Box 1, Folder 14, Complete Folder

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Box 1, Folder 14, Complete Folder

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�I NT R ODUCT I ON
This report covers a short study of fire alarm boxes for 10 of the 11 largest
cities in the State.
This evaluation covers the effectiveness of the fire alarm box as part of the
communication system for fire calls.
Box coverage per 1,000 population is
compared to total boxes in each city.
Further comparison is made with false
alarms to total alarms received through the fire alarm boxes in each city.
GMA wishes to acknowledge the rapid response of Fire Chiefs Carl Callaway,
Thomas Eberhart, J . G. Fitzgerald,
C. W. Ford, Dewey B. Foster, J.M. Kidd,
A. D. Nixon, J. R. Parham, W. A. Register and Howard C. Schaffer, also the
fire department staffs of each city who kindly completed this information and
provided their many combined years of e xperience in the evaluation of this
communication device.
Equal appreciation goes to the entire GMA Staff who
individually contributed to the development of this report.
It is intended that this brief yet concise piece of basic information will contribute to improved effectiveness in municipal fire service.
Jerry A. Singer
Director of Research
May, 1969
W. Elmer George,
Executive Director
- 1 -
�FIRE ALARM BOX USE
A Survey of Georgia's Largest Cities
The fire chiefs of Georgia's ten largest cities 1 favor the continued use of fire
alarm boxes.
Although false alarm rates are high the boxes are still considered
the most effective and fastest means of communication to a fire department.
The
many valid calls received through the fire boxes result in the saving of lives
_and property value.
,.
This leaves the false alarms in the necessary nuisance
ca~egory.
=TOTAL ALA RMS
(Fire Boxes)
FALSE ALARMS
(Fire Bo~es)
320
160
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�The survey revealed suggestions that boxes be removed from residential areas.
Another a.rea in which fire alarm boxes do not appear useful are certain industries
with private alarm and sprinkler systems in use,
Several chiefs feel the conversion to a telephone alarm system might be better,
but the costs are prohibitive.
Savannah uses such a system through which the fire
department, police department, or an ambulance can be summoned.
,.
For 212 such boxes,
Savannah pays a yearly rental of $11,448.
According to a report by the International City Managers' Association, the proper
placing of fire alarm boxes in a city is important in effective fire control and in
·2
reducing false alarms .
Downtown office buildings are high value areas in which
telephones cannot be reached at night.
at two block intervals.
It is recommended that fire boxes be placed
High life hazard areas, such as schools, nursing homes, and
hospitals, should be adequately covered.
areas where telephones are numerous.
Fire boxes should be removed from residential
Slum areas are an obvious ex ception, since there
are few av ailable t1elephone s .
According to the National Fire Protective Association 10% of all fires in the United
States account f or 90 % of a ll property damage loss.
It appears that the high value
area s a r e most in ne ed of easily reached fire alarm bo xes .
This is further substan-
tia t ed by the assigning of deficiency points by the American Insurance Association .
Conce r ning f ire alarm bo xes , t he AI A ass i gns a maximum of 20 points fo r residential
areas , 67 points fo r prin cipal business distr i cts and 40 points fo r other high v alue
areas, 3
Some cities have g r e atly reduced the ir pe rce ntage of fals e alarms b~ various me-ans ,
Washington, D. C. reduced false a l a rms 45% in one month thr ough an intens ive e ducati on
project with the public school children.
Publicity given to the arrest and conviction
of a few false alarm violato r s s uccessfully reduced the overall false alarms in one
c i ty,
Arr es t of the guil ty was a result of cameras placed on t h r ee of t he city's fire
I
a l a r m boxes ,
- 3 -
�I
Norfolk, Virginia found that 51% of all false alarms were placed on the weekends
when children were out of school.
Relocation of certain boxes greatly reduced
the false alarms.
To receive the largest benefit from fire alarm boxes -- Consider:
1.
What area needs the protection of fire boxes?
2.
Where can fire boxes be eliminated and relocated?
To reduce the percentage of false alarms -- Determine:
1.
Which boxes are most affected?
2.
In those areas with most false alarms are telephones nearby?
3.
Would these high false alarm boxes be more effective in another
part of town?
Another valid consideration might be the box es in use per 1,000 population.
Use the following charts to see how your city compares.
1
At l anta Excluded.
2 11Fire Alarm Communicati ons 11., Management Information Service.
December 196?.
3Ibid
- 4 -
(Report 28?)
�1.
Savannah
. Columbus
Macon
Augusta
Albany
Athens
~rietta
East Point
Rome
Valdosta
Boxes per 1,000 population
- 5 -
�250
(/)
(I)
X
0
..0
E
150
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127
126
64
85
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POP U. LAT IO
(THOUSANDS)
- 6 -
37
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37
33
32
�NAME OF
CITY
&
NO. FIRE
ALARM BOXES
IN CITY
NO. OF
FIRE
CALLS
NO. VALID
FIRE CALLS
ANSWERED
AS RESULT
OF FIRE
ALARM BOX
COST OF FIRE
ALARM BOXES
TO CITY
ARE BOXES
RENTED?
WHO DOES
CITY PAY
FOR RENTAL
OF FIRE
ALARM LINES?
IF COST IS
ADDITIONAL
TO ANY OF
PREVIOUS
COSTS·, STATE
HOW MUCH IS
PAID PER YEAR
FOR LINE
RENTAL
Albany
127
154
29
$145.00, $190.00
Auxiliary Side
or Master Box
No
Athens
75
41
11
$200.00 Varies
No
Augusta
210
84
. 55
$34,236.72 Annual
Yes
None
None
Columbus
241
394
152
$200.00
No
None
None
East Point
190
302
182
$172.50
No
None
Macon
182
366
323
$250.00 (Box Only)
No
None
Mariet t a
172
106
39
$250.00
No
None
84
26
$250.00
No
Savannah
212
(Street
Boxes)
157
(Year
1968)
89
Valdosta
98
83
15
Rome
115
$243.30
- 7 -
City Owned
None
None
Yes
Telephone Co .
$4.50 pe r
mo. per box
$11,448 per
yr.
No
None
None
City Owned
�C O MME N T S
"I feel every means possible should be used for the public to summon help
in an emergency such as fire , Alarm boxes have been used for other emergencies other than fires. I think they are necessary. The most efficient
emergency alarm equipment for the general public are emergency telephone
boxes, but they are too e xpensive for most fire departments to install and
the recurring charges are too high,"
-
"It is necessary to properly maintain the system that carries the fire alarm
boxes, service them and test them often . I know of no better way to have a
fire alarm system."
"Fire constitutes the most destructive force encountered in an Urban Community.
And yet, it is -the most easily controlled when dealt with in its incipient
stages .
The gene r al public can sound a Fire Alarm quickly and easily by operating the
PULL LEVER on the alarm bo x. A coded signal automatically flashes to the Fire
Dep ar tment in seconds . Complete fire defences are responding immediately.
We very definitely need them and they are effective even with the rate of False
Ala rms . "
"A Munic ipal Fire Alarm System is reliable means of notifyi ng a fire department
that a fir e emergency exists.
The r e are two ba sic elements in the communication. requirements of a modern fire
dep artment:
( a)
An e f fec tive system of rapid communications between the operating units
of the depa rtment .
(b )
The devices which provide for pr omp t reporting of fi r es to the depar tment
up on dis covery .
(A)
It is necess ary f or fire depar tmen t office rs t o be able t o communica te r ap i dly
with the offic e r s in charge of individual fi r e commands. The se offi cer s i n
turn must keep in t ouch with fire h e adquarters . A mean s of c a lling of f- du ty
firemen t o duty with mi nimum de lay when emer gency demand s , It i s al so desirable that the c ommunicat i ons s y s t em permi t a f ire department t o c ontac t departments in neighboring communiti es . For the s e v a rious purp os e s a ll forms
of communication are us ed in one way or a no ther, i ncl uding radi o , telephone
and telegraphic equipment and me s s enger . s e rvice.
(B)
The second basic element of fire department communications is the provision
of means whereby a person di s covering a fire may promptly report it to the
fi r e department , utilizes the telephone, and the municipal street box fire
alarm system .
The Ame r i can Insur ance Association grading schedule assigns the communicatioti and
f ire a l arm sys t em five hundred fifty of 5,000 possible defic i ency points . Ther e
- 8 -
�is some questions whether such a high percentage of the total points should
be assigned to the street box system and related equipment, the purpose of
the grading schedule is to measure factors involved in large fires or conflagrations. Actual fire experience shows that delayed alarms have resulted
in many important fires in the large loss class.
Street fire alarm box systems are used in three out of five communities of ·
more than 5,000 population in some areas of the United States. This ratio
is much higher in some parts of the country where 9 out of 10 cities of more
than 5,000 population have fire alarm systems.
Fire department communications and public fire alarm systems are supplemented
by private fire alarm and supervisory systems.
Before a city discontinues their fire alarm system they should determine the
effect removal will have on fire insurance rates within the city, Compare
cost of leased service and municipal owned systems. The effect of delayed
alarms , "
"I do not think that there is any faster or more positive means for a department to receive and respond to an alarm. However, I feel that if we could
cut out the unnecessary street boxes, this would definitely cut down on our
false alarms, as over 50% of our box alarms in 1968 were false."
"In determining a city's classification according to American Insurance Association we must have fire alarm boxes. Due to the number of false alarms, I'm
sure there must be a better way. Yes, this is a needed thing."
"We do nee d fire alarm boxes. They are effective.
American Insurance Association requirement."
There is no better way.
"Under the present insurance grading schedule, it is almost mandatory to have
fire alarm boxes to achieve a low b ase i nsurance rating.
For the transmission of fire alarms, they are effective. But, in my opinion ,
the high cost of procurement, installation and maintenance for the number of
valid alarms transmitted does not justify the expense, taking into consideration
that the majority of homes and business areas have telephone service , Also,
most cities have police patrol cars with radios at all times f or transmission
of fire calls."
"I think the f ire alarm b ox in our residential areas is becoming less effective
each year, be cause the number of alarms is gradually getting smaller each year.
Also, many of t he residents do not know the location of their nearest alarm box
be cause they depend on the telephone f or reporting fires.
I do think that our buildings with automatic sprinkler and other systems should
have an alarm box connected wi th the fire department for several reasons which I
will not go into .
I think we could have a better system but it would be expensive to make the change
over. "
- 9 -
�"The telephone fire alarm system, in my opinion, is most effective in
that the exact locations of fires and what is burning can be reported
with fire equipment being dispatched accordingly. Phones in the fire
alarm boxes are also used for emergencies other than fire such as for
police, ambulance, etc."
- 10 -
��CITY OF ATLANTA
DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE
501 CITY HALL
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303
_y 20i 1969
CHARLES L. DAVIS
DIRECTOR OF FINANCE
W. ROY SMITH
DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF FINANCE
EDGAR A . VAUGHN , JR.
DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF FINANCE
JAMES R . FOUNTAIN , JR .
DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF FINANCE
r
Chi f
Pira De..,.,"",.."'t
City of Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgl 30303
ar Paul i
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Management Information Service
International City Managers' Association/ May 1969, Vol. 1 No. L-5
THE REPORT
AT A GLANCE
Civil disorders accompanied by
fire destruction are not new in
this country. Nor are fire problems created by riots significantly different from those
possible under nonriot con ditions.
Yet fire fighting during civil
disorders is obviously more diffi cult than under normal circumstances. The violent reaction of
spectators, the duration of a
riot, and the intense news coverage given serious disturbances
add new dimensions of complexity .
Experience in dealing with fire
problems caused by rioters suggests the need for establishing a
task force system, under which a
coordinated group of fire companies travels and operates as a
self-sufficient unit throughout
the emergency. Confinement of
fires, rather than prevention of
fire losses, and rotation of man power to prevent fatigue are
other key factors in effective fire
fighting during riots. In addition ,
adequate communications and
command posts are essential to
keep tab on fire developments.
City administrators should
recognize that the typical fire
department is inadequately
manned and equipped to deal effectively with fire problems
caused by riots. Among major
elements in an emergency operations plan should be steps for
police protection of fire fighters,
provision of adequate fire alarm
systems, plans fo r pu rchase of
apparatus suited to riot conditions, and arrangments for
call ing fire-f ighti ng assistance as
needed .
��•
,Fire Department
Operations
During
Civil Disorders

This report was prepared for MIS by Boyd
A. Hartley, Associate Prof essor, Department of
Fire Protection Engineering, Illinois Institute
of Technology.
Location: A community of about 20 ,000 people
on the East Coast. Background: There had bee n
trouble in town and soldiers were on duty in the
event of further trouble. Fire protection consisted of
a volunteer fire department with outside sounding devices to indicate an alarm of fire . Situation: About
9: 15 P .M. the alarm bells rang. The people of the
community turned out to fight the fire and to watch
the firemen. But it was a false alarm ; there was no
fire. Instead of going home, the crowd began to jeer
at the soldiers, calling them names and throwing
things. The soldiers eventually lost their composure
and fired into the crowd, killing five people of whom
three were volunteer firemen.
Sound familiar? Read on.
A tide of people swarming into the big cities were
causing labor and welfare problems. These people"
were looked down upon , persecuted, and exploited in
the labor market. Most were penniless, seeking out a
bare existence in the slums. It was impossible for one
of "these people" to succeed in business or politics;
fire and police departments would not consider them
for membership.
As "these people" became more numerous, they
were shut off more and more from the social life of
the community, keeping to themselves in their own
slums and ghetto areas. In one large community , after
several weeks of sensational rumors of immoral conditions and strange behavior among "these people,"
particularly in their churches, a mob formed and
marched on the area in which they lived. The mob
even tually destroyed the principal church, a fourstory 80-foo t-long building, by burning it to the
ground while preventing firemen from fighting the
fue.
On ano ther occasion in the same city, a riot eventually resulted in ransacking of every house in the
ghetto area, with win dows broken, furniture thrown
into the street, and shops smashed and destroy ed.
In ano ther city, some shots were fired at a political
rally and the resulting riots lasted four days, with a
school, three large churches, and blocks of buildings
destroyed by fire.
The emotional response generated against the constant increase of "these people" was such that a national political party was formed and received considerable support from citizens, many of them well
known, who had previously supported the existing
two-party system. A nationally known political figure
ran for president of the United States under the auspices of this party but, fortunately, was defeated.
Sound familiar again? Maybe , but I doubt you
have recognized any of these situations.
The first was a riot in Boston on March 5, 1770,
commonly known as the Boston Massacre. The incident was co nsidered to be of particular influence in
solidifying the inhabitants of the British colonies behind those advocating a rebellion, now better known
as the revolutionary war.
3
�The second series of incidents occurred as a result
of Irish immigration into the United States in the
middle of the nineteenth century. The riots described .
occurred in Boston in 1834 and 1837 and in Philadelphia in 1844; "these people" were Irish Catholic immigrants. There were a number of riots in those cities
most_affected by the immigration, and many of the
riots resulted in destruction by fire and direct conflict
between the firemen and gangs of Irish toughs as well
as other normally peace-loving Irishmen defending
their slum residences.
The political party founded on an antiforeigner
bias, especially anti-Irish and anti-Catholic, was the
Native American party, commonly .k nown as the
Know-Nothings. Former President Millard Fillmore
ran for another term on the Know-Nothing ticket
and, fortunately , was unsuccessful.
A History of Riots
4
By now it is obvious that public riots are nothing
new in this country. In fact , we have a long history of
riots accompanied by fire destruction of property,
beginning with our earliest history.
There was a wave of incendiarism in many cities in
1676, and a large fire occurred in Boston with some
feeling that sermons by Reverend Increase Mather,
better known for his later connection with the witchcraft trials, encouraged the arsonists. In 1715, before
New York or Philadelphia had even one fire engine in
service, Boston had a board of "fire wards" with responsibility not only fo r extinguishing fires but also
for suppressing all disorders.
A series of fires in New York City in 1741 appeared to be caused by a conspiracy of Negro slaves
and resulted in trials and executions with eventually
154 Negroes sent to jail, 13 burned at the stake, 18
hanged, and 70 transported. Twenty whites· were
jailed, 4 hanged, and 8 transported.
The Committee of Vigilance was founded in San
Francisco in 1851 during the gold rush boom as a
result of fires started by the criminal element k nown
as Hounds, who robbed shops, stores, and homes in
the path of the fires. The vigilante system spread
through the gold rush area until eventually superseded by law and order.
Some of the worst riots in the history of this country occurred in 1863 as a result of opposition to the
draft during the Civil War , with riots, fires , and demonstrations in cities and towns of New York, New
Jersey, Wisconsin, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Ohio,
Missouri, and Kentucky. Confederate saboteurs took
advantage of the riots to destroy food and ammunition supplies and arms factories while encouraging the
Northerners to fight among themselves. In New York
City there were three days of draft riots during which
1,200 people lost their lives and many buildings in all
parts of the city were destroyed by fire.
MANAGEMENT
INFO RMATION
SERVICE
••
May 1969 - Vol. l No. L-5
Editor: Walter L. Webb
Management Information Service reports are
published monthly by the International City
Managers' Association, 1140 Connecticut Avenue, N.W. , Washington, D.C. 20036. Copyright
© 1969 by the International City Managers'
Association. No part of this report may be reproduced withou t permission of the copyright
owner.
Subscription rates (including inquiry-answering and addi ti onal services) are based on
population of subscribing jurisdiction and will
be furnished on request.
This report is intended primarily for subscribing jurisdictions above 25 ,000 population.
C:oncurrent monthly reports, prepared primarily for jurisdictions below 25,000 population,
are available from Management Information
Service.
The Fire Probl em
The fire problem created by a riot or civil disturbance is not much diffe rent from the problem that has
been present in most cities all along but has been
ignored under the philosophy that " it can't happen
here." This statement is better understood by analysis
of the fire problem normally present in every community .

TYPES OF FIRES
Most fires are small fires . The National Fire Protection Association defines a large-loss fire as one involving a loss of $250,000 or more. The NFPA reports
that about 10 percent of all fires in the United States
and Canada account for 90 percent of all propertydamage loss; conversely stated, 90 percent of the fires
account for only 10 percent of the loss. Fires causing
individual losses of $250,000 or more represent less
than 0.02 percent of the total number of foes but
account for 20 percent to 25 percent of the total fire
loss in any one year.
NFPA statistics for the calendar year 1967, the
latest available at the time of this writing, bear out
these general statements. In 1967, there were 471
fires in the United States and Canada that caused
$250,000 or more property damage each; the total
number of fires that year was 960,900. Thus, the
l
1
�•
large-loss fires were only 0.049 percent of the total,
or about one-half of one-tenth of 1 percent . The total
d a m age from these fire s was estimated at
$443 ,471 ,000 out of a total fire loss of
$1,623 ,000,000. It is particularly noteworthy that
only three of the large-loss fires contributed $ 148
million of the total d amage caused by large-loss fires
during 1967.
.-
'l
1

\
l
Typical Small Fire. From these data and by analysis
of the fire statistics of any given community it becomes clear that most fires within a city are extremely small , easily extinguished by a relatively
small fo rce of men and a few pieces of fir e apparatus.
If we add to the statistics of actual fires and fire losses
the large number of fire department responses to false
alarms, it is quite likely that nearly all actual-fire responses in any given commun ity are to fires well below t hat classifie d as a large loss.
Unfo rtunately, many cities h ave restricted their
fire departments to a size and efficiency that can
easily handle this type of fire but would be poo rly
equipped or prepared to handle larger fires .
One-Building Fire . T he next most serious fire situation in a community is the single large fire involvi ng
one occupancy or one building; this may or may not
be a large-loss fire . Any city with one or more large
buildings - whether an industrial property, an apartment house, a hotel, or a school - has the potential
fo r this type of fire.
·
When such a large single-building fire occurs, the
fire department will characteristically attempt to extinguish the fire as quickly as possible while at the
same time minimizing the fire damage . To accomplish
this , every effort is made to adva nce into the building
and figh t the fire from inside. If manpower permits,
salvage operations are carried on during the extinguishment phase as well as duri ng subsequ ent phases.
After extingu ishment , the fire-damaged area will
be overhauled to be certain of complete extinguishment and to eliminate the possibility of a rekindled
fire . Even after overh aul, it is quite pro bable a few
men will be left as a fire watch, with hose lines connected directly to hydrants. During every phase of
the fire-fighting operation , passive spectators will be
controlled without difficulty by a usually ample supply of policemen.
Multibuilding Fire . The next most serious fire situation is a single large fire involving several multistory
or multioccupancy buildings. Again , essentially the
same procedure must be fo llowed as described above;
only the magnitude of the fire problem has changed.
Several Large Fires. The most serious fire condition
enco untered , usually in only the largest communities,
is several large fires at the same time, widely separated or at least not adjacent to one another.
Fires During Civil Disorders
The fire pro blem encountered during a riot or civil
disorder is essentially one of those described above or
a combination of them . However, additional factors
complicate the problem.
• First, the spectators are not passive by standers
and may be violently hostile. As the police have a law
enfo rcement problem of their own in attempting to
quell the riot, they can devote only a limited force to
protect the firemen.
• Second, whereas the normal fire situation in a
community can be expected to last only a matter of
hours as the period during which maximum manpower is brought to bear, a riot and its accompany ing
fires may last f or several days. The duration of a disorder intensifies any probl ems caused by basic inadequacies of manpower, apparatus, and equipment.
• Third, a riot is more spectacular than a large fire
and, being a police problem as well as a fire problem,
receives more publicity in the national news and communications media. For example, the typical citizen
is aware of the riots in Detroit in 1967 , lasting for
eight days and resulting in a fire loss estimated up to
$12 million, but hardly anyone outside the immediate area concerned is aware that a fire in a refinery in
Lake Charles, La., burned for two weeks in 196 7 and
resulted in property dam age of $20 .5 million!
OP ER ATIO NA L PRO BLE MS
Operational problems caused by riots and possible
solutio ns have been recognized and discussed by the
International Association of Fire Chiefs. A valuable
pamphlet for every fire department official having
command responsibilities is Fire Fighting During Civil
Disorders, published by the IAFC in 1968. 1 This report goes into detail concerning operational problems
that may be expected to occur in any given situation.
Although written for the fire chief, it will be of value
to other city administrators by making th em more
aware of fire department problems. The appendix to
this MIS report , which is excerpted from the IAFC
pamphlet , includes a checklist of recommended firefighting procedures during civil disorders.
Several operational features are noteworthy:
1. Experience indicates the best approach is establishment of a task fo rce system unde r which a coordinated group of companies travels and operates as a
single unit for the duration of the emergency .
1 Copies of thi s pamphlet are available at $5 each from
the !ACF Headqu arters Office, 232 Madison Aven ue, New
York , N. Y. 100 16 .
5
�2. Because of the probable limited capability of
the department, each task force must be self-sufficient; the task force must handle its assigned problem
without recourse to any assistance.
3. The operations in many situations must be directed toward confinement of the fire to the building
of origin, with extinguishment at less"than a total loss
of the building being· improbable.
, 4. Communications must be maintained and command posts established to determine what is happening and what must be done next.
5. The possible duration of the riot or civil disorder forces establishment of a system for rotation of
manpower to avoid undue fatigue and for continuous
use of fire apparatus.
What Can the
City Ad ministration Do?
Many fire chiefs have recognized the necessity for
a more adequate and better trained and equipped fire
force than is presently available in the community.
All too often, fire chiefs' requests for increased fire
protection have been ignored because of costs or the
size of fire normally encountered .
The city administrator must recognize that a small
fire department (in relation to the needs and fire hazards of the community) can extinguish only small
fires and will be overwhelmed when a iarge fire occurs, whether caused by a civil disorder or not.
The American Insurance Association in its Special
Interest Bulletin No. 319 published in January 1969,
states that "except for the fire departments in a few
of the larger cities, none are adequately manned , with
the result that in many instances the on-duty fire
fo rce may not be able to control a serious fire without the assistance of off-duty members or outside
aid."
Ask yourself or your fire chief this question : If the
two largest buildings in our community were burning
down at the same time, would our fire department be
able to ex tinguish both fires? If the answer is yes, you
may be able to overcome the fire problems encountered during a riot , if it does not last too long.
OPERATIONS PLAN
6
Possibly the most important fu nction of the city
administrator is to see that complete and detailed
plans are drawn up for every p redictable situation
that may occur during, or result from, a civil disorder.
Obviously not every situation can be covered in this
short report, but the following comments give some
indication of the scope of and necessity for planning
civil disturbance operations.
Police-Fire Cooperation. First and foremost, there
must be cooperation among all city departments and
particularly between the fire department and the police department. Fire fighters should not be expected
to provide their own protection against injury while
fighting fires and should not be permitted to bear
arms of any description. Protection is a police function . If the police or other enforcement agencies cannot provide the necessary protection, fire-fighting
personnel should leave the riot area and allow the
individual buildings to burn, directing their efforts to
preventing the fire from extending beyond the riot
area.
Fire Apparatus. Apparatus purchased in the future
must be selected with riot situations in mind , for even
though a riot or civil disorder may not have occurred,
many cities report an increasing number of incidents
of harassment of firemen. All equipment carried on
fire vehicles should be in closed compartments. Every
vehicle must have protection for firemen, such as
closed cabs of possibly six-man size with shatterproof
glass all around, or protective screens of wire netting,
plastic, wood, metal , or other satisfactory material.
As fires will probably be fought from outside of
buildings and with minimum manpower, every
pumper should have a vehicle-mounted turret nozzle .
The list of design features could be continued at
some length. In addition, spare parts must be stockpiled in order to be immediately available. For example , a good supply of tires must be on hand , as a
carpet of broken glass will probably lie between the
fire station and the building on fire.
Fire Alarms. It is predictable that all methods of receiving alarms from the general public will be
swamped and overwhelmed at an early stage of a riot.
A community of any size having only a few fire alarm
operators on duty can fully expect to lose control of
the fire situation and never regain it. The limited
number of trunks usually available on the switchboard of fire departments will prove to be totally
inadequate for the purpose, and many citizens will be
unable to call the fire department to report fires .
The public telephone system also will likely be
overwhelmed by the number of phone calls placed
du ring a riot. In addition , it is quite possible that the
telephone system will be destroyed either by sabotage
or fire in the riot area , causing exposed wires on
buildings , in alleys, or on streets. Thus, underground
construction of circuits is not only aesthetically pleasing but also highly practical as a protection against
damage .
A municipal fir e alarm system is an asset , particularly as a means of receiving alarms of fire from locations outside the riot area. It should be noted that a
telegraph-type fire alarm box works on a clockwork
mechanism having an operating spring that will run



�•
down if the box is operated repeatedly withoµt being
rewound.
All fire alarm calls received must be investigated in
some way. Once a riot starts, the police should investigate all calls 'from the riot area; the fire department should respond only after it is certain there is a
fire to be fought.
Fire-Fighting Assistance. It is vital that written arrangements be made in advance for whatever aid may
be available from nearby communities. This has been
an important factor in the abrnty tg provide fire protection during riots. However, it must also be kept in
mind that riots may occur in more than one city, and
outside aid may be busy with problems of their own.
Therefore, assistance from other communities should
be depended upon for only a minimum amount of
help.
Arrangements for assistance need not be limited to
other communities or government installations such
as naval bases. It is possible that many citjes could get
assistance from the citizens of the community and, in

some cases, from the inhabitants of the riot area .
There have been many occasions when the nonmilitant residents of an area have helped firemen by hauling hose and preventing theft of equipment.
In New York City, Engine Company 28 on the
lower East Side responds to alarms accompanied by a
fire department patrol car carrying four Puerto
Ricans and a Negro, aged 16 to 21, who guard the
truck and other equipment to prevent theft, try to
see that firemen are not attacked, help in directing
traffic and giving first aid, and act as interpreters.
The city administrator should also see that the fire
chief and his staff attend conferences and meetings,
both national and regional, where they may listen to
speakers and talk with personnel from other cities to
learn what can be done to fight fires during riots.
Again it should be emphasized that the fire situation caused by a civil disorder is probably no worse
than could be encountered during times of civil order.
The fact that it occurs during a civil disorder merely
complicates and intensifies the hazards.
APPENDIX
Fire-Fighting Procedures During Civil Disorders*
The following im portan t points should be considered in
developing plans for civil disturbance operations.
Fire Problems
l. Police problems should be watched closely fo r possible
development into fue problems.
2. Time interval between police and fue problems may be a
matter of an hour or days.
3. Helicopters or small planes are effective in evaluating the
dimension and direction of the fue problem. Activate
plans for their use .
Command Posts
]. Number required based on local fue problem(s).
2. Define probable areas in advance.
3. Site selection based on:
a. Ample parking space
b . Wide roads for maneuvering
c. Accessibility
d . Communications capabilities
e. Living accom modations
f. Coo king facilities
g. Toilet facilities
h. Medical facilities
i. Command operations rooms
j. Secure area
k. Near trouble areas
I. Fuel dispensing facilities
m. Mechanical repair facilities
Communications
1. Prepare communications plan and determine where sup-
•Extracted from Fire Fighting During Civil Disorders
(pp. 58-59) , published in 1968 by the International Association of Fire Chiefs.
plementary communications are available. Civil Defense
may be helpful.
2. Obtain extra portable radio units. These are at a premium
at such times.
3. Inform all personnel of any special signals to be employed
to designate civil disturbance.
7
�4. Keep one radio channel clear for operational command
purposes. If supplementary channels are not now available , start a program to obtain them.
5. Messages must be screened and those of extrem e importance should be transmitted by telephone , not radio, for
security reasons.
6. A system of hand signals should be used by department
officers to direct fue fighters.
Personnel
Relief and Feeding
l. Plan for relief of crews on a' regular b asis so that men do
not beco·m e exhausted.
2. Do not overlook planning for fe eding crews. Civil Defense
authorities can probably be of great assistance.
Recall
l. Plan for speedy recall of off-duty men and a manning
schedule for splitting two-piece companies and activating
reserve apparatus.
2. Plan for reassignment of men in salvage companies, e tc. ,
that may te necessary during such times.
Protection
1. Identify protective measures and procedures for implementation during tim es of tension.
2. Notif y police to obtain arm ed guards for active units.
3. Order all men to wear full protective equipment , including face shield s, if available .
4 . Warn all men not to operate alone in the event of trouble;
officers to p ay particular attention to pump operators and
hydrant men .
5 . Order all men and officers to wear same colored protective clothing and helmet s when disorder signal is re ceived .
This in cludes chief officers.
6 . Prepare an evacuation plan for stations in critical areas.
7. Assign a fue fi ghter with good fust aid knowledge to each
apparatu s.
Mutual Aid
1. Do not call mutual aid until af ter your own men are
recalled .
2. Advise all mutual aid companies that may be called of
yo ur plans and their place in them .
a. T ype of equipment which m ay be needed.
b . Double m anning for units to provide fo r relief.
c . Location to respond to for convoy directions.
3. Ad vise mutu al aid companies as to where to assemble in
convoys fo r later response to predete rmined assembly
areas.
Operations
1. Set fort h on-site opera tional activities to be implemented
if a civil disturb ance em ergency occurs.
8
2 . Provide writtell documentation of authorities and responsibilties of key participants in the plan.
3. Provide basic guidance for gathering intelligence and for
activating communication s necessary to make tim ely and
effective decisions.
4. Provide maps and inventories necessary to make effective
decision s and take effective action.
5. Identify priorities to be considered in local fue defense .
_6. Fire service and law enforcement agencies must work
together to solve the problems.
7. Frequent briefings must be held with Federal, State,
County , and local law enforcement agencies to keep
aware of any possible condition that might arise.
8. Coordinate all plans with local police, sheriff, and National Guard and jointly plan police protection for all
task force units .
9. Plan a basic task force of two pumpers, one ladder, and
one chief officer for operations. A third pumper may b e
sub stituted if ladder comp any shortage exists.
10. AU task force companies should immediately remove
axes, bars, nozzle s, and other equipment from exterior of
apparatu s and place them in compartments or otherwise
under cover.
11 . AU open-cab apparatu s should immediately be protected
by means of shields previously prepared and in readiness.
12. Provide mutual aid and command arrangements necessary
for effective fire defense .
13 . Don't commit your forces until certain of need. Make
certain armed guards are on hand .
14 . Decide whether or not to respond to obvious false
alarm s.
15 . Warn all officers not to respond with red lights or sirens
where mobs are gathered.
16 . Order fire station doors closed and maintain only a minimum of illumin ation.
17. Chief officers may have to move from on e location to
another du e to the numbers of fues.
18. When an area is considered unsafe, fire alarms should not
be answered in that area.
19 . Units attacked upon responding to an alarm should leave
at once.
20 . Task forces should respond to and re turn from all calls as
a group .
21. Use hit and run tactics .
a. Task for ces should attempt to k nock dow n and
black out fires as quickly as pos ible with heavy
streams. Small fues should b e attacked with preconnected lines to maintain mobility .
b. Keep men together an d operate as closely as possible
to apparatu s.
c . Keep hose lines to minimum length .
d . Use straight stream s for best reach .
e. Make maximum use o f wago n pipes, turre ts, etc. If
mutual aid is required , make your call imm ediately .
f. Do not overhaul or even think of salvage.
g. Never le t m en operate alone - at least two men
should always b e with the apparatu s.
h . When fire is blacked o ut, pick up and ge t ou t of the
area as quickly as p ossible.
22. Provide policies for trai ning personnel as necessary to
cope with potential local fire threat.



�October 29, 1969
Chief C. H. Hildebrand, Jr.
Atlanta Fire Department
46 Courtland Street, S. E.
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Chief:
I am indebted to you for having sent me a copy of the Annual Report of the
Fire Department. I shall pass it around the premises. It ls mo t complete
and the taxpayer can read It and answer all the questions, and I know It is
prepared with no small amount of work.
I have been in Atlanta seventy-seven years, they say, and with this company
almost sixty years. I have known many firemen ln my time and remember
when many of the various houses were built, and when Assistant Chief Bill
Cummings lived ln the block near me at Pulliam Street and Georgia Avenue.
By the way, the fire bell in one of the boxes was actually repeated in his
residence. One of the things all of us carried in those days was a card with
the number of the fire alarm boxes and their street addres1.
You have a right to be proud of your department and so has our Mayor·, for
whom I have a profound respect.
Sincerely yours,
GWW:aac
cc: Mayor Ivan Allen /
~
~
~5~-;
.. AA~\\
l / /L
P.1,:_·
�behind the news
National Economic Council, Inc.
230 Park Avenue
New York, N. Y. 10017
BILL COULD WREC K' FEDERAL RESERVE
TWENTY- FIVE BANKERS - the largest in the nation
were asked to hold the line on interest rates by Treasury
July 27. - Secretary David M. Kennedy
However, no promises were made, and small businessmen
on
have begunto worry since last month's 8 ½% historic increase on lendlngmtere~ -Chairman Wright Patman (D.,Texas) of the House Banking Committee, ca lled on Nix0n to decide whether the
Secretary should be removed from offi ce . He said :
"The Secretary had the 25 largest bankers in the room for
2½ hours and he could not bring himself to speak up for
the American public and ask for a roll back in interest rates.
In my opinion, the Secretary has abdicated his office."
William McChesney Martin attended the meeting, and was
repo rted as smi ling throughout t he meeting ... But Wright
- - - -Patman may have the last laugh on Martin.
Patman introduced a bill (H.R. 27) which may destroy the
Central Banking System which has lootedthe world, and
made perpetual debtors of all Americans - the most product ive people since time began.
Patman made Martin admit !!}_ ~ Congressional hearing that
t he Federal Reserve holds $52 billion f!! Government Securities_paid for in full, but o n which t he American people are
still payinginterest.
Patman pointed out that this should be subtracted from
the national debt.
If the Federal Reserve System breaks up and Co ngress
regains it s Constitut ional right to mint money, the United
States would fast become financially solvent.
An organ ization of international mo ney-lenders and users,
who have usurped the right of the American people to coin
their own money, and have made the American people
pay for it, now have been caught charging the American
people for a debt that has a lready been pa id .
The international bankers will no doubt J!.!!!. millions out
to destroy the new bill. That wi ll be a sma ll price to pay for
their ho ld over this count ry .
DELLINGER : "THE MAN IN RED"
at PARIS TA LKS
NEW LEFT LEADE R David Dell inger's representing the
United States of America in prisoner negotiation with the
North Vietnamese !!! Paris, has shocked Americans, and
utterly shaken members' of Congress fa it h in Secretary of
Sta-::e. Wil liam P. Rogers.
Members of the House Committee on Internal Security,
under the prodding of Representative Albert Watson (R., S.
C.}, demanded " an explanation of t his sordid and unbelievable episode".
August, 1969
No. 4
Representative Watson wrote t o Rogers : " As a member of
the House Committee on Internal Security, I have had an
opportunity to question Dellinger at length . . . He is
dedicated to the overthrow of the United States Government .. . By ~ own admission , the radical bra nd of communism is appealing to him. To even entertain the idea of
allowing David Dellinger to in any way, officially or unofficially, represent the United States is one of the most
preposterous schemes I've heard in my over t wenty years of
public service."
Dellinger was under indictment for his criminal acts in
inciting a riot, violation of T it le 18, Section 2101 of the
United Stat es Code, at the time he represented the United
States.
ANTI -SEMITISM AT ALL TIME HI GH
IN THE U.S.
ANTI -SEMITISM IS AT ALL T IME HIGH in the United
States, according to the Jewish Times.
Boris Smolar, a columnist in the Times, noted that many
white Christia ns and Negroes openly and strongly are ant iJ ewish.
"It (anti -semit ism) is beginning to show signs of becoming
an acceptable subject after fa lling into d isrepute for more
t han a quarter of a century ", he said .
The Nat ional Jewish Community Re lations Advisory
Council blamed the new open feeling against Jews o n Arab
propaganda in this country .
The N.C.R .A.C. predicted the expansion of this antiJewish propaganda in "everysphere of Americar1public
life, including campuses, churches, church organi zations,
t he mass media and public forums" .
-Acco rding to the NEC's study 0n this problem we have
fo und only o ne Arab o rgan ization which puts out much
anti-J ewish propaganda, and that is on ly on the Israeli
quest ion . This organization is the Arab Palestine Delegation
to the U.N.
According to our study t he growing ant i-sem itic feeling
has severa l causes:
(1) Israeli aggression against the Arabs. In spite!!! massive
propaganda b y the powerful Jewish-owned press and television for Israel's seizure g.f Arab lands, Americans feel that
Israel under the protectio n of t he U.S. has beeA a warmonger of t he worst t ype , and t hat American Jews are
aiding and abetting what is even against the best interests
of the United States.- - - - - - - - - - - - ---
(2 ) Many libera l and left-wing groups such as The AntiDefamat ion League, Civil Liberties Union, Lawyers Gui ld,
League for Industrial Democracy, American League for
Peace and Democracy, American Committee for Protection
of F0reign Born, American Peace Crusade, Americans for
�c>eihocratic Action are composed largely of Jews.
Revolutionary groups of the New Left as S.D.S. are reported to be one-half to two-thirds Jewish. The average
American feels that many of these organizations are led by
Jews.
(3) Jewish owned newspapers, magazines, T.V., and movies,
and Jewish writers, book authors, and motion picture producers, often support or are identified with pornography.
(4) Jewish insistence in many cities and towns on abolishing
Christian traditions in schools and publir, places. These
predominantly ChristTan towns resent being forced to abandon the Christmas tree, the singing of Carols and prayer in
the schools.
(5) Forcif) g of membersh ip for Jews by political pressure on
hitherto private clubs.
(6) Political harassment by the Anti-Defamation League
etc., of conservative organizations who are not anti-Jewish,
but simply patriotic. Also political pressure keeps these
groups from gaining tax exemption , and further harasses
thei r donors. About 80% of all Americans are conservative.
JAVI TS AND 23 OTHERS PRO-COMMUNIST
BY VOTING RECORD
SENATOR JACOB JAV ITS led the way "in giving aid and
comfort to the enemy" in the 90th Congre'ss:- - - On eighteen anti -communist bills, Javits voted 18 times
for the communists.
Some of t hese bills are : Giving the President discretionary
autho rity t o give aid to communist countries, ot her than
t he Sov iet Union, even if they export arms and strategic
weapons t o the Soviet Union and Red China. (Voted Yes) ;
Barring foreign aid to countries trading arms and strategic
materialstocommunist countries. (No); Permitting the
Presiden t to give or sell surplus food to communist countries (Yes);Barringaid to Nations trading in strat egic materials with thecommunist block (No) ; Amendment authorizing t he President to allow aid to commun ist countries at his
d iscretion. (Yes) ;
To delay date of rat ification of the NUCLEAR TEST
BAN T REATY unt il it was revised to provide fo r adequate
on-site in spection (No) ; That So viet Consular Treaty not
take effect until Soviet aid to North Vietnam cease (No) .
Full immunit y from criminal prosecution fo r Soviet and
UT personnel assigned t o fut ure consulates, and to authorize the establishment of such co nsulates (Yes) ; Soviet Space
Treaty : Treaty banning the use of outer space fo r military
purposes, but not providing for inspection to insure Soviet
compliance (Yes);
Twenty -three other senators having almost the same voting record are : Sparkman of Alabama; Inouye of Hawaii;
Ribicoff of Connecticut; Musk ie of Maine; Hart of Michigan; Griffin of Michigan; McCarthy of Minnesota; Mondale
of Minnesota (late comer) ; Metcalf of Montana; Case of
New Jersey; Will iams of New Jersey ; Kennedy of New York
(deceased) ; Bu rdick of Nort h Dakota; Monroney of Oklahoma; Harris of Oklahoma ; Clark of Pennsylvania; Pastore
of Rhode Island; Pell of Rhode Island; Gore of Tennessee;
Baker of Tennessee; Moss of Ut ah; Randol ph of West Virgi nia; McGee of Wyoming.
The hi ghest rating anti -commu nist Congressmen are :
McClellan (Ark.), Will iams (Del.), Ru ssell (Ga.), Jordan
(Idaho), Eastland and Stenn is (Miss .), Curtis and Hruska
(Neb.), Thurmond (S.C.), Mundt (S.D.), Tower (Texas),
Bennett (Utah). Smith (Me.).
TAXPAYERS REVOLT COMING
A TAX REVOLT by the American people is brewing.
Citizens may absolutely refuse to pay taxes, according to
The New York State Taxpayer. - -More and more people, finding that taxes are too heavy
are going on the relief doles. Savings havedropped and
business expansion is slowing down .
In 1969, the American worker will labor two hours and
34 minutes of his 8-hour workingday to pay his federal,
state and local taxes - the largest single item in the budget.
Housing costs him 1 hour; food and tobacco, 56 minutes;
transportation , 40 minutes; clothing, 25 minutes; medical
bills 21 minutes; recreation 18 minutes; all others, 1 hour
and 46 minutes.
Meanwhile the value of the dollar sinks lower and lower,
and the tax reform is just talk. Taxing bodies refuse to cut
back their expenditures to combat inflation and bolster the
economy. Few Congressmen listen to their taxpayers'
laments. All that spending-money for bigger and bigger
government is too tempting.
Martin A. Larson, in his book, "The Great Tax Fraud, "
calls the income tax "An empire of Tnµ;s~ -Under the schedule of fiscal 1969, the levy upon personal
incomes reaches 49. % at $18,000, 68.2% at $50,000 and
77% at $100,000.
Mr. Larson, who pointed out the loopholes and the
inequities of tax, says; "if ten principal types of legal tax
avoidance were abolished, the National Treasury would
have $20 billion more annually, even while excusing 80% of
~I!!!:!! people from all direct federal taxation.
Larson demonstrates that honesty with the Internal
Revenue Service is almost certain to plunge an independent
business man into ruin .
Tax lawyers' latest clients are just plain taxpayers organ-
izing into corporations!!! fight the unfair tax.
--
CONGRESSM EN ON A CONSTITUTI ONA L
CR ISIS- THE POWELL DECISION
" Chief Justice Warren in his swa n song has given t he
American people his final insult, a license to any Member of
this body t o misappropriate public t ax funds under judi cial
protection from the wrath of honest men.
If th is House is t o bow t o court orders controlli ng the
conduct of its internal bu siness-the separatio n of powerst he Constitutio n it self is dead.
If we bow t o t he orders of the Supreme Court it necessarily fo llows t hat we beco me subserv ient to the o rders of
any lesser Federal judge" ... Rarick ( Rep. La.)
The Founding Fathers provided that the jud iciary, the
legislative, and t he executive departments are equal , coordinate, and independent in their powers and judgment . And ,
if I can comprehend plain langu age, that document also
provif.1les that the House shall be the judge of the qu al ifications of its own Members .
Finally, so far as I am concerned , I believe t hat the House
should take the attitude of a former great President of the
Unit ed States, Andrew Jackson . After the Supreme Court
had reached a decision in Worchest er against Georgia, March
3, 1832, which he tho ught infringed upon constitutional
rights of t he Executive , President Jackson said:
'John Marshall has made his dec ision. Now let him enforce
�it."' ... Colmer (ReP,_. Miss.)
"Permissiveness is thus sanctioned for the highest places in
American life. Two years ago the gentleman from New
York (Mr. Powell) was a fugitive from justice. As such, he
would have been barred from induction into military service. Yet the Court finds he was entitled to sit in a legislative body which orders other men into service" ... Van
Deerlin (Rep.Cal.)
DEAD BLONDES TELL NO TALES
TEDDY KENNEDY'S STRANGE INT~RLUDE WITH A
BLONDE may not affect his popularity very long ... Our
sources report that the KK machine has already greased
up for the line-up of contenders for President in 1972:
Demohats, Repu.blicans and Independents.
Governor Ronald Reagan, Senator Edmund Muskie and
George Wallace: Watch for special smears carefully done on
each.
Did Jack's eye for a pretty girl ruin his chances for
presidency? ... And Bob's romantic involvement with
Marilyn Monroe. That was shut up and glossed over.
.......... Dead blondes tell no tales.
THE MAN WHO KILLED
MARTIN LUTHER KING
Christian Century, a leading non-denominational weekly
recently proposed on its editorial page that churches -
Protestant and Catholic - canonize Martin Luther King.
On June 2. on the House floor, Rep. Robert A. Liggitt,
eulogized King, "as!!. leader !!!_ the fight against communism".
Throughout the United States efforts are being made to
make King look like a saint. More has been done to make
King a martyr thanhas been done to save the Rosenbergs or
any other communist sympathizer.
Even before his death, Congressmen knew the score about
King. They were saying:
"They've got to kill him. Everybody knows too much
about King. You can't have a tarnished hero, but you could
have a tarnished martyr".
The F .B. I. disclosed its wiretappings on King, over Justice
Department objections at a Federal District Court this June
4, showing King participating and planning violence with
Black Muslim leaders.
A confidential report by the F .B. I. in 1967 was in the
hands of three Congressional Committees showing that
King was a Communist agent, receiving sums and taking
Tnsii-uctlons which he faitiifiiiiy carried out. Congressmen
planned to summon King.
The F.B.I. had proof King violated the Mann Act (white
slavery) of the U.S. Criminal Code. Neither Attorney Generals Katzenbach, nor Ramsey Clark w0uld allow the F.B.I.
to present this evidence to a Federal Grar:id Jury.
Congressman George W Andrews placed an account of
King's national car theftring in the Congressional Record in
1966, but the Justice Department had instructions from
L.8.J. to protect his image, and refused to let the F.B.I.
arrest
- - -him.
-
Dr. King revealed in his own words that he gave plans to
Stokey Carmichael to set up black militant organizations in
order to dislocate the functioning of major cities without
destroying them. King trained subversives in the techniques
gf violence that looked non-violent.
- -
The F .B.I., although a branch of the Justice Department,
refused to keep quiet about King and Americans learned
the truth.
Who killed King? Someone who wanted .E. martyr and the
passage of the 1968 Civil Rights Bill.
King hadlilmost lost his usefulness to the international
conspiracy to destroy the U.S. Money quit coming in from
Negroes and white "little givers". The full cost of his
activities- fell back to the Warburgs, Soviet agents and a
little gang of communist professional revolutionists who
first launched King into orbit.
The only way to make King.look good was as a corpse.
Was Ray a paid killer for those who needed a martyr? Or
was he framed by one of the very ruthless and dangerous
enemies of America who killed King?
NEW HOUSE BILL GIVES HEW $12,000,000
FOR FORCING INTEGRATION: $344,000
TO PROTECT AGAINST OVERTHROW OF
UNITED STATES
A Bill for Four Government Departments - State, Justice,
and Commerce, the Judiciary - "and related agencies for
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1970, and for other purposes" has just been passed. This catch-all bill was fought
by some of the more sophisticated members of Congress.
"Other purposes" sneaked into the bill are: Obligations of
membership in international multilateral organizations $130, 187,000; community relations services - $3,077,000;
minority business enterprises - $1,200,000; commission on
civil rights - $2,650,000; civil rights education, HEW $12,000 000; equal employment opportunity commission
- $10,000,000.
The Hon. John R. Rarick of Louisiana said in the House
of Representatives on July 24, 1969:
"Moneywise, our people at home will conclude that we
are 36 times more determined to fight them than we are to
protect them from the ever-growing threat of communist
tyranny".
Rarick says that the civil rights money is not for education toward integration, but like all HEWmonies, is used to
strongarm citizens into compliance.


ADA AND THE ABM ASSASSINS
AMER ICANS FOa DEMOCRAI IC ACIION are tr.ying te
kill the ABM in their biggest fundraising d rive to date.
AOL, with a huge picture of homely Arthur Schlesinger on
its latest direct mail piece, states:
"ADA organizers are forming and helping anti-ABM
cofninunity groups throughout the country. ADA 7ejfs7atfve
representatives work daily on Capitol Hill in close contact
with the increasing number of senators and congressmen
who share our doubts about the infallibility of the mil itary
mind".
Such persons as these appear on the Board of ADA:
Reinhold Niebuhr, honorary chairman; John Kenneth
Galbraith, national chairman: Meyer Berger, treasurer; vice
chairmen, Walter P. Reuther ("Y0urs for a Soviet America"). HarisG. Morgenthau , David Dubinsky, Joseph L.
Rauh, Jr., Marvin Rosenberg.
Many of the people on this board appear on countless
other boards of leftwing organizations which are interested
in World Government, destroying American sovereignty,
building up the welfare state, and heavy taxation, unlimited
.,
�government spending, aml anything except preserving the
strength of the United States in a communist-expanding
world.
Polls show that the public !!_ backing President Nixon 's
proposed ABM system. 8 out of 10 Americans prefer over
to under nucleur capability .
Yet Congressmen state that their mail !! running l1_ ~
against ABM. That means a vocal and active minority !!_
putting on the pressure to leave America defenseless.
Yet our entire defense system is under attack.R.O .T .C.,
most effective anti-drug organizations created. It aims at
the young people in grade schools, high schools and
colleges.
Its bulletins are shocking, but they lay it on the line as to
what happens to kids who take drugs .
The raw facts are there, and they are backed up by
experts.
Write to them at 3875 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles,
California, if you would like to help .
university projects for military research, scientific research
all are being attacked .
WARNING:
ON THE DECLINE AND FALL OF A NATION
NEW TYPES OF REVOLUTIONARIES
"We are taxed in our bread and our wine , in our incomes
and our investments, on our land and on our property not
only for base creatures who do not deserve the name of
men, but for foreign nations, complaisant nations who will
bow to us and accept our largesse and promise us to assist
in the keeping of the peace - these mendicant nations who
will destroy us when we show a moment of weakness or our
treasury is bare , and surely it is becoming bare! We are
taxed to maintain legions on their soil, in the name of law
and order and the Pax Romana, a document which will fall
into dust when it pleases our a llies and our vassals. We keep
them in precarious balance only with our gold . Is the
heartblood of our nation worth these? Were they bound to
us with ties of love, they would not ask our gold . They ta ke
our very flesh, and they hate and despise us . And who shall
say we are worthy of more? . .. When a government becomes powerful it is destructive, extravagant and violent ; it
is an usurer which ta kes bread from innocent mouth s and
deprives honorable men of their substance, fo r votes with
which to perpetuate itself. " - Cicero, 54 B.C.
YOUNG P EOPLE HAVE FOUND A SQUARE REVOLUTIONARY they are proud to follow. He follows the Jefferson brand of revolt. His name is Ed Butler, and he publishes
a rapidly growing publication called "Square Magazine".
Mr. Butler believes that leaders of S.D.S. want to set up a
Marx ist dictatorship . His slogan is "Strike back " and youngsters across the nation are joining up to help him.



* * *




The National Youth Alliance represents America's young
conservatives. On its Board are young college professors,
news analysts, writers, military heroes and just plain cleancut American kids .




* *






Council on Dangerous Drugs promises to be one of the
,
Extra copies of this Bu lleti n 1 5 ¢ eac h ; 8 for $1. 00 ; 1 0 0 for $10.00 ; 1 ,000 for $6 5 .00
National Economic Council, Inc., 230 Park Avenue, New York, N. Y. 10017
�Sir:
Wi t hin the next f ew week there will be t wo retirements in the Atlanta Fire
Department. The Chief and 1st Asst Chief.
0
We have a Alderman on the Board of Firernasters that has a personal friend who
he wants to make Chief of the department. This would be fine if he was the
most qualified man.
This Alderman is more interested with his personal gains than with the city
interesto
The Chief of the Atlanta Fire Depart ment is a very i mportant position and with
times like they are today it would be a shame for the Mayor and Board of
Firemasters to sit back and l et this Alderman appoint his friend brother
when there is better mateeial available.
Why not interview some of the Division Heads in the Fire Department and select
the most qualified man.
Speak up, do not let t his Alderman lower the moral of the department anymore.
Such things as this is why the moral is so low in the Fire Department today .
The other Chief Officers i n t he dapartment wi ll not even be cons idered for
this position because they do not have a brot her who is connected with this
Alderman.
�BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH
P. 0. \~ ILLIAMS
Born in \~ inchester, Tennessee on January 27 , 1916, Chi ef Paul Ott is
Williams attended public school in Adairsville, Georgia; and Tec1
High School in At lanta, Georgia .
Chi ef Williams interrupte d his career i n the Atlanta Fire Uepartme nt
which began Septembe r l , 1942, to serve in t he U. S. ~avy for three
years during World War II. Upon 1i s return, he worked his way
throug h t he ranks to his present position. He was appo i nt ed Fire
En gineer 7/2/4~, promoted to t he ran k of Lieute nant 10/1/ 52,
Ca ptai n 1/4/57, Batta lion Chi ef 1/1 1/ 62, and Ueputy Chi ef 3/2/67.
On Ap ril 1, 1969, Chi ef Willi ams wi ll have attai ned nis life l ong
amb i t ion of be i ng Ch i ef oft e Atlanta Fire Department .
Married to t he form er Christine Ho ll and on July 1, 1936, they are
the pa rents of t wo ch il dren : daugh t er Be tty Jane who is a senior at
Sy1va n Hi gh School , and son Paul Jr . v1ho is at t end i ng t he University
of Georg i a. \.J ith a devo t i on to f amil y, Chief l·Jilliams enjoys campi ng
and fish i ng tr i ps wit h his fami ly, ha s de voted much time to wo rk
wit h t he boy scouts, and i s a membe r of the Capitol View I ethodi st
Churc h.
Ever alert to the needs of a prog ress ive Fire Department, Chief
Willi ams attended a Seminar at the Un iversi ty of Geo rgia on Fire
Administrat i on in 1968 and is present ly attending week ly classes on
Executive Development in Muni ci pal Governmen ts conducted as a part of
the Un iversity of Georgia Sys tem.
�)\
Metropolitan Cities That Do Not Operate a Fire Department Shop.
The following question was asked of each nrunicipality that is
covered by t hio survey. "As the Chief of your department, would
you give your candid opinion as to which method is more efficient?"
Cincinnati, Ohio
Chief B. A. Lugannani
Comment: There are good arguments pro and con on both methods of
maintaining equipment. However , all factors being equal, I t h ink
there can be little question th at when the repair shop is, part_ _ _
of the Fire Department, the quality and quantity of the work
are far superior to that obtained from an agency responsible
for the maintenance of a wide variety of automotive equipment.
A comparison of Fire Department maintenance shops in Cincinna~i
and Columbus, Ohio readily demonstrates this. The Columbus s .t.ops
are well maintained, with mechanics trained in the servicing of
fir~ ~quipment only, who devot e their entire time to meeting the
needs of the Fire Service and who are subject to Fire Department
discipline. In Cincinnat i the area designated as the Fire Division
shop is shared with street s weeper s, a tire shop and a wash rack. ·
The general appearance is more that of a truck junkyard than of
an efficient, well maintained repair shop. Although me chani cs
are supposed to be assigned to Fire apparatus, there is frequent
transferring of personnel so that s ome men whose major me chanical
experience is that gained in the lawn mower and small car shop
are assigned as Fire equipment me ch ani cs under supervisors with
little more experience. Over the years, the Fire Division has
lost pra ctically all effective control over this agency. The
situation in general is far from satisfactory.
There is an area, however, which a Fire Chie f cannot ignore
in evaluating a centrali zed maintenance sh op. This is the
area of economy to the municipal operation. Unquestionably
the maintenance of separate repair agencies--pers onnel,
equipment , buildings, etce--for each City department cannot
help but be more costly than when they are centralized, taking
advantage of the e conomies that are achieved through the consolidation of personnel, equipment and buildings. Although the
centraliz ' d agency will probably never serve an individual
deµ3.rtment or division as e ~e ~~v~:J ~s o~ ·
~
· t~se tto


wn



=

i




·, ~ r~believe it can be operated with a degree of effic:
would be acceptable, if a City Administration establishes controls that restrict the maintenance facility to a service
organization and insure the operating agencies of supervisory
contro.l over the i r own work and full control over selection and
approval of thei. r equipment
For a Fire Department that for years has maintained a high
level of efficiency and discipline, and recently at tained a
Class One A.I.Aerating, our present maintenance facility
is an eyesore and a disgrace. City Administration is becoming
aware of this, and it is anticipated that some corrective
action will be forthcoming.
-1-
�Metropolitan Cities That Do Not Operate a Fire Department Shop.
The f ollowing question was a s ked of each nrunici pal i ty that is
covered by this survey. "As the Chief of your department, would
you give your candid opinion as to which method is more efficient?"
Cincinnati, Ohio
Chief B. A. Lugannani
Comment: There are good a rguments pr o and con on both meth ods of
ma intaining equipment. Howev er 1 all factors bei ng equal, I think
t here c an b e l i t t l e qu es tion that when th e repai r s ho p is part
i
of the Fire Department , the qua lity and quantit y of the work
are far s uper ior to that obtained f r om an agency responsibl e
for the ma i ntenance of a wi de variety of automotive equi pment.
A comparison of Fire De partment maint en ance shops i n Cincinnati
and Columbus, Ohi o readily demonstrat es this. The Columbus shops
a re well maintained, with me chan i cs tra ined i n th e ser vicing of
f ire ~quipment ·only, wh o devot e thei r entir e time to meeting the
needs of the Fire Servic e a nd wh o a r e subject to Fire Depart ment
discipline. In Cin cinnati t h e area designated as t h e Fire Division
s hop is shared with s t reet s weep er s 9 a tire shop and a wash rack.
The general ap pearanc e i s more t h at of a truc k junkyard than of
an effi ci ent, well maint ained repair shop . Alt hough me chani cs
are su pposed t o b e a s signed to Fire apparatus, t h ere is frequ ent
transferring of pers onnel so t hat some men whose ma jor me chanical
ex perience is tha t gained i n t he lawn mower and small car s hop
are assign ed as Fire equ ipment me chanics und er supervisor s wit h
little more experienc e . Over the yearsj the Fire Division has
l ost pra cti cally all e ff e ctive control over t his agenc y . The
situation in general is far from satisfact ory.
There is an area , howev er, which a Fire Chief cannot ignore
in evalu ating a centrali zed maint enan ce sh op . This is the
area of economy t o the municipal operation. Unquestionabl y
the maintenance of separate repair agencies--personnel,
equipment, buildings, etc.--for each Cit y department cannot
help but be more costly than when they are centralized, taking
advantage of the economies that are achieved through the consolidation of pers onne l , equipment and buildings. Although th e
centraliz ed agency will probably never serve an individual
department or division as effectively as one of its own, I
believe it can be operat ed with a degree of efficiency 'that
would be acceptable» if a City Administration establishes control s that restrict the maintenance facility to a serv ice
organ iz ation and insure the operating agencies of supervisory
control over their own work and f u ll cqnt,.rol over selection and
approval of their equipment
1
For a
level
Class
is an
Fire Department that f or years has maintained a high
of efficiency and discipline, and recently attained a
One A. I.A. rating , our present maintenance facility
eyesore and a disgrace . City Administrat ion is becoming
aware of th isj and it is anticipated that some corrective
action will be forthcominga
-1-
�It may be of some value to r elat e so me of our background in
this area. Until shortly after the end of World War II, the
Fire Division did have its own r epai r sh op ~ with most personnel
being part of the uniformed ran kso At that t ime, i n an economy
move, the City centralized the mainten an ce sh ops und er one
J\fu nicipal Garag e operation. Ho wev er, the Fire Di vision retained
a supervisory position in the Municipal Garage with supervisory
authority over the mechanics wor ki ng on Fire apparatus and with
some voice in the transfer of men in and out of the Fire Department repai r section. This man , under the Fire Chief, had full
control over practically all matters concerning Fire equipment.
His position carried the ti·t l e of Sup ervisor of Fire Apparatus
and Equipment and had rank equal to a Battalion Chief.
· ·,
In January, 1966, over strenuous objection of the Fire .Division,
this position was abolished, and all operational control over
t he repai r facilities -by the Fire Divisi on was take n away.
Since then, we have be en able to show the need for filling the
vacated position, but it has be en r eestablished at the rank of
Lieutenant. The new position , however, has no supervisory
authority and little control over th e s hop work related to
Fire Department equipment and as to other duties and responsibilities assigned to the f nrmer. posi t i on at the Municipal
Garage . There has been strong opposi t i on from t he man i n charge
of municipal f a c i l i ties to the presen c e ,o f any Fire Division
personnel in his operation.
San Francisco, California.
Chief William Murray.
Comment: I f we had our own mai nt enanc e shop i t woul d b e more
effi cient .
J a cksonvi l le, Fl ori da.
Chie f J. J. Hubb a rd.
We
It
if
it
operated our own ma int enance sh op unt il Novemb er 1968.
is now u nder t h e Ci t y Motor Pool . I t is my opi nion that
we had our own s hop und er Fire Department Supervision
would be mor e effi c ient .
Fairfax Count yj Vi rginia.
Chi ef Wa Ha Burtonj Jr.
Comment: Cent ralized repair shop for alr ..the municipalit y may
wor k efficiently for t h e Fire Servicej but I do not believe t h is
would be possibl e without cl os a control b y the Fire Service.
Su ch contro l wi l l ne ces sit at e a well qua lified Superint endant
of Fir e Equipment and other personnel , al l under the control
of the Fire Chief .
-2-
.,
�Minneapolis, Minnesota.
Chief K. W. Hall.
Comment: Our Maintenance of Fire Apparatus is conducted by the
Equipment Division of the Department of Public Works. We are
satisfied with the service and fe el that it is more efficient
and economical than it was when under the Fire Department.
This is partly due to having to use the shop to employ various
disabled fire fighters whereas this is not possible now.
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
Chief Harry J. Keller.
Comment: No, we do not operate our Maintenance Shop. It is
my opinion it would be better under the Fire Department Supervision.
Newark , New Jersey.
Chief J.M. Redden.
Comment: I find that c entralized maintenance, as opposed to
a Fire Department operated shop, to be a severe detrement to
Fire Department operations.
Cleveland, Ohio.
Comment: A separate and. complete maintenan ce would be more
efficient.
New Haven, Conn ecticut .
Chief Frank Sweeny.
Comment: No Department takes c are of its equipment like the
Fire Service. You will not be satisfied with a City operated
repair complex.
Jersey City, New Jersey.
Chief R. A. Gibney.
Comment: A central garage maintained by the Department of
Public Works maintains our equipmente This arrangement has
been in existence short period of time., _ JJnable to say which
method is more efficient.,
New Orleansj Louisiana
Comment: A shop operated by the Fire Department for Fire Department e qu ipment is the only way a large Department can keep equipment rolling • .

.3
V
/
�Salt Lake City, Utah.
Comment: Public Safet y Garage comprises: Fire Department,
Police Department, and Boa~d of Health, all under the direction
of the Fire Department Master Me chani c. We think our system
of public safety works very well. We always have our fire
apparatus under our supervision.
Tulsa, Oklahoma.
Chief E. s. Hawkins.
Comment: We had our o~m sho p for some 50 years, but for many
reasons--cost, help, etc., we joined a Central City Maintenance
Shop. A Fire Department Shop is more efficient ' when adequate
quarters and personnel can be providedo Most cities are growing
so rapidly that a Central Garage is a must. We have a firm
understanding that our emergency equipment co mes first.
Richmond, Virginia.
Chi ef Sherry .
Comment: I think a separate Maintenance Shop is more efficient
and more economical.

4
.
�The undersigned are reside nts _g!_ ~he_ Seminole Court Apartments . The buildf9g _
at 585 Seminole Ave . , N. E. , directly South of the apartments, is to be razed
in the near future because of the Expressway . Several other buildings in this
neighborhood have been razed by Hudgins and Company, and the combustible materials were burned at the site . However, the law limiting the size of the fire
to 10 feet in diameter was not obeyed , the fires were often 40 to 50 f e et in
diameter, and the material was not completely burned but was doused with water
and left smouldering for several days . Also, the burned-out debris was not
taken away. This caused an unpleasant odor, and is harmful to the health .
Because of the dang~r of fire to the Seminole Court Apartments, whose upper
floors are constr ucted of wood , and the failure of the contractors t o observe
the law, we are r espectfully petitioning you to refuse a permit to the contractors to burn the combus t ible material whe n razing the building at 585 Seminole
Ave ., N. E.
(Y?!
s- Cf I
-s-93 5eMl",oc/£ /lv€ A)E. Ar:
6 - 9 7 ~~
fl
Ck--N.'
ff?
f_e_ _( {
&
�CONSOLIDATED MONTHLY REPORT
For the month of December
FIRE DEPARTMENT
A
CLASSIFICATION OF ALARM•
How Alarms Were Received:
Box
Teleol,one
Auxiliary and Miscellaneous
Total Alarms
FIRES
In Building,
Brush or Grass
Rubbish near Buildings
Rubbish in Vacant Lots
Dumps ·
Miscellaneous Fires Outdoora
Vehicles in Street
Total Fires
~

-
This
Month
Last
Month
136
1020
157
131 3
19 8
811
122
1131
117
641
114
8 72
186
371
11
1
1
16 8
19 7
14
154
102
5
1
4R
117
735
3R
99
522
lR
128
2 63
72
31
161
527
224
100
31
219
57 4
20 8
1262
This Month
Last Year
. ,I\
,
CALLS OTHER THAN FIRES
Rescue or Emergency
N eodless Calls
Accidental Alarms
False Alarms
Total Calls Other Than Fire,
~~
~
Total Alarms in City
6
This Year
to Date
2045
9 776
19
Last-Year
to Dato
13557
126 8
8224
1459
10951
2059
2683
105
16
25
1796
2113
136
20
24
1 7ih
LI.A t;
'"J.?7
1545
F,q ] R
1392
c; R0R
1838
34
132
436
2501
87 ?
36q
238?
6124
47 4 7
1096
844
1304 2
10555
51
35
28
515
396
51
35
28
515
396
1313
1131
8 72
13557
109 51
40A
F, ?
68
} ()Qt;
11q
14q c;
OUT-OF-CITY CALLS
Special Aid
Contract Aid
Mutual Aid
Total Out-of-City Calla
Total Alarm,
i
B
This
Month
DIRECT ... IIIE L08S
6 4 6 548
17
18
Fire Loss (Bett Figures to Date)
Persons Killed by Fire
Persons Injured
C
LOSS BY SIZE
OF' F'IRE
Over $15,000
$5,000 to $15,000
$1,000 to $5,000
$100 to $1,000
Less than $100
No Loss
4. 11
. 55
9.34
1 5.0 0
2034 . 68
3643 . 46
Thi s Year to Date
% of Lo11
% of Fires
3.20
5.71
10.91
20.18
5.18
54. 8 2
335232
3
5
. This Year to Date
INDEX ,..IGUIIIES
Fires per 1000 population
Fires per $1,000,000 valuation
Fires per 1000 buildings
Fire lo8S per capita
Fire loss per $1,000,000 valuation
Average Fire losa per building fire
D
Same Month
Last Year
77.05
12.56
7.75
2.55
.09
Last Year
% of Fires ¾ of Lo11
2.61
5.17
13.28
19.79
9.06
50.09
66.41
16.40
13.04
3.29
.36
This Year
to Date
7 702317
39
1 07
Laat Year
to Date
471 5 91 2
18
107
Lut Year to Date
3 . 50
. 50
8 . 14
9.05
. 12 9 6. 05
2S86 . 33
Additional data uaed In C above:
Population_ ,?_Q_Q.,_tQQ ____________ _
Valuation of Real Eatat.. corrected
to true value
Buildings in city_ ~?:.9,_.?§. _________ _
Note : Building fire, and loaea only are
used in C and D.
•--i~?..g4--4.Q,.~§.t __
�•
PAGE 2
E
Dece mbe r 1 9 6 8
This Year
to Date
ANALYS I S OF LOSS FIGURES
-
FIRES IN BUILDINGS
Insurance Carried on Property Involved in Fires
Preliminary E&timates of Insurance Losses
Total Valuation of Pro~ rty Involved in Fires
Insurance Losses Adju sted
Insurance Losses Pending (Preliminary Eatimatea)
Estimated Uninsured Louea
Best Figurea ·to Date
· Last Year
to Dato
4 78 21 7089
7 0 2 9388
613 9 13 8 7 8
40 2 3 251
352 0698
':47.250 8
7501 89 6
26 4 75 6 63 4
4 ?n11qn
327921026
3 36 08 20
1031732
25250 9
4 645061
200 4 2.L
7702317
7085.L
4715912
OUTDOOR FIRES (Automobilea, Graa1, Misc.)
Beat Figure, to D ate
Total1
.
,.
F
CAUSES OF FIRES
IN BUILDINGS
Fire•
Lon
(Beat Figure)
% of
Total
Lo11
No. of
Fire1
Lo11·
( Beat Fipre)
% of
Total
Lo..
I
Chimneys, Flues
3. Sparks on Wooden Shingle Roofl
4. Sparks on Other Roofing
5. Defective Heaters
6. Rubbish Near Heaters
7. Combustibles Near Heaten
a. Open Light,, Flamea
9. Hot Ashes
10. Oil Burners
11. Starting Fires, Kerosene, Gaao-
5
27
1F.7F.7
L1.Rq
9
41
11
152
14
99201
7945
2 3 8547
2 1 6100
1. 3 1 9
.105
3 . 172
2. 8 74
?.7 c;
00 1
c;
6.34 ?
.866
fi34
2 .074
3.343
.003
2.140
2
477
172
fi 1
149
84
1
64
15
2
]
line
42
12
6
14
12
12. Carele11 Smoking
Total Building Firee
No. of
LHt Year to Date
1
1. Chimneys, Soot Burning
2. Defective or Overheated
13. Children with Matches
14. Other Carele11 Uae of Matches
15. Defective Electric Wiring
16. Electric Appliances and Motors
17. Home Dry Cleaning
18. Other Use of Flammable Liquids
19. Lamps and Stov es
20. Gas and Appliances
21. Grease on Stoves
22. Spontaneous Igni tion
23. Fireworks
24. Lightning-Rodded B uildings
25. Lightning-Not Rodded
26. Thawing Pipes
27. Sparks from Machinery
28. Incendiary
29. Miscellaneous Known Causes
30. Suspiciou11
31. Unknown
Th11 Year to Date
No. of
Firea
Thi,
Month
6
1
535
132
58
151
122
1
66
A.1.-6e4h
65173
47fi83
155995
251355
250
160943
??
1
.L
29
10
1 14
9
4
?O F. l t;
.44
652 2 5
? 7A1t;
1 739 53
25 90
1700
RAnn
1.401
. 59l
3 . 7 3<
. 0 5c
. 031
10805
36473
169190
117fiS
29314.8
71390
. 23;
7. 76~
3. 63.
. 68 '
1. 30;
1. 53L
131727
2. 83 ..
l.02J
5.26
.09~
. 45,
. 00~
.67
8. 69'
4. 56:
. 04:
49. 58:
_ lR<
2
1
16
1
'
I
1
6
13
51
167
4
11015
207151
47c;
.146
2 755
28
141
oni::.
R
47520
24i;n19
4S80
1
17
4662 1
.620
20925
571149
116600
.278
7.596
1 . 550
9
2
16
134
90
2
157
21155
120
21500
404631
212349
2040
2306231
1796
4645061
?~
22
165
105
2
212
186
2059
4770880 53.452
7501896
�PAGE3
G
Thia Year to Date
Occupancy
of Building
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
I. PUBLIC BUILDINGS
Government Buildings
Hospitals and Institutions
Schools
Churches
Amusement Buildings
II. DWELLING OCCUPANCIES
a. Hotels
b.
c.
d.
e.
December 1 968
INSPECTIONS, FIRES, AND LOSSES l!IY OCCUPANCIES
Lodging Houses
Apartments
Dwellings
Stores and Dwellings
III. MERCANTILES
Office Buildings
Small Retail Stores
Restaurants
Large Single Occupancy
Mercantilea
e. Multiple Occupancy Mercantiles
f. Wholesale Houses
11. Storue Warehouses
a.
b.
c.
d.
IV. MANUFACTURING
Textile, Fabric Workers
Metal Workers
W ood Workers
Food Products
Chemical Works
Flammable Liauids and Gases
Multiple Occupancy Manufacturin2
b. Miscellaneous Manufacturin2
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
V.
a.
b.
c.
d.
MISCELLANEOUS BLDGS.
Lumber Yards
Railroad, Wharf Property
Bulk Oil Stora2e
Public Garages and Filling
Stations
e. Private Garaa:es
f. Miacellaneoua Structurea
Total in BuiJdinga
Inspectlona
Firea
La1t Year to Date
LolHI
Inapectiona
Firea
Lo11e1
192
489
1 ? qo
629
1077
2
17
lR
10
17
6 5 200
5714
? 4.hR l q
52258
14565 0
156
45 1
1078
658
8 15
2
13
10
15
6
1286 7
1 66100
48946 5
64190
281
337
563 9
164
84
78
23
507
8 76
6
1771 5
4 5 49 5
504710
148 7918
2550
225
3 93
c:;1 2?
q7
7?
85
25
Ll.lq
RO t;
4.
43 319
16095
L].q ? ?04.
11nc.c; ? h
t; R? OO
1 1 92
4 3 17
971
45
116
68
2439975
42481 0
160275
1567
1 Rl R
q4. 1
48
c:;?
c; 7
275950
1177qo
?L1LLR77
496
159
112 4
2300
14000
34075
226918
398
1c:;1
770
1053
5
1
5
23
2500
1 n<rn
4
6
7
c:;o
73000
133100
298
c:;c:;2
154
171
93
qR7
24
l7
6
3
2
25
50190
1 H; 1 01
.2]7 00
16
23550
Q
c;Ann
250
2656
234
c:;4. 7
H,F.
137
118
943
R
5
4
29
?c:;nnn
150
ROR71
762C::,
77
568
7
2S4000
31
6-=!0
l c;
558599
123
11
1
1
2
5000
l
7SOO
1147
1183
703
lR
c:;c:;qi:;
44
60
34712
129310
899
1420
i::.R1
26
60
LI. c;
141180
?41?41
37160
25659
2059
501896
23579
1796
4645061
,
7
67
29
8
2
�H
December 1 968
FIR E S AND LOSSE S B Y TYP E OF B UILDING
Lo11e1 to Date
Fires to Date
Type of Building
Thie Year
BUILDING IN WHICH FIRE STARTED
Fi re-Resistive:
R einforced Concrete
Protected Steel Frame
Not Fire-Resistive *:
Brick or Stone Walls
Iron-Clad
Concrete Block or Tile Walla
Wood Frame
Not Classified
Totals in Buildings Where Started
Last Year
103
2
2 4 2393
22 88576
6512 8 3
2 460
9 28
31
58
9 20
12
8 50
27
39
750
19
27 6189 7
J 74?10
2 8381
qi::,0577
20~ ':1
.L / 'jb
325617 4
S2n17
2 6 0910
l?.q? 4 l l
? nn 4 r.:;
7 4 13146
4 5 9 1 826
29
22
88750
53235
7501896
4645061
5
188
167
2
I
.LU
1
6
771
14
4 10
Total Loss es
1 nt_ .. ,,... _ en n c, I
1r t ! - -
m nct l v
w,... n A
o r
w it h
u n nr ,.,_
ected St ed
Plans checked f or new and alteration
Fire al.arm s v s-c.ems new
Exit liqht svstems new
Fire alarms and e x i t liohts (Exist
I
Lut Year
77
33
E xposure Losses (Number of the above fires which spread to
other buildiruzs, and losses in these other buildings):





Thi• Year
meml
rs.
b
1q
fiCj
FOLLOW- U P O N IN S PECTIONS AND OTH ER F I RE PRE, E N TION WO R K
N umb er of Cases in Which the
F ollowing Wor k Was Done
Inspection s by company personnel
Inspe ctions by F ire Preve ntion Bureau
Total re-insp ections
Gas and fue l a ll i n_~ections
New buildings i nspected
1Witef.. inspections of fires in buildinas
Oil burners inspected
Bottle gas inspections
Zoning inspections
Complaints received
Violations found
Extensions of time granted
Notices of violations issued
Liability notices served
Violations corrected
conditions referred to other denartments
Court actions instituted
Arrests made
convictions
Fire drills supervised
Radio talks
Other talks and lectures:
Number
Total audience
Photographs taken: for Fire Prev. Bureau
other
School Exit Drills supervised
Dynamite Permits
Burning Permits issued
=IJIISIIB! permits
Issw=,n
Thi a Month
129 98
Last Month
582
2056
363
16
16
1 42
180
21 80
237
13
22
133
78
571
33
338
151
457
15
3
31
57 4
19
297
229
406
27
1
I
Thia Year
to D ate
1503
25 6 59
3530
29 9
326
111.n~
1
4
f.47
i::,qn 1
LutYear
to Date
1S11
21S 77
3144
170
157
11 ~?
3
h? r.:;
F.F.OQ
34~
~Llf,
1012
21 qf.
50f:.1
ini::.
21
1 ?q7
?175
dQ8fi
24
10
1 c:; 1
18
4
1
1
7
25
3000
_.5A._ __
l?
- 38
3720

23
i
1
87
12
2
f. 7
29
i~
26
402
4h?4F,
482
19 7
1
~Q
18
l ?l h
418
Remarks on Inspection and Other Fire Prevention Work May Be Found on Page No. 8.
~.4.__
95
249
1?AOA
3S2
188
107
22
1 ~Ah
536
�December 1 968
T his
Month
INV GTIGATION OF FI R E S
T otal Fires Investigated
Determined· Accidental
Determined Suspicious
Undetermined Origin
Incendiary
Incendiary F ires :
F ires. for which Arrests w ere Made
Number of Arrests
Cases in which Convictions were Secured
N umber of Convictions
F alse Alarms :
Alaqn!> far which Arrests were Made
Cases in which Convictions we,e Secured
Misdemeanors (in connection with hres):
Convictions
Last
Month
This Y ear
to Dato
Last Year
to Date
25
13
28
317
319
9
1 21
7 4n
'6
6
3
16
2
48
144
c;i:;
119
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
22
31
1
-
5
18
~4
11
1 i:;
21
15
11
6
.s
2
26
11
l.
2
2
1
Not Classified
Remarks on Investigation Work :
.
~
.,
,.
..
December 1968
K
PllRSONNEL DATA
Manpower
Total P ersonnel at End of Month
Total Days- Lo.st for Sickness
Total Days Lost for In.Jury
Average Daily Absences
smallest Fighting Force on Duty
Largest Fighting Force on Duty
Total Days vacation
Days off, Personal
Military Leave, Days off
suspensions, Days off
outy out<>0f•City, Days off
Holidays
Loaned from Ext.
Div.
This
Month
911
880
84
90½
14
10
7
240
21
Last
Month
911
352½
87
490
17
22
21
441
40
Same Month
Last Year
895
439
147
53
24
20
2
178
21
Changes
NJpointments
Resignations
Retirements
Dismissals
Deaths
Promotions
Demotions
Military Leaves
Ret .Mil .Lv.
~eemoloved
3uspended
Reclassified
This
Month
9
6
2
3
1
3
2
2
6
5
This Year
to Date
173
102
20
50
4
49
4
31
16
32
20
Last Year
to Date
247
97
5
82
240
7
40
18
95
22
42
�PAGE&
L
December 1 968
This
Month
HOW ALL FI RES WERE CON T R OLLED
o ut before arrival of apparatus
BY occupants ( With extingUishers, hose lines, etc.)
Automatic sprinklers controlled fire
Automatic sprinklers held fire in check Heads Reolac e d
BY Fire Department; using :
Standp ipe Sys tems
Water solution extinguishers
Pump cans
Foam extinguishers
I
u
Carbon Tetrachloride ·units
CO 2 or dry-chemical ·gas units
Other type extinguishers
Burned off
Booster line with fog
Booster line with fog and wet water
One 1½- inch hos e line with fog
One !½ ~inch hose line with fog & wet water
Two or more l ½-inch hos e line with fo g
Two or rr:ore 1½ - ·i nch hose line with tog · & wet water
One 2½-inch hos e line with fog
One 2½-inc...1 hose line with s traight stream ·
Two or more 2½ - inch hos e line with foll!
Two or more 2½ - inch hdse line with straiizht streams
Brooms
_ .__Qther eauinment
n 11.rdP-n hoi::e
P ulling s ·.,itches or fuses
76
767
1395
??
41n
98
41 4
20
1?1
5
15
3
2
2
4
1
1
4 75
205
9
163
4098
180
· -5
45
1{;·1t:;
3
131
117
64
776
11
6
2
110
104
92
622
2?
111
52
110
4
l?~
S?
62
102
130
22
lf'lO
23
17
.
5
11
21
4
Rakes
Last Year
to Date
This ·Year
to Date
75
214
20
Ll.?
77
Total Fires
At Fires
M
USE OF EQUIPMENT
t 1t
- FFeet
of booster hose used
c,f l½ • inch hose used
Feet of 2½ - inch hose used
Feet of ladders used
Number of s alvage covers s pread
Gallc"ls of water used {estimate)
Gallons of Wet water used ( estimate)
CO 2 {lbs. ) .
,___
Chemical foam (lbs, )
Gas maslrn
-
Resc. bv LadnPr Co. 's
Smoke Eiectors
N
Last Year
to Date
745634
283950
5314 75
37279
1011
588167
257585
459 200
40631
867
2220
1878
707
206
100
S2S
200
22
This
MISCELLANEOUS WORK
Fire alarm boxes tested
F lJ·e alarm boxes painted
Underg-round c~ble installed (feet)
UnderL,'1"01ind cable removed (feet)
- - --·Aerial wire installed (feet)
.,
Aerial ·,· ire remove-d ( feet)
reasons
for
various
r,1oved
(Referred to water De_p.artr:!l~!!t) .. _ . - ··
HJtlrants
..
Individual cut- o!f valves installed on existin~ l}Ldrants(Referred. WD)
( R:!~~d W~_t
hydrants installed
1S
1
900
!
r
This Year
to D ate
Last Year
to D ate
·-
T his Year
to Date
Mon.th
~
l~ ew
At Drills
This Year
to D ate
1007
95
14271
1420
42334
10759
Last Year
to Dato
q?4
91
1615fl
990
2687R
8209
-
�7
PAGE
December 1968
fN
I
I
MISCELLANEOUS WORK
-
This
CON T.
Month
Lut Year
to Date
This Year
to Dato
EYdrants painted
H.Ydre.nts lubricated
! HYdrants renal.red
Work done by Engine Comoanies:
Hvdrants flushed & insoected
Hvdrants oainted
HYclrants lubricated
Flrewells inspected & lubricated (Not applicable in Atlanta)
Pieces of ~l!aratus re~aired
Material cost
Labor cost
Al>(!aratus tire ex11ense
25232
26380
9840
49





I
0
WOltK OP' P'IIII: COMPANll:8
WORKING TIME
Times



om.-ny Number




of
Number
Rum
at
Work:
at
At Fires
'
Hra.
Min.
RUD
ll'ir-
'
-
--·
-
Engine
Truck
Mile,
· - ---
Special
Hn.
Min.
At FirN
Min.
Hra.
Special
Hn.
Min.
�PAGE 8
De c e mbe r 196 8
EQUIPMENT USED BY SQUAD CAR
This Month
No. of Runs
This Year
Last Month
to Date
Last Year
to oate
42
37
4 32
~11 ,
3
10
4
32
53
30
32
Bandages
First Aid
Resc.
Inhalatcrs &
10
Splints
Blankets
I
I
Diving Hoods
Oxygen Masks
Mileage
ESTIMATED MILES SAVED BY CANCELLATION VIA RADIO
This Month
·Last Month
This Year
to o a.t e
L ast Year
t o oate
REMARKS (Use space below for comm ents or explanation of important or unusual i t ems in any section, A too, above.)
�I
December 196 8
WORI< OF FIRE COMPANIES
THIS MONTH
p
T
1
n7
31
2
QF,
3
54
57
96
88
90
33
40
107
79
64
67
34
61
97
80
44
62
45
40
73
50
19
57
53
15
19
18
56
39
14
54
47
59
11
29
20
9
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10 I
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
R-1
R-2
R-3
R-4
Y-1
Y-2
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
R- 21
C
47
53
s
71
29
121
108
80
89
86
R- 43 2
p
89
62
72
72
LAST YEAR
THIS YEAR
R- 4 2
18
48
37
37
38
23
15
I
I
I
971
8 15
74 3
763
1266
996
1161
522
465
1000
808
790
617
363
588
1138
765
431
534
452
465
845
507
242
58 3
6 03
139
241
231
38 9
397
26 2
6 31
534
537
140
322
183
101
4
T
C
478
630
8 71
1137
8 14
398
694
717
786
1 486
1156
968
1130
817
309
547
315
4 06
355
243
83
s
p
583
525
483
575
956
826
785
398 ·
276
766
596
625
489
311
467
734
551 .
320
517
424
408
609
344
25 4
472
488
179
251
24 5
293
344
216
4 24
468
4 46
1 57
249
13(
65
R-34 1
T
C
28 3
4 36
647
Rnn
521
291
486 1086
4 76 980
537
514
667
621
246
389
23 0
30 2
34 6
22 7
s
�CITY 0
ATLANTA
DEPARTMENT of FIRE
46 COURTLAND ST., S. E.
Atlanta, Georgia
RtCFIVFb
January 1, 1969
DEC 31 1968
C. H . HIL DEBRAND, JR.
C h ief
iill.ANTA F,ii£ DEPT.
Chief of Department
TOt
ROM :
Ohief of Traininc
Monthly Repor~
Su.BJEC
Dear Sira
During the month of December the annual pumper tests
completed and a copy of the results and maintenance
ne ded for eaoh apparatus was forwarded to the shop
w
r
divi ion offio .
The Education 1 Training Progr
sohedul
as co plated
xaminations w r
dminietered to all company personnel
ranking from private through captain. A ne training
sch dul waa isaued for the first quart r of the year. fh
safety paper was printed and issued al P•
and
R.
Atl
R
tment
I
"HELP SAVE LIFE AND PROPERTY BY PREVENTING FIRES"
�CI TY OF ATLANTA
DEPARTME N T of .E!B-E46 COURTLAND ST., S. E .
Atlanta, Georgia
February 19, 1969
C. H . H IL DEBRAND, JR .
Chief
Honorabl e Ivan All en, J r .
Mayor , City of At l anta
City Ha 11
Atlanta , G org i a 30303
Dear ~ayo r All en :
I am deep ly grateful for th conf i de ce and t rust dis pl ayed
by naming me to t he honored position of C i ef of t he At l anta
Fir Depa r b,ent to become effective Ap ril 1 , 1969 .
I appreciate your support and pl e ge to yo u my u t iri ng
efforts to\.'1ard a rea 1i sti c con ti nu i ng progressive program for
this depa rtment ~'1°1 i ch wi 11 meet tie de, ands at <.l needs of t hese
changirg t i mes .
That my years of serv i ce are t.,e i 19 climaxed i n this lilanne r
i s my 1i fe 1ong a1,1uit ion and the greatest cha 11 e ge of my life .
Thank you for making t hi s opportunity poss i ble for me .
S? Jrely,
JroK?i~~
At l anta Fire Depa rtment
PmJ : 11 a
"HELP SAVE LIFE AND PROPERTY BY PREVENTING FIRES"
�CITY OF ATLANTA
DEPARTMENT of FIRE
46 COURTLAND ST., S. E.
Atlanta, Georgia
February 20, 1969
C. H . HIL DE BR A ND , JR.
Chie f
Mr. Earl Lande rs
Adm . Asst . to the ~ayor
Ci ty Ha ll
Atlanta, eorg i a 30303
Dea r Mr . Landers:
I am de ply gr at eful to you for t he confi den ce and
trust dis pl ay Jin support i ng me i n my bi d for t ne
hono red posit i on of Chief of t:1e At l anta Fire De partment
t o become effect i ve Ap ril l, 1969 .
To attain th is pos ition is a cul, i nat i on of a life long
ambiti on to v1h i ch I p1edge my untiring efforts toward a
realistic conti nu i ng pr ogres sive program for t his depa rtmen t wh ich will meet the demands and needs of t rese
changing times .
Si ncere ly,
,


a143.215.248.55


Atlanta Fire Department
POW: 11 a
"HELP SAVE LIFE AND PROPERTY BY PREVENTING FIRES"
�CITY OF ATLANTA
DEPARTMENT OF LAW
2614 FI -RST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303
June 26, 1969
Chief P. O. William
Atlanta Fire Departm nt
46 Courtland Str t, S. E.
Atl nta, G orgi
30303
Dear
Chief:
Your letter of Jun
the Fire Dep rtment
con tructe and man
Fulton County purauan
G orgia
gi 1 ture .
Pl
of
th t
y b
Pr viou
r aponsibil
th op r tio
County .
If you n
d
~ ~ ru• m ntion d
aed the numb r
ov r four and incr a
ount of mon y
ton County for fir pr v ntion
rvic.
L gi 1 tur h v
lr ady r ov d th
ty of Atl nta Fire Dep rtm nt to up rvi
t tion built nd maint ind by Fulton
ny furtb r inform tion; pl
Your
s
dvis.
ry truly,
alph C. Jenkin
1 t City Attorn y
Aa o
RCJ/j
BC: Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr .
�CITY~ OF ATLANTA
DEPART M ENT of FIRE
46 COURTLAN D ST., S. E.
Atlanta, Georgia
.June 26, 1969
P . O . WILLIAMS
CHIEF
Hono ra bl e Ivan ll en, Jr.
Mayor, City of At l anta
City Ha ll
Atla nta, Georg i a 30303
ea r Mayor All en :
This is to ad vis e that I will be on vacat i on fro m
Ju ne 30 until my return on Ju ly 14, 1969 .
1st ep uty Ch i ef J . I. Gi bs on will be i nc arge of
the depa rtment du ri ng my absence.
Respectfu lly submi tted,
.
OQu)~ ·
jlJ_, 0 . \Ir LLI AMS
Chief Fire Department
POW: 11 a
"HELP SAVE LIFE AND PROPERTY BY PREVENTING FIRES"
�- -- - --
PIED M C NT DRIVING
CLU B • 1 215 PtEb M C N,. A \fE NUt, N,
E, •
A TL A NTA ,
GE O RG .I A
30:30~ - - - - -
July 7, 1969
The Honorable Ivan Allen
Mayor, City of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Sir:
This past Sunday, we found it advisable to call on
the Atlanta Fire Department for assistance during
an emergency, at our swimming pool.
/
Even though our own lifeguard and a physician in
attendance at the pool were able to prevent a tragedy,
I would like, on behalf of the Piedmont Driving Club,
to e x tend our sincere appreciation to the Atlanta
Fire Department . The speed with which they responded
to the call , the courtesy, and genuine concern and
spirit of helpfulness displayed by the members of the
department were most comforting and appreciated.
In
addition, a police cruiser arrived at the same time
to render whatever assistance would have been necessary.
With ~
il rsonal regards ,
B . fla ter Schytte
Manager
BWS/n f
cc :
Mr . P . O. Wil l iams
Chief , Atl a nt a Fi r e Depar tmen t
�- ------ ----------· .
)
MINUTES OF THE BOARD OF FIRE MASTERS MEETING, July 28, 1969.
The following members were pres ent :
Mr. W. T. Knigh t
7
Mr. Jack Summers, Mr. Q.. V. Williamson.
Mot ion by Mr . Summe rs 9 seconded by Mr. Williams, that the minutes of
the last meeting b e approved. Motion c arried.
The Board was informed of _the following assignments to regular
positions:
See Attachment #1 .
Moti on by Mr. Willia mson, seconded by Mr. Summers that these
a ssignme nts be approved. Motion carried.
!he Board was informed of the following re-employments:
See Attachment #1.
Motion by Mr . Summers, seconded by Mr. Williamson, that the~e
re-employments be approved. Motion c a rried. Requests for military leave was read to the Board for the
followi ng:
See ~t tachment #1 .
Motion by Mr. Williamson, second ed by Mr. Summers, that these
military leaves b e a pprove d. Motion carried.
The Board was informed of the following personnel that have
returned from military leave:
See ~t tachment #2.
Motion by Mr. Williamson, seconded by Mr. Summers,that the se
person n el be rei nstated to their positions in the Fire Department.
Motion carried.
The Board was informed of the following resignations:
Se~ttachment #2 .
Motion by Mr. Williamson, seconded by Mr. Summers, that these
resignations be accepted. Motion carri ed.
The Board was informed of the following dismissals:
See Attachment #2.
Motion by Mr o Williamson, seconded by Mr. Summers, that the
Board concur in these dismis sals. Motion carried.
�Min . of Bd. F.M. Mt g.
July 28, 1969
Page #2
The Board was informed of the following retirements:
Fire Investigator E. F. Davis, effective 6-1-69.
Li e utenant J. C. Wingo 9 #21, effective 6-10-69.
Deputy Chief D. W. Garrett, #4, effective 7-17-69.
The Board wa s informed of the non-service connected disibility
pension of W. c. · Lamb, # 15, effective 6-9-69.
A 6 months leave of absence was requested for Fire Investigator
F. s. Stonecypher, effective 6-11-69, for assignment to the Law
Department.
Hotio n by Mr. Williamson, second ed by Mr. Summers, that this
leave of absence be approved. Motion c a rried.
The Board was infomed that the War Service Appointment as Fire
Apparatus Operator of L. L . Wood, #29, had been withdrawn,
effective 7-1-69, due to the return from military leave of the
regular Fire Apparatus Operator.
The Bo ard concurred i n this action.
The Board was in f ormed of the following diciplinary actions:
W. L . Kemp, #11, suspended 3 d ays, effective 6-22-69, for
violation of the Rules and Regulations of the Department.
J. R. Colbert, #4, suspended 1 day, 6-24-69, f or violation
of the Rules and Regulations of the Department.
C. E. White, #8, suspended 4 days, effective 7-19-69, for
violation of the Rules and Regulations of the Department.
C. A. Livingston, #37, susp~nded 4 d a ys, effective 7-19-69,
for violation of the Rules and Regulations of the Department~
Motion by Mr. Surmners, seconded by Mr. Williamson ;-t ha t the
diciplinary action taken by the Chief be approved. , Motion carried.
Sick Leave Extensions were requested f or the following:
.
H. D • . Smith, #11 , 30 calendar days, 5-17-69 through 6-15-69~
J. H. Grant, Shop, 14 calendar days, 6 - 2- 69 through 6-15-69.
R. S. Marbut, #23, 27 calendar days, 6-1-69 through 6-26-69.
H. T. Proctor, Signal , 3 calendar d ays, 6 - 9-69 through 6-11-69.
C.R. Hitchcock, #8, 90 calendar days, 6-12-69 through 9-9-69.
R. W. Pealor, #6, 25 calendar days, 6-1-~-69 through 7-11-69.
Motion by Mr. Williamson , seconded by Mr. Summers; that these
extensions be approved. Motion carried.
�Min . of Bd. F.M. Mtg.
July 28, 1969
Page # 3
The Chairman informed the Boa rd that the fo~lowing promotions were
to be made:
1
1
l
2
2
Deputy Chief
Battalion Chief
Captain
Lieutenants
Fire Investigators I
The Chairman asked Chief Williams for his recommendations:
Chief Williams recommended Battalion Chief A. P. Black, top man on the
eligible list as certified by the Personnel Board, to be promoted to
Deputy Chief effective 7-17-69.
Motion by Mr. Summers, seconded by Mr. Williamson, that Battalion
Chief A. P. Black be promoted to Deputy Chief effective 7-17-69.
FOR:
Summer, Williamson, Knight.
Chief Williams recommended Captain J. R. Pittman, top man on the
eligible list as certified by the Personnel Board, to be promoted
to Battalion Chief effective 7-17-69.
Motion by Mr. Williams<:rn, seconded by Mr. Summers, that Captain
J. R. Pittman be promoted to Battalion Chief effective 7-17-69.
FOR:
Williamson, Summers , Knight.
Chief Williams recommended Lieutenant P . W. Mauldin, top man on
the el igi ble list as certified by the Personnel Board, to be
promoted to Captain effective 7-17-69.
Motion by Mr. Will iamson, seconded by Mr. Sumrner s, that Lieutenant
P . W. Mauldi n be promoted to Captain effective 7-17-69.
FOR:
Williamson, Summers, Knight.
Chief Williams recommended Fire Apparatus Opera t or L. L. Chapman,
certified by the Personnel Board, to be promoted to Lieutena nt
(Aide ), effective 7 -17-69 .
Motion by Mr. Williamson, seconded by Mr. Summers, that Fire
Apparatus Operator L. L. Chapman be promoted to Lieutenant (A ide)
effective 7-17-69.
FOR:
Williamson, Sumners, Knight.
-
---
�Min of Bd. F.M.Mtg.
July 28, 1969
Page #4
--
.----
Chief 'Williams recommended R. T. White, top man on the eligible
list as certified by the Personnel Board, to be promoted to
Lieutenant effective 7-17-69.
Motion by Mr. Summers, seconded by Mr. Williamson, that R. T.
White be promoted to Lieutenant effective 7-17-69.
FOR:
Summers, Williamson, Knight.
Chief Williams recommended Fire Apparatus--operator J. G. Hill,
top man on the eligible list as certified by the Personnel Board,
to be prqmoted to Fire Investigator I, effective 6-2-69.
Motion by Mr. Summers, seconded by Mr. Williamson, that Fire
Apparatus Operator J. G. Hill be promoted to Fire Investigator I
effective 6-2~69.
FOR:
Summers, W;i.lliamson, Knight.
Chief Williams recommended S. A. Moss, t_.9p man on the eligible list
as certified by the Personnel Board, to be promoted to Fire
Investigator I, effective 6-11-69.
Motion by Mr. Williamson, seconded by Mr. Summers, thats. A. Moss
be promoted to Fire Investigator I, effective 6-11-69.
FOR:
Williamson, Summers, Knight.
Chief Williams showed a draft of the pr oposed new Rule Book
for the Department to the Board and exp lained that it was to
be refi ned and prepa red for pr esen t ation to each Board Member
fo r s tudy after which time they will b e requested , to adopt it.
- - Ch j_e f Wi lli ams e x p lai ned t ha t copies of r u l e b ook s from some
of t he most progres s i v e cities had b een r e sear ched a nd that
thi s propos e d rule book would be up-to - d a te a nd compre h e nsive.
Ca p ta in C.
t h e Board r
requesti ng
resolutio n
H. El lis , and Capta in P. E. Johnson appeared before
e p resent i ng Local 134, I AFF , a nd pr esente d a resolution
res tor a t i on o f senior ity rig h ts . (A copy o f thi s
is attached ) .
Captain Sl l is po i nt ed out the fac t tha t one o f the pri mary
objec t ives of Loc al 134 was s e n i or i t y and u r g ed favo ra b le
consideration of t heir resoluti on. He furt her stated t hat
a survey he had mad e indicated t ha t t he mo rale was very good
at the pre s e nt time a nd rest o ratio n of seniority would incr ease
the g ood mora l e a nd more solidify t h e rank s and team spir it
with i n t he Departme nt.
�--
---
Min. of Bd. F.M.Mtg.
July 28, 1969
Page #5
Mr. Knight thanked Captain Ellis for his appearance before
the Board and -assured him that the resolution would be given
very careful consideration.
Meeting Adjourned.
�ASSIGNMENT TO REGULAR POSITION:
Effective 5-27-69
Wood
Livingston
5-27-69
"
Shiver
6-3-69
"
Henley
6-3-69
"
Worsham
6-:3-69
"
Willingham
6-3-69
"
Morris
6-5-69
"
w. c. Jones
6-5-69
"'
II
R. J. Nollie
6-7-69
II
K. P. Nash
6-7-69
II
Carol J. Burge, Steno.
6-9-69
II
Martha J. Ray, Typist
6-9-69
R. w. Tinke r
6-11-69
"
J. A. Smith
6-11-69
"II
B. L. Brammer
6-17-69
II
P. R. Pace
6-17-69
c. L. Reese
6-17-69
"
J. R. Hardy
6-17-69
"
G. L. Winfrey
6-18
-69
"II
D. L. Guy
6-19-69
G. A. l'vlaner
6-19-69
"
Prince
6-19-69
J. A.
"II
6-20-69
J. E. Jones, Bldg. Cust.
P. A. Chovan
7-3-69
"
c. E. White
7-8 -69
"
Sanford Cameron
7-9-69
"
L. E.
c. A.
B. w.
H. F.
13. R.
A. s.
J. R.
Total
-
26
Effective 6-3-69
II
6-5-69
6-12-69
"
II
6-24-69
II
7-9-69
Tot.al
-
5
Effective 5-22-69
6-4-69
"
II
6-6-69
Total
-
3
RE-EMPLOYMENTS:
w.
Bi gg s
L. House
G. w. Gibson
H. E. McCoy, Auto Mech.
s. L . Smith
K.
s.
MI LITARY LEAVE REQUESTS:
D. F'. Robinson
c. Bradley
JG v. Harris
F'.
ATTACHMENT #1
�RETURNED FROM MILITARY LEAVE:
D. A. Millar
c. I\. Noel
w. E. Coker
L. R. Atchley
R. E. Stephens
s. E. Tolbert
Effective 6-16-69
II
6-25-69
II
7-1-69
II
7-5-69
II
7-11-69
II
7-15-69
Total
-
6
Effective 5-26-69
II
5-26-69
II
5-28-69
6 -1-69
"
II
6-6-69
II
6 -7-69
II
6-15-69
6 -2 1-69
"
II
6 -2 4-69
II
6 -27-69
II
6-27-69
6 -27-69
"
6 -29-69
"
6-30 -69
"
7-3-69
"
II
7- 8 -69
7-15""'.69
"
Total
-
17
Total
-
4
RESIGNATIONS:
Natha niel Maddox, #16
c. Cooper, # 15
Peter Sheller, # 1
F. A. Smith, # 33
L. E. Burkett, # 8
H. D. Mills, # 13
w. c. Adams, # 5
s. L. Smith, # 18
L. H. Yancey, # 30
\ 1. L. Kemp, # 11
R. s. Marbut, # 23
M. D. Kelley, # 12
Leothus Slaughter, # 5
P. A. Copeland, # 24
R. c. Wallace, # 25
J. M. Odom III, #30
J. T. Cleveland , # 23
J.
DISMISSALS :
w.
C. Jones, # 31
R. G. Buc han an, # 22
H. F. Henley , #8
G. L. Winfr ey, #12
ATTACHMENT #2
Effective 6-5-69
6-6-69
",,
6-11-69
II
7-3-69
�I NT E R NAT I ON AL
8
8
I
P
E
A
C
ATLANTA ,
H
T
R
AS SOC I AT I ON
E
E
GEORG
S
I
T
A
R
-
E
3-0
E
T,
3
0
N,
O F --F· I R E -E ,
-
SU
I
T
F I GHT E RS
E
2
3
4
g
The follO'wing re sol u tion was adopted by majority
vote at the regular meeting in July, and i s here~vith presented to the Board of Fire Masters for
consideration :
WHEREAS; For many y ears, the Rules and Regulation
of the Atlanta Fire Department have provided that
a member may terminate his employment with the
depar tment for a period of up to six months without lo ss of seniority, and
WHEREAS ; ·. the_se.~1rul es and regulations were changed
on September 12th, 1966 to provide that all member s
l eaving the servic es of the departmen t for any time
would l oose all seniority rights-, and _.
WHEREAS; time has passed, and s ituations have
changed, and meanings and intentions of the above
changes in the Rules and Regulations have made it
necessary, and the feeling has been generated amow1g
our members to correc t many inequities caused by
these changes, Therefore
BE IT RESOLVED ; That Local 134 of the International
Association of Fire Fighters petition the Board ofFire Masters of the Atlanta Fire Department, thru this
-....-_-_ --_-_ .-- ---=--.......:.eso-luti.on-,-to-rr.el.le-r-t:- back-t(;'-the--Ru-l-e.s- ai:1d Regulations
that were in effect immediately prior to September 1966.
And:1
.
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED; that all members of the
Atlanta Fire Department be accorded all seniority rights
as provided by those Rules and Regulations which were
in effect September 2nd, 1966. ·
Presented 017, behalf of the membership of the Local
~
JI-ii'
fz5_
ccro,
~
,.
'tJ ~
ee.---~
diaries H. Ellis, President
0
AFF I<...
• :;o WITH THE I NTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF F IR E FIGH TER S SIN C E 11118 GEORGIA STATE
THE GEORGIA STATE F IR E F IGHTER S A SSO CIAT ION A NO THE ATLANTA LABOR COUNCIL
AFL•C·IO
�c
1~-r· u~ 1'-.J TA 1
1·T ,,t C) c
DEPARTMENT of FIRE
46 COURTLAND ST.,
s.
E.
Atlanta, Georgia
X 119J Jr
9t1.
P.O. WILLIAMS
CHIEF
AU']USt
15:i 1969
demo to:
All PE:rsonnGl
Frora:
Chi~f of Fir~ Jspartm2nt
Su~j~ct:
Reiteration of Fir~ D~partm2nt Policies
t-1
re Deo arti:l<2ni.: or n c--=rs s.1a i I
aGJre: ss
comr.iand· by t:1ci r surna1-:-12s.
tne fi r t::men und,2r th1;:i r
Fi re~,1en sha 11 ad::.;r~ss t i,::: i r su~;2ricr offi c2rs or acting offi Cl:rs
iJy rank.
Qualified
mt::i1
i•il1 :.i1:: assigner:! on a ro tating i..asis to th;.;
capacity as ccting offict: r or ~xtra apparatus OiJL! ra t or.
Fill - ins will al so oe donG o~ rotati n~ basis with ccns ist2nt
records !·ept at sac:i 0nn i ni2 hous G on an indivi dua.l s hift
basis as c~posc1 to a sEation.
by order of ;
. -:Jl,. ,
')
I •
~'
I ..,~.- /
,
L-v ~ C~,,~
).!A-
P, O. '!~I LL1,'\i 1S~ C, i1cf
Atlanta Fir~ 0ep1rtmant
PO\tJ: 11 a
"HELP SAVE LIFE AND PROPERTY BY PREVENTING FIRES"
�OEPARTMENT of FIRE
46 COURTLAND ST.,~. E.
Atlanta, Georgia
P.O. WILLIAMS
CHIEF
August 15, 1969
Honorabl e Ivan All en, Jr.
Mayor, City of A.t l an ta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear f-,iay or Allen:
He have been dea ling iii t h Co1.1 mu nity Re l ati ans and have accepted so1·i1 e of t lle i r
su ggestions re l ativ e to e li Din atin g some pro bl e~s. Various polici es and facts
pertaining to this departmen t are attac hed.
It is ir.ter-<?s t in~ to not ,., th ~ followin a exce r ot f r om the Rep ort of t he Un ite d
St ates Co1i11n-is.,ion on Civil Ri ghts 196 9: entitl ed Fer /\11 th e Peopl e . . . By ./.\11
the Peopl e 1·1 hich has just r ea ched this off-ic e :
11 Despite t he be l at ed ad;n i ss ion of fi r em
2n in t o t he /l.t l anta de; artment
and t he e l abor ate pro ce dur es 1·n i ch s urr0Ui1d2d t he ir i nt rodu cti on, t he
Atlanta Fire Department had a l arge r pr oporti on of :·legroes i n unifo rm
than any ot her ce:ntra l city in the survey and a hi gile r de gr ee of
in teg r ation than many . 11
We are in th e proces s of ie-writi ng th e Rul es and Reg ul ations of the Atlanta Fire
Depa rtment to e li Ji nat e any in equ i t i es in t he old boo k, to e li min ate any
possibility of di s cri mi nat i on or t~ e possi ~ility of any office r over-reacting
1-1ith authority. As soon as this ll as been comp l eted, it ',<J ill be presented to t he
Board of Fire Masters for their approv a l and adopt i on.
We ~voul d 1i ke to stress t i1at any fireman ~-J ho has grie van ces , has three methods by
which to air t hem in t iiis office: by comp l etin 0 a Form 52 (Spe ci al Request ) ,
go throu gh t he Company 0-ffi ce rs and Batt al ion Chi ef , or by use of a Sug ge stion
Form availuble in all stations. Any justifiable gri e vances \<J ill oe strai ghten ed
out.
Yours ve ry truly ,
QO,
(, /{J 'd'f-r.A " ~
pl_' O. HILLI AMS, Chief
Atlanta Fire De;-;a rtr:ie nt
POW: 11 a
Enclosure
cc: Mr . W. T. Kn i ght, Chai rman Bo ard of Fi re f·'i as t ers
"HELP SA VE LIFE AND PROPERTY BY PREVENTING FIRES"
�The Atlanta Fire Department's only interest is in t he protection of lives and
property from fire. The citizens of Atlanta should have and deserve t he best
fire protection available. In order to accomplish this, we nust have the best
trained, qualified, and experienced personnel in responsible positions
regardless of race, creed, or color.
Fi re Department o ffi cershi p must have le ade rship.
One cannot gain leade rship
Subordinates will not look
upon such an officer as a l eader. Life and property is at stake . Decisions
and act..ions of a fire officer are bused on knowl edge and experience of the job.
Therefore, standards and qualifications must be kept high. Rather than lower
the standards, they should be rais ed.
if standards have to be lov-1e red so one can qua"lify.
PROMOTIONAL POLICIES:
Promotions in the Fire Deµartnent are made according to merit and fitness.
The promotional system of the Atlanta Fire Department is set by law.
Anyone r.ieetin'.J t,1e qualifying standards as set fort h Liy the
Promotion al Board will be promoted regar dl ess of race, creed, or
color. We 1,1ill not and do not discriminate for or against anyone
meeting the qualifying standards of this system.
Promot ion ai examin ations for Fire Lieuten&i'its ar.:: h::1d ::very t \·:o
years. To qualify , a i~an must have had f ive years service in the
Fire D2pa rtm2nt . After t he examin ation, t he app licants are li st ed
according to their scores from a combination of th2 written test ,
training school aver age , and sen iority points . This list is
divided into gr.oups of 20 . The first 20 me n are rated at oral
intervi e\vs , and t hi s score is added to their grades fror.i the above
three items. Promotions from t his list are made in order of t he
applicant's fin al score.
So far , the first 7 men have been promoted from the Li eutenant's
examin ation he ld in March of 1969 . The first bl ack f iremen started to
work in April 1963, so that this is t he first year (1 969 ) any of them
have been eli gibl e to ap ply f or promotion to Lieutenan t. There we re 153
applicants, of whom 6 we re bl ack. The first bl ack app licant is in the
6th group of 20 or approxir.1ate ly position 102 on t iie li st.
Promoti ons to Fi re Apparatus Ope r ator are made by appointment. The
Captai n at each station makes these sel ections s ubj ect to t he
approval of the Battali on Chi ef. The men must have i1ad at l east two
years servi ce with t he Fi re De partm2n t and have passed ti1e required
dri ving tests at the Training School. There are nine black firemen
in these pos itions.
�. ~- ·
-·-- ·- ..
HIRING PRACTICES:
Eligible lists for Firemen are established every week after the weekly
intervie\·1s. ·(During 0·larc h, Ap ril, and July of this year, interviews
were held every t vw v,eeks.) As vacancies occur, the Fi re Depart ment
calls the men on a list in t he order of their scores. Each person on
the list of a certain dat e is contacted and offered emp loyme nt be fore
movin g to the next chro nological li s t. O~ce a man is on t he eligi ble
list , he is not by-p assed unless the Fire De partment is unabl e to
contact him by tele phone or letter.
Through July 25, of this ye ar) 60 white men were put on the eli ~i ble
list and 57 black men. Of these, 45 wf1ite men have been employe d and
41 black men.
Of the 86 7 men in t he extinguishing division, over 19% or 165 are black.
Nine of t hese are Fi re Ar,pa ratus Operators and 25 are on Military
Leave. Fireme n that l eave the departn1ent for military service are
reinstate d when they return (this is a Fede r al Law ) and are usually
returned to t he sam2 station from vihich ti iey l eft.
RECRE.D.TIOi'~ CLUB:
In J an uary of 1959, a grou p of firemen lease d a 5. 7 acre tract of
l and at Lake ! 11 atoona fro:,1 tne JOver nrnen t and organized a cluo
wh ic h ~as call ed Atl anta Firene n 1 s Re creation Club. However, the
Fir2 Depa r tr,12nt nor th e City of At l anta has any j uris diction over the
activiti es of tr1is club. It i s a private organ i zat i on controll ed oy
a Board of Trustees composed of e l even men, 1·1ho adhere to tr1e i'li s '1es
of the majority of t he m2mbe rs, and i s sup ported entirel y by dues pai d
by the membe rs and ma in tai ned througi1 voluntee r services of t he membe rs.
�RUL E S
F I R E P R O MO T I O N B O A R D
CITY
Revised 11arch 196 7
OF
ATLANTA
�11.
An examination for Fire Captain will be held annually and the
register established will be valid for one year.
12.
Examinations for all other classes of positions will be held
when the Board deems a list necessary~ and the registers established will be valid for one year. The life of such registers
may be extended for an additional year if the Board deems it
practical and expedient to do so.
13,
Satisfactory completion of a performance test of driving skill
under the supervision of the Fire Training Chief is a prerequisite
to applying for proraotion to Fire Rescue Lieutenant.
14.
When a man on an eligible register for a higher position than his
present class declines an assignment which would allow him to act
as an alternate for the higher position, his name will be moved
down on the eligible list below the name of the man who accepts
the assignment.
15,
If a qualified eligible is serving io a permanent vacancy in a
temporary capacity at the time of a new examination, he will not
be required to take any further examination.
16.
The Fire Alarm Superintendent will qualify men for the position of
Fire Dispatcher and will furnish the Fire Promotion Board a list of
qualified applicants and their grades.
17.
Non-fi refigh ting personnel desiring to retur n t o firefi ghting must
serve one ye ar as full- pay Firemen before being eligible to corn~et e
in promotional examinations. Members of the Training Division are
considered to be firefishting personnel.
18.
Upon r e turn to the Fire Departraent, reenployed Firemen~ including
those who we re formE: rly on th e eli gible r e gist e r for Fire Lieut enant
or other pr omotional r e gisters , must serve one year as full-pay
firemen befor e being eligible to compete in promotional examinations.
19,
Seniority will be reco gnize d by the addition to the final attained
passing grade of one -h a lf (½) point for e c ch ye ar of service in the
Fire Depar t ment beyond the first five (S) years to a maximum of five
(5) points in any cas e . For promotion to th e rank of Cnptain and
highe r., s eniority will b.:: reco gniz e d by giving one - ha lf (!~) point for
each year of s e rvice on next lower r ank only , to a maximum of five
(5) points .
20 ,
In t he e ven t of a ti e in fin a l grade s a ft e r addition of s enio r ity
po ints, the man with t he hi ghest s eniority will be pl a ce d h igh est
on the e l i gi ble registe r . If s enio r ity po int s a·.ce the s ame~ t he
man with the highes t wr i tten grade will be placed hi ghe s t on t he
eligible regis ter.
21.
Fire Department personnel serving in the armed f orces will accru2
seniority as th ough serving j_n t he Fire Departr.1ent.
22.
Fire Department pers onnel on military le~ve may be given the promotional examination for which they are eligible and will be notified
of the opening and closing dates of application for all examinations
for clas ses to which they may apply.
�•
23.
Linemen, tr.echinists; fire equipment mechanics, and fire carpenters
may be qualifi~d by th~ Personnel Department from open competitive
registers. Fire Department personne l who quclify may be certified
ahead of others on the list if desired. Fire Department personnel
may be qualifie d by the Personnel D~partmcnt from promotional examinations from within the Fire Deportment.
24.
A sche<lule of eligibility for promotion and who may apply for the
various classes is shown in Table I.
25.
Examinations '.:vill be conducted according to the schedule of weights
and phases listed in Table II.
�T ABL E I
SCHEDULE OF-ELIGIBILITY FOR PROMOTION
FOR PROMOTION TO :
WHO MAY APPLY :
Fire Appa ratus Opera tor
Firemen who have completed
two years of s e rvice.
Fire Rescue Lieutenant
All fire fighting personnel
who have completed five years
of s e rvice in the Fire Department.
Fire Dispetcher
All fire fightin g pe rsonnel
who have completed five years
of service in the Department
and have had one year of service
in the Signal Division of the
Fire Department.
Fire Lie uten ant
All fire fi ghting personne l
who have c oople t e d fi ve years
of s e rvice in the Department.
Fi r e Captain
Fire Lie utenants wi th a t l east
3 years ' s e rvi ce as Lie utenant.
Fire Drill Instructor , Chi e f
All Fi re Captains
Fire Battalion Chief
Fire Captains wi t h a t least
3 years ' s ervi ce as Captai n.
First Deputy & Deput y Fi re Chief
All Fire Battalion Chie fs
Fire Inves ti gator I
All f i re fight ing pers onnel and
fire disp~tchers who have comple te d
five years of servi ce i n the Fire
Department.
Fire Investigator II
Fire Investigators with one year
of service as an Investiga t or.
Assistant Fire Marshal
Fire Investigators with 3 years'
service as lnvest igator.
Fire Marshal
Assistant Fire Marshals and Fire
Investigators with 3 years' service,
�--~-....c==:::::;======
-· -~-=-

----- --·---- .------··
.,
CITY OF ATLANTA
8 August 1969
,
.
Memorandum Regarding Discrimination .Against Black Fir emen Of Atlanta
.
-- ~

.
Mayor Ivan Allen, Chairman Board of Firemaster s-, Alderma-r-k...\'lm. :·.r •
Knight and Atlanta Fire Chief Paul O•. Williams
. --.. ~
. . .___·.
......_,__
-· . . .
Black Firemen of Atlanta

__
.. To:
··-- - -'" ·
--·
From:
/ ·-.
--
"
The Black firefighters of Atlanta are dedicated municipal emplo{eei,
\
concerned wi th the safety and welfare of our city and all of its citizens ; ·During the years of our tenure as f iremen we hav& been subjected to dis- ·· ·
crimination and abuses as outlined below. We request that imrre clia te _





action be taken to correct these practices, and that on or before Mond~,
\
August 18, 1969 that we receive a formal report on your 1fc.:t io·ns in corre~ '
ing the act ions cited herein:
,
-~
/ \
· . . :. .·-.. . .
1
I.
HIRING PRACTICES
.. _=--:::--=- ~ - -
r
\ :;~11,;
.
,
-~
.
-- -
The ratio of Black Firemen to White Firemen does not
- ~ to the· popu lation of Black citizens in Atlanta. There -.. . a re. . . about 90 to
100 Black Firemen in a department of more than 900 men. Black·-Eiremen
that are drafted into the armed servic~s are rep.laced by sthi te firemen
II.
SEGREGATED SLEEPING
& LOCKER
AQ.RANGEMENTS
J
Lockers and beds of Black Firemen are placed in the back or away
frcm the whit e firemen.
III.
RECREATION CLUB
_,._..=--,~_ ·__
.l.963 .
N.
Y-~


____


ci dCZ>n
d
-
' ~·
~
The membership was clos ed the vear Black Firemen were hired in
Land was given to th e club by the governm:l\t_ ~~ , Lake Allatoona. )_13 acres)
.( ~ -4N-~
h0 ~ ~ ~ ° ' - )
1
PROMOTIONAL DISCRIMINATION
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Black Firemen should be included in every department. White ,fil$~ -a,- i•
r.1en with less time and experience are promoted· to -dr-:i-ve-r po sit1on s .~ --d l ack
Firer.ien with 5 and 6 years should be promoted to Lieutenants-;-·- beca use the
entire officer cabi net is mad e up of all white officers. Most of these
off i c er s have _b e e o k.n.o-wr:1-t-G-£.0 r c e t l=\-e-i-r--p-r-ejtta'rc-e-s-on- B"'l-a ck Firemen • We
ar-e aware· of the test for Lieut.e nants, but in a time of an emergency men





have been promoted wholesale from private to captains within a year, thus_
i
setting proper precedent. We consider this an er.1ergeJ)_cy .-hec-atrse--o-f tne
overall discrimination in the depa rtm ent. White drivers are giving up their
positions because they know future Lieutenants are going to be appointed by
Chiefs. · This is true because in the last capt ain's test the aides of all
the chiefs dominated the list. Some of these Lieutenants didn't place in
the top 40 on the Lieutenants list. Now they are captains.
\
V.
EXP!:RIENCE AND LENGTH OF Tir.1E ON THE DEPARTMENT
Acting offi cers, we feel th at every Black Firemen with _the time
and experience, equal to any . white firemen, should be.given the opportunity
to be an ac~ing office~: This ap~li:s tol°;ra driverse House d~ies
should be picked according to seniority.
~ 1 /·S ,)-f2rvyJ f,../-,v. ~ )
VI.
STAtJDARD SET OF RULES FOR ALL C
INS
~ich shift is operated different, captain authority has no limit.
He forc es personal prejudices on Black Firemen. Transfer of ~en to other
stations.
( ~ ~~ ~
FOR CONTACT:
Fireman William Harner
195 Hermer Circle, N. W.
Atlanta, Georgia 30311 ________
elephone - 794- 2244
__ __
. or ----Fire Station 16 on C Shift
Telephone 523-5786
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DEPARTMENT of FIRE
46 COURTLAND ST., S. E.
Atlanta, Georgia
P.O. WILLIAMS
CHIEF
AUJUSt 15:1 1969
i iemo to:
All PE:rsonnGl
Fror.1:
Chfof of Fi re; Jepartincnt
Su~j0ct:
Re iteration of Fir~ D~partrnont Policies
1
Fi re uepartmeni.: or n c2:rs s.1a
by t:wi r surnar;·1;;;s .
comr.;and
n
aG,m:1 s s tne f i r ~1;ien und·: .' r til ::,; i r
Fi re:,1en sha 11 ad~r\2 s s t i 1c i r sup:.- ri or offi c2rs or acting offi cGrs
'uy rank.
Qualified m~n will Le assigned on a rotating ~asis to th~
capacity as acting officer or ,;"!Xtra apparatus OiJl: r ator.
Fill - ins will also oe donG o~ rotati ng ~asis with cons ist~nt
records kept at ~ac~ onn i nG house on an individual sh ift
basis as opposed to a station.
By orde r of.
J ,.
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?. O. ·,,ilLL1,,, 1.S , C,ll(-;f
Atlanta Fir~ Llepartm~nt
POlii: 11 a
"HELP SAVE LIFE AND PROPERTY BY PREVENTING FIRES"
�•
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C I TY OF A Tl_/\NTA
O EPART MENT o f F IRE
46 COURTLA ND ST., ~ . C:::.
Atl a nta , Georg ia
P .O. WILLIAMS
CHIEF
August 15 , 1969
Honorabl e Ivan All en, Jr.
M~yor~ City of Atl ant a
City Hall
Atlant a , Georgi a 30303
Dear May or All ~n :
We ha ve been dealin g 1·1it11 Coumunity Re l ations an d have accep ted sot",1e of t heir
su gge stions rel at ive t o eli Di nat i ng some pro bl eDs. Variou s polici es and fac t s
pe r t ai ni ng to t hi s de partment are at t ached .
It is inte rest i n~ to not c:> th r f oll owi na excer ot f r om t he Re port of th e Un ited
St at es Cor,11wis s i on on Civil Ri gi,t s 1969: ent it.l ed Fer /\11 t he Peopl e ... By All
t he Peop l e ,,.:hic h has j us t r eached t hi s off-i ce :
Despi t e t he be l at ed ad:ni ss i on of fir eme n 11no t he Atl anta de ;J ar t rnen t
and t he el aborat e procedu res w1ich s urroui1 ded t he ir i ntrodu cti on, t he
Atl an t a Fi re Departmen t had a 1a r ge r pr oporti on of ['leg roes i n unif orni
th an any ot her central city i n t he s urvey and a hi gh 2r de gree of
in teg r ati on t ha n many . 11
11
We are in t he process of r e-wri t i ng th e Ru l es and Reg ul ations of th e At l anta Fi r e
De pa r t ment t o e li mi nat e any in equ i t i es i n t he ol d book, t o eli ~in ate any
poss i bili ty of di s cr i ill i nat i on or 'Lie possi bil ity of any off ice r ove r - r eact i ng
with aut hority . As soon as th i s has been comp l et ed, it \vill be presented t o t he
Board of Fi re Mas t e rs fo r t he ir approv al and adopt ion.
He \'>J OUl d 1i ke to st ress t ;·iat any fir eman who has ~ri evan ces , has t hree meth ods by
\'lhich t o air t he17 i n t 11 i s office: by compl et i n~ a Fo rm 52 (S pe ci al Req ues t) ,
go throu gh t he Company Off i ce rs and Batt ali on Chi ef , or by us e of a Sugge s t ion
Fa nn avai l abl e in all s tat ion s. Any j us t ifi abl e gri e van ces will oe s trai ght ened
out.
Yo urs very t r uly ,
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0. WILLII\MS, Chi e f
Atl anta Fi re De~a r tr.ient
POW:lla
Enclosure
Mr. W. T. Kni ght, Chairman Board of Fire t1a sters
cc :
"HELP SA VE LIFE AND PROPERTY BY PRE VEN llNG FIRES"
�The Atlanta ~ire Depa rtmEnt's only interes t is in t he protection of lives and
property from fire . The citize ns of Atlanta should have and deserve t he best
fire protection availabl e. In order to accomp lish this. we must have t he be st
trained, qualified, and experi enced pe rsonnel in res ponsible positions
regardl ess of race, creed, or color.
Fire Dep art11ent officers hi p must J1ave le ade rship. One cannot gain leadership
if standards have to be lov-1ered so one can qua 1i fy. Subordinates wi 11 not look
upon such an officer as a l eade r. Life and pro perty is at stake. Decisions
and actions of a fire officer are based on knO\·!ledg e and experi ence of the job.
Therefore, standards and qualifications must be kep t hi gh. Rather than lower
the standards, th ey s hould be rais ed.
PROMOTIONAL POLICIES:
Promotions in t he Fire De part:nent are made according to merit and fitness.
The promotiona l system of the Atl anta Fire Department is set by law.
Anyone r.ieeting t11e qualifying standards as set fort h by the
Promotional Boar d will be prrnnoted rega r dl ess of race, creed, or
color. We will not and do not discri min at e for or against anyone
meeting the qualifying standards of this system.
Promotion ai exa1n-inatio11s fur · Fire Li e ut2n;:rnts at2 h21d ever:/ t \·1c
years. To qua li fy, a man must have had five yea rs service in the
Fire Depa r tme nt . Afte r the examination, t h~ applicants are li st ed
accordin g to their scores from a comb i na ti on of th 2 \'iritten test,
trainin g school average, and sen iority points. This list is
divided into gr.ou ps of 20. The first 20 men are r at ed at oral
i ntervi ev.;s, and th is score is added to t he ir grades fror:1 the above
three items. Promotions. from t his list are made in order of the
applicant's fin al score.
So far , the first 7 men have been promoted from the Lieutenant's
exami nati on he l d i n March of 1969 . The first ~lack firemen starte d to
work in April 19~3 , so t hat t his is t he f irst ye ar (1 969 ) any of t hem
have been el i gi bl e to apply f or promotion to Li eutenant . There were 153
app licants , of vJhom 6 ~·Je re bl ack. The first bl ack applicant is in the
6th gro up of 20 or approxi r.1ately position 102 on t l1e list.
Promotions to Fi re .Appa r atus Operator are made by app ointme nt. The
Captain at each st atio n make s t hese sel Gctions subject to the
approval of t he Batta.lion Chief. Th e men must ha ve had at least tvJO
year; service with the Fire Departm2nt and ha ve passed t he required
drivin g tests at the Trainin g School. There are nine bl ack firemen
in these positi ons .
�HIRING PRACTICES:
Eligible lists for Fii·emen are established every \'1/eek after the weekly
intervie ,·1s. (During March, April, and July of this year, intervi ews
were held every two weeks.) As vacancies occur, the Fi re Department
calls the men on a list in the order of their scores. Each pe rson on
the list of a certain date is contacted and offered employment before
movin g to the next chronological li s t. Once a man is on the eligible
list, he is not by- pas sed unless the Fire Department is unable to
contact him by telephone or letter.
1
Through July 25, of this year, 60 white men were put on the eligible
list and 57 black men. Of these, 45 wh ite men have been employed and
41 black men.
Of the 86 7 men in the extinguishing division, over 19% or 165 are black.
Nine of these are Fi re Apparatus Operators and 25 are on t•iil itary
Leave. Firemen that l ea ve the department for military service are
reinstated w:1en til e:,1 return (this is a Fede ral Lm·d and are usually
returned to t he sam2 station from v-1hi ch t hey 1eft.
RECREATI Oii CLUB:
In January of 195 9, a group of firemen leased a 5.7 acre tract of
land at Lake A11 atoona fro:;1 t ne government anrl organized a c1 uo
wh ich 11as call ed At l anta Firer.1en 1 s Re creation Club. Ho:·iever, t he
Fire Depa rtm2nt nor t he City of Atl anta has any jurisdiction over t he
activiti es of thi s club. It is a private organization contr oll ed by
a Board of Trustees composed of e l even men, \'/ 110 adhere to ti1e wis hes
of the majority of t he members, an d is supp·orted entirely by du es pai d
by the membe rs and ma intained t hrough volunteer services of t f1e memu2 rs.
�RUL E S
F I R E P R O MO T I O N B O A R D
CITY
Revised l1arch 196 7
OF
ATLANTA
�11.
An examination for Fire Captain will be held annually and the
register established will be valid for one year.
12.
Examinations for all other classes of positions will be held
when the Boa rd deems a list necessary, and the registers established will be valid for one year. The life of such registers
may be extended for an additional year if the Board deems it
practical and expedient to do so .
.13.
Satisfactory completion of a performance test of driving skill
under the supervision of the Fire Training Chief is a prerequisite
to applying for promotion to Fire Rescue Lieutenant.
14 .
When a man on an eligible register for a higher position than his
present class declines an assignment which would allow him to act
as an alternate for the higher position, his name will be moved
down on the eligible list below the name of the man who accepts
the assignment.
15.
If a qualified eligible is serving in a permanent vacancy in a
temporary cap a city at the time of a new examination, he will not
be required to take any further examination.
· 16.
The Fire Alarm Superintendent will qualify men for the position of
Fire Dis pa tche r and wi l l furni s h the Fire Promo t ion Board a list of
qualified applicants and their grades.
17.
Non-fire fi gh t i n g pe rs onnel desiring to retur n to firefi gh t ing mus t
serve one year a s full-pay Firemen be for e being e li gible to cornFe t e
in pr omotiona l examina t i ons . Membe r s of t he Training Division are
cons ide r ed to be firefi ghting pe rsonne l.
18.
Upon return to the Fire Department , r eenployed Firemen, including
those who we r e forme rly on the eli gible r egist e r for Fire Lieut enant
or other pr omoti ona l r egiste rs , must s e rve one ye ar as f ull~pay
fi remen before being e l igible to compe t e in promoti onal examinations .
19.
Seniority wil l be recognized by the a ddi t i on to the f ina l attained
passing grade of ona-hal f (½) point f or ecch year o f service in the
Fire Departmen t beyond the f irst five (5) years t o a maximum of five
(5) points in any c as e . For pr omotion to t he r ~nk o f Cap t a in and
higher., s eniority will b2 recognized by giving one-half (!~) point fo r
each year of service on next l ower r ank only, t o a maximum of five
(5 ) points.
20.
In the event of a tie in finel grades after addition of s eniority
points, the man with the highest seniority wil l be placed highest
on the eligible register. If seniority points are the same~ the
man with the highest written grade will be placed highest on the
eligible register.
21.
Fire Department personnel serving in the arm~d forces will accru2
s eniority as though s erving in the Fire Depart~ent.
22.
Fire Department personnel on military leeve may be given the promotional examination for which they are eligible and will be notified
of the ope ning and closing dates of application for all examina tions
for classe s to which they may apply.
�23,
Linemen 1 machinists; fire equipment mechanics, and fire carpenters
may be qualified by th ~ Personnel Department from open cosp etitive
registers. Fire Department pe rsonnGl who quclify may be certified
ahead of others on the list if desired. Fire Department personnel
may be qualified by th e Personnel Department from promotional examinations from within the Fire Departfilent,
24,
A schedule of eligibility for promotion and who may apply for the
various classes is shown in Table I.
25.
Examinations will be conducte d according to the schedule of weights
and phases listed in Table II.
�I
T ABL E I
SCHEDULE OF ELIGIBILITY FOR PROMOTION
FOR PROMOTION TO :
WHO MAY APPLY:
Fire Appa ratus Operator
Firemen who have completed
two years of service.
Fire Rescue Lieutenant ·
All fire fighting personnel
who have completed five years
of service in the Fire Department.
Fire Dispe tcher
All fire Ugh ting personnel
who have completed five years
of service in the Department
and have had one year of service
in the Signal Division of the
Fire Department.
Fire Lieuten ant
All fire fi ghting pe rsonne l
who have ccopleted five ye ars
of service in the De pa rtment,
Fire Captain
Fire Lieutenants with at l east
3 years' s e rvi ce as Lieutenant.
Fire Drill Instructor, Chie f
All Fire Captains
Fire Battalion Chie f
Fire Captains with a t least
3 years ' service as Captain.
Fi rs t Deputy
All Fire Batta l i on Chiefs
&
Deputy Fire Chief
Fire Investi gator I
All fire fi ght i ng pe rsonne l and
fire dispatchers who h ave complete d
five years of s E.rv:i.ce in the Fire
Departmen t.
Fire Investigat or II
Fire Investigat ors with one year
of service as an Investigator .
As s istant Fire Marshal
Fi re I nves tigator s with 3 years '
s e r vice os Investigator.
Fire Marshal
As sistant Fire ~arshals a~d Fire
Inves tigators with 3 years' service .
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�DEPARTMENT of F!RE
46 COURTLAND ST., S. E.
Atlanta, Georgia
P.O. WILLIAMS
CHIEF
AUJUSt 15:1 1969
i'iemo to:
A11 P;:rsonnG 1
Fron:
Chfof of Fi re; Jepart1:12nt
Su~j~ct:
Reiteration of Fir~ D~partrncnt Policies
Fire Depa rtr:1~n1:
comf.iand
ornc2rs s .-,a-i l a(j..:: r oss cne
fird 1e i1 und';2 r tii1.0 ir
by t:1e;ir surna1-:-1;:;s.
Fi re:-,krn sha 11 ad~ress t i1ci r sup(;ri er offi c2rs or ~cti ng offi c1.;rs
uy
rank.
Qualified m1.: i1 ~1il1 t,12 assi gner1 on a rotating i..asis to thi.::
capacity as acting officer or ~xtra apparatus o;:i1;.; rc1t or.
Fill - ins will also oe do~~ o~ rotating basis ~ith cons ist~nt
records kept at eac~ ono i n~ house on an indivi dual shift
basis as cpposcu to a station.
By orde; r of .
POvl: 11 a
"HELP SAVE LIFE AND PROPERTY BY PREVENTING FIRES"
�OEPARTMENT o f FfRE
46 COURTLAND ST.,
s;. E .
Atlanta, Georgia.
P.O. WILLIAMS
CHIEF
August 15, 19o9
Honorabl e Ivan All en , Jr .
Mayor, City of Atl3. nt a
City Hall
Atlant a, Ge orgia 30303
Dear ~ay or All en:
t•/e have been de aling 1': it h Coum unity Re l ations and have a ccepted so1-.ie of t fle ir
su gges tions r e l at iv e to c 1i n in at in g some pro ble1:is. Va riou s polici es and f a ct s
pert ai ni ng to t his de partment a r e attac hed .
! t is i nte rest inn to n0t P the followin a excerpt from t he Re port of t he Un ite d
States Cor.11:i iss io~ on Civil Ri gl, ts 1%9:· f:nt it .l c d For J\11 the PeoiJ 1e ... By All
t he Peop l e \·.'hic h has j ust r2 a ched t hi s offic e :
11 D
espite t he be late d ad:i1 i ss i on of fi r en12 11 in t o t he Atlanta de ;,) artrne nt
an d t he e la bora t e p rocedu res w1 ich s urround e d th e ir introduction, t he
At l anta Fire De partmen t !1ad a l a r ge r pr opo rti on of :·Jegroes i n unifo nn
th an any ot he r cent ral city in the s urvey and a hi gh er degree of
in teg r ation t ha n many. 11
vJe are in th e process of r e-1·1ritin g th e Ru l e s and Reg ulations of the At l anta Fire
Depa rtme nt to e li ~i na t e a ny i nequ i t i es i n t he ol d ~oo k , to e li ~in ate any
possibility of discr i mina ti on or ti-,e poss ib ility of any office r over-re act i ng
wit h au tilori ty. As soon as th i s has be en comp 1eted. it iv i 11 be pr e s e nte d to the
Board of Fire Mas te rs for t he ir app roval and adoption.
W
e would li ke to s t r e ss t hat any fire8 an who ha s gri e vances, has thre e me th od s by
whic h t o a i r then in t i,is off ic e: by comp l et in g a Form 52 (Spe ci a l Req uest ) ,
go t hrough t he Cor1pany Office rs and 3att a lion Ch i ef, or by use of a Sug gest i 011
Fom ava il ab l e in all station s. Any justifi ab l e gri e vances ~v ill 0e straighten ed
out.
0.J-,C, ·c:{.RLv<'~
Yours very t ruly,
l,L
0. HI LLI AMS, Chie f
Atlanta Fi re De;,artr.1ent
POW: 11 a
Enclosure
cc: Mr. W. T. Knig_ht, Chairman Board of Fire Maste rs
"HELP SA VE LIFE AND PROPERTY BY PREVENTiNG FIRES"
�The Atlanta Fire Depa rtment s only interest is in t he prote cti on of lives and
property from fire . The citi zen s of At l an ta shoul d have and dese rve t he be st
fire protection avai 1abl e. In order t o accompl is ;, tl1 i s , we r:1ust have the best
train ed , qualifi ed, and expe ri enced personne l in res~onsi bl e pos itions
regardl ess of race , creed, or color.
1
Fire Dep artment officers hi p must have le aders hip. One cannot gain l eaders hi p
if standards have to be lm·,e red so one can qualify . Su bordi nate s will no t iook
upon such an officer as a l eade r. Life and property is at sta ke. De cisions
and actions of a fire officer are based on knov1l edge and expe ri ence of t he job.
Therefore, standards and qu alifications must be kept hi gh. Rat her than lower
the standards, t hey should be rais ed.
PROMOTIONAL POLI CI ES:
Promotions in t he Fire De partme nt are made accordi ng to me rit and fitn ess.
The promoti ona l system of the Jl.tl an ta Fire Dep artme nt is set by l avJ.
Anyone me eti n'.J the qualifyi ng st anda r ds as set f or t h by t he
Promotio na l Board vdll be promoted rega r dl ess of r ace, creed, or
color. We will no t an d do not discri min ate for or aga i nst anyone
meeting th e qu alifyi ng st anda rds of th is system .
Promot i ona i exami nation~ f ut Fi re Li .:utcn a,1t::; ar2 h::: 1d c. ·:2.r~· t'::o
ye ars . To qua 1·i fy, a man must have had f i ve yea rs service i n -~:he
Fire Depa r t me nt . After the exami nation, t he a;-Jp licants are li ste d
accordin 0 to t heir scor es f rom a comb i nati on of t h2 v1ri tten test,
traini ng school average , and sen iority poi nt s . This li st i s
divi ded into gr.cup s of 20 . The first 20 men are r ated at oral
i ntervi ews , and t hi s score is added t o t he ir grades f ror, t he above
three items. Promot i ans from t his lis t are r.iade in orde r of t he
applicant s fi na l score.
1
So far , th e first 7 men have been promoted from t he Li eut enant s
examin ati on he l d in Ma rc h of 1969 . The fi rs t ~l ack f iremen started t o
work in April 196 3 , so that t his is t he f irst yea r (1 969 ) any of t hem
ha ve been eli gi bl e to apply for promot i on to Lieuten ant . There were 153
app li cants , of whom 6 were bl ack. The f i rs t bl ack app l ic an t i s i n the
6th grou p of 20 or approx i mately pos i t i on 102 on t he li st.
1
Pr omot io ns to Fire Appara t us Oper ato r are made by appoi ntme nt. The
Capta i n at each stat ion makes thes e se l ~ctions subje ct to t he
approval of trie Batta li on Chief . . Th e men mus t nave i1a d at l 2ast t wo
years service wi th the Fi re Dep artrn2 nt and have pas sed t he required
driving tests at the Trai ni ng School. There are ni ne black firemen
in these positi ons .
�,.
HIRI NG PRACTICES:
Eligi ble lists for Firemen are established every 1tJee k after the weekly
interviev,s. (During March, April, and July of t his year, intervi ev~s
were he 1d every t wo ~"ee ks.) As vacancies occur, t he Fi re Department
calls th e men on a list in t he orde r of th eir scores. Each pers on on
the list of a certa in date is contacted and offered employment be fore
movin g to t he next chronological li st. On ce a man is on the eli gi ble
list, he is no{ by-pas sed unl ess t he Fire De partment is un ab l e to
contact him by tel ephone or l etter.
Thro'. 1gh July 25, of thi,s year , 60 ~'lhite me n \•/ere put on the eli gi bl e
list and 57 black men. Of these , 45 white men have been employed and
41 black men.
Of the 86 7 men in t he exti ng ui sh ing division , over 19% or 165 are black.
Nine of t hese are Fire Appa r atus Operators and 25 are on Military
Leave . Fireme n t ha t l eave t he de partment for mili ::a·r y service are
rein~ta t~d when t hey r etu rn (th is is a Feder al Law) and are usuall y
returned to t he s ame station from \·vhich ti1ey l eft.
RE CRE.O.TIOi\l CLUB:
In Janu ary of 1959, a group of firemen l eased a 5.7 acre tract of
1and at Lake ,.n.11 atoon a from t !le gove r nr11ent (ln d or gani zea a cl uo
wh ich ~,as cal led At l anta Firenen' s Re creation Cl ub. Hm-1e ve r , t he
Fi r e Depa rtm2nt nor t he City of At l ::nt a h:is any juris di cti on over th e
activi ti es of th i s cl ub. It i s a pr ivate crgani zat i on contr oll ed by
a Board of Truste es compos ed of e l even men, '. 1110 adhe re· to fr,e \,fis hes
of t he nrn j or ity of t ~~e rnembe rs , an d i s supported ent i re l y by du ' s pai d
by the membe rs and ma i ntai ne d t hrough volunt ee r services of t he meinliers .
1
�-
RUL E S
F I R E
P R O -H O T I O N
CITY
Revised March 1967
OF
B O A R D
ATLANTA
�---- -----
- --
11.
An examination for Fire Captain will be held annually and the
register established wiil be valid for one year.
12.
Examinations for all other classes of positions will be held
when the Board deerus a list necessary~ and the registers established will be valid for one year, The life of such registers
may be extended for an additional year if the Board deems it
practical and expedient to do so.
13,
Satisfactory completion of a performance test of driving skill
under the supervision of the Fire Training Chief is a prerequisite
to applying for promotion to Fire Rescue Lieutenant.
14.
When a man on an eligible register for a higher position thau his
present class declines an assignment which would allow him to act
as an alternate for the higher position, his name will · be moved
down on the eligible list below the name of the man who accepts
the assignment,
15.
If a qualified eligible is serving in a permanent vacancy in a
temporary capacity at the time of a new examination, he will not
be required to take any further examination.
16.
The Fire Alarm Superintendent will qualify men for the position of
Fire Dispatcher and will furnish the Fire Promotion Board a list of
qualified applicants and their grades.
17.
Non-fi re fightin g personnel desiring to return to firefi ghting must
serve one ye ar as full-pay Firemen be fore being eli gible to comFete
in promotional examinations. Members of the Training Divis ion are
conside r e d to be firefighting personne l.
18.
Upon r e turn to the Fire Departraent, r eeuploye d Firemen, including
those who were forme rly on th e e li gible register for Fire Li e utenant
or other promotional registers , must serve one year as full- pay
firemen before be ing e ligible to compete in promotional examinations.
19.
Seniority will be recognize d by the addition to the final attained
passing grade of one-h a lf (½) point for e~ch yea r of service in the
Fire Depa rtment be:,rond the first five (5) ye a rs to a maximum of five
(5) points in any cas e . For promotion to th e r ank of Captain and
higher.., s eniority will ha r e cogniz e d by giving one-h a lf (!~) point for
each year of s e rvice on next lowe r rank only , to a maximum of five
(5) points .
20.
In the e vent of a ti e in final grade s aft e r addi ti on of s enio ri ty
po ints , the man with t he h igh est s eni ori ty wi ll be pl ac ed hi gh es t
on t he e ligi ble r e gister . If s cmior i t y p.oint s are the s ame , the
man with t he hi gh es t writte n grade wil l be p laced h i ghest on t he
eligible register.
21.
Fire Department personne l s ervin g in t he armed fo rces will accru2
seniority a s though s erving in the Fire Department.
22.
Fire Department pers onnel on military leeve may be given the promotional examination for which they are eligib l e and will be notified
of the opening and closing dates of application for all examinations
for clas s es to which they may apply.
�23.
Linemen 9 reachinists , fire equipment mechanics, and fire carpenters
may be qualified by th~ Personnel Department from open competitive
registers. Fire Department personnel who qualify may be certified
ahead of others on the list if desired, Fire Department personnel
may be qualified by the Personnel Department from promotional cxamin~tions from within the Fire Department,
24,
A schedule of eligibility for promotion end who may apply for the
various classes is shown in Table I.
25.
Examinations will be conducted according to the schedule of weights
and phases listed in Table II.
�T A BL E
I
SCHEDULE OF ELIGIBILITY FOR PROMOTION
FOR PROMOTION TO :
WHO MAY APPLY:
Fire Apparatus Operator
Firemen who have completed
two years of service.
Fire Rescue Lieutenant
All fire fighting personnel
who have completed five years
of service in the Fire Department.
Fire Dispt!tcher
All fire fighting personnel
who have completed five years
of service in the Department
and have had one year of service
in the Signal Division of the
Fire Department.
Fire Lieutenant
All fire fighting personnel
who have conple ted five years
of service in the Department.
Fire Captain
Fire Lieutenants with at least
3 years' service as Lie utenant.
Fire Drill Instructor, Chief
All Fire Captains
Fir e Battalion Chief
Fire Captains with a t least
3 years ' service as Captain.
First Deputy & Deputy Fire Chief
All Fire Bat t a lion Chiefs
Fire Investigator I
All fi r e fi ghting personnel and
fire di sp ~t chers wh o h ave complete d
five year s of s ervice in the Fire
Depar t ment .
Fire I nve s ti gator I I
Fi r e I n ves tiga tors wi t h one year
of se r vice as an I nvestigator.
As s istant Fire Marshal
Fire Inves tigator s with 3 years '
s ervice ns Investigator.
Fire Marshal
As s i s tant Fire ~arshals and Fire
Inve s tigators with 3 years ' se rvice.
�-- - - - -- --· -.-------- ..
--
---·
CITY OF ATLANTA
8 August J.969
,.
Memoran dum Regarding Discrimination .Against Black Firemen Of Atlanta

.. To:
. ',
-- ~
.
'
Mayor Ivun All an , Chairman Board of Firema sters-, AJderma-n__Wm. :. T•
Knight and Atlanta Fire Chief Paul o• .Williams
- -~
--.. . __·-
--'--- ----~ --
---
Black Firemen of Atlanta
From:
-
-
The Black firefighters of Atlanta are dedicated municipal empl~ee ~, _ ., ,
concerne d with the safety and welfare of our city and all of its citizens ~ During the years of our tenure as firemen we have been subjected to dis-·criminatio n and abuses as outlined below. We r equest that imma diate _
action be t aken to correct ·these practices, and that on or before Mond~y,
August 18, 1969 that \'.'e receive a formal report on your 1ie.:t io ns in cor~ ~
ing t he acti ons cited herein:
/
---.. .
0
~
I.
HIRING PRACTICES
The ratio of Black Firemen to White Firemen -dR__es not correspon
- to th-e: population of Black citizens in Atlanta. There are-- about 90 to
100 Black Firemen in a department of more than 900 men. Blac k--Eiremen
that are drafted into the armed servic~s are replaced by _w.hite firemen
II.
SEGREGATED SLEEPING
&
LOCKER A'\RANGEMENTS
J
Lockers and beds of Black Firemen are placed in the back or away
from the white firemen.
III.
RECREATION CLUB
_, _ _ . , , ~
~-· ,_,.....,,.,,
<>rt ' '" ~ "
The membership was clo~ed t he year Black Firemen wcro hired i~
Land was given to the club by the governme,P._t on Lake Allatoona~l3 acres)
~I C ~ ,-..rt>-/ --fvr~, ¥__ 4 ~ ~ u
°' )
1
IV. PROMOTIONAL DISCRIMINATION l__io~ o-w--t ~ ~ 1 !~~:a-.... . -
i
-
Black Firemen should be included in every department. White fi.u~
r.ien with less time and experience are promoted·· to -dr-i-ve1 posltion _s~~dlack
Firemen with 5 and 6 years should be promoted to Lieutenanti; because the
entire officer cabinet is made up of all white officers. Most of these
officers h ay__e. be en k o o v-n+-t-o..-f--G-:i.~-r--p-r-e--j-t2·d±c-e-s- on- a-l-a ck Firemen. We
=- -are ..a\'1ar e of the test for Lieutenants, but in a time of an emergency men
have been promoted wholesale from private to captains within a year, thus_
setting pr oper precedent. We consider this an emerge_n_cy ..-heG-al:t'Se-- -o-f tne
overall discrimination in the department. White drivers are giving up their
po&itions because they know future Lieutenants are going to be appointed by
Chiefs.· This is true because in the last captain's test the aides of all
the chief s dominated the list. Some of these Lieutenants didn't place in
the top 40 on the Lieutenants list. Now they are captains ..
~
t
I
0
V.
EXPERIENCE AND LENGTH OF TI ME ON THE DEPARTMENT
Acting officers. we feel that every Black Fi remen with the time
and experience, equal to· any white firemen, should be . given .the opportunity ,
to be an ac~i ng office~: This ap~li~s to ~,tra driverso House d)ies
should be picked accord i ng to sen10,:-J_ty . . . _ G.,.J . . \ s ~
-h;nv- c,,t.;x
·
VI.
I
·
·v
v
STNJDN~D SET OF RULES FOR ALL cAnArNS
Each shift is operat ed different, captain authority has no limit.
He forces personal prejudices on Black Firemen. Transfer of men to other
stations.
( ~ I ' ~ ~ .A!~
FOR COrITACT:
-- --·
l
Fireman William Hamer
195 Hermer Circle , N. W.
Atlanta, Georg'ia 30311
- -elephon e - 794-2244
--- --- __ _
or -- -Fire Station 16 on C Shift
Telephone 523-5786
. . ,~
~
°'M/u
. __________
· ··
I ,
.
,.
ad
_;
�SJ
'-' !
Au
st J.8, 19 9
NDUM
FROM:
h • written
• 1t ell to th
of A
1
yor .A 11 n e u.b ittin bu r
ti
orandum Re rdin1 Dia<:ri -1 tio
ntatt ~
n d to
y:o-r
d Fir D
nt
y r
�---- ··
DEPARTMENT of FIRE
46 COURTLAND ST., S. E.
Atlanta, Georgia
AUJUSt 15, 1969
i'iemo to:
All PE:rsonnGl
Fron:
Chief of Fi ri;; Jepart1:knt
Su~j~ct:
Reiteration of Fir~ D~partmcnt Policies
Fi re Departi:l12n-c of ii c2rs s.,a i I ac: ..m: ss t i'le: f i rt.";: 1:ien und,2r th~i r
by t:1cir surnar.1;:;s.
comr.;and
Fi re~11en s ha 11 adJr~ss t i,c i r su~,(; ricr offi c2rs or acting offi cGrs
liy rank.
Qualifi ed m1.:: ;1 ~1il1 ~1:; assigne,j on a rotating 0asis to tht::
capacity as acting officer or ~xtra apparatus o~~ r atur.
1
Fill - in s will al so oe donE o~ rotating bas i s with cons ist~nt
records kept at each engine house on an indivi dual shift
bas i s as cpposc<l t o a s t ation .
8y orde;r of;
POvJ: 11 a
"HELP SA VE LIFE AND PROPERTY BY PREVENTING FIRES"
�OEPARTMEN T o f F IRE
4 6 COURT L AN D S T., ~ - E .
Atl a n ta , Geo rg ia
P.O. WILLIA MS
CHIEF
August 15, D o9
Honorab l e Ivan All en, Jr.
Mayor , City of Atl ant a
City Hall
Atlanta , Ge orgi a 30303
Dea r t iayor All en:
1
He ha ve been deali ng 1·1it h Cm11nun ity Re l ati ons and have accepted so,·;ie of t he ir
su ggest i ons re l at i ve t o e li mi nat i ng some pro bl e1:is . Vari ous poli ci es and f act s
perta i ni ng to t his dep artment are atta ched .
! t is inte r es t i n~ to not,'.> th e fo ll ovJi ng excerpt f r om the Rep or t of the United
Stat es Co1,11nission on Civil Rig ht s 196 9 , e nt i tled For /\11 th e Peo;J 1e . . . By .l\ll
the Peop l e v;hich has j ust r2a ched t ,1i s of f ·ice :
Des pite t he be 1ated ad;ni ss i on of fi r em2n i nt o t he ,l\t l anta de ;J artmen t
and t he el aborat e procedu res which s urrounded t hei r i nt ro duct i on, t he
At l an t a Fi re Departmen t ll ad a 1arge r pr opo rt i on of ;·leg r oes i n unifonn
th an any ot her cen tral ci ty in t he s ur vey and a hi gi1er degree of
integrat io n t han many . 11
11
vJe are i n t he process of re -v1rit i ng th 2 Rul es and Reg ul at i ons of the At la nt a Fi r e
Depa rtment to e li @i nat e any i nequi t i es i n the ol d book, to eli ~in ate any
possibility of di~cri min ati on or th e possi bil ity of any offi ce r ove r-reacti ng
1-Jith aut hority . As soon as t his has been comp l et ed, it i>Jill be presented t o t he
Board of Fi re Masters for t he ir approva 1 and adopti en.
We \voul d li ke to st r ess ti1a t any fi reman who has 9ri ~vances , has th ree met hods by
whi ch to ai r t hem i n t iiis office: by comp l et in g a Fo r,n 52 (Speci al Req ues t) ,
go t hrou gh t he Company 0-ffi ce rs and Batt alion Chi ef , or by use of a Sugg es t ion
Fo nn avai l able in al l s tatio ns . Any just ifiab l e gri e vances will be s tra i gh ten ed
out.
Yo urs very truly ,
/)
'
0, { ,(__ 1d~~
O. HILLI AMS, Ch ief
Atl anta Fi re De; artr.1ent
POW : lla
Enclosure
cc : Mr . W. T. Kni g_ht , Ch airman Board of Fi re !·1aste rs
"HELP SAVE LIFE AND PROPERTY BY PREVEN TING FIRES"
�The Atlanta Fire Department's only interest is in t he protection of lives and
property from fir2. The citizens of Atlanta should llave and deserve t ile best
fire protec.tion avai.la.bl e. In order to accornplisi1 this , i.-ve r:1ust nave tile best
trained, qualified, and experienced personnel in res ponsible positions
regardless of race, creed, or color.
Fi re Department o ffi cershi p must have 1eadershi p. One cannot gain leadership
if standards have to · be lov-:ered so one can qualify. Subordinates v1ill not look
upon such an officer as a l 2ader. Life and property is at stake. Decisions
and actions of a fire officer are based on knowledge and experience of the job.
Therefore, standards and qualifications must be kept high. Rather than lower
the standards) they should be raised.
PROMOTIONAL POLICIES:
Promotions in the Fi re Department are made according to merit and fitness.
The promotional system of the Atl anta Fire Department is set by law.
Anyone meeting the qualifyi ng standards as set fort h by the
Promotional Board will be prrnnoted regardl ess of race, creed. or
color. ~{e 1,1ill not and do not discriminate for or against anyone
meeting the qualifying standards of this system.
Promoti onai exam-inati ons for Fi re Li eutcii a~ts 0.r2 h21 d every t\·:o
years. To qualify , a man must have had five years service in the
Fire Depa rtm2nt . After the examin ation, t he appl icants are li sted
according to their scores from a combination of the v1ritten test,
trainin g school average, and seniority points. This list is ·
divided into gr_ou ps of 20 . The first 20 men are rated at oral
interviews , and t his score is added to their gr ades fro~ the above
three items . Promotions from t his list are made in order of t he
applicant's fina l score.
So far, the first 7 men have been promoted from the Li eutenant 's
examination he l d in Ma rch of 1969 . The first bl ack firer;1en sta rted to
work in April 196 3, so t hat this is t he first year (1 969 ) any of t hem
have been eli gibl e to app ly for promotion to Li eutenant. There \'Jere 153
app licants , of whom 6 we re bl ack. The f irst bl ack app licant is in the
6th group of 20 or approxi ma t e·ly pos ition 102 on t l1e li st.
Promotions to Fi re Apparatus Operator are made by appointment. The
Captain at each station makes these se l ~ctions subject to the
approval of the Battal i on Chief. The men mus t have had at least two
year5 service with the Fi re Department and have passed t i1e required
driving tests at the Training School. There are nine black firemen
in these positions.
�,.
I-I IRING PRACTICES:
Eligible lists for Firemen are establi shed every i\leek after the we ekly
inte rvi e :1s. (During Harell, Apr"il, and July of t his year, inte rvi e~·Js
were hel d every t wo v,ee ks.) As vacanci es occur , t he Fi r e Department
calls th e men on a list in t he order of th eir scores. Each pe rs on on
th e list of a certain date is contacted and offered e!·np loyme nt be fore
movin g to t he next chro nological li s t. O~ ce a man is on th ~ eli gi ble
list, he is not by- passed unl es s t he Fire De partment is unabl e to
contact hi m by tel ~p hone or l ette r.
1
Through July 25, of this year , 60 wh ite men we re put on the eli ~i ble
list and 57 blac k men . Of th ese , 45 white men have been employe d and
41 blac k men.
Of the 86 7 men in t he ext i ng ui s hin g division , ove r 19% or 165 are black.
Nine of t he se ar e Fi r e Appa r at us Op e rators and 25 are on r,iil it ary
Le ave . Firemen t ha t l ea ve the dep ar t ment for mi 1i ta ry se rvic e ar e
r eins t ated whe n t hey r etu rn (t his is a Fede r al Law) and are us uall y
returned to t he s am2 station fr om \st hi ch t i1ey l eft.
RE CRE.LffIQ:-.1 CL UB:
In J anu ary of 1959, a group of fireme n l ea sed a 5.7 acre t ra ct of
l and at Lake .8.ll at oon a f r o::1 t ne gove r nme nt and or ganiz ed a ciuo
whic h was call ~d At l ant a Firene n ' s Re crea t io n Clu b. Howe ve r , the
Fi re Depa rt r:12 nt nor t 112 City of At l anta ha. s any ju ri s dict i on ove r th e
act i viti es of th i s clu b. It is a priv ate or gan i zati on controll ed by
a Boa r d of Trus t ee s comp os ed of e l e ven men, w;1 0 ad he r e to ti-,e wis he s
of t he ma jority of t he membe rs , and i s su pported ent i r el y by dues pa i d
by t he membe rs and ma i nt ai ne d t i1 rou gh volunt ee r services of t he membe rs.
�I
RUL E S
FIRE
PROHOTION
CITY
Revised March 1967
OF
BOARD
ATLANTA
�11.
An examination for Fire Captain will be held annually and the
register established will be valid for one year.
12.
Examinations for all other classes of positions will be held
when the Board deems a list necessary~ and the registers established will be valid for one year. The life of such registers
may be extended for an additional year if the Board deems it
practical and expedient to do so.
13.
Satisfactory completion of a performance test of driving skill
under the supervision of the Fire Training Chief is a prerequisite
to applying for promotion to Fire Rescue Lieutenant.
14.
When a man on an eligible register for a higher position than his
present class declines an assignment which would allow him to act
as an alternate for the higher position, his name will be moved
down on the eligible list below the name of the man who accepts
the assignment.
15.
If a qualified e ligible is serving in a permanent vacancy in a
temporary capacity at the time of a new examination, he will not
be required to take any further examination.
16.
The Fire Alarm Superintendent will qualify men for the position of
Fire Dispatcher and will furnish the Fire Promotion Board a list of
qualified applicants and their grades.
17.
Non-fi r efi ghting personnel desiring to r eturn to firefightin g must
serve one ye ar as full-pay Firemen before being eli gible to comfete
in promotional e xaminations . Members of the Training Division are
conside r e d to be f i refighting personnel.
18.
Upon r e turn to the Fire Departnent, r e enployed Firemen~ including
thos e who we re forme rly on the e ligible re gist e r for Fire Lieutenant
or othe r pr omotional registe rs , must serve one year as full-pay
firemen be fore being eligi ble to compete in promotional e xaminations.
19 .
Sen ior ity will be recognized by the addit i on to t he final attained
passing grade of one-h a l f (½) poi nt fo r ecch y ear of se r vic e in the
Fire Departmen t beyond t he first five (5) years to a maximum of fiv e
(5) po i n t s in any cas e . For pr omotion t o t h e r ank of Captain and
higherJ s eniority wi ll b2 recogni ze d by gi ving one-half ( !2) point fo r
e ach year of s ervi ce on next lower rank onl y, t o a maximum of f ive
(5) points.
20.
In the e vent of a tie in fina l gr ad e s after addition of s eni ority
points , the man with the highe s t s en iority wi l l be pla ced highes t
on the e ligibl~ re giste r. If s enior i t y poin t s are the same , the
man wi th t he highe s t wri t t en grade will be placed highes t on the
eligible r egis t e r.
21 .
Fire Dep a rtment personnel s erving in t h e a rme d fo rce s will a c crua
s eniority a s though s ervi n g in t h e Fi r e Dep a rtment.
22 .
Fire Department pers onnel on mi li tary leeve may be given the promotional examination for wh ich they a re eligible and will be not i fied
of t he opening and closing dates of application for all examina tion s
f or classes to which they may apply .
�23.
Linemen, mechinists; fire equipment machanics, and fire carpenters
may be qua1ificd by th~ Personnel Department from open competitive
·registers. Fire Department pe rsonnGl who qualify may be certified
ahead of others on the list if desired. Fire Department personnel
may be qualifie d by the Personne l Department from promotional examinations from witpin the Fire Department.
24.
A schedule of eligibility for promotion and who may apply for the
various classes is shown in Table I.
25.
Examinations ~ill be conducted according to the schedule of weights
and phases listed in Table II.
�T ABL E I
SCHEDULE OF ELIGIBILITY FOR PROMOTION
FOR PROMOTION TO:
WHO MAY APPLY:
Fire Apparatus Operator
Firemen who have completed
two years of service.
Fire Rescue Lieutenant
All fire fighting personnel
who have completed five years
of . service in the Fire Department.
Fire Dispctcher
All fire fighting personnel
who have completed five years
of service in the Department
and have had one year of service
in the Signal Division of the
Fire Department.
Fire Lieutenant
All fire fighting personnel
who have conpleted five years
of service in the Department,
Fire Captain
Fire Lieutenants with at least
3 years' service as Lieutenant.
Fire Drill Instructor, Chief
All Fire Captains
Fire Battalion Chief
Fire Captains with at least
3 years' service as Captain.
First Deputy & Deputy Fire Chief
All Fire Battalion Chiefs
Fire Investigator I
All fire fighting personnel and
fire dispatchers who have completed
five years of service in the Fire
Department.
Fire Investigator II
Fire Investigators with one year
of service as an Investigator.
Assistant Fire Marshal
Fire Investigators with 3 years'
service as Jnvestigator.
Fire Marshal
Assistant Fire Marshals and Fire
Investigators with 3 years' service.
�--
-- .---
.------
.---------.
CITY OF ATLANTA
8 Aug ust 1969
,,
.
Memorandum Regarding Discriminatio n Against Black Firemen Of Atlanta
_
__: ..
--==-- ,.
To:
..
Mayor Ivan All en, Chairman Board of Firema sters-, AJderlTra-fk__Wm. :,_ T.
Knight and Atlanta Fire Chief Paul O• . Williams
- ~ -- --------..-· ._ _
From:
Black Firemen of Atlanta
- ------. , /--,
--
.......___
..
'
The Black fir efighters of Atlanta are dedicated municipal empl~ee~, .
concerned with the s afety and w~lfare of our city and all of its citizen$ ; ·--.
During the years of our tenure as firemen we have been subjected to dis- ·- ·1
crimination and abuses as outlined below. We ·request that imrre diate __





action be taken to correct these practices, and that on or before Mo·nd~ .·





August 18, 1969 that we receive a formal report on your ae---tio"ns in corre~ I
ing the action s cited herein:
.
~.
/ . ~- ···.
.---'
I.
HIRING PRACTICES
The ratio
of
.. _ -=-~-~---
r
..:;j )1,;
'
.
-
Black Firemen to White Firemen -does not correspon


...-~ to th~ pop ulation of Black citizens in Atlanta. There are~about 90 to


100 Black Firemen in a department of more than 900 men. Black~-Firemen
that are drafted into the armed servic~s are replaced by ._white firemen
II.
SEGREGATED SLEEPING
& LOCKER
A'9.RANGEMENTS
J
Lockers and beds of :Black Firemen are placed in the back or away
from the whit e firemen.
III.
RECREATION CLUB
_,, ___,~
--
,_
~ dB ,,... .,, ~
The membership was clos ed the ye ar Black Fi ~e~en were hired in
Land was giv en t o the club by the _g overnme~t
on ~ake ~llatoon!. )_lJ a cres)
.
../ C <1--.,, ,40-/_
. (_~
~0 ~ ~ ~ - - )
J.963.
N.
PROMOTIONAL DISCRIMINATION
~~
lJv<J-'t
.
'
i
j
~1
/1'!~..... .
-
Black Firemen should be included in ·every department. Wh.i t ~. . .f i r_~ _,-'f
r.ien with less time and experience are promoted .. to --driver poslt"ions. r:Hack
Firemen with 5 and 6 yea rs should be promoted to Lieutenants ·;·-be-cause the
entire officer cabin et is made uo of all white officers. Most of these
officers have _bee o kn o ~-O--I'-€-e-t-h-e--i-r-p-r-e--j-ttd±c-e-s- ·on- s-1-a ck Firemen. We

~ -are- awar e of the test for Lieutenants, but in a time of an emergency men
have been promoted wholesale from private to captains within a year, thus_
setting proper precedent. We consider this an emerge_n_cy ---hec---uu-se---o'f tne
overall discrimination in th e department. White driv ers are giving up their
positions because they know f uture Lieutenants are going to be appointed by
Chiefs.· This is true because in the last captain's test the aides of all
the chiefs dominated the list. Some of these Lieutenants didn't place in
the top 40 on the Lieutenants list. Now they are captains.
V.
EXP!:RIENCE AND LE NGTH OF TH1E ON THE DEPARTMENT
Act ing offi cers, we feel that every Black Firemen .with the time
and exp erience, equal to any white firemen, should be .given the opportunity
to be an ac~ing officer: This apJ?li~s toce
tra dr ivers o House d~ies
should be picked according to seniority.
~ I l·S ~ r/f'·,··
dio )
VI.
STAtJDAR D SET OF RULES FOR ALL C
INS
Eich shift is operated different , captain authority has no limit.
He forc es personal preju dices on Black Firemen. Transfer of ~en to other
stations.
( ~ ~ ~ Afavk
FOR COl\ITACT:
Fireman William Hamer
195 !for mer Circle, N. W.
Atlanta, Georgia 30311
__
elephone - 794-2244

·
_ ---- -or ----Fire Station 16 on C Shift
Telephone 523-5786
/
, ",-u-1-
~
___..----:--
r)
/I
A
~-
77v--,
.
Iv a()j
,.
I '
I
l
I
L.~
�- --- . - - --- -______-,CITY OF AT LANT A
8 August 1969
.,
'. !
Memorandum Regarding Discriminatio n .Ag ai n st Black Fir emen Of Atlanta
. '·
-- - ~
_· - _. To :
Mayor Ivan Allen, Choirman Board of Fir emast-ers-, AJde rma-n.____Wm. i. T.
Knight and Atlanta Fire Chief Pa ul o. Wi lliams
· -. ________ · - ~ -- ___
---.....___
--·
.
.-Black Firemen of At l ant a
--

From:
I
The Bla ck firef i ght er s of Atlanta are dedicated municipal emplo{ee ~._
concerned wit h th e sa fe ty a nd welfare of ou r city and all of its citizen$ : 'During the ye ars of ou r te nure as firemen we have been subjected to dis- ·.
- ·\
crimination and abu s es as outlined below. We request that imrre diate _
action be t ak en t o co rr ec t these p r actices, and t hat on or before Mond~·-' ·
1
August 18, 19 69 t hat we r eceive a fo r mal repo r t on your '1rc-l io ns in corre ~
'
ing the act i ons c i t ed herein:
/
·
. ·-......
1
0
~
I.
HIRING PRACTICES
.. - :: ::-- - -
~ ..::!
f;
The rati o of Black Firemen to White Firemen -dpes not correspon
to -th-e' population of Blac k citizens in Atlanta. There a re----~bout 90 to
100 Black Firemen in a depa r tment of more. than 900 men. Blac k---E iremery
that are drafted into t he armed servic~s are replaced by _white fi r emen
~
II.
SEGREGATED SLE EPING & LOCKER A.ttRANGEMENTS
J
Loc k ers and b eds of :Black Fir emen are placed in the back or away.
from the whi te firemen.
III.
RECR EAT ION CLUB
· - - ~ ~ ---- c_.d>rn
.l963G
IV.
~
~
--
~
The membership was closed th e yea r Bla ck Fi r emen were h!~cd i~
Lan d was given t c the club by the gov ernme~
· on Lake Aila!o~l}a~l3 a cres)_
..( C <I-,.,,
PROMOTIONAL DISCRI MI NATION l._S,~
-
~ CL,v<-JD1u
, c0.d,,/- N,0
,,..10--(_
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Ov<-'-'t
/ct ~ - - -
o-.... )
-
I
i
.--I
Black Firemen should be included in every department. White Ji~~ ~ ,
r.1 en with 1 es s t i me and experience are promoted - to -dr-i-ve-r po sit ions. ~Black
Firer.1e n with 5 and 6 years should be promoted to Lieutenants --;- -·be-cause the
ent ire officer cabinet is made uo of all white officers. Most of these
o f f i c er s h av e____p_eJ;.n__Jm own-t-o-f-G-I'-€-e--'t-1,-e±-r--p-r-ejt1d-±-ce-s- on·- s-1-a c k F ire me n • We
are- a\'1are o, f the test for Lieutenants, but in a time of an emergency men
hav e b een promoted wholesale from private to captains within a year , thus_
settin g prope r precedent . We consider this an emergeJ)_cy .-heG-atl-'Se --o-f tne
over~ ll discr i mination in the department. White drivers are giving up their
positions b e cause they know future Lieutenants are going to be appointed by
Chief s . · Th i s is true because in the last captain's test the aides of all
•I
the chief s dominated the list. Some of these Lieutenants didn't place in
the top 40 on the Lieutenants list . Now they are captains.
~
·V.
EXPERIENCE AND LENGTH OF TIME ON THE DEPARTMENT
Acting officers, we feel that every Black Firemen with the time_
and exp eri ence , equal to any white firemen, should be . given· the opportunity
to be an a c ~i ng off ice:r:: This apJ?li~s tofitra driverso House d~ies
should be picked according to sen1or1 ty.
~ 1 I-~
~ -{urv-dio )
VI.
STAtJDAR D SET OF RULES FOR ALL C
INS
Eich shif t is operated different , capt a in authority has no limito
Tran s fe r of ~en to other
stations.
( ~
~~ ~
He forces pers ona l prejudices on Black Fi r emen.
6
FOR CONTACT:
.-
--·-
Fireman William Hamer
195 Hermer Circle , N. W.
Atl anta , Geo r gia 30311
__ _____
elephone - 794- 2244
_
- or ---Fire Sta t i on 16 on C Sh i ft
Telepho ne 523-5786
-~ N
. ____ _ - -
.
r./l.P1./v ciZf
77v-,
,-.
.

I •
I
.,
.. (·
�DEPARTMENT of FIRE
46 COURTLAND ST., S. E.
Atlanta, Georgia
P.O. WILLIAMS
CHIEF
AUJUSt 15, 1969
i'iemo to:
All PsrsonnGl
Fror.i:
Chief of Fir~ Jepart,:12nt
Su~j~ct:
~2iteration of Fir~ D~partmont Policies
i-1re Dep artr:i~nt of fi c2rs s .1 a1l ac.i J r css t i"1e
com.r.iand by t:1cir surnar;i es.
fir ~,1;12 11
und-::: r til i2ir
Fire:;ien shall ad:.re:ss t i,cir su ~,;;; ricr officers or acting offic(.;rs
uy rank.
Qualifi ed ffi(.;il ~,;11 t,1:: assign er1 on a rot at i ng i.,asis to the
capacity as acti ng officer or ~xtra apparatus o~~ rator.
Fill-ins will also oe don ~ o~ rotating basis with consist~nt
records kept at each ongin8 house on an individual shift
basis as cpposcu to a sta t ion.
Sy orde:r of ;
/"")


../ I


,_
I
.
.
/. ,,',' /
'
) , v.. L-v:~~,. ~,'lAAtlanta Fir~ 0epa r tmant
? • O. ·:•JILL1A11Ss C,nef
PO\IJ: 11 a
"HELP SAVE LIFE AND PROPERTY BY PREVENTING FIRES"
�CITY Of-- AT L_I\NTA
OEPARTMENT of F IRE
46 COURTLAND ST.,~- E.
Atlanta , Georgia
P .O. WILLIAMS
CHIEF


1.ugust 15, 1969


Honorab l e Ivan All en, Jr.
May or , City of At l ant a
City Ha 11
Atlant a, Georgi a 30303
Dear ~ay or All en:
l/e ha ve been d2ali ng 1·1i t h Co!.lmunity Re l atfons and have accepted so1·.1 e of t h2ir
1
su gge stions r e l at ive to e li ~i nat i ng s ome pro bl e~s.
pertai ni ng to this dep artmen t ar e attac hed .
Variou s polici es and fac t s
I t is ir.teres t i n~ to not ,°' th r: follo-.1in a exce r pt from tile Repor t of th e U.i ited
States Crn, 11ni ssion on Civil Ri gr,ts 196 9: cntit .l ed Fer .11.11 the Peopi e . .. By Al1
th e Peop l e v1:1 i cil has j ust reached t i1i s off-ice :
" Desp ite t he be l ated ad:nission of fir eme n into t he Atlanta dc;Ja r t rnen t
and t he e 1ab orat e proce du res w: li ch surr0Ui1ded th eir i ntroduction, t he
At lanta Fire Dep artmen t had a l arg e r proport i on of ['leg r o2s i n unifo rni
than any ot her ccntra 1 city in t he survey and a hi gher deg ree of
integration t han many. "
We are in th e process of re -w riting th e Ru l es and Regu l ations of th e Atl anta Fire
Departme nt to e li r,1in at e any i nequit i es in t i1e ol d uoo k, to eli r:iin ate u.ny
possibility of discri mi nu.ti on or b12 possi i::d lity of any office r over-rea cti ng
with authority . As soon as th i s has bee n cor:-1pl eted, it ,vill be pre sented to ti1e
Board of Fire Masters for t heir approval and adopt i on.
i•Ie 1vould like to stress t ;1a t any firer;ian who has ci ri evances , has t hr ee met hod s by
which to air them in t iiis off ice: by comp l eting a Fam 52 (Spec i al Reques t) ,
go throu gh the Company Office rs ai1d 3att a 1ion Chi ef, or by use of a Sugge s tion
Fonn available in .a ll stations. Any jus t ifi able grie vances ~'i ill oe strai ghtened .
out .
You rs very truly ,
QC, t,Ll.R.t~~
pl_' 0.
HI LLI AJ.1S, Chief
Atlanta Fire De;, artr.1ent
POW: 11 a
Enclosure
cc: Mr. 14. T. Knight, Chairman Board of Fire l·la sters
"HELP SAVE LIFE AND PROPERTY BY PREVENTING FIRES"
�The Atlant a Fire DE!partment's only i nt erest is i n t he protecti on of lives and
property fro;fl f ire. The citize ns of Atlanta shoul d have an d dese rve t ;1e be st
fire protecti on avail ab l e. In order to accomplis h t his , we must have t he best
trained, q~alifi ect , and expe ri enced pers onnel in res ponsi bl e positions
-rega rdl ess of r ace , creed , or color.
Fi re Dep art-nent o ffi cers hi p must ha ve le aders hip. One cannot gain l eade rs hi p
if standards have to be lov1ered so one can qualify. Su bordi nates v-ri 11 no t l ook
upon such an officer as a l eade r. Life and property is at sta ke. Decisions
and actions of a fire officer are bas ed on knowl edge and expe ri ence of t he j ob.
Th erefore, stan dards and qualification s must be kept hi gh. Rath er than lower
the standards, t hey s hould be rais ed.
PROMOTIONAL POLICIES:
Promotions in t he Fire Departme nt are ma de accordi n~ to me rit and fi t ness.
The promoti ona l sys t em of the l\tlant a Fire Dep artment is set by l av,.
Anyone mee ti ng the qualifyi ng sta ndards as set f crt h by th e
Promot io na l Goa r d will be promote d reg ardl ess of ra ce, cree d, or
color. We will not an d do not discri min at e f or or ag ai n~t anyone
meeting the qu alifyi ng standards of t his sys t em.
Promot i on a i exami nc1 t ions fo r Fi re Li eut enc.nts ure h2 l d cv~ry t ·1c
years . To quali fy, a man must have had fi ve yea rs serv i ce i n -~he
Fi re Depa rtm2~ t . Aft er the examin ati on, t he app lican ts are l i st ed
accordi nc; t o th eir s cor es f rom a combi nati on of t h2 \'iritten t est ,
trai ni ng school aver age, and seni ority poi nts . This lis t is
divided into grou ps of 20 . The firs t 20 me n are rat ed at oral
i nt ervi ews , and t hi s score is added t o t heir grades fron t he above
th ree i tems . Promot i ons f rom t his lis t are made in order of t he
app licant's f i nal s core.
So far, th e f i rs t 7 men have been promot ed from t he Li eut enant' s
examinati on held in Marc h of 1969 . The f i rst blac k fi re~en st arted to
work in April 196 3, so t hat th i s i s t ~e f i rst ye ar (1 969 ) any of t hem
have been eli gib l e t o ap ply f or promot ion t o Li eutenan t. The re we re 153
app licants , of wh om 6 were bl ack. The fir st bl ack app li cant is in t he
6th group of 20 or approxi r.1ately positi on 102 on t he l i st.
Promotio ns to Fi re .Appar at us Ope r ator are made by ap poi nt me nt. The
Capt ai n at each stat ion makes t hese se l ection s sub j ect to the
approval of t he Bat t ali on Chi ef . . Th e men ~ust ha ve i1 ad at l east two
yea rs service wi th the Fi re Oepa rtm2n t ar. d ha ve pa ss-ed t r1e required
dri ving t ests at the Train in g School . There are nine bl ack f i remen
in these positions .
�-
~
~
-·-
HIRING PRACTICES:
Eligible lists for Firemen are established every \<1eek after the \'ie ekly
intervie\·1s. (During ~larc h, Jl.pril, and July of this year, interviews
were held every t vJO weeks.) As vacancies occur, t he Fi re Department
calls the me n on~ list in the · orde r of th eir scores. Each person on
the list of a certain date is contacted and offered emp loyment before
movin g to th e next chronological list. Once a man is on th e eligible
list, he is not by-passed unl ess t he Fire De partment is unabl e to
contact him by telephone or letter.
Thro,,!gh July 25, of this year , 60 wh ite men were put on the eligi ble
list and 57 blac k men. Of these, 45 \vhite me n have been employed and
41 blac k men.
Of the 86 7 men in t he extinguishin g division, over 19% or 165 ar e black.
Nine of t hese are Fire Appa r at us OiJe rators and 25 are on fsiilitary
Leave. Fireme n that l ea ve the depa rtment for military service ar e
reinstat~d whe n t hey retu rn (this is a Fede r al Law) and are usuall y
returne d to t l1e same station from \';h ic h they left.
RECREATIOi'·l CLUB:
In Janu ary of 1959, a grou p of fireme n l eased a 5.7 acre tract of
land D.t Lake i~1l at oona fro;;1 ti1e Jove r nme nt and organ ized a cl ub
whic h vias can ed Atl anta Firer.1e n 1 s Re creat ion Clu b. Ho:·;e ver, the
Fire Depa rtn12nt nor the City of At l dnta has any jurisdiction over the
activiti es of th i s clu b. It is a priv ate or ganization cont r oll ed by
a Board of Truste es compos ed of e leven men, \'/ilO ad he r e· to tile vvis he s
of t he majority of t he membe rs , and i s su pp orted en tirely by dues pa i d
by the membe rs and ma int ai ned t hrou gh voluntee r services of tr,e m2,ntJ2 rs .
�RUL E S
F I R E P R O MO T I O N B O A R D
CITY
Revised Harch 1967
OF
ATLANTA
�11.
An examination for Fire Captain will be held annually and the
register established will be valid for one year.
12.
Examinations for all other classes of positions will be held
when the Board deems a list necessary 9 and the registers established will be valid for one year. The life of such registers
may be extended for an additional year if the Board deems it
practical and expedient to do so.
13.
Satisfactcry completion of a performance test of driving skill
under the supervision of the Fire Training Chief is a prerequisite
to applying for promotion to Fire Rescue Lieutenant.
14.
When a man on an eligible register for a higher position than his
present class declines an assignment which would allow him to act
as an alternate for the higher position 9 his name will be moved
down on the eligible list below the name of the man who accepts
the assignment.
15.
If a qualified eligible is serving io a permanent vacancy in a
temporary capacity at the time of a new examination, he will not
be required to take any further examination.
16.
The Fire Alarm Superintendent will qualify men for the position of
Fire Dispatcher and will furnish the Fire Promotion Board a list of
qualified applicants and their grades.
17.
Non-firefighting personnel desiring to return to firefi ghting must
serve one year as full- pay Firemen before being eligible to comfe te
in . promotional examinations. Members of the Training Division are
considere d to be firefighting personnel.
18.
Upon return to the Fire Department , reenployed Firemen ~ including
those who were formerly on the eligible r e gister for Fire Lieutenant
or other promotional registers, must serve one year as full-pay
firemen before being eligible to compete in promotional examinations.
19.
Seniority will be recognized by the addition to the final attained
passing grade of ona-h a lf ( ½) point f or e c ch year of service in the
Fire Department beyond the first five (5) years to a maximum of five
(5) points in any case . For promotion to the rank of Captain and
higher, s eniority will b2 recognized by giving one- half (!2) point for
each year of service on next lower rank only, to a maximum of five
(5) points.
20.
In the e vent of a tie in final grades after addition of s eniori t y
points, the man with the hi ghest s eniority will be plc}ce d highest
on the e ligib l e register. If s enior ity points ar e the s ame 9 the
man with the highest wr i tten grade will be placed hi ghe st on the
e li gible regi ster .
21.
Fire Department personnel serving i n t he armed f orces will accrua
seniori t y as t hough serving in t he Fire Departr.1ent.
22.
Fire Department pers onnel on mi l itary leeve may be given the promotional examination for which they are eligible and will be notified
of the opening and closing dates of application for all examinations
for classes to which they may apply.
�23.
Lin8men , reechinists , fire equipment mochanics, and fire carpenters
may be qualified by th~ Personnel Department from open competitive
registers. Fire Department personnel who qualify may be certified
ahead of others on the list if desired. Fire Department personne l
may be qualified by th e Personnel Department from promotional examinations from within the Fir€ Department.
24,
A schedule of eligibility for promotion and who may apply for the
various classes is shown in Table I.
25.
Examinations will be conducted according to the schedule of weights
and phases listed in Table II.
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�T ABL E I
SCHEDULE OF ELIGIBILITY FOR PROHOTION
FOR PROMOTION TO ;
WHO MAY APPLY:
Fire Apparatus Operator
Firemen who have ·completed
two years of service.
Fire Rescue Lieutenant
All fir e fighting personnel
who have complete d five years
of service in the Fire Department.
Fire Dis pe tcher
All fire fi ghting pe rsonnel
who have comple t e d five years
of service in the De partment
and h ave ha <l one yenr of s e rvice
in the Signal Divi sion of the
Fire Depar tment.
Fire Lie uten ant
All f ire f ighting pe rsonne l
who have ccnple t ed fi ve y e ars
of service in the Depa rtment,
Fire Captain
Fire Lieutenan ts wi t h a t l eas t
ye ars ' s e rvice as Lie utenant ,
3
Fire Drill Instructor, Chief
All Fire Captains
Fire Battal i on Chief
Fire ~aptains with at least
3 years' s ervice as Cap t ain,
Fi r st Deputy & Deputy Fire Chief
All Fir e Ba tta l i on Chiefs
Fire Investigator I
All fire fighting pe rsonne l 2nd
fire dispe tche r s who have completed
five years of service in the Fire
Depart men t .
Fire Investigator II
Fire Investigators with one year
of service as an I nves t igator,
Ass istant Fire Marshal
Fi r e I nvestigator s wi t h 3 years '
s ervice as Inves tigator .
Fire Marshal
Assistant Fire Marshals and Fire
Investigators with 3 years' service,
�T ABL E I I
,,
SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATION \<IBIGHTS AND PHASES
ORAL
EXAM
TNG SCHOOL
AVERAGE
Fire Apparatus Operator
(Appointed by Chief)
Fire Rescue Lieutenant
(Appointed by Chief)
Fire Lieutenant
25%
25%
Fire Captain
70%
30%
Fire Ba ttalion Chie f
70%
30%
Fire Training Chief
35%
30%
Deputy & First Deputy Fire Chie f
Fire Investi~ator I
WRITTEN
EXAM
50%
35%
100%
50%
50%
Fire Investigator II
100%
Fire Harshal
100%
Fire Dispatcher
(Qualified by Fire Alarm Superintendent)
Because of the infrequency of vacancies and the specialized nature of the
work requirements and exaoination procedures for the positions of Fire
Alarm Superintendent, Fire Equipment Superintendent, Fire Dispatcher Supervisori and Assistant Fire Equipment Superintendent will be set when such
vacancies occur .
�I
i
I
\
.Auguat 18, 1969
DUM
,
FROM: D nSw
t
Chi _f Will' m& h s writt n letter to
yor .AU n ubmitting inform- Uon
which ddr
it elf to th "
mo:t'andum R


rdin Diacrimination


A ain t Black Firemen of .Atlanta." pr a nt d to th
yor and Fir Depa.rt ..
ment ollic le rn Augu t 8th.
Th l tter c<>ntaina attachm nta which indud
a1unu:n 1:y nd naly is o1
promotional policies,
d ecdption of firing r <:tic s
d
tem nt of
plor tion r gardin th Atlanta ir m n'•
ere tion Club. .Abo incl\ld d
uat 15th rn mo fr
Chief Willi ma to a.U p J'•onn l ol th Atlanta
rtm nt r it r Una Fir D p rtm nt polict.
in · l vtn th prop r
lonn f v rbal ddr • of fir m
nd •
doT offic r
d
a nment of
fire station per.aonn 1 a ctina officer or xi,- a.ppar _ tu.a oper tors.
yor
D :lr
�~-.us ,
16 YONGE ST. S. E., ATLANTA, GA. 30312
(404) 525-8441
{il,~ii 1
~.,..,0,11.\'()~
•ME MI l I•
Apr:il 14, 1969
/)/ 'f CH _I,~...,
Chi f J.P. Sea9ra ••
ir Marehall
46 Courtland &tree~
Atl
nu,
s.
Geor9ia
,(j/j/.,.__,

L ;/.'


,I


~~
--
Dear Chiefs a9ra•••2
• at
1 7, , , '
~/
heparda do hereby requeat equ 1 and tair tr a·ta nt
•city ot Atlanta Pire Co<l.e.•
under t.h
•To wit• the Atlanu Pir o artaent ha• aince 1963 r quirea
our C pa.ny to u
fl eproofe material in 11 our 4 eorationa.
Thi•
an• that we had to tak the following atepar
.... .... .
l.
top ain9 cloth urchaaed fro local tax p ying
er han.ts. N nov p rcb •• ll our oloth fr
ev Yor City ere nte.
2.
e had to throv aw y ov r $6,000 worth of overhe d
ra • ua
a the
utbeaat rn Pair and other
loca ions bee ue• it ~a not fl eproof d.

••
All of
r ~able co era h d
be torn up nu ua
•• r gs. Thi• it
cot my Co any ov•r 5,000
nnually ~• t the D nt l bows and o~her l r •
abl• aho a •
All or ow: plaatic pl• ta ha4 to be junk
ad 11
lat• UNd o
ur •hov•.
o var the •u
bo •
• 111 u•e
o pl nta. not 1• etill uae nonproof
o
other ban
ta.kn.
th
aot1o
1.
A&ro
••1
~
la
• followinc; it.
r~e4
• have
on~•• (3) ••parate
a for n t u t
fla
f
A. G• • • • Mar h 1 67
». Mart if~ Show - January 1 It
c. a a w - A ril 10, 1969
C ti
an reported v1t.h no

On
cl t.h.
•v• T
Convention Service C!;nlr J.ctorj
.
�SrrnlJARD
Chief J. F. Seagraves
Fire Marshall
deco; ating c,.mpany
16 YOi-JGE ST. S. :'::., A 'rLANTA, GA. 30312
(40~) 5_25-8441
i~:~;·1
,,._,.Joc·1,.'-...,o~
• M E M ' ( I•
On the last show eleven (11) exits were tound blocked and
the floor plan wa not approved. However Aaron was allowed
to continue uaing non-flameproof cloth. This is in violation
of the City Fire Code.
·
·
Aaron does not get their floor plans approved as required
2.
That the Atlanta Merchandise Mart exhibit floor
does not meet the minimum requirements for aisles
and fire exits as set forth by your department.
3.
That the 1968 and 1969 Camping Show and Boat Show
has less cross aisl sand smaller than required on
other shows, even though th se shows have a larger
public attendance than other showa .
4.
The Southeaatern Hospital Association requested that
we submit a floor plan showing a larger number of
booths in the l~rriott exhibit hall than would m et
the standards s t forth by your office. Our comp titor
meet their requirements and had 6 foot and 7 foot ai les.
When we pointed out to your office that the floor was
not layed out asp r your approved plan no ction was
tak n.
.
\
·( ,t,
We could ite case after oaa of non oompliance with the Atlanta
Fire Code a you have explained it to our Company. Your ruling
9ainat non-flameproof cloth alone has cot our Comp ny b tter
than $10,000 plus per year.
We do hereby
request the following:
ither be enforc d equally or
1.
That th Fire Cod
forgotten.
2.
That on man, other than yours lf, be charged with
the reaponsibility of inspecting each ahow. No
tter
wh n the ahow i• held. This thi• an by charg d with
the following duti a.
A.
-B.
c.
D.
E.
That all exi~a re clear nd open.
That no fire h zard is pr aent.
That all City of Atlanta Cods ar
et.
That th floor pl n ia approv d before the
show op na.
That no aet working hours are k p. He should
be pr ant on a show be it night, S turday or
Sunday.
CONTI OED O PA
Con·vention SerYke Contrs.::·:..: ...-s
TH
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Thr~-MEJ?e,ARD
c."us,
dec(ln iting company
W YONGE ST. S. E., ATLANTA, GA. 303:i.2
( 404) 52_5 -8441
Chief J. F. Seagraves
J'ire Marshall
We have moved our City into the big league convention arena.
Lets not tarnish our image by ill-defined and/or hap-hazard
enforcement of our fire code.
In closing I wish to commend you Chief Seagraves and your
department in the outstanding job you have done in fire
prevention. My compl aints are not directed at you or your
men. I just feel that enforcement has been almost an honor
system.
We need someone who is not bogged down with other fire prevention dutie to oversee the convention industry . We do not
want another Winecoff or McCormick fire in Atlanta .
I will await your reply~
Sin/Jr/!_
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I remain
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J. Lynch , 111
CJL/raw
P.S.
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I have taken th liberty of writing you as you once said
you hav to act on all written request .
Mayor. Ivan Allen y""
Chief P. o. Williama
Mr . Bill Knight - City Councilman
Mr., Jim Hurst - Convention Bureau
Convention Service Co-rihacto1·s
ti~ii
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• ME M I ( I •
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-- - --------- . . ~----_
CITY OF ATLANTA
8 August 1969
,.
· :: .
Memorandum Rcga_rding Discrimination _Agai ns t Black Fi r emen Of Atlanta

. . ... To:
. '·
-- ~
Mayor Ivan Allan, Chairman Board of Firemaste rs-, Alde rman..__Wm. :· T,
Knight and Atlanta Fire Chief Paul O. Wi lliams
--.. --------_
. . . ___·· .
...____
·-
---
Black Firemen of Atla nt a
From:
-
.....__
-
'
-
~ -.
'
The Black fir ef i ght er s of Atlanta are dedicated municipal emplo{ee ~,
conc~rned wit h t he sa f ety and welfa r e of our city and all of its citizens ~ - ,
During the y ears of ou r tenure as firemen we have been subjected to dis- ·.
·1
crimin ation and abuses as outlined below. We :cequest that imire diate action be tak en to correc t these p r actices, and th at on or before Monday,
August 18, 19 69 t hat we receive a fo r mal report on your '1i'e-..tio·ns in corr'E?~
i ng the action s ci t ed her ein:
/
....._
.•.
I.
-
HIRI NG PRACT I CES
'..·.·:·~~I~~ .,;_: - : ~
Th e rat io of Blac k Firemen to White Firemen -does not
to th·e· popu la t ion of Black citizens in Atlanta. There-'1ire-- ~bout 90 to
100 Black Firemen in a department of more than 900 men. Black ·-E.iremen
that are draft ed i nto the armed servic~s are replaced by ._white firemen
II.
SEGREGAT ED SLEEPING
&
LOCKER At\RANGEMENTS
J
Lo ckers and beds of Black Firemen are placed in the back or away
from the whit e f iremen.
III.
RECREATION CLUB
·· - ~
••- - ,_rri'iBZ


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~
Th~ membe r ship was closed the year Bl ack Fi rem en were hir ed in
Land was given to the club by the govern~:At_ °r~ Lake Aila~. )._13 acres).
J.963.
IV.
PROMOTIONAL DISCRI MI NATION
.,ls?~
.
1
,-.1~~
143.215.248.55
....~ ' ; . )
.
Black Firemen should be included in every department. Whi t .~•.Jitfr ~
r.1en with 1 e ss tim e and experience: are promoted - to ··dr·-i-v-e r positions. i:H ack
Fire!7len wi t h 5 and 6 years should be promoted to Lieutenants -;-·-because the.
entire off icer cabinet is made up of all white officers. Most of these
offic ers h a v e ~ vm t o f or ce t h e-i-r-p-r-ejttdices ·on-- B1·ack Firemen. We
-~ are · aware of the test for Lieutenants , but in a time of an emergency men
have be en pr omoted wholesale from private to captains within a year, thus_
set t i ng prop er precedent . We con sider this an em erg e_o_cy--beG-ati-Se--o-f tfie
overal l discrimination in the department . 'Nhite drivers are giving up their
~ositions because they kno w future Lieutenants are going to be appointed by
Chiefs.· Thi s is t r ue because in the last captain's test the aides of all
the chief s dominated the list. Some of these Lieutenants didn't place in
the top 40 on the Lieutenants list. Now they are captains.
V.
EXPE.RIENCE AND LE NGTH OF TIME ON THE DEPARTMENT
Ac ting officers ,we feel that every Black Firemen with the time
and experi ence , equal t o any white firemen, should be.given the opportunity
to be an acting officer. This applies to~ra driverso House d~ies
should be picked acco r ding to senio r ity.
~ 1 1-<::; ~ {u-,v- ~ )
VI.
STMJDARD SET OF
RULES FOR ALL C
INS
Eich sh ift is operated different, captain authority has no limit.
He forces person al prejudices on Black Firemen. Transfer of ~en to other
stations.
( ~ ~~ ~
FOR CONT ACT:
- ~ ~ r)/1.VL/v all)
·, t;v-,
Fi r eman Wi 11 i am Hamer
195 1-!er me r Ci r c l e, N. W.
Atlanta, Georg ia 30311 _____
elephon e - 794-2244
-- ·-- . or
Fire Station 1 6 on C Shift
Telephone 523-57 86
. ----~
··
I .
'
,.
.





.l
1
�- -·-------------------.
CITY OF ATLANTA
8 August 1969
,
·-
.
Memorandum Rcga~d i ng Di scrimination Agai nst Black Firemen Of Atl anta
·--==--- . .
" ~ --·
-
Mayor I van Allen, Choirman Board of Firemas te rs-, Ai de rma-n_,__Wm. :. T•
Knight and Atl anta Fire Chief Paul O. Wi l liams
-~
. ,_____ ·.
. To:
__ _...:. .. • .
Bl ack Firemen of Atlanta
From:
The Black fir efighter s o f Atlan t a ar e dedica t ed municipal emplo{ee ~, .
I
conc ern ed with the s af ety an d wel f are of ou r city and all of its citizens : · .
Durin g t he years of our ten ure a s firemen we hav e been subjected to dis- ·-I
crimina tion and abuse s a s outli ne d below. We request that imire diate -.
,
action be taken t o co rr ec t • t hes e pr actices, and t hat on or before Mond.ay, .





August 18, 1969 that we rec ei ve a fo r mal report on your ac---t io·ns in cor~
ing the actions cited her ein :
·
/
. ·, ._
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...
.,\
I.
HIRING PRACT IC ES
_ ·. ..:;] ,;_
(-=-~ -~ -
. ,.
..
.
j

Th e ratio of Bl ack Firemen to White Firemen does not
- - to th·e population of Bl ac k citi zens in Atlanta. There ~a·re.._ about 90 to
100 Black Firemen in a department 6f more than 900 men. Blac k--Ei=emen
that are drafted i nt o th e armed servic~s ar e replaced by _white fi r emen
I I.
SEGREGAT ED SLEEP ING & LOCKER AO.RANGEMENTS
J
Locker s and bed s of Bla ck Firemen are placed in the back or away
from the white fi remen .
III.
RE CREAT ION CLUB
The membersh i p was closed t he y ear Bla ck Fi r~men were hir ed in
.t963 .
Land was g iven t c the club by t}e
I.V.
~
PROMOT I ONAL DI SCRI MI NAT ION
~e:;~.~
~
l.fo
· .
a.J'! 143.215.248.55J.. )a cr es)l
~
1
1
w..:;a.... -
i
-
Black Firemen should be includ ed in every department. Whi t _~,..J.i t.§?~ ~
r.1en wi th le ss time and experienc e are pro mot ed·-to -d;r--i -ver pos it ions. tHack
Fi r er.1 f n with 5 and 6 yea r s should be promoted to Lieutenants-;··· because the -entire officer cabinet i s mad e uo of all white officers. Most of these
off i ~g_s_h_ay___e_h_e.e.n__k\Am t o f o :r-e--e--t---h-e±r--p-r--e-juu'-:tc-e-s- on - Brack Firemen • 1,'/ e
aie--awar e of th e test f or Lieut enants , bu t in a time of an emergency men
h ave been promot ed wh ol e sale from priva t e to captains within a year , thus_
s et t ing prop er pre cedent. \'le consider this an emerge_o_cy ..beG-attSe--o--f tne
over all discrimi nation i n t he depart ment . White drivers are giving up their
pos i tions because t hey know future Lieut enants are going to be appointed by
Ch i efs. · This i s true because in the last captain's test the aides of all
th e chief s dominated the list. Some of t hese Lieutenants didn't place in
t he top 40 on t he Lieutenants list. Now they are captains .
V.
f
EXP!:R IENCE AND LE NGTH OF TI ME ON THE DEPARTMENT
Actin g officer i, ·we f eel that every Black Firemen with the time
and experienc e , equal t o any whi t e firemen, should be . given the opportunity
to be an ac!ing of f_ice:r:: This apJ?li~s to.f;;tra drivers. House d~ies
shou l d be picked acco r ding to sen1.or1. ty.
~ \ \·<; ft-I21v-o
r.f/V' ut.io )
VI.
STAtJDARD SET OF RULES FOR ALL C
INS
Eich shift i s opera t ed differen t, captain authority has no limit.
He f orces personal pre judices on Black Fi r emen . Transfer of ~en to other
stat ions.
(
~~ ~
~
At_ /,J a{!j
FOR CONT ACT: Fi rem an Wi 11 i am Hamer
7 7 v-i
195 Herrn er Circ le , N. W.
.---- - - .
_
Atlanta, Ge or gia 30311 ___ _____
elephone - 79 4- 2244
or ..-----t •
Fire Station 16 on C Shift
Telephone 523 a 5786
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___ ... - - . ___.
. .DEPARTMENT of FIRE
46 COURTLAND ST., S. E.
Atlanta, Georgia
P.O. WILLIAMS .
CHIEF
AUJUSt 15, 1969
demo to:
A11 Pc rs onnG 1
Fror:i:
Chief of Firt::
Su~j~ct:
Reiteration of Fir~ D~partmcnt Policies
J8part,:12nt
Fi re Departr.1~ ni.: of f i Ci:rs s.aa i I aciJr2ss the fi r01;,en und:: r ti1 .:: i r
coITl!7iand by t:wir surnar.1;;:; s.
Fi re:.ien sha11 ad;.;ress
oy rank.
t 118i r
su ~,~ ri or offi c 2rs or acting offi c1::rs
Qualified m8n will b~ assigned on a rotat ing ~asis to th~
capacity as acting officer or ~xt ra apparatus o~crator.
Fill-ins will also oe don~ o~ rotating basis with consist2nt
records kept at each cnnin8 hous e on an indivi dua l shift
basis as cpposcu to a sta t ion.
by
orde;r of.
POl>J: 11 a
"HELP SAVE LIFE AND PROPERTY BY PREVENTING FIRES"
�·OEPARTMENT of FIRE
46 COU RTLAN D S T,, ~ - E .
A tl a n ta , G e o rg ia
P.O . WILLI AMS
CHIEF
Augu s t 15, 1969
Ho~orab l e Ivan All e~, Jr.
Mayor , City of At l :111 t a
· City. Ha ll
At lant a, Ge orgi a 30 303
De a r ~iayor A1fon :
1
~le have been d~ali ng v,i it h Co1.1munity Rel ations and ha ve accepted so1·,1e of t heir ·
su ggesti ons r e l at i ve to e l i mi na t i ng some probl e~s. Var i ous polic i es and f act s
pe r t ai ni ng to th i s de partme nt a r e att ached .
It is i nterest i n~ to nnt P t h~ f oll owi ng excer pt frc m t he Repor t of the Un i ted
States Crn;i111i ss -ion on Civil Ri gi1 t s 196 9, 2n titlcd Fer /\11 th e Pe op l e . .. By A"ll
t h2 Peop 1e v1hi ell has just n ~a che d t i1i s off"i ce :
11 D
esp i t e t he ~e la t ed ad·ni ss i on of f i r eme n i nt o t he At l ant a de;; ar t men t
an d t he e l ab orat e procedu res which sur r ound ed t he i r i ntrod uct i on~ t he
At l anta Fi r e Dep artmen t had a 1ar.ge r propo rt i on of ;·1egroes i n unifo rm
th an any ot h•:! r cen tra l city i n t he s ur vey and a lii gher de gre e of
i nte grat i on t han many. 11
·
~Je are in the process of r e-v1rit i ng th e Ru l es and Reg ul at ions of the At l an ta Fi r e
Depa rtme nt to e l i mi nat e any i neq ui t i es i n t he ol d 0 0 0k, to e l i ~in ate any
possi bility of disc r i mi nat i on or t ~e possi bil ity of any office r ove r-reactin g
1-J it h aut hority . As soon as th i s has been comp l et ed, it ·,'l il l be presente d t o t :1e
Boar d of Fi re Masters f or t he i r approval and adopt i on .
He t'l oul d li ke t o s t r ess t i1at any fireman wh o has gri evan ces ; has t hree met hods by
wh ic h to ai r t he1:1 i n t rii s office : by comp l et i ng a For:n 52 (S pe ci al Reques t) ,
go t hrough t he Company Office rs and Bat ta lion Chi ef, or by use of a Suggest ion ·
Fonn availab l e in all s t at ion s. Any j us t i f i ab l e gr i e van ces ~v ill oe stra i ghtened
out.
You r s very truly,
r
-
a tLld2£t.,,<",<.4~
O. HILLI AMS, Chief
Atlanta Fi r e De~a rtr.1ent
POW: ll a
Enclosure
cc: Mr. W. T. Kn i gJ.'l t , Chairman Board of Fire f·la:;ters
"HELP SA VE LIFE AND PROPERTY B Y PREVEN TING FIRES"
�The Atlanta ~ire Department's only interest is in the protection of lives and
property from fire. The ~itizens of Atlanta should hav,2 and deserve tile best
fire protection av_ail ab l e. In order to accomr, lisi1 t11is, we r:1ust have the best
trained, qualified, and experien ced pe rsonne l in responsi ble positions
regardl ess of race, creectj or color.
Fire Depart11ent officers hi p mus t have le2de rship. One cannot gain leadership
if standards have to be lm--:ered so one can qualify. Subordinates will not look
upon such an officer as a l eader. Life and property is at stake . Decisions
and actions of a fire officer are based on knov1l ed:;ie and experience of t he job.
Therefore, standards and qu alifications must be kept high. Rather than lower
the standards, they should be rais ed.
PROMOTIONAL POLICIES:
Promotions in t he Fire Depart:11ent are made according to merit and fitness.
The promotional system of the ,ll.t l anta Fire Deriartment is set by lavJ.
Anyone meetin~ the qualifying s tandards as set f orth by tile
Promotional Board will be promoted regar dl es s of race, creed , or
color. We will not and do not discrimin at e for or agains t anyone
meeting the qualifying standards of th is system.
Promotion ai exai11i r,a Liuns ro r Fire Li 2utcnc.nts :::.r2 h21d 2vcr~! t\-:o
years. To qualify, a man must have had five years service in the
Fire Depa rtm2 nt. After t he examin ation , t he app lican ts are li st ed
accordino to their scores from a combin ation of th2 \ffitten t es t ,
training sch ool average, and seniority points. This list is
divided into gr.ou ps of 20 . The first 20 men ure rated at oral
intervi ews , and t his score is added to their gr ades from the above
three items. Promotions from t his list are made in order of t he
applicant's fina l score .
So far , the firs t 7 men have been promoted from the Li eutenant 's
examinati on he ld i n March of 1969 . The first black fire~en started to
work in April 1% 3, so t hat this is t he f irst year (1 969 ) any of them
have been eli gibl e to apply f or promotion to Li euten ant. There were 153
a.pp licants of v1hom 6 v1ere bl ack. The firs t bl c.ck ar plicant is i n the
6th gro up of 20 or approxi mately position 102 on t he list.
9
.· Promoti ans to Fi re Apparatus Ope r ator are made by appoin t ment . The
Captain at each station makes t hese sel ections subj ect to the
app roval of t he Battali on Ch i ef. The me n must r,ave iiad at l east two
year5 service with the Fire Department and have passed tne required
driving t ests at the Training School. There are nine black firemen
in these positions.
�;.
HIRING PRACTICES:
Eligible lists for Fitemen are established every week after the weekly
i ntervi ev,s. (During ~-larc h, Apri 1, and July of t his year, i ntervi e~vs
were he 1d every t vJo ~,,eeks.) As vacancies occur, the Fi re Department
calls the men on a list in the order of th eir scores . Each pe rson on
the ,·ist of a certain date is contacted and offered '2!:tp loyment before
movin g to the next chro nological list. On ce a man is on the eligible
list, he is not by-passed unl ess t he Fire Depa rtment is unable to
contact him by tele ph one or letter.
Through July 25, of this year, 60 wh ite men were put on the eliJi ble
list and 57 black men. Of these, 45 white men have been employe d and
41 blac k men. ·
Of the 86 7 men in the extinguishin g division , over 19% or 165 are black.
rli ne of these are Fi re Apparatus Ope rators and 25 are on r,·ii 1i tary
Leave. Fireme n that l ea ve th e department for military service are
reinstated whe n they return (this is a Fede r al Law) and are usually
returned to t he same station fr om 1vhi ch t hey left.
RECRE.l'ff IOi··I CLUB:
In Janu ary of 1959, a ~roup of firemen le ased a 5. 7 acre tract of
land at Lake All atoona fro m t .1e government and orga niz ed a clu o
wh ic h ~as call ed At l anta Firenen's Re creat i on Clu b. However , the .
Fire Depa rtme nt nor t he City of Atl anta has any juris diction over t he
activiti es of tilis club. It is a priv ate organization cont roll ed by
a Boa rd of Tru st ees composed of e leven men, wh o adh ere to the wis he s
of t he maj ority of t he members) and is supported entirely by du es pai d
by the members and ma intained t hrou gh volunteer services of the membe rs.
�RUL E S
F I R E P R O MO T I O N B O A R D
CITY
Revised l1arch 1967
OF
ATLANTA
�11.
An examination for Fire Captain will be held annually and the
register established will be valid for one year.
12.
Examinations for all other classes of positions will be held
when the Board deems a list necessary~ and the registers established will be valid for one year. The life of such registers
may be extended for an additional year if the Board deems it
practical and expedient to do so.
13.
Satisfactory completion of a performance test of driving skill
under the supervision of the Fire Training Chief is a prerequisite
to applying for promotion to Fire Rescue Lieutenant.
14.
When a man on an eligible registe r for a higher position thau his
present class declines an assignment which would allow him to act
as an alternate for the higher position ~ his name will be moved
down on the eligible list below the name of the man who accepts
the assignment.
15.
If a qualified eligible is serving in a permanent vacancy in a
temporary capacity at the time of a new examination, he will not
be required to take any further examination.
16.
The Fire Alarm Superintendent will qualify men for the position of
Fire Dispatcher and will furnish the Fire Promotion Board a list of
qualifie d applicants and their grades.
17.
Non-fi refi ghtin g pe rsonnel desiring to return to fir e fi ght i n g must
serve one year as full-pay Firemen before being eli gible to comp e t e
in promotiona l e xami nations. Membe rs of the Training Division are
conside r e d to be firefighting personne l.
18.
Upon re turn to the Fire Dep a rtment, r ee~ployed Firemen , including
thos e who were forme rly on the eli gible r e gister for Fire Lieut enant
or oth e r pr omotiona l r e gisters , must serve one year as full - pay
fire men before be ing eligible to compe t e in promotional e xar:1inations.
19.
Seniority will be r e co gnized by the addition to the final at t aine d
pass ing grade of one-h a lf ( ½) po in t fo r c~ch year of s e rvice in the
Fi r e Department beyond the fi r st five (5) years to a maximum of five
(5) points in a~y cas e. For promotion to th e r ank of Cap tai n and
h i gher.., s enior i t y will b z r e co gniz e d by giving one-h a lf (!2) point fo r
each year of s e rvice on next lower r ank only , to a max i mum of f i ve
(5) point s.
20.
I n t he event of a t i e in fi nn l grades a f ter ad0ition o f s eni ority
po ints , the man with t he hi ghe s t s en i ority wi l l be placed highes t
on the eligib le regis te r . I f s enio rity po int s are the s ame, t he
man with the hi ghes t written grade will be placed highe s t on the
eligible regis ter.
21.
Fire Department personnel s erving in the armed forces will accru2
seniority as though serving in the Fire Department.
22.
Fire Department personnel on military leeve may be given the promotional examination for which they are eligible and will be notified
of the opening and closing dates of application for all examinations
for classes to which they may apply.
�23.
Linemen , machinists , fire equipment mechan1.cs, and fire carpenters
may be qualifiGd by th~ Pe rsonnel Department from open comp etitive
registers, Fire Department personnGl who qualify may be ce rtified
ahe ad of others on the list if desired . Fire Department personne l
may be qualified by the Personne l Department from promotional examina tions from within the Fire Department.
24.
A schedule of eligibility for promotion and who may apply for the
various classes is shown in Table I.
25.
Examinations will be conducted according to the schedule of weights
and phas es liste d in Table II.
�T A BL E I
SCHEDULE OF ELIGIBILITY FOR PROMOTION
FOR PROMOTION TO ;
WHO MAY APPLY:
Fire AppBratus Operator
Firemen who have completed
two years of service.
Fire Rescue Lieutenant
All fire fighting personnel
who have completed five years
of service in the Fire Department.
Fire Dispa tcher
All fire fighting personnel
who have completed five years
of service in the Department
and have had one yenr of service
in the Signal Division of the
Fire Department.
Fire Lieutenant
All fire fighting personnel
who have co1;1pleted five years
of service in the Department.
Fire Captain
Fire Lieutenants with a t least
3 years' service as Lieutenant.
Fire Drill Instructor, Chief
All Fire Captains
Fire Battalion Chief
Fire Captains with at least
3 years ' service as Captain.
First Deputy & Deputy Fire Chief
All Fire Battalion Chiefs
Fire Investigator I
All fire fighting personnel and
fire dispatchers who h ave completed
five years of service in the Fire
Department.
Fire Investigator II
Fire Investigators with one year
of service as an Investigator.
Assistant Fire Marshal
Fire Investigators with 3 years'
service as Investigator.
Fire Marshal
Assistant Fire Marshals aud Fire
Investigators with 3 years' service.
�DEPARTMENT of FIRE
46 COURTLAND ST., S. E.
Atlanta, Georgia
P.O . WILLIAMS
CHIEF
demo to:
Ail P;;rsonnGl
Fror.1:
Chie:f of Fi rC:: Jeparti:12nt
Su~j~ct:
R2iteration of Fir~ D~partrn2nt Policies
Fire Dt:partr.i~nt otncGrs s.,an ac.iJr2ss
comr.iand by t:1Gi r surna17"1.:; s.
t i1E: firtjr;ien
und~r th ~=:ir
Fi re.,1en sha11 ad(ress ti,ci r su~,~rior offi c2rs or acting offi cc- rs
Ly rank.
Qualified mGn wi ll b~ assigne1 on a rotating ~asis to th~
capacity as acting offic~r or ~xtra apparatus o~~ rator.
Fill-ins will also oe donG o~ rotatin~ basis ~ith consist~nt
records kept at each ~nnin~ house on an indivi dual sh ift
basis as opposed to a sta t ion.
by
ord~r of .
, -:.Jl·- ,
I. · ,~: /
,
) , . '. . Lv._~ ec, .,~,-i.+-
P. O. ·:1ILL1Ai 1S, C,ncf
Atlanta Fir~ Uepartm~nt
POvJ : 11 a
"HELP SAVE LIFE AND PROPERTY BY PRE VEN TING FIRES"
�OEPARTMENT of F!RE
46 COURTLAND ST., ~ - E,
Atlanta, Georgie
P.O. WILLIAMS
CHIEF
August 15, 1969
Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
l~ayor, City of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear ~,:ayor A11 en:
\.Je have been d2a 1 i ng
1·i i t 11 Co!.lmuni ty Re 1ati ons and ha ve accepted sc1
-.ie of t lie i r
su g9estions r e l at iv e to eli ~i nat in g s ome pro bl e~s. Variou s polici es and fac t s
pertainin g to this depa rtment ar e atta ci,ed.
It is i nteres t i n0 to rinti"' th e follov,in g excer pt f rom t he Rep ort of th e Un ite d
St ates Cor, 11:i is s ion on Civil Ri gi1 t s 1969 , er.t it led For P,11 the Peop1e ... By .All
th2 Peop 1e \·.' hi ch has just reac hed t ;1 ; s of f·i ce :
Despi te t he belated admission of fir e,nen into t he At lanta de ;:i artme nt
and t he e 1ab orate procedures which s urroui1ded their introdu ction, t he
Atlanta Fire Departme nt l1ad a l ar ge r pr oport io n of ;·1egro2s i n unifo rm
than any ot her cen tral city i n the survey and a hi g!le r de gr ee of
in teg r ation than many. 11
11
vJe are in th e proces s of re-vJriting th 2 Ru l es and Regul at ions of the Atlanta Fire
Depart ment to e li nin ate any in equit i es i n tile ol d uoo k, to elir.1in ate any
possi bility of discri mi nat i on or b1 e possi bili ty of any officer ove r - r eact in g
11Jit h authority . /'l.s s oo:1 as t hi s has been comp l et ed, it ',<J ill be pre sented to the
Board of Fire Mas ters for their approval and aJopt ic:n.
We would like to s tress t hat any fireman who has gri evances , has three methods by
which to air t hem i n t iii s office: by comp l eti no a Form 52 (Specia l Request ) ,
go throug h t he Company Office rs ai1d Batta lion Chi ef, or by use of a Suggest ion
Fonn available in all stations. Any justifiable gri e -.1 ances ~vill oe straightened
out .
Yours very truly,
.
Q C, LL,~ £ £ ~
p1_' O.
HILLI Ai'i S, Chief
Atl_anta Fi re De; artr.1ent
POW: 11 a
Encl osu re
cc : Mr . W. T. Kni g.li t , Chairman Bo ard of Fi re i·1as t ers
"HELP SAVE LIFE AND PROPERTY B Y PREVENTING FIRES"
�~
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The Atlanta Fire D2partment 1 s only interest is i n t he protection of lives and
property from fire. Th e citizens of Atlanta should have an d des erve t he best
fire protection avail ab l e. In order to accomp lis h th is , we must have the best
trained, qualifi ed, and ex perience d personnel in res ponsi bl e positions
regardl e~s of race, creed , or color.
Fire De partment officers hi p must have leaders hip.
One cannot gain l eadership
Su bordi nates will no t look
upon such an officer as a l eader. Life and prope rty is at stake. Decisions
and actions of a fire officer are bas ed on knowl edg e and experi ence of t he job.
Therefore, standards and qualifications must be kept high. Rather than lower
the standards ~ th ey should be rais ed.
if standards ha ve to be lov:ered so one can qualify.
PROMOTIONAL POLI CI ES:
Promotions in the Fire De partment are made accordin g to merit and fitness.
The promotional system of the P.tl anta Fire Depa rtme nt is set by l av,.
Anyone mee tin g t,1e qualifying sta nda r ds as set fort h by the
Promotional Loard will be prrnnoted reg ardl ess of race , creed ~ or
color. We will not and do not discrimin at e for or aga inst anyone
meeting the quali fying standards of this system.
Promot ion ai exami nat i ons fo r- Fi re Li eut 2nc.nts Jie h2 l d 2v2 ry t\·:o
years. To qualify , a man must have had five years service in ·the
Fire Departm2~t. Aft er t he examin ation , t he applican ts are li st ed
accordi n~ t o th eir scores from a combination of th 2 wri t t en t est,
trainin g scilool average , and seniority poi nts. This list is
divided into gr_ou ps of 20 . The first 20 men are r at ed at oral
intervi ews, an d t his score is added to th eir gr ades f rom the above
three items . Promotions from t his list are made in order of the
applicant's fin al score.
So far , th e first 7 men have been promoted from th e Li eutenan t 's
examin ati on held in March of 1969 . The first bl ack firemen started to
vwrk in April 196 3, so t hat t hi s is t he first ye ar {-1 96 9) any of them
have been eligi bl e to apply f or promot ion to Li eutenant . The re we re 153
app lic ants , of vJhom 6 v;ere bl ack. The fir st bl ack appli can t is in t he
6th group of 20 or approxi mately position 102 on t he li st.
Promot ions to Fire Appar atus Ope r ator are made by appoi nt ment . The
Cap tain at each st at ion makes t hese se l ections sub j ect to the
approval of t he Batta li on Chi ef . . Th e men must have had at least t wo
year; servi ce wi th t he Fi re Departm2 nt and have passed t he required
dri ving test s at the Traini ng Sc hool . Th~re are nine bl ack firemen
·
in these pos it i ons .
�HIRING PRACTICES:
Eligib'le lists for Firemen are established every week after the weekly
inte rvie\·1s. (During rla rch, April, and July of t his year, interviews
were he 1d every two v,eeks.) As vacancies occur, the Fi re DepartTT1ent
calls the men on a list in tiie order of their scores. Each person on
the list of a certain date is contacted and offered ernp loyment before
movin g to the next chro nological li s t. Once a man is on the eligible
list, he is not by-passed unless the Fire De partment is unabl e to
contact him by telephone or letter.
Through July 25, of this ye ar , 60 white men were put on the eliJi ble
list and 57 black men. Of these, 45 wh ite men have been employed and
41 black men.
Of the 86 7 men in th e extingu i sh ing division , over 19% or 155 are black.
Nine of these are Fi re Appa ratus Ope rators and 25 are on l•ii l i tary
Leave. Firemen that l ea ve the department for rnilita·r y service are
reinstated l'Jhen th e./ r eturn (this is a Federal La·:J ) and are usually
returned to t he same station from \lh id, ti1ey l eft.
RECRElHIOi~ CLUB:
In January of 1959 , a group of firemen leased a 5.7 acre tract of
land at Lake /1.ll atoon a fro:,1 tne government and organized a cl uo
which was call ed At l anta Firenen ' s Recreat ion Clu b. Howeve r , the
Fire Oepa rtm211t nor th2 City of Atl dnta has any j uri sdiction 6ver the
activiti es of t hi s club. It is a private organi zation controll ed by
a Board of Trustees compos ed of e leven men, 1,1;10 adhe r e to tiie i·lis he s
of t he nw.jority of t he membe rs , and i s supported entirel y by dues paid
by the membe rs and ma intained t hrough volunteer servic12s of t he merni.J ers.
�RUL E S
F I R E P R O MO T I O N B O A R D
CITY
Revised l1arch 1967
OF
ATLANTA
�11.
An examination for Fire Captain will be held annually and the
register established will be valid for one year.
12.
Examinations for all other classes of positions will be held
when the Board deem3 a list necessary, and the registers established will be valid for one year. The life of such registers
may be extended for an additional year if the Board deems it
practical and expedient to do so.
13.
Satisfactory completion of a performance test of driving skill
under the supervision of the Fire Training Chief is a prerequisite
to applying for promotion to Fire Rescue Lieutenant.
14.
When a man on an eligible register for a higher position than his
present class declines an assignment which would allow him to act
as an alternate for the higher position , his name will be moved
down on the eligible list below the name of the man who accepts
the assignment.
15.
If a qualified eligible is serving io a permanent vacancy in a
temporary capacity at the time of a new examination, he will not
be required to take any further examination.
16,
The Fire Alarm Superin tendent will qualify men f or the pos iti on of
Fire Dis pa tcher and will furni s h the Fire Promot ion Board a list of
qualified applicants and their gr ades.
17.
Non-firefi gh ting personne l desiring to return to firefi ghting mus t
serve one year as full- pay Firemen before being e ligible to com~e t e
in . promotiona l examinations . Me mbers of the Training Division are
cons i de r e d to be fire fightin g pers onnel.
18.
Upon r e turn to the Fire Department , r eenployed Firemen , in cludin g
those who we r e forme rly on t he eligi ble r e gist e r for Fire Lie utenant
or other pr omotional registers , must se rve one year as ful l - pay
fi remen before be i ng e l igible to compe t e in promotional examina t i ons .
19.
Seni ority will be r e cognize d by t he addition t o t he final att aine d
pas s i n g gr ade of one- ha lf (½) point f or ccch year o f s e rvice in t he
Fi re Depa rtmen t beyond the f irs t fi ve (5) years t o a maximum o f five
(5) points in any cas e . For pr omotion t o the r cnk of Captain and
higher ., s enior ity will bz re cognized by giving one-ha lf ( !2) poi nt for
each year of s ervice on next l ower r ank only, to a maxi mum of five
(5) points .
20.
I n the e ven t of a tie in final gr ades after addition of s enior ity
poi n t s , t he man with t he hi ghest s enior ity will be p l ace d highest
on t he eligible regis t e r . I f s eni or i ty p.oint s are the s ame 9 the
man with the hi ghest written grade will be placed highest on the
e ligi ble re gis ter .
21 .
Fire Department pe rs onnel s e rving in t h e armed f orces wi l l accrua
s eniority as t hough s erving in the Fire Department.
22.
Fir e Department personnel on mi l i tary leeve may be given the promotional examination for which t hey are eligible and will be notified
of the ope ning and closing dates of application for all examinations
for classe s to which they may apply,
�23.
Li~emen, machinists; fire equipment mechanics, and fire carpenters
may be qualifiGd by th~ Personnel Department from open comp 2titive
registers. Fire Department personnGl who qualify may be certified
ahead of others on the list if desired. Fire Department personnel
may be qualified by the Personne l Department from promotional cxamin~tions from within the Fire Department,
24.
A schedule of eligibility for promotion and who may apply for the
various classes is shown in Table I.
25.
Examinations will be conducted according to the schedule of weights
and phases listed in Table II.
�I
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TABLE
I
SCHEDULE OF ELIGIBILITY FOR PROMOTION
FOR PROMOTION TO ;
WHO MAY APPLY:
Fire Apparatus Operator
Firemen who have completed
two years of service.
Fire Rescue Lieutenant
All fire fightin g personnel
who have complet e d five years
of s e rvice in the Fire Department.
Fire Dispatcher
All fire fightin g personnel
who have comple t e d five years
of s e rvice in the Department
and have h ad one year of service
in the Si gnal Divi sion of the
Fire Department.
Fi r e Lieutenant
All fire fi ghting personnel
who have coopleted five ye ars
of service i n t he De partment.
Fi r e Captain
Fire Lie utenants wi t h a t least
3 years' se r vi ce as Lie ut enant .
Fire Drill I ns tr uctor, Chi ef
All Fi r e Captains
Fire Battalion Chief
Fi re Capt ains wi t h a t l east
3 years ' s ervice as Captain ,
First Deputy & Deputy Fire Chief
Al l Fi re Battalion Chi efs
Fire Investigat or I
All fire fighting personnel end
f i re disp ~tche r s who have completed
f ive years of s ervice in t he Fir e
Depar t ment,
Fire I nves t iga t or II
Fire Investi ga t ors with one yea r
of se r vi ce as an I nvesti gator.
As s i s tant Fire Marshal
Fi r e Investigator s wi t h 3 years'
s ervi ce as Inves ti gator. _
Fi r e Marshal
Assis tant Fire Marsha l s and Fire
Inves tigators with 3 years' s ervice.
�Septemb r .3 , 1969
Mr. Cobb T . Ed ards. Pr ident
Georgi Art Supply Comp y, Inc.
-280 G rn tt Street, S. W •.
Atlanta .. G orgi 30303
Dear
r ~ Edward :
Tha
you very much for your letter of September z.
cone mi · the fire at Georgi Art Supi,ly Company.
rry for the d
ge cau ed your
company, how ver. 1 m ple ed that our City Fire
Department
e helpful in prev nting further damage.
I am certainly ery
I am sendir,.g your letter to Chi l P. 0. Willi ms, so
th_ th may kno of
p cial cooperation by the
tbr e fireme you m .ritlo d.
Sine rely your•,
Iv.an All n. Jr ..
Mayor
IAJr:lr
CC:
. f P. 0.
illlam
�L
,,
September 26, 1969
Mr. William H. Hame r
Brothe1·s Combined Social Club
425 Chapple Road, NW
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mr. Hamer:
I have received and reviewed your l etter of September 25, concerning
matters which will be considered at the meeting of the Boa1·d of Fire
Master s on Monda y, September 2.9.
Because of a previous commitment of long standing, I will be unable
to per sonal!}' attend this meeting~ 1 am, however, sending as my
representative. George Berry, Deputy Chief Administrative Officer.
I have a lso nsked Mr-. Nat Welch, Executive Director of the Community
R lations Commission, to be in attendance at this meeting.
Sincerely yours,
Ivan .Allen, Jr.
Mayor
IAJr:sm
cc: M embers Bd. Fire Masters
P. O. Williams
v-Ge orge B err y
Nat W elch
�September 25, 1969
The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor
City of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Mayor Allen:
This letter is in response to the letter of August 15, 1969 addressed
to you by Chief P. o. Williams of the Atlanta Fire Department.
You will recall that at the meeting which prompted that letter, many
of the Atlanta firemen expressed to you their grievances over dis criminatory practices in the AtJanta Fire Department. We are certain
that y ou a r e unaware of the extent of the racial discrimination pr act ic ed i n t h e Atlanta Fir e Depar t ment . The pur pose of this lette r is ,
first, t o summari ze cer tain major grievances in the light of Chi ef
Williams ' letter, and secondly, t o r equest that you a ttend t h e meeting
of the Board of Fire Mast e r s on Monday, Sept ember 29t h , when the s e
matters will be c onsidered.
This letter will emphasize three spec i fic courses of action in which
the black firemen of Atlanta are intere s ted. Although this l i st is
not exhaustive, it is believed that action in the s e t hree areas will
demonstrate good faith on t h e part of the City and on the part of the
senior officials in the Fire Department, and will also make it possible
to work effectively toward resolution of the other grievances of the
black firemen.
First, on promotional practices. In his letter of August 15, 1969,
Chief Williams stated that the promotional system of the Atlanta Fire
Department is set by law. This is true. The Code of Ordinance s of
the City of Atlanta requires that all hiring and promotional practices
by City Departments shall be on a non- dis criminatory basis. It is not
true, however, that this law is always followed in practic e . As Thomas
Jefferson observed: "The execution of the laws is more important than
the making of them."
In his letter, Chief Williams states that promotional examinations for
Fire Lieutenants are held every two years. In the past, such examinations have been held at varying intervals of time, from six months to
as much as two years. The most recent such examination was last March.
As Chief Williams states, there are no black firemen high enough on the
promotional list which resulted from that examination to anticipate any
promotions of black firemen to Lieutenants within the foreseeable future.
For the reasons summarized below, it is the position of the black firemen
that the examination given in March, 1969, was unfairly administered,
and that there were both over and covert methods of favoring white
firemen who took this exam.
�•
For example, at ·the time prior to the test in March, many white firemen were seen studying copies of an examination folder, and discussing
among themselves questions that would be on the exam. Whether these
were actual copies of the exam to be given, copies of examination booklets from which the questions would be taken, or copies of previous
examinations, it is not known because none of them were made available
to any black firemen. The only textbooks available to the black firemen for study were t h e one set of regulations and fire fighting procedures av ailable at each station, to which the black firemen had only
l imited access.
Mor eov er, the writt en examination is not t h e only grade upon which pr omoti on is based. In addition to the written examination score , f i r emen
are gr aded at the training tower and the scor e given t hem there c an only
help their grade , n ot det r act f r om it. Scores given at the train i ng
t ower a re ent irely s ub j ective and t h e onl y gr ader s a:re white offi cers.
The white firemen wh o are favored by the offi c ers rec eive h igher scores.
Even if a black fir eman were t o s cor e i n the t op twenty of all the Atlanta
f iremen on the written and training t owe r tests, there is an oral interview to determine the order in which t he t op twenty will b e promoted.
It would be an easy matter, under this system, t o place the black f iremen at the bottom of the list, and before that point was reached in promot ions , to call f or another Lieutenant' s examin ation, which would "re shuffle t he deck ." No othe r r eas on f or breaking down the promotion list
into groups of t wenty suggests itself.
It must als o be remember ed that white fi r emen r eceive encouragement and
special inst ruction from t he whi te of fice rs who want t o see them succeed.
There is no such encouragement to bl ack firemen even t o t ake the examination, much less is there any special inst r uc t ion or advice on taking the
examination given to black firemen . The numerous instanc es of discrimination in the Department make it clea r t o the black firemen that the
leadership of the Department is committ ed to a policy of making certain
the black firemen are not t o be judged on an equal basis with white
firemen.
On t he basis of the f oregoing analysis it is diffi cult for us not to
believe two things. First, the examination for promotions given in
March, 1969, for fire lieutenant was not fairly administered as between black firemen and white firemen. Black firemen were expressly
discriminated against in that copies of the examinat ion were not made
available to them, and in that they were graded down at the training
tower. Black firemen were more subtly discriminated against in that
they did not receive the encouragement to take the examination and
the assurances that the examination would be fairly administered.
Given these disadvantages, which were apparent to all black firemen,
the motivation of the black firemen who took the examination was
understandably low.
Again, we wish to point out that promotions have been made within the
Fire Department in the last few years on an emergency basis, promoting
persons who did not have the required length of time in grade. The
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�present situation is a crisis of confidence by black firemen in the
administration of the Fire Department, and is an emergency which would
justify the immediate appointment of several black firemen to officer
status. In addition, for the benefit of all the black firemen who
desire to see fair, non-discriminatory administration of the promotion
process, no promotions to Lieutenant should be made on the basis of the
March, 1969 examination, and promotions already made on the basis of that
examination should be rescinded. A new examination should be held,
administered under the supervision of an outside agency to guarantee
its fair, non-discriminatory administration. All black firemen should
be given the same access to study materials as white firemen. Only
af ter such a depar tmentwide examination is given, should any furthe r
pr omotions be made in the Fire Department .
Second, we believe the rules of the Department are, as a matter of
policy, being unf airly administered to discourage blacks from r emaining in the Fi r e Department. There are numerous ex amples , known
to every black fi r eman, of unf ai r administ r at ion of the r ules of the
Department. For exampl e, black fi r emen will be r epor ted and di s ciplined f or b eing a few minut es late r epor t i ng f or duty. White firemen who are late f or a l onger p eriod of time are not r eport ed and di s ciplined. In order t o put an end to this petty abuse of rank, there
must be created in the Fire Department a grievance pr ocedur e whereby
such specific discriminatory prac tic e s can be called t o the at t ention
of higher of ficials , and dealt with i n some spec i f ic fas hi on . Ther e
is no such gr ievance procedure which has the c onfidence of the black
firemen at pr esent . In his letter of August 15, 1969, Chief Willi ams
s aid t here a r e, in fact, thr ee methods by which to air grievances .
There a r e (1) c ompl eting a spec i al request, ( 2 ) going through company
offi c ers and battali on chiefs , and ( 3) using t he suggestion f or m available in all s tat i ons . The problem is, t h at af ter using t h ese methods,
nothing is done. Th ere mus t be a nonpar tisan committee, pref erably
with both outside and black offi c er pa rt i ci pat i on, whi ch would publicly
hear all complaints, and whi ch will f ollow a consistent patt er of punishing and suspending those officer s who practic e p etty discrimination .
Without such a grievanc e proc edure , the black firemen feel that there
is no hope of ending the pett y discrimination which presently pervades
the Department.
In addition to the unfair administration of the present rules, we feel
that discrimination is being built into the proposed new rules promulgated at the last meeting of the Board of Fire Masters. In his letter
of August 15, 1969, Chief Williams stated that "we are in the process
of rewriting the rules and regulations of the Atlanta Fire Department
to eliminate any inequities in the old book, to eliminate any possibility
of discrimination or the possibility of any officer over-reacting with
authority."
Section 21, Paragraph 1 of the proposed new rules, relating to reemployment, provides that any employee who resigns or is dismissed from
this Department may have his name plac ed on the re-employed list for reemployment within three (3) years from the termination of his services
and that any member who is so re-employed may be credited with all former
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service in the class in which he is re-employed. The present period
for which this privilege of credit for former service is allowed is
six (6) months. The effect of the adoption of any such rule would be
to place all of the white firemen who left as a result of the strike
less than three years ago, and in whose place many black firemen were
employed, ahead of the black firemen in seniority. To the minds of
the black firemen, such an unjust result, achieved with a mere "flick
of the pen," is an important and significant manifestation of the bad
faith of the present administration of the Fire Department with respect
to black employees. You, as Mayor of this City, are urged to use your
influence to prevent any such change in the regulations of the Fire
Department whi ch would place all black firemen at the bottom of the
list in terms of seniority.
Within the confines of the above problems, there are many specific
grievances and complaints of Atlanta black firemen. The purpose of
the black firemen of Atlanta is to serve their City well and to protect its citizens from the dangers of fire and other hazards for which
the Fi r e Department was organized. However, the black firemen of
Atlanta are not able to serve their City eff ectively in the present
atmosphe r of disc r i mination and unjust treatment that pervades the
At l ant a Fire Dep ar t ment.
Your earne s t att ention t o the above matte r s is urged.
Your s ve ry truly,
William Hamer, f or
BRarHERS COMBINED SOCIAL CLUB
cc:
Members of Board of Fire Masters
Chief P. o. Williams
4
�September 16, 1969
Mr . Robert M . O'Hara
Pre ident
Mead Pac ging
P . 0 . Box 4417
Atlanta, Georgia 30302
Dear Bob,
Thank you for your letter of Septernb r 12, reg rding the
recent fire t e&d Pac ging.
I m very sorry that the fire occurr d, but l m pl a
that the AU nta Fire Dep rtment could be ol servic •
d
I atn sending a copy of your letter to Chief P. O. William
of the Fire Department.
Sine rely,
Ivan Al
Mayor
JAJr:lrd
cc,
Cblef P. O.
illianu
n, :rr.
�j
' )~
packaging
MEAD PACKAGJ:NG
P. 0. BOX 4417, ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30302
September 12, 1969
The Honorable Ivan Allen
Mayor of the City of Atlanta
40 Pryor Street, Southwest
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Ivan:
Enough time has passed since that momentous night to be able
to sit back and properly write a thank-you letter to you to
express our deepest appreciation for the contribution and
outstanding efforts of the fire and associated departments
of the City of Atlanta. We know that it is impossible to
write letters or to verbally thank each of the many individuals who contributed so much to have the fire quickly and
completely contained.
We had hoped that our advertisement in the Journal had been
a small effort along these lines, but I did want to write
you personally to thank you from all of us at Mead Packaging
for the immediate and whole-hearted assistance. Please use
this letter as an ex tension of our thanks to all the many
dedicated people under you .
We are proud to be citizens of the City of Atlanta, and we
can assure y ou that we will do everything in our power to
make the city 's growth in the future match the outstanding
recor d it has amassed in the past.
·
Cor dially ,
/?rt~7
Rob ert M. O'Hara
Pr es ident
ih
A
f> IV l ! , l ( ) N
OF
T HE
MEAD
CORPORATION
PAPE R S
CO NT A IN E R S
B O A R D
PACKAG I NG
P U L P
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�September 26, 1969
. Mr . William H . Ham r
Brothers Combined Social Club
425 Chapple Road, NW
Atlanta, Georgi
Dear Mr. Hamer :
I have rec ived nd reviewed your 1 tter of Septemb r ZS, concerning
m tters which wW be considered at th me ting of the Board of Fire
Masters on Monday, September 29 .
Bee us of a previous commitment of long tanding, I will be ~bl
to personally att nd thi m ting. I m, however, sending as my
r preaentative, Geot'g B rry, D puty Chief .Admini trativ Ofiic r.
l h ve al o aaked Mt-. N t W lch, Executiv Director of tho Community
Relations Commieaion, to be in att ndance at this m. ting .
Sine r ly your•,
Ivan All n, J :r.
Mayor
lAJr:•m
~ ~ ~~
p. 0 . tAJ ~
~ ~
~Jl)J~
�J . W. PINKSTON , JR .
Executive Director
WESTON 0 . BERGMAN , J R.
Assistant Director
DOUGLAS B. KENDRICK, M. D.
Medical Direc tor
FRED M. WALKER
Consu ltant
ROBERT E. CUNDIFF
Assistant Director
§ra4),
'-Memorial
filos1Ji· t'.a'
J uJ
u (;
80 BUTLER STREET.
MARY F. WOODY, R.N .
Assis tant Directo r-
Directo r of Nursing
,,;i;1--, {:



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s.
E .. ATLANTA. GEORGIA 30303
m<PHON< •
«04' s,,.4rn
November 8 , 1969
P. O. Williams , Chief
Atlanta Fire Department
46 Courtland Street , S . E.
Atlanta , Georgia 30303
Dear Chief Williams:
We deeply appreciate the magnificent service rendered by your
Department at the tlme of the disastrous fire at our laundry . The
special efforts of your men to keep such an extensive flre from
spreading to adjacent buildings certainly helps our feelings
tremendously this day. We give them 11 our unanimous vote of
thanks.
All members of our organization were most concerned for the
safety of the firemen on Thursday evening . We will make every
effort to see that the best possible care ls given to those who
were lnJured.
Please feel fr, e to call on us lf we may be of any service to you.
~
•L t
J. W. Plnkston a Jr.
Executive Director
/ 4py to Mayor Ivan Allen
�4, 1969
Decem


Fire Chi~


City ot tlanta
46 Courtland Street
Atlan , Georg:ta
S. E.
Dear Sir:
a
Lut Digbt,
our
..a.a_
w
thoug):lt
ala1:a box 80\lm.tlG..
al&ra.
W\114 li
Station 29
to
p;preoiattcm to the
lf!!ltffl"l!tA-1
rupoDled to
eourtec)IJ.8ma&m.
aentc.
CCI
n.re 1n our bu:UcU
out, tb1 vu
As 1 t turned
call in
fflll!!!ml!'m. ~
quick and
�Decembe r 22~ 196 9
Mrs . Jacki T h ompson
320 4 Laur Lane
Lithia Springs, Georgia 30057
De r Mrs . Thompson:
Thank you very much for your kind lett er of Dc·c emher
17th telling rne of the help you r e c eived from. Captain
Ragsdale and the men a t F i re Station R l.
I am cert inly ple ed that our peopl could sai · t
you, a nd I am forw rding your l ette r to Chi, l P . 0 .
illiatn .for hia inform.-tio.n.
ith b st wi he for the ho lid
on, 1 a.m
Sine r ly yours,
1 n A llen, Jr.
M ayo r
lAJ r:lrd
CC: C
ef P. 0.
illiam.e
�,,
MINUTES OF THE BOARD OF FIRE MASTERS MEETING
DECEMBER 29, 1969
The following members were present:
Mr. w. T. Knight
Mr. Q. V. Williamson
Mr. Cecil Turner
Mr. Ralph Jenkins, Associate City Attorney, was present.
Messrs Sutherland, We aver, Wilson and Mrs. Van Houten from the
City Personnel Department were in attendance.
Mr. W. H. Hamer and Attorneys, Mr. Goldstein and Mr. Helms representing
the Brothers Combined Social Club were present.
Reverend Samuel Williams, Mr. Nat Welch and a delegation of members
of the Community Relations Committee were present.
Mr. Mike Wright of the Atlanta Journal, Mr. Art Schultz of W. s. B.
Radio and many others f rom the news media and radio and TV were in
attendance.
Members of the International Association of Fire Fighters Atlanta
Local 13 4 were represented by President c. E. Ellis, Committee Members
J.E. Whitley, J. G. McEver and J. L. Pennington .
Reverend S amuel Williamson· presented to the Board a report,
The Gri evances of Black Firemen, from the Community Relations
Commission. He apologized for the delay in presenting the
report but due to the shortage of workers, it was impossible
to prepare this report any earlier. Reverend Williamson touched
on a few points in the report.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Hiring
Promotions
Personal Indignities
Assignment to Duties
Assignment to Stations
Firemen's Recreation Club
Grievance Procedures
�MINUTES OF THE BOARD OF FIRE MASTERS MEETING
DECEMBER 29, 1969
PAGE -2-
Mr. Knight explained to the Community Relations Committee that they
would accept this report and evaluate it and pass the findings on
to the new Board of Firemasters for 1970.
An Ordinance by Alderman Cecil Turner was presented and received an
adverse decision.
Members of Local 134 presented a Resolution requesting that a position
be created as Chaplain of the Atlanta Fire Department. This was
taken under consideration by the Board.
Mr. Turner made a motion, seconded by Mr. Williamson, that a
Resolution be sent to the Board o f Aldermen in regard to Reverend
Bill Allison. Motion ca r ried.
A motion by Mr. Turner, seconded by Mr. Williamson, that the new
Rules and Regulations be adopted after paragraph 4, section 21,
was deleted in lie u o f paragraph 4 of Rule Book of February 26,
1968 under Re-employment. Any member who is discharg ed, resig ns
or leaves the Department f or an y reason and is re-employed shall
loos e any hous e senio r it y h e had as a result of his prior service.
Als o a c h a nge i n Sectio n 22, p age 60, "Un ifo r ms " • The hai r will
be short and n eat ly trimmed: the mustach e ( if wo r n) will be s h o r t and
neatly trimmed . No beards will be pe rmitte d. Mot i on c a rrie d.
The Bo a r d was i nformed o f t he fo l low i ng assi g nments to re g u la r
positions:
c.
G.
R. E .
J. D.
M. D.
s. R.
B. J.
w. R.
H. H.
F. E.
J. A.
Winn, #11
Franklin, #34
Rose, #9
Bozeman, #9
Jackson, #11
Ha ynes, #9
Wise, #16
Da vis, #26
White, #1
Yancey, Jr., #33
Effecti ve
II
II
II
II
II
II
II
II
II
1 1/2 6 /69
11/26/69
11/28/69
12/1/6 9
12/4/6 9
12/10/69
12/10/69
12/14/69
12/15/69
12/15/69
Motion by Mr. Williamson, seconded by Mr. Turner, that these
assignments be approved. Motion carried.
�MINUTES OF THE BOARD OF FIRE MASTERS MEETING
DECEMBER 29, 1969
PAGE -3,,
The Board was informed of the following re-employed Firemen:
J. G. Ellis, #26
Leon Walker, #35
Effective
11/24/69
12/13/69
11
Motion by Mr. Williamson, seconded by Mr. Turner, that these reemployments be approved. Motion carried.
The Board was informed of the following personnel who have returned
from Military Leave:
A. L. Smith, #6
H. P. Long, #1
T. E. Dean, #7
Effective
11/25/69
li/26/69
12/12/69
II
II
The Board concurred in the reinstatement of these men.
Request for Military Leave for the following men was made to the Board:
D. M. Roberts, #35
F. L. Streetman, #3
L. L. Gardner, #28
Effective
11/25/69
12/2/69
12/4/69
II
II
The Board concurred in the granting of these Military Leaves.
The Board was informed of the following re-employed probationa ry
Firemen:
J.
s.
Mart in , #27
Effective
12/15/69
Motion by Mr. Williamson, seconded by Mr. Turner, that this
re-employment be approved. Motion carried .
The Board was informed of the following resignations:
D. A. Griffin, #27
J o Jo Stanley, Jr., #11
Mo L. Oliphant, #7
Ronald Smith, #1
Clarenc e Porter, Jr., #9
J .. E .. Jones , Custodi al Worker
Effective
II
II
II
II
II
11/22/69
11/23/69
11/30/69
12/ 4/6 9
12/4/69
12/11/69
Motion by Mro Williams on, seconded by Mro Turner, that these
resignations be accepted. Motion carried.
- ~ ------~--...-.-~--
�I
MINUTES OF THE BOARD OF FIRE MASTERS MEETING
DECEMBER 29, 1969
ProE -~
The Board was informed of the following resignations whil~ on
Military Leave:
J. v. Harris, #29
T. W. Kent, #7, F. A.O.
Effective
II
11/28/69
12/15/69
·'
The Board concurred on these resignations.
The Board was informed of the following man who was permitted to
resign:
J. H. Colbert, #4
Effective
12/8/69
The Board concurred on this resignation.
The Board was informed of the following men who were dismissed for
failure to return to work following 90 days expiration for Military
Service as required by Law:
R. L. Moore, #17
F. M. Whitehead, #8
Tommy Resmando, #27
Effective
II
II
11/25/69
11/25/69
11/25/69
Motion by Mr. Williamson, seconded by Mr. Turner, that these dismissals
be accepted. Motion carried.
The Board was informed of the following dismissals:
M. w. Clark, #5
Jo G. Ellis, #26
Effective
II
12/4/69
12/4/69
Motion by Mr. Turner, seconded by Mr. Williamson, that these
dismissals be approved. Motion carried.
The Board was informed of the following men tho were on suspension:
Ro A. Watson, #31 , s uspended 3 days, 12/1/69 through 12/3/69,
for violation of the Rules and Regulations of the Department.
M. To Gaultney, Iv., #19, suspended one day, 12/4/69 through
12/5/69, for viol ations of the Rules and Regulations of the
Department.
Motion by Mr . Williamson, seconded by Mr. Turner, that the action
�MINUTES OF THE BOARD OF FIRE MASTERS MEETING
DECEMBER 29, 1969
PAGE -5-
take.n by the Chief be approved.
Motion carried.
Sick leave extensions were requested for the following men:
C. F. McCravey, #27
Turner Pritchett, #35
W. T. Saunders, # 12
12 calendar days
10 calendar days
19 calendar days
12/20/69 thru 12/31/69
12/22/69 thru 12/31/69
12/13/69 thru 12/31/69
Motion by Mr. Williamson, s e conded by Mr. Turner, that these
e xtens i ons be granted. Motion carried.
The Board was informed of the following service retirement:
J . E . Allen, # 31
Effe ctive
11/20/6 9
The Board was in f o r me d o f the following e xtension of Leave o f
Absence:
F . E . Stonec yph er , Fire Inve stig ator I, presentl y on Leave of
Absenc e, b e gra nte d an add i t i ona l 6 months .
6/11/70 ~
Motion by Mr. Williams o n , seconded by Mr . Tu rner, that this
leave b e gran ted. Motio n c arr i e d .
Chief Williams expressed his apprec i ation for the cooperation of this
Board of Firemasters for helping him with his problems as Chief of
the Department.
The Minutes of the meet ing of the Board of Fire Masters held on
November 24, 1969, are hereby amended as follows:
J. R. Sangster sick leave extension 35 calendar days and 24
work days, beginning November 26, 1969 through December 31,
1969.
Meeting Adjourned.

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