Box 12, Folder 28, Complete Folder

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Box 12, Folder 28, Complete Folder

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Bedeviled by long, hazardous hours, low pay, public
abuse and unrealistic court decisions, policemen
across the country are at an all-tim e low in morale.
Is it any wonder that police departments are so
dangerously undermanned that crime is flourishing?
Our Alarming
Police
Shortage
BY \ i\l JLLI AM SCHULZ
M
m ajor crim es
a re committed during a
typica l week in the city of
Los Angeles. Twenty-five women
are raped; fo ur citizens are murdered; 190 others are bea ten , kni fed
or shot. Poli ce switchboa rds light up
w ith reports of r 53 robberies, 445
stolen ca rs, 637 larcen ies involving
$50 or m ore, and 1076 housebrea kings . Yet thi s orgy of law less ness is
no reAection on the L os Ange les Poli ce Depa rtm ent. " We just don't
have the m a npowe r to keep crim e in
check," says embat tl ed poli ce chi ef
Thom as Reddin . " We need 10,000
m en, but we ca n't even fi ll our a uthori zed st reng th of 5383."
ORE THA N 2500
Officials in every sect ion of the
co untry echo C hief Reddin 's complaint. Ameri ca is desperately underprotected - at a tim e w hen crime
is grow in g six tim es fas t er than
p op ul a t io n- a nd t he situ a ti o n is
wo rsening rapidly. Demoralized by
in a dequ a te wages, fr ustrated by
judicial nitpicking , sickened by citize n apathy, poli cemen by the thousa nds are turning in their badges,
whi le potentia l replacem ents look
elsewhere fo r employm ent. A survey of 36 m ajo r departments from
Bo sto n to Hono lulu di sc loses
that not one is up to authorized
st reng th. U.S . Ass istant Atto rn ey
General Fred Vin son, Jr., puts the
I
�2
THE READER'S DIGEST
nationwide police sh ortage at a
frightening 50,000.
On the Run. New York's 73rd
Precinct - the teeming Brownsville
section of Brooklyn-is a microcosm of the national problem. Last
summer, the "normal complement"
of 374 men needed to safeguard the
area was short by more than roo.
Bone-weary officers put in r6-hour
days in the attempt to maintain
law and order. But they were no
match for ma rauding criminals.
Homicides soared. Stores were repeatedly burglarized . Policemen
themselves were mugged in broad
daylight. "They've got us on the
run," an exhausted patrolman said
bitterly. "And they know it."
To remedy the situation,
ew
York officials have la unched a highpowered recruiting campaign. But
their problem is not unique. Recruiters from the Washington, D.C.,
police department comb the eastern
United States, a nd cannot fill the
nearly 400 vacancies on their 3100man force. Meanwhile, crime in the
nation's capital increased 38 percent
in a recent 12-m onth period.
Behind the cold statistics are the
individuals who suffer: the mercha nt forced out of business by repeated holdups; the pretty teen-ager
disfig ured for li fe by a n assailant's
razor; the young housewife thrust
into widowhood by an armed robber - and you may well be next.
For make no mistake about it: every
gap in the "thin blue line" means
that more citizens get hurt.
This was demonst rated vividly in
mid-1966, when hundreds of Chicago police were taken off their regular beats to quell potential riots in
the tense Eighth District. During
this time, the city's crime soared 29.8
percent over the previous year, with
increases recorded in 20 of 21 police
districts. The sole exception: the
Eighth District.
H igh Risk, Low Pay. The shamefu l events of last summer, during
which more than 100 communities
were ravaged by riot, have made
the police manpower situation even
more acute.For example, 20 men had
signed up to take the examination
for admission to the undermanned
P lainfield, .J., police department.
Then came that city's riot, in the
course of which a young patrolman
was stomped to death by a savage
mob. Only five of the applicants
showed up to take the test. Of the
five, only two qualified. In nearby
ewark, a policeman threatening
to turn in his badge said, "They
just buried the best man I've ever
known" -this of Frederick Toto, a
decorated policema n shot to death
by a sniper during the July riot. 'Tm
not afraid, but m y wife's near a nervous b reakdown."
But the riots are only part of it.
In recent months I have traveled
from one end of the country to the
other, interviewing former policemen as well as harried young patrolmen who at least for now, are
stick ing it out. From their stories
t hi s dep lorable f inanci al picture
emerges :
Although the Office of Economic
�OUR A L ARMING POLICE SHORTAGE
Opportunity puts the pove rt y level
a t $3200 for a non -farm fa mily
of fou r, patrolmen in Di ck so n ,
Tenn., start at $2400 a year ; in Durant, Okla., at $2760; in Glasgow,
Ky., at $3000. Coeur d 'A lene, Idaho,
pays its patrolmen an annual ·$5280,
but requires them to work 54-hour
weeks .
Salaries in large r citi es, while
hig her, are nonetheless disg raceful.
In Seattle, cable splicers ea rn $375 a
month more than poli ce men; Chicago electri cia ns receive $1.40 an
hour more than the patrolman on
the bea t; carpenters in N ew York
comma nd 50 percent m ore per hour
than patrolmen. M oreover, the cable
sp li cer, e lect rici a n a nd carpente r
work 35- or 40-hour weeks, with genero us ove rtime. The policeman toils
ni g h ts and holidays, rarely with
overt im e, often under in cr edibl e
stra in , hi s li fe freq uentl y in danger.
In 1966, 23,000 poli cemen were assa ulted in the lin e of duty.
More appa lling than low pay to
m an y po li cemen is the att itude of
the publi c. "I'm willing to take m y
chances w ith the punks and the
hoods," says a vetera n policeman in
Balt imore. "A ll I ask is a li ttle support from the average citizen."
Yet, all too often, peop le "wa lk
the ot her way." Fo r h::i lf ::i n hour,
t wo membe rs of t h e C a li fo rni a
Hi g h way Patrol teetered on the edge
of a bridge 185 feet above Sa n Pedro
Bay, st ruggling to save a man bent
on suicide. Agai n and aga in they
shouted for help to passing cars. Not
one driver stopped, or even bothered
3
to ca ll for aid when he reached the
end of the bridge.
In another insta nce, a Sa n Fran cisco policeman attempted to arrest
two drunks on a downtown street.
Forty minutes late r he was ca rried
into San Fra ncisco General Hospital, his cheek slas hed open, his
nose broken . "The crowd just let
them beat m e," he sa id . "People act
as if the police were their enemies."
Case Dismissed. A nother m ajor
factor in the sorry state of police
morale is th e se ries of vague and
loosely wo rded Supreme Court rulings handed down in rece nt years.
Consider these typical cases reported
to the Senate Subcommittee on
C rimin al L aws a nd P rocedures:
• " Thi s fe llow went throug h a
red lig ht a nd ran into me," an a ng ry
motorist told the policem an dispatc hed to the scene of a traffic acci dent in Providence, R.I . " Is that so?"
the officer inqu ired of the second
motor ist. The latter ad mi tted that he
had indeed run the li g ht. Later, the
case aga in st him was thrown out of
co urt . Why? Th e poli cema n had
fa iled to notify him of hi s rig hts, as
required by the Supreme Court's
1966 Mira nda decisi on,* before asking, " ls that so'"
• An officer in Torran ce, Ca lif.,
picked up two young men on narcotics cha rges. Acu tely ::iwa re of
Miranda, the pol ice man in formed
the suspects, "Yo u have the rig ht to
• Whi ch ,a ,·s that a suspect mu, t be info rmed of hi s right to silence, of his rig ht to
a lawyer e,-cn if he cannot affn rd o ne. a nd of
the fact tha t a nything he sa ys ca n be held
.tga in !-i t
hirn
in court .
�THE READER'S DIGEST
the services of a n attorney during all
stages of the proceedings against
you." Tot good enough, Judge Otto
Willett ruled in dismissing the
charges. What the officer should
have said, Willett declared, was,
"You have the right to the services
of an attorney prior to any questioning." The defendants left the cou rtroom gn nnmg .
" itpicking of this kind h;r.; had
a disastrous effect on our force," says
Lt. L ee J. As hma n, head of the
T orrance narcotics squad. "Some
veteran officers have become so frustrated they've simp ly quit."
Turnstile Justice. Just as demoralizing is the cava lier attitude that
m any judges have toward juvenile
crime. Co nsider the case 0£ Harry
Sylvester Jones, Jr., a Washing ton,
D.C., delinquent who was g iven an
earl y release from reform schoolonl y to embark on a criminal career
that included rape, auto theft and
g rand larceny. Sentenced to prison
three times in eig ht years, Jones was
three times released on parole or
p robation. Within seven m onths after he was released for the third
tim e, he had raped two women at
kni fe-point, stabbed a nother nine
times as she knelt in church, and
committed his third rape against a
54-yea r-old wom an he trapped in an
elevator.
Jones is ha rd ly unique. Police fil es
in every state bulge with cases in
which innocent members of society
pay fo r the mistakes of unrealistic
judges and pa role o fficers. The careers of Gregory Ulas Powell and
4
Jimmy L ee Smith, young Cali forn ians who had amassed 25 arrests by
the time they were 30, are depressingly typical.
On the night of M arch 9, 1963, en
route to their fi fth robbery in two
weeks, Powell a nd Smith were
stopped for a defective taill ig ht by
Los Angeles policemen Ian James
Campbell and K arl Hettinger. The
unsuspecting officers were promptly kidnaped at g u npoint, d riven
n o rt h in to K e rn County an d
m arched on to a deserted field . As
the officers stood with their hands
raised, Powell calmly fired a .32-caliber bu llet into Campbell's mouth.
Hettinger whirled and ra n, miraculously escaping as Powell soug ht to
gun him down and Smith pumped
four more slug s into the dying
Campbell.
The lesson to be learned from
that March night is the folly of
turnstile justice. Campbell's killers
were both- on parole. Eight tim es
they had been the recipients of judicia l leniency in the form of conditional release, parole or probation.
N or has their luck run out. C aptured within hours of the murder,
the two were convicted a nd sentenced to death . But, last July, the
Ca liforni a Suprem e Court reversed
the convictions on the ground that
the defendants had not been fully
ad vised o f their rig hts, and ordered
a new tria l, perhaps p roviding a noth e r oppo rt u nit y to prove tha t
crime does pay.
" The. weakness in our handling of
re peating offenders has caused vet-
�5
OUR ALA RMIN G POLICE SHORTAGE
eran law-e nforcement officers to of a nonparti sa n crime comm ittee.
throw up their hands in despair," Mobili z ing public support, the comsays FBI Director J. Edgar H oover. mittee won an imm edi ate $rooo pay
" Worse, it makes ou tsta nding you ng hik e for Cincinnati 's policemen,
men reluctant to enter the law- with promises of m ore to come.
enforcement profession at the ve ry Today, a bi t m ore than a year later,
tim e their services are so gravely m orale is m eas urably improved.
needed."
Resig nations and retirements have
A Major Commitment. Wh at can been slas hed by two thirds, and the
we do to close the dangerous "police force is aga in attracting ambitious
gap"? Two steps are clearl y called
yo un g recru its. "We've got to unfor :
dersta nd," says John Held, " that
1. We must pay th e police a Living yo u ca n't stop crim e wi th an underwage. James Ro ye r, father of two, ma nn ed police force whose morale
resig ned from the C incinnati police has been broken."
2. T,Ve must provide th e police the
department in the summer of 1966.
"My ran k is that of police specialist," moral su pport they so desperately
he wrote. "My sa la ry, after -nine need. Througho ut the countr y, poyea rs, is $7507- I have no union , no lice efforts to improve community
g uild and ve ry few rig hts - civil or relation s have been undermined by
otherwise. Our city perso nn el offi cer a co n cer t ed campa ig n of ab u se.
classifies me as se mi-sk illed labor Commonest charge is that of "police
my co llege degree, g raduate work,
brutality." Yet a tas k force of the
adva nced train ing and yea rs of pro- Pres id e nt 's Cr im e Co mmi ss ion,
fess ional ex perience notwithstand- whi ch w itn essed 5339 " police-citi zen
ing . Private industr y has offered m e encounters," during 850 eight-hour
a substa ntia l sa lary increase and an
patrols, fo und only 20 cases in which
opportunity fo r advancem ent. I re- police were fe lt to have used ung ret that thi s co uld not be ac hieved
necessa ry force. " Th at is a reco rd of
as an employe of the people of Cin- . sa ti sfactory perfo rm ance in 99.63 percinn ati. "
cent of the sa mple under stud y,"
Jim Royer was not a lone, as City says syndicated newspaper columCou nc ilm a n Jo hn E. H e ld w as ni st Jam es J. Kilpatrick. "What
shocked to nnd . M any of the city's other occupa tion or profession boasts
outstand ing poli cem en we re q uit- a better record ?"
To counterbala nce the work of poting the force to acce pt hig her-paying jobs as g ua rd s, truck dri vers, lice-baiting grou ps, F red E . Inbau,
sa lesmen. Crime was up sharp ly; the professor of crim inal law at Northnumber of offenses culmin ating in
western University, recently formed
a rrest was down 25 percent from a n organ iza tion ca lled A mericans
the preceding yea r.
for Effective L aw Enfo rcement "to
H eld led the ng ht for the creatio n represent the law-abiding p ubli c and
�THE READER:S DIGEST
its embattled protectors." Enthusiastically supported by many of the
country's top experts on crime and
punishment, AELE will defend ,
among others, policemen it considers
unjustly accused of brutality; draft
m odel anti~crime statutes; and argue
major cases in the nation's courts.
Meanwhile, in Indi ana polis, a
band of housewives has demonstrated that anyone may enlist in
the battle for law and order. Stunned
by the brutal slaying of a 90-year-old
woman, a group of women residents
initi ate d the Indian apo lis AntiCrime Crusade in March 1962. Since
then, enlisti ng more than 60,000
women in its ranks, the Crusade has
won badly needed pay hikes for the
Indianapolis police, lobbied for effective anti-crime measures and sat
in on more than 80,000 court cases
to keep local judges on their toes.
Its dogged efforts have helped to
curb Indianapolis crime and have
6
won the kudos of the President's
Crime Commission.
The exodus of policemen can be
stopped. Thousands of young men
can be persuaded to make law enforcement their career. But it will
require a major commitment from
ordinary citizens across the land,
not only in dollars but in spirit. As
Rep. Joel T. Broyhill, of Virginia,
has said, "In part because we, as ordinary citizens, have waited too long
to fight back, a pol ice uniform today
is the target for epithets and abuse.
It is time to ask our decen t citizens
for collective action; our public officials for more backbone; our courts
for more reality. We must stop this
nonsense not tomorrow, not next
week, but today."
Rep rints of this art icle arc available.
Prices, postpaid to one add ress: 10 - 50¢;
50 - $2; 100 - $3 .50; 500 - $ 12.50; 1000
- $18 . Address Reprint Editor, The
Readers Digest, Plcasamvillc, N.Y. 10570
REPRINTED FROM THE JANUARY 1968 ISSUE OF THE READER ' S DIGE ST
©1967 THE READER ' S DIGEST ASSOC I ATION , I NC., PLEASANTVILLE, N. Y. 10570 PRIN TED IN U.S.A.
�Mrs, Birdie N. Ba ldwin
4401 Lake Forrest Drive, N. W.
Atlanta, Georgia 30305
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
30303
�ound Over
n Burglary
A man identified by police
field coordinator for- the Stu
tlent Non-Violent Coordinatin
mittee Friday was he!
tier $5,000 bond for the Fult
ty grand jury in connecti
the burglary of a Peac
Street clothing store.
·ckerson and Harvey G
, 21, and a third man 11
apprehended, were wa
onnection with a $3,000
Oct. 13 of Spencer
eachtree St. NE , dete
. They added Gay w
d Friday night and w
·gned in Municipal Cou
day.
'Records show Rickersoia
esteci here Sept. 14, 1
e Boulevard (NE) riots.
In the burglary, detecy.
aid a skylight atop the bull
as pried open and the m
ise brought back out th
e _skylight. Detectives
ey had recovered four
ut of an assortment of e
·ve impor ted coats, sw
nd shirts reported taken
e fi rm.
�J. Edgar Hoover, Director,
Federal Bureau of Investigation,
announces the
Graduation Exercises
of the
FBI National Academy,
Wednesday morning, November First,
Nineteen Hun<ked Sixty-seven,
at ten-thirty o'clock, in the
Departmental Auditorium,
Constitution Avenue between
Twelfth and Fourteenth Streets, Northwest,
Washington, D. C.
�Mr .E r
qn 9r
Of fice
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�Mayor I v an Allen
City Hall
As t he parents of . the c hildren a t Warren. J aek s on g.chool , we feel that it
is necessary for !!heir safety that a polie e w01nan···be ·stationed on Mt . Paran
Road to assist them in crossing o
We feel that e c onomy is not . a factor where the s-a£·ety o f our children is
inv olv ed a
�Mayor Ivan Allen
City Hall
As t he parents of the c hildren at Warren. Jaekson School, we feel t ha t it
is necessary for t!heir safety tha t a polie e woman ·-lYe ·stat ioned on Mt. Paran
Road to assist them in crossi ng o
We feel that economy is not a factor where t he safety of our children i s
involved o
.....
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�Ivan:
Is this the sort of thing we should have to put up with?
Could I obtain a permit to carry a protective weapon in my
car?
Don
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PUBLIC RELATIONS
WASl-llNGTON, D. C. 20001
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MOSS 1-l. KENDRIX
Director
Wl-lAT Tl-lE PUBLIC Tl-llNKS
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A TL ANTA O F F I CE : LOBBY FLOOR , WALUHAJE APARTMENT S
7 9 4-766 6
�ATLANTA, GEORGIA
P HO NE 5 22 - 44 6 3
George,
Check with the Police Department to see if
these threats were reported, and if they were
not, have someone go out and talk to the ladies
to get any information, per attached letter.
IAJr.
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F O R M 25 - 6
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ATLANTA, GEORGIA
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TO:
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FROM : Dan E . Sweat,
ROUTE SLIP
£ Ckdt/2-0d
Jr.
~ your information
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Please refer to the attached correspondence and .make the
necessary reply.
O
Advis e me the status of the attached .
FORM 25- 4-S
�JULY 1967
LAW ENFORCEMENT BULLETIN
r7 therefore believe it is my duty to
my country to love it, to support its
constitution, to obey its laws, to respect
its flag, and to defend it against all
enemies.

JJ
WILLIAM TYLER PAGE
FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION
JD EDGAR HOOVER, DIRECTOR
UNITED STATES
DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE
�JULY 1967
VOL. 36 NO. 7
..,_
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·----·-*
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-·-
THE COV ER- Patriotism and respect /o r the
fi ag. S ee Mr. Hoove r's
message on page 1.
--
LAW ENFORCEMENT BULLETIN
CONTENTS
Message From Director]. Edgar Hoover .
1
An American Policeman in England, by Lt.
R obert C. Mitchell, Multnomah County Department of Public Safety, Portland, Oreg.
2
Search of Motor Vehicles (Part V)
7
Seeing More While Looking Less, by C. Alex
Pantaleoni, Coordinator of Police Science, Rio
Hondo Junior College, Santa Fe Springs,
Calif. .
9
A Public Safety Cruiser, by Warren Dodson,
Chief of Police, Abilene, Tex.
12
The Silent Witness
17
FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION
Wanted by the FBI
24
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE
Tribute to Peace Officers
Published by the
Washington, D.C.
20535
( inside back cover)
�CAN THERE BE ANY ACT more sickening and
revolting than a crowd of so-called citizens desecrating and burning their country's flag? Those
who resort to such moronic behavior are surely
lost in the depths of depravity. Obviously, their
first loyalty is not to the United States.
emphasized and excluded from several phases of
our life. Many educators and other leaders seem
to feel it is no longer necessary for boys and girls
to be concerned with how our country came into
being, what it stands for, and the courageous and
noble deeds of our forefathers to preserve it.
True, our Nation is founded on concepts and
principles which encourage dissent and opposition. These are traditions we must always defend
and support. But touching a torch to the flag far
exceeds reasonable protest. It is a shameful act
which serves no purpose but to encourage those
who want our country to erupt in violence and
destruction.
Conditions are now such in some circles that
an individual who professes love of his country,
reverence for its flag, and belief in the principles
which make our Nation great is considered a
yokel. Open aversion to patriotism of any form
is increasing. Even some news media take a
"tongue-in-cheek" approach to persons and
groups which promote and pa1iicipate in patriotic
endeavors. Love of one's country is treated as
some kind of social disease to be tolerated, if not
stamped out. Protests are made that too much
patriotism leads to international conflict. I submit that the United States will never have anything to fear from its ardent and genuinely patriotic citizens.
On this 191st anniversary of the Declaration
of Independence, we might ask what causes unpatriotic outbursts and irrational protests. Why
do people turn against their native land and
openly support totalitarian forces whose goal is
to enslave the world- forces which do not even
allow token opposition from their subjects ? Why
do some individuals refuse to serve and defend
their country? Why do they burn their draft cards
and their flag?
There may be many reasons for such action,
but I am fully convinced that dying patriotism
is one major cause. Love of country is being de-
JULY
1, 1967
American history proves that freedom and liberty come at high prices and that their upkeep is
costly and time-consuming. As Daniel Webster so
aptly put it, " God grants libe1iy only to those who
love it and are always ready to guard and defend
it. Let our object be our country . . . "-not our
country the object of desecration and abuse.
�An American
Policeman

1n
England
Lt. ROBERT C. MITCHELL
Multnomah County Departmen t of
Public Safety,
Portland, Oreg.
Lightweight motorcycles are used to patrol extensive rural beats.
An American police officer, for a period of 6
months, exchanged home, car, and job with his
English counterpart in an experiment in the
observation of police work in a foreign country.
�Law Enforcement
Foreign Exchange
Experiment
0
n April 1, 1966, I began a 6month tour of duty with the Lancashire Constabulary, England's second largest police force. At the same
time, Chief Insp. John P. Kennard, of
the Lancashire force, was assigned to
the Multnomah County Sheriff's Office, Portland, Oreg., to study our organization and methods. To the best
of our knowledge, this was the first
direct exchange of police personnel
between an American and a foreign
police agency. I t should not be the
last. The exchange was total in that
we traded houses and a utomobiles as
well as jobs during this period .
Personal problems arose almost immediately, b ut none were beyond solution. For example, both of our insurance companies had to be contacted
and their feelings determined as to
continued insurance coverage on the
automobiles. Chief Inspector Kennard
I fo und that the fir ms with
which we dealt were fascinated by the
idea of the exchange and were more
than glad to give us their full cooperation. My own children are grown,
but Chief Inspector and Mrs. Kennard
were bringing their two daughters,
Paula, age 3, and Alison, age 9, to the
United States. Our local elementary
school was delighted with the idea of
enrolling Alison for the balance of the
school term. House payments and
the forwarding of pay were left in the
competent hands . of the assistant
cashier of our bank.
Advantages of Venture
There are tremendous advantages,
both personal and professional, for the
police officer chosen to participate in
such a venture. The exposure to different concepts, tools, techniques, and
training methods is bound to create
a thirst for further knowledge.
The exchange certainly changed
any_preconceived ideas of ours about
the " typical" Englishman. We had
prnbably seen too many motion pie-
tures depicting stereotyped roles of
the English and heard too many jokes
about their lack of a sense of humor.
We found a warmhearted, generous,
and hospitable people with a sense of
humor as keen as our own.
There are differences in living conditions, monetary systems, and many
of the things which we take for
granted in -t he United States. We
found no real difficulty in adapting to
these differences.
Housing, or a housing allowance,
is provided for the British policeman
by his force. Thus we found ourselves housed in one of a row of nine
police houses. They were more or
less identical, of standard brick construction, and heated by coal fireplaces. Our neighbors were policemen and their families. Some of the
friendships formed with our neighbors will last a lifetime.
I believe that living under these
conditions proved the necessity of a n
Chief Supt. William Little
(right), uN" Division
(Ashton-Unde r-Lyne ),
and Lie ute nant Mitche ll.
a'~a
July 1967
3
�and as a result we both found ourselves being invited to speak to various civic organizations. It is our
hope that we left a good impression of
Americans with those organizations.
The Unarmed Police
Lieutena nt Mitchell chats with offi cers in the communications section, a vita l public service in
all police departments.
officer involved in such an exchange
being accompanied by his wife a nd
famil y. It would have been difficult,
if not impossible, fo r a single man to
have fitted in with the fa mily atmosphere of this police community.
Scope o f the Exchange
Inasmuch as this was to be a new
experience, neither my sheriff nor I
was in a position to know just what
we should consider as the scope of
the experiment. I was given specific
a reas to study : The penal system, the
use of the summons as opposed to
physical arrest, and the relationship
of the British police with the public
they serve. Beyond these three points,
I was given a free hand to delve into
anything I felt would be of value to us.
Chief Constable Col. T. Eric St.
Johnston was on a world tour at the
time of my arrival, but he had left
instructions that I was not to be " desk
bound" but was to be left ver y much
as a free agent to come and go as I
4
saw fit. Visits had been scheduled
for me with police fo rces in England,
Scotland, Northern Ireland, and the
Isle of Man.
Although b ased at Lancashire Constabular y Headquarters, I visited each
of its 18 divisions as well as 15 other
police forces, In every case I was
given any information I requested,
shown anything I wished to see, and
given free access to anything I fo und
of interest. Each fo rce visited had
ar ranged both professional and social
engagements which they felt would be
of value and interest to both Mrs.
Mitchell and me. As a result, we h ad
access to ma ny places and activities
that no tourist would ever have.
Thro ugh these programs we were able
to broaden our outlook far beyond
the confines of the police service.
Being cast in the role of an ambassador of good will came as something
of a surprise, but both my wife and I
fo und ourselves placed in this position. P ress and television coverage
of the exchange was quite extensive,
After 22 years of close association
with a sidearm, it was both pleasant
and disconcerting to find myself work ing with policemen who neither use
firearms nor care to use them. This,
of course, was the first difference to be
encountered in our two police systems
and was the one on which I was most
often questioned. The arming of the
British police became the subj ect of a
great deal of public controversy when
Detective Sgt. Chris Head and P olice
Constables Geoffrey F ox and David
W ombwell were slain in London on
August 12, 1966. Oddly enough, the
police were not nearly as enthusiastic
about being armed as the public was
about a rming them.
In my opinion the answer to this
problem may lie in stiffer prison sentences for those criminals wh o use a
gun against an unarmed society and
unarmed police fo rces. The British
policeman has spent nearly 150 years
in building the tradition of keeping
the peace without the use of firearms.
This is a tradition which should be
kept as long as it is possible to do so.
I t would be h ighly improper if I
were to create the impression that the
police are completely inept in the use
of firearms. Every force has a num ber of men trained in the use of weapons, and the equipment i available
for issue when it is needed .
Standard ization
The British police enjoy a standardization of many elements of the
police service that may not be attainable in the United States. P a y scales
are the same in all E ngli h forces,
with the exception of London, which
FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin
�allows a cost-of-living adjustment.
Entrance requirements may vary
slightly from force to force, but conditions of service are the same in all
forces. This standardization is also
found in training, uniforms, and retirement benefits. It would appear
that the key to standardization is the
50 percent grant from the national
treasury of the annual budget of each
police force.
Every force is inspected annually
by one of Her Majesty's Inspectors
of Constabulary. His report, indicating that the force is up to standards,
determines whether the grant will be
allo wed. Although placin g chief constables in a ver y advantageous position when presenting the p olice budget
to their local authority, this system
does place the national government
squarely in the local police picture.
Any suggestions presented to the chief
constables by the Home Secretary will
usually be implemented. Without a
doubt, this is the major factor in
achieving the uniformity which I
found so impressive.
Training Program
The value of standardization is most
apparent in the training program.
England is divided into eight geographic police districts, each with a
district training center.
Recruits
from every force in the district train
together and take the same 13-week
basic training course. This concept
of training is possible where criminal
law is national in scope rather than
regional, as in our own State statutes.
Women police constables in patrol cars undertake the same duties as the men but especially
concern themselves with cases involving women and children. The police car is white so
that it can be readily identified as a police vehicle.
Training does not stop at the recruit
level. Inservice training is carried
out within the forces, · and refresher
courses are offered at the district
trammg center. Specialized courses
are frequently given in the larger
forces with vacancies in the class held
open for officers from surrounding
forces.
One of the more interesting inservice training courses is the refresher
course for sergeants of the Lancashire
Constabulary. It is based on a concept of three R's:
1. Relax-by virtu e of short hours, no pres-
sure, and long weekends.
2. Refre sh- the officer's kn owl edge of th e
latest laws and court decisions.
3. Ren ew- the officer's enthusiasm for his
job, the department, and th e future.
Supt. Walter Butterworth, now retired, assured me that the relaxed atmosphere, the roundtable conference
approach to teaching, a nd the complete lack of pressure do send the men
back to their posts with a far better
outlook on their job.
The Police College at Bramshill is
the seat of higher education for the
whole of the English police service.
The 6-month Senior Staff Course
trains officers of the rank of inspector
and above to assume the highest posts
in the police service. The Intermediate Command Course, lasting 3
months, is designed to train inspectors and chief inspectors in the responsibilities of posts held by superintendents and chief superintendents.
Sergeants and newly promoted inspectors attend the 6-m onth " A" Course
to prepare them for the duties of inspector and chi ef inspector.
The Special Course impressed me
with the potenti al of hav in g tremendous impact on the British police service of the future. Young offi cers of
outstanding pro mise, wh o have passed
hi gh ) n pro motio nal examinations,
are assig ned to this 1-year course
under a q uota system. They are
given the temporar y ra nk of sergeant
5
�for the duration of the course, the
rank being made permanent after the
successful conclusion of their studies.
There are a number of scholarships
available for the outstanding officers
in the class to continue on to university studies.
I would hope that the P olice College
program could be expanded to accommodate far more students. The
coll~ge graduated 448* men and
women in 1965 from a total authorized police strength of about 95,000.
Crime prevention and public relations are sometimes treated as sepa-
On the day I inspected this installation, police were keeping a parking lot
and a city street with a high crime
rate under surveillance. Any suspicious activity was reported to plainclothes officers on the ground who immediately investigated !he situation.
In addition to setting up many good
arrests, this system appears to keep
many of the thieves · off balance, as
they are never quite sure where the
television will be installed next.
With the cooperation of BBC and
the independent television stations,
the police sponsor regional programs
Officer and police dog patrol a children's playground at Kirkby near Liverpool .
rate fun ctions, but to me they appear
to interlock to such an extent that it
is difficult to tell where one stops and
the other begins. Most of the forces
I visited had assigned offi cers to the
crime prevention detail on a full-tim e
basis, and these men were very devoted to the program. In addition to
the expected posters, pamphlets, and
personal contacts with business people, I found two techniques th at were
of great interest.
The Liverpool City P olice have
mounted mo vable television cameras
atop one of the do wntown buildings.


R eport o f H er i\ laj cs ty·s Ch ief Ins pec tor o f Co n stnbu lnry for th e Year, ] 965 (Lond on: Her Majes ty' s


Sta ti onery Office, 1966), p. 33 .
6
with such titles as " P olice File" and
" P olice Five." These programs are
on the air during prime time in the
evening, and public reception and reaction are excellent. The usual fo rmat might show a photograph of a
wanted man, a certain type of vehicle
the police are looking fo r , a list of
stolen items, and a missing person .
" Police File" is aired at 7 p.m. on
Frida y over Granada TV. The ro ugh
scri pt is written by the Manchester
City P olice public relations offi cer and
is then poli shed by television script
writers under his supervision. T his
is not an attempt at censorship or co ntrol by the television people, but is
designed to convert the script from
police language to television language.
Forty-eight police forces in the
Granada viewing area contribute to
the program through the Manchester
Police.
Displays
Also of particular interest and value
are large assortments of locks and security devices displayed by most crime
prevention officers and · provided
through the courtesy of the manufacturers of such hardware. Many
officers pointed out that the businessman should be invited to the police
station to view these displays privately. There was a strong suspicion that
the local burglars would enjoy attending any public display of such security devices.
During my tour in England, I had
the pleasure of visiting the following police departments: Lancashire
Constabulary, P reston Borough P olice, Ro yal Ulster Constabulary, Liverpool City P olice, Isle of Man Con stabular y, Manchester City Police,
Birmingham City P olice, Coventry
City P olice, Stockport Borough Po lice, Blackpool Boro ugh Police, City
of London P olice, London Metrop olitan Police, Southport Boro ugh P olice,
Edinb urgh City P olice, Glasgow City
Police, and Durham Constabulary.
The British Police m an
I have touched briefl y on a few of
the many facets of the British police
service. I should like to generalize
a bit and attempt to describe the
Br itish policeman . He is a first-rate
police officer by the standar ds of any
p olice agency known to me. He is
gro3sly underpaid when one weighs
his respo~sibilities against those of
men employed by British industry.
He perfo rms the deeds of valor which
a re expected of policemen everywhere.
The 1965 report of Her Majesty's
( Continued on page 16)
FBI Law Enforcement Bull eti n
�Search
of
Motor
Vehicles
This is the fifth of a series of articles
discussing the Fecleral law on search
of motor vehicles.
VI. Consent Searches
The constitutional p r o t e ct i o n
against unreasonable searches and
seizures provided by the fourth
amendment can be waived by the express consent of the person whose·
property is to be searched. On Lee v.
U.S., 343 U.S. 74-7 (1952 ) . Because
of the obvious advantages it offers
over the search by warrant or incidental to arrest, the consent search
has become a popular method of
sec uring evidence from suspected offenders. Where properly obtained
from the party in interest, it _avoids
the requirements of probable cause
and particularity of description necessary to a valid warrant. And since
it need not be tied to an arrest, the
contemporaneo us factors of time and
place associated with the incidental
search are also inapplicable. But it is
precisely because thi s technique circumvents these traditi onal safeguards
of privacy that consent searches are
looked upon with disfavor by the
courts.
When one consents to a search of his
automobile, it is said that he waives
any constitutional right of privacy he
might otherwise en joy over the vehicle or any property contained therein. And as in all situations involving
a waiver of fundamental constitutional rights, it can be expected that
the pr,osccution will have to meet a
hi gh standard of proof. Johnson v.
Zerbst, 304 U.S. 458 ( 1938) . In general, the limitations set on consent
searches are the same considerations
that have been employed in the past
in determining the voluntariness of
confessions. Thus the courts have held
that consent must be given in circum263-817 0 - 67- - 2
stances free of "d uress or coercion,"
that it be " knowingly and intelligently:' given, and that it be stated in
a "clear and unequivocal" manner.
Because these determinations generally involve inquiries into the subjective state of mind of the suspect, the
officer, or both, they present practical
difficulties in judicial supervision
which more often than not are resolved in favor of the criminally
accused.
A. Duress or Coercion
Applicability of the fourth amendment guaranty of immunity from unreasonable searches or seizures is not
dependent upon any affirmative assertion by the private citizen. U.S. v.
Rembert, 284. F. 996, 998 (1922);
Dacle v. State, 188 Okla. 677, 112 P.
2d 1102 (1941) . To hold otherwise
would require the individual to make
the difficult choice either of challengin g the officer's authority, perhaps by
force, or waiving his constitutional
rights through inaction. I bicl. Thus,
in many cases where a consensual
situation is in issue, there is no overt
indication that the person voiced objection or otherwise contested the
search. The courts must therefore look
to the surrounding circumstances to
determine whether or not the purported consent was induced by pressure or coercion. Peaceful submission
under such circumstances is not consent but simply acquiescence to higher
authority and cannot lawfully support
a search without a warrant. U.S. v.
Rembert, supra; Johnson v. U.S., 333
U.S. 10 (194-8) ; Amos v. U.S. , 255
U.S. 313 (1921).
There is, of course, no easy yardstick by which to measure the degree
7
�of coercion or duress necessary to
vitiate an expressed consent, for this
must depend upon the characteristic
facts of each case. Nonetheless, it is
possible to identify several factors
which generally influence the courts in
making this determination. It has
been held, for example, that the attitude and conduct of the advising officer are an important consideration,
particularly where they might indicate
that he had intended to search in any
event. If he states peremptorily,
"Open the glove compartment," or "I
want to look in the trunk of your car,"
it is likely that this will be viewed as
coercive. The courts have also pointed
to such factors as undue emphasis on
authority and even an aggressive manner as being sufficient to invalidate
consent. U.S. v. Kelih, 272 Fed. 484
(1922). Similarly, the time of night,
U.S. v. Roberts, 179 F. Supp. 478
(1959), number of officers seeking
consent, U.S. v. Alberti, 120 F. Supp.
171 ( 1954,) , display of weapons or
other symbols of authority, U.S. v.
Marquette, 271 Fed. 120 (1920), or
presence of the suspect's family during questioning, Catalanotte v. U.S.,
208 F. 2d 264, (1953) , all tend to
create a strong implication of CO·
ercion.
It is important therefore that the
police avoid use of demanding words
or gestures or any comment which
might be construed to mean that the
subj ect has no ch oice but to allow a
search. This issue often arises when an
officer threatens to procure a search
war rant if consent is not given. It has
been held by some courts that permission given under these circumstances is a mere submission to a uthority and that the individual yields
his rights only because he feels there
is no reasonable alternative but to
consent. U.S. v. Baldacci, 42 F. 2d
567 (1930); U.S . v. Dix on, 117 F.
Supp. 925 (194-9) ; see also, Weecl v.
U.S., 340 F. 2d 827 (1965 ).
On the other hand, it is arguable
8
that knowledge that one cannot lawfully prevent a search indefinitely
may enable him to make a more intelligent decision as to whether and
how much he will cooperate. It is not
required, of course, that the individual desire a search be made of his
property, but only that he make a
free and voluntary choice on the matter. Accordingly, some cases hold that
where the officer in good faith informs a party of the likelihood that a
~varrant will be issued, he does no
more than advise the _suspect of the
legal alternatives confronting him,
and, i"n the absence of any aggravating circumstances, this factor alone
will not invalidate the consent. Simmons v. Bomar, 230 F. Supp. 226
(1964) .
This line of reasoning is implicit in
Hamilton v. State of North Carolina,
290 F. Supp. 632 (1966 ) , wh ere po·
lice, alerted to a recent safe robber y,
arrested the defendant near his automobile. The arresting officer asked for
permission to search the car, stating
that he did not have a warrant with
him but could get one if necessar y.
The defendant replied, "There is no
need of that. You can search the car ."
He then handed the keys to the officer
who searched the vehicle and found a
pistol. In denying a petition for
habeas corpus, the Federal district
court ruled, " The fact that the officer
told [the defendant] that he did
not have a search warrant but that he
could get one is immaterial." Citing
an earlier appellate decision, the court
stated, " a defendant cannot assert the
illegality of a search made with his
consent, though given in response to
a threat to procure a search warrant."
!cl. at 635. See, Gatterdam v. U.S. ,
5 F. 2d 673 ( 1925 ); K ershner v.
Boles, 212 F. Supp. 9 ( 1963 ), modified and aff'd, Boles v. Kershner, 320
F. 2d 284, ( 1963) . There is common
agreement, however, that if the consent is obtained through fra ud, deception, or misrepresentation regard-
mg either the officer's authority or
intention to secure a formal warrant,
the search will be invalid. Bolger v.
U.S., 189 F. Supp. 237 (1960 ) , a:ff'd
293 F. 2d 368, rev'd on other grounds,
371 U.S. 392 ( 1963 ) ; Pekar v. U.S.,
315 F. 2d 319 (1965 ) ;U.S. v. Wallace, 160 F. Supp. 859 (1958) .
One of the more troublesome issues
of consent arises when permission to
conduct a warrantless search is obtained from one who is under arrest
or otherwise subj ected to official restraint. Since intimidation and duress
are necessarily implicit in such situations, it is especially difficult for the
prosecution to convince the court that
the waiver was given free from negating pressure or ·c oercion. U.S. v. Wallace, 160 F. Supp. 859 (1958 ) . But
while some courts consistently view
consent given b y one in police custody
as invalid, Judd v. U.S., 190 F . 2d 649
(D.C. Cir . 1951 ), most Federal courts
will inquire into the total circumstances of the case. Burke v. U.S. 328
F. 2d 399 (1st Cir.) , cert. denied, 379
U.S. 84.9 ( 1964); U.S . v. Paradise,
253 F . 2d 319 (2d Cir. ) (1958 ) ; U.S.
v. Perez, 242 F . 2d 867 (2d Cir. ),
cert. denied, 354, U .S. 941 ( 1957 ) ;
Gendron v. U.S ., 227 F. Supp. 182
(1964,) ; Kershner v. Boles, supra;
Hamilton v. State of No rth Carolina,
supra.
On the other hand, where condi tions of the restraint indicate a high
probability of intimidation, consent
by the person in custody will usually
be invalid. This is often the result
when a display of firea rms or other
open show of force is made during
the course of the arrest. Thus, in one
case police officers, exhibiting drawn
pistols and riot gun, stopped the defendant's veh icle an d placed the occupants under arrest fo r vagrancy a nd
auto theft. One of the offi cers asked
the defendan t, Weed, about a vehicle
parked approximately one and onehalf blocks a way from the scene of
( Continued on page 20)
FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin
�A New Application of an Established Technique-
Less
[seeing I
Looking
More
While
Law
enforcement officials are constantly seeking new and productive
means to solve old and persistent problems. Rapid technological advances
mark the pattern of growth of today's
police forces, but sometimes a new
and modified application of an old
method proves highly effective.
Such is the case with the proposal
presented in 1964 to the California
Peace Officer's Training Division by
the California Optometric Association. In charge of the research proposal was Dr. Arthur Heinsen of San
Jose.
In 1964 vision science as applied
to law enforcement was a new application of an already known and established training technique. During
World War II many courses were developed for aircraft spotters and other
military personnel receiving tachistoscopic training. Such a course conJuly 1967
sisted of Hashing silhouettes of various aircraft, naval vessels, and other
military equipment on a screen for a
fraction of a second. With speedy
identification as their ultimate goal,
the military was very successful with
this type of training. However, after
the war, the consequent reduction of
a constant need created obsolescence
for the tachistoscopic training.
With an official of the California
State Department of Education, Dr.
Heinsen and I explored the feasibility
of a pifot research study to present
a new application of the tachistoscopic
tramm g. Our final project involved
the development of an optometric
program applicable to law enforcement personnel and suitable for possible incorporation by the department
of education into a teaching manual.
The manual would then be available
to local law enforcement agencies
C. ALEX PANTALEON!*
Coordinator of Polic-e S·cience,
Rio Hondo Junior College,
Santa Fe Springs, Calif.


M r. P an taleoni recei ced his Bachelo r of A rts t11l d


Maste r of S ci ence degrees from California Sta t e
College and has done additional gradu at e work nt
U.C .L.A. and the Unive rsity of Washington.
9
�which would be able to conduct their
own local program.
The necessary funds for the pr oj ect
were made possible by a contract
grant from the department of education to the California Optometric Association to develop and prepare a
teaching syllabus that included equipment, supplies, and training aids.
Early in the development of the program, it became increasingly evident
that at least one complete course would
have to be offered prior to completion
of a syllabus worthy of distribution.
Accordingly, the Rio Hondo Junior
College participated in a National Defense Education Act grant which provided matching funds for the cost of
initiating this type of pilot program.
Three-Part Program
The theor y of vision was the first
a rea wherein the optometrist could apply already established and known
training procedures. Already in use
and available for application to this
program was a basic slide series prepared by Dr. Ralph Schrock of Chula
Vista. This excellent slide series was
used in the beginning phases of train. ing with the tach istoscope. The use
of symbols, such as numbers, letters,
and geometric configurations, applies
training techniques similar to those
currently used in speedreading. This
method begins by h aving the students
view one digit for a fraction of a second and thereafter three, four, five,
and more digits. This allows the students to develop their perception and
" after-image recall" so that they perceive more in a given time period.
As a second step, the motivation fo r
police officer personnel required the
use of numerous law enforcement
"s~enes," which were prepared in cooperation with the Los Angeles P olice
Department and the Los Angeles
County Sheriff's Department. As a
one-man patrol unit, an officer remains extremely busy while driving
25 miles an h our on routine patrol, operating his radio, and referring to a
list of stolen cars. When he passes an
alley, he has but a fraction of a second to glance down it and determine
whether any police action is needed.
Frequently, he is already past the alley
at the time of his mental reconstruction of the perceptual "after image."
T his was only one of the many areas
that were developed to orient the program toward law enforcement.
Students in the program use p eriph e ral s timulators to increase more accurate fi xa tions.
The initial phase of letters and numbers rendered itself very naturally to
the speedy identification and recognition of license plate numbers. After
the initial slide series, numerous license plates were flashed on the screen
and, thereafter, pictures of autom obiles were placed on the screen to simulate various driving conditions which
might be encountered by the patrol
officer.
The third phase involved actual eye
training, using specialized equipment
developed by Dr . Schrock in cooperation with the Keystone View Co.
The first pilot program was ready
and offered on a test basis in the
spring semester of 1965 at Rio Hondo
Junior College. The course was designed to cover 30 h ours on the basis
of a 2-hour class twice a week. However , the initial pilot course was for
34, h ours, with the additional h ours at
the beginning a nd end devoted completely to testing. T his comprehensive testing si:rved to properly evaluate the total project and was not
merely a part of the traihing program.
T esting With a Control Group
Twenty-six students from 14 different law enforcement agencies started
the program. A group of 25 officers
from the Los Angeles P olice Department's cadet class was chosen as the
control group. Accordingly, both
groups were tested with tachistoscopic
slides and a series of timed tests developed by the Califo rnia Test Bureau.
The parts of the multiple aptitude tests
that were used were :
( 1 ) Factor II: P erceptual Speed:
Test 3-Language Usage.
Test 4--Routine Clerical
Facility.
(2) F actor IV : Spatial Visualization.
Test 8-Spatial Relations,
two dimension.
Test 9- Spatial Relations,
three dimension.
FBI Law Enforcemen t Bulleti n
�The group scheduled to undergo the
training was further tested for peripheral vision and possible vision deficiencies. Two of the students needed
glasses, but they were allowed to continue the program and their improvement was measured accordingly.
Because of its initial testing and its
research problems, the pilot course
was conducted by local optometrists,
Dr. Homer Hendrickson and Dr. Luprelle Williams. These two optometrists studied , reevaluated, and rewrote the course as it progressed.
In short, the course consisted of
three basic phases for each session.
The first phase involved vision theory,
which explained the functions of vision memory and the various structures which permit vision . The second phase of instruction revolved
around tachistoscopic training, using
the basic law enforcement slide series.
The third pha3e involved actual exercise and development of vision skills
throu gh use of optometric equipment
developed by Keystone Co. The vision science kits included stereoscopes, plus and minus lenses, peripheral stimulators, and chiro-3copic
drawings as well as manuals on their
use. Two students used a kit on a
"coach-buddy" system. It should be
noted that the kits cost $125 each and
refill consumable supplies for each kit
cost $25.
At the completion of the course, both
gro ups we re again tested. Comparison of the two sets of tests provided
an evaluative basis inasmuch as the
Los Angeles P olice Department cadets
had been given no specialized visual
training. The results were evalu ated
by Dr. Melvin H. Dunn , an analytical psychologist and chairman of special services education at the University of Nevada, Reno, Nev. His
complete report confirms that there
was a high degree of improvement on
the part of the trainin g program
g ro up. Definite improvement was
achieved in speed and adjustment of
July 1967
<· .s; .t. .r. ·>
¢:- ~ ¢
-~


!,~


h','I '
S \tf!tJ&. \\'t.S!tOS .,
Students improve the visual ability of their eyes to converge accurately and quickly at various
distances.
fo cus, span of perception, and "afterimage recall." In addition , Dr.
Dunn's report indicates the training
was more beneficial for yo unger students than it was for older students.
There also appeared to be a correlation between I.Q. and vision ability.
The self-evaluation reports prepared
by the sudents indicated certain unexpected
benefits. One
student
stated he was an avid golfer and that
the course had taken five or six
strokes off hi s handicap because he
was able to judge distances more accurately. Another
student
who
played in a semiprofessional softball
league indicated his batting average
had improved over 20 percent.
Additional Studies
Followup 3tudies made 6 months
later indicated a reduction in proficiency. The optometrists felt that
this loss could be reduced to a negligible percentage if the trained officers
were assigned to patrol functions exclusively after their training. This
procedure might help the officers
maintain their acuity through prac-
tice. The expected net result of the
officer's maintenance of his improved
visual acuity is the reality of a "foureyed" one-man patrol unit.
The coune, taught by Dr. Williams,
was again offered by the college in the
spring of 1966, at which time several
preservice police science students
were also enrolled. The improvement
noted after the course was very similar to that in the pilot pro gram; however, the improvement was much
greater in the younger students between the ages of 19 and 22, thereby
suggesting that this training be conducted for recruits rather than for
older officers. The college is offering
the course again this year.
The California State Department ·o f
Education is proceedin g with the production of the teaching syllabus as
well as conducting programs throughout the State. Dr. Williams is most
satisfied with the results of the program and feels very strongly that this
course can be presented throughout
the country if it is taught by an optometrist who is familiar with the program. Rio Hondo Junior College has
added this course to its vast police curriculum.
11
�A Public Safety
Cruiser
l
WARREN DODSON
Th e A bilene sa fety cruisers have the necessary equipment for any emergency.
Chief of Police,
Abilene, Tex.
Abilene to the public safety cruiser
which was inaugurated in February
of 1963. Since then its sound in
emergency situations has become a
source of comfort and solace to many
of Abilene's citizens.
Purpose of Cruiser
"D
ogs were once content to howl
at train whistles, fire trucks, and
Civil Defense sirens. Now they have
another electronic tormentor. It's the
'yelper' on the Abilene Police Department's new public safety cruiser.
Every time the powerful wagon roars
off to the scene of a bad wreck or
other emergency, the dogs join in the
chorus."
This excerpt from an article which
appeared in the Abilene Reporter
News shows the immediate reaction of
12
FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin
Capable of performing a multitude
of tasks relating to public welfare and
safety, our public safety cruiser is
a multipurpose police unit designed
and equipped to render service and
protection for citizens while aiding in
the enforcement of laws.
As a police unit, public safety officers are responsible for the enforcement of all laws of the State of Texas
and the city of Abilene. They respond to all calls of the police
dispatcher just as any other police
unit. The safety cruiser is assigned
to a district to patrol with due regard
for the enforcement of all laws including those pertaining specifically to
traffic. However, as a specialty unit,
it is not assigned to investigate traffic
accidents, handle domestic problems,
or transport prisoners. Likewise, it
July 1967
is not required to respond to calls involving misdemeanors~ unless the call
is an emergency.
As a public safety unit, it responds
to all major accidents where persons
are injured for the purposes of rendering first aid, releasing trapped persons, and preventing fire. The cruiser
responds to all calls of an emergency
nature, such as drowning cases in
which they use scuba diving equipment to dive, locate, and recover the
victims and render what first aid is
possible. When the fire department
arrives on the scene with its equipment for dragging, etc., the public
safety officers assist as directed by
commanding officers of the fire or
police department. The unit also responds to any call concerning unconscious or seriously injured people,
_ like those suffering from heat exhaustion, strokes, poisoning, asphyxiation,
electrical shock, or heart attack. The
unit frees trapped persons and removes and destroys the explosive in
cases involving an explosion or explosive material. Under normal circumstances, this unit does not respond
to calls involving gunshot or knife
wounds unless so directed and then
op.ly to render what first aid is needed
at the scene or to act as a backup unit.
As a fire patrol unit, the . public
safety cruiser responds to all fire
alarms and upon arrival extinguishes
all small fires that can be controlled
with a hand extinguisher, if the fire
department unit has not arrived. At
all major fires, the public safety officers are under the immediate control
of the fire department supervisors and
carry out their orders immediately to
the best of their abilities. While on
patrol, our officers always watch for
fire hazards and notify the fire department of any encountered.
The public safety cruiser never, under any circumstances, operates as an
ambulance. However, in many cases
the assistance of the public safety
officers is needed by the ambulance attendant. In such cases, one of our
officers ( the cruiser is a two-man
unit) will accompany the victim in
the ambulance to the hospital and will
render aid and assistance if necessary.
The public safety cruiser is not a
rescue unit per se, nor is it an ambulance, but it is basically a police
13
�unit fully equipped to handle all types
of emergencies.
Services Rendered
"Send the safety cruiser" has become the most common request at
the Abilene Police Department. In
ali emergencies, both large and small,
our citizens have come to rely on the
se.rvices rendered by the cruiser.
Many of the calls are humorous (such
as, " My cat is caught in the air conditioner"), but others are tragic and
often fraught with danger for our
safety officers. Recently, on an attempted suicide -call, the person threatenino- suicide was located in a garage,
. o
H
holding a razor to his wrist. . e refused to lay the razor down. One
of the safety officers calmly talked to
the disturbed person and grabbed the
razor away from his wrist while the
other officers assisted in restraining
the individual.
During the first 14 months, the
cruiser made 740 emergency calls.
Out of this total number of calls,
emergency oxygen was administered
to 83 people. Man y of these first calls
involved life- or-death situations.
\
Record of Service
In the 3½ years that the cruiser
has been in existence, we have a record of first aid bein g administered
983 times. The resuscitator has been
used 294 times, the scuba diving
equipment 9 times, and the fire extinguishers 79 times. The safety
officers have administered a rtificial
respiration 18 times and assisted in
sav ing 20 persons wh o had attempted
suicide.
Th ey also performed ma ny min or
services, such as in cases involvin g
citizens who had locked themselves
out of their cars or homes, fin gers
ca uo-ht
in a utomati c electri cal kitchen
0
appli ances, ca rs with dead batteri es,
etc.
14
One phase of training given by our
local physicians has come in handy a
number of times-how to deliver a
baby. Incidentally, the first baby delivered by our public safety officers
was 1 year to the day from the time
they began their duties. Since that
time a number of Abilene's "young
o-eneration" has arrived with the aso
sistance of the safety officers. In one
case the parents honored the officers
by naming the new arrival after them.
Last year, during the national scare
that dolls shipped home to loved ones
by servicemen in Vietnam might be
booby trapped, these officers, who are
thoroughly trained in the handling of
explosives, checked more than 500 of
these dolls. However, they found
none containing explosives.
SCUBA Gear
The SCUBA diving gear ha.:5 been a
real asset to our police department
as well as to the public. In some
cases, the public safety officers have
retrieved discarded evidence from one
of the three large lakes nea r Abilene.
In cases involving a possible drownin O'
rr one officer begins dressing for
divinoen route to the scene and is
0
ready to don the underwater breathing apparatus when he arrives. In
one such incident where a double
drowning was reported at Lake For:t
Phantom Hill, both bodies were recovered within 5 minutes after our
cruiser arrived at the scene of the
emergency. While the diver goes into
the water, his partner maintains the
safety line and has the resuscitator
read y to administer oxygen when th e
victims are located.
The most co mmon treatment given
by the offi cers is to apply a medical
swab to a cut or laceration a nd an
anti septic bandage while awaitin g the
ambulance at the scene. They apply
an air splint to broken limbs q uite
often also. Thi s p rocedure is of grea t
assistan ce to the hospital because it
allows them to make an X-ray without
removing the splint.
Emergency Procedure
Since it stays in-service at all times,
the cruiser seldom is preceded to the
scene of an emergency by an ambulance. Because it is on call for
emergencies, both officers are never
out of the cruiser at once except at
the scene of an emergency. This
policy is also true in cases where the
public safety officer is writing a traffic
citation. If, in an y case, the officers
have to be out of the car at the same
time, they are able to switch their
radio to a public address system
which enables them to hear all calls
from the dispatcher.
After making an emergency run ,
they call the station and are switched
onto a dictating machine to record a
report of their run. This is then
typed by a clerk typist and placed in
a file.
Conception of th e Unit
We conceived the idea for a public
safety unit after the drowning of two
youths in a creek which flows th ro ugh
Abilene's city limits. We were the
first called to the scene of this tragic
occurrence, but when the drownings
were established, the fire department
with their boats and rescue equipment had to be called because we did
not have the necessary training or
prope r eq ui pment to retrieve the
victims.
A short time a fter this, on a dark
rainy night, an a utomobile crashed
into a utility pole causing a high voltage line to come p recariously close to
the vehicle. There was some diffi culty getting the occupa nts of the car
to remain in the car until the utility
co mpany co uld be summoned to remove the live wire. The many spectators who were attracted to this incident were in jeopardy of coming in
FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin
�The unit' s portable oxygen kit has b een used to save several lives.
contact with the high voltage wire
which hung close to the gro und .
Some of these individuals stooped t o
go under this wire before ou r officers
at the scene could move them back
to a safe distance.
After this tragic incident and near
catastrophic occurrence, we began to
plan and resea rch for a police unit
which wo uld be trained to cope with
all types of emergency and rescue
work.
After discussing our ideas abo ut the
safe ty unit, we assigned senior staff
officer Capt. L. A. Martin to head the
planning a nd research.
We contacted the director of civil
defense and obtained hi s opinion as
to what type of emergency gear
would be needed to eq uip the unit.
Next, we called the fi re chi ef for con sultation and considered his recommendations. Then we invited the
local chapter of the Ameri can Red
Cross to assist in the train ing of each
officer assigned to the safety unit in
advanced first aid co urses.
We contacted the local medical
society, and they agreed to appoint a
committee to serve in an advisory
July 1967
capacity as well as. to assist m the
training of the officer s.
After months of a rdent research ,
the plans were fin ally fo rmulated and
presented to the city governmen t.
They were hesistant at fi rst to approve
such a project mainl y beca use of the
expense of such a unit. However,
when they were presented all the fac ts
of the value of its services, they gave
us the authority to proceed wi th our
plans.
After m uch consideration , we chose
a fo ur -doo r stati on wagon as the
vehicle for th is unit. I ts equipment
included spotlights, large revolving
red lights, a nd an electronic siren
and public address system to iden tify
it as an emergency vehicle.
Selection and Training of
P e rsonnel
The men operating and maintaining the public safe ty cruiser are all
vo lunteers carefull y screened on the
basis of their experience, aptitu de,
a nd mental and ph ysical abilities. A
committee comp osed of train ing office rs fr om both the fi re and police
departments, plus the city's personnel
director and assistant city manager,
screens the volunteers before they receive joint approval by the chiefs ·of
both departments.
The fire department conducted the
initial training of the pu'blic safety
officers over a 3-week period. This
training covered such basic firefi ghting techniques and subj ects as: small
structure fires, ladder and aerial
work, elements and causes of fires
the duties of fire hosemen, fire re:
sponse and attack, rescue and carries,
safety techniques, the use of a gas
mask, ventilation of a fire, and fire
hazards. Experienced fire department training officers personally conducted or supervised these training
sessions and exercises.
The second phase of training included a 1-week session in high-risk
rescue work at Texas A. & M.
College. Thi s second step included
" hotwire" handling and first aid
through the advanced level, along
with instructions in the use of such
life-saving appa ratuses as resuscitators, oxygen equipment, cutting
torches, etc. Additional trainin g included defen sive d riving, scuba di ving, explosives handling, and radiological monito ring.
The Taylor-Jones Count y Medical
Society fu rn ished the physicians who
trained our officers in such techniq ues
as how t o deliver a baby during
emergency conditions and other
emergency aid that could be rende red
at the accide nt scene. Thi s extensive emergency tra ining, plus the past
experience and training that normally
is retained by vetera n poli ce officers,
full y prepared our p ublic safety offi cers to cope with any emergency that
might arise.
·
Ve hicle and Equipment
As mentioned above, the p ublic
safe ty cruiser is a n up-to-da te station
wago n eq uipped with radi os on both
15
�police and fire department frequen- has run approximately $30 per month
cies, emergency lights and sirens, res- in keeping it equipped.
cue and first aid equipment, and firefighting extinguishers and tools.
Evaluation
A partial list of the cruiser equipment includes: fire extinguishers,
There seemed to be some skepticism
( dry, CO 2 , and water) , fireman boots, at the start as to the true value of such
helmets, bunker coats, gloves, safe- a unit as the public safety cruiser. It
ty goggles, gas masks, completely had only been in service a few days
equipped toolbox, axe, sledge ham- when the public began to recognize its
mer, disposable blankets, army blan- worth.
One lady wrote our department and
kets, ropes, _block and tackle, large,
co~pletely equipped first aid kit (in- the Abilene Reporter News the followcluding splints, medicold compresses, ing letter after her husband had been
etc.), Porto-Power kit, frogman suit aided by our public safety officers :
and scuba equipment, lanterns, hot " He is alive today due to the excellent
stick (for handling high voltage service rendered by your safety
wire), stretcher, Scott resuscitator, cruiser and its men. My husband
Scott air pack (for use in building had an acute attack o-f allergy, to the
filled with smoke, etc.) , battery jump point of death. He collapsed from
cables, tools for entering locked ve- lack of oxygen and at one time comhicles, various types of saws, and pletelr: stopped breathing. Officer
other tools to cover any type of emer- Bill Paul, our neighbor, rendered first
gency situation. When the unit aid and called the cruiser.
makes an emergency run and the offi"We are grateful to the Abilene Pocers have no tool to cover the particu- lice Department and its men for the
lar type of situation, they immediately service rendered. Words seem inadeadd that tool. The initial total cost quate when you are trying to thank
for equipping the cruiser ran close to someone for saving your mate's life."
$3,000. The average cost of supplies
We have received numerous similar
letters of thanks and appreciation
from citizens.
Public acceptance of the safety
cruiser grew until it was necessary for
us to add a second unit in July of
1965. Even physicians now tell their
heart patients and others who may
need emergency aid to call the safety
cruiser prior to calling them.
Not only do our public safety officers feel a keen sense of pride in being
able to serve humanity in this capacity, but the citizens of Abilene are very
proud of our cruiser and the men who
operate it. We feel that it has done
more for the benefit of public relations
than any other thing that the department has ever undertaken.
One of the big selling points that
we used in getting our cruiser approved was, " If one life is saved, it
will he well worth all the expense."
Well, the public safety cruiser has
more than proved its worth. This is
attested to by many local physicians,
families who have been assisted, and
three Red Cross Life Saving Awards
earned by the men who operate Abilene's public safety cruiser.
AMERICAN POLICEMAN
Chief Inspector of Constabulary lists
58 awards for gallantry to British
policemen ranging in rank from constable to inspector. Two of them are
posthumous. Five civilians who assisted the police are also on the list.
Armed with a whistle, a wooden
truncheon, a pair of handcuffs, and,
if available, a personal radio, the
British policeman performs the same
duties as his American counterpart.
I formed the impression that, although he may be as young as 19, a
great deal of his success is based on
his almost amazing personal dignity
when on duty. Most of the policemen
I came in contact with were more than
deserving of the English term of ap.
"He,s a proper Copper."
pro bat10n,
1
( Continued from page 6)
A police employee
explains lo Lieutenant
Mitchell her department's records and flling
system .
FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin
�Let the bank robber b eware! More and more his criminal acts
are b e ing w atched by a sile nt witness-the hidden cameraw hich re cords the infallible truth.
Washington area. These identifications supported prior investigation
by FBI Agents who had developed the
man as a suspect. He was arrested
and charged with bank robbery.
The value of a strategically placed
camera and resulting publicity of suspects ia illustrated by another incident
in which a subject was caught on
camera in the act of committing a
bank robbery.
In this incident a youth entered the
National Savings & Trust Co. in the
District of Columbia on January 4-,
1967, at which time he took an
estimated $6,000.
The picture taken by a hidden camera during the robbery showed a man
wearing glasses, with his hand partially covering a pistol, at a teller's
window.
The suspect in the photograph released to newspapers by the FBI was
recognized by a local police officer.
He notified police investigators who
arrested the youth .
Just in Time
I n identifying bank robbers, many
times a picture . is worth a th o usand
descriptio ns-espec ia ll y if th e ph otograph catches the bandi t com mittin g
the robbery.
Abo ut 6 :45 p.m. , December 6, 1966,
three armed men, all wearin g sun glasses, ente red a branch of the So uth ern Maryland Bank and Trust Co. a t
Oxo n Hill, Md. , a nd ordered two ma le
tellers to th e rear of th e bank. One of
the robbers ha nded a la undry-t ype bag
lo the fema le tell er and ordered her to
J)UL al/ the money from the cash drawer into th e ba~. Then the robbers
fled. Total amount of mone y taken
was $1,659.
The bank is equipped with a co ncealed camera whi ch runs continu ously during bankin g hours a nd takes
photographs at r eg ular inter vals. T he
July 1967
film in th e camera was processed by
the FBI. Three frames contained
photogra p hs of the per so ns in volved
in the r obber y, one of which was a
good clear picture of the fa ce of one
of the ro bber s. He was wearing a
special police offi cer 's uniform, including a b adge a nd cap.
Th e ph otograph and p ertinent information co ncerning the robber y
were pr epar ed by the FBI and r eleased to all maj or newspapers in th e
Washin gton, D.C. area for p ublication in t he hope o f sec ur in g a n ide 11Lification .
Several calls were recei ved fr om
citizens who sa id they could p ositively
id entify the s ub ject of the ph oto g raph. He was s ub sequen tl y identi fied by th ree people as a n ind ividu al
who had pr evio usly worked in th e
In one instance, a camera had been
installed only the day before the robbery, when shortl y before noon a
masked bandit, accompanied by a
teenage female, entered a banking institution in Cleveland , Ohio. Brandishing a small h and weapon, the
masked man warned bank employees
that this wa.;; a stickup and to stand
back. Stationing himself in front
of a teller's window, he waited while
his accomplice calml y proceeded to
empt y the money fr om the teller's cash
dra we r into a b row n paper bag .
One of the b ank tellers had observed
Lhe m a sked bandit e nle r the bunk and
had immediately tripped a silent alarm
which also set a hidden movie camera
into motion.
T wo minutes after the bandits had
fled wi th $2 ,,372, detecti ves fro m th e
Cleveland Police Department arri ved
at the b an k and rushed the film for
17
�immediate processin g. FBI Agents
dispatched to the scene commenced
immediate investigation.
Still prints of the film taken during
the robbery were distributed to police
officers, FBI Agents, surrounding police dep·a rtments, and to newspapers.
The film was rushed to TV stations
and given nationwide coverage.
The youthful b ank robber turned
himself in to police the foll owing day.
He told police he h ad gone to Indiana
by bu:, after the robbery, but when
he realized the robbery film was being
shown on TV, he had decided to return to Cleveland and surrender.
"Where can you go when you're on
TV all the time !" was the remark he
made to detectives and FBI Agents.
The girl was arrested the following day when her whereabouts was
made known to police by an anonymous telephone call.
The man was sentenced to a term of
10 to 25 years in the State penitentiary. The girl was. placed on probation fo r 2 years.
Joe Meador, caught by a hidden camera , wa s convicted on charges of robbing a bank of more
than $30,000.
Ne rv ous Robbe r
Another bank robber, an 18-yearold youth, robbed the Citizens &
Southern Emory Bank, Decatur, Ga.
Holding a sawed-off shotgun, he
herded 18 persons into the open space
of the bank lobby, then ordered the
tellers to put the money in a green
paper bag he was carrying. , He
showed extreme nervo usness and at
one time was heard to remark, " I
swear to God, I'm scared to death ."
He obtained $19,475 and escaped in
a stolen car.
The bank manager in an office ad joining the lobby, seeing this acti on,
set off the silent bank ala rm which also
activated the bank's two hidden
cameras.
Ten clear photographs of the robber were taken during the course of
the robbery. These were released to
all available news media and dis18
' .
Jo e Meador photographed following h is arrest.
pl ayed thro ughout the Nation.
The robber was identified as Stephen P atrick Wilkie by a tenant of a
home where the robber had been livin g
for several months; but he, in the
meantime, was traveling all over the
co untr y living a life of luxur y on th e
money he had stolen. When a phone
call to his hometown revealed that he
was wa nted by the FBI fo r b ank ro bber y, he surrendered to Specia l Agents
in San Francisco. He was sentenced
to 10 yea rs fr1 the custody of the
Attorney General.
In another ro bbery two bro th ers
armed with h andguns entered an
Indiana bank and forced the manager
to fi ll a cloth bag with money fro m the
vault and the tellers' cashboxes.
After obtaining $30,845, one of the
brothers r ipped two sequence cameras
from the wall of the bank and took
them along when they fled from the
scene. Apparently they had no objections to being photographed during the robbery, but they made sure
the film co uld not be developed after
they left.
During the ensuing investigation,
one of the bank tellers told FBI
FBI Law EnforcelT! ent Bull etin
�Agents that she recognized one of the
robbers as having b een in the bank
some 6 weeks previously to cash a
check.
With the cooperation of the bank
officials, FBI Agents assisted the teller
in the task that lay before her in effecting an identification. Sequence
camera films for the preceding 6
weeks were developed and shown to
the teller. F or several h ours each
day fo r 11 days, she sat with FBI
Agents reviewing the frames, until
one day, after having viewed some
20,000 frames, she picked up the
frame identifying the robber- the
man who h ad entered the bank almost
6 weeks before the robbery.
N umerous prints of this photograph were made and circulated iby
the FBI to various sources. T hree
days after the photograph was first
obtained, a trusty of a local county
jail identified the bank robber as Joe
Wayne Meador. With h is identification, the brother , Ratline Meador, was
fo und to answer the description of the
other robber.
Green Thuml1
Both men denied guilt of the rob bery, stating they had been planting
tobacco on the far m of a relative at
the time. T his in fo rmation was
checked out, but apparently tobacco
was not the only thing they had
planted. After many hours of backbreaking digging, FBI Agents unearthed a 25-pound la rd can which
had been b uried some 15 inches under
a stable. Inside the lard can was a
plastic container ; inside the plastic
container was a styr ofoa m ice bucket ;
and inside the bucket was $ 11,000
completely saturated with talcum
powder.
Confronted with the buried treasure, the brothers accompanied FBI
Agents to another location where a
simi lar lard can was buried containing a nother bucket a nd $11,487 comJuly 1967
pletely saturated with talcum powder.
The brothers explained that the talcum powder served as a dehydrating
agent for the preservation of the
buried money.
FBI Agents and SCUBA divers located the cameras in a deep creek
running through a heavily wooded
area in the geileral vicinity of the
bank. Although t he cameras had
been completely submerged for almost a month, it was possible t o develop 1½ frames on the exp osed film
which clearly showed one of the victim tellers with hands upraised a nd
one of the brothers standing nearby.
The two brothers were each sentenced to 10 years' imprisonment.
pictures or show them on television
which requires pictures of good quality if results are to be achieved from
such investigative procedures.
Experience in the FBI with pictures
provided by numerous bank camera
installations have led to the following
conclusions with respect to these
installations:
1. Cameras of 35 mm. or larger negative
size will produce better results than
cameras of smaller negative size.
2. A sequence camera is preferable to · a
movie camera. This kind of camera
will produce a series of still photographs tha t will ordinarily be of higher
quality for identification purposes and
will also record the action.
3. Camera (s) (more than one if necessary)
( Continued on page 24)
Camera Scores Again
Another y<mth , Albert Earl Ehrenberg, recognized from a photograph
taken at the time of the holdup and
publicize2d in a widely read daily
newspaper, was convicted for the robbery of the Colonial National Bank of
Alexandria, Va., fo r which he received
a sentence of 15 years' imprisonment.
He was also charged with the robberies of banks in Maryland and the
District of Columbia, bul in view of
the substa ntial sent_e nce given him for
the Alexandria robber y, these other
two cha rges were dismissed.
More a nd more banks are installing
cameras as a means to reduce their
vulnerability to marauding bank robbers. Certainly, the results achieved
in many cases in which robbers have
been ca ught on film while committing
the crime are encouraging and indi ca te the value of this technique.
If, however, a camera installation
in a bank is to be of maximum usefu Iness, certain technical factors
should be considered. The photographs produced by a concealed
ca mera must be of good enough
quality fo r identification of the personal fea tures of the bank robber. It
is frequently desirable to publish such
Albert Earl Ehrenberg photographed during
the robbery of a Maryland bank.
Ehre n be rg following h is a rrest on ba nk
robbe ry cha rges.
19
�- - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - ~-
SEARCH OF VEHICLES
· (Continu ed from page 8)
the arrest and he answered that the
vehicle was his. Weed surrendered the
keys to the car after being told by the
officers that they could get a search
warrant if necessary. The latter circum stance, coupled with the fact that
the defendant relinquished the keys
while in custody and " during a period
of dramatic excitement of drawn
guns," led the court to conclude that
the alleged consent was not " freely
and intelligently given." Compare,
U.S. v. Kuntz, - F. Supp. - (Northern Di strict of New York, March 17,
1967 ) ( uph olding co nsent search at
a roadblock manned by an offi cer
armed with a shotgun ) .
As a general rule, the courts tend to
question the competence and voluntariness of consent given b y a subj ect
who denies guilt, particularly where
it is apparent that incriminating evidence will be discovered. One appellate court rejected a waiver in this
situation, stating that " no sane man
who denies his guilt would actually
be willing th at a poli ceman search his
-roo m for contraband which i~ certain
to be discovered. " Higgins v. U.S.,
209 F. 2d 819 (1954) . See also, U.S .
v. Gregory, 204 F. Supp . 884, aff'd
309 F. 2d 536 (1 962) , holding th at
consent given under these circumstances is simply " not in accord with
human experience." On the other
hand, a confession of guilt which precedes a search tends to sup port the
a uthentici ty of the consent. U.S . v.
M itch ell, 322 U. S . 6
i 1944) ; U. S . v.
S mith, 308 F. 2d 657, 663-64 ( 1964 ) ;
U. S. v. Wa llace (d ictum ), siipra. See
also, Stale v. Bindhamm er, 209 A. 2d
124 (N.J. 1965 ) .
Also, where it appears t hat the person in custody consented prim arily in
an effort " to shift culpability" to
another, U.S. v. DeVivo, 190 F. Supp.
4,83 (1961 ), or to bluff his way
th ro ugh a search on the mistaken be20
lief that the incriminating articles are
too well concealed to be discovered,
the courts have generally allowed the
admission of such items into evidence.
Grice v. U.S. , 146 F. 2d 849 (1945 );
contra, Smith v. U.S. , supra. A similar result was reached recently in a
case where the subj ect delivered the
keys to his vehicle in an attempt to
" corrupt" a Federal agent into preventing the Government from obtaining pertinent evidence. In U.S. v.
Hilbrich, 232 F. Supp. 111 (1964),
aff'd, 34,1 F. 2d 555 (1965 ), the defendant was arrested by police officers
shortly after he had robbed a savings
and loan association. While being
interviewed by an agent with whom he
was acquainted, he gave his car keys
to the agent and asked him as a "favor" to go to the automobile, which
was parked a short distance from the
scepe of the r obber y, and to " get rid
of" two boxes of ammunition located
in the trunk. A second agent used the
keys and seized the ammunition . The
defendant later advanced the rather
novel argument that he had not in fact
consented to the search since his only
reason in surrendering the keys was
to prevent the Government from getting the evidence. The appellate court,
however, rejected this contention,
stating that in the absence of an y
showing of coercion, the motion to
suppress the evidence was properl y
denied.
The defendant's argument here was
not without merit, i.e. , that permission to enter the vehicle was extended
for the sole and limited purpose of
di po in g of the evidence and t hat,
once this auth ority was exceeded, the
consent, which has sometimes been
viewed as an agency relationship, was
terminated. But since it is also clea r
that Hi lbri ch made no effort to with draw his co nsent even after the agent
unequivocall y info r med him that he
could not comply with the request, the
result in this case seems a proper one.
It is worth repeating at this point,
-
--~
-
however, that whenever the conditions
permit, as would appear to have been
the case here, an officer should endeavor to obtain a warrant. Although
the practicability of doing so does not
have a bearing on the legality of the
consent search, evidence which has
been obtained in the execution of a
proper search warrant is always received more favorably by the courts
than that which has b een secured
through a claimed waiver of rights.
B. Clear Expression of Consen t
Aside from consideration of duress
or coercion, consent cannot validly be
obtained unless it is expressed in a n
explicit and unequivocal manner b y
the person whose property is to be
searched. _U.S. v. Fowler, 17 F.R.D.
499 ( 1955 ) ; Karwicki v. U.S., 55 F.
2d 225 (1932 ) . Where the consenting
words are such that they do not show
a clear and unmistakable intent to
waive one's constitutional right to refuse a warrantless search, the evidence
so obtained will be inadmissible. R ay
v. U.S ., 84, F . 2d 654 (1936).
But as a general r ule, the express
language used by a susp ect is merely
a factor to be considered , among
others, in determining the voluntariness of t he consent. As one appellate
court stated: " .. . a waiver cannot
be conclusively presumed from verbal
expression of assent. The court must
determine from all the circumstances
whether the verbal assent reflected an
understanding, uncoerced, and unequ ivocal election to gr ant t he offi ers
a license which the person knows may
be freely and effectively withheld,"
Cipres v. U.S ., 343 F . 2d 95, 97
( 1965). Thus, while t he party may resp ond with words indicating consent,
they do not constitute a valid waiver
when the surro unding circumstances
fail to support the voluntar y use of
such words. Accordingl y, consent
searches have been invalidated in
FBI Law Enforc eme nt Bull etin
�'-
some cases notwithstanding such remarks as, " I have no stuff in my apartment and you are welcome to go
search the whole place," Channel v.
U.S., 285 F. 2d 217 ( 1960), or, " I
have nothing to hide, you can go there
and see for yourself." Judd v. U.S. ,
190 F. 2d 649 (1951 ) . See, 79 C.J.S.,
Searches and Seizures, n. 89, sec. 62,
for further examples.
In Application of Tomich, 221 F.
Supp. 500 (1963), aff'd 332 F. 2d 987
(1964), the defendant was arrested
for a traffic violation. When asked b y
the offi cers for permission to search
his car , Tomich replied that " he didn't
mind," ·b ut stated that he did not have
a key to unlock the trunk ; in fact, he
had the key hidden in his shoe.
Eventually, the police were able to
gain entrance into the trunk by having
a key made a t a local garage. Tool s
and a p air of shoes linkin g Tomich to
a burglary were found in t he trunk of
the vehicle and were later used in evidence against him. In a subsequent
habeas corpus proceeding, a Federal
district court rejected the Sta te's contention th at valid consent had been obtained, stating: "At all times when he
was allegedly consen ting to the search,
he had in his possession , hidden in his
shoe, the key to the trunk. If he trul y
consented to the search, he wo uld have
delivered up the ke y to the officers and
saved them all the troub le they went
to to get into the trunk of the car."
Id. at 503.
The difficulty with this reasoning
i that the officers in this case had no
way of knowing that the subject was
in possession of the key. Had his overt
conduct reasonably indicated that he
did n ot in fact wish to cooperate,
the police would not have been justi fi ed in relyin g on his expressed con sent. But to all outward appeara nces
the defendant in this case kn owingly
and voluntarily relinquished hi s right
to insist upon a warrant. It wo uld
seem that if the police are to kn ow
with an y ce rtainty when a proper
July 1967
waiver of fourth amendment ri<Yhts
0
has been made, they should be permitted to rel y on the open and expressed conduct of the suspect, without regard for the possibility of
pretense. Carried to the extreme
Tomich could open the way fot ~
criminal suspect to insure the inadmissibility of ph ysical evidence, which
might otherwise be acquired by an
alternative method , by professing cooperation at the scene and later
refuting his alleged consent, pointing
out that he had in fact withheld the
keys to the vehicle or in some other
manner had not full y assisted the police. See e.g., Burge v. U.S., 332 F. 2d
171 ( 1964) , in which the defendant
apparently feigned consent as "a determined strategy" to a later claim
of ill egality on the part of the officers.
In some cases, permission to search
has been fo_und by the courts in the
absence of consenting words by the
suspect, where it appeared that the
party had indicated a willingness to
cooperate or had rendered some affirmati ve assistance to the officers.
Where the defendant readily tendered
th e keys to his vehicle upon request,
Robinson v. U.S., 325 F. 2d 880
( 1963), or, without obj ecti on, opened
the trunk a nd surrendered porn ograp hic ma teri als_to investigating offi cers, Burge v. U.S. , 332 F. 2d 171
( 1964) , such conduct has been viewed
as convincing evid ence of consent.
See also, Smith v. U.S., 308 F . 2d 657
(1962 I (dictum ) , cert. denied, 3 72
U.S. 906 (1963 1 (co nsent fo und
where t he defend ant, while under a rrest for possession of narco tics, led
officers to a nearby apar tment a nd
prod uced a suitcase con tainin g heroin) ; U.S. v. Macleod, 207 F. 2d
853 ( 1953) (dictum) ( following his
arrest, the defendant cut th e lock off
a chest conta inin g in crimina tin g evidence and , without suggestio n from
the agents, went into the bedroom and
carri ed out a hand printing press) .
C. Kn owing and Intelligent Waiver
of Rights
The courts have long required that
consent to search be a " deliberate relinquishment of a known right," U.S.
v. Alberti, 120 F. Supp. 478 (1959) ,
and that such consent be " intelligently" given. U.S. v. Smith, 308 F.
2d 657, cert. denied, 372 U.S. 906
( 1963 ) . As a general rule, however,
there need not be an affirmative showing that the consenting party was advised of his fourth amendment right
to prevent a search without a warrant.
Although a failure to warn has sometimes been persuasive on the issue of
coercion, that factor alone has not
been sufficient to invalidate the search.
U.S. V. Paradise, 253 F . 2d 319
(1958) . Rather, the practice has been
to establish whether, in view of the
circumstances as a whole, the waiver
of fourth amendment rights was voluntary and intelligent. Tatum v. U.S. ,
321 F. 2d 219 ( 1963 ) ; Channel v.
U.S. , 285 F. 2d 217 (1960) . In making thi s determinati on, the courts have
been influenced by the suspect's
" marked intelligence and mental alertness," U.S. v. Haa s, 106 F . Supp. 295
(1952) , or the fa ct that the consenting parties were "sophisticated businessmen of many years experience."
U.S. v. Martin, 176 F. Supp. 262
(1954); In re White, 98 F. Supp. 895
(1951) . A history of previous arrests
or " indicated kn owledge from previous search and seizure experience"
may also show that the party was
probably alert to his rights and to the
consequences of a waiver at the time
he allegedl y gave permission to
search. Burge v. U.S., 332 F. 2d 171
(1964 ). Thu s, while upholding a consent search, one Federal court declared: "The amo unt of intimidation
or fea r of the badge in a person with
little knowledge of police officers or of
legal proceedings would be much
more acute and motivating than that
of a man with 13 years of experience
21
�as an officer and investigator. It may
be reasonably assumed that he was
aware of all the consequences." Tatum
V. U.S. , 321 F. 2d 219, 220 (1963 ) .
By the same token, the government's
burden of proving an intelligent and
understanding waiver of rights is understandably difficult to sustain when
the consenting party is illiterate or
does not have a good understanding
of the English language. U.S. v. Wai
Lau, 211 F. Supp. 684 (1963) ; Kovach v. U.S. , 53 F. 2d 639 (1931 );
U.S. v. Ong Goon Sing, 149 F. Supp.
267 (1957).
In a noticeable departure from the
tra ditional approach, however, some
courts have interpreted the requirement of a knowledgeable waiver to
mean that, in the absence of other evidence that the suspect was aware of his
fourth amendment rights, a formal
warning by the police officer is a necessary prerequisite to consent. For example, in U.S. v. Blalock, 255 F. Supp.
268 (1966 ), the defendant was questioned in a motel roo m concerning his
possible implicati on in a recent bank
robber y. When asked whether he
would min d if the agents sea rched the
roo m, th e defendant replied that he
had no obj ection. The search disclosed
a q uantity of bait money taken during
the robber y. On a moti on to suppress
the evidence, the Federal district cour t
stressed the need for an " intelligent"
consent and restated the long-standing
rule that one cann ot be said to waive
a fun da mental right unless he knows
the right ex ists. P ointing out that the
"voluntariness" of the consent was not
-in issue, the cour t stated : " [T ] he
fourth amendment requires n o less
know in g a waiver than do th e fi ft h
and sixth. The req ui rement of knowledge in each serves th e same p urpose,
i.e. , to prevent the possibility th at the
· ignorant ma y surrend er their rights
more read il y than th e shrewd ." See
also U.S. v. Nikrasch, 367 F. 2d 740
(1966).
Blalock expresses the grow ing tend-
ency among the Federal courts to
avoid resolving each case on its own
set of facts where a waiver of constitutional rights is involved. By requiring an explicit warning of fourth
amendment rights for all suspects,
regardless of age, experience, or coercive influences, the court frees itself
from the burden of deciding whether
this particular defendant knew of his
rights in the matter. This trend away
from " particularism" in the law h as
been most evident in the fifth amendment area where, as indicated earlier,
the court previously weighed similar
factors in establishing the voluntariness of confessions. In Miranda v.
Arizona, however, the court rejected
this approach , requiring that all persons in custod y be warned of their
ri ght to remain silent prior to interrogation. Sin ce there are elements of
self-incrimination 1n illegal searches,
Boyd v. U.S ., 116 U.S. 616, 630
( 1886) , it has been speculated that
Miranda bears constituti onal implications for consent searches as well.
See, Note, "C onsent Searches : A Reap praisal After Miranda ·v . A rizona.,"
67 Colum. L. Rev. 130 ( 1967 ) .
Whether advice of fourth amendment
rights need be as comprehensive as
Miranda requires, or whether the
States would be bound by such a rule,
is largely a -matter of conj ectu re at
this point.
But even assuming th at Miranda
is relevant to fo urth amendment matter s, at best it would apply only where
the consenting party is " in custod y o r
oth er wise deprived of hi s freedom of
action in any significant ,vay."
Miranda v. A rizona, 384 U.S. 4,36,
444, (1966) . As noted earlier, however, it is in this type of situati on that
consent searches a re mo t di ffi cult to
sustain , the theory being t hat custod y
itself creates a coercive atmosphere
which makes it diffi cult for one to
exercise free choice. Th us, while a
technical reading of the law at this
point may not req uire a warning in
every instance, the better practice in
situations of restraint or intimidation
is to inform the consenting party that
he has the right to insist upon a warrant.
D. Consent by Third Parties
As a general rule, the constitutional
right to privacy is personal to the individual and cannot be waived by
third parties. Stoner v. California, 376
U.S. 483 ( 1964 ) . Consequently, in the
absence either of expressed or implied
authorization to consent or a joint occupancy or ownership of the property
to be searched, a valid waiver of
the privilege against unreasonable
searches and seizures can be given up
only by the person himself. This limitation holds true, moreover , regardless
of the personal or familial relationship which may exist between the consenting party a nd the person against
whom the evidence is t o be used.
The specific question of whether
the wife's consent can validate a
search against her husband rem ains
unsettled in both the State and Federal
law. See, Note, "The Effect of a Wife's
Consent to Search and Seizure of the
Husband's Property," 69 Dick. L. Rev.
69 (1964) . But judging from the existing law applicable to the search of
fi xed premises, one ordinarily can assume that a spouse can give consent
to the search of a motor vehicle which
is valid as against the other, where
they jointly own and utilize the a utomobile in q uestion. See, State v. Coolidge, 208 A. 2d 322 (N.H. 1965)
( wife's consent t o search famil y cars
parked in yard upheld ) . See also,
R oberts v. U.S ., 332 F. 2d 892 (1964),
cert. denied, 380 U.S. 980 ; Stein v.
U.S ., 166 F . 2d 851 (1948); U.S . v.
Heine, 149 F. 2d 485 (194'5), cert. denied, 325 U.S. 885. In this type of situation, the wife's autho rity to permit
a search comes from her right to joint
possession of t he property to be
searched an d not fr om the marital relati on per se. For example, in Dalton
FBI Law Enforcement Bull etin
�v. State, 105 N.E. 2d 509 (Ind. 1952),
officers investigating a hit-and-run
offense asked the wife for consent to
search the suspect automobile, which
was registered in h er name. The car,
however, was paid for by the husband,
who had sole control and possession of
it. The wife had never driven the car.
In view of her lack of possession, the •
court held that the wife could not consent to a search of the car which was
her husband's personal " effect," protected by the fourth amendment.
However, if a specific area of the vehicle or a container in the automobile,
such as luggage or a fo otlocker, is the
exclusive property of the defendant,
it is doubtful that a proper waiver can
be obtained from a consenting spouse.
See, e.g., State v. Evans, 372 P. 2d
365 (Hawaii 1962 ) (wife cannot consent to search of husband's cuff link
case in dresser dra wer ) .
The issue of interspousal consent
was p resent in a case which came befo re the Supreme Court r ecently, but
the Court disposed of the matter on
other grounds. In Henry v. Mississippi, 379 U.S. 44 3 (1965 ) , the petitioner was convicted of disturbing
the peace by making indecen t pro posals to and offensive contact with a
hitchhiker to whom he allegedly gave
a ride. The only evidence available
to corroborate the complainant's
charges was obtained by an allegedly
unlawful search of the vehicle. The
evidence tended to substantiate the
complainant's stor y by sho wing its
aocuracy in details which could only
have been seen by one inside the car.
Subsequent to the petitioner's arrest,
an officer went to his home and obtained permission fr om the petitioner's wife to search the vehicle without
a warrant. Despite the fact that under
Mississippi law a wife could not give
consent which waived the constitutio nal rights of her husband, the State
Supreme Court affirmed the conviction
on the ground that the petitioner's
co unsel had fa iled to make a timely
July 1967
obj ection to the introduction of the
illegal evidence. In vacating the judgment and remanding it for a rehearing on the question of whether the
noncomplianice with the procedural
rules constituted a waiver, the Supreme Court noted: "Thus, consistently with the policy of avoiding premature decision on the merits of constitutional questions, we intimate no
view whether the pertinent controlling
federal standard governing the legality of a search and seizure, see Ker v.
California, 374 U.S. 23, is the same
as the Mississippi standard applied
here, which holds that the wife's consent cann ot validate a search as
against her husband." Id. at 449,
fn. 6.
Where a gratuitous bailment of a
vehicle is concerned, one appellate
court has taken the view ·t hat delivery
of the a!}tomobile into the temporary
custody of another represents an affirmative relinquishment of one's
fourth amendment protection over
such property. In Eldridge v. U.S.,
302 F . 2d 4,63 ( 1962 ), the susp ect lent
his automobile to a friend , Nethercott,
who had requested permission to use
the car to visit his daughter . The keys
to the ignition and to the trunk were
given to him. Actin g on information
that there was a stolen rifle in the car,
a nd after obse.r ving a rifle on the b ack
seat, the p olice asked the friend for
permission to examine the automobile.
The trunk of the car was voluntarily
opened by the friend, disclosing two
stolen Govern men t radios which were
immediately seized and turned over
to Federal a uth orities. At his trial th e
defen dant contended unsuccessfull y
that the radios had been illegally
seized , claiming t hat the pro tections
of the fo urth amendment are personal
to him and cannot be waived for him
by the gratuitous ba ilee of the car .
On review of the conviction, the
Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled
that the articles seized from the a utomoL,ile were properly admitted in evi-
dence. The court reasoned that the
friend
" was clothed with rightful possession and
control and could do in respect to the automobile whatever was reasonable and not
inconsistent with its entrustment to him.
No restriction was imposed upon him except to return with the car by a certain
hour. Although the defendant knew of th e
presence of the stolen radios in the trunk,
he apparently did not think it worthwhile
to take the precaution of forbiddin g his
bailee to open the trunk or permit anyone to
look into it. He r eserved no exclusive right
of privacy in respect to the trunk when he
delivered the key. In respon'ding as he did
to the police, Nethercott did not exceed the
authority Eldridge had seemingly given him.
Using the key to open the trunk was not an
unwarranted exercise of dominion during
the period of his permissive possession and
use. Access to the trunk is a normal incident to the use of an automobile. And if,
when he voluntarily opened the trunk,
N ethercott did not exceed proper bounds
because he had to that ex tent at least concurrent ri ghts therein with Eldridge, was
the ensuin g search by the police unreasonable ? We think not." Id. at 466.
A similar result was reached in
Hamilton v. State of North Carolina,
260 F. Supp. 632 (1966 ), where a
Federal district court ruled that petitioner's codefendant, who was in
temporar y possession of the vehicle,
had the capacity to consent.
It has been argued in suppo rt of
Eldridge that one who has lent his
vehicle to another " seems affirmatively to be taking the risk that the
third part y will show his belongings
to others. Therefore, it is not unreasonable to conclude th at in these cases
the suspect has impliedl y given the
third pa rty a uth ority to waive his own
personal right to privacy." Note, "Effec tive Consent to Search and Seizure," 113 U. P a. L. Rev. 260, 263
(1964 ) . But not all decisions are in
agreement with thi s view, as evidenced
by the holding in State v. Bernius, 203
N.E. 2d 24-1 (N.J. 1964). There the
defenda nt lent his a utomo bile to a
friend who was later arrested on a traffi c violation . When she was unable to
( Continued on inside back cover )
23
�WANTED BY THE FBI
bed rail to dig thro ugh the brick and
mor tar enabling them to escape their
confinement on July 5, 1965.
Hemminger usually wears glasses
and h as been employed as a factor y
worker, laborer, and welder. He h as
been convicted of bur glary. and larceny and has escaped custody on previous occasions.
Description
LAWREN CE ROBERT HEMM'INGER, also known as Larry Hemming er.
Interstate Fligh t-Escape
LAWREN.CE RoBERT HEMM INGER is
being sought by the FBI for un la wful
interstate fli ght to avoid prosecution
for the crime of escape. A Federal
warrant for his arrest was issued on
July 8, 1965, at Springfield , Mo.
In ·Camden County, Mo. , on September 16, 1964, Hemminger and two
other individuals allegedly attempted
to kill a Missouri State Highway P atrol trooper. They were arrested 10
days later and incarcerated at the
Greene County Jail at Springfield,
Mo ., to await trial on this charge.
Over a period of several weeks, Hem min ger and three other men used a
Age -- - ---- - ---- 37, born April 12, 1930,
Sterlin g, Ill.
Height - --- ------ 6 feet.
Weight ------- -- 165 pounds.
Build - ------- --- Slender .
Hair ------ - --- - Brown, graying.
Eyes - - --------- Blue.
Com plexion __ ___ Medium.
Race ________ ___ White.
Nationality _____ _ America n.
Occupations __ __ _ Factory worker, laborer,
welder.
Scars and marks_ P itted sca r between
eyebrows, skin moles
acro ss back and shoulders, scar on back of
r ight ha nd a nd on
right thumb, scars on
sid e an d base of left
th umb.
Remarks ____ ____ Usually wears glasses.
FBI No ---- ----- 752,904 B.
Finger print classifi cation.
18
SILENT WITNESS
( Continu ed from. page 19)
shou ld be placed in strategic locations,
prefera bly over entran ce for best fa cial
vie ws .
4. Li ghtin g is an importan t. ro nsideration
in such install ati ons. Minor changes
in li ghtin g will someti mes grea tly en·
ha nce th e res ult s. An initia l tes t of
equipm ent wi ll determ ine result s th at
ca n be a nticipa ted.
S. It is important to arra nµe to hav e a ny
insta ll ation servicer! on a regul ar basis
to make ce rta in film supp ly is fres h a nd
tha t equi pmen t is fu nction in g properl y.
Law enfo rcement sta nd s read y to
shoulder its responsibility in reversing
24
the ri sing tide of bank ro bberies, but
it needs help from the banking in stituti ons themselves, fr om news media,
and from the courts which must deal
realistically with those who are fo und
guilty.
Experience shows that time-pro ven
deterrents to crime are sure detecti on ,
swift apprehension, and pro per punishment. As a deterrent, t he latter is
by fa r the most important ; however,
its news va lue is co nsiderably lower.
Co nseq uentl y, ro bbers and potential
rob bers see an d hear a lot ab out se nsa ti ona l ba nk hold-u ps but may never
kn ow of the puni shm ent invoked when
the perpetrators are caug ht.
0
0
31 W MOO 21
20 W MOI
Ref :
31
24
Ca ution
Hemminger may be armed and
should be considered dangero us.
Notify the FBI
Any person having information
which might assist in locating this
fu gitive is requested t o immediately
notify t he Director of the Federal Burea u of Investigation , U.S. Depa rtment of J ustice, Washington, D.C.
20535, or the Special Agent in Charge
of the nearest FBI field offi ce, the telephone number of which appears on
the fi rs t page of most local d irectories.
FBI Law Enforc em ent Bull etin
�Tribute to Peace Officers
The following is a statem ent by FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover
concerning Peace Officers Memorial Day and Police Week which
was addressed to t he 79th Session of the FBI National Academy
on May 15 , 1967.
GENTLEMEN :
This day has a special meaning for
all of us. Nearly 5 years ago, the
President of the United States signed
the public law which authorizes and
requests him to issue annual proclamations designating May 15th of
each year as P eace Officers Memorial
Day. The purpose of ceremonies and
activities prop osed for the occasion is
to honor those officers who have been
killed or disabled in line of duty. The
law also authorizes and requests a
presidential proclamation each year
designating the week in which May
15th occurs as P olice Week.
Now, when the rate of crime con -
tinues to ascend, our mutual friends
and colleagues on the firing line face
an increasingly danp;erous and aggressive army of criminals. Some
bear on their bodies everlasting reminders of the intense struggle in
which we are engaged- indeed, there
may be those a mong you who carry
such scars. Others, less fortu nate, are
tied to wheelchairs or bound in utter
helplessness to their hospital beds.
Still others- and some were known to
each of us- will never again awaken
to a spring m orning.
We pause today to honor those men
in la w enfo rcement whose commit-
SEARCH- OF V EHICLES
owner is, as against such owner, prounreasonable
hibited . . . as an
search." Id. at 243.
A somewhat different situation is
involved if the bailment is for hire
as, for example, where the defendant
places his automobile in the custody
of a parking lot attendant. In this case
it is do ubtful that the bailee can waive
the defendant's rights. But see, Casey
v. U.S., 191 F. 2d 1 (1951 ) (h olding
the defendant, who failed to cl aim
ownership or interest in articles seized
fr om vehicle, lost immunity from
search and seizure when he placed
garage in possession of his automobile). As a general rule, when con trol over the propert y is limited to
tempora ry custody for storage purposes with rights of access expressly
or impliedly denied, the co urts hold
that t he custodian lacks sufficient
capacity to consent. Co rngold v. U. S .,
367 F. 2d 1 ( 1966); Holzhey v. U.S .,
(Continued from page 23)
give a satisfactory account of her possession of the automobile, she was
taken into custody and the car was
removed to a local p olice lot. While
being detained at the station, the
friend gave the keys to the car to the
police who searched the trunk and
fo und incri min atin g evidence which
subsequentl y was used to convict the
defendant. In reversing the conviction, t he New Jersey State Supreme
Court refu sed to accept the implied
authorization theory which h ad infl uenced the holding in Eldridge. Instead, the court ruled tha t "where
the owner of an a utomobile entrusts
the possession and control thereof to
another, a search thereof with the
consent of the one so entrusted but
without a warrant and without the
express consent authorization of such
ment was complete and whose sacrifice was total.
What kind of monument can we
erect to keep alive the memory of
such men? What memorial can we
raise to their courage, their dedication, and their sacrifice?
I believe that if the men who have
given their lives to uphold the law
could speak, they would desire most
the type of testimonial which is to be
found in your presence here. With
every forward step we take in making
certain that our law enforcement representatives are better trained, better
equipped, and generally better prepared than their predecessors, we add
strength and dignity to the living memorial we are developing. The good
men whose lives have been sacrificed
on the evil altar of crime would find
in your determination, your effort,
and your dedication to the advancement of our profession the memorial
they would welcome above all others.
I thank you.
223 F. 2d 823 ( 1955 ) . The issue here
is analogous to that presented in Chapm an v. U.S ., 365 U.S . 610 (1961) ,
where the Supreme Court held that a
search by police officers of a house
occupied by a tenant violated the
tenant's constitutional right, even
though the search was made with the
authorization of the owner. There the
owner had not only apparent but
actual au thority to enter the home for
vari ous purposes, such as to "view
waste." Sin ce the purpose of the entr y
was not to view waste but to look fo r
evidence of a crime, the court held the
search unl awful. See Stoner v. California, 376 U.S. 483,489 (1964). On
this reasoning, it would seem that the
authority conveyed to the garage attendant would relate solely to the
pro per and safe storage of the vehicle,
and entry for any other reason would
be improper .
( To be continued in August)
�UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE
POSTA GE ANO FEE S PA ID
FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION
FEDER A L BUREAU OF I NVESTIGAT I ON
WASHINGTON , D .C.
20535
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
RETURN AFTER 5 DAYS
HONORAB LE IVAN ALLEN 9 JRc .
MAYOR
· AT L ANTA , Gl.
30303
M
�IN THE UNITED STATES
ISSUED BY
JOHN EDGAR HOOVER, DIRECTOR
FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION
UNITED STATES DE · RTMENT 0~ JUSTICE
UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS-1965
FOR RELEASE
THURSDAY, A.M., JULY 28, 1966
PRINTED ANNUALLY
�UNIFORM
CRIME
REPORTS
for the United States
PRI N TED ANNUALLY - 196 5
ADVISORY: Committee on Uniform Crime Records
International Association of Chiefs of Police
Edmund L. McNamara, Commissioner of Police
Boston, Massachusetts, Chairman
J. Edgar Hoover , Director , Federal Bureau of Investigation
U.S. Department of Justice, Washington , D.C., 20535
-
�F or snl c b y t he S u pcr inLcnd cn l o f D ocn m cnts, U .S. Govcrn mcn, P r int in g O ffice. \1"ashin gton, D .C . 20402
Price 55 cents
�Contents
r
I
~~i;t:~-:~-'~,~/:-:__:_::_:__:__:_:_:_:_::::-::-:::-:-::-:
i}~~?fIttt \ t:=::=:=::::=::=::
P age
V
Vil
1
2- 3
Crime and pop ulation ________ ___ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -== 3-6
Crimin al hom icide ______ ____ _
6-7
7- 9
9- 10
10-1 3
14- 15
15- 17
Au to theft __ ______________ ____________ _____________ _ 17-1 8
Clearances ____ ____ ___ ____________ ________ _____ _____ _ 18-20
Persons arrested ____ ______________________ __________ _ 20- 22
Per ons charged ____ __ _________________ _____________ - 22- 23
Mobili ty of offenders ____ ____ ______ ____________ _____ _ 23-27
Car eers in Crime ______ ____________________ ________ _ _ 27-31
Police employee data __ ___ ___ ____________ ___________ _ 31-38
Introductio n __ ____________ __ ____ ___ ____ _____ ___ ________ _ 39- 49
The index of crime, 1965 ________ ____ _________ ________ ___ _ 50-89
Un ited States, 1965 (table l ) __ ______ _____ ___ ___ _____ _
51
United States, 1964-65, by r egions, geograp hic di visions
and states (table 2) __ _- - - ___ - - - - - __ ____ __ ___ __ _____ 52- 55
States (table 3) _ ___ __________ ___ ____ ___ ___ _____ ___ __ 56-70
Standard metropolitan statistical areas ( table 4) ___ _ _ _ __ _ 71- 89
General United States crime statistics, 1965 ____ _________ __ 91- 106
Crime trendi:, 1964- 65, by pop ulation gro ups (table 5) ___ 92- 93
Crime rates, by p opulation groups (table 6) __ __________ _ 94- 95
Crime trends, 1965 versus average of 1960- 64 (table 7)_ __
96
Offen es kn own, cleared by arrest, by pop ulation groups
(table 8) __ __ ____ ___ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ___ 97- 98
Offen ses k.no\rn , cleared by arrest, by geographic d ivisions
( table 9) _____ - __- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - _ _ __ __ __ _ _ _ 99- 100
Offenses cleared by arrest of per ons under 18 years of age
(table 10) ______ ____________ _____ __________ _____ 101-102
Di p osition of person. formall y charged by the police
(table 11)___ ____________ ______________ ___ ________
103
Offenses kno,\·n, cleared; persons arrested , charged and
disposed of ( table 12) ___ _________________________ _ _
103
P olice disposition of juvenile offenders taken into cu tody
104
(table 13) ______ ___ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Offense analysi. trends, 1964- 65 , and average values
105
( table 14) ___________ ___- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 111
�G eneral U nited St ates crime statist ics, 1965-Con tinued
Pag,,
Type and value of prop er ty stolen and recovered (table 15) _
105
1'1urder victims- weap ons used (t able 16) ______________
106
Murder victims by age, sex and r ace (t able 17) ___ _______
106
Al-rests _______ ___- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - _ _ _ 107- 145
Iumber and r ate by popula tiop gr oup (t able 18) ______ 108- 109
Arrest tr ends, 1960- 65 (table 19)_ ___ ___ _______________
llO
T ot al arrest trends, 1964- 65 (table 20)__ ____ ___________
lll
T ota] arrests by age group (table 21) ____ ____________ ll2- 11 3
T otal arrests of persons under 15, u nder 18, un der 21 , and
under 25 ( table 22) __- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - _ - _ _ _ _ _ _ _
114
115
T ot al arrests, distribution by sex (table 23)_ ______ ______
T otal arrest trends by sex, 1964- 65 (t able 24) ___ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
116
T otal arrests b y race (table 25) ___ __ _____ __ ____ _____ 117- 119
120
City arrest tr ends 1964- 65 (table 26) _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
City arrests by age (t able 27) ___ ___________ ____ _____ 121 - 122
City arrests of p ersons under 15, under 18, under 21 , and
under 25 ( t able 28) - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
123
City arrests, distribution by sex (table 29) ___ __ _________
124
125
City arrest tr ends by sex, 1964-65 (table 30) __ ___ _______
City arrests by race (table 31) ______________________ 126- 128
129
Suburb an arrest tr ends, 1964- 65 (t able 32) _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
Suburban arrest by age (table 33) - - _ - - __ - ____ ___ ___ 130- 131
Suburban arrests of persons und er 15, under 18, under 21 ,
and under 25 (t able 34)_ ________________ ______ __
13?
Submban arrests, distribut ion b y sex (t able 35) __ ____ ===
133
Suburban arrests by race (table 36) _~-- --- - - - - - ----- - 134- 136
Rural arrest trend ·, 1964- 65 (table 37) - - - -- _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
137
Rural arrests by age (table 38) ______ ____ ___ ____ ___ __ 138- 139
Rtffal arr ests of persons und er 15, u nd er 18, under 21 and
under 25 (table 39) ________ _______ ________ ____ ' __ __
140
Rural arrests, distribu tion by sex (t able 40) _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
14 1
Rural arrests by r ace (table 41)_ _____ ___________ __ __ 142- 144
Suburban and rural arrest tr(jnds by sex, 1964- 65 (table
42) __ _________ _____________________ ___________
145
P olice emrloyee d_a ta _ - - --- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ____ ___ -= - 147- 175
F ull-time police employees ; n umber, r a te and r a nge (table
Fljf}ti~~- p~li~~- ~ffi~; 1~s_; _~~1~b; 1~,-
~·~t~ -~~d-;.~1;g; - (t~bl~4
- l 49
g~
Ci!tl ~1; -;~pl ~y~~;, -l;;1~c-e~i ~f t~t~( (tS:-bl~-45)----======- l 50- i
P olice officers l~illed ( table 46) __ _______ ___________ _ - - 9
Assaul ts on police officers (table 47) _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
--15~
153
Full-time state police and high,rny p atr ol empl~y;~s- - ~l;d
police killed (t able 48) _ _ _ _ __ __ __ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _
'
. P olic~ e1:Ilp~o:yees in individual cities (tables 49 a~-d 50)-- 155_ 154
175
Offenses m md1v1dual areas 25,000 and over by p op ula tion
groups (table 51) ___ __ _______ ____ ___ ______ __________ _ 175 _192
lV
�Preface
Recent years h ave witnessed a m arked in crease in citizen awareness
of the crime problem . This gr owing interest-p articularly that
shown by persons who previously h ave t aken the p osit ion tha t crime
is solely the responsibility of the law enforcement profession- is most
encouraging. I t offers promise of m aterially aiding police efforts
in the con trol of crime.
Individuals and organizations r epresenting m any segments of our
society are displaying a keen in ter est in progr ams to assis t law
enforcement and, ul timately, to reduce the volume of crime. In m any
par ts of the country , studies h ave been instituted and plans developed
not only to achieve a better unders tanding of local crime conditions,
but also to find solu tions to the complex problems involved . Tbe
success of these programs depends lar gely upon th e availability of
factual and complete s tatis tical da ta-da t a which help individual
com muni ties to comprehend the n ature an d extent of crim e locally
and to formulate effective measures of pr even tion a nd control.
U nder the s tew ardsh ip of the FBI, the U niform Crime R ep or ting
Progr am h as, for m any years, been a primary som·ce of info rmation
on the nature, exten t, trend an d dis tribution of cr ime. R ecently,
there has been a sh arp increase in the u tiliza tion of these data and
other police statistics by the cour ts, legisla tors, p enal authorities and
others concerned with the administr ation of crimin al jus tice.
Crime statistics are a n essential tool of police m anagement.
Growin g r ecognition of this fact is r esul ting in an im proved collection
of information-and in a continuing determina tion by the F BI and
the indiYidual contribu tors to this voluntary n a tion al P rogr am th a t
the most relii1ble and m eaningful statistics possible be provided in
meeting the needs of the wide v ariety of users.
Advan ces in comp uter and related communications technology
now make it both practical and fe asible to obtain crim e tati tics
more rapidly and in greater detail t h an heretofore p ossible. In
cooperation with state and local p olice agencies, t he FBI is currently
developin g a Nation al Crime Informa tion Center-a computerized
law enforcement information network wh ich will begin opera tion
early next year.
At th e outset, emphasis will be placed on information regarding
wanted persons, stolen proper ty and other operational-type d a t a
which will assist the police officer on the s tree t . The inform ation
V
�processed thr ough the National Crime I nformation C enter w ill,
however , offer a rich potential for statistical d a ta concerning crimin als
and their crimes. T his potential will be fully explored an d exploit ed
as the compu terized network develops.
Ultimately, Uniform Crime Repor ts an d r el a ted records will be
proces ed directly into this n a tiom,ide network, from a centr alized
state source, making possible up-to-:~he-minu te kn owled ge concerning
many ar eas of the crime problem. T he availability of such timely,
in-dep th statistics will open a ne\\- p athway to b etter service and
understanding among those engaged in the enforcem en t of t h e l a·w
and the administration of justice.
The new computer system pr omises an expanded u se of statistic
concerning crime. Accomp anying this expan ded u age is a greater
responsibility-particularly for accuracy, r eliab ility and confor m i ty
with established standards.
T echnology h as given us the tools t o bet ter u tilize t h e information
we possess. W e must cultivate this ability to the fullest.
JoHN EDGAR H o ovER, D i1·ector .
Vl
�Criine Factors
Unifo rm Crime Rep or ts give a n ation wide view of crime b ased on
police statistics m ade p ossible by the voluntary coop eration of local
law enforcement agen cies. Since the factors which cause crime ar e
many and vary from place to place, r eaders are cau tioned against
draTuing conclusions from direct comp arisons of crime figures between
individual communities withou t first considering the factors involved.
The national material summarized in this publication sh ould b e used,
ho,rnver, as a star ting p oin t to determine deviations of individual
cities from the national aver ages.
Crim e is a social problem and the concern of the en tire communi ty.
The la\\· enforcement effort is limited to factors within its con trol.
Some of the conditions which "ill aff ect the amoun t and type of cri me
that occm s from place to place ar e briefly ou tlined b elow:
D ensity and size of t he comm unity p opulation and the m etrop olit an area of which it is a p ar t.
Com p o ition of the population with referen ce par ticul arly to age,
sex and r ace.
E conomic status and mores of the p opul ation .
Relative stabili ty of population, in cluding commu ters, season al,
an d other tr ansient typ es.
Climate, including season al we ath er condi tions.
E ducation al, r ecr eational, an d religious ch aracteristics.
Effective strength of the p olice force.
S tandards governing ap pointments to the p olice fo rce.
Policies of the prosecuting officials an d the court .
Attitude of the public toward l aw enfor cemen t problems.
The administr ative and in vestigative efficiency of the local law
enforcemen t agency.
V ll
�Sum1nary
( This section is for the reader interested in the general crime picture.
Technical data, of interest primarily to police, social scientists, and
other students, are presented in the following sections. If yoii wish
assistance in the interpretation of any information in this publication,
please communicate with the Director, Federal Bureau of I nvestigation,
U.S. Department of J ustice, Washington, D .O., 20535)
Crime Capsule
More. than 2,780,000 serious crimes reported during 1965; a 6 percent
increase over 1964.
·









Fourteen victims of serious crimes per 1,000 inhabitants in 1965,
an increase of 5 percent over 1964 and 35 percent over 1960.









More than 5,600 murders, 34, 700 aggravated assaults wi th a gun
and over 68,400 armed robberies in 1965.













118,900 robberies, 1,173,000 burglaries, 2,500,000 larcenies, and
486,600 auto thefts r esulted m total property stolen in excess of
$1 billion.













Arrests of persons under 18 for serious crimes increased 47 percent
in 1965 over 1960 . Increase in young age group popula tion for same
period was 17 percent.









In 1965, 53 police officers wer e murdered in the line of duty.
Fiftytwo were killed by firearms. Since 1960, 96 percent of officer s murdered with the use of firnarms.













Over 30 percent of persons arrested in suburban areas were nonresidents of suburban community where crime committed.













Careers in Crime: Ini tial FBI study of offenders disclosed over 48
percent repeated within two years after being released to the street
following a prior char ge.
1
�Crime Index Tot als
In the Uniform Crime R epor ting Program the n umber of crimes in
seven offense categories is tabulated on th e b asis of counts m ade by
law enforcemen t agencies as crimes of these types b ecom e known t o
them. · These crime categories-murder and nonnegligent man slaugh ter, forcible rape, robbery, aggrava t ed assault , b m '.glary, larceny $50 and over, and au to th eft-are used to provide an in dex of
the trend of crime in the United 5'tates. As a group, these offenses
r epresent the most common local crin1e problem . Each cr ime cla ssification is serious, either by virtu e of the n ature of the criminal act
itself, such as m urder, forcible r ape, rob bery an d aggr avated a ~saul t,
or because of the volume of criminal inciden t s which requ ire a n inordinate amount of police investigat ive effor t and t ime, such as
bmglary, larceny and auto th eft.
During calendar y ear 1965 m ore th an two and t hree-quart er m illion
serious crimes came to police atten tion , a 6 p er cent increa se in t h e
Crime Index in 1965 over 1964 . E ach of the ind ividual crime categories con tributed to the overall incr ease. When considered as a gr ou p
the crimes of \Tiolence, which comprise 13 p er cent of the C rime Index
total, registered a 6 percen t incr ease. Murder rose 6 percent, for cible
rape 9, robbery 6, and aggravated assaul t 6 p ercen t . The p roperty
crimes, which m ak e up 87 p ercen t of the Crime I n dex, r ose 6 p erce~t
as a group with burglar y up 6 percent, larceny $50 and over 8 percent
and auto theft 5 percent . Since 1960 the v olume of crime h as in~
creased 46 percent . During this six-year peri od the property cr im e
s
r ose 47 per cen t and the violen t crimes 35 per cent.
All city popula tion ~~oups h ~d increases in 1965, led b y a 7 percent
rise in th e group of cities h avrng less th an 50,000 inhabitants. The
group wit!1 500,000 ?r m01:e popula_tion showed a 4 p ercent upward
trend. City groups m the mte1m echa te p opulation r ange from 50,000
to 500,000 h a_d incr~ases from 4 to 6 p er cen t . Suburban areas wi th
an 8 per cent rise agam had a sharper per cen tage incr ease in tlle ,. 1
. .
o u1ne
of crime than cities over 250,000 p opulation , which were u p 4
.
percent
as a group, and r mal areas which were up 3 p er cent.
When viewed geogr aphically , all r egions experienced crime 1· .
.
.
.
nc1 ea es
in 1965 with a n se of 10 per cent m the Wester n States 8 p .
.
,
e1cent 111
the Northeastern States, and 4 p ercent in th e Iorth Ce t 1
Sou thern Sta tes. All Crim e Index offenses wer e u p in· all .n ra and
.
.
.
.
geograp1uc
reg10ns with the exception of auto theft, which declined lio·h tl .
the Southern S ta tes.
"' Y 111
E stimated crin1e figures for t he United State
f
are set orth in the
2
�following table. T he trends shown in t his table are b ased on t he
actual rep or ting experien ce of comp ar able places.
Estim ntcd crime !Ofi5
P~rccnt change over
1964
Crime Index classification
Number
R ate pe r
100,000
inhabitants
Number
R ate
TotaL . ____ ___ ________ __ __ ________ ______ ______ _
2,780, 000
1, 434. 3
+o
+5
l~
~=-=~
~ ~~l= == ==f-===~-=-=I= = ==
~~ti~
15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST):~::::~:: ::______-----------------------
'I
~~:i!ifi~~;:~-u~~ii_:~::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
Auto theft _. . _______ ---- - ------ ------ - ----- - ------- -
9, 850
22, 4i0
118,920
206, 700
! , 173,200
762, 400
486, 600
5.1
11. 6
GI. 4
106.6
605. 3
393.a
251. 0
+ o
+o
+a
+o
+o
+s
+s
I
Crime and Population
A crim e rate, for practical p urposes, sh ould be considered as a victim
risk rat e. Crime r ates d o not represent t he n umber of criminals b ut,
more accurately, the number of victims. The crime r ate relates the
inciden ce of crime t o p opul ation . According to figures released by
the Unit ed St ates B ureau of the Census, total United S t at es population
increased 1.3 percent in 1965. In that year t h e n ational Crim e Index
rate was 1,434 offense per 100,000 population, r epresenting a 5 percent
increase over 1964.
Many factor s influen ce the nature and extent of crime in a particular community. A number of t hese factors are set forth on p age
vii of this publication . A crime rate is lim ited to a con sideration of
the numerical factor of popul ation and does not incorporate any of
the other elements which contribute to t he amount of crim e in an area.
The tatistical tables in t his publication disclose that the varying
crime experiences, especially among l arge cities and suburban communities, are affected by a complex set of in vol ved factors and are not
solely limited to numerical pop ul ation differ ences.
The overall crime rate increase was largely influenced by the
continuing upsurge in t he property crimes. However , crime r ates rose
in each of the violent cr ime cat egorie. with the rnmder rate up 6
percent, for cible rape 8 per cent, aggravated assaul t 5 percent and
robbery 5 percent over 1964. The num ber of crimes per unit of
population is highest in the large pop ul ation center s and those areas
recording th e fastest growing p opulations.
The accomp anying ch-arts illustr ate the trend in serious crime from
1960 through 1965. They reveal the percentage increase in the
volume of crime, the t rend in t he crime rate and pop ulation growth .
A further breakdown is shown in the charts for crimes of violence and
3
�CRIME AND POPULATION
1960-1965
PERCENT CHANGE OVER 1960
+SOr---.--------,----,-------,,------,
,
,
,,
Crime
up46%
+ 40 i------,-----t-------t-----,-=------1
,
I
I
Crime Rate
up 35%
I
I
+30,----""t------r-------t-----h,llc._~
·········
1960
CRIME
1961
=
1962
......... .........
1963
1964
Population
Up
8%
1965
INDEX OF CRIME OFFENSES
CRIME RATE
= NUMBER OF
OFFENSES
PER 100, 000 POPULATION
FBI CHART
Chart 1
4
�CRIMES OF VIOLENCE
1960-1965
PERCENT CHANGE OVER 1960
+ 50
VIOLENT
CRIME
+ 40
+ 30
, , '"
,,1/ . .
+ 20
+10
1960
,-
-- -- /

..
~
- ----
1961
1962
1963
1964
, ,.
~
UP 35%
I_
) ~-
-RA_T
_E_ _,
UP
25%
1965
LIMITED TO MURDER, FORCIBLE RAPE, RO BBERY, AN D A GGRAVATED ASSAULT
FBI CHART
Cha rt2
CRIMES AGAINST PROPERTY
1960- 1965
PERCEN T CHANGE OVER 1960
+ 50
r-- -~ - - - ~ - - ~- - - ~ - - ~
PROPERTY
CRIME
UP 4 7%
RATE
UP 36%
1960
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
LIMITED TO BUR GLA RY, LARCENY $ 50 AND O VER, AN O A UTO THEFT
Chart 3
FBI CH ART
5
�involves hazards for police. In the last five years 58 police officers
have lost their lives responding to calls for assis tance involv ing
"clistw·b ances" or "family disputes."
Police n ationally solved 73 percent of these crimes which came to
their attention in 1965. Police activity, as measur ed by arrests for
this offense, increased 5 percent during the p ast year. Arres ts of
adul ts rose 5 percent, while arrests for persons under 18 were up 7
percent. In reviewing arrests for this offense by se:;'{, m ·ales outnumbered females by more than 6 t9 1. The 20-24 year olds led the
arrest rate age group. This is prim arily an adul t crime but person s
under 18 were represented in 15 percent of the arres ts. By ar 13 as,
the distribution of arrests by age gr oup was fairly consis tent; however,
in thermal areas the involvement of persons under 18 was significantly
lower, n amely, 7 percent.
The seasonal variation for aggravated assault r emained consis t ent
with the experience of the past several years; namely, a high number of
off enses in the summer months tapering off to t he l ows in the colder
months of the year . Similar to the 1964 experience, ao·oTavated
bb
.
assault reached its p eak in August, 1965, " ·hile J anuary appeared l ow .
Because of the frequent close relationship between victim and
offender, this offense is also a prosecutive problem. In 1965, 41 percent
of the adults charged were found guilty of aggravated assault, 18
percent were found guilty of some lesser charge, and 41 p ercent were
dismissed or defend ants acquitted. P ersons under 18 were ch aro·ed in
0
15 percent of the incidents.
Approximately 17 percent of all aggravated assaults were committed
with a firearm in 1965 , 36. p er~ent by knife or other cutting instrument,
22 percent with a blunt obJect or other d angerous weapon, and 2 5
percent with personal weapons, such as h ands, fists, and feet . Firearms wer e used in 17 p~rcent of the attacks in cities over 250 ,000, 20
p ercent _of the assaults m rural areas and 1_6 percent in t h e suburbs .
It is estima ted there were 35,000 assaul ts with a gun in 1965 in wh· h
· · survive
· d.
IC
th e v1ctrm
The following table demonstrates the percent distribution by t y
f
weapon used in aggravated assault by 0 ·eographic region in 1965 _p e 0
Type of Weapon Used - P ercent
R egion
Fireanns
Northeastern States . .. __. __________ ____ _____ __ _
North Central States.- - - --- ----- - ---- -- -- ----Southern States . .. ---- -- -- ---- __ _______ __ . ____ _
Western States . - ---- -- ------- - - --- -- --- - --- ----
8
10. 3
16.
19. 8
18. 3
Kni fe or
Bl u nt ob·e
o_ther cu tting
or oth Jr ct
1nstrun1ent
dangerous
weapon
39.
36. 7
35. 8
29. 7
P ersona l
weapon s

23. I
21. 8
19. I
26. 3
26.
24. 6
25. 3


!5. 7


�Th e low conviction p ercentage on the origin al charge is d ue primarily
t o the close rel ationship between the assailant and victim and the
latter 's refusal to prosecu te. Slightly over 7 of every 10 persons
affested for aggrav ated assaul t in 1965 ,v-ere formally charged by police.
Forcible Rape
T here were 22 ,4 70 forcible r ap es or assaults to commit this offense
in the Uni ted States durin g 1965. .lVIany offen ses of th is type are
not rep or ted to a law enforcement agency primarily due to fear and/or
embarrassm en t on the p art of t he victim. Volumewise, these offenses
ha,e been steadily rising for several years and were up 9 percent ov er
1964. Of t he seven Crime Index offen ses, forcible r ape showed the
highest percen tage in crease during 1965. N ation ally, the forcible r ape
rate ,rns 23 offenses p er 100,000 fem ale p opulation. F or the period
1960- 1965, the tr end of this crime against the person h as increased
36 percent.
F orcible r ap e follows a similar season al p attern from y ear to year
in that the wairm or summer months, J une through September
generally ar e high. In 1965, th e m onth of Jmrn was the high point in
cities, while July was th e high m onth in the submb an and rural areas.
The chart \Yhich follo,rn d em on str ates the m on thly variations in 1965,
as ,rnll as the five-year average seasonal variation s for this offen se.
Nearly two-thirds of th ese crim es were actu al rapes by force, while the
remainder were attemp ts to commit r ape.
These offenses occur in all areas, but they are primarily big city
crimes. The overall forcible r ap e r ate in creased 8 percent in 1965,
with cities in excess of 250,000 r ecordin g a ra te of 21 per 100,000
population.
Geogr aphically , all regions r ep orted increases in the volum e of
these offenses with the Nor th Central States recording the sharp es t
upward trend of 14 p ercent. The W estern States repor ted the highes t
forcible rape r ate. Approximately 1 of every 5 forcible rap es occurred
in cities in excess of 1 m illion, which r ecord ed an in cr ease of 12 percent. The volume \\·as up 14 p ercent in th e suburbs, 11 percen t in
large cities as a gr oup, and in the rural ar eas there was little ch ange.
Similar to t he other crim es agains t t he p erson , p olice efforts are
limi ted in preventing the occurre nce of forcible r ~p e offenses sin ce
they generally occur beyond r each of p atr ols. P olice clear ed up by
the arrest of the offender 64 of every 100 cases. F or all offen ses
cleu.red, police identified per sons un der th e age of 18 in 14 p ercent of
the. e attack s.
Arrests for fo rcible r ap e in creased 2 p ercen t in 1965 wit h 64 p ercent
of the p ersons arrested under t h e age of 25 . Arres ts fo r p ersons under
18 increased 13 p ercen t and r epresented 2 1 p ercent of all those arrested
221- 746 °- 66- -2
9
�for this offense. Since 1960 , forcibl e rape arrests for persons under
18 have incr eased 35 percent.
Not all p ersons arrested are bound · over for prosecutive action .
Many reasons exist, such as the victim refuses to prosecute, etc.,
which may preclude cour t action. In 1965, 72 p ercent of the p ersons
arrested for forcible rape \\" ere tried in comt. Of all persons charged
with forcible rape 24 percent wer e referred to juvenile court jmisdiction. Of t he adults charged with this offense 40 percent were found
guilty of for cible r ape, 17 p er cen t of some lesser offense and 43 percent
were acqui tted or h ad their case other\\·ise dismissed.
D ata concerning statutory rape where no force is used and other
sex offenses ar e collected on the basis of persons arrested. Arrests
for these offenses d ecreased 8 p er cent in 1965 and accounted for about
1 p ercent of all p olice arrests. Adult arrests d eclined 7 percent and
arrests for p ersons under 18 were down 11 percent in the cit ies, 3
percent in the subtfrbs and up 13 p er cent in t h e rural areas. Of the
total persons charged for these crimes, 55 percent were found guilty as
ch arged, 7 p ercent were found guilty of a lesser charge, 17 percent
were acquitted or dismissed at som e prosecutive level and 21 p er cent
of t he p ersons ch arged were referred to juvenile cotfft.
Robbery
R obbery is a viol ent crime, ana. in a o-reat many instances these
t:,
'
cnmes result in p ersonal injury to the victim and are always accompanied by the use of force or t h e thr eat of for ce. In 1965, 58 percent
of the robberies, ·
· db
.
vei e committe
y armed perp etrators. The remainm :::,o- 42 .l)ercent
were sti·ono· t
·
·
··
.




,- aim ype cnmes such as muo-o-mo· yokmot:,t:,

,,

,,






e t c., or were attempts to commit robbery.
There was a 6 p ercent · .
·
·
.
mc1 ease 111 the estunated total number of
these cnmes when compar d t 196
. .
e o
4. There were more than 118 900
r obbenes m the United St t d ·
'

a es urmg 1965, an averao-e of abou t 326
cnmes of robbery every da f th
o

.
YO
e year. The relative increase in this
t ype Of came
was hio-hest · th
b
0


m
e su urban area, up 13 percent. C it ies
ovei 250 ,000 populat10n were
4
.
declin d 4

.
.
up
percent, while rural robberies
pe1cent. Smee 1960 th
b
e
in th e United St t h
.
'
e num er of r obberies committed
a es as risen 29 J)e .
t
G
.
.
howino- the gr·eate t
rcen ·
eographically, the region




,






<
s percentao- h
up 13 percent folio db 1 °e c ange was the Northeastern States
'
we
Yt e W t · s
and North Central St t 2
es ern tates 10, Southern States 5,
<
a e
percent.
_The Western State had the hio.
.
with al most two-third f th
":hest peicentage of armed robbery
0
e e ofiens
·
·
weapon. Strono--ai·m . bb
o <
10
ery
1es· committed ,nth the u e of a
was ighe t in the
orth Central

10
�Region. The following table gives the robbery breakdown for all
geographic regions.
Robbery b:, geograp hic regions
T otal
Armed -any weapon ___ __ __ ____ ________
Strong-arm-no weapon ______ ___ __ __ ___
57. 6
42. 4
Nor theastern
60. 3
39. 7
N orth
Central
52. 7
47. 3
Southern
56. 9
43. 1
Western
63. 9
36. 1
When consider ed by type, all r obbery categories had increases. In
1965, street r obberies, which comprised over one-half t he offenses
committed in this category, rose 3 percent. R obberies of gas or
ser vice stations h ad a substantial increase of 8 percent, and chain
store robberies r ose 7 p ercent . B ank r obberies, alt hough m aking up
less t han 1 p er cent of all robbery crimes, jumped 19 percent. T he
average value of loot obtained by b ank robbers in each attack rose
from $3,309 in 1964 to $3,789 in 1965. T he average loss in each
robbery was $254 which amounted to a total dollar loss of m or e than
$30 million.
The 1965 ra te was 5 p ercent higher than in 1964 with 61 victims p er
100,000 population . The gr oup of cities with p opulation s of mor e
than 250,000 had a 1965 r ate of 179 offenses p er 100,000 inhabit an ts.
This was about 6 times greater t h an the suburb an area rate and 18
times higher than t he r ural rate. G eographically, t he robber y rate
was highest in t h e W estern St ates.
ationally in 1965, p olice cleared 38 p ercent of t he robbery offenses
through the arrest of the offenders. Slightly m ore than 1 of 5 of these '
crimes involved p ersons under 18 years of age as offenders. These
young p ersons were responsible for 32 p er cent of the strong-arm
robberies and 12 p ercent of t he robberies where a weapon was used .
R obbery arrests for 1965 h ad t h e great est p ercen tage incr ease
among the young age group under 15. There was a 9 p ercent rise in
arrests of these young p ersons , whereas arrests of p erson s under 18
rose 6 p ercent and adults less t h an 1 p ercent. P ersons under 25
accounted for 69 p ercent of all arrests for robbery nation ally an d
those under 18 for 30 per cent. From 1960 to 1965 t he arrests of
persons under 18 for robbery rose 40 percent.
Of those ch arged with robbery, 34 p ercen t wer e r eferred to juvenile
court. Of t h e adults charged 52 p er cent were found guilty as ch arged,
19 percent guilty of a lesser offen se and 29 percen t of the cases were
dismissed or the defendan ts were acquitted.
11
�CRIMES
KEY :
______ 1960-1964 MOVING AVERAGE
AGAINST THE PERSON
+30 % - -- - -- -- - - - - - -- - - - - : : - - : - - - - - - --;;----,,-1
+ 10% L---'-------------,~-,;_:,-;:_~~-;;,,-;_-::__--'-~~-:-----'-T-1
ANNUAL
- 20 % 1.--:- - - - - - -- - -- - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - 1
-3o % L.._ ____:_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _- '
JAN.
FEB.
MAR.
APR.
MAY
JUNE
JULY
AUG .
SEPT.
OCT.
NOV.
DEC .
+30% - - - - - -- - - - - - -- - - - -- - - - - - - -- 1-.
NEGLIGENT
MANSLAUGHTER
- 30% L-- -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - _ _ _ : _ J
JAN.
+30%
FEB .
MAR .
APR .
MAY
JUNE
JULY
AUG.
SEPT.
OCT.
NOV.
DEC.
r---- - - - - -- - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - -FORCIBLE RAPE
- 20 % r--- -- - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - : : - -- - - - -- - _ J
-30% ' - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - . . . . : . ._ _ _ _ _ __ __J
JAN.
+30 %
- 20%
- 30 %
FEB.
MAR.
APR.
MAY
JUNE
JULY
SEPT.
OCT.
NOV.
DEC .
r-------------------------___J
' - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -..I._________J
Chart 4
12
AUG.
�BY MONTH
VARIATION S FROM 1965 A N NUAL AVERA GE
AGAINST PROPERTY
AVERAGE
- 20% t-- - -- - - -- - -- -- -- - -- - -- -- - - - - - l
- 30 % ~ - -- - - - -- -- -- - -- - - -- -~ - - - ~ ----'
JAN .
FEB. MAR. APR .
MAY
JUNE JULY AUG . SEPT. OCT.
NOV.
DEC,
+ 30% r - - - - ----:;----:-- -- -- -- - - - - -- - - - - - - ,
BURGLARY
+ 20 % t--- - - - - --'--"-'-,'-- - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - ---l
+ 10% t;-:_::-:_=-_-_-- -ANNUAL
- - .. .., ..
AVERAGE
-'---,---- -- - - - -- -- --'--- - - - ~
- Jo%~ - --'--- - - - - ' - - - - - - -- - - - - -- - - - - - - - '
JAN.
FEB .
MAR.
APR.
MAY
JUNE
JULY
AUG .
SEPT.
OCT.
NOV.
DEC,
+30% ..-- - - - -- - -- - - - - -- - - - -- - -- - -- ~
-30%~
· - _ _ __ _ _ _ __ __ _ __ _ _ _ __ _ __ __ _ _..__.
JAN.
FEB .
MAR.
APR .
MAY
JUNE
JULY
AUG .
SEPT.
OCT.
NOV.
DEC.
+ 30% - - - - - -- - - -- - - - -- - -- - - - -- - -- ~
AUTO THEFT
1
+20 % 1-c.. --,.----- -----'-- -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - , , - i
+ 10% 1--- - - -- - - - ; -- -- - - - -- - - - - ~,---....:::-'-I
ANNUAL
.- - - - -~ ..... ~
~ ,"'-~': -::,~' ~
AVERAGE - - ~
---.- - - - ------'
·<'
- 10% 1 - - - - - - - -- - , - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - -~ - -----i
- 20%
1,-:- - - - -- -- -- - - - - - -- -- - - - -- -- - -;
-30% ~
it~
- - -- - - -~ - - - -- - -- - - - -- - - - - -~
FBI CHART
Chart 4
13
�Burglary
Buro-lary is the crime with the high est v olume of off enses knmvn to
li e "'of any of the Crime Index offenses. In 1965 t h ere wer e 6
pp ercent
o C


. 1964 an d sm
. ce 1 9 60 t h.1s
more burglanes
committed
t h an m
crime h as increased by 41 percent . There w ere over 1, 173 ,20 0
buro·laries committed during 1965 which aver aged m or e t h an 3,200
per°day. In the Uniform C rime R eporting P rogram, b u rgl ~ry in clud es both forcible en try and unlawful en t r y wh er e n o force 1s u sed
but trespass exists.
Burglary is primarily a crime of stealth and over 70 percen t of these
crimes wer e committed at night . Places of business were v ictimized
in m ore than 50 percent of th e burgl aries b u t only 9 per cent of these
nonresidential burglaries occurred d uring d ayligh t h ou rs . Residential burglaries wer e ab out evenly divided b etween n igh t and day,
with 49 percent occurring during the d aytime a n d 51 p er cen t at n igh t .
There were sh arp incr eases, how ever, in b oth d ay an d night r esidence
burglaries amounting to 12 and 7 percent resp ec t ively .
In 1965, 76 percent of all off en ses of burgl ar y involved t h e u se of
force t o gain entry. Seventeen p ercent wer e t h e unlawful entry-typ e
wh ere n o force was used and 7 p ercen t were a t tem pts to commi t
forcible entry.
In 1965 t he average value of prop er ty stolen in each bur gl ary w a s
$242, or a n ation al t ot al dollar loss of $284 million. T his l oss does
not include the d am age and d estruction of p roperty w hich results
·from breaking and entering offenses.
The burglar y r ate, t h e n um b er of off enses p er 100,000 population
r egi ter ed a 4 p er cen t rise in 1965 over 1964. T h e trend in this of~
fense was consistent in _all areas. Geographically the We tern States
r ep or ted an 11 p er cent m crease, .North easter n 7 , North Central 5 a nd
th e Sout hern States 1 p er cent.
The p olice wer e able to clear 25 percent of the buro·l ai·y off·e
b
.
.
.
,
o
n ses y
iden~1fica~1on and a~Test of _th~ offender. This clearance percentage
applies with only sh ght van at10ns to all po1)ulation o·i·otip
_d
~
.
. . .
o
s an geographic d1vis10ns. P ersons under 18 years of age ,ver·e fo d t b
.
.
un
o e r ed
sponsible m 37 p ercent of t h e b urglary offense ,,-111·ch .
,vere so1, ·e
T he clearance percen tage for p er sons in the youno· a . . .
·
.
o
ge g1 oup ran 0o·ed
ill.
fr om a low of 20 p ercent m the largest citie with over
. to a h 1g1
" l of· 51 percent
.
. c1tie
. . under 10 000 one m .ion populat10n
m
.
,
popu1at10n
at10nally there was a 4 per cent increase in , . t f
·
an es s, or. buro-lary
1\/[or e than h alf the per ons arrested were under 18
"' < •
and 8
of every 10 person arrested for buro-lary were l d yea1s
, 2 of ~we
°
0

.
Ill ei
5
years
of

The high est p ercentage of mvolvement of th
a"'e.
e
youno·
ao·e

.
.
O
b urglary arrests occm-red in the Sl b ·b
o
o 1 oup rn
1 in an area where 56 percent of
O
14
.
�those arrested were under 18. From 1960 to 1965 arr ests of p ersons
under 18 years of age for burglary incr eased 26 p ercent .
With respect t o persons charged wit h burglary, over h alf were referred to juvenile court . F or adul ts charged with burglary 51 percent
were foun d guilty as ch arged, 15 percent were found guilty of a lesser
offense and 34 per cent were acquitted or h ad their cases dismissed.
Larceny
Larceny-t heft includes crimes such as shoplifting, pock et-pickin g,
purse-snatching, t hefts from autos, t h efts of auto parts and accessories, etc. It does not include fraudulent tr ansaction s, fraudulent
checks or embezzlement. The Crime Index off ense of larceny is
limited t o those th efts where the value of t he goods stolen is $50
CRIM E CLOCKS
1965
6
6
6
SERI OUS CRIMES
MURDER, FORCIBLE RAPE
OR ASSAULT TO KILL
MURDER
5
EACH
M I N UTE
6
FORCI BLE RAPE
ON E
23
EV E RY
M I N UTE S
ONE
27
S EC ONDS
E V E RY
HOU R
6
6
ROBBERY
ONE
6
EVERY
ON E
M I N UT E S
A GGRA V ATE D ASS A ULT
BURGLARY
ONE
2
E VERY
O NE
E VERY
2½ M I N UTE S
ONE
EV E RY
4½ M I N UT ES
6
6
LAR CENY
($50 an d o ve r)
AUTO THE FT
E V ER Y
41
S ECON D S
]
EACH
M I N UTE
FBI CHART
Cha1·t 5
15
�or more. In 1965, t his Index crime incr eased 8 percent over 1964
an d was Secon d only to burn:l
~ ary in volume with 762,400 offen ses
r eported . Since 1960, there has b een an incr ease in l arceny $50
and over of 57 p er cent.
The upward trend of l arceny in 1965 was mo~t pronoun_c ~d in the
s uburb an areas which sh owed an 11 p er cent rise. All cities when
gro uped were up 6 percent and the rur~l areas recorded a n 8 p erc~nt
upswing. Cities over 250 ,000 ? opulation report~d a n ·average m cr ea e of 3 percent. Geo gr aphically, the trend m thefts over $50
ranged from a rise of 11 p ercent iri th~ W estern States, and 10 percent
in the Southern States to 8 percent m the Northeastern States and
3 p ercent in the North Central States.
Seasonally, these crimes conform to a gen er al p attern which is
r ela tively stable thro ugh ou t t he year but h as a tendency to p eak
in August. In l 965 there wa an unusu ally sharp upswing in D ecem b er when comp ared to prior years .
The l arceny or victim r ate, which is the number of thefts per
100,000 population, was 393 in 1965 . This was an increase of 7 percent abo ve t he rate in 1964. As in the past, the rural r ate was l owest
at 176 , the suburban area r ate was 359, and the ci t ies over 250,000
popula tion had a rate of 633.
In 1965 the a:er age value of prop erty stol en in each l arcenytheft was $84 which made the total l oss from these crim es in excess
of $211 million. This includes the numerous t h efts under $50 in
value which total ed 1,752,600 in 1965 . The average dollar loss for
larceny in 1960 was $74. It is a recognized fact that many thefts
particularly those wh·er e th_e val ue of the ~oods stol en is small, ar~
never reported to l ttw enforcement agencies. The averao·e , - 1
·
· k?mg
.
o
a ue
was $100, purse-snatchino·
$ 45
of prop er ty sto1en m p ock et-pie
sb oplifti~g- $27, theft from autos $110 and miscelhneou ~heft~
from buildm 0 ·s $159.
Wh en_r eviewed b y type, i t is _found that thefts of auto parts and
acce son es and other thefts from auto accounted for abo t 40
.
·
Thef ts fTom buildmo·s
· ·
u
pe1 cent of a11 1arcemes.
made up 18
0
· 1at10ns
·
.
of all lar ceny vio
an d stol en bicycles
contributed 15 percent
.
of the total.
pel cent
Larceny is a crime of opportunity and in most in t
h
. a matter of chance. l\'Ian s ances
of the prop erty sto1en 1s
f tl t e value
.<
· ·
would b e preven t e d if· c1t1zen
would use appropri Yt O . :ie e cnrnes

~
measur es to safeguard their property . W i th thea ~ piec au~ionar~theft removed, frequ ently the temptation to teal . 1Pportumty for
In 1965 l aw enforcement agencies nationally · 1is a, dso brem o ve d ·
Y arrest 20
p er cent of all l arceny cases brouo·ht to th . , c_ear~
.
. o
attention.
Th e c1ear..
ance r ates were con 1stent,
rangm
g from 1 enpe,
.
area to 22 p er cent in cities under 10,000 populrct~nt in t~e s uburba.n
a ion and ll:l t he rur:1,l
16
�area. City crime figures disclose that 44 percent of all larceny
clearances involved persons under 18 years of age. This is a slight
increase in the involvement of this young age group when compared
to 1964. In t he suburbs 46 percent of the larceny offenses were
cleared by the arrest of juveniles while the percentage in the rural
area was 30 p ercent.
Nationally, police m ade an average of 286 arrests for larceny for
every 100,000 p opulation in 1965. Total arrests for this crime wer e
down less than 1 percent with decreases recorded in the adult arrests
as weil as arrests of p ersons under 18. P ersons under 25 accounted
for 76 percent of all arrests for theft. P ersons under 21 were involved
in 67 p ercent, those under 18 in 55 p ercent. Since 1960 police arrests
of persons under 18 years of age for larceny have increased 60 percent.
Police charged 82 percent of the persons they arrested for larceny.
Of those charged, 45 percent were referred to juvenile court jurisdiction. Of the adults charged 70 percent were found guilty of
larceny, 6 percent guilty of som e lesser offense, and 24 percent were
acquitted or their cases were dismissed.
Auto Theft
In 1965 there were 486,600 auto thefts, a 5 percent increase over
1964. On the average, over 1,300 motor vehicles were stolen each
day during th e year. Since 1960, au to theft bas increased 51 percentmore than double the percen tage increase in automobile registrations.
Auto theft makes up 18 percent of the Crime Index offenses. The
value of th ese stolen motor vehicles exceeded one h alf billion dollars
in 1965. Although 88 p ercent of the stolen automobiles were recovered, the remaining 12 p ercent constituted a total dollar loss in
excess of $60 m illion.
Geographically, the Nor theas tern States recorded the highest
increase in volum e for auto theft, followed b y th e N ortb Central and
Western States. The South ern S tates r ecorded no change in th e
volume of car theft .
ationally , auto theft reached its peak durin g
the mon th of October, 1965 .
Abou t on e of every four auto t h efts was cleared by the arrest of the
offender. The burden placed on law enforcement in this important
category is readily recognizable by t he involvement of young persons
in the transpor tation-type thefts . Citizen alertness in keeping cars
locked and in n ot leaving k eys in igni tions or ignitions unlocked would
aid materially in r ed ucing th ese th efts since so many occur due to th e
acces ibility of th e vehicle and the easy opportunity presented for
theft .
Across the Nation, aITests for a uto th eft decr eased 3 percent.
Arrests of p ersons under 18 d ecreased 5 p ercent, while adult arrests
increased a slight 1 percent . Since 1960, howev er, arrests for auto
l7
�th ef t for p er son s under 18 y ear s of age incr eased 44 p er cent and
aidults 37 p ercent.
Offenders under t he age of 18 accou n ted for 6 2 p ercent of the
arrests while p ersons under 25 wer e respon sib le fo r 88 percen t of t h e
t otal ~rrests fo r auto t h eft. T h e 15-19 year ol d gro up r ecorded
t he highest arrest r ate for a u to t h eft . Males m a de up 96 percent of
t he arrests for t his offense.
Of all p erson s ch ar ged wit h a u to t h eft, 6 1 p er cent a r e referred to
juvenile com t. W it h r esp ect t o the a dul t_ offender s 54 p er cen t ~ ere
found a uilty of auto t h eft, 16 p ercent gu ilty of som e l esser off en se
and 30t:ip er cen t h ad t h eir cases dism issed or w er e a c quitted .
N early two-t hirds of a ll a u to thefts occur at n igh t a nd over on e-half
ar e from private residen ces, a p art ments or streets in residential areas .
While r ecoveries of stolen a u tomobiles run h igh, p olice a re not a ble i n
m ost instan ces to determin e t h e p ur p ose of the theft unless a n a rres t
is m ade. Prior surveys h ave disclosed, however , that abo u t 75 percent
of t he car s stolen wer e u sed for tran sp ortation or t h e purp os e of the
t heft was not known . E igh t p ercent wer e tak en for t he purpo e of
stripping for p_ar ts , 5 p er cent wer e u sed in another crime or for escape
and the r em amder for resale purposes . L aw enforcement a o·en cies
ar e faced with a constan tly r ising numb er of car s b ein g stol en for
_stripping for p arts .. R eg_a rdless of the pur pose of the theft, a n exten t rme and .effor t are r e quired to handle and
sive amount of p oli
process t h ese thefts . The mount_mg number of au to thefts wit h t h e
avernge val u~ of the stol en car bemg $1,030 , p l us t h e added costs d u e
to incr ea~ed m surance rat~s, d amages to the st ol en vehicles a n d t h e
inconvem en ce and economic loss_for t h e owner combine to m a l
t


c re au o
t heft a very exp ensive
cr im
e problem.
C learances
I n 1965 the clear ance or p olice sol ution r ate nationall
,
. · 11y unc h an ge
· d f r om 1964 . Reports fron 1 Y ~ a f 24 .G
p ercent, vutua
1
· f or 1965 d'1sc1osed p olice
· clear ed by a rrest of th
aw en
ment agen cies
ft' or<·ed
·
1 means 9 1 p er cen t of t h e mur d er 5 4
e o en
or by except10na
. or
.
,
percent
of t he
r eported form'bl e. r ap e, 73 percen
t of t h e ao·o'l'a, ·.,ted
,
l
t:i:::,
a:::;sa
p ercent of the rob b ery. P roperty crim e cleara
n'"c
. u t. ·<:tn d 3 '~
lower wit h clearance sh own in 25 p ercen t of the bl71~0 .;::,ie, o f co ~i r::;c ,
of th e l arceny -theft an d 25 percen t of t h e auto t h f; {' 2 0 pei cent
crimes universally h awed a low er clear a n ce rat de t.
he properl y
d
h
e
u
e
o
the
v O1un1e u ('
these offen es an t e ab sen ce of wit n esse to
t
.
mos
of
the
.W hen clearan ce for n egligen t man sl a u o·h ter
d 1 .
- e c11mes.
in value ar e d elet ed from the compu tat~n s t~n
ficeny u nder $50
for the erious, or Cr im e Index offen es b '
e po ice clear ance r ate
.
. cl earino·
, cecome
gr ap hi c ally, p o1.ice exp erience
m
.- . b 26 ·3 percen t . G eo:::, 11mes Y ai·1·est
· l only
<
,
vu.nee
18
�CRIMES CLEARED BY ARREST
1965
AGAINST THE PERSON
CLEARED
91 %
85%
NOT CLEARED
MURDER
NEGLIGENT
MANSLAUGHTER
nt
64 70
FORCIBLE
RAPE
nt AGGRAVATED
73 70
ASSAULT
AGAINST PROPERTY
CLEARED
NOT CLEARED
J8%
ROBBERY
25 %
20%
25 %
BURGLARY
LARCENY
A UTO THEFT
FBI CHART
Chart 6
rn
�slightly . T he highest overall clearan ce r ates were rep~rted by the
South Atlan tic and West South Centr al States , each w ith 27.6 p ercen t. Since 1961 police clearan ces h a v e d ecreased 8 percent wi.t h all
Crime Ind ex classifications disclosing a d ownward trend.
Statistical d ata was collected in 1964 fo r t h e firs t time w hich p ermitted t he publication of figures indica t ing the extent of the implication of persons under 18 in t h~· C rime Index offenses as m easured
by the numb er of crimes clear ed b y arres t s of persons in this young
ao·e o-roup . The sta tistics r ep or ted b y p olice in 19 65 confirm t h e
e;p e;ience of t he preceding year. P ersons u nder 18 y ea rs of age
wer e iden tified as having b een involved in 30 p er cent of the ser ious or
Crime Index offenses which wer e cleared b y arrest . By includino·
.
0
clear ances for larceny under $50 and negligent manslaughter , th e
juvenile p er cen tage jum ps to 37 p er cen t . The young age grou p 10
to 17 years n ow m ak e up approximately 15 p er cen t of t h e total United
States population and b ased on p olice solutions of crimes, they commit
42 p ercen t of all prop erty off enses . B oth a rrest s a nd clear a n ces a r e
useful as indices to measure invol vement of y outh in cr im es commi tted
in a cer tain ar ea or comm unity. Arrest s show the numb er of p er so n s
involved w~ e clea~·an ce~ ~easure t h e extent to which yo ung p eople
can be identified ,'\Tl.th crrm~ al acts. Clear ances a r e on e m easure of
p olice activity to control cn me; arrests for crimin al acts a r e a n oth
·
.
er .
Further information re1atmg to arrest d ata will b e found in subsequ e t
pages of t his publication .
n
· In considering crime clearan ces it is J?oin ted ou t again t h at t h e
arrest of one person can clear s~ver al crimes or , on the other hand
several persons m ay be arrested m t h e process of clearino· one er·
P olice count a clearance wh en they h ave iden tified th e offen d . lime .
.
" a nd actu ally tak e him ·nto e1, t lave
sufficient
evi"d ence to ch ar ge h 1m
d
1
. al clear an.ce are cou nted w h en som
cus
I n t ance of exception
1 ·o ·Y .
·
bey ond police
contro1 prevents t h em from form ally h- e , e.· ement
.
.
.
'
f
1
c
mgmg
h
offender , sue as _VIct1m s re usa to prosecu te or prose tL· ' dan
·
· h· eu of· prosecut10n
·
cu 1011 eclmed
m
e1sew h er e.
Pe rsons A rreste d
In the period 1960- 1965 p olice arrests for all crimin 1
traffic off enses, h ave n.· sen 10 p er cen t . D ur ino· th·a. act ' except
.
. arrests of· p erson un d er 18 years of a,o·e. '='jum l ::s dsan1e penod
police
For the am e p eriod of t ime t h e increase in° t h e 1 ~~ 17 54 _Per cent .
popula tion was 17 p er cen t. Thus, it can be cl ·l
b age gro u p
. cr ease m
. t h e mvol
.
p er cen tage m
vem en t of thes e:11
_ y o served t l10
.
_
. m or e t h an tr· el Joth
u no·
measw·ed b y po1we
arrests,
1s
·:--. per~


sons, as


1
P
e
·mcr ea e m
· t h e nat10na
·
1 p opulation.
·
en
perce n t age
Keep in · l l
.

rela tively
sm a 11 per cen tage of th e t otal you n o· n0 •u nc ' 1oweve.
1 , th at a
in volved in criminal acts, les th an 5 ou t of
population becomes
20
°i~o~
�·ch pere implieasure d
F of age
~ri o us o r
~eluding
er, the
o up 10
United
ommit
er so ns
people
- ure of
otherequen t
at t he
hand
crime have
',., todY em en t
er
1;
il,n
de-
,;.:cep t
eriod
·cent -
·ro li P
tb C
s,
[L S
IJUL~ e
' at a
JJJ.es
When only the serious crimes are used for trend purposes during
this six-year period, it is noted t hat arrests increased 33 percen t.
Arrests of the under 18 age gTOup for the same crimes rose 47 percen t.
Although adult arr ests were up sharply dlU'ing this period, the upward trend for the young age group was double that for adults.
The young age arrests for violent crimes were up 50 percent and for
the property crimes 4 7 percent.
Adul t arrests for the violent crimes for the same period were up 17
percent and for property crimes 25 percent. Arrests are first a
mea ure of police activity as it relates to crime. Arrests do, however ,
provide a useful index to measure involvement in criminal acts by
the age, sex and race of the perpetrators particularly for those crimes
which have a high solution rate. Procedures used in this Progi-am
require that an arrest be counted on each sep ar ate occasion when a
person is taken into custody, notified , or cited. Arrests do no t
measure the pecific number of individu als taken in to custody since
one person may be arrested several times during the year for the
same or different offenses . This h appens frequently for certain types
of offenses against public order such as drunken ness, vagrancy,
disorderly conduct and related violations.
In 1965, arrests for all crimin al acts, excluding traffic, in cr eased
less than 1 percent over 1964. Nationally, there were 37 arrests fo r
each 1,000 persons in the United States. The arrest rate for cities
as a group was 43 per 1,000 population, for suburb an areas 22, and
for the rmal areas 16. The total volume of city arrests in cr eased
almost 1 percent, suburban 5 percent, and rural 2 p ercent.
N ationn.lly, persons under 15 years of age made up 9 percent of the
total police arrests; under 18, 21 percent; and under 21, 32 percent.
In the suburban areas the involvement of the young age group i11
police arrests is considerably higher than the n ational figure with the
under 15 age group represented in 12 percent; under 18, 32 percent;
and under 21, 45 percen t . In the rural area the di ·tributions were
lower for the younger age gro up with the under 15 age group bein g
involved in 4 percent of the total police arrests ; under 18 in 19 percent ;
and those under 21 in 35 percent.
In revie\\"ing arrest .figures it is important to keep in mind that
police arrest practices and emphases vary " ·hi cb "·ill acco unt for som e
\·a,riation s in these statistics from year to year. It is noted that
arrests of perso11s under 18 rose 35 percent for prostitution an d com mercialized vice, and 38 percent for Narcotic Drug Law violations.
In fact, nationally, approximately 1 of every 4 individuals arre ted
for violations of the Narcotic Drug Laws was a person under 21 years
of age.
Arrests for Narcotic Drug Law violations were up 12 percen t
nationally. From 1960 to 1965 arrests for th is violation in creased 46
21
�~!
ercent. There is set fort h belo.'" a tabu_lation
gaographi? region
o rnvolved m theauestof theoffender.
sh0wing
p
· the t yp eofnarcotic-druo·
Geographic regions
Northeastern
Narcotic drug laws (percent): .
.
.
' Opiu m or cocaine and their denvat1ves ___ _
Marijuana __ ________________ ____ __ ____ ___ ___ _
Synthet ic narcotics___ _- ------.- - - -- -- - - -- - -,
Other-dangerous nonnarcotic drugs_- - - --
54. J
22. 5
2. 5
20. 9
North
Cen tral
35. 1
28. 4
G. 0
30. 4
Sou t hern
26. 8
19. 0
,7.. 6
46. 6
Western
24. 0
47. 2
G. x
22. 0
Male arrests for all crimes outnumbered female arrests 7 to 1; however , female arrests continued to incr ease m ore ;r apidly in 1965. There
s little chano·e
in total male arrests, up 1 p ercent, and female arrests
O
wa
·
ily m
· fl u en cecl b y a 9 percen t
increased
2 percent. This "-as pnmar
1· crease in arrests of young females under t he age of 18. Fem ales
~ere arrested in 12 percent ,of the seriou s or Crime Index-type offen ses.
~heir involvement in these crimes is primarily for l arceny. Femal es
accounted for 18 percent of the forgery, 20 percent of the fraud and
17 percen t of the embezzlemen t arrests.
Persons Charged
In 1965 in the serious cr ime categories there was a significant 5
percent decrease f~·om 196~ in th e number of adul~s found guilty and n
- sharp 13 percen t mqrease m th e nu mber of acquittals and dismissals .
Each of these serious crimes contribu ted to the increase in the percentao-e of those acquitted or dismissed. Three out of every 10 murde1·
d: fendants were either acquitted or their cases were di :missed at some
prosecutive stage, about o~e-third ~f t~ose charged with for cible rape
were acquitted or had theu- ca e d1sm1ssed and over one-third of the
persons charged with ag_g ravated as~at~t won freed om through acquittal or dismissal. Acqmttals and d1sm1ssals r an h igh i n the N ar co ti c
Drug Law violations ':-hi~h wer e up from 36 percent in 1964 to ;38
percent in 1965 . A s1g~11fican~ fact emerges-since 1962 acq uittals
and dismissals for the serious crunes, as a group, h ave risen 14 percent .
Not all p ersons aues ted a~·e turned :)Ver to t h e courts for pr osecu tio u .
Some ~f t~e reasons for _tb1 are: failure of the victims to cooperat e
or testify m the prosecution, person s arrested are released with warn ings, polic~ deter~ine t~e arrested ~)erson d id no t commit the offen se
and sufficient evidence 1s not obtamabl e to support either a forma l
charge or a subsequent pro ecution. I t is noted for ex.a11,, 1 t l t
.
nationftlly law enforcement agencies
handle ab out, 50 pe. . . ,p t e, f rn
.
.
.
o t 110
J·uveniles they arrest w1thm their own agencies a.nd relea~ rcen
t 1.


se uese you n~·


22
�persons without preferring a formal charge or referring them to juvenile
authorities. In this Program, all law enforcement agencies are urged
to obtain and report final dispositions in cases in vol ving persons they
arrest. Tables containing this data commence on p age 103. Included
in these tables are j11veniles (local age limit) who were arrested and
turned over to juvenile authori ties in connection with specific criminal
acts. In using these figures keep in mind that p olice methods of
handling juvenile offenders differ widely.
In 1965 in the serious or Index crime categories 8 out of every 10
per ons arrested were form ally charged by police. Of the adul ts who
were ch arged for these Index offenses, 58 p ercent were found guilty as
charged, 12 percent guilty of a lesser crime, and 30 percent were
acquitted or their cases were dismissed. The highest p ercen tage of
persons found guilty on the original charge was in the larceny category
where 70 percent of the defendants were convicted for larceny. This
was followed by 54 percent conviction on the origin al ch arge for auto
theft, 51 percent for r obbery and burglary, 48 percent for murder,
41 percent for aggravated assaul t and 40 percen t for forcible rape.
The offense showing the highest percen tage conviction on a lesser
charge was murder where one of every 5 defendants was convicted
on some charge other than criminal homicide . The offense which had
the highest p er centage of acqui ttals and dismissals was forcib le r ape
with 43 percent. Person s charged with larceny h ad their cases dismissed or were acquitted least often-24 p er cent of the time. In 45
percent of the cases where formal charges were preferred the offense
was referred to juvenile court jurisdiction . Juvenile referr als were
highest fo r auto theft with 61 p ercent. Youn g person s were referred
to juvenile co urt jurisdiction after being ch arged in 52 percent of the
burglary cases, 45 percent of the l arceny, 34 percent of the r obbery,
24 percent of the forcible rape, 15 p er cent of the aggravated ass au l t
and 7 percent of the criminal homicide.
When all crime categories are reviewed , i t is found co n victions on
original charges remained high in the offen ses against public order
and decency-driving while intoxicated, drunkenness, disorderly co nduct and vagrancy. Offenses of ar son and vand alism recorded th e
greatest percentage of juvenile referrals.
Mo bility o.f the Offender
As indicated in other pages of this publication, the mobility of t he
general population, and specifically the mobility of the criminal
offender, influences crime rates from jurisdiction to j misdictionstate, county and l ocal . This factor of mobility h as mul tiplied
police problems in the contr ol of crime and the performance of other
23
�WASHINGTON, D. C. M·ETROPOUTAN ARE A
OTHER
MARYL 1A ND
MAR :Y LA N D
S,U BU :R BAN
V.IRGIN I A
Oil"HER
VIRGIN II A
PO PU LA TION, 2 ,'389,00C
AREl , 1, 43·5 'SQi;£ RE M OU. ES
Ch a.1·t 7
FBI CHART
1. e services. L aw enfor cem en t agencies, p articluu.rly in suburb a n
po IC

·
l
'd
.l ·
·
m.eas, h ave been exp en encm

res1 ent 1poplua t1on ,i n crensec;
1 g. s 1arp
wi'th
. OU t a propor tional g,r ow tJ m p 0n ce personne
.
'
. In 1965 suburban
police agen cies ihad an average ?f
po~ c~ officers per l '. OOO pop uln.tion , considerably b elow th e 1: a tion al aver age. Add to t lus u co ns tant
fl.ow of nonresident p op~at10n_ fi~orn oth er p arts of the metr op olitan
. a as well as th e mobile crnnm al, and a gr.ea t er s train is p la.ced
L2





the already inadequate p olice str ength in sub u1·ban communit ies .








In an a ttempt to m easure the m obility factor in a m etropolitan
ar ea, the 17 muni_cipal p o~ic~ agen cies in th e Washington, D .C .,
Standard Metropoh tan Statrnt1cal _Area cooperated with the FBI by
fmnishing information m a sp ecial survey con d ucted in t h e Fall
(Octob er-November ) of 1964. Some high lights of th is s t u dy are set
24
�forth below. It is reasonable to assume that the experience of this
metropolitan area would be very similar to that in other large metropolitan population centers.
For all criminal acts, excluding traffic offenses, 15.3 percent of the
persons arrested in the entire Washington, D .C., metropoli tan area
were nonresidents of the place where arrested. When drunkenness
and disorderly conduct arrests were excluded, 17 .3 percent of the
offenders were nonresidents. For the crimes against the personmurder , forcible rape and aggravated assault- IO percent of the persons arrested were nonresident offenders. While 9 percent of the
robbery arres ts were of nonresiden ts, 19 percent of the persons arrested for burglary, larceny and auto theft as a group were nonresidents of the community where the crimes were committed .
These mobile off enders were primarily from some part of the metropolitan area (64 percent), although they traveled to another political
subdivision of the area to commit their criminal acts. Fomteen percent came from a state other than Maryland and Virginia and the
District of Columbia. Twenty-two percent were from Marylan d or
Virginia but resided beyond the suburban fringe.
The Maryland and Virginia suburbs of this metropolitan area experienced proportionately a greater degree of criminal mobili ty than
the large core city, Washington, D.C. In these suburbs 31 p-ercentof
all persons taken into custody were nonresidents of the community
where arrested. For the crimes against the person 16 percent of the
persons arrested were nonresidents. For the property crimes of
burglary, i·arceny and auto theft 39 percent were nonresident offenders.
In suburban robberies it was disclosed that over one-half were sol ved
by the arrests of offenders who were nonresidents of the community
where the crime occurred.
These mobile offenders by sex were 91 percent m ale and 9 percent
fem ale. The nonresident female offenders were arrested primarily on
charges of larceny, assault, drunkenness and disorderly conduct. A
percent distribution by age gro up and type of offense of these mobile
offenders for the entire metropoli tan Washington, D.C., area is set
for th below.
Nonresident Offender- Percent Dis tribution by Age G1·oup and Type of Offen se
T ype of offen se
Violent cri mes (m urder,
forcib le rape, robber y , aggravated assau lt) __ ___ ____
Property crimes (b urglary,
larceny, auto the ft,) _______
D runkenness an d d isorderl y cond uct __________ _
Other offenses ____ ____ . ____ -
Under
Under
20-24
25-29
20
- 18- - - - - - -
30-34
35-39


40-44
-
45-49
-
-
50 nnd
ovor
16. 7
34. I
0.8
10. 6
11. 4
o. 1
3.8
30. 7
22. 9
12. 7
12. 0
8. 0
7. 0
2. 5
4. 2
9. 5
27. 1
12. 0
0. 8
11. 0
11. 7
ll . I
12. 6
II. 9
9. 4
9. 2
14. 0
21. 9
16. 3
4. 3
13. 4
8. 9
14. 8
27. 2
20. 9
10. 8
11. 7
JO. 8
8. 5
3. 6
6.
9. 1
17. 7
1. 6
4.
- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- ---
Total, less d ru nkenness a nd d isorderly
cond u ct_ __ __ ________
25
221 - 746° - 66--3
�Victim
The increasing mobility of the general population, p articul arly
within a metropolitan area, also places greater demands on police
protection needs. Crime and police employee rates in this publication
are based on permanent or residen t population figures since transient
population counts are not ~vailable. However, the constant flow of
nonresident population within and through metrop olitan areas ,
particularly by means of the automobile, is a factor for consideration
in establishing police needs in each community.
.
This -survey in the W ashington, D.C. , metropolitan area revealed
that 21 percent of the victims were nonre idents of the community
in which the crime was committed. Specifically, in crimes again s t
the person 15 percen~ of the victims were nonresidents and 22 p er cent
of the robbery victims did not reside in the community where v ictim ized. W ith r espect to the crimes against property, particul arly
larceny and auto theft, 30 percent of the victims were nonresiden ts.
There were proporti~nately m~re nonresident victims of property
crimes in the large city, W as~mgto_n,. D .O ., than suburbia, 35 percent versus 20 percent.. 'l'rans1en t victrms of r obbery were also hio·her
in the large city, 22 percent, compar ed with 14 p ercent in t h e s ubl~·bs.
For the crimes against the person, nonresident v ictims were in the
same :proportion in both the large city and the submbs.
There is set forth below a comparison based on av erages rela tino·
victims and offenders by age, sex, mobility and type of crime . 0
Compariso n of victim and offcnde1-
f
age, sex and mobility by t
Ype o
.
c nrne
Victim
Offe nder
P crce-11tagc
Per centage
Average
age
Sex
R esiden t
M alo F em ale
-Cr imes against person
(murder, forcible rape
a ncl aggrava ted assault) __
R obbery_-- - ------ - -- --- --Crimes against proper ty
(burglary, larceny and
au to theft) ____________ ___
31
34
57
77
3
75
N o nresid ent
Average
age
Sex
Rcsident
- - - - - -- -Ma le F emale
43
85
78
23
25
I
70
15
22
30
31
20
23
G
98
94
14
2
6
88
91
85
Nonr esiden t
12
9
15
A review of this table indicates victims
are older
t h an off
except for crimes again t the per~on, particlllarly
murder
d e n d ers
an aggra26
�vated assault . Offenders are primarily m ale. This is true also of
victims, alth ough in crimes against the person the percen tage of m ales
is only slightly more than · h alf. T he nonresiden t is victimized most
frequently by robbery or other forms of t heft .
The abo,7 e material was gathered on th e basis of police solu tions
of crime. I t is reasonable to assume th at a greater proportion of
unsolved crimes are committed by m obile offenders. This is p articularly true for the crimes against property. It is also the property
crimes which result in fewer clear an ces.
Although we have highligh ted here t he mobility of the offender
in the metrop olitan area, it is clear th at the v ast majority of offender s
an d victims of crime are of local concern. The need for pol{ce to
centralize criminal information is, therefore, apparent. This is
especially true in view of the r epeater and the extent . to which he
contributes to crime.
Careers in Cri m e
At the close of calendar year 1965 the criminal histories of 134,938
individual offenders h ad been en tered into a study of criminal careers
which was initiated by t he FBI in J anuary, 1963. This progr am and
t he publication of this material are made possible through the cooperative exchange of criminal fingerprint data among local, st ate and
Federal law enforcement agencies which submit criminal fingerprint
cards to the FBI's I dentification Division on persons whom they
arrest. There is a lack of uniformity in submissions made by all law
enfor cement agencies for all criminal charges but, gener ally, it is the
practice to submit a criminal fin ger print card on all serious crimes,
felonies, and certain misdemeanors. On the F ederal level almost all
arrested persons are fingerprinted_by the arresting F ederal agency,
United States Marshals and/or the Bureau of Pri ons.
Using this positive m eans of iden tification it is possible to obtain
the criminal history of an offender. T his history is limited, of course,
to the extent that the offender is detected, arrested, a fi ngerprint
card submitted at arrest and a disp osition is furnished for the arrest.
The fingerprint files of these known offenders are "fl.ashed" in the
FBI IdenLification Division thus providing a means of follow-up with
respect to their future criminal involvement. Additional informa tion
received on these persons is added to th e record which has b een
previously stored on magnetic tape. For the most part, th ese offenders
are persons who have been arrested on a Federal ch arge in 1963, 1964
or 1965, parolees, persons on probation, serious state violators arrested
27
�as fugitives under th e Fugitive Felon Act , p~u s ~ocal viol ator s ':ho ~omprise abou t 25 p ercen t of the ~ot_al. Chrom e_v10la tor s of t~e rmm 1gr ation la,Ys and those ,Yhose cn m m al fin gerprmts are submitted b y th e
military are not included in the tabula tions . The d a t a which follows
is based on an analysis of the crim inal activity of offenders on whom
finger print cards wer e r eceiv ed from J anuar y 1, 1963, to December 3 1,
1965.
F or th e 134,938 offender r ecords which h ave been p rocessed , 3 ou t
of every 4 wer e repeaters ; th a t _is, t h ey h a d a prior arrest on some
charge. T his entire sample h ad an aver age criminal car eer of m or e
than 10 years (span of y ear s from first to last ar rest) d m·ing w hich
th ey averaged 5 arrests, 2 .4 convictions and 1.5 im prison m ents .
Disposition data is two-thirds comple te for fel onies but more in com plete for the misdemeanors or m inor offen ses. L enien cy in the form
of probation, su spended sen tence, parole and conditional r elease h ad
been affor ded to 51 per cen t of the offender s . After t he first leniency
this group averaged m or e th an 3 n ew arres ts. The gr oup gr an ted
leniency h ad, on the aver age , a criminal career extending over 12
years and th ey accumulated approximately sev en arres t s each.
The mobility of these _134 ,938 offender s r eveals t h at sligh tly . over
52 per cent were arrested m one s tate, 25 p er cent in two s tates a n d 2 2
percent in three or m or e states . A distribution by sex indicates t h a t
93 percent were males and 7 p ercen t fem.ales . By r ace 70 per c~~t
were white, 27 percen t Negro and 3 p er cen t all oth er.
'
~he _foll~wing table se ts for th a distribu tion b y age gr ou p in 1965 ,
a d1stnbut10n by age at first arres t and mobility b y age group .
Tabl~ A .- Dis t ribut ion by Age G rou p
A ge, 1965
Age group
. ' u mber
A ge at nr sL a rrest
P e rcent
Under 20____ __ ___ ______ ______ _____________ ____ _
?024 ____ ---- -- ---- --- - - - - -- - - - - - --- - - - - - - - - - - - 25- 29 ___________ ________ ______ _____ _________ --- 30-39 __ - - -- -- - - - - - - - - - - --- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - 40-49__ ___ ___ _________ ______ _________ __ ____ ____ _
50 and over. _________ __ __ _____ _________ _________
6,322
25,
9 4
25,1 51
37, 969
24, 044
15, 46
- - -- ___
T ot al. . _--------------------------------134, 938
umber
4. 7
19.
3
18. G
28. l
17. S
11 _5
P ercent
?
5 023
-,
3 ,200
7
17,307
l ?:. 145
38.
6
27. 6
12 . S
12. 7
!• 421
?i·. g
a , 836
- IClQO - ~ - -- 1-00:0
u
I
D is t r ibution by Mob i lit y
Age group
i[.. :··;_.
Arres ts in J
s i atc
i:::m
T ota!_ __ _____ ___ _____ _______ ______ ________ ______ __ -
P,"'"lll
~
52. 2


28


Arres ts in 2
s tates
""•m
~!
A rrests in 3 or
m ore s t ates
Pm , rn
~l
_ _ _ _"_-1_· 2_ 1_ _ ___ _2_3_. o
25. 4
22. 4
�This sample of almost 135,000 individual criminal records is primarily made up of Federal offenders in the sense that it was their
involvement with the Federal process which brought them into the
program. Keep in mind, however, that most of the Federal crimes
as defined by statute are also local in nature. These violators are
generally t he serious off enders and, therefore, likely repeaters since
it _is not police practice to submit fingerprint cards on minor or petty
crimes.
Profiles
Table B , Profile of Known Repeaters by Type of Crime, provides
pertinent information for comparative purposes. It suggests the
extent to which the repeater contributes to our crime ·counts year
in and year out. The group of offenders making up T able B are
repeaters ; that is, they have been arrested at least twice and were
selected by type of crime based on their last charge. The average
age of these offenders ranged from 27 years for the au to thief t o 45
years for the gambler . For the auto thief who repeated in that
offense, the average age at first arrest for auto theft was 23 and the
gambler 40 years of age. Again, the extreme ranges of average
age at first arrest for any offense were the gambler 31, and the auto
thief, r obber, and burglar 20 years of age. Since fingerprint cards are
not submitted with any degree of consistency on juvenile arrests, the
average age at first arrest is influenced upward.
Criminal careers of these offenders ranged from 13 yeal'S for the
gambler to 6 years for the more you thful auto thief and rapist. However , averages indicated th at the burglar, auto thief and robber had
the highest rate of repeating in the serious crime categories. More
than h alf of the crimes committed by these offenders were of the Crime
Index type; namely , murder, forcible rape, r obbery, aggravated assault,
burglary, larceny and auto theft.
Repeating in the same crime was highest for the nar cotic offender
53 per cen t, the burglar 48 percent, the gam bler 47 percent, and the
bogus check offender 40 percent. Thirty-six percent of the au to
thieves repeated in au to theft during t he course of their criminal
careers and 33 per cent of the robbers repeated in robbery. F or the
crimes against the person- murder, r ape and felonious assault- t he
rate of repeating in t he sam e crime is considerably lower than for t he
property offenses.
The frequency of leniency action in the form of probation, suspended
sentence or p arole ranged from 38 percen t for the murderers to 55
percent for the bmglars. Like the burglar , 54 percent of the bogus
check offenders also had leniency ; yet, both of t hese. criminal ty pes
have a high rate of repeating and, r epeating in the same offense. The
29
�Table B.-Projile of K nown Rep ea.te rs by Ty p e of Crime
M urder
rota! n um ber or su bjects ______ __ __ ___________ __ __
verage age 1965 __ ___ __ ____ __ _______ ____ __ ____ ____
Average age fi rst arrest for specific charge______ ___
Average age at fi rst arrest ____ ___ __ __ ___________ ___
Average criminal career (yrs) _______ ____________ __
Average arrests d uring crim inal career_ _____ ____ __
rime Index arrests . . _---- --------- -------- ----- F requency of arrest on specific charge (percen t):
One ____ __ _______ __________ ____ .----- -------T 11·0______ ____ _____ ____ __________ __ __ __ _____ __
T hree or more ________ ___ _____ __ _____ __ ______ _
Frequency or leniency action on any charge (percent):
One _______ -- ___--- __ ______ -- --------- ----- -- -
900
34
32
24
9
G
3
8
11
Felonious
assault
Robbery
Burglary
Au to theft
4, 330
32
30
23
9
7
3
6, 028
29
26
20
JO, 260
28
24
20
993
28
26
20
6
6
3
1, 127
34
31
25
8
6
1
9, 661
32
27
22
77
Sex offenses Narcotics
Rape
Gambling
8
8
7
4
8
4
17,310
27
23
20
6
6
3
67
21
12
52
24
24
64
22
14
85
13
2
78
14
8
47
21
32
30
26
9
6
28
7
23
4
3
33
12
6
30
10
4
9
7
2
3, 963
45
40
31
13
5
Bogus
checks
l
53
12,772
34
30
23
9
7
2
60
20
20
I
16
7
26
8
4
28
9
5
28
Three or more ______ ______________ __ _____ _____
7
34
13
8
T otal (percent) ______ . ____ ___ ___________ ___ _
38
42
46
55
45
44
41
46
30
54
Len iency on specific charge (percent) ______ ___ ___ _
Average arrests arter fi rst leniency ___ ____ __ ___
5
5
7
5
II
18
6
27
6
5
8
4
8
6
24
6
12
4
27
5
Mobility (percent):
Arrests in 1 State ___ ___ _____ ____ ____ ______ ___
Two States __
'l' hree or more States_. ________ _____ __ __ ______
47
31
22
41
3fi
24
39
29
32
34
32
34
33
32
35
40
31
29
43
29
57
26
17
71
20
9
37
2i
36
'"11 \ VQ___________ _ __ __ _________ _____ __ _ __ _ __ ___ _
I
ll
9
28
IL
22
25
9
�auto thief, bogus check offender and the narcotic violator had the
highest proportion of leniency for specific charges.
The forger, the auto thief, the burglar and the robber recorded the
highest mobility with over 30 percent having been arrested in 3 or
m ore states during the course of their criminal careers.
Follow- up
The first results of follow-up since this program was initiated in
J anuary, 1963, are set forth in T able C below. The 6,907 offenders
in this tabulation represent crimin al offenders who were released to
the street between Janu ary and June, 1963. They were released
either by prob ation , suspended sentence, parole, fine or acquittal
and dismissal. By the posting of "flash" notices in the criminal
identification records of these offenders, arrests for new crimes were
added to each record when received through the submission of a
fingerprint card . The cutoff date on follow-up was June, 1965;
therefore, the experience reported below covers a two-year period.
Age was computed a t time of entry into the progr am in 1963. As a
group, 48 percent of these offenders were arrested for new crimes
within two years- namely between June, 1963, and June, 1965.
Table C. - Repeate rs By Age Group
[Two-year follow-up)
R epeaters
Non re peaters
A ge
T otal
' umbe r
U nder 20_ ·-- --- -------- - --------- - -- - -- - - 00-24 . - - -- - - --- --- - - - - - --- ------- - - - ------ 2,S-?<l - - - - - - --- - -- -- --- - - - -- ---- -----------
30--39 ___-- - - - - -- - - -- -- - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 40-49
___over
-- -------------- - - -____
- - - -___
- --____
__ --_
50
a nd
_____ ____
______--_____
Tota l a ll ages ______ ____ ____ _________ _
871
1, 565
] , 11 8
1, 620
1, 069
664
P ercent
Percent
365
664
511
869
678
503
41. 9
42.4
45. 7
53. 0
63. 4
75. 8
506
901
607
751
391
161
58. 1
57. 6
54. 3
46. 4
36. 6
24. 2
3,590
52. 0
3, 317
48. 0

1
6,907
Number
When the above records are examined by type of offense for which
charged at time of release to the street, it was found tha t 59 percent
of the burglars, 70 p er cent of t he auto thieves and 64 percent of the
robbers r ep eated. Of t hose charged with theft 45 percent repeated,
as d id 65 percen t of the n arcotic offenders and 49 percent of the forger s .
Police Employee Data
Tables ar e set for th commencing on page 148 of this publication
which contain information on aver age police strength by geographic
division and p opulation group, p er cent civilian employ ees, law enforcement officers assaulted and killed in the line of duty and indi-
31
�.
vidual city listino·s of po1ice
emp1oyees fo1· cit ies ·w ith over 2,500
p opulation ,Yhich ~uade th eir figures ·availabl e.
The year 1965 witnessed no ch an_ge in the national police empl oyee
r ate for all cities " ·hen compared with 1964. The average r ate of 1.9
p olice employees per 1,000 pop~1lation (includi?g civilian _Perso1:n_el)
has been r elatively constant srnce 1958 despite th e r apidly n sm g
incidence of crime and the gro,Ying frequency in the n umber of
requests for police service. 11any dep ar tments are below this
aYerage, however, ,Yhen arrayed it i found that one-half of t he depar tments h ave a police employee rate of 1.4 per 1,000 p opulation or
less. Due to the fact that on the aver age 85 to 90 percent of the total
police budget is for salarie , it is incumbent on the l a " · enforcement
administrator to insure b e is utilizing available manpo,Yer in the most
efficien t and effective way.
A table is offered this year (T able 44) " ·hich, for the first tin1.e,
provides figures as to t he average police empl oyee r atio using only
s"·orn p olice personnel as a b ase. I t "ill be n oted the nation al
aYerage decreases to 1.7 per l ,00_0 p opulation when.civilian employees
ar e eliminated from t he tabulations. There exists a h ealthy and
gr owing trend among l aw enfor cement agencies to utilize civilian
employees in clerical and other n onp olice j obs which r el eases sworn
personnel for patrol and other enforcement functions . Efforts in t his
direction are important at any t ime, but particularly now ,Yhen
· r ecrniting accep table. officer candidates is d ifficul t.
C ri~n e in t he sub~u:bs continues to _increase at a more rapid pace
than m t he large c1tie:3, yet the n ational police employee ratio for
suburban areas of 1.4 IS well b elow the average for all cities. This
figure i reduced ~o 1_.2 _when civilian p ersonnel are excluded . When
m·~·ayed by quartil~, it IS found t h at at least 50 p ercent of the cities in
tlns, group h ad police employee rates ranging from 1.0 to 1.6.
1 be average employee rate for sh eriffs' department · 1 0 b t
drops to less than on e (0.8) when onh, sworn pei·
Isl · ' u
·
d
Wh
.
·1
.1
sonne
are cons1dere .
en qu art1 es are used the rates rar1
f
0
ge
r
om
.3
to 0 g
per 1,000 popu1at10n ~or 50 p ercent of t h e departments.
·
It must be recogm zed that the law enforce
t
. .. .
m_en responsibihhes
of berifl'::;' departments differ co · d _ bl .
n sI er a y lll vario us sect·
f tl
niled States. In ome jurisdiction for
..
ions O . ~e
1
· · · are 1·1mite
· d m
· 1arge part to civil f exa,mp
e the
shenfi
fLCliVIties
t"
n
·


s·'


ments used in computing r ates, however . unc. 111n s. 1 he ?epart.
. .
O
·cal e po1ice
actiV1ty
an d are re ponsible f' are a, eno·ao·ed
m f u11O
forcem ent in their jurisdictions
In ...· . orh all phases of l ftw en.
u:smo t ese ra.t

be exercised b ecause of the variations . "' t h '
< es cau 1011 must
the duties performed by t h e heriff.
in
e nature and ex tent of
Any_ attefn1dpt to men.sure police activity on the
collection o n.ta can at best b e a rouo·h
d .
basis of a. broad
o
Yar stick. p o1·ice wor1"-tuads
_1


12


°
do
li
Cti
of
�do vary geogr aphically by volume and t ype of activity. · The t abulat ion below shows the n um ber of repor ted Crime Index offenses,
criminal arrests made, and traffic ch arges issued per sworn police
officer by geographic region . It is based on 1965 calend ar year data.
This indicates a h igh rate of activity for th e police officer in the
Western States followed by t he Sout hern and Nor th Cen tral States
and a comparatively low activity rate in t he Nor t heastern S tates.
A nn u al numbe r p e r o fficer ( g eogi-aphic re gion)
Police Activity
Crime Index offenses reported ___ _____ _____ ___ _
Drunkenness and disorderly conduct arrests ___ _
Other arrests (crimin al) ______ ___ ______________ _
Traffic charges issued ___ __ ______ _____ _____ ___ __
Northeastern
6. 5
3. 8
6. 4
130
North
Central
10. 0
8. 7
15. 8
244
Southern
11. 3
21. 5
22. 1
~4
Western
15. 8
14. 7
21.1
322
The police employee strengths of State P olice and State Highway
Patrol organizations are set for th in T able 48. In addition , th is table
provides information concerning th e miles of primar y highway and
the number of state motor vehicle registrations per swor n employee
by state.
Figures with respect to average police strength , as well as r a tes
which are set for th in T ables 43 and 44, are supplied as a guide and
must not be interpreted as representing desirable or recom mended
police strength. A careful analysis mus t be m ade of the various
factors which contribute to t h e need for police ser vice in a given
community before a dete · ation can be reached with regard to
adequate manpower r ·1irements.
Police Killed
The number of law enforcement officers murdered in the line of
duty in 1965 dropped slightly from 1964. T here were 53 police
victims in 1965 whereas there were 57 officers murdered in 1964.
With the addition of these 53 deaths the total number of police killings
increased to 278 for the six-year period 1960- 1965. In 1965 there
were 30 additional deaths of law enforcement officers as a r esult of
accidents in the line of duty, most of which were automobile or
motorcycle fatalities.
Effecting arrests and transporting prisoners continue to carry the
greatest risk for police as evidenced by the fact that 30 percent of the
278 men rnw-dered over the six-year period wer e engaged in h andling
these p olice fun ctions . In fact, 42 percent of the 53 police killed in
1965 wer e making arrests or were transp orting prisoners who h ad
been apprehended. A further analysis of the type of acti vity in which
the 278 officers were involved discloses 21 percent were answering
disturbance-t,ype calls, such as family quarrels, man with a g un, etc.,
while 20 percent were mmdered when they interrup ted a robbery in
33
�POLICE EMPLOYEE DATA
AVERAGE NUMBER OF POLICE DEPARTMENT EMPLOYEES, AND
RANGE IN NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES, PER 1,000 INHABITANTS
BY POPULATION GROUPS, DECEMBER 31, 1965
7.8
5.4
4.2
3.8
AV.
2.6
·····
2.8
AV.
1.7
t.O
3.6
·····
.9
AV.
·1.s
AV.
AV.
1.5
..... ·····
1.4
·····
.6
.2
ALL
CITIES
CITIES
OVER
250,000
CITIES
100,000
TO
250,000
CITIES
50,000
TO
100,000
Ch art 8
34
CITIES
25,000
TO
50,000
AV.
1.5
·····
.2
CITIES
10,000
TO
25,000
CITIES
LESS
THAN
10,000
FBI CH ART
�I
j
j
I
j
progress or were pursuing r obbery suspects. Interrupting burglaries
in progress or pursuing burglar y suspects accounted for 12 percent
of the deaths, investigating suspicious persons and circumstances 11
percent and 17 men or 6 percen t were murdered in unpro voked attacks
by berserk or mentally deranged or disturbed individuals, a number
of whom had prior histories of mental disorder s. In the following
t able, police murders are distributed by geographic reg10n and by
type of activity in which the officers were engaged .
Police Killed by Geographic Region and Type of Activity 1960-1965
I. R esponding to "disturbance" cnlls
(famil y quarrels , m an w it h gun, et c.).
2. Burglaries in progress or pursuing
burglary s us pects _____ ___ ____ ______ ___
3. Robberies in progress or pursuing
robbery sus pects ______ ____ __ _______ ___
4. A t temp t in g ot her arrests and t ransport in g prisoners __ _____ __________ __ ___
5. Invest igating s uspicious persons a nd
Total
Northeast
N orth
Central
11
19
22
6
58
21
4
8
13
8
33
12
15
12
13
15
55
20
6
10
57
Ji
84
30
11
South
W est
.N um ber
P ercent
circwns tances _______ __________ ___ _____
3
6
14
8
31
6. Berserk or deranged person (no wa rnin g-unprovoked attack) ______ ________ _
6
2
7
2
17
6
Total __ ___ ____ ____________ _______ ___
45
57
126
50
278
100
- --
In 1965 all b ut one of the 53 officers died from wounds inflicted by
firearms-32 were victims of handguns, 13 were killed by use of
shotguns and 7 by rifles. · Since 1960 firearms have been used in
96 percent of the murders of police officers in the line of du ty and of
those killed by firearms, 78 percent were m urdered with handguns.
Th e median period of police ser vice fo r officers slain since 1960 remain ed a t 6 years . Ten percent of the murdered officers had been
employed in law enforcement one year or less, 59 percent h ad 5 or
more years of police experience and almost one-third were veterans
of 10 years or more service.
Police officers on car p atrol contribu ted the h eaviest toll to those
murder ed in 1965 with a total of 37 deaths . This is typical of the
six-year period during which time 186 of the deceased officer were
assigned to car p a trols, 24 were on foot patrol, 48 were detectives or
were assigned du t ies of a specialized nature and 20 were technically
off duty. The la tter became involved in the incidents which resul ted
in their deaths by attempting to pre vent a crime occurring in their
presence.
During 1965, 27 of the officer s who died from criminal action were
being assisted at th e time of the incident by a fellow officer while 26
were alone . During the six years for which these fig ures have been
accumula ted 123 offi cers died while operating alone, whereas 155
were receiving assistance at the scene when they were killed.
35
�/
In studying police deaths in cit ies wher e depar t m ent policy is
n with respect to u se of one-nian p a trol car s , t w o-m an p atrol
l
-:nowOT combinations of 1 and 2-m an p a trol car s, 1t
. 1s
. f oun d t h a t s~
cars
t
officer s lost their lives in 69 cit ies over the 6-y ear sp a n un~er co usideration. Forty-five (52 percen t) of th ese m en w ere a ssig ned to
two-man car p atrols, while 42 (4~ percen t) were assigned to one-ma n
cars. In carr ying this analysis a s tep fur t her i t is found th at in 22
of th e 42 incidents where the p olice vic tim was assign ed t o a on e-m an
car the lone officer was receiving assistan ce fr om fell ow offi cer s a t
the' scene of the crime. It is thus de termined th at of the 87 death s,
officers were being aided at th e scene in 77 p er cen t of th e cases ai1d
were alone at the scene in 23 p er cen t of the cases . I n th ose cit ies
which u ed combin ations of 1 and 2-m an p atr ol car s t here wer e 36
mm·ders reported where th e officer s w er e en gaged in tw o-man car
oper ations and 25 where one-m an car s wer e in u se .
D uring 1964, the la test year for which figm es ar e available, th er e
was a slight 3 percent upward trend in th e number of ci ties u sing only
one-m an cars. T h ere w as a corresp ondin g 3 p er cen t d ecr ease in the
number of cities u sin g combination s of on e and tw o-,ma n cars . The
number of cities u~ing t:v_o-m an cars exclusively r emained at 5 p er cent
of the _to t al repor tm g c1 ties, unchan ged fr om th e preceding ye ar .
A table is presented this year whi ch indicates th e type of p olice
duty to whi?h_ m1~.rder e_d officer s were a ssign ed , as well a s the type
of police acti vi ty m whi ch t~ey wer e en gaged a t t h e t ime th ey w er e
murdered. These figm es disclo e th e highes t incidence of p olice
death s r esulted when th e law enforcemen t officer w h o were assio·ned
to one-m an p atrol car s attem p ted to m ak e arrests or transport ; ris. d.
oners. The second m ost fr equ ent set of circumstaiices s
.
urr oun 111 0·
th ese death s occun:ed am o13:g officer s assign ed to tw o-m an car p atr ol:
wh o_ were r esponding t~ di s t urb an ce calls including s u ch things as
family quarrels, m an wi th a g un , etc. This ca teo·or·y
f 11
d
.
o
w as o ow e
t 1
closely by death s of p olice officer s assio·ned to t,n 0 m
.
o
vv
an pa To cars
who ,~er e m a~ ng arrests or tr anspor ting priso ner s . It sh o uld b e
n oted m studym g these figm es th at as indica ted b
.
d to one-m an p atrol cars
'
·
officer s ass1gne
and foot a t ove
. l , m ~tny of. t. he
.
p a 1 0- w er e r ece1v1n ""o·
fl.ss1stance
on th e cene fr om fellow office-·s at th
i
e time of th e fa tal
attack s.
During th e six-year p eriod for which s tatis tics h ave b e
.
.
th ere h ave been 362 p erson s invol ved as off d
.
en marn tam ed
vVh en accoun t in g for th e e 362
,.
~n . ers rn the 278 m urd ers .
.
.
.
p
e1
on
s
,
it
is fo 1111d tlla t "'04
.
.
arrested 43 were slam Just ifiably b
0
\\.ele
1
,
y p o ice at th e tin1 f t1. . 'd
or shor tly th ereafter , 13 comm itted s u icide 1 d " e O ue m c1 enl
and 1 drowned b efore b ein o· t al-en 1· ' t
'
iecl a n atural d eath
i":"
t , o cus t ody.
36
�POLICE KILLED BY FELONS
BY TYPE O F PO LI CE ACTIVITY
1960-- 1965
58
21%
RESPONDING TO "DISTURBANCE• CALLS
(Fa m ily q uarrels, man w ith g un, etc.)
33
12% •
BURGLA RIES IN PROGRESS, OR
PURSUING BURG LARY SUSPECTS
ROBBERIES IN PROGRESS, OR PURSUING
ROBBERY SUSPECTS
A TT EMPTING OTHER ARRESTS AND
TRAN.SPO RTING PRISONERS
31
11 %
INVESTIG A TING SUSPICIOUS PERSO NS
A NO ClRCUMSTA NCES
17
6%
BERSERK OR DERANGED PERSONS
(No warning - unprovoke d attack)
278 POLICE KILLED
INCLUDES CITY, COUNTY, AND STATE_ POLICE
FBI CHART
Chart 9
Police Killed by Felons, 1960- 1965





'
T wom an
cars
- One-man...
cars
Foot
'
D etect ive
a nd special
assign1nen t
Off
d uty
Total
Alone
Assisted
28
9
7
4
8
2
12
12
1
1
7
0
33
JO
14
5
5
12
9
55
21
32
6
6
15
4
84
7
14
1
3
5
l
31
4
2
I.
5
1
4
17
82
•s 3
21
24
48
20
278
--I. R esponding to " distu rbance" calls __ _
2. Burglaries in progress, or pursuing
burglary suspects ____ _____ ______ ___
3. Robberies in progress, or pursuing
robbery sus pects __ ______ ____ _______
4. Attempl ing other a rrests and transporting prisoners __ _________ _____ ___
5. Investigating suspicions persons and
circumstances ____ ______ _______ _____
G. Berserk or deranged person (No
wa rni ng-unprovoked attack) ______
T otaL __________ __ ___ ___ ___ -- - - - -
58
- - - --- - - -- - - - ----- - - - - - -
•51 city police officers , 32 county an d state police officers.
When an examination is made of the prior criminal histories of
those involved, it is found that 76 percent had been arrested on
some criminal charge prior to the time they became p ar ticip an ts
in the police murders and, of even more significance, over one-half
of this group had been previously arrested for assaultive-type crimes
such as rape, robbery, as ault with a deadly weapon , assault with
intent to kill, etc. In fact, t he r ecords d isclo e 9 indiv iduals had
been charged on some prior occasion with an offense of murder .
37
�Seven of these had b een p aroled on_the m'.1rder_ char ge , one w as an
escapee h aving fled confinem ent_while ~~rvrng_trme for murder,_and
one was an escapee who fled while await m g trial for murder . Sixtyeio-ht per cent of t he 362 per sons wh o were resp onsib le are known
to have had prior convictions on criminal charges and m ore t h an
two-thirds of this group h ad received len iency in t h e form of p r obation or p arole on at least one of these convictions . 1\/fore t h an
1 of every 4 of t he m urd erer.s was on p arole or probation w hen h e
killed a police officer.
_
The murder ers of p olice officer s r anged in age from a b oy of 14
to a man of 73 . T he median age was 27. S eventeen of t h e sl ayer
were under 18 years of age at the t ime t hey commit ted t h e offen se ,
40 wer e in the 18- 20 year age group and 99 w ere in t h e 21-25 year
bracket. T wenty-two were over 50 years of age when t h ey m urder ed
a police officer and t h e h eaviest age con centration lies in the 20
to 30 age sp an with the highest frequ ency b ein g found at age 25 .
T he national r ate for assaults on law enforcement officers in 1965
was 10.8 assaults for every 100 officer s . While these assaults did
n ot always re~ult in p erson al injury to t h e officer -v ictim, in a pproxim at ely one-t ~rd of t ? ese assaults the officer d id suffer physical h ar m .
Fmther details r elatm g to assaults on p olice by geogr aphic division
and poptu atio~ group can b e found in T able 4 7 . B r iefly, t his t able
discloses the high est overall assault r ate was in t h e E as t S outh Cen tral
States with 18.3 a~suults p er ~00 p olice officers . This w as follow ed bv
the Sou th Atlant ~c States with a r ate of 17 .8, the 1\/fou n tain Stat;s


J.2.9, ~nd _t~e- P acific §~ates 10.8. The r ate in each of the o t her geographic divis10ns was slightly b elow t h e national aver age .


0
-~
38
�1Jjaw 1.Eufnrremeut Qlnhe nf 1.Etqtrn
i\.a a 11Jant 1.Ettfnrr:emeut ®ffir:er. m'I /undamenlal dut'I it1 lo


Jerve m a nkind; lo tia/effuard /ivetl and properl'I; lo prolecl lhe innocent affaintil


decep lion, lhe weak affaintil opp,·et1t1ion or inlimidalion, and lhe p eace/uf
affaintil violence or ditiorder; and lo retipecl lhe Contililulionaf riffhlt1 o/ all
m en lo hberl'J, e9ualil'I and jutilice.
II Will k eep m'I private li/e untiullied atl an example lo af/; mainlain couraffeoutl calm in lh e /ace o/danffer, :Jcorn, or ridicule; d evelop t1et/-ret1lrainl; and
be con:Jlan tf'I mind/u f o/ lhe wet/are o/ olhertl . ..JJonetil in lhouffhl and d eed
in bolh m'I pertlonaf a nd o//;.cial /i/e, .!J wilf be exempfar'I in obe'linff lhe fawtl
o/ lhe land and lhe reffu fa liontl o/ rn'I d ep arlmenl. Whalever .!} tlee or h ear o/
a con/;.denliafnature or lh at it1 confid ed lo me in m 'I o//;.cia f capacit'I will be
kep i ever tlecrel unlet1t1 revefalion it1 necetltlar'I in lhe p er/orm ance o/ rn'I dut'I.
II Utill n ever a cl o//;.ciou:Jl'I or permit f'er:Jonaf/ ee/in fj:J, preiudice:J, animo:Jilie:J or /,-ienclhip:J lo influen ce m'I d ecit1iont1. W ith n o comprom i:Je /or crim e
and wilh relentle:1t1 f'ro:J eculion o/ crimina£, .!} wifl en/orce lhe law courleoutl f'J
and approprialef'I without / ear or /avor, malice or ;// wifl, n ever empfo'linff
unnece:Jtlar'I /orce or violence and n ever acceplinff ffra lu iliet1.
II r:ernguii:e
.!} accepl ii a:i
th e badffe o/ m'I o//;.ce a" a "'lmt ol o/ public / auh, a nd
a p ublic lru:il lo be h efd :Jo fonff a:J
.!} am
lrue lo lhe elhic:J o/
lh e p o/ice :Jervice. .!} ~ill con:Jlantf'I :Jtrive lo achieve lhe:Je obieclive:i and idea£,
d edicalinff m'l:Jet/ be/ore (}od lo m 'I cho:ien pro/et1t1ion , . . law en/ orcem en l.
lnl.ernntion•I Au oci•l ion
(Jr
Chief, ol Po llo:•, Inc.
39
�~
-
Introduction
Background
The Uniform Crime R eporting Program is the outgrow th of a need
for a n ational and uniform compilation of police statistics. This
need was expressed by law enforcemen t executives m any years ago.
In 1930, crime reports were solicited from police depar tm en ts throughou t t he Nat ion b ased on uniform classifications and procedures
developed by the Committee on Uniform Crime Records of the
In tern a tion al Ass'ociation of Chiefs of P olice (IACP). In th at year
th e F ederal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), on request of the above
organiz ation, as urned the role as the national clearinghouse.
The Commi ttee on Uniform Crime R ecords, IACP , con tinues to
ser ve in an advisory capacity to the FBI in the oper ation of this
Program . The assistan ce of the Committee is especially valu able in
~ctively prom oting the qu ali ty of the repor ts supplied by the cooperating law enforcemen t agencies . In this connection , the Field Ser vice
Division of t he IAC P is also playing an active and effective p ar t in
quali ty con trol through surveys of police record and crime reporting
$ys tems . Dr. P eter P. L ejins, Professor , D epartmen t of Sociology,
U niversity of l\!Iaryland, con tinues as a consultan t to the FBI in t he
condu ct of this Progr am.
T he Committee on Unifo rm Crime R ecords at its April, 1965,
meeting reaffirm ed the purpose and obj ectives of the Uniform Crim e
R epor ting Program. Briefl y, the Committee approved a more
refin ed collection of robbery by type, a revision in the lar ceny classification , a special n ationwid e st1Tvey on sex offenses, restated its
position wi th r eo-ard to the defini tion of au to theft, and the form at
b
u tilized in th e publication of crime statistics .
The Commi ttee at the foregoing meeting and al o dur ing the
course of the Octo ber , 1965, m ee ting discus::;ed the need to fm ther subdi vide a numb er of the broad crim e chtssificat ions u tilized in the
Progr am . A detailed breakdown of lar ceny by type of tbef t was
developed and in troduced as a collection item beginning in J anu ary,
1966. While thi breakdown of the larceny cla sifi cation pro vides
for a better unders tanding of the natm e of this offen e, it will also
serve to iden tify types of theft which could be u tilized as a Crim e
Index category. The dollar valu ation of lar ceny as present!~ used
would be elimin ated in favor of a collec tion of lar ceny by type w1thou t
regard to the value of proper ty stolen . The experience gained from
-n
221- 746° - 66- 4
�th·
ationwide collection of larceny by type in 1966 wil~ gre~tly
1~ n · m akm· a- a d etermination with respect to t b1s crnne
assist m
b
classification.
·
.
. .
Committees on Uniform Crime Reportmg w1thm state l aw enfor?em en t associations are active in prov~ding service by p~·omotmg
in terest in the Uniform Crime Repor t mg. Progra~, fo ste~m~ more
·despread and more intelligen t u se of umform crrme s tat1st1cs and
WI
.
. .
by lending assistance to contnbutQr
s w h en t h e n ee d eJ,,..7.sts
Objectives
The fundamental objective of this Program is to produce a reliable
fund of nationwide criminal statistics for administrative and oper ational use of l aw enforcement agencies and executiv es. At the same
time, meaningful data is provided for other professionals with related
interests in the crime problem and for schol ar s, as well as to inform
the public of general crime conditions.
Specifically, the means utilized to attain t h ese goals are : ( 1) an
attempt is made .to measure the extent, fluctuation and distribution
of serious crime in the United States through the use of a C rime
Index consisting of seven selected offenses. This count is based on
these seven offenses being reported to the p olice or coming directly to
their attention . (2) The total volume of all types of criminal offenses
is compiled as they become known by police arrests. (3 ) Since the
above are also measures of l aw enforcement activity, r el ated data is
collected to demonstr ate eff.ectiveness of enforcement activit ies
available p olice str ength and significant factors invol ved in crime'.
Reporting Procedure
Under this natio~1al vol untary system each contribut ing law
enforcement agen cy 1s wholly responsible for compilino· its own ·
. .
"' sup 1· dcrime
r eports for su b m 1ss10n
toth e FB


I. Each contributor is


'th
.
C
.
R
.
H
P ie W1
the Umform n m
. e epor tmg andbook which outlin · d t ·1
.
d 1 . .
es in e a1 procedtll'es for scormg an c assifym 00 • offenses
The H db l ·11
.

oo;;:: 1 ustrates and discusses the monthly and annual report1· .an
f
ll
11
h
ng
orms,
as.- we
as the numerous ta y s eets made avail able to facilit t th
d'
tabnlation of the desired d ata.
a e
e peuo I C
The publication of the Uniform Crime Re ·t· . " r
· was 1mtiate
· · ·
d m
· October, 1963 has cont· POI lino"' . h . ewsletter ' "
which
In~lec wit issues being
Published when pertinent Thi "N, . 1
.
revisions in the ProoTam a · well as t ews
. etter"
. is utili,ze d t o exp1a1n
"' .
s o p1esent informat·
d. .
.
tional material to ass1 t contributor s.
ion an mstrucReco0·nizing that a sound records syst
·
.
.
reporting is to meet desirable standards th:;~s ~ece_s sary 1f cnme
of Police Recor<!s 1,o l aw enfor cement 0.'
.
I furm hes a l'VIanual
abenc1es upon request . Special
42
�Agents of the FBI are widely utilized to encomage new contributors
and to assist t hem by explaining t he procedmes and definitions
necessary under t his uniform system.
On a m on thly b asis, city police, sheriffs and state police report the
number of offenses that become known to them in the following crime
categories : criminal homicide, for cible r ape, robbery , assault, burglary ,
larceny, and au to theft . T his coun t is taken from a r ecord of all
complain ts of crimes received by the police from victims or other
sources or discovered by the police in their own operations . Complain ts determined by police investigation to be unfounded are eliminated from t his count. The number of "offenses known" in these
crime _categories is r eported to t he FBI without regard to whether
anyone is arr ested , stolen pr operty is recovered, local prosecu tive
policy , or any other consideration. Police agen cies repor t . on a
monthly basis the total numbe_r of these crimes which they clear by
arrest and, separately , the crim es cleared by the arres t of persons
under 18 year s of age. P olice additionally r eport certain other
analytical data pertaining to specific crime ca_~egories, including total
arrest m ade for t he month for all criminal acts sep arated as to adult s
and juveniles .
In annu al r epor ts, " offenses known" data and clearances by arrest
are summarized by t he con tributors. Annual form s provide a repor t
of persons arrested for all criminal offenses with respect to age, sex
and race of the offender , as well as an accoun ting of the number of
persons formally charged and their disposition . P olice employee data
a.re collected annually, including the number of police killed and
assaulted.
Reporting A rea
During the calendar year 1965, crime repor ts were received from
law enfor cement agencies repr esen ting 97 percen t of the total Uni ted
States population living in s tandard me tropolitan st atistical area ·,
89 percent of the population in other cities, and 75 percen t of t he
rural population . The combined coverage account for 92 percent
of the national population .
Pre entation of crime data by area as used in this publication
follows as closely as practical the definitions u ed by the Bmeaus of
the Budget and Census for standard metropolitan s tatistical areas and
other cities. There is, however , some devia tion insofar as the rmal
area i concerned. For crime repor ting purpo es r ur al is generally t he
unincorporated portion of a coun ty ou tside of st andard metropolitan
stalistical areas. In addition, sheriffs' dep ar tmen ts or st ate police
agencies frequently provide cover age for m all in corporated com munities which do not provide t heir own p olice ser vice. These places
43
�' ..
are characteristically more rural t h an urban , t hus t he crime counts
for these places are included in the rural tabulations . In addition,
statistics are pr esented in certain t ables r elat ive to " suburban". areas .
A suburb an area consists of cities wit h 50,000 or less popula t10n too-ether with coun ties which lie within a standard metr opolitan statisti~al area. I n this use of suburban t he core city experience is , of
course, excluded . T he subm·ban .area con cept is u sed b ecause of t h e
peculiar crime conditions which exist in t hese communit ies surrounding the major core cit ies. These metropolitan areas are n ot rur al in
nature, yet neither are they compar able to lar ge cit ies al though they
h ave many of t he problems identified with t he latter .
Standard metropolitan statistical areas are generally m ade up of an
entire county or counties having at least one core city of 50 ,000 or
mor e inh abitants, wit h t h e wh ole meeting the requirements of certain
metr op olitan char acteristics. I n New Engl and , "town" in stead of
"county" is used to describ e st and ard metrop olitan stat istical areas.
These towns do not coincide gener ally wit h established crime r eporting units; t h erefor e, metrop olitan stat e economic areas in New
E ngland are used in this area tabul ation since they en comp ass an
entire county or counties. Stand ard metropolit an stat istical areas
mal~e up an estimated 67 p ercent of the total United States population .
Other cities are urb an places outside standard metrop olitan statistical areas. Most of these places of 2 ,500 or more inhabitants ar e
inc_orporated and co~ prise 12.6 percent of the 1964 estimated p opu lat10n: Rura_l areas are made up of t he unincorporated p or t ion of
counties outside of m·b an places and standard m etrop olitan statistical
areas a:1d repr:sent 20.4 _Percent of ou r n ~t ion al p opul ation. T h r ough out this Progr am, sheriffs, county poh ce and m an y st ate p 1·
.
. d . hin
o ice report on crimes committe wit
the limits of t h e count 7 b t
. ·d
· ·
hil

.
.


, u ou ts1 e


c(1tibes, w 1 e p)o ice r eport on crimes committed wit hin the city lim its
ur an p aces .
Verification P rocesses
Uniformity of crime d ata collected under this p
.
·
.
O w ·.1s of
concern to t he F B I as t h e nation al clearino·hol rooram
. pn n,ary
.
1th t h e r eceipt
of reports coverino·0 approximatelv 8 000 . 0 • _ts~ .
.
. d on a
voluntary b asis,
the problems Jof , tt · ]Urisd1ct1on
. .
. s , .pr ep a1e
.
a
auu
n
g
uniformit
r
.
.
d" l
apparent. I ssu ance of m struction s does not
1 . J aie I ea i Y
F BI. On the cont r ary it is standai·d
, .. comp et e the r ole of the
pro d . .
.
.
.
.
'
op e1 atmo·
.6
ce lUe t o ex amin e
each m commg r eport n ot only for a·'th
metical
ace
.
b
.
.
n
and possibly of even m or e impor tan ce for ,
b ur acy ut a1so ,
'
r easona leness as a p o sible
indication of errors.
Variations in the level an d r atios amon o· th ,·
by previous reports of each agency ar e ~sede ~run e classe est ablis? ed
as a n, easlU·e of J)ossible
4-!
�or probable incompleteness or ch anges in repor ting policy. Necessary
ari thmetical adjustmen ts or un usual vari ations are brough t t o the
attention of the submitting agency by correspondence . Dming 1965
17, 101 letters were addressed to contributor s primarily as a result of
,·erific at ion and evalu ation processes. Corresp onden ce wit h contri but ors is t he principal tool for super vision of qu ality. N ot only
are the individ ual reports studied, but also periodic t rends for indi,·idual reporting units are prep ared , as are crim e r ates in descending
or der for all un its gro uped for general com p arability to assist in detecting vari ations and fl uctuation s possibly due to some reason other
than chance. For the most p art, the problem is one of keeping t he
contributors informed of the type information necessary to the success
of this Program.
The elimin at ion of duplication of crime repor t ing by th e various
agen cies is given constant attention. In addition to detailed instrirctions as to the limits of repor ting jurisd ictions between heriffs and
police in urban places, lis ts of urban places by county are furnish ed to
sheriffs, county police, and in some in stan ces state police organ izations .
Uniform Crime R eportin g h as been taugh t to all law enfo rcement
officers attendin g the FBI N ation al Academ y. Th e Academy was
establish ed in 1935, and there are 2,972 gradu a tes wh o are s till in law
enfo rcemen t , over 27 percent of whom are th e execu t ive heads of
law enforcemen t agen cies . Th e FBI al so presents this subj ec t t o
region al police sch ools t hroughou t the countr y.
Con tact by Special Agents of the FBI are 11tilized to enlist th e
<:ooper a tion of new contribu tors an d to eJq>lain the purpose of this Program and th e methods of. assembling inform a tion for repor tin g. Wh en
corresponden ce, in cludin g specially designed ques tionnaires, fails,
~pecial Agents may be d irected to visit th e contributor to affir matively
resolve the m isunderstan ding.
Variations from the desired rep or tin g s tandards which cannot b e
re,;olved by the steps ind icated above are brought to th e attention of
the Comm ittee on Un iform Crime R ecords of th e I ACP. The CommiLLee may designate a representative to make a personal vi it to the
local department to assist in the n eeded revision of record and
reporting methods .
It is clear, of course, that regardless of the extent of the s tatis t ical
verification processes used by th e F BI , the accm acy of the data as:;em bled under this P rogr am depen ds up on the degree of sin cere effort
exerted by each contributor to m eet the n ece sar y standards of
reporting and, for this reason, the F BI is not in a position to vou ch
for the validity of Lhe reports received .
45
�The Crime Tota ls
Communities not represented by crime r epor ts are rel a t ively few ,
as discussed previously and as shown b y an examin ation of th e table_s
which follow presenting 1965 cr ime to tals for the I ndex of Crime classifications . The FBI conducts a ce:m tinuing p r ogr am to further r edu ce
the un r epor ted areas .
Within each of th e three areas-stand ar d metr op olitan stat istical ,
other urb an, and rur al - it is assumed that the unreported portion
had th e same proportionate crime exp erience as th at for which reports
were r eceived. In lieu of figures for the entire year from those
agencies, repor ts for as many as 9 months were accepted as sufficien tly
representative on which to b ase est im ates for the year . Estim ates
for um·eported areas are b ased on the r eported crime experience of
similar areas within each state. Cer tain refinements are made of this
b asic estimating procedure as t h e need arises .
Crime Trends
Crime d ata for tr ends are homogeneous to th e extent t h at fio·ures
from identical r ep orting units are u sed for each of the p eriods rabul ated. E xclusions are m ade when figures from a repor tin o- unit ar e
ob viously inaccur ate for any p eriod or when it is a scert: ined th at
unusu al fluctu ations are due to su ch var i ables as improv ed r ecor d
·procedures and not t o ch an ce.
As a matter of stand ar d proce_dure, crime trends for individu al pl aces
are analyzed by the FBI five tim es a y e ar . Any significan t incre ase
or decrease is made the su?J~ct of a speci al inquiry wit h t he contrib uting agencr
Whenever _1 t l S foun~ th at crime repor ting procedures
are responsible
for the
.
. difference m le,Tel of crime , t h e fi gures f or
specific cn me c ategones or t ota~s ar e excluded from t h e t r end tabu l ations. On the oth er h and, crime rate tables b y state and t d ·d
·
· t· 1
·
s an ar
metropoh tan statis ica ar ea contam the m ost r eliable rep or ts available
for the current ye ar, and car e sh ould be exer cised in anv d. , t
.
. .
Ch
J
u ec comor issues.
an ges in crime level m . h
b
p arisons with pn
·
d
·
ay ave een
du e in part to improve reportmg or r ecords proced l'.u" es r. ath er t h an
to chance.
Population Data
In computing crime r ates by state o-eoo-raphi d. . .
ul .
. ' :::. :::.
c iv1sion and the
.
h 1
N ation as a w o e, p op ation estimates r eleased b
.h '
t he Cer_is:1s on ~':gu st 27, 196~ , were u sed . Po : 1 t _e Bm~au .of
for individual cities and counties wer e pr e , dp b atioi: estimates
Y us:1Ilg Speci al
Census R eports, state so urces an d estimat pare
and extrapol ation wher e no oth er estimate , es, coi?mercial sources,
_1

·
f" .
va avml able
Co
1t
1965 poprnation
estimates or mdi vidual cities
d

mp e e
an counties were nsed
46
�from 14 st ates while official som ces in other states provided limited d ata
which was used selectively . The estimat ed United St ates population
i~crease in 1965 was 1.3 per cen t over 1964 according to figmes published by the Bureau of th e Census.
Classification of Offenses
A stumbling block to a unifor m national crime repor ting system in
the United States r esults from vari ations in definitions of criminal
violations among the states. This obst acle, insofar as uniformity of
definitions is concerned , was removed by the adop tion of an arbitrary
set of crime classifications. T o some extent the title of each cl~ssification connotes in a general way its content. However , in r eadi1w the
explanation of each category, it is very important to keep in minci'th at
because of t he differences among the state codes ther e is n o possibility
in a system su ch as t his to distinguish between crimes by design ation s
such as "felony" and "misdemeanor."
A continuing progr am is cari-ied out to furnish contributors with
timely supplemental instructions as t h e need arises in certain classifications. These are aimed at the clarification of any misunderstandings which may arise and the redirection of attention to the proper
application of classification procedmes under this system .
Brief definitions of crime classification s utilized in this P rogram are
H ted below :
1. Criminal homicide.- (a) Mmder and nonnegligent man. laugh.:
t er : all willful felonious homicides as distinguished from death s
caused by negligence. Excludes attempts to kill, as aults to kill,
suicides, accidental deaths, or justifiable homicides. Justifiable homicides are limited to : (1) the killing of a person by a peace officer
in line of duty; (2) the killin o- of a person in the act of committing a
felony by a privat e citizen. (b) Manslaughter by negligence : any
death which t he police investigation establishes was primarily attributable t o gross negligence of some individual other than the victim .
2 . Forcible rape. - Rape by force, assault to rape and attempted
rape. Excludes statutory offenses (no force used - victim un der
age of con sent).
3. Robbery. - Stealing or taking anything of value from the person
by for ce or violence or by putting in fear , such as strong-arm robbery,
st ickups, arm ed robbery, assault to r ob , and attempt to rob.
4. Aggravated assault. - Assault with intent to kill or for the purpose of inflicting severe bodily injury by shooting, cutting, stabbing,
maiming, poisoning, scalding, or by t he use of acids, explosives, or
other means. Excludes simple assault, assault and b attery, fighting,
etc.
5. Burglary-breaking or entering. - Burglary, housebreaking,
safecrackin g, or any unlawful entry to commit a felony or a the£ t,
47
�even thouo-h no force was used to g ain entrance and attempts . Burglary follo~ed by lar cen y is not counted again as l arceny.
6. Larceny- theft (except au to theft).-(a) Fifty dollars and over
in va.lue; (b) under $50 in value. Thefts of bicycles, automobile accessories, sh oplift ing, p ocket-picking, or any stealin g of property or
ar ticle of value which is n ot taken b y force and v iolence or by fraud.
Excludes embezzlement, "con" games, forgery , worthless check s , etc .
7 Auto theft .-Stealing or drivin g away and aband oning a motor
vehicle. E xcludes taking for temporary u se when actually returned
b y the taker or unauthorized use b y those having l awful access to the
vehicle.
8. Other assaults.-Assaults and attempted assaul ts which are not
of an aggravated nature.
9 . Arson.- Willful or malicious burning with or without in tent to
defraud , Includes attempts.
10. Forgery and countedeiting.-Making , altering, uttering or
possessing, with intent to d efraud , anything false which is made to
appear true. Includes attemp ts.
11. Fraud .-Fraudulent conversion and ob taining money or prop -
erty by false pretenses.
counterfeiting.
Includes b ad checks except foro·eries and
0
12. Embezzlement.-Misappropriation or misapplication of money
or property entrusted to one's care, custody or control.
13. Stolen property; buying, receiving,
possessino-.-Buyino·
0 '
receivin g, and possessing stolen proper~y and att~mp ts . 0
. 14. Vandalism.-Willful or malicious destruction 1·n·
d"
..
.
,
Jury,
1sfigurement or _defacement of property without consent of the owner
or person havmg custody or control.
15. We apons; carrying, possessing, etc.-All v iol at·
f
.
·
ions • o . reou
1at10n
or sta t u t·es contro 11·me; t b e carryino· us m· 0 •


=' 0 ,


· ·
·
· of deadly weapons
o, possessino· fur 0 '
rnshmg,
an d manu f acturmg
il
'
or s en cers and
a tt emp ts .
16. Prostitution and comn:iercialized vie
-S _
commercialized nature and attemp ts such a e.
e~ o~enses of a
s
b awdv house, procuring, transp ortin:· or d ts ?~o t itution , keeping
"' '
e a1n1no·
·
moral- purposes.
o w 01nen f·or im17 . Sex offenses (except for cible r ape

.
ciali zed vice) .-Statutory r ape ofl'e
' pr~s ·it u t ion , and comm er'
n ses ao·a1n t ch t" t
as i Y, co1nm on
decency, morals, and the like. Includes att0
. .
.
.
empts .
18. Na1cot1c d1ug laws.- Offen ses r elat· .
.
as unlawful possession, sale or u se Ex 1 ldng tFo n arco tic drugs, s uch
" c u. es 'ed er al off en ses .
·
· n i tti·
19. Ga1nhling.Promotin o· p en
0

ng,d or en Oo·ao··
· gan1 bl.m g.
20 . Offenses agains
t the ' fan iil
,,,tng. 111
·
Y an
child ·
N
d
neglect, e ert1on, or abu e of fanuly a nd childreu~en. - on s up p or t ,
48
�---
-
-
---


21. Driving under the influence.- Dri ving or operating any motor
vehicle while drunk or under the influence of liquor or narcotics.
22. Liquor laws. -State or local liquor law violations, except
"drunkenness" (class 23) and "driving under the influence" (class 21) .
Excludes Federal violations.
23. Drunkenness. -Drunkenness or intoxication.
24. Disorderly conduct.- B reach of the peace.
25. Vagrancy .-Vagabondage, begging, loitering, etc.
26. All other offenses.- All violations of state or local laws except
classes 1-25.
27. Suspicion .-Arrests for no specific offense and released withou t
form al charges b eing placed .
28. Curfew and loitering Jaws (juveniles).- 0:ffenses relating to
Yiolation of local curfew or loitering ordinances where such laws exist.
29 . Runaway (juveniles).-Limited to juveniles taken into ·protective cu s tody under provisions of local statu tes as runaways.
49
�The Index of Cri1ne, 1965
I n this section, tabulations are shown to indicate the probable
extent, :fluctuation and distribution of crime for the United States
as a whole , geographic divisions, individual states and standard
metropolitan statistical areas . T he meastu-e u sed is a Crime Index
consisting of seven important offenses which are counted as they
become known to the law enforcement agencies . Crime classifications
used in the Index are : murder and nonnegligent 11.1.ansl aughter, for cible rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary-breaking or entering ,
larceny $50 and over, and auto theft.
The total number of criminal acts that occur is unknown, but those
that are reported to the police provide the first means of a count.
Not all crimes come readily to the attention of the police ; not all
crimes are of sufficient importance to be significant in an index; and
not all important crimes occur with enough regularity to be meaningful
in an index. With these considerations in mind, the above crimes
were selected as a group to furnish an abbreviated and convenient
meas me of the crim.e problem.
It is important to remember in reviewing the tabl es in this section
that the volume of crime in a state or standard metropolitan s t atistical area is subject to the factors set forth on page vii . Estimates
of cmrent permanent population are used to construct crime rates .
With our highly mobile population all communities, metropolitan
areas and states are affected to a greater or lesser deoTee b"'r the el
t
.
Th. f




,






.;
emen
of transient poptil at10n.
1s actor is not accounted for in crime
·rates since no reliable estimates are avail able nationwide.
50
---
�Table 1.-fndex of Crime, Uni te d S t ates, 1965
Area
P opu lation
T ota l
offenses
United States Total. _____ ____ _____________________ ___ ___ ___
193, BIB, 000
2,780, 01 5
I, 434. 3
R ate per 100,000 inha bitantS- - --------------- -- - ----- - ------ --- ---- --Stan dard Metro politan Statistical Area ________ ___ _________
129,790, 000 ___ __ ______ _
Area actuall y reportin g ' -- ------ - --------------- - - - --07. 4%
2, 268, 555
Esti mated tota L ___ ___ ______ ______ ___ ___ _______ ___ ___
100. 0%
2, 312,35 1
R ate per 100,000 inha bitants-- --- - --- -- -- -- - ---- ----- - __ __ ___ _________
1, 7 I. 5
Other Cities ___ __ _--- - ---- --- - ---- --- --- ---- --- - ---- -- -- - -24, 338, 000 - -- -- ______ _
Area act uall y reporti ng _________ __ __ ___ ___ ___ ___ ______
. 5'.zl,
21 5, 748
E stimated total.. _______________ _______ ___ ______ ___ ___
100. 0'1o
242,345
R ate per 100,000 inh abi ta nts-- -- ---- - ----------------- - -- -- -- --------99.5. 7
RuraL--- --- - - ____ ________ - ___ ____ ____- - -- --- - - --- - -- - -- - 39,684,000 __ ___ ___ ___ _
Area actuall y reporting___ ______ ______ ______ __________
75.0%
173, 730
Estimated total.. ________ __ _____ ____ ___ ___ _________ ___
100. 0%
225, 319
Rate per 100,000 inha bitants- --: - ---- - ----- - - ------ - -- - --- - ----- - ----567. 8
J\I urder
nnd nonnegligent
manslaughter
Forcible
r ape
Robber y
Aggravated
assa ult
Larcen y
Burglary
S50 an d
Auto
t heft
over
9, 850
5. 1
22,467
II. 6
11 8,9 16
6 1. 4
206, 661
106. 6
I, 173, 201
605. 3
762, 352
393. 3
486, 568
251. 0
6, 801
6, 978
5. 4
17, 408
17,844
13. 7
10 ,682
LIO, 623
85. 2
155, 479
158,843
122. 4
937, 583
956, 038
736. 6
615,031
627,054
483. 1
426, 671
434,971
335. I
71 6
85 1
3. 5
1,170
I, 317
5. 4
3,051
4,433
18. 2
17,4 12
_20, 435
84. 0
07, 106
109,12 1
448. 4
65, 950
73,408
301. 6
20, 443
32, 780
134. 7
2, 021
5. 1
3, 306
8. 3
27, 383
69. 0
108, 042
272. 3
6 1, 890
156. 0
18, 8 17
47. 4
---12-- ----- --2,786

--- --- --- --- -- ----- ---- - ------ ----- - ----- -- --------------- -------2,4
14, 722
I, 296
48, 8 16
17, 684
86,0 19
3, 860
9. 7
1 The percentage re presenting area actuall y reporting will not coin cide wi t h t he ra tio betwee n reported nnd estim ated crime totals since these data represent t he sum of t he
calculations for indiv idual states whi ch have varying populati ons, porti ons reportin g and crimo rntes .
Popul ation by area for each state is 1965 estimate; tota l population for each stat.a is B ureau of tho Census provisional estimate as of J nl y 1, 1965, and subject to change . All
rates were calculated on t he estimated population before rounding.
o,
......
�I
Table 2.- Inde x of Cri m e by R e gions ,
[N u mber a n d r ate per 100,000 inhabitants ;
Murder and
n onnegl igent
m a n s la u ghter
Total offen ses
Area
Year P op ulat ion 1 i - - ---,------
1-
Forcible rape

,----- -- - - ~ - ----,- 1
1
N umber Rate per Num ber R a te per Number R a te per
- - - - -- -
1---1-- - - - -.-- - -
1-
1964
191, 818,
334, 000
223
United States Total ' - - - - - 1905
193
000 2,
2, 614,
780,015
P ercentchange __ ___________ __ __~-+ 6. 3
Northeast ___ _- - - --- - -- - - 1964 _ 47, 125,000
1965
4 7, 526, 000
587, SGI
636,929
P ercen tchange _____ _ _j 964 -- -il,070,000
130,030
+ s. 3
New England ______ __ _ 1965
11, 159, 000
140,067
100,000
100,000
100,000
- - - - - ---
I. 366.
I,
434. 33
+5. 0
9, 850
249
9,
+6. 5
4.
5. 8I
+6. 3
20,
551
22,467
+9.3
10.
IL 67
+8. :._
1, 24 7_ 4
I , 341. 0
1, +1.
174. 56
1,255.2
1, 607
l , 693
+ 188
5. 1
235
3. 4
3. 6
l.7
+ 5. 9
2. J
3, 745
4,052
62:l
--t-s.
2
556
7. 9
8. 5
5.G
+ 7. 6
5.0
+6.9
1, 120.6
1,
175.1
671. 80
680.
+25. 0
49
46
- 10. 8
152
148
-10. 7
5. 52
5.
15
21
+ 23.5
1. 86
1.
L 5
2.1
i7
43
7. 8
4.3
1,375_ 7
1, 507.3
546. 0
105
129
6
2. 0
2. 4
_9
320
290
25
6.0
5.4
3.8
Percen tcha nge____ ___
t
1964
Connrcticu --- - ----- 1965
1964
J\1Rin e _________ _____ 1965
2
766 000
2: sa2:
ooo
989,000
993,000
3+
0,7
9.967
33, 277
6, 644
6,752
Massach use tts --- - - N ewHampsh ire __ __
1964
1965
11996645
5, 338,000
5,348,000
654,000
73, 440
80,610
3, 571
Rhode Island__ ___ __ 11996045
669,000
914,000
4,084
13,
278
610. 5
1,452.8
18
11
2. 72
1.
, 7ermon t ------ - -- - -- 1964
1965
920, 000
409,000
397.000
13,044
2,
101
2.300
1,417. 9
513.7
579.4
19
22
2. 1
.5
.5
14
2
5
35
24
26 1
2._7l
2
3.8
5.9
6.5
M iddle Atlantic____ ___ 11906654 i- "".3:;:6;-,;::
05:;;5;-,;;;
oo;;o~ - 4;5;;:7;-,;;:
83;;1~ -;-1-, ;;:26;;9;--_;;:
87r-:;-1,-:4:;-1:::
9i - - : : 3:-:_9::"i--::-, '.".::":'."'i'- '-"'.:-":
_
3 122
89. 67
36,367,000
496, 862 l , 3fi7. 4
l , 458
4. O
3, 49fi
5
Percent
change
__
+
s.
+
2.
7
+
2.
6
+12.
0
+
10.
+
7.
7
New Jersey _______ :_ 1964
6,682,000
91, 637 1,371. 4
207
3. J
_3
0
ew Yor k --- - - ----- 1964
1965
P ennsylvan ia _______ 1964
1965
6,774,000
17,915, 000
18,073,000
11 ,459,000
29684,, 61210!
290,647
_19181,. 0 74
604
1,396.6
1,496.6
1,60
.2
85,5. 9
2 19
833
833
379
3. 2
4.6
4. 6
3 _3
Nort h ContraL ________ _ 1964
1965
11. 520,000
53,370,000
657,515
968;!:
1,232.0
406
1,846
1965
54, 014,000
4, s 5, ooo
8,098. 000
Ohio ________ _______ _ 1965
1964
Wiscons in ________ __ _ 1965
1964
10,
8,218,000
100,000
142,.563
102, 10
l , 269. 6
3- 1
1,307. 9
l , 339. 3
+ 2. 4
1,112. o
1,613.1
1 166 o
1' 211· 9
1,537. 2

·
1,
l , 734.8
01I. O
2, 009
+ s. 8
1,396
l 510
-t-8.2
572
551
1955
Michigan____ __ ____ _ 19f:4
685, 720
+ 4. 3
492, 008
510, 720
+ ~- 8
179,631
171,
69!
56,264
59,493
124,486
3. 5
3_
5
3. 7
+5. 7
3_ 7
4 O
+ 8· 1
·
55· 52
N
change ___ ___
- -E Percent
t Nort h Central
1964
37,619,000
as
-- - 1965
38,137, 000
Percentchange ____ __1-9-64-- - 10, 409, 000
Ill
ois
o
1.11 - - - -- ----- ---- - 1965
10,644,
000
Ind iana _____ ___ _____ 1964
4, 825,000
1965
West North Central_ - 19r 19 5
Percent change ____ - i 964
I owa __________ __ ___ _ 1965
K ansas ___ ____ __ ____ _ 1064
mt
l!J65
M innesota __ __ __ __ __
Missou ri _______ ___ __ 1964
+
145
171
269
350
358
3 0
3 3
3.
-5
4.4
3. 5
6 9
605
1,
1, 507
i72
l ,OOG
1. ll9
,
5 59
6, 387
+14_ 1
,
228
44 905
+ ie o
1 ' 569'
l , 06
7
56
l, 4
466
358
1, 669
721
915
9 1
8. 9
8.
9. 84
_
8 8
9. 7
_
10
l I. 85
+12. 4
I.
1I ? 92
+
·
l15 ·· 2
5 00
16.
o._5
9. 8
5
16
20._3
7 1
3- 6
8. 9
1 5
4,144,000
30, '16.5
737. 6
64

124
3. 0
_6
1, 050. 8
450 t - - ~
2.-~5+-:-g
l , ~70
u:™~ooir 165,507
ios~~"i:~is1i- :~
~14~9~ - ~
3~89. 37
,>,
,
17i99} 1, 102.2
499
3 1
1.482
2 756 ooo
17 g?4
+10. 9
+n: 9
+ s ?
+ o 9
2:100:000
1~:498
706: 5
1.3
137
5: o
2, 225, 000
21, 480 ·
96.5. 4
l. 3
123
4. 5
75
2, 234, 000
22, 261
996. 5
3. 4
246
1 I. I
60
10,245,
000
4,107,000
106,417
29, 519
~~· ~%•888
~:~~:888
4,409, 000
rn~~
tJ ~
cb raskn ___ __ __ ___ _
Nortl1 Dakota__ _____ 1964
South Dakota__ _____ 1965
I 964
366
60
~g


g::r Ugo:1


ii
5
240
300
67, 77
l::1~;888 gJ~6
1065
1,038.7
718. 7
1, 539_
m::
4,497, ooo
72, 0.59
1, 0 02. 5
645, 000
3,567
553.
652,
715, 000
000
3,271
4, 624
0
501.
546 _7
7
632. 4
i4
6
6
6
i
U
fgi
l.4
186
ii. 2
5. 4
8~~
1a. o
2. 4
76
\ :
5_1
45
33
7. O
5.
1
u
.. 9
9
661
ti
~
j ir-:;-;:;;+-~1~-f~i "i--:~4~8l.+.-_j6:J.s
1965
703, 000
4,44 5
9
south _ ____ - _- - - - -- -- 1964 1-~5~9~.~
- 6~2~
,~
oo~o~~73~2~.~38
~7;"j~1~23~6 0
-- - 1065
60,049, 000
759, 982 1' 255·
Percent change
___ ___ 3
SouthAtl ant ,c ___
1961
1965
Percent change__ __
D elaware __ __ ____ ___ 1964
·1905
_ ----
28, 311, 000
28,714, 000

491, 000
505,000
, ·ee fo otnotes a t e ncl or tabl e .
52
+a. s
37 .392
398,900
+s. 4
6, 339
6, 502
'+<>· ~

1 33 5
1'389· ;,
' + 3 · jj
1
·
29 1. 0
1 • 28
, 7. o
l
4, 5 77
4, 797
,
1
~, ;,
2 420
+4.6
~l
2L
26
l. 3
39
5. 5
7. 7
G. 06 1
r; _469
+ n. 7
2, 859
a . 203
+ 15.,
·3G'
30
10. 2
10. s
+5. 9
JO.I
11. 5
+
"
I 3·
5.
3
7. 9
8. O
+ a. 9
.2
8. 4
+ '> 4
4-.- 3
_
5 1
~
'





�Geograp h ic Div isions and States, 1964- 65 ·
percent change ove r 1964]
Aggravated
assault
Robbery
B urglary
Larceny $50
and over
N umber R ate per Number R ate per N umber R ate per N u mber
100,000
100,000
100,000
Au to theft
R ate per N um ber
R ate per
100,000
100,000
---111, 753
118, 916
+6. 4
58. 4
61. 4
+s. 1
20,971
23, 712
+13. 1
2,343
2,964
+ 20.5
414
546
44. 5
49. 9
+1 2.1
21. 2
26. 6
+ 25 . .5
15. 0
19. 3
7. 6
4. 0
30. 6
40. 0
6. 6
6. 9
17, 7
19. 0
3. 2
4. 5
75
40
1. 636
2,139
43
46
162
175
13
18
101. 8 1, 110, 458
106. 6 1, 173, 201
+4.7
+ s. 1
580. 4
605. 3
+ 4. 3
704, 536
762, 352
+ s.2
75
78
380
493
50
43
76. 9
84. 7
+ 10.1
40. 4
43. 6
+ 7. 9
41. 9
43. 5
31. 0
30. 4
46. 8
50. 7
11. 5
I I. 7
41. 6
53. 6
12. 2
10.8
229, 262
245, 024
+ 6. 9
55, 010
58,044
+ 5. 5
J,J , 713
15,959
3, 248
3, 54 1.
28, 278
29,655
I , 827
2, 11 7
5, 880
5, 486
I , 064
I. 286
486. 5
515. 9
+ a. a
496. 9
520. 2
+ 1. 7
531. 9
563. 5
328. 1
3.56. 6
529. 7
554. 5
279. 3
316. 5
643. 4
596. 4
2fi0. 1
324. 0
172, 013
186, 488
+ 8.4
32,595
33,904
+ 4.0
, 793
9, 188
I. 868
1,9 11
16,470
17, 152
1,046
I , 224
3. 876
3, 93
542
· 536
88. l
97. 4
+J0. 6
87. 2
86. 3
104. 4
117. 5
63. l
72.0
174, 252
186, 9SO
+ 7. 3
40, 143
42, ll 3
90,277
97, 23,5
43,832
47. 632
483. 3
514. 6
+ 6. 5
600. 7
621. 7
503. 9
538. 0
382. 5
41 3. 5
139, 4 18
152,584
+9. 4
22, 11 5
194, 705
206, 661
+6. 1
- - - - - -- 36,230
40, 239
+11 . 1
4,468
4,861
+ 8. 8
I, 158
l , 233
307
302
2, 498
2, 71 2
18,628
20, 748
+ll. 4
3,812
3, 753
9,829
11,073
4,987
5. 922
+10. 4
57. 0
55. 4
54. 9
61. 3
43. 5
51. 4
31, 762
35,378
+ 11 . 4
5, 828
5,845
18, 701
21, 238
7,233
8. 295
40. 675
41. 397
+1.8
34 . 081
34,459
+1.1
19.123
17. 535
2. 731
2. 731
7. 113
8.432
4. 663
5. 286
451
475
76. 2
76. 6
+.5
90. 6
90. 4
- .2
182.3
164. 8
56. 6
55. 9
87.8
102. 6
46. 2
51. 6
II. 0
11. 5
43,919
45, 425
+ 3.4
35, 186
35. 733
+ 1. 6
15, 652
14,553
2,977
3, 067
9,582
10. 669
5. 848
6,221
l, 127
1. 223
82. 3
84. 1
+ 2. 2
93. 5
93. 7
+. 2
149. 2
136. 7
61. 7
62. 8
118.3
129. 8
57. 9
60. 7
27. 4
29. 5
269,955
282, 727
+4. 7
192, 193
201 , 832
+5. 0
57, 416
58,566
23,962
25/ 245
51,990
57,951
47, 100
48, 199
11, 725
11. 871
505. 8
523. 5
+ 3.5
510. 9
529.3
+ 3.6
547. 4
550.3
496. 6
516. 8
642. 0
705. 2
466. 3
_470. 5
285. 5
286. 5
170. 239
175, 74 1
+ 3. 2
126,601
128, 260
+ 1. 3
42, 744
38, 342
15,628
16,343
33, 163
37. 183
24,901
25. 971
10, 165
10. 42 1
6,594
6,938
+5.2
310
354
623
537
I. 285
1. 433
3, 955
4.195
306
324
56
30
59
65
41. 9
43. 7
+4.3
11. 2
12.8
28. 0
24. 0
36. 5
40. 3
89. 7
93. 3
20. 7
21. 9
8. 7
4. 6
8. 3
9. 2
8, 733
9. 692
+n.o
525
554
1,629
1, 591
I, 108
1,405
4,697
5,281
351
416
122
154
301
291
55. 4
61. 0
+10. 1
19. 0
20. 1
73. 2
71. 2
31. 5
39.5
106. 5
117. 4
23. 7
28. 2
18. 9
23. 6
42. 1
41.4
77, 762
80,895
+4. 0
8, 004
8, 398
9,626
JO, 443
18,833
18,853
33, 051
34 , 311
4. 832
5. 684
1, 546
1, 348
1,870
l. 858
493. 7
509. 5
+ 3.2
200. 4
304. 3
432. 6
467. 5
534. 9
530. 5
749. 6
763. 0
326. 5
384. 8
239. 7
206. 8
261. 5
264. 3
26,045
27. 406
+5.2
14. 434
16.161
+12.0
196
277
44. 0
45. 6
+3.6
51. 0
,56. 3
+10.4
39. 9
54. 9
79, 940
84. 408
+s.6
44,758
47,610
+6.4
183
142
134. 9
140. 6
+4.2
158. l
165. 8
+4.9
37. 3
28. 1
328,601
331, 768
+1. 0
166,043
168,871
+ 1. 7
3, 071
3, 033
554. 6
552. 4
-.4
586. 5
588. 1
+.3
625. 5
600. 6
51. 7
57. 1
=
368. 2
393. 3
+ a. a
365. 0
392. 6
+ 7.6
294. 4
303. 8
+ 3.2
317. 9
324. 4
188. 9
192. 5
308. 5
320. 7
159. 9
183. 0
424. 1
423. 2
132. 5
13,5. 0
386. 7
419. 9
+ s. 6
331. 0
327. 0
54 5. 6
593. 9
170. 7
200. 6
462, 971
486,568
+ 5. 1
242. 0
251. 0
+3. 7
124,033
135,721
+ 9.4
34,803
39,503
+ 13. 5
5, 717
6, 157
I , 054
894
24, 133
28 , 533
549
263. 2
285. 8
+ s. o
314. 4
354. 0
- -- - =
+12. c.
206. 7
217. •I
106. 6
90. 0
452. I
533. 5
83. 9
5 i
8 7. 7
2,944
2, 943
•106
322. l
319. 9
99. 3
98. 0
389
89, 230
96. 218
+1. s
247. 5
264. 8
+1.0
18, 923
19, 924
49, 228
51, 17l
21, 079
2,5. 123
283. 2
294. l
274. 8
283 . l
184. 0
21 ~. I
247. 5
25 1. 5
125, 283
132, 034
+5.4
98, 323
104 , 030
+ s .8
42,555
40, 438
10, 365
11 , 470
21, 011
26,301
18, 525
19, 459
5,867
6. 362
234. 7
244. 5
+4.2
261. 4
272.
+4.4
405. 7
379. 9
214. 8
234. 8
259. 5
320. 1
183. 4
189. 9
142. 9
153. 5
43,638
47. 481
+8.8
6,274
7, 144
6, 175
6,685
11 ,209
11 , 789
13,831
15. 374
3, 198
3,636
1,208
l , 199
I , 743
I. 654
277. 0
299. 1
+ 8. o
227. 6
258. 8
277. 5
299. 3
318.3
331. 7
313. 7
341. 9
216. 1
246. 2
187. 3
183. 9
243. 8
235. 3
26,960
28,004
+ 3. 9
2, 639
2, 889
3, 106
2, 741
6, 384
7, 165
11, 442
11, 7 6
2,202
2, 404
5 4
501
003
518
171. 2
176. 4
+a. a
95. 8
104. 7
139. 6
122. 7
181. 3
201. 6
259. 5
262. 1
148.
162. 8
90. 5
76. 8
84. 3
73. 7
181,266
199,611
+10. 1
93,293
104. 833
+ 12.4
I. 5 8
1, 758
305. 9
332. 4
+ 8. 7
329. 5
365. 1
+ 10.8
323. 4
348. 1
105,897
1051 52~
- .4
54,692
55, 71 2
+ 1. 9
1,244
1,236
178. 7
175. 7
- 1. 7
193. 2
194. 0
+.4
253. 4
244 . 8
22, 152
97, 745
!07, 325
19, 558
23, 107
3 19. 0
325. 4
+ 2. 0
336. 5
336. 3
- .1
407. 5
360. 2
323. 9
334 . 6
409. 5
452. 5
246. 5
253. 5
53
�Table 2. -:Index of Crime by Regions,
[N u m b er a nd r ate p er 100,000 inha b ita n ts;
Murder and
nonnegligent
m a nsla u ghter
Tota l offenses
Area
Forcible rape
Year Population 1 l - - - - - , - -- - -i 1- - - - - - - , - - - - --1- - ---,,--------1
N umber R ate per Number R ate per Number R ate per
100,000
Florida __ ___ _______ _ 1964
· 5,705,000
5,805, 000
4,294, 000
4,357,000
3,432,000
3,519, 000
4,852, 000
4,914, 000
2,555,000
2,542,000
4,378, 000
4,457,000
1,797,000
1,812,000
12,678, 000
12, 808,000
109,965
116, 732
1965
Georgia__ ___________ 1964
53,594
1965
52,271
M ary land __________ _ 1964
49, 858
1965
60,464
North Carolina_____ 1964
45,205
1965
48, 155
South Carolina______ 1964
31,081
1965
27, 880
Virginia__ ________ ___ 1964
49, 356
1965
,51, 635
West Virginia _______ 1964
9,854
9,581
1965
E ast Sout h Central ___ 1964
125,344
128, 072
1965
Percent chaRge___ _
+2. 2
Alabama_ ____ _______ 1364
3,407,000
35,981
1965
3,462, 000
36,972
Keutucky ____ ____ __ _ 1964
3, 1.'i9, 000
32,755
1965
3, 179,000
33,431
Mississippi__________ 1964
2,314,000
14,688
1965
2,321,000
16, 034
Tennessee __ ______ ___ 1964
3, 79 , 000
41,920
1965
3,845,000
41,635
West South Cen t ral ___ 1064
18,263, 000 ' 228,651
1955
18,527,000
233, 010
P ercent change____
- - - -------- - -+1 .-9
Arkansas __ ___ _____ __ 1964
1,933,000
14,688
1965
1,960,000
14,503
Louisiana__ _________ 1964
3,468,000
42,418
1965
3,534,000
41, 840
Oklahoma___________ 1964
2,465,000
29,844
1965
2,482,000 .
28,543
Te.xas ________ ____ ___ 1964
10, 397,000
141, 701
1965 ·
10, 551,000
148, 124
West ___ ______ ___ _____ ___ 1964
31, 587, 000
636, 460
1965
32,231,000
697,384
Percent change______ -- --+ o. 6
Mountain __ ______ __ __ _ 1964
7,697, 000
l18, 463
.
1965
7,775,000
118,906
P ercent change ___ _ ------ ---- --------- +.4
Arizona ___ __________ 1964
1,581,000
32,693
1965
1, 60 , 000
31, 108
Colorado __ ____ _____ _ 1064
1, 966,000
30, 552
1, 692,
969, 000
000
30,
407
Idaho ________ __ __ ___ 1965
1964
6, 145
1965
692, ooo
6, 417
Montana ________ ___ _ 1964
705, 000
7,845
706,
7,643
Nevada ___ _______ __ _ 1965
1964
408, 000
000
11,387
NewMexioo ____ ___ _
~!!! dgHgg
Utah __ ___ ___ ____ ____
iig,, ggg
rn~~
Pacific__ _________ ___ __ 1964
23, !ll , 000
1965
24,456.000
578 478
AJ;i15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)~-15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST):~:: - j 954
m:
ggg
Washington ___ __ ___ _ 11964
250,000
253,000
18,
084,
_
~, 000
1 60
701-, 000
7II.
000
1, 871 , 000
1, 99, 000
2,984,000
1965
2,990,000
1065
California ____ ______ _ 1964
1n 6 ,
1"904"
llawaiL __ ___ _______ 1965
Oregon____ _____ _____ 1964
965
100,000
(
518
.503
491
229
236
369
388
206
245
297
296
67
72
938
1, 077
+14. 8
316
395
lfi4
168
233
207
22..;
307
1,326
1,300
- 2. o
147
·115
287
285
110
lJO
782
790
1,219
1,351
+10. 8
332
300
- 9. 6
83
80
3
2
69
28
14
l9
12
32
927. 3
1, l12. 8
1,
082.
7
2, 790.9
1. 001. 6
2 168 2
4,326
438.399
2' 365. 6
'+o: 1
41°09·
2 94
.
·
2,424.2
491,
713
11, 083
2,643.
1,581. 5o
13, 438
25,
073
28,235
39,936
1,890.1
1, 340.1
11' 486 · 9
33 3
1 '. 363: 4
t1~~
40, 766


~


i
}:J3½9i:
1, 974.1
4. 3

100.000

- ---- - - - 489
~Mt~ UrU
n851g0~3
,...,
3, 34 1
3 40
, 5
517, 997
Wyoming ___ ____ ____ 143.215.248.55 15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)
1,927. 6
2, 010. 9
1, 248.1
1, 199. 7
1,452.8
1, 718. 2
931. 7
980. 0
1, 216.5
1,096.8
1,1 27.3
1, 158. 6
548.3
·528. 8
988. 7
1,000.0
+1. 1
1,056. 1
1,067. 9
1, 036.8
1, 051. 6
634. 7
690. 8
1,103.8
1, 082. 9
1, 252. O
1, 257. 2
+- 4
759. 8
739. 9
1, 223. 1
1, 184. 0
1, 210. 7
1,150. O
1,363. O
1,403.9
2, 015. o
2, 163. 9
+7. 4
1,539.5
1, 529. 6
- .6
2, 067.8
1, 934. 5
1, 554. O
1, 888.
544. 3O
~~
-
15
J9
10
88
7
5
8. 6
8. 9
11. 7
11. 3
6. 7
6. 7
7. 6
7. 9
8: 1
!l. 6
6. 8
6. 6
3. 7
4.0
7. 4
8. 4
+ 13.5
9. 3
11. 4
5. 2
5. 3
10. l
8. 9
5. 9
- 8. 0
7. 3
7. 0
-4. 1
7. 6
5. 9
8. 3
s. 1
4. 5
4.4
7. 5
7. 5
3. 9
4. 2
+7. 7
4. 3
3. 9
- 9.3
5. 2
Ii. 0
4. 2
3. 5
4.0
2. 0
2. 7
1. 7
7. 8
8. 4
5. 4
6. 1
1. 5
1.5
5. 5
2. 9
3. 7
,2ig 1 +it~
26
16
740
-880
15
23
34
65
~~
589
77]
529
58G
346
489
451
437
258
271
45H
483
89
77
10. 3
13. 3
12. 3
13. 4
10. 1
13. 9
9. 3
8. 9
10. l
10. 7
10. 4
10. 8
5. 0
4.2
1,204
9. .i
9. l
-4. 2
11. 7
10. 6
8. 0
1, 161
- 3. 6
397
367
2M
209
217
160
336
425
1,998
2,015
+.9
157
203
384
394
269
275
1,188
1, 14;~
5, 147
5. 559
+8. o
998
1. 030
+3.2
259
286
336
318
41
38
53
55
54
68
120
138
100
88
35
39
4, 149
i~
r,_ r,
9. 4
6. 9
s. 8
11. 1
10. 9
10. 9
8. 1
10. 4
11. 1
11. 1
10. 9
11. l
11. 4
10. R
16. 3
17. 2
+5.5
13. 0
13. 2
+1. 5
16. 4
17. 8
17. 1
Hi. 2
5. 9
5. 5
7. 5
7. 8
13. 2
15. 5
11. 9
13. 4
10. 1
S. 9
10. 2
l 1. 5
17. 4
-j2 ~1
10. 4
6· 3
2~
56
45
i:4. i1
3, 948
621
3,
20.
21. 20
3. 2
l. 8
3.4
186
225
226
2.. 86
12.
ll.!JO
2. 4
229
7. 7
22. 4
17. 8
1 Population for each State for 1964 and 1965 is Bureau of t h e Cens u s ro v·
2· 2
304
10. 2
subject to chflnge. Aldi ratestere eal_cu.lated on the estnnated popuJatfou ~s ~o~a l estnnatc as or J ul y 1 ancl
, Offense totals base on a reportmg a gencies a nd estimates for u11r
e o1e rouncltng .
'
e
portecl
aieas
.
A
ggra
vated
assault
54
�Geographic D ivisions and Staie s, 1964- 65- Conti nued
p ercent cha nge, over 1964]
Aggravated
assault
Robbery
N um ber
Rate per N um ber
100,000
B ur glar y
R ate per N w n ber
4, 958
5,146
1, 445
I , 297
2, 041
2,919
I , 034
1, 062
658
545
I, 462
1. 71 5
303
261
86. 9
88. 6
33. 7
29.8
59. 5
83. 0
21. 3
21. 6
25. 8
21. 4
33. 4
38. 5
16. 9
14. 4
IO, 951
5,808
6, 403
4, 830
6,388
10,264
10, 635
3, 104
3 428
6; 533
5, 968
900
I , 003
184. 1
188. 6
135. 3
147. 0
140. 7
181. 5
211. 5
216. 4
121. 5
134. 9
149. 2
133. 9
50. 1
55. 4
54, 959
55,556
22. 706
21. 236
18, 735
22, 474
17,922
18, 610
14, 106
11 , 885
20, 746
21, 540
3, 756
3,593
- 4. 3
992
992
l, 140
1, 167
476
334
I , 148
1.100
29. 6
28.1
- 5.1
29. 1
28. 7
36. I
36. 7
20. 6
14. 4
30. 2
28. 6
13, 471
13, 830
+ 2. 7
5, 555
5, 162
I , 928
1, 919
3,192
3,248
2, 796 _
3, 501
106. 3
108. 0
+1. 6
163. 1
149. I
61.0
60. 4
137. 9
139. 9
73. 6
91. 1
57,676
56,992
- 1. 2
15,627
16, ll 9
14,571
14,1'10
6, 157
6,626
21,321
20, 107
7,855
7, 652
- 2.6
565
465
l , 849
1,813
I, 038
942
4, 403
4,432
43. 0
41. 3
- 4. 0
29. 2
23. 7
53. 3
51. 3
42.1
38. 0
42. 4
42. 0
21, 711
22,968
+5.8
1, 772
1,879
4,620
4, 686
2, 100
1,928
13,219
14, 475
118.9
123. 9
+4. 2
91. 7
95. 9 133. 2
132. 6
85. 2
77. 7
127. 1
137. 2
76. 2
81. g
+ 7. 5
48. 0
42. 0
- 11. 3
61. 2
55. 7
67. 3
54. 5
I O. 3
10.1
15. 6
1,5. 9
109. 8
97. 5
46. 2
42. 7
26. 5
23.1
13. 4
17. 9
34,616
36,589
+5. 7
6,274
6,533
+ 4. 1
2,050
1,831
1,378
I, 547
397
371
382
335
449
419
914
1, 329
510
554
185
147
109. 6
] 13. 5
+ 3. 6
81. 5
84. 0
+ 3. 1
130. 2
IJ3. ~
70. I
78. 6
.57. 4
53. 6
64. 2
47. 5
11 0.0
05. 2
90. 7
129. 2
51.4
56. 0
53. 9
43. 2
24,062
2li,401
+o. 1
3,694
3,308
- 10. 4
967
895
1, 323
I, 073
71
iO
110
112
448
429
466
430
263
229
46
61
-..
85. 3
34. 4
+ 10. 7
21.. 2
39. 9
103. 2
113. 3
13.0
18. 7
37. 6
46. 0
28. 5
30. 3
28,342
30, 050
+6. 0
240
215
24,998
26, 581
447
329
1,047
I, 126
1,610
I. 805
118. 6
122. 9
+3.6
00. 0
85. 0
138. 2
11 2. a
63.8
4fl.3
56. 0
59. 3
M. O
new reportin g procedures init ia ted in 1964 .
a Includes the Dist rict of Columbia.
Auto t heft
R ate per N u mber
100,000
R ate per
100,000
963. 4
957. 0
528.8
487. 4
545. 9
638. 7
369. 4
378. 7
552. 1
467. 6
473. 9
483. 3
268. 1
253. 9
26, 692
31,728
12, 654
13, 828
14,410
17, 191
10,253
11, 732
8,586
7, 741
13. 300
14, 366
2, 267
2, 3!0
467. 9
546. 6
294. 7
317.4
419. 9
488. 5
211. 3
238.8
336. 0
304. 5
303. 8
322. 3
126. 2
127. 5
11, 775
12, 062
9, 949
8, 430
9, 267
10, 767
4, 012
5, 291
4, 163
3,765
6,562
7,267
1, 410
l , 258
206. 4
207. 8
231. 7
193. 5
270. 0
306. 0
101. 2
107. 7
162. 9
148. I
140. 9
163. l
78. 5
69. 4
454. 9
445. 0
- 2. 2
458. 7
465. 6
461. 2
253. 6
270. 9
266. I
285. 5
561. 4
523. 0
32, 148
34,692
+ 7. 9
9,415
10, 235
10, 172
1,1, 006
3, 143
3, 664
9, 418
9, 787
276. 4
295. 6
322.0
346. 2
135. 8
157. 9
248. 0
254. 5
16, 151
16, 727
+3. 6
3,679
3, 702
4, 526
4, 822
I , 270
I , 795
6,676
6,408
127. 4
130. 6
+2. 5
108. 0
106. 9
143. 3
151. 7
54. 9
77. 3
175. 8
166. 7
104, 882
105, 905
+ 1.0
6, 436
5, 723
16, 730
15, 9 3
14,047
13,089
67,669
71, 110
574. 3
571. 4
- .5
332, 9
292. 0
482. 4
452. 3
569. 8
527. 4
650. 9
674. 0
55,825
60,086
+ 7. 6
3,898
4., 552
10, 539
11,521
7,399
7, 4 2
33, 989
36, 5.1 1
305. 7
324. 2
+6. J
20 1. 7
232. 2
303. 9
326.0
300.1
301. 5
326. 9
346. 2
35, 054
33, 084
- 5. 6
I , 713
I , 566
8, 009
7, 158
4,881
4, 71 7
20,451
19, 643
191. 9
178. 5
- 7. 0
8 .6
70. 9
230. 0
202. G
198. 0
190. 0
196. 7
186. 2
282,640
313,682
+ 11. 0
50, 127
49,948
- .4
13, 726
13, 129
13, 367
12,817
2, 285
2, 483
3,328
3,197
4,4 16
3,863
6, 471
7,216
5, 233
6,008
1,301
I , 235
894. 8
651. 4
642. 5
-1. 4
868. 2
816. 5
679. 9
651. 0
. 330. 2
358. 8
472.1
452. 9
I , 082. 3
878. 0
64 2. 0
701. 3
527. 5
606. 9
379. 3
363. 3
181,018
200, 512
+10. 8
37,396
39, 4.52
+ 5. ,5
10, 25 1
10, 267
8, 734
9, 687
2,053
2,733
2,537
2, 53<1
3, 79
3, 802
3, 931
4, 134
4,065
4, 845
I, 346
1, 450
573. I
622. 2
+ .6
4 6. 0
507. 5
+ 4.4
048. 4
638. 5
444. 2
402. 0
383. 4
394. 9
359. 9
359. 0
950. 7
864. I
390. 0
401. 8
409. 8
489.4
392. 4
426. 5
107, 758
113, 290
+5.1
19, fi42
I , 335
- 6. 7
5,348
4, 620
5, 332
1, 806
670
708
1,4 16
1, 398
2, IGa
1,923
2, 348
2, 263
2, 010
2, 064
409
46-3
341. 2
351. 5
+3.0
255. 3
2:J5. 9
-7.0
338. 3
287. 3
271. 2
24 . 7
90. 8
102. 3
200. 0
198. 0
516. 9
437. I
232. 9
210. a
202. 6
208. Ii
973. 2
I, 078. 5
+10. s
443. 6
554 . 5
1,088. 7
l , 209. fl
838. 8
980. 9
573. 4
636. I
000. 3
611. 1
143,622
161, 060
+ 12. 1
l, 137
I, /i l 6
ll 7, 703
132,443
2, 825
3,392
8, 447
JO, 020
13. 510
rn, 6Sa
601. 2
658. 6
+9. 5
454. 8
599. 2
650. 9
712. 0
403. 0
477. I
451. 5
527. 7
4-52. 7
457. 8
88, 116
94,955
+7. 8
5
I, 030
75, 7 7
8 1, 773
1, 803
2, 581
3, 800
3,846
5, 751
Ii. 725
36 . 8
3 .3
+5. 3
354 . 0
407. I
4 19. I
439. 6
257. 2
303. 0
207. 9
202. 5·
192. 7
19 1. .5
4,818
4, 600
232,513
203, 734
+ 13. 4
I , 109
1,403
196,R83
225, 007
5,880
6,974
10, 727
12,079
17, 914
18, 27 1
60. 4
tou,l does not agree with t he number published in 1964
20, 368
23,093
+ 13.4
53
101
LS, 067
21,081
95
13~
703
873
850
905
R ate per Number
100,000
100,000
10, 503
L ar cen y $50
and over
444.8
973. 3
+ 8. 8
+ 6. 8
Jl9. 2
1:m.2
issue due to sta tist ical adJUstments resu lting frolll
�Table 3.-Index of Crime by State , 1965
[ See footnotes 1 and 2 for population data]
A rea
Population
Total
offenses
Murder
and non·
negligent
man.
slaughter
Forcible
rape
Aggravated
assault
Robbery
Burgl ary
L arceny
$50 and
over
A uto theft
ALABAMA
Standa rd M etropolitan Statistical Area.. . ..................
Area act uall y repo rting. ....................... . ....... .
E sti mated total.... . ................. . .. . . . . ............
Other Cit ies.. . . ..... . ..... . .... . .................. . . .......
A rea actuall y reporting.... . ... . ............. . . ....... . .
E stimated total...... .... . ......... . ................... .
R ural...... . ....... . ... . ..... . ....... . . . . . .... . ... . ... .. .. . .
Area actuall y report ing. .......... . . ....................
E stimated total.......... . . . .. . .. . ... . ........ . . . . ......
I , 777,000
86. 0%
JOO. 0%
553, 00.0
67. 4%
100. 0%
I, 132,000
39. 7%
100. 0%
State TotaL... . . .. .. ... . . .. ... .. . . .. . . . . ... ... . . ....... ....
3,462, 000
Rate per 100,000 inhabi tants . . . ... . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . .. ... . ............ . .
26,830
28, 801
180
209
200
231
703
761
2,695
2,931
12,1 53
13, 150
7, 750
8,226
3, 149
3,293
3, 074
4,564
28
42
17
25
81
120
615
913
1, 316
1, 954
822
1, 220
105
290
. 1, 431
3,607
36, 972
1, 067. 9
57
144
395
11. 1
44
44
lll
Ill
367
10. 6
992
28. 7
523
1,318
5, 162
149. 1
403
1, 015
16, 119
465. 6
313
789
10, 235
295. 6
47
119
3, 702
106. 9
2,409
2, 666
8
9
18
20
73
81
135
149
586
649
932
i , 031
657
727
1,660
4, 326
1, 709. 9
7
18
6. 3
25
45
17. 8
20
101
39. 9
66
215
85. 0
754
1, 403
554. 5
485
l , 518
599. 2
303
l , 030
407. 1
25, 965
59
217
746
1,401
lO, 929
8, 677
3, 936
2, 90~
5
17
89
208
l , 302
926
356
2, OiO
2,240
31, 108
1, 934. 5
15
48
52
286
55
16
895
205
222
1, 831
113. 9
830
898
13, 129
816. 5
614
664
10, 267
303
328
4, 620
(;38.
2 7. 3
ALASKA
Standard Metropoli tan Statisti ca l Area. . . . . . .......... . . .. .
None
Other Cities.. ...... . ... ..... . . . .. . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . ..... . .
89, 000
A rea actuall y reporUng.. .. .. . .... . ... . . ... . ... . .. .... ..
90. 4%
Estimated total... . . . . . .. .. . ... .. .. . .... . ..... . ... . .... .
100. 0%
Rw·al. .. ..... . . ... . . . ... .. . . ..... .. . ... . . . . . . .. . . .. ... . ... . .
164, 000
Area actuall y report ing. . .... . ... . .. . .......... . . ...... .
100. 0%
State TotaL . ...... .. . ..... ... . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . •.. . .. . . .. ... . .
253, 000
R ate per 100,000 inhabitants .. . . ... .. ... ... . . ........ .. . ......... ... . .
ARIZONA
Standa rd Metropoli ta n tat istical A rea. . .. ... .. . ... . . . .. . . .
A rea actuall y report in g. ....•........ .... ... . ...... . ... .
Other Cit ies . . . . .... ..... . .......... . ....... ........ . ... . . . .
Area actuall y reporting•. . ... . .. . .. . .......•. . . . . . .. ....
Rural.. .. . .. . ... . ............ . ... . . . ...... ... .•. .... . . . · · · ··
A rea act uall y reporting. ....... . .... . ... . ....... . .. . . . . .
E stimated total.. ......... . . .. . ..................... .. . .
State TotaL ................ . ..... . . . ....... . . ..... . . .
Halo per 100,000 iuhabitunts .
1,177, 000
100. 0%
l 73, 000
100. 0%
258, 000
92. 4%
100. 0%
1. 608, 000
80
ii. 0
17. 8
60


)5 . i



j


�ARKANSAS
Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area ______ __ ____ _____ ____
595,000
Area actuall y reportiug_________________ ____________ ____
91. 9%
Estimated totaL_________________________ __ ____________
JOO. 0%
Other Cities __ _____ ___ __ __ ---- ------------------ ----- --- --- 465,000
Area actuall y reporting____________________ ____ ____ _____
61. 0%
Est imated totaL_____ __________ ____________ __ _____ _____
100. 0%
RuraL_____ _________ __________ ________ ______________ ________
900, 000
Area actually reporting_______ __ ______ ______ _____ _______
51. 0%
Estimnted-totaL_________________ ____ _________ ____ ___ __
100. 0%
State Tota!__ ___ ___ _____ ____ ___ __ _____ _________ _______________
l, 960,000
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants___________ ______ ___ __ ______ ----- --- ------
8,120
8, 571
46
50
104
120
324
347
914
995
2, 946
3,052
2,912
1,028
1, 095
2, 151
3,520
11
18
16
20
37
61
301
494
945
1, 550
621
1,019
220
361
1,226
2, 403
14,503
739. 9
24
47
11 5
5. 9
29
57
203
10. 4
29
57
465
23. 7
199
390
1,879
95. 9
572
1, 121
5, 723
292.0
317
621
4,552
232. 2
56
110
1, 566
79. 9
454,460
456,222
707
800
3,670
3, 689
20, 244
20,303
24,000
24, 796
205,884
206, 793
121,479
121, 925
77,606
77, 916
17, 080
17,165
26
20
80
80
428
430
812
816
8,345
8,382
4,914
4,936
2,475
18, 304
l ,326
491, 713
2,643. 5
54
54
880
·1. 7
170
170
3,948
21. 2
348
348
21, 081
113. 3
968
960
28,581
142. 9
0,819
0,832
225, 007
1,209.6
5,575
5,582
132,443
712. 0
1, 370
l, 371
81, 773
430. 0
24,278
50
243
1,012
1, 179
10,407
7,119
4,268
1,063
1,119
320
337
2,758
CALIFORNIA
Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area_______ ___ ___ ________
16,615, 000
Area actually reporting_______ _____ ________________ ___ __
90. 5%
E stimated total______ ___ _____ ___________ _____ _____ ____ __
100. 0%
Other Cities___ ____ _____ __ ___ ------ _______ ___ --- --- ---- --- -06, 000
Area actually reporting_____ ______ ___ _____ ______ ____ __ __
99. 6%
Estimated total __ ____ _____ _______ _____ _- ___ __ -_- _______
JOO. 0%
Rural _- ---- --- -- --- -- ----- --- ---- --------------------- --- -J, J O, 000
Area actually reporting__________________________ ______ _
09. 0%
E stimated total_ -------- --- ------- ---- ------------ ----100. 0%
State TotaL----- - ----- - -- _______ _________ __ ________ ---- ____
18,602,000
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants----- ---- ----- ------ ------ -- -- ------ ------
2,486
COLORADO
Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area__ _____ ___ _____ ___ ___
J, 378,000
Area actually reporting_____ ___ ___ _____ ____ ____ ____ _____
JOO. 0%
Other Cities______ _____________________ ___ ____ ______________
227, 000
A.rea actually reporting__________ ______________________ _
. 95. 0%
E stimated totaL __ ______ ___ _____________ _____ _____ ___ __
JOO. 0%
Rural __ ________ ______ _____ _____ ___ __ __________ _______ __ ____
304,000
Area actually reporting_____ _______ ______ ______ ____ ___ __
7 . 5%
E stimated total_-- ---- ----- -- --- ------- ---- ------- --- -JOO. 0%
State Total___________________ _____ ___ __ _____ ___ ___ ______ ___ __
1,969, 000
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants..---- ------ --- --- -------- -- - - ---------- -- -
2, 518
2, 651
2
2
15
16
22
23
112
118
984
1,036
2,728
3,478
30,407
1, 544.3
13
17
69
3. 5
46
59
318
16. 2
30
38
1,073
54. 5
196
250
1, 547
78.6
1,078
1,374
12,817
65 1. 0
!, 137
I, 449
9,687
492. 0
228
201
4, 896
248. 7
20, 448
30,196
41
41
110
112
501
514
l, 072
1,099
13, 826
14, 171
8,262
5,636
1, 356
3
20
JO
78
638
363
244
16
22
546
19. 3
56
1,233
43. 5
1, 150
15, 959
563. 5
350
9, 188
324. 4
129
8, 157
217. 4
CONNECTICUT
Standard Metropolitan Statistical Arca__________ _____ ______
2,44 1,000
Area actuall y reporting________ _____ ________ ______ ______
97. 6%
E stimated
total

-------100. 0%
Other
Cities ______
___-----------------------____ ___ ______ ______ __ _____--__

102,000
Area actually reporting____________ ___ ________ ___ _______
100. 0%
Rural __ _______ ____ ___ ______ ____ -- ---__ __ ___ __ ______________
229, 000
Area actually reporting_____ ___ ____ _____ __ __ ___ _____ ____
JOO. 0%
State Tota!___ ______ _________ __ ____ _______ ____________________
2,832,000
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants--- --- ----- ------- ----- ----- -- --- --- ------.;r
°'
See footnotes at end of table.
1,725
33,277
1, 175. 1
2
48
I. 6
148
5. 2
8, 475
5,784
�Table 3.-lndex of Crime by State, 1965-Continued
[See footnotes 1 and 2 for population data]
Area
Population
Total
offenses
M urder
and nonnegligent
manslaughter
Forcible
rape
Robbery
Aggravated
assault
Burglary
Larceny
$50 and
over
Auto theft
DELAWARE
Standard Metropoli tan Stati~tical Area __ ______ ___ _______ ___
350, 000
Area actually reporting________ .. ________ ___ ___. . ____ . __
100. 0%
Other Cities __. _____ . ___ __ __ ___ ______ ________ __ _. _______ ___ _
29,000
Area actually reporting ______ ___ __. ___ . _____ ______ ___ . . _
80.4%
Estimated totaL ______________ -. ---- --- --- --- -- ---- ---100.0%
Rural. ________ __ _________ __ ____ __ ___ ___ _____ ____ _______ _____
126, 000
Area actually reporting _____ ___________. __ __ ___ __ __ ____ .
LOO. 0%
State Tota!_ _____ _________ ___ ----- ------- ----------. ------ - ___
505, 000
R ate per 100,000 inhabitants ___ ____ ________ __________ ___ ------ -------FLORIDA
Area ______ ___________ ____
3, 899,000
Standard Metropoli tan Statistical
Area actuaJ! y reporting _____ ------ ----. -... -- ---- . -- . --96. @o
100. 0
Estimated total. ____ _. --- - --- . ---- .. . ---- ---- -- --- -- --- .
795, 000
Other Cities ___ __. ____ _. __. ---- --- .---- .---- -------- --. -- --83. 6%
Area actually reporting ___________ . --------. --- . --- ----100. 0%
Estimated total.. ... --- __ __---- _---- -- ---- .. -- ---- -- . . -],
Ill,
000
Rural. ....... ___ - -- . ---- ---- - -- -- -- ---- -- ----- -- ------- -- --Area actuall y reporLing ___ ____ ____ __. _. . . __.. _--- - .. ____
57. 8%
Estimated total __ ____ ______ ___ ____ ____ __ ___ _____ __ ____ __
100.0%
State TotaL. ____ ____ _____ _____ __.. ___ . ----- --- - --- --- - -- --- ..
5, 805,000
R ate p er 100,000 inhabitants ________ _____ __ ___ ___ _____ __ --------------
5, 462
15
21
257
48
2, 524
1, 465
I, 132
332
372
3
2
3
2
13
15
48
54
14 l
158
78
87
47
53
668
6, 502
1,287. 6
8
26
5. 1
7
30
5. 9
5
277
54. 9
40
142
28.1
351
3,033
600. 6
206
1, 758
348. 1
51
1,236
244. 8
88, 837
91,665
303
313
498
516
4,311
4,438
7,474
7,707
41 , 928
43,264
24,693
25,483
9, 630
9, 944
10,014
11, 974
53
63
53
63
317
370
I, 128
I, 349
4, 871
5, 825
2,564
3,066
1, 028
I, 220
7,573
13. 093
116, 732
2,010.0
82
142
518
8. 0
111
192
771
13. 3
190
329
5, 146
88. 6
1, 096
I, 895
10, 951
188. 6
3, 711
6,467
55, 558
957. 0
1, 839
3,179
31, 728
546. 6
514
89
12, 082
207. 8
33,411
35, 057
225
237
300
318
942
082
2,508
2,615
13,529
1'1, 233
9, 941
10,458
5,966
6,214
63
95
918
I, 382
2, 4i4
3,726
J, 231
1,854
776
I, 169
I, 148
3, 2i7
531
I, 516
13, 828
8,430
3 17. •J
J03. 5
GEORGIA
Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area ___________________ __
Area actuall y reporting ______ _________________ ____ _____ .
Estimated total. __ ___ ___ __ . _. _. ___ . ______ _. ___ . _______ __
Other Cities .. _________ ___________ . ____ ________ . . ___ ____ ____
Area actually reporting ________ --- --- ------ ------------Estimated total ________________ . __ . _______ __ ____ ________
RurnL _________ ___ _________ . _______________ . __ .. __. __ ... _.. _
Area actually reporting __________ ___ _____ ___ __ _________
Estimatccl total__ __________ . _____ . ______ _____ .. ____ . __._
State TotaL ___ _____ ____ ________ ___ ___

------ --- ---- - --Rote per 100,000 i nhahitnnts __
2, 116, 000
94. 5%
JOO. 0%
695, 000
66. 4%
100. 0%
I, 546, 000
35.0%
100. 0%
4, 357, 000
5,537
8,339
45
68
30
45
3, 109
8,875
52,271
78
223
586
- -----------
65
180
491
I, 100. 7
11. :i
13. 4
77
220
1, 297
29. S
843
2,406
6, 403
117. 0
21,236
,JS7. ,1
367
l ,0'17
�HAWAII
Standard Metropoli tan Statistical Area___ _________ ___ __ __ __
Area actualJy reporting____ ____ _______ _______ ________ ___
Other Cities_________________ ____ _____ ___ __________ _______ __
Rur~rea actuall y reporting________ ___ __________ ___________ _
1:: ~6ll
Area actualJ y reporting____ ___ ____________________ ______
JOO. 0%
8t01
574,000
JOO. 0%
5 1, 000
R~t~·~ei--ioo;iioo-ia-habitaiiis::: :: :::: :::::::::::: ::::::: -----_:'. '.'. 143.215.248.55 -
12,522
479
437
13,438
l, 890. I
6
130

------- --- ---- ----- -- -- -------5 ·---- --- --- -3
23
133
8
3. 2
.8
J .7
2 2
6, 430
~, 125
2, 531
' 18
287
143
131
29
329
46.3
257
6,974
9 9
124
3,392
4ii. 1
19
2,68 1
363. 0
o.
IDAHO
Standard M etropolitan Statistical Area ___ _________ _____ ____
Oth_e,\rrec1ta1_cestually reporting _________ _____ _______ ___ _________ .
lf~ff~;f~l~lt~f15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)~~::::::::::::::::: :::::: ::: :::::::
J00, 000
JOO. O%
259,000
l , 203
3
Ji
50
425
.579
1'20
l~~: 6~
3.102
3, 14<1
5
5
13
13
45
40
·160
102
1, 228
J. 245
l , 214
J. 230
437
,i43
1, 757
19
22
38
5. 5
6
7
70
10. I
127
2,070
6,417
927.3
8
9
14
2. 0
371
53. 0
090
813
2, 483
358. 8
78-1
924
2, 733
394. 9
123
145
708
102. 3
153, JO I
158,0 14
505
520
I , 536
J, 590
17, 223
13, 155
13, 589'
50,496
52, 54-l
32, 65~
33,909
38, 061
39,233
5,948
0, 6 ll
0
10
29
32
JOO
211
2,734
3,039
1,928
2, 143
649
455
5,200
6, 4G6
171, 691
l , 613. I
J7
81
10[
17, 535
IM. 8
409
509
14, 553
130. 7
2, 399
2,983
58, 588
550. 3
1, 842
2,290
38, 342
360. 2
389
484
5. 2
63
78
1, 708
16.0
45,4 15
46,539
121
123
308
378
2,450
2, 523
2,308
2,369
18,640
19,082
12, 131
12, 429
9, 391
9,635
7,923
8, 560
18
19
43
46
137
148
405
438
3,35'1
3,624
2,&10
2,852
l, 326
I , 433
4,377
4, 394
59, 493
I, 217. 9
29
29
171
3. 5
42
42
466
9. 5
60
00
2, 73 1
55. 9
259
260
3,067
02. 8
2,529
2, 539
25, 245
516. 8
1, 0.58
1,062
16, 343
334. 6
400
402
11 , 470
234. 8
Rural_________ __________ _______________ __ ___ ____ ____ ___ ___ _
333, 000
Area actuall y reporting____ ________ _____ __________ __ ____
84. %
Estimated totaL _______ _______ ____ ___ _______ ____ __ __ __ _
JOO. 0%
State Total__ __ __________ _________ _____ ______________________
692, 000
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants__ __ ___ _________ __ ___________ _______ _____ _

--------
150
ILLINOIS
Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area____ ____ _________ ____
8, 486, 000
Area actuall y reportin g_______________ ____ ______________
95. 4%
Estimated total_________ ____ _____ ____ ____ ___ ___________
JOO. 0%
Other Cities_____ _______ _______________ ___________ ___ __ _____
913,000
Area actuall y reporting_______________ ______ ____________
90. 0'.!'9
E stimated total ________ _____________ ___ ___ _____________
JOO. Oo/0
RuraL ______ ______ ______ _______ ____ ___ ___ ___ _____ ___ _______
l, 244 , 000
Area actuall y reporting____ __ _______ ______ ______________
80. 4%
Estimated totaL_____ __________ __ __ _____ ____ ___ ___ _____
JOO. 0%
State TotaL ____ ________ _,_________ ______ ____ __________ ______ _
10, 844, 000
Rate per J00,000 inhabita nts ________ ____ _____________ _____ __________ __
21
551
JG, 755
409
·,
721
~1i~g
4
INDIANA
Standard M etropolitan Statistical Ar ea____ ___ ______________
2,876, 000
Area actuall y reporting_________________ _______ __ _____ __
98. 1%
Estim ated totaL____________ ___________________________
JOO. 0%
Other Cities ______ ________ _________________________ _------- 824,000
Area actuall y reporting_____________ _________________ ___
92. 6%
Estimated total _--- ------------- ------- ------------ -- -JOO. 0%
Rural _-- -------- ----- --- --------- ------ __ _____ _-----------l, 185,000
Arca actually reporting_______ _________ ______ _____ ____ __
99. 6%
Estimated totaL _________ _____________ -- -------- ------100. 0%
State TotaL ---- ---------- ------------ ----- -- ----- --- __ __ ____
4,885,000
Rate per 100,000 in habitants __ ____ ____ ___ _______ ___ ___ __ -------- ---- -<:.,,
<:O
See footnotes at end of table.
- I
�0:,
Tahle 3.-lndex nf Crime by State, 1965-Continued
0
[Sec footnotes I and 2 for population data]
Population
Arca
Total
offenses
M urder
and non·
negli gent
, nan slaughtcr
Forcible
mpe
Aggravated
assault
Robbery
flw- glary
Larceny
$50 and
Auto theft
over
IOWA
Standard Metropolitan Statistical Are,1 .. . .. . . . . .... .
Arca actu all y reporting... .... . . .. -· -··········· ·· ··· · · Other Cities. . ___ _____ . . ____. __. . . __ _.. ____ -· . ... ---···.....
Arca actually reporting. . . . -- · ·-········· · ·-· · · -·· -·····
Estimated totaJ... _________ ____· · · ·--·· -··· · · ····- ··· . ..
Run·L-- ·--·- ··· - -- -- ---- - - --- -· - -·········· · ·-·· · · ···-- · .. .
03i,OOO
100. 0%
ilO, 000
0/i. I%
100. 0%
I, I 13. 000
Arca act uall y rcpor ling. ............. -· --····· · · · ···-···
R5. i%
Estim ated tntaL - -- - --····· -··-·········-- · ··········· ·
100.0%
State Total. - -·· . ____ ___. . ______ . .... . ....... . ___. . · -........
2, 760, 000
Rate per 100,000 inh ahitn nts.... . . . . . . . . . ... . -·-· · · ··· - · · · · ·· · · ·· - ····
10.fi'.19
20
nO
266
209
4, 244
3, R54
1, 97r,
166
175
2, 1"7
2,280
I. 638
1,723
68 1
ilfi
2fl
4, 72fi
4: 971
fl
r,
12
13
55
58
3, 342
3, 898
19. 498
706 . 5
9
10
36
I. 3
43
50
123
4. 5
30
354
12. 8
14fi
170
554
20. 1
I , 60fi
1,874
8, 398
304. 3
I. 343
I. .'ifi7
7, 144
2/iR. 8
lfi9
197
2,889
104. i
13, 12R
34
121
359
1,005
r,, 274
3, ;i22
1, R13
,5, 137
5, 197
14
14
20
20
104
105
281
2S4
2,345
2, 373
1. 73 1
fl42
I , 751
fi.'iO
3, 520
3, 93(i
22, 261
99fi . .'i
11
12
60
2. 7
.'in
65
73
537
24. 0
270
302
1,591
71. 2
1,fiOfi
1, 796
10, 443
407 . .'i
I , 263
r,3
204
9. 1
1, 412
6, 685
299. 3
240
278
2, 741
122. i
22, 743
24, Oi 4
79
84
100
107
942
99fi
91 5
9r,9
8, 833
9,350
8.144
8, fi23
3, 730
3, 94.'i
4,481
5,329
2fl
23
27
94
112
493
58fi
2, 144
31
2, 550
I. 183
1,407
518
fi l6
37
7/l
209
2fl
180
3fi4
1. 919
I. IOR
2,240
14. 140
483
\)ifi
11. 008
120
21i l
4. 822
KANSAS
Staorlard Metropoli tan Statistical Area...... --·-··- · ·······
oor..ooo
Arca actuall y rcporlin ~----········· · · · ······· - · · ...... .
IOO. 0%
Other CitiCS-, - ---- -- --------- -····-·····. ·· ···- · ··· · -·-···.
r.04, 000
Arca actuall y reporting ______ . . _... --·· .... ··-· - · · ·- ··- ·
08. 8%
Estimated total. ---------····· · ··-····--·· . ... ··· -···· .
100. 0%
Rural ____ __-···-· ---- --. ____ ·-··-- . ................... ·- . ..
724. 000
Arca actually reporting ...... ---·-··-···· --·· - -·-··· · -··
89.4 %
Estimated total. - ---·· · ·····-···-·-···--· ·· · -·· ··-·····
100. 0%
State Total. _··· · -··-- ___ ....... ____ .. ___ ........ __ __. .. ___ ..
2, 234, 000
Rate per 100,000 inh ahi tants.---- --· ·-·· ·· ·-··-·-··-···- -- · ··-·- · -· · -·
KENT UCKY
Standard Metropolitan Statistical Arca .. . .. -- ·-- ·--· - · ·-Arca actuall y reporting. . --···-··· ·-······-··-·····--···
E stimated total. __ ___ __ _____ ... __ .... _. . ___.. __ ... . _._.
Other Cities . . __ ______ ____ ___ _. ___ . . _. ....... _.. __.. -- ... . . .
Arca actu all y reportin g.. --- ----···-···-·····-···-· · ···.
Est imated total __ ____ ____ . __· -· .... _........ · -........ .
R ural __ -· ···- .. . ______ _________ . _____ .. -·_ . .. _.... _. . . ____ .
Arca act uall y reportin g______ __.. __ ............. ___. . .. .
Stat143.215.248.55 15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)\'~t tcr~_total __ .------ -- ---·- -------- · ·---- - -- --- ... .
Rate per I00,01)0 inhal,itn nt:,; __
--- - -
I , 17/i. 000
94.4 %
100. 0%
!i03. 000
84. 1%
IOO 0%
I , :,01. 000
,m.5%
100.0%
3, 179.000
I, 992
4., 028
33, 431
1,051.fi
2fi
53
168
ii. 3
n. n
/i9
l , 187


~n. 7


liO. 4
4•14. 8
3·1/i. 2
l fl l. 7
�LOUISIANA
Standar d M etropolitan St a t istical Area _________ ______ ___ ___
A r ea actually repor ting____ ________________ ________ _____
Estimated tota L _____ ___________ ___________ __________ __
Other Cities_____ ____________________ ____ _____ _____ ___ ____ __
1, 930,000
98. 8'.z!,
100. Oo/o
454,000
33,143
33, 64 1
176
178
269
272
1,533
I, 559
2,915
2, 956
12,620
12, 809
9,258
9, 386
6, 372
6,481
i~~l'i:;t~ftlt~r15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)~~:::::::: :::::::::::::::::::::::::
1l8: g~
2,293
3, 039
15
20
18
24
61
81
231
306
1, 128
1,405
608
806
232
307
3,483
41,840
1, 184. 0
59
87
285
8. 1
66
98
394
11. 1
117
173
1, 813
51. 3
961
1,424
4, 686
132. 6
I. 133
J, 679
15, 983
452. 3
897
l , 329
11, 521
326.0
250
370
7, 158
202. 6
2,567
2,664
6
6
14
14
23
24
07
100
I, 259
I, 304
I, 736
2, 186
7
9
7
9
5
6
77
97
l , 877
1,902
6, 752
680. 0
21
2. 1
20
20
43
4. 3
10
JO
40
4. 0
56,148
103
455
l , 935
1,060
13
13
7
7
2, 058
2, 347
60,464
26
30
236
24
I , 71 8. 2
75, 771
79,214
RuraL _ ----------------------- ---------------- ____ _______ __
1,150,000
Area a ctu ally re porting_____ ___________ ____ ___________ __
67. 5%
E stim a ted totaL ___ ________________ _____ ___________ ____
100. 0%
State Total______ __ __________ _________________ _____________ __
3,534,000
R a te p er 100,000 inhabita nts ____ __ ___ __ ____ ______ ___ ____ --------------
5, 160
MAINE
Sta ndard M etr opolitan Statistica l A r ea ________________ _____
2i7, 000
96. 3%
A rea a ctually reporting __ ____ ___________ _________ ______ _
E s timated total____________ __ _____ ___ ______ _____ __ ___ __
100. 0%
Other C ities__________________________________ _________ _____
369,000
Area a ctuall y r epor ting____________ _________ __ ________ __
79. 4%
E s tima t ed total_- ------ --------- ------------ - -------- -100. 0%
Rural___ __________________ ____ __ ___ _____________ __ __ ____ ___
347,000
98. 6%
A r ea actually r epor ting_______ __ __________ ____ ______ ____
JOO. 0%
E s t im a ted tota L ______ ______ _________ ____ __ ___ ______ __ _
State TotaL _____ ____ ____________ ___ ___ __ _______ __ ___ ___ ____ _
993,000
R ate p er 100,000 inha bita nts ___ ___________ _____ __ ____ ___ -- - -- - - -- - ----
782 .
813
386
403
I, 113
884
521
656
235
296
104
105
302
30. 4
1, 109
1, 124
3, 541
356. 6
436
442
1,911
192. 5
192
195
894
90. 0
2,827
6,067
20,459
16, 000
10,147
53
54
135
137
890
906
507
516
330
336
6. 7
33
38
2, 919
83. 0
161
184
6,388
181. 5
973
1, 109
22, 474
638. 7
592
489
13. 9
17,191
488. 5
249
284
10, 767
306. 0
124
129
259
272
2,023
2, 115
2,400
2, 604
27, 772
29, 032
15, 960
16,685
27,143
28, 3'17
1, 260
17
22
101
553
424
1,43
136
80, 610
l, 507. 3
I
290
2
2, 139
40. 0
7
2,712
50. 7
70
29, 655
554. 5
43
17, 152
320. 7
13
28, 533
533. 5
6
6
MARYLAND
Standard M etr opolitan Statis t ical Area ..... __ ____ _______ __ __
2,824,000
Area actuall y reporting_ __________ ___ ___ ____ _________ ___
100. 0%
Other C ities ____________________________ _____ _____ __________
182,000
Arca a ctuall y reporting__________ _________ _______ ___ ____
98. 2%
100. 0%
E s timated totnL __________________ ______________ _______
514,000
R u ral. ----------------------------- --- - -_ _____ __ ________ ___
Area a ctuall y r eporting______________ _____ _______ ____ ___
87. 7'.z!,
E s timated total _____________ ______ _________ ____ __ ______
JOO. Oo/o
State Tota!_____ ____ _____________ _______ _______ ___ __ ___ ______
3,519, 000
R a te per 100,000 inhabita nts ____ _________ __________ __ ___ - - ----- ------ -
MASSACHUSETTS
Sta ndard Metropolita n Sta t is tical Area ___ _____ ____ _____ ___ _
5,207,000
Area a ctually reporting _________ ____ __ _____ _____________
95. ?'.z!,
E s tima t ed total ___ _______ ____ _______ __ ___ ____ ______ ____ _
100. U"/o
Other Cities_ _____________ ____ _______ _______ _______ _______ __
107, 000
A rea actually reportfog___ ____ _____ _____ _________ _______
100. 0%
Rural _____ __________ ______ ___ __ ___ ____ _______ __ ___ ______ ____
34, 000
Area actu all y reporting_______ ____ ____ ___ ______ _____ ____
JOO. 0%
State Tota!_ _________ . __ _______ __ ____________ _. __ _____ . ______ _
5, 348,000
R ate per 100,000 inha bita nts _____ ____ ______ _________ ____ ---- - ---- -----
See foo t notes at encl of table.
129
2. 4
27
5. 4
675
�r
Table 3.-lndex of Crim e by State, 1965-Continuecl
[Seo footnotes I an d 2 for p op ula tion d a t a ]
A rea
Pop nla t ion
T ota l
o ffenses
M ard er
an d nonnegligen t
man-
F orcible
rape
Robbery
Aggrava ted
assa ul t
L arcen y
$50 and
Burglar y
over
Auto the ft
· sla u gh ter
MICHIGAN
S ta nda rd Metropolita n S ta tistical Arca __ ___________________
Area actuall y repor ti ng __ ____ __ ___ _____ __ __ _______ ____ __
E s tim a ted totaL ________________ ____ _______ _____ ______ _
Other C ities ___________ ______ ________ ____________ ____ ___ ____
Area
reporting
- --------- -- --- --------------E
s timactually
a ted totaL
_____ ____
______
. ____ ______
__ _________ ____
R u ra l __ __ __ _________________________________________________
Area actuall y repor ting _______________ ____ ______________
E stim a ted totaJ ___ ___ __ _______ . __ _____ __ __ _________ ______
State Total. ___ _______ ______ __ __ ____ -- - ___ -- - _________ _____ ___
R ate p er J00,000 in ha hitan ts ___________ __________ ____ ___
r,, 305, 000
99. 2%
100.0%
f,73, 000
95.6%
100. 0%
1, 230,000
09. 5%
100.0%
8,218,000


123, 027
124, 025
303
305
l, 44 1
I, 453
8, 074
8, 146
9, 346·
9,423
47, 896
48, 275
31, 811
32, 064
24, 156
24,359
5, 912
6, 181
9
9
47
40
125
131
470
401
2, 878
3, 009
I, 539
I, 600
844
883
12,200
12, 357
142, 563
1,734.8
44
44
358
4:4
166
167
1, 669
20. 3
154
155
8, 432
102. 6
751
755
10,669
129. 8
6,631
6, 667
57, 951
705. 2
3,491
3, 510
37, 183
452. 5
1, 053
1, 059
26, 301
320. l
33, 560
33,69 1
35
35
150
150
1, 394
1,399
1: 203
l , 208
15, 340
15, 396
9, 195
9,228
6, 252
6, 275
9
9
Jll
Ii
7.5
77
1, 258
l , 298
1,346
1, 389
562
580
2r,
27
186
In
17
1, 433
40. ~
116
120
1, 405
39. 5
2, 003
2, 159
18, 853
530. 5
1,136
I, 172
11, 789
331. 7
301
310
7, 165
201. 6
MINNESOTA
S ta n da rd M etrop olita n S ta tis tical Area ___________ __ ________
Area a ct u a ll y repor ti ng ___ ______ ____ ______ _____ --------E s tim a ted totaL ____ __ __ ______ - _____ - _- --- - - - - - - - - -- - - -Other Ci ties _____ __________ . __- _- - - --- -- --- ---- - -- - ---- - - --Area a c tually rep or ting ____ - - -- ----- - - . - . - - -- - - ---- - - - - E s____
timated
LOta_________________
L. . __ ___ . - - -- - - - -___
- - ________
. -- - - --- ______________
- - - - - - - - - - -- -Rural
___ __ ____
A rea actually rep or ting ____ ___ .- ------- - - - -- ---- -- -----E stim a ted tota J. ______ - _- -- - - - - ____ --- - - - - - - - - - --- - - - - - State Total. ______ ___ ___ ._ -- -- __- - - - - - - - - -- - - - -- - - - - - -- - - - - - - R a te p er 100,000 inlla hi ta n ts _____________ ______ ____ _____
l , 881, 000
99. 7%
100. 0%
547,000
9fi. 0~
100. 0 0
J, 127, 000
07.0%
100. 0%
3,554,000
--·-------- ---
3,267
3,371
3, 702
~. 810
40, 881
I, 150. 3
14
14
50
I. 4
5. 2
I, 594
2, 063
18
25
11
17
34
45
151
25H
857
1, 045
309
406
214
267
5, 287
7, 158
46
22
30
81
110
905
l , 225
2, 249
3,045
J, 405
62
579
784
46
57
17U
334
521
l, 7fi5
3,248
4 13
2, 53f,
6, 626
149
I, 35fl
3, 664
U!) 0


.!~.).


I Al.!)
MISSISSIPPI
S tancla rcl i\fotropolita n S ta iistica l Arca --------- ------- -Arca a ctua ll y rep orting _______ ___________ -- -------- ---- E sLim a tcrl total. _____ - - . - - - - - - - - ... - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Ot her C it ies _________________________ ___ ______ . -----. --- ___
,\rca actua ll y re p or t ing __ ___ ______ .. - - --------- - -------E stima ted total _- ------- - --------------------------- ___
Ru•·,, i
__ - -- - - - - - ______ ___ - _ - ___ - _ - - _______ . __ - _ - _ - - - _ - _ ____
.\ rca actu a ll y rep or tin g __ __ _____ __
li:s1inmtccl totuJ
State Total
H:lll' p r r 100,0<l(i -i11 l~·d1i1a111 s

--- ------- ----
251, 000
66. I%
100.0%
715, 000
73.9%
100. 0%
1, 355, 000
33.0%
JOO. 0%
2, 321, 000
l , 377
Ii, Sta
16, 034
i:no
'
41
120
207
R. n
113
160
n. n
II I
I
f-i
l, 002
150
744
I, 795
ii :l
�MISSOURI
Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area_________ _________ ___
Area actuall y reporting____ _____________ _____ ___________
E stimated totaL - -- -- -- ---- -- ---- - - -- - - --- - -· ·-- - · · -··Ot her Cities . . - · -··- ' -·-·-· · · - · · -·-·· ·-· -····--·-·-· · - · -·· ·Arca actually reporting.. · - · - - · -- · - - --· -· - - · -·-·-··-· ·- ·
E stimated totaL -· -··· - · · - · - · -- --· -·· ·--· · - - - -···- · - · · Rural _- -···---·- - ·---· -··-·· · -·- · · -· ---·- - -- · -- --· -· --· - · · -
~~IT~~ticfi~t~I~~:~'.' .!:::::: :::::::::::::::::::::::::::
2, 835,000
99. 5%
100. 0%
532, 000
93. 6%
JOO. 0%
I, 129,000
186: i~
State TotaL - --·-· · · · · · -·- ···-·- · --- - · -- -·--- - ·-- - -· - ·--···-4, 497,000
R ate per 100,000 inha bitants--·· ··· ··- · ·-·-·-··-·- -· ·· ·- · -- ···-·----·-
59,364
no, 102
230
23 1
663
607
3,901
3, 925
4,22 1
4, 246
27, 900
28,056
4, 106
4, 385
13
14
17
18
77
2
267
285
2, 120
5, 346
7, 972
72, 059
1, 602. 5
37
55
300
6. 7
85
127
812
18. I
126
4, 195
93. 3
503
750
5,281
117. 4
II
63
10
II
23
25
I
11 , 7 1
11, 7 2
JO, 73 1
10, 795
I, 367
l , 460
380
34, 311
763. 0
l, 430
2,132
15,.374
341. 9
392
585
11, 786
202. I
JO I
I, 304
976
499
77
83
845
9 16
732
793
572
620
148
1.51
335
47. fl
957
977
3, 197
452. 9
750
765
2, 534
359. 0
273
279
1, 398
198. 0
I , 985
2,773
4, 135
406
MONTANA
Standard 1'"1etropolitan Statistical Area ...· --·-- · - · - · - - -- · ··
165,000
Area actually reporting .. · - ·----·· · · · -· ··-·- · -··-·-·--·JOO. 0%
Other Cities.--- ·---- · ······ · ·- ·-·-·---· · -· · --· -· -·-·-··--··
206,000
Area actuall y repor trn!:.· -- -·· -· --··--· · · - -- · - - · -· · - · -··
92. 3%
E stimated totaL · · -· . . _. ___ .... -- · ··-·. -- -·. - · - . ·- . . -·100. 0%
RuraL - · - ·-- -·. --·-· _·-- __. . __ -· -- · -· ·-. -· ---- . . -· ··-·· ___ 335, 000
Area actuall y reportiog.·-·- · - - · ··- -·-·· -·- · ----··----- _
98. 0%
E st imated totaL - --·· · - ···· -· ·- · - - · -··-·----·-·-- ·-··-·
100. 0%
Sta te Total. . _____ . __ _. _- · _. -· · ·.-· ._ . _-· - ·--. • . · - - . -- . ·-· _- .
706, 000
R ate per 100,000 inha bitants· -·- · --··-··-·--·-···-··--·- · ··---·-····· ·
!?, 955
2,263
2, 452
4
4
2, 191
2,236
7,643
I, 082. 7
7
12
I. 7
32
33
55
7. 8
24
24
112
15. 0
8, 020
8,568
20
21
50
56
270
278
139
156
3,604
3, 830
2,071
2, 252
l , 866
I , 975
I , 756
I , 933
3
3
8
9
19
21
94
104
755
83 1
626
689
251
276
1, 840
2,075
12, 576
51. 5
IJ
10
78
22
25
324
21. 9
138
156
418
28. 2
907
12
36
2. 4
616
695
3,836
246. 2
136
153
2, 404
162. 8
NEBRASKA
Stan dard l\Ietropolitan Statist ical Area. ---· · ····-------· ···
Area actuall y reporting.---··· · ··---····---······----· · ·
E stimated total.. .... . ... . . ··----···----· · ··-·--- -··-··.
Other Cities __. . ... . . · -- - - - .. __·- .. _.... _-· .. ·- __ . _. . . . __...
Area actually repor ting.... . . . ... -- -- · · · - -- - · · · ··--·· . ..
E stimated total. . .. .... _.· · -· . . ____ . . . . · - -- -··· -- -- · · -· ·
R ural.. ..... ·-· · · · - · -···----······· ··--·· -··· ·- --- - · · · - -·. . .
614,000
92.8%
100. 0%
292, 000
90. 8%
100. 0%
571 , 000
~~!l1ni'~titlKt~T~~:~'.~~:::::::::::::::::::::::: ::::::::: 1: :g~
Slat'k~1~ :Je~ ioo:oo0-inl1ah·ita~-ts::: :: :: : : : : :: : : : : :::: : : : : :: : . · -. ~'.~'.'.'. 143.215.248.55.
8
See footno t es at encl or table.
II
5. I
I , 023
5, 884
384. 8
l
�Tahle 3.-lnde:-.: of Crirne by S ta te, 1965-Con Linu ed
[See footnotes l and 2 for population data]
Murd er
Arca
Population
'l'otal
ofTcnscs
and non-
negligent
Forcible
rape
Aggravated
assault
Burglary
374
395
308
320
3. 233
3, 445
3. 143
3,373
l , fi2i
1,702
204
254
181
ior,
22r,
132
Robbery
man-
Larcen y
$50 ancl
over
Auto theft
slnugh tcr
NEVADA
Stanrtar1 n SLatisLic>tl 11, ea ..
Arca actuall y reportinJ?...
Forcible
rape
.
30,517
31,403
lf,4
mo
24
274
8•12
860
2,091
2, lSO
15, 04
15,538
6, 932
7,082
5, 192
5, 3f,0
3, 528
4,700
21
28
28
37
02
83
302
402
l, 6fl7
2, 22 l
969
I, 291
470
fl3
I, r,3r,
5, 472
41,635
J, 0 2. 0
31
11 0
307
R.O
32
I l4
425
ll. I
44
l57
1, 100
28. r,
25R
910
3,501
9l. l
li50
2, 348
20, 107
523. 0
397
I, 414
9, 787
254. 5
11 ·
4 l0
6, 408
119,04 [
122, 050
574


)9


82
874
3,057
4, 065
IO, 741
II , l34
57, 47R
59, 25:i
28,087
29,225
17, 37r,
17, 799
52
"
lfiO. 7
TEXAS
Stannard Metropolitan Statistical Area .... . ... -··· ·· · ...
7, 174, 000
Area actuall y reporting . . . · -· ... -··· . . .. ........ . ... . ...
95.9%
Estimated toinl. ... __ ....... ··· ········· ·· ·· · ·-· · · ...
100. 0%
Other Cities . .... · ········· · ······· ··· ·············-·· ··· ...
1, 54 1,000
Arca actuall y reporting.·-······-·· · · ··-········ ··· .. ...
8\). %
E stimated Lota!. __· · · ··········-···· · ····· ········ ·· ...
100. 0%
Rural. .--··· ........ ....... . . ·-·· . ..... .. ....• ........ . . .
I, 83(;, 000
Area actually reporting. .. .. •. .... . ......•.... ..
72. 2%
Estimated totaL _·-· ·- ······· ······ ···· ·-··· · ······
100.0%
State Total. _... . ... . ........ ----· ····· · · ········ ·······- ·· . .
10,551, 000
Rate per I00,000 inhahitants
. ... ··-···-· ······· · · - ---- ---------·
l I, 650
12,970
57
fi3
,58
142
158
l, 25
1, 401
5,92 1
H, 502
3,23 1
3,597
989
1,1 01
8, SOfi
12,204
148, 124
1,4m.9
93
l29
790
7. r,
152
211
1, 143
10. 8
151
209
4, 432
42. 0
I, 400
l , 940
14,475
137. 2
3, 798
5, 2f,3
71, 110
674. 0
2, fi7fi
3,709
36, 531
34fi. 2
53r,
743
19, 643
186.2
12,023
12, 127
9
82
21(\
9
83
217
470
475
5, 05fi
4,307
4, 3fi0
1, 883
1, 89
375
70.,
I
2
19
220
fiR
fib
•\30
128
103
R98
9,1
13, 803
1.:1111 :l
4
4
15
4-\6
483
6. 008
339
31i7
4. 845
1~!1 I
UTAH
Standard Metropolitan tatistica l Arca ... .
Area actuall y reporting. . ·-· .. _ . ........ ······-· ..
E stimated tol11L ···-··· ... _ -· · ···· ····· -···· · ..
Other C' ities._ .. -· ..... ··- ...... _........ . .......•... -·· ·Area actually reportin!(.-.. ·····-·· ················ ·· ..
EsLimatcd total. ........... ... ...... . .. ... ......•...
Hurni. _-····· . .. . ........ .
..
Area actwil ly reporting
Estima ted tol al
State Total
l<:t11• p f·t lltll .fl!U l 1 11!1:11!1 1·, 111-.
7.,7, 000
gg_ l o/,,
100. 0%
8fi, 000
53. 3%
100.0%
147,000
92. 3%
100.0%
990, 000
I .r)

--------------- 5
3
6
(\
5
(i
88
229
' H
2:{ I
an
40
43
554
.;,; n
fi, 095
tiOH. !l
,1
fi3
2, 064
inC:
A
�VERMONT
Sta ndard M etropolitan Statistical Area ___ _____ ________ _____
one
Other Cities__ ______ ______ __ _____ ______ __ __________ __ ____ __ _
186, 000
Area actually reporting_______ ____ _____ _____ ____ ________
90. 2%
Estimated totaL _________ ___ ______ __ ___ ___ __ ______ ____ _
JOO. 0%
Rural_ ___ __ _________ __ __ __ ___ ___ _______ ____ _______ __ ______ _
211 ,000
Area actually reporting_____________ __________ ___ _______
99. 1%
E stimated totaL __ ____ ______ _____ __ ___ ______ ___ _____ __ _
100. 0%
State Tota!__ __ ____ ___ __ ______ __ ___ _____ _____ _____ ____ _______
397, 000
Ra te per 100 ,000 inhabitants ________________ ___ _________ -- - ---- -------
852
945
-- ------ --- ---------- --
2
2
2
2
18
20
385
427
199
221
246
273
I, 343
1, 355
2,300
570. 4
2
2
.5
24
2,1
26
6. 5
16
16
18
4. 5
23
23
43
10. 8
851
859
1,280
324. 0
312
315
530
135. 0
11 5
116
389
98. 0
39, 529
14.8
313
1, 433
3, 721
16, 836
11 , 199
5, 870
5, 015
5, 44 1
36
39
45
49
151
164
717
778
2,110
2,289
I, 480
I , 006
476
516
6, 64 1
6,665
51, 63 5
I, 158. 6
109
109
296
6.6
121
121
483
10. 8
11 8
11S
l , 715
3S. 5
1,463
I, 469
5, 96
133. 9
2, 400
2,4 15
21,540
483. 3
l , 555
I, 561
14, 366
322. 3
869
872
7,267
163.1
20, 11 3
29, 2.16
45
227
227
767
45
771
) , 256
l, 260
13, 094
13, 149
9,410
9,449
4, 314
4, 335
0, 121
6, 340
10
10
2
20
71
74
25-1
2,490
2,579
2,317
2, 400
951
985
4, 835
5, 190
40, 760
1,303.4
11
12
67
2. 2
45
48
304
JO. 2
56
60
905
30. 3
1,805
60. 4
2, 369
2,543
18,271
61 I. 1
I, i14
I , 840
13, 089
157. S
377
405
5, 725
19 1. 5
4, 762
4, 907
28
24
24
162
167
595
614
2,.044
2,105
I, 255
1, 295
654
674
1,576
2, 215
4
6
8
II
40
56
11 5
162
792
I , 113
309
56 1
218
306
2, 435
2, 459
9,581
528. 8
38
38
72
4. 0
42
42
77
4. 2
38
38
261
14. 4
225
227
1, 003
55. 4
1, 368
I, 382
4,600
253. 9
449
454
2,310
127. 5
275
278
I, 258
69. 4
2
VIRGINIA
Standard Metropolitan Sta tistical Area __ ______ ____ __ ____ ____
2, 39 1, 000
Area actually reporting___ __ ____________ _____ ________ ___
100. 0%
Ot her Cities _____ _____ __ ____________________ __ ________ ___ ___
4 9,000
Area actually repor ting______ ___ __ ___ ____ ____ ___ ________
92. 2%
E stimated totaL _- ------------- - --- -- --- ------- -------100. 0%
Ru.ra l _ ----- -- -------- -- ---- - --- -- - -- ---- -- -------- - -------l , 577, 000
Area actually reporting_ ___ _____________________________
99. 0%
E stimated total _- - -- - -------------- --- ------ --- -------100. 0%
State Total__ _____________________________ ___ ________ ________
4, 457, 000
R a te per 100,000 inhabitants ___________ _______ _________ _ - ------------WASHINGTON
Standard Metropoli tan Statistical Area_________ __ ____ _______
1, 909,000
Area actually reporting__ ___________ ________ __ ______ ___ _
99. ~'.il,
E s ti mated total _________ __________ ___ __ __ ___ ___ __ ___ ___
100. UV/o
Other Cit ies_ ___ _____ _____ ________ ___ ___ ____ ________ __ ______
469, 000
Area actually reporting_____ ______ __ __ ______ ____________
96. 5'.z'g
E stima ted total __ ______ ________ __________ ____ __________
100. Oo/o
RuraL ________ _____ __ _____ __ __ _______ __ ___ _____ ___ ________ _
613, 000
Area actually reporting____ __ ___ _________ _____ ___ _______
93. 2%
E stimated totaL _- ------- -- ----- ------ -- - - --- --- ---- - -100. 0%
State Total__ ___ _______ ____ ___ __ _____ ______ __ ____ _____ ________ _
2,990,000
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ______ ______________________ --- ------ -----
263
263
282
WEST VIRGINIA
Standard Metropoli tan Statistical Area___ ____________ _____ _
588, 000
Area actu aUy reporting____________________________ ____ _
97. 7%
Estimated totaL _-------------------------------------100. 0%
Other Cities__ ___ ______ _______ ___ ________ ___________________
329, 000
Area actually reporting___ ___________ _________ ___ _____ __
71. 1%
E stimated totaL _--- --- -- --- ---------- ------ -- --------100. 0%
Rural _-- -------------------- --------- --- ------------------894, 000
Area actuall y reporting______________________ ____ _____ __
99. 0%
stimated
_--0%
StateETotaL
___totaL
_____ ___
____----_____-----------------------------___ ___ ___ ____ ____ ____ ___ __ ___
1,8100.
12,000
R ate per 100,000 inhabita nts _________________ __________ _ -------------See foo tn otes nt end of table.
28
�~1
Table 3.-lnde,~ of Crime by State, 1965- Continued
0
[ Seo footnotes 1 and 2 for population d ata]
Area
Population
Total
offenses
M urd er
and nonnegligent
manslaugh ter
Forcible
rape
Robbery
Aggravated
assault
B urglary
Larceny
$50 and
over
Auto theft
WISCONSIN
Standard M etropoli ta n Statistical Area ___ - --- --- - - --- - --- 2, 060, 000
Area actuall y reporting_ _____ _____ _____________ __ __ ____ _
98. 2%
Estimated totaL _--- - ------- - ------------ ------- ------100. 0%
Other Cities___ ___ _______ __ _____ __ _____________________ ____ _
9 10, 000
Area actuall y reporting ______ _____________ ____ _____ _____
96. 7%
Estimated
totaL
- - --- - -- - -- - - --------------_
100. 000
0%
R ural
___________
____ ---------___ _________________________
-- -- -- -____
1, 174,
Area actuall y reporti ng_ ___ __ ____ _________ ____ __________
85. 5%
E stimated totaL ____________ _________________ ____ ______
100. 0%
StateRTote.I
________
__-- -- - ---- --- --- --- - ------- - - ------ -- --4, 144,000
ate per
100,000 inhabitants _____ __ __ __ __ _____ _____ _____ _____ ____ __ __ _
19,938
20, 159
44
45
80
83
397
399
869
875
6,423
6, 534
7,210
7, 290
4, 906
4,933
5, 128
5, 303
4
4
15
16
39
40
92
95
2,370
2,451
I, 720
I, 779
888
9 18
4,364
5,1 03
30, 565
737. 6
13
15
64
1. 5
43
50
149
3. 0
31
36
475
11. 5
216
253
1, 223
29. 5
2, 468
2, 886
11, 671
286. 5
I, 156
I, 352
10, 421
251. 5
437
5 11
6, 362
153. 5
2, 233
2, 354
3
3
16
17
42
44
72
76
888
885
933
327
345
801
I , 051
3,405
1,001. 6
,',
17
22
39
11. 5
13
17
61
17. 9
54
228
7
10
2. 9
71
147
43. 2
299
304
517
! , 460
426. 5
90
118
463
136. 2
WYOMING
Standard M etropoli tan Sta tistical Area __________ __ ____ ____ _
Other Cities ____ __________________________ ----- --- ---- _____ _
Area actually reporti ng ______________ __________ ________ _
E stimated total ___ ___ _____ ------ ___ __ __---- --- _______ __
R urnL ______________ ________ __________ ------ - __________ ___ _
~~mtitiffit~f~~'.-~'.·:~:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
None
208, 000
94. 9%
100. 0%
132, 000
76.1%
100. 0%
340,000
State TotaL _ __ _____ ___________ __ ________ __ ___ ___ ___ __ ___ __ _
R ate per 100,000 inhabita nts _______________________________ ______ __ ___
936
l , 235
363_3
1 For sta ndard metropoli ta n statistical areas in this table the percentage actuall y may not coincide with the ratio between reported and esti mated crime totals since t hese
data represent the sum of sucb calculations for individual areas varyi ng in size, portions reporting, and cri me rates.
2 Population by area for each state is 1965 estimate; total population for each state is Bureau of the Census pro visional estimate as of July 1, l965 , a nd subject to cha nge.
All
rates were calculated on the estimated popttlation before round ing.
�Table 4 .- Index of Crime , 1965, Standa rd ft1et ropolitan S tat.is t ica l A re as
Standard met ropolitan stat istical ar ea
P opulation
Abilene, Tex_ ___ ______ ___ ________ ______________ __ __ __ _____ __
131, 000
(Includes T aylor and J ones Cou nties.)
100. 0%
Arca actually reporting______ __ ________ ___ __ ___ ____ ___ __
R ate per 100,000 inhabitants _______ __ ____ ____ _____ __ ___ _____ ___ ____ ___
Akron, Ohio_____ ___ _________ ___ ____ ____ __ _____ ____ ___ ____ __ _
649, 000
(Includes Summit and Por tage Counties.)
Area actuall y reporting____ ___ ______ ___ ______ ____ ___ ____
100. 0%
Rate per 100,000 inha bitants _____ __ _________ _______ ___ ___ ___ ________ __
Albany-Schenectady-Troy, N .Y_____ ______ __________ _____ ___ _
720, 000
(I ncludes Albany , Rensselaer, Saratoga and Schenectad y
Counties.)
Area actually repor ting_________ __ __ ___ ___ ___ ___________
100. 0%
R ate per 100,000 inha bitants __ ____ ___ __ _____________ ____ ____ __ ____ ____
Allentown-Bethlehem-Eastori, Pa.-N ,]_ __ ____ _______ ____ ___ _
502, 000
(Includes L ehigh and Nor t hampton Counties, Pa.; a nd
Warren Count y, •. J.)
Arca actu ally re porting________ ___ ____ ______ __ _____ _____
90. 0%
~;tl;;J;1ot~~gb-i"~i:i-abitaiiis:::::::::::::::::::::::::::: __-___ '143,000
. ~~: ~~Altoona, Pa __ -- --- -- ----- -------------- ______ __ ____ _________
(Includes Blair Count y.)
Area actu ally reporting__ ______ ____ _____ __ __ __ ___ __ _____
97. 0%
~!~empa;;1ot~5~6-it1-hnbitai11.s:::::::::::::: ::: :::::::::: : -----_'181,
.~~:~
~Amarillo, Tex__ ______ ____ ________ ____ __ _____________________
000
(Includes Potter a nd R a ndall Counties.)
Area actuall y reporting___ ______ ____ _________ ____ __ _____
100. 0%
R ate per 100,000 inhabitants _____ ______ __ __ ____ __ __ _____ ____ ______ ____
Anaheim-Santa Ana-Garden Grove, Calif__ _____ __ ___ __ ______
1, 148, 000
(I ncludes Orange Count y.)
Area actually repor ting__ ___ _____ __ ________ _______ ___ ___
100. 0%
R ate per 100,000 inhabitants ______ __________ __ _____ __ ___ ___ ____ __ _____
Ann Arbor, Mich _------- ----- -- ------ - ---- ----- -----------189. 000
(Includes Washtenaw Count y.)
Arca actuall y repor ting__ ___ ____ ___ _____ ___ _____ __ ____ __
100. 0%
R ate per 100,000 inhabitants ____ _______ __ __ ______ ______ __ ____ _____ ____
Asheville, N.C _____ ____ ________ ___ ____________________ __ ___ _
139,000
(Includes Buncombe Co11nt y.)
Area actuall y repor ting____ _______ __ ____ ____ __ ___ __ ____ _
100. 0%
R ate per 100 ,000 in habitants ______ __________ ___ __ ______ _ ____ _________ _
'J'otal
oITenses
i\'1urder
and nonnegligen t
manslaughter
F orcible
rape
Aggra-
R obbery
rnted
assault
Burglary
Larceny
$50 an d
Auto
theft
OYe r
4
3. 0
13
9.!)
23
I 7. 5
59
44. 9
910
099. I
592
450. 4
JG8
127. 8
3
I. 308. 9
IO
2. 0
74
11. 4
486
74. 9
347
53. 5
3, 37
520. 5
2,547
, 392. 5
2, 032
313. I
6,497
902. 4
9
1. 3
38
,1, ~
12G
17. 5
374
5 1. 9
3. 0f>3
42-1. 0
I. 445
200. 7
I , 452
20 1. 7
3. 55 1
~- 745
745. (i
G
7
I. 4
26
28
5. 6
78
89
17. 7
143
158
31', 5
I, 722
1, 800
358. 4
I, 065
I, 105
220. 0
511
558
Il l. I
755
03
563. 0
3
3
2. I
5
5
3.;)
II
13
9. I
20
23
IG. I
49 1
514
360:-.4
75
85
5U. 6
150
I GO
11 2. 2
2. 707
l, 54(i. l
7
3. 9
IO
5. 5
82
45. 3
21 4
I IS. 3
I, 125
621. 9
I, 039
57"1. 3
320
170. 9
26, I 7
2. 281.0
32
2. 8
131
I I. 4
538
,10. 9
992
Su. 4
13, 273
I, 156. I
s, 042
700. 5
3, 179
270. 9
3, 0 70
I. 626. 7
2
I.I
26
13. 8
70
37. I
234
124. 0
1, 065
504. 3
I, 224
648. 5
449
237. 9
2,003
I, 439. 0
7
IO
7. 2
42
30. 2
187
134. 3
717
5. 0
515. I
754
54 1. 7
2 G
205. 5
I , 778
I, 352. (i
s,
�Tah le 4. - lndex of Crime, 1965, S t a ndard Metropolitan Statistical Areas- Conti nued
Standard metropolitan statistical a rea
Atlanta, Ga ___ ___ _______ __________ ____
(Includes C layton, Cohh, D e Kalh, Pul ton Hnd Gw innett
oun t ies.)
Area actually reporting __ ______ ... -- · -- __ ----· ·Estima ted totaL __ ____________ __--- - __-- -- -· --- -- - -- -- Rate per 100,000 inhabitan ts __ ____ ___-- -- --- - --- --- - - __ _ _
Atlantic City, N ,J _______ ____ ____ _____ ____ ___ ____ _______ ____ _
(Includes Atlan tic County.)
Area actually reporting ______ . _ - - -- - -- ___ ___
E s timated tota L .... - ____ ___ ______ __ _______-- · · -· ---- --·
Rate
per________
100,000____
in ha
bitants-- -- -- ----------- -- _ _
Aus tin, Tex
______
____ _________
___ _____-·-______
(Incl udes Travis County.)
Arca actually repor ting ______ _ _____ ______ _____ _ _
Rate per 100,000 inha!Jitants__ ______ _____________ _______
Bakersfield, Calif_______ ___ ____ ______ _____ ____ ____ ___ _
(Includes Kero County.)
Area actually reporting ____ ___ _ ___ - --- -- - -- ---- - -Rate per 100,000 inha hitanLS-- - ----- - ------ -- --- -- - -- ---.
B altimore, Md _____ ____ __ __ ____-- -- --- --- ------ -- ---- -- ----(Inclucles Ba ltimore C'ity a nd .>\ nno Arunrtel, Baltimore,
Carroll a nd Howard Coun t ies.)
Area actua lly reporting _________ _____
_________
·Rate per 100,000 inha hitants __________ __________ ______ _
Baton Rouge, La ____ __ __ _____ ___. ______ ____ ___ -· -- - - -·-- -- -(Includes Eas t Ba ton Rouge P nrish .)
Area actually reporting __ _______ _______ ---- - -- - - - -Rate per J00,000 inhahitan ts ____ ____ ___________ ______ __ .
B ay City, Mich _____ __ _____ ____ ___ ---- - -------- --- -- - (Inclucles B a y C'ounty .)
Area actually reporting ___ _
Rate per 100,000 inha hil a nts_ . ------ · ___

·
Beaumont-Por t Arthur, Tex ____ . _·-·· · · ------ ___ . .
(Includes J efferson a nrl Orange Count ies.)
Area act ually reporting ___ ____ .
E s t imated tota L _ ___________
-·Rate per 1011,000 inha bitants- .. _
__
.
--Binghamton, N.Y.-Pa ---····· - ____ . _____ _ ________ _
(IDclurl es nroo me and 'l'ioga roundes , N . Y .: a nrl Susqueha n na ('011nl.y , P fl .)
Area nctuall y reporting __ __
l l:ltr J)('r 100,onn inhnh i1a nls
Population
'I'otal
offenses
Murder
and n onnegligent
manslnughter
Forcible
R obber y
rape
Aggravated
assault
Burglary
Auto
the rt
L arceny
$50 and
over
I, 227, 000
OR. I %
100. 0%
21, 557.
22, 088
I , 800. 7
137
141
I I.
a
175
179
14. fl
537
553
1,273
45. I
!03. 8
8, 229
8, 435
fi87. 7
7, 055
7,206
587. 5
94
99
M.4
124
132
75. 2
2,034
I, I 9. 7
1,027
1,055
601. 1
i25
293. 0
2,202
?- J-
889. 9
333. 4
2,452
l , 229
4,195
4,301
350. 6
I 76, 000
30
603
630
95.6%
3,919
100.0%
4,042
2,303. I
4. 0
31
17. 7
4,508
I, 821. 7·
23
9. 3
14. l
118
47. 7
7, 3fi5
2,255. I
lfi
4. 9
84
25. 7
263
258
3,428
80. 5
79. 0
1,049. fi
38,858
2,088. 5
161
8. 7
2,336
125. 6
4, 346
12, 587
676. 5
11 , 629
18.0
625. 0
7,464
401. 2
5,315
2,005.4
JR
6. 2
28
IO. 9
11 9
318
123. 6
2, 295
46. 2
2,085
810. 2
176. 4
35
32. 4
40. 8
405. 8
295
2i3. 3
20fi
190.
7
7
2,088
359. 0
247, 000
100.0%
35
580
234. 4
327,000
100. 0%

--
753.
R5
261. 5
! , 861, 000
100.0%
335
233. 6
257, 000
100.0%
891. 9
454
108, 000
100. 0%
1,031
13
955. I
12. 0
44
43
333, 000
98. 9%
100.0%
2, 794
2, SnO
858. 8
22
22
13
13
fl.fl
3. 9
50
52
15. 6
2. 093
lii-1. (i
r)
g
2. U
12
58
I fi


~. 0


18. 7
338
344
103. 3
l, 494
5fi3
314
l , 52i
458. 5
578
173. 6
97. 3
I , ! Sf>


182. 2


59ti
1\l2. I
7;1 2
324
310,000
100.0%
2:n
�B ir ming h a m , Ala ______ ___ __ _____
671, 000
(Includes J efferson County.)
Area actu a ll y repor t ing _______ _____ ___ ____ __
.
100.0%
R ate p er 100,000 inhabita n ts ____ ____ __ ___________ _______ _


Boston-Lowell-La w re n ce, Mass, __ ___ __ ____ _______ __________


3,217, 000
(Inclu des Essex, M iddlesex , N o rfol k anrl Su!Tolk
Counties.)
Area actu ally repor t ing_____ ____ ________________ ___ ____
97. 3%
E stimated totaL __ _____ ____ ___ ___ _____________ ____ _____
100. 0%
R a te per 100,000 in h abitants ________________ ____________ __


Bridge port-S ta mford - N orwa lk , Con n ________________________


734, 000
(Includes Fai rfield C ounty.)
A rea a ct u all y r epor t ing___ __________________________ ___ _
100. 0%
R ate per 100,000 inhabi tan ts ________ ______ _____ _____ _____ _


Brock ton , Mass________ __ ______ ___ _____ _____________ ________


277, 000
(Incl udes P l ymou t h Cou nty.)
A rea actu ally repor ting________________ _______ __ ________
93. 0%
Estim a ted total _------ ---- - - - - - - - --- -- - ---- -- - - ------- 100. 0%
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants __ ______ ____ __ _______________ _


Brown s ville -H arlingen-Sa n B enito, T ex ____ _____ __ ___ _______


160, 000
(Inclu des Cam eron Coun t ~•.)
A rca actu all y repor t ing _____ _______ ___________________ __
100. 0%
Rate p e r 100,000 i nh abitants ______ ___ ___________________ __


Buffalo , N .Y_ ___ ____ _______ ____ ______ _____ __ ________ ________


1, 459, 000
(Inclu d es E ric a n d N iagara Cou nties.)
Area actu all y rep orting _____ _________ __ ___ ____ _____ ____ _
99. 7%
Estimated total__ __ ___ ____ ________ _____ __ __________ _____
100. 0%
Rate p er 100,000 i n h abitants ____ __ ___ ____________ ____ ___ _
Ca nton, Ohio _____ - --- - --- - - - --- - - -- - - ------------ -- - ------- 355, 000
(I ncl udes Stark Coun ty.)
Arca actu all y repor ting______ _____ ___ ________ ___________
100. 0%
Rate p e r 100,000 inhabit a nts ____ ____ ______________ ______ _ _______ ___ _
143, 000
Ce d ar Ra p ids, Iow a __ - - -- - - - - - - - - --- - -- - -- - ----- - -- - --- -- - __
( Includes L i n n County. )
Arca actually repor t ing ____ ___ ____ ______ ________________
100. 0%
Rate p er 100,000 inhabita nts ______ ___ __ ___ ________ __ __ __ -Ch a mpa ig n - Urbana, IlJ __ ___ ______ ________ ____ _____ _____ ____
145, 000
( I ncludes Champaign Cou nty.)
100. 0%
A rea act u nll y reportin g ___ __ _______ ______ __ _______ ._ ___ _
Rate p e r 100,000 inhabitan ts ______ ____ __________ __ ____ __
C h arleston, s .c ___________ __ _____ ____ ____________ __ _________
297,000
( I ncludes Charleston and B erkele y Coun ties.)
Arca actu all y reporting_____ ______ __ _________ ______ _____
100. 0%
Rate p e r 100,000 in h a b i tants __ __________ __ ___ _________ _____ __ ________ _
Charlotte, N.C._______________ ___ ___ ______ ____ ___ ____ _____ ___
366, 000
(Includes Meck lenburg and Union Coun ties. )
Area actua lly repor t ing _____ ____ __ ____ ____ ___________ ___
100. 0%
Rate p er 100,000 inh a bitan ts ______________ __________ ___ _ ___ ______ ____ _
11 . 659
,g
I , 737. 1
13. 3
53, 637
54. 998
I, 709.·4
3
12. 4
3 7
57. 7
l , 171
174. 5
4, 9S•I
742. fi
3, 531
526. l
I, 4 14
210. 7
2. 8
so
157
162
5. 0
l ,f,68
I, 704
53. 0
1,695
I , 740
54. l
17, f,32
18, 127
563. 4
10, 655
10,942
340. 1
21, 743
22,234
691. I
9. 825
1,338.2
18
2. 5
33
4. 5
175
23. 8
323
44. 0
4, 562
621. 4
2,745
373. 9
1. 969
268. 2
4,324
1,689.7
6
7
2.5
22
23
8.3
73
83
29. 9
212
224
80.8
2, 177
2,307
832. 4
1, 188
1. 264
456. 1
64fi
775
279. 6
l ,6fi3
I , 037. 7
2
1. 2
10
11. 9
24
15. 0
178
Ill. 1
832
519. 2
429
267. 7
17fl
111.7
lfi, 998
l i, 082
1, 170.8
33
33
2.3
103
10-1
7. I
571
575
39. 4
957
964
66.1
6, 974
6,999
479. 7
4,720
4, 752
325. 7
3, G40
3, 655
250. ,5
3,677
1,036. 3
10
2.8
27
7. 6
133
37. 5
129
36. 4
1, 616
45:i. 4
1, 193
336. 2
5fi9
160. 4
991
691. 7
1
.7
2
I. 4
17
11. 9
25
17. 4
389
271. 5
341
238. 0
2lfi
150. 8
I, 140
784. 7
7
4. 8
7
4. 8
38
20. 2
79
54. 4
483
332. 5
335
230. fi
191
131. .1
5, 072
1, 710.2
31
10. 5
61
20. 0
167
56. 3
415
139. 9
2,214
746. 5
I , 424
480. 2
700
256. 3
fi, 947
1,898.9
58
44
12.0
296
15. 9
so. 0
910
24 . 7
3,225
SSL 5
I, 712
468. 0
702
191. 9
4,683
7
�r
Table 4 .- lndex of Crime, 1965, Stan dard Jlfetropolit;a.n Sta tistical Areas- Continued
Standar d metropolitan statistical area
Population
320, 000
Chattanooga , Tenn.-Ga __ __ . . . .... .. -· .. _..... _· - · -· _.... __..
(Includes llamilton County, T ena. ; a nd Walker County,
Ga.)
Area actually reponiug ___ ··- -·--··-·-·-·· - ··-···-·---·84. 3%
Estimated total. - -·-·. __ . ..... _.·-·-_ . . . . . .... _..... _._
100. 0%
R ate per 100,000 inhabita nts--- ··-··· -·····----··-······ · ·-·· -·- ····-Chicago, Ill-·- -·-·-- .. _. .. .. _... . . _. .. ___ ... _._ ... _... . _. __ ._
6, 641. 000
(Includes Cook, Du P age, Kane, Lake, McHenry a nd
Will Counties .)
07. 1%
Area actua lly reporting ___ · --·--··- · - -· · · · ··· -·····-· ·- _
I00.0%
E s timated total. - ··· ······---·-············----· __-·-·_
Ra te per 100,000 inha bitants. · -·····--- -· · · · ··--··-··--- · -·-··-·· --·
Cincinnati, Ohio·Ky ..fodiana _. .. -· -·· · -· -· -· -··········- -· _
!, 349,000
(Includes II.ami lton, C lermont and \\'arren Counties,
Ohio; and Campbell, Kenton a nd Boone Coun ties,
Ky.; a nd Dearborn County, Incl. )
Oi.1 %
Area actually reporting ..... . · · · ··-···-· ···-··· .. -· __ -·_
100.0%
Estim ated totaL -· .. -·-· -· -· · --··· . . ···-···-··-- · -·-···
!{ate per 100,000 inhabitan ts---- ·-- · · · ·······-·--····-··.
2, 022.000
Cleveland, Ohio....... __ --· · · ··--·- ··· · - · ··-·· .. -·--···(Includes C uyahoga, Lake, Geauga a nd :Medina Counties .)
Area actua lly reporting __. . . . . ... . . . ..... -·-···-·-· -· __.
Oi . 0%
E stimated tota l. ---··-····· ····· ·- ···--·---·--- · · · . __
100.0%
Rate p er 100,0tlO inha bitants. . ··-·-··--···--- ···- · -·-· --·-·-- -·173, 000
Colorado Springs, Colo. · · · ··· · ·· · -·· · · ·- -··-·-·-······· - -(.!ncludcs El Paso Coun t )·.)
Arca act ually repor1 ing __. _.... . .. .... _. .... ·- -.. __. ... .
JOO. 0%
Rate per 100,000 inlrn bita ntS-·-···--···---·--·· -···· · -· · ..
249, 000
Columbus, Ga. -Ala .. --·---- ... --------· -- --- -·- ··· ....
(Includes C hatta hoochee and :\l 11scogec Counties, Ga .;
a nd Russell County, A la .)
Area acwaJ ly reporting
~6. :io/c
Estimated total _ _
100. oc;
Ha te per JOO.ODO inha ilitants-.
Columbus , Ohio
_ . .
_
832, 000
( I ncludl's Fra nkl in, !Jl'la warc• a nd l'icka w:1,v l '011n1 iC's.)
\rrn :1<'1unll ,1 l'('jl()l'IIIII!
100. oc:
H·l11· P"' 1011.0flO i11h·,l,i1 ·lJJI'
'J'otal
offenses
M u rder
and non·
negligent
manslaughter
Forcible
rape
Robber y
Aggrarnted
assault
Burglary
Auto
theft
Larceny
$50 and
over
1, 2i2
1,337
418. 3
38
42
13. l
34
42
13. I
104
1l 6
36. 3
198
228
71. 3
2, 143
2,411
754. 3
I , 402
I , 435
15, 800
16,224
244. 3
12. 245
12,514
41, 2i6
42,386
2,048.9
445
455
G. 0
I .4
63 . 3
[ 2,056
12, 763
9-16. 3
54
57
193
108
463
14. 7
886
010
68. I
5, 430
5. 715
423. i
3'. soo
4. 2
23, 474
113
176
2. 008
2, i 93
115
5. i
I 'I
2,043
IOl. 0
I. 620
I, 6:i6
' I.O
10, i 08
24,062
II, 055
2, 025
5,066
6,087
546. f,
144. 6
301. 0
4, 1123
5,007
I, 566. 6
132, 8 9
136,060
I. 189. 8
21. 6
.9
497
36. 8
2,28 1
5
20
46
1, :3 I7. I
2. 9
11. 5
26.1)


iO. a


2, i fi9


J, Q.i J


I, 22i. :J
10
13
17
i . (i
f,, 8


)7


fi4
2,i. 7
-lfi. 2


tl


!Of;
I :!. ;
1:1 :io;
l ..-1i1!1 I
16
I .,
103
91
11 5
•iOO



t '.!




634
83 1
260.0
27,005
27, 709
417. 3
34, 577
3 288
1,712
1,868
13 . 5
35, 337
532. 1
260. 2
I, 01 8
i56


,8i. 8


4:m. 5
333
192. 3
1, 21 6
i72
1,:J:,lj


i45. I


60-l
854


N:1. 3


628
2j2, b


!AH




ii ....




'{,
tj 1
.~):{"
1:>:,
•I


?,


\~~


!ti:! q


�Corpus Christi, Tex __ -- -· ---------- -- _- ____ ----· _____ ___ __. .
272, 000
(Includes Nueces and San P atricio Cou nties.)
Arca actuall y reporting .. · - -- · · ·· · - · · · · ·· · -· · · - · · ·-·····
97. 2%
E stimated totaL .-·· ·-··· · · ·· · ·· · · · · ·-····-- ··· · · · ····100. 0%
Rate per 100,000 inhabitan ts. .... · - · - · ····· · · ·-·- · ·--·-· .. .. ......... .
Dallas, Tex.·-·-·· · · · · ······--· ·· · ···· · · · -· · · · -· · · ··-- --- · ··
1,298, 000
(Includes Collin, Dal las, Denton and E llis Count ies .)
Arca actuall y reporting_ · ···· · ·· · · ·-- ··· -··---· -·· · ··-··
95. 0%
E stimated totaL .···- · ·· -· · ··· · -·· · · - · ··-- · - · -· ----·-·100. 0%
R ate per 100, 000 inhabitants-·· · · · ·· -· -· ·---- -···· · -·· · · ------·· ··· ···
Davenport·Rock I sland·Moline, Io wa•III ____ .. .. . . . . . . .... . ..
329, 000
(Includes Scott Coun ty , I owa ; and Rock Island and
Henry Coun t ies, Illinois. )
Area actuall y repor ting ... . ... . . ... ____ -·····- · ··- ···-··
100. 0%
R ate per 100,000 inha bita nts---- · - · ·· ····--·· ··-·-·-·- ·- · ·· -······ ····
Dayto n, Ohio ___ - · ·· · ··-·· ·- · · · -·- · -- -· ··· · · ·-·- · - -- -- --···791, 000
(Includes Greene, Miami, Montgomer y and Preble
Counties. )
98. 4%
Area actu all y repor ting .. . ·-···- · ···· · · -···-·---- -·--- · Estimated totaL. .... -. -·-· · · ·· ·· ··-· -- -· -· -· ··-· -·- . ...
100. 0%
R ate per 100,000 inhabi ta nts . . . . ·-·· ··· · · · · ···· · · ····· · · . ... ......... .
Decatur, III.- . --· · · - .· ·-· . . . . · · · · · · -· ... . .. -·- · -· -·-· .. ··- · .
125, 000
(Includes M acon County .)
100.0%
Area actually report ing_·-···· · -···· · ··· · · · ··--··-·-· --R ate per 100,000 inhabi ta nts· · · ·· ·· ·· ····- - -·-·· · ··- · ···· ··· ·-·- · ·····
De n ver , Colo . . ... -··--·-·-·· · · · -···- · -· · · - .... .. . ··-·-_-··__
1, 078, 000
(Includes Adams, Ara pahoe, Boulder, Denver and
Jetferson Coun ties. )
100.0%
Area actually repor ting _·-···-·--· · ··-···-·-·-···· · · ··· ·
R a te per 100,000 inhabitants·- ···-·-· -· -·- · · · -· ·· · · ····- ···-·-········
Des Moines, I owa __ · ·- · · · -···- · -· -·-·-·-· -· -- -·- · · · -· -· ··· · ·
268,000
(I ncludes Polk County.)
Area actually repor ting··· · ·· · · -·- · ··-··· ---·- · ··---·--100. 0%
R ate per 100,000 inhabitants·-· · · ··· ··· -·· · · · · · · · · · ··· · · ···· ··· -·---·Detroit, Mich __ ····· · · · · ·· · · · · -·-·-·-·· --· ·· ·· · · ··· · · · · · · · ···
3, 952, 000
(Includes Macomb, Oakland and Wayne Counties.)
Area act uall y repor ting··· ·-· ··· · ···· ··-· --··-··· -···- ·09. 0% ,
Estimated total. _. . . .. ·· · · - . -· .... . . __-· ___ . __ .. . . .. ··100. 0%
R ate per 100,000 inhabitants· · · ····-·-·-·- · · · ···· ---·--- ····· ·· -······
Duluth.Superior, Minn .• Wis . · ····-·- · ····· ----------· · ··-··
277, 000
(I ncludes St. Louis County, M inn.; and Douglas County,
Wis. )
99. 0%
Area actually reporting_···-· · · ·· · ··· ···--·----·--····-·
~~ti;ipa:re?~~gg5.inh-abttaiits~
~
Durha m , N .C·-····- - ···--· ····· -·-··· · · ·· ···· ·-·-·-·-·····123, 000
(Incl udes D urham Coun ty.)
100. 0%
Area actu all y reporting.·-· --- · ··· ·· · · ·· ··········-·· · · ·
R ate per 100,000 inhabitants·-·-·-- · -······ · · ···· · · · ·· -· -·-----···-···
El P aso , Tex _· ---···-· · ··············· -· · ·-· ··· · ··- · ·· ··· -·362, 000
(Includes El Paso County. )
·
Area actuall y reporting... · - -··-····· -·· · ---··- · -···· ·· 100. 0%
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants·-·------·-··--··· ·- ···-·--· ·-- ·- ----·-·--
=143.215.248.55:: ::::::::::::~:::::::: _..... ~: ~.
-;i
c.,-.
5,455
5, 505
2, 054.6
19
20
7.3
28
29
10. f,
129
134
49. 2
500
611
224. 4
2, 259
2,327
851. 5
1, 887
1, 9 10
704. 7
534
555
203.8
22, 338
22,018
130
134
10. 3
170
180
13. 9
678
691
53. 2
1, 748
1, 812
139. 6
10, 54 1
10, 789
83 1. 0
4, 622
4,821
371. 3
4,449
4, 491
345. 9
9
2. 7
25
7. 6
123
37. 3
149
45. 2
l, 770
537. 3
l , 591
482. 0
790
239. 8
39
40
5. 1
86
87
11. 0
426
437
55. 2
535
546
69.0
4,542
4,621
583. 8
2, 054
2, 095
264. 7
1,677
I , 71 4
216. 6
1,274.7
3
2. 4
8
6. 4
62
40. 6
28
22. 4
835
668. 2
452
361. 7
205
164. 0
20, 564
1,906.8
44
4. 1
205
10.0
909
84. 3
953
88.4
8,817
817. 6
5, 906
547. 6
3, 730
345. 9
3,523
I , 312. 4
7
2.6
18
6. 7
100
37. 3
37
13. 8
l , 488
554. 3
l , 333
496. 6
540
20 1. 2
86, 085
86, 029
2, 100.5
243
245
6. 2
1, 052
1,061
26. 8
6,090
7, 051
178. 4
5, 889
5, 954
150. 6
32, 895
33, 214
840. 4
10, 866
20, 080
508.1
19, 150
19,324
488. 9
2, •130
2, 482
896. 2
2
2
.7
5
5
1. 8
47
49
17. 7
67
69
24. 9
1,106
1, 220
4'10.5
685
699
252. 4
428
438
158. 2
I, 588
l , 288. 8
15
12. 2
13
10. 6
23
18. 7
380
308. 4
589
478. 0
362
293. 8
206
167. 2
5, 502
1, 52 1.4
9
2. 5
34
9. 4
167
46. 2
402
111. 2
3, 0.13
84 1. 5
864
238. 0
983
271. 8
I, 765. l
4, 457
I , 352. 9
0, 359
9,540
I , 205. 3
I , 503
�r
Tabl e 4 .-[ndex of Crime, 1965 , Standard Jlfetropolitan S tutis tical Areas - Continued
Standard metropolitan statist ical area
Population
Total
offenses
Murder
and non.
negligent
Forcible
rnpe
Robbery
man-
Aggra.
vated
assaul t
Burglary
Larceny
$50 and
o\·er
Auto
theft
slaughter
253, 000
Erie, P a ._ ·-· --- --··----·- ·--·.· --· - ·-- · .·--··--·.·---· . ....
(Incl udes Erie Count y.)
Area actuall y reporting··- -· · · ---· ··--·· ·· ····· -· · · ·· · · l 00. 0%
R ate per 100,000 inhabitants-· ··· · --· · · ·· · · ··-····-· · ··· --- · ··········
Eugene, Oreg·-· · -··-····· · -···-··· -·· ·· ·- ---- ---·· -· · -· ---·
189, 000
(Includes Lane Coun ty.)
Area actu a!J y reporting .. · -· --·--···· -· -· - ·-···· ··· · ····
100. 0%
R ate per L00,000 inhabi ta nts . ... . .. . ........... . . . . .. . .... ... . . .. .. .. .
Evansvill e, Ind.·Ky. .... . ...... .. .. . ... . . . ............ . . . ...
227,000
(Includes Vanderburgh and Warll'i ck Counti es , I ndi ana;
and H enderson County, Kentucky.)
Area actu all y reporting..... . ....... . .. . . . ... . ...... .. . .
100. 0%
Rate per 100,000 inh abitauts . . . ..... . ....... .. . .. ... . . ............. . . .
Fall Ri ver·New Bedford, Mass. ... . . ......... . ..... . . . ... ..
415, 000
(Includes Bristol County.)
9i. 2%
Area actw1.ll y reporting... . ...... .... .. . .....·.... . .. ....
Estimated totaL . .. .. . .... . .. .... . ... •... .. .. . ..... . . ..
100. 0%
Rate per L00,000 in habi ta nts . . . ... . . .. .. . . . . ..... . ... . ............... .
Fargo.Moorhead, N. Dak.·Minn.. . . .. .. . .. . . .. .......... ...
11 4, 000
(Includes Cass Coun ty , N. Da le ; and lay Count y ,
Minn.)
100. 0%
Area actuall y reporting ... ... . ... ............. . . . ...... .
Rate per J00,000 inh abitants . ... . . . . .. . . . . . . ... . . .................. .
Fayetteville, N.C.. .......... . . ..... .. . . . . . . .. .... . . . . .. . . . .
180. 000
(In cludes Curnberland Coun ty .)
Area actu all y reportin g. ..... . . . . ... . ..... . ... ... .. . ... .
100. 0%
Rate per 100,000 inha bitants .... .. . ... ... .. . ... . .. .. . ... ... . ... . ... .
Flint, Mich ...... ........ ........ . ..... . . . . .... .. .. . ... . ....
457,000
(Includes Genesee an d Lapeer Counti es.)
100.0%
Area actuall y reporting . . . ... .. ........ . ........ . ...... .
Rate per J00 ,000 inhabi ta nts ... . ... . ...... . ..... . ...... .
436. 000
Fort Lauderdale·Hollywood, Fla . ........ . .... .. ......•......
(In clu des Broward C'oun ty .)
Area actuall y repor ting. ... . . .. ..... .... . .. . . . . . . .. .. . . .
96. 9%
Est.im ated tota l. .. ··-········ · · ···· · ·· ·· · ·······--···
100.0%
Rate per 100,000 inhab ita nts...................................... ..
Fort Smith, Ark .·Okla . ....... . . ... . . . . . . -. . .. . .. . ... ... ... .
167, 000
(Includ es Se basti an and Craw ford Cou11 tirs, .\rk .; nncl
Lenore ;l!ld Scq noyah C'onn t ics, Ok la.)
B0.3%
A rca actuall y rrporti11,:. .... .................. . .. . ..... .
100. 0%
Est imated tota l. . . ..... .. .. . ................•..........
Rate per 100,000 inlrnhilnnt ,
612
2,479
979. 3
6
2. 4
13
5. 1
44. 2
83
32. 8
I, 130
446. 4
523
206. 6
24 1. 8
2,244
I , 185. 0
2
I. 1
22
11. 6
35
18. 5
76
40. 1
782
413. 0
l , 024
540. 8
303
lGO. 0
4,084
I, 802. 5
7
3. I
29
12. 8
11 0
48. 6
21l
93. 1
1,942
857. 1
l, 242
548. 2
M3
239. 7
6, 379
fi, 55B
1, 578. 3
IO
IO
21
22
5. 3
100
2. 4
105
2.1. 3
312
318
76. 6
3,091
3, 157
760. 0
I. 291
1, 328
319. 7
1, 552
1,61 6
389. 0
11
265
233. 0
391
343. 8
130
11 4. 3
11 2
815
2
716. 5
1. 8
7
6. 2
9
7. 9
9. 7
2,087
1, 159. 5
13
7. 2
2l
II . 7
85
47. 2
301. 1
855
475. 0
302
167. R
269
149. 4
IO, 079
2, 20G. :,
18
3. 9
104
22. 8
369
0. 8
1,511
330. 8
3,4 55
756. 3
3, 406
7-15. 6
266. 2
IO, 431
JO, 771
35
36
8. 2
71
73
16. 7
407
97. 4
l, 159
l 189
272. 5
5, 122
5, 282
I. 210. 3
2,586
2,680
(1 14. 1
I, 05l
\, 086
248. 9
41
H
28. l
578
G87
10-1.
10U
368
219. !J
215
243
1-1:,. 2
2,468. I
I 3JG
1: 559
\1:1 1. n '
9
27
30



, 4




I i. fl
8
425
542
158
l7,5
r; '
·11 0. :i
1, 2 16
�Fort Wayne, I nd . . . . . . .. . . . . . .. . ......
252,000
(Includes Allen County.)
Arca neturul y rcportini:... ,.. .... ............. . . . . . .....
IOO. 0%
R ate per 100,000 inhabitants . ....... ... . . .... .. ... .... ... . . ... . .. . . .. .
Fort Worth, Tex. . ........ . . ........... ....... ..... . .........
632, 000
(Includes Johnson and 'l'nrrnnt Counties.)
94. 0%
Arca actually reporting................ . . . . .... . . .......
E stimated totru. .......... .... .................. . . ... ..
100. 0%
R ate per 100,000 inhabitants ....... . ... . . ..... . ... . . . .. ..... . . ... .. .
Fresno, Calif........ . . . ..... ........... . . . ... ..... ... . . . ....
405, 000
(Includes F resno Cou nty.)
~;~fi:;fifttt~f~)15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)~:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
' 1: :6~
R ate per 100.000 inhabitants............... . . ........... . ............ .
Galveston. Texas City, Tex........ . .... . .... . .......... ..... .
156, 000
(Includes Galveston C ounty.)
Area actually reporting.................. . . ......... . ...
05. 7%
E stimated totru. ...... . . ..... . ..... . ..... .. . .. .........
100. 0%
R ate per 100,000 inhabitan ts... . ... ..... ... ... .......... . ............ .
600, 000
Gary•Hammond ·East Chicago, Ind.... . . . . . . . . . . . . ...........
(Includes L ake a nd Porter Counties.)
09. 3%
Arca actually reporting.. . ..... .. . . . .......... . .. . . . ... .
E stimated totaL ......... . . ............ . .... . ..........
100. 0%
R ate per 100,000 inlrnbita nts....... . . .......... . ........ . . . ... .... ... .
Grand Rapids, Mich.. .......................... . . . . . . .......
491, 000
(Includes K ent nnd Ottawa Counties.)
~;~f~;fitttt~f~~:143.215.248.55 15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST):::::::::::::::: :::::::::::::: :::
-:r
-:r
Gree143.215.248.55f.c!;.A~:~!~!143.215.248.55'.143.215.248.55 15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)::::::::: :::::::::::::::::::
(Includes Brown County,)
Arca actually repor ting. ..................... ....... ....
R nte per J00,000 inhabita nts ........... . . . . ............ .
Greensboro.High Point, N .C......... . . . .... . . ..... .... . . ....
(Includes Guilford County.)
Area acturuly reporting............ . .. ..................
R ate per 100,000 inhabitants. .... .... . . ............ . ... .
Greenville, S.C...... . . . . ................. ...... . . . ..... ... ..
(Includes Green ville and Pickens Counties.)
Arca actuall y reporting............. ....... ... . ....... ..
E stimated total.. .............................. .........
R ate per 100,000 inhabitants ... ...... ... ................
Harrisburg, P a ................ .... ..... . ... . . .......... . ... .
(Includes C umberland, Dauphin and Perry Counties.)
Area actually reporting......... . . ..... . ......... .......
Estimated total. ....... . . .. . ... .... . ... . . . . . . ... . . . . . ..
Ra te per 100,000 inhabitants ......... . .... . ..... . ... . ...
Hartford·New Br itain.Bristol, Conn..... . . . . . . . . ......... . ..
(Includes H artford County.)
Area actually reporting.. . ..... . .... ..... . . ..... . . . .....
Estima ted total. . ... . .... ........ ...... . ..... . ...... ...
R ate per 100,000 inhah itants.... . . . . . .
lgg: ~~
······1a1;iiiiii.
IOO. 0%
. . . . . ........ .
23
9. 1
13r,
.'\4. 0
184
73. 1
1, 2 1n
483. I
l ,~r,
i\10. 9
4n0
182, 8
10. 4
87
93
14. 7
443
457
72. 3
49r,


\47


Sn. .'\
4, R05
5, 12fi
RIO. R
2, 20fl
2, 352
372.0
I, 727
273. 2
10,230
10,331
2, .,51. 4
19
19
1, 7
43
44
10,9
3 12
3 17
78. 3
302
307
7.1. R
4,337
4,3Rl
1, ORI. 9
3, 411
3,439
R49. 3
1,806
1,824
450. fi
3, 3 11
3, 434
2, 196. R
l fi
17
10. 9
41
42
2n.O
109
113
72. 3
74r,
7.'\7
4114. 3
I, 039
l,OUS
702.4
93 1
959
nl3. fi
429
44R
286. 6
12, 072
12, mo
2,028.3
31
31
fi, 2
100
101
JR.R
8 13
8 18
130, 4
992
997
ln6. 3
3,959
3,994
r,r,r,, 2
3,543
3,566
594.8
2, f,34
2,653
442. 5
5,994
fi,08n
I, 240. 1
9
9
1. 8
59
23fl
243
49. o
1, 943
2,621
I. 967
12. 4
195
201
41. 0
534. I
400. 8
96
984
200. 5
748
Mfi. 4
I
.7
f\
f,
4. 4
4. 4
40
29. 2
285
208, 2
273
199. 4
137
100. 1
3. Rr,4
1,370. 2
20
7. 1
27
9, r,
70
24. R
I, 015
359, 9
I, 197
424 . .'\
1, 010
358. I
525
18n. 2
4,430
4, 542
1,617.8
17
17
f>. l
33
34
12. 1
78
81
28. 9
284
292
10<1. 0
1,74 1
1,788
636, 0
1, .504
I, 530
5'18. 2
773
79 1
281. 8
2,493
3,005
79B. 7
17
19
4. 9
30
36
9. 4
fif,
100
26.0
81
128
33. 3
I, 421
I, 649
428. 6
603
719
186. 9
275
414
107, 6
9,035
9,305
15
15
2, 0
3
30
5. 1
221
220
20, 5
419
429
55. 0
4,708
4, 832
n30. 2
2,285
2, 3R2
30R 0
I, 349
1, 402
182. R
3
3,308
1, 3 14.3
I. 2
9,Ro2
10, 3f,8
I, f>40. 0
r,3
f,fl
fi l
2,584
I, fi72
282, 000
100. 0%
. .. . . . ....... .
281, 000
98. 4'.z!,
100. 0'10
. . ... ........ .
386,000
87. 9%
100. 0%
. ............ .
767,000
97. 2%
100. 0%
I, 2 13. fi
�-:r
00
Table ,t . -l ndex of Crime, 1965, Standard Jllletropolitan Statistical Areas- Con tinu ecl
Standard met ropolitan statistical area
P opulation
Murder
Total
offenses
and non-
negligent
I
Forcible
ra pe
Robbery
man-
slaughter
Aggra,·ated
assault
Burglary
Larceny
$50 and
o\·er
Auto
theft
Honolulu , HawaiL __________________ ________________________
574, 000
(Jnclucles H onolulu Coun ty.)
Area actuall y reporting __ _______________________________
100.0%
Hate per 100,000 inhabitants ___________________________
Houston , Tex __ _____________________________________________
I. 645,000
(Includes ll arris, Brazoria, F ort Bene!, Liberty a nd
i\fontgomery Counties.)
Area actua ll y reporting ______ . __________________________
Q,J.O%
E stima ted tota L __ _______ ___ ______________ ____________
100.0%
Hate per 100.000 inha bitants _______________________
India napolis, I nd ___ , ________________ ____________________
9S5, 000
(fnclucles Marion , H a milton, ll a ncock, I lend ricks, J ohnson, Morgan and 'helby Counties.)
Area actually reporting _______________________________
97.9%
Estimated Lota !__ ____________________ . ____ . _____ . ____ __
100.0%
Hate per I00,000 inlrnbitants _____ _____________ __________
-Jackson , Mich _________________ __ ...
137,000
(l ncludes J ackson County.)
Area act ually reporting ____ ._. ______________ . _________ ._
100.0%
Rate per 100,000 inha hiJ.an1 s _ _____ ______ ______________ - · ----------Jacksonville , Fla ___ ___ _. ___ __ ___ _
494,
000

----------- ---------(lnclucles D uva l Coun ty.)
Area actuall y reporting ___ ____________ . ______________ ...
100. 0%
R a te per 100,000 inha bitants ____________________________ -------------Jersey City, N.J__________________ ---- --- -------- ---- -··-602,000
(Includes Iludson County.)
Area actual ly reporting __. ______ __ ___________ ___ __ - _- _- .
99. 1%
E stim utecl tota l__ _____ __ _____ ___ ________ __ __ __ _____ . ____
100.0%
Ha te per 100,000 inha bitants ___________________________
Johnstown, Pa,. ________ ____ __________ ____ . _________________ -----------278, 000
(lnrludcs Cambria a nd Somerset Counties.)
Area artuaJly reporting __ _-- __________ - -- _- _. _- ___ - -- . - .
94. 5%
Estimated totaL ______ --- - - _- _- _-__ - - -- . - - - - - - . -- - - - . !00. 0%
R
ate
per
100,000
inba
bi
wnts----------·----------------Kala mazoo, Mich _______ . ___________ __________ ___ ___________ -------------179, 000
(Jncluclcs Kalamazoo County.)
Area actuall y reporting_ .- -- _--------------- ---------- _
JOO. 0%
H ate ncr 100,000 inha bita nts-- ------· --- --- ----------·- --Kansas City, Mo.-Kans - ----------I, 247,000
--- ------([nclu<lcs Clar. J ack,on, Ca sa nd PlaLtr ('ou111 ics, t\lo.:
mHI Johnson a nd 11·ranrl0Ltc C'ou n1it's, Kuns.)
.\ rPn :ict 1rnll _,· rP poni n~
100. 0%
H:ilt· 1wr 100.000 inh:i loi1n11rs
12,522
2, 181. 7
18
3. I
1.0
130
22. 6
2 2
49. l
G, 430
I, 120. 3
3, 125
544. 5
2,53 1
441. 0
29, e18
31, 112
1, 800. 8
IGS
176
10. 7
180
194
11. 8
11 fl26
I , 5i l
95. 5
2, 701
2, SH
li2. s
l4, 796
15, 497
941.
5, 49
6,242
379. 4
4,398
4. 588
278.
17,562
Ii. 981
1, 825. 3
50
51
.) . 2
168
171
17. 4
l, 152
I, I 77
I 19. 5
662
6 5
69. 5
7,696
7,861
798. 0
3, 64-1
3, 75:i
381. 2
4, 190
4,281
434. 6
I, 7i8
I, 293. i
I
.7
21
15. 3
2fi
18. 9
219
159. 4
839
610. 5
50-l
366. 7
168
122. 2
11 , 97i
2, 425. 1
55
11.1
78
15. 8
840
I70. I
714
1'14.6
6,476
I, 31l. 2
2, 67fi
541.8
I, 138
230. 4
7, 34 I
i, 42-1
I, 234. 0
2
2
4. i
26
2fl
230
234
3~. 9
429
434
72. I
2,600
2, fi36
438. 2
82
901
149. 8
3,146
3, l65
526. l
802
1, 058
381. 2
6
5
7
? -
-· J
7
2. 5
16
32
11. 5
29
50
18. 0
465
565
203. 6
170
222
80. 0
l ll
175
63. I
2, fi94
1, fiO:l. 9
2
l.l
19
JO. n
52
29. 0
255
142. 3
I, 277
712. 9
835
461i. l
254
141.8


mg


1. -17:1
I Js. I
I, 9.10
11,•\:i:l
n, ,;oo
4, 202
l ,ifi.:{
HI;'\. '.2


WI.I



l:lr1. 9


2;;, nsa


i. o~:i. 2


9fi
7. 7
(i
4. 3
n
'
�Kenosha, Wis ___ ______ ____ ____ _________________ -··
11 3,000
(Includes Kenosha County.)
Arca actuall y reporting_ ______ __ ____ ____ __ ___ ___________
100. 0%
Rate per 100,000 inha bitan ts-- -- ---- ------·-·-·-·-·- - ·-- - --- - - - -- - -- - Knoxville, Tenn ____ _____. _____ __ _-·- - - - -- - ---------. -- ___ __ _
398, 000
(Includes Anderson, Blou nt and K nox Coun ties.)
82. 0%
Arca act uall y reporting____ ___ _______ ______________ _____
E stimated t otaL. __ _______________ ___ ___ ___ _____ ___ ___ __
100. 0%
Rate per 100,000 inhabitan ts __ __ ____ ____ _______ ________ _ _. . . . __ ____ __ _
Lak e Charles, La ______ ______ ------- ----- - -- - ----- - -- - -- ---165,000
(Includes Calcasieu Parish. )
Area actuall y reporting______ ____ ___ __ ___ ___________ ____
100. 0%
R ate per 100,000 inhabitants _____ __ __ ______ __ ___ __ ________ ____ ____ ____
Lancaster, Pa ________ __________ -- -- - -- ---- - -- --- -- -- - - - - -- - 288,000
(Includes L ancaster County.)
Area actu all y reportin g_ __ ________ ____ __ ___ _________ ____
96. 2%
E stim ated totaL ____ _______ ___ ______ __ _______________ __
100. 0%
R ate per 100,000 inhab itants _______________ ____ ______ ____ ___ ____ __ ___ _
Lansing, Mich _- --- · - - - - -- - -- -- -- - - ----- - - ---- ----- - -- - --- -325,000
(Includes Clinton, E aton a nd Ingham Cou nties.)
Area actu all y reporting_ ______ ____ ______ ____ ______ ______
100. 0%
~:::s~~Ji~·-~~!~-143.215.248.55'.15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST):::::::::::::::::::::::::::: -----
. Las
-25 i:ooii(Includes Clark C ounty .)
Area actuall y reporting___ ___ ________ ____ __ ____ _________
100. 0%
R ate per 100,000 inhabitants----- -- --- --- - ------- - - - ---- __ ___ ___ ______
Lawton, Okla_____ __ ____ ______ __ ___ _____ _____ _____ _________ _
111, 000
(Includes Com anche County.)
Area act uall y reporting____ ___ _______ _____ __ ___ ___ __ ____
100. 0%
R ate per 100,000 inhab itants ________ ______ _______ ____ ___ - -- - - -- - -- - -- Lexington , Ky__ ________ ______ ______ ____ ___________________ __
154, 000
(I ncludes F ayette County. )
100. 0%
Area actually report ing_________ ___ _______ ________ __ __ __
R ate per 100,000 inhabitantS- - --- - · - · - ·- - --- ---- - - - --·-· -- ·-·- - --- - -- Lincoln, Ne br ___ ___--- -- ---- --- -- - · ___ ____________ -- - -· - · _..
168, 000
(In cludes L ancaster Coun ty.)
100. 0%
Arca actuall y re porting_____ ______ __ ___ _______________ __
R ate per 100,000 inha bitan ts- -- - -- · - -- - -· -·- - --- - -- - -- -- --- - -- - ---- - - Little Rock-North Little Rock, Ark__ ______ ____ _______ _____ ___
293,000
(Includes Pulask i County .)
100. 0%
Arca actual ly reporti ng_. _______ _____ ___ _____ ___ ___ _____
R ate per 100,000 inhabi tantS- - ---- · · - -- --- ---- - --- - - --- · ____ ________ __
Lorain-Elyria, Ohio _- ---- - -- ---- ---- - -- - -- - - -- - - - -- --·- · · · - ·
245, 000
(Includes L orain Coun ty.)
9 . 5%
Area actuall y reportin g___ ________ __ ______ ____ ___ ___ ____
E sti mated totaL ______ ______ ___ _______ ____ ____ ____ ____ _
100. 0%
R ate per 100,000 inha bitants.. --- --· - - --- · ---- · ·- · -- - · - ·- --- - - --- -- ---Los Angeles-Long Beach, Calif_ ___ _______ ____ __ _______ _____ _
6, 820,000
(Includes Los Angeles County.)
Area actuall y reporting_____________ ________ ____________
100. 0%
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants _________ ___ __ ____ _____ _____ _____ ___ _____ _
22
19. 5
577
511. 0
34 1
302. 0
276
244, 4
80
01
22. 9
387
442
Ill . 0
1, 824
2, 125
533. 7
612
704
176. 8
512
6-1 5
154. 5
fl. 0
32
19. 3
157
94. 0
664
401. 4
548
331. 2
127
76. 8
13
14
4. 9
·18
26
9.0
61
72
25. 0
658
711
246. 6
252
280
97. 1
163
197
68.3
I, 240
I, 098. 2
2
1. 8
4
3. .5
3,478
4,059
I, 0 10.;;
26
29
7. 3
37
53
13. 3
I, 543
932. 7
5
3. 0
10
I, 16fi
1, 300
450. 9

-------- ---- ----- --- -----
18 ·
15. 9
5, 003
I, 8 15. 5
12
3. 7
87
26. 8
85
26. 1
259
79. 7
2,529
777. 8
2, 11 5
650. 5
8lfi
251. 0
5, 852
2, 332. 3
20
8. 0
28
I I. 2
255
IOI. 6
238
04. 0
2,091
833.4
2,236
801. 2
984
392. 2
I, 455
I, 306. I
10
9. 0
13
II. 7
36
32. 3
195
175. 0
555
498. 2
490
439. 9
156
140. 0
3,925
2, 549. 3
12
7.8
12
7. 8
133
8fl. 4
186
120.8
1, 591
1,033. 4
1,451
942. 4
540
350. 7
I, 764
I, 047. 3
3
1. 8
!fl
9..';
13
7. 7
99
58.8
639
379. 4
763
453. 0
23 1
137. 1
5, 621
1, 921. I
27
0. 2
62
21.2
247
84. 4
622
212. 6
1, 907
651. 8
2,03 1
694.1
725
247. 8
2,190
2,239
912. 5
II
II
4. 5
26
26
IO. 6
81
84
34. 2
125
128
52. 2
924
946
385. 5
448
459
187. 1
575
585
238. 4
243,229
3,566.6
417
6. 1
2, 241
32. 9
12, 899
189. 1
15, 662
229. 7
106, 686
1, 564. 4
62, 540
917. 0
42, 784
627. 4
�00
0
Table 4 . -lndex of Crime , 1965, Standa rd ft'Ietropolitan Statistical Areas- Continued
Standard met ropolitan sta tistical area
P opula t ion
'T'otal
offenses
M urder
and nonnegligent
man-
Forcible
ra pe
R obbery
slaughter
Louisville , Ky.-Ind .. __ ___________ ______ _____________________
816, 000
(Includes J efferson Coun t y, K y .; and Clark and F loyd
Cou nt ies, Incl .)
Area actually reporting ____________________________ ____ _
96. 9%
Estimated total . ________ __ ____ _________________________
100. 0%
H ate per 100,000 inhabitants __ ______ _______ ___ __ __ ___ ___
Lubbock , Tex __ ____ _____ ______________ __________ __________ __
182, 000
(Includes Lubbock C ounty.)
Area act uall y reporting _____ __________ ____ ___ __ ___ ______
83. 9%
Eslimatocl total ___ ______ ______ __ _____ ___ __ ________ _____
100. 0%
R ate per 100,000 inhabita nts ______ __ ___________________

Lynchburg, Va ___ ___ _____ ____ ______ _________________________ --------123; 000
(lnclucles L ynchburg City a ncl Amherst nncl Ca m p bell
Counties.)
Area actuall y report ing ______________ ____ _______________
100. 0%
R ate per 100,000 inbabitanls __________ _____ _______ ______
Macon , Ga ______ __________________________ ____ ___________ ___ -------------195, 000
(I ncludes B ibb a nd Houston C oun t ies.)
Area actualJ y repor ting ___ _______ _____ ____ ________ ______
89.4%
Estimated total __ ______ __ ____________ _____ ____ -- - -- - - - 100. 0%
R ate per 100,000 inhabita nts __ ___ _________ _____ ___ _____ _
- -- - --Mad ison , Wis ____ ___ __ ___ _____ ______________ __________ ______ ----- - 258,
000
(I ncludes D one Count y.)
.\ rca actuall y repor t ing ___ __________ _____ _____________ __
100. 0%
R ate per 100,000 in habit an ts _______ ___ ___ _________ ____ __
Manchester, N .H____________________________________________
204, 000
(Includes Hill s boro Cou nty .)
Area act ually reporting ___ _________ _______ _- - -- - _- - -- - __
100. 0%
Rate per 100,000 inha bi tan ts ___ _________________________
Memphis , Tenn .- Ark ____________________________ ___________ -------------802, 000
(Includes Shelby Coun ty, T en o .; and C rittenden C'onnty,
Ar k.)
95. 9%
1i~f~1~t~cm ·t~f~~r~~1'.~: ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
100.0%
Ra te per 100,000 inha hita nl s ____________________________

··-----Miami, Fla
I, 111, 000
(lnr·lucles riade C'oun-t y .)
.-\rea :H·t11all~ reporting
l{a l C' J1Pr 11 111.111111 i111lalii1a111s
Jllll_ O,
Aggrarntcd
assault
Larcen y
$50 and
Burglar y
Aut o
theft
over
17. 167
17, 755
2, 175.5
65
67
8. 2
77
80
9. 8
783
S13
99. 6
682
708
86.
6, 303
6, 530
800. 1
6, 350
6,5'10
801. 3
2, 907
3, 017
369_7
3, 21
3,534
1,943. 8
8
10
5. 5
28
33
18. 2
53
60
33. 0
236
271
149. 1
1, 493
1,628
895. 4
1, 124
1, 233
67 . 2
276
299
164. 5
1, 1!9
90i. 6
6
4. 9
16
13. 0
20
16. 2
li2
139. 5
648
525. 6
152
123. 3
105
5. 2
3,065
3, 357
1, 718. 4
24
26
13. 3
30
33
16. 9
98
105
53. 7
298
317
162. 3
1, 475
1, GOO
819. 0
768
860
440.2
372
416
212. 9
11
2, 1iG
844. 9
l. G
4. 3
10
7. 4
35
13. 6
861
334. 3
891
345. 9
355
137. 8
1,210
592. 2
6
2. 9
6
2. 9
17
8. 3
33
16. 1
575
281.4
372
182. l
201
98. 4
14, 058
H,:l(i4
' · i90. 2
47
50
6. 2
120
131
16. 3
383
399
49. 7
i OO
755
94. l
i , l i6
7, 2-18
903. :i
3, 058
4,062
50G. 3
1, il 9
214. 2
,,
1]9
I , ~2•1
lfi•l. '.!
1:l, i ll\
II 1;
10, 12\l
'2\A. ,·,
4


n :rn,,


.!. \11 '~ ~
!JD
'
2, :{!15
I. 1'.l I
'{
ci:\'-1
,,
l , 674


J, 77U

~ 11 l.


~
�1, 355, 000
Mil wa ukee, Wis . .. ... . . ............................•......
(In cludes M il waukee, Wa ukes ha and Ozau kee Counties .)
97. 2%
Area actually reporting . .................. . ..... ........
E stimated Lo Lal. . .. .... .. .... . ..... . ... .. ... ... ........
100. 0%
Rate per 100,000 in habitants .. . ... . ......... ..... ....... .. .. ... ..... .
Minneapolis·St. P aul, Minn . . .. ...... ... . ... ............ . ...
1,604, 000
(Includes Anoka , D akota , Hennepin, R amsey a ncl Wash·
ington Counties.)
99. 8%
Area actu all y reporting.. . .. . .. . ..... .... ... ..... .. .....
Estimated total. .. ... . .. . . ... ... . . . ............. . . . ....
100. 0%
Rate per 100,000 inhabita nts ......................... . .. .... .. . .. . . . . .
410,000 ·
Mobile , Ala ... .. . .... . . ........ . .. ... ....... ........ . ...... .
(Includes Mobile and Baldw in C ounties.)
88. 5%
Area actu all y reporting. ... . ... . ... .... .. . . ... . .........
Estimated total.... . ... . ..... ...... .... ... . ....... .. .. . .
100. 0%
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... . .. .... .................. .. -- ·· ····· · ·
Monroe, La ________ ______________ ___ ____ ____ ____ ___ __ _____ __ _
(I ncludes Ouachi ta Parish.)
Area act u all y reporLin g....... ... .. .. .............. . ... .
Rate per I 00,000 inhabitants . .. . . ........ ... .. .. . ... ... .
Muncie , Ind . ... . .... . ...... . ... .. ........... .. . .. ......... .
(I ncludes Delaware Count y.)
· Area act uall y reporting.. . .... . ... .. •.......... . . . ... .. .
R ate per 100,000 inhabitants ....... ...... . ..... .. .. ... ..
Muskegon.Muskegon Heights, Mich ... . . ... . .... . .......... .
(Includes M us kegon C ou nty.)
Ar ea ocLUall y reporting . .... ..... . ............•..... ... .
Estim ated toLal.. ... . . ..... . ... . .......... ............. .
Rote per 100,000 inh abiLants . . .......... .... . ...........
Nashville, Tenn . ... . . . .... .... .. ....... ...... ........... . .. .
(Includes Davidson, Sumner and Wilson C'ounties.)
..\. rea act ua ll y reporting .... . ... ................... ... _..
Estimated total.. ... . . . .. .... ...... ... .......... ..... ...
R ate per 100,000 inhabitants . .. ... ... ... ... ...... .......
Newark, N .J. . .. .... .. . ....... . . ..... . ..... ... . ...... . .. . . . .
(Includes E ssex, Morris and Union Counties .)
Area actuall y reporting .. . . . . . . ... . . . ..... . . . . ... .. . . . .
E stimated total .... . ........ ... ..... . . . . . . ....... . . . .. .
R ate per 100,000 inhabitants ..... . .. . . . . ... . . ... . . .. . . . .
New Haven-Waterbury, Conn ______________ ______ _____ ______
I3, 4f,3
13, 684
1,0 10.2
30
31
2. 3
48
51
3. 8
248
250
18. 5
52 1
527
38. 9
3, 724
3, 835
283. I
.';, 118
5, 189
383. 1
3, 774
3,801
280. Ii
3 1,352
3 1, 122
I , 958. ,5
33
33
2. 1
144
144
9. 0
I, 352
I, 355
84. 5
I, 148
] , 151
7 1. 7
14, 322
14, 354
894. 7
8, 49 1
8, 510
530. 4
,i, Sfl2
5, 87a
3fi6. 2
r,, 534
fi, 833
I, fif, . 4
33
39
9. 5
,57
63
15. 4
168
177
43. 2
,527
565
138.0
3, 67fi
3,834
936. I
I , 398
l , 4fl4
357 . .,
fi7.5
RO I
HlR 7
8Rfi
7fi7. 4
fi
5
4. 4
16
/\. 3
14 . 2
241
213. r,
332
294. 2
l :,4
l 3fl. ;;
11 2
99.3
11
9. 4
35
30. 0
38
32. 6
908
778. 0
3or,
262. 2
450
385 . .';
23
24
15. 3
80
85
.54. l
267
272
173. l
I, 139
f,84


a~


l , 162
739 . .'i
699
444 . 9
28'1
182. 0
58
68
13. 0
283
290
55. 3
863
897
170. 9
4,053
4,242
808. 4
l , 837
I , 895
361. I
l , 784
I , 849
352. 3
113, 000
100. 0%
__
11 7,000
100. 0%
...... . ...... .
I, 754
6
l, 502. 8
,'i. l
2, 47 1
2, 533
I, fil2. l
.'i
5
3. 2
8,033
0, 208
I, 77 1. 8
57
IO. 9
3fi, 342
36,387
I, 904 . 9
4. R
24 1
241
13. 2
l , 903
l , 995
l09. 4
2, 705
2, 708
153. 4
15,891
15, 911
872. 3
7,945
7. 955
43fl. l
7,394
7. 404
405. 9
R
r,
.8
29
4. 0
72
74
10. 2
277
282
39.0
3,594
3,650
505. 6
2,669
2,709
374. 3
2, 053
2, 0 I
2 7. 5
2
2
.9
10
11
5. 1
33
39
18. 0
53
r,5
30. I
962
I, 11 8
517. 4
563
659
305. 0
zr,5
332
153. 6
157, 000
98. 2%
100. 0%
.
525, 000
9 1. 3%
JOO. 0%
..... . .. . . . .. .


\5


1, 824, 000
99.8%
100.0%
.
83
83
724, 000
(Includes New H aven County .)
98. 5%
Area actuall y reporting.... . .... . . . . ... ........... . . . . ..
Estimated Lota!. ... . .... . . . ...... ... .... . . . . .... . . . . . . .
100. 0%
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants.... . ... . ...... . . ..... .. . .. . . ... .. . .. . ... .
New London·Groton·Norwich , Conn...................... . ..
216, 000
(Includes New London County .)
87. 7%
Area actuall y reporting .. . . ........ . . .. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .
Estimated total. .. .......... . .... ..... . . . ... . . . .. .. . . . .
100.0%
R ate per 100,000 inhabitants . . . . . . . . . . . . •.. . • . . • .
8,700
8,840
1, 22 1. 5
l,
2, 22fi
l , 030. 1
29
�l
Table 4,. - fnde x of Cr ime, 1965, S tandard Nletropo li tan Statistica l Areas- Con tinuecl
00
Lv
Standard metropolitan sta tistical area
New Orleans, La .. . . . . . ... . .. ...... . . . . ... .. .. .. .. ........ .
Popul ation
11 , 484, 000
(!nclucles Bronx, Kings, Manhattan, Queens, Rich·
mood, . assa u, Rock land , Suffolk and ll" estchester
Counties.)
Area actually reporting ..... . .......................... .
lOO. 0%.
Hale per J00,000 ioha bitants..... .............................. .
NorfoJk . Portsmouth, Va..... . ... . ..... . ...... . .. .. ..........
850, 000
Ogden, Utah. .. . ... . ........... . .. ......................... .
120, 000
(Includes Norfolk, Chesa pea ke, Portsmouth and Vir·
ginia Beach Cities and Norfolk and Princess ,\ nne
Counties.)
1\ rea actuall y reportin g. . .. ......... . ...... ... .. . . .. . ...
100. 0%
Rate per 100,000 inhab ita nts... . ... . .... ....... . . . . .... .. ... .. . ... . .. .
(Jncludes \Veller County.)
Area actually reportin g. .. . ........ . . ... . ... . . . .. .. . . . . .
9-1. 2%
Estimated total. ... . ... . .. .. .. . ... ...... . .......... . .. .
100. 0%
Rate per 100,000 inh abitants ...... ... . .. . ...... . ... . ... .. .. ... .. .. ... .
Oklahoma City, Okl a. .. . ..... . .. ..... . . ... . .. .. . ...... . . .. .
583, 000
(I ncludes Canadi an, Clevelan d and Okbhoma Cou nties.)
Area actuall y reporting. . ...................... . ........
100. 0%
Hate per 100,000 inh abitants .................................. .. . . .. . .
Omaha, Nebr .. fowa . ..... . ... . . . .......... .... . .............
(111cludes Orange and , em i11 0J,, ('nunLi<'S .)
Area actuall y re portin g. ........................ .. ..... .
Est imat.r cl to t al. ......
. ... • ...
H a t e pt'r 100,000 inh ahi tn nt s
Forcible
rape
Larceny
Aggra·
vated
assault
Robbery
Burglary
$50 and
Auto
theft
OYer
l Ii
I 19
12.0
199
202
20. 3
I. 187
I, 210
121. i
23
8. G
33
12. 3
2l
I. 3
I, 9 I. 6
i02
G. I
I, 30 l
11. 3
9, 620
3. 9
Ii, 6i8
154. 2
13. 20-1
2,02Y. 8
42
6. 5
llU
IOG
575
88. 4
~2 1. 7
847. 4
I, 196
J, 300
J. 080. 7
2
2
l. i
86
91
75. 6
4 142
I.
54.1. 5
227, 162
fJ, 8%
1.1198.6
33
,5. 7
7
8
22
23
6. i
19. I
S4
14. 4
8!). 3
520
i, 320
i, 488
753. I
.5, 30 l
5,4 15
544. 6
5,099
5, 190
522. 6
33i
I , 912
12.'i. 7
i\ 3. 4
1,169
436. 2
450
167. 9
67,006
5 4. 5
9, 4i6
780. 5
4l , 379
36 1. 0
5 51?
3,529
1,998


'142. 5


30i. 2
619
514. 6
2i l
314
261. 0
243
202. 0
-!. 915
,13_7
294. I
2, 139
3Gi. 2
3. -!7-1
3. li50
i03. \J
I. i4G
I. 899
306. 2
1'. 88i
I , 404
I. 500
150. 9
I, 4-12
49 1
84. 3
,,so
I, il3
519. 000
(fn cludes Douglas an d Sarpy Coun ties, >IPhr .: and
Pottawattamie Count)', Iowa .)
Area actuall y reportin g... . ....... . ................ . ....
93. 0%
E ti mated total. .. .. . . .... .... . ........... . ... .. ...... .
100. 0%
Hate per 100,000 inh abita nts........... ....... . ....... . . . . ... .. . .. . .. .
Orlando, Fla. . . . . . ...... . .. .. .. . . . . ............ . ... .... .. ...
20, Ci8i
21, 130
2. 125. 2
268,000
(Includes Newport News ancl I !amplo n Cities and York
'ounty.)
Area actnall y reporting .. . . . . ....... . ................. .
100.0%
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ........ . . ............... . . ............ .
New York , N.Y . .... .... . . ... ... . . . . . . ............ . ..... .
Murder
and non-
negligent
man slaughter
994, 000
(Includes Jefferson, Orleans, St. Bernard and St. Tam·
many P arishes. )
Area actuall y reporting..... ... .. ..... . . ... ... . .........
9i. 9%
Estimated total.. . ...................... . ... .. . . . .... .
100. 0%
Rate per 100,000 inh abitants ........ .. .. ... . . . . ... . ......... . . . . . . . .. .
Newport News· Ha mpton , Va ... ......... . . . . . ..... . .........
Total
offen ses
i , 4 IG
19
35
7. 8:i3
I. fi l4. 4
20
3. 9
40
7. 7
fiO-~
20
fi. GI•\
I. 7-J.i . I


N


,;_:i


J2


40
10. I
285


,3


28\J
G
13. I


j;).


7
228
I 04
363. 9
383, 000
8i.:l%
100.0%
!)I
192
388
2. Ot1t1
228
-lf i(i
3. 1-14


"1\l. :"1


l ~I. 7
~:?! . 0
I, o84
I. UCi9
Al I. :?
02-1
74:1
101.
n
�Oxnard·Ventura, Calif___ ____ ___. _· ··-· --- ·-300, 000
(Includes Ventura County.)
Area actually repor ting ............ . . . .... _. . . . . . .. . . .. .
100. 0%
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants . ... ........ ... . ...... ...... - -- -- ------- -Paterson·Clifton·Passaic, N .J ••••••••• •.•....• ••• • •••.••••••.
1,326,000
(Includes Bergen and Passaic Counties.)
97. 4%
tiri:;;~tt;c~Tporting. . ····· ··········· · · ·········· · ··
100.0%
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants . ................. ........ .. -------------Pensacola, Fla ... ·-··-·· .......... ·............. ..... . .......
234, 000
(Includes Escambia and Santa Rosa Counties.)
Area actually reporting . .... ................... .........
100.0%
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ......... . ... ....... ........ -------------Peoria, Ill..... . . .... ... . . ................. . .... . ... . . . ...•..
359,000
(I ncludes P eoria , T azewell and Woodford Counties.)
74. 3%
~~iri:;t~J~;t~?143.215.248.55'.143.215.248.55:::: ::: : : : : : :: : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : :
100. 0%
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants . .. -. . . ... . . . . .... . . . . . . . . . . ------ -- ---- -Philadelphia. Pa .•N .J•...• • • • • ••.... • . •• •••• • • •• ••• •••.•••. .
4, 622, 000
(Includes Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery and
Philadelphia Counties, Pa.; and B urlington , Camden
and Gloucester Counties, N .J .)
Area actually reporting . ...... . . . . ..... .... ...... .......
04.3%
100. 0%
Estimated total...·- -··· ······ ···· ... ....... .... . . . . . ...
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .......•. •..•... •.. ......... -- ------- ----Phoenix, Ariz. •............. . .......... ... ..... . .... •. •.. . . •
845, 000
(Includes M aricopa County.)
Area actually reporting_. . . . . . .... . ..... . . .. . ...... . . ...
100. 0%
R ate per 100,000 inhabitants ...... ........ . . ......... ..
Pittsburgh, Pa . ..... .... . . .. ......... .. .......... . . .. . . · . . ..
2, 341, 000
(Includes Allegheny, Beaver , W ashington and Westmore·
l and Counties.)
Area actually reporting.... ...................... . . . . .. .
93.3%
Estimated total . . . . . ..................... . ......... . . . .
100. 0%
Rate per 100.000 inhabitants ...... .... . ...... ....•... ...
147, 000
Pittsfiel d , Mass.·-·········· ···· ······· · · · ······· ········ ··(Includes Berkshire County.)
Area actu ally reporting. ....... .... .....................
100.0%
R ate per 100,000 inhabitants .... ... . ........ ..•.. . .... . .
189, 000
Portland , Maine .......... ······ ···· · · -·········-····· · · ··· ·
(Incl udes Cumberland County.)
96. 1%
Arca actuall y reporting_··-···· · -·-·· · ··-- · · - - · · - ····-··
100.0%
Estimated totaL . . . · ···-· · ···· · ··· ··· -···· · ·····-··· · . .
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants . . . ..... ......... ... ........
876, 000
Portland , Oreg.-Wash __.... ...... ............ . . .. ····· ···· · (Includes Clackamas, Multnomah and W ashington
Counties, Oreg.; and Clark County, Wash.)
Area actually reporting_......... ..... . . . .... .... ..... ..
100.0%
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants . ................. ·-······-· -- ----------00



.:,




\'"f
5,363
I , 785. 8
9
3. 0
91
30. 3
102
34. 0
181
60. 3
2, 6<17
881. 4
I. 685
561. 1
648
215. 8
13,379
13,939
1, 051.1
23
24
l. S
55
4. 4
58
404
428
32. 3
785
821
61. 9
5, 823
6,067
457. 5
3, 669
3, 796
286. 2
2, 620
2, 745
207. 0
4, 503
1,920.6
13
5. 5
34
14. 5
132
56. 3
304
129. 7
2,103
896. 9
I, 111
473. 9
806
343. 8
4,345
5,442
1,515.3
7
10
2. S
30
43
12.0
161
236
65. 7
228
310
86. 3
2,049
2,497
695. 3
995
1,261
351. 1
875
I , 085
302. 1
56,413
59,876
I , 295. 5
243
253
5. 5
704
734
15. 9
3,638
3, 830
82.9
5,588
5, 853
126. 6
23, 096
24, 501
530. 1
10,702
11, 433
247. 4
12, 442
13, 272
287. 2
20, 703
2,449. 9
44
5. 2
181
21. 4
598,
70. 8
1, 136
134. 4
8, 418
996. 2
7, 311
865. 2
3, 015
356. 8
28, 500
30,525
1,303. 7
75
82
3.5
220
241
10.3
1,664
1, 788
76. 4
1,524
1,692
72. 3
10, 508
11,295
482. 4
6,278
6,691
285. 8
8,231
8, 73",
373. 1
916
623. 2
2
I. 4
5
3. 4
8
5. 4
50
34.0
417
297. 3
272
185. 1
142
96. 6
1,816
1,885
995. 4
4
4
2. 1
14
14
7.4
18
19
10.0
71
73
38. 5
871
903
476.8
561
583
307. 9
277
289
152. 6
16,994
I, 941. 0
26
3. 0
118
13. 5
735
84. 0
549
62. 7
7,226
825. 3
5,810
663. 6
2, 530
289. 0
�Table 4 .-lndex of Crime, 1965, Standard 1'1/e tropolitan Statistical Areas- Co ntinued
Standard metropolitan statist ical area
Popu lat ion
Total
offenses
Murder
and oonocgligeo t
Forcible
rape
man-
Robbery
slaughter
Pro vidence-Pawtucket -Warwick, R.L . _.. __ ______ -________ . __
760, 000
(Includes Bristol, Kent and Providence Counties.)
Area actuall y reporting_______________ ______________ ____
100. 0%
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ___ ____ _________ ____ __ ______ ____ _____ ____ _
11 6, 000
Pro vo- Orem, Utah ______ ___ ... __ . ___ . ____ ___ ___ ____ ____ .__ ___
(Includes Uta h County.)
Area actuall y reportin g_______ _____ ____ _____ __ _________ _
100. 0%
Rate per J00,000 inhabitants .. _____ ____ ____________ _______ _____ __ ____ _
126, 000
Pueblo, Colo__ ____ __________ ______ ____ ____________________ __
(Includes Pueblo County.)
Area actuall y reporting__ ____________ _____ ___ ___ ________
100. 00/o
Rate per 100,000 inh abitants _____ ______ ___ ______ _______________ __ __ __
Racine , Wis_________ ____________ ______ ________ __ ____________
155, 000
(Includes Racine County.)
100. 0%
Area actuall y reporting________ ___________ _____ ___ ______
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants _________ ____________ _________ __ _____ ____ _
191 , 000
Raleigh , N,C ___ -------- ---- ------ __ __ _______ __________ _____ _
(Includes Wake Cotmty.)
Area actuall y reporting___ ___________ ______ _____________
90. U%
Estim ated totaL ____ ____ ______________ __________ _______
100. 0%
Rate per 100,000 inh abitants _____ ___ ____________________ ---- --- ---- --·
Reading , Pa____ ________ ____ ___ ___ ____ __ ______ _____________ __
293, 000
(Includes Berks County.)
07. 7%
Area actuall y reporting____ _____ ____ _______ ______ ______ _
Estimated tota L __ ____ ________ ______ ____ ___ _____ __ ____ _
100. 0%
R ate per 100,000 iuhabita n ts ___ _______ ___ ____ ________ ___ ------ ------- 493, 000
Richmond , Va__ ___ _______ ________ ____ ___ __ __ ________ ____ __ __
(Includ es Richmond City and C' hestrrfie ld, H enrico and
IIanover Counties.)
Area actuall y reporting_ ________________________ __ __ ___ _
100. 0%
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants___ _________________________ ______ ___ ____ _
Ro anoke, Va_____ _________ ____ ______________ ____ ___ __________
181, 000
(facludes Roanok e City and Roanok e County.)
IOO. 0%
Area actually reportin"- --- --- --- __ _______ __ _________ ___
R a t e per 100,000 ioh abit>1 nts __ ________ ___ _____ ________________ ______ __
Rochester, N.Y_____ ____ ___ _____ ____ ___ _______ _______ ________
813. 000
(lucl11cles iVTonroe, Li vingston, Orlean s and \l' a yne
Counties.)
Arra act.u all)' report ing_____ _____ ___ _____ ___ __ ___ ___ ____
97. 2%
Eslinrnted tntnL _________ _____ ________ ________ _____ _
IOO. 0%
Ha ir prr 100.000 inha h il a n ls
11 ,875
' · 563. l
17
2. 2
3. 8
0 0
587. 2
1
.9
0
1
7. 8
.9
29
166
21. 9
Aggravated
assault
422
55. 5
Burglary
Auto
theft
Larceny
$50 and
o,-er
4,954
652. 1
3,403
•155. 8
2, 824
371. 7
23
343
19. 9
296. 2
209
180. 5
94
8 1. 2
I, 433
I
.8
18
I, 135. 7
57
123
14. 3
45. 2
97. 5
572
453. 3
457
362. 2
162. 5
1,847
l , 188. 4
7
4. 5
11
7. I
JOO
04. 3
236
15 1. 8
733
47 1. G
485
312. l
275
170. 9
3,02 1
3, 1,13
' · 049. 8
15
16
1,237
859
326
8. 9
66
70
3G. 7
502
IO
8. 4
525
275. 0
1, 285
8 8
342
170. 5
I, 721
1, 78 1
GOS. 3
9
9
3. l
0
G
2. 0
43
46
15. 7
84
28. 7
o, •198
I. !128. 4
50
10. 2
70
14. 2
303
GI. 5
867
176. 0
2,259
I. 2-18. 8
12
4. 4
76
42. 0
I 18. 3
7. 027
R. :J8:l
1.11:1 I.:,
8
17
6. G
01,1. 5
166. l
003
030
426
255
438
3 17. 6
149. 6
268
91. 5
79
21-1
205
ma
2,206
85 1. 7
466. 2
I, 717
348. G
933
515.
62 1
343. 3
218. ,J
4.
18
19
74
77
21 1
3,999
2. 249
231
4. 1:1 7
2, ·12'.l


! :3


~) :)


!t--. I


.'lll\11)
211,
I
395
987
o; 1
1:1 1 ,
I
�Rockford, llL ______ _
257,poo
(Includes Winnebago a nrt Roonc ('ounLics.)
Arca actuall y reporting___ __________ ··-·-··--- - ___ _____
IOO. 0%
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ________ · - - --·- ---- - --- - - --- - - · -- · ··---- - Sacramento, Calif_____ .. _-··- --· - -- --------- - -·· - __-- -·- ·-·762, 000
(Includes Sacramento, Placer and Yolo ('aunties.)
Arca actually reporting ______ ___ ·-- --- ---- -- - -- -··----- 99. 5%
E stimated totaL·-··-- -·-· -- --·- --- ---- --- - --·· - ---- - -100. 0%
Rate per 100,000 inhnbitants ______ _·-------- --- --· ·----- - -- - - --- -·- - - Saginaw, Mich __ _. ______ ________ -·-··---_______ __ ___ ____ ____
203, 000
(Includes Saginaw County.)
Area a ctually reportini:.---· - -·-- ----·---· - --- - - ____ ___
100. 0%
Rate per 100,000 inhahitants--··········---·-····-··-··· ... .......... .
St. Louis, Mo.·Ill. . ... . ........... .. -. . ·-·· ··-·····---·······
2, 267,000
(Includes St. Louis City nnd Jefferson, St. Charles, St.
Louis and Franklin Counties, Mo.; noel i\fartison and
St. Cla ir Counties, Ill.)
05. 2%
Area actually reporting·-·······--· -·
.... . .... . . .
100. 0%
Estimated total . . . . . ... . . . . . ......... . .. . . ·-··- ········
Rate per 100,000 inhabita nts......... ... . . -············- .
173,000
Salem, Oreg. · ··········-················--··-·· -· · ·········
(Includes Marion and Polk Counties.)
100. 0%
Area actually reporLinl;;·-··-········· ... -·······-· ..... .
R ate per 100,000 inhabitants ...... - . ... .............••..
521,000
Salt Lake City, Uta h · -·-· --······· · · · · ······· ···· ·· ··········
(Includes Salt Lnke anrl D avis Coun ties.)
Area actually reporting_ ........•......... -· -·· ······ · · ·
100. 0%
Ra te per 100,000 inha hitauts ... . --· ·· · ···-···-·-··--···. ··-···· ···
San Antonio, Tex -····· ···· -······· -········· -·-···· · · · · ····
806, 000
(Includes Bexar and O uadalupe Counties.)
Area actually reporting_· · ··· ·--·-·····-·-······· · ·-·-· 98. 0%
Estimated total. · - · ·········-·······---· · ··· --··-······
100. 0%
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ........... - - -·-···· · -·-·- · - ·-··· ······ · · ·
San Bernardino·Rivers ide·Ontario, Calif_.. ·- · ··· · · ··-·---··
1, 044, 000
(Includes Riverside and San Bernardino Counties.)
Area actually report ing .. .... . . ... ·-····· · · · ·-·-····-··100. 0%
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants....... .. . · -·-·-···· · -· ····· ··-·-···· ·· · · ·
Sa n Diego, Calif. . . .. . . ···- -·· · . ... . . . . . . ---·-·-· .. . ... __...
1, 191,000
(Includes San D iego Count y.)
100. 0%
Area actually reporting .. .....• -··· ····---··············
Rate per 100,000 inha bi ta nts... . . . · -· ···· · · ··-· -·-·-·-·- . . .
San Fra n cisco.Oakland, Calif ____ .......... - _.. . . ..... . . . . . . .
2,989, 000
(Includes Alameda, Cont ra Costa, Mnrin, San Francisco
and San M a teo Counties.)
Area actually reporting ..... ·--·· · · ···--············· · ··
97. 7%
E stimated total. . · -· · - · · ---···· · · - · · · · · · · · -·-------····
100. 0%
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants. . . . ... --········ · ---····-·- --·-·-······· ·
Sa n Jose, Calif_. . -· · ·-· .. -· · · . . .... . . . . . . .... .. -· -- -- _. -·...
884,000
(Includes Santa Clara County.)
100.0%
Area actually repor ting _._ ..... . .... .
Hate per 100,000 inhahitants
.
2, 41l3
9:i9. r,
4
I. r;
16
6. 2
95
37. 0
112
43. fl
I, 19-1
4fl5. 2
7!15
294. I
287
111. 8
lfi, 845
16,954
2,224. 5
34
34
4. 5
189
24. 9
623
628
82.4
519
525
f,S. 9
8. 177
8,224
1,070.0
4, 072
4, 102
538. 2
3,231
3,25 1
426. f,
27
13. 3
· 154
75. 8
3r,4
179. 2
I , 177
5i9. fl
fi42
316. I
5.'il
271. 3
452
470
20. 7
2, 60
2, 952
130.. 2
2, 977
3, 085
13fi. I
20, IO I
20, 747
915. 0
7. 307
7,057
337. 7
8,098
8,3fi4
3C.S. 9
JO
4. 9
41,972
43, 455
177
180
190
om. 5
7. 9
1,918
I, 110. 4
4. I
10
5. 8
33
19. I
94
54. 4
79
508. 9
681
394. 3
21 4
123. 9
10, 147
1,948. I
6
I. 2
66
12. 7
193
37. I
361
fi9. 3
4, 133
793. 5
3, 827
734. 7
I, 56 1
299. 7
16, 404
16,657
2,065.9
62
63
7. 8
11 1
112
13. 9
353
359
44. 5
I , 459
I , 473
182. 7
7, 875
7,954
9 6. 5
4,534
4, 57l
566. 9
2, JOO
2, 125
263. 6
24, 482
2,345.2
52
.5.0
108
10.0
520
49.8
1,206
11 5. 5
12, 685
I , 215. 1
6, 883
659. 3
2, 938
281. 4
18. 141
I, 523. 7
40
3. 4
llfi
505
42. 4
726
9. 7
m. o
6, 7 3
569. 7
7,303
6 13. 4
2, 6f,S
224. 1
74,341
75, 893
2,539. 3
125
128
4. 3
393
410
13. 7
3,865
3, 9r,o
132. 5
34, 193
35, 0 11
1, lil. 4
16, 617
17, 005
569. 0
15,300
15. 482
518. 0
14,651
1,658. I
22
2. 5
84
9. 5
424
4 .0
7, 23 1
818. 3
4, 193
474. 5
2, 471
279. 6
1,
7
3,848
3,897
130. ,4
226
25. 6
�r
Cl)
0:,
TabJe 4 . -Inde x of Crim e , 1965, S ta n da rd 1U etropolita.n Sta.t is t ica.l Are as - Co n t inu ed
Standard metropolitan stat istica l area
Populat ion
'l'otal
oITenses
Murder
an d 0 0 11negligent
man-
F orcible
rape
R obbery
slaughter
Santa Barbara, Calif_- - -- -- --· · · - · · · · · · · · · · . . ....... ... . . . . .
..
(Includes Sa nta Bar bara Coun ty.)
Area actua ll y reporting·· · ··· · -· ·· ·· ·· · ·-·· ·- · -·· · · · · ·· ·
Sava~!~\~~;15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)~ ~.1.~ ~ ~'. '.~ ~ ~ ~: : : : : : :: : :::: : : : : ::: : ::: : : : :
Burglary
Larcen y
$50 an d
o,er
Au to
t heft
241, 000
100. 0%
- .. . ..
20f 000.
(Incl udes Chatham Count y.)
98. 0%
Area actual ly reporting.. _· · · · ·· ·-- ·· ·· ··-···· · · --· · ·· · ·
Estimated total. ··· ·· ····· ·· · · · ·· -· · ·· · ·· -········· · ·· ·
100. 0%
R ate per 100,000 iubabi ta nts .. .. . · -········--··· - -·· · ·· ·
Scranton, Pa. • • • · ·-- · ·--·.· - - - · ·- • • • . .. • • . . • · - - · .•.•• .. . · -··
227, 000
(I ncludes Lackawanna Cou nty.)
Area actu all y reporti ng. . ... . - · ···-· · ··· · ·· · · · ··· ·-· ··- ·
98. 1%
Estimated t otal __ ·- · -· ··-·-·· ......... . · · -· · · ··· ····· ··
JOO. 0%
R ate per 100,000 iuhabitauts . ........ _. .. . ..• _. ... -.. . .. · · ···· · ··-····
Seattle-E verett, Wash __ _··· · ·······-···-·········- ·· · -· ·····
1, 189,000
(I ncludes K ing a nd S'nobom isb Coun ties. )
Area actua ll y repor ting. · · ·-······-· · ······ · -·· ·· - · -····
99. 7%
E stimated total. .---····················· · · · · -·-·· -· ·· ·
JOO. 0%
Hate per 100,000 i n.ha bita nts . .................. . ...... . . ·- ·········--Shre veport, La .. · -· ·····-··············-· .. .... . . ..... . ..
306, 000
(Includes B ossier a nd Caddo Parishes.)
Area act uall y reportin g.····-· . ............. ··· ·······-·
100. 0%
Hate per 100,000 i nhabitau ts .... ............. -······ ··· ···-·· · ······Sioux City,Iowa·Nebr .. . .. ... .. .. -- ·········- ....... ... .
119, 000
(I nclud es Woodbury Coun ty, Io"·a; a nd 11a kota Count y,
Nebr.)
93. 5%
Area act uall y repor ting. .... · ·····-··· ··· -············
E ; tima tecl totaL -·-· · - · ···-·· ...... ........... ··-·· · ···
100. 0%
Rate per 100,000 inhabita nts . ..................•... ·· ·-·········
South Bend, I nd ... . · · · ·· -· -·· · -···-················-··· ···281, 000
(In cludes St . J osepb and lVJa rshall C'ou nlies .)
Area acu rnJJ y repor ting ............ ······· ····· ·· ·-· ···
9 . 8%
E stimated tota l.. .. . - ...... . .. . . . . ···-···· . ...••...
I00.0%
R a te per 100,000 inha bita nts... -...............•• . ...... ·· ···-·-····
Spokane, Wash .. .. - . ....................... ·-·-· .. ..
290, 000
(lnclndcs Spokane Coun ty.)
98. 7%
100. 0%
R a te per 100,000 in ha bita nts ...•... ... . ..
Springfield, Il l.. ... ... - ........... .
152, 000
( Include~ Ra nga mon Co unt ;·.)
\n'a ac·t unll _,· rr por ling
100. 0°,;
l<-Jlf· 1,1·1 100.000 inh:1ld1·1111,
~~f~1~;~~J1i6t~f143.215.248.55'.'.~ ~:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
Aggra.
vated
assaul t
4, 302
10
I, 7 4. 8
4. l
3, 871
3, 948
I, 945. 7
I , 361
J, 531
lli -1. 4
20, 960
21, 020
29
38
15. 8
41
94
39. 0
170
2,11 0
875. 4
604. 5
1, 7 10
1, 740
857. 5
496. 3
i5
33. 0
647
713
314. l
141. 8
168. 3
9, 368
9, 305
790. 0
6,808
3, 062
3, 072
1, 4 8
897
293. 5
515
168. 5
561
589
493. 5
268
294
246. 4
7G I
501
143
59. 3
570
576
30
42
172
14. 8
20. 7
84. 8
283. 9
18
28
61
1
7
2
.9
4. 0
12. 3
627
629
32
9
450
186. 7
J. 457
985
366
381
I , 007
187. 8
287
322
I , 767 . .,
32
174
174
2. 7
14. 6
52. 9
889
891
H. 9
3, 74 7
I, 225. 9
26
8. 5
20
6. 5
168
55. 0
207. J
I, 40G
I, 517
l , 27 1. I
4
4
3. 4
31
5 12
10. 9
33
18.4
27. 7
562
470. 9
2, -582
2, fi51
943. 9
g
3. 2
9
10
73
77
27. 4
if
81
28.
l, 178
419. 4
779
277 . 4


is


36
76
7S
26. 9
1, 272
l, 300
874
l'.l. 1
2,867
2,9:JO
I, 009. 4
6
6
2. I
I. ~9:l
I.:! I ~. fl
., ti
12
13
II


J. 9


14
14
4. 8
18
22
633
486. 8
1, 15 l
417. 9
0, 827


i i 4. 0


89-1
308. 0
4( -1
·n1
n
340
382
258. 3
516
183. 7
589
GOO
20G. 7
-1~ 2


!;"1(),;


�Springfield, Mo __ ___ ____ _____ _________ ______ _____ ____ ___ -- ·· ·
(Incl udes Greene Count y.)
Area actually reporting.·-· - · ·-·--··· ·---····- · ·· ··· · · ··
135 000
'
100. 0%
Spri~: r\~1~~r6:~~ . '.~-143.215.248.55!143.215.248.55-t~:::::::::::::::::::::: : : :: · . . . - ·-j37-ooo·
(Incl_u des Clark County.)
·
'
100. 0%
Area actually reporting.·-·-··-········ -···-· -- · ··· · · ··R ate per 100,000 inhabitants. ······ · · · · -·--···· · ···-···- . .. ... .. ... .. .
Springfield·Chicopee·Holyok e, Mass ... ...... · · · · ···-··· · ····
555 000
(Includes H am pden and H ampshire Counties.)
'
Area act ually reporting.-··-······· ··· · ·····-·········· ·
98. 3%
i !\~mpaetrc1ob~8&\·1oiiabi taot;.-_·_~-.--·.·_·_·.·.·.~·-·-·.·.~~·.~-.~-.·_·.·.·...•.. . !~~:~~.
Steubenville-Weirton, Ohio-W. Va..... .. .. . .... ..... . ... . ...
167,000
(Includes Jefferson County, Ohio; and Brooke a nd
H ancock Counties, W. Va.)
t ~itr:~t~~Kt~!~~:~'.~~:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
1~b:~~
Rate per 100,000 inha bi ta nts. - · ·-·--·-·· · ··· -····-·-···· ·· · · · · -·- · ··-·
Stockton, Calif __ ..... ·· · - · - · · ··· · · ····· · ··- · -·- · ··· · · ·· ·-. . .
271, 000
(Includes San Joaquin Coun ty.)
Area actually reporting... ···· · ··· ········- ·· · ···· ·· ···JOO. 0%
Rate per 100,000 inha bitants.·-· · -···-··· ······ · -·· · ·· ·· · ·· · · · -···· ··Syracuse , N .Y. . ·- ··· · ··· ··- -··· · · ·· · · ··· · -········· ·· · . .
630 000
(Includes Madison , Onondaga and Oswego Coun ties.·) - ·
'
Arca actuall y reporting.·····-· · ·· ··-·--·········· ······
09. 2%
Taco;~ti{~l15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)143.215.248.55:15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)::·15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST):~:·~:-15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)~:::
-:- ...... ~ :' : :.
(Includes Pierco County.)
Area actually repor tlng.... _· ·-····-· ··· ·· · -·- · ···- · ··· ·
100. 0%
R ate per 100,000 inhabitants. . ·- ··· ·· · ·- · -· · · ·· ·· ·· · · ·· · · · ·--··--· ·- ··
Tampa·St. Peters burg, Fla_--- ·-·· · ··-·-- ····-· ··· · · · · · ··· ·
887,000
(Includes Hillsborough and Pinellas Counties.)
Arca actually reporting.-···· ·· · ······ · · · - -··· · · · ·······
97. 3%
TeJ~:! ~~fi!15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)~
~~i15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST):~·:~-:~: ~·: :~·~·:~·~-::~·~·::~
·~
·~·~-.·-· ~~; ~~.
Tex!l!f£:~i143.215.248.55%f15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)'.15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)::::::::::::::::::::::::::::....-.143.215.248.55;:.
1
(Inclu des Vigo , Olay, Sullivan and Vermillion Counties.)
Arca actuall y reporting...... _.... .. ---··-··········- ···
07. 2%
(Includes Bowie County , T ex.; and Miller County , Ark .)
84. 7%
Area actually reporting· · - · · · · · - · · · · -- -··· ···- · ···-·-···
E stimated total _- · · ··- ·-· ···· · ·-· ···-· · ·· ···· ··· · ·· ·-··
100. 0%
T R ate per 100,000 inhabitants_···- ······ ·· ····· · · · · ··· · · · · ······-·· -· ··
oledo, Ohio.Mich.·-· · ···---· ·· ·· · ·-· -·-- ·· ·-·- · ··-···-· ···
654, 000
(Includes Lu cas and Wood Counties, Ohio; and Monroe
Coun ty, M ich.)
Arca actuall y reporting·-· ·· ·-·· ·· · ·· · -···-·- · ··-···-···
100. 0%
Rate per 100,000 inhahlfants._ ....•. -·-·- · - · ········-· - · · -·-·· · · · - · · -·
1,554
I, 147. 8

----- ---- -- ---
5
3. 7
47
3,1. 7
35
25. 0
002
666. 2
41 5
300. 5
150
110. 8
588
I, 220
93. 6
4
2. 0
7
5.1
37
27. 1
13. 0
430. 7
328
240. 2
237
173. 6
4, 593
4, 744
854. 5
8
8
I. 4
29
30
5. 4
~
46
50
0. 0
78
83
14. 0
I, 633
1,688
304. 0
1, 261
I , 293
232. 9
1, 538
1, 502
286. 7
9i7
I, 155
690. 3
2
2
1. 2
9
IO
6. 0
28
37
22. 1
121
137
8 1. 0
497
573
342. 5
224
268
160. 2
96
128
76. 5
6, 336
2, 334. 0
13
4. 8
43
15. 8
221
81.4
33 1
121.9
2, 097
I, 104. 0
1, 875
690. 7
856
315. 3
8,162
8, 227
I, 305. 8
14
14
2. 2
91
91
1-1.4
252
255
40. 5
482
487
77. 3
3, 382
3,402
q4 0. 0
2, 868
2,893
459. 2
1,073
I , 085
172. 2
4, 392
I, 329. 7
4
I. 2
34
10. 3
88
26. 6
258
78.1
2, 036
616. 4
I, 422
430. 5
550
166. 5
I , 336
18,94 1
2, 135. 8
51
53
6. 0
Ill
114
12. 9
797
830
93. 6
I, 700
1, 753
197. 7
9, 244
9, 528
1,074. 4
4, 784
4, 951
558. 3
1, 64.9
1, 712
193. 0
1, 7 4
1,881
0
0
5. 3
11
12
7.1
44
50
29. 4
32
37
21. 8
856
894
526. 0
636
662
389. 5
196
217
127. 7
8
66
92
91.1
326
360
356. 6
187
23 7
234. 8
104
126
124. 8
481
73. 6
4, 377
660. 4
3, 057
467. 5
1, 387
212. 1
l, 106. 6
700
851
843. 0
IO
11
5
IO
10.9
9. 9
15
14 . 9
9, 943
I , 520. 7
23
3.5
73
11. 2
83. ,1
545
IO
�00
00
T able 4 .-lndex of Cri me, 1965, S tanda rd Metr opolita.n S ta tistical Areas - Continued
Standard metropolitan statistical area
Populat ion
Total
offenses
Murder
and n onnegligent
Forcible
rape
man-
Robbery
slaughter
Topeka , Kans ____ _____ __ _____ _______ _____ _____ __________ ____
(Includes Shawnee County.)
Area actually reporting. _____ ___ __ __ __ ______ ____ _____ ___
R ote per 100,000 inhabitants __ ____________ _____ ________ _
Trenton, N .J______ ___ _______ _. _. ____________ ____ ____ ________
(Includ es Mercer Coun ty.)
Area aclllall )• reporting ____ __ ___________ ____ __ _____ _____
E stimated total.. _____ _____ __ -- -- --- _______ ______ ______ _
Hate per 100,000 inhabi lani s _____ ______________ ____ ____ _
289, 000
Tucso n, Ariz ___ __________ __ _______________ ____ ___ ________ __.
331. 000
98. 3%
100 .0%
99. 2%
if;t~:;;iJ~lt~f:143.215.248.55: ~~!::::: : :::::: : :: ::::::::::::::::::
I00. 0%
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ______________ __________ ____
Vallejo-Napa, Calif__ ___ _. _____________ ____ _______ ______ ___ __ -------------234, 000
(Includes Solano and Na pa Counties .)
Area actuall y reporting ___ _________ ___ ______ ______ __ ____
100. 0%
W Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ___________ _______________ __

----aco i Tex ____ _____ ___ __ ____ _
158,
000
(Includes M cLennan County~) -- ------ --- -- ----- -----·-·Area actually reporting _____ ___ __ ___________ __ ____ . _____
JOO. 0%
H:11P pPr rnn,cln11 inhahitnrn..;
B urglary
Larceny
$50 and
Auto
theft
over
150, 000
100. 0%
(Includes Pima County.)
Area actu ally reporting _____________ ____ ___ ____ ___ ______
100.0%
Hate per 100,000 inhabitants __ ___ ________ _______________
Tulsa, Okla ___________________________ ____ . __ _______________ ------ ----- --449, 000
(Includes Creek, Osage and Tulsa Counties .)
Area actually reporting __ ____ _____ . _____________ . ___ . ___
100. 0%
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants __________________ __ ___ ___ __
Utica-Rome, N, Y____ _____ ___________ ____ . _. _. ___ . ___ .. __ . __ _ ----- --------352, 000
(Includes H erkim er and On eida Counties.)
Was143.215.248.55 15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)::·ri~'. ~JJ~-t~~'. 15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST):::: ::::::::: ::::::::::- .:::
(lnclud es District of Columbia; Montgomery and Prin ce
Georges Counties, M el.; Alexanclria Fairfax and F alls
Church Citiesa ncl Arlin gton ancl Fa;;.ra, Counties, Va.)
Area actuall y reponin g_____ ---··--·· _____ _ ___ __ __
Rate per 100,000 inhabitan ts . ____ __ ____________________
Waterloo , Iowa__ ___ __ ________ ______ _____

(Incl url es Bl ack H awk C' ounty.)
Area a,·111 a ll ,- rcpnrting
Aggravated
assaul t
-- --------- -
1. 780
1, 183. 1
3
2. 0
22
14. 6
47
31. 2
li5
116. 3
915
608. 2
41G
276. 5
202
134. 3
5,373
5,452
I , 885. 7
7
7
2. 4
24
24
8. 3
235
238
82. 3
219
224
ii. 5
2, 272
2. 307
797. 9
1, 110
1, 128
390. 2
1,506
l , 524
527. 1
5,202
l , 587. 4
15
4. 5
36
10. 9
148
44. 6
265
79. 9
2,511
757. 5
1, 366
412. 1
921
2ii. 8
7, 488
I, 6G7. 2
Jg
40
4. 2
10. 2
220
49. 0
49 l
109. 3
3, 051
6i0. 3
2,408
536. 2
I , 253
279. 0
1, 89 1
2. 102
59(i. 5
4
5
J. 4
9
10
2. 8
37
46
13. l
51
19. 3
I, 044
l, 108
3 l4. 4
494
574
162. 9
252
29 1
82. 6
2,988
I. 279. '.l
8
3. 4
19
8. l
93
39. 8
81
34. 7
I, 337
572. 4
939
402. 0
511
218. 8
3,056
I, 937. 9
13
8. 2
17
10. 8
61
38. 7
229
145. 2
2, 008
I, 273. 3
519
329.1
209
132. 5
51, n4 7
2,1 71. 3
197
8. 2
339
14. 2
3, 665
153. 2
5, 087
2 12. 6
21,323
89 1. 3
11 , 869
496. 1
9,467
395. 7
42


l:l .-1


2, 392, 000
100.0%
126, 000
11)0,
or;
1, l ii8
2
1:i
\l:ll . I
I I\
JI ) :i
68
40


ll


~
-133
425


3.J.J. I



l:Jq_ I


203
H il. A
�West Palm Beach , Fla_ ___ __________ ___ _________ _______ ___ ___
(I ncludes Palm Beach County.)
Area actuall y reporting__ ____ __ __ ________ ____ ___ _____ ___
274, 000
93. 4%
615:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)'.143.215.248.55 15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST):::::::::::::::::::::::::::: ------:;~::-
Whe;itfil~t~%
(Includes Marshall and Ohio Counties, W. Va.; and Belmont County, Ohio.)
Area actuall y reporting__________________ _____ _________ _
91. 9%
Wic!~Y,!7Jt115:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)-!143.215.248.55 15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)'.143.215.248.55::::::::::::::::::: ::::::::: -- -- --; : : :(Includes Sedgwick and Butler Counties.)
Area actually reporting_ ___ ___ ___ _________ _____ ____ ___ __
100. 0%
Wic~:,t~~ii~ .1£~;?_~'.~-~ ~~i_t_143.215.248.55 : :: : :: : :::::::: : ::: :-- ---- -- - - --- - 147- 000(Includes Archer and Wichita Counties.)
-- --- --'
Area actually reporting_ __ ____ ____ ___ ___ ___ ____ ____ ____ _
JOO. 0%
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants _______ ____ ____ ___ ____ _____ ______ ________ _
348 000
Wilkes-Barre-Hazelton, Pa___ __ ________________ __ __
(I ncludes Luzerne County.)
-- --- -- -'
Area actually reporting ____________________ ____ _______ __
96. 4%
Estimated
totaL inhabitants
__----------__-------- - --_---------JOO. 0%
Rate per 100,000
___ ---___________
_
Wilmington, Del.-N .J.-Md ________ ___ _____ ___ _____ -------- -- ------463-000(lncludes New Castle County, Del.; Salem -c-oii_~t;y- '
N.J .; and Cecil County, Md.)
'
~ r~!' acfually reporting ____ ______ ____ __ _____ ________ __ __
99. 0%
s una ed totaL ___ _______ ______ _____________ ______ ____
100. 0%
w· RateJ'er 100,000 inhabitants __ ___ _____ __ __ ____ ____________ ___ __ ___ ___ _
2 17 ooo
mst-0n- alem, N,C___ ______ ______ ____ _________ __
(Includes Forsyth County.)
- -- ------'
100. 0%
Area actually reporting____ __ _____ __ _____ ___ __
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants __ _______ ____ _____ : ---- --- -Worcester, Mass __ ___ ________ ______ ____ ____ ________________ _
61 5 000
(Includes Worcester County.)
'
86. 9%
Are!' actually reporting____ ______ ___ __ ___ _________ ___ ___
Estunated
totaL

JOO.
0%__
Rate per 100,000 mhabitants ______ ____ _________ ___ ___ ___ __ __________
York, Pa __ __ _____-- ---- ---- ----- --- -- -- -- -- ----- ----303, 000
(Includes York and Adams Counties.)
-- ----Are!' actually reporting_____ _______ ____ __ _______ ______ __
97. 2%
Estimated
totaL rnhabitants
, - - - -c--- -----------JOO. 0%
Rate per 100,000
_____ --------__ ________--_____
_ -----Youngstown-Warren, Ohio______ _______________ ______ _----- - - - -- ---532-000(Includes Mahoning and Trumbull Counties.)

--'
JOO Oo/c
Area actuall y reporting_______ ___________
Rate per 100.000 inhabitants ____ ____ ____ _: : : : : : : :::- ---- ________ _· __0 _
4, 647
5, 103
1, 862.3
28
29
10. 6
34
36
13. 1
105
130
47. ,1
699
739
269. 7
2,2 12
2, 426
885. 4
1, 112
1,238
451. 8
457
505
184. 3
829
1,040
56 1. 7
3
4
2. 2
l
3
1. 6
23
36
19. 4
59
72
38_-9
409
501
270. 6
235
282
152. 3
99
142
76. 7
5,824
1, 586. 6
13
3. 5
41
J I. 2
13 1
35. 7
322
87. 7
2, 757
751. I
I , 691
460. 7
869
236. 7
2, 192
1,496. 0
10
6.8
21
14. 3
92
62. 8
369
25 1. 8
652
445. 0
829
565.8
219
149. 5
1, 60•1
1, 748
503. 0
2
2
.6
12
13
3. 7
20
29
8. 3
92
103
29. 6
620
678
195. l
483
512
147. 3
375
411
118. 3
6, 311
6, 359
I , 374. 5
20
20
4. 3
34
34
7. 3
276
278
60. 1
107
110
23. 8
2, 895
2, 91 6
630. 3
1, 711
1, 722
372. 2
1,268
I. 279
276. 5
3, ],13
1,148. 0
34
15. 7
17
7. 8
55
25. 3
792
364. 9
1. 2 16
560. 2
608
280. 1
421
194. 0
5, 922
7,3 17
I , 190. 3
11
13
2. 1
25
30
4.9
128
165
26. 8
143
189
30. 7
2,800
3, 316
539. 4
1,293
I , 586
258. 0
1, 522
2. 018
328. 3
4
4
1. 3
JG
17
5.6
63
69
22. 7
69
78
25. 7
1,306
I, 347
443. 9
438
460
151. 6
259
2 5
93. 9
17
3. 2
23
4. 3
152
28. 6
426
80. 0
2, 029
38 1. 1
1, 171
219. 9
1, 075
20 1. 9
2,1 55
2, 260
744. 8
4, 893
919. 0
..
�General United States Crime Statistics
enforce
are 1wimarily of value to law
The data prese-n t ed 111
. t h 1s
. sect10n
.

. and others for
.. the purpose of
compa .-ment ex· ecut1ves,
news media
l'eported
• e cnme
experience
of a community with the ave,,,ges
nn Oo· th
.
.
rates al' nationally by communities of similar size. Crime trends and
Police e tn.bitlated by grouping places accoi·din• to population size.
0
PopuJatperfor mance m
cn. mes by a,,-est is
presented by
·
· c1eanng

l'\1 ati ion o-roll
. d.1v1sion.
. .
.t~
P an d geograpl uc
O •
of the o~al city averages are also shown indicating the type and value
Police pi~o;erty stolen, by offense and type, and value recovered by
examined' estigat10n. Robbery, bw·glacy, and larceny-theft are
Cit
by type, as well a where and when they occw-red.
1
ofl'e Y' sub
· ur·b an and rur al area arrest r ates are shown for all cn1n1Dtw.
· · offens
nses. An-est 'rotes by population
'
gi·oup are olso listed for specific
·
Othe,· es. This is another step in building totals for crime cotegones
to the th a~ those in the Crime Index and in presenting crimes known
0
.
. ·d d f · th use
_Po~cel through arrests.
f!Stawat1st1
'
enfca. data relatrn•'"' to suburban areas are· provi
· · e 1,·o,o· r roited
Con,
. orcernen t officials in suburb an comm um ties 10 m • ~n, ' .
cio/•nsons. Places used to establish totals fo,· subuxban areas m'.'>ties with 50 000 or le s populotion and county Jaw enforcement
. cies ·
. · _1 •
Of course the
'
.
1n standard metropolitan statistw~ ,ueOS°"1
'
n,;,;
It eIse_inx perience of t he Iar•e
city is
"' core
.
· excluded.
. .
th t usuallY abou t
a
N atwntw.
. _1
half the 1 P0·rtan t to remember 10 studymg
d bave1t ages
h lf below. m ust be . above an
· · •. tou.
••er8.ges unitsprousedv1de
the police adm1n1st1a o1
·
,th
• valuable gu1·d ance
i.: s
.
11 "1
th6 erforJJl ance of .LU
foree in
. h as r Pdoes not en d with
. zmg the local cnrne count, l1S we
combatino· crime. The analysis, oweve ' 0
.1
ditions
8
thllch
ac
. "
. .
. · al f!oc~ con
at ompanson, !ont is only through an •PP' "'s
the eflecti vanes, • clear picture of the community crime problem or
of the po lice force 1s
. poss1·ble.
111 n,llaly· can
.
91
�Table 5.-Crime Trends, O.D'e n ses K nown to the Polic<', 1964- 65 , hy Pop ula tio n G roups
[1 965 estimated population]
Crim inal homicide
I'opulation group
Grand
total
Crime
index
total
Jlfor clcr
and nonnegligent
man-
slaughter
Manslnughtcr by
negligence
L arceny-theft
Forcible R obbery
rape
Aggravated
RSSR UIL
Burglarybreaking or
enterin g
$50 and
over
Un de r
$50
Auto
theft
TOTAL, ALL AGENCIES: 5,388 agencies; total po pu,000


_____ ___ ___ ____ ______ ___ ______ _


lation
_____
1964 159,771
___ ___ ___
7, 457
17, 580
3, 937, 663
2, 326, 875
6, 090
103,984
162. 527
987, 594
624. 783
1, 604, 698
422, 950
1965_-- _--- - _______ -- _-- ________ ____________ ____ _ 4, 047, 861
667, 896
1, 692, 666
18, 989
6, 661
2, 448, 534
7,898
109, 198
167, 379 1,037, 650
439, 524
P ercent change _______ __ ______ ______ __ ___ __ _____ _
- .8
+2.8
+5.2
+ 5.9
+ o.4
+ 8.o
+5. 0
+3. 0
+5. 1
+ 0.0
+ 3. 9
0
l= = = =t== = = l = = = 1====1==== - - - - - - - - - - - - ====l = == =I = = =
TOTAL CITil.S : 3,798 cities ; total population
111,798,000
1964 ______: __ __ _____ _____ _______ _____ ___ ____ ____ __ 3,295, 325
1, 380, 178
94, 923
133. 497
780, 268
509, 601
374, 259
12, 763
I, 911, 193
5, 882
3. 954
1965_____ --- __--- _-- __-- ____ -- __ __-- ___ ____ ______ 3,374, 112
99, 461
6, 180
3, 907
137, 055
540, 731
1, 362, 929
390, 327
819,837
13, 685
2, 007, 276
P ercent change ____________ ___ ____ ___ ______ ___ __ _
1.
2
1.
3
+5. 1
+7. 2
+4.8
+2.7
+ 6. 1
+2.4
+5.0
+4. 3
+5.1
l== = = l == = = I - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ====l,= ===I= = =
<1ROl' P I
53 cities
over 250,000;
40,800,000
]964 ______
______ ___population
____________
__ ____ ___: ________ _
1965 _____ ________ ___ __ ___ _________ ________ ____ ___
P ercen t change ___ _____ _______ _______ __ _______ ___
6 cities over 1,000,000; population 18,881,000:
1064_ - -- - -- - -- -- - - -- _--- __ -- ____ -- __ -- __ -- __ _- 1965 __ __ ____ ___ __ _______________ ________ ----- --Percen t change ____ _______ __ __ ____ ___ ___ _
18 cities, 500,000 to 1,000,000; population 11,641,000:
1964 _______________ ---- ---------- -------- -- -----1965 ____________ ___ _________________________ __ __ _
Percent chan ge ____ _____ _______ _________________ _
29 cit
ies,_______________
250,000 to 500,000;
populat
ion 10,284,000:__ _
1964
__ __ _____
__________________
1905 __________ ______ ___ ______ .
P ercent chan ge __ __ ______ _______ _____ __ __ _______ _
,,,,8,300
2, Olfl
2, 000
- .3
7, 74-1
8, 509
+ 11. 0
70. 4,12
73, Oli2
+3. 7
77, !2R
70, 4fi8
+:l .O
3~3. 444
402, 687
+ s. o
243. 82 1
+ 3. 0
,53fi, Olfl
- 4. 0
224, 2!i9
233. 402
+ 4. 1
l , fif> l
fi87
f\54
-4. 8
4, 40 1
4. 949
+ 12. 5
40, 489
41, fi33
+2s
4fi , 21\7
4!i, 3G8
+. 2
l63, 4fi7
l , 807
+ 8. 8
175,50 1
135. 812
138, (i32
+2. 1
108, r, 19
l 7, 811
- .5.4
105. 382
110, 5!i7
+4.9
1, Iii
] , 195
+1. 5
739
758
+2.n
I. 911
2, 148
+ 12.4
17, !HO
18, r,97
115, i RO
11 , 796
+r,. 2
17, 825
19, 453
+9. I
M.823
57, 725
+5.3
19G. 757
183, 993
- G. 5
73,003
75, 204
+ 3. 0
230, 810
?39 391
- -f-3. 7
722
754
+4. 4
590
597
+ 1. 2
1. 432
I , 502
+ 4. 9
12,353
12, 732
+3.l
13. 03fi
13, (i47
+4. 7
104, 197
108, 390
53, ] 8(i
54, 735
+2.9
lli3, 024
IM, 212
+.7
45. 884
47. fi3 1
+ 3. 8
245, 140
759
R3,i
59G
0. 043
9. 57 1
18. 127
IR.442
108. 347
11 2,-1-l!i
fi5. Rl 8
198.-140
107. 11;3
4 1. 572
f- 111. 11
+- A. :,
I, 474
I. 438
1,570, 734
1,590, 081
+1. 2
I, 010, 418
I, O!i2, 05fi
+ 1. 1
3, !ifiO
3, 7.i fi
+ fl. f,
696, 685
707, 912
+1. 6
497,479
519, 447
+4. 4
479,625
477, 969
- .3
282, 120
293,218
+3.9
394,424
404, 200
+ 2. 5
444. 27fi
455. OJI,
+ 2.-1
+7.4
+H
+4.0
2.i l , 0, 2
GROUP II
92 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; population 13,087,000:
1964 _-- ___ - - - - ------------ _ _
_
_ __
1965 _
Pc-r ..:cnt l'h:m~c
2,17, '.!24
+ 4. \I
mo
- 2 .\
+ r, "'
-L I 7
+ :l '
70. 377
j
ti q
44 . I Iii
+r.
I
�GROUP Ill
224 cities,
100,000;
15,390,000:
1964 ___50,000
__ ____to
_____
__ ____population
______ ___ ____
___ ____ ____ _
1965 __ ____ __ ____ ______ ___ _______ __ _____ ____ ______
Percent change ___ _--- --------- ---------- ------ __
431,691
444,502
+3.0
232, 297
245,543
+5.7
546
534
-2. 2
554
506
- 8. 7
I, 207
I, 283
+6.3
7, 117
7,508
+5. 5
11,865
11, 841
- .2
98, 184
103,074
+5.0
69, 673
75, 023
+7.7
198,840
198, 453
- .2
43, 705
46,280
+ 5.9
380, 826
395,591
+3. 9
193,882
207,702
+7. 1
458
488
+ 6.6
447
402
- 10. 1
913
975
+6. 8
4,439
5,098
+14. 8
IO, 226
10,643
+4. 1
83,983
88,012
+4 . 8
62, 113
69,027
+ u .1
186, 497
187, 487
+.5
31,750
33,459
+5.4
313,813
327,635
+4.4
150,989
161,799
+7.2
364
368
+1. 1
225
239
+0.2
870
872
+. 2
2, 654
2, 990
+12.1
9,831
10,545
+7.3
69, 349
74,360
+ 7.2
45,525
49, 944
+9.7
162,599
165,597
+1. 8
22, 396
22, 720
+1.4
153,985
161, 287
+4.7
78,467
82, 952
+5. 1
195
199
+ 2. 1
116
122
+ 5. 2
555
518
- 6. 7
1,218
1, 232
+1.1
6,320
6, 116
- 3. 2
36, 961
39, 258
+ 0.2
2'2, 051
25, 278
+11.6
75, 40'2
78,2 13
+3. 1
10, 567
10, 351
- 2. 0
903, 061
953, 344
+5.6
517,273
558, 20-2
+7. 9
I , 149
1, 207
+5. 0
I , 288
I, 608
+ 24.8
4,024
4, 581
+13.8
ll, 842
13, 419
+ 13. 3
27, 901
29,979
+7.4
243, 119
260, 570
+7.2
154,560
171, 207
+10. 8
384, 500
393,534
+2.3
74, 678
77, 239
+3. 4
204, 474
210, 139
+ 2. 8
142, 714
147, 591
+3.4
837
933
+11.5
I , 346
I. 602
+19. 0
2, 079
2, Oil
2, 344
2,255
-3. 8
12, 464
12,997
+4.3
73, 148
74, 684
+2. 1
39. 213
42,290
+7. 8
60, 414
60,946
+.9
12,629
12, 361
- 2.1
GROUP IV
451 cities,
25,000
to_____
50,000;
population
15,720,000:
1964 ____
______
_____
___ ___ ______
____ ____ ____ _
J1l::cent change_ - -- - -- -- - ---- -- -- -- - ----- ----- _:
GROUP V
1,0511964
cities,
10,000
to 25,000;
population
16,198,000:
______
_______
______ _____
______ _______
___ ___ __
J.;1::cen t chn,;ge - - ----------- -- -- ---------- -: -: : :
GROUP VI
1,927 cities under 10,000; population 10,596,000:
~!t~~ :hange __ ____ ______ _____ __ :: : : : : ::::::::
SUB URBA N AR EA I
1,963 agencies; population 47,882,000:
~:ir:~i change _-______ ____ ___ :: :::: --------- ---RURAL AREA
1,325 agencies; populat ion 23, 761 000:
~!Lnt change __ ___ _____: : ~::: : -- --- ----- --- --:
I
Agencies and populat ion represented in suburban area are also represented in other city groups.
- .1.
�r
Tahlc 6.-Crime Ra t es, Offenses Known lo t he Police, 1965, by Popiilatinn Gro ups
[I Ofi5 esti m aterl popul a tion ]
C ri m inal homicide
n rn nrt
Po pulation group
total
C ri me
in dex
total
Murde r
a nd nonncgli!!en t
m a nslau ghte r
1la nsla ughtor h y
ncgligcn cc
L arcen y-theft
Fo rcible
ra pe
f! ohher y
Airirrnv·a tc rl
assa u lt
Rur irla ryhrca k-
Au to
theft
in g or
enter ing
$50 a n rl
o ver
185, 11 5 1, 096, 974
108. 5
643. 1
71 6, 637
420. 1
1, 660, 139
978. 5
462, 778
27 1. 3
149, 433
127. 7
857,088
732. 7
575,498
492. 0
1, 420, 739
1, 214. 6
409, 179
349. 8
Unrlcr
$50
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -TOTAL, ALL AGENCIES : 5,931 agencies; total pop ulation 170,577,000 :
Nu m ber of offenses known ___ _____ ___
-Ra te per 100,000 inh abitants _____ ____
-
TOTAL CITIES: 4,073 cities; total popula t io n
116,974 ,000 :
N umber of offe nses known __ ___ __ __
Rate per 100 ,000 inha bitants ____ __
4, 281, 134
2, 509. 8
2, 604, 982
I, 527. 2
3, 540, 630
3,026. 9
2, 115, 860
1, 808.8
=
8, 538
5. 0
6, 474
5. 5
7, 013
4. 1
20,456
12. 0
4,031
3. 4
14,512
12. 4
GRO("P I
/ifi cities over 250,000; popula t ion 42,.173,000:
N umher or offenses known ________ _
f!aLe per 100,000 ____ ___________
6 cities over 1,000,000; popula Lion 18,SR l,000:
N u mher or offenses k nown _____ ___ ____
Ra te per 100,000 ________ ___ ___
20 cities, 500,000 to 1,000,000; popu la t ion 13,090.000:
N umhc r of offenses known __ - R Ate per 100,000 ___ __________
30 cities, 250,000 to 500,000; population l0, 599,000:
N u mher of offenses known ____ _ _ _ _
Ra te per 100,000 ___ --
114, 484
67. 1
- - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - =
103, 676
88. 6
=
- -- - - - --
I, ni2, 573
3,028. 7
l , 106,313
2, 59S. 6
3, 93r,
0. 2
2,000
4. 0
9, 112
21. 4
i/'i, 115
178. 8
R5, 23fi
200. 2
418,34 1
9 2. r,
2fi0, r.22
633. 3
/ifi4 , 170
I, 325. 2
2'13, 0.';J
573. 0
707,912
3, i -!O. 4
510,447
2,75 1. 2
1,807
9. n
(i54
3. 5
4, 040
26. 2
4 1, fi33
220. 5
4fi, 3fi8
245. 6
I75, /iO I
029 . .'i
138, f,22
i34 . 2
187, 8 1I
994. 7
I IO, /ifii
585.
540,595
4, 12 . 9
337,826
2, 580. 2
I, 363
10. 4
830
6. 4
2,547
10. 5
21,563
Ui4. 7
23,830
182. 0
13? 050
1,008.5
72. 712
555. 3
20 1,030
l, 542. 3
83, if>
639.
424, 0fi6
4,000. 0
249,040
2, 349. 6
766
7. 2
507
5. 6
1, 616
15. 2
12, 910
121. 9
15, 038
14 1. 9
I IO, 790
l , 045. 3
58,288
549. 9
174,420
1,645. 7
49, fi2 3
468. ·2
484, 465
3, 53.5. 3
2i7. 040
2, O~ l. i
SiJ
644
4. 7
l, 536
11. 2
!O, 017
20,601
151. 0
11 9, 380
8il. 2
70, l50
555. 7
206, 78 1
I, 509. 0
48. 38
353.
l!>fl, :!;jfi
'2 .i4 , ()0:.?
,'i l0
Ul~
':1
7, f'ti:!
1, ,,
J'.l, !4~
1nn. .i l fi
7i . B:! I
,.i I
li7 I tl


-:t i


I ,-- -
tri. PI
<.ROUP 11
06 cit ies, !00, 000 to 250,000; popu lation 13,701,000:
N u mbe r of offenses kno ll'n __ ______ _ ·-- - ___
Rate per !00,000 ___ __
--- --- ----
6. 4
73. I
GllO UP ill
230 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; popu la tion J.5,i88.000 :
\/umhcr of o ffe nses kno ll'n
f! atP 1w r tnn. nnn


.! • ..,..,n.....


I
,;n, ,
-54,i


i. ,,


'. l '.j





llll
"


,! () l_


_?f\7
�GRO UP IV
468 cities, 25,000 t o 50,000; population 10,280,000:
N u mber of offenses k nown ___ ___ ____ __ _________ _
R ate p er 100,000___ _______ ______ ___ ____ ___ ____ ___
410,613
2,522.2
216, 457
1,329.6
499
3.1
409
2. 5
I, 018
G. 3
5, 353
32. 9
11,515
70. 7
91,450
561. 7
72, 036
442. 5
193, 747
1, 190. I
34, 586
212. 4
34 1, 957
2,011.2
170, 821
I, 004. 7
387
2. 3
242
I. 4
049
5. 6
3,170
IS. G
11,343
66. 7
78,514
46 1. S
52,575
309. 2
170, 894
I, 005.1
23, 883
140.5
174, 766
1,503.2
01, 227
784. 7
234
2.0
127
I. I
585
5. 0
I, 369
11. 8
7, 206
62. 0
42,887
368. 9
27,488
236. 4
83,412
717. 4
11, 458
98. 6
l , 018, 740
1, 0 0.
601, 930
1, 170. 1
I, 363
2. 7
I, 752
3. 4
5, 042
9. 8
J<J, 449
28.1
33,88fi
65. 9
280, 083
544. 6
184, 717
359. 2
415,058
807. 0
82, 390
160. 2
237,041
874. 1
167,281
616. 9
I, 152
4. 2
I, 693
6. 2
2,372
s. 7
2, 684
9. 9
15, 80
58. 3
83,625
308. 4
47, 785
176. 2
68,067
251. 0
13, 855
51. l
GROUP V
1,104 cities, 10;000 to 25,000; p opulation 17,003,000:
N w n ber of o ffenses known ____ ____ ________ _____ _
R ate per 100,000_______________ _______ ______ _____
GROUP VI
2,110 cit ies un d er 10,000; population 11,626,000:
N u mber of offenses k nown ____ ____ _________ _____
R ate per 100,000____ _______ ____ __________ ____ ____
SUB UR B.AN AREA 1
2,113 agencies; p opulation 51,431,000:
N umber of offenses known ___ ___ _____ _______ ____
_R ate per 100,000. ___ _____ __ _____ ________ ____ __ ___
- - - - - - -- - - - - - - - -
RURAL ARE.A
1,559 agencies; population 27, 118,000:
N u mber of offenses lcnown ____ __ _____ ____ __ __ ___
R ate per 100,000___ ___ _____ ________ ___ ___ ___ _____
Agencies an d population represented in su burba n a rea arc a lso included in other city g rou ps.
Population figu res rou nded to the nearest thousand. All rates we re ca lcula ted on t he popula t ion before rounding .
1
,..-
�Table 7 .- Cri,ne Tre nds, Offe n ses Known to t h e Po lice , 1965 versus Average
1960- 64
[3 ,363 agen cies; ID65 estim ated popu lati on 127,795,000]
N u mber of olienscs
Offense
A \·cra~c
1960-04
TOTAL _- ------ - - -- ------ -- -- -- - - ---- -- -- - - -- ---- ________ ____.
1965
Percent
chan ge
2. 997, 815
3. 665. 860
+ 22. 3
M urder nncl n on negligent manslaughter _. ···· - · · ·· · ·· · ----- · · __ ___ _
!\,J anslaughter by negligen ce __ . ____ ______ ___ .. ·· · · · -· - ··---- - - --- -- Porcible rape ___ ----·-·- · -- - - - ----- - ---- · -·- · - ·· -· --- -- - · -· ·- ··· ···- Hobbery. __--- _-- · · ·· _... . . . .... -- . -- . -- - ---- -- -- . - -- ___. . . _.. __. . _.
5, 828
3,925
12, 592
87,352
6, 934
4, 44]
16,554
JOG, 879
+ 1u. o
+ 13.l
+31.5
+ 22.4
143.215.248.55 15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)f:;;~b143.215.248.55t
'~t.;-ar-oniciiiag:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
Larceny-theft:
107, 790
734, 205
] 36, 644
919,203
+20. 8
+25. 2
460, So l
603, 366
1,454, 044
417, 795
+20.s
$50 and o,-er __·- · · ·- -- - ----------- --- - - - ---- · ··· __ __________ ____
Under $50 ___ _. -- - -·- · -- - - - ••• ---- - -- -- ·· · - -- . • -- - - _. ____ • ____ • __
A u to theft_ . . . . ___ - -- . -. -- -- - ... . . --- . --- . . - . - -- - . - . . . - . . ___. . ___ .. .
D6
l , 263, 472
321, 790
+ 30.9
+15.1
�Table 8.-0}Jenses Known and Percent Cka.red by A rrest, 1965, by Popufotion G roups
[1965 estim ated population)
L a rcen y-theft
C riminal hom icide
Population group
G rand
totul
C rime
index
total
Forcible Robbe ry
•I urdcr
M a nrope
and non- slau gh te r
negligent by negligence
mans laughter
Aggrnvatcd
assaul t
Burglar ybreaking
or .
entering
S.iO and
Total
Auto
theft
over
- - - - - -- - - -- - - ---
TOTAL CITIBS
2,784 cities; total population 99,846,000:
Offenses known _____ __ __ __ ___________ ______ _____
P er cent cleared by arrest. ___ _______ _____ ______
3, 078, 931
24. 6
1,817, 172
26. 3
5,691
90. o
3, 505
So. 3
12,271
64. 0

----
89, 982
37. 6
126, 612
72. 9
729, 347 1, 756, 719
19. 6
24. 7
- - - - - - --
498,465
13. 9
~
GROU P I
53 cities over ~50,UUU; total population 38,742,000:
Offenses known _- ------ ---- - - - -- - - - - ---- --- - - --.
Percent cleared by arrest ______ ____ ______ __ __ ____
5 cities over l ,0U0,000; total population 16,149,000:
Offenses known ___ ________ ___ ________ _______ ____
Percent cleared by arrest ______ ______ _____ _____ __
19 cit ies, 500,000 to 1,000,000; total population
12,343,000:
Offenses k nown ________ ______ ___ _______ ________ _
Percent clear ed by arrest ______ ____________ ___ ___
29 cities, 250,000,o 500,000; total population 10,250,000:
Offenses known ___ ___ __ ________ _____ ___________ _
Percent cleared by arr est __ __ __ ___ ____ _______ ____
354,804
25. 2
949, 25l
27. 5
3,574
89. 8
1,793
87. 7
7,71 5
26.0
61. 9
65, 713
38. 4
73,402
70. 6
352,294
26. 3
732,886
20. 2
233, 295
14. 2
213,258
23. 5
5<13, 75<1
28.1
398,0
29. 8
l, 558
89. 0
455
0. 2
3,681
03.1
33,617
40. 6
37, 157
70. 8
124, 730
27. 9
254, 125
20.0
l08, 91-1
15. 5
88. 431
26. 5
-19fi, 905
26.0
310,869
27. 4
l, 300
91. 0
769
94. 8
2,462
62. 2
19, 476
38. l
22,000
69. 0
120,515
27. 9
253,004
20.8
68, 737
13. 9
76,373
21.6
410, 076
23. 1
240,294
23. 6
7IO
87. 7
569
84. 2
1,572
58. 7
12, 620
33. 1
14, 245
71.1
107, 049
22. 6
2'25, 757
19. 6
55,644
ll. 8
4 ,- 454
21.0
446, 403
24. 4
254,370
26. 3
781
04. 4
599'
I, 443
77. l
66. 3
9,291
36. 1
18,870
76. 9
110,550
24.1
260, 765
10. 7
60, 241
14. 2
44, 194
24. 4
418,549
21. 9
229,255
23.3
479
88.9
462
81. 2
1, 149
62. I
6,962
33. 2
12, 064
72. 7
96, 775
22. 2
259,543
18. 1
70,71 1
13. 0
41. 115
25. 6
I , 450, 035
GROUP ll
89 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; total popnlation .12,563,000:
Offenses known ________ ___ ________ __ ______ ______
Percent cleared by arrest____ ___ ______ ____ _______
GROUP Ill
209 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; t otal population 14,403,000:
Offenses known _________________ ___________ __. __
Percent cleared by arrest_____ _____ ______________
�r
Table 8 .- 0.ffe n ses Kno w n and Pe rcen t Clea red by Arres t , 1965, by l'opuln lion C rou.ps- Cont inue d
[1065 estimated popula tion]
C rimin al hom..icidc
C rime
P opula tion grou p
Grnnd
total
ind ex
tota l
Murder
..
Man-
Fo rcible
and non- sla ughte r
neg ligent
man -
Ilohhery
rnpe
by negligence
Aggrn,,ated
assault
n urglnrybreak-
La rcen y- theft
$50 nnd
i ng or
en te rin g
T otal
Auto
theft
over
sla ugh te r
- - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - -- - - - - GROUP I V
416 cit ies, 25,000to 50,000; total popula tion 14,503,000 :
Offenses known- - - ---- - - -- --- --- ---- - -- - ----- - -Percent cleared IJy a rrest __ ___
-- ---------
9,955
75. 4
81, 2ifl
23. 2
242,544
19. 1
65,261
12. G
30,556
28. 3
2,420
36. 9
8. 248
7fi. 3
fi0. 034
22. 6
181. 565
18. 7
40,820
13. 7
18. 215
34. 9
347
79. 3
R!R
44. 0
4,073
83. fi
2q,4 1R
24 . 7
79. 4l6
22. 2
19, 137
17. I
7,4fifi
I, 0~9
7, . 5
3. 7,11
11, RI0
35. 5
25. ,% 2
fi6. n
no.434
,iao, 48n
147, 847
12. il
Bfi,4~9
30. I
i40
fill.fl
I. 294
I, 538
4~. 3
7,008
74 . 2
370. 829
22. 7
193. 174
23. 8
44 1
9 1. 4
907
69. 6
4. 778
8G. 0
372
27 1, r,55
22. 9
130, 725
25. fl
2i8
89. 6
185
95. I
710
70. 3
120, i70
2(i. 11
fi0, 397
29. I
13R
92. 0
94
RO. 4
820,904
21. i
47,. 176
23. 3
9R3
90.1
14~.%R
102, 470
31. 3
512
8,i 7
35. 6
GROUP V
817 cities, 10,000 lo 25,000; total population 12,728,000:
Offenses kno ,rn ______ ____ _____ _____ ________ _____
Percent cleared by a rrest_ ____________ _____ ____ __
GROU P VI
1,200 ci l ies unde r 10,000; tot~! popul ation 6,906,000:
Offe nses k n ow n ___ __ ___ ____ ___
- ---I'e rcen t cleared by nrrcsL _______ -----
4 1. g
SURVR RA.'J' A REA I
1,411 agencies ; tota l popu lation 37,951,000:
Offenses kn own ______ ___ __________
Percent cleared IJy a rrest_ _________ ___


fi<l. 9
2!. 4
17. 5
53. /i29
2(i. 7
75,481
21. 6
RCRAI. AREA
620 agencies; total popula tion 15,761,000:
Offen~cs known _____ __________ __ _ _____________
P e rcent clea red fly arrest. _________________
-- --
1 Agencies
2~. ~
nncl populntion rc prcse ntcn i.n s u!Jurhnn a rea a rc a lso rcprcsc11Lerl in otl1c r dly ~roups .
f,7, 9
29. 733
21. 3
, 758
47. 3
�T ab]e 9. - 0.ffe n ses Kn own and Pe rce nt Cleared by Arrest, 1965, by Geograp hic D iv is ions
(1 965 est imated populat ion]
Larceny-theft
Crimin al h omicide
Geographic division
Grand
total
Cri me
index
total
Forcible Robbery
Murder
M anrape
ond non- slau ghte r
negligent by neg111 a n ligca cc
slau gh t er
Aggravated
assaul t
Bu rgla rybrea king
or
entering
$50 and
'l'otal
Anto
t heft
over
TOTAL , ALL DIVISIONS
2,784 cities; total population 99,846,000 :
Offenses know n ____ __ ________ _______ __ _________
P ercent clear ed by arrest_ _____ ______ ____ ________
498,465
13. 9
41, 697
21. 6
78, 497
19. 5
25, 171
16. 7
3 1, 709
23. 6
31,025
69. 3
139,210
24. 7
284, 185
16. l
126,1 87
13. 0
82,5 18
21. 2
31, 153
36. 3
27,801
73. 1
140,000
26. 0
392, 785
20. 5
90, 759
16. 0
85, 96 5
28. 3
940
64. 3
0, 153
32. 1
6, 932
72. 1
57, 774
26. 5
160,261
20. 7
32,269
13. 7
23,083
27. 4
1, 410
69. 7
II , 862
38. 7
25, 005
77. 6
91, 032
24 . 6
199, 121
21. 0
5 , 154
13. 9
34, 988
28. 2
3, 605
85. 3
12, 271
64. 0
89, 982
37. 6
126, 612
72. 9
105, 224
23. 6
159
8 1. 8
209
77. 0
3i l
o. 3
2,462
36. 7
3,655
78. 1
560, 38 1
23. 2
401, 766
24. 9
I, 195
85. 9
617
7 .I
2,766
GS. 5
18, 865
38. 8
682, 961
25. 9
3 0, l i9
28. 9
l , 157
92. 5
756
86. 6
3, 344
59. 5
255, 738
24. 6
127,505
26. 7
354
90. 1
24 1
86. 7
365,009
27. 6
223,566
29. 7
1, 11 5
94. 0
476
96. 0
1, 817, 172
26. 3
158, 759
22. 8
N E W ENGLA ND STATES
- - -- ----
- -- -
258 cities; total population 7,241,000:
Offenses known ____ ____ ___ __ ____ _____ ____ ____ ___
P ercent cleared by arrest_ _____ _________ _________
354, 80
25.
729, 347 1, 756, 719
19. 6
24. 7
5,69 1
90. 5
3, 078, 931
24. 6
MIDDLE ATLA NTIC STATE S
585 cities; total population 23,118,000:
Offenses known ___ __ _________ ___ __ ____ __________
Percent cleared by arrest_ ___ ___ __ _____ __________
EAST N ORTH-CEN TR AL STATE S
651 cities; total population 22,131,000:
Offenses known _____ __ __ ______ __ __ ______________
P ercent cleared by arrest_ __ _________ ____________
WE ST N ORTH CEN TR AL STATES
309 cities; total population 7,855,000 :
0 IIenses known ____ __ _____ ___ ____ __ ____ _______ __
Percent cleared by arrest __________ ____ ___ _______
SOUTH ATLAN TI C STATES
241 cities; total populat ion 10,309,000 :
Offenses known _____________ ____ __ _______ _______
Percent cleared by arrest ___ _______ _____________ _
�r-'
0
Table 9.- 0.ffe n ses Kno w n and Percent C leare d by Arrest, 1965, by Geographic D ivis ions- Con t inued
0
(1965 esLirnatcd populaL ion]
C rimina l homicid e
Geographic d ivision
Grand
t otal
Crime
index
t otal
~lurdcr
and nonneglige nt
n1anslau gh te r
Man sla ught cr b y
n cg ligc11cc
L a rcen y-t heft
F orcib le
Robber y
rape
Aggravatcd
nssnult
Bu rglnr ybrea kin g or
e nterin g
T ota l
Auto
theft
$50 a nd
over

---- - - -EAST SO UTH CE NTB:AL STATES
85 cit ies; t ota l population 3,828,000:
Offenses known . ... . ... . ....... ... .. ___ _____ _. __
Percent cleared by ar rest_ __ __ ___________ ______ __
105,097
22. 9
69,058
24. 2
382
91.1
202
78. 7
391
66. 8
2, 101
35. I
4. 869
71. 0
31. 575
20. 6
54,925
18. 5
19,088
15. 6
10, (i52
22. 7
299,924
27. 6
lfi3, 503
29. l
757
OJ. 5
427
97. 7
!, 030
fi , 101
44. 3
13, R95
75. 4
7(1, 002
63. 9
25. 9
174, 543
23. 6
3R, !i09
17. 1
27, 079
25. 2
15'1, 5fl0
22. 3
77, 905
24. l
l59
96. 2
J52
72. 4
532
fi l. 3
2, 457
40. 7
3. 732
73. 4
33, 243
24. l
lO\, 192
JR 4
24, (i80
12. 4
13, 102
2fi. 5
496, 493
21. g
2fi8, 40R
22. 2
413
88. 4
425
80. 0
I , 487
R, 828
37. R I
n. riaR
n1. n
11 s . 72,1 I 3 11 ,210
23. 8
18.f>
83, 648
10.,
WE ST SOUTH CENTRAL STATES
181 cities; total popula tion 9,405,000 :
Offenses kn own_ ---------- - --------------- -- __
Percent cleared by arrest . .. ____ __ ___ ___ ___ _____
MOUKTAIN STATES
139 cities; t otal population 4,084,000:
Offenses known _________________ ____ __ __
Percent cleared by a rrest ____ _____ __ ___ ___ :_: :: ::
PACffl C STATES
335 cities; total popula tion 11 ,873 000:
Offenses known _____ __ ____ __'___ ____ ----·· · · -··
Percen t cleared by a rrest . _________ _

--- -- -
56. 3
I
I
4:,, 70,
24.
�T able 10. - Ojfenses Cleared by A rre st of Persons Under 18 Years of Age
[Percent of total cleared ; 1965 estimated population]
Larceny- theft
Criminal homicide
Population group
Grand
total
Crime
inrlex
totnl
M urder
ManForcible Robbery
rape
nnd non- slaughter
by
negnegligent
ligence
manslaughter
Aggravated
assault
Burglarybreaking
or
entering
T otal
$50 and
Auto
theft
over
- -- - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - -- - -- TOTAL CITIES
2,642 cities ; total population 90,434,000 :
Total clearances __ __ ____ __ _______ ___ ___ __ ________
Percent under 18_ - ---- - -- - ----- - - -- ---- --- - - -- - -
81, 065
9. 1
159, 719
37. 4
306, 237
43. 7
60, 444
24. 5
75, 07
48.
22. 3
43, 168
9.0
78, 355
3l. 8
121,492
38. 8
26,908
18. 9
39, 065
46. 4
1,549
14. 9
7,120
19. 7
18, 761
8. 4
24, 07'1
20.4
31, 1 0
33. 1
12,267
12. 0
13, 690
28. 3
698
4. 2
I , 488
13. 3
7,296
26.1
14,988
9. 7
32,324
36. 3
50,832
39. 7
8,730
24. 9
15, 981
5.5. 3
551
4. 0
450
4. 2
849
12. 0
3, 756
19. 5
9,4 19
8.8
21,957
37. 6
39, 480
42. 2
5. 91 1
24. 4
9, 394
57. 6
61,238
30. 5
647
4. 0
6. 4
392
850
14. 6
2, 954
15. 9
13, 542
8. 0
24, 431
39. 5
47,871
41. 3
9, 016
26.
9, 798
50. 1
48,963
33. 2
385
4. 2
353
5. 4
664
13. 7
2. 138
16. 5
8,229
10. 8
19, 745
40. 0
43, 767
43. 9
8. 510
28. 5
9, 292
49. 2
2, 597
5. 4
6, 736
14. 1
25, 950
20. 7
1,304
4. 5
3,886
13. 7
IS, li2
1, 014
5. 1
156
7.1
SI, 967
32.1
l , 160
5. 0
85, 856
37. 3
51,837
3 2. 4
100,485
35. 9
84,573
39. 1
661, 865
36. 8
413,475
30. 2
4,483
4. 6
308, 167
32. 1
212,279
26. 7
2,725
97,544
23. 0
78,475
17. 2
124, 767
35. 6
GROUP I
- --- - --- =
49 ci~es ~ver 250,000; total population 33,826,000:
P~;~e;f143.215.248.55 15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)e1t: :: : : : : -- -: : : ::: : : : : : :: : : : : : :-4 cities over 1,000,000; total population 12,611 ,000: -i~;~itei~ct'e;efs __-_-: _- - : : : ~-_-::::::::::::::: ::
18 cities, 500,000 to 1,000,000; total population
4.
- - -- - - --
11,742,000:
i~:~it143.215.248.55;efs::::::::::::::: ::::: : :::: : ::::::
27 cit ies, f5~,000 to 500,000; total population 9,474,000:
i~;~e;te:n°tl!;ek::: :::::::: : : : : : :::::::::::::::
GROUP II
so0~/es, 100,000 to 250, 000; total population 11 ,222,Total clearances __ ______ _______ _______ _____ ___ ___
Percent under 18 _______ _______ __ ___ ___ _____ ___ __
GROU P IIl
193 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; total population 13,334,000:
.
Total clearances _____ ___ __ ___ ______ ___ __ __ _______
P ercent under 18 __ _____ __ _____ ____ ___ _____ ____ __
�r
Table 10.-0}Je n ses Cleared by Arrest nf Persons Un d er 18 Yea rs nf Age-Co n tinued
[P ercent or t otal clea red; 1905 estima ted popula tion]
' riminal homi cide
Popula tion group
(l ranrl
tota l
C rime
index
t otal
A ggrn-
~lu rcler
a nrl nonneg li gent
lllflll -
sla ugh te r
Ma nslnug htor h y
ncglig-cncc
F orcihlo
ra pe

- - - - -
R ohhery
va tocl
assa ul t
n urg!a rybrea ki ng or
enterin g
L a rcen y- theft
Tota l
,, 50 a nd
over
Auto
theft
- -- - - - - - -- - - -- - - - - -
GROUP I V
374 cities , 25,000 to ,50,000; tota l populat ion 13,052,000:
Tot al clearances . ___ ____ __ ___

- ----·-- --Percent under 18 ____ __
--- ---- ---
77, 115
44. 2
41, fl4 4
35. 1
3fi5
4. 7
299
5. 0
585
16. 6
1,503
17.8
6. 797
8. 9
17, 182
44. 4
42, 555
50. 6
7, 383
28. I
7. 829
50.3
fi O, 45fi
45. 3
32, 45 1
3(i. 9
24 1
4. l
rn1
481
14. 8
853
10. 2
19. 2
6, 007
10. I
13. 242
46. 8
33,293
51. 2
5,455
30. 8
6, 112
53. 0
31, 060
46. 4
If>, 000
38. 7
120
3. 3
82
6. I
270
14. J
330
18. 2
3, 2fi2
IO. I
6, 7fi4
51. 3
17, 250
52. 0
3, 172
35. 2
2, OR2
l.i 7, .17P.
30. 7
flfi, '.W:2
33. I
, 44
P. ! 3
a. o
., . 7
2, Ofi9
lfi . 2
3, 401
t.,. R
14,037
JI. I
41, (i(i ~
40. 2
i7, 291
4.,. a
lfi, 7RR
27. 2
17. .1.;.;
4,i. 7
30,6 10
31. 2
W, , I i
301
30. ,;
304
fi,f,
2. 0


9,5


14. 5
fif,
10. 0
4, 7(;0
7. 2
13, 357
40. 7
Iii, 4fi0
30. l
s, o.;2
23. 1
3, 7R.
44. 8
GRO OP V
792 cities , I 0,000 to 25,000 ; t o tal popul a tion 12,349,000:
T o tal cleara nces ____ . ____ ____ ________________
--P ercent u nder 18 ____ ___ _____
-- - ---- -- - ··G RO UP VJ
1,1 54 cities un der 10,000; t ot a l popul a t ion fi ,651,000 :
1' otal clearan ces ___ ______________ ___
-Percent u nde r 18 __ __
··--
51. 2
SU R UnR ..\ N A REA I
l ,321 agcn eies ; t ot al popul a t ion 33 , lfi l ,000 :
T ot a l clea m n ccs __ __ _ -P e rcent under 18. -- --------


Rl'RA L AREA
585 agen cies ; t otal popu la tion 11,11,i,000:
'l.'otal clea ran ces . ___ _____
-· -- --------------P erce nt unde r 18 ___
--- ----1
Age n cies a n cl popula t ion re presenter! in subu rba n a rea a rc a lso re presen te d in ot her ci Ly g- ro u ps.
"
�Table IL-Disposi tion of Persons Formally Charge d by the Police, 1965
[1,781 cities; 1965 estimated popul at ion 57,761,000]
Percent of persons charged
Ch arged
(held for
prosecu·
tion )
Offen se
TOTAL . ...... . ... . . . . .... .. . ... ... _
orrense
charged
Acquitted
or
dismissed
Lesser
offen se
67. 5
I , 997
797
3,386
14, 655
3 1, 275
69,242
152, 968
39, 794
35. 4
30. 7
34. 0
34. 9
24.8
38.3
3 14, 11 4
32. 6
87,294
2,048
9,754
18,864
2,626
50. 5
5. 7
1. 6
6. 6
4. 5
7. 4
8. 1
9. 2
2. 1
11. 3
1. 5
.5
14. 6
15. 2
2. 7
2, 058, 42 1
Referred
to ju ven ile
cour t
j=====f=====•l===,,;;;~ I===~~!===~~
Criminal hom icide :
(a)
Guilty
M urder and no11.11egligent man·
Forl ti;le~;~l143.215.248.55 ~te{by.negligen ce :: : : :::
~;ii~i~=: :::::::::::::::::: :: ::
f~~r~e;:ite~·
rurglary-breaking or entering
..
A~~';ri;till:l~~::::·............ ·::::: :::::==
Subtotal for abo ve offenses .. ..... . . .
Other assaults
~~son. _. . . . . . :::: : ::: : :::: :::: : :::::::::::
Fr143.215.248.55[Y and counterfeiting . .. . . . .. .... ... .
Embezzle.rne"i,;t .......... . . ............... .
Stolen propert:1,:;. bu
~ing: ·pcis: ·
y·~g.-~ecei
.............:::::::::::::::::::
Prear,ons; carry in g, possessin g, etc ________ _
~;~~i~m
1tut10n and commerciali zed vice .. . . . .
8exosoITenses
. . .. ... .. . ... ... . ........ . .... .
drug laws ........ . ..... . ....... . :
a!;,t;g;~
st
·an ci"ci1iici.ren:::
g'V;h~


e143.215.248.55;s::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::


sorderl y cond uct .. ........ .. ...... .... . .
A~g~:~irorrenses:: ::::: :::::::: :: ::::: ::::
grr~n ses ! ga in tiie·frunily
Lnvmg un der the influence . . .. ... ...... .
0
1
44. 7
21. 5
17. 5
61. 9
70. 6
70. 3
38. 5
22. 2
57. 4
69. 2
54. 7
46. 5
55. 4
62. 9
78. 6
65.3
89. 2
73. 9
76. 6
50. 4
7,304
29,546
20,825
9,042
23, 149
16,545
36, 471
21, 604
94,937
76, 9 5
753,577
255,333
52,044
226,359
32. 5
19. 1
34. 9
16. 2
13. 0
11. 8
7. 0
8. 4
23 . 4
34. 2
14. 8
51. 4
45. 1
60. 6
6. 6
16. 4
44.3
3. 7
4. 5
10. 6
3. 9
3. 6
33. 3
10. 9
17. 4
22. 6
21. ()
12. 4
67. 1
10. 1
2. 8
29. 1
18. 2
20.2
24. 9
16. 8
38. 0
34. 4
28. 4
9. 6
14. 9
9. 4
17. 0
17. 0
17. 0
26. 6
58.0
15. 8
1. 3
21. 1
7. 3
1. 0
6. 6
30.1
18. 2
JO. 5
13. 4
12. 7
15. 4
7. 5
3. 6
6. 2
45. 7
.6
1. 5
1. 1
4.. 5
•G
18. 4
1.0
8. 5
4. 9
31. 5
Table 12. -0.ffenses Known, Cleared; Persons A rrested , Charged and Disposed
of in 1965
[1,657 citi es; 1965 estimated population 56,554,000]
T y pe
TOTAL


Murder


a nd non·
negligent
man-
sla ugbter
Auto
tbeft
- -- - - --- --- --- ---- -981,1
89 192,209
387, 538
99,217
25. 6
184,670
18. 8
20,904
41,462
81, 325
48,40 1
4, 708
185, 497
3, 177
47. 8
362
19. 6
3,380
71. 8
1,028
39. 9
447
17. 3
14,606
69. 9
4,931
51. 3
1,852
19. 3
31,007
74. 8
10,680
40. 6
4, 744
18. 0
68,430
84 . l
16, 838
50. 8
5, 098
15. 4
151, 482
1,987
62. 5
39,204
81.0
8,347
602
32. 6
J39
7. 0
] , 104
42. 8
801
23. 7
2,825
29. 4
4,998
34. 2
10,8 1
41. 4
4,702
15. 2
11, 191
33.8
35,303
51. 6
19, 760
23. 9
68,635
45. 3
385, 474
Total persons cha rged ...... . .
Percent of arrests . . . .......
Ad ul ts guiJLy . ...... . .... . . . .
Percent of charged . ........
Ad ul ts guil ty of lesser oITense.
Percent of charged . .. .. . ...
Adu lts acq uitted or
dismissed . . . ..... . .. . . -··
Percent of charged . .. . ...•.
Referred to juvenile court. . . .
Percent of charged .. .. . . ...
310, 096
80. 4
100, 364
29. 7
138, 329
44. 6
Bur·
Lar·
glarybreak· ceaytbeft
ing or
entering
66,0 12
48,087
72. 8
ARRESTS ... . . .. . ..............
51, 031
Aggra·
vated
assault
41, 762
16,055
38. 4
3,01 5
2,709
89. 9
20. 372
·11. 9
cible
rape
Rob·
bery
6,349
4, 163
65. 6
074
gienses knowu ................ 1, 678,
534
eases cleared . __ . . .. _....•... 403,24.
0
Percent cleared .. ... . ... . ..
58. 4
For-
884
81. 7
57,656
69. 6
5, 43 1
6. 6
48,633
25. 3
54. 0
2,438
15. 8
4, 668
30. 2
23,75 1
60. 6
�Table 13 . -Police- Dispos i t ion of Ju venile Offe n d e r s Take n Into Cus tody , 1965
(1965 estim ated p opulation]
P op ula t ion gro u p
T ota l
1
H a ndled
w ith in
depar t me n t
and released
Referr ed
t o juYeni le
cour t
j urisd ict ion
R eferred
towelfa re
agen cy
R e ferred
t o other
poli ce
age n cy
Referr ed
to criminal or
ad ul t
cour t
TOTAL
2,877 agen cies; total population 95,096,000 :
Nu mber . . . .. ·--·· ---- ---· - __ ·- __ __· - --- 833, 507
389,278
383,875
24, 146
22. 114
2 100. 0
P ercen t.. .· - ··-·---· - · · - - - -·- · -· - --· -·-·
46. 7
46. 1
2. 9
2. 7
TOTAL CITIES
i====ii====cJ= ===i=====I== = =
2,294 ag~n cies; total population 76,144,000:
Nnm ber .... - ·- ·. __· - · - --- - --·-- · ·-· - ·-·
P ercent --- -··- -· --- ----- -··-·. ·- -. - . ·--
741. 353
100. 0
348, 827
47. 1
339. 651
45 . 8
22. 865
261, 195
100. O
100, 532
38. 5
139. 911
53. 6
99,671
100. 0
48, 731
48. 9
J OI , 630
100. O
19, 674
14. 094
l. i

Contents

1 =
2
3 = = = =1====1==== = = = =1====1==
4 == =11,
5 =0 1= = = =1= =
6 - --===
7 =
8 =
9 ==i=== = i= =

9.1 = ,[= =
9.2 ==





=
2. 7
10. 336
1. 4
15,862
6. 1
3, 798
l. 092
44. 649
44. 8
I. 4 15
I. 4
2,950
3. 0
1.926
I. g
55. 531
54. 6
39, 848
39. 2
2, 111
2. 1
3, 404
3. 3
i3 ti
115. 831
100. 0
59. 669
51. 5
48, 640
42. 0
1, 442
1. 2
4, 072
3. 5
2, 00~
l. 'i
104. 949
100. 0
55, 105
52. 5
42, 594
40. 6
1, ~65
1. 2
3,564
3. 4
2. 421
24, 009
41. 3
77 0
1. 3
1, 886
3. 2
2, 153
7,9 12
3. G
3, 387
1. 5
1, 237
2, 7 fi
8. 3
3. 1
GHOUP I
39 cit ies o,·er 250,000; popula ti on 31,1 i7,000:
N umber. . . . - -- -- - - ____ ·- . . -- - - - - -- · - --P ercent .. . . .. . -- . --·-·· · - · . ·- · --- ·--- -- .
1. 5
.4
GROU P JI
58 cit ies, 100,000 t o 250,000; populat ion
7,850,000 :
N umber ... . - . - -- ___ _·- ____. ____ ____-- - _
Percen t . ..... ·- . - . - _- -- - - - - __ - - - _- - - . -- _
GROU P Ill
137 cities, 50,000 t o 100,000; p op u la ti on
9,456,000:
N u m ber . .. . - - -· ·-·- ···· - - -- - - -- - --- -- P er cent_ __·------------·---- - - - -- -- -- · ·
GROUP IV
319 cit ies, 25,000 to 50,000 ; pop ul at ion
11 ,059,000:
N um ber. ____ ·------ · - - -- -------- - ----·
Percen t_ _. __ _.. __ . __ . __ ._ . .. _. ______ ..•
GHOU i' V
688 cit ies, 10,000 to 25,000; pop ula t io n
10,571,000:
N umber _____ _______ _____ ___ ___________
Percent_ _. __ __ . _____ . - -- - - -- _. __.. _. __.
GROUP V I
1.053 cities und er 10,000; pop u lation
6,03 1,000:
N um ber_. __ . ____ ___ ______ _____ ·------ 1~erccnt ________ __ ___________ _________ __
58, 077
100. 0
29, 259
50. 4
SUBU RBAN A RE A 3
1,163 agen cies ; pop ul a tion 26,222,000:
N um ber . _______ ___ __ ___ ____ ____ _______
P er cent . • - - - - --- -- - --- - -- ------- - - - ----
220. 293
100. O
124, 0 3
56. 3
82, 769
37. 6
2.142
. 1. 0
33. 425
100. 0
9.8%
29. G
18. 846
56. 4
661
R U RAL AR EA
494 agen cies ; p opu la tion 8,806,000:
N u mber __________ ______ ____ __ . _______ _
Percen t __ ______ ___ ___ ___-- -- - - --- -- -- - 1
2
8
2. 0
3. 7
I n cludes an offenses except t ra ffi c an d n eglect cases.
Becau se of r oundi n g, the p er cen t ages m ay n ot add to t o t a l.
A gencies and pop ulat ion r epr esente d i n s u b ur b a n ar ea a r c a lso included in oth er ci ty gr o u ps .
104


.!. 3


3. 7
�Table 14 . - 0jfense Analysis, T rends, 1964- 65; Percent Distribution a n d
A v erage Value
[646 cities 25,000 and over; 1965 estima ted population 75,400,000]
N u mber of o!Ienses
C lassification
Percent
change
1964
itobben ·:
Percent
d is tri bution
1965
1965
A verage
\· nluC'
I
TOTAL ___ __- - - - -- -- - - - - --- - - - - --- - - - - - - - --
82, 938
85, 999
+ 3. 7
100. 0
$254
Highway ____ __ ________ __________ __ __ ___ _---Commercial house __________ ____ ________ ___ -Gas or service station ___ ____ __ ______ ____ ____ _
Chain store ______ ___ __ ____ ___ ___ ------- -- - - - Residence ___ ____ _____ ____ __ ___-- -- --- - -- -- --
42, 718
+ 3.4
+ 1. 2
+ s. 4
+ 7.3
+ 1. 3
+19. 0
+8.o
51. 4
20. 2
4, 660
2,200
7, 6 8
659
7. 888
44, 164
H,337
5, 050
2,360
7. 788
784
8. 51G
11 3
41 1
109
809, 821
834, 603
+ 4. 1
Rank ___________ __ ________ __ ____ ___ _____ ___ _
Miscella neous ______ _________ _____ _---- - ---- - B urglary- breaking or e ntering :
TOTA L __ ___ -- - -- - - - - ---- - -- --- - - ----- --- - -
17. 125
5. 9
2. 7
534
I
.9
9. U
391
3, 789
203
100. 0
242
u.
l== = = ,l=====l====I===
Residence


________ ____________ . N ight_ (d\\·elling)


____ ________
Uay ___ _______ _____ ______ _______________ _
N onresiclence (store, omce, etc.) :
>l
- - -- ---- - - --___
- - -____
- - - -____
- - - --- - - -- ---Daight_
y ____- -____________


150,390
136. 034
152. 758
lGl , 119
+7.1
+ 12.3
25. 4
24. 1
247
274
293,937
29. 460
291, 230
29. 496
- .9
+. 1
45. 9
4. G
223
231
Larceny-theft (except a uto theft , i.Jy va lue) :
I.=433,
I. 438,==l,=
341
- .3
100. 0 ,===8=4
TOTAL __ __ _____ _____ _____ _____ ______ ______ l===
=647
= = ==-'-143.215.248.55=-=-=~1
$50 a nd over_ _______ ______ ____ _____ ______ __ 432, 866
414,310
+ 4.5
30. 2
236
773,341
- 1.l
781, 814
53. 0
23
$5 to $50. _________ - ___- --- - - - --- - -------- - - -227.
440
242.
217
G.
l
15.
0
2
Under $5 __ - - -- ____ - - - - - - - -- - -- -- - - - -------- Larcen y- theft (by t y pe) :
-.3
1,433, 647
1,438, 341
100. 0 l====8=4
TOTAL __ ___ _____ _______ __ ___ ____ __ ______ __ l=====l=====l====l====
14,
006
13,
692
+2.3
l.O
Pock et-picking __ __ _____ - -- -- - - --------- - - - -I ~~
- .8
24,0ll
24, 205
I. 7
P urse-snatching. __- - ---- - - - - - - -- ----- - -- - - -11 2,361
106, 515
+5. 5
7. 8
7
Shop lifting_. -- ----- - ----- - -.- - -- - -- - -- - - - -- -1
- 2.0
279, 717
19. 5
2 5t 470
From a utos (except accessories) __ ___ ________ _
20. 2
289, 711
288, 722
+.3
Auto accessories. ______ - - ---- - --- - - - ------- - ·





- 2. 5
221,425
15. 4
227, 170
io
¥143.215.248.55 15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)1G1:i1,1ini:s~~==:: ____________ :::::::: :::::
From coin operated maclnnes____ ___ ____ _____
All others. __ _____ - --- - - - - --- - -- - - --- - --- - - - -
241, 695
38,772
'.ll 2. 091
262, 958
24, 03
205. 420
+8.s
-38. 0
-3. l
18. 3
1. 7
14. 3


g


159
1
AULo theft_ _-- -- --- _--- - - - - - - --- ----- - - - - - -- - - -- - --- - ---- -- -- -- - - - ------ - - --------- -- -- -- -- --
I. 030
' Because of rou nding t ile percentages may not acid to total.
Tab]e 15 .- Typ e a nd Va.lu e of Prop e rty Stolen and Recove re d, 1965
(G46 cit ies 25,000 a nd over; 1965 est imated populat ion 75,400,000)
Value of p roperty
'!'y pe of p roperty
Stolen
Percent
recove red
Recovered
8629,
700,~=l
000 =8324,
000 ' i=== = 52
T OTAL ___ ___ ________ _______ _______ ____ ___________ __ ____ __ l=
~=
= 500,


0
Currency , notes, etc _- _- - -- - - - - -- ---- - --- ------- - ___ _________ .Jewelry
preciou
s 1net
als _- - -__- ___
- - -____________
- - - ---- - -- - -_-- __ ____ ______ _
F u rs ____and
_______
__ __ __
__ ________
__ : __ ___ _______ :
Cloth mg _____- ----- - ----- --- -- - - - --Locall y stolen a u tomol11les .. - - - -- - - - - - -- - - - -- - - - _____ _
Miscellaneous ___- --- - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - -- - -
6 1, 700, 000
52, 200, 000
13. 100, 000
5, 600, 000
3, 500, 000
600, 000
9
7
5
25, 100, 000
332, 900, 000
144. 700, 000
2, 500, 000
290, 000, 000
22,300, 000
10
87
15
105
221-746° -00- -s
�Table 16 . -Murd e r Vic ti,ns - W eapons Used, 1965
Weapons
N um b er
A ge
Gun
TOTAL. . . . . -- 8,773
P er cenL ...... ... . . . ..
5, 015
57. 2
C u tt in g
or
sta bb ing
B lu nt
Personal
object
weapons
(clu b ,
(stranPoison
hammer, gula t ions
et c.)
and beatings)
E xp\o.
20
.2
5
.1
2, 02 1
23. 0
505
5. 8
894
10. 2
sives
Oth er
(dr ownings,
arson ,
etc.)
226
2. 6
U n.
known
a nd
no t
staLed
87
1. 0

= = = =1====1==== = = = =1====1==
Infa nt (un der 1) . . . .
11 6
1-4 . . . · - · · ···· · · · · ·-198
5-9 . .. . . ... . . ... .. - ..
121
10-14.. .. ... -··-- · · · ·
97
620
15-19 . . . . . . -.... . . . . .
?0-?4 . .. .. · - - · ··- - · ·- 1,062
25-29 . . . . · - ··· --··· ·· · l , 128
30-34 . ... . ·-- ·· · · · · · · 1,008
35-39 . .. . .. . . · - · -· · ·- 1, 029
40-44 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
888
45-49 .... .. ... . . . - . . .
694
50-54· ·· · ·- ·· ·-- ·· · · ·
529
55-59.. . . .. . ... . ·- · ..
384
60-64. .. . .... . . ·- -· -276
65-69 . . . . ... _. . . .....
172
70-74.... ..... ..... ..
130
75a nd o,,er. .. . .. _. _
U nknown ... . ......
7
25
43
45
383
G90
747
628
615
5328
95
6
4
10
14
150
262
260
264
270
222
166
11 3
85
64
3
22
25
~o~
132
80
55
44
106
~h
6
22
64
105
35
.. 17
37
48
55
60
78
69
70
58
45
41
23
29
52
8
11
10
29
37
39
35
33
50
44
50
40
29
25
17
22
6
4G
3
2
2
- - · -· - · ·
1
1
2
2
2
1
2
1
· ···- · ···---··-· · -- · ·-· · · · --·
2
29
36
19
9
12
18
16
14
20
15
10
59
· ··-·- -·
1
···-·- · ·
· ···-··-
· · ·-· - · ·
· · · -·-··
·· · -· - - ·
···· · - - ·
6
I
1
3
3
· ··-·- · · · - · - ·· - ·
l
4
l
2
6
6
9
5
10
3
6
9
5
4
4
6
2
4
Table 11 .- llfurde r V icti,ns by A g e, S e x, a n d Race, 1965
Sex
A ge
umber
~lale
-
= = = = = -1 1 - - - -
-= -
TOTAL. .... 8,773 ·-····-·
P ercent .. ... ··- · ·· · · 1 100. 0
In fant (under 1) .. ~
1-4 . . .. . .... . . .. . .
5- 9.14. ..
......
10•
•••• •. ......
• • •. ••
15- 19 ..... . ... . . . .
20-24.. . ... . ... . ..
25-29. . . . .... ... . .
30-34 . . . .. .. ......
35-39.. . ... . . . . . ..
40-44 . . . . . .. .... ..
45-49 .... ·· · · · . . ..
50-54 . . . .. _... . ...
55-59.. . ... ... . . ..
60-64 . . . . .. .. . . . . .
65-69 . . . . . . ..... . .
70- 74 · · -· · · -······
75 and over .. -.. ..
U nkno w n __·· ··· ·
198
l~~
!i20
1, 062
1, 128
1, 008
1, 029
888
694
529
384
276
172
130
148
173
R a ce
Percent
F em al e
- - - --
6, 539
74. 5
2, 234
25. 5
- ---;;- - - - ; - _ _ 3_9_
2.3
95
103
66~
g~
i:{
7.1
12.1
12. 9
11. 5
11. 7
10. l
7. 0
6. 0
4. 4
3.1
2. 0
1. 5
l.7
2.0
464
802
857
765
789
644
541
424
206
212
129
90
103
118
156
260
2il
243
240
244
153
105
88
64
43
40
45
55
White
-
-
-
3, 970
45. 3
71
133
/6
V
264
460
409
394
394
380
327
263
217
1i
104
87
102
49
N egro
-
I ndia n
40
62
3397
.r a p a.
nese
A l l ot h ers
(incl u <les
race u nkn ow n )
- - - = = =·1 - -- - -
-- -
4. 693
53. 5
Chin ese
51
.6
16
.2
6
.1
37
.4
1 - - - = = --1-~= = =
2 ····· ··· ··· · · ···
·· ·· ·· i · ::::: :::
1
2
3 · ·· ···:i· ···· ·· ·· · · · ·· ···
7
1
~
6
2
8
1
2
9
1
1
3
2
2
3
2
1
1
2
4
I
2 · · ····· · ··· · · · ·· · · ·· ··
1 .. · · · ·· ··
3
1
347
592
709
604
620
500
363
262
162
95
66
39
3 ·- · ···· ·
43
1 · ····· 2·
113 .. ... . . . · · ····-· ·· ·-· · ·-
i
2
l
1
11
1
B ecau se of rounding t h e p ercen tages m a y not a dd to total.
106
�Arrest Data
Tables in t he following sec tion pro ,id e cer tain perso nal charac teri stics of ind i,-iduals ar rested for all cr im inal ac ts. Arr es t r a tes a nd
trends are shown for city, suburban a nd rural a reas, as well as the
United Sta tes as a whole. T abulations are published containi ng
characteristics of p er ons arres ted by age, sex a nd race.
Arrest statistics are collected a nnu ally from contribu ting lnw
enforcement agencies and t he figures used in t he tables this y ear were
snbmi tted by agencies r ep resen ting 69 per ce nt of t he United S tfl te
population . In using t hese arrest figu r es i t is impor tant to r em em ber
that the same person may be arres ted se,-eral times during one :rea r
for the same type or for different offe nses. Eac h arres t is co unt ed.
FLffther, the arrest of one p erso n may soh -e se,-eral cr imes and, in
ot her instances, two or more persons may b e arre ted during th e
solution of one crime.
Arrests are primarily a measure of pt)lice acti,-i. ty, as i t r elates to
crime. Although police arrest practices rnry, par ticularly with
respect to juYeniles, contributors to th is Program are ins tru cted to
co unt one arrest each time an incfo-id ual is taken in to custody for
committing a specific cr ime. A ju ,·enile i co unted as n, p erson
arrested when he commits an offense a nd the cir cums ta nces ar e su ch
that if the offender were n.n n.du l t, a n a rrest wou ld be made.
Arrest data is primn,rily a measure of law enforce ment activity,
but it does pro,·ide useful information on the charncteristics of p ersons
arrested for criminal acts. It i a gauge of cri minali ty wh en used
within its limitations as must be done wi th all forms of crimin al
statistics ' includino·
court and penal.
b
107
�Table 18. - Arrests, N tunber a nd Rate, 1965, by Popula t ion G ro ups
[Rate per 100,000; 1965 esLimatcd population]
Cities
O!Iense charged
TOTAL
(4,062
a ge ncies ;
total
'population
134,095,000)
Group II
T otal city
arrests
Group I
(54 cities
(3,083
cities;
over
250,000;
(86 cities,
100,000 to
250,000;
40,IJ00,000)
12, 157,000)
Grou p l lI
(I93 cities,
50,000 to
Other areas
Group I V
100,000 ;
(387 cities,
25,000 to
50,000;
I 3,270,000)
13,427,000)
Group V
(884 cities,
10,000 to
25,000;
population population popu lation popnJat ion popnJat ion popnJation
10 I,652,000)
13,626,000)
Group VI
(1,479
Submban
area t
(1,538
agencies ;
cities
under
population
10,000;
popnJation 33,874,000)
Rural
area (839
agencies;
populntio n
I ,515,000)
8,27 1,000)
TOTAL_____ ______ ______ ___ _______ ___ __ ____
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants _____ ____ ___
Criminal homicide:
(a) M urder and nonncgligcnt nrnnsluughter.
Rate per 100,000 ____ ____ ______ ____ __ __
(b) M anslaughter by negligence ___ ________ ___
Rate per 100,000 __ ____ ________ _____ __ _
Forcible rape ___. __ ___ ______ ___ ______ _______ _____
R ate per 100,000 _____ ____ ___ __ __ __ ___ _____ ___ _
Robber y ______ _____ ___ __ __ ___ ________ __ __ ___ __ ___
R ate per 100,000 __ __ _____ _____ ________ ____ ___ _
Aggravated assault. ___ ___ ____ ___ ____ ___ __ _______
Ra te per 100.000 ____ ____ ___ ______ ___ ___ __ __ ___
Burglary-break ing or entering __ _____ ___ __ ______
Rate per 100,000 __ ______________ _____ ___ ______
Larceny-theft_ ___ ______ ___ ____ __ _______ __ __ ____ _
R nte per 100,000 ___ ____ _____ __ ___ ________ _____
Auto t heft. __ ____ _______ _________ _____ __ _____ ____
Rate per 100,000 __ ________ ___ _______ ______ ____
Subtotal for above ofYenses ____ ___ __________
Hate per 100.000 _______ ___ ____ __________ __
0 th
A
'ifJ!s~~-tfoo,iiii_~: : : :::: ________ ________ ____ _
po~-iiiii,ooo_---------::::::::::::::::::::
rs~ate-
F' orger y and countcrfeiLing_________ _____ ___ ______
Rate per 100,000 __ ___ _____ __________ __________
F•raud __ _____ ___ ____ __ __ __ ___ ______________ ____ __
Rate per 100,000 ____ ___ ____ ____ ___ ________ ____
E' m bezzlement_ __ ______ ___ _________ _______ ___ ____
Rate per l00,000 ____ _________ ____ __ ____ _______
s lolen propcn y; buying. recci\'in g, possessing ____
lt atc prr 100,000 __ .
_ __
_ ___ _ _
4, 955, 047
3, 695. 2
4,401, 598
4, 330. 1
2, 128, 794
5, 204.8
598, 094
4,919. 6
487, 740
3, 675.4
476, 008
3, 545. 1
436, 348
3,202.4
7,348
5. 5
2, 815
2. l
10, 734 ·
8. 0
45,872
34. 2
84,4 11
62. 9
197, 627
147. 4
383, 726
286. 2
101, 763
75. 9
0, 144
0. 0
. 1, 822
1. 8
8, 035
8.5
42, 134
41. 4
73,606
72. 4
162,281
159. 6
338,543
333. 0
89,095
7. 0
4, 0 7
LO. 0
707
l. 7
5,526
13. 5
30,906
75. 6
42,493
103. 9
84,268
206. 0
142,361
348. l
46,449
11 3. 6
744
0. I
294
2. 4
947
7. 8
3,866
31. 8
9,619
79. l
19, 57
161.0
,Ji, 034
386. 9
II , 551
95. 0
438
3. 3
271
2. 0
747
5. 6
2,869
21. 6
6, 155
46. 4
17, 01
134 . 1
•13,431
327. 3
10, 143
76. 4
420
3. l
263
2. 0
623
4. 6
2, 336
17. 4
5, 990
44. 6
17,079
127. 2
46,27 1
344. 6
9,320
69. 4
303
180
I. 3
504
3. 7
I, 472
10. 8
5, 888
43. 2
14, 575
107. 0
38, 778
28·1. G
7,059
56. 2
152
1. 8
107
l. 3
2 8
3. 5
6 5
8. 3
3,46 1
41. 8
8, 980
108.6
20,668
249. 9
3,973
48. 0
12,325
654
3. 5
615
3.3
1, 084
5. 9
1,423
7. 7
5,447
36. 4
37,977
11 2. l
77, 749
229. 5
18, 799
55. 5
18, 976
102. 5
21, 40[
115. 6
6, ll 8
33. 0
834, 296
622. 2
722. 260
710. 5
356, 797
872. 4
93,633
770.2
81, Sii5
GIG. 8
82, 302
613. 0
69,359
509. 0
38,3 14
463. 2
155. 433
458. 9
55, 718
300. 9
207,615
154. 8
6, 187
4. 6
30, 617
22. 8
52, 007
38. 8
7, 674
5. 7
19, 060
14. 2
180,531
177. 6
4,9 12
4. 8
23,053
22. 7
37, 144
36. 5
5, 3l0
5. 2
16,434
81,25 1
198. 7
2, 227
5. 4
9, 204
27. 423
225. 6
518
4. 3
3,699
30. 4
6,384
52. 5
1, 092
9. 0
2, 077
17. I
22, 034
166. 0
60 1
4. 5
3,006
22. 7
11,550
3,1, 3
509
3. 8
1, 520
20. 542
153. 0
570
4. 2
3,275
24. 4
5,282
39. 3
1,005
18,804
l38. 4
603
10, 4l 7
126. 0
393
1 l. 5
12 , fi
Ill . 2
22. ,'i
14,313
35. 0
!, 839
4. 5
8,89 1
21. 7
7. 5
l , 687
2. 2
4.4
2,629
19. 3
4, <133
32, 5
653
4. 8
I. 37 1
10. I
274,614
3, 320. 3
4.
1, 240
15. 0
2. 182
26. 4
212
2. G
888
10. 7
751, 031
2. 217. 1
95 1
2. 8
709
2. 1
1, 801
5. 3
5, 122
15. 1
37. 729
111.4
l. 592
4. 7
5, 685
16.8
11 , 439
33. 8
2, 135
6. 3
3, l8'1
9. -I
294, 773
1, 592. l
29.4
11,540
62. 3
644
3. 5
4,897
26. 4
8, 769
47. t I
1.103
6. 0
1, 4U! ;
7. (u
�Vandalism _____ ____ . ___ . ___ ___ . ___ ______ __. ___. _.
W Rate per 100,000_____ ________ __ ______ ___ __ ___ __
eapons; carrytn g, possessing, etc __ ____ _________
Rate per 100,000. __ _____ __ ________ ___ _________
Prostitution and commercialized vice ____ ____ __ __
Rate per 100,000___ ___ __ ___ __ _____ ___ ____ _____
Sex
offenses
(except
forcible
prostitu___ _____
_______rape
_____and
__ ____
____ ____
tion)
____ _____
R ate per 100,000____ ____ _______ _____ __ ________
Narcotic drug laws _____ ___________ _____ __ _____ __ _
aa!ti1li~f-~~
-1-~'.~_o:~-==~-----==~--==:::::::::::::::
Rate per 100,000 __ __ _ _ ___ _ ___ __ __ _______ , _
Offenses agai nst fam il y and children __ ___ ___ ___ __
Rate per 100,000 __ ___ __ ____ ___ _____ ____ ___ ___ _
Driving under the in flu ence ____________ ____ ____ __
Rate per 100,000 ___ ___ __ ____ ________ ____ __ ____
Liquor laws ____ __ ___ __ ____ ______ _______ ______ ___ _
Dri!~!~f,; \143.215.248.55·.°.°_0_-: : ::::: : ::: ::::::::::::::: : : :
Diso~1!~1 ~efo~~ u~f-: ::: : : : : ::::::::::::::: : : : :::
Rate per 100,00Q _____ ______ __ _____ ____ ____ __ __
Vagrancy ______ ____ ___ ________ ________ ___ -------Rate per 100,000 __ ___ _______ ___ _______ ______ __
All other offenses (except trnill c) __________ ___ __
Rate per 100,000 ___ __ ______ _____ __ ___ ______ ___
Suspicion (not included in totals) ____ ______ __ ____
Rate per 100,000 ____ _____ ___________ _____ ____ _
Curfew and loi tering law violations ___ __ ______ ___
Ru!!t;Y~er _100,000 __. ___ _____ __ _____ ______ __ __ __
Rate per 100,ooo__ ____ , _____ ___ __ ______ ___ ____
1
89, 668
66. 9
53, 585
40. 0
33, 987
25. 3
58, 205
43. 4
46,069
34. 4
114, 294
85. 2
60,98 1
45. 5
241, 511
180. 1
179,219
133. 7
1, 535, 040
1, 144. 7
570, 122
425. 2
120,416
89. 8
531 , 970
396. 7
76,346
56. 9
72, 243
53. 9
90, 28 1
67. 3
77, 207
7fi. 0
48, ROS
48. I
32,849
32. 3
.'\ !, 45 1
30, RR4
75. .1
71. 3
n. 347
70. 4
26, fi94
7. J24
4, IO
fi5. 3
29, 3 1.;
71. 7
2, 054
16. 9
3fi. 2
709
.'\. 3
27, G<lO
!iO. fi
07. fi
43, 527
42.S
108, fi02
! OG. 8
,10, 927
40. 3
20 1, 334
198. 1
144,4 65
142. 1
I, 438, 075
1, 414. 7
!i28, 350
519. 8
l1 2, 432
11 0. 6
44 1, 401
434. 2
68,962
67. 8
67, 929
60.8
74, 411
73. 2
34 , fi81
8-1. 8
91,354
223 . 4
16, .'\ 12
40. 4
82, f120
202. 0
45, 868
11 2.1
f,84 , 873
l , 674. ,;
28 1,930
689. 3
62, 666
153. 2
179,736
439. 4
23, 235
56. 8
28, 750
70. 3
30, 714
75. I
I
fi70
ns. n
R, 917
73. 3
2, M4
20.9
8, ,5,53
70. 4
8, f.28
71. 0
22, 13fi
182. I
17, 07 1
14 0. 4
220, 2.17
1, 61. 0
(13,7 15
524. 1
15, 304
125. 9
55, 794
458. 9
10,387
85. 4
.'\, 009
4 1. 7
11 ,44 2
94. I
fl. 173
39. 0
2, f.05
19. f,
3, 029
27. 3
.'\, 11 8
3 _r,
24 ,078
18 1. 4
15, 895
119.8
lfi3, 77fi
I , 234. 2
49, 11 7
370. 1
12,2 10
92. I
a8, 802
443. fi
10, 552
70. il
7, fl(l'J
.'\7. S
10, '1116
s o. 4
10, 079
7,5. I
4. 392
32. 7
3,rn
2. f,
4, 40-1
32. R
2, !Of>
15. 7
2, ,119
18. 8
4, 44
33. I
27, 149
202. 2
22, l 5!i
165. 0
144, f,S,
1, 077.fi
.'\O, 858
378. S
9,039
67. 3
.,9, s os
445. 4
9,977
74. 3
10, 325
70. g
0, 028
r.1. 2
Agencies and popul ation represented in suburha n nren are also incluclerl in other city groups.
Population fi gures round ed t o t he nearest th ousand . All rates wore calcul a1ecl on t he r nr ulntion hoforr ro un rli ng.
<jf
10,938
RO. 3
3, 7.'\2
27. .'\
223
I. fi
3, fl
27. 1
I , 089
8. 0
7, 370
89. 2
2,! W
2,i. 7
202
2. 4
I , fi03
19. 4
r,02
R: 1
I , 7 11
83 f,
12. f,
4, !OR
30.
27, 385
20 1. 0
10. I
2, 025
24 . .'\
17,966
217. 2
19,9 18
24 0. 8
85, 483
I , 033. R
33, 400
403. S
5, 189
62. 7
3,1, 000
4 11. l
7, 895
95. 5
5, 98fi
72. 4
4, 353
., 2. 6
23,557
172. 9
133,008
976. 2
49,336
362. I
8, 01 8
58. 8
, 3, 201
390. 5
fl, Ol fi
!iO. S
10, 120
74 . 3
8, 20S
liO. 2
2:l, 4fi7
fi, 13,
"
fi6. 3
33. 1
2, 2R,
20. fi
977
2. 9
12. 2
34 0
9, 244
27. 3
4,344
12. 8
.'\, 013
14. 8
15,83 1
46. 7
48, 312
142. 6
35, 358
104 . 4
138, 316
408. 3
SI , 175
239. 0
10, 517
31. 0
11 4,4 19
337. 8
15, 590
46. 0
18, !Sf>
53. 7
2, 90,
15. 7
970
.'\. 2
2, 14
15. 2
9, 63 4
,; 2. 0
24 , 583
132. s
r., 979
22,mm
Ri . 0
"
I. 9
25, 51 4
137. s
,; 1, 85 l
312. 5
19, 8 19
107. 0
3, 06 2
19. 8
46, 51 0
251. 2
2, 099
14. 6
I, ~3 7
2
'· 9
6, 28
34. 0
�Table 19.- Arre s t Tren ds, 1960-65 1
[1,882 agencies, 1965 estimated population 86,157,000]
N umber of persons arrested
0 ffcnse charged
•rota! all ages
1960
1965
U ndcr 18 years of age
Percent
chnnge
1960
1965
Percent
change
18 years of age and over
1960
1965
Percent
change
TOTAL .... ___ ._. - - _. . . _. . . . __ . __ _. __ _. . . . . _. _____. . . _.. _.. . _.
3, 103, 515
3,398,433
+0. 5
452, 962
699, 588
+54. 4
2, 650, 553
2, 698, 845
Crim inal homicide :
(o) Murder and oonnr,g!igent manslaughter . ... . ___ ______ ____ . . .
(b) M anslaughter by negligence. __ ___ _______ __ _----· __________
Forcible rape . .. . ____ _. ....... --··· .. ····---· ---------··-· ____ ___ __.
Robbery ... ___ ---- ------··· -- -····-------·----- · ----·· - ________ ____
Aggravated
assault. ___
___.. ----··
___ _.----------------·-···-·---··
B urglary- breaking
or entering
___________
___________ ___
____ ___ _____
Larceny- t l·eft. __. ____________ _______ ______ _____________________ ...
Auto theft ..... __ . . __ ..... _... _.. _. ____ ._ . . ___ . ___ _._. ____ ._._ .. ___ .
4,214
I , 678
6,359
29,277
46,640
111, 37
l 2,6 6
51, 644
5, 074
1, 745
7,379
33,525
60, 156
135,268
261,241
72,957
+20.4
+ 4. 0
+rn. o
+14. 5
+20. 0
+21. 4
+43.0
+41. 3
322
130
1, 144
7,043
5,833
54,060
89,487
31, 9 I
459
128
1,540
9,835
9. 637
GS, 291
143,201
45,982
+12. 5
-1. 5
+34.6
+39. 6
+05. 2
+26.3
+GO. 0
+43.8
3,892
1, 54
4,615
1, 617
5, 839
23,690
50,519
66. 977
ll8, 040
26,975
+ 18.6
+4. 5
+ 12.0
+6. 5
+23. 8
+ 16. 9
+26. 7
+37. 2
433, 876
577,345
298,272
+22.3
114,772
139, 712
21, 3.55
38,108
13, 511
36,699
27, 2;14
41, 730
37,307
89,725
37,319
149,436
118,528
1,101, 5S6
3[14,869
01, 650
522,3[9
48,145
ll7, 853
19,354
36,693
8. 967
29,350
26,589
32, 52
33. 591
88, 136
30,910
148,282
8 , 247
1,084,908
296, 6 0
85,099
260. 462
35,847
+ 14.3
+a. 7
+ 19. 7
+46. 5
+26.0
+ ll.5
+ 1. 9
+ 39. 1
-18. 7
+7. 9
+ 11.2
+34.0
- 5.0
- .3
- 24. 2
+s.o
-:,7. 6
Subtotal for above offenses .... -- ---------- ---- -----·· -··-· . . .
Other assaul ts .. __ . ___ . __ . .. __ . . ..... __ __. __ ___ _______ _____ _. .. __ .. _

20, 115
31,477
~~;fi143.215.248.551~~1~1~i:,te143.215.248.55i~t~:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: : : : : : : :::::
Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing.. ___ ____ __ ___ ___ ____ _
8,339
29, 189
Weapons; carrying, possess ing, rtc ... . - -----·-··--------·--- --- ----P rostitut ion and commercialized vice ____________ ___ ________ ___ ___ __
24,245
Sex offenses (except forcible rape and prostitution) ________ ____ _____ _
40,867
Narcotic cl rug laws _.. . . . __··-------·-· ____ . ___ __ _______ _____ ___ __ __
25,623
Garn bling. ____ ___ __ ... _____ . . . ___ . ___ . .. ______ ______ . __ __ _____ . . ___
109, 839
34, 768
Offenses agaiJJst family and children .... - --- ----------------·-··- - ··
130,793
D rivin g under the influence.-----------······ · -- --------- ---- --·- · ·
81,404
Liquor laws . ______ · · ------ ----------- -- ------- ------ --- ---------- ..
Drunkenness __. _. ______ _. ______ __ __ . ______ ____ . ___ __•. _. ____ _. . _. . . 1, 153,092
D isorclerly conduct ____ __. . ____ ____ ___ ___ __ ____ ___ ___ . __ __. _. _. . ... _
338,717
Vagrancy . . .. ___ . __ . __ .. _______ _. ____ _______ ----- --. --- - -... --. - --- .
121,189
40-5, 210
All other offenses (excegt traffic) ..... · ·-·-·-· -·····--· . ...... __... ..
Suspicion (not include in totals) .... . . _. . ... . ... _____ __ ___ . ___ .....
103, 24 2
1

+33. l
190, 000
+21. 7
+o.2
+21. 1
+62. 0
+25. 7
+ 12.3
+2.1
+45. 6
-18. 3
+7. 3
+ 14. 3
+45. 6
-4. 5
+ 4. 8
- 2•1.4
+28. 0
- 53. 4
ll , 647
], 447
8ll
2,219
5,891
402
8, 637
1,481
1, 433
572
971
15, 554
11,041
41, 213
8,097
151, 546
18. 713
279,073
21,859
2,001
1,415
4,544
7,349
645
8,87
3,716
1, 589
409
] , 154
30,281
16,678
58, 189
5,951
255,857
12,298
5,215
22, 234
40, 07
57,318
93, 199
19,663
+ 1. 8


- - - - - - ---- - - - + 46. 9
243, 876
+87. 7
+38.3
+74. 5
+104. 8
+24. i
+60.4
+2.8
+150. 9
+ io. o
-28. 5
+ 18. 8
+94.7
+51.1
+11. 2
- 26.5
+GS. 8
-34. 3
Basc(l on co111pn rnbk' rrports from 1,520 cit ics rrprcscnting 72, Il!J,000 popul:tl ion and 3fi2 c-011 11 1 irs rr prrsrnl ing 14 .038.000 pop11la1 ion .
103, 125
18, 668
30,666
6, 120
23,298
23,843
32,230
24, 142
108,406
34, 196
129. 22
65. 850
1, 142·. 051
297. 504
113. 092
253. 664
84, 529
�1:ri: .i At,
401\.
!,! I I)
10 :, . •
• •• 1 ;.
~
_u.
ct ~
,u0...1 .:ifo'i
n 11n
n;..;; :.'~"
I
i 1n .-.1
• I 11 i 11 /
I
j
I'
i J • f.,, i 'J(I
J.- (/,l
lJ,355 ngc n cics ; HHi5 c s LimaLcd po pulat ion l 14,9ti9,000]
N umhc r o f persons nrrcs tcd
() !Tense cha rger]
1064
IO!i.i
r crccnt
c hange
4,419,196
4, 453, 098
+.s
fi, 5 10
2. 2i (j
+7.5
- -L 7
9. 524
1:.!.:?01
fi35
17 11, fi2fi
344, 5r, 1
91,962
+ 2.2
+2.~
+5.2
+ 1. 0
- .i
-2.H
74 1. 124
7•18, 205
+ 1.0
183,837
4, 1\0li
27, 3SO
43, 105
7, 891
183. 309
5. 2~2
2fi, 810
43. 480
fi,855
-. 3
+ 12.5
'"· 344
45, 779
34, 4~5
lfi, fi 7,i
1or;5
19fi-l
JS yea rs of age and orer
L"n rler 18 year s of a~e
l I n<lcr 1,5 y c:-us of :1gc
T otal all ngcs
Percent
change
! OM
10fi5
Percent
196•1
1065
ch,,ngc
- -- - - -- - - - -- - - - - - - - TOTAL ..
Criminal homicide:
(a) Murder a nd nonnegligent man.
slaug hter .. .... ........ .. .. .. .
( b) Manslaug hte r hy ne~ligence ..•..
Forcible rape ... . . . . .. . . . . ... .. . . . .. . . . .
Rohher y .. . . .. .. . . . .. . .... .. . ... . . . . __ .
Aggravated assaul t ....... .... ... ... . .. .
nurglary-hrcakin g or entering ____ ____ _
L arcen y-theft. .. . ..... . . .. . . . . . . .. ... .
A u to theft . . . . . .... .. .. . . . ... . . . ....... .
n. osn
2,389
9. 319
41,277
72,845
lfi7 , 900
34(i, 857
94, 391
1
j(i,
S u btotal for a!Jo,·e olTenses .... .
Other assa ul ts ........
.. ............ .
Arson . ... .. . . . . .. . __ . ....... . ... . . . ... .
Forger y and counter feiting . .. .. ... ... ..
t;143.215.248.55i,11>roperty;
,imcn£.·:~:::::::.
·............
!Juyin~, recei,·ing,
vric1;~r:,\~~---~::::::::::-:-: :· ----- -- ··
St olen
>--'
~
\Yea pons; carryin J! , possess ing:, e tc. _ __ _
Prostitution nncl com-111crcia li zcd v ice __ _
Sex olTen ses (exce pt forcible rape and
prostitution) __ . . . ............. . ... ..
Nnrcot ic d ru g lnws __ ____ . __ ___ ____ _
Gamblin ~·-- ···· -- -- .............. ..
OITenses against fa mily a nd children . . . .
Dri ving und er the influence .. . ........ .
Liquor laws .. ..... ... . __ . ... .. __ . . . . . . .
Drunkenness . . ..... . ... . . . ..... .. . .... .
Disord erly cond uct. .... ....... . .. .. . . . .
Va~ranc y . . ........ . .. .. . - . . . ..... .... . .
All other olTenses (excep t trnni c) ... . .. ..
S uspicion (not included in tota ls) . .. .. . .
C ur re"· a n rl loiterin ~ la w violations .. .. .
Runaw ays __ ___ __ ____ __ ___ ___ _
73. 2fi l
57. 28fi
38,903
JOO, 540
53, 09fi
210, lif\7
143, 555
1, 43 1, 101
481, 153
11 5. 335
4fifi, ' 4
81. 70)
li4 , 079
fiO, 755
78, 11I
48. 907
33,057
52, 7fi3
43. 481
10~. li42
51. 4(i l
213, fi33
159, 184
l, 40fi, lii5
513,084
99, 138
4fi9, 302
3, 509,968
+. l
5ifi
+R.!
-9.fi
+ 13.4
+5. 7
+7.1
+ 1. -1
5,523
2,2 11
so. ggr,
-. I
15'1, 423
+7. 4
-4.3
-. 5
+.s
+ 1. 0
+3.5
-1.3
+ 1.1
913, 125
94
18


io2


11 3
22
474
+ 20. 2
+22.2
+20.0
+9. 2
+ 11 . I
+ 7.8
+1. s
-.(i
533
l 7R
l. S3 1
12, 3S8
11. 350
87, 004
l 90,434
iiO, li-19
13. 1192
12. 152
90,833
100,2 12
57, 858
3or.,
-4. Ii
33. 742
5,934
2, 11 5
7.44S
20, 109
r.4 . 4S3
83, 793
15-1,349
34,104
ono
+. 7
37G. i 5i
381. 335
+ 1. 2
29, 147
3. 4(\J
2, (i55
1. f\24
157,11 9
i54. IH2
l, li52
I. 821
24 . 155
40. [f,4
i. ilO
41,SSfi
2fi4
+ 0.1
+ 13. 7
-5.S
-44. 8
+ 15.9
fi, 501
-1. 9
+10. 2
-1. i
+4.2
- 14. 5
fi, 007
5. 9-11
-I.I


)(i,fi,1~


50, 720
10. 337
lfi, (HO
fil3
10, l 18
828
10. 734
18, 382
38. 789
32, 229
+3.8
+ 10.r.
+7.3
- -1 . 7
40. 258
38,5<18
-7. 4
+0. 1
llifi. ~ 12
1n.so 1
+3.li
3r.4,31i7
10, 135
2. 315
11. fi(J5
2n. 71 R
-2. 1
5~{0
f>,55
+ 15.4
+ 15.9
+ -1. 7
+.o
- 13. l
l, 097
41
453
45
-5K i
+ 2.0
+r..r.
+r..s
-4. 0
2. 233
2, .i52
+ 14.3
+fi. 3
+ 11.n
-1 5. l
- - --
- - -- - --2. li82
2. 824
93
39. nor;
3. 218
79
- 7. n
4, 0.'i8
4, 'i 05
+ 11.s
-. 8
-3.1
+ !.4
+ 10.0
- 1. j
flfi3
400
Oti2
,;02
15fi
12fi
3fi. fi88
42


!4


2, 3:J5
2,Hfi5
2. n20
2,:H i
25, 233
l, }.i,7
,i i, lti4
2.~. fi71
- 14.0
fi4, i i fi
-'20. i
5, 1175
fi:i, 744
79, 810
+ 2.1;
+ 14.4
2S, ,;53
+.r1
3. 506. Oil
+5.3


i,032


4, I I 7
45, 2fi5
102, Gil
15. Hi7
+fi. (j
+3.4
381. 401
3, 707
41. ()79
100. 758
15. 255
)- - - - -
943, 730
302. 105
- - - - - - - ----- - - - - - -- -
4,fm9
Jfi,H:,!O
I. '2ifi
+o. s
-3. 3
+ '15. l
+~5. 5
- 10. 2
-10. n
+13.2
+15. 7
+ 13.fi
+10. ,,
51i . f.: lfi
- . (\
lfi, 188
33 , 933
-.3
-2. i
+ 18. 8
5. or.o
r ercent
change
3. 0H
2. 818
2. 94 1
18 1
n. <120
13. 7\19
3. 5i2
2, 51i7
i15
l.li59
37, 4 l
211. 837
'jfi , 9 13
7. fi84
141. 11 3
17. 407
fl4.
n,n
fiO. -;,; ;,
If,[
2, Oifl
12. 505
4,933
2,441
520
I. 7114
42. 315
23, Hi3
84. 379
7. 344
138. 139
!fi. 0-17
f\5. 744
70.
sin
+s ..,
+5.2
+35. l
-9.4
+38. l
- 4.9
- 20. 4
+2. 7
+ 12. 0
+11. 2
+o. 1
- 4. 4
- 2. 1
-7. 8
+2. f\
+ 11. 4
7. 48R
28,S 9
li l. 495
24 ..iH2
3fi, 159
33,812
43,487
35,331
IOfi, 973
52. 381
200, nos
106, 074
I, 410, 2M
404, 240
107, fl5 1
3~5. 771
f>4, 294
IOI\, 201
50,935
211 , 9:1<J
llfi,Sfi9
1, 383,512
428. 705
91, 794
33 1. Hi3
48, 729
.. ----
-.,
-2. S
+ 1. 1
+10.2
-1.9
+11.1
-14. 7
+ 1. 7
- 24 . 2

-----
�Table 21. -Totci l Arrests by Age, 1965
[4,062 agencies; 1965 estimated popul ation 134,095,000]
Offense charged
Ages
uuder
ages
15
- - - - -- -- - - - - - - -- --
TOTAL______ _________ ____ ___ 5, 03 1, 393
Crim inal homicide:
(a) Murder a nd nonnegligent
m anslaughter __ ______ ____
(b ) M ansla ughter by negligence ______ ___ ________ ___ _
F orcible rape _______ __ ____ _________ _
R obber y _- --- --- - --- - - ---- - ---- - -- Aggravated assa ul t_ __ _______ ____ ___
B urglary- brea king or entering ____ _
Larcen y-theft_ _____________ _- ____ _
A uto theft- _____ ___________ __ __ ___ _
-
-
Ages
under
18
Ages 18
a nd
over
13- 14
- -• - ~- -,,-
-
-
--- -
6, il3
11
2,815
10, 734
45, 872
84,4 11
197,627
383, 726
101, 763
27
49 1
5,274
4, 335
50,297
l 12,839
16,662
196
2, 245
13,8 13
.12, 950
[02, 472
2 l 0, 469
63, 596
2, 619
, 489
32, 059
7 1, 46[
95, 155
173,257
38, 167
21
502
52 1
8,945
18, 8 1
34 0

-
2l
20
19
-
7
I, 006
13, 100
30, 732
I , 766
12,624
3, 112
609
492
48
3 1,948
4, 03[
2,962
1, 796
275
I 75,667
2, 156
27, 655
50,211
7, 399
1,676
1,439
39
28
l
3,030
735
132
12[
19, 060
89, 668
53, 585
2,852
44,5 13
3, 500
6, 720
68, 785
10, 985
12,34 0
20,883
302
1l, 779
239
33, 987
80
839
33, 148
5, 384
1, 058
528
14,097
44, 10
5, 34.5
2,56 1
40, 724
HO. 2R 1
60
86
70 !
2,958
3,026
16,821
27, 929
12,072
1G6
917
3, 523
3,57 1
14,357
22, 605
8,397
150
78 1
2, 78 1
2,985
9, 8 16
14 ,358
5, 108
14 5
677
2, 552
3, 000
7,810
11, 333
3, 729
149
720
2, 63 1
3,270
7, l [4
9, 885
3, 072
Gl8
3 003
3: JOO
17,886
33,733
17,424
207,615
6, 187
30,617
52,007
7, 674


u. 5~0


278
432
48, 104
660
263
2,578
2, 489
18,468
35,968
17,438
11--- - -
648
60,333
1,937 239,574
48,456 130, 763
2ii, 9 12 1,509, 128
93,4 72 470, 650
I 12 5??
7,894
156,3 10 375;
5.5, 734
20,612
72, 243
265
14
378
3, 384
2,808
2 , 252
63, 226
J4J556
29,228
147
39
3, 117
2,543
31,882
1, 318
64,575
6,32 1
I 7. 673
284
6
92
I , 388
4.27,920
1 11 , 733
226
106
406,376
42, GOO
183
95
190, 045
Sex offenses (except for cible rape
and prostitution) ___ _____________ _
58, 205
Na rcoti c d rug laws __ ___ ___ ________ _
46, 069
Garn blin g ______________ ______ _____ _
114, 294
OITenses against famil y and
ch il dren ____________ _____________ _
60,981
Driving under t h e in fluence __ _____ _
241, 511
Li quor laws _________ ______________ _
179, 219
D rn nken ness ___ ________ ___ ________ _ 1, 535, 040
Disorderly cond uct__ ___ ___________ _
570, 122
120, 416
Vagrancy ___ _____ -------- -- --- -- -A II other offenses (except traffic) __ _
531, 970
Sus picion __ ____________________ _
76, 346
Cu rfew a nd loitering luw Yiolnt ions
72. 243
uo: 28 1
Hun nwa :•s
18
- - - - - - - - -- -1·-- - + -- - - I - - --
14
- 1 1 - - ----1- - - - - ,1-- --1-- --
Other assa ul ts __ ________ ______ ---- __
Arson ___________ __ __ ___ ____ ____ ___ _
F orger y and counterfeit ing _____ __ __
F ra ud ____ _____ ____ ______ __ ____ __ __ _
Em bezzlement ____ __ ____ ___ ____ __ __
Stolen property; bu ying, receiving,
possessing. ____ __ ____ ___ _____ ____.
Va nd alism __ __ ___ _____________ _____
W eap ons; ca rr ying, possessin g, etc __
P rosti tution a nd commercialized
17
70, 593 IOI, 103 258, 3'44 200, 389 229, 928 214, 128 210, 032 162,9 17 146, 240
147, 754
430, 040 I, 074, 485 3.956,908
l=== =l==== cl===
- - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - -635
834, 296
IG
15
unde r
120
l- --
11 - 12
IO no el
7,348
Sub total for a bove offenses __ .
vice ___ ____ _____ ___ ______________ _
Age
Grand
total
all
-
-
23
- - - - --
11 2, 71 3 _77,502
-
-
-
--- -
76, 007 _62, 822
53,820
~
-- ---
I~ _ 27, I I\)
7,9 18
938
438
343
38
5, 4 3
357
5[ 9
306
35
6,755
314
845
443
86
7,086
248
989
555
106
8, 287
20 [
I , 506
I , 059
162
7, 137
186
l , 373
1, 190
7, 129
124
I, 394
l , 483
177
252
71 6
12, 234
78 1
1,834
20, oOO
I , 260
10, 106
2, 17 1
I , 337
8,337
2,646
1,27 1
5,829
2,668
I, 240
3,299
3, 025
959
2,234
2,407
787
1,645
2,222
1, 4 l
2, ,1 0
1
12
67
96
203
460
1,287
I, 607
1, i 39
2,462
615
71
34
1,1 24
3, 645
2,826
2,803
215
772
828
4 10
3,084
1, 396
703
2,387
2,5 11
I , 485
2, 180
2,41 1
1,4-10
2, 153
2,410
2 24 1
790
1,727
2, 51i
57
22
GS
154
2
65
GO
4
33
2i 0
I , 275
239
5, 073
l 21i
l 2, 775
I, 089
I , 167
14, 122
I , 42 l
2, n7-I
,1, 7 1 ~
7, n:l
9
88
234
7,399
254
406
2,818
2, 23:i
19 4 10
'938
37, 67
3 II
13'. 532
2:, . 11n
77
101
6,539
4,065
JG, 01 6
I, 059
29,882
3, 40-1
15. 6-1 1
522
15, 18 1
7,723
2 1,383
2, Oo5
32,388
4. 910
22. 4i2
2 1, 70(;


W. !lS-1


2, 063
920
23, 610
11 ,58 1
24, lfll
3, 41i2
29,465
51 Oi i
J (i, 4.) 7
Ill. 0 11
l , 610
3, 154
29,470
21,92 1
31,505
7, 275
27,813
fi, 93;;
I , 625
3, 651
1. 806
4, 5-17
23, 260
17,574
19, 571
18. 9 17
24,0H
5, ll 6
22, 162
4, 594
21,723
4,378
19,966
4. IOI
8, 178
100
l 58 1
1: 884
304
76
2,357
2:
2,244
6 528
i33
29, 108
?3 246
379
19,978
3.833
1:
-4'.
�.,h\•o
Table 21.-Total Arrests by Age, 1965- Continued
Age
Offense ch arged
22
23
25-29
24
30-34
35-39
40-44
45-49
50-54
55- 59
60-M
65 and
over
Not
known
- - - - - - -- ------- - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - 8,447
101,419
123,221
193,438
370, 360
299, 847
454, 372
482,457
117,988
48 1,087
429, 665

- - -- - - - - - -- - - - - =
- -- - - - - - ---- - - -- =
- - --
TOTAL ___ _____ ___ __ ____ __ _____ _
Criminal homicide:
(a) Murder and nonnegligent
manslaughter ______ _________
(b) Manslaughter by negligence __
Forcible rape __ ___ _______ ___ ___ __ _____
Robbery_------- -------------- ---- Aggravated
assault_
__________________
Burglary- breaking or entering ___ ___ _
Larceny-theft_ _____ _____ ________ ____
Auto theft_ ___ ________ _____ __ ______ __ _
140,451
124, 233
277
145
610
2,438
3, 170
6,502
8,814
2, 552
304
135
521
2,053
3,048
5,426
7,204
1, 893
2
11 8
426
1, 809
3,017
4,643
6, 605
1, 610
I, 143
393
I , 485
6, 025
12,058
15,1 08
22,055
4,571
895
285
935
3,463
10,007
9, 345
17,384
2, 619
808
244
600
2, 33 1
8,777
6,330
15, 120
1, 95 1
636
203
393
I, 205
fl,889
3, 997
II , 959
1,314
438
172
187
609
4,563
2,244
8,592
677
333
131
120
301
3, 198
I , 232
6, 738
391
206
76
54
142
1, 81'1
684
4,153
163
99
I, 570
2, 234
304
78
1,300
2, 128
306
82
1, 337
2, 175
362
302
5, 172
9,51 5
I, 362
256
3,969
8, 347
1, 222
193
3,270
7,162
1,071
192
2, 50~
5, 823
48
124
1,371
3,300
459
88
664
I , 9S2
342
760
I, 094
2,205
3 , 269
61 8
977
2,038
2,536
553
832
1, 894
2, 359
2, 03 1
2, 567
7,042
7,113
I , 474
I, 855
5,41 7
3,924
I , 125
I, 678
4,556
2, 818
768
I, 233
3, 438
1,620
545
823
2,34'1
920
368
550
I, 5/)6
675
2,250
2,685
2,541
2, 652
6, 803
3,542
28, 570
21, 098
3, 930
18,777
3,326
I , 942
2,532
2,667
2, 624
6, 478
2,645
26,544
17,874
3,360
16,242
2,934
I, 039
2, 185
2,907
2, 673
6,478
2,290
26, 776
16,303
2,890
15,248
2,547
r,, 804
8, 574
14, 619
II , 899
28,6 17
7,301
120, GI 9
61, 145
10, 524
53,923
7,91 5
5,652
G, 26 1
15,190
10,208
30,260
6, 845
145, 61
54, I IG
9, 489
43, 55
5, 345
5,207
4, 188
15,268
9, 11 5
34,434
7,427
196,031
54,368
II , 184
40, 404
4,33 1
4, 124
2, 154
13, 944
6,604
34, 444
7,1 27
226, 172
49,609
12,234
33,928
3,439
2,465
912
II , 407
3, 740
27, 670
6, 134
205,967
36,388
11 ,011
23, 71 5
2,424
I , 792
538
10,046
2, 029
21,650
5, 146
176, 624
27, 199
IO, 288
17,1 38
I , fi39
5
125
45
31
67
979
306
2, 633
62
165
62
29
5S
1, 020
218
2, 753
46
56
36
358
948
133
159
493
65
30
111
326
29
72
I
171
285
052
377
104
182
527
207
70
184
535
206
34
45
20
1, 146
275
6, 809
843
13,193
3, 377
121, 470
16,987
7,290
9, 90 1
I , 91 2
801
150
4, 500
342
7,045
2,034
i7, i97
11 , 046
4, 980
5, 865
697
908
135
4, 624
255
4,438
1, 798
62, 423
, 529
4, 050
5, 965
576
57
13
42
64
184
60
4, 757
1,467
135
I , 047
36
-·--·-----3
11
35
23
76
12
- - - - -- - - -- ---- - - -- - - -- - - - - - - - -- - --- - - - - - - - - - - 24,508
- -- - -20,674
4, 24
4,351
165
12,444
7,292
17,482
26,656
36,16 1
44,993
18,516
63, 738
-- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - -- - -7,049
- --- ---- --- =
--233
I, 943
1, 870
3,563
JI, 069
17, 498
22,400
8,234
143.215.248.55;~ _a_s15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST): ::-:-- ______ _____ ______
7, 727
7,642
30,285
25, 423
Subtotal for above offenses _____
Forgery and counterfeiting ____ - _-- -- 143.215.248.55izzie-me-nt:-: :: :: : :: : : : : : : : : : : _: :
Stolen property; buying, receiving
v:~1:~~:-: _____________________ '. _
Weap_ons; carrying, possessing, etc::::
Prost1tut10n and commercialized vice_
Sex offenses (except forcible rape an d
prostitution) __ ____ __ ______________
Narcotic drug laws ______ ______ _____ Gambling ________ _____ __ __________ - _Off_e~ses against family and children_:
D n vmg under the in fluence. _________
~ir=e143.215.248.55s::-::- --------------- ---Disorderly conduct_ __ ________ _______ :
Vagrancy ___ ___________ ___ __ _____ _____
All other offenses (except traffic) ____ __
Suspicion ________ __ __________ _____ ____
Curfew and loitering law violations __ _
Runaways __ __ ____ ___ __ __ _____________
3
6
f,
�r
Tabl e 24.-To tal Arres t Tre n ds by Sex, 1964-65
13,355 agc nrics; 1965 es t im ated popu lation 11 4,969,000]
F emales
M ales
U nder 18
Total
Offense charged
1964
JOGS
P ercent
clrn nge
1964
1965
Total
P ercent
change
1964
1965
Under l
P ercen t
change
1964
--TOTAL __ --- - ----- - - --- ------ - ----- ---
3, 898, 105
3, 919, 702
+. 6
Criminal homicide ;
(a) M urder and nonnegligent m anslaughter. ___________ __ _____ __ _. __
(b) Manslaughter by negligAnco ___ _____ _
Forcible
rape ___ __________________ _____ ______
Robbe r y ____ ____ ______ _____ _____ ____________
Aggravated assa ult. ___________________ ______
B urglary-breaking or entering ___ _____ ______
Larceny- theft_ _____ _____ __ __ __________ ___
Au t o theft _____ ____ __ ___ --- ----- --- --- - -----
4,946
2,153
9,319
39, 107
62,744
161,698
27G, 221
90,406
5,344
2, 059
9,524
40,007
66,033
168,065
266,815
88, 119
+s. 0
Su btotal for above offenses ____________
646, 594
645,966
Othe r assaults ____ ____ ____

--- --- -----A rs on __ ______ --- ---- -- ----- ------ ---- - -----Forgery and counterfeitin g ___________ _______
F ra ud _____ __ __ ______________________ __ -Embezz lemen t_ _______________________ ______
Stolen p roperty; bu yiu g, receiving, possessing _____________ . ______ _. ___ ______ . - ___
Vandalism ____ ______________________________
W eapons ; carrying, possessing, etc __ __ __ ____
Prostitution and commercia lized v ice __ _____
Sex offenses (except forci ble rape and prostitution) ____________________________________
N a rcotie drug laws ________________ __________
Gambl ing ____ __ ______________________ . _____ _
0 fienses agaiw:t famil y and child ren __ ____ __
D ri ving nnder t he influen ce _________________
L iquor laws ___ --- - - --------- - ---- --- --- - - - -runkeru1ess ___ _____ __ ____ __ ______________ __
D
D isorclerly conduct. ______________________
V agraucy __ -- - - - - --------------- - - - - - ---- - -A II other offenses (except traffic) __ __________
suspicion (not included in totals) ___________
C urfew and loitering law v iol ations _________
R unaways __ ______ _______ . __________________
1
783,215
+ 2. 3
-4.4
+2. 2
+2.3
+5.2
+3.9
-3. 4
- 2. 5
494
15
1, 31
11 ,815
10,007
83,858
157,7 18
58,064
538
141
2, 070
12,506
10, Qlfj
87,657
152, 764
55,351
+ 8. 9
-1 0. 8
+ 13.4
+5,8
+6. 1
+4.5
-3.1
-4. 7
- .1
323,945
321,649
- .7
521, 091
533,996
+2.s
147, 366
160,515
+ 8.9
1, 110
1, 166
+5.0
39
38
- 2. 6
+ 1.1
+ 5. 0
+4.3
+ 10.1
- 3. 6
1,343
3, l4 (i


12, il 6


2,585
5 6
1,536
3, 176
37. 448
2,507
+ 2. 3
+14.4
+ 1. 0
+ 14.5
- 3. 0
+ 8.3
40,422
45,3ll
+ 12. 1
+ 1. 3
+2. 4
- .4
+4.4
-1 2. 2
3,916
195
520
710
19
4,604
191
283
42
+li.6
- 2. l
+ 4.8
- 60. 1
+ 121 . 1
217
- 8. 1
236
20
20 ------------------- --- -------------- ------ ---- ------ ---- ---- -----2, 194
2, 170
573
10, 101
6,292
70, 63G
3,985
10, 602
6, 561
77, 746
3, 43
94,530
102,329

---- ---- ---- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
164,388
4, 279
22,331
34, 617
6,536
163,615
4,855
21,782
34,620
5,665
-.5
+ 13. 5
-2. 5
14,935
68,820
42,760
10,554
15,356
73, 397
45,652
7,405
+ 2.8
+6.7
+6. 8
48,020
33,484
JOO, 622
48, 139
196,776
126, 015
1,320,391
416,039
104, 297
398,572
73, 097
51, 839
38,097
44, 850
37,654
100, 093
46,812
199,969
140,504
1, 299, 705
447,215
89, 134
400, 4,55
57,892
53, 43 1
41,567
f ncrP asc of I C'SS Lilan om'-tcn 1h of one pcrccot.


765. 759


Percent
change
1965
(')
-13.3
- 29.8
- 6.fi
+ 12. 5
-.5
- 2. 8
+ 1.6
+ll.5
- I. ti
+7. 5
-14. 5
+. 5
- 20. 8
+3.1
+0.1
= 22,802


- --
- --
2,849
2. 298
2, 2'J I
IQ 2
24,543
3,270
2, 110
1,34 1
222
+7. 6
+ 14. 8
- 8. 2
-39. 9
+37. 0
19,449
417
5,049
8,488
1,355
19,694
427
!i,028
8, 60
I, 190
5,5i4
53, iii
9,273
207
5,560
5fi, 811
9,791
223
-. 3
+5. 7
+1. i
1, 409
4, 441
3,019
23,871
1,310
4,714


1, 255


25,652
- 6. 4
+6.1
+7.8
+7. 5
433
2,871
347
406
381
2,918
327
605
- 12. 0
+1. 6
-5. 8
+49.0
9,902
3, 140
2,494
525
I, 595
32,370
18, 710
65,672
6, 871
Ill , 432
15, 455
51, 39
38,097
9, 148
4,350
2,360
357
!, 633
36,653
20,823
72,014
6, 39 1
108,968
14,281
53,431.
41, ,i67
-7. 6
+38.fi
-5. 4
-32. 0
+2.4
+13. 2
+ 11.:l
+n. 7
- 7. 0
-2.2
-7. 6
+3. 1
+9. l
9, 2(i(i
5, 419
R, 918
4,957
13, S91
17,540
110,710
65, 11 4
11, 03
68,312
8,604
12,24 0
31, 65
7,913
5, 27
8,549
4,649
13, 664
I, ,GS0
JOG, 970
65,869
10,004
GS, 847
6,884
12,313
3 , 243
-14. 6
+ 7.5
-4. 1
3,897
432
73
190
64
5, 111
2, 127
11,241
813
29,681
I, 952
12,240


Ji.658


3,357
583
81
169
71
5,662
2,340
12,365
953
29, 171
1, 766
12,313
38, 243
- 13. 9
+35.0
+ 11. 0
-l l. l
+10.9
+ 10. R
+10.0
+10.0
+17.2
- 1. 7
- 9.5
+.6
+20.s
+5. 6
- 6. 2
-1. 6
+6.5
- 3.4
+1.2
- 9.4
+.8
- 20. 0
+. 6
+ 20. s
545
�Table 25 .- Tota l A rrests by Race, 1965
[4,043 agen cies ; 1965 estimated population 125,1 39,000]
T otal a rres ts
R ace
0 ffense charged
Total
White
Negro
Ind ia n
C hinese
J a panese
All oth ers
(includ es
race un·
known)
- - -- - - - -- - - -- - 1-----11-- -- 1 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- TO T AL __ ____ _____________ _____ 4,743, 123
Crimina l hom icide:
(a) :'durder a nd nonnegligent
m a nsla ughter _____ ____ ____ _
(b ) _\Ia nsla u ghte r
by
negligence- ____-- - - -- - - - - -- --- - Forcible rape- _____ __ - _-- - - - - - ---- _- H obbcry _____ ______ _____ _______ ___ ___


\ ggra n 1ted assa ult _____ ________ ---- - Burglnr y-hrcll1iag or ente rin g _____ _


L arce n y- t heft ______ ______ _---- - - __-Au t o theft _______ _____ ____ _____ _____ _
3,235, 386 1,347,994 113, 398
2,970
1, 293
42,082
,====•,==== = - -- - - - - - ·=== = ,====
6,509
2,675
2,457
9, 328
39, 854
70, 285
181, 429
364, 072
93, 108
1, 883
4,485
16,586
32, 539
11 , 167
247,606
64, 200
3,704
46
3
5
76
541
15
1
4
13
85
4,005
2
4
87
22, 540
288
23
6
405
36,558
569
21
10
582
59, 673
150
1, 298
61
2, 080
? 583
3 18
109, 792
222
3, 55 1
-, 927
26,372
106
33
1,470
- - - - - - - - - - - - -1-- -63
1
344
8,
204
Su btotal for a bo,e offenses __ ___ l==7=67='=0=4=2 =1 ~= 4=
88='=1=4=l=l==26=3=,=8=5l=l=5=,=8=
! I=
193,475
11
6,
734
73,
284
l,
207
3•
1
92
2,
064
0 thcr assaults ______ --- __ --- --- - - _- -I
5, 51 6
4,321
l , 127
28
I
38
_\rson ____ ___ - - - __ _____ --- - -- -- --- -- - 27,477
21, 690
5, 44 0
24 1
10
16
80
Forgery a nd count.er(eit.ing ___ _______ _
F ra ud-- ___ ___ _______ ________ --- _-- - _
13
49, 537
40,843
8, 253
192
23
213
Em bczzle m ent_ __ ___ __ _____ ___ ___- - - _
2
6, 781
5, 777
066
22
I
13
Stole n propert y; bu ying, recei ving,
possessing _____ ______ ______ ____ _- ___
88
10, 120
5, 463
0
174
15, 869
18
33 1
27
729
82, 798
65, 601
16,074
36
, -a nfinJism ____ __- -- - - ___ - -- - - - - - - - - - 200
16
49, 731
22, 695
26, 226
28
557
\\·ca pons ; carr y ing, possessing, e tc. -
Prostitution and commercialized
30,63 5
12, 6•13
\· ice_. __ __ __------ · - - ----- · ·- --- -· -Sex offe nses (excep t forcible ra pe a nd
53, 422
38, 615
prosti tution ) ___ ____ -- - ___ - - - - - - -- - N a rcotic drug la ws __ ____ _____ _______ _
31, 294
1 , 530
G a mbling __ _____ ________ ______ ___ ____
87, 627
19, 842
59,
958
39,
449
O ffenses against fam il y a n d children _
188, 159
Dri ving under tbe influe nce __ ____ ___ _ 231, 899
167,
815
131,452
Liqu or laws . .. .. . .. -- - · - ---- - - - ·----548 I, 070, 861
Orunkenness-. - ·- - - - - . - - - . - - - -. - - - -- 1, 516,
503, 849
312, 228
Disorderl y conduct __ _- - - -- - - - -- - - --11 5,305
3, 495
\" agrancy _. ·-- - - ... - -- - - .. - · - --- · - -- ·
511,
121
365,
869
-~11 ot her offe nses (except traific)-- -76, 183
53, 651
~ us p1c1ou ____ _. - .- - - - . . - .. - - . - - :- · -- - ·
71,
138
54,
288
Curfe w and loitering law violat10n s ..
I{ 11n a w nys .. __ _. - . . . - - . - - - - · - -- - -- · - -
88, 103
70,382
17,598
142
11
29
212
13, 759
12, 069
64, ]35
JO, 699
38, 966
31, 929
354, 158
179, 506
28, 161
135,946
2 1, 72 1
1'1, 521
15, J.1 2
237
80
28
474
3,433
3,065
81, 987
0 095
37
73
51
395
701
53.i
3,049
3 10
I, 163
I , 27 1
8, 975
5,878
871
4,075
187
1, 353
1, 364
2:
6 17
4, 782
005
586
1,078
29
178
JO
JO
41
137
69
423
9
!31
298
0
338
75
29
144
53
30
151
13
52
62
117
�Table 25 . -To t al A rrests by Race, 1965- Continued
Arrests under 18
Race
Offense charged
Total
TOTAL ... . . . ... . ......... . . . . . 1, 019, 301
White
733, 585
Negro
263, 690
C riminal homicide:
(a) M urder a nd n onnegligent
manslau gh ter. .... . . . . . . ....
(b) M anslaughter by negligence.
Forcible rape. . . . . . . .. . . .... . . . .. . . . .
Hobber y ........... ......... . ... . . . . .
Aggravated assault...... . . . ... .. . ... .
Burglary- brea ki ng or entering... . . .
Larceny-theft . . .............. .. . . . ..
Auto t heft. .. ........... . ... . .. . . . . ..
504
165
1, 940
11, 440
10, 594
94, 699
201, 242
59, 298
190
121
658
3, 281
4, 638
62, 665
137, 446
41,875
296
42
1,229
7, 977
5,760
29, 892
60, 131
15, 791
Subtotal for a bove offenses... . .
379,882
250,874
121,1 18

== =11,
Other assa ults. .... ........ ... . ......
28, 946
Arson ............ . . ..... . . ... . . .. . .. .
3, 680
Forger y and counterfeit ing.. ..... ....
2, 714
Fraud. . . . .. . . . .. . .. . . . ......... .... .
1, 710
E mbezzlement . ... . . . ... . . . . . . ... . . . .
241
Stolen property; bu y ing, receiving,
6, 238
possess ing. ..... ... . ... ....... .. . . . .
Va ndalism . ..... . ........ . .. . . .. . ....
64, 015
W eapons; carrying, possessing, etc..
10, 156
Prost it u t ion a nd commercia lized
v ice... . ...... . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .... .. ..
799
Sex offenses (except forcible ra pe
13, 079
a nd prostitution).. . . . . . . .... . .. . ..
N arcotic drug laws.... . .... . .. . ... . ..
4, 021
Gambling . . . . .. ... . ....... . . . . . . .·....
2, 194
Offenses against fa mily and childr en.
607
Driving u nder the infiuence. . .. . . .. ..
1, 886
L iq uor laws.... . ... . . .. . . . ... . . . . . . . .
46, 091
D runkenness... . . .... . ........... ...
25,583
D isorderly conduct . . ... . . .. . ~. . .....
88, 982
Vagrancy... .. .. . .. . .. ...... .. ...... .
7, 107
All other offenses (except t raffi c).. . . 151, 651
Sus p1c10n.. . . . .... ..... .. ..... . ..... .
20, 478
C urfew and loitering la w v iola tions.
71, 138
R unaways. ... ... . . . . . . . ........ . .. . .
88, 103
118
I ndia n
C hL
n ese
7, 585
12, 218
626
4,004
52, 631
5,738
2, 087
10,649
4, 231
329
466
8, 882
2, 853
568
473
1, 708
42, 691
21, 045
60, 643
5,069
113,691
14, 995
54, 2
70, 382
3, 859
996
1, 503
129
122
2, 365
3,200
27, 063
1; 699
35,425
5, 288
14, 52l
15, 142
'515
423
45
n ese
440
1, 059
---
- --
3 -- ------------ ----- 14
12, 942
27
1
1
1
2
3
99
196
81
2, 058
105
384
11 1
16
23
5
5
16
1
1
1
1
47
10
102
25
70
546
1,004
396

=0 1= = = =1= =
16, 118
3, 005
2, 154
1,252
192
A ll 0U10rs
(includes
race unknown)
Japa·
1
2
2
44
119
H
1
37
153
121
1,453
2, 346
1. 128
5. 253
32
21
29
2
33
206
29
22
24
483
7
10
141
26
15
3
4
4
12
7
9
296
] 46
11 1
l
JI
283
202
805
2
2
4
43
730
1, 131
439
66
56
126
586
1,078

-- - ---- ---2
6
l
16
19
13
44
90
4
52
2
52
62
4
225
I. 537
2
6,1
338
1. :15:i
1, ~64
75
�Table 25 . -1'otal A r rest s by R ace, 1965- Contin~ed
Arrests IS and over
Race
0 liense char ged
Total
TOT AL __ ______ ·- - --- - - ----- --- 3, 723, 822
W hite
' egro
I nd ia n
Chinese
2, 501. 801 1, 084.304 105, 813
- - - --
Cri m ina"l homicide:
853
J npnnese
A II others
(includes
race unknown)
1, 911
29, 140
-- - - - -
(a ) M mder
and non negligent
ma nslaughter_ __ ___ __ _____ _
2,485
3,408
3
62
6, 005
43
4
1, 762
499
15
l
12
3
2, 292
3,
827
3,436
71
1
7, 388
3
50
14, 569
263
4
13,305
21
28, 414
252
27,901
30, 708
499
14
18
461
59, 691
2<J, 781
752
17
027
55, 502
51
86, 730
l , 5;g
49, 661
122
110, 160
103
I , 205
162, 830
22,325
10, 581
531
6
25
342
33,810
1- -- - -11-- -- -1-- - -- 1- - - - - - - - - -- - -- Su btota lfor a bo,-eoffenses ____ 387, 1,60
237. 267
142, 733
3, 753
149
247
3, 0 11
(b) :\'1anslaugh ter by negligence_
Forcible ra pe ___ __ __ ___ ·-- __ __ ______ _
Hobber;- __ _____ _-- - ---- _-- - - - - - -- --AggrnY·a ted assaul L ____ ______ ______ _
Burglary- brea kin g or entering ____ __
Larceny-theft_ _________ ____ ____ ___ _
A uto theft_ _________ ____________ ____ _
1=====11=== ,I= = =
Other assa ults ____ ____ ____ __ __ ______ _ 164, 529
100, GIG
1, 316
1, 836
Arson _____ --- - - -- -- - -- - -- ---- -- ---- 19, 536
24, 763
Forgery a nd counterfeiting ___ ______ _
Fraud _______ _____ ______ ______ ______ _
47, 827
Embezzlemen t- ____________________ _
6. 540
Stolen property; buy ing, recei\·ing,
6, 116
possessing___ ______ ________ ___ ___ __
9, 63 1
12,970
,-andalism _ ________ __ ______ _________
18, 783
16,
95i
\ \'capons ; carrying, possessing, e tc__ _
39, 575
12. 314
Prostitu t ion a nd commercia lized ,·ice_
29, 836
Sex offenses (except forcible ra pe
29, 733
a nd prosti t u t ion)------- ------ -- -- 40, 343
15, 6i7


\Tarcotic drug lfn1-s _ _______ ____ ·-- __ _


27, 273
19, 274
(;am bling_ ___ ___ ______ ___ ______ _____
85,433
38,976
Offenses against family a nd ch ild ren _
59, 351
186, 451
llri,·ing u nder t he influence - __ ______ 230, 013
, 7Gl
Liq uor laws_ ___ __ ____ __ _____________ 121, 724
16
Drunkenness----- - ------------ --- --- 1, 490, 965 1, 049,
251,585
Disorderl y conduct______________ ____ 414, 867
78,426
Vagrancy ___ ___ __ _____ __ _____________ 108, 198
252, 178
All other offenses (except t raffi c) _____ 359,470
38, 656
Sus picion_ _____ ____________ ______ ___ _
55, 705
Curfew and loitering la w ,·iola t ions __ --------·-
3~:~1
61,066
501
4,925
7, 830
921
-
-
I, 156
12
218
187
22
3, 376
5. 1125
21 995
17: 132
55
125
180
141
9, 900
11 , 073
62, 632
19, 570
38 844
211
05
25
470
3, 390
2,335
0, 856
5,650
2,551
3,926
479
zo'.5M
350 95
152: 443
26,402
100, 521
16, 433
-
-
2<J
-
-
76
-
-!, 586
l
6
10
13
1
15
22
4
8
12
18
5
9
11
33
25
178
lO
39
23
143
34
26
99
11
28
61
44
386
10
137
53
4 10
70
87
208
4
59
184
11
72
2,1u
416
210
405
3 0
2, U38
315
I, 152
988
, 773
5. 073
G46
2. 53
122
Hunaways____ ____ __________ -------- -- - -- - -
119
�Tabl e 26.-City A rrest Tre nds, 1964- 65
[2,047 cities over 2,500; 1965 cstim!ltcd population 94,084 ,000]
Nu mber of persons arrested
T otal all ages
Offense charged
1964
1965
Und er 18 years of age
P ercen t
chan ge
1964
1965
18 years of age and over
P ercent
chan ge 1
1964
1965
r ercen t
chan ge
1

---4. 05i, 529
4, 080, 259
+. 6
833, 769
860, 645
+ 3. 2
3, 223, 760
3, 219, 614
- .1
!iflfft]i~r143.215.248.55 15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST) 15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)143.215.248.55 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Auto t heft _____ ___ ___ __. ____ __ __ _____________________________ . ... ______ .
5,367
1,782
7,932
39, 020
66, 038
145,434
317,256
8.i, 567
5, 764
1, 674
8, 125
39, 891
69,238
151, 769
315,038
83,612
+7. 4
- 6. 1
+ 2.4
+2. 2
+4. 8
+ 4.4
- .7
-2. 3
4 8
128
1, 068
12, 034
10,685
75, 3il
177, 828
55, 64i
523
131
1, 876
12,685
11 , 340
79, 372
177,682
53,317
+ 7. 2
+ 2.3
+ 12. 5
+ s.4
+0.1
+s.3
-.1
-4 . 2
4,879
1, 654
6,264
26,986
551 353
10, r 53
139,42
29, 920
5,241
1, 543
G,249
27,206
57,898
72, 397
137,356
30,295
+ 7.4
- 6. 7
-.2
+.8
+4.6
+3.3
- 1. 5
+ 1. 3
Subt otal for above offenses __________ . ______ ___ __________________ .
668, 396
675, 11 1
+ 1.0
333, 849
336, 926
+. 9
334,547
338, 185
+ 1. 1
Other assaults ___ __ _____ ________ ____ ______ _______ ____ _____ ___ _________ __
167, 418
4, 041
21, 969
35,645
6,297
14, 890
66,456
42,4 08
33,644
52,849
37,221
106, 662
40, 588
183, 01 6
121,266
l , 363. 366
455, 268
110, ll 7
404 , 100
77, 699
61,386
60,526
166,982
4,540
21,501
35, 188
5, 148
14,994
70, 484
45,674
32, 241
48,284
41 ,541
105, 950
38, 189
185, 41
133,256
1,337,321
485,199
94 , 356
407, 438
Gl , 209
62, 399
68,622
- .3
+1 2.3
- 2. 1
-1. 3
- 18. 2
+. 7
+5. 1
+7. 7
- 4.2
-8.6
+ 11. 6
-. 7
-5.0
+ 1. 5
+o.9
25,390
2, 755
2, 418
2,839
16 1
5,642
51, 611
9, 024
592
12,917
3,4 15
2, 504
528
l , 41 9
31, 859
19,067
73,144
7, 263
125,460
16,355
61, 386
60, 526
+ 9. 3
+10. 8
-4 . 4
- 47. 6
+ 5s. 3
- 1. 6
+ 4.9
+6. 1
+36. 7
-\0. 8
+ 39.9
-5. 5
-12. l
+3. 8
+11 .s
+ 11. 9
+7. 4
- 4. 1
-. 5
-7.2
+ 1.1
+13.4
142, 028
1,286
10, 551
32, 806
6, 136
9,248
14, 45
33,384
33, 052
39, 932
33,806
104. 158
40, 060
181,597
89, 407
1,344, zgg
382, 124
102,854
27 ,640
61,344
139, 234
1, 488
19, 190
33,699
4, 898
9, 442
16,322
36, 101
31,432
36, 764
36,762
103,583
37, 725
184,368
97. 733
1, 315,994
406,675
87,394
282. 625
46,036
-2. 0
+ 15. 7
- 1. 8
+2. 7
-20. 2
+2. 1
+9. ~
+s. 1
-4. 9
-7. 9
+ 8.7
TOT AL __ ________ ____ __ ____ _______ -- -- - -- - - - - -- - - - -- - - -- - - -- - - - -- -
Criminal hom icid e:
(a) Mll!der and nonnegligen t manslaughter_ _______________________
(b) Manslaughter b y negligence __ __-- -- ------ - -------------- -- ----Forcible rape________ - - - - -- - - -- - - - - ---- - - - ----- - -- - -- - -- - -------- - --- - -.
Arson
___and
_------- - -- - - - - - --- --- - - - - - - - - -- --- - -- -- - - -- -- - - -- - ----- ---- - Forgery
COllll terfeitin g ___ ______ ____ _________ ____ ------ - _____ _____ _.
F raud _____________________ _____________________________ ___ __ __ __ __ _____
E mbezzlemen t_ . ___ ___ __ _________________ _________ _____ ___ ________ ___ __
Stolen property; b uyin g, receivin g, possess in g. __ __________ __ ___ ________
Vand alism __ . . ______________ ____________ __ __________ ___ _____ __ __ _______
Weapons; carr yin g, possessin g, etc _______ -- ------------ ------------ - - -- P rostitu t ion a nd commercialized v ice _____ -- ----------- -- - ---- - - - - - - -- -Sex offenses (except forcible rape and prostitu tion) ___ ___________________
Narcotic cl rug Jaws __ __ ______________ __ ___ _____________________________ .
Gamb ling _. _____________________ ____ ___________ ________________________
Offenses against fa mil y and ch ild ren __ _________________________ _________
D ri vin g und er t he in fl uen ce .. ______________ _________________ ___ _____ ___
Liquor laws ._-------- ------- - ---------- -· __ ________ ___ . __ . . ____ ______ __
Drunkenness __________________________ ____ . . .... _

--- ---- ---- ---D isord erly con d uct __ ___ _________ _____ . . __. . . _
Vagrancy _____ ___________________ ___ ___ ___.
All other offenses (except traffic) ___ _______ __
Sus picion (not in cluded in totals) ___ ____ ____ - ·
Cll!few and loitering law violat ions___ _________ __
_ _
--- ··· · · ·
Rwrnways _____ ___ ____ _____________ _____ _____ _________ ______________ ___ _
1
-1.9
+6. 6
- 14.3
+. 8
- 21. 2
+ 1. 7
+ 13.4
27,748
3, 052
2,311
1, 489
250
5,552
54 , 162
9,573
09
11,520
4, 779
2,367
464
1, 473
35, 523
21, 327
78,524
6,962
124 ,813
15, 173
62, 399
68. 622
-.(i
-5.8
+1.5
+9.3
-2. 1
+6.4
- 15. 0
+ l.4
- 25. 0

--- ---- --- --- --- --- ------ ------ ------ -- ------ ------ ·-- -- ·
fn 654 citi es ove r 25,000 popu l a1ion . arr es l s of prr:-ions und r r I ~ y<'nrs o f ap:1" in <' l' <',JSP d 3. 0 1w rc·t•11 t an<l n rr1·~t-.: of p,·rsnn...: 1-.: nn 11 OYPr df'rr<'·1st•d .4 pr rcr11 l: in 1 ,flfl3 ,·ii k.'- t1 n d 1'r
'..!.i,000 populat ion, a r re~ l s of prr...: 0 11-: undt'r 1,._ llH'l'i':l•'d t 1 11L' f•·1• 111 a 11d :1rrp•;I-: ,)f pn-: p11 -. 1, a 11d 0 \· 1• r i 111·n •:1...: .,d I I pt>r<···nl
�Table 27.-City Arrests by Age, 1965
[3,083 cities over 2,500; 1965 es timated population !01,652,000]
I
r
Grand
total all
ages
Offense charged
0
<O
Ages
Ages
Ages I S
under 15 under 18 and over
Age
10 a nd
11- 12
13-14
under
TOTAL __ ___ ___ _____ _. _____ ___ __________ ___._. ___ 4, 470, 560
---Criminal homicide:
(a) M urder and nonnegligent manslaughter ____ ____
6,144
(b) Ma nslaughter by negligence ____ __________ ____ __
1, 822
iiti;}t~;::;~iE=_~:::::::::::::::-:::::::::::::::::
Burglary-brea king or entering______ ___________ ____ ___ _
Larceny- theft_ ________ ______ __. ____ __ _________________
Auto t heft __ _____ ___________ ___ _________. ____________ ___
Subtotal for a bove offenses. ___ ___. ______ _. ____ ___
0 tber assaults __ ____ __ ________ _______ ___ __ ___ _________ __
Arson. ___ _____ ___ ______ ______ ________ ____ _____ ___ ____ __
Forgery and counterfeiting ___ ____ ____ ____ ____ _____ ___ __
8,635
42, 134
73, 608
182, 28 1
338,543
89,095
---722, 260
=180, 531
~~b~zzlement __ ___ :::::::: : :::::::::::::: :: : - -- -- -- Stolen
property;
buying,
receiving,
possessing
Vandalism
__ ________
__ __ ____
___ __ __ ____
_________::::::::
4,912
23, 053
37, 144
5, 310
16, 434
77, 297
\ Veap_ons; ca rr yi ng , po:5sessin g , etc ____ ____ _____ -- ----- - 48, 898
P rostitution a nd com mercialized vice
32, 849
Sex offenses (except forcible rape and prosti tution)
51, 451
43, 527
~ ! ~gtl~t~~- 143.215.248.55v_s______ ______ ______ __ ____________ : :::: 108,
602
Offenses against famil y and children ________ __ __ ________
40, 927
143.215.248.551 i,~~ e~_L!~~! ~_flu ence ___ _______ __ __ ____ ___ _____ . _ 201, 334
144,465
1,438, 075
528, 356
112, 432
All other offenses (except traffic) ____________ ___ ________ 441, 401
Suspicion __ __ ____ _____ ___ ______ ___ _____ . - - - -- --- -- - -- . 66, 982
Curfew and loitering law violations ____ _____ ____ __ ____ __ 67, 929
ft
~r~t~f;143.215.248.55 15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST):15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)~-~-~;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
Ru naways ____________ __ ________ __ _ __ _________ ·· --· --
74,4 11
15
16
17
IS
19
20

--- --- --- ------ --388,168'
102
24
455
945, 24 1 3,525,319
64, 120
91,650
4, 063
43, 055
104 , 929
15, 117
142
I, 946
13, 236
11, 896
84,698
191, 037
56, 675
5,602
I, 080
6,689
28,898
61,710
77,583
147, 500
32,420
10
IL
4
0
18
88
1,
307
492 I
474 !
954
7, 837 11, 385
17, 789 28, 741
1,620
308
172, 920
360, 172
362, 088
2fi, 934
11 ,909
2,028
546
454
46
2, 693
39,400
3, 265
79
4,83 1
1. 028
29,333
3, 332
2, 458
I, 563
256
6, 079
151, 198
I , 580
20, 595
35, 581
5, 054
JO, 355
17,-523
38,682
32, 03•1
3S, 863
38, 375
106, 143
40,398
199, 724
105, 502
1, 4 14,799
443, 744
105, 179
307, 177
50, 725
5, 175
518
127
32
2, 687
2, 386
29,304
I, 266
57,01 8
6, 062
16, 809
32, 160
54.2
59, 774
10, 216
815
12, 588
5, 152
2,459
529
1, 610
38, 963
23, 276
84, 612
7, 253
134,224
18,237
67, 929 -- ---- ---74, 411 __ ____ ,. __ _
I, 502
1, 246
30
27
1
293
10, 500
210
1
635
70
33
49
2
61
66
4, 617
123
11 , 527
I, 066
1, 11 8
4, C07
232,398 176,470 197, 185 183, 418 177, 068 137, 980
124,096
--- --- - - - --- - - - --- - -Si
14
349
3, 316
2,635
23,833
58, 399
13,1 89
88
17
374
2, 483
2,317
15, 125
32, 578
15, 502
152
43
525
2, 8 29
2,806
14, 070
29, 522
lfi, 368
200
58
592
2,749
2,710
12, 448
24,008
10,688
243
105
694
3, 151
3, 047
11, 028
18, 610
7, 213
232
92
005
2,521
2, 503
7, 6ll
11, 83 0
4,422
7,4 51
777
386
317
37
1,722
18, 173
2, 324
66
3,292
744
398
59
29
2, 428
2, 09 1
17, 88 1
896
33,034
3, 622
12, 846
22, 009
5,059
289
432
270
33
I, 131
8, 781
2, 018
88
2, 537
793
398
69
80
5, 418
3, 699
14, 576
043
25, 666
3, 168
14, 791
I 7, 74 1
6, 040
6,325
168
779
452
9/i
1,- 078
4, 72 1
2,481
44 9
2,476
I, 98,5
871
207
1, 077
18, 858
10,284
22,009
3,224
24,4 10
5,019
7, 157
11 7
I, 106
796
11-1
962
2, 477
2,700
1, 251
2, 029
2, 382
6, 152
11 3
1, 058
893
122
792
I, 74 0
2, 170
223
94
508
2, 275
2,539
6, 197
9,290
3,177
--- - - - - -- --- - -- --- - -- - - 44, 170 101, 816 68, 484 65,3 15 53, 453 44, 091 29,8 16
24,3 03
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - 2, 866
605
124
HO
8
678
10,727
725
12
1, 004
214
87
19
J
198
229
6, 806
247
12, 457
1,374
2, 845
G, 144
247
701
381
82
1, 177
6,872
2, 452
190
2,744
1, 346
672
126
42 1
12, 000
6, 907
18, 723
1, 820
27,1 30
3, 958
21, 186
16, fi86
15, 143
7,824
1, 4 15
I, 175
2,596
23, 138
19, 623
2 , 325
6,688
22,839
6, 107
1,565
1, 837
2,257
1, 381
J, 185
2, 09
18,04 0
17, 06
21,736
4, 692
18, 161
4, 204
6, 100
85
1,060
I, 074
194
641
1, 280
2,006
1,707
1, 844
2, 276
1, 659
I, 309
3, 767
13,528
17,489
19, 778
4,011
16, 270
3, 71 5

-------- --- -- -·------- --- ----- ----- ---
�Table 27.-City Arr e.s l.s by Age, 1965- Continuccl
Age
0 ffense charged
21
22
23
24
25-29
30- 34
35- 39
40-44
45-49
50- 54
55- 59
6D-64
65 and
over
Not
known
94,259
8,267

- - -- ---------11--- --- --- --- --- --- - -- --- - -- -- - --- --- - -- --TOTAL ___ ___ __ ___ ___________________ _____________ 128,547 122, 262 108, 310 102,4 12 405,293 381, 739 415, 273 411 , 459 337, 625 274, 622 181, 672 114, 406
Criminal homicide:
(a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter_ _____ __
(b) Manslaughter by negligence ___ _________ __ ______
Forcible
rape ____ _________________ ______ ____ _____ ______
Robbery ___ __________________ ______ _____ __ ______ _____ __
Aggravated assault _______ _____ __ _____ ______________ ___
Burglary-breaking or entering _____________ ____ ___ ____
L arceny- theft _____ ___ __ __ ____ --- _______ ___ ____ ______ __
Auto theft_ ______ __ _____ _____ ___ ____ ___ __ __________ ____
- -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 234
106
545
2,383
2,824
5, 721
8,244
2,615
235
92
490
2, 183
2,715
5,271
7,323
2, 142
253
82
403
I , 844
2,649
4,479
6, 140
l, 607
245
76
329
I , 607
2,581
3,811
5,534
l , 349
946
249
1, 191
5,437
10,497
12, 702
19,657
3,880
765
173
776
3, 152
8,704
7,938
15, 007
2,220
682
145
481
2,113
7,681
5,416
13,097
1,605
525
130
324
I , 142
5, 9 6
3,432
10,379
1,066
- - - - - - - - - - - - --- - - - - - - - --
355
106
146
553
3,940
1, 889
7, 545
565
- -
265
90
96
284
2,749
1, 036
6,032
322
162
54
47
130
I , 564
587
3,760
130
105
38
26
60
816
255
2,4 14
48
127
48
25
52
880
I 8
2,569
40
5
3
11
35
22
75
10
- - - - - - - - - - -- - - -
Subtotal for above offenses ___ ___ ___ _____ ____ __ ___ 22,672 20,45 1 17, 457 15,532 54,559 38, 744 31,220 22,984 15,099 10,874
6,434
161
3, 762
3, 929

--- --- --- --- ---- --- --- --- --- --Other assaul ts. __ __ __ _________ _____ ___ __ __ ____ _________ -7,026
3,032
9, 420
5,947
6,598 26, 185 21 ,972 19,252 14,993
1,679
7, 161
6,694
1, 607
223
Arson ____ ____ ___ __ _____ _____ ____ ________ ___ _______ _____
234
193
155
151
97
71
42
68
80
52
66
26
29
1
Forgery an d counterfeiting ___ _______ ______ ______ _______ I , 213
2,427
I , 814
475
1, 169
I, 014
I , 001
3,858
2,961
976
260
111
86
6
Fraud _____ ____________ ________ __ ____ ___________ _______ l , 364
4, 154
2,362
359
24 1
l, 607
I, 554
5,803
5,003
I , 383
666
69
6,674
1,579
Embezzlement_ __ _____ __ _____ _________ ______ ________ ___
237
101
43
15
578
214
237
920
837
70 1
306
205
230
Stolen property; buying, receiv ing, possessing __ __ __ ____
461
315
156
85
62
1,270
957
65 1
612
I, 75 1
4
523
466
Vandalism ______ _____________ ______ _________ __________ _ 1, 647
172
1, 513
1, 109
501
257
167
27
932
2, 239
1,676
738
189
812
694
Weapons; carrying, possessing , etc ____ _____ _____ ________ 2, 130
476
489
4,219
1,446
44
1, 983
6,384
4, 916
3, 148
2,159
865
1,705
1,842
Prostitution and commercialized d ee _____ __ __ ________ _ 2,406
204
195
20
2, 704
1,553
355
3,814
889
645
2,261
6,860
3, 162
2,443
700
788
I , 570
5, 028
4,695
3, 690
1, 018
56
Sex offenses (except forcible rape and prostitution) _____ 1, 982
2, 188
6,043
l , 972
l , 730
1, 693
Narcotic drug laws __ ___ ______ ______ __ __________________ 2,619
122
142
13
2,045
249
8. 072
5,958
3,981
846
496
2,496
2,036
2,385
Gambling _____ ____ ____ _______ ____________ ________ __ ___ 2,434
4,260
4, 418
42
6,460
2,764 14 , 043 14, 505 14,458 l:l, 175 10,733
9,406
2,434
2,556
Offenses against family and children ________ _______ ____ 1,536
215
6, 103
24
186
7,738
6,83 1
4,453
2, 434
1, 78 1
l , 33 l
530
l, 776
1, 791
Driving nnder tbe inflnence ______ ________ ___________ __ _ 5,371
5,700
3,599
160
5, 734
5,319 24,226 25,629 29, 057 28,732 22, 842 17,697 10, 44
5,453
Liq nor laws __ _____ __ __ ____ _____ ___ ____ ___ ______ __ ______ 3, 710
1, 742
1,516
55
2,879
6,366
4, 452
1,820
6,067
5,851
6, 159
5, 288
2,799
2,092
Drunkenness __________________ ________ __ ______ ________ 26,643 26, 105 24, 250 24, 447 111 ,579 135,926 183, 928 212, 946 194, 553 Hi6, 790 11 5, 295 73,975 59, 440
4,742
Disorderly conduct_ _____ ________ _____ .____ ________ ___ __ 21, 274 19,412 16, 474 15,006 56,883 50,663 51, 279 46, 770 34,294 25,583 16, l83 10, 539
8,082
1, 463
Vagrancy ___ ______ ______________ _________ __ __ __ ________ 4, 042
4, 744
3,843
6,930
134
8,839 10,527 11, 526 LO, 389
9, 735
9, 722
3,621
2, 658
3. 078
All other offenses (except traffic) _______________ _____ ___
8, 193
4,837
4,904
993
538 15,513 13,226 12, 405 43. 987 35. 415 32. 736 27,681 19,319 14,160
Susp1c1on _________________________________ ____ _________ 16,
923
640
536
30
4, 908
3,992
3, 147
2, 232
3, 47
l. 508
2, 700
2, 307
7, 269
3, 029
Curfew and loitering law violat ions _____ _______________

----- --- -------- -------- -- ----- -------- -------- --- ----- --- --- -- ---- ---- ------ -- -- ------ -------Runaways ___ _________ ___ __ __ ______________ __ ___ __ ___
---
-- --- -----
--- - ---- ----- - - - - - - - ----

---- ------ -- ----- --- -- -- ---- -- ------ ----- --- ---- ---- ----- -- - -------- ------ --
�Table 28 . -City Arrests of Persons Unde r 15, Under 18, Unde r 21 , and Unde r 25 Years of Age, 1965
[3,083 cities over 2,500; 1965 estimated population 101,652,000]
Grand tot•!
all ages
TOTAL _____ _____ ___ ____ _____ _____ _________ _____ ___ ______ ____•.- _____
~~{~~l~g~!~~'.143.215.248.55 15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)-15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)143.215.248.55::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::=:=::::::::::
Su btotal for above offenses . ____ _________ _______ ____ ___ __ ___ __ ___ __ _
P
Nx
iif!!ll!Iiiillll:l;li\l\\ll\i :Ili l l il i l
1
Less than one-tenth of one percent .
18
15
18 Under 21 Under 25
21
25
8. 7
21. 1
- - - --
945, 24 1
1, 384,405
8,635
42, 134
73, 606
162, 281
338, 543
89, 095
102
24
455
5, 175
4, 063
43,055
HH,929
15,11 7
542
142
I , 946
13,236
11, 896
84,698
191,037
56, 675
1,240
433
3,753
21,183
19,985
IO<J, 534
230, 767
71, 487
2,207
789
5, 520
29,200
30, 754
128,816
258,008
79, 200
I. 7
1. 3
5. 3
12. 3
5. 5
26.5
31.0
17.0
8.8
7. 8
22. 5
31. 4
16.2
52. 2
56. 4
63. 6
722, 260
172,920
360, 172
458, 382
534,494
23. 9
49. 9
29, 333
3,332
2,458
I, 563
256
6, 079
59, 774
10,2 16
8 15
48, 742
3,647
5,682
4, 326
686
8, 474
65,27 1
17,092
5,338
18,298
12, 067
6,9 14
4,198
JO, 971
93,669
77, 456
154, 45 1
22,644
191,494
32,263
67,929
74,4 11
76,22 1
3, 913
10,079
IO, 430
I, 572
10,722
68, 898
24, 752
15,610
25. 675
21,603
17, 102
11 ,0 2
32,848
104,090
178,901
226,6 17
36,043
249, 176
43, 777
67, 929
74,4 11
6. 6
53. 5
2. 4
I. 2
16. 2
67. 8
10. 7
4. 2
4. 8
37. 0
77. 3
20. 9
2. 5
24. 5
11. 8
2. 3
1. 3
.8
27. 0
I. 6
16. 0
6. 5
30. 4
26. 4
100. 0
100.0
l= = ==I
V dal ism
" __ _____
Y, _________________
YI g,
g, __
possessmg_
--- -- --- -- - -- --- ---Wan
___ __ ___ ___- -____________________
__ --___ -_
eap ons: carr yJpg, possessing, etc __________ __ ____ __________ ______ ____ __ __
1
tutlon and commercialized vice __ _____ __ ______ __ ______ ________ __ __ __
S rosto!I~nses
(excep t forcible rape and prostitution) _____ ___ ______ _____ __ __
15
388, 168
4,470,560
R~b143.215.248.55 15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST) rape:::::: : : : ::::::::::::- - -- - -- - -- - - -- - - -- - - -- - -- - - -- - - -- - -- -- - Aggravated assaul t._ ______ _______
- - - - --- -
Under
Under
Under
Under
Under
____
,____
,_____
,_Under
____, ____
- -· 1,845, 945
1= == = 1
Criminal homicide:
(a) M urder and nonnegligen t manslaughter __ ____ ___ ___ _______ _____ __
6, 144
F (b) Manslaughter by negligence __ ___ ___ _____ ____ _________ ____ __ ______
1, 822
il~ii:~':·,,:~~'.+t t+::t:::::m::
Percentage
N umber of persons arrested
0 !Iense charged
180, 531
4, 912
23,053
37, 144
5, 310
16,434
77,297
48, 898
32,849
51,45 1
43, 527
108,602
40, 927
201, 334
144,465
1, 438, 075
528, 356
112, 432
441, 40 1
68, 962
67, 929
74,4 11
= 11,909
2, 628
546
454
46
2, 693
39,400
3,265
79
4, 83 1
1,028
5 18
127
32
2, 687
2, 386
29,304
1,266
57,018
6,062
10,809
32, 160
12,588
5, 152
2,459
529
1,6 10
38,963
23,276
84, 612
7,253
134,224
18,237
67, 929
74, 41 I
.9
16. 4
51.0
6. 7
.2
' 9. 4
2. 4
.5
.3
(')
1. 9
.2
5. 5
I. I
12.0
8. 8
24. 7
43. 2
=
31. 0
- ---
=
41. 3
20. 2
23. 8
43. 5
50. 3
27. 2
67. 5
68.2
so. 2
35. 9
43. 3
63. 0
69. 3
41. 8
70. 4
76. 2
88.0
27.0
74. 2
24. 6
I I. 6
12. 9
51. 6
84. 4
35. 0
16. 3
35. 6
27. 7
6. 4
10.3
5. 4
64 . 8
5. 4
29. 2
20. I
43. 4
46. 8
100.0
100. 0
79. 7
43. 7
28.1
29. 6
65. 2
89. 1
50. 6
47. 5
49. 9
49. 6
15. 7
27. I
16. 3
72. I
12. 4
42. 9
32. I
56. 5
63. 5
100. 0
100.0
- -- - --- - 74. 0
63. 5
- -- 42. 2
�Table 29.-City Arre s ts, Dis tribution by Se,~, 1965
[3,083 cities 01-cr 2,500; 196!i estimated populat ion 101,652,000]
N u mber of Persons Arrested
0 ffense charged
Total
Malo
Female
Percent
ma le
Percent of total
Percent
female
Total
- - - - - - -TOTAL. . . . .... . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . ... .... . . . ... . . . .....•. . . ........ .. . . ..... ......
Cri minal homicide:
(a) M urder and nonneglig_
e nt mauslaughteL ... .. .. . . . . . . . .... . . ... . . . . . ........ .
(b) M anslaughter by negligence. . .... ... ...... ... .... . . . . . . . ...... . . . . .... ...... .
F orcible rape ... •.... ... ... •. . . . . . ••.•.. ... . . . . . . •.. . . . . . . . . . ••.. ••...•. . . . . ..........
R obbery . ..... •. . . •. . ....... ... .... ... . ..... ..... ...... . . . .... .. . ...... . .. . .. . ... . ...
4, 470, 560
Other assaults . . . • . •. . .. •... ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . ... . . . . .. .. . ... . . .
Arson . . . . . ... . . . ... . . . ..... . . . . . . .. . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . .. . ... . . . . . . . ...•. . . ... . . . .... . . . . .
F orger y a nd counterfeiting . . . ... . . . •. . . . . . . •. . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . ...• . . . . . . .•. . . . . . . . . ...
Fraud . . . . . . . . . . .•. . .•.. ..•.. . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. .. ... . . . ............. . .. . . .. . ...
Em bczzlement. . ... . • .. . •. ... .... . . .... .... . . . . ........ . . ... . . . . . ..... . . . . . ..... ... ..
Stolen proper t y; buyi ng, receivi ng, possessing .... .• . . . . . . . . . . .•. . . . . . ... . .. ... . . . .. ..
Va ndalism . .. . . . . . . . . ..•. . . . . .....•.. . ... . . .. . ..... .... .. . .. . .. .. .............. . .. ...
i~-~~g143.215.248.55io<;;1 :,;b
1
0
J'o,~~!~~f:J'i~·e~t~icc~: : : : : : : : : : : ::::: ::: :: : : : : : : ::: : : . : : : : :: : : : : : ::::
Sex offenses (except forcible rape and prosLiLUtion) ........ . ....... . . . .............. . .
N arcotic d rug la ws . · · ···· · · ·-· -··--· - · · · · · · ···· ····· ·· · · · · · · · ·· · · ·· · · · · · · · · ·· · · ·· ····
Ga m bli ng . . . . . . . . . . .... . ... . . . .. · ·•··········· ····· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ··· · ·· · ·····
Offenses against famil y aod cbildren .. . . .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . .... . . . .. ... . . .
Driving under t he influence . · · · · - · - · ··· · · · · · · ···· · · · · · · · · · · · · · ···· · · ··· · · · · ·· ··· · · · ··
Liquor laws . . . . .. .... . . . . · · · · · ··· ·-·- ····· . ... . . • .. · - . .... . . . ... .. ... . ... .. ......•...
D runkenness .. . ... . ... . . . . . . . .... ... ... •. . . .... .. .. ... . ..... . .. . .. . . . . .. . . ... . . .. •. . .
Disorderl y cond uct . . . ... . . . . ... . . . . . .... . . . . . ... . ...•.. ................•.... . . .. .. . . .
Vagrnncy. . . . . . . . . . •. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . • . .. . .......... . . . . . . . ......... .... . . . ....... . . . .
t ,\~g}:l143.215.248.55.143.215.248.55.s~~. '.15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST): .t:.a.~ .c}_-~:::: : : ::: : :: : : : : : :: : : : : :: : : : : : : :: : : : ::: : : : : : ::: : :: ::
Curfew and loitering law viola I ions . ... . . . . ... . ........... . ........... . .....•.. .. . . . .
R u na ways····· · · · · · · · · · · - · ······ · · · · · ·········· ··· · · · · · ·· ·· ... . .....•.... . •..... .... .
1
Recause of rounrlin~. 1lw percentages mny
~ l .11>..;~ 1han 0 11P-1r n th of om•
1,1·rc·rn 1
110 1 adrl
to 101n l.
542, 246
87, 9
12. 1
100. 0
1=====11=====1=====1= = =1,== =i==~=i
2,244
10,575
6,186
7 , 533
3, 726
8 1. g
89. 8
100. 0
94. 7
85. 6
96. 2
76. 8
95. 8
6 19, 700
J02, 560
160,591
4,508
18, 626
29,283
4, 3 3
15, 062
72, 4(i2
4:), 574
7,352
43, 4 11
37, 697
JOO, 0 9
36,424
187,865
126,998
I, 327, 0-14
460, 295
IOI, 692
374, 8(i3
6 1,249
19,940
404
4,427
7, 861
927
I, 372
4, 835
3, 324
25, 497
8,040
,'j,830
6, 144
1, 822
8,635
42, 134
73,606
162,281
338, 643
89,095
5,033
1, 637
, 635
39, 890
63, 031
156,095
260, 01 0
85, 369
722, 260
180,531
4, 912
23, 053
37, 144
5,310
16, 434
77, 297
48, 898
32, 849
51, 451
43, 527
108, 602
40, 927
201, 334
144, 465
1,438, 075
528, 356
112,432
441,401
68, 962
67, 929
74,411
143.215.248.55 15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)t:i~~b~!~;i ~~.ii~"terfnii::::::::::=:=:=::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
Larceny-theft. . .... . . •.•.. ...... . . .... . . .. . . . . . . . . ... . . .. . . . .. . .. . ... .... .. . ... .. . . .
Au to t heft . . . . . . . • . . ........ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . ...... . • . . . . . . . ... . . ..... . ....... . . . ,_____
Su btotal for a bove offenses ... . ... . . . . . . . . . .. ..... . . . . . . . . ..... . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . .
3, 928,314
I= = =
5.\ 3.~7
37, 789
J, 111
185
8, 5 13
4,503
13, 469
17,467
11 l, 031
68, 0fil
IO, 740
6li, 538
7, 7 13
12,572
36, 622
I .J
10. 2
ialc
- - -- -
=
100. 0
.I
(' )
5. 3
.g
14. 4
3. 8
23. 2
4. 2
l. 6
3.6
7. 6
2. 0
85. 8
14. 2
16. 2
89. 0
9 1. 8
80.
78. 8'
82. 5
91. 7
93. 7
93. 2
22, 4
84. 4
86. 6
92. 2
89.0
93. 3
87. 9
92.3
87. J
90. 4
84. 9
88. 8
81. 5
50.
11.0
8. 2
19. 2
21. 2
17. 5
8. 3
6. 3
6. 8
77. 6
15. 6
13. 4
7. 8
11. 0
6. 7
12. l
7. 7
12. 9
9. 6
15. I
11. 2
l .5
49. 2
4. 0
.1
.5
.8
.I
.4
J.7
J. l
.7
J. 2
1. 0
2.4
.9
4. 5
3. 2
32. 2
l l. 8
2. 5
9. 9
J. 5
1. 5
1.7
Female
=
- -100. 0
.1
(' )
.2
1
.2
(')
.2
1.0
1. 6
4. 0
6. 6
2. 2
.4
2. 0
I. I
14. 5
.7
15. 8
18. 9
4. 1
.1
.5
.7
.I
3. 7
.l
.8
]. 4
.2
.3
.9
- -- - - - - -
.4
1. 8
l. 2
.2
I. I
1.0
2. 5
.9
4. 8
3. 2
.6
J. 6
I. 4
4. 7
1. 5
LI
I. 6
.8
2. 5
3. 2
20. 5
12. 6
2. 0
12. 3
1. 4
2. 3
1.0
6.8
33. S
l 1. 7
2.G
9. 5
�Table 30.- City Arrest T rends by Sex, 1964- 65
[2,647 cities over 2,500; 1965 est im ated population 94,084,000]
Females
Males
· O ITense cbnrged
1964
TOTAL___ __ _____ __________________ ___ _
Criminal homicide:
(a) Murder and non negligent manslaughter ____________ ___ ____ ___ ____
(b) Manslaughter by negligence _________
Forcible rape __ _________ __________ ____ ___ ___ _
Robbery __ __ ___ ______ ________ __________ ____ _
Aggravated assault_ _______ ____ _____________ _
Burglary-breaking or enterin g____ __ ____ ____
Larceny-theft_ __ _____ ________ __________ ____
Anto theft_ ___ --- -- - -- --------- -- - -- ---- -- -Subtotal for above offenses __ __ ___ ___ __
143.215.248.55'.;~ assaults ________ ___ ____ ---::::: ::::::- _
Forger y and counterfeiting _________ _____ _::
~~b~izie,,;eiii:: :::::::: :_ -----------------Stolc1~ propert y; bu yin g, receiving,
-pQS:-
v!~'a'!\1~m~:::::::::::::--------------------
Weap~m s;_ carry ing, possessing, etc __ __ _::: : ::
Prost1Lut1on and commerc ialized vice
Sex offenses (except forcible rape a nd p~osii:-
~;~~1\1f~~:l~,~~::: ::: : :::::--- --- --::::::
Offenses against famil y a nd children
-- -Driving under the influence _______ - ---- -- -
,~,143.215.248.55===:


=:=:=:::::::=:= :: _________{?~irt~~{e


isorderly conduct _____ _____ ___ __ ____ __ ___ _:
1
agrancy ___ _-- - -- --- --- --- - ------ -- ---- -- -All other offenses ( except traffic) ____ ___ ___ __
Suspicion (not included in totals) ____ _______
Curfew and loitering law violations __ _______
Ru na,vnys. ____________ __ ___________________
--
-
Under 18
Total
-
· 1965
P ercent
change
1964
1965
Percent
change
.
Total
1964
1965
Under 18
Percent
change
147, 202
+8.5
+3.8
-10. 5
34
15
35
16
+2, 9
+6. 7
3, 483
+5.1
+6. 1
+ 10_.3
- 5.0
1, 299
2, 69 1
31,253
2,383
1,428
2,775
35,664
2,278
+o.9
+3. 1
+ 14. 1
-4.4
18,471
380
4, 139
7,410
896
+ 1.0
+.3
- 2.0
+2. 1
- 21. 2
3,808
184
466
696
18
170
479
258
40
- 7.6
+2.8
- 62. 9
+ 122.2
1,284
4, 138
2, 868
23,265
1,177
4,359
3, 131
25,033
-8. 3
+5. 3
+9.2
+7.6
392
2,643
330
394
359
2, 660
320
593
- 8.4
+.6
- 3.0
+50.5
8,78 1
5,185
8,682
4, 312
12,585
15,456
105,301
62,322
JO, 630
60, 486
8, 255
11, 605
28,253
7, 450
5,553
8,305
4,098
12, 487
16,042
I OI, 928
62, 777
9,637
61, 738
6,680
JI, 481
34, 122
-15.2
+ 7. 1
- 4.3
- 5.0
- .8
+3.8
-3.3
+.7
-9. 4
+ 2. 1
-19. 0
-1. 1
+ 20. 8
3,606
414
73
131
57
4, 314
1,943
JO, 716
751
26,505
1,814
JI, 605
28,253
3, 138
555
75
156
66
4,577
- 15. 1
+34. 1
+2. 7
+19. 1
+ 15.8
+6. 1
+ 12. 5
+7.0
+20.1
- .5
- 5.3
- 1. 1
+20.8
+ 2.2
485, 080
498, 727
+2. 4
454
113
I , 668
11, 480
9,386
72,680
146,575
53,264
488
115
1,876
12,109
9, 912
76,597
142,018
51,039
+ 7.5
+1.8
+ 12.5
+5.5
+5. 6
+5.4
-3. 1
-4.2
1,007
190
1,045
170
9,518
5,437
66,668
3,667
JO, 001
5, 802
21,582
2,571
1,952
2, 143
143
23,295
2,882
1,832
1, 23 1
210
+ 12. 1
- 6. l
- 42.6
+46.9
18,294
379
4,224
7,260
1, 137
+ 1.6
+6. 1
+7.6
- 30.6
5,250
48,968
8,694
198
5, 193
51,502
0,253
216
-1.1
+5.2
+6.4
+9. 1
-7.3
+ 12. 3
- .3
- 6. 0
+ 1.1
+10.8
- 1.8
+ 7.5
- 14.8
+.6
- 21.5
+2. 3
+6.9
9,221
3, 001
2,43 1
397
I, 362
27,545
17, 124
62,428
6,5 12
98,055
14,54 1
49,781
32,273
8,382
4,224
2, 292
308
1, 407
30,946
19, 142
67,054
6,000
98,442
13, 455
50,918
34, 500
- 9.1
+40.8
- 5. 7
- 22. 4
+3.3
+ 12.3
+ 11. 8
+7.4
-6.9
- .5
-7. 5
+2. 3
+ 6.9
+.3
4,360
I , 592
7,932
36,973
56,520
139,997
250,588
81, 900
4,719
1,504
8, 125
37, 798
59, 237
145,967
24 1,519
80, 129
+8. 2
- 5.5
+2.4
+2.2
+4.8
+4.3
- 3.6
- 2.2
579,862
578, 998
-. 1
149, 124
3, 662
17, 745
28, 385
5, 160
148, 5JI
4,160
17, 362
27, 778
4,252
- .4
+ 13.6
-2. 2
- 2. 1
-1 7. 6
13,606
62,318
30, 540
10,379
13,817
66, 125
42,543
7,208
44,068
32,036
97,980
36, 276
170, 431
105, 810
I, 257,975
302, 946
99,478
343,614
60, 444
49,781
32, 273
40,834
35,988
97, 645
34,091
173, 354
117, 214
I, 235,393
422,422
84,719
345, 700
54,520
50, 918
34,500
-
- - -- - - - -
- - - - - - -- - -- - .5
294, 154
295,620
- - -- =
+ 7.9


-
--
- --
135, 818
713, 443
3,583, 532
Percent
change
1965
- - - - - - -- - - - - ---- -
698, 151
3,572,449
1964
- ---
-- ------- ---------- -------554
--- ---------------- -- ---------576
+4. 0
2,093
+2.2
2,047
---88,534
--
73,510
- - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - 42, 772
+ u .9
38, 229
96, 113
+8. 6
- --= +16. 9
4,453
2, 185
11 ,470
902
26,371
1,718
11,481
34,122
�Table 31. - City Arrests by Race, 1965
[3,069 cities ornr 2,500; 1965 estimated populat ion 92,880,000]
Total arrests
Race
O fiense charged
Total
White
Negro
All others
(includ es
J a panese
Chinese
Indian
race un-
known )
--TOTAL ________ ____ ____ ___ ____ _ 4, 234, 008
2, 815, 121 1, 278, 817
97, 422
Criminal homicide:
(a) M urder and nonnegligent
manslau ghter _____ ___ - - - - - (b) Manslaugh ter by negligence_
Forcible rape __ _-- -- ---- -- ---- --- ---.
Robber y_ .. __ _------ -- --- -- - -- - - - - -- Aggravated assault ____ __ _________ __ __
Burglary- breaking or entering ____ __
Larceny- theft_ __ _____ ____ _-- - - - - - - Auto theft . __ _______________ ____ . ____
5, 425
1, 770
7,567
36, 545
60, 418
151, 825
323, 764
82, 125
1,978
1, 340
3,247
14, 247
25,996
93,098
214, 633
54,805
3. 349
4ll
4, 198
21,64 7
33, 520
55,875
103, 298
25, 187
27
7
~5
237
357
788
2, 051
581
Subtotal for above offenses _____
669, 439
409, 344
247,485
4,083
96,420
3,389
15,992
27,463
3, 848
68, •184
1, 053
4,767
7,215
717
927
12
101
101
11
8,364
56, 185
19,96 1
5, 151
15, 446
25, 028
58
222
194
11,968
17,400
137
33, 461
16,869
17,855
23,871
155,5 10
109, 111
997,083
282, 166
76,976
294 , 106
47, 528
50,573
57, 078
12,974
11,816
62, 196
16, 225
35,309
29,466
342,475
173,8 15
26,977
125,597
20, 567
14, 403
176
70
25
228
2,102
2, 308
74,213
4, 767
2,4 76
3,394
518
482
817
Other assaults __ ___ _----- - --- __ ____ . . 167, 849
Arson ____ ____ ____ -- - - - -- ---- ________ _
4,494
Forgery and coun terfeitiug ______ ___ __
20,94 1
Fraud ____ _____ ___ ________ __ ___ ______
34, 991
Embezzlement ___ ___ ___ . ____ _____ . __ _
4, 589
Stolen property ; buying, receiv ing,
possessing ._ . __________ __ ____ _______
13, 743
Vandalism .. ___ _____________ ___ __ ____
72, 540
W capons; carrying, possessing, etc __
45, 744
Prostitution and commerciali zed
vice _______ ___________ ______________
29, 748
Sex offenses (except forcible rap e
and prostitut ion) __ ____ ____________
47,368
Narcotic drug laws ____ _____ ________ __
29, 322
Gambling ____ ___ ____ ---- __ ___ __ . . ____
83, 674
Offenses against family, aud children .
40, 594
D ri ving under the influence _______ ___ 194, 077
Liquor laws __ ____ _______ ____________ _
142, 052
Vagrancy ______ ______ ___ __ - -- -- - -- - - -
107, 415
427, 020
68, 799
67, 134
73, 558
D ru nkenness- __ ________ __ ______ . ___ . 1, 422, 446
Disorderl y conduct ____ ___ ___ ·---- - -- 466,47 1
All other offenses (except traffic) ____
Susp1c10n _____ -- ------------ ----- -- ..
Curfew and loitering law violations ..
Runaways ____ _____ ·- ---------- ·-----
126
14, 251
1, 230
---
2. 822
38, 596
4
1
2
20
21
135
296
10,5
64
10
83
389
51 l
1,870
3. 271
1,41 6
584
71G14
2
83
1
15
20
1
I. 90·1
38
57
181
10
5
27
16
18
30
23
147
630
522
11
28
204
36
24
176
3
41
29
135
51
30
142
73
49
392
9
130
67
4 1l
86
l28
264
5
33 1
3
1
2
5
13
59
215
31
- - 329
--31
1
9
11
11
52
58
74
648
494
3. 030
258
985
1, 071
, 129
5. .ssn
828
3, 5 17
170
I. 293
I , 2S11
�Table 31.-City Arre sts by Race, 1965- Continued
Arrests under 18
Race
0 ffe nse cha rged
C hi-
J a pa -
All others
(includ es
nese
nese
race un-
Total
White
Negro
India n
know n )
- - - -- -- - - -- - ---1- - - -1- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -TOTAL ____ _______ _____ ___ ___ __
C r im inal homicide :
( a) M urder a nd non negligen t
m an sla ugh ter _________
(b) M a nslaughter by neglige~ce~
For cib ley rape_--- -- --________
- - --------Robber
____ ________
__ ___---__ _
Aggrava ted assa ul t_ _______ ____ ____ __
B urgla r y-br eak ing or en ter ing ______
L a r ceny -theft __ __ _______ __ ___ _-- - __
Auto theft ______ ________ ___ ___ __ ___ __
905, 086
426
135
1, 684
10, 920
9, 720
79, 939
183, 819
53, 429
S ub total for a b ove offenses ____
340, 072
Oth er assa ul ts __-- ---- __ __- ---. - - - - -A rson __ --- - - - -- -- --- - --- --- -- - . -- - -For ger y a nd counterfeit ing _______ ___
Frau d __- ___-- ___ __ __ _ -- - - - - - - . - - - - - .
Embezzlemen t_ __ __ ______ ____ - - - _. - Stolen proper ty ; b u y ing, receiv i.ng,
possess ing __ . _______ . ___ . _____ ____ _
Va n d a lis m __ ___ ___ ___ ______ ______ __
\\"ea pons ; carr y ing, possessing, e t c __ _
Pros t i t u t ion a nd com merci a lized
\ice.------ - ---- --- - -- ------ -- ----Sex offen ses (except for cible rape and
prostitu t ion) ______ __ _______ ____ ___


-,/arcotic drug laws __ _______ ___ _- -- . .


Gamb ling __ --- ---- - - -------- ---- - - -Offenses aga inst fam ily a nd childr en .
D r i,, ing under the infl uence _ _____ ___
Liquor laws ___ ____ ____ __ __ _______ ___
Dru nke n ness_ .. ________ __ - - - - - - - . - - D isor derl y condu ct ___ ._. ___ - - - - - - - - -
26,446
3, 111
2, 266
1, 487
228
Vagrancy __ _____-- - - -- -- -- ---- -- - - - - -
A ll oth er offenses (except traffi c) ___ __
S us p icion .. ___. _._._._. ________ - - - -- C urrew a n d loiter ing law v iola tions __
Runaways __ _________________ __- - ___ _
5, 716
56, 474
9, 481
=
633, 018
=
252, 957
135
100
503
2,928
4,092
49, 964
122,854
36, 632
276
33
1, 139
7,816
5, 462
28, 185
57,625
15, 327
14, 027
2, 465
1, 768
1, 038
179
II , 843
607
462
419
45
3,587
45, 630
5, 197
1,998
10, 269
4, 104
5, 625
- --
433
- --
1 - -------

---- --- --1
4
25
43
343
854
266
996
12, 057
- -- - -- 1
2
-2
44
11 9
27
2
3
87
176
81
5
95
6
19 - - - -- -- 2
1
15
1
1
1
14
1
37
147
118
I , 316
2, 191
1, 096
- -- - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - -4, 920
21 7, 208
11 5, 863
I , 536
195
350
- - - - - - - - - - - -=
785
316
465
11, 755
3, 869
2, 107
504
1, 576
38, 622
23, 013
80, 724
6, 473
13 1,582
18, 103
67, 134
73, 558
7, 729
2, 707
3, 71 6
996
I , 463
521
390
l, '129
35,650
18,898
53, 411
4, 558
95, 757
12, 902
50,573
57, 078
Ill
11 3
2, 254
3,082
26, 186
1,599
33, 691
5, 017
14,403
14, 251
l
461
32
16
27
2
2
22
7
10
18
JO
96
400
137
4
19
13
4
3
3 - - - - -- - 22
2
459
6
1
846
18
320
4
60
617
52
121
52
482
817·
58
12
6
9
275
143
111
15
4
13
43
80
1
331
74
238
182
776
209
1,385
62
! , 293
1, 280
23
135
26
2

--- --- ---10-
127
�Table 31.-City Arrests by Race, 1965- Continued
Arrests 18 and ov er
R ace
0 ITense charged
Total
TOTAL .. --- · - -·- ---- --- - - --·- · 3, 328,922
White
Negro
2, 182. 103 I , 025, 860
India n
91, 797
J a panese
All others
(includ es
race unknown)
797
1, 826
26. 539
3
4
50
g
Chinese

- --===
Criminal homicide:
(a) M urder and nonnegligent
manslaugbter _____ __ . - _- -- _
(bl Manslaughter by negligence_
Forcible rape.·--- - -- --- --- ·-- -- ---·.
Robbery ___. . . - - . -- - - -- -- --- - - - . - -- .
Ag1;rarntcd assaulL - · --- ---- - --· ....
Burglary- breaking or entering ____ __
Larceny-theft __ ____ ____ ------ -- -.. Auto t heft. ______ __________ ___- . --- . -
4, 999
I, 843
3. 073
26
I , 240
I, 635
378
7
5, 883
2, 744
3,059
31
25, 626
11 , 319
13,831
21 2
21. 904
50, 698
28,058
314
71,886
43, 134
27, 690
445
139, 945
91, 779
45,673
1, 197
28, 696
18, 173
9,860
31 5
1 - - - - -11- - - - -1- - - - -1- - -Subtotal for above offenses __ _. 329, 367
192, 136
131,622
2, 547
1
1
3
15
96
4
2
18
18
48
120
24
1. 080
320
134
234
2,694
11
46
242
393
5,=;.1

=
1==56,==1

=
=26= ==1==~
=
Other assaults______ ______ _____ __ ____ = 141, 403 1
82,393
641
832
68
I. 44 ;3
Arson__ _____ __ ________ _____ __ ______ _
1, 383
924
446
6
1
6
Forger y a nd counterfeiting____ ___ __
18,675
14, 224
4, 305
82
9
14
41
Fraud _____ ______ ___ _____ __ ___ _______
33, 504
26, 425
6, 796
99
11
19
154
Embezzlement_ _______ ___ _______ ____
4, 361
3, 669
672
11
1
8
Stolen property; buying, receiving,
possessing___ _____ __ __ __ ______ __ ___
8, 027
4, 777
3, 153
35
3
8
51
Va ndalism ____ __ ___ __ _______________
16, 066
10,555
5, 177
87
5
12
230
W eapons; carrying, possessing, etc___ 36, 263
14,764
20, 924
168
9
13
385
Prost itu tion and commercialized vice.
28,963
11 , 652
16. 935
136
11
27
202
Sex offenses (except forcible rape
and prostitution)- -- - · - - -- - · --·-- ·35, 613
25, 732
9, 258
157
32
61
373
N arcotic drug laws_ _______ _______ ___
25, 453
14,162
10, 820
57
20
43
351
Gambling ___ _______ ___ --- ------· - ·-Bl , 567
17, 334
60, 733
22
176
383
2. 919
Offenses against fam ily and children.
40, 090
23, 481
16, 11 4
225
3
9
258
Drivmg undertbe influence _____.... 192,501
154, 081
35, 196
2, 0 0
39
130
975
Liquor laws _-- --- - --- - -- - - - -- ---~--- 103, 430
73, 461
27,212
1, 849
23
52
833
D run kenness_·-- - - ----- - -- --------·- I, 399, 433
97 , 185
339, 393 73, 367
134
407
7, 947
Disorderl y cond uct ____ _____________ _ 385, 747
228, 755
147, 629
4, 447
33
73
4, 810
Vagrancy ···------------- - ----------- 100, 942
72, 41 8
25,378
2,4 16
26
85
619
All other ofTca ses (except traffic) _____ 295, 438
198, 349
91,906
2, 777
90
184
2. 132
Suspicion . ___ - ---- - -- --- - ---------·
50,696
34,626
15, 550
397
11
4
108
Curfew and loitering law· violations __ -- -- -----Runaways _________ __ _--- - ------ -- --- -- - -----·.
0
128
�Tabl e 32. - Suburban Arrest Tre nds, 1964- 65
[1,281 agencies ; 1965 estimated popul ation 25,896,000)_
Number of persons nrrested
Offense charged
TOTAL __ ·-- ----- ....... ... _.... . .. . .. . . ....... .. .. . . .. ...... .
Criminal homicide:
(a) M urder and nonnegligcnt manslaughter .. .. ... ... . . . .. •. . .. .
(b) Manslaughter by negligence ......... . . .. .. . . . . . . ..... .. .. .. .
!143.215.248.55;lt~~:~;~1=t~~= : : : : :: : : :: : : : : : : : : : : : . : : : ::: : : : : :: :: :: : :::: :: ::
Burglar y-break ing or entering ..... . ... ... . . . . . . . . . . ...••.... . . . . .•.
x143.215.248.55erli~t.1:~r.t: : : : : : : : :: : : : : :: : · · ::::::: :: : :: : : ·:: : : : : : : : :: : : :: : : : : :
Snbtotal for above offenses . . ...•... .. .... ... . . . . . , .. . ..... ... .
1964
1965
568, 818
594, 582
623
/i22
1,272
3,4 17
8, 415
28, 666
60,508
15,047
650
473
1, 340


i, 928


9,474
20,583
62,600
14 , 700


118,470
122, 766
l= = == I = = = =
27,367
28, 165
942
1, 234
4,320
4,447
7,645
7,952



===··· · · =· =========== ==




I , 689
1, 804
Stolen J)roperty; buying, receiving, possess ing..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... .
2,367
2,425
...
.
.
..
.
.......
.
.
....
...
..........
.
Vandal!sm
15,
837
17,588
Weapons : carry ing, possess ing, etc ___ ________ ----- ---- -- - -- -- ------5, 327
5,581
Prost itut ion a nd commercialized vice ... . .. ... . ···· ·· ··· · · · · · ····•··
745
827
Sex offonses (except forcible rape and prostitntion) ::: :: : : : : : : :: : ::::
7, 773
7,4 26
2,070
3,001
3, 794
3, 203
10,480
10,852
as,626
38,578
24, 846
28,918
111 , :i
114,483
60,183
64 , JOO
R, 711
7,788
All other offenses (except t raffic) ... . . . ... . . . ...... . ...... .... . . . . . .
87, 608
89, 137
Suspicion (not included in totals) .... . ..•. . . . . ... . ................. ·
11 ,487
10,900
Curfew and loiteri ng law violations . . .. . ....... .... . . . . . ' . . . . . ..... .
13,070
15,767
Runaways ... . . . ... . ........ ..•. •.. . ... . . .• . . . ... .. . .. . .. .. . ..•.. . ..
14 ,459
17, 94 0
tiiz~::;i 143.215.248.55i143.215.248.55i143.215.248.55 15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)==:::=:=:::::
ii~tf~~::~it(~ i ~~:~:~::: : :
18 years of age anr! over
Under 18 years of age
Total all ages
Percent
change
+7.9
392, 610
404, 484
+ 3. 0
+16. 7
- 37. 0
+ 4.2
+21.0
+ 12.8
+2. 1
+4.6
-3. 7
581
476
1,080
2,703
7, 130
12,383
25,065
5,059
610
444
1,140
3,021
8, 035
12,959
25,528
5, 089
- 6. 7
+ 5.6
+11 . 8
+1 2. 6
+4. 7
+1. 8
+.6
65,940
+3. I
54 ,486
56,826
+ 4.3
3,989
919
4Jl
24.,
37
953
15, 291
l , i 50
18
2,205
fi07
158
144
414
10,867
4,773
17, 182
714
29, 714
2,960
15, 767
17,940
+15. 3
+ 38.2
+3.3
+ 23. 7
+ 54.2
- 6. 9
+ 9. 2
+1 2.3
+ s o. o
- 3.2
+69.1
- 30. 4
- 41.0
+ 8.9
+12. 1
+12. g
+ 21. 7
-4. 2
- 4. 2
- 15. 6
+20.6
+24. I
23,907
2i7
3,922
7,447
l, 665
1, 343
1,839
a, 768
733
5,432
2,3 11
3,567
10, 236
3ll, 246
15, 155
107, 656
46,065
7,966
56, 58g
7,979
24,176
315
4, 036
7,707
1, 767
I , 472
2, 297
a,831
809
5, 161
2,994
3, 045
10,708
3S, 164
18, 051
100, 71 0
46,918
7, 074
59,423
7,940
+1.1
+13. 7
+2.9
+3.5
+ 6. l
+ 9.6
+ 24.9
+1. 7
+10. 4
- 5.0
+29.fi
- 14. 6
+4. fi
- .2
+19.1
+1.0
+ 1. 0
-11.2
+4. 5
176,208
190, 098
+5. 8
- 0.4
+5. 3
+15.0
+ 12.6
+ 3.2
+ 3.5


-2, 2


42
46
192
714
1,276
16, 283
35,443
9,988
40
20
200
907
1, 439
16,624
37,072
9,620
+ 3. 6
63,984
-1 5.G
+3.5
- .I
+16.4
+2.3
+6.5
-10.6
+ 1. 7
- 5. 1
+20.6
+24. l
3,460
6fi5
398
19S
24
1,024
13,998
l , 559
12
2,34 1
359
227
244
aso
9,69 1
4, 227
14, ll S
745
31,019
3,508
13,076
14,459
Percent
change
1965
1965
+ 2.0
+31.0
+2. 0
+4.0
+6.8
+ 2.5
+ ll .l
+4. 8
+ 11.0
- 4. 5
+34. 9
Percent
1964
1964
change
+s. o
+5.0
- .5

-------- ------------ --- ------------- ·-- -- ----------- --------- -
�Table 33.- Suburban Arrests by Age, 1965
fl , 538 agencies; 1965 estimated population 33,874,000]
Grand
Offense charged
all
Ages
under
ages
15
tota l
Ages
under
18
Ages 18
and
over
Age
10 and
under
TOTAL__ ____ ________ ______ _____ __________________
Criminal homicide:
(a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter __ ___ ___
(b) Manslaughter by negligence__ ____ __ ____ ____ ____
Forcible rape __ _______ ________ __ _-- -- - --- ---- ___ ______ __
Robbery ___ __ ___ _________ _____ ___ ___ ___ __ __ ___ _________
Aggravated assault_ ____ _____ ___ __ _-- --- ------ ------ - _-Burglary-breaking or entering __ ____ _____ ____ ____ ____ __
Larceny- theft__ ________ ___ ____ ________ ____ _________ ___
Auto theft__ ___ ___ -------------------------------------Su btotal for above offenses ___ ___ _____ ___ _____ ___ _
0 tber assaults ____ _____ ___ ______ ___ ____ ____ _____ __ __- - - Arson ___ ____ _____ __ ______ ____________ ___________ ______ _
Forger
y and
counterfeiting
________
-- --- -- ____
________
____ ___ ______
_____ _______
_________-----__ __ __--_
F raud ___
Em bezzlement_ ______ _____ ______ _------ - -- ---- - -- ---- - -Stolen pro perty; buying, receiving, possessing __ ________
VandaliEm _____ ___________ _____ __ ___ _______ ___ _________
'i-Veapons; carrying, possessing, etc____ _______ ___________
P rostitu tion and commercialized vice __ ____ ___ ___ __ __ ___
Sex offenses (except forcible rape and prostitution) ___ __
Narcotic drug laws __________ ________ __ ____ _______ ____ __
Gam bling ________ __________ ______ ___ ____ ____ ___ ______ __
OfTenses agaiust family ijUd children ________ ____________
Dri ving uuder the in fluence _____ ________ __ __ __ ________
Liquor laws ___ __ ___ ___ _.____ ________ __ ____ ____ _____ _____
D run ken ness __ ____ ________ _______ _____ ___ _____ ______ ___
D isorderly conduct__ _____ ______ ___ ____________ ______ ___
Vagrancy ___ ___ _________ ____________ __--- ----- -- -- -- - -All oth_er offenses (except traffic)_ _________ ____ ___ ______
Susp1c10n __ _____ ______ ______ __ ____ ____________ ________ _
Curfew and loitering law violations ______ ___ ________ ____
Runaways ___ ___________ __ __ _____ ___ ___ ___ ___________ ..
766, 621
- --
13-14
15
16
17
18
19
20

-------------------92, 940
243, 160
523, 461
15,260
951
709
1,801
5, 122
12, 325
37, 977
77, 749
18, 799
14
6
35
277
485
9, 754
23, 505
2, 907
73
37
253
1, 10 1
1, 759
21,304
45,474
12,046
878
672
I , 548
4, 02 1
10,566
16, 6i3
32, 275
6, 753
1, 562
3, 823
55
155,433
36, 983
82, 047
73,386
5,541
37, 729
I , 592
5, 685
ll, 439
2, 135
3,184
22,467
6, 979
977
9, 244
4, 344
5, 013
15, 831
48, 312
35, 358
138, 316
Bl, 175
10, 517
114,419
15, 590
18, 186
22, 696
1, 727
029
103
74
7
447
12,339
774
3
1, 075
15 1
21
32
5
792
475
6, 059
131
16, 174
I, 104
3, 691
8,944
5, 364
I , 15
483
332
39
I , 166
19, 369
2,082
32, 365
434
5, 202
11,107
2,096
2,0 18
3,008
4,807
952
6, 424
3,589
4, 821
15,624
4 7, 839
22, 363
132, 851
59, 677
9, 540
74, 701
10, 477
203
429
5
4
- --
11-12
25
2,820
755
192
207
473
12, 095
5, 465
21, 493
977
39, 718
5, 113
18, 186
22, 696

------------
1
4
l
25
70

----
21,719
2
l
3
52
1-0
2, 270
6, 299
279
46,298
54, 766
49, 156
43,887
31, 216
26, 114
ll
l
31
200
307
5,922
13, 383
2, 573
17
3
46
20
315
4, 130
8,035
3, 475
21
16
78
291
466
3, 984
7, 71 6
3,489
21
12
94
325
493
3,436
6,218
2,175
30
47
201
483
684
3,098
5, 058
l, 644
27
45
141
389
536
2,020
2,863
914
40
33
121
351
536
1,468
2,220
688
1, 100
274
77
57
5
303
5, 596
518
3
708
126
19
27
5
734
44 1
4,205
99
9, 356
778
2, 954
6, 148
9 13
99
96
62
2
212
3,043
421
7
542
119
33
40
28
1, 844
955
3, 754
172
7,703
774
3, 767
5,483
1,368
62
137
86
21
232
2, 471
464
6
642
187
59
51
137
4, li7
l , 778
5,565
307
8, 361
l, 655
5, 490
5, 449
1, 356
68
147
110
9
275
l , 516
423
9
561
298
79
l , 769
64
346
213
30
286
748
545
30
471
32-3
100
339
718
6,992
3, 567
6, 722
821
6, 6'13
l , 915
1,361
52
253
229
41
221
441
368
29
394
300
67
334
807
5, 202
2,931
4,680
584
4,986
I, 001
1, 329
35
270
292
82
138
3 14
288
30
362
262
76
300
956
3, 528
2, 9 8
3,679
469
4,246
9 15
- - - - - - - - - --- - -- - -- - - 9,014 22, 428 16, 229 16,061 12, ii4 11, 245
6,935
5, 465
- - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -424
226
21
13
2
27
3,172
70
117
3,571
186

- - ----- -148
210
5
20
l
1
2
3

-------10
9
l , 081
16
3, 127
118
130
I, 162
55,961
- - - --- - - - - - - ------- --
48
25
I , 673
16
3, 691
208
607
I , 634
4
303
6, l 2
2,257
5, 220
367
7,480
I. 5 0
5,238
2,820

--- ----- ---- ----------- ------- - --------
�Table 33 . -Suburban A rrest s by Age, 1965-Continued
[1,538 agencies; 1965 estimated population 33,874,000]
Age
Offense charged
21
22
23
24
25-29
30- 34
35- 39
40-44
45-49
50-54
55- 59
6()-64
--::-- - -- - - - -- - - -- - -- - 1 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -TOTAL_____________ ______ __ ___ ___ ___________ ____ _
24, 239
22, 853
19,471
18, 160
64,623
55, 615
35
38
183
350
536
1, 400
I , 900
524
41
48
104
326
549
1, 204
1, 738
475
47
35
98
280
507
931
I, 367
336
37
32
83
220
499
799
I, 200
298
153
93
256
736
1,656
2, 278
4, 031
710
Arson______________ ___ ___ _____ _____ _____ ___ ____ _____ ___ 1,435
14
Forgery and counterfeiting___ __ ______ ____ _____ ____ ___ __
309
Fraud ___ ______ __ ___ _____ ___ __ ______ ___ _________ _______
371
Etnbezzlement_ _____ ___ __ ________ __ _____ ______ __ ___ __ __
80
Stolen property; bu ying, receiving, possessing_______ ___
141
Vandal ism, _________ ____ ___ _______ __ __ _____ _____ - - -- - - 213
Weapons;_carrying, possessing, etc__ __ __ ____ _________ ___
282
P rost1tut10n and commercialized vice___________ ______ _
49
3;3
Sex offenses (except forcible rape and prostitution) _____
laws ____________ ____ ____ __________ ______ _
297
1,614
25
302
458
80
127
176
264
105
331
319
Ill
706
I , 483
555
3,642
3, 264
379
3,903
624
1,418
8
241
451
93
101
154
252
80
311
249
121
664
1, 395
367
3, 197
2, 632
345
3, 260
531
5,332
I , 364
48
19
279
964
481
2, 171
ll4
409
91
296
321
!12
227
825
80
222
269
965
186
723
145
571
652
3, 189
1,354
5, 511
296
750
3,074 12,348
2, 384
7,429
264
1,008
3,093 10, 292
508
1,336
- --- ----
Criminal homicide:
· (a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter_ __ ____ _
(b) Manslaughter by n egligence_______ ___________ __
tirbl15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)~-~~= ::::::::::::::::::::::::: ::::===:::::::
Aggravated assault_ _____ __ _______ ___ _____ _____ ____ __ __
Burglary- breaking or entering ____ ____ ______ _____ ____ _
Larceny-theft ____ ______ __ __ ___ __ _____ ____ __ ____ _______
Auto theft_ ______ ___ ______ ____ __ __ ____ ____ ____ ___. _____
39,425
30, 442
93
47
60
141
936
529
2,068
231
54
43
27
69
603
332
1,499
100
45
34
14
22
438
170
1, 074
52
3,388
36
479
1, 339
241
92
122
329
64
523
137
621
1, 717
6,864
734
18, 432
4,885
872
6,688
483
2,103
22
251
762
!17
65
70
230
33
324
65
551
1,014
5,450
527
16,105
3,420
765
4, 513
311
1,333
8
125
390
92
51
47
145
20
234
36
477
537
4,399
503
13,054
2, 520
765
3, 064
193
56, 176
52, 151
97
62
158
366
1,404
1,355
3,055
387
103
70
91
264
1, 177
920
2,708
346
4, 603
44
672
2,023
331
196
163
542
93
795
387
590
2, 693
5, 868
678
13, 132
5,930
826
8,303
4,168
38
612
I , 644
330
171
160
420
93
675
258
605
2, 439
6, 890
742
16, 374
5,484
833
7, 826
6i5
- -- - - - - - - - - - - -- - - -
--- - --
---=
- - - - - - - -- - - - - -- - - - ------ - - - - -Subtotal for above offenses__ _______ __ ___ __ ___ ____ 4,966
4,485
6,884
2,727
1, 849
3,601
9, 913
5, 679
4, 105
3,168
Other assaults _____ ____ ___ ___ _____ __ ____ ___ ___ ___ __ ___ _ - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --- - - -
~:~bl\~tru~
98
525
1, 463
828
3,830
3, 707
403
4, 033
822
Offenses against family and children ___ ______ _____ _____
Driving under the influence____ _______ _____ _____ ___ ____
Liquor laws __ ____ _______ ___ __ _________ __ _____ __ ___- - --Drunkenness ___ __ __ ____ ___ _____ __ ___ ______ __ -- -- - -- - - Disorderly conduct_ __ _______________ __ _______ ___ -- - --Vagrancy ______-- -- ----- - -- - - - --- --- - - -- · - - -- --- - - - - --~ II o~her offenses (except traffic) ___ ____ _____ ___ ________
usp1c10n ____ ____ __ _________ ____ _____ . ______ __ ___ ___ _. Curfew and loitering law violations ____ _____ __ ______ ___ -------Runaways ______ __ ___ ___ ________________ ____ _______ ____

--------
802
65 and
over
Not
known
- - - - --
18, 650
11, 135
9, 103
201
31
22
3
9
235
105
703
31
16
12
4
3
153
41
386
9
25
12
3
7
4
9
62
163
33
22
7
22
58
15
12
15
44
- - - --- - - - - - -
HO
I
5
7
23
393
6
3
2
- - - --- - - - 1,-579
22
624
139
= 625 = 317 - -298- - - -8
~:,
21
158
23
280
260
2,559
297
9,027
I, 420
522
I , 752
151
96
8
190
99
1,338
199
5,837
801
368
I, 014
71
4
14
51
8
6
7
42
3
141
16
158
66
784
165
4, 710
703
316
959
i3
I
1
ll
2
2
2
3
17
126
6

-------- -------- -------- -------- -------- --------
�Table 34 .- Subiirba n Arres t s of Pe rsons Unde r 15, Unde r 18, Un der 21 and Und e r 25 l 'ears of Age, 1965
f 1, 538 agencies; I 965 estimated population 33,874,000]
0 ffense charged
Grand
Total
All Ages
N umber or persons arrested
U nder 15
Under 18
U nder 21
P ercentage
Under 25
Under 15
Under 18
U nder 21
429, 100
12. 1
31. 7
44. 9
56. 0
330
314
7. 7
5. 2
14. 0
21. 5
14. 3
56. 1
58. 5
64. 1
17. 9
22. 7
39. 8
45. 4
2S. 5
73. 4
71. 5
8 1. 3
34. 7
44. 3
65. 7
68. 3
45. 5
84. 9
79. 5
90. 0
Under 25
TOT AL __. ___ __ __ ___ ___ _____--- -------- -- -- -- --- -- -- -- --
766, 621
92,940
243, 160
344, 377
Crim inal homicide:
(a) Murder an d non negligent manslaughter_ ____ ___ _______
negligence __ __ ___ ____________ _______
(b) Manslaughter by
Forcible
rape ______ _________ ___________ ___ __ __________ __ __ __ __
Robbery ___ __ _____ ____ ______ ______ ____ ___ ____________ _______ __
Aggravated assa ult_ ____ ___ ______ ___ ------ --- - __ --- _--- ___. __ -Burglar y- breaking or enteri ng ___ __ _--- __ ---- _----- _______ __ _
Larceny-theft_ ____ __ . ________ ____ ____ ___ ______ ___________ __ __
Auto theft_ ____ __ _________ ______ __ _____ __ __ ______________ _____
951
709
1, 801
5, 122
12,325
37, 977
77, 749
18, 799
14
0
35
277
485
9, 754
23,505
. 2, 907
73
37
253
I, 101
1,759
21,304
45,474
12,046
170
161
716
2,324
3,515
27,890
55,624
15,292
3,500
5,606
32, 224
61,829
16,925
I. 5
.8
1. 9
5. 4
3. 9
25. 7
30. 2
15. 5
155, 433
36,983
2,047
105,692
121 ,9 12
23. 8
52. 8
68.0
78.4
37 , 729
1, 592
5, 685
11 , 439
2, 135
s, 184
22,467
6,979
977
9, 244
4, 344
5, 01 3
15,831
48 , 312
35, 358
138, 316
81, 175
10,517
11 4,419
15, 590
18, 186
22, 696
1,727
929
103
74
7
447
12,339
774
3
l , 075
151
21
32
5
792
475
6, 959
131
16, 174
I, 104
3,69 1
8,944
5, 364
1, 158
483
332
39
1, 166
19,369
2, 082
25
2,820
755
192
207
473
12,995
5,465
21, 498
977
39,718
5, I 13
18, 186
22, 696
4. 6
58. 4
1. 8
14. 2
72. 7
8. 5
2. 9
1. 8
36. 6
86. 2
29. S
2. 6
30. 5
17.4
3. 8
1. 3
26. 0
82. 2
23. 8
9. 3
9. 0
56. 9
92. 9
47. 0
11. 7
43. 8
37 . 8
8. 7
8.0
6. 1
8 1. 2
10. 8
45. 1
27. I
48. 6
57. 4
100.0
100. 0
41. 2
86. 4
43 . 7
24 . 7
26. 2
71. 3
95.8
6 1. 7
43. 8
57. 7
61. 9
18. 2
24. 1
17. 9
87. 0
20 . 7
59. 8
40. 3
61. 1
73.3
100. 0
100. 0
Subtotal for above offenses _________________ __ ___________
Other assaults __________ __ ______ ________________ __________ ___ _
Arson ____ __ _____ __ _____ ____ __ _____________ ______ ____ _________ _
Forgery and counterfeiting ______ __ ___ __________ __ ____ __ ____ ___
Fraud ____ ____ _____ __ ________ ________ ____ _______ ___ ___ __ ______
Em bezzlernen t ___ ___ ___ __ ____ _____ ___ ____ _____ - __----- __ _____ _
Stolen property; bu ying, receiving, possessing __ ____ ________ __ _
Vandalism _____ ______ ______ _______ __________ ____ __________ __ __
Weapons; carrying, possessin g, etc ____ ______ __ ___________ ____ _
P rostitn tion and commercialized vice__ _________ ____ ___ _______
Sex offenses (except forcible rape and prostitution) ___ _____ ____
Narcotic d ru g laws ___ ____ ________ _____-- -- --- - ----- --------- -Garn bling __ _________ ___ ___ ____________ __-- _--- _----- _______ ___
Offenses aga inst famil y and children ___ _____ _____ ________ _____
D riving u nder the influ ence _____ ___ _____ _____ ___________ __ ____
Liquor Jaws ___ _____ ________ ______ ____ ------ __ _________________
D runkenness ___ ___ __ ___ ____ __ __ ______ ______________ ____ ___ ___
Disorderly condu ct__ __ _______ ____ c ____ _ _____________ ___ _ _ __ _ __
Vagrancy ___ __ ___ __ _____ ____ ____________________________ ___ __ _
All other offenses (except traffic) ___ ___ ___ __________ ___ ________
Suspte10n ___________________ __________ _______________________ _
Cu rfew and loitering law vio!Mions ___ ________ _________________
Runa,,rays __________ ___ ___ __________________________ ___ ____ ___
1
Less th an one-tenth of one percent .
9,823
1,309
1,352
I , 066
192
1,8 11
20,872
3, 283
I 14
4, 047
1,640
435
I, 270
2, 954
2 , 717
14, 95 1
36,579
2,851
55,593
8,944
18, 186
22,696
I , 184
15,554
1,375
2,483
2,827
559
2,27 1
2 1,527
4, 30
428
5,33 1
2,69 1
9 10
3,817
8,649
30, 763
2 , fi94
48,566
4, 242
69,882
11,429
18,186
22,696
.6
.3
14. 0
54 . 9
11. I
.3
11. 6
3. 5
.4
.2
(I)
2.2
.3
8.6
I. 2
14. I
7. I
20. 3
39. 4
1.0
36. 8
4. 0
26. 5
9. 3
34. 7
32.
100. 0
100. 0
�,~
~---~
-

-

-
.,,_ _ _ _
--
-
-
--
--
--~
--
- - -
---
=-'--._-
-
7 -
,_____.,,...,~~:tr'JI.
-I
-
-
~
-
-
-
Table 35 .- Suburba n Arres t s, Dis tribution by Sex, 1965
[1 ,538 agencies; 1965 estimated population 33 ,874,000]
TOTAL. . . .. .. . . . .. . . ........ . . . . . . ... .. . . .. . · · ············- ·· ... . .
~~f143.215.248.55;it~;~:( ::···· · ·: • ::i:::; ::::::
Subtotal for obove oITenses.. . .. ...•. ... .......... . . ... . . ... .. . . . ....
i~:::::::~;;143.215.248.55;:··· · · :. . .:.: :.... :.:
143.215.248.55rii~tio ii;.r;Jnc"o,~~!~~f;fi~e~t~ice··········:::::::::::::::::~:::::::::
iex oIT~nscs (except forcible rape and prostitution). . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . ..... . .
1
2
Because of rou nding, t he percentages may not acid to total.
Less tban one-tenth of one percent.
Female
786, 621
676, 961
89, 660
88. 3
11. 7
160
81
1,073
1, 283
16, 126
736
83. 2
88. 6
100. 0
96. 0
91. 3
96. 6
79. 3
96. 1
16. 8
11.4
itil
791
628
1,801
4,917
11, 252
36,69'1
61, 62J
18, 063
155,433
135, 769
19, 664
3,228
81
994
2,403
388
240
1, 11 2
318
722
961
580
391
893
3, 161
3,673
11 , 283
0, 023
924
15, 385
1,402
3,870
8,964


i:m


2~:m
m
6'
9, 244
~l!143.215.248.55fi143.215.248.55!:~":.••::•: :···:•:::• •··:· :il
143.215.248.55::ao;~~.143.215.248.55t.e~!~!. '.~~.~i~! ~:'.143.215.248.55:::::: :: ::::::: :: ::::: ::: :::::: :::: :: : :
Percen t
female
Malo
l= == =I
~,ti143.215.248.55y;~e~::':. ~~.~i.143.215.248.55 143.215.248.55 15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)'. ~'.~~'. 15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)~s.i~.~ ~. . .. . . . . . . • . . . . •. . . . . .. .. . .
Percent
mol e
Total
Criminal homicide:
l====I
(a) Murder and nonneg] igent manslaughter .... ..•.. . ..•....• .. ..... .
95 1
(b) Monslanghter by negligence.. .. .. . . . .... . . .... . .... . .. . ... ... ...
709
0
P ercent of totol
N u mber of persons orrestccl
OITensc charged
~: :
m
34,501
1, 511
4,601
9,036
1, 747
2, 9'14
21,355
6,661
255
8,283
3, 764
4,622
14,938
45, 151
31,685
127, 033
72, 152
9, 593
99,034
14,188
14,310
13,732

205

Total
Female
100. 0
100. 0
.1
.1
.3
.7
1. 7
5. 4
9. 1
2. 7
.2
.1
8. 7
3. 4
20. 7
3. 9
.1
.1
.2
.7
1.8
5. 0
10. 1
2. 5
87. 3
12. 7
20. 3
20. 1
21. 9
91. 4
94. 9
82. 5
79. 0
81. 8
92. 5
95. 1
95. 4
20. l
89. 6
86. 6
92. 2
94. 4
93. 5
89. 6
91. 8
88.9
91. 2
86.6
91. 0
78. 7
60. 5
8.6
5. 1
17. 5
21. 0
18. 2
7. 5
4. 9
4. 6
73. 9
10. 4
13. 4
7. 8
5. 6
6. 5
10. 4
8. 2
II.I
8.8
13. 4
9. 0
21. 3
39. 5
4. 9
.2
.7
1. 5
.3
.4
2. 9
.9
.1
1. 2
.6
.7
2. 1
6. 3
4. 6
18. 0
10. 6
1. 4
14. 9
2. 0
2. 4
3. 0
5. 1
.2
.7
1. 3
.3
.4
3. 2
1. 0
3. 6
.1
1.1
2. 7
.4
.3
1. 2
.4
.8
1. 1
.6
.4
1. 0
3. 5
4. 1
12. 6
10. 1
1. 0
17. 2
1. 6
4. 3
10. 0
-- ---- -----4. 0
100. 0
Male
1
(' )
1. 2
.6
.7
2. 2
6. 7
4. 7
18. 8
10. 7
1. 4
14. 6
2. 1
2. 1
2.0
-- --- --- ---.2
1. 2
1. 4
18. 0
.8
�Table 36 . -S ubu rba n A rres ts by Race , 1965
[I , 537 age ncies; 1965 estima ted population 33,699,000]
T o t a! arr es ts
R ace
0 ffense charged
Total
Whit e
N egr o
Ind ian Chinese
T OT AL __ ______ __ __ __ _____ ____ _
762 , 212
654,202
100, 190
C rimin al hom icide:
(a) i\ [u rdc r and n on ncgligcn t
m anslaugh ter __ _____ ____ ___
(b) M ansl au gh ter hy negligence_
Forcible rnpe ____ ____ ____ ____ __ __ ____
R obbery _____ __ ______ ____ ___ _________
Aggrava ted assaul t __ ________ ___ ____
Bu rglary- b reak ing or entering __ ____
Larcen y- t heft_ ____ __ _____ ____ __ __ __
Au t o theft ____ _______ __ ___ ____ __ __ ___
943
704
1, 767
5, 069
11 ,870
37, 799
77 , 470
18. 668
614
583
1, 271
3, 543
8, 174
32,040
65, ~04
16, 093
321
117
485
1. 481
3, 578
5, ,'\15
11, 719
2, 427
3
1 -- --- --9 -- - ----Ii
1
47
1
82
8
164
35
74
8
Sub total for above offenses ____
154, 290
127, 622
25,643
397
37, 71 4
1,584
5,679
11 ,421
2, 134
30,4 79
I , 472
.5, 013
10,494
1, 902
7, 037
109
637
912
229
105
I
16
9
1
3, 172
22, 269
6,902
2,594
20, 976
4, 916
559
1, 228
1,934
Other assaul ts _____ ____ ____ _____ _____
1\rson ______ ______ ____ ____ ______ ______
Forgery and counterfeiting______ _____
Frau d ______________ _____ ___ _________
E mbezzlement __ ___ _______ _______ ____
Stolen propert y ; bu ying, receiving,
possessin g _____ __ ______ __ __ ________
Va nd alism ________________________ __ _
W cnpons; carr yin g, po ssessing, etc ___
P rostitution and co m merciali zed
v ice _______ ____ _______ _____ _____ __ _
Sex ofTenscs (except forcible rape and
prost itution) ______ ______ ___ _____ __ _
N arcotic drug laws __ __ ___________ ____
G arn hli ng ___ ___________ _________ _____
OfTcnscs against famil y and children _
Driving under t he influ ence ____ _____
Liquor laws _________________________
D runkenness _______ ____ _____ ____ ____
D isorderl y cond u ct _______ _______ ____
Vagrancy __ ___________ __ _____ _______ _
A11 other ofTen ses (except t raffi c) ___ __
Su sp1c1on ___ ____________ _.____________
Curfew and loiteri ng lnw violations __
R una\·v ays ____ _____ __ __ __ __ ____ ______
134
5, 137
138
=
71 2
216
2
8, 103
3,793
2, 386
12, 618
43, 122
32,257
117, 6-12
67, 766
8, 711
100, 197
13, 290
17,348
20, 799
984
487
2,429
3. 060
4. 415
2. 184
16. 891
12, 45 1
1,693
12. 913
2,228
543
1,414
9
6
2
50
265
165
3. 146
202
73
434
26
35
166


2. 351
4
3
2
21
151
224
53
45
510
2
1
1
1
5
1
3
86
I
11
2

--- -----
11
938
178
6
2
3
24
9
3 - --- - - -13
9, 131
4, 337
4,844
15, 771
47, 964
34, 730
138, 220
80, 646
10, 508
113, 927
15, 59 1
17, 966
22, 474
A ll
ot hers
(includes
race unkn ow n)
J apanose
2
5
2
3
4
2
20
6
1
17
6
1
9
(iS
57
2
4
8
rn
47
32
1
7
2
4
7
1
18
3
31
31
42
IS
7
2
28
2
1
5
39
140
11 ~
500
21-1
2R
3:is
39
~s
SI
�Table 36 .- Subur ban A rrests by Race, 1965- Continu ed
Arrests under 18
Race
Offense charged
Total
Whi t e
N egro
I ndian Chinese
J apanese
All
oth ers
(includes
race unkno w n)
TOTAL___ ____ ___ ____ ____ _____ _
Crim in al homicide:
(a) M urder and nonnegligen t
m anslaugh ter ___ __ ________ _
(b ) Manslaugh ter b y negligence _
Forcible rape __ ___ _____ ___ __ ___- - ____
Robber y _____ ____ ____ ____ __ __ ___ --- __
Aggrava ted assault ______ ____________ _
Bu rglary- breaking or entering___ __ _
L arceny- theft ___ ___ _______ ___ ___ ___
Auto theft_ ____ ____ ___ __ ____ __ ____ __ _
241, 204
217, 416
73
37
247
1,091
1, 639
21, 202
45, 270
11, 963
56
27
157
1 - - --
Su btotal for above offenses ____ _
Other assaults __ ___ __ ___ ____ ___ _____ _
Arson ___ _____ __ __ ____ ____ __ _____ ___ __
Forgery and counterfeiting ___ _____ __ _
Frau d ____ ______ ___ __ _____ ___ __ ___ __ _
Embezzlem ent_ _____ __ ______ ________ _
Stolen property ; bu ying, receiving,
possessing___ __ ____ _______ _____ ___ __
Va nd ali sm _______________ __ ___ __ ____ _
W eapons; carr ying, possessing, etc __ _
Prostit u tion an d co =ercialized
v ice ______ __ ________ __ ___ ______ _____
Sex offenses (except forcible ra pe
and pros tit ution) __ __ __ ___ ___ __ _--N arcotic d rug la"·s __ ____ ___ ___ __ _____
Garn bl ing. ___ _______ __ _____ ____ ___ -- Offenses against fam ily a nd chil d ren_
Driving u nder t he influ ence _______ -- L iquor laws _______--- -- ----- - ------- D ru nk enness ___ ___ ____ ____ __ - - - - - - -D isord erl y con duct _________ __.- - -- -- -
\ 1agrancy _____________ ___ ________ ___ -
All other offenses (except traffi c) __ __ _
Sus p1c10n _. __________ . ___ . _- - - - -- - -- Cu rfew a nd loiteri ng law viola tions __
Run a,v ays _____ __ _________ - _- - - - - - - - -
672
1, 137
18, 265
39, 057
10, 590
22, 523
81, 522
69, 961
11, 121
5, 356
1, 155
479
33 1
39
4, 498
1, 106
418
313
36
838
48
1, 153
19, 195
2, 049
945
18,201
1, 700
204
943
338
25
24
2, 485
721
135
185
452
12, 551
5, 194
18, 858
759
36, 206
4,521
17, 348
20, 799
43
16 -------- -- -----10 - -- ----- --- -- --90

-- -413
2 -- -- - --13 ---- ---481
2, 817
I
30
5,991
64
16
1,303
31
4
1
2, 752"
754
185
207
465
12,873
5, 464
21,291
973
39, 385
5, Ill
17, 96 6
22, 474
508
49
665
- -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
57
18
3
259
26
48
21
12
246
218
2, 379
211
3,002
573
543
1,414
1 --- --- ----------- -- --- ---- -- ----- - -4

-- 8
-- -----1
88
16
3
126
32
- - - - - - - --140
21
21
258
- - - - - - --- - - - 9 - - - ----- - ----- -11
I
-- - -- -- - - ------ ----- --I ---- --- - - --- - - -3

- --- -- --- - - --- --- --- -- -- ----- --- -- --- ----- -- ---- -- ----- ----4
---7
1
4
39
2 ---- ---3
6

---- - - - ----- -------- ------ ---2
1
2 - - - - - -- 2 -- ------ -- ---- -- --1 -- - - - --- -- --- --- --1 - - - --- - - ----- --- - -37
2
34 ·--- -- -- - - -- - - -17
2
1
2
52
7
5
I
2
I
I
35
1
166
9
5
5
5
36
18
34
113
13
38
81
135
�Table 36. -Subur ban A rre sts by Race, 1965- Continued
Arrests 18 and over
R ace
0 ITensc charged
Total
White
Negro
I ndian Chinese
J a pan ese
All
others
(includes
race unknown)
- -- - - - - - - - - - - - - -1-----1---- - 1-- - - -1- - -- -- - - - - - - --- -TOTAL__ _________ ___ ____ ___ ___
521, 003
436, 786
Criminal homicide:
(Cl) :\ lurdcr and nonncgligcnt
manslaughter______ ____ __ __
(b) '> l anslaughter b y negligence_
Forcible ra pe____ ______ _____________ _
Robbery ______ ________ ______ ____ ___ _
Aggravated assault __ ___ ______ ____ ___
Burglary-breaking or entering______
Larceny-theft_ ___ _____ .:-__ ______ ____
Anto t heft _____ __________ __ __ ____ __ __
870
667
1, 520
3, 978
10, 231
16, 597
32, 200
6,705
556
1, 114
2, 871
7,037
13. 775
26. 24 7
5, 503
55
1- - - - -IJ,- - --


3uhtOtal for above offenses ____


72, 768
l= ===ll•=
Other assaults____ ______ _____ ___ ____ _
32,358
Arson _______ _____ ___ _____ _____ _____ _
429
Forger y and counterfeiting___ ___ ___ _
5, 200
Fraud_ _____ ______ ___ ____ __ ______ __ __
11, 090
Embezzlement ___ ___ _____ ___ ______ __
2, 095
Stolen property; bu ying, receiving,
possessing____ ____ __________ ____ ___
2, 019
Vandalism ______ ____ ____ _____ ___ __ __
3, 074
W eapons; carrying, possessing, etc_ __
4, 853
Prostitulionand commcrcializcd vice_
913
Sex offenses (except forcible rape
and prostitution)__ _______ _____ ____
6, 379
Narcotic drug laws __ ___ ____ ___ ___ ___
3,583
Gambling ___ _____ _______ ___ ____ __ ___
4, 659
Offenses against family a nd children_
15, 564
Driving under the influence__ _______
47, 499
L iquor laws ____ ____ ___ _________ _____
21,857
Drunkenness______ ___ ______ _________ 132, 756
Disorderl y conduct ______ __ __________
59,355
Vagrancy______________ ________ ___ ___
9,535
All other offenses (except t raffi c)__ ___
74. 542
Suspicion __ ___________ _______ __._ _____
10, 480
Curfew and loitering law ,1 iolntions __ ____ _____ _
Runaways ____ __________ _____________ ________ __
136
57. 661
77, 673
4, 629
305
107
395
1, 06
3, 097
2,69
5. 728
1, 124
3
95
1
9 ____ _____ _____ __
15
1
6
34
1
2
52
7
2
100
19
8
43
4
G
1- - - - -1- - - -
14,522
257
32

==i=== = i= =
25. 981
366
4,595
10, 181
1,866
1, 649
2,775
3,216
688
5,618
3,072
2, 251
12, 433
42,670
19. 706
112,438
48 , 908
7. 952
(l.3, 991
8, 769
129
6, 109
61
580
894
226
355
285
l l 596
215
725
461
2, 381
3, 039
4, 403
1, 938
16,673
10, 072
1, 482
9,911
1,655
9G
1
15
9
1
24
1. 693
-l


3


2
17
no
63
98
25
2, 2

= ,[= =
2
1
1
1
5
1
3
75

----
8
2
2
3
6 __ ______ ___
9
2
5
1
2G
7
6
1
4
2G
49
264
128
3, 112
1 5
72
382
25
2
3
2
3
4
1
20
5
1
12
4
12
7
I
18
I
31
5
21
1
s
7
37
18
39
1-!0
83
-1S2
180
2~
225
21)
--- --- ----
�Tab le 37 . -Rural A rres t Tre nds, 1964- 65
(614 age ncies ; 1965 estimated populaLion 12,34 0,000]
N umber of persons arres ted
1064
1965
Percent
1965
1064
change
TO TAL __ . ______ _____ _________ ___ ______ ____ ___________ _____ __ _
Criminal homicide:
(a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter. . - ---- -····--·-- -··
(b) Manslaughter by negligence .. . ·· -- --····· - --- --- - --- --· - --·
ll~f.i~.tt'.~E-,;{··· · ·: =: :: i: : • :•
Sub total for above offenses __ -· --------.--· - - __ ... ......... ·-.
i~[~f:ffa~?}lf{(::: :: : : : : : : : : : : : : :~:~
Stolen property; buying, rereivinii:11ossessino
Vandalis1n _ -- ----- - - -- ---- --· ___ ____ ____ _
..
0 - - - - --- - --- -- - ------ --
Weapons; carrying, possess ing, etc .... - .. ·.· · ·•····· · · · · ··· ··· · ·· ···
Prostit ution and commercialized v ice ...... .. ··· · · · · ··-····-· · · · ··· ·
Sex offenses (except forcible rape and p rostitution)
~~;m~t~~ !143.215.248.55 15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST):: :: :::::::::: ::_: .. -· -·-···-·-·····:::::: :: :::::
i~¥~)l:?E :\:\;····· ····· :·:
Offenses agains t fam il y and children .. ·- -· -··· - · ··· · ··-··· ·--··· · · ·
,-,
~
~
All other offenses (except traffi c) .... .... . . . _· · · · ··- · -···-···-······ ·
Suspicion (not included in totals) ..... . ... . _... : __· · - ····· - · · ·······
Curfew and loiterin g law viol ations .. ....•. . . _· · - ··· -·· · · · --··· ·-· -·
Runaways ..... . . . . ... . ..... . . · ············ · · ··· · -······ · ·· ·· · · ·-· · ·
18 years of age and over
U nder 18 years or age
'l'ota.l all ages
Offense charged
Percent
change
1064
1965
Percent
change
204, 300
207, 508
+ 1. 0
37, 341
37, 985
+ 1.1
166, 959
169,523
+ 1.5
360
420
746
1,015
3,516
12,725
14,853
5, 027
429
423
740
892
3,723
12,392
14,378
4, 485
+m2
+.7
21
32
+47.6
-34.4
+22. 1
-15.1
+1 s.s
- 3.9
- 6. l
-1 7.4
339
38~
669
869
3,256
6, 70S
9, 50S
2,293
398
402
646
768
3,414
6, 610
9,360
+17.4
+3.6
- 3. 4
-11. 6
+4.9
-1. 5
- 1. 6
- 2.9
24 ,030
23,824
- .9
7, 282
7,1 89
209
3,358
4, 835
734
773
1, 309
!, 371
127
1, 531
734
l, 205
6,976
17, 493
14, 703
40,538
12, .,99
2, OOi
27. 948
1, 2,59
- 1. 3
-10. 3
+.4
+8.ri
+ 6.4
+ 14. 2
+21. 5
- 4. 7
-4 7. 5
- 6.0
+34. 2
+7.6
- .8
77
-1 2. l
+5.9
- 2.6
- 3. 2
- 10. 8
146
260
6. 017
5,345
2,734
31
21
94
124
309
5,782
5, 018
2,259
14,632
13,628
- (LS
563
4SO
143
261
75
12
243
2,-525
150
12
315
59
32
48
174
4,972
!, 039
1,866
172
6,380
579
1, 022
4,367
-14 . 7
- 2. l
-8.1
+ 41.5
- - - - - - - - - - - - -38.662
7,845
379
3, f,28
4, 504
702
885
3,401
l , 654
260
!, 909
fl2 1
1. 141
6,562
18,020
16,894
41,1 94
13,758
2,520
34,387
2,395
954
4,420
37,462
7,669
352
3,61 9
4,910
746
l.Olfi
3, 834
! , 521
139
1, 846
793
! , 237
7, 024
17,667
19,675
41,577
14,465
2,239
34 , 328
1, 838
1,022
4,367
- 3. 1
-2. 2
-7. 1
-. 2
+o.o
+ 6.3
+ 14.8
+12. 7
- 8.0
- 46.5
- 3. 3
. +27. 7
+ s .4
+1.0
-2. 0
+16.5
+. 9
+5.1
-11. 2
- .2
- 23.3
+7.1
-1. 2
146
284
53
12
208
2,324
216
18
280
74
21
70
173
3,952
1,047
! , 417
181
6,296
fi98
954
4,4 20
+16.8
+s.6
- 30.6
- 33.3
+12.5
- 20. 3
+ 52.4
- 31.4
+ .6
+25.8
- .8
+31. 7
- 5.0
+1.3
- 3. 2
+7.1
-1.2
2,226
- - - - - - - - - -233
3,344
4, 451
690
677
1,077
1, 438
242
1, 629
547
!, 120
6,492
17,847
12,942
40, 147
12,34 1
2,339
28, 091
! , 797
+1 ..,
- 2.0
+!3. 6
+ 1.0
+2. 1
-II. Ci
-.5
- 29.9
�Table 38 .-R,ual Arres t s by Age , 1965
[839 agencies; 1965 csLimatcd popul ation 18,515,000]
Offense charged
Grand
total
all
ages
Ages
under
Ages
under
15
18
Ages 18
and
over
Ago
10 and
11- 12
under
13- 14
15
1G
17
18
10
20
--- --- --- --- --- --- - -- --TOTAL.·-··· · ·-·-····· · ·--··--··- - ··- ·- ·· ······
Criminal homicide:
(a) M urder and nonnegli gent manslaughter ..... ...
(b) Manslaughter by negligence _- ·· ··· ···-· ·· · ·-··
Forcible rape_-··- -· ----- · --· · - ...... ·-· .. . .. ·- · . ·- · ...
Robbery. . .... . . · --- -- -· -- --- -· . . · - . . ..... ... -· . . ·- ·- ..
Aggravated assaul t. _----··· -- -·· ·- ··· -· . · ··-- ··--- ·· ..
Burglary-breaking or entering.- · ·-······ · ··· ·· -·-···Larceny- theft.... -·- _·- ... . _._._ .. __ .. ·-. _.. . _. . . _....
Auto t heft. _···----.-· ·-·-· · ·- ... . ·- .... · - . . .. ··---· .. ·-
297, 472
---
13, 347
55, 727
24 1, 745
1, 592

--- -
654
615
1, 084
1, 423
5, 447
18, 976
21, 401
6, 11 8
2
16
26
70
2,959
2, 121
640
50
37
150
175
407
8, 23
7,545
3, 120
604
578
934
1,248
5, 040
10, 153
13, 856
2, 998
Snhtotal for above offenses . . ···--·· · · · ····· · · · -- ·
55, 718
5,844
20,307
3o, 411
Other assaul ts . . . -··- ------· ·- · -- ....... ·-·· ....... ·- ..
Arson ... ·- ---- · ·- --- - ··----·- ---· · ····· --· ... ·-·-·.·- ..
Forgery and connterfeitin g. . ·- -· · · .. ·-- - ____ ____ ___·--·
F raud _.. __ ____ __ ----- --·-··-·- -----· _. __ ._·- .... · -.·-·
E mbezzlement ... ____________ ___ __ ___ ._. __ ... __ ... _. ___
Stolen property; ba ying, receiving, possessin g... · -·-- ··
Vandal ism.. ·- - ·----------·-·--· - ·---·--· .. ·-· - ... __...
Weapons; carrying , possessin g, etc_ . ... ·---··---·---- · ·
P rostitutioD and co mmerciali zed vice _- ··· ·· -·-· -·- ---·
Sex offenses (except forcible rape and prostitu tion) .. __ .
Narcotic drug laws .. . . -- --· --· -- -- -----·-····--·-·----Gam bli ng. -·· ·-- -·-·- __ -- ----·-· - . __·--·--·· .. . ... _....
OffeDscs against famil y and children · -······--·- -·· · -·D ri ving under t he influ ence.. ·- ---- -- ·--··· --· -- ··- ·· -·
Liq uor laws ... . ----- -- --- ---- --- -· -·-· ___ _____ ·-.· --··-D runkenness _. . ____ __ __ ____ __ ___ _____ _____ · - ··-· · ·._._
Disorderl y cond uct _- -·- --------- ---- --· -._ ... _· -· . --·Vagrancy ._. __ __-· _____ ·-------- -- -----·---·----- -·-_ . .
All other offenses (except traffic) ·---··-·--- ---·----·-··
SuspicioD . _______ . ___ · - ___ .. -· _· -- ... ·-. ____ . -· _. __ . _..
Curfew and loitering l aw violations.-· ·- --··--_ . . --_ ...
Runaways. --- - ---- --- ----- -· ·- . _____ . . ·-·- ... -· · . -· . . .
11, 540
644
4,897
8, 769
1, 103
1, 466
6, 135
2, 265
346
2, 907
970
2, 814
9, 634
24, 583
25,514
57, 851
19,8 19
3,662
46, 510
2, 699
1, 337
6, 289
ll 6
165
49
26
1
6:1
1, 876
78
1
148
726
10,814
17
277
367
59
374
4, 523
3
11 6
8, 653
1
15
1,088 -- --- --362
1, 104
7
4, 076
2, 059
385
267
1,998
6
13
333 ---·-- -516
2, ~91
70
900
1
46
2,768 ----- --74
9, ,160
8
243
24,340 ----- -- 6,845
18,669
3
1,590
56, 261 - - - - --- 2, 5 5
17, 2-34
86
26:J
3,3fl9
2
8, 591
37, 919
2nl
745
1, 954
12
l , 337 --- ---- -8
G. 289 . ..
65


10
7
20
5
279
74
538
31
2, 02J
162
217
U HG
1
2
5
9
372
258
13
660
s
2, 760
8, 995
10, 160
15, 732
16,488
18, 775
15, 121
13, 340
8
4
33
31
16
16
22
58
68
152
2, 049
2,055
706
24
36
102
132
263
1,938
2,212
n20
19
30
94
109
265
1,329
1,547
369
19
33
89
103
229
981
1,200
277
262
44
156
61
JO
119
687
75
488
--- - -- --- --- --- --- ---
2
8
1 .. -- --1
13
7
14
46
15
1,887
700
508
1,3.15
67
560
(l4
1,668
1, 313
SH
9
43
50
121
2, 147
2,056
960
- -- - - - - - - - -- - - - - -- - - - - - 1,301
3, 883
3,935
5,402
5,327
5, 126
3,762
2,93 1
--- --- --- --- --- --- --22
40
6
10

--- 8
552
28
-- --- --31
1
1
3
3
27
7
125
4
265
32
21
273
77
66
40
15
1
48
939
44
1
109
11 5
28
GS
7
2
73
650
4-2
G
6
10
8
7
16
750
215
400
35
I. 61
127
315
1, 624
6
9
2
249
67
327
25
1,497
118
188
1,278
109
233
40
IOI
22
2
107
863
i2
1
114
23
12
16
76
2,319
481
705
85
2, 424
207
412
2, 015
5
52
225
172
27
156
502
132
11
161
46
25
2'11
358
4,671
1,286
l , 590
187
2, 845
213
145
29
19
31
146
3, 497
20
942
11 2
2. 526
2-19
393 . . ---- l , 034 ··- -· -
463
46
206
195
31
93
327
11 2
20
162
55
29
245
4-31
4,000
l , 080
1,211
127
2. 381
145
516
26
215
281
22
89
242
11 0
i
135
56
30
268
484
3, 20 0
1, 23 0
1,
130
2, 139
142
as,

-- -------- --- - -- -------
---
---
�Table 38.-Rural A rrests by Age, 1965- Con t in ued
Age
0 !Tense charged
21
22
23
24
25-29
30-34
35-39
40-44
45-49
50-54
65 and
over
55-59
'ot
known
- - - - - - - - -- - - -- - - - -1-- - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - TOTAL_------- -------- --------------- ---- -- -- --- 10, 695
Criminal homicide:
(a) Mur der and n onnegligent manslaughter ____ ___ _
(b) Manslau gh ter by n egligence __ ________ __ ______ _
Forcible
___ --------- -_____

Robber y rape
___ ______________
__ _____ ___ ____
__ ---____ --____--_
Aggravated assault_ ____________ __________ ____ __ __ ___ __
Burglary- b reaking or en tering _____ _____ __ _____ __ ____ _
Larceny-theft ____ _____ ____ __ ___ ________ ___________ ___ _
A u to theft _________ _--- --- ----------------- - -------- __ _
Subtotal for above offenses____ ______ ___ _____ ____ _
9,873
8,678
8, 813
24
33
57
02
226
710
825
107
22
28
50
81
214
547
619
136
20
24
54
85
232
486
611
123
29 907
- - - ---------- '
24
24
72
102
219
791
911
236
- - - 2,379
105
03
157
202
831
1,409
I, 701
387

2,164
1, 706
1, 63S
4,885
i~~%~zzle~wt_:::::::::::::
l~it:,143.215.248.55 15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)i~~iiii~i-~~:___::::::::::::--:::::::::::::::::::---:3~~!~ :H3~~ :~13~~
ttolen l)roper ty; buying, receiving, possessing____ ___ ___
andahsm__ ________ ________ __ _______ ___
Wea pons; carrying, possessing, etc ___ ___ :--- ----- - ----P rostitution and commercialized vice ___ --------- ----Sex offen ses (except forcible rape and prostitu tion)_____
Nar cotic drug Jaws__ ____ ______________ ____
Gambling __ _____ ____________ ____ ___ _____ __ ---- ------ -- Offenses against f amily and children ______ ::: ----------
57
134
126
17
ll3
68
32
395
90
100
123
21
136
64
42
403
g~
109
48
42
403
A ll ot ber offenses(excep ttraffic) _________ ______ ___ __ __ _
1,955
1, 787
1, 673
58
06
iii~~g;:;:?t\ - : :: : ::m ·-m ..


i :u


3g~
53
82
0
\g
109
52
53
471
25,338
25,237
23,457
18,640
14, 783
8,943
5, 405
4, 613
72
80
83
140
674
733
I, 174
229
73
55
41
41
51
43
28
24
322
184
535
66
39
30
17
14
242
127
351
46
25
15
6
10
135
67
165
11
4
67
86
553
474
1,030
160
21
10
4
2
87
IS
87
3
---======


H ·:!i ·:ii :!i :ii


I,
l,
l ,~~1
153
171
303
65
337
186
267
I, 944
1,r~~
105
92
257
31
253
105
323
1,534
m;; ;:m
S,367
60
460
327
786
110
- - - --- - - - - ---3, 185
2,497
1,808
I, 253
866
111 ..
1, 6~;
54
4,252
143.215.248.55:~:~~:~~i!143.215.248.55 15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST):1:143.215.248.55:i~!15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)~: ::::::::::::::::::: :::_'.~;: :::: ~;~: ::::;~~: :::::~; : : ::: 223- ___ : ;~~:
1
1,m
78
88
181
36
256
89
408
1,402
1
143.215.248.55
66
60
153
24
183
46
402
I , 024
6Jg
52
43
100
IO
141
30
350
3~~


i


30
28
75
15
115
27
359
333
2, 502
1,714
,
2
19
4
6
79
· 31
101
0
- - - - - - - -442
245
232


! :i :i


2
1
1
I~
8
l3
52
7
60
18
172
157
1~1
IO
6
35
3
59
5
123
9
i:
6g
4
8
33
9
61
5
Ill
32
617
6~~


~1 ;

; till ::m ::m ·1~ ·-!~




4,053
3,345
989
127
---
1
1
2
--4
I~
r
2
7
I
~~
·1
8




t;:::::;;~:::::~;;: :::::;;: :::::~;: :::::;;:: ::::::::::::::






�Table 39. - Rura.l Arres ts of Pe rsons Under 15, Under 18, Under 21, and Unde r 25 Years of Age, 1965
[839 agencies; 1965 estim ated popul ation 18,5 15,000]
Offense
charged
TOTAL ___ ____ ________ _______________ ___ ______ _______ ___
Criminal homicide:
(a) Murder and nonnegligent m anslaughter __ ___ ___ _______
(b) M anslaughter by negligence __ ______ _________________ __
Forcible
rape_______
____ ------------- -- ---- -------------- .
Robbery ____
___ _______
___ __________
__________
_____ ______
______
Aggravated assault__ ___ ____ ____ ___ __ ___ __ ___ ____ ______ ___ ____ _
Burglary-break ing or entering ____ __ __ _____ __ .___ _______ ______
Larceny-theft ____ ___ --- -- - _---- ------ ---- _-- -- ----- _-------- Auto theft ____ _______ ___ ------ -------- ---- -- --- -------- --·subtotal for above offenses _____ ____ ___ ________ -Other assaults __ ____--- --- ----- ------- ---- ---- ______ ----- ----Arson ___ __ __ __ -- __- __ -----_----- --- ---------- ----------------Forgery and counter feiting_______ _________ __ ····-······-- · ·· ·Fraud -----------·----·---- ------ - ---- --··· ·---·- ·- -----· ----·
Em bez, Iement... .. .. ... --·- .. · ----·· .. .. -... --·-. ··-· ----·· ··
tolen propert y; buyin g, receiving, possessing..... - ---·---·· ·Vandalism ______ ____ -·· ····- -. . . ____ __ --·------ - -· ·- ... -·-- - -Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc_··-- -·--·-----------------P rostitution and commerciali zed vice.----···-··-·--- --- -- --- Sex offenses (except forcible rape and prostiLUli onl ---- ·------·
Narcotic drug laws __· ----- · - · -- ---- -·-- -·-· ·-- ··· ··---·-·- - Gambliug. ______ __ ___ _·-··---···-···- --- ·- ---------------·-·-Offenses against family and ch ildren_. ------ ·- --- ------·-- ---Dri ving under the influence __ ___. . ---- -···--- ·-----·-··---···
Liquor laws_________ ____ ·- . · -- ---- --- -· ____ __ __ ._.·----- _
Drunkenness _____ -··· _..• . _--··-- --· ______ ________ ·-· __ ._ ---Disorder! y conduct. __ ___ ------ ·- --··· -. . _- · __ --· ___ _____ . __:_
Vagrancy __ . _--··------. --· __ . _______ _____ · -- _____ . __ ___ ______
All other offenses (except trafficl --- · ·-- --·- -·- ···- -----------·
Suspicion __ . _____ ·- ___ -· .. ______ ___ .- --· __ .... ________ ___ _. ___
Curfew aud loitering law violatious ___ ___ ·-· ·---------------Run aways ____ . --·------·---------- -- ··- -· -·---- -----· -I I ,ess I hnn
one-lenl h of one percent.
Grand
Total
All A~es
Number of persons arrested
Percentage
Under 15
Under 18
Under 21
Under 25
Under 15
Under 18
Under 21
297,472
13, 347
55, 727
102, 963
141,022
4. 5
18. 7
34. 6
47.4
654
615
1,084
1,423
5,447
18, 976
21, 40 1
6, 118
10
2
16
26
70
2, 959
2, 12 1
640
50
37
150
175
407
8, 823
7, 545
3, 120
11 2
136
435
519
I, 164
13,07 1
12,504
4, 38fi
202
245
677
879
2,055
15,005
15,470
I. 5
5,078
1. 8
1. 3
15. 6
9. 9
10. 5
7. 6
6. 0
13.8
12. 3
7. 5
46. 5
35. 3
51. 0
17. 1
22. 1
40. 1
36. 5
2 1. 4
6 .9
58. 4
7 1. 7
30.9
39.8
62. 5
61. 8
37. 7
82. 2
72. 3
83. 0
55, 718
5, 844
20,307
32,327
40,2 11
10. 5
36. 4
5
.o
72. 2
2, 193
401
1,020
764
95
700
5,207
621
51
974
227
130
828
4,208
467
I, 868
2,109
278
958
5,619
I, 075
146
I, 44 1
459
299
2,510
4. 209
20:834
10, 934
9, 866
I, 129
22, 995
I , 690
I, 337
G, 289
1.0
25. 6
1. 0
.3
.I
4. 3
30. 6
3. 4
.3
5. I
.8
.2
.2
6. 3
43. 0
7. 6
1. 3
1. 4
24. 7
66. 4
11. 8
3. 8
7. 2
I. 6
.8
19. 0
62. 3
20.8
8. 7
8. 6
47. 7
8•1. 9
27. 4
14. 7
33. 5
23. 4
4. 6
8. 6
26. 8
2. 7
13. 0
i. 2
18. 5
27. 6
100. 0
100. 0
73. 4
9. 0
32. 7
l9. 3
34. 3
46. l
100. 0
100. 0
- - --
11 , 540
644
4,897
8, 769
1, 103
1, 466
6, 135
2,265
346
2,907
970
2,8 14
9, 634
24, 583
25,514
57, 851
19, 819
3, 662
46, 510
2,699
1,337
6,289
116
165
•19
20
I
63
I, 876
78
I
148
8
7
20
5
279
74
538
31
2,023
162
217
I, 61G
726
277
374
11 6
15
362
4, 076
267
13
516
70
46
74
243
6,845
1, 590
2,585
263
8,591
7'15
l, 337
G, 289
1,5 16
18,71 6
5, 186
6,473
707
15, 956
I, 245
I, 337
G, 2 9
.3
I. 5
(I)
17. 8
l. O
1. l
.t
2. 7
.8
4. 3
6. 0
16. 2
25. 7
6. 2
Under 25
36. 5
72. 5
38. I
25. I
25. 2
65.3
91. 6
47. 5
42. 2
49. 6
17. 3
10. 6
26. I
17. l
81. 7
18. 9
49. 8
30. 8
49. 4
62.6
100. 0
100 . 0
�Table 40. - R u ra l A rres t s , Dis t ribit t ion by Sex, 1965
[839 agencies; 1965 estima ted· popul a tion 18,515,000]
0 ffcnse ch arged
TOTAL
TOTAL _____________ _____ ____________ ___ _________ ___ __ ________ ___ __ _
297, 472
l= == = I
C riminal h omicide :
(a) M u rd er an d n onnegligent m anslau ghter _____ ___________ ___ __ ___ ___
654
(b) l\<Ia
u gh__ter
y negligence.
--- - - -_________
- - - - --- - -___
- ------ - - -____
- ---61 5
Forcible
rapnesla
_____
___b_______
___ _________
___ _____
___-----____ _
iiitif~jr!tf143.215.248.55 15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST))~~;~~tt=======/===========================
Sub total for above offenses _____ ________ ____ ____ ___ ___ __ ______ __ ____ ___
P ercent of total
N u mberof persons a rrested
P ercent
m ale
Male
P ercent
female
TOTAL
Fem ale
Stolen property ; buying , receiving, posscssing __--~~---- -- -- - - -- - - ------ - -- -
~:'at~!~
fcarri,iiig;posscss~g; ,,t;,~:: :::::::::: ::-=:::::::::::::::::::::::
P rostitution a nd com m ercial ized vice ____ ______ __---- --- - --- ----- - - ---- - - -
Sex offenses (except forcible rape and p rosti tution) _____ _____ _________ ____
~




gu~~-143.215.248.55-143.215.248.55 15
52, 29 December 2017 (EST)---_-::: :::::::::::::: :: =---------=::: :::::::::::::::: ::: :






Offen ses aga inst family and child ren __ ______ ____ _- - -- -- - --- --- - --- - --- - - -
i!li~l'.i~~f;i~:.;=::=:::i:i : . :::: : :
C urlew a nd loiter ing law v iolatio ns ____________ __ ____ __ ____ - -:::: : ::: :: : : :
Run aways ________ _________ ____ ____ ____ _______ _______ _____ ________ ___ ____ _
1 Beca use of rou nd in g, t h e percentages m a y n ot ad d to total.
' Less th a n one-tenth of one percen t .
F em ale
M ale
273, 210
24, 262
91. 8
8, 2
100, 0
100. 0
100. 0
566
576
1, 084
1, 360
5, 11 0
18,407
19,572
5,889
88
39
.2
.2
.2
.2
.4
.2
.4
.4
337
569
1, 829
229
86. 5
03. 7
100. 0
95. 6
93. 8
97. 0
91. 5
96. 3
13. 5
6. 3
1, 084
1,423
5, 447
18, 970
21,401
6, 118
55, 718
52, 564
3, 154
94. 3
11 , 540
644
4, 897
10, 797
611
4,142
7,337
971
1, 357
5,864
2, 189
121
2, 675
851
2, 656
9, 197
23, 648
23,233
53, 926
18, 000
3,389
42, 168
2, 479
1,024
4, 011
743
33
755
I , 432
132
109
271
76
225
232
119
158
437
935
2, 28 1
3, 925
1, 819
273
4,34 2
220
313
2,278
93. 6
94. 9
84. 6
83. 7
88.0
92. 6
95. 6
96. 6
35. 0
92. 0
87. 7
94. 4
95.5
96. 2

63--
------4. 4
6. 2
3. 0
8. 5
3. 7
.5
I. 8
6, 4
7. 2
2. I
.5
1. 9
6. 7
7. 2
2. 2
1. 4
2. 3
7. 5
.9
5. 7
18. 7
19. 2
13. 0
4. 0
.2
1. 5
2. 7
.4
.5
2. 1
3.1
.I
3.1
5. 9
.5
.4
I.I
.3
.9
1. 0
.5
.7
1. 8
3. 9
9.4
16. 2
7. 5
1.1
17. 9
.9
1. 3
9. 4
=~~1 1 =,,;;;;~l=~ ~ = ==l====t====:=1
3. 9
6. 4
i~ir;2~fri\e)~ifr\143.215.248.55//~~:::::::::------------=::::::::::::::
1
8, 769
I , 103
I , 466
6, 135
2, 265
346
2, 907
970
2, 814
9, 634
24,583
25, 514
57, 851
19, 819
3, 662
46, 510
2, 699
I , 337
6,289
0 1. L
93. 2
90. 8
92. 5
90. 7
91. 8
76. 6
63. 8
5. I
15. 4
16. 3
12. 0
7. 4
4. 4
3. 4
65. 0
8. 0
12. 3
5. 6
4. 5
3. 8
8. 9
6. 8
9. 2
7. 5
9. 3
8. 2
23. 4
36. 2
.2
1. 6
2. 9
.4
.5
2. I
.8
.I
1.0
.3
.9
3. 2
8. 3
8. 6
19. 4
6, 7
1. 2
15. 6
.9
.4
2. l
.8
(')
1.0
.3
1. 0
3. 4
8. 7
8. 5
19. 7
6. 6
I. 2
15. 4
.9
.4
1. 5
.3
�Table 41. - Rural Arrests by Race, 1965
[835 agen cies; 1965 estimated population 18, 505, 000]
T otal arr ests
R ace
O!Iense ch arged
Total
Whi te
TOTAL _________ _______ _____ ___
C riminal homicide:
(a) M urder and nonnegligent
m an slau gh t er ______ _____ ___
(b) Manslau gh ter b y negligence._
F orcible rape _________ ___ _____ __ __ ___
Robbery. __ ·- __________ ____ __ ________
Aggravated assa ult ___ _____ ____ __ _____
Burglary- b reaking or entering ______
L arceny-theft_ _________ _____ __ _____
Au to theft _. ____ _______ _____ ____ __ ___
Sub to tal for above offenses .. ___
Other assaults ____ __ __ ____ ___ ___ ____ _
Arson.,. ____ ___ _____ ____ ____ _____ ______
Forgery and counterfeiting ____ ______ _
Fraud ________ ______ ______ _____ ____ __
E m bezzlement_ ___ _____ _________ ___ _
St olen property ; buying, receiving,
possessing _____ _________ ______ _____
V andalism ___ ____ __ ___ __ _____ _______ _
W eapons; carryi ng, possessing, etc. __
Prostitut ion and com merciali1.ed
vjcc _______ ____ ____ ___ __ ___ __ _____ __
Sex ofTe nses (excep t fo rcible rape and
prosti t u t ion)_. ___ _________ ____ __ __ _
N arcotic dru g laws ______ _______ ____ __
G am blin g ____ __ _________ ____ __ _____ __
OITenses aga inst famil y an d ch ild ren _
Dri\·ing under t he influ ence __ ________
Liq u or laws ___ ___ _____ ____ __ _•___ __ __ _
Drunkenness. _____ ___ ____ _____ _____ _
Disorderl y cond u ct ___ ____ ____ ____ __ _
V agrancy ____ ___ ____ _____ ______ ___ __ _
All o~her ofTcnses (except t rafft c) _____
Susptcton ______ ___ _____ _____ __ ___ ____
Cu
and________
loit ering
la w______
violations.
Ru rfew
naways
______
____ ____
142
N egro
India n C hinese
249,366
207, 193
24, 944
14, 708
540
314
778
1, 044
4, 962
IS, 408
16, 733
4,546
358
253
593
775
3,501
11, 653
14, 214
3, 886
155
50
135
213
1, 221
1, 127
1, 829
30G
18
8
44
42
191
470
484
314
42, 325
35, 233
5, 036
1, 571
10, 084
398
s, 874
8, 473
930
7, 750
367
3, 364
7,805
854
1, 909
15
35G
550
G5
291
974
4, 173
1, 624
3,855
I , 165
838
89
131
435
30
104
10
133
2,297
407
1, 245
8, 990
22,504
16, 837
54, 983
15, 943
3, 567
40,526
2, 699
1,2 14
5, 166
89
2, 025
356
869
7,664
19, 552
14, 85
41,929
12, 4 7G
3, 125
34,858
2, 326
1, 04G
4, 789
1G
136
84
10
40
3
178
28
355
1, 075
I, 5 6
1, 169
5,223
1, 966
288
4, 019
281
29
121
56
6
3
220
1, 249
G84
7, 1 4
1, 262
127
1, 255
77
96
234
31
J ap anese
A ll
ot hers
(includes
race u nk nown)
98
2,392
-- ------ ---- ---3
2
2
9
4
12
4,
14:3
189
40
2
1
1
14
16
4
37
444
2
1
31
1
--- ----- --- ---- -
- -- =
2
7
125
--- ----1- ------ -- --- -- -- --1
1r.

--- ---- ---1
6
--- -- -- - ---- --- -- --- -- - ------- ---- ---3 - -- -- --- 1
2
1
5
4
1
2
4
3
3
22
1
1
5
2
-- ---- -- ---- ---7
lfi
77
14
18
12
l(;
26
llf,
124
638
234
24
368
15
3f\
20
�Table 41. - Rural A rre s t s by Race, 1965- Contin u~cl
Arrests u nder 18
R ace
0 ffense charged
Total
White
TOTAL _____ ____ ______________ _
42, 316
35
13
113
128
342
5,909
5, 657
2, 144
Subt ota l fo r a bove offenses ____
2, 212
1, 827
Japan esc
A ll
others
(includes
race unk nown)
57
572
14, 341
26
11
7
77
105
26 1
5, 219
4, 939
1,912
2
25
17
57
385
467
92
610
150
321
108
9
513
139
273
102
75
1
391
250
2, 729
193
218
2, 532
175
2 - - - - - -- - - - - - -- - - ----·-----
10 ------- -
1 --- - --
22 ------ - - ---- - ---
190 -- - - ---12
135 -- - ---- 16
117 - --- - - - - - - - -----
G
2
l03
100
23
1-----11-- - - - -1,052
-- - -476- -- - - -29 - --234
12, 550
__ ______
Ot ber assau lts _____ __ _- --- - - - - - - - - -- Arson ___ ____ __- __ ____ - - - -- - - - - - - - - - F orgery a nd counterfeiting __ _____ __ _
F ra u d _____ ___--- __ __- - - - - - - - - - - - - -- Em bezzlement ____ _____ _- - - - - - - - - - - S to len property; buy ing, receiv ing,
possessing ___ __ ____ _______ ___- - - - - Va n dalis m ____ _____ _____ __ __- - - -- - - - \Veapons; carry ing, possessing, etc ___
P ros tit u tion and commercia lized
vice __ - -- --- - - --- --- ------ --- ----- Sex offe nses (except forcible rape and_
pros t it u t ion) _____ ______ - - - - - -- - - - Na rcot ic d rug laws _______ ______ ____ _
G a mbling ____ ____ ________ __ _- - - -- -- OfTenses agains t famil y and ch ildr en _
D ri vin g under the influence __ __ ____ _
Liq u or la ws __ ___ __ ____ ____ ---- - - --- D runkenn ess ____ --- -- ---- - -- - - - -- -- Disorderl y conduct _______ _____ _____ V agrancy ___ ___ ___ __ - - -- -- - - - ----- -- -
37, 646
Ind ian C h inese

==
C rimina l homicide:
(a) Murder and n oaneglige n t
manslaughter ___ _____ _____ _
(b) M a nsla ughter by negligence _
F orcible rape__ _____________ ___ ______
Robbery _____ ________ - --- - - --- - ----- Aggravated assa ul t__ _____ ____ ______ _
Burglar y-breaking or entering _____ _
L a r cen y -theft__ ___ ________ ________ _
Auto theft ____ _____ _____ ________ ____ _
~ II ot h_er offen ses (exce pt traffic)- --- S us p1c10n ___ ___ _______ - - - . - - - - - - - - -- C urfew a nd loiter ing Ja w viola tions _
H un nways ___ __- - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Negro
3
381
29
38
57
233
4, 929
1, 524
2, 167
256
6, 863
745
1, 214
5, 166
==
12
9
10 - - -- -- - - ---- - - - - -- -- --- - - 4

5
3 ___ ___ __ __ __ ____
2
9 -------- - - ------ -- - -- - - - - - ---- -- - - - ---------
17
57
16
10 - - ------ ----- - - 70
6
1
5
64
1
3 - --- - --- - - --- ----- -------- - -- - ---- ------ -- --
321
24
27
55
209
4,607
1,202
1, 870
224
6, 103
655
1,046
4, 789
32
ll
1
2
46
38
169
9
414
82
29
121

- --- - --27 -________
1
21
251
274
114
6
231
l
- -- - ---1
10
21
2
I
I
24
10
13
1G
105
5
96
234
3
7
1
36
20
143
�Table 41.-Rural Arrests by Race, 1965-Continued
Arrests 18 and over
R ace
0 ffense charged
Total
White
TOTAL______ ___ __ _______ _____ _
Criminal homicide:
(a) Murder and nonnegligent
m an slau ghter_____ __ __ __ ___
(b) M a nslaughter by negligence_
Forcible rape________ ___ ___ ______ ____
Robbery_ ____ _ ________ ___ ___ __ ___ __
Aggravated assault_ __ ___ __ _______ ___
Burglary-breaking or entering______
Larceny-theft___ ______ ___ ____ __ ___ _
Auto theft__ ____ __________ ______ __ ___
20i, 050
Negro
Indian C hinese
- - - -1- - - - -169, 54i
22, 732
12, 881
1= = =1= = =1°= =
505
301
665
916
4, 620
7, 499
11, 076
2, 402
332
148
16
242
48
8
516
110
34
670
196
42
3,240
1, 164
169
6, 434
742
280
9, 275
1, 362
349
I, 974
214
197
Subtotal for above offenses ____i--2-7,-9-:-84-ll - - - -i- - - -l
22, 683
3, 984
1, 095
Other assaul ts __ _____ ------- - - __ __ ___
9, 474
7,237
1, 834
279
Arson __-- -- ------ -- --- - -- - - -- --- - - -248
228
14
6
Forgery and counterfeiting _____ ____ _
3, 553
3, 091
317
132
Fraud __-- _- __-- -- - -- -__- -____
- -- -__- -__
--_
8,365
7,703
549
Embezzlement_
__ -__--______
81
921
845
65
10
Stolen property ; buying, receiving,
possessing __ _________ ____ _____ ___ __
724
620
72
20
Vanda lism ____ _____ ___ _ ____·- -----1, 444
1,323
74
34
\ Veapons; carrying, possessing, etc ___
1, 43 1
990
419
9
Prostitut ion and commercialized
vice ______ - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - -,.- - - - - - · 130
86
40
3
Sex oITenses (except forcible rape a nd
prost itution) __ _______ __ ----_ -- . -- 1, 916
1, 704
146
49
Narcotic drug laws_ _____ _____ __ __ __ _
378
332
28
Gambling ____ ________ ______ __ ___ -- - _
1,207
4
8•12
344
3
OITeuses against family a nd child ren _
8,933
7,609
1, 074
220
D ri,·ing under t he influence__ _____ __
22, 2il
19, 343
1, 584
1, 22
L iq uor la\\·~-- --- ----- - ------------·11, 908
10,251
I , 123
433
Drunkenness ____ _-- --- - - --- - - ----- -53, 459
40, 727
5,1 85
6, 910
Disorderly conduct__ ____ ____ ____ __ __
13, 776
10, 606
I , 797
1, 148
Vagra ncy___ ____ ____________________ _
3, 311
2, 901
279
121
33, 663
A ll other oITenses (except t raffi c) _____
28, 755
3,605
1, 024
Sns picion ______ - - - - - - - __ - - - - __ -- -- _-1, 954
1, 671
199
Curfew and loitering law viola tions __ ____ ___ ___
72
lt una"·ays ___ ___ __ _______ ___ ____ __ ___ _____ _____ ------ --- - ------- --- -------
J ap a-
n ese
All
others
(includes
race unknown)
- - - - -- -
29
=
41

- ------ -2
1
1
3
1
2
2
-- ------ --- --- --
=
1. 820
9
4
6
45
40
89
17
4
8
21 0
2
6
116
I
2
11
29
1
11
13
13
I
--- ------------ --- --- ----- ---- ----- --3
1
5
5
I
4
I,
I
l
I
4
3
2
12
10
16
25
11 5
100
628
221
s
263

-- --12
- ----- -- ---- -- -- ---------- - -- ------- - ---- --- -- -- --- -- - - ----- -- -- ------ ---
144
�-
--
Table 42. - Suburban and Rural Arrest T re nds, 1 by Sex, 1964- 65
1,281 suburban agencies; l965 estimated populat ion 25,896,000
0 ffense charged
Males
1964
TOTAL ______ ___________ __ _____ ___ ____ ____
Criminal homicide:
(a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter
(b) Manslaughter by negligence _______ ____ _:
Forcible rape __ ________ __ ____ ___ ____ _______ ____ _
R
obbery
__ - assault_
-- - --------- --------------_______
__ ___ ___
Aggravated
_________
___ __ _____
__
Burglary- breaking or entering __ _____ ___ ___ ____
L arceny- theft _______________ __ ___ ___ __________
Au to theft_ __________ ___ _____ ________________ __ _
Subtotal for above offenses ____ __ __ _______
Other assan1ts _______ ____ ____ __ _____ ____ ________
Arson ________________________ ___ ____ ______ ___ __
Forgery and counterfeiting _____ ____ ___________ _
[[[Special:Contributions/143.215.248.55|143.215.248.55]]zzlement_ _________ __ _____ _:-::::::::: :::_
Stolen property;
ying, receiving,
Vandalism
_______ bu
__ __________
__ ______possessing
______ ___ -Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc __ __ ____ __ ____
P rostitu tion and commercialized vice __ _______ __
Sex offenses (except forcible rape and prostitu-
g:~i~l~t~-~'.143.215.248.55 15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)= :::::::::::::::::::::::::::-
Offenses against fami l y and children ____ _______D riving u nder the influence ________ _____ __ ___ __
Liquor laws ____ _____ ___ ______ _____ __ ____ _____ __
Drunkenness __ __ ___________ _____ ___ __________ __
Disorderly conduct_ ____ ____ _________ ___ _______ _
Vagrancy_____ ____ ______ ___ __________ _________ __
AU other offenses (except traffic) ___ ___ _______ ___
Suspicion (not included in totals) _____ _________ _
Curfew and loitering law violations ____ __ ___ ___ _
Runa,vays ______ __ __ _______ _______ _______ __ ____
.....
fj>..
Ol
502, 962
1965
614 rural agencies; 1965 estimated population 12,340,000
Percent
change
1964
1965
525,607
-t4- 5
65, 856
68, 975
513
456
1, 272
3,268
7, 6~1
27,569
48,525
14,500
547
420
1,340
3,773
8,646
28,561
40,281
14, ll4
+6. 6
- 7.9
+5.3
+15.5
+13.4
+3.6
+1.6
- 2. 7
llO
66
ll2
53
103, 724
106, 682
+ 2.0
-3. 6
+33.3
- 15.0
+4.0
+. 1
+16.2
+3. 1
+6. 8
- 10. 5
+2.5
-4. 5
+18.3
+21.2
020
331
352
669
2,677
2,433
0, 427
6,548
634
ll, 906
1,018
818
484
279
647
2,588
2, 878
8,823
6,833
556
ll, 564
898
3, 360
7,014
2,592
5,867
62
25
+37.8
+4.2
367
398
740
854
3,500
12,037
13, 319
4,308
+16.5
+.5
-. 8
- 10. 1
+ 6.1
- 2.5
- 4.1
- 10. 7
35,523
- 3. 4
1, 896
1,939
+2.3
441
22
486
636
70
47
146
61
175
474
20
556
767
00
70
141
50
87
+1.5
- 0.1
+14. 4
+20.6
+ 28.6
+48.9
- 3.4
- 18.0
- 50.3
188
79
63
343
6il
1, 381
2,489
1,160
169
3, 237
220
225
1,482
150
99
75
290
616
1, 748
2,346
1,327
148
3,005
126
236
1, 547
- 20. 2
+25.3
+19.0
- 15.5
- 8.2
+ 26.6
- 5. 7
+14.4
- 12. 4
- 7.2
- 42. 7
+4.9
+ 4.4
36, 766
6,608
3, ll7
2,924
10, 205
35,990
26,040
105,660
57, 267
7, 232
77,573
10,002
12,407
10,926
45
24
+1.8
-10. 7
+ 0. 1
6,853
2,339
3, 442
9,811
35,949
22,413
102,456
53,635
8,077
75, 702
10,469
10,484
8,592
+2. 0
+ 1. 5
16,084
2, 320
67
82 1
1,616
326
179
845
245
628
15, 781
191, 727
14, 746
2, 188
58
835
1,612
270
200
732
258
583
15,467
188, 833
+ 4.0
+4.3
· -6.8
+u. 1
+s.s
+2.6
+32. 0
+4.0
+ 5.o
+4. 8
+4. 1
+10.s
+ 5.3
+22.8
1965
+4. 7


828
1, 022
13,319
595
25,845
1, 167
3,626
6,336
1, 478
2,246
16, 743
5,336
100
Percent
change
1964
1965
704
1,007
ll, 083
547
25,179
884
3,485
6,033
1, 410
2, 158
15, 105
5,069
162
Percent
change
1964
Percent
change
315
396
746
950
3,300
12,347
13,890
4, 822

149
--------155
Females
Males
F emales
- -- -
+6.0
+15. 5- 1. 7
+.2
+16. 8
- 14. 4
+15.4
- 5.0
+1. 7
7, 404
357
3, 142
3,868
632
838
3,255
1,593
85
7,195
332
3,063
4,143
656
946
3,603
1,471
52
- 2. 8
-7.0
- 2.5
+7.1
+3.8
+12.9
+13. 5
- 7. 7
-38.8
- 11.1
+46.2
- 20. 7
- 3.3
- 3.3
+ 18.3
- 6.4
+4. 4
-12. 3
- 2.9
-11. 8
+29.6
+19. 6
1, 721
542
1, 078
6,219
17,340
15, 513
38, 705
12, 508
2,351
31,150
2,175
729
2,938
1,696
604
1, 162
6, 734
17,051
17,027
39,231
13,138
2,091
31,323
1,712
786
2,820
- 1. 5
+2s.o
+7. 8
+8.3
-1. 7
+15. 6
+1.4
+4.3
-ll. 1
+. 6
- 21.3
+1.s
- 4. 0
--- ------ --------38-- -65
216
378
963
205
223
355
1,059
177
- 41.5
+3.2
- 6. 1
+10.0
- 13. 7
- -- - - - - -
1 In suburban agencies male ~rrests under 18 increased 6.6 percent and female arrests under 18 increased 15.5 percent.
In ru ral agencies male arrests u nder 18 increased 1.0 percent a nd female arrests under 18 111creased 6.4 percent.
�Police Employee Data
h This sec ti@ contoins tables relating to police personnel . Figures
_"'.mg police streng th by number of full-time police officers and
0
ivilian employ ees are based on national aver ages. These figures
sho~ ld no t be in terpreted as indicating recommended or desU-able
police streng th. Adequ ate police requiremen ts for a specific place
can only be determined following careful study and analysis of t he
local situation together with a thorough evaluation of the numerous


.


factors which affect local police needs.
T wo tables con taining police employee rates are set for th. In th e
fu·st, total employees including civilian personnel are used, whereas
lil the second table only sworn personnel are used _
to ~ompu te ~-a~~s.
The police employee J·ate ranges in T able 43, whi~h mclude mvilmns,
show t he in terquartile range between the upper _hnnts of the lowest
qu artile and the lower li,nits of the highest quartile. ,In other words,
50 p m·cent of the cities shown in each popul ation group and geographic division have a police strength within th~ r~te ranges shown
By arraying rates in this manner, ex'"'mes are ebnunated.
In T able 44 where rates are published for pobce officers, complete
rate .
·d d
upplemental data for t hose who may be
1anges are prov1 e as s
. .
.
interested in usin. • these fioures
toyear
make
brrllted
c?mpan
sons. for all
"'
d
th'
showinopolice
strength
0
A
s n oth er
. table 1s presente
·
is atrol organizatwns.
·"' ·
Th'JS t abl e JS
·
tate p ohce and state highway P b . f miles of state and Federal
O
. one d t o sh ow, b Y s tate , the num ll
the number of re0'1stered
.
desiO'
er
h10'h
. emP1Oyee' as we• as
. o as to
o way p e1. sworn
nlY a rouo-h yardstick
v eh'1c1es p er officer. Th ese rates are
o
o
because
of widely dif1 treno-th
co ~ paratJve
· world oad an d personne
s
"'
.
The wide v.,,iations in sworn and
fermg fun ctions and other {acto~s. tates can be accounted for in part
c·ivi}'ian p ersonnel among the van
ous sassianed to the departments. It
'bil't'
by the differences in responsJ : J:s te p~lice generally are responsible
is p oin ted ou t, fo r instance, th !1 sl a conduct a major portion of t he
not only for traffic pa t 1.0 1, but
.
ha so incorp orated are!1S of the states.
=ork
1
n
t
e un
·
·
·
·
. . of
t he state highway pa t ro1 orgamzaCrrmm al investign,t1 ve .,
On t he other hand, the acti_vi~Y d t t roific and highway patrol, which
.
t ·e 1u:r11te : o which come to t h eJI'
. . attention
.
t· ions for t he m ost p ar ai s of cilroe
f
h
ncludes handlincr all type .
t . 1 functions. Many o t ese state
1
.
"'
f their pa 1 0
durmg the p erforro o.nce O
147
�highway p atrol groups also ar e au t horized to and do p articip ate in
criminal investigative work wh en r equested to do so b y local d ep art m ents or sh eriffs' offices.
The annu al collection of police employee data provides figures for
p olice killed and assaulted . Collection of these data is supplemented
'with r espect to p olice killed in th e line of duty b y the use of a special
questionnaire, through the use of which addi tion al d etails on t hi
imp or tan t subject ar e acc umula ted. D ata r elat iv e to p olice killed
and assaulted are also presented in th e Summary Section of this
publication.
T able 43 . -Full - Time Police D ep a rtme nt Employees, 1 D e c e m ber 31, 1965 ,
N umbe r and Rate per 1,000 Inhabi t ants, by G e og raphic Divisions a.n d
Population Groups
[1965 est imat ed p opulatio n]
P opulation group
G eogra p hic division
TOTAL
(3,613
cities ;
po pulation
109,633,000)
TOTAL : 3, 613 cities ;
population 109,633,000 :
Number of police
e mployees . ..•.. ..
A verage number of
e mployees per
1,000 inha bita nts . .
Interqu artile ra n ge_
Ne w E ngla nd : 331
cities ; population
8,216,000 :
N umber of police
em ployees .... __ ..
Average n umber of
em p loyees per
1,000 inhabitan ts _
In terquartile ra n ge_
Midd le Atla n tic : 776
cities; population
24 ,456,000:
N u mber of police
em p loyees ........
Average nwn ber of
employees per
1,000 inha bitants _
I n ter q u artile ran ge.
East North Ce ntral : 810
cities i population
23,827,000 :
Nwn ber of police
employees . ...... .
A v erage n u m ber of
employees per
1,000 in h a bi ta n ts_
In terq uartile ra nge_
West North Central : 399
cities; population
8,369,000 :
N u mber of police
emp!oyees ...... ..
Average nwnber of
employees per
1,000 inha b ita n ts _
I nter quartile range_
G rou p V
(974 cities,
10,000 to
25,000;
p opulatio n
15,016,000)
Group VI
(l,842 cities
u nder
10,000;
popul a tion
9,806,000)
22, 589
21, 984
21, 008
14. 567
1. 7
1. 3-1. 9
1. 5
1. 2-2. 1
1. 5
1. 1- 1. 7
1. 4
1. 1- 1. 6
1. 5
1. 0-1. 8
2, 842
4,022
2, 941
2,372
873
2. 5
2. 1-2. 7
I. 6-2. 0
1. 9
l. 7
l. 4-1. 9
1.4
1. 1-l. 5
I. 2
0. 7-1. 4
3,254
4,289
4,423
4, 930
3. 224
2.0
1. 8- 2. 3
1.
l. 0- 2. l
1. 7
1. 2-2. 0
1. 5
l. 1-1. 8
0. 8-1.,
3, 714
4,330
4,533
4. 397
3. 2f>
I. 6
I. 6-1. 7
l. 1-1.6
1. 1- 1. 5
1. 1-1. 5
1, SGl
Gro u p II
(92 cit ies,
100,000 to
250,000;
popu lation
I 3,035,000)
212, 883
110, 666
22, 069
1. 9
1. 1- 1. 8
2. 6
1. 5-2. 7
15, 746
1. 9
1.1- 1. 7
2, 696 1
(')
4.1 1
Grou p Ill
(217 cit ies,
· 50,000 to
100,000;
popula t ion
14,891,000)
I
62, 967
42, 847 1
61
2. 6
1. 0-1. 8
3.
2. 9-3. 8
45, 367
25, 129
I
6
1. 9
1.1- 1. 6
2. 7 1
l. 6-3. 0
13, 021
5, 904
1, 156
944
1,510
1. 6
1. 0- 1. 5
2. 2
1. 4-2. I
l. 3
1. 2-1. 3
1. 2
0. 9-l. 3
1. 2
I. 0-1. 3
See footnotes at end of t a ble.
148
G rou p I V
(433 cit ies,
25,000 to
50,000;
popula tion
15,061,000)
Grou p I
(55 cit ies
over
250,000;
populati9n
41,822,~00)
1. 4
I. 4
1. 3
1. 2
1.0-1. 5
l. 4
1. 4
l. 0-1.
1, 64
I.
I. 0-1.
C,
�Table 43. - Full - Tim e Police Depar t m e nt Employees, 1 D ecembe r 31, 1965,
Numbe r and Rate per 1,000 In ha bitan ts , by G eog raphic Divis ions and
Population G roups - Continued
[1965 estim a ted po pulation ]
P opul a tion group
TOTAL
Geogr a phi c divisio n
South Atlantic: 321
cities; population
10,66 1,000 :
N u mber of p olice
e mp loyees __ ______
A verage number of
employees per
1,000 inha bita n ts _
I nte r q u a r tile ra n ge _
East South Ce n tr al : 135
cities; po pulation
4,570,000 :
N um ber of p olice
e m plo yees __ _____ _
A verage n um ber of
e mployees p er
1,000 in hab itants _
Io ter q uartile r ange _
West South Ce ntr a l: 258
cities i pop ulation
10, 174,000:


-.I umbe r of police


employees __ - ----Average n um ber of
e m ployees per
1,000 inh abita n ts _
Inter qua r tile ra n ge_
Mounta in : 176 cities;
population 4,502, 000 :
N u m ber o f poli ce
employees-- -- ---.Axerage number of
employees per
l 000 in h a bita n ts _
rnt'erquartile ra nge _
P acifi c : 407 cities ;
po p ulation 14, 858,000 :
N umber of police
employees- - - - - - - A vorage n u mber of
employees per
J 000 inh abitants_
Interquartile r a nge_
(3, 613
cities;
pop ula t io n
109,633 ,000)
Grou p I
(55 cit ies
over
250,000;
population
41 ,822,000)
21, 892
G roup II
(92 cities,
100,000 to
250,000;
popula tion
13,035,000)
G rou p III
(217 cities,
50,000 to
100,000;
popula t ion
14,891,000)
G roup I V
(433 cit ies,
25,000 to
50,000 ;
popula t ion
15,061,000)
G roup V
(974 cities,
10,000 to
25,000;
populat ion
15,010,000)
Gro up V I
(1 ,842cities
u n der
10,000;
popul a t ion
9,806,000)
9, 431
4, 258
2, 324
2, 124
2, 088
l , 667
2. 8
1. 4-2. 1
I. 7- 3. 6
1. 6
l. 3- l. 8
l. 8
l. 5-l. 9
1. 6
1.4-l. B
I. 7
1. 4-2. 1
1.9
1. 3-2. 2
7, 224
2, S30
1,583
456
1, 070
688
59i
1. 6
1. 3-1. 8
1. 6
I. 5-1. 6
I. 5-1. 9
I. 7
I. 4-2. 0
I. 6
I. 4-1. 7
l. 4
1.1-1. 7
l. 6
1. 2- 2. 0
13, 960
6,889
2, 154
! , 476
1,311
I, 256
874
1. 4
1. 0-1. 5
1. 5
1. 2- 1. 9
I. 4
1. 2-1. 4
I. 2
1.1-1. 4
I. l
l. 0- 1. 3
1. 2
0. 9-1. 5
l. 4
l. 0- l. 7
6, 719
2,442
605
913
1,190
750
19
1. 5
1. 2- 1. 8
I. 4
I. 3- l. 8
1. 9-2. 5
6
I. 3
I. 2- 1. 4
1. 3
I. 0-1. 5
J. 6
L 3-1. 9
25, 987
12, 498
2,503
3,835
2, 882
2,066
1, 603
1. 7
1. 3- 1. 9
2.1
1. 3-2. 3
1. 5
1. 3-1. 7
1. 4
I. 2-1. 5
1. 5
I. 2- 1. 6
1. 6
1. 3-1. 8
l. 4- 2. 3
2. 1
1. 6
2. 0
I. 6
I . 0-1.
1. 9
S u b ur ban Pol!ce a nd County Sb en ff D epartments
Suburb a n: a 1,770 a gencies; p opulation
40
of police employees _______ __
A vernge nwnber of employees per
J 000 inh abi t ants _ --------- ---- - ---
·J~~;,~~2;
lnt~rq ua.rLile ran ge_ - - - - --- - ---- - - - --
55,040
I. 4
1. 0-1. 6
populatio n
Sh er iffs: 1,1 54 a ge n cies ;
32,357 ,000 :
N umber of police employees __ __ ____ _
A verage num ber of emplo yees per
1,000 inha bi tan ts __ __ ______ _______ _
I nterq uar t ile ra nge ___________ ___ __ __
32, 159
1. 0
0. 3- 0. !l
'. I ncl~des ci v iliagf~ s ize in geographi c division .
- <\Jnl) one citdyptop.ul a t· 1-0 n r epresented iu s u bu r ba n a rea a re also included in other city gro u ps.
gcnc1es an
Popu lation figu res ro u nded to t h e nea r est tho usa n d . A ll rates were calculated on the po pul a t ion before
3 1
rounding.
14!)
�Table 44,.- Full- Time Police Depart,n e nt Officers, December 31, 1965, Number
and Rate per 1,000 Inhabitants, by Geographic Divisions and Population
Groups
[1965 estim a ted population]
P opula tion group
T OTAL
(3,613
G eogra phic division
cities;
popula tion
109, 633, •
000)
G roup I
(55 cities
over
250,000;
popula t ion
41,822,000)
Group II
(92 cities,
100,000 to
250,000;
pop ula t ion
13,035,000)
Group III
(21 7 cities,
50,000 to
100,000;
p opulation
14,891,000)
Group I V
(433 cit ies,
25,000 to
50,000;
population
15,061,000)
Group V
(974 cities ,
10,000 t o
25 ooo·
pop~lation
15,016,000)
Grou p V J
(l ,842 cities
und er
10,000:
p opul nLion
9,806,000)
20,191
19, 972
19,370
13. 086
I. 4
TOTAL: 3,613 cities;
population
109,633 ,000:
Number of police
officers ___ __ ______ _
Average number of
officers per 1,000
inhabita nts _____ ___
Rate range ___ ____ ___
N ew England: 331
cities; population
8,216,000 :
N umber of police
officers _________ ___
Average number of
officers p er 1,000
inhab itan ts ______ _
R ate ran ge __ ____ ____
M iddle Atla ntic : 776
cities; population
24 ,456,000 :
Number of police
officers _____ ____ ___
Average number of
officers per 1,000
inhabitan ts ___ ___ _
R a te range __ ____ ____
East North Ce ntral : 810
190,005
1. 7
0. 1- 7. 5
14, 789
98,147
o. 8-2. 7
o. 6-3. 2
1. 3
. 0. 2- 3. 3
1. 3
0. 1-5. 2
0. 1- 7. 5
2,495
2,608
3,766
2,801
2,289
830
3. 8
2. 3
2. 0--2. 7
I. 1-2. 6
o. 9-2. 7
1. 6
1. 3
0. 5--3. 0
o. 2-3. 5
2. 3
I. 0--3.
1.8
0. 2-3. 8
19, 239
(1)
I. 5
). 8
I. 3
I. I
58, 651
39,842
2, 930
3,953
4, 197
4, 710
3. 01
2. 4
0. 1-5. 7
3. 3
1. 6-3. 5
1. 0
1. 3-2. 3
1. 5
0. 6-3. 2
o. 5--3. 3
1. 6
1. 4
0. 1-5. 2
0. 1- 5.
40,529
22, 367
3, 297
3,891
4, 086
4. 01 6
1. 7
0. 2-4. 4
2. 4
1. 0--2. 9
1.4
1-1. 7
o. 6-2. 5
o. 7-2. 7
I. 2
1. 2
0. 3-3. I
11, 099
4,758
1,008
838
1,355
1, 683
I. 4ii
1. 3
0. 3- 3. 7
1. 8
1. 1- 2. 8
). 1
0. 8- 1. 5
o. 6-1. 3
1.0
1.0
0. 4- 1. 5
1. 1
0. 5- 2. 7
0. 3- 3.
19,367
8,267
3,706
2, 065
1, 881
I, 931
1.8
0. 3- 7. 6
I. 3-3. 6
2. 5
). 4
0. 9-2. 0
1. 6
1. 0--2. 7
). 5
0. 6-2. 0
1. 6
0. 4- 3. 6
6,239
2, 366
l, 289
411
985
647
"
1. 4
0. 2-4. 2
1. 3
1. 2- 1. 4
I. 3
I. 1- 1. 7
I. 6
1. 3-2. 0
1. 4
I. 1- 1. 8
I. 3
0. 6-2. J
1.
0. 2--1.
).
I
cities; population
23 ,827,000:
Number of p olice
omcers __ __________
A verage number of
officers per 1,000
inhabita n ts ___ ___ .
R a te ran ge _____ __ ___
West North Central :
399 cities; population
8,369,000:
N umber of p olice
offi cers __ ___ __.. __ _
A verage number of
officers p er 1,000
inhabita nts ____ ___
Rate range __________
South Atla ntic: 321
cities ; population
10,661,000:
N umber of police
officers __________ __
Average number of
offirers per 1,000
inha bit ants ___ ____
R ate ran ge __ _____ ___
East South Central :
135 cities; population
4,570,000:
Number of police
omcers ___ __ _. _____
Average number of
officers per 1,000
inhabita nts _______
Rate ra n ge __ ____ __ __
See footnotes a t e nd of t abl e .
150
).
1. 2
2, 87
I.
0. 2- 4.
).
1, 5 1
1.
o. 3--7.
41
�Table 44.-Full- Tim,e Police D epartm,e nt Officers, December 31, 1965, Nurnber
and Rate per 1,000 Inhabitants, by G eographic Divis ions and Population
Groups- Continued
(I965 estimated popula tion)
Popula t ion group
TOTAL
Geogra phic di v ision
(3,613
cities;
p opulatio n
109,633,000)
Group II
(92 cities,
100,000 t o
250,000;
250,000;
p opula tion popul a tion
41,822.000) 13,035,000)
Group I
(55 c it ies
over
G roup III
(217 cities,
50,000 to
100,000;
popula tion
14,891,000)
Group IV
(433 c ities,
25,000 to
50,000;
popula tion
15,061,000)
Group V
(974 cities,
10,000 to
25,000;
population
15,016,000)
Group VI
(l ,842 cit ies
under
10,000;
popula t ion
9,806,000)
--West South Central:
258 cities; population
10,174,000:
Nwnber of police
offi cers ___ __. . .. · -A verage n um ber of
offi cers per 1,000
inha bita nts .... - ··
R ate ra nge_·····- - · ·
Mountain: 176 cities;
population 4 ,502,000:
Num b er of p olice
offi cers .. -.. ·-- . . ..
Average n wn b er of
offi cers per 1,000
inha b itants. ____. .
R ate range . .... -··-·
Pacific : 407 cities;
population 14,858 ,000 :
N um ber of p olice
offi cers._. _.. . ___..
Average nwnb er of
offi cers per 1,000
in habit ants. -·- -·.
R ate range.... -- - ···
5, 900
I, 836
1, 319
I, 171
I, 111
756
1. 2
0. 3-2. 4
I. 3
1. 0-1. 8
I. 2
0. 9-1. 6
I.I
0. 6-1. 5
1.0
0. 5-1.4
o. 3-2. 4
1.0
1. 2
0.4-2. 4
5, 725
2, 037
803
I, 033
653
700
1. 3
0. 2- 3. 2
1. 0-1. 5
I. 6
1. 3-2. 3
]. 2
0. 9-1. 7
I.I
0. 5-1. 6
o. 4-2. 2
o. 2-3. 2
21, 513
10, 115
2, 066
3, 145
2,463
2,330
I, 394
1. 4
I. 7
I. 0- 1. 9
I. 3
1.0-1. 7
o. 9-1.9
I. 2
I. 3
0. 2-3. 2
I. 4
0. 7- 2. 5
1.6
0. 4-3. i
12,093
o. 2---3. 7
I. 3
499
I.I
I. 4
S u b ur ban Police a n d Count y S hen IT D e pa r tme n ts
Suburban: 2 1,770 a gencies ; population
40. 251. 000:
Num ber of police officers _.. -- · · · ·· · ·
A ,·erage n umbe r of ofli 9ers p e r 1,000
inhabitants _____ __- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Ra te range __···- · - · -- ·· - · ·· -· · - · ·-·-
,is. 446
I. 2
0.1- 7. 5
Sheriffs: 1,154 agencies; population
32,357,000 :
Number of officers ..... · -······- - ·· ··
A verage n u mber of officers p er 1,000
inha bita nts·- · ··- ---- · ····-·-·-·· ··
R a t e range. -. - - ----- - -···· · · ·-·-·· · ·
27, 299
0. 8
0.1-9. 7
Onl y '?ne cit y t his size in geograp h icdd ivisig~~ba n ar ea a re a lso includecl in other city groups.
Agencies and populat.1011 represente 1n s u
Popula tion figures round ed t o the n ea rest t h ou sau d. A ll rates were calcula ted on tbe popul a tion before
1
2
rou nd ing.
151
�Table 45.-Civilian Police D epartme nt Employ ees, D ec e mbe r 31, 1965,
Percentage of Tot al by Population Group
P ercentage
ci,ilian
employees
Population grou p
TOTAL, ALL CITIES _ _____ __ ___ ____ ____ ____ ___ -------- ----- - - - - --- - --------- ______ __
10. 7
G roup I (over 250,000) ___ _____ ____________ __________ ___ ___ _____ ____ _____ ____ ____ ______ _____ _I= = = = =
II. 3
(Over 1,000,000) _______ - - _- - -- - -- - -- - __- - - -- - - ----- _____ - - - ___ ___ _____ ____ ______ _______ _
9. 6
(500,000-1,000,000) __- _-- ___ -- ----- __ ---- --- --- __ ___ ---- - - _-- _- - -- - - __- - - ____ ____ ________
12. 4
14. 9
12. 8
ro~~i~tit~~i.50-,000)::: :::::::::::::::::::::::: :::::::::::::::::::::::::: :::::::::::::
G rou p III (50 ,000-100,000) - ______ - - - - - - ---- ------ - -- - -- - - - --- ___________ ______ _______ ______ _
G
10. (i
G roup I V (2.'i,000-50,000) - _---- --------- - - --- - - - -- --- ---------- --- ----- - - -- ------- - ____ _____
G rou p V (10,000-25,000) - ------ - ------------- - - - - - -- - ---- -- -- -- - - -- - ----- - - - - -- - - ---- _____ __
G roup VI (2,500-10,000)- -- --- - - - ----------------- - -- ----- - - - -- - - - - - - --- - - - - --- - --- - - - - - __ __
9. 2
7. S
10. 2
Su burban agen cies ______- - - - ------ - - - - -- - -- - - -- - --- -- -- - - -- - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - -- - ______ ____ ___
Sheriffs __ __ ___ -- - - -- - - --- - -- --- - -- -- -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
12. 0
15. I
Table 4-6.-Nurnbe r of Police Officers K illed,' 1965, by Geo graph ic Divisions
and Popu lation Groups
Popula tion group
Geographic
division
TOTAL
Grou p! G roupII G roupII!GroupIV GroupV G roup VI
Over
250,000
TOTAL _ ______ __
'ew England ____ ____ _
M iddle Atla ntic _____ _
East Nor th CentraL __
" 'est Nor th CentraL_
Sou th Atlantic ___ ___ __
Eas t Sou th CentraL _
W est South CentraL _
Mountain __________ __
P acific ________ _______ _
1
83
3
10
IO
3
15
9
14
7
12
100,000 to 50,000 to
250,000
100,000
20

-- - - - - --- ------ --- ------- - --- --- ---
3
1
1 ----- - ---5 ---------- --- ------- ------ - - -
10,000 to
25,000
U nder
10,000
12
! ----------
40
2
2
I --- - ----- - __ _ _______ ______ ____
3
2
I - -- -- -- - - - - - - -- -- -· . . ___ . _. _ __
J
3 ---- - ----- ---------- ---------2 - -- - - ---- ----- --- i- -- -- -----1
3

·- ---------1
53 killed b y felons; 30 k illed in accidents.
152
25,000 to
50,000
Count y.
Sta te
Police and
Higlrn·ay
P atrol
3
3
3
g
5
9
2
f,
�,,
-
•. , ~ . . . , . . . _ .....,.....,
-~~


-
r ,.....,- .,..........,...~ ...-----"*·
-_____.,....,..,


-
Table 47. - Assaults on Police Officers , 1965, by G eog raphic D ivis ions and Popula tion Group s
(4,652 agencies; IY65 estimated population 125,029,000]
Geographic d i,·ision
Total
assaults
R ate per
JOO poli ce
om ccrs
TOTAL __ _______ _______ _____ ________ _
N ew England ____ ______ _
Middle Atlan t ic_______ __::::::- - - -------- -- -E ast No rth Cent rnL ______ _
\Yest No rt h Cent ral

--
1l~~1~~F143.215.248.55\~f:-~===:::~=~l15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST)143.215.248.55
20, 523
1, 140
5, 868
3. 320
I. 021
3. 585
1, 227
898
95 1
2. 513
Assaults R at e per
wit h
100 police
inju r y
Population gro u p
6,836
3. 6
TOTAL __ ____ --- -- ·- ------- ----- -----
9. 7
9. 5
9. 2
5 18
I. 704
4. 4
2. 7
I.O•JO
2. 9
8. 8
17. 8
I .3
462
I. 28 1
278
3 14
·103
827
G roup I
(Over 250,000) ___ . --- - -- -------------- - -Group TI
(1 00,000 to 250,000) _____ -·--- --- - - --- - --- Gro
u p I ll
(50,000 to I00.000) _________ __ ____________ _
Grou p I V
(25,000 to 50.000).- - -- -------------------Group V
( 10,000 to 25,000) _____ - - . . - --- - - - - - - · - - --G rou p VI
(U nder J0 ,000) ___ __ _____________ - - -------
10. 6
- -- - = ==,l====I
8. 7
I 2. 9
JO. 8
4. 0
6. 4
4. 2
3.0
5. 5
3. 5
1 - -- ----- - - ----- --- ----S uburba___
n ___
agencies
Sheriffs
__ _____________
________ ___ ____
1
Total
assaults
Agen cies and popul ation represented in s uburban area are also in rluded in other city groups .
Ra te per
JOO police
officers
ofl:icers
Assa ul ts Rate per
wi t h
JOO police
injury
officers
3. 6
20, 523
10. 8
6. 836
9, 667
JJ. 5
2. 917
3. 5
I. 763
11. 9
684
4. 6
2. 156
12. G
763
4. 5
2,2 15
J l. 7
785
4. 2
1,857
9. 7
65 1
3. 4
1, 358
10. 5
468
3. G
3. 759
507
8. 8
I. 392
G.8
568
3. 2
2. 6
1;
�Table 48 . -Fu ll- T i m e State Police and Hig h way Patro l Employees,
- D ecembe r 31, 1965
Sta te
Alabama _______ ____ ____ -Alas ka ____ _________ ____ __
Arizona ____ ____ _____ _. __ _
Ark ansas __ ____ ___- - __ - - - -
TOTAL
510
147
414
Ca lifornia ____ __________ __
Colorado _________ __ •. ____
Connecticut _____________ _
333
4, 277
502
7il
D elawa re ___ __ ___ __ __ ____ _
Florida __ __ ________ ______ _
Georgia. ___ _______ ______ _
Idaho __ ___ ________ _____ __
Illinois ________ . __ __. ____ _
1, 378
743
Ind iana ______ ________ ____
Io,va ___ ___ ____ ___ ___ ___ __
Kansas _________ __ _____ ___
K en t ucky __ ____ _______ ___
Louis iana ____ _____ __ ___ __
. '.f nine_____ ______ __ _______
M a ryland _________ __ - -- - M assachusetts __ __ __ _. __._
M ichiga n __ _____ __ -- - --- - Nfinnesota _____ _________ __
Mississippi__ _______ __ __ __
M issouri . . ___ _____ ____ · ·Montana .. _.... · - - · - . ·- · ·
Nebraska _· ·· ·· - ... · · - · - · .
N evada. __ __. . ·- ··· .·· ··New H a mpshire . .. .. . __..
New J ersey· · · ·· ·· - · · · ·- · ·
N ow lVIex ico ______ ________
New Yo rk . . .. ·- ··· · · · - ··, orth Ca rolina . . .. . - · ·· -·
orth Dakota . . · · · · · ---· ·
Ohi o·- · · ··- ··· · ····· ·-·· ·
Okl a homa_. . .. _... ·· - -.·Oregon· - - · - ····- · · · · - . ...
Pennsyl vanin __ _____ ___ ___
Rhode Island . . .. -. . · -· · ··
South Carolin a_. . ... . . _. .
Sou t h D a kota . . ·-· · · - ··- ·
Tennessee _________ ___ ___ _
rrexas . - ---- - - - -- -- - -----Utah . .. -··········· ·- - · -·
Vermon t. - ....... . . · - ··-·
V irgin ia ____________ __ ___ _
Was hington . .. _·· ··· -···.
West Virginia·- ·-· · ···· · ·
Wisconsin . . . . ___ .. ___. _. .
W yom it1g _· ··· · ·-· · · - ·· · ·
154
284
175
1, 717
Pol ice
offi cers
433
107
324
248
3, 135
33 7
557
I, 179
733
350
333
692
250
468
749
297
77
10
29
538
332
194
83
224
180
569
246
788
51
-290
3ii
95
462
156
•162
647
I , 14 5
230
2,588
698
569
3 13
65 1
2,64 1
152
5S6
2,285
234
220
123
190
1, 074
737
410
416
98
ifi5
42 1
3 12
232
7
3, 032
2, 400
I. 665
I, iiO
3, 1-1 0
2, 995
3, lfii"
3 13
3 1. 6
23 . I
4 744
16. 3
3. i i 5
2. 080
3. 39,
I : 884
38. 2
23
14. 0
4, 386
2. 34.J
I. 7
•I.,. 0
2. -190
3 7. 3
2
193
14
549
256 1- ------ - --- !
95 - ··-······-·
3!! 1::::::::::::
39 1··-···- · -···
1,
,j ,
4,5. I
7. 7
14. 8
2. 4
3. 613
·L 2-Hi
51
15
76
JO
I , 374
3,599
H52
2. 444
3, 52 1
3,043
3. 303
2/ -11 2
41. 2
41. 2
25
63 1
2, 430
p er police
ofli cer
I , 039
4, I 10
3, -157
2, 874
7. 3
32 1
127
429
State m otor
ve hi cle
registrat ions
2. 7
15. fi
30. I
32. G
13. 5
14. 9
28. 3
3. 8
54
245
56
134
1, 395
48 1
147
888
138
538
143
78
8 46
2. 2
19G
472
1,403
4. 5
24. 8
684
3 18
306
2, 909
89 1
92
48. 9
58
I , 255
197
296
71
157
15. 7
85
I , 142
165
2 14
1, 078
785
1, 573
618
1, 000
21. 8
20. 0
90
226
694
547
146
1, 065
544
iWiles of
primary
high way
p er p olice
officer
Police
killed
C ivilia n
6gb
68
7
309
316
98
·--·-··--·a·
1· ····--·-··-·
·- · ······· .•
-··· · ·····-·
--···· ·--···
'
I
184 1- -- ···· · · · · ·
II
-··· · ····-··
-'. 2
18. 6
8 1. I
21. 8
37. 6
.6
fi. fi
7. G
2 1. 8
70. 9
13. 9
44. 4
24 . 4
18. 3
11 . 3
10. 0
l (i. 4


i O. 3


fi3. I
2, 20fi
2, 213
2, 909
4, 93.1
5, :')2 1
4, ·11 0
I. 91 0
2. JO~
3. on~
2. -100
3. fiJ:J
2,48 1


J. Sfi(i


2, 23:l
I. 3fi8
2,23 1
3. ,.~,
2, I ! ti
7. if\7
2. :')(i~
�Table 49 .- Num b e ,· of Full - Time Police D epartme nt Employees, D ece mbe r 31,
1965, C itie s 25 ,000 and o ver in Population
' umber of police depar t·
ment employees
Number of police depart·
meat employees
City by state
City by state
Total
51
542
44
60
58
81
203
321
227
42
101
50
482
40
58
53
78
155
256
192
41
95
1
60
4
2
5
3
48
65
~5
1
r,
ALASKA
Anchorage . . ........ .
92
70
22
ARIZONA
F lagstaff. . .. ..... .. . .
G lendale ... . ........ .
M esa . . ............ . .
Phoenix .... . ....... .
Scottsdale ... . ...... .
Tempe .... ... . . ..... .
I'ucson .. ........... .
1run1a_- - -- --- -- -- - --
32
4_1
55
798
59
42
349
29
38
49
3
3
6
677
121
50
38
266
9
4
8~
1
42
41
23
35
98
44
196
99
22
l
29
6
ARKANSAS
Blythe ville . . . . ..... .
El Dorado . ... ..... . .
Fort Sm it h .. .. . . . . . .
Bot Sprin gs .... . ... .
Little Rock . .. .... .. .
No rt h Little Rock ..
Pine B luff . .... ..... .
62
92
43
177
94
59
6
l
19
5
3
CALIFORNIA
Ala meda... ..... .
A lhambra. ___ - - - - - - Anaheim ___ ______ -- -
Arcad ia ..... ... . . .. . .
Azusa .... . ...... .
B a ke rs field ... ...... .
Baldwin Park . .. ... .
Berkeley ... .......• ·
Bcvc rlv Hills . ..... .
Buena.Park .. . .
Bu rha n k .... .. . ..... .
Burlingame.. ..
. ..
C hula Vista .. ... ... .
Compton.. ...
. ··
Concor d ... .. .
Cost a Mesa .. .. .
Covina ____ ___ _
C ul ver C ity .. .
Daly C ity ... . .
Downey... ...
. ..
El Cajon .... . ... · ·
E l Cerrito . . . .....•
El .\1onte .. . . . . . . . .
Eureka._
F a irfield . ....
Frcmo11t_ ___ _
Fres no ______ - · Fullerton .. . . . .
<~nrdcna _____ __
Garden G rove . .
Glc•11dalr ...... .
( : \cn dor a .. _____ _
ll awthorne .. ..... . .
ll ayward _____ __ ·_ II unting ton Beach...
I funtin v;ton Park . -
lll~le wood ... ..
Police C ivilians
officers
CALIFORNIA---Gon.
A LA BAMA
Besseme r . . .. ..... .. .
Birmingham.. . .. . .. .
Decatu r_ ________ __ __
Dothan. . ........... .
Florence . __ __ _______ _
Gadsden . . . .. ....... .
Huntsville . ....... . . .
Mobile . . .. .. .. ..... .
Montgomery .. . . ... .
Selma.... ........... .
T u scaloosa ... ....... .
Tota l
Police C ivi lians
officers
81
90
255
74
49
164
53
166
94
86
166
39
70
130
83
96
41
65
64
JOO
5(i
37
74
43
32
90
289
127
(i4
137
J(i8
33
54
99
89
50
126
i
74
74
16
207
64
44
48
10
5
128
41
153
12
87
65
137
36
13
7
21
29
30
9
57
102
13
28
63
20
~! I
22
7
87
44
19
12
31
(i
~~ I
56
37
27
76
225
100
54
l\1ountain V iew __ ___ _
Napa . . ............. .
N a tional C ity .. . .. . .
New por t B each .. . . . .
Novato . .... . ....... .
Oa kla nd ..... . . ..... .
Oceanside .... ... . ... .
Ontario.... ..... . ... .
Orange .. . . . ........ .
Oxnar d .. ......... . . .
Pacifica . . ........... .
Pa lo Alto . . . . ....... .
P asade na .. . . . . ..... .
Pleasant R ill . ..... .. .
Pomona ___ ________ __
R eel la nds . .......... .
R edondo Beach .... . .
R edwood City... ... .
Richmond . .... . . ... .
Riverside .. ......... .
Sacram en to .. . .. .... .
Salinas. _______ _____ _
San Bernardino. . . .. .
San Bruno___ _____ __ _
San Diego . ... ....... ,
San Francisco ____ ___ _
San Gahr ie L .. . . ... .
San Jose . .......... .
San Leandro .. _____ __
San Luis Obispo . ... .
San Mateo ... ...... .
San R afaeL . ....... .
Santa Ana ..... . .... .
Santa Clara ... ...•...
San ta Cru z _________ _
Santa Ma ria ..... ... .
Santa Monica ... . ... .
Santa Rosa .. ....... .
Sou t h Gate ......... .
South San F rancisco. I
tockton ... ......... .
8
Sunn~rvale __________ _
9
Torra nce . . . .. ...•••.
Upland .. ....... .. .. .
Va llejo... ........... .
Ventura ..... . ...... .
West Covina_._ ._ .. __
Westminst er . . ...... .
18
(j
5
14
(i4
27
10
g~ I
~I
25
34
4
~i45 I
17
95
L a Habra.. ......... .
L a Mesa . .. ..... . .. . .
Livermore ______ ___ __
Lod i. . . . . . .... .. .... .
Long Beach .... ..... .
L os Angeles .... . ... .
Ly n wood ... ........ .
Man hatt a n Beac h . .. .
Menlo Park . . ....... .
Modesto . .. ..... .... .
Monrovia ____ _______ _
Montebello... . . . . ... .
Monterey . . . . . ...... .
Monterey P a rk . ..... .
(j
15
5
31
·1
26
42
704
6,613
45
38
34
21
42
599
5, 18 1
39
50
40
37
37
79
51
65
44
52
39
51
58
36
46
75
58
51
60
61
43
55
97
25
835
55
77
82
80
25
82
214
11
105
56
68
73
168
173
445
91
2 14
39
853
2, 035
42
388
81
40
100
53
201
92
51
21
638
49
68
68
73
105
1, 432
(j
10
14
7
(j
12
9


J


7
9
22
4
197
(;
g
14
7
Ii
Ii
38
19
11
91
49
57
64
138
137
372
71
171
32
721
1, i86
36
14
7
II
9
30
3(i
n
20
43
7
132
249
Ii
357
62
37
83
40
31
15 1
50
11
i
80
44
38
125
32
86
H2
3
5
76
44
179
12
176
163
50
84
51
179
102
4
19
3
17
13
Ii
38
2
77
7
41
155
79
149
25
10
73
24
2:J
30
7
13
8
58
M
5fJ
40
12
89
i i
18
34
64
58
146
98 1
43
34
46
27
57
72
Whittier_ __ _______ _
C OLO RADO
50
37
Iii
I
Arvada ....
Aurora __ ___ . ______ _
Boulder .... ......... .
Colorado , prin gs ... · I
Denve r .. ............ 1
E nJ,?lewood ... ______ _
F or t Coll ins ... ...•• .
Greeley .. .......... .
Pue blo.... ... ... . . .. .
1~7
58
126
20
8 19
1H2
40
3
26
36
12 1
JO
16
8
155
�Table 49 . -Num.be r of Full-Tim.e Police Departm.ent Em.ployees, D ecem.ber 31 ,
1965, Cities 25,000 and o ver in Population-Continued
C ity by state
umber of police depart ment employees
C ity by s tate
T otal
P olice
officers
Civilians
391
374
62
17
57
65
5
73
37
3
CONNECTICUT
IlridgcporL . _____ ___
B r istol__ __ __ ______ ___
Danbury _______ ____ _
East Hartford ____ __ _
E n.field __ ___ _____ ___ _
Fairfield _________ __ __
Greenwich _ ___ _____ _
1-Ia.mclcn ________ ____ _
H artford __ __ ________ _
Manchester
Township _ ___ _____
Meriden ______ ____ ___
Middletown __ ________
Milford Town __ _____
New B ritain ___ ___ __ _
New Haven ______ ___
New London _______ _
Norwalk ____ _______ __
Norw ich. _______ ____ .
Southington Town _ _
Starn ford _______ ____ _
Stratford _____ _______ _
Torrington _____ _____ _
Trumbull ___ _______ _
Wallingford ____ ___ ___
Wa terbury _____ ______
West Hartford ______ _
W est Haven __ __ ____ _
Westport. ___ _______ _
65
76
39
68
66
134
11 4
78
385
75
348
57
55
81
51
86
150
2
10
408
19
91
53
90
164
427
75
143
49
28
2 18
81
48
30
38
235
107
74
41
72
1 28
45
28
208
76
47
29
38
2
2
20
3
37
2
3
15
4
10
5
1
1
225
10
99
73
39
8
l
2
254
223
31
3, 159
2, 9 11
248
FLORIDA
Clearwater_____ ___ __ _
C oral Gables __ _____ _
Daytona Beach _____ _
For t L auderdale __ ___
For t Myers ___ ______ _
}i'ort P ierce _________ _
Gainesville ___ ______ _
l l ialeah _____________ _
Jacksonville _____ ___ _
Key West_ __________ _
Lakeland ___________ _
Miami_ ___ ___ __ ___ __ _
Miami Beach __ _____ _
North lWiami_ __ ____ _
North Miami B each _
Orla ndo ____ ___ _____ _
Panama City _______ _
P ensacola__ __ _______ _
St. Petersburg ____ __ _
Saras ota _______ ____ . _
Talla hassee __ _______ _
T ampa ___ __ _______ __
98
101
116
301
55
52
84
108
474
39
104
869
267
55
45
71
27
82
19
29
60
12
17
13
13
81
87
241
43
35
71
95
393
37
85
633
205
47
'12
2
19
236
62
3
197
44
119
164
37
33
330
61
95
677
106
252
13
78
9
7
151
52
8
526
7
GEORGIA
Albany ___ _________ __
Atla nta _____________ _
Augusta __-- - _______ _
College Park __ _____ _
Columbus __ __ ____ ___
Decat ur ___ ______ ___ _
La Gr ange __ ______ ___
Macon _________ _____ _
Marietta ________ ___ __
156
Police C ivilians
officr rs
80
888
159
31
192
30
44
166
51
79
765
136
31
179
27
43
163
45
Rom e __ __ __ _____ ___ __
Savannah _ _ __ ____ ___
Valdosta _____ ________
56
203
40
52
168
39
H ilo ___HAWAII
________ ___ ___
Honolulu ______ ______
93
766
83
10
648
118
8
58
46
9
12
Aurora __ ___ ______ ____
Belleville __ ____ _____ _
Berwyn ___ ________ ___
Bloom i11gton ___ _____ _
Ca lumet C ity ___ _____
C ha m pa ign __________
Chicago ____ _____ _____
Ch icago Heights ____ _
Cicero ___ ____ __ ____ __
DanviLle _____ ___ _____
D ecatur ___ ______ ____
Des Plaines _________ _
Eas t St.Louis _______
E lgin ___ ____ ________ _
E lmhurst ___ ________ _
Evans ton ___ ________ _
E vergreen Park __ ___
Freeport_ __ _____ __ ___
Galesb urg __________ _
Grani te C ity ____ ____ _
H a r vey _____ _______ __
H ighla nd P a r k _____ _
Joliet. ____ ________ ___
Lomba rd ___ _____ ___ _
M a ywood _________ _
Moline _____ ________ _
Monon Gro ,·e ______ _
Moun t Prospect __ ___
' iles ___ _--- - ------- North C hicago _____ __
Oak Lawn __________ _
Oak P a rk _________ ___
Park Forest_ ___ __ ___ _
Park Ridge ___ ______ _
Pekin ___ __________ ___
P eoria ____ __________ _
Qui ncy ___ ___ ______ __
Rockford _________ __ _
Rock Is land _______ __
Skokie __________ ____ _
Spring field ____ ___ ___ _
Urba na _______ ______ _
Villa Park __ ________ _
\.Yau kegan ____ ______ _
Wheaton _____ ___ ___ _
Wilmette _ ·------ - -- -
67
58
6
49
44
93
47
63
49
26
58
11, 745
59
101
47
82
55
104
72
53
141
28
34
42
41
35
42
80
31
39
54
33
31
43
20
52
90
26
42
33
196
55
190
87
120
11 5
29
25
70
30
41
42
37
84
42
58
44
23
56
10, 269
50
99
39
69
53
90
54
49
109
26
30
36
41
35
35
75
24
39
47
30
26
39
18
49
72
21
39
32
178
52
166
71
107
U:-!
26


n


63
27
7
9
5
5
5
3
2
1,476
9
2
8
13
2
14
18
4
32
2
4
6
7
3
5
4
2
3
18
5
3
1
18
3
24
l tl
13
23
3
4
3
33
8
92
41
135
70
224
251
255
l u4
14
12
INDI ANA
Anderson __ ____ _____ _
23
Bloo rn ingLon ___ _ ____
1
3
6
94
ILLINOIS
Alton _____ ______ _____
Arlington Heigh ts ___
1
123
13
3
4
35
1
IDAHO
Boise __ _______ ___ ___ _
Idaho F alls ___ ____ ___
Poca tello _________ ___
4
14
DISTRICT OF
COLUMBIA
Washington ___ ___ ___ _
Tota l
GEORGIA-Con .
DELAWARE
Wilmington ___ ____ ___
N u mber of police clepar trncnt eniployees
E ast Ch icago _____ ___
Elkhart_ __ __ ___ ____
Evansville _______ . ___
Fort W ayn e . _____ _
Gary _____ _____ _____ _
Ila mmond __ ___ ___ __
10G
53
141
83
240
259
294
179
tl
13
l tl
s
3U
l5
�Table 49 . -N um.ber of Full-Tim.e Police D e partm.e nt Employees, Decemb e r 31
1965, Cities 25,000 and over in Population-Continued
'
Nnmber of pollce department employees
N u mbe r of pol ice depa rtm ent mnployees
City by st ate
C ity by state
T ota l
P olice
officers
Civilian s
916
82
65
52
58
111
1
1
1
Ind iana polis . _. .. . _. .
Kokomo .- - ···· · ·· · · Lafayette .. . . . . . . ·- . .


VIarion . . - - · · ··· ·· · ·:Vl ichigan City_ . . . . . .


.Mishawaka _. . . . . . .. .
.Mu ncie •. . _. . . .. ·· · ·-


--:ew A l ban y ___ ___ ___


1, 027
83
66
53
62
51
111
43
Richmond . - - ·· · · - · . .
South Bend _· · -·-·- -·
T erre Ha u te . ·· · ··- · ·
2 11
116
64
48
104
43
60
202
109
4
3
7
4
9
7
IOWA
35
41
27
L38
38
60
115
2 56
68
44
4-1
34
130
lOti
32
32
24
121
35
58
llO
231
63
27
3
9
3
17
3
2
5
25
5
17
34
10
32
100
94
30
12
2
KANSAS
H u tch inson .. . _.. .. . .
Kansas City ________ _
La wrence_. - · - . -· . . ..
Lenvenwo rLh . __ _- . - .
Ornr lan d Pa r k_ _.. .. .
Prairie Village . . . . . . .
i:la lina . · ·- - -· ·····- · ·
Topeka . . . ... . --· . . - .
Wichita--···· .... .. · -
42
242
42
24
41
32
49
169
392
36
L92
34
23
34
30
40
142
310
6
50
8
1
7
2
9
27
82
KENTUCKY
Bow ling G reen .. . .. .
Co ,·ington . .... ... . -.
Lexing ton . ... - - -- - Louis d llc . . .


\"ewpor t. . . ... --··· · ·


Uwensboro . _
Paduca h .... --·····
46
98
176
644
67
80
59
45
88
150
542
54
78
57
1
10
26
102
13
2
2
LOUISIANA
A lcxand ria .... .. . . . - Ba ton Rou ge .
Bossier City
.... H ouma ...
La ke C ha rles


Vl onroc, .. ..... :--:c w [ beria



\c w Orleans . . . .


t; hreveport. .. _
55
308
38
46
49
83
32
l , 249
254
53
271
38
42
47
71
31
I , 087
222
MAIN E
Au burn . .. .
Bangor . .. .
Le w is lon . ___
Portland ...
33
58
62
127
C u111hcrl an d . .
11 agcrs town . ...
2
37
4
2
12
1
162
32
32
48
1
10
5.5
111
16
7
A r lington_. . .. ... . .. .
Attleboro .... . . . .. . . .
Belman t . .. . .. . · - ... .
Beverly _.. _. . ··· ···- ·
Boston _._ .. . ... .. ·--·
B raintree. __ _--· - ··-B rockto n ___... · ·-- - ·
B rook! ine __ _. - .... ·-·
Cam br idge ._ ._ .. . . . .
C helsea__. . ... . ... - -·
C bicopee_. .. · ··-- ·-·
E verett. ____ · -._ · -- ·
F a ]] River_ . . - · - ·--· ·
F itchburg. __ _· · - ·· · F ramingham _· · -- · · · ·
G lou cest er . . .. ··· · · · H a verhill _. .. ....... .
Ho! yoke . .. . . ... .. .. .
L a w re nce .. . . _-· · - · · Le0111 inster . ___ .. _.. .
L exington ___. .. .. .. .
Lowell_ . . --· ···-·· ·· ·
Ma lden . _.. ... . ..... .
Med ford . . . · ·· -··· · · ·
Melrose_ - ·· · ····· ·- · ·
Milton . . . - ··· ·· ··· ···
N atic k . . . . .. . ....... .
Needham . .. . . . . . . .. .
New Bed ford .. .. .. . .
ewton .. . · · -· · · ·· · ·
Nor t ha mpton .... . . . .
N or wood ___. .. . .. . . .
Pittsfield . __ . . . . . . . . .
Qn incy _ - ·· ·· · · ···· · ·
Revere . . · - .. . . ..... .
Salem __ . . . .. .. .... . .
Somerville . .. . . . . . . . .
Wak efield .. .. . . . . . . . .
Waltha m . . ... . . .. . .. .
Wat ertow n_.. . . ·-· ·· ·
Wellesley ._.· -··· · ···
West field . . -. . . . . ... . .
West Springfield . . . . .
Wey mouth _. . . . ... . . .
Woburn . . .. . .. .... .. .
Worcester .... ...... . .
L ans in g_ . . . ·- · · . . .. . .
Li vonia . . . . . . . . .. · -·-
3,365
63
us
3. 003
59
65
362
4
3
91
41
51
61
2,696
58
149
149
240
76
97
120
258
81
82
54
77
ll4
139
41
37
194
124
116
55
55
51
43
249
166
43
42
89
178
100
81
155
38
102
78
82
40
47
58
2, 495
54
143
142
230
72
94
11 7
236
74
80
52
74
112
130
39
35
18 1
9
1
4
3
201
4
6
7
10
4
3
3
22
7
2
2
3
2
9
2
2
13
124
112
48
42
2
1
3
1
234
160
15
6
53
54
43
42
84
165
95
76
148
37
100
74
5
13
5
5
7
1
2
4
84
53
82
2
2
1
2
44
416
44
362
54
52
122
79
88
45
201
49
107
40
38
45
54
43
MICHIGAN
Allen P ark . ... . ..... Ann Ar bor__. . ... .. . .
Batt le C reek ... . .. . _.
B ay C it y_ . . ..... . . . .
Bir m ingham ._ . . ·-· · ·
Dear born .. . .. .. . . . . .
Dear born Heights .. .
Detroit. . · · · ·· · · - · · ··
East Detroit•........
E ast Lans ing . . . - · - · ·
F erndale ... ..... . ... .
Flint. .. ·-···········
Gar den C it y ... ..... .
Grand Ra pids . . .. . . .
H am trnmck ... ..... .
High la nd P ar k .. . . . .
!Tolland .-· _. .. ·-· ···
Inkster . . . . . . . . . .. .. .
J ackson .. .... . .... . . .
K alamazoo . . . . . . . .. .
Li ncoln P ark . . ..... -
MA RYLAND
Balti, nore .. ..
Pol ice Civilians
officers
MASSACHUSETTS
INDIANA- Con.
Am es- -· · - - ··· - · · · - · ·
Burlin gton .. __ _. . . . · Ceda r Fa lls_ . .. . .. --.
Ceda r R apid s . . . _. . . .
Clin ton _· --··· · · · · · · ·
Cou ncil B lu ffs . . .. . . .
Da Yen por L.- . .. .. . . .
Des :Vl oin es_ . . .. . ... D u buque .. .... . . . .. .
Iowa C ity ... . . ..... .
M ason City .. . . -- ·- ·
Ottumwa _
Sioux CitY-- · ·· · · ····
Water loo ... _.... . . . .
Total
Madison lleights ... . .
Midland ... · ··-· ·····
Monroe_. ..... . . .. . . .
61
64
3
3
179
58
3
1/i
I ii
5
7
22
3
4,841
54
4, 40 1
46
440
8
30
47
28
41
324
86
410
38
267
81
I 15
38
35
226
40
73
100
32
38
85
74
15 1
210
124
187
63
83
66
93
38
31
. 39
34
28
2
6
3
4l
8
15
6
2
II
27
29
3
10
4
3
38
157
�T abl e49.-N umbe r of Full-Ti m e Police D ep a r t m ent Employees , D e cembe r 31,
1965 , Ci t ies 25 ,000 a n d o v e r i n Pop u lation- Con t i n u ed
City by state
N u mber of police depa rt.
m cnt employees
City by s tate
Total
P oli ce
officers
Civil ia ns
30
72
59
2
15
8
MICHIGAN-Con .
Mou n t C lemens . . .. .
Muskegon . . ... . ..... .
Oak Park . . . .. ... .. . .
Pon tiac . . . ..... . ... . .
P ort H uron . . . . . . . .. .
R osev ille • . . . . . . . . •..
R oyal Oak . . .. . . . . . .
Saginaw ___ ___ ____ __ _
St. Clair Shores . . .. . .
Southfield .•• .. . . . . . .
W arren ____ ______ ____
Wyandotte . . . . .. . . . . .
Wyoming . .. . . . . . ... .
\:V inon a __________ __ __
! JG
49
53
91
140
76
46
154
58
51
37
3,
50
47
20
16
24
17
25
134
32
36
792
13
23
36
72
42
10
3
15
17
4
13
17
7
7
2
121
28
3
4
I
I
13
4
34
725
6i
24
2
474
13
23
34
72
40
39
414
38
37
60
1
75
60
15
41
46
53
328
51
54
45
45
46
267
4Ci
54
42
2
2
l
7
61
5
3
MISSO URI
Columb ia ..•. ...... . .
F erguson .. .. . .. .... .
F lorissan t .... . . ..... .
Independence. ... ... .
J efferson C ity . . . . ... .
J oplin . . . . .... ...... .
Kansas C ity ________ _
Kirkwood . ... ... ... .
Overland . . .. ....... .
St . J oseph .. ... . ... . .
St . L ouis ... . .. .. ... .
Sed ali a . . .. .. . ...... .
Spr_ingfie lcL ._. ..... . .
U n1vers1ty Cit y . . .. .
Webster G roves .. .. . .
58
30
62
94
37
63
l. 174
43
32
108
2,582
31
123
5Y
34
51
29
52
84
37
54
89 7
36
2fi
94
l , 987
31
1I 7
55
29
L as Vegas . . . . . ... ... .
• 1 or th L as Vegas ... . .
Re no . . .. ... . . . . . . .. .
24
MISSISSIPPI
Greenv ille . .. . ...... .
Gu lfpor t ........ . . . . .
H atties bu rg. . . . . .... .
J ackson . . ........... .
L aurel. . . ........... .
atchez. . . .. . .. .... .
Vicksburg . . . . . . . . . . .
Total
7
1
10
10
9
277
7
ti
14
595
G
4
5
MONTANA
76
36
70
70
3G
(i3
42
35
7
N EB RASKA
Grand I sland .... . . . .
O ma ha . . . ....... . . . .
158
37
490
37
425
65
295
52
180
248
50
144
47
2
3G
N EW HAMPSHIRE
C oncord . . .. . . . . . .. . .
Manchester . • .. . .. ...
N ashu a . . . . . . . . . . . .. .
Por tsmouth . ... .... . .
46
122
76
41
42
11 5
69
40
N EW JERSEY
Atlant ic C ity ....... .
B ayonne ___ ___ _____ __
Bellev ille . . . ... . . . . . .
Bergenfield ... . . . ... .
B loo m fi eld . ... ..... . .
Camden . . . . .. ..... . .
C herr y H ill.. . . . . .. . .
Clifton .... . . . . . . . .. . .
Cranford T ownsh ip ..
E as t B runs,v-ick
T ownshi p . . . . . ... .
E ast Orange . ... .... .
E dison . . . . . ......... .
Elizabe th . . ...... .. . .
E ngle wood __ ____ ___ _
E "~i ng Tow nship _____
F a1r L awn _____ _____ _
For t L ee.. . . .... . . .. .
Gar fi eld .. . ......... .
H am il to n T ow nsh ip.
Hoboken . .. .. . .... . .
Ir v ington ___________ _
Jersey C ity .. ... .... .
K earn y ............. .
Linden ___ __________ _
Liv ingston . . . . . . . .. . .
L odi . . .............. .
L ong B ra nch .. .. . .. .
M ad iso u T ow ns hi p ..
M idd letown To wn.
ship . . . . . . ....... . .
Montcla ir. ... ..... .. .
Neptu ne Town ship . .
New ark ________ _____ _
New Brunswick
1 ort h
Bergen
T ownsh ip ... . . . .. .
Nu t ley . . . . . ...... .
Ora nge . . . . . . ..... .. .
Para1n us _________ ___ _
P arsip pan y.Tro y
Hi lls . . . . . .... . . . .. .
P assa ic . . . ... . . .. .
P aterson __ _____ ______
P en nsau ken .
. .. .
Per t h Am boy .... .. . .
Piscataway Township.
Plain fie lcL. . ... . .... .
R a hwfly . . ......... .
Rid gewood . . . . . .
Sayrev ille __________ _
B il lin gs . . ......... . . .
B u tte. . .. .... . ... ... .
Grea t F alls . . .... ... .
Missou la . . .. ...... .. .
Poli ce Civili ans
offi cP r:-
N EVAD A
32
87
67
140
59
56
106
157
80
59
171
65
58
MINNESOTA
A ust in . . .. . . ... . . . . . .
B loomington ... . . ... .
Brookly n Center. .. . .
Coon R apids . . .. .. . .
Crystal . . . .. . . .. . ... .
D uluth . . . . .. . . . .... .
Edina .. . . . . . ... . ... .
Mankato . . . . ........ .
Minneapolis . . . . ..... .
Minneton k a .... . .. .. .
Moorhead .. . ........ .
R ichfield . . . . . . . .. .. .
R ochester .... ....... .
St. Cloud . . . . . . .. ... .
St . Lou is P ark . . . . . . .
St. Paul. . . .. . ..... . .
N u m be r of poli ce de p:1rt.·
1n en t ernplo yecs
T eaneck Towns hip
T renton
. ..... . .. .
U nion C ity . .... ... . .
U n ion Town shi p . . . .
Vinela nd . - ··· ... ... .
Westfield
West New York ... .
West Ora nge .... . .. .
Woori br id ge 'l'own·
s h ip . .. .. ..... ... . .
230
187
65
39
JOG
256
55
123
41
29
168
84
273
59
30
47
45
48
98
156
1J1
921
120
11 9
42
39
48
39
40
97
41
1, 674
89
115
53
82
64
37
132
343
4G
109
36
99
66
40
33
62
275
122
91
192
169
65
39
102
239
48
11 5
40
26
164
80
256
59
38
18
4
17
7
8
I
3
4
4
17
28
45
45
4U
93
154
103
828
11 9
11 6
41
38
4G
2
5
?
8
93
l
3
1
I
39
37
9
41
1, 401
86
273
3
105
51
81
10
?
(il
3
37
120
3JG
39
95
14
3 (i
1
90
63
39
30
GO
3
1
25 1


!4


\)
3


n


87
101
90
47
51
81
85
128
11 5
13
48
52
81
1
I
I
�Table 49 . -N u mbe r of Full-Tim e Police D epartme nt Employ e es, De ce mbe r 31 ,
1965, Cities 25,000 and over in Population-Continu ed
N um ber of poli ce depa rt m ent e mployees
N um be r of police de pa rt men t employees
C it y by st a te
C it y by st a te
Total
Police
offi cers
Civilia ns
14
275
32
5
39
Al bu q uerque ... . ... .
Car lsbad .... . . . ..... .
C lo,· is . . . ... . .... .. .
Farmington . . .. . .... .
!lob bs . . ...... . . . . . . .
Las Cruces ._ . . ... . . .
Roswell.. . . . .... .. . . .
~a nta Fe . . .. ... ... .. .
19
3 14
38
37
44
33
40
60
59
30
34
33
6
7
10
A. msterclarn __ ____ --- _\ ubur n __ _. __ _-- -- -- -
Bingha mto n . . - . -- - - Br ig h to n .... . . .... .. .
Bulfa lo .. ....... ... . .
C heektowaga . ____ --Clarkstown _______ __ .
Co lonie T own
£J1n in.L .- - - -- - -- - --- -
F ree J)fJ f t . ____ . _. - - - - -
Uarden C it y ___ ____ __
G le n CoYc . . .. . ... .. .
G reece .. . .. . .. .... -· ·
CT reen b urg h ... . . . ... .
ll e mps tead
Irondeq uoit. . . . . - · . . Ithaca . . .... . .. ... .
Jn mcstowo . _- . - --- - -
K ings to n .. ____ ____ _
Lac ka wan n a .. . .. ... .
Lockport .. . ..... .. .


\lount P leasa n t . . . .

Vl ou nt \ ·ernon ..... .


'.\i e> wb urg; h . . -- __ --- - :slew Roc l1 ellc ... . .. . .
>1 l'W
Yo rk .


-.:iagara Fa lls .... . . .


.'.'Jori h T onawand a . . .
O rnntrc town
Port C hester. .. . .. . -
Po ughkrcps ie _. _. - - Ra111 apo .. . . .
Roe l1estcr. . . ...... Rome _
1-'chen ectady . ...... .
Sy racuse. __________ _
Tonawanda Town . . .
Troy ........... .. .
t·tica
..... .. .
\\. atcrtow n
11·csL SeJJeca . ..... .. .
1\"hitc Plains
Yon kers
_- -- - - - - - - -
221
259
72
39
63
146
36
1 538
' 79
69
3
59
136
32
1,316
75
47
47
33
33
97
64
56
46
40
78
67
41
53
81
55
65
45
24
195
59
170
28,671
189
40
42
58
84
35
590
62
162
460
83
143
199
62
38
157
44 0
96
60
56
41
37
74
66
40
47
70
53
64
42
24
180
57
155
27. 001
171
39
41
53
81
35
509
57
151
389
8l
135
185
58
38
154
410
NORTH CAR OLINA
.\ shevil le
Burlin gto n
J>urham .
Fa yc 1tc\' ille .. .
fh1sto n in
__ .
flo ld s horo
<;rcf'ns horo
(irrr n vi lle
11 i~h Point
Kan11apolis
Ki ns ton
Ralci~h
Ho<'kY Mo un t
\Vilm ington
\-\"ilson . ...
\\' inst on-fa1Je1n
120
58
13 1
85
70
46
249
40
109
28
60
182
G:l
89
42
213
11 4
53
121
78
G7
46
226
38
104
28
53
1.53
58
72
41
180
Bisma rck .. ....... . . .
F a rgo . . . . . . . . .... .. . .
G ran d Fo rks . .. .. . . . .
Minot .... . . . . . ... . . .
42
87
52
38
75
4
12
48
4
3
44
41
309
39
34
295
34
33
166
31
859
OHIO
40
60
52
NEW YORK
Al ban y . .. . . . . . . . . . . .
.\ m hersL _. ____ ___ -- -
Police Civ il ians
officers
NORTH DAKOTA
NEW MEXICO
Ala n10gord o _ ______ _-
Total
38
3
1
4
JO
4
222
4
5
3
4
1
1
6
II
2
1
3
15
2
24
1,670
18
1
1
5
3
5
11
71
2
8
14
4
3
30
6
5
10
7
3
... ·····23
2
5
7
29
5
17
1
27
Akron .. . ... . . . . . .. . .
Allia nce .... . . . • . . .. .
Ash ta bula .. . ... ... . .
Barberton . ___ ___ ____
Ca n to n . .. . ....... .. .
Chi.llicoth c . . .. . ... .. .
Cincinnati. ....... . . .
Clevelan d .......... .
C leveland H eigb ts . . .
Co lu rnb us . . .. . ..... .
Cu ya hoga F a lls . . ... .
D a yton . . . ... . ... ... .
E ast Cle,·e la nd . . .. . .
El y ria . . . .. . . ....... .
E u clid . .. .. ... . ..... .
F a irborn . .. . ....... . .
F in dlay .... ......... .
H a m il ton . . ..... . ... .
Ke tte ring . ...... ... . .
L a ke wood . . . . . . . .. . .
L an caster .. .. .. ... . . .
Li ma .. ....... . ...•. .
Lorain . . . .... ....... .
M a nsfi eld ... . . . ..... .
M a p le H eigh LS. .. .
lVI a rion . __________ __ _
M assillon . . ......... .
M en to r . .. ....... .. . .
M idd letown ........ .
No rwood .. _______ ___
P ortsmo u t h . .. . ..... .
Sand usk y ... .... . ... .
Sou t h E u clid ....... .
Sp rin g field .. ........ .
T oled o ...... . ....... .
Upper A rlington .. .. .
W a rren ...... .. ..... .
Wh iteha ll.. .. .. . ... . .
Yo ungsto wn ..... . . . .
Zanesville . ... ... . . .
178
33
963
2,295
68
823
49
434
72
44
96
33
36
97
41
72


37


78
71
74
38
42
35
24
78
45
53
40
39
12 1
643
34
30
2,040
14
5
4
1
12
2
104
255
65
3
687
47
136
378
65
56
41
84
30
3G
94
39
2
7
3
12
3
6
3
2
68
4
35
69
70
2
71
38
40
32
21
9
1
3
2
3
3
71
45
52
42
34
11 2
603
1
4
5
9
26
40
2
75
31
278
31
23
LI
340
37
47
74
32
47
3
357
31
284
3
50
I
56
31
27
4
107
49
17
7
838
98
90
42
699
65
139
33
61
29
176
· 103
25
61
29
151
91
21
25
12
4
28
77
34
301
42
3
OKLA HO MA
B a rtlesville . . ...... . .
Enid .... . .... . . . . . . . .
Lnwton .... ______ ____
Midwes t Ci Ly . . . ..••
Muskogee .. ..
Tarman . _____ _______
Oklahom a C it y . .. . . .
Still wa ter .. . . . . . . ... .
T ulsa . . .... . . ....... .
41
55
75
37
54
41
407
32
5
7
OREGON
Co rva ll is .... . .
E ugene ... .
M ed ford . . . . . . .
. ..
P ortla nd ...
Salem .. ... .
PENNSYLVA NIA
AbingtoD T ownsh ip .
A liqu ip pa .... . ... . .
All entown .... . . . . .
All oon a ...
Ba Id wi n Borough ...
15!)
�Table 49.- Numbe~ of Full-Time Police Depa.rtme nt Employees, December 31 ,
1965, Cities 25,000 a.nd o ver in Popula.tion-Continued
C ity by state
Number of police d e pa r t ment employees
City by state
Total
Police
office rs
C ivilia ns
PENNSYLVANIAContinued
Bensa lem Townshi p .
Bethlehem __ _________
Bristol Township ____
C hel
tenham
Township
____ ____
______ _
Ch ester ____ _____ ___ __
Easton ____ __ __ __ _____
E rie ______ _______ ___ _
Falls Township _____ _
H a rrisburg _________ __
Haverford Township.
J ohnstown __ ___ ___ __ _
Lancaste r ___ ___. . ____
Lebanon __ ____ ___ ____
L ower :M erion
Township __ __-- - · .
M illcreek Township _
Mount Lebanon
Township __ _- -- - -Norristown ___ ___ __ __
North Huntingdon
Township ___ ______
P enn H ills Township __ _______ __ ___ _
Philadelphia __ ____ __ _
Pittsburgh ______ ___ __
Pottstown __ ____ _____
Radnor T ownship _. _
Reading ____ ____ ____ _
Shaler 'l'ownship ___ _
Springfield Township _____ __ _____ __ __
State College _____ ___
Upper D a rby
Township __ _______
West Miffiin __ _____ __
Wilkes-Barre __ . _. ____
Wilkinsburg __ _____ __
Willia m sport __ __ __. __
York ___________ _____
28
117
57
25
108
' 50
GO
108
55
82
57
193
!\3
26
4
182
))
31
151
l
6
57
77
3
13
32
157
GO
90
91
4.2
121
28
87
6
14
14
48
44
7,815
1,638
7, 194
1. 593
28
29
44
159
21
19
24
166
27
138
27
104
41
103
59
84
4
11 5
22
34
57
82
105
86
85
154
521
133
103
6
4
2
4
62!
45
1
4
32
4
5
28
i
2
2
99
Si
6
70
141
440
121
6
13
98
50
140
166
48
56
83
39
50
11 8
144
45
53
60
37
5
72
12
5
22
22
3
3
14
2
SOUTH DAKOTA
A berdeen _. ....
R a picl C it y__ ____
Sioux Falls ___ ____ __ _
160
Policr C iv ilians
officer~
32
4U
96
29
46
85
Abilen e _____ ______ ___
Ama rillo __ _____ ___ __ _
Arlington ____ __. ____ _
Austin ___ ____ _______ _
B ay tow n ___ _____ __ __
B eau mont_ __ _. __ __ __
Big Sprin g ________ ___
B rownsv ille ____ __ __ __
B ry an _____ ____ __ ___ _
Corpus C hristi_ ____ __
D allas ________ ___ __ __
D enison __ ___ __ ___ ___
D enton __. ___ ____ ____
El P aso _____ _____ ____
Fort Wort h ____ _____ _
G al veston ___ _.. . __ __
G ran d Prair ie . _. __ __
H altom C it y_ .. ___ __
H a rlin ge n ___ ___ _. ____
Hou ston ___ __ _. __ . ___
Irvin~- ______ ____ . __ _
Killeen ___ ___ _______ _
Kin gsville ______. ___ _
L a redo _____ __ . ______ _
Longvie w ____ . __ _____
Lu bbock_ ____ . ______ _
1a rsh a!L _______ __ __ .
McAllen _____. _. ____ .
Mesquite ______ _____
Miclla nd ____________ _
Odessa __ ____________ _
Orange ___ _. _______ ..
P ampa ____ __ ___ ___ _
P asad en a _______ _____
P ort Art hur __ _
Rich a rdson ___ _
San Angel o __
San Antonio _ . _
S herm a n __ ___ ._._
T e m ple _____ ___ _
T exas City _____ _
Tyler_ _____ ._
Victoria ______
Waco ____ _____ ____ _
Wich it a F an s ________
2 19
64
45
60
193
62
38
49
26
2
i
11
653
41
226
59
798
29
544
38
193
109
3
133
209
64
347
47
138
47
80
31
265
1. 532
32
39
402
589
84
38
29
38
1, 578
56
35
29
52
57
184
33
22
46
96
lli
36
25
81
Si
38
91
792
33
43
31
69
49
122
13 !
1)6
174
62
248
41
121
40
51
29
237
1, 330
27
33
345
507
75
34
25
27
l , 318
48
30
29
52
54
174
33
Ii
35
2
9\J
L\
li
i
29
2
28
202
l\
Si
82
u
4
4
11
2GO
~
f,
3
Ill
21
40
Si
96
34
li
i i
l
33
77
672
29
40
29
66
36
100
112
(\
!l
21
2
~
IO
ti
t4
120
4
3
2
3
l :l
22
HI
UTAH
Ogde n ___ _______ ____
P rovo _______ ___. __ ___
Salt L a ke C ity ____
47
76
43
3 10
2 51
18
43
173
223
62
100
105
144
196
11 4
97
89
VERMONT
3
3
11
28 5
991
29
TEXAS
Bur!ini:,t.on _______ ___
TENNESSEE
C h a tta n ooga ___._. __ .
J ack son ________ ____ _
Johnson C ity _______ _
Kingsport _____ _. ____
Knoxville __ ____ ______
Memphis ____ _______ _
.Morristow n __ ____ __ __
N ashville __ __ _______ _
Oa k Ridge __ ______ __ _
5
l
42
60
23
7
41
46
62
29
48
191
21
3
9
SOUTH CAROLINA
Anderson __ . ... ___ ___
C harleston __ ___ .. _.. .
C olu m b ia _________ ___
F loren ce ___ ________ _
R ock Ri!L __ ___ ____ _
S parta n burg_. .. ___ . .
S um t er_ ___ ___ ______ .
'I'otril
TENNESSEE- Con.
RHODE ISLAND
C ranston _____ __ __ . _..
E ast Providencr. ___ .
N ewpor t_ ___________ .
Pawtuck e t_ __ _______ _
Providen ce ____ _. __ _.
Warwick ___ ____ ___ _._
Woonsock et_ ___ . ____.
' u mbe r of police d e pa rt m e nt. e mployers
VIRGINIA
Ale xa ndria __ __.. ____ _
Arling ton ______ __ _
C ha rlo t t es,·illc__ . __
Chesapea k e __ . _____
D a n v ille ______ _. __ __ _
H a m p ton __ ____ ____ _
L y n chburg __ _____ __
96
HO
95
95
2!1
'21
~
5
10
Ii
�Table 49 . -Nu mber of Full- Tim e Police D epartment Employe es, D ecember 31
1965, C i tie s 25,000 and over in Population- Continued
N um ber or police de partment employees
Ci ty by state
Cit y by state
Poli ce
offi cers
Civilians
148
473
43
167
477
151
132
138
429
40
155
441
143
123
10
44
49
50
77
30
37
1, 047
270
237
56
41
78
40
48
70
30
32
897
234
2 17
54
32
67
T otal
3
12
36
8
9
WASHINGTON
Bellingham __ ___ _____
B remerton __
E,erett- . __.. __ __. . __
Long vie" · ___ _. __ _· --Rich la nd ... ___ ______
Seattle . __·-·-- - · ---- Spoka ne . ·-·--- --- - -Tacoma ____ __ ________
\ "a n cou ver_ _____ _____
Wa ll a Wa lla __ ____ ___
Ya kima ___ ___ __ ___ ___
9
2
5
150
36
20
2
9
11
221- H G0- GG-
T ota l
Appleton . . __.. .. __ __
Beloit_.. ___·--- · - - -· E au C la ire ___ ___ ___ __
F ond du Lac ___ ___ __
Green Bay .. ___ ___ ___
J anesville ___ _.. . · - -·.
Kenosha __. __ . · - -· . __
L a C rosse __ _______ ___
M a dison __ ______ _. ...
M anitowoc ___ ____ ___ _
M il wa u kee _.. ·- - -- ·Osh kosh ____________ _
R a cine ____ ___ __. · - · . .
Sheb oyga n ___ ___ . ____
Superior_ __ __ __ _. . _..
Waukesha_· - ---··-·W ausa u _._ . -- - - - -- -Wauwatosa . . ___ ___ __
West All is.·-- --- -· - -
Police Civilian s
officers
149
103
52
93
-1 2
140
96
44
91
9
7
8
2
79
55
6"3
52
131
56
129
75
244
57
2,049
70
166
85
61
63
49
88
129
75
52
51
45
11 6
53
11 5
69
203
53
1,910
67
156
81
60
60
49
78
111
4
3
12
7
15
3
14
6
41
4
130
3
JO
4
1
3
10
l
WYOMING
Casper ________ - · -- --·
Cheyenne _____ _·-- · __
WEST VIRGINIA
Cha rles to n _______ ____
J-I un ti nµ:to n ____. . __ __
P a rk ers burg .. .. ___ - \\"h eeli ng. _______ ____
N um her or polite department em ployees
WISCONSIN
VIRGINIA-Con .
X ewpo r t K ews _______
X orfolk __- -· __. ____..
Pet:ersbu rg ___ _.. _. __ .
Portsmou th ________ . .
R ichmond __________ _
Roa noke _____.. ____ . _
\ -irginia Beac!J _____ ..
'
Canal 7.onc .. _. _.. _..
G uam _____ ___ _______
P uerto R ico ... . _____
50
80
42
54
8
26
330
139
5, 448
262
130
4,765
683
68
9
161
�Table 50. -N iimber of Fiill - Time Police D epar t m e nt Employees, December 31,
1965, Cities W ith P opula tion unde r 25,000
City by state
N umber of
police
department
employees
ALAB A MA
Alexander City . ... .
Au burn . . . . . .... .. . .
Boaz __ _____ _____ ___ _
Br ighton ... . . ... . . . .
C hickasaw ......... .
Fairfield . . .. ... ... . .
Fairhope . ... .. . .... .
For t Payne..... . . . .
Graysville . . .... .. . .
Guntersv ille . . ..... .
H a rtselle•... .... . ...
1:IomewoocL __ __ ___ _
Il ueytown __ ___ ___ __
L afayette .. .. ... ... .
Leeds . ... . . . .. . . .. . .
Mar ion ..... . ... . ... .
Midfield .. . . ..... . . .
Mounta in Brook . .. .
Northport. . . ... ... .
Oneon ta .. . . ... .... .
Ox ford ..... . ...... . .
Prattville ... . . .. . . . .
Saraland __ ___ ____ ___
Sheffield .......... . .
T allassee ......... . .
Troy ... .. .. . .. . . . . . .
T uscumbia .. . ..... .
25
12
4
15
20
7
20
5
15
9
25
5
g
7
6
11
25
13
8
6
10
11
17
7
23
16
37
15
11
11
2
A RIZONA
Avondale...... . ... .
Bisbee . . . ..... . .... .
Casa G rande .... . . .
C handler .. . ....... .
Douglas . . . .. . . ... . .
Globe....... ... . . . . .
Holbrook .. .. ... ... .
Huachuca ..... . ... .
Nogales . . . . ...• .....
Page ... ..... .... ... .
Peoria __ _________ ___
Prescott .... ..... . . .
Safford .. . . ... . .... .
Sierrn Vista....... . .
Tolleson . . .. . .. . ... .
Williams .... .. ..... .
Winslow ..... ... . . . .
11
18
19
28
18
9
12
3
19
7
4
25
8
8
5
g
18
ARKANSAS
Arkadelphia ... . ... .
Batesville. . . ... . . .. .
Dooneville ... .....•.
Camden . . ... . .... . .
Ha rrison . .. . .... ... .
Hope . . .... . ....... .
Jacksonville ........ .
Meno. _____ _________ _
Monticello . ... . . . .. .
ashville .. .... . ... .
Paragould .... ... .. .
Piggott .. ... .. . . ... .
Russell ville ..... ... .
iloam Springs ... .. .
pringd ale.... .. ... •
Stu ttgart .. . .•......
Van B uren . .... . .. . .
Walnut Ridge . ..... .
West Memphis .. . .. .
162
· umber of
p olice
department
employees
City by state
g
6
3
17
6
12
12
4
7
4
14
3
8
10
16
12
8
8
34
Number of
police
d epar tment
employees
CALIFORNIAContinued
CA LIFORNIA
21
ALASKA
Fairbanks ______ ____
Ketchikan . . . . . . ... .
Kod iak .. .. ..... . . . .
Sitka .... .. ........ .
Valdez •......... ... .
C ity by state
Albany .. ......... . .
Alturas . .......... . .
Anderson .. . ....... .
Antioch ...... . . . . . . .
Arcata .. . . .. . .. . ... .
Arroyo G rande ... . .
22
5
.A r v in ____ ____ ______ _
6
Atherton ..... . . . ... .
Atwater .. . . . . ... . . .
Au burn ... ... .. . .•..
Banning . . .. . ... . .. .
Barstow .... . ...... .
B eaumont ____ _____ _
Bell. . . . ..... . ...... .
Bel mont .. .... . • . . . .
Belvedere. . ... ... . . .
Benicia.......... .. .
B iggs . . ..... . ... ... .
Bishop. . . . .. . .. .. . . .
Dlythe. ... .. ... .... .
Brea .. . . . ...... .... .
B rentwood . .. ... . . .
B roadmoor . ..... . . .
Calexico .... . . . ... . .
Cal istoga . .. . ..... . .
Campbell .. . ....... .
Carlsbad . . ... . . .. .. .
Car mel. .. . .... .... .
Ceres . .. . .. . . . . .... .
C hico... ....... .. . . .
C h ino .... .... . .... .
C howchilla . ....... .
C laremon t. ...... . . .
C loverdale .... . . . . . .
Clovis . . ..... . ..... .
Coalinga .. ..... .... .
Colfax. . ...... .... . .
Colma . ....... . . . . . .
Colton ...... .. ..... .
Colusa . . .... . .. ... . .
Corcoran .... .... . . .
Corning.. . . .. . .. . . .
C oronado ... . . .. . .. .
Corte Madera .... . . .
Cotati. •.. .. ... .....
Crescent C ity ..... . .
Cypress . .... .. ..... .
D avis ... ........... .
D esert not Springs.
D inu ba .... . . . . .. . . .
D ixon . .. ... . .... . . .
Dos Palos ..... . .... .
Dunsmuir .. ..... .. .
E l Centro . . .... ... . .
Elsinore .. .. .......•
Emer yv ille ... ..... .
Escalon ............ .
E scondido . . . ..•....
Fillmore ........... .
Folsom ____________ _
FontRna ___ ________ _
F ort Brairg . . ... ... .
Port Jones ___ ___ ___ _
Fort una ... . ..... .. .
Galt_ ______ ________ _
G ilroy ....... ...... .
Gonzales . .... . ... . . .
Grass Valley . . . . . . . .
Or ielley ... ..... .. . . .
G rover C ity .. ..... .
G u11dalupo . ... . . . •.
H alf Moon B ay . ... .
Hanford .. . ........ .
H emet . . ...... . . .. . .
H ermosa Beach . .. . .
Hillsborough .... . . . .
Hollister ........... .
16
15
15
21
32
9
10
29
13
g
27
25
5
14
2
10
22
22
5
8
20
5
26
18
14
g
33
22
II
26
8
15
12
3
1
31
7
12
6
22
10
3
7
25
19
7
13
7
5
9
40
10
22
5
37
8
II
2ti
10
I
7
4
19
5
15
6
6
6
28
17
32
18
14
Holtville . . . ... .. . .. .
Huron .. . .. .. . . . .. . .
Im perial ..... . . . ... .
I mperial Beach . .. . .
Indio... . .... ...... .
Ione . . ... .......... .
Isleton ...... . ...... .
J ackson .. . .. .. . .... .
Kensin gton ... . . . .. .
Kerman .... ....... .
King City .. . . ..... .
Kingsburg ........ . .
L aguna B each .. . .. .
L akeport ... ..... .. .
L a Palma . ... .. . ... .
L arkspur . .. .... .. . .
L a Verne ..... .. . .. .
Lemoore _____ ______ _
Lindsay ____ _____ __ _
Liv ingston ... . ... .. .
Lompoc.... ....... .
Los Altos . ......... .
Los Gatos .... ..... .
Madera .. . ......... .
Man teca .. . ........ .
Mart inez . .. . . . . .. . . .
Marysv ille .. . . ..... .
Maywood . .. . . ..... .
McFarland . . .. . . . . . .
Mendota . . . .... .... .
Merced . .... . . . . .... .
Millbrae . ... ... .. . . .
Mill Valley .... . . . . . .
i\'lilpitas . ... ....... .
Montcla ir . ... ... . . . .
Morro B a y .. ....... .
Needles . ........... .
Newark ____ ________ _
~r;~·-~1~---143.215.248.55=::::::
Orange Cove . . .. ... .
Orland ... . .. ....... .
Oroville ..... ... . . . . .
Pacific Grove ______ _
P al m Springs . ... . . .
P alos Verdes
Estates ..... .... . .
Pa.rlier .. ........ ... .
P aso Robles . . .. ... .
Patterson . . ...... .. .
Perris ...... .. ..... .
Petaluma . ......... .
Piedmont_ . . ...... .
Pinole ............. .
Pismo Beach .. .. .. .
P ittsburg . ..... .... .
Placen,ia . . ........ .
Placerville . . ... .... .
Pleasanton . ... .. ... .
Port l [ uoneme . .... .
Portola .... ........ .
Reel BlnIT ...... ... .
Reclcling . ... ....... .
Reedley ... . ...... . .
Rialto . . .. . . ... .... .
Rio Dell . . . . . .. . ... .
Rio Vista . .. . ...... .
Ripon . . ..... ..... . .
Riverhank .. . ..... .
R ocklin ..... . ...... .
Rohnert Park . . . .. .
R osev ille .... . ..... .
Ross.. ....... ... . . . .
St. Helena .... ..... .
San Anselmo ..... . .
an Carlos . . .. ..... .
12
4
10
18
28
3
3
4
g
4
10
g
31
5
6
10
17
g
12
6
34
26
23
2~
rn
19
28


25


7
6
38
23
w


!:2


31
11
10
21
4
13
R
8


?A


18
on
19
4
1~
4
~
24
20
15
10
31
2:?
13
13
.~)
3
18
3~
13
29


J


5
Ii
ll
3
j
'.lti
4
I~
3:?
�Table 50. - N umbe r of Full-Time Police D epartment Employees, Decem b e r 31 ,
1965, Cities With Popuwtion under 25,000-Continued
City by sta te
Nwnbe r of
police
depar tm ent
employees
CALIFORNI A-
,vasco _____ _- -- -- --- -
Watso
n vill____
e ____
- - ---_
Weed ____
______
Will iams __ _________ _
Willi ts __ ___ ______ ___
Wil lows ______ ______ _
27
36
14
8
28
36
29
20
37
30
11
14
11
16
5
g
34
32
5
IO
11
7
24
27
18
16
21
41
23
62
13
37
50
12
30
6
4
IO
8
Win ters__-------- ---
Wood la ke ______ ____ _
Woodl a n d ____ _____ _
4
4
28
Yreka. __ __- ---- ----
IO
Yuba City ___ _______
25
COLORADO
Al a mosa ____ __ -----B r ighton ___ __----- -Broomfield __ __ ____ _
Brush __ - - - -- - -----Ca non City---- - ---Commerce C ity ____ _
Cortez
____
- -- - -- - - --_
Delta ___
___________
Durango __ __ ____ -- -Florence . . -- ------UJcmrnod Sprin gs __
Golde n __----------G ra n d J nn ction ____ _
GUJ11J ison __ - ------L a Jun ta __ -- - ----- Lam ar __e-____
- - --------_
Leadvill
__ ____
LitL!cton _____ _- -- - - Lon g mont __ ___ _____
Loveland_ -- -------~fani to u S prin gs ___ _
Monte V ista ____ ___ _
Montrose ___ ___----Rocky Ford _______ _
Sa lida ______ -------T ho rnton ___ __ ----- Wa lsenb urg ___ -- --- Wcstrn in ster _- -- -- --
Nwi1ber of
police
depart,nent
emplo yees
CONNECTICUT
Continued
San Clemente ____ ___
San F ernando _____ _
Sanger_ __ ____ ____ ___
Sa n J acin to __ __ ____ _
San Ma rino ___ _____ _
San P ablo ___ ______ _
Sant a P a ula ___ ___ __
Sausalito ___________ _
Seal Beach _ ___ ____ _
Seas id e ____ ________ _
Sebastopol_ __ _____ __
Selma _____ __ __ _____ _
Sh a fte r ____ ______ ___
Sierra Madre __ __ ___ _
Soledad ____________ _
Sonora _______ ____ ___
Son t h P asad en a ___ _
Sta nton ___________ _
S uisnn C it y ______ __
S usanville ___ _____ __
T a ft ________ ____ ___ _
T e h acha pi __ _______ _
Tracy ___ __ __-- -- - --Tul a re ___ _-- - -- -- --Turl ock ____ ______ --Tustin _____ - ___-- - __
U kia il __ __ ______ ___ _
U ni vers ity of
Ca li fornia _ _ ----- Vacav ille __- - - -- -- -Vernon ___ - - ----- -- V ictor v ille ___ ______ _
Visalia ___ _____ ____ __
Walnut C reek ______ _
City by state
10
IO
7
9
13
13
14
6
17
3
7
11
35
10
10
12
7
29
21
17
6
7
10
6
8
12
7
15
Avon __ __ _____ __ ___ _
BetbeL ___ _________ _
Bl oomfield __ ____ __ __
B ra nford __ _________ _
C heshire ____ ____ __ __
Clinton ____ __ ______ _
Danielson _____ _____ _
Der by __ ___ __ __ ___ __
F a rmington ____ ____ _
Glastonbury __ _____ _
G ranby ___ _______ __ _
Groton Borou gh ___ _
Madison __ ________ __
Monroe __ _________ __
N a n gatuck_ __ __ ___ _
New Canaan ____ ___
Newington ___ ___ __ __
Nort h H a ven ____ ___
Old Sa yb rook ___ __ __
Oran ge ____ ____ ____ _
Pl ainville _______ ___ _
P utnam __________ __
Rocky Hill ___ ___ ___
S helton ___ ________ __
Simsbury ________ __ _
Sprague ___ _____ ____ _
Stonington ____ ___ __ _
Vernon __ ____ _____ __
Wa ter ford ___ ______ __
Wa terto,vn ____ ____ __
Wethersfi eld ____ __ __
Wilton ___________ __ _
Winsted __ ___ _____ __ _
Wolcott ____ ___ _____ _
Woodbridge ____ __ __ _
7
6
18
20
16
3
24
8
19
33
28
23
29
10
17
17
9
8
26
9
I
21
2IJ
15
17
31
11
12
14
11
29
14
23
5
8
7
FLORID A
Apalachicola __ _____ _
Apopka ___ _____ ___ __
Au burn dale ______ __ _
Bartow ___ _________ _
Bay H a r bor Isla nds _
Bi scayne P ark _____ _
Boca R a ton _____ ___ _
Braden to n ______ ___ _
C lewiston ________ __ _
Cocoa __ ____________ _
Cocoa Beach _______ _
Dacie C ity _______ ___
D ania ________ _____ _
Deerfield B each __ ___
D uned in __ __ ___ ____ _
E a n Gallic ____ ____ __
Eustis __ ____ _______ _
G reen Cove
S pri ngs __________ _
G ulfpor t ___ ____ ____ _
Haines C ity ____ ___ _
Halland ale __ _______ _
Holl y Hill ________ __
J ackson v ille
Beach ____ __ _____ _
K issin1mce ____ ____ __
L a ke Wales ________ _
L a ntaand
n a __
-- -_
Maitl
__ -__ ----___ ____
Margate __ ___ ______ __
N umber of
police
departm ent
employees
FLORIDA- Con.
6
8
22
26
17
DELAWA RE
Dover_ ___________ __
Milford __ _____ ____ __
Newark __ __ ___ ___ __ _
N ew Castle _____ ___ _
Sea ford ________ ____ _
Smyrna __ ____ ___ ___ _
City by state
4
11
10
23
14
4
44
33
7
33
34
11
18
25
17
36
12
9
12
14
28
12
31
16
17
8
12
5
Miami S hores ___ ___ _
~Iirruu ar _________ __ _
Naples ____ ___ ____ __ _
eptune Beacb ___ __
New Port Richey __ _
New Smyrna
Beach ___ ____ ___ __
ortb Palm
B each ____ ___ ____ _
Ocala ____ ___ __ _____ _
Ormond B each ___ __
Palatka __ _.__ _____ ___
Palm Bay __ __ ___ __ _
Palm Beach _______ _
P al m S prings ______ _
Pinellas Park ______ _
P lantation __ __ - --- __
Pompano Beacb __ __
Port St. Joe __ ______ _
Quincy __ ____ ___ __ __
R ockledge __ ____ ___ _
Sa fety Harbor ____ __
St. Cloud __________ _
St. P etersburg
Beac h ____ _____ __ _
Sanford ____________ _
Sebring ___ ___ ___ ___ _
So uth M iam i_ __ ___ _
Stark e __ __ __ __ ___ __ _
Stuat t_ _ _ __ _ _ ___ __ _ _
Surfside __ _____ ___ __
T a rpon Springs ____ _
T emple T errace __ __ _
Treasure Isla nd ___ __
W est Miami __ _____ _
Winter Haven ____ __
Zephyrhills ______ __ _
31
15
20
4
7
22
9
39
23
16
7
58
5
20
21
59
5
2i
8
4
8
18
28
15
27
12
II
18
13
13
II
9
39
8
GEORGIA
Am ericus . __ __ ____ __
Barnes ville ____ ____ _
Calho u n ___________ _
Canton ___ __ ____ ____
Carroll to n __ _______ _
Cord ele __ _______ ____
D a lton ________ _____ _
El berton ____ _____ ___
Ga inesville _____ __ __
Ga rd en City ____ ___ _
G reens boro __ ______ _
Griffin _______ ___ ___ _
H a peville _____ ____ __
L a faye tte __________ _
M adiso n __ _______ ___
McR ae __ __________ _
Milled geville ___ ____
T ifton __ ___________ _
W as hin gton ____ ____
W inder __ __ _____ ___ _
22
8
8
7
19
17
21
15
33
4
3
50
19
12
6
7
23
18
5
14
IDAHO
B lack foot_ ________ __
Buh!_ ___ ______ ___ __
Burley _____________ _
Oaldwe!L ___ ____ ___ _
Coeur d'Alene _____ _
Jerome __ ___________ _
18
4
19
20
16
g
K ell ogg _______ __ ___ _
L e wiston __ ___ ____ __
Montpelier_ _______ _
?vfoscow ____ _______ _
Mountain Rome ___ _
17
15
~:~~ft
~~::::::::::::
Ruper t_ __ _________ _
12
JO
26
6
22
6
163
�T able 50. - N u,nbe r of Full - Tim e Police D epart m e n t E m p loyees, December 31 ,
1965, Cities W ith Popiilation unde r 25,000- Co nti nued
C ity b y state
N u m ber of
police
depar tment
employees
IDAHO-Con.
Sa lmon . . . . ........ .
Sa nd point. . ... . ... .
Shelley . . . . . . .. . . . . .
Soda prings . ... . . . .
Twin F alJs . . . .. . . . .
W eiser . . . . .. .. . .. . . .
B rid g:cYicw _______ __
B road view ____ _____ _
Brookfield . . .. .. . . . .
B ushnc!L .. . . . . . .. .
Cahokia . . .. . . . . ... .
Ca lum et P ark . . .. . .
Ca nton ..... . .. .. . . .
Car bondale . . . .... . .
Carmi. . . ... . .. . . . . .
Carpenters ville . .. . .
Car terville.. ...... . .
Cary ___________ ___ _
Centralia .. . .. . . . .. .
Charles to n . . . . . . . . . .
Chester. - · . . . . .. . . . .
ChilJicothe. .... . . . . .
Clarend on R ilJs ... . .
Columbia . . . .. . . . . . .
Crest H i!L . .. . . .. . .
Crete .. . . ... . . . . ... .
D eerfield ... . . .. .. . .
D e K alb . . .... . . .. . .
D b..a11oor ____ ____ __ __
Di xon __ ____ ____ __ __
D own ers Grove . . .. .
D u po . . ........ . .. . .
D wi gh t . .. . . .... .. . .
E ast Alton .... .. ... .
E ast :\foli ne .. . . . . . .
Ed wardsv ilJe . . . .. . .
Effin gham ______ ___ _
E ldorado . .... . ... . .
E lk G ro ve Village ..
E lm wood Pa rk . . . . .
E ureka . . ........ . .
F air field ... . ..... .. .
F a irm ont City .. . . . .
F lom .. . . ... . . .. .. . .
F lossmoor ___ ____ ___
3
8
4
6
28
7
4
19
15
6
JO
24
12
6
3
I
9
11
19
22
2
14
27
16
18
10
19
3
4
17
12
9
6
7
3
9
3
21
29
11
17
28
2
4
12
22
14
8
4
18
23
3
10
4
11
Fores t P ark .... . .. . .
F ulton . .. . .. . .. ... . .
23
Genesco. ____ ___ ___ _
Geneva . . .... ... . .. .
Cl il lespie . . .. ... . •. . .
6
6
II
3
Gl en E IJ yn . . . • . .• ••
21
23
30
Galena ___ ___ __ _____ _
G lcncoe_____ ________
G lenview ____ ______ _
Go!L .. . . ... . . .... . .
Grayslake . . ..... .. .
H anover P ark .. . . . .
H a rvard .......... . .
H a rwood H eights . . .
Hickory lli lJ s . . . .. . .
Highl and . ......... .
High wood . . . .. . .. . .
H illsboro . . .. . . .. . . .
164
N um ber of
police
department
employees
ILLINOIS- Con.
IL~INOIS
Abingdon ... .. . . . . . .
Addison . . .. . .. . .. . .
Barri n~to n ... . . . . .. .
Ba rtonv ilJe ... ... . . .
Batavia .. . ..... . .. . .
B en wood . . . . . ... .. .
Belvid ere . . . ... . . . . .
Berkeley ... . .. . .. . . .
B ethalto . . .. . . . . . . . .
B ourbonna is ... . . .. .
B rad ley . . .. . . . ..... .
City b y state
2
6
3
6
5
14
3
8
5
6
Hinsdale... . .. .. . . . .
Hoilman E states .. . .
Homewood . . . . ... . .
H oopeston . . . .. . .. . .
I tasca . .. ... . . . .. . . . .
Jackson ville . . .. . . . .
Jerseyv ilJe . ... . . .. . .
K enilworth . ... . .. . .
L a Gran ge . ..... . . . .
L a Grange P ar k .. . .
L ake Forest. .. . . . . .
Lake Zurich .. . . .. . .
Lansing .... . .. . . .. . .
L a Sane . . .. . . . . . . . .
La wrcncev ilJe. ... . . .
Lebanon . . . . . . .. . . . .
Lincoln .. ... . .... . . .
Lincolnwood . .... . . .
Lisle. . . . . . . . . . .. .. . .
Litchfield . . . . ... .. . .
L oves P ark . ... . . . . .
L yon s . . . . .. .. . . . .. .
M acomb .. . . .... . . . .
Madison . . . . . .. .. . . .
Markha m ...... ... .
M a rquette H eights .
M ascou tah . . . . . . . . .
M a tteson . .·... . ... . .
M a ttoon .. .. . . . .. .. .
McLean sboro .. . .. . .
M end ota .. . ... . . .. .
M et ropoli s . . . . . ... . .
M ilan . ... . ... .. . . . .
Mon mou t h . ... ... . .
Morris ... ... . .. . . . . .
Morrison . ...... ... .
Morton . ... ..... . . . .
Moun t Morris . .... .
Moun t Olive .. . .. . .
Moun t Vernon .. . . •
M un delein . .. . . . . . . .
aperv ill e..... .. . . .
1 ashv ille . ......... .
N okom is . .. .. . . . .. . .
1 ornrnL .......... . .
N orth A urora _____ __
North brook . .. .. . . . .
1 or thfield . ...... . .
Northl ake ... . .... . .
N or t h R i versicle . . . .
O' F a lJon ... . ... ... . .
Oglesby .. . .. ... . ... .
Olney . .. . . ........ . .
Oly mp ia F ields . . . . .
Orland P ar k . . . .. . . .
Ottawa . . . ..... .. . . .
P ala tine . ...... .... .
P ana .. . . .... . . .. . . .
Peoria Ileights . .... .
Peru ........... .. . . .
P ittsfi eld . ____ __ ___ _
P lano .. . .. .... . .. . . .
P olo . . . ...... .. . .. . .
P rin ceton .. . . .. .... .
R an toul. .. . . . .... . .
R iver F orest.. . . . . . .
R iverside . .. ... .... .
R obinson . .. .. . ... . .
Rochelle. .. .. ... ... .
R ockd ale . . . .. . . . . . .
Rock Falls .. . . . .... .
Rolllng M eadows . . .
R osello .. . . . ... .. .. .
Roun d L ake Beach.
St. Char les .. . . . . . . .
Salem .... . . .. . .... . .
Sand wich ... . . . .... .
City by state
Number of
police
depar t ment
employees
ILLINOIS-Con.
22
13
17
8
6
23
12
11
28
24
31
7
13
17
JO
3
20
24
9
6
11
14
14
17
19
2
2
6
22
3
9
8
5
10
7
Schiller Par k . . . . . . .
Sbelbyvil le . . .. . .. . .
Sih' is . . . ..... . . . .. . .
Sou t h Beloit. . . . . . . .
Sou th Chicago
H eights . . . .. ... . . .
South E lgin ... .. . . .
Sou t h Hollan d . . . . . .
Staunton ... .. . . . .. .
Stone Park ... ... . . .
Stream\\·ood . . . . .. . .
Strea to r . . ... . . . . . . . .
Sullivan .. . .. . . . .. . .
Swan sea . .. ... . . . . . .
T ay lorville . . . . . . . . .
Thorn ton . .. . . . ... . .
Vanda lia .. . . .. . . . . . .
Venice . . . ...... . . . . .
, Vashington .. .... . .
W ashington P a rk . . .
vVaterloo ... . . .. .. . .
vVatseka .. . . . . . .... .
vVau concla . . ... . . . . .
W estchester . -· . . . . .
\ Vest Dundee . . . .. . .
W estern Springs . . . .
W est Frankfort. .. . .
W estmont. . . .. . .. . .
W estvi lJe . . . . ... . . . .
·w hi te Hall . . . . . .. . .
W ilmington ... . . . . .
Winnetka . .. . . . .. . . .
W ood R iver. .. ... . .
W oodstock .. .. . .. . .
Zion . . . . . .. .. . . . . .. •
5
G
4
I NDIANA
5
Angola ... . .. .. . . . . . .
A ttica . .. . . . . . . . .. . .
A u burn . . . ... . .... . .
Aurora . .... . . . . . . .. .
B a tesv ilJe ... ... . . .. .
Bed ford . . . . . . .. . . .. .
Berne .. . .. ..... • .. . .
B icknell .. .. .. . . . .. .
Boon vilJe . ... . .... . .
Bcz iL .. . ........ . .
B rookv ille . . .... . . . .
C hesterton .. . ..... . .
C lin ton . ....... . . . . .
Co!n mhus ....... . . .
Corydon ....... ... . .
Cra\\·for ds, ilJe . . . .. .
C rown Poin t .. . . . . .
D eca tur ... . . ...... .
D elphi. . . . ........ . .
Dunkirk ......•.....
E ast Gary . . ... . .. . .
F ra nkfort. . . ... .. . . .
Garrett ... ..... . .. . .
Gas C ity ... . . ..•...
Goshen ..... ....... .
G reencastle . ...... . .
Green wood .. . . .. .. .
G rimth . .... ...... . .
H ighlaud . ..... . .. . .
Hobart ... ..... .... .
Runtinghurg .. .. . . .
H un tin i:ton ... . . . . . .
Jason v ii le . . . .... .. . .
J asper .. . . ....... . .
Jefferson ville . . . . .. . .
Kencla L! vilJ e . .. . . .. .
Knox .. ...... . . . . . . .
L a Porte . . . . . . . . . . . .
L aw rence.. . . . . •. . ..
10
17
19
3
3
16
3
22
16
24
14
4
4
14
3
3
24
21
7
6
16
4
7
3
5
16
25
16
6
12
4
23
19
8
6
18
10
4
13
8
9
7
3
3
12
3
II
24
21
5
5
9
l
9
15
9
3
4
10
9
~o
4
18
5
II
2
4
7
26
13
11
14
6
5
11
II
3
'!.7
3
4
14
4
g
9
H
4
25
9
13
4
5
13


t.?


5
ti
2'!.
16
9
11
18
19
4
23
3
10
2:Z
10
4
36
15
�Table 50 , -N umber of Fu ll- T im e Police D ep a rtme nt Employ ees, Dece mbe r 31,
1965, Cities W i t h Popula t ion unde r 25,000- Continuc d
City by stat e
N u mber of
police
d epartmen t
employees
V incennes . - . -- ---- -
W a bash . .. . .. . .... .
\Varsaw. - . - - ------W est L afayette .....
W est T erre H a u te . .
Whiting ........... .
8
12
6
32
20
6
8
10
11
13
38
10
15
8
9
26
9
10
18
12
12
8
4
12
10
4
13
22
19
6
8
26
23
21
14
25
5
27
IO WA
Albia . . . .. . . .... ...•
Alp;o na . .. ... ...... .
Anamosa. - - - ------An keny .... ... ..... .
Audubon ......... . .
Belmond . . .. ·······
Beucndorf. . .. · · · · · ·
Bloomfield . . . ...... .
Boone ...... ··· ·····
CenLerYille ... · ···· ·
Charles C ity ... .... .
C lar inda .. . . .. ·· ·· ··
C lear La ke .... .... .
C resco . . .. . ..... . . .
Decorah . ..... . . · ···
Drnison __ __ - - -----DvcrsYille . . . . . .... .
F.idora .. ... .......•.
Emmetsburg . ..... .
Esthervi lle . ... . .... .
Ernnsdalc ....... . . .
Fairfield .. ...... . . .
Fort .\fadison .... . . .
G!Pnwood
. . - - - - - --Gri 11nc lL . _____ ___ __
nampLOn . . ........ .
Ha rla n ... . . ....... .
Inde pendence .... .. .
Ind ia nola .... .. .... .
.Jefferson ........... .
Keokuk .... ........ .
Knoxvi lle .... . ..... .
Le :\fars .... ....... .
Manchester .. . ... .. .
M a r1 uoketa . . . . . ... .
N umber of
police
departmen t
employees
5
8
4
4
3
2
16
4
15
9
1G
10
J1
4
9
8
4
3
8
10
6
JI
18
4
8
9
6
11
12
4
23
7
8
8
10
Marion ........ .... .
Mars hall to"·n . .. . . .
M issou ri Valley . .. .
Mount P leasa n t ... .
Tew H a mpton . ... .
Newton .. ____ __ ___ _
OehYe in .. . . . .. . ... .
Osage .. .... . . ... .. . .
Osceola .. ... . . . . ... .
Os kaloosa . .. .. .... . .
Perr y ___ .---- - - -- - -R ed Oa k ....... .... .
Roc k R a p ids . . .. . . .
S heldon .. .. . .. . .. . .
S hen a n doa h . .. . ... .
Sibley ..... . . . . . .. . .
Spe ncer .... ..... ... .
Spirit L a ke .... . . .. .
T ama _________ _____ _
rbandale. ____ ----Vin to n ... . ..... .... .
vva,-:erl y - ----- - - - - --
W e bster C ity .. . . .. .
,Vest Burlingto n .. .
W est D es Moines .. .
Windsor H eigh ts . . . .
\Vin terset . . . ....... .
13
24
3
10
4
17
13
5
3
12
9
8
3
5
8
4
14
6
2
9
6
JI
14
I
18
5
5
KANS AS
Abile ne .. . ..... . ... .
A r ka nsas City ..... .
Atchison .. ...... ... .
~~IY~,
~fi'l.;: ::: :::::::
Beloit . . . . . ... .... . .
C hanu te __ ________ __
Clay Oen ter .. . . ... .
Coffeyvi lle . .... .... .
Colby ... ..... . .... .
Concord ia . ........ .
Council Grove . . ... .
Der by . ... ......... .
D od ge C ity .. . . .. .. .
E l D orado . . ..... . . .
Ellinwood ___ . ----- E llis ... . ........ . . . .
Em poria .. ..... . .. . .
Eureka ......... ... .
F a ir way _____ __ ____ _
F redonia ........... .
Garden City ...... . .
Garnett. .. .. . .... .. .
Good land ... .. ... .. .
G reat n en d ........ .
Herington . .. . .. . . . .
H iawat ha ... . . . .... .
Hoisington ....... .. .
Ho lton ... . ... .. .... .
HorLon .... .. . ..... .
Humboldt .. .. ..... .
lndepen de nce .. . ... .
Iola . ... ...... ...... .
J unctio n City . .... . .
t:,143.215.248.55 15:52, 29 December 2017 (EST):::::::::::
Leawood .. .. . ..•....
Li bera l. . ........ .. .
Li ndsborg . . ....... .
Lyons _- - --- --- ----ManhaLtan .. .... .. .
M a rysv ille ... . .. ... .
McPherson . . . ..... .


rvlcrriam ___ _- - - - - ---


Mission ........... . .
Mu lva ne ..... . .. . . .
Oakley .. ..... . ... . •
C ity b y state
Number of
police
depar tment
employees
KANSAS-Con.
IO WA - Con .
INDI ANA-Con .
L a \\"renceburg ..... .
L e banon ... .. ..... . .
Ligonier .. ......... .
L oganspor t .. . . .... .


Vl adison . . .... . .... .

11 itchelL .......... .

VIon t icello . . ....... .


Mooresville ....... . .
Mo un t \"ernon . . . . .


11un ster . . ......... .


Ne \\" Castle ........ .
New H aven __ . ____ _
Noblesville . .. . . ... .
No rth Manch ester ..
No rt h Vernon ... . . .
Peru ............... .
Plain field . ..... . ... .
Plymou t h .. . . ..... .
Por t age ........ . .. . .
P ort la n d . . . . . . . . ... .
P rin ceton _____ - - -- - Rensselaer. - --- --- - Rock v ille . .. ... .... .
Rushv ille ...... . . . . .
Scottsburg .. . . . ... . .
Se llersburg . ... .. ... .
Seymour ___ __ - - --- - Sh.elbyville .....•...
Spccd,rny . .... .. . . .
Te ll C ity . ......• . . .
Tipton .. . . ..... . . . .
Valparaiso .. .... . . . ·
C ity b y sta te
8
21
I7
16
8
6
13
5
25
5
8
3
JO
17
13
4
4
26
8
6
6
23
6
8
25
5
4
8
8
8
5
16
JI
29
7
6
JI
16
3
7
32
6
15
9
9
4
3
Olathe . ... . ... . . . . . .
Osa\\"atom ie . . ..... .
Ottawa . . . . ....... . .
P aola ..... . . ... . .. . .
P a rsons. ·-· · ·· ·· ··· ·
P hill ipsburg . . .. . . ••
Pi ttsb urg ..... . . .. . .
Plain Yille . . ... .. ... .
P ra tt ....... . ... . . . .
R oe lan d Par k .... .. .
Russell. .. .. ...... . .
Shaw nee . . .. . . .... . .
Va lley Ce n te r . . . . .. .
Welli n gto n .. . . . . . . .
West wood . . .. .... . .
W infield .. . ... . . . .. .
15
6
14
7
16
4
29
4
11
7
8
10
3
14
5
16
KEN TUCKY
Bardsto\\"11 . .... . . .. .
Be nton .. . .... -- ·· · ·
Berea . ........... .. .
Ca mp be llsville •. . . ..
C ynt hia na . . .. . ... . .
D a n ville .. ........ . .
D a \\"so n Sprin gs . .. .
E li za bet h to\\"n . . . . . .
E ls mere ........ ....·
E rla nger . ..... . .. . . .
F a lmou th ........ .. .
Flatwoods .... ..... .
F ort Thomas . ..... .
Franklin . ... .. .... . .
Glasgow . .... . . .... .
H a rla n ...... ... ... . .
H arrodsbu rg . . .. . . . .
H a za rd . .. .. .. ..... .
Henderson _______ ___
Highla n d H eigh ts ..
Hop kinsv ille ....... .
J effersontown . .. ... .
L a n caster. .. .... ...•
Ludlow ........ .... .
M iddlesboro .. ..... .
Mo n ti cello ......... .
Mo u nt Sterli ng .. . . .
P a ris ...... . ....... .
P a rk Hills . ... . .... .
Russell ville ........ .
St. Ma t t he ws .. .. .. .
Somerset .• ... . . . ....
South F ort M itchell.
Winchester . ...... . .
9
5
7
7
8
21
4
13
2
10
5
8
16
8
17
JI
9
13
35
l
32
4
5
7
16
4
JO
14
3
10
JO
17
4
Jg
LOUISIANA
D e R id de r. .. . ... . . .
Donaldsorw ille . ... .
E unice ............. .
Fra nk lin ___________ _
H a m mon d . . .. ..... .
H aynesvi lle ... ..... .
Jones boro .......... .
K a pla n ... ........ . .
M amou ....... .. ... .
Mar ksv ille ... ... . .. .
Minde n ... .... .. . . . .
New R oa ds........ .
Opelousas ...... ... . .
P laq uem ine ........ .
Rayne . .. . ........ . .
p rin ghi!L ........ .
Sul p hur. .. ....... . .
Thiboda u x... ...... .
II
)6
19
J7
18
4
9
8
g
7
12
5
2
J:J
I7
9
V i via n __ ___________ _
8
23
4
Welsh . .. . ......... .
West Monroe . ..... .
26
6
165
�Table 50.- N umbe r of Full - Time Police D epart m e n t Employees, D e c e m b e r 31 ,
1965 , Citie s With Populatio n unde r 25,000- Cont inue d
Cit y by state
N umber of
police
department
em ployees
MARYLAND
A bcrdcen ____ ____ __ _
Anna.polis . _____ ____
Bel Air ____ _____ __ __
Blade nsburg __ ___ ___
B runsw ick _________ _
Cambridge ________ _
Crisfi eld _____ __ ____ _
Distr ict H eights ___ _
Easton ____ ___ __ ___ __
E lk to n ________ ___ __ _
Frederick __ _______ __
Frost burg__________ _
Greenbelt ______ _____
H yatts ville _____ ___ _
Laure!_ ____ __ ______ _
Mou nt R ainier_ ___ _
Salisbur y _______ ___ _
Sparrows Poin t_ ___ _
T a kom a Par k ______ _
T hurmont ___ __ ___ __
U ni ve rsity of
M ar yland _______ _
U n iversity P ar k ___ _
Westm inster _______ _
MASSACHUSETTS
Abingto n __ _______ __
Acton ____ __________ _
Acushn et_ _____ ____ _
Ada ms __ __________ _
Aga wam __ __ __ _____ _
Amesbur y __ -- -----Am herst_ _______ __-Andover ___ ___ _____ _
As hburnham ______ _
Ashland ____ ____ ___ _
Hi6
N umher of
police
depar tment
employees
City b y state
MASSACHUSETTSContinue d
MAINE
Augusta __ ____ __ ___ _
Bar Harbo r_ __ ____ __
Ba t h __ ____ _____ ____ _
B runswick __ ___ _____
Cam den ____ __ _____ _
D exter __ ___ ____ ___ __
E llswor t h __________ _
l"a lmou tl1- _____ ___ _
Farmin gto n __ _____ __
Gardiner _______ ____
H allowell _________ __
H am p den _________ __
Houl to n _______ ____ _
K itter y _____ ___ ____ _
M a da waska ____ ____
lV[ adison _______ ____ _
M illinocket ___ ______
iV[ilo ______--- --- - - -Old Orchar d Beach _
Old
To",'--- - --Orono
______ -_____
__ _
Pari s __ ___ ______ ____
P it tsfi eld ___ ____ ___ _
P resque Isle ______ __
R ocklan d __________ _
R umfor d _____ ___ ___
Saco ______ _____ ___ __
San for d ___________ __
Scar borough __ ____ __
Skow hega n _____ __ __
Sou th Portland ____ _
Van Buren ___ ____ __
W a ldoboro __ _____ __
Wa ter ville ______ ___ _
Wells ___ ______ _____ _
W estbrook __ ___ ____ _
York_ _______ ______ _
C it y by state
34
5
Athol__ ____ _- _- - - - - Au burn _____ ___ ____ _
15
Ayer ________ ___ ____ _
21
Barnsta ble ___ ___ ___ _
i
Bedford __ _______ __ __
3
Blackstone _________ _
5
Bourne __ ________ __ _
3
Boylston __ __ _______ _
3
Brid~ewa ter ____ ___ _
9
Burli ngton _____ ____ _
2
C ha t ham ____ ___ ___ _
3
C helmsford _____ ___ _
11
___ ________ __
s Clinton
Cohasset_ _____ ____ __
3
Concor d ___ ____ ____ _
3
Da lton T o,n1- ___ ___
7
Dan,·ers ___ . ____ ___ _
2
Dartmou t h ___ ______
9
11
D ighton __ --- -- --- ··
Do,·cr ___ ·-· _·-· ·· · 5
4
Dracu t ._._ ·· ··· · ·- ·
3
East Bridgewa ter_ . .
12
E asthampton . .. -···
East Longmeadow . .
12
13
E aston .... ..... -··- .
Fair haven _________ _
12
Falmouth ... - . . _... .
Ii
4
Fo xborou gh .. .. .. ·- ·
i
Franklin . . . . ··· · -···
36
Gar dner .. . .. _- · · ·-Georgetown ...... . . _
2
I
Grafton . . .. -· · ·· ····
Greenfield _..... ... .
23
3
Groveland . . _· · · · -· ·
19
H ar wich . . ···-·· ·-· ·
.3
Hingha m _·--· -· · ·· ·
Holbrook _· · ·· ·· · · -H olliston _. ___ .. . .. .
H opedale ... . ... . .. .
12
Hudson ... .. ...... . .
59
Hu ll . .. . . . ---·· ···· i
l ps" ·ich ........... · Lan caste r_ . ... -.... .
8
5
Leicester ... _······· 26
Lincoln . .. _.... -·· · ·
8
Littleton .. -. .. . -· · ··
3
Longmeadow _.... . .
13
Lu dlow .. _........ . .
7
L;'IlnficlcL . . -··· . . .
3i
M a nsfi eld . . . . __ _-·- ·
11
M a rblehead ___ . . ...
] ;\
M arion . . ·--···· -···
18
M arl boro _....... .. .
12
M arshfi eld .... ... .. .
6
Mat ta poisett _._ ... .
3i
M eclfielcL . _. -·--· · ·
201
Merri mac. _. .. _-··- ·
24
M icld lcboro . .. -... . .
2
Mi lford . . __···-·· ···
M ill bur y ___ --·-· ···
38
M illis·-· -···- -······
2
M ontague. __ - -·· -··
7
Na hant To ,n1s hi p . .
Na n t u cke t . . .. .. _.. .
N e wbur yport ______ _
15
12
i
18
2G
14
12
30
2
10
Nort h Ada ms . . . .. . .
N ort h An dover_ ... .
Nor t hboro .. _-·-- · - North bridge .. _.... .
N orth Broo kfield .. .
North Read ing . _. . .
TorwelL ____ __ ____ __
Orange . _. . ·· - · ·· · - ·
Oxfor d .. . __ ·· - - - - - -·
Palmer _· - · ·· · · -·--·
Pe pperelL .. . ·- · -···
N umber of
police
department
employees
MASSACHUSETTS-
Continue d
Ii
10
9
39
17
6
19
1
10
29
11
28
19
13
21
7
25
rn
1
5
10
8
Ii
17
11
l
31
T opsfi eld . . . . .. · · · ·Tyngsborou gh ... .. .
U p to n _· ·-··· · -· ··-·
\\" alpole .. . ·· · · · · -··
2
,v a.re ___ ______ ____ __
31
14
14
31
3
7
31
3
3
P l,7non th . .. . . . . .. .
P ro vince town ____ ___
Reading .. .. . . . . .. . .
R ehoboth . . . . . . . . . . .
Rockp ort . .. · · -·· · · ·
Sa lis bury. · - ···· · - · ·
Sa n gn s. ____ . -· . . . · - Scitua te .. . . ·- · - ·· - ·
Sharon. ___ . .. . · - - - · ·
Shirley .. _. · · · ··· · - ·
Som erset . . . . . ... .. . .
So u t hborough __... .
Sou thbridge _____ ___
Sou t h H adley . . .. .. _
Stoneha m . . . ... - . . . .
Stough ton .. . . . · · - · Sto\\· .. .. . . . ... . .. . . .
Sud bnry -.. . · · -··· ··
Swa
mpscott _. ····-·Sw anse::i. ____________ _
s
9
9
5
19
25
13
W are ham . . . - . .. . . . .
\Va yla n d ... . . .. . .. .
We bster ........... .
, Vest Boylston _.. .. .
West Bridge wa ter . .
Westfor d .... . . ·· - · ·
\Veston . .. . .. -·· · · ··
\ Vestpo r t_ . . . . .. . ·- .
Whi tm an .. .. . .. . .. .
\\"illia m stowu _. ... .
\Yi lm in gton.-.. - . .. .
\ Vinchcster
"Winthrop_ .. . . .. . .. .
\ \" rcn t ham . __ ·· · ·· ·Adr ian ____ ______ ___ _
9
r,
Al bion . . ...... ..... .
Algonac .. -. . .. . . ... .
19
18
17
s
32
G
32
31
10
9
2
20
23
12
6
10
9
11
21
31
19
7
13
2
13
6
6
5
13
2
10
II
32
29
H
4
11
5
30
14
31
24
4
13
30
JI
5
1
?l
-8
2:3
I,
25
l
6
6
15
1:1
13
II
24
-II
32
8
MIC HIGAN
4
5
10
32
3
~J


~a............ :


Battle Cree k
'l'0\\71·
s hi p ... _......... .
Bedfo r d To"·ns hi p . .
Beld ing .. . _.... .. .. .
Benton H ar boL ... _
Ber kley . .. ...... . . . .
Berr ien ISpriu gs .. -..
Bessem er _........ . .
Bc,,crl y H ills _·-· .. .
Bi g R a fi cl s _· · ····- ·
Blissfic cl . ... · ·· ·· ·B loomfi eld 'l'0 \\71sh iP .- -·· ·-· -· ·· --·
B oy ne C it y ... .. ... .
Ca di llac __ . . ·· ·-···Ca ro .. _·· · ··- · ·· ···Cnspia n __.. ·· ·-· · · Ce n te r Line ... _·- - ·
Charlotte _... -···· ··
C helsea. _· ··-····- - Cla wso n .. .. .... . .. .
Colclwa t er . --·· · -·-·
Coru nna. _.- ---·· - -·
Cr ys tal Fnlls. - · - ·- Davison __-··- ·· ·· ··
Du ra n d ... .... .. . _. .
E
corse.···-··
Esca
naba ____ ··
___· ···
___-_
"Fa.rm in gton __ ___ ____
26
20
fl
13
20
IO


1


5
4G
2:l
3
4
Hi
12
l
30
5
13
·l
2
Ji
9
•l
21
15
2
4
3
8
-18
22
23
�Table 50.-N umber of Full - T i m e Police D epartment Emplo:yees, December 31
1965, Cities With Population under 25,000- Continued
'
C ity b y state
MIC HIGAN- Con.
Fentcin ___ _____ __ ___
F la t Rock __ ____ __ __
G ibralt ar __ ___ ___ __ _
Gladstone ____ ___ ___
Grand H a ven ___ ____
Gra nd Ledge ______ _
Gr and v ille ____ ____ __
Green v ille _____ _____
Grosse Pointe __ ___ __
Grosse Pointe
Farms ____ __ ______
Grosse
P ointe
__ ____ __ __
P a rk ____
Grosse
Pointe
Woods
_____ __ ____ _
H ancock ____ ____ ___ _
H a rpe r W oods -- ___ _
H astings _________ ___
Hillsda le ____ ____ ___ _
HowelL ___ ___ ____ __
Huntington Woods_
lron M oun ta in ___ __
Iron Ri , er_ ____ ____ _
lronwood _____ __- - -Ishpeming __ __-- - __ _
L a ke Orion __ _______
L a peer __ __--- - - - - -- La t hrup Village __ - _
Lauriu m ____ ____ ___ _
L u d ington ______ ___ _
M ack inac Island --- M anistee __ _--- - --- M arine C ity __ _____ _
M ar q ue t t e ____-- ---lVIars ha lL-- ____ __ __
M ar ys,·iJle ______ ___ _
M ason __ ____--- -- --M elvindale ___ --- --Menom inee _______ __
Michigan Sta te
U nivers ity __ _- -- - Milfo rd _________ __ __
Mount P leasan t ___ _
Mu nising __ __ _- --- --
M us kegon H eights_
Negaw iee __ ____ -- --Ne ,\· B alt irnore .- - - N il cs _____ ___ _____ __
N or t h M us kegon ___
N or thvi lle ________ __
N orway ___ _____ ____
Oscoda ____ _----- -- Otsego ___ ______ ___ _
O \\"0 SSO - - -- ----- - - --
Oxfo rd ______ __ __ --- P etoskey ____ ___ __ __
P la in we ll __ __ ___ ____
P leasant R id ge ____ _
P lymou t h ______ ___ _
Portland --- - ______ __
Richmo nd __ _______ _
R iver R ouge _____ ___
R iYcrvi cw .. ____ ____
R ochester __ ____ ____ _
R ogers C ity __ - _- - - R omeo ___ ____ ______ _
Rooseve lt P ar k --- -St . C la ir_ ________ ___
St. Johns __ _____ __ __
St. Jose ph ____ __ ___ _
St. Lo uis ___ ____ __ __
Sault Ste. M a rie ____
Scottville ________ - - Sou t h H aven .-- ---So u t h Ra n ge ____ ____
Spar ta ____ . ___ - - - - -Stam bau gb ____ _____
N umber of
police
department
employees
C ity by stat e
Num ber of
police
dep artment
employees
6
18
8
8
9
19
29
31
44
6
33
9
7
6
13
12
5
15
15
8
11
5
4
13
2
12
5
29
11
8
6
22
14
39
10
16
5
20
13
5
29
3
11
4
9
4
22
9
8
4
8
16
5
9
47
16
13
4
10
2
5
10
22
5
30
2
13
1
3
4
Stu r gis __ __ ___ __ ____ _
Swartz Creek_ . _____
T ecu m se h _______ __ _
Three R ivers _____ __
T renton _. ____ ___ __ _
T roy __ _____ __ ___ __ __
Vassar ____ _____ __ __ _
W a kefie ld _. . ___ ___ _
W ayn e ____ _____ ____
Woodha ven . ____ __ __
Ypsilan ti __ _____ ___ _
Zeeland __ _____ ___ ___
16
4
12
14
41
25
4
5
34
2
36
4
MINNESOTA
A lber t Lea ___ ____ ___
A lexand ria ____ __ ____
Anoka _________ __ ___
A urora _____ _______ __
B a bbitt __ _______ __ __
B ay port __ __ _____ ___
Bemid ji__ __ __ __ _____
B enson _______ ______
B laine . -- --- -- - - -- - Blue E artb .- -- -- -- B rain erd __ ____ ____ __
B recken ridge ... ____
B rookl yn P a rk ... __
B urn sville _______ __ _
Cam bridge ____ ___ __
C haska ____ __ __ __ __ _
C hisholm _______ __ __
Cloquet ___ ________ __
Col u mbia H eights . _
C rook ston ___ . ___ . __
C rosby ______ ______ _
D eephaven . ______ __
D etroit L akes ____ ___
El y _____________ ___ _
E veleth ____ .--·-- - - F airmont --------- -F alcon H eigh ts ._ -- F ari bault .. ----·-- · Fergus F alls . ------ ·
Fridley - . ----------G lenwood . __ ------G ol den Valley ____ __
G rand R a pids _.. ___
H astings __________ __
Hi bbing _---------- Hopkins.---- ------Hoyt Lakes. ______ __
H utchinson ___ __ __ __
In terna tional Fall s .
Jackson __ ___ _______ _
L ake City .------- · L au de rdale _. ______ _
Le Suenr .--- ---- - -L ittle F alls . _____ ___
M aplewood __ _____ ..
M arshal!__ _,. _____ __
M end ota H eigh ts--Mon tevideo .------·
Morris------------·Mound s View . __ ___
ew B righ to n ___ __ _
New H ope . .... ----New P rague_. -----New U lm __________ _
N ort hfleld . --------Nor t h Mankato ___ _
_ or tb St. PauL .. __
Orono . - - --- --- - ---Orto nv ille ._- ------ ·
OWa tonll!L-- -- - - -- P a rk R apidS--- -- --P ipestone ________ __ _
N umber of
police
department
employees
MINNESOTA-Con .
MICHIGAN-Con.
14
6
10
City by state
25
7
16
4
4
3
16
7
10
5
1~
lO
11
2
2
13
13
18
17
8
2
8
10
11
14
3
21
15
18
10
18
118
23
21
3
6
10
5
4
1
4
8
17
14
3
8
5
4
8
7
2
17
9
5
9
4
7
18
4
6
Pl ymouth ___ ___ ____
R eel Wing ___ ____ ___
R ed wood F alls .... _
R obbinsdale. ____ ___
St. Anthony __ _____ _
St . Ja mes ____ ______ _
St. Paul Pa rk ______ _
St. Peter __ ____ ____ __
Sauk R apids ___ ____ _
Shakopee ______ __ ___
Silver Bay ____ ____ __
Sleepy E ye __ ______ _
Sou t h St. PauL . _. _
Springfield ___ ___ ___ _
Stap les . . _________ __
Still wa ter. __ ___ ____ _
T
hief R
iver
F alls
. --_
Tracy
____
_____
_____
T wo H arbors ______ _
Virginia ____ _____ ___
Wa bas ha .. ______ ___
West St. P auL . __ __
W hite Bea r Lake ...
Will mar _____ ____ ___
Windom . _____ ____ __
Wort hin gton _______ _
6
17
4
15
9
5
3
8
3
6
4
4
29
3
4
8
14
4
8
22
3
13
13
16
4
13
MISSISSIPPI
Aberdeen __ ___ ______
Batesville ___ __ ______
Booneville ___ ___ ____
Brook haven __ _____ _
Cleve land __ ___ ____ _
Clin to n _____ _______ _
Forest_ ___ ____ _____ _
Greenwood __ ___ ___ _
Ind ian ola_ . ____ __ ___
Long Beach ___ _____ _
McComb _. ________ _
New A lbany __ ___ __ _
Newton __ __ ________ _
Oxford _____ _______ __
Senatobia __ ___ . ____ .
Waynes boro _______ _
MISSOURI
Ba llwin ___ ________ __
Bellefontain e
Neighbors __ _____ _
Ber keley ______ __ ___ _
Boon ville ____ ___ ___ _
Bren t wood ______ ___
B ri dgeton ____ __ __ __ _
B rookfield _______ ___
Ca mer on __ _______ __
Carthage _______ ___ _
Centra lia ____ ___ ____
C harleston ___ ____ __ _
C hillicothe _______ __ _
Clay ton _____ _____ __
Crestwood __________
Creve Coeur_ __ ___ __
D
.- -________
--- - -·--_
D ellwood
e Soto ____
E ldon _____________ _
E xcelsior Sprin gs ___
F ar mington ___ ____ __
F ayette ____ ___ __ ._ . _
F lat R iver- --- --- - -F ronte nac ___ __ ____ _
F u lton ________ ______
G ladstone ______ ____
Glendale ___ ______ ___
H an ley H ills ___ ___ __
H anni bal__ _____ ____
12
4
7
18
20
6
6
35
16
5
18
9
5
17
2
5
8
13
25
11
18
19
7
5
17
5
9
14
42
17
14
6
9
5
15
5
4
7
10
16
15
11
3
24
167
�Table 50. -Nu mbe r of Full-Time Police D epartment Employees, Dece mbe r 31 ,
1965, Cities With Population under 25,000-Continued
C ity by state
N umber of
police
department
employees
N un1Uer of
C ity by state
NEBRASKA-Con.
MISSOURI- Con.
Harr ison ville __ . ___ _
H azelwood __ __._ . . . llermrurn _____ - - --J ackson ___ _______ _. .
Jenn ings_ .. __ .. . . _. .
L aduc. _.--- - ----- - Lamar ___ _____ -- - --Lees Summit. ____ __
L iberty ___ __. -- - -- - M a lden __ __ __ ____ ___
Maplewooc\ __ . - - - - -Marceline ___ _____ ___
Marshal!__ _________ _
Maryville ____ __ ____ _
Mexico __ _____ __ ___ _
Moberly ___ ____ __ --Monett_ ______ --- - - Neosho
--- -- ---- -_
Nevada__
__ _____
__ ___
1
ormandy ___ ____ __ _
4
14
2
6
37
26
4
14
17
s
22
5
14
13
16
19
9
12
16
3
Nort h Kansas Cit y _
Northwoods _. ___-- O'Fallon ___ ... __. __ _
Olivette ___.. . . . ---Palmyra ____ . . -- . . -Pine Lawn ____ ____ _
Potosi _.. __ ___ __ _--R aytown __ ___ _____ _
R ichmond Heights _
25
4
5
13
3
Rolla __ _____ _____ ___
St. Ann ___ _____ ____ _
St . John Vi Hage ____ .
Salem __________ _____
Shrewsbnry ____ ____ _
Sikeston _._ . . .. _____
"later ____ __._ .. ____ _
Tren ton ____ _____ ___
Union ___ ___ ____ ____
Va lley Park __ ___ __ _
Vinita P ark __ ___----
20
\Varre.nsburg _ - - -- - -
11
Riverv iew ____ ______
Rock Hi!L ___ _____ _
Webb City ______ ___
West P lains . _______
7
5
37
24
3
11
12
7
·9
1G
4
4
3
5
10
9
MONTANA
An aconda ___ _____ __ _
B aker_ ___.. ____ .. ___
Bozeman . _____ ____.
C hotean _.. . _. . ___ __
Conrad _____ . . --- - __
Culbertson __ . ____ __
Di llon ______ ___ ___ __
G lasgow ________ ____
G lendive ____ _. ___ __
H elen a ____ ___ _______
LaureL __ . . _____ . ___
Lew-istown ____ _____ _
Libby _________ ___ __
Livin gston __ __ _____ _
M iles City __ __ ______
Reel Lodge __ _______ _
Sidney __ ____ _____ __ _
Wh itefish ___ ___ ____ _
Wolf Point. ______ __
12
3
16
3
3
1
7
14
12
28
9
10
6
12
14
4
10
4
3
NEBRASKA
Alliance ________ ____
Aubu rn _____ ____ -- -Aurora __ ___ ________ _
B eat rice . _. ____ ___ __
Be!Jevne __ __ __ ___ ___
B lai r ____ ________ ___ _
C hadron _________ __ _
168
C ity by stat e
police
department
employees
13
8
3
23
17
5
7
Columbus . __ ______ _
Crawford ___ _____ __ _
-- ----- -- -_
Crete .- ____
Fairbury
__ ______
F remon t_ _____ __ ___ _
Gering ___ ____ ____-- H astings __. ____ __ ___
Holdrege ___ ______ ___
Kearney ... ____ _____
M cCook _____ _______
M illa rd _____ _____ __ _
Nebraskn City ____ __
Norfolk _____ ___ ___ __
Nort h P latte ____ ___ _
P lattsmonth _____ ___
R a lston _______ --- --Schu y ler _______ ____ _
Scottsblu fT __ _______ _
Sewar d .. ___ ___ ____ _
Siclney ___ _. - - - - - - - -Superior . ______ ____ _
W ayne __ _________ __
York __ ____ __ _______
NEVADA
B oulder City . . ____ _
Carson Cit y _____ __ _
Elko _________ ______ _
F allon ________ ___ ___
Sparks __ __ __ ____ ____
NEW HAMPSHIRE
Berlin . _. ____ ___ ___ _
Claremon t ________ __
Conway __ ___ ______ _
Derry ____ __________ _
D urham ._. __ __ __ ___
Gofisto\\71- __ _. _____
H ampton ___ ____ ___ _
H anove r_ ______ ____ _
Ilndson ___ _. --- -- - -K eene .. . ___ ____ ____
Littloton ______ -- ---M ilforcL __ ____ ____ _
Ne\\711ark t ___ _____ _
1 0\\-port ___ ___ _____ _
P elha m ______ ______ _
Peterborough ______ _
Rochester. ___. --- - -Salem __ ______ ____ __ _
Somers\\·orth __ ___. _
NEW JERSEY
Absecon . __.. _____ __
Allendale . __ ____ ___ _
Asbu r y Park ____ __
Atlantic Highlands_
Auduhon ______ __ __ _
Tlelvidere ______ ____ _
Berkeley H eights ___
B erna rds Township_
Beverly ____ ____ ____ _
Bogota ______ . ___ __ __
Boonton _________ __ _
Bordentow,1_______ _
B0tmd B rook ______ _
Bradley Beach ___ ___
B ridgeton __ ___ _____ _
B rielle ________ _____ _
B rigantine. _____ __ __
B urlin gton __ __ ___ __ _
Butler ___ ____ __ _____
Caldwell__ ___ ____ __ _
Qape M ay __ __ _____ _
N umber of
police
department
employees
NEW JERSEY- Con.
Carlstadt_ ___ ___ ____
Car teret ___ _____ ___ _
Cedar
Grove
ship __
__ ____Town
____ _-_
19
2
6
7
Chatham T ownship __ ___ ___ _____ _
34
Cinnaminson T own10
sh ip __ __ _______ ___
21
Clark _____ _____ _____
15
Clayton ____ ___ __ ___
4
Cliffside P a rk _______
8
C loster __ ___ _____ __ _
19
Collingswood ____ ___
32
Cressk ill _____ ______ _
10
DeaL __ _____ ______ _
4
D elan co T ownship __
5
D em arest __ ___ ______
23
D em,ille Towns hip_
S
Dover_ __ ___ ____ ___ _
14
Dumont ___________ _
4
Dunellen ___ _____ ___
4
E ast Hanover
10
Townsbip ____ ___ _
E ast Paterson _____ _
E ast Ruther ford ___ _
E atontown ___ _____ _
10
Edgewa ter _________ _
18
E gg Harbor C ity __ _
16
Emerson ________ ____
10
Englewood Cliffs __ _
36
F a irfield ___ __ ___ ___ _
Fair H a ,,en ___ ___ __ _
F airview ___ ________ _
F anwood __ __ ___ ___ _
30
Fle mington ___ _____ _
17
Florence Township_
4
F lorham Park _____ _
9
Franklin ____ ___ ____ _
4
Freehold ___ ___ ___ ___
4
Garwood __ __ __ ___ __
12
G lassboro ___ ____ ____
6
Glen Ridge _________
6
Glen R ock __ __ ____ __
22
G lou cester City __ ___
6
G reen Brook
4
Towns hip __ _____ _
Greenwich
4
Township __ ______ _
6
2 Haeketts tow1.1- _____
3 H a ddonfield ____ ____
20 H addon Heigh ts __ __
14
U addon Townsh ip __
13
Hammonton _____ ___
Hanover Township _
Harrington Park ___ _
16
42
17
29
9
Jlnrrison _____ _____ __
15
7
45
9
14
2
1
7
4
15
17
8
15
13
33
14
10
26
6
23
13
H asbrou ck H e igh ts _
ITawort h ___ __ ______ _
H a wthorne __ _____ __
Highland Park ____ _
Highlands ___ __ __ ___
Hillsdale __ ___ ____ ___
Ilills icle T owi1sbip. _
Ho-Ho-Ku s ______ ___
Hopatcong ___ ___ __ __
Jamesburg ___ ______ _
Jefferson Township _
Kea nsbu rg _______ ___
Ken ilwort h _____ ___ _
K innelon __________ _
L ak wood __ __ ______
L awren ce
T ownship ___ ____ _
L incoln Park __ __ ___
L inwood _________ ___
L ittle Ferry ________
Little Silver_ ____ ___
13
17
26
4
29
14
24
14
lG
4
f,
20
23
30
15
12
23
20
16
rn
11
11
13
10
8
22
Jf,
6
13
JG
3
1r.
10
14
23
22
24
4
11
11
2G
15
rn
16
19
Ii
59
24
(i
20
24
6
rn
f,5
s
.5
2
10
12
rn
6
36
27
s
9
12
12
�Table 50 . -N umber of Fu ll - Time Police D epa r tme nt Employ ees D ece mbe r 31
1965, Cities W i t h Population und e r 25,000 - Contim;ed
C it y b y state
N w nber of
police
depar t ment
e mployees
Paul sboro. -- - - - - - - - -
P cm he r to n Towns hi p ._
Penn s G rove .. --- - -Pcnn svill e Townsh ip .. ·-·-····---P eq ua nnock T ownship ... ----- - ---P hil li psb u rg . __- - --P itm a n . .. .... - . . - -Pl easantville . ___ _- -Point P leasant . .. --l'oinL Pleasa n t
Beach .. ··---- --Pompton L a kes_ . __ _
Princeton T ownsh ip
N um ber of
police
depar tm en t
e m pl oyees
13
33
29
4
18
12
5
15
17
56
19
12
24
10
23
18
8
53
6
25
4
9
13
22
35
25
7
15
7
19
11
1
27
19
7
9
16
G
5
21
5
15
JO
46
10
25
16
28
21
13
8
13
14
12
16
14
28
13
27
17
13
14
24
Prospect P ark ___ __ _
R a1n sey ____ _______ _
R and olph T ownship _. ________ ___ _
R ed B ank .- --- - - - · R idgefield __ . ____ ___
Rid gefield P a rk ___ __
Ri ver Edge ________ _
Ri versid e ___. ____ ___
R ochelle Park
T own ship . _.. - - -R ock a way ____ __ ___ _
Rock a way T own sh ip . - . ____
- - -- -______
-- ----_
Roseland
R oselle _. . . ----- · -- Rose lle P a rk ____. __ _
R oxbury Town ship_
R u mson . _. ______ ___
R unnemed e _. . · - - - Ru t herford . . ____ ___
Sad d le B rook
Township _.. ____ _
Scotch P lainS-- -- - -Sea I sle C ity ___ _____
Secau cu s-- --- - -- - -- Sbre wsb u ry ___ __ __ . _
Somerd ale . . ___ ____ _
Somers P oint.- - - -- Somerv ille. _-- - - __- South Amboy __. ___
sou t h B runswick
Townsh ip .. : . . -- Sou th Orange_. _____
Sou th P lainfield . . - Sou th River. - .. · -· ·S pa rt a T o,n1shiP - ·Spotswood __. · - - - --·
S pringfield . ---- - . --Sp riug L a ke
E eigh ts-- -- - -- - -- S tratfo rd __ ___ - - - -- - Sum mit . __ - -- ' -- - -T enafly. __. --- - - -- - Toms R iver .. . . - - ·U n ion B each . .. - -·U pper P enns N eck
T own ship _.. . - - -Up per Saddle
R iver. - -----·. - - - ·
Ven tno r C!tY --- -- ·Verona .. - · -- ·--··· Voorhees T ownship .
W a!d wick ... -· - · - -W alliugton ... - -· · - ,v an aq ue- --· .. · - -· W ashin gton ... · -- · W ashington Townsh ip __ · ---·--·- -· ·
W a t chung _______ . __
W eeha w ken Town ship .... . -----· - -·
W est Ca!d we!I. .. .. West D eptford
T own sh ip ... · "- -·
W est L on g B ranch __
W est P a terson ___. __
W estwood . ---·-·· · ·
W h a rton .-. -·.-- ··- Wi ldwood .. . - · -· - ·Wildwood C rest . · ·W illingboro ,.r ownsh iP - - · .------ - --Woodbury _____ . . · - Woodcli ff La ke .· -· ·
Woodly u n e __. · ·· · - ·
W ood-R idge--- ·· ·· .
C it y by state
'
N u mber of
police
departmen t
em ployees
NEW JERSEY-Con .
NEW JERSEY-Con.
NEW J ERSEY- Con .
Lower Townsh ip __ _
L yn d hurst
Township ___ ___ __
M a d ison ___ __ _____ __
M agnolia __ _____ __ __
Mah wa h Towns hip _
M an asquan __ . ____ _.
M an t oloking ___ ___ __
M a m ·ille ______ ___ __
M a ple Sh a de
T owns h ip __ ___ ___
l'vla p le wood
Townsh ip ___ __ ___
M ar gate City _____ __
M atawan ___ __ __ __ __
IV[ a y wood ____ ___ __ _
M e rch a nt ville _____ _
M e t u ch en ___ ___ ___ _
M id d lese:<- - - - - -- - -M id lan d P ark - - - - - M ill b urn
Townsh ip ____ ____
M illt ow11- ____ ___ ___
M ill \'ille- --- ----- -- Mine
Hillhip _______ _
T owns
l\1on t vale ___ ___ __-- :!Vfon t d!Je
T o\\-ns h ip _- - - - -- M oorestown
T owns hip ____. ___
Morristown _. ____- - Morris Town shiP. - Mo un t a in L a kes -. -Mou nta ins ide- · -· - -Mo u nt Ephraim -· - :\1. oun t H oll y ___ ____
Ne p t une C ity ___ ___
N e t con g __ __- - -- --- N e w M ilford -- -- -- Nc w P roYiden ce .--'Nc w Sh re wsbury ___
Ne wton ___ _- -- - - - - - Nortl1 B ru ns w ick
To,vnf. h ip . ______ _
N orth rra ledon __-- N ort ln-a lc ___. - . - --·
Nort h W il dwood - -~orwoocL -- -- - ----Oa k la n d . - - ---- -- --Oa kl vn _· - ---- - ----Ocean C itY.------ -Ocean G rove . . ,-- - - Ocea n T ownsh1p . . -Oradell. . .. . --- · · · -P a lisad es Ln t erst a te
P a rk _.. -- ------ - -P a lisad es P a r k . .. --P a r k R idge- --·-;-· ·
P a ssaic Tow nslu p . -
C ity b y st at e

4
17
12
23
22
37
17
ll
ll
6
20
JO
37
22
16
13
~~
21
24
10
31
6
4
11
25
19
13
41
30
22
13
8
34
11
5
40
30
47
5
16
13
27
25
5
11
15
7
6
12
11
45
21
12
8
12
23
7
26
12
18
24
6
3
20
W righ tst own .. . . - . .
W yckoff- - -- - --- ··- -
2
15
N EW MEXICO
Artesia . ______ _____ _
A zteC--- ----- --- --· Belen.- - -- ---- -- ---·
C layton . . - -- - -- - - ·D eming . . _. ·- - ----E span ola . . ·- --- - --E unice--- -· -- - -----·
GallUP----·- -- · . ·- -Ja L - ·--·- --- · - ---- ·
L as Vegas C ity . . . - L os A la mos-·- ·- · · - ·
Portales - - · ·--·- ·--Sil ver C it y . . .. ·- --T ru t h or Conse-
T~ii:;,ie:rc_::::::::
Tularosa _. ____ ____ ·Universit y Park ____
16
9
7
11
l!
12
6
45
2
19
24
15
13
8
15
3
]]
NEW YORK
Alfred ____ ____ . ____ _
A lt amo n t_ __._ . ___ __
Am ityville ___ _. ___ __
A rdsley __ _____. __ ___
Ash aroken ____ __ __ __
A ttica_ - - · --· -· - - --·
B ald winsvi!Je __ ____.
B a llsto n Spa __ .. ___ _
B a ta v ia ___·' -- ·- · - -B a t h-.-- -·· --- ·-- --B eaco n __. · -·-·- - -- B et hlehem ____ ___ ___
BlasdelL -- - - · ·- --·Bria rcliff Ma no r ____
Canajoharie __ __ _____
Ca na nd aigua _. . - ·- ·
Can as tota.- · ··-····
Ca n is teo __·-·- -· · - ··
Ca nton ___ ··---· - -- Ca rmcL. - -· · - · - -· · Carthage . _- -- ·- - - · ·
Ca yu ga H eigh ts . ___
Cazeno via. ____ ____ _
ChesteL .·- · · ·- ·-·-C h itLena n go __.- .. -CobleskilL--- ·----Cohoes _- - -- -··-··-·
Cooperstown __ _. __ _
Corinth ___ __ . . ·- ·· -·
Corning __. - ·-·- · -·Cornwa !L __ __ . . . - - Cortlan d ___ _. · -· · -- ·
D a nsville_· -·---·--·
D ewitt_ - - · - -- · --- -D obbs F err Y---- ·--·
D olge v il le . . ·· - - -· - ·
D un k irk_ · - ·· --- - - - ·
E as t A urora _. ··· - - ·
E astchester_ ____ ____
E llen v ille- - -··-··--Elm ira H eigh ts _._ ..
E lms fo rd ___ _. __ .. __
Endico tt-·- - -···---E ,1 ans __ ___ _____ ____
F a irport -- - ·· -·-·--F a lconei __. . - · - - · . · F loral P a rk_ ···-·--F ort E d wa rd _- - · - - F or t P lain - ---··-··Fred on ia ---- ·-- - ···Gene va~···-·- · · · - · ·
5
1
l~
11
4
2
6
5
33
14
31
17
5
16
4
19
7
2
7
15
7
4
3
l
3
3
41
4
2
23
3
31
10
4
20
3
28
14
55
11
7
13
42
15
8
5
36
4
3
10
30
169
�Table 50.-Niunber of Full-Time Police Depart m,ent E,nployees, D e c e mber 31,
1965, Cities With Population unde r 25,000-Con-tinued
City by state
Nwnber of
police
department
employees
NEW YORK-Con,
Glens F a lls. ·-·- -··G lovcrs villc __. _. . -· _
Gasheu. _--·- -······
Gouverneur ____ ___ _
Gowanda. ·-·-······
Oran ville _____ ____ __
Green Island __···--·
Greenport __ · · -· ··-n
arnilton. _. -· - - - · · ]-Iarrison __ ____ _____ _
II astings-on.
Hudson _... . . . . . . .
IInvers traw ........ _
Her kime.r_. _· · -·····
Highla nd . -··· --····
H ighla nd Falls . . . . .
Iloosick F alls .... _..
Hornell. _. . _.. ..... .
Il orsehcads ... ..... .
II udson ... ... . . . ... .
Il udson Falls . ..•. . .
Ilion . . ... _..... . ... .
Irvington ...... . . . . .
J ohnson City . ... . . .
Johnstown .. _. . . . . . _
K enmore _. . -· ·· · · - ·
L a ke P lacid .. ... __ .
L akewood .. ··· -····
L an caster Town_· -·
L an caster Village ...
L archmont .. . .. . •..
L e Roy. ---· · · · ···· ·
Liberty. ___ . . ···· ··Liver pool.. ..... . . . _
Lowville......•... . .
L ynbrook_·· · ·· - · ···
Lyons . _··-··-····· ·
Malone.- ··--·-··· · ·
M alvcrne_.. _. -.... .
1'\II amnroncck ____ ___
Massena . . - · ·-·- - · · ·
Medina · -··-·-·· -· · ·
i\,J iddletown_· · · -· · ·
Mohawk _·-· -······ Monticcllo_ . .... .. . .
Tewark __ ______ ____
New Castle. _..... . .
New York Mills . .. .
North Castle . . . . . _.
Northport. · ·--·····
Nort h Syracu se.- . ..
Norwich __ ______ ____
unda 'l'owo .. . . . . .
Ogden ._···· ··- · · · ··
Ogden sburg.. . . ... .
Olea n .. . _· ··· - -· · · · ·
Oneida _··-· · · ··· ···
Oneonta . .. ........ .
Ossining .. - . . . . .•. . .
Oswego··--·· ·······
Owego·· -· -·-· ······
Oxford.· -··-·· · · · - - ·
Pain ted Post ... ... .
Palisades Interstate
P arkrn
_·__· ________
-· ··--····
P almy
__
Peekskill. .. · ·-· · · · ·
Pelham · - --····-- ···
Pelham Manor_. ....
P enn Yan . · -·- ·· ···
Plattsburgh . . ··- · · ·
Pleasant v ii.le .. . ... .
Port Jerv is.. . · ····Potsdam ... ······· Poughkeepsie
T own ___________ _
Riverhead Town . _.
-170
City by state
Nw11bcr of
police
department
employees
NEW YORK- Con.
31
36
6
9
5
3
6
5
2
59
rn
I?.
17
I
5
3
24
10
21
12
13
17
30
19
28
10
5
15
13
26
5
11
5
4
51
7
15
20
45
23
9
44
3
18
17
23
I
18
Ii
5
15
2
6
23
32
20
23
39
32
14
I
3
75
5
39
14
26
13
33
Ii
15
16
38
30
Rotterdam . .. . . _...
Rye ··· ·-··- -· - · · · -Sag H arbor·- -·· -· · ·
St . .Tohn sville. -.. ...
Salamanca __··· · ···Saranac L ake _·- -· · ·
Saratoga Springs. . ..
Sau ger ties . . ... _...•
Scarsdale . .. -· . __ ...
Scotia ... ······· - · -·
Sherrill .. . . __.. . . . _.
Skaneateles. -· · · ·· · ·
Sloa n · · --· -- · ·-- ·· -·
Sloatsburg __ · ·- ·· ·- ·
Solvay ___.· --·-···-·
Southa m pton __·· · · ·
South Glen s Falls ..
South Nyack . · --- · ·
Spring Valley . . ... _.
Springville . . · ··-··SuITern . _. - - · · ·· · · -·
Ticonderoga.. _. . . -·
Tuckahoe . . -·-···-·
Tupper L ake .. ·--··
TtLxcdo. __ ··-···- ···
Tuxed o P a rk. -· -· · Vesta l _· ---·--·-- ··Walden .. __· · -······
Walton .. · ·--·- ··-··
Wappingers F alls . ..
War
sa"-· · - __ -·· -· --·
\Varw ick ________ ____
24
Waterloo. ___········
Wat kins G len . ..... .
" 'avcrl y _____ ______ _
Well sville . . _.. .... . .
Westfield _. . · ··--···
Whitehall. . __ · ···--·
Whitesboro .. _-···· ·
Woodbury ··-- ··--··
York v ille __···- · - -··
6
i
12
47
3
3
12
II
29
8
53
12
2
2
6
I
12
13
3
4
25
2
16
6
20
9
2
8
11
6
i
5
3
5
9
G
3
2
3
I
NORTH CAROLIN A
N w11ber of
police
department
employees
NORTH
CAROLIN A-Con.
L exington . . . .. · - -··
Lincolnton .... . . . . _.
L ouisburg . .. -· · · ·· ·
Lumberton . .. - · - · ·iVIarion ____ __________
1\1onroc__ __ ___ ___ ___
1organton . .. _. . .. . .
Mount Airy . . . . ... . .
Mou nt Oli ve .. . _.. __
Murfreesboro .. .... . .
New Bern .. -. . ... . _
Reel Springs · -· · -·· ·
R eidsvil.lc . .. _-·· · -·
Roa noke Rapids .. _.
Sa Us bury_ -· · · -·- ___
Scot land Neck_ ···- ·
Shelby_ .. _· ··-·· -··.
Sm it hfield .··-- · · -··
pray __ ____ ________ _
Spring Lake· - ···· · tatesville ______ ___ _
T arboro ___________ _
T homas ,7 ille .. __ .. - ·
\"aldese _. ·- ·· -· · ··-\r adesboro_._ .... _- ·
Wake Forest. . __ ··· ·
Washington. _. __ · -·Waynes ville. ·· · - · - · -
33
13
8
24
10
22
21
20
G
7
32
31
28
44
r,
30
15
6
3
44
17
31
5
II
6
20
13
NORTH D AKOTA
De,-ils Lake _.. __ .. .
D ick inson _______ ___
Grafton .. . .. . ...• ..
Jamestown ____ __ ___
1\tTandan ______ _____ _
R u gby · -- · ···_ -····South \Vest Fargo . . _
\"alley Cit y· ·-··-·-\\'illiston __· · ·-· ·· · --
10
17
7
20
13
4
3
II
LS
OHIO
Ahoskie. .. __-···- ··
Albemarle .... -.- ...
Asheboro.·- ··· · · · · ·
A yden _· -·- · ·-· ·· ···
B eau fort .. · ·-· · - --··
Belhaven .· -··-·· · · ·
Belmont. _···-··· ···
B lowing Rock . . . . _.
Boone .. ··- ··· - · · · · ·
Brevard . ____ ..... . .
Ca ry . _ . ........... .
C ha pel Hill.. . . . . . . .
C herry ville. - · · ·- ···
C la~·ton . . · · -···- ···
C linton . _-··-·· - · ···
Concord . . _- · ·-·· ···
Drnper . __ ·· - · ... . . .
E lizabeth C ity .. . . .
E lkin _...... -·-·- · · ·
Enfield . _·······-···
9
26
24
Forest C ity_· · · · · · ··
Fuquay Spring . -··
Gmham _. · --- ·- -·-·
Gran ite F al.ls· ·-····
llavelock _· ·-·-·····
H enderson . _._ . . -···
Henderson ville . . . ..
J acksonville . _· · ···Lake \Vaccmn aw __ __
L aurin b urg .. . . . . . . .
LeaksviUe . . . -· -· · · ·
Lenoir.--· -- .... _...
12
5
10
10
3
24
1
F arm v ille _ _ _______ _
City by state
6
4
3
11
3
5
5
29
i
5
14
35
5
26
10
G
9
28
1
18
10
2G
Am berley . . . _. .. . _..
Amherst .. ··· ··- · · · ·
As hland __- · -· - · - · · ·
Aurora __ ____ _______ _
A von L a ke .. . . .. .. _
Barnesville __. .. ... .
Ba y Village __ ···-· ·Bcachwoocl . . ·-·· · ·B eavercreek
T ownship ... .. . .. .
Bedfor d . ___ _..... . . .
Bellaire. __. . · - .... . .
Bcllefonta inc_. _·· · ·l:lelle vue ... . - · __....
Belpre . ... _·-·-····.
Berea . . . _. . . . ...... .
BexlC)' · -·-· · · ··-· · ··
B lue As h.· - --·--· - ·
B owlin g G reen __· -·
Brocks ,, illc . . _.... -·
llrm1cl\, iew H eigh ts _
Brooklyn __-····· ···
Brook P ark· ··--···Bryan···- -··- ·- · - . . .
Cam bridge .. -...... .
CamplJelL. . __. . . .. .
Cann I !. . . ·- · - -··-·
Carey··-· ···· ··· - · ··
Celina . ···-·- · ···- ··
hagrin F alls . ... - . .
C hardon . ..... . . _.. _
C heviot.. ·· - · ···· - ··
irclev illo.. . . ... . _.
14
8
19
7
12
5
15
18
7
19
14
Ji
II
4
22
~o
6
17
14
i
14
23
12
20
23
4
5
13
8
8
8
13
�Table 50.-N umber of Full - Time Police Department Employees, Dece mber 31
1965, Cities JT7 ith Population unde r 25,000- Continue d
City by state
OHIO- Continued
C lyde __ ____ ________ _
Coal Grove ___ ____ __
Colwnbiana ____ ___ _
Conneaut ______ ___ __
Crestli ne _____ _____ _
Crooksville __ ______ _
D eer P ark _____ __ ___
Defiance __ __ ___ ____ _
Delaware ___- - - - --- D en n ison __ ___ ______
Dover ____ ____ ______
E ast lake _____ ____ ___
E ast Liver pool_ _____
E a ton ____ ___ __ ___ __
Elmwood Place _____
F a ir(ield ___ __- ___- _F airport H ar bor_ ___
F a irview P a rk __ __ __
F
ostoria ___
- - - -- -_
Franklin
__ ____
___--__
F remont_ _________ - Gahan na __ __ ______ _
Ga lion _________ _____
Geneva ____ __ - -- - - - Gern1autown _ - - --- -
G ibson burg ___ __ - - - G Iendale __ __- _- - - - - G olf Manor_ _-- --- - G ran dview H eights_
Gra n v ille ____- -----Greenfield __- --- --- Greenh ills __ -------G reenville __ -------Grove City ___ _____ _
H icksville _________ _
Highland H eights __ _
Hilliar d ___ - - -- -- - - - H illsboro __ _ -- - --- - H u bbard ___ - -- - - - - H uron _____ ______ __ _
I n dependence __ _-- -Jackson ___ _- - ,- - - -- Kent__ - - - - - --- - - - - K enton_ - ---- - --- - - L eba non __- - - ------ L eetonia __ ____ _____ _
Lexington _- _ - --- - -Lockland __- - - - - - --Logan __ -- - -- -- - --- Louisv ille __ __- - - ---Loveland ____ _______
l\,Jadeira ___ __ _- -- -- - -
Mariemont_ __ ___- - - Marietta __ ______- -- lVlarysville __ ___ - --- Ma umee __ - - ---- ---Mayfield
__ ---__- -- - - _Medina _____
__ ___
Men tor-on-t he-L ake
i\liam isburg ___--- -- Middlepor t __- - _- - -Mingo J u nction _--- Mogadore_- - ---- - - - Montgomery __ -----Montpelier __ __--- - -Moraine ____ __ - -- - -- Mount Gilead _______
Mount H ealthy ____ _
Napoleon ___ ___ - -- -'avarre ___ __ ____ - -cw 13oston ____ ____
Newburgh HeightsNew Carlisle ____ ___ _
Newcomerstown_- -New Lexington - 0 -- N ew Philadelph ia __
Newton F alls- -- - ---
N wnber of
poUce
depar t m ent
employees
8
2
4
16
4
2
9
18
17
4
19
16
25
4
6
12
5
22
23
11
25
10
17
9
7
4
6
7
13
2
8
6
10
14
3
4
8
9
9
8
10
14
16
13
12
3
3
13
9
5
5
5
7
21
7
17
7
16
5
18
4
8
4
5
4
14
7
5
11
2
11
5
4
8
5
16
8
C ity by sta te
OHIO-Continued
Niles _________ ___ __ _
N or t h Ca nton ______
Nort h College Hill __
Nor th Olm sted ____ _
Nort h R idgeville __ _
N or t h Royalton ____
Nor walk ____ __ __ __ __
Oak Harbor_ _______
Oakwood ___ ___ ____ _
Oberli n __ ___ __ __ ___ _
Ontario ___ __ ____ __ __
Oregon ____ ___ ______
Orrv ille__ __ ___ ___ __ _
Ottowa Hills ____ ____
Oxford __ ___ ____ ____ _
P a inesville__ __ ___ __ _
P arm a H eigh ts ____ _
P a ulding __ ______ __ _
P erry sb urg ______ ___
Piqua _____ _______ __ _
Por t Clinton ________
R avenna ___ ___ ___ __
R eading __ _______ __ _
R eynoldsburg ____ __
Rich mon d H eights_
Rittma n __ ________ __
R ocky River ___ ___ _
R ussell Township __
St. B ernard ___ _____ _
Salem __ __________ ___
Sebring __________ ___
Seven H ills _____ ____
Shad ysi,:le ___ ______ _
Sharonville __ __ ____ _
Sheffield Lake _____ _
Shelby __ _____ ____-- Sid ney ____ ___ ___ ___ _
Sil ver L ake _________
Silver ton ___ __--- - -Solon ____ ___ ____ ____
Sou th C harleston ___
Spr
ingdale

--_
Stow
___ ___ __
____
_____
Strongsv
ille
___
-Tiffin _____ ___ __ __ -__ -_
T ipp City __ __ _____ _
Trenton ____ _____ ___
T rotwood
______--___
-- -__
--_
Troy
____ ____
Twln burg ____ ___ __ _
U nion C ity ________ _
U ni versity H eights_
U rbana __ _---- - _____
Van da lia __ ___ ___ ____
Van Wert ____ __ __ ___
W ads wort h _______ __
Wa pakoneta ______ __
Washington Court
JluUSC--_________
- - - - - - - - -\Vauseon
__
W averly ____---- -- -W ellington ________ _
Wells ville _________ __
West Ca rrollton ____
W ster ville _____ ___ _
Westla ke __ ____ __ ___
W ickliffe ____ ___ __ __
W illa rd _______ ____ __
W illoughby ______ ___
Willou ghby H ills ___
Willowick ___ ______ _
W
ilmingtot1_- ---__
--_
W indham
__ _____
W inters ville _-- -- - -Wood lawn _________ _
Wort hington __ _-- _-Wyoming __ ______ __ _
Number of
police
department
employees
23
14
8
25
7
12
14
6
37
7
4
21
11
10
9
2"2
20
3
12
19
9
13
15
15
10
10
26
City by state
OHIO-Continued
X enia ________ ______ _
Ada __ _________ ____ _
Bet han y ____. ______ _
B lackwell __ ________ _
B roken Arrow ______
Checotah ____ ____ ___
Chorokeo _____ ____ __
Chiekasha ___- --- - -Olarc more ____ ___ ___
Cleveland ____ _____ _
Collinsville __ __ ___ __
Cushing_: ______ ___ _
Doi City ___ ___ _____ _
Dewey __________ __ __
D ru mrigh t ___ _____ __
D uncan __________ ___
Edmond ____ ____ ___ _
El Ren o____ ___ ___ __
Gut hrie ____ ______ ___
Healdton _________ __
Lindsay ____ _____ ___
Madill _______ ____ ___
M ~Al~ster_ ___ ______
MrnmL . ---- -- - -- ---
2
N ichols H ills _____ __
Okmulgee ____ __ __ __
P a uls Valley _______ _
Pa whuska ____ ____ __
8
6
10
7
10
18
4
7
20
3
5
14
17
25
3
4
8
14
12
3
26
15
10
13
18
8
13
4
4
9
7
12
10
21
19
9
23
4
18
16
8
3
6
17
13
N wnbcr of
police
department
employees
28
OKLAHOMA
18
19
7
'
Nowata ___ _________ _
Perry ____ ___ -- -- -- - -
PurceU__ ____ ____ __ _
San<! Springs ___ __ __
Sapulpa _______ ____ _
T ahlequah ___ ___ ____
T ecu mseh _____ -- - -Tonkawa ________ ___
Village __ _________ ___
Vinita __ ___________ _
Warr Acres _____ ___ _
Yukon ___ ___ __ __--- -
23
18
15
12
3
3
23
13
4
4
13
18
4
7
28
15
19
14
3
6
6
28
24
10
5
18
11
12
6
9
15
19
13
5
5
11
8
9
9
OREGON
Alban y _____ ____---As hland __. ____ ___ __
Astoria
_- - ___

-- -_
Baker_ ___
______
Beaverton _______ ___
Bend __ _____ ______ __
Brookings ____ __ -- __
Canby _________ ___ __
Cent ral Point_ _____ _
Coos Bay _____ ___ __ _
Coquille ____ __-- - - -Cottage Grove _____ _
Dallas ____________ __
F orest Grove _______
Grants P ass __ _____ _
Gresham ________ ____
H ermiston ____ ___ __ _
H iUsboro ___ _______ _
H ood Rh·er_ ____ __ __
K lamath Falls. __ ___
La Grande _______ __ _
La ke Oswego __ __ ___
Lebanon ___ ___ ___ ___
M ill Cit y _______ ___ _
Milton-F reewater ___
M ilwaukie. ___ __ ___ _
M yrt le Point_ ___ ___
Newberg ________ ___ _
Newport_ ______ ____ _
Nort h Bend ________
Onta rio: ___ ______ __ _
27
16
20
16
]fl
19
5
3
6
22
~
12
6
12
15
8
8
14
5
35
17
17
14
2
10
20
4
8
7
14
15
171
�Table 50.-N u mbe r of Full-Time Polic e D ep a r t m ent Employees , D e cembe r 3 1,
1965, Cities Jrl'i t h Popu lation unde r 25,000-Continued
City b y sta te
N um ber of
police
department
employees
OREGON- Con .
P end leton _________ _
Pri neville __ ______ __ _
Red mond __ ________ _
Reeds port __ _______ _
Roseburg _______ ___ St. Helens __ _____ ___
Sand y __ __ __ _______ _
Seaside ________ __ ___
Silverto n _____ _____ _
T he Dalles ____ _____ _
Till amook __ ___ ___ -T oledo___ _---- -- - - __
West Linn ____ _____ _
Woodburn ____ ____ __
An n v ille____ _______ _
Arnold __ _____ ____ __ _
Ashland ______ __ ___ _
Athens ____________ _
Baldwi n Tom1sbip_
Barnesboro ___ ___ __ _
B eaver __ _____ - - - __ __
Bed ford _____ __ __ __ __
Bellefonte ___ __ ___ ___
Belle Vern on __ ____ __
Bellevue __ __ _______ _
Bentleyville __ __ ___ _
Berwick __ __ _____ ___
Bi rds boro _ ___ ___ __ _
Bloomsburg _____ ___
Borough T ownshi p_
Boyertown ________ _
Bradford __ __ __ _____ _
Brentwood ___ _____ _
BristoL ___________ _
B rowns v ille _____ ___ _
PENNSYLVANIAContinued
9
6
10
23
7
2
12
8
20
8
8
5
8
9
18
3
12
4
7
3
3
10
5
9
I
18
2
12
3
7
1
4
24
17
15
10
B urnh am-D err y
T ownship __ ___ __ __
Bntler _____ ____ __ - __ _
Bu tler Township __ _
Caln T ow nship ___ __
Center T ownsh ip __ _
C ham bers burg _____
Churchill_ _________ _
Clairlon ___ _____ __ _
Clarion ______ __ ___ __
Clar ks Summ it ____ _
Clearfield __________ _
Clymer ______ ___ ___ _
Coaldale ________ ___ _
Colum bia __________ _
Connellsvil le ____ ___ _
Copla y _________ ___ _
Coraopolis _________ _
Corr y ___ ___________ _
Couders port_ ______ _
Crafto n _____ ___ __ __ _
Cresson ___ ____ __ ___ _
Cresson a ______ __ ___ _
C u mru T ownship __
Curwensville ____ __ _
D ale _______________ _
D allastown _____ ___ _
n an ville ____ _____ ___
D err y __ ___ _______ ___
D onora ____ _______ __
D oylestown ___ __ ___ _
D u Bois _____ ____ ___
D u nmore _____ __ ___ _
D u quesne ___ _____ _
172
E ast Deer Township _
E ast L ansdowne ____
E ast Stro u dsburg ___
E asttown
om 1sh ip _____T____
___ __
E ast Wh iteland
Townsh ip __ __ __ __
E bensbur g ____ ____ _
Ed gewood __ __ ___ __ _
Ed gewor t h _______ __
E d wardsville ___ ___ _
E li zabet htow n ____ __
E liza bet h Township __________ ____
E ll wood City ____ __ _
Enun aus ____ __ __ ___ _
Emporium ____ __ ___ _
Ephrata ____ ___ ____ _
Etna __ ___ ____ ___ ___ _
E xeter T own ship ___
Farrell__ __ ___ ___ ___ _
F ern dale _____ __ __ __
F leetwood __ ______ __
Ford C it y ______ __ __
Forest City _____ ____
Forty Fort_ _____ ___ _
Fountain Rill__ __ ___
F rack v ille __ ___ ___ __
Frank lin Township_
Freeland _________ ___
Ga llitzin _________ ___
G lass por t_ _________ _
Greens burg____ ____ _
G reen ".l"'ree. ______ __
Green ville __ ___ ____ _
Grove City ________ _
Tia m burg _________ __
l.fa m pdcn T owuship ____ ___ _____ __
TTanovcr _________ __.
2
H a tbo ro ___________ _
H ellertown ___ ____ __
H onesd ale __ ______ __
Hu mm elstown ____ __
Jlun lingdo n _______ _
G
.In d iana __ __________ _
7
35
15
2
Cambridge Springs_
Camp R ill __ _______ _
Carnegie ____ _______ _
' u mber of
police
departm ent
emp1oyees
15
4
22
8
24
5
3
II
2
2
9
1
3
12
10
2
12
2
l
5
2
2
2
7
2
13
g
14
~93
I ngram ___ _________ _
J ea nnette __________ _
J efferson __ ________ __
J en k in to wn ________ _
J ersey Shore _______ _
J im Thorpe ___ _____ _
J ohnson burg __ _____ _
K en horst_ _________ _
K enned y T om 1s hip _____________ _
K on a ctt Sq uare ____ _
Ki ngstoD__ _______ __
K ul pm on t_ ________ _
L ansdnle ___ ________ _
L a nsford ____ _____ ___
L~ ;vrcnce _Park
l ow nsh1p _____ ___
L eetsd ale ___ _______ _
L ebighto n _______ __ _
L em oyn e ___ __ _____ _
Lewis bm g _______ __ _
L ewis town ____ _____ _
Li gon ier_ ___ _____ ___
Liltlestown ________ _
Lock U nven _______ _
L ower A llen Township _____________ _
L ower Burre\L __ ___
L ~~ver M o_rela nd
l own sh1 p ____ __ __
City by sta te
N um ber of
police
dep ar tment
em ployees
PENNSYLVANI AContinued
24
PENNSYLVA NIA
Ambler ____ __ ___ ____
A m bridge ______ ___ __
C it y by state
3
4
8
10
7
4
9
7
5
5
5
16
9
3
10
8
4
22
3
I
5
2
6
6
4
6
3
5
10
28
11
10
6
4
20
12
7
6
I
10
16
5
21
9
15
4
4
4
2
ID
5
20
2
18
4
4
4
6
3
5
17
2
2
16
6
8
10
L ower Providen ce
Towns hip ___ __ ___
L ower Sou t hampton
T owns hip ____ ___ _
M a hanoy City ___ ___
M arcus Rook __ ____ _
M a rple T ownship __
M a rysville _______ __ _
l\1cAdoo ___________ _
Mc Cand less Towns hip ___ ___ _____ __ _
Mc Connells bu rg ____
McKees Rock s __ ___
J\1I cSherr ystown ___ _
M ead v ille _______ __ _
M echanicsb urg __ ___
M ed ia ____ ___ ____ __ _
Meyersdale ___ ____ __
Mi lton _______ ___ ___ _
Miners v ille ____ ____ _
Monessen __________ _
M onongahela ______ _
M on tours ville ___ ___
M orrisville ________ _
l\'l ount P enn ____ ___ _
Mou nt P leasa n t ___ _
M ount Un ion _______
Mu
h len
berg __
T own______
_____ _
s hip
M unh a lL __________ _
M yerstown ________ _
N an t icok e ___ ______ _
N ether P rovid en ce
T owns hip _______ _
N ew B righ ton __ ___ _
New Cu m bcrlancl __
N e w E a!!lc ____ _____ _


\Tew Holla nd ______ _


New K ens in gton ___ _
N orth B elle Vernon_
N orth Catasa uqua __
Nor t h E ast_ _______ _
N or t h Sewickley
'l"'o"· ns hip _______ _
17
9
8
28
6
3
16
I
19
I
23
5
12
4
9
5
21
12
2
IO
4
II
4
7
25
2
13
10
8
7
2
2
32
2
3
4
Nort h Versa illes
To wns hi p _______ _
Oi l City _____ ______ _
Ol ypha nt ______ ___ __
P a lm er To wn s h ip __
P alm yra _______ ____ _
Pen brook _________ __
P enn T ow nship
8~-i~~;t:!~~-~---
Pcnn Tow ns h ip
(Yor k Coun t y) __ _
P i tcairn ___________ _
P leasa nt H ills _____ _
P lym out h ___ ___ ___ _
Portage ____ ------ -PortA llegan y __ __ _
P or t Car bo n __ __ ___ _
Potts ville __________ _
Pros pect P a rk _____ _
Pun xsu ta wney ___ ___
Qua kertown __ _____ _
R epu blic ________ __
R eser ve T ow nsh ip __
R ey nolds v ille ___ ___ _
Richla nd Town s hip _____________ _
R oches ter ___ _______ _
R ock led ge _________ _
R osslyn F arms
Borough _________ _
Royersford _____ __ __
14
24
6
6
6
3
5
2
3
16
l :l
2
2
2
29
5
12
9
2
3
3
5
8
I
I
4
�Table 50. - N umber of Full- Ti,ne Police D epar tme nt Em ployees, Dece mber 31
1965, Cities TPith Population unde r 25,000-Con t in u ed
'
City by state
N um ber of
police
department
employees
I
l
i
•I
~
t
'l
Township ____ ___ _
Springfield
T owns hip _______
___ __ __
Spring Garden
Tow ns hi p __ __ ___ _
Spri ng Townshi p ___
S tee! ton ____ _____ __ _
Stowe T ownship _ __
Stroudsburg ___ ___ __
Sugar . 'otch. ______ _
Summit H iJI.. _____ _
Su nbury . . _. . _· · ·-··
Swarthmore _______ _
Tamaqua
. . - ---··-·
Taylor .. ________
____Telford _____ ___ __ __ _
Titusville ______ ___ __
Trafford. __· --- - - --T urt le Creek ___ "- - ·
Tyrone _______ ____ __
Cnion C ity _____ ___ _
U niontown ______ __ _
U pper Cl1 ichester
Towns hip ___ ____ _
U pper Dublin
Township . ___ - --·
-pper Gwynedd
Tow nship _____ __ _
U ppcr i\'lerion
To,n1s hip. _.. ___ _
t:pper ~'lorcland
T ownship ___ _____
u pper Saucon
T o wns hip ___ ___ __
U pper Southampton Township ___ _
,· a ndergrift _______ __
\ ·crOIHL -- - -- - - ---- - -
\ "ersailles ___---- - --\\°ashin~ton ____ ____ _
Weatherl y ____ ___ _- \l"Plls horo ________ --\Yest C hester ____ ___
\\"est Goshen
T ownship ______ __
West llomesteacL_ - \\"est L a mpeter
Township _. __ ----
West m ont Borougl1\.Vcst Newton.-----\Vest Norri ton
Township __ - - ---West P ittston _____ __
N w nber of
police
department
em ployees
5
2
4
32
8
7
5
5
3
2
8
2
2
3
1
1
1
West Reading ______ _
West View __ ____ ____
Whi tehall_ _________ _
Whiteba
ll Town- _
ship _____________
Whitem
arsh_________
Town- _
ship ____
Whitpa
in
T
ownship ___ ______ ___ ___
Wi lkins Township __
Wi lliam stown ______ _
T own- _
Willistown
s hip __ ___________
Wilson Borou gh __ __
Wind ber _____ _____ __
Winton Bora___ ____ _
Wyomi ng ____ ____ __ _
\Vyo111issing _ _ __ ____
Yea don ____________ _
Zelienople __ _______ _
6
8
17
16
18
7
6
2
6
5
5
3
2
11
18
9
2
4
8
26
12
6
13
14
9
2
3
12
7
9
4
1
10
3
19
8
3
35
7
20
8
33
23
2
11
9
6
3
31
2
4
21
8
14
1
5
2
7
JO
RHODE ISLAND
Barrington ____ _____ _
Br istol.. __ __ _______ _
Burrillville ________ _
C wnberland __ ____ __
E ast G reenwich ____
.Tan1estown ___ ______
Johnston ___ _______ __
Lincoln _________ ___ _
Narragansett ____ ___
North K ingstown - _
North Smithfield __ _
Portsmouth __ __ _-- - South K ingstown_ - West War wick __ - _ - -
19
Newberry . -- - - ---- -
Nor t h Augu sta_ - - - Orangeburg __ _-- -- -Travelers Rest- ---- -
\-\'i nnsboro .. - - - -- -- -
6
25
13
5
24
16
15
30
6
11
21
29
6
16
12
21
13
18
19
20
37
19
14
23
13
18
JO
34
3
JO
SOUTH DAKOTA
Belle Fourche ___ ___ _
Brookings_ - - - -- - , __
Canton- -- - --- - - - - - Cham!Jerlain_ - -- - - Hot Sprin gs_- - - - - - F[uron ___ - ---- -----Lead ---- -- - - --- - -- -Madison_ - - - ----- -- Mitchell - - - - - - --- - -Sisseton --- - -- - - - - - -Spearfisl1- - - - - --- -- Ver million ------ - --Watertown ____ -- - - --
Alcoa __ __ ____ ______ _
Bristol.. ____ ___ ____ _
Clar ksville ___ __ _____
Clinton __ ____ ___ __ __
Columbia ___ __ _____ _
Dyersburg____ _____ _
Etowa h _______ __ ___ _
Greeneville _____ ___ _
La Follette ____ _____
Lebanon _____ ______ _
Lenoir City ___ _____ _
Lex ington ____ ___ ___
Mar yville ____ ___ ___ _
Millington ______ ____
i\1 urfrees boro ____ ____
police
depar tment
employees
7
17
3
5
8
18
5
12
18
4
10
10
16
12
25
43
26
23
6
24
5
19
10
10
orris __ _______ ___ __
Paris____ ____ _____ __
17
14
30
l
15
R ed
OakBan
____k-\Yhite
_____ __ ___
Rockwood ________·__
Savannah ___ _____ ___
Shelbyville ____ ____ _
Signal Mountain ____
Springfield ___ __ ___ __
Sweetwater _____ __ __
Union City _______ __
10
20
17
15
7
18
21
SOUT H CAR OLINA
Andrews __ ________ _
Bea ufort- - - - - - - -- -- Bennettsviile
- - - -___
- --_
Camden __ __ ____
C hester ___ __- - -----Con way __ -- - -- -- - - Darlington ____ __-- - Gaffney __ _- - -- - - - - Greenwood- - - - -- - - Greer_ - - - - - - - - - - - - - L ake City - - - - - -- - - L aurens_ - - - - -- - - - - Marion __ __ - - - - -- -- - -
N umber of
. City by state
TENNESSEE
P ENNSYLVANI AContinu e d
PEN N SYLVANIAContinued
St. Marys ________ __ _
Salis
bury
Township
___ ____
__ ___ __
Selinsgrove ______ __ _
Sharon __ __ _________ _
Sharon ·run ____ __ ___
Shar psburg _______ __
Sh ar psviUe ____ _____
Shillington ____ _____ _
S latington _____ ___ __
Slip pery Rock _____ _
Somerset____ __ ___ __ _
Sou th G reensburg __
South L ebanon
Township __ ___ __ _
Sou t hmont_ __ _____ _
Sou
thwest
G reens- _
b urg
__ __ _________
Spangler_ ______ __ ___
Speers Bora ___ __ __ _
Spri ng City ___ ____ _
Spri ngdale _______ ___
Springettsbury
City by state
8
6
TEXAS
Alamo Heights ____ _
Alpine __ __ ____ ______
A n drews _____ ____ __ _
Aransas P ass _____ __
Athens ____ _____ __ __
Atlanta ___ _________ _
B a Uinger _____ _____ _
Belton __ __ _____ ___ __
Borger_ ______ ______ _
Brady __ _______ ___ __
Brownwood ____ ___ _
Canadian ______ _• __ _
Ca rrollton ____ ______
Carthage ___ _______ _
Castle Hills __ _____ __
Cisco __ __ ____ ______ _
Cleburne ___ _____ -- ·
g~f!~1~!/~!'.~-:::::::
College Station_. ___
Comanche. __ ______ _
Conroe _____ ______ __
Corsicana . . ___ __ ___ _
Crockett__ _____ _____
Daingerfield _______ _
Dalhart ____ ___ ______
Deer Park ______ ___ _
Denver City ______ __
D immitt_ __ _______ __
Donna__ ________ ___ _
Dublin ___ _______ ___
Dumas ___ ________ __
Duncanvi lle __ ____ __
Eagle P ass ______ ____
Eastland ___ ______ __ _
E dinburg___ _______ _
E lectra ___ . ________ _
Ennis __ ____________ _
Euless _______ __ ____ _
Farmers Branch . __ _
Freeport_ __ _____ ___ _
Ga ines ville. ____ ___ _
Georgetown ____ ___ _
G iddings __________ _
Gilmer_ __ __ -------Gonzales ___ ____ ____ _
Graham ___ _____ - · __
Grapevine ____ ___ .· -
15
4
10
11
13
4
7
8
24
7
24
3
14
g
0
fi
I
fi
7
7
4
17
28
5
4
5
13
7
3
6
3
13
JO
14
5
16
8
10
13
25
15
20
6
1
f,
13
5
173
�Table 50.- Nii,nber of Fnll-Tim,e Police Depart,ne nt Employees, Decem ber 31,
1965, Cities W i th Popula tion under 25,000- Continued
City by state
Number of
police
depar tment
employees
TEXAS-Continu e d
Greenville __ ______ __
u
·earne_- - ------ -- -H enderson __ _______ _
Uereford __ __ __ _____ _
Highlfincl Park ____ _
H ills boro ___ ______ __
Hurs t__ _________ __ __
Ingleside_______ ____ _
Iowa Park _____ ____ _
Jacinto
City_ - - --- -Kerm it_ _________ ___
Kerr ville ____ ______ _
K ilgore __ _- · -·-- -··L a ke .Tackson . __ . . . _
Lake Worth __ . __._ .
Lamesa __.. ----· -· -Lewis ville ___ .. . . . · Livingsto n ___ _· -· -·Lufkin_._... · - · - ·· · McGregor_ __·· ·- · · iV!cKinney __ __. __ __.
M creed es . . ·- ·· ·- · ··
IVl cxin.. _____ _-- --- - Mincola _. _···-·-- -·
?vl ission ________ --- - M ount Pleasan t_ __.
M ulcshoe. .... ___ __ .
Nacogdoches ___ ____ _
Ncclcrlancl _____ ._ ·-New Braunfels. ___ _.
North Richland
H ills ______ _·· ·- · -O imos Park . . ___ . __
Palacios ____ . ___ __ __
~a les tino. ___ . __.. -1 nr1s. _____ ___ ___ ___
P ecos ___ ···-·-·- ....
P lainview . ________ _
P lauo____ ______ ____ _
Raymond ville __._. Refni,:io. -... _.. _... _
Richland Hills __. __ .
Richmond . __ .·- ....
Robstown ___·-·-- -·
Rockdale• . '. .. ·-.·-Rosen berg. _____ . - . .
Rusk __ -----· .. ... . .
San Benito ... _. __ . _
San M arcos __._ .. __ _
Seminole_. . __··---·
Slaton . _·· - ----. ___ _
Sou t h H ouston ___ __
Sta mford _· - -----·-·
Ste phen ville. ·---·-Sweetwater _. -- - -·-T a ft. . --·-······· ·-'l'errclL . ·- · ·- -- --- T ulia ____ ___ _______ _
U va lck .. _... ______ _
V ernon . ____ ___ __ ___
W a xahachie .. __·--Wea therford .. ___ ...
Weslaco. __. ---··--White Settlement __ _
Win ters ... . _______ _
Yoakum ___ .--·-- -·-
174
Number of
police
department
employees
UTAH- Con tinued
22
6
15
14
26
11
22
~
4
14
15
11
17
7
7
17
8
2
25
5
24
8
9
5
14
9
i
17
8
lG
15
6
3
15
28
12
35
13
10
8
9
4
ID
8
10
2
12
12
9
9
l?
5
10
21
2
14
4
I?
Ii
17
14
13
12
3
4
UTAH
American Fork. ___ _
RountifuL . ___ ____ __
n elper_. ... .. __ ____ _
M id vale _________ __ _
M oa b. -.- --··· - -- - - ' orth Ogden ____ ___
Orem
·--- ·___
-·--__--__--__
--_
P
ark City
C ity b y state
G
14
4
G
,5
1
20
3
Roy . . . _.. _. . _._ .. . .
St . Georgc __. __ . ____
Sa ncl y __ __ ._ . . _._ . . .
South Ogden .. __ . __
Sunset_ __ .··--·- - . ..
Tooele.·--. __ ·--.· - Verna l. ___ ·--. -- - - - ·
WASHINGTONContinue d
5
1
5
4
13
6
Franklin _____ _____ __
Fredericksburg ___ __
Front Royal. _____ __
H arrison burg. ___ ___
Hopewell. .. ···-- --Lexington __ ___ ·---Luray ___-·. · ----· -l\lfanassas ... ____ ---M arion . _.----- - -· - Morton
art in ____________
\'ille _---· ---_
Poquoson .. . . ___ ·--·
Pulas kL. _. __ ._ · ··-R adford ___ ---·--- . .
Salem ·-·· · ··-------·
Saltville ___· --. ____ _
Sou t h B oston _... __ _
J-!.~t~~.-.~::::: ::::::
Warren ton ..... __ ...
Wn;,u eshoro. ·· ··-·Willia ms burg __ ·--·Wimhestcr. . ···- -· -
6
9
1
3
3
9
7
i
2
11
6
10
r.
13
9
25
l4
5
3
i
10
1i
14
29
15
20
Hoquiam ______ ____ _
Ke lso _____ _______ . __
K ennewick __ ______ _
K ent_ __ ___ __ · - - ·-- Kirklan d __ ___ _____ _
L yn den .. . · - - - · -- -· Lynnwood __ . ______ _
Marys \"ille _. ________
Mercer I sland __ ___ _
M oses L a ke ·-·· · --- ·
Mountla.ke T errace .
M ount Vernon _ . ...
Oa k H arbor ___ ____ _
Pasco_. _____ · - -- --- Port Angeles .. _____ _
Port Orchard ___ ___.
Port T own sencl-- .- Pullrnan . . .. ___ _____
Puyallup __ ___ ______
R a ymond . __ _____ . __
R enton _____ . . . ____ _
Selah __ . __ _____ ____ _
Shelton . __ _________ _
Sn oh omish ._. ____ ___
Smrnysiclc __ _____ · - T oppen ish . ___ _____ .
T own of M ercer
Isla u cl . ___ ____ ____
Tumwater _________ .
Washou gaL _. . ____ _
Wenatehee . ________ _
2G
14
WEST VIRGINIA
5
9
Rcnwoocl ___·-- ____ _
Bluc ne lcl.. ... __·- ·-R r icl!!rpor t . ____ ... __
C harles Town __ _. __
C hester __ ___ ·-··· -. _
D unba r ___ _. ______ __
Follans bee ____ - ---- .
Hinton __ _____ _____ _
13
3~
10
4
I ii
17
22
7
I
30
9
10
27
17
3'.l
l ~C'YS('r _________ ____ _
Kingwood ______ ___ _
M art ins b urg __ . ____ _
M cMechen . . ______ _


M orga n tow n __ ··---N it ro_. __ ______ ____ _


Poin t P leasan t . . ___ _
R a vens wood .. _____ _
Ri ploy __ ____·-·--- -pC'nrcr _______ ____ __
WASHINGTON
Ab rclcen · ·-· -· ·---.
Anacortes .... ·-·-·-Au burn . ______ . ____ _
Bellc n1c ·---·------Rurliugton ...... ___ _
Ca mas ___ ________ ___
Ccnt ra li11 __-· ·- __ ___
Cheha lis ._. __ ··--·-Ch ney· - - -- ·-- - ---Cla rkstou . _______ ·-Cle E lum ___ ·- ·-- · - Clyde llUI T own ___
Colfax ____ ____ ______
College Place __ · --- Col\' ille._ . . ___ ____ __
Des Moincs· -··-- - -E cl moncls . ____ . ___._
Ellens b urg _·- · _____ .
Enun1claw ___ ______ _
Ephra t a __ __ ___ ____ _
F ircrest. ____ ____ ___.
Grandview __ ______ _
Ii
VIRGINIA
Abingclon ._ . __· · - - _.
Altavista __ ____ _____
Bedford .· · · - -- ·- . . __
B ig Stone Ga p __. __ _
Bristol.. __ . __ ____ ___
Buena Vista ____ __ . _
Chase City - -· ··---·
Chincoteague ___ ·- - Christians burg ..... .
Clifton Forge ______ _
Co\'i.ngton ____ _____ _
Number of
police
d epar t ment
employees
9
VERM ONT
Brattleboro . _..... · Essex J unction __ __ . _
H a rtford __ ____ ··-- · M a nches ter __ ___. _. .
M anchester Center _
Miclcllebury_ - - · -- ·Montpelier_ _. _____ _
N ewport ___ __ ·- - ---Nor t h field.
·----__
--_
Randolph
___- -_____
St. Alba ns .- ... __ ___
South Burlington . __
W indsor_- - - - - ·-·- -·
Winoos ki_ __ . __. _. __
City by state
27
9
24
2,
4
0
17
10
3
7
3
2
4
Vienna ___ _·--·--- -Williamstown _ - -- - ·
G
5
4
25
14
10
II
5
15
I(\
20
17
13
3
1:1
6
J.,
18
Jr.
11
s
21
19
10
r,
Hi
19
G
41
3
12
9
10
12
3
9
4
32
22
3
i
2
0
Ii
f,
12
3
it)
3
2i
n
Ii
i
4
3
,)
4
WISCONSIN
Algoma . __ . . .. . ____ _
Ant igo···-- · -···--·As hla ncl __ ___ . ·- _..•
Bayside .... . _.·-- __ _
Beaver D a m ... ___ __
Berlin __ _· --- --·-· · Blar k Ri ve r Falls ...
Burlington ...... ___ _
Cedarburg . ___ __ ___ _
Chilton _____ __ _____ _
5
14
14
11
20
$
4
la
IO
3
�Table 50 . -Num,be r of Fu l l- T i m,e P o l ice D ep a r t m,e n t Employees Decembe r 31
1965, C ities With P opulatio n unde r 25,000-Contin~ed
C ity by state
Number of
police
dep artment
employees
WISCONSIN- Con.
Chippewa F alls ____ _
Clinton , Ille ___ _____ _
Col nm bu s __ _______ _
Cornell_ __ ___ __ ____ _
Cudahy ____ _______ _
Dodge,ille ____ ___ __ _
Elkhorn ___________ _
Elm Gro,e. ______ __
E\'ansville .. ----- --Fox Point_ ___ ____ __
Franklin ___________ _
G len da le __ __ .... ___ _
G ra fton .... . _______ _
G reendale . _____ ___ _
Greenfield ____ _--- - Hales Corners. ___ - _
H art lord .... -------Horicon ...... - - - - - -Hudson ____ ------ - - Hurley ____ ---- -- --Je fferson _____ . - __ - - .
Kanka una. _. _... - . Kewaunee ____ __ ___ _
Kiel_ __ ---- - ------ -Kimberly ..... ---- -L a ke Gen e,·a .. ----Lake M ills .... -- ---Lancaster ___ _-- - -- -Little Chutc.------Mar inctte ___ _---- -Marshfield ..... _. - - Mayville . ___ ------ M enasha .. __ ------lWenomonee Falls ...
21
8
4
3
28
3
6
9
7
20
13
25
6
13
15
10
9
4
6
4
7
13
3
4
4
13
3
4
4
18
25
4
28
23
. City by state
Number of
police
department
employees
C ity by state
WISCONSIN- Con.
WISCONSIN- Con.
M enomonie .. -- ----M e quon ... .... ----M errill ____ .. ____ ___
Middleton _________ _
Monona_-- ---- ---- Monr oe .... ----- ---Neenah ......... ___ _
N e koosa .......... ..
New Holstein ...... .
New Richmon d ___ __
Oa k Creek ......... .
Oconomowoc ____ __ _
Ona laska ___ _.. _.. ..
Pesht igo .. . ...... _..
P la tte ville _...... --Plymou t h ____ ______ _
Port W ashmgton __ P ra irie d u Chien ... .
Reedsb urg.... - ... ..
R hinelander _. __._ ..
Rice Lake ____ .... ..
Richland Cen ter .. ..
Ripon __ _.. .. - .... ..
River Falls . ....... River H iJ!s. _- -- ---Rothschild .. - ---. ___
St. Francis ... __- ....
Schofield ..... ------Sbawano ...... ----- Shc bOygan F alls .. ..
S hore wood ........ -Sou t h Milwaukee .. .
Sparta .. ...... - - - . -Spooner ...... - - - - - - -
Stevens Point.......
Stoughton . .. _.. _.. _
~tnrgeon Bay.......
un P ratr1e __ _____ __
Tomah. __ ...... ___ _
Two Ri vers __ ______ _
Viroqua. ___ _..... __
W atcrrord . ____ .. _..
Watertown . ___ ___ _.
Waupaca __ _______ __
Wa upnn .......... -West Bend __ ______ _
West Milwaukee __ _
Whitefish Bay .... ..
W'l1ite water . .... __ . _
Wisconsin R apids ...
14
13
16
7
11
15
35
5
3
5
23
12
2
4
10
7
10
6
10
15
11
8
8
6
12
3
9
4
10
6
27
29
10
5
'
Nwnber of
police
depar tment
employees
28
11
9
5
y
23
4
3
20
8
10
17
24
27
13
31
WYOMING
Buffalo.. . __ ........
Evanston ___ _____ ___
Gillette ........... - Grecn Ri\·er. .. _.. ..
Lander_ .. .... _.... .
L aramie... _.. _.. .. _
Newcastle _.... .. __ _
Powell.. .......... ..
Rawlins ___ ...... _..
River ton ___ _______ __
Rock Springs _____ __
Sheridan ..... ---. __ _
Ther mopolis ....... _
Torrington ..... _.. ..
Worland .......... ..
5
5
14
6
13
25
0
11
10
15
18
rn
9
10
13
175
�Table 51.-Nu mbe r of Offenses Known to the Po lice, 1965, Cities a nd Town s
25,000 and O ve r in Population
C rim ina l
homicide
City
I ndex
total
L a rceny the ft
Murd er
and
Mannon- slaughnegli- te r by
gen t
n egli111811gence
slaughte r
- - - - -- Cities over £50,000 in
p opulation
Akron, Ohio _______ ____ 5,846
Albuquerq ue, N. Mex . 5, 646
At lanta, Ga __ ___ ___ __ _ 13,529
B a lt imore, M d .1____ ___ 26, 193
B irmin gham, A la ___ ___ 8, 746
14
13
100
131
56
Bost on , M ass ___ ____ __ 22, 542
Buffa lo, N.Y ___ _______ 9. 833
C hicago, IlL __ ___ ____ _ 103, 343
C in cinnat i, Ohio __ ____ 6, 076
C leveland , Ohio __ _____ 16, 697
Colum bus , Oh io __ ____ _
D a llas , T ex ________ ____
D ayton , Ohio _______ __
D enver , Colo __ ________
Detr oit, M ich ____ ____ _
17
20
F orcib le
ra pe
Robbery
B urA ggra- glaryva t ed b reakassa ul t ing or
entering
S50
and
over
U n de r
$50
Au t 0
t heft
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --
66
28
31
40
11 5
260
44
395
41
108
43
I
209
37
23
50
1,223
122
149
14, 888
10, 920
15,830
5, 543
13, 688
48,599
31
11 6
27
37
188
28
90
9
15
33
77
137
51
139
648
517
592
343
757
5. 498
424
547
3,728
5,130
7, 715
2,595
5. 861
18, 460
E l P aso, T ex _____ _____ 5. 243
For t W orth, T ex_ _____ 7, 172
Hon olulu , H awaii_ ____ 9,28 1
H ouston , T ex_ ___ ----- 25. 238
Dl cl ian ap olis. In d ______ 13. 555
2, 725 6. 11 0 1. 9 11
2, 256 18, 712 3. 694
9 9 5, 038 I.I 14
3, 207 7. 554 3.1 40
7, 416 25, 083 12, 661
8
57
13
139
41
8
4
32
70
6
121
143
164
392
103
! , 434
! , 051
360
388
100
2, 314
518
2,927
3. 955
4,652
12. 860
5, 69 1
8 13 6. 378
959 9, 397
2, 171 5, 673
4. 380 13. 066
2, 474 8. 19 1
J ersey C ity, N.L ___ __
Kansas City , ~1[ 0 __ ____
Lon g Deneb , Ca li f. ____
L os An geles , Ca lif _____
Lou.isv illc, 1ry ___ ______
3, 582
16,866
11,550
121. 359
11, 328
14
2
71
18
249
52
41
14
199
21
16
209
113
! , 268
52
121
1,212
719
8, 016
633
Mem ph is , T enn ____ ___
Miami, F la _____ _______
Milwau kee, Wis ___ ____
~1inn ea polis, 1inn __ __
Nash v ille, T enn ___ ____
12, 295
13, 903
JO, 361
14, 657
8,796
41
46
27
23
55
32
18
25
9
34
63
70
33
49
58
1, 136
214.
924
280
481
1,647
477
603
07
ewark, N .J __________ 19, 706
New Orleans, La _____ _ 16,62 1
New Y ork , N.Y __ ____ 187, 795
orfoLk , Va _______ ___ _ 7, 128
Oakland, Cali f_ ___ __ __ 11,647
f,8
87
631
24
32
67
32
50
28
25
162
11 9
1, 154
50
66
! , 515
1,065
8, 904
314
795
1, 99 1
979
16, 325
911
580
Oklahom a C it y , Okla _ 7,1 25
Omaha, N ebr_ __ ______ 5,752
P hiladelphia, P a ______ 33, 11 3
P hoenix, Ariz ___ ______ 14, 752
P it ts burgh , P a __ ______ 18, 495
Portland, Oreg __ __ ___ . 10,454
R oches ter , N,'y ___ ____ 4,988
Sacram ent o,\ Calif_ __ __ 8, 848
St. Louis, i o . ________ 25, 750
St. P aul , Minn ________ 8,905
27
16
205
30
40
39
19
125
4.2
41
64
28
535
110
152
488
253
2, 893
490
1,373
371
30
4, 408
766
1, 108
3, 773
2, 711
12, 318
6, 273
6, 001
556 6, 590
1, 130 6. 389
4. 755 15. 085
4, 727 10, 802
3,833 4,169
1, 846
1. 5 4
7, 999
9 356
'
5: 988
40
58
44
76
323
62
573
187
434
2,293
362
282
106
22 1
4, 018
2, 400
3. 522
12. 661
no
3, 752 7. 685
l , 356 4,684
2, 716 5,66 1
2,533 27, 736
1,940 4, 748
1. 757
793
I . 856
5. 546
1, 986
94
44
85
30
78
336
367
2,087
11 6
516
1, 380
479
1,830
115
394
7, 161
3,165
11 , 535
3, 327
4,965
4,165 JO, 461
4. 372 9. 2"22
3,975 17, 663
I , 01 6 10, •Jul
3, 938 8,601
15
14
19
40
45
26
29
140
525
487
135
183
2,881
718
307
236
335
2,635
4, 305
3. 096
2, 054
2, 270
9,886
2, 197
2, 311
1,092
I , 929
4, 153
5,533
7, 851
6,632
4, 182
8, 423
942
1, 161
82G
1, 159
5, 61 9
24
32
122
261
2,271
1, 238
6,268
812
San An ton io, 'l'cx ___ __
Sa n Diego, CaliL ___ __
San F rancisco, Calif_ __
an Jose, C alif. __ _____
Seat t le, Was h ______ ___ _
15, 222
JO, 25 1
26, 924
6,066
11,826
T am pa, F la ______ _____ 8,753
T oledo, Oh io __________ 7, 427
T ucson, Ariz __________ 4, 379
Tulsa, Okla . __________ 5, 917
Wash ingto n , D. C ______ 25, 462
Wich it a, K ans ____ ___ __ 4, 747
176
57
16
14
12
23
138
7
53
2G
57
10
24
26
20
10
12
148
11
44
1
38
20
-- -----16
44
29
97
54
70
21
13
15
22
77
410
208
417
2, 109
299
124
535
903
3,830
793
! , 109
930
418
10, 382
651
1. 288
381
317
1,832
344
529
! , 320
184
! , 180
505
9. 211
477
2,256
37
2,2 12
3, 127
4. 820
7, 393
3, 741
! , 477 4, 444
777 6. 057
4, 200 8. 168
7, 053 10, 383
2, 644 4, 316
1. 578
946
2, 974
5, 417
1. 169
'
4. 68 1 2, 775 3, 450 12. 9 13
3,899 2, 359 4. 143 2. 710
30,020 17,38 0 51. 178 29, 055
2,451 ! , 656 7. 027
8 38
7, 374 1, 025 11. 993 4, 921
g 3g
1. 351
2. I 46
3, 990
3, 637
955
137
358 2, 155
7. 219 3,921 10, 559 3. 054
4, 939 2,753 4,522 2. 503
50, 771 29, 708 4.2. 600 22. I ~6
4, 138 3,864 4, 757 2. 107
6, 24
6, 460
2, 433
6. 855
4,020
3,613
3, 167
3,841
3,4 18
1,802
4,912
6, 177
9, 490
8,645
2, 099
1. f, 05
!, 377
3, 33G
'
2, 785
1, 774
7,924 3,548 5, 372 4, 498
5, 798 3,953 5, 331 4, 620
51, 072 74. 983 40, 799 34, 72G
2. 882 l , 748 5.196 1. 190
5,14 1 2, 773 8,080 21 260
4,
., 033
'i'. 798
7. 355
l , 45:.?
l. 911
�Table 51.-N um,be r of Offe nses Known to t he Police, 1965, Cities and Towns
25,000 and Over in Population- Continued
L arcenyt heft
C riminal
homicide
Index
total
City
Murde r
Manand
non- slau ghnegli- tcr by
negligent
gence
mansla u ghte r
- --
Forcib le
rape
R obbery
B urAggra- glaryv atecl breakassault ing or
entering
$50
a nd
over
--- --- - - - --- - -- - --
Au to
Unde r t heft
50
--- -
-
Cities 100,000 to 1!50,000
in population
9
21
4
5
17
49
109
35
63
87
82
311
25
184
87
757
850
445
1, 063
2, 056
429
932
l, 182
351
1, 720
98 1
2,303
2,755
67
289
137
284
468
6
3
5
4
8
18
27
20
21
54
105
9
31
165
161
476
144
290
89
1, 007
1,860
1, 824
889
I , 659
l , 208
571
l , 597
197
523
2, 391
5, 259
3, 649
I , 657
4, 009
366
556
383
166
394
8
11
7
1
46
5
2
6
2
3
5
26
14
2
30
78
228
66
16
271
74
125
54
21
729
l , 584
I , 373
738
287
2. li77
626
503
602
302
l , 414
1,392
1,229
I. 547
l. 555
2,762
952
658
324
209
624
3. 020
2,488
2, 184
4. 750
2,251
30
15
13
19
9
9
1
8
20
17
8
18
7
94
53
47
121
106
148
171
43
509
32
1,585
1,082
939
1,9 12
723
322
751
588
I , 702
850
L. 205
1,863
1,233
2,576
3,320
821
399
546
477
529
3,207
1,407
2.806
I. 693
3/ 47 7
7
1
4
16
2
10
5
4
3
17
I
4
97
38
170
101
93
28
24
247
55
175
1,344
665
1,390
699
l , 577
l , 200
403
365
34 1
1, l3 l
3,096
I. 570
1,485
1, 446
2, 207
7. 013
3, 748
2,846
5. 848
3. 04 0
16
8
2
10
2
17
12
13
4
62
15
5
11
31 7
135
129
189
67
1,296
296
15/i
122
87
2,140
l, 907
927
2. 155
1,502
2,332
1,030
l , 184
2, 102
984
3,799
2,670
3, 01
4. 4/i7
I, 700
850
361
434
I. 265
3 7
22
I
9
JO
3
21
3
9
11
11
48
10
27
17
9
558
80
143
58
99
573
38
11 5
028
132
l , 728
1, 111
1,355
672
702
I , 570
848
1.032
771
40
2, 439
1,776
2,538
l , 844
l , 510
I , 235
5, 734
2. 596
3,330
2,838
2.362
11
JO
19
5
18
7
3
3
2
8
7
10
22
11
II
36
145
40
37
32
52
257
602
95
143
688
1,529
3,942
3. 349
1. 393
l. 568
l , 910
I, 032
67 1
845
/i75
8 14
1, 179
393
305
1. 098
3, 038
l , 757
l , 297
1, 77
160
796
45;;
181
214
6. 627
3. 167
2,783
3,14 1
2,4 17
35
16
21
7
JO
40
26
l6
13
13
622
14 3
65
42
128
419
370
264
99
132
3,221
1,512
l, 453
1,1 63
781
1,659
574
520
l , 163
871
4,339
1,991
1,823
2,769
1,857
63 1
526
444
6M
482
2
14
6
19
2
13
9
152
50
89
13
83
l , 434
3, 672
3,072
2. 74 1
I, 576
~79
221
Zi2
14
/i44
l, 293
1, 391
1, 350
533
656
1,439
I , 106
664
704
2, 755
2, 949
2,492
I , 701
2,504
127
367
270
323
304
340
60
109
141
2, 985
1, 169
1,096
1, 037
1,101
1,069
884
1,.025
1,935
I , l04
2,022
1,788
546
401
641
980
275
l
Alban y , N . Y __ _______ _
Alexandria, Va ______ __
All entown, P a ______ __
A marillo, T ex _________
~na beim, Calif_ ____ ___
1. 901
2. 210
I , 077
2,538
3,901
3
4
2
7
4
5
5
A.rlington , Va _______ __
2,819
3. 614
4,076
l . 594
2, 855
5
19
10
13
4
C amden, N.J ___ ___ ___ _
C anton . Ohio _____ ____ _
C"edar R a pids , Iowa..
C harlotte, N .C .. ----- ·
B ri chreport, Con n __ __ _
3, 327
2,924
1, 805
838
5,691
C hattanooga. T e nn .. - .
C olumbia, S.C ........
C ol u mbus, Qa_ .. .... - C orpus Ch rL~ti. Tex .. _
D ear born . :Vl iclL------
D es :Vloines. Iowa ____
Minn __ ___ --- E lizabeth. N .J. ___ -- -.rie,
Pa
_______________
F
vansv ille, Ind-- -- ---.
lint. Mich __ ___ ______
1"
F ort L a uderdale. Fla_
I' ort Wayne. Ind- ___
F rcsno. Calif __
u nrden Gro,·e, Calif. _-
A ustin, T ex ___ ___ ___ __
I3aton Rouge, L a ____ __
r-Jeaw11ont, T ex ____ ___
B erkeley, CaliL ___- __ _
I) uluth,
1,
(l ary, Ind ________
(l lcnclale, Calif _


rand R apids, Mich
u rce
nsboro, N .C _____
(l
lJ ammond, Ind _____ _
an1pton , Va
rr artfo
rd. Conn ___ _____
11
IL unts,·ille, Ala ___ ____
fn dependence. Mo ____
J a c kson, :vliss ____ .. _
.l acksonville, Fla ____
K unsas City, Kans _
K noxville, 'J'c1111- __ ____
l,a nsing, Mich --- --L,is Vegas, Nev -----
Li ncoln, Nebr ________
Li ttleRock. Ark ____ Lu bbock, Tex_ _____ ___
Ma con, Ga ____ ________
Ma clisoa, Wis __________
11
4
l
20
3
7


io19
3

1
16

--7
Ii
24
11
28
28
24
I
6
28
5
43
20
5
17
19
5, 135
23
Mo bile, Ala __ __
2,64 1
2

Mo ntgomcry, A Ja.1__ __ 2. 366
10
2
Ne w Bedford, Mass ____ 2, 735
w
Haven,
Conn
__
__
6
11
Ne
2,389
Ne w p ort Ncws 1 Va ____
, Figures not co mparable with p rior years.
132
75
38
19
179
254
323
620
475
539
550
515
274
620
491
472
508
649
382
577
177
221 - 746- 66-- 13
�Table 51. - Numb er of Offe n se s Know n to t h e Police, 1965, Cities and Towns
25,000 and Over in Pop u lation- Co n tinu ed
C rim inal
hom icide
C ity
Index
t otal
L arceny theft
Murd er
and
Mannon- slanghnegli- te r by
n egligent
1nangen ce
slau ght er
Forcib le
ra pe
- - - - -- -
-- -
Rob bery
-- -
C iti es 100 ,000 to !!50,000
i11 p opul at ion- Con .
N iagara F alls, N. Y __ __
Orlando, Fla _____ _____
P asadena, C alif__ ______
Paterson , N .L ___ _____
Peoria, Ill_ _______ _____
1,618
2, 644
3, 425
2,699
3,215
4
13
4
9
4
Portsmou t h, Va ___ ____
Prov idence, R. L ______
R aleigh, N.C _______ ___
R eading, Pa __ _________
Richmond , Va ______ __
2, 901
5, 502
2, 610
1,007
6,511
12
7
3
42
Riverside, Cali f_ ____ __
Roanoke, Va ______ ____
Rockford, Ill __ __ _____ _
Saginaw, Mich __ ____ ___
St. P etersburg, F la __ __
3,857
1, 872
1,598
2,012
4,508
5
7
2
9
11
17
11
7
Salt L ak e C it y, U ta h _
San B ernardino, Calif_
San ta An a, Calif_ ___ __
Savanna h, Ga ___ ______
Scra nton , P a __ ____ ____
5, 510
3,499
2, 564
3, 185
949
Shrevepor t , L a __ _____ _
South Bend , Ind _____ _
Spokane, Wash ____ ____
Springfi eld , Mass ____ __
Springfield , Mo ________
2, 775 •
1,725
1, 790
1, 725
1, 134
St amfo rd , Conn __ ____ _
Syracu se, N .Y ______ __
T acom a, \"\'ash __ __ __ ___
T opek a , K an s _________
T orrance , Calif_ _______
1,752
5,238
2,313
1,537
4, 289
T renton , N .J_ __ _______
Utica, N .Y _____ _____ __
Virgini a B each , V a ____
W aco, T ex ____ ________
W arren, M ich _________
3, 229
64 1
2, 028
2, 67 1
2,500
W ater bury , Conn __ ___
Wichi ta Fa lls, 'l' ex. ___
Winston-Salem, N .C __
W orcester, M ass ____ __ _
Yon kers. N.Y ________ _
1, 569
1, 159
2,797
3, 194
3,399
1
5
28
6
17
2
3
5
10
3
Y oungstown , Ohio _____
2, 3-14
9
16
7
2
11
B urAggra- glaryv ated break a ssaul t ing or
en tering
$50
and
over
- - - -- - -- - --
7
12
41
13
23
82
116
117
176
138
251
193
172
134
203
500
1, 010
1,548
1, 200
1, 408
600
906
1, 032
284
688
1,213
1, 483
3, 029 1, 083
2, 199
10
16
13
1
41
190
124
59
30
277
177
245
439
38
537
1, 26
2, 169
996
523
2, 742
753
1, 028
200
1, 450
1,615
3, 019
1, 654
815
4, 366
496
1, 9OS
3'25
212
1, 422
10
1
22
9
4
10
37
78
61
64
135
183
176
136
39
325
710
1,898
797
795
716
2, 211
1, 174
514
474
357
1, 073
2, 734
1, 317
1, 693
2, 453
4,210
504
348
220
460
283
5
4
8
17
17
6
4
5
7
28
16
23
29
2
158
103
89
155
16
133
11 2
126
506
46
2,379
1,510
1, 356
1, 306
424
1,996
1, 239
471
811
183
4, 565
2,256
2,773
1, 383
860
8 11
5 15
491
361
278
17
8
4
1
6
1
21
10
5
5
2
3
3
127
58
543
61
50
13
29
1, 121
789
826
414
662
529
438
410
325
269
3,085
2, 785
3, 641
1, 299
1, 777
433
366
471
946
136
5
6
4
2
2
1
6
10
1
8
6
60
15
12
18
29
228
62
47
91
73
395
117
160
85
009
1,901
1, 150
808
2, 001
415
1, 949
582
324
1, 442
339
3, 468
2,409
2, 220
2, 079
699
383
184
650
4
10
1
10
18
2
15
16
9
192
20
36
56
49
165
6
208
209
79
1, 357
339
837
I , 749
1, 061
382
143
723
456
1, 041
130
975
] , 676
2, 127
2, 221
1, 111
131
203
178
3.10
2
2
57
14
10
28
39
48
101
82
182
745
fiO
166
668
428
I, 056
1, 456
1,319
365
345
516
474
1, ll S
486
I, 8 3
I. 601
1, 7-12
2, 029
44
158
390
1. 093
690
i
98
260
921
399
1, 773
660
3
17
14
779
484
l , M6
134
1
12
18
17
35
6
15
25
53
207
244
296
562
213
162
41
455
300
934
62
836
127
120
163
9
9
23
2
4
8
47
329
344
346
171
170
31
205
8 /\6
91
.59
34
448
1,822
1, 119
106
138
86
212
84
Bi
7
-- -----7

---
---6
7
1
1
--- ------- ----4
--- -------- ---30

--1
14
27
17
35
771
Cities 50,000 to 100,000
in p op u lation
Abilene, T ex_ ___ ______
Abin
gton __T__owns
hip,___
P a _____
___ ____
1, 43/\
4
Alameda . Calif. _____ __
Alban y , Ga __ · -------Alhambra, C alif_ ___ ___
515
568
503
1. 277
1
1
3
Al too na, P a __ · - - -- - --Amherst, N. Y ___ ____ __
An n Arbor, Mich ____ _
A ppleton, Wis ____ _____
Arli ngton , M ass _______
522
6/\3
1, 490
350
295
178
Au t 0
Un d er theft
$50
--- ----3

--2
----
1
1
1
9
3
4

- ---- ---3
2

-6
2
-- -----2
5 ------------ ---
6
-- ----- -- ---- --
174
39 4
511
883
7-a l
315
if>
�'
Table 5 1. - N u mbe'.: of Offe nse s Known t o the Po lice, 1965, C i tie s and Tow n s
2;,,000 a nd Ove r in Pop u la tion- Continu e d
L ar cenyt heft
Crim in a l
homicide
City
I ndex
to ta l
B ur·
A ggra· gl ary v a tecl b rea k·
a ssau lt ing or
enter·
ing
Mu rd e r
I\1a na nd
no n- slau gh·
negli- te r b y
neglige nt
in ange n ce
sla u gh·
t er
F orcib le
ra pe
2
I
5
4
5
8
23
6
4
6
21
80
31
22
55
79
61
185
17
1,500
61
65
28
--- - - - --- -
Ro b·
ber y
- - --- -
-- -
$50
U nde r
a nd
over
$50
Au to
theft
- - --- - -
Cities 50,000 to 100,000
i n population-Co n .
Arli ngt on . T ex_ . . . . .. .
As he d lle . ::-J. C ... .... .
ALlantic C ity . ::-J .J. . . . .
.\u gu sta , Ga __ __ . . . . . .
.I ur ora . Co lo ... . . . . . . .
1, 098
1. 143
2. 9 17
841
817
.\ ur ora . II L . .. . ... ... .
Ba kers fi eld . CaliL .. . .
Bay C it y . ·:-.,1 ich . .... . .
B ayonn e. N .J _______ __
Ber wyn. Ill .. . . . ...... .
784
1,940
620
8 19
587
lk thl e he m . P a ....... .
llillin gs . :\<lon t. .... . . .
B ing ha1n ton . N .Y _____
Uloomfiold , N .J. .. ... .
Bl oOi n i n gt on , M i n n ___
15
1, 1r.6
728
4
.152
2
Uoise . Ida ho . .. . ...... .
Bou ld er , C olo _ . . ... . . .
Br istol. Conn .... .. ... .
JlrisLOI T ow ns hi p,
960
647
357
5
1
JO
1
6
2
5
3
2
l
2
l
5
13
,;
2
3
1
1
3
5
.i 24
l) roc k to n . :\<Iass . . .. . . .
Brookl i ne. :vi ass ..
B ro w ns ville. T ex .. . . . .
B u e na P a r k , Cali f.. . . .
B ur lK1 11k, Ca liL ------Cm 11 hri rlge , i\l ass ___ ___
1. 645
8 01
1,069
2, 022
3 . 54 1
1
2
4
1
i 26
6
15
(' !l " lllPa ign , IIL .. . . . . .
C h a rl est on . S .C .. .. . . .
C lrn rl esLOn , IV. Va .... .
C !,cek towaga, N . Y . . . .
C hesapeak e, Va ______ _
C hester. Pa. - - - - - - - - C h icopee, Mass . . . ... .
Ch ul a \" ista , Calif. ... .
Cicero, Ill ., ..... . . .
C leve land H eights,
O hi o . .. . .. ........ .
C lifton . ::-J .J. . . . . . . .
Colo11ie T own, N . Y __ _
C o lorado S pr inJ!S,
C'o lo.. .
. ....... .
Co lllpton . Ca lif. .. .. . . .
Concord, Cali f.. .... .
Cos ta .\ lesa, Calif. .. .
<·01111ci l Blu ffs , Iowa ..
( 'ovi 11 gt o11 1 K y _____ _
( 'ra11ston, R.L --- - ---C u )·a l1oga F a lls. O h io.
D a ly <i LY, Calif.. . . . ..
I >avcnport, Iowa . _ __ _
Da ytona Beach, Fla . . .
Dearborn Heights ,
~lich ... .. . ..... .... .
Decatur , Ill . . . . - . . . .. .
2. 268
I, 393
532
1,147
2, 120
377
815
857
13
29
45
22
332
47
379
260
140
2fi2
398
222
182
835
1, 424
701
?.77
482
171
176
09
102
91
I, 096 .
1, 074
320
114
68
36
16
285
3
4
101
161
fil 6
462
13 7
18
39
39
68
367
708
142
415
478
058
115
344
I
9
2
6
20
12
37
68
85
8
57
28
53
57
849
452
,; 58
88 1
953
329
243
599
742
916
922
071
1. 303
663
438
98
199
411
1,696
3
27
90
58
79
220
847
467
200
305
822
I, 997
953
799
52 1
138
321
216
86
476
99 1
105
855
400
28 1
3
4
6
44
1
11
31
5
35
136
4
146
2i4
897
517
235
525
l i2
272
100
3
2
2
20
140
277
498
2
1
2
1
5
4
15
43
18
65
4 11
297
19 1
152
286
170
2
JO
22
196
100
453
67
9
8
20
26
294
286
99
476
128
4
8
1
IO
30
41
303
15
6
3
1
2
4
1
2
2
I , 11 9
I , 675
I, 543
2
6
802
1, 357
1
3
1, 294
949
I , 197
l , 218
16-1
298
166
209
106
28
11
16
1
I. 729
754
2,373
1,066
323
163
16
5
55 1
59 1
I, 198
260
836
142
2 12
171
l
19
397
5, 158
25 1
6i 5
257
240
263
3
11
2
3
3
32
42
48
21
132
JO
3
5
1 · ·······
···· ···- · ·• · •· ·•
120
19 1
482
186
104
14
l
I
98 1
743
806
141
7fi0
.;
5
l
688
1,583
1-'H --- - - - - - -- - --- - -- --
6
290
38.i
656
469
766
133
284
254
370
11 1
11 0
7
207
363
63
230
1,350
161
58
410
23
571
1, 978
615
295
1,06
474
1,456
2, 264
l. 40 7
46
13
50
42
906
416
522
327
I, 2 12
830
863
5
24
25
39
11
2
543
536
129
323
3
465
155
710
605
227
163
233
166
44
12
I
12
14
29
50
84
26
34
122
334
673
817
332
4 3
304
612
2,178
1, 374
307
421
196
4
II
45
55
36
22
389
688
262
302
1,018
1, 363
148
4
344
8
2
195
179
�Table 51.-Niimber of Offenses Known to the Police , 1965, Cities and To wns
25,000 and Ove r in Population- Continued
Crim inal
homicide
City
Index
total
Murder
and
Mannon- slaughnegli- te r by
gen t
negli111 angence
slaugbto r
D es P laines, lll ________
Downey, Calif__ ___ ____
Dubuque, Iowa __ ___ __
Durh am, N.C _______ __
East C hicago, Ind __ ___
442
2,639
396
1, 226
l , 396
1
l
I
14
5
East Orange, N.L ___ __
East St. L ouis, UL ____
Edison, N.L __ ____ __ __
Elgin , IlL __ ____ _______
El yria, Ohio ___ ______ __
l , 687
2, 046
704
463
289
1
19
Euclid , Ohio ___ ___ ____
Eugene, Oreg___ ____ ___
Evanston , IIL ____ ____
Everett. Wash _____ ____
F airfield, Conn __ __ ___ _
295
l , 456
991
747
725
F all River, Mass __ ____
F ayetteville, N. C ____ _
Florissan t! Mo ___ ___ __
For t Suut 1, Ark __ _____
F ramingham, Mass ___
1,857
1,2 17
388
598
498
Fremont, Calif_ __ __ ___
Fuller ton , Calif_ _______
Gadsden , Ala __________
Galvesto n, 'l'ex ________
Ga rla nd , 'I'ex_ _________
1,045
1,358.
928
2, 477
I , 03
Great Falls, Mont_ ___ _
Greece, N.Y __ _____ __ __
Green Bay, Wis _______
Greenville, S.C _______ _
Greenwich, Conn ____ __
I , 246
393
431
2, 302
279
H a m il ton , Ohio _______
H arrisb urg, Pa _______ _
Haverford
Township,
Pr ________________
___
833
1,082
1, 123
H ayward, CaliL ___ __ _
300
2, 379
Hialeah, F la ______ ____ _
Fligh Point, N . c _____ _
Holl ywood , F la ______ _
H olyoke, M ass _______ _
Huntington, W. Va ___
2, 050
803
1, 774
7(i3
1, 700
Hu n t ington Beach,
Ca liL _______ _____ ___
Inglewood, Calif_ ___ ___
Iron dequoit, N .Y __ __ _
lrvin g, T ex_ ________ ___
Ir vington , N.L __ _____ _
l , 335
3, 2 9
30
1,251
848
Joli et, flL. ___ __ ____ ___
K ala mazoo Mich ___ __
K enosha, ,vis ______ __ _
K etterin g, O hio ______ _
L afayette, L a ______ ____
1, 3 15
1,696
694
391
921
180
Forcib le
ra pe
Robbery
BurAggra- glaryvated b reakassaul t ing or
entering
$50
and
over
Au to
Under theft
£50
- - - --- - - - - - - - - - - - - --- - - - - -
Citi es 50,000 lo 100,000
in population- Con.
H aN.J
m il__ton
____Tom1sbip,
__ __________
Larcenytheft
1
7
5

----- --5
10
27
72
2
373
194
167
1, 094
101
404
323
163
l , 057
160
227
385
561
1,174
84 1
564
639
71
344
126
175
387
512
395
282
172
83
752
358
177
414
234
372
647
139
79
65
8
23
94
2
13
34
l
3
4
60
177
8
15
17
40
149
8
30
5
689
625
266
163
115
4
7
4
11
21
56
9
13
10
12
103
25
8
117
416
375
374
307
45
770
238
182
234
603
1,473
1, 608
1,440
494
111
233
209
153
163
6
1
2
5
2
40
54
7
15
3
55
293
9
13
8
900
617
156
266
152
311
36
152
147
227
386
1, 002
424
405
397
54 5
211
62
151
105
6
1
8
26
5
21
38
9
98
14
53
28
82
599
66
477
528
414
662
4 2
348
603
295
743
376
1, 701
1, 447
622
1, 155
855
137
158
6
3
27
8
594
182
134
1, 059
135
344
140
189
687
91
1, 209
337
569
1,012
236
24
98
303
43
8
1
1
2
4
1

--- ------ -5
--- ----- ------ -4
2
3
2
5
12
4
6
7
2
3
13
66
7
2
2
1
11 5
337
91
3
1
I
11
3
22
2
59
4
39
36
8
162
4
9
l
l
2
5
14
20
12
43
11
144
32
334
297
568
296
483
297
688
1, 202
663
170
140
162
JG
4
46
1
91
144
825
97
881
317
1. 602
54
520
1
5
2
9
7
57
6
58
4
87
61
35
127
27
325
8 13
423
7U2
302
649
784
200
605
211
371
1, 783
435
1, 468
643
1,211
330
11
7
5
3
l
3
I
5
2
7
2
13
2
5
19
1
9
3
18
134
I
10
30
60
11 8
1
25
9
574
l , 242
232
511
387
546
1, 163
58
499
166
l , 252
1,203
500
1,34 7
627
131
608
15
195
253
2
1
1
l
4
1
1
5
4
2
4
5
77
38
15
8
12
82
195
11
13
106
474
737
276
162
460
480
549
1 2
135
258
l , 011
21 220
940
883
543
195
172
20i
69
10
7
4
6
5
--- ---- - --------
3
-- ------
2
236
128
21 5
21()
250
7,
�Table 51. - Nu,nbe r of Offe n ses Known to the Police, 1965, Citie s a nd Towns
25,000 and O ver in Population-Contin u ed
L arcenytbeft
C riminal
homicide
Murd e r
City
Ind ex
total
and
nonnegligent
1nan sla u ghte r
Ma nsJnu ghter by
n egligence
Forcible
rape
Robbery
BurAggra- glaryv a ted b reakassaul t ing or
enterin g
$50
a nd
over
Au to
Unde r theft
50

------ --- - - - -- - - - Cities 50,000 to 100,000
in p opulat ion -Con .
L ake Charles, L a __ ___ _
Lakewood, Ohio __ __ __ _
L a n caster . Pa ___ _____ _
L a redo, T eX------- ---Lawrence, Mass ______ _
Lawto n, Okla ____ ____ _
Le xington, Ky _______ _
Lima . Ohio ___ ___ _____ _
Lincoln Park. Mich ___
Li voni a, M ich __ ______ _
Lorain, Ohio ___ __ ____ _
Lowe U. M ass __ _______ _
Lower l\1crion Township, P a __ ______ ____ _
Lynchburg, Va __ ___ ___
Lynn 1 M ass __ ______ ___


\1 a lden, Mass __ ______ _


.\llanchester , . .H ____ _


\I ans fteld, Ohio ______ _


.\ll edfo rcl. M ass _______ _
.\IIeriden , Conn __ _____ _


\Ieridian, Miss __ _____ _


.\!I iam i Beach . Fla __ ___
'.\Ii ddletown ,..rownship. N . .,_ __ __ _____ _
.\II idla ncl. T ex __
.\l on roe, La __________ _
,\ ton,ercy P a rk, Ca liL
{ount Vern on,
.Y .\1 uncic . Incl ____ _____ _
'.'\Tew Britain , Co nn __ _
. \1


--/ewpor t , R.L ___ ___ _



--iew Rochelle . . . Y __ _

\"e\\"Lon . Mass _____ __ _


Little__________
Rock,


\"orl


Arkh ______
_


\"orw alk· , Conn ____ ___ _


485
2
302
406
923
1,032
1,330
2, 877
940
7
11
2
1,097
747
722
2, 454
594
637
950
2.59
443
449
13
24
42
157
334
452
1, 058
272
11 9
363
41 7
861
I , 211
100
79
216
154
194
97
140
12 1
2
4
3
4
1
2
1
5
1
1
4
l
l
5
14
48
6
3
88
JI
9
46
1
17
569
52fi
210
4.34
153
277
202
229
419
304
102
99
90fi
363
1,843
68
302
11 8
237
0
198
707
1, 228
49
109
403
58
107
727
388
433
291
24 1
325
29
26
5
2
3
2
1
6
9
13
80
179
145
433
26
56
28
12
53
38
304
.55 1
4
4
11
5
3
1 ------- -
13
8
2
2
1
1
1
2
2
1
3
5
--- --- --- -1
1
2
1
2
186
5
140
169
27
14
41
386
421
522
520
639
220
912
590
166
146
196
103
92
1,948
2 18
405
228
198
1, 779
1,058
504
403
98
212
19 1
126
38
53
22
48
12
726
98
72
2
261
264
318
182
73
24
295
80
83
34
12
24
37
59
16
425
511
93/i
400
257
6
86
277
550
353
400
144
201
396
2
7
36
34.3
19
8
132
53
301
700
305
141
1
4
fi38
10
) , 521
704
3
2
437
153
45
245
141
13
21
18
15
2
2
306
531
2
10
6!ifi
83
15
21
15
18
7
5
1,247
856
561
2
6
i 82
302
5
77
2
576
168
730
1
6
6
Oxnar d. Calif_ ____ -- -Palo Alto, Cal if _____ _
18
87
83
8
1
7
5
1, 147
990
587
51
18
1
4
6
2
5
1, (-ifil
901
765
130
269
1, 587
6
!)dcssa, TCX- -- -------O~dcn. lilah _________ _
OnLario, Calif_ _______ _
Ornn~e, CaliL ___ ____ _
Overland Park , Kans __
Pawtucket, R.I _ ___ _
Penn Dills Townshi p.
p a ___ _
Pensacola, Fla __ ______ _
Pinc Aluff. Ark __ ____ _
Pittsfield, Mass -------
139
428
1,1 46
l ,3Jfi
2
2
4
1,820
1, 197
1,853
2
6
2
528
1, OaO


,93


466
1, 110
278
439
225
636
11'-------- --
Par ma, O hio .
-,04
237
247
1
Pasadena, T ex _____ _
Passaic, N .L - __ . _- _-- -
445
324
1, 103
I, 527
534
108
303
1, 101
473
250
71
319
25
378
Oak P a rk,
172
Jl 5
16
19
56
39
5
1, 025
829
39
53
785
9
2
347
36
109
388
861
11
11
329
873
544
1: 002
11
3
114
43
97
270
136
5
4
2,565
l 530
25
279
176
191
479
402
8
2
483
842
1,411
6
29
55
20
3
3
2
6
26
19
13
8
40
33
593
532
6
2
5
3
5
1, 023
1,178
1, 363
10
2
1
19
17
17
61
15
1
45
84
6
457
430
292
213
919
1,039
588
768
247
228
123
87
74
625
so:i
238
389
139
89
181
1, 38 1
490
188
361
248
126
116
2fi0
77
67
344
181
�Table 51. - N um.be r of Offe nses Know n to the Police, 1965, Cities and Towns
25,000 and Over in Population- Continued
C riminal
h omicide
City
Index
t otal
Murder
an d
nonnegligent
n1anslaughter
L ar ceny theft
Manslaughter by
negligen ce
- - - - -Cities 50 000 to 100,000
in population-Con.
Pomona. Calif__ ___ ____
Pontiac, M ir h _________
Por t Ar t hur, T ex_ _____
Portland , M aine. __ ___
P richar d, Ala _____ _____
2, 179
2, 219
552
939
731
I
7
5
1
6
P ueblo, C olo. ___ __ ____
Quincy, M ass .. _______
R acine, W is _____ ______
Rapid Cit y, S. Dak . ..
R ed
ford_____
T ownship,
Mich
____ _____ __
1, 120
I , 166
1,392
781
1
1
6
1
R edondo BPach , CaliL
R edwood City, Calif._
Reno, Nev. _. . -- - - - --R ichmond, Calif_ _____
Rock I sland, rn . . . . ...
Rome, N .Y __ ___ __ ____
R osevill~, M ich __ __ ___
R oyal Oak , Mich ____ __
St. C lair Shores, M ich .
St . J oseph , Mo ... _____
2, 297
I , 094
2, 343
2,677
I , 087
884
286
972
1, 129
993
716
10
16
2
4
13
5
Aut0
Under t heft
$50
- - - - -
58
154
8
12
22
95
249
6
33
115
998
794
283
396
331
640
801
148
299
152
I , 195
1,810
430
1,210
332
37 7
198
100
19 4
92
47
422
431
503
197
389
319
343
401
1,672
628
1, 935
903
389
219
I 31
5
28
27
42
277
362
1,042
I 6i
2
10
4
7
15
14
1
60
19
102
131
37
79
6
53
224
56
I , 069
456
964
1,310
345
679
363
664
637
470
1,331
373
1,749
2, 15S
818
399
245
536
356
I 76
2
3
1
4
5
2
2
1
22
44
8
7
6
48
70
31
49
118
357
507
470
371
97
401
306
409
204
275
1, 140
1,729
1, 062
880
64
I 40
I 97
5
3
4
8
6
19
63
13
37
42
40
40
26
29
48
471
934
463
653
675
413
4f,S
222
516
510
1, 581
916
6.58
I , 175
1, 848
l 61
247
80
I
5
I
3
I
2
2
2
2
68
12
150
11
15
49
,12
201
13
24
669
514
1, 328
285
458
625
460
I. 365
93
515
1,460
I. 860
1,886
405
1,341
227
7
2
3
13
9
12
1
6
4
1
13
2
10
19
47
83
81
32
69
22
31
38
195
405
770
749
722
252
581
379
542
342
1, 029
815
1, 051
522
1. 254
83
155
4
17
5
9
7
36
150
11
14
27
13
136
67
115
17
413
1, 115
340
396
517
253
726
317
311
414
1,265
2, 789
1,426
723
1, 003
1
8
3
8
35
14
2
29
8
112
156
li
20
271
463
661
247
422
211
220
354
59
117
370
645
175
193
229
GO
20i
22
26
18
4
333
313
311
172
614
683
121
15
37
26
357
548
300
187
455
289
1,270
1,466
458
231
1
1
9
5
2
- - --- - - -

---- -- -I
2
1,653
1, 230
3, 540
563
I , 270
Sioux Falls, S. D ak ___ _
Skokie, Ill__ _____ ___ ___
Somerville, Mass _____ _
South Gate, Cali f_ ____
Springfield , I!L _______
576
I , 229
1, 793
1, 757
1, 459
Spri Dgfleld. Ohio ____ __
Stockton , Cn!if. _______
Sunny vale, Calif_ ___ __
T allahassee, F ln ___ __ __
T erre H au te, I nd ____ __
941
2, 700
830
973
1, 141
3
5
2
2
8
T onaw anda Town,
N. Y _________ _____ __
Troy , N. Y ____ ________
Tuscaloosa, A la __ ____ _
T yler, T ex_ _______ ____
U n ion City, N .J __ __ __
569
1,047
1,228
361
811
I
2
2
3
1
18~
- -- - -- - -- --- -
$50
and
over
9
Santa Barbara, Calif__
Santa Clar a, Calif. ....
a nta M onica, Calif. __
Schenectady , N. Y ___ ..
Siou x City, Iowa ... ___
829
1, 428
709
7
5
I
B urAggra- glaryv ated brea kassault ing or
enteri ng
4


1, 11 0
I , 760
80
1, 4r,5
I , 488
808
571
8
Robbery
85
12
227
18
Salem , Orel!-- --- -- -- -Salinas, Calif. _________
8011 An ~elo, 1., cx ____ ___
San Leand ro. CaliL ...
San Mateo, Calif. .. ___
U nion Township, N .L
U niversity C it y, Mo __
Upper Darby 'l'ownship, P a ______ _____ __
V allejo, Calif _____ ___ __
Walt ham, Mnss ___ ___ __
4
9
--- -------- --- -
Forcible
rape
1
5

1
---- -
1
4
2
1

-----3
1
4
--- -------- ---- ---------- --- --

- ----- ----- ------ ------
·------4
l
2
2
3
2
I
6
2
15
1

-1
1

1

2- --------
----
5
1
3
6
4
2
--- ----2
5
2
14
90
71
11
23
I -t 1
72
81
9-21
206
183
477
158
249
573
335
272
219
551
88
126
151
38
33
222
56
320
173
�Table 51. - Nu,nbe r of Offe n ses Know n to t h e Police 1965 C-t"
d Towns
25,000 and Over in Population- Co.,; tiin,; cl • ies an
L arcenytheft
C riminal
homicide
C ity
I ndex
total
Murder
and
non-
negligent
1nanslaughter
Manslaughter by
negligence
F orcib le
rape
Robbery
BurAggra- glaryvated breakassau lt ing or
entering
$50
Au to
Under t heft
and
over
$50
- - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - C ities 50.000 to 100,000
in population- Con.
Warren , Ohio ______ ____
Warwick, R.L _________
Wa terford To,n1ship


\lich __ ___________ : __


Wa te rloo, Iowa _____ ___
11·aukef:!an, Ill _______ __
1,086
1. 563
891
928
12
\Vcstminster, CaliL ____
411
454
1, 482
373
1,134
\\"est Palm B each, F la_
Weymouth, Mass _____ _
\Vheelinf:!. IV. Va ___ __ __
White P la ins, N.Y ____
ll"h it tier, Calif__ ______ _
1. 044
204
444
l , 391
! , 451
l\'ilkes-B arre, Pa ______
Wilm ington, De!__ ___ __
\rood
ownsh ip,bridge
__ J_ T
_____ __ __ __
484
2,633
Wauw atosa, \Vis _____ __
\Yest Allis, Wis __ ____ __
West Covina, Cali f_ ___
West r-I a nforcl, Conn __
Wyoming, Mich ____ ___
York, Pa ______________
2
2
2
3
3
2
2
l
2
4

2 ----- --2
3
1

----- --3
8
2
1
3
4
1
1
l
2

-- 5--------10
1
3
2
997
621
680
5
4
25
5
42
34
450
672
343
715
774
1,035
219
131
9
16
41
37
63
30
56
317
334
233
414
338
314
24
938
838
163
5
7
24
5
14
10
2
26
8
45
139
147
760
204
609
197
204
432
80
302
516
1,036
904
123
782
.
60
92
217
66
158
5
33
l
14
34
39
70
9
24
182
40
559
74
204
437
730
215
SL
148
575
357
1,563
73
460
534
510
152
35
53
149
280
2
6
7
196
'Z7
24
164
1, 172
125
539
313
1,842
150
686
1
3
9
22
10
39
11
8
33
466
280
299
354
247
148
623
910
695
151
I
8
5
2
9
18
73
98
472
88
199
48
21
88
107
238
322
309
580
196
674
32
11
101
28
74
24
193
319
75
37
39
136
64
125
39
549
535
702
303
8
1, 087
50
47
28
16
472
342
178
129
393
99
186
139
140
394
114
123
291
210
763
554
165
70
21.
89
40
63
92
77
128
324
76
159<