Box 3, Folder 16, Complete Folder

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Box 3, Folder 16, Complete Folder

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����ATLANTA,GEORGIA
PHONE JA. 2•4463
Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor
Ul1l
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3/ U4. Pe~,111 »t tJ ~
ll-ur //~?
FORM 25 · 2
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L_1
ECONOMIC OPPORTU NI T Y ATLAN T A, IN C.
ROUTING SLIP
BUILDING, ROOM, ETC.
1.
2.
3.

5.
YOUR INFORMATIO N
D HANDLE DIRECT
D APPROVAL
D IMMEDIATE ACTION
D AS REQUESTED
D INITIALS
D CONCURRENCE
D NECESSARY ACTION
D CO RRECTION
D NOTE AND RETURN
D FILING
D PER OUR CONVERSATIO N
D FULL REPORT
D PER TELEPHONE CONVERSATION
D :~Jn~06'la143.215.248.55 13:06, 29 December 2017 (EST)-L
_ _ ____________
D READ AND DESTROY
D RECOMMENDATIO N
D SEE ME
D SIGNATURE
D YOUR COMMEN T
D
D
D ;~~Pti~N~Ti~tg~
REMARKS
FR O M -
NAME AND/ OR DI VI SION
BUILDIN G , ROOM , ETC.
TELEPHONE
DATE
~ -5-G
EO A· ADM• 2
�I.
ECONOMIC OPPOR T UNI T Y ATLANTA, INC .
ROUTING SLIP
BUILDING, ROOM, ETC.
1~
.
2.
3.
4.
5.
YOUR INFORMATION
D APPROVAL
D AS REQUESTED
D CONCURRENCE
D CORRECTION
D FILING
D FULL REPORT
o :~in~
D HANDLE DIRECT
D IMMEDIATE ACTION
D INITIALS
D NECESSARY ACTION
D NOTE AND RETURN
D PER OUR CONVERSATION
D PER TELEPHONE CONVERSATION
D REA D AND DESTROY
D RECOMMENDATION
D SEE ME
D SIGNATURE
D YOUR COMMENT
D
D
0iRA8143.215.248.55:_L_ _ _ __ _ _ __ _ _ _ __
D 143.215.248.55pti~N~l~~E~~
REMARKS
FROM -
N AME A ND / OR DIVIS ION
BUI LDIN G , ROOM , ETC.
TELEPHONE
EO A- A DM- 2
�FROM:
Ivan Allen, Jr.
0
For your information
0
Please refer to the attached correspondence and make the
necessary reply.
0
FORM 25· 4
Advise me the status of the attached.
�~(f~ ~
'
Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.__

101 Marietta Street Bldg.
William
w.
o
Aclanta, Georgia 30303 •
Allison
E xe cutive Administrator
December 18, 1969
Mr. Dave Houser
Arthur AndP.rsen & Company
25 Pryor Street
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Dave:
In response to our conversation resulting from my previous
discussion with Al Bow.s on the Administration's proposed Manpower
Training Act of 1969, I am attaching a draft copy of the Bill
along with a summary of the provisions and a cover letter by
Secretary of Labor Schultz.
I received the draft earlie:c this
year at a one day staffing sponsored by the U.S. Conference of
Mayors in Washington as Mayor Allen's representative. Subsequent
to this staffing, a committee from the U.S. Conference of Mayors/
U.S. League of cities held an interview with Secretary of Labor
Schultz expressing the concerns of the Mayors of ma jor cities
relative to the Bill.
I am also attaching copies of two s~tuna ries
of such concerns res u lting from ma npower conferences which were
sent to city Hall after my return from Washington.
This morning I also h a d the opportunity to review the brochure
prepare d on the coordi nat ion of manpower efforts.
I e .x;press e d to
Al Bows my fe e ling t h at such coordina tion is not feasible unless .
done through a po l it i c a l me cha nism.
I further sugg e sted that the
att a che d Manp ower Act would pres ent this opp ortunity provide d that
the city governme n t has b oth th e d e sir e and commitme nt to take on
·t h i s task and mak e i t work.
A few ma jor c oncern s I have about the propos ed Bill are a s
follows:
1.
That it is abso l u tely e s s e ntia l that the city governme nts
r eceive unin cumbe r e d g ran t s f r om the Sta te for ma n p ower
�_I -
Mr. Dave Houser
Page 2
December 18, 1969
needs in the SMSAs. Most state governments especially in
the south are still basically dominated by rural interest
and political power, and based on past experience can
not be expected ·in the immediate future to address themselves voluntarily to urban needs.
2.
The formula for computing training allowances under this
act is basically the same as under MDTA and is totally
inadequate.
3.
City governments, however, assuming a manpower role under
this Act must be unincumbered in their objective evaluation
and selection of agencies and techniques to be utilized
in all aspects of manpower programs. This may mean the non
selection of some traditional agencies working in this
area.
4.
The Bill should be carefully watched to insure that an
appropriate concerned local government official is
selected as Prime Sponsor and that the mechanism for
this selection not allow for capricious designation of
irrelevan t officers .
5.
Recently Preside nt Nix on indicated that this Bill was on
what he termed his "red light" list of legislation. This
was int e rpr e t e d to me a n that items on this list would not
be press e d f or legi s lative action this congres s ional year.
I hope the se points c a n s e rve as a b e ginning point for our
di s cuss ion on th e r e l e v a nce of this proposed legislation for the
pur pose and intent o f your wo rk towa r d r ea li s tic coordination and
c ons olida tion ef f o rt s.
Sinc er ely,
C!L~
Cl i nt Rodger s
Deputy Adm in istrato r
CR: a
At ta ch ments
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ATLANTA FOSTER GRANDPARENT PROJECT
QUARTERLY REPORT
July, August, September, 1969
TO:
Mr. M. Gene Handelsman, Director
Foster Grandparent Project
FROM:
Mrs. Georgie 0. Miller
Project Director
I.
DESCRIPTION
The Atlanta Foster Grandparent is directed locally b y
Senior Citizen Services of Metropolitan Atlanta, Inc., through a
contract with Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. , the Grantee, and
was started in January, 1966.
Thirty six foster grandparents are employed at three
institutions: Carrie Steele-Pitts Home for neglected children (2) ,
Georgia Regional Hospital at Atlanta, Retardation Unit (4), and
Grady Memorial Hospital (30).
In February, 1969 one foster grandparent was employed
a t Grady Memorial Ho s p i tal with funds from a private Foundation ,
and i n Jun e fun ds wer e recieved f r om another Foundation to
fin ance fou r additional gr a ndparents at the Georgia Regional Hospital ,
mak ing a total of 41 .
I I.
PROG RESS AND PROBLEMS
Statist i cs:
1 r esignation , due to ill health
1 replacement employ ed in September
15 app l icat ion s h a v e b een r eceiv ed , b u t
h a v e no t b een p r oce ssed . Scre en ing
and t raining o r ienta ti o n classe s are
planned f o r Octob e r.
40 days absence due t o illnes s
32 clinic visits we r e made by grandparents
At Grady Memorial Hospital 31 grandparents
were assigned to 20 teenage patients and
315 pediatric patients.
At Georgia Regional Hospital 8 grandparents
were assigned to 16 retarded children .
Six children were assigned to two grand parent at Carrj_e Steele-Pitts Home .
�2.
The large number of children is due to the rapid turn
over at Grady Hospital. Most of this year the census has been low
and many times "good" assignments (long term, chronically ill)
were not available. If this situation persists, a change in placement of grandparents will be recommended.
One of the two grandparents at Carrie Steele-Pitts has
resigned due to extended illness. We are not planning to replace
her since we were advised that it is impratical to place less than
four in an institution. We plan to transfer the other one in
January.
The major problem has been transportation for the eight
grandparents at Georgia Regional Hospital. There is one morning
bus which goes to the hospital, and no other bus until f our-thirty.
The Hospital pays taxi fares back to city bus lines, however,
these buses are irregular , and there is no place for them to wait
out of the weather. The Advisory Committee and the Hospital are
trying to assist us, hoping to find a solution before winter.
On the brighter side we have enjoyed a very good
summer. Three grandparents went to California to visit their
families (who paid their fares) and our oldest grandmama, age 85
flew to New York to visit her granddaughter. Many of the others went
on shorter trips, and all of them expressed gratitude for the "paid
vacation", but said they were glad to be back on the job.
The grandparents enjoyed "Senior Citizens Day" at the
Southeastern Fair in September. The Foster Grandparent Club members
ma de f ancy aprons which they sold at the Fair; the money will go
to the Club trea sur y.
The Atl anta Project was highly honored t o h ave t h e
Commi ssioner on Aging, Mr . John Martin visit us on July 10th. He
t alked with the g r andparen ts working with their c h ildren and
commended them f o r t heir c o ntr i bution. He stated that th is was
the first project he h ad seen i n act ion and that h e wa s very i mpressed with what he saw. He promised t o work for an extended
program in 1970.
The Policy Advisory Committee heard a report from
Chaplain Keith, Program Director for the Retardation Cottage at
Georgia Regional Hospital. He described the 16 severely or profoundly retarded children assigned to grandparents, and told of the _
dramatic progress made by many of them since the grandparents starte d
there in April. He said that the hopsital is very anxious to get
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more grandparents, and that funds have been requested from the
Georgia State Director of Mental Health.
Letters requesting foster grandparents have been received from two local institutions, the Southern Christian Home
for children (a private home 50 - 60 children 4 - 5 years) and
the Atlanta Association for Retarded Children, which sponsors
day school programs, training schools, etc. This group has
given us much support in the past, and has volunteered a full
week orientation and training to all future classes by their
staff to supplement our orientation program. This was particularly needed since we are affiliated with the Retardation program at Georgia Regional Hospital. These requests will be considered for 1970 and referred to the Advisory Committee.
�FOSTER GRANDPARENTS - JULY, AUGUST, SEPTEMBER, 1969
STATISTICAL REPORT
Foster Grandparents (Program Account Number 14)
A.
PARTICIPANT CHARACTERISTICS
1.
Age Range
0 -
5
6 -
15
21
44
64
65
16 22 45 Over
42
10
32
2. Family Income
Above Poverty Line
Below Poverty Line
$1 - 499
6
$500 - 1,499
36
$1 , 500 or more 0
3 . Sex
Male
Female
2
40
4 . Ethnic Grouping
Caucasian
Spa nish Speak ing
Neg r o
Ame ri can I n di an
Ori ental
Othe r
21
21
0
0
0
5.
Families Re c ei ving Welfar e
6.
Heads of Household
7.
Referrals to CAA's Neighborhood Se rvice Centr.
5
6
�2.
Statistical Report Continued
B.
PARTICIPANTS
Planned Participants (for reporting period)
38
Actual Participants (for reporting period)
42
Enrolled at end period
Drop Outs during period
41
1
Participants Completing Project-FGP Employed
C.
41
RESULTS FOR PARTICIPANTS
Number obtaining jobs directly from Program
Planned
Actual
0
0
Number obtaining jobs through other placement service
Planned
Actual
0
4
Average Income Gain (from actual placement)
$32.00 per wk.
Referred to Vocational or Prevocational Training
6
Number Not Placed/Placement Pending
1
l
�MEMO
TO:
,b./
Dan Sweat
FROM:
Clint Rodgers
SUBJECT:
~
~
DATE:
October 6, 1969
A
Manpower Critique
Attached is a copy of a critique I wrote for Dr. Cooper at the University
of Georgia Social Science Research Institute. The paper I criticized
was by Dr. Fulmer of Georgia Tech. Since I understand from the grapevine that the Mayor's Office had a hand in recommending me to critique
the paper, I thought you might like to have a copy. I thought you
would be interested in the approach I took even at the risk of not being
invited to write further critiques for the State Board of Education.
I would appreicate any comments you might have.
CR:caa
Attachrrent
'
�-· - · -- ·
- -- --· - --- -- -··- ---- -------· - ·- - - ·- ···--- --- --· ·
Dertr. Dr. Coop~rP
Attaclwd :lo L'lY crittqt1c on D1·. Fulmer I s po.per, ,rl·i-:mpoucr and Employu10nt:
in Gcor3in 1r.
I appreciate the oppor tuni~y to make this contribution.
Hy onJ.y :ccr;rct :I.n that the sch.N1ulo d:Lcl not : l low rno,:e t:l.mc :for prepcirnti.m1
a ad rev:Lew of the er:Lt:iquc althour;h I rn.1.dcr-o'i.:and tho nccesn:tty for the
x-ush~
'fhc Eippt·o.:::tch I cho:w :tn <lo:tng my c rit:tquc somewhat ccrnp l :Lc.QtC!d th0 tl'.lck
vlthin the 3pRcc and time limi tations. I felt that t he rnost valid
c riticir.;rn I cc,ulcl offer· wrw to challongc the ooC::.al ,:m<l cultm:nl assumpt:Lonn on uh:l.ch the rnanu:.,c1-:-;l.pt ,10.s 'based. I c1.ncc,:·c1y hope thnt I
Guccecdr:cl ou f f:Ld.cnt 1.y to provok<:. f u'f.·thcr thought on tome of the :L<lcns
nnd :Lo:;,l.(~f.l r..:1 i :;ed. If you hnve tmy · corr:.~1cnts, plcflsc feel fa:ee to
cornmun:tc 11tc thor:i~
Sincm:-cly,
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�CRITIQUE OT?
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11
Hanpower. a nd ·-Emp J.uymcnt J.n Ge orgia 1' _
by
Cl:i.n t Rodge:c r1
Deputy Adminis t rato r
Economic Opportuuity At lanta, I n co
101 Mar:Lett.2 St.> N. H.
Atlanta, Geo ~g la 30303
Octobu:: l~) 1969



.


':
�Cr itique of
"Manpower and Employme nt in G0orgto "
by Clint Rodge ro
The structure o[ -thi.u cr it :l.quc on the above n o.me d mm1unc}:ip t will
be under the th.,.;e e_ major head ings of Stnt-:i.s t:tcnp Interpre tation of Data,

I
'
-
and Conclusions and Impli cnt1.ons o
This -s--t,.:uc tur.e :l.tHe.lf is indic c.tive
of the oren3 in the manuccr:i.pt J.endtng them.se lves to questio ns nnd
critic a l a na lyaiso
STATISTICS
..
- Gencn:a lly the stat:Lstic;-; rc::fercncod a ud used in t he m~musc.:;::tpt
are the best av[t iJ. tlble ~n<l ,:o p:r.esent a breed spect:rum of so1.n:c:es and
d isc :i.plincGQ
A , Yord of c nution~ howe-1Te::.-? must b o :f.nscr.ted in that
pract:tt:foncrs a nd tHlm:i.nistr~torn :1.n. t:hc? manpm·1 er. field c onsi.Gt0ntly
de scry tho l<elck of c\dcqu.!Lo d:,, t:a on x,hich <·o base decision:::.
Further~
r.:eidc b:om th{;.:t,:- :Lncowplctcncs::: t :;~eprGsent ldstoi;.·lccil nituat:lonti und
thei r u se for maki ng p:rc.dictioiw :ts i ncr. c.-.w ingly en<lr:ng~rc<l l>y a multi-
tude of socinl , and cultural forcen axcr tinB ever occclerntinR change on
the ~conomi.cs o f the ·1fat:lon ar:i well ac the Statco
The manuscr ipt is one of few that rccoini zcn the existence and
magnitude of what the author calls the "un:i.c1ent:i.fioc1 uncmployc<l n.
This
phenomeno n cannot be overs tr. cs:::ed , cspc r: !:l.nlly ln tc rmn of ito i mpUc ,. t:ionn
for ml\npowe r and ocucation.
It pro· nbly 1~cprescnta the ninglc most urgent
13ympt:cm of tlu1 de cpe,: problems in the educ atio nal r.: nd t~1anpowor "'ystcms .
Thi s ,dll l-C' furtl1 cr diB cussc<l in the later parts of this ci:it:1.que o
Ano ther c,~t:c ·1:ic ly i rnpor.tant symptom mentioned in Dr. Fulmer ' D
pap er wa:J underemployment.
given.
l~·l::J
Sign:U.:icantly no complete stot: is tic.a were
major pr.oblemG :r.cVttive to ttn(forcmp loym nt p,·cvent nn


-....


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nclcquntc EHJoeosmcnt.
First~ (l co nsensus on wha t const:U:utcs tmdcr-
employment is lncking.
Tho U.
s.
Department of Ltibor. roughly defines
11
11crson in a job which requir.ea lees
unc1e>:employment aa pltlccment of
sk:Ul than the employee posBe: osco.
However. ~ most: poor peop le nnd civ il
r i ghts groups usunlly r.penk o f m,dcrcmploymcnt
.<lS
working :Ln a job which
pays lcds than ia raqui~ed to ~3intain a minima l standard o f living.
Lack of: u ndCJrstand:!.ng und/ or Hcccptnncc of a definition makes communic n.tions and cla ta coHect:ion vi.:,:-1:ually impossible~
TI.is ' rcEmlts in
statc!mcntn such as the one on pngo 28 of the man.uscr:f.p t which Hc.ys,
11
0bv:tously many worlrnrs, er.:lpcc:i. r-i lly among forMlcs :failecl to uo r k f:ull -
t ime thJ:our;h choi.cc.
a~
11 o
fu-;iong poot' womc1.1$ wh;.1t: mny nppcm: to be a -
f: nilm:c to ,-1 0rk by choice of:tcn ):eprcnentc over.-uhclm:1.n~ obot nc:los to
cmployi.ncnt creatotl hy lens then subsL:; tcnce lQvcl ,.,, ages coupled Pith
a mu 1 t ituclc of eoc J.(l 1 ancl. pc,~:rni:rn 1 proh lcm8.
if the S<!m,:.mt:l.cc::
Wt)TC
c lni--:l.fic.!d .
Secon<lly ~ there :L o cm:,:ent; ly
Tbc dcg,:c:c of confu:Jion on this i ::;
~
11 H.ow mrmy nb1e ho<l:i..o<l hlo (.;k men ,: n:e t:hcrG :n the gho l~t(, th.nt: h.:rve -t1ct
..
been countc.d? 11
/i.lthour;h much r,pecul.'.lt:f.on Jws been don.c , th e only olrnolutc


r.cspon~1c :!. n thnt as aoo1.1 ,;13 t:111:•y ~rrc counted , there will not b e uny.


IN1'ERPRETATTON Of D:\TA
You may hci ve noted tlrnt
fJCV(!rB l
time G the wonl ir "'ymp t 01n 1_! h.:1s
been u ~rncl :tn t h :!.G crf.tlquc, Hb(;rcan the r; mnc phenomenon iu the manuscript was urnrnlly :::tc1tcd in t1,o 1.r.lplied c ontext of
.'.1 ' 1p.
oblcnu 11 •
,
1-Ici:c-
i.n. l ice the clu o to the major thrust of cr it:i.c:tsm o f the rn:.musc r.:7-ptc
Yet th1.s thr ust ;_r, ext:rcmciy c1.:tfficult;: to coromunici.-1t c bccauoe it rc-
qu:i.rea n f :r:mne of rcforcnce nllnoct contradictory to mnny accepted
vnlues uhich serve 11s .1n ~'1
.l.?2.:i~
<lcpm·ture for the nwnuscr:i.pt.
Or
�to state th:ts another \,m y, much of the manusc r ip t er; :tntcr pretnt:Lon
of tho dota hccomaa the best c ~~amp1.c of its own luck of. validi t yo
Before proccocling with c :x::.unples wht ch clemonotrc:1 t o the Cl.hove point.p
.
plcnsc no t e th at thex-e i s absolutely no :lntc.mt t o qucctlon
the :f.ntcgr:Lty or chm:nctcr 0-£ the m.::i mrn c:ript
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,-r.1: Hc:q:; .. Ifath0.r thcn,):11·---~---- " ··
__·,. -
qu:t to va 1 id f:o:c a whi tc ~ m:l.c1d1c c larrn or :lcnta tccl. rJod.c ty, but 'i·m ~re
.
.
of t ubcu:Ltur c groups comprised
~
o f bot;.h 1,:t/1 ck and poor whH:e e::i..t: :l.~~Gn(: . - Withoitt m~[:;Uc:tng the -,; clad.v0
\,,_
mci~:l.ts of the v alue _1,1y:Ji:cnw of: t h e se v~tr i01.rn g 1.:-oups , the fDct rema ins
th nt: conc lusion~; and ii1t;c r prctntionn h,::GE:<l on mc:l j or ity cu1. tur81 out look
are uo t n e c e r,r;~,rily v,11:Ld f:or the s ubg:roup s , an.cl p J_an r.: a nd p):oz r oms b a s ed
to f:n:l. 1.
X


Ls q1. 1 5. to n~t11r:il for- onymi.t~ :i..rnhw :i d wi.th dorrd.nc:mt cu l tu:cn l - v i.cw-·


· p oh~t 1: 0 ar: ur.1e 1:hn t a puhlic schoul r)yntc.m uhich lw c b een f n :i.:r.ly r-m cc 0.sPi ··
0
f ul i.n cducat5..111J t he mn j od.. t:y of the r.1otn1.n::m t \-:-11.H<s rn:i.dtllc cl nes shou l d
ouccccd d .th oUic:i..· group:, .:w we ll .
'J1mc i!: :f o '.U o·;-;,s thn t a nyone .Hho fo :i.b
. .. .,
in th e r:: y r:; t:c-:m docs so b ccciUf;e he :f. s inca p~blo
0 1·
urn-1:!.ll:lng t o l cL1rn.
11ms the rn n.nu~; c -;:- :i.p t cont::lllu.c::; tn tho nc2,t l og:!.c a l step o f pr opo sini
add:L t :i.onal ,!duc"tion, tr,, ir:in.g .:ind c.ounsoling fo.1· the dropouts .:ind fa:l.lu:r e s • . _
Thl::; i n trcatEir:n t for tlw cymptom uh cn:- t:h'3 c nu~Q :ls pcrhllp ~., more rcL1t0- <l
t o luck of belicnrt-'bla oppo r i;uni tic:.i even wHh C!duc.:1tion , ho:; t ility tow.a :n l
I
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th ~ c~duc n t:tonnl :Ji.1.d cconomlc nyntemn
'i,11:d.ch
fll:Ll t o rccogn:i.:.-:;c t:he mi nor H:y
cultural vnluw:: P otce
.
The p::ip8r aln o c i t es !:t'nnGportat:io n as n job b.:irrier whe n :f.n
reality thin :i.fl of ten a i.:ymptom of the :~cal problem wh:J.c:h ia tho
economic and rrnc:Lal r cn tri.ctlonn on housin~ p,'.lttcrn::i i:ot· the poor nnd
.
•:
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II
tho blt1ck wh:i.ch f1cpnrat:c th0.m f,:oru job o pportun itles.
Other c:wmJ?ler; could be c ited~ but the- po:l.nt :l.o that the
cxp:L:Lc :tt rmd :l.mpl :i.c:tt :tntcrprotat ionn 1n: the rn:'.lrn.1nc~:tpt must be
qucs t:!.oncci. oince t;h0y ,:cf:leci: i.:h0 e.du.c af:1.orui l mid economic v~1l uc
aro P to vnr:toun d" grccs ~- rcjcct:c:d. byt tho::: c --to·
bo
bcr{eHt t cd~
The purpose
- ·- - - - - - 11lnjor d~m5cr comen only if t,c bcliev0 thnt we aro trcat:tng the causes.
CONCLU~; J.O.\~S Al: D II-lJ?LICAT:tO:-TS
If the~ v.ppx-onchcs t o t h o intcr-prct.:.1t :lon. of c:t..1ta sugg estcJ :tn
th:tu cd.tique m:c. va.1:Ld ~ tlte conclus:1-oi.18 .and :Lmplic;:;tion s for edu cation
it :r c :i: nl:hcr c>:ten.niva.
Alt:lwu~>;h any of tho followi1 g po:tn t;µ <lcscr.·v~ more_
pc·.c:i.cn.eer: o f ono i-nvolvecJ. in. odmi.nif;!.:m:-ing .1,:ot,:::.1mn d csizncd to c<lucn t0
t:md trnln the h,'.L::d cor.e 'lmet,1p loycd nnd unclo1:mn1,loyc<l .
Gduc nt:i.on clocr; not ex:l.c t in r.t v··cuum, bv t:
nncl c c~o:10m:l.c vnlua cystcrrw .
Also cincc thfa


I.G l1 p ur l: of tlw to tal sod.nl


1'he:cofo1·c cducr.t:l.on nJ.onc cct1.mot solve all
the prohlo;nn or :~yDptorn!, v1.n1.ble :ln it r- s t:x-uctur c., but umst: 0 if it in to
s m:-·'l:i.\1(• ~ .'.lGrm.mo mo:t:c poaitivc l c ndcn:hlp both inside :ttn structu~:c no
ucll n.n :tn t:h<! totnl c orrmmn ity .
'11w cducntfo:.1 (~otnhl:lsl1.m0nt rm.1!:lt :re0)rnmh10 :l!:~1 o.t:titudcs, both
consciouu and unconnclouo, toward the <lropout.
It i G oaDy ond c nlming
to one t n ego to n::rnumo that .~ st:1.t dcnt ,1i:io foilo o r t1 ;_~op~ . out is incupnblc 0 1,- unwil11nr, t:o folt:tn.
It is nomc'i-,h.'.\t d:L nqufoting to i:rny that
. ;.-r;-
�· - · -· -- - --
the ochool nyotcm docs 1.1ot know oi: unclcr Gtm:i.d hou to tc t1Gh the fltutlcnt 6
rt
is 0.asy to of:i:c1: com:)cnoGtory c ducat:i.on bccc1use t hnt impl:tcn that th.a
oyGtem :b v .11:i..d and the. ctuclcnt :tti jur.t cJ.ow.
To ouggcHt th..."lt the systmn
may not h e ,:eJ. ~vnnt to tha student :l.n o ften viewed us m 'li\!ne r:i.can.
the r;yLJ tcm 1 s t'l clf ir:icigc .
To e;;~plorc.. t ho po sciV.'il:i ty
fo:Us to po:cfon, tmd m:tr.bclwvco bcc,'.'.l ucc hiG


J.r,


0110
of h o::;t i:\.ity tc)'\n:n: d 1 1m


r.~1


p r~:l.i.1.ft.d.~
v:f.C"i·Y
To
th.'.'lt the studo nt:
of the school 1,; :Lraa 0 e
.
Although the ol:u<len t f'i: om
_______ .. __·~·--·-- --~- -._
-·-·--· ·- -··-- - - -
··- . · --· ··
to the futur e of cduc n t: :Lon :L 8 to lcm:-n how t o t:ucc ccd ·w:t th h:l..r:1.
Dr. Fulmer su r;c~~ct:G t ha t rn::n:c cmph ::wi s ho p 1.ftced on ·\roc .'.'.l t :!.onci l
Aren Voc.;.1 ti.orwJ. Tcchn ic.n l School s.
\n t:hc r,u'Gli<! Gchools : 11ch ,i p rogr.mn
0
rccc:1tly 1:-'.i,.1dc by rm ht1:h,tn c c.1u c.:ito:c .
If th:lr; h<'tppcnt3 > iJ; will ogtt:ln
l.'c:tnfo1:ce tlrn attitu.<1(~ tlwt these s tur.ltrnts ,n-c :l.nci:ipab le of acnckmJc
\-mr Jx..
'1.1.11.s t; pp:co ;:i ch ·c oulJ :1.nrmrc rniluro 1.m d ;m c vc ntunl <.:onf:ron 1·:Jt:i.o n
c11onrr r.ncial l:tncs.
/1. quaU.ty llcodc::r.:t.c pr-02;:cwn J.c n eecfoo. ln ' .:ll l ·; )v.blic
schooi u rw ,-1011 a s voc u t:io rinl eciuc£1t ·' on o
An Dr~ 1~u:tmc1:- p o:l nto out, th(~
i . l': 0 ,1
Voc nt :lonn l Tcchn:tc1c1 l Scl100J.r.
'
h ave done an c :~ccllcnt job 1.n t ~o.:l.n:Lng'pcop
l c £oi: 1.:mccc nu:fo l job p laccu
mcnt ·-
i:or those uho ct,n nnd u :1.'J.l ,:1 ttc.1d.
Lnot yc~r one r.:t c h vocntiona l
ochoo l 1n the :3tatc ptlhHched ntnt::i.et:tcn uh:tch re:vcD. lcd th:1t ovc-n: 95%
not ocl:'vinL; the l.11:n:-d cc,rc unemployed.
hutccl to at lca:;t:
t~10
mnjo1: fnctorr;
~
This fact can probnhly be attri••
t:hc hlah cntrnnec rcqu:i.rcmonts :for
many of the courscE, .1n<l ho~:tility tom.!.nl the c-ducntion.ol c~tt:lbllshmcn.t
.






�on the part of the dropout.
Skills centers a~o being propoaed to meet
the n0ads o f the ha-rtl core uiwmployod.
trndi.t:lonal vocntiono.1
cducatio1i 1 D
Such cei:i.tm'.'s hnvc h a d Gome success
-pl1 :t. lo.aoph:i.cs 11 at tl t u<l0s nnd techniques.
-
-
-
.


Cn sunmi,_wy, the mQnur:cr:t pt he:i.ng : cnHe,!o<l <i:i.d-un ·e xcel lent j i~> -·:, r-,. '-


,:cveal:i.n.r; mony pcrt1.nont · f:ac.tors ralative ·-r:o -·thc future of: manpo,-mr in
Gcorg:ta ~
The main thrtw t o :i: th:i..fl er :r. t::i.que io to provi.de the reader n:t t h
snothe1: :lntcrprctad.on o:Z the d.:-tt.r.i bnsccl cin c;cpc:cicncc w1.th thor.e whom
- -------- ------- -- -- - - -- - - - - - - -- - -- - - - - - -~ - - -- - - - - ···-- ---· -- -- the ccluc.:1tionul system foiled~ 'I'ho ti.rn3- nn.d c:p.:lce rcst:r.1..ct:tons in th:!.,'3
c ritique made impossible the full uovelopmcnt of the :i.d.cr.w m1d conccptB
Ol1tUnc~ds but tho hope 1.s that udc~qu.n!: c :Jtimufot:ton for
has been presented~
.[u-i:th(;~X"
though t
�Economic O pportunity Atlanta, Inc.
101 Marietta Street Bldg. • Atlanta, Georgia 30303 o
William W. Allison
Executive Administrator
September 30, 1969
Mr. John Watson
Planner III
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Mr. Watson:
As a result of your conference of September 26, 1969, with Mr.
Clint Rodgers concerning the proposed Integrated Municipal Information
System, I would like to express the interest of this agency in participating in your program. Specl[lca lly , I untlerscand chat a manpower
component has b een added to the Human Re sources Deve lopme nt Subsystem
and sinc e Economic Opportuni ty Atlanta , Incorporated, is vita lly
involved in most ma npowe r ef forts de s igned to s e rve the dis a dva n taged
of the city, I a gr e e tha t our imput could be a benef icial and ne ce ssary
part of the total Information System.
Therefore, I would like to indicate ou r desire a nd intent to
cooperate with the city in this e ndeavo r and am de signa ting Mr. George
Williams , Division Dir ector of the Emp loyment Program Op e r a tions, as
our conta ct for fu r ther i mput a nd coordi na tion on this question.
c --~n,~l~ yours)

8t i!.~Q~
William W. All is on
Executive Adminis tra t or
WWA:a
CC :
Mr. Cl i nt Rodger s
Mr. George Wi ll iams
Mrs . Burnella J ackson
Mr . Dan Sweat
�Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.
101 Marjetta Street Bldg. • Atlanta, Georgia 30303 •
William
w.
Allison
Executive Administrator
September 18, 1969
Mr. Dan Sweat
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
[),C/v(_
Dear .lid.:. Sweat:
The EOA Board of Directors at its monthly meeting on
September 17, 1969, appointed Mr. George C. Williams as
Division Director for the Division of Employment Program
Operations for Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Incorporated.
This position replaces the previous Associate Administrator
for Manpower and includes responsibility for all EOA manpower efforts including direct supervision of the ACEP, NYC
Out-of-School and Job Corps GATEHOUSE Program and Liaison
with GSES, Vocational Rehabilitation, Vocational Education
and other manpower related agencies and programs.
Mr. Williams will officially assume his new duties on
October 1, 1969. In the interim Mr. Williams will be attending
many manpower meetings for the purpose of establishing
continuity. I am sure that you will give Mr. Williams the
same cooperation and assistance that you provided me when I
was serving in a manpower capacity.
Sincerely,
~
Clint Rodgers
Deputy Administrator
CR : l ms
�i_ cf} . ([ 0
-'r 'li
.
101 t-.br icrc a Srr c ct Bldg.
T . M. Parham
r:
i;
~-
li ~..u.
,, .•7·
b-
j
t\tl. ,n t;-i , G eorg ia 30W3 c
· J·uly 1 6, 1959
E:-c:c uriv c t\dm ini s tr"t o r
Ivan Allen, ·Jr. , President
Allen Foundation, Inc
29 Pryor Street, NE
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear
Mr. Allen:
This is a direct appea l to Atl.an·'.:::a area civic c l ub3 · and.
.
phila nthr opic f oundat ion thou9ht t o h ave som,~ concert1 fo ::'.:' ths
w 12lfar e o f th e young peop l e li vin9 in
Oilr
c or:rm11::1ityo
'11 ;1ro~J.gh
my work as EOA cons ult an t in me ntal re·!:ard a tion and .3pecial
ed.u::ation I have :b 12c ome aTr-1a re o f th 12 l a rg"" n um]Je:::- o f m,3::1.tal ly
r etard ed chi ldren re3idiwr in EO_'\ t arg e t areas who are not
r e:::::e i ving ad s q :.:iate .3 er v ice3 from area ::,ge :.icies re sp,: msible
for tbs c a r e of these children.
received .3 -s i:vice from a11.y agencyo
.s i tu a t io;1 o
Many area children h ave never
To ;:ns , th is i s an incredib l e
Perhaps as a profess io~a l p erson I have b e 8 n too
f ar r e:nov 2 .::l. f r ')7l reality to fe s l t he urgency of the:~ :'l(~ed th ese
chi l dren h a v e for tr a inin3 in s e l f - c a re skills.
Aft er eva lu -
atinq the p r o:J ra1.n s a n d c ommu nity fac i li t i es f o .:. t h e r e t ard·s d,
I am we ll awa r e of th-8 d s,1perat e sit uation f asinq the3.3 neJ ~
l ec: t ed c hild .reno
T.:1.e public s c:.1.0 0.ls can care fo:r only a
�-2 -
fr a ct i o o:1 of o ur ment a lly retard2d ~hildre::i ; private c oTTun·.mity
agencies prov id e p.r ogr a~ s · for e7en sma ll er gro'J.ps, and · thi s
l e aves mos t
of o'J.r c::1iJ.d ren. wi th no prb,JTam s of any kind o
I fe e l th a t
eac}1 of th e fm:trt e,3n EOA Neighborhood S ervic e
Centers sho'J.ld have at l eas t
on e p r o,:1-ram ser vi ng fro:11. tw,.3lv2
t o fifte.3::1 n ,2 ighborh.::>od chil dren.
At this time , only four
o f th e Centers h ave proJr ams and two of thos ,3 are f o:.:- th-2
current sumner only.
Econo:11i c Op,;;:,ortuni ty Atla:ri·':a, Inc o, has no fun::ls for this
speci fic area of n eed .
Th e i r c ont r ibution thus f ar ha s baen
i n the form of s.e:::iio:c Aides , Neighborhood Yo'J.th Corps tra in.e es ,
su rp lu.s food com.nodi ties and tr a n s p o rtation services provid9d
by individu a l Ce nt ers.
Ea c h Cent er probably has suffici e:::it
f lex ibl e funds to spons o r a n e i ghborh.'.) o d p ro gram for the ::nentally ret a rd ed , h o~eve r , due to the o rga nization structure of
N,eighbo:ch.:)od Se:i::vi c e Cent ers too l it t l e t i m.:::. is l e ft b e fo:.:-e
the co:T1.m i t tme:it of 1969- 7 0 fu nds to fully info :".:'rn e ad1 3-:ro,rp
of the urge n c y o f n ee ::l for thi s p 3rticul ar kind of service
pro:Jram~
'I '~,is makes it n ecessary to s2,:)k oth 3r s,:m rce .s of
fu nd .s for staffing to in s u re th e .ext e::1 ,3ion ,.:)f some o f o:1r
establish e d progra.:'tls beyond this s ··..1.rt1tn1;.r o
By bud,; et p l anning
time for 1 970 - 71 a ll Centra l N·~ighbor}1ood Action Com"Tli tt ees
wi ll h.e throuJhly fa:."Tli li a r with th e necessity of establishin3
�-3 -
neighborhood pro:::sra1.n s fo r t hei r rn en Lc1. l ly retard ed ::::hildre::1~
An add jt io~al so~ rce of funds for th 3 cani ng fi~ca l y8ar is
t h e Geo rg ia State Dapartme nt o f Public 3 e alth - th e ag e~:::: y
w~1ich i s l ega lly ch arged wj.th t he r e .3 pO!Lsibi l ity of p ...:-ov iding
s e rvic es for t hese chi ldren.
In thG meantime , if eve~1 a f ew
of th e many t arget area chi ld ren needing servi c es a re to b e
served , civic organi z ations , church g r o~ps , and p r i vat
0
fo~~-
d a tions need to provid e fin a nci a l s:ipport wi t h wl:lich to staff
n e ighborh:::>:::>d p r o 3rams fo :'.'.' the cu.rrent fiscal y ear o
I firmly
believ e in th e concept o f loc a l r espo~sibility for loc a l pro gr ams and the s i tu a tion regardin-3 the care of mentally retarded
childre;-i in th is community i s a s evere loc a l p roble::n.
If I h ava ~ een emot ional I do not apologiz e.
My sense of
p r ofess ion a l and pe rson a l inte grity is outr aged by such n eglect
and \v2. ,3 imp l y
1
rn·.1
s : not a llo,v thi s to cont i nue o
Plea s2 do every -
thing po ss ibl e to -'.~nable th e econo::nic a lly d ·~prive d areas o f
Atl an.ta to st aff n:;ighbo rhoo:1 pro1rai:ns for th e i r ment a lly .c e :: ard e d childre::-i.
E:".lclo s .3::J. i s a
p~ogra:11
'tv1.1i ch
,::o;?'_/
o f a prop:isa l for a s:na ll n ei ghborh,:,:id
can ::>G fol lowed b y any sponsor i n3 a :re.::-1cy w.i. th
eno·J.9~.1 c oncern for mentally re t ard e d c;.1ild.rven to initiat e ac:tio n
to pro7ide th e~ wi t h th ~ s erv ices we t ak e for gr a nt ed for ou r
O'iln
children.
duri ng- th 3
w,22k
I will b e ql ad to m·~<;;t with your g roup anytime
to answer any qu ,9 stion.s you or th ey might h a v e
abo'..1t th-~ propo.;;al, and discuss ways in which your gro:J.p might:
�-4-
make a soncre t~ contribut ion to the wa lfa re 6£ our gro ss ly
11,33lected ln e::i.ta lly re_t ard e ::J chi l dr e ::l c
Since:r-ely,
Enclo s ure
JDZ/bh
�,,

.
DECENTRALIZED COMMUNITY SPECIAL LEARNING CENTERS ·
FOR
TRAINABLE MENTALLY RETARDED CHILDREN
Submitted by:
Jean D. Zorn, Consultant
Mental Retardation and
Special Education
Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc .
101 Marietta Street, N. W.
Atlanta, Georgia
30303
and
~
Dave Roberts
Southern Education Foundation Intern
Economic Oppor tuni ty Atlanta, Inc .
101 Marietta Street , N. W.
· ·Atlanta, Georgia
30303
,,
June 2, 1969
�GENERAL CONCEPr FOR DECENTRALIZED COMMUNilY
SPECIAL LEARNING CENTERS
FOR TRAINABLE MENTALLY RETARDED CHILDREN
·/
The need for speci~l lea~ning programs to meet the needs of physcially
a~d mentally· handicapped children ·is a cause of concern for parents and
residents in many Economic Opportunity Atlanta Target communities.
Many of
these children do not meet the criteria for admission to the two programs
provided by the Atlanta City Schools.
Even those who are eligible to attend
public school still have the difficulty _of transportation - lack of economic
resources, and need for constant supervision.
Enrollment in provate schools
in the area present the same problems even when tuition is arranged for
through scholarships.
Parents are unable to pay the cost of transportation
necessary for their children _ to attend school.
The concept presented here seeks to point to directions a program might
take which would provide a practical learning program on a neighborhood level.
Two ideas are basic to this concept (1)
The handicapped child is entitled to educational services within
his own neighborhood, and
(2)
any program which offers a meaningful service to both parents
and children must be one irr which parents are genuinely involved in its policy-making and administration.
Primarily the concept is a developmental process of impacting parents and
the handicapped children with the potential of life within the context of
the child's given limitations.
In operation .this concept might look like
several on-going learning settings for parents, children and staff.
-
,
-The ideal setting for such - a program would be a hQuse in the neigh.I
borhood rented or purchased, renovated and :fur nisnea - to teach the life
styles practicable for the trainable mentally retarded._ However, due
t o the economic limitation which exist at present, an apartment in
!
�_L _ . -2.
.'
a public hcusing project or sp 3~ ~ ·n a neighbor~ood church should prove
0
adequate for small neighborhood· projects.
"The following proposal was designed with the hope of developing a program which with modification of the number of children, staff and housing
facility, could be sponsored ,•b y any Neighborhood Service Center. 11
11
...
" ' .,.
,,
�PHILSOPHY of EDUCATION for the MENTALLY RETARDED
'
All cb~ldren are entitled to an education with the oppo~tunity to
develop to the limits of their individual capacity.
In this respect,
education for the mentally retarded does not differ from education for
any group of children.
The goals are the same: to teach the individual
to make full use of his capabilities, and to become a useful member of
his social group {i.e. all others).
In analyzing the concept of social compe tence, self-expression and
sel-control are the primary traits of outstanding importance.
To be
able to express one's ideas in work and in play, to other individuals
and to groups, is a necessary requisite for happiness and efficiency.
Even more important is the ability to control one's self in accordance
with socially accepted standards of behavior.
self-control leads to chaos and confusion.
Self-expression without
With all the need for the
child to express himself, it should not be forgotten that unless at the
same time he learns self-discipline to control himsel f , he will not have
fulfilled his capabilities.
If the mentally retarded child is to assume
a place in the cormnunity with a measure of self-reliance and self-respect,
it becomes necessary for education to provide training for some participation in productive work and to plan teaching procedures and objectives to
correspond with his needs, interests, abilities and limitations.
This is
the basic philosophy underlying any educational planning for the mentally
retarded child.
The parents of the mentally retarded are also entitled to an education
which will enable them to better understand their child.
By participating
in the program, parents will learn di fferent ways of coping with · the problems that arise in daily living.
The parent-child relationship should
�.
.

-
-2-
improve when the parent is relieved of the constant supervision of a
mentally retarded . child.
The a tti.tude of a parent toward his child
might change if ·he understands that mental retardation can occur in

j
any family, and that the mentally retarded can learn some things
which will benefit him, particularly in the area of self-care.
Representatives o_f the National Association for Retarded Children,
The Georgia Association for Retarded Children, and the Atlanta
Association for Retarded Children have all expressed an interest in
and a desire to work with all parents who wish to avail themselves
of their respective services.
Organizations such as these should
be the primary source of support for parents.
.
Membership fees are
modest and the security derived from belonging to a large group with
similar problems and interests is highly satisfactory.
ifo
.

,,
�PLAN OF ACTION
.
(
'
I.
Identification
..
Families -having a retarded member in need of community services
can be identified by the Neighborhood Aides in their regular contact with
target area families.
identification.
The McBee System record should also provide this
A community survey under the supervision of University
personnel is still another method of identification.
Information should
include name of family, name., ...age ...and sex of child; previous community
services (if any) received by child, i.e., medical and/or psychological
evaluations, Grady Hospital ID number, local Health Center_reco~d and
,,,--· -,..-· . .
neighborhood or e ommunity program attended if any, b~ chi~~Parental attitude toward child should also be obtained (do parents
feel child can be helped; what kinds of services do their children need,etc.)
II.
Pre s enta tion to CNAC
(a)
Scope of problem.
(b)
Plans for parent discussion group.
(c)
Progress r e ports should be made to the CNAC
on a continuing bas is.
Initial discussion should be h eld with parents covering the following areas:
.. .
Through
(a)
Problems involved in obta i ning service s for
menta lly retarded ch i ldren .
(b)
Corrnnm,ity serv ices ava i lable f or the mentally
retarded .
(c)
Program s t r ue t ure f or parents.---
weekly meetings with res ource persons , parents c an l earn many
of the facts regarding mental retardation and may, i n t urn, b ecome resource
persons themselves to their friends ~nd neighbors.
,
Knowl edge o f facts can
go a long way toward dissipating myths and :supers tit ions s4rrounding the
mentally handicapped~
�-2-
III.
Project Structure
.
,, .
A poss·ible structure for administering a project such as the one
proposed could be an incorporated group of citizens seeking funds and acting
·,
as the grantee.
This group would consist of perhaps fou~ residents of the
target cormnunity being served, three or four resource experts in the fields
of health, special education, and social services, and four parents elected
by the parents themselves to represent them on an annual basis.
Legal
assistance in establishing necessary agency status should be sought from the
Legal Aid Society office in the target connnunity.
An alterna tive to this
arrangement could be with EOA acting as the grantee with a Board of Advisors
composed of the above mentioned persons.
One adult resident of the target area should be chosen by th e parents
to direct the activities of the program.
This person should enroll in the
Child Growth and Development course taught at Atlanta Area Tech.
This is
a ten week course in the physical, menta l, emotional and social growth and
development of normal children.
Registration fee is $5.00; class meets on
Tuesdays and Thursdays from 12:30 to 3:30 P.M. After completing this course,
a two-week observation at a local facility for trainable mentally retarded
children will prove most profitable.
A neighborhood learning center will provide excellent training opportuni ties f or Neighborhood Youth Corps workers.
Three such persons should
~c provided for each group of fifteen children and each enrolled in the
Child Growth & Deve lopment course offered at Atlanta Area Tech.

The staff members and NYC trai nees could serve as resources to the
parents in helping them to better und erstand their own childs 1 problems,
behavior, and possibilities for development.
I
Together parents and staff
�-3·/
.,,-
could plan learning activities in self-care skills for the children.
The
children should be grouped according to their particular needs and capabilities.
Staff and parents could also seek to understand better how to
help the child ~t home so as to utilize more fully the attention received
in the learning activities which take place at the center.
These learning
activities would be directed toward any and all kinds of areas the child
needs (e.g. self-care skills, recreation, social interaction, academic
work, imaginal education).
Underlying the program would always ,be. the idea that both child and
parent could see themselves as significant human beings for whom possibilities are open to play a meaningful part in the life of their neighborhood, community and the world •
.
.. .
'
.,
�An Example in -
Program Account Form
~
I.
RJRPO~E
Ao
To provide educational services for trainable mentally retarded
children · and their parents in their own neighborhood for an
eleven-month period.
B.
Objectives
1.
To provide a facility in which moderately retarded children and their parents may receive assistance in developing
ways of coping _qa:t:h daily living problems.
2.
To provide for the training and education of each child
to the maximum of his potential for health, ..educational,
emotional and social growth and development.
3.
To provide continous evaluation of progess made by each
child in each --a:rea of development.
4o
To aid parents in understanding the problems which arise
from having a mentally retarded child in the family
through group meetings and home visits which offer
counseling and guidance, and referral services.
5.
To aid parents in developing positive attitudes toward
health care and utilizing health services available to
them.
6.
To maintain continous contact with parents and assist them
in putting into practice those things le~rned through group





meetings.
7.
To develop a system of record keeping which will accurately
reflect progress made by child and parents.
!
�· Page - 2
II.
PROGRM1
A.
Children
1·.
This program will serve fifteen (15) moderately retarded
children between the ages of six (6) and twent y-one (21)
years who are not pres ently receiving educationa l services
from any source.
2.
The program will operate from nine (9:00) A. M. to two (2:00)
P. M. five days a week, Monday through Friday.
3.
Children will be group ed accordi ng to age and educationa l
needs.
4.
Core content of the program.. will be center ed around behavior
modificat i on
which will ena ble the child to r elate pos i tive ly
to his family, peer group, neighborhood and connnunity.
5.
Recrea tion and learning tasks will be provided to develop
s e lf- awa r ene ss, s e lf-contr o l and s e l f -c are .
6.
Basic academic instruction will be o.ffered to children possessing the necessary intellectual potential to benefit.
·7.
Spe c ial h ea lth problems of ind i vidua l children will be r ef e r red t o the appropr i a t e agency .
B.
Par ents
1.
Organize parent workshops to meet on a regular basis to
de sign a pr ogram f or themselve s .






2.
Provide instruction to parents to h e l p t hem in understanding
the nature of mental retardation and the special needs of
their children .
�Page - 3
3.
.,,
Introduce the concept of behavior modification and emphasize
the benefits which can be derived from its use by both the
child and his family.
·,
4. · Provide instruction in home management, fa~ily planning, ·
hygiene and nutrition.
5.
Referral to other agencies for unmet needs in health, welfare,
vocational counseling and education.
6.
Group recreational activities planned by parents and volunteers.
7.
Involve parents in planning learning tasks for children to
carry out goals of their program.
III.
PARTICIPANTS
A.
Children will be recruited through the EOA Center staff, welfare
workers, public health nurses, and school counselors.
B.
IV.
Criteria for Selection
1.
Child must not be currently enrolled in an educational
program.
2.
Child must be ambulatory.
RESIDENT PARTICIPATION
A.
CNAC general advisory board will work with the Center subcommittees on education and health.
B.
-•
Parent Workshop group will seek to involve CNAC members and
members o .F the two sub-committees in setting general goals
and objectives for the program .
~
,I
c.
Involve parents in developing specific educational , recre ational and social learning tasks .
�Page - 4
V.
COORDINATION
A.
,,.-
O~her agencies involved ,J n
P
program such as this will include
State and County Depar t,-.r-n b~ of Family and Children Services,
State and County Departments of Public Health, Georgia State
Department of Education - Special Education Division of Vocational Rehabilita tion . and local school systems.
B.
Funding
Funds and services will be requested from the following community
organizations:
C.
1.
Civic Organizat ioll.s -,,:;C ivitans (local), Lions Clubs, Masons,
Kiwanis and Jaycees
2.
Church Groups - Christian Counicl of Metropolitan Atlanta, Inc.
3.
EOA - Neighborhood Youth Corps trainees, bookkeeping s ervices,
tius drivers, transportation supervisots and Social Services.
4.
USDA - Commodities, supplementary funds for snacks and hot
lunches.
5.
"Start Now Atlanta" - Volunteers to work witl;i children, siblings
and par ents in r ecreation and family
counseling (preferably gradua t e studen t s
from local institutional departments of
Education, Pschology, Physical Education,
Sociology and Social Work).
·This program will focus on parent-child relationships, education
for daily living, and home situations. :
VI.
1.
Parent-child group meeting at least once a week.
2.
Par ents to at t end da ily cl asses as volunteer worker s and
as observers.
3.
Counseling for child's .sibli!lgs to promote better understanding
on the ir part of the MR relative.
~
,,
-- - - - - - - - - - -
EVALUATION
A.
Chil dren coul d be evaluated by parents regarding changes in
beh avior .
B.
Staff could evaluate child ' 's progress ' in rel ation t o h is peer
group.
t ··
�Page - 5
C.
,,
Volunteers could assess child's progress in recreation and social
ir.::eraction and offer suggestions for ::i.dditional appropriate actvities.
.
The Program should help the child to become aware of himself
as a worthwhile individual., develop academic skills to the best
of his ability, become socially acceptable, develop the mechanical
and intellectual skills necessary to function in society and help
him develop his ability to participate constructively in society.
The Program should also increase the effectiveness of intrafamily
relationships and add to the general family stability.
VII.
IMPLEMENTATION
A.
Facility
May be located in a house, an apartment in a low-cost housing
project, a day care center, the educational facilities of a neighborhood church or public school.
It should not be difficult to
provide space for a small group of from twelve (12) to fifteen (15)
children in any of the target area neighborhoods of Atlanta.
Acco-
modations should conform as closely as possible with required standards of the Georgia Department of Family and Children Services in
to insure maximum health and comfort of children.
B.
Staff
All of the staff will be recruited from the target area in which
the students resides.

All staff members who work directly with the





children will either have had fonnal course work in Child Care or
be currently enrolled in such a program.
The cost of the program
to funding agencies will vary depending upon the value of volunteer
work done and salaries finan~ed from other sources.
�Page - 6
.. Staffing Cos ts
Salary
1 Older Adult---·-- - --- -- --- -- - - - -- - - --- -- - --- -- -- -$3, 328
3 NYC Trainees------------------------------------ 7,488
1 Bus and Driver---~------------------------------ 4,280
1 Cook-------------------------------------------- 1 820
'
Space Rental-------------~------------------------ varied
Utilities------------------------------------~---170
Transportation Maintenance-----------------------900
Social Security & Workmen Compensation----------277
TOTAL---------$18,263
Salaries for the NYC trainees are paid by the United States Department of
Labor.
Driving of the bus and supervision of the children en route to and
from school could be services donated by parents,
Parents could also
volunteer to prepare and serve one hot meal each dayo
If Rrogram is lo~
cated in a low-cost public housing authorlty the Atlanta Housing Authority
could be asked to provide space on a one · dollar per year basis.
With NYC salaries and volunteer service costs deducted from the total budget,
a small neighborhood program for mentally retarded children coµld be operated
at a cost of approximately $5,675 per year.
According to figures supplied-by the Georgia Department of Public Health,
the cost of caring for the mentally retarded in other programs around the
state are as follows:
.
Cost per retardate per year
Program
Residential (Gracewood) -----------------------------$3,183
Special Education (EMR) ----------------------------615
Special Educatio~ (TMR) ----------------------------- 1,000
All Other Corrnnunity' Programs -----------------------1,000
~





With a new approach effectively utilizing the services of parents, volunteers
and Neighborhood Service Centers personnel not usually considered suitable
for this t y pe of employment, the cost per retardate per year would be approx i ma tely $378.
Even if some of the services should have to be purchased from
�Page - 7
\.
parents or other targ~t area residents, the cost per child per year
I
should stiJ.i be less than · the cost of maintaini:ig one educable mentally
retarded child in a public school special education class.
Equipment and Supplies
Some of these materials will be provided by the Neighb;rhood
Service Center.
It is expected that most of the additional needed
supplies will be made and furnished by parents.
Purchase of necessary
materials will be financed through miscellaneous costs and funds
raising endeavors of the parent group for the Parent Fund.
D.
Food, Paper Products, Cleaning Supplies
1.
Surplus connnodities
2.
USDA supplementary foods f~nds
3.
Parents Fund
..





�July 1 , 1969
illi am O.. . orwood, Jr .
Mr,.
aegional Manpower A ini str t or
Departm nt of Labor
1371 Pe ohtree Street , N.
u. s.
tlanta, Georgi
30309
Dear Mr . Norwood :
Gr v
cone: rn
up ... coming r qUir
tcbing fund in our n xt
temb r 1 , 1969 . Atl nt
ha v ey limit d f.inanci l
nd , nd it i
r
ly
l.ilte
to
t th JUn Ea Board me ting
m t for ten perc nt non ... fad r l
ACEP progr
year b inning·
, lLk · 11 1 g citi
tod y ,
r, ourc s c
r d to it d ...
difficult for aommunity ag nci s
xpr s ed
about th
ddition l loc l cash .
you will · r c ll , th
o.riglni l ACEP propo . al
110 ·
d
QA
to cl im
loc l "in-kind" th supporting r souro
of it
co unity cti on progr
and oth x- f
r l l y a ·· i t
genci
providing c:,pportuniti
for uw Cr ~
nd NYC
tr in

ith thi now di· llow , an
wning current
fundinq l
f c
n d to gen · r t approxim t ly
200, O
r 1 h r . At r · nt only about
, 000 of "in-kind"
ol
ly v il 1. l ving
pot ti 1 non•f
ral.
f1ci t of a r than 100 , 000.
�Page 2
Mr . William Norwood
July 1, 1969
Beoause of the above factors, the EOA Board would like to
r quest that the u. S . Department of Labor grant a aiver
on our New Careers _ nd q;, r tion Ready components allow-ing us to claim as loo l in-kin9, the particip -tion of
feder lly supported agenci • We unde.rotand th t such
action is possible and that there re simil r preced nts.
Your f vorable consid r tion of this requ
gre tly appreciated.
twill b
Sincerely yoursf
Jon
ctor
/er
cc:,
/4
yor Ivan 1.1 n
.
n SW t
Dr. Ch rl
Hick
f
Ch irman
�ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY ATLANTA, INC .
ROUTING SLIP
BUILDING. RO OM. ETC.
I.
2.
3.
4.
5.
D HANDLE DIRECT
D IMMEDIATE ACTION
~FORMATION
D
APPROVAL
D AS REQUESTED
D INITIALS
D
D NECESSARY ACTION
D NOTE AND RETURN
D PER O UR CONVERSATION
D PER TELEPHONE CONVERSATION
CONCURRENCE
D CORRECTION
D
FILING
D FULL REPORT
D
t~Jf6':-i°Jlai~~f_L_ __
D


~tPti"JN~T'G
/g~


D READ AND DESTROY
D RECOMMENDATION
D SEE ME
D SIGNATURE
D YOUR COMMENT
D
D
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
REMARKS
FROM -
N AME AND / OR DI VISION
BUILDIN G . ROOM . ETC .
DATE
Cf-s -(;
�September 5, 1969
Mr . John Feild, Director
Center for Policy Ana lysis
1612 K Street, N. W.
Washington, D. C. 20006
Deor John:
In response t o your memo of August 20th concerning City ction
ieaulting from the manpower seminar which you sponsor don pril 8th
of this year, I would like to offer the following comments.
The City of Atl nt still doe not h ve an official mnnpower st ff
fi nc d and controlled by city government. Howev r, Atlant ha a
r~tber unique situation in that th loc 1 Community Action Agency b
11 d velop-ed
npcn,;er st ff which 1- s rving th n eds of Atlanta
in a
ti f ctory manner con id ring the limit tion of re ource
v U bl •
The City
t this point in time will probably coutinu
rel donship on manpow r with the CAP
th funding by block gr nts through th
gove
nt
ke
ch nge n ce
ry.
this
ency unless
jor shift in
state nd/or city by the fed r 1
Th C P Agency in Atlant h
identif1 bl manpo r c ponente
which re th Atl nt Cone trat d
plo
t Program funded by u. s .
J)epaT nt of Labor with
t ff of pproximately 120. N ighborhood Youth
Corpe Out-of-cool Pro ram funded l>y u. s.
part nt of L bor with
t ff of 10.
Job Corp GATE Hou e Progr m with a ataff of four, nd
rk1
rel tio hip with th Atlanta Offie of the St t
loym.ent
S rvic funded jointly by th Stat
lo ent S rvice nd OEO vers tile
n y with staff of 16. Last y r' exp nditure on 11th
~om,,,
po nta of th Atl nt
•s pprox t ly $4.340,000.00.
th1
information w111
ti f.y th
qu etiona that you po
inc r ty.
era
1ni ti-at.or
Cl:caa
l
cc,
• W1111
MT. Dan
Allison
t
d
�l
J uly 29, 1969
Aldcnnan G. Everett M ill can
Chairman, ~ublic V'l c rks Committee
500 B i sho p Street, N . \\' ,
Atlanta , Georgia 30318
Dear M r. M illican :
The Atlanta Beautification Co rpa Pr oj e ct was a cornponent p r o gram of t he
. Atlanta Concentrated Emi)loyr.ncnt Pr o gram s ponsored by E con o n1i.c Opportunity
i\ tlanta , I n c. It p r ovided £ 0 1· hiring of about 40 pove :rty area people who could ·
not otherwi oe quaHfy for City e2nployrnent (becaus ~ o f ge , health , etc .) and
u s ing thorn fo:r street cleaning and other similar duties in the Sanitary Depax :rn2 nt,
The prog:r.a1n haB been funded for over a year o n a rein1bursable basis by EOA .
The Ci.ty h as pc'.id thE- u 10:rk':'rs ~ J , (10 pr-:-r hour ;:;,nrl th!? 1:11-1pe :rvi~n1'R ~;,, , 7.5 np1•
hour and each 1nonth we have bill ed E OA for the a1nount expended .
.
Ye,u wili recall that budget c utbacks t the Federal level c ause!d EOA to ad v ise
the City in Mar ch that it \VOUl<l no longer fund this proaxam after April 30, 1969.
·w e pre vail ed upon the ,-:.gency to continue funding the pro g ram a t one-half the
previo u s level thr o ugh August 31, 1969, and the F inance Comrnittee pprovecl
City funds to continu~ the whole p rogran1 until that date .
The City, therefore, will be "£equired to make a de ci s i on on this pr o gram by
early August beca us e it is o nly funded until A u gust 31P 1969 . v-:e have reviewed
this question with the City Pers o nne l Department and the Sanitary .D i vis ion of
the Public VTorks Department. Both of these organiz.ations recom.rnend stron gly
that the program be c ontinued at least until the end of the: year if funds can be
rnade available . A copy of M r. Ralph Hulsey 1 s letter is encl o sed .
In order to continue the program until December 31, 1969 , in the manner
Mr . Hulsey suggests will re(!uirc a rnaximum of ..:-47 , 000 for salaries. The
abnonnally high rate of absenteeism in the Sanitary D i vision this ye ar h as
caused a surplus to exist in the sala ry account whi ch could be ueed for this
purpose . The amount oould be confi rmed by the Finance Director .
�------Ald e rman M illican
P age T w o
·-
July 29, 1969
Vl hat it boil s down to is t Ms . Thes e pe ople w ant to wo r k and the Sanitary
Divi s ion s~ys they are p:rodu cing.
This i s a de ci sion which addresses it self t o the Publi c W o Tks Committee cf the
Board of A l dern~e n. I would hope s o me d ecision coul d b e made a t the C om.mittee
meeting Thu:.: sday so that action might be taken at the M onday, A u guat 4 ,
me eting of the Board of Al dermen.
If I c an be of s ervice tc y ou in h e l ping to res olv e thh m.atter , please let me
know.
Since1·ely yo u r o~
Dan Sweat
DS :fy-
cc: M r. Ray Nix on
M 1·. Ral ph Hulsey
�Sept mber 10, 1969
Mr. William W. Allison
Executive Administrator
Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc,.
101 Marietta Street Building
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Mr. Alli on:
Thi ia in re ponse to your letter of Aug t 22., 11'69 concerning
the Atlanta Beautification Coi-p Program.
We have worked out an arrangement hereby these wor ers
can be placed in ,p ermanently utb-01"iz d wa te collector
o ition on a temporary basi until the end of the year .
This. i• po ible because ol th relatively high rate of vacanc:ie ·
t
City i no expert · cin in the pe:rman nt po itio.n •
I am dvi ed that the Sanitary Divi ion ill et a ide 40 of
the e pe:rm nent po Uio
o1 employin t until Dec
.o that
e orker
ber 31, 1969.
can b
ured
Thi will, for th tim
ing. ccontmod.ate i progr
until
a d -c1 ion c:an b m de on th perm ent eontin tion of the
progr
• Be'C&uee ol tb City' • · erio-g.a financial problems·,
it i m thought
tit will not be possible for th City to
finance i pro r
continuin b el
t Dec bel!' 31.
1969. It .. ow. b
tbat EOA, Inc. cotlld locate ome
pro ram
t · t dat •
Slncer ly.
Iara AU n,, Jr.
Mayor
�101 Marietta Street Bldg. o Aclanta, Georgia 30303 e
·William W, Allison
Executive Adminiscrncor
August 4, 1969
Mr. Andrew B. Horgan, III
Summer Transportation Project
NLC/USCM
1612 K Street, N.W.
Washington, D. C. 20006
Dear Mr. Horgan:
Dan Sweat of the Atlanta City Hall has just forwarded to me your letter
of notification relative to $3,500 additional support for the Atlanta.
Summer Youth Program. I am responding to this matter sinc e Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Incorporated, the local CAP Agency, has agreed to handle
the disbursement of these monies.
This lett er represents official notification that the required
matching local non-federa l share in the amount of $1,667 is available to
match the additional $3,500 o f federal money . This non-federal share wa s
available from local city appropriated funds for summer transporta tion and
is money which has not been previously programmed as matching funds against
other federal grarits.
We v ery much appreciat e this additional h e l~ and on beh a lf o f the
City Government, I would like to thank you for your effort on this mat t er .
I f additiona l federal money for this purpose s hould be come avai l a ble in the
near future, we will most likely be in a position to utili ze it well and
would appreciate consideration in its disburs ement ,
Sincerel~
A
((f(l/f -Deputy Admim.s t r a tor
CR :ca
CC :
Dan Sweat
�Econornic Opportu1-n.ity l~tlarJlta, I11co
101 Marietta Street Bldg.
William W. Allison
Atlanta, Georgia 30303 o
o
r
Executive Administrator
August 26, 1969
Mr. Andrew B. Horgan, I II
Summer Transportation Project
NLC/USCM
Center for Program Implementation
1612 K Street, N. w.
Washington, D. C.
20006
De':l.r Mr. Horgan:
Thank you for your letter of August 14 with regards to additional
funds for the Atlant a sunnne r transport at ion proj ect. We are more
than h appy to rece ive authorization so that we may continue to fulfill
our obli gation in providing transportation for the summer activities.
These transportation funds have been vit al to our summer projects and
h ave aided tremendously in increased opportunities in r ecreationa l activities in the City of Atlanta.
Thank you for your inte r es t and consideration in ou r sunnne r programs .
tcere~y yours _'
lf 1f:, f:c-:~,_
1
Jilliam Allison
Executive Administrator
WA/DH:dt
cc:
Mr. Harold Barrett
Mr. John Cox
Mr. Lewis Dinkins
Mr. Dan Swe at
�August 14, 1969
Mr • Edna B . Tate
He 1th Coordinato1:
Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.
101 Marietta Street Building
Atl nta, Georgia 30303
D ar Mrs . Tate :
I am returnin · your C.AP Form b which was sent to the M yor fo~ h is
eignatu:r . Becau. of the 195Z Plan of lmppovement which deleg t s
r pon ibility for all he 1th matter in Fulton County, including the
City of Atlanta, to the Fulton County Government, it i om: fe ling that
this form should be igned by the Chairman of th Fulton County Commi sion
ince th Mayol' h
no leg 1 authority to aign this form .
l W1der tand that the fo:m-m i to indicate that the city i familiar with the
Compreb.en iv He 1th Pro ram nd
s no objection to it. Ple
be
a sured that tb.e City ia acquainted with the Comprehe.n ive H 1th Pro ram
nd ha given it
upport to the pro ram within the bound of it le al
utbority.
I hope thl
will m et your r qui:rem nt for
ubmi
ion of thi
pplie tion.
Sine rely,
Dan E . S eat, Jr.
Chief Admini tratlv Officer
DESJr:j
�. J(lf/T
~)
.
Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.
101 Marietta Street Bldg. • Atlanta, Georgia 30303 •
William
w.
525-6854
Allison
Executive Administrator
August 8, 1969
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
City Hall
68 Mitchell Street, S. W.
Atlanta, Georgia
30303
Dear Sir:
We are sorry you were unable to attend the meeting on August 5, 1969
to review the work plans for the Atlanta Southside Comprehensive
Health Center.
If you have any questions concerning the program on funding request,
please call me at 525-6854.
I am enclosing another copy of CAP f orm 46, for your signature, with
the hope that it will be returned for inclusion in the funding request
which is due August 14, 1969.
Sincerely yours,
(Mrs.) Edna B. Tate
Health Coordinator
EBT:nap
Enclos ure
�July 10, 1969
Mr . Vincent L . Tata
1495 Barnett Shoals Road
A th~ns , Georgia. 30601
Dear Mr. Tata:
Thank you for the l tter and resum and your interest in possible
mployment in the City of A tlant .
I know of no sp clfic positions. withi'n City Gov rnment which
might interest you. or fit your sp cial qualifications .
How ver, l hav forw rded your letter and r sum. to Mr. Clint
Rodger , Deputy Adminlstratol' , Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. ,
the City's community action agency, for con ider tion. Mr. Rodgeii f miliar with many of the program which might ofter an
opportunity for you to us both you.r p at xperlence in OEO
pl'ogr ms and your st:rong cap bUity in th S pani h 1 nguag •
Slncer ly yours,
D
DS:fy
cc: Mr . Clint Rodg r•
S
at
�July 10, 1969
Mr . B oisfeuillet Jones , President
Emily and Ernest Woodruff Foundation
Suite 210 , Pea chtree Center Buil d ing
230 P e a chtree Sti-eet, N . W .
Atlanta , Georgia 30303
Dear Boisfeuillet:
I am in agreement with the c,eorganization of the EOA B oard of
Dire cto rs in accordance with your letter of July 3, 1969, and
the memo randum which you submitted . I believe this w ould provide
proper representation to local agencies and citizens groups and
will meet the guideline requirements of OEO .
It is my desire that you serve as one of the four appointees of
the City and that Rev. M. L . King, Sr., Mr. A. L . Sterne ,
and Rev. Joseph L. Griggs also serve under City appointment.
I do not have to tell you how fortunate the peopl of Atlanta and
the surrounding area have been to have you setv as Chah:man
of the EOA Board of D irectors ince its establishment in 1964.
We thank you again for your service in the p st and your continued
service in the future.
Sincerely yours,
Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor
I.AJr:fy
�EMILY AND ERNEST WOODRUFF FOUNDATION
SUITE 210, PEACHTREE CENTER BUILDING
230 PEACHTREE STREET,
ATLANTA. GEORGIA
N .W.
30303
BOISFEUILLET JONES
PRESIDENT
3 , 19 69
1
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
City Hall
Atlanta, Geor g ia
D e ar May or Allen :
/
~\
\\i
W e ar e now proc ee ding w ith r e or g urtio~ of the E. O.A . Board of
Dir e ctors i n accordanc e w ith t he atta c h e d m emorandum w hich w as cleared
w ith the Fulton Coun t y Commissione rs and May or of Atlanta a b out a y ear
a g o.
O r i g i nally , th e Fulton County Commissione rs a p point e d s eve n b o a rd
me m be rs , t he May or of Atlanta a ppointe d s e v e n, and t he Coun t y Co mmis sio n e rs a n d M a y or to g e t he r appoin t e d jointly a fift eenth membe r to s e rv e
as C h air m a n . Late r , u n d e r r e quireme nts of OEO, t w elve e l ec t e d r e pr e s entative s o f t he poor we r e add e d to t he B oard fro m r e spe ctive n e i ghb orhood
s e r v ic e c e nt e r ar e as i n Atlanta and Fulton Coun t y . Also late r, Co mmission e rs
of G w inn e tt and Roc k dal e Coun ti e s e ach appoint e d tw o membe rs a n d a t h ird
fr o m e ac h coun t y wa s e l e c t e d by the poor.
Unde r t he r e quired r e o r g a n i z atio n, F ulto n Coun t y a n d Atlanta w ill
e ac h appoi n t f o u r memb er s . O f the s eve n membe rs w ho have s e r ve d as
a p poin t ee s of Fulto n Count y , M rs. Lu cy Ai ken, M r . H a rold Be nson ,
M r . J e ssi e Hill , and M r . J ohn Gree r w ill c o n ti nu e to s e r ve unl e ss Fulto n
C o u nty w is he s to r e plac e t he m n ow . As to t he othe r thr ee, M r. Ca r l
Plunk e tt and D r. P a ul W e st w is h to r e ti re fr o m t he B o a rd n o w and M r.
J e ssi e Grantham will b e repl ace d by a d ir e ct n o m i n at i o n fr o m the A tlanta,
G e or g i a L a b o r C o u nc il AF L-CIO.
Th e C hairman is now e l e cted b y t he Board, w h i ch po s itio n I h o ld.
Sinc e I w as an appointee jointly of the C ity and County and s ince ther e is
n o l ong e r pro v ision for a joint appo i ntme nt, the May or has a s k e d that I
continue on th e B oard a s o ne of the four app ointe e s o f the C i t y a l ong w ith
R ev . Jos e p h L . G ri gg s, Mr. A.H. S t e rne, and R e v . M. L . King.
�•
As to the other four City appointees, Mr. William L. Calloway will
probably be continued on as a nominee of the Community Council of the
Atlanta Area, Inc., Dr. John Letson will retire from the Board in reco g nition of a nominee selected by the Board of Education, Mr. W. H. Montague
is deceased, and Mrs. Ann Woodward will probably be nominated by the
Board of Education as its representative.
·'
We believe that this plan continues on the Board the Fulton County
and City of Atlanta appointees who are willing to continue, which will
provide necessary stability.
May I say that it has been a very g reat pleasure to work with all
of your appointees, who have contributed very ge nerously of their time
and talents to our local anti-poverty efforts. The support of the Fulton
County Commissioners and the Mayor and Aldermen of Atlanta and the
wisdom of your choices for members of the Board have had considerable
impact on development of the local prog ram into what has been reco gnized
nationally as one of the best. We hope to merit your continued interest
and help.
Since rely yours,
~~ll~t, ~~
~=
J(&=rsfe~
t J onv fv"
Chairman
EOA Board of Dir ectors
cc:
Mr. Walter M. Mitchell
Chairman
Fulton County Commissioners of Roads
and Revenues
�Memorandum on Reorganization of EOA Board of Directors
The Mayor of Atlanta and the Com1nission e rs of Fulton, Gwinn e tt, and Rockdale
Counties, th e Board of Directors of Economic Opportunity Atlanta, and the Office of
Economic Opportunity have agreed to the following composition of the EOA Board in
order to meet requirements of amendments to the Fed e ral Economic Opportunity Act
governing community action agencies:
L
Total number of seats is 39.
2.
Nmnber of s e ats for r e pres e ntativ e s of the poor is 14. (No change.)
One repres e ntativ e is electe d by the poor in each of the fourte e n Neighborhood Servic e Areas into which Atlanta and Fulton, Gwinnett, and Rockdale
Counties are divided.
3.
Number of seats for chi e f e lected officials or their r e pr e s e ntatives is 14.
(Forme r numbe r was 19.)
Representativ e s ar e s e lected by officials or public agencies as follo w s:
Atlanta Mayor and Board of Alderme n
4
Fulton County Commission e rs of Ro a ds and R e v e nues
4
Gwinne tt County Com missione rs of Roads and R e v e nu e s
1
1
Rockd a le County Commission e r of Ro a ds and R e v e nues
Atlanta Board of Education
1
Georgia Com.miss i one r of Labor
1
Atlanta R e gional M e tropolitan Planning Commission
1
Atlanta Community R e lations Commission
1
4.
Numb e r of s e ats for m .ajor private or g ani z ations or inte r e st groups is 11.
(Fo r m e rly, non e w a s s e l e cte d dir e ctly. )
One r e pr e s e nta tiv e is sel e cte d by e ach of th e follo w ing groups:
Atlanta Chamb e r of Comm e rc e
(Busin e ss)
Atlanta F e d e ral E xe cutiv e Boa r d
( Community Support)
Atla nta Univ e rsity C e nte r Co r por a tion
(Educ ation)
Natio na l Allianc e of Bu sin e s sme n, Atla nta
(E m ploy rnent)
M e tropolita n Atl a nta Coun c il for H ea lth
(Health)
Atlanta, G e or g i a L a bor Council AFL-CIO
(Labor)
Commu n ity Counc il of th e Atlan t a Ar ea
(Planning )
Christian Council of M e tropolita n Atla n t a
(R e lig ion)
Comm.unity Che st of M e tropolita n Atlanta
(Social S e r v ice)
(S e l e cte d throu g h County Com mission e rs)
(Gwinne tt S e rvic e s)
(S e l e cte d t hr oug h County Commis .;; i o n e r)
(Roc k d a l e S e rvic e s)
5.
R e presentat i v e s o f th e po o r s erve f o r t erms to w hi c h e l e cte d, w ith n ew
e l ectio n s to b e h e ld i n D e c e m b e r, 19 69 , fo r t e rm s b e g i nn i ng J anu ary 1, 19 7 0 .
Publi c r e pres e nta tives and p riva t e gro u p represen t a tiv e s are s e l ec t e d for
t e rm s b eg inn i ng J u l y 1, 19 69, w i th r e appointment o r re plac eme n t in D e c emb er ,
19 69, for o n e - y e ar t e rms b e g i nning J anuary 1, 19 70.
(Former number was 33.)
Bo i sfe uill e t J o ne s
EOA B o a rd Cha ir man
J un e 16, 19 6 9
�EMILY AND ERNEST WOODRUFF FOUNDATION
SUITE 210, PEACHTREE CENTER BUILDING
230 PEACHTREE STREET, N .W .
ATLANTA. GEORGIA 30303
80ISFEUILLET JONES
PRESIDENT
July 3 , l l 9 6 9
Mr . Walter M . M itchell
Chairman
F ulton County C ommissioners of R oads and Revenues
165 Central Ave nue S . W.
Atlanta, Georgia 3 0 303
Dear Mr . Mitchell :
We are now proceeding with reor g anization of the E . O . A . Board of
Directors in accordance wit h the attached memorandum which was clear ed
with the Fulton County Commissioners and Mayor of Atl anta abou t a year a go .
,,-
Originally , the Fulton County Commissioners appo inted seven board
members, the Mayor of Atlanta appoin ted seven , and the County Commissioners
and Mayor together appointed jointly a fifteenth member to sel"v~ as Chairman.
Later . under requirements of OEO , twelve elected repre entatives of the poor
were added to the Board from respective neighborhood service center areas in
Atlanta and Fulton County . Also later, Commissioners of Gwinnett and Rock dale Counties each appointed two members and a third from each county was
elected by the poor .
Under the required reorganization , Fulton County and Atlanta will
each appoint four members . Of the seven members who have served as
appointees of Ful ton County , Mr . Lucy Aiken , Mr . Harold Ben on, Mr . Jessie
Hill, and Mr . John Greer will continue to serve unless Fulton County wishe
to replace them now . As to the other three, Mr ; Carl Plunkett and Dr . Paul
West wish to retire from the Board now and Mr . Jessie Grantham will be replaced by a direct nomination from the Atlanta , Georgia Labor Council AFL-CIO .
The Chairman is now elected by the Board, which position I hold . Since
an appointee jointly of the City and County and ince there ie no longer
provi ion for a joint appointment , the Mayor a.a asked that I continue on the
Board a one of the four appointees of the City along with Rev . Joseph L . Griggs,
Mr . A.H. Sterne , and Rev. M . L . King .
1 wa
A to the other four City ppointee , Mr. Willi m L . Calloway will probably be continued on a a nominee of the Community Council of the Atlanta Are ,
Inc., Dr. John Letson will retie from the Board in recognition of a nominee
elected by the Board of Education, Mr . W. H. Montague ie cl ecea,·ed, nd Mrs.
Ann Woodward will probably be nomin ted by the Board of Educ tion as it
representative.
�We believe that this plan continues on the Board the Fulton County
and City of Atlanta appointees who are willing to continue , which will pro- .
vide necessary stability .
May I say that it has been a very great pleasure to work with all of your
appointees, who have contributed very generously of the ir ' time and talents
to our local anti-poverty efforts . The support of the Fulton County Commissioners and the the Mayor and Aldermen of Atlanta and the wisdom of your
chpices for members of the Board have had considerable impact on development of the local program into what has been recognized nationally as one
of the be's t. We hope to merit your continued intere t and help .
Sincerely yours ,
Boi feuillet Jones
Chairman
EOA Board of Directors
cc: Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr .
City of Atlanta
�.-
·. I~
\
~
E.c ononiic Opportunity Atlanta, Tnc.
101 Marietta Street Bldg. • Atlanta, Georgia 30303 • Telephone 688-1012
William
w.
Allison
Executive Administrator
July 23, 1969
r
Mrs. Sarah Baker, President
Grant Park Community Club
938 Park Avenue, S. E.
Atlanta, Georgia 30315
Dear Mrs. Baker:
Thank you for your letter of last week in which you
expressed the need for additional services in the Grant Park
area.
E.O.A. appreciates the opportunity to work with persons
like yourself and the Grant Park Community Club.
In this way
I think we can help each other to make Atlanta a better place
in which to . live.
Sincerely,
CD' JC
J~
W. 1'.llison
Executive Administrator
WWA/gj
cc,
~
Alderm n Griggs
Mr.. Dan Sw at
Mr. Johnny Johnson
,,
..
-:,1
.:.-
�ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY ATLANTA, INC.
BOARD MEETING
JULY 16, 1969
ADMINISTRATOR'S REPORT
T. M. PARHAM
PROGRAMS
Because people are poor due to many different reasons and circumstances,
EOA has many different approaches~ The money r~ceived supports all ,
a big part, or a tiny part of many activities
••• . Neighborhood Service Centers
•• • Concentrated Employment Program
••• . New Careers
••• . Operation Ready
••• Atlanta Beautification Corps
.Manpower Training Center
Neighborhood Youth Corps
Gate House (Job Corps returnees)
State Employment Service personnel
Vocational Rehab personnel
Rent- A-Kid
Community Organization
Consumer Services
VISTA
Recreation
Creative Atlanta
Sta r t Now Atlanta
VIP's (Ve r y Informed P e ople)
Volunteers
Full Year Head Start
s ummer Head Star t
Parent - Ch i ld Cen ter
We s t End Child Devel opment Center
. . Emerg e n c y Schoo l Lunch (4 s c hools)
. Summer Feeding (Snacks )
Legal Aid
P r og r ams fo r the Aged
Foster Gr andparents
. Comp r ehens i ve Hea l th
Pl anne d P arentho od
Aide Training
.
..
.. .
..
...
...
These ~hirty program titles do not nea rly exhaus t the possibilities or
give the kaleidoscopic effect. To exp a nd t h e list, one cou;bd name all
�-2-
fourteen neighborhood service centers and several extension offices,
or list ten separate full year head start Centers, nine family'
planning clinics, five legal aid offices, and the seventeen
delegate
agencies carrying out summer recreat~on activities. One might name
the 200 block clubs and list the CNAC and CCAC committees which make
up the heart of the community organization program. The VISTA and
volunteer projects could be listed individually. There would be
still further ways to break it down, but suffice it to say, we have
a lot going.
Furthermore, these program titles do not reflect Headquarters support
activities like finance which h a ndles payrolls, accounting, purchasing 0
inventory, retirement, workman's compensation, the credit union, group
health insurance; or planning which handles proposal development, contracts and data retrieval; or personnel with its task of recruiting,
processing, keeping time and attendance, handling grievances, etc; or
public information which answers countless questions, guides tours,
sends out literature, writ1es stories and seeks attention for us.
After this recitation, there's one thing that should be said:
to Mr. Allison --- he will need it.
Be kind
PROGRESS
In the past year, progress has been made in many ways:
(1)
The planning operation has been substantially improved and
systematized under the leadership of Mr. Allison.
(2)
The MIS (Management Information System) report required
by OEO has been facilitated by the diligent work of
Mrs. Maynard Jackson and her assistant Mrs. Ann Sieffer t.
A regional OEO off icial recently called this achievement outs tandin g .
(3)
The Finance Department is in the best condition ever;
accor ding to our external auditors , Wolf and company.
(4)
Neighbo rhoo d Service Operat ions, u n der the ab le
gu idance of Sue Crank, h ave b ecome more clearly
defined, and the Center Directors have establ ished
some exacting per f ormance s t andar ds of t he i r own.
The _accomplishme n ts of o u r i ndividual Centers h ave
been recited here each month, and their importance to
the total program cannot be over-emphasized.
�-3-
(5)
Edith Hambrick has led a special effort to improve
social service activities in the NSC's . Four master
social workers now provide guidance and supervision
to social service counselors in all the Centers, making
our service more consistently adequate and improving
the efficiency of our record keeping.
(6)
The Community Organization Program, led by John Calhoun ,
established specific goals in a wide variety of areas,
including edu cation , housing, welfare , employment,
health, recreation, etc., and citizen committees hav e
worked diligently and persistently at them. The results
have shown increasingly productive dialogues between
representatives of the poor and community institutions.
(7)
Manpower Programs, spurred by Clint Rodgers, have all
registered gains. ACEP has been restructured with
a much clearer understanding of its potentials as well
as its limitations. All the cooperating agencies, EOA,
the Georgia State Employment Service, the Vocational
Education Division of the City Schools, and Vocational
Rehab , have grown in their understanding of the needs
of the hard core unemployed.
The NYC Program under Charles Pierce has been complimented by the Regional Labor Office for its improved
operation .
(8)
Public Info rmat i on , with Mrs . Mitchell assisted b y
Pat Mason, cont i nues to do outstanding work . They
scor ed notab l e achievements initiating the Start Now
At l anta P r ogram a nd the VIP ' s.
(9)
The Volun te er P r ogram, u n der June sammon s ' ener get ic
and r e s ourcefu l l eader sh i p , has b los somed t o 602
act i ve wo rke rs and s e ems l imitl ess i n i ts pote nt ial.
(1 0)
At long last, we have o ur Aide Tr a ining Program under
way. Mrs. Anne Jackson i s in charge a nd t he goal is
to give increased skills to all our aides and equip
them for better jobs.
(11)
VISTA has had one of its brightest, most able groups
of volunteers . They have worked on a variety of
community problems 8 and through a joint effort involving a large number of them , they hope very soon
�-4to open a warehouse that will be a coordinating
purchasing office for six buying clubs they ~~ve
organized.
(12) Recreation, with Harold Barrett and Duke Harrison
leading, has been developed into a y ear-round rather
than strictly summer activity. A t otal of ten youthcommunity centers have been assisted into being, and
football, basketball, and baseball teams have been
developed among otherwise unreached youth .. One
pr_e sent goal that seems achieveable is a year-roun d
arts activity modeled after this summer's Creative
Atlanta Program.
(13) Child Development activities have been augmented by
the successful beginning of the Edgewood Parent-Child
Center for children from birth to age 3 and by the
opening of the West End Child Development Center with
its special emphasis on the use of older citizens a s
child care specialists. There is real hope how that
our Full-Year Head Start Program can be vastly improved in coming months by the conversion of summer
Head Start funds.
PROBLEMS
In view of its assigned mission, EOA has several fundamental p roblems:
(1)
The basic community action program is under-funded
and stretched · too thin . Neighborhood target areas
are far too large for the r esources deployed . NSC's
have too little staff to perform adequately their
out-reach and community organization functions.
(2)
There is a need to further strengthen our plannin g
and evaluation capacities . Close attention needs
to be g iven to activities to determine what works
well and why --- what doesn't work and why. Productive activities should be encourag ed and
disseminated; promising ideas should be exploited.
Regular operations staff, burdened with daily
duties, seldom have energy left for this&
�--5-
(3)
A formal staff development program is needed. EOA
has, as part of its agenda, the employment within
its own program of persons who are not fully p _r;-epared
for the responsibilities given them. This affords
opportunities to many who have aptitude but little
formal training and experience. Many persons have
blossomed with this opportunity, but some have been
overwhelmed and frustrated. More consistent performance would be secured if each staff member could
be regularly exposed to a program designed to increase
his understanding of the problems the agency is working
on and the techniques it attempts to use.
{4}
Erratic, year to year funding greatly handicaps planning ,
program development , and staff recruitment .
It is hard
to persuade competent, widely sought personnel to come
to a program the future of which seems constantly in
jeopardy. It is hard to plan and build improved services
with the constant threat of budget retrenchment. Congress
should be encouraged to clearly define the program and
to give it authorization and appropriations adequate
and dependable enough to do the job.
(5)
Finally, the biggest problem for EOA, in my opinion.,
remains the inherent complexity of the task. You are
expected to solve the pnoblem of unemployment among
the poor, but you do not control the jobs, the placement services or the training programs. You are
expected to perfect the delivery of human services,
but other a gencies contr ol welfare; _. health, education
and recreation resources . You are expected to mobilize
the poor in their own behalf but to do it without
disturbing anyone o
In s uch an as signme nt , the arr ay of forc e s , attitudes
a nd cir cums t a nces which mu s t b e dea lt with a re inf initely
complex and i n terwoven with the total fab r ic of society .
To carry i t off with a ny degree of succ ess requir es
g reat sensit i v ity, tact, intelligence , d et ermi nation ,
and cou rage. If success h as been l ess than c omplete, as
it obviously has, it s h o u ld not, in any sense, be looked
opon as fail.ure. To have attacked these tough problems
a t all is a tribu t e t o the program's a udaci ty and to its
willingne ss to risk itsel f on behalf of the poor. We need
to remember that those of us who undertake to "wash society ' s
dirtiest linen" seldom have happy customerso
�July 1 , 1 969
Mr. Willi am u . No rwood, Jr .
Regional Manpower Admin1-strator
U. s . Department of Labor
1371 Peachtree Street, N. E.
Atl nta , Georgia 30309
Dear Mr . Norwood :
Grave concern w s expres ed at the Jun EOA Board me ting
about the up-coming requirement for ten p rcent non-feder 1
matching funds in our next ACEP program ye r beginning
Septemb r 1 , 1969 . Atl nta, lik
11 l arge citi s tod y ,
has very limited financi 1 resourQ s comp red to its demands . and it is extx
l y diffioult for community ag ncies
like EDA to secure addition- l local cash .
As you will rsoall , the original ACEP px-opo al llow d EOA
to 0laim
loc l "in-kind" the supporting r souro s of its
community ction progr
nd 0th r fed -11y ssisted
agencie providing opportunitLe for New c ~ ere and NYC
traj.n - •
ith this now dis llowed, and
urning current
funding lev l , EOA f ca
n ed to gen x t
pproximat ly
200 , 000 in non-f d r l shar.
t p~ ent only bout
88 , 000 of "in-kind" ·ems el rly v il bl, le ·ving
pot ntial non-f d
1
ficit o mor th
100,000.
t , b in9 th r ion l city th t i t i . in
t N w car r tr ining lot, with promi ing
and up r mobility pot nti l, ~ wit.hf d r 1
upport d 9 nei • Lik wi , th youth cOIIi)Ort
R dy), by virtu of bing ti d 1n with roj ct V .lu, pon•
ii.tu tion.
or d by th D artment of Def n , 1 1n th
Whil thi i
h py c rcumst nc fo~ th in vidu 1

roll , it po
dil
for tho• who mu t find 10% loc ·1
~
ou~o
to
teh th
cot.
Atl
b
�..
.,.J
page 2
Mr. William Norwood
July 1, 1969
Because of the above factors, the EOA Boa..t:d would like to
request that the u. s. Department of Labor grant a waiver
on our New CaJ;'eers and Operation Ready components allowing us to claim as local in-kind the participation of
federally supported agencies .. We understand that such
action is possible and that there are similar precedents.
Your favorable consideration o f this request will be
greatly appreciated .
.Sincerely yours,
Bo~
1let Jones, chairman
Board of Directors
/er
co:
Mayor Ivan All n
-A,1r . D n $wet
Dr. Ch rl s Hicks
�July • 1 69
1'llly
Aila.
V ry
ly yo
r••
1'11.
�I
Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.
101 Marietta Street Bldg . • t\tl::inta , Geo rgia 30303 •
T. M. Parham
Executi ve Admini s trator
May 9, 1969
The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor of the City of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
30303
Dear Mayor Allen:
Enclosed you will find two sets of Modifications extending your
present contract with Economic Opportunity Atlanta's Atlanta
Concentrated Employment Program.
Modification #10 legally extends your sub-contract until May 4,
1969, and replaces my "Letter of Intent" dated April 18, 1969.
Modification #11 extends your sub-contract until August 31, 1969.
Please sign and return five copies of these Modifications.
TMP/js
cc: - Mr. Clint Rodgers
-Mr. William Allison
...--Mr. Pete Jones
Mr. Samuel Russell, Jr.
~ John Davis
�0
·-....,._,.}
E
0
10] Ma riett a Street Bldg.
T. M. P arham
Exccu t i\· e Ad mi n istra. vr
MEMORANDU M
--- - -----
TO:
Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor, City of Atlanta
FROM:
William W. Allison
Deputy Administrator
DATE :
June 11, 1969
-·/
Just a r eminder th at the planning sess ions for EOA ' s 1970
program whi ch b egan l ast Monday wil l continue on_ Mond a y ,
Jun e. 16th - 7: 30 p .rn. in th e fourth floo r EOA Conference
Room.
You or your agency representat i ve are inv ited to at t end .
WWA:jjj \
�.,
I
,-
'j
'
·Economic Opportunity P1tlanta, Inc.
101 Marietta Street Bldg . • t\cl a nta , Georgia 30303 •
T. M. Parham
Executi ve Adminiscra ~0r
June 4, 1969
l
i
Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor
city . of Atlanta
City Hall
68. I'-'.!itchell Street, S.W.
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Mayor Allen:
Planning for the 1970 EOA Program will begin this month.
In
order to establish program goals and strategies it is necessary
for the planning staff to obtain as much information as possible ·from, residents, clients, community groups and staff.
'
o1
A series
meetings is scheduled for this purpose beginning
June 9th,in the EOA conference room at 7:30 p.m.
It will be
followed by several more meetings depending on the need expressed.
representative from your agency is cordially invited to
attend.
A
Sincerely,
/4;I//;_~- /;lZ[;
{_e : ~ -
Wi 11 iam W. Allison
Deputy Administrator
WWA:jjj
�June 17, 1969
Mt. Randall N. Conway
Staff Division
Memphis Manpower Cotm1ission
P.O. Box 224
Memphis, Tennessee 38103
Dear Mr. Conway:
I h ve received a copy of your l tter of May 21 to the Atlant .
city government relative to the establishment of a manpower policy as
w 11 as Mir . Sweat 's reply to you. As Mr. Sweat has pointed out, the
City of Atlant , at this point; has no overall of fici 1 manpower policy.
However, I would like to off r the following thoughts from where I
see this heading .
I beli ,ve that most peopl involved in manpower planning that
r 1 ts to city government h v com to th conclusion that, in
larg
urban are, manpow r pl nning and policy can not be isolated frO!ll the
plan to tght urb n problems in gen r l. Manpow r policies, sp cially
as thy rel t:e to inner-city poverty res, are irrevoc bly ti d to
problems in housing, eduction, transport ti.on, tc . It 19 ·'11Y p rson 1
b lief that n ov rall st,: 8 dy can b and wUl be dev loped through the
Urb n Obs rvatory hich is bin
t blish d through Georgi St t
Coll ge in Atlant. Th Ob rvatory s envision d her will provide th
nee ·saey link .g of th varifs cad ie di6ciplinc a
11 · with
th administt'atore who f c . tn praetic 1 probl ms of pl
ntation
on both
hort nd lon r ng b sia. I b 11-v th t thi
ffort link d
with a strong vigorous imput ittto th CAMPS y t
can b gin to
some kind of
nse out of th pr s nt 11ultf.pl1oity of effort
and oth r ~ lat d probl ar as.
that these ·t hou ht wilt b · us ful ·t o you in looking 4t t:h
nt of such a policy in
phi • If I can b of ny furth r
on tbi
tt r, pl aa
1 fte to get in touch with
Stnc r 1y.
'
GC acaa
C'lint Rodgers, A aoclat ·
Admini tr · tor for ManJ>OW r
�June 18, 1969
Mr . P eter S . Jonea
Ec onomic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc .
101 Marietta Street, N. W.
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Pete:
I believ that this should be handled by you without any requirement for ction on our p rt.
Pl
s
let me know if I am not correct.
Sincerely yours,
Dan Swe t
DS :fy
E.nclo ure (1)
�.J.LJN 6·- 1969
Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor, City of Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Mayor Allen:
This letter is in reference to the May 5, 1969 letter from Mr. Peter S. Jones,
Director of Finance, Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. (EOA), and correspondence referred to below, concerning the National Endowment for the Arts grant
(A68-0-161) to the City of Atlanta.
In vie ~ of the fact that the balance of unexpended funds returned to the Endowment included $1,000 due the Academy Theatre, the grant is hereby amended as
follows: $1,000 will be forwarded to the City of Atlanta , c/o Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc., upon receipt of the signed acceptance of this amendment.
It is understood that the $1,000 provided for by this amendment is for tpe s pecific purpose of satisfying the Academy Theatre's cl im.
Please confirm acceptance of this amendme nt (which henceforth should be referred
to as Amendment No. l) by signing the carbon and returning it in the enclosed
envelope.
Sincerely yours,
Douglas MacAgy
Acting Chairman
Referenc e :
5/5/ 69 Ltr. P. Jones to C. Mitze w/encl.
(5/1/69 Ltr. Nancy Hager to P. Jones w/eocl.
(4/30/69 Ltr. Berman, Mills & Co. to Southeastern
Academy of Theatre and Music w/Statement of
Rec ipt and Expenditures)
nclosures:
1~ Grantee Acceptance Copy
2.
cc:
iJ turn Env lope
Mr. Petr s. Jones
Mr . Nancy Hager
ACC E P T E D
DATE
�June 18, 1969
MEMORANDUM
Tc: Mr. Collier Gl din
F rom: Dan Sweat
Are you£ mlli r with th nature of the eudorsement which
Bill Allison is lookin for?
1 s ume he want n ndorsement from the City of Atlanta.
I! o, would you ple se ndle.
DS :f.y
�Tci "Whom It May Concern:

As Manpower Representative for Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Incorporated, the private non-profit Community Action Program serving
Atlanta, I would like to state my support in principle for • a resident
Urban Skills Center for young women. Experiences in the Concentrated
Employment Program, Neighborhood Youth Corps and other training programs
which we sponsor has consistently demonstrated the need for additional
training opportunities for females. I believe a residential program
will be essential if a Skills Center is to serve young women from extremely deprived backgrounds in terms of providing a change of environment
and to provide in depth Supportive Services on a consistent basis.
Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Incorporated, has in existence a
well established system for dealing with many aspects relating to the
unemployed. We have established a strong working relationship with the
Georgia State Employment Service in a coordinated outreach, job referral
and job development effort. We also have viable linkage with other
community groups concerned with manpower problems such as the Atlanta
Urban League, Model Cities, State Vocational Rehabilitation, and the
Atlanta Board of Education. Economic Opportunity Atlanta will be happy
to cooperate in these and other functions relating to a Skills Center
if such a Center is relevant to the needs of low income residents in
the Atlanta area. In addition, we would consider coordinating existing
training slots in our Concentrated Employment Program and other training
efforts provide funding levels are adequate and appropriate linkage to
the Skills ~enter could be negotiated.
We feel strongly that the Skills Center must provide a meaningful
opportunity foi input as to design and functioning on the part of
low income residents to be served. Without this the Skills Center will
lack creditability in the community it purports to serve and will make
recruitment and retention extremely difficult.
I am not by this letter endorsing any particular agency or company
seeking this contract but intend to convey our desire as an agency to
cooperate .constructively with whoever receives the contract and providing
that the prime contractor pres ents a program that is relevant to the
needs of the people we serve.
~//I--
Clint Rodgers, Associate
Administrator for Manpower
�'.
ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY ATLANTA, INC.
101 Marietta Street, N. W.
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
- 525-4262
Established 1964
T. M.(Jim) Parham, Executive Administrator
To
bring employment, social services, and community organization
to low income areas.
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Services: Job counseling, training, placement and follow up; day care;
legal assistance; aid in securirgmedical, psychiatric, housing,
emergency financial assistance and other social services
through the use of existing services and the development of
new ones; corrnnunity organization; youth development and recreation;
family planning; programs and help for the elderly; assistance
to families with problems of budgeting, nutrition, meal planning
and preparation, child care, hygiene , and houseke eping; assistance
in self-improvement and educationa l programs; prevention of crime
in cooperation with the Atlanta Police Department which assigns
policemenLto work in the centers; becoming friends with the
residents and aiding them with their problems; social casework
by trained staff located in ea~h center; training of neighborhood
residents as aides; special projects and programs utilizing
volunteers.
Purpose:
Area Served:
Metropolitan Atlanta, Fulton, Gwinn e tt and Roc.kd a le Counties.
Hours of Service:
Eligibilit y :
, Fees:
8:30 A.M. - 5:00 P.M., Monday through Frida y .
No restrictions e x c e pt that applicants b e o f low income.
None
Applic a tion rocedure: Cont a ct r e ceptionist at Neighborhood Serv ice
Centers or the ma in Economic Op p or t unit y At l a nta , Inc., offic e
or 1the igency administering specific pr ograms .
Aus p ic es:
Non-profit cor pora tion. ·
Sou rce of Funds:
Federal, loc al.
�•
PROGRA1'5 LOCATED IN EOA CENTRAL HEADQUARTERS:·
ATLANTA CONCENTRATED EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM (ACEP)
A comprehensive manpo,ver program for the hardcore
unemployed and underemployed in five EOA target
areas: NASH-Washington, Sum-Mee, Pittsburgh,
Price, and West End.
688-1494
HEAD START
full year
Ten centers provide supervised /day care plus
Head Start enrichment and education for children
of working parents. Summer Head Start is an
enrichment program for culturally deprived
pre-school children operated by the Atlanta
School System and five other agencies, The full
year centers are listed under "Programs Administered
Directly by Economic Opportunity At lanta."
525-4266
NEIGHBORHOOD ;YOUTH CORPS (out-of-school)
688-6232
NYC is a job training and employment program for out~of-school,
unemployed youths aged 16 - 21. Counseling · and individual
help are offered to each of the enrollees who work in non-profit
organizations throughout the city. Return to school is encouraged.
' i
VOLUNTEERS IN SERVICE TO AMERICA (VISTA)
525-7813
A domestic Peace Corps of volunteers assisting low-income
neighborhood residents wi th education, community organi zation,
recreation, couns e ling, h ea lth, employment and other
specialized programs.
VOLUNTEER SERVICES
A program to enlist vitally needed local volunt~ers
in all-phases of the war on poverty. Volunteers
are used in existing proj ects and encouraged to
begin new programs.
525-2068
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PROGRAMS ADMINISTERED DIRECTLY BY ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY ATLAl.'HA
GATE House (Graduate Aid To Employment)
522 West Peac}itree, N. W., Atlanta / 30308
876-4831
A program which provides counseling, job referral, and
other placement services to returning men and W01I1en Job
Corps graduates.
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FULL YEAR D.1\-Y CARE CENTERS
Antioch North Day Care Center (50 children)
540 Kennedy Street,N. W. / 30318
Telephone·: 523-4862 ·
Bowen Homes Day Care Center (100 c~ildren)
{Gate City Association)

1060 Wilkes c1rcle, N~ w. / 30318
Telephone: 799-1170
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C9llege Park civic & Educational Center (35 children)
407 West Harvard Street, College Park, Georgia
30337
Telephone: 766-4456
East Point Child Care Center (24 children)
1147 Calhou n Avenue, East Point, Georgia/ 30044
Telephone : 767-4404





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Fort Street Kiddie Korne r (104 children )
562 Boulevard, N. E. / 30308
Telephone: 876-9279
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Gate city at St. Paul's
(Gate City Associat ion)
1540 . Pryor Ro a d, s. W. /
Telephone: 622-8951
(36 children)
30 3 15
Grady Homes Day Ca r e Ce nter · (90 children)
(Gra dy Homes Te n a nt Associatio n )
.
100 Bel l St r eet , S. E . / 30303
(5.:__::,_:, - / :J9-5)
T e..<J.._, lt./>'--<- - - - -- - -- -------l
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South Side Da y care Ce nter (120 children)
802 Pry or Stree t, s. W. / 30315
Telephone : 577-264 0
Taberna cle Bapti st ch u rch (12 0 chi l dre n )
465 Bo ule var d , N. E. / 30308
Telepho n e: 8 76 -1779
.
Vine City Chi l d Deve lopment Ce n ter
168 Gri ff in Stree t , N. W. / 30314
Tel ephone : 525-44 1 9
(5 0 childre n )

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NEIGHBORHOOD SERVICE BENTERS Al~D EXTENSIONS
J
Central City Neighborhood Service Center
840 Marietta Street, N.W. / 30318
Telephone:
873-6759

East Central Neighborhood Service Center
486 Decatur Street, S.E./ 30312
Telephone: ..;_ 577-1735
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East Side Community Extension Center
54 7 Hunt Street, S. E. / 30-~l-2
( '3 C:?
Telephone: 872-2445
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Edgewood Neighborhood Service Center
1!23 Boulevard Drive, S.E./ 30317
Telephone:
378-3643
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Gwinnett County Neighborhood Service Center
148 Clayton Street; Lawrenceville, Georgia/ 30245
Telephone:
963-180£
· ()
NASH~washington Neighborhood Service Center
30314
Telephon~:
524-2084
·247 Ashby Street , N.W . /
NASH-Ex tension Center(Eaga n Home s)
-$!!/ Chestnut Stre et , N.W. / 30314
Telephone :
523-3186
Vine Ci ty Extension Center
141 Wa ln ut Street, N.W./ 30314
Telephone:
523-5 136
North Fulton Neighborhood Service Center
27 Oak Street, Ros well, Georgia/ _30075
Teleph o n e:
993-~795
Northwe st (Per ry Home s) Nei gh bor h ood Serv ic e Ce nter
1927 Holl ywood Rocd , N. W. / 30 318
Telepno ne:
799-9322
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· Northwest (Perry -Homes)
Extension Center
1660 Drew Street, N.W. Apt 758 / 30318
Telephone: 3 S/- '.6 7/t::J ·
Pittsburgh Neighborhood Service Center
933½ McDaniel Street, S.W. / 30310
Telephone:
523-1577
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Price Neighborhood Service Center
112~ Capitol Avenue, S. W. / 30315
Telephone:
522-5792
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Rockdale-Conyers Neighborhood Ser v ice Ce n~~r
_
' 929 Commercial Street, Conyers, Georgia / - 30207
TTlephone: 483-9512


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South Fulton Neighborhood Serv ice Center
2735 East Point Street, East Point, Georgie:/ 30344
Telephone:
767-7541


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Sumrn,erhill-Mechanics v ille Neighborhood Service Center
65 Georgia Av enue, S.E. / 30315
Telep~oGe:
577-1351
SUM- ME C Ex tensio n Ce nt e r
508 'McDaniel Str ee t, Apt. 1853/ 30311
Teleph on e :
52 4 -21 4 0
West Cent ra l Ne ighb o rh ood S erv ice Cent e r
2193 Verbena Street , N.W . / 30 3 1 4
Tel ephone:
799-0331
,
West End Neighborhood Service Center
72 7 Lawton Street, S. W.
/ 30 3 10
Telephone:
753~.6101
West End Extension Center
1278 Plaza Avenue, S.W. / 3 0 3 10
Telephone:
758-8609
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· . i \ · \ \EQA .PROGRAMS_ CONTRACTED ANP ADMINISTERED BY OTHER AGENCIES IN THE COMNUNITY
I '
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.THE ATLANTA LEGAL AID SOCIE;TY, INC •
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Le.g al Aid provides counsel and· ·representation· for the poor as
individuals and in ·groups, presses for the change of laws that
work unfairly against ·the impoverished, provides connnunity
education and conducts research into_ t he legal problems of the
poor.
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Downtown Office
153 Pryor Street, S.W. / 30303
· Phone: 524-5811
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Bellwoood Office
717 Marietta Street, N.W. / 30318
Phone: 523-2528
Hunter Street Office
947 Hunter Street, N. W./ 30314
~ iI •Phori.e:
52 5-884 1

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' i Northwest
Office
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11839-C Hollywood Road, N. W. / 30318
. Phone:
799-8336
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Sum-Mee Office
6~ Georgia Avenue, S.E. /
Phone;
524-7982
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30312
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ATLANTA SOUTHSIDE COMPREHENSIVE HEALTH CENTER
1039 Ridge Avenue, S. E., Atlanta/30315
688-1350
The health center pro.v ides complete medical care,
except hospitilization, for low income residents
who live in the Price and Sum-Mee neighborhoods.
Residents are trained for and work in a variety of
health jobs. The Fulton County Medical Society is
the delegate agency and the Emory School of Medicine
operates the program.
EDGEWOOD PARENT AND CHILD CENTER
112 Rogers '. ~treet, N. E., Atlanta/ 30317
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378-3135
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· 'The FCC is a pilot program in the Edgewood community
,which serves children under 3 and their families.
'The aim is to foster the maximum development of
very young children through improved family living
and training in child rearing techniques.
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FOSTER GRANDPARENJS
Administered by:
577-2474
Senior Citizen Services of Metropolitan Atlanta, Inc.
120 Marietta Street, N. W., Atlanta/ 30303
· A program to provide children in institutions with adult
affection and companionship while also giving older
citiz ens a chanc e to be employed in a useful, personally
satisfying job.
�···'
MULTI-SERVICE CENTERS FOR THE AGED
A program of health maintenance, adult education, recreation,
transportation, counseling, and other services to residents
of ~ e --c1TW•/ high rise apartment buildings for the aged •_
constructed by the Atlanta Housing Authority and for the ·
low-income senior citizens who live "in the surrounding
ne~ghborhoods.
Administering Agency:
Senior Citizen Services of
, Metropolitan Atlanta, Inc.
120- Mar!~k
Telephone:

577-3828
~ - Street, N. W. , Atlanta / 30303
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John O Chiles Center
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Addres~ :
43 5 Ashby Street, S_. W.
Telephone: 755-5771
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Palmer House Center
Address:
430 Techwood Drive, N.W.
Telephone: 873-3453
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Antoine Graves Center
Address:
126 Hillard Street, S.E.
Telephone: 577-1793
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Martin Luther King Memorial Center
Address:
530 McDaniel Street, S.W.
Telephone: 525-0651
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PLANNED PARENTHOOD
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Administering Agency
Downtown Clinic
118 Marietta Street, N. W.
Telephone: 523-6996
Monday - Wednesday
Friday






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The Planned Parenthood
Association of the Atlanta Area
Bethlehem Community Center Clinic
9 ,McDonough Boulevard, S. E.
Telephone:
627-0176
Monda y - Thursday
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Central Presbyterian Clinic
201 W~shington Street, S. W.
Teleph one:
521-1347
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Ea·s t Poin~ Clinic
2735 Ea?t Point Street
Telephone:, 767-75 4 1
Tuesday '
Edgewood Cl i nic
1713 Bou l e vard Dr ive, S. E .
Telephone: - 378-36 4 3
Geo r gia Avenue Pre sbyte ri a n Clinic
645 Gr ant Street , S. E .
Telepho ne:
6 88- 08 71
Tuesday
John 0 . Chi les Cli n ic
43 5 Ashby St r eet, S. W.
Tel ephone:
75 3-4228
Thursday
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M. Agries Jones clinic
1040 West Fair Street, S. W.
Telephone:
758-8326
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PIANNED PARENTHOOD Cont'd
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Perry Homes Clinic
· 1660 Drew Drive, N. W. Apt 756
Telephone: 355-8278
Monday - Wednesday
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West End Clini~
. _4 35 Ashby Street, S. W.
Telephone:
Thursday
753~4228
Wheat Street Baptist Church
18 Yonge Street, N. E.
Telebhone; 522-3634
Monday
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Vine ;C ity Clinic
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558 M~gnolia Street, N. W.
Telephone: 523-8112
Friday
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RODENT CONTROL PROJECT
30 Courtland Street, N. E. , Atlanta/ 30303
525-8275
A demonstration project implemented with the cooperation
of the Atlanta Children and Youth Services. The two
target areas are Pittsburgh and Northwest (Perry , Homes).
WEST END CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTER
760 Westview Drive, S. W., Atlanta/ 30310
753-9734
·.\ A demonstration full year day care center which employs
\ senior citizens as a majority of :J:ts sta f f. The training
· \of the senior child care workers is under the direction
, 'of Senior Citizen Services of Me tropolitan Atlanta, Inc .
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ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY ATLANTA, INC.
101 Marietta Street, N. W.
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
525-4262
Established 1964
T. M.(Jim) Parham, Executive Administrator
Purpose:
{I
To bring employment, social services, and community organization
to low income areas.
Services: Job counseling, training, placement and follow up; day care;
legal assistance; aid in securirgmedical, psychiatric, housing,
emergency financial assistance and other social services
through the use of existing services and the development of
new ones; community organization; youth development and recreation;
family planning; programs and help for the elderly; assistance
to families with problems of budgeting, nutrition, meal planning
and preparation, child care, hygiene, and housekeeping; assistance
in self-improvement and educationa l programs; prevention of crime
in cooperation with the Atlanta Police Department which assigns
policemeni. to work in the centers; becoming fri ends with the
residents and aiding them with their problems; social casework
by trained staff located in each center; training of neighborhood
residents as aides; special projects and programs utilizing
volunteers.
Area Served:
~etropolitan Atlanta, Fulton, Gwinnett and Rockdale Counti es .
Hours of Service:
Elig ibility:
Fees :
8:30 A.hl. - 5:00 P.M., Monday through Friday.
No r estrictions except tha t applicants be of low income.
None
Application Proc edure : Contac t receptionist at Neighborhood Service
Centers or the ma in Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc., offic e
or the i g ency admi ni steri ng spec i fi c programs.
Auspic e s:
Non-profit c orpora tion.
Sourc e of Funds:
Federal, loc a l.
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PROGRAMS LOCATED IN EOA CENTRAL HEADQUARTERS:
ATLAl'ITA CONCENTRATED EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM (ACEP)
A comprehensive manpower program for the hardcore
unemployed and underemployed in five EOA target
areas: NASH-Washington, Sum-Mee, Pittsburgh,
Price, and West End.
688-1494
HEAD START
fu_l l year
Ten centers provide supervised /day care plus
Head Start enrichment and education for children
of working parents. Sunnner Head Start is an
enrichment program for culturally deprived
pre-school children operated by the Atlanta
School System and five other a8encies. The full
year centers are listed under "Programs Administered
Directly by Economic Opportunity Atlanta."
525-4266
NEIGHBORHOOD YOUTH CORPS (out-of-school)
688-6232
NYC is a job training and employment program for out-of-school,
unemployed youths aged 16 - 21. Counseling and individual
help are offered to each of the enrollees who work in non-profit
organizations throughout the city, Return to school is encouraged.
VOLUNTEERS IN SE~VICE TO AMERICA (VISTA)
525-7813
A domestic Peace Corps of volunteers assisting low-income
neighborhood residents with education, community organization,
recreation, counseling, health, employment and other
specialized programs.
\
VOLUNTEER SERVICES
A p'rogram to enlist vitally needed local volunteers
in 1f ll phases of the war on poverty. Volunteers
are used in ex isting projects and encouraged to
begtn new programs.
..
525-2068
�PROGRAMS ADMINISTERED DIRECTLY BY ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY ATLAl'-lTA
GATE House (Graduate Aid To Employment)
522 West Peachtree, N. W., Atlanta/ 30308
876-4831
A program which provides counseling, job referral, and
other placement services to returning men and women Job
Corps graduates.
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HEAD START
FULL YEAR DAY CARE CENTERS
Antioch North Day Care Center (50 children)
540 Kennedy Street,N. W. / 30318
Telephone ·:
523-4862 Bowen Homes Day Care Center (100 children)
(Gate City Association)
·• ·
1060 Wilkes Circle, N; W. / 30318
Telephone: . 799-1170
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_C9llege Park Civic & Educational Center (35 children)
407 West Harvard Street, College Park, Georgia
30337
Telephone:
766-4456
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East Point Child care center (24 children)
1147 Calhoun Avenue, East Point, Georgia/ 30044
Telephone:
767-4404
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Fort Street Kiddie Korner (104 children)
· s62 Boulevard, N. E. / 30308
Telephone: 876-9279
_,.
Gate City at St. Paul's
(Gate City Association)
1540 . Pryor Road, s. W. /
Telephone: 622-8951
I ,.
(36 children)
30315
Grady Homes Day care Center · (90 children)
(Grady Homes Tenant Association)
100 Bell Street, S. E. / 30303 __ (5;:__;:,-_ -/5 90
T e-&;1·/:_/, ,_(,.. - - - - - . ------ - - -7
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South Side Day care Center (120 children)
802 Pryor Street, S. W. / 30315
Telephone:
577-2640
Tabernacle Ba ptist Church (120 children)
465 Bo u lev ard , N. E. / 30308
Telepho n e: 87 6 -1779
.
Vine city Child Dev elopment Ce n ter
168 Griffin Street, N. W. / 30314
Tel e phone : 525-44 19
(50 children)
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NEIGHBOPJWOD_. SERVICE CENTERS A.L\/D EXTENSIONS
\
Central City Neighborhood Service Center
840 Marietta Street, N.W. / 30318
Telephone:
873-6759
._i.
East Central Neighborhood Service Center
-_ f
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486 Decatur Street, S.E./ 30312
Te1lephone: --. 577-1735

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East Side Community Extension Center
54 7 Hunt Street, S. E. / 30-3-1-2 J 1-'3 C?
Telephone:
872-2445
Edgewood Neighborhood Service Center
1723 Boulevard Drive, S.E./ 30317
Telephone:
378-3643
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Gwinnett County Neighborhood Service Center
148 Clayton Street; Lawrencev ille, Georgia/ 30245
Telephone:
963-1806
NASH:..washington Neighborhood Ser v ice Center
·247 Ashby Street, N.W. / 30314
Telephone:
52 4 -208 4
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N~ SH Ex t ens ion Center (Eag an Ho mes )
~ -- ~ Chestnut Stre et , N.W. / 30314
Te.l ephone:
523-318 6
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Vine City Extension Cen t e r
141 Walnut Street, N . W./ 3031 4
Tel eph o ne:
523-5136
North Fulton Neighborhood Service Center
27 Oak Stre e t, Roswe ll, Georgia/ 30075
Tel ephone:
993-3 795
Northwest (P erry Homes ) Neighborhood Service Center
1927 Hollywood Rocd., N. W. / 30318
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Telepnon e:
799-9322
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· Northwest (Perry -Hornes)
Extension Center
1660 Drew Street, N.W. Apt 758 / 30318
Telephone: 3 S / - d ;7/cJ ·
Pittsburgh Neighborhood Service Center
933½ McDaniel Stre et, S.W. / 30310
Te'. lephone:
523-1577
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Price Neighoorhood Service Center
112? Capitol Ave nue, S. W. / 30315
Telephone:
522-5792
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··Rockdale-Conyers Neighborhood Service Center
· 92~ Commercial Stre et , Conyers, Georgia /. 30207
Telephone: 483-9512
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South Fulton Neighborhood Service Center
2735 East Point Street, East Point, Georgi~( 30344
Telephone: 767-7541
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Sum.m,erhill-Mechanicsville Neighborhood Service Center
65 ,G eorgia Avenue, S.E. / 30315
Teleppor.e:
577-1351
shM-MEC Extension Center
5 t 8 McDani e l Stree t, Apt. 1853/ 30311
Telephone:
52 4-2140
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West Central Neighborhood S e rvi c e Ce nt er
2193 Verbena Street, N.W. / 30314
Telephone:
799-0331
West End Neighbo r hood Servic e Center
727 Lawton Str eet , S.W. / 30310
Telephone:
753 ~6101
West End Extension Center
127 8 Plaza Avenu e , S.W. / 3031 0
Te l ephone :
7 58-8609
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THE ATLANTA LEGAL AID _socn;TY, INC.
--.:·
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Legal Aid provides counsel and ·representation· for the poor as
individuals and · in ·groups, presses for - the change of laws that
work unfairly against ·the impoverished, provides community
education and conducts research into_the legal problems of the
poor.
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Downtown Office
, 153 Pryor Street,
1· P~one:
524-5811
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30303
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Bellwoood Office
717 Marietta Street, N.W. /
Phone:
523-2528
Hunter Street Office
947 Hunter Street, N. w./ 30314
Phone:
525-8841
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\ Northwest Office
.1839-C Hollywood Road, N.
Phone:
799-8336
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30318
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Sum-Mee Office
6~ Georgia Avenue, S.E. /
' ·P hone·
524-7982
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ATLAl'ITA SOUTHSIDE COMPREHENSIVE HEALTH CENTER
1039 Ridge Avenue, S. E., Atlanta/30315
688-1350
The health -center provides complete medical care,
except hospitilization, for low income residents
who live in the Price and Sum-Mee neighborhoods.
Residents are trained for and work in a variety of
i health jobs.
The Fulton County Medical Society is
1\ the delegate agency and the Emory School of Medicine
operates the program.
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EDGEWOOD PARENT AND CHILD CENTER
112 Rogers Street, N. E., Atlanta/ 30317
378-3Y.:35
The PCC is a pilot program in the Edgewood connnunity
which serves children under 3 and their f amilies.
The aim is . to foster the maximum development of
very young children through improved fami l y living
and training in child rearing techniques.
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FOSTER GRANDPk ENTS
Administeref by:
577-2474
Senior Citizen Services of Metropolitan Atlanta, Inc.
120 Marietta Street, N. W., Atlanta / 30303
A program to provide children in instituti ons with adult
affection and comp anionship while also giving older
citizens a chance to be employ ed in a use fu l, personally
satisfying· job .

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�MULTI-SERVICE CENTERS FOR THE AGED .
A program of health maintenance, adult education, recreation,
transportation, counseling, and other services to residents
of ~.e
high rise apartment buildings for the aged
constructed by the Atlanta Housing Authority and for the
i low-income senior citizens who live tn the surrounding
\neighborhoods.
-Jrn-···-'
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Administering Agency:
120 Ma~f~1-ta · Street, N. W. , Atlanta / 30303
577-3828
->
Telephone:
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Senior Citiz e n Serv ices of
.. Metropolitan Atlanta, Inc.
0- - : : - ' - ' - -
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John O Chiles Center
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Address:
435 Ashby Street, S.W.
Telephone: 755-5771
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Palmer House Center
Address:
430 Techwood Drive, N.W.
Telephone: 873-3453
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Antoine Grav es Center
Address :
126 Hillard Street, S.E.
Telepho ne: 577-1793
Martin Luth e r Ki ng Memo r ial Cent e r
530 McD anie l St re e t, S. W.
Add ress:
Tel e phone: 525 - 06 51
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PLANNED PARENTHOOD
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Administering Agency
The Planned Par~nthood
Association of the Atlanta Area
Downtown Clinic
118 Marietta Street, N. W.
Telephone: 523-6996
Monday - Wednesday
Friday

Bethlehem Community Center Clinic
9 .McDonough Boulev ard, S. E.
Telephone: 627-0176
Monday - Thursday
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Central Presby terian Clinic
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' - 201 Washington Street, S. W.
Telephone:
521-1347
Tuesda y
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Ea·s t Poin~ Cl i nic
2735 Ea?t Point Street
Telephone:, 767-7541
Tuesday '
1' :
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Edgewo od Clinic
172 3 Bo slevard Drive , S . E .
Tele pho ne : 378 -3 64 3
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Ge o rgia Avenue Presbyterian Clinic
6 4 5 Gr a nt Street , S. E.
Telephone : 688-0871
Tu esday
John 0 . Chiles Clinic
435 Ashby Street , S. W.
Teleph o n e : 753 - 422 8
Thu rsda y
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M. Agnes J o n es Clinic
104d Wes t Fair Street ,
Te l eph one:
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PI.A.'I\TNEP PARENTHOOD Cont 1 d
Perry Homes Clin~c
· 1660 Drew Drive, N. W. Apt 756
Telephone:
355-8278
Monday - Wednesday
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West End Cl1n1~
435 Ashby Street, S. W.
Telephone:
753~4228
Thursday
Wheat Street Baptist Church
18 Yonge Street, N. E.
Telephone _: 522-3634
Monday

Vine City Clinic
558 Magnolia Street, N. W.
Telephone:
523-8112
Friday
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RODENT CONTROL PROJECT
30 Courtland Street, N. E. , Atlanta/ 30303
525-8275
A demonstration project implemented with the cooperation
of the Atlanta Children and Youth Services. The two
target areas are Pittsburgh and Northwest (Perry Homes).
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WEST END CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTER
760 Westview Drive, S. W., Atlanta/ 30310
753-9734
A demonstration full year day c are center which employs
senior citizens as a majority of its staff. The training
of the senior child care workers is under the direction
of Senior Citizen Services of Metropolitan Atlanta, Inc.
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525-4262
ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY ATLANTA, INC.
101 Marietta Street, N. W.
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Established 1964
T. M.(Jim) Parham, Executive Administrator
Purpose:
To bring employment, social services, and corrnnunity organization
to low income areas.
Services: Job counseling, training, placement and follow up; day care;
legal assistance; aid in securirgmedical, psychiatric, housing,
emergency financial assistance and other social services
through the use of existing services and the development of
new ones; corrnnunity organization; youth development and recreation;
family planning; programs and help for the elderly; assistance
to families with problems of budgeting, nutrition, meal planning
and preparation, child care, hygiene, and housekeeping; assistance
in self-improvement and educational programs; prevention· of crime
~n cooperation with the Atlanta Police Department which assigns
policemenLt o work in the centers; becoming friends with the
r~sidents and aiding them with their problems; social casework
by trained staff located in each center; training of neighborhood
residents as aides; special projects and programs utilizing
volunteers.
Area Served:
Metropolitan Atlant a , Fulton, Gwinnett and Rockdal e Counti es .
Hours of Service:
Eligibility:
Fees:
~:30 A.~. - 5:00 P.M., Monday through Friday.
No r est rictions except that ap plicants be of l ow income .
None
Application Procedu re : Contact receptionist at Neighborhood Serv ice
Centers or the main Economic Op portu nity Atl a nta , Inc., office
or the agency admi ni stering spe ci f ic prog r ams .
Au s pic es :
Non-profit corp ora tion.
Source of FUnds:
Federal, loc al.

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PROGR.Af'B LOCATED IN EOA CENTRAL HEADQUARTERS:
ATLANTA CONCENTRATED EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM (ACEP)
A comprehensive manpower program for the hardcore
unemployed and underemployed in five EOA target
areas: NASH-Washington, Sum-Mee, Pittsburgh,
Price, and West End •
688-1494
HEAD START
full year
Ten centers provide supervised /day care plus
Head Start enrichment and education for children
of working parents. Summer Head Start is an
enrichment program for culturally deprived
pre-school children operated by the Atlanta
School System and five other agencies. The full
year centers are listed under "Pr ograms Administered
Directly by Economic Opportunity Atlanta."
525-4266
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NEIGHBORHOOD YOUTH CORPS (out-of-school)
688-6232
NYC is a job training and employment program for out-of-school,
unemployed youths aged 16 - 21. Counseling and individual
help are offered to each of the enrollees who work in non-profit
orga~izations throughout the city. Return to schoo l is encouraged .
I
VOLUNTEERS IN SERVICE TO AMERICA (VISTA)
525-7813
A domestic Peace Corps of volunteers assisting low-income
neighborhood residents with education, community organization,
recreation, couns e ling, health, employment and other
specialized programs .
VOLUNTEER SERVICES
A program to enlist vitally needed local volunteers
in all phases of the war on poverty. Volunteers
are us ed in existing projects and encouraged to
begin new programs.
525-2068
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PROGRAMS ADMINISTERED DIRECTLY BY ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY ATLANTA
GATE House (Graduate Aid To Employment)
522 West Peachtree, N. W., Atlanta/ 30308
876-4831
A program which provides counseling, job referral, and
other placement services to returning men and wemen Job
Corps graduates.
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HEAD STAR.T. - FULL YEAR DAY CARE CENTERS
Antioch North Day Care Center (50 children)
540 Kennedy Street,N. W. / 30318
Telephone ·: 523-4862 ·
Bowen Homes Day Care Center (100 children)
(Gate City Association)
1060 Wilkes Circle, N~ W. / 30318
Telephone: 799-1170
,
_C9llege Park Civic & Educational Center (35 children)
407 West Harvard Street, College Park, Georgia
30337
Telephone: 766-4 456
East Point Child Care Center (24 children)
1147 Calhoun Av enue, East Point, Georgia/ 30044
Telephone: 767-4404
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Fort Street Kiddie Korne r (104 children )
562 Boulevard, N. E. / 30308
Telephone: 876-9279
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Gate City a t St. Paul's
(Gate City As soc iat ion)
1540 . Pry o r Ro ad , s.
Telephone: 622-8951
w. /
(36 chi ldren)
30315
Grady Homes Day Care Ce nt er · (90 child r e n)
(Grady Homes Tenant Association )
.
100 Bell Street , S . E . / 30 30 3 ___ (5;:_~ - / 2 95=;
Tel~v : l!../H.;.... - - - - - - - - ---------?
South Side Day care Cente r (120 c h ildren )
802 Pryo r Str eet , S. W. / 30315
Te l eph one : 577- 264 0
Tabern acle Baptist Churc? (120 chi l dren )
46 5 Bou levar d , N. E. / 30308
Te l ephone: 876 -17 79
.
Vine City Child Deve l opment Center
168 Grif fi n Street , N. W. / 30314
Telephone : 525-4419
(50 childre n )
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NE~GHBORHOOD .SERVICE CENTERS Al~D EXTENSIONS
\,
Central City Neighborhood Service Center
840 Marietta Street, N.W. / 30318
Telephone: 873-6759
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East Central Neighborhood Service Center
486 Decatur Street~ S.E./ 30312
Telephone: .,_ 577-1735
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East Side Community Extension Center
54 7 Hunt Street, S. E. / 30-3-1-2 ;J /'3 t,?:?
Telephone:
872-2445
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Edgewood Neighborhood Service Center
1~23 Boulevard Drive, S.E./ 30317
Telephone:
378-3643





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Gwinnett County Neighborhood Service Center
148 Clayton Street; Lawrenceville, Georgia/ 30245
Telepnone:
963-1806
NASH~washington Neighborhood Service Center
247 Ashby Street, N.W. / 30314
TelephonE:
524-2084
"79,·
NASH Extension Center(Eagan Home s)
~ Chestnut Street, N.W. / 30_3 14
Telephone :
523-3186
Vine City Ex t e nsion Cente r
141 Waln u t Str e et, N.W. / 3031 4
Teleph o ne:
523-513 6
North Fu lto n Ne i ghb orh o od S e r v ice Cen ter
27 Oak Street , Ro s we ll , Ge o rgia/ 3 0 0 75
Te l epho ne : 9 93 - 379 5
No rth west (Perry Home s ) Ne i ghborh ood Service Cente r
1927 Holly;,vood Ro ad, N. W. / 30318
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Te l eph o ne : 799 - 9322
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· Northwest (Perry -Hornes)
Extension Center
1660 Drew Street, N.W. Apt 758 / 30318
Telephone: 3S/- 6.//LJ ·
Pittsburgh Neighborhood Service Center
933½ McDaniel Street, S.W. / 30310
Telephone: 523-1577
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Price Neighborhood Service Center
112~ Capitol Avenue, S. W. / 30315
Telephone: 522-5792
·· Rockdale-Conyers Neighborhood Service Cent_e r
'92~ Commercial Street, Conyers, Georgia / ~30207
'---""
Telephone: 483-9512
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South Fulton Neighborhood Service Center
-~
2735 East Point Street, East Point, Georgie:( 30344
Telepqone: 767-7541
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Su.rnrn,erhill-Mechanicsville Neighborhood Service Center
65 Georgia Avenue, S.E. / 30315
Teleppo~e : 577-1351
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SUM-MEC Extension Center
508 McDaniel Stree t, Apt. 1853/ 30311
Telephone:
52 4-2140
West Ce ntral Ne ighb orhood Se rvice Cente r
2193 Verbena Street, N.W. / 30314
Telephone: 799-0331
,
West End Ne ighb orhoo d Se r v ic e Ce nt e r
727 La wton St re e t , S.W. / 30310
Telephone: 753~6101
West End Ex t e nsion Cent e r
1278 Pl aza Ave nue , S .W. / 30310
Te l e phone : 7 58-86 0 9
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CONTRACTED
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AND ADHlNiSTERED BY OTHER AGENCIES I N THE COMHUNITY

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· l . , THE· AT4ANTA LEGAL AID SOCIETY, INC.
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Le.g al Aid provides counsel and ·representation· for the poor as
individuals and · in ·groups, presses for the change of laws that
work unfairly against ·the impoverished, provides cormnunity
education and conducts research into__ j;he legal problems of the
poor.
.· ~
Downtown Office
153 Pryor Street, S.W. /
· Phone:
524-5811
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30303
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Bellwoood Office
717 Marietta Street, N.W. /
Phone:
523-2528
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30318
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Hunter Street Office
947 Hunter Street, N. W./ 30314
i Phone: 52 5-884 1


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Northwest Office
. 1839-C Hollywood Road, N. W. /
Phone:
799-8336
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Sum-Mee Office
6~ Georgia Avenue, S.E. /
Phone;
524-7982
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30312
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30318
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ATLANTA SOUTHSIDE COMPREHENSIVE HEALTH CENTER
1039 Ridge Avenue, S. E., Atlanta/30315
688-1350
The health center provides complete medical care,
except hospitilization, for low income residents
who live in the Price and Sum-Mee neighborhoods.
Residents are trained for and work in a variety of· •
health jobs . The Fulton County Medical Society is
the delegate agency and the Emory School of Medicine
operates the program.
EDGEWOOD PARENT AND CHILD CENTER
112 Rogers Street, N. E., Atlanta / 30317
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378-3:05
The PCC is a pilot program in the Edgewood cornrm.inity
which serves children under 3 and their families.
The aim is to foster the max imum development of
very young children through improved family living
and :training in child rearing techniques •
..:...
FOSTER GRANDPARENT·s
Administered by:
577-2474
Senior Citizen Services of Me tropolitan Atlanta, Inc.
120 Marietta Stree t, N. W. , At l anta/ 30303
A program to provide children in institutions with adult
affection and companionship while als o giving older
citi zens a chance to be employed in a us eful , personall y
satisfying job.
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MULTJ-SERVICE CENTERS FOR THE AGED
A program of health maintenance, adult education,. ,recreation,
transportation, counseling, and other services to residents
of ~ --d-17w.. ,. ,. high rise apartment buildings for the aged
constructed by the Atlanta Housing Authority and for the '
low-income senior citizen s who live "in the surrounding
ne~ghborhoods.
Administering Agency:
Telephone:
Senior Citizen Services of
. Metropolit an Atlanta, Inc.
120. Marfit-t-a
577-3828
Street, N. W. , Atlanta / 30303
-'- ------:c·- -- ., .:. ---0
John ·o Chiles Center

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Address:
435 Ashby Street, S.W.
Telephone: 755-5771
Palmer House Center
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Address:
430 Techwood Drive , N.W .
Telephone: 873-3453
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Antoine Graves Center
Addres s :
126 Hillard Street, S.E.
Telephone: 577-1793
Martin Luther King Memori a l Center
Address :
530 McDan i e l Street , S.W.
Telephone: 525-0651

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PLANNED PARENTHOOD
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Administering Agency


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Downtown Clinic
118 Marietta Street, N. W.
Telephone: 523-6996
Monday - Wednesday
Friday
.

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The Planned Parenthood
Association of the Atlanta Area
Bethlehem Community Center Clinic
9 .McDonough Boulevard, S. E.
Telephone: 627-0176
Monday - Thursday
Central Presby terian Clinic
201 Washington Street, S. W.
Telephone: 521-1347
Tuesday
Ea·s t Poin~ Clinic
2735 Ea~f Point Street
Telephone:, 767-7541
Tuesday '
Edgewood Clinic
17.23 Boulevard Driv e, S. E.
Telephone:
378-364 3
Georgia Av enue Pre sby t e ri a n Clinic
645 Grant Street, S. E .
~elepho ne: 68 8 -08 71
Tues day
..\
John 0 . Chiles Clinic ·
435 Ashby St r eet , S . W.
Telephone:
753 -4 2 28
Thu rsday
M. Agnes Jones Cl i nic
1 04 0 West Fair Street,
Telephone : 758-8326
s. w.

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PIA..NNED PARENTHOOD Cont'd
_J
Perry Homes Clinic
· 1660 Drew Drive, N. W. Apt 756
Telephone: 355-8278
Monday - Wednesday
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West End· Clinic.,
435 Ashby Street, S. W.
Telephone: 753~4228
Thursday
Wheat Street Baptist Church
18 Yonge Street, N. E.
Telephone; 522-3634
Monday

Vine City Clinic
558 Magnolia Street, N. W.
Telephone: 523-8112
Friday





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RODENT CONTROL PROJECT
30 Courtland Street, N. E. , Atlanta/ 30303
525-8275
A demonstration project implemented with the cooperation
of the Atlanta Children and Youth Services. The two
target areas are Pittsburgh and Northwest (Perry. Homes).
WEST END CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTER
760 Westview Drive, s. W., Atlanta - / 30310
753-9734
A demonstration full year day care center which employs
senior. citizens as a majority of its staff. The training
of the senior child care workers is under the direction
of Senior Citizen Services of Metropolitan Atlanta, Inc.
t' .
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�May 26, 1969
MEMORANDUM
To: Mayor Ivan Allen., Jr .
From: Dan Sweat
Subj ect: At tached 1 tte:r f r om New Yoi-k Urban Coali tion
on Summer NYC Jobs
1 had · call frorn Wa hington a few days a o sking how many
NYC slots w would like for this summer. W had anticipated
250. I sugg st d that we would be able to efi ctiv l y use 6 75
which w s th £lna1 total we re ched la t summer. Since
that time , we have J' ceiv d word that 675 slot have be n pproved.
The U. S . Dep nm nt of Labor ha be n fair with u in my
opi.nion in givin UI th
slot • I don 't really feel like we should
' ve to hel p £i gh.t New York ' battle. The pl'obl m i t t New
York i in a cl
U by its l! and the numb
of jobs they ne d
tagge~s th imagln tion. You wtll notic they re t lldng bout
upw rd• to 100. 000 Jobs . Th y have ss. 000 approv d~
Unl s you ju.st want to support gene1'al d mand for more slot •
• w ha:v don in th paet. l would recommend no ction ..


ly


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