayor and
Boa rd of Aldermen could act on the r ecommendation,
Monday, August 1, 1966.
We believe that such a Human Relations Commis sion would
offer a permanent channel of connnunication through which
solutions to probl ems could be sort and that crisis situations
preven ted . We sincere ly hope t ha t the Mayor and Board of
. Alder men give thes e r ecommendations favorable considerat ion .
Very truly your s,
Miss Dori s Alexa nder, Convenor
Technical Neighborhood Advisory
Committee
Rev . BB Bowens
Mr . Harry Chance
Rev CD Colbert
Mr. William Dunn
Mr . CG Ezzard
Rev. Edgar Grider
Mrs • M Y Greene
Mrs. Betty James
Rev BJ J ohnson
Mrs. Eva Lindsay
Mr. Ralph Mitche l l
Rev W J Rowe
Mr. Reubin Stafford
Rev L M Terrill
ML Victor Franc o
Mrs. Sara Kel l ey
Mrs. A J Lacy
�FREDERICK
R.
D . BROWNE, President
Chairman, Board of Trusl ees
JAMES
J. MARTIN,
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
A.
HAWES, JR.,
Vice President
Treasurer
SYLVESTER ASHFORD,
201 Ashby Street, N.W.
Atlanta, Georgia 30314
522-7512
Mrs. C. w. Pollard
L . S. Molette
Frank S. Mcclarin
L eonard N . Rodgers
D . L. Thomas
Lawrence S . Young
Henry B . Bryant
J . T . Lacy
Charles C. Hall
Robert F . Jackson
Walter Belton, Jr .
Jam es C . Reese
H. E . Tate, Executive Secretary
August 1, 1966
TRUSTEES
Harry S. King
Earl H. Thurmond
Napoleon William s
Honorable Ivan Allen
Mayor City of Atlanta
68 Mitchell Street, S. W.
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mayor Allen:
On July 21, 1966, a meeting of community leaders was held at
the Price High School Community Center that had as its major
objective that of discussing problems that are prevailing in the
City of Atlanta. Another major objective of this meeting was to
determine if problems prevalent in the Atlanta community could be
resolved without unnecessary hardships being placed on citizens of
this community.
After a lengthy discussion of prevailing problems and subsequent
suggestions for solutions to the problems, the group as sembled
decided that a resolution should be passed which would request the
Mayor and Aldermanic Board t o establish a human relations office
with direc t re spons ibilities t o aid in resolving problems that are
prevailing in our city .
It is the sincere desire of many c itizens of the Atlanta a rea that
such a director and such an office be commissioned as early as possible so that this office can begin work on preventing burdensome
problems from oc curring . I am therefore sending this letter at this .
time to remind you t o bring this matter before the Aldermanic Board.
"Invest in a Child and Make a Man"
�Hon orable Ivan Allen
August 1, 1966
Page 2
This letter comes from me simply because Mr. Bennie Smith, who
called the meeting, asked me to serve as chairman of the group.
I wish to thank you for your cooperation and for your efforts in
seeing that this request gets to the Aldermanic Board.
On the enclosed sheet will be found a copy of the resolution.
Names of the persons who attended the meeting and who voted for
the res elution are stipulated at the end of the res elution.
With kindest personal and professional regards, I am
Sincerely yours ,
/
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t L

H. E . Tate
Executive Secretary
HET :dc
Enclosure
�RESOLVED, that a full-time director with a staff be established
in the City of Atlanta with full responsibilities to establish and maintain rapport in the human relations
81'89
for citizens of Atlanta and for
the Atlanta community. The undersigned group urges the passage of the
necessary city legislation to implement the human relations office with
the necessary responsibilities and authority to completely implement the
objectives of such an office.
Mr. Bennie T. Smith,
Dr. H. E. Tate, Presiding Officer
Vice l\1ayor Sam Mas sell, Jr.
Alderman Q. V. v\Tilliams
Alderman Richard C. Freeman
Alderman George Cotsakes
Alderman Jack Summers
Alderman Rodney Cook
Alderman Charlie Leftwich
State Representative A. D. Grier, Jr.
Chief Herbert Jenkins
Helen Howard
Edward Moody
Rev. V1J. A. Hines
James Howard
Elm ore Keith
LeRoy Aldridge
Pa uline Ki ndell
Mrs. Martha VIeems
Rev . H. F . Gre en
Mrs. Sa rah F. Baker
Theodore if-Jard
Sen Horace T. vVard
J. H. Calhoun
Capt. M. G. Redding
Clinton Chafin
G . A. Beard
James E. Dean
Rep. Charlie L. Carnes
Rep. Tom Dillan
Dr. C. Clayton Powell
Mrs. Dorothy Bolden
Rev. C.' D, Colbert
P,,e~1. E. J. Jones
Dr. Gerald Reed
Vvilliam Merritt
John Hood
Joel M. McGuire
Rosa L. Burney
�OFFICE OF CLERK OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN
CITY OF ATLANTA
GEORGIA
A RESOLUTION
BY:
\
ALDERMEN WILLIAMSON, COOK, COTSAKIS, FREEMAN,
LEFTWICH AND SUMMERS
WHEREAS, investigation and survey of various areas
t •
of the CityJ of Atlanta show that many of said areas are sub1
standard and lacking in certain essential facilities, many of
which are provided and furnished by the City of Atlanta, and
WHEREAS, it is the desire and goal of the City ·of
Atlanta to see that all areas of the City are furnished
standard service and facilities which are under the supervision
and control of the City of Atlanta,
HOH, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Mayor and
Board of Aldermen of the City of Atlanta, as follows:
1.
That the President of the Board of Aldermen
appoint a committee of the members of the Board of Aldermen to
be composed of the chairmen of the following committees:
Finance, Parks, Police, Public TTorks I, Public
Harks II, Urban Renewal Policy c!nd Zoning
to work in cooperation with a committee to be selected and
designated by the Atlanta Summit Conference.
2.
That said committee shall visit and survey the
services and facilities which are furnished in the areas of
the City known as Blue Heaven, Vine City, Mechanicsville,
Summer Hill, Cabbage Town and such other areas as may be
determined by the committee and to make recommendations to
the Mayor and Board of Aldermen for the furnishing of neces,snry
services and facilities
within the control of the City of
Atlanta which will standardize the services furnished in the
above-mentioned areas with all other areas of the City of
Atlanta,
J
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3.
That said committee further be authorized to
'
formulate and present recommendations to the Board of Aldermen
for the membership and formation of a Human Relations Commission
for the City of Atlanta together with an estimated financial
statement as to the required sum of money to commence the
operation of a Human Relations Commission for the City of Atlanta
as soon as funds can be made available, but not later than January 1,
1967.
ADOPTED BY BOARD OF ALDERME N August 1, 1965
APPROVED August 3, 1966
A True
Copyx~\'0]--)
Clerk o f ~ Aldermen
3
--
�June
a,
1969
Mr . Eugene T . Br nch, Chairman
The Community Council of the Atlanta Area , Inc .
c/o Jones , Bird and H owell
Fourth Floor Haa. .. ffowell B uilding
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Gene :
Thank you for giving m the lat st status report on Volu.oteers
Unlimited . This i
s rvice long ne ded in th city.
The proper utlliz tion of volunteer citizens i
very difficult
t sk to handle . M tching th e volunteer with commu.o.ity
n eds in the most · ffleient and c:onst:ructlve manner is something that just doesn't take place without lot of org nb:ation
nd const t tt ntion. We hav found in City Hall th ton many
occ sion we h v h d to turn down ofie'1:' of • istanc from
highly motivated volunte~rs bee u e of 1 ek of prop r machinery
to coordinat the volunte r fforts .
It look
if the timing on Volunt er Unlimit: d i ju t bout
right nd l am ur th t e are going to be v ry thankful that
you nd the orga.niz tion took the inWi tlve to stabll h this
et.fort now th t the N tlon Administration h
kicked off the
Volunteer Action Progr m in the D partment of Housing n d Urbnn
De velopm.ent. I hop th t you will make our Model Citi
peopl
w r of w t you h ve to off r
well
other City dep nm nt
d gencl
Th nks
gain on b hall of the City tor your fin work.
Sincerely youre,
I an Allen. Jr.
M yor
lAJr:fy
�ROBERT T. JONES , JR.
FRANCIS M . BIRD
ARTHUR HOWE LL
EUGENE T. BRANCH
E D WA RD R . KANE
ROBERT L . F OREMAN. JR .
LYMAN H. HILLIARD
FRAZER DURRETT, JR .
EA RLE B . MAY, JR .
TRAMMELL E . VICKERY
RA L PH WI LLI AMS.JR .
J. DO NALLY SMITH
WI LLI AM B .WASSON
C. DALE HARMAN
PEGRAM HARRISON
CHARLES W. SMITH
CHASE VANVALKENBURG
R ICHARD A . ALLISON
F. M.B I RD , JR .
PEYTON S. HAWES,JR .
RAWSON FOREMAN
MARY ANN E . SEARS
A RTHUR HO WELL Ill
VAN C E O . RAN KIN Ill
CYRU S E.H O RNSB Y Ill
R ICHARD M . ASBILL
LAW O FFI CES
JONES , BIRD &
FOURTH
FLOO R
HOWELL
H AAS- HO W ELL BUI L D ING
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303
ROBERT P. JONES
1879 - 1956
RALPH W ILLI AMS
19 03 - 196 0
May 28, 1969
TELEPHONE 522-2508
AREA CODE 404
Honorable Ivan Allen
Mayor, City of Atlanta
68 Mitchell Street, S. W.
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Re:
Volunteers Unlimited
Dear Mayor Allen:
This is to bring you up to date on the present status of
our project to recruit, train and place individual and group
volunteers in the metropolitan Atlanta area. Volunteers Unlimited is the name given to the project which is now being sponsored by the Atlanta Chamber of Corrnnerce, EOA, the Junior League
of Atlanta, the Corrnnunity Chest, and the Corrnnunity Council.
I enclose a copy of a letter from me to Secretary Romney,
together with a copy of the Memorandum enclosed with my letter.
The Letter and Memorandum are self-explanatory. I attended a
meeting in Washington last Thursday and Friday, May 22 and 23,
of executive directors and presidents of councils in cities having a population of one million or over. It was well attended.
About twenty-five cities were repr esented.
At the meeting with Secretary Romney and Mr . Max Fisher,
our group first obtained assurance that the Voluntar y Action
Program as envisioned by the National Administration is not intended to be a substitute for federal or state funds or programs
- but is intended to be a supplement to these programs. We emphasized the fact that the nature of the problems in the cities
is such that more federal and state money is r e quired - not less.
�Hon. Ivan Allen
May 28, 1969
Page Two
At the Friday meeting it was pretty obvious that Secretary
Romney would like to have gotten into a discussion of the Model
City Program. As I am sure you know, the Nixon Administration
plans to spread the "Model City" money over areas in the city
beyond the boundaries of the neighborhoods now designated. We
didn't get into a lengthy discussion but he did mention one
thing which would be of interest to you and the people involved
in the program in Atlanta. He said that preference in Model
City Programs would be given to cities making maximum use of voluntary agencies and volunteers in the total community. It may
be helpful to you and those involved in the Model City Program
to point out that we have a project for the recruitment and placing of volunteers which is jointly sponsored by strong organizations and has the support of your office.
We had a number of outstanding applicants for the job of
Executive Director of Volunteers Unlimited. We finally selected
Mr. Jack T. Mallory, Jr., who is twenty-eight years old and has
had considerable experience with the YMCA and community organization. His employment is effective June 1. The Massell Companies
are permitting us to use, without charge, a building on Gordon
Street about one-half block from Ashby. This is a building formerly used by the Bank of Georgia. It is directly across the
street from a branch of the Atlanta Library and a branch of the
Atlanta Federal Savings and Loan Association. We think it is an
ideal location and facility.
During the next two months most of our time will be devoted
to the organization of committees which will be responsible for
recruiting, training and placing volunteers. One large committee
will begin working with agencies in the accumulation of job de scriptions for volunteers . We still need some help in a number
of a reas. We have to do some painting and remodeling of the
building. We have to provide office equipment and supplies for
our Headquarters. We do not have at this time sufficient funds
JONES . BIRD &
HOWELL
�Hon. Ivan Allen
May 28, 1969
Page Three
to employ two neighborhood aides which we need in connection with
the project. If you or Dan Sweat know of any large corporations
which would loan us a young executive for a couple of months,
this would be most helpful.
We are basically funded for the first year. The next year
we are going to have to take care of on the basis of our performance during the first year. However, we are determined to make
this project a success. We are most encouraged by the enthusiastic
support of the Junior League. As you know, these gals are real
movers.
We appreciated very much your letter of support and it has
been helpful to us. We'll keep you posted. In the meantime, if
you have any questions or suggestions, please let me know.
Yours very truly,
~~
Eugene T. Branch
ETB : j s
Enclosures
cc:
Mr. Dan Sweat w/Encls.
JONES . BIRD &
HOWELL
�ROflER1 T. JOtlES. JR .
F RANC I S M. B IRD
ARTHUR HOWELL
EUGEtlE T. BRANCH
EDWARD R . KANE
R08(RT L . FOR E MAM, J R.
L AW OFF I CES
JONES , B[RD
& HOWELL
FOU RTH FLO OR HAAS - H ·OWELL BUILD I NG
RO BERT P. JONE S
LYM AN H. HILLI ARD
FRAZER DU RRETT, JR .
E ARLE B . MAY. JR.
T RAMMELL E.VICKERY
RA LPH VllLLIAMS.J R .
J . OON A LLY SMITH
ATLANTA , GEORGIA 30303
WILLIAM B.\'IASSON
C, DALE HAR MAN
P EGRA M HARRISON
CH ARLES W. S MI T H
CH ASE VAN VAL KENBURG
RI CHARD A.A LLI SON
F. M. BIRD. JR .
PEYTON S. HAWES.JR.
RAWSO N FOREMAN
MARY AN N E. SEARS
ARTHUR HOWELL Ill
VANCE O. RANK IN Ill
C YRUS E . H ORtJSBY Ill
R ICHARD M. A SBILL
1879- 1956
RALPH W ILLI AM S
190'.3 · 1960
May 28, 1969
TELEP H ONE 522-2508
AREA CODE 404
Honorable George W. Romney
Chairman, Cabinet Committee on Voluntary Action
c/o Department of Housing and Urban Development
451 Seventh Street, S. W.
Washington, D. C. 20024
Dear Secretary Romney:
I am Chairman of The Community Council of the Atlanta Area,
Inc. and was among those present at the meeting held in your department on last Friday, May 23. We appreciated very much the
opportunity of meeting with you and Mr. Fisher and some of the
· members of the staff which has been formed to move forward with
the Voluntary Action Program. The proposal and the meeting could
not have b een more timely from our standpoint. Our Council and
other organizations in the Atlanta area have been working for
fourteen months on the organization of a facility to effectively
.and efficiently recruit, train and place volunteers. We enthusiastically support the idea proposed by the President as we understand it.
I enclose a Memorandum which sets out the procedure which
we followed in organizing and funding an agency designed to use
individual volunteers and groups to expand , supplement and enrich
programs of existing public and private voluntary agencies and
to stimulat e the deve lopment of n ew and innovative pr oj ects or
programs to solve specific problems in specific areas. As ·s tat ed
in the Memorandum, we b egin our operation on June 1.
Aga in, let me say how much we appreciated the opportunit y
of meeting with you. I am today writing to Mr. Roger Feldman
and will send him a copy of this Memorandum . We look forward to
�I ·.,'
.
.
Hon. George W. Romney
May 28, 1969
Page Two
working with your corrrrnittee.
Yours very _truly,
1
.,
.
c-;--··/ 4 .-,)l .,. , .'l-----e,.-L/ t_ _
~ 1., VL/ {
'-
VEugene T. Branch
Chairman, The Community Council
of the Atlanta Area, Inc.
ETB:j s
Enclosures
JONES , BIRD &.
HOWELL
�MEMORANDUM
May 28, 1969
TO:
Honorable George W. Romney
Chairman, Cabinet Committee on Voluntary Action
FROM:
Eugene T. Branch
Chairman, The Community Council of
the Atlanta Area, Inc.
This is to review briefly the background and present
status of a planned volunteer citizens service project in the
metropolitan Atlanta area.
This area - encompasses five counties
in the metropolitan Atlanta area.
The project is being spon-
sored by the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce, Economic Opportunity
Atlanta, the Atlanta Junior League, the Community Chest, and the
Community Council of the Atlanta Area, Inc.
It also has the
strong backing of the Office of the Mayor of the City of Atlanta.
The Community Council convened the meetings of the organizations
which lead to the formation of the project and the Council now
serves as the umbrella organization under which the project is
operated.
1.
Background.
The proposed project for the training and
placement of volunteers arose from the realization that in the
Atlanta urban area we are not likely to be able to expand services as rapidly as needed unless we effectively tap some presently untapped resources.
If we undertook to expand the exist-
ing services of public and private agencies in the traditional
way, it would be years before we would have sufficient funds and
trained personnel to make any serious impact on our problems.
s
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�The largest untapped resource appears to be individuals and
organizations whith would like to make a contribution.
Effic-
iently and effectively channeling this resource is not an easy
task but it has been done in a number of cities and it was believed Atlanta has a unique opportunity to demonstrate an effective use of volunteers.
In the late spring of 1968, we had a meeting of organizations which were being flooded with calls from citizens and
groups which wanted "to do something."
We met with representa-
tives from EOA, the Mayor's Office, the Atlanta Junior League,
and the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce.
From this early meeting,
it was decided that we should sponsor a luncheon meeting of
organizations which might be helpful in either using or recruiting volunteers.
This larger meeting included representation
from about seventeen organizations.
At that meeting a Steering
Committee was formed and has been functioning ever since.
2.
Steering Committee Recommendations.
The Steering
Committee consists of representatives from the Atlanta Junior
League, the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce, EOA, Corrrrnunity Chest,
and the Community Council of Atlanta.
From time to time we have
also had present representatives from the Women's Chamber of
Commerce.
The Steering Committee after a number of meetings
reached the conclusion that the most desirable procedure was to
sponsor a demonstration project to extend over a two, maybe
three - year period.
The project would be jointly spon~ored by
the Junior League , the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce, Corrnnunity
- 2-
�Chest, EOA, and the Connnunity Council.
would be "members."
Other interested groups
Funds for the support of the project would
flow through the Community Council and be specifically designated
for
the Volunteer Service project.
.
'
I enclose a copy of a docu-
ment entitled "A Coordinating Agency For Volunteers" and this
sets out the general procedure which will be followed.
This was
simply an outline document from which we worked and does not
purport to be a blueprint for organizing an agency for placing
volunteers.
In essence, the purpose of the organization is as
follows:
(a)
Recruit and register volunteers and volunteer
groups.
(b)
Screen such individuals and groups for placement.
(c)
Provide training for volunteers. This would consist of some classroom activity and some on-the j ob training.
(d)
Provide leadership on the effective use of volunteers and work with agencies and programs in
which they would be used. The experience which
we have had, and that of volunteer programs in
most other cities, illustrates that the most dif ficult part of the job is training agencies to
use volunteers effectively.
(e)
Evaluation. We would provide a procedure by
which we would periodically evaluate the using
agency and the volunteers.
The Steering Committee was divided up into various
task forces.
One committee reviewed applications for the job of
Ex ecutive Director.
One committee, with the Atlanta Chamber of
Connner ce, sought a suitable location for the operation .
The
Junior League, in conjunction with a subcommittee, undertook to
rec r uit the Cha i rman of the committee s which will be responsible
fo r th e var ious func tion s of the agency.
It is cont emplated t ha t
the pr oj e c t i tself will b e sta ff ed almos t entirely by volunt e ers.
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�. __,_
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One of the most encouraging developments is the express ed desire of the Junior League representatives to support
the project not only with money but with a considerable amount
of volunteer time by its members.
3.
Funding The Project.
The enclosed outline of the pro-
ject has been revised from time to time.
been added as a sponsor.
Of course, EOA has
Also, we have reached the conclusion
that the first, and possibly second, year of the project could
be adequately supported by $40,000.00 a year.
The Atlanta Junior League has voted to support the
project by a contribution of $15,000.00 during the first year
and $10,000.00 during the second year.
The Atlanta Chamber of
Commerce has voted to provide $10,000.00 during the first year.
The contribution towards the second year operation has been left
open.
The Community Chest is contributing $5,000.00 for the
first year's operation.
Local foundations are providing the
balance of the funds.
The Community Council has provided some staff assist ance and will continue to do so.
EOA has also provided staff
and consultant support and has pledged to continue to do so.
I
• 0
enclose a copy of a letter from Jim Parham dated March 12, 1969
indicating the willingness of EOA to be one of the sponsors of
the project.
I also enclose a copy . of a letter from Mayor Allen
dated April 10, 1969 expressing the City 's interest in the pro ject.
We have corfllTlunicated frequently yJith Mr. Dan Sweat in the
Mayor's Office, and I am confident that we will be able from
/:
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�time to time to obtain assistance from the City.
Mr. Sweat's
office has been flooded with people and organizations calling to
find out what sort of project or program they could work on and
they have not been able to respond as they would wish.
4.
Present Status of the Project.
named "Volunteers Unlimited."
The project has been
We have had donated. to us until
September of 1970 a building which fits the description set out
in the document entitled "A Coordinating Agency For Volunteers."
The building has adequate adjacent parking, is just off an expressway, is near the complex of predominately Negro universities in Atlanta, and is easily located.
We have employed an
Executive Director who is now working on a voluntary basis but
goes on our payroll on June 1.
The Chairmen of the committees
charged with the different responsibilities of the agency have
been named ·and are enlisting their committee members.
We will spend about two months educating our committees
on their functi6ns and getting our building in shape for operation.
When we are equipped to recruit, train and place volun~
teers effectively, we will have a concentrated program designed
to give full publicity to the purposes of the agency.
The agency
will b e run by a Board which will encompass r .epr esentation from
every segment of our population.
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�·' .
A C.OOIWIN:\TING AGJ::;:-{CY For. VOLU rffEEES
Purpose:
To _provicle a central point where volunteer activities could be coordinated,
devc_loped and orga nizeu so that the vast reservoir. of man and woman powe r
who ar~ looking for ways to make constructive, significant contributions
to the comn1unity can be utilized. This would be more than the traditional
volunteer bureau. It would not only wo rk with existing programs but also
develop new areas of service for individua ls and groups an~ be innovative
in its approaches. For the most part it would be organize d, administered
and operated by volunteers and its functions would vary according to the
_group or organization it was working with.
Function:
1.
It would be a place where agencies can register theirneeds for
individual volunteers and group projects.
2. · It would be a place where individuals or groups can register and
. become kn0\ m to an agency or program where his capabilities and
interests can be u sed to bes t advant age .
1
3.
It woyld conduct an initial screening of volunteers to protect
the agency from clearly unsuitable applicants, while the agency
retains its ri ght to select its own volunteers. ·
4.
It would offer leadership on the effe ctive use 6f volunt eers.
5.
It would provide a framework for communication a mong civic
organizations r e garcli_n g their owi1 areas of community participation.
6.
It would conduct regular p rograms to educa te the public about
project s and problems in the fie ld s of h e a lth, we lf are and
enrichment.
7.
It ~ould d eve lop challeng in g opportunities for volunt ee r
commitme nt.
Sponsors:
Possible sponso r s could be the following as we ll as othe r int e r e sted
o:rgan i zations:
1.
. 2.
3.
Atlanta Junior League
4.
Women ' s Cha mbe r of Commerce
Chambe r of Corrm1erce
5;
Un ite d Fund
Comrnuni ty Council of the Atlanta Are a, Inc.
- 1 -
�Members hip:
Members would be solicited from organizations and agencies that arc
possible providers ancl users of volunteers.
Location:
The ~hysicnl facilities should include the following:
l.
Office space for a minimum of seven people (four staff and three
full -time volunteers).
2.
Adequate parking nearby for a minimum of fifty cats.
3.
Be in an area that is well lighted, and where staff end volunteers
· would feel comfortable when attending meetings at night.
4.
A large meeting room in the building or nearby that could be
.utilized for training sessions or conference meetings.
How It Nay Be Financed:
There are various ways in which the volunteer project can be financed and
services provided. A · few of these are liste·d as follows:
I -
l.
Community Council of the Atlanta Area Inc. - Technical assistance
and assistance in traini~g of neighborhood aides.
2.
Junior Leagu~ - Financial support, and volunteers to staff the
office and assist project director
3.
Chamber of Commerce and Women's Chamber
publicity.
4.
Foundations - Financial grants
5.
Business - Office and meeting spa~es, e9uipment, financial
donations
6.
United Fund - Financial assistance
7.
News media - Publicity. Perhaps a daily column on needs of and
services provided by volunteers, radio announc emerits:
8.
EOA, VISTA, .Member ag enci e s - Staff to teach train"ing courses,
and perhaps funds to train volunteers for them .
- 2 -
Financial assistance and
!
·1
�Co s t
Ferso nncl
.$
Proje ct Dire ctor
Executive Sec retary
Ncic;hborhoocl Aides 2
@
$LI, 000 .
· Fringe bcnefHs
Cost
12,500
5,000
8,000
2,100
Minimu m s taff
$
27,600
·I
'l'raincc s
Subsistence ($1.00 per day x 12
· ,c 300 trainees )
$
Travel ($.50 per day x 12 days
x 300 tr.a inees)
3,600
1,800
$
5,400
meals, r~freshme nts
and travel necessary to
train 300 voluntee rs
Permanent equipment
6 desks, executive
@
6 chairs·, executive
@
$150
90
$_
1
1
7
1
desk, secretarial
chair, secretarial
@
30
side chairs
electric typewriter
3 manual typewriters
@
220
4 file cabineis; 5 drawer@ 100
equipment maintenance
900
540
150
80
could be donated
· 210
550
660
400
500
$ " 3,990
Cons umable supplies
Office supplies and postage
Educational ~aterials
$
1,150
1,200
$
_2 ,350
minimum necesary to
train 300 volunteers
1,840
to reimburse 6 people
for travel nece ssary and
public r e l a tions
Trave l
Local
15,400 miles@ $.10
per mile
1 out of town trip
$
1,540
300
$
Misce ll a neou s expenses
. Rent - 1,200 sq . ft .. @ $3 ,00 pe r
sq: ft. per yea r
$ 3,600
Telephone
900
Insurance and bonds
150
Promot ion and pubiicity
1,000
Auditing
600
Organiza tion dues
250
Publications
75
Meeting space for training classes
and Board mee tings . 80 d ays
@ $3 0 p er d a y
·2,400
-
3 -
could be donat ed
could b e donated
could be dona t ed
cpuld be donated
$
8,97 5
�Overh e ad co s ts.
3 1 .5 % of $::iO, 155
$17,303
1
Total Costs
$G7,45S
Total pos s ible donation
$28 ,,893
Total of minimu m funds
necessary if separate
agency and all listed
donations received
$38,~ 5G5
only ncccs s a ry if
hou s ed i11 O!l~oin2:
agchcy - not needed
if orgm1ization is
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Paid Staff Organization:
1.
Project Director
The Project Director will be responsible to the Board of Directors.
a.
· b.
Duties and Responsibilities
(1)
Admi~istration of the program. Guidance and supervision
of all s·taff engaged in the- project.
(2)
Promote the Volunteer Project in all necessary areas
particularly public and voluntary agencies, and to the
general public. Interpretation of the goals of the
Volunteer Project.
(3)
Responsible for all publicity of _the program.
assignme nts for speaking engagements.
(4)
Supervisor of volunteers who will organize, plan and
develop all training classes.
(5)
Select and work with volunteers and agencies in developing
curriculu~ for class e s. Edit training manual and select
all materials used in course.
(6)
Work with Board of Directors of the Volunteer Project and
sub-committees in op e ration of program.
(7)
Work with volunt eers to develop contracts with age ncies and
organizations for training programs for othe r volunteers.
(8)
Program plannin g and deve lopme nt for futur e ex pansion of
the Volunt ee r Proj e ct.
. .
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10
Qua lific a tions
(1)
.
Review all
(2)
Executive ability ne ces sary for the admini s tration, promotion and impl e me nt a tion of the_ Volunteer Proj e ct ..
Abilit y to relat e to individu a ls and g r ou ps both profession a l s a nd volu nteers . Good jud ge me nt in se l ec ti on of
staf f , f a cult y a nd tra in e e s.
4 -
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(3)
.,.
E~pcd c nce and s kill in com:n un ity or 6 :.r n i z ati c,n. A
thoroug: h k11 0·.•:lccl 6 e of th e he ::i.lth, we lfare ancl education
1
resources of the cor.imunity.
I
2.
(4)
Unclerstamling: of the needs of lower income people in
.
order to plan training; pro g:r::i.ms that will equip volunteers
to make significant contributio ns toward meetin g so me of
these needs.
(5)
Background and academic degree in Education, psychology,
social work or a related field.
(6)
Administration experience.
Neighborhood Aides
The Neighborhood Aides will be responsible to the Project Director.
a.
Duties and Responsibilities
(1)
Responsible for volunteer recruitment of residents from
low income groups.
(2)
Assist with interviewing and screening of trainees from
low income are as.
(3)
Maintain contact with neighborhood organizations and
community leaders. These will include P.T.A., church,
civic, service social tenant associations, and .other
groups •
. (4)
Attend mee tings of conununity orga nizations to inform
people of prog ram. Ma k e ~pc e che s and public a ppe ara nc e s
to int e rpre t the Voluntee r Proje ct in low income are as .
(5)
Develop records of recruitme nt resource s within these
groups. Initiate follow up proce dure s for recruitme nt.
~6)
Organi ze h o u se mee tin gs
in small communiti es .
(7)
Work with volun t e ers from targe t areas to deve lop additional
recrtiitme nt r e sources ,
(8)
De ve lop sps cial publicity ma t e ri a l s , fly e r s , post e r s , b r ochures f or u se in l ow i ncome areas .
io
publici ze Volunt ee r Pro j e cts
t-e.
(9)
(10)
Work \\'ith Project Dire ctor to gain first h a nd informa tion
·. on volunt ee r placeme nt s rt e~d c d.
Ac t a s li ason b e t wee n P ro j ec t . Di r ec to r a nd volun teer s t aff ,
a nd resi d e nt s o f l ow i n come areas.
-
5 -
,-
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b . . Qualifications
3.
(1)
Ability to communicate effectively with residents of lo w
income areas both low a11d miclclle inc o111e groups .
(2)
A good grasp of th e problems in lo w income areas and
receptiven ess to n ew ways of doing things.
(3)
Knowledge of conununity organizations, church, civic,
P .T .A., service and other groups in low income areas.
(4)
Ability to discern th e qu a lities that make a good
volunteer and assist in intervie wing and scre en ing
candidates for trai ning,
.
Secretary
The secretary of the Volunteer Project shall be responsible to the
Director of the Volunteer Prpject .
. a.
Duties and Resporisibilities
(1)
Personal secretary to the Project Director, i.e.
appointments, telephone calls, p ersonal files, etc.
(2)
Supervision of all office clerical work. Should be
capable of properly coordinatin g all work, insure
proper distribution of workload and relieve ' the Director
of tasks which come with supervision 6f clerical work.
,
b.
(3)
Personally responsible for all docu mentar~ typing, pro gram
development, evaluation, proposals, budgets, etc.
(4)
All dictation and transcription for entire department.
(5)
All typing for r ec ruit ment and publicity.
(6)
Record all sessions in • connection with 'evaluation and in
~egular trainin g session~ when n ecessa ry.
(7)
Minutes of all meetings requiring the use of shorthand.
(8)
Direct supervision of a ll filin g procedures.
records are filed regularly and properly.
(9)
Keep co mplete records of all supplies and postage ch arged
to the Volunteer P1·oject.
Qualifications
(1)
Good typing spe ed.
-
6 -
See th at all
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. . .- .
'
.
(2)
Exce lle nt shorth,rncl speed to cnaule he r to tnke
verbatim note s nt all conferen ces ancl teaching -sessions
where nec essa ry.
(3)
Goocl ove rall uncl crstanclin g of offic e pr,., ceclures ancl
policies. .
/
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.
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!
(4)
Ability to work we ll \;tith p eop l e , wi th1 initia ti vc to
to a job on her o wn witho ut invo lve d i h structions.
Ability to supervi se addition a l cl e rical s 't aff .
..,
- 7 -

�'
JEcono1nic. 0 por t 1 11ity Atlanta, Inc o
101 Ma ri etta Str e et Bldg.
o
Acl a nca, Georgi a 30303
o
T. M. Parh a m
Exe c uti ve Admini s tracor
March 12, 1969
Mr. Eugene T. Branch
Chairman of the Board of Directors
Community Council of the Atlanta Area, Inc.
1000 Glenn Building
120 Marietta Street, N.W.
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Mr. Branch,
Economic Opportunity Atlanta will take pleasure in being
one of the sponsors of the Volunteer Bureau. I understand you
plan to be in operation by June 1, 1969. The need for this
type of city-wide bureau is obvious as the Economic Opportunity
Atlanta volunteer staff receives daily calls from various
organizations and agencies requesting volunteer help.
We will be glad to give you staff and consultant support.
With every good wish for the success of the Volunteer
Bureau.
Siit;:·
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T/ M Jim) Parham
Executive Administrator
~c7 kic Opportunity Atlanta
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.,
CI'T~Y OF A':.:LANT.A
CITY l-IALL
April 10, 1969
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
IVAN ALLEN, JR ., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assist ant
. MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secret ary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governm ental Liaison
Mr. Eugene T. Branch
Chairman of the Board of Directors
Community Council of the Atlanta Area, Inc.
c/o Jones, Bird and Howell
Haas -Howell Building
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Mr. Branch:
The City of Atlanta has been fortunate in having 1nany citizens and
groups volunteer their time and services to help resolve important
needs in -our community.
As the City has grown and the interest and concern of our citizens
has increased, it has become more and more difficult to effectively
and efficiently utilize volunteers in meeting the needs of the city.
It is extremely encouraging to see the efforts being put forth by
the Community Council, the Chamber of C o mmerce, the Community
Chest and the Atlanta Junior League in developing a vehicle for
providing orderly assignment and utilization of volunteer manpower.
It is essential that there be a central point wher e by community needs
can be catalogued and consolidated and volunteers enlisted and trained
to help .fulfill these needs. I believe only through such a coordinated
effort can the talents and skills of Atlanta's volunteer citizens be
marshalled and utilized to the best advantage of all the people of the
city.
Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor
IAJr:fy
�Memo
F R
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Sam Massell, Jr.
Mr. Dan Sweat
~s~Pue-~
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�CITY O F ATLANTA
Atlanta 3, Georgia
SAM MASSELL , JR .
November 10, · 1966
Pres ide nt, Boord of Ald e rm e n
TO:
Alderman Rodney M. Cook
Alderman Milton G. · Farris
Alderman John M. Flanigen
Alderman Richard C. Freeman
Mr. Charles Hart
Alderman Charles Leftwich
Alderman G. Everett Millican
Mrs . Eliza Pascall
Mr. L. · D. Simon
Mr. Benny T. Smith
Alderman Jack Summers
M r s. Dorothy Bolder Thompson
The Rev. Samuel Williams
FROM:
Sam Massell, Jr., Chairman·, ·Ad Hoc Commi ttee for
Establishment of Community Relations Commission
. I
I
i
I
T h e :i'e soluti on es tabli s hi ng our ad hoc com mitte e d ir e c ted that w e
recommend to the Board of Aldermen the structure, membership and
budget for a proposed permanent community relations commission. As
most of you probably know, t he Board _of Alde r men at i ts meeti ng on
Nove mber 7 adopt ed_a charte r amendme nt which form a lly cr e ates said
c o m m i s sion.
I
..
I
It is no w necessar y that we p r epare .bur r ecommendations on the
..
me mbe rs hip and budge t , fo r which pur po s e I a sk you to a ttend a me eting .
at 10 : 00 a. m., Thursday, Nov einbe·r i7, in c o mmittee r obm No . 1 o n the
second floo r o f city hall.
.
\
The charter amendment provides t hat the commission shall consist of
_20 members appointed b y the Mayor with the 'appro val of the B o ard of
Aldermen. With this in mind - - and with good a t tendance at our meeting
on the 17th - - it is probable that we could submit our recommendations
to the Mayor on that day, which would give him time to compose his
final list for submission to the Board of Aldermen at its next regular
meetj.ng on the following Monday (November 21). This means that if
you will make a special effort to attend this meeting on the 17th, this
could - for all practical purposes - be our last meeting,
and we could
...
dissolve our ad hoc committee upon the establishment of the permanent
commission.
.
�Nov mb r 17, 1966
Honor ble Ivan Allen, Jr.
M yor of th City of Atlanta.
City Hall
tlan • Georgia 30303
Dea.r M yor Allen:
A ched ls a. Uet ol nam th Ald rmank Ad Hoe Human
R 1 tion Committee wlehes to ubmit in ccordanc-e with
it
eponaiblliti s as i-ovid for in th r solution
ata'bliahing thi committee, for your conei ratiou in
nominat on to fill th tw ty po ltione ci- ated by charter
ndm.ent tabli bin th Atlan Community R lation
co~~,~....u lon.
chart r provid a that th member hip hall includ
.. ,.. r 1entati¥ a of 1
eot of the City of A~,a~11 ,.
Thi• requir m nt w: a of prime eonsideration m th e 1 ction
of
· me
ttach d. Th number d name • o tb.Jrough
r the 1!.r t choi r commend ti.one by our
r 1 of hich ar .followed by term.
eu

oy
W appoint ix for on ye
r tenns, and aeven for th
t yo
~
aa th c:habrnan. Yotd' ppointubj ct to th pproval t the
t yo wll1 c nd the• ta
tin on Monday. Nove.1M.b
1.
mo•t ca•••• inclden lly.
• have not ch c d
ti d•
rrnln
�Mayo:r Allen
Page Two
NovembeJ" 17, 1966
lt th se people are willing to sen .
Your since\" ly.
Sam Masaoll. Jr., Chairman
Alder nic: Ad Hoc Human
R 1 tion• Committ
S
r:fy
�Sept embe r 16. 1966
Alderman M ilton Farri s
Gulf Oil Co r p o rat ion
Post Office Box 7245
Station C
Atlanta , Georgia 30309
Dear Alderman Farris:
Attached is a copy of a draft of minutes of the September 9,
1966, meeting of the Human Relations Committee .
Please mark your calendar to attend the next scheduled
meeting on Thursday• September 22, at 1.:.Q.Q. p . m . t City
Hall in Committee R oom # 2.
We are looking forwai-d to this meeting,
Sincerely yours,
S m Massell , Jr .
Acting Chairman
Human R lations Committee
SMJr:fy
�September 16, 1966
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Mr . Chai-lee Hart
807 Conunodore Street
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mr . Hart :
Attached is a copy of a draft of minutes o.{ the September 9,
1966 , meeting of the Human Relations C ormnittee .
Please mark your calendar to attend the next scheduled
meeting on Thursday, September 22, at 2:00 p . m. at City
Hall in Committee Room # 2.
We a.re looking f orw rd to this meeting.
Sincerely yours,
Sa.m Massell, Jr.
Acting Ch irman
Human Relations C oznm.ittee
SMJr:fy
Enclosure (1)
�September 16 _ 1966
Alderman G . Everett Millic an
500 Bishop Street, N . W .
Atlanta, Georgia 30318
Dear Alderman Millican:
Attached is a copy of a draft of minutes of the September 9,
1966 , meeting of the Human Relations C ommittee .
Please ma1·k your calendar to attend the next scheduled
meeting on Thursday. September 22, at 2: 00 p . m . at City
Hall i~ Committee R oom # 2.
We are looking forward to this meeting .
Sincerely yours .
Sam. M ssell, Jr .
Acting Chairman
Hum n Rel tions Committee
SMJR:fy
Encl sure (1)
�September 16. 1966
M rs . E liza P aschall
Greater Atlanta Council on Human
.,,'6\
Rel a tions
I'
5 Forsyth Street
L '1 0.,
dt
r~-~
Atlanta, Georgia
L
Dear Mrs . Paschall:
A ttached is a copy of draft of minutes of the September 9,
1966. meeting of the Human Relations C ommittee .
Ple se mark your c endar to attend the next scheduled
rn eting on Thursday, September 22,- at 2.:00 p . m . at City
H 11 in Committee Room ,fl 2.
We
re looking forward to this meeting.
Sincerely yours,
Sam Masaell. Jr.
Acting Chairman
Human R latlons C ommitt
SMJr:fy
Enclosure {l)
�Septe mber 16, 1966
Mrs . D orot hy B older Thompson
643 Del bri dge Street, N . W .
Atl a nta, Georgia
Dear Mrs . Thom pon:
Attached is a copy of a draft of minutes of the Sept ember 9,
1966, meeting of the Human Relations C ommittee .
Please mark your calendar to attend the next scheduled
meeting on Thursday , September 22 , at 2 :00 p . m . at City
Hall in C ommittee Room # 2.
-
We are looking forward to this meeting .
Sincer ly yours,
Sam Massell , Jr .
Acting Chairman
Human Relations Committee
SMJr:fy
Enclosure ( l )
�September 16, 1966
Rev . Samuel Williams
Friendship Baptist Church
437 Mitchell Street, S . W .
Atlanta , Georgia
Dear Rev. Williams:
Attache d is a copy of a draft of minutes of the Septembe r 9,.
1966 , meeting of the Human Relations C ommittee .
Please mark your calendar to attend the next scheduled
meeting on Thursday, September 22, at ~ p. m . at
City Hall in C ommittee Room # 2.
We a:re looking forw rd to this meeting .
Sincerely yours ,
Sam M ssell, Jr.
Acting Chai:rman
Human Rel tions Committe
SMJR;fy
Enclo ur
(l)
�•
September 16 , 1966
Mr . L . D . S i mon
23 Maury Avenue , S . E .
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mr . Simon:
I regret th t you w re un ble to attend the meeting of the
Human Relations Comnuttee on Friday, September 9 , 1966 .
Due to an insufficient number of members to constitut e a
quorum.. formal organization of the comxnittee was postponed until the next regul rly scheduled meeting. Thi s
meeting has been called for Thursday. September 22, 1966 ,
at 2: 00 p . m. at City Hall in C ommittee Room # 2.
A copy of the minutes of the 1 st meeth1g 1 attached .
Sincer ly yours,
Sam M s 11, Jr.
Acting Chairman
Human R lations C omrnitte
SMJr:fy
E nclo ur
(1)
�September 16, 1966
,,
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1
Mr . Benny T. Smith
209 Arch c rest Drive
Hapeville , Georgia
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Dear Mr. Smith:
I regret that you were unable to attend the meeting of the
Hwnan Relation s C ommittee on Friday. Septembe r 9.
Due to n insufficient number of members to constitute a
quorwn, formal organization of the committee wa postponed until the n xt regul rly sch duled meeting. This
meeting has been call d for Thursday., September 22, 1966,
t 2:00 p . m . at City Hall in C <.J mmittee Room# 2.
A copy of th minut s of the last me ting i
att ched.
Sincerely yours,
Sam Ma ell, Jr.
Acting Ch irm n
Human Relation Committ e
SMJi-:fy
Encloeu:re (1)
�Sept ember 16 , 1966
Alderman Charl es Leftwich
1665 Jonesboro Road, S . E .
Atlanta, Georgia 30315
Dear Alderman Leftwich:
I regret that you were unable to attend the meeting of
the Human Relations C ommittee on Friday, September 9 .
Due to an insufficient number of members to constitute a
quorum, formal organization of the committee was postponed until the next regularly scheduled meeting . This
meeting has been called for Thursday, September 22,_ 1966,
at 2:00 p . m . -at City Hall in Committee Room# 2 .
A copy of the minutes of the last meeting is attached.
Sincerely yours,
Sam Massell, Jr .
Acting Chairman
Human Relations Committee
SMJr:fy
Enclosur
(l)
�September 16, 1966
Alderman Richard Freeman
1116 First National Bank Building
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Alderman Freeman :
I regret that you were unable to attend the me ting of the
Human Relations Committee on Friday, September 9.
Due to an insufficient nwnber of members to constitute a
quorum, form.al org nization of the com.mittee wa s post ..
poned until the next regularly scheduled meeting. This
m eting has been called for Thursday, September 22 , 1966 ,
at 2:00 p. m •. at City Hall in Committee Room# 2.
A copy d the minutes of the last meeting is att ched.
Sincerely yours,
Sam Massell, Jr.
Acting Chairm
Human Relations Committe
SMJr:fy
Enclo ur
(1)
�September 16, 1966
Alderman Jack Summers
167 Trinity Avenue , S . W .
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Deal' Alderman Sununers :
I regret that you were unable to attend the meeting of the
Human Relations Committee on Friday, September 9.
Due t o an insufficient number of members to constitute a
quorum, formal organization of the committee was postponed until the next re gularly scheduled meeting. This
meeting ha been call d for Thursd y;. S eptember 22~ 1966
at 2:00 p . m.
City Hall in Committee Room # 2.
at
A copy of the minutes of the last meeting is attached.
Sincerely yours,
Sam Mass 11, Jr.
Acting Chairman
Human Relations Committ e
SMJr:fy
Enclo11ute (l)
�Septe mber 16 , 1966
Alderman Rodney Cook
34 - 10th Str e et, N. E.
Atlanta , Georgia 30309
Dear Alde r man Cook:
1 regret that you were unable to attend the meeting of the
Human Relations Comzni.ttee on Friday, SeptehJher 9.
Due to an insufficient number of members to constitut e a.
quorum, formal organization of the conunittee was post ~
poned until the next regularly scheduled meeting . This
meeting has been called for Thursday, September 22, 1966 ,
at 2: 00 p. m . at City Hall in Committee Room# 2.
A copy of the minutes of the la.st meetin g is attached.
Sincerely yours ,
Sam Massell , Jr .
Acting Chairman
Hum.an Relations Committe
SMJlhfy
Enclosur
{1)
�September 16 , 1966
Alde1·man J ohn Flanigen
245 Third Avenue. S. E .
Atlanta , Georgia 30317
,.
Dear Alderman Flanigen :
l ,:egret that you were unable to attend the me ting of the
Human Relations C ommittee on Friday,. September 9.
Due to an insufficient number of members to constituee a
quorwn, fo1·mal organization of the conunittee was post-poned until the next regularly scheduled meeting . This
meeting has been called for Thursday. September 22, 1966,
at 2:00 p . m. at City Hall in Committee Room# 2.
A copy of the m!nums of the last meeting is attached .
Sincer ly yours,
Sam Massell, Jr.
Acting Chairman
Human Relations Committee
S MJr:fy
E nclo ul'e (1)
�·'
'I
11
I I'
I
MINUTES
HUMAN RELATIONS COMMITTEE
NOVEMBER 17, 1966
Members of the Human R e lations Committe e met at City Hall on
Thursday, November 17, 1966, at 10:00 a. m. with the following
merribers present: .
\
. '
i

I
j
,j
Vice Mayor S am Mas sell, Jr., Chairman
Alderman Rodney Co ok
Alderman Milton G. Farris
Alderman Richard C. Freeman
Mr. Charles Hart
Alderman Charles L eftwich
Alderman G. Everett Millican
Mrs. Eliza Paschall
Mr. B enny T . Smith
Alderman Jack Summers
Mrs. Dorothy Bolder Thompson
The meeting was called to order by Chairman Massell and the Committee
considered the recommenda tions of the sub -committee appointed to
submit nominees for membership on the Community Relations Commission.
After discussion of the sub-committee I s report and additional nominations
by the Committee members, the following individuals were recommended
to Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. for consideration:
1.
Mr. James Moore, President, Atlanta Labor Council
Alternate:
Mr. 'E. L. Abercrombie
Int~rnp.tion_a l Vic e President
Secretary,. Tr@t:l.t:mrt:! r Loea.1 21§
Laundry, D ry Cleaning and Dye House Workers
International Union
Board of Directors, Atlanta Urban Leag u e
2.
Rab.b i Jacob Rothschild, The Temple
3.
·Miss Helen Bullard,· Consultant, T oombs, Amisano and Wells
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Human Relations Committee Minutes
Novembe~ 17, 1966
Page Two
4.
Mrs. Sara Baker, Resident of Peoplestown Section
Alternate:
I
Mr. Arthur Smith, Manage r of Perry Homes
Public Housin g Development
5.
Dr. Cleveland Dennar d , Principal, Carver High School
6.
Mr. Robert Dobbs, R esident of Perry Homes
7.
Mr. C. G. Ezzard, Resident of Summerhill-Mechanicsville
Section
8.
Rev. Joseph L. Griggs, Gordon Street Presbyterian Church
Alternate:
Mr. Edgar Schukraft, Schukraft's Florist
9.
Archbishop Paul ?allinan, Atlanta Archdiocese
Alternate:
The Rev. Kernan, St . · Anthony 's Catholic Church
10.
Mr. Charles Hart, Member o f Human Relations Committee
11.
Mr. James H. Moor·e, Attorney
Aiternates :
Mr. Irving Kal el'
Mr. David Gol dwasser
Mr. Hamilton Douglas, Jr .
. 12.
Mr. Mills B. Lane, C & S National Bank
Alternates :
Mr.
Mr.
Mr .
Mr .
Mike Che atam
J. Ben Moore
W. L. Duvall
Lucien Oliver
•• • _
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Human· Relations Committe e M inute s
Noven~ber 17, 1966 ·
Page Three
13.
Mr. Joseph Haas, Attorney
14.
Mrs. Fred Patterson , F orme r Pr es i dent of Unite d Church W omen
Alternates:
Mrs. L. L. Austin, Unite d Church Wome n
Mrs. Carl J. Blie m, P re side nt, Unite d Church Women
15.
Mrs. Mary Stephens, R e sident of Lakewood S e ction .
16. Mr. James Townsend, Editor, Atlanta Magazine
Alternates:
M r.
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Ray M o o re
B en Pe r ry
Al Keuttner
Mike Davis
17.
Mrs. Dorothy Bolder Thompson , Memb e r of H u man Relation s
Committee
18.
Rev. Samuel Williams , Memb er of H uman R e lat ions Committee
I 9.
Rev. F re d Sta i r , C entral P r e sbyte r i an' Chur ch
A l t ernate :
R e v. Alli son Willia ms, Trin ity Pr esbyt eri a n Ch u rch
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20 .
Mr. R obert Mitche ll, Vice Pa.-es ide nt of Lockhe e d
A lte r nates:
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M r . R obert M . Wo od, Sears, Ro e buck and Company
M r. W . A . Parke r, Sr., B e ck & G re gg
Mr . John W il son, Horne Wils on & C omp.any
The Community R e l ations Commis.s i on ch a r te r provide s tha t t he Mayo r
shall nominate individua ls to s erv e on this Commis s ion t o the B o ard of
�Hun~an Relations Committee Minutes
Noven~ber 17, 1966
Page Four
Aldermen for their approval. It also provides that the M·a;yor shall appoi:qt
six individuals for one year terms, seven for two year terms, and seven
for three year terms and shall appoint one membe;r as Chairman.
It was also agreed that the names of all individuals considered for
membership on this Commission be submitted to the Comm\lllity Relations
Commission for consideration on any advisory committees which might ·
be established.
The Committee also voted to recommend a budget for the first year of .
$30, 000 which Mr. Farris will have included in the Finance Committee
report.
There being no further business the meeting was adjourned sine die.
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�MI.NU TES
HUMAN RELATIONS COMMITTEE
NOVEMBER 17, 1966
Members of the Human Relations Comm itte e rrie t at City Hall on
Thursday, November 17, 1966, at 10:00 a. m. with the following
members present:
Vice Mayor Sam M a s s e ll, Jr., Chafrman
Alderman Rodne y Cook
Alderman Milton G. F a rris
Alderman Rich a r d C. Fr ee man
Mr. Charles H a rt
Alderman Cha rl es L e ftw ich
Alderman G. E verett Millican
Mrs. Eliza Pa s c hall
Mr. B e n n y T. S m i th
Alderman J a ck Summers
Mrs. Dorothy B olde r Thomp s on
The m ee ting was called to o r d er b y C hai rman Ma ss e ll an d the C ommi tt e e
considered the r e commenda ti ons of t he s ub-commit t ee a ppointed to
submit nominees for memb e r shi p on the Commu n i t y R e lation s C ommiss ion.
Afte r discussion of the sub-commi tte e ' s re port a nd a ddition al n omin ati on s
by the Committee members , the fo ll owing i n dividua ls were r e commended
to Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. fo r c ons ideration:
1.
Mr. James Moore , P resi d e n t, Atl ant a Labo r Council
Alternate:
M r. ' E . L . Abercrombie
International Vic e President
Seeretary~Tr a.s u1•er Lc eal 218
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L aun d r y , D ry Cleaning and Dye House Wor k ers
Internati onal Union
B oar d of D irectors, Atlanta U r b an League
2 • . Rabbi J acob Rothschild, The T e mple
3.
·Miss Helen Bullard, Cons ultant, Toombs, Amis an o a nd Wells
�Human Relations Committe e Minute s
November 17, 1966
Page Two
4.
Mrs. _Sara Baker, Reside nt of P eoplestown S e cti'o n ·
Alternate:
Mr. Arthur S mith, M a n a ge r of P e rry Home s
Public Housing D e v e lop m e nt
5.
Dr. Cleveland Denna rd, P rin c ipal, Carve r Hi gh School
6.
Mr. Robert Dobbs, R e sid e n t of P e r r y Homes ·
7.
Mr. C. G. Ezzard, Reside nt of Summerhill-Me chanicsville
Section
· 8.
Rev. Joseph L . Griggs , G ordon S t reet Pr e s byte ri a n Church
Alternate:
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Mr . Ed ga r Sch ukr a ft, S chu kraft 's Fl o r i st
9.
Archbishop P a ul Hallina n , Atla nta Ar ch d ioc e s e
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Alte rnate:
T he R e v . Kern an, St. A n thon y ' s C a thol i c Church
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10 .
Mr. Charl es H a rt, M e mb e r of H uman R e lations C ommittee
11.
Mr . J ame s H . M o ore, Attorne y
Ait ern ate s:
Mr . Irving Kal er
M r. D avi d G o l dwasser
M r . Hami lton D ouglas, J r .
. 1 2.
Mr . M ill s B. Lane , C & S N a tiona l Bank
A lte rna t es:
M r.
Mr.
M r.
M r.
M i ke Cheatam
J . B en Moore
W. L . . Duvall
L ucien Oliver
�Human Relations Com.mhtee Minute s
November 17, 1966
Page Three
13.
Mr. Joseph Haas, A t torne y
14.
Mrs. Fred Patterson, Fo rme r President of United Church W omen
'Alternat es:
Mrs . . L. L. A u s t i n , Unit e d Church .Women
Mrs. Carl J. B liem, P res i de nt, United Ch urch Women
15.
Mrs. Mary Stephe ns, R e side nt of Lakewo od S ection
16.
Mr. James Townsend, Editor , Atlanta Mag azine
Alternate s:
Mr.
Mr .
Mr.
Mr.
Ray Moor e
B e n P e rry
Al K e uttner
Mike D avis ·
17.
Mrs. Dor ot h y B ol d e r Thomp s on , M e m b er of Human R e l a tio ns
Committee
18 .
Rev. Samue l Willi ams, Memb e r of Human Re l ati ons Commit tee
19.
R e v . Fre d Sta i r, C e ntra l P resbyte ri a n Church
Alternate :
R e v. A llison Williams , T r inity Pre~b yte r i an <;::hurch
20.
M r. Robert Mitche ll, V i c e P res i dent of Lockhee d
Ali:~rfiate§ i
M r . R obe rt ·M . Wood, Sears, R o ebu ck and C ompany
M r. W. A. Parker , Sr . , B eck & Gregg
Mr . John W ilson, Horne Wilson & Company
The Community Relations Commission charter provides that the Mayor
shall nominat e indivi dual s to serve on this C ommission to the Board of
,' ,
�Hun1.an Relations Committee Minutes
November 17, 1966
Page Four
Alderinen for their approv.al. It also provides that the Ma;yor shall appoint .
six individuals for one year terms, seve n for two year terms, and seven
for three year terms and shall appoint one m e mber. as Chairinan.
It was also agreed that the names of all individuals considered for
membership on this Commission b e submitted to the Community Relations
Commission for consideration on any a dvisory committees which might
be established.
· The Committee also voted to recomme nd a budget for the first year of
$30,000 which Mr. Farr;i.s will have included in the Finance Committee
report.
There being no further business the meeting was adjourned sine die.
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CONTENTS
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1.
GETTING STARTED
2.
ORGANIZING THE COMMISSION
3.
GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
4.
SELECTING COMMISSION MEMBERS
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. 5.
STAFFING THE COMMISSION
6.
THE COMMISSION IN OPERATION
7.
HOW OTHER COMMISSIONS WORK
8.
SOURCES OF ASSISTANCE
�1. Getting Started
What one citizen has described as the "comfortable , self-satisfied existence" of a certain
North Carolina town came to a sudden end
in 1960.
Two unrelated events caused the people of
this community to raise questions about their
way of life which had gone unchallenged for
more than 200 years.
One event forced the citizens of this community to reexamine race relations in their
city. The other required that they review the
entire economic structure of the community.
The latter event was the shutting down of
Southern Railway yards in the area, throwing
hundreds of workers out of work. The shutdown
was damaging both economically and psychologically. Not only was the railroad operation
the major industry in the area , but it was a
symbol of industrial activity in the community.
The second event had its beginning nine
months earlier in a nearby community. Four
Negro college students had sought service at
the segregated lunch counter of a five-and-tencent store in the other town. Service was
denied, so ..the students sat.
Now, just as the sit-ins had spread to
hundreds of cities throughout the South, they
threatened this economically troubled community as it"battled to overcome its economic plight.
Negro students at a local college picketed
the segregated movie theaters of the community, and announced that they would also conduct sit-ins and demonstrations against other
places of public accommodation which still
had not desegregated.
The demonstrations surprised many white
citizens. They considered their community
further advanced in race relations than most
southern communities and saw no need for
demonstrations. They feared that protests
would frighten off the new industry the community needed, and also bring an angry, or
even violent, reaction from extremist factions .
An informal biracial committee of white and
Negro leaders met to consider the situation.
One request that arose from the meeting was
for the establishment of an official interracial
comm1ss1on capable of the continual handling
of grievances. Presented to the city's mayor,
the request was rejected.
But events were occurring which made it
imperative that the city have such an organization. Theater owners did agree to desegregate
their movie houses. Extremists, however, were
threatening to do bodily harm to any Negro
entering a desegregated theater. The day the
first Negroes entered the formerly all-white
theaters, known extremists did show up, but
failed to carry out their threat.
The biracial group that had met earlier was
nonetheless concerned that another confrontation might not be as peaceful. So the group
began to meet as an unofficial human relations
commission.
Their first act was to convince the Negro
students to suspend demonstrations while they
attempted to correct further injustices in the
city. With the assistance of the Chamber of
Commerce and the Merchants Association, the
group began calling on businessmen and urging
them to integrate their facilities. Quiet negotiations with the Board of Education brought the
beginnings of school integration. The city was
well on · the way to solving its major racial
problems.
In 1962, a national organization named the
community an "All America City" because of
its success in rebuilding its economy and for
other citizen action achievements. While the
human relations program was not a part of its
entry in this competition, the community assuredly would not have received this award
had not its racial climate also been good.
Early that same year, the mayor introduced
an ordinance in city council to establish an
official biracial committee . On the day the
ordinance was adopted, members of the original, informal committee sat in council chambers and heard their names read among the
charter members of the official body.
That is how the Salisbury, N. C., Community
Services Committee was formed. Today, it is
an active force in the community. It has helped
· Salisbury immeasurably in resolving racial disputes without undue friction.
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�The community now has integrated all of its
places of public accommodations. The committee is working to promote merit employment
with the continuing assistance of the SalisburyRowan County Chamber of Commerce and the
Salisbury-Rowan Merchants Association which
now have Negro members. The committee too
is working with an integrated school board in
trying to find a satisfactory solution to the
integration of Negro teachers in the community's school system.
Other communities can profit from Salisbury's experience without awaiting a crisis. The
racial problems of Salisbury are present in
every southern city, and appear in a different
form in most northern communities.
A commission on human relations may have
the most humble of origins. One very simple
beginning may be an informal parlor meeting
of a group of concerned citizens, white, Negro
or interracial. If members of this initial group
are all of one race, they should move immedi ately to become interracial. This interracial
group should next seek to invite as participants
representatives of a broad cross-section of the
entire community.
Another approach to formation of a human
relations commission may be through the
avenue of already existing organizations. Almost any church , civic, fraternal, neighborhood
or social group may provide the initiative for a
commission . Several groups, or chapters of
several groups, may act in concert.
Many communities never progress beyond
establishing an interracial committee with broad
representation from all segments of its population. It remains an unofficial committee,
with perhaps no more than informal approval
of city fathers.
Organizations such as this-and indeed
those with official standing-may select a
variety of names, such as "friendly reiations
council ," "community relat ions committee,"
" friendly neighbors," " human relations com mittee," etc. The most commonly used designation-and the one that best conveys the
nature and purpose of the organization-is
"human relations committee" or "commission."
A group without official status can and has
proved beneficial in tackling a community's
human relations problems. But the most effective bodies have been those constituted as
official human relations commissions under
local ordinance .
2.
Organizing the Commission
The most effective commission on human
relations-o'ne that is best suited to cope with
racial problems and help improve intergroup
understanding in the community-is one that is
created with a firm legal basis-a municipal
ordinance. This type of commission operates
with a clear and unmistakable official sanction.
The city council and the mayor, as representa tives of the city, are unquestionably on record
as favorable to the commission and its goals.
The commission has permanency. Its members
will not hesitate to tackle in a forthright manner the issues and currents that otherwise
might lead to community dissension and racial
turmoil. Commission members may speak and
act with authority, without fear of reprisal or
reproach.
About 20 percent of the human relations
comm1ss1ons in existence across the nation
operate under local ordinances. These include
commissions in Pittsburgh, Baltimore, Cleveland, New York, Toledo, Ohio , Erie, Pa., Des
Moines, Iowa, and Louisville, Ky.
There are alternative, but less effective ,
bases for a commission . It may be created by
proclamation of the mayor, with approval of
the city council, It may be created solely by a
mayor's proclamation or executive order, without formal city council approval. These types
operate with some official sanctions, but obviously not with the strong backing of city
fathers afforded under a local ordinance. Nevertheless, a commission established under procla mation offers greater potential than a private
citizens group or a quasi-legal body. Cities
with human relations agencies without enabling
ordinances include Phoenix, Ariz., Tampa, Fla .,
Alton, Ill ., Durham, N.C., and Richmond , Va.
�A proper local ordinance should spell out the
scope and authority of a commission on human
relations. It should specify the number of
members on the commission and provide for
a specific term of office. The size of a commission may vary according to local conditions and
makeup of a community's population. Generally, a commission can function comfortably with
between five and 15 members. A larger commission may prove too unwieldy for obtaining a
consensus. One too small may not have sufficient manpower to cover its chores adequately.
A commission should meet periodically, at
least monthly. Its meetings should be public,
unless sensitive matters require a closed execu tive session.
There Will be little service to the community
from a commission empowered to act only when
trouble is brought to its doorstep. A good
human relations commission has the authority
to initiate investigations into potential or actual
areas of trouble and tension. Of course, much
of a commission's work will be that of quiet
probing and persuasion. But it should also
have the power, when necessary, to hold public
hearings and to request and summon the
presence of citizens.
The enforcement powers of a comm1ss1on
naturally depend on the laws in the field of
civil rights · a community has to enforce. In
many communities with local ordinances banning discrimination in public accommodations,
housing and employment it is the commission
on human relations that is charged with their
enforcement. These powers should at least be
as broad as the 1964 Civil Rights Act and
prevailing state law.
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3.
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Goals and Objectives
The best organized commission on human
relations will be ineffectual unless it sets for
itself clearly defined goals and objectives. In
fact these ought to be set forth in its establishing ordinance or charter.
It should be made plain that a commission
is an instrument for orderly change toward the
goal of equal opportunity for all. The commis sion must seek actively to promote this goal.
It should do so by creating a climate of understanding, cooperation and mutual respect
among all citiz~ns. The commission should
keep open the channels of communications and
provide these channels when they do not exist.
Much of, the racial ills of a community result
from the frustrations of those without a procedure for airing their grievances. A commission should serve this function. It should strive
aggressively to prevent violence and ease tensions. And it should provide the resources and
research into methods for accomplishing this
end.
A good commission is a leader in its com munity-not a mere follower. It is a mediator
when turbulence erupts, but it should provide
the groundwork that would make such mediation unnecessary.
4.
Selecting Commission Members
Many an otherwise well organized and directed human relations commission falters because its membership is not properly or carefully chosen.
The membersh ip should reflect the composi tion of the community. It should be representative of religious groups, business interests, civil
~ights organizations, labor unions and civic
bodies. It is wise to sound out leaders of these
groups before selecting commission members.
The prestige of a commission will mirror
that of its members. Particularly in a young
commission it is important that members be
persons of respect and influence in the community. It is equally important that their commitment to the aims and programs of the commission be unswerving.
Selection of minority group members must
be made with great care. For example, often
white leaders search for Negroes who will
merely reflect tt"\eir own conception of the Negro
community. They look for Negroes whom they
trust. Their choice may not have the trust of
the Negro community. A Negro who enjoys a
fine status among white persons may not necessarily have the same standing among Negroes.
Thus many, perhaps a majority of Negro citi zens, will be alienated and communications
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channels to them jammed. Certainly all elements of the Negro community, including those
thought of as extremist, should be canvassed
for advice.
The role of militant civil rights groups and
even those persons sometimes looked upon as
"extremists," is of vital importance to a commission on human relations. Direct contact
should be maintained with these groups. This
does not mean that it will be necessary, or even
wise, to appoint representatives of militant
groups to the commission. On the contrary, it
may be that such appointments would compromise the militant's standing with his followers. He would sometimes be required to vote
on issues which would be contrary to the position of his organization, preventing both the
commission from functioning effectively and
jeopardizing his own position of leadership.
Still, militancy must be acknowledged, understood and heard. It is imperative that the
commission maintain the closest contact and
mutual respect of these elements. It is an
absolute necessity that the activists in the civil
rights movement have a direct access to the
commission's listening post. For they often
telegraph the direction in which the community
eventually must travel and the points of trouble
it is likely to encounter.
5. Staffing the Commission
A commission without an adequate staff is
seriously handicapped in its efforts to serve the
community in the field of human relations.
As a bare minimum every commission should
have a full-time, trained professional staff
member and a secretarial assistant. They
should operate from a permanent office.
Careful attention should be given to staff
qualifications. This is an essential for a commission with a lone professional. He should
be a college graduate, preferably with a master's degree in the social sciences or social
work. He should have experience in the fields
of community relations and community organization . It is desirable that he be a good public
speaker, resourceful in dealing with others and
an effective writer.
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Above all, the post should never be considered a political plum or a refuge for cronies. It
is not necessary to limit the search within the
community. Often, in fact, a likely candidate
may be a staff member of a larger commission
in another, city. He may be willing to accept a
position as director of an agency in a smaller
community for the challenge of helping to organize and develop such an agency.
It is difficult to specify a budget for a commission. Obviously this depends on the size of
the staff, the work it is expected to accomplish
and the facilities it is given. A commission's
resources are expanded, of course, by organized volunteers and committees.
6. The Commission in Operation
A good starting point for any commission on
human relations is to learn more about the
community it serves. A commission ought to
be a source of expert knowledge on all matters
pertaining to human relations problems in the
community. It should undertake detailed surveys to determine the patterns of employment,
housing, educational opportunities and leisure
life of its minority groups. For the financially
limited community, a cross-section of volunteer
community organizations might provide this
service.
This type of research should be a continuing
concern of the commission. There should be
periodic dissemination of all of the material
gathered through an active on -going public information program.
The commission should not overlook the
importance of publicizing itself. Even the most
eleme:itary brochure or leaflet on its organization and function should be given wide distri:
bution. Its executive director should not be a
stranger before local groups, to local newspaper
columns or on community airwaves. A periodic
newsletter is highly effective in keeping the
commission before the community and speaking to its citizens.
A good human relations commission is well
known within local government. It should not
hesitate to provide advice to city fathers. It
ought to see that all arms of government oper-
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ate under policies and practices of nondiscrimination and equality of opportunity. Local government must be a model for the rest of the
community.
When moments of crisis arise, the commission must be prepared through advanced planning. It should arrange procedures with local
law enforcement officials for coping with trouble
and violence. Similar arrangements should be
made with the mass media.
But a commission cannot merely operate a
fire bucket brigade. It should develop long
range programs that will minimize the chance ·
· of serious flareups. It should lead the efforts
to erase all discrimination in places of public
accommodations. It should search for realistic
programs for eliminating racial segregation in
schools, whether under law or de facto. It
should plot methods for improving the living
standards of minority groups confined to the
ghetto and enabling them to move freely and
orderly to neighborhoods throughout the community. It should make certain that discriminatory barriers to any citizen's right to vote are
dropped. It must encourage and push forward
equal opportunities for employment for all its
citizens, both in private industry and in government. In most cases, to give official sanction
and direction to these efforts, a commission
will find it necessary to work for local ordinances. Throughout all its activities, a commission must attempt to educate its community
to an awareness of and desire to pursue these
goals and objectives.
t
policeman clubbed a 17-year-old Negro teenager over the head, requiring his hospitalization
for a possible concussion. The Negro community became aroused over what it considered
police brutality. Several thousand persons, including 'angry teenagers, prepared to demonstrate. A critical confrontation developed between the Negroes and the police department.
Working swiftly, the New Rochelle Human
Rights Commission opened lines of communication between police and municipal officials
and Negro leaders. The result: the police department held a human relations course for all
of its patrolmen; the hearing of the accused
o'fficer was speeded up; New Rochelle's City
Council agreed to press the city's business
community to hire more teenagers; the housing
authority began to acquire more integrated living units; and the recreation commission expanded its entire program.
7 . How Other Commissions Work
Chicago, 111.-During the summer of 1964,
t_he Mayor's Commission on Human Relations
observed that potentially explosive conditions
which had led to riots in other urban cities also
existed in Chicago. Feeling the urgency of the
situation, it brought together representatives
of the mass media, and the top city and police
department officials to explore the situation.
The result: mass media cooperated fully in
adopting guidelines for reporting racial incidents in a non-provocative manner. The police
department instructed its officers in the proper
handling of arrests in predominantly Negro
areas. Not one case of police brutality was
reported during the entire summer. Chicago
remained peaceful.
Creation of human relations commissions is
not a recent occurrence in our nation's history.
As early as the 1920's there were committees
in many Southern communities. Today there are
more than 200 cities with some type of human
relations agency. Here are some examples of
how they have worked in some of these communities.
New Rochelle, N.Y.-On June 21, 1964, the
same day that three civil rights workers disappeared in Philadelphia, Miss., a New Rochelle
Louisville, Ky.-ln May, 1963, the Louisville Human Relations Commission conducted
an extensive testing campaign to determii:ie
whether public places were open to all the
city's citizens. The survey found that 35
percent of the city's restaurants were still
segregated and not likely to desegregate voluntarily. The result: the commission helped obtain
an ordinance prohibiting discrimination in
places of public accommodation.
�- ---~
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M E MO R A N D U M
November 23, 1966
TO:
·. FROM:
Irving Kaler
Grace Hamilton
Congratulations on your new responsibility as Chairman of the
Community Rel ations Commission . There are opportunities ahead
and I believe that much depends upon the quality and competence
of the person selected as Executive Director . It seems to me
that a first objective might be to consider s omeone who has had
working experience with one of the better munioipal canmunity
relations commissions . Tho difficulty is that such a person
would probably require a larger salary and operating budget than
is likely to be available here as a beginning.
George Culbertson, who is presently a member of the Community
Relations Service staff, Washington. o.c. would be such a person .
He would be excellent if available . Before oin to the Community
Relation$ Serviee, he was a staff member of the Pittsburgh Human
Relations CQfflJllis ion, He was one of the founders of NAIRO ( Na tional
Association of Intergroup Relations Officials) . I understand that the
Pittsburgh operation is among the better ones .
Mr. Joe Hendricks, who is pres ntly Dean of ~ at Mercer University
in Macon, Georgia, is another p rson who ·~
b considered. His
origins are Talbottom 1 Georgia and he has an undergraduate degree
from Mere r with further eraduate work som where. I under-st nd that
he was invited to be the Chairman of the Georgia Civil Rights Advisory
Commi sion but declined. He is well acquainted with the c001munities
in the St te. is personable and bti ht . He is presently th volunt er
Chairman of the G orgia Council on Human Relations . H perhaps would
b moe
bl to consider the position with the sal ry which is available.
third ugg stion is Paul Rilling, wbo i now th Director of th
Hu n Relation Commi ion in th Di trict of Columbia. You my
r emb r hi from hi work in Atlanta 4 or 5 ye rs a o. Hes rv d
tor
whil s Dir ctor of Field Services with th Southern Rolon l
Council and befor that wa · the Director of hum n r lations sp oial
proj ct of the Nation l Council of th
Y.M.C.A., Southern Fi ld.
�Irving Kaler
-2-
~ovember 23, 1966
It occurs to me that there might be value in seeking executive dire ction
from someone net presently associated with any of the community relation
organizations or agencies working in the City f or several reasons. In
the fi rst place, we have an opportunity here to add additional professional leadership to the community and; secondly, the work of the
Col'nlllission will obviously require the utmost of cooperation and s upport
on the part of all of the existing organizations ang agencies interested
in this field of endeavor.
I pass these ideas on for whatever worth they may be,. If there are
ever any ways in which I can be helpful. please call upon me.
Sincere ly your friend.
GTH teo
BCC:
= ....................
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. and Dan Sweat
�I.
Mr . Jim Moore , President, Atl anta Labor Council
Mr . E . L . Abercrombie
International Vice President
Sec retary - Tre surer Local 218
Laundry, Dry Cleaning and Dye H ouse Workers
International Union
Boa.rd of Directors , Atlanta Ul'ban League
2.
Dr . Jacbb::Rothschild, The Temple
3.
M iss Helen Bullard, Consultant, Toombs , Amisano and Wells
4.
M rs . Sara Baker, Resident of Peoplestown section
Mr . Arthur Smith, Mana ger of Per:ry Homes
Public Housing Development
5.
D r . Cleveland Dennard, Principal, Carver High School
6.
Mr . Robert Dobbe , Res ident of Perry Homes
7.
Mr . C . G . Ezza:rd, R sident of Summ.erhill .. M chanicsville s ction
8.
Rev. Joseph L . Griggs , Gordon S treet Presbyterian Church
M r. Edg r Schuk:raft, Schukr ft ' s Florist
9.
Archbi hop Paul Hallinan, Atlanta Archdioc se
Th
R v. Kern n, St. Anthony ' s C -tholie Church
10.
Mr . Ch rl
H . rt, M mber of
11.
Mr. Jame
H. Moor • L wyer
Suman R l tion Conunitt e
Mr . lving K 1 r
Mr. David
ldwa ser
Mr. H milton Dougl • Jr.
12.
Mr. Mill
B. Ln
Mr. Mik
Cheatam.
Mr. J. Ben Moor
Mr. W. l.,. Duvall
Mr. Lucien Oliv i'
�13. Mr. Joseph Haas , Atto:rney
14. M rs . Fred Patterson, Former President of United Church Women
Mrs . L . L . Austin, United Church Women
Mrs . Carl J . Bliem, President, United Church Women
15. M rs . Ma:ry Stephens , Resident of Lakewood section
16. Mr. Jim Townsend, Editor , Atl nta Mas zine
Mr . Ray Moore
M r . Ben Perry
Mr. Al Keuttner
Mr. Mike Davis
17 . Mrs . Dorothy Bolder Thompson, Member of Buman Relations
Committee
18. Rev. Samuel Williams, Member of Hu.man Relations Committee
19. Rev. Fr d Stair, Central Pre byterian Church
-- - - )
R v. Allison Willi ms , Trinity Presbyterian Church
ZO. Mr . Rob rt Mitchell, Vice Pr sident of Lockhe d
~
~
Mr. Robert M . Wood, Se rs Roebuck & Company
Mr . W. A . P rker, Sr. , Beck & Gr gg
r. John Wils on, Horn Wilson & Comp ny
-
'\
�•
January 13, 1967
Mr . Al Kuettner
675 Sherwood Road, N. E .
Atlanta, Georgia 30324
Dear Al:
Mayor Allen has asked me to answer yo\U" letteT of January 4
regarding grants which have been made to the City which would
be of concern to the Cornmimity Relations Commission. I
have been out of town and I am sorry that you~ letter has not
been answered sooner .
The only c\U'rent grant that I ~ow o! which might be of
intei-eet to you would be the $23 , 000 gr nt from the Stern
Family Fund. Attach dis a copy of the announcement put
out by the Stern Family Fund which I think explains the intent
of the gt nt.
We have employed Johnny Robinson to direct this demonstration
ptoject and Johnny is now located in Room 1204 in City Hall .
in the process of completing a comprehensive outline
of the project from the execution standpoint and I will make
this available to you in th next few days .
We ar
Please call me if you need any further inform tion .
Sincerely yours.
Dan Sweat
DS,fy
�AL
KUETTNER
675 SHERWOOD ROAD , N . E .
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30324
J -. n .
The Hon . I van Allen, May or,
City of Atl.w t a ,
City Hal l,
Atl - n t -. , Ga. 30303.
4, 1967
Re : Co mmunit y Re l a tio n s
Co mmis s io n
De a r May or Al len :
I am se r v ing as c ha irma n of a s pe c ia l co mmitt ee i n th e
Community Rel a ti ons Co mmission which i s i nv es ti ga ting t he
fu nd i ng of proje ct s th a t mi g ht be initi ated u nder the juris dictio n of th e Commission.
I woul d app reci a te any i nf or mat io n fro m y our office as
to g r ant s fro m found a ti ons or oth er sour c es , now a v a i la ble or
i n pr ospe ct, fo r t he city of At l a nta i n t he a r ea of o ur
Co mui ss io n ' s i n t e rest .
I am no t th i nki ng he r e of the many
funding prog r ams t hat ha v e be en made to th e v a ri ous estab li shed
org an iza tions b ut th ose made or a v a il ab l e direct t o th e cit y
and whi c h a r e not now being adm ini ster e d .
I un i e r s t an d o ne
su ch fu nd i s a $ 23,000 g r ant fro m the S t e rn F am ily F und for
a " Neig hborho od I nv olv ement" prog r .i.m .
As we get furth e r i nto o ur wor k , such inquir i es as tha t
a bove wil l , of course , co me f r om t he Executi v e Director .
I
am required to make a r e port ' t o the Ex~cuti v e Committ ee on
J a n. 20 and would be gra t ef ul f or a ny i nfo r ma tio n pr io r to
t hat ti me .
Bes t personal r ega rds.
Sincerely ,
?V--~
cc: Mr . Irving K. Kaler.
�L AW
OF F ICE S
KALER, KARESH
1820 F U LTON NAT I ON A L
I RVING K . KA LE R
S AN FORD R . KAR E S H
MART I N H. R UBI N
P A UL M. M <? L A RT Y , J R .
C . L A W R E NC E JEW E TT, J R .
&
RUBIN
B ANK BUILOI N G
CA B LE AD D R E SS :
ATLANTA , GEORGIA 30303
"KKAT TY" AT L A NT A
TELEPHO N E :
January 5, 1967
A R EA CO DE 4 04
525 - 6886
Miss Faye Yarbrough
c/o Office of Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Faye:
The nex t meeting of the Community Relations
Commission will take place on Friday, January 27 at 1:30
P.M . We will meet in Committee Room 2, City Hall . I
appreciate very much your assenting to take the minutes
of this nex t meeting.
I look forward to seeing you at that time.
Yours very sincerely ,
IKK/sf
�Race Relations Commission
Organizes; Gets Challenge
. Atlanta's new Community Relations Commission, created to
help sofa.re problems of racial
strife, was officially organized
Wednesday and urged to "get
out there to the danger spots
as quickly as possible. "
The challenge came 'from T.
M. Alexander, a member of the
commission, set up recently by
the Atlanta aldermanic board.
. Alexander's comments came
after the 20- member commission had been sworn in and
was having its first business
session.
Alexander and several other
members expressed the hope
that the commission could move
1swiftly to head off potential
1trouble in areas similar to Boule! vard and Summerhill where ra. cial incidents erupted in Sep' tember.
Division of t he commission
1lnto small groups which could


move into these potentially ex, plosive areas "and hear the


, people" was suggested by Alexander.
Vice Mayor Sam Massell J r.
declared that with formation of
the commission "no longer will
official concern about community relations come about only as
· result of crisis and emergency."
Organization of the commission,
said Massell, assures that racial
problems will "now rightfully
take their place in City Hall
as a day-to-day responsibility.
The commission, headed by
attorney Irving Kaler as chairman, will operate initially on a
$30,000 a year budget. Thls includes some $12,000 to $15,000
for an executive director.
Much of the commission's
first meeting was taken up with
discussion of the type of person
needed for the executive direc
tor's job .
-The Rev. Sam Williams head
of the commission's scr~ening
committee, said some 17 applications for the job have already
been received.
Massell 11rged the commission
to hold "mass meetings" in Atlanta neighborhoods in order to
"catalog grievances" of the citizens.
He also suggested that the
commission pursue an application for an Office of Economic
Opportunity grant in the amount
of $130,000 to establish a "fair
housing center" as an adjunct
Mayor Ivan ~Hen's camp~i_gn
for more housmg opportumties
for the lower econoIIDc bracket.
John G. Feild, director of the
Community Relations Service of
the U.S. Conference of Mayors,
told the commission members
that they would have to decide
themselves what role they wish
to play in the city's racial relations.
·
Feild said they must decide
"whether you're going to do it
yourselves or see that it gets
done."
The Rev. Mr. Williams was
named first vice chairm;m of
the commission; Helen Bullard,
second vice chairman, and Mrs.
Fred Patterson, secretary.
�,. J
.c;,J
·~··'
AGENDA FOR
ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING
OF
COMMUNITY REIATIONS COMMISSION
(Wednesday, December 14, 1966)
1.
Statement by Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
2.
Mayor Inducts Conn:nissioners and Installs Chairman.
3.
Statement by Chairman.
4.
Chairman Presents Vice-Mayor Massell
Vice-Mayor Introduces Speaker - Mr. John Feild
5.
Chairman Calls Connnission to Order for Business Session
(a)
Adoption of rules of parlimentary procedure.
(b)
Election of officers.
(c)
Establishment of powers of Executive Connnittee. 1
(d)
Selection of monthly meeting date and time.
(e)
Report of Committee on designation of Executive Director.
(f)
Announcement of Committees to report at January meeting.
(g)
Good and welfare.
(h)
Adj our nment •
·/
�January 13, 1967
M:r . Sydney Wi rsdorfer
Program Devel opment and
Evaluation Speciali t
Community Action Program Committee
1209 Li!e 0£ America Building
Fort Worth, Texa 76102
De r Mr. Wirsdor.£er:
The Mayor and Board of Aldermen of the City of Atlanta have
rec ntly authoriz d the establishment of C ommunity Relations
Commission. Thi Commi sion i in the formation tage at the
present tim and it will be a few more weeks before we will be
abl to answer th queatlon in your January 5 letter in detail .
The City has appropriated $30 , 000 for the e tablishm.ent nd
opelt'a.tion of the Commi sion. dudng the c\U':r nt y ar . However,
the development of det il staffing plans h
not b en completed
at the pre ent time . We wUl be gl d to funu. h you with the e
oon
they ha.v b en completed.
The Conuni sion is ere tion of the Mayor and Board of Alderinen
and ia compo ed of tw nty member :tecomm.ended by an ad hoc
~om.mitt e e tablbh d by the Alderman.l e Bo rd. This committe
w • composed of Aldei- -n and a cros section of citi~ens . Th
M yor made th ppointments.
Tb r is no direct 1"elatlon hip to th loc comm.unity ctlon
goncy, Economic Opportunity Atlanta, In<:. How ver, I m sur
th t
the Commia ion b gins to function v ry close rel tion•hlp will be e t bU. hed ..
I will forward your letter to th
C ommieslon
o t
t whenev r
�Mr. Wirsdorfer
Page Two
January 13, 1967
an Executiv Director i · employed copi
projects may be forw rd d to you.
oj r ports and
Sincerely your ,
Iv n Allen, Jr.
M yor
IA1r:ly
ctivity
�" The United States can achieve its full economic
and -social potential as a nation only if every
individual has the opportunity to contribute to
the full extent of his capabilities and to participate in the workings of our society."
88th Congress, Aug. 20, 1964
0
COMMUNITY ACTION PROGRAM COMMITTEE • 1209 LIFE OF AMERICA BLDG. • FORT WORTH, TEXAS 76102 • ED 6-8714
January 5, 1967
Mayor
Atlanta City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Sir:
The Executive Committee of the Fort Worth Human Relationa
Commission has requested assistance in s ecuring funds for professional staff.
Before approaching the Community resources for financial
assistance, the Executive Committee desir es information
concerning similar commissions throughout the United States.
Res ponse to the following items would be helpful:
1.
What are the staff patterns, size of the staff, salary
range and the .iob descriptions?
2.
How doe·s the Commission relate to the local War on
Pov erty and the city council?
3,
Copies of reports and activity pro jects which are
available would be appr ec iated.
An answer from you at you ear liest convenience would facilitate
our planning. Thank you for your time and assistance.



~$~




Sydney Wirsdorfer
Program Development and
Evaluation Specialist
SW: j ab
�ATLANTA,GEORGIA
PHONE 522-4463
Faye Yarbrough
12/29/66
Mr . Kaler:
Attached is a copy of the draft of the minutes
for the Community Relations Commission
meeting of December 14.
If you have any changes or corrections you
w ould like to make, I will hold the copies
before mailing them to the other members
of the Commission until I hear from you.
I am sorry that I didn't get them any sooner
but things have b een a little hectic here during
the holiday season.
FOR M
2SL 13
�C
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I
COMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMISSION
MINUTES
DECbMBEH 14 , 1966
Members of the Community Relations Commission met for their organizational
meeting on Wednesday, December 14, 1966, at 2:00 p. m. in City Hall. The
following members were present:
Mr. Irving K. Kaler, Chairman
Mr. T. M. Alexander, Sr.
Mrs. Sara Baker
Miss Helen Bullard
Dr. Cleveland D e nnard
Mr. Robert Dobbs
Mr. C. G. Ezzard
Mr. A. L . Feldman
Rev. Joseph L. Griggs
Mr . Joseph Haas
Archbishop Paul J. Hallinan
Mr. Al Kuettner
Mrs. Fred Patterson
Rabbi Jacob Rothschild
Mrs. Mary Stephens
Rev. Samuel Williams
Mayor I v an Allen, Jr. called the meeting to order and spoke briefly regarding
this ne w ly created Commission. He e x press e d the City's appreciation to the
members of the Commission for their interest and willingness to serve a nd
to all those w ho have furnished leadership and have worked to see the Community
Relations Commission established. H e revie w ed the functions of the Commission
a s d e signated in the charter and charge d the g roup as to their duties and
re s ponsibilities . He then introduced t he Community Relations Commission
Chai r man, Mr . I r ving Kale r , and tu r n e d the m e eting o v er to him.
Mr. :Kale 1' thahked M a y o :1' A llen :fo r himself a hd fo:r his fe llow tnetnbet's fo-r
the confid en c e shown i n thei r a ppointme nts . H e st a t e d the membe rs of the
Commi s sion rec o gni zed the challenge and a cc e pte d it . H e also s tate d he
f elt the g reate s t r esour ce o f the city wa s i t s p e ople a nd t his Commiss i o n
seeks to reserve and de v e lop thi s res o urce s o tha t Atla nta can have a f o rce
and economic climate to maintain i t s po s ition of leader ship. He then introduced
Vice Mayor Sam Mas sell, Jr., who has been so instrumental in the creation of
this Commission.
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Community Relations Commission Minutes
December 14, 1966
Page Two
I
Mr. Massell expressed his pleasure in seeing this Commission' become a
reality and told the group of the earlier meetings and committees preceding
this Comn,i ssion. He made the following recommendations for the Commission's
conside ration as their program is established:
1.
Consideration of those individuals considered for membership on the
Commission and those who have expressed interest in assisting in this
work for utilization in advisory committees or similar capacities.
2.
A mass meeting with representatives of the disadvantaged neighborhoods
in an attempt to catalog the grievances in the community.
3.
A conference or consulting session with the professional representatives
of the local human relations groups to benefit from their experiences
and ideas.
4,
Inquire into the possibility of an Office of Economic Opportunity grant
possibly in the amount of $130, 000 to establish a fair housing center in
Atlanta.
Mr. John Field, Director of the Community Relations Service of the U. S.
Conference of Mayors, spoke to the group regarding his experiences and
observations of the activities and undertakings of other commissions around
the country. He stated that these groups played various roles in each
community including such things as performing advisory functions for the
governing bodies, handling complaints and grie vances, acting as mediators,
a nd r e viewing and monitoring the function s of governme nt to insure d e mocratic participation. He then reviewed some of the methods and techniques
used by other groups . He told the members they must now decide what role
this Commission is going to play in the community. The Commission must
d e cide whe ther it is going to try to do the wo r k itself or see that it is carried
out by a nothe r group and to what ext e nt the Com mission will participa t e when
other exi sting age ncie s can h andle the problem. H e sta t e d the n e c ess ity i s
n ot to d i spla ce othe r agencies but to work w ith them.
The Commis sion membe r s the n proc ee d e d with their busines s s es sion.
Upon mot ion duly m ade , s e conde d and u n animou s ly pas se d the C ommission
agreed to follow R obert s Rules of O rder for the c o n d uct o f a ll meetings.
The group next cons ide red the e l ect ion of of fi cers of the C ommiss ion.
Upon
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Community Relations Commission Minutes
December 14, 1966
Page Three
motions duly made, seconded and unanimously passed the following
individuals were elected as officers:
de-:,..,,,._,~
Rev. Samu~l Williams, First Vice ~iJcnt . J . _
Miss Helen Bullard, Second Vice &:Jt::elllll!!!ileE.t ~ - . . . ,-,,,
Mrs. Fred Patterson, Secretary
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q he above officers and the Chairman shall constitute the Executive Committee .
in accor'1aR8"9 •.vi+h-t!tt t h a ~ . Upon motion duly made, seconded and
unanimously passed, it was agreed that the Executive Committee has and
is authorized to act for and on behalf of the full Commission, subject to
review of the Commission, between regularly scheduled meetings of the
Commission.
A regular meeting date was discussed at this time and it was agreed that the
Executive Committee be allowed to deliberate on the selection of the meeting
date and time and report back to the Commission at the next meeting.
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reported 'ttiat tlie position hact oeen advertised 1n the various
news media and that seventeen applications were received.-it...Interv· w ~~t ,u.i.A.
(~,...s~
ul d to ~Eiri on Tuesday, D ecember 20. It was h"
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J
a
e omm1ss10n discuss the type qualifications, characteristics and
experience of the individual to fill this position. Various members gave
their opinions on this subject and Mr. Feild and Mr. Clifton Henry of the
Confere nce of Mayors also offered the ir suggestions based on their work
with other commissions. It was generally agreed it would be n ece ssary for
the Commission to determine specifically what type program was to be
conducted before selecting the individual to fill the position as different
prog rc!rn empha§e f:! worud :r~q\lire different qualifieat:i.ons a:pd experience.
..
In an effort to expedite this Miss Bullard distribute d a questiofll1a.ire regarding
the function and program content of the Commission to each member.
questionnaire is to be · returned to her for analysis and consolidation.
Mr. Kaler appoint ed the following temporary ad-hoc committees:
Program Committee (To m a k e recommendations
to the Executive Committee meeting in January
This
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Co1nmunity Relations Commission Minutes
December 14, 1966
Page Four
. and thereafter to the full Commission)
Miss Helen Bullard, Chairman
Mrs. Sa.ra Baker
Dr. Cleveland Dennard
Mr. Robert Dobbs
~b
~-E ,o,
-
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rlla,....Q
'e x..~t.a:rt:t:.{~:nn·· ~ ( To
make recommendations to the Executive Committee
meeting in January and thereafter to the full
Commission)
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Al Kuettner, Chairman
T. M. Alexander, Sr.
Hamilton Douglas, Jr.
c. G. Ezzard
James 0. Moore
Committee to make recommendations on the
establishment of <;;tanding ' °mmittees (To make
recommendations to the Executive Committee
meeting in February and thereafter to .the full
Commission)
Rabbi Jacob Rothschild, Chairman
Mr. A. L . Feldman
Mr. Joseph Haas
Archbishop Paul J. Hallinan
Mrs. Mary Stephens
There being no further business the meeting was adjourned at 4:05 p. m.
Respectfully submitted,
(Miss) Faye Yarbrough
Acting Secretary
�COMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMISSION
MINUTES
DECEMBER 14, 1966 .
M e 1nbers of the Community Rel a tions Commission met for their organizational
meeting on W e dn e sda y, Decemb e r 14, 1966, at 2:00 p. m. in City Hall. The
following memb e rs were pr e s e nt:
Mr . Irving K. Kaler, Chairman
Mr. T. M . Alexander, Sr.
Mrs. Sara Baker
M iss Helen Bullard
Dr. Cleveland Dennard
Mr. Robert Dobbs
Mr. C. G. Ezzard
Mr . A. L. Feldman
Rev. Joseph L. Gri gg s
Mr. Joseph Haas
Archbishop Paul J. Hallinan
Mr. Al Kuettne r
Mrs. Fred Patte rson
Rabbi Jacob Rothschild
Mrs. Mary Stephens
Rev. Samuel Williams
Mayor I v an Allen, Jr. called the m e e t ing to order and spoke brie fly r e gar ding
t his newly created Commission. H e expr e ss e d the City's appreciation to t h e
m e mbers of the Commission for th e ir inte r e st a nd willin gness to serve and
to a ll those w ho have furnished l e ade rship a nd h a ve worked to see th e Community
R e lations Commission establishe d . H e r evi e w e d the functions of th e Commission
a s d e si gnated in the charter and cha r ge d th e gr oup as to th e ir duties and
r es ponsibiliti e s. He then introduc e d t he Com munity Rel a tions Commission
Chai r man, Mr. Irving Kaler, and tu rne d th e m ee ting over to him.
Mr. Kale:r th a nke d M ayo r Allen fo r himself and £or h i s :fell ow n:1ett1.bers for
the confi d e nc e show n in th e i r appointment s. H e stat e d the m e mb e r s o f the
Commis sion r e co g nized the chall e n ge and ac c e pte d it. H e a lso st ated he
fe lt the greatest res ourc e of the city wa s it s pe opl e and th i s Commiss ion
seeks to reserve an d d e v e lop thi s res o ur c e so that Atl anta can have a force
and economic ciimate to maintain its position of leadershi p. He then introduced
Vice Mayor Sam Mas sell, J r., who has been so instrumental in the creation of
this Commission.
�C o rnrn uni ty Re l at ions Commission Min ute s
D c c en1be r 14 , 19 6 6
P age Two
M r. Mas s e ll e xpr e ss e d his pl ea s ur e in se e i n g t his Commission b e c o m e a
r e ali ty a n d to ld th e g roup o f th e e a r li er rn e e t i n gs an d comm itt ees pr e c e ding
this C o1n rr1i s sion. H e m a de th e fo ll owing r e comm e ndations for th e Commission's
consid e ration as th e ir program i s e s tabli shed :
1.
Cons i de r a tion of those individua l s co ns i de r e d for m e mbership on the
Commission and those who ha ve expr essed inte r e st in a ssi sting in this
work f or utilization in advisory co m mi t t e es or similar capacities.
2.
A n1.a ss meeting with r e pr e s enta t i ve s of th e di sa d v antaged n e i g .b orhoods
in a n atte mpt to cata log th e g ri evan c es in t h e communit y.
3.
A confe r e nce or consultin g s e ss i o n w ith th e professiona l repres e ntatives .
o f t h e l o c a l human relations gr oups to b e n e fit from their e xp e riences
a nd idea s.
4.
In quir e into th e possibility of a n O ffic e of Economic Opportunity g rant
p os sibly in th e amount of $130, 000 t o e s tablish a fair housing c e nter in
A t l a nt a .
Mr . John Fie ld, Director o f th e C ommuni t y R e l ati o ns S ervic e o f the U. S.
Confer e n c e o f May ors , spoke to t he g r oup r egar d i n g his exp e ri e nc es a nd
obse r va tions o f the a ctiviti es and und e rtakin g s of oth e r commi s si ons around
th e c ount r y . He s ta t ed t h at th e s e g roup s p layed va rious r o l e s in ea c h
co mmunity i n clud i ng s uch things as p e rformin g a dvis o r y fun c tions for th e
g o ve r n i ng b odie s, ha n dlin g compl a i nts and g r i evan c e s, a c t in g a s med i ator s,
a n d reviewing a nd monitorin g the f u nctions of gove rnme n t to insu re democ ratic p arti c ipation. H e t h e n r evi ewed some of the meth od s and techn iqu e s
u sed by o th e r gr oups. H e told th e m embers t h e y m u st n ow de ci de w hat ro l e
thi s C ommiss ion is goin g to play in th e comm unity. T he C ommi ss i on mus t
de ci d e w h e the r i t is goin g t o t r y t o do t he w ork i tse lf o r see th a t it is carried
ot:it b y a noth e r gro u p and to w h at e x t e n t th e Commis s ion w ill par t icipat e when
o ther e :xi s ting ag e ncies c an handle the p rob l em . He state d the n@ e s ity bi
not to displ a c e o ther agen cie s b u t to w o r k w ith them.
The Commi ss ion m e mbers t h en pr o c ee d e d w ith t h e ir busine ss s es sion .
Upon motion duly ma d e , seconde d and u n animously passed th e C omn1.i s s io n
agreed to follow R ob er ts Rul e s o f O rder for the c o n duc t o f a ll meetings.
The group next co n sidere d th e e l e ction of offi c er s o f th e C ommis sion.
Upon
�I .-
Con1rn.unity Relations Comrnission Minutes
Dec e rn.ber 14, 1966
Pa ge Three
1notions duly made, seconded and unanimously passed the ,following
individua ls were elected as office rs:
Rev. Samuel Williams, First Vice Chairman
Miss Helen Bullard, Second Vice Chairman
Mrs. Fred Patterson, Secretary
In accordance with the ordinance, the above officers and the Chairman shall
constitute the Executive Committe e . Upon motion duly made, seconded and
w1.animously passed, it was agreed that the Executive Co1nmittee has and
is authorized to act for and on behalf of the full Comm.is sion, s.ubje ct to
review of the Con1mission, between regularly scheduled meetings of the
Comn1is s ion.
A regular rneeting date was discussed at this time and it was agreed that the
E xecutive Committee be allowed to deliberate on the selection of the meeting
date and tin-ie and report back to the Commission at the next meeting.
On behalf of the Committee appo i nted to select the E xecuti ve Director,
Rev . Samuel Williams then reported that the position had been advertised
in the various news media and that seventeen applications were received.
Interviews have been scheduled to b egin on Tuesday, D e c ember 20. It
was the sugge stion of Rev. Williams (Ch airman of the Committee) that the
Comm.is s ion discuss the type qualifications, characte ristics and experien ce
of the individual to fill this position. Various members gave their opinions
on this subject and Mr. Feild and Mr. Clifton Henry of the Confer en ce of
Mayors also offered their suggestions based on the ir work with oth e r
commissions. It was generally agreed it would be necessary for the
Commission to determine specifically w hat type program was to be
conducte d before selecting the indi v idual to fill the position as differ ent
program emphases wg\J.ld require different qualifications and experience.
In an effort to e x pedite this Miss Helen Bullard distributed a questio nn aire
regarding the function and program content of the Co1nmission to each
member. This questionnaire is to be returned t o her for analysis and
consolidation.
Mr. Kaler app ointed the followin g te1nporary ad -hoc committees:
Program Committe e (To make recommendations
to the Executive Committee meeting in January
�Corn.11.1.unity Relations Com1nis sion Minutes
D ecembe r 14 , 1966
P age F o ur
and th e reafte r to th e full Commission)
M iss H elen B ull a rd, Chairman
Mrs . S a r a Bak e r
Dr. C lev c l., nd De nna r d
Mr. Ro b, · rL o bbs
Rev. Jos eph L. Griggs
Mr. Lucie n Oliv e r
Committee to Investigate P o ss ibility of OEO Grant
( and grants from Fo undat i ons ) (To make recommendations
to the Executive Committe e mee ting in January and
thereafter to the f ull Commission )
Mr .
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Al K u ettne r, Chairman
T. M. Ale xand e r , Sr .
Hamilton Dougl as, Jr.
C. G. E zzard
James 0. Moor e
Committee to n'lake R e comme ndations on the
Establishment of Standin g Committees (T o make
-recommendations to the E xe cutive Committee
meeting in February a nd thereafter to the f ull
Commission)
Rabbi J a cob Rothschil d, Chairman
Mr. A. L. Feldman
Mr. Jo seph Ha a s
Archbishop Paul J . H a llinan
· Mrs. Mary Ste p he ns
There being no further business the m ee tin g was adjourned at 4 :05 p. m.
R e sp e c t fully submitte d,
(M i ss) Faye Ya rb r ough
A c ting Se c retary
�COMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMISSION
NOTICE OF MEE TING
To All City Department Heads:
The C ommunity R e l a tions C o m m i ss ion invites you t o a tte.n d
the public hearing sche duled for Thursday, February 16, 1967,
at 7:30 p. m. to be held in City Hall i n Committee Room 2.
The C o mmission pla ns to sche dul e a n othe r m eeting
spe cifica lly with City officials t o h ear how we can w ork
c ons t r u c tively w ith y ou b u t we want you to k now we w ould
w e lcome your atte ndance at this public hearing .
Since r e ly yours,
J~1 k
~n,Q,_,_,b"\
Irving K. K ale r, Chairman
Commun ity R e l a tions Commission
I KK:fy
�7
NOTI C E 02? MEE TI1 -G
T o All C" ty D epa r tment Heads :
T nc C on1munity Relati on s C or:1.mis sion i nvi te s you t o atte:.'ld
the public hearing schedulec· :or ThL:1.· s day, "'<'eb r u a ry 16, 196 7,
a t 7 : 30 p . m. to be h eld i 11 C i ty I-L.111 in Com 1.itt e c Ro o1n 2.
T he C o miriis sion plans to s chc d ulc a ,1othcr n1.eeting
s pe c i fic a ll y with C i ty o fic i a i s to hear ho, we c an 'No rk
c ons u :uc t iv e ly w i th you b u t \ Ve w nt you to know we would
we come your a t tendan c e at this )t. blic hea ing .
Sincerely you rs,
\ ·
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1] ) .
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I r vi}1g K. Kale r, C ha i rina:n
C omn1.uni ty Re la tio n s C onu-n.is sion
I KK :fy
�PERSONAL DATA SHEET
(Mrs.) Eliza King Paschall, 1957 Westminster Way, N. E., Atlanta, Georgia 30307
PERSONAL:
Native of Charleston, South Carolina; grew up in Columbia, S. C.
Widow of late Walter Paschall, WSB News Editor; form'er president, Atlanta
Civitan Club.
Mother of 3 daughters: Suzanne (Mrs. Martin Gilbert, of London); Jan independent study in Europe; Amy - attending Druid Hills High School.
EDUCATION:
Graduate of Agnes Scott College, Phi Beta Kappa, with High Honor.
Graduate study in Public Administration and Sociology at American University,
Emory University; independent study in England.
CURRENT EMPLOYMENT:
(Since 1961) Executive Director of Council on Human Relations of Greater
Atlanta, Inc.
FORMER EMPLOYMENT:
Consumer Consultant, U. S. Food & Drug Administration; American Red
Cross O v erseas Ser v ice, European Theatre Operation, World War II;
National Youth Administration of Georgia.
OFFICES HELD:
President, National Alumnae Association of Agnes Scott College
Alumnae Trustee, Agn e s Scott College
President, League of Women Voters of Georgia
P r esident, League of Women Voters of Atlanta
Chairman, Council on Human Relations of Greater Atlanta, Inc.
CURRENT:
Board of Atlanta Urban League ( 7 years)
Life p re sid e nt of Agnes Scott class
Memb e r ACLU, National Democratic Party, Atlanta Press Club
Na t ional Com mitte e fo r Support of Public Schools
Am er ican Academ y of Political and Social Science.
Nati o n al Confe r enc e of Christians and Jews Good Neighbor Award, 1962
Fun d fo r Adult Education Fellowship, 1960
F ir s t Editi on of Who's Who Among American Women
Publi s h e d a rtic l e s i n v a r ious journals
Speakers Bureau o f Ame ri c an Embass y , London, 1964 - 65
�.,
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,., .· ,.
' ,1 ·
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AGENDA · FOR MEETING OF COMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMISSION
(January 27, 1967)
I.
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I
COMMITTEE REPORTS:
1.
\
RJport of Committee on Selection of Executive
Director -- Reverend Samuel Williams
a.
Establishing of salary for
Executive Director
2.
Report of Committee on Obtaining Grants·0 -~r. Al Kuettner
3.
Report of Progrannning Committee_ -- Miss Helen
Bullard

II.
NEW BUSINESS:
1.
Resolution adopted by Executive Committee establishing
the monthly meeting date and time of Commission
2. · Resolution adopted by Executive Committee respecting
attendance requirements of members of Commission •

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�7
LA W
OFFICES
KALER, KARESH &
16 2 0
I RV I NG K. KA L ER
SAN F ORD R. KAR E SH
MARTI N
PA U L
RUBIN
FU LT ON NAT I O N AL B ANK BUILDI N G
CABLE ADDR E SS:
ATLA N TA, GEORGIA 30303
"KKATTY" AT L ANTA
H. R U BIN
M. M 'l' L A RT Y, JR .
T E L E P H ONE :
C. L AW RE NC E J E W ETT, J R.
January 23, 1967
AR E A
CODE 4 0 4
525 - 6666
I
Miss Faye Yarborough
c/o Office of Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
City Hall
..,.
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Faye:
Enclosed you will find copies of the Agenda for the
January 27, meeting of the Corrnnunity Relations Commission.
You will remember that we will convene at 1:30 p.m., on that
day 1n Room #2 at City Hall. Please di stribute copies of the
Agenda to members of the Corrnnis·s ion.
In anticipation of the meeting, I should also appreciate
your confirming with Mr. Monroe that:
(a) There will b e s uff ic ient chairs f or all the
Corrnnission members in Committee Room #2.
(b) We will need pads and pencils for all member s
of t he Corrnnission.
(c)
The usual ash trays, carafes of wat er, etc.
I under s tand that the conference t able in Committee
Room #2 is no t large enough f or a l l t he Corrnnittee members t o
sit around. Nevertheless, I am hopeful that they will be able
to group around the table somehow and perhaps in two rows.
I will rely upon you to make all the necessary arrangements
with Mr . Monroe as to the appointments for the meeting.
Again , thank you for your kind and generous assistanceo
Yours very sincerely,
<<
I {____
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)
Irving K. Kaler, Chairman
Corrnnunity Relations Commission
IKK:db
Enclosures
�j
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COMMUNITY RELA TlONS COMMISSION
MINUTES
JANUARY 27, 1967
Members of the Community Relations Commission met on Friday, January 27,
1967, · t 1: 30 p . m . in City Hall. The following members were p resent:
Mr. Irving Kaler, Chairman
Rev. Samuel Williams , First Vice Chairman
Miss Helen Bullard, Second Vice Chairman
Mrs . Fred Patterson, Secretary
Mr. T . M . Alexand r , Sr.
Mrs . Sara Baker
Mr. C . G. Ezz rd
R v . Joseph L . Griggs
Mr. Joseph Haas
Archbishop Paul J . Hallinan
Mr. Al Kuettner
Mr. Rolland Maxwell
Rabbi Jacob M . Rothschild
Mr. M . 0 . Ry n
Mrs . ·Ma~y Stephens
Upon motion duly made , econded nd unanbnously passed, the minutes of the
p:reviou meeting were dopted ae submitted.
Mr • P tteraon r ad th minutes of the me ting of the Executive Committe
held on Friday, January 20, 1967, nd the Commi sion m mb rs di cussed
th busin
ri ing from this meeting.
R v . S a muel WilliamB , Chai;rman of the committc to el ct the Executive
Dh· ctor, repoitted th t M:r • Eliz Pa chall h -d be n recommended to
rve
a th Executiv Dil' ctor and mov d the . pprov l of this r commendation.
Upon rnotion duly m d , second d and p sed, it w s RESOLVED to ace pt .
the Committ e's r commend tion and request th M yol' nd Board of
Ald rmen to pprove th ppointm nt of Mrs. Pasch 11
Ex, cutiv
Dil' ctor t a al ry of $12, 500 p r annum.
Th Com.mi ion th n dhcuf..l d the dvi ability of st blishing tenure of
rvlce. Upon motion duly
de, s cond d nd pa eed it wa RESOLVED
that th •election of th Executiv Director b for
J'iod of on y :r subject
to i rmination upon sixty (60) daye notice on a m jodty vote of th full
Commi •ion.
�-

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Page Two
The Chai rman then asked Mr. Al Kuettner, Chairman of the Special Committee
to Investi gat e OEO Funding, to give the Committee ' s report at thi s time .
A copy of M r . K uettner ' s report i s attached and made a part of. these minutes
(Attachment A ). M l". Kuettner rec ommended that early in the operations of
the Commission a stand ing committee be established to w o r k clo sely with
M r . C . O . Emmerich, Admin i ·trator of E c onomic Opportwiity Atlanta, Inc.,
to f ollow through on this r eport.
M r . Kaler then asked the Commission t o consider two reconunendat ions
adopted by the E xec utive Committee :
1.
That any member of the C ommis s ion who ie absent from th~ee
consecutive meetings without valid reason be J'epl a c ed by the Mayol'
on request of the Commission.
2.
That the time of t he monthly m eetings of the Commi ssion be
e stablished on the f ourth Friday of each mont h t o c omrnense
at 1; 30 p . m . at City H 11.
Both of the s e i-ecomm n dation
were unanimously approved b y the C ommissi on .
The Chai rman official! y welcomed two new members, M;r. Rolla n d Maxwell
and Mr. M . O. "Buzi" R,an, t o the body nd xpr es ed the pleasure of the
Commis sion on their appoi ntment .
Rabbi J a c ob Roths child made the following announcement a t this time . The
Templ e i s c e lebira ting it 100th Anniver · a.ry and the Con g r egation wis he
to make ome contribution to the Cit y .
Therefore , the Congr egation h a s
et s i d a t rus t i und in the mount of $5 , 000; the procee d s of. which will
b turned ov e r to the Community R l ati on s Commi i on fo r the purpose of
e ta.bliahing and giving a good citizens hip wal'd t o an individ 1 o~ grou p
who be t c a :rd s out th
pirit and pui,,os of the Comm! sion. T h e Rabbi
p~ s nted thi to th Commls ton
a p r oject ed gift from th Congregation
with the und - rstanding that th r spon ibilU:y for s lectlon of th award wUl
be 1 ft to th Commitslon. Upon mot ion duly mad , s conded and unanimou ly
p a d it w
R
OLVED that thl gift be cc pt d and that an a.ppfopd t
1 tter of appre-clation be
nt to the Congr gation. Th Commission m mb r
xpr s d theiz- gratitude lor th gift and th int r et of The Temple.
Mte H len Bullard, Cb ir n of th Progl' m CornmUte • pr
nted th
Com.mltt 's -, port to th Commi · "ton, a copy ol which is ttached nd mad • pavt o f th ee minutes (Att ehm.ent B). Th Conuni lon dl cussed thi repoi-t
�Page Three
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at great length and adopted the Committee I s recommendations with the
following c hanges :
1.
Section 3 in the Preface was revised to read as follows : "That the
Commission wherever possible avoid duplicating any function that
is already being satisfactorily pedormed by an already established
agency o:r group and further that its efforts be channeled in the areas
of implementation rather than mere £act finding . 11
2.
The listing of the survey areas in the Program I section was revised
to read as follows. These areas will be listed acco1·ding to prio:rity
after consultation with the Executive Director.
a . Blue He ven
b . Cabbage Town
c. Mechanic ville and Pittsburgh
d . Summerhill, Peoples Town and South Atlanta
e . Vine City and Lightning
f . 5-cotts Cro sing
g . Plunkettown
h . Bankhead Highw y area
i . Thomasville
j . Ea t Atlanta, Reynolds Town nd Lynwood Park
k . Boulev rd (Bedford-Pin )
3.
Program ll will be implem. nted in the form of a seminal".
The Pi-ogT m C ommitte
w
The following memb rs wer
Q
commended fo:r it
appoint d as team
Blue Heav nz
C bbag
T own:
Me cba.nic ville and P ittaburghe
plendid r port.
to work in specific at as :
Rev. J o ph L. Grigg ·
Mr. Ha milton Dougl , Jr.
M r. M . 0 . Ry n
Mr. Joo ph H
R bbl J a cob M . Rothschild
M r. A. L . F eldman
Mi
Hel n Bullard
R v. Samu 1 William
M r. Rolland ..v.ur:,u,o. well
�Page Four
Summerhill :
Mr. Al Kuettner
Mr . C . G . Ezza.,_..d
Mr . James O . Moore
Vine City:
Mrs . F1·ed Patterson
Mr . T . M . Alexander, Sr .
M:r . lrving Kaler
Committee to Organize
Public Hearing on February 16 :
Committee in Reeorve
(To Serve on 0th r
Committee When Regul r
Membei- Cannot Attend)
Th meettng was
Mr . Robe~t Dobbs
Rev . Samuel Williams
Mrs . Mary Stephen
Mrs . Sa;ra Baker
Mr . Robert Dobbs
Mrs . Ma:ry Stephens
Mws . Sa:ra Bakeir
Archbishop Paul J . H llinan
djoqrned at 4 :00 p . m .
Re peetfu,lly submitt d ,
Mi's . Fr d Patter on
S cretal"y
�February 16, 1967
Mr. Irving K . Kaler
Kaler, Kare sh and Rubin
1820 Fulton National Bank Building
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Mr. Kaler:
Enclosed are the minutes of the Community Relations
Commission meeting of January 27, which Miss Yarbrough
has prepared.
1 am enclosing cot"respondence which this office has kept
on file until such time as the Executive Dire ctor of the
Commission was named. I feel that since you have now
appointed a Director and are in the process of establishing
an office that you would want to transfer all responsibilities
for administi-ation to this office .
Please feel fr e to call on us at any time we can be of
fqrther help to you or the Conunission.
Sincerely yours,
Dan Sweat
DS:fy
�COMMUNITY-RELATIONS COMMISSION
MINUTES
J ANUARY 2 7, 196 7
Members of the Community Relations Commission met on Friday, January 27,
1967, at 1:30 p. m. in City Hall. The following members were present:
Mr. Irving Kaler, Chairman
Rev. Samuel Williams, First Vice Chairman
Miss Helen Bullard, Second Vice Chairman
Mrs. Fred Patterson, Secretary
Mr. T. M. Alex ander, Sr.
Mrs. Sara Baker
Mr. C. G. Ezzard
Rev. Joseph L. Griggs
Mr. Joseph Haas
Archbishop Paul J. Hallinan
Mr. Al Kuettne r
Mr. Rolland Maxwell
Rabbi Jacob M. Rothschild
Mr. M. 0. Ryan
Mrs. Mary Stephens
Upon motion duly made, seconded and unani.mously passed, the minutes of the
previous meeting we re adopted as submitted.
Mrs. Patterson read the minutes of the meeting of the E xe cutive Committee
held on Friday, January 20, 1967, and the Commission members discussed
th e business arising from this meeting.
Rev. Samuel Williams, Chairman of the committee to select the E xec utive
Director, reported that Mrs. Eliza Paschall had been recommended to serve
as the E xecutive Director and moved the approval of this recommendation.
Upon motion duly made, seconded and passed, it was RESOLVED to accept
the Committee's recommendation and request the Mayor and Board of
Aldermen to approve the appointment of Mrs. Paschall as Executive
Director at a salary of $12, 500 per annum.
The Commission then discussed the advisability of establishing a tenure of
service. Upon motion duly made, seconded and passed it was RESOLVED
that the selection of the Executive Director be for a period of one year subject
to termination upon six ty (60) days notice on a majority vote of the full
Commission.
�Page Two
The Chairman then asked Mr. Al Kuettner, Chairman of the Special Committee
to Investigate OEO Funding, to give the Committee I s report at this time.
A copy of Mr. Kuettner's report is attached and made a part of these minutes
(Attachment A). Mr. Kuettner recommended that early in the operations of
the Commission a standing committee be established to work closely with
Mr. C. 0. Emmerich, Administrator of Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.,
to follow through on this report.
Mr. Kaler then asked the Commission to consider two recommendations
adopted by the Executive Committee:
1.
That any member of the Commission who is absent from three
consecutive meetings without valid reason be replaced by the Mayor
on request of the Commission.
2.
That the time of the monthly meetings of the Commission be
established on the fourth Friday of each month to commence
at 1: 30 p. m. at City Hall.
Both of these recommendations were unanimously approved by the Commission.
The Chairman officially welcomed two new members, Mr. Rolland Maxwell
and Mr. M. 0. "Buzz Ryan, to the body and expressed the pleasure of the
Commission on their appointments.
Rabbi Jacob Rothschild made the following announcement at this time. The
Temple is celebrating its 100th Anniversary and the Congregation wishes
to make some contribution to the City. Therefore, the Congregation has
set aside a trust fund in the amount of $5,000, the proceeds of which will
be turned over to the Community Relations Commission for the purpose of
establishing and giving a good citizenship award to an individual or group
who best carries out the spirit and purpose of the Commission. The Rabbi
presented this to the Commission as a projected gift from the Congregation
with the understanding that the responsibility for selection of the award will
be left to the Commission. Upon motion duly made, seconded and unanimously
passed it was RESOLVED that this gift b e accepted and that an appropriate
. letter of appreciation be sent to the Congregation. The Commission members
expre ss ed their gratitude for the gift and the interest of The T empl e.
Miss Helen Bullard, Chairman of the Program Committe e, presented the
Committee I s report to the Commission, a copy of which is attached and made
a part of these minutes (Attachment B). The Commission discussed this report
�Page Three
at great length and adopted the Committee I s recommendations with the
following changes:
1.
Section 3 in the Preface was revised to read as follows: 11 That the
Commission wherever possible avoid duplicating any function that
is already being satisfactorily performed by an already established
agency or group and further that its efforts be channeled in the areas
of implementation rather than mere fact finding."
2.
The listing of the survey areas in the Program I section was revised
to read as follows. These areas will be listed according to priority
after consultation with the Executive Director.
a. Blue Heaven
b. Cabbage Town
c. Mechanicsville and Pittsburgh
d. Summerhill, Peoples Town and South Atlanta
e. Vine City and Lightning
f. Scotts Crossing
g. Plunkettown
h. Bankhead Highway area
1.
Thomasville
J• East Atla nta, R e ynolds Town and Lynwood P a rk
k. Boulevard (Bedford-Pine)
3.
Program II will be impl e m e nted in the form of a seminar.
The Program Committee was comme nde d for its splendid report.
The following members were appointed as teams to work in specific areas:
Blue H e ave n :
Rev. J o seph L. Gri gg s
Mr. H a milton Dougl a s, J r.
Mr . M. 0 . Ryan
Cabbage Tow n :
Mr. Joseph Haas
Rabbi J a cob M . Rothschild
M r . A . L . F e ldma n
M e chanicsville and Pittsburgh:
Miss H e l e n Bulla rd
R e v. Samue l Williams
M r. Rolland M axwell
�Page Four
Summer hill:
Mr. Al Kuettner
Mr. C. G. Ezzard
Mr. James O. Moore
Vine City:
Mrs. Fred Patterson
Mr. T. M. Alexander, Sr.
Mr. Irving Kaler
. Committee to Organize
Public Hearing on February 16:
Committee in Reserve
(To Serve on Other
Committees When Regular
Members Cannot Attend)
Mr. Robert Dobbs
Rev. Samuel Williams
Mrs. Mary Stephens
Mrs. Sara Baker
Mr. Robert Dobbs
Mrs. Mary Stephens
Mrs. Sara Baker
Archbishop Paul J. Hallinan
The meeting was adjourned at 4:00 p. m.
Respectfully submitted,
Mrs. Fred Patterson
Secretary
�ATTACHMENT A
AT LANTA COMM!PlITY RELATI O'lS COMMIS S ION
Re por t
of .S p e c i a l Commi t t ee t o I nv es t ig a te OE O Fund ing
Mr. Irvi ng Ka l e r , Cha ir ma n,
Community Rela ti on s Commiss i on.
De a r Mr . Cha irma n:
Yc ur commit ~ee t o inv e sti g a t e supp l eme nt a ry fundin g possibi Liti e s f or th e
Atl a nta Community Re l a tio n s Commis s i o n h a s c omp l e t ed its work an d make s
her e with its r eport. Me mb e rs of t his c ommi t tee we r e Al Ku e ttn e r, Chriama n;
C. G. Ezz a rd, J ames O. Mo or e , Ha mi l ton Do ug l a s a nd T . M. Al e x a nd e r, Sr.
The c ommit tee held t wo le ng t hy mee ting s
ot f ic e of Ma_y or Iv a n Al l e n; :r . Cha r l e s
Opp ortuni ty Atl a n ta ; Mr. Ric h a r d Gr a na t
Opp ortunit y in Wa s hi ng t on , and wi th t h e
F lei s s i g and As so ci at e s i n At l a nt a .
a nd wa s i n c or r espon a en c e wi th t he
Emme r i ch , d i r e ct or of Eq ua l
of t h e Of f ic e of Ec on omic
c i t y pla n ni ng fi r m o f Cand e ub ,
Th e c ommit t ee h a s a s c e ~ t a i n ed t he f ol l owi ng i nf or ma t i on :
1. Mr . Gra na t a dv ises t h a t his of f i c e wi l l b e hap py t o d i sc uss a ny
p r opo s a l we mi h t h a v e , eithe r i nfo r ma l ly or on t he b a s i s of a fo r ma l
sub missi on of a p r o je c t . He po i n t s o ut t ha t a n ea rl i e r -c on t e mpla te d f und
f or f a ir hou s ing oper at io n is n ot pr e se n t l y a v a i lab le b e c a u s e of a s e v e r e
c utb a c k i n a ll s u c h f und s , but he i nd ic a t es t ha t OEO wil l b e gla d t o wo r k
wit h us t o e v e ry ex t ent poss ibl e . He s ugge s ts t ha t we dea l dir e ct ly wit h
t he Atl a n t a o f fic e .
2.
Mr . Emme r i c h ha s ad vi se d t ha t h i s of f ic e wi l l c o op er a t e f u l ~y wit h
o ur Commission ori spe ci f ic p r o j e cts a n d t he Commi tt e e f eel s t ha t we
sho u l d c all upon thi s o ffic e f or long r a nge p l anni ng a n d a cti on .
3. The city o f At lan t a has r e c e i v ed a $23 ,000 g r an t ~r om t h e S ter n Family
F und fo r t he p urpos e of s t a f fk n g t he may or ' s offt c e wit h s pe ci a l he l p so
as t o de v el op s t r ateg y and a cti on f or mob ilizi nB t he c i t y ' s fo r ce s t o
a tt a c k p robl em s of the slums. The c ity is mo ving ahead on t h is p ro j e c t
and has an ~mploy e for t he wor k .
Lette r i s atta a:h e d t o t h i s repor t as
we ll as a r esume of t he St e rn Family F und .
4.
~r . Ha rv ey F ri edman , Chai r ma n of th e Lawyers Commit t e e for Civil Ri g h t s
Under Law , Washing t on , D. C . , has b een c on t a c t ed. He says his gen cy wi l l
be glad to wor k with u s , i n i t ially in an achv i sor y c apacity . This is a v ery
signi f icant commit t ee f t p lawyers.
5.
Our Commi t tee is of the opini on that f unds can be obtained f r spe c ifi c
projects, based n detailed plans a nd pro g ram . It is t h e co mwittee ' s
recommendation that pr jects be planned in or d er of p riority, these proj e cts
then t
be submitted t o the pr per a g ency for funding. It is t he co nc e nsus of
the committ e e that long r· nge planning, fact finding and prog ramr,D.ing must
come ahead f efforts to fund the prog ~
~
A~ ,,Ktk& ner~
For the Cummittee.
,
�.
C .ir.l
1
iT
0 £17
• ·CITY HALL
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Ttl. 522-4463 Area Code 404
August 6, 1969
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Ass istant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental liaison
MEMORANDUM
TO:
Mr. Dan E. Sweat, Jr.
Deputy Chief Administrative Officer
FROM:
Johnny H. Robinson
Communjty Development Coordinator
SUBJECT:
Monthly Report {Statistical)
Dan, you will find enclosed a breakdown on the amount of
complaints received from July 1, 1969 - August 1, 1969.
The overall received are as following:
Total Received
708
Total Corrected
405
Total Meeting Attended
105
We were also involved in a survey for the Planning Department
in Plunkettown.
JHR/mc
�- - - - ---'-'--..:.....C..--'"---<---.- - - -
Johnny H. Robinson
A~r/4;
FROM:


-r143.215.248.55//Je/)/


SUBJECT
COMPLAINTS
Received
Atlanta Housing Authority
Sanitation
Police
Parks
Housing Code Divisi·.)n
Traffic Engineering
Construction
Planning
Fulton County Health Department
OTHER
Corrected
I
a
16"
15
I
I
I


-- ==========
TOTAL
41
}4-
lv1EETINGS
Number
2
i
2
E. O.A. Staff
CNAC
Area Block
CRC
MISC.
7
TOTAL
·coMMENTS - O BSERVATIO NS


�-----------•

TO :
Johnny H . Robi ns on
~
!/ ;-<-'/-Y~
_ _ • <..l_/(..L
F itOM :
,
--
-~
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... r <._1,,../ C _...
to
SUBJECT
,.f/t!Jj- ./ / cj~--cz
7
GOMPLA INTS
R
C
--/ // ,c;


z


3
11/6
Atl a nta Hous ing Authority
S a nita tion
d
P olice
I t-/
sl
H ou s i n g Code Divi sfon
Traffic Engin e ering
Construction
-5l ~~
,s
l '7
II
JI
/ ,2
c;
~3
2
if
P:anning
Parks
Fulton County Health Department
O THi:R

---
/VC;/.d:>e v
_
.....'S"nt1. 'F(
lv1 EE TINGS
/
I
-·- .


,
.,o, ~- -,,.-/1/J~CP O\/


...__ ... . . . '
_ ., ,


.L,,'~,,.1n


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1
J
C
~.53
TO T AL
\tVC DO it:A/:;'D
0
.... .
·~·- 1
-v
l Y.'.,1-·,.~~
JlJl
r:;,; , 1 .,.. 11,1
'--'
_ .._,_..,. ,
N un1ber
,,,..-,--,.,,.. r
L. - ,,


'.;,-,:l·,-


E .O .A . Staff
CNAC
Arca B l o ck
'7 .
I
\
2
.
2
C RC
l,1ISC .
If-
LJ-
12
11
T O TAL •
0?
C OMMENTS - O BSERVATIONS
1
(1'7!( C:f
·;
IJJt
jl


r l (! 1.-,i /J


I
. , ,-
L-._ IV L
J::>
�r...
I
Johnny H. Robinson
TO:
E. E
FROM:
ZicKSdrl
~y
J,
7
SUBJECT
_.,.-,
/9{9
to
VJ14
/
V 3~
'
/9t 9
I
COMPLAINTS
Received
Atlanta Housing Authority
Sanitation
Police
Parks
Housing C _o de Division
Traffic Engineering
Construction
Planning
Fulton County Health Department
OTHER
/ ,Z,,
II

Yv8 i c tf,{,/4',kS ,,2/ I/
,<_,
. 73:)/, /!() 0/- ,{_-:-/)l/C'.
";?__ . . .·': ._._
·~ ,
~ v /A..., v~,)l(._::r
/Jt!.L-1/VSF
~
&
2
?t/c- :-,.,._r ""1-
.- / , . ; / ..
-
_,
/)1//
TOTAL
,c.


?


fl.-X'SOIJdL.--L
Corrected
,ID
t
!l I
g .I
,?
I
/
E . O. A. Staff
CNAC
Area Block
CRC
MISC.
Number
.
-5T4 ,r.;: /"'Yt'.--r//v'6s
{c:/7 y l7"4.L0
/)isl"- du.er
TOTAL
COMMENTS - O BSERVATIO NS
l
-
I
l,"'-1L:-L-71~c:- . C{.1/~-// 115</C
it/ ,,<x.5'
@.!..-- {)t)!-""4 .57,.<.< & --,,..J:?/J ;Nf.
& ,/?A'.!) //No C<. ('.!/?k
.. .
/?~S/S~- /')/ -~
//tr
1
L
6 ,f)
,8y ~:.c <-~/ )·:'t -·,c t ,
/:/4--/?,1.Uc'.
7
{!../?.(:. 2oL-/VT d v vT,,(.1..(, /7~?/7/t)/c'[ r-u:"
7
,i..~/6:-
h>s d -tt:JVZ,,1/ /=-?=-<.< C:I-- S,Pl-·(!J/?c7 .O,f'(~-/t!d 1-7S ~
.
//25,0 ( l.-?,..; ,,,,~
n -/?d_,t7zs: m
/21.{.)F ,C?1{IC.
/2'/VO C/..>-.~-~/1/ v/) b?t ) 1~·-c
/
/
v
rs.
/-Ju.
0/C7(l),P<;
ljµ?,
TC 71-!dK ?(l; Z?,/ LJ'a~
/'-/ ,/'J-e: - /?S k t.:%> /-?u.:: /-.: V
-<7t.--
~/,/{J/.//4_./J {'()NO/vc11-~
/'3.1...1c / -- S/--:C' ////'./-- I~
z?> .i)o .s-(: . Llc>,,p~:~/? 7/cJ/v ;7-~,,~~ L..::-c')-P. Sz--4_..1:£ ;s 6i1<1.o
.s~ 0 :,(.) .l!UT
h~L--V. (Jc;r-/._,.,c..-,(-:S /)A.' L-~ G.et:--1/lT //c!.--/4/)_ --S::-,-
c;/~J;tc:;--
�....
DATE
Ht/ Ct- ST /; /9C:9
1
Johnny H. Robinson
TO:
~
1/o;,:,u:/1 v
FROM:
__.f
-
Js4ac
l/V.L. I/ ;:, /9?
7
SUBJECT
9
to
- -, ~ /
,~,/9&9
COMPLAINTS
Received
Atlanta Housing Authority
Sanitation
Police
Parks
Housing Code Division
Traffic Engineering
Construction
Planning
Fulton County Health Department
OTHER
Corrected
~I
'
19
II
'
l:Z
I
/l'>
17

:--
?I
TOTAL
'- L T:"' T:"" rr, Tl\. T , - C"
J.\'J..J..:.JJ....J .!.. .W..'\ \......,l .....,J
Number
I
E. 0 . A. Staff
CNAC
Ar e a Block CRC
MISC.
I
2-
CI ry f/;u'-TOTAL
COMMENTS - OBSERVATIO NS
/11;<". .Ts:a&c
,-/
«-121!/:'z 'i Qoc;1.J c.·Y /1Z/tY-/
/)1 ()
.
tfi_:-_~J,QFN_Lr/l;-1.1 L. E T
7
-ZLIwr-:.. s
SI//.> u,<, a
u
1


T//



C /4-;-v7~
C;,,v
/,7'--: /J . /J.
S:,-,12 a .::
.
/4IE'S- r N/C/z'.'.Z: !l(V/J //-=- 7ZJIJ!/ _V../S: /27/v'.,V / /V()/CIPV<?i½
C/1//NG J.--.


/4 7s- h1/? c ,i


1.
r:11/u--,e 01,:z-/ c ·y /<,c -/ -/OS
/ / / .'-'"
i
7
�.,
DATE Jul y 311969

Johnny H. Robir. son
TO:
-
FROM :
July l, 1969
SUBJECT
-,
·to ·
I
July Jl, 1969
'
.
COMPLAIN TS
Rece ived
Correc t ed
Atlan ta Housing Authority
San i t ation
Polic e
Parks
Hous ing Code Division
Traffi c _Engin e ering
Const ruction
Pl a n n in g
Fu lton County Health D ep a rtme nt
OTHER

TOTAL
6
L1
.51
39
24
'tt
~
11
9
29
10
16
...,
I
0
15
0
7
9
s
6
172
101
Numb e r
E . 0 . A. S t aff
C NAC
Area Bl ock
CR C
MISC.
5
2
11
l
6
TOTA L
COMMENTS
O BSERVATIO NS
Corm1ents are on next sheet.


�·- ---
A SUMMARY OF THE EVALUATIONS AND
RECOMMENDATIONS OF:
Mr. Bement (East Central) ·
Mr. Bruce (West Central)
Mr. Christenberry (Pittsburg)
Mr. Isaac ( Central City)
Mr. Menez (Ed g e w ood)
Mrs. S n ider ( C i ty H a ll)
Miss Sow ell (Na s h-Washi n gton - E x tension)
Miss Woodward (West End)
AUGUST 1, 1969
�EVALUATIONS OF CITY SERVICES
,
In evaluating City Services not all interns mentioned all City' Services.
divided opinion on many departments.
There was
However, the general consensus was that
the City Services were not responding well enough to complaints by area residents.
The Atlanta Housing Authority, according to Miss Sowell, does not respond at all.
.
.
.
However,- the Housing Code Department was commended by Mr. Christenberry and
Miss Sowell.
This was not the case with Mr. Menez, who feels the department is
"not only inadequate, but also poorly administered 11 •
Mr. Isaac reported that the Police Department is· doing well in Central City, but
Mr. Christenberry, Mr. Menez, and Miss Sowell reported very poor response.
Mr.
Christenberry was told that the Police D epartment did net knov.r to return route sheets;
howev er , that is not b e liev e d.
In most areas they have shown poor response on
pick-up of junk cars:
Only Mr. Isaac mentioned Public Works.
He noted only one third response.
The Recreation D e partm e nt was commented on by Miss Woodward and Mr. Menez.
Mr. Menez stated that the Recreation Department was not only hampered by lack
of e quipment, but its unsystematic s yste m allows for i!1consistenc y.
Miss Woodward
was more explicit, stating that recreation "app ears to suffer not in quanity but in
quality".
Since this is Atlanta's third y ear of exp a nd e d summer r ecreation , she feels
that " one would exp e ct to find a ctivities with carry ov e r values 11 •
Further, Atlanta
is loosing its b es t opportunity t o communicate with youth in th e se areas.
She
r e ports t h at youth do e s not participate in othe r programs, such as Mod e l Citi e s,
E. 0 . A. , e t c .
�-2-
The Sanitation Department came in for quite a bit of com1neint.
Miss Sowell, Miss
Woodward, and Mr. Isaac had reasonably good e x periences with this department.
Mostly their request had been answered promptly.
Miss Sowell stated that the
quick response on the trash barrels gives tangible evidence of the City's concern.
Thus this service of the Sanitation Department is invaluable.
Miss Woodward
states tha"t ther·e· is such· high c·onfideri~e in the department and in Mr.· Hulsey in ·
West End that citizens there usually call Mr. Hulsey directly with their complaints.
Not all opinions of the Sanitation Department are good.
Mr. Christenberry reports
poor pick-up of junk cars by this departme n t, especially if the car has not been
tagged by the City Service Coordinator.
Mr. Menez feels the departments "output
well _on complaints concernin g litte r barr e ls and/ or trash removal and poorly on
removal of junk cars.
The "Sid ewalks D e partm e nt" wa s commended by Mr. Isaac who stated that he has
r e c e ived o ne -hun dred percent r e spon s e .
Miss So we ll r e ports Str ee t Mai n t enanc e as b e ing prompt in r e plying.
Ho wever, she
f ee ls they should h ave inf o r m ed this offi c e t hat no addition al p av in g could b e done.
The Traffic Engineerin g D e pa rtment d id not p lea se M iss S owe ll , Mr s . Snid er, o r
Mr. Menez.
Mi s s Sowell fe lt they s houl d h ave no tifie d th e Commu n i ty Development
Coordinator 1 s Office t h at n o traffic s ignals were availa bl e for this year.
Mrs.
�---- -
-3-
Snider noted that many times the Traffic Engineering Deparhnent replied with "will
check this next week" or "maybe next year".
harm than good.
are done".
She felt this type of reply did more
Mr. Menez criticized "the bureaucratic procedure in which things
Mr, Isaac reported answers to all five route sheets sent to Traffic
Engineering.
Thus of the four comments on this department, only Mr. Isaac was
satisfied.
RECOMMENDATIONS
There were several types of recommendations which appeared often in the intern
evaluations. · These were concerned mainly with the City Services Coordinator, ·
junk cars, and the establishment of a central tel ephone nurn.ber or office.
Although
many recommendations were quite si1nilar each wa s p:resented from a slightly
different viewpoint.
The recommendations conc erning the City S ervi c e s Coordinators cent ere d around
the number of coordinators and their duties,
Miss Sowell, Mr. Isaac, and Mr.
Bement recommend that the re be one City S ervice Coordinator per target area.
I•
Others , such as Christenb err y, Mrs. Snider, and Miss vVoodward felt that more
City S e rvice Coordinators should be hired 11 •
Mr. Christenberry su ggested that
since the City Service Coo r dinator's do public relations work anyway, the
11
e x pens ive,
blu e-ribb on b e d ecked Community Rel a tions Commission 11 could be abolished and
the commission 1 s money be used for more City S ervice Coordina tors .
Miss
Woodward, Mr . Bement , Miss Sowell, and Mr. - Ch r ist e neerry also discussed
pos sibl e change s in the coord i nat or 's duties .
making them the administrators of
11
Miss Woodward recommended
Little City Halls 11 and increasing the scope of
�- -4-
their duties to include early slum detection, consumer services complaints,
public relations, and general information distribution.
removing the coordinators from the E .O. A. Centers.
the City Service Coordinators be viewed as
11
All of this involves
Mr. Christenberry feels
inovaUve chaps with an overview of
the whole system whose job is to better integrate existing services and develop
ne~ services as they see .fit 11 •
They should have the po\ver to "recommend
revisions in and additions to the city codes in their respective areas 11 •
Mr.
Bement saw the coordinator: s job as that of a "city-man in the ghetto; touching,
listening, stimulating, teaching, reporting " .
Miss Sowell believes the City
S ervice Coordinators could perform a broader coordi nating function between the
va.1~i 0LLS groups en h.is (or her) area.
Those were not the only recommendations pertaining to City Service Coordinators.
Mr. Christ enberry wants all City Service Coordinators (both present coordinators
and all future ones ) to sp e nd tim e w ith experienc e d coordinators, le arning methods
of "handling 'routine ' community proble ms".
He also fee ls that all City S e rvic e
Coordinators should have a per sonal knowledge of the operation of all city departments.
Mr. Isaac recommended tha t the coordinators b e publicized in th e community.
Miss Sowell suggeste d that re g ul ar
11
hou t' .!. of att endance 11 in their offic e s b e kept
by the coordinators, and that route she e ts from the Cit y S ervic e Coor dina tors
should received priority action (perhaps special funds could be a ll ocated for thi s ) .
Thu s the s e inte:o. r ec omm end a tions conc e rnin g the City S e rvic e Coo r dinators r e l a t e
�-
r - - - - - - -- -
-5-
· to their role, their number, their training, etc.
There is disatisfaction not with the
ideal of a City Service Coordinator, but with the reality.
A large number of recommendations concerned centralization.
the entire system be tied to one telephone number, such as 511.
Mr. Bement suggested
He also suggested
.a cent~al City Services intake . and Routing Office containing one or two complaint
desks from each department.
This would expand the Community Development Office's
· coordinating function by enabling departments to work together on problems not
"apropos II to any one department.
Mrs. Snider also felt a central information
service for field personnel was needed.
Under her plan, the Community Develop-
ment Office could become a central coordinating a ge ncy for target area groups who
might need supplies or other help and those churches, busine sses, etc., who rr1igh:
like to help such groups.
A centralized publicized telephone number was also
recommended by lvlr. Isaac.
Miss Woodward suggested a central complaint depart-
ment similar to that of Mr. Bement, but not included as a part of the Community
Development Office.
In the complaint department there would be a central real-time
information bank and "exceptions 11 crews to investigate a11 types of complaints.
Centralization as seen by the interns, wouLd expand the function of the Community
Development Office and aid in its operation.
Junk cars were the object of many of Mr. Christenberry 1 s and Mr. Menez's
recommendations.
Both felt that only one department of the City should have
re spons ibility for removal of junk cars, rather than both Sanitary and Police.
Menez suggested that this single ag ency be the Sanitary Department.
Both felt that
manpower in Sanitary should be increased; Christenberry suggesting that these
�-6-
--


be used to make "periodic sweeps through all infected are as to remove junk cars 11 •
An additional suggestion made by Mr. Christenberry was to assign personnel from
the Community Development Office to work with Rex Honeycutt of Sanitary in the
development of a profitable system for handling jul"'..ked cars.
In other words, these
intern recommendations were concerned with increasing the efficiency of junk car
removal.
Although the above are the major types of groupings of intern recommendations, there
were many more. - Mrs. Snider and Miss Woodward suggested "little City Halls".
Miss Woodward also sugg e sted a social research and planning staff which would .
begin slum prevention studies, a new training orientation program for summer
recreation employees, pla.i.11 english transl~tions of city orcHnances. new ordinances
concerning consumer service violations; investi g ation of bribery complaints,
regulation of absentee landlords, and use of volenteers for summer recreation
programs.
publicity.
Mrs. Snider and Miss Woodward had recomm endations pertaining to
Miss Woodward feels the War on· Poverty should be publicized to affluent
Atlanta; Mrs. Snider sugg ested that City Hall publicize itself through direct effective
action.
Miss Sowell and Mrs. Snider felt thathi gh l evel p ressure (i.e., Mayor Alle n)
should be used against those departinents which were unresponsive to the Commqnity
Development Office .
Several sugg es tions were made with regard to p ers onnel.
Mr . Isaac b e lieves the inter n progr am should be continue d part-time all year.
Miss
Woodward sugge sted the pay of polic emen and recreation e1nployees be increased.
She also suggested strengthening the lines between the E. 0 . A. Manpower Progra1n
�- -7and the City Personnel Office.
Miss Sowell r-ecommended that the Atlanta
,
Beautification Corps workers could be used to clean streets and vacant lots in
.
'
answer to complaints.
Mr. Christenberry also suggested increasing the number
of housing inspectors.
Other's suggestions included improving the Summer
Program Book by printing it in color code, having each department use the same
are~ definition providing space for up-da_tir1g t~e book, revising th~ route sheet
filing system by using file cards (Mrs. Snider); charging land owners for cleaning
their property, giving recognition to the Housing Code Department for its fine
performance, making a concentrated effort in one area in the hope that changes
in crime, property values, etc.
(Mr. Christenberry).
�f
//
I
,-'
(DRJl..FT)
1970 PROGRAM PLAN
COMfv'lUNITY RELATIONS COMMISSION
SECTION I
LEGISLATION
The Conmmnity Relations Commission has.been operating for
.almost three. years under the initial ordinance creating the Commission.
The Commission has been able in many cases to implement suc-
~essfully its duties and functions "to foster mutual understanding,
tolerance, and respect among all economic , social, religious, and
ethnic groups in the City."
The Board of Aldermen also charged
the C_o rnmission with the responsibility "to investigate, discourage
and seek to prevent discriminatory practices against any individual b e cause of rac e , color, creed, religion, national origin or
---
ancestry.'.'
Here the Com.m ission has foun d that the only tool it
ha s is tha t of per s u asi on.
./
L
In light of the nature of the dis-
,
criminatory pra ctice s still e x isting in Atlant a , th e Comm is s ion
1
a s found thi s tool, to b e. in a de q u ate .
To do the job the Comm is -
s i o n be l ieves must b e d o ne i n elimin a ting disc r imi na tory prac t ic e s,
lo ca l l egis l a tive acti o n i s n e eded in the following ar e a s:
0
�--
Page 2
Program Plan 1970
Draft
1.
Public Accommodations.
Although the 1964 Civil
Rights Act has been an effective to~l in eliminating discrimination in most businesses serving
I


the public, the law is applicable only to firms


engaged in interstate commerce.
Some Atlanta
businesses not in interstate commerce, such as
trailer parks, skating rinks, health spas and
barber shops,discriminate because of race.)
In the opinion of the Commission, it is unjust for
this small number of businesses to enjoy the prosperity of this great City while the vast majority
of business es are abiding by the letter and spirit
of the Federal law.
The Federal remedial process
is slow, cumbersome and e x pensive ..
A local public
accomi~odations ordina nce with enforc e me nt powe rs
through the municipal courts of Atlanta is nee ded.
2.
Contract Comp liance . . In 1967 the Board of Alder men ena cte d Ordina nc e # 31-41.1 ma king it nec es sa r y
for f irms contracti n g with the City to h a v e a nondiscrimina tor y hiring policy.
Each supp lier
c e rti f i es he doe s nof di s crimi n a te but nothing else
i s dbn e t o enfo rce t h e o rd ina n ce .
conta i ns
The o r d i n ance -
no inve s t i gator y o r e nfor cement powers.
In 1969 , t he budget o f the City o f Atl anta was
$2 0 7,0 0 0, 000 .
The f ull imp l enenta tion of thi s
o r dinance .would be a n imp o r tant l e ver in e n d i ng
employment d i scri :mi·nation in At l a nta.
0
�Page 3
Program Plan 1970
Draft
3.
.Fair Employme nt.
The 1964 Civil Rights Act
covers firms with 25 or more employees.
This
1
leaves thousands of Atlanta citizens without
fair employment protection.
Furthermore, the
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's
backlog of cases in the Southeast is proof that
more action is needed on a local level.
Other
Southern cities such as Miami and Nashvill~
~
have found their local fair employment ordinances to be highly useful in combating discrimination.
The Commission believes that
Atlanta needs an ordinance with enforcement
powers to cover firms with ten or more employees.
~-==,
In order to enforce effectively ordinances on public accommo-
!
dations, contract compliance and fair employment the Commission
J
needs subpoena, cease and desist, and other powers which may be
,.
"'. ~ ·
necessary to implement these ordinances.
The Commission recommends that the number ·of Commission /~(,/) /
v(1/
members be increased from 20 to 22, with the additional two «::_
positions being designated for young persons age 22 or under.
The Commission asks that the terms for these two youTthhepybosuitt-hion_s
be rotated yearly for increased youth · involvement.
Commission er s ar e to have full voting rights and powers.
~
-~
~
They are _
to s erve on an equal b a sis with th e othe r Commission membe rs.
v<./4
~
f
wv- p d ,


�--
Page 4
Program Plan 1970
Draft
SECTION II - TOWN HALL .MEETINGS
Immediately afte r its creation three years ago, CRC instituted a series of Town Hall meetings in disadvantage,d areas.
Thesy
~
meetings gave citizens an opportunity to e x press their grievances
and City Hall a chance to take remedial action.
~~
CRC benefited
from this progra m because it gave the Commission a direct involve-JJY~ "L,
ment with the people in their neighborhoods.
The ci;iz!ns bene~»
fited because they had a direct line to City Hall.
'
/
_
Concurrently the office of Community Development Coordinator ~e,, ~
was created to deal with City services in disadvantag e d areas.
cJfa1/
Although the CRC has h a d an effective working relationship with
Johnny Robinson's office, duplication of effort exists.
~
CRC's
main goals a r e to improve human relations and to elimina te discrimination. f Th e Town Hall mee tings d ea l prima ~ily with imp roving City
services. J The Commission recommends that the staff of the Community
Deve lopme nt Coor din at or b e e x panded with more City coord inators being
place d i~~dis a dvantag e d a rea s 611 a year iound basis and that the
Community Development Coordina tor's o f fice assume the responsibility
for th e Town Ha ll mee ting p r o gram.
SECTION III - PUBLIC HEARI NGS
Th e Or din a n c e c rea ting the Commu n i t y Re lation s Commi s sion
st at e~ iri Se c . 3.8 . 5 .:
. " Pu rs u ant t o the n amed f u nct i ons and duties o f th e
Community Relations Comm i ssion , i t is empower e d to
hol d h ear i ngs and t ake the t est i mony o f any p ers o n
under o ath. The Co:rruriission, after the comp l etion
of any h eari ng , shall make a report in writing to
the Mayor setting for th the facts found by it and
its recommendat ions .. At any hearing before the
Commission a witness shall have the r i ght to be
advised by counse l present during such hearings."
�Page 5
Program Plan 1970
Draft
~
t· ,
<f~~
The Commission has ma de very little use of this section of
its charter.
In an effort to get to the root
cause of discrim_i_- ,
nation, CRC will institute public hearings in such .areas as
o~!
~v
~
'
public ac6ommodations, employment discrimination, school segre- \\))/\ ~/ 1
gation, housing discrimination and other vital areas affecting
~ c)vv
improved human relations in Atlanta.
SECTION IV - EMPLOYMENT
1.
Starting in September CRC will undertake a systematic
i
study ·\of minority employment and promotion in each City Hall





.
I
depart,m ent, the Atlanta Housing Authority, and non-professional
positi~ ns in the Atlanta Sc~bol System,
Upon completion of this
study, \ the Commission will make a public report of its findings
with recommendations.
· 2.
Jobs Creation-Atlanta, a joint project of the Equal Employ-
ment Opportunity Commission and CRC, has been refunded for another
ye~r.
Mauric e Mitche ll has been employed to direct this project
during 1969-70.
During the last 12 months CRC has worked with 25
companies on their hiring and recruiting practices of minority
0
persons.
The plan for the forthcoming year is to continue working
with th e se 25 firms and to add , 15 new companies.
3.
· The C~mmi'ssion will work for the elimination of discrim-
in a tion in Atlanta labor union s , tr a de associ a tions, and prof e s siona l o r g a ni za tions.
4.
to
CRC wi ll c o n i nue it s
f o r t s with an
o f ant i c' ated j ob
pen ings i n Atl an a d ur i ng
and how v o ca ·iona l an
geared to
0
d hoc
ca
be
e ·
I
�~~
(I_/.,',
Page 6
Program Plan 1970
Draft
5.
CRC will c
sider havin·g another workshop on minority rt__
economic developm nt in mid-winter.
)
41) G
~
SECTION V - EDUCAT ~
1.
CRC will work with the n e w school board to impro~~ the
quality of education for minorities and the .disadvantaged and to
accelerate desegregation.
2.
The CRC plans to work with the Atlanta School
System and
y
...,
the City Planning Departme nt in d e t ermining how locations fo r new
schoo~s can assist in solving the desegre gation problem .
.j
I
3:.
The Commission will make personal calls on each coll e ge
pre sid\e nt in Atla nta to ur g e his in.s titution to acce l e r a t e s tude nt
arid fap ulty r e crui tme n t a c r o s s r acial l i n es .
I
I
SECTION VI - POLI CE-COMMUNI TY RELATIONS
in deve lop ing tr a in i n g programs i n police-community
r e l ati o ns fo r seni o r officers , p a t rolme nt a nd n ew recruits . · Effor ts
will be ma d e to util i z e outstanding s ocio l o g i sts , crimi nolog ists ,
p sycho l o g ists, p sychi a tri s t s , l aw enfo rceme nt o ff ic ers a nd consulta nts
in Atlanta a n d e l sewhere.
2.
The C~C wili o ff e r i t s s e rvic e s t o the Police De p a r tme nt i n
init iating more t r aining in huma n r e l ations fo r the polic e / c ommuni ty
s e rvic es o f fic e rs .
3.
CRC -will monitor Mun i c ipa l Co u r t s and make r e c omme nd a t ions
to j udges on how h u ma n r e l ation s c a n b e improve d.
0
�Page 7
Program Pl a n 1970
Draft
SECTION VI I - HOUSING
1.
In the l a st nine y e ars 22 Atlanta schools have gone from
all white , to virtu a lly all Negro.
The City of Atl~nta Planning ·
I
I
Departme nt estimat e s tha t
in 1967 and 1968 490 City blocks changed
from white to non-whit e .
After identif ing one or two targ'et ares for transition
the Commission will s e ek to ma r shall ' total community support~····
~
....
businesses, churches, the Atlanta School Board, huma n relations
organizations, r e al esta te broke rs, and the press ..... to stablize





i
The Commission will s eek to d e velop ways and
these t r ea s.
to report and halt block-busting~
2.
The .CR5)plan ~ to
memb e r ~ fu varlo;
u st 'part
.
and / /sk fo
I
housi
g.
.
n doing
.
be ide nt j/f i e·a. and d e 1 t wi .t h.
3. / The Commis ion will con t a c t The Adv erti s ing Council and
the De partme nt of Housing a nd Urba n Deve lopment to find out _the
availability of public s ervic e
TV . spots, ads and c a r-cards.
The
sta ff will the n ur ge ~o ca l medi a to us e th e s e public . s e rvice ads
·on ope n hou s ing .
4.
CRC will continue to p a r t ici pa t e a ctive ly as a membe r o f
th e Metropolitan Atlan t a Hou s ing Conf ere nc e which seek s to f u r th e r
o pe n hou si n g and t he d ispersa l of low- income hou si ng to a ll q uadr ants o f th e Ci ty and s u b u r b s .
5.
There i s a t remend ou s need i n Atl a nt a fo r a c entra li zed
'
a~ency which lists available housing at a ll income l eve l s.
CRC
plans to talk to representatives of the American Friends Service
0
�Page 8
Program Pl a n 1970
Draft
,.-·
CbITLrni ttee, Metropolitan Fair Housing Con ferenc e and the .M·a yor' s
Housing Resources Committee to s ee if such a function can be
assume d.
SECTION VIII - PUBLIC INFORMATION
1.
CRC will strive to furth er its public information role
by working closely with all n ews me di a and having member~ and staff
speak to church and civic groups.
It is the wish ofy th~• staff
to involve more inte n s ive ly Commission membe rs in public speaking
roles.
The staff will make personal calls on television stations
and s ervic e clubs o ffer ing a lis t of pane lists a n d speakers who
r efl ec t a wi d e r a nge o f exp eri e n ce a nd vi ew p oints in the human
relations field.
2.
Spec ial effort will b e made to conc ent rate on the huma n
r elation s edu cation o f white a n d b lue coll ar workers in At l a n ta .
The staff will prepare t wo or three storie s for the 25 largest
.....
.
compan y h ouse o rgans in the City.
Personal c a ll s will b e made b y
the staff at h igh c ooperat e lev e ls t o u rge t h e ~ se o f _these materi a ls . .
SECTION IX - INTER- AGENCY COOPERATION
1.
The Commiss ion will invite al l Atlanta profess:i.. onal
o rganizations concern e d with the h u~an relations to a o ne day
meeting at City Hall in Decemb er so each organi zat ion can outline
its progra m plan for 1970.
2.
Throughout the year the staff will concentrate on improving
communications with other human re l ations organiz at ions ..... working
�Page 9
Program Plan 1970
Draft
directly with them and through the Atlanta Chapter of the National
Association of Inter-Group Relation s Officials
I
I
1.
(NAIRO ).
SECTION X - WORKSHOPS IN HUMAN RELATIONS
In mid-1970 the CRC staff plans to repeat several sessions
· of the Workshop in Human Relations for new c·i ty Hall employees.
2.
As a follow up to the Workshops in Human ·Relations, CRC plans
an on-going program on human rela tion :i. for City of Atla'"hta personnel.
Each department will be asked to designate a person through which the
Commi ~sion can work.
i"
!
SECTION XI - REACTION ·TO CRISIS
CRC 's foremost function is to identify and eliminate discrim-
I
ination in Atlanta.
minimized.
If this job is done, civil disorders will be
However a ma ster plan n eed s to be d e v e loped outlining
what CRC should do in eve nt of a racial crisis.
For example:
1.
The opera t ion of Rumor Control ·.
2.
The organiz a tion of "Inte rfaith. Mobilization",
a group of Atlanta ministers traine d to act as
obs erv e rs and report e r s at hospitals and police
stations .
. 3.
The identification of · a list of community leader s
who can b e called on for specific as s ignme nts.
SECTION XII - RESEARCH
The Board of Aldermen charged the Coni.mission with several
responsibilities including .. .: .. "To make studies, and to have
0
�Page 10
Program Plan 1970
Draft
studies made, in
the field of human relations, and to prepare
and disseminate reports of such studies.
Due to lack of staff,
the Commission has not adequately discharged this responsibility.
The Commission req uires a full time staff member to initiate
specific studies in the field of human relations in 1970.
staff
This
work closely with the Community Council, the
, and colleges and


· #


\
,
0









�!'
'
( DRA.FT )
)'
.
""•
1970 PROGRAM PLAN
COM.l.ViUNITY RELAT I ONS COMMISS I ON
l'
I
!
I
SECTION I - LEGISLATION
'l'he Commun ity Re lations Commiss ion h a :3 b een o per a ting for
almo s·t thr e e y ears und er the ini t i a l o rdi n a n c e c reat ing the Commi s sion.
The Commiss ion h as b e en a bl e in ma ny cas e s to i mpleme nt sue-
ces sfu l ly its dut ies and fu n c ti ons to fost e r mut u a l und ers tanding ,
tol era n c e , a nd r e spe c t among a l l e c o n o mic , s o c i a l, r e lig ious , and
ethnic grou p s i n the Gity ."
Th e Bo a rd o f Al d ermen a l s o c h a rge d
t h e Commissi o n with the re s pon s ib i lity " t o inves tigate , discourag e
and s eek t o p rev e nt di scrimina tory pract ic es ag a ins ~ a ny i ndividu a l b e c aus e o f r ac e , c o lor , c reed , re ligion , n a t i ona l o rigin o r
a ncestry. " · Her e t h e Comm i s s ion h as fo u nd that the o n l y too l i.t
h as is that o f p e rs u as ion.
In l ight o f the n a ture o f the d is-
c r imi n u.to ry p rac t i c es s t ill e x i stin g in Atl a n t a , the Commis s j,on
· h as f ound this t ool t o b e i n a dequ a t e .
To do the job t h e Commi s -
s ion b e li e v e s mu st b e done i n e limi n a t i ng disc r i mi n a tory pra ctice s,
l oca l l e gis l ative act ion i s n eeded in t he f o l l owi ng areas:
0
�Pa g e 2
P£ograrn Plan 1970 ·
Draft
1.
·-
~
Public Accommodations.
Although the 1964 Civil
Rights Act has been an eff ective tool in eliminating discrimination in most businesses serving
_the public, the law is applicable only to firms
engaged in interstate coITuuerc e .
Some Atlanta
businesses not in interstate commerce, such as
trailer-rarks, skating rinks, health spas and
barber shops,discr i minate b e c a use of race.
'I' .
...
In the o pinion o f t he Commi·ss ion, it is unju s t
for
this small number of businesses to enjoy the prosperity of this g r e a t City while the vast majority
of busines s es are ab iding by the l etter a nd spirit
of the Federal law.
The Fede ral remedial process
is slow, cumber some and e x pensive .·
A loc a l public
ac c ommo dations o rdinan ce wi t h e n f orceme nt powe rs
through the municipa l courts of Atlanta is needed.
2.
Contrac t Comp l iance .
In 1967 the Board o f Alder-
me n ena cted Ordi nanc e #31 - 41 . 1 makin g i t n e c essa ry
fo r fi r ms contracting with the City t o h a v e a nondiscriminatory hiring p olicy .
- Each s uppl ier
c erti f i es h e do es n o t discr i minat e b u t nothing els e
/
0
i s done t o enfo r c e the o r d inanc e .
contai ns
The o r dina n ce
n o i n v e stigato ry o r enfo rcement p owers.
In 1969 , the budget o f the City o f Atl a n ta was
$2 0 7 ,000 , 000 .
The f u ll imp l er,1e n tation of t h is
o rdinan ce wo u l d be an i mp o r t ant
l e v er i n e n d i ng
emp l oyment discrimina ti o n in Atlanta .
-=--- ~--=-
- ---- -
�Page 3
P~ogram Plan 1970
Draft
3.
Fair Employment.
The 1964 Civil Rights Act
covers firms with 25 or more employees.
This
leaves thousands of Atlanta citizens without · •
fair employment protection.
Furthermore, the
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's
backlog of cases in the Southeast is proof that
more action is needed on a local level.
Other
Southern cities such as Miami and Na~hvill~ ·
have found their local fair · employment ordinances to be highly useful in combating discrimination.
The Commission believes that
Atlanta needs an ordina nce with enforceme nt
powers to cover firms with ten or more employees.
In order to enforce effective ly ordinances on public accommodations, contract compliance and fair emp loyment the Commission _
ne e ds subpoena, cease and desist, and other powe rs which may be
n e cessary to implement th e se ordinances.
The Commission recomme nds that th e number of Commission
members b e increased from 20 to 22, with the additiona l two
posit i o ns b e ing designat ed fo r young p e rsons age 22 or under.
0
Th e Commission asks th a t the t e r ms fo r these two youth po s itions
be rot a t ed y e arly for incre a sed youth involveme nt.
The youth
Comm is s ioners ar e to hav~ full voting rights and powers.
The y a re
to serve o n an equa l b as is with t he o t h er Commis sion memb ers.
�Page 4
Program Plan 1970
Draft
SECTION II - TOWN HALL MEETINGS
Immediately after its creation three years ago, CRC instituted a series of Town Hall meetings in disadvantaged areas.
These
meetings gave citizens an opportunity to express their grievances
and City Hall a chance to take remedial action.
CRC benefited
from this program because it gave the Commission a direct involvement with the people in their neighborhoods.
The'citizens
benev .
.....,
fited because they had a direct line to City Hall.
Concurrently the office of Community Development Coordinator
was created to deal with City services in disadvantaged areas.
Although the CRC has had an effebtive working relationship with
Johnny Robinson's office, duplication of effort exists.
CRC's
main goals are to improve human relationi and to eliminate discriminatioh.
services.
The Town Hall me etings deal primarily with improving City
The Commission recommends that the staff of the Community
Development Coordinator be expanded with more City coordinators .being
plac e d in disadvantag e d areas on a year round basis and that the
Community Development Coordinator's office assume the responsibility
for the Town Ha ll meeting program.
SECTION III - PUBLIC HEARINGS
0
The Ordinance creating the Community Relations Cormnission
sta t es in Se c . 3.8.~.:
0
"Pursuant to th e n aLted functions and duti e s of the
Communi t y Re l a tions Comm ission , it is e mpowered to
hold h ear ings and t ake the test~mony o f any p e rson
u nder o ath.
The Commi s sion, after t he c omp l e ti on
o f any hearing, shall make a repor t in wr i ting t o
t he Mayor setting forth th e facts fou nd by it and
i ts recommendations. At a n y h ear i n g b efo re the
Commission a witn~ss s hal l have t h e right to be
advised ::iy counsel presP.nt during sur.h hearings."
�_Page 5
Prbgram Plan 1970
Draft
,.
The Commission has made very little use of this section of
its charter.
In an effort to get to the root
cause of discrimi-
nation, C~C will institute public hearings in such areas • as
public accommodations, employment discrimination, school segrega t ion, housing discrimination and . other vital areas affecting
improved human relations in Atlanta.
SECTION IV - EMPLOYMENT
1.
\f

-\.\1
Star ting in Septembe r CRC will undertake a systematic
\
study
~f
minority emplciyment and promotion
in each City Hall
.
I
.
.
I
department, the Atlanta Housing Authori ty , and non-professional
positi~ ns in the Atlanta School System.
Upon comple tion o f this
i
study, \ the Commission will make a public report of its findings
with recommendations.
·2.
Jobs Creation-Atl anta , a joint project of the Equal Employ-
ment Opportunity Commission and CRC, has been refunded for another
ye ar.
Maurice Mitchell h as b een employed to direct this project
during 1969 - 70.
During the last 12 months CRC has worked with 25
companies on their hifi n g and recruiting pract ic e s o f mi nority
per·sons. · The plan for the forthcoming year is t .o continue working
with these 25 firms and to add 15 n ew compa ni es .
3. · The Commission will work for the elimination o f discriminat ion in Atlanta l abor unions, trade a ssocia tions, and professiona l o rga ni za tions.
4.
CRC will continue it s efforts with an ad hoc committ e e
to make a study of ant ic ipa ted job o p e nings in Atl a nta during the
nex t f ive years and how vocational and other training can b e
g eared to me e t these n eed s.
0
�Page 6
Program Plan 1970
Draft
5.
CRC wili consider having another workshop on minority
economic development in mid-winter.
SECTION V ·· EDUCATION
1.
CRC will work with the new school board to improve the
quality of education for minorities and the disadvantaged and to
accelerate desegregation.
2.
The CRC plans to work with the Atlanta School System and
the City Planning De p a rtme nt in d e t ermi ning how loca tion s for new
schools can assist in solving the desegregation problem.
3.
The Commi ssion will make p ersonal calls o n each college
president in Atlanta to urg e hi s insti tution to acce lerate student
and faculty r e cruitment across racial lines.
SECTION VI - POLICE-COMMUNITY. RELATIONS
1.
The Commission will work with the Police Departme nt and the
Urban Lab~ rato~y in d eve loping training programs in police-community
relations f or senior officers , patrolme nt and new recruits.
Efforts
will b e made to utili ze outstanding sociologists, criminologists,
p ~ychologists, psychi a trists, l aw enforceme nt offic er s and consultants
in Atlanta and e l sewhere.
2.
The CRC will off er its services to the Polic e Department in
initiating more t raining in human relations f o r t he police/communi ty
servi ces offic er s.
3.
CRC will monitor Municipa l Cour ts and ma k e rec omme ndat ion s
to judg e s on how huma n r e l at ions can b e impro v e d.
�Page 7
Program Plan 1970
Draft
SECTION VII - HOUSING
1.
In the last nine years 22 Atlanta schools have gone. from
all white to virtually all Negro.
The City of Atlanta Planning·
Department estimates that in 1967 and 1968 490 City blocks changed
fro m white to non-white.
After identifing one or two target ares for transition
the Commission will seek to marshall ' total community support .....
y
....
businesses, churches, the Atlanta School Board, human r~lations
organizations, real estate brokers, and the press ..... to stablize
these areas.
The Commission will seek to develop ways and
means
to report and halt block-busting.
2.
The CRC plans to send out te a ms of black and white staff
members to various apartme nt buildings and housing developme nts
and ask for housing.
In doing so discriminatory practices will
be identified and dealt with.
3.
The Commission will contact Th e Advertising Council and
the Departme nt of Housing and Urba n De v e lopme nt to find out the
avail a bility of public service
TV s p ot s , ads and car-cards.
The
staff will then urge local me dia to u se thes e public servic e a ds
on ope n housing .
4.
CRC will continue to parti c i pa t e actively as a memb e r of
0
the Met r o p olit a n Atlant a Hou s i n g Con,fere nce which seeks to further
· ope n hou s i ng a nd t h e dis pers al of low- income housin g to all qua d r a nt s o f the City and su~u r b s.
5.
Th e r e i s a t remend ou s n eed in Atlanta fo r a c e nt ra liz e d
agency whi ch lists availab l e h o u sing at a ll i ncome l evels.
CRC
p l ans to ta l k to representatives o f the American Friends Serv i ce
�Page 8
Program Plan 1970
Draft
Committee, Metropolitan Fair Housing Conf erence and the Mayor's
Housing Resources Committee to see if such a function can be
assumed.
SECTION VIII - PUBLIC INFORMATION
1.
CRC will strive to further its public information role
by working closeiy with all news media and having members and staff
speak to church and civic groups.
'
It is the wish ofv th~ staff
to involve more intensively Commission members in public speaking
roles.
The ~taff will make personal calls on television stat ions
and service clubs offe ring a list of panelists and speakers who
reflect a wide range o f experienc e and vi ew points in the human
relations field.
2.
Sp ec ial effort will be made to concentrate on the human
relations education of white and blue collar workers in Atlanta.
The staff will prepare two or three stories for the 25 larges t
company house organs in th e City.
Personal calls will be made by
th e staff at high cooperate levels to urg e the use of these materials ~
pECTION IX - INTER- AGENCY COOPERATION
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Th e Commission will invite all Atlanta professional
a,rganiz a tions conce rn ed with the huma n r e lations to a one day
mee ting at City Ha ll in Dec emb e r so e a ch organization can outline
it s p r o gram p lan f o r 1970.
2.
Th r o ug h out t h e y ear th e staff will conc e ntra t e on i mpr ovi ng
communications with o the r huma n r e l a t i on s orga niza t i o ns .... . wo rk i ng
�Pa ge 9
Prngram Plan 1970
Draft
directly wi th them a nd thr o ugh t he Atlanta Chapte r of t h e Nationa l
Associ a tion of Inte r-Group Rel at ions Of fici a ls (NAIRO).
SECTION X - WORKSHOPS IN HUMAN RELATIONS
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1.
In mid-1970 the CRC sta ff pla ns to r e p eat several s e ssions
of the Work shop in Hu man Re l a tions f o r n e w City Hall employe es.
2.
As a follow up to the Workshops in Human ·Relations, CRC plans
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'\&i
an on -going p r ogr am on human r e latio n :·i for City of Atl a nta p e rsonnel.
Each ~epartme n t will be asked to d e signat e a p e r s o n thr ough which the
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Commi s sion can work.
I
SECTION XI - REACTION TO CRI S I S
CRC 1 s for e most function is to ide ntify a nd e limina te discrimi
ina tion in At lan ta.
minimized .
I f th is job i s d o ne , civil di s o r d ers wi ll b e
Howe ver a ma ste r plan n eeds to be dev elo p e d outlinin g
wh at CRC shoul d do in event o f a racia l cr i s i s.
For e xamp l e:
1.
The ope ration of Rumor Control .
2.
The o rga ni zat ion o f " Inter fai t h Mobi l iza t i o n ",
a group o f Atl a n ta min i ster s tra ine d to act a s
0
obs erv e r s and r eporters at hosp i ta l s and poli ce
sta t i ons .
3.
The ide nti fica tion o f a lis t o f community l eaders
who c a n b e c a lled o n f o r s p e ci f i c a s signme nts.
SECT ION XI I - RESEARCH
The Board of Aldermen charged the Commi$sion with several
responsibil i ties includi ng .. .' .. "To make studies, and to h ave
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�Page 10
Program Plan 1970
Draft
. studies made, in
the field of human relations, and to prepare
and disseminat e reports of such studies."
Due to lack of staff,
the Commission has not adequately discharged this re,sponsibilit_y . .
The Commission requires a full time staff member to initiate
specific studies in the field of human relations in 1970.
This
staff member will work closely with the Community Council, the
Urban Laboratory, and colleges and universities to avoid ~uplica....,
\' .
tion of efforts.





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Pa.ge
Program Plan 1970
Draft
SECTION XII - HIPPIES
CRC will endeavor to serve as a communications link between
the growing hippie community and the City of Atlanta.
CRC plans
to hold periodic meetings in the near Northside neighborhood with
residents, business proprioritors and landlords and to make
recommendations to City officials.
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  1. http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_003_014.pdf

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