Box 9, Folder 4, Document 41

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Box 9, Folder 4, Document 41

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A RSPORT Cr THE
STUDENT I l\'TER:·~SH IP PROG!v1J-'iS
rn
RESOURCE D~LOFi•E"JT
SOUTHERi•J REG!ONAL EDLICATIOI~ BOARD
RESQUBCE DEVELOPl'fNT PROJECT
1:50 s I XTH STP.':ET, i~I\!~
/\TLAi\lTA, Gi:ORG If. 3J3J.)
�TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTERNSHIP PROGRAM BROCHURE
INTRODUCTION
· •

e .. •
o
1
PARTICIPANTS
2
PROJECT SUBJECTS .
2
1968 SUMMER INTERN ASSIGNMENTS SITES .
3
SEMINARS AND i'llEETINGS
4
FINAL REPORTS
5
ACADEMIC YEAR INTERNS •
. 5
VARIETY OF APPROACHES •
• • 5
EVALUATION NOTES
• 7
I NTERNS INTERESTED IN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT
EMPLOYMENT AND/OR EDUCATI ONAL OPPORTUNITIES
.11
APPENDIX
. . .
Aca demi c Year Compendi um
Stat i stical Summary
�SOUTH N REGIONAL EDUCA 10 BOARD
Int rnships in Resource De e op nts 1968
GENERAL INFORMATION
The Resource Development Project of the Southern
Regional Education Board is offering summer internship appointments to a limited number of college
juniors, seniors and graduate students who demonstrate an interest in the processes of social and
economic change. The program is designed to provide
service-learning experiences for students through assignments to specific projects of development agencies, community action programs, and to other local
or regional organizations concerned with the problems of developmental change.
Projects to wh ich interns are assigned are selected
and structured to ach ieve several goals :
(1) T o give immediate manpower assistance
through the work of students to economic and
social development agencies.
(2) To provide constructive service opportunities
for students seeking to participate in the
solution of social and economic problems.
(3) To encourage young people to consider careers
and citizen leadership roles in programs of
development and to provide a pool of trained
personnel for recruitment by sponsoring
agencies.
(4) To give students in social sciences and related
studies a more relevant and meaningful education and training in the complexities of resource development.
(5) To provide additional avenues of communication between institutions of higher learning and
programs of social and economic development
by making the resources of the universities and
colleges more accessible to the community and
keeping curriculum, teaching and research
relevant to societal needs.
PROGRAM OPERATION
projects with a minimum of supervision and direction. Each intern participates in an orientation program and at least one seminar on resource development during his appointment. A written report is
required of each intern upon completion of the
project.
u
FINANCIAL CONSIDERATIONS
A stipend of $65 per week for undergraduates and $75
per week for graduate students is paid to each intern
for a 12-week assignment period. The first payment is
made upon initiation of the project and final payment is made upon completion of the final report. A
travel and miscellaneous allowance of up to $200 is
available to each intern. On-the-job t ravel is reimbursed at 8 cents per mile. Housing and food arrangements are the responsibility of t he intern.
REQUIREMENTS
Interns must have completed at least t wo years of
college prior to beginning their assignments. They
must have demonstrated high academic achievement, maturity, writing ability and be capable of
independent work. They must be citizens of the
United States, in good health and free to spend full
time in the area of assignment for the 12-week
internship period.
APPLICATION
Interns apply to designated persons of the participating university or college or may send forms to the
address below. Applications are available from the
SREB Resource Development Project. Appointments are made beginning in April, and summer interns
normally begin working in June.
PROGRAM SPONSORSHIP
Each intern is guided by a project committee consisting of at least one representative of the local
organization, a university representative appointed
as a counselor, and a technical adviser- usually from
the sponsoring agency. The project committee assists
in defining specific objectives and suggests approaches to operation at the initiation of each project. Interns, however, plan and carry out assigned
Financial support is provided by federal agencies
interested in economic development, resource development, community action and related fields.
During the summers of 1966 and 1967, internships
were supported by the Tennessee Valley Authority;
the Economic Development Administration of the
U. S. Department of Commerce; the Office of Economic Opportunity, and the U. S. Department of
Labor.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
SOUTHERN REGIONAL EDUCATION BOARD
Campus representative:
Resource Development Project
130 Sixth Street, N. W.
Atlanta , Georgia 30313
Phone: (404) 872-3873
�PS
UR
Resource Development ProJect
Southern Regional Education Board
DEVELOPMENT
1968
• A 12-WEEK SUMMER PROGRAM
FOR COLLEGE JUNIORS, SENIORS
AND GRADUATE STUDENTS TO
WORK
WITH
DEVELOPMENT
AGENCIES AND COMMUNITY ACTION PROGRAMS IN THE SOUTH.
• $65 PER WEEK FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS.
• $75 PER WEEK FOR GRADUATE
STUDENTS.
• LIMITED TRAVEL AND MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES.
SOUTHERN
REGIONAL
EDUCATION
BOARD
SREB was established in 1949 under interstate compact,
now ratified by t he legislatures of Alabama, Arkansas,
Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia.
SREB aids in t he social and economic advancement of t he
Sout h by assisting states to improve the quality of higher
education ... provide the widest opportunity possible in
higher education . . . build educational programs which
meet t he social and economic needs of the region.
SREB is devoted to helping Southern colleges build high
quality research and education programs . . . by providing
regional support and utilization of advanced programs . ..
and avoiding unnecessary duplication of facilities among the
compact states. (over)
�INTRODUCTION
Internship assignments were arranged for 151 students during the summer
of 1968 by the Resource Development Project of the Southern Regional Edu~aticr~
Board.
Interns were appointed in each of the 15 member states of SREB, in-
volving 109 local, state and regional agencies and 69 s.:mthern collP-ges a1~.i
universities.
All internship projects were concerned with developmental problems ani:l
opportunities in the region, and were conducted in the context of SP.EB's
service-learning internship model.
Tb.ese 1968 internships were technically in four separc.t e programs, ea cb
sponsored by a different federal or state agency.
Agency sponsorship deter-
mined the general focus of the projects and t be types of crgani zat ions to
which i nterns were as signed.
Although major financial support for the internships came through t he
four fe deral grants or contracts, a variety of local, state and r egi orn.J.
organizations also provided financia l support.
The major sponsors ,K:,r-:.:
Economic Development Administrati on
Office of Program Analysis and Economic Re.~E8Xch
Economic Development Administration
Office of Technical Assistance
Off ice of Economic Opportunity
Cormnuni ty Action Program
Tennessee Valley Authority
Office of Tributary Al·ea Development
State, local a.nd regional agencies supporting interns i:ncl·,1de:
Appal achian Regional Commission: Tennessee
The City of Atlanta
Coe.stal Plains Regional Commission
North Carolina State Planning Task Force
Tennes r.2e Office of Economic Opportuni'cy
Fifteen .~ rea Planning and Deve l opment Comm5.ssions : Ge or gia
�2
Administration by the Southern Regional Education Boar d all owed for
coordination of all internships into a single program.
This uni fied approach
provided for economy and efficiency in management and emphasized the related
r oles of various programs and agencies in the t otal development pictur e.
PARTICIPANTS
Internships were extended to include three states and 39 academic
institutions not previously parti cipating .
Over 600 individuals participated
i n the progr am duri ng t he summer and aca demic year.
Summer 1968 Academic Year 68--69
Interns
Local Agency Committee Members
Faculty Counselors
Technical Repre sent atives
Total Participants
151
116
106
178
551
21
8
12
11
52
Totals
172
124
118
18q
6c,._
3
PROJECT SUBJECTS
Project subj ects, identified by host agencies, continued to refle ct a
wide variety of topic s .
Project subj ect areas that previously interns h,::-_d
not been asked t o exami ne incl uded :
Economi c Impact of Coll ege on Community
OB-GYN Service Delivery of Publ ic Hospita l
Headstart Training in Rural Area
Small Business Administration Assistance in Mississippi
Census of Mississippi City
Neighborhood Yout h Corps Evaluation
Study of Dyslexia and School Dropouts
Profile of Seafood Processing Industry in two North Carolina
Counties
Family Planri.ing Assistance and Review
Comprehensive Health Planni ng Assistance
Aid for the Elderly
High School Counseling
Assistance with Rural Co-ops
These topics, in addition to the t raditional project categories, continue
to suggest that student manpower is capable of assisting with a great variety
of societal problems, a.nd that their services can be applied wii:.h insight and
skill .
( See Summer 1968 Bibliography. )
�1968
SUMMER
INTERN
ASSIGNMENT
SITES
e
e
e
ao
t
0
e
eo
e
tt
00
ee
0
0
e
eeee e
eee eeeo
eeo
eee
ee
e
e
0
e
e
0
ee
e
e
ee
a - Appalachian Regional Commission
e - Economic Development Administration
o - Office of Economic Opportunity
t - Tennessee Valley Authority
e
e
ee
ee
�SEMINARS AND MEETINGS
Counselor Seminars were conducted in Memphis and Atlanta to acquaint
faculty participants with program objectives and operations, federal agency
sponsors and the roles of counselors.
Sixty professors attended.
Intern Seminars were arranged for student participants to explore developmental and educational objectives.
Eighty-two percent of the ::.nterns
attended at least one seminar.
INTERN SEMINAR ATTENDANCE--SUMMER 1968
Atlanta (July 18-19)
Charleston (July 22-23)
Louisville (July 18-19)
New Orleans (July 21-22)
Memphis (July 24-25)
Washington, D.C. (July 28-30)
Totals
OEO
EDA
TVA
5
7
3
16
9
14
12
13
14
78
3
2
1
6
4
10
35
2
2
10
1
1
24
18
18
18
19
27
124
In November, a Review Conference brought together 30 :representatives
of sponsoring federal agencies, state agencies, university officials, studen-:;s
and local developmental agencies to critically examine the Southern Regional
Education 13oard's.Resourc€:! Development· Interni:;;hip Programs.
/Donald Eberly ' s
"Di&koni a Paideia" paper reports on the substantive i s S-V'= S discllssed du:: i.n13
t h~s conference.)
Experimental interdisciplinary seminars were conducted by Memphis State
Ur: j_•rersity and the University of Tennessee for interns participating in
internships in their area.
The seven Memphis State University interns were
enrolled in a seminar course for six credit hours.
assigned to OEO, EDA and TVA related agencie s.
The se j,ter~s were
The seminar met weekly and
us2d the i ntern assignment s as primary subject matt er for discussion .
�5
Interns appointed in the East Tennessee a r ea attended thr ee semine.rs
on resource development in July, August and October on a non-credit basis.
1'hese were arranged through the Political Science Department of the University
of Tennessee.
£INAL REPORTS
One hundred twenty-eight final reports prepared by interns have been
reproduced, with 11 not yet completed.
Several· reports represent team
eff orts.
Reports have been provided to sponsoring federal agency reprPRentatives
as they have been completed.
Local distribution of reports has been arranged
b:r t be host agency representatives.
printing several intern reports.
Requests ha ve been received for re-
(See Summer 1968 Bibliogra.phy .)
ACADEMIC YEAR INTERNS--1968-69
Internship assignments were arranged for 21 students during the aca demic
year of 1968-69.
These interns were appointed on a part-time basis and in-
volved 16 colleges and universities and eight local, state and r egiona l
ag~::ncies.
A compendium of these assignments is in t he Ar -p endix .
'lAR IET'I OF APPROACHES
Extending beyond the one intern from one uni ver;:,i t y to worL on a singJ.e
problem with a single agency, a variety of approaches to r esour ce devel opme~t
inter nships chara cterized the 1968 summer progr runs.
(1) A statewide project to colle ct and analyze data on muni c i pal and
count y gover nment f i nancial status was completed in cooperat ion with t he
Georgi a Muni cipa l As sociation, Georgia Ar ea Planning and Development Comm.iss i ons, Count y Commissioner's Association and nine state college s and univers i ties in Georgia. Twenty- eight inte r ns used a standard data coll ect ion
procedure for obt a i ni ng basic data which was i n t urn sent to Georg i a Munici pal
�6
Association for computer processing . This infor mation has provided the
basic content of GrrlA' s data bank for service to Georgia communities and
agencies. L~ addition, each intern prepared a specia l report on one
facet of local government for the participating Area Planning and Development Commission. (See Bibliography.)
(2) Four interns were appointed on part-time bases during the spring
semester to develop their projects in more deta il pr ior to initiating a
full-time summer commitment. Advantages of such an approach ar e clear er
project definition, earlie r university involvement and a longe r time period
for the project.
(3) Georgia Area Planning and Development Commissions and other host
agencies participated in a cost-sharing arrangement for the parti~l suppor t
of internships.
(4) Three interns worked with the Atlanta Model Cities Progr am . Two
l:::.:.~d.scape architecture undergr aduates from the Universit y of C-eo:v.·gi a were
supported directly by the City of Atlant a with educational overhead being
covered by SREB from EDA funds. The third intern was supported with OEO
funds with the cooperation of Economi c Opportunity Atlanta.
(5)
project:
In several proje cts, a team of interns collaborated on a single
Three Ea st Carolina University int e rns prepared an extensive
economic ba se study f or a four county ar ea in Ea ster n North
Carolina.
Two Univer sity of Kentucky Law students worked with Legal Aid
efforts i n Lexington> Kent ucky .
In Little Rock , Arkansa s, t wo University of Ar ko.nsa.s medi ca l
students conducte d a t horough r evi ew of outpatient pr acti ce s
of t he OB-GYN Section . Impr oved se rvice s have s :.nce be en
repor t ed .
A study of Negro ent repreneurs i n thz·ee Southwest Mi ss i s sip:i;,i
countie s was completed by joint wor k of an Al cor n A & M st udent
and a Univers ity of Souther n Mi ss i s s ippi student.
Manpower pro j ects in North Ca rolina and Ge or gi a were done by
teams of two int erns each .
(6 ) A former intern (James Wi l son , TVA 1 66 ) s erved as a counse lor
for an EDA i nte r n i n Virgi ni a .
(7 )
Se veral agenc i es r equest ed extensions of pr ojects.
(8) Five interns from the 1967 progr am period wer e appointed a s
advanced 5-nterns duri ng the 1968 summer program.
�7
EVALUATION NOTES
All project committee members and interns were requested to evaluate
the internship program and their particular project experience.
were formulated by SR.EB and mailed to participants.
Questions
Ninety percent of the
counselors prepared lengthy evaluation statements, and over 50 percent of
the other committee members :responded .
(1) Interns, counselors and all other project committee members indicated the worth of the intern 's project fo r the host a gency as follows:
Interns
Res:12.
~
Very valuable
Of limited value
No value or
negative value
Don't know
44
31
49.9
34.4
1
1.1
14
90
15. 5
Counselors
Resp.
%
26
17
52.0
34.o
55
30
.L
2.0
1
1.1
6
l?.O
(,
6.5
50
Total
Resp. _J;_,_
Local Re12s.
Resu.
%
125 55. 8
78 33 .6
59.7
32.6
3
~;.6
92
J.. J
i l ~ ~~
232
(2) Learning dimens ions and e ducational va l ues indicate d. in the qvest.i.::-,n naires are very similar among interns, counselor s and committee menbers. Most
frequently mentioned educational values were :
1.
Part icipation with problem so l vl.ng or developmen~al
process at many levels.
2.
Better understanding of research, interviewing,
analyzing and writing techniques .
3.
Enhance d human relations ab ilities .
4.
Motivation for educational and career goals .
( 3) I nterns responded to t he que stion, "How wi ll your internship rel at e
to your a cademic program? (Check as many a s apply)" in the fo llowing way:
83 Interns
Re sponding
o/o of
No.
Complement classroom activities
No direct relationship, just broaden background
Help pr epare f or eventual career
Research for advanced degree
Othe r
42
41
29
9
2
50. 5
49.4
34 .8
10 .8
2.4
�8
(4) Sixty-five percent of the interns responding to a question asking
f or recommendation on curriculum change recommended offering wide variety of
courses that require field work experience with concrete societal problem.
(5) Based on responses received, about 30 percent of the 1968 su,.•nmer
interns received academic credit for their internship activity. Course
credit ranged from one hour to 10 4ours credit for required field experience.
(6) The following quotes from evaluation materials indicate that basic
objectives and operational procedures remain ·worthwhile and fUnctional.
J..o
give immediate manpower assistance to de velopment agencies and provi~e
constructive service opportunities for students.
"Mr. Bigner established and conducted an in-service training program
for Head Start which will be continued and enlarged upon as time progresses." (Les Montgomery, 0E0 Project Committee Member)
"It (the intern's report) has been of tremendous help to us in evaluating the goals of our organization. The report will be widely distributed and studied throughout our organization and used as a future
policy guide." (R. Kirksey, EDA Project Committee Member)
" . . . my work on this project provides them (agency) with signif:'..cant
information relative to their obj e ctives of pr::-motin _, tourist nttre.ctions. Much unc oordinated. material has been arranged into the final
report." (Kenny Smith, EDA Intern)
"The intern compiled a Where to Turn Directory, a compilation of resources in Dade County, indexed in a simple way to make it especiall y
useful for target area wor kers and residents." (Betty Lou Barbieri,
0E0 Project Committee Member)
,:'l'he r eport is to be used for educational purposes with governmental
officials, thought molders in the community, and civic leaders who
will T,rork for solution to the solid waste problem. 11 ( Clarence Streetman,
TVA Project Committee Member)
1'£...~ncourage young people to consider careers and citizen leadership in prof1"3:.,s of development and to provide a pool of trained person."lel for recruitP':.~nt ~;z_sponsorina agencies.
"The program has convinced me that a career in urban or regional planning
is the one I would most like to pursue." (James Nic~1ol, TVA :i:ntern)
"The internship program has caused me to take course s deal::.ng ·with social
and economic problems in my academic studies this year . . . I have decided
definitely upon a career dealing with some phase of community development. "
(Betty Dwight, 0E0 Intern)
�9
"I have learned different aspects of resource development that I never
saw before. I have been thinking seriously of changing majors if I
don't lose too many credits. I feel that I would enjoy planning work."
(Raymond S. Cannon, EDA Intern)
"It has influenced my thinking to the extent that I am now considering
taking Urban and Regional PlaI:¥1ing in Graduate School, instead of
Economics." (Richard V. Dunn, EDA Intern)
To give students in social sciences and related studies a more relevant and
meaningful education in the complexities of !esource development.
"I have learned more through my internship than through any previous
college or work experience . . . It has strengthened my dedi cation t o the
field of social sciences." (Stuart A. Bach, OEO Intern)
"I now view this program as a valued part of the needed effort t o have
each and every person develop to the fullest his potentia l with a feeling of responsibility to the society which made that deve lopment
possible.
( Carol Brumby, EDA Counselor )
"The most s ignificant part of the internship project is that -young men
and women are given the opportunity t o ma t ur-= to fac ·~ r e 2.lity and t o
be ready to enter the world realizing t hat t hey have civic obli gations
as well as se l f ish obli gations. 11 (Thoma s W. Willis , EDA Cour..se lor )
"I l earned about what goes on in the world other than that which i s
immediat e ly linked t o my 18 stra i ght year s of education." (Thoma s J.
Blystad, EDA Intern)
"I l earned how to work with people more e ffectivel y ; something t hat I
coul d neve r have learned i n a cl as s room ." (Tommy Austin, TVA I 1;tern )
Jo ~rovi ~~ addit ional a venue s of communication between institutions of
hi ghe r l earni ng and progr ams of socia l and economic development.
"We have now established wor ki ng r e l ationships with th8 univers ity ' s
Depar t ment of Home Economi cs through Bigner ' s wor k he!'e ." (Le s
Montgomery, OEO Project Committee Member )
"Thi s experience has gotten our foot subst a ntia lly into the door c f the
UNC Popul ation Center . . . Thei rs i s a big operat ion and a l rea dy we ar e
maki ng f ull use of t he i r audio-visual s ection, and hope to ha ve t raining further augmented by them after t heir training sub commi ttee f ormul at es pl ans. Your program gave me new i nsi ght s ." (Leon Mann, OEO Proj ect
Commit tee Member )
"An import ant secondary benefit to the agency as well as the university
has been that these t wo i nstitut ions have been brought i nto a mea ningfu l contact, which may lead t o fruit ful cooperat ion in the future."
( Sagar Jain, OEO Counsel or )
�10
"On the basis of this experience, c:::-edit will be given for future
internship activity. Under study is a plan to conduct all summer
school architectural design activity much like an internship program
with field work and independent study as the basis for other course
effort." (Anders J. Kaufmann, OEO Counselor)
Counselor comments on the most significant part of the internship program.
"This opportunity to gain insight, first-hand, into the complex
problems of human and physical resource utilization and development is one of the most significant contributions of the internship program. 11 (James D. Wilson, EDA Counselor)
11
The most significant part of the entire program was the
scheduled and unscheduled meetings." (Bill R. Darden, EDA Counselor)
"The opportunity for students to become exposed to an action setting,
to work largely on their own but with counseling available, and the
opportunity to be freed of course and grading requirements are the
most significant parts of the internship. Not to be overlooked,
however, are the reciprocal benefits which accrue to faculty
counselors who observe student growth and to agency persons who
have opportunity to learn what students a re interested in and capable
of doing." (Daniel F. Hobbs, Jr., OEO Counselor)
"Action, man , action--student a ction, without the confinet"!ents of the
curriculum and the clas sroom, against which r ebellion is over due .
Self -det e rmination , sel f -reliance, self- imagi nation, se l f - ingenuity,
self-responsibility, self-etc. 11 (Robert M. Viles, OEO Counselor)
" . . . The most significant part of the internship pr ogram is the
opportunity for students t o participa t e in situations r e l ated t o
but often not ava ilable in the academic atmo spher e . By be i ng i nvol ved i n service activitie s , students are sensit ized t o t he needs
and problems of t heir community and the society as a whole . ff
(Mason Willrich, OEO Counsel or)
�ll
INTERNS INTERESTED I N RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT EMPLOYMENT
AND/OR EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES
Interns, upon completion of their assignments , are a sked about their
interests i n re ceiving inf orme.tion rela ted to employment or education
opportunities·in resource development.
Since 87 percent responded affir-
mat ively, a listing of these former interns, indicating their present
position and/or a cademi c background and t he i r SREB internshi p as signment
particulars has been compiled.
Individuals are listed by academic ba ckgrounds , which include l aw ,
economics, liberal arts, medicine, political scie nce, social science s ,
business and nat ural sciences .
This listing is provided to developmental agency empl oyers and educational insti tutions .
CASE STUDIES OF SELECTED INTERNSHIPS
Case study brochures have been prepared to i llustrate t he scope and
nature of resource development internships.
The case study include s a
E:t atement of the intern ' s project subject; a note on the intern ; a bri e f
de s cription of the project activity ; and notes on the final r epor t and
f o2low-up results.

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