Box 7, Folder 11, Complete Folder

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Box 7, Folder 11, Complete Folder

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The Urban Coalition
CHAIRMAN: John
1815 H Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20006
Telephone: 347-9630
Jv. Gardner
f
CO-CHAIRMEN: Anilrew Heiskell/ A. Philip Randolph

INFORMATION SERVICE FOR COALITIONS
SUBJECT:
Advertising Council Campaign
The Advertising Council has prepared its most massive
public service advertising campaign on "Crisis in Our
Cities." Through radio, television, and newspaper ads,
the Council seeks to "inspire, encourage and move
Americans to become more involved in the urban, racial
crisis faGing our nation."
Enclosed is the Council's radio campaign packet.
Similar ad spots have been sent to television stations,
newspapers and magazine~, outdoor advertising agencies,
and transit authorities.
In total, 33,000 local media
outle ts have been contacted.
You will note that the packet includes a letter from
John Gardner, Chairman of the Urban Coalition, urging
support of the campaign. Any additional encouragement
you might give to the effort locally will be welcome.
You ma y wi sh to contact the me dia i n your community
a nd u r g e the m to use the s e ma t erial s i f the y a re not
now doing so.
For furthe r information, please contact Mr . Brian Duff,
the Urban Coalition's Vice President for Communications .
�GENERAL MOTORS CORPORATION
GENERAL MOTORS BUILDING
DETROIT, MICHIGAN 48202
GAIL SMITH
GENERAL DIRECTOR
ADVERTISING AND MERCHANDISING
August, 1968
From One Involved Businessman to Another:
The CRISIS IN OUR CITIES campaign is the newest public service effort
of The Advertising Council, and in many ways it is the most significant
project the Council has undertaken in a number of years.
The advertising is straight talk. It deals with the hard realities of
life in Urban America. It is not a 11 scare 11 campaign, nor was it meant
to be . Rather, it seeks to inspire, encourage and move Americans to
become involved in the urban, racial crisis facing our nation -- to
do something constructive to help solve the problems of our cities.
Unfortunately, until now too many of our citizens have been bystanders
in this vital area.
As you will see from the encl osed materials, the campaign puts into
clear perspective the . aspirations of those who live in the ghettos. And
it calls f or action, individually and collectively, from all of us who
are -- or should be -- concerned.
We are conducting this campaign in cooperation with Urban America, Inc.
and the Urban Coalition. You and your associates will be interested in
the enclosed letter from John Gardner .
Ketchum, Macleod & Grove, Inc. is serving as the Council's volunteer
advertising agency for the CRISIS IN OUR CITIES campaign. I think you
will agree that they have created outstanding advertising about a very
complex subject .
I have learned from first-hand experience here in Detroit that effective
communications are absolutely vital to any successful effort in dealing
with the problems of the city. In my opinion, advertising can make a
significant contribution in these critical times. But we need your hel p
and the help of all media. I am particularly hopeful that your medium
can,persuade millions of Americans to send for the free booklet, 11 The
Turning Point 11 , which is offered in the advertising.
I know that you will do everything you can to give this important campaign
the maximum exposure which the urban, racial crisis demands.
Everyone concerned with these problems will be most grateful for your
valuable help.
Gail
Volunteer Coordinator
CRISIS IN OUR CITIES campai gn
�The Urban Coalition
1815 H Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20006
Telephone: 347-9630
CHAIRMAN: John W. Gardner
CO-CHAIRMEN: Andrew Heiskell/ A. Philip Randolph
August, 1968
We need your help:
The Urban Coalition and local Urban Coalitions in 33
American cities join in asking your support for the
campaign, "Crisis In Our Cities", prepared by the
Advertising Council for Urban America. This fine
example of advertising in the public service, coupled
with related campaigns, represents the largest single
effort yet attempted to use the power of mass advertising
to meet the growing problems of cities and people which
threaten to destroy our way of life.
No domestic crisis has equaled the gravity of the one
which now confronts us and never has there been a more
important opportunity to turn the nation's communications
resources to better purpose. I urge you to give to
this campaign the full and continuing support of your
organization. The stakes, .for all of us, have never
been greater.
Sincerely,
John W. Gardner
Chairman
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�25 years of
advertising contributed
for the public good.
THE ADVERTISING COUNCIL, INC.
25 WEST 45th STREET, NEW YORK, N. Y. 10036
NEW
Y O RK
WASH I NGTON
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C H IC AG O
No. 91
CRISIS IN OUR CITIES
(The material contained in this Fact Sheet has been obtained from
Urban America, Inc. Volunteer Advertising Agency" Ketchum,
MacLeod and Grove, Inc. Volunteer Coordinator: Mr. Gail Smith,
General Motors Corporation)
ATTENTION TO WHAT IS HAPPENING .•.
With repeated explosions of violence and destruction spotlighting
the deteriorating condition of our cities, each of us needs to be
vividly aware of the depth of the crisis now facing America's Urban
communities.
Regardless of where we and our families live, the problem
of the cities is ~problem. John W. Gardner, Chairman
of the Urban Coalition, has pointed out that although many
· believe that 11 their special worlds can flourish while the
society decays •.. our Society is wholly interdependent today,
and decay in part endangers all . 11
.•• AND TO THOSE AFFECTED
America's spreading slums affect most drastically the non-white
populations that each year come crowding into our cities. The
rate of non-whiteJS to whites in American cities has been growing
since the War -- and the trend is continuing.
The over crowding has been accompanied by poor housing, inadequate
education, high rates of unemployment among people segregated along
racial lines .
THE CHOICE -- DISASTER OR CONSTRUCTIVE CHANGE
Statistical projections point to the danger that in the future
America will become divided i nto non-white ci ty ghettos and white
suburbs .
Conditions of deprivation for one segment of a divided population
can bring disaster to the nation as a whole. Or they can lead to
constructive change.
H O l.LYW O OD
�-2EVERYONE HAS A PART
A major aspect of life in the slums is its failure of communication
with the rest of America. The slums become ghettos which breed
misunderstanding and frustration. If disaster is to be averted and
conditions changed for t he better this communications gap must be
overcome. Whites and blacks must develop the means for acting
together against poverty, discrimination, bad housing, poor
education, powerlessness and estrangement.
11
THE TURNING POINT"
Every citizen can participate in voluntary activities to eliminate
slums and improve relations among Americans of all races and
economic groups. A booklet entitled, The Turning Point lists
things that individuals can do now to help alleviate the crisis
in our citie s . The Turning Point is available free of charge by
writing Urban America, Inc ., Box 6087, Washington , D.C. 20005
SUMMARY • •. WHAT TO TELL YOUR AUDIENCE
1)
Point to the crisis in our cities -- over crowded neighb or hoods,
poor housing, inadequate education , unemployment -- and emphasize that what happens to our cities happens t o our suburbs.
Society today is a i nt erdependent whole, and decay
in one part endanger s all.
2)
Emphasi ze t hat unle ss we act to remake our cities , ghe tto condi t ions -- and the frustrat i on and unrest t hey br eed, will
spread, dividing America and t hre atening i ts f u t ure .
3)
Explain that lack of communi cation be t ween the slums and t he
rest of t he nation mus t be overcome , s o t hat all can wor k to gether
agains t poverty, di scrimination, po or physic al conditions,
unemployment, powerl e ssnes s and e s t rangement .
4)
Drive home that every American has a part to pl ay as a vol unteer
i n i mpr omlng existi ng condi t i ons and human relations - - and
urge everyone to write for the free booklet, The Turning Point
whic h l ist s many things t hat individual s can do to all eviate
the crisi s in our ci t i es. Addres s Ur ban America , I nc ., Box 6087,
Washington, D.C. 20005
NOTE:
If you woul d l ike further informat ion or addi tional service in
connection with this campai gn, pl ease get in touch with any of
the following Advertising Council offices:
NEW YORK
Mr . Henry C. Wehde, Mr . Gordon Kinney or Mrs. Mildred
Vega, 25 West 45th St reet, New York, N. Y. 10036 ...
JUdson 2-1520.
CHICAGO
Mrs. L. S. Schwartz, Room 2000, 203 North Wabash Avenue,
Chicago, Illinois 60601 .•. RAndolph 6-1753 .
�-3HOLLYWOOD
Yirs. Celeste Meakin, 1717 North Highland Avenue,
Los Angeles, California 90028 .. . HOllywood 2-0988.
WASHINGTON
Miss Eleanor Sullivan, 1200 18th Street, N.W.,
Washington, D.C. 20036 ... FEderal 8-9153.
7.8
�PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT
advertising contributed for the public good.
THE ADVERTISING COUN C I L, IN C.
2 5 WEST 45th S TREET, N EW YORK , N. Y. 10036
NEW YORK

WASHINGTON

CHICAGO

HOLLYWOOD
THIS PUBLIC SERVI CE A DVERTISING MESSAGE MAY BE USED IN COM MERCIAL OR SUSTAINING TIME AND MAY BE SOLD FOR CO MM ERCIAL SPONSORSHIP.
The Advertising Council
Urban America - Crisis In Our Cities Campaign
ONE-MINUTE RADIO SPOT #1
ANNOUNCER
The most obvious symbols of today's affluent society are the
outdoor barbecue and the sports car.
is the rat.
The most incongruous
According to the 1960 census, more than 4 million
urban dwellings were completely dilapidated, 3 million more
were badly deteriorated, and another 2 million had serious code
violations or were overcrowded.
If building codes were enforced,
most ghetto buildings would be boarded up.
During the nineteen-
thirties, we saved the farms from starvation.
need help.
Before they die of neglect.
nothing you can do to help, think harder.
Now the cities
If you think there's
For more information,
write Urban America, Box 6087, Washington, D.C.
20005 .
7 .8
�THE ADVERTISING COUNCIL, INC.
Urban America - Crisis In Our Cities Campaign
ONE-MINUTE RADIO SPOT


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ANNOUNCER
The year 2000 is little more than a gene~ation away.
the question is precisely this:
celebration or a wake?
For our cities,
Will the New Millenium mark a
If you think you can sit snug in a suburban
split-level while the cities slide downhill, you're only kidding
yourself.
do.
Slums won't stop at the city line any more than commuters
What happens to our cities happens to our suburbs.
we can remake our cities.
We will.
We must.
nothing you can do ·to help, think harder.
Together
If you think there's
For more information
write Urban America, Box 6087, Washington, D.C.
20005.
�THE ADVERTISING COUNCIL, INC .
Urban America - Crisis In Our Cities Campaign
30-SECOND RADIO SPOT #1
ANNOUNCER
If you think you can sit snug in a suburban split-level while the
cities slide downhill, you're only kidding yourself.
stop at the city line any more than commuters do .
remake our cities .
We will. We must.
you can do to help , think harder.
America, Box 6087, Washington , D.C.
Slums won't
Together we can
If you think there's nothing
For more information write Urban
20005 .
7.8
�THE ADVERTISING COUNCIL, INC.
Urban America - Crisis In Our Cities Campaign
30-SECOND RADIO SPOT #2
ANNOUNCER
The most obvious symbols of today's affluent society are the outdoor
barbecue and the sports car.
kids live in cities.
help.
The most incongruous is the rat.
So do most rats.
Our cities need help.
Most
Your
If you think there's nothing you can do to help, think harder.
For information, write Urban America, Box 6087, Washington, D.C .
7.8
20005.
�THE ADVERTISING COUNCIL, INC.
Urban America - Crisis In Our Cities Campaign
20-SECOND RADIO SPOT #1
ANNOUNCER
Most kids live in cities.
Your help.
harder.
So do most rats.
Our cities need help.
If you think there's nothing you can do to help, think
For more information, write Urban America, Box 6087,
Washington, D. C.
20005.
The Advertising Council
Urban America - Crisis In Our Cities Campaign
20-SECOND RADIO SPOT #2
ANNOUNCER
During the nineteen-thirties, we saved the farms from starvation.
Now the cities need help.
Before they die of neglect.
think there's nothing you can do to help, think harder.
If you
For more
information, write Urban America, Box 6087, Washington, D.C.
20005 .
7.8
�NATIONAL LABORATORY FOR
THE ADVANCEMENT OF EDUCATION
DEMONSTRATIONS

PRESENTATIONS

DISCUSSIONS

DISPLAYS
featuring
"INDIVIDUALIZED LEARNING FOR THE INNER CITY"
NOVEMBER 18-20, 1968
WASHINGTON HILTON
WASHINGTON, D. C.
September 20, l968
headquarters office:
1750 PENNSYLVANIA AVE., N . W.,
W ASHINGTON, D . C. 20006
202/298-91 23
F. MAGER
director of research
DR. ROBERT
Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor
Atlanta , Georgia
Dear Mayor Allen:
organization is in full accor d with the Urban Coalition
fundamental objective of putting the urban crisis at the top
of t he agenda of nat i onal concern. The por tion of t he crisis
i n t he urban area or inner cit y areas that we are mostly concerned
with is education. I am enclosing a br ochure whi ch describes this
concern and effort entitled "Indivi dualized Learning in the Inner
Cit y" which will take place November 18-20, l968 , in the Nation ' s
capital and which wi ll f ocus on potential s olutions for the
educational problems in the urban areas .
OUr
DR. ROBERT REID
director of plans
C HARLES F. S CHWEP
director of programs
V. , V HITENER
display manager
R ALPH
DR. C . R AY CARPENTER
advisor
We strongly encourage industrial organizations and other
grou;ps such as the Urban Coalition to assume leadership in
implementing the concept of team registration which you will find
under the general section on registration. For if community
members from around the Nation are group sponsored to attend an
action oriented function such as this, they will take back valuable
i ni'ormation and will be able to create follow- on action progr ams
to enhance t he quality of education in their local areas .
If you desire further information, please feel free to contact
us at any time.
Sincer ely yours,
/:=.~ ~~
Enclosure
sfJonsored by
THE AEROSPACE ED UCATION FOUNDATION
president,
in cooperation wit h
D R. LEON LESSJNGER

executive director,
TH E U. S. OFFICE OF EDUCATI ON
JAMES
H.
STRAUBEL
managing director,
M I CHAEL J.
N1sos
�In the nation's capital .
an action-producing
work-session
for-
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Educators/ Government Officials/ Civic Leaders/ Industrial Executives
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THE NA Tl
N~L LA'BO A.lO. Y
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A new medium of communications to demonstrate, analyze, evaluate the
Washington Hilton Hotel
November 18-19-20, 1968
�__. ........
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THE NAT ONAL LABORATORY
for
T
ADVANCEMENT Of EDUCATION
featuring
• Classroom Demonstrations -
actual classroom experience demonstrated by teachers
w ho have provided effective changes in the learning process through i nnovat ive conce pts and techniques - covering all grade levels from preschool through adult educatio n - and a wide range of subject areas.
• Three-Phase Seminar- "Individualized Learning for the Inner City" -
featuring
reports and panel d iscussions on actual results achieved in the movement from classical group instruction to self-paced individualized learning-with concentration on
education's role in solving urban problems.
• Exposition -
industry displays and demonstrations of products and services complementing the sup ject areas covered in the Classroom Demonstrations and Sem inar
sessions - with the Exposition Area adjacen t to the con ference room s - and a program schedule which not only encourages but requires multiple visits to the Expositio n.
• Talk-Back Sessions -
each registrant does mo re than attend the Natio nal Labo rato ry.
He participates in it. To enhance personal involvement, each evening of t he co nference will be devoted to follow-on question-and-answer di scussion pe riods with th e
principals involved in the Classroom Demonstrations and Semin ar Sessio ns, and with
Industry representatives as well.
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OBJECTIVES
The " on switch" for the National Laboratory was
triggered by the fact that far too many human
swi tches, particularly in the teaching profession,
have been turned " on" by promises of an educational revolution which has yet to materialize; with
resultant frustrations obvious for all to see.
At issue here are the innovative practices in education. And by " innovation," a word bad ly maligned, w e mean "significant changes in teaching
which measurably improve the learning process
through the creative application of ideas, methods,
and devices."
Establishmen t of the National Laboratory was the
outgrowth of a w idespread survey of educational
innovations, cond ucted by the Aerospace Education
Foundation. The survey reveal ed that, whil e com pletely innovative systems are not yet available,
significant innovative components, o r modules of
systems, do, in fact, exist in a number of subject
areas; and further, that both the producers and
users of innovative materials deserve a new means
of communicating their successes, as well as thei r
failures, one to another.
The National Laboratory has been created to
demonstrate outstanding examples of innovative
components on a national platform, and on a
teacher-to-teacher basis, to show that changes in
the learning process are on the march (if not on the
run) and that effective innovation is proving out.
Thus, rather than thrash more wordage at the inadequacies of education today, the National Laboratory will demonstrate what is working, and how by the people actually doing the job. The aim, o f
course, is to precipitate follow-on action in many
classrooms.
Individualized Learning was selected as a practice which has progressed to the point where it
merits exposure as the prevailing theme. Further,
individualized learning shows potential as a key to
the solution of many urban problems in education.
With these problems in high priority status, we have
concentrated on Individualized Learning for the
Inner City.
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�Classroom Demonstrations:
WORKING EXAMPLES OF
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INNOVATIVE TEACHING EXPERIENCE
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PROGRAM
OBJECTIVE
In a nationwi de su rvey involving numerous evaluation s, the Aerospace Education Foundation encountered a number of on-going proj ects qualifyin g
as " significant changes in teaching which measurably improve the learni ng process," to quote from
our ow n defi niti on of educational innovation.
Some of th ese are the ou tgrowth of long-range,
heavily fu nded stud ies ; others seemed to grow out
of the classroom w oodw ork w hen dedicated, hardworki ng practitioners, on th ei r ow n, faced up to
th e need fo r change.
With the huge commu nicati ons gap that exists
in education today, far too little of this effective
experience has spilled over fro m one school district
to another. Hence the Classroo m Demonstration s
as a major feature of the National Laboratory.
This project, the fi rst of its kind, wi ll bri ng together for demonstration purposes the best exam ples
the nation has to offe r in educational innovati o n and reveal the results on a teach er-to-teacher basis.
These demonstratio ns w il l simulate - in te rm s
of facilities, resources, teacher-studen t rel ationships,
etc. - the actual situatio n in the ori gi nating classrooms across the cou ntry. The teache rs fro m these
classrooms will conduct the demonstrations with
actual students (not adults pretending to be ch ildren). Demonstration periods w ill range from thirty
minutes to one hour.
To present this unique program in a reali stic
manner, and permit each observer to visit each of
the eleven demonstration areas, it wi ll be necessa ry
to limit participation to 1,500 registrants. Attendance, on an invitation-only basis, therefore w i ll be
highly selective to guarantee a cross-section of th e
educational community.
R
• Preschool: Learning to Learn
How the Montessori, Moore/Kobler and Deutsch concepts are
combined to motivate the desire to learn- Washington, D.C.

Individualizing in Elementary
Where every student pursues learning according to his own personal
inventory of abilities, needs and interests- Duluth, Minnesota .

High School Work and Learn
How cooperative education stimulates learning, reduces drop-outs
and produces responsible future citizens- Patterson High School,
Dayton, Ohio.
• LSD: The Trip Back Home
A school system's unique educational campaign against LSD and
marijuana- San M ateo Union High School District, California .
• College Without Classrooms
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How the unstructured coll ege day increases student alternatives and
enhances individualized learning- Oakland Community College,
Detroit, Michigan.
• Sex Education
How new approaches to an age-o ld teaching probl em help to take
th e mystery and the mystique out of sex - Dr. John Cagnon,
Uni ve rsit y of Indian a.
• Self-Pacing Vocational Skills
How t he U. S. Ai r Force employs learner-centered instruction and
advanced communi cation s techno logy - Air Training Co mm and,
Rando lph A ir Force Base, Texas.
• Compu ter M anaged Instru ction
How co mputer techno logy is utilized in the cl assroom fo r
diagnostic, prescriptio n and evalu atio n purposes - New York
I nstitute of Tech no logy.
• Strategy for Teacher Training
How teac hers are better prepared to meet student prob lems in
disadvantaged areas- Pennsyl van ia Advancement School,
Philade lph ia, Pa .
• Education in the Factory
How private industry's factory classrooms he lp solve underemployment and unemployment- M IND, Inc.
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Three-Phase Seminar:
INDIVIDUALIZED LEARNING
FOR THE INNER CITY
OBJECTIVE
PROGRAM
Individua lized learni ng involves a system of instructio n
in w hich edu cationa l objectives are based on individual
student achievement rather than. on average behavio r or
on group sched ul ing. Thu s, student activity is controll ed
la rgely by specific performance criteria, rathe r tha n by
bl ocked-out time pe riods, and the students often have a
stro ng voice in the selection of procedures and materials
to fulfi ll these criteria.
Phase O ne- 9 :00 A.M ., Mond ay, November 18, 1968
••
With urban education posing massive problem s in th e
handling of disadvantaged youth, the p rese nta tions and
panel discussions will be concentrated o n Indivi dua lized
Learning for the Inner City.
E
• Ro le of th e Teacher
• Ro le of t he Student
• Ro le of the Admi nist rato r
s
• Role of City, Co unty and State Officia ls
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• Ro le of the Parent
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Note : Disc ussio n periods fo llow each presentation
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12:00 Noo n -Buffet Luncheon-Exposition Area
But it does invo lve learner-centered rather than
teacher-centered instruct ion, and self-pacing to the extent that stud ents move ahead according to their indi vidual abilities, needs, and interests.
All major elements of indi vidu alized learning wi ll be
evaluated at the Semi nar - by members of the educationa l community who have made ind ividualized learning work - and evaluated from a stand po in t o f resul ts.
s
Participants
Con tra ry to popular bel ief, this means that any instructi onal method or device might be approp ri ate in the pu rsuit o f indi vidualized learn ing. It ca n involve studying
al one, in small or la rge groups, with or witho ut a teacher,
with or without mach ines, with or without lectures.
Given the proper arra ngement of teacher strengths,
support and participatio n, inst ructional materials and administrative support, an ind ividua lized program of instruction can be achieved now, wi th the means w e have
at our disposal.
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Phase Two-9 :A.M ., Tuesday, November 19, 1968
Results
• Se lf-pac ing i n Elementary
• Work-and-Learn i n High Schoo l
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• Individualized Teacher Trai ning

• Factory Classrooms
Note : Discussion Period s fo ll ow each presentatio n

12:00 Noon-Conference Luncheon-International Ballroom
Phase Three-2 :00 P.M ., Wed nesday, November 20, 1968
Futures
• Guaranteed Education
•J
• • Toward the Comprehensive High School
• The Growing Work-Study Movement
• Facing up to Faci lities
• The Search for Values
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�THE WASHINGTON HILTON HOTEL . . . ONE OF THE WORLD'S NEWEST AND FINEST!
FEES
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Full Conference (includes opening reception, two buffet luncheons, the
annual Educators Awards Luncheon, and all other events described in the
brochure).
Early Registration (reservation made prior to
October 1, 1968, with or without payment of fee) . ... . . .. . . . $50.00
Regular Registration (after October 1, 1968) .. . .. ... .... .. . .. . . $60.00
Individual Days (includes all events described in brochure for each
day of conference)
Per Da y (regard less of registration date) .. . . . . ... . .. .. ... . .. .. $25 .00
- Hotel Accommodations: National Laboratory registrants are responsible
for making their own reservations at the hotel of their choice. However, a block
of rooms has been set aside for registrants at the Washington Hilton Hotel, site
of the conference. If you desire such accommodations, a hotel reservation
card is attached for your convenience. For further information or assistance,
ple·ase contact the .sponsor: National Laboratory for the Advancement of Education, c/ o Aerospace Education Foundation, Suite 400, 1750 Pennsylvania
Avenue, N.W ., Washington, D.C. 20006 (202/298-9123) .
Press Accommodations: Complimentary registration, credentials, and appropriate facilities will be available for the working press.
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REGISTRATION
Invitations: Registration, on an in vitat ion-only basi s, wi ll be limited to a
select group of educators, go vernment o ffi c ials, ci vic leaders and industrial
executi ves.
As many as 3,000 registrants can be accommodated at the Seminar Session s,
and even more in the Exhibition A rea, but both fac ilities and schedul ing li m it
participation in the Classroom Demo nstrations to 1500 registrants.
Early Reservations: To meet scheduling requirements for the Cl assroom
Demonstrations, it is desirable to receive as many co nference reservatio ns as
possible by October 1, 1968. Therefore, prior t o t hat d ate, earl y reservations
(for the fu ll conference onl y) w ill be accepted-w ith o r without remittance of
the registrat ion fee.
Confirmation: Early registrations received wi th fees rem it ted w ill be conf irmed immedi ately. Early reservations not accompanied by fees w ill be confi rmed and in voiced by October 21, 1968.
Procedure: Earl y reserv ations and registratio ns can be accomplished by
usi ng t he conference registration card enc losed w ith thi s brochure, or by direct
contact with the National Laboratory for the Advancement of Educatio n, Su ite
400, 1750 Pennsy lvania Ave., N.W ., Wash i ngton, D .C. 20006. The Nat ional
Laboratory's Registration Desk at the W ashington Hil ton Hotel wi ll be open from
4:00 P.M ., Sunday, November 17, 1968.
TEAM REGISTRATION
The National Laboratory w ill stimul ate action whi c h re lates t o society
as a whole-to industry, government, c ivic agencies and organized labor
as well as the academic community .
Therefore, the sponsor encourages parti cipation by teams of individuals who represent these interested and responsible elements in t heir communities. For example : ed ucators and school administrators, i ndustrial
planning and training execut ives, PTA head s and c ivi c leaders, local
government officials and labor u nio n personnel.
Community teams, w ith inform ation obtained at the Natio nal Laboratory, can create follow-on action programs to enhance the quality of
education in their areas.
We invite industrial organizatio ns and other groups to assume leadership in implementing this concept. We do so in the belief that team registration at the National Laboratory w ill lead t o team interaction at the
community level.
The staff of the National Laboratory is prepared to work c losely with
team contacts in this new and promising effort.
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INDUSTRY DISPLAYS OF EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES
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The Exposition, featuring Industry displays and demonstratio ns,
will be an integral part of the National Laboratory for the Ad van cement of Education.
In attendance will be the educators who will observe the Classroom Demonstrations (limited to 1500 participan ts) plu s the additi onal 1500 educato rs who can be accommodated in the Sem inar
sessions. All will be present on an i nvitation-only basis.
These educators - from campus, government and indust ry rep resent organizations deeply concerned w ith the growi ng need
fo r new educational resources. Example : the admi nistrators and
program di recto.rs responsibl e fo r the 100 maj o r innovative proj ects cu rrently being f unded by the O ffice o f Education.
From the Office o f Educatio n itself w ill come a large contingent
of key staff m embers to pa rticipate in the National Laboratory
events and view the Exposi tion.
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Th e Di stri ct of Columbi a school system is selecting 500 of its
administrators and teachers to at tend the Exposition. As the Dist rict moves towa rd a heavily-fi nanced Model City program, changes
in its educati o nal system w ill have national significance.
The schedule of events at the National Laboratory will permi t
all participants to spend am p le time in the Exposition Area, which
opens out to the d emonstration classrooms. In fact, two of the
th ree luncheons scheduled, plus a reception , will be held in the
Exposi tion A rea. The evening Talk-Back Sessions are available for
deeper exploration of Industry's products and services.
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THE NATIONAL LABORATORY FOR
THE ADVANCEMENT OF EDUCATION
W ash ington Hilton Hotel

Was hington, D. C.
PROGRAM
Sunday, Nov. 17
7 :00 PM - 8 :30 PM
O pe n in g Receptio n
an d Prev iew of D isp lays
Exposi tio n Hall
Se minar : Indi vidu a lize d
Lea rnin g fo r the Inn er City
Review D isp lays
Re cepti o n (cash ba r)
Bu ffe t Lunch eo n
Class roo m De mo nstra tio ns
Recep t io n (cas h b a r)
Ta lk- Back Sess io ns
Intern ati o nal
Ba ll roo m
Exposi tio n Hall
Expo siti o n Hall
Exp os i tio n Hall
Exp os itio n A rea
Exp ositio n Hall
Exp os it io n A rea
Monday, Nov. 18
9:00 AM -1 1 :30 AM
11 :00 AM 12:00 Noo n
12:30 PM 2:30 PM 5:00 PM 7:00 PM -
6:00 PM
- 12: 45 PM
2: 00 PM
5 :00 PM
6:00 PM
9:00 PM
.,
Tuesday, Nov. 19
9 :00 AM - 11 :30 PM
11 :00 AM - 6:00 PM
12:00 Noon - 12:30 PM
12:30 PM - 2:30 PM
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2 :30 PM - 5 :00 PM
5:00 PM - 6:00 PM
7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Semi na r: Ind iv idua lized
Lea rn in g fo r the Inn er Ci ty
Rev iew Di sp lays
Reception (cas h ba r)
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Awa rds Lun cheo n
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C lassroo m Demonst ratio ns
Rece p t io n (cas h ba r)
Talk-Back Sessions
Wednesday, Nov. 20
8:00
9:00
12 :00
12:30
2 :30
AM - 2:00 PM
AM - 12:00 Noo n
Noon - 12:45 PM
PM - 2:00 PM
PM - 5:00 PM
5 :00 PM
Int ern atio nal
Ba llroo m
Expos itio n Hall
Expos iti o n Hall
Int ern atio nal
Ba ll ro o m
Expos i tio n Area
Expos iti o n Hall
Exposi tio n A rea
....
Review Displays
C lassroo m Demo nstra ti o ns
Reception (cash ba r)
Buffet Luncheo n
Se mi na r: Individua lized
Lea rni ng fo r the Inn er City
Adjournme n t
[ xp osition Hall
Exp os iti on A rea
Expositio n Ha ll
Exposi tio n Hall
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�THE NATIONAL LABORA ORY FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF EDUCATION
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Ja m es H. Straube !
MANAGIN G DIRECTOR
Mi chael J. Nisos
GENERAL CHAIRMAN
D r. Leon M. Le ssinge r
Supt. , San Mateo Union High School Distri ct, Calif.
President, Aerosp ace Education Foundation
DIRECTOR OF PLANS
Dr. Ro b e rt Re id
DIRECTOR OF PROGRAMS
Charl es F. Schwep
DIRECTOR OF RESEARCH
D r. Robe rt F. Mage r
CHIEF ADVISOR
D r. C. R. Carpen ter
DIRECTOR OF DISPLAYS
Ra lph V. Wh itener
BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF TH E AEROSPACE EDUCATION FOUNDATI O N
Chairman of the Board
Dr. Walter J. Hesse
Dallas Aerospace Executive
Treasurer
Earle N. Parker
Fort Wo rth Industrialist
EDUCATIONAL
INDUSTRIAL
PROFESSIONAL
D r. Paul R. Bea ll
Pres., O glethorpe Univ.
Dr. T. H. Bell
Supt. o f Pub . Instr., Utah
D r. B. Frank Bro w n
School Supt., M elbourne, Fla.
D r. C. R. Carp e nte r
Pro f., Penn State U niv.
,1
D r. B. J. Cha ndler
D ean of Ed uc., Northwestern Un iv.
Dr. Ma rtin W. Essex
Sup t. o f Pub . Instr., Ohio
Dr. Ja m es C. Fle tc her
Pres., Univ. o f Utah
Jack R. H unt
Pres., Em bry-Riddle Inst.
D r. Le o n M. Less in ger
Sup t., San M ateo, Calif.,
Union High School District
D r. Ro b e rt F. Mager
RFM Associa tes
D r. Ca rl L. Ma rburger
Comm . of Educ., N . / .
Dr. D uan e J. Mattheis
Comm. of Educ., M inn.
Dr. Bill J. Pries t
Chancellor, Dallas Co. Jr. College Dist.
Dr. Ja mes C. Sh elburne
Air U niversity
D r. Lindl ey J. Stil es
Prof., Northw estern Univ.
D r. Edwa rd Te lle r
Prof., Un iv. of Cal if.
Geo rge L. W ash in gton
Asst. to Pres., Howard Un iv.
Jo hn R. Alison
V. P., North rop Co rp.
Ke n Ell ington
Aerospace Industri es Assoc.
Arthur F. Kelly
V. P., Wes tern A irli nes
John P. Henebry
Pres., North Amer. A l um. Corp.
Laure nce S. Ku te r
V. P., Pan Am erican A i rw ays
Cu rtis E. LeMay
Pres ., Networks Elect. Corp .
J. B. Mo ntgo me ry
Pres. , M arquardt Corp.
J. G ilbe rt Ne ttl e to n, Jr.
V. P. , General Precis ion
Pete r J. Sche n k
V. P., W estern Union
Sherrod E. Ski nn er
Chm . o f Bd., A erospace Corp.
Ro bert W. Sma rt
V. P., Nor th Amer. Rockwell
A. Paul Fo nda
North rop In tern ational
M ilton Cani ff
New Yo rk, N . Y.
Edw ard P. Curt is
Rochester, N . Y.
N. W. deBerard in is
Shrevep ort, La .
Jam es H. Dooli ttle
Los Angeles, Calif.
Edwa rd R. Finch, Jr.
New York, N . Y.
Joe Foss
Scottsdale, Ariz.
Jack B. G ross
Harrisburg, Pa .
George D. Hardy
Hya ttsville, M d.
Josep h L. Ho d ges
So uth Boston, Va .
Jess Larson
W ashington, D . C.
Carl J. Long
Pi ttsb urgh, Pa .
Howa rd T. Ma rkey
Ch ica go, Ill.
Nathan H. Maz e r
Roy, Utah
0 . Dona ld Olson
Colorado Springs, Co lo .
Chess F. Pizac
Denver, Co lo .
Be n Regan
N ew York, N . Y.
Joe L. Shosid
For t Wo r th, Tex .
Will iam W . Sp rua nce
W i lmington, D el.
Arthu r C. Storz
Omaha, Neb.
Ja m es M. Trail
Bo ise, Idaho
Nathan F. Twin ing
Arlington, ~a.
THE SPONSOR ...
Secretary
Ju lia n B. Rosen tha l
New Yor k A ttorn ey
The Aerospace Education Foundation, now in its
fourteenth year, is a nonprofi t organization dedicated to educational, scientific, and charitable purposes; it is supported by the Air Force Association.
The Foundation takes a basic interest in the educational signi fi cance of the vast research, development and operational experience underlying the
advancement of air travel and space fli ght.
Currently the Foundation is pioneering in the
o rganized adaptation of advanced Air Force course
materials for use in public school systems.
The govern ing body of the Foundation, the Board
o f Trustees, represents the purposeful combination
of edu cators, industrial executives, and professional
men, most of them with personal experi ence in the
movement of aerospace techno logy.
The Foundation thus reflects the efforts of dedicated, forward- looking men from three prime elements of o ur society, w orking closely with representatives of governm ent at all levels, to enhance the
impact of advanced concepts and techniques on the
learni ng process in this country.
Each year, for more than a decade, the Fo undatio n
has made it possible fo r hundreds of selected educators to attend the nation's largest display of advanced technology - the annual Aerospace Deve lopment Briefings of the A ir Force Asso ciatio n - and
this experience has resulted d i rectly in the enhancement of m any school curricu lums.
Now, with the same professional staff responsible
for these major expositions, t he Foundation enters
the field of educationa l displays - convinced that
our school systems merely have scratched the surface
o f A merican industry's vast potential in the field o f
innovative learning.
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Re p ly to :
THE NATIONAL LABORATORY FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF EDUCATION
1750 Pe nnsylvania Ave., N.W.
Washingto n, 0 . C. 20006 (202/ 29&-9123)
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�THE AEROSPACE EDUCATION FOUNDATION
cordiall y invites you
to participate in
THE NATIONAL LABORATORY
for the
ADVANCEMENT OF EDUCATION
W ashington, D.C.
R.SV. P.
Registratio n Ca rd Enclosed

November 18-20, 1968
Dr. Leon M. Lessinger
President
�Reservation/ Registration Form
THE NATIONAL LABORATORY FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF EDUCATION
November 18-20, 1968 • Washington, D. C.
Early Reservation/ Registration
Please Print
(Honored Only Before October 1, 1968)
NAM" - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - -- - -
D
Tin.___ __ _ __ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Ch eck Enclosed or Bill Me Later
at Special Fee of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $50.00
Regular Registration
O RGAN IZATION _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
ADDRESS,_ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
CITY & STAT" -- - --
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Make checks payable to Aerospace Education Foundation
D
Full Co nference . . ...... . . . . . .. $60.00
D
First Day Only .. . .. ... . ... . . . . $25.00
D
Second Day O nly .. .. . . .. . ..... $25.00
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Third Day Only .. . . .. .. .. .. . . . $25.00
�FIRST CLASS
PERMIT
NO. 4623R
Wash., D. C.
BUSINESS REPLY MAIL
No Postage Sta mp Necessary If Mai led in th e United States
Or Any U.S. Military Post O ffice
Postage Will Be Paid By -
THE NATIONAL LABORATORY FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF EDUCATION
c/o Aerospace Education Foundation
1750 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W.
W ashington, D. C. 20006
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�BUSINESS
First Class Perm,t No. 35590
REPLY
CARD
Wa shington . D.C.
THE WASHINGTON HILTON
Connecticut Ave . at Columbia Road N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20009
Att. Front Office Manager
�9/ 6 7
TEL. Area Code 202 483-3000
GUEST ROOM RESERVATION REQUEST
Name
Address
City.
. ..... State ..
Arrival Date
. Hour
Departure Date ..
Hour
A.M.
.. .P.M.
A.M.
PM .
MEDIAN RATE UNDER LI NED
PLEASE CIRCLE RATE DES IRED
If rate requ ested is not ava·i l able next available rate will be
assigned
....SINGLES ...... 18 19 20 21 22 24
.. .. DOUBLES ... ..... .... 23
24
25
26
.. .. TWINS ..... ...... ... 23
24
25
26
.... CABANAS .... 25 single 30 double
.... SUITES .................... ... ..... 50 and up
ALL RATES PLUS 5% D. C. SALES TAX
Reservations must be received not later than
two weeks prior to op~ning date of meeting.
ROOMS WILL BE HELD ONLY UNTIL 6 P.M.
ON DATE OF ARRIVAL, UNLESS GUARANTEED.
AEROSPACE EDUCATION FOUNDATION
National Laboratory for the Advancement of Education
NOVEMBER 1B - 20, 1968
�I>
The Urban Coalition
1815 H Street, N.W.
Washi ngton , 0 .C. 20006
Telephone : 347-9630
CHAIRMAN: John W. Gardner
CO-CHAIRMEN : Andrew Heiskell/ A . Philip Randolph
September 6, 1968
The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr .
Mayor of the City of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
30303
Dear Mayor Allen:
Enclosed for your information as a member
of the Steering Committee, is a schedule
of the meeting planned for November. We
hope you will note the date and make
every effort to attend.
In connection with the Coalition's media
relations and potential publications, we
would appreciate your furnishing us with
your current biographical data and your
photograph.
Sincerely,
Christopher M. Mould
Executive Assistant
to the Chairman
Enclosure
�SCHEDULE OF MEET ING
OF
THE STEERI NG COMMIT'l'EE
OF
THE URBAN COAL ITION
November 13, 1968
Reception:
6:00
p.m.
Dinner
6: 4 5
p.m.
Meet ing
8: 00
p .m. *
Place
Wash ington, D. C.
Addres s not yet determined


The counterpa rt committee of the


Urban Coal ition Act ion Counci l
will convene one hour later.
�INFORMATION SERVICE FOR COALITIONS
SUBJECT:
Volunteer Management Consulting
Assistance
In the development of a few of the coalitions, it has been
found useful (or necessary) to seek the volunteer assistance
of one or another of the national management consulting firms.
They have helped in some instances in developing organizational
plans for the coalition itself and in other instances ~n
working with enterprises being established in the ghetto areas.
It is this experience of a few coalitions that prompted John
Gardner to ask the Association of Consulting Management Engineers(the North American association of prominent firms in
this field) if their member firms would volunteer to assist
when and as their help might be needed by urban coalitions.
ACME's Board of Directors has told its member firms that the
program of The Urban Coalition merits their support and has
asked them to provide assistance to coalitions when they can
be helpful.
The experience of those coalitions that have drawn on the
capabilities of management consulting firms suggests that they
can be used effectively to help with (a) the working out of
organizational plans of the coalition, (b) the development of
procedures (e.g., budgeting procedures, purchasing procedures,
personnel procedures), and (c) in assisting enterprises that
are being established with similar problems.
When you feel your coalition needs the assistance of a consultant, you may wish to contact the associate director responsible
for your area, indicating the nature of assistance you seek or
the problems on which you want consultants to help . In turn ,
he will pass on your request to the Ex ecutive Director of ACME ,
who will invite one or another of the member firms in your area
to provide assistance.
�INFORMATION SERVICE FOR COALITIONS
SUBJECT:
New Detroit Committee
Progress Report
You may find the enclosed Progress Report of the New
Detroit Committee of special interest. The Committee
was the nation's first coalition and has moved quickly
and effectively to assess and to begin to face up to
local problems.
�NAM
THE COALITION'S LIMITED SUPPLY OF STEP CASE STUDY FILES HAS
BEEN EXHAUSTED.
THE FILE INCLUDES CASE STUDIES ON COMPANY
EMPLOYMENT PROBLEMS, SUCH AS SELECTION, COMPANY SPONSORED
TRAINING, RETRAIN!NG AND REDIRECTING.
IT ALSO INCLUDES
STUDIES ON COMMUNITY EMPLOYMENT PROBLEMS, INCLUDING SELFDEVELOPMENT, COMMUNITY-SPONSORED TRAINING, JOB DEVELOPMENT
AND RELOCATION.
TO OBTAIN THE CASE STUDY FILE, PLEASE WRITE DIRECTLY TO:
Urban Affairs Division
National Ass ociation of Ma nu f acture r s
277 Park Ave nue
Ne w York, Ne w York 100 17
�THE URBAN COALITION ACTIOi'-J COUNCIL
JOHN W . GARDNER
CHAIRMAN
1819 H STREET, N. W.
September 16, 1968
WASHINGTON, D . C. 20006
TO:
Chairmen and Executive Directors of Local
Urban Coalitions
FROM:
Lowell R. Beck, Executive Director
SUBJECT:
Senate Action on Public Service Employment
Last month we asked you to call or tel egram your
senators, u rg ing their support for the Clark-Javits -P routy
bill on Public Service Employment. Although we expected
it to be offered as an amendment to the Manpower Development
and Training Act extension, MDTA was not called up for a
vote and no action was taken.
It now appears th at MDTA will be b e fore the full
Senate late this week or early next week. Once again, we
call on you to let your senators know your fe e lings about
the need for public service employment. Please ask them
to support Senator Clark's ame ndme nt to the Manpowe r Deve lopme nt and Training Act Exte n s ion (S. 2938).
Several days ago we asked you to urge your senators
to support higher appropriations for education and poverty
programs, and your response was most gratifying. Thanks
to the combined efforts of many interested persons, the full
Senate rais e d the appropriations figures significantly.
We h ave another ch a nce in these ·clo s ing days of Congress to
b e h ea rd on one o f the mo st significant progra ms affecting
our cities and would appre ciate your assistance .
Enclosed for your inf o rmation is a factual memorandum
on the l atest version of the Clark-Javits-Prouty bill.
LRB:m
Enclosure
TELEPHONE: 202 293- 15 30
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�THE URBAN COALITION ACTION COUNCIL
August 1968
JOHN W . GARDNER
CHAIRMAN
1819 H STREET. N . W.
WASHINGTON.D.C.20006
FACT SHEET
ON
PROPOSED
COMMUNITY EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING AMENDMENT
TO
MANPOWER DEVELOPMENT TRAINING ACT EXTENSION
(S.2938)
Purpose
The purpose is to provide public and private employment
opportunities in com.t-nuni t y service occupations for unemployed
and low-income residents of urban and rural poverty areas in
order to relieve severe problems of unemployment and underemployment, to prepare such persons for jobs in the private
sector of the economy, to increas e opportunities for local
entreprene u rs hip through the creation of local service comp a ni es , and to meet critical national needs for com.munity
services.
Authorizations of Appropriations
$500 million is authorized for fiscal year 1969, $1
billion for fiscal year 1970. This will create 600,000 jobs
over two years.
Distribution of Funds
The Secretary of Labor may transfer (but not to exceed)
40% of the funds appropriated to private employers for p rograms
that carry out the purpose o f this Act unde r e x isting programs
such as the Manpower Development and Training Act or the Economic
Opportunity Act.
of the remainder, the Secretary can reserve
50 % for direct f unding of community employme nt and training progr ams.
not less than 50% is reserved for state plans
using criteria specified in this Act.
(S ee
Section on State plans).
e a ch Sta t e sh a ll r e c e i ve a b as ic s um of $1
mill i on p lus s u ch a d d i t i on al f u nds as t h e
Secre t a r y s h a ll d etermi n e under t he Act' s
allocation guide lines.
T ELEPHONE: 202 2 93-1530
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no state may receive more th a n 15 % of
the funds appropriated.
in alloting the funds among the states,
the Secretary of Labor shall consider:
(a)
(b )
(c)
the State ' s population
the proportion of low-income
families in the State
the unemployment in the State
a state's allotmen t can be realloted
after nine months of the fiscal year.
Eligible Programs and Supportive Services for Public
Service Employme nt
jobs
public safety,
beautification
proj ects which
in community service, in such fields as health ,
education, housing, etc. Also programs for
and cons ervation. - Priority shall be given to
are l abor inte nsive in character.
activities to assure persons employed in such jobs
have further education and supportive services (counseling,
medical care, transportation, etc.)
lo ans for purchase of supplies and equi pment to
supplement projects carried out by the participants.
The Secretary of Labor may provide assistance either in
the form of grants or contracts and may pay all or part o f the
cost of programs.
Re quire me nt for App licants
Each applicant for jobs and supportive services funds
must provide a community employment and training plan covering
the following:
analysis of priorities o f unmet community
n ee d s .
the education , t raining , and supportive
services which will improve the abi li ty
of the participants to compete in the job
market.
e li gib l e are as and type of work to be
perfo rmed .
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training of supervisory personnel.
future career o ppor tunities to insure
these are not dead-end jobs .
coordination with other federally ass isted
manpowe r or economic d evelopment acti vities.
State Role
50 % of the money must be channeled through
State p l ans .
Up to 25 % o f the funds received by a State
may be us e d for jobs in State agencies.
All local applications that go directly to
the Secretary o f Labor must be submitted .
to the States for comme nts.
State Plans
Each State must establish a St ate Manpower Coordinati ng
Council to prepare the State plan. The Secretary of Labo r must
approve a state plan if i t meets criteria, such as -an equitable distribution of funds on
four poverty, low-income indicators.
an analysis of n ee ds in the state for
com_munity services .
coordinates all simi l ar jobs programs .
provides planning and technical assistance
to localitie s.
Th e Secre tary of Labor may approve only the part of the
State plan which mee ts the above req ui rements , and operate the
remainder of the State plan portion through direct Federa l and
local grants.
Program Preferences
The Secretary of Labor and State Councils (wherever practicable )
shall encourage and give preference to applications that involve:
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local service companies owned in part by
low-income resid__ents of the areas.
public safety emp loyment programs.
heads of households.
The Secretary shall give preference in his other private
on-the-job training programs to qualified participants in
community employmen t programs.
Eligible Areas and Prime Sponsors
The Secretary of Labor shall designate urban and rural
areas containing high concentrations of unemployed or lowincome persons. A community program area designated under
the manpowe r section of the Economic Opportunity Act shall
be an eligible area for this Act.
For each eligible area the Secretary or State council
shall design a te a single public or nonprofit organization
to be a prime sponsor that receives all funds in that area.
The Secretary of Labor, to the e xtent practicable, shall
assure the prime sponsor receives Federal funds under other
manpower training acts such as MOTA, Demonstration Cities,
OEO, the Social Security Act, etc. The re is a by-pass provision for funding to organizations other than the prime
sponsor if this will enhance program effectiveness.
Special Conditions
No program may result in the displacement of employed
workers or impair existing contracts for services, nor may
a program result in the substitution of Federal funds for
other funds for work that would otherwis e be performed.
Wages must be based on the highest of th e following criteria:
(a) the Federal minimum wage, (b) the most comparable State
or local minimum wage, or (c) the prevailing wage rate in
the area for similar work. Programs must contribute to
occupational development or upward mobility of pa rtici pants,
to the e x tent feasible. Where a program involves physical
improvements, preference must be given to those wh ich are
used by low-income persons. Programs should seek to eliminate
artificial barriers to employment and occupational advancement, and particular attention should be given to altering
civil service r eq uiremen ts which restrict e mp loyment opportunities for the disadvant age d.
�THE URBAN COALITION ACTION COUNCIL
JOHN W . GAR DNER
CHAIR M AN
1819 H STREET, N . W .
September 13, 1968
WASHINGTO N , D . C . 2000 6
WEEKLY LEGISLATIVE REPORT
Public Service Emp loyment (The Emergency Emp loyment and
Training Act o f 196 8 ). The Public Se rvice Emp loyment will
be offere d in the Se n ate a s an amen drnen t to Manpower De v e lop me nt and Tra ining Act ext e ns ion. The move will b e made b y
Senator Jos e ph Clark (D-P a .), with the supp ort of Senators
Jacob Javits (R- N.Y.) and Winston Prouty (R-Vt.).
It is
possible that the MOTA will be schedule d for Senate action
late nex t week. The Clark-Javits-Prouty amendment would
provide for at leas t 600,000 public s e rvice jobs in the n ext
two y e ars.
The MDTA passed the House on Septe mber 4, 1968 by a
vote of 315 to 0.
Appropri a tions. Fina l d e cisions on appropriations for
k e y hou s ing , e duc at ion a nd anti p overty prog rams will b e made
soon by Cong r ess .
HUD appropriations will be decide d on when House and
Senate Appropriations Committee me mber s begin their confe rence s on the Independe nt Of fic e s Appr o p riations bill Septemb e r 18.
At s t a k e are the amount s f o r u r b a n re n e wa l, mode l c i t i es ,
rent s upplements , fa i r hou s ing admini s tra tion and urb a n
planning and r e s ea rch (se e Appe ndi x A for d e tails). App ropriations fo r th e n e w programs in the rec e ntly ena cted Housin g
Act wi ll b e sough t in a supp l ement a l appropri at ions bill tha t
h as no t y e t b e e n se nt to Co ngres s.
The Se n a t e p a ss e d t h e edu cati on, a nt ipove r t y a nd ma n power traini n g a ppro p r i ation bill (for th e Departments o f
Lab or and HEW and the Off ice o f Economi c Opportun ity) Sept emb er 6. On t he Se n a te f l oor ma j or incre as es we r e vote d o v e r
th e Hou s e amount s f or e d u c a t ion o f c hildre n from p oor famil i es
(known as th e Ti tle I pro gram), for OEO , the Teach e r Corps
and the n ew dr o p out preven t ion p rogram.
TELEPHONE: 202 293·1530
®
�-
2 -
Most of the Senators named to the conference committee
that will decide the final appropriations -- possibly next
week -- opposed the increases the Senate voted (see Appendix
B for details).
HUD Personnel Cutback. The tax surcharge - budget cut
law (the Revenue and Expenditure Control Act of 1968) requires
the Executive Branch to cut back its total number of employees
to the number on June 30, 1966. This is to be accomplished
by filling three out of every four vacancies. HUD employment
increased by only 900 after the 1965 and 1966 housing la,.,rn
for rent supplements and model cities we re enacted. This
900-person increase will be wiped out and no provis ion made
for administering the new programs in the giant 1968 Housing
Act.
The cutback ~s a harsh restriction on agencies such as
HUD which have been assigned major new programs in the last
two years. Congres s has already taken steps to e xempt the
FBI, post office and air traffic controllers from the cutback.
�APPENDIX A
Housing Funds.
In the conferences on the HUD - Independent
Offices bill, th ese a re th e ma jor p r ograms on which the House
and Se nate confe rees must s ettle thei r dif ference s.
(The t wo
programs for which the Hous e did not grant any appropriations
were not ye t authorized by law when the House passed the funds
bill, so money could not be v oted at the time.)
Budget
House
Senate
Committee
Senate
Passage
(in millions o f dollars)
Urban Renewal
Urban Planning
Model Cities
$1, 4 00.
55.
$1,300.
38.8
38.8
$1,250.
47.5
1,000.
500.
1,000.
1,000.
Urb an Res earch
20.
10.
15.
15.
Rent Supplement
Contract Authority
65.
25.
65.
65.
Fair Housing
11.1
9.
9•
�APPENDI X B
Education, Labor and Antipove rty Funds. The Senate de bate d t he Labor-HEW Approp riations bill Se pte mbe r 4- 6 and
adopte d four k ey amendme nts prov iding more funds for educa tion
and anti poverty programs tha n the Se nat e Ap propri a tions Committe e and t h e House h a d r e comme nded (see t a ble b e low ). No
cha nge wa s ma d e in th e House fi gur e f o r ma npower t r aining
programs , which i s $4 0 0 million , s ome $13 mil l ion below the
Bu dget .
These were the k e y amendme n ts : Ti t le I education funds .
wer e raised to the Budget figu re of $1 . 2 billion afte r Sena tor
Hill (D-Al a . ) , the bill ' s manager , agreed th a t e a ch sta t e
s hould r e c e ive as muc h mone y fo r this pro g r am in fisca l 1 96 9
a s it did for this year. The amendment was o ffered by Senator .
Hart (D -Mich. ) a nd met no opposition .
Senator Pas t ore (D-R.I.) s p onso re d the a mendme nt rai s i n g
antipove rty funds $215 million ove r the Hous e and Senate Committee figur e . Hill o p po sed the ame ndme nt and it wa s a do pted
on a narrow 37-26 vote . Alt hough the Se n a t e f igure was $92
mi l lion under the Budget , Pastore said i t was acc e ptab l e to
OEO.
Sena to r Ne lson (D-Wis.), o r i g ina l s p onsor o f t h e Teache r
Corp s , presen t e d the ame ndment increasin g app ropri a tion s to
the Bu d get l e v e l. Hill pro p o sed th at Ne l son s e t tl e f o r
$24 , 667 , 000 , a comp romise sum me ntione d by HEW o f ficials , but
Nelson stuck by his higher figur e and th e Senate went along
with it.
The drop out p r eve ntion prog r am , wh i ch was wr itte n int o
the 1967 ant ipove rty b ill by Se n a tor Ge orge Mu rph y (R- Ca l i f . ) ,
wi ll get its f irst appropriation s i f the House g o e s a l ong with
the Se n a t e . Murp hy's ame ndment rais i n g th e fund s to $20
mill1on wa s adopte d on a 4 2-21 vote.
Approp r i at ions f or th e f o~r pro grams , fr om Budge t r eques t
to Se nate passage :
Budge t
Hous e
Se n a t e
Committee
Se n a t e
Pas sag e
(i n millions o f d o l lars )
Title I Education
$1, 200 .
$ 1 ,07 3.
$1, 123.
$1 , 2 00 .
Tea che r Cor p s
31 .2
1 5. 0
17 . 3
31. 2
Dropout Pr e v e ntio n
3 0.
00 .
10 .
20 .
2, 1 8 0 .
1, 8 73 .
1,87 3 .
2, 088.
OEO Antipoverty
�THE URBAN COALITION ACTION COUNCIL
JOHN W. GARDNER
CHAIRMAN
1819 H STREET, N. W.
WASHINGTON. D. C. 20006
August 30, 1968
TO:
Chairmen and Executive Directors 6f Local
Urban Coalitions
SUBJECT:
Education and Poverty Appropriations
The full U.S. Senate will consider. the education and
poverty appropriation bill (H.R . 18037) as the first order of
business on Wednesday, September 4. The House cut the OEO
appropri a tion s request by $307 million and the Senate Appropriations Committee refused to restore any of this.
Senator
Pastore will move to increase the funds on the Senate floor.
The House cut $127 million from the appropriation for
Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act . The
Senate Committee restored $50 mil lion. Senator Hart will
move on the floor to incre a s e the amount by $77 million.
We realiz e time is short , but t e lephone calls or t e l e gr ams
to your Senator s , urging support of the Pastore and Hart
amendments, would be very h e lpful.
Sincerely yours,
-/ .,_µ ~ <-Ci_/
({;: ell R. Beck
Executive Director
LRB :m
T E \- EP H ONE: 202 293- 1530
�,-
\
I
\
TELEPHONE CALL IN SHOW ON VITAL ISSUES
A NATIONAL RADIO
NELSON PRICE, Executive Producer
BEN LOGAN , Producer
EDWARD M. JONES, Director of Programming
DEL SHIELDS, Host
475 Riverside Drive, Suite 420, New York, New York 10027 Telephone: 2121663-8900
August 27, 1968
Mr. Dan Sweat
City Hall
A tlant a, Ga.
Dear Mr. Sweat:
The Urban Coali tion cooperates wi t h three o t he:i' nat ional organj_ z ations in presenting a national radio program five nights each week.
In Atlanta, Night Call is heard on station WAOK (1380 kc) from 11:30 PM
to 12: 30 AM.
Night Call is a nat ional, telephone c a ll-i n prog ram. A guest of n a tional or int ernationa l prominence is f eatured each ni gh t .
Persons
listening to Ni ght Call in 60 cities across the country may t elephone
collect , talk wi tl l the guest and host, Del Shields, about the issue
of the nigh t . Most of the issues revolve around the urban crisis.
I
am enclosing a p a cket with full informat ion .
Would you consi d e r doi n g a coupl e of t h i n g s ?
Help build audience for the prog ram b y
promoting i t through your channels:
We wi ll be gl a d t o furnish posters t o
y ou in quantity, weekly information
regard i n g guests and i s sues, and a
demo nstrati o :, .n tap e o f t h e p rogram for
use in meeting s o r wi t h individu als.
Suppo rt the s t a t ion in its p r es e ntati on
o f Ni gh t Call?
Sinc e th e p r o gram does
d eal wi ~i1.~ c on troversial issu es and at
t imes pres e nts controversial gu ests ,
stations need suppo rt from community
l e aders .
Th e p erson with whom we h a v e
been working at WAOK i s Ken Gol d bl att .
Released in c ooperation with th e Broadc asting and Film Commission,
National Counc il of Churc hes, and the National Cathoiic Office for Radio and Television (NCO RT)
Prod uced by TRAFCO/Televi sion, Radio and Film Commission of Th e United Method ist Ch urch,
Harry C. Spe.nce r, General Sec retary ,
�Continued, Page two, Mr. Swea t
Night Call is based on the premise that Americans are willing
to listen and discuss an~ idea; that people from different
backgrounds and with different attitudes and ideas must speak
and listen to one another before they can accept each other and
work together in solving the problems of our nation. Night Call
provides this opportunity.
It demonstrates that problems are
pretty much the same everywhere and that the search for answers
in Pittsburgh or Watts are relevant to just about every part of the
nation.
We'll also be glad to have suggestions on issues and guests.
If a
problem or a success program can be helped by, national exposure, we'd
like to know about it.
I will be looking forward to hearing
NP:mj
Enclosure
�A NATIONAL RADIO TELEPHONE CALL IN SHOW
ON VITAL ISSUES
��T I ME SCHE DULE
A NATIONAL RADIO
TELEPHONE CALL IN SH OW ON VITA L ISSUES
NELSON PRICE, Executive Producer
BEN LOGAN , Producer
EDWARD M. JONES, Director of Programming
DEL SHIELDS, Host
CLOCK TIME
LAPSED TIME
475 Riverside Drive, Suite 420, New York, New York 10027 Telephon e: 2121663-8900
TIME TO GO
11:30 PM
00:00
59 : 30
S t anda r d c a rtr i dge t a pe opening
esta b l ishing s h o w a n d ho st with
p h one n umbe r .
Gu est is introduced by ho s t and topic is
e s tabl i she d.
Gue st q u i z zed b y
h o s t wi t h a udienc e c all s t ake n
at lib erty .
11 : 43 :30
13 : 30
46 : 00
"Stay
Ho s t give s b reak cu e :
tu n e d to th e ' Ni gh t Call ' Ne twork ," f o ll o we d by c a rt ridge
tape c o n clu di n g wi th c ue wo r d s ,
" ... a f t e r s t a t ion i d e n tific a t i o n . "
11:43 : 50
13:50
45 : 4 0
Stat i o n s cut fo r loca l comme rcia l
and S t ati o n I.D. OR s tati ons take
PSA fed d o wn l i n e- (6 0 seconds )
a nd the n b r eak for Stati o n I . D.
( 1 0 seconds ) .
11 : 45:0 0
15: 00
4 4: 3 0
Ca r t r i dge tape s tand ard r e -intr o
wi th s ound a nd t e l ephone numbers
( 2 1 2 7 49 - 33 11 o r 2 1 2 866 - 5010) .
Hos t r es tate s is s u e a n d reidenti fies g u es t and call- in
numb e r. Ho st i nterv i ews g u es t
a n d moves t o c a ll e r s as a v ai l abl e .
11 : 58 : 30
28: 30
31 :00
Same as 11 : 43: 3 0
11: 5 8: 5 0
28: 5 0
30: 4 0
S ame a s 11 :43 : 5 0
1 2 :00:00
30:00
29 : 3 0
Sa m
1 2 :1 3 : 30
43: 30
1. G:00
Same as 11 : 43 : 30 a n d 1 1 : 58:30
1 2 : 1.3 : 5 0
43:50
14 :3 0
Same a s 11: 45 : 0 0 e tc .
1 2 :15 :00
45: 00
14 : 30
Same a s 11: 45 :00 etc.
1 2:28 :50
58:5 0
1:40
Ho s t wr aps up s h o w, a n nounc es
n ext n i ght ' s iss u e and guest ;
f ollowe d b y c a rtridge tape credit,
with so u nd t rai l i n g o u t.
12:29 : 30
59: 30
0:00
Sh ow END.
as 11: 45 : 00
(revi sed 7 /68 )
Released in c ooperation with the Broadcasting and Fi lm Commission,
National Council of Churches, and the National Catholic Office fo r Rad io and Television (NCO RT)
Produced by TRAFCOI Television, Rad io and Film Commissio n of Th e United Methodist Churc h,
Harry C. Spencer, General Secretary,
�TELEPHONE CALL IN SH OW ON VITAL ISS.U ES
A NATIONAL RADIO
475 Rive rsi de Dri ve , Su ite 420, New Yo rk, New Yo rk 10027 Telephone : 2121663-8900
FOR IMMEDI ATE RELEA SR
NATI ONWIDE CALL-IN SHOW
TO "TELL I T LIKE I T I S"
On (_____ ) _ ___ ) j oin s t he gr owing lis t of rad i o s t a tion s
Dat e
Stati on
c arry i ng the new na tional call- i n pr ogram NI GHT CALL.
,,
Produced by TRAFCO, the Telev ision, Radio & Fi lm Commission of
the United Met hod i s t Church, NIGHT CALL will be heard Monday through
Friday fr om
on _____ _ _____ ). The program
Station and Frequency
hos t Del Shields and a guest - which includes such
)

Time
format i s s i mple :
people as Dr . Ralph Abernathy , Fonner Maryland Governor Theodore
McKeldin and Stokely Carmichael - plus an open phone line whereby anyone in the United States may call collec t and speak directly with a
guest.
And they do -- from San Diego and Boston, Memphis and Minnea-
polis, New York and Seattle, South Bend and Winston-Salem---and now
from
______
).
-m9reReleased in cooperation with the Broadcasting and Film Commiss ion ,
National Council of Churches, and the Nati on al Catho lic Offic e fo r Radio and Television (NCO RT)
Produced by TRAFCO/Telev ision, Rad io an d Film Commissi o n of The United Methodi st Chu rch,
H9 rry C. ~pencer, Genera l Secretary ,
"
�.Page 2 of 2
The purpose of NIGHT CALL is t o he lp people find reconcil i a t ion,
t o move towards solutions t o problems t hrough understandin g .
NIGHT
CALL offers persons of wi dely dif f ering views and backgrounds the
chance to speak, to be challenged, t o ask questions, to discover new
views and truths.
Listeners to NIGHT CALL have heard Ralph Abernathy wa rn t hat if
racial problems are not solved thr ough non-violent channels,
Ther e are other forces who are going to lead people down a mor e v i olent path."
They have heard St oke l y Cannichael say he has no t g i v en u p hope
of Blacks and Whites l i v ing t oge t he r , but " ... Sinc e the Whi t e man has
. t he power to des_troy me , I am pre pa r e d £or him."
They have he ard what Ba l timore i s doi n g to solve rac i al problems,
and h ow a Los An geles j ob program has reduc ed t ension i n Watt s .
Other NIGHT CALL gue s t s include H. Rap Brown, J acki e Robinson ,
New York Mayor Lindsay, Cleveland M~yor St okes , Ralph McGi ll, Bill
Cosby, H. W. Glass en, Pres.ident o f <NlM .
I n ac t ualit y , NIGHT CALL is a national t own mee t in g whic h off e rs
all Amer ic ans t he opportunit y to meet and ta l k over their problems in
the best way man has yet found:
pers on t o pers on .
Si nc e NI GHI' CALL began broa dcasting on J une 3rd ov er 20 stations,
the nationwide network of stations carrying the program has nearly
tripled.
NIGHT CALL originates from New York Cit y.
-1/:(For further infonnation contact: Mil t on .Rich Associates 212-758-6610)
�I
N I G H T
CALL
I
June, 1968
GUEST LINEUP FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE
DATE
3
4
5
6
7
GUEST'S TITLE
GUEST
Acting President of SCLC
Co-Author FAILSAFE
Baltimore Urban Coalition
Former Chairman SNCC
Liaison to Poor People's ·CaH!paign
Rev. Ralph Abernathy
Harvey Wheeler
Theodore R. McKeldin
Stokely Carmichae_l
Rev. John Adams
ISSUE
American Poverty
A Moral Equilvalent to Riots
Savior our cities
Racial Violence
Poor People's Campaign ·{NCC)













































































































































































































































































































































































,,
10
Rev. Dean Kelly
11
Rev. Andrew Young
H. C. McClellap.
Michael Halberstam
William Hedgepeth
12
13
14
Director for Civil and Religious
Liberty - NCC
Vice President - SCLC
Council for Merit Employment
Psychologist - Washington, D. C.
Sr. Editor LOOK Magazine
Religious Obedience and Civil
Disobedience
Poor People's Campaign
Jobs for Minority Groups
Are you guilty of murding Martin L. King?
.L\merica's Concentration Camps - Reality
or Rumor?





































































**********************************·********************








































































































































17
Dr. Robert E. Fitch
18
19
Honorable Julian Bond
Gen George M. Gelston
20
Juan Gonzales
21
Dr. Margaret Mead
Professor of Ethics - Pacific School
of Religion
House of Representatives - Georgia
Adjutant General of Ma ryland
National Guards
Students for a Democratic Society
(SDS - Columbia University)
Anthropologist - Museum of Natural
History
.
Morality in the United States.
The Negro and Politics.
Your Property or their lives?
What do the rebellious students want?
.I
t.





Bravery Without Guns




































**************************** ***********************************************************






































































24
25
26
27
28
John Ga r dner
Dr. Truman
H. Rap Brown
President of the Urban Coalition
Vice President - Columbia University
Student Non-violent Coordinating
Cammi ttee (SNCC)
Special Asst. to Gov. Rockefeller
Professor at City College
Jackie Robinson
Dr. Kenneth Clark
Rev olt of the Moderate
Who's going to run the universities ?
I
A
,J
-~
Black Power
Is the Church a joke?
Is Integration out of date?
I
"l



















































































































































































































































































































































































.
~
.
I
• l ••
,.
) ,.1..~.-.t•'·
-~ /H
·'.
�N I GHT
CA L L
July, 1968
GUEST LINEUP FOR THE MONTH OF JULY ..
DATE
GUEST
GUEST Is TITLE
1
2
Mayor John V. Lindsay
Dr. W. A. Criswell
Mayor of the City of Ne w York
Pre sident, Southern Bap t ist
3
Eldridge Cleave r
4
H. W. Glassen
Ralph McGill
Bl a ck Panthers and Aut ho r
of "soul On Ice"
President, Nat'l Rifle Assoc.
Publisher of Atlanta Constitution
5
ISSUE
What Happened t o the Kerner Repo r L?
.Is the Southern Baptis t Church
racist anymore?
Bl ack Panthers and Black Power
Can Laws Prev ent Gun Deaths?
The South, Race and Tomorrow







































































































































































































































































































































































8
9
10
11
12
Stev en J . L e dogar
William Lederer
F. Edward Hebert
Colonel Corson
John Mecklin
Vietnam Wo r king Group S t ate Dep t .
Author of " Our Own Wors t Enemy "
Congressman - Louisiana
Author of "The Betrayal"
FORTUNE Editor
What are we doing in Vi etn am?
The Dea f and Dumb American
Vi e tnam: A Ha wk' s-Eye Vi e w!
The Other War a nd How we ' re los ing it .
Vietnam, A Balanced View.







































































































































































































































































































































































l ;J
-
~
16
,-
.L '
18
19
Bill Cosb y
James Baldwin
John Conyers, Jr.
Winton Blount
Rev. A. D. King
Come di a n
Author
Congressman - Michigan
Pres . U.S. Chamber of Commerce
Bro. of the late .M. L. King, Jr.
Humor and the Black Bag
The Christian Black Be trayal
The New Black Politics
No Riots Allowed
I s St. Pet ersbu rg Ano t her Memphis?







































































































































































































































































































































































22
Rev . Je s sie Jackson
Che st e r Lewis
Roy Innis
Robe rt Sorin·y Carson
Ron Karenga
Dire ctor o f "Opera t ion Br ead
Bask e t" - SCLC
The Young Tur ks, NAACP
Acting Nat ' 1 D.i rec t o r o f CORE
Brooklyn CORE Leade r
President o f "us" Organi zation
What ' s Ne x t f o r SCLC? •
The New Mili t a n c y in t h e NAACP
Has CORE Gone " TOM"?
What's the fu ture of CORE?
Cool It Ba by!
x~x~ ~** ****************************************************************************************************************
29
S aul Alinsky
30
Dick Gre go r y
31
Morri s B . Ab r ams
Exec . Direc tor o f I ndustrial
Are as Foundation
Come dian
P res . Ame rican Jewi s h Commit tee
a nd Pre s.- e l e ct Bra ndeis Univ .
How t o make Bl ack Power wo rk for
Black People.
The Red Man ' s Got It Wo r s e than
the Black Man .
Violence ma~ be Ame rican, but it
i s n't any good ...


xxxx ******************************************************************************************************************


"'J uly 24th -
Scheduled g uest changed due t o Clev eland r io t s.
Gue st :
Rev. Ralph Cou sins - Chairman of Communi c ations Netwo1~
of Cleveland Council of Churche s
Is s ue : Cri si s in Cl eveland
�August, 1968
~QR THE YtONTH OF AUGUST
MONDAY
JULY Z9
· st: Saul Alinsky,
=Cutive Director of
dustrial Areas Fount ion
-
=
TUESDAY
JULY 30
Guest: Dick Gregory
Issue: The Red Man's
Got It Worse Than the
Black Man
~ : How to Make
ack Power Work for


i.ck People


WEDNESDAY
JULY 31
Guest: Morris Abram
THURSDAY
AUGUST l
Guest: Don Luce, Center
for International Studies
Issue: Violence May Be • Cornell University
American But It Isn't
Any Good •••
· Issue: Lots of Money for
~Vietnam, Little Help for
the Vietnamese
AUGUST 6
Guest: Dick Schaap
Guest:
- ~ : Titles Aren't
or Blind-Muhammad
- , Alias Cassius Clay,
a s the Heavyweight
~pion of the World
Issue: Revolt of the
Black Athletes
Issue: The Black Boss
and the White Player
AUGU::iT lZ
Father Bernard


ing


AUGU::iT .l.j
Guests: Robert Hooks
and Douglas Turner Ward,
The Negro Ensemble
Theatre
~ : Cat holics and
t h Control
Issue: We're Blowing
the Vietnamese Talks
in Paris •••
"
AUGUST 5
·,g: Muhammad Ali
l st :
FRIDAY _
AUGUST Z
Guest: Arthur Miller
Issue:
AUGUST 7
Bill Russell
AUGUST 14
Guest: Paul. O'Dwyer
e andida te for u. s.
Senate from N.Y.
Issue: Why McCarthy
should be President.
Guest:
IIssue:
AUGUST 8
Frank Robinson
Black Discount
Prices
for
the Most
I


Valuable Player


AUGUST 15
\ Guest: Don Mc Gannon
I Issue:
i
What is an Equal
Opportunity Employer?
The Black Artist
AU GUST 1 ~
A IJ IJl_1.-LU
A UGU ::sr :ll
AUGUST 22
~st: J ohn Harringt on, Gues t : Robert Theobald, ., Guest: Senator George


Guest: William Katz

i onal President of


Economist
McGovern, Democrat from General Editor of Arno
t ernal Order of Pol i c E 1
Pr ess
South Dakota
l
' I ss ue: Guaranteed Annua] I s sue:
I ss ue : What Hap pened to
Income
Black His t ory?
~ --
··-
AUGUST 9
Guest: Harry Edwards
Leader of the Olympic
Boycott
Issue:
Olympic Boycott
AUGUST 16
Guest: Father Santin
Kilbride , Biaf ran
Missionary
Issue: Starvation ~
in Biafra
AUGUST :lJ
Guest: Dr . Wi ll iam
Grier, Psycho lo gi s t
and co-author of
Black Rage
Is s ue: · Bl ack Rage
�TELEPHONE CALL IN SHOW ON VITAL ISSUES
475 Riverside Drive, Suite 420, New York, New York 10027 Telephone: 2121663-8900
ROLE OF THE GUEST ON NIGHT CALL
The basic idea of NIGHT CALL is to get callers and the guest into
down-to-earth dialogue in a way that helps the audience participate
in the discovery of new information, new ideas, new understandings.
The role of the guest is dual:
1.
At the beginning of the program the guest enters into a
brief and informal conversation with the host, Del Shields,
to sharply focus and clarify important points. Because
this section sets the give-and-take pattern of question
and answer for the entire show, it is essential that this
be an exchange between the guest and host, not a capsule
swmnary of points by the guest.
The key word in the NIGHT CALL idea is the word "Conversation."
2.
The next step comes four or five minutes into the show when
the host takes the first call. The caller puts his question
or cormnent directly to the guest. Here again the idea is an
exchange between caller and guest. If the guest keeps his
answers short and sharply focused, the caller can respond with
new questions and ideas. Thus, we begin to achieve what the
audience is really looking for -- the chance to hear an average
person putting his questions, coiunents and concerns to the
expert, almost as in normal face-to-face conversation.
Some guests, fearing important points will be overlooked, tend
to unwrap several ideas at a time in the early part of the show.
We have found that audience interest and caller response is much
higher when the guest deals with one idea at a time. The natural
progression of the show soon moves us on to new ideas .
At thr ee poin ts in the program - - every 15 minutes - - there is a break
for station identificatfon. The guest stays on the line during these
breaks.
Released in cooperation with the B roadcasting and Film Commission,
National Council of Church es, and the Nation al Catholic Office for Radio and Tel evision (NCO RT)
Produced by_TRAFCO/Te levisio n, Rad io and Fi lm Comm ission of The Un ited Methodist Churc h,
Harry C. Spence r, General Secretary ,
�S'fA'l'lON8 CARR l li NIG1 '1' CALL
ALABAMA
Mobile
WKRG
MISSOURI
Kansas City
St. Louis
CALIFORNIA
Sacramento
San Diego
KERS(FM)
KOGO-AM & FM
MONTANA .
Missoula (eff.9/16)
COLORADO
Loveland
KLOV-FM
NEBRASKA
Omaha
CONNECTICUT
Stamford
WSTC-AM & FM
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Washington
WAMU(FM)
FLORIDA
Jacksonville
Miami
Tampa
WRHC
WAME
WFLA
GEORGIA
Atlanta
WAOK
ILLINOIS
Champaign
WLRW(FM)
INDIANA
I ndianapolis
WTLC(FM)
Je f fersonville
WXVW
(Louisville, Ky.)
Kokomo
WIOU
I OWA
Des Moines
KRNT
KENTUCKY
Le xing ton
Louisvill e
Mor e h e ad
-: · ·, .
(e f f . 9/16 )
WBKY(FM)
WLRS(FM)
WMKY(FM)
MASSACHUSETTS
Amher st
Boston
WFCR ( FM )
WBUR(FM)
MICH IGAN
De troi t
Flint
Ironwood
Whitehall
WJLB
WMRP - FM
WJMS
WLRC
MINNESCYI'A
Minneapolis
WPBC-AM & FM
,.
WPRS-FM
KMOX-FM
KGVO
KBON
NEW YORK
Jamestown
WKSN
New York
WLIB-FM
WRVR(FM)
New York
WWRL (2nd½ only)
New York
Syracuse (Eff.9/16) WAER(FM)
WRUN-AM & FM
Utica
NORTH CAROLINA
Durham
Winston-Salem
WSRC-FM
WAAA-FM
OHIO
--Alliance
Cleveland
Columbus
Fostoria
Toledo
WFAH-FM
WERE-AM &FM
WOSU-FM
WFOB-A~ & FM
WCWA
OREGON
Por tland
KLIQ- AM & FM
PENNSYLVANIA
Phi l a delphia
Pitts burg h
St a te College
Tyr one
Wilkes-Bar re
WHAT
WAMO- FM
WGMR(FM)
WTRN
WBAX
RHODE I SLAND
Pr ovid ence
WLKW-FM
TENNESSEE
Memphis
Nashville
WDIA
WVOL
TEXAS
- ~
r th Wor th
Aus t in
VIRGINIA
Char lottesv ille
Ri c hmond
Wa ynes boro
Newp ort
WASHI NGT ON
Be llingham
Seattle
WISCONSIN
Milwauke e
KNOK- FM
KUT( FM) (Eff. 9/2)
WI NA
WTVR
WAYB
WGH
)
)
)
)
Eff.
9/2
KERI (FM)
KUOW- FM
WTMJ
(E:ff# 9/16)
�TELEPHONE CALL IN SHOW ON VITAL ISSUES
475 Riverside Drive, Suite 420, New York, New York 10027 Telephone: 2121663-8900
S T A T I O N
R E L A T I O N S H I P S
Orig-ination:
NI GHT CALL orig ina t es i n New York at 11:30 p.m.
Ea s tern Time. The program i s broug h t to you r
c ommunity by br oadcast lines .
Cost o f broa d-:cast lines to your telephone compa n y te s t board
is borne by t he producer. The loop and bridg ing
costs f rom t he telephone compa ny to station a re
borne by the station.
Charges:
There are no program charges. Production costs
are the responsibility of the producer.
Stat i on
Cuta wa ys:
There wil l be thr e e 70 s econd b re a ks - -on e eac h
quarter hour -- du r ing t h e one -hou r broadcas t: a
10 se c ond st a t ion ID and 60 seconds f or local
commercials . Revenue from commercia ls is the
st a tion' s . The c hoice a nd res ponsibility fo r
s u ch advertising rests wit h t he s ta tio n.
Public
Ser v ice
Spo ts:
Pu blic se r v ice spo ts will b e f e d down the network
li n e f or the s t a tions whi c h wa nt a c omplete ly
packa ged program.
7 Second
De l ay:
NI GHT CALL will be f ed live t o the s tatio ns with
no delay. There a re two reasons why the show is
not del a y e d n a tiona lly :
a.
The p roduce r c a nnot assume th i s res pons ibility legally for the station; therefore ,
n o attempt to do so is made.
b.
Acce ptable a ir expres sion c h anges f rom
mark e t t o mark et. What is accept a ble
in Ch ic a g o ma y be u nacceptable in
Siou x Cit y .
(Page 1 o f two)
Released in cooperation with the Broad casting and Ftlm Commission,
National Council of Churc hes, and the National Catholic Office for Radi o and Te levision (NCO RT)
Prod uced by TRAFCOITelevi sion, Rad io and Fil m Commission of The United Method ist Chu rc h,
Harry C. Spencer, General Secreta ry,
�· Producer
Precautions:
The producer does have several precautions against
abuse on the air:
a. The calls are screened before being
placed on the air.
b. The host has override capability
over both telephone lines. When the host
speaks, the gain automatically lowers on
the audience and guest lines.
c. NIGHT CALL permits any point of view
to be expressed.
Ideas are attacked but per.s ons
are not. This basic respect for persons has
effectively negated the bigot in the past.
d . The audience caller can be taken off
the air at the flip of the switch by the host.
Station
Identification
on the Network:
Participating stations are identified on the
air when a listener calls in from that station's
listening audience.
Audience
Callers:
NIGHT CALL accepts calls collect from listeners
anywhere in the country. This cost is the
responsibility of the producer.
Test Signal:
A program test signal with time checks will be
sent down the line 15 minutes prior to starting
time each night.
Emergency
Number:
To contact the producer during or near show
time, call:
212/ 749-5400.
In c ase of a line problem, call your local
tel e phone company.
Regul ar Phone
Number :
The producer may be reached during office hours
at:
212/ 663-8900.
(Page 2 of two)
�TELEPHONE CALL IN SHOW ON VITAL ISSUES
475 Riverside Drive, Suite 420, New York, New York 10027 Telephone: 2121663-8900
S T A T I O N
R E L A T I O N S H I P S
Origination:
NIGHT CALL originates in New York at 11:30 ~.m.
Eastern Time. The program is brought to your
community by broadcast lines.
Cost of broadcast lines to your telephone company test board
is borne by the producer. The loop and bridging
costs from the telephone company to station are
borne by the station.
Charges:
There are no program charges. Production costs
are the responsibility of the producer.
Station
Cutaways:
There will be three 70 second breaks--one each
quarter hour-- during the one-hour broadcast: a
10 second station ID and 60 seconds for local
commercials. Revenue from commercials is the
station's. The choice and responsibility for
such advertising rests with the station.
Public
Service
Spots:
Public ser vic e spo ts will be fed down the network
line f or the stations which want a completely
pack~ged program.
7 Second
Delay:
NIGHT CALL will be fe d live to the stations with
no delay. There are two reasons why the show is
not delayed nationally:
a.
The producer cannot assume this r e sponsibility legally for the station; therefore,
no attempt to do s o is made.
b.
Acceptable air expressio n changes from
market to market. What is acceptable
in Chicago may be unacceptable in
Sioux City.
(Page 1 of two)
Released in cooperation with the Broadcasting and .Film Commission ,
National Council of Churches, and the National Ca tholic Office for Radio and Television (NCO RT)
Produced by TRAFCO I Television , Radio and Film Comm ission of The Uni ted Methodist Church,
Harry C. Spencer, General Secretary ,
�Producer
Precautions:
The producer does have several precautions against
abuse on the air:
a. The calls are screened before being
placed on the air.
b.
The host has override capability
over both telephone lines. When the host
speaks, the gain automatically lowers on
the audience and guest lines.
c. NIGHT CALL permits any point of view
to be expressed.
Ideas are attacked but persons
are not. This basic respect for persons has
effectively negated the bigot in the past.
d. The audience caller can be taken off
the air at the flip of the switch by the host.
S t ation
Identification
on the Network:
Partici pating stations are identified on the
air when a listener calis in from that station's
listening audience.
Audience
Callers:
NIGHT CALL accepts calls collect from listeners
anywhere in the country. This cost is the
responsibility of the producer.
Test S ignal:
A program test signal with time checks will be
sent down the line 15 minutes prior to starting
time each night.
Emergency
Number :
To contact the producer during or near show
time, call:
212/ 749-5400.
In case o f a line problem, call your local
telephone company.
Regular Phone
Number:
The producer may be reached during office hours
at:
212/ 663-8900.
(Page 2 of two)
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�CRIS I . S
I N
T H E
NAT I ON
NIGHT CALL performs a unique service during the
Crisis in the Nation.
and cultural boundries.
It crosses regional, urban
It reaches both Black and
White -- but more important, it brings persons of
various backgrounds and points-of-view into dialogue.
Radio permits person to speak to person without visual
images getting in the way of communication.
It ·permits
persons with deep concerns and frustrations to find a
responsible audience.
It secures key national leader-
ship at the right time -to speak -- to have rumor confronted, to let facts and truth speak in the midst of
suspicion and misinformation.
town meeting.
NIGHT CALL is a national
�P UR P OS E
In a nation where individual is estranged from individual
and group from group, it is the purpose of NIGHT CALL to
•,.
help people find reconciliation
to problems through understanding.
to move towards solutions
NIGHT CALL is a national
town meeting of the air -- where persons of widely differing
views and backgrounds are given a chance to speak, to be
challenged, to ask questions, to listen to other views, to
discover new facts.
Here barriers of economic class, race





and culture are crossed.
The hoped for results include:
1.
Individuals are given a chance to gain new information and insights which help them to act
more responsibly in their community.
2.
Individuals are aided in discovering that there
are· no easy answers , that all issues have "grey
_areas , " but that solutions lie in the direction
·of person underst a nding · per son.
3.
The opportunity to be h eard and to h a ve their
ideas dis cussed hones t l y a nd f orthright l y will
encourage a small but significant number of
persons to express their frustrations in constructive dialogue instead o f in destructive
viol enc e.
4.
Some o f the barriers a nd credib i l ity gaps between
indiv iduals and groups are broken down.
5.
I ndivid uals and c ommu n it ies can s h are sol ut ions
to problems i n c o ntrast to further exploration
of problems.
6.
A deepening awareness that a search for the
ultimate meaning and purpose of life moves one
away from abstract issue s and toward ever-growing
relationships with other people .
�FORMAT
D E S C R I P T I ON
NIGHT CALL ulitizes the popular telephone-talk format in radio.
It presents the controversial issues which are affecting our
lives today.
There are several unique characteristics to
NIGHT CALL:
1.
It is the only national call-in show enabling
points-of-view from every region of the country
to be aired and discussed (this national
capability is possible through specially designed
equipment).
2.
NIGHT CALL selects an issue for discussion each
night. Because it is broadcast live, issues can
move with the concerns and events of the day.
3.
A nationally or internationally qualified guest is
featured each night. The host and the guest quickly
open up the issue. Then the audience is invited to
participate by calling long distance collect. The
guest also is usually on long distance telephone,
sometimes from overseas points, thus giving NIGHT
CALL a limitless range of guest possibilities.
4.
NIGHT CALL is broadcast by both Black and White
audience stations, thus enabling cultural as well
as · geographical boundries to be jumped. The ghetto
. Black communicates with the suburban White. This
kind of confrontation and dialogue takes place on
NIGHT CALL even where it isn't taking place in faceto-face conversation -- the result is an exciting
show and experience.
5.
An independent radio network has been established
to permit broadest possible station acceptance.
Both Black and White audience stations are encouraged to carry the program.
NIGHT CALL originates in New York.
June 3, 1968.
The starting date was
It is broadcast for one hour, five nights each
week at 11:30 p,m. Eastern Time (immediately following TV news)
and works back to 8:30 p.m. on the West Coast.
�H I S T OR Y
NIGHT CALL was broadcast for eleven months in 1965/66
-- 230 one-hour programs.
It grew from a three-station
hook-up with three hosts to a 25 station network with one
host.
Produced by the Television , Radio and Film Com-
mission of The United Methodist Church, NIGHT CALL was
presented as a program of the National Council of Churches.
I
Issues which were d~scussed ranged over a broad spectrum
of personal problems and national concerns -- from abortion,
drug abuse, the Klan, to Vietnam , gun control, and adult
morality.
NIGHT CALL was terminated because of technical
difficultie§ :
ther e was not adequat e equipment available
to handle a national telephone talk program.
Equipment
now has been designed which permits a national call - in show
of h i gh technical qua lity.
On April 9, 1968 , TRAFCO co-
operated with Rad i o Station WRVR- FM in establ i shing a 36 statio n n etwork f or a "di a l -in for n on- v i olence."
3-1 / 2 hour show was b r o adcas t
The l ive
i n such c i t i e s as New Yo rk,
Boston, Washington, D. C., Philadelph ia, Buffalo, Cl e veland,
Detroit, Chicago, Milwaukee and Minneapolis.
"dialed in" from every market.
Listeners
NIGHT CALL began . broadcast
nightly Monday through Friday on June 3, 1968 on over 21
stations.
Station affiliatiQn has grown rapidly.
�E
Q
U I P ME N T
Research and development of special NIGHT CALL
equipment was commissioned in August, 1965.
delivered to TRAFCO in January, 1968.
It was
Now for the
first time a national telephone talk show is possible.
Simply, the equipment
permits the caller, the host and
I
the guest (who is on long distance also) to talk together in a· normal way, automatically increases or
decreases volume, provides an over-ride for the host,
permits ~udience callers standing by while waiting to
go on the air to hear the program while waiting on their
telephones, and improves telephone line quality.
equipment is highly technical and unique.
applied for 16 patents.
The
TRAFCO has
The consulting engineer who
designed and constructed the NIGHT CALL equipment is
Mr. Warren Braun of Harrisonburg, Virginia.
�R E L A T I ON S H I P S
NIGHT CALL is produced by the Television, Radio and
Film Commission of The United Methodist Church (TRAFCO)
and released in cooperation with the Broadcasting and
Film Commission of the Nationa l Council of Churches of
Christ in the U. So A., the National Catholic Office
for Radio · and Television (NCORT) , the American Jewish
Committee and the Ur ban Coalition.
NIGHT CALL is a
part o ~_ the Nationa l Council' s Cr isis in the Nation
program.
Church and community or ganizations and leaders
a r e invit e d to p a rt i c i p ate i n t he NI GHT CALL radio s er ies.
Execu tiv e p r oducer f or TRAFCO is Ne l son Pr i c e, 4 75 Riverside Drive, Suite 420, Ne w York , New York 10027,
212- 663 - 8900.
�QUOTES FROM THE NIGHT CALL MAIL BAG
"I enjoy listening to your new program ... My only suggestion
is NOT TO DISCONTINUE ... "
St. Paul, Minnesota
"More power to you, Del, and to all who make Night Call
possible.
I'm a summer visitor listening to you in
Collegeville, but l hope to be able to hear you at home
in Bismarck, North Dakota, a town that really needs
, open
discussion and a remedy for latent racism." Collegeville, Minn.
We are regular listeners (and callers, when we can throu gh
your busy lines) ... and commend you and its sponsors for an
excellent program."
The writers suggested guests from the
National Alliance of Businessmen and the movie industry on
"the incredibly poor and potentially dangerous movies that
appear in every movie house all over the nation." San Dieg o
" ... thank you ... for, the most interesting prog ram it has ever
been my privilege to listen to over the radio in these recent
years ... Our only problem down here is that we hear the program
over WFLA in Tampa (and Night Call gets pre-empted for baseball)
... last week we lucked out and only missed one program ...
Good luck to you all, perhaps all the baseball games will be
'rained out."
Tampa, Florida
"This is to- let you know we are listening... It's important
information, not only educational, but providing important
insights and inquiries into issues that are vit al to the
sani ty and success of this nation."
Seattle, Washingt on
"Please -- can 't we h a v e s ome moderation or sense o f politica l
b a l ance -- perhaps only pure coincidence, but the programs I
have listened to seem to be purely 'libera l' and left-wing
in the nature of the guests and topics.
I am tired o f the
Carmichaels, the Raps a nd the racial divisionists -- there
are still white p e ople with problems, too:" Chagrin Falls, Ohio
"I hope you have H. Rap Brown on again some night.
It is somewhat of a perverse pleasure to hear a grown man figuratively
cry and so distort the facts as to make a jack-ass of himself.
Thank you."
Toledo, Ohio
"I am very sorry for Mr. Carmichael and his feeling of hatred ...
I think I heard you say you are black.
I too am black and
proud of it, but Mr. Carmichael will be surprised to know how
many thousands of blacks disagree with him and will never join
a revolution. Think of the victories won by violence. Where
are they?" New York
�"Nice going on a great program. Now the problem is to get
everybody listening to it. I will do my selling bit down
here." Winston-Salem, North Carolina
"First I must apologize for hanging up abruptly in my exchange
with Mr. Steven Ledogar. The fact is I was so caught up in the
issue and so angry at Mr. Ledogar that I wanted to conclude our
communication ... my hanging up in such a manner was, obviously
indefensible.
I am somewhat surprised, myself, at this action
... What he is repeating ... is utterly, cynically untrue.
(administration position on Vietnam).
"I believe we are in a
period of continuing and perhaps periodically escalating crises.
I believe that, ultimately, only self-knowledge, introspection,
will halt this process. NIGHT CALL is playing an extremely
important role in this end. ':'
Cleveland, Ohio
"I like the way you conduct your NIGHT CALL.
So many of the
moderators do all of the talking. Since you put this Cleveland
"pest" ... on last night, I am sure you are going to be bothered
with this old John Bircher. Keep up the quality that you have
now."
Cleveland, Ohio
Excerpts of a letter to Dr. A. W. Criswell, Southern Baptist
Convention: "I have just heard you 1n on NIGHT CALL.
I feel
like crying and crying. You have not begun to understand the
problem ... ! call myself a Baptist and profess to be a Chris tian
.. . as I understand my Baptist training, we need not progress
but repent ..• Don't tell the black that time caused the problem
and time will cure it. Time didn't cause it -- White Baptists
(and others, · but the number game must fault the Baptist) caused
it ••• "
Minneapolis, Minnesota
NEW STATIONS
The week of September 2, we are please to be adding a number of
stations to the NIGHT CALL network. These include:
KUT(FM)
WINA
WGH
WTVR
WAYB
Austin, Texas
Charlottesville, Va.
Newport Ne ws, Va.
Richmond, Va.
Waynesboro , Va.
Stations slated to join starting September 16 are:
WMKY
KGVO
WAER(FM) WTMJ
Morehead, Ky.
Missoula, Montana
Syracus~, N. Y.
Milwaukee, Wis.
�TIME
THE
WEEKLY
NEWS A-\AGAZINE
August 23, 1968
Vol. 92, No. 8
DAVID GAHR
ROOERT LI GHTFOO T 111
GUEST ALINSKY
MODERATOR SHIELDS
Just call collect for an argum ent.
The Cool Hot Line
The hot-line show is one of the most
discredited forms of radio programming. What could be more µnedifying
than know-nothing listeners phoning in
their philosophies to know-it-all ex-disk
jockeys? But this summer the United
Methodist C hurch is making judicious
use of the format. It is sponsoring a
radio dialogue between the races that
is more compelling than any heard on
the sudden multitude of such talk shows,
including those produced on TV.
T he name of the program is Night
Call, and it is carried live (11 :30 p.m.12:3 0 a.m ., E .D.T.) five evenings a week
on an ad hoc chain that has grown
from 21 to 57 radio stations in less
than three months. Listeners anywhere
may phone collect (Area Code 2 12: 74933 11) and argue racial issues with an influential national figure who is guest of
the night, say James Baldwin, the Rev.
R alph Abernathy, Muhammad Ali, Sargent Shriver or A rthur Miller.
The most provocative visitor so farjudging by the number of callers totted
up by the phone company-was Stokely Carmichael, who was dialed by
64,440 Americans. In custo mary form ,
Carmichael told one listener who wondered about the impact of nonviolence
on whites, "You should ask Martin Luther King that question. " A wh ite guest
who stirred a big switchboard jam was
New York's Mayor John Lindsay.
Quizzed on the wa r in Viet N am, Lindsay replied ·that it was " unprod uctive.
unwanted , end less, bottomless, sideless,
and its cost is unquestionably affecting
the problems in our cities." Another
night, White Radica l Saul Alinsky, in
sympathy with black callers, blasted the
Job Corps as a "payoff to stay quiet'·
and categori zed m uch of the rest oi
the poverty program as ·'a public relatiops gimmick."
Ranting Nuts. Thanks to a specially
built phone link-up system, the program's guest generally participates as
the listeners do-by long-distance from
his home. A Manhattan staffer receives
calls on three phones, screening out
·'the drunks and ranting nuts." T he
twelve or J 5 most pertinent questions
are put th rough to the show's moderato r, Del Shields. In case the conversation gets li belous or licentious, Shields
can push a cut-off button, but he has
not yet had to use it. T hough the discussion is freq uently fiery, about the
roughest language used to date was
Rap Brown's dismissal of civil rights legislation as "intellectual masturbation."
Shields, who is a radio veteran and
militant black, got into the debate himself once when he felt that a Negro caller was unfairly attacking Guest Jackie
Robi nson for Uncle Tomism. Often,
Moderator Shields, who hits fungoes
to the guest for ten or 15 minutes before turning him over to the phone-in
aud ience, is the toughest interrogator
of the night. Roy Innis, director of
CO RE, should know what is in store for
him next month. Shields plans to as~
him " Has CORE gone Tom?"
�A NATIONAL RADIO
NELSON PRICE, Executive Producer
BEN LOGAN , Producer
EDWARD M. JONES, Director of Programming
DEL SHIELDS, Host
TELEPHONE CALL IN SHOW ON VITAL ISSUES
475 Riverside Drive, Suite 420, New York, New York 10027 Telephone: 2121663-8900
NELSON PRICE, Executive Producer of NIGHT CALL, has been a
member of the TRAFCO staff since 1959. He is Director of
the Radio and Television Department for TRAFCO (Television,
Radio and Film Communications for The United Methodist Church).
Mr. Price was Producer of the BREAKTHRU television series f or
c hildren, Producer of several TRAFCO films and filmstrips,
Executive Producer of the award winning AMERICAN PROFILE
radio series, THE WORD--AND MUSIC weekly radio series, and
THE MAN WITH A MIKE daily radio series. He is Chairman of
the Radio Opera tions Committee of the Broadcasting and Film
Commission, National Council o f Churches, and Chairman of
THE PROTESTANT HOUR Committee. He ser ve s on the Executive
Committee of the Protestant Radio and Television Center in
Atlanta, is a member of the World Association for Christian
Broadcasting, the National Association for the Study of
Communications, and member of the Board of Managers and
Executive Committee of the Broadcas 1, ing and Film Commission
of the National Council of Churches.
Mr . Price is a graduate of Morningside College in Sioux City,
Iowa and did graduate work in communications at the University
of Ch'icago. He was Director o f Public Relations for the Indiana
Area of The Methodist Church from 1952-57, and held a similar
position in Chicago from 1957-59.
Mr. Price has four children and lives in Pomona, New York.
Released in c ooperation with the Broadcasting and Film Commission,
National Council of Churches, and the National Catholic Office tor Radio and Television (NCO RT)
Produced by TRAFCOITelevision, Radio and Film Commission of The United Methodist Chu rch,
Harr y C. Spencer, Generaj Sec retary ,
�TELEPHONE CALL IN SHOW ON VITAL ISSUES
475 Riverside Drive, Suite 420, New York, New York 10027 Telephone : 2121663-8900
BEN LOGAN, NIGHT CALL Producer, has been a member of
the TRAFCO staff since 1961. For the last year and a
half he has been producer of AMERICAN PROFILE, the
award-winning daily radio series which is syndicated
to 490 stations. He also produced MAN WITH THE MIKE
for TRAFCO, was Producer-Writer of the half-hour TV
documentary, CRISIS CONGO, and wrote the Christmas
film, THE COMING OF THE STRANGER.
Mr. Logan was story editor for the BREAKTHRU TV series
and has written fuany films and filmstrips for TRAFCO.
He has also done extensive free-lance fiction, non-fiction
and commercial film writing. For several years he was
employed by Ford Motor Comp a ny as a magazine editor and
script writer.
Mr. Logan has a master's degree in journalism from the
University of Wisconsin and has done advance work at
New York ·~niversity and the University of the Americas
in Mexico City. He has taught creative writing for the
University o f Wisconsin Extension Division and Scarritt
College in Nashv ille , Tennessee.
Mr. Logan has t hree children and lives in Golden Bridge ,
New York.
Released in cooperation with the Broadcasting and Film Commission ,
National Council of Churches , and the National Catholic Office tor Radio and Television (NCORT)
Produced by TRAFCOI Te levis ion , Radio and Film Commission of The United Methodist Church ,
. Harry C. Spencer, General Secretary ,
�TELEPHONE CALL IN SHOW ON VITAL ISSUES
475 Riverside Drive, Suite 420, New York, New York 10027 Telephone : 2121663-8900
EDWARD MAGRUDER JONES, Director of Programming for NIGHT CALL, has
just completed an assignment as Producer-Director-Writer for the
TV documentary, ONE NATION INDIVISIBLE. This 3 hour program on
racism in the United States is a Westinghouse Broadcasting Company
production.
1966-67
ABC Ne ws Producer-Director-Writer
"Africa, World Boy Scout Jamboree " , "Glassboro Summit",
"Nurs es: Crisis in Medicine",
"GT-9, 9A & 10 Space Missions".
1963-65
WABC TV Producer of News and Public Affairs
Series: New York, New York", Page One", "The Bi g News"
Speci a ls: "Who Will Tie My Shoe?: The Mentally Retarded",
"The Fair Face o f Robert Mose s , Parts 1 , 2 and 3" ,
"Opening D~y At The World's Fair, '64 and '65",
"Puerto Rican Day Parade 1965", "The Big News of 1964",
"Ten Years:' .. . . with all deliberate speed.'" ,
"Herbert Lehman: The Making of a Hero", "The Deputy" ,
"The Teacher : Honor Without Profit", "Blowup At Breez y Point" ,
"#2 Columbus Circl e : New Gall e ry In Town",
"Action At St r ycke r' s Bay".
Ne two r k Spec i a ls:
11/22/63: half hour bio LBJ ; 1 1/23/63 :
An ,Appreci ation o f JFK by Henr y St ee le Commager ; 11/ 24/ 63:
An Apprecia tion o f JFK by James Mac Gre go r Burns;
1 1/25/ 63:
hou r bio LBJ ; r e mo te p rodu cer Nationa l Re publi c an and
Demo cratic Conve nt io ns, 1964.
1952-62
CBS Ne ws
Producer CBS Repor t s
" Sho wdown I n The Con go ", "The Ho t And Co l d Wars o f Alle n Du lles",
"East Ge r ma ny: The La nd Be yon d The Wall",
"E isenhower On The Pre s i d e n cy , Par t s 1, 2 a n d 3 " ,
" Cross ro a ds Afr i ca: Pi lot For A Peace Cor ps " .
Associ ate Produ cer CBS Reports
"The Bea t Majority: Our Ele ction Da y Illu s ions ",
"The Case o f t h e Bos ton El ec t ra " , " Iran : Britt l e Al ly",
"Bio g r aphy o f a Miss il e " .
Produce r Small World Spe cial
The Sma ll World o f Le o Szilard" .
Associate Ed i to r -Pr oducer " Sma l l Wo r ld" series
Reporter- Pr oduc tion Asso c i ate "See It No w" ser i es
Reporter-Writer " Th is Is Ne w Yo r k" series W
CBS Rad i o
Desk Assista n t-Junior Wr iter Netwo rk Radio Ne ws
Mr. Jones has 3 chil d re n and li v e s in Scarsd ale , Ne w York.
Released in c ooperation with the Broadcasting and Film Commission,
National Council of Church es, and the Nation al Catholic Offic e fo r Radio and Television (NCORT)
Prod uced by TRAFCOI Television, Radio and Fil m Commission of The United Methodist Churc h,
Harry C. Spencer, General Secretary,
�A NATIONAL RADIO
TELEPHONE CALL IN SHOW ON VITAL ISSUES
475 Riversi de Drive, Suite 420, New York, New York 10027 Telephone: 2121663-8900
Del Shie lds, Host for NIGHT CALL, will continue to serve
as Executive Secretary of the National Association of
Television and RRdio Announcers (NATRA), which has a
membership o f 500 Bl ack broadcasters.
For two years Mr. Shields has hosted a daily 4½ hour
radio show on WLIB-FM, New York. The program combines
interview and listener call-in. Shields was Director of
Special Events, WDAS, Philadelphia 1963-1965 and Producer
and Host of a daily 4½ hour record and interview show ,
1959-1965. He s e rved a s Program Director for WEBB,
Ba lt i more, 1955-1957.
Mr. Shields' Television work includes Co-Producer and
Host, "Del Shields Summer Showcase", WRCV-TV , Philadelphia,
1962 As sociate Pro ducer and talen t, "Who Speak s for Negro".
WCAU-TV, Philadelphia, 1962 Producer, Writer a nd Host,
"Taste of J azz " , WCAU-TV, Ph iladelph i a 1957 -1962.
As Execut i v e Secretary of NATRA, Mr . Shields de ve lopes
programs t o increase responsibj.lit y sta ndards of et hni c
a ppeal stations. He represe nts NATRA on t he President's
Council o n Youth Oppo rtuni.ty, the NAACP Pupil I n centi v e
Program a nd Gov. Rockefeller's Committee on Minority
Employment Opportunities in News Media.
Mr. Shields has five chil dren and lives in Philadelphia.
Released in cooperation with the Broadcasting and Film Commission,
National Council of Churches, and the Nation al Catholic Office for Radio and Television (NCORT)
Prod uced by TRAFCOITelevi sio n, Radio and Fil m Commission of Th e Un ited Meth odist Church,
Harry C. Spencer, General Secreta ry,
�l
Host Del Shields of NIGHT CALL, the nation-wide call-in show on vital issues hea r d
each week night at 11 :30 Eastern Time .
�THE URBAN COALITION ACTION COUNCIL
JOHN W. GARDNER
CH A IR MAN
1B 19 H STREET, N. W.
Jul y 19, 1968
WASH I NGTON, D . C. 20006
WEEKLY LEGISLAT IVE REPORT
(Current as of July 19, 1 968 )
FROM:
THE STAFF
THE STATUS OF SU BSTANTIVE LEGISLATION
The Emergenc y Emp loyment and Train ing Act of 1968
The measure h as not bee n repor ted by the Senate Labor
and Public We lf are Cowmittee .
The extension o f the Manpower Deve lopment and Training
Act has been ordered reported by the Committee, and
there is no schedule at this time for taking it up in
the Senat e . When the bill is con s i dered by the full
Senate , a bi partisan co aliti o n comprised of Senator s
Clark, Javits and Prouty wi ll attempt to amend it by
adding the Emergency Emp loyme nt Act to it . i
/
The House Se lect Subcommittee still h as no plans to
mark - up th e JOBS bi ll.
The MDTA extension was not tak en up by the House on
July 15. It is more li kely th at the Senate will act
first.
Housing and Urban Deve lopment Act of 1968
The bill has passed both Houses and ~snow in Conference
Committee. The conferee s have been meet ing this week
and intend to complete th eir work today. The Co nference
Report will be filed on July 22. The Senate votes first
on the Report and wil l li ke ly do so on July 23 or 24.
TELEPHONE: 202 293· 153 0
· @
�-2THE STATUS OF APPROPRIATIONS MEASURES
The proposed schedul e of action on Appropriat ion bills
concerning legislation of interest to the Action Council is:
1.
The Housing and Urban Developmertt Appropriations
bill for Fiscal Year 1969 passed the House on May
8 and the Senate on July 12.
It will now go to
Conference Committee.
2.
AS report ed l ast week, the Labor-HEW (includin~ OEO)
Appropriations bill passed the House on June 26.
The Whitten Amendment, passed by a Teller (unr ecorded )
vote, prohibits the use of funds appropriated by the
bill to force busing of school children, to abolish
any school or to force seco n dary school students to
attend a partiGular school against the c h oic e of
p arents.
The House approved serious cuts in Title I of the
Elementary ahd Secondary Education Act (aid to schools
in impover ish ed areas), the Teacher Corps and the
Office of Economic Opportunity.
The Senate Appropriations Subcomrni t tee on Labor-HEW
(i ncluding OEO) has been unable to meet to mark up
the bill.
It may do so on July 22.
Thi~ delays the
timetable on final Senate action by at/least another
week.
· rt is very important that every effort be made in the
Senate to restore the Hous~ cuts in the HEW and OEO
requests, and to defeat the Wh itten Amendment.
If you wish more information on the specific cuts
in the HEW and OEO appropriations," please contact
The Urban Coalition Action Council office.
�THE URBAN_ COALITION ACTION COUNCIL
JOHN W . GARDNER
CHAIR MAN
181 9 1-1 STREET. N. W.
July 19, 1968
WASHINGTON, D. C. 20006
WEEKLY LEGISLATIVE REPORT
(Current as of July 19 , 1968)
FROM:
TH~ STAFF
THE STATUS OF SU BSTANTIVE LEGISLATION
The Emergency Employment and Training Act of 1968
The measure has not been reported by the Senate Labor
and Public Welfare Committee.
The extension of the Manpower Development and Training
Act has been ordered reported by the Coromittee, and
there is no schedule at this time for taking it up in
the Senate. When the bill is considered by the full
Senate, a bipartisan coalition comprised of Senators
Cla rk, Javits and Prouty will attempt to amend it by
adding the Emergency Employment Act to it . '
/
The House Select Subcommittee still has no plans to
mark up the JOBS bill.
The MDTA extension was not taken up by the House on
July 15.
It is more likely that the Senate will act
first.
Housing and Urban Developme nt Act of 1968
The bill has passed both Houses and is now in Conference
Committee. The conferees have been meeting this week
and intend to complete their work today. The Conference
Report will be filed on July 22. The Senate votes first
on the Report and will likely do so on July 23 or 24.
TELEPHO NE : 202 293 -15 3 0
@
�-2THE STATUS OF APPROPRIATIONS MEASURE S
The proposed schedule of action on Appropriation bills
concerning legislation of inter~st to the Action Council is:
1.
The Housing and Urban Development Appropriations
bill for Fiscal Year 1969 passed the House on May
It will now go to
8 and the Senate on July 12.
Conf erence Committee.
2.
As reported last week, the Labor-HEW (including OEO)
Appropriations bill passed the House on June 26.
The Whitten Amendment, passed by a Teller (unrecorded )
vote, prohibits the use of funds appropriated by the
bill to force busing of school children, to abolish
any school or to force secondary school students to
attend a particular school against the c hoice of
parents.
The House approved serious cuts in Title I of the
Elementary and Secondary Education Act (aid to schools
in impoverished areas ), the Teacher Corps and the
Office of Economic Opp ortunity.
The Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor-HEW
(i ncluding OEO) has been unable to meet to mark up
the bill.
It may do so on July 22. Thip delays the
timetable on final Senate action by at)-east another
week.
It is very important that every effort be made in the
Senate to restore the House cuts in the HEW and OEO
requests, and to defeat the Whitten Amendment.
If you wish more informa tion on the specific cuts
in the HEW and OEO appropriations, please contact
The Urban Coalition Action Council office.
�The Urban Coalition
1815 H Street, N.W.
Washington , D.C. 20006
Telephone : 347-9630
CHAI AMAN: John W. Gardner
CO-CHAIRMEN : Andrew Heiskell/ A . Philip Randolph
July 15, 1968 .
Mr. Dan Sweat
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
30303
Dear Dan:
Many thanks for your willingness to call Q. V.
Williamson. We are in desperate need of getting
John Dean settled and this housing problem is becoming a major problem.
With appreciation,
Sincerely yours,
~~-
Peter Libassi
Deputy Director
PL : djf
�T HE URBAN COALITION ACTION COUNCIL
J OHN W. G ARDN E R
C HA I RMA N
18 19 l-1 ST REET, N . W .
WASH I N G TON , D . C . 2 0 006
July 26 , 196 8
WEEKLY LEGISLATIVE REPORT
(Current a s o f July 26 , 1 9 6 8 )
FROM:
THE STAFF
THE . STATUS OF SUBSTANT I VE LEGI SLAT I ON
The Emergen cy Emp l oyment an d Tra i ni n g Act of 19 68
Service Emp l oyme n t )
(Pub l ic
The me asu re has ~ot been reported by the Senate Labor and
Public Welfare Committee .
The ext ension o f the Manpower De velopment and Train i ng Act
h as been o rdered reporte d by the Committee, and ac tion o n
t h e measure h a s b een de l aye d . Ma j ority Leader Mansf i eld
h as indicate d h e wi l l call it u p i n September . When the
bill is considered by the f u ll Se nate , a bipartisan co a lition
compris e d o f Sena tors Clark , J a vits a nd Prouty will attempt
to amend i t by adding the Emergency Emp l oyment Act to i t.
The House Se l e ct Subcommittee still has no plans t o mark
u p the J OBS bill .
. The MDTA extension h as r e c e ived a rul e b y the Hou se Rul es
Conunittee clear ing it for f l oor action, bu t it is u n l ikely
to be acted on u nt il Congress returns a f t er the po litical
c onventions .
The House bill contain~ an a~endment by Congr~ssman Goodell
which would disallow the reallocation of MDTA funds by the
Departme nt of Labor until th e e nd o f e v ery fisca l y ear . ·
The Departme nt presently can r ea lloca t e at t he end of six
months. This could seve rely handicap those states which
h ave s ub stantial manpower programs.
T•ELEP HON E: 202 293·1530
®
�-2 Housing and Ur ban Deve l opme nt Act of 1968 .
Senate-House c onferees f il ed their report on the HUD Act
o f 1968 on July 23 and it was a cc ep t ed by the Se nate July
25.
It is e xpected to be acc e pte d b y the House tod ay .
Signing could t ake place next week.
THE STATUS OF APPROPRI AT IONS MEAS URE S
The propo se d sch edu le of a ction on Ap~ropr iation bills concerning l eg islation of i nte re st to the Action Council is:
1.
The Housing and Urban Dev e lopment Appropriations
bi l l for Fisca l Year 1969 passed the House on May
8 and the Se n a te on July 12.
It wi l l now go to
the Conf erence Committee, but no date h a s be e n set
for a mee tin g .
The confe re es may wait unti l th e
HUD Ac t o f 1 968 cle ars both Houses si nce some of
the items in the appropriations bill r equire
authori zati o ns included in the Act.
2.
As reported last week, the Labor -HEW (including OEO )
Appropriation s bill passed the House on June 26.
The Whitten fa.me ndment , p asse d by a Teller (unrecorded )
vote , prohibits th e use of fund s appropr i ated b y the
bill to for ce busing of school child ren , to abolish
any schoo l o r to for c e s eco n dary school stude nts to
attend a particular school against the choice o f
p aren ts.
The House appr oved serious cu ts in T i tle I of th e
Element ary and Se c ondary Education Act (aid to schoo l s
-in i mp o ve rish ed areas ) , the Te acher Corps and the
Office of Economic Opportun ity .
The Sen ate Appro p ri a tion s Subcommittee on Labor-HEW
The Sub(including OEO ) h as marked up th e bill.
c orr~ittee did not restor e mu ch of the edu c at ion
fundin g .
The follo wing li st indica t es how the Subcomm ittee acted o n t he re quests made.by the Depa_rtment
of Health, Educa tio n and We lf are to restore funds
cut by th e House .
Title I, ESEA
Drop ou t
Preve nt io n
REQUESTED
APPROVED
$1 26 mil
$5 0 mil
30 mi l
10 mil
�-3 REQUESTED
Bilingual Educ a tion
Teacher Cor ps
$
5 mil
9.6 mil
APPROVED
$ 5 mil
3.2 mil
In addition, the Subcorrrmi t t ee k ept the OEO
appropriation at the low level approved by the
Hous e and the Whitten Amendmen t. The full Cormni ttee
mee ts to mar k up the bill at 10:00 a . m., Friday,
July 26.
It may be t aken up in the Se nat~ during
the we ek of July 29.
It is very important th a t every effor~ be made in .
the Senate to restor e the House cut s in t h e HEW
and OEO r eque sts, and to d efeat the Whitte n Ame ndment.
If you wish more inf orma tion on the spe ci f ic cuts
in the HEW a nd OEO appro pri at ion s, pl e as e contact
The Urb a n Coalition Action Coun cil office.
�THE URBAN COALITION ACTION COUNCIL
JOHN W. GARDNER
CHAIRMAN
1819 H STREET, N.
July 18, 1968
W.
WASHINGTON, D. C. 20006
Memorandum To:
Subject:
Chairmen and Executive Directors of Local
Urban Coalitions
HEW and OEO Appropriations Eor Fiscal Year 1969
Several days ago local coalitions were asked to urge . their
congressmen to suppo r t a strong Housing and Urban Developme nt
Act, and 1nany coal it ions r esponde d vi g o r ously . The Ac t has been
passed by the Senate and House and con£erees are working out the
differences.
We now call your atte ntion to another important measure
which is vital to the well - being of u r ban communitie s -- the
Ap propriations Bill for the De partme nt of He alth, Education and
We lfare and the Office o f Economic Opportunity.
The House of Representatives r e fused to appropriate funds at
levels considere d minimal b y the Administration in the field s of
education and poverty. A memorandum summarizing p rograms o f hi g h e st
priority and budge t r e ques t r e duction s is enclosed for y our in f o r mation. Al s o e nclo se d i s a list of citie s af fe c 4 e d by the Hous e 's
r e duction s in Title I, ESEA .
/
The House also cut substantially requests for funds for
Maternity and In f ant Care p r ojects, Child Wel fa re Demonstr ation
Projects, and Mat e rnal and Child He alth Res e a rch Ce nters.
The Senat e App ropri at ions Subc ommi t tee o n La bor , HEW a nd
Re l a t ed Agenci e s is cons i der ing the appro pri ati ons measu re this
week, and it i.s e x p e cted to be b e fore the full Se_n a te Appro pr iations
Committee on July 23.
Sena te action is e x pecte d late n ex t week o r
e a rly in the week of July 29.
Loca l coa li t ion members are u rge d to ask t h e i r sen ators to
s u ppo rt- ful l f u ndin g of t hese measures .
I t would be particular l y
hel pful i f Appr o pr i ati ons Committee mewber s we re c9ntacted 1 and
th e li st o f members is e n c los e d .
Sincere l y y ours,
_,,;/
/
/7\.:. c.. , l
I I l~
~
y
,/
-.
/ ! ( .
/c .)-c · ( ( L--.,.,
Lowe l l R. Beck
Executive Director
LRB:m
En c lo sures · (3 )
TELEPHONE: 202 293•1530
@
�THE URBAN COALITION ACTION COUNCIL
Memorandum on Budget Allowances for HEW and OEO
I.
HEW Appropriations
EDUCATION
Elementary and Secondary Education Act Activities
1.
Title I - Educationally deprived children
Offers financial assistance to state and local public
edu~ational agencies to expand and improve their education
programs to meet the needs of educationally disadvantaged
childr en in low-income areasi also handicapped, delinquent,
neglected, and foster children; children of migratory
·agricultural workers; and American Indian children attending
Bureau of Indian Affairs schools. A wide range of educational
activities is permitted so long as the focus is on services
for educationally disadvantaged children.
1968 Appropriation
1969 Budget Request
1969 House Allowance
HEW Appeal to Senate from House Allowance
2.
$1.191 billion
1.2 billion
1 . 073 billion
126.873 million
Dropout Prevention Programs
A grant program direct to local education, agencies for
carrying out programs to prevent dropouts in schools with
a high percentage of dropouts and a high percentage of
poor children~
1968 Appropriation
1969 Budget Request
1969 House Allowance
HEW Appeal to Senate from House Allowance
3.
$ ----
30 million
20 million
Bilingual Education Programs
A federal grant program to local education agencies for
the purpose of establishing and developing bilingual education
programs.
It is for public school systems that have schools
with a high concentration of poor children coming from homes
which speak other than the English language.
1968 Appropriation
1969 Budget Request
1969 House Allowance
HEW Appeal to Senate from House Allowanc e
$ - - -5 million
5 mill i o n
�-2Teacher Corps
A program to improve educational opportunities for children
in areas h a ving conc entr a tions of low-income families by
recruiting and training teaching te a ms for local educational
agencies . The local school di s t r ict selects corps~ en for
its schools and adminis te rs the program locally.
1968 Appropriation
1969 Budg e t Re quest
1969 House Allowance
HEW Appea l to Senate from House Allowance
II.
The
the OEO r
programs
are Head
1.
$13.5 million
31 million
15 million
9.667 million
OEO Appropriations
House App r o p riations Committe e cut $300 million from
e que s t without indicating specific areas.
The educational
that would be cut d r astically because of this reduction
Star t, Upward Bound, and Follow Throug h.
Head Start
A program d es igned for the economically dis a dvant aged
pre-school c h ild. The full y ear Head Start p r ogr ams
are primar ily for childre n of age 3 u p to the age th e
child enters th e s chool sy stem .
Summe r Head Start
programs are · f or childre n who a re eli g ibl1e for kind ergarten or fi rst g rad e , and will be attending school
for the first time in the fall.
/
·
2.
Upward Bound
Upward Boun d is a p r e - coll ege program for hi g h school
students fro m low-i n come f ami l ie s. Any acc re dited
ins t itution wi th r es i d ent i al f acilities may submit a
p r o p o sa l f o r a n Upward Bound p rog ram.
Youn g s ters in
thei r sec ond or t h ird ye ar of hi g h school· whose famili e s
have an n u a l income s b e low the pove r t y line are scr ee n e d
and s e l e cte d by the educat io na l insti t ution conducting
th e pr o gram.
3.
Follow Thr ough
To sustain the g ains made b y c h ildren in Head St ar t
pro grams fund e d b y OEO and p res cho ol p rog r a ms f u nde d
by Ti tl e I o f t he El e ment a r y and Secondary Education
Act, a s we ll as o the r q u ality preschoo l pro g r ams, the
U . S . Of fic e o f Ed u cat i o n in coll abor at ion wi th t h e
Off ice of Economi c Opportun i ty h as e s t a b l i she d the
Follow Th r o ugh prog ram.
Jul y 1 8 , 19 68
�DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCAT ION, AND WELFARE
Office of Education
. Eiementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, P.L. 89~ 10 As .A.mended
Titl e I, Assistance fo r Educati ona l l y Dep rived Chi ldren
Compar ison of 19 68 Initial Allocation s and 1969 Est i mat ed All oc a ti ons
und e r House Allowance fo r Selected Larg e Cit i e s
Ci t y
Akr on , Ohio
Al bany , New York
Albuque rque, N. Me~ .
Al l entown, · Pa .
Amar i ll o, Texas
1968
I nit i a l
Al l oc at ion
$ 1,04 2 ,187
800, 86 0
1,645 , 40 3
188 , 001
288 , 432
19 69 Estima ted
All ocati on unde r
Hous e Allo wance
$
9 20,070
644 ,30 6
1,3 98 ,5 92
1 59 ,77 1
246 ,0 84
Dec r ease
$
122pl17
156 ,5 54
246. 811
28 ,23 0
42 , 35 4
I
At l anta , Ga .
Austin , Texas
Ba ltimore, Md .
Ba ton Rouge, La .
27 6 , 144
2,7 58,76 7
836,40 8
7,57 4 , 551
1,0 40, 972
251 ,4 30
2,5 11 , 741
713 ,695
6,8 97, 328
94 7 , 824
24; 714
247 , 026
1 22 ,7 13
677 , 223
93,148
Be aumont , Texas
Be rkley , Calif .
Bi rmingham, Al ao
Bo ston, Ma s s.
Buffalo , N.Y .
371,611
4 22 , 743
1,996,83 1
4, 613 , 141
5, 384 ,7 34
31 7 , 086
384,99 5
1, 818 ,0 24
4,2 01,283
3,8 23 ,9 89
54,525
37 , 748
1 78,80 7
411 , 858
1,5 60 ,7 4 5
Cambr i dg e, Mass .
Camden , N.J.
Ca nton , Ohio
Char l otte , N.C.
Chattanooga, Tenn .
462,0 85
1,2 34, 536
33 5 ,. 065
1,2 9 9, 834
928, 55 0
4 20,818
1, 11 9 , 990
295,7 81
1,1 83 , 53 8
844, 392
41, 267
114 ,5 46
39 , 284
116,2 96
84,158
23 , 396 ,3 81
3, 156 , 114
5, 531 , 982
79 7 , 121
2 , 343 , 964
20 ;0 97 , 6 85
2, 786 ,2 96
4, 883 , 785
725 , 741
2 ,0 69 , 291
3 , 298 , 69 6
369,818
648,197
71,380
274 , 655
Dea rborn, Michig an
Denve r , Col orado
1 ,0 76 , 559
2 ,466,750
1 , 404,1 86
125 , 675
2,234,345
918 , 626
2,104,888
1 ,239 , 642
112 , 762
2,004,850
157,933
361,862
164,5 44
12,913
229,4 9S
Des Mo ines , Iowa
Detroit 9 Michigan
Duluth, Minn.
Eli zabeth, N.J .
El Paso, Texas
763 ,843
11, 455,586
418,913
462, 832
94·6, 066
649,268
10,2 80 ,12 9
364,400
41 9 ,8 80
807,2 50
114, 575
1,175,457
54,513
42,952
13 8,816
An a heim , CaliL
Ch ica.g o , I 1 1.
Cincinnati, Ohio
Cleve l and , Ohio
Co lumbus, Ga .
Columbus , Ohio
Co r pu s Christi, Texas
Dallas , Texas
Dayton, Ohio ·
/
�-2 -
1968
I nitial
City
Allocation
Erie, Pa .
Evan sv ille , Ind.
Flint, Michigan
Fort Wayne, Ind.
Fort Worth) Texas
$
566,908
6 24,544
778,243
485,685
1, 453,49 9
196 9 Est ima te d
All oca ti on unde r
Hou se Al l owa nce
(.,
,p
481,85 3
541,8 80
698,373
421,397
1,240,279
Decreas e
$
85,055
82,66 4
79,870
64,288
213,220
Gary, Intl.
887,73 6
Grand Rapids , Mich .
Hammond, I nd.
Hono lulu, Hawaii
Houston, Texas
784,3 42
275,642
2 ,226, 60 8
3,448,670
671,53&
23 9,1 55
2,082,657
2,94 2 ,766
Ind ianapolis , Ind.
J ackson, Miss.
Jac ksonville, Fla.
Jer sey City, N.J.
Kan sas City, Mo.
1,591 ,286
1,136,492
2, 392 ,80 9
1 ,485,388
1,8 13 ,8 31
1,3 80,664
1,0 34, 70 5
2,03 3,879
1, 347, 573
l,566 s51 7
210 ~622
101 , 787
358,930
137,815
247,3 14
1,015,1 53
614 , 500
1,363,356
16,1 43,188
1 ,932,193
92 3,14 7
559,5 12
1,241,663
14,70 2 , 309
1,75 9,1.04
92 , 006
53,9 88
121,693
1,440,879
173,089
Minne apolis, Minn .
418,285
3,1 49, 017
3,419,439
2,843,756
2,494,562
356,903
2,863,67 3
2,906,508
2,4 26,525
2,169,934
61,3 82
285,3 44
512,9 31
417,231
324,628
Mob ile, Ala.
Montgom ery, Ala.
Nashville, Te nn.
New Or le ans , La.
New Yor k , New Yo rk
2,0 09,397
1,362,914
1,577 1'9 15
3, 742, 865
71,513,045
1, 829,475
1,240,866
1, 434,922
3,407,945
69,89 2 ,210
179,922
122,04 8
142,993
334,9 20
1,6 20,8 35
Newa r k, N.J.
Nia.ga r :1 Fall s, N.Y.
Norfolk, Va.
Oakl and , Ca lif.
Phi lade l phia , Pa.
4,966,293
701,825
2,433,3 26
2,875,1 01
12,420,8 84
4,50 5 ,560
604,198
2,2 1 5,757
2,6 18 ,455
10,5 57,7 44
460,733
_·g 7 ·, 6 2 7
217,7 51
256, 646
1,8 63,1 40
3, 214,988
1, 902 , 11 0
4, 381,175
2 , 855 , 158
2 ,l 44,795
2,7 32 , 738
1, 841,973
3 , 783,831
2 ,436 , 341
1, 953 , 326
482 , 250
60,l37
597 , 344
418,817
191,469
Knoxville, Tenn .
Li ttle Rock, Ar k.
Long Beac h, Calif.
Lo s Ang e le s j Calif.
Louisvill e , Ky.
77 -0. , 232
117,50 4
76,&-0 4
36.487
143 :9 51
505,904
/
Lub bock, Texas
Memphis, Tenn.
Miami, Fl a,
Milwaukee, Wiscons in
Pittwburgh, Pa.
Rochester , N.Y .
St. Louis, Mo .
San Antonio, Texas
San Diego, Calif .
�-3-
In itia l
Allo cat io n
1969 Es t i mated
Alloc at io n under
Hous e Allmvance
$3,2 75 , 608
1 ,48 5 , 841
1 , 62ls3 8 2
1,501,5 88
873,003
$ 2,982,203
1,287,885
~, 443 ,853
1,3 25,626
792,006
792,04-2
1,396,716
706,983
5,397,367
1,3 46,2 22
673,230
1~271,803
56Ss616
4,587,762
1,144, 28 5
118,812
124,913
14 1 ,367
809,605
20 1 ,937
985,2 4 6
745,069
586,50 9
897,086
621~572
517,775
88,160
123,497
68 '7 34
1,757,979
1,10 4 ,514
1,674,678
1,57 4 ,9 3 2
1,276,7 4 5
1,088,26 4
1,600,766
1,002,040
1,461,008
1,433,985
1,110,595
157,2 13
102,47 4
213,670
140,947
166,150
97,450
196 8
City
San Franc isco, Ca l i f.
Seattl e , Wash .
Syracuse, N.Y .
Tole; do, Oh io
Trenton , N.J.
Tuscont Ari zona.
Tuls a, Okln.
Utica, New Yor1c
Washi ng to n , D. C.
Wichit a , Kans a s
Wins t on Sa l em , N. C.
Yon ker s, N. Y.
Youngstown , Oh io
Okl ahoma City, Okl a .
Pat e r s on, N.J.
Po r tl and, Ore gon
Richmo nd, Va .
St. Paul, Minn.
Sava nnah, Ga.
9 90, 8 l t}
/
'
Dec rea se
$
292,405
195 , 956
177, 4 29
175,962
80,997
1
�SENATE APPROPRIATIONS C.OMM ITTEE
Democrats
Carl Hayden (Ariz. ), Chairman
Richard B. Russe ll (Ga. )
Allen J. Ellender (La.)
Lister Hill (Ala.)
John L . McCle llan (Ark. )
Warren G. Magnuson (Wa sh.)
Spessard L . Holland (Fla. )
John C . Stennis (Miss.)
John 0. Pastore (R. I.)
A. S. Mike Monrone y (Ok la . )
Alan Bibl e (Nev .)
Robert C. Byrd (W. Va.)
Gale W. McGee (Wyo. )
Michael J. Mansf ield (Mont.)
Edward L. Bartlett (Alask a)
Willi am Proxmire (Wis. )
Ralph W. Yarborough (Texas)
Republicans
Mil ton R. Young (N. D.)
Karl E. Mundt (S. D.)
Margaret C. Smith (Me. )
Thomas H. Ku chel (Calif. )
Roma n L. Hru ska (Ne b. )
Gordon L. Allott (Colo.)
Norr is Cott o n (N. H.)
Cli ff ord P. Case (N. J. )
J acob K. Javits (N. Y. )
/
�THE URBAN COALITION ACTION COUNCIL
J O HN W. GA R DNER
CHAIRMAN
181 9 H STREET , N. W .
August 2, 1968
WASHINGTON , D . C . 20006
WEEKLY LEG I SLATIVE RE PORT
(Current as of August 2, . 1968)
FROM:
THE STAFF
THE STATUS OF SUB STANTIVE LEGISLATION
The Eme r ge ncy Emp loy me nt and Training Act of 1968 (Public
Serv ice Emp loy ment)
The me asure h a s not be e n reported b y the Senate Labor and
Public We lf a:re Co mmittee.
The e x tension of th e Man powe r Developme nt and Tr a ining Act
has b ee n orde r ed rep or ted by the Commi ttee, and a ction on
th e meas ure has b ee n d e l ayed . Ma jority Leade r Mans f i e ld
has i n d ica t ed h e will ca ll it up in Septembe r. ¼The n t he
bill i s co ns idere d by the f ull Se n ate , a bi pa r t i san co a lition
comp ri sed o f Senators Cl a r k , J avits an d P r o u t y wi ll a ttemp t
to ame nd it by add ing the Emergency Empl o yme n t Act to i t .
The Ho u se Se l e c t Sub com.mi ttee st ill has n o p l ans t o mark up
th e J OBS b ill.
The MDTA extens i on measure h as rece i ved a ru l e by the Ho u s e
Rul es Committee cleari n g it fo r f l o o r act ion, but wil l n ot
b e acted o n un t i l Co ngress returns after the p ol i t ical
convent ions.
Ho using and Urban Development Ac t of 1 96 8_
On Augu s t 1 st, t he Preside n t s i gned into l aw the Hous i ng a n d
Urban Development Act of 1968 . Representat i ves 6f the Urb an
Co alit i on Action Coun cil were present by invitat ion for t h e
c eremony.
A SlLmmary of the more i mp ortant provisions of this very
significant new act is to be found at the end of this
we e kly report.
The Urban Coalition will be prep a ring a
more detai.led analysis · of the l aw focusing on the new
TELEPHON E : 202 29 3 · 15 30
�-
2 -
potenti a l it presents for local a6tion . · This analysis
will be distributed to local coalitions an~ made available to oth er parties on request when comp l eted.
THE STATUS OF APPROPRIATIONS _1\1EASURE S
The proposed sch edule of action on Abpropriat ion bills concerning
legisl ation of interest to the Ac t ion Council is:
1.
The Housing and Urban Development Appropriations
bill fo r Fiscal Year 1969 passed the House on
May 8th and the Senate on July 12th.
It now goes
to the Conference Committee, which has waited un- ·
til the HUD authorization bill was enacted into
law.
I t will meet sometime in September although
no meeting date has been set~
2.
As previously reported, th e Labor-HEW (including OEO)
Approp r iations bil l passed the House on June 26th.
Th e Wh itten Amendment , passed by a Telle r (un recorded )
vote, prohibits the us e of funds appropriated by the
bill to fo rce busing of school children, to abolish
any school or to force secondary school students to
atten d a particular school against the choice of
parents.
The House approved serious cuts in Title I of th e
Elementary and Secondary Education Act (aid to schools
in i mpoverished areas ) , th e Teacher Corps and the
Office of Economic Opportunity.
The full Senate Appropriations Committee has marked up
th e bill.
The Cammi ttee did n·o t restore much of th e
education funding.
The following li s t indicates how
th e Committee acted on the requests made by the Department of Health, Education and Welfare to restore funds
cut by the House:
-
REQUESTED
APPROVED
$126
mil
$50
mil
Drop Out Prevention
30
mil
10
mil
Bilingual Education
5
mil
.10
mil
9.6
mil
2.3
mil
Titl e I' ESEA
Teacher Corps
�- .3 -
In add ition, the Committee kept the OEO
appropria tion a t t he low level approved by
the House and retained t he Wn itten A.mendment .
New l anguage was added to the Whitten Amendment
by the Committee.
It is believed th at this
language will substantially ameliorate its impact.
The bill is scheduled for the Sena te floor on
September 4th.
· rt is very imp ortant th at every effort be made
in the Se nate to re s tore the House cuts in the
HEW and OEO requests, and to defeat the Whitten
. Amendme n t, even though it has been amended .
If
vou wish more inf ormation on the specific cuts in
ihe HEW a nd OEO a ppropri~tions, pl~ase contact
Th e Urb a n Coaliti on Action Council office.
NOTE :
Due to th e Congressional recess for the party conventions, the
Action Council wi ll not issue f urther weekly reports until the
Congress reconvene s in Septembe r.
�SUMMARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT ACT OF 1968
An expanded supply of housing for low-income and moderateincome families is the key objective of the Housing and Urban
Development Act of 1968.
The Act authorizes a 3-year program aimed at producing an
estimated 1.5 million new and rehabilitated housing units, with
highest priority and emphasis placed on meeting the needs of
families for which the national goal of "a decent home and a
suitable living environment for every American family" has not
become a reality.
The Act's new programs include:


Home owner s hip ass istance through subsidized interest


rates which could provide housing for 500,000 low_ and
moderate-income famili es .


Rental and cooper ative housing, also through subsidized


interest rates, which could make 450,000 dwellings available
for low and moderate-income families.


Credit assistance and family counseling service s to help


families with spe cial problems of debt and budget management
to attain homeownership.


Mortgage insurance for homes qualifying as "acceptable


risks" in older, declining urban nei ghb orhoods.


Aid to nonprofit sponsors of low and moderate-income


housing, including informa tion, advice, and technical
assistance; and interest-free loans to cover up to 80
perc~nt of preconstruction costs.


National Homeownership Foundation to c arry out a con_tinui ng program of encouraging private and public organizations to provide increased homeownership and housing


opportunities for lower income fam ilie~. The Foundation
will encourage inve stment in and sponsorship of housing
deve lopment , provide technical assistance and advis ory
services to public and private organizations, and make
loans a nd grants to cover expenses of organi z ations engaged
in carrying out housing programs.


National Housing Partnerships to encourage maximum


participation by private investors in programs and projects
to provide low a nd moderate-income hous ing. This will join
new capital sources with business and organization skills
in th e construction and operation of housing for the lowinc ome market; a n d will bring large-scale capital into the
field on a private basis.
�-2-


Federal reinsurance against abnormal property insurance


losses from riots and other civil cowmotion; and a
National Flood Insurance program to make insurance available for residen tial and small business properties in
flooded areas.


* * *







* * * * * *


Existing programs are also expanded and improved by the Act.
It continues authorizations for public housing to provide 375,000
new units in three years and adds authority to provide social
services for t enants in public housing; rent supplements, which
would support an additional 145,000 dwelling units; model cities,
urban r enewal, o pen space land, and water and sewer facilities.
It expands u r b an planning grants and provides grants for planning
in non-metropolitan areas.
It modifies the college housing pro~
gram.
It includes provisions for rural housing.
A new financing method for urban renewal permits n e ighborhood
redevelopment which permits improvement activity to begin wh ile
planning i s in progress. The New Communities program is expanded;
FNMA 's secondary market operations are transferred to a n ew
priva tely-owned corporation; mortgage insurance is provided for
nonprofit hospitals; rehabilitition loans and grants programs
are liberalized and expanded.
'
�The Urban Coalition
1815 H Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20006
Telephone : 347-9630
CHAIRMAN: John W. Gardner
CO-CHAI AMEN: Andrew Heiskell /A.Philip Randolph

August 13, 1968
Mr. Dan Sweat, representing
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
·
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Dan:
Many individuals and communities have long requested
a document which would explain to them the nature of
an urban coalition, its goals and some of the activities
it should be involved in.
I am enclosing five copies
of an offset edition of our new publication "An Urban
Coalition in Your Community."
I believe this document will be of interest to members
of your community because it explains how a coalition is
organized, what leadership elements should be involved,
a small sampling of local coalition activities around the
country and a brief statement on the kinds of assistance
local coalitions may expect from the national office.
Printed editions of this document will be available in
mid-September and you may order through me as many copies
~s you feel necessary.
SincUJ;fa-
hn Dean
Associate Dir ector
Local Coa lition Staff
Enclosur es
JD:lyt
�-~
Hon. Theodore R. McKeldin, Chairman
Dr. Homer E. Favor, Vice-Chairman
Farren J. Mitchell, Vice-Chairman
Gilbert Rosenthal, Secretary
Dr. Wilmer V. Bell, Treasurer
Walter H. Lively, Executive Director
_July 3, 1968
Dear Sir:
As Chairman of the Baltimore Urban Coalition, I am writing
to inform you that we have undertaken the task of mobilizing
a g roup of outstanding local businessmen who are greatly conce r ned over the future of America's cities.
These men numbering about 200 and representing a full range
of the commercial interests of our city will be accompanied by
Mayor Thomas D' Alesandro, III and leaders from religious,
labor, educational, and civil rights groups when they journey
to Washington next Thurs day, July 11th to meet with the Mary-·
land Delegation to the Congress.
It is our purpose to make it clear to our representatives that
we care deeply about the conditions in Baltimore and a ll of the
cities of the country and to urge them to give priority attention
to Urban America and its people.
We would like to urge y ou and the other local Urban Coalitions
around the nation to act as the catalytic agents in your cities to
activate similar de monstra tions on the part of your local busines s
leadership. We believe this is vitally important--that the timing
is such that we have the opportunity to be effective with Congress
and with the people at home who will be heartened by our show of
concern .
We share the sense of urgency expressed in John Gardner's letter
to Congress on June 27th and this is our way of supporting it
with the delegation in Congress. We sincerely hope that you will
in some way join us in this effort to inform Congress of the concern of the American business community.
Ve ry t r uly yours,
·d e
{01
),ey{( e_Ju
Theodore R. McKeldin
Room 3505-:- 222 Saint Paul PJace - Baltimore, ~aryland 21202 -
Phone: 752-84 70
�Hon. Theodore R. McKeldin, Chairman
Dr. Homer E. Favor, Vice-Chairman
Parren J. Mitchell, Vice-Chairman
Gilbert Rosenthal, Secretary
Dr. Wilmer V. Bell, Treasurer
Walter H. Lively, Executive Director
_July 3, 1968
...
Dear Sir:
As Chairman of the Baltimore Urban Coalition, I am writing
to inform you that we have undertaken the task of mobilizing
a group of outstanding local businessmen who are greatly concerned over the future of America's cities.
These men numbering about 200 and representing a full range
of the commercial jnterests of our city will be accompanied by
Mayor Thomas D' Alesandro, III and leaders from religious,
labor, educational, and civil rights groups when they journey
to Washington next Thursday, July 11th to meet with the Mary-·
land Delegation to the Congress.
It is our purpose to make it clear to our r e presentatives that
we care deeply about the conditions in Baltimore and all of the
cities of the country and to urge them to give priority attention
to Urban America and its people.
We would like to urge you a nd the other loc a l Urban Coa litions
around the n ation to act as the c a t a lytic agents in your citie s to
activate similar demonstrations on the part of your local busine ss
leadership. We believe this is vitally important--that the timing
is such tha t we h a ve the·opportunity to be effective with Congres s
and with the p e ople a t home who will be heartened by our show of
concern.·
We share -the sense of urge ncy e x pressed in John Gardner's letter
to Cong r ess on June 21th a nd this is our way of supporting it
with the d e~egation in Cong r e s s . We s inc e rely hope that you w ill
in some w a y join u s i n thi s e ffort t o inform Congress of the concern o f the Ame r i c an b u s i n ess com m unity.
Ve r y t ruly yours ,
\:ffc
cry(
)C<l_~t Ju
T h eodore R . M cKeldm
Room 3505 -- 222
Saint Paul PlaceBaltimore, Maryland 21202 - Phone: 752-8470
y
.
�July 9, 1968
Mr . W . B . Spann
Alston, Miller & Gaines
C & S National Bank Bllilding
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mr. Spann:
Attached are copies o! information pieces concerning the
Urban Coalition. I hop this will give you some idea of
our st tus of involv ment he re in Atlanta..
I am also sending copi s of material fo-rw rded to Bob
Foreman in conn c:tion with the City's prOg? m of response
to the Civil Disorders Commission Report.
Sincerely yours,
Dan Sw
DS:fy
Enclosures
t
�TE L EP H ONE
To
ME~ 1 AGE
lf<e5s
I 'J-.-
Name
UJ · /3 .
~ Wants
0
0
you to call
Returned your call
0
0
Is here to see you
Cam e by to see you
Left the follo wing me ss a ge:
a . m. / p. m.
By- - - ~ - - - - -- -- - - - - -- -- -- - -F O R M 25·5
�(Draft)
June 6, 1968
Revised June 12, 1968
MEMORANDUM
TO:
1J
Local Coalitions
THE NATIONAL COALITION PROGRAM OF TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE
Responding to the Emergency Convocation of August 1967
and to the critical urban crisis of our nation, many
cities have formed local coalitions and many are or soon
will be in the organizational phase.
These local coalitions
are becoming a vital forum for communication among different
elements in the community.
C
They are a mechanism for assess-
ing community problems, establishing priorities, coordinating
efforts and initiating new programs.
They are also extremely
potent -vehicles for members of coalitions to individually and
collectively speak out on national issues and to support,
propose, or oppose legislation affecting urban problems and the
resources needed for their solution.
The National Urban Coalition, in an effort to maximize the
aims and objectives of local coalitions, will make available
through its s ta ff a broad technical assistance program at the
request of the local coalition .
This program is developed
within the li mits of resources presently available to the
national Coalition to meet needs of local coa litions.
be e x panded and/or mod ifi ed as those needs change .
It wi ll
�-
2 -
The National Urban Coalition's technical assistance program will range from assisting communities to organize
and launch local coalitions to concentrated assistance
for specific programs.
To accomplish this assistance
program, the national coalition has divided its staff
·
f our -{yboar
-':,,._,,d, · units;
·
· ·
· · ·
into
t h e Loca 1 Coa 1 1t1on
Division,
t he
Program Development Division, the Communications Division
and the separate Action Council Division.
(1)
The Local Coalition Division is the operational staff
of the national Coalition.
Its primary task is to explain
the urban coalition concept and assist communities in organizing local coalitions.
C
It will also render general
technical assistance on coalition programs and relate national
issues to local coalition objectives.
(2)
The Program Development Division is the program
specialist staff of the national Coalition.
Its primary
task is to provide expert assistance in specific program
areas by its staff members and through its consultant
resources.
It will also be the major channel for the
assembly and dissemination of technical program information
relative to local coalition activities.
(3)
The Communications ~ivision
(to be filled in by Brian Duff)
�-
(4)
3 -
The Urb a n Coalition· Action Council is a s e parate unit
of the nation al Coa lition .
The p r i mary functions of its
staff will be to promote social improvements in the nation's
urban centers through its study of proposed legislation and
its mobilization of community leaders across the country to
support, propose and oppose legislation affecting urban
problems and the resources for their solution.
Local coa l i tions will addr ess requests for all forms of
technical assistance to the Local Coalition Division.
As
the operational staff of the national Coalition, these staff
members are assigned to e a ch of the local coalitions through out
c.
the country.
They will either respond directly to the request
or, if it require s extreme ly technical problems, refer it to
the a ppropriate spe c i aliz e d d iv i sio n .
Counc i l staff wi l l d e al direc tly
The Urban Coalit ion Action
with coalitions a nd coalition
membe r s.
Th e n ati o nal Coalition will provid e the f ol l owing f o rms of
technical a s sista nc e u p on reques t :
1.
Pr ovi d e assis t anc e to ne w communi tie s in i den t i fy in g
a n d b ringing t oge the r loca l l eaders who might
in the fo r mat ion o f a coal ition.
2.
be inte r ested
(loca l)
Pr ovide assistanc e t o n e w communi t i e s in exp l a ining
the philosophy and
ob j e ctiv es o f The Urban Coa liti on and .
i n t h e formation and r e prep entative character of o r g anizing
a nd p e rmane nt ste ering committ e es .
~-

( l ocal )
�- 4 -
3.
·Provide speak er resou r ces through the national +Ldcc:\. \
~
Steering Cqmmittee~ to assist in the launching of
the local coalition.
4.
(communic a tions~ loc_tll)
Provide assistan ce to e x isting coalitions on
improving the
representative character of its
steering committee and guid a nce on the composition,
purpose and functioning of its task forces.
5.
(local)
Provide assistance to coalition on how they organize
neighborhood groups for community leadership in coalition
planning and policy making and for community generated
social action projects which require no funds.
(local,
program development)
C
6.
Provide guidanc e on dealing with the diverse elements
of the black community.
(local, program developme nt)
f
7.
Provide assistance to local coalition staffing, funding,
administration and program manag ement problems.
(local ,
progra_m development)
8.
Provide liai s on fo r local coalitions with Fe deral agencies
on clar i ficatio n a n d mod i fic a t i on of policy and fo r their conside ration o f _ mer itor ious applications fo r grants .
(local ,
prog r a m deve lopment)
9.
Pro vide info rmat i on o n s ou rces of l oc a l , state, fe dera l
and foundation funds t o emp loy staff and to i mpr ove e x isting
programs o r start new onei t o mee t communi t y pri o rities.
.
'
(?)
�-
10.
5 -
Provide representation before.various national private
organizations conducting programs locally to insure that
their local counterpart organization cooperate with the
coalition in its effort to coordinate all programs.
11.
Provide assistance to help local coalitions analyze
community problems, inventory existing programs aimed at
the solution of those problems and identify gaps or
duplication of effort.
12.
(program development)
Provide a periodic newsletter to include relevant
national or local surveys and studies on urban problems,
information on new program concepts, Federal program
C
guides, new national Coalition statements and policy,
visual materials developed by local coalitions related
to coalition goals.
13.
(communications, program development)
Provide a periodic proqram memo to include intensive
case studies of successful programs of local coalitions.
(program deve lopment)
14 ~
Provide assistance on a range of specialized programs
(ghetto entre pre n e ur s hip, youth mobilization, manpower,
housing , educ a tion, communications, etc .
15 .
(program development)
Provide a dv i c e to local coalitions on me chanisms by
which t hey may coo r di na t e e x isting and new commu ni t y p r o grams .
(loc a l, p rog ram d e v e lopme nt)
�-
16.
6 -
Provi~e assistance in the writing of applications
for state, federal and fo~ndation funds.
(program
development)
17.
Provide assistance in developing projects and
materials on attitudinal change and methods on
increasing communication between the black and white
community.
18.
(communications, program development)
Provide advise on the programmatic implementation
of the Kerner Commission Report by local coalitions.
(communications, program development)
19.
Provide information and guidance to aid local
coalitions in interpreting local, state and national
legislative issues and relating them to the coalitions
goals and priorities.
20.
(Action Council)
Provide periodic legislative reports on the
status of pending national legislation of interest to
coalitions and to outline significant features of newly
passed legislation concerning urban problems.
Council)
..
(Action

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  1. http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_007_011.pdf

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