Box 6, Folder 10, Complete Folder

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Box 6, Folder 10, Complete Folder

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THE ATLANTA
REG I ONAL RAILROADS I NdTHE
RAPID TRANSIT PICTURE
last
Back i n Febr uar y of nia year , I pr e s ented to t he Georg ia Ar chi tects
and Eng i neering Society a concept that I had long been i nteres ted i n,
that pr opos ed to bring tl:J.e r a ilroa ds s e r v i ng At lan t a .so well for the
past cent ur y, back i nto t he p i c t ure of provide ing reg i onal t ·rans it
and commuter s e r v ice, by pr ovi di ng a climate that wo uld r emove t he
ece nomic handi caps t hat had pr ogr e ssive l y forced them out of the f i eld
they are s o eminantly fi t ted to ha ndle---the hauling of large numbers
of peopl e, ecenomica lly, and effi c i e nt l y .
thus
The a ge of t he personal automible provi ded Ce fl e x i ble and enj oyable
means of trans p ortat ion ( r e member this worc!5ig) oyable'). t han t he
s mokey, dirty, off s ched ul e trains of t he pasvV making t he personal
auto yir e f err ed, even for t he long haul . Then the airplane, delivered
the coupe degr ace,t:t,Q:~:-- t he railroads ,-\,.t oday be i ng almost out of t he
passenge r b usiness e nt ire l y .
and
When I talked of us i ng t he railr oad s f or our rapid trans i t I presume
there we r e many who wonder ed why I looked t o t his means of sol vi ng
our rapid transit , delima .
This is brought a bout by severa l f a ctors:
First: The boomi ng us e of the pers onal ca r has beg un to boomerang
and is defeating its own ends . Ther e are not e no ugh h i ghways, exp ressway s t o handle the volume of cars want i ng t o us e them, bri ngru~g
about monume n t a l traffic j a mbs , air polut i on , and parki ng problems , etc
ther e fore t he ave rage commute r is n ow look ing f or a be t ter a nswe r t o
his desire t o live out , ye t not have to pay s o heavily i n pr e cous
time, frustration, and health. He i s asking if possibly there is 1 nt
a bette r way.
t~ the. fa~t t h ~t
e ve r y expre sswa y worthy of the name takes so much of the city a wa y ,
that ecenomically it be comes more a nd more i mposibl e to consid e r.
true
.
Third : I t i s tn most ci t ies , and ce r tinally is/i n Atlanta , that t he
r i ght of way that t he railroad s have a r e very a dva ntageouslylocat ed
to be st serve as r api d transit routes, and serve the vario us s e ctions
of the city, and this without ca using the d isrupt i on or los s of a
s i ngl e bit of t he existing city.
--- _,- - -'2,--e-c-mra-:-"I'he GovBrnmerit isb;ginn-i ng t o - fa ~~- u;
I , thus propos e t hat we look t o the railroads a gain , and see wha t they
offer i f anyt hing.
So:
First, they move masses of people, bet t er than any other means,
and have for a cent uar y. Having done t his, they have much that
it takes, such as t ra i ned pers onell , management abil i ty, eonstr ucti on
ability and equipment , opperati on, and mai ntenance moxy.
Second: The r a ilroa ds started so far back that the cities were
not here, but rather the citi es grew along the railroads. If these
right of ways are now put to this new use vast portions of the
city will not have to be sacrificed to acquireexpressway right of-way, and with stops suitably located, feeder bus lines can
radiate out into the neighborhoods from these stops, over the
existing streets, and not have to be routed~own town as now to
congest the downtuwn streets as is now done. to
Third: The railroads are inter-city, going on, and on beyond the
limited range that M.. .lhR.T .A. could serve. This means that our
outlying cities and towns become satelite cities, and open spaces
become available for NEW CITIES, industrial complexes, and office
parks, and by reaching out to cities like Gainesville, Athens,
Monroe, Covington, Jonesboro, Griffin, Newnan, and Cartersvill~,
it becomes a state responsibility, and the state can legitamly
participate in its funding and contribute services of the
highw y department, and other state agencies . This is needed to
take care of grade separation, provide access roads to the stations, and parking at the stations, and other services and implementation acts. In return the successful opperation of this
leapfrogging opperation will lessen the need for new wxpressways,
thus reducing the expansion needs for expressways .
�Page 2 .
Fo urth: It has been shown that experience in handling trains as
demonstrated over the years by the railroads, is a most valuable
phase of railroading, and the existing, trained personell is a
a most valuable asset that the railroads have to offer.
Fifth: The management and technology of running a transportation
system is incomprehensible to most, but is extremely important and
NECESSARY. The existing trained technical and managerial resivor
that the railroads already have is trully pricel ess . The know how J' -:.,'Yoc
for cons truction,opperation, and upkeep of Facilities is truly
hard to come by. The railroads have it already, ready.
I d-0 not propose, nor do I recomend for a new Metropolitan System to
take over the railroads right of way and install tracks, stations,
rolling stock, etc., and organize and opperate a rapid transitsystem.
I am proposing for the railroads to be· subsedized to the extent that
their facili t ies can be updated, with new or s uppl ement tracK as needed
modern trains or cars, computerized schedul ing and controlls, then under
suitabl e controlls leave the opperation to the railroads own opi:*nation
staff. I further propose that they be guaranteed a satisfactory earning
on the investment, and opperation by an anual supplementary earning
supplement, if rates cannot be set that will show the necessary earning s . This will be required becaused rapid transit will not attract the
patronage if i t is ecenomically unattractive to the user, therefore a
subsidy most likely will be necessary.
I also propos0that the present city transit company opperate the feeder
bus service with the existing and augemented equipment, and that the
city transit and raiload fares be kept as low asnecessary to meet the
competition of the personal vehicle, by subsedizing the earnings i f
necessary.
I propose that the capitol improvements needed be provid ed by Federal
and Metro Bond grants, and by highway aide in the provision of g rade
separations where necessary, and access roads t o the railro~d &tat~ons
and paviug i.;he needed all day parking lots at the stations . .
I suggest that funds to cover these subsedies might be raised in vavious
ways, such as to have the Bureau of Public Roads permit an exit toll to
be charged to leave the expressways between certain s e ctions. This will
serve two purposes. F~rst it is to raise the needed subsidy and bond
revenue funds , and· to also discourage use of the private cars to g et
into the congested down town areas, and in turn encourage use of. the
rapid transit, and city tra nsit. Also for the same reasons, req uire
that a tax be imposed on all parking down town, hopefully believeling
that both revenue that is needed, and that ecenomic deterant to use
of the private vehicle would stimulate use of the transit facilities.
Anothe r gainful development to the rail road opperation of the rapid
trans i t, would be the planned dual airport for Atlanta.
When the .t11wo airports are in opperation, the interchange of passengers
will become a ma j or problem, and to throw this load onto the expressways will be intolerable. Yet that is about all that can be done, as
he licopt e rs and short hop plan.~s are too r isky, a nd i mpract ical. But
i f t her e are r aiload faci lities be tween the se two airpor t s, shut,tle ·
t r a i ns can handle the loads . As of now t her e is a possible r a il
fa cil ity a va iable fo r t he pr e s ent airport, a nd i f t he new a i r port is
l oca t ed s o that a few miles of t r ack from the nearby railroad i s
possible then the railroad is the way to handle it by using s h uttl e
trains f or passengers and baggag e . Eurthermore if t his second a i r port
i s l oca ted nort h or east of At lan ta, a d owntown Central Air Termi nal
can be created , a s t he State now control ls the air rights over the
railroads, r i ght whe r e t he railroad tra ns it cent er would be. This
area could become a lar geparking facility to handle the central terminal
needs, and with a i rpassengers be i ng picked up from the down town
terminal and hauled by train to the embarkation port, a reduction of
the t e rminal f a cilities could be ma de at these points. to the beiliefi~f mf
the public, the air lines and the communities. Also by this set up the
railroads, being regional rapid transit facilities, could thus become
feeders for the air lines from the outlying cities on the lines.
1
It seems that with all this to start with, a definate demand and
effort should be made to endeavour to implement something that has so
much merit.
I
�Page 3.
Howe¥er , the way things are movi ng , this cannot be dallied with.
Critical decisions must be made without any delay.-· Some grantt funds
~re even now avail able, and p ossibly by the end of the wi n ter large
participation by the Federal Government will become available, that
will be eagerly so ught by rival cities, and rival groups right here
in our own city . Much has to be accomplished, as of now the railroads
have no program to participate in this . They must be either sold or
or compelled to participate. Our rival , grandiose MARTA scheme must
· be r eplaced by this or this encorporated int o its picture. The Federal
Government mblst be s old , however it s e ems ·that this will not be too
hard, for much has recently been discussed in Washing ton to give t e
railroads a subsidy break such as the airlines and expresswaw n ow are
recieving .
I have j ust been coaching , I want to have y ou get us a quarterba ck
a nd a t eam of experts who can now take the ball and score. I am not
t ry i ng to creat e a ny j ob or work f or my company . It is out of my
t .e.chnical qualif ications, and I dont care who takes it on if it is
pushed as it should be . If MARTA will take it on and p ush it, fi ne,
or Voreese, or Mingledorf, or some one capable ~ut n ot a lready too
commi ted to be handicapped wi th it.
As I s aid i n the beg i nni ng , I a s ked for t his oppert unity to talk to
yo u ab out thi s, be ca use I need y our hel p, or rather we need y our help.
We have made a lot of contac t s. I have been cores ponding with Mr. Volpe
the Secret a ry of Transportation in Washing ton , and have a lot of
l iter at ure f urnished f rom his office . He wants gra ssroot hel p with
congres s, to get the funds f or the program they are wor king on . I t
need our Congressmen, a nd Seaators support ; It needs our legislat ure
support . · I already have the Govermors hearty s upport . We have the
support of the air l ines f or the Central Terminal idea, and train
for transferring passenger s . We have the iruioesemrnt of the Atlanta
Transit Company . We do not have the backing of M. A.R.T.A., but do
have their strong resistance, for it is undermining their plan, and
·,~
•4tant t; n e:1 ther stoo them. "'r ha:ve them accept this modefication.
You are a very represenative cross section of our comunity, ~ana 11::·
what I have propos e d to you makes s ense, there are those among y ou
who can reach some that need to be met, your help is wanted, and I
beg of you to become real l y involved, with our State, County, and
City g overnments, not just Atlanta, but Decat ur, Marrietta, Hapeville,
College Park East Point, J onesboro, Chamblee, Doraville , etc.
Thank yo so much ~.x f ·o r having heard me thru. Ihope it has hit
home. If there are any questions, I will be happy to try to answer
them.
..
�. -~· ..
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PHONE JA. 2:4453
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F O R M 25-4-S
�Memo
DATE
From GEORGE BERRY
To _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
�MARCH
1969
Serving Architectural, Engineering and Scientific
Interests in the State of Georgia
VOL. XXVII
No. 3
In This Issue :
From the Editor's Desk
Programs for April ------------------------------------- ---President Bagley's Letter --------------------------------- ---personal Shorts ----- -- ----------- - ------- - ----------- ------Georgia Tech Short Courses -------- - ------ - ------------------Formula for Success ----------------------- -- ---------------Ra id Transit Now - Another Look __ __ __ ___ _ __________________
3
5
9
11
19
21
22
Sustaining Members Listing -- ---- -------- -- -- ----------------- 28
�THE GEORGIA ENGINEER
"Serving the Architectural and Engineering Inter ests in the Stat e of Georgia"
[Bl
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Published each month by t he Georgia Architectural & Engineering Society.
Subscription price $3 per year . Advertising rates quoted upon application. Address
all correspondence to the Business Office, Georgia Engineer, 230 Spring Street,
N.W., Atlanta, Ga. 30303. Telephone 525-9046.
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From The Editor s Desk
1
The prog-rams at our weekly luncheon meetings continue to be excellent. Next
month, we'll have some photos of the Science Congress winners as they present t heir
achievements to the Society.
This month we r eport on perhaps the "sleeper" program of the year - t he one
t hat really made a lot of m embers say, "Why couldn't it be done that way ?" There
may be several good r easons why N orman Stambaugh 's plan for a r ailr oad oriented
rapid transit won't work, and we publish his paper so t hose who know will know we
want
ar t hose r easons. That paper begins on page 22.
Keep the last weekend in May open for our Annua l Summer Outing. The Committee is already hard at work, a nd details will be for t hcoming.
Stewart Huey, Editor
(g)
MIAMI

P O Box 1680
CorJI Gabll."S, Florida
QUOTES WE LI KE
"A real friend never gets in your way ...
Unless y ou hapven to be on t he w ay down."
-
THE GEORGIA ENGINEER
2
r
March, 1969
ANON.
3
�TRANSIT NOW-ANOTHER LOOK
by Norman Stambaugh
B
ack in 1952, I became interested and
made some studies to show that t he
railroads had a natural facility to start a
Rapid Transit system for Atlanta, but I
couldn't arouse much interest. The railroad
said they didn't want any part of it, because
of feather bedding and union domination
they couldn't make it pay . . Then our expressway came along and it looked as
though we at last had the answer. But our
first expressway wasn't finished before it
became apparent we had created a noth er
monster that we could not seem to control.
Yes, these expressways move a lot of
vehicles, but at a slower, and slower, and
more exasperating pace. To expand, these
are g utting our cities, and soon there will
be nothing left but expressways and parking
lots, with the people and facilities they
should serve moving away and leaving them
to die if nothing succeeds · in solving the
problem .
It is not hard to see that mass movement
of people, and doing away with much of
the need for movement would do much to
correct this, but mean,s for satisfactory mass
movement and intelligent long range planning is not yet realistic.
Why we are where we are, and as we
are, is important. Some say Atlanta developed from cow paths-but this is not true.
Atlanta did g row from paths or trails that
t h e early inhabitants created and used. It
was the conflux of such trave l as existed
then, and still is the Conflux of todays
t r ave l by rail - auto - truck - air - and foreseeably by water.
Even when railroads were very new, they
reac hed out from the ports and factories
toward a conflux or junction, where East,
South, West and North met, and exchanged
their resources, and so Atlanta grew. Since
it was primative, it g r ew a long these
arteries, and so Atlanta today, and its outlying towns, are largely developed along
the railroads, and this is tremendously important. This is why I am concerned. They
didn't put the railroads thru Atlanta- At22
p RO POSED · R. E.Gl ON AL
-R.A I L R..OA D · R.APID·TRANS IT
TO· SEQVE_- AT LANT A·
lanta developed a long the railroad. Thus
railroads are here now-open, flowing arteries. To use them to their real capacity
is mandatory. Why deface our city when
it is not necessary-let's use what we h ave !
Look at the accompaning map - can
you show us a better place to put our rapid
transit-that is, mass rapid transit?
An a uto is a selfish thing-"! will ride
it a lone, or my family will ride it, thus I
will occupy the highway, and you be
damned. If I want to go slow-I will. If I
want to speed and jump lanes, I will, etc.
etc. We cannot solve our transit needs by
your's or my auto in a metropolitan environment. But if you could conveniently
use your car to get to a place where you
would be able to whisk, in minutes, near to
where you want to go, your car would be a
help. With your car and rapid transit together, a solution to our dilemma is found,
for we will keep the autos off of our downtown streets, leaving surface buses, routed
to radiate out from the transit stops more
speedily and efficiently.
Parking lots could become sites
buildings, factories, and stores. Better
congested city dwelling would not be
essary, but people could move out to
ellite towns instead.
T-28!>
To
I-20
]
for
still,
necsat- .
I now want to become specific. L ook at
the black lines on the map? They are railroad right of w ays ! Note that these railroads do not end at Doraville, College Park,
Decatur, or the Airport as doe;; the MARTA
plan, but they go on to Buford, and Gainesville, Palmetto, or N ewnan, Jonesboro or
Griffin , Decatur or Covington, Emory or
Athens.
This brings me to what I am really
offering, or visualizing. Instead of a very
expensive system, as proposed by MART A,
going throug h already densely developed
sections, I propose that the railroads be developed to handle t h e rapid transit, not just
from Lenox or Decatur, or Hightower Road,
(Continued on Pag e 2 7)
THE GEORGIA ENGINEER
LEGE.ND:
RA IL ROAD~ - - - -......
-Sulli=Acf.B145: - -
Su ~wAy


bP~ c.!>S-
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This sketch illustrates the suggestions made in Norman
Stambaugh's article, " Rapid Transit Now-Another Look."
March, 1969

23

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THE GEORGIA ENGINEER

that the interest on the bonds that would
be required by MARTA would care for the
subsidy. Why should the State pick up this
but from farther out, as expansion needs tab? Because it will help the entire State.
It will mean everything to the satellite
call for.
There are reasons why this is very good. cities. It will also mean that instead of the
State having to build extra expressways,
If no more is provided than MART A has
the rapid transit will reduce the growing
proposed, nothing more than a glut of high
rise apartments will develop, and the chance load on t h e expressways and eliminate some
for home ownership, on a decent plot of land new ones. Of course, something would have
will disappear. If industry is served by to be worked out to provide these funds to
MARTA's proposed transit, residential areas the Highway. Some suggestions are that
must disappear and then the city will be- the Federal Government might make grants
to cover capital costs, such ·as it is doing
come less and less useful.
On the other hand, if rapid transit is . for the Airports and trucking industry.
When the actual interurban rapid tranprovided from the smaller satellite cities,
sit
is taken care of by the railroads, who
then family living in healthful open space
is possibie, where schools, community cen- are most qualified, and with fewer private
ters, and typical American living is possi- vehicles on the street, the present city tranble. Also, along these railroads are the sit system should be revamped to provide
logical industrial sites, and with rapid tran- better routes out from the rapid transit
sit provided from the population centers, stops, and avoid lines converging into the
workers can reach their job without the downtown area as now. The city-transit
should also remain in the hands of its prinerve racking traffic problems now faced
vate
operating company; but to maintain
by all who work in large plants.
low cost transportation it will be necessary
This is but a rough generalization of
for both Rapid Transit, and street transit
what I am proposing·. But, you say, even
to be subsidized. However , low fares alone
"MARTA" planned to make use of the railwill not make the overall transit system
roads, where are you so different?
work-other vital ingredients will be necesSpecifically, I am proposing what has
sary, such as conveniences, speed, parking,
been done in Philadelphia and what is being and access roads must be provided to get to
proposed in the Cincinnati, Dayton area, and the stop. It means that modern electronic
in others recently heard from-that is let safety and schedule control must be prothe railroads, who have the vital right-ofvided.
way, know how, track building equipment,
Best of a ll, this could start taking place
and trained crew handle the development this year if the legislatur e could act, and
and operations of the rapid transit facilithe working arrangements be set up, whereties. But you say, " You just said the rail- as if we wait for MARTA, perhaps Atlanta
roads want no part of it." That was back will be so fouled up that it will not matter
in 1952, and today, if th ey would not have anyhow.
to invest their capital to do this job, but be
I for one want a Rapid Transit, but to
subsidized to the extent that they cou1d
be Region a l, and not MARTA. I was glad
derive reasonable income on their investthe Governor scotched the MART A plan. I
ment, they would.
have reason to believe he will go for this
This is the crux. I propose that the State Regional Plan. The State can participate
- possibly through the Highway Departon a regional plan, but would find it hard
ment - subsidize the capital improvements
to go a long on MARTA.
n eeded and g uarantee the annual reasonable
I hope I have been able to start someincome for this. It is believed by some that thing-that more able politicians, and enthis would be far cheaper than to acquire
gineers take this up and put it over. It is
the right-of-way, equipment, a nd operation
what we need . It will do the trick and can
of the proposed project that MARTA
be done decades before anythin g· else could.
planned. In fact, it is consider ed possible

Another Look at
Rapid Transit- Con't.

March, 1969

�THE

INTERIM
OF THE

S TU DY COMMISSION

METROPOLITAN

ATLANTA

RAPID

TRANSIT

AUTHORITY

GLEHH BLDG. , ATLANTA , GA .

30303

January 11, 1966

Hon. Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Ivan:
You will recall that at the organization meeting
of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority
the Chairman, Mr. Rich, stated that he was appointing a Finance Committee to meet with financial advisors of each of the participating governments.
I would be grateful if you would send me the name of
the official whom you are appointing to this position.
Yours very sincerely,

GEB:rc

cc:

Glenn E. Bennett
· Secretary

Mr . Richard H. Rich
Chairman

7
'

�METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
BUDGET REPORT
JULY 31, 1967

BUDGET
196 7
Una ppro pri ated Sur plus

ACTUAL
J ANUARY 1, 1967
TO
JULY 3 1 , 196 7

$128 ,2 81.64

$ 128,2 81.64

Appr opriations:
City of At l anta
Clayton Co un ty
DeKalb Coun t y
Fulton County
Gwinnett County
Sub-Tota ls

$ 84,030 . 00
23 ,1 90 . 00
82 ,77 0 . 00
91,800 . 00
18,210 . 00
.§..300, 000 . 00

$ 63,022. 50
17,392.50
41,385.00
68,850.00
9,105 . 00
$1 99,755.00

Int erest Income

$

INCOME

5,520 . 00

$

2,7 92 .27

Federal Funds:
702 Loan
Section 9 Grant
Interest - Federal Funds
Sub-Totals

_$,371, 000. 00

$ 60,000 . 00
67,6 86. 12
597.46
$128,2 83 . 58

TOTAL INCOME

$6 76, 520.00

$33 0 , 830.85

TOTAL INCOME AND UNAPPROPRIATED SURPLUS

$804,801.64

$45 9,112 . 49

$ 95,000 . 00
276,000 . 00
0

EXPENSES
Staff Cost:
Sala ries
Expenses
Benefits :
Socia 1 Sec- r ity
Gua ranty Fund
Health and Accident Insurance
Retirement
Workmen's Compensation
Sub -To tals

$ 68, 950 . 00
10,500.00

$ 35,~20.51
6,361.63

1,109.00
533 . 00
1,6-8 0, 00
10,000 . 00
99 . 00
$ 92,871.0 0

1 ,002 .7 5
400.00
640 , 67
300 . 54
104.00
$ 44,23 0 . 10

Board Meetings

$

3,150.00

$ 1, 900 . 00

$

3,000 .00
2,000 . 00
2,0 00 . 00
3,600.00
1 ,000 .00
250 . 00
1,000.00
33,000.00
5,000 . 00

Administrat i ve and ffice Overhead :
Rent
Communicati ons and Postage
Furniture and Equipment
Supplies
Printing
Auditor
Accountant
Public Information
Advisory
Insurance :
Public Liability
Depository and Forgery
Fidelity Bond
Sub - Totals

72.00
56 . 00
199.00
51,177.00
$

55.00
56 . 27
__
_l28.60
.§. 20,273.86

CARRI.ED FORWARD

-~147, 198. 00

$ 66,403.96

$

1, 750 . 00
1,101.21
411 . 97
1,214 .7 8
623 . 56
250.00
250.00
13,385.12
977. 35

�METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
BUDGET REPORT
JULY 31, 1967

BUDGET
1967
TOTAL I NCOME AND UNAPPROPRIATED
SURPLUS BROUGHT FORWARD

ACTUAL
JANUARY 1, 1967
TO
JULY 31, 196 7

$804,801.64

$459,112.49

Brought Forward

$147,198 . 00

$ 66,403.96

Counse l
Consultant s:
Atlanta Region Metropolitan
Planning Commission
Urban Design Study:
Secti on 9
Match i ng _
Atlanta Transit Study :
Section 9
Matching
Parsons-B rinckerhoff - Tudor - Be cktel:
702 Loan
Section 9 :
Federal
Matching
Retainer Agreement
Research and Technica l Servic es
Sub-Totals

$ 20,000.00

$

$ 31,250 . 00

$ 29,939.00

32,667 . 00
16 ,3 33.00

8,000.00
9,800.00

3 , 333.00
1,667.00
95 ,0 00.00

0
1,000 . 00
60,000.00

240,000.00
12 0,000 . 00
60,000.00
2,000.00
$602,250.00

60,000 . 00
100,000 . 00
21,8 59 . 05
1,595 . 84
$292,193 . 89

TOTAL EXPENSES

$769,448.00

$366,356 . 46

SURPLUS

s 3~, 353. Q~

s

EXPENSES

7,758 . 61

22 ,Z56, Q3

�•
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
ATLANTA, GEORGIA
STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL CONDITION
JULY

3 1 , 196 7

ASSETS
Cash in Banks:
C & S Nationa l Bank
First National Bank - Payroll
Trust Company of Georgia
Fulton National Bank - Section

$ 10,729.07
2,332.07
1,000.00
90,283.58

9

Deposit In Transit (DeKalb County
Appr o priation)
Investments :
U. S . Treasury Bills
U. S. Treasury Bills - Sec tion

20,692 . 50
130 , 585.50
0

9

Pett y Cash

25. 00

Accounts Receivab le :
Gwinnett County - 1967
Gwinnett Count y - 1966

$9,105.00
4,552.50

13,657 .5 0

TOTAL ASSETS

$269,305.22
LIABILITIES

Account s Payable

$ 91,857 .45

Payroll Taxes Withhe ld and Accrued
Reser ve s :
ARMPC :
Ur ban Design Study
Atlanta Transit Study
Parsons - Brinc kerhoff - Tudor - Bechte l :
Sect i on 9 Matching
Retainer Agreement :
Transpor tati on Study
Publ ic Information
Surverying
TOTAL LIABILITIES
SURPLUS

1,166 . 97

5 , 800.00
1,000 . 00
70,000 . 00
$

207. 70
696 . 30
5 ,820 . 77

6,724.77
176,549 .19

$ 92,756.03

...

�/

SUMMARY OF MARTA REVIEW OF "RAPID BUSWAYS 11 PROPOSAL.

As requested by Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. on June 28, 1967,
MARTA and its staff and consultants have reviewed the proposal made
by the Atlanta Transit System for 11 RAPID BUSWAYS" in Atlanta.
The proposal was given serious and objective consideration
and study over a period of approximately five weeks. Contact was
made with Atlanta Transit System personnel and additional material
was obtained from them.
MARTA reports three basic findings:
1.

The costs to develop the busways were seriously underestimated. MARTA estimates that the costs would be
three to four times the amount noted in the proposal.

2.

Time schedules also were seriously underestimated. No
busway could be made operational in less than 3½ years,
the same time required for the East Line of rapid transit.
The interim between completion of busways and completion
of rail rapid transit would range from a minimum of one
year to a maximum of three years.

3.

The amount of busways coinciding with MARTA routes is
no more than 50 percent, and quite likely would be no
more than one third and require considerable expenditures which would never be recovered by MARTA.

MARTA makes two recommendations :
1.

Because of the high cost for very short term relief , _ implementati on of the "Rapid Busways 11 proposal should not
be attempted .

2.

If the public interest demands an e x perimental development of buswa y s , it is recommended that any expe r i mental
busway be bui l t f i r st along MARTA ' s Ea s t - We s t Li n e .

The attac hed r eport p r ovides deta il s f o r the above find ing s and
recomme ndat i o ns .,

- 1 -

�CLOSING SUMMARY

Based on MARTA's study and review of the " Rapid Busways" proposal , MARTA concludes that the implementation of the busways proposal
as it now stands is not practicable e
--The time required to complete a specific busways and rapid
transit line (except where subway is concerned) is virtually
the same. The " interim" between operational busways and
operational rapid transit would be almos~ entirely consumed
by the laying of tracks for rapid transit .
--The total cost of busways is not $52 million as described in
the proposal , but , according to MARTA engineers, more like
$150 million.
--While $150 million is indeed much less than the cost of rapid
transit , busways so constructed would not do the job of
relieving traffic as will be required for a permanent longrange solution for a city of 2 million people.
- -Although there is a great differential in costs , it would be
much more wasteful to spend $150 million for an inadequate
interim system than to spend $350 million for permanent and
eff i cient relief .
MARTA ther efore :
1.

Di sappr o v es of busways as a permanent solution and
r ecommen ds against its i mplementation as an interim
mea s u r e ;

2.

Co n c l udes that the e x per imental route p r oposed b y the
At l anta Tr a p s i t System as an interim soluti on would be a
wa s te of p ub li c money ;

3.

Recommend s that i f i t i s deemed nece ssa ry by t he Atlan ta
c ity o ffici a ls to dev elop a n e x perimenta l s e ction , t h at
the e xperime n ta l s ection s houl d ut ilize MARTA ' s Ea s t - We s t
Line s, a nd u se them e x c l u sive l y and n ot att emp t to u se
rights o f wa y wh ich wi l l n e v e r b e o f any v alu e t o MARTA .

-END-

�@,Jlfl@~@,Il£.
CITY COMMISSIONER J. STEVE KNIGHT,
COLUMBUS

~&~Il©Il~£IL:,

MAYOR MALCOLM
SAVANNAH

R.

MACLEAN,

MAYOR JOHN L. CnoMARTm,
GAINESVll.LE

W.

406

FULTON

FEDERAL BUILDING• /

ATLANTA . GEORGIA 30303

ELMER GEORGE ,

/

President

First Vice President

Second Vice President

Executive Director

TELEPHONE 255 -0424

June 27, 1966

ACTIVE PAST
PRESIDENTS
CITY COMMI SS IONER JOHN E. YARBROUGH
IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT
ROME, G A.

MAYOR RANDOLPH MEDLOC K
STONE MOUNTAIN , GA .

MAYOR W . B . WITHERS
MOULTRIE , GA .

Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia

CIT Y COMMISSIONER CARL E. PRUEnGRIFFIN, GA .

MA YO R B . F . MERRITT. JR .
MACON, GA.

FIRST

DISTRICT

PRESIDENT

MAYOR JAC K A . LERO Y

Dear Mayor Allen:

AILEY
DIRECTOR

MA YOR J . W . S N ELL
WRIGHTSVILLE

SECOND

Since you have more than casual interest in rapid
transit, I thought you would like to have copy o f
the minutes of the meeting of the Ge.orgia Highway
Users Conference recently held in Atlanta.

DISTRICT

PRESIDENT'
MAYOR W . P. HENRY
PELHAM

DIRECTOR
COUNCILMAN J. C . MINTER
CAIRO

THIRD

DISTRICT

We are a little bit unusual in that the Georgia
Municipal Association is possibly the only state
municipal group belonging to the state or national
Highway Users Conference. The Association of Count y
Commissioners used to dominate this group , however ,
we have as much influence with the membership as
the county folks do.

PRESI DEN T

RI C H A RD B . R AY

PERRY
DIRECTOR

M AYOR 0 . E . WHIT E
PINE MOUNTA IN

FOURTH

DISTRICT

PRES IDEN T

C OUNCILMAN LINTON BROOME
DORAVILLE
DIRECTOR
C OU NCILMA N CL YDE

J .

HI CKS

CONYERS
FIFTH

Please l e t us know whenever we may be of service.

DISTRICT

PRESIDENT
MAYOR AUBREY E . GREENWAY

ROS W ELL
DI RE CTO R
ALDER MAN E . GREGORY GRIGGS
A TLANTA

SIXTH

~ly,

DISTRICT

PRESIDENT

MA Y OR J . GA RD N E R NEWMAN
LAGRANGE

W. Elme r George
Executive Di rector

DIRECTOR

MA Y OR HERBERT H . JONES

Mc DONOUGH
SEVENTH

DISTRICT

WEG/rs

PRESI DEN T

M AY OR J . C . WOODS
TRION

encl o sure

DIREC T OR
MAY OR R A LPH R . CLARK , JR .
RINGGOLD

EIGHT H

cc :

DISTRICT

PRESIDE N T
MA Y OR ELTON
DOUGL AS

0 .

GMA Board of Directors

BROO K S

D I R EC TOR

MAYO R J AME S T . W I ND S O R . JR .
Mc R AE

NI N TH

DI S T R ICT

PR E S I DEN T

MAYOR 0U AR D B . WHITLO W
CARNE S V ILLE
DIRECTOR

MAYOR M RS . J E S S I E

L.

G A RNER

DAHLONEGA

TENTH

DI S T R ICT

PRES I DENT

MAYOR JULIUS F . B ISH OP
ATHENS
DIRECTOR

GEORGE A. S ANCK EN , JR .
AUGUSTA

D I RECTOR S
STA TE

COUNCILM A N GEORGE H . BULLOCK
ATH E NS

ALDERM A N J . J . S H OOS
S AV ANN AH

MA Y OR WILLI A M J A C K HAMILTON

A LD ERM AN C E CIL T UR N ER
A TL ANTA

DE C AT U R

A1' L A R G E
M AY OR JOHN C . E D EN F IELD
T HOMA S T ON

M AYO R L EE E . C AR T ER
HARTWELL

CITY M A N A GER JOHN H . MAR K LAN D
P RE S ID EN T . C I T Y M AN AGER S " SEC TION
D ECA TU R

AD M I N . AS S I S T . R . TR A VIS HI G G I NB O T H AM
PRESIDENT. CITY C L E R K S ' SECTI O N
AW B ANY
C ITY ATTORNEY W ILL I AM E . S MITH
PR E S I DENT , C IT Y ATT O RNEYS' SECTION
AMERIC U S

�HUC-6-66
MINUTES OF MEETING
GEORGIA HIGHWAY USERS CONFERENCE
MARRIOTT MOTOR HOTEL, ATLANTA, GEORGIA
June 8, 1966

r bhose present were:

o. C. Hubert, Chairman
William Dal ton, Vice Chairman
Charles Skinner, Vice Chairman
Stephen Styron, Vice Chairman
Harold Budreau
A. R. Brickler
W. B. Bryan
Charles Clynick
Tom Duncan
George L. Evoy
Harry Fox
Elmer George
Billy George
Ed McGill
James Golden
Otis Hathcock
Jack Houston
George H. Jones
Iverson H. Lord, Jr.
Tom Patton
Walter Phillips, Jr.
I:I. Eston Reagan
M. F. Smith
Andy Springer
H. c. Thompson
W. M. (Bil l) Williams

Georgia Motor Club (AAA)
Georgia Rural Letter Carriers Assn.
Georgia Motor Trucking Assn.
Georgia Hotel-Mot~l Assn.
Turner Advertising Company
Portland Cement Assn.
Southern Bell Telo & Tel. Co.
Automobile Manufacturers Assn., Detroit
Atlanta Journal
Georgia Motor Club (AAA)
Georgia Branch, Asso. General Contractors
Georgia Municipal Assn.
Visitor (son of member)
Georgia Mobile Homes Assn. and Georgia
Oilmen's Assn.
Ford Motor Company
Travelers Protective Assn.
Georgia Assn. of Petroleum Retailers
Georgia Tire Dealers Assn.
National Highway Users Conference
Georgia Oilmen's Assn.
Georgia Automobile Dealers Assn.
Atlanta Automobile Assn.
Tr avelers Protective Assno
Atlanta Traffic & Safety Council
Georgia Assn. of Petroleum Retailer s
State Representative, Hall County

Introductions :
The meeting was called to or der by Chairman Hubert, who i nt r oduced Iver son
Lord, Regional Repr esentative of the National Highway Users Conference .
Eleventh Highway Transportation Congress :
Reports of committee re commendat i ons during t he Elevent h Highway Transport ation Congress in Washington, D. c., held in April, were made by members who attended.
Rapid Transit:
Charles Skinner, Chairman of the Legislative Committee, explained a resolupassed by the last Georgia General Assembly that proposed a constitutional amendment to allow the state to help finance rapid transit. The proposed amendment,
to be voted upon in the next general election, declares public transportation of
passengers for hire to be an essential governmental function. It limits the ·
state's participation to not more than 10% of the total cost. The resolution, as
written, does not threaten gasoline tax funds, which by constitutional amendment
must be used for highway purposes.

�I ~-

HUC-6-66-2
FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS
Governor' s Safety Commit t ee I s Tes t imony.~
State Representativ-e W. M Bi ll) Williams ., Chairman of the Governor's Commit tee on Traffic Safety, repcr ·~ed en his commit tee's -t",estimony before a u. s.
House Committee hearing on proposzd federal automobile safet.y legislation.
0

(

The committee hearing was told, Williams said, that a federal agency to lead
the way for traffic safe t y is necessary for unifo~mity . How2ver, Williams added,
Georgians do not want fo dGral con-::.rol; just federal l e adership. The federal
legislators, Williams reported, were told that a cill submitted by Georgia Congressman James Mackay is superior to the administration measure. Williams added, however, that there are portions of the President's bill that the C~orgia
panel agrees with.
Industry's Position on Safety Bills:
James Golden of Ford Motor Company, in Atlanta, predicted that compromise
legislation would come out of u. s. Congressional proceedings on federal safety
standards for automobiles allowing the states to participate in setting the
standards. Golden said industry wants the states to utilize their know-how in
the field of safety when standards are set and that federal authorities should
supervise.
Golden predicted, however, that t he Vehicle Equipment Safety Corrnnis s ion,
which a lready has been setting standards, will not be utilized by t he fede r al
gover nment.
It is wrong to conclude that the s tates have done nothing in the field of
auto safety, Golden said. Then he enmnerated many safety features now on automobiles tha t came about through states actions.
It is also wrong to conclude that the industry has done nothing, Golden .
said . Ther e would be many more deaths on the highways if industr y had not been
attacking t he problem, he said.
Other bus ine s s :
Chairman Hube r t de clar ed that constr uction of per imeter r oads would be a
good alternati ve to r apid t rans it . They would keep thr ough traffic off downtown
s tretches, he s aid, and all ow l ocal t raffi c to f l ow mor e smoothly. He urged the
conference t o cons ider three points f or f uture programs . They are (1) f i nish
perimeter roads, ( 2) start pl anning mor e oute r perime te r r oads, and ( 3) plan f or
additi onal traffic now on freeways, including overbuilding in downtown areas and
extra lanes for other portions.
The Atlanta Automobile Association was approved for membership by the Conference.

�METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORI TY
GLENN BUILDING • A TL ANT A , GEOR GI A 30303
OFFICERS :

April 18, 1966

Richard H. Rich,Chairman
Roy A. Blount, Vice Chairman
Glenn E. Bennett, Secretary

MEMO TO :

Members of MARTA
Heads of Governments in MARTA
Members of ARMPC

FROM :

Glenn E. Bennett, Secretary, MARTA

SUBJECT :

Report on Transit Authority Progress

The Washington meeting was reported to y ou a week or so ago .
Since then progress has been made in implementing agreements
with the Department of Housing and Urban Development.
1.

The 702 loan application has been revised to cover
$125,000 worth of engineering.
This will be used for
a lump sum contract between the Authority and Pa rsons ,
Brinck erhof f - Tudor-B e chtel, to provide preliminary
engineering data· on th e 1962 "Initial Sy stem" of 21
mil e s of rapid transit, roughl y b e tween Oglethorpe and
Hapeville . Th is includes studies of e x isting c onditions , preliminary designs , methods of construction ,
soil conditions , mapping , e quipment t ype , t y pical
structure , and preliminary e ngine e ring of rout e s and
st a tions . Estimated time : J ul y 1 , 196 6 to J u ne 30 , 196 7 .

2.

A 701 planning study h a s b e en outlined a nd p r ese nted to
HUD , a mounting to about $1 8 7 , 500 . Th is invol ve s ab ou t
$ 1 25 , 000 in gr ants fr om HUD and ab ou t $62,5 00 in
Autho r ity ma t chi ng f und s . A lump s um c o n t rac t fo r
about $100 , 0 0 0 wi ll be ma d e by ARMPC with Pa r son s Brinckerh o f f - Tudo r- Bech t e l fo r u p d a ting t h e entire
1962 r a p i d tran si t p l ans, devel oping new patr o nage and
revenu e es t imate s , opera t i ng c o sts , and for preparing a
comprehe n sive report on the entire project .
I t will

�Memo to MARTA

-

April 18, 1966

2 -

include consideration of new and proposed development
in all parts of t h e area as it relates to transit.
A lump sum contract for about $ 50 , 000 will be made between ARMPC and Hammer , Greene & Siler Associates for
economic and financial studies. Th is will include determination of all feasible methods of financing the
system in stages , equitable formulas for cost-sharing
among participating governments , proper allocations of
capital costs, projections of tax digests, and the
preparation of a comprehensive financial plan with appropriate reports.
About $37, 000 will be for admi nistration, staff planners , audit , travel , and ARMPC overhead chargeable to
the transit project.
Th is is an eleven-month pro j ect , probably beginning in
J une, 1966.
3.

Th e Authority wi l l make a cost - plus contract with
Parsons , Brinckerhoff - Tudor- Becht el to cover other
continuing engineering services required ov er and
above the two federall y- assisted programs. The amount
of work to be done u nder this contract within about a
year from J ly 1 , 1966 , is estimated at $1 00 , 000 , although the extent of work required cannot be determined
e xa ctly .

The financial position of t h e Authority at present is a s
follows ~
Local p ledged money for 1966 ~

$ 91 08 00

Fu lton Cou nty
Atlanta
DeKa l b County
Clayton County
Gwinnett County
Amount e xp ected from

$ 3 0 , 000

30
8 2 , 77
23 , 190
18 , 210

84 ,

u.

S . Go v ernment

_e.0 , 000
$ 550 , 000

�Memo to MARTA

-

April 18, 1966

3 -

Actual amounts received as of April 15 :
City of Atlanta
DeKalb County

$ 21 , 007.50
20,692.50
$ 41,700.00

Total
Amount disbursed for expenses to date

21,084.46
$ 20 , 615.54

On Hand

Amount now due from local governments ~
City of Atlanta
Clayton County
DeKalb county
Fulton County
· Gwinnett County

$ 21,007.50
11 , 595.00
20,692.50
45,900.00
9,105.00
$108,300.00

Summary of requirements for the $ 3 00, 000 local government funds :
Disbursements to date for expenses of
Study Commission
Matching funds for 701 planning project

$ 21 , 084.46
62,S0Q.00

Non-federal engineering contract

1 00,000.00

Authority staff , office o verhead ,
equipment, and items not chargeable
to federal projects

116 , 415.54

Total

$ 300 , 000.00

On April 14 , the Ch airman , Mr. Rich , and the Vice Chairman , Mr .
Blount , reviewed the program with the Secretary, Mr . Bennett ,
the Legal Counsel , Mr . Etheridge , and representative s of the
two consult i ng firms ~ Mr. W. O. Salter of Pa rs ons , Brinckerh off ,
Quade and Douglas ; and Mr . Alan Welty of Hammer and Company.

�Memo to MARTA

-

4 -

April 18, 1966

Meetings have been held with the appropriate federal officials
of HUD.
The Chairman has sent letters to the participating governments
requesting quarterly payments due on the 1966 pledges.
It has been decided to call a meeting of the Authority for the
first week of May.
I would like to try May 3rd at 4:00 P. M.
in the Glenn Building 6th floor conference room. Will MARTA
members please let my office know if this is acceptable?
For your information, I have been asked by Senator Harrison
Williams (N. J.) to testify April 28 before the Senate Housing
Sub-Committee relative to proposed new mass transit legislation.

�CHARLES LONGSTREET WELTNER

COMMITTEES :

FIFTH DISTRICT, GEORGIA

BANKING ANO CURRENCY
UNAMERICAN ACTIVITIES
SMALL BUSINESS

W ASHINGTON OFFI CE:
1724 LONGWORTH BUILDING

TELEPHONE, 225-380 I

~ongrtss of tbc Wnittb ~tatts

327 OLD POST OFFICE

11'ouse of ~epresentatibes

ATLANTA 30303
TELEPHONE, 523-5041

DISTRICT OFFICE:

mtasbington, 1».~. 20515
August 19, 1966

Dear Friend:
Knowing of your interest in the paramount problem of
urban development, I am writing to you about a major issue in
this field. The question of mass transit is one which plagues
all cities, especially Atlanta.
My concern with urban transportation has involved me
with legislation since my arrival in Congress. In 1964, after
months of work, my committee on Banking and Currency reported
out and pressed ior passage of the first major rapid transit
bill in this country. The act passed the Congress: and I am
pleased to report that under it, Atlanta has received almost
$300,000 in Federal Aid.
Atlanta demands a rapid transit system to unify a growing
city. The metropolitan center must grow··into a cohesive unit
with -organized means of transportation.
Currently, the Congress is considering the Urban Mass
Transportation Act of 1966. The bill was reported out of my
committee and passed the House on August 16th.
The bill included an amendment which I offered for grants
for technical study. Under this section of the bill, grants
are made available to states and local public bodies and agencies:
for planning, engineering, and designing of urban mass transportation projects. Studies pertaining to feasibility of- projects,
preparation of ~urveys and engineering specifications, and
other pre-construction activities fall under this section. The
version of the bill which passed the House kept my amendment
intact.
I am pleased with the progress which has been made in
this area and shall continue to do all that I can to promote
the advancement of interest and action in the field of rapid

�August 19, 1966
Page Two
transit.
If you have any questions or comments in this area,
please do not hesitate to call on me.
With best wishes,
Sincerely,

~-....

,-1\M'-,_,,

~---f~

Charles Longstreet Weltner
Member of Congress

�E

OPOU :A ~ Al l

&JA RAPID "; RA NSil"

UT 0 . TY

GLENN BU ILDING/ A TLA N TA , G EO RGIA 30303 / AREA CODE 4 0 4 52 4 -5711
OFFICERS:
Richard H . Rich, Chairman
Roy A. Blount, Vice Chairman
Edmund W. Hughes, Secretory

August 4, 1969

Henry L. Stuart, Gen e ral Manager

Mr. Charles L. Davis
Director of Finance
City of Atlanta
501 City Hall
Atlanta, Ga. 30303
Dear Mr. Davis:
We appreciate very much receipt of the City of
Atlanta's· check No. 77'J,.5 dated July 30, 1969 in the amount
o f ~12,520 . 50 covering the City's appropriation to the
oper a t i ng budge t o f the Transit Authority f or the thi rd
q uarter of 1969.
With kindest reg ards.
Sincerel y yours ,

HLS:JJ

cc:

~

~ r I van Allen , J r .
Mr. rvii l t on G. Far r is
Mr. John c. Wilson
Mro Rawson Hav erty
Mr. L . D . Mi l t o n

H. L . Stu art,
General Manager.

�MINUTES OF THE EIGHTEENTH MEETING OF THE
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
AUGUST 1, 1967

The Board of Directors of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit
Authority held its regular meeting on August 1, 1967, at 3:00 P.M.
in the Glenn Building Conference Room, Atlanta. Mr. Richard H.
Rich, ·chairman, presided.
MEMBERS PRESENT:
Robert F. Adamson (City of Atlanta)
Sanford Atwood (DeKalb County)
M. C. Bishop (Fulton County)
Edgar Blalock (Clayton County)
Roy A. Blount (DeKalb County)
Rawson Haverty (City of Atlanta)
K. A. McMillon (Gwinnett County)
Richard H. Rich (City of Atlanta)
MEMBERS ABSENT:
L . D. Milton (City of Atlanta)
OTHERS PRESENT:
Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority
H. L . Stuart, General Manager
Glenn E . Bennett~ Secretary
King Elliott , Public Information Director
Earl Nelson, Chief Engineer
H. N. Johnson , Secretary to General Manager
Joan Eschenbrenner, Secretary
MARTA Advisory Committee
H. Bo y er Marx, American Society of Landscape Ar chite c t s
Ro y J . Boston, P . E ., Georgia Society of Pr ofessiona l
Engineers

�Consultants
W. 0. Salter, Parsons, Brinckerhoff-Tudor, Bechtel, San
Francisco
J. A. Coil, Resident Manager, Parsons, Brinckerhoff-Tudor,
Bechtel, Atlanta
Raymond O'Neil, Deputy Resident Manager, Parsons, Brinckerhoff-Tudor, Bechtel, Atlanta
R. W. Gustafson, Supervising Engineer, Parsons, BrinckerhoffTudor, Bechtel, Atlanta
Robert P. Barksdale, Project Estimator, Parsons, BrinckerhoffTudor, Bechtel, Atlanta
David McBrayer, Traffic Engineer, Parsons, Brinckerhoff. Tudor, Bechtel, Atlanta
Louis Dismukes, Eric Hill Associates, Atlanta
C. B. Cleveland, Eric Hill Associates, Atlanta
Arden Brey, Eric Hill Associates, Atlanta
W. Stell Huie, Huie & Harland, Atlanta
Torn Watson Brown, Huie & Harland, Atlanta
Others
Joseph Errigo, Urban and Community Development Assistant,
Department of Housing and Urban Development, Atlanta
P.A. Springer, Atlanta Traffic and Safety Council
Rober t W. Roseveare, Traffic Engineer, DeKalb County
J. B. Cooley, Planning and Research Engineer, Bureau of
Public Roads
Norman J. Van Ness, Bureau of Public Roads
George B. Pilkington, Bureau of Public Roads
Gerald L. Smith, Bureau of Public Roads
Joseph E. Lay, Robinson-Humphrey Company, Atlanta
William M. G. Fletcher, White, Weld & Co., New York
Dick Hebert, Atlanta Constitution
David Nordan, Atlanta Journal
Art Schultz, WSB Radio
Ken Goodnight, WSB-TV
Abe Gallman, WSB-TV
Harve y Kramer, I n tern, Fulton County Comptroller's Office
Al Barr, Intern, Fulton County Comptroller ' s Office
Bill Hayes, Intern, Fulton County Comptroller's Office
J . D. Wingfield, Jr . , Jerry A. Coursey, Mrs . Margaret C .
Breland, Miss Claudette Parrish , Tim Urban , Atlanta
Region Metropolitan Planning Commission

-

2 -

�•

The meeting was called to order by the Chairman.
Minutes
Upon motion by Mr. Bishop, seconded by Mr. Blount, the reading
of the minutes of the July meeting was dispensed with and they
were unanimously approved.
Financial Report
The Gene ral Manager presented the financial report as of July 31,
1967, which is attached hereto and made a part of these minutes.
DeKalb County had sent in its second quarterly payment; Gwinnett
County was the only one in arrears.
Progress Reports
General Manager
Mr. Stuart reported on the two-week managerial seminar he attended
at Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, sponsored by Kent University
and the Department of Housing and Urban Development.
The General Manager said Los Angeles, Seattle and Washington, D.C.,
were to have referenda during 1968 with regard to rapid transit.
He pointed out that insufficiency of federal funds may be less
important than the competition from these cities. Mr. Rich mentioned the importance of taking steps to hold a referendum in 1968.
Mr. Stuart reported on meetings with Cousins Properties regarding
MARTA's requirements. Cousins Properties were about to incur certain construction expenses in the Air Rights area in their efforts
to provide for future rapid transit operations; these were costs
that could be charged to MARTA under appropriate agreements. Mr.
Stuart requested the Hoard's approval to continue negotiations
with Cousins. Costs involved had not been determined; however,
Mr. Stuart es timated th em t o be between $70,000 and $90,000 . The
Chief Engineer was to mee t with repre sentatives from Cousins Properties and reach agreement as to exact costs which would be eventually chargeable to MARTA, when funds were availab le. MARTA
would be responsible for accrued interest as well.
It was moved
by Mr. Bishop and seconded by Mr. Haverty that the General Manager
continue negotiations with Cousins Properties with an indication
of intent o~ the part o f the Authority, provided al l requirements
were met.

-

3 -

�Mr. Stuart said the proposed subcontract between Parsons, Brinckerhoff-Tudor, Bechtel and Law Engineering Testing Company for test
borings had been reviewed and found to be in order.
Upon motion
by Mr. Bishop, seconded by Mr. McMillan, approval was given to proceed with the subcontract.
Mr. Rich suggested that in the future the General Manager prepare
a brief write-up on each proposed subcontract prior to the Board
meeting.
Consultants
Parsons, ·Brinckerhoff-Tudor, Bechtel
Mr. Coil summarized the report given at the briefing prior to the
Board meeting, which included parking layouts, patronage estimates,
and parking lot requirements for the 64-mile system; work contemplated in connection with the soils engineer on the central and
west lines which Law Engineering Testing Company was to do; as well
as the work being done in San Francisco on central line alignments
affecting the I-75/I-85 connector on West Peachtree Street.
Hammer, Greene, Siler Associates

.

In the absence of Mr. Hammer, Mr. Bennett said the report on financial feasibility was completed and that copies would be made available to the Board very soon.
"Rapid Busways" Proposal
As a result of a request from Mayor Ivan Allen, the Board had directed
the MARTA staff to review the rapid busways proposal made recently
by the Atlanta Transit System. Mr. Stuart read the complete report
of this evaluation, the summary of which is attached hereto and made
a part of the minutes.
In response to a question from Mr. Blalock, Mr. Stuart said the
rights-of-way for rapid busways and rapid transit were not the same.
The Chairman polled each Director for his reaction to the report.
Mr. McMillan was emphatic in hoping that nothing would divert the
Board from its efforts to bring rail rapid transit to metropolitan
Atlanta . Mr . Bishop said he was concerned with the legal entanglements involved in the busways proposal. Mr. Haverty stated he wouid
be interested in the rebuttal from the Atlanta Transit System with
regard to the report.
Mr. Adamson felt there were too many problems

-

4 -

�and that there would be a delay in rapid transit if the busways
proposal were accepted.
After discussion, it was moved by Mr. Blount, seconded by Mr. Bishop,
and unanimously agreed that the Chairman forward to Mayor Allen
MARTA's recommendation that the implementation of the "Rapid Busways" concept not be attempted.
Other Business
The Chairman introduced the following interns from the Fulton County
Comptroller's Office: Harvey Kramer, Al Barr and Bill Hayes.
Adjournment
The Chairman adjourned the meeting at 3:50 P.M.
Next Meeting
September 5, 1967.

-

5 -

�MINUTES OF THE EIGHTEENTH MEETING OF THE
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
AUGUST 1, 1967

The Board of Directors of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit
Authority held its regular meeting on August 1, 1967, at 3:00 P.M.
in the Glenn Building Conference Room, Atlanta. Mr. Richard H.
Rich, Chairman, presided.
MEMBERS PRESENT:
Robert F. Adamson (City of Atlanta)
Sanford Atwood (DeKalb County)
M. C. Bishop (Fulton County)
Edgar Blalock (Clayton County)
Roy A. Blount (DeKalb County)
Rawson Haverty (City of Atlanta)
K. A. McMillan (Gwinnett County)
Richard ·H. Rich (City of Atlanta)
MEMBERS ABSENT:
L. D. Milton (City of Atlanta)
OTHERS PRESENT:
Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority
H. L . Stuart, General Manager
Glenn E. Bennett, Secretary
King Elliott, Public Information Director
Earl Nelson, Chief Engineer
H. N. Johnson, Secretary to General Manager
Joan Eschenbrenner, Secretary
MARTA Advisory Committee
H. Bo y er Marx, American Society of Landscape Architects
Ro y J . Boston , P.E. , Georgia Society of Professional
Engineers

�Consultants
W. 0. Salter, Parsons, Brinckerhoff-Tudor, Bechtel, San
Francisco
J. A. Coil, Resident Manager, Parsons, Brinckerhoff-Tudor,
Bechtel, Atlanta
Raymond O'Neil, Deputy Resident Manager, Parsons, Brinckerhoff-Tudor, Bechtel, Atlanta
R. W. Gustafson, Supervising Engineer, Parsons, BrinckerhoffTudor, Bechtel, Atlanta
Robert P. Barksdale, Project Estimator, Parsorts, BrinckerhoffTudor, Bechtel, Atlanta
David McBrayer, Traffic Engineer, Parsons, BrinckerhoffTudor, Bechtel, Atlanta
Louis Dismukes, Eric Hill Associates, Atlanta
C. B. Cleveland, Eric Hill Associates, Atlanta
Arden Brey, Eric Hill Associates, Atlanta
W. Stell Huie, Huie & Harland, Atlanta
Tom Watson Brown, Huie & Harland, Atlanta
Others
Joseph Errigo, Urban and Community Development Assistant,
Department of Housing and Urban Development, Atlanta
P.A. Springer, Atlanta Traffic and Safety Council
Robert W. Roseveare, Traffic Engineer, DeKaib County
J. B. Cooley, Planning and Research Engineer, Bureau of
Public Roads
Norman J. Van Ness, Bureau of Public Roads
George B. Pilkington, Bureau of Public Roads
Gerald L. Smith, Bureau of Public Roads
Joseph E. Lay, Robinson-Hwnphrey Company, Atlanta
William M. G. Fletcher, White, Weld & Co., New York
Dick Hebert, Atlanta Constitution
David Nordan, Atlanta Journal
Art Schultz, WSB Radio
Ken Goodnight, WSB-TV
Abe Gallman, WSB-TV
Harvey Kramer, Intern, Fulton County Comptroller's Office
Al Barr, Intern, Fulton County Comptroller's Office
Bill Hayes, Intern, Fulton County Comptroller's Office
J . D. Wingfield, Jr . , Jerry A . Coursey, Mrs. Margaret C .
Breland, Miss Claudette Parrish, Tim Urban, Atlanta
Region Metropolitan Planning Commission

-

2 -

�The meeting was called to order by the Chairman.
Minutes
Upon motion by Mr. Bishop, seconded by Mr. Blount, the reading
of the minutes of the July meeting was dispensed with and they
were unanimously approved.
Financial Report
The General Manager presented the financial report as of July 31,
1967, which is attached hereto and made a part of these minutes.
DeKalb County had sent in its second quarterly payment; Gwinnett
County was the only one in arrears.
Progress Reports
General Manager
Mr. Stuart reported on the two-week managerial seminar he attended
at Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, sponsored by Kent University
and the Department of Housing and Urban De velopment.
The General Manager said Los Angeles, Seattle and Washington, D. C.,
were to have referenda during 1968 with regard to rapid transit.
He pointed out that insufficiency of federal funds may be less
important than the competition from these cities. Mr . Rich mentioned the importance of taking steps to hold a referendum in 1968.
Mr. Stuart reported on meetings with Cousins Properties regarding
MARTA ' s requirements. Cousins Properties were about to incur certain co n struction e x penses in the Air Rights area in their efforts
to pro v ide for future rapid transit operations ; these were costs
that could be charged to MARTA under appropriate agreements . Mr.
Stuart requested the Board's approval to continue negotiations
with Cousins . Costs involved had not been dete r mined ; howeve r,
Mr. Stuart estimated them to be between $70 , 000 and $90 , 000 . The
Ch ief Engineer was to meet with r epresentatives from Cousins P r ope r ties a n d r each ag r eement as to exact costs which would be eventuall y c h a rgeab le t o MARTA , when f u n ds we r e a v a i lab le . MARTA
wo u l d be r es p o n sible for accr ued i nte r est as we l l .
I t was mo v e d
by Mr. Bis h o p a n d seconded b y Mr. Have r t y tha t th e Gen e r al Ma nag er
continue n e gotiatio n s with Cousin s P r o p e r t i es with a n indi c a tion
of inte nt o ~ the part of t he Au t ho r ity , p r o vide d a ll r e quir e me nt s
were met .

-

3 -

�Mr. Stuart said the proposed subcontract between Parsons, Brinckerhoff-Tudor, Bechtel and Law Engineering Testing Company for test
borings had been reviewed and found to be in order.
Upon motion
by Mr. Bishop, seconded by Mr. McMillan, approval was given to proceed with the subcontract.
Mr. Rich suggested that in the future the General Manager prepare
a brief write-up on each proposed subcontract prior to the Board
meeting.
Consultants
Parsons, Brinckerhoff-Tudor, Bechtel
Mr. Coil summarized the report given at the briefing prior to the
Board meeting, which included parking layouts, patronage estimates,
and parking lot requirements for the 64-mile system; work contemplated in connection with the soils engineer on the central and
west lines which Law Engineering Testing Company was to do; as well
as the work being done in San Francisco on central line alignments
affecting the I-75/I-85 connector on West Peachtree Street.
Hammer, Greene, Siler Associates
In the absence of Mr. Hammer, Mr. Bennett said the report on financial feasibility was completed and that copies would be made available to the Board very soon.
"Rapid Busways" Proposal
As a result of a request from Mayor Ivan Allen, the Board had directed
the MARTA staff to review tqe rapid busways proposal made recently
b y the Atlanta Transit System. Mr. Stuart read the complete report
of this evaluation, the summary of which is attached hereto and made
a part of the minutes.
In response to a question from Mr. Blalock , Mr. Stuart said the
rights-of-way for rapid busways and rapid transit were not the same.
The Chairman polled each Director for his reaction to the report.
Mr. McMillan was emphatic in hoping that nothing would divert the
Board from its efforts to bring rail rapid transit to metropolitan
Atlanta. Mr. Bishop said he was concerned with the legal entangle ments involved in the busways proposal. Mr. Haverty stated he wouid
be interested in the rebuttal from the Atlanta Transit System with
regard to the report. Mr. Adamson felt the ~e were too many problems

-

4 -

�and that there would be a delay in rapid transit if the busways
proposal were accepted.
After discussion, it was moved by Mr. Blount, seconded by Mr. Bishop,
and unanimously agreed that the Chairman forward to Mayor Allen
MARTA's recommendation that the implementation of the "Rapid Busways" concept not be attempted.
Other Business
The Chairman introduced the following interns from the Fulton County
Comptroller's Office:
Harvey Kramer, Al Barr and Bill Hayes.
Adjournment
The Chairman adjourned the meeting at 3:50 P.M.
Next Meeting
September 5, 1967.

-

5 -

�THE SECRET A RY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOP M ENT
WASHINGTO N, D. C . 20 4 10

Oc t ober 16, 196 7

Honora ble Ivan Al len, Jr.
Mayor
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
near Mayor Allen :
An invitation i s being extended to all rec ipients of financial
assistance under the Urban Mass Transportation Act to participate
in the 1968 Design Awards Program conducted by the Urban
Transportation Administration of the U. s. Department of Housing
and Urban Development.
Awards will be given in System Design and in Item Design, including
rolling stock, stations, and rights-of-way. New and rehabilitated
works will be judged, as will planned projects.
Judging will take account of how the design is related to comprehensive planning and of the entry's contribution to the physical,
economic, social and aesthetic development of the metropolitan area,
the central city, and the neighborhood. Consideration will also be
given to excellence in function, and to economy and environmental
harmony.
Entries must be received no later than January 15, 1968. A
distinguished jury, including persons in the fields of planning,
architecture, engineering, sociology, and graphics will evaluate
entries and reconnnend awards.
A limited number of Honor Awards and several Merit Awards will be
given in System Design and Item Design. The Department also plans
to prepare brochures and other printed materials describing the
award-winning projects.
Detailed information is attached, and
in this inaugural program of Design

Robert
Enclosures

that you will participate
Urban Transportation.

c.

Weaver

�I

LIST OF VISITORS TO ATLANTA, ,

M.~RCH 27, 1969, I N R.EI/4TION TO
URBAN MASS T~~NSPORTATIO N AGE NCY
CENTRAL CITY PROG~"-1'1S
Dick Lam , responsible for cen t r al city programs o f Urban Y~ss
Transp ortation Agenc y .
HaFry Braley, director of five ci ty program for Arthur D. Little
cori.sorti u.rn working otit of Washington , D. C.

.

Peter Hetz , assistant to Harry Braley.
·Allan S 1 oan, director of Arth u r D. Little consortium team in
Atlanta.
Lois Dean, Arthur D. Little t eam member.
Mark W. Cannon, Director, Institute of Public Administration,
New York~ re s p ons ible for study of votes
rejection of mass transit bond referrendurn.
,.

Frank Graves, Institute of Public Administration.
,/ Le~is Bowr!'.a n, Chai rr'.'. an, Politi ca l Science Depa rt me n t, Emory
Uni v2rsity and IPA consultnn t o n voter study.

�METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
GLENN BUILDING / A TL ANTA , GEORG IA 30303 / AREA CODE 404 524 -5 7 11
O FFICE RS:
Ri chard H. Ri ch , Cha irman
Roy A. Bl ount , V ic e Chairman

June 3, 1968

Edmund W. H ugh e s , Se cre t ar y
Henry L. Stuart, Gen e ral Manager

Mr. Dan Sweat, Jr.,
Director of Go~ernmental Liaison
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Mr. Sweat:
Your letter to Mr. Rich has been forwarded to me for
reply. We are indeed sorry that you will not be able to make
the trip to Montreal and Toronto on June 12th and 13th.
May I suggest that you extend this invitation to someone else whose opinions and judgement are highly regarded in
the community? We will continue to accept reservations as
long as there are seats available.

sz;:,

Henry L . Stuart

HLS:scl

�May 31, 1968

Mr. Richard H . R ich, Chairman
Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authodty
Glenn Building
Atlanta , Georgia 30303
Dear Mr. R ich :
Thank you for the invitation to participate in the MARTA.
in - pection tour of. the Montreal-Toronto mass tr nsit sy t ms .
I will be unable to ccept this invitation. However,
Mayor. All n is · ncouraglng all the member of the Board
of Alderm. n to go and I hope that 11 ol th m can.
I s w ome of the Montreal system. last urnm ;r and f · el
that it will help our c u
for some of the top policy .. makers
to g t first hand look.

Sine rely yo,a ,

D n Sweat
DS :fy

�METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
GLENN BUILDI N G / A TL AN TA , GEORG IA 3 0303 / AREA CODE 4 04 5 24 - 5711
OFFICERS:
Richard H. Rich, Chairman

May 29, 1968

Roy A. Blount , Vice Chairman
Edmund W. H ugh e s, Se cre t a r y
Henry L. Stuart, General Manager

Mr. Dan ·sweat
Liaison, Mayor's Office
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mr. Sweat:
The Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority is organizing a trip to Montreal
and Toronto to see their rapid transit operations. The char~ered fli ght will leave
Atlanta for Montreal on Wednesday, June 12, go to Toronto that night , and leave
Toronto Thursday, June 13, to return to Atlanta. (Abbreviated itinerary is attached.)
Since MARTA is not able to pay for such a trip, each person who accepts the invitation to go will bear his own expenses. The cost of the trip, including contingency
allowance, will be $180.00 excluding hotel charges other than room, breakfast and
lunch Thursday, or any personal expenditures. Any overage will be returned to you.
Invitations are being extended to about 300 governmental and business leaders, including Atlanta's Mayor, Vice-Mayor, and aldermen; the Commissioners of Clayton,
DeKalb, Fulton and Gwinnett Counties; all mayors in the four counties; members of the
Atlanta Area Transportation Study Policy Committee; presidents, executive officers,
and others in the Chambers of Commerce; the Governor, Lt. Governor, Speaker of the
House, and other state officials; news media, and other individuals who have expressed
interest in such a trip. If you know of someone not in these categories who should
be invited, please let me know immediately, and this same invitation will go to
those you suggest.
Reservations for the trip will be made on a first-come, first served basis for the
86 seats available.
I hope you will make your reservation promptly. Your check for $180.00 made out to
MARTA for the Montreal-Toronto Trip should be in our office as soon as possible.
This trip will enable you and others who will play a leading role in the development
of rapid transit in Atlanta to see first hand two modern rapid transit systems and
what they have done and are doing for their communities, and to do so at min imum
ex pense.
I hope you will plan to make this trip.
· Since r ely ,

~

~~4~/
Richa rd H. Rich

�•

ABBREVIATED ITINERARY

Wednesday, June 12, 1968:
7:30 A.M.
_8:

00 A.M.

11:00 A.M.

Check in at Atlanta Airport.
Take off for Montreal.
Arrive Montreal. Chartered buses to
tour and guides for the inspection.

4:30 P.M. -- Chartered buses leave Montreal for the
Airport.
5:30 P.M.

Take off for Toronto

6:30 P.M.

Arrive in Toronto. Chartered buses to
the hotel.
(Accomodations are double
occupancy. )
Attend banquet and reception following
annual banquet of the Institute for Rapid
Transit.

Thursday, June 13, 1968:
After breakfast on your own, join IRT
for a tour of Toronto rapid transit and
real estate developments associated with
it.
Lunch on your own.
3:15 P.M.

Chartered buses leave hotel.

4:00 P . M.

Take off for Atlanta.

6 : 45 P . M.

Arrive Atlanta Airport .

�M ETROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHO RITY
GLENN BUILDING / ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 / AREA CODE 404 524-5711
OFFICERS:
RichQrd H. Rich, Chairman
Roy A. Blount, Vice Chairman

July

a,

1969 .

Edmund W. Hughes, Secretory
Henry L. Stuart, General Monogor

MEMORANDUM TO HEADS OF LOCAL GOVERNMENTS AND FINANCIAL OFFICERS .
In accordance with Section 16(b) of the MARTA Act of 1965,
the Financial Statement for the second quarter of 1969 is
attached and made a part of the enclosed Minutes.

H. · L. STUART

�MINUTES OF THE FORTY- SECOND MEETING
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
JULY 1 , 1969
The Board of Di r ectors of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid
Transit Authority held its regular meeting on July 1, 1969 at
3:30 P . M. in the Conference Room, 619 Glenn Building, Atlanta , Ga .
Mr . Roy A . Blount , Vice Chairman , presided .
MEM BERS PRESENT
M. c. Bishop (Ful ton County)
Roy A. Blount (DeKalb County)
s . Truett Cathy (Clayton County)
Rawson Haverty (City of Atlanta)
K. A. McMillon (Gwinnett County)
L. D. Milton (City of Atlanta)
Richard H. Rich (City of Atlanta)
John c. Wilson (City of Atlanta)
MEMBERS ABSENT
Sanf ord s. At wood (DeKalb County)
John c . Staton (Fulton County)
OTHERS PRESENT
Me t r opolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority
H. L. Stuart , General Manager
E. w. Nelson, Chief Enginee r
King Elliott , Public Information Director
Edmund w. Hughes , Auth ority Secretar y
H. Ne Johnson , Administrative Assistant
Consultants

w. o. Sa l t er , P BQ&D, San Franc i sco
Je A. Co i l and Ra y Gus tafson , PBTB ,
w. Stell Hui e, Hu ie and Ha r land

Atlant a

Others
Jan Richey, Georg e Brown and John Mil l er , City of Atlanta
Planning Department
Andy Springer , Great er At lant a Traffic & Safety Council
Dona l d G. Ingram , Central Atlanta Pr ogress , Inc e
William H. Par r , Atlanta Chamber of Commerce
Jerry Cour sey, Atlanta Region Met r opolitan Planni ng
Commissiono

- 1 -

�I

Before taking up the regular agenda, Mr . Blount stated that
he was presiding at the request of Mr . Rich. Mr. Blount expressed
regret in behalf of the Members over the recent resignation of Mr.
Rich as Chairman of the Authority. Mr. Rich had tendered his
resignation to Mayor Ivan Allen on June 23rd, advising that due
to the press of other essential business he felt that it was necessary that he leave the Board.
The meeting was then called to order by the Vice Chairman .
Minutes
Minutes of the June 3rd meeting had been mailed prior to the
meet ing . Upon motion by Mr . Bishop , seconded by Mr . Haverty, they
were unanimously approved .
Financial Report
The Authority's financial report as of June 30, 1969 was
before the Board. Mr. Stuart asked for approval of the statement
in order that it might be mailed to the Local Governments, as required at the close of each quarter by the MARTA Act. He pointed
out that tbe budget was closing out for the first half with a
balance of some $14,000.00 due to lesser charges to Counsel and
PBTB .
Financial support from DeKalb County and Gwinnett County
had been assured for the balance of the calendar year. Payment
from Clayton County had been received for the entire year. Meetings had been held with financial officials of the City of Atlanta
and Fulton County concerning their contributions for the second
half of 1969. Attention was called to the Bus Lease Account financial s tatement .
Mr. Stuart stated . that the apparent deficit reflected in this account was not an "out of pocket" deficit and was
due to the differential between interest and depreciation charges
and that the two figures would even out within a few years. Upon
motion by Mr . Bishop, seconded by Mr. McMillan, the financial
statement was unanimously accepted , and Mr. Blount directed that
a copy be forwarded to heads of the Local Governments and financial
officers. The financial statement is attached and made a part of
these minutes.
Report of General Manager
Mr . Stuart stated that at the June meeting the Board had
authorized him to proceed with the preparation of an application
to the Department of Transportation (DOT) fo r financial suppo rt
towards a proposed technical studies work progr am .
He sta t ed this
program had been presented to the AATS Technical Co o rdinating Committee (TCC) at their meeting on June 19 , 1969 and subsequently
the TCC had p a ss ed a resoluti on a pproving the filing of the appl icat ion with DOT and recommended its appr oval by the AATS Policy Committee.
·
-

2 -

�Report of General Manager (cont ' d)
Afte r some discussion the Board agreed that before lengthy
and expensive engineering and cost studies are made , various
transit proposals should be analyzed and taken to public meetings
to determine their general acceptance and political feasibility .
The Board instructed its General Manager and Chief Engineer ,
working with its consulting engineers, Parsons Brinckerhoff-TudorBechte l, to analyze the mass transit recommendations of the Voorhees
Report and to compare them with the regional rapid transit system
proposed earlier by MARTA. They are then to produce a recommendati on for a s y stem which will include t he best elements of both
proposals e The Board asked that this analysis be completed for
presentation at the MARTA Board Meeting on August 5th. Following
this meeting , it is expected that this analysis will be presented
to the AATS Technical Coordinating Committee , the AATS Policy Committee , and at public meetings.
In assigning this work to the engineers, the Board agreed
that this approach is in agreement with the resolution of the AATS
Policy Committee of May 22, 1969 in which MARTA was asked to develop
f u r ther specific information in connection with those r e commendations
o f the Voorbee s Report involving rapid transit.
Resignation of John C. Staton
Mr. Blount advised the members that Mr. John c. Staton had
also resigned from the Board because extensive t ravel commitments
mad e it impossible for him t o attend regular Board meeting s e I t
wa s with regret that Mr . Staton had found it necessary to take this
action since he had contributed tremendously to the rapid transit
p r ogram ..
Mr e Blount advised that if it was a g reeabl e to the Members
he would be glad to serve as Acting Cha irman of the Authority unt il
an e lecti on c o uld be held after the two new directors are appointed .
This action was enthusiastically approved by the Membe rs present.
Report of Counsel
Mr o Huie stated that several legislator s had asked him if
MARTA was plann i ng to seek a n e w sour ce of loc al f unds f o r a llocation to rap id transit .
He s ugg est ed tha t the Board c onsid er a
study of possible s ources with the view of eventually r ecommending
a speci fi c source b eing earmar ked for rapid t r ansit .
Ad jou rnme n t
Mr . Blount adj o u rned the meeting at 4:20 P . M.
Next Meeting
August 5 , 1969.
3 -

�METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORI'IY
BUDGET REPORT
JUNE 30, 1969

BUDGET
Fund Balance
Les s :
Adjustment _- State of Georgia

ACTUAL
JAN. 1, 1969
TO
JUNE 30
1969

$ 49,720.61

$ 49,720.61

$ 49 2 720.61

1 925.80$ 47,794.81

Appropriations:
City of Atlanta
Clayton County
DeKalb County
Fulton County
Gwinnett County
Sub - Totals
State of Geor gia
Interest Income
Federal Funds

$ 42,015.00
2,898.75
41,385. 00
45,900.00
2,276-.25
$134 , 4 75 • 00
20,633.05
500 . 00
31,000.00

$ 16,974.00
2,898.75
16,719.54
18,544.00
919 . 61
$ 56,055 . 90
0
2,728.45
0

TOTAL INCOME
TOTAL INCOME AND FUND BALANCE

$186,608.05
~2.J6,,J28.6'1

$ 58,784 . 35
~l06,!2Z2 .l6

$ 7 o, 274 . 08
8,976.92
1,,581.12
266.66
1,227 . 97
13,339.88
182 . 00
3 , 000 . 00
$ 98,848 .63

$ 35,974.19
4,199.72
1,409.84
266.66
746 .38
0
213.00
1,500.00
44,309
. 79
$

$

3,050 . 00
2,231.47
3,338 . 49
361. 87
1,500. 00
500. 00
3,000.00
25,000 . 00
$ 38,98 1. 83

$

$137,830.46

$ 55,369.89

INCOME

EXPENSE
Staff Costs:
Salaries
Expense
Social Secur ity
Guarantee Fund
Health and Accident Insurance
Retireme nt
Workman 's Compensation
Board Meetings
Sub - Totals
Administrative Costs:
Rent
Communications
Supplies
Insurance
Accountan t
Auditor
Public Information
Attorney s Fees and Expense
Sub - Totals
EXPENSES - CARRIED FORWARD

1,551.00
1,105.10
9 01. 62
5 09 . 79
37 5. 00
5 00 . 00
7 3. 59
6,044 . 00
$ ll, 060.10

�METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
BUDGET REPORT
JUNE 30, 1969

BUDGET

ACTUAL
JAN. 1, 1969
TO
JUNE 30 1969

TOTAL INCOME AND FUND BALANCE•
Brought Forward

$236,328.66

$106,579 . 16

EXPENSES:
Brought Forward

$137,830.46

$ 55,369.89

Consultants on Retainer:
Parsons, Brinkerhoff-Tudor-Bechtel

$

Contracts :
Atlanta Area Transportation Study
Technical Studies
Sub-Totals

$ 14,000. 00
46,500.00
$ 60,500.00

$ 12,500.00
14,000. 00
$ 26,500 . 00

TOTAL EXPENSES

$206,330.46

$ 82,702 . 44

FUND BALANCE BALANCE

$ 29,998.20

$ 23 , 876 . 72

8,000.00

$

832 . 55

�METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
ATLANTA, GEORGIA
STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL CONDITION
JUNE 30, 1969

ASSETS
Cash in Banks:
Citizens and Southern National Bank
First National Bank
Trust Company of Georgia
Fulto n National Bank
Citizens Trust Company

$ ll, 353.53
2,849.60
1,000.00
1,731.91
940. 74

$17,875.78

Investments - U. S. Treasury Bills:
Regular Funds

29,713.33

Petty Cash
Airline Deposit

25. 00
425.00

TOTAL

$ 48,039, ll
LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCE

Current Liabilities:
Payroll Taxes Withheld and Accrued
Fund Balances:
Reserve - Parsons, BrinckerhoffeTudor-Bechtel
Retainer Agreement:
Transportation
$ 557.46
43. 27
Reproduction
Unappropriated
TOTAL

$

2,561.66

$ 21,000 . 00

600. 7 3
23,876 . 72

45 , 477 . 45

$ 48,039 , ll

�METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
BUS LEASE ACCOUNT
JUNE 30,1969

ASSETS
Cash in Bank
Busses
Less:

$

Accumulated Depreciation

$398,946.80
39,894.72

4,696.52
359,052.08

TOTAL

$363,748.60
LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCE

Notes Payable

$370,139.26

Fund Balance:
Balance at Dec. 31, 1968 (Deficit)
Less for Current Period

$

2,366.99·
4,023.67-

6,390.66--~------:.-

TOTAL

$'.36,'.3;748 ,60
INCOME AND EXPENSE STATEMENT
JAN. 1, 1969 TO JUNE 30, 1969

Rental Income
Less:
Depreciation
Interest
LOSS FOR CURRENT PERIOD

$ 25,410.00
$19,947.36
9,486.31

29,433.67
$

4,023,67 -

�AT LANTA

AREA

900 GLENN BUILDING

TRANSPORTATION

MEMO TO:

TELEPHONE

ATLANTA , GEORGIA 3 0303

August 6, 1969

STU DY

522 - 7 577

JER RY A. COURSEY . TRANSPOR TATI ON PLANNING COOR DINATOR

TCC Members

Agency

Member

Atlanta
Clayton County
Clayton Municipalities
Cobb County
Cobb Municipalities
DeKalb County
DeKalb M~nicipalities
Fulton County
Fulton Municipalities
Gwinnett County
Gw i n nett Muni c i pal i ti es
Atlanta Transit System
MARTA
State Highway Department
ARMPC

Collier Gladin
Tom Hawkins
William E. Bennett
Joe Sims
Don t~h i te
Arthur A. Mendonsa
Robert Roseveare
Turner McDonald
Undesignated
Clarence Higginbotham
Bill Fortune
Bill Nix
Earl Nelson
Leland S. Veal
J . D. \~i n g f i e l d , J r .

FROM:

Jerry A. Coursey
Transportation Planning Coordinator

SU BJECT:

Revie w of 11 Atlanta Area Transportatio n Study Recommende d Re g i o n a l Hi g h way P l a n 11

Enclosed is a copy of the 1'Atlanta Ar ea Transportation Study
Recommended Re g ional Hi g hway Plan , 11 drafted by the State Hi ghw ay
Depart ment , s ho wi n g :
l.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Exis ting f r ee ways .
Fr ee wa ys p r oposed for construction by 19 83.
Fr ee ways pr oposed fo r r ight - of -way acquisi ti on by 1983.
Art e ria l str eets (e xisting a n d/o r p r o posed f o r i mpr ove men t or cons tr uction by 1 983 ) .
Coll e ct o r str e e t s (e xistin g a nd/o r p r o pos e d for impr o vement o r con s t ruc t i on · by 1 983 ) .

�As you recall, the AATS consultant primarily focused his attention
on the evaluation of freeway and express transit alternatives in
developing his recommended plan.
In the Summary of HighlightsRecommended Transportation Program, the consultant says 11 The
arterial and collector street system included in the highway
recommendations is fundamentally that developed by the AATS
staff following analysis of earlier forecasts of highway travel
and review with area planning and traffic eng i neering staffs.
This system represents a general plan indicating the approximate
locations and scope of the arterial-collector system. It will
require further study and refinement as the final freeway and
transit routes are determined and as future development occurs.
The traffic operations study procedures advocated by the U. S.
Department of Transportation (TOPICS) will be useful in this work.
A development and improvement pr ogram of major proportions is
required and it will require a major financial underta king. "
You are asked to review the enclosed map with two separate and
distinct objectives:
FIRST : The arterial and collector system is intended
to be essentially the same as that contained in Test
Netwo r k 80 3 which was developed jointly by the AATS
staff and the TCC membe r s during 1967. Each county's
TCC member or alternate has a colo r -coded copy of
Networ k 803 showing the a r terial and collector system.
You are requested to carefully compare the enclosed map
with this earlier version ( 80 3 ) to identify copying
errors . The first objective is to produce a correct
copy of the recommended plan . Please notify me of any
errors prior to Au gust 15 so that I can assemble the
comments and transmit them to the State Higpway Department for co rr ection of the o ri ginal .
SECO ND: You are as ked to aga i n revie w the map (as
co rr ec te d) to i dentify any su r face streets which mi ght
wa rr an t r ev i s i on either i n functional classif ic a t ion
(h i ghe r o r l owe r ) o r number of lanes ( mor e or less) .
As yo u kn ow as pa r t of a new cons ul t ant contract , i t
is i nt ended t h a t t he f i nal r ecommended plan soon
r ece i ve traffi c fo r ecasts f o r des i gn pur pos e s . The
AA TS s taf f wo uld again li ke the benef i t of y our a dv i ce
in its rev ie w of t he ar te ria l and collec t o r s y s te m pri o r
t o use by the c onsu l tant i n this f in al phase of the
current AATS work pr og ram . The AATS sta ff intends th a t
the recommended pla n should refl e ct t he local gov e rnm e nt s
plans to the maximum extent pos s ibl e , consistent with
overall AATS r e gional system planning criteria . Th e

- 2 -

1

�second objective of this review is to provide the AATS
staff and consultant with current local technical staff
s u gg es ti on s ab o u t po s s i b l e a rte r i al an d col l e ct o r re visions in the recommended AATS plan. Please notify
me by mail before September 9 of any suggested changes,
including appropriate supporting technical materials,
so that I can consolidate your technical comments for
review by the AATS staff and consultant. These comments
sho~ld be separate and distinct from the previously
discussed "corrections."
TCC members representing municipalities are reminded that they
should consult appropriate technical staff persons in each city
within their county in carrying out these reviews.
Each TCC
member is expected to consult all appropriate staff persons
within his agency.
As you know, the Policy Committee recently authorized a TOPICS
study for metropolita n Atlanta (lraffic Qperations !:_"rogram for
Increasing Capacity and Safety). The TCC's TOPICS Subcommittee
Ts active l y-engaged in developing a proposed planning program.
State Highway Department TOPICS guidelines indicate that the
approved AATS highway plan will form the basis for the TOPICS
study system. This State Highway Department policy adds urgency
to the need to reach final technical and policy level agreement
on the recommended transportation plan.

En Cl OS u re
cc :

Policy Committee Members
TCC Alternate Members

- 3 -

�l.j

... '

©@

G

12:00 News
July 2, 1969
RAY MOORE

When a Decatur housewife - not mine, incidentally
~

heard that Richard Rich had stepped down as MARTA
chairman, she said, "That's good

I'm tiring of hearin,

our neighbors say he only wants rapid transit so people
can get downtown to his store."
That criticism was unjustified by logic - because the
tougher it is to get down town, the more Rich will sell
in suburban stores.
Moreover, those who worked with him know him as a
public spirited man who wants what's best for Atlanta.
Still, the complaint was heard frequently - and it was
I
one more albatross hovering over last November's ' sinkin

of rapid transit.
Another person who watched MARTA in action - if that iE
the proper word for it - said, "Mr. Rich is an intelligent, . forceful man - perhaps too forceful and authoritarian.

He ran the board like he was running an effi-

cient store.

But there were many volunteers, and

volunteers don't always jumµ like paid employees."
That same force and authority, however, was necessary
to bring together and hold t ogether a METRO group different people with different ideas and different
interests.

Richard Rich held them because of who he ii

and what he is.

�r- 7
@

RAY MOORE

The Board will elec.t a permanent chairman to take Rich's ;
place.

But Mayor Allen will name a person · to fill his

seat on the board.
When he's looking around, the Mayor is not likely to
forget the opposition to MARTA from the Negro community. ·
l

MARTA tried to counter that by hiring a Negro staff
member late in the game.

It was too late.

He was the

last hired and the first fired after the election.
I

Rich is quoted as saying he be1ieves a younger man ought
I

to head the authority - one who has the patience to wait ;
for things to happen and see them through.
t

Young?

Maybe.

Patient?

Please, not while we're stalle,

on the expressway - cooling in a steel pot on a concrete
griddle.

I

\

�MINUTES OF THE FORTY-THIRD MEETING
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRN'!SIT , AUTHORITY
AUGUST 5, 1969

The Board of Directors of the Metropolitan Au lanta Rapid
Transit Authority held its regular meeting on A:qgust 5, 1969 at
3 : 30 P.M. in the Conference Room, 619 Glenn Building , At t anta,
Ga. Mr . Roy A. Blount, Vice Chairman, presided .
MEMBERS PRESENT
Sanford s . Atwood (DeKalb County)
Roy A. Blount (DeKalb County)
s. Truett Cathy (Clayton County)
Rawson Haverty (City of Atlanta)
K. A. McMillon (Gwinnett County)
L. D. Milton (City of Atlanta)
John c. Wilson (City of Atlanta)
MEMBERS ABSENT
M.

c.

Bishop (Fulton County}

OTHERS PRESENT
Metr opolitan Atlanta Rapid Tr~nsit Authority
H. L. St uart , General Manager
E.W. Nelson, Chief Engi neer
King El l iott , Public Information Director
H. N. Johnson , Administrative Assistant
Consultant s

w. O. Salt e r, PBQ&D, Sa n Franci s co
J. A. Co il, PBTB, Atlanta
w. Stell Huie, Hui e and Harl~nd
Others
Jan Richey and George Brown, City ot Atlanta Pl~nning Dept.
Andy Springer, Greater Atlant a Traffic & Safety Council
Donald G~ Ingram, Central Atlanta Progress, InG.
William Ho Parr , Atlanta Chamber ot Commerce

- 1 -

.

�Others (cont 1 d)
Glenn E ~ Bennett and J. D. Wingfield , Jr., ARMPC
Edgar E. Schukraft , Southwest Atlanta Association
Newsmen - WSB-TV
Newsmen - WAGA-TV
Tom Linthicum 8 The Atlanta Constitution
Aubrey Morris , WSB Radio
Pat Potter , DeKalb New Era
The meeting was called to order by the Vice Chairman.
MINUTES
Minutes of the July 1 meeting had been forwarded to the
members prior to the meeting. Upon motion by Dr. Atwood,
seconded by Mr . Cathy, they were unanimously approved.
FINANCIAL REPORT
The General Manager reported that administrative and
operating expenses were well within the budget and the fund
balance remained ahead of the budget . Appropriations from the
Local Governments for the third quarter had been received with
the exception of Gwinnett County. After some discussion, the
financial statement was unanimously accepted and is attached and
made a part of these Minutes.
REPORT BY THE VICE CHAIRMAN
Mr e Blount reported on his recent appearance before the
United States Senate Banking and Currency Committee in Washington
on July 29 in support of the Transit Trust Fund. He noted that he
had urged the passage of this important legislation as a means
of financing mass transit .
He was doubtful that the legislation
would pa ss t his year but was hopeful that it would be introduced
for congressional consideration again next January~ Following
his appearance before this Committee, he met with Senators Russell
and Talmadge to seek their support in the passage of the bill.
ENGINEERING & DESIGN REVIEW COMMITTEE
Mr ~ McMillon reported on a probl e m that had previously been
brought before the Board but never resolved regardi ng additional
costs to Cousins Properties Inc . in modifying the construction of
their a ir rights parking development to accommodate a future
rapid transit line .
He said the p r oject in the Spring-TechwoodHunter Street Viaduct area was now complete and in operation with
all constr uction costs finalized ~ Mr. Cousins had asked that the
Board acknowledge its o bligation to pay for the additional cost
of construction amounting to $85 , 770 . 00 o Adequat e documentation
had been received f r om the contractor to substantiate t he additional costs and the Chief Engineer for the Transit Authority had
-

2 -



�reviewed and verified the above figure ~ Meetings had also been
held with L&N Railroad officials under whose jurisdiction the
construction work was perf ormed, and they felt this cost was
appropriate 0 Mr ., McMillan stated that it was the recommendation
of the Engineering and Design Review Committee that the Board
pass a r esolution in which it recommended payment of the $85 , 770e00,
plus a reasonable interest rate to Cousins Properties Inc . for
extra expenditures on its air rights development in the vicinity
of the Terminal Station, contingent upon a successful referendum
to finance a mass transit system for Metropolitan Atlanta ., Upon
motion by Mr .. Haverty, seconded by Dr ., Atwood 8 the following
resolution, after being read by the General Manager , was unanimously adopted·i
WHEREAS u on August 1 8 1967 u the MARTA Board in it s r egular
meeting considered the problem of the Air Rights Development over the proposed west line right- of -way, and
WHEREAS , the Board authorized the General Manager to
negotiate with Cousins Proper ties Inc. , the developer , with
an i ndi cation of intent on the par t of the Authority to bear
necessary expenses to which Cousins might be put to accommodate a rap i d t r ansit line beneath the said Air RightsDevelopment e and
WHEREAS , it now appears that the construction has been completed at a cost to Cousins of $85 , 770 more than the same
would have cost without special a r rang ements having been
made for t he proposed MARTA lines , and
WHEREAS, it appears that an expenditure considerably in
excess of the aforesaid amount would be required had not
Cousins been wi lling to make advance p r ovision for said
right of way during construction ;
NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED u that the Board of Directors
of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Tr ansit Authority hereby
agree a nd accept as a proper figur e t he sum of $85 ,770 for
extra expenditures by Cousi n s P r oper ties Inc . on its Air
Rights Development to provide a mass transit right of way
and does hereby r ecomme nd, contingent upon a successful
referendum financing a mass transit plan for metropolitan
Atlanta approving routes whereby the right of way provided
for mass transit by Cousins Properties Inc . through said
a rea will be utilized for the benefit of t he public, that
t he said sum of $85 0 770 be p a id to Cousins P roper ties Inc.,,
its successors or assigns, and
BE I T FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Board recommend that Cousins
Proper ties Inc. be reimbu rsed at a fair and reasonable interest
rate on the afo re said s um from thi s date forthwith and until the
same is final°ly acknowledged and paid as set forth above .
-

3 -

�Mrs McMillan further reported that the Engineering and
Design Review Committee had met on July 24th for the purpose of
discussing the progress being m~de by the staff and consultants
in executing the assignment given them July 1 to compare the
earlier MARTA plan and the Voorhees recommended plan and to produce a recommendation for a transit system which would include
the best elements of both plans. Mr. McMillan stated that the
Committee felt that work was proceeding along appropriate lines
but was not complete enough to present to the Board at the
current meeting. Mr. Blount suggested that the Committee work
closely with the staff and con$ultants and report to the Board
regularly as to the progress of this work.
REPORT OF FINANCE COMMITTEE
Dr. Atwood presented a new two-year work program and an
application for $718,000.00 in federal funds. The work program
covered the work necessary to prepare a new rapid transit proposal
for submission to the voters, including several new projects, as
well as a revision of earlier work, some of which had been outdated
since failure of the referendum last year. Three broad categories
of work were involved, the first of which concerned concept
studies involving route or ha~dware adjustments. This work would
amount to ~bout 8% of the total project. Continuation and completion of the Voorhees work is included in this; also an analysis
of busways. Second, there would be a refinement of an adopted
system to the same standards of detail and accuracy as the system
proposed by MARTA in 1968. This work would amount to 47¾ of the
total. Patronage, operations and revenue estimating, and a new
financial plan would be among the projects in this element. Third,
there would b e a supporting program which would form a foundation
for public understanding of the plan as finally adopted. This
would be 45¾ of the total project. Included in this element would
be a cost/benefit analysis and a public information program plan~
tring project. The total budget for the two-year period would be
$1,693,000.00. For 1970, the budget is $732,000.00 and for 1 971
$961, 000 . 00 . Federal funds would amount to $359,000.00 each year.
State funds would be $73,200.00 in 1970 and $91,600.00 in 1971.
Local participation would be $299,800.00 in 1970, returning to
the pre- 1969 level .
In 1971 the local participation would be
$465,400 . 00 , a s omewhat higher rate than previously. Completion
of the work described would result in a program which could be
sutrnitted to the voters late in 1971 o r in 1972.
Dr. Atwood stated that it was the consensus of the Committee
members that the budget, pS pr~sented, was appropriate to the work
to be done during 1970 and 1971 and recommended that the Board
adopt the budget framework and plan to approach the Local Governments about 1970-71 appropriations. I~ response to questions ,
Mr. Stuart stated that the new program is responsive to the resoluti on of the AATS Policy committee; that the program is in keeping
with the Federal guides; that Federal funds are available, and
-

4 -

�I

that the Federal application can be amended if it is found
desi r able to do so after the p r ogram i s discussed with Local
Government s ~ Mr ~ Blount stated it was necessary to have not only
money from the Local Governments , but their full support of the
program as well ~ Dr e Atwood said it was most important that we
anticipate needs for 1971, going beyond 1970 . Mr . Wilson suggested that the Board take the recommendation to the supporting
governments as early as possible to determine if they will fully
support the p r ogr am a After discussion of the proposed 1970-71
budget and work program, including the new Federal application,
upon motion by Dr a Atwood , seconded by Mr e McMillon, they were
unanimously adopted , subject to gaining acceptance by the Local
Governments ~
CHANGE IN TIME OF REGULAR BOARD MEETINGS
Mr $ Stuart stated that one of the Board members had approached him about setting an earlier meeting time due to heavy traffic
congestion a r ound 4:30 and 5:00 P 9M. following adjournment of the
meeti ng s i n o rder to accommodate those members living in adjacent
counties ~ After a discussion, the members approved moving the
meeting time of f utur e meetings fr om 3 :30 P.M. to 3:00 P.M.
REMARKS BY GLENN E. BENNETT - ARMPC
Mr . Bennett stated he had two items that he would like to
discuss wi th the Board .
The first item was the continuing
planning activities f o r the Atlanta Area Transportation Study
(AATS) which would amount t o practically a new AATS .
ARMPC had
passe d a reso l ution at their July 28 , 1969 meeting in which they
urged their member governments and other appropriate agencies to
take immediate steps to initiate the continuing , comprehens i ve
land use/ t ransportati on planning program called f o r by the
Atlanta Area Transportati o n Study Policy Committee and keyed t o
the 1970 census e Mr . Bennett hoped that .MARTA would continue
to parti c ipate i n the AATS work . Mr . Wingfield stated the continuing p lanning process was a Federal requi rement and ARMPC was
concerned abou t the State Highway Department of Georgia and MARTA
quali f y ing for F e deral funds . Mr. Blount pointed out that our
proposed Techni ca l Studies Application to the Depar tment of Transportatio n d o es hav e an i t em for the continuing planning wor k and
that MARTA does i nte nd to cooperate a nd p articipa te in f uture
AATS work.
The second i tem discussed by Mr . Be nnett was t he purchase
o f the Atlanta Tra nsi t Syste m by MARTA.
He stated many p eop le
b elieve MARTA shou l d purch a s e ATS n ow a s an int e rim mea sure to
improve transit service in t h e Atlanta area. This item was also
discussed at the ARMPC meeting on J u ly 28e
It was Mr. Huie's opinion t h at the legal problems cou ld be
worked out for this transaction but · the big problem was financi al
-

5 -

�support. It was felt that if MARTA bought the Atlanta Transit
System and improved the bus service, it would probably operate
at a deficit, and the deficit would require a subsidy from the
supporting governments which would probably require a referendum
to raise these funds.
Mr. Blount asked about Fede~al support in such a situation.
Mr. Stuart stated that the Authority could receive up to a twothirds grant for buying the Atlanta Transit System, but there
was no Federal provisions at this time for financial assistance
towards an operating subsidy.

Mr. Haverty stated that it was MARTA's function now to do
planning for a mass transit system and that the purchase of ATS
should be part of the implementation when the over-all project
has been approved by the public. Mr. Blount pointed out that our
proposed application to D.O.T. does have an item for the bus
system acquisition investigation and that it was his opinion that
purchase of the Transit System should be initiated by the
participating local governments rather than by MARTA.
Mr. Bennett asked that a representative from MARTA atte nd
the next AR!-1PC meeting, which Mr. Blount acknowledged.
ADJOURNMENT
The Vice Chairman adjourned th~ meeting ~t 4: 25 P .M.
NEXT MEETING
September 2, 1969 - 3 ; 00 P.M.

-

6 -

�HETROPOL ITt\N ATIAUTA i Al'IP TRAffo I T AUTHORITY
,~llIX, aT :.E!.'ORT

JULY 2d, 1969
ACTUAL
1 , 1( ' ' · ' TO
JULY 28 , 1969

JAN,
BUDGET

mli balance
Le.,"' :
. •1

$ 49,720.61

$ 49,720.6 1

$ L~9 , 720 . 61

1,9 25 .80~
$ 47 , 794.8 1

_i•1s::!1e.nt ~ S ate 0£ Geon:ia

.. lt'rC'._.1t:ia~io ~r,~
City , •1 Atl ,nta.
1~1 t·, ~ · n Cr,,mty
,',li h c,,11n "

!'·.b - T, ~uls

.i;c ol Ge r g i a


T·1:cri:!sr I nco me
f.,, J.,r,il Funds

$ 42 ,015 .00
2,898.75
41 ,38s.oo
45 ,9 00.00
2,276 . 25
$ l34, 4 75 00
20 ,63 3 .05
·, 00 . 00
.L. OJ . 00

rn 1.\b

$186,608 .05

•ti.'ll" (',,1ntr
Cnur '-y

~v,in•! t

H

~

$ 29 ,4 9 . s o
2, 898. 75
29,r~2.21
32,222 . 00
1, 597.93

$9 5 , 265 . 45
INCOME
$236 ,328.66
.A_L INC01 ,::, A'ND F ND BALANCE
1, C'l r., , ' 2
Sl4b , o-,. ~s
EXIENSC
$ 70,274. 08
8, 976.92
1 . 581.12
ti
I ,
1 ',
':
.. bb . b6
'. l . 97
J
l') .
.~
..
8, ,' . r,:, -
88
182.00
·r'l··,
1
' 1
t
. ..
~)
l,7'i0 11 lO
$ <'i8, 84o . 63
,.
, , o::;o . oo
~
2,231. /~ 7
1t l
3, '318.49
, ,l
OJ
i(
'\
$ .l8, 981. 8 3
LAli..
l,/AR1
1, 6 7
'• 1,. , 9
•l 0
3 , 00('. 00
2,, on. oo
[nform.1 t il 1.
. , hl I • 0
1,10 , 10
~I'
Jbl. 87
1,r)oo .00
'>C •
·. .,, t
Ii.'
)
qJ
~.b '• I)(
3,000 .00
1·1
./
'
1 ' ~
. 0
L 59
7, PW. /9
12, b! 3 . 44
7
$
�.METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
BUDGET REPORT
JULY 28, 1969
BUDGET
TOTAL I NCONE AND FUND BALANCE Brought Forward
SES:
Brought Forward
ACTUAL
JAN . 1, 1969 TO
JULY 28,19 69
$2 36,328 .66
$146,075.38
$13 7 , 830.46
$ 63,651.99
E ' PE
Consultants on Retain r s :
drsons, Brinckerhoff-Tudor-Bechtel
$
Co ntra ts:
Atlanta Area Transportation Study
Te chnical Studies
Sub-Totals
$ 14, 000 . 00
46,500 . 00
$ 60 ,500.00
$ 12,500.00
14,000.00
$ 26,500 . 00
TOTAL EXPENSES
$2 06,330.46
$ 90. 984 . 54
~
§
FU ND
BALANCE
8,000.00
22,228.20
$
832.55
2.2, 020 . 84
�.METROPOLITAN ATLA TA RAPID TRANc;JT AUTHO RITY
ATI,ANTA, GEORGIA
STATEHEN1 Ot FIHA.l\JCIAL CONDIT ION
JULY 28, 1969
ASSETS
a~h in Banks :
ritit ns and Southern Nationdl Bank
t ; . Na ti o nal Bank
irus l Company of Georgia
t,ilto n National Bank
1'i:·i7ens Trust Co mpa ny
A.ppr, pr1atio n s Receivah le:
.ity of Atlanta


), ~ .dh Coun ty


~ill cm County
G~1inne tt Co unty
$
4 ,2 58 .5 6
854.52
1,000.00
1 , 731. 9 1
940 . 74
$
$ 12,5 2 0.50
12,332.73
13, 6 78 .00
678.3 2
8 , 785 .73
39 ,2 09. 55
Inv0stme nts - U. S . Treasury Bills:
R!:- \U lar Funds
29,463.90
'. '. ', . 00
5 . 00
!'. tty Cas h
,\ i line DPposit
L12
$ ZZ , 9 Q!L 1.8.
T,)1AL
LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCE
ru 1
1
>, I
•• '
,;i
·ul ll ili til .;
I J I s Withheld a 1 1d Ace 111
a
1, .. 17.61
1
, rvt
ar:,ons, Brine kerhot l ~T<Jd,1r -Bc·L ltr.r>l
~rc,e men t:
..,' ,")7 .46
, • 111 p,,rtdt1on
P pr0d11, ti n
43. 27
t
$
l
11. ,,, r
$ 21,0 00.00
,1.
600.73
55,09 0 , 84
76,691.57
S 77,909, 18
�l
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
~
GLENN BUILDING / ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 / AREA CODE 404 524-5711
OFFICERS:
Richard H. Rich, Chairman
Roy A. Blount, Vice Chairman
October 13, 1969
Edmund W. Hughes, Secretary
Henry L. Stuart, General Manager
Mr. Charles L. Davis
Director of Finance
City of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Ga. 30303
Dear Mr. Davis:
This will acknowledge receipt of the City's fourth
quarterly payment to the Transit Authority's operating budget
for 1969 in the amount of $12,520.50.
Thank you very much for this payment.
With kindest regards.
Sincerely yours,
H. L. Stuart,
General Manager.
HLS:JJ
cc:
/
4r
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Ivan Allen, Jr.
Milton G. Farris
Rawson Haverty
John c. Wilson
L. D. Milton
�I
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
GLEN N BU ILD ING / A TL AN TA , GEO RGI A 30303 / AR EA CODE 4 04 524 -571 1
OFFICERS:
Richard H . Rich, Chairman
Roy A. Blount , V ice Chairman
Edmund W . Hug h es, Secre t a ry
October 8, 1969
H e n r y L. St ua r t, G e n er al M a n a g e r
7$~S;,,-~~





.
......
Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor
City of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Ga. 30303
2
.. -
..-
·----
Dear Mayor Allen:
Enclosed is copy of MARTA's propose d 1970 budget
as presented by the Board of Directors yesterday in conformance
with Section 17(a) of the MARTA Act .
If you have any questions, please c a ll me .
Sincerely yours ,
H. L. Stu art ,
Ge n e ral Mana g er.
HLS: JJ
c c:
Mr . Char les L. Davis - 7 copies.
Mr . Milton G. Farri s
�1.
METROPOLI TAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
PROPOSED 1970 OPERATING BUDGET
Line
1.
INCOME
2.
Appropriations
1970
Proposed
1969
Estimated
$ 94,000
$ 42,015
$ 84,030
$ 84,030
6,500
2,899
23,190
23,190
1968
Actual
· 1967
Actua l
~
-,
3.
City of Atlanta
4.
Clayton County
s.
DeKalb County
92,300
41,385
82,770
82,770
6.
Fulton C_ounty
102,000
45,900
91 , 800
91,800
7.
Gwi nnett County
5 , 000
2,276
18 , 210
18,210
8.
Sub-Total
$299,800
$134,475
$300,000
$300 ,000
7 3, 200
33 , 000
6 4 , 4 26
12 5 , 0 0 0
5,250
3,000
6,66 5
5,502
9.
State o f Georgia
'\
1 0.
Intere s t I ncome
11 .
Federa l F u nd s
3 50 ,000
4 6 , 584
240 , 925
30 2,667
12.
TOTAL INCOME
$ 7 28 , 250
$ 21 7,0 59
$ 6 1 2, 01 6
$7 3 3,169
I
�2.
Line
-
1970
Proposed
1969
Estimated
1968
Actual
1967
Actual
$728,250
$217,059
$612,016
$733,169 ·
13.
TOTAL INCOME BROUGHT FORWARD
14.
EXPENSES
15.
Staff Costs
16.
Salaries
82,919
70,27~
76,971
66,408
17.
Expenses
12,500
8,977
13,852
11,008
18.
Social Security
1,859
1,498
1,702
1,188
19.
Guaranty
267
533
533
1,884
1,518
1,528
1,228
13,374
13,374
13,340
13,520
264
213
so
182
4,200
3,300
3,400
3,250
$117,000
$ 99,421
$111, 316
$ 97,317
~ 99 ,4 21
~111 , 376
~ 97,317
- 20.
--
-- ~. : _ "21.
Health and Accident Insurance
__ Retirement
workmens' compensation


2i.


- 23; -· -~----- ·- -- Board Meetings
-- ·-----.
~
24.
Sub-Total
25.
Les s: Charge to Program
26 .
CARRIED FORWARD
30 000
$ 87,000
�•
1970
Proposed
27.
INCOME BROU<ITT-IT FORWARD
28.
EXPENSES
29.
Brought Forward
30.
Administrative Costs
1969
Estimated
$ 7 28 ,2 5_0_ _ _ _$~2_1_7~,_0_59_ _ _ _-$6_1_2_,_0_1_6_ _~$_7_3_3'~1_6_9_
87,000
99,421
111,376
31.
Rent
5,888
3,050
3,102
32.
Communications & Postage
4,307
1,700
4,988
33.
Furniture & Equipment
2,000
34.
Supplies
6,250
35.
Printing
4,000
36.
Insurance
37.
Accountant
38.
Auditor
39.
Public Information
40.
Public Hearings
41.
Attorney's Fees & Expenses
42.
43.
Sub-Total
CARRIED FORWARD
1967 3 •
Actual
1968
Actual
1,400
.
97,317
3,000
2,012
533
6,416
3,127
11,792
2, 31.2
555
555
190
362
1,500
1,500
1,600
750
500
500
250
250
32,000
500
32,127
33,004
1,990
40,000
16,000
41,711
24,314
$ 97,000
$ 25, 205
$106,178
$ 69,884
$184,000
$124,626
$217 , 554
$167 , 201
�4.
Line
44 .
I NCOME BROUGHT FORWARD
45.
EXPENSES
46.
Brought Forward
1970
Proposed
1969
Estima ted
1 9 68
Ac tual
1 967
Actual
$728,250
$217,059
$61 2,016
$7 33,169
$184,000
$124,626
$21 7,554
$ 167,201
10,575
2 ,816
47.
Con sultants on Retainer :
48.
The Research Group
49.
Advisory Committee
5,379
5,370
50.
Hamme-r, Greene, Sil e r Assoc.
8,650
4,7 4 2
51.
Eric Hill Associates
3,34 0
52.
PBTB
53.
AATS
54~
55.
Sub-Total
Te c hnical Studies
6,000
7,333
32,631
37 000
1 56 000
$ . 2~, _0 00
$ 44 ,333
$2 ~6, 575
$ 3 2,_323
$525£000
$ 451000
$3751036
$4121303
17 , 000
19,395
..
$ 732,000
$ 213 , 959
$809 , 1 6 5
_fl>
. .::.·.
.
56.
TOTAL EXPENSES
57 ~
I NCOME LESS EXPENSES
58.
PLUS: FUND BALANCE BEGINNING OF YEAR
$ 551 57 5
$ 5 21 4 7 5
$ 2491624
$1281 282
59.
FUND BALANCE END OF YEAR
$ 51, 8 25
$ 551575
$ 52, 4 75
$ 249 , 6 24
"
$611 ,827
0
(3,750)
3,100
(1 9 7, 1 4 9)
121,342
~
..
�EXPLANATORY NOTES TO MARTA PROPOS ED 1970 OPERATI NG BUDGET
LINE
9.
10¾ of Line 56.
11.
$350,000 does not inclu de any of the current technical studies grant which is to be
closed out in 1969.
19.
Deposit to Retirement System of Georgia, Inc~ paid up in 1969.
21.
New personnel, if any, will not be brought into the e x isting program.
25.
Portions of the time o f individual staff members will be charged to technical studies
(Line 55). Such charges are used in lieu of cash as matching funds. Details appear
in the note on Line 55.
41.
$40,000 shown is for d i rect legal support of the Authority's operations. Not i ·ncluded
is other legal services required under technical studies, two-thirds of which is to be
finan~.ed by the Federal. Government.
55 ..
Summary of 1970 work program cost:
Federal
$350,000
Local:
cash - $145,000
Staff- . $ 30,000
Total 1970 Program
$175,000
$525,000
~
�~
._.,..._,..,
.,.,_..,,,.,.,~,...;
.. •.;:;:.~..
fc-,......,_,.......,._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _.....__ _ _.....,.....,_.....,.._ _..,..,._.•,..,
ROUGH
~~x~,·- -~----=-7
DRAFT
By .......~~...~:....~~.o an
Date .... ~/.?.~/~~.. .
Page ....... .. ....... ..~.. .
WORK PROGRAM FOR ATLANTA - CCT PROJECT, Oct.-Nov. 1969
I.
CAS Program - objective, to develop a work program with analysis planning
components:
CCT role - assistance to CAS to start
process, not develop complete plan.
A.
sketch plan - develop ideas on:
1)
land development - review all hard and soft areas
2)
circulation - including parking system - put into time frame
_ ,3)
B.
short range
before subway
4)
long range - after subway
5)
alternatives if no subway
--
f analytical
base - for testing
1)
develop initial variables needed to test sketch plan ideas
2)
review data base from existing sources - including travel data
3) · work program for
t
data collection operations
systems development
- reports, etc.
~
II.
Shuttle bus demo - objective, have appropriate applications ready for DOT
approval in November
A.
Service operations - prepare capital grant application to buy new buses
B.
Monitoring operations - CCT work program - (tech. studies - supplement)
C.
Second phase demo program application ,
I II.
,.
St r ategy on ,Feder al Applications fo r Atlanta - obj e ctive , to get an
expl a inable p icture of Atlanta's planning and
operationa l structure
WW 143.215.248.55- ·~~-\
~





.3rthur 1llJUttldJnc.
ADL 116- 768
�ROUGH
DRAfT
By ......1':.:....~.'. ... ~.1.?an
D ace ...9/29/69
.... .... ...... ..... .
?.....
Page ...... ....... ....
Work Program f or Atlanta - CCT Project , Continued
II I.
Continued
i n t ransportation f or us e in Federal applications
to DOT, HUD, HEW
A.
Paper des c ribi ng r ole of variou s agencies
B.
Dec isions on what kind s of appli cation s should be handled by which agencies
C.
IV.
,"j
I;
cap i tal grants
2)
technical s t udi es
3)
demo . proje ct s
4)
701 planni ng
5)
others.
Strategy f or timing of current app l ications
Financial Study of Atlanta Transit System - needs more thought
V.
I'
1)
Busway s Experiment - hold f or time being
Time Allocations:
I.
~
II .
II I.
IV .
v.
'"""
WSA
, Gammel
10•
CAS Pro gr am
A.
Ske tch planning
B.
Analysis base
6 wks. Oct. to Nov. 1 5 '
SOM
Courtney
RERC
Hen s en
ADL
Sl oan
10
5
3
5
5
10
3
Shu ttl e bu s demo
3
1
2
3
Fede r a l Ap plica tion Stra t egy
1
1
2
5
ATS Financ i al Study .....
2
2
3
Busways Demo
---
(
Mi sc. pr ogr am <level ;
organiz a tion and adm.
)
~
1
TOTAL
20
18
3
21
21
2rthm D.11.ittkJJnc.
ADL 116- 768
�_.
I •
- - -- - - - --,---- - --,----- --D_o_T_ -_ c_E_ T_E_R_c_
1T_Y_T_ R1
_ _\0_1s_r_o_1_'T_A_T_1_o_N_ P_R_o_J_E_c_T_-_-_A_T_L_A_N_T_A_-_
- _P_II_A_s_
E_I_ I_ _ _ _ __ __--=--:- - -- ~
1
C\\DIDATE
P,OJECTS
' RE SPONSI- 1
BI LITYIN .I
ATL1\NTA /
.,._.::II 0:--1
P.OJECT S
AT S
?2riphera l
? 2 r'.dng t o
C2ate r Cit y
"?20 le Nove r "
U"ITA
1
INTE REST
OU'I'PUT OF
PHAS E lI 6/70
Init i a t e ne w sc r Qu ic k
Actio n Pro j e c t vi ce in De c . ' 6 9
wit h demo. f unds
t es t new s e r v ic e
CCT moni tor r e wi th i mpli cas ul t s a nd propo se
tion s f or ne w
expand e d d emo ' s
"p eopl e move r "
by G/ ?O
har dware
"l
\J OR FE \'fU RE S
11
L
,
OF PROJ ECT
'I'E 1 I CAL r.ro RK
· · CIN
"
REQUI RED
, 1 s t phas e - a l l da y
' io d s htittl e b~s
' s e rvice f rom Stadium-Civ ic Ccnt e rpa rk ing to down,
town
· 2nd phase-pos s ible


n e w hardware sys ·', t ern if conditions


ju s tify
pr e par e demo n s tr a tion
proj e c t a pplic a tion
monit or an d ev a l ua t e
performa nce of s e rvi c e ,
once o pe ra ting-stud y new
ma rke t a nd t e chnology
a pplic a tions
I
I, WO TECHNICAL
RK PROJ ECT
1
TEAH
AT L
CCT
WS A
ADL
SOH
I



us\,-ays



 : : xpe r i men t


2nte r City
~-Js
C:. rculat i on
=-=provemen t s
' Te st s uit a bility as ba sic
tr a n s it sys t em
MARTA
in medium size
or
me tro. area s.
City EOA
exam ine new
t e chno l ogy
ap plica tion for
demon s tr a tion
proj e ct funds
AT S
CAS
wi th
TOPIC S
grou p
qui ck action
pro j e c ts s tr a t eg y f or
int e rim se r v ,--ice i mprove me nts
s pecifi c im prov e me nts i dentified ap plicatio ns for
f e de ra l f unds
CAS
be tt e r unde r s t anding of
cent e r c it y
dy nami cs and
needs
r e por t on ce nt e r city plus
wor k p rog r am de sig n f o r se tting
up sys t em- - t e c hn ic a l s tu dy ap pl .
informa ti on sys t em~ ! c heck on e sist i ng da t a I des i g n a nd set up sys bas ic da t a an d
a na l ys is
t ern inc l uding surv e ys ,
col l ection a nd proce ssing me thod s - - a na ly si s
and co n clu sio ns
CAS
dev . of f utur e
p roj e c t s to f it
int o p r ogram- de fine UMTA int eres t
a l ter na tive pla n s
with ne w p r oj e c t s
r eady to f it into
f und ing program
s tudy of to t a l sys- 1 fir s t r o und s ke tch
t ern a l t e r na t iv e s


. pl a ns cov e ring l a nd de- I SOM


fo r c e nt e r ci t y- v e l opme nt a nd circula- I RERC
I
s uppl . f a cilitie s I tion a lt ernativ e s-WSA I
I
cent ra l s ub wa y dev. · i mpac t s tu d i cs- -u r ba n
ADL '
desig n & t raff i c
I (i
a na l ys is
CD;TER CITY
Je·.re lopmen t
0: Data Base
Circu lation
S:.-stem a nd
JE:-:e lopment
?lanning
I


1 s t pha se - se l e ct

p r oject from AATS


· pl a n routes
I - ------- --------- -
.I 2nd phase - t e st
f e a sibility a nd
develop program for
impl eme nt a tion





me thod s
prov ing
i ng a nd
ti on in
c ity
ADL
s u rve y area s a nd marke t s c heck on politic a l
a cc e pt a bil i ty and t e chnic a l _f e as ibility _____ _
RERC
WSA
SOM
t es t i mp a c t s on n ~ig hbo rhoo d s -d e s i gn proj e cts and se t up i mpleme nta ti on
for imbus routc ir c ula cen t e r
s tud y exi s t ing bus
r ou ting a nd ope r a ting
WSA
pr obl ems - t e s t a lt e rnat i ve i mprovements
I
-c ha nne l i za tio n- tur~ina ry mo vemen ts-st a t ionse tc.
I
I
ADLRE RC
I
I
I
1
1
COST
�-- ------- - - - -
GE:O:ERI\L
Trans it Poli cy
and Pl·o,.. c.1 m
Deve l opmen t
AATS
MARTA
guida nc e £or
UMTA funding
of future
proj e cts in
Atlant a
3 t o 5 yea r mass
t ra nsi t prog r a m
including UMTA
f unding
he lp put AATS pl a n
' i nto programmatic
I



t erm-- p r ior:Lt\ies
a nd . s cheduling·
I
d epends on policy a nd
pro g ram of AAT S a nd
its cons titu e nts
ADL
WSA
�MINUTES OF THE FORTY-SIXTH ME~TING
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
NOVEMBER 4, 1969
MEM,BERS PRESENT
Sanford s. Atwood (DeKalb County)
Roy A. Blount (DeKalb County)
M. c. Bishop (Fulton County)
s. Truett Cathy (Clayton county)
Rawson Haverty (City of Atlanta)
Allens. Hardin (Fulton County)
K. A. McMillan (Gwinnett County)
L. D. Milton (City of Atlanta)
,MEMBERS ABSENT
John c. Wilson (City of Atlant~)
OTHERS PRESENT
Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit
Authority
.





H. L. Stuart, General Manager
E. w. Nelson, Chief Engineer
King Elliott, ~ublic Information Director
H. N. Johnson, Administrative Assistqnt and
Assistant Secretary
Consultants
J. A. Coil, PBTB, Atlanta
Francisco
w. o. Salter, PBTB, San
w. Stell Huie, Counsel
Others
Jan Richey, City of Atlanta Pla~ning P~partment
William H. Parr, Atlanta Chamber of C:omme,fce
Edgar E. Schukraft, southw~st Atlanta A~sociation~ Inc.
Newsmen - WAGA-TV
Newsmen - WSB-Radio
Dick Miles, Atlanta Constitution
Bill Collins, Atlanta Journ2 1
I
- 1 -
�The meeting was called to order by Mr. Roy A. Blount,
Acting Chairman .
MINUTES
Minutes of the Octqber 7th meeting had been mailec prior to
the meeting and were unanimously approved ~pon ~ motion by Mr.
Bishop, seconded by Mr o Hardin.
FINANCIAL REPORT
The Financial Report as of October 29, 1969, presented by
Mr. Stuart , showed appropriations received from t~e participating
governments for the fourth quarter with the exception of Fulton
and Gwinnett Counties. Mr. Stuart pointed out that since preparation of the statement, Fulton County's fourth payment had been
received, leaving Gwinnett County in arrears for the third and
fourth quarters. Staff and administrative costs continued to
run within the budget.
Upon motion by Mr . Bishop, seconded by Mr. Hardin, the
financial statement was unanimously approved ~~dis attached and
made a part of these Minutes.
Mr . Stuart stated that Mr. Hardin h~d suggested that the
monthly financial statement would be more informative if the
budget column were pro-rated and if it inciuded a new column for
the same period last year. Mr. Hardin's su~gestions had been
r eferred to the Finance Committee, and MJ;'. Stuart was directed
to set up an a d ditional meeting between the Finan~e C9mmittee ,
c o unsel , Account ant and Auditor for ~TA, someti me during
December to d iscuss the matter further and report back to t h e
Boa r d by t he f irst o f the y e ar.
Mr. Blount stat ed that it would be necessary to appr ove
the p ropo sed 1 970 b udget during December. It haq alr e q d y been
submitted to t he Local Gover nment s and f a v o~able comm~nt s had
b e e n re c eived fr om t h em.
Mr. Bl o unt further s tat e d tha t due t o 9hanges in t he City
government as a resul t of the r e cent eleation t p at \he new budg et
sho ul d be st!bni tted t o the n ewl y eleqted Mayor, Vice-Ma yor,
Aldermen, and to a ny others c o ncerned . Upon motion by Mr o
Haverty, seconded by Mr. McMil lan, it wa ~ un~nimously agreed
that a meeting should be arrang ed by the General M~nager with
t~·, e new officials to apprise them of the proposed 1970 . budget
and work program.
REPORT OF GENERAL MANAGER
Mr o Stua rt repo rted on a meeting in Atlanta on October 23rd
with Mr. Jerome Co Premo of the Urban Mass T+ansportation Adminis tration , Washington, D. c., at which meeting representatives of
- 2 -
�of the Highway Department, Federal Highway Administratio~, u. s.
Department of Housing and Urban Development, Atlanta Transit
System , Metropol i tan Planning Commission, City of Atlanta, Central
Atlanta Progress , Inc., Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc., and
other transportation and planning agencies were in attendance.
Purpose of the meeting was to discuss MARTA's new federal application , as well as applications filed by the City of Atlanta and
Central Atlanta Progress, Inc., and by Economic Opportunity
Atlanta , Inc ..
It was pointed out that Federal agencies are concerned about
overlapping work items in the above applications, as well as that
of the TOPICS (Traffic Operations ProgrqITI to Increase Capacity
and Safety) Study that is soon to be initiated by a consultant
for the State Highway Department. It was noted that these studies
should be coor dinated with each other in order to avoid any duplication of work. Work schedules would be submitted to the Federal
agencies with an explanation of how these various programs will
be coordinated and tied in .
Two char ts were presented by Mr. St~art, the first of which
showed the wor k schedule for conducting an ~ast-West Busway
f .easibility study. Planning projections for this study would be
furnished by ARMPC and the remainder of the work would be undertaken jointly by Parsons Brinckerhoff-TudoE-Bechtel and Alan M.
Voorhees and Associates. The work would take about nine months
but it is hopefu l that early conclusions can be reached before
that t ime peri od . Wor k items 1, 2, 3 and 4 of the MARTA application a r e involved i n this evaluation study.
The s e con d c a r t p r esented reflect ed MARTA' tota l wor k
p r ogram a nd it s howed coordi nation with the Central Area Study
bei ng spo nsor ed by t he Ci t y of Atlanta and Central Atlanta Pr o Thi s
g ress , and t h e work o f Econ omi c Oppor tuni ty Atlanta , Inc .
wo u ld be .a two - yea r p r ogram with the approximate starti ng dat e
bei ng J a nuar y 1 , 1 9 7 0 , broken down into two phase s with Pha s e I
being t he wor k progr ammed f o r 1 970 and Phase II the r emaini ng
work.
Upon c ompletion of Mr. Stuart' s p r e s e nt at i on a copy of
each chart was fur nished the Memb er s wi t h t h e r equest tha t they
be studied , fo ll owed b y any questions th~ ~ oar d mi ght h a v e .
Th e Genera l Manager stated that a written monthly progr ess
r eport would b e r equ i r ed in or der to keep all agencies fully
i n fo r med o f d evel opment s t hrougho ut the wor k p r og r am . .I t was
p oint ed out t hat al l wo rk e lements r eflected on the c har ts wer e
c o ntained i n the new federa l application being submitted to DOT
with the e xception of t h e pla n ni ng p r ojec tion s wh ich we r e b e ing
pre p a r ed by ARMPC a n d wou ld be i ncorpo r a t ed i n t he a ppropria te
section of t he appli cation wh en r e c e i ved o
-
3 -
�Mr~ Stuart expressed hope that a new approach to transit,
new amendments that would be required, and a sound financial
plan would be ready to present to the General Assembly during
1971~
Mr. Stuart also mentioned that Economic Opportunity
Atlanta, Inc. had filed their application directly with the
u. s. Department of Housing and Urban Development, but HUD
preferred to have it filed through MARTA with the Transit
Authority being the Administrative Agency and responsible for
the work. It would not cost the Transit Authority any funds
except for the occasional staff time that would be required to
review and administer the work. Mr. Stuart had agreed to this
arrangement and planned to meet with EOA officials in the near
future o
REPORT OF PUBLIC INFORMATION DIRECTOR
Mr. Elliott reported that public information activities
were being accelerated as requested at the OGtober Board Meeting. Contacts had been made with Editors of the Atlanta Journal
and Constitution, and with News Directors of local radio and
television stations. Information had been supplied for a special
edition of the Atlanta Journal, and WRNG Radio had agreed to
provide a one-hour program when the MARTA program is defined.
A re-cap of the MARTA program had been drafted and will be put
into final form when the program is firmed up. The re-cap will
serve as the framework for more detailed informational efforts.
ADJOURNMENT
Mr. Blount adjourned the meeting at 3:45 P.M.
NEXT MEETING
December 2, 1969 - 3:00 P.M.
diN·
H. N.
Assistant
-
4 -
�METROPOLITAN ATLANIA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
ATLANTA, GEORGIA
STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL CONDITION
OCTOBER ' 2,9 , t% 9
ASSETS
Ca sh- in Banks:
Citizens and Southern National Bank
First National Bank
Trust Company of Georg ia
Fulton Nati onal Bank
Cit i ze. s Trust Company
$ 9,560.76
7,822.25
1,000.00
1,731.91
940.74
$ 21,055.6 6
Appropr iations Re ce ivable :
Fulton Count y
Gwinnett County
$13,678.00
1,356.64
15,034. 64
Inve stments ~ L . S. Tre i.sury Bi lls:
Regula r Funds
11,916.70
Petty Cash
Airlin e Deposit
25.00
425 .00
S 48 ,45 7.00
T TAL
LIABILI TIE S AND FUND BALANCE
Current Li a bilit ies :
P~yr o ll Taxes Withheld and Acc rued
Account s Paya ble
Fund Ba l ance s:
Re serve ~ Pa rson s, Brinckerhoff=Tudor-B e ch t e l
Re t a i ner g r ee ent :
Tr an s por t a ti on
$1,114 . 42
Re pro-fo cti n
392 . 6
lh .a:;,propr i a t ed
TOTAL
$
1,188. 75
346. 24
$
1 ,534 . 9
$ 21, 000 . 00
1, 507. 2
24 , 414 . 73
46 , 92' .• 01
~ 48 ,45 2. QQ
�METROPOLI TA..i ATLANTA RAPID TRANS IT AUTHORITY
BUDGET REPORT
OCTOBER 29 , 1969
ACTUAL
J AN . 1, 1969
B DGET
?cc.d Ba lane _
.es s:
OCT . 29
$ 49 , 720. 61
$
$ 49 -,) no . 1
$
196
49 , 72 0. 61
.dj us t ment - St ate o i Georgia
INCO~ii::
n ·,::q:ropr." a.tions :
Ci t y o:: At _3_r:.ta.
Cl::J.yto._ ·oun.ty
$ ·' ~-, 015 . 00
42 , 015 . 00
2 , 8 . 8 . 75
2 ' 9 • 7 .'"
1 , 3 5 . • ,1
s ' .' 00 000
' , 76 . '1.5
$134 , '·-75 . O•,)
4 1, 385 . 00
5 , 900 . 00


JeKa l b Cou.:1ty


?u lton Cour~t y
Cwinnett c o,:.r:ty
2 , 276 . 25
Sub- ,.,.o ta l s
S~at n of Georg ia
$134 , 473 .00
0
2 , 633 . 0.5
SOl1 •
31 r't(l() . 00
I n . .:re st Income
Fe der:,. l F und s
3 , 551. 22
()
TOTAL I NCOME
TOT. -, -NCOME AND F UND BALA1';.CE
~236 , '328 . 66
.J S,. , 8' l
Q .
EXPE:N"E
· -u:J.ii Cos ts :


'ct


,,
l J:r ies
·?
7
!i . 08
,' 976 . 92
1,
.:: cc ·~ 1.l S e curit:1
C
$ .) 8 , 03 .~L., :
r ' y~ ;- fl ·~ ._,
1.1~
l ,
u ·.: ,;-:,_'~~/ F und
·,:-~.o
'I
E~~ 1~i. and Acc i<le~~ ~=sur rec
R..- ,t · r -':ment
•·· r f<'mlr-. 1s Comf1<c!.-.B
-i. ·
i
·Q.
~ 2 ( 1.. .',,_!_2..,,
B , '.rd Ne~ting s
Sub - 'l ot ds
~ 8 ... 2
A-.~t:.~:~!iG t:;.~,:;, t i ve ~c;; t E :
$
. t·:!TC
_'.)rmru-aicat ions
Suppl:'_e ,
i:. • l t
1 , ~- : 1 :2~·.
1 · , Ji .
2L, . 0O
J , ()50 . 0()
$
!i.-.i


J , .51:11. ()


1 , 7()~· . '.lh
l , J{l;._ _ 7 ·
.s.s ::. . -: q
1 , 1 2, . _;\
A,~C· :.r.::-:t · n t
Au '. lto:
_"; ·_1 . ()0
Puhl.tc.: I nformat l'n
.-c, ·:r.·11eys ' Fees ;nd. Ex-pense
0
A
Sub-Tot · .ls
F.'.Ki?EN '
~
' ., G.A.RRIED FORWARD
lL • li :~
l[l , qpt\ .
57
$ l.' 2 . Y:~ ._ul
TO
�I
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
BUDGET REPORT
OCTOBER 29, 1969
BUDGET
ACTUAL
JAN. 1, 1969 TO
OCT. 29 196~- -
TOTAL INCOME AND FUND BALANCE -
$236,328.66
$185 ,821, 03
EXPENSES:
Brought Forward
$13-7,830.46
$103,073.75
Con s ultant s on Retainers:
Par s ons, Brinckerhoff-Tudor-Bechtel
$ 8,000.00
$
Contracts:
Atlanta Area Transportation Study
Technical Studies
Sub-Totals
$14,000.00
46,500.00
$ 60,500.00
$ 37,000.00
14,000.00
$ 51,000.00
TOTAL EXPENSES
$206,330.46
FUND BALANCE
S 29,998.20
7,332.55
$ 24,414 73
�r---
St)_n d-ay, Journal-Constitution, 11/23/60
IE!
- ~
p
Atlanta m 'Excellent Position'
-
For Fed era I Funds, He Says
' By BILL COLLINS
.
\ The l-J.S. secretary of transportation says
Atlanta will b';Ti\


( an ~xcellent position '_' to get two-thirds of the money for a rapid


hans1t system from the federal government. .
_.!..·
· - John Volpe, former governor
of Massachusetts and one of the
front-runners for the vice presidenti al nod at ~it143.215.248.55'·
the 1968 Repub- i'#F ·
lican presiden- f ·
··;>
tial convention i
,,,
was in Atlanta i ~
Sa turday night ·
to address the •·
11th a n n u a I


neeting of the


. "THE OTHE R $2.5 billion
Nationa l Co n- ¢.'(
,vould
be used to help build 900
ference of State if,{.'?~~*
. ~1rports and expand 2,700 air-'
a · I ative t•<-:.>:/'.g
'.J e O I S
~~¼/·Ji .
fields around the country "
ueaders.
J o hn \'ol pc
Vol pr said.
'
The · secretary, at a news con. , 'fht . secr~tary said the Nixon
ference before his speech, exadmt 1stration hopes to r estrict
plained the Nixon administrathe !,umber of rncoming fli ghts
tion 's $10 billion, 12-year public
a~ f ve of the nation 's busiest
transpart:ation bill and said Atairports and to better control .
lanta "may get the jump on
_the fl_1 ghts at 22 other airports
other citi es" for funds under the
'
mclud1ng Atla nta 's
bill, if the measure is approved
I_n his remarks t~ the 800 legisby .Congress.
la tive leaders attending the
. He sa id the bill would auth_orfouQ·-day con fer e nc e Volpe
1
1ze him to make S3.1 b1l11on
_c? lked ~bout the need fo~ federavail able immediateiy upu1, ii.s ·
a1-state-1oca1 government coon- I
• I
being signed into law. The iederal money would be spent over
f~
_r:_s. ··- - - c·- . - ~ ~ - ~- He also sa id Atlanta would be
"in an excellent position" to get
a federal grant totaling twothirds of . the cost of a rapid
transit system because of the
planning it has done and also because it is one of fiyg ~ £..~DJ.er
@~s."
---...:::--
At


VOLPE POINTED OUT, however, that under the proposed
bill no one state coul d get more
th·a n 12½ per cent of the total
appropriation.
He also told newsmen the
Vietnam war is not draining
funds he has requested for his
department and added, " The administration and the director of
the Bureau of the Budget have
approved the two transportation
bills I have requested."
Vol pe says the two measures
he woul d li ke to see enacted include the $10.1-billion public
transportation hill and the airport-a irw,iys bill which would
provide $2.5 bill ion for air-traffic
control and $2.5 billion for construction of new airport s and explansion of existing fac,il ities.
He sa id lhe .administration is
co n c er n e d about in-fli ght
crashes and fee ls the airportairways bill would help dim inish
the possibility of future collisions.
Wit h $2.5 billion of the airport -airways bill, Volpe explr1incd. the fedcrcil government
would work towards development of ii ful ly aulom,itt'd sysll'm t~1,1ffic ontrol sys-
tem.
..
I
eration in solving the nation's
problems.
Much of !?he glamour, power
and ' prestige that once surrounded state Capitols shi fted to
Washin gton in the past 25
yea rs," be sa id.
" And when the power went to 1
Washington, many of the tal- I
ented young men went also. I
Washington has been the mecca
Forf young A m e r i c a n s who
w:\1ted lo dedi cate their lives to
fulji ll ment of the American ,
dre1a m," he added.
I
VOLPE SAID there has been J
a trend towards reversing the I
growing dependence on the fed- 1
era! govern ment in the past few I
year~ ·
'
"This new trend first becnme
stronf ly ev-ident. under President Jo•hnson, " he ndded.
"But Pre ident. Nixon has
gone a step furt her. He has propose~ a program of revenue j
sh;1nng between the states and I
Washinglon. And , ;ilthough il is'
a modest b •ginning, il will be
stepped up," Volpe said.
I
�December 8, 196.9
Mr . N. B . Herndon, President
Atlanta Life Insuranc e Company
148 Auburn Avenue, N . E .
P . 0 . Box 897
Atlanta, G e orgia 30301
Dear
r. Herndon:
Thank you very much for your letter of December 5th
dvising me of r. Jesse Hill, Jr' • vailability to
erve on the etropolitan Atl nta Rapid Tr 11 it
Authority.
With appreciation for your cooperation nd best wishe
for the holiday
son, I m
Sincerely yours,
Ivan Allen, Jr.
ayor
lAJr:lrd
�•
Dec ember 8 , 1969
Honorable J . J . Little
Clerk of tb.e Board of Ald rm n
City of Atlan
Atl nta, Georgi
D
r
r . Littl :
By authority ~ ted
me, lam
r by ppointlng r .
Je ae Hill, Jr ..
m
ber of the etropoli
All nta
pid Tranait A thority to till the
expir d
rm of
r. Ric rd H. Ric : said term xpirl
mber 31.
1969.
ctfuUy requ at confirmation of thi
Board 0£ Alder en.
S
c rely yout'•,
lva Allen, Jr.
ayor
IAJ'r:lrd
CC: M r. Jeaee Hill, Jr.
ppoilltment
�P. W. PHOTBROW, .JR,
0.l'FIC-Jll<S AND Dl.RECTOBS
Dill110TOJl OF AOZN0IIUI
A, F. HERNDON
FOUNDER
JESSE
mLL, JR.
X. B.HERNDON
AOTUAJl'I'
PRESIDEST.TREASURER
G. E. DELORME
E. M, MARTIN
DISTJUOT lllAllfAOBJl
VICE PRE SIDENT• S EOBJ!:TARY
CHAS. W. GREENE
W, H. SMITH
Dill, POBLIO Jll<LATIONS
2ND VICE PllEBIDRNT
DH.H.L.LANG
GEO. W. LEE
KBDIOA.L DUIZCTOJl
3RD VICE PRESIDENT
P. H. WILLARD
E, L, SIMON, FLMI
DIBTJUOT MANAOBJl
GENERAL AUDITOB
148 A UBURN AVENUE, N. E.
ATLANTA LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY
P. 0. BOX 897
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30301
December 5, 1969
The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor
City of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Mayor Allen:
I am pleased to advise you of the avail ability
of our Mr. Jesse Hill, Jr. to accept your appointment as
a member of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit
Authority.
We at Atlanta Life take pride in knowing that
over a long period of years throughout our system in
eleven states we have acquired and developed men of such
capabilities needed to serve their respective communities
in positions and ways to enhance their communities' growth
and development. Mr. Hill is one of such persons and we
are sure that in serving on this board he will help make
an outstanding contribution to the betterment of our great
City of Atlanta.
My best wishes also to you and your family for
an enjoyable holiday season.
Very truly yours,
N. Be Herndon
President
NBH/e
�December 3. 1969
r . Norris H rudon
587 Univer ity Plac e , N . W .
tlanta~ Geor ia 30314
De r Mr. Herndon:
I ould like to ppoint r . Jesse Hill as a member of
th Metropolitan Atlanta R pid T ran i t A1.1tbority. I
fe l that Mr. Hill is minently qu lifi d to fill this
position nd bri
not only to the po ition
rso al
l ader hip but tron ii
ci 1 kno ledg
hich is
tly n
d i tbi proj ct.
I
ould appr date v ~y mueh your a.dvi in me o1 the
vailability of Mr . Hill to ,cc pt thi
ppo' tm .ut,
With be t wis
for th eomil1 holid y
eon,. I am
Sincer · ly yo r •
I an All
ayor
, Jr.
IAJt:lp
Hold for B epl y
Original sent h o me and c opy s ent to c o mpany
copy sent to Jesse Hill.
�MINUTES OF THE FORTY-SIXTH MEETING
)<
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
DECEMBER 2 , 1969
MEMBERS PRESENT
Sanford s. Atwood (DeKalb County)
Roy A. Blount (DeKalb County)
M. c. Bishop (Fulton County)
s. Tr uett Cathy (Clayton county)
Rawson Haverty (City of Atlanta)
Allens . Hardin (Fulton County)
K. A. McMillan (Gwinnett County)
L. D. Milton (City of Atlanta)
MEMBERS ABSENT
·John c . Wilson (City of Atlanta)
OTHERS PRESENT
Metr opolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority
H. L . Stuart , General Manager
E. W. Nelson , Chief Engineer
Ki ng El l i ott , Public Information Director
H. N. Johnson, Administrative Assistant and
Assistant Secretary
Cons ultants
J. A. Coi l , PBTB , Atlanta
We Stell Huie, Counsel
Others
Edgar E. S chukra f t , Southwest Atlanta Asso c iation
R. E. And rews, DeKalb Co u nty J ur or s Associati o n
Al e x Coffin, The Atlanta Co nst itution
Raleigh Bryans, Th e Atl a nt a J o urna l
Newsmen - WSB Radi o
Newsmen - WSB - TV
Newsmen - WGST Radio
- 1 -
�The meeting was called to order by Mr. Blount, Acting
Chairman.
MINUTES
Minutes of the November 4 meeting had been mailed to the
members prior to this meeting, and on motion by Mr. Bishop,
seconded by Mr. McMillan, they were unanimously approved.
FINANCIAL REPORT
Mro Stuar t presented the financial report as of November
27, 1969. Staff and administrative expenses remained within
the budgeted figures with no significant changes from the October statement. A fund balance of $24,096.53 was reflected for
the period ending November 27. Mr. Bishop said it was encouraging that the Authority had stayed within its budget and would
close out the year without a deficit. Mr. Stuart noted that
the State of Georgia was a full 10 percent participant in the
MARTA budget as of June 30, 1969. The financial s~atement is
attached and made a part of these Minutes.
~he General Manager stated that the Finance Committee would
meet on December 16 with MARTA's counsel, accountant and auditor
i.n attendance for the purpose of discussing the Authority's
financ i al r eporting procedures; to prepare recommendations for
the Board's January meeting, and to discuss the State's support
for the second half of 1969.
GENERAL MANAGER'S REPORT
Mr. Stuar t r eported on two transportation seminars that he
had attended i n Washington during November , one being the Center
City Tr ansportation Project Conference sponsored by Urban
America , Inc . dealing with transportation in the center c j ty ,
and the other being the Transportation Demonstration Projects
Conference sponsored by the Technical Council on Urban Tr ans porta ti on and the National Capital Section of the American
Society of Civil Engineers and the u. s. Department of Trans portation at which various transportation agencies presented
their findings as a result of completed demonstration p r o ject s .
While in Washington Mr. Stua rt also visited with offic ials of
HUD and DOT , and with members of the Georgia Congressi onal Delegation t o apprise them of the Transit Authority's present wo rk
p r ogr am and wha t it p r oposed during 1970.
A p r ogr ess report was given by Mr. Stuart concerning rail
commuter ser vicee He pointed out that tracks of the Southern
Railway f r om Dora ville to Atlanta were the only ones suitable
for such service. Other lines leading into the city had too
many g r ade crossings , had single tra ckage, plus changes that
would be requi r ed in tracks , signals , parking lots and plat forms . Souther n°s response had not been as enthusiastic as the
-
2 -
�Authority had hopedo Cost figures were being prepared by
r a i l road off icials and were expected to be available by the
end of December in connection with the Doraville to Atlanta
line .
REPORT ON MR o CARLOS VILLARREAL'S VISIT TO ATLANTA
Mre Blount stated that Mr. Carlos Villarreal, Administrator ,
Ur ban Mass Tr anspor tation Administration, had visited Atlanta
on November 28 in connection with the inauguration of shuttlebus servi ce by Atlanta Tr ansit System between the Atlanta
Stadium through the Peachtree corridor to the Civic Center
par k ing l ot. Mr. Blount advised that Mr a Villarreal was sympatheti c to Atlanta's transportation problems and very interested
in f inding a solution to them. He would like to receive from
the Transit Authority an application for additional federal
f unds i f the p r esent Senate bill pending in Congress is passed
which would set up a 10-billion dollar federal fund over a
12- yea.r peri od to be distributed on a two-thirds federal - onethird l ocal matching basis for the purpose of establishing a
complete t r ansit system to serve the Atlanta area. Mr.
Villarreal fe lt that this bill would probably pass in lieu of
the p r oposed Transit Trust Fund bill. Mr a Blount said MARTA
should be ready to move as soon as federal funds are approved .
STATUS OF NEW FEDERAL APPLICATION
.MARTA's new federal appli cation had been revised in line
with changes agreed on between Alan Voorhees and Associates and
Parsons Brinckerhoff-Tudor-Bechtel, and it had been f o rwarded
t o the Depar tment of Transportation on November 26. It was
poi nted out that the work p r ogr am i ncluded in the appli cati on
could not act ually commence until DOT had approved the appli cationo
Mr o Haverty inqu ired about the status of third- party contracts in connection with the application and u r g e d that they
be drawn p r omptly for submittal to DOT for appr ov al . Mre Hui e
s t ated t hat some of the c ontr acts were being p repared e The
General Manager was d irected to follow up and have the contracts
d r awn a s rapidly as possible. He pointed out that the wor k
p r ogr am would r equire execution of these third-party contracts
bef or e wor k could commence and that these contracts would be
p r esented to t he Board for review and app roval before being
placed i n for ce.
ADOP TION OF 197 0 BUDGET
Mr Q Blount stated that a tentative budge t had been p res ented to t h e members at the Oc tober mee ti ng and that a f inal
-
3 -
�budget of $827,000 was before them for adoption for 1970 $407,000 of which would come from Fede+al funqs. Dr. Atwood
advised that the Finance Committee had met to discuss the
budget in detail prior to the meeting 9 nd recommended its
approval. After considerable discussion, upon motion by Mr.
Bishop, seconded by Dr. Atwood, i~ was unanimously approved,
recognizing that local appropriations had not been made and
that following local commitments, review might be necessary.
The budget is attached and made a part of these Minutes.
ELECTION OF OFFICERS
the
the
the
Mre
As the City of Atlanta had not appointed a member to fill
unexpired term of Mr. Richard Rich, Mr. Blount asked that
election of officers for the year 1970 be deferred until
January meeting. Upon motion by Mr. Haverty, seconded by
Hardin, the members unanimously assented to this action.
Following the meeting two films were shown by Mr. Coil
of the Bay Area Rapid Transit System now under construction in
San Francisco.
ADJOURNMENT
Mr. Blount adjourned the meeting at 4:00 P.M.
NEXT MEETING
January 6, 1970 - 3:00 P.M.
~.:cff~
Assistant Secretary.
�METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
BUDGET REPORT
NOVEMBER 27,1969
ACTUAL
Fund Ba l anc e
Le ss:
Adj ustme nt "' St a te of Georgia
BUDGET
.TAN . 1 , 1969 TO
NO~
27. 1969
$ 49,720 . 61
$ 49 , 720 . 61
$ 4 9, 72 0. 6 1-
$ 47 , 794 . 81
1, 925 . 80"'
I NCOME
Appr0pri;:ttions :
City £ Atlant a
Clayton County
Dc _'a lb County
Fn lton County
Gwinnett Count y
Sub ... Tota l s
t a te of Georg i a
I nterest I n come
federal Funds
$ 42 , QlS . 00
$ 42,015.00
2 , 898.75
2 , 898 .75
41 , 385.00
41 , 385.00
45 ,9 00.00
45 , 900 . 00
2~276.25
2 ,1,76 .2~
$134,475 . 00
$134:475.00
20,633.05
10,812.20
500.00
3 , SS l. .2
31 , 00Q_->.a-o_o_ _ _ _ _- - ~ ~ 1 ) _
TOTAL .INCOME
..$_1_s_6...,,_6_o__s__._o_s_~__..J 1'18 ~- B ~
TOTAL INCOME AN!) FUND BALANCE
$236 .32,8. 66
~126 , 6..J.1..2j__
$ 70 , 274 .08
8~976.92
$ 65, 072 . ·
7 , 9SJ ~~A
1, 58 1.12
ls_c;q3 J )
266 . 66
1 ,227 . 97
l 1,33Q. 88
~G6 . G6
l, J7R . 7J
l ~,"?q_~?
EXPENSE
St a ff Cos t s :
s, ·ir ies
I:z pens e
Snci I l . 'ec m~ i y
,rari ty · ,u 1
"1 1P. lltl1 :ind Accident I ns ur1nc e
( ·1
' e ti mcnt
Porkm iU 8 s Cornn n s ,1t:i.on
1
n.n <l Meet i nb i;
r,nb - 'I o ., , l s
Adr:i.n is r 1tive
,,e"' t

J23,11n
2 •.2:1~. 1'.}
...,
$___
9__
8_..,_84_8____
• 6_3_______ _i
'J 2 , 4 I 8 • ~J
stc :
', - mu.n ic.iti,,:,s
s,r,_-,-:i lin s
(r <::n:r- :ir,ce
Acc:01mt ant
·1.1 it,,r
r 1.h l:ic: I _fe r at i c,p
Att"r n ey <:: 1 Fee s .:11 d expens e
•'nb ... rot, 1·'3
_r;•,
L::: _,oo
3 , 000 .0 0
· .,S ... l;A.kI'1E1, } 1 q,,.;,A, I1
$
3,050. 00
2,231.47
3 , 338 .49
36 1. 87
1, .500 . 00
2 ~ Rl' l. 111)
1, % • 70
1, /~ l!i . 32
%9 0 7q
500 . 00
3 )000 . 00
1, 000. (1()
ll J a ·•J
_2s . ooo. oo
$ 38;981. 83
1, Ls .no
123656.2]
~
21:_ 2 725,2,Jl
~$_1~37_.....8~3_0~·~4 _6~----,$_1l.4.:.2fr'~.l~
�ME'lROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORI TY
BUDGET REPORT
NOVEMBER 27, 1969
BUDGET
ACTUAL
JAN . 1 3 1969 TO
NOV . 27, 1969
TOTAL I NCOME AND FUND BALANCE ..
Br ou h t Forward
$236,3 28.66
$196, 633.23
EXPENSE S:
Br ought Forward
$137, 830. 46
$114 , 204.15
Consu lt ants on Ret a iners:
Parsons , Brinckerhoff-ludor-Bechtel
$ s,000.00
$ 7; 332 . 55
Cont r a cts:
At lant a ~r ea Transporta tion Study
Technica l Studies
Sub-Totals
$ 14 , 000. 0()
46,500.00
$ 60,500 . 00
$ 37 , 000 . 00
14 . 000 .00
$ 51,000.00
TOTAL EXPENSES
$206.330,46
$172.536. 70
FUND BALANCE
s
29, 998, 20
�METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
A'l'IANTA, GEORGIA
STATEMEN'f OF FINA,-CIAL CONDITION
NOVEMBER 27, 1969
ASSETS
Cash i n Banks:
Citizens and Southern Nationa l Uank
First Nationaf Bank
Trust Campany of Georgia
Ful ton National Bank
Citiz ens Trust Company
$29,854.90
781.23
1,000.00
l·, 731. 91
940.74
$ 34,308.78
Appr opria tion Receivable:
Gwi nnett County
Investments~ u.
Regul ar Funds
s.
1, 356 64
0
Tr easury Bills:
11 , 916 . 70
Pe tt y Cas h
Ai rline Deposit
25 . 00
425 . 00
$ 48,032 .12.
TOTAL
LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCE
I
Curren t Liabilities:
Payro ll Taxes Withheld and Accrued
Fund Bc1 l ance_, :
Reserve - P rson& , Brincker hoff-Tudor-Becht e l
Re t a t n0.1· Agr eement :
Tr 11 sp~·r t a t · n
$1,114p 4 2
f,0. pr d t ctinn
392. 86
TTnappropria t ed
TOTAL
$2 1, 000 ~00
24,096.53
46 ,, 603,81
~
48.032 .12
�1.
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
1 970 . OPERATING BUDGET
1.
INCOME
2.
Appropriations
1970
Propose d
1969
Estimated
$ 94,000 -
1968
Actual
1967
Actual ·
$ 42,015
$ 84,030
$ 84 , 030
6,500
2,899
23,190
23,190
41,385
82,770
82,770
4~, 900_
91,800
91,800
5,000
2,276
18,210
18,210
$299,800
$134,475
$300,000
$300 , 000
$ 82 , 700
33,000
64 ,4 26
1 25 , 000
5,250
3 , 000
6,66 5
5 , 502
3.
City of Atlanta
4.
Clayton County
s.
DeKalb County
92,300
6.
Fulton County
102,000
7.
Gwinnett County
8.
Sul:?-Total
9.
State of Georgia
10.
Intere s t Income
11.
Federal Funds
$ 407 , 000
4 6 , 584
24 0 , 9 25
302,667
1 2.
TOTAL INCOME
$794,750
$217,059
$612, 0 16
$733 , 169
�2.
Line
13 .
TOTAL INCOME BROUGHT FORWARD
14.
EXPENSES
15.
Staff Costs
16.
Salaries
17.
Expenses
18.
Social Security
19.
Guaranty
20.
Health and Accident Insurance
21.
Retirement
22.
workmens' Compensation
23.
Board Meetings
·.
1970
Proposed
1969
Estimated
1968
Actual
1967
Actual
$ 794,750
$217,059
$612,016
$733,169
82,919
. 70,274
76,971
66,408
12,500
8,977
13,852
11,008
1,859
1,498
1,702
1,188
267
533
533
1,884
1,518
1,528
1,228
13,374
13,374
13,340
13,520
264
213
50
182
4,200
3,300
3,400
3,250
$117,000
$ 99,421
$111 , 376
$ 97,317
~ 99 l 421
~111 , 376
~ 97, 317
.
24.
Sub-Total
25 .
Less: Charge to Program
$ 20,000
26 ..
CARRIED FORWARD
2 97 , 000
�·----~
Line
27 .
INCOME BROUGIIT FORWARD
28.
EXPENSES
29.
Brought Forward
30.
Ad.mini strati ve Costs
1970
Proposed
1969
Estimated
1968
Actual
1967 3.
Actu al
$794,750
$217,059
$612,016
$733 , 1 6 9
$ 97,000
99,421
111,376
97,317
31.
Rent
5,888
3,050
3,102
3,000
32.
Communications & Postage
4,307
1,700
4,988
2,232
33.
Furniture & Equipment
2,000
2,012
533
34.
Supplies
6,250
6,416
3,127
35.
·Printing
4,000
11,792
2,31 2
36.
Insurance
37 .
Accountant
38.
Auditor
39 .
Public Information
40 .
Public Hearings
41.
Attorney's Fee s & Expe n ses
42.
43.
Sub - Total
CARRIED FORWARD
1,400
555
555
190
362
1,500
1,500
1,600
750
500
500
250
250
32,000
500
32, 1 27
33,004
1 , 990
4 0 , 000
16 , 000
41 1 71 1
24,314
$ 97 , 000
$ 25 ,205
$106,178
$ 69,884
$194,000
$124 , 626
$217 ,554
$167,201
�\
Line
44.
INCOME BROUGHT FORWARD
45.
EXPENSES
46 .
Brought Forward
4.
.
1970
1969
1968
Proposed
Es timated
Actual
$..'.7941 7 50
$217,059
$61 2,016
$733,169
$194 1 000
$124,626
$217,554
$167,201
1967
__. Actua l
47.
Consultants on Retainer:
48.
The Research Group
49.
Advisory Committee
5,379
5,370
50 .
Hammer, Greene, Siler Assoc.
8,650
4,74 2
51.
Eric Hill Associates
3,340
52.
PBTB
53.
AATS
54 .
55 .
Sub-Total
Te chnical studi e s
56.
TOTAL EXPENS ES
57.
INCOME LESS EXPENSES
58 ..
PLUS: FUND BALANCE BEGINNING OF YEAR
59.
FUND BALANCE END OF YEAR
10, 575
6,000
17,000
$_ 2J, 000
7,333
32 , 631
37,000
156,000
$ 44,333
$?~?, 575__
19,395
$ 32, 323
~$~6_l~0~,~0~0_0_ _ _~$__4~5~,~o~o~o:.__ _ _ _$~3~7.:....-=..5~,-0~3~6~_ _i$~4 =
1 =2L,~3~0~3
.$~
8 _27....&..,o_o_o____ _i$~2~1 ~3L,9~5~9:'.,__ _ _~$8~0~9~,~1~6~5~ _ _.::t...$~
6 1~1~,~8~2::...!..
7
(32,250 )
3,100
(197,149)
121,342
~$--::.5~5~,~5~7~5_ _ _$L--:5~2=,~4~7~5'-----~$=24~9~,~6~2~4=------I$~1~2~8L,=2~8=2
$ 23,325
$ 55,575
.,::§ -. 5·2,475
$249,624

===========::::::::==============':::::::~=======::::::::
�r
5.
EXPLANATORY NOTES TO MARTA PROPOSED 1970 OPERATING BUDGET
LINE
9.
11.
19.
10¾ of Line 56.
$407,000 does not include any of the current technical studies grant which is to be
closed out in 1969.
- Deposit to Retirement System of Georgia, Inc. paid up in 1969.
21.
New personnel, if any, will not be brought into the existing program.
25.
Portions of the time of individual staff members will be charged to technical studies
(Line 55). Such charges are used in lieu of cash as matching funds. Details appear
in the note on Line 55.
41.
$40,000 shown is for direct legal support of the Authorityrs operations. Not included
is other legal services required under technical studies, two-thirds of which is to be
financed by the Federal Government.
55.
Summary of 1970 work program cost:
Federal
$407,000
Local:
Cash - $183,000
Staff - $ 40,000
Total 1970 Program
(Rev. 12/1/69)
"/
$203,000
$610,000
�Dee ember 11. 19(> 9
Mr. Tom C. Campbell, President
Southern Iron
Equipment Company
552Z New Peachtree .Ro d
Chamblee, Georgia
Dear Tom,
Thank you very much for your letter of D cember 10th
eoncer.nitlg the llapid Tran it .Authority. At the pre ent
time, all ppoin . ent on the Authority re till d, and l
don't anticipate ny vacanci
until after my admini tration
is ov r.
I hope you ill
ve a continuing intere tin _A tl nta and the
city's traffic problem , and I am ending your l tter to
Mayor-Elect a sell tor hi inforDl tion.
ith ppr ciation and
11 good
iahe for the holiday • a.son.
I m
Sincerely yoara.
Iv
All n, Jr.
yor
lAJr:lrd
CC:
· ayo
�CITY OF ATLANTA
DEPARTMENT OF
FINANCE
501 CITY HALL
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303
J nUOl'y 3 ~ 1968
CHARLES L. DAVIS
DIRECTOR OF FINANCE
E DGAR A . VAUGHN , J R.
DEPUT: Dl~ECTOR OF FINANCE
GEORGE J . BERRY
DEPUTY DIRECTOR Of; FINANCE
(
A'?'thu1" Andoraen & Compa.ny
34 t>eacl:.ttree StreQt, N.
At l anta., Geor ia 30303





D ar Sirs ;
r to r . R.. L . Stuart 's l ttor of Decernh-er 31, 1968, addr.e
d
to Honorable Ivan Alle, Jr . .
or requeatin inform tiou rel ti
to certain a propriatio.oa mad b t he City to t he Metroi,olitan ·tlant
pid Tran it otbortt · lease be dviaed of the foll~l\8 =
In , ns
Th
City Bpl):l!'Opri t d a.nd remitted to t h Aut hority
4_.030. for th yq r ending D c. 31, 1968.
The
ount of $16 , 974~ has
ubj ct to
udg t
ppTov 1
been ppropriGted
in year
odin .
Dec. 31, 1969.
U
e, can b
plea e 1 t
of further
know .
•isttanc
t.o you in
r
to t bS. , t.t r.
v ·r, truly our,
(£,/,~:;("~
Charl
L. Davi
Di ctor of li~nc
CLO: oh
cc:
l v n All n, Jr.
rl l.at\ders
ll~ t. St V 1."·t
V
�ATLANTA, GEORGIA
RO UTE SLIP
Mr. King Elliott
TO:------------------------
0
Please refer to the attached correspondence and make the
nec essa ry re pl y.
D
Advise me th e status of the a tt ac hed .
I believe that we are not quite to this
point yet.
about it?
I
FORM 25 - 4 - 5
Do we need to do anything
�ATLANTA, GEORGIA
PHONE J A . 2 • 4463
R. Earl Landers
�COME TO RAPID TRANSIT
PUBLIC HEARING
All residents on the West Side of Atlanta are i n vited to atte n d public hea r ings on the p r oposed rapid transit lines .
The map below shows the p r oposed location of the i-apid tran sit stations and routes .
The rapid transit system would use
high- speed trains , which wou l d ru n as fast as 75 mi les per hou r
and would average more than 40 miles per h our .
Representative s of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid T ransit
Authority will discuss ro u tes and locations of all stations .
There will be a detailed discussi o n of the West Line, and how
i t wi l l a f fect this a rea .
They will show aer i a l pho t os, maps,
and s lides to sho w how the rap i d tr a nsi t sys t em wi ll look and
where it will go.
People who live i n t he area from Westlake Ave nue t o L ynh u rst
Drive and beyond should t ry t o com e t o th e h ea rin g wh ich will be held
WEDNESDAY, MAY 22, 1968 at 8 :0 0 P. M.
at the
AME ZION C HURCH , 38 HIGHTOWER R D. , N. W.
�May 5.: 1969
MEMORANDUM
T o : Mr. Ea r l Landers
From : Dan Sw at
1 ha-ve added ome n mes to the map and plott r th ir addres es .
I hope this might be of some h lp.
DS;fy
,.
�.

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�r
RAPID TRANSIT
ss
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
" MA-C:,l"'T"1A
"
~ . J . . ~ REPORTS TO THE PEOPLE IT SERVES ..
.,._.....,,._......,_....,...,...,...,.=-=--------_,..,..:a:::,....,.....,,,_==....,....,a=_.-..,__..,...,__ _,,_,___,_...,.;;;a.__.__
FEB. -MA RCH
1968
V O L . 3 . N O . 2
CANADIAN RAPID TRANSIT
PLEASES DEKALB VISITORS
Six prominent DeKalb visitors returned from a recent trip
to Toronto and Montreal to inspect those cities' rapid transit
operations, and reported that what they saw was "most impress ive," "fantas tic," "fi rst cl ass," and "mag nificen t. Th ey
concluded that "we should proceed as rapidl y as we possibl y
can" in developing a rapid transit system for Metropolitan
Atlanta.
Those in the group were Brince H . Manning, Chairman,
DeKalb County Board of Commissioners; William C. Painter,
Mayor Pro-Tern , City of Decatur; William H . Breen, Architect
and member of the Decatur City Commission ; Tom McCord,
President of Tom McCord Construction Company and C hairman of Decatur Planning Commission ; John H. Ingram , President C & S Emory Bank and Chairman of Decatur/DeKalb
Rapid Transit Committee; and Aubrey C. Couch, Executive
Vice President, D ecatur /DeKalb Development Association.
The six members of the group discussed their impress ions
and evalu ations of the two systems at a news conference held
in the DeK alb Commission chamber on February 9.
Manning observed that "we came away from Toronto and
Montreal with different impressions from those we had gotten
from just reading literature. Certainly we ought to get on to
DeKalb group in Montreal Station . Left to right, William H.
Breen, Tom McCord, John H. Ingram, W illiam C. Painter.
Rapid Transit train approaching Eglinton Station with highrise building and parking decks using "air rights" over tracks.
the job one way or the other because we need to be able to
move people. We have to have a totally integrated system with
automobil es, buses, and possibly even trackless trolleys, as
well as rail tra nsit.
"I think the thing we here in this area have overlooked so
much in the pas t is the impact that this will have not only on
land values but also on the development th at will come and
the terrific increase in the tax digest which will arise from this
development. We saw pl ans that could fit into almost any area
th at we have in DeKalb Count y or the City of Deca tur or the
whole metropolitan area of Atlanta, of development whi ch has
res ulted fro m rapid transit .
"Certai nly we ought to move forward with the program if
we are go ing to have it ; and if we don't move forward , we wi ll
all regret it in years to come.
Breen, an architect, was unequivocal in his enthusiasm for
the speed of the system and for the design of the stat ions in
Montreal. He stated, "The most summarizing thing yo u could
say abo ut the whole trip was th at I ca n come back now and say
that 'rapid transit works - I have seen it .' "
"The system is fan tastic," he said. "A system that allowed
me to get on at one end of the line in Montreal, cover 15 stops
�METROPOLITAN ATLANTA
RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
808 GLENN BLDG .
AT L ANTA.
0
120 MARIETTA S T . . N.W .
GA . 30303 • P H ONE 524 - 5711
· " DIRECTED BY THE GEORGIA STATE
LEGISLATURE TO DEVELOP A RAPI D
TRANSIT SYSTEM FOR THE S · C O UNT)'.
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA AREA ."
Edited by
KING ELLIOTT
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
OFF I CERS:
Rt C H AllD H. RI CH, Clrnirmrm
HERB ERT J. OrCK SON, Treasurer
R o Y A. 8Lo u :-,;T, //ic e Ch airman
Eo:\tUND W . H uc HES, S ec retary
CIT Y OF ATL A:'<T A:
L. D. 1\ 111.TON
RonEHT F . AoAM So:-.
R1C 1J A RD I-1 . HJCH
B.AW SON J-IA \'E ltTY
CLAYTON CO NTY:
EocAR BLALO C K
..,
DEKALB CO NTY :
Ro v A.
On. SA:-.Fono ATwooo
BLOU NT
F ULTON COU:'iTY:
J OHN
c.
STATON
'.\JJTCHELL ( . B I S HOP
GW I NN ETT COU.:\1TY:
K. A. :\lc:\l1LL10 :v
CODB COUi'-TY (Obsc,vc,)
Ons A. Bnt::'\TIIY, J n.
H. N .
~IA RTA STAFF :
Genaa/ M anager
Chief Engin eer
of Pu blic In fo rmation
As.~i.~trml lo G eneral Manag er
L. STUA RT ,
EARL W. Nt:r.so;-;,
KIN c ELLIOTT , Dir ecto r
J O H NSON, Adminis trative
l·I ENl!Y
ti
in 13 miles, let everyone get on and off who wished, and have
spent no more th an 15 minutes, is reall y moving people."
"The thing that I saw as an arch itect which was most impressive was the definition of this th ing 'corridor impact.' I've
heard this thing discussed, and seen it in papers, graphs, and
charts, but in Mont real I saw it all in flesh and blood and in
architecture. I certainly want to compliment the architects who
handled the situation in Montreal.
"The ex.tensive development aro und rapid transit stations in
Toronto and Montrea l ind icated to the group what might be
accomplished in the Metropolitan Atlanta Area, with good
planning before and during rapid transit development."
McCord stated, "What impressed me was that rapid transit
made the backbone of the future deve lopment regarding bui lding and other developments. In the city of D ecatur's planning,
we have just been through workin g ove r our documents again
and we are real concerned that property va lues wi ll not onl y
stay where they are, but will continue to go up. As yo u know,
we have had urban renewal and this has bee n a great boon .
We now have several high-rise buildings here includ ing the
new county courthouse building. We would like to think that
we could help the people who own property in Decatur to continue to have valuable property. If rapid transit would make the
land values continue to go up near the stations, then we wo uld
like to be involved where the stations wo uld be and to help
plan for the future. We are not talking about a one or twoyear plan, we are talking about a fifteen or twenty-year plan. "
Painter agreed with McCord's observation abo ut development in Toronto and related that to the futu re of Decatur.
"The city of Decatur will be in a very critical spot in this whole
metropolitan area transit. We fee l that rapid transit in the city
of Decatur will be an exciting and meaningful development
for the entire citizenry. It will not only mean a mode fo r moving back and forth in the downtown area of Atlanta, but will
also be the backbone for the development that you have just
heard about. The residenti al development will be more signi ficant to Decatur because we have always been an area where
people like to live. High-rise developments will be avail able.
We saw there in Montreal and Toronto many high-rise apartments, and good rentals can be obtained in these because of
the proximity to rapid transit. We feel th at what we saw there
can be related to Decatur in a very, very meaningful way, and
we fee l that our citizens will support it."
Ingram was particularl y impressed with the speed with
which the Montreal system was developed and the speed with
which the system moves large numbers of people. "Mont real
had talked about rapid transit for some fifty yea rs but when
the decision was fin ally made to act, they accomplished what
they now have in a short period of time of about five years .
"We were impressed with the speed with which they moved
350,000 people each day in the city of Montreal and moved
them in quiet and in comfort and with efficienc y.
"Each of these cars will carry about 160 people and they
will run about 10 cars to a train, so abo ut 1,500 people can
ride on one train . The trains are spaced something li ke two or
three minutes ap art, so you can visualize how fast you can
move people into Atlanta, or out to Decatur, or out into DeKalb County.
"We found out that the public attitude abo ut rapid transit
had changed quite a bit. People in that area feel that it is no
longe r to th eir adva ntage to drive automobiles to work . Th ey
know now that they can ride the rapid transit system , have no
parking problem , and arrive at work much more quickly. It is
certa inl y easier th an the way they were able to do this before."
" The cost of the system was certainl y large; one car for
example, will cost an average of about $ 123 ,000 and this was
fi ve or six years ago. We are talking in the Atlanta area abo ut
some 52 miles of track. The las t figure I recall was in excess
of some four hundred million dollars, and this keeps goin g up
every year. We feel in the interest of Atlanta and D ecatur and
this great area we all li ve in , th at we have got to translate this
talk and these discussions into action as soon as possible."
Couch, too, concluded that after visiting the Montreal system, "We cannot afford not to build a system in A tl an ta, and
speed is of the essence. We rode the system in Montreal as the
average person would ride it. We stayed in the Hotel C hamplain in Montreal , rode one floor down on the elevator and
were in the rapid transit system at that point. We paid a
quarter, and, as far as we know, yo u could ride all day long
for the price."
"The opportunity is so great and is so stagge ring th at I
don't think anybody can really understand what an opportun-
ity this a rea has . I have seen METRO in P aris and I have seen
the subway in New York and I must confess, the subway in
New York did not impress me. But what I saw in Montreal,
and to a larger degree in Toronto, was so different that I came
away with the same feeling that Mr. Breen mentioned - rapid
trans it works. "
"They have done magnificently," Couch emphasized , "and
if they can do it in Montreal and Toronto, we can do it here
in Atlanta and we must with the greatest speed possible. "
Manning agreed with McCord that, " the longer we wait, the
mor~ it is going to cost. This entire project will have to be
sub mitted to the people and we should move forward with the
progra m. " Manning concluded , "Certainl y we should move
forward with the program if we are going to have it, and, if
not, we are going to regret it in years to come."
The inspection tour February 1-3 was arranged and sponsored by the Decatur / DeKalb Development Association ; transportation was by private plane owned and piloted by Tom
McCord.
Breen sa id , "There is one thin g I would like to say. This
general conversation has related to Metropolitan Atlanta, Decatur and DeKalb County and the number of stations and extensions of the routes . If there are any interested persons in
counties which are not in favor of rapid transit, I would like
to recommend to these persons and to persons in other parts
of the State that they give their attention to two things :
"First, I recommend to any one that befo re they reall y become set against rapid transit that they make an effort to take
a trip to Toronto and Montreal. After . our trip, we are enthusiastic about rapid transit and see that there is a real need
for it.
"Second , rapid transit adds a fac ility or capability to a city
which in our case would ge nerate new economy throughout
the whole State. This is something that would lift Atl anta up
out of a questionable area of whether it is indeed a great city
or not quite great. I think rapid tra nsit would help make the
whole Metropolitan Atlanta area and all of its environment
including D eKalb County and D eKalb municipalities part of
a great area of high density hab itation . T hi s could not help
but affect economy of our State. If I were in Valdosta, Thomaston, or some other part of Georgia, I would be in favo r of
rapid tra nsit. "
RAPID TRANSIT EXHIBIT
WINS . FIRST PLACE AW ARD
An exhibit on rapid transit won a blue ribbon for four
Chamblee High School students at the Science Fair in DeKalb
County in Febru ary. The exhibit, titled " Rapid Transit for
Atlanta," used plaster of paris, wood, plastic, to ys, parts of a
train set and other materials to show the basic layout of the
rapid transit system now being developed . The " mushroomshaped.". objects in the picture above are signs depicting station
locations and the time/distance from Transit Center. T he
"Blue Ribbon" in the upper left corner of the display indicates
a First Place award.
The display was developed and built by Carol Pitts, Dianne
Coffee, Jud y David and Barbara Wilson, all ninth-grade stu dents at Chamblee H igh School. Ken Moore, World Geography
I
,.,..-.....·..
,.!~
~
DeKalb County School Superintendent Jim Cherry listens intently as Chamblee student Carol Pitts explains the display she
and three other students built, depicting rapid transit plans for
Metropolitan Atlanta.
"We saw it, we rode it, we like it!" William Painter (l) with Ingram and Breen; and, across the aisle, McCord with DeKalb Commission Chairman Brince H. Manning (r), as they rode the Montreal rapid transit trains.
teacher at C ha1nblee, was the s upervising teacher for the project .
T he project took approximately 60 "girl-hours" to complete,
and won a "Fi rst Place - Blue Ribbon" in the DeKalb competition. A total of more than 600 project was entered in the
Scie nce Fair. DeKalb School officials say the fair provides '·an
opportunity for students to develop research skills and engage
in individual and in-depth studies as they learn to distinguish
between fact and opinion while exploring a more e ·citing approach to learning."
�MARTAnswers
The following questions were asked by newsmen and were
answered by m em bers of th e D eKalb group which recently
toured rapid transit system s in Toronto and Montreal.
QUESTION - Did you get any feeling from the people
there as to whether they were glad to have rapid transit and
depended ?n it or whether they wished it had never been built?
BRINCE MANNING - I personally did not ta lk to any
public officials or to anyone connected with rapid transit. We
went to get the feelings of the average person in these two
great cities and the opinions of business people who have their
places of business around rapid transit and also the attitudes
of those who live around rapid tra nsit. I did not get the impression in either city that the public was against it. Two or
three people did say that t),ere was opposition to it in the beginning but they felt as a result of the completed system , that
most of the people are in favor of it.
QUESTION - How well do you feel the new systems were
integrated with existing neighborhoods as well as with the new
de velopment that took place after the stations were ~uilt?
WILLIAM BRE):,N - In the neighborhoods, the stations
were largely underground as far as size and volume were concerned. Portions of the neighborhood stations which actually
occupied ground and sp ace above ground was very small . You
could have had two or three of them around our court square,
for instance, without disrupting any of our present operations.
People walk to the stations. The only exception was where the
automobiles and buses came to the stations; there they have
drive-in stations which allow rapid transit riders to get to their
cars or to buses which feed out into the neighborhoods.
QUESTION - You mentioned the possibility of expanding
the system in DeKalb County with more stations and longer
lines. Do yo u have any specific idea as to wh at and where?
MANNING - Well , the initi al line in DeKalb Count y is
to come out along the Georgia Railroad, College Avenue and
D eK alb Avenue throu gh Decatur, on out p ast Sams Crossing
to Avonda le. It is our thinking that because of the traffic p attern set up by the Perimeter Highway that the initi al line should
be extended beyond the P erimeter Highway. The reason for
this is the limited crossings of the perimeter, not only for
private a utomobiles but also for bus t rans portation.
Q U ESTION - You also want more stations along the line
than a re now in the pl annin g?
,,
808 GLENN BLDG .
MANNING - Yes, sir : I believe in Toronto the stations
are spaced about a mile and a quarter apart. You can see the
development at each station, and I think if we have more stations, there will be a greater impact on every are~ in DeKalb
County as well as in other counties in the Metropolitan area .
I would like to say this - there has been a lot of talk about
rapid transit as something which is just for moving people
downtown. The two cities we saw defaults this theory. There
is much movement out to the areas, shopping centers, and
office buildings that have been developed as a result of rapid
transit. I would say that people are going out to these more
than they are going downtown. I think this would be true in
the Atla nta Metropolitan Area and this suits me fine. The
more people we can move out here to shop, to live, to invest
their money in real estate development, the better of( we will
be.
MARTAcTION
At its regul ar meeting January 15, 19 68 , the MARTA board
of directors re-e lected Richard H . Ri ch as Chairman and Roy
Blount as Vice Chairman. The Board was advised th at the
followin g directors had been re-appointed to new terms: from
Atlanta, L. D. Milton to a term expiring December 31, 1971 ;
from DeKalb County, D r. Sanford Atwood to a term expir,
ing Dece mber 31 , 1971 ; from DeKalb County, Ro y Blount to
a term ex piring Dece mber 3 1, 1969; and from Gwin nett
County, K. A. McM illan to a term expiring December 3 1,
1971.
The Board ag reed to participate in an acce lerated program
of the Atlanta Area Transportation Stud y.
At its meeting in February, the Board of Directors au,
thori zed the Genera l Manager to fi le an appli cmion with the
U.S. Department of Housi ng and Urban Development for
$ 166,666.00, to be matched by $83,334.00 of loca l funds for
continuati on of the wo rk progra m in 1968. This program
includes work elements on Preliminary Ownership Study
($49 ,000) ; Acco unting and Financial Control System ($25,000) ; Architectu ra l Studies ($32,000); T rans it Center Technica l Studies ($99 ,000) ; Socio-Economic Benefit Analysis
($30,000) ; and Impac t of Proposed System of Atlanta
Transit System ($ 15,000).
The Board also ag reed on MARTA's share of the cost of
the acce lerated Atlant a Area Transportati on Stud y; MARTA
and the State Hi ghway Department wi ll each contribute
$ I00,000 toward this work.
The next meet ing will be April 2. 3: 30 P.M .. Room 6 19.
The Glenn Building, 120 Marietta Street, N .W .. Atlanta.
R.A..PID TR.A..NSIT
BULK RATE
PROGRESS
PAID
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
120 MARIETTA ST .. N . W .
U.S. Postage
Atlanta, Ga .
Permit No. 705
ATLANTA , GEORGIA 30303
PHONE 524-5711 ( AREA C O DE 4 0 4)
FEBRUARY-MARCH
1968 - VOL.
3,
NO.
2
Mr. Da n E. Swea t , Jr ., Director of
Go ver~mentat Lia i s on, Ci ty of At la~ta
City Ha ll
Atlanta. Ga. JOJO,
���Maroh 21, 1969
nonorable Ivan Allen
Mayor, City of Atlanta
· City llall
68 Mitchell Street, s.w.
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear f.layor Allen:
If the mail balloting of the Atlanta Area Transportation
Policy Committee for establishment of a 60-man Citizens'
Advisory Committee results in this resolution being passad,
I would like to be considered for member3hip on this Citizens• Advisory Committee.
My qualifications include nine years experience in the automotive industry, fifteen years residence in the City of Atlanta, the application of computers to the solution of business problems when I was employed by IBM, and a strong lay1uan' s
interest for a number of years in traffic and transportation
problems.
You and I know that Atlanta is the finest city in America.
Frankly, though, Mayor Allen, I feel that this all-pervasive
transportation problem is the most significant cloud on
Atlanta's horizon. I want Atlanta to continua to be a wonderful place to live for my children and grandchildren, and I
know that proper traffic and transportation planning will help
assure this.
May we meet personally to discuss this?
Very truly yours,
Bernard A. Mcllhany
Marketing Representative
BAM/dd
�~
r
~
ReLC. .A.P.
NUMBER rn ·
CENTRA L ATLANTA PROGRESS, me.
Do.es Atlanta Need RAPID TRANSIT
This is one of the most important questions to face Atlantans
in modern times.
OCTOBER 18, 1968
2 PEACHTREE STREET, N.W., SUITE 2740
7
THIS IS NO CHOICE BETWEEN RAPID TRANSIT OR HIGHWAYS
All of both that can be built will be needed.
Response to this question will detennine ..... .
But, it's perfectly obvious that highway construction into the
central core cannot continue without limit.
whether we grow or choke
whether we have a strong central hub or disintegrate
ATLANTA MUST MOVE FORWARD -- OR BACKWARD -- IT CAN'T STAND STILL,
whether we go forward or bog down
whether we compete with other regional cities or not
in summary, whether ·we are to become a truly great City.
RAPID TRANSIT IS NEEDED NOW . ... NOVEMBER 5th IS THE DATE OF
DECISION .... A VOTE "FOR" IS A VOTE "FORWARD".
BASIC PHILOSOPHY IMPORTANT
A city can sprawl --- or it can develop like a wheel, with a
noticeable "hub" and satellite development all around, with
trafficways and corridors lihking places of residence, places
of work, recreation areas, shopping and entertainment facilities.
The dramatic concentration of new high-rise office buildings and
apartments in central Atlanta is evidence of our commitment to
the strong central . core type of city --- with other elements
around the central core comprising a great Metro wheel.
BUT, A STRONG HUB!
In Montreal, a sparkling new rapid trans it system not only
moves thousands of people to and from work, but has helped
build an exciting new downtown. Atlanta can do li kewi se .
ACCESSIBILITY/CIRCULATION VITAL TO THE HUB
For the hub to grow --- and function efficie ntly
it mu st be
readi ly access i bl e t o t hose seeki ng t o rea ch it, and i t must be
operable internally.
Otherwise, the growth will go elsewhere.
OF COURSE, R/T WILL BE EXPENSIVE --- BUT ... . ... .
so will be the cost of not doing it.
TELLING THE CENTRAL ATLANTA PROGRESS STORY
in lost efficiency
in accidents -- damages
In the loss of Honorable Ivan Allen, Sr., Atlanta
has lost one of its grea t citizens --- a person
,hose love for Atlanta and vision for its future
have left an indelible mark. We extend deepest
sympathy to Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr ..
Executive Director spoke to the Nort hs ide Kiwanis Clu b Oct. 4th.
injuries
deaths
in lo ss of development opportunities and the jobs
and tax base t here in represented
in los s of property values as streets choke up
Will address Decatur Rotary Club on November 1st.
Secretary of State of Florida, Tom Adams, visited Centra l Atlanta
Prog ress on Octo ber 16t h to learn of this un ique particjpation
of priv~te enterprise in a cooperative effort to build a better
City .
in loss of business activity
in tryi ng to pay for less workable so lu tions (for
ex ampl e, some ci ties have found that it costs as
mu ch as $2 1, 000 average TO ADD TO THE EXPRESSWAY
SYSTEM THE CAPACI TY TO MOVE ONE ADDITIONAL
VEHI CLE. )
-
In the current urban cr i sis, those centra l cores tha t do sound
planning and act forcefully wi ll move forward
the othe rs
will falter.
Bob Bivens
�REPR INT FROM THE ATLANTA JOURNAL
(By Ce ntra l At l anta Progress, In c. 9/30/68 )
Downtown: I 's the
By TOM WALKER
At la nta Joar na l Re a l E:i late Ed t111 r
Like the hub of a wheel 1 the
downtown core of a ma10r city
is the axis around which its
suburbs turn. Atlanta is no excepuon .
From th is central point, the
sprawling urba n community is
held together in a meaningful
pattern. Without it, these
outlying areas would be just
so many unrelated neighborhoods.
This is why so much concern is expressed in Atlanta
and othe r cities about the
hea lth and vita lity of the
downtown core. In aver real
sense the siren
o
e eniire ur ban complex depends
llpon the sfrenglh of the ce~
,tral city. just as the extremities of a human being depend
upon the beat of the human
hea,rt.
Ma ny agencies and individuals-both private and governmental-are actively engaged
in -the business of keeping Atlanta'5 downtown strong.
THE PR IVATE real estate
developers are in t he forefront
in this effor.t, with such major
projects as:
- Peachtree Center, an In-lel'llationally known deve lopment that will eventually en- ·
compass office, enterta inment
and living space.
-The projected " air rights"
complex of office. hotel and
retail bui ldings which Dallas
deve loper Ray,nond Nasher
plans to construct over the
railroad tracks nitar the Sta te
Capitol.
- The sim il ar air rig11ts project which Cousins Properties,
Inc . of Atlanta plans over the
railroad right-of-way at Sprin g
Street and Techwood Drive.
- The Georgia State College
ex pansion plans which will
make way for a school of
25,000 students by 1975 right in
the hearit of Atlanta .
-The government center,
where stale. city and county
agencies are housed. but
which will need room fo r expansion in the future .
- Colony Square, a complex
of office bu ildings, apartments, hotel, retail and restaura nt Facilities on P eachtree '
at I Hh streets.
P L US DEVELOPMENTS
connerted with the Georgia
Tech campus. the Atlanta
Civic Center and new highrise. med ium -r ise and Jow~ise
office buildings in downtown
Atlanta that. are almost too
numerous to keep up with .
And at some future date. developments associated with
the Metropolitan At I a n ta
Rapid Transit system will
help transfi gure the downtown
core .
These are projects or plans
which have already been
made public. and have advanced to one or another
stage of advanced planning or
actual construction. But there
are other dramatic plans for
downtown Atlanta which are
Hu
The rime re uisites of a
down own area, sa1
r. tven\ are that 1t be alfracLlve 1 :
eas_ to ~el around ffi, and safe.
One o the maior trends in
downtown Atlanta development,
he said, is the large-scale complex, such as Peachtree Center .
Business News and
Rea 1·Estate·
Frido y, Septem be r 20, 1968
still in the formulative stage,
but all of them are aimed at
creating a stron~. throbbing
central hub (or a sprawling
metropolitan community .
THE DOWNTOWN, however, is the center of more
than just a prom ising future
- it is the center of some.
major ur ban problems which·
will have to be solved before
the promise can be ful filled .
These include d o w n to w n
blight ; ghetto and slum areas:
deteriorming neighborhoods,
within the very shadows of
gleaming new office structures ; transitional business
districts where vacant buildings sit idle within a short
walk of F ive Poi nts , fin anci al
center of the Southeast ; congested streets and clogged freeways - among others.
Coping with the future of
this high-density downtown
core requires detailed study of
literally every square fool of
space .
In its planning " you've got
to ta lk about feet and inches
where you might be lalk in1;
about miles if you're considering areas Carther out,' ' sairi
Robert W. " Bob" Bivens. executive director of Central Atlan ta Progress (CA P).
A PRIVATELY FINANCED





The overall goal of CAP,
said its executive director. ,s
1'to develop ideas that make
sense and see them through.11
THE AIM IS NOT to come
up with
"me in the skv" nr2:
posats that sound great, but
are 1mpract1cal. The tdea 1s to
come up with sensible, practica l proposals.
A community which develops the .la!ter 1s m the best position to take advanta~ of
mone which 1s ava1able
rom ex1s m sources sue as
a num er o e era agencies) , he sa1d 1 and also 1s m
6e!!er 9*s1t1on lo mlluence
priva te evelopers.
Associate Drrector Donald
G. Inirram said : ,1We want to
enllsF the pnvate sectbf I tD
make ir1vate
enleronse a
earl of he ~rocess of fmd mg
solutions . T 1s refu resents a
iiewC!imens1on: I e mvolvement of the busmess community in the process of olannmg. II they are mvol ved , we
th ink they wilt carry out the
~
"
""Aflhe same time, Mr. Bivens emphasized, CAP works
closely with the public planning agencies in the overall
search for an answer to the
question : What kind of core
dqes a booming. metropolita n
area need, and how can th is
be brought into reality?
The central core of Atlanta
is hard to deline in exact
terms. As conceived ~ Central Atlanta Progress. it is
somewhat lar~er than .!;!'•, _region which most people proba- ·
bly think of as " downtown."
agency, Central Atlanta Progress , in effect. is the business
community's own planning
agency. as opposed to the publicly fi nanced planning departments of the City of Atl anta .
the metropolitan area and the ·
St.ate of Georgia .
GE NE R A LL Y,
THE
As such it is unique "locally,
"CORE' ' is defin ed as the
and possi bly is unique among
area from Brookwood Station
major cities of the nation.
on the north to Atlanta StaAs Mr. Bivens puts it. Cen.
dium
on the south , and within
tral Atlanta P rogress is th11
the
railroad belt line extendlatest step in the evolutionary
ing eastward beyond Bouleprogress of the business comvard-Monroe Drive and westmunity of central Atlanta.
ward
as f;rr as Maddox Parlt
It was formed from the nuand Washington Park.
cleus provided by two older
organizations: the Central Al·
One reason for selectinl! ·
lanla Improvement Associathese general boundaries is
tion. founded in 194 1, and the
the fac t that so much statistiUptown Association. organized
cal data ts available from
in 1960.
· such agencies as the Census
Bureau on neighborhoods that
In .January of last year,
have these fixed limits.
CAP was organized. But .Mr.
One of the fundamenta l
Bivens explains, these organiproblems
facing the future of .
1.ations were also restructured
downtown
Atlanta is trafficso that, in effect, a completely
how to get there and back
new association was formed .
from outlying regions, and
" It is not a rnromotional
how to circulate within the
~roup. " sa id Mr. ivens, " but
downtown a~ once there.
I IS a Blanmng agency, Wtffi
e x per I e need. mof•_ssional
1anners who have a strong
ackground m pri vate enter-
6
rn,
1- D
" Georgia State College is
planning for a student body of
25,000 by 1975," Mr. Bivens
said. " Obviously, even with
r apid transit, most of these
will drive cars to school. How
will they get in and out? How
will you separate pedestrian
traffic from streets? These
are some of the types of problems which someone has to be
thinking about right now. "
Said Mr. Ingram : " There is
an overriding concern over
just what kind of downtown
area we are trying to achieve
in relation to a city with a ( fu.
ture) population of 3 millionplus. "
In short, what ought to be
downtown and what can be located elsewhere in the metropolitan region: how many and
what kinds of jobs, how much
office space and for what purposes, what kind of and how
much bousing?-to mention
just a few major considerations.
" EXPERTS SAY, AND we
agree, that all great cities
have two things in common.11
said Mr. Bivens. "One IS an
exciting central core, where
people want to go to shop, for
entertainment, go lo the theater, to restaurants-and it is a
place that is active 24 hours a
day.
"Second, a stronf, . middle
class citiz:WX 11ves ose to the
c
central core, he wen£ on. I his
concen!rabon of people provides
the leadership for U1e downtown
and patronizes what the downtown offers-without, Mr. Bivens notes, having to commute
many miles fro m the suburbs .
What then, should go into the
central, downtown core? Mr.
Bivens and Mr . Ingram listed
these:
-More high-rise, high-income
apartments ("Atl anta is really
not quite ready for this now,"
sa id Mr. Bivens , " but we
ought to be thinking ahead
to that day, and take steps to
make it possible" ).
-Downtown •should be the
focal point of cultural activities.
( "This is pretty well happening
now, but we ought to strengthen
it, " he said). This includes theaters, restaurants and great hotels, among other features.
-A COMPLEX OF strong retail establishments, which attract shoppers not only from the
metropolitan community, but
from throughout the region.
-A concentration of government offices.
-A concentration of financi al
activity.
- -Merchandise and t r a d e
marts.
THE LARGE COMPLEX
represents a new dimension,
because this type of project
includes the full range of
human activities from homes ,
to jobs to recreational facilities and entertainment, r ight
in the central area.
While most air rights developments have been envisioned
so far over railroad right-ofway , Mr. Bivens pointed out
that air rights developments
ROBERT W. Bl\, ENS
'Se nsib le' Solm in ns
over freeways offers a broad
opportunity for future development.
Resourceful thinkin
so ua so come u w1
10ns o e use o muc owntown l~nd that 1s currently not
utilize to its maximum potential, the planners md1cated.
One such area is the socalled "garment district" of
downtown Atlanta just south
of Five Points. Obviously in a
transitional state, the main
questions for this and sim il ar
property would be: What land
use would make the most
sense here?
AND ALSO IN THE slum
neighborhoods-what would be
the best use for land that is
obviously not fit fo r human
habitation?
A dilemma here is how to
bring the ghetto dweller into
closer contact with his potential jobs? It is literally a geographical problem, since the
job quite often is many miles
from the needy person's dwelling, and the transportation between the two may be too
costly, or inadequae.
" We've got to work in the
Jong haul on a sensible match
of people with jobs," said Mr.
Bivens, "so that people in the
cities can work to improve
themselves."
This, in. short, is one of the
i m m e d i a t e problems that
must be solved en route to solutions that are mapped out for
longer-range problems.
�RAPID TRANSIT
ESS
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
" MA-C:::,r""nA
..1,;;v.L~
REPORTS TO THE
PEOPLE IT SERVES .. .
AUG •. SEPT., 1968
3
N O . 6
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _....,__,....,.,.,.....,__,...,,.._,._m,::::z::,l!Cll____...,,_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ v o L.
TRANSIT CHIEF HAILS
ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT PLANS
Pa ul L. Sitton, newly-named chief of the Urban Mass
Transportation Administration , U. S. Department of Transportation, has commended Atlanta leaders for taking the
initiative in developing a proposal for a rapid transit system.
Sitton , a native of DeKalb County and a graduate of Emory
University, was in Atlanta August 27 to meet with transportation and government officials. At a news conference that
afternoon , he praised Atlanta for having "a leadership that is
concerned with the future. "
Sitton stated, "I think a mass transportation system for Atlanta is essential for future growth and development." On the
topic of available federal funds , he noted that in other cities
which are building new rapid transit facilities , "The federa l
government has been prepared to meet its commitment to these
programs."
He commended Atlanta for having "a very well-balanced
approach to transportation," and observed that rapid transit in
Atlanta would have a benefici al effect on the entire state.
The text of the news conference is printed in its entirety
in succeed ing paragraphs.
A number of local elected officials and business leaders
attended ' the news conference to meet Mr. Sitton and to hear
his comments. These included Atlanta Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.;
Fulton Cou nty Commission Chairm an Charlie Brown; Nelson
Severin ghaus, Chairman of the Atlanta Region Metropolitan
Planning Commission ; MARTA Vice-Chairman Roy Blount;
and MARTA Directors John C. Wilson and Dr. Sanford Atwood. Georgia former Governor Carl Sanders introduced Sitton to the group of abo ut 30 persons, including representatives
of newspapers, radio and television.
Sitton opened the news conference by explaining that he
has been traveling around the country since his nomination,
visiting the cities to fami liarize himself with their problems in
transportation and their plans for solutions.
SITTON: I think Atlanta is a very unique city .. .. Atlanta
is a center city-a central distribution area for a large part of
the nation-for the Southeast. Atl anta has grown, it has developed, it has looked forward to its future . In fact, Atlanta
has always anticipated its future. I think the Lockner Program
for highway development in this area is indicative of this. I
think the high-rise office development is a recognition that
Atlanta will truly be the central service city of the Southeast
fo r governmental services, for banking, for retailing, cultural
activities and other activities of this nature that make up the
critical activities of a classic city of the size of Atlanta.
Aristotle said that the people came together in cities to live,
and they stayed there in order to live the good life. The
Congress, when it enacted the Urban Mass Transit Act in 1964,
recognized th at there was a need for national support of programs in major urban areas of our country to improve their
transportation . It reflected a recognition on the part of the
Congress that our urban areas are changing. They are perhaps
the most dynamic part of our economy; they are, there's no
question about it. And there is a growing demand for services
of an affluent society. Transportation is one of those services.
The Department of Transportation is attempting to take all
of the programs concerned with transportation and which relate to our cities-highways, urban mass transportation, aviation , and so forth-and to weave them into a systematic pattern in which we can see how the central cities, or the central
business districts, can best be served-how to move people
back and forth to work, how to provide for recreational outlets-all of these cannot be carried out without a significant
transportation service.
Atlanta to me, as I said, is a classical example of this
city. I think, also, that Atlanta has a unique leadership among
the cities that I've visited. Atlanta has a leadership that is concerned with its future, it is concerned with its growth, and
recognizes the things that have to be done in the future, if Atlanta is to remain the cultural and business and economic
center of this fast-growing section of our nation .
l came here to get a briefing on the mass transit program
which is under study and under consideration by the region ;
( continued)
At news conference, left to right, are John Wilson, MART A
Director; Roy Blount, MART A Vice Chairman.; Paul Sitton,
UMT A Director; and Carl Sanders, former Governor of Georgia.
�TRANSIT CHIEF
(continued)
I wanted to see how it is integrated with the total plan of the
development of the area, and try to understand this as one of
the major component problems that we face on a national level.
I will be glad to answer any questions or discuss any issues
that yo u may have, or specific points concerning the program
that I administer.
QUESTION: There seems to be one key factor in Atlanta's
rapid transit plan and that key factor is money. How far is the
federal government going to participate in rapid transit?
SITTON: Well, let me put it this way-the federal government between 1964 and 1967 provided over 400 million dollars
in grants to support certain cities that were prepared to move
ahead with development of their transportation system . We
have supported the San Francisco BARTD project; we have
provided for replacement equipment in ~Chicago, in New York,
in Philadelphia-there are active projects underway in those
cities. In each case, the fede ral government has been prepared
to meet its commitment to these programs. And I think that
the political response of the two parties, the recognition by
the Congress and the Administration of the critical federal role
is an answer to the question of the willingness of the federal
government to meet the matching requirements it has set forth
in the federal grant program.
QUESTION: Is there enough money
available now to get Atlanta off the
ground?
SITTON : There is not enough money
available to get any one city off the
ground, because you have to approach
these projects in developmental stages.
One Congress cannot commit itself from
one term to the next. We are trying to
work out long term programs of authorizations that will permit the cities to plan
Paul L. Sitton
and to look to the future. I feel that with
the support of the cities and of our Congress, we can provide
the kind of sound program that will permit the cities to proceed
with the assuredness that the federal support required to sustain
these programs will go ahead .
At the present time, we have 190 million dollars in grants
that are available for this fiscal year.
I might also add that, in terms of this, we provide support
under research programs looking to what the future prospects
are for augmenting systems that are provided and for looking
at new technology that may come along.
QUESTION: From your knowledge of Atlanta and from
what you've seen on your visit this time, bow important is a
rapid transit system of some type to Atlanta?
SITTON: I think a mass transportation system for Atlanta
is essential for future growth and development. With a city
with the projected population that you envision in the next 20
or 30 years, one cannot see its future development taking place
at the pattern that you anticipate in terms of your economic
growth without providing the key service that is necessary to
serve a central city like this. And this can only come about
through some very effective, convenient, r apid, and viable form
of mass transportation.
The people of Atlanta have a choice-the choice is to move
ahead with the transportation that you are planning and anticipate the future growth of your city in a constructive and a
progressive manner, taking into account what the economic
growth potentials of this area are, what the population is, and
by providing the services that are essential to sustain these
jobs, this economy at a high level. And to provide the qualities
of excellence that are necessary in our society today to provide
the kind of life that our people demand and will want. The
other alternative is to let "drift" take place-no planning, no
prospective analysis of what will happen in the future, and
permit things to proceed in a kind of a "drift pattern," and
I don't think Atlanta will take that choice.
QUESTION: How does it tie-in with the development of
highway programs?
SITTON: I'm glad you mentioned that, because we are
working-in fact, I came from a meeting this morning out at
the airport with regional highway officials from all over the
United States, explaining the program, how the mass transit
program ties in very closely with the highway system. It doesn't
compete with highways, it augments highways. We have highway demands that far exceed the revenues that are available,
even under existing Jaws, to meet those demands. What we are
trying to do is to make highways more efficient in terms of
movi ng more people who want to use their automobile along
these highways, and remove the clogging and congestion that
restrict the use of them at this time, and, prospectively, in the
future . So, it's an augmentation of existing forms of transportation and existing services.
QUESTION: If Atlanta is successful in passing a bond
referendum this fall, how long will it have to wait for matching
funds from the federal government?
SITTON : Well, let me put it in this light-the federal
government has been prepared whenever a major city has come
forward with a plan and with a viable financing scheme to
provide the grants that are needed . We have done this on a
timely basis. And, in pl anning the future of this program, we
are certainly taking into account the prospective demands that
will be placed upon 'this program by Atlanta and other cities.
QUESTION: Are you familiar enough with Atlanta's plan
to say whether or not it's a well-integrated and adequate plan?
SITTON: I have followed Atlant~'s plan from Washington
over the past several years, primarily when I was working on
the highway program, and trying to make sure that federal programs at the local level were being placed as part of an integrated plan. I would say that in no city that I've been in and
worked with has there been a more constructive effort on
the part of all parties to brmg together into a systematic approach to the problem of transportation the solution that we
are seeking in a balanced transportation system. The answer
is, Atlanta has, as fa r as I've seen in Washington , a very wellbalanced approach to transportation.
QUESTION: Would yo u elaborate on a situation where
one metropolitan county did not participate in the rapid transit
program?
SITTON: I can't elaborate in detail, but I can point to an
example where, in San Francisco, I believe, the plan is proceeding without the participation of Marin County, which is
across the Bay from San Francisco, and which was part of the
initial system. That's the only example I know of. The essential
thing to focus upon, however, is the need for an initial core
system. T he need for experience, the need for trying to adjust
the travel patterns. There is no question in my mind, once a
system is developed and the economic benefits flow from it,
that you will see a full regional participation at some point in
the future .
QUESTION: How would it affect the county not participating?
SITTON: I think it certainly would affect the county, in
terms of its integration into the total sys tem, of the total
metropolitan growth and economy of the metropolitan area.
Like having an arm cut off, you know, it's lying there not very
effective.
QUESTION: How will rapid transit benefit the rest of the
state?
SITTON: That's a very good question; I'm glad you asked
that. W hat benefits Atlanta benefits the State of Georgia. What
benefits Atlanta benefits the Southeast. What benefits Atlanta
benefits the nation. The benefits that grow from an efficient
form of transportation service to a core area like this spreads
throughout the economy. It has a very distinct "multiplier
effect," if I may use a word of BARTD, and it will have very
large implications for people in other parts of the state. T hey
come here to perform many functions and services; they rely
upon Atlanta as a distribution center. All of this affects the
cost of doing business. T hank you, gentlemen. (End of news
conference.)
MARTA REJECTS
"BUCKHEAD ALTERNATE"
The proposed " Buckhead Alternate" was rejected by the
Board of Directors of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit
Authority at its regular meeting September 3, 1968. After
hearing a report of the Engineering and Design Review Committee, presented by Mitchell C. Bishop, the Board agreed
unanimously that future planning of the Northeast rapid transit
line should proceed on the Southern Railroad alignment as
proposed earlier.
.
The following is the text of the EDR Committee report:
REPORT OF THE ENGINEERING _AND DESIGN
REVIEW COMMITTEE METROPOLITAN ATLANTA
RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
SEPTEMBER 3, 1968
SUBJECT: "Buckhead Alternate"
In accord ance with the decision of the Board at the August
meeting, a public hearing was held Thursday night, August
15, at the gymnasium of North Fulton High Sc?ool on the
subject of the proposed "Buckhead Alternate" ahgnment for
the Northeast rapid transit route. Director John Wilson presided Director Rawson Haverty assisted Mr. Wilson.
Advantages and disadvantages of both lines were presented by MARTA consultants at the publ!c he~ring. A~ong
the advantages which Leon Epl an, of Enc Hill Ass?ciates,
attributed to the " Buckhead Alternate" were the followmg:
J . Direct service to the Buckhead business district ;
2. Two additional stations;
3. Better access by residents of Peachtree Road and
Roswell Road ;
4. Improved possibilities for orderly growth and development of the area, especially in the vicinity of stations;
and,
5. Prob ability of greater patronage in the future.
The disadvantages which were vo iced included the following:
1. The requ irement for a greater number of homes, businesses, and other private property for right-of-way.
2. The need for some ri ght-of-way on, or adj acent to,
property now bein g used fo r parks, schools and
churches ;
3. The inconvenience of major construction through established neighborhoods; and,
4. The additional cost of $48 million for the "Buckhead
Altern ate" over th at of the railroad alignment.
One thousand people attended the public hearing. About
fort y-five persons, other than MART A consultants, addressed
the hearin g. Two of these spoke in favo r of the "Buckhead
Alternate"; others spoke against it, generally because of the
disadvantages referred to earlier.
The audience almost in its entirety supported the statements
made by those opposing the "Buckhead Alternate." They lis-
tened to the arguments favoring the Alternate alignment, but
gave clear indication of their opposition to the proposed
Alternate.
It should be mentioned here that when the audience was
given opportunity, on four different occasions, to express their
opinion of rapid transit generally, they showed just as great
enthusiasm for rapid transit as originally proposed as they
showed opposition to the proposed Alternate.
MART A Director John Wilson presides at Public Hearing on
"Buckhead A lternate."
About 1,000 persons attended tile hearing, held in the gymnasium of North Fulton High School.
Atlanta Alderman Douglas L. "Buddy Fowlkes was one of
about 40 persons who gave th eir views on the suggested alternate route.
In addition to the comments made by the speakers, additional comments were registered in writing, and several petitions of opposition were submitted, including the one given to
this Board at its previous meeting. In addition, in response to a
request from the audience, the formal record was held open
until the following Thursd ay to allow the submission of written
statements for the record. T he written comments submitted
reflected the same opinions in the same proportion as the
spoken comments at the meeting - the majority opposing the
"Buckhead Alternate."
This Authority was given the responsibility by the people
of this area, and by their elected officials, to develop a proposal for a rap id transit system which will serve the people of
this area in the best manner at the lowest possible cost. While
there are advantages and benefits to the "Buckhead Alternate,"
the disadvantages and additional cost in this situation would
appear to indicate the adoption of the route proposed along
Southern Railway right-of-way.
It is for the reasons outlined herein, that the Engineering
and Design Review Committee therefore recommends that the
"Buckhead A lternate" alignment be rejected and the alignment
along the Southern Railway rights-of-way be adopted for
further pl anning in the development of a proposed system of
routes and station locations for the regional rapid transit
system.

�THE INFLUENCE OF RAPID TRANSIT
ON REAL ESTATE VALUES IN TORONTO
G . W arren H eenan, past president of the Toronto Real
Estate Board, was a principal speaker at Georgia Tech's "Conference on Impending Technology , Its Challenge to Livable
Cities," on M ay 8.
Heenan spoke on "The Influ ence of Rapid Transit on Real
Estate V alues in Toronto." H e observed that in many ways,
the A tlanta of today is remarkably similar to Toronto in the
late 1940's when Toronto embarked on building its rapid
transit system . Excerpts from Heenan's speech are reproduced
below.
I have enjoyefi the cultural, social and
historical features, and witnessed the
community pride and spirit, which have
made Atl anta one of North America's
truly great cities. Metropol~tan Toronto,
like Atlanta, is a fabulous boomtown. In
the next few minutes at my disposal, I
would like to relate to you what has
happened, and the exciting developments
about to take place in Torontq,, as a
G. Warren Heenan direct result of the existence of a balanced transportation system . Balanced transportation, featuring
Rapid Transit as the main component, is the key to phenomenal
urban growth.
Above all , the one thing that all large North American
cities have in common is the problem of automobile traffic
congestion. More and more great cities are working toward
Rapid Transit as a solution to traffic strangulation.
For example, of the existing Rapid Transit cities, New
York, Boston, Philadelphia, Cleveland, Chicago and Toronto,
all have extensions now under construction. A number of other
cities are in the advanced stages of planning entirely new
systems . Amongst these are: Seattle, Baltimore, Atlanta, Los
Angeles, Pittsburgh, and St. Louis. However, in spite of this
spectacular pace of expansion and planning of mass transit
facilities, there is more and more evidence that traffic congestion is strangling the growth of many of North America's
great cities because the y have neglected to provide fo r total
transportation needs .
Local and state leadership must take the initiative in identifying transportation problems and developing solutions. The
Federal Government, whose transit role has only recently been
defined, can play an important supporting role in helping cities
achieve balanced metropolitan transportation systems.
There is no doubt that it would be a great service to your
community if the real estate people and business and civic
organizations continued to insist that rapid transit become the
major element in the overall transportation requirements for
your metropolitan area.
We must look to a balanced transportation system and not
fall into the trap of putting all our eggs in one basket, as has
been done in Los Angeles where transportation is almost entirely oriented to expressways.
There is only one way to prevent large cities and their surrounding subu rbs from being strangled by traffic, poisoned by
exhaust fumes and forced to devote more of their living and
working space to parking lots. That is to provide inexpensive
public transportation service that is frequent, fast and reliable
enough to induce citizens to leave their cars at home when
they go to places of work or pleasure.
Mass rapid transit is about the best bargain since Peter
Minuit, Governor of New Netherlands, bought Manhattan
Island from the Indians for $24 worth of trinkets in the early
1600's. The Dutchman's investment of $24 in 30 square miles
of land now has a physical value of $250 billion.
I am convinced that for any major urban area, mass rapid
transit as the main base of a balanced transportation system
creates and enhances property values like nothing else on earth.
If an urban rapid transit system never earned a dime, it
would still pay for itself a thousand times over through its
beneficial impact on real estate values and increased assessments. The greatest cities in the world have that essential common facility- an efficient rapid transit complex.
The major achievement in public transit in Metropolitan
Toronto has been the successful creation of a subway system.
As far back as 1942 it was realized that the growth and expansion of Toronto would in a few years result in a transit
situation which would be beyond the capacity of surface street
car routes . Separation of street car and automobile traffic was
the obvious solution, and the Commission began to study a
rapid transit system for Toronto.
In 1946, when plans were completed and the war was over,
the subway project was submitted to a vote of citizens who,
by a 10 to 1 majority, endorsed the construction of a subway.
Construction began on a 2-track route from Union Station to
Eglinton Avenue, in September 1949, and on March 30, 1954,
Yonge Street Subway, the first subway in Canada, was open
for business. The total length at that time was 4½ miles, of
which approximately 3 miles is underground and 1½ miles is
in open-cut.
The total cost of Canada's first subway, including right-ofway, rails, electrical distribution system, signal system and
rolling stock was $67,000,000.
This small investment ignited a $10 billion development
explosion along the route from Front and York Streets to its
northern terminal, Eglington Avenue.
The appraised value of all the land and facilities in Metropolitan Toronto is now over $50 billion. $ 15 billion of this
appreci ation in physical value has been added in the last 10
years and two-thirds of this is attributable to the existence
of the Yonge Street Subway.
Properties along the subway route doubled and tripled and
sometimes increased as much as tenfold in value. Land prices
would have increased anyway, but sales at $ 125 to $150 per
square foot near the downtown stations became commonplace.
The 1952-1962 ten year increase in tax assessment in districts contiguous to the Yonge Subway line was 45% in the
downtown area. The assessment increase for the rest of the
city durin g the same period averaged 25% . On this basis, the
subway has craned enough new tax dollars to pay its annual
amortization costs.
Another $2 billion in building is underway and in the planni ng stages in downtown Toronto. There is no doubt that the
subway to downtown, and our new $35 million City Hall, are
the catalysts speeding the redevelopment of Toronto's downtown.
Each year between 2 and 3 milli on square fee t of new office
space and 5,000 apartment suites, of which 3,000 are within
walking distance of the Yonge Street Subway, are being added
to Toronto's skyline.
Up home, they call it boomtown Metro. That it is - with
the highest per capita construction expenditures in N orth
America.
Just for comparison, here are some figures: Metro Toronto
issued permits to allow $800 million in consiruction in 1967.
This building volume compares with $45 1.6 million in permits
last year in the Atlanta standard metropolitan statistical area.
Toronto is now fourth spot in total building in North
America behind Los Angeles, Chicago and New York, cities
which all have more than double metro Toronto's population.
Real estate sales in Metro totalled over $1 billion in 1967
- the highest per capita volume of transfers in North America.
Sales through T he Toronto Real Estate Board's Multiple Listing Service wi ll hit a record $400 million this year compared
to $367 million last year.
The City of Toronto is divided into 24 Planning Districts.
A detailed "Planning Di strict Appraisal" has been, is being or
will be prepared for each Planning District. The character of
each Planning District is thoroughly described in the planning
reports . From these it may be discerned what type of neighborhoods benefit most from the subway.
For example, in a five year period between 1959 and
1963, 48.5 % of all high rise apartment development in the
City of Toronto occurred in four Planning Districts. The
Yonge Street Subway runs right through the center of each
of these Planning Districts.
Similarly, 90 % of all office construction in the same period
occurred in three Planning Districts. The Subway cuts right
through these areas.
In other words, two-thirds of all new development in a five
year period was put in place within five minutes walk from
the Yonge Street Subway. Hundreds of large residential lots,
175 feet wide and 200 feet in depth, were rezoned to accommodate high-density apartment buildings. The apartment land
boom brought as much as $4,000 per suite to speculators.
H eenan, next to lectern, talks rapid transit with M ARTA
Chairman Richard H . Rich.
Going rates offered to home owners were $ 1,000 to $2,000
per front foot. Many fa milies who bought modest houses at
$ 15,000 to $25,000 each, sold them to developers for $50,000
to $75 ,000. Downtown land is selling at upwards to $200 per
square foot or at the rate of $8.7 mill ion per acre. .
There is no doubt that a subway has a tremendous impact
on land use and consequently on land values.
Now the 8-mile crosstown leg of the $200 million project
has been completed to assume a major role in Metro's balanced
tra nsportation system.
But there is no lull in subway construction activity in
Metropolitan To ronto . Work on two more extensions is taking
the subway into suburban districts. Total cost of the extensions
will be $77 million . Now completed, the Bloor-Danforth line
is over fo urteen miles in length and Metropolitan T oronto is
criss-crossed by a total of 21 miles of fast, modern subway
lines .
The city section of the Bloor-Danforth line is carrying
25,000 passengers hourly. It is expected to step up to from
35,000 to 37,000 passengers hourly now with the opening of
the extensions. T he subway line is designed to carry 40,000
hourl y, triple the number of passengers transported on the
fo rmer street car and bus service in the Bloor-Danforth area.
T he proposal for a Bloor-Danforth subway line was made
by the TCC in 1955. P lans were completed in 1958 . Construction started in 1962.
Money was rolling along the tracks, even ahead of the
trains. New bus iness and higher assessments are following the
transit lines li ke bears after honey. The east-west subway is
adjacent to properties which were valued at $250 million
before the project was announced . These same properties have
already doubled in value to $500 million.
The subway's influence on rezoning along the line will
generate $2 billion worth of office and apartment building in
the next ten years.
So you see, land values are directly related to public
transportation.
Real estate value is created by two fund amental things:
people and accessibility. T he more accessible any land area is,
the more valuable it becomes. As a result of their lack of
accessibility, many of our cities are in danger of losing their
economic and cultural vitality, and all of us are paying an
increasingly higher price in terms of tension, time and money
just to move about.
Rapid transit is a continuing program. In Toronto we do
not just build a subway line and forget about it. A decision
has been made and detailed planning is in progress to add a
4½ mile, $87 million northern extension to the Yonge Street
Subway, and acquire the right-of-way fo r a possible fu ture I ¼
mile extension to Finch Avenue at an estimated cost of $2 to
$2½ million. A six-mile rapid transit line is also proposed in
connection with the Spadina Expressway.
I will note here that, as a general principle, is it clear that
as the rapid transit system is extended further from downtown, the stations should be spaced at wider intervals, since
this is the best way to achieve train speeds and traveling times
from the outlying areas which are reasonably competitive with
the private car. This is where the city rapid transit line should
be integrated with or become a commuter train.
As all the bus and auto ro utes leading to commuter parking
stations are improved through road widening, thousands of
acres of land are brought within development range. I would
estimate that each mile of rapid transit brings suburban and
ru ral land three years closer to developmen t.
The amount and intensity of new development and the
volume of retail sales at a given point on the raP.id transit line
are directly proportionate to the passenger traffic to and from
the closest subway station.
I believe I can prove this theory without giving you all the
figures on p assenger flows at each station in Toronto.
There are p rese ntly 36 stations in operation on the Toronto
Subway network. T he three busiest stations are Eglinton, St.
Clair and Queen. Of a daily passenger traffic to all stations
of 400,000 (April, 1966), the three stations handled 28 percent of all daily traffic into the stations . The three station areas
also accounted fo r three-quarters of all new development in
the City of Toronto over the past two years.
In conclusion, I would like to say - as a guest in your
coun try - I am deeply impressed with what I see. We truly
appreciate the royal treatment we have enjoyed during our
stay. Thank you for inviting us here to enjoy it.
M E T ROPO LITAN ATLANTA
RA P ID T RA NSIT AU T H O RITY
8 0 8 GLENN BLDG . • 120 MARIETT A ST ., N.W .
ATLANTA. GA . 30 30 3 ' PHONE 524-57 11
" D IR ECTED BY TH E GEO RGI A S TATE
LE GI SL A TU RE TO DEV E L O P A RA P ID
T R AN S I T SY S T E M FOR THE 5 -COUNTY
M ET R O PO LI TAN ATLANTA AREA , "
Edited by
KIN G ELLIOTT
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
OFF I CERS ,
H1c11Anu H. R 1c 11 , Ch air111m1
HEHll EIIT
J.
DICK SON.
HoY A.
Tr t•asurer
B LOUNT,
E 1n1 UND \\ ' .
V ice Chairman
Huc 1-1Es, Sccretar _,
CIT Y OF ATL A NTA ,
Jou :,., c.
L. D. :\Ill.TON
H.AW SON HA\' ERTY
WILSON
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IIAHTA STAFF,


H 1::;,. 11 y L. STIIAHT . Getlt'f(I/ .1/111,r1pr>r
EAIII. W. NELS O:-- . Chit'/ Et1gi11ccr
KIN, : ELLIOlT, Director oj Public /11/ ormatiun
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�WASHINGTON, D. C., PROTOTYPE
GOES ON DISPLAY
The prototype of the new Washington, D. C., "Metro"
rapid transit car is now in the midst of a series of appearances
for public inspection in the four counties and four cities which
will be served by the 97-mile rapid rail transit system, scheduled
to begin initial operation in 1972. The prototype has sculptured,
contemporary design, featuring a polished metal exterior
and tinted panoramic windows. Passengers will enter the vehicle
through three, 50-inch wide double doors on each side.
The interior of the car permits two-by-two seating for 82
passengers. The decor includes wall-to-wall, wool pile carpeting in gold and brown, with seating in black, saddle tan, and
oyster white.
When the Metro is completed, more than 800 cars will
carry millions · of commuters per year in air-conditioned comfort at speeds up to 75 miles per hour.
"The High Cost of Delay."
MARTACTION
At its regular meeting July 2, the MARTA Board of
Directors approved a planning study fo r a line in the
Perry Homes-Proctor Creek area. The study was estimated to cost $16,000 and would take eight to ten weeks
to complete.
A t the August 6 meeting, the Board agreed to retain
the planning fi rm of Eric H all Associates to continue
work to coordinate MARTA's plans with those of other
public agencies and private development groups.
The Board adopted a resolution calling for a public
hearing on the proposed "Buckhead Alternate" route; the
hearing was set fo r Thursday, August 15, 1968, at 7: 30
p.m. at the Garden Hills Elementary School. (See page 5.)
RAPID TRANSIT
BULK RATE
PROGRESS
PAID
M E T R OPO LITA N ATLAN TA R A P I D T RA N S IT A U T H O RIT Y
BOB GLENN BLDG . · 1 20 MAR I ETTA S T . . N . W .
PHON E 52 4 -5 7 1 1 ( AREA CO D E 404 )
A U G. - SE P T .. 1 96 B , VO L . 3
-
·
AT L AN T A , GE O RG I A 3 0 3 0 3
NO . IS
Mr. Da~ E. Sweat , Jr,, Direc tor of
Gover :imcntal Lla ~so :1 , Ci ty of At. a , ta
City Hall
Atla:ita , Ga.
~
10
30303
U.S. Postage
Atlanta, Ga .
Permit No. 705
�R.A.PID TR.A.NSIT



PI<,OGI<,ESS




METRO POLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTH O RITY
"
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JUNE-JULY,
L.
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1 96 B
No .
MARTA-ATS BUSES ARRIVE
Ten of the most modern buses ever built, and the only
buses of their kind anywhere, were delivered to eager Atlantans July 1, 1968. The arrival of these new buses was especially
_s ignificant because it marked the first of many anticipated joint
efforts between the Atlanta Transit Sys tem , who is leasing and
operating the buses, and MARTA, which purchased the buses.
The buses were officially welcomed in a brief ceremony by
Richard H. Rich, MARTA Chairman; William P . Maynard ,
President of Atlanta Transit System ; and C. J. Jacobs, President
of Local # 732, which represents the drivers.
Mr. Maynard noted that " the buses would immediately be
put into service, to se rve riders on routes throughout the city,
and give everyone the opportunity to enjoy and inspect the
new ve hicles in air-conditioned comfort."
The buses, which were built by General Motors, were purchased by MART A under competitive bidding procedures, and
will be leased to the Transit Sys tem over a period of ten years.
Revenu e to MART A from the lease will pay both the principal
and the interest.
Mr. Rich outlined the reasons for the purchase. " It is esse nti al to the development of rapid transit for Metropolitan Atl anta that a balanced sys tem of transit be developed, including full y coordinated bus tra nsportation. "
He noted th at under the terms of the lease ag reemen t, the
Transit System will fu rnish MA RTA with inform ation as to
patronage, routes and other information helpful to MARTA
in its studi es of a bus feeder system .
"Through this rapid transit project," Mr. Rich concluded,
"MART A can contribute immediately to relieve some of the
transit pressure, and can meanwhile gather much valuable information in regard to the coordination of such facilities in the
future ."
A prototype of the new vehicles, the first of its kind tested
anywhere, has operated in Atl anta since las t fall and greatly
exceeded expectations in terms of perform ance and public acceptance. Each bus is powered by a big, new 338 H .P ., V-8
engine that repl aces the stand ard 238 H.P ., V-6 formerly
standard in city buses . The greater size of this new engine
makes it equal to the task of operating faster and more efficiently in all types of traffic conditions, while powering the
air-conditioning system to deliver thermostaticall y controlled
comfort.
These unique new 47-passenger buses also feature the latest
in appearance and comfort styling. New, super-soft foam seats
of speci al design, are two inches wider than stand ard with
higher seat backs to afford passe ngers greater comfort and leg
room . Interiors are tastefully color-h armonized in a fresh,
modern decor.
Riding comfort has been increased by a more adva nced
suspension system and new super V-8 transmission that allows
smooth shifts under full engine power and an overdrive feature
which cuts-in at speeds over 40 m .p .h. Coupled with the new
power pl ant, the vehicles are capable of highw ay speeds up to
65 m.p.h ., with an in crease in operating economy. ·
The buses which are now in service will be used on various
routes throughout the entire system.
MA RTA Chairman Richard H . Rich, in driver's seat, hands
keys to A TS President W illiam P. M aynard.
The ten MART A -owned, ATS-operated air-conditioned buses
were placed into service immediately throughout the transit
system.
s
�MARTAcTroN ___________________
At its May meeting, the MARTA Board of Directors
agreed to purchase ten air-conditioned buses and lease them
to the Atlanta Transit System. The money to buy the buses
would be borrowed from a local bank , and the revenue from
the lease would be sufficient to pay both principle and interest. ( See story on Page 1.)
The Board also agreed to perform additional studies on
a Model Cities line for approximately $30,000.00 and on
a Buckhead Alternate for approx imately $9,500.00.
\
The Board confirmed the appointment of Mr. Ed Gilcrease of Parsons Brinckerhoff-Tudor-Bechtel as MARTA
representative to work with the Alan Voorhees firm in the
Atlanta Area Transportation Study.
(
'ta
I I
A.
At its June meeting, the Board was advised that the
General Motors Corporation was the low bidder on the
purchase of the ten air-conditioned buses, at $38,728.68 per
bus, with delivery charges specified se parately at $300 .54
each. The Board, by resolution , accepted the General Motors
Corporation bid .
General Manager Henry L. Stuart recommended a number of additional planning programs as a result of the recent
series of public hearings. Stuart reported that the ge neral sentiment expressed at the 12 public hearin gs conducted in late
April and in May was favorable toward th e routes and station locations which had been proposed by the engineering
consu ltan ts.
Stuart stated th at a number of recommendations had been
made for modifications, extensions, and additions to the proposed routes. He recommended th at MARTA "undertake a
planning program similar in refinement to what is required
under Section 701 of th e Housin g Act of 1954 to exa mine
the possibilities of the following:
I. A line to wa rds the Perry Homes area in Northwest
Atlanta.
2. An extension of the West line to Fulton Indust ri al
Boulevard.
3. An extension of the East Line past T-285.
4. A line towards South D eKalb County. This line needs
only to be studied sufficiently at this time to identify
potential corridors. There is no need as yet to perform patron age studi es."
Stuart's proposal was adopted by th e Boa rd.
Stuart also summari zed the public response at th e 12
public hearin gs. The followin g is a brief acco unt of Stuart's
report.
EAST POIN T , April 29. East Point and College Park
speakers we re outspoken in th eir support of th e projec t and
the way in which we a re developing our program. They
were delighted that the first hearing was held in their areas.
Onl y o ne person spoke in opposition , and he objected to the
cost and to taking people out of Eas t Point.
LENOX, April 30 . Leading ci ti zens s poke strongly for
the project. The Buckhead Alternate excited no interest at
the hearing, but since then we have lea rned of co nsiderable
feeling in opposition to this alternate. When work on this
subject progresses suffi ciently. we should go back for another
formal hea rin g.
DOWNTOWN, May 2. We received st ron g endorsement
from all the business gro ups such as the At lanta Cha mber of
Commerce, Cent ra l Atlanta Progress, Inc. , A tl ant a Jaycees,
a nd from the Mayor's office.
WEST END, May 6. West E nd business, civic and church
groups gave us a strong endorsement. They did not place into
the record their ea rli er req uest fo r a different station site.
We are continuing to wo rk with them on th is matte r.
CLAYTON COUNTY, May 9 (Forest Par/.:). We received
I 00 per cent support from the C lay ton County Comm issioners
and gratify ing suppo!1 from business a nd other leaders. One
man a ppeared to protes t cost es timates which were not at
issue at the hearin g, and to objec t to the continuance of the
C layton County vacancy on th e MARTA Board.
DECATUR, May 13. We received strong support from
business and political leaders, but they made it very clear
that more lines are needed to serve DeKalb County. Strong
support was given to th e D ecatur Alternate, which would
pl ace the station close r to the Courthouse Square. One
speaker expressed concern abou t costs.
DORAVILLE, May 15. This hearin g was also productive
in that local speakers gave us advice about the schedule of
development they expect. In one word, "quicker." They recognize th at Doravi lle/ Chamblee is a long way out, but a
prolonged development schedule is not acceptab le. A stated
reas on for the impatience of North D eKal b County residents
is the crowded condition of the Northeast E xpressway.
WEST SIDE, May 16. A very productive hearing in tha t
communications were established with a substantial pa rt of
the Negro community. We received a list of requ ests from
the Atlanta Summit Leadership Conference, and we we re
ab le to respond to them positively.
CANDLER PARK, May 20. We used a different communications pr0gram to generate atte ndance, and learned
th at the method used for the West Side he arin g was more
effective. Statements made most often by speakers related to
requests for assurances about no job discrimination.
AME ZION CHURCH, Ma y 22. Several speake rs took
exception to our arrangement for the West Lake Station .
They place more importance on our use of vacant land th an
we do, and th ey do not pl ace as mu ch importance on street
access as we do . Most speakers addressed themselves to objections to our organization ; specifically, the absence of
Negro employees o n th e staff a nd th e lim ited Negro represent ation on the Board. We explained this as best we cou ld .
SANDY SPRINGS, May 27. Speakers presented an understandin g th at Sandy Springs is not a first priority, and
they expressed quite clearly th at they expect to be pa rt of
our project so me day.
SOUTH DEKALB, May 29. There was so me expression
of interest and need for a rap id tra nsit line into South DeKa lb Count y where non e is now shown. However, the proponents of this South . DeKalb Line a lso stated th at th ey do
not travel into At la nt a very often .
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA
RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
8 0 8 GLENN BLO G . 120 M A RIETT A ST . , N .W .
ATLAN T A. GA . 303 03 · PH ONE 524-5711
0
" DIRECTED BY THE GEORGIA STATE
LEGISLATURE TO DEVELOP A RAPID
TRANSIT SYSTEM FOR THE 5 -COUNTY
METROPOLITAN AT LANT A
Edited by
AREA."
KING 'ELLIOTT
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
OFFI CEH S ,
H1c 11 A11u H. H1 c 11. C h air nHm
H ElWEIIT J. IJICK SON. T r CflSUr er
H OY A.
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II AHTA STAFF,


II E:-. 11 , l.. :=-n 1A11T. G1' 111•ral l fo 1wf!1'r
EAnL \\' . N•:1.so:--.. Clii1 •/ E11g1111·,·r
l... 1:-.l. E 1.1. 101T. /Jir 1..·,·t<•r of Pulilit' ln{ M111,1tw11
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�"MARTA CHART/\'. ROUSING SUCCESS!
The ··MART A C HA RTA"" inspection tour of M ontreal and Toronco rapid tran.sit systems was an eye -opening e.~perience. according
to those who made the trip June 12 and 13.
Henry L. Swart. General Manager of !he Metropolitan Atlanta
Rapid Transit Authority. said, "I talked to many of those who went,
and they invariably stated they were impresse d with the two systems,
and acrced that something similar ;5 needed :o l\l etropolitan At!:i.nta.
Eve ryone a g reed that the stat ions ill 1'fontrcal were beautifully designed and were well-coord inated with !he buildings on 1hc surface:·
he co n1inucd. "The bus tour of the surface development around the
rapid tnrnsit stations in Toronto was of gT<,at in terest to all of us," he
slated. ·'\Ve were able to sec for ourselves the tremendous growth
which has taken place within a fivc-minuto walk of the stations. and
I believecveryoneofuswasvisuali:dngwhat might take place around
s ta.tion_s i~ - Allan\~. Decatur. the Tri-Cities, Doraville and all other
"" One of the most interesting reactions, l think. was the cx!cmporaneous organization of the "Exc,,va tion "69 Club" hy .several of the
participants. Their mono ls .. Dig!" and they arc convinced that we
need1ogctstartedasso,;,naspossibteaemallybuild ingarapidtransi t
syslem. I agree with them one-hundred percent."" Stuart said
The inspection trip, dubbed ··MARTA C H AR.TA."" w:i.~ organized
by MARTA to allow local leaders the opportunity to ride modern
rapid transit and to observe the impact rapid tra nsit has h"d on real
cst:ue development and other phase£ of activity in the 1....-0 Canadian
cicies. Those accepting 1he invitat ion made the trip at their own
expense
The group included a number of mayors. coumy commissioners.
city aldermen and councilmen. members of the Georgia General Assembly. archi1ec1S, engineers. planners. real estat.: developers. and
01hers. Eight other persons who could not be accommod:itcd o n the
charter flight flew by commercial air lines and made !he tours with
the ""MARTA CHAR.TA" group.
The Eastern Air Lines chann jet left Atlanta at 8:53 :1 .m. Wednesday. June 12, and arrived in Montreal shortly before noon. T he group
toured the Montreal METRO during the afternoon. and new to Toron1o that evening by Air Canad;t commercial serv ic e. The visitors
toured the Toronto system Thursday morning. June 13. as pan of the
J nstitute for R;1pid Transit conference, which was in progress in Toronto. The group retu rned by charter jet that afternoon, arriving in
Atlanta at 6cl."i p .m
,,j
Mr. Rober/ Haimmlr, member
rhe ,\fomreal Transportaiion Comminio11. ;:reels ""A·fARTA C/f,IUTA"" 111t·m/!a,· <11 Crcnw~ie SratiOI!
Us1<•11i11g ar,· John C<1lf101111. EOA (11·i1!, hack /0 ,·«111era); Leland Ve<1/
Stmc ~ligl1way D,,part1111•11t of G.-or;:ia; am/ S1e/l 1/uie. A1ARTA
,\frGil! Sw1ion ;_,-
011e:
of 1//c most co/or/11/ um/ /1<•«.-ily us<'d ;1mion., 011 A1ETRO system
fo Toro/1/o, ""MARTA CIIAUTA"" members arri ~ed m 1hc
.,·.,bway stotio11 hy /ms. 1he w<1y hwulreds of rl1011sw1ds of
comnuu.-rs ,lo
d<1y, ""d wu/ked dowu cft>a11 , we/1-/igl,ted
A erial ,•icw sl,ows c/11stas of l,igh-rise dc,·e/opme111
l!rO""" titre,, Toro11/0 ,uhway s/<1tio11s S1<bway
para/Ids Yo11;:.,S1
corridors
,.,.cJ,
10 trnin p/wform<. ,Hrs. Lithangia Robiuson. V<1lCo,,,,.,,.,,;,y C/,.l,; Scuator Leroy Joh11so11, a11</ Atla111<1
Alder11um Q. V. IVilliamsou ure ill //,,: forcr;ro1<11d.
hacl,e~
Toronro mak,·s goml use of ""Bus ·,,• Ride'" ,en•ice. Buses circ11/are through
re.,idem ial areas. pick U/J llundr.-ds of //101<somls of people each day, """
de/i>'er them to a 11enrby suhw<1y s1mio11 for comp/e1io11 of their trip ,/own-
Gro1111 wailing /0 board train inc/,u/,:
Gwim,e11 R ep. Norris Nush (iu gr,,,,,,
""ii):
Commission Chair"'"" R<l)' Aforgau (second from righ1);
""" ,HAR1A Gwi1wn1 Directm·, l(c,o
Afr,\,fil/011(rig/,1).
a,..;,,,,a,
Fu//Or, Commissioner Walter Mi/Chell, MARTA Chairman Richard H
Rich. and Srate Highw<1y Dep<1rlme111 P/a,.,oer Ldaml V-,a/ are ill
cemer of group of members of ""MARTA CHARTA'" a,od 1/,e fnsritule
for Rapid Tra11sit.
""A·IARTA C HARTA "" ••isirors inspect exrnnlll dn•e/opme/11 w Victoria Sq,wr-.- Statio11 . METRO o:ir is part of
higi,-rise office building which comains1/ie /llonuea/Sux:k
Exd1a11ge amt 01/,er business offices.
Atw<Ucr Swtio11 ope11s 011/0 a 11111/1i-s1ory de,·dopm"m cot1tai,ring
,Hirac/e A/art.'" b11siHes.,·. ,'hoppin!,;. m"I ,,,11,•r1oi1m1<•m c,-nt,•r h11ilt
aro11nd " cncloud mall . Tl,e ma" who dc,·elop"'I this ce,uc,· ,,,,,. e.t preJ"H'd imcrest "ill ,he 1,0,·,·ib;Jiri,-s of" ,·imi/ar proiC<"t di /11AR"rA"s
propos,·d stmion iu V.-cm11r.
A special train cond11cud MARTA people 011</ members of
the /11s1itureforRt1p1d Transit on tourofemireeast-west line.
f"ive A1fmuo Aldermen talk things o,·e:r "' J'oromo subway statiou . Left to
righl ore Rober/ Denni.r, l/ug/1 Pierce, Charlie Le/twicl,. J<1ck S11mmers,
ondlVilliamKnigl,t
�RAPID TRANSIT
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
" MARTA
REPORTS TO THE
PEOPLE
IT SERVES
,,
MAY,
1968
VOL . 3, NO. 4
MARTA CONDUCTS ITS
FIRST PUBLIC HEARING
MARTA Director Mitchell C. Bishop presided at the public
hearing in East Point . . .
... introduced the local officials and citizens, answered their
questions . . .
. .. and answered questions raised by members of the audience
after registered speakers had completed their remarks. A bout
90 persons attended the first public hearing.
The Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority conducted its first public hearing in April, and the opinions
expressed by those attending it were generally favorable. The
hearings are to allow the general public rn hear in detail the
proposals for rapid transit routes and station locations, and
then to comment on them.
Mitchell C. Bishop, College Park, member of the MARTA
Board of Directors, presided at the first hearing, which was
held in the Tri-Cities area at the East Point City Auditorium,
on April 29th.
In remarks formally opening the hearing, Mr. Bishop
said, "The proposed routes and stations, though the result
of exhaustive studies by MARTA's consulting engineers, have
not yet been approved by the MARTA Board of Directors."
"The purpose of these hearings is to get your point of
view to see whether you agree with the engineers' recommendations or have alternative suggestions," Mr. Bishop said.
" In short, we want to know what you think before these
plans are finally adopted by the Authority."
"The thoughts expressed in this series of public hearings
will be given careful consideration before finalizing our
pl ans," he said.
"Locations of all routes and stations will be finalized before the ultimate decision on rapid transit is submitted to
the voters in a referen dum. "
After the proposed routes and station locations were outlined b y John Coil , Resident Manage r, Parsons BrinckerhoffTudor-Bechtel , engineering consultants to MARTA , Mr.
Bishop opened the heari ng to members of the audience.
The first statement from the audience was made by Mr.
Marion Nolan, Mayor of College Park. He opened his remarks by saying, "Mr. Chairman, I don't know much about
rapid transit, but I do know we need it, and we are going
to have to do something about it before too long. Our
highways and our transportation system are outdated . I know
that we are going to have to get something that is fas ter,
larger and more economical than what we have tod ay ."
Nolan continued, "Now, I have never seen a rapid transit
system. I couldn't tell you what kind of rapid transit we
would need or how to operate it or how much it will cost,
but I think that anything we do will be economical for the
system we have now. Now, tonight, we only have a handful
of people here . T his place should be plumb full , with people
standing out on the gro unds around with loudspeakers so
the people could hear what we have to say."
"I have never spoken for rapid transit before, but this
time I'm speaking for rap id transit. I think we need it. I will
endorse it personally, and I think most of the people that
(Continued on Page 2, Col. 1)
�MARTA WINS HUD AWARD
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA
RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
8 0 8 GL ENN BLDG . 1 20 MARIETTA S T .• N.W .
A TL AN T A . G A. 30303 · PHONE 524-5711
0
" DIRECTED BY THE GEORGIA STATE
LEGISLATURE TO DEVELOP A RAPID
TRANSIT SYSTEM FOR THE 5 -COUNTY
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA AREA ."
Edited by
KING ELLIOTT
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
O FFI C ER S ,
R I CHARD H. R1c 1-1 , Chairman
H ERBERT J. D I C K SO:-.:, Tr eas u rer
I\O y A . B LOUNT , V ice Cha irman
Eo Mu:-.o W. H uc 11 Es, Secre tary
CITY OF AT L ANT A,
ROBERT
F.
RI CH ARD
L. D. l\ l l LTO:'\"
ADA:'\TSO:-.
H.
R ICH
RA WSO:-;" H AV ERT Y
C LAY T ON COU:--I TY ,
Eoc,rn DLA LOCK
D E K AL B C OUN TY,
RoY A . BLou:-.T
Dn. SANFono ATw ooo
F U LTO N C O U"<T Y,
J OH N
C.
l\ !IT CH E LL
STA T O:-.
C.
BI S H OP
GW I NNE TT COU:--I T Y ,
K. A . '.\ Ic'.\l1LL 10:-.
CO B B COL:--ITY \Obs erve r)
Ons :\. Bnt::-.rnY . Jn .
i\ l AR T A S T AFF ,
L. STUART, Genernl Manag er
W. J\i.:1.so;s, Chief Engin e er
K1:-•c ELLIOTT. Dir ector of Pu blic Informa t ion
H t::"/RY
EAnL
H . :"i. JoH:-. so:-.-, Admiriis rrative A s.( i.Hant to G en e ral .lf anage r
Marta Conducts Hearing
(Continued from Page I)
realize that we need rapi d tra nsit will do the same," Mayor
N olan stated.
M rs. Ruth G . Gunter, M ayor Pro Tern of East Point, extended an offici al welcome from the City of East Point to
the MART A off ici als, and ex pressed her appreciation that
the fi rst public hearing was held in East Point. She went on
to say, "As fa r as I am personall y concerned, I do see a
great need fo r rapid tra nsit in this area. It's going to cost
money, but I notice on our schedule that a $20,000 house,
even at the highest point of re turn in the three mill tax
raise which you're anti cip ating. will only be $18. 00 a year.
Yo ur time, efforts, parking and everyth ing else will cost yo u
peopl e a great deal more than $ 18.00 a year, ar:d I can see
where this wo uld be benefi cial to everyone in our area,"
she concl uded.
Severa l other public offic ials and private citizens spoke
in support of MART A plans. Some asked questions about
routes and station locations. or ex pressed their opinions
about the proposed system. M r. Jody Brown of H apeville
stated that the re was some dissati sfaction in that area be-
The Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority is one
of the winners in the first nationwide Design Awards Competition sponsored by the U . S. Department of Housing and
Urban Development. The Award of Merit was presented by
HUD Secretary Robert Weaver in Pittsburgh at the Third
Annual International Conference on Urban Transportation
on March 11. The award was accepted by Earl W. Nelson,
MARTA Chief Engineer.
MARTA was honored for its Rapid Transit System Plan
Concept. The judges said, "The relation of the planned Atlanta System to existing and proposed educational institutions, commercial and cultural facilities , will create a high
qu ality of urban design. "
Secretary Weaver stated in presenting the award, "The
Department of Housing and U rban Development takes pride
in recognizing the accomplishments of MARTA. The pioneering work we have here today points the way to urban transportation patterns of the future. "
Three honor awards were presented to : San Francisco
Bay Area Rapid Transit District; The City Planning Commission, Philadelphia ; and The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority, Boston, Mass.
In addition to the award to MARTA, eight other merit
awards were given : The Municipality of Metropolitan Seattle
and City of Seattle; Washington State Highway Commission;
The City of Seattle, Wash.; Southern Californi a Rapid Transit District, Los Angeles ; The Metropolitan Commuter Transportation Authority, New York City ; The City of Philadelphi a, Pa. ; The Port Authority of Allegheny County, Pittsburgh , Pa. (two awards).
cause of the change in MARTA pl ans to provide direct
service to the new proposed airport terminal , rather than to
run the line through Hapeville as origi nally planned. Mr.
Bishop responded by saying that the change was brought
abo ut by the plans to build a new airport termin al, and was
necessary to provide service to both air passe ngers and to the
40,000 employees who wi ll be workin g at the airport in the
next decade or so. He assured Mr. Brown th at a well-planned
feeder bus service would be provided throughout the H apeville area to transport residents to a nearby station.
A total of 12 public hearings were sched uled for late
Ap ril and the month of May. MART A is required by law to
conduct public hearings on routes and stations, as well as
other fac tors of the syste m in each jurisdiction represented
in the Authority. After all the hearings have been completed the testimony wi ll be transcribed , and MARTA directors will evalu ate the comme nts and recommendations before
a decision is made on ro utes and station locations.
A summ ary of com ments and reco mmend ations made at
other hearin gs will appear in the next issue of RAPID
TRANSIT PROGRESS.
" MARTA REPORTS
TO THE
PEOPLE IT SERVES ..
"
SECOND
ANNUAL REPORT
1967
0
Prior to the public hearings, MART A officials briefed go vernmental leaders on th e routes and station locations to be discussed
at the public hearings. MART A Chairman R ichard H. Rich pr esided at a meeting with A tlanta offi cials on Ma y 2. Attending
were Mayor Ivan A llen, Jr.; Vice-Mayo r Sam Massei!, Jr .; A lde rm en E. G regory G riggs, William T . Knight, Q . V. Williamson,
Hugh Pierce, Charles Leftwich, George Cotsakis, G. E verett Millican , Cecil Turn er, Jack Summers, and Douglas L. Fowlkes;
Earl Landers, Administrative Assistant to the M ayor; and Collier G ladin , Director, Planning De partment .
M E T RO PO LITA N AT L AN TA RAPID TRANS IT AUTHORITY
�.REPORT TO THE CITIZENS
From : Chairman of the Board
A number of major steps were taken by MARTA during
1967 and many policy decisions were made.
T he decision of the Georgia G eneral Assembly to participate fi nancially in MARTA is a most gratifying development. T his decision gives substance to a financial proposal
which allows for a full 10% State participation in rapid transit. T he successful applications by MARTA for additional
Federal funds encourage us to believe that substantial Federal
fu nds will be available if local voters approve construction of
the system .
T he progress made in planning during 1967 encourages us
to believe that we will be prepared to ask the residents of at
least F ulton and D eKalb counties to vote on November 5,
1968, to finance construction of a basic rapid transit system. ~
D uring 1967 MARTA's approach became considerably
broader than it had been in- 1966. It was apparent that
MARTA could not plan or develop a rail rapid transit to
stand alone, but that MARTA would have to plan a system
which would be an effective and integral part of a balanced
transportation system . Rail rapid transit, along with an effective bus service, a highly developed network of arterial and
surface streets and an expanded expressway system, if properly coordinated, could effectively red uce traffic congestion
and make transportation fas ter, more efficient and more comfortable. To achieve these goals MARTA is participating
full y in the Atlanta Area Transportation Study, and I represent MARTA on the Atlanta Area Transportation Policy
Committee.
MARTA pledges its full support and cooperation to the
effort to fi nd effective solutions to our transportation crisis.
Recognizing the necessity for the best possible coordination
among the professions involved in Rapid transit development,
the MARTA board of directors created a five man Advisory
Committee to assist the A uthority. T he Advisory Committee
represents professional Engineers, Architects, Landscape
Architects and Planners. T he Committee has reviewed
MARTA's work to date and has offered m uch constructive advice· concerning our plans.
MARTA staff and consultants have spent m any hours
in coordinating rapid transit planning with other activities
in organizations. Through such coordination and interchange
of ideas, MARTA hopes to achieve the highest degree of
excellence yet obtained in the creation of a rapid transit system.
T he Directors of MARTA express their appreciation to
the many business, civic and governmental leaders of this area
who have supported rapid transit plan ning efforts duri ng 1967
and earlier years. It now appears that 1968 may well be the
year of decision - the year when the voters decide whether or
not rapid transit will be built in the Atlanta area. With the
continued enthusiastic support of the leaders in Metropolitan
Atlanta, a referendum in I 968 could be successful, and 1969
see the actual start of construction on rapid transit.
e
From: General Manager
The year 1967 saw much solid progress made in the development of a rapid transit system fo r Metropolitan Atlanta.
Significant accomplishments were achieved in the fields of engineering, planning and coordination with public and private
groups.
In the field of engineering, the Metropolitan Atlanta
Rapid Transit Authority signed a contract with consultants to
provide MARTA with preliminary engineering on the EastWest line from the intersection of 1-285 and Lynhurst Drive
on the West, to the intersection of I-285 and Covington Highway on the East.
T his contract extends the work of earlier contracts to
provide preliminary engineering for the area between Doraville and Forest Park. The work now under contract encompasses a full system whcih will reach I-285 at fo ur places.
This is a workable basic system for this region and needs
only p ublic approval and final design work to be ready for
construction.
In March, a "Corridor Impact Study" was begun; its goal
was to assess the probable impact of the proposed rapid transit
system on the communities and neighborhoods in which it
would be'i located. Toward the end of 1967, this work began
to develop tentative conclusions and to suggest modifications.
Through the work of the "Corridor Impact Study" and the
-concomitant understanding of the effect of rapid transit, a
system can be designed which will be completely sensitive to
local needs and which will bring into real ity more of the potential benefits than any other system ever built.
Another significant event of 1967 was the f.i rst direct
fi nancial contribution by the State of Georgi a fo r rapid
transit. The 1967 G eneral Assembly appropriated $500,000.00
for the two fiscal years beginning July I , 1967, as authorized
by a Statewide constitutional amend ment in 1966. This appropriation is evidence of an awareness at the State level of the
transportation problems in the Metropolitan Atlanta a rea, and
of a determination to assist in the solution of these problems.
T he activities of the Authority have been the subject of
hu ndreds of presentations by MARTA directors and staff
members to members of the general public and to elected officials and professionals at all levels of government. All the
planning was brought up to date in "Rapid Transit fo r Metropolitan Atlanta," a special report which was introduced by
the Atlanta Region Metropolitan Planning Commission at the
end of the year. T he report was distributed widely, received
enthusiastically, and was declared "out of print" after a few
weeks.
1967 was a productive year, and the way to even greater
achievement in 1968 is clearl y open to us.
.----


-/ 'J Al;;,,JMETR OP O LITAN ATLAN TA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY


808 GLENN BLDG.
i- '
'
Edited by KING ELLIOTT
o

120 M ARIETTA ST., N.W .

ATLANTA, GA. 30303

PHONE 524-571 1
" DIRECTED BY THE GEORGIA STATE LEGISLATURE TO DEVELOP A RAPID
TRANSIT SYSTEM FOR THE 5-COUNTY METROPOLITAN ATLANTA AREA."
BOARD O F DIRECTORS
O FFICERS:
DEKALB COUNTY:
COBB COUNTY (Observer)
RICHA RD H. RICH, Chairman
ROY A. BLOUNT, Vice Chairman
HERB ERT J. DICKSON , Treasurer
EDMUND W. HUGHES, Secretary
ROY A. BLOUNT
DR. SANFORD ATWOOD
OT IS A. BRUMBY, JR.
FULTON COUNTY:
HENRY L. ST UART
CITY OF ATLANTA:
JOHN C. STATON
M ITCHELL C. BISHOP
ROBERT F. ADAMSON
RICHARD H. RICH
L. D. MILTON
RAWSON HAVERTY
GWINNETT COUNTY:
K. A. M cMILLON
M ARTA STAFF:
General Manager
KING ELLIOTT
Director of Public Information
EARL W . NELSON, Chief Eng.
H. N. JOH NSON
A. A.
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
STATEMENTS OF CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS
FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 3 1, 1967
AND CUMULATIVE TOTAL SINCE INCEPTION (JANUARY 3 , 1966)
T otal
CASH RECEIPT S :
P articip ating local governments
U. S. G overnment
Interest on U . S. T reasury B ills
CASH DISBURSEMEN TS FOR :
Joint project with Atlanta R egion
Metropolitan Planning Co mmission
( Note)
Engineering services - Parsons
B rinckerhoff-Tudor-Bechtel ( Note )
C onsul ting services
Administrative and general expenses
1967
Since
Inception
$ 30 4 ,552
302,667
5,50 3
$ 595 ,447
0 2 ,667
5.9 32
$612,722
$ 904,046
t o t h e Board or D!re,nor1 or
l'let r cpol1 t u 1 J.tlu1u Ra pid
Tr •nat t 4 llthorlt:r:
$ 65 ,939
$ 97,189
lie h a Te o::a at n ad th• a t at e a ente
or
c:eeb r ece 1pt1 and
dt1b1.:.ru11ente or u,a M1tropol1Un &U e na Ra pid tre r.att A11.t!:.or l t 7 ( e
283 ,624
12,928
168,634
325 ,222
12,9 28
264,706
$531 ,125
$70 0 ,04 5
Oaor-1 !• 111;.:tc!pa l c o r po ta tlon )
to :- the ,.aar u1ded Dece:ober
and cua ul a t !Ye to t a l e tcoa t ncapti on ( J a nuary ), 1966 ).
)l ,
1967 ,
Our
e :;,;ai,.tnattcn v•a 1.ade ln ecc o rd a nce vtt h 1a11erelly a cce pted a udltl n e
a i:id 1uc:b o t h er a1.1d! t ln1 pro,: .di:ree •• ve o:0111lderel!a nee111e ar,- in the
In our o plnloc, the accoi:pu :i:,tn1 •tat.u:u,nt.1 present. !'&! r ly
the c e irh r,c e1pt.a a nd d1 11buru1.11.e nt • o!' t he He t.ropolit • n J. t.l a nt. , Ra pid
EXCESS OF RECEIPTS O VER
D ISBU RSEMENTS
Trenl1t. Au t hority t o r t he ye ar e nde d Deoe .11.'o1 r
$204,001
t.ot.1 1 •inc, 1nccpt.1 on ( J anu a r y J , 1966 ) .
REP RESENTED BY :
C ash
U . S. T re asury B ills
$ 13 3,912
70,089
Atl a nt a , 0 ,.o ra• • ,
J a::u u·:, 19 , 1'168.
T he accompanying note is an integral part of these statements.
$204,001
$ 81 ,597
) 1 , 196'1, 1 nd c uJ1.ul a t.1Yc
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
NOTE TO STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS
FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 19 67
T he A uthority was formed on January 3, 1966, by an act of the Gener al Assembly of The State of Georgia to design and
implem ent a r apid transit system for the Atlanta, G eorgia, m etropolitan area. Since its organization, the A uthority's
principal activities have included the updating of the 1962 plan and program of rapid transit for the A tlanta m etropolitan region and contracting for preliminary engineering on the proposed tr ansit system. The contracts let and the
related sources of fund s are as follows:
A mount
D isbursements to Date
of
Source of Funds
Contract
Total
L ocal
Federal
a . A tlanta R egion M etropolitan P lanning
$ 61, 189
$ 61,189
$ 61,18 9
(c)
$
Commission 49,000
36,000
3 6,000
(c)
Update 1962 plan
Corridor Impact Study
$110, 189
$ 97,189
$ 97,1 89
$
b . P arsons B rinckerhoff-Tudor-Bech tel $125,000
Pr eliminar y engineering for initial
500,000
system (70 2 loan project )
100,000
Preliminary e ngineering and planning
for major lines ( Sect ion 9 project)
R etainer contract for extended su pport $725,000
$ 90,000
180,000
55 ,222
$ 325,222
$
$ 90,000
(32,070 )
55 ,222
$ 23,1 52
212,070(d)
$302,070
c. T he D epartment of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) of the United States Government is participating with the Atlanta R egion M etropolitan Planning Commission ( ARMPC ) by funding up to twothirds o f project costs.
d . As of D ecember 31, 1967 , there was an addition al $90,000 payable to Parsons Brinckerhoff-TudorBechtel for work completed to that date. Payment was made on January 24, 1968 .
The Auth ority has received $90 ,000 of a $ 125 000 advance commitment from the United States Government under
Section 7_02 of the Housing Act of 1954. The advance is noo-interest bearing and repayable only upon the start of
construct10n of the System .
The $5~0,0~0 co?trac_t with Parsons Brinck~rhoff-Tudor-Bechtel for completing preliminary engineering and planning for
ma1or Imes 1s. bemg funded under Section. 9 of the Urban Mass_ Transportation Act of 1964. Under the provisions
of the grant signed under the Act, two-third s of the contract will be funded by the United States.
�EXPENDITURE
INCOME
RESERVE TO
COMPLETE
UNFINISHED
PROGRAMS
28.0 %
U.S. DEPARTMENT
OF
HOUSI NG & URBAN
DEVELOPMENT
\\
PLANN ING
&
ENGI NEERING
48.5%
41.1%
,7
HIGHLIGHTS -1967
March- contract signed for Corridor Impact Study.
March 7- Charles M . Haar, Assistant Secretary for
Metropolitan Development, U.S. Department of HUD,
visited MARTA.
March 17-Gov. Lester Maddox signed appropriations
bill , which included an allocation of $ 500,000.00 for
MARTA.
A pril 4- MARTA received the "Meritorious Award"
of the Association of County Commissioners of Georgia for
its multiple-county service.
April 24-Earl W. Nelson becomes MARTA chief
engineer.
May 22-MARTA exhibits past and present work at
the confer ence on D esign in Urban Transportation in
Washington , D . C. ; conference sponsored by HUD.
August 4- Rapid Transit's first "hole in the ground"
was dug at Trinity a nd Broad Street-first of 35 soil test
holes .
August-Chief Engineer N elson was appointed as
MARTA's r epresentative on the T echnical Coordinating
Committee of the Atlanta Area Transportation Study.
September 12-MARTA participates in formation of
Atlanta Area Transportation Policy Committee.
May-Robert F. Adamson becomes MARTA director, succeeding Mills B. Lane, Jr.
October 22-26-American Transit Association C onvention held in A tlanta.
May 2 4-26-Institute for Rapid T ransit convenes in
Atlanta.
D ecemb er- Up-d ated rapid transit plan received from
con sulting engineers.
June 9-MARTA creates 5-man A dvisory Committee.
June 9- Herbert J . Dickson named
MARTA.
~
1n
Treasurer of
D ecember-MARTA Director Sanford Atwood of
DeKalb, L. D. Milton of Atlanta and Ken McMillon of
Gwinnett, reappointed to new 4-year terms.
MARTAdditions
EXPERTS SEE NEW SYSTEM
Three new additions have recently been made to the
MART A Board and Staff.
John C. Staton has been appointed by the Fulton County
Commission as Fulton County member of the Board of
Directors of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid T ransit Authority. Staton, Staff Vice-President of the Coca-Cola Company,
will fi ll the unexpired term of W. A. "D ick" Pulver, who
recently assumed new duties with the Lockheed Aircraft
Corporation in California. Staton's term will expire December 31, 1970.
Staton joined the Coca-Cola Company in I 925. He has served in executive posts in Canada, New Zealand,
Australia, and Brazil. In 1948, he was
elected Vice-President in Charge of
Manufacturing, making h is headquarters in Atlanta. He was named Staff
Vice-President and Assistant to the P resident in August, 1966.
A 1924 graduate of Georgia Tech
John C. Staton
in Electrical Engineering and AllSouthern end on the football team, Staton also received a
law degree from the Atlanta Law School and was admitted
to the Bar in 1928. He has served as President of the Georgia
Tech A lumni Association and other Georgia Tech grou ps;
and has been a leader in Boy Scouting, Rotary Club and
nume rous other organizations.
Edmund W. Hughes has been appointed as Secretary to
the Authority. Hughes is Managing Di rector o f the Greater
Atlanta Traffic and Safety Council. He succeeds Glenn E.
Bennett, Executive Director of the Atlanta Region Metropolitan Planning Commission, who has
served as Secretary since MARTA was
officially organized in J anuary, I 966.
Hughes has been Managing Director of the GAT&SC since 1962. Prior to
that. he was Ed itorial Associate with
Th e Atlanta Journal and had been a
reporter with the Journal since 1955. H e
is currentl y P resident of the Association
of Safety Council's Advisory G roup for
Edmund Hughes Safety Organizations. He is a member
of the Governor's Traffic Safety Study Committee.
Sue Logan is the new Secretary to
the P ublic In form ation Director, and
assists in the editing of Rapid Transit
Progress. Miss Logan attended Keystone J unior College in La Pl ume,
Pennsylvania, after graduating from
Northside H igh School. Before coming
to M ARTA, she was Receptionist and
Secretary to the Manager of the International Division o f an Atla nta-based textile chemical firm.
Sue L ogan
MARTA General M anager Henry L. Stuart was among a
group of transit experts which inspected the new $85 million
Lindenwold-P hiladelp hia Rapid T ransit Line being constructed by the Delaware River Port Authority (DRPA) .
T he tour was conducted T uesday, April 23 in conjunction
with 1968 Rail Transit G roup Conference of the American
Transit Association in cooperation with the Institute of
Rapid Transit in P hiladelphia Monday through Thursday.
Some 400 visitors were to be transported by bus to visit the
new facility along the 10.4 miles of new construction between
Camden, N . J. and Lindenwold, N. J.
MONTREAL-TORONTO TRIP PLANNED
Some 87 prominent Atlanta businessmen and governmental officials will make a two-day tour of rapid transit
facil ities in Toronto and Mont real in J une. M ARTA is organizing the trip to allow local leaders the opportunity to
ride modern rapid transit systems and to observe the impact
rapid transit has had and is having on real estate developments and other phases of acti vity in the two Canadian cities.
Over 300 individuals were invited to make the trip those accepting are paying their own expenses. Cost of the
trip to each is $ 180.00.
The Eastern Air Lines charter flight will leave Atlanta
at 8: 00 A.M ., Wednesday, June 12, and fly to Montreal.
The group will tour Montreal the rest of the day and fly
to Toronto that evening. After spending the night in Toronto,
Train at station, Delaware R iver Port A uthority System.
The morning trip included a ride on one of the new
stainless steel transit trains now undergoing tests . In the
afternoon, separate inspection trips for various advisory committees were arranged to the m aintenance and shop facilities,
the control center at Camden, power substations, passenger
stations and various track structures.
Stuart commented after riding the system, "The 75 miles
per hour automated rapid transit ride is no longer a theory;
it is now a fact of life. The same is trne for the automatic
train control concept, which will allow trains to run only
90 seconds apart. This system is doing now what is being
planned for San Francisco, Atlanta, and a host of other
cities."
Large parking lots are being built at suburban stations to
accommodate cars of the "park and ride" passengers.
He continued, "The train accelerated from a standing
start to 7 5 miles per hour in 55 seconds, and the ride is not
as noisy or as rough as the average automobile ride. There is
no doubt in my m ind that a modern. comfortable rapid transit
system such as this can be bui lt in Atlanta; and when the
people in Atlanta see it and try it, they will like it and ride it."'
the group will tour rapid transit facilities along with a group
of individuals who will be attending the Institute for Rapid
Transit meeting in Toronto. The group will return to Atlanta Thursday evening. June 13.
�MARTAction
At its meeting March 5, the Board of Directors of the
Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority by resolution
accepted preliminary engineering work on the North-South Line
from Oglethorpe to the Airport. The work was performed by
Parsons Brinckerhoff-Tudor-Bechtel under Section 702 of the
Urban Mass Transit Act.
The Board established the amount of $200 million as the
appropriate local share for constructing the system. The balance
of the cost would come from federal and state funds .
John C. Staton, newly appointed member of the Board from
Fulton County, was welcomed to the Authority. Edmund W .
Hughes, Managing Director of the Greater Atlanta Traffic and
Safety Council, was appointed Secretary to the Authorit y. (See
separate sto ries on page 3.)
At the meeting April 2, the MARTA Board reviewed the
auditors' report for 1967, and adopted it unanimously. The 1967
Annual Report contains the auditors' report.
Four contracts were presented for work to be done subject
to approval by the U. S. Department of Housing and Urban
Deve lopment. The four contracts cover the following work:
. I . To determine value of Atl ant a Transit System .... $20,000 .
2. To develop system-wide criteria and standards
for engineered facilities ; compilation of design
control data in connection with Transit Center;
and other engineering work ................................ $99 ,000.
3. Technical studies for accounting and financial
control systems, etc. ............................................ $25,000.
4. Resea rch on certain parcels of land deemed critical right-of-way (work to begin after routes a re
definitely established) .......................................... $49 ,000 .
General M anager Henry L. Stuart reported th at HUD had
as ked th at the proposa l for a cost / benefit a nalysis be withdrawn
as it is the type study which should be done by a university
system inste ad of a transit system . Stuart recommended th at the
money for the study ($30,000) be used instead to study a line
in the Model Cities a rea . The Board approved the change, subject to ap proval of the federal application by HUD.
The Board approved in principle a set of rules for the
conduct of public hearings.
Stuart reported th at competitive bids had been received for
the printing and distribution of Rapid Tran sit Progress. D a rby
Printing Company was the low bidder at $992. 50 per issue,
based on printing 12,500 copies, addressing 12,000 copies,
mai ling, and adding an average of 200 new ad dresses per
month. This was the first MARTA contract to be Jet under
competitive bids.
The Board adopted a resolution expressing so rrow at the
death of Mr. Rob ert L. Sommerville, President of the Atlanta
Transit System, and expressing deepest sympathy to his family
and business associates.
CAN SUBWAYS SERVE AS
FALLOUT SHELTERS?
MARTA is discussing with Civil Defense officials the
possibilities of incorporating facilities in the design of subways to allow them to serve as shelters for protection against
radioactive fallout in the event of a nuclear war.
Three high-ranking Civil Defense officials met with
MARTA Chief Engineer Earl Nelson, April 5, to begin
initial talks. The officials were Gen. W. R. Woodward, Director, and Col. W. E. Smith, Assistant Director, Atlanta Area
Civil Defense ; and Dr. Robert N . Bruce, Jr., Tulane University, Technical Advisor to the Federal Office of Civil Defense.
After reviewing MARTA subway plans, Dr. Bruce stated
an opinion that, "With minor design changes, the basic subway structures could be converted to highly effective fallout
shelters for little or no increase in cost. The major problem ,"
he said, " would be to provide service areas for the storage
of shelter supplies." He added, "The cost to make the subways into blast shelters would be prohibitive. It would be
more economical to provide for this protection in some of
the downtown buildings."
A set of the preliminary engineering plans and transit station drawings were sent to the Civil Defense office in Washington.
The idea for using subways for fall-out shelters was suggested to MARTA by Georgia's Fourth District Congressman Ben Blackburn of Decatur.
Congressman Blackburn stated that he would propose legislation enabling the federal government to provide up to 90 %
of the costs to modify rapid transit systems for civil defense
use.
RAPID TRANSIT BRIEFS
THE TORONTO TRANSIT COMMISSION opened, on
May 11 , 1968, for regular service, two new subway sections,
totalling six and a quarter miles.
Added to the 14-mile East-West (Bloor St-Danforth
Ave .) line, the additions are three new stations and 2. 77 miles
eastward - and six new stations and 3.49 miles westward.
Total cost of the two extensions, approximately $77 million, is being met by Metropolitan Toronto and the Toronto
Transit Commission with assistance from the Province of Ontario.
LOS ANGELES has completed preliminary engineering
for the 89 mile proposed rapid transit system. Voters are expected to decide this November on financing the $2. 5 billion
project.
RAPID TRANSIT
PROGRESS
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
808 GLENN BLDG .
1 2 0 MARIETTA ST . . N . W .
ATLANTA . GEORGIA 30303
PHONE 524-5711 ( AREA CODE 4 04 )
VOL .
3 .
NO .
4
MAY ,
1 96B
Mr. Oa ~ E.• Sweat, Jr • • Dt r ector of
Gov er1men t a l Lla i so , , Ci ty of Att a : ta
C1 ty Ha. ~ l
At la :-ita. G-a.
~
lD
30303
BULK RATE
U.S. Postage
PAID
Atlanta, Go.
Permit No. 705
��A city must be a community where our
lives are enriched. It must be a place where
every man can satisfy his highest aspiration. It must be an instrument to advance
the hopes of all its citizens. That is what we
want our cities to be. And that is what we
have set out to make them.
Lyndon B. Johnson
The modern city by the volume and rap idity
of th e movements of its people and goods
can in large part gro w or atrophy depending
on the efficacy of its transportation systems. A transit system has to be more than
vehicles and tracks. There are also social
and political dimensions. A forward looking
transportation system can inject new economic vitality into a failing and deteriorating
isolated area. It can be the means of directing and encouraging new and untapped
areas of metropolitan gro wth. In short, it
can give the city a new image for urban
design.
Robert C. Weaver
Secretary
U.S. Department of Housing and
Urban Development
The Federal Govern ment has a responsib il ity
to make clear the positive potentials of well
designed transit for meeting the needs of
our urban people. There is a national need
for a stronger concern with the urban
design features in urban transportation
development. For much of the future of the
quality of urban life hinges upon transit
development. Design components in publ ic
transit play an extremely important role not only in shaping ou r citi es - but in
making them more attractive and stimulating places in which to live and work.
Charles M . Haar
Assistant Secretary for
Metropolitan Development
U.S. Departm ent of Housing and
Urban Development
The life blood of the city is carried through
the arteries of public mass transportation.
Indeed, public transportation can be the
most important single force in shaping the
development of the Nation's metropolitan
areas. We think it is exciting to be tackling
such a huge and complex problem; for the
goal we have in mind is a most important
urban design goal - that of meeting the
human needs of urban life.
Leo J. Cusick
Director, Urban Transportation
Administration
U.S. Department of Housing and
Urban Development
program
The 1968 Design Awards Program in Urban
Transportation is initiated by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to recognize superior design in public
transportation. Awa rds will be made for
winning entries in two categories: systems
or major portions of systems, and components such as stations, vehicles, and
trackage.
Judging will consider how design is related
to comprehensive pl anning and the contribution of the entry to the physical, economic,
social, and aesthetic development of the
metropolitan area, the central city and the
neighborhood.
An nounced at the HUD-sponsored Design in
Urban Tra nsportation Conference on May 22,
1967, this program will stimulate awareness
of the affirmative rol e of good design. It will
encourage active exchange of new ideas and
broader concepts in urban transit development.
eligibility
Public agencies which have received financia l assistance from HUD's urban mass
transportation programs are el igible to submit one or more entries. The entry itself
need not have received HU D assistance.
Total systems or major segments thereof,
and individual items (including rolling
stock, stations, rights-of-way) may be
entered. Eligible projects include those
comp leted after World War II, or planned
by January 1, 1968.
form and
method of entry
Ma il entries to:
'68 Design Awards Program in
Urban Transportation
Department of Housing and
Urban Development
1626 K Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20410
Insert all material in a standard Ful-Vu
Economy Binder containing ten 9" x 11"
transparent Mica-film window sleeves for
displaying up to 20 inserts, back to back.
More than one binder may be used. The
identification sheet shou ld be completed
and inserted in the first transparent window
of the entry binder. Category must be
specified as:
System Design (Completed project or plan)
Item Design (Completed project or plan)
The entry will consist of a descriptive
statement, supplemented by such photographs and plans as are necessary to fully
evaluate the project.
Photographs must be 8" x 10", glossy
finish , and reproducible. They may be in
color or black and white. Photographs
should completely convey the qualities of
the design.
Plans should be folded to 8½" x 11" size.
They may be in any medium. Scales must
be shown graphically.
Descriptive data must be limited to five
typed pages, 8½" x 11" , and be inserted in
the entry binder. The statement should include all information relevant to the evaluation of the project. The following factors
will be among those considered in judging
entries.
system design
1. System impact on immediate environment (right-of-way):
Urban development patte rns (contribution to futu re community development, control of factors disruptive
to neighborhood stability, preservation of historic sites and open
space, urban design considerations).
User needs (attention to scheduling,
travel time, accessibility, orientation, comfort, safety).
Comprehensive traffic flow (effect on
congestion at coll ector stops, distributor stops, along right-of-way;
ease of transfer among modes).
Efficiency (social , environmental , economic costs and benefits in meeting
transportation needs).
2. System impact on total environ ment:
Urban development patterns (stren gthening of business districts, promot ion of group interaction, respon -
siveness to changing area needs,
urban design considerations).
User needs (service for those without
autos; access to hospitals, schools,
employment centers, etc.).
Comprehensive traffic flow (interfaces
between transit, auto, etc.).
Efficiency (social , environmental, economic costs and benefits in meeting
transportation needs).
item design
1. Rolling stock (buses, rail transit cars,
etc.):
Planning (inherent design features ,
attractive display of signs and information, lighting, noise, ability to
see outside, innovation in color and
design of equipment).
Safety (incidence of property damage,
�personal injury, fatal accident).
Comfort and convenience (temperature
and circulation, seat size and leg
room, ease of boarding and alighting, provisions for handicapped).
Economy and efficiency (present condition of equipment, freedom from
breakdown, cost of operation and
maintenance, flexibility- adjust- ment to peak and nonpeak periods).
2. Right-of-Way:
Planning (inherent design features;
signs; landscaping; compatability
with adjacent development, including other rights-of-way).
Safety:
Economy and efficiency (cost of construction - use of materials, maintenance, durability).
3. Stations:
a. Building:
Planning (inherent design features,
aesthetic and functional consistency with adjacent development,
access to other transportation
modes).
Safety (police protection, areas hidden from view, adequate lighting).
Comfort and convenience (cleanliness, stairs-escalator, capacity,
seating, weather exposure, heating, facilities for handicapped,
attractive display of route and
scheduling information, covered
and heated wa lkways).
Efficiency (construction, ma intenance,
durability).
b. Site Area:
Planning (inhere nt design featu res,
landscaping, aesthetic and functional consiste ncy with adjacent
land use, accessibility from roadways; separate access routes and
facilities for feeder bus, park and
ride, automobile drop-off, pedestrian access).
Convenience (sheltered waiting area,
protected walkways leading to
station).
Safety.
Efficiency (construction, maintenance,
durability).
jury and judging
Entries will be judged on the basis of aesthetic and functional design of the project
with consideration given to both current
and future impact. System Design will be
evaluated in terms of impact on the immediate- envir-onment - and -total environment
over a fifty year period. Item Design will be
judged with particular refe rence to user and
community benefits. The time frame for
performance will be 10 years for bus, 30
years for rail transit car, 50 to 100 years for
buildings and rights-of-way.
A jury including distinguished persons in
the fields of planning, architecture, engineering, sociology, and graphics will be appointed to evaluate entries and recommend
awards to the Secretary. Ralph J. Warburton,
A.I.A., Associate A.LP., Special Assistant to
the Secretary for Urban Design, will serve
as Professional Advisor.
awards
A limited number of Honor Awards will be
given, and in addition several Merit Awa rds
will be made. Award categories are System
Design and Item Design. Suitable cert ificates will be presented by the Secretary to
each entry receiving an award. The certificate will include the names and affiliations
of all those participating in the project
design.
publicity
The Department plans to prepare brochures
and other printed materials describing the
program and award winning projects. Therefore, all material submitted for award must
be cleared for release upon submission by
the entrant. No responsibility will be assumed for copyrights or photographic fees.
All photographs and material submitted with
entries will become the property of HUD,
and will be actively used in program development efforts.
time schedule
Entries must be received no later than
January 15, 1968.
Judging will take place in February 1968.
The date of the Awards Cere mony will be
announced.
for more information
Additional information may be obtained by
writing to:
Mr. Robert H. McManus, Chairnran Committee on Design Awards in-Urban Transportation
Department of Housing and
Urban Development
1626 K Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20410
or phoning: 202 - 382 -5374 .
MT MP-59
�check list
The following list is provided as an aid in the proper
preparation of submission. Full instructions on the
preparation of the items noted will be found in your
program announcement.
O Remove all white sheets between (not within) transparent window sleeves.
Identification:
O Information is. complete.
O Information is accurate as to credits, spelling and
punctuation.
O Insert in first window sleeve, .facing front cover.
Descriptive Data:
O Type. Insert in binder, beginning with second window
sleeve.
Photographs - 8" x 10" - Glossy:
Do not glue, tape, or otherwise adhere photographs
to any backing within window sleeves.
D All photographs and plans are cleared for publication.
D At least one photograph is reproducible.
Horizontal photos D All such photos are to be placed in window
sleeves so that the bottom of the photo is
parallel with the right edge. (In relation to the
inside back cover).
D No transparencies are included.
D
Plans:
D Folded to 8½" x 11" size.
Mailing:
O Allow sufficient time to reach the Department by
January 15, 1968.
/""'•,, U.S. DEPARTMENT O F HO USING
!* I
II*:
AND URBAN DEVELOP M ENT
\,,,,_,...... W a s h ingto n, D.C. 20410
�©
1968 Urban Transportation Design Awards Program
(Please type)
Category
Date Completed _ __ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ __ _
Entry Submitted By:
Authorized Representative - - - - - - - - - ---- - - -- - -- -- - -- - -- - -Name of Agency - - - -- - -- - - - -- - - -- - - -- -- - - - - -- -- - Address
Phone Number _ __ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ __ __
Signature
Please submit the following information as necessary:
Arch itect
Transit Consultant
Name
Name
Address _ _ __ _ __ __ _ __ _ __ _
Address
Signature _ _ __ __ _ _ _ _ _ __ __
Signature
Transit Operator
Engineer
Name _ _ _ __ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ __
Name
Address _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Address
Signature _ __ _ _ _ __ __ _ __ __
Signature
Urban Designer
Urban Planner
Name _ _ __ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _
Name _ _ __ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Address
Address
Signature
Signature
Graphics Designer
Additional Participants
Name _ _ _ __ __ __ __ _ _ _ _ _
Name _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ __
Address
Address
Signature
Signature
�RAPID TRANSIT
F1GOGR...... S~
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
"MARTA
REPORTS TO THE
PEOPLE IT SERVES ... "
SEPTEMBER 1967
VOL. 2 . NO. 9
FINANCIAL PLAN OFFERED
PROPOSES "HAMBURGER-A-WEEK"COST TO LOCAL CITIZEN
Rapid transit can be built at a maximum cost to the taxpayer
of 3 mills in Fulton County and 1.6 mills in DeKalb County , according to economic consultants of the Metropolitan Atlanta
Rapid Transit Authority. The figures are contained in the final
draft of a report by Hammer, Greene, Siler Associates prepared
as part of the revision of the 1962 plan "for rapid transit for Metropolitan Atlanta. The 1967 revision of the plan is expected to
be completed in the next few weeks.
The report shows that the basic 30-mile system, which will
cost about $332 million, can be built with local funds of $199
million, state funds of $3 3 million, and federal funds of $ 100
million. The Fulton County share would be $146,265,000
(73.5%) and the DeKalb County share $52,735,000 (26,5%).
Clayton and Gwinnett Counties would not contribute to the capital construction costs until work is begun on the extensions to
complete the 52-mile system when additional federal funds are
expected to become available. The Clayton and Gwinnett fjnancial support would include a pro rata share of the costs of the
basic system.
"This report shows that the maximum cost of rapid transit in
Fulton County to the owner of a $15 ,000 house would be
$12.00; the same person in DeKalb County would pay about
$6.40 maximum," MARTA General Manager said. "In Fulton
County, this amounts to the price of a hamburger a week, or
two or three cups of coffee a week ," he told the MART A Board
of Directors at their regular meeting today. "And these amounts
would be paid only for about 5 years; the rest of the time the
costs would be even lower," he continued.
"When Clayton and Gwinnett counties assume their share of
the costs, their rate would be a maximum of 1.5 mills, or about
$6.00 a year to the owner of a $15,000 house," Stuart explained.
"The report of our financial consultants proposes what appears to be a practical and feasible approach to financing construction of the rapid transit system," he said. "Our final plans
are taking shape and preliminary engineering is developing well. ·
If a successful referendum can be held in November 1968, we
would begin construction in Spring of 1969. If this program develops in this manner," he stated, "we would have the first line
operating about the end of 1973 and the basic 30-mile system in
service in 1975. The entire 52-mile system could well be in operation before 1980, or in about the same length of time it is taking to complete the perimeter expressway.
"We need to begin construction as early as possible," he concluded, "since every year's delay costs us $ 18 to $20 million
thru inflation and increased construction costs.
The basic 30-mile system would have 24 stations and would
run from Brookhaven to College Park and from Decatur to Lynhurst Drive near i-285 on the west, with a northwest stub to
Northside Drive. The electrically-driven, air-conditioned cars
would operate at maximum speeds of 70 miles per hour, averag(Continued on Page 2, Col. 1)
FEDERAL
STATE
STATE
FULTON
DeKALB
FULTON
FED ERAL
$332 MILLION
(30 Miles)
$479 MILLION
(52 Miles)
�THIS MANY CARS PARKED HERE ...
(Continued from Page 1)
ing about 40 miles per hour including station stops. Trains
would run as often as every 90 seconds during rush hours. The
commuter will ride to Transit Center, just a block from Five
Points, in about 13 minutes from Brookhaven, 9 minutes from
Decatur, and about 13 minutes from College Park.
CITY PLANNING
AND RAPID TRANSIT
... COULD REMOVE MANY
CARS FROM HERE
-

American Transit Association Convention-October 22-26, 1967,
Regency-Hyatt House, Atlanta. The AT A has as members only
those operating transit systems (railroads, bus lines, rapid transit, etc.)
MET ROPOLITAN ATLANTA
RAPI D TRANSIT AUTH ORITY
808 G LENN BLOG . · 1 2 0 MARI ETTA S T . , N . W
AT L ANTA . GA . 30303 ·PHONE 524-57 11
" DIRECTED BY THE GEORG I A STATE
LEG ISLATUR E TO DEVELOP A RAPID
TRANSIT SYSTEM F OR THE 5-COUNT Y
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA AR E A,"
Edited by KING ELLIOTT
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
OFFICERS :
RICHARD H. RICH. Chairman
RoY A . BLOUNT. Vice Chairman
HERBERT J. DICKSON, Treasurer
GLENN E . BENNETT, Secre tary
CITY OF ATLANTA:
L . D. M ILTON
ROBERT F. ADAMSON
RAWSON HAVERTY
RICHARD H. RICH
CLAYTON COUNTY :
EDGAR BLALOCK
DEKALB COUNTY:
ROY A. BLOUNT
DR. SANFORD ATWOOD
w.
FULTON COUNTY:
A. P ULVEII
MITCHELL C. BISHOP
GWINNETT COUNTY:
K. A . McMILL8N
COBB COUNTY (Observe!')
OTIS A. BRUMBY, JR.
MARTA STAFF:
HENRY L. STUART, General Manager
EARL W. NELSON, Chief Engineer
KING ELLIOTT, Director of Public I n formation
H. N . JOH NSON, S ecretary t o Gen eral Manao.er
An important facto r in attracting commuters fro m their cars
to rapid transit is the "Park-N-Ride Principle," according to a
noted transportation expert.
George L. DeMent , Chairman of the Ooard of the Chicago
Transit Authority, recently discussed the importance of parking
facilities in connection with rapid transit stations. Referring to
the new Skokie Swift extension to the Chicago rapid transit system , he said, "The 522 Park-N-Ride spaces provided at the outer
Dempster Street terminal has proved to be a major fac tor in the
success of Skokie Swift. This Park-N-Ride is used to 100 per
cent capacity every weekday. It is obvious to the Chicago Transit Authority that the patronage of the highly successful Skokie
Swift operation would be increased automatically if additional
parking spaces cou ld be provided at the Dempster Terminal.
Similar examples could be cited for the Park-N-Ride lots along
other Chicago lines."
DeMent noted that " the Cleveland Transit System has given
emphasis to Park-N-Ride. Seven 'Rapid' stations have been provided with 5,218 free parking spaces ... Additional parking spaces
soon will be provided along the airport rapid transit ex tension
now under construction." He quoted a survey which "indicated
that parking spaces are being used at a rate of I .3 cars per day,
and that each car carries an average of 1.2 passengers.
He says further that "the Toronto Transit Commission will
provide parking spaces for 3,000 cars at three stations along the
Bloor Street subway extension now under construction , with
(Continued on Page 3, Col. 1)
The American Institute of Planners has a strong interest in
the development of a rapid transit system for the Atlanta Metropolitan Area. The specific interest in MARTA and its proposed system is related to the "balance" and relationship of the
transit network to the rest of the metropolitan area and to the
total transportation system of the metropolitan area- as it exists
and is planned.
The planner is concerned with the relationships that will be
an outgrowth of the system. What impact will MARTA lines
have on public and private property? Which areas will be likely
to develop because of a MARTA installation- a station, for instance? Will the system be sensitively related to neighborhoods
and business areas, or industrial areas? How? Will the system put
stations in places where other planning and development activities provide an opportunity to "multiply" the effect of the investment in transit by an investment in urban renewal, or a college, or a new business area, or a special school? Can better relationships be established between elements of the transit system and the environment?
The planning profession is interested in the general and the
comprehensive dimensions of the city and the metropolitan
area. Therefore, the plann ing interest in the transit system will
extend beyond the tracks and the stations, into a concern for
nearby property-and, more important, property that is not so
near. The planning concern for all of the Atlanta area is oriented
_ __ _ _ _ _ __ 1 to
maximizing the livability of our
"place," and deals equally with the
areas impacted and not impacted. In the
areas being served (giving the word "impact" a positive tone) the planner is
likely to seek to make the favorable impact more favorable , more utilitarian,
more significant to the area in terms of
its present and future role in the city,
whether this role is related to change,
redevelopment, more intensive developR ichard M. Forbes
ment, new uses or no change.
The planning attitude about any public or private investment
is based on what the facility will mean to people in their environment. What will it mean to citizens as they travel to and
from work, to recreation, to shopping? This is one level of concern. What it will mean to people at home , if they live near the
transit line, is another concern. For example, will it cause an unpleasant industry to develop nearby?
The planning concern reduces itself to a concern fo r our city,
our place, our environment. The planner wishes to make Greater '
Atlanta the best possible place in which to live and work. He
consequen tly sees transit as a marvelous opportunity to use a
large public investment as one of the elements that will help to
do that. However, transit will make a positive contribution only
if it is very carefully related to each part of the area and to
other projects and plans so that the system is balanced. This relationship to the whole is o( prime importance .
Richard M. Forbes, Assistant Professor of R eal Estate and Urban A ffairs at Georgia State College, is a member of the MARTA Advisory Committee, representing the planning profession. He is a member of the
American Institute of Planners, and other professional groups.
(Continued [roin Page 2, Col. 2)
additional spaces planned for the Yonge Street Subway Extension just authorized. The new I 0-mile extension in South Jersey
will provide nearly 5,000 parking spaces at six locations with
provision fo r fu ture expansion. Over 16,000 parki ng spaces at
23 stations will be provided along the 75-mile rapid transit system being built in San Francisco .
Quoting DeMent , "There 'is no Io rfger a qt1estion of the need
for such facilities. It is only a question of how much parking
should be provided fo r any given rapid transit installation."
The system being designed for the Atlanta area will include
·-· ·
adequate parking facilities at suburban stations.
MARTA TALKS ... AND LISTENS
The story of rapid transit plans for Metropolitan Atlanta is
finding interested audiences throughout this area. Between the
first of June and mid-September, the MARTA directors and
staff talked to some 1700 members or more than 30 civic and
other groups, illustrating the MARTA story with slides or motion picture films. In addition, many other discussions were
held with city and county officials, planning departments, state
legislators, and citizen groups such as Chambers ofCommerce 1
and Central Atlanta Progress. Afte r the fo rmal presentations,
the meetings were generally opened for questions. In. the picture
below, Henry L. Stuart, MARTA General Manager, is listening
to a question being asked by a member of the Atlanta Civitan
Club.
A MARTA display depicting pr'ogress in the development of
rapid transit was part of the fifth Annual Fall Sale at Jamestown
Shopping Center in College Park recently. The event was sponsored by the College Park Jaycees in cooperation with merchants at the shopping center.
The MARTA display shows the location of Transit Center in
downtown Atlanta, and the various lines considered for rapid
transit routes.
The display back of College Park J aycee President Paul Green
shows in the upper left corner a cutaway view of how Transit
Center might be designed, with escalators connecting the two
levels of trains with the sidewalks above.
The lower left corner contains typical site development plans
fo r the four levels of Transit Center while in the lower right corner is a map locating Transit Center in relation to downtown
streets.
The map in the upper right corner shows the areas in which
the routes and stations will be located. Routes as planned in
1961, 1962, and 1966-7 are variously indicated.
The display back of Joan Eschenbrenner, MARTA secre tary ,
fe atures a large aerial photo o f downtown Atlan ta and pictures
of various major building developments now unde r way near
rapid transit stations.
The MARTA exh ibit aroused many enthusiastic comments
from those who viewed it.
�MARTAnswers
MARTA ACTION
QUESTION : Why is MARTA planning to use the old-type steelwheel and steel-rail system instead of something new, like
monorail?
ANSWER: In the first place, monorail is not new or modern. As
shown in the picture below, monorail has been around a long
time- 70 years or so. A short monorail line has been operating
across a river in Germany since 1906.
The major reason for not using monorail, however, is simply
that no monorail system has ever been a commercially successful operation in moving numbers of commuters.
In recent years, short, relatively simple monorail systems
have b~en built in Paris and Tokyo, and others have been used
in World's Fairs in Seattle and New York, and at Disneyland.
These small operations, however, do not meet MART A's design
requirements to transport commuters at 70 miles per hour in capacities approaching 30,000 passengers per hour.
There are other problems relating to cost, engineering, construc~ton, and route location:
Both the top-supported (suspended) and bottom-supported
monorail systems are more expensive to construct system-wide
than the conventional steel-wheel steel rail system . The topsupported monorail requires the supp~rt structure throughout
the system, whereas MARTA's plans call for only 3½ miles of
aerial structure. The top-supported monorail requires a much
larger,, tunnel for subway where subway is essential. Trying to
_eliminate the monorail subway brings us back to the problem
MART A faced all along-where to put the routes through downtown Atlanta without using subway. There is no feasible surface
route for either system.
MEIGS COLLECTION , Yale University Library - MON ORA IL , 1887
VERSION - Jo e Vin cent Meigs (second row, six th from right) patented
this early "monorail " in I 8 73. Th e running wh eels were tilted at 45 degree angles; horizontally -mounted steam-driven wheels running on an up-
The Board of Directors at its September 5 meeting heard a report on a financial study by Hammer, Greene, Siler Associates,
Inc. No act10n was taken on the report.
No official action was taken by the Board sin ce a quorum was
not present.
The next meeting of the MARTA Board of Directors will be
Tuesday, October 3, 1967, 3:30 p.m., Room 619, Glenn Building,
120 Marietta St. , N.W.
The bottom-supported system would be somewhat more expensive for grade and aerial structure than the steel-wheel steel
rail system, and considerably more expensive for subway because of the larger tunnel required.
If expense were not the major factor it is, the question then
arises, "what would monorail give you that the conventional
system would not · provide?" The answer is "nothing." The
monorail is slower, has higher operational costs, and does not
provide as comfortable ride. During the past 70 years, engineering problems relating to monorail have not been satisfactorily
resolved. These include switching, high speeds (70 to 80 MPH),
sway, and other technical problems.
These and other disadvantages may eventually be resolved,
but no solution is in sight. By contrast, the dual rail system
solved these and many other engineering and operational problems years ago. The dual-rail system will definitely provide what
is needed in this area: 70 MPH speeds, safety, comfort, and convenience at less cost than any type monorail. Using a known
and proven technology means MART A will be able to bring the
system into operation at the earliest possible time. This is our
goal. - Henry L. Stuart, MARTA General Manager
per set of rails provided propulsion. Th e Philadelphia City Council visited
th e I , I 14-foot long test track in East Ca mbridge, Mass., in I 887. Th e revolutionary Me igs railway did not gain acceptance, however; and the
company failed a f ew years later.
RA.PID TRA.NSIT
PROGRESS
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
BOB GLENN BLDG. · 120 MARIETTA ST ., N.W .
PHONE 52 4- 5711 (AREA CODE 40 4 )
ATLANTA , GEORGIA 30303
SEPTEMBER 1967 . VOL . 2, NO. 9
Hon. lvan Allen, Jr.,
City ot Atlanta
City Ha 11
Atlanta, O-a. .30.30)
~l
ayor
�I
RAPID TRANSIT
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
"MA-c::::,
r-n A
..1,;;v.L..ci
REPORTS TO THE
PEOPLE IT SERVES ... "
M
A
Y
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - VOL.
1
I I,
9
6
7
NO.
5
IRT CONVE ES
IN ATLANTA, 'MAY 2
_ Some 300 of the nation's top transit leaders are expected
to attend the 1967 Convention of the Institute for Rapid
Transit to be held May 24-26 at the Atlanta Marriott Motor
Hotel.
An unusual in-depth program featuring national experts
in urban transportation and special work shop sessions will
center around the theme, "Growing Cities MOVE ... With
Rapid Transit," according to George L. DeMent, IRT President and Chairman of the Board of the Chicago Transit
Authority.
The Annual Conference of the Institute for Rapid Transit,
which represents this industry in the United States and Canada, is expected to be attended not only by experts in various
phases of the rapid transit field, but also by city planners,
traffic engineers, public works officials, government officials
and many others concerned with urban transportation
problems.
Henry L. Stuart, General Manager of Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority, stated, "We consider it a
tribute to Atlanta and its growing importance in rapid transit
to have such a group as the Institute for Rapid Transit to
meet for its annual convention here in our city." He continued, "Atlanta is on its way to joining the rather select
group of American cities which have rapid transit systems
operating, and feel that the presence of so many persons
concerned with transporting people will give increased impetus to our efforts. We welcome the Institute for Rapid
Transit to this great metropolitan area," Stuart concluded,
"and we are confident that all who attend the convention
will find it both profitable and enjoyable.
"The A nnu al Conference of th e Institute for Rapid Transit
will provide a special insight into the vi tal field of developing
modern and efficient mass transportation systems for our
growing American cities," said DeMent.
"We are fo n te in having a group of outstand'
experts whose pres . t · ns will set the stage for
special
workshop sessions in
·
ersons at
· the convention will participate," DeMent exp ame .
"Major cities in the United States and Canada, with existing rapid transit systems, are concerned with plans for
enlarging those systems. Many other cities, with prospects
of great metropolitan growth, are now searching for guidance and expert help in planning new mass transportation
systems for the future .
"The 1967 Annual IRT Conference, patterned after our
successful workshop conference last year at Boston College,
will provide an excellent opportunity for an exchange of
ideas by the experts, as well as developing further ideas in
the mass transportation field ," DeMent said.
After a welcoming address by Atlanta's mayor, Ivan Allen,
Jr., Charles M . Haar, Assistant Secretary for Metropolitan
Development of the United States Department of Hou sing
and Urban Development, will keynote the IRT Conference
at an opening luncheon May 24.
William J . Ronan , Chairman of the Metropolitan Commuter Transportation Authority (New York) , will make the
first presentation for a workshop session on the afternoon of
May 24. The subject of this initial workshop will be
"Environmental Support."
For the second workshop session, " System Characteristics," on the morning of May 25 , the major presentation
will be made by Henry L. Stuart, General Manager of Metropolitan Atlanta R apid Transit Authority, and b y Leo J.
Cusick, Director of th e Urban Transportation Administration of the Department of Housing and Urban Development.
As a "challengi ng ed ucator," Noah Langdale, Jr., President of Georgia State College, will address the IRT Conference Luncheon on May 25.
(Continued on Page 2)
~
/_
George L. DeMent
Charles M. Haar
Leo J. Cusick
Walter S. Douglas
IRT CONVENTION ISSUE
�METRO AREA BOOMS!
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA
RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
8 0 8 GLENN BLDG .· 120 MARIETTA ST . , N . W .
ATLANTA. GA . 30303 • PHONE 524-5711
" DIRECTED BY THE GEORGIA STATE
LEGISLATURE TO DEVELOP A RAPID
T RANSIT SYSTEM FOR THE S-COUNTY
MET ROPOLITAN ATLANTA AREA ,"
Edited by KING ELLIO'.IT
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
OFFICERS:
H . RICH , Chairman
Roy A. BLOUNT, Vice Chairman
ROBERT F. ADAM SON, Treasurer
GLE NN E . BENNE'.IT, Secretary
RICHARD
CITY OF ATLANTA :
ROBERT F. ADAMSON
L. D. MrLTON
RI CHARD H . RICI-I
RAWSON HAVERTY
C LAYTON COUNTY:
EDGAR BLALOCK
DEKALB COUNTY:
ROY A. BLOUNT
DR. SA NFORD ATWOOD
w . A.
FULTON COUNTY :
PULVER
MITCHELL C. BISHOP
GWINNETT COUNTY:
K. A. MCM ILLON
COBB COUNTY (Observer)
OTIS A . BRUMBY, JR
MARTA STAFF :
HENRY L. STUART, General Manager
KI NG ELLIOTT, Director of Pnblic Information
H. N. JOH NSON, S ecretary to General Manager
IRT (Con tinued from Page 1, Column 2)
During the afternoon of May 25, the IRT Conference participants will visit the campus of Georgia Institute of Technology, where they will review and study a model transportation system being developed by Georgia Tech's Complex Systems Design class.
On the morning of May 26, Walter S. Dougl~s, partner
in the consulting engineering firm of Parsons, Bnnckerhoff,
Quade & Douglas, will make the presentation for the final
workshop session on "Management Organization."
"For each of the workshop sessions, participants will be
organized into small panels for discussion and consideration
of special case studies," explained DeMent. "At the close
of each workshop session, there will be a group critique,"
he said.
The program for the 1967 IRT Conference was planned
by the Program Committee of which the Chairman was
Thompson A. Nooner, Executive Assistant to the President
of General Railway Signal Company.
The IRT Convention is the first of two major transit
conver.tions scheduled for Atlanta this year. The American
Transit Association will hold its Annual Convention at the
Regency Hyatt House in Atlanta October 22-26.
1960
1961
The expanding economy of the five county metropolitan
Atlanta area is making an increasing impact on the four
counties surrounding Fulton County: Clayton, Cobb, DeKalb and Gwinnett. Brunswick A. Bagdon, Southeastern
Regional Director of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, reports
that 4 7 percent of all non-residential construction during the
first half of the 1960's came in the four counties outside
Fulton. These same counties had 71 percent of the industrial growth of the Metro area.
The central city had 75 percent of all office construction;
56 percent of the value of stores and other mercantile buildings was in ,the central city.
Fulton County still has the bulk of the payroll employment, but the suburb an share increased from 11 percent in
1959 to 13 percent in 1965.
Using the rate of employment growth as a yardstick, Atlanta's rate is almost three times the average of the eleven
other Metro areas surveyed, 32 percent compared with the
twelve-area average of 12 percent rate of employment
increase.
Atlanta is building toward another record breaking year
in construction. Building permits issued during the first four
months of 1967 total more than $66.5 million in value, an
increase of more than $22 million for the 'same period
last year.
"It's obvious that the Metro area is going to continue to
grow and develop," says MARTA General Manager Henry
L. Stuart, "and as jobs and population increase, and as
more people move into this area, the need for rapid transit
grows more and more critical. And, if what has happened
in Toronto is any indication, the presence of rapid transit
will cause this growth to accelerate."
The pictorial chart, from ATLANTA Magazine April
1966, across the bottom of these two pages shows evidence
of the building boom in Atl an ta during th e 1960's.
Atlanta's building boom got off th e ground in 1960 and kep t going
wit!, 1. Atlanta Mercl, andise Mart; 2. Comm erce Building; 3. Georgia Pow er B uilding; 4. National Bank of G eorgia Building; 5. Atlanta A irport T erminal Building; 6. Peachtree Tow ers Apartments;
1. L enox T owers (South ); 8. Landmark Apartments; 9. First Federal
Building; 10. Atlanta T owers; 11. Hartford Building; 12. Peachtree
Center Building; 13. Georgia A rchives Building; 14. Atlanta Stadium ;
15. Peachtree North Apartments; 16. First Na tional Bank Building;
17. L enox T owers (Nortl,); 18. R egency H otel; 19. Life of Georgia
Buildin g; 20. Gas Light To wer; 2 1. Th e Equitab le Building; 22. C & S
Norri, Avenue Building; 23. Trust Company of G eorgia Building;
24. Tl, e Bronze Buildin g; 25. University Tow ers; 26. Tower Apartm ents; 27. I vey Building.
1962
1963
1964
"RAPID TRANSIT WILL KEEP
ATLANTA MOVING ... RAPIDLY!"
STUART REPORTS PROGRESS
"Of the many developments and changes which have taken
place in and around Atlanta in the past few years, including
those in progress now and on the planning boards for the
future-regional shopping centers, trade areas, skyscrapers,
Atlanta's expanding airport, the expressway system (which
perhaps one day will be complete, but will never be adequate) , the Stadium with its Braves,
Falcons, and Chiefs, the new Auditorium-Convention complex, the Cultural Center - none will be more
relevant to nor affect the daily lives of
so many Atlantans as Rapid Transit,"
says MARTA Director Rawson
Haverty.
"Any growing metropolitan area
reaches a point where it must develop
an alternate to automobile-highway
Rawson Ha verty
transportation in and out of its central
city, or movement bottlenecks and the central city deteriorates. The central city is the magnet and service center of
the metropolitan area. If it declines, the satellite business,
industrial, and residential areas are not properly served, the
metropolitan area as a whole declines in importance, everyone suffers.
"Rapid, efficient, pleasant, and safe movement of masses
of people from their homes, outlying points of business, outlying industrial areas directly into the central, financial, business, shopping and cultural core is an essential requirement
for a city's health and prosperity," he explains.
"The March 10 issue of Th e Kiplinger Washington Letter
is a prediction of the Seventies. If their projections are accurate, Atlanta can expect to increase in population from
1,211 ,000 in 1967 to 1,532,300 in 1973 (the year the
North-South line of Rapid Transit will be ready) . We in
Atlanta can be glad we are well advanced in our planning
for Rapid Transit and that we have defi nite target dates for
completion. We have stepped ahead of most other metropolitan areas in this program, and when the Seventies arrive
Atlanta's citizens will, we hope, continue to be 'moving
rapidly' while many other cities are plagued by traffic bottlenecks," Haverty concludes.
- (Rawson Haverty is P-resident of Haverty Furniture Companies, past president of Atlanta Chamber of Commerce and
Atlanta Retail Merchants Association, President of Forward
Atlanta, and has held numerous other business and civic
responsibilities.)
1965
1966
Considerable progress is being made under the several contracts which have been let by the METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY, according to
H enry L. Stuart, MART A General Manager.
In a quarterly report of contract studies for the period
January 1 through March 31, 1967, Mr. Stuart says, "Our
contractual obligations total $962,566,
of which $616,709 (64 % ) represents
the Federal portion, and $345,857
represents the local matching funds."
Stuart explains that, "The majority of
funds are being spent under three
major contracts: the updating of the
1962 rapid transit report; the preliminary engineering on the north-south
line, and the greater portion of the
east-west line; and the technical
H enry L. Stuart
studies program .
The updating program, referred to as the "701" contract
($183,566), encompasses revision of the financing of the
proposed rapid transit system and is about 70 percent complete. Another segment of this same contract updates the
other parts of the 1962 report and is about 70 percent complete. This segment includes the re-study of the routes and
station locations, which are about 90 percent complete, and
patronage, revenues, and operating cost predictions 75 percent complete.
Work on this latest segment incorporates the latest highway statistics by the Highway Department. The "70J "
contract should be completed by early summer.
The preliminary engineering work is being conducted
under the "702" contract ($125 ,000). This program originally encompassed only the north-south system from Oglethorpe to the Airport. It has been expanded to include all
the preliminary engineering for the basic forty-four mile
system , Doraville-Forest Park on tl1e north-south line, and
on the east-west line from the Perimeter Road (I-285) west
of Hightower Road to the Perimeter Road east of Avondale
Estates.
Preliminary engineering involves the development of information on utilities, existing buildings, highways, railroads
and geology. The preliminary design of typical structures
and stations and the functional layout of Transit Center and
the shops and yards, and the analysis of equipment requirements. It also includes plans for alignment of tracks and
stati on sites, and cost estimates for construction, and purchase of right of way. The work is being integrated with the
work under the Technical Studies Program and should be
completed by the end of 1968.
Continued
1967
1968
1969
0 11
page 4
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EQUITABLE
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�STUART REPORTS (cont'd)
MARTA NAMES CHIEF ENGINEER
The third major program is the Technical Studies Program
($554,000) which includes portions of the work under the
"702" program . It also includes the Corridor Impact Study
which will assess the probable impact of the proposed rapid
transit system on the total community. The Impact Study
will survey MARTA's relationship to, and impact on, land
use and related controls, public improvement planning; local,
public and private development plans; urban renewal
projects; and benefits to disadvantaged groups, and other
public programs.
A separate study under this program will exa mine the
probable impact of rapid transit on the existing Atlanta
Transit System and the privately operated bus system.
A separate contract covers planning, consulting, or
engineering services not covered by existing contracts
($100,000).
In add ition to these existing programs, MART A's staff
is in process of developing a new application for approximately two million dollars of Federal funds, using the
$500,000 in State funds approved by the 1967 General Assembly as matching funds. When Federal funds are approved, this two and one-half million dollar program wil l
cover the following:
A Deputy Director of the Ohio State Department of Highways has been appointed Chief Engineer for Rapid Transit
here.
Henry L. Stuart, General Manager of the Metropolitan
Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority, announces that Earl W .
Nelson of New Philadelphia, Ohio, assumed his new duties
here April 24, 1967.
Nelson was Division Deputy Director for the Ohio State
Department of Highways, and was responsible for the design, construction, maintenance, and acquisition of right of
way for the 1400 miles of State and United States routes in
his division. His duties included preparation of all construction and maintenance projects,
which total $70 million under construction as of October 1966; supervision of all engineering and right of
way acquisition; control of purchases
of material and equipment; and personnel responsibilities for 700 employees.
As MARTA Chief Engineer, he
reports directly to the General Manager, will participate in policy deEarl W. Nelson
cisions of the Authority, and will
~dminister those policies having to do with design and engineering. He will review engineering work performed by
MARTA consultants; and, when construction of the system
begins, will supervise all construction projects.
Nelson is a Registered Profess ional Civil Engineer in the
State of Ohio. He is a graduate of the University of Kentucky with a Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering,
and had done graduate work at the University of Cincinnati .
He is a Fellow in the American Society of Civil Engineers
and is a member of the Ohio Society of Profess ional
Engineers.
He was a Division Deputy Director of the Ohio Department of Hi ghways from 1963 until his resignation to accept
the positi on with MARTA. Prior experience includes two
years as City Engineer, Steubenville, Ohio; aAd 13 years as
Design Engineer and Project Engineer with H azelet and
Erda! , Consu lting Engineers, Cincinnati , Ohio.
Nelson, a native of Peru , Jllinoi s, and hi s wife, Shirley,
have three children: Candi 19, Mark 17, and Jeffer y 9. His
family will join Nelson in Atl anta at th e end of the current
school term.
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
title searches of selected ri ght of way parcels
ea rl y acqu isition of critical right of way parcels
a plan for relocation of uprooted persons
employment of Urban Plannin g (Architectural)
continued work on Atlanta Transit System impact and coordination pl an
6) fir st steps in detailed design of Transit Center
7) fin anci al operations pla n and organization
8) preservation of histor ical si tes and st ructures.
"As these four programs are completed we will have more
and more of th e detailed information required to determine
the best methods for fin ancing this system; and , to develop a
specific plan to bring to th e voters for their approval, probably in November 1969 ," Stuart said.
MARTA ACTION
Th e Boa rd o f Di rec to rs of M ARTA a nn o un ced the appo intm en t of R obert
F. Ad amson as a directo r represent ing the City of Atlant a . Ad amson was
appo int ed by M ayo r Ivan All en, Jr., and th e Boa rd of Aldermen to fill the
un expired te rm of Mills B. Lane, Jr" who res igned h is positio n as Me tropolit an At la nt a Rapid Transit d irector beca use of increased pressures of
his many business interests .
Ad amson has been Treasurer of MARTA si nce its o rgani za tion, and wi ll
continue in this post as well as se rve as its directo r.
The next meetin g of the Boa rd of Directo rs has been ch anged to Fr iday,
June 9, 1967 a t 3 :3 0 P.M . in Room 619 of the Gl enn Buildin g, 120 Marietta
Street, N.W.
RAPID TRANSIT
PROGRESS
IQQ TH
\
MO REH
I 8h
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
808 GLENN BLDG . · 120 MARIETTA ST ., N.W.
PHONE 524-5711 (AREA CODE 404)
MAY
19 6 7 .
V O L.
II,
N O.
·
ATLANTA. GEORGIA 30303
5
Hon.
Tva~
Allen, Jr., Wayar
City of Atlanta
City ff.all
Atl
~
l
nta, Ga.
30-Y03
�LUMBER
&
BUILDING
MATERIALS
Specializing in Fir & Redwood Lumber, Creosoted Poles, Crossarms & Cross Ties
1335 Marietta Blvd., N. W., Atlanta, Ga.
PHONE 794-2471
,/
�Aid Jo~Coy;;n
,i;it
Seen by Volpe
Atlanta in 'Excellent Position'
For Federal Funds, He Says
B
By BIU, COLLINS
he U.S. secretary of transportation s;ys Atlanta will be in
eXCfilJlent position " to get two-thi rds of the money fo r a rapid
1t system from the ferleral govern ment. .
John Volpe, former governor
of Massachusetts ,and one of the
front- runners for the vice presiaential nod at
the 1968 Ri;pubUca n w esiden- '
tial convention
.
was in Atlanta ~. ;a i
S aturday night .,.
to address the
llth a n n u a 1


neeting of the


"THE OTHER $2.5 biUic
·
National Co n-"
"".0 uld be used to help build 9(
ference of State
..
~1rports an d expand 2 700 aii
t e g i s I ative
f1elds around the c~un try
J oh ,{ Volpe
Leaders.
V
The secretary , at a news conoltsaid.
'
T ' secretary sa id the Nixo
ference before hi s speech, exadm nJstration !hopes to restrid
plained the Nixon administrat~e umber of incoming fl ight.
tion 's $10 bi ll ion, 12-year public
a_
e of the nation's busies
transportJa tion bill and said Atf~;por_ts iand to better contro
lanta " may get the jump on
.
fl!ghts at 22 other airports
other cities" for funds under the
me1ud111g Atlanta 's
bill , if the measure is approved
I_n his re marks ~ the 800 le isby Congress.
Iat1 ve leaders attending 1h
He sa id the bill would authorfour-day c o n f e re n c e V l
ize him to make $3.1 biJJion
talked abou t the need fo~ fe~e~~
available immedi ately upon its
al-sta te-local government coopbeing signed into law . The federal money would be spent over
five ye;.;;;a;;;
.cs:..:..·- - .,.._ _ _ ___
Heafso said Atl anta would be
"in an excellent positi on" to get
a fede ral grant totaling twothirds of the cost of 1a rapid
tra nsit system because of the
plann ing it has done and also because it is one of ~~r
~ s."
1
VOLPE POINTED OUT, however, that under the proposed I
bill no one state could get more
thia n 121/2 per cent of the total '
appropriation.
He also told newsmen the
Vietnam war is not draining
funds he has requested for his
department and added, "The administration and the director of
the Bureau of the Budget have
approved the two transportation
bills I ha ve requested."
Volpe sa ys the two measures
he would li ke to see enacted include the $10.1-billion publi c
ttansportation bill and the airport-a,irways bill which wouid
rovide $2.5 billion for air-tra ffi c
control and $2.5 billion for construction of new airports and exlansion of existi ng fa 'lities.
He said the ,administration is
on c e r n e d about i11-flight
rashes and ff!els the airportairways bill would help diminish
e possibility of future colliions.
With 2.5
i lion o the airrt-airw.1ys bi ll , Volpe exlained, the federal ,government
uld work towards developent of II fully automated · s-
em
m.
·
ic control
sys-
eration in solving the nation's I
problems.
' 'Much of the glamour, power
and prestige that once surrounded state Capitols shifted to
Washington in the past 25
years " he said.
"And when the power went to
Washington, ma ny of the talented young men went also.
W~ hi ngton has been bhe mecca
fo young A m e r i c a n s who
w _ted to dedicate their li ves to
fu 11lment of the American
dr m," he added.
1
VOLPE SAID there has been !
a trend rowards reversing the I
growing dependence on the fed;~!;sigovernment in the past few
"T s new trend fi rst became
stron ly evident under President ohnson," he added.
·'But President Nixon has
gone a step furthe r. He has proposed a program of revenue
sharing between the states and
Washington. And, although it i
a modest beginning, it will be
-_!:pped up," Volp said.

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