Box 9, Folder 4, Complete Folder

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Box 9, Folder 4, Complete Folder

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l
"TOP FORTY" - Inter n s M eeting
Aug ust 4, 1969 - 3pm
Attendance:
Purpose:
32 Intern s out of the invited 4 0
To ind octrina t e interns who will be in the City of Atlanta to
prepare t h e m to i nfor m student s and faculty on their campus
regarding t h e U r ban Corps. Also, it was hoped that the "Top
40" students could present so m e g ood or g anizational ideas for
the fall pro g ra m .
AGENDA:
I.
Sarn V{illia:ms prese n t ed the History of the Urban Corps
fro m its be g inning in New York and on.
II.
The ~nte rn s w e r e told the purpos e of the three se m inars,
how thi s s p ecia l g roup was chosen and why they w e re
selecte d.
III.
Don Ebe rly, of t h e Atlanta Service -Learning Conference,
spoke on the value of the service -le arning aspect as it
relate d t o t h e Urb a n Corps and to t h e s ummer exp e rienc e of
t he intern .
IV . .A f ew question s we r e a s k e d to all :the inte rns in orde r to
ge t so rne g oo d ide a s:
E x a rnp l e :
~/hat s h ould be the p urpo s e and g o a l of
t h e U rban Corps .?
E x arn.p l e o f answere : O ne i nte r n fe lt that t he "le arning "
part of t h e p r o g ra rn sho uld b e droppe d-he fe l t
tha t y o u a u t o~;nt ica lly l e arn whe n y ou s e rve .
Ano t h er inte rn fe l t tha t the g oa l s o f the pro g ra m
ca n n ot b e struc t u red - i t w as s uch an i n dividua l
rna tter - a nd that if you s t r ucture d the go a l s , you
would n a tura lly look for s tud e nts w ho " fit the m old.
V.
S u gges t i ons fo r c h a n ge
1.
l\fake a ll financ ing t h e sarne for a ll l evels . Thi s s u rnrne r
the r e w e r e m any s t ude nts of different l e vels rnaking different arno unt s and d o ing the exa ct same thi ng.
2.
Expand the Urban Corps- i t was t o o s1nall to make
significant impact.
1
/
/'
3.
Expose the interns more to each 9 1ther which would
make e ach inte rn aware of where other interns are - and
could possibly de velop into interns using each other's
services and help.
4.
Se nd a list of all interns to each intern and their agency.
5.
Have interns on each c a mpus screen other interns for
participation in the pro g ram.
6.
Orient mo r e Urban Corps jobs to outside adrr.dnistrative
city departments.
11
�M EETING OF "T O P 4 0 11 INTERNS
A u gust 11, 1969
G e or e;ia State Collee;e - 8:30 P. lV.
PURPOSE O F MEETING: To present to the inte rns the non-city a ge ncy and
city department views of v,hat an int-2rn can and
should do.
ATTENDING:
NAME
AGENCY
1.
2.
3.
4.
i\!1ayor 1 s ,-=:: ££ice
Grady M. & I Project
Atlanta Urban Corps Staff
M orris Brown College
Urban Corps staff
EOA H ea lth
Atl. Public Library
Emmaus House
Sanitation De pt.
Mayor's Office
Servic e -Lear nin g Con£.
\/Vater Department
Se rvic e -Learning Con£.
National Welfare Ri g hts
Kennesaw Mt. Nat'l, Park
UJ."ban Co-rps Staff
Tra ffic Eng inee rin g Dept
Atlanta Youth Council
Vv" h eat Street Baptist Cburch
K e nne s aw ·Mt • .Na.t 1 1 Bat.t!e. 9-k..
SREB
At l anta Urban Corps Staff
Atla nta Urban Corps Staff
Economic O pportunity Atlanta
Kirkwoo d Christian C ente r
City Department A dmin.
Kennesaw Mt. N at'l Battle Pk.
Atlanta Urban Corps Staff
Finance Departrnent
Atla nta U rban Corps Staff
A tlant?. Urban C o rps Director
(Rent-A-Kid) tlanta Youth C.
At l anta Urban Corps Staff
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15,
16,
17.
18.
19.
20,
21,
2 2.
23,
24.
25.
2 6,
27.
28 .
29.
30,
31,
32,
33,
Walter L. Bloo1n, Jr.
Car ea tha Dani e ls
Inmond De e n
Ivlatti e Dirr1n1e ny
Maggie G erbe r
Rose Haywood
Janice Herring
Freddye Hill
John Hotard
Ton1my Isaac
Babs Kalve l age
Michael Kemp
Me linda La wre ne e
S. R a lph Ma r tin
Ala n M ille r
Ken M illwood
·Rona ld Nash
Rick Padge tt
K 3r l P a ul
Sus n n Pickard
Bill R am s ;:i. y
Tim Ro ~e rs
Barbara Rudisill
Christime Smith
Kendra Smith
Dan Swea t
Sn lly Tucke r
Bettye Underwoo d
·wagee n e r
D2.ve ~N h ~ lan
Sam -Yl illiams
Gary 'N ood
Sue Zander
Jelrn
The meeting was opened by Mr. Dan Sweat. City Deputy Administra tor, giving
his opinion of why the city d~partments need intern s. He pointed out that the city
needs the new ideas of ~ollege interns. He feels the streng th and w ea. knesses of the
Urban Corps c:euld be (1) strength - Se rvic e -Learning wn.cept, Souther n R egional
Educational Board an d that the Urban Corps is stude nt run. ( 2 ~ Weaknass; The Dr.bt1n
C orps is not y et a year round operation .
Sam Vvilliar.c,s a sked Mr 0 Swe at to expla in hi s f~e lings Oll how !ar an Urban Corps
type program <:an go in change city government.
Mr. Sweat stated that students should go in and expand th0 syste m to the tr,3;:i kin g
point, then loosen-up, otherwi s e there's no more S)JBten~ to work on.
Bill Kemp, an Urban Corps intern in the Water D '" pcirtment , suggGstaJ that the
city set up permanent adminish·3tive po.sitions i;:1 city departments for int rns. He
felt this could be a unifying force for city go v . . : rnmen t, i . .:. . , int~rns come togeth:.H
and t a k~ problems to th~ Board of .Alderma n.
�Cont'd
Mr. Sweat, whe n a ske d about the possible e ffe ctive n e ss of the inte rn r e ports
being writte n, stre sse d the importance of being thorough in the reports a nd tha t .
they would a ll be r e ad by some one in his depa rtment. Some would b e sent to the
Mayor, but he assured the group that the Mayor could not re a d all r e ports.
A discussion of city governme nt followed a nd Mr. Swe a t e ncoura ged the interns
to s ee k caree rs in city governme nt.
In the a bsenc e of F a the r Ford, Emma us House , who was to discuss the inte rn as
se e n by the private - a gency, the discussion was opened by Mr. Bill Ransey, of the
SREB.
Ga ry Wood, a n Urban Corps inte rn with the R e nt- a -Kid Agency, said tha t
the Urban Corps w a s vital in kee ping private a gency going.
Freddye Hill, of Emma us House, sta ted tha t a lthough inte rns were needed in
the a gency, "could we a ll possibly b e do gooders a nd doing more h a rm in starting
progra ms tha t w e must h a v e in the fa ll. 11 She stated tha t a n Urban Corps intern
should go into a priva t e age ncie s a nd d e t e rmine their n ee ds a nd work within the m.
Rick P a dgett of the Atla nta Youth Council a sked why should th e r e b e a diffe r e nce
of purpos e b e twee n going into a city d e pa rtme nt a nd a priva t e age ncy? In othe r
words, w a s it more importa nt a s a n inte rn h a ving a p e rsona l rela tionship to a
group of k i ds or a n i nte rn in the city d e p ar tme nt where you'r e a ffe cting the syst em
of mass m e dia .
John Hota rd, Sanita tion D e p a rtme nt, conclude d that we should a tte mpt to do
both.
MEETING OF TOP 40 INTERNS
Monda y, August 18, 1969
City H a ll - Committee Room #2
3:00p.m.
The fina l m e e ting of the "Top 40" intern s w a s h e ld Monda y, A u g ust 18, 1969, m
Committee Room #2, City H a ll, 3: 00 p. m. , with Da ve Whelan, Director of
D e v e lopme nt, Urba n Corps sta ff, pre siding.
Tla..e purp ose of t h e m e e ting w a s to inform t h e i n t ern of wha t a ctio n c a n b e t a k e n on
c a mpu s, w h a t r e source s a r e a v a ila ble on the c a mpu s a nd t h e pre s e nt s t a t us o f
a c a demic cre dit, a nd wha t proble ms a r e pre s e nt in the c ampu s a nd c o mmu n i ty.
Dave W hela n pointe d out the fo llo wing e x a mple s of PROG RAM POSSI B I L I T IES:
(1)
E m ory Uni v e rsity
a.
T h e sch oo l o f Nursing a t E mory Univ ersity is negot iating
t o p l a c e junior nur sing stude nts in a commun ity a ction
age ncy using the U rba n C o rps to a ssit t hem. The D ean
of the Nur sing S choo l a t Emo ry, M r s . Ada Fort, i n her
explanation as to why the N ursing Schoo l is very much in
fa v or of thi s plan, stated that nursing students a re taught
all medical subj ect s and that the faculty now is pushing to
give the stu dents expose on a "real life " basi s to the types
of people and sit uations they coul d be exposed to and this
in turn, would possibly develop a more a ware type of person.
�b.
(2}
The Political Science departme nt a t Emory (Dr. Bowen
a nd Dr. Main) a r e b a cking the idea of stude nts enrolling
in certa in course s and having the option of coming to
cla ss or wor king through the Urban Corps and r e c e iving
credit for the ir inter ship providing the y me e t a ll othe r
criteria set. (example: re a dings, r e ports, etc.)
Clark Colle ge
a
Dr. H a rris, Cha irma n of the 11 C ommitte e on Non-Tra ditional
Curriculm" agrees that if a student wishes to p articipate in
the Urban Corps for credit (3 to 9 hours) then he c an a ppea r
b efo r e the committee .
M rs. Edith Ross-Associate Professor, Atlanta Univer sity
Schoo l of So cia l Work, interj e cted the pla n o f the AU
Cente r Schools c o mbining a ll Atlanta Unive rsity schoo ls ·
in a program of SOCIAL WELFARE-which will include
under g radua t es in 4 courses of social work. She suggested
this was a possible w a y to link the AUC with the Atla nta
University Complex. (Dr. Garth is cha irman of the program,
Mrs. Ross is Coordi nato r}
(3)
G eo r g i a Tech
a.
( 4)
Social Scie nce course -"Problems in Urban Socie ty,"
is a co ur se whe n the r e is a p o ssibility of the stude nt
e nrolling a nd h a ving an inte rnship through the U rban
Corps part of hi s course.
Tra nsfe ring Credit
D a v e Whe l a n sug g e ste d tha t the r e mi ght b e a possibility o f a
tra ns i e n t stude nt e nrolling in other school Is c ourse t:-ia t might
h a v e an internship, a nd t r a sferring the course b a ck t o the
p a rtent i nstitution. Stude nts w e r e told to check w ith the ir
depa rtme n t h ea d.
Mr. Bill R a ms e y, of the So uthe rn Regiona l Educa tion B oa rd,
sta t e d tha t a ltho u g h h e is not a ga inst the ide a of cre d it b e ing
g iven, h e fe lt stude nts should no t approa ch their respective
departme nts heads i mmedi a t e ly with the idea of getting credit
for their inte rnship, (e ither summe r or fa ll} this is not the w a y
t o a pproa ch the faculty, a s the y n re proba bly n o t a w a r e o f
Urba n C o rps a nd w ill w a nt t o kno w imme dia t e ly the impo rta nt
t hing s such as the Educa tio n a l Aspe cts, v a lue and t e chniques .
In o rde r to pre s e nt this a d e qua te ly, the students m ust b e pre p a red
t o b a ck t his up a nd give c o ncre t e exa mple s o f " w h a t w a s lea rned
fro m the ir inte rnship this summe r. 11
Some student sugge stions g iven a t the mee ting perta i ning to the
o v era ll U r b an Corp s p ro g r am a n d s p ecifi c a lly c ampu s p a r ti c i pa tion a r e a s fo llo ws:
{l)
C h arlie B rown, Georgi a T e ch, s u ggested tha t the
diffi c ult y a s far a s T e ch ·w o u ld be in c onvincing the
faculty tha t t h e program is important. He sugge sted
tha t a n exampl e o f an inte rnship to b e suggeste d t o
the fac ulty w o u l d be the idea of engineering students
s urveying part of the M odel Cities area where surveying
i s needed r a ther than surveying Peters Park which is
surveyed because o f lack of other suggestions.
�- - - ~---- ~ - -- - -~ - - - - - -~
- - - - - - - - -- - ~ ~ ~- - -~ =----=
Susan Picka rd, Agnes Sco tt, suggested the possibility of usin g
a n 11 ENDOWMENT 11 fund Agne s Scott for Urban Corps inte rns
from Scott since they do not r e c e ive CWSP funds.
L o yd Sande rs, Morehouse, sugge ste d tha t a faculty members from
ea ch schoo l b e a sked to w o rk with the Urba n C o rps s o tha t transferring cre dit w o uld b e m o re ea sily h a ndled.
K e n Milwo o d, University of Geo rgia , suggested t o have both student
a nd faculty r e pre s e nta tive from ea ch schoo l as the " o fficial"
Urban C o rps R e pres e ntatives.
Sa m V{illia ms m a d e the follo win g sugge stions for the inte rn t o do
in the fall:
1.
Meet a s a group aga in sometime in Octobe r
or Novembe r.
2. Go se e fina ncia l a id o fficer a nd find out wha t
is th e schoo l I s a llo cation for CWSP a nd h o w
much the y a r e r e que sting n ext ye a r a nd h ow
much is b e ing spent off-campus.
3.
K ee p in touch with the Urba n Corps o ffic e with
n a m e s, et c., of people to conta ct.
�August 18, 1969
Possible Urban Co1·ps Director s Contacted
To Date
1.
Bob Sigmond, Assistant Director, Resource Develop1nent Project
SREB
2.
Ken Millwood, Public Relation Director, Atlanta Urban Corps
3.
John Sw eet, VISTA Volunteer, Atlanta
4.
Alan Gould, Assistant Director, New York Urban Corps
5.
Elayne Landis, Assistant Director, New York Regional Metro Planning
Commission
6.
James W. Foughn;:;r, Financial Aid Director, Dalton Junior College
7.
Ronnie Chinchilla, Director VISTA training program, Westinghouse
Lea r ning , Atlanta
8.
Imre. Kovacs , Youth and Urban Minister, NewHaven Congregational Church
9.
Thorburn Reid, President, Project Earning Power, Washington, D. C.
1 0.
Ronald Kabl, M.S. degree, Community Development, · university of Missouri
1 1.
Michael K. Ray, Retired Major, EOA at present
�ELAYNE LANDIS
220 Garfield Place
Brooklyn, New York 11215
EXPERIENCE:
Editorial Assistant - World Scope Encyclopedia, New York City, August , 1959,
io January, 1960, general editing of articles submitted for printing in encyclopedia
Editor - Freelance, January , 1960, to August, 1960, research and editing of
theses in political science and history; bibliographical research for magazine articles
Editor - Anderson Map Company, New York City , April, 1960 , to August, 1960,
research for isometric map of New York City, developing location and
significance of historical sites, ethnic neighborhoods and places of interest
Teacher - New York City Board of Education, October, 1960, to January, 1966,
teaching el ementary school one year at P. S. 144 in Harlem; teaching English
and Social Studies three years in junior high school in Greenwich Village;
faculty advisor to student newspaper and magazine; faculty advisor to General
Organi zation
Urban Planner - Nassau County Planning Commission , January, 1966, to January,
1968, site planning for Mitchel Field; study of office construction and white
collar employment; assignment by County Executive to work with Metropolitan Regional Council in New York City resulting in revival of the council of
governments through revitalization of programs in transportation, jet noise,
air pollution, water pollution, recreation, solid waste disposal, etc.; preparation and submission of first HUD application for planning funds.
Assistant Director - Metropolitan Council, January, 1966 to present, general
administration, organization, budgeting, program development and writing;
direct responsibility for regional program areas in narcotics addiction,
law enforcement, student internship; work with mayors and chief county
elected officials in tri-state metropolitan area towards goal of regional
cooperation and local participation in regional planning and decision-making
EDUCATION:
Brooklyn College, Government and History, B. A., 1958
Harvard University, Government, Summer, 1956
University of Pennsylvania, History, M.A., 1961
New York University, Urban Planning, 60 credits, M. U. P . ;
Werner-He gemann Scholzi.rship, 1963-64; 1964-65
�l
THESES :
University of Pennsylvania , M . A . thesis about assimilation of immigrants in New
York City , considering housing, education, group affiliations, employment ,
governmental participation
New York University , M. U. P. thesis concerned with goals, problems and
accomplishments of neighborhood conservation programs
PERSONAL:
Born:
U. S. A .
Age:
32
REFERENCES :
Perry L . Norton, Professor of Planning
Graduate School of Public Administration
New York University
Four Washington Square North
New York, New York
Hon. Lawrence F. Kramer
Mayor
City Hall
Paterson, New Jersey
Hon. Charles E. Pound
Commissioner
Department of Parks and Recreation
County Office Building
White Plains, New York
Marital Status: Single
�·Resume of:
JOB
JA1'-:1ES HILLI.hl-1 FOUGHNEH
22}-5- -C-aus t -o n- Bl -uf f - R-oad I 1..10 .). - D R(, v J... D ·- i~ c... {-l. 1:c s T ~u ·s. k
s.av-a-nna·rr;-- Gtrn-rg t a- 3t ·4o4- ·AT. (}- tVTR I G-Gu A G- 1/ =} . .s.::.J, (:Phone : 9-1-2---2~&~6 64l/0 11 __ J.. 1fi _ /Cf 7 ;)..._
OBJE_C_T_IVP-,:
Position of developmen t director or fed e ral programs coordinator.
Also interested in public relations and related fields.
PERSONAL DATA:

Bii:..th: .
Height:
Height:
Health:
Harital Status:·
Draft Statu s :
Employment Area:
Hobbies:
August 22, 1938
. 5 f 10 II
· 190 lbs.
Excellent
S-ing..l.e- ft) Pr Ar<. l ~ -D
1-Y
Southeast
Sports, Government, Music,
Literature and Theater.
EDUCATION:
1960- 1963
Law School, University of Georgia
Graduated June 1. 1993 ulth JD
1958-1960
~ourna lism School, University of Georgia
Gradu a. t ed .June 4, 1960 lri th ABJ B average:
Major field, Radio and Television •
. Extra-curri cular Activities:
1960- 1963
Member of Athens Le gal Aid Society, Vice
Chairman of Leg a l Aid Society • • • Phi Delta Phi
Legal Fraternity ••• First place wi.nner from
Georgia Law School in Le gal Aid Essay Contest.
1958-1960
Hember of Di Gamma Ka_ppa .Broadcasting Fraternity
EHPLOYrIB NT EX PERIENCE:
- 1968- 1969
1963- 1968
Director of Information, Federal Projects Officer
and Alumni Director, Dalton Junior Colle g e
Civil Defense Research University of Georg ia
Rese a rch Associate, Director of Publicity and
Recruitment, under contra ct with the Office of
Civil Defense, Department of Army , to investie;a te
the ha bitability of co~~ unity fallout s he lt er s • ••
Rese ar ch duties includ ed experimental de s i gn for
simula ted confinemen t studie s) se l ection a nd
trainin g of man a8eme nt of staffin g, su pervisin g
the work of gr aduate a s sistant s, ·wr i ting the f ina l
r epo rts , pa rt i cipati on i n government and acad emic
sem inars. As a result of our public i ty eff or t s,
4 1000 s h el ~er ee volunt eers were r ec r u ite d over a
five ye a r period o
I
�REFERE1WES :
Dr. Thomas R. Ahearn, Kennesm-r Junior College, Harietta, Ga. 30060
Mr. Thomas E. Hart, Dalton Junior Colle ge, Dalton, Ga. 30720
Professor i'lorth HoDougald, University of Geore;ia, Athens, Ga. 30601
Dr. James Allen 1-Ta tson,
Atlanta _Board
of
Education,
Atla~ta, Ga.
Mr. James McIntyre, Georgia Municipal Association, Atlanta, Gao
Mr. Don Southerland, Georgia Center .for Continuing Education,
Athens, G-a.
I .
!:
�lmre Ko v acs
19 Orc h a rd Pl ace
New H aven , C on ne c t ic u t 0,6511
August 15 9 1969
!1r. Sam /villiams
Atlanta Urban Corps
30 Courtland Street, N.E.
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Mr. /lil li ams:
Mr. Ta p pan Wilder, the Dir e ctor of the Yale Int ernship Program
in Urb an Studi es , t e lls me t ha t he r e commende d my name· to you .
for the posit ion of Director of the Atlanta Urban Corps and
that h e s ent you my resume.
As outli ned in your letter to Nr. Fleishman, the Atlanta Urban
Corps s e ems to be a succ e s s with hi gh potential for even greater
succe ss and gr eat er s ervic e to the commun ity. I wo u ld like to
expres s my strong inter es t in the pro gram and de sir e to work
with it.
At pre sent I am the Assistant Minister at the North Haven Congregationa l Church. Durin g th e pas t y ea r I ha v e bee n r espon sibl e for
develo p ing on urba n ministry pro gram, r e l a ting th e church to an
inner city tar ge t neighborhoo d in New Hav e n. Th e program has
included get t ing groups in t h e church inv o lv e d in s e rvice opportunities in the city and educating th e youth t hrough a pro gram
of encounters wit h different a sp ects of urban life.
In a ddition,
part of the pro gr am was to e duc a t e s uburbanit es in the complexiti es of the me tro p olitan ar ea in ~hich th e y live thr ough a day
lon g e ducati onal seminar which I helpe d de v e lopo A t pr e s ent,
I am tra ining a gro up of pe op l e who will t ak e r esp ons ibility
for the urban ministry using the assistant minister as a resource
person.
Another group in th e church which I am training is a gr oup o j
six coup les.
I rec r uited th e coupl es for an inten s iv e wee k end
trainin g con fe r en ce la s t fa ll . Th is group i s de v e lo p ing a
comprehen s iv e r e - e va lua tion of t h e chur ch and a p l an f or t h e
restructuring of the church for service to the community.
An additional r e s pons ibility wh ich I h a v e as sume d this summer
i s be i ng Res ide nt Dir e c t or of the Yal e S ummer Pr ogra ms.
Thi s
pos it ion inv o lv es adm ini stering and c oor di na t ing th e non-a cademic
pr ogramjbr ov er f iv e hun dr e d st ude nt s . A major r esponsibi lit y
of th e p o s ition i s th e g en era l ~re a n d we l fare of th e students.
Th i s i n v o lv e s da il y c on t a c t _wit h a l arge number of st udents who

�.. ·- - - --1
~
lmre Kovacs
19 Orclrnrd Place
New H a ven, C o nn ec ti cut
Mr. Sam Williams
-. ' :
.,
0-6511
page 2
range from college and hi gh school students studying foreign
languages, to black colle ge stu dents doing intensive gra duate
preparatory work, to graduate studen ts on rese arch grants.
My vocational gJal is to be in a position where it would be
possible Jo use th e resources of th e structures of society and
direct them toward solvin g the problems of the city. I am
particularly int erested in the Urb an Corps because it ha s as
its goal directing the resources of the adademic structures in
Atlanta toward the needs of the community.
I believe that I h a ve abilities which would especially suit me
for working with the Urban Corps. First, I have had experience
in both the academic and urb an communities, not only as a
stu de nt and resident, but also in positions of responsibility
demanding administrative ability. Second, I believe that one
of my strongest abilities lies in the area of planning and
administering. I h a ve had train¢ng and experience in planning
and model building processes, and possess the ability to direct
and coordinate individuals and groups.
My resume does not inclu de any references. Below are the names
of two men whom I believe can give you a fair evaluation of my
work and abilities.
Nr. Joseph Downey
Director of Comm unity Services Division
«:ommunity Progress Incorporated
270 Orange Street
New Ha ven, Conn e cticut 06511
-·.
Rev. Arthur Hig g ins
Minister of Church and Society
Connecticut Con fere nce of United Church of Christ
20 Dra z en Drive
North Haven, Connecticut 06473
.
. --
I look forward to hearing from you •
.:"
Sincerely 1
1~l0vQ~/2 ~
�Resume
Imre Kouacs
Address
19 Orchard Place
New Haveh, Conn. 06511
Telephone
203-776-3044
Present position
Youth and Urban Minister
North Haven Congregational Church
Background and
past posit ions
Grew up in New Yorh City • • • Father, minister of the First
Hungarian RcformGd Church, New York • •• Secretary of the '
Notional Youth Cabinet of the United Church of Christ 9 1961.--62
• • • Delegate to the North American and European Ecumenical
Youth Assemblies, 1961 9 1962 • •• Vice-president~ Yale Divinity
v'fs·chool Student Association, 1968. ~ • Resident Di1·ector,
Ya le Summer Programs, 1968, 1969
L
Education
Urban expericmce
1963-68
Urban-suburban
ministry, 1968
to the present
Vocational goals
Rudolf Steiner School, New Yorh, 1953-1961 • ••
~ale University, B.A., 1965, majored in Chinese Studies and
religion • •• Yale Divinity School, B.D., 1968P •• Yale
School of Art and Architecture, courses in the history of
city planning and urban structure while at the divinity school
Secretary of Dwight Hall, undergraduate organization at
Yale responsible fo1· studen.t involvement in the New Haben
inne1· city. Responsibility for developing new programs • • •
YNCA group worlter with inner ct'. ty boys • • •
Executive Secretary of Hiil-Dwight Ninisterial Ailiance.
Community organization worh with blncli mission churches in
New Haven inner city, field worh while in divinity school.
Organized day care center. Edited Alliance newspaper which
was distributed to the churches. Worked with New Haven
Redevelopment to relocate churches in r~newal area. Assisted
in comprehensive analysis of Hill area. Co-ordinated
Alliance programs with Community Progress, Inc., New Haven's
a~ti-pouerty agency
Grant from the Connecticut Conferenc:e of · the United Church of
Christ to discover ways of relating the North Hauen church to
an inn<1r city target area t'.n New Hauen, Netbhallville. Planned,
with the assistance of Christian Conmunity Action, a day long
educational program on the interrelationship of the city and
suburb. Worked with the black ministers in the Ninisters
Assoc_iation of Newhallville.
Secured and supervised divinity
school student to work with Association. Developing a group
within the North Haven church to take responsibility for
continuing the ministry. Final report to the Conference to
be "Nanual for Dev e loping an Ur~an - Suburban Ninist r y"
To undGrstand the dynamics of ur ban change • • • To enabl e
. the structures to be more responsive · t o the needs of peo p l e
• • • To change the st r ucture s to c r eate a more h uman urban
envi r onment
�..,
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Resume
THORBURN REID
3429 3L1th Pl ace, N. ~l.
Washington, D.C. 20016
Home:
0-ff ice:
363-8554 (202)
Project Earning Pov/er
1826 Jefferson Pl~ ce, N.H.
Washington( D.C. 20036
296-'-¼4 33
SUMMARY
202)
Ski 11 s





Program analysis, evaluation and development
~·<Writing: analyses and programs


General management and administration


. ~·( Youth l eodership


Fluent Spanish, fair French


\
Areas of Experience
~·(
1c
~·(

. -{:
·l:
National and international government agencies
Community developme nt, urban and rural
Youth involvement in contemporary problims
International relations and law
Latin America
WO~K EX PER I ENCE
1967present
I' .
I
PRESIDENT, Project Earning Power, a national, non-profit corporation
with headquarters in Washington. The Corporation's first president
and officer. Responsibility for planning and administering a national
program to assist severely handicapped workers in sheltered workshops
to. raise their earnings.
The job involves:


Securing












19671966
and administering government contracts and grants.
Directing, evaluating and supporting national orgunization with
offices in Los Angeles, Chicago and New York.
Coordinating and dire~ting professional · (designers, businessmen,
etc.) volunteers, consultants, national organizations such as
the Women's Committee of the President's Committee on Employment
of the Handicapped, the National Association of Sheltered Worksh1ops, the Industrial Design Society of America.
Total reorganization of all phases of the Corporation, stressing
establishment of clear goals and clear lines of authority, and
stream! ined organization.
ADMINISTRATOR, Mid-Atlantic Region, VISTA, Hashington, D.C. The "domestic
peace corps", a program of volunteers working in the war on poverty.
Responsible for establ fshing and directing the Mid-Atlantic office when
VISTA was first regional ized.


Selected

Planned,


and supervised staff of 28, regarded as best region a l staff .
administered, evaluated and supervtsed Qrograms and t ra ining
involving 750 volunteers in seven states ~nd the District of
Columbia.
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·k





19661964
Coordinate d pro91 '-'"'.:, 1·J1 th OEO offices, state and loc a l agencies,
and proj ect·s pon s or s .
Progr ams were pr edom in antly in urb a n a nd rural community deve lopment and mental heal th ; stressed institution building in
·
progr amm ing, i.e., assigning volunteers to instltution ~which
would th ereby be aided most in becoming self-sufficient.
DEPUTY DIRECTOR, Peace Corp s / Per u, in Lima , Peru. Volunteers work in
development pro grams in: urban and ru ra l community develop me nt; coops,
and sma ll indu st ry deve lopment ; education.











I





Sha red re spo ns ibility with Director for pl an ning and administering
progr ams for ov e r· LfOO volunteers.
Coordina t ed and wo rked with participating Peruvian agencies and
U.S. Overseas Mission officials.
Sh a red responsibility with Director for sev en region a l offices
and ten associate dir ec tors, plus three Peruvian technical
advisors.
Emphasi zed: building self-sufficient Peruvian institutions;
establishi.ng clear program priorities r e flecting Per uvian needs;
matching volunt ee rs with ap propr i ate jobs; maintaining open
communications with volunteers and staff.
I
/ EVALUATOR, Pea ce Corps/Washington . Ev a luation Division reviewed for
Dir ~c to r all aspects of Pe ace Corps, including sel e ction and training
of V,olunteers, program p1l a nning and operation overseas.





I


frepared








19621960
written reports for Peace Corps Director and Division
\ Heads on all aspects of Peace Corps country programs; a nd
\ reports on all aspects of Peace Corps training progr ams. ,
~isited and studied intensive ly Pea ce Corps progr ams in countries
, in Latin America, and 3 countries in East Asia and Africa,
\ interviewing Peace Corps, AID, Embassy and ho s t national
1officials and Peace Corps volunte e rs.
·
·
S~ressed: compa rison of stated program go a ls with actual perl f ormance; aptness of program goals; matching volunt eer s with


p::~:: ~: S~:.:: ~


COMM ITT~


e


I Comm i t tee on \/or I d Peace Through Law of the
I
!
/
)
.
/
Ameri~an Bar Associ ~t ion, Washington, b . C. Committee was en gaged in ;
preparing · and direc~ing four regional international conferences to
promote deve lopment! of international law.
/


P;epared


draft ~onference wor king papers on problems a~d potentia~ ·
internati on al law; special committee reports; confereace
/
agendas and budgets; correspondence for participating lawyers
here and abr oad .
Responsible for advance preparation on site and administration of
conferences in Costa Rica, Nigeria, lt_aly and Japan with local
public and private officials.
of





'
�RES U/vl,E
fVr,i.u!l-t /r?-~ >
-11- -·-·--R-o-..Ju
ROl"-J ALD J. KALIL
1ke,
HO/v\ E ADD RESS
TEMPOP-ARY ADDfz F.SS (un t i I Jun e 1969)
314 C:Pti~s t/n Coll ege Ave nu e
. Colun~
163 Kohanza Sf-reet
Ar+ t,
Jll/4.Jct-
Danbury, Connecl-i cut


ssouri 65201


Phone: 203-74 8-6134
Phone: 31 4- 44 9-4556
VOCATlOt'-IA L GOAL
To engage in any or all aspe cts of community deve lopm ent: training 1 promotion,
programming , marke ting, evaluation, and consulting.
· PERSOl"-lAL
Born:
April 4, 1942
Heallh: Exc e llent
Danbury, Conn eclicut
Height: 5 1 8 11
Marital Status : Sin9le
Weight: 155 pounds
EDUCATION
M.S. : Co mmunity Developme nl·, Univ ersity of Mi ss ouri 1 June 1969
B. B.A.: Account-ing, Unive rsity of Connecticu t , June ·,1964
EXPERIENCE
September 1968 to Pres ent:
Graduate Research Assistant
An eight month ass istan tship !-o work on community
deve lopm ent research proi ccts in mid - Mi ssouri .
September 1967 to Present:
Graduate S!ude nt
I am working toward on M . S. deg ree in Co mm unity
Devel opme nt. It wil I be comp le ted in Jun e 1969.
\.
�Jun e 1967 f·o September 1967 :
VISTA Asso cial·cs Progrom Mcm oger
A lempor_cry job lo acl- as I ia iso n be twe e n VISTA
cenl-rcd offic e in Wmh ingf·on , D. C. ancJ VISTA
volunl ec rs in !h e fi e ld . It was my job to se le ct
eighty applicants, ass isf· in irnining them , fincling
pl accrn e: nls for i·he rn , and representing 1·hcs e
summer volunle:crs in J·he field.
Nov ember 1966 to Jun e 1967:
Peace Corps Recruiter
I was employ ed by Pe ace Corps as a cam pus recruit e r
at coll eges and univ e rsiJ-i es in th e southern and
soulhwesl e rn regions of !h e United States.
August 1964 lo Augusf· 1966:
Peace Corps Volunf·ee r
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.
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l
I worked in a communily developmenl proj ec t at the
village leve l in rural Norlh eas f· Brazil •
'
FORE!Gl'-J LANGUAGE S
Portugu ese , Sponish, and Arabic ·
TRAVEl~
Brazil, Paragu ay , Argentina, Uraguay , Chile, Bolivia, Pe ru, Ecuador, Venez uela,
Dominican Republic, " and Mexico.
REF ERE l~ C ES
Dr.LceJ.Cary
Dep l. of Regional and Commun Hy
Affairs
Profession al Building
Universily of /\l1issouri
Columbia, Missouri 65201
Chairm on of Department and Professor
Joseph Higdon
Trans Century Corporation
1520 Seventh Street, N. W.
Washington, D . C . 20001
Program
Adm in isf-rator
Roger Bouteiller
127 Westville Avenue Ext.
Businessman
Danbury, Connecticut 06810
Laurie Grae ff
2600 East Ward Te rrace #10
Anaheim, California
Social Worker
.,,
�,·
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,~
• c-..
Micha.el K. Ray
P.rm:;o:rAt
D.WA-:
~
Retired. l-1 a.jor
Date of Birth: ·
12/2.2/22
WeiGh·c:
155 Po1...Lri0..s
5' 6"
Height :
Marital Sta tu.:;:
Draf-t; -Sta tu.s :
Militory Ei:3torJ: _
1943-194G
,,
Infantr y
~
Hichest gradt
Harried. - 5 children
3-A
1st. Sgt.
Infantry ~ Adj. Gen . · Corp. Hic;bcst gro.de M~jor
1950-1967
Retirca June 30, 1967
19~-1- 1942
Amexica.n Institute of BCLl.1.king
Los Anzcles, Califo:enia
AccountiTig and ?rinc :i..paJ G of D2.nJ~i116
1939 ..1941
Belmont High School
EDUC!i.T IOl'T:
Los Angeles, California
SERVICE
sc:-:oor.s
Adj. Gen. Officers C5.l·eer Couree
Ft. Har~ison, Ind.icna
1959
Duri113 pcrioa. of 1952 to 19 67, attcnc1.cd cou..r::;es in Pc:r::;onncl
Ha..11.D.[';ea ent, Civilic.n ena. l-1ilita ry Purch:i.;:;ins m1cl Con.t:r-.1.cti r:~
Spec:i.o.l Services Cou~·ccs in o;._--:crL:.tio:1 of R~c:r2~ti0,'! /,l·,~:.s
to i :o..c ]:...1.c1c f2.cili tie::; suc::i e.s Golf com·sc::;, Bmrlinc :I.r::82s ,
SerYi cc Clubs , 'l·h~s.i:.~r.-;, Cra i"'c::; Clu"b mid. Sn c.ck Bo..r Op-2:::"ntio.:1 .
Public Tielation Cour~es.
Ed.ucatio:1 ec.:,u::i.l to ~-1:r;;iroxfr1,~.tely three years college.
E-fPLO"fl-IZriT HIS'I'ORY:
United States Arny
9/15/50 to ?re3c1~
Officer ~ Pr·lr-r.::.ry du ties : Chief of Speci3.l Servicec.
and DivlGion ~8vcl.
1950- 1952
Cor.'!pm1y · Coi:rru..." lder
1952-1956
\
1
I
Po.:::t
Assista:-tt S:pccia.1 Ser,..-lce::; Offi c ~r ru1c1. Cus toc.ian cf Cc~1tr2l
Post Fund ,
Dutie :;: Rud co'.'.Iplcte respons ibility f or the contrecting
and. IAU-cln;;lnc of all :cec:r;;;o:t.ion i::n.:.p-plic8 a."1.d rmt8rioJ.s,
food 0.nd bever a ge for ooldicrG clu"'v, snJ.ck b :U' 3 etc.
Coatr;,.1cting Ol'i'iccr for new construction a:1.d r.:::ll~bilit~tio;:i
plus f'urnitu:rc ELYld fix·~urcs. H:i.ndlir!g all r,n-:::sc..:; to
mra.rdi.i.J.J of co:.-i~ro.ct. Su:9ervioecl co::-1 3truction of 18 hole
e;oli' co·..u·se, Pro Di10::;> end Clu'b Eou::; c . St n.ffcd and
supervlscd o:per-::i.tion o f Club Eouz; c, Coc~~t ~il lou.."lge, e.nd
- DiniP..g Roo:n. Arr-2-:.--is-.::~--:e..11t s fo1~ a lJ. p r i vo.te p -:i.rtics u 9 to a
1:1~ir'.'.w:1 of 250 v ...t.s h ::i.nclled u:1d2r r.ry d.irect za:)8l.'Vl::::io.:1.
Ori;nnl:'.(:U. Holl.yvoo cl Llv ...: S b o ·.;.1 , ihlci\ incl111l~l1 loc •1l t ~,J.c :1t,
Bob Ilo;,c, Bing Cro:.by, J C:.ck lk:n:1y e.nd Lou Co::it c l.lo.
Provic.c :1 tr.inc?orto:tion., Hotel i::.nd Hotel ac cc:2;,oc~.,.J.tio,1 ::; .
·-
�MINUTES
GRANT REVIEW BOARD
AUGUST 13 , 1969
The Grant Review Board of the City of Atlanta met Wednesday, August 13, 1969,
at 10:00 a.m. to discuss the Request for Proposal from the U.S. Department of
Housing and Urban De v elopment for participation in the Urban Information
System project. The following persons were present at the me e ting:
Members
Dan Sweat, Chairman
Collier Gladin, Planning Dir e ctor
Jay Fountain, Deputy Dir e ctor of Finance
Others
John Watson, Planner
Raymond Fleming, UrbanCorps Intern
Kenneth Gregor, Urban Observatory Coordinator
Mr. Watson e x plained that the RFP i nvites proposals for t he research and development of a compr e hensive , i nte grate d muni cipa l information system or subs ·y·stem . This i s a n expe r iment to l ea. r !'l v:.rh ether o r r10't ~ p rotot~,rpe r: an be
developed and successfully op e rat e d as a r e latively standardized system w hich
can be transferred t o other municipalities wi t h a minimum of alteration s.
It is the i n t e ntion of HUD to s e lect one city in th e population range 50, 000 to
500, 000 to award a $2. 5 million gr a nt for th e d e velopm e nt of a compr e h e nsive
system and s e v e ral c i t ie s will be chosen to r e c e ive lesser grants for d eve lopm e nt
of individua l sub- systems.
A detailed summary of RFP 2-70 is attached.
After much d i scussion, the Grant R e vie w Board recomm e nds th e follo w ing:

~
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1.
That th e City of A tla nta m a k e application for th e $2 . 5 m i llion compreh ens1ve
system g r an t , pr ovid e d th e Ma yor and B oar d o f Ald ermen comm it a dequa t e
re sources a nd a s s i gn h igh prio r ity for th e proj e ct.
2.
That th e re sponsibility fo r pr e pa ra tion -of t he G r a n t a pplicatiqn b e lodge d
with the Da ta P roce ss ing R evi ew Comm ittee u n d_e r th e fo llo wing cond i t i on s :
(a)
Tha t th e Data P ro c e ssing Revi ew C omm i t t ee b e expa nd e d to includ e
qual i f i ed representative s from ea c h c i ty department, the S chool
Departm e nt and th e Administrative Staff of tr..e M a yo r a nd Boa rd of
Aldermen and that an executive committee compos e d of thos e b e st
�Grant Review Board Minutes
Page 2
August 13, 1969
qualified representatives of departments most affected by this
project be chosen to guide development of the application. The
project director for application development be recommended by
this group and will report to it.
(b)
That this committee report to a joint committee of the Aldermanic
Finance Committee and the Planning and Development Committee.
3.
That the committee take immediate steps to accept proposals from.
interested software consulting firms and recommend a software
firm to the Joint Aldermanic Committee.
4.
That the committee establish immediate communications with the
Urban Observatory through the City's Urban Observatory Coordinator
to determine the interest of the Urban Observatory in participating
in the Urban Information System project.

.-L.--..!"--- .C-..-- L1.- G:r-ant Itc·vie·w· B .oa rd feels that th.is is an important UJ:-'_JJUJ.
~l.U .J.J.~Y .I.UJ.
~HC
City to obtain consid era ble f e deral assistance in deve loping an information
system and that maxirnum effort s hould b e put forth in an attempt to be selected
as the compr eh ens ive system city.
Respectfully submitted,
A\a--J/N~,vf1an Sweat
Chairman
DS:je
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Consultant Firms, Software/ Sytems
HUD RFP H 2-70
,_
}
1.
Computech Systems, Inc.
2.
Leasco Systems and Research Corp.
3.
Service Bureau Corp.
4.
Computer Usage Development Corp
5.
Computer Applications, Inc.
6.
Doxiadis-System Development Corp
7.
Ernst & Ernst
8.
Arthur Andersen
9.
Community Development Associates
10.
Urban Research & Development/Management Science America
11.
Control Data Corp
12.
Electronic Data Systems
13.
Computer Technology, Inc .
14.
Arthur Young
-- . --- -- -----
--- - ------· -
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MEMORANDUM
TO:
Members of the Data Processing Rev-Lew Committee
FROM:
John
SUBJECT:
WatsaqaW
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HUD RFP 2-70, Urban Infornation System Grant
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p
!ir;
The City has received RFP 2-70 from the Department of Housing and
Urban Development.
This statement of work invites proposals for the
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research and development of a comprehensive, integrated municipal information bystem or sub-system.
This is an experiment to learn whether or
not a prototype can be developed and successfully operated as a relative-
ly standardized system which can be transferred to other municipalities
with a minimum of alterations.
Past approaches to urb an information systems have been fragmentary.
What is needed is a system formulated as an integra l part of municipal
((
opera tions.b ased on the s a tisfaction of operationa l requirement s of
municipa l agencie8 and maintenance of the data base for tha t system.
To a chieve thi s br oad goa l, a fourfold integra tion is required, linking
together the foll owing :
1.
The processing, analytica l and contr ol c apabilities of urban
information s ystems .
2.. The several comp limentary approa ches to i nformation deve lop ment ; housekeeping , da t a bank, model··bui l ding, and pr ocess
control.
3.
,:he various processes of ur ban administration .
4.
The many urban and other governmental entities within a
municipality.
There are several basic principles which this project must observe:
1.
A fundamental analysis of the entire system and its needs is
necessary.
2.
The system must be ·operationally based, i.e. in support of
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municipal operations.
l.
The syotem :f.s municipal - oriented, since it is at this level
that urban problems and programs are dealt with.
4·. . Automation rather than computerization of the system is de-sired.
S;. .
The system must provide for feedback from the community & its
government.
6·.
Since this is an R & D effort, experimentation and innovation
are desirable.
Careful documentation is an absolute necessity.
Success and failures should be explicitly recorded for the benefit of other municipalities.
One_ complete system and several subsystems will be funded in this
project.
I .n general, the functions of a municipality fall . in four
categories:
1 •. Public safety - police, fire, inspections
Z..
Public finance - usually every department has an accounting
· function, with an overall budget department.
3..
Human resources development - health, welfare, education, recreation, etc.
4.
Physica l and eco.aomic development - planning, .- ·construction,
maintenance, engineering, utilities.
A subsystem comprising one of the above divisions should be completed and tested within two years , while the complete system will have three
years.
Respondents are required to propose their respective for ma tion into
consorti a . consisting of a t a minimum the municipality as the prime contr actor and a systems /so f t ware subcontractor.
A college, univer s i t y , or
center s ubcontractor as a t hird member of the consor tium is urged but
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not required.
No contractor or sub-contractor may be involved in more
than one such project.
A. municipality must demonstrate that it has already made a sub-
"
stantial investment of human and material resources into the development of a municipal information system.
Existing experience and resources






must be utilized to expedite the development of a system.
The proposal
must have a rational relationship to existing development of an ir.. formation system or subsystem in the municipality.
The municipality must provide the project leader and leadership
for all phases of the pr,oject.
Assuming that a university or research
center is included, the following roles are most appropriate:
- educational and training course design, and orientation connected with
the project
• cost/benefit analysis and evaluation of the success & failures
systems conceptualization
- rationalization of information .and decision processes
_The systems/computer software organization would perform the following:
- s ystems conceptua lization
• detailed systems design
• programming
- systems & procedures
- detailed documentation
&
manual preparation
technical training
The proposal must specify who will do what and when it will be done.
The consortium project team should include the following tyPes of
personnel:
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- experienced municipal functional and managerial professionals
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• municipal government analysts
- computer technicians
- d.ocumentation & procedures manual specialists
-researchers, hum.,n factors scientists, social scientists
- training specialists
-academicians - political scientists, public administrators, urbanologists, and infornation and computer scientists.
The municipality must show evidence of the commitment of all government individuals & units whose cooperation is essential to the scope
of.-·work proposed.
It must also show a commitment of the following re-
SDur.ces to the project:
r. .
Personnel:
..
,
- · the mix of talents available
C
- · the· specific persons involved, their contribution and relevant background, & the time they will spend on it.
- · the relationship of non-project municipal professional
employees & policy-making officials to the project.
2..
Machines:
- the EDP equipment available
- the support available from suppliers/manufacturers
3.
Organization:
- · a project leader
- the c apability to continue the proj ect beyond the life of
the fed er a l f unding
The munici pality mu s t i nclude a " le tte r of i ntent" f rom al l members of
the con.sortium.
It must a l so show evidence of its co1Illlitment to utili ze
the systems in planning, operations , and management .
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The consortia involved in ·:the project will maintain a close liaison
Informal status and
.,,
progress reports will help to keep everyone informed and to reduce dup-


j


~o discuss comnou problem areas & expressed needs.


,


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rt:c:a:t:i.on of_efforts.
·1


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Res:ear.ch· &. development is defined to consist of six steP"s:
,,
1
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1.
Systems analysis
z..
Sys.t ems Conceptualization
3.
Systems Design
4.
Systems De,•elopment
~
.,
5.:•. Sys.tems Implementation
Systems Evaluation
Each. s.tep. is: closely interrelated and provides inputs to the other.
The
are:as: which will require the greatest attention to detail, and which
have been merely skinnned in the past, are data acquisition and data base
management.
Present emphasis should be on an information and decision
system rather than a data processing system.
The research and development projects must utilize the systems
approach, have clearly stated objectives, and exhibit effective systems
management.
They must also be based on design concepts that are trans-
ferable to other municipalities.
H
-n•t
The information systems must provide
for continuing data base management and development, as well as implementation procedures for data base management.
Data base documentation will include the exact n ame of each datum,
a discussion of its .-meani ng where necessary ,to . be absolutely clear , its
sour ce location , the frequency with which it is repor ted , t he range and
kind of values associated wi th it , the meaning of the codes , and the
medium, place and identity of its s torage .
This process s hou ld be automated
with a minimum of human interfacing wherever pos sible .
The problem of
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data compatibility is greatly increased by multi-source reporting.
t
Differences in coding and classification schemes, data names, area
definition, reporting dates and period covered will have to be reconciled.
A data access control plan must be developed for the system, governing- the release of data in terms of what, who, when and how.
Certai-n
data will be considered mandatory, some will be recorrmended, and some
optional by Federal agencies.
Geocoding of the data base is also required.
The data system should be open-ended to allow data sharing.
Proposals
should reflect an interest to employ conventional models of hardware and
peripherals which have o;ccapacity appropriate for the system or subsystem.
This is necessary if the project· is to be transferable to other cities.
This approach permits the conceptualization of incremental development of the information system.
At the least sophisticated level are
automatic data processing techniques conventionally employed in the
administr a tive a f f a irs of the municipality.
These include pe..--sonne l,
finance and property accounting, . billing and disbursing, registering
and licensing, and other routine tasks.
The requirement for software is
generally limited to data and files management, cross-tabula tion and
report genera t i on.
The computer proces sing mode conventiona lly emp loyed
is batch- proces s ing.
A second level of sophistica tion are hardwar e and software in
support of the control of operation of a municip ality .
These i nc lude
scheduling, dispatching , alloc a t i on and moni tering, e.g ., t raffic control , and emergency vehic le di s pa tching.
Emphasis here is on a rapid
response capability , and therefore, the on-line, real time mode is more
generally appropriate.
A third level of s ophistication is in terms of the hardware, software and files required for planning support.
Here, both batch processing
l
j,
I'.
�- 7 and on~line, real time modes are important.
0
Generalized software
conventionally required includes PERT and/or CPM for planning and
s..cheduling, simulation and statistinal analysis programs.
Tharemaining level of sophistication is at the policy- making
I
and management level.
Here the requirement at its fullest development
- -is- fo.r exception-reporting techniques, a planning-programming-budgeting
system, automated alerting systems, on-line cross-tabulation and report
generation and the cathode ray tube and teletypewriter for on-line
displays.
Detailed analysis of current municipal operations is required to
determine their relationship to the goals of the system.
Existing
procedures, forms, records, and reports must be evaluated in terms of
the. basic functions performed by the city.
Points of information
generation, processing, and utilization and the extent of this information
must also be identified.
Decision-flow analys~s are also nec~ssary.
Bel.ow is a check list of specific capabilities the data processing
system should have:
--Capabilities to accept and output data in a variety of forms.
--Capabilities to handle large volumes of data.
- -Capabilities to operate on individual values in a data set.
- -Capabilities to manipulate and a lter data set structure.
--Capabilities for report production and gr aphic displ ay.
--Capabili ties for f act retrieval and ana lysis.
--Capabi lities for data base r efer ence s ervi ce and documentation.
--Capabilities for pr oces s management.
The deve lopment o f an i mplement ati on p l an mus t be effected in coordination with all participating agencies .
necessary to implement the sys tem.
The plan should outline the steps
It should include:
,1
II
1i
. 'I
�,;
•'
- 8 -
I\,,
--Hardware and software considerations, i. e., detail the hardware
installations and system progranmtlng.
-Facility requirements.
-Procedures necessary to integrate the system into operations.
-Discussion of user needs and how the system will meet them.
-Discussion of subsystem development and strategy.
--0-efinition of external agency relations.
--Automatic data processing p0licies.
-A central index of information that presently exists in the municipality.
HUD will require that the proposals be submitted prior to 3:00 P.M.
(EDT) o·c tober 31, 1969.
Format for submission will be Part I, Technical
and Administrative Data, and Part II, Financial Data.
Standardized terms
and conditions for federal grant programs will apply to the contract.
Proposals will be evaluated by HUD and results of the competition should be
known during December, 1969.
Factors in Selection
The selection of participants in this program will be determined by
the extent to which each of the items listed below is satisfied in the
proposals of respondents.
These items are sunmarized from indicated loca-
tions elsewhere in this statement of work.
they appear, and not in order of importance.
1.
Objectives of the Project.
2.
Sel~ction of project.
3.
Emphasis on Fundamental Analysis.
4.
Emphasis on operationally based.
s·.
Emphasis on municipal orientation.
They are listed in the order
lj
!
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- 9 -





i
6.
Emphasis on automation.
7 •.
Emphasis on providing environmental and governmental feedback.
ff •. Emphasis on research and development.
9-.. The type of project.
If an information subsystem, the munkipal
functions which will be grouped together and served by the subsystem
s.hould. be listed and discussed.
If an integrated municipal infor-
mation system, the functions grouped together in each subsystem
should be listed according to subsystem.
Full justification should
be set· forth for departures from the classification of functions
ur. the statement of work.
10·•. P.opulation of the municipality.
Departures from the expressed
rnle. must be justified.
11.
Assurance of sufficient level of investment to promise completion
01:· project within. the allowed . time.
ll.
Current existing level of investment in municipal information
systems.
13.
Relationship of the proposal to existing information system development in the municipality.
14.
Formation of Consortium and identification of members.
15.
Definition of roles of members of the consortium.
16.
Range of talents made available by the consortium.
17.
Evidence of cooperation.
18.
Resource conmitment.
19.
Letters of intent.
20.
Long-range commitment.
21.
Plans for extra-consortium participants.
22..
Willingness to participate on Inter-Consortium Panel.
2J·.
Concept of Data Acquisition.
,,
1l;>
I'
i;
!I
11


·


IiI
I:
i'
�- 10 -
}
24.
Concept- of Data Base Management.
25.
Concept of Data Base Documentation.
26:. . Concept of Data Compatibility.
U. . Concept . oLData Access Control.
2lr. . Concept- of Data Standardization.
- 29.
s·tatement of willingness to comply USAC standardized, data lists.
..
I
I
1.0:. . Geocoding.
31.
Concept of system expansion.
32.
Concept of ·documentation.
33:. . Concept of _Transferability--hardware.
3:4-. . Concept of Transferability--software.
35~. . Concept .of _Transferability--System design.
3b~ . Concept of . Transferability--Documentation.
3].
Concept of internal monitoring and evaluation.
38 .
Statement of willingness to plan a pro gr um of briefings and
demonstrations.
39.
Concept of Research Program.
40.
If the comprehensive integrated municipal information system
(IMIS) option is exercised:
41.
Concept of IMIS.
If the municipal information subsystem (MIS) option is exercised:
Concept of MIS.
42.
Proposal of special area of research.
43.
Concept of system perspectives.
44.
Definition of effort and mix of resources al located by tasks.
45.
Specification of task time-phasing.
46.
Agreement to perform tasks.
47·.
Agreement to use conventional, non-machine language in progranming.
�- 11 -
lj
I
I
48.
C
Agreement to use conventional, easily transferable programming
,,
language(s).
4-9~. Agreement to place all software and related documentation developed
in this project in the public domain.
50~ . Agreement to the principle of program modularity.
51:• . Agreement to project orientation.
52·.
D"escription of organizational arrangements.
5.3.
Dissemination plans.
5~.
Continuation plans.
55~ . Existing long-range information system development plan.
Sb~. Relate the proposal to the long-range plan.
ST• . Iaentification of probable other resource support for plan.
SB:
Agreement to maintain a project journal for case study.
5.9.. . Agreement to use systems approach.
60.
Concept of specifications and characteristics.
�ATLANTA URBAN CORPS , GENERAL FUND ACCOUNT
BALANCE SHEET
July 31 , 1969
A ccount Number
Title
G -25-62
Partitions
646 .00
646.00
G - 25 - SO0U
M ile a ge
500.00
15. 00
485.00
G-25 -62-830
S a l a ries
170,115 . 00
86. 412 . 08
83, 782. 92..-
G-25 -62-7140
Telephone
600,00
0
600.00
G-25 -62-7600
Postage
150. 00
0
15 0 . 00
G -25-62-7610
Printing and Reproduction
500,00
62 .24
853.40
( 415. 64)
G - 25 - 62-7700
Office Supplies
1,000.00
171. 80
450 .43
378.49
G-25-62 - 8100
Rentals
400.00
210. 00
50 . 00
140. 00
A ppr:>-ff tation:
Encumber a nces
Expenditures
Balance
0
!
I
�....
ATLANTA URBAN CORfi; GENERAL FUND A CCOUNT
BA LANCE SHEET
August 14, 1969
Account Number
Title
G-25 - 62
Partitions
646 .00
646 . 00

G-25 - 500U
Mileage
500.00
2 81. 70
218. 30 ,
G-25-62 -8301/
Salaries
Appropriation
'1 ·'1.l
Encumbaera nces
110. 19s. oo ~
Expenditures
88, 212 . O&.
Balance
J\
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,8 2 , 44 7. 3 9 .1 1.;. ~
s~


'


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I
G -2 5 -62-714b
v
Telephone
600.00
298. 75
301. 25~
G-25-62-7600 V
Postage
150. 00
150. 00
0
G -25-62-7610 lJ
Printing and Reproduction
500.00
.
62.24
902 . 23
(464, 47) "1
"
• J
\
G-25-62 -7700(
L
Office Supplies
1, 000. 00
171. 80
450 . 43
378.49 ) ·
r
G-25-62-SlOQ
~
Renta ls
,
400.00
210. 00
90. 00
100. 00 .:- ·10.
,.>
�July 28 , 1969
MEMORANDUM
To:
Charles L . Davis
From :
George Berry ~
Subject:
Urban C orps
I met with Sam Willi ms and Inmond Deen of the Urban Corps this morning to
!review their financial status . It appears that we are pretty well on budget
for the time being. This, however, depends upon the success we have in
billing the colleges and univer ities for their participation under the College
Work Study Program. As of yet, we have not submitted our first bills to them
but a I understand it, they are on your desk for signature as of now. W should
know within the next two weeks if w
re operating ~ithin the budget that was
approved on June 19, 1969.
One of the item discussed was the propo ed $9, 000 contribution that was to
be contributed by Atlanta University from the proceed of the city gr nt to
th m. I dvised Sam that 1 would talk with you concerning this and if it wa
your de ire, I would follow up nd see what could be don to consummat thi
tr n ction.
GB:j
�ATLANTA VRBAN CORPS
30 COURTL AN D ST ~
E.
/
PHONE [404] 524-8091
/
ATLANTA , GEORGIA 30303
July 18, 1969
Mr. George Berry
Office of the Mayor
City of Atlanta .
City Hall
68 Mitchell Street, S. W.
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear George :
1O
Enclosed are accumulative bills from the Mentally Re~_a_rded Chi ~ens
9-:- _ _
Camp totalling $116.79 which I approved i n advance, -rr-l ,.lv\,4.l.
(;IN'\~
Also enclosed are donations to aover this amount. Would you please
route this through proper chanels to see that the bill i s paid.
Sincerely,
~
ILLIAMS
Director
SAW : sz
Enclosures
( 3)
1.
2.
3.
Two bills from Stone Mountain Memorial
Associat i on
Two checks (1@$50; 1@$10 )
$56. 80 - cash
�July 22, 1969
Mr . Charles L . Davis
Director of Finance
City of Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Charles :
With this letter J. am hand delivering to you cash in the amount of $56. 80 and
two checks payable to the Atlanta Urban Corps in the total amount of $60 . 00 .
Please deposit the e funds in the General Fund and appropriate to the Urban
Corps Budget Account #G-2.S ... 62•770U .
ln a few day • I will forward two invoices from the Stone Mountain Memorial
As ociation totaling $116. 79. The
funds are for th purpose of making
these disburs m nte.
Very truly yours,
Georg J. Berry
.Admini tr tive Coordinator
GJB:je
E nclo ure
�l ~ ~s
~..,
/ ~
ATLANTA VRBAN CORPS
3 0 CO URT L AN D STR EET , N .E .
/
PH O N E [404) 524-8091
/
('(
~
~
ATLA N T A, GEORGIA 30303
July 17, 1969
Mr. George Berry
Office of the Mayor
City Hall
68 Mitchell Street , S. W.
Atlanta , Georgia 30303
Dear George :
Enclosed are properly validated Urban Corps contracts with the following
colleges:
Brandeis University
Brown University
Clark College
DeKalb Junior College
Emory University
Georgia College at Milledgeville
Georgia State College
Geor g ia I ns titut e of Te chnology
Lake Forest Col lege
Morehouse College
Morris Brown College
Spelman College
Vass ar College
Y~;a Un i_vers 1~ ~
As was mentioned in your recent ~
you still have contracts for I ndiana
University, Mercer University, Oglethorpe College , Southwestern Univers ity, and
the Universit y of Pennsyl vani a which lack the Mayor' s s i gnature , pending an
authorizing resolut ion by t he Board of Aldermen.
In reviewing the l ega l ity of t hese cont ract s for fUture programs note that the
offic ial cont ract c owers respons i bil ity arid administrat ion . Wage rat es and program
length can be readily changed by signing a new "Schedule" attached to each contract.
Thi s shoul d fac i l i t ate quicker legal arr angements for f uture inter ns f rom t he
college s .
Sincerely,
~
LI-
Director
SAW:sz
Enclosures
�July 18, 1969
Mr. Charles L . Davis
Director
Department of Finance
Dear Charles:
I am submitting fully executed copies with 15 colleges and universities
providing for their financial commitxnent to the Atlanta Urban Corps
Project under the College Work Study Program :
Brandei University
Brown University
DeKalb College
Emory University
Clark College
Georgia College
Georgia State College
Georgia Institute of Technology
Lake Fore t Colleg
Morehou
College
Mord Brown College
Spelman College
V ear College
Yeshiva University
The Univer ity of the South
Pl a
. file
nd index th
e contract a
the offici l City copy.
Very truly your&.
G org Berry
QB:J
Enclosur
�July 17 , 1969',
MEMORANDUM
To :
Linda Anderson
From :
Geo rge Berry
Subject:
Attached M. R. ' s for Urban Corps
As you have requested, I have had the Urban Corps people prepare a
M . R. i n the amount of $1, 315 . 11 payable to the Atlanta Children and
Youth Service Council. In addition to this, the Urban Corps Finance
Director advise·s me that his records indicate that they owe the Council
$20 for postage and $33. 86 for office supplies. They have prepared two
additional M. R .' for these amounts.
It would be appreciated if you would determine whether or not these
latter two amounts are valid and if not, please return the M. R . 's
to this office.
�July 28 , 1969
MEMORANDUM
To:
Jay Fountain
From:
George Bony~
Subjec t :
Urban Cor ps Deposits
In discussing Urban Corp finances this morning with Sam Willi ms and Inmond
Deen, I was advi ed that they have been forwarding th ir cash receipts dir ctly
to you for deposit. As you know, three external sou rces of funds w re e tablisbed
by the Finance Committee and Budget Commi ssion by a resoluti on adopted on
Jun 16, 1968. Inmond was not ure that all of the ca h receipts that they have
ubmitted h ve been d po ited to the proper account.
I
dvised him that I would
k you and or Lind Ander on to check into tbi
b en depo ited to th appropri te
tom ke sure that all th receipts h v
revenue account.
GB:J
�CITY OF ATLANTA
DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303
TO:
George Berry
FROM:
Linda Anderson
SUBJECT:
Urban Corps
W
Attached are four checks (each in the amount of $250000) in payment of the
first installment due under the agreements with Carl Wiecke, Patrick Ntukogu, Roger
Whedon and the Georgia Institute of Technology (Roger Rupnow) for services as
educational advisors.
LA:s
Attachments
�CITY OF ATLANTA
DEPARTMENT OF LAW
2614 FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303
HENRY
CITY
ROBERT S. WIGGINS
MARTIN McFARLAt,ID
EDWIN L. STERNE
RALPH C . JENKINS
JOHN E. DOUGHERTY
CHARLES M. LOKEY
THOMAS F. CHOYCE
JAMES 8. PILCHER
L. BOWDEN
ATTORNEY
FERRIN Y. MATHEWS
ASSOCIATE CITY ATTORNEYS
ASSISTANT Cl TY ATTORNEY
July 24, 1969
HORACE T. WARD
DEPUTY CITY ATTORNEY
ROBERT A. HARRIS
HENRY M.MURF F
CLAIMS ATTORNEYS
Mr. George J. Berry
Administrative Coordinator
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
30303
JAMES 8 . HENDERSON
SPEC IAL ASSOCIATE Cl TY ATTORNEY
Dear Mr. Berry:
I am herewith returning the following contracts which have been
approved as to form:
1.
Twenty-five (25) contracts between the Atlanta
Urban Corps and non-city agencies.
2.
Five (5) contracts between the Atlanta Unban
Corps and specific colleges and universities.
With best regards, I am
H'IW/ cj
Enclosures
�CITY OF
DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE
501 CITY HALL
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303
July 28, 1969
CHARLES L . DAVIS
DIRECTOR OF FINANCE
W. RO Y SM I TH
D E PUTY DIREC T OR O F FINANCE
EDGAR A . VAUGHN, JR.
DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF FINANC E
JAMES R . FOUNTA I N , JR .
D EP UTY DIRECTO R OF F INANCE
Memorandum
To:
George Berr y
Fr om:
Linda Anderson
Subject :
Atlant a Ch ildren and Youth Services Council
Account s Receivable f r om At l anta Urban Cor ps
Thanks f or the t hree miscel l aneous requisitions which you f orwarded
to me on July 17, 1969, as follows :
(1)
(2 )
(3 )
MR #16 - ne t s alaries
MR #15 - office supp lies
MR #14 - postage
$1,315 . 11
33.86
20 . 00
I am sending MR #16 t o account s payable f or proces sing, howev er, I am
holding MR #14 and MR #15 for further v erification.
The report furnished to me by Mike Aarons of our Audit Staff indicated
an account receivab l e for offi ce supplies of $35. 00 . By copy of
this memo, I am requesting Mike to veri fy the amount f or me.
The charge for postage would have arisen from use of t he Youth Council's
postage machine . By copy of this memo, I am requesting Martin Burke to
check t heir postage log and advise if the amount is correct. (This
figure would not have been picked up on Mike's audit a s his records would
indicate total expenditures from po stage rather than any usage allocation).
cc :
Martin Burke, Youth Council
Mike Aarons, Audit Division
�CITY OF ATLANTA
DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE
501 CITY HA LL
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303
July 30, 1969
CHARLES L. DAVIS
DIRECTOR OF FINANCE
W. ROY SMITH
DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF FINANCE
EDGAR A. VAUGHN, JR.
DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF FINANCE
JAMES R. FOUNTAIN , JR .
DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF FINANCE
TO:
George Berry
FROM:
Linda H. Anderson
SUBJECT:
Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council
Accounts Receivable from Atlanta Urban Corps
V
I am writing in regard to my memorandum of July 28, in which I stated
that I had forwarded MR #16 for processing but was holding MR #14 and
MR #15 (postage and office supplies, respectively) for verification.
I have now rec eived verification of these amounts and accordingly have
released MR #14 and #15 to Accounts Payable for pr oce ssing.
LHA
LHA:MM:vl
�l)~~c
CITY OF ATLANTA
DEPARTMENT OF LAW
2614 FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303
ROBERT S. WIGGINS
MARTIN McFARLAND .
EDWIN L . STERNE
RALPH C . JENKINS
JOHN E. DOUGHERTY
CHARLES M. LOKEY
THOMAS F. CHOYCE
JAMES B. PILCHER
HENRY L . BOWDEN
CITY
ATTORNEY
FERRIN Y . MATHEWS
ASSOCIATE CITY ATTORNEYS
ASSISTANT CITY ATTORNEY
July 31, 1969
HORACE T. WARD
DEPUTY
CITY ATTORNEY
ROBERT A. HARRIS
HENRY M. MURFF
CLAIMS ATTORNEYS
JAMES B . HENDERSON
Mr. George J. Berry
Administrative Coordinator
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
30303
SPECIAL ASSOCIATE CITY ATTORNEY
Dear Mr. Berry:
Transmitted herewith are two contracts referred to me by your office
which have been approved as to form.
T. Ward
City Attorney
HTW/cj
Enclosures
�ATLANTA URBAN CORPS
DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE
To: Sam Williams, Director, Atlanta Urb an Corps
From: Inmond L. Deen, Dir e ctor of Finance, Atlanta Urban Corps
Re: Initial R epo rt on the D epartment of Finance
Date: July 2, 1969
�I.
The payroll sche dule for e mployees of the A t l a nta Urba n Corps is s e t forth
in a memorandu m (labele d Appe nd age 11 A 1 :) w hich h a s b een distribute d to
a ll interns.
Individuals. who agreed to w ork as volunte ers and who ar e to receive $200. 00
as compens a tion for their serv ices w ill be p a id $ 100 . 00 on July 16, 1969, -~
and $100.00 on August 27, 1969. It is felt that this method w ill serve to
e ncourag e the v olunte e r in tha t it p e rmits him to receive some mone tary
rew a rd for his se r vices p r ior to the conclusion of the sum mer prog ram. It
furth e r has the effe ct o f providing protection to the Urb a n Corps in t he
eve nt that the voluntee r r e sig ns prior to the con clusion of the summe r program. Payme nt at the b e g inning of the progr a m would l eave the Urban
Corps w ithout prote ction fro m financial loss should the v olunte er r e sign.
P a yment a t the conclusion of t h e prog ram could conc e iv ab ly, w hile affording
p r ote ction to the U r b an C or p s , imp o s e a bur d en o n the v oluntee r and w ould
not conta in the incent i ve fa ctor inhe r e nt in the split payme n t m e thod.
II.
I n o r d er to c omply with g u id e line s s et fo r th b y the D e p a r t m ent o f H ealth,
Educ a tion, a nd Wel fa r e , C o lle g e Wo r k-Study Pr o g ram D ivi sion , the follow i ng proc edur e h a s b een ina u g u r a te d:
A.
A c ertifi e d statement ( l a b e l e d App e n da ge 11 B 11 ) w ill b e maile d
to eac h p ar ticip a ting c ollege or u n iversity h a v i ng College
W o rk - S tudy Progr a m stud e nt s e mpl oy e d b y the A tla nt a U r b a n
Corp s. The s t a t ement w i ll inclu d e i nfor m a tion re l a t ing to
each stu dent as f ollows :
1.
N a me .
2.
W ag e r a te.
3.
Tota l n u m b er of c omp e n sable h o u rs worke d d u r i n g the
i mme d i a t e l y p rec e ding pay pe rio d .
4.
G r o ss pay re c e ive d f or t h e i mme d iat e ly prec e ding p a y
p e ri o d, and
5.
G r o ss p a y r e c e iv e d t o d ate .
B.
Tim e c ar d s ( l a b e l e d A p p e ndage 11 C1 1 ) signed by eac h stude n t a nd
his imme dia t e s u p e rvis o r c ertifyi n g t h a t a p a r t icul ar num be r of
hour s w ere w o r k e d by the s tude nt w i ll b e mail e d t o the s tud e nt 1 s
c olleg e o r u n ivers ity in i n s t a nc es w h ere the stud e nt i s enr olle d
i n the C o ll ege W o rk - S tud y P r o gram .
C.
E a ch e mployee is r e q u ir e d to pick up in p ers on his p a yche c k
or to g ive wr itte n a uthor i z a t ion t o the i n dividu a l w ho w ill pick
u p the c h eck. In the f orme r s i t u ation t h e indi v idua l i s :i.·equire d to g ive writt e n cer tific a ti on of r eceipt. In the l a tter
s itua tion t he a uth or i ze d indivi dua l is r e quired to c e rtify re c eipt
�Page 2
July 2, 1969
of all pay checks received.
(See Appendages
II
D" and
II
E".)
III·
A bookkeeping system has been designed and is tentatively scheduled to
become operative on July 10, 1969 . The system will consist of the main-·~
tenance of the following Journals and Ledgers:
A.
General Journal- -posted daily Monday through Friday prior
to 9: 15 a. m. listing all monies received and all liabilities
incurred the pr e ceding day.
B.
Cash Rec e ipts and Disbursements Ledger--posted twice weekly
recording the flow of capital.
c.
General Ledg er- -posted twice weekly containing separate
a ccounts for:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Office e quipment,
Office supplies,
Paym e nt rec e ived from age ncies as contract e d for,
Payme nt received from e duc a tional institutions as contr a ct e d for,
Payme nt rec e iv e d in the form of grants and donations
f r om fou n dations,
P a yme nt rec e i ve d in the fo r m of grant s a nd don a tions
fro m the private business sector,
Utilit i e s, and
All oth e r nece s s a ry accounts.
D.
Indiv idua l E ar nin g s R e cords -- p o st e d bi - w eekly.
E.
Petty C as h Re co r ds -- m a int a ined by Sam Williams.
I n mon d L . D ee n, Jr.
D irect or of Finance
A t l anta U r ban Corps
�ATLANTA URBAN CORPS
DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE
To: Sam Williams, Director, Atlanta Urban Corps
From: Inmond L o De e n, J r., Dir e ctor of Finance,
A tla nta Urban Corps
Re: D e p artme ntal R e port
Date: July 16, 1969
�I.
After repeate d e fforts to r es olve the u n usually p e rple x ing s ituation surrounding comp e n s ation for VISTA volunte ers a ssi g n e d throu gh the Sout h e rn R e gional
Education Bo a rd to the City of Atlanta , Atlanta Urban Corps, little has been
accomplished. R e sponsibilities, ho weve r, have been d e fin e d, to wit:
A. VISTA voluntee rs will r e c e ive bi- wee kly supple m e nts from the
City of Atla nta , Atlanta Urba n Corp s in amount s d e t e rminable
by multiplying the tota l numb e r of comp e nsable hours w orked
by each intern durin g the pre ceding p a y p e riod by either . 07, • 47,
or . 77, dep e nding upon the individua ls e duc a tiona l level.
B.
Volt Technic a l Corpor a tion, a sub s idiary of Volt Information
Scie nces, Inc., 795 P ea chtre e Str e e t , N. E., Suite 63 0, Atlanta,
G e or g i a , a priva te co r por a tion unde r contract w ith VISTA to
p r ovide admini s trative and lo g i stic a l fina ncial s upport, will
disp e r s e on a wee kly b as is the VISTA sha re of VISTA volunteers
pay.
C.
The City of A tla nta, A tla nta Urba n Corps supple ment plus the
VISTA s h are w ill clo se l y a pp r o x i ma t e tha t r e c e i ve d b y a ll other
i nter n s o f a co m p a r a ble e ducatio na l l e v e l.
D.
C aro l Lim , Volt T e chnic a l Co rp o ra tion, phone 8 76-635 4 , has
b een des i gnated as t h e represent a t ive o f h er c omp a n y to h a ndle
i n qui r i e s fr o m VISTA Volun t eers ass i gn ed t o t he U r b a n Corps
regardi ng c omp ensatio n fr o m VIST A.
II.
T he pr o cedu re outline d in se c t ion II of thi s D epar t ment ' s i niti a l re po r t , da ted
July 2 , 1969, regarding Co llege-W o rk Study Program g u idelines is pr o v ing
sati s facto r y.
III .
The book keeping system outlined in Sectio n III of this Depa rtment 1 s initi a l
repo rt is now in o peration and is relative l y efficient. I mprovement is neede d
in this area. As a bare minimum the following is necessary:
A.
B.
Working space (availab l e for payroll auditors )
Freedom from unnecessary interruptions and confusion
�IV.
Mr. W. Walton Clarke, First National Bank of Atlanta, was talked with on
July 10, 1969 . He agreed on behalf of the First National Bank to donate
One Thousand Dollars ($1,000.00) to the City of Atlanta, Atlanta Urban
Corps.
Mr. Charles S. Marvin, A. T. &T. , was talked with on July 9, 1969.
Mr. Marvin indicated an interest on the part of A. T. &T. to make a donation to the Urban Corps. He suggested that I call his immediate supervisor,
Mr. Tom Koneig, on July 14, 1969, and arrange a conference. Mr. Koneig
was ill. However, his secretary set up a conference for July 22, 1969 at
10:00 A. M.
Mr. Plemon Whatley (Junior at Harvard) , employed by A. T. &T. and
assig ned to E. O.A., w a s talked with on or about July 1, 1969, and has
reported to Mr. Marvin that he feels the Urban Corps is deserving of a
donation.
A. T. &T. 1 s office s in Atlanta are located at Room 1831, The Hartford
Building.
In gene ral, Fina nce ha s b ee n pla g u ed by s e n se l es s mista k e s, inade qua te
secretaria l sup p o r t, a n d t r oubleso me i nefficiency.
At this time the addition of Dianne W il s on to thi s D e partme nt in a so m ew h at e lus ive po s ition i s not, i n my o pinion, justi fiable e ither in cost to
the Urba n C o rps o r in inc rease d effi ciency.
T h e a bove m e ntione d rec o mmenda t ion, if follo w e d, w ill pro v ide the
n e ede d spac e m e ntio ne d i n Se cti o n III, A g abo v e and will e lim i n a t e the
n ee d for clos e s u pervi s ion a nd w ill, t o s o me e x t ent, prov i de relief f r om
u n n ece s s a r y c o nfu s ion and i neffic iency.
�ATLANTA URBAN CORPS
DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE
To: Sam Williams, Director, Atlanta Urban Corps
From: Inmond Lo Deen, Jr., Director of Finance,
Atlanta Urban Corps
R e:
D e partm e ntal Report
D ate:
Aug ust 1, 1969
�L Payroll
The payroll system is functioning satisfactorily.
ment:
Two areas n ee d improve-
A.
At present, billing colleges requires a manual transferance
of information from computer print outs which are grouped
according to w ork location, typing of the bill, a nd checking
of the fig ures. The city gave the option of having the print
outs group e d e ither by work location or school. Someone
chose to h ave the interns gr ouped by w ork loc ation. This is
of little value to my D epartment as agency (work location=
agencies) financial ar rangements are handled by contract.
If the problem of s eparating CWSP interns and non-CWSP
interns c an be overcome (if the city c a n be sold on the idea)
the compute r print o uts could be c er tifie d a nd mailed to
the colleges. This would e liminate three steps and at the
same time reduce the probability of errors. This system
w ould, however, involve the inconvenience of sorting pay
che cks and g rouping the m by City D e partme nt a nd agency. ·
L es s time and effort are required to sort p a y checks than to
manually tr ans fer the r e quir e d inform ation. In my e stimation, this should b e done if the city and the Urban Corps
m aintain the ir pres e nt re l a tionship.
B.
The procedure outlined i n se c t ion II, C, of my report
d a t e d July 2, 196 9 i s one rous a nd burde nsome. The i nter ns,
justifiably, do not lik e it. I fe e l HEW should be made
aware of the unpala t ab l e nature of the guide line necessitating this procedure and a r equ est for r e lief made. I
int e nd to act a ccordingly. We were f o r tuna t e on the July
3 0 , 1969 di sbursement date . O n ly one problem of any significance arose: a s t aff member told Andr ea Frye , a v olunteer , s h e would rec eive $10 0 on July 3 0 . The 11 culprit1 1
had not the author ity to make the decision. None theless,
we will p a y her and Young Hugh ley a t their convenience
after 12: 00 o ' clock noon 8 /1/ 69.
II. C allege Billing
The college billing s ystem w ill w o rk adequat ely. Colleges will be billed
(bills mailed} toda y fo r amounts owed as of July 2, 1969 . The y will be
billed Augus t 5, 1969, for amounts owe d as of July 3 0, 1969. The August
13th, and August 27th, billings will be no problem. The S eptemb er 10th
billing should not b e a probl em but the m e chanics h ave not been worked o ut.
�2
III. Agency Payments
Non-profit agencies in which A UC interns are placed have contractually
ag reed to employ the student and to p ay a part of the student's salary
ranging from 100% to 00% . On Wednesday, A ugust 6, 1969, prompting of
agencies w ho have not fulfilled th e ir contractual oblig a tions will be comme nced.
IV.
A.
Contracts
A gency Contracts
EOA wa s delaye d in executing our contract due to the change of directorship. The contract has been delivered to George Berry for
execution by the city.
We still do not have a contr a ct w ith SREB for the Fulton C aunty He.a lth
Dep ar tm ent. This involves 21 interns. Since SREB has given us
$ 7, 000. 00 and w ill g ive us $13, 000. 00 within two weeks {according to
Bill Ramsay) I consid er that org anization reputable. ·
The d e cision was made to contract with the Academy Theater as a
non-city agency even though the funds a ctually come from the City
(Atlant a Board of Education). Miss Nanc y Hag ar was talked with and
agreed to this arrangement on July 15, 1969. A l etter co nfirming the
earlier verbal agreement and a written contract were mail ed to Miss
Hagar July 16, 1969. The contr act has not of this date been returned
to this office.
The Atlanta Youth Council is for our purposes a non-city agency.
contract has b ee n exe cuted.
B.
The
C ollege Contracts
When the college contracts were exe cuted, both copi e s of the West
G eorg i a contract were returned to the college. Mr. Paul M. Smith,
.Jr . , Dir ect or of Financial A id, stated by telephone on 8 / 1/ 69 that
he would on that date mail one copy to me. When it is received, Mr.
Charles Davis, Dir e ctor of Financ e, City of Atlanta, will certify
the West Georgia bill.
C.
Educational Advisor Con tracts
Con tracts have been entered into between the City of Atlanta, Atlanta
Urban Corps, and Carl Wieck, Patrick Ntokogu, Roger Whedon, Barbara Rudisill, and the Georg i a Institute of Technology--Roger Rupnow,
�3
the said individuals to act as Educational Advisors to the 1969 Urban
Corps Project. Duties to b e p e rform e d shall include but not be limited to job visit ation with the interns arid agency supe rvisors, planning
and conducting education seminars for small groups, as well as all
interns, working in coordin ati on with our field evaluation staff to insure job relevancy and educ a tional sign ificance of the program for
each intern, as sis ting the intern in his articulation of his experience
and other couns eling and advis ory duties connected with the program.
For the services outlined above, each Educational Advisor shall be
compensated in the amount of One Thousand Dollars.
D.
Urban Corps - Library Theatre Contr a ct
A contract b e tw ee n the City of Atlant a , Atlanta Urban Corps, and
Arthur Pellman has been drawn, approved, and is in the process of
ex e cution. The contract provides in essence that Arthur Pellman is
to serve as Director of the Urban Co rps-Library Theatre for a period
of not l ess than ten weeks a nd that he will be compensated in the amount
of One Thous an d Dollars.
V.
Staff
Steve M wamba is p erfo rming a task that is in my estimation tedious and
demanding. He has and is continuing to keep errors at a minimum.
M a c Rabb is now workin g in my office and is p er forming at a l eve l that is
above what can ordin ar ily b e expe ct e d or d emanded of an individ ual.
P a tty H arwe ll is d oing an e x c ellent job in providing secretarial supp ort.
She i s diligent, unusually efficie nt, and in every resp e ct a pleasure to
work with.
�July 18, 1969
Miss Elayne Landis
A sociate Director
Metropolitan Regional Council
155 East 71st Street
New :York, New York l00lZ
I:
(
Dear Elayne:
I am leaving Atlanta the fir t week of September for Harvard Busine s
School and wen ed a Director . I ' ve b en talking to Mike Goldst in
about possible director and h
uggested you. I did c asually mention
at the recent Urban Corps Conference that we're looking, but I'd like
to make it more definite .
very w 11 . We h ve
,
.
A you know, Atlanta
Urban Corps 1 progr s ing , -~
. . ~
cooperative resource from area college , busin s donors, city government nd private agencl s . I h ve no doubt about expan ion pos ibiliti s- ·
only through planning . City government is co- pon oring an Urban Life
Center with Georgia St t College through a pecial grant fro m Housing
and Urban D velopm~nt. It is a "kind of" university relations office with
promising opportunity.
The M yor' assistant aay th t if a decision. w
m de to hire a per on
of your caliber that you could po eibly be a profe or in the Urban Life
Center a• well as direct the Urban Corps .
If you ar int rested, could you please
about arranging vi it?
ILLIAMS
Director
s7:d1
Vc"c: M yor's Office • D n Swe t
nd me
resume and call me
�,•
i
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30, 1969
July
Dr • John Hogarty
Di.r ctor, Co-op ProgrQ.m
Antioch Coll
Yellow Springs, Ohio
Dear Dr. Hogarty z
I am sorry all our efforts did not bear fruit in bringing Antioch students to
Atlanta Urban Corps this first ye-ar. How ver, we may yet aleviate the
t
situation.
AB you,know, th- Urban Corps is a college int rn p1•ogram. Thi au.mm r, or
the.n 220 students from 4330011 gs participated. Our mine phasis is
building a prosr
whose pri,mary purpos is an ducatione.l xp rience for
the intern. This summ r, our staff of fift en is compoo d lroost entir ly
of otudonta. We also ha.ve f'iva professors serving as eduo tionel c:onsulta.nt •
7e a.re preo ntly pl nning o. y ar-round program that will include academic
er dit for int r-ns through thre cooperating Atlanta coll ges .
Our c ntra+ :_)rob le is th n _d ror a director . I
for
Ha.rvurd Business School. Id ally, -, would liko a. you
gr uat student type
with axperiene in working with stud nta and admini tr tive probl ms. Th
ir ctor will b jointly orking with th South rn R g1 n 1 Education Bo ·d
d The Oftic
of Th Me..,yor tor program administration. Foss1bilit1 s for
dir tor t
orgie. Stat Coll 1J
good through
t ir Urban Studios program. Salary 1 v 1 is in t
"'8oo p r month ~e
and above~
pending upon xpe ienc . The job i full-time and minimum
obl.ig :tion of yea:r.
faculty status of
I.f' you know ot anyone t t mi ht b int rest din oorVi
you pl e ha~ t m call o coll et? The nclosed inf'o
thio lott r in expl ining th Urb
Corps.


kar


clo
I
Mr.
a.a direct-or, w-o- 1
tion will s~pl
nt
�July 30, 1969
Dr. Joel Fleishman
Yale Intern Program
-Ye.le University
Ne'tl Haven , Connecticut
Dear Dr. Fleishman:
Mt- . Bill Ramsay of the S.R . •B. has told me of your int rest in th servicelearning approach to educ8.tion. Bill also indicated tha.t you are a.ware of some
of the stud~nt intern programs in the South and. that you might b able to
belp us in :f'tnding a. director tor the Atlanta. Urban Col'];)S ..
As
you know, the Urban Corps is a coll ge intern progr(ml .
This summer, more
than 220 students from 43 collegea participated. our in emphasis is building a program whose primary purpose 1s an ducational xpericnee for the
int rn . Thie summ r, OlU' staff of f1t'te n is oompos~d almost enti:r ly of
students . We also have five professors serving as -educational consultants. i
a.re pr oently planning a - oo:-.... ro®d program i1hat will include eademi credit
for interns through thre cooperating Atlanta colleges .
Our c ntrt:u. problem ia th need for a. director. I
leaving in Sept
er t'or
Harvard Business School. Id ally' we would like a young BI"aau te stud~nt
t
vith expe~1enc 1n , orkine; with students Q.Ud a.clministrati ve probl
The dtreoto~ rill b jointly 1orking with tha Southern Regional E uo tion
B d and T
Ot:f'ic of The Mayor fo1" progi•a.m arua1nistnlt1on . l osoibll:lti s
for faculty tatus of a director at Georgia st ·te Colli
arc ood through their
Urb
Sttdi s pro
• &al
v 1 is in th $130o
r tnonth r
e and bov . ,
d pending upon
ri nee . Tho Job i ~ll-t~ and minim.um obligation of
Y'
It you know of a.nyone that might b int r sto t in erving s director, would
you please ha.v th m ca,ll
coUeat? Th-e n.oloso.d info tion will uppl ant
this l tter in cX;pla.ining th Urb
Corps.
Bincor ly,
~
Dir ctor
Jmelosu,r
�rliE ,\TL.-\\T.\ C0\ :'- TIT1 'T :L1 .' i, :c;;,i,
r ,) J)' ,
00,·, 3fl, l'Jt_;;;

Atlanta city g0\·ernmcnt ho!)C3
to have an Urban Corps of up
to 100 colle ge interns working
for and with it by the spring
semester.
Dan Sweat, governmental liaison director at City Hall , said
Friday that the city is seeking
to employ 100 under the federal
College Work · Sl11dy Program,
and already is negotiating ivilh
college offici,ds.
Sam Williams, president of
the Georgia Tech student body
last year , brou ght the attention
of Sweat and Mayor Ivan Allen
Jr. to the success of the New
York intern program last spring.
Williams and other college
leaders have follo wed up this
fall. The delav was due to the
time needed to begin and carry
out the city's massive summer
program, Sweat explained.
Sweat met with the stud ents
last Monday and has another
session set for next Thursd ay .
The studen ts have been asked
to select a spokesm;:in. who w:11
be sent to New York to can,cr
with the director of the program
there, Michael Gildstein .
The Ford Found ation gave
New York funds to provide free
technical assistance to other cities interested m establishing an
Urban Corps.
Sweat said that the City Personnel departm ent has established two class ificat:ons for the
college interns. J oh n C9x. executive director of the Atlanta Children and Youth Services Commission also has cooperated.
Sweat hopes that the colle ge
students ca n provide ge nera l administration and supervision for
the program. The program will
hit its peak dur ing the summer
'
Frank ?\kGaughey and Eugene
l\fcLemore last su mmer rein,:{ force d the intent of tr.e city
~·to establish a large r progra m.
\
" We must use the talents of
the young men and wom en,"
Sweat sa id . "We've four.d they
can carry a larger role than we
norm ally would think. We must
use their creati ve abilities in
our government."
,-., .~-"-<;/





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PLANS FOR SPRING
Dan Sweat
months Swea t said, but could
have about 50 working for the
city in all departments during
the spring months. Ne w York
City has about 3,000 in its prog~m.
.
Georgi a Tech student., -spearheaded the drive to establish
an Urban · Corps here , Swea t
said, and Emory University and
the Atl anta Univers ity Center
have also been interested. In
fact, Swe at added , he hopes all
3<l colleges in the metropolit;in
area will eventually take part.
Sweat said the ou tstanding
performance of city interns





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�Student Application Process Procedure
1.
Student application forms distributed on campus by colle,r, e relations board to student center, student government offi.ce, placement center ~- etc .
2.
Applications returned to college relations board member on individual campus ,~()%
completed by May 2, 1969. Postcards will be sent to all applicants stating "that
the j_r application has been :received and is be:i.ng processed .
3. Urban Corps f i nance representative will meet with financial aid officer on each campus and review applicants from that campus as to their eli,,;,;ib i 1 i ty for financial aid .
Some applicants will already be eligible from past aid records . Other applicants may
have to complete supplementary financial applicat ions. The definition of fi nand al
aid is the financial aid officers respons i bili ty. Ideally we will request him t 0
certify from Atlanta Urban Co1·ps applicants a number eligible for work study funding equal to his number of off campus work. study slots. In addition we w:, 11 ask the
financial aid officer to select alternately eli:sibles equal i n number to 20% of his
total number certified i n the event that those originally certified cannot be placed
due to job requests not avai lable .
4.
Application forms will be reviewed by the Personnel Committee consist:i_ng of student .
agency , job developer , and recruiting representatives. Those applicants prev:i.ously
approved for work study funds by i ndividual campuses will be separated from other
applications.
5.
Remaining non-work- study eligible applicants will be reviewed by the Personnel Committee and a number of applicants will be selected to be funded from private sources
(estimated to be equivalent to 70 interns), on the basis of ability > desire ; work
experience and f i nancial need . Likewise the Personnel Committee will select an
,:a lternately elir,ible"' group i n the event their f i rst selections cannot be placed .
6. Work- study and privately funded applicants will be ,~rouped according to interest and
assigned to job slots by the Pers onnel Committee. Of these financially "covered"
applicants those that cannot be placed for reas ons of specific job 1·equests w:i 11 be
held aside and replaced from 0 alternately eli'.· i ble 1' applicants ,
7. All applicants wi ll be notified of their application s tatus .
fol lows ·
a . financially el i ? ible
b . pr i vately funde d and
c . alternately eli1.1::i.ble
d. cannot be placed due
cants request .
Categories will be as
for work- study fundinr and assigned .
assir,;ned.
- pos s :1.bilit y of placement .
t o l ack of funds and/or job not available to fi t appli-
8.
Assigned interns will be notified of their job description and request ed t o i ntervi ew
their i ntern super vi sor. Student and a,r:-,ency wi l l approve ass :i.··· nment .
9.
Internships not approved by a~;ency or student will b e r ev~.ewed and placed els ewhere
by the Personnel Commi ttee J_f possible .
10 . If approved internship cannot be fil l ed a new appl icant wi ll be drawn from the
"alternately e l i c-;i ble;' applications.
�Page 2
11.
Confirmed interns will be sent orientation material and i nformed of payroll and
operat i ng procedure .
12.
Intern attends orientation program.
13.
Work period begins .
�PRIORITY IN PLACEMENT FOR INTERNS Nar APPROVED FOR CWSP
1.
Genuine interst in educational concept of URBAN CORPS experience.
~-
Educational and job experience that is relevant to job opening applied for.
3.
Financial Need
4.
Atlanta resident - enrolled in Atlanta college
5. Atlanta resident - enrolled in non-Atlanta college
6.
Non-Atlanta resident - enrolled in non-Atlanta college
May 5, 1969
PLACEMENT SUB-COMMITTEE
Linda Bullock
Education
Dianne Wilson
Soc i al Services & Humani t i es
Marc Dash
Science & Technol ogy
Dave Whelan
Admi ni stration . Management & Law
Sub-committee will separate j ob slots and student applications into
above four categories and make placement subject to veto by Personnel Committee
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ATLANTA VRBAN CQRPS
30 COURTLA N D STREET , N .E .
/
PHONE (404] 524 -8091
/
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303
July 10, 1969
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
City of Atlanta
City Hall
68 Mitchell Street, S. W.
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Mayor Allen:
Thank you for addressing our interns during the recent
Atlanta Service Learning Conference. Your enthusiasm and
support are vitally needed and appreciated on behalf of the
Urban Corps .
I am enclosing a list indicating each college , student and
assignment for Urban Corps Interns.


{ezy,


WILLIAMS
Director
SAW :s z
Enclosure
�.
,
AGNES SCOTT COLLEGE
College Work-Study Students
Name
Agency
Pay Rate
None
Non-College Work-Study Students
T. Brackin
S. Dennard
J. Lang
J. Maulding
S. Pickard
S. Tucker
T. Swartsel
C. Watkins
M. Gordon
Kennesaw Mountain Park
Fulton Cou_n ty He,alth Dept.
Fulton County Health Dept.
Fulton County Health Dept.
Kennesaw Mountain Park
Kennesaw Mountain Park
Atlanta Urban Corps
Fulton County Health Dept.
Community Council
Declining Students
L. Cooke
E. Willis
$2.20
2.20
2o20
1. 80
2.20
2.20
2.50
2.20
2.20
�Non-College Work- Study Students
Atlanta Universitt
Name
K. Liang
D. White
Pc!Y, Rate
Finance
Atlanta Urban Corps
$2.50
2.50
�Brandeis college
College Work-Study Students
Na;-ne
V. Spaulding
Agen<;Y_
Atlanta Youth Co~ncil
Pay R~
$2.20
�BROWN UNIVERSITY
College Work-Study Students
~r1£!_
R. Padgett
Atlanta Youth Corps
~~
$1.80
�CLARK COLLEGE
College Work-Study Students
Name
L. Alexander
C. Bonner
R. Childress
c. Choice.
w. Driver
G. Fretwell
J. Herring
D. James
c. Knight
B. Peters
M. Sinmons
D. Wright
Dekalb YMCA
Peace Corps
Water Works
Parks & Recreation
Co,:mn:. mi ty Arts
Atlanta Youth Council
Library
Atlanta Youth Council
Wheat Street Church
Literacy Action
Atlanta Yo~th Co~ncil
Library
$1.80
2.20
2.20
2.20
2.20
2. 2 1)
2.20
1.80
2.20
2.20
1.80
2.20
Non-College Work-Study Students
c..
I. Highta:-,er
P. Johnson
Co;mnunity Arts
2 .20
Water Works
2.20
Declining Students
M. Bostick
J. Bussey
I. Cleveland
M. Tagen
B. Stinson
B. Thom?svn
T. Williams
P. Wilkes
-'Bl--• . Iia-t -tand
�Dekalb College
College Work-Study Students
Name
J. Flemister
B. Grimes
E. McCord
F. McCord
E. Neal
R. Rucker
L. Scandrick
c. Thomas
v. Tomlinson
P. Watkins
E. Stulciivant
Agency
Pay Rate
Parks & Recreation
Atlanta Youth Co~ncil
Atlanta Youth Council
Dekalb YMCA
Gate City Day Nursery
Kirkwood Center
Atlanta Youth Council
Com~unity Council
Y-wCA
YV.JCA
Boy Scouts
$1.80
1.80
1.80
1.80
1.80
1.80
1.80
1.80
1.80
1.80
1.80
Declining Students
c. Cotton
M. Ham;:,ton
c. Person
c. Robinson
J. Searcy
M, Almond
�EMORY UNIVERSITY
Non-College Work-Study Students
Name
B. Bainbridge
F. Benfield
J. Bruce
N. Corcoran
K. Frye
M. Gerber
D. Harvey
C. Haynes
F. Hillbrath
J. Hollenbeck
M. Irby
A. Von·Keller
G. Lurie
K. Kirschstein
R. Martin
A. Mayeaux
J. Martin
J. Mulligan
N. Norbert
11 • Newman
R. Simmons
B. Snoo~inson
c. Smith
o. Williamson
M. Wo~dward
Agency
Wheat Street Church
Grady M & I Clinic
City Parks
Fulton County Health Dept.
Atlanta Public Library
Wheat Street Church
Street Theatre
Atlanta Girls Club
Mayor's Office
Pay Rate
$2.20
2.2i)
1.80
1.80
1.80
2.20
2.20
2.20
2.50
Non-College Work-Study Students
J. Bridges
Colliers
Fleming
F.
B. Kavelage
s. Lindsey
s. Mr,.;ram:>a
v. Scalera
R. Toney
w. Tra1Tis
J. Petzelt
w.
Atlanta Public Library
Aviation
Mayor's Office
Atlanta Urban Corps
Atlanta Girls Club
Atlanta Urban Corps
Ga. State Phy. Ed. Dept.
Sanitation
Sanitation
Ga. State Phy. Ed. Dept.
Declining Students
c. Bostick
G. Faison
w. Huff
D. Kavelage
M. Langford (Is working part-time)
M. Morris
R, Ratte tree
2.50
1.80
2.50
2. 20.
1.80
2.20
2.50
2.20
2.20
2.20
�GEORGIA TECH
College Work-Study Students
~ency
C. Brown
D. Christenberry
D. Draglin
P. Harwell
K. Batcher
A. Keck
W.
H.
D.
J.
J.
Kemp
Nash
Paul
Wilcox
Wilson
St. Vincent de Paul Center
Mayor's Office
Water Works
Atlanta Urban Corps
T.,ibrary
Atlanta Youth Corps
Water Works
Traffic
Wheat Street Church
Water Works
Atlanta Youth Council
$2.20
2.50
2.20
1.80
1.80
2.20
2.50
2.20
2.20
2.50
2.20
Non-College Work-Study Students
M.
'W.
C.
R.
A.
J.
M.
Bodor
Bloom
Caskey
Combes
DeLuca
Foster
Howec::ly
T. Hunt
J . King
S. Lester
A. Miller
M. Rabb
T. Snider
P .. Sta nsbury
J. Uffelman
D. Whelan
Finance
Mayor's Office
Sanitation
Sanitation
Sanitation
Mayor's Office
Planning
Atlanta Housing
Atlanta Youth Corps
Sanitation
Kennesaw Mountains
Atlanta Urban Corps
Finance
Sao.itatio".l
Sanitation
Atlanta Urban Corps
Declining Students
S.
S.
J.
R.
R.
D.
Becket
Chen
Devenny
Elliot
Fenet
Hend,=rson
T. Ho od
K. Jackson
C. Johnson
M. Karwisch
P ~ .Lu
D. Ma r sh
R. May
P. Nwghe
J . Ol son
P . Robe r ts
R.
P.
R.
J.
A.
Scholos
Scott
Still
Sous
Wallace
G. Weaver
li:. White
E. Wahlen
G. Zitlow
T. Hatcher
2.20
2.20
2.20
2.20
2.20
2.50
2.50
2.20
Volunteer
2.20
2.20
2.20
2.50
2.20
2.20
2.50
�Indiana University
College Work-Study Students
Name
W. Patterson
JIB.~
Atlanta Yo~th Corps
143.215.248.55
$2.20
�LAKE FOREST COLLEGE
College Work-Study Students
Name
S. Cantor
S. Dawson
Service Learning Conference
EOA
$2.20
1.80
�MERCER COLLEGE
College Work- Study Students
Na.ne
T. Wade
Age!Y'i
Southwest YMCA
Pay Rate
$1.80-
Non- College Work-Study Students
G. Wood
Atlanta Youth Council
2.20
�MOREHOUSE COLLEGE
College Work-Study Students
Name
R.
K.
M.
E.
A.
E.
J.
L.
J.
Carroll
Dunlap
Floyd
Gaffney
Kennedy
McMichael
Moore
Sanders
Stephens
Pay Rate
Personnel
City Parks
City Parks
Vine City
Atlanta Youth Council
Community Arts
American ·Cancer So~iety
Atlanta Youth Council
Parks & Recreation
$2.20
2.20
_2.20
2.20
1.80
2.20
2.20
2.20
2.20
No~-College Work-Stu1y Students
E. Barrett
R.
L.
M.
M.
R.
c.
Bro-.-m
Keys
Mangham
St blefield
Terry
Wilso".l
Georgia Emµloym,:nt
Purchasing
Water Departm,:nt
Finance
Street Theatre
Water Department
Traffic.
Declining Students
c. Burnett
T. Cuffie
A. Dollar
K. Fa 6 en
K. Martin
A. Moses
J. McCottrell
G. Sim_;,son
w. Wilson
2.20
2.20
2.20
2.20
2.20
2.20
Volunteer
�MORRIS BROWN COLLEGE
College Work-Study Students
Name
t
B. CoJ1er
c.
Davis
Hamil ton
Hayw;:iod
Humphrey
Jefferson
A. Mitchell
c. McElroy
c. Myrich
B. Pe!lningto':1
c. Simmons
D. Small
M. Strozier
B. Underw.:>od
C • Waddell
c. . Wheeler
R. Williams
R. Braxton
D. Hicks
A.
R.
D.
R.
Agency
fay Rate
Atlanta Girls Club
Parks & Recreation
Atlanta Youth Corps
EOA
YWCA
Mennonite House
Wheat Street Baptist Church
Parks & Recreation
Academy Theatre
Immigration
Atlanta Girls Club
Irrnnigration
American Cancer Society
Atlanta Urban Corps
Easter Seal
Finance
Gate City Day Nursery
Fulto!l Co unty Health Dept.
Gate City Day Nurs~ry
$2.20
2.20
1.80
2.20
1.80
2.20
2.20
2.20
2.20
1.80
2.20
1.80
2.20
2.20
1.80
2.20
2.20
1.80
2.20
Non-College Work-Study Students
J. Myle s
S. Prator
Sanitation
Sarah D. Murphy Homes
Declining Students
M. Comb
M. Co~en
J. Delay
w.
Flanders
J. Ho·.vard
s. Johnson
A. Jone s
D. Lemon
A. Love lace
J. Po·.vell
R. Rynder
Y. Ross
R. Sis t:a rie
w. Smith
c. Smith
c. Will iams
E. Warner
v. Ch andler
2.20
2.20
�OGLETHORPE
College Work-Study Students
Name
D. Hanley
J. Menez
EOA
Mayor's Office
$2.20
· 2. 20
Non-College Work-Stuiy Students
T. Isaac
Mayor's Office
2.50
�· Southwestern
College Work- Study Students
Pay_ Rate
Name
F. Flowers
G. Roberts
-.
Community Relations
Street Th2atre
$1.80
· 1.so
�SPELMAN
College Work-Study Students
Name
R. Arnold
A. Chapman
P. Dozier
D. Lewis
M. Moore
B. Qui.llins
T. Sinkfield
C. York
s:: Mincey<
L. Howard
M. Kreger
Kirk-w;:,o:l Center
Gate City Nursery
Easter Seal
Atlanta Girls Club
Library
Kirkwo,:)d Center
Atlanta Youth Council
Family Counseling
Wheat Street
No~-College Work-Study Students
Literacy Action
Fulton County Health Dept .
Declining Student s
S. Holiday
V. Smith
$2.20
2.20
2.20
1.80
2.20
2.20
2.20
2. 20
2.20
2.20
2.20
�UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA
College Work- Study Students
Name
S. Berry
M. Friedman
Crim~ Co:nmission
City Water
$2.20
2.20
Non- College Work-Study Students
F. Go~dson
J. Hotard
K. Millw.:>0d
J. Spencer
Sanitation
Sanitation
Atlanta Urban Corps
Crime Co~mission
Declining Students
W. Goldstein
L. Shahid
2.20
2.20
2.50
2.50
�University of Pennsylvania
College Work-Study Stuients
Name
P. Whatley
~e_T}£/_
fay Rate
Fulton County Health
$2.20
Non-College Work- Study Students
J. Waggener
Business License
2.20
�VASSA.~
College Work-Study Students
Name
M. Freeman
Me_TJ.SL
)? ay_J3,.a ~
Dekalb YMCA
$1.80
�WEST GEORGIA COLLEGE
College Work-Study Students
Name
s. Ball
K. Betsill
L. Brow:i
D. Cousineau
N. Ingram
M. Jaccino
K. Kennedy
s. Kiemele
J. Mann
R. Lyne s
P. McLaughlin
s. Stro1.)hert
c. Thurmond
L. Tilley
D. Turner
s. Windom
M. Winston
E. Henderson
Fulton County Health Dept.
Decatur YMCA
Fulton County He alth Dept.
Fulton County Health De pt.
Atlanta Public Library
Fulton County Health Dept.
Fulton County Health Dept .
Fulton County Health Dept.
Atlanta Youth Council
Water De pt.
Atlanta Girls Club
Kirkwood Center
Grady's Girls Club
Atlanta Youth Council
De kalb YMCA
Fulton County He alth De pt.
Motor Trans.
Parks & Recreation
Declining Students
J. Neighbors
\
$2.20
1.80
2.20
2.50
2.20
1.80
1.80
1.80
1.80
2.20
1.80
2.20
2.20
1.80
2.20
2.20
2.20
2.20
�YESHIVA COLLEGE
College Work-Study Students
Name
L. Shields
~~Si.
Easter Seal
~
R~te
$2.20
�Non-Colle ge Work-Study Students
Agency
Pay Rate
Tulane
I. Deen
Atlanta Urban Corps
Vanderbilt
J. Elman
Sanitation
Declining Students
R. Westbrook
Univers ity o f t he South
~o
Benjamin
C. Dill
Earlham Coll ege
A. Cherry
Tuskee gee
w.
Johnson
Smith
J. Dayan
Barnard
A. Waller
Ht. Holyoke
s.
Erlick
$2.50
�No:a-College Work-Study Students
Agency
Name
Pay Rate
Florida Presbyterian Coll ege
._ s.
Fulton County Health
Chandler
$1.80
Northwestern University
Emmaus House
F. Hill
2.50
University of Ken tucky
Water Depto
,, J. Hill
I
2.20
Coppin State College
Jacqueline Blackwell
EOA
2.20
Randolph-Iviacon
A. Luce
Decatur-Dekalb YMCA
1.8;o
University of North Carolina
1
M. Lawrence
B. White
Atlanta Service Learning Conference 2.20
Literacy Action
2.50
Wesleyan
' W. Hillkey
Finance
1.80
Anti och Coll ege
· M. Berk
Mayor's Office
2.20
Clemson
T. Rog·e rs
Atlanta Ur ban Corps
2.50
George Wa shington College
1
11. Silberstein
Kennesmv Mountain
2.20
North Carolina Arts Sc hool
· Ce Walker
Finance
1. 80
East Carolina ·
E. Wi tCher
, Fulton Planning
2.50
. Berry College
G. Smi tb·
Emmaus House
Volun teer
�1:w :-.,·;_,1!,
,\/rl'('/,
.\'.IV· ,/1/u11111 . L'eo,:i;ia :w·11:1 · -JrN 87::!-887:1
July 7, 1969
TO
Atlanta Seminar Participants
FROM:
Robert L. Sigmon
RE
Preparation for Seminar
A.
Over 20 interns from 12 states representing both undergraduate and graduate
institutions and from a variety of projects and agencies will be attending.
B.
As a technique for each intern to present the nature and substance of his
internship assignment, you are requested to prepare and bring with you to
the seminar a symbolic expression, some tangible evidence, of your project
efforts.
As an example, last year an intern working with Mexican-American Consumer
Co-op in Texas brought a paper bag containing a can of beans and some
tortillas to symbolize the basic diet of the people and products for the
co-op. Another intern working with comnru.nity organizations in North
Carolina used a cigarette to discuss the tobacco economy of that area and
its relationship to organizing in rural North Carolina.
Each intern will be offered the
To facilitate early discussions
requested to develop an outline
includes in the carrying out of
you are familiar with.
opportunity to discuss his or her project.
on the nature of development, you are
of what you think the developmental process
your project or in any other area that
C.
We will attempt during the seminar to examine the developmental process
as it relates to you and your project.
D.
To focus the educational question, would you be thinking about the question
of how we became autonomous learners?
E.
On Monday morning, a public official and a representative of a higher
education institution in Atlanta will attend the seminar to dialogue
with us on the role of youth in both the meeting of public needs and
discovering better ways of encouraging learning in the context of meeting
those needs.
See you Sunday, July 13 in Atlanta.
RLS:ht
�~.·
DIA KONIA PAIDEIA
and the
SO UTHE RN REGIO NAL EDUCATI ON BOARD
RESOURC E DEVEL OPMENT INT ERNS HIP PROGR AM
By Donald J. Ebe rl y
The Resour c e De v elopm e nt Pro j ect of the Southern
Re gi o na l Education Board o ff ers interns h ip app o intme nts to a I imited number of colle ge upp e rcl a s sm e_n
and g raduate students who demonstrate an int e rest in
the pr oce ss e s of social a n d econ o mic ch a n ge.
The
pr og ram is designed to · provid e service-learnin g e x peri e nc e s f o r students through assignments to specific projects of dev e l o pmental agencie s , community
action pro g rams, a nd to oth e r l o cal, st a te, or r e g ion a l o r ga nizations conc e rne d with deve lo pment a l
chan ge.
Fi nanc i al s u p port i. s p r ovided by p ubl ic age n c i es
i ntereste d in ec on o mi c de ve l opme nt, r eso ur ce de ve lopm e nt, co mmunity a ction a nd r e lated f i e ld s.
The y
includ e:
Appalachian Re g i o na l Commission, Coas tal
Plain s Reg ional Commis s ion, Economic Deve lopm e nt .
Admini s tr a tion, Office o f Ec o no mic Opportuni ty a nd
Te nn essee Valley Auth o rity.
Th i s r e po rt, pr e pa red by Mr. Do na ld J. Ebe rl y, Ex e c ut ive Dir e ctor o f th e Nat ion a l Se rvi ce Sec r e t a ri a t,
e v a lu ates th e SR EB Re s o ur ce Dev elopm en t Int e rn sh i p
Pr og r ams and r eco mme nd s d i rec tio ns f o r f ut ur e se r vice l ea rnin g ac ti v ities.
SO UTH ERN REG ION AL EDU CATI ON BOARD, Reso u rce Deve l o pment Pro j ect
130 S i xt h St ree t , N. W., Atl a nta, Geo r g i a 303 13
�DIAKONIA PAIDEIA
AND THE
RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP PROGRAMS
Donald J. Eberly
It is useless to try to report on SREB's Resource Development
Internship Programs (RDIP)
in one dimension, albeit that is the
traditional approach taken to problem solving.
done, we hire someone to do it.
If we want a job
If we want someone to learn, we
teach him and thereby, the assumption goes, he learns.
I .f we want
to promote university-community relations, we establish a Committee
for the Promotion of Relations between the University and the
Community.
But that kind of uni-dimensional approach just won't
work with the Internship Program.
However,
it is reassuring to
note that if we took a series of snapshots of the program along
different axes, we would see everyday occurrences.
Looking along
one dimension, we would see a person doing a job; along another, a
person
l ea rning in the field of
la w or economics; along another, a
person experiencing I ife in a poverty area for the first time; along
sti I I another dimension, a person deciding upon a career.
The
Ii s t
And so on.
is a I ong one.
The beauty and strength of the RDIP is that al I these th ings
can happen to the same person at the same time, for the int er nship
co ncept r ejec ts the no tion that learning can o c c u r ~ at schoo l
as firmly as it does the notion that a job is a job, and has no
business be ing examined against the writings of Plato, or Spinoza,
or Frost, or Keynes, or King.
�Yet there seems t o be no wo rd or phras e th a t captures the
essence of thi s kind of service-learning program.
occas ions,
On such
it has been he lpful to borrow from ancient Greek, as
Norbert Wiener did in coming up th e the word "cyb e rnetics," to
tr y to s ymbolize the project.
In this paper we use diakonia
an d paideia, t wo Gr eek p hrases th a t carry wit h th em the concepts of teaching and
of
learning thr o ug h activity, a nd of a style
ife gear e d to contributing t o th e welfare of others.
In our special shorthand,then, this paper is a report on
the diakonia piadeia concept as impl e mented and a dministered by
th e RDIP.
It is based o n the writer's inter v i ews with several o f
the interns, counselors, governm e nt officials and administrators,
his attendance at RDIP conferenc es in
of confidential
19 6 7 and 1968 , his perusal
reports of progr a m participants, and his deliberate
exposure to the diak o nia piadeia concept for th e past two decade s .
Unf o rtun ate ly, the med ium in wh i ch this report is r ende re d
does not permit a s imult a neou s exa min a t i o n o f a l I aspects of th e
co ncep t and th e program, so it wi I I l ook sepa r ate ly a t thr ee major
compo nents: manpower for se rvi c e , th e l e a rnin g as pec t, and communityuniver s it y r e l at i o ns hips.
ponents meet;
th e future.
Th e n it wi 11 exp lor e a r eas whe r e al I com -
name l y , program balances and imba l ances, fundi ng, and
Th e r epo rt ass um e s th e k ind of f am i I iarit y with the
p r ogram th a t can be obta in e d by r ea d in g th e 1966 and 196 7 r epor t s
of the RDIP .
Manpower for Serv i ce
A fundamenta l change that i s occ urring i n th e Amer i can concept
of wo rk was emphas iz ed by th e in t e rn s in their app li c a tion forms
2
�- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - -- - - - -- - -- - -- -- - - - -- -
and evaluation reports.
-- - -
According to their statements, only three
percent of the interns in 1967 and
ments in order to get a job.
1968 sought internship appoint-
The other 97 percent app Ii ed in
order to:
I. Relate academic theory to the real world
2. Contribute to developmental activities
3. Acquire research experience
4. Work with people
5. Help with career choice
Traditionally, a job is something obtained to enable a person
to make ends meet.
One doesn't go to his job a minute early or re-
main a minute overtime without remuneration.
scorned.
It is something to be
One feels a sense of relief on Friday afternoon, and
Monday morning is blue.
Economists can control the flow of man-
power into industries and services simply by regulating salaries
and wages, because employees automatically seek the highest level
of emoluments.
John Kenneth Galbraith punctured this picture of a job when
he noted,
in The Affluent Society, that some middle-class college
graduates would prefer low-pressure jobs in pleasant surroundings
to better-paying jobs that involve high tension and
time.
long commuting
It has been further punctured by some 25,000 Peace Corps
Volunteers--most of them college graduates--who have sometimes
chosen a primitive existence in a strange land at subsistent wages
over more "attractive" offers at home.
3
And today it's being further
-
- ---.
�deflated by thousands of ministers who turn down suburban churches
for ghetto parishes,
lawyers who choose legal aid help for the poor
over prestige law firms, and business graduates who are more interested
in a firm's social
involvement than its corporate profits.
Most interns appear to have similar attitudes.
with meaning, where they can
~
They want a job
learn and serve and work with people.
The internship concept gives to government officials, private
employers and educators an opportunity to transform the classical
notion of a job into one that has the characteristics des~ribed
above.
Today's youth is searching for meaning and relevance and
many have found that jobs can be structured to include these
attributes by assigning much of the drudgery to automation.
Many business and
labor officials are actively concerned with
restructuring jobs so that the worker performs more effectively
and gains satisfaction from
learning and serving.
But there is
I ittle evidence to suggest that the spirit which motivates such
officials is at all
pervasive, or that it stems from
th a n a r eac ti o n to de ma nd s a nd e ve nt s .
little more
It s hould be c l ea r from
r ece nt uph ea val s o n c ampu ses and in ma j o r c iti es th a t mo r e th a n
"reacting" is required.
Imagination and initiative is nee ded
in the realm of tran s forming jobs into e x pe riences with greater
meaning, relevance, and satisfaction for the worker.
The intern-
ship program offers an ideal setting . for such a transformation.
Interns are y o ung .
They possess the energy ,
imagination,
ideal s a nd mo bi I it y of youth. Further, they serve only a short time
( 12 we ek s in the ca s e of RDIP) which permits a wide array o f e x peri me nts with
little ri s k of
loss from those which fail .
4
Als o,
�internships occur at the inter f ace of the generati o n gap, and at a
po int where the a c a demic world and the wo rld of wo r k meet.
At t he same t i me, the in te rnship prog ram i s fa r fr o m et here a l
Real wor k is done--real services performed.
It was r eported. t hat
research done by a two-man intern team was the basis of a $500, 0 00
g r a nt t o the ag e ncy where th e interns we r e eng a g e d.
Anothe r 's r e -
search contributed to passage of a new law in Tennessee which p ut
contra Is on I oan sharks.
We k now that in t erns under go rea I t r a in-
ing and ca reer dev e lopment in t he fiel ds i n which t hey serv e .
results can be seen in the intern's evaluation reports,
Th ese
in job offers
received from their summer employers, and in changes in educational
progr a ms s uch a s the s hift o f a law stud e nt's c aree r from c o r por ation l a w t o po ve rty l a w.
With a firm foundation
in manpower de velopment and accomplish-
me nt o f us eful se rvice s , th e d iakonia pi ad ei a con cep t and th e RD IP's
impl eme ntat i o n of i t g iv es t o da y's l ea de r s in bu s in es s, go v ernme nt,
labor a nd education a model for the transformation o f the cla s sical
notion of a j ob into one th at ha s me a nin g a nd rel e vanc e.
I t al s o
of f e r s a co nst ru ct iv e a lte rn ati ve t o t he co nfr o nt a t ion s t ak i ng p l ace
ac ro ss t he nat i o n: pr ovid es in te rnship o pe nin gs for a l I y o ut h who
s ee k t hem a nd a re wi I I in g t o pa rticip a t e.
Wi th the c ha ng ing att i t u de toward jobs goes greater u npr ed ic t ab i I i t y abo ut j ob s .
I t has rece ntly been reported th at 10 y ea r s ago
ha l f of toda y' s jobs for co ll ege g radu ates d idn ' t e xis t .
Whi l e we
can g uess the f ut ure on the basis of extrapo l at i o n o f curre nt trends,
hi sto r y s ug ges t s th a t mor e import a nt c r i t e r i a are sc i e ntifi c
5
�i
discoveries and international events, ne it he r of which yield to
ex trap o lation.
We cann ot be very specific in att empt ing to define
jobs that wi I I have to be performed in 1980.
Hence it is a disservice to students and to society to regard
th e tr a ining element of any educational program as a uni-dim ens ional
assemb ly I in e operation.
Rather, there must be several deg r ees of
freedom within the training process to enabl e the stude nt to probe
and explo re relat ed areas of interest, and to do so on his ow n
initi ati v e .
RD I P intern s seem to possess this freedom to a · greater
degree than do their colleagues in other older intern programs.
The traditional, voca tionally-orient ed int e rn pro grams (e.g.,
medicine, ed ucati on , publi c adm ini stration ) were seen by conferees
a t a r ece nt RDIP Review Conference as over-programmed, offering too
I ittle ex posure to o ther fi el d s , and g iving the int e rn I ittl e chance
to free h im se lf from fee lin g l ike a s tudent.
Th ere seems to have
bee n v e ry I i tt l e mutual ex ploration be tween the RD I P orga ni ze rs a nd
those who a dmini ster tradi tional
intern ship p rogr ams.
It would
appea r t h a t both groups cou ld benefit from discussions and, perhaps,
cooperati v e program s .
Sim il a r exp l ora tor y discussions should occur with
l eaders of
stude nt- s ponsored co mmunity service project s, which ca n be found on
mos t ca mpu se s . Typ ic a lly, th e s e are part-time pro g r a ms, with no
academ i c credit given, with I ittl e academic conside r a ti o n of what i s
observ e d whi l e serv ing, and with I ittle feedback t o the c las sroom.
He r e aga in a l I partie s co u l d ben e fit from a mutu a l exp l o ration o f
in t e r es t s a nd ac tivit i e s .
6
�One vital, unanswered question in the ma np owe r field
ma ny jobs exist?
is how
Th is question should hav e high research priority
becau se of its implications for the eventual magnitude of inter nship pro g rams.
One or more smal I areas should b e s e lected and
approaches made to al I organizations where int er n s might be placed
t o determine how many co uld be used a nd i n what capacity .
summer and academic yea r interns should be co ns id e red.
Bo t h
It is strongly
suggested that this s urvey be I inked with a promis e of intern s for
agenc i es which want them a nd are qua I ifi ed to r ece iv e them.
Ju st
another survey would mea n that some administrators would pul I numbers
out of a hat or throw the s urv ey or out of the office in order t o get
rid of a use l ess intrusion.
To b e done properly, there mu st be c om-
muni ty back ing, wide publicity, full
s ur vey and , of co ur se ,
exp l a nat i o n, a c o mpr e hen s iv e
intern s a nd funding.
The Lea rning Dim e ns ion
It i s wel I estab li shed that what is learn ed i n a n ed uc ationa l
sett in g may bea r sma l I resemblance t o what i s t aught .
An i nt e rn
spe nd s ve ry I it t l e t im e i n a c l ass r oo m but mos t of the s um mer,
wh e th e r he i s o n th e j ob , a t a coun se lin g sess i on , or in an int er n
se min a r,
is spe nt i n a l ea rnin g e nvironm en t.
Th e same i s true of
th e other fu l I-tim e par ti c i pa nt s , members of the SREB sta f f, and to
a l esse r exte nt, of t he part-time pa rti c i pa nt s , th e cou n se l ors ,
s up erv i sors an d co nsu lt a nt s.
Wha t , then,
is
l ea rn ed?
Wr it te n rep o rt s and comments by a l I co nf erence pa rti c i pant s
e mph as i ze th ese kinds of l ea rning:
I.
The part i c ipant l earns i nterpersona l s k i I l s whi ch
c ontribute to be in g a n effec tive pe rs on, and discover s
7
�his strengths and weaknesses in sensitive situations.
2.
3.
He learns the consequences of putting to the test his
ideas conceived in a theoretical or vicarious setting.
He learns how to identify a problem and bring appropriate
resources to bear on its solution.
4.
He learns what moves people and what prevents movement.
5.
He learns something about the totality of facts and
forces involved in resource development.
6.
He learns strategies that can maximize service-learning
opportunities for himself and others.
7.
He learns some of the characteristics of the cooperative
and competitive process and the strengths and wea·knesses
of the two.
8.
He learns that the actual accomplishment of something is
inevitably more complex and difficult than is studying,
planning, dreaming.
9.
He learns how creative freedom and imaginative guidance
can be combined in enabling a person to accomplish things
and become a constructive force.
10.
He learns of deficiencies in his regular academic work
and feeds back this information to his academic col leagues.
II.
He learns vital -t-echniques in interviewing people, conducting research, and writing reports.
12.
More prosaically, he gains knowledge of the one or
several disciplines related to his assignment--knowledge
that was not in the textbooks or lectures.
Obviously there is overlap among the 12 types of
described above.
statements.
learning
Perhaps they could be fully covered in three
Perhaps 30 statements are needed to differentiate
sufficiently.
The critical question is what produces these learnings?
Some
agency representatives and counselors participate in as many as seven
different internship programs, yet they consistently and independently
8
�point to the RDIP program as having much the biggest "payoff."
What strikes the observer as the prime ingredient came through
most clearly in the dramatic presentation of a case study at the 1968
RDIP Review Conference.
The lonely intern, surrounded by a supervisor
who was pushing him to complete an application for a federal
grant,
a counselor from the university who was trying to pul I him into producing
research data of interest to the counselor, and an attractive technical
representative who was trying to lure him into an extended visit to
her agency, turned to the RDIP official and asked, "Who am
responsible
to?"
"You are responsible to yourself," came the reply.
In short, an intern is seen by the RDIP staff as an adult and
is treated in that manner.
He is expected to give evidence of having
learned without resorting to a multiple-choice exercise or the rephrasing
of his counselor's pet theories.
He is expected to seek outside aid
while seeing that it remains secondary to his main project.
Secondly, the RDIP insists on maintaining an even balance between
service and
learning. This attitude frustrates the impatient official
and professor who think in only one dimension at a time.
the real
purpose," they demand, "to learn or to serve?"
"What is
When the
answer "both" comes back, the inquirer is dumbfounded and may want
no more to do with the idea.
Receptivity for the concept is more
I ikely to be found among those who have themselves experienced
service-lea r ning and by those who commonly practice multi-dimensional
thinking.
Third ,
it's wel I managed .
Interns show up at the appoint e d
tim e, s tipends arrive on schedule,
interns'
9
reports are publi s hed
�as promised.
This aspect does not require a detailed analysis, but
must be included in a I ist of attributes because too many good concepts have foundered
in the sludge of technical
incompetence and
mismanagement.
Fourth, the seminars and reports appear to be valuable learning
instruments.
Several
interns came to the seminars with problems they
thought were unique to themselves, but discovered they were common
to most of the other interns, and everyone benefitted from the ensuing discussion.
Both seminars and reports produce some tension in
interns because they must assume responsibi I ity for something that
wi I I be pub Ii c I y assessed.
On the who I e, the tension so produced does
not seem inordinate; after the internships, some students look upon
their responsibi I ities in the seminar or report writing as the most
valuable part of the internship.
Fifth, off-campus experience appears to be a crucial
of the internship program.
usual
On campus, even in a work situation, th e
protectiv e forces and pecking orders are at play.
the intern encounters the real
its unreasonableness,
ingredient
Off campus,
world, with its loneliness,
its demands,
its rewards.
Academic credit for internships is certainly justifiabl e on the
basis of the above 12 points.
learnin g process, although
harmful
in others.
However, credit is no t essential to the
it may be helpful
in some cases and perhaps
In 196 8 about 40 of the 150 interns received credit,
although f e w expected it at the beginning of th ei r pr ogram.
Whi I e
the promise of academic credit might stimulate some intern s to learn
more,
it might constrain others from giving ful I reign to their ideas
in deference to doing what they think wi I I produce the best grades.
10
�Of course, academic credit,
intrinsic value.
I ike a dollar bi 11, has no
It is simply an arbitrary measuring device which
is convenient to many people and institutions.
Learning went on
before academic credit was invented, and wi I I continue after it is
discarded.
But it exists, and must be considered.
The way a
student regards academic credit might provide a clue to its proper
relationship to the internship program.
The student who views credit
requirements as a series of undesirable hurdles to be gotten rid of
would benefit I ittle from receiving credit because that attitude by
a student won't permit him to learn much as an intern.
On the other
hand, the student who regards academic credit as accurately reflecting the importance of a series of experiences appropriate to a person
of his age and background and interests wi I I benefit from receiving
credit because it wi I I be consistent with his outlook.
Apart from the intern himself, academic credit for internships
is a means of getting one's foot in the door of the academic establishment.
The program can be I isted in the college catalogue and the
administration can decide that counseling five
lent of teaching a class of, say, 20 students.
interns is the equivaThus, academic credit
f o r i n t e r n s h i p s wo u I d g i v e t h e p r o g r a m i n sti t u t i o n a I b a c k i n g a s we I I a s
higher esteem in the eyes of government officials and others who look
for evidence of institutional support as a major index of the merits
of a program.
What has to be guarded against in this kind of situation
is a slackening of standards.
Un I ess more deta i I ed studies revea I that academic credit for
internships leads systematically to a strengthening or weakening
of learning,
it is probably the course of wisdom to continue the
II
�practice of treating each case on its merits.
At the same time,
RDIP officials should remain responsive to requ es ts f or help in
handling the i ss ue o f a cademic credit.
Two factors that one might assume to be crucial are no t .
One, the nature or content of the intern's assignment is not
ne cessarily important.
For example, a chemistry st udent conducted
a survey of count y p urchasing procedures and i n so doing pr od uc ed
a usefu I document for th e agency.
had learn e d a great deal.
He came away fee Ii ng that he
Two, it' s not necessa rily i mportant
whether the agency where the intern works is efficient or inefficient, whether his supervisor is strong or wea k .
Each kind
of situation provid es a se tting for a learning expe rienc e , given
th e int e r es t of th e int er n a nd the s upp o r t a nd g uidanc e of the
counselor.
What i s import ant in r ega rd to the prece din g pa r agraph- - an d
thi s gets us bac k to th e hea rt o f th e co nc e pt--i s that th e total
o pe ratio n not be th o ught of as the addition of its part s ,
in wh ich
a " g ood" age ncy i s rated +2, a ba d s up erv i s o r as - 3, b ut as a process
th a t
in cl ud es a multitud e of i nt e r-r e l ationsh i ps .
This ho li s tic
perspe ct iv e i s he ld by me mb e r s of the SREB staff and many ot hers
involv ed in th e int e rn s hip program.
prog r a m nee d no t
An app li ca nt for a n int ern
have i t, but many ac quir e it i n th e cour se of the i r
in t e r ns hip, a s i s e vid e nt from th e i r r e port s .
"Th e university a nd publi c se rvi ce" has been t he s ubj ect of
a much p u b I i c i ze d, o n- a nd -off de bat e in rece nt mo nth s a mo ng s uch
me n a s J ac qu es Barz un, C l ark Ke rr, Al a n P i f e r a nd Ma rk Rudd.
It
i s di sappo in t in g that the debat es ha v e emphasized the ro l e of the
univ e r s i t y in provid i ng in s titutiona l s upport for pres um a bly benef i c i a l
12
�programs, to the virtual exclusion of the importance of community
service by staff, faculty, and students in the performance of i t s
teaching function.
Whether, how much, and how the university as an institution
should serve the community may be debatable issues.
univ e rsity should be a seat of learning is not.
Whether the
The embarrassing
question for educators is how do you expect to prepare your students
to become competent in their fields, and more importantly, to become
effective and constructive·citizens unless you arrange for the m to
experience me a ningful
involvement in the real world and to reflect
upon this involvement in the company of your learned faculty?
Wi 11 iam James tel Is us that readin g and I is ten in g can enable us
to kno w about something but not to know it un t i I we have experience d
it.
For example,
it has been reported that a full-year internship for
Ethiopian university students typically teachin g i n village schools
a dd ed nothing to the st ud e nt s ' a waren ess of rur a l pov e rty a nd its
associated problems.
But what did happen to the average intern was
that he move d from the level of awareness to the level of commitment
to do someth in g about rur a l poverty.
In t he Unit e d St a t es, the
pr ob l ems of today a nd tomorrow ca n be id ent i f i ed throug h a waren ess,
but th e y cannot be solved without commitment.
For un iv ers ity l eaders who co ns i der k nowin g someth i ng to be
a hi gher form of l ear nin g than mer e ly know in g abo ut something, the
tim e has c ome to intro duce internships of the RDIP type as an in tegra l
part of the l ear nin g process.
The Univer s ity a nd th e Commun i t y
As with the awarding o f academic cred it , the fostering of
university-community re l ationships is almost impo ssible to institu tionalize from the outside.
Clearly the t hru st of RDIP inte rest is
13
�to move beyond the traditional town-grown k ind of relationship common
to academic institutions
At one
int o patterns of r ea l pa rticip ation .
university, businessmen and others in the commun it y serve as visiting
lecturer s and discussants and are
common
Mu c h more
I isted in the cata l ogue .
i s the practice of pr of essors engaging th e mselv es , sometimes
with pay a nd sometimes with out ,
in commun it y affa irs.
The RD I P is
anothe r brid ge between community and uni ve rsit y ove r wh ich mutual
pa rticipation can flourish.
At the RDIP Rev iew Conference in the fa! I of
1968 , most of th e
discussion on uni ve rsity-community r e lationship s ce nter e d around
strategies for ex panding the RD I P type of
internship program.
Con-
ferees were unanimous in urgin g p ro g r a m ex pansi on , but RDIP officials
cautioned that, as presently co n s tituted,
been rea c hed
it s cei I in g h as a lmost
in t e rms of administrative capability.
It was ge nerally ag r eed that some k ind of decentr a lization
was i n o r de r,
but where respons i bi l it y shou ld r es t
major dis ag r ee me nt.
was a po int of
The case f o r uni vers i ty admin i st r atio n was
espo use d by thos e who saw the int e rnship s as primari l y a l ea rnin g
ex peri ence , a nd who be li ev ed th a t
th e
l ea rnin g dimens i on would
with e r away under auspices ou tsid e the univers i ty.
suggested th a t
university studen t s be i nvo l ved
and administrat i on.
A l so,
was
i n progra m pol i cy
One p rob l em , of course , wou l d be th e
o f th e program in th e uni ve r s it y.
it
l oc ation
For exam ple, one wo uld env i s i o n
the t y pe of program administered by the Sc hoo l of Pub I i c Hea lth ,
and qu it e another t ype by th e Schoo l of Education.
Perso n s who argued fo r s tat e spo n so r ship seemed to fee l that
a state agency would maintain a better ba l ance of
14
interes t s between
�doing a job (many of the age ncies where int e rn s serve are staterelated) and
learning.
(Most interns serve in their r espe ctive
states so the states have a vested
int e r e st in them as human
res o urces.)
What i s so clear is that the SREB-RDIP has the confidence of
al I parties in the int e rn program and a ny new agency , wherever it
is based, wi I I be suspect by o ne or mo r e parties, perh aps to th e
extent that it would neve r be able to get off the ground.
Further,
any a ttem pt to create an enti r e l y new set of agenc ie s wou l-d g i ve
ris e to in-fighting th at cou ld wel I defeat th e program.
Given the mag nitude of goo d wi I I a nd b r ea dth of s upport f or
the program, SR EB- RD IP will
be delinquent in i ts resp o ns i b ility to
the So uth, a nd to th e na ti on,
central
if
it fai I s to co ntinu e t o play a
r o l e in bui I ding the i nternsh i p program.
don e in ways that do no t
Thi s can be
neces s ar ily mea n a grea tl y expanded
ad mini st r a ti ve rol e for the RD IP.
For exa mpl e , t he RD IP co uld
es tab Ii sh gu id e Ii nes for int e rnships, ac t as a co nd uit of fu n ds
for program s , a nd evaluate programs.
This kind of arrangement
wou ld pe rmi t a variety of sponsors~ - a university he r e, a sta t e
agency ther e --t o evo l ve on the basis of merit a nd
in the image
of th e SREB-RD IP .
Another poss i bi I it y wou l d be for the RD I P to create or to
co ntract to a se parate agency the bulk of administrative c hor es
whi ch
it present l y car ri es.
In this way, th e RD I P cou l d maintain
its present smal I staff who cou ld conce r n them se lves with kee ping
on the right track a grea tl y ex panded internship program.
15
�Ba l a nces and
Imbal a nc es
To return to th e multi-dim e nsi o nal
p r o g r· a m,
it
v i e w of the intern ship
i s o b v i o u s t h a t a n u mb e r o f b a I a n c i n g a c t s mu s t
ca rried on simultan eously .
be
Among th ese are :
I.
A ba lanc e between e l ements of ri g i d i t y , e . g ., the
writing o f r epo rt s o n sc h ed ul e , a n d e l eme nt s of
flexibilit y , e .g., scope fo r int er n ini tia ti ve
2.
A balance between the int e rn' s pa r t i cu l a r assign ment
a nd exp os ur e to new fields and situations
3.
A balan ce betwe e n mak ing s uit ab l e a rran geme nts for
l e arnin g t o occ ur, b ut no t makin g thi ngs so easy_
that I ii"tl ~ o r no l ea rning wi 11 occur
4.
5.
A bal a nce be twee n a n int ern ' s pe rf o rmin g a u sefu l
ta sk and ga inin g know l e dge and wi sdo m
A ba lanc e whee l t o ma int a in a dynamic equ i I i b rium
amo ng th e pr og ram ob j ect i ves a nd amo ng the sometimes
competin g forces th at c om e int o p l ay (R ev i ew Conference
part i cip a nt s fe lt that SR EB- RD IP is just th e ri g ht kind
of balanc e whee l)
Two impo rt ant as pects of the i nte rn sh i p p r og ram see m to be
se r i o u s l y out o f ba l ance : th e pr o gr a m i s f a r too s mall
wi th th e nee d fo r
it a nd
i t appea rs to receive its mo ney from so urc es
o ut of propo rti o n t o the r etu rn s .
kind o f
in co mpari so n
Fo r r easo ns c i ted ea rli e r, thi s
i nte rn s h i p i s on e that s ho uld be wi t hi n r ea ch o f e ve r y
co ll ege a nd univ e r s it y student , a l I 6 , 000 ,0 00 of t he m.
I t s hou ld
not be r es trict ed t o o ne reg i o n of the country, no r t o s tu de nt s who
just happen to hear about it.
It
is certainly not foreseen that
e very st ud e nt wi I I want to par ti c i pate in thi s prog r am, for some
a re
in a position to se t
up their own i nternships a nd others wi I I
pref e r a lt e rnative us es o f tim e. But no o ne s ho u l d be exc lud e d from
th i s kind o f experience s impl y for
l ac k o f fund s,
16
inf o rmati o n , job
�openings, supervision, or counseling.
To try to analyze costs and benefits is difficult because of
several
unknowns.
We do not know, for example, what overhead costs
to assign to the participating university or host agency.
We do not
know what dollar value to assign as the benefits of an internship
received by the federal or state government or by the university.
In spite of these unknowns, certain conclusions can be drawn
from what we do know, and from assumptions that seem reasonable.
Not every case yields a savings comparable to the two-man team
which, at a total cost of $5,000, completed an analysis and report
which the host agency had been prepared to contract out at a cost
of $51,000.
But reports from supervisors and others give clear
evidence that the overwhelming majority of
interns make a contribution
to the host agency at least equivalent to the stipend they receive
as interns.
Only in a minority of
internships does the host agency
even make a contribution to the stipend.
The first conclusion, then,
is that ful I payment of the intern's stipend by the host agency is
economically justifiable.
We also know that the internship process generates a significant
amount of
I earning by the intern.
This outcome is seen in the award-
ing of academic credit to interns, and in report s of the interns and
their advisors.
\lvhile impossible to quantify exactly,
to be fairly comparable to what is
it would seem
learned in half a normal
semester.
Judging by tuition charges at institutions receiving the
lowest amounts of pub I ic subsidies, the cost to the student of a halfterm's
learning is at least $500.
Hence, the second conclusion is
that the amount of relevant learning derived from the internship pro c ess
17
�justifies ful I payment of the universit y co unsel or 's fee ($30 0) by
the university.
(Also, th e university ove rhe a d appear s to be at
l eas t offs e t by th e learning gained by the profes so r and benefits
ga ined by the instituti o n, as a consequence of participatio~ in the
int e rnship program.)
Be nefits to the several governments--federal, s tat e a nd
local--are more general.
The expectation is that interns wi I I
sel ect careers consi ste nt with the needs o f society, that they wi I I
be be tter citizens a nd mor e productive members of the eco no my .
Whether or not these expectations materialize wi I I not be known for
20 o r more years.
At this stage,
it ca n be report e d that the intern-
ship process i s having th e kind of e ff ect on intern s that th ey are
mov in g themselves in t he se direction s .
He re ag a in, qua ntifi cati o n
is impossibl e , but in c o mparison with th e magnitude o f pub I ic
s upport for clas s r o o m educat i on , and conside rin g the a s s umpti ons
u po n which it i s bas ed , financial
s upp ort for e xp e riential e ducation
o f th e RDIP vari ety ce rtainly appears to be a bett er inv est ment than
s uppo rt fo r c l assroo m e du cation.
The obj e ct iv e s hould be to achie ve
a prop e r balanc e be tween c l ass r oom an d ex pe ri e nti a l e ducation which,
i n f i nanc i a l terms, wi I I be reach e d when t he rat es o f r e turn on
inv estm e nt become eq ua l.
I n a dd iti on to th e f e de ral a g e nc i es supportin g th e RD I P, exp e rime nt a t i o n with th e d i a ko n i a paid e i a
co nc e pt c a n b e f o und i n s uc h
programs as the Peac e Co rps, Co ll ege Work-Study Program , Neighborhood
Yo uth Co rp s , J o b Co rp s , VI STA a nd Teac he r Co rp s . Thi s ex pe r i me nt a ti o n
s ho uld co ntinu e , a nd c ha nges sho ul d be ma de wh e r e nee de d .
18
�From where this observer stands, the RDIP offers a unique
experiment in the diakonia paideia concept and, as may be inferred
from foregoing observations, more advanced than other experiments
in several
financial
important respects.
Hence, wh i I e a re-a Ii gnment of
support is appropriate, continued support from govern-
ment agencies is warranted during this experimental period.
As the internship program becomes institutionalized,
it should
endeavor to alter its support pattern in three ways, as fol lows:
I.
The university should cover the cost of fees for the
counselors and should assume a greater role in ·the
recruitment of interns, development of projects,
seminars and report writing.
2.
fhe host agency should pay a share of the intern's
stipend that reflects the real worth of the intern
to the agency, but not so much as to make the agency
feel it can exert an employer's control over the in""'
tern. Thus, the agency's contribution should always be
less than the salary or wage a regular employee would
receive for doing the intern's job.
Using these criteria, a typical agency could be expected to contribute
from 50 percent to 75 percent of the intern's allowance.
3.
Government, at al] three levels, should provide general
purpose support of sufficient magnitude to enable researchers
to determine the appropriate balance between classroom
education and experiential education for college and university students.
In addition to altering the support pattern, SREB should look
for savings.
Consider the team concept.
A team of four interns could
have one basic task, one university counselor, and one technical
advisor, and write a single report, thereby reducing the number of
consultants by 75 percent.
Another saving in scale should result from more concentrated
recruitm e nt and placement efforts.
for
The administrative backstopping
100 interns from one campus or at one agency should be only a
19
�fraction of the present administrative costs for one intern
multiplied by 100.
One important funding feature to retain is use of SREB as
a conduit of funds.
Both the government agencies and the ~niversities
much prefer dealing with one place having fiscal
severa I.
responsibility than
Of course, SREB does not want to become a large operating
agency, but there is really I ittle problem here because the SREBRDIP could allocate funds just as foundations do.
Project submissions
could be made to the SREB- RDIP for approval, payment and evaluation.
Much of the legwork now done by the RDIP staff could be assumed by
the institutions submitting the projects.
The Future
The i nevitabi I ity of change is truer today than ever, for
changes occur more quickly than before.
o f st a gn a tion.
Yet the RDIP is in dan g er
As pre se ntly c on s ti t uted a nd sponsored, th e num e ri c
c e i I ing has bee n r ea ch e d a nd, bec a use o f g e ne r a l p r ogr a m ex c e ll e nc e ,
qualit a tive chang e s can be expected t o l e ad to incre mental
impr o v e -
ment o n ly.
Giv e n thi s r at her co ns tr a inin g s itu a tion, wh a t s ho uld be the
future c ourse of the RDIP?
In r e viewing th e observations and sugges-
ti o ns co nt a in e d in thi s pa pe r, th e f o ll o wing activitie s s ho ul d be
ca r e fully co n s id e r e d :
I.
Ex periment with larger-scale pr o grams. This a cademi c year,
pursue ag g re s siv e ly the po s sibilities for l a rger pr og r a ms
in No rth Ca rolin a, Geo r g i a, and Atl a nt a . Nex t ye a r , co nce ntr ate o n o ne o r t wo ca mpu ses, gua r a nt ee in ter ns hi ps to a l I
wh o gen uin e ly see k the m, d i sc o ver wh a t pe r ce ntage of st u de nts
co me fo rw a rd . At t he sa me t im e , sa tur ate a co mmuni t y o r
r eg i o n to de t e rm in e t h e num ber of in t e rn s h i ps a v a i l a b l e
In c lude se mes te r- l o ng and aca dem i ca mong a g iven popul a ti o n .
yea r int er ns hi p s .
20
�l
2.
Encourag e campuses to share the counselor's allowanc e
and agencies the intern's allowance.
3•
Encourage universities, agencies, and consortia to
sponsor internship projects on their own, but tied
in with the RDIP tor standards, consultations an~,
where appropriate, funds.
4.
Spread the word.
Proceed with the conf ere nce being
planned for 196 9.
Invite a few r epresentat ives from
outside the domain of SREB.
Make it a setting for the
strongest kind of endorsement possible f o r the RDIP
program and discuss future plans.
21
�A RSPORT Cr THE
STUDENT I l\'TER:·~SH IP PROG!v1J-'iS
rn
RESOURCE D~LOFi•E"JT
SOUTHERi•J REG!ONAL EDLICATIOI~ BOARD
RESQUBCE DEVELOPl'fNT PROJECT
1:50 s I XTH STP.':ET, i~I\!~
/\TLAi\lTA, Gi:ORG If. 3J3J.)
�TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTERNSHIP PROGRAM BROCHURE
INTRODUCTION
· •

e .. •
o
1
PARTICIPANTS
2
PROJECT SUBJECTS .
2
1968 SUMMER INTERN ASSIGNMENTS SITES .
3
SEMINARS AND i'llEETINGS
4
FINAL REPORTS
5
ACADEMIC YEAR INTERNS •
. 5
VARIETY OF APPROACHES •
• • 5
EVALUATION NOTES
• 7
I NTERNS INTERESTED IN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT
EMPLOYMENT AND/OR EDUCATI ONAL OPPORTUNITIES
.11
APPENDIX
. . .
Aca demi c Year Compendi um
Stat i stical Summary
�SOUTH N REGIONAL EDUCA 10 BOARD
Int rnships in Resource De e op nts 1968
GENERAL INFORMATION
The Resource Development Project of the Southern
Regional Education Board is offering summer internship appointments to a limited number of college
juniors, seniors and graduate students who demonstrate an interest in the processes of social and
economic change. The program is designed to provide
service-learning experiences for students through assignments to specific projects of development agencies, community action programs, and to other local
or regional organizations concerned with the problems of developmental change.
Projects to wh ich interns are assigned are selected
and structured to ach ieve several goals :
(1) T o give immediate manpower assistance
through the work of students to economic and
social development agencies.
(2) To provide constructive service opportunities
for students seeking to participate in the
solution of social and economic problems.
(3) To encourage young people to consider careers
and citizen leadership roles in programs of
development and to provide a pool of trained
personnel for recruitment by sponsoring
agencies.
(4) To give students in social sciences and related
studies a more relevant and meaningful education and training in the complexities of resource development.
(5) To provide additional avenues of communication between institutions of higher learning and
programs of social and economic development
by making the resources of the universities and
colleges more accessible to the community and
keeping curriculum, teaching and research
relevant to societal needs.
PROGRAM OPERATION
projects with a minimum of supervision and direction. Each intern participates in an orientation program and at least one seminar on resource development during his appointment. A written report is
required of each intern upon completion of the
project.
u
FINANCIAL CONSIDERATIONS
A stipend of $65 per week for undergraduates and $75
per week for graduate students is paid to each intern
for a 12-week assignment period. The first payment is
made upon initiation of the project and final payment is made upon completion of the final report. A
travel and miscellaneous allowance of up to $200 is
available to each intern. On-the-job t ravel is reimbursed at 8 cents per mile. Housing and food arrangements are the responsibility of t he intern.
REQUIREMENTS
Interns must have completed at least t wo years of
college prior to beginning their assignments. They
must have demonstrated high academic achievement, maturity, writing ability and be capable of
independent work. They must be citizens of the
United States, in good health and free to spend full
time in the area of assignment for the 12-week
internship period.
APPLICATION
Interns apply to designated persons of the participating university or college or may send forms to the
address below. Applications are available from the
SREB Resource Development Project. Appointments are made beginning in April, and summer interns
normally begin working in June.
PROGRAM SPONSORSHIP
Each intern is guided by a project committee consisting of at least one representative of the local
organization, a university representative appointed
as a counselor, and a technical adviser- usually from
the sponsoring agency. The project committee assists
in defining specific objectives and suggests approaches to operation at the initiation of each project. Interns, however, plan and carry out assigned
Financial support is provided by federal agencies
interested in economic development, resource development, community action and related fields.
During the summers of 1966 and 1967, internships
were supported by the Tennessee Valley Authority;
the Economic Development Administration of the
U. S. Department of Commerce; the Office of Economic Opportunity, and the U. S. Department of
Labor.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
SOUTHERN REGIONAL EDUCATION BOARD
Campus representative:
Resource Development Project
130 Sixth Street, N. W.
Atlanta , Georgia 30313
Phone: (404) 872-3873
�PS
UR
Resource Development ProJect
Southern Regional Education Board
DEVELOPMENT
1968
• A 12-WEEK SUMMER PROGRAM
FOR COLLEGE JUNIORS, SENIORS
AND GRADUATE STUDENTS TO
WORK
WITH
DEVELOPMENT
AGENCIES AND COMMUNITY ACTION PROGRAMS IN THE SOUTH.
• $65 PER WEEK FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS.
• $75 PER WEEK FOR GRADUATE
STUDENTS.
• LIMITED TRAVEL AND MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES.
SOUTHERN
REGIONAL
EDUCATION
BOARD
SREB was established in 1949 under interstate compact,
now ratified by t he legislatures of Alabama, Arkansas,
Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia.
SREB aids in t he social and economic advancement of t he
Sout h by assisting states to improve the quality of higher
education ... provide the widest opportunity possible in
higher education . . . build educational programs which
meet t he social and economic needs of the region.
SREB is devoted to helping Southern colleges build high
quality research and education programs . . . by providing
regional support and utilization of advanced programs . ..
and avoiding unnecessary duplication of facilities among the
compact states. (over)
�INTRODUCTION
Internship assignments were arranged for 151 students during the summer
of 1968 by the Resource Development Project of the Southern Regional Edu~aticr~
Board.
Interns were appointed in each of the 15 member states of SREB, in-
volving 109 local, state and regional agencies and 69 s.:mthern collP-ges a1~.i
universities.
All internship projects were concerned with developmental problems ani:l
opportunities in the region, and were conducted in the context of SP.EB's
service-learning internship model.
Tb.ese 1968 internships were technically in four separc.t e programs, ea cb
sponsored by a different federal or state agency.
Agency sponsorship deter-
mined the general focus of the projects and t be types of crgani zat ions to
which i nterns were as signed.
Although major financial support for the internships came through t he
four fe deral grants or contracts, a variety of local, state and r egi orn.J.
organizations also provided financia l support.
The major sponsors ,K:,r-:.:
Economic Development Administrati on
Office of Program Analysis and Economic Re.~E8Xch
Economic Development Administration
Office of Technical Assistance
Off ice of Economic Opportunity
Cormnuni ty Action Program
Tennessee Valley Authority
Office of Tributary Al·ea Development
State, local a.nd regional agencies supporting interns i:ncl·,1de:
Appal achian Regional Commission: Tennessee
The City of Atlanta
Coe.stal Plains Regional Commission
North Carolina State Planning Task Force
Tennes r.2e Office of Economic Opportuni'cy
Fifteen .~ rea Planning and Deve l opment Comm5.ssions : Ge or gia
�2
Administration by the Southern Regional Education Boar d all owed for
coordination of all internships into a single program.
This uni fied approach
provided for economy and efficiency in management and emphasized the related
r oles of various programs and agencies in the t otal development pictur e.
PARTICIPANTS
Internships were extended to include three states and 39 academic
institutions not previously parti cipating .
Over 600 individuals participated
i n the progr am duri ng t he summer and aca demic year.
Summer 1968 Academic Year 68--69
Interns
Local Agency Committee Members
Faculty Counselors
Technical Repre sent atives
Total Participants
151
116
106
178
551
21
8
12
11
52
Totals
172
124
118
18q
6c,._
3
PROJECT SUBJECTS
Project subj ects, identified by host agencies, continued to refle ct a
wide variety of topic s .
Project subj ect areas that previously interns h,::-_d
not been asked t o exami ne incl uded :
Economi c Impact of Coll ege on Community
OB-GYN Service Delivery of Publ ic Hospita l
Headstart Training in Rural Area
Small Business Administration Assistance in Mississippi
Census of Mississippi City
Neighborhood Yout h Corps Evaluation
Study of Dyslexia and School Dropouts
Profile of Seafood Processing Industry in two North Carolina
Counties
Family Planri.ing Assistance and Review
Comprehensive Health Planni ng Assistance
Aid for the Elderly
High School Counseling
Assistance with Rural Co-ops
These topics, in addition to the t raditional project categories, continue
to suggest that student manpower is capable of assisting with a great variety
of societal problems, a.nd that their services can be applied wii:.h insight and
skill .
( See Summer 1968 Bibliography. )
�1968
SUMMER
INTERN
ASSIGNMENT
SITES
e
e
e
ao
t
0
e
eo
e
tt
00
ee
0
0
e
eeee e
eee eeeo
eeo
eee
ee
e
e
0
e
e
0
ee
e
e
ee
a - Appalachian Regional Commission
e - Economic Development Administration
o - Office of Economic Opportunity
t - Tennessee Valley Authority
e
e
ee
ee
�SEMINARS AND MEETINGS
Counselor Seminars were conducted in Memphis and Atlanta to acquaint
faculty participants with program objectives and operations, federal agency
sponsors and the roles of counselors.
Sixty professors attended.
Intern Seminars were arranged for student participants to explore developmental and educational objectives.
Eighty-two percent of the ::.nterns
attended at least one seminar.
INTERN SEMINAR ATTENDANCE--SUMMER 1968
Atlanta (July 18-19)
Charleston (July 22-23)
Louisville (July 18-19)
New Orleans (July 21-22)
Memphis (July 24-25)
Washington, D.C. (July 28-30)
Totals
OEO
EDA
TVA
5
7
3
16
9
14
12
13
14
78
3
2
1
6
4
10
35
2
2
10
1
1
24
18
18
18
19
27
124
In November, a Review Conference brought together 30 :representatives
of sponsoring federal agencies, state agencies, university officials, studen-:;s
and local developmental agencies to critically examine the Southern Regional
Education 13oard's.Resourc€:! Development· Interni:;;hip Programs.
/Donald Eberly ' s
"Di&koni a Paideia" paper reports on the substantive i s S-V'= S discllssed du:: i.n13
t h~s conference.)
Experimental interdisciplinary seminars were conducted by Memphis State
Ur: j_•rersity and the University of Tennessee for interns participating in
internships in their area.
The seven Memphis State University interns were
enrolled in a seminar course for six credit hours.
assigned to OEO, EDA and TVA related agencie s.
The se j,ter~s were
The seminar met weekly and
us2d the i ntern assignment s as primary subject matt er for discussion .
�5
Interns appointed in the East Tennessee a r ea attended thr ee semine.rs
on resource development in July, August and October on a non-credit basis.
1'hese were arranged through the Political Science Department of the University
of Tennessee.
£INAL REPORTS
One hundred twenty-eight final reports prepared by interns have been
reproduced, with 11 not yet completed.
Several· reports represent team
eff orts.
Reports have been provided to sponsoring federal agency reprPRentatives
as they have been completed.
Local distribution of reports has been arranged
b:r t be host agency representatives.
printing several intern reports.
Requests ha ve been received for re-
(See Summer 1968 Bibliogra.phy .)
ACADEMIC YEAR INTERNS--1968-69
Internship assignments were arranged for 21 students during the aca demic
year of 1968-69.
These interns were appointed on a part-time basis and in-
volved 16 colleges and universities and eight local, state and r egiona l
ag~::ncies.
A compendium of these assignments is in t he Ar -p endix .
'lAR IET'I OF APPROACHES
Extending beyond the one intern from one uni ver;:,i t y to worL on a singJ.e
problem with a single agency, a variety of approaches to r esour ce devel opme~t
inter nships chara cterized the 1968 summer progr runs.
(1) A statewide project to colle ct and analyze data on muni c i pal and
count y gover nment f i nancial status was completed in cooperat ion with t he
Georgi a Muni cipa l As sociation, Georgia Ar ea Planning and Development Comm.iss i ons, Count y Commissioner's Association and nine state college s and univers i ties in Georgia. Twenty- eight inte r ns used a standard data coll ect ion
procedure for obt a i ni ng basic data which was i n t urn sent to Georg i a Munici pal
�6
Association for computer processing . This infor mation has provided the
basic content of GrrlA' s data bank for service to Georgia communities and
agencies. L~ addition, each intern prepared a specia l report on one
facet of local government for the participating Area Planning and Development Commission. (See Bibliography.)
(2) Four interns were appointed on part-time bases during the spring
semester to develop their projects in more deta il pr ior to initiating a
full-time summer commitment. Advantages of such an approach ar e clear er
project definition, earlie r university involvement and a longe r time period
for the project.
(3) Georgia Area Planning and Development Commissions and other host
agencies participated in a cost-sharing arrangement for the parti~l suppor t
of internships.
(4) Three interns worked with the Atlanta Model Cities Progr am . Two
l:::.:.~d.scape architecture undergr aduates from the Universit y of C-eo:v.·gi a were
supported directly by the City of Atlant a with educational overhead being
covered by SREB from EDA funds. The third intern was supported with OEO
funds with the cooperation of Economi c Opportunity Atlanta.
(5)
project:
In several proje cts, a team of interns collaborated on a single
Three Ea st Carolina University int e rns prepared an extensive
economic ba se study f or a four county ar ea in Ea ster n North
Carolina.
Two Univer sity of Kentucky Law students worked with Legal Aid
efforts i n Lexington> Kent ucky .
In Little Rock , Arkansa s, t wo University of Ar ko.nsa.s medi ca l
students conducte d a t horough r evi ew of outpatient pr acti ce s
of t he OB-GYN Section . Impr oved se rvice s have s :.nce be en
repor t ed .
A study of Negro ent repreneurs i n thz·ee Southwest Mi ss i s sip:i;,i
countie s was completed by joint wor k of an Al cor n A & M st udent
and a Univers ity of Souther n Mi ss i s s ippi student.
Manpower pro j ects in North Ca rolina and Ge or gi a were done by
teams of two int erns each .
(6 ) A former intern (James Wi l son , TVA 1 66 ) s erved as a counse lor
for an EDA i nte r n i n Virgi ni a .
(7 )
Se veral agenc i es r equest ed extensions of pr ojects.
(8) Five interns from the 1967 progr am period wer e appointed a s
advanced 5-nterns duri ng the 1968 summer program.
�7
EVALUATION NOTES
All project committee members and interns were requested to evaluate
the internship program and their particular project experience.
were formulated by SR.EB and mailed to participants.
Questions
Ninety percent of the
counselors prepared lengthy evaluation statements, and over 50 percent of
the other committee members :responded .
(1) Interns, counselors and all other project committee members indicated the worth of the intern 's project fo r the host a gency as follows:
Interns
Res:12.
~
Very valuable
Of limited value
No value or
negative value
Don't know
44
31
49.9
34.4
1
1.1
14
90
15. 5
Counselors
Resp.
%
26
17
52.0
34.o
55
30
.L
2.0
1
1.1
6
l?.O
(,
6.5
50
Total
Resp. _J;_,_
Local Re12s.
Resu.
%
125 55. 8
78 33 .6
59.7
32.6
3
~;.6
92
J.. J
i l ~ ~~
232
(2) Learning dimens ions and e ducational va l ues indicate d. in the qvest.i.::-,n naires are very similar among interns, counselor s and committee menbers. Most
frequently mentioned educational values were :
1.
Part icipation with problem so l vl.ng or developmen~al
process at many levels.
2.
Better understanding of research, interviewing,
analyzing and writing techniques .
3.
Enhance d human relations ab ilities .
4.
Motivation for educational and career goals .
( 3) I nterns responded to t he que stion, "How wi ll your internship rel at e
to your a cademic program? (Check as many a s apply)" in the fo llowing way:
83 Interns
Re sponding
o/o of
No.
Complement classroom activities
No direct relationship, just broaden background
Help pr epare f or eventual career
Research for advanced degree
Othe r
42
41
29
9
2
50. 5
49.4
34 .8
10 .8
2.4
�8
(4) Sixty-five percent of the interns responding to a question asking
f or recommendation on curriculum change recommended offering wide variety of
courses that require field work experience with concrete societal problem.
(5) Based on responses received, about 30 percent of the 1968 su,.•nmer
interns received academic credit for their internship activity. Course
credit ranged from one hour to 10 4ours credit for required field experience.
(6) The following quotes from evaluation materials indicate that basic
objectives and operational procedures remain ·worthwhile and fUnctional.
J..o
give immediate manpower assistance to de velopment agencies and provi~e
constructive service opportunities for students.
"Mr. Bigner established and conducted an in-service training program
for Head Start which will be continued and enlarged upon as time progresses." (Les Montgomery, 0E0 Project Committee Member)
"It (the intern's report) has been of tremendous help to us in evaluating the goals of our organization. The report will be widely distributed and studied throughout our organization and used as a future
policy guide." (R. Kirksey, EDA Project Committee Member)
" . . . my work on this project provides them (agency) with signif:'..cant
information relative to their obj e ctives of pr::-motin _, tourist nttre.ctions. Much unc oordinated. material has been arranged into the final
report." (Kenny Smith, EDA Intern)
"The intern compiled a Where to Turn Directory, a compilation of resources in Dade County, indexed in a simple way to make it especiall y
useful for target area wor kers and residents." (Betty Lou Barbieri,
0E0 Project Committee Member)
,:'l'he r eport is to be used for educational purposes with governmental
officials, thought molders in the community, and civic leaders who
will T,rork for solution to the solid waste problem. 11 ( Clarence Streetman,
TVA Project Committee Member)
1'£...~ncourage young people to consider careers and citizen leadership in prof1"3:.,s of development and to provide a pool of trained person."lel for recruitP':.~nt ~;z_sponsorina agencies.
"The program has convinced me that a career in urban or regional planning
is the one I would most like to pursue." (James Nic~1ol, TVA :i:ntern)
"The internship program has caused me to take course s deal::.ng ·with social
and economic problems in my academic studies this year . . . I have decided
definitely upon a career dealing with some phase of community development. "
(Betty Dwight, 0E0 Intern)
�9
"I have learned different aspects of resource development that I never
saw before. I have been thinking seriously of changing majors if I
don't lose too many credits. I feel that I would enjoy planning work."
(Raymond S. Cannon, EDA Intern)
"It has influenced my thinking to the extent that I am now considering
taking Urban and Regional PlaI:¥1ing in Graduate School, instead of
Economics." (Richard V. Dunn, EDA Intern)
To give students in social sciences and related studies a more relevant and
meaningful education in the complexities of !esource development.
"I have learned more through my internship than through any previous
college or work experience . . . It has strengthened my dedi cation t o the
field of social sciences." (Stuart A. Bach, OEO Intern)
"I now view this program as a valued part of the needed effort t o have
each and every person develop to the fullest his potentia l with a feeling of responsibility to the society which made that deve lopment
possible.
( Carol Brumby, EDA Counselor )
"The most s ignificant part of the internship project is that -young men
and women are given the opportunity t o ma t ur-= to fac ·~ r e 2.lity and t o
be ready to enter the world realizing t hat t hey have civic obli gations
as well as se l f ish obli gations. 11 (Thoma s W. Willis , EDA Cour..se lor )
"I l earned about what goes on in the world other than that which i s
immediat e ly linked t o my 18 stra i ght year s of education." (Thoma s J.
Blystad, EDA Intern)
"I l earned how to work with people more e ffectivel y ; something t hat I
coul d neve r have learned i n a cl as s room ." (Tommy Austin, TVA I 1;tern )
Jo ~rovi ~~ addit ional a venue s of communication between institutions of
hi ghe r l earni ng and progr ams of socia l and economic development.
"We have now established wor ki ng r e l ationships with th8 univers ity ' s
Depar t ment of Home Economi cs through Bigner ' s wor k he!'e ." (Le s
Montgomery, OEO Project Committee Member )
"Thi s experience has gotten our foot subst a ntia lly into the door c f the
UNC Popul ation Center . . . Thei rs i s a big operat ion and a l rea dy we ar e
maki ng f ull use of t he i r audio-visual s ection, and hope to ha ve t raining further augmented by them after t heir training sub commi ttee f ormul at es pl ans. Your program gave me new i nsi ght s ." (Leon Mann, OEO Proj ect
Commit tee Member )
"An import ant secondary benefit to the agency as well as the university
has been that these t wo i nstitut ions have been brought i nto a mea ningfu l contact, which may lead t o fruit ful cooperat ion in the future."
( Sagar Jain, OEO Counsel or )
�10
"On the basis of this experience, c:::-edit will be given for future
internship activity. Under study is a plan to conduct all summer
school architectural design activity much like an internship program
with field work and independent study as the basis for other course
effort." (Anders J. Kaufmann, OEO Counselor)
Counselor comments on the most significant part of the internship program.
"This opportunity to gain insight, first-hand, into the complex
problems of human and physical resource utilization and development is one of the most significant contributions of the internship program. 11 (James D. Wilson, EDA Counselor)
11
The most significant part of the entire program was the
scheduled and unscheduled meetings." (Bill R. Darden, EDA Counselor)
"The opportunity for students to become exposed to an action setting,
to work largely on their own but with counseling available, and the
opportunity to be freed of course and grading requirements are the
most significant parts of the internship. Not to be overlooked,
however, are the reciprocal benefits which accrue to faculty
counselors who observe student growth and to agency persons who
have opportunity to learn what students a re interested in and capable
of doing." (Daniel F. Hobbs, Jr., OEO Counselor)
"Action, man , action--student a ction, without the confinet"!ents of the
curriculum and the clas sroom, against which r ebellion is over due .
Self -det e rmination , sel f -reliance, self- imagi nation, se l f - ingenuity,
self-responsibility, self-etc. 11 (Robert M. Viles, OEO Counselor)
" . . . The most significant part of the internship pr ogram is the
opportunity for students t o participa t e in situations r e l ated t o
but often not ava ilable in the academic atmo spher e . By be i ng i nvol ved i n service activitie s , students are sensit ized t o t he needs
and problems of t heir community and the society as a whole . ff
(Mason Willrich, OEO Counsel or)
�ll
INTERNS INTERESTED I N RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT EMPLOYMENT
AND/OR EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES
Interns, upon completion of their assignments , are a sked about their
interests i n re ceiving inf orme.tion rela ted to employment or education
opportunities·in resource development.
Since 87 percent responded affir-
mat ively, a listing of these former interns, indicating their present
position and/or a cademi c background and t he i r SREB internshi p as signment
particulars has been compiled.
Individuals are listed by academic ba ckgrounds , which include l aw ,
economics, liberal arts, medicine, political scie nce, social science s ,
business and nat ural sciences .
This listing is provided to developmental agency empl oyers and educational insti tutions .
CASE STUDIES OF SELECTED INTERNSHIPS
Case study brochures have been prepared to i llustrate t he scope and
nature of resource development internships.
The case study include s a
E:t atement of the intern ' s project subject; a note on the intern ; a bri e f
de s cription of the project activity ; and notes on the final r epor t and
f o2low-up results.

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  1. http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_009_004.pdf

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