Box 9, Folder 1, Complete Folder

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_001.pdf

Dublin Core

Title

Box 9, Folder 1, Complete Folder

Text Item Type Metadata

Text

ATLANTA , GEORG I A
PHONE 522-4463
Sarah Mobley
~(_143.215.248.55·~.
Yh~/~~,-,a--,
cy- ~ ' a : / ~ ~ ~
~
FORM 25- 11
{A/a/2 ~
.
�-.:a .Bell ~L
» ' L .; '\, ounded
Co
in a gun
..iattle wit a"rou_ . y .,uspect. ·
The cab driver, Bennie Lindsey, told police two men asked
to be driven to Western Union and one got out and went in,
saying he wanted to wire money to his mother.
Later the man ran out, jwnped into the cab and threatened
to kill him if be didn't drive away, Lindsey said.


7Businesses


Contribute $40,000
To the Atlanta Urban Corps
The Atlanta Urban Corps has announced that it received
over $40,000 in contributions this year from the Atlanta business
community.
Those firms contributing were First National Bank of
Atlanta, The Stern Foundation, Ivan Allen Co., Barnes Real
Estate Co., The Coca-Cola Co., Citizens and Southern National
Bank, Pattillo Construction Co. , Southern Bell, Atlanta Transit
Co. National Bank of Georgia, Georgi a Power Co., DeJta Air
Lines, Rich's Inc. , Southern Regional Education Board, and the
Metropolitan Atlanta Commission on Crime and Juvenile Delinquency.
The Atlanta Urban Corps is the only such organization in
__the nation which is partially funded by private organizations.
C v/lSft"fvft'7JY--
8-13-67
N
There an
can't fall
Sleep con
sleep. Asp
ing drug5
quicklyp0,
bright-eye
soundly ye
encies. An
get the ~di
ASPER
�ATLANTA VRBAN CORPS
30 COURTLAND ST. , N .E. / A TL AN T A, GA. 30303
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
Office of the Mayor
City Hall
Atlanta, Geo r gia
��~-
<
I
0 ~
JY-
/ {;Jvt
I
to
ftr= - ~
�@~-143.215.248.55
TELEPHONE
MESSAGE
To_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Name------- - -- - -- - - -- - - - -- - - -- -Telephone No .. _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
D
Wants you to call
D
Returned your call
D
Left the following message:
D
D
Is here to see you
Came by to see you
~. ~{I
Date: _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ Time _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ a. m. / p. m.
By FORM 25 · 5
��TELEPHONE
To


fffi1f


MESSAGE
<
N~ee-~~ ~ - -~ ~~
~ ~D~
VL~
~=
~·----
Telephone No. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
D
D
Wants you to call
/ Returne d your call
G:'.J
0
Is here to see you
D
c~e by to see you
Left the followin g messa ge:
C'&i.,fk ibm;., ~ - J~
~_gcL
Date:_ _--"&--+/_3
' ------
-
By- -~-'-~==t->e
_ __
F0 RM 25 •!l
~
~
_,;-
T ime - ~/_.'~%~ - - -a · m. / p. m.
_ _ __
_
_
��@fo1143.215.248.55
7-
ATLANTA ,Gll!:ORGIA
N\~JGILSLIP dl/)qJ0
TO:
J /
E. Sweat
'
_
1 1
_,,__-1._


r.
For your Information
·
D
corresp on d ence and ma k e the
Please ref rep y.
necessary er
tol the attached .
D
Advise me th e status of t h e at tache d
FORM 25 - 4 - 5
�Plu Tribble
Youths Ready To Help
If Adults Will Listen
To the older generation , he is acceptable in
dress and appearance . The dark hair of this
handsome yourig man is longer than the white
shirt and tie boys would prefer, but it doesn't
run down his neck and curl back up. It doesn't
come down over his ears and the sideburns are
reasonable in length.
His clothing, though fashionably modern, is
not mod. And his steady eyes clear and blue
compell respect ; by his mere presence this 24year-old man compells respect.
He's Sam Williams , director of the Atlanta
Urban Corps. Sam is an electrical engineering graduate of
Georgia Tech. He was student body president
there and " Time" magazine selected him as one
of the nation's 12 outstanding college leaders at
that time.
So, what's he doing heading up the Atlanta
Urban Corps? What has organizing youth activities , city planning, developing community programs, working in head start, teaching prisoners , listening to citizen complaints, making
films for the city to do with electricity?
Nothing, Sam told the West End Kiwanians
last week at their meeting in the Braves Stadium Club. He freely admitted urbanology is a
field in which he has no business in the light of
his major.
But, he also freely stated that this nation's
most pressing problems are in the cities. And
that's why he's in Atla nta, along with 224 other
college gradua tes, trying to do something to
correct some of the city's ills, trying to correct
from within!
Tha t's significant a bout this young man and
his colleagues and that's one reason older people should listen to and try to help and support
their efforts.
They are not destroying. They aren't running
wild through the streets rioting and dissenting
merely for the sake of dissent. From the point of
view of " racial students" these young people
have copped out, joined the establishment.In a
sense, they no longer belong to their own.
And Sam asked, even pleaded, that the successful businessmen of the West End Kiwanis
Club LISTEN to what "the most highly skilled
minority in the nation has to say.
" Help us bridge the gap between generations. So far, we have made all the efforts in this
direction. It's important for you to make an effort also.
"Yourig people aren't motivated by the same
things which motivated you, " he told the audience of men, most of whom lived through the
agony of a depression. "We aren't motivated by
money, amassing material possessions, building
up power. Young people want to correct the ills
they see in their country."
Sam was quick to add he loves America and
if he didn' t think it good and great he wouldn't
be here. But he's not blind to its imperfections.
Neither are other young people. Nor are they
afraid to speak up and say America is not perfect. This is one of the nation's str~ngth's-it
can allow dissenting voices, Sam said.
As a consequence of their beliefs Sam and
224 others have involved themselves in this city
and its problems. They have put to use their
classroom skills and talents and abilities in the
real world and Atlanta is benefitting from their
fresh ideas.
Soon the aldermen and the mayor will have
to decide if the Urban Corps should continue.
They will have to decide if they are willing to
continue with a bold experimentation,at a cost
of less than $40 per student per week.
The time is right for action and experimentation, with its inherent possiblity of failure , Sam
told the Kiwanians.
He said " It doesn't matter if we can send a
.rocket to Mars if we can't do something about
the problems of our city' some of which exist
within the shadow of this stadium."
Sam's r ight.
�ATLANTA VRDAN CORPS
30 COUR TL AND ST., N .E. / ATLANTA , GA. 30303
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr .
�· ATLANTA VRBAN CORPS
30 COURTLAND ST .. N .E. / A TL AN T A , GA. 30 303
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
City Hall
�A TL AN T A , G E ORG I A
PHONE 522- 4463
~<SO~ )
Mg
I I
M\~
~Q...~,~~ ~~\._
143.215.248.55,"'~ ~
<:..,143.215.248.55
\.o
~
~~ ~
143.215.248.55
143.215.248.55
c:..c~~
\.o...~~ '-)~~"~~. .
~
~,-a_
c.o'\....~~ ~,~
c..c143.215.248.55 15:40, 29 December 2017 (EST) 143.215.248.55 15:40, 29 December 2017 (EST) ) ••~.~ .... ,
,> a
w~~ ~~" 143.215.248.55 15:40, 29 December 2017 (EST) ~ ~
143.215.248.55 ~ ~ , \ . 143.215.248.55 15:40, 29 December 2017 (EST)­
~~ ',
FOR M 25- 11
,~ ,~
~'O
~
-
�AC TIO N
ROUTING AND TRANSMITTAL SLIP
1
TO
(Name, o ffi ce
symbol or lo cation)
Mr . Sweat
2
3
4
INIT IALS
Cl RCULATE
DATE
COORDINATION
INITIALS
FILE
DATE
I NFORMATION
INITI ALS
NOTE AND
RElURN
DATE
PER CON VER S ATION
INITIALS
SEE ME
DATE
SIGNATURE
REMARKS
Per your conversation with Sam regarding your
writing Heubner and Allen a
11
tha.nk you" from
your Office.
Do NOT u ?e thi s form as a R ECORD of a p p r o va l s , c oncurre n ces
d isappro va l s , cle a ra n ces, a nd s imila r a c ti o ns .
'
FROM
(N am e, o ffi ce symbol o r l oca ti o n)
Sue Zander
- Urban
OPTIONAL FORM 41
A UGU S T 1 9 67
GSA FPMR ( 4I CFR )
DAT;, IO
Corps
PHONE

i'l 1-to,;/
GPO : 1967 0 - 300- 455 (8- H)
IOO · l l . 206
5041-101
�"3~'1 0, IV
Ge \ _,._ ·. "
.)
.AJVt
dv.,"'
...r~-v ~{- ~ c_ J.l--.i 1...l. ..& l\__j_ "' 0
0~°'- 1v\-O...
·
~
~LL,._,
~
-l:o
0..~J. ~ _
Q_; ..0---
1~ \JJ
A>
-.9,
fL
~~
J ()..
cl
LA.At
(>.....
L,"', . ' -
.lh.,Q.
_Q
5 (J..__sj.__
t wv
0L
~C..:
-
\'\.ji- I l ,
~vjo_~~
~
-
Je_A..,.
Q~
Je_~ o1..J l/)
(
ui ... ~
,-~ ~ J
-::p~
��ROUTE
SLIP
TO:
FROM:
George Berry
D
For your information
D
Please refer to the attached correspondence and make the
necessary reply.
CJ
Advise me the status of the attached.
FORM 2 5-19
�Memo
DATE
7-11-69
From GEORGE BERRY
Note:
This contract was
superceded by a later agreemet
per Inmond Deen.
�Me n10
DATE
From GEORGE BERRY
+;fe..
u,rbA"-' (i:.'>..rf>,
To _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
4
l. D-f11 r
'to
~e, 'r
1!I)
Aje /\c i ~
.s -Q#
b2.
-rc:c e, ve.~
Q
45
S
o+
,,- (:,q·_
tu \h,'"'
l'Z-)
P. c: {
( C.u>'\{1
/I
II
(~) € M~aur
fte., I.Is£.
C4-} E.
IA.:>c..
d.
II . ./
c;
C,V
I-\-
tf~ 11H ft
De.p1
�Memo
DATE
From GEORGE BERRY
To
B
0v::---
-
�The Atlanta Service-Learning Conference
invites you
to its inaugural meeting
Urban Needs
=Educational Opportunities
at the
White House Motor Inn, Atlanta
June 30 -- July l, 1969
The first in a series of meetings
planned for 1969 by sponsors of the
Atlanta Service-Learning Conference,
including:
The City of Atlanta
The Atlanta Urban Corps
Economic Opportunity Atlanta
The Colleges and Universities of Atlanta
Department of Health, Education and Welfare
The Se>uthern Regional Education Board
Volunteers in Service to America
The Peace Corps
�THE ATLANTA SERVICE--LEARNING CONFERENCE
Atlanta shares with other major American
cities its needs for increased services and its
large population of college students -- some
40,000 in the metropolitan area. In an attempt
to explo re ways to meet urba n needs, to offer
students a more relevant education, and to
bring ca mpus and co mmunity closer together,
Atlanta students, city officials, high er education faculty and staff, regional and federal
agency officials are j ointly launching the
Atlanta Service-Learning Conference.
R esearch : How are students' educational
and career choices affected through participation in service-learning programs?
Methods and Programs: How should a
service-learning program be d esigned for
implementation on a large scale?
Laboratory
Among t h e work group participants w ill b e
m emb ers of the Atlanta Urban Corps and
o ther service-learning programs which will
fo rm a practical lab oratory fo r the Co nference.
Meeting Series
Information Exchange and Results
T h e m eeting on June 30 and July 1 marks
the o pening event of t h e Co nference. T h e
Conference will continue for six m o nths a nd
will sponsor periodic meetings t o consider maj or dimensio ns of the service-learning concept.
The Conference w ill foster the exchange of
info rmatio n am o ng participants and with interested perso ns in o ther m etrop olitan areas.
It is a lready sponsoring surveys of student
manp ower resources in the urba n area, of t he
n eeds of t h e public and voluntary agency
secto rs for student ma npower, and of present
college and university p rograms helping to fill
these needs. A wrap-up meeting a nd publication is planned for the coming w inter, w hen
p la ns for co ntinuing t he examina tio n of servicelea rn ing and extending service-learn ing progra ms will b e co nsidered.
Work Groups
In exploring the service-learning co ncept,
work groups will b e formed t o co ncentrate on
particular aspects of t h e idea. These work
groups , and a typical questio n t o b e p osed to
each of them, are listed b elow:
Service: How can the student make a
maximum contribution in his sho rt t erm
assignment ?
Learning: What learning can take place
during t he assignment ?
Curriculum : What are the implications of
the service-learning idea for curricular d evelopment?
Financing: What is a n equi tab le dist ribution of cost a m o ng the h ost agen cy? the
college? the government?
Participation
Participatio n in the Co n feren ce is op en t o
a ll perso ns a nd groups interested in sharing
informatio n o n service-lea rning program s.
Inquiries may be addressed t o :
Atla nta Service-Learning Con feren ce
Peace Corps , So uthern Regio n
Su ite B-70
275 Peachtree St reet , N.E .
Atla nta, Georgia 30 30 3
�Urban Needs = Educational Opportunities
Monday, June 30
9:00
Welcome by Mayor Ivan Allen
9:30
A Case Study presented by the
service-learning players
11:00
Service-Learning in Action in
Atlanta -- up-to-the-minute report
12:15
Needs of Urban America
luncheon address
·
2:00
Seminars on service-learning
concept and programs
5:30
Social hour
7:00
Educational Needs of Young
People -- dinner address
Tuesday, July 1
9:00
Service-Learning and National
Programs, an exchange with
national officials of the Teacher
Corps, VISTA and the Peace Corps
11:00
Workshops
A. Service
B. Learning
C. Curriculum
D. Finance
E. Research
F. Methods and Programs
12:15
Service by Youth
luncheon address
2:00
Workshops resume
4:00
Workshop reports and discussion
5:00
What Next?
5:30
Conclusion
�ROUTING AND
To
(Name,
office
--:-:143.215.248.55------,r.-:-::---
TRANSMITTAL SLI p
s
AC TIO N
IN ITI ALS
y mbol o r l oca ti o n)
Mr. George Berry
C IRC ULATE
DATITE:-1-=-=-,----COOROINATION
2
I NI TI ALS
FILE
DATEE-f-;::-:=---- I
INF"OR MAT ION
3
IN I Tl ALS
NO TE
AND
RElURN
PER CON VERSAT I ON
4 _ _ _______:__J::D
ATE1::
INITI ALS
SEE ME
DATE
SIGNA T U RE
REMARKS
143.215.248.55 15:40, 29 December 2017 (EST)
M~
143.215.248.55 15:40, 29 December 2017 (EST)J~
~ fk c4J- ~J
~r--0""'
0\01,V:v r
~ ·~
l
f;;
-j


yh,Ji 9'- ~ ~ ,'llflR


F
ROM
\J1'\.
.udi~
Do NOT d"
use this f o rm as
isapprova l
a R ECORD f
a n cl s~prrova
l s co
imil a r ac;io
e n ces '
nsncurr
.
(Nam e, off,ce symbol or locat
s , cl10n)
· ea ra nc es ,
Sam Williams
OPTIONAL FORM 41
AUGUST 1967
GSA FPM R ( 4ICFR)
6-24-6
DATE
GPO : 1967 0-300-455 (8-HI
IOO·ll . 206
5041-101
�Urban Needs = Educational Opportunities
Monday, June 30
9:00
Welcome by Mayor Ivan Allen
9:30
A Case Study presented by the
service-learning players
11 :00
Service-Learning in Action in
Atlanta -- up-to-the-minute report
12 :15
Needs of Urban America
luncheon address
2:00
Seminars on service-learning
concept and programs
5:30
Social hour
7:00
Educational Needs of Young,
People -- dinner address
Tuesday, July 1
9:00
Service-Learning and National
Programs, an exchange with
national officials of the Teacher
Corps, VISTA and the Peace Corps
11:00
Workshops
A . Service
B.
Learning
C. Curriculum
D. Finance
E.
Research
F. Methods and Programs
12: 15
Service by Youth
luncheon address
2:00
Workshops resume
4:00
Workshop reports and discussion
5:00
What Next?
5:30
Conclusion
�-
THE ATLANTA SE~~ICE--LEARNIN~ ~ONFERENCE
Atlanta shares with other major American
cities its needs for increased services and its
large population of college students -- some
40,000 in the metropolitan area. In an attempt
to explore ways to meet urban needs, to offer
students a more relevant education, and to
bring campus and community closer together,
Atlanta students, city officials, higher education faculty and staff, regional and federal
agency officials are jointly launching the
Atlanta Service-Learning Conference.
-
Research: How are students' educational
and career choices affected through participation in service-learning programs?
Methods and Programs: How should a
service-learning program be designed for
implementation on a large scale?
Laboratory
Among the work group participants will be
members of the Atlanta Urban Corps and
other service-learning programs which will
form a practical laboratory for the Conference.
Meeting Series
Information Exchange and Results
The meeting on June 30 and July 1 marks
the opening event of the Conference. The
Conference will continue for six month,5 and
will sponsor periodic meetings to considn major dimensions of the service-learning concept.
The Conference will foster the exchange of
information among participants and with interested persons in other metropolitan areas.
It is already sponsoring surveys of student
manpower resources in the urb an area, of the
needs Gf the public and voluntary agency
sectors for student manpower, and of prese nt
college a nd univers ity programs helping to fill
these needs. A wrap-up meeting and publication is planned for the coming winter, when
pla ns for continuing the examin ation of servicelearning an d extending service-learning programs will be considered.
Work Groups
In exploring the service-learning concept,
work groups will be formed to concentrate o n
particular aspects of the idea. These work
groups, and a typical question t o be posed to
each of them , are listed below:
Service: How can the student make a
maximum contribution in his short term
assignment?
Learning: What learning can take place
during the assignment?
Curriculum: What are the implications of
the service-learning idea for curricular development?
Financing: What is an equ itable distribution of cost among the host agency? the
college? the government?
Participation
Participation in the Conference is open to
all persons and groups interes ted in sharing
information on service-learning programs.
Inq_uiries may be addressed to:
Atlanta Service-Learning Conference
Peace Corps, Southern Region
Suite B-70
27 5 Peachtree Street, N .E.
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
�The Atlanta Service-Learning Conference
invites you
to its inaugural meeting
Urban Needs
= Educational Opportunities
at the
White House Motor Inn, Atlanta
June 30 --July 1, 1969
The first in a series of m eetings
planned for 19 69 by sponsors of the
A tlanta Service-Learning Conference,
including:
The City of Atlanta
T he Atlanta Urb an Corps
Economic Opportunity Atlanta
Th e Colleges and Universities of Atlan ta
Department o f Health, Education and Welfare
The Sou thern R egional Education Board
Volunteers in Service t o America
The Peace Corps
�Lillk~
NEWS OF THE CORPS
Atlanta Urban Corps
80 Courtland Street. N. E.
Atlanta. Georgia 30303
PEOPLE OF THE URBAN CORPS
As the program of the Urban Corps develops, an increased
personnel is necessary. The people we have working on the
administrative staff are a group of interesting men and women
from various backgrounds; together they are coordinating the
many aspects of the Urban Corps. Let us introduce them to yo1:1I
Betty Lue Underwood and Marjorina Langford will both be
working in the administrative offices as secretaries. Betty Lue is a
junior at Morris Brown College and is from Barnesville, Georgia.
Marjorina is a freshman at Georgia State College and is from our
own Atlanta. Both of these girls are Urban Corps interns, financed
by the College Work Study Program.
Dianne Lovejoy, a senior at Price High School, will work with us
as an intern with the Neighborhood Youth Corps. She has worked
with E.O.A., and will be our receptionist for the summer.
The Education and Evaluation team is made up of Resna
Hammer, Education Director, Maggie Gerber and Dawn White,
both Education Coordinators. Resna received her BA from Bennett
College, and then served in the Peace Corps first as a volunteer for
two years and then as a selection coordinator. She is married and
living in Atlanta with husband Jeffrey and 10 month old baby,
Rachel. Maggie is at presen1 a candidate for her-Ph.D. at Emory
and received her BA from the University of Denver and her MA
from Boston University. She has worked as co-director for the
American Friends Service Committee and has taught both at Clark
nd at Northern Michigan University. She and her husband Leslie
ive here in Atlanta. Dawn received her BA at St. Francis College,
Indiana, and is now working on her MA at Atlanta University. She
is originally from Ceylon, but her family has been living in Detroit
for the past nine years. She has worked with E.OA. both in
Atlanta and in Indiana and taught for a short time at a parochial
school in Fort Wayne, Indiana.
Coordinating our staff are Sam Williams and his assistant Dianne
Wilson. Sam, a former student body president at Georgia Tech, was
director of President Nixon's task force on youth in federal
government during the past year working in both Washington, D.C.
and New York. Dianne, who received her BA from Spelman and
has done work toward her M.A. at Atlanta University, is in charge
of all special programs. She served in Kenya for one year in a
program of the World Council of Churches in Harlem, N.Y. as a
church program director.
Another of our busy, hardworking staff members is Sue Zander
whose position as Executive Assistant makes her an important
"information source." Sue received her B.A. from George Peabody
College in Nashville, Tenn., and has worked with E.O.A. here in
Atlanta as a personnel assistant since 1964.
The Urban Corps financial program is being handled by Steve
Mwamba, payroll coordinator, and Inman Deen, physical director.
Steve, originally from Zambia, Africa, has been in the U.S. for the
past four years attending first the University of Nebraska and theFI
Georgia State, majoring in finance. He and his wife Ivy and
dault,ter Suzgyo live here in Atlanta. Inman comes to our program
from Tulane University where he has just finished his first year of
law school. He has worked in the Fulton County Juvenile Court as
a probation officer for the past three years. Inman and his wife
Mary will return to Tulane in September.
The job of keeping the Urban Corps before the public goes to
Ken Millwood and Tara Swartsel. Together they will be publishing
graduated with a B.A. in Art from Agnes Scott College in Decatur,


.~ !:,;;.,m ·.;;o;-!-fr19 ·;.; ,h the d01,-.:l.;pment of the Ur~n Corps sim:e


this past winter.
AGENCY SUPERVISORS PARTICIPATE IN
"CRASH COURSE"
On Tuesday, June 3, forty-five agency supervisors who will be
supervising Urban Corps interns met at the Urban Corps office. Mr.
Dan Sweat, City Deputy Administrator, was on hand to make
introductory remarks. A film, "Action Summer" from the National
Urban Corps office in New York, was shown to help the
supervisors visualize the kind of work that their student interns can
carry out this summer. Explanations of several operational areas of
the Urban Corps followed: Steve Mwamba discussed the intricacies
of the payroll procedure to be used throughout the summer; Dave
Whelan explained legal procedures, contracts and special
arrangements to be carried out by the Urball'! Corps and the
agencie'.i; ~ a v e - a - s hort descripti ~ · the
- the lftban..C.orps
~-=so,. ;
P,articular cflreas..,of
p g am. As Sa
ilhams
after the meetin "
n ~ bee dealing w th p~i l.vor
fc so fong e · t ~ R g . w W ! thesesu peiv~rs,t0 c,
brought the program to life again for us - we are working with
[X!ople! The success of the Urban Corps really does depend as
much on these supervisors as it does on the interns. The enthusiasm
exhibited by the supervisors gave our staff a real shot in the arm."
INTERNS MEET FOR ORIENTATION
On Monday, June 9, fourteen student interns met with the
Urban Corps staff for an orientation program. The same film which
had been shown to their supervisors at the meeting on June 3 was
presented to the interns in the sky room of the old city
auditorium. Following the film, Dave Whelan, Resna Hammer and
Steve Mwamba explained such aspects of the Urban Corps summer
program as payroll, education evaluation, and intern placement. As
Dave pointed out to this group of interns who are to begin work
this week ... as the first interns to be "on the job" theirs is a
responsible position. We are working with people - our student
interns are, in fact, the Urban Corps.
OUT OF CHAOS . . . OUR OFFICE HAS A
"FACE LIFTING!"
The bare, football field-sized echo chamber that our office once
was is now beginning to look like a new place. With the addition of
partitions the large room on the 2nd floor of the old city
auditorium now is divided into five smaller offices with a large
center room and a movable partition which allows fOf' the addition
of a sixth office space which can be adapted to various sized
meetings. Office equipment has been provided by several of our
special friends, among them the Atlanta Police Department and the
city Purchasing Department. The Police Department has given us
thirty cushioned straight chairs to be used in large meetings while
the Purchasing Department has provided a filing cabinet and many
"emergency supplies" - a special thanks goes to Mr. Al Randall of
that department.
We have also found that Mr. Dan Sweat, City Deputy
Administrator, can run a mimeograph machine and "tote" a load
o paper - because he helped us do it - and we thank him II I
�~
(Uc
TO:
FROM:
ROUTE
SLIP
~
Ivan Allen, Jr.
D
For your information
D
Please refer to the attached correspondence a nd make the
necessary repl y .
D
Advise me the status of the attached.


Ld.a,(__~~<,_,~


£a
FORM 25-4
--/4 ~
· cJ2__ ~
�APPE~DJX l
MODEL OFF-CAMPUS AGREEMENT
{The paragraphs below are suggested as models for the development of a
written agreement between an institution of higher education and a public
or private non-profit organization which provides for employment of college
students participating in the College Work-Study Program. Both institutions
and organizations are advised that additional or substitute paragraphs may
be devised, which are not inconsistent with the statute or regulations.)
This agreement is entered into between
,
hereinafter known as the "Institution," and _________________ ,
hereinafter known as the "Organization," a (public organization),
(private nonprofit organization), (strike one), within the meaning of that
term as defined in Section 175.2 of the College Work-Study Regulations, for
the purpose of providing work to students eligible to participate in the
College Work-Study Program.


(If appropriate, the following paragraph may be included.) The Organization
is a component or the administering body of a Community Action Program
established under Title II of the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964.
Schedules to be attached to this agreement from time to time, bearing the
signature of an authorized official of the Institution and of the Organization,
will set forth brief descriptions of the work to be performed by students
under this agreement, 1/ the total number of students to be employed,
Footnote
!/
In accordance with the requirements of the Federal program, work to be
performed under this agreement must be work .in the public interest, which
(1) will not result in the displacement of employed workers or impair existing
contracts for services; (2) will be governed by such condition of employment,
including compensation, as will be appropriate and reasonable in light of
such factors · a s type of work performed, geographical region and proficiency
of the employee; (3) does not involve the construction, operation, or maintenance of so much of any facility as is used, or is to be used, for sectarian
instruction or as a place for religious worship; and (4) does not involve any
partisan or nonpartisan political activity associated with a candidate, or
contending faction or group, in an election for public or party office. Further,
no work shall be considered to be in the public interest where (1) it is work
for which the political support, affiliation or affinity of the student is a
prerequisite or consideration for employment, (2) it is work to be performed
for an elected official other than as part of the regular administration of
Federal, State, or local government, or (3) it is work for a membership organization (such as a credit union, a fraternal order, or a cooperative) which is
primarily for the benefit of the members of such organization, rather than the
public.
�-2the hourly rates of pay, and the average number of hours per week each
student will be utilized. 'l:_/ These schedules will also state the total
length of time the project is expected to run, the total percent, if any,
of student compensation that the Organization will pay to the Institution,
and the total percent, if any, of the cost of employers' payroll contribution
to be borne by the Organization. The Institution will inform the Organization
of the maximum number of hours per week a student may work, during the sunnner
or other period of nonregular enrollment during which the student is attending
classes.
Students will be made available to the Organization by the Institution for
performance of specific work assignments. Students may be removed from.work
on a particular assignment or from the Organization by the Institution, either
on its own initiative or at the request of the Organization. The Organization
agrees that no student will be denied work or subjected to different treatment
under this agreement on the grounds of race, color, or national origin, and
that it will comply with the provisions of the Civil Rights Act of 1964
(P.L. 88-352; 78 Stat. 252) and the Regulations of the Department of Health,
Education, and Welfare which implement that Act.
(Where appropriate any of the following 3 paragraphs or other provision
may be included.)
(1) Transportation for students to and from their work assignments will
be provided by the Organization at its own expense and in a manner acceptable to the Institution.
(2) Transportation for the students to and from their work assignments
will be provided by the Institution at its own expense.
(3) Transportation for students to and from their work assignments will
not be provided by either the Institution or the Organization.
Footnote
'l:_/ Under the College Work-Study Regulations, no student may perform work
on any project unde r the Work-Study Program for more than an average of
15 hours per week in any semester (or other academic term on the basis of
which credits are awarded) in which classes in which he is regularly enrolled
are in session.
�-3(Whether the Institution or the Organization will be considered the
employer of the students covered under the agreement depends upon the
specific arrangement as to the type of supervision exercised by the
Organization. It is advisable to include some provision to indicate the
intent of the parties as to who shall be considered the employer. As
appropriate, one of the following two paragraphs may be included.) '}_/
(1) The Institution shall be deemed the employer for purposes of this
agreement. It has the ultimate right to control and direct the services
of the student for the Organization. It shall also determine that the
students meet the eligibility requirements for employment under the College ·
Work-Study Program, assign students to work for the Organization, and
determine that the students do perform their work in fact. The Organization's
right s hall be limited to direction of the details and means by which the
result is to be accomplished.
(2) The Organization shall be deemed the employer for purposes of this
agreement. It has the right to control and direct the services of the
student, not only as to the result to be accomplished, but also as to
the means by which the result is to be accomplished. The Institution
shall be limited to determining that the students meet the eligibility
requirements for employment under the College Work-Study Program, to
assigning students tow ork for the Organization, and to determining that
the students do perform their work in fact.
Footnote
3/ (It should be noted that although the following paragraphs attempt
to fix the identity of the employer, they will not necessarily be determinative if the actual facts indicate otherwise. Additional wording which
specifies the employer's responsibility in case of injury on the job may
also be advisable, since Federal funds are not available to pay for hospital
expenses or claims in case of injury on the job. In this connection it may
be of interest that one or more insurance firms in at least one State have
in the past been willing to write a workmen's compensation insurance policy
which covers a student's injury on the job regardless of whether it is the
Institution or the Organization which is ultimately determined to have been
the student's employer when he was injured.)
�-4(Wording of the following nature may be included. as appropriate. to
locate responsibility for payroll disbursements and payment of employers'
payroll contributions.) Compensation of students for work performed on a
project under this agreement will be disbursed -- and all payments due as
an employer's contribution under State or local workmen's compensation laws,
under Federal or State social security laws, or under other applicable laws,
will be made -- by the (Organization), (Institution), (strike one).
(Where appropriate any of the following paragraphs may be included.)
(1) At such times as are agreed upon in writing, the Organization will
pay to the Institution an amount calculated to cover the Organization's
share of the compensation of students employed under this agreement.
(2) In addition to the payment specified in paragraph (1) above, at such
times as are agreed upon in writing, the Organization will pay, by way of
reimbursement to the Institution, or in advance, an amount equal to any and
all payments required to be made by the Institution under State or local
workmen's compensation laws, or under Federal or State social security .laws,
or under any other applicable laws, on account of students participating in
projects under this agreement.
(3) At such times as are agreed upon in writing, the Institution will pay
to the Organization an amount calculated to cover the Federal share of the
compensation of students employed under this agreement and paid by the
Organization. Under such an arrangement the Organization will furnish to
the Institution for each payroll period the following records for review and
retention:
(a)
time reports indicating the total hours worked each week and
containing the supervisor's certification as to the accuracy
of the hours reported and of satisfactory performance on the
part of the students;
(b)
a payroll form identifying the period of work, the name of each
student, his rate per hour, the number of hours wor ked, his gross
pay, all deductions and net earnings, and the total Federal share
applicabl e to each payr oll ; ~/ and
(c)
documentary ev i dence tha t s tuden ts rec eived payment for thei r work,
s uch a s photographic cop i es of canc elled checks .
Footnote
~/ (The s e forms, when accepted, must be counter s i gned by the Institution as
to hours worked and satisfactory pe rformance, a s we ll as to the accuracy of the
total Federal share which is to be reimbursed to the off-campus organization.)
GSA DC
69 . 8 5 7 6
�EDE AL-~GI TER
VOLUME 34
Tuesday, May 13, 1969
°
NUMBER 91
Washington, D.C.
PART II
-
Department of Health, Education,
and Welfare
Office of Education
COLLEGE WORK-STUDY
PROGRAM
No. 91- pt. II-
1
�7632
RULES AND REGULATIONS
(d) "Commissioner" means the U.S.
incurring an unduly heavy burden of
Commissioner of Education ' or his
indebtedness; and
(4) Broaden the range of worthwhile designee.
(e) -" Cooperative educat ion" means a
Chapter I-Office of Education, De- job opportunities for qualified students
partment of Health, Education, and in employment for the institution itself full-time course of study in an instituor for public or private nonprofit organi- tion, under which all students in the
Welfare
zations, especially those engaged in institution, or a major subdivision
PART 175-COLLEGE WORK-STUDY health, education, welfare, and · related thereof, may a.lternate periods of fulltime attendance with periods of r elated
public service activities.
PROGRAM
full-time employment, upon the compleCha,pt,er I of Title 45 of the Code of § 175.2 Definitions.
tion of which course of study a degree
F ederal Regu]aitions is hereby amended
or other certificate is normally awarded.
(a) "Act" means Title IV, Part C of
by ,a,dding a new part, Part 175.
(f) "Eligible instltution" or "instituthe Higher Education Act of 1965, as
Federal financia l a,ssista,nce maide amended (Public Law 89-329, 79 Stat. tion" means an institution of higher
education or an area vocational school
avaifa1ble pursuant to the regulations set 1219) .
(as herein defined ), except that n o instifort h below is 5l!bject to the regulations
(b
)
"Administra
tive
expenses"
means
tut ion of the United States shall be
in 45 CFR Pa rt 80, issued by the Secrethose
direct
costs
incurred
by
an
eligible
tary of Healt h , Educa,tion, and Welfa're,
eligible to enter into an institution al
and approved by the President to effec- institution which are necessary for the a greement with the Commissioner .
proper
and
efficient
administration
of
a
(g) "Family" means parents or other
tuaite •the provisions of section 601 of the
Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Public Law Work-Study Program- conducted pur- indi:viduals (except foster parents) who
suant
to
an
institutional
agreement,
but
stand in loco parentis.
88-352) .
only to the extent that the items of cost
(h ) "Fiscal year" m eans th e F ederal
Sec.
are attributable to that portion of such fiscal year commencing on the first day
Purpose and ob jectives.
175.1
program in which studen ts are working of July and ending on t h e 30th day of
DefinLtions.
175.2
Allotment of F ederal f u nds to States. for public or private n onprofit organiza - t h e following June.
175.3
tions other than the institution itself,
P rog.ram eligibUlty. 175.4
(i) "Full- time
attendance" means
Ehl.gibility and select ion of student including such items as salaries of staff, compliance by a full- time studen t with
175.5
p a.rtidpan ts.
.
communications, supplies and p rinting, the p olicies and regulations regarding
Limitations on t he number of hours and travel ; but exclusive of overhead ,
175.6
atten dance in effect at the institution in
of employmen t.
other indirect costs, and equipm ent .
which h e is enrolled.
Use of funds.
175.7
Cc) "Area vocational sc.llobl" means;
( j ) "Full-time student " means a stuLimitations on F ederal share of stu175.8
dent compensation.
(1 )
A specialized h igh school used dent who is pursuing any combination
Minimum wage r ate.
175 .9
exclusively or principally for the provi- of courses, research, or special studies
175.10 Nature and source of institutional sion of vocational education to persons
(wh~ther or not for credit) which, acs hare of st udent compensat ion.
who are available for full-time study in cording to th e standards and practices
Mainten
an
ce
of
level
of
expenditures.
176.11
prepara tion for entering the labor mar- of th e institution in which the student
175.12 Coordination of stu dent financial
ket , or
is enrolled, is considered full- time study.
a ld pr ~.
(k) " Good standing" means t he eligi(2) The department of a h igh school
175.13 Ins tit u t ional agreemen t and a pplica tion for funds.
exclusively or principally used for pro- bility of a student to continue in full175.14 Criteria for approval of applications.
viding vocational education in no less time attendance in accordance with th e
176.15 Payment a nd r eallocation of gr_a nt
th an five different occupational fields to standar ds and practices of the instituf u nds.
tion in which he is enrolled.
pr ocedures, r ecords, a nd p ersons who ar e available for f ull- time
176.16 Fiscal
(1) "Institution of higher education"
study in preparation for en tering t he
r ep orts.
.
m eans an educational institution in any
176.17 Preceding provisions n ot exh au stive la bor market, or
of jurisdiction of the Commis(3) A t echnical or vocational school State which meets the requirements of
sioner .
used exclusively or principally for the section 435(b ) of the Act. The t erm
provision of vocation al education to "educational institution" limits the scope
A U THORrrY : The provisions of t his P art 175
issued under 82 Stat. 1014, 2 0 U.S .C. 10 11, persons who have com pleted or left high of this definition to establishments where
Public Law 89- 329, Higher Ed uca tion Act of school and who are available for full- t eaching is conducted and which h ave
1966, as amended , Title IV, P a re c.
time study in preparation for ent ering an iden tity of their own.
Cm ) "Institutional agreement" means
the la bor m arket , or
§ 175.l
Purpose and objectives.
(4) The department or division of a t he written agreement between an eligi(a) The pw1)ose of the- College Work- junior college or community college or ble institt1tion and t h e Commissioner,
Study Progr am is to stimulate and university which provides vocational edu- which provides for the conduct of a
promote the part- time employment of cation in no less than five different oc- Work-Study Progr am and which meets
studen ts, particularly those from low- cupational fields, under the supervision t h e conditions of section 444 of the Act.
income families, who are in need of the of the State board , leading to immediate
(n) "Low-income family" m eans a
earnings from such employment in ortler employment but not leading to a ba c- family whose basic n eeds exceed its
to pursue courses of study at eligible calaur eate degr ee,
m eans to satisfy them primarily because
institutions.
its annu al income is less than the miniif
it
is
available
to
all
r
esidents
of
the
m um amount determined, according to
(b) This purpose will be prom oted
S
tate
or
an
area
of
the
State
designated
standards promulgated by the Commisthrough the development of student
employment programs designed t o meet and approved by t he S tate Board, and sioner from time to time, to be necessary
if, in the case of a school, department , to maintain a decent standard of living.
the following objectives :
or division described in stibparagraph
(o) "National of the United States"
Cl ) Encourage eligible institutions to
expand their efforts t o enroll needy stu- (3) or (4) of this paragraph, it admits means (1) a citizen of the United States,
dents, p articularly those f rom low- as regular students both persons who or (2) a person who though not a citizen
have completed high school and persons of the United States owes permanent alincome families ;
who have left high school. The term legiance to the United States. (8. U.S .C.A.
(2) Increase the proportion of eligible "State
Board" as used in this definition
high school gr aduates who continue means the State board for vocational 1101Ca) (22)) .
(p) "Part-time employment" means
t heir education in eligible institutions;
education design at ed or created pursuant
(3) Provide fin ancial a id for eligible t o section 5 of the Smith-Hughes Act hourly employment of a student under
students through combining the earn- (that is the Act approved Feb. 23, 1917 the Work-Study Program in accordance
with the limits established in § 175.6.
in gs from part -time employment with
other forms of financial assistance to (39 Stat. 929, ch. 114; 20 U.S .C. 11- 15, Work performed as a prerequisite to a
en able students to meet th eir educa- 16-28 )) to secure t o the State the bene- degree or a certificate will not be considered employment except for not more
tiona-1 expenses without the necessity of fits of that Act.
Title 45-PUBLIC WELFARE
FEDERAL REGISTER, VOL. 34, NO. 91-TUESDAY, MAY 13, 1969
�RULES AND REGtJLATIONS
t han ·120 da ys of work perfor med during
any full-time work period of an organ ized cooperative education program.
(q ) "Period of non -r egula r enrollm ent" m eans a summer vacation period
or an eqUivalent period such as the fulltime work period of an organized cooperative edu cation progr am during which
the student is enrolled in one or more
cla sses.
Cr ) "P eriod of regular enr_ollment"
means any period of time d uring which
a particular studen t is norm a lly expected
by his institution t o be pursuing a course
of full -t ime studies, a ccording to the
usual standards and practices of the
instit u t ion.
Cs ) "P rivate n onprofit" (as applied to
any school, institution, organization or
agency ) m eans a school, institution , or ganization or agency, no par t of whose
earnings inures or lawfuly m ay inure
directly or indirectly to t he benefi t of
any private member, shareholder, or
other individual.
Ct ) "Public or ganization" includes a
school, agency, or ganization or institution of the United States.
Cu ) "State" means, in addit ion to the
several S tates of the Union, the Dist r ict
of Columbia, the Commonwealth of
Puert o R ico, G uam, American S amoa,
the Trust T erritory of the P acific I slands , and the Virgin Isla nds.
§ 175.3
Allotm.ent of Federal f unds to
States.
(a) Initial allotments: From sums a pprop1iated to ca rry out this part for a
fiscal year , not to exceed 2 per centum
shall be allotted by the Commissioner
among Puerto Rico, G uam, American
S amoa, the Trust Territory of the P a ci.fie
Islands, and the Virgin Islands accor d ing to their respective needs f or assistance under this part. In addition to such
sum, an amount shall be reserved t o pr ovide work- study assistance t o students
who reside in, but attend eligible institu tions outside of, American Sa moa or the
Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands .
The amount so reserved shall be allott ed
to eligible institutions and shall be available only for the purpose of providing
work-study assistance to such students.
The remainder of the sums shall be
allotted among the remaining States as
provided in paragraph (b) of this section. For the purpases of computing this
allotment, the Commissioner will use in formation for the most recent year for
which satisfactory data are available to
him.
(b) Of the sums being allotted under
this paragraph:
(1) One-third shall be allotted -by the
Commissioner among the States so that
the allotment to each State under this
clause will be an amount which bears
the same ratio to such one-third as the
number of persons enrolled on a fulltime basis in institutions of higher education in such State bears to the total
number of persons enrolled on a fulltime basis in institutions of higher education in all the States;
<2> One-third shall be allotted by the
Commissioner among the States so that
the a llotmen t to each S ta t e under this
cla use will be an amount which bears
the same ratio to such one- third as t he
number of high school gra duates <as defined in section 103(d)-( 3) of the Higher
Ed ucation Facilities Act of 1963) of such
State bears t o the total number of such
high school gra duates of all the States ;
and
/
(3) One-thir d shall be allotted by the
Commissioner among the Sta tes so tha t
the allotm ent to each S tate under this
clause will be an amount wh ich bears
the sam e ratio to such one-third a s the
n umber of related children under 18
years of a ge living in ·families with ann ual incomes of less than $3,000 in such
State bear s to the number of related children under 18 years of age living in families with a nnual incomes of less tha n
$3,000 in all the Sta tes .
Cc ) R eallotment: The amount of any
State's a llotment which h as not been
granted t o a n institution at the end of
the fiscal year for-which a ppropriated
shall be r eallotted by the Commissioner
in such a manner as h e determines will
best assist in achieving the purposes of
the Act. Amounts r eallotted under this
p ar agraph shall be available for m akin g
grants until the close of t he fiscal year
n ext succeeding the fisca l year for which
appropria ted.
§ 175.4
Program eligibility.
(a ) G en era l . Work-Study Progra ms
operated under an instit ut ional agr eement for the part - t ime em ploym ent of
students m ay involve work for the inst itution itself or wor k for a p ublic or private ·nonprofit organiza t ion in any S t a te.
(1) S uch p rograms :
(i) M ust n ot result in the disp la cement of employed workers or impair existing contracts for services ;
(ii) Must not involve the construction ,
operation, or m aintenance of so much of
any facility as is used or is to be used
for sectar ian instruct ion or as a place
of religious worship.
(2) The work provided under such programs Ci ) m ust n ot involve any partisan
or n onpartisan political a ctivity a ssociated with a candidate, or con tending
faction or group, in an election for public
or party office, and (ii) m ust be governed
by such conditions of employment , including compensat ion , as will be appr opriate and reasonable in light of such
factors as t ype of work performed, geographical region, proficiency of the employee, and any a pplicable F ederal, State,
or local legislation.
(b) Work f or t.he inst i t ution i t se lf. To
be eligible for Feder al fin ancial pa rticipation, work fo r the institution itself (including any nonprofit entity which is
under the control of the govemLr1g boa r d
of the institution) m ust result in an expansion or broadening of the instit ution's
student employment programs.
(c) Work for a public or private nonprofit or gani.zation. To be eligible for
Federal financia l participation , work for
a public or private nonprofit organization
other than t he institut ion must Cl) be in
the public interest (d evoted to the gen eral., national or community welfare
7633
r a ther than tha t of a p articula r interest
or ·group) , and (2) be evidenced by a
written agreement conta ining t h e con ditions of such work between the institution
and the organization. The institut ion is
r esponsible for ensuring that any ar r an gem ents be with a reliable or ganization with professional direction and staff,
and that the work performed by each stud ent will be properly supervised, a nd
consistent with the purposes of the Act .
( d ) Work in the publi c i n ter est. In no
event sh all work be considered to be in
the p u blic interest wh ere Cl) it is work
for which the political support or affiliation of the student is a prerequisite or
consideration fo r employment, (2) it is
wor k to be performed for an elected official other t h an as part of the regular a dm inistration of F ederal, S tate or local
government or (3) it is work which is
p rima rily for the ben efit of the m embers
of a limited membership organization
(such as a credit union, fra t ernal order,
or a cooperative) , r a ther than the public.
§ 175.5
Eligibility and selection of student participants.
(a) Eligibi li ty. A student is eligible for
p a rt-time employment under the WorkS tudy Progra m only during p eriods in
which he m eets all of the following
conditions :
(1) Is a nation al of the Un ited S tat es,
or is in the United Sta t es for oth er than
a tem porary purpose and intends t o become a permanen t r esident thereof , 01·
is a perman ent resident of the Tr ust
T er ritory of the P acific I slands ;
(2) Is in n eed of the earn in gs fro m
such employm ent in order to pursue a
course of study at the institution;
(3) I s capa ble, in the opinion of the
institution, of m ain tainin g good stand ing in such course of study while employed under this program; a nd
( 4) H as been accep ted for enrollment
as a full -tim e student at th e institu tion
or, in the case of a student alrea dy en r olled in a n d attending the institu tion ,
is in good st anding and in f ull-time att enda nce there, either as a n under gra duate, gradua te or professional student .
Cb) Eligibili t y of students attending
area ,vocational schools. A student enrolled in an area vocation al school is
eligible for erp.ployment under the College Work -Study P rogram only if h e
meets t h e following conditions in addition to the provisions described in para graph Ca) of this section :
Cl ) H as a certificat e of gradua tion
f rom a school providing secon dary education or the r ecognized equivalent of
such a certificate, and
(2) Is pursuin g a p rogram of education or training wh ich requires a t least
6 m on ths to c omplete and is designed
to prepare the student for gainful employment in a recognized occupation.
Cc) D et er min ation of need. In determining whether, and to wh at extent, a
'Studen t is in need of the earnings from
employment, t h e institu tion shall, at
least a nnually, (1) determine what income, a ssets, and oth er resources (including other forms of aid ) are available to the student for the t ime period
FEDERAL REG ISTER, VOL 34, NO . 9 1-TUESDAY, MAY 13, 1969
�7634
· RULES AND REGULATIONS
under consideration; (2) calculate according to standards published from time
to time by the Commissioner what portion of the income, assets, and resources
of the student's family may reasonably
be expected to be made available to the
student; and (3) determine the cost
reasonably necessary- for the student's
attendance at the institution, including
any special needs and obligations which
directly affect the student's financial
ability to attend the institution on a
full-time basis. A student shall be considered to be in need to the extent that
such costs of attendance exceed the sum
of the amounts determined to be available to the studen€ and the amounts, if
any, which may reasonably be expected
to be made available to him by his family.
(d) Selection of students. In the selection of students for employment under
the Work-Study Program, an institution
shall give preference to students from
low-income families.
(e) Availability of st udent employment. Each institution shall make em-
ployment under the Work-Study Program, or equivalent employment offered
or arranged for by the institution, reasonably available (to the extent of available funds) to all eligible studen ts in the
institution in n eed thereof.
(f)'
R ecord of approval or di sapproval.
Each institution shall maintain records
which reflect the approval or disapproval
of all or part of each student's application for employment under the program
and which identify the institutional officer who made each such determination.
§ 175.6
Limitatio ns on the number of
hours o f employment.
(a) During periods of regular enrollment, when classes in which a student
is enrolled are in session, he shall be
limited to working no more than an average of 15 hours per week under the program, averaged· over the semester or
other time period on the basis of which
the institution in which he is enrolled
awards academic credits. Work performed during any week when the student is on vacation shall not exceed 40
hours and shall not be counted as contributing toward the average of 15 hours
per week established in the preceding
sentence.
(b) Du1ing periods of nonregular enrollment, when classes in which a student is enrolled are in session he may be
employed under the program for as many
as 40 hours per week or such lesser number of hours p er week as the institution
m ay determine in accordance with its
own standards and practices and considering (1) the extent of the student's
financial n eed and (2) the h arm or pot ential harm of a particular combinat ion of hours of work and hours of study
on a given student's h ealth or academic
progress.
(c) During p eriods n ot covered under
paragraph s (a) and (b) of this section,
a student may work up to 40 h ours per
week under the program.
submitted pursuant to this part may be
used only (1) to pay the Federal share
of compensation to eligible students employed in eligible Work-Study Programs,
and (2) to meet administrative expenses,
as defined in§ 175.2 Cb). The amount for
such administrative expenses may not
exceed 5 percent of that portion of the
Federal payments used for compensation
of students in work for public or private
nonprofit organizations other than the
institution itself.
(b) Interest, if any, earned on Federal funds shall be remitted to the Commissioner in accordance with instructions
issued by him.
§ 175.10
Nature and source of institutional share of student compensation.
(a) An institution may use any source
available to it to pay its share of the
compensation paid to students employed
under the Work-Study Program.
Cb ) No_ institution shall solicit or
permit any public or private nonprofit
organization with which it has an arrangement pursuant to § 175.4 (c) to
solicit from a student or any other person any fee, ·commission, or compensation of any kind, or the granting of a gift
or gratuity of any kind, as a consideration or a prerequisite for the employment of any particular student under the
§ 175.8 , Limitations on Federal share of program.
student compensation.
§ 175.11
Maintenance of level of e x penditures.
Ca) The Federal share of the comp ensation of students employed in any
Work-Study Progr am under an institutional agreement shall not exceed 80
percent of such compensation for parttime employment, except that in unusual
cases a Federal share in excess of 80
percent may be approved by the Commissioner, but only and to the extent
that he determines, pursuant to such objective criteria as m ay be established in
regulations, that a Federal share in excess of 80 p ercent is required to a chieve
the purposes of this part.
Cb) The Federal share of compensation for part-time employment shall be
calculated on the basis of the hourly rate
paid the student for actual time on the
job but such calculation shall not include
any compensation paid which is in excess of such maximum hourly wage rate
as may from time to time be set by the
Commissioner, or any costs of the employer's contribution to Social Security,
workmen's compensation, retirement, or
any other welfare or insurance programs
which m ay be paid by the employer on
account of a student employed under the
Work-Study Program.
§ 175.9
In each fiscal year during which the
institutional agreement remains in
effect, the institution shall expend (from
sources other than payments of Federal
grants under this part) for the employment of its students (whether or not in
employment eligible for assistance under
this part) an amount that is . not less
than the institution's average annual expenditures for such employment during
the three fiscal yearn preceding the fiscal
year f or which the institutional agreement is in effect.
§ 175.12
Coordination o f student finan cial aid programs.
In order to carry out the purpose of
the Work-Study Program, the institution shall provide for the coordination
of this program with other programs of
student financial aid, including the National Defense Student Loan and Educational Opportunity Grants P rograms
where the institution also participates
in such programs. Responsibilit y for t h e
gen er al conduct of the operation of the
Work-Study Program shall be assign ed
to an institutional official who h as other
student financial aid r esponsibility.
Minimum wage rate .
The minimum rat e of compensation
for a student employed under the Work. Study Progr am shall be
(a) $1.15 an hour for work p erformed
thr ough J anuacy 31, 1969;
(b ) $1.30 an hour for work performed
from Februa ry 1, 1969, through January 31, 1970;
Cc) $1.45 an hour for work performed
from February 1, 1970, through J anuary 31, 1971 ; and
(d) $1.60 an hour for work performed
thereaft er;
(e) Or such higher minimum wage as
may be required under any applicable
Feder al, State, or local legislation; except that the Commissioner m ay approve
a lower r ate of com pensation in cases
(1 ) wh ere a lower m inimum wage for
such emplbyees h as been established by
t he Secretary of La bor, un der the provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act,
or (2) wher e exceptional circumstances
warra.nt a lower rat e and,_where the ap§ 175.7 U se of funds.
proval of a lower rate is not precluded
(a) Federal funds m ade available on by law an d is consistent wit h and prothe basis of an app roved application motive of the purposes of this part.
FEDERAL REGliTER, VOL. 34, NO. 9 1-
TUESDAY, MAY
§ 175.13 In stitutional a g reement and application for f unds.
(a) Applica tions for Federal funds
under this part sha.11 be a pproved only if
there is in efl'ect an institutional agreemen t . Such agreement shall be executed
by an official of the institution wh o is
legally authorized to commit the institution.
Cb) Applicaltions for F ederal funds
m ust be submitted to the Commission er
by an authorized official of-the institu tion in such form and at such t ime as
the Commission er may prescribe.
§ 175.14 C1·iteria for approval of institutional a pplications.
· In order t o achieve equitable distribu -
tion of assistance a s required by section
446 of the Act, institutional applications
for the allocation of funds under this
program shall b e reviewed and approved,
in whole or in part, on the basis of, but
not limited t o, the following criteria:
(a) Whether the institution employs
under the program a large p roportion
of students f rom low-income families in
relation to the total number of n eedy
students employed under the program ;
p,
1969
�RULES AND REGULATIONS
(b ) Wheth er provision has been made
for effective administration of the program, including effective coordination
with · institutional and ot her Federal
programs of student financial aid ;
(c} Whether public a nd private nonprofit organizations, especially those engaged in health, education, welfare, and
rela t ed public service activities h ave
been included ;
(d ) Whether t h e institution has demonstrated a strong commitment t o enr oll
stu dents fr om low-income families, as
evidenced by Cl ) specialized recruitment
and admission, such as that provided
througli the programs of Talent Search
or Upward Bound, (2) remedial instruction, (3) specialized counseling, and (4)
any other relevant factors;
Ce ) The anticipated number of students t o be employed under this pr ogram as compa red to the institution 's
anticipated enrollment;
( f) The an ticipated average compensation of Work-Study students in rela t ion .t o the institution's average educational costs ;
Cg ) The instit ution's utilization of
Work-Study Progra m funds, if any, allocated in previous years ; and
Ch) The ins titution's total request for
Federal st udent financial aid funds (including Educa tional Opportunit y Grants
a nd Na tiqn al Defense St udent Loans)
in relation t o t he average cost of education at t he institution and t he institution's anticipated enrollment .
available for use by the institution dura subsequent grant period or be made
available for use by other eligible
institutions.
(c ) No w aiver. Neither approval of a ny
a pplication nor any payment of funds to
a n institution shall be deemed to waive
the right or duty of t he Commissioner to
withhold funds by r eason of failure of
the institution to observe, before or after
such a dministr ative action, any F ederal
requirement .
ing
§ 175.16
Fiscal proce dures, records, and
reports.
(a) F iscal procedur es. (1) The insti-
t ution sh all administer the Work-St udy
Program in s'ijch a m a nner as to provide
for an adequa t e system of intern al cont rols. Wherever practical, t he various a dministr ative responsibilities shall be divided so as to pr even t the handling of
all aspects of t he pr ogram by a single
individual.
(2) If a fiscal agent is utilized by the
institution, its func tion must be limited
solely t o t he perform ance of ministerial
acts. The responsibilities of the institut ion to m ake determinations relative to
the eligibility of students for employment under t h e program can not be
delegated.
(3) P a yments t o students sh all be
m ade at least once a mon t h . The institution is responsible for ensuring t h at
students are paid the full a mount of
wages earned under the program,
wh eth er the work is for the institution
§ 17 5.15 Paymen t and realloca tion of itself or for a public or private nongrant funds.
pr ofit organization.
(a) Payment of f unds. F unds will be
Cb) Records. The institution shall
made available in advance on t he basis maintain, on a current basis, adequate
of substantiated need and periodic fiscal records which reflect· all tra nsactions
reports submitted by the institution.
with r espect to the progra m, and shall
establish a nd m ain tain such gen eral le.d( b) Reall.ocation · of unused F ederal
funds. Any funds which are available to ger control accounts an d r ela ted subsidan institution but not used, or which t he iary accounts as are prescribed by the
institution agrees will not be used, by t h e Commissioner . Such records shall:
end of the period for which such f unds
(1) Meet a t lea.st the minimum standwere made available shall, in t he discre- a rds prescribed by the Commissioner as
tion of the Commissioner, either remain set forth in the most recent official Col-
7635
lege Work-Study Ma nual an d other official guidelines that m ay be issued from
time to time;
(2) Be ma intained in such a m anner
as to separately identify all pr ogram
transactions from ot h er institutional
funds and activities ; a nd
(3) Be maintained in such a m anner
as to be readily audita,ble. All records
pertaining t o activity durin g a given fiscal year , including a,pplications of studen ts for employment un der th e WorkStudy Progr am during th at fiscal year,
shall be r etained for a period of 5 years
following t h e end of the fiscal year, or
until audited by a representative of the
Commissioner, which ever is earlier. R ecords involved in a ny claim or expenditure questioned by th e Commissioner , or
on audit, sh all be retained until necessary adjustments have been reviewed
a nd approved by the Commissioner .
Cc) R eports. Institutions sh all submit
such r eports and information as the
Commission er m ay reasonably r equire in
connection with the administra tion of
the Work-S tudy J;>rogram a nd shall comply with such procedures as h e m ay find
necessary t o ensure t h e correctness and
verification of such r eports.
§ 175.1 7
Precedin g provisions n o t exhaus tive of jurisdiction o f the Commissioner.
No pr ovision of this part n ow or h ereafter prom ulgated sh all be deemed exhaustive of t he jurisdiction of the
Commissioner under the Act. The provisions of this part may be m odified or
further regulations may be issu ed hereafter as circumstances m ay warrant .
Dated: April 10, 1969 .
P ETER P . MUI RHEAD,
U.S. Commissi oner of Education.
Approved : May 7, 1969.
H . FINCH,
Secretary of Health,
Education, and W elfar e.
ROBERT
JF.R.
I
Doc. 69- 5667; Filed, M a y 12, 1969; 1
8 :45 a.m. J
,, .
,/
FEDERAL REGISTER, VOL. 34, NO. 9 1-TUESDAY, MAY 13, 1969
�SARAH LAWRENCE
ALUMNAE MAGAZINE
FALL/WINTER 1969
This Issue: Try to Shake Things Up With Your Dissent, by Teresa Baker '69
�Dolores Janiewski '70 comforts a member of the Fountain House, a schizophrenic rehabilitation center in New
York City. Therapy at Fountain House centers on activity, and social workers and interns join in the work. "I
do everything in the snack bar," Dolores said, "from
throwing out garbage to cleaning toilet bowls. I try to
help the members succeed at something. I'm frustrated
at times. It's hard always smiling, being kind and
considerate."
Dolores is one of 20 Sarah Lawrence students who
worked in the New York City Urban Corp intern program last summer.
�"Try to shake things up with your dissent," the deputy mayor of New York City was
speaking to an audience .of over 2,500 college students (20 of them from Sarah
Lawrence). It was June and the first day of the N.Y.C. Urban Corps' third summer
intern program.
We seemed a small group, filling only a fraction of Madison Square Garden's riew
and capacious Felt Forum. It was fiattering to hear Deputy Mayor Costello tell us
that in the course of this summer we should be able to "mobilize energy fast enough
to solve problems" and that he was interested in "immediate effects."
This was the spring of the Columbia riots, and this was three days after the assassination of Robert Kennedy. Yet he spoke with calm and with his psychologist's vantage
point; He said, "Young people do not always know how to handle their guilt." Dissent
as it existed at Columbia was not the only kind in Costello's eyes. He called for
another form of dissent, which we were to begin to use that day. Constructive dissent
was the phrase he offered, explaining, "the right to dissent may depend on how constructive it is."
Costello discarded implications that Columbia University was an isolated trouble
area. "As if a Columbia could exist outside New York City!" he said. If we wanted
to solve the problems of Columbia, he assured us that we had to also want to combat
the insistent troubles of New York City.
By Teresa Baker '69
TRY TO
SHAKE THINGS UP
WITH YOUR DISSENT,"
Most of us, I think, left that auditorium with glorious
expectations of what we would be accomplishing in the
summer. We had been dared to "shake up" the city government. With the summer now in the past, I can say
that, of those interns from Sarah Lawrence, several did
"shake things up," a little anyway. But many left the third
month feeling like they, not the government, had been
"shook up." Still, they were quick to say the experience
was worth it. And all 20 Sarah Lawrence interns were
anxious to describe what it was they found themselves
up against in their offices or agencies:
"I wondered how they got anything done; it's so slbw!"
"The one good person in our office is leaving."
lt was never clear what we were supposed to be
doing. "
"An awful lot of sloppy work!"
"No one knew what was going on."
"At times it frustrated the hell out of me."
I heard comments like these every week; it was my job
to listen to them. Working in the administrative office
of the Urban Corps, I talked with many interns, city administrators and community action workers.
Although they all would agree that the Urban Corps
was the best idea around for enlisting students in the
service of the cities, they knew it could be better. The
problems were many even within the understaffed, underfunded administration of the Urban Corps itself. For
some the greatest problem was to convince the office
they worked for that a college student was capable of
accomplishing something or that the office itself was
capable of doing more than it had.
Katy Ledford '71 was hired as a tutorial aide to work
in the South Jamaica branch of the Youth Services
Agency. When she arrived she found she would be doing
no tutoring. Leading bicycle outings was the main part
of her duties in entertaining about thirty neighborhood
children. "You weren't giving them anything useful," she
complained. " It isn't enough just to keep them busy.
One of the workers suggested training the older ones to
pass the civil service exams so they could get a job and
earn some money. That would be a good idea."
But the older ones weren't responsive, anyway, Katy
explained. They would say, "Ah, you can't do anything!"
The younger ones were "more open as people" according
to Katy. But the one tutorial aide in the office still couldn't
handle them. "All the kids sat on the floor, while everyone else walked around doing their work. It was so noisy.
1
�The Free Theater is about to perform on a street corner in Park Slope, a white ghetto in Brooklyn. The performers, all Urban Corps interns, played several shows a day all over the city. They pitched their im provisations to the mind of the particular audience to bring prejudice, especially racial, to the surface. Their concern was with the white m iddle class. They
hoped to get under attitudes by provoking reaction and then discussion. Here, the theater's leader and creator, Arnold
Middleman of New York University, has sounded his horn to start the show.
So they all just ran around. One of them was a pickpocket."
The program could have done something, Katy said ;
but it didn't. "My supervisor didn't care what we did
or whom we met, he didn't have to pay our salaries.
(They were paid through the offices of the mayor.)
So he didn't care. He said he didn't want any Urban
Corps workers. I couldn't talk to him about anything."
Katy would not criticize the form of the program, the
direct contact with the people. "But the actual workers
were so haphazard in their work." She remembered,
"They did do one good, thing. They picketed a grocery
store and the prices went down. The owner got really
scared."
Another office of the program Katy worked for was
on the corner of Second A venue and 118th Street in
Manhattan. Lorie Yarlow '70 worked there and found
that it was possible to do something. In a typical week,
Lorie and the four young neighborhood boys who made
up her team of paid helpers, conducted three or four field
trips. They took pre-schoolers to the Bronx Zoo, junior
high kids to tour NBC, and high schoolers to see the
show, "Walk Down My Street." It was a surprise to Lorie
that she found herself so comfortable on the blocks so
soon; she knew most of the children by name. But she
was not without her frustrations. She had to start planning trips two weeks in advance. If the transportation
was too complicated or expensive she had to cancel. Also,
all the children had to have signed parent permission
slips to go. They had to leave behind anyone who lost or
forgot them or whose parents wouldn't sign them.
2
Janice Simpson '72 found frustration of a different
sort. Hers was also a Youth Service office. But it had
nothing to do with the neighborhood children, except
accidentally. In fact, "There really wasn't enough to keep
me busy," Janice said.
For Bonnyeclaire Smith '69, who worked for Head
Start, there was plenty to do. Her objection was to how
it was done. Community Life Centers Incorporated, a
Black agency funded by Head Start, was missing the boat
in her opinion. "My big gripe is that, OK, so they're doing
a lot ; there is always a big improvement in the kids, like
even 200 per cent. But they could improve much more
by gearing more toward Black culture. Make the classroom more relevant to Black people."
Bonnye saw that they were "actually excluding Black
culture" by avoiding the use of any picture or anything
that reflected clear racial identification. Her other complaints described the common bureaucratic trials. "Too
many kids. The chairs don't fit under the tables. A woman
who is getting her masters in education bought all the
materials. She also got this blackboard that you couldn't
write on. All sorts of things like that made for an uneasy day."
Brumas Barron '71 suffered even worse bureaucratic
tribulations, although she worked for an extra-governmental project. It was the Free Theater of New York,
the brainchild of a New York University student who
managed to get government funding. The Free Theater
performed on the busiest street corners of Manhattan,
the Br_onx and Brooklyn to large, standing audiences.
They chose white neighborhoods, because their message
�Top left : Karen Gilbert '69 at the New York City T heatre
Workshop where 100 children worked all winter preparing
for summer productions.
Bottom left: Joan Griffin, graduate dance student, coordinated the production of a movie about Brooklyn's P ark Slope.
The filmmakers used crowd reaction io the free Theatre and
the institutions of Park Slope to help develop an awareness
of the problems faced by it and similar communities in the
city.

Upper right: A string of tennis shoes flies from a street lamp
on the block where Janice Simpson '71 managed a "Youth
on Wheels" office. She dispensed bikes for planned outings
of the various Street Corps groups.
Lower right ; (left to right) Barbara Huvumaki '69, Eli
Hausknecht '70, Judy Parker '70, and Teresa Baker '69 were
among the Urban Corps interns who had summer jobs in
the offices of the mayor, city agencies and organizations.
The program which the City of New York began three years
ago is designed to provide students with an opportunity to
learn about city government by doing actual work, provide
a source of financial assistance to students, and attract them
to public service.
3
�"Our program wasn't just a bandaid. ... This was a little more, like mercurochrome maybe. It was stinging anyway, and it was doing something."
was for the white middle class. The only black faces
around were always those of three of the performers.
They hoped to bring prejudice, especially racial, out into
the open with their provocative shows. They usually succeeded easily; then they would move into the crowd and
start talking about justice, the flag, and Negroes. These
interns found they could truly "shake things up."
The problems Brumas had were not from within the
organization, but from without. It was her task to secure
permits from the Department of Commerce and Industrial Development for every show, usually two a day. Not
uncommonly, the group didn't know whether it could
perform at a location until the day of the performance.
"One day," she said, "I walked into the Department.
The man I was to see was talking to a cop about our
group. He said, 'I really don't know what's wrong with
this group we haven't had any trouble with any other
group in the city.' The cops just didn't know what to do
with our group. So they created trouble by delaying the
permits. They would say, 'Why do you want to go into a
community like that? Why don't you go into the Black
community and keep them busy?' " Brumas has an answer, "What do we have to tell Blacks about injustice?"
The police were suspicious of the Free Theater because
it had people yelling in the streets at each performance.
At one point in the show, the group asks for an audience
vote on whether or not to shoot the black performer who
is wrestling on the ground with a white performer. A
plant in the crowd starts shouting, " Kill him, kill him!"
The ice broken, the rest of the crowd then starts saying
what they really think. The performers spread into the
excited audience and turn the reactions into dialogue.
It was an amazing thing to watch. As Brumas said, "Our
program wasn't just a bandaid as Barry Gottehrer (an
aide to Lindsay) has said most of the summer programs
are. This was a little more. Like mercurochrome maybe.
It was stinging anyway, and it was doing something."
No o~her interns were as successful as the Free Theater
at "shaking things up," But Nancy Jervis '69 and the
film crew she worked with also found that it was possible
to really accomplish something. The crew was composed
entirely of Urban Corps interns. Together they produced
a film about the Phoenix Houses of New York City where
addicts work things out in a community atmosphere. "We
lived in the house for awhile first and really got to know
the place. Addicts are just people with a particular kind
of problem. They are very sensitive to the ills of our
society. They are very articulate. We narrated the film
through the voice of an addict."
The usual red tape plagued this group, too. "We spent
a whole week talking to people in the agency so that we
wouldn't step on anyone's toes," Nancy said. B-qt that
4
was more understandable to her than the time that they
couldn't get any film. "We were renting equipment that
costs thousands. We were out of film and lost a whole
day of shooting time simply because we had to buy it
through one store with a city contract. The store couldn't
get it to us in time for some reason."
Joan Griffin; graduate dance student, helped with
the coordination between the film crew and the people
in the agency. She became so sold on the importance of
the work of the Phoenix House that she now plans to use
her dancing as a rehabilitative tool. She is hoping to teach
there on a part-time basis during the school year.
Another house, the Fountain House, a schizophrenic
rehabilitation center, had two Sarah Lawrence interns.
Shoshanna Zwickelberg '70 and Dolores Janiewski '70
joined the "members" in two of their business enterprises,
the thrift shop and the snack bar. Therapy is activity
there, and the Urban Corps interns joined in the work.
"I do everything in the snack bar," Dolores said, "from
throwing out garbage to cleaning toilet bowls. I try to
help the members succeed at something. I'm frustrated
at times. It's hard always smiling, being kind and considerate. We have to learn how to do these things so we
can teach the others."
Shoshanna noticed that "the emphasis of the place is
on extroverting people," something which she believed
Sarah Lawrence could use too. To improve Fountain
House, both girls suggested more structure, more staff,
and more young people with the necessary enthusiasm.
The calmer Urban Corps jobs and the least frustrated
interns were found in the American Museum of Natural
History. They didn't have the chance to "shake things
up," but they did get incomparable experience in their
fields of interest. "Between what I do and the people I
meet, I mean, what could be better?" said Cynthia Goddard '71 . Her research for a curator of Asian ethnology
gave her fresh insights into a recent sociology paper she
had written on the structure of the Negro family, and it
has inspired her to pioneer in the field of urban anthropology.
Nadine Seltzer '69 was also attracted by the people at
the museum. "Scientists are fascinating people who are
fascinated by the mind. And every other scientist is a
musician here." In the ichthyology department, Nadine
reclassified the skeletons of dry fish. "I really got a feeling of what an academic atmosphere is. It's not like the
real world. It's relaxed."
Barbara Havumaki '70 had a position similar to those
at the museum. Working for the Metropolitan Regional
Council, she researched everything from air and water
pollution to recreation and open space to jet noise. "It's
�Brumas Barron '71 prepares to accompany the Free Th eatre
on her tambourine.
Lorie Yarlow '70 organized and conducted cultural and
recreational activities for the neighborhood children around
her N ew York Street Corps Office at 118th Street and Second A venue. The City's Youth Service Agency runs the
program in 27 poverty areas.
a very relaxed and constructive atmosphere here," she
said. "Terrific people. They get a lot done. Constantly
on the ball. As a result of this job, I've given a lot of consideration- to going into government."
The Metropolitan Regional Council is a speciallyfunded, new organization and not actually part of the
government of New York City. The girls who did research for regular government offices found it less exciting, but still worthwhile.
As Judy Parker '71 put it, "The actual work was often
very boring, but I was finding out about government.
At least I felt I was doing something constructive. It's
important to be doing work for people who need it."
Judy worked for the Mayor's Commission o~ Physical
Fitness and the Urban Adion Task Force. Her office
ran a program called "Broadway in the Streets" which
brought movies and entertainers into ghetto neighborhoods for free. Some had criticized the program as just
a diversion, but Judy reasoned, "New York City is an
entertainment center, yet there are millions of people
who have never seen a show. Entertainment is a really
good thing for people who have bad lives."
" T he whole Task F orce serves as a problem
squelcher," Judy went on, " but it also enables the people
to be heard and then their problems to be acted upon."
She added that the job had been a great opportunity for
her to see what government is and could be.
Karen Gilbert '69 also fou nd herself doing boring
work, but staying on because she believed so much in
the program she was with. She worked in the office of the
New York City T heater Workshop which trained and
directed 100 children in a full stage production. "It was
the greatest thing I've ever participated in. Those kids
had been in intensive training all winter. They were so
disciplined, it gave me inspiration."
The jobs these Sarah Lawrence girls did are fairly
representative of the variety available through the Urban
Corps. Each intern applies for a position according to
his interests. He qualifies through the Federal workstudy
program on his campus. Among the other kinds of internships were psychiatric aides and lab technicians in
hospitals, announcers and researchers for a city radio
program, interviewers for the Urban Coalition, community workers for the Model Cities program, and legal
aides for community legal services.
Mayor John V . Lindsay has commented nationally
that the Urban Corps could take 10,000 more students
into New York City immediately. He has backed the
program as an alternative to military service. With the
money and the Congressional support, it could ·happen.
5
�REPRINTED WITH P E RMI SS ION BY
URBAN
CORPS
NATIONAL
DEVELOPMENT
2150 BROADWAY
NEW YORK , N. Y, 10007
OFFICE
�NATIONAL
DEVELOPMENT
OFFICE
2 !5 0 BROADW A Y
NE W YORK, N. Y . 10007
The effectiveness of an Urban Corps depends in large part upon
the perceptions of the participating students themselves.
During the
summer of 1968, 20 students from Sarah Lawrence College took part
in New York City's Urban Corps, and one of them, Teresa Baker, wrote
this article
on their experiences with the city.
Miss Baker had a bird's-
eye view of the entire program from her internship position in the Urban
Corps program development office.
A native of Denver , Colorado, Miss Baker received her B. A.
from Sarah Lawr e nce College in June , 1969.
Miss Baker, 21, w as editor of her college newspaper, an editorial
assistant in the Sarah Lawrence Office of Publications and Publicity, and
a t utor in the Upw ard Bound Program .
She w ill be atte nding the Columbia University School of Journalis m
in S e ptember, 1969.
Addit i o nal copie s of this reprint are available upon request.
�URBAN §Vational GJVews
CORP
JUNE - JULY 1969
The National Program - - A PROGRESS REPORT
The Urban Corps National Development Office was established in the fall of
1968 under a grant from The Ford Foundation to serve as a catalyst for the establishment of local Urban Corps programs
in cities throughout the nation, and
through this vehicle to create new and
viable relationships between the academic
community and our urban centers.
This initial period of our operations
has been devoted to exploring the feasibility of implementing Urban Corps in a
wide variety of communities and in developing a series of reports documenting
and examining the concept and technology of the Urban Corps.
Our success in this pursuit may now be
measured in terms of concrete accomplishments:
- - - Our initial pilot group of eight
cities has blossomed into more than 15
operating Urban Corps programs in every
part of the nation.
- - - Federal officials, including the Secretary of Health, l;ducation and Welfare
and the Commissioner of Education, have
enthusiastically endorsed the Urban
Corps concept as a valuable method of
both serving the needs of the city and the
colleges - and providing our nation's
young people with an opportunity to
constructively participate in the resolution of the urban crisis.
- - - Institutions of higher education
and regional organizations have begun to
move actively towards the development
of new forms of academic curricula, involving not only courses and lectures but
also the opportunity to test theory
against the realities of the outside world.
In several cases the local Urban Corps is
se r ving as the test-bed for this develo pment.
(conti nued on page 2)
NUMBER5
EDUCATION CHIEF URGES CHANGE IN
WORK-STUDY PRIORITIES
U.S. Commissioner of Education James E. Allen, Jr. has called for an increased commitment of Federal work-study funds to programs which reflect the concern of today's
college population for "an education geared to realities."
OE ALLOCATES $23.4-MILLION
IN ADDITIONAL CWSP FUNDS
The nation's colleges and universities
will share an additional $23.4-million in
College Work-Study Program funds,
thanks to a supplemental allocation just
announced by the U.S. Office of Education. The new money brings the total
allocation o'f CWSP funds for the six
month period ending December 31, 1969
to $102,662,178, an increase of nearly
twenty-five per cent over the previously
announced Work-Study levels.
The supplemental grants are the result
of a re-allocation of CWSP funds originally allocated for use during 1968 and
unexpended by the participating colleges
as of December 31st of last year. The new
money is being distributed primarily to
colleges in those states which suffered
most heavily from the low level of the
initial CWSP funding for the JulyDecember 1969 period. Generally, institutions in those states which received less
than 70% of the amount recommended
by the regional CWSP panels have been
granted enough additional funds to bring
them up to that level. Schools in states
which already received all or nearly all of
their recommended funding will not share
in the supplement.
The largest supplemental grant went to
California, which received $3.7-million in
additional funds, increasing its allocation
from 44% of t he level approved by the
regional panel to 70%.
The University of California at Berkeley will receive the nation's la rgest CWSP
grant of $879,898, with $320,012 coming from the supplement.
Speaking at the opening session of the
Atlanta Service-Learning Conference, Dr.
Allen said that young people have reversed the traditional concepts of success,
putting the pursuit of goals beyond the
self" before monetary rewards. "Today's
youth is as bored with fou r-wall abstractions as it is with materialism," the
nation's education chief told the more
than 200 delegates to the conference. He
said that education must extend beyond
the confines of the campus, to give students the sort of first-hand experience
they now demand.
Dr. Allen applauded the Urban Corps
as a way to inject reality testing into the
present academic structure. He called for
major changes in the College Work-Study
Program to facilitate the development of
programs for the constructive involvement
of college students in important urbanrelated activities. Observing that most
work-study funds are now used fo r the
employment of students in work on their
college campuses, Dr. Allen said that he
would like to see this situation reversed,
with the bulk of work-study resources
being used to help the nation's communities resolve their most pressing problems.
Dr. Allen also called fo r an examination of techniques for the effective integration of new people into existing organizations on a short-term basis, and for the
exploration of programs combining community service with academic credit.
"The need," Dr. Allen concluded, " is
to concentrate on ways of helping the
young to real ize the potential of thei r
new sense of purpose and spirit for
service."
�URBAN CORPS NATIONAL NEWS
Published by the Urban Corps National
Development Office under a grant from the
Ford Foundation.
June-July 1969
Number 5
Michael B. Goldstein
Director
Anna Beranek
Editor
250 Broadway
New York 10007
Telephone: (212) 964-5552
PROGRESS REPORT
(continued from page 1)
- - - Dozens of cities have expressed an
interest in adopting the Urban Corps concept, and a number of state governments
have begun to offer coordinating and resource services for those of their cities desiring to develop such a program.
- - - Hundreds of copies of each of the
reports issued to date by the National
Office are in use by cities and universities
throughout the nation, and each issue of
the National News now reaches more
than 5,000 persons (up from an initial
press run of 200 in the early s'pring).
Remaining ahead is the expansion of
the Urban Corps concept to every major
Urban Center, the development of "spinoff" programs intimately involving the
cities with the academic community,
completion of the documentation of the
Urban Corps ex perience and method ology, and an analysis of the success,
techniques and impact of the various
Urban Corps programs throughout the
nation .
The Urban Corps National Development Office is programmed to conclude
it s effort in the spring of 197 1. At that
time it is our sincere ho pe that t~e Urban
Corps will hav e proven it self a viable and
valuab le program fo r the nat ion and its
people.
- - - Michael B. Goldstein
Director
2
VVUnl'\•;:,1 uu I ni;;uuLM,
,u,w.,
After more than four years of operating under unofficial guidelines, the U.S.
Office of Education has promulgated a
set of Regulations governing the College
Work-Study Program. The new Regulations, effective June 13, 1969, together
with the legislative requirements of Title
IV-C of the Higher Education Act of
1965 (as amended) provide the legal
framework for all CWSP programs,
whether involving work for the college
itself, or off-campus (such as an Urban
Corps). The CWSP guidelines, embodied
in the 1968 College Work-Study Program
Manual, remain in effect as the official
interpretation of Federal law. It should
be note-d-:---however, thatthe new
Regulations modify certain aspects of the
program, so that the guidelines as currently issued do not completely conform.
Conflicts must be resolved in favor of the
Regulations.
The most noteworthy changes caused
by the new Regulations concern the
increased emphasis upon off-campus
work relating to public service activities,
especially in the health, education and
welfare areas. The Regulations also provide specific guides for the full -time
employment of students attending summer school or other "non-regular"
courses, and recognize for the first time
the legal right of an institution to delegate to an outside agency (e.g. an Urban
Corps) the ministerial tu nctions of adm inistering an off-campus work-study p rogram, such as payroll · processing and
on-going supervision. The., Regulations
specifically reserve to the institutions the
sole power to determine the eligibility of
students for CWSP awards.
(continued next column)
More than seventy upperclassmen
attending units of the City University of
New York have been working part-time in
city agencies as part of a new seminarexperience program in urban government.
Each of the students is enrolled in the
seminar at his college, and spends ten
hours a week on a high-level assignment
within a municipal agency. Weekly seminars are augmented by monthly meetings
of all the participating students, with top
urban officials discussing the problems
and prospects of the city.
The students in each seminar often
concentrate.,or.i .a-specific geographic part
of the city, permitting an interchange of
ideas and perceptions concerning the various services, resources and needs of the
community. Although the students receive no pay for their work, they do
receive academic credits for the successful
completion of the program.
The seminar-experience program is administered jointly by the City Administrator's office and the City University,
under the direction of Depu ty City Administrator Philip Finkelstein and Dr.
Robert Hi rschfeld of Hunter College.
The Regulations were published May
13, 1969 in Vol. 34, Number 9 1 of the
Federal Regist er at pages 7632-7635 and
will appear in Title 45 of the Code of
Federal Regulations (CF R) at Part 175.
Copies of the new CWSP Regulations,
togethe r with an ·analysis and finding Iist
keyed to the CWSP Manual, are available.
from t he Urban Corps National Development Office.
Alumni Journal Tells Urban Corps Story
The Fall/Winter edition of the Sarah Lawrence College Alumnae Magazine carries a
lengthy article on the exploits of twe nty Sarah Lawrence students who participated in the
New York City Urban Corps during the su mmer of 1968. Written by an undergraduate,
Teresa Baker, who herself served in the program, t he well-illustrated article examines the
rewards and frustrations t he girls experienced during three months with the city. The gi rls
worked in a wide variety of assignments, from tutoring children and working with addicts
to researching t he problems of air and water pollution. They tell of their encounters with
government bureaucracy, and their own perceptions of the effectiveness of thei r
experience.
Repr int s of the article are available without charge from the Urban Corps Nat ional
Development Office, 250 Broadway, New York, N.Y. 10007.
�NEW HAVEN URBAN CORPS
LAUNCHED
ATLANTA URBAN CORPS TO
TEST "SERVICE-L EARNING"
Mayor Richard C. Lee has announced the formation of a New Haven Urban Corps to give
th e Connecticut city "an opportunity to benefit from the enthusiasm, energy and idealism of our young people."
Lee said that the program will assign students to "meaningful and creative jobs" in a
wide variety of city activities, including health, public safety, education and recreation.
The Mayor said that the students wil I work in administrative, research and evaluative
capacities, under the supervision of regular city employees.
Mayor Lee also announced the appointment of Alan Trager, a 22-year-old city planning student, to serve as coordinator of the new program. A former V 1STA volunteer and
program planner, Trager previously participated in an effort to involve city planning
students in local poverty programs.
Festivities Mark Urban Corps Openings
During the month of June more than a
dozen cities throughout the nation formally launched their Urban Corps programs. Here is a sampling of the opening
events.
Atlanta - More t han 200 students attended the opening session of the Atlanta
Service-Learning Conference. They heard
Atlanta Mayor Ivan Allen and U.S. Commissioner of Education James Allen, Jr.
urge the development of program s geared
t o t he needs of today's youth.
Detroit - The Motor City welcomed
its Urban Corps students with a reception
o n t he grounds of Mayor Jerome Cavanagh's offic ial residence. The Mayor welcomed t he group of 100 students, and
spent over an hour discussing the city's
problems and prospects with them.
Mayor Kevin Wh ite greeted
severa l hund red Urban Corps students in
ceremonies at Boston's new award-winni ng City Hal l. He stressed t hat t he potential learning ex perience of a summer in
the city is just as import ant as t he work
they w ill be doing.
Boston -
Minneapolis - Urban Corps students
,wo rking in t he Min nesot a city spent a full
day getting acquai nted wit h their hostemployer. Mayor Arthur Naftalin, in his
fin al official address after eight years in
City Hal l, called upon th e st udents to
direct th eir t alents towards improv ing
their community. City Coordi nator
Thom as Thompson discussed t ransit
problems in th e Tw in Cit ies area, and a
panel of city offic ials and civic leaders
participated in a series of ro und-tabl e discussions on specific local problems. The
students were gu est s of the city at a
luncheon at the Minneapolis Ath let ic
Club.
New York · - More than a thousand
Urban Corps students heard Deputy
Mayor Timothy W. Costello urge them to
"shake things up" through what he
termed "constructive dissent." "Action
Summer", a motion picture on the Urban
Corps, was shown at this opening event.
From The Editor ...
The National News is designed to serve
as a vehicle for the interchange of ideas
and developments in the growth of Urban
Corps student involvement programs, and
indeed in the entire area of the urbanacademic interface. We hope that by
spreading an understanding of the
concept, benefits and technology of the
Urban Corps we will be serving t o stimu1ate t he growth of these programs
througho ut the nation.
This issue of the National News .marks
two important mileposts in our rather
short existence : distribution to every
major c ity and institution of higher education in the nation, and a new format
permitting both en larged content and
easier reading . Indeed, t his issue has been
delayed due to the need to adapt our production facilities to "mass produvtion."
We will resume monthly publication with
the August issue .
Thanks to the generous support of the
Ford Foundation, we are able to circulate
t he Na tional Ne'ws without charge. Requests fo r new swbscriptions and/o r additional cop ies should be addressed to Anna
Beranek, Edito r, Urban Corps National
News, Room 1410, 250 Broadway, New
York, N.Y. 10007. We of course invite
y our comments and suggestions for
future issues.
The Atlanta Urban Corps has been
selected to serve as a "practical laboratory" for the development of a broadbased urban-academic involvement effort
in the Atlanta area.
The Atlanta Urban Corps will work
with the recently organized Atlanta Service-Learning Conference to test new ideas
and concepts designed to involve students, faculty and practitioners in arrangements providing both valuable
services to the community and relevant
learning experiences for the participants.
The Atlanta Service-Learning Cqnference is designed to bring together
agencies, institutions, organizations and
individuals interested in the relationships
between service experience and higher
education, combining their resources in
"an exploration and development ot a
concept u a I framework and practical
model for service-learning programs." The
Conference will operate for a nine-month
period, examining the various elements of
the service-learning concept, from
curriculum design and service potentials to
financ ial resources and inter-institutional
relationships. Conference meetings are
planned on a regular basis, with monthly
reports of the results of detailed examinations of each element.
The Atlanta area is considered a hospitable one for this type of experimentation due to its unusual diversity of organizations and institutions, coupled with a
tradition for innovative local development. More t han· 30,000 students attend
Atlanta's eleven colleges and universities,
a nd most of the "socially-relevant"
Federal agencies, such as HEW, HUD and
the Peace Corps have regional headquarters in the city.
The Conference is being sponsored by
the Southern Regional Education Board
(SREB) , a public agency of 15 Sou thern
states created by interstate compact to
assist in the development of higher education and the fostering of soc ial and
economic growth in the Southern region.
Information on the Conference may be
obtained from Mr. Wi lliam Ramsay,
Director, Resource Development Project,
Southern Regional Education Board, 130
Si xt h Street N.W., Atlant a, Georgia
303 13. Area code (404) 872-3873.
3
�URBAN CORPS AROUND THE NATION
(All programs are operational unless otherwise noted)
•AKRON
Richard Neal
Youth Coordinator
City-County Building
219 South High Street
Akron, Ohio 44308
(216) 376-1431
•CLEVELAND
Robert McAuliffe
Manager of Recruitment,
Placement and Training
Personnel Department Room 120
601 Lakeside Avenue
Cleveland, Ohio 44114
(216) 694-2635
•ALBUQUERQUE
John Cordova
Director
Model Cities Program
P.O. Box 1293
Albuquerque, New Mexico 87103
(505) 243-8661
ATLANTA
Sam Williams
Di rector
Atlanta Urban Corps
30 Courtland Street
Atlanta, Ga. 30303
(404) 024-8091
Estimated size: 250
BOSTON
Roblin Williamson
Director
Boston Urban Corps
City Hall
Boston, Mass. 02101
(617) 722-4100
Estimated size: 300


COLUMBUS


Frank Cleveland
Director of Youth Opportunity
Office of the Mayor
City Hall
Columbus, Ohio 43215
(614) 461~384
DAYTON
S. Henry Lawton
Director
Dayton Urban Corps
Third and Ludlow Streets
Dayton, Ohio 45402
(513) 222-3441
Estimated size: 130
DETROIT
Carroll Lucht
Director
Detroit Urban Corps
City-County Building
Detroit, Mich. 48226
(313) 965-3992
Estimated size: 150
BUFFALO
Peter Fleischmann
Director, Council on
Youth Opportunity
City Hall
Buffalo, New York 14202
(716) 854-1022
Estimated size: 40


CI NCINNATI


Barry Cholak
Youth Coordinator
Office of the City Manager
Room 105, City Hall
Cincinnati, Ohio 45404
(513) 421 -5700
•EUGENE
Hugh McKinley
City Manager
City Hall
Eugene, Oregon 97401
(503) 342-5221


INDIANAPOLIS


Robert D. Beckmann, Jr.
Director of Public Information
Office of the Mayor
City-County Building
Indianapolis, Indiana 46204
(317) 633-3371
NEW HAVEN
Alan M. Trager
Director
New Haven Urban Corps
185 Church Street
NewHaven,Conn.06510
(203) 772-3460
Estimated size: 20
NEW YORK
Martin Rose
Director
New York Urban Corps
250 Broadway
New York, New York 10007
(212) 566-3952
Estimated size: 3000
NEW YORK METROPOLITAN REGION
(Outside New York City)
Elayne Landis
Associate Director
Metropolitan Regional Council
155 East 71 Street
New York, New York 10021
(212) 628-6803
Estimated size: 50
MADISON
Charles F . Reott, Jr.
Director
Personnel Department
City-County Building
Madison, Wisconsin 53709
(608) 266-4422
Estimated size: 20
MINNEAPOLIS
Babak Armajani
Director
Minneapolis Urban Corps
City Hall
Minneapolis, Minn . 55415
(612) 330-2293
Estimated size: 60
SAN FRANCISCO
Thomas P. Nagle
Director
San Francisco Urban Corps
City Hall
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
(415)-558-5930
Estimated size: 25


SANJUAN


Franklin D. Lopez
Special Aide to the Mayor
City Hall
San Juan, Puerto Rico
(809) 725-6775
ST. LOUIS
John Maier
Director
St. Louis Urban Corps
303 N . 12th Street
St. L ouis, Missouri 63101
(314) 621 -4827
Estimated size: 175
SYRACUSE
Frank T. Wood, Jr.
Director
Executive Department
Division of Research and
Development
County Office Building
603 South State Street
Syracuse, New York 13202
(315) 477-7645


TOLEDO


Charles Buckenmeyer
Youth Coordinator
Office of the Mayor
City Hall
Toledo, Ohio 43624
(419) 255-1500
TRENTON
Jerry Miller
Program Developer
Model Cities Program
City Hall Annex
Trenton, New Jersey 08608
(609) 394-3242
Estimated size: 50
WASHINGTON, D.C.
Marcia R. Kunen
Deputy Director
Program Coordination Unit
Office of the Mayor
1329 "E" Street NW
Washington, D .C. 20004
(202) 628-6000 Ext. 3495
Estimated size: 125 (Dec. 1969)
• program in advanced stages of developmen t
Urban Corps National Development Office
250 Broadway
New York, New York 10007
NON-PROFIT ORG .
U.S. POSTAGE
PAID
NEW YORK . N .Y .
PE AMIT NO. 22
Hon. Daniel Sweat
Assistant to the Mayor
Ci ty- Hall
Atlanta, Georgia .3030.3
~346
�STATE-BY-STATE ANALYSIS OF CWSP GRANTS
JULY 1, 1969 - DECEMBER 31, 1969
SOURCE: U.S. OFFICE OF EDUCATION REPORTS
State
1969
ALABAMA
ALASKA
ARIZONA
ARKANSAS
CALIFORNIA
COLORADO
CONNECTICUT
DELAWARE
D. C.
FLORIDA
GEORGIA
HAWAII
IDAHO
ILLINOIS
INDIANA
IOWA
KANSAS
KENTUCKY
LOUISIANA
MAINE
MARYLAND
MASSACHUSETTS
MICHIGAN
MINNESOTA
MISSISSIPPI
MISSOURI
MONTANA
NEBRASKA
NEVADA
NEW HAMPSHIRE
NEW JERSEY
NEW MEXICO
NEW YORK
NORTH CAROLINA
NORTH DAKOTA
OH10
OKLAHOMA
OREGON
PENNSYLVANIA
RHODE ISLAND
SOUTH CAROLINA
SOUTH DA KOT A
TENNESSEE
TEXAS
UTAH
VERMONT
VIRGINIA
WASHINGTON
WEST VIRGINIA
WISCONSIN
WYOMING
GUAM
PUERTO RICO
VIRGIN ISLANDS
$ 2,576,668
133,844
856,363
1,869,023
10 ,220,954
1,488, 121
1,224,327
141,163
905,839
2,767,480
1,897,108
399,495
401,491
3,933,688
1,744,989
1,409,829
1,186,820
1,713,068
1,970,513
599,761
1,082,731
5,182,142
3,536,808
2,150,169
2,238,181
2,254,088
2,249,413
800,480
212,879
544,196
2,326,422
910,077
7,060,948
3,348,490
567,424
3,523,585
1,418,51 4
2,531 ,756
3,827,699
443,338
1,043,836
565,648
2,752,225
5,568,463
798,666
288,364
1,358,592
2,067,502
1,199,597
2,645,802
334,412
66,472
313,615
9,100
1968
$ 1,782,172
65,321
711,477
1,573,204
7,455,118
1,120,927
1,018,~m1
173,893
338,233
1,957,226
1,293,104
240,587
332,887
3,848,506
1,457,736
1,194,601
978,994
1,579,372
1,648,010
478,974
853,114
3,507,862
2,907,969
1,568,109
1,573,392
1,716,345
1,860,429
756,785
153,690
367,343
2,023,512
604,861
5,719,414
2,877,249
400,788
2,898,890
1,190,013
2,026,828
4,232,789
319,420
828,989
392,232
2,255,468
4,712,246
735,646
212,317
979,497
1,487,133
1,102,732
2,041,511
212,134
37,861
349,289
10,080
$ 102,662, 178
$82, 196,284
TOTALS
Change 1969 % of 1968
144.5%
204.9
120.3
118.8
137.0
132.7
120.2
81.1
267.8
141.3
146.7
166.0
120.6
102.2
119.7
118.0
121.2
108.4
119.5
125.2
126.9
147.7
121.6
137 , 1
142.2
131.3
120.9
105.7
138.5
148.1
114.9
150.4
123.4
116.3
140.7
121.5
119.2
124.9
90.4
138,7
125.9
144.2
122.0
118.1
108.5
135.8
138.7
139.0
108.7
129.6
157.6
175.5
89.5
90.2
124.8
�SCHOOLS RECEIVING LARGEST CWSP GRANTS
July 1 - December 31, 1969
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11 .
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
SCHOOL
CITY
AMOUNT 1
University of California at Berkeley
Boston University
San Jose State College
Northeastern University
Oh io University
University of Montana
Montana State
University of Washington
Michigan State University
San Diego State College
University of Minnesota
Un iversity of California at Los Angeles
Central YMCA Junior College
Portland State College
Oregon State
University of Oregon
Rutgers University
Harvard
Bishop
University of Utah
Mississippi State University
University of Alabama
Miami-Dade Junior College
Yeshiva University
Oh io State University
Indiana University
Columbia University
University of Missouri
Wilberforce
Temple University
Berkeley, California
Boston, Massachusetts
San Jose, California
Boston, Massachusetts
all campuses
Missoula, Montana
Bozeman, Montana
Seattle, Washington
. fast L~nsirig, __Michigan
San Diego, California
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Los Angeles, California
Chicago, Illinois
Portland, Oregon
Corvallis, Oregon
all campuses
(New Jersey) all campuses
Cambridge, Massachusetts
Dallas, Texas
Salt Lake City, Utah
all campuses
University, Alabama
Miami, Florida
New York, New York
al I campuses
all campuses
New York, New York
Columbia, Missouri
Wilberforce, Ohio
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
$879,898
787,227
765,597
741,759
686,007
657,951
655,992
622,877
_6~)_2.,.695
586,646
558,286
554,483
546,558
535,160
531,660
512,078
505,806
503,860
499,367
498,546
496,016
461,515
460,835
456,686
455,982
450,700
442,628
431,000
345,206
329,615
ENROLLMENT 2
28,863
23,011
26,975
34,831
21,858
6,655
6,888
30,357
38,758._ _
22,355
58,304
29,070
3,826
9,479
13,319
15,207
30,319
19,135
1,598
18,488
9,114
13,236
23,326
5,528
42,206
47,806
17,459
20,945
914
33,824
Sources
1Work-Study R_ep-orts No . 29 (4'/18/69 ) ; Supplement No. 1 (5/5/69); Supplement No. 2 (6/6/69); U .S. Office of Education
2 Education Directory, 1968-1969, U .S. Offi ce of Education
WORK-ST UDY MANUAL REVISED
The U .S. Office of Education has issued a set of revi sion pages to up-date the 1968
College Work ,Study Program Manual. Copies of t he replacement pages, and a new "Model
Off-Campus Agreement" which incorporates provi sions more suited to the requirements
of an Urban Corps, are available from any regional office of the U .S. Office of Education
or from the College Work-Study Program Branch , Bureau of Higher Education , U.S.
Office of Education, Washington, D.C. 20202.
PER CAPITAGRANT
$ 30
34
28
21
31
98
95
20
15 .
26
9
19
142
56
39
33
15
26
312
26
54
34
19
82
10
9
25
20
377
9
�_ __-::.-1---- _...:;
ATLANTA URBAN CORPS
DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE
FINAL REPORT
.
I.
I
f
SUBMITTED BY:
INMOND L. DEEN, JR.
DIRECTOR OF FINANCE
AUGUST 22, 1969
�INDEX
Page:
I.
Introduction
i. .
II.
Funding
2.
A.
Contributions
2.
1.
2.
2 •
3.
4.
III.
IV.
Background Information
Southern Regional Education Board, Resource
Development Project
Summary
Recommendations
2.
. 3.
4.
B.
City of Atlanta Governmental Departments
6.
C.
Non-Profit Organizations, Governmental Departments,
and Governmental Agencies
8.
D.
College Work Study Program
9.
Payroll
_g.
A. - Procedure
11.
B.
Volunteers
12.
C.
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare,
College Work Study Program Division Guideline
13.
1.
2.
3.
13.
Proof of Compensable Hours Worked
Proof of Receipt of Payment
Recommendations
13.
13.
Contracts
15.
A.
Agency Contracts
15 .
B.
College and University Contracts
15 .
C.
Educationa l A dvisor Contracts
16.
D.
U r ban Co r ps - Library Theatre Contract
17 .
i.
�V.
Atlanta Urban Corps, General Fund Account
18.
A.
Balance Sheet as of July 31, 1969
18.
B.
Balance Sheet as of August 14, 1969
19.
VI.
Statement of Revenues and Expenditures
20,
VII.
Summation
21.
Appendix - Previous Departmental Reports
22.
I
ii.
�I.
Introduction
William Faulkner stated when he accepted the Nobel Prize for Literature in Stockholm, Sweden on December 12, 19 50, "I believe that
man will not merely endure: he will prevail. 11
The City of Atlanta, Atlanta Urban Corps, constitutes an effort toward
this end, and it is realized that in seeking to implement noble and lofty
concepts many obstacles must be overcome and many frustrations must
be endured.
The Department of Finance has in many estimation overcome many obs tacles and endured many frustrations. It is my belief that the effort
is not in vain.
The information contained in the following pages is presented in an
effort to increase efficiency, lessen the probability of a repetition of
errors, and contribute to an overall impro vement in administration.
1.
�~ --_,,._...___ ____ .----·----- ·-'"
II.
Funding
A. Contributions
1.
Background Information
In March, 1969, efforts were begun to solicit funds from the
private sector of the business community. Richard N. Speer,
Jr., Bill Adams, Dave Whelan, and Marcus Dash, all students at the Georgia Institute of Technology, obtained the
support of Dr. Edwin D. Harrison, then President of the Georgia Institute of Technology. Dr. Harrison met with Mr. Harold Brackey, President, Rich's Inc., and Mr. Al Bowes of
Arthur Anderson and Company, arid past president of the Chamber of Commerce. Messrs. Brackey and Bowes provided
substantial support to the Urban Corps; Mr. Brackey by verbal and written endorsement; Mr. Bowes by supplying
counsel in the person of Mr. David Hauser, a gentleman
well versed in fund raising.
Over all I feel that the efforts Qf Rich Speer, Bill Adams,
Dave Whelan, and Marc Dash produced amazing results in
view of the many liabilities they found, some of which follow,
to wit:
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
T_he late date at which efforts were begun,
The fact that most budgets had been drawn,
The fact that taxes had recently been paid,
The fact that only a limited amount of time could be
expended, and
Most importantly, the fact that the Urban Corps was
unknown and in reality nothing more than an idea.
During the summer months while the program was in full operation, a low priority was placed on the solicitation of funds.
The soundness of this decision, I feel, is debatable. None the
less it must be said that fund raising conducted after the consummation of the Summer Program will have certain advantages, some of which are the experience gained, the wide-spread
exposure through the mass media, and, of particular significance, the record compiled by students, i.e. the results achie ved .
'-
2.
Southern Regional Education Board, Resource Development
Project
M r . Bill Ramsey, Director of the R e sour ce Development Pro j ect, Southern Regional Education Boar d , donated T w enty
2.
�~.
• • •t
·-
.~. ~
·--·
-

-

Thousand Dollars {$20,000.00} to be used for the development
of an internship program in Atlanta. He stipulated that the money be used, 11 • • • • • to increase opportunities for college
students to have service-learning experiences related to community development and to their educational and personal
growth. 11
3.
Summary
A concerted effort was made by Rich Speer, Bill Adams, Dave
Whelan, and Marc Dash. The effort was successful and com- .
mendable.
The support provided by Mr. Bill Ramsey, Director, Resource
Development Project, Southern Regional Education Board, constitutes a major portion of the total budget and to a large extent
served as a catalytic agent making it possible for the idea to
become reality.
Contributions rec e ived a nd the ir status as of August 21, 1969,
are as follows, to wit:
Allen Foundation {l)
500.00
$
Ame rican T e l e phone and T e legr a ph Co. {6)
1,000.00
Atlanta Transit Compa ny {6)
250.00
B a rnes R eal Esta t e {l)
1,000.00
C & S Bank (1)
1,000.00
Coca Cola Company {l}
1,000.00
100. 00
Cousins Prop e rty, Inc. {6)
Delta Airline s (1)
500.00
Dull, J a m e s E . {4)
10. 00
First N a tion a l B a nk {2)
1,000.00
Franklin Foundation (1)
250 . 00
Garson Fund (1)
250.00
Georgia Powe r Company (1)
1,000.00
N a tiona l B a n k of G e or g i a (1)
250.00
P a rke r, W. A. (4)
50 . 00
P a tillo F ound a t ion {1)
200 . 00
R e sourc e Deve lopment Project , S. R. E. B . (7)
20,000 . 00
R i c h 1 s (1)
1, 000 . 00
S ear s Ro e buc k Found a tion ( 5)
1,000 . 00
Southern B e ll (1)
1,000 . 00
Spe rry & H u tchin s o n C ompa n y (6)
25 0 . 00
1
Stern Founda tion (D a n Sweat s offic e } ( 3 )
1, 000 . 00
3.
�Thorpe Brooks (1)
University of North Carolina (1)
TOTAL
(1)
(2)
(3)
( 4)
(5)
(6)
(7)
$
50.00
440.00
$33,100.00
Deposited.
Encumbered - used or to be used to pay for intern participation in the Atlanta Servic e -L earning Confe r e nc e .
Encumbered - used or to be used for payment of $250
each to Rich Spe e r, Bill Adams, D a v e Whelan, a nd
Marc D a sh for s e rvices rendered prior to the c r e ation
of the Urb a n Corps as a Division of t h e Office of the
M a yor.
Encumb e r e d - u se d or to b e us e d t o p a y a p a rt of the ex pense incurred in providing trips to Stone Mounta in
for Decatur-D e kalb Y. M. C. A. Day Camp educable
mentally r e tarded children.
Encumber e d - us e d or to b e us e d to compens a te Arthur
P e llman p er contr a ct t q direct the Urb a n Corps - Libr a ry
Theatr e .
Receive d but not yet d e posited.
Seven Thous a nd Doll a rs ($7,000.00) r e c e ived and d e posite d, Thirte e n Thous a nd Dolla rs ($13, 000. 00) c ommitted
but not y e t re c e ive d.
It is my o p inion a t this t i me tha t a ppr oxim ately O ne Hund re d
Thousand Dolla rs ($100, 000. 00) is a r e alistic a moun t t o s e ek
and exp e ct to r e c e i ve from the p rivat e sector of the Atl anta
busine ss commu n ity for the upc o m i ng y ear .
4.
R e comme nd atio n s
a.
b.
c.
Complete, a ccurate, d etaile d, and e asily a cc e ssible r e cords shou ld b e main t aine d r e cor ding each contac t mad e
and t h e resp o n s e r eceive d.
As an exampl e see Ap p e n d age A , a s u mmar y o f a pre liminary disc u ssio n.
The b l ack b u siness community has a stake in this city
and a proportiona t e responsibility. A list of possible
suppor t ers whom I fee l should b e c ontacted is attached
and lab e l ed Append age B.
Loc al businessmen have a greater stake and interest in
Atlanta than any other possible source of funding . It is
my opinion tha t the degree of involvement by loc a l businessmen is dir ectly correlatable to the soundness of the
4.
�program, the acceptability to the public at large, and
consequently the overall success of the Atlanta Urban
Corps.
For this reason, I feel a major effort should be made to
transform the potential into reality.
d.
Specifically, I feel that an individual should be employed
and given the responsibility of concentrating on this area
alone. The cost is negligible in comparison to the product.
The relationship between Atlanta Urban Corps and the
businessmen who have thus far provided support should
be nurtured and cultivated. Satisfied supporte rs provide an enormous supply of good will and visibility.
5.
�B.
City of Atlanta Governmental Departments
An ordinance by the Finance Committee, adopted by the Board of
Aldermen of the City of Atlanta on the 19th day of May, 1969, provided:
BE IT THEREFORE ORDAINED BY THE MAYOR AND BOARD
OF ALDERMEN OF THE CITY OF ATLANTA that Article III,
Volume II of the City Code is amended by adding a new section
thereto appropriately numb e red as follows:
"Section 2-63: There is hereby created in the Office -of
the Mayor, a division known as the Atlanta Urban Corps.
The Mayor or his duly appointed representative has the
duties and responsibilities for maintaining and administrating this division and the interns employed therein.
The Mayor shall have authority and responsibility for
entering into contracts with universities for College
Work Study Program positions; non-profit organizations,
other governmental units, and non-governmental organizations for the employment of interns. Said contracts
shall be ratified by the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen . .
A copy of the above mentioned and quoted ordinance is attached
and label e d Appendage C •
A Resolution by the Finance Committee and Budget Commission,
adopted by the Board of Aldermen on the 16th day of June, 1969,
provided for the transfer of Fifty Two Thousand, Six Hundred and
Five Dollars ($52,605.00) to the Atlanta Urban Corps account.
This transfer of funds represents the amount committed by the City
of Atlanta to the Atlanta Urban Corps. A copy of the above mentioned Resolution is attached and labeled Appendage D.
'
Without the financial, logistical, and consultory support provided
by the City of Atlanta , the Atlant a Urban Corps quite obviously
would not have reached fruition.
Student inte rns and th e governme ntal departments to which they
were assigned are as follows :
Mayor's Offic e
M. Berk
Bloom
J. Br uc e
w.
Lib r a r y
R. Brow n
K. Hatche r
J . He rr ing
6.
Wate r Works
R. Child re ss
D . D ra g a lin
M. F rie dman
�--...------··
t
Ingram
Moore
McCrary
Wright
Owens
D. Gilbert
J. Hill
W. Kemp
L. Keyes
R. Lynes
J. Wilcox
P. Johnson
D. Christenberry
T. Fleming
J. Snider
T. Isaac
J. Martin
J. Menez
M. Woodward
N.
M.
A.
D.
S.
Finance
M. Bodor
D. Harvey
M. Irby'
C. Liang
M. Mangham
W. Millkey
T. Snider
J. Walsh
Sanitation
F. Benfield
C. Caskey
R. Combes
A. Deluca
J. Elman
F. Goodson
J. Hotard
S. Lester
G. Myles
B. Snooks
P. Stansbury
R. Toney
W. Travis
J. Uffelman
Kennes a w
R. Bracken
A. Miller
N. Norbert
S. Pickard
M. Silber ste in
R. Simmons
S. Tucker
Parks &: R ec reation
C. Choke
C. Davis
K. Dunlap
P. Durrah
J. Fle mister
M. Floyd
E. Henderson
C. McElroy
J. Ste phens
City Attorney
J. Hollenbach
Motor Transporta tion
M. Winston
Business Lic e nse
J. Waggener
Aviation
W. Collier
J. Tumlin
Tr a ffic
H. Nash
Community R e l a tions
F. Flowe rs
7.

--
Purchasing
R. Brown
C. Wheeler
Personne l
R. C ar roll
A. Mayeaux
Housing Con£.
E. Whigham
Planning
M. Howeedy
�C.
Non-Profit Organizations, Governmental Departments, and
Governmental Agencies
Thirty Two (32) contracts or agreements were entered into between the City of Atlanta, Atlanta Urban Corps and non-profit
organizations, governmental departments, and governmental
agencies who agreed to employ student interns and to reimburse
the City of Atlanta, Atlanta Urban Corps for a part of the monies
expended for salaries and administrative costs.
An accounting of the funds received, and outstanding as of the
21st day of August, 1969, is as follows, to wit:
AGENCY:
OUTST ANDING:
Academy Theatre
American Cancer Society
Atlanta Girls Club
+;ass . 00
Atlanta Youth Council
Atlanta YWCA
Boy Scouts of Ame rica
Center for Research in Social Change
250. 00
Community Council of Atlanta Area
Decatur-Dekalb YMCA ($12 5 per for 5 weeks)
Department of Justice (Immigr ation)
342. 00
Easter Seal Rehabilita tion C e nter
E. O. A. (2 a t $880; 2 at $250)
d , a68 . 00
Family Counseling Center (Child Service)
Fulton County Government
250. 00
Fulton County Health D epartment
5,400.00
Gate City D a y Nursery Assoc.
·Georgia Easter S eal Socie ty
Grady M e tro Girls Club
Hardee Circle Arts The atre
300. 00
Kirkwood Christian C enter
Literacy Action Foundation
250. 00
M ennonite House
Phyllis Wheatle y YWC A
Saint Vinc ent d e Paul Society
Sarah D. Murphy Homes
Southern Consortium for Int. Education
2 50 . 00
South er n Council on International & Public Affairs
Southwe st YMCA
SRE B, Atlanta S e rvic e -L e arning Conferenc e
2 50. 00
Urb a n L a b in E duc a tion ($5 0 p e r )
150 . 00
Vine City Child Development Center ($50 per)
Wheat Street Baptist Church ($ 50 per)
188 . 007
$ :1.4 ,: QSiiL 6'0
,,""1.,
8.
00
RECEIVED:
800.00
500.00
1,750.00
~
1.So , 00
250.00
250.00
500. 00
750.00
500.00
2. '2.. loO . Oo
500.00
1,000.00
250.00
250.00
450.00
1,000.00
250.00
250.00
500.00
250.00
250.00
2,000.00
25 0 .0 0
50.00
i 00.00
$ lsa , 7S 0 , 0 0
\ \ C\ '?> tou .u o
�Of the Fourteen Thousand and Fifty Two Dollars (14,052. 00)
outstanding, Twelve Thousand, One Hundred and Sixty Dollars
($12,160. 00) is owed by three organizations. They are:
1.
2.
3.
Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council. A requisition for Four Thousand, Two Hundred and Fifty
Dollars ($4,250.00) payable to the City of Atlanta,
Atlanta, Urban Corps was submitted to the City of
Atlanta and approved August 20, 1969.
Economic Opportunity Atlanta. Mr. William W. Allison, Director yyas reminded in a letter dated August
14, 1969, that Two Thousand, Two Hundred and Sixty
Dollars ($2,260. 00) is due and payable.
The Resource Development Project, Southern Regional Education Board contracting for itself and as
agent for the Fulton County Health Department. Mr.
Bill Ramsey, Director stated that payment in the amount
of Five Thousand, Six Hundred and Fifty Dollars
($ 5, 650. 00) is being processed.
9.
�D.
College Work Study Program
A total of twenty-one (21) colleges and universities contractually
agreed with the City of Atlanta, Atlanta Urban Corps for the employment by the city of certain of their students, certified cer tain students for the College Work Study Program and agreed to
reimburs e the City of Atlanta in the amount of Eighty per cent of
the gross pay received by certified students.
A schedule entitled Accounts Receivabl e - C. W. S. P. and labeled
Appendage Eis attached and contains individual information relating to each college or university, to wit:
1.
2.
3.
Gross pay earned by certified C. W. S. P. student interns
for each bi-weekly pay period, through August 4, 1969,
The C. W. S. P. share for each bi-weekly pay period
through August 4, 1969 (the amount due and payable to
the City of Atlanta), and
The amount received for each bi-weekly pay period
as of August 21, 1969
Statements have been mailed to all colleges for all bi-wee~ly
pay periods excluding the August 18 and August 22 periods which
will be combined, with the following exceptions:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Mo rehouse College - pay period ending July 21, 1969.
Dekalb College - pay period ending July 21, 1969.
Georgia State College - pay period ending August 4, 1969.
Morehouse College - pay period ending August 4, 1969.
West Georgia College - pay period ending August 4, 1969.
Georgia Institute of Technology - pay period ending
August 4, 1969.
The six above mentioned stateme nts should and are expected to
have been mailed by no later than August 25, 1969.
The statements for the joint pay periods ending August 18, 1969,
and August 22, 196 9, should and are e x pected to have been mailed
by no later than September 1, 1969 .
10 .
�Ill. Payroll
A.
Procedure
Payroll disbursements were made on a bi-weekly basis as follows:
Time period ending:
June 9
June 23
July 7
July 21
August 4
August 18
August 22
Disbursement date:
June 18
July 2
July 16
July 30
August 13
August 27
August 27
One disbursement for the bi-weekly pay periods ending August
18, 1969, and August 22, 1969. The said August 27, 1969, disbursement will be contingent upon the submission 1:y each intern
on August 22, 1969, and upon the approval of the Evaluation Staff
of individual intern reports.
The following instructions regarding pay periods, time ca1:ds, and
disbursement dates are contained in a memorandum which was distributed to all interns:
Time cards must be turned in to Steve Mwamba or Mac Rabb
in Room 7 of the Audit Department in the basement of the Atlanta City Hall, 68 Mitchell Street, S. W. , by 12: 00 noon on
the last day of each pay period in order for the payee to receive compensation on the above listed dates of disbursement.
Supervisors should anticipate the number of hours interns will
work between 12: 00 noon and the close of business on the last
day of each pay period and include it on the time cards.
Pay checks for interns assigned to agencies other than Governmental Departments of the City of Atlanta are to be picked
up between the hours of 12: 00 noon and 5: 00 p. m. , on the above
listed dates of disbursement in the Atlanta Urban Corps office,
30 Courtland Street, N. E. by agency supervisors or their designated representative, who present to the Payroll Auditor
written authorizations from each payee represented .
11.
�B.
Volunteers
Individuals who agreed to work as volunteers and who are to receive
Two Hundred Dollars ($200. 00) as compensation for their services
were paid One Hundred Dollars ($100. 00) on July 16, 1969, and will be
paid One Hundred Dollars ($100. 00) on August 27, 1969.
It is felt that this method served to encourage the volunteer in that it
permitted him to receive some monetary r eward for his services
prior to the conclusion of the summer program. It further has the
effect of providing protection to the Urban Corps in the event that the
volunteer re signs prior to the conclusion of the summer program~
Payment at the beginning of the program would have left the Urban
Corps without protection from financial loss should the volunteer
resign. Payment at the conclusion of the program could conceivably
while affording protection to the Urban Corps have imposed a burden
on the volunteer and would not have contained the incentive factor
inherent in the split payment method.
12 .
�C.
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, College Work
Study Program Division Guideline
In order to comply with guidelines as set forth by the Department
of Health, Education, and Welfare, C allege Work Study Program
Division , the following procedure was inaugurated.
1.
Proof of Compensable Hours Worked
a.
A certified statement mailed to each participating college or university having College Work Study Program
students includes inform a tion relating to each student .
as follows :
(1)
(2)
(3)
( 4)
( 5)
b.
2.
·,
Name,
Wage rate.
Total number of compensable hours worked during
the immediately preceding pay period,
Gross pay r e ceived for the immediate ly preceding
pay period, a nd
Gross pay received to date.
Time cards signed by e a ch student and his imm~diate
supervisor certifying that a particular number of hours
were wo r ked by the student wer e mailed to the student's
colle g e or unive rsit y in insta nc e s whe r e the student w a s
enrolled in the C allege Work Study Program.
Proof of Receipt of Payment
Each e mployee was r e quir e d to pick up in p e rson his pay che ck
or to give w r itten a uthori zation to the i n dividua l w h o p icke d up
the check. In the former situation the individua l was requir e d
to give written certification of rec e ipt. In the l a tter situa tion
the authoriz e d individual w a s required to c e rtify r e c e ipt of a ll
p a y che cks rece ive d .
3.
R ec o mme n d a tions
a.
At pres e nt, billing college s require s a manua l t ran s fera nc e of i11for m a t i o n fr o m computer p r intout s which
are gr oup e d acc o rding t o w o rk l oc a tion, t yping of t h e
bill, and checking o f the figur e s. The city gav e u s the
option of h a ving the p r intouts gr oupe d e ither by work
l oc a tion or school. S ome o ne c hos e to have t h e i nterns
. This is of
g r ouped e i ther by w o rk location
little value to my I? e par tment as age ncy (work loc a tion =
13 .
I
i
�agency) financial arrangements are handled by contract.
If the problem of separating CWSP interns and non-CWSP
interns can be overcome ( if the city can be sold on the idea)
the computer printouts could be certified and mailed to
the coll e ges. This would eliminate three steps and at the
same time reduce the probability of errors. This system
would, however, involve the inconvenience of sorting pay
checks and grouping them by City Department and agency.
Less time and effort are required to sort pay checks than
to manually transfer the required inform a tion. In my estimation, this should be done at the ear lie st date possible.·
b.
The procedure regarding proof of payment is onerous and
burdensome. The interns, justifiably, do not like it. I
feel HEW should be made aware of the unpalatable nature
of the guide line necessitating this procedure and a request
for relief made.
14.
�- -------
IV. Contracts
A.
Agency Contracts
All contractual agreements between the City of Atlanta, Atlanta
Urban Corps and non-profit agencies, governmental departments,
and governmental agencies have been fin a lized and are on file in
the Department of Finance, City of Atlanta, City Hall, 68 Mitchell
Street, S. W. , Atlanta, Georgia.
B.
College and University Contracts
All contractual agreements between the City of Atlanta, Atlanta
Urban Corps and colleges and universities have been finalized
and are on file in the Department of Finance, City of Atlanta, City
Hall, 68 Mitchell Street, S. W., Atlanta, G e orgia. The said
college and university contracts embody the agreements reached in
relation to funding originating in the Department of Health, Education,
and Welfare, C allege Work Study Program Division.
15.
�C.
Educational Advisor Contracts
Contracts have been entered into between the City of Atlanta, Atlanta
Urban Corps, and Carl Wieck, Patrick Ntokogu, Roger Whedon,
Barbara Rudisill, and the Georgia Institute of Technology - Roger
Rupnow. The said individuals agreed to act as Educational Advisors
to the 1969 Urban Corps Project; and to perform duties including
but not limited to job visita tion with the interns and agency supervisors, planning and conductit1g education seminars for small
groups, as well as all interns, working in coordination with the
field evaluation staff to insure job relevancy and educational signi- ·
ficance of the program for each intern.
For the performance of the duties as outlined above, the City of
Atlanta agreed to pay each Educational Advisor One Thousand
Dollars ($1,000.00).
16.
�D.
Urban Corps - Library Theatre Contract
A contract between the City of Atlanta, Atlanta Urban Corps and
Arthur Pellman was executed. The contract provides in essence
for the service of Arthur Pellman as Director of the Urban Corps Library Theatre for a period of not less than ten weeks; and for the
receipt by Arthur Pellman of One Thousand Dollars ($1,000.00)
as compensation for the above stated service; said compensation
to be paid by the City of Atlanta.
17.
�--------------

ATLANTA URBAN CORPS, GEN ERAL FUND ACCOUNT
BALANCE SHEET
July_31, 1969
· Expenditure s
Account Number
Title
G-25-62
P artitioris
646.00
646.00
G-25-500U
Mileage
500.00
15. 00
G-2 5-62-830
Salaries
170,115.00
86,412.08
G-25-62-7140
Telephone
600.00
0
· 600. 00
G-25-62-7600
Postage
150.00
0
150. 00
G-25-62-7610
Printing and Reproduction
500. 00,
62.24
853.40
{415. 64)
G-25-62-7700
Office Supplies
1,000.00
171. 80
450.43
378.49
G-25-62-8100
Rentals
400.00
210. 00
50.00
140. 00
Appropriation
Encumberances
Balance
0
485.00
83,782.92 .
�......
ATLANTA URBAN CORPS, GEN ERAL FUND ACCOUNT
BALANCE SHEET
August 14, 1969
Account Number
Title
Appropriation
G-25-62
Partitions
646.00
646.00
0
G-25-500U
Mileage
500.00
281. 70
218. 3 0
G-25-62-830
Salaries
88,212. 08
82,447.3 9
Encumberances
170,195. 00 -
Expenditures
Balance
/
G-25-62-7140
Telephone .
600.00
298.75
3 01. 2 5
G-25-62-7600
Postage
150. 00
150.00
0
G-25-62-7610
Printing and Reproduction
500.00
902.23
(464.47)
G-25-62-77 00
Office Supplies
G-25-62-8100
Rentals
1,
62. 24 .
ooo. 00
171. 80
450.43
378.49
400.00
210. 00
90.00
100. 00
�VI.
ATLANTA URBAN CORPS
STATEMENT OF REVENUES &: EXPENDITURES
August 21, 1969
REVENUES:
City of Atlanta
C.W.S.P.
Contributions
Non-profit Agencies
RECEIVED:
ANTICIPATED:
$52, 605.00
8, 771.12
1'9 , 6:1::8 . 66 1.o ,,oo ,,u
12,750. 00
0
64,344.88
13,000.00
14,052. 00
TOT AL REVENUES
TOTAL:
$52,605.00
73,116.00
32 , 616 . eo
26,802.00
$ 1~ 8, 133.
QQ
,,,- .s1~ . oo
EXPENDITURES:
Intern Salarie s
Oper ational E x p e nses
Educational Advisors
Non-Intern Staff
PAID:
ANTICIPATED:
TOTAL:
$115,268 . 25
2, 819.11
4,000.00
4,932.70
$ 54 ,926.75
444. 04
1,000.00
392.30
$170,195.00
3,263.15
5, 000.00
5,325.00
TOTAL EXPENDITURES
SURPLUS
2 0.
$183,783.15
~'\ 1\ oo .u
�VII. Summation
In matters of Finance, it is absolutely essential to maintain accurate,
complete, and easily accessible records. Every effort should be made to
achieve this end.
Prior to mid July, 1969, this department was plagued by senseless mistakes, inadequate secretarial support, a nd troublesome inefficiency.
The acquisition of Patty Harwell, whose competence is remarka ble and
whose willingness to work is admirable, eliminated the problem of inadequate secretarial support and made it possible to reduce inefficiency..
E'arlier mistakes, inefficiency, and an almost total lack of secretarial
support had a pyramiding effect which resulted in the depletion of many
valuable hours and had the end result of causing a pronounced reduction
in positive achievement.
Given a more efficient operation and the consequent increase in unconsumed man hours a great deal could have been accomplished in the area
of fund raising.
Absent senseless mistakes, e.g. an absurdly inaccurate listing of students
accepted and placed, a much better cash-flow ratio could have been maintained.
There is no justification for a repetition of the same mistakes.
In closing, I feel Patty Harwell, James Rabb, and Steve Mwamba
should be commended for their diligence, competence, and ability to
withstand frustration.
Inmond/
Dir ec t o1 · of Fin a nc e
Atlanta Urban Co r ps
21.
�--
. -·-
..;
.
.
APPENDIX
22.
�r.~ - ·- . ,--.
!'
-
ATLANTA URBAN CORPS
DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE
To: Sam Williams, Director, Atlanta Urban Corps
From: Inmond L. Deen, Director of Finance, Atlanta Urban Corps
Re: ~nitial Report on the Department of Finance
Date: July 2, 1969
�I.
The payroll sche d u l e for e mploye e s of the Atlant a Urba n Corps is set forth
in a memorandum {la b e led App e ndag e 11 A 11 ) which has been distributed to
all interns.
Individuals who agr ee d to work as volunt ee rs and w ho are to r e ceive $200. 00
as compensation for their s e rvices will b e p a id $ 100. 00 on July 16, 1969 7
and $ 100. 00 on Aug ust 27, 1969. It is felt that this method will serve to
encour a ge the volunteer in that it p e rmits him to rec e ive some monetary
reward for his ser v ices prior to the conclusion of th e summe r program. It
further has the e ff e ct of providing protection to the Urban Corps in the
event that the v olunte er r e si g ns prior to the conclusion of the summer program. Payment a t the be g inning of the program w ould le a v e the Urban
Corps without protection from fina ncial loss should the volunte e r re-sign.
Payment at the conclusion of the prog ram could conceivably, while affording
protection to the Urb a n Corps, impose a burd e n on the volunt e er and w ould
not contain the incentive f a ctor inhe r ent in the split payment method.
II.
In order to comply with guid e lines set forth.by the D e partme nt of H ealth,
Education, and W e lfa r e , Coll e ge Work-Study Progr a m Division, th e following proc e dure has b een inaugurated:
A.
A c e rtifie d st a t e m e nt (la b e l e d App end ag e 11 B 11 ) will be m a iled
to each p a rtic i p a ting college or univer sity h a ving Colle ge
Work-Study Prog ram stud e nts employe d by the Atla nt a Urban
Corps. The s t a t e ment w ill includ e informa tion rela ting to
each student a s follows:
1.
Name.
2.
Wage rate.
3.
Total num b e r of comp e ns a ble hours worke d during the
immedi a t e ly prec e din g p ay p e riod.
4.
Gross pay r e ceived for the imme diately prec e ding p a y
period, a nd
5.
Gross p a y r e ceive d to date.
B.
Time c a rd s (l a b e led App e nda ge 11 C 11 ) s i g n e d by e ach stud e nt a nd
his imme di a t e s up e r v isor c er tifying tha t a p a rticula r numb e r of
hours we r e w o r k e d by t h e s tud e nt w ill b e mail e d to the s tud e nt's
college o r u n iver sity in i n sta nc es w h ere the student i s enr oll e d
in the Coll ege Work-S tudy P r ogra m.
C.
Eac h emp l oyee i s requi re d to pic k up i n p ers o n h is payc he c k
o r t o give wr itt en a ut h o rization to t h e i n d ividu a l w ho will p i ck
up the c heck. I n the fo rmer sit u ati on the i ndividu al is required to give wr i tten c ertification of re c eipt. I n the latter
situation the author i zed individ ual is required to certify receipt
�Page 2
July 2, 1969
of all pay checks receivedo
(See Appendages "D" and "E".)
III•
A bookkeeping system has been designed and is tentatively scheduled to
become operative on July 10, 19690 The system will consist of the maintenance of the following Journals and Ledgers:
Ao
General Journal- -posted daily Monday through Friday prior
to 9: 15 a. m. listing all monies received and all liabilities
incurred the preceding dayo
B.
Cash Receipts and Disbursements Ledger--posted twice . weekly
recording the flow of capital.
c.
General Ledg e r--posted twice weekly containing separate
accounts for:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Office equipment,
Offic e supplies,
Payment r e ceived from agencies as contracted for,
Payment received from educa.tional institutions as contracted for,
P ayment received in the forin of grants and donations
from foundations,
Payment receive d in the form of grants and donations
from the private busines s sector,
Utilities, and
All other necessary accountso
D.
Individual Earnings Records--posted bi-weekly.
E.
Petty C ash Records --maintained by Sam Williamso
Inmond Lo Deen, Jr.
Director of Finance
Atlanta Urb an Corps
�ATLANTA URBAN CORPS
DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE
To: Sam Williams, Director, Atlanta Urban Corps
From: Inmoncl L. Deen, Jr., Director of Finance,
Atlanta Urban Corps
Re: Departmental Report
Date: July 16, 1969
�I
j
I.
After repeated efforts to r e solve the unusually perplexing situation surrounding compensation for VISTA volunteers assigned through the Southern Regional
Education Board to the City of Atlanta, Atla nta Urba n Corps, little has been
accomplished. R e sponsibilitie s, however , have b een d efined, to wit:
A. VISTA volunteers will rec eive bi-weekly s upplern.e nt s from the
City of Atlanta, Atlanta Urban Corps in a1nounts determinable
by multiplying th e total numb e r of compe nsable hours worked
by each intern during the preceding pay period by either . 07, . 47,
or . 77, depe nding upon the individuals educational level.
B.
Volt T e chnical Corpora tion, a subsidiary of Volt Informa tion
Science s, Inc., 795 Peachtree Street, N. E., Suite 63 0, Atlanta,
Geor gia , a priva te corporation unde r contract with VISTA to
provide administrative and logistical financial support, will
dispe rse on a wee kly basis the VISTA share of VISTA volunteers
pay.
C.
The City of Atlanta, Atlanta Urban Corps supplement plus the
VISTA share will closely a ppro xima te that rece ive d by all .othe r
interns of a co1nparabl e e duc a tiona l l e v e l.
D.
Carol Lim, Volt Technical Corpora tion, phone 876-635 4, has
b ee n designate d as the repr ese ntative of her co mpany to h andl e
inquiries from VISTA Voluntee rs assigned to the Urban Corps
rega r ding compens a tion from VISTA.
II.
The p r oc e dur e outline d in se ction II of this D e p artment' s initia l report, da t e d
July 2, 1969, regarding College -Work Study Pro g ram guidelines is proving
satis fa ctory.
III .
The book keeping system o u tlined in Section III of thi s .Department's initial
rep<;>rt is now in operation and is relatively effic i e nt . Improve ment is ne e de d
in this area. As a b are minimun1 the followin g i s n e cessary:
A.
B.
Working space (a v a ilable for p a yroll a uditors )
Freedom f r o m unnecessary inte rruption s and confu sion
�r · - :-- .. --·-
1.
Mr. W. Walton Clarke, First National Bank of Atlanta, was talked with on
July 10, 1969. He agreed on behalf of the First National Bank to donate
One Thousand Dollars ($1,000.00) to the City of Atlanta, Atlanta Urban
Corps.
Mr. Charles S. Marvin, A. T. &T., was talked with on July 9, 1969.
Mr. Marvin indicated an interest on the part of A. T. &T. to make a donation to the Urban Corps. He suggested that I call his immediate supervisor,
Mr. Tom Koneig, on July 14, 1969, and arrange a conference. Mr. Koneig
was ill. However, his secretary set up a conference for July 22, 1969 at
10:00 A. M.
Mr. Plemon Whatley (Junior at Harvard) , employed by A. T. &T. and
assigned to E. O.A., was talked with on or about July 1, 1969, and has
reported to Mr. Marvin that he feels the Urban Corps is deserving of a
donation.
·A.T.&T. 's offices in Atlanta are located at Room 1831, The Hartford
Building.
In general, Finance has been plagued by senseless mistakes, inadequate
secretarial support, and troublesome inefficiency.
At this time the addition of Dianne Wilson to this Department in a somewhat elusive position is not, in my opinion, justifiable either in cost to
the Urban Corps er in increased efficiency.
The above mentioned recommendation, if followed, will provide the
neede d spac e m e ntione d in Section III, A, above and will eliminate the
need for close supervision and will, to som.e extent, provide relief from
unne ce s sa ry con£ us ion and inefficiency.
�AT LANT A URBAN CORPS
DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE
To: S a m Williams, Director, Atlanta Urb a n Corps
From: Inmond L. D een, Jr., Dir e ctor of Finance,
Atlanta Urban Corps
Re:
Dep a rtmenta l Report
D a t e : Augu s t 1, 1969
�~ - -- ~-
I. Payroll
The payroll system is functioning satisfactorily.
ment:
Two areas need improve-
A.
At present, billing colleges requires a manual transferance
of information from computer print outs which are grouped
according to work location, typing of the bill, and checking
of the figures. The city gave the option of having the print
outs grouped either by work location or school. Someone
chose to have the interns grouped by work location. This is
of little value to my Department as agency (work location=
agencies) financial arrangements are handled by contract.
If the problem of separating CWSP interns and non-CW·SP
interns can be overcome {if the city can be sold on the idea)
the computer print . outs could be certified and mailed to
the colleges. This would eliminate three steps and at the
same time reduce the probability of errors. This system
would, however, involve the inconvenience of sorting pay
checks and grouping the m by City Department and agency.
Less time and effort are required to sort pay checks than to
manually transfer the required information. In my estimation, this should be done if the city and the Urban Corps
maintain their present relationship.
B.
The procedure outlined in section II, C, of my report
dated July 2, 1969 is onerous and burdensome. The interns,
justifiably, do not like it. I feel HEW should be made
aware of the unpalatable nature of the guide line necessitating this procedure and a request for relief made. I
intend to a ct a ccordingly. We were fortunate on the July
30, 1969 disbursement dat e . Only one problem of any significance arose: a staff m ember told Andrea Fry e , a volunteer, she would receive $100 on July 3 O. The "culprit"
had not the authority to make the decision. Nonethe l ess,
we will p a y her and Young Hughley at their convenience
after 12: 00 o'clock noon 8/1/ 69.
II. College Billing
The college billing system will work adequa tely. Colleges will be billed
{bills mailed) today for amounts owe d as of July 2, 1969 . They will be
billed August 5, 1969, for am ounts owed as of July 30, 1969. The August
13th, and August 27th, billings will be no problem. The September 10th
billing should not be a problem but the mechanics have not been worked out.
�2
III. Agency Payments
Non-profit agencies in which A UC interns are plac e d have contractually
agreed to employ the student and to pay a part of the student's salary
ranging from 100% to 00%. On Wednesday, August 6, 1969, prompting of
agencies who have not fulfilled their contractual obligations will be commenced.
IVo
A.
Contracts
Agency Contracts
EOA was delayed in executing our contract due to the change of directorship. The contract has been delivered to George Berry for
execution by the city.
We still do not have a contract with SREB for the Fulton County Health
Department. This involves 21 interns. Since SREB has given us
$7,000.00 and will give us $13,000.00 within two weeks (according to
Bill Ramsay) I consider that organization reputable.
The decision was m ade to contract with. the Academy Theate r as a
non-city agency even though the funds actually come from the City
(Atlanta Board of Education). Miss Nancy Hagar was talked with and
agreed to this arrangement on July 15, 1969. A letter confirming the
earlier v erbal ag r eement and a written contract were n,ailed to Miss
Hagar July 16, 1969. The contr a ct has not of this date be en returned
to this office.
The Atlanta Youth Council is for our purposes a non-city agency.
contract h a s b een executed.
B.
The
College Contr a cts
When the college contracts were executed, both copies of the West
Georgia contr a ct were returned to the college. Mr. Paul M. Smith,
Jr., Dir ector of Financial Aid, stated by t e l ephone on 8/1/ 69 that
he would on that date mail one copy to me. When it is received, Mr.
Charles Davis, Director of Finance, City of Atla nta, will certify
the W est G e orgia bill.
C.
Educationa l Advisor Contracts
Contracts h ave b een entered into b e tween th e City of Atlanta, Atlanta
Urban Corps, and Carl Wieck, Patrick Ntokogu, Roger Whedon, Barbara Rudisill, and the Georgia Ins titute of Technology--Roger Rupnow,
�3
the · said individuals to act as Educational Advisors to the 1969 Urban
Corps Project. Duties to be performed shall include but not be limited to job visitation with the interns and agency supervisors, planning
and conducting education seminars for sm a ll groups, as well as all
interns; working in coordination with our field evaluation staff to insure job relevancy and educational signific an ce of the program for
each intern, assisting the intern in his articulation of his experience
and other counseling a nd advisory duties connected with the program.
For the services outlined above, each Educational Advisor shall be
compensated in the amount of One Thousand Dollars.
D.
Urban Corps-Library Theatre Contract
A contract between the City of Atlanta, Atlanta Urban Corps, and
Arthur Pellman has been drawn, approved, and is in the process of
execution. The contract provides in essence that Arthur Pellman is
to serve as Director of the Urb an Corps-Library The at re for a period
of not l ess than ten weeks and that he will be compensated in the amount
of One Thousand Dollars.
V.
Staff
Steve Mwamb a is performing a task that is in my estimation tedious and
demanding. He has and is continuing to keep errors at a minimum.
Mac Rabb is now working in my office and is performing at a level that is
above what c an ordinarily be expected or demand e d of an individual.
Patty Harwell is doing an excellent job in providing seer eta rial support.
She is diligent, unusually efficient, and in every respect a pleasure to
work with.
�[]
- . , .J:~
July 24, 1969
I

~
'"C
'"C
(1)



i




0..
p.,
Summation of a discussion between Atlanta Urban Corps and Fulton
National Bank
Participants:
J. Leland Phillips, Vice-President, Fulton National
Bank
Inmond Deen, Urban Corps
Dave Whelan, Urban Corps
Materials presented: Atlanta Urban Corps Prospectus, labeled
appendage "A" o
Length of Discussion:
5 0 minutes
Major Topics:
lo
2o
·,
3o
4.
5.
6.
Definition of Atlanta Urban Corps goals and scope
Fulton National's involvement in the community
(As a representative sample, Fulton National provides financial support to United Appeal, Lovett School, Westminster
School, private colleges in Georgia.}
Fulton National, according to Mr. Phillips, has a Foundation which was created 5 years ago and which does not as yet
yield substantial incomeo As a result of this the bulk of the
money donated to service organizations, etco is taken from
the bank's net profit.
Need to coordinate various service groups in the Atlanta area
in a fashion similar to United Appeal.
The ineffectiveness of Federal programs to achieve results,
ioe. Job Corps, VISTAo
The stigma of the name Urban Corpso
Summation:
Fulton National Bank appears to be a rather conservative organizationo The Urb a n Corps would profit considerably from endorsement of
its program by Fulton National Bank. The prospe cts of Fulton National
Bank providing financial support and thereby endorsing the Urb an Corps
ar" good. The relationship, however, must be carefully cultivated.
Action Taken:
Fulton N a tional has been placed on the Urb an Corps mailing list in
an effort to provide continuing information to the bank and thereby p ermit
closer observation and evaluation of the Atlanta Urban Corps.
OQ
(1)
�Page 2
Recommendations:
It is recommended that the Director who will assume leadership
of the Atlanta Urban Corps at the expiration of the 1969 Summer Program contact personally Mr. Phillipps and present and explain the most
thorough evaluative summary of the Atlanta Urban Corps that is obtainable. It is felt that if the program h a s achieved substantial fulfillment
of its goals and Mr. Phillipps is appraised thereof, Fulton N a tional
Bank will provide financial support.
�BLACK BUSINESS COMMUNITY:
1.
2.
Citizen's Trust Company
L. D. Milton, President
Mutual Federal
J. B. Blaton, First Vice-President
3.
Atlanta Life Inusrance Company
Norris Herndon
J. D. Martin
Additional information in this area is contained in a file labeled 11 Fund
Raising" in the Department of Finance, Atlanta Urban Corps, 30 Courtland
Street, N. E., Atlanta, Georgia 30303.

-
b:I
�- , :, .
-
( ,j
,.r·
May 19, 1969
I
ORDINA.'lCE IlY
FINANCE COHMITTEE:
l-nIBREAS, the City of Atlanta has decided that it is in its best
interest to foster interest in r.~nicipal government within the college
corI'.muni ti·; and
\~U::REAS, the City believes that thi::; goal can be enhanced through the
extensive USC of ,1 college intern!lhip program; and
WHEREAS, the City is desirous of establishing with5.n its present
org:inizationnl frarncwork ~n agency to control and itr.ple:ncnt this pro-
posed internship program; and
WHEREAS, this egency is to be placed within the Department of the Mayor
and to be given the .title Atla:-ita Urban Corps;
()
BE IT TilEREIURE ORDAD!ED DY TliE MAYOR .AXD OOAi"ill OF ALDEru-am OF THE CITY
OF ATLA;.ITA th.:1t Article III, Volun:c II of the City Code is rune:nded by
ndding a new section thereto oppropri a tcly numbered a s follows:
Hscctiol1 2-63: T11t..:t"e is licrc.bj' cl.'eated ii1 t !& i! ~: f ~~ e e,~ ::!-. c
Mayor, a division i:nown as th e Atl.:mtn U~b.in Co rps . The Hayor
or his duly a ppointed rep:esentativc h3s tl1~ duties ond responsibilit ies for m;tint a.ining and ;1drili-nistt·nt:i.ng this div isio n and
the intern:. c n:pl oycd therein. The }iayor :;hall ha·.;e authori ty
and re s ponsibility for entering into contr~ctD wit h universities
for Colle ge Vork Study Progr~m positions; non-profit o rganizations, o ther governr:ie ntal units, .l~d nongovernr:'icntal oreo.nizations
. for the cr::ploy.nent of interns. Said contrtlcts shall be ratified
by the Hr:iyor and Board of Aldermen. 11
.r
_.....,.
___
....____....---..-..:. -· ... ..........~...._........
_ ,,
~
�......._,,:. .....__
- .-~-
..
. ..
......
.
.
. .. · ·- •·lo-
··-~'-----=-- ·-- - ----"'- - - - -- -·- -------~-.. ·----.. ~
,-----
F
'
\,
iJ
~ -- ... ,. ~
/ ; J--35 G
CERTIFf ED
-r.
--- -.i ....._ ..___ ...__~--- -~ .

:---..
\;o}i)1ITTEE:
3&.-
~ \.:-~,:z
'
. Prnld~nt 8:;i;rd of Alderrt.9!'1.~
.t\11E~:DI(\G ARTICLE III, vo:,tfi.~£ II, OF ?HE CITY
CODE BY !1DDI~;c; A r:-sw SEC? IO~i 2-63 CR~::,.TIN.'.;
IN THE: OFFI,: E O::? ?1AYOR A DIVISION l~\OWN AS
THE ATLANTA URB1m CORl:S
-·· - - - -

· -
• · · - - - - - - - ½',

• •
•• • • --..-- ,..'>• •· ---·• - I •
�June 16, 1969
RESOLUTION BY
FINANCE COMMITTEE AND BUDGET COMMISSION
WHER,EAS, The Atlanta Urban Corps Project is a project developed
and initiated by College Students for the purpose of . introducing
young people to the problems of the modern urban environment;
and
--
- -........
WHEREAS, the Program anti-c ipated the employment of approximately
200 students for work in city government, other local governmental
units and other local nonprofit agencies to which students may
be assigned; and
WHEREAS, the total city contr~bution to the program can be financed
from accumulated savings in the funds already appropriated for
salaries in the various departments of city government to which
students may be assigned and, due to the Federal grants available,
the City can receive the services of the students in various
City functions for approximately $50 per student for the summer.



i>




NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED BY THE MAYOR AND BOARD OF ALDERMEN
that the 1969 (General Fund) Budget be and is hereby amended as
follows:
'U
'U
I
(I)
i



l




'
i
l
ADD TO ANTICIPATIONS
Account No.
G-16-76 ,!O
G-16-76 45"
G-16-7650
I
Grants, Non-Profit Agencies
Grants, College Work Study Program
Grants, Private Contributiou
$15,280.00
77,856.00
28,250.00
$121,386.00
Partitions, Auditorium Offices
Postage
Printing and Reproduction
Telephone
Office Supplies and Expense
Rentals
Salaries
$
646.00
150.00
500.00
600.00
1,500.00
400.00
117,590.00
$121,386.00
TRANSFER FROM:
Account No.
G-9-62-830A
G-ll-62-830A
830F
G-12-62-830
G-23-62-830
G-25-62-830
G-29-62-830
G-30-62-830
G-34-62-830C
G-46-62-830
....... ,,. . ......
'1)
(I)
I t)
ADD TO APPROPRIATIONS
Account No.
G-25-62-570U
760U
761U
714U
770U
810U
830U
0..
(JQ
Salaries, Department of Finance
Salaries, Department of Public Works
Salaries, Sanitary Division, Garbage
CoHection
. Salaries, Libraries
Salaries, Department of Law
Salaries, Department of Mayor
Salaries, Department of Purchasing
Salaries, Department of Planning
Salaries, Department of Parks
Salaries, Traffic Engineering
/
6,500.00
1,500.00
11,605.00
8,500.00
1s6.oo
7,500.00
750.00
2,500.00
10,000.00
'3 2 000. 00
$52,605.00
�~
• r

TRANSFER TO
Account No.
G-25-62-830U
$52,605.00
Salaries
The purpose of this resolution is to establish the budget of the
1969 Urban Corps Project within the Office of the Mayor by anticipating
and appropriating grants to be received and by transferring certain
existing appropriations.
APPROVED BY:
Mayor
(0--._7~/--__-· '
---; J
/ / 1.~_/,,/'(Wf/ J l
/
,.../
Chairman of Finance Committee
l -7
/~~/_//
!Y.;i,/,-,<~
. / /} / '
._/4~ , .,. ,o' ,.(_;://1)--::-.-: ,V Memo_: r ·z
-....
- -c_,.:-1,
~-- -
I
.

A1-1/1. · ,l-[ -~ i~m··ber.. \'· ,of Board of Aldermen
') /,·" l 1·~ :~ ~.
O -llc-- -· -- ;,L- t~ · ·- -Director of Finance
·•
/
L;:· i / /
1 •
'
- . -: ~
·.
·i
·. .·· ·
,
Board of Aldermen
�__ __.-..
-, --C-. _E_R_..-c
. . -u= \E i)
I
• .,TION' BY
·:E cornrrTTi:: E AND BUDGET COMMISSION


i sh ing th e budget of the 1969 Urban


Pro j ect within the Office Of Mayor


ic i pating and appropriating


· . .:86 in g r a n ts to be rece ived and


e rring $52,604 in existing appropriat•


.-·
. r:-1 C:: .
/
'
.·,
\cJUN
.\
1G 1eu9 .· ..,_
, . •••••
I (_ .__.
I
. - ~-'\ ::._--t' '><• ~..?.,;..;.-:;..
'
~-----·
---. r'N>.eldent Soii.rd of P.\dwnz:i
�ACCOUNTS RECEI VA BLE - C WSP
Univer sity of Pennsylvania
SRE B f or Unive rsity of Georgia
Southw estern at Memphis
Lake Fore st College
Ga . C a llege at M i lledgeville
O glethorp e
Br a nde i s Uni ve rsit y
Br own
Emory Univ ersity
I n diana U niver sity
M erc e r
Geor g ia Institute of T e c hnology
Clark College
Spelman
M orris Br own College
Ye s hiva
West G e or gia C ollege
M o rehouse Colleg e
Va ss ar
Ge o rgia Stat e
Dekalb J unior College
176. 00
334.30
216. 00
392.00
46 4 .00
17 6 . 00
144. 00
12 9 . 60
176.00
14 0. 8 0
267 . 4 4
172 . 80
313 . 6 0
371. 20
140. 80
115 . 20
103. 68
14 0. 80
176. 00
144. 0 0
1,635.5 0
lp 4 9 6.80
1, 241. 80
2,54 1.38
45.70
2,90 9 . 6 0
1,22 2 .5 0
144. 00
(1) 1, 64 9 . 60
1, 4 00.40 .
TOTAL
( 1)
(2)
Gross Pay
7/7/69
CWSP Share
$1, 64 9 . 60 - $144. 0 0 (Susie L ind sey)
80% of $1, 505 . 60 = $1,2 04.48.
j &.I tSJ ...,, },?
= $ 1,5 0 5. 60.
140. 8 0
115 . 20
1,308. 4 0
1,197 . 44
9 93. 4 4
2, 0 33 .10
36.5 6
2 , 327 . 68
9 78 .00
115.2 0
(2) 1,319.68
1,12 0 . 32
I 3/IS) . Jt./
Rece ive d
\12.. ~u
103. 68
\ 44.0 .9,o
2 ,327 . 6 8
Gros s Pay
7 / 21/ 69
C W SP Sha r e
176. 00
3 52 . 00
270.00
302 . 4 0
481. 60
352. 00
144. 0 0
144. 00
176.00
140 . 80
281. 60
216 . 00
241. 92
385.28
2 81. 60
115. 20
115. 20
140 . 80
17 6 . 00
144. 00
1, 6 7 6 . 60
1,843 .60
1, 427 . 7 0
3, 085 . 8 0 .
14 0. 80
115. 20
1,341.28
1, 474. 88
1, 142.16
2,46 8.64
2,5 97 . 4 0
1, 4 60. 2 0
2,077 . 92
1, 168.16
1, 785. 60
1,42 8. 4 8
\\ 'I • 'Z.O
1,204 . 4 8
l l, 1 5 9</.96
13
)
~
,-/ -:), 'i7 2--
Re ceived
"2.1\,-(o .oo
�ACC OUNTS REC EIVAB LE - C W SP
Gross P a y
University of Penns ylv ania
SR EB for University of Georgia
Sout hwest e r n at Memphis
Lake F or e st Colle ge
Ga. College a t Mille d geville
Ogletho rpe
Brand ei s Un i versity
Brown
Emory Univ e r sity
Indiana Uni ve r sity
Mercer
Georgia Institute of T ech n o l o g y
Clark College
Spelman
Morris Brown C ollege
Yeshiva
West Georgia College
Mo rehouse
Vassar
G eorgia State
Dekalb Junior College
TOTAL
8/ 4 /69
CWSP S har e
17 6. 00
352 . 00
1.5 5. 60
320. 00
452 . 80
352. 0 0
144. 00
144 . 00
140 . 8 0
281 . 60
2 04 . 4 8
25 6 .0 0
362. 24
281. 60
115 . 20
115. 20
17 6. O0
144. 00
1,890.00
1,52 0.00
1,359.60
140 . 80
115 . 2 0
1, 512. 00
1, 216. 00
1, 0 87 68
15 4. 00
2 .393. 00
1, ·2 01. 00
144. 00
1,486 .40
1,512. 90
123. 20
1, 914.40
960.80
115. 2 0
1, 18 9 . 12
1, 210 . 32
IL/ 1 c2?1, 3ll
1/_;t/ ;J./, <i i/
0
Rec eived
2..o"\,'fS
�~orris ~rofun Qloll2g£
~thmht, ®.enr.si<t 30314
STUDENT LOAN OFFICE
August 13 , 196 9
Mr. Irunond L. Deen, Jr.
Director of Finance
Atlanta Urban Corps
30 Courtland Street, N. E.
Atlanta, Georgia
30303
Dear Mr. Deen:
Please find enclosed our check for $1,276.16 which represents the
80% federal share for Morris Brown College CWSP students through
June 23, 1969. We note that Chester McElroy worked 46 hours within
one week. We can only pay for 40 hours, which means that our 80%
is computed on $1,595.20 rather than the $1,608.40 which is the total
of the payroll submitted by you.
s
(Mrs.) I. , . Jones
Student Financial Aid Director
IBJ/bs
Enclosure-Check $1~276 . 16
I
�r
A ppend a g e E
ACCO UNT S RECEIVAB LE - C W SP
G r oss Pay
Unive r sit y of P ennsy l vani a
S RE B for Unive r s ity of Geor g i a
Sou t hwestern at Memphi s
L a k e For e st Colle ge
G a. Colleg e at M illedgev ille
O gletho r p e
Brandeis Unive rsit y
Br o w n
Emo ry U n ive r sity
Indiana Universit y
M ercer
G e o r g i a In s titu te of Techn o l ogy
C lark C allege
S pe l m a n
M o r r is B r o w n College
Y eshiva
We st Georgia C olle ge
Mor e h ouse C o lle ge
Va ss ar
Georgia State
D e kalb Junio r Colle g e
86.40
6 / 9/69
C W SP Share
R e ceived
Gross P ay
6 / 23 / 69
CWSP S har e
84. 48
105. 60
193 . 60
158. 40
2 9 . 10
211. 20
105. 60
144.00
144. 00
105 . 60
10 5. 6 0
158 . 4 0
1, 07 4 .80
1,296 . 00
688. 7 0
( 5) 1, 5 02.80
84 . 4 8
154 .88
126. 7 2
230 76
168 . 9 6
84 . 4 8
115 . 20
115. 20
84 . 4 8
84 . 4 8
12 6 . 7 2
859 . 84
1, 03 6 . 8 0
550 . 96
( 6} 1, 202 .24
2,02 7.20
866.80
144. 00
(3} 1,07 2 .00
1, 058.40
I I ) .I 1 • L/ Cl
1, 621. 7 6
6 9 3. 4 4
115 . 2 0
{4) 8 57 . 60
8 4 6. 7 2
69.12
70.40
5 7.50
10 5. 60
56. 32
4 6.00
84 . 48
21. 60
17 2 8
(1) 2 8. 00
99.9 0
tj(.. ~J' L/ 0
{2 } 2 2. 4 0
7 9 . 92
0
7 9. 92
3 ri~ • j:L
TOTAL
( l}
( 2}
( 3}
( 4}
( 5}
{ 6)
ir, 53.9 -;;_,
$ 2 8 . 00 was p a i d to Sus i e Lind sey w ho w as net c e r t ified for C. W. S. P.
W e cannot c olle c t t h i s due to n on - c er tific a tion.
$1, 0 72. 0 0 - $144. 00 (Susie L i n d sey) = $ 92 8 . 00 .
80% of $92 8. 00 = $742 . 4 0 .
$1,502 . 80 - $13. 2 0 (See appe nda g e #1) = $1,489.60 .
80% of $1 , 489. 6 0 .= $1, 191. 68 .


Received
126. 72
115. 2 0
84. 4 8
8-i .lo\ S
12 6. 72
1, 191. 68
1, 621. 7 6
115. 20
742. 40
8 4 6. 72
�December 4 , 1969
MEMORANDUM
To:
Charles L . Davis
From:
George Bei-ry
Subject:
Attached Checks Totaling $1 ,0 25
The Urban Corps had forwarded to me the attached checks which
~epresent unanticipated contributions to the Urban Corps Project.
With these checks, they have sent a miscellaneous t""equisition
payable to Norrell Tempol'ary Services in the amount of $113. 75.
In addition, they forwarded me a memorandum; dated December 3 ,
1969, detailing the amount of unanticipated contdbutions that they
have forwarded to the City. The Urban Corps~ of course , fe ls
that they should have considerable latitude in expending th e
contributions th t they solicit and which are over and above the
budgeted receipts . They will, therefoJ' , be forwarding cert in
other miscellaneous requisitions in the neal' future to be paid from
thi balance of $949. 06 .
GB:ja
Attachm nts
�,,
.
ATl./\.1'~ TA VRBAN CORPS
3 0 C OU RTL A N D STRE ET . rU :.
/
PHO N E [ 404 ] 5 24 -809 1
/
,1-\ TLA N TA . G E OR G I A 30 3 03
MEMORANDUM


fll\.~ ·C:..0-~ ~DATE:
TO:
Pat Haliburton (.
FROM:
Ken Millwood
RE:
Urban Corps City Pla ceme nts - 1970
December 5, 1969
In response to your r eques t the following breakdown of interns by city
department by program periods are s ubmitted. It must be remembered that
these are only reas ona ble estimat e 5 because ex act placements obviously
cannot be made at this early date . (Note - Mode l Ci ties i s include d as
per our Fall, 1969 Budget procedure)
Departments
Winter
Jan . 19 - April 5
Summer
June 15 - Sept. 5
Fa ll
Sept. 28 - Dec. 18
(1)
Comm•_1!1ity Re l. Comm.
1
1
.L
1
(2)
City Pe rsonnel
2
2
2
(3)
Wate r Works
2
12
2
(4)
Building Department
2
4
2
(5)
Business License
3
6
3
(6)
Accounting Division
5
3
3
(7)
Atlanta Youth Council
1
20
4
(8)
Mode l Cities
6
25
8
(9)
Mayor 's Offi c e
2
10
2
(10) Police Departme nt
0
8
2
(11) Law
2
5
2
(12) Pur chas ing De partme nt
0
1
0
(13) Parks
2
12
0
(14) Av i at i on
0
2
0
(15) Budget
0
1
0
(16) Motor Transport
0
1
0
�Page 2
December 5, 1969
Winter
Departments
·J an. 19
~
April 5
Summer
J une 15 - Sept. 5
Fall
Sept. 28 ·• Dec. 18
(17)
Planning Department
0
2

(18 )
Li brary
0
7
2
(19 )
Traffic Engineeri ng
0
1
0
(20)
Fire Depar t ment
0
3
0
(21)
Courts
0
5
1
(22)
Prisons
0
5
1
30
150
40
Tot a l s
�ATLANTA VRBAN CORPS
30 COURTLAND STREET, N .E .
/
PHONE ( 4 04 ) 52 4 -8091
/
ATLANTA , GEORGIA 30303
ME MO R A N D U M
TO:
FROM:
George Berry
DATE : December 3, 1969
Ken Millwood ~ ~
SUBJECT :
Urban Corps Unanticipated Revenue
Enclosed you will find a miscellaneous requisition, it s
related bill, and two contribution checks payable to the
Atlanta Urban Corps in the total amount of $1,025.00. The
two checks are :
American Telephone
Mr.
w.
&
Telegraph
Elliott Du nwoody, Jr.
$1,000.00
$
25.00
This unanticipated revenue is to be totalled with the
present balance of $37.81 q uoted in my memo of October 14,
for a new total of $1 ,062.81. The requisition for $11 3.75
payab le to Norrell Temporary Services brings the new balance
to $949.06. As stated in our meeting o f De c ember 2, we will
maintain a record of t h is b alance.
cc :
Mr. Hugh Saxon
�D cemb r 8, l96f
Mr. Mil~ o. ~ ni
GUlf OU c«por U.
P. O.
124-5, Stati . C
A~1 · ~ .. Goo 1a !i030~
i- Milton:
tht
c.
itio
at 1
t
til
,
�December 15, 1969
Mr . Ken M illwood
Dire ctor
Atlanta Urban Corps
30 Courtland Strett N.E.
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Mr. Millwood:
At the request of Mr . Masse ll, this is to acknowledge
receipt of your communication and to confirm his
review of its contents.
We hope you will understand the Mayor-elect's inability
to respond personally at this time to the voluminous
correspondence being received during our transition
period .
Sincerely ,
(Mrs.) Norma Day
Secretary to Mr. Massell
P. S.
Mr. Massell is interested in the Urban Corps
and will plan to meet with you at a later date.
In the meantime, h.e asks that you confer with
Ken Gregor, Urban Observatory Coordinati>r
at City Hall.
N.D.
CC· Mr. Ken Gr gorv"
ND·bh
�Decemb er 18, 1969
Mr. Sam Mass e ll
Mayor - Elec t
Allan- Grayson Realty Company
AO Pryor Street , S. W.
Atlanta , Georgia 30 3 03
Dear Mr . Mass el l:
At t he request .of Mrs. Day , I am pr e s enting our prob l em
to you i n this letter rathe r than wai ting the several
we eks until you will be avail ab le to discuss it in person .
As you know, t he Atl anta Urban Corps i s a student pro gr am
now ope r at ing t hrough the Mayo r's offi c e . The program is
de signed to offer s t udents an avenue f or constructive community s ervice whil e expand i ng the re l ev anc e of t he i r coll ege education . The progr am has operated s ucc essfully since
June, but i s now facing a very unc ertai n f uture .
The Atlanta Urban Corps is being caught in the squeeze of
the change of City Administrations. For six and one-half
months, ( s i nce June 16 , 1 969 ) , the City of Atlanta allocat ed
$76,000 f or the operation of the Ur ban Corps . This money
helped pay t he compens a t ion of City interns plus admini s t ration cos t s . In to tal, the program invo l ved 300 students in
1969. We were asked to plan and document an expanded and
improved program for fiscal year 1970. Of a total bud et
of $650,000, the City was asked to allocate $139,000 for
administration and City interns . The total program was designed to include 660 students, of which 220 will work for
City departments. Mr. Milton Farris has decided to allocate
$40,000 to pay both matching costs and administration . The
matching costs alone will amount to some $38,000, &four plans
develop as they should. Obviously, this will leave little to
operate an effective program.
Unfortunat ly~ Mr. Farris is viewing the program only in dollar terms. I feel he has overlooked some important consider·
ations concerning the Urban Corps. He has failed to grasp the
importance of a meaningful relationship between the needs of
th City and the potentials of the student community. It is
wasteful to di regard the motivations, energie and abilities
of the rea students. W have pl ns and procedur s to produce
�Mr. Sam Massell
December 18, 1969
Page 2
an effective 1970 program to build upon the documented success
of our 1969 efforts. However, this serious budget cut, which
represents only 28.5% of our original request and merely 6% of
the total program cost, threatens to destroy the possibilities
of the Urban Corps.
In real terms, the Urban Corps needs at least $50,000 for
program administration. I am asking for your personal intervention before the budget is passed to correct this situationL
Mr. Dan Sweat will be glad to discuss the program with you,
and is able to illustrate the benefits of the Atlanta Urban
Corps. Of course, I am available and welcome the opportunity
to discuss the matter with you at any time.
Sincerely ,
Ken Millwood
Director
i)W :sz
�December 18, 1969
Mr. Maynard Jackson
Vice- Mayor Elect
HS Forsyth Street, N. W.
Atlan ta, Georgia 30303
Dear Mr. Jackson:
As you know, the Atlanta Urban Corps is a student program
now operating throu gh the Mayor's office. The program is
designed to offer students an avenue f or constructive community service while expanding the relevance of their colle ge education. The program has operated successfully since
June, but is now acing a very uncertain future.
The Atlanta Urban Corps is being caught in the squeeze of
the change of City Administrations. For six and one-half
months, (since June 16, 1969), the City of Atlanta allocated
76,000 for the operation of the Urban Corps. This money
helped p ay the compensation of City interns p lus administra t ion c osts. In tota l , the pro gram involved 300 students i n
196 9. We we re a s ked to pl an and document an expanded and
imp roved p rogram f or f iscal year 1 9 70. Of a total budge t
of $650 ,00 0, the Ci t y was asked to allocat e 139,000 fo r
admi n istra tion and City interns. The total p ro gram was de signed to include 660 students, of whi ch 220 will work f or
Ci t y dep artments. Mr. Milton Farris has deci ded to allocate
40, 00 0 to pay both ma tching costs and administr a tion. The
matching c osts al one wi ll amoun t to some $38 , 000, if our plans
develop as they should . Obv iously, t h is wil l le ave l it t le to
operate an effective prog r am .
Unfortunately, Mr. Farris is v iewi ng t he program on l y i n dol lar terms . I fee l he has overlooked s ome i mportant conside r ations conce rning the Urban Cor ps. He has fai led t o gr asp the
importance of a meaningfu l re l ationship between the needs of
t he City and the potent ials of the student community . It is
wasteful to disregard the motivations, energies and abilities
of the area students . We have p l ans and procedures to produce
an effective 1970 program to bui l d upon the documented success
of our 1969 effQrts. However, this serious budget cut, which
represents only 28.5% of our original requ st and merely 6\ 9 f
t he total progr m cost , threatens to destroy the possibiliti
of the Urban Corps .
�Mr. Maynard Jackson
December 18, 1969
Page 2
In real terms, the Urban Corps needs at least $50,000 for
program administration. I am asking for your personal
intervention before the budget is passed to correct this
situation. Mr. Dan Sweat will be glad to discuss the program with you, and is able to illustrate the benefits of
the Atlanta Urban Corps. Of course , I am available and
we lcome the opportunity to discuss the matter with you at
any time .
Sincerely ,
Ken Millwood
Director
KM:sz
�DEPART MENT OF
FINANCE
501 CITY HA LL
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303
December 30, 1969
CHARLES L. DAVIS
DIRECTOR OF FINANCE
W. ROY SMITH
DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF FINANCE
EDGAR A. VAUGHN, JR .
DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF F IN ANCE
JAME S R. FOUNTA IN , J R .
DEPUTY D I RECTOR O F F IN ANCE
Mr. Ken Millwood
Atla nta Urban Cor ps
30 Courtland Street, N. E.
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Ken :
According to our records, the r e are three colleges and one agency that
still owe the City for their pa rticipation in the 1969 Summer Urban
Corps Program. The remaining balances are :
Cla rk r.o l e ge.
Georgia Tecl1.
Univer s ity of Georgia
Ha rdee Circle Arts Center
TOTAL
$2 , 3.5() 88
279 . 04
1,379 . 84
300 . 00
$4,309.76
The City of Atla nta would like to know what efforts are being made to collect
the a bove balanc e s . Our r ecords indicat e tha t the University of Georgia
has not ye t ma de a ny payments ; if ·the r ev i s ion of a written contract is
n e cessary, we lvould apprecia t e it if the Ur ba n Corp s would attend t o this
matt e r as s oon as po s sible.
On the attached sh eet, please find the operating statement f or the Urban
Corp s ' 1969 Summer Program.
As you ca n see , thi s program cost the City an approx i mat e a dditiona l $9,458
to $13, 768 a bove t h e a nticipat ed $5 2 ,605 depending on how much of t he rema i ni ng
balanc es a re co llect ed. I hop e t ha t t h e f i gur e s will be us eful t o t h e
Urb a n Cor ps 1 futu re planning . If you hav e any questions concerning this,
pleas e l e t me know.
Sincere ly ,
(/~ t~/4¼143.215.248.55
Char l e s L. Davis
Dire ctor of Finance
CLD: DMH: j cl
/ Attachment
1-___cc : George Berry
�Atlanta Urban Corps
Operating Statement
1969 Summer Program
Actual
Anticipated
Difference
Balance
Due
&
Actual Total
Balance Due
Income:
College Work Study
Agencies
Private Contributions
$67,356.76
26,072.80
33,181.80
$77,856.00 ($10,499.24)
15,280.00
10,792 .80
28,250 .oo
4,931.80
$126,611.36 $121,386.00
City's Anticipated
Share
Total Income
52,605.00
$5,225.36
$4,009.30
300.00
$71,366 . 06
26,372.80
33,181.80
$4,309076
$130,921.12
52,605.00
$179,216.36 $173,991.00
52,605.00
$5,225.36
$4,309.76
$183,526.12
Expenses:
i <·
Ccn-i=,,.,,.,,.,.," "' S
1,000.00
0
• $1~000 . 00
Office Supplies
1,843.24
1,500.00
343.24
Auto Allowance
436.50
0
436.50
Partitions, Auditorium
646.00
646.00
0
Telephone
601. 71
600.00
1.71
Service Contracts
. 9,533.34
0
9,533.34
Postage
343.10
150 . 00
193.10
Printing and Reproduction 1,236.23
500.00
736.23
64.2. 50
Rentals
400.00
24.2. 50
176,702.11 170 195.00
Salaries
6 507 . 11
Total Expenses
Additional Cost to
City
$192,984.73 $173,991.00
$13,768.37
$18,993.73
$9,458.61
�,.
I I
CITY OF ATLANTA
DEPARTMENT OF
FINANCE
501 CITY HALL
A~ AN A_'tG2&:Gtgiff03
CHARLES L. DAVIS
DIRECTOR OF FINANCE
W. ROY SMITH
DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF FI NANCE
EDGAR A. VAUGHN , JR.
DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF FINANCE
JAMES R . FOUNTAIN, JR .
DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF F INANCE
Hr. &eQ Mill
Atlallt,f._U an Coipt
30 Courtland $tr t , .1.
AC · . a, Qeorg-U 30303
lcl:
fhf.• 1, t§· ,1 e
l
r :tun of - - io-,
s
r~e1pt of · • ·f oU.~ lt,t-4 cootr.-ct• for the ra.c,u .. •i~ b 1, •
th

�Mr. Ken
.
- MtU
.
.
,,.• • 2
0d
lk>v _. ~r 24, 1969
t1on the City l• to pq for Chea lntetne. By• .eopy c,f tbte :f.. tt r.,
I •
uki . th Aecomxt P•y•blca Audltof not tQ pr~eaa any ~ t •
fot th th:b:an Corp, for tm: . unttl tbS..a
fr · _ ·t he fumb, &llocat
tp
_t t• it . ·tvecl.
If I ~ b., of M1tatauce toy .
ac1V$•,••
tn correctlQS
th••• *&reemeut•., plNf
t%143.215.248.55
.Chit'1• L. Dari•
·D U'e¢t~' of f1UDC41
CU,r-dbf
·I ncl . ••
co, lfr. Ce.Qt e a.n,·
• • • l,lnde, Allder•
- • talcl •rail
-.c• W.d


· .


�.,
�November 21 , 1969
MEMORANDUM
To:
Ken Millwood
From:
Geo:rg
Berry
I am nclosing a fully
ecut d copy of the agre ment b tw en
th City of Atlant and the Southern Regional E ducation Bo rd
providing for SREB acting
p ym.a ter and as uming the
financial liability th io-efor for the Urb
Co rp interns during
th fall of 1969. W ith copy of this 1 tter. 1 am providing
the Finance Directo,: with th offici 1 City copy.
OB:j
Encloeur
cc: Ch rle
D vi
�October 28, 1969
Mr . Jay F ounta in
D eputy Dir ec.t'o r of Financ e
City of Atlanta
~
City Hall
68 M itc hell Street, S. W.
Atlanta , Geor g i a
Dear J y:
Please make the following deposits:
DRAWN BY
E conomic Opportunity
Atlanta, Inc .
AMOUNT
G-16-7645
WestGeorgi
$3 , 078.40
G-16-7645
lndi na Univer ity
ACCOUNT NUMBER
G -16 - 7640
Coll
e
138. 80
$
$
197.12
Acknowledgement of r ceipt will be appreciat d .
Sincerely,
\
H ugh H . Saxon, Jr.
D irector of Fina nce
,.
_,
J
HHSjr:sz
Enclo•ur a
cc: M r. G or e B r r y..,
·-
�~·
December l, 1969
Mr. Jay Fountain
Deputy Director of Finance
City of Atlanta
City Hal l
At lanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Jay:
Please make the following deposit in the Urban Corps
account :
ACCOUNT NUMBER:
G-16-7645
DRAWN BY:
Georgia Institute of
Technology
Acknowledgement of receipt will be appreciated.
Sincerely,
Hugh H. Saxon, Jr.
Director of Finance
llIIS jr : sz
Enclosure
cc :
,tr.
Ceorge Berry~
AMOUNT:
$
138.34
�PROPOSED REVISED BY - LAWS
Atlanta Urban Corps,
ARTICLE I.
Inc .
Purpose and Functions
The Atlanta Urban Corps, Inc. s:hall. have ass its purpose the development of
programs for the constructive involvement of college students in: various phases and
forms of public service activ itie s within the greate r- A t~anta area, in association with
Federal, state and local gov ernments, the busines-s - and academic communities, and
such other organizations and individuals whose inter.est s complim.ent the aforesaid
purpose.
The Atlanta Urban Corps., Inc·. , s-h all~endeav or: to~stimulate .interest and
support in such programs, shall develop appropriate sources ' of:funding .and shall,
either directly or in cooperation with. other.. agencies. and. organizations, administer
such programs as shall be consistent with . the. aforem e ntioned ..purpose.
ARTICLE II.
Offices
The principle office of the corpuration in- the State of.Georgia sha ll .b e loc a t e d
in the City of Atlanta, County of Fulton.
T.he c.or.por:ation shall:have such. other offices,
either w ithin or without the State of G e orgia as- the Hoard oLilirectors . may d e termine
or as the affairs of the co r po rati on may require fr om· time to time .
The corporation shall ha:v e and. c:ontinuo.usl y mai ntai n in the State of Georgia
a registered offic e and a r egis te r ·ed agent whose office is. identical.with such regis te r e d
offi ce .
The r e g i ster e d offic e m ay be,. but. n e e ci not b e , . identicaL with. the p rincipal
office in t he S tate of G eo r gia,. a nd the a ddr .e:.S'S: of_ the: r .e g,is tere d :..offi ce may be chan g ed
from time t o time b y the B oar d of D i.re c t o r s •.
ARTICLE Ill.
S ection L
Adviso ry C oun c il
Powers .
AII p-ow e r-sc at.· the- Atlanta- Ur·b a rr- C-o rps i Inc ; , and the
e xerci se of s u ch p,ow. ers shall he. vested in an .Advisory C:.ounci l ,. . e ,x :cept as aothe r wise
�-
2
provided in these By-laws or by the provisions of the Charter of the Atlanta Urban
Corps, Inc., or the laws of the State of Georgia.
It will be the sole quty of the
Advisory Council to determine the community needs in regard to Atlanta Urban
Corps ,: Irie.•: ,. and. to reflect :same in establishing the overall policy direction of the
corporation.
Section 2.
Members -of Advisory-Council.
The.Advisory Council shall be
composed .of 32 .members, _ each· to. be of either ex officio or elected status.
(a):. Ex Officio ~embers.. :.. Tliose members of the advisory Council by virtue
of .their.:offic.e shall .be:
The .E x ecutive Director of the Atlanta Urban Corps, Inc.
?
Tlie.Mayor oLthe City of Atlanta
Tlie·.Regional Directors of the Peace Corps, VISTA, and
Teachers Corps
eJ;The. Dir e ctor, · (or . his design ated r e pr e s e ntative ) of SREB ·t.;J'·-J::;:.(b): Erecte d M e mb e rs.
(total numb e r in each c a t egory)
Student Repres e ntative (6)
-
The student members of the Advisory
counc·il .sha ll b e chos e n from thoe e students who have spe nt a minimum
of: one- t e rm in the A tla nta Urba n Corps, Inc. prog r a m.
The y sha ll b e
stude.nt.s . of.Atlanta ·ar e a colleges, no more than one student sha ll be
chos:e:n f r om a ny one colle g e .
A eademi<: Repr esentat ives ( 5 ) - F ive c ollege Presid ent s ( or t heir
d e signat e d re:p re senta t i v es ) shall b e chos e n from c olle g e s in t he
Atlanta area.
Governmental_Represent a tives ( 5) - Five governmental representatives
shall be chosen fr o m within t h e framework of city government and shall
be: -crunp-os.e.d oLone ·eity ·administrator from the Mayor I s Staff, two city
�-
3
department he a ds (from _d e p a rtments utilizing Urban Corps
interns), and t w o members of the Bo a rd of Alder1nen.
Agency Repr e s e ntative ( 5)
-
Five agency representatives from
.s
the private agencies utilizing the larg1t number of Urban Corps
interns· in the Summer Program most recently completed.
No more
than :one representative from any one agency.
Community R e pr e s e nta tive (5)
-
Five members shall be chosen
fr:om··.the Professional and Business sectors of the Atlanta Community.
Ne> two Community Representatives shall have primary affiliation with
the . same organization.
Section 3.
Electlon of Members..
Members shall be electe d by the Advisory ·
c rounc.ii. in .power at the time of the election.
An affirmative vote of t w o-thirds of the
Advisory Council shall b e required for election.
S e ction 4.
T e rms • .
(aY E x Officio Members . are permanent memb e rs of the Advisory Council
(b):.. E r ected members.
Student representatives and Agency repres e ntatives
shall .serve a term of one year.
All other electe d members will serve a term of
t w o :year.s.- AlL elect e d members may be selected for successive terms.
S e ction 5.
T e rmination.
The Advisory Council by affirmative vote of 2/ 3
of :al L of the memb er s of the council, may suspend or e x pel a member for cause after
a n :app r op riate. hea rin g, and, by a majority vote of those p r esent at any r egula rly
cons.titut e d- m e eting , _ m ay t e r minate the membershi p of any m e mbe r w ho b e co me s
ineligible for memb er s h ip.
S e ction .6 •. _vacancies . =.Any vac a n cy on the A d v i sory C o uncil for any re a son
shall be tentatively filled by app_o intment of t h e Chairman of the Advisory CounciL
A :.r e pr esentative fr.om the are a whose representation is reduced by the v acan cy, -s'\.....,,.__._._
~ 143.215.248.55,~~
--~
~ ---"
So-.'-~
143.215.248.55
�-
4
-
The .appointment shall be. for the unex pired term of the vacated position and shall
become final upon the majority vote of those present at a regularly c~mstituted
meeting .of the Council.
All .members of the Council shall be advised in writing
of ±he appointment within. 3 0. days of said appointment.
Section 7;
Meetings.
The A divsory Council shall beet bi-annually once in
the :£fr st week in April, . and . again in the fir st week in November, for the purpose
of:elections and for. the transaction of such other business as may come before the
m-eeting.
The.se by-laws shall serve as notice of regular meetings.
m ·an :·of .the A.dv:is.o :ry Council .has the power to call special meetings.
Only the ChairIn doing so,
he :must give 10 days prior. notice in writing and must inform the Chairman of the
B:oard .of Directors and the .E xe cutive Director as to his actions in advance of the
notification by 3 .days~
Any petition bearing the signatures of 25% of the Advisory
Gouncil.sha lLcompelLthe Chairman to call a meeting with the due process of
notific a tion.
S e ction 8.
Quorum.
A majority of the met1;1bership of the Advisory Council
shall :Constitute a quorum for . the transaction of business at any meeting.
A majority
of:'a :.quorum is sufficient to a ct. unless specified herein. However, a majority of thos e
ppesant. when a quor.um. .i s · not pr e sent may adjourn the meeting from time to time
,
..
with.due process of notific a tion until a quorum is reached.
S e cti on 9._ Voting Rfghts and Prox y.
Each member s hall b e entitle d to one
votewn :e ach m atte.r. :submitted to a vote of the members.
In case of a tie, the i ssue
shalLhe :defeated.: Any mem.b er entitled to vote may vote by proxy executed in writing
by the member or. by his duly. authoriz ed designa te.
All proxies will be valid until
the e.next: tluly:. constituted m eeting.
Section 10.
Compensation.
Each member of the Advisory Council will serve
without. ·compens ation exce.pt·for reimburs ement for authorized expenses incurred
�5
.;.
within the scope of the business of the corporation.
ARTICLE .IV.
Section 1.
Board of Directors
Powers of Boa rd of Directors. The Board of Directors shall
during times as the Advisory Council is not conve ned, e x ercise all the leg a l powers
oL said Council with the e x ception of amending the Charter or By-laws of Atlanta
Urban Corps, Irie. ·, disposing of the property of Atlanta prban Corps, Inc.
e x cept
in:the regular course- ofbusin:ess, or dissolving the Atlanta Urban Corps, Inc.
Specificially ,- the Board· of Directors shall appoint the E x ecutive Director of the
A-tl:anta ·U-rban Corps, , Inc., confirm his staff appointments, confirm the budget
proposal of the E x ecutive Director and organize and conduct fund raising efforts.
It :shall also delegate to the duly appointed E x ecutive Director the operational control
of ±he Atla nta Urban Corps, Inc.
The Executive Director shall be appointed for a term
of i me year ·with the r i ght to success i on .
S e ction 2 .
M e mb e rship.
The Bo a rd of Directors shall be composed of members
of ±he Advisory Council in the following fashion:
T w o members from Student Representatives
O fi. e each from the representafives of Government, Agencies, Community
and Hig~er Education.
O n e member from the E x Officio members of the Advisory Council
T lie E x ecutive Dir e ctor of Atlanta U r ban Corps , I n c., (who shall not
a lao b e t he E x Officio rep resentative)
Tlie T rea s urer of the cor poration w ho shall b e t he Atlanta U r b an C o rp s ,
Irie., Dfrecto r of F i nanc e, w ho shall n o t b e a m emb er of the Advis o ry
Council and who s hall b e a n o n-vot ing member of the Board of Director s .
Section 3. · Election.
The Board. of Directors s h a ll be elected by a majority
of :a ·-quorum in a duly constituted meeting of the Advisory Council.
(The E xe cutive
�6 Director and Treasurer are ex officio memb e rs and are not voted upon.)
Section 4.
Terms.
Members of the Boa rd of Directors shall serve a
term· which coinsides with their term on the Advisory Council.
Each member has the
right to successive terms.
S e ction 5.
Termination. T lie Boa rd of Directors by affirmative vote of
zt 3 ~of- ·all .the m e mbers
V;o:-,.,,~
of the a ~ftoil, may syspend or e x pel a member for cause
after :-an appropriate hear ing, and, _by a majority vote of "those present at any
reg1:1la.rl y constituted meeting, may terminate the membership of any member
wh o ~becomes i n e lig ible_for m e mbership.
Section 6.
V a cancies.
Any vacancy on the Board of Directors for any reason
shallbe tenta tively filled by appointment of the Chairman of the Board of Director s of
a z..r e p!esenta tive fro m the a r ea whos e r e pr e s e nt ati ~
is r e duc e d by the v a c a ncy.
The
appointment ·shall b e for the unex pir e d term of the vacated position and shall become
final :upon ·the m a jority vote of thos e pr e s e nt at a re g ularly constitute d m e e t ing of the
K oa rd ~.
Al L me mbe rs of the Board shall b e a dvi se d in w riting of the appointme nt
w ithin: 30 days -of said appointment. ·
S e ction ·7 .- M eet i n ga.
T lie Boa rd of.D i r e ctor s sha ll m e e t qua rterly a t the
f ollowin g t ime s : ·
ls.tc we ek of Mar c h
1st Week of June
4th :Week of. September
1st: Week of. D ecember
These meetings will .be to- re-e-valuate the financial situation of the Atlanta Urban
Cl>rp~,- .Inc.: , conduct ·elections, and transact any such business that may come before
the meeting.
Only the Chairman of the Board may call a special meeting,
In doing
se; he is =requir_ed ta giv.e one week ( 7 days) prior notice in writing to all the members
�-
of the Board of Directors.
7
Prior to this notification (by three days) he must
inform the Executive Director of the called special meeting.
Any petition bearing
the. names of one-third of the members of the Board of Directors will compell
the. Chairman to call a special meeting with due process of notification.
Section 8. Quorum.
A quorum shall consist of two-thirds (2/3) of the
membership of the Board with a majority of quorum being sufficient to act unless
ot-he-r_wise. specified herein.
However, a majority of those present when
a quorum
is. noLpresent may adjourn the meeting from time to time, with due process of
notification, until a quorum is reached.
Se·ction 9.
Voting and Proxy..
Each member shall be entitled to one vote
orr :each matter presented to the Board, with the exception of the Treasurer, who
shalLbe a non-voting member.
Any Board Member erttitled to vote may vote by
~by his duly authorized designate.
p;oxy: executed in writing by the member ,Y1-
Proxies
shalLb e valid · until the time of the next duly constituted meeting.
Section 10.
Compensation.
Each member of the Board of Directors will
serve without C'Ompensation except for reirp.burs e ment for authorized expenses
incurr.ed . within. the scope of the business of the corporation.
ARl'ICLE :V~
Officers and Committees
S e ction 1.
Chairman of Advisory Council. The chairman of the Advisory
C<iu..-ricil ' shall.be. official head of said Council and shall be elected by a majority
of.:a ,q uorum·~of. Cciuncil • . He shall serve a term corresponding to his term on said
Council.
Sectio n 2. :.. Chair_man of the Boa r d of Directors.
The Chairman of The
Board of Directors shall be offocial head of said Board a nd shall be elected by a
maj:o r.:ity: of:quorum of the Board.
He shall be a memb er of the Board and shall serve
�8
a term corresponding to his term on said Board.
Section 3.
Executive Director.
The Executive Director shall serve in the capacity
of the. President of the corporation and shall be invested with the authority to execute
the operational control of the Sorporation.
thirds vote of the Board of Directors.
He shall be chosen and elected by a two-
He need not be <!- member of eitrer the sAdvisory
Council. or. the Board of Directors, but shall fill the ex offcioposition on both bodies
upon :election.. He . shall have a term of one ye a r and have the right of succession.
Section 4 • . Assistant Director.
The Assistant Director shall serve in the
cap9-c.ity. of.Secr.etary to the corporation and shall be invested with such powers and
duties ca s deemed necessary by the Executive Director.
He shall be appointed by the
E x ecutive Director and approved by a majority of a quorum of the Board of Directors.
(J'l.(
He
need not be a member of either the Advisory Council_p/the Board of Directors.
He -.sha ll
serve a t e rm of one ye a r with the r i ght of succession.
S e ction 5.
Director of Finance.
The Director of Finance shall serve as
the -treasurer of the corporation and shall be invested with such powers and duties
as d eemed n e c essary by the Executive Dir e-ctor.
0
H e sha ll be appointed by the
E x ecutive Dir.e ctor and approved by the Board of Directors.
He shall be a non- voting
memb.er .of. the Board of Directors but n ee d not b e a m e mber of the Advisory Council.
He .shall
serve a t erm of one y ear and h as the rig ht of succession.
S e ction 6. Removal. . Any officer may be removed by the authority impowered
to :appoint or. :e lect him whenever such authority in its judgement fe els the b e st interests
of the corporation w ould be served ther eby.
Section ·7.- Compen s ation.
The Advisory Council and the Board of Directors
shall se r ve without compensation except .for reimbursements specified her ein.
The
Executive Director, Assistant Direc tor, and Financ e Director (the President, Sec -
�9
retary, and Treasurer, respectively) shall be compensated as specified in the
annual budget as approved by the Board of Directors.
Section 8.
Committees.
...
Both the Advisory Coun cil and the Board of
t
Directors shall have the. right to appoint any committee deemed necessary to
conduct the business of the . body in.question.
The necessity, members, and
chairme n ..of ~a ny and all. committe es shall be determined by a majority of
a c..q uorum_of.the body. forming the committee.
The removal of any committee,
in:·.whole .or .in .part,· shall follow the removal procedur e of its parent body~
ARTICLE:.VI.•. F owers of the Corporation.
S e ction 1.
Grants or Gifts.
T lie corporation shall be empowered to
r :e ceiv·e grants sand gifts,. by will ·. or in any other manner, in a n y form of property,
in:·.tr ust ·or .othe r w is e , wheree v e r situ a t e d, to c a rry out any of its purpos e s .
o. ~~·.. ~~
All
<:.V
such. g µ.ts .and grants shall be administered by the Treasurer as a,ppointe Ei by the
Bnard .of Hir e c t ors i n a ny fa shion d e eme d n e c e ss a ry (un less prior ag r eem ent with
b :en-e f a ctor . is i n c onflictj to c a r r y ou.t s pec ific purpos es of A tlant a Urb an Cor p s , Inc . ;}
S e ction 2 .
U s e of Assets •. All prope rty and income of the corporation shall
h :e( u se d .exclusive ly f or ·the purpos e s s e t oq.t in t h e Charter , a n d no p a rt the r e of
s halLbe .use d .fo r .t h e b enefit of a ny pe r s on who m soe v er except i n a manner con sistent
with.-.such· purposes.
S e c tion 3 .
G eneral P ower s.
The cor po rat i on s h a ll h ave the power t o re t ain
alLg!ant s and gi.fts in the o riginal form in which they were received unless otherwise
required by-the t erms .thereof; .to b uy, s e ll, exc hange o r otherwis e d eal i n stocks,
bonds , securities, real estate and any other form of property at public or private
sale; to _invest ·and reinvest. any of its funds or property belonging to it a t any tjme
in such securities and other property, real or personal, regardless of whether such
investments ·are .legal investments .for trust funds under the laws
of Georgia or any
�10
other state and to borrow money and secure the payment thereof by mortgate,
pledge, deed or other instrument or lien upon all or any part of the property
of the corporation •. All of the foregoing powers may be exercised without order
of court or other authority and are invested in the Exec·utive Director (President)
with .the approval.of the Board of Directors.
Section 4.
Statutory Powers..
The corporation shall be vested with all
of the. rights, powers, and privileges which may be necessary or proper to achieve
the purposes in the charter subject to the provision hereof; and the corporation
shalLhave all.of the powers and privileges enumerated in #22-1827 and #22-1828
of the Georgia Code, as amended, together with such other powers and privileges
as ::may· now or hereafter be given to corporations by law.
ARTICLE YII. _
Section 1.
Amrpendments to By-laws
Power to A mend.
power to. amend by-laws.
Only the Advisory Council shall have the
Amendments shall require a vote of a majority of
the. memb-ers of the Advisory Council.
ARTICLE ::VIII • .
Liquidation or Dissolution
Se·ction 1. . Power to Liquidate or Dissolve. .
Only the Advisory Council may
liq.uidate· or. dissolve the Atlanta Urban Corps, Inc., and may do so only on a 2/ 3 .
vot·e. -oLthose- present at a properly constituted and quorumed meeting.
Section 2.
Distribution of Assets.
The Advisory Council shall decide, by way
of:a 2/3 vote of these present at the same meeting whent dissolution is decided, upon
the ·distribution of as sets.
Said distribution will be only to a non-profit organization( s)
whic h has as its . purpose service and/ or education.
The specific recipient( s) will
be those deemed most worthy by the Advisory Council at the time of liquidation.
�11
Know"G all men that these present that we, the undersigned, b~ing
all .members of the Advisory Council of the Atlanta Urba n Corps, Inc., hereby
assent .to .the .foregoing By-laws and adopt them as the By-laws of said
corporation.
Iii:·witness whereof, . we have hereunto subscribed our names this


day of .
, 19
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --'----•-
SIGNATURES OF .ADVISORY COUNCIL
Know all men by these presents, that the undersigned Secretary of the
Corp_oration known as the Atlanta Urban Corp.s 9
Inc., does hereby certify that
the·. above and foregoing By-laws were duly adopted by the members of said
Advis0ry Council of said corpor a tion, as the By-laws of said corporation, on
the

day of ----------------------, 19------,
and
that-.they· do .now constitute the by-law s of said .corporation.
ATTEST: .·
Secretary
Atlanta Urban Corps, Inc.


Transcribe This Item

  1. http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_001.pdf

Document Viewer