Box 6, Folder 10, Document 61

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Box 6, Folder 10, Document 61

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ReLC. .A.P.
NUMBER rn ·
CENTRA L ATLANTA PROGRESS, me.
Do.es Atlanta Need RAPID TRANSIT
This is one of the most important questions to face Atlantans
in modern times.
OCTOBER 18, 1968
2 PEACHTREE STREET, N.W., SUITE 2740
7
THIS IS NO CHOICE BETWEEN RAPID TRANSIT OR HIGHWAYS
All of both that can be built will be needed.
Response to this question will detennine ..... .
But, it's perfectly obvious that highway construction into the
central core cannot continue without limit.
whether we grow or choke
whether we have a strong central hub or disintegrate
ATLANTA MUST MOVE FORWARD -- OR BACKWARD -- IT CAN'T STAND STILL,
whether we go forward or bog down
whether we compete with other regional cities or not
in summary, whether ·we are to become a truly great City.
RAPID TRANSIT IS NEEDED NOW . ... NOVEMBER 5th IS THE DATE OF
DECISION .... A VOTE "FOR" IS A VOTE "FORWARD".
BASIC PHILOSOPHY IMPORTANT
A city can sprawl --- or it can develop like a wheel, with a
noticeable "hub" and satellite development all around, with
trafficways and corridors lihking places of residence, places
of work, recreation areas, shopping and entertainment facilities.
The dramatic concentration of new high-rise office buildings and
apartments in central Atlanta is evidence of our commitment to
the strong central . core type of city --- with other elements
around the central core comprising a great Metro wheel.
BUT, A STRONG HUB!
In Montreal, a sparkling new rapid trans it system not only
moves thousands of people to and from work, but has helped
build an exciting new downtown. Atlanta can do li kewi se .
ACCESSIBILITY/CIRCULATION VITAL TO THE HUB
For the hub to grow --- and function efficie ntly
it mu st be
readi ly access i bl e t o t hose seeki ng t o rea ch it, and i t must be
operable internally.
Otherwise, the growth will go elsewhere.
OF COURSE, R/T WILL BE EXPENSIVE --- BUT ... . ... .
so will be the cost of not doing it.
TELLING THE CENTRAL ATLANTA PROGRESS STORY
in lost efficiency
in accidents -- damages
In the loss of Honorable Ivan Allen, Sr., Atlanta
has lost one of its grea t citizens --- a person
,hose love for Atlanta and vision for its future
have left an indelible mark. We extend deepest
sympathy to Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr ..
Executive Director spoke to the Nort hs ide Kiwanis Clu b Oct. 4th.
injuries
deaths
in lo ss of development opportunities and the jobs
and tax base t here in represented
in los s of property values as streets choke up
Will address Decatur Rotary Club on November 1st.
Secretary of State of Florida, Tom Adams, visited Centra l Atlanta
Prog ress on Octo ber 16t h to learn of this un ique particjpation
of priv~te enterprise in a cooperative effort to build a better
City .
in loss of business activity
in tryi ng to pay for less workable so lu tions (for
ex ampl e, some ci ties have found that it costs as
mu ch as $2 1, 000 average TO ADD TO THE EXPRESSWAY
SYSTEM THE CAPACI TY TO MOVE ONE ADDITIONAL
VEHI CLE. )
-
In the current urban cr i sis, those centra l cores tha t do sound
planning and act forcefully wi ll move forward
the othe rs
will falter.
Bob Bivens
�REPR INT FROM THE ATLANTA JOURNAL
(By Ce ntra l At l anta Progress, In c. 9/30/68 )
Downtown: I 's the
By TOM WALKER
At la nta Joar na l Re a l E:i late Ed t111 r
Like the hub of a wheel 1 the
downtown core of a ma10r city
is the axis around which its
suburbs turn. Atlanta is no excepuon .
From th is central point, the
sprawling urba n community is
held together in a meaningful
pattern. Without it, these
outlying areas would be just
so many unrelated neighborhoods.
This is why so much concern is expressed in Atlanta
and othe r cities about the
hea lth and vita lity of the
downtown core. In aver real
sense the siren
o
e eniire ur ban complex depends
llpon the sfrenglh of the ce~
,tral city. just as the extremities of a human being depend
upon the beat of the human
hea,rt.
Ma ny agencies and individuals-both private and governmental-are actively engaged
in -the business of keeping Atlanta'5 downtown strong.
THE PR IVATE real estate
developers are in t he forefront
in this effor.t, with such major
projects as:
- Peachtree Center, an In-lel'llationally known deve lopment that will eventually en- ·
compass office, enterta inment
and living space.
-The projected " air rights"
complex of office. hotel and
retail bui ldings which Dallas
deve loper Ray,nond Nasher
plans to construct over the
railroad tracks nitar the Sta te
Capitol.
- The sim il ar air rig11ts project which Cousins Properties,
Inc . of Atlanta plans over the
railroad right-of-way at Sprin g
Street and Techwood Drive.
- The Georgia State College
ex pansion plans which will
make way for a school of
25,000 students by 1975 right in
the hearit of Atlanta .
-The government center,
where stale. city and county
agencies are housed. but
which will need room fo r expansion in the future .
- Colony Square, a complex
of office bu ildings, apartments, hotel, retail and restaura nt Facilities on P eachtree '
at I Hh streets.
P L US DEVELOPMENTS
connerted with the Georgia
Tech campus. the Atlanta
Civic Center and new highrise. med ium -r ise and Jow~ise
office buildings in downtown
Atlanta that. are almost too
numerous to keep up with .
And at some future date. developments associated with
the Metropolitan At I a n ta
Rapid Transit system will
help transfi gure the downtown
core .
These are projects or plans
which have already been
made public. and have advanced to one or another
stage of advanced planning or
actual construction. But there
are other dramatic plans for
downtown Atlanta which are
Hu
The rime re uisites of a
down own area, sa1
r. tven\ are that 1t be alfracLlve 1 :
eas_ to ~el around ffi, and safe.
One o the maior trends in
downtown Atlanta development,
he said, is the large-scale complex, such as Peachtree Center .
Business News and
Rea 1·Estate·
Frido y, Septem be r 20, 1968
still in the formulative stage,
but all of them are aimed at
creating a stron~. throbbing
central hub (or a sprawling
metropolitan community .
THE DOWNTOWN, however, is the center of more
than just a prom ising future
- it is the center of some.
major ur ban problems which·
will have to be solved before
the promise can be ful filled .
These include d o w n to w n
blight ; ghetto and slum areas:
deteriorming neighborhoods,
within the very shadows of
gleaming new office structures ; transitional business
districts where vacant buildings sit idle within a short
walk of F ive Poi nts , fin anci al
center of the Southeast ; congested streets and clogged freeways - among others.
Coping with the future of
this high-density downtown
core requires detailed study of
literally every square fool of
space .
In its planning " you've got
to ta lk about feet and inches
where you might be lalk in1;
about miles if you're considering areas Carther out,' ' sairi
Robert W. " Bob" Bivens. executive director of Central Atlan ta Progress (CA P).
A PRIVATELY FINANCED





The overall goal of CAP,
said its executive director. ,s
1'to develop ideas that make
sense and see them through.11
THE AIM IS NOT to come
up with
"me in the skv" nr2:
posats that sound great, but
are 1mpract1cal. The tdea 1s to
come up with sensible, practica l proposals.
A community which develops the .la!ter 1s m the best position to take advanta~ of
mone which 1s ava1able
rom ex1s m sources sue as
a num er o e era agencies) , he sa1d 1 and also 1s m
6e!!er 9*s1t1on lo mlluence
priva te evelopers.
Associate Drrector Donald
G. Inirram said : ,1We want to
enllsF the pnvate sectbf I tD
make ir1vate
enleronse a
earl of he ~rocess of fmd mg
solutions . T 1s refu resents a
iiewC!imens1on: I e mvolvement of the busmess community in the process of olannmg. II they are mvol ved , we
th ink they wilt carry out the
~
"
""Aflhe same time, Mr. Bivens emphasized, CAP works
closely with the public planning agencies in the overall
search for an answer to the
question : What kind of core
dqes a booming. metropolita n
area need, and how can th is
be brought into reality?
The central core of Atlanta
is hard to deline in exact
terms. As conceived ~ Central Atlanta Progress. it is
somewhat lar~er than .!;!'•, _region which most people proba- ·
bly think of as " downtown."
agency, Central Atlanta Progress , in effect. is the business
community's own planning
agency. as opposed to the publicly fi nanced planning departments of the City of Atl anta .
the metropolitan area and the ·
St.ate of Georgia .
GE NE R A LL Y,
THE
As such it is unique "locally,
"CORE' ' is defin ed as the
and possi bly is unique among
area from Brookwood Station
major cities of the nation.
on the north to Atlanta StaAs Mr. Bivens puts it. Cen.
dium
on the south , and within
tral Atlanta P rogress is th11
the
railroad belt line extendlatest step in the evolutionary
ing eastward beyond Bouleprogress of the business comvard-Monroe Drive and westmunity of central Atlanta.
ward
as f;rr as Maddox Parlt
It was formed from the nuand Washington Park.
cleus provided by two older
organizations: the Central Al·
One reason for selectinl! ·
lanla Improvement Associathese general boundaries is
tion. founded in 194 1, and the
the fac t that so much statistiUptown Association. organized
cal data ts available from
in 1960.
· such agencies as the Census
Bureau on neighborhoods that
In .January of last year,
have these fixed limits.
CAP was organized. But .Mr.
One of the fundamenta l
Bivens explains, these organiproblems
facing the future of .
1.ations were also restructured
downtown
Atlanta is trafficso that, in effect, a completely
how to get there and back
new association was formed .
from outlying regions, and
" It is not a rnromotional
how to circulate within the
~roup. " sa id Mr. ivens, " but
downtown a~ once there.
I IS a Blanmng agency, Wtffi
e x per I e need. mof•_ssional
1anners who have a strong
ackground m pri vate enter-
6
rn,
1- D
" Georgia State College is
planning for a student body of
25,000 by 1975," Mr. Bivens
said. " Obviously, even with
r apid transit, most of these
will drive cars to school. How
will they get in and out? How
will you separate pedestrian
traffic from streets? These
are some of the types of problems which someone has to be
thinking about right now. "
Said Mr. Ingram : " There is
an overriding concern over
just what kind of downtown
area we are trying to achieve
in relation to a city with a ( fu.
ture) population of 3 millionplus. "
In short, what ought to be
downtown and what can be located elsewhere in the metropolitan region: how many and
what kinds of jobs, how much
office space and for what purposes, what kind of and how
much bousing?-to mention
just a few major considerations.
" EXPERTS SAY, AND we
agree, that all great cities
have two things in common.11
said Mr. Bivens. "One IS an
exciting central core, where
people want to go to shop, for
entertainment, go lo the theater, to restaurants-and it is a
place that is active 24 hours a
day.
"Second, a stronf, . middle
class citiz:WX 11ves ose to the
c
central core, he wen£ on. I his
concen!rabon of people provides
the leadership for U1e downtown
and patronizes what the downtown offers-without, Mr. Bivens notes, having to commute
many miles fro m the suburbs .
What then, should go into the
central, downtown core? Mr.
Bivens and Mr . Ingram listed
these:
-More high-rise, high-income
apartments ("Atl anta is really
not quite ready for this now,"
sa id Mr. Bivens , " but we
ought to be thinking ahead
to that day, and take steps to
make it possible" ).
-Downtown •should be the
focal point of cultural activities.
( "This is pretty well happening
now, but we ought to strengthen
it, " he said). This includes theaters, restaurants and great hotels, among other features.
-A COMPLEX OF strong retail establishments, which attract shoppers not only from the
metropolitan community, but
from throughout the region.
-A concentration of government offices.
-A concentration of financi al
activity.
- -Merchandise and t r a d e
marts.
THE LARGE COMPLEX
represents a new dimension,
because this type of project
includes the full range of
human activities from homes ,
to jobs to recreational facilities and entertainment, r ight
in the central area.
While most air rights developments have been envisioned
so far over railroad right-ofway , Mr. Bivens pointed out
that air rights developments
ROBERT W. Bl\, ENS
'Se nsib le' Solm in ns
over freeways offers a broad
opportunity for future development.
Resourceful thinkin
so ua so come u w1
10ns o e use o muc owntown l~nd that 1s currently not
utilize to its maximum potential, the planners md1cated.
One such area is the socalled "garment district" of
downtown Atlanta just south
of Five Points. Obviously in a
transitional state, the main
questions for this and sim il ar
property would be: What land
use would make the most
sense here?
AND ALSO IN THE slum
neighborhoods-what would be
the best use for land that is
obviously not fit fo r human
habitation?
A dilemma here is how to
bring the ghetto dweller into
closer contact with his potential jobs? It is literally a geographical problem, since the
job quite often is many miles
from the needy person's dwelling, and the transportation between the two may be too
costly, or inadequae.
" We've got to work in the
Jong haul on a sensible match
of people with jobs," said Mr.
Bivens, "so that people in the
cities can work to improve
themselves."
This, in. short, is one of the
i m m e d i a t e problems that
must be solved en route to solutions that are mapped out for
longer-range problems.

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