Box 6, Folder 10, Document 64

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Box 6, Folder 10, Document 64

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RAPID TRANSIT
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
" MARTA
REPORTS TO THE
PEOPLE
IT SERVES
,,
MAY,
1968
VOL . 3, NO. 4
MARTA CONDUCTS ITS
FIRST PUBLIC HEARING
MARTA Director Mitchell C. Bishop presided at the public
hearing in East Point . . .
... introduced the local officials and citizens, answered their
questions . . .
. .. and answered questions raised by members of the audience
after registered speakers had completed their remarks. A bout
90 persons attended the first public hearing.
The Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority conducted its first public hearing in April, and the opinions
expressed by those attending it were generally favorable. The
hearings are to allow the general public rn hear in detail the
proposals for rapid transit routes and station locations, and
then to comment on them.
Mitchell C. Bishop, College Park, member of the MARTA
Board of Directors, presided at the first hearing, which was
held in the Tri-Cities area at the East Point City Auditorium,
on April 29th.
In remarks formally opening the hearing, Mr. Bishop
said, "The proposed routes and stations, though the result
of exhaustive studies by MARTA's consulting engineers, have
not yet been approved by the MARTA Board of Directors."
"The purpose of these hearings is to get your point of
view to see whether you agree with the engineers' recommendations or have alternative suggestions," Mr. Bishop said.
" In short, we want to know what you think before these
plans are finally adopted by the Authority."
"The thoughts expressed in this series of public hearings
will be given careful consideration before finalizing our
pl ans," he said.
"Locations of all routes and stations will be finalized before the ultimate decision on rapid transit is submitted to
the voters in a referen dum. "
After the proposed routes and station locations were outlined b y John Coil , Resident Manage r, Parsons BrinckerhoffTudor-Bechtel , engineering consultants to MARTA , Mr.
Bishop opened the heari ng to members of the audience.
The first statement from the audience was made by Mr.
Marion Nolan, Mayor of College Park. He opened his remarks by saying, "Mr. Chairman, I don't know much about
rapid transit, but I do know we need it, and we are going
to have to do something about it before too long. Our
highways and our transportation system are outdated . I know
that we are going to have to get something that is fas ter,
larger and more economical than what we have tod ay ."
Nolan continued, "Now, I have never seen a rapid transit
system. I couldn't tell you what kind of rapid transit we
would need or how to operate it or how much it will cost,
but I think that anything we do will be economical for the
system we have now. Now, tonight, we only have a handful
of people here . T his place should be plumb full , with people
standing out on the gro unds around with loudspeakers so
the people could hear what we have to say."
"I have never spoken for rapid transit before, but this
time I'm speaking for rap id transit. I think we need it. I will
endorse it personally, and I think most of the people that
(Continued on Page 2, Col. 1)
�MARTA WINS HUD AWARD
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA
RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
8 0 8 GL ENN BLDG . 1 20 MARIETTA S T .• N.W .
A TL AN T A . G A. 30303 · PHONE 524-5711
0
" DIRECTED BY THE GEORGIA STATE
LEGISLATURE TO DEVELOP A RAPID
TRANSIT SYSTEM FOR THE 5 -COUNTY
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA AREA ."
Edited by
KING ELLIOTT
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
O FFI C ER S ,
R I CHARD H. R1c 1-1 , Chairman
H ERBERT J. D I C K SO:-.:, Tr eas u rer
I\O y A . B LOUNT , V ice Cha irman
Eo Mu:-.o W. H uc 11 Es, Secre tary
CITY OF AT L ANT A,
ROBERT
F.
RI CH ARD
L. D. l\ l l LTO:'\"
ADA:'\TSO:-.
H.
R ICH
RA WSO:-;" H AV ERT Y
C LAY T ON COU:--I TY ,
Eoc,rn DLA LOCK
D E K AL B C OUN TY,
RoY A . BLou:-.T
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F U LTO N C O U"<T Y,
J OH N
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GW I NNE TT COU:--I T Y ,
K. A . '.\ Ic'.\l1LL 10:-.
CO B B COL:--ITY \Obs erve r)
Ons :\. Bnt::-.rnY . Jn .
i\ l AR T A S T AFF ,
L. STUART, Genernl Manag er
W. J\i.:1.so;s, Chief Engin e er
K1:-•c ELLIOTT. Dir ector of Pu blic Informa t ion
H t::"/RY
EAnL
H . :"i. JoH:-. so:-.-, Admiriis rrative A s.( i.Hant to G en e ral .lf anage r
Marta Conducts Hearing
(Continued from Page I)
realize that we need rapi d tra nsit will do the same," Mayor
N olan stated.
M rs. Ruth G . Gunter, M ayor Pro Tern of East Point, extended an offici al welcome from the City of East Point to
the MART A off ici als, and ex pressed her appreciation that
the fi rst public hearing was held in East Point. She went on
to say, "As fa r as I am personall y concerned, I do see a
great need fo r rapid tra nsit in this area. It's going to cost
money, but I notice on our schedule that a $20,000 house,
even at the highest point of re turn in the three mill tax
raise which you're anti cip ating. will only be $18. 00 a year.
Yo ur time, efforts, parking and everyth ing else will cost yo u
peopl e a great deal more than $ 18.00 a year, ar:d I can see
where this wo uld be benefi cial to everyone in our area,"
she concl uded.
Severa l other public offic ials and private citizens spoke
in support of MART A plans. Some asked questions about
routes and station locations. or ex pressed their opinions
about the proposed system. M r. Jody Brown of H apeville
stated that the re was some dissati sfaction in that area be-
The Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority is one
of the winners in the first nationwide Design Awards Competition sponsored by the U . S. Department of Housing and
Urban Development. The Award of Merit was presented by
HUD Secretary Robert Weaver in Pittsburgh at the Third
Annual International Conference on Urban Transportation
on March 11. The award was accepted by Earl W. Nelson,
MARTA Chief Engineer.
MARTA was honored for its Rapid Transit System Plan
Concept. The judges said, "The relation of the planned Atlanta System to existing and proposed educational institutions, commercial and cultural facilities , will create a high
qu ality of urban design. "
Secretary Weaver stated in presenting the award, "The
Department of Housing and U rban Development takes pride
in recognizing the accomplishments of MARTA. The pioneering work we have here today points the way to urban transportation patterns of the future. "
Three honor awards were presented to : San Francisco
Bay Area Rapid Transit District; The City Planning Commission, Philadelphia ; and The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority, Boston, Mass.
In addition to the award to MARTA, eight other merit
awards were given : The Municipality of Metropolitan Seattle
and City of Seattle; Washington State Highway Commission;
The City of Seattle, Wash.; Southern Californi a Rapid Transit District, Los Angeles ; The Metropolitan Commuter Transportation Authority, New York City ; The City of Philadelphi a, Pa. ; The Port Authority of Allegheny County, Pittsburgh , Pa. (two awards).
cause of the change in MARTA pl ans to provide direct
service to the new proposed airport terminal , rather than to
run the line through Hapeville as origi nally planned. Mr.
Bishop responded by saying that the change was brought
abo ut by the plans to build a new airport termin al, and was
necessary to provide service to both air passe ngers and to the
40,000 employees who wi ll be workin g at the airport in the
next decade or so. He assured Mr. Brown th at a well-planned
feeder bus service would be provided throughout the H apeville area to transport residents to a nearby station.
A total of 12 public hearings were sched uled for late
Ap ril and the month of May. MART A is required by law to
conduct public hearings on routes and stations, as well as
other fac tors of the syste m in each jurisdiction represented
in the Authority. After all the hearings have been completed the testimony wi ll be transcribed , and MARTA directors will evalu ate the comme nts and recommendations before
a decision is made on ro utes and station locations.
A summ ary of com ments and reco mmend ations made at
other hearin gs will appear in the next issue of RAPID
TRANSIT PROGRESS.
" MARTA REPORTS
TO THE
PEOPLE IT SERVES ..
"
SECOND
ANNUAL REPORT
1967
0
Prior to the public hearings, MART A officials briefed go vernmental leaders on th e routes and station locations to be discussed
at the public hearings. MART A Chairman R ichard H. Rich pr esided at a meeting with A tlanta offi cials on Ma y 2. Attending
were Mayor Ivan A llen, Jr.; Vice-Mayo r Sam Massei!, Jr .; A lde rm en E. G regory G riggs, William T . Knight, Q . V. Williamson,
Hugh Pierce, Charles Leftwich, George Cotsakis, G. E verett Millican , Cecil Turn er, Jack Summers, and Douglas L. Fowlkes;
Earl Landers, Administrative Assistant to the M ayor; and Collier G ladin , Director, Planning De partment .
M E T RO PO LITA N AT L AN TA RAPID TRANS IT AUTHORITY
�.REPORT TO THE CITIZENS
From : Chairman of the Board
A number of major steps were taken by MARTA during
1967 and many policy decisions were made.
T he decision of the Georgia G eneral Assembly to participate fi nancially in MARTA is a most gratifying development. T his decision gives substance to a financial proposal
which allows for a full 10% State participation in rapid transit. T he successful applications by MARTA for additional
Federal funds encourage us to believe that substantial Federal
fu nds will be available if local voters approve construction of
the system .
T he progress made in planning during 1967 encourages us
to believe that we will be prepared to ask the residents of at
least F ulton and D eKalb counties to vote on November 5,
1968, to finance construction of a basic rapid transit system. ~
D uring 1967 MARTA's approach became considerably
broader than it had been in- 1966. It was apparent that
MARTA could not plan or develop a rail rapid transit to
stand alone, but that MARTA would have to plan a system
which would be an effective and integral part of a balanced
transportation system . Rail rapid transit, along with an effective bus service, a highly developed network of arterial and
surface streets and an expanded expressway system, if properly coordinated, could effectively red uce traffic congestion
and make transportation fas ter, more efficient and more comfortable. To achieve these goals MARTA is participating
full y in the Atlanta Area Transportation Study, and I represent MARTA on the Atlanta Area Transportation Policy
Committee.
MARTA pledges its full support and cooperation to the
effort to fi nd effective solutions to our transportation crisis.
Recognizing the necessity for the best possible coordination
among the professions involved in Rapid transit development,
the MARTA board of directors created a five man Advisory
Committee to assist the A uthority. T he Advisory Committee
represents professional Engineers, Architects, Landscape
Architects and Planners. T he Committee has reviewed
MARTA's work to date and has offered m uch constructive advice· concerning our plans.
MARTA staff and consultants have spent m any hours
in coordinating rapid transit planning with other activities
in organizations. Through such coordination and interchange
of ideas, MARTA hopes to achieve the highest degree of
excellence yet obtained in the creation of a rapid transit system.
T he Directors of MARTA express their appreciation to
the many business, civic and governmental leaders of this area
who have supported rapid transit plan ning efforts duri ng 1967
and earlier years. It now appears that 1968 may well be the
year of decision - the year when the voters decide whether or
not rapid transit will be built in the Atlanta area. With the
continued enthusiastic support of the leaders in Metropolitan
Atlanta, a referendum in I 968 could be successful, and 1969
see the actual start of construction on rapid transit.
e
From: General Manager
The year 1967 saw much solid progress made in the development of a rapid transit system fo r Metropolitan Atlanta.
Significant accomplishments were achieved in the fields of engineering, planning and coordination with public and private
groups.
In the field of engineering, the Metropolitan Atlanta
Rapid Transit Authority signed a contract with consultants to
provide MARTA with preliminary engineering on the EastWest line from the intersection of 1-285 and Lynhurst Drive
on the West, to the intersection of I-285 and Covington Highway on the East.
T his contract extends the work of earlier contracts to
provide preliminary engineering for the area between Doraville and Forest Park. The work now under contract encompasses a full system whcih will reach I-285 at fo ur places.
This is a workable basic system for this region and needs
only p ublic approval and final design work to be ready for
construction.
In March, a "Corridor Impact Study" was begun; its goal
was to assess the probable impact of the proposed rapid transit
system on the communities and neighborhoods in which it
would be'i located. Toward the end of 1967, this work began
to develop tentative conclusions and to suggest modifications.
Through the work of the "Corridor Impact Study" and the
-concomitant understanding of the effect of rapid transit, a
system can be designed which will be completely sensitive to
local needs and which will bring into real ity more of the potential benefits than any other system ever built.
Another significant event of 1967 was the f.i rst direct
fi nancial contribution by the State of Georgi a fo r rapid
transit. The 1967 G eneral Assembly appropriated $500,000.00
for the two fiscal years beginning July I , 1967, as authorized
by a Statewide constitutional amend ment in 1966. This appropriation is evidence of an awareness at the State level of the
transportation problems in the Metropolitan Atlanta a rea, and
of a determination to assist in the solution of these problems.
T he activities of the Authority have been the subject of
hu ndreds of presentations by MARTA directors and staff
members to members of the general public and to elected officials and professionals at all levels of government. All the
planning was brought up to date in "Rapid Transit fo r Metropolitan Atlanta," a special report which was introduced by
the Atlanta Region Metropolitan Planning Commission at the
end of the year. T he report was distributed widely, received
enthusiastically, and was declared "out of print" after a few
weeks.
1967 was a productive year, and the way to even greater
achievement in 1968 is clearl y open to us.
.----


-/ 'J Al;;,,JMETR OP O LITAN ATLAN TA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY


808 GLENN BLDG.
i- '
'
Edited by KING ELLIOTT
o

120 M ARIETTA ST., N.W .

ATLANTA, GA. 30303

PHONE 524-571 1
" DIRECTED BY THE GEORGIA STATE LEGISLATURE TO DEVELOP A RAPID
TRANSIT SYSTEM FOR THE 5-COUNTY METROPOLITAN ATLANTA AREA."
BOARD O F DIRECTORS
O FFICERS:
DEKALB COUNTY:
COBB COUNTY (Observer)
RICHA RD H. RICH, Chairman
ROY A. BLOUNT, Vice Chairman
HERB ERT J. DICKSON , Treasurer
EDMUND W. HUGHES, Secretary
ROY A. BLOUNT
DR. SANFORD ATWOOD
OT IS A. BRUMBY, JR.
FULTON COUNTY:
HENRY L. ST UART
CITY OF ATLANTA:
JOHN C. STATON
M ITCHELL C. BISHOP
ROBERT F. ADAMSON
RICHARD H. RICH
L. D. MILTON
RAWSON HAVERTY
GWINNETT COUNTY:
K. A. M cMILLON
M ARTA STAFF:
General Manager
KING ELLIOTT
Director of Public Information
EARL W . NELSON, Chief Eng.
H. N. JOH NSON
A. A.
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
STATEMENTS OF CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS
FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 3 1, 1967
AND CUMULATIVE TOTAL SINCE INCEPTION (JANUARY 3 , 1966)
T otal
CASH RECEIPT S :
P articip ating local governments
U. S. G overnment
Interest on U . S. T reasury B ills
CASH DISBURSEMEN TS FOR :
Joint project with Atlanta R egion
Metropolitan Planning Co mmission
( Note)
Engineering services - Parsons
B rinckerhoff-Tudor-Bechtel ( Note )
C onsul ting services
Administrative and general expenses
1967
Since
Inception
$ 30 4 ,552
302,667
5,50 3
$ 595 ,447
0 2 ,667
5.9 32
$612,722
$ 904,046
t o t h e Board or D!re,nor1 or
l'let r cpol1 t u 1 J.tlu1u Ra pid
Tr •nat t 4 llthorlt:r:
$ 65 ,939
$ 97,189
lie h a Te o::a at n ad th• a t at e a ente
or
c:eeb r ece 1pt1 and
dt1b1.:.ru11ente or u,a M1tropol1Un &U e na Ra pid tre r.att A11.t!:.or l t 7 ( e
283 ,624
12,928
168,634
325 ,222
12,9 28
264,706
$531 ,125
$70 0 ,04 5
Oaor-1 !• 111;.:tc!pa l c o r po ta tlon )
to :- the ,.aar u1ded Dece:ober
and cua ul a t !Ye to t a l e tcoa t ncapti on ( J a nuary ), 1966 ).
)l ,
1967 ,
Our
e :;,;ai,.tnattcn v•a 1.ade ln ecc o rd a nce vtt h 1a11erelly a cce pted a udltl n e
a i:id 1uc:b o t h er a1.1d! t ln1 pro,: .di:ree •• ve o:0111lderel!a nee111e ar,- in the
In our o plnloc, the accoi:pu :i:,tn1 •tat.u:u,nt.1 present. !'&! r ly
the c e irh r,c e1pt.a a nd d1 11buru1.11.e nt • o!' t he He t.ropolit • n J. t.l a nt. , Ra pid
EXCESS OF RECEIPTS O VER
D ISBU RSEMENTS
Trenl1t. Au t hority t o r t he ye ar e nde d Deoe .11.'o1 r
$204,001
t.ot.1 1 •inc, 1nccpt.1 on ( J anu a r y J , 1966 ) .
REP RESENTED BY :
C ash
U . S. T re asury B ills
$ 13 3,912
70,089
Atl a nt a , 0 ,.o ra• • ,
J a::u u·:, 19 , 1'168.
T he accompanying note is an integral part of these statements.
$204,001
$ 81 ,597
) 1 , 196'1, 1 nd c uJ1.ul a t.1Yc
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
NOTE TO STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS
FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 19 67
T he A uthority was formed on January 3, 1966, by an act of the Gener al Assembly of The State of Georgia to design and
implem ent a r apid transit system for the Atlanta, G eorgia, m etropolitan area. Since its organization, the A uthority's
principal activities have included the updating of the 1962 plan and program of rapid transit for the A tlanta m etropolitan region and contracting for preliminary engineering on the proposed tr ansit system. The contracts let and the
related sources of fund s are as follows:
A mount
D isbursements to Date
of
Source of Funds
Contract
Total
L ocal
Federal
a . A tlanta R egion M etropolitan P lanning
$ 61, 189
$ 61,189
$ 61,18 9
(c)
$
Commission 49,000
36,000
3 6,000
(c)
Update 1962 plan
Corridor Impact Study
$110, 189
$ 97,189
$ 97,1 89
$
b . P arsons B rinckerhoff-Tudor-Bech tel $125,000
Pr eliminar y engineering for initial
500,000
system (70 2 loan project )
100,000
Preliminary e ngineering and planning
for major lines ( Sect ion 9 project)
R etainer contract for extended su pport $725,000
$ 90,000
180,000
55 ,222
$ 325,222
$
$ 90,000
(32,070 )
55 ,222
$ 23,1 52
212,070(d)
$302,070
c. T he D epartment of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) of the United States Government is participating with the Atlanta R egion M etropolitan Planning Commission ( ARMPC ) by funding up to twothirds o f project costs.
d . As of D ecember 31, 1967 , there was an addition al $90,000 payable to Parsons Brinckerhoff-TudorBechtel for work completed to that date. Payment was made on January 24, 1968 .
The Auth ority has received $90 ,000 of a $ 125 000 advance commitment from the United States Government under
Section 7_02 of the Housing Act of 1954. The advance is noo-interest bearing and repayable only upon the start of
construct10n of the System .
The $5~0,0~0 co?trac_t with Parsons Brinck~rhoff-Tudor-Bechtel for completing preliminary engineering and planning for
ma1or Imes 1s. bemg funded under Section. 9 of the Urban Mass_ Transportation Act of 1964. Under the provisions
of the grant signed under the Act, two-third s of the contract will be funded by the United States.
�EXPENDITURE
INCOME
RESERVE TO
COMPLETE
UNFINISHED
PROGRAMS
28.0 %
U.S. DEPARTMENT
OF
HOUSI NG & URBAN
DEVELOPMENT
\\
PLANN ING
&
ENGI NEERING
48.5%
41.1%
,7
HIGHLIGHTS -1967
March- contract signed for Corridor Impact Study.
March 7- Charles M . Haar, Assistant Secretary for
Metropolitan Development, U.S. Department of HUD,
visited MARTA.
March 17-Gov. Lester Maddox signed appropriations
bill , which included an allocation of $ 500,000.00 for
MARTA.
A pril 4- MARTA received the "Meritorious Award"
of the Association of County Commissioners of Georgia for
its multiple-county service.
April 24-Earl W. Nelson becomes MARTA chief
engineer.
May 22-MARTA exhibits past and present work at
the confer ence on D esign in Urban Transportation in
Washington , D . C. ; conference sponsored by HUD.
August 4- Rapid Transit's first "hole in the ground"
was dug at Trinity a nd Broad Street-first of 35 soil test
holes .
August-Chief Engineer N elson was appointed as
MARTA's r epresentative on the T echnical Coordinating
Committee of the Atlanta Area Transportation Study.
September 12-MARTA participates in formation of
Atlanta Area Transportation Policy Committee.
May-Robert F. Adamson becomes MARTA director, succeeding Mills B. Lane, Jr.
October 22-26-American Transit Association C onvention held in A tlanta.
May 2 4-26-Institute for Rapid T ransit convenes in
Atlanta.
D ecemb er- Up-d ated rapid transit plan received from
con sulting engineers.
June 9-MARTA creates 5-man A dvisory Committee.
June 9- Herbert J . Dickson named
MARTA.
~
1n
Treasurer of
D ecember-MARTA Director Sanford Atwood of
DeKalb, L. D. Milton of Atlanta and Ken McMillon of
Gwinnett, reappointed to new 4-year terms.
MARTAdditions
EXPERTS SEE NEW SYSTEM
Three new additions have recently been made to the
MART A Board and Staff.
John C. Staton has been appointed by the Fulton County
Commission as Fulton County member of the Board of
Directors of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid T ransit Authority. Staton, Staff Vice-President of the Coca-Cola Company,
will fi ll the unexpired term of W. A. "D ick" Pulver, who
recently assumed new duties with the Lockheed Aircraft
Corporation in California. Staton's term will expire December 31, 1970.
Staton joined the Coca-Cola Company in I 925. He has served in executive posts in Canada, New Zealand,
Australia, and Brazil. In 1948, he was
elected Vice-President in Charge of
Manufacturing, making h is headquarters in Atlanta. He was named Staff
Vice-President and Assistant to the P resident in August, 1966.
A 1924 graduate of Georgia Tech
John C. Staton
in Electrical Engineering and AllSouthern end on the football team, Staton also received a
law degree from the Atlanta Law School and was admitted
to the Bar in 1928. He has served as President of the Georgia
Tech A lumni Association and other Georgia Tech grou ps;
and has been a leader in Boy Scouting, Rotary Club and
nume rous other organizations.
Edmund W. Hughes has been appointed as Secretary to
the Authority. Hughes is Managing Di rector o f the Greater
Atlanta Traffic and Safety Council. He succeeds Glenn E.
Bennett, Executive Director of the Atlanta Region Metropolitan Planning Commission, who has
served as Secretary since MARTA was
officially organized in J anuary, I 966.
Hughes has been Managing Director of the GAT&SC since 1962. Prior to
that. he was Ed itorial Associate with
Th e Atlanta Journal and had been a
reporter with the Journal since 1955. H e
is currentl y P resident of the Association
of Safety Council's Advisory G roup for
Edmund Hughes Safety Organizations. He is a member
of the Governor's Traffic Safety Study Committee.
Sue Logan is the new Secretary to
the P ublic In form ation Director, and
assists in the editing of Rapid Transit
Progress. Miss Logan attended Keystone J unior College in La Pl ume,
Pennsylvania, after graduating from
Northside H igh School. Before coming
to M ARTA, she was Receptionist and
Secretary to the Manager of the International Division o f an Atla nta-based textile chemical firm.
Sue L ogan
MARTA General M anager Henry L. Stuart was among a
group of transit experts which inspected the new $85 million
Lindenwold-P hiladelp hia Rapid T ransit Line being constructed by the Delaware River Port Authority (DRPA) .
T he tour was conducted T uesday, April 23 in conjunction
with 1968 Rail Transit G roup Conference of the American
Transit Association in cooperation with the Institute of
Rapid Transit in P hiladelphia Monday through Thursday.
Some 400 visitors were to be transported by bus to visit the
new facility along the 10.4 miles of new construction between
Camden, N . J. and Lindenwold, N. J.
MONTREAL-TORONTO TRIP PLANNED
Some 87 prominent Atlanta businessmen and governmental officials will make a two-day tour of rapid transit
facil ities in Toronto and Mont real in J une. M ARTA is organizing the trip to allow local leaders the opportunity to
ride modern rapid transit systems and to observe the impact
rapid transit has had and is having on real estate developments and other phases of acti vity in the two Canadian cities.
Over 300 individuals were invited to make the trip those accepting are paying their own expenses. Cost of the
trip to each is $ 180.00.
The Eastern Air Lines charter flight will leave Atlanta
at 8: 00 A.M ., Wednesday, June 12, and fly to Montreal.
The group will tour Montreal the rest of the day and fly
to Toronto that evening. After spending the night in Toronto,
Train at station, Delaware R iver Port A uthority System.
The morning trip included a ride on one of the new
stainless steel transit trains now undergoing tests . In the
afternoon, separate inspection trips for various advisory committees were arranged to the m aintenance and shop facilities,
the control center at Camden, power substations, passenger
stations and various track structures.
Stuart commented after riding the system, "The 75 miles
per hour automated rapid transit ride is no longer a theory;
it is now a fact of life. The same is trne for the automatic
train control concept, which will allow trains to run only
90 seconds apart. This system is doing now what is being
planned for San Francisco, Atlanta, and a host of other
cities."
Large parking lots are being built at suburban stations to
accommodate cars of the "park and ride" passengers.
He continued, "The train accelerated from a standing
start to 7 5 miles per hour in 55 seconds, and the ride is not
as noisy or as rough as the average automobile ride. There is
no doubt in my m ind that a modern. comfortable rapid transit
system such as this can be bui lt in Atlanta; and when the
people in Atlanta see it and try it, they will like it and ride it."'
the group will tour rapid transit facilities along with a group
of individuals who will be attending the Institute for Rapid
Transit meeting in Toronto. The group will return to Atlanta Thursday evening. June 13.
�MARTAction
At its meeting March 5, the Board of Directors of the
Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority by resolution
accepted preliminary engineering work on the North-South Line
from Oglethorpe to the Airport. The work was performed by
Parsons Brinckerhoff-Tudor-Bechtel under Section 702 of the
Urban Mass Transit Act.
The Board established the amount of $200 million as the
appropriate local share for constructing the system. The balance
of the cost would come from federal and state funds .
John C. Staton, newly appointed member of the Board from
Fulton County, was welcomed to the Authority. Edmund W .
Hughes, Managing Director of the Greater Atlanta Traffic and
Safety Council, was appointed Secretary to the Authorit y. (See
separate sto ries on page 3.)
At the meeting April 2, the MARTA Board reviewed the
auditors' report for 1967, and adopted it unanimously. The 1967
Annual Report contains the auditors' report.
Four contracts were presented for work to be done subject
to approval by the U. S. Department of Housing and Urban
Deve lopment. The four contracts cover the following work:
. I . To determine value of Atl ant a Transit System .... $20,000 .
2. To develop system-wide criteria and standards
for engineered facilities ; compilation of design
control data in connection with Transit Center;
and other engineering work ................................ $99 ,000.
3. Technical studies for accounting and financial
control systems, etc. ............................................ $25,000.
4. Resea rch on certain parcels of land deemed critical right-of-way (work to begin after routes a re
definitely established) .......................................... $49 ,000 .
General M anager Henry L. Stuart reported th at HUD had
as ked th at the proposa l for a cost / benefit a nalysis be withdrawn
as it is the type study which should be done by a university
system inste ad of a transit system . Stuart recommended th at the
money for the study ($30,000) be used instead to study a line
in the Model Cities a rea . The Board approved the change, subject to ap proval of the federal application by HUD.
The Board approved in principle a set of rules for the
conduct of public hearings.
Stuart reported th at competitive bids had been received for
the printing and distribution of Rapid Tran sit Progress. D a rby
Printing Company was the low bidder at $992. 50 per issue,
based on printing 12,500 copies, addressing 12,000 copies,
mai ling, and adding an average of 200 new ad dresses per
month. This was the first MARTA contract to be Jet under
competitive bids.
The Board adopted a resolution expressing so rrow at the
death of Mr. Rob ert L. Sommerville, President of the Atlanta
Transit System, and expressing deepest sympathy to his family
and business associates.
CAN SUBWAYS SERVE AS
FALLOUT SHELTERS?
MARTA is discussing with Civil Defense officials the
possibilities of incorporating facilities in the design of subways to allow them to serve as shelters for protection against
radioactive fallout in the event of a nuclear war.
Three high-ranking Civil Defense officials met with
MARTA Chief Engineer Earl Nelson, April 5, to begin
initial talks. The officials were Gen. W. R. Woodward, Director, and Col. W. E. Smith, Assistant Director, Atlanta Area
Civil Defense ; and Dr. Robert N . Bruce, Jr., Tulane University, Technical Advisor to the Federal Office of Civil Defense.
After reviewing MARTA subway plans, Dr. Bruce stated
an opinion that, "With minor design changes, the basic subway structures could be converted to highly effective fallout
shelters for little or no increase in cost. The major problem ,"
he said, " would be to provide service areas for the storage
of shelter supplies." He added, "The cost to make the subways into blast shelters would be prohibitive. It would be
more economical to provide for this protection in some of
the downtown buildings."
A set of the preliminary engineering plans and transit station drawings were sent to the Civil Defense office in Washington.
The idea for using subways for fall-out shelters was suggested to MARTA by Georgia's Fourth District Congressman Ben Blackburn of Decatur.
Congressman Blackburn stated that he would propose legislation enabling the federal government to provide up to 90 %
of the costs to modify rapid transit systems for civil defense
use.
RAPID TRANSIT BRIEFS
THE TORONTO TRANSIT COMMISSION opened, on
May 11 , 1968, for regular service, two new subway sections,
totalling six and a quarter miles.
Added to the 14-mile East-West (Bloor St-Danforth
Ave .) line, the additions are three new stations and 2. 77 miles
eastward - and six new stations and 3.49 miles westward.
Total cost of the two extensions, approximately $77 million, is being met by Metropolitan Toronto and the Toronto
Transit Commission with assistance from the Province of Ontario.
LOS ANGELES has completed preliminary engineering
for the 89 mile proposed rapid transit system. Voters are expected to decide this November on financing the $2. 5 billion
project.
RAPID TRANSIT
PROGRESS
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
808 GLENN BLDG .
1 2 0 MARIETTA ST . . N . W .
ATLANTA . GEORGIA 30303
PHONE 524-5711 ( AREA CODE 4 04 )
VOL .
3 .
NO .
4
MAY ,
1 96B
Mr. Oa ~ E.• Sweat, Jr • • Dt r ector of
Gov er1men t a l Lla i so , , Ci ty of Att a : ta
C1 ty Ha. ~ l
At la :-ita. G-a.
~
lD
30303
BULK RATE
U.S. Postage
PAID
Atlanta, Go.
Permit No. 705

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  1. http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_006_010_064.pdf

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