Box 8, Folder 16, Complete Folder

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_016.pdf

Dublin Core

Title

Box 8, Folder 16, Complete Folder

Text Item Type Metadata

Text

A;
ECONOMI C OPPORTU NITY ATLANTA, INC .
. f,
TO -
I.
ROUTING SLIP
NAME/ AND / O R DIVIS ION
BUILDING, ROOM, ETC.
l
Mr. Dan Swe a t
2.
3.
4.
s.
~
YOUR INFORMATION
D APPROVAL
D AS REQUESTED
D CONCURRENCE
D CO RRECTION
D FILING
D FULL REPORT
OR ACKNOWL
D ANSWER
EDGE ON OR BEFORE
D THE
PREPARE REP!. y FOR
SIGNATURE OF
D HANDLE DIRECT
D IMMEDIATE ACTION
D INITIALS
D NECESSARY ACTION
D NOTE AND RETURN
D PER OUR CONVERSATION
D PER TELEPHONE CONVERSATION
D READ AND DESTROY
D RECOMMENDATION
D SEE ME
D SIGNATURE
D YOUR COMMENT
D
D
REMARKS
FROM -
NAME AND / OR DI VI SION
BUILDIN G . ROOM . ETC.
William W. Allison
TELEPH O NE
I
D~ T; / 1 3 / 6 6
GSA AT L ANTA G A 66-3 4 33
EO A • ADM • 2
�~ ~_-;_ :_ _, cb- ?;J~
- ~

,
�>.



...j
·.
�t
\__
I
ATLANTA , GEORGIA
PHONE 522-4463
George Berry
FORM 25-20
,
�~
\
\
~o/~~
\
I
\ ATLANTA, GEORGIA
1
PHONE 524-8876
From: Johnny C. Johnson, Director
Model Cities Program
To _ _M_a_y...__o_r_A_l_l_e_n_ _ __ __ _ _ Da te
~
For your information
0
Please ma k e necessary reply
O
Advi se s t a tus of the a ttac he d
~!
FOR M 2 5- 1 3- J
_9_-_2_-_6_9 _ _ _ __ _
�{


143.215.248.55


I
I
ATLANTA, GEORGIA
.._,/
PHONE 524-8876
From: Johnny C. Johnson, Di rec tor
Model Cities Program
T0
Mayor Allen
_ _____.
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Date __6_-_2_5_-_6_9_ _ _ __
IBJ. For your information
D
Please make necessary reply
0
Advise status of the attached
FOR M 25 -1 3 -J
'
�ATLANTA,GE:OAOIA
FROM:
Dan E. Sweat,
Jr.
D
For your information
D
Please refer to the attached correspondence and make the
necessary reply.
D
Advise me the status of the attached.
FORM 25-4-S
'
�ATLANTA, GEORGIA
PHONE 524-8876
From: Johnny C. Johnson, Director
Model Cities Program
Mayor
Allen
To _ _
_;:c....__ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Date
_9_-_8_-_6_9______
~ o r your information
D
Please make necessary reply
D
Advise status of the attached
The attached "Accounting and Financial
Management Procedures for Operating Agencies
and Citizens Participation Organization"
was developed by our Program Management
Section for distribution to all agencies.
It has be e n approved by HUD
F ORM 25- 1 3- J
'
�ATLANTA , GEORGIA
PHO NE JA . 2 •446 3
Ivan All en, Jr. , Mayor
7G ~~
(/J/PII.J-1
h i :;t
J
~eJ~
ds Ct.HJ'
f ~ /uk
cfu-
Pe/et-R4-;( ~
I
�ATLANTA,GEORGIA
FROM:
Dan E. Sweat,
Jr.
D
For your information
D
Please refer to the attached correspondence and make the
nec essa ry reply.
D
Advise me the status of the attached.
1
FORM 25 -4-5
'
�ATLANTA,GEOROIA
FROM:
Dan E . Sweat,
Jr.
D
For your information
0
Please refer to the a ttached correspondence and make the
nece ssary reply .
0
Advise me the status of th e attached.
I
u
F ORM 25- 4 -S
I
�I
�I
�ATLANTA, GEORGIA
~
·
To .
FROM:
ROUTE SLIP
o h.~,
~ o
,.J..L,
Dan E. Sweat,
Jr.
c /For your information
0
Please refer co the attached correspondence and make the
necessary reply.
0
Advise me the status of the accached.
FORM 25-4-5
I
�ATLANTA, GEORGIA
ROUTE SLIP
FROM: Dan E. Sweat,
Jr.
0
For your information
O
Please refer to the attached correspondence and mak e the
necessary reply .
O
Advise me th e status of th e attached.
FORM 25 - 4-5
I
�I
�HUD-96 (7-66)
UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT
Memorandum
DEPARTMENT OF
HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT
ALL REGIONAL ADMINISTRATORS
TO
Attention:
Assistant Regional Administrator
for Model Cities
ALL CDA DIRECTORS
FROM
Floyd H. Hyde
SUBJECT:
Establishing the Beginning of the First Action Year
OCT 14 1969
DATE:
In reply refer to:
A number of ~ities have asked us about the time period of the First Action Year.
In particular, they have asked whether it starts at the time expenditures subsequently to be reimbursed from supplemental funds are first incurred under a Letter
to Proceed, or whether it starts after approval of the comprehensive program and
tender of the grant agreement.
This memorandum outlines the procedure to be followed in establishing the beginning
of the First Action Year. It does not deal with the question of adjusting the
length of the Action Year in order to even out the review load. This will be dealt
with in a subsequent memorandum. For the purpose of this memo, the First Action
Year is deemed to be a 12-month time period.
The First Action Year should begin following execution of the grant agreement, which
usually is the point at which the city is in a legal position to start all the
projects and activities included in the first approval action of its comprehensive
program.
The Action Year start may be placed before signature by m.JD of the grant agreement
if the city has sought and received approval of a Letter to Proceed for all of the
projects and activities approved. Because of the short time span between the time
that a program is approved and the grant agreement is executed, it is not expected
that many cities will seek and receive a Letter to Proceed at this point in time.
A large number of cities sought and received Letters to Proceed, reimbursable from
supplemental funds, to carry out administrative functions during the period they
were awaiting approval of the comprehensive program. The First Action Year should
not be dated at the start of such a Letter to Proceed. Reimbursement for these
interim expenses should be handled in the following way:
1.
All such expenses included in the budget of the earlier planning grant
contract should be charged to that contract up to the point of exhausting
all remaining planning grant funds, including the ten percent hold-back.
l
�2.
2.
Interim expenses which cannot be charged to the planning grant contract ,.
either because there are insufficient planning grant funds to cover them or
because the expense items were not detailed in the planning grant contract
budget, then will be charged to supplemental funds.
3.
To accomplish this, an amendment should be made to the 12-month administrati ve
budget for the First Action Year which adds the amount of interim expenses to
be covered. In a few cases, Letters to Proceed were given for expenses more
properly chargeable to other First Year Action budgets. In these cases amendments should be made to those other budgets.
4. The actual steps to make such amendments should be:
(a) establish the start of the First Action Year. This date will normally
be shortly after signing of the grant agreement by the city and by HUD.
(b) after charge-off of all possible interim expenses to the planning
grant contract, total up uncovered expenses incurred , or to incur ,
under Letter to Proceed up to the established start of t he Fi rst Acti on
Year.
(c) amend the administrative budget of the First Action Year (or project
and activity budget if appropriate) to add the uncovered expenses . The
budget so amended then would have a time period of more t han 12 mont hs ,
running from the start of expenses incurred under Letter t o Proceed
which cannot be charged to the planning contr act budget t o the end of
the Fir st Action Year.
5.
If the amendment amounts to less than ten percent of the budget being amended
and also amounts to less than $100,000, HUD appr oval is not required. However,
a properly approved amendment should be entered i n t he cit y files where it will
be available for Federal inspection. If the amendment amounts to more than ten
percent of the budget being amended , or $100 , 000, whichever is lesser, the
amendment must be submitted to HUD f or review.
6. To find the addi tional funds to cover these i nterim expenses, corresponding
reducti ons should be made either within the admini s trative budget or other
budget being used to cover t he i nterim expenses , or by reduction of any other
appr oved pr oject or act ivity budget . Because of normal delays in the staffing
of new programs, cities should be able to make this type of transfer without
reducing the level of proj ects or activities. Cities whose presently approved
pr oj e ct s and acti vities do not t ot al t he total doll ar amount of the grant
agreement tendered t o them may, if they wish, transfer funds from the amount
not approved for projects and activities to the administrative or other budget
which is covering interim expenses. HUD will not approve increases in the
total grant amounts tendered for the purpose of covering interim expenses.
�3.
Here is an example of how a typical city may carry out this process.
March 1, 1969
- City submitted comprehensive program.
March 15
- City received Letter to Proceed covering interim CDA
and citizen participation expenses during the review
period. Most of the expenses were for staff and other
items previously detailed in the planning grant budget.
May 1
- Planning funds are exhausted.
June 25
HUD announces approval of program and tenders grant
agreement.
July 10
City council approves grant agreement and mayor signs
and returns to HUD.
July 21
- HUD Regional Administrator signs grant agreement.
August 1
- Start of First Action Year is established as of this date.
The city then goes back over the interim expenses, charges all those that were detailed
in the planning grant contract to that contract up through May 1. The city then amends
the approved administrative budget for the First Year Action program, so that its
dates read from May 1 to August 1, 1970, and its dollar amounts equal the previously
approved administrative budget plus the amount required to cover expenses from May 1
to August li / 1969. These interim amounts covered are detailed in accordance with
CDA Letter 1ft). To balance the amount added to the administrative budget, the city
makes transfers from other parts of the administrative budget or from project and
activity budgets, selecting for reduction line items in which expenditures have been
or are expected to be, at a slower rate then projected.
The amendments then are approved by the city council and filed with the city, unles s
it requires HUD approval in accordance with paragraph 5 above.
Questions on this process or its particular application should be directed to the
fiscal officer in HUD Regional Office.
,,,
HUD-Wash., D. C.
�SEN I OR C ITI ZEN SER VI CES
of METROP O:i;_.,I T AN A TL AN T A , I ncorporated
7 '19 GLENN BUILDING
TELEPHONE 577-3828
ATLANTA . GEORGIA 30 3 03
120 MARIETTA STREET. N . W .
August 11, 1969





B O ARD O F TR US TEES
T . M . A L EXAN D ER . SR .
C H A I RMA t ~
.
MEMORANDUM
I
DR . J . GRA N T W ILME R
V I CE C HA IR M A N
M I SS L ORRA I N E H . J ENN RI C H
SECRETARY
G E OR G E SHERRIL L . J R .
TRE A SU R ER
TO: .. Key Staff Persons
FROM:
,I
Al Horvath
MRS . C ECIL A . ALEXAN D ER
M 'R s . O LA BENT L EY
D R . S IDNEY L . DA V I S
D ONAL D B . D I X ON
J . RAY EF I R D
MR S . DAN GARSO N
GEORGE T . H EERY
The enclosed "exhibits" are bei ng passed on
to the Community Chest Agency Relations and Allocations Division for updating their Senior Citizen
Serv ices Manuals. They are being sent to you for
y our inf ormation.
JOHN / ZAR O
J A M ES W . ME RCE R
DR . ELL EN F INLEY KI SER
REV . FRANK R OS S
MRS . J . R . S IM MONS
MRS . DAIS Y W A LKER
We are e ncourag ed a nd stimulated by our involvement in the Model Cities eff ort and are committed
to the dev elopment of simi lar opportunities throughout
the me tropolitan At lanta a rea.
,
M RS . JU DSON C . WARD . JR .
ALBERT E . HORVATH
AEH/bh
/
EXECU T IVE DIRECTOR
.'
I
.
I
\
D E K ALB . FULTON . G WINN E TT C OUNTIES
\,
�CITY OF .ATLANTA
August 7, 1969
OFFICE OF MODEL CITIES PROGRAM
673 Capitol Avenue , S.W.
Atlanta , Ga. 30315
404-524-8876
Ivan Allen Jr., Mayor
J. C. Johnson , Director
Mr. John Martin
Commissioner of Aging
Department of Health, Education
and Welfare
Washington, D. c.
Dear Commissioner Martin:
The Atlanta Model Cities Program was very honored by your recent
visit, and greatly appreciates your keen interest in our efforts .
We have gathered together some descriptive material about the
programs for senior citizens which we visited or discussed during
your visit, and we are enclosing the same along with this l etter.
The Atlanta Model Cities Program has benefitted tremendous l y f r om
its close working relationship with the Senior Citizens Services
of Metropolitan Atlanta . In the spring of 1968, du r ing o ur ear l y
planning period, Senior Citizens staff provided direct as s istance
to the Model Cit{es social services planner . Their professional
staff drew up and conducted , with the help of Model Cities a i des ,
a survey of about 300 senior citizens, and obtained valuable
information about the needs and services of our olde r popul a t i on.
They also met with groups of senior citizens a n d with the reside nt
s o cial s ervice c ommi t t ees to furthe r e x plo r e the prob l e ms and
unmet need s o f o u r s enior citizens .
Comb i ning t h e mate r ia l ga ined f r om the survey and t h e community
meet ings with th e ir gene r a l expe r tise in the fi eld of aging, they
then d evelope d with o u r s taff a n 6 u ti i ne o f the problems, causes,
�-2-
goals and program approaches for older persons liv i n g in t he
Model Cities neighborhood . This was a valuable contribution to
Atlanta's Model Cities overall plan.
Senior Citizen Services will receive Model Cities supplemental
funds in two major projects~ one for day care services and a
second for a personal services center (see attached description).
Since the beginning of this year, our respective staffs have
worked closely to finalize plans for these projects. In
addition, Senior Citizens has continued to lend assistance in
our ongoing planning process . A timely e x ample of this . is our
joint efforts, along with Fulton County Department of Family
and Children's Services, to develop a protective services
project for older persons in the Model Cities Area.
This close working relationship between our two agencies has
provided the Model Cities program with valuable e x pertise in
the field of aging and has insured the inclusion of meaningful
projects for senior citizens in our first year plan. Senior
Citizens Services has, in effect, acted as an advocate - and a
most s u ccessful one - for the senior citizens in Model Cities.
Atl a n ta's Model Cities program has planned a wide vari e ty o f
p r ojects which will benefit senior citizens . These p r ojects
a r e described i n gr eater detail in the attached mater ial . Als o
inc luded a re d es c r iptions of several projects which Senior
Ci t izens Serv ices has planned fo r both the Model Cit i e s a rea and
t he city as a whole .
We hope that y ou will find the e n closed mater ial u seful. We will
be h appy to supplement i t with mo r e d etai led information about
any p a r ticular projec t.
Onc e again, thank you for you r in ter e s t i n o u r program .
-~
·~
James R. Shimkus
Social P l a nning Director
cc: Al Horvath
�8/8/69
ATLANTA MODEL CITIES PROGRAM
FIRST YEAR PROJECTS SERVING SENIOR CITIZENS
1.
Child Care Services: Senior Citizen Services of Metropolitan
Atlanta - A multifaceted child care program which includes two
child care centers, ten family child care homes and 10 block
mothers. Approximately 60 senior citizens will be used as
aides in the child care center and in other supporting positions.


2.


Senior Citizens Personal Service Center: Senior Citizens Services
of Metropolitan Atlanta - A service center to provide ·assistance
to senior citizens of the Model Cities area. Services will include day care, transportation, low cost meals and an advocacy
program.
3.
Specialized Passenger Vap Program: Economic Opportunity Atlanta
A program to meet the transportation needs of the aged, handicapped, infirm, etc. Three vehicles and drivers will be assigned
to the EOA neighborhood service centers.
4. · Model Cities Shuttle Bus: Atlanta Transit System - A circumferential bus route to improve transportation' within the Model Cities
area. It is expected that the senior citizen population will
greatly benefit from this service.
5.
Homemaker Program:
Fulton County Department of Family and
Children's Services - A unit of six homemakers to serve the Model
Cities area. They will be of special importance to the aged
population.
6.
Neighborhood Consumer Services: Economic Opportunity At lan t a This pro j ect will work with residents of all ages to d evelop
sk ills in consumer buying, food preparation , etc .


7.


8.
Project Ex pand: Economic Oppo r tunity Atlanta - An exp a n s ion of
EOA centers and a n e x tension of their present EOA staff s e rving in
cente r s i n t he Model Cities area. Two new cente r s a r e planned in
a r eas wi th a h i gh conc e ntration of senio r citi zen s .
(No t De t e rmined) - This p r o gr am is not in its
Health Program:
f i n al form, b ut it s implementat i on will r esult i n improved health
care to olde r p e rsons.


Not yet approved by Model Cities Executive Board.


�8/8/69
ATLANTA MODEL CITIES PROGRAM
PROJECTS FOR SENIOR CITIZENS NOT RECEIVING SUPPLEMENTAL FUNDS
Housing Aid to the Aged:
Fulton County Department of Family and
Children's Services - This is a program to provide specialized
housing assistance to old age recipients.
(Note: this project
is still pending in HEW)
Golden Age Legal Aid: A legal aid project sponsored by the
National Council of Senior Citizens for the Office of Economic
Opportunity. The GALA office is located within the Model Cities
area and will provide direct services to senior citizens.
�~b.eAllnnla Journal 2-A
Thursday, July 10, 1969











FHONT
I Atlanta's Aid to the Elderly
Draws Praise of U.SGOfficial
By CHRISTENA BLEDSOE
The new U.S. comimissiOTier on aging, John B. Martin,
Thursday stressed that all Model Cities programs should include
plans for the elderly, and said he would use Atlanta efforts as an
example to sell this idea to other cities.
I
WHILE the ranks of the elderly are mushrooming because of
medical advances prolonging
life, their special problems
haven't yet really been Jll'apI pied with, Martin said.
I
The elderly teml to be quiet
about their problems, so some, one needs to "push" for them,
Martin said. His Atla nta visit
attempts to come up with " innovative ideas" to help make
these people feel a useful part
! of society, he said.
Atlanta and Seattle a<re among
, the few cities in the nation now
' paying attention to their needs
Through an " understanding" under Model Cities programs,
with the Housing and Urban De- Martim said. His Atlanta visit
velopment Department, Martin Thursday was the commissionsaid he expects federal officials er's firs_t to any of the regional
.
who r eview pla ns for some · 150 offices.
Thursday Martin visited a fosModel Cities programs across
the country to " look with special ter grandparent project at Grafavor" on those with plans to dy Memor ial Hospital, 1.nder
some 41 pe rsons r anging
tend to the needs of the eiderly . which
from 60 to 85 years wor k part-
In Atlanta for a regional meeting with personnel in the aging
field from five states, Martin
t°?k a whirlwi~d tou:r of_ ~tlanta s efforts to aid semor c1t1zens,
and liked what he saw.
Martin, who also has been appointed as President Nixon's special assistant for the aging, said
the Nixon a<lministration plans
to put special emphasis on the
problems of the elderly.
,
UNDER HIS dual title he will
be able to coordinat.e plans for
the elderly with othe r federal
agencies, Martin said.
Since t he Model Cities pro- .
grams are reviewed annually,
Martin said this could serve as
a built-in check to assure a ttention for the elderly.
Some 10 per cent of the popula tion is 65 years and older, and
nearly 40 per cent of this group
lives in poverty or near-poverty, he said.
Equally bad, Martin said, is
the fact that the elde<rly feel
lost and out of the mainstream
of our youth-oriented society .
I
ing a baby, grinned and. said of
her charge, " She's spoiled. "
Mrs. George Miller, a _nurse
with the project, told Ma rtin the
program could use 50 more_fos1 ter grandparents at the reg1onaJ
mental hospitia~ alone a_nd 25


more !or the new G~org,_a Rej tard:at10n Center opening 111 Oc- ,


tober.
·





"I hope I'm talking to the 1
right person," she said with a
smile.
I
time, at Grady and a t the r egional mental hos pital five days
a week car ing for childn!n. They
ar e paid $1.60 an hour .
EACH WOMAN is assigned to
the care of one child a nd often
attends him a month or longer
at Grady. The program is set
up to mutually benefit the children and fill a need of senior
citizens .
Mrs. Sar ah Hinton, 85, told
him she loved her work so much
that if she were fired , "I'd just
come back on m v own. "
The gray-haired woman said
she had Z!> grandchildren, 21
great-grandc;hildren a n d one
great-great-grandchild of ·her
own.
Another woman, who rocked
in a rocking chair, bottle-feed-
I
MARTIN responded, " We
want to know about it (the
project)-not only where you
are but what your dreams are."
He said he is now trying to
wrangle out of Congress $9.2
million for foster grandparent
programs across the na tion.
I
In the Model Cities area , Martin took a quick neighbor hood
tour and saw work at the Child
Development Center whe r e older persons are being trained as
classroom aides, the McDa niel
Street Housing project for the
aged, and learned of a project
that will get volunteer s to take
the elderly to the doctor, give
home care if needed and even
deliver m eals.
A woman working at the
Child Developm ent Center told
Martin she was lost before she
1started working " but I haven 't
missed a day since . : . . It's
done a lot for my health," she
I
said with a smile.
Martin commended the metro'polita n area Senior Citizens
Ser vices Staff, headed by Al
Ho rvabh, for p'lugging for the
older people to assure they were
included in Model Cities planning in health, education, transpor ta tion and hous ing components.
�~


~-------
Older Volunteer Participation in Community Life
Task Force Report, June, 1969
The Task Force was comprised of five retired or semi-retired
persons with known skills and varied background e xperience. They
were employed on a part-time basis, during June, to assist Senior
Citizen Services with the following tasks:
1.
Explore e x isting volunteer service opportunities which
may be suitable for the involvement of older volunteers
as well as of the .more traditional age groups.
2.
Suggest new and untried service opportunities that might
be developed by Senior Citizens and/or other agencies
and organizations.
3.
Contact sources of older volunteer recruits, or potential
recruits, through organized groups and individual contacts. This was not intended as a specific recruitment
effort, but rather a testing of attitudes toward, and
interest in, participation as opportunities come to
light.
4.
Interpret the Educational Motivation school program now
in the planning ~tages with the Atlanta School System.
5.
Report fi n dings to Senior Citizen Services fo r comment
and future prog ram planning efforts , includi ng the
Model Cities Pr ogram.
Assignments were assumed by the Ta s k Force
of a contact area with whi ch they were familia r
ically.
However, d if f erent a n d varie d e c onomi c
were reached . A mo r e deta iled r eport t o f o llow
of service oppor tuni t ies and volunteer i n te re st
serve in appr opriate r o l e s.
worker s on th e ba si s
rathe r than g e ograph levels o f the commu n i ty
wil l r e flect the range
and wil l i~gness to
A ve ry b ri ef summary of f i nd ings suggests the following:
1.
Nursing Homes, with o ne o r t wo e xceptions, can and will
we lc ome the skills an d intere st of older volunteers and
will assure proper a ssig nme nts and supervision. The
s ame is true of the two l arg e hospitals visit e d and
other institutions conc e rne d with mental and physical
health.
2.
Elementary Schools in low-income areas reiteriated their
d e sire to involve older persons in one - to - one relationships
�with slow learners and with children lacking motivation .
A limited number of older individuals e xpressed interest
in this type of service.
3.
Public Housing , High-rise Apartments and contiguous
communities - produced a vast need for personalized
services and comparable interest in giving service
to others by many residents. Simple service needs
e.g., friendly visiting, home delivered meals,
transportation to church and to markets, telephone
re-assurance and others were obvious.
4.
Churches and related organizations were most enthusiastic
about a movement which would engage many of their older
members in other than so-called social clubs. By and large,
each congregation cares for its own but has not moved
beyond this concept in favor of serving the community at
large.
5.
The Task Force workers report a receptive attitude toward
the utilization of older volunteers and a surprising
number of retire.es were pleased, others somewhat surprised,
to learn that there are roles and opportunities f or them
in this big Atlanta metropolitan area.
6.
The ever-present problem of transportation ava i labi lity
and cost is, and will be, a deterent u nl ess s p e cial
attention is given to ways and means o f o vercoming it .
In conclusion - Senior Citizen Services wil l work closely with
the newly established Volunteer Bureau of the Community Council to
assure the involvement of Older Volunteers a n d wi ll strengthen the
volunteer se r vice corps concept as a built - i n d i mensio n of its own
agency prog r a ms .
Elsie C. Alvis
Task Fo rce Director
�I NT ER - 0 F F I CE
o.
TO:
Mr. C.
FROM:
Willi~~ W. Allison
SUBJECT:
EOA Housing Program
Emme rich
C OR R E S P O N DE N C E
DATE :
February 15, 196 7
Pre sently , we are invol ved in a limit e d Hous ing Program. This
is r epresented by a Housi ng Assistance Progr am where inf ormation
and guidance especially to r eloc atees is provided and housing
loans for the cost of r eloc ation.
In view of our active participation in the Model Citie s Program,
EOA could deve lop a more Comprehensi ve Housing Program.
The comp onents of the program could include :
a.
Fair Housing Center s for the de velopment of open
hou sing through r eliable information , guidance and
counse_ling .
b.
Housing De velopment Corporati ons by providing seed
money fo r both prof it and non-profi t making groups
in the de velopment of adequate, moderat e l y priced
housing. Als o cooper ative housing ventures could
be as sisted.
c.
Strengthen Tenant As sociation in publ ic hou sing
thro ugh educ a tional and inf ormational pr ogr ams
either i n housing project s themselves or Neighborhood Centers.
d.
Strengt hen Community Involvement in physical
planning proce sses through a series of reports
by city planners in all neighborhood cente rs.
Organize loc al planning committees or inc l ude
·physi cal planning as responsibili t y of the center
advi sory committees.
�Mr . C. o. Emmeric h
Page 2
February 15, 1967
e.
Organi ze Ne i ghborhood Imp r ovement Cl ubs f or the
improvement and ma i ntenanc e of ne ighborhood
appe arance . Awards or s ome form of recogn ition
coul d be incenti ve . Spec i al pr ogr ams could be
de s i gne d to highl i ght e conomic al ways of home
up keep .
Su ch a comp r ehensive ende avor by 60 A coul d possibl y be f unded
by OEO and/or Model Cit ies .
can we dis cus s thi s?
WWA: cw
�Admini ste ri ng the Demonstrat ion
Ci ties Program i n Atl an ta
Ia
Rationale :
The d raft prepar ed b y severa l a.g e nci es in conne ction wi th
'
the Mayor's Director of Governmen t Liai son outlines the goals
and steps by which Atlanta c an participate in tDe recently
p a ss e d Model Citi es or Demon s tration Cities Act o f 1 966.
What this statemen_t negl e c t s to outli n e is the me thodolo gy
by which these goals and programs are to be acc omp lished.
The
i mplemen tation of this plan i s p erhapE! its most c ru ci a l c ompone n t .
Pl ans ther e ar e in abundance.
But t _h e skill f ul execution o f such
pl ans r emains the k ey to eff e ctive act i on.
That At l anta po sses th e fund amen tal reso ur c es it n eeds to
meet the r equir eme nt s o f th e pemonstration Cities Plan is without
doubt .
What i s required i s l ess the c reat ion of new me ch anisms
th an the effective h arnessing and , where necessary , the r eor i en ta.t ion
o f tho se whi ch already exist.
It
i s p a ramount that the essentia l thrust of t he De11onstra.t ion
Ci ties Program s hould be kept in rnind.
It i s essentially d es igned
to make a social i rnpac -t. on a low--i ncome neighborhood, br i nging
to gether the tools of both phys ic a l and s o c i al plann i ng agencies.
As such the coordination and i mp l ementat ion of the pl an should
b e gin with thi s end in mind and, accordingly, build fro m th is
b ase.
�-2-
As s u ch t he pl an c a l ls fo r an agenc y wh i ch c arr i e s b o t h t he
c apacity and me a n s f or i nte gratin g social and physic a l plan ning
functions.· The only age ncy wh ich is currently ge ar ed to mee t
this n e ed in terms • of a c tion i s the Econ omic Op portuni ty At l anta
Program.
II.
EOA
&
Demonstration Cities:
On at le ast t wo· bases, if not all three , the Economic
Oppor tunity Pr ogr am i~ uniquely equippe d t o condu ct the plan o f
attack outlined in the d faft statement.
Th e p l an c a ll s for Neighborhood Orqan i zat i on and Resident
· · participation :
In each of the targe~-~~i~hborh6ods delineat~d
for the Demo ns~~ation Cities Program, EOA has developed we ll organized and function i ng neighborhood groups.
Most of these
have b een active l y i nvolved i n initiating planning act ivities
fo r the Demonstration Cit ies Program .
These n e ighborhood group s h ave made it possible f o r the first
real " grass roots " l eadership to participate in pl anning community
l ife.
Every aspect o f the community is dealt ,~·ith, ·f rom employ-
ment to education , housing to h ealth, recreation and aging.
Secondly , the plan calls for the improvement of Health and
Welfare and the phys ic a l renewa l of the area.
In both in stances
l ocal neighborhood comm i ttees have organized to survey needs and
recommended programs.
These neighborhood cowmittees stand ready
to make their cont r ibution.
�-3-
F i nal l y , as t h e Act i s d es igne d to br i ng about the
c oor dinat ion of agencies in an all-out attac k on the c ondit i o ns
o f poverty , the fr amework o f the NeighJ?.Efrh o od Serv ice Ce nter
progr am is s uch t h a t
a Te c hn i ca l Adv i sory CoITLm i ttee is o rgan i ze d
to prov ide t his a d de d and much needed res our c e .
In review it can b e shown that the Nei'ghborhood Service
Centers in the targe t Demonstration Cities Ar e a provide a r e ady ·
made we 1 1.:.:. o rgan i ze d forum for "grass ro ots participat ion," a
mechani sm for attack and a b as e on wh ich addition a l program effort
c an b e l a id.
Pl an o f Attac k :
III.
It
is , howeve r , not
the contention of EOA that its pres e nt
structure i s ent ire l y sufficient to meet this task a lone .
Indee d ,
were it not f o r the fact t h at ma ny agenc i es h ave made their
s erv ices availab l e from the outs e t would i t b e possib l e for EOA
to have reached it s pres e nt stage o f evolution.
far from the d es i red goal.
It rea l izes it i s
But it is on the r i ght road and hopes
t his l atest effort (De mon itration Cities) will reinforce i ts
rol e and future .
There a r e some areas of n ee d wh ich g o b eyo n d the p resent
structure and act i vities of the Ne i ghborhood Service Cent e rs .
It
r e ma in s o n ly to outline some of the s e to indicate the gap s which
s hould b e clo sed wi t h a dditiona l p r o grams a nd p ersonne l.
A.
Pres e nt activities include :
1.
Emp loyment - j ob p l acement, counse ling
r eferra l s , t rai ning opportunit i es, et c .
�-4-
B.
2.
Soci al Se rvic e s - multi-purpose n e eds
(health, fami l y coun s e l i n g , day c ar e ,
aging, 'etc. )
3.
Education - comrnunity schools, adult
education , e t c.
4.
Hou s ing_ - relocation assis tance and hou s ing inf ormation
Need Areas :
1.
Economic infra-structures - businesses lend ing in s tituti~ns, commer ical e st ab l ishment , e tc.
·- .
I V.
2.
Social i nf r a - s truc tures -con1-rnun ity clu b s,
r ecre at ion h a l l s , etc.
3.
Phys ic a l
i nfra-structures-roa ds, parks , etc.
Imn l ementat i on:
It
i s r e c ommended th at these c enter s whi ch a r e loc a t ed in
t h e Demons trat i on Ci t i e s Ar e a s h oul d b e merge d i nto a Demonstr a t i o n
Ci t i es Pl a n n ing Task F o r c e .
As s u ch they woul d b e f u n d e d through
t he i nit i a l p l ann i ng grant wh i l e prov i d ing s erv i ces at t he s ame
time .
'I 'hese c enter s would b e administered b y the Mayor ' s of f i ce
u nder a De mons t rat i on Ci t i es Pr o j e c t Off icer who i s r e s pons i b l e
to the Mayor.
Although o ff ici a l l y responsible to the Mayor,
these c enters wou ld continue t o operate under the administrative
procedur es o f the l ocal CAA .
The l ocal CAA , EOA , wou l d provide at leas t one coordinator
from its office to that o f the Mayor ' s Demonstrat ion Ci ties
Office.
�-,;-
-5-
V.
Evalu a tion:
Under terms still unwr i tt e n an evaluation o f the
Demonstration Ci ties Program, the Ne ighborhood Center Program
and the coordina t ion of these activities would be undertak en by
a local educationa l ins ti tut ion.
Hope fu l _ly, this negotiation
would le a d to a gre'ater , sustai ne d involve ment o f the academic
c o~ u n h :y in urb an p r ob l e ms .
I
· I dea ll y, Atl anta Un i versity and ·Georgia State Co l lege
a nd/or Emory Un i ver s i t y c ou l d fu l f ill t h i s n eed.
�The p r opose d a µrn i n istr ativ e str uctur e of Atlanta ' s
part icipation. in the De monstration Cit i es Program follows :
1.
The City De monstration Ag e ncy - is responsibl e
to the Mayor·. 'I'hi s b o dy would b e compose d o f
repres e ntative s from City Planning, EOA,
Atlanta Housing Aut hority , CCAA, and HUD . The
Planning Dire ctor or an appointee from hi s
office wou l6 a ct a s coor din a t or .
2.
Soc i a l i l ~nn i ng f u n c t ions woul d be c oord ina t e d
jointly by EOA and CCAi~ . Othe r p ublic a nd
p r i vat e gr oups wou l d c ompr ise a dvi sory commit tees.
3.
Physic a l p l anning fu nct ions would b e coord i n a t e d
j o i ntly b y the Ci ty Pl ann i ng Off ice , Atl a nta
Hou s ing Au tho r i t y and t h e Metrop o l it a n Pl anning
Comm i s s i o n.
�PROPOSED ADMI NIS TRATIVE STRUCTURE
Mayor
~------1
Director of
· Gov . Li a i s on
Ci ty .... Lanning
Mayor ' s Off ice
~ C CAA - Soc i a l P l ann i ng
EOA - Local CAA
AB:A - Housing
- Me tro Planning
- Federal Government
City
Demon strat i on
A enc
Price
Soci a l &
Ph s i cal
Sum-Mee
Social &
Ph sical
P ittsburgh
Social &
Ph sical
�r.-
Io
Neighborhood Planning
A.
B.
c.
Planning Go a l s
1.
Long-range - 100 years
2.
Middle-range - 10 years
3.
Short-r a nge - now
Agency coord inat ion
1.
Pub lic
2.
Pr i vate
Ne ighborhood Org a niz a tion
1.
Center Structure
2.
Additiona l c omponent
3.
City Adm inistr at ion
D.
Communication and In f o rmat ion
E.
Evaluation - Un ivers ity - Urban Extension
Program
�APPENDI CES
' l.
NSO Organ i zat ion
?. .
EOA Organ iz ation
3.
Technical Adv i s ory Committee
4.
Ci t y o f Atlanta
5.
Re l ated Agencies
I
�r
MEMORANDUM

Mrs. Helen Meyers
DATE:
s. c,P
FROM:
February 27, 1967
F.
SUBJECT:
Model Cities Information
Here are the materials that were sent over Friday.
see that it gets to the 'proper persons(s) in City Hall.
Will you please
E - Health Services
I - Social Services - The Day Care and Aging information
should go with this section.
N - Resident Participation includes the material that Mr.
Calhoun and I said we would get to you.
Q - Private Initiative and Enterprise - This information was
given us by Dr. Patterson of the Small Business Development Section of our program. Maybe it can be included
under Q.
I hope this is clear.
call.
Thank you.
SFC:dnb
cc :
Mr. Allison
Mr. Calhoun
If you have any questions don't hesitate to
�Operation 1 'Expo5urau ,- to be initiated a:r.d t h.:-0°,m i n to action on or
n!)out '1ay 1, 1966 , Hill beo a .1 intense, :!.n-tlep r...l p1·0~-::ara of con,::entt"a-
Washi ngton S t rcet poverty a a a in a <le lil>c1.·ate atte::1pt to ;;.up;:-ove the
standards of 1i ring for these r es idents.
It i$ a n tici pa.ted "t ~ t every de pns.· t :.1ent of center operations ,-Jill
be bl"cu,.,.ht. to bca :t" on eve.;:y hou se 1old in the ·re
wi th a view t o·,1trr<l
of th, neicl-1borl ood ; i np1:ovi ng the fa. :lily uni t s tlt,.cugh coun~e lin3 and
•.,,e n::i;u1~('-..:::-1 ...::nt
.-crvic es , i ~?Z<r'li.
~
i: d ivicluab by e::po.:; i nn th o t o u
'!
c..:i1>-c;11n2nt o n9ort:m.itie5 t hrou3h o• r r.u.....
o·.1e.r ,J;2.partr.1.cnt,
o:;viou,
Li
..:;;;, lo:,~-a:::n t ; no rc._rcation fo.c ilit fo;; , n~cd fo~- cb.y c.:irc .
!, 1:::::3 .
cc:-~ tion
�2
W!.ll then ::""gin to cr2.:mwe b lod.~ cl •bs ~.nd inter-es t: gi-oups , i nc l u d i ng
i:1eighbvrhooo .•i c:J -creuld .,,.130 con u ct en i ntense femily- by- f amtly
Socia l
' c.::rvicc u 11 ser:k to ""C t evecy child
oz
s-e:.~ol aGc i n "c· .ool
J. ..".~ .. ~.~r· s cf t!., .. t . 1<J ol:!--t; • t;re:.as C1:1d th
c :~f L:,r ~/~cl
-·---. - ,-·---~--. - _,.._
- .,a _.: will foUc-.., c o<;c:ly
�3
,. ... ~_....--<. ....... ·-· ...... - _ _ ...... ___ .. - - - ..
,~
�r
PRICE NEIGHBORHOOD SERVICE CENTER
1127 CAPIT~L AVENUE, S. E.
PROJECT
BUSINESS
IMPROVEMENT AND
DEVELOPMENT
These are some of the areas of business problems to be covered in the
workshops:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23 .
24.
25.
26.
Buying
Advertising and Sales
Merchandising
Bookkeeping and Accounting
Budgeting, Expense Control and Ratio Analysis
Pricing
Credit Management
Inventory Control
Problams of Starting a Business
Insurance Information
Tax Information
Location and Economic Feasibility of Proposed Business
Problems of Franchising
Federal, State and Local Regulations Governing Busines s
Financial Management
Planning and Policy Making
Hiring and Training Employees
Customer and Public Relations
Customer Services
Decision Making
Management Development
Motivating Employees
Buying a Going Concern
Sources of Information and Assistance for Small Business
Store Appearance and Modernization (Interior and Exterior)
Adjusting to Change
�CITIZENS PARTICIPATION -- PRICE NEIGHBORHOOD SERVICE CENTER AREA
Citizens participation in the Price Neighborhood Service Center
area is relatively wide-spread.
From the be ginning of our e xi stance,
May , 1965, we have had organized neighborhood groups to determine
existing p r oblems, and help to find solutions to these problems.
For the la s t 12 months, we have broadened this community
participation to neighborhood participation.
neighborhood groups, or block clubs.
We have 25 organized
These gro ups meet and discuss
neighbo r hood , as we ll as , community problems , and at the same time,
they are ex posed to total city reso urces and problems.
Neighborhood
groups also have repr e sentation on the over-all Center Advisory
Council.
This coun cil ser ves as a soundin g boar d for all problems f r om
the individual ar eas as well as an excellent v e hicle for the Center
staff to r e lat e to th e community.
In addition to block or ganization s , th e Cen ter staf f has i nvol ved
scor e s o f ne i ghb o r hood, soc ia l , and church groups at th eir r e qu e sts
who had s pec i fi c i nt e r es ts for group n eeds .
We have or gani z ed f ive
group s that s aw a need f or day car e serv ices in their community.
Two
o f t he s e group s were s u c ce s sful in ge tting t wo la r ge day care center s .
From a nucleus of a s mall group of busi ne ssmen fr om t h e a rea, we
o rganized two- business i mprovement c lin ic s .
had an average attendan ce of 50 per s ons .
The se clini c s , ten ses s ions,
Two s imi lar-type clinic s were
organized with residents of the area who managed apartments.
These
re s idents wanted to gain knowledge on how to properly care for the
prope r ty and work with the resident s .
�- 2 -
In September, 1966, residents of the area, interested in family
day care, were organized to co~duct training clinics and to help get
the existing family day care programs up-graded.
One block club, that saw an over-all need for concentrated
attention on many areas 0f problems, was involved in what we chose to
call "Operation Exposure".
Representatives from the area block clubs,
interested in recreational services, have been involved in area
recreational council.
This council, during the sunnner of 1966, made
approaches to City officials and land owners, and successfully
established two equipped play-lots.
This group ha3 held many
training sessions in an attempt to learn what is involved in an
adequate recreational program and what connnunity resources are presently
available.
�A Repmrt of Citizen Participation in the
Pittsburg Connnunity
The Pittsburg Neighborhood Service Center, as is true of all
other centers, has a citizen's advisory connnittee, whose primary function
is to keep the staff of the center advised on changing needs and suggested remedies.
Since the Pittsburg Neighborhood Service Center is
still operating with a temporary connnittee, and is only now holding
elections for its first permanent committee, the ad hoc committee in
this community is much larger and has a broader base than normal.
The
prior function of this group had been to generate sufficient connnunity
concern and interest, and to demonstrate to EOA Headquarters a need
for a center in the Pittsburg Community .
To this end, meetings were
held over a period of a year during which all of the committees and
sub-committees functioned .
Whe n the Pittsburg Neighborhood Service Center opened, this
temporar y connnittee continued to advise.
Representing approx imately
fou r hundr ed (400) people , this group has been able to give direct i on
to the cent er from a var iety of experiences , and from a gene r al k nowledge of c ommuni ty problems .
Things f or which th is corrnnuni ty is or
has been d i re c t l y re spon sibl e are:
1 - rec ommendat ion s f or indige neou s and indigent p er sons
t o be empl oyed
2
determination of prioritie s o f service
3 - selec tion of s ite
4 - advocate s for the c enter.
�A further evidence of citizen involvement may be demonstrated by
the neighborhood elections which are now in progress.
The entire
connnunity, which has been subdivided into groups called area blocks,
is at work electing persons to represent them on a permanent connnittee,
and this is being accomplished via the same procedure used in all
local and national elections.
The same machines used in general
elections are being used in these neighborhood elections, and the
same registration procedures are being employed.
After a survey conducted
by the center staff, and after finding that voter registration did not
account for a reasonable percentage of the total community population,
the ad hoc committee of the Pittsburg Neighborhood Service Center felt
that in conjunction With the election process, some emphasis should be
placed on voter registration.
In all of these instances, the entire
staff of the center has operated both at the direction of the committee, and in response to the obvious need for organization.
One major pr oject, which is still continuing, is a cooperative
effort of the center and the Pittsburg Civic League toward the acquisition of a community center.
The extension and housing departments,
along with the director, have had plans drawn up, inspected sites and
written proposals, all at the direction of the Pittsburg Civic League.
Contact has been m~de with Dr. Phillip Weltner of The Whitehead
Foundation wi th the hope that funds for this project may be made avail-
'
able.
Due to some difficulty with a wi ll, the first choice was re-
luctantlY, rejected.
Title searche s are in process to determine the
availability of other sites, and, hopefully, the Pittsburg Civic League
will be able to realize this ambition in the very near future.
There are other instances of general connnunity involvement which
are usually on a smaller scale , and would require a more specific and
numerical presentation.
�All of the above are submitted as examples of the involvement of
the Pittsburg Cormnunity through the Pittsburg Neighborhood Service
Center in the solution of their own problems.
�SUMMERHILL - MECHANICSVILLE
DEVELOPMENT ENTERPRISE, INC.
STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS
January 23, 1967
On Tuesday, December 26, 1966 the Summerhill-Mechanicsville Development Enterprise group, which has been developed primarily by the SummerHill-Mechanicsville Neighborhood Service Center of Economic Opportunity
Atlanta, Inc. became a legal corporation. The general purpose of this
corporation is to provide employment for adult semi-skilled and unskilled
workers who come from the poverty areas of the Metropolitian Atlanta area.
It does at this time include residents with experience that will lead to
management of small businesses. ·
The operation of the corporation includes the demolition, cleaning
and boarding-up and renovation and repair of sub-standard housing and
properties. The demolition, cleaning-up, and boarding-up is done in
close cooperation with the appropriate departments of the city of Atlanta
that relate to housing. The renovation and repair operations are contracted from private individuals.
It is anticipated that the work of the corporation will involve demolition and boarding-up 41% of the time. The remaining percentage of
the work, being renovation and repair work, should provide work for the
people in the corporation on a full-time, year-round basis. At any time
there might be a slack period, Mr o Charles Holt, owner of the Lane Grading
Company will give them work during that period of time on his company's
payroll. Mr . Holt is a member of the Board of Directors of the corporation.
In planning and developing this project, an organization of residents
from the poverty area of Summerhill - Mechanicsville was formed through the
use of appropriate technical assistance from the different parts of Economic
Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. Skilled, ex perienced, licensed, and technical
personnel are the workers themselves, and they do posses necessary technical skills for a successful operation as well as the desire to manage their
own company. Equipment and part of their on-the-job training will be provided by Mr. Chat les Holt . Mr . H&lt is donating his training services to
this corporation, but he will be paid for the operation of his heavy equip ment. Other advice and training in the operation and management of their
businesses is being provided by a technical advisory committee (see attached
sheet for members names) . Weekly detailed supervision will be given to the
business manager of the corporation by a committee from the Atlanta Jaycees,
who will be readily available in a hous e they have rented in the Sunnnerhill
Mechanicsvtlle area.
�Statement of Operations Continued
Page 2
January 23, 1967
The corporation will continue to exist to provide a chance for the
residents of Atlanta pvoerty areas to help them help themselves through
the betterment of their own housing and other living conditions. As the
corporation develops, it will have as a basic goal, the increase employment of poverty area resident, rather than the maximization of profit.
The support that the corporation has found during its organization
and development has been very encouraging. Many people in Atlanta believe
the general purpose of re-developing the slum areas to be a very worthwhile endeavor that will be welcomed by the city as a whole. The part
that the Surrnnerhill-Mechanicsville Development Corporation is to play in
this has been highly commended. (See attached letters) .
With the coupling of the worthy purpose of the corporation, the
ambition and desire of the corporation members and the support of the
corporation from public and private interests in Atlant, the success of
the business is most certainly assured.
�Young en of t he l ower area of Pryor Street along with Representa tive John
Hood came to t he Extension Manager ' s Offi ce with a c ommunity pr ob l em . This
pr obl em wa s centered around a plac e of busine s s known as "Hurray's Liquor
Store, Wine and Beer Super-rett 11 and " Carrol's Dr i ve~ in_Tavern, all
located on the co rner of Pryor and Rid ge . There have been numerous counts
of di s order over the years ·a t t his l ocation. Very li tt l e was done to
correct t he situa tion unt il a s ixt een year old young t11an
ki ll ed by
Securi ty Guards of scurr ilous na tur e.
,.1as
The Ext ens ion Hcrlage r ca lled a meet i ng of t he communi t y t o ge t more infonno ..
tion as to the r eason of the young man' s death and t he vi ce of t he busine ss
corner . The meet ing at t he Chur ch of God brought f orth more in f orma tion.
Young men, young l ad i e s 2nd adul ts expressed t he f oll owing i nforma tion
wh i ch proved to be f acts. The ma nageme nt o f t he liquor store , beer and
,-7ine s t ore and Taver n wa s s elling a lcoholic bever ages to minors . The
Security Guard beat u p nu,i1erous a nd s eptuagena.r i an ci tize ns ,;-1ho we r e not on
Murray 's br Carrol' s pr qper ty, and the ones who were, were bea t en int o submis si on . There was talk of rape but no f ac ts provided , Act ivitie s of all
ki nd s aze done in cars on t he lot and behind t he t a vern .
The Ex t ens:i.on Manager ,rns told of a plo t to ourn down t he cori.1er by ma ny
yo ung nen and ·woraen 0 £ t he neighborhood. The group was fou nd, - a n appea l
was made by t he ,::::x t ens i oc1 i:-.[anager, Representative Hood and llr . Pet ers , Cr1A C:
Chai rman t o le t us t ry t o use the avenue s of t he l aw and re traj_ n f r om
v i olence. After hours of t al king , t he young people agreed to use t he
cour t s of l aw to c lose the corner but assured- us i f the cour t did . no t close
t he t hre e busines s es , t he neighborh ood wou ld without regard to l i fe or
pr operty .
The f oll owiug action ~-,as pu t i n t o operation : The i;westigation of t he
young rr.a·,1 1 s death ; pr oof was e s t a blished fro r,1 the coroner I s repor t t ha t t he
bul l e t came f roffi a . 22 ca libre gu n ca rried s ecre tly on one of the Se curity
Guards . The Guar d cl a i med o~e of the yo ung men in the group shot the young
,,ian. The Guard has bee u bound over to the Sta te fol" mur de r . W-i t h what
infor ma ti on t he c itizens had , a cocmnitt ee wa s sent t o the Pol ice Con~ni t tee
~t City Ha ll .
�Extension 1'iana3er
August, 1966
Page 2
After hearing the complaint, the Police Committee booked the case for
August 31, at which time the m-mers uould be present to show cause as to
why their license should not b~ revoked.
The Extension Manager ot ta 5.-::ed information that the , oi:mer, Mr. Murray has
unusual power in the citJ 3t~ucture. His long arm re ~ches very deeply -into
the ranks of the police ~orce and so,,,.e of the city ofiicials. Reports
·
show that many charge s ha 1e been brought against his ausiness but · never seem
to 3et to couTt. The coc1,·,1unity citizens ·were oreanized into eroups to
produce ,evidence that co uld not be thrown out of court. The Citizens
corn:nittee feels su:;:e Ur. i:·il rra7 cannot control every alderr:ian of the Police
Corru.:1 ittee chaired by AldeT.,, ':in Richard Free!·nan.
0
1
1
The Extension Manager wc1.s ~~isited by Captain Mullens of the Atlanta Police
Department. Captain i'iullens assured c.,e this uo'uld be a very hard case to
~in due to lack of evidence. The Extension Manager called on City officials
who,n he had ,1or!~ed with befor e and obtained the following evidence from
police reports: Over 87 serious accounts of disor de r this year, an aver~ge
of 3~ pe ople are arrested each week- end. Sots of a ll kinds are forever
present in and around the area. The Guar d ·who shot the young raan had a
police record in Florida and Ge orgia .
With th is evidence ci ty official s 1;,1ho .. attended the next meeting said this
was e nough to de clare the. corner a "Pub lic Nuisanc e. " Hou t h e citi zens
d eep ly ho pe that t he Police Ccmmittee Hill vote to clo se th i s corner fo r the
improve·,:ient o f the commun ity, and preven t th e viole nce of the young people,
who are tired of waiting fo r the result s o f -the co urt August ·31, 1S66 .
No t on ly are the young people o f t he area a pr oble~ a lone, the Vine Ci ty
agitato r s plus the Blacl~ Poi1er Organization are s tand ing by to :nove in on
the action.
�Sum-Mee Neighborhood Service Center
Report on Community Improvement Program
Novembet 22, 1966
In.April, 1966, several groups in Sum-Nee area organized neighborhood
clean-up groups in scattered sections of the target area. When the Mayor
declared war on slums in 1'1ay and initiated the Community Improvement Program,
it .seemed a natural for organization of the total cormnunity around it so
as to involve residents in the CIP and form a kind of partnership between
citizens and the City, not to mention the benefits to be derived from a
concentration of city services in the community. To have such a concentration
of services in an area where these had been at such a minimum was indeed
salutary.
The Citizens Neighborhood Advisory Council and the Technical Neighborhood Advisory Committee joined forces in setting up a plan for the entire
area. Committees of the CNAC were assigned responsibilities as liaison
between the community and various city services to work along with the
neighborhood units through block captains. It was hoped that through this
kind of a ppr oach it would be pos sible to maintain continuing interest and
e fforts toward community improv~ment even beyond the Mayor's campa ign.
Many areas have shown decided improvements in their "housekeeping."
Most encouraging were clean-up efforts in some of the wors t "pocket s " i n
the a rea , emerge nce of some potential new l eadership at the "gr ass root s "
level.
EOA gave f ull cooperation, and, in the l a tter stage s, even pr ovided
some t oo ls f or residents to use on a loan basis from t he Center.
While there was ne ither maximum part icipat i on nor one hundred per cent
improvement, results have been a good be ginning in t his direction.
The attached record of tangible accomplishments were result of these
combined efforts. The City not only responded promptly to citizens requests
wheuever possible, but they also made improvements without waiting for
specific requests. As encouraging a s this record i s , the interest
generated, participation initiated, and successes experienced are achievemeats that are even more significant.
�COMMUNITY IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM
I.
Sanitation Department
A.
Motorized Street Sweepers - The City's Sanitation Department.has
assigned four motorized street sweepers to the Sum-Mee area.
These
machines are used on all paved streets with some degree of regularity.
B.
Garbage Collections - Garbage collection increased from ,n o pick-up
or one pick-up a week to two or more times a week.
C.
Trash Pick-Up - Trash pick-ups increased from forty-five loads a
week to one hundred or more loads a week.
D.
Abandoned Automobiles - Iickets are placed on automobiles that have
been abandoned on vacant lots, streets, and occupied areas.
These
cars are to be moved as soon as storage space is available.
At present, approximately ninety cars have been moved
frpm
the area.
E.
Litter Baskets• Litter baskets were requested for some areas.
Eight litter baskets have been placed to date .
F.
City Work Crews - City work crews were sent to some a reas to cut
gras s from sidewalks and vacant lots, and to remove t r ees and ·root s
f rom wa lking areas .
G.
Sani tation Inspectors ar e
now
giving tickets and notices to
citizens in the area who continue to neglec t and lit ter t he ir
premises.
II.
Housing Code Enforcement and Inspection
. A.
Building ins pectors are working in the area on a limited basis and
in response to calls from area citizens.
A great number of tickets
have not been given perhaps due to the lack of adequate housing to
accomodate the displaced families.
�- 2 -
B.
Approximately forty unfit dwellings which received tickets from
the Coding Inspector have been demolished.
III.
School Improvements
A.
Peter James Bryant is adding portables to accommodate its overflowing student body.
B.
The Connnunity School Program is underway and is doing a very fine
job in its adult programs.
IV.
Recreation
A.
Capitol Avenue School has added a full program in recreation to its
playground facility for the young people in the area.
B.
Sum•Mec Center's Recreation Room is a much enjoyed facility for
some of the area's teen-agers and adolescence.
C.
The Connally Play
l,ot
carried a capacity cr~tJ.d .until school opened
and is still doing big business after school hours.
V.
Street and Traffic Improvements
A.
The area citizens are very proud of the following streets which
were paved:
Terry Street from Georgia Avenue to Bass; Bass Street
from Martin to Capitol Avenue; Glenn Street from Reed to Connally;
Terry Street from Glenn to Crumley; Little Street, Crumley Street
from Fraser to Martin.
B.
Partially paved streets are Rawson, Formwalt , Windsor, Coope r,
Eugenia and Fulton.
Si de walks a re be i ng repa i red and r eplaced i n Cens us tracts
4S and 46.
Crosswa l ks and school zone control lights placed on the corne·.:
of Martin Street and Memo~ial Drive, Census Tract 48 .
�- 3 -
This effort was a real ~chievement on which area citizens had
been working for ten or more years.
They had had meetings with
City officials, had written letters with ~ignatutes of organizations
attached, had protested to the Board of Education.
Finally, one of
tbe area groups, "The Friendly Citizens", protested on the corner
of busy Memoriai Drive with radio, television, and some City
officials presep.t.
After the demonstration, thesei much needed
items were installed.
A group of citizens in Census Tract 46 registered a complaint
about the poor lighting on Bass Street between Pryor and Formwalt.
The group wrote a protesting letter concerning these conditions,
stating that people leaving the trolley at Bass and Cooper Streets
had great fear of this unlit area, particularly in both directions
on Bass Street.
on Bass Street.
The City responded with lights in both directions
�RESIDENT PARTICIPATION - EOA
The sponsoring Neighborhood Advis ory Councils and the i r supporting
Area Block organizations have just completed their annual elections;
the following results have been obtained for the area comprising the
Model Neighborhood Program :
NSO Center Area
Census Tracts
Pittsburg
i
, F-57 ~
Area Block
No . Register ~d
to vote
Number
Voted
14
1,395
585
20
2,891
1,793
9
1,140
618
43
5,426
2 , 996
F-58
F-44
F-45
F-46
L •
'
-
Summec
F•47
F-48


F-55A

F-56


Price


SSA


56
11


Parts of Census Tracts 55A and 56 lie in both Price and Summec.


�I
. --·__·:~!.·-,:.
....... .... _ . ... CL!·-.· ~·
·.1 ......_;:~:'
·- ......_.._,.. .......
._
.... '- .._ .... 1
-
2 !:~.:.. /G I
~
._,......
~~
·. ·.r·· .. ·· ;··
~-
--
.: · · ~ ·I -=.. ·I.. ~ \


a


4
4
••
t: ~!~ p::.:' ..1""... :.·:
f.)
1. . .
~
T
.£:.~ :.: .: _·,: !._:-"·..~
r: ::~ -~ ~f!.7 ~-~1....
v,i.-.·~:: ::"/.·!_·!,.' ......... ~ . .
1
,- :;


_ · _·


t~:,) ... ~··_£ ~ -J.~;.f,J,. l


~ : .;. - · ; . ; : - - ~-


J.':1r·rc l .J
~~'::'~:'! : _
>. ~.-. ·
. . . !.c ~ ·-·.- _:_:c· t I::. ~f o.: :, :: ~ -'".:u:--~; .; ~ t·.: · .1 c ·;!.::. :' '!_
i :.!:_~ 1 "!..·· -_..,-::-;~ ~; :·. --::~ t~;



.:.· :.'~ :;---: •.: ..... ~ t; .. ~ . < • ~: c ::· .




. .:~:- . ·) :·· . · .. ~~ :· t~-~·:'l!.·: £:.~.t ,i_~_ ~ ··ri ll r.-:_ . ' l. n · ·F, ..
<.··~-:; ,:,~-:1r! ;." !~~ - ~:, ... • ..;1:~~J. ~
... (:;. ::;. :.~:~~\~ -:: . .1 . ·. l-2 ~:,:-·-:,-- .. .:. r :.-: Lu 1.t o
~: ....... . :.?
~-1:.:-c:·.:-)
1~;::·,
t ~l.:::
-·-,.. .. - ,-·..., . - ,............. .....
..)


. ...... -·· ·


C:.·.
('
• .t..
. .:.: i~ ,;\
... .
t. . . .
.,
•••..• t
I. ~
• ., • ••
J. '
~- t. l:~
... . . -~
· ~
I
li •
0~
.!
._.J.;.
·-~- -
f-..• I
.


,__. 1...


\
,/
'.·
1·.
.,
).
.....~:..:
..
...,


--:J\.-: ~-,


'.
,._ r.,
--,. : lh
-; . Li./ r. ·::::.·· ··-·'
'
·.. l
! ~ •'
i..
...
,- ..
.:..
I ..;
'\
~
.J
I
t

........
•: . '
,.
~


.~.


·:.\ ! - ~ C • t: :· - -: • ·,1
·, · .,
, ' ' :~ ...
. ........
.
~
.
.
' '~- . 1
......
• t








.. ,.-.,
.:,.
'-
,:
\..
}.
...,,,
�I
~o LG i n. :-~·?11i:'.~i~.. c J.y _!: .~- ··)l :: l : .!'~~ 1:,3,:.~ c:~1cl £,,. tl1 c tr le\.r-, 1 of c:::~p2;: i c1 ~eo J.. ni s
l i 1."'i.tt~t ian :!1 20 ~:1.. . ~2tl·- ~:1,'::~1.'ssoI·~:s tl1e · n.c '"' 1 fol.- c:i.ti;:e;L i :.11\101 ·\;m~nt as ~
i.. ::,1:,' o.0 Tc :.-. n: i:: ~ a ,:,: pn:: ;.:i.e.:.:: ~·-:::io,:i .
1
1
Fe. ,~ , R-::!3icbnts o · t h·· r1.od0l nd.~.,b~l'." i, :)~'.1 2:' c .'.'. h.:1.v(, D': ,-;n. sth · e ted t o t he
r. o.c:~,.: l li.~e c::p:: r: ::.e r,ce ::i of. p,.::o:, J. 0. :i. 11 p;:J,; c:,::ty i n <!ludiu'-' cvicticn.
d .ition~J.
c.!i s loc L ·.i o ,1 of 1 ,:i '.J'.,)le o::: ~-~::: Loc:.ec.. by u::·h m:. r ,::;,.·:-~;.. l ~r:.J c::prc " :l';:.'..", · clc Lre.nee i n
t.b':! n rc ~ llr.!.\l ":l i 11c:t~~'l!) r.? C. t i::.~_; f cr.. l." ci bc~ir~s t.'O"'J8G. o Ci tizens ~:..e ;u~ l ~ct of
" :.c;1 11 p o~l.\?.L ..~ b c irt~ p:. . .: c.~ ~t i:-:.t(~ J up c u. t h c.:-:1~
pcc,~le in pe,·/Cl.'" t
a:--·~a s, £1.. ~1:l t .!~ r ~.J:~·:=!J. i12 :i:_::~1b o::h.c-:d p1--opo::,:-,d i s 110
·cvc ::ils ths. · t1:~ :;:e :-; ::.c~ -nts c!o 1n~- ;:ela te t o t :1~ c.:f. ty
a~,
, ,hate o::: e·.- ~n. !:h'..l ;:.o !:::i l -r r.t:,·2 , J.;;.;:,? c "' ,,.·::,.mif:, :i.n ·h!.ch t ley 1::. c . E=~·-:>oncondi tic:1.J o.i":
ct l e ~3t; is
~rc,~.. tl:l 11"; :,.--J:;cl ~
I~ff o:~t ,, tc 5-ncr (?,""J.'; C . :id:!: 1 ·;.cit1 :1 l ci t:t~·en\"'c...i.nd oro·~ :) n :2;.:ttcip~\t:i.pn h::.·,,,, bi:-·3un r.wJ fl-:::: .:1 lo b p :c:... U. · ,,: t 1icu:;;d1-;i::e d C: ff i ncr ... a sc<l . •
·
c;~ce:,:it::oi1,
7
Di:!~ic; :~t\
E:c!)0:;.::i.C'.ccc
1
�At l anta~ Georg ia
Part IIX~ Pa ge N2
Februa ry 17» 19 6 7
a.
U!.' b.s;n r ren~wal .
Hes t :L_gs h a v :.. b s n h e ld b etw~en th e Planning De p a r t ~
0
men t i,nd ne i ghb o r h .r,o d group s which r e.s i d e !.n prc,p os e d urba n n ., . <':Wa l .
a.re.as .
l 'he mee il;:1.r1.gs ha v e: b e .e:iJ. h .::- J. d ,oin requ e st: fr om residents of the target
areas,
EOA S t iB, £ £ 9 an:l a.s a r e sul t o f E; Ol icita.t.iom of resident
~.\
b e h ~ l:1 b ,;,.fo,i: -~ a,ny l a:Tud xn£y b
c f fid &lly -r-e z0ned .
There h a .s b . ®n
g 01r.,J att,e rd .ance fr i01m t he. pe.,,p l e o f t he }:o-:lel Ne ig,hb orhcad Are.a at
to t h ~
u bl i c .
1:h~ P l .:1.rmir,.g D~p ,L' t:men.·1: h .!ts tried t o info rm some: o f
t h e H;sid >2nt:s and EOA S t9.f£ fr on t h e M-- de l Ne!ghb c heed A
iu.ue s e.rl.s e t:h .s.t conc ~.r 1. it~ r e s i de ·1ts .
S t ~ff a.r,d res :1..dent s w-:;. rkl ng t h roug
e.
The e h · s b een
a when
ub l i c
its .a,r,:,:;:ncy .
Radl..o a,,·.i '.:i::.l 1:!v:i si 0 n. r -r.:) gl'.'a..ms and inta.r v i 1:-v s .
Physical , so.c i a. l and
cCOcJ::..m:l.c p : -::. b l E.,ns ar d s o l ut:i-::r.E, , f t h e M0·:k l Nelg:hb or h on. d Area w~re
�At l anta ~ Georgia
Part I I I ~ Page N3
Febr u :1.ry 17 ~ 1967
I•
I
f
ld(1cr&n.g DLS°-tl'""r.·~me!'i.t St.s f :f '.J:,o grou ps o f 306 /t Q", sno peo pl e at each
m~a~! r.~:$ 0
P.~
b~: e f
qui?:s til;}d~.-2 i r·e was ci~cu l a t e d i n ~n effort to dis-
The ~uestion~a i r e wi ll be
,;-\\
He l d i
J a ._ua.ry
�Atlanta, Georgia
Part III, Page N4
February 17, 1967
2.
Economi c Op po rtunit y Atlanta, Inc. (EOA), The Community Action Agency
opera tes three Neighborhood Se rvic e Centers in the Model Neighborhood
Area:
a.
Price, Pittsbu rg , and Summe rville-Me chanicsville (Sum-Mee).
Or ganized block clubs held elections for official representatives
on three Cit~ zens Neighborhood Advisory Councils (CNACs).
These
neighborhood groups mee t monthly, discuss community problems, work
with component Area Block gr_oups, and b ecome exposed to total city
resources and problems.
b.
The CNAC acts as a sounding board for p·r oblems from individual
.,.\ \
Area Blocks and a vehicle for the EOA center staff in communicating
with th e community.
CNACs h av e r epres en tation on a Citiz e ns
Ce ntr a l Advi s ory Council.
c.
EOA works with ne ighborhood, socia l and chur ch group s a t th e ir
r eques t who h ave sp e cific inter es ts or gro up ne e ds.
d.
A Techn ic a l Ne i ghbo r hood Advisory Council in each area, compose d
of l ead e rs and professionals living or work ing there in, are
r es our ce pe ople to he l p th e l ess f ortunate people of th e c e nt e r
ar e a .
The CNAC for each ne i ghbor h oo d c ent er discuss es physical,
economic and soc i a l problems and po ss ibl e soluti ons .
e,
Se l e ct ed and t r a ined r e sid e nts of th e c enter a r eas serve as sa la rie d
ne ighbo r ho od aid es for e a ch ph a se of EOA activity.
f.
Ci ti z en
p ar ticip a tio n ac tiviti e s in c e nt e r progr ams include:
Price Ar ea r e cr e ationa l counc il, Price bu s i ness imp r oveme nt c l a s s e s,
Pittsbur g community c e nt e r project, Sum- Me e Developme nt Ent e rpris e s,
Inc., Good Ne ighbor s Club (Sum -Me e ), and Sum-Me e Pi lot Proj ec t in
citi zensh ip training .
�Atlanta, Ge or g ia
Part III, Pa g e NS ·
February 17, 1967
g.
Sp e cific activities co nc e rning Model Neighborhood Program in center
prog ra ms are:
beginning in February, 1966, EOA, Summe c and .Price
leaders held me etings of staff, CNAC and he ads of organizations of
southe a st Atlanta to acqu a int th emselves with Demonstration Cities
bill and determine a pl a n of action.
They request ed the city to make
applic a tion for Demonstr a tion Cities funds, asked to be the first
i area to receive assistance und e r Demonstration Cities Act of 1966 and
I
I
I


, II


I'
finally resolved th ems e lves into · a temporary Summe c-Price-Pittsburg
"Demonstr a tion Citi e s" group.
About the time it became known that
this ar e a was to b e includ e d in the city's first Model Neighborhood
...,\'\
Application, Are a Block elections for CNAC repre se ntatives in the
Mod e l Ne i ghborho od Ar e a we r e b e i ng held.
Th e Summe c-Price-Pittsburg group he ld a Hod e l Ne i ghborhood Communit y
Group Works h op on Febru a r y 15, 1967 to di s cuss th e program and divid ed
int o c ommitt ees ac cordi ng to th e Progr am 's ma j or a ctivities
su ch a s ho using , h ea lth and r ec r ea tion.
3. At l a n ta Hous i ng Auth or ity
Th e Raws on -Was hing ton Ur b an Re newa l Pr oj e ct wa s th e only a r ea within th e
Mod e l Ne i ghbor hood Area with whi ch th e Atl an t a Hous ing Authori ty has
h a d c ontact.
Within thi s a r ea, th e Au tho r ity ha s s e t up a n on - sit e
pr oj e ct o ff i ce for th e purpose o f p r ov iding i nformat i on to ci t i zens living
in t he p ro j e c t area .
Th rough the At l anta Hou s ing Authority ' s Pub li c Infor ma ti on Office, in ~
formationa l brochures on v a rious aspects of th e pro gr am are made av a ilab l e
to c itizens i n the proj e ct are a s.
Sli de pres en t at ions t o civ i c, churc h,
s chool and c l ub gr oups are pres ented , a l l owing for discussion afterwa rd.
For spe cia l act i viti es , radio and TV progr ams are arranged.
�At l a nt a , Georgia
Par t I I I , Page N6
Febr uary 17, 1967
c:r 5 i;::.~iat:!,Y£:c .;'; f I0y ~:r•.:i J:".: l • c out f<:: r c1ops , $ce: Cud .ng t e ~c h e rs f o r s ew=
I
,h, I
..... ~-~
,r,,,:i(+,,,;;·
.~
h yJO .;}E.:'.':e
c l a.s;;; ,.':: c: ,
-..:o ."'
-J .i. ~ - - __,
- ·r.d
~ ..,...
':)
s e:J mu l ,s ti::))n o f c h u r c h group, s t o i n =


I


I
C 1J_i,:;
I
Se r,ior
\'I.


B..c::'s: :f


-=-·.:.,::'-' ·.1,c,,;.,~2, C;J'.: :; :':. .:i.z Cs:\:.m..·1JT'.: i~y o r gs·.rd. z.iti~r:s t o irw o l ve publ i c h ousi ng
�,
Atlanta, Geor ~i~
Par t :.CL , F~.ge ··s:7 _
February 17, 1967
-,..:, c1: t,11
L
C,
-· . , .,
~ ':-,·.·=·
"
At ~e~iance was qu ite good, du e in
~\\
~~o
~.. -:: .~ ::-~ .:'._ ·~:,::-.::~
~ .-~:-; : ,.
-~~:..:: ·.t:!i=~·:'. "t'~:£:1.ci,':!:r·:';:; ·"' o 'In.:E.Jt. ~
~ B~1:r v :=.:1
UJ\1 EO:iel pr a b l s1ns
t..
..
0
fo,( ·,;: h
e por '- .
'!.lrpos es .~n d
! ,
. - ·- -------~
.-.,.
~
, ... . ,;:;, .L -~
~
~
......
. ; '> ,.:
_,.
.... ... ....
0
~ ~
~
..


 :·. r. -:i:il s


_,...,~
,~-.:
~
s
�Organi za tions
2/24/67
Summe rhill Civic League
People's Town Civic League
Capitol Homes Tena nt Association
\The Wes ley Ho_µ se Center
Negro Voter's League
Pittsbur g Civi c League
.j
Mechanicsville Civic League
Counc il of Negro Women
_\ \
Sunrrnerhill-Mechanic svil l e Communi t y Improvement Conunitt ee
�Atlanta, Georgia
Part III, Page NS
February 17, 1967
social activities rather than long-range programs for the total
neighborhood.
Among them are:
Summerhill Civic League, People's
Town Civic League, Capitol Homes Tenant Association, The Wesley House
Cent er, Ne gro Voter's League, Pittsburg Civic Le ague, Mechanicsville
Civic Le a gue, Couns_elor of Wome n, Summerhill-Mechanicsville Community
Improvement Committee, John Hood, Member Georgia Legislature, and
others.
9. Church e s
These institutions poss e ss gr e at influence anq organizational strength,
not as units of social service but as bodies' under whose pastors and
lead e rs ther e i s v e to or endors ement powe r in community affairs .
Ove r
100 Bapti s t, Episcopalian, Me thodi s t, Presbyterian, Holline ss, African
Me thodist and oth e r Atl a nta Urba n Leag ue congr ega tions , lar ge and sma ll
ar e active in th e area.
This local unit of th e Na tion a l orga ni za tion
works with Ne i ghbo r hoo d Or g ani za tions and diss emina tes Mod e l Ne ighborho od
Progr am in f orma tion to th em.
to th e ir club membe rs.
They, in turn, pr ese nted thi s information
They also comp il e d a list of active ne ighborhood
as s oci at io ns in th e a rea .
Go a ls
What are th e goa l s so ught with r espec t to citi ze n pa rticip at io n ?
1.
Provi d e ne i ghb orho od r es id ents with a more mea ni ngful r o l e in th e
r e - bu ild ing and restru cturi ng o f t h e ir own communit i es.
Pl anni ng
shou l d be c arr i ed out with , as we ll as for , th e peop l e liv i ng i n t h e
a ffected a r ea.
a.
Promote l oca l s upp9r t f or pr ogram s uccess.
b.
Deve l op more c apacity and se l f-suff i ci e ncy among area residents
nec e ssary to sust a in gains mad e throu gh th e pro gram.
�Atlanta, Georg ia
Part III, Page N9
February 17, 1967
c.
Incre ase commu nit y neighbo rho od orga nizations' capacity to
continue actively to repres e nt neighborhoods beyond th~ execution
period of Mode l Ne ighborhood Progr am.
2. Provid e more mechanisms in th e program for a flow of communication and
social contact b etween the citi ze ns of the area and residents in
other parts of th e city.
Th e result will be two-fold:
low income
resid en ts of the Model Neighborhood Area will see the life style of
other p eop l e and th e latter wi ll better und e rst a nd the probl ems of
the Model Neighborhood.
3. Dev e lop a Citi zen Partic ip a tion Program
~D
g ive a voice to all elements
of th e loc al population fro m all parts of th e are a through s ma ll churches ,
meet ing places and li tt l e gatherings in addition to large one s.
4. Uti li z e ex is t ing ne i ghborhood organizations where possible, find
and involve unor ga ni ze d peop l e , ge t to know eve ry fami l y, knock on doors.
5.
Provid e fu ll in fo r mat ion t o are a r esidents concerning th e program,
pla nni ng d ~cis i ons to be ma de , al t e rnative cours es of action; solicit
e xpres s ion of r e sid e nts' conc e rns , d e s i res , and nee ds , individu a lly
and in gr oup s .
6.
Inco r pora t e r es id e nt ' s conce rn , desir es and nee ds in planriing and
exe cution o f th e progr am.
7.
Dev e lop mea ns of in t roducing vi ews of ar ea r es id e nts in policy making.
8.
Af f or d opportuniti es to city~wid e and me tropolit a n groups to discuss th e
i mpact of th e pr ogram on th e ir par ti cu l a r ar ea s and int e r es t s and
b r i ng to b ear t he ir p o int s o f v i ew in th e pl ann i ng and execution of
th e d emonst r at io n p rogr am.
9.
Util ize ex i s t i ng citi ze n c owJTiitt ees esta bli sh e d under oth er Fe der a l
p rogra ms such as CACUR , and EOA gr oups.
�.f ,
f.
,,t
'
,:
!t
'-
4.
Atlanta, Georgia
Part III, Page N6
February 17, 1967
'
I
__.
Citizens Advisory Committee for Urban Renewal
An aggressive and effective force for citizen participation in urban
renewal and associate activities is the Citizens Advfsory Committee
for Urban Renewal. Authorized by resolution of the Board of
Aldermen, this committee has a membership of some 80 citizens,
appointed by the mayor. The membership represents all sections
of the city and the ·various economic strata of business and
professional life. Special care is taken to have at least 40 per cent
of the membership from the minority race.
Ever since Atlanta became actively engaged in urban renewal, this
citizens committee has been very forceful in broadening public
understanding of the aims and actions in the various projects. It
has subcommittees specifically assigned to each point in the city• s
workable program. A special subcommittee has worked closely with
the Community Improvement Program since its inception. The
Citizens Advisory Committee as a whole headed up a campaign which
played a leading role in strengthening the city• s housing code enforcement program to meet workable program requirements. The full
committee meets four times a year.
At the first meeting of each year, the mayor outlines his plans for
the year in urban renewal and housing, as was done in January of
the present year. The executive committee meets during each of the
other months of the year. At its February meeting the executive
committee centered its program on the plans for the city• s application
to be included in the model neighborhood demonstration program.
To obtain fuller citizen participation in each new urban renewal project
added to the Atlanta program, the main Chairman of the Citizens
Advisory Committee appoints an associate committee in the project
area. Chairman of this associate committee meets regularly with
the full committee and the executive committee. The committee's
e x ecutive director meets with the associate committees and attends
citizens meetings in the project areas.
The committee conducts citizen tours of present urban renewal projects
and areas being considered for future projects. Groups from 40 to 75
citizens are thus given a first hand view of slum conditions. These
tours are conducted all through the year , averaging at least one a month.
�During the first two months of 1967, such different groups as two
Georgia Tech classes, a Georgia State college class, the
provisional members of the Atlanta Junior League and a women's
club in an area adjacent to the model neighborhood target area were
taken on tours by the Citizens Advisory Committee in conjunction
with the Atlanta Housing Authority which is the city's agent for urban
renewal.
The Citizens Advisory Committee is supported by public contributions
and a matching fund from the city. It is staffed by an executive
director, who is a former TIME and LIFE staff writer of 25 years
experience and a secretary. The chairman is Robert L. Sommerville,
president of the Atlanta Transit Company, and one of Atlanta's topmost
ci vie leaders.
�~ (
,
_,
Outline - 1
Suggested Outline of Application
for Planning Funds for
Atlanta Demonstration Program
@- ® - ~
GOALS AND OBJECTIVES OF THE PROGRAM.

-
A.
Integration of social rehabilitation and phy sical renewal.
B.
Acc e l era ti on of phys i cal ren ewal.
c.
Rapid provision of low and moderate cos t housing.
IDENTIFICATION OF PROGRAM AREA .
~~/
<5;r
A.
Appr opriate maps.
B.
Narrative description of area boundary. \
c.
Basic data:
1.
2.
Size.
Number o f famil ies (by rac e ) .
ELIGIBILI TY OF PROGRAM.
A.
Relati o nship to policy set f o rth i n S e c tion 101 .
B.
Impact of progra m on physical and s ocial prob l ems o f the
city.
(Inclu d e data comparing area with entire city. )
c.
Re l ationship o f p r ogram to sound deve lopmen t of e nti re
city.
D.
Impact of program on r e ducing social and e ducational
disadvantages, ill health, unde r- e mployme nt, and
enforced idleness.
E.
Contribution of program t o economic revitali z ation of a r ea.
This s ecti on should emphasi ze participation of area
residents, employme nt of residents, a nd enlarge d opportuniti e s for work a n d training.
- -
F.
Impact of program on supply of low and moderate cost
housing, housing choice, and creation of a suitable
living environment .
1
�l
Ou t line - 2
III .
ELIGIBI LITY OF PROGRAM (Cont ' d .)
G.
Encouragement of p r ivate init i ati ve and e nterprise.
H.
Prop osed t i ming of program:
1.
2.
I .
P l ann ing p e riod.
Execut ion phase.
Contribu t i on to urban beauti f ication and h i storic preservation.
I V.
AVAILABILITY OF LOCAL RESOURCES .
v.
ADMIN~S ~ RATIVE MACHINERY.
~
- ~
Exis t i n g laws a nd o rdinanc e s and n e w laws that wi ll be
necessary to carry ou t the program.
B.
Assurance of cooperation by other agencies:
Letter
Letter
Letter
Le tter
Le tter
Letter
Letter
Letter
Letter
f
VI.
fr om
from
fr om
from
from
from
from
fr om
from
a state off i c ial.
Fu lton County.
ARMPC.
Commu nity Council.
EOA.
Civic Design Commission .
Atlanta Housing Authority.
MARTA.
chairman of Federal Executive Board.
Discussion o f procedures to be us e d in developing a high
degree o f intergovernmental cooperation, both horizontal
and vertical.
RSSURANCE OF COMPLIANCE WITH RELOCATI ON REQUIREMENTS.
A.
Anticipated displacement .
B.
Housing resources.
C.
Relocation assi stanc e program.
D.
Propos e d program to stimulate c onst r uction of low and
mod erate cos t housing.
�Outline - 3
LEGAL DOCUMENTATION.
~~
AB..
Letter from city attorney.
Resolution by Board of Aldermen .
~/
VIII. BUf><;·ET7\ND. iJ-t..J-8-'P-IF±t!}trroN. ,
A , .{=~
fJ .
0
.
~
1-1
~
~~ - ( ~~
.-t.P \'\SJ
�Admi ni ster i ng the Demonstra tion
Ci ti e s - Prog r am in Atlanta
Io
Ration a, le:
Th e dra f t prepar e d by seve r a l
age ncies in connec t ion wi t h
'
the Mayor ' s Di rect or o f Gov ernme nt Liaison outlines th e go a ls
and step s b y wh ich Atlanta c an participate in the rec e ntly
passed Model Citi es o r Demonstration cities Act of 196 6.
What this statemen_t neglects to outline is the methodology
by wh ich these goals and programs are to be accomplished.
i mpl emen t at ion of thi s p l an i s p erh aps it s mo s t
Pl ans there are in abundan c-2.
The
c ru ci a l component .
But the s k ill fµ l exe cution of such
p l ans rema i ns the key to effective action.
That Atlanta posses the fu n damen tal resources it needs t o
meet the r equ iremen t s of the Demonstrat ion Cities Plan i s without
doubt .
li'Jnat i s r equ i re d is l ess t h e c reation o f nevJ me chan i s ms
th a n t h e effecti ve h arness i ng and, where n ecessary , th e reor i entat ion
of those v~ich a l ready exist.
It is paramou nt that the es sential thrust of t he Demonstration
Ci t ie s Program should be kept i n mind.
It
is essen-ia ll y designe d
to ma};:e a socia l .tmr2ac-~ on a lo'.v- i n c ome neig-hborhood , brii ging
together the tooJ s of both phys ic a l
and socia l p l anning agenci es .
As such t he coordination and implementation of the plan should
begin with this end in mind and, accor dingly, build from this
I
base .
�r
-2-
As such the plan c a lls f or an agency which carries both the
c apacity and means for integrating social and physical pl ann ing
functio ns .
The only age ncy which is curre ntly geare d to meet
this n ee d in t erms•of action is the Economic Opportun ity Atlanta
Program.
It ..
EOA & Demonstration Cities:
On at least twd bases , if not all thre e , the Economic
.Opportunity Program is unique ly equ ipped to conduct the plan of
attack out li ned in the dtaft statement.
Th e plan c a ll s f or Ne i ahborhood Orqanization and Residen t
Part i cipation.
I n each of th e target neighborhoods del i neated
for the Demonstration Cities Program, EOA has developed we llo rganized and func ioning neighborhood groups.
Most of these
h ave been active l y invo l ved in i nit i at in g p l anning act i vi tie s
for th e Demonstration Cities Program.
Thes e ne i ghborhood groups h ave made it possibl e for th e first
'
real "grass roots " l eade r sh i p to partic i pate in pl ann i ng community
lif e.
Every aspect of the com.rnunity is dealt with, ·f rom employ-
ment to education , housing to health, recreation and aging.
Secondly, the plan c a lls for the improvement of Health and
Welfare and the phys ic a l renewal of the area.
In both i nstances
local neighborhood committees have organized to survey needs and
recommended programs.
Thes e n eighborhood corrm1i ttees stand ready
to make their contribution.
�r
...,
-_)-
Fina lly , a s the Act is des i gne d t o b ri ng about
t he
c oordin a tion o f a g e n cie s in an a ll-out at tack o n the cond ition s
of pov erty, the fr amework o f the Neigh bor hood Service Ce nter
program is .s uch tha t a Te chn ical Advisor y Comm i t tee is organized
to prov ide th i s adde d and much n eed e d r es ource .
In review it can be shown that the Neighborhood Service
Centers in the target,, Demonstration Cities Area provide a ready
ma d e well-orga nize d f orum for "grass roots part i cip a tion,, .. a
mechanism for attack and a base on which additional program effort
c a n b e laid.
Plan of Att a ck:
III.
I t is , howeve r , n o t the con t ent i on of EOA t h at its p resen t
s tructure i s ent ire l y suffic i ent to mee t thi s t ask a l one .
I ndee d,
were i t not for the fact t hat ma ny agencies h ave made the ir
serv i c es a v a ilab l e from the out se t wou l d it be p o ss i b le for EOA
t o h ave r eached i t s p resen t st age o f evolu t i o n .
far from t h e d es i r e d g o a l.
Bu·t i t
It rea li zes it i s
i s o n the r i ght r o ad and h o pes
t~ is l atest effort (Demon s trati on Ci ties ) will r e i nforc e i ts
rol e and future.
There are some areas o f n eed wh ich go b eyond th e pr esent
str u cture and activities of t h e Neighbor h o od Serv i ce Centers.
It
r e ma in s on l y to outline some of these to indic ate the gaps which
shou ld be closed with add itional programs and personne l.
A.
Prese nt a ctivities i nclude :
1.
Emp loyment - j ob placement, counsel i ng
referrals, tra{ning o pportun ities, e tc.
�-4--
2.
Soci a l Se r v ice s - multi-purp os e n eeds
(h e a lth, family coun se ling , d ay care ,
aging, 'etc. )
3.
Ed ucation - co~munity schools , adult
e ducation , et c.
4.
B.
.•
Housin~ - relocat i on assistance and
h ousing i nformation
Need Are as:
1.
Economic infr a -struct ures - businesses le n ding in st i tution s, comrne r ical establishment , etc.
2.
Social i nfra-str u c ·cure s- c ornmun i ty clu bs ,
r e cr eat i on h al l s , et c.
3.
Physical i n f ra-s ·t ructures-road s, parks, e tc .
I mp l ementation:
I V.
It
i s r ecommend e d th a t t11e s e c enters which ar e loc ated in
the Demon strat ion Ci ti e s Area should b e me rge d into a Demon st ration
Ci t i es P l ann i ng Task Fo rce .
As su c h t h ey would b e funded throu gh
t he i nitia l plann i ng grant wh ile prov i ding servic es at the same
time.
These c en ers wou l d be adm i nistered by t he Mayor ' s o ff i ce
u nder a Demonstrat i on Ci ties Pro j ect Offi c er who i s responsib l e
to the Mayor.
Al though o fficia l ly respons i ble t o t he Mayor ,
these centers would cont inue t o operate under t he ·admin i strative
proc ~dures of the l ocal CAA.
The local Cl\A, EOA, wou l d provide at l east o ne c oordinator
from its office to that of the Mayor ' s Demonstrat ion Citie s
Office.
�-5-
V.
Eva luation:
Unde r terms sti ll unwr it ten an e va lu a tion o f the
Demo nstrati on Citi es Program, the Neighborhood Center. Pro gram
and the coordination o f the s e act i v iti es wou ld be undertaken by
a lo ca l educational i~s titution.
Hopefully, this negoti a tion
wou l d lead to a greater , sustain ed i nvo l vemen t of the academ ic
c omrnun ity i n urb an p::cob l ems .
I deally, At l cnta Uni vers i ty and Georgia St a t e College
and/or Emory Un i versity cou l d fulf il l this n ee d.
..J
�The p ropo sed admi nistr a tive s t r u c t u re o f Atlant a 's
p a rticip a t i on i n the De monstr at ion Citie s Program follows :
1.
The City De mo nstrat i o n Age ncy - i s respon s i b l e
t o the Ma yor ·. Th i s b ody would ~e c o mpo s ed o f
r epresen t a t i v e s from City Planning, EOA,
Atl anta Bm ~.s i ng Aut hor i ty, CCAA , a nd HUD. The
Pl annin g Dire ctor or a n a ppointee f r om h i s
o ff ice ...,,,,ould act a s coor din a Lor.
2.
Social pl ann ing f u nct i on's wou ld be coordina ted
jointly by EOA and CCAA . o _her pub l ic and
p r i v ate groups wou l d c ompr i se advi sory c omm i ttee s .
3.
Physical p l anning functions would be coordin a t e d
j oint l y by the Ci ty Planning Office , Atlanta
Hous i ng Authority and the Metropo li tan P l a n n i ng
Comm i ssio n .
�PROPOSED ADMINISTRATiv~ STRUCTURE
.M ayor
I
Di re ctor of
·G0v . · L i a ison
City P . L anning
Mayor ' s Office
CCP...A - Soc_i al Planning
I
~
EOA AHA AR.IviPC
\ HUD rep.
Local CAA
Housing
- Metr o Pl anning
- F edera l Government
ci·ty
De monstration
Acen c v
Price
Soci a l &
Physi cal
Sum-Mee
Soci al &
Phys ical
Pittsburgh
Social &
Physical
�APPENDICES
l o
NSO Organ i z a tion
~-
EOA Organ i zat i.on
3.
Te c hn ic a l Adv i s o r
4.
Cit y of Atl ant a
5.
Re l ate d Age ncies
Committee
�i
Io
Neiahborhood Pl a nnina
A.
Pl anning Goals
1.
Long-range - 100 y e ars
2.
_Middle-range - 10 years
3.
B.
c.
Short-ra nge - now
Agency c o ordination
1
1.
Publ ic
2.
Priv a te
Ne i gh b o r h ood Organization
1~
Center S tructure
2.
Add i tion a l comp o n en t
3.
City Administr ation
D.
Commun i catio n and ·I nformat i on
E.
Eva l u a tion - Unive rsity - Urban Ex t e nsion
Prog ram
��ORGAN IZATION LEVEL
RIGHTS OF CITIZEN GROUP
RESPONSIBILITIES OF CITIZEN GROUP
Neighborhood Council (There
are four - neighborhoods each
having its own council,)
1. Appoint 3 members to the Citizens

Advisory Council for the Model
Cities Program
2 . .R~view~ !t"ecoiiunend ~; changes, if necessary, and approve all proposed
programs and facilities for the
neighborhood .
3. Appoint committee chairman for review of all major problems affecting
the neighborhood.
4, Set priorities on problems within
the neighborhood.
5. Stud y alternatives and establish
general policy , determining the
future design and appearance of the
neighborhood.
6. In cooperation with the project director , determine the appropriate
structure and administration of the
neighborhood facility housing
dec e ntralized services to the
neighborhood,
7. To study and recommend to the board
of aldermen a zoning plan for the
neighborI?-ood.
1. Establish study committee to investigate
the major problems in the neighborhood
as a whole.
2, Maintain continuing relationships with all
city and county departments and agencies
and to review ~he activ ities of these
agencies and departments as they affect
the neighborhood.
3. Ma int a in a continuing relationship with the
alderm en f or t he i r wa rd and keep him inf ormed on t h e pr oblems and concerns of
the citi z ens in the neighborhood.
4. Continuall y search f or unmet needs and
problems in the neighborhood and recommend
solutions to the appropriate agencies
or departments.
5 . Insure a continuing coordinated effort
on the part of the neighborhood district
councils within the neighborhood.
Citizens Advisory Committee
l J . Rev iew and approve all programs affecting the entire model cit y area.
2. Se r v e as an adv isor y committee to
t he a rea- wide centrali z ed f acil it y.
3. Rev i ew t h e recommendations af th e
nei g hbo r h o od councils o n v a riou s p r ograms.
4. Revi e w the citiz e ns p ar ticipa t ion
struc t u r e and recommend a n y necessar y
cha ng es i n such structure
1. Establish the necessary stud y committees
to carr y out the rights of the Citizens
Advisor y Council.
2. Maint a in continual liais o n in relationship
with public of f icials and departments and
a ge ncies o f th e cit y and the count y .
3 . Ta ke a n y necess a r y steps t o maintain a
v i a ble Cit izen pa rt i c ip a tion program.
t
�ORGANIZATIONAL LEVEL
Block Unit or Cell
(four to eight blocks)
RIGHTS OF CITIZEN GROUP
RESPONSIBILITIES OF CITIZEN GROUP

~
1. ~¾ i et one member to the neighborhood district council
2. Appoint information and service
chairmen for block unit
Neighborhood District Council 1.
3 members to the Neigh(a subdivision of the neighborhood Council.
2. Appoint committee chairmen for /
borhoods; one for each eledifferent review and planning
mentary school in the
neighborhood)
functions (Committee members
need not be members of the Neighborhood Council. ) ~
3. Set priori ties ilaa/\problems ·within
the Neighborhodd district
4. Review and recommend changes for
all programs designed for th~
neighborhood district.
5. Within the limitations of budget
snd tecnical requirements, choose
from among proposed alternatives
the housing and physical designs
for the neighborhood district
6. .lp. _. coopera tion . with:· the program
director, appoint at least 50% of
the board me~bers to each program
'-organized at the district level.
1. Insure that Block Unit residents know
about plans for area.
2. Establish system to provide appropriate
referral for those needing help.
3. Maintain the appearance of t he block ll.XB
unit area through cleanup campaigns;: ,
,.
cooperative maintenance programs and encouragement of citizens. ·
4. Refer block unit area problems and suggested solutions to the neighborhood
district council
5. Organize babysitting pools to serve the
residents of the area
6. Seek out volunteers to work in recreation
programs as well as other programs . for
the neighborhood.
1. Carefully stud y the major problems in the
neighborhood district and the existing
services for dealing with these problems
so that a knowledgeable review of proposed
programs can be made.
2. Establish a s ys t em for providing volunteers
to various programs within t he neighborhood
district.
3. Work toward the establis hn ~n ~ o f recreation,
day care, and educational pro grams organized at the neighborhood dis t rict lev el.
1. Arrange sufficient neighborhood dis t rict
meetings to inform resident s a bout various
phases of the Demonstration Ci t ies program.
j
..
�CITIZEN<PART.lGIPATI0N
~
~=-~-.. ~--- ~- -·

- - - - - -
Conmrunity Council
··,_i;Iand train
· t,,(resi•d ents to ~~
Recrui~
uv a survey on soc i a 1 prob 1 ems i n SuIImler h i 11 ,
Mechanicsville, Peoples Town, Pittsburgh, and Grant Park
YJ~.OrganizeAmeetings
of residents of the target ~model citie~ , for the purpose
C
- b
of obtaining information for the CIP Report and the 143.215.248.55lm~: 'commissio;.:'a. ~~p~r~.
V
(1./ f\ ~~-ti;~~;-<~,;t s·o~-partici~at~ in the development of the Legal Aide Program and the
proposal to curb· absenteeism from school.
~ /,:,,.,,J., 1-€5 i J.,__)_;
l /"
c4:·-~T~-~hnical assistance~~d r~gistration and get-out-to-vote campaigns,a~ where
7
and how to obtain services.
~
~
..t
.
-~ '
In- the--process--of yvelopi-ng a directory of neighborhood organizations, ~e1.r
purposes and..,th,Q-rr programs.
-·;. __.....
-1 ?.
~ -
PTA
I ,c~
.,
s; ~'<a-"'""\
c.9 -r
&........~ ,.. ,.e_ ,;_ ~'°'<' ~....:,
\o- ; ..,_ c...it-~
V'--~
'-\
~~
C c... ..- ..-"\. <.0-_.
e,........ \ \.
c ...__c_:\.i.
~ \tw.J......r-~
l
a ;- Do- fund raising for Community Chest, Cancer Drive, March of Dimes.
SponsorJ
welfare fund to benefit less fortunate children.
b.
..
Aid in sponsoring boy scout and girl scout troops not present in every school .
-;.,{~·!',J.,\
,//
c. r, Cultural · enrichment program for children.
d.
Support' a city-wide PTA council.
\> ' ()' .:,,..,,_ , •\, ( . (
\( e.
i (~
\:,,°'~~J.
Gy'°,U...f?...5
- I I .. ~-Socia l --and- We·lrare- Groups ·
\- .



···,)C,) $). 0 . \C\.~ ~ "'1.,..C&,.- ; ..,_,


0-.Q_ ~ J ~
~-U
'-6- '-4.._~ - Do friendly visiting t o the ~ed, sick, and shut-in. ,\__·t:Ct.. 0 "" 'S(?c., , Q. a
/
0h
~ e>.-.~i;. '-.l 1·\., 1 CS v- ~~
b.
Support connnuntty projects
.~
~ ..,___
I
/
k...at
S> 'S:~~¢~
L\
h
f
1c .
.
/
Entertainment
~
/
...\.u
\ o~"O
Suppor t t he Summerhill YMCA
e.
Donate flowers / a t desk and comfort neighbors in bereavement
f.
Emergency assistance to less fortunate families
,.
_,/'
Ii
(,)roi;.-c~J ,
~
I
\-J ~ ~ ~ .\.t., .1.i,~. \,
d.
/
~CA.-... 0'-
J;lj
U·.·-tt -,,t
1
�I
I
I
g.
Give campships _and scholarships
\
\
h.
Savings co-op
/
/
i. · Out-of..'town trips and outings
I
'
j.
½~
,/
/
Community Improvement
I
III.
Churches
a.
/
Spnnsor · scout troops
J
Support Community projects
c.
Aid ,f ess fort,lnate' resident~/ of( the counp{in0
d.
Provide meeting facility for neighborhood groups
e.
Spir itual/ and salvat! on influence.)
/
' _, (
(
( ( 7
\ )~:;).) ·- .!
~
':,
,- c_
(
_Q
c.. -~
I ----~ -
~
c_
)
_:l;·
V
_Q
0..-
/
~ c ,_ l
-L
,..:t,.:__J :s -\N_ (tl_
�l
C~N-' PARTJ.CIPATI0N
? . -.: ., --·-9 .-
Conmrunity Council
0f
J
',;.Qk.,z__
Recruit' and train residents to do a survey on social problems in SuIImlerhill,
Mechanicsville, Peoples Town, Pittsburgh, and Grant Park
t
- -

. . '
Organize meetings of residents of theC~~Eget ar~model citie~ for the purpose
Fi ,,_, .:L.,., _
o,.., Ci-,
. , ·:... I'::.
of obtaining information for the CIP Report and the ..Cr-rme· Commission(\"8- Report.
(1./ (\ ~ ~-~i~;~;-~ ~-o7p arti~ipat~ in the development · of the Legal Aide Program and the
proposal to curb absenteeism froµi .school.
J /"
..(
i,:~
.a~d
~ ,:-)tr ;~hnical assistance
Q,,,f-,in~ tp_$ i Jul.;
.
r~gistr~'tion and get~~ut-to-vote campaigns , a~ where
and how to obtain services.
t' ,,t
~
I'


..s~ In- the ..·process- of _
g.evelopi-ng a directory of neighborhood organizations, .-cneir


L ~
purposes and-th.e-i::c""' programs.
~
"'/ , /~. \ c..--h-.._ VJ....t '::..~::n~~d~ighbo~hood
i TA . \
a2..........
,c-. :
s.-, y~ "'- \.
(.9
~
.__ .-"_,.,_.~.c:, ...
-r
\0..... i
-i.
Cc~~- ... '\. c.0--
~\.\,(L\
c.~
"""~
Groups
'-\ e c.....r \ \ ,
c ...__('_-1,..\
VW...,.J L ~
U-<'-
l
a c-Do- f und rai s ing for Conununity Chest, Cancer Drive, March of Dimes.
Sponsox;J
we lfa re fund to benefit less fortunate children.
/
b.
Aid i n sponsor ing boy scout and girl scout troops not present in every school.
/
!.)( . •~ ·. ,')., \
c. r, Cu ltural enrichmen t program f or childre n.
d.
Suppor t ' a c i t y-wide PTA council.
l'.;--<>-.~ J . GY-0-u..y-?.J
I_.,_,_,, : ,,_c ' ( \\{ e \ <
/v'.
· I I ·.· - Social-- and- Wel ·fare- Groups ·
,.--
· k, ,. ,•.,_:,, ' '::).
o ·r ·
G\- ~
.,_c,&_,(....~..._.,J)
~ -..a_..¢~
0---.Q...
~


f


'o.J
Do friendly visiting to the a_ged, sick, and shut-in.
b.
Support connnunity pro jec~s /
/c.
Entertainment
d.
Support the Su~rhil l YMCA
e.
/
Donate f lowers at desk and comfort neighbors in bereavement
f.
Emergency, assistance to less fortunate families
./
~,. ~
. •~--0- - .CL~-'-
/
'··
'-<!,..,__
'.J. , -\~f
<Z-5
c..o__
~ ~
r~
~ \ o'-~ ro.-~ (?Y-O\i'O-J
//
/
k_.,t -..+-u
-\.~ ii:t_ O ~ S<.0 c:...r
a.
~ h~~ ~ . .\-o W ~ q<..!~,:l
�I
I
g.
Give campships and scholarships
I
1
h.
//
Savings co-op
/
i. · Out-of-town trips and outings
j.
Corrnnunity Improvement
I
C,:
I
III.
Churches
a.
\
Spnnsor ~ out :troops
b ".
I
Support Corrnnunity projects
c.
Aid -~ess fortlnate' resi_d ent~/ of/ the
d.
Provide meeting facility for neighborhood groups
o... - ~
connp{m0
/
�DRAFT:MoLean:ez 12/1/69
TO
Attention:
~JJL REGIONAL ADMINISTRATORS
FROM
Robert H. Baida, Deputy Assistant Secretary (MCGR)
SUBJECT
I.





Assistant Regional Administrator
for Model Cities
Establishing the Start of the Second Action Year
Purpose.
This memorandum sets forth the procedure for establishing the start
of the second action year for each first round Model City.
It
follows discussion at the July and October meetings of Assistant
Regional Administrators and response of ARA's in September to a
memorandum dated July 28, 1969, asking how Regional re-v iew loads
might be spaced out.
I I. Considerations .
Among considerations in setting the start of s econd action year s
are t h e fo llowing:
1.
Nec e ssity of spacing r eview loa ds. If every f ir st r ound city
had exactly a 1 2-month first a ction year, abo~t one - h alf t h e first
round cities and perhaps one-half the second round cities would come
up for review at the same time.
2.
Effect on the cities. In some cities, it appears from results
so far, there is an advantage in entering the second action year
as soon as possible.
Continued planning efforts point to a better
second year program mix than the presently funded first year package.
Shift to the ·s econd year may give the city an opportunity to kill a
few doubtful programs before they start.
On the other hand, some
�-2other cities have started a lot of promising projects but have not
kept pace with their monitoring and evaluation efforts.
A later
shift to second year programrning--perhaps 15 or 16 montbs after the
start of the first year--may give evaluation a better chance to
impact the second year decisions.
3.
Adjustment to local calendars. Some cities will want to fit
their Model Cities program year to the city fiscal year • . others may
prefer not to do this.
Some cities may wish to avoid making program
decisions at the time of municipal elections.
There may be other
local reasons for preferring one renewal time over another.
4.
Effect on quality of review.
Because of changing conditions
in the cities--new leadership, a later start of projects, etc.--there
may be some cities which the RICC and the HUD staff feel will be
easier to review at a later time than others.
5.
Funds available to the cities.
Obviously a city that is
running out of money must be reviewed promptly, or perhaps given a
few months' money to finance a first year continuation until the
seco nd year planning can be reviewed.
At this point, however, it
appears very doubtful that any first round cities are going to be
out df funds 12 months after their contract signing.
III.
carry-over of unspent funds.
An important factor of entering the second action year is the disposition of funds obligated to the city for the first action year
but not spent.
In various ways· we have promised the cities that
such funds may be carried over into succeeding years, providing the
city is performing well in the programo A city that may have started
�-3-
sl,:)·.-;ly but has steadily increased program momentum during the first
y-s::. rr should not be punished in the second year.
However, i:.he
national purpose of the Model Cities Program may not ris i·. rall ser v,~d
by allocating a full second round target figure to cities whict
have shown little or no promise in getting good programs started
in the fir.st year.
Even for good cities, there may be a problem in building up a
spending rate in the second year which cannot be maintained in the
third year.
For example:
City A has a first round target figure
of $4 million and a second round figure of the same.
During the
first year, while projects were starting up, it spent only $2 million.
With carry-over, it then has $6 million for the second year.
If the city's supplemental spending consists entirely of on-going
staff or other expenses, as compared to one-time capital expenses,
for which there is no take-over source in the third year, it cannot
establish a $6 million spending rate in the second year without
facing a likely cut of $2 million for the third year.
The tendency
of all projects to get more expensive without increasing their
scope (because of pay raises, more utilization of services and other
reasons) heightens this risk.
Therefore, cities shall not be allowed to use their remaining
first round funds to increase their second year spending rate
except to the extent that:
1.
An amount equal to the first round carry-over is applied to
capital or other projects which, by their nature, will not require
renewal in the third year, or
2.
The city can demonstrate a commitment from other sources,
�-4-
preferably local or State , to carry out the exce·ss on-going projects
in year three, or
3.
A combination of #1 and #2.
In cases where the city has carry-over but cannot meet the above
conditions for spending the carry-over in year two, either of t h e fol lowing steps may be taken :
A.
The city's first year may be stretched out to use all or
part of the carry-over.
This technique should be used
when a stretch-out is desirable for other reasons--in particular, when it will result in a better s.e cond year program,
or
B.
The c i ty may be renewed without stret ch- out, but the allowab l e
s.e cond year spending level wil l be held to the second year
tar get f igure without the carr y- over , or without that part
of the carry - over not covered by paragr aphs 1 t o 3 i mmed iately
above.
Example:
Ci t y A, cited above, shows that $1 million of
its projected second year programming represents one- time
expenditure, either as capital projects or as projects
for which other funding is secure for the third year.
It's
s pending guideline for the second year would be $5 million.
Th e city would not be per mitt ed to carry f or ward $1 million
of i ts fir st year f unds .
Where a city , because of a pplication of the above, it not a l lowed
to add all or part of its carry-over to its second year spending
level, it should be indicated to the city that it may get the
~emaining increase during the seqond year.if it can come up with
�-5-
one-time projects as described above.
Example:
Half-way through
its second action year, City A identifies a new adult education
project for which State or loo~~ funds will be available in the
third year.
It may start t~is project on supplemental funds in
advance of its other fundi,.ng.
Given these operating considerations and policies, we now
request that ARA's recommend a specific starting date fo~ the second
action year of each first round city.
This date should be not less
thaµ ten months nor more that 18 months after start of the first
action year.
It will be the Central Office intention to follow the
ARA's recommendations providing the tqtal pattern of recommendations
is consistent with obligation and spending patterns.
If recommen-
dations have to be changed . to meet these considerations, it is hoped
that the changes will affect only a few cities.
Proposed changes
will be discussed with the ARA's, and time will be allowed to discuss them with the citi~s before final decision.

Transcribe This Item

  1. http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_008_016.pdf

Document Viewer