Box 15, Folder 1, Complete Folder

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Box 15, Folder 1, Complete Folder

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Dr. Harmon D . Moore
E xecutive Director
Christian Council of Metropolitan Atlanta, Inc.
5 3 Six th Street, N. E .
Atlanta, Georgia 30308
Mr. Albert J. B ows
Vice President
Partner - in- Charge
Arthur Ande rsen & Company
Bank of Georgia Building
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Mr. Erwin Stevens, President
Citizens Central Advisory C o uncil
799 Parsons Street, S. W.
Atlanta, Georgia
..,
Dr. J o hn W. Letson
Superintendent
A t lanta Public S chools
22 4 C entral A venu e, S. W.
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Reverend Samue l Williams
Co-Chairman
Summit Leade rship C onfe re nce
F ri endship Baptist Church
437 Mitchell Street, S. W.
Atlanta, Georgia
Mr. R obert J. Butler
President
Atlanta Labor Council
250 Tenth Street, N . E.
Atlanta, Georgia
..-- Mr. Opie L. Shelton
E xecutive Vice President
Atlanta Chamber of C ommerce
P. 0. Box 1740
Atlanta, Georgia 30301
Mr. Bois feuillet Jone s
230 Peachtree Street, Suite 210
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
�/
October 20 , 1967
Mr. Erwin St evens., President
Citizens Cent\' · 1 Advisory Council
799 Parsons Stre t , S . W .
Atlant , Geol"gla
De i- MT , Stevens;
1 am sure that you . re we.re of the movement et the national
level to dev · lop strong c oalition of urban intei-ests in an effort
to x rt mo1,'e influence in national programs and priorities £01"
the benefit of our citi·e e .
R present ·tives of busines , l bor, civil rights, religion, educ tion
d Mayo,: of I.Ul'ban citi s have joined tog ther in n Urb n Coalition
to provide coordin t d machinery for getting the story of our big
city problems cttoe to the n tion.
I am tt dung som information xn terial
Th e will -xp1-in the b ckgi,ound and go
com.mitt e .
on tho Urb n Coalition.
of th n tional ste ting
It
be n ..- cognl ed £,:-om th beginning that in ord i- to b
££, ctive , loc count l"•P rt co Utlon mu t be dev loped in
p rt of th count#y to support th
goals . It l my belt £ th ti
foi, y J'S Atl ni h s b n ble to gtow and pro,p r thl'ough n
eUectiv
nd inform coalition r lationship ol bu lnee
nd gov rnmenl nd with th
upport of th oth r re
of int r st whlch l'
p rt of the n tio
coalition effort. I believe, however,, that
w need to i-ecognl
a Uttl · mor formally th co lltlon which
keep oul' clty movtn
nd al o to develop loc co litton • 1 ion•
ship wlth the national Urb
Co ition.
�Mr. Stevens
Page Two
October ZO, 1967
It is my thinking that an initial step would be for us to get together
the top rep:resentatives of these key interest gi--oups to form a local
cl>alition steering committee an~ invite the participation by othe:ir
org nized groups. The initial steex-ing committee could be composed
of the Mayor~ as chief elected official of the c;:ity, the President
of the Chamber of Commerce, the President of the Atlanta Labor
Council, the President of the Atlanta Christian Council., the co ...
Ch ia,rnan of the Summit Le dersbip Confei-ence; the Supel'intendent
0£ public education,. and the Chairman of the Citizens Centl"al
Advisol'y Couneil, who is the' elected repi-esentative of p -rtlcipants
in the Economic OpportW'lity program.
1 have drafted statement which might be considered by this group
which recognizes the need for a local coalition - d endorse the
d cl l' don of principles of the national coalition. A copy of th
principl · of the n tional co ition is · so att ch d for your
consld r tion.
By recognizing th · Jtist nee of co litlon we will be ble to b tter
corrununic te urb n probl ms nd focus max.imwn re outc s upon
their olution •
Ol'd r that we might consider this proposal I h v, invited th
following p opl to me.et with mo t my otilce t City Hall on
Wednee Y; Oetob .. 2.5, t 10;00 • m .:
ln
Mt" .. A~ H. St rne, Preaid nt
Atl
Chamb , of Comm re
R v. S mu l Williams
C o.Cb 1"man
Summit Le der hip Conf
r
Mr.B obnJ.Butl .Pi:
Atl ·
L boJt Council
nc
ident
�Mr. Stevens
Page Three
October 20, 1967
Rev. Bevel Jones, President
Christian C ouncil of Metropolitan
Atlanta, Inc.
Dr. John W . Letson
Superintendent
Atlanta Public Schools
Mr, Erwin Stevens,_ President
Citizens ·centr 1 Advisory Council
Economic Opportunity Atl nt , Inc.
Sincel"ely yours.
Ivan Allen, Jfl.
Mayor
IAJr :fy
�October 20 ,. 196 7
Dr . John W . Letson
Superintendent
Atlanta Public Schools
224 Central Avenue , S . W .
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
De
~
John i
1 am ute that you ar aware of the movement · t th n tional
level to develop strong coalition of urban interests in an eftoi"t
~o ej( tt more in!luence ln national pro gr me and priotitie 8 for
the b nefit 0£ our of.tie •
R pres ntatlve of business ,. labot .. civil rights , r ligion, educ tlon
d M yoi- · of ~ban clti s h ve joined together in n Urban Co ition
to provld coo,tdinated machin NY lor getting the stoty of our big
city probl m a.croe · to the n ti.on.
X am tt cht,ng eome information mated
on th Urb n Co lition.
Th s wW expl ln th b ckground
d goals of th n · tlonal teering
committe •
it h . s been r cognlz d from the beginning 'th t in ol'd r to b .
eliecth ,. local count t.,P i't co lition muat b _ d velop d in all
pa.l't of the country to upport th e go l • lt is my b U f that
for y t Atl
. ha b n abl to .-ow and pro p r throl.l h an
flectlv and lnforrnA]. coalition rel tionshlp ot bu. in •
d gov tn ...
m nt d with the uppo~ of th oth r a e
of inter et which a
" pal't of the national coaJ.ltlon effort. t b U.ev , ho V ft, th t
w ne d to
cogni
llttle more form.ally th co lltlon which
k e p our city movin
nd also to dev lop a. loc.al coalition el ti.on•
ship with th national Urban Coalition.
�Dr. Letson
Page Two
October 20, 1967
It is my thinking that an initial step would be £or us to get together
the top representatives of these key interest gl'oups to form a loc 1
coalition steering committee and invite the participation by other
organiiaed groups . The initial stee,.-ing comrnJ.ttee could be composed
of the Mayor, as chief elected official of the city., the President
of the Chamber of Commerce , the President of th Atlanta Labor
Council, the Pl'e ident of th Atlanta Chris~ C ouncil,. the Co•
Chahm1.an of the Summit L adership Coniet'ence, the Superintend.ant
of public education,- Wld the Chairman of the Citiz ns Centr 1
Advisory Council, who is the elected i,epl'esentative of participant
in the Economic Opportunity program.
I have drl.fted a statement which might be con ldet" d by this group
which recognhtes the need for local coalition and endorses the
declaration of princlplea of the national coalition. A copy of the
principles of the n tional co ition i al o ttach d for your
coneide ration.
By recognizing the xistence of coalition we will be · ble to bett ~
communicate urban p:robl ma and focus maximum re ourc; s upon
their solution .
In orde:r that we might con ider thl ps,oposal I h ve invited the
following p opl to me t with me at :my offic
Wedn d y , Octobet- 25. t 10:00 • m .:
at Clty Hall on
Mr. A. H .. Stern , P esi.de.nt
Atl nta Ch mb r of Comme,-c
R v. S muel Will
C o.-.Ch irman
Summit L d :rship Conf t nee
Mr. R obert 1. BuU ~. Pre ld nt
Atlanta L bor CouncU
�Dr. Letson
Page Three
October 20, 1967
II
Rev. Bevel Jones , President
Christian Council 0£ Metropolit n
Atlanta , In.c.
Dr . John W . Letson
Superintendent
Atlanta Public Schools
Mr. Erwin Stevens , President
Citi~ens Central Advlsoty Council
Economic Opportunity Atlanta. Inc.
Sincel" ly your ,.
lvan Allen; JJ'.
M yo1t
IAJr:fy
�October 20 ; 196 7
Reverend Bevel J ones " President
ChJ."ietian Council of Metropolitan
Atlanta, Inc .
143 B verly :Road, N. E .
Atlanta, Georgia
Deat Bevel :
lam sure that you are aware of the moveme.nt t then tional
level to develop strong eoa.lltion 0£ urban inter sts in n effort
to exert mor · influence tn national programs and prioritieai for
th benefit of O\ll' citi
· Represent tiv s 0£ buelnes _ labor• c:lvil rights,, religion, education
d Mayors of w:ban citi s have joined tog th r in an Urb
Coalition
to provide cool"dinated ma.chin ry tor getting th
tory of our bl
city probl ms ae,.-o s to the nation.
1 am tt ching som tn£ormation mate'rials on th
Th se will xpl · in the b ckground
d go ·
UJ!ban Coalition.
of th n .tlonal te _,dn
eommitte · .
b n r cogni.zed f:rom th · b ginning th .t 1n ord r to b
it c:tive ; loo _ counter--p rt coalition rnuit b dev lop d in all
p rt of the countJ'y to suppo-rt thee go· i.. Ii l my b lie£ th :t
(or y .rs Atl nt
· b en ble to row d pro p r throu b an
ff ctlv nd lnfo~mal <:<> i.tion r
tion hip ol buslnea
d ov tn•
ment and with th upport of th · oth l' I' Q.a of intet t which · · e
pa_r.t of th na.tlon coalition U.ort. l b · u v , howev r. that
w lteed to r cogni~
llttl mor form.ally th coalitions hi.ch
ki . p our city moving
d al o to d v lop a local coalltion Jf~l tlon
-hip with th n tlon l Urban Codltion.
It h
�Reverend Jones
Page Two
October 20 , 1967
lt is my thinking that
inttlal step would be for us to get together
the top representatives of these key interest groups to form a loc
coalition steering committee a,;id invite th · puticipation by other
org nized groups . The initial steedng committee could be composed
of the Mayor. as chief elected official of the city., the President
of the Chamber 0£ Comme:rce , the Pr·e sident of the Atlanta Labor
C ouncil , the President of the Atlanta Christian Council, the Co•
Chairman of the Summit Le der hip Conference , the Superintendent
of public education~ and the Ch irman 0£ the Citizens Cent:ral
A dvisory Council,. who is the elected represent tive of particip ts
in the Economic Opportunity program.
1 have dr ted a statement which might be considered by this group
which recognizee the need for a local coalition and endorses the
decl r tion of principles of the national coal.Won. A copy of the
principle o! the n tional coaHtion is also attached fo~ your
. con ideration.
By recognizing the xistence of · coalition we will be ble to ~ettel'
communic te u.rban problems nd focus maximum i-e ourc s upon
their eolutions.
In order that we might con id r this proposal I
v invited the
following p opl t o m t with rn
t my office at City Hall on
Wedne da.y, Octob tr ZSa t 10:00 . m .:
Mr. A, H.Sterne" p,_.. ld nt
Atl ia C mber of Commerce
I\ v. Samu, 1 William
C o -Ch lrman
Summit Le d rehip C ont renc
Mr. B ob rt J. Butler, P r s id nt
At1 ta L bor C ouncU
�Reverend J ones
Page Three
October 20, 1967
Rev . Bevel Jones., PresJ.dent
Christian Council of Metropolit n
Atlanta, Inc.
Dl' . John W . Letson
S upe:rintendent
Atlanta. Public Schools
Mr. Erwin Stevens. President
Citizens Central Advlsoi;y Council
Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.
Sincerely you.rs,
Ivan Allen, Jr .
Mayor
IAJrtfy
�October 20; 1967
Revei-end Samuel Willia.ms
Co-Chah·man
Summit LeadeJt. hip Confe1tence
Friendship Bapti st Chui,cb
4l7 Mitchell Stre t , S . W.
Atlanta. Georgia
Dear Sam:
lam sure that you a.T aware of the mov ment t the national
level to develop a stl'ong coalitlon of urban lntei-ests In an etloi-t
to exert more infiuenc inn tion progr ms
d priodtles for
the benefit of Ou.JI ci'ti
Represent tlve of bu in s , l bor, clvil rights , r ligion 1 education
and M yors of \lrb n cities hav join d tog · th l' in an Urban Coalttion
o provid coordin ted ma.chin ry fo~ g Ulng the tory of our blg
city problems aero s to the na.tlon.
l · rn tte.ching om Wonnatlon mat,erlals on th Urban Coalition.
The
will explain th b ckgtound and goals of th ~tlonal te rin
conunitte .
It h b n recognt.z d from the be lnnlng that ln ord r to b
U ctive 1. loc count I' part coalitiona muat b dev loped in ·1
pan of th · country to suppoi--i th e go • It i my bell ! that
fo~ ye r Atl~ ha b n bl,, to tow d pro
r through
I.£ ctlve and into~ coaUtlon 't lationship of busin • and governm nt and with
uppor-t of th oth I' &l' a• of int · f t which t
& pa.lf·t of th n.atlonal coallUon -!fort. 1 beltev • ho
v · r-, th t
w n d to recopl · . little more tor-mally
co•lltions which
ep ou~ clty movin .-.nd al o to d v lop a loc coditlon relationhip wlth th
\ion.al Urban Coalition.
�R e verend Williams
Page Two
October 20 , 1967
It is my thinking that .an initial step would be for us to get togeth r
tho top repi-e entatlve$ of these key inte re t groups to form a local
coalition ate ring committee
d invite the participation by othe:r
organized groups . The initial steering committee could be c omposed
of the Mayor , as chief elected official of the city. the President
of the Chamber of Commerce,,_ the P~e ide,n t of the Atlanta L ,b o~
Council , th President of the Atlanta Christian Co1;m.cll , the Co•
Ch bma.n of the Summit Lead rship Conference~ the Superintend nt
of public educ tion~ and th Chairman of th Citizens Centi'
Adviao~y Council, who i the elected repJ'esentative of particlp
in the Economic Oppo,;tunlty progi-am.
ts
1 have drafted e ternent which might be conoidered by this group
which recognii,; a, then , d for local coaUtton
d endo:r es th
decl
tion of p ln,ciplee of the
tional co - ltion. A copy of the
of the nation co iltion i also ttachcd foT your
·cone de:t tion.
i-
principle
By r c:ognidn
th
communlc t urb
th ir solution •
exi tenc
pl'obl ms
co U.tion
will b
ble to b tt ind tocu · mPimum r sourc~ u -
of
In order th t w rnight con idet" thl p;ropo~ I h · v lnvl d th
following p opl to meet with me t my oW.c at City H
on
Wcdne d y , Oetober ZS. at lOiOO • m.;
Mr.: A . H. St rne, P
ld nt
tlant Chamb t of Commerce
Rev. Samu 1 Willlanua
C o -Ch tl'lnan
Summit Lead r,hip C
M • Rob r J. Butl *'• Pn ld nt
U _ ta L bot C ouncil
�11•= =-------..-:---;:,r,.1==~-=:c,:,n-=-""""'"'"""_______________c:ga_ _ _ __ ,_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _..,
Reverend Williams
P age Three
October 20, 1967
Rev . Bevel Jones . Prttsident
Christian Council of Metropolitan
Atl taa Inc .
Dr. John W. Letson
Superintendent
Atlanta Public Schools
Mi . Erwin Stevens, President
Citizens Central Adviso:t;'y Council
~conomic Opportunity Atl nta, l,nc .
Sincet'ely yours .
lv n All nt
Mayor
lAJr:£y
Jr.
�Octobe,: 20; 1967
Mr. Robert J . Butler
President
Atlanta Labor CouncU
250 Tenth Street, N. E .
Atlanta, Georgl~
De r Bob :.
l am a u.te th t you ai.-e aware of the mov ment t the n tional
level to develop s ong coalition of urba?J. lntet"ests in an effol't
to exert more influence ln national pi-ograme and priori.ti s for
th bene!lt of our cities .
Representatives of bu inesa, 1 bor,. civil rights, religion, education
nd Mayor of Ut'ban cltl~s have joined togethe~ in
Urb
Co lition
to p:rovlde coordinated ma.chine1y for getting th story of our big
city problems across to the nation.
I am tt ching som info
tlon mat rial on th Ui-ban Coalition.
The e will e,xpl in the background nd goa.l oj th n tional st ring
committee ,
It ha be n recognized from tb beginning that in ord r to b
effectiv , local count r .. p rt co lition mu t b developed in all .
p rte of the country to upport th se o s. It i my b 11 f th i
for ye r Atl nt h s b ·n able to grow
d pro p
through n
ffec:tiv and inform. · coalltlon rel tlon hlp ot bu in s nd ov tn•
ment and with th upport of th oth r re s of int rest which r
, p rt of th n tlonal co itlon effort. 1 b li" v • bowev r ,. th t
w n d to r . co¢~e little mor formally th coalition• which
ki p ou.r city moving
d also to develop 1oc co Ution rel tlon ..
hip with th .
Urban Coalition,
�Mr . Butler
Page Two
October 20, 1967
It is my thinking that an initial step would be for us to get togethet"
the top representatives of these key inteJ."est groups to form a local
coalition steering committee and invite the participation by other
organized groups . The initial steering committee could be cornpos d
of the Mayor, as chief elected official of the dty, the P:resident
of the Chamber of Commerce, the Piesident of the Atlanta Labor
Council , the President of the Atlanta Christian C ouncil , the CoChairman of the Sujunit Leadership Conference,, the Superintendent
of public education, and the Chairman of the Citizens Central
Advisory Council, who is the elected representative of patticip nts
in the Economic Opportunity program.
I have drafted statern nt which might be conside:red by this group
which recognizes the n ed for a local coalition and endo:tses the
declar tion of principles 0£ the national coalition. A copy of th
pri.n ciples of the nation coalition is also ttached for you.r
con ider ti.on.
By recognizing the existence of co lition we will be ble to bett r
conununic te urban problems and focu maximum r sapce · upon
th h~ · olutione ~
In order that we might consider th" propo all h ve invited th
following people to m et with m.e t my office t City H 11 on
W dne d-,y., October 25, t 10:00 • m.:
Mr. A . H . Stern , Pre id nt
Atl ta Chambel' of Comm rce
Rev . S mu.el Williams
Co-Ch irman
Su.mrnlt Le d r hip Conle11 nc ·
Mri Robert J. Butl l', P:r sident
Atlanta L bot Council
�Mr. Butler
Page Thl'ee
October 20, 1967
Rev·. Bevel J ones, President
Christian Council of Metropolitan
Atlanta,, Inc.
Dr . John W . Letson
Superintendent
Atl ta P ublic S chools
Mr. Erwin Stevens , P,:esident
Citizens Cent:ral Advisory Council
Economic Opportunity tlanta •. Inc .
Since11ely yours ,
Iv n Allen. Jr.
M yol'
IAJr,fy
�CITY OF .ATLANTA.
CITY HALL
Feb ruary 13, 196 9
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assi st ant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison
MEMOR AND UM
To : Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
From:
Subject:
Dan Sweat ~
Urban Coalition
In determining whether or not a formal 11 Urban Coalition 11 should be
established in Atlanta, I feel the following points should be considered:
1.
The National Urban C oalition will apparently be a key communications
link to the Nixon Administration. Whereas in the past, the heavily
Democratic dominated National League of Cities and U. S. Conference
of M a yors have enjoyed a key position in national administration
affairs , they might not have quite the muscle with the Republicans .
John Gardner does have.
2.
It is abundantly clear that the Nixon Administration intends to
funnel as many urban programs as possible through the priv ate ,
business s e ctor. This will requir e some sort of c oordina tion
a mong busine ss and g ove rnme nt a t the lo c al l evel a nd m e tro l evel.
3.
There probably will be a greater need and demand for an identifiabl e
local coalition a fte r you l e ave the offic e of M a yo r. The n ext M ayo r
c e rtainly won 1t be the leade r of the 11 powe r structure 11 and proba bly
not even a me mb e r of it .
4.
If a real coalition is formed , it must be done by the
11
p ower struct u re 11
a nd supported by the very top l e adership .
5.
A meanin g ful c o a lition should a ttemp t to ge t metro representation .
If it is t o set the r ules for t h e city in the f uture it must be geared to
i nfluence annexat ion, dispersed h ousing , p l anning for industry ,
transpo rtati o n , e t c.
�Mayor Allen
Page Two
February 13 , 1969
6.
Someone should look into the Winston-Salem Urban Coalition . They
have already raised $1. 7 million for coalition activities , plus some
$ 2. 5 million for a Housing Dev_elopment Corporation. I understand
they met the other day and raised $120 , 000 for summer programs .
If we had just a fraction of that kind of money to 1 1 sell 1 1 projects , we
could multiply it many fold.
7.
I envision an Urban Coalition whose membership would consist of
every organization wishing to identify with it and which would get
together as a whole at one big annual dinner . A small executiv e
committee of pow er structure 11 statesmen 11 would set the policies
and priorities between annual meetings and communicate to the
community through a small high powered staff.
DS :fy
�The urban Coalition I
Federal Bar Building West/ 1819 H Street, N. W. Washing t on , D. C. / 20006
Steering Committee Co-ch airmen : Andrew Heiskell/ A. Philip Randolph
\1
MEMORANDUM
TO:
MEMBERS OF THE STEERING COMMITTBE, THE WORKING
COMMITTEE, AND THE TASK FORCE ON LOCAL COALITIONS
FROM:
JOHN FEILD--RON LINTON, NATIONAL COORDINATORS
SUBJECT:
GUIDELINES FOR FORMING LOCAL COALITIONS
A working group of the Task Force on Local Coalitions
developed the attached Guidelines for Forming Urban
Coalitions Nationwide. This version is a result of
a series of meetings of the Task Force working group
and a series of redrafts.
National Coe,rdinafors : John Feild/ Ron M . Linton
Telephone 293-1530
�GUIDELINES:
FORMING URBAN COALI'rIONS NATIONW1IDE
On August 24, 1967, in Washington, D. C., the Emergency
Convocation of The Urban Coalition issued an urgent appeal
to all concerned American citizens to join with The Coalition
in efforts to fashion a new political, social, economic, and
moral climate that will make possible the breaking of the
vicious cycle of the ghetto.
Action at the community level
must now follow.
Community leadership is now called upon to use its commitment
and ingenuity to muster the public support and involvement
needed to bring about a major reordering of both national and
local priorities in the face of the unresolved urban emergency.
At the conclusion of the August Emergency Convocation, The
Urban Coalition adopted a comprehensive Statement of Principles, Goals and Commitments.
It is this document which charts
the course for our mutual efforts.
The Urban Coalition's
program as adopted at the August Convocation may be characterized as follows:
�( 2)
"We believe the American people and the Congress
must reorder national priorities , with a commitment
of resources equal to the magnitud~ of the problems
we face. The crisis requires a new dimension of
effort in both the public and private sectors,
working together to provide jobs, housing, education,
and the other needs of our cities.
"We believe the Congress must move without delay
on urban programs. The country can wait no longer
for measures that have too long been denied the
people of the cities and the nation as a whole-additional civil rights legislation , adequately
funded model cities, anti-poverty, housing, education, and job-training programs, and a host of
others.
"We believe the private sector of America must
directly and vigorously involve itself in the
crisis of the cities by a commitment to investment,
job-training, and hiring, and all that is necessary
to the full enjoyment of the free enterprise
system--and also to its survival ...
"This convocation calls upon local government ,
business, labor, religions, and civil rights groups
to create counterpart local coalitions where they
do not exist to s~pport and supplement this declaration of principles."
The National Steering Committee at the present time consists
of thirty-six members.
They are broadly representative of
business, labor, local government, religion, civil rights,
communications, and education.
The Coalition identified seven specific areas of urban affairs
calling for action by The Coalition and the Nation.
Emergency
Task Forces have been created reflecting these problem areas:
�( 3)
Public Service Employment and Urban Legislation
Private Employment and Entrepreneurship
1
Educational Disparities
Housing, Reconstruction and Investment
Equal Housing Opportunities
Communications and Public Support
Local Coalitions
The National Steering Committee and its seven Task Forces are
already at work developing strategy and fostering action to
achieve the goals set forth in The Coalition's Statement of
Principles, Goals and Commitments.
This will not be enough.
There must be complementary action at the local community
level where ultimate responsibility rests and where u r ban
problems are most clearly perceived.
November 1 , 1967
�(4)
What is a Coalition?
A "coalition" is an alliance , association 0r combination of
persons , groups , organizations or constituencies drawn together for one or more specific purposes.
A coalition is not
necessarily a formally chartered, regulated and structured
organization.
Typically , coalitions emerge in time of crisis
or emergency and endure for the period of that emergency.
Development of a coalition which will include all civic
interests is , therefore , most appropriate in the face of
America's present urban crisis.
Local Circumstances
Local circumstances and the status of existing local organizations, of course, vary greatly from community to community.
The Urban Coalition recognizes that the nature of the organized response to its call for local counterpart action will
also vary from community to community.
A local coalition
can encompass a single city or an entire metropolitan area
in which it is located, whichever is feasible and appropriate.
The organization of an urban coalition may take several forms.
It may involve individuals or organizations.
It may embrace
a large membership or be an organization centered on leadership.
�(5)
New Coalition s
In those local situations where citizens determine that it is
appropriate to for m an essentially~ coalition of community
leadership, the immediate need is to assemble an organizing
or steering committee.
As is the case with the National
Steering Committee , local steering committees will typ ically
be made up of representatives from the community's business ,
organized labor , religious , civil rights, educational , local
gover nment and communications lea dership.
I n or der to insur e ,
however, that the local steering committee is b r oadly repr esentative of the life of t he community , it is imp ortant that
low-income n e i gh b orhoods o f t he c ommuni ty also b e represented.
It is the local steer ing c ommittee which would s erve as the
i nitial l ink with t he nationa l Coalition.
Coordinati on o f Existing Groups
In other c ommunities, it may b e that c o a l itions broadly
representative of the life of the community have previously
been formed around such single i ssu es as jobs, schools, or
housing.
A local coalition in these communities may, under
these circumstances, be an association of such existing
single-purpose groups which should jointly establish a
coordinating committee to serve as a local coalition with a
�( 6)
multi-purpose, comprehensive concern.
Through this mechanism,
mutual agreement on goals, policy positions, and local needs
could be developed.
Equally important, a joint coordinating
(steering) committee could also facilitate a complementary
network of program efforts carried out through its member
organizations.
The full weight of community leadership
could, thereby, be brought to bear on local problems without
causing any existing individual organizations to surrender
their identities or their program control.
The coordinating
(steering) committee would serve as the initial local link
with the national Coalition.
Incorporation Not Necessary
In either kind of community situation , formal incorporation
o f a new loca l coalition or of an association of existing
single-purpose groups is not necessary, although in some
cases it may be desirable.
The national Urban Coalition has
chosen not to incorporate.
In the case of unincorporated
local coalitions, funds for technical support may be
channeled through a separate fiscal agent, such as a cooperating organization.
�( 7)
Statement of Principles
The steering or coordinating committee in either kind of
community situation should consider developing a draft Statement of Principles , Goals and Commitments, which (a) endorses
the national Statement and (b) broadens and supplements it
to include major local concerns.
This approach will chart
the course for local efforts in cooperation with the national
Ur ban Coalition.
Such a local statement, when formalized ,
will also serve to inform local citizens and focus their
discussion and action.
Operat i n g Str ucture
With respe c t t o newly -fo rmed l o cal c o ali t ions , it is
antici pated that the local structure wi ll inc l ude not o nly a
steering committee b u t task f orces to dea l , respectively,
with national urban l egislatio n, expansion of private employment, housing and e ducation , and public support.
The task
force subjects suggested above are, of course, by no means
the only problem areas for which task forces could be created.
Task forces in the named problem areas would correspond with
and could relate to the task forces working at the national
level.
�( 8)
In the case of an association of existing single-purpose
\\
organizations, the coordinating (steering) committee could
look to its respective member organizations to serve the task
force roles and treat those problem areas closest to their
respective program concerns and organizational focus.
This
is in lieu of appointing new task forces as is recommended
for an entirely new coalition .
Each participating single-
purpose organization could relate functionally to the
national task force working in its subject area of concern ,
e.g. a local community-wide employment committee could work
cooperatively with the national Task Force on Private Employment and Entrepreneurship.
Assistance for Local Coalitions
It is strongly recommended that where a new coalition or a
new association of existing single-purpose organizations is
being formed ,
the local steering or coordinating com-
mittee arrange for at least
2n,g_
staff person to work full
time for the new coalition venture.
It is likely that this
staff person could be borrowed from the staff of one of the
participating groups of the coalition.
While the National
Steering Committee is not able to offer any financial assis tance to local coalitions, it will provide other assistance
�(9 )
in p r eparing and convening local coalition activities o
The
National Steering Committee will also provide speaker s ,
where needed and request ed, in any or all of the subject
a r eas under consideration by The Urban Coalition Task For ces
mentioned earlier.
The national task forces and the national coor dinati ng s t aff
are prepared to shar e wit h cooperating community leadership
the results der ived f r om their continuing surveys of avai l able re sour ces and eva luation o f current progr ams dea l ing
wi th urban problems.
For e x ample , local coalitions can b e
k ept advised of t h e s tatus , meri t s a nd relevanc e o f pend ing
nat i onal legislation p e r tai ning t o critic al urban prob l ems o
Up t o d ate i nformation o n the exp erience g aine d with new
recr uiting, training and employ ment activities o r l ow-income
hous i n g d e velo pment in the pr ivate secto r
can also b e ex-
changed through the nationa l task force s.
Affiliation wi t h The Urban Coa l i t ion
The expec t a tion o f t h e Nationa l Steering Committee is that
local coal i t ions wi ll , when ready , seek affiliation with the
national Urban Coalition .
To be eligible for affiliation, a
�(1 0)
local group :
One:
Must endorse The Urban Coalition's Statement of
Principles , Goals and Commitments.
In the absence of common agreement between the local coalition and The Urban Coalition on the basic need for action on
urban problems and the broad character of the action needed,
affiliation would have little meaning.
stitutes the agreement.
The Statement con-
Insofar as it is the product of
the Emergency Convocation of The Urban Coalition and, there fore , received the endorsement of over twelve hundr ed
leader s from across the nation , it should not be difficu lt
for like-minded local leaders to support it.
Two :
Must be a multi- purpose comprehensively committed
group.
By way of example, while a broad-based local o rganization
devoted to promoting equal housing opportunity may, in
effect, be a local leadership coalition, because of its
single purpose it would not meet this standard.
The purpose
of the standard is to encourage local action on all major
urban problems and a single-purpose organization such as a
f air housing coalition is not o rgani zeo o r prepared t o ac c omplis h that end.
�(1 1 )
Three:
Must be broadly representative d f the life of the
local community .
The ultimate significance and effectiveness of a local
coalition's efforts will be dependent on the extent to which
all significant sectors of the community participate in and
support the local coalition.
A coalition comprised exclu-
sively of businessn en and labor leaders would not be in a
position to accomplish nearly as much as a coalition involvin g ,
in addition , leaders from religion , local government , civil
r ights , education , communications and disadvantaged neighbor hoods .
This standar d is a means of encouraging the degr ee of
community involvement essential to major local accomplishments.
Th e Coun c i l of Ur b a n Coa l itio n s
The Urban Coa l ition is i n tereste d i n continu i ng p artic i patio n
in its affairs by l oca l c ommunitie s a nd n o t
of its g o al s and c ommitments.
just endorsement
The f o r matio n of a Council of
Urban Co alitions is anticipated shortly after the beginning
of 1968.
Each affiliated local coalition should pla n to
designate two repr esenta tives to ser ve o n this nationa l
Counci l .
At i ts f i r s t mee t ing , the Council wi l l elect two
representatives to serve o n the Natio n a l Steering Committee
of The Urban Coalition.
Additional representatives may
�(12)
be added as the Council expands.
In this manner, affiliated
local coalitions will participate in and help shape the
programs of The Urban Coalition.
The Council will serve as
a community-based national body working with the National
Steering Committee.
Working Approaches
With any new effort, such as that being undertaken by The
Urban Coalition, it may be expected that national organizational structure and methods will continue to undergo change.
For this reason, The Urban Coalition is understandably
following a flexible course of action.
Among the working
approaches currently being taken are the following :
1.
A supporting rather tha n operational emphas i s:
The Urban Coalition is supporting efforts to solve
ongoing problems at both the local and nat ional
levels. It will stimulate new under takings, f or example ,
in the crucial are a of expanding pr ivate emp loyment o f t he
h ard- core unemployed, giving empha s i s to effect i ve training
approaches , recr u itme nt prac tices and facilitating assimilation of new employees into r egular wor k f or ce s. It is
working copperative l y with s uch ma jor new e ffor ts as t he $1
billion i nvestme nt a llocation of t h e i n s ur a nce i ndustry for
center city develo pment.
The Urban Coalition ' s posture is that of a catalytic agent
stimulating public d iscussion, communicating the need for
national and local action, and supporting appropriate ongoing efforts. It is unlikely that it will, itself, initiate
and administer programs, on a continuing basis as this would
tend to detract from the central and critical catalytic role.
Given the multitude of existing national and local, public
and private organizations capable of program implementation,
that role, in most instances, is best left to them.
�( 13)
2.
Stimulat ing interest i n s ucc e ss f ul exa:::nples of
action.
Through its task forces . The Urban Coalition is
attempting identify, work with, and publicize
successful efforts to expand employment, extend lower income
housing and equal housing opportuniti es , new educational
programs and the like. The task forces hope to serve as
catalysts and conveners. They will further serve a clearinghouse function with respect to news of local action.
3.
Coor dinating a national legislative c a mpaign. The
Ur ban Coalition has called upon Congr ess for action
acr oss a broad front to meet the urban crisis.
Interpreting and emphasizing the need for national action is
as much a local obligation as it is a commitment of the
National Steering Committee. Discussions with members o f
Congress is as much a hometown affair as are appearances
befor e Congressional committees.
4.
Workinq with the mass media. Through its Task Force
o n Communicatio ns and Public Support and t hrough
counterpart committees at the local leve l , it i s
hoped that the mass media can be encouraged to focus greater
attention on the needs of cities. Br oad public understanding
of the need for greater ·resources , of the complex i t ies of the
problems involved and the need for u r gent act ion are e s sential . if the goals of The Ur b a n Coali tion are t o b e
achieved.
(Reprint Statement of Principles ,
Goa l s and Commitments)
�'
'
·~
Q
NATIONAL URBAN COALITION
ATLANTA URBAN COALITION
Local
Government
Business
E TF .I'<
on• Public
Service Employment
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, , ... .:,
1.
Polic
pr ctice
2.
Un mployment and
Under mployment
- Labor
Civ il
Rights
~ TF on Private
Employment
Education
ETF on
Educational
Disparities
4 . lnad q
te Edu.c tion
Religious
ETF on
Reconstruction
Investment &
Urban Development
Citizen
Participation
ETF on
Equal
Housing
Opportunit)
7 . Di .r e
ctful
bite attitud s
Civic
.t.TF on
Communi cations
10. In dequ cy 0£
municip
1'vices
5 . Poor r ere tio · f ciliti s
nd progr
8.
11.
ol jus tic
3. lna.d quat Housin
6. lneff
d
C
ETF on
Local
Coalition s
9. In d q cy of
£ der pro r ma


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�- ~ - - - -- - - -- - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
February 13, 1969
MEMORANDUM
To: Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
From: Dan Sweat
Subject: Urban Coalition
ln d termining wh ther
not a formal "Urban Co:hlition" should be
stablished in Atlanta, I fe 1 the following points should be cons idered :
1.
2.
oi-
The National Urban Coalition will apparently be a key communications
link to the Nixon Administration. Wh r as in the pa t, the h vlly
Democratic dominated National League of Citi s and U. S. Conf r nee
. o1 Mayors hav enjoyed k y position in national administration
affairs , they might not h v quite th mu cle with the Republicans.
John Gardner do .s h v •
It i
funnel
bundantly cl ar that the Nixon A dministration intends to
many \irba.n progr - ms as possible through th prlvat ,
business
ctor. Thi will l"equir sol'Ile o:rt of coordination
mong business nd government at the loc: l lev 1 and m · tro level.
3.
Th r probably Ul b a greater n d and d mand for n identifi bl
loc:al coalition ft t you 1 ve th offie oi Mayor. Th next Mayo't
c - i,t inly won't b th le d r of th "pow l' tructur " nd prob bly
not ev -n . m mb r of lt.
4.
lf a 1"• 1 coalition ls foirmed, it mu t be done by the " pow r struetul°'
and upport d by th v · ty top leadership.
5.
nlngful coalition should att mpt to et metro r p~. -nt tlon.
U it ta to s t the J'ul a for th city in th £utur it mu t b
· a.r d t
lnflu nee a.nn~ tlon, dlsp rs d hou in , pl nnin fot industry,
A tn
tr n po~tatlon.
te.
11
�Mayor Allen
Page Two
February 13, 1969
II
6.
Someon~ should look into the Winston ..Salem Urban C oalition. They
have already raised $1. 7 million for coalition activities, plus some
$2 . 5 million for a Housing Development Corporation. I understand
they met the other day and raised $120,000 for summer programs.
If we had just a fraction of that kind of money to 11 sell I projects, we
could multiply it many £old .
7.
I envision an Urban Coalition whose membership would consist of
ev-ery organization wlehing to identify with it and which would get
together as a whole at one big annual dinner . A small executive
committee of power st!l:'ueture "statesmen" would set the policies
and priorities between annual meetings and communicate to the
community thi-ough a small high powered stafi.
DS :fy
�(Draft)
June 6, 1968
Revised June 12, 1968
MEMORANDUM.
TO:
1J
Local Coalitions
THE NATIONAL COALITION PROGRAM OF TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE
Responding to the Emergency · convocation of August 1967
and to the critical urban crisis of our nation, iany
cities have formed local coalitions and many are or soon
will be in the organizational phase.
These local coalitions
are becoming a vital forum for communication among different
elements in the community.
C
They are a mechanism for assess-
ing community problems, establishing priorities, coordinating
efforts and initiating new programs.
They are also extremely
potent vehicles for members of coalitions to individually and
collectively speak out on national issues and to support,
propose, or oppose legislation affecting urban problems and the
resources needed for their solution.
The National Urban Coalition, in an effort to maximize the
aims and objectives of local coalitions, will make available
through its sEaff a broad technical assistance program at the
request of the local coalition.
This program is developed
within the limits of resources presently available to the
national Coalition to meet needs of local coalitions.
be e xpanded and/or modifi ~d as those needs change.
It will
�- 2 -
The National Urban Coalition's technical assistance program will range from assisting communities to organize
and launch local coalitions to concentrated assistance
for specific programs.
To accomplish this assistance
program, the national coalition has divided its staff
t .,,_,--r.cJ 1 _
into four board units; the Local Coalition Division, the
Program Development Division, the Communications Division
and the separate Action Council Division.
(1)
The Local Coalition Division is the operational staff
of the national Coalition.
Its primary task is to explain
the urban coalition concept and assist communities in organizing local coalitions.
c:
It will also render general
technical assistance on coalition programs and relate national
issues to local coalition objectives .
(~)
The Program Developme nt Division is the program
specialist staff of the national Coalition ,
Its primary
task is to provide expert assistance in specific program
areas by its staff me mbers and through its consultant
resourc es.
It will also be the major channel for the
assembly and dissemination of technical program information
relative to local coalition activities.
(3)
The Communication s Bivision
(to be filled in by Brian Duff)
,,
�- 3 -
(4)
The Urban Coalition Action Council is a separate unit
of the national Coalition.
The primary functions of its
staff will be to promote social improvements in ' the nation's
urban centers through its study of proposed legislation and
its mobilization of community leaders across the country to
support, propose and oppose legislation affecting urban
problems and the resources for their solution.
Local coalitions will address requests for all forms of
technical assistance to the Local Coalition Division.
As
the operational staff of the national Coalition, these staff
members are assigned to each of the local coalitions throughout
the country.
They will either respond directly to the request
or, if it requires extremely technical problems, refer it to
the appropriate specialized division.
Council staff will deal directly
The Urban Coalition Action
with coalitions and coalition
members.
The national Coalition will provide the following forms of
technical assistance upon request:
1.
Provide assistance to new communities in identifying
and bringing together local leaders who might
in the formation of a coalition.
2.
(local)
Provide assistance to new communities in explaining
the philosophy and
(
be interested
objectives of The Urban Coalition and
in the formation and reprepentative character of organizing
and permanent steering committees.
.,;.
\
,,
(local)
�-
3.
4 -
·provide speaker resources through the national +LdcC\ \
~
Steering Committee~to assist in the launching of
the local coalition.
4.
(communications~ loc.tJ)
Provide assistance to existing coalitions on
improving the
representative character of its
steering committee and guidance on the composition,
purpose and functioning of its task forces.
5.
(local)
Provide assistance to coalition on how they organize
neighborhood groups for community leadership in coalition
planning and policy making and for community generated
social action projects which require no funds.
(local,
program development)
C
6.
Provide guidance on dealing with the diverse elements
of the black community.
7.
(local, program development)
Provide assistance to lucal coalition staffing, funding,
administration and program management problems.
(local,
progr~m development)
8.
Provide liaison for local coalitions with Federal agencies
on clarification and modification of policy and for their con-
sideration of__meri torious applications for grants.
(local,
program development)
9.
Provide information on sou rces of local, state, federal
-,
and founda tion funds to employ staff and to i mpr ove existing
programs or start new oned to meet community priorities.
~
I
(?)
�- 5 -
10.
Provide representation before various national private
organizations conducting programs locally to insure that
their local counterpart organization cooperat~ with the
coalition in its effort to coordinate all programs.
11.
Provide assistance ~o help local coalitions analyze
community problems, inventory existing programs aimed at
the solution of those probl~ms and identify gaps or
duplication of effort.
12.
(program development)
Provide a periodic newsletter to include relevant
national or local surveys and studies on urban problems,
information on new program concepts, Federal program
guides, new national Coalition statements and policy,
visual materials developed by local coalitions related
to coalition goals.
13.
(communications, program development)
Provide a periodic program memo to include intensive
case studies of successful programs of local coalitions.
(program development)
14.
Provide assistance on a range of specialized programs
(ghetto entre prene urship, youth mobilization, manpower,
housing, education, communications, etc.
15.
(program development)
Provide advice to local coal i tions on mechanisms by
which th ey may coordinate e x isting and new community p r ograms .
(local , p r ogram d e v e lopme nt)
'\
�-
16.
6 -
Provi~e assistance in the writing of applications
for state, federal and fo~ndation funds.
(program
~
development)
17.
Provide assistance in developing projects and
materials on attitudinal change and methods on
increasing communication between the black and white
community.
18.
(communications, program development)
Provide advise on the programmatic implementation
of the Kerner Commission Report by local coalitions.
(communications, program development)
19.
Provide information and guidance to aid local
coalitions in interpreting local, state and national
legislative issues and relating them to the coalitions
goals and priorities.
20.
(Action Council)
Provide periodic legislative reports on the
status of pending national legislation of interest to
coalitions and to outline significant features of newly
passed legislation concerning urban problems.
Council)

(Action
�..
. _.,. . ·-,
.
·
-,·
CITY HALL
ATLAI'<"TA, GA. 30303
el. 522-4463 Area Code 404
January 8, 19 68
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR ., Director of Governmental liaison
MEMORANDUM
To:
Members of Atlanta Urban Coalition
From:
Dan Sweat
Attached is a copy of a preliminary program for the New York
meeting next Friday on Mobilizing Urban Coalitions. Some of
you might be interested in attending this meeting and this is for
your information.
I would also lik e to call your attention to the January issue of
FOR TUNE Magazine. This is a special issue on business and
the urban crisis.
It contains several in-depth a:rticles relating to the problems
of the cities and discusses briefly the Urban Co alition. It is
the typ e publication that you would want to keep on your desk for
reference and illustration when discussing urban problems and
the business responsibility and involvement in particular.
DS:fy
Enclosure
�"
·MOBILIZING URBAN C.OALIT/ONS
January 12, 1968
New York University
Loeb Student Center
New York, New York
8:30 am
Registration: New York University
Loeb Student Center
9:30 am
Opening General Session:
Eisner and Lubin Auditorium
Presiding: Andrew Heiskell
Co-Chairman, The Urban Coalition
Welcome: Dr. Allan M. Cartter
Chancellor, New York University
Remarks: The Most Rev. John J. Maguire
Administrator, Archdiocese of
New York
Address:
Jarnes F. Oates, Jr.
Chairman of the Board - Chief
Executive Offic er Equitable Life
Assura nce Society of the
United States
10:30 am
Mobilization Workshops
All workshops will deal with the same
series of topics.
The morning workshops will deal with
methods of organizing local coalitions.
12:15 pm
Luncheon Session:
Eisn er and Lubin Auditorium
Presiding : A. Philip Randolph
Co-ch airman, The Urban Coalition
Remarks: Dr. Joseph P. Sternstein
Rabbi of Temple Ansche Ch esed
Memb er, Executive Committee,
New York Board of Rabbis
Remarks: Ch ristian A. Herter, Jr.
Chairm an, New Yo rk Co alitio n
Address :
Hono rable Jo hn V. Lindsay
Mayor of the City of New York
2:00 ..p m
Mobilization Workshops
The aftern oon worksh ops will deal wi th the
development of task forc e acti vi ty at the
community level in counterpart to the
national l evel task forces on specific
urban problems.
4: 15 pm
Concluding General Session:
Eis en and Lubin Auditorium
Presiding : Ron M. Linton
National Coordina tor,
Th e Urban Coalition
Remarks: Dr. Edler G. Hawkins
St. Augustine Presbyterian Church
New York City, New York
Former Moderator, General
Assembly, The United Presbyterian
Church U.S.A .
Address:
Whitney M. Young, Jr.
Executive Director
National Urban League
11
�.
. - .........-
-__,__._.,_ .
CITY HALL
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
January 8, 1968
.\\
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governm ental Li aiso n
MEMORANDUM
To:
Members of Atlanta Urban Coalition
From:
Dan Sweat
Attached is a copy of a preliminary program for the New York
meeting next Friday on Mobilizing Urban Coalitions. Some of
you might be interested in attending this meeting and this is for
your information.
I would also like to call your attention to the January issue of
FOR TUNE Magazine. This is a special issue on business and
the urban cr:sis.
It contains several in-depth articles relating to the proble-ms
of the cities and discusses briefly the Urban Coalition. It is
the type publication that you would want to keep on your desk for
reference and illustration when discus sing urban problems and
the business responsibility and involvement in particular.
DS:fy
Enclosure
,,
�•
t
'
~
·
\
\
MOBILIZING URBAN COALITIONS
January 12, 1968
New York University
Loeb Student Center
New York, New York
8:30 am
Registration: New York University
Loeb Student Center
9:30 am
Opening General Session:
Eisner and Lubin Auditorium
Presiding: Andrew Heiskell
Co-Chairman, The Urban Coalition
Welcome: Dr. Allan M. Cartter
Chancellor, New York University
Remarks:
The Most Rev. John J. Maguire
Administrator, Archdiocese of
New York
Address:
James F. Oates, Jr.
Chairman of the Board - Chief
Executive Officer Equitable Life
Assurance Society of the
United States
~-
10:30 am
Mobilization Workshops ·
All workshops will deal with the same
series of topics.
The morning workshops will deaf with
methods of organizing local coalitions.
12:15 pm
Luncheon Session:
Eisner and Lubin Auditorium
Presiding: A. Philip Randolph
Co-chairman, The Urban Coalition
Remarks: Dr. Jos eph P. Sternstein
Rabbi of Temple Ansche Chesed
Member, Executive Committee,
New York Board of Rabbis
Remarks: Christian A. Herter, Jr.
Ch airman, New York Coalition
Address:
2:00 ..pm
Honorable John V. Lindsay
Mayor of the ·city of New York
Mobilization Workshops
The afternoon workshops will deal with the
development of task force activity at the
community level in counterpart to the
national level task forces on specific
urban probl ems.
4: 15 pm
Concluding General Session:
Eisen and Lubin Auditorium
Presiding: Ron M. Linton
National Coordina tor,
The Urban Coalition
Remarks: Dr. Edler G. Hawkins
St. Augustine Presbyterian Church
New York City, New York
I\
Former Moderator, General
Assembly, Th e United Presbyterian
Church U.S.A.
Address:
Whi tney M. Young, Jr.
Executive Director
National Urban League
II
(?
.
�_.. ._ =!
.I
-
CITY HALL
ATLANTA. GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
January 8, 1968
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison
MEMORANDUM
To:
M e mbers of Atlanta Urban Coalition
From:
Dan Sweat
Attache d is a copy of a preliminary program for the New York
meeting next Friday on Mobilizing Urban Coalitions. Some of
you might be interested in attending this meeting and this is for
your information.
I would a lso like to call your a tte ntion to the January issue of
FORTUNE M a g az ine . Thi s is a s p e cia l i s sue on busine s s a nd
the urban crisis.
It contains s eve r a l in-de pth articles relating to the problems
of the citie s a nd dis c u s s e s brie fly t he Urban Coa lition. It is
the typ e publica tion tha t you w o uld wan t to kee p on your d es k for
r e f e r ence and illus t rat i on w h e n d i s cuss ing urb a n p robl ems an d
the busine ss responsibility and involveme nt in particula r.
DS:fy
Enclosur e
�:
MOBILIZING URBAN COALITIONS
1
January 12, 1968
New York University
Loeb Student Center
New York, New York
8:30 am
/Registration: New York University
Loeb Student Center
9:30 am
Opening General Session:
Eisner and Lubin Auditorium
Presiding: Andrew Heiskell
Co-Chairman, The Urban Coalition
WeUcome: Dr. Allan M. Cartter
Chancellor, New York University
Remarks:
The Most Rev. John J. Maguire
Administrator, Archdiocese of
N ew York
Addr,ess:
James F. Oates, Jr.
Chairman of the Board - Chief
Executive Officer Equitabl e Life
Assurance Society of the
United States
~-
10:30 am
nobilizafion
Workshops .
/Ml workshops will deal with the same
series of topics.
The morning workshops will deal with
methods of organizing local coalitions.
12:15 pm
Luncheon Session:
Eisner and Lubin Auditorium
Presiding: A. Philip Randolph
Co-ch airman, The Urban Coalition
Remarks: Dr. J oseph P. Sternstein
Rabbi of Temple Ansche Chese<;l
Member, Executive Committee,
New York Board of Rabbis
Remarks: Christian A. Herter, Jr.
Chairman, New York Coalition
Address:
Honorable John V. Lindsay
Mayor of the City of New York
2:00 ..pm
Mobilization Works hops
The afternoon wo rkshops will de al with the
development of task forc e activity at the
community level in counterp art to the
national level task forc es on specific
urban problems.
4:1 5 p m
Concluding Gene ral Sessio n:
Eisen and Lubin Auditorium
Presidi ng : Ron M. Linton
National Coordi nator,
The Urban Coalition
Remarks: Dr. Edler G. Hawkins
St. Augustine Presbyteri an Church
Now York City, New York
Former Moderator, General
Assembly, The United Presbyterian
Church U.S.A.
Address:
Whitney M. Young, Jr.
Executive Director
National Ur/Jan League
�The Urban Coalition
I
Federal Bar Buildi ng West/ 1819 H Street, N. W. Wa shington. D. C. / 20006
Steering Committee Co-chairmen: Andrew Heiskell/ A. Philip Randolph
MEMORANDUM
\\
TO:
Members of the Steering Committee
FROM:
John Feild
SUBJECT:
San Francisco Meeting on Local Coalitions
DATE:
November 16, 1967
&
&
Working Committee
Ron Linton, National Coordinators
Attached is a list of major cities west of the Mississippi
from which we hope to have delegations at the Western
Regional meeting on local coalitions. If you have any
personal contacts or know of any interested persons in
these cities we hope you will call this meeting to their
attention. The Planning Conference on Forming Local
Coalitions will be held on November 30th at the Hilton
Hotel in San Francisco.
Please have any persons you contact inform our office by
Wednesday November 22nd if they plan to attend so that we
may make the necessary arrangements.
Thank you.
attachments:
List of Western Cities
Letter of Invitation
N ational Coordinators : Jehn Feild/ Ron M. Linton
Tel ephone 293 -1530
�LARGER U.S. CITIES - WEST OF THE MISSISSI PPI
A.LASKA
COLORADO
MINNESOTA
NORTH DAKOTA
Anchorage
Fairbanks
Colorado Springs
Pueblo
Duluth
St. Paul
Fargo
Grand Forks
Bismarck
ARIZONA
HAWAII
MISSOURI
OKLAHOMA
Phoenix
Mesa
Scottsdale
Honolulu
Kansas City
Lawton
University City Oklahoma City
Independence
Tulsa
Springfield
St. Jose ph
\I
IDAHO
ARI<ANSAS
Fort Smith
Pine Bluff
Boise City
Idaho Falls
Pocatello
Billings
Great Falls
CA_LIFORNIA
Compton
Oakland
Pasadena
Richmond
Rive r s i de
San Bernardino
San Diego
San Francisco
Burbank
Santa Ana
Santa Monica
Torrance
Anaheim
Berkeley
East Los Angeles
Fresno
Glendale
Long Beach
Los Angeles
Sacramento
San Jose
MONTANA
Des Moines
Cedar Rapids
Council Bluffs
Davenport
Dubuque
Sioux City
Waterloo
KANSAS
Wichita
Kansas City
Topeka
LOUISIANA
Baton Rouge
New Orleans
Shreveport
NEBRASKA
Lincoln
Omaha
NEVADA
Las Vegas
Reno
NEW MEXICO
Albuquerque
Roswell
Santa Fe
Ogden
Salt Lake City
Eugene
Por tland
SOUTH DAKOTA
Rapid City
Sioux Falls
TEXAS
Amari llo
Austin
Beaumont
Corpus Christi
Dallas
El Paso
Fort Worth
Houston
Lubbock
San Antonio
Waco
Wichita Falls
WYOMING
Casper
WASHINGTON
Spokane
Seattle
Tacoma
Cheyenne
�The urban Coalition I
Federal Bar Building West/ 1819 H Street, N. W. Washington, D. C. / 20006
Steering Committee Co-chairmen : Andrew Heiskell/ A. Philip Randolph
November 15, 1967
\\
Dear Friend:
You are cordially invited to attend a one-day planning
conference on mobilization of local coalitions to be
held in San Francisco at the Hilton Hotel on November
30, 1967.
This is the second of a series of three regional conferences the Coalition is holding in response to requests from
local community leadership across the country for assistance
in organizing and programming local action counterparts to
the national Urban Coalition. Leadership delegations from
cities throughout the western part of the United States
are expected to attend and participate in this meeting.
While the major portion of the meeting will be devoted to
workshop sessions dealing with the organization and programming of local coalition efforts, we will have brief
addresses from Mr. Bayard Rustin, Executive Director of
the A. Philip Randolph Institute, Mr. Kenneth Wright, Vice
President-Chief Economist of the Life Insurance Association
of America, who is directing the insurance industry's $1
billion urban program, the Honorable Jesse P. Unruh, Speaker
of the California Assembly, the Most Reverend Joseph McGucken,
Archbishop of San Francisco, and a representative of the New
Detroit Committee, that city's urban coalition. Mayors
John Shelley (San Francisco), Frank Curran (San Diego) and
Floyd Hyde (Fresno) are co-hosts for the session . On hand
to assist in the workshop sessions wi ll be a number of
s k illed resource persons . The one - day conference will commence at 9 : 30 a . m. and the formal proceedings will be
adjou r ned no later than 5 : 00 p . m. The National Confe r ence
of Stat e Legi s lativ e Leaders wi ll join us i n spon sor ing a
recept i o n for those attending wh i ch wil l b e held at the St .
Franc i s Hote l and will beg in a t 5 :3 0 p . m.
National Coordinators. John Feild/ Ron M . Linton
Telephone 293-1530
�\\
We would appreciate your notifying this office no later
than November 22, 1967 if you will be able to join us
in San Francisco. A reply card is enclosed for hotel
accomodations for the evening of November 29th (if you
desire other dates, please indicate). We can arrange
accomodations for you at a flat rate of $19.00 for a
single room and $24 for a double room.
We expect to forward further details on the program in
the near future.
Cordially,
Andrew Heiskell
Co-Chairman
Randolph
Co-Chairman
�The urban Coalition
I
Federal Bar Building West/ 1819 H Street, N.
w.
Washington , D. C. / 20006
Steering Committee Co-chairmen : Andrew Heiskell / A. Philip Randolph
November 15, 1967
\\
Dear Friend:
You are cordially invited to attend a one-day planning
conference on mobilization of local coalitions to be
held in San Francisco at the Hilton Hotel on November
30, 1967.
This is the second of a series of three regional conferences the Coalition is holding in response to requests from
local community leadership across the country for assistance
in organizing and programming local action counterparts to
the national Urban Coalition. Leadership delegations from
cities throughout the western part of the United States
are expected to attend and participate in this meeting.
While the major portion of the meeting will be devoted to
workshop sessions dealing with the organization and programming of local coalition efforts, we will have brief
addresses from Mr . Bayard Rustin, Executive Director of
the A. Philip Randolph Institute, Mr. Kenneth Wright, Vice
. President-Chief Economist of the Life Insurance Association
of America, who is directing t he insurance industry's $1
billion urban program, the Honorable Jesse P . Unruh, Speaker
of the California Assembly, the Most Reverend Joseph McGucken,
Archbishop of San Francisco, and a representative of the New
Detroit Committee , that city's urban coalition. Mayors
John Shelley (San Francisco), Frank Curran (San Diego) and
Floy d Hyde (Fresno) are co-hosts for the session .
On hand
to assist in the wo r kshop session s will be a number of
s k illed r esource per sons . Th e one- day con f erence will commen ce at 9 : 30 a . m. and the formal proceedings will be
adjou r ned no l a ter t han 5 : 00 p . m. The National Conference
of St a t e Le g i slativ e Leade rs wi ll j oin us in sponsor ing a
r eception fo r tho s e attending whi ch wil l be held at the St .
Francis Ho te l and will b egin at 5 : 30 p.m.
Nation al Coordinator s : John Feild/ Ron M. Linton
Telephone 293-1530
�i
We would appreciate your notifying this office no later
than November 22, 1967 if you will be able to join us
in San Francisco. A reply card is enclosed for hotel
accomodations for the evening of November 29th (if you
desire other dates, please indicate). We can arrange
accomodations for you at a flat rate of $19.00 for a
single room and $24 for a double room.
We e x p e ct to forward further details on the program in
the near future.
Cordially,
Andrew Heiskell
Co-Chairman
Randolph
Co-Chairman
�The Urban Coalition
I
Federal Bar Building West/ 1819 H Street, N. W. Washington, D. C. / 20006
Steering Committee Co-chairmen: Andrew Heiskell/ A. Philip Randolph
MEMORANDUM
\\
TO:
Members of the Steering Committee
FROM:
John Feild
SUBJECT:
San Francisco Meeting on Local Coalitions
DATE:
November 16, 1967
&
&
Working Committee
Ron Linton, National Coordinators
Attached is a list of major cities west of the Mississippi
from which we hope to have delegations at the Western
Regional meeting on local coalitions. If you have any
personal contacts or know of any interested persons in
these cities we hope you will call this meeting to their
attention. The Planning Conference on Forming Local
Coalitions will be held on November 30th at the Hilton
Hotel in San Francisco.
Please have any persons you contact inform our office by
Wednesday November 22nd if they plan to attend so that we
may make the necessary arrangements.
Thank you.
attachments:
List of Western Cities
Letter of Invitation
National Coordinators : John Feild / Ron M. Linton
Telephone 293-1530
�IJ\_RGER U.S. CITIES - WEST OF THE MISSISSIPPI
ALASKA
COLORADO
MINNESOTA
NORTH DAKOTA
Anchorage
Fairbanks
Colorado Springs
Pueblo
Dulut h
St. Paul
Fargo
Grand Forks
Bismarck
ARIZONA
HAWAII
MISSOURI
OKLAHOMA
Phoenix
Mesa
Scottsdale
Honolulu
Kansas City
Lawton
University City Oklahoma City
Independence
Tulsa
Springfield
St. Joseph
\I
IDAHO
ARI<ANSAS
Fort Smit h
Pine Bluff
Boise City
Idaho Falls
Pocatello
CALIFORNIA
I OWA
Compton
Oakland
Pasadena
Richmond
Riverside
San· Bernardino
San Diego
San Francisco
Burbank
Santa Ana
Santa Monica
Torrance
Anaheim
Berkeley
East Los Angeles
Fresno
Glendale
Long Beach
Los Angeles
Sacramento
San Jose
Des Moines
Cedar Rapids
Council Blu ff s
Davenport
Dubuque
Sioux City
Waterloo
KANSAS
Wichita
Kansas City
Topeka
LOUISIANA
Baton Rouge
New Orleans
Shreveport
MONTANA.
Billings
Great Falls
NEBHASKA
Lincoln
Omaha
NEVADA
Las Vegas
Reno
NEW MEXICO
Albuquerque
Roswell
Santa Fe
Ogden
Salt Lake City
Eugene
Portland
SOUTH DAKOTA
Rapid City
Sioux Falls
TEXAS
Amarillo
Austin
Beaumont
Corpus Christi
Dallas
El Paso
Fort Worth
Houston
Lubbock
San Antonio
Waco
Wichita Falls
WYOMING
Casper
WASHINGTON
Spoka ne
Seattle
Tacoma
Cheyenne
�C
C
A
A
Cha irman of the Board of Directors
Vice Chairman
RHODES L . PER DUE . Secretary
CALLOWAY . Associate Secretary
PADGETT . Treasurer
JAMES P. FURNISS ,
ommunity
ouncil of' the
tlanta
rea inc.
CEC I L ALEXANDER .
MRS.
w.
L.
A . B.
DUANE W . BECK .
ONE THOUSAND GLENN BUILDING, 120 MARIETTA ST. , N. W .
Executive Direc/Vr
ATLANTA , GEORGIA
30303
TELEPHONE 577-2250
November 28, 1967
Mr. Dan Sweat
Mayor's Office
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
30303
Dear Dan:
I appreciate so much your coming to our staff meeting on Monday
to make the presentation about the Urban Coalition project.
I plan to talk with Duane about your suggestion that the Council
Board go on record as endorsing this program and that they request
that the Council be a participating organization.
There certainly
should be a place in Urban Coalition for health and welfare planning and social service agencies.
Thanks again for a good presentation!
Kindest regards.
Cordially,
(Mrs . ) Inez B. Tillison
Associate Director
IBT:re
�BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Cecil Alexander
Luther Alverson
Edward H. Baxter
Tully T . Blalock, M D
Joseph C. Bronsby
Mrs. W1ll1om R. Bridges
Napier Burson, Jr, M
W. L. Calloway
Campbell Dosher
D
Cleveland Dennard
Herbert J. Dickson
Jomes P. Furniss
Mrs. Thomas H. Gibson
Elliott Goldstein
George E. Goodwin
J Winston Huff
Joseph W. Jones
Vernon E. Jordon
Albert Love
Mrs. Louis Montag
T. F. Morrow
A. B. Padgett
Mrs. Rhodes L. Perdue
William I. Roy
Al B. Richardson
E L. Simon
Jomes M. Sibley
Hughes Spold :ng, Jr.
Fred R. Stair, Jr, D. D.
A. H. Sterne
Don E. Sweat Jr
Morton L. Weis~
John C Wilson
Asa G Yancey, M. D.
Clayton R. Yates
ADVISORY BOARD
Jomes H Aldredge, Sr
J. G. Bradbury
J. V Carmichael
R. Howard Dobbs, Jr
Edwin I. Hatch
Bo1sfeudlet Jones
Mills B. Lone, Jr
Lucien E. Oliver
W A. Porker, Sr.
W A. Pulver
Richard H. Rich
Jomes D. Robinson, Jr .
John A. Sibley
Corl N. Singer
Lee Tolley
Elbert P. Tuttle
Preston Upshaw
William C. Wordlow, Jr.
George W. Woodruff
�AMERICAN TEAM W ORK WOR K S
National Urban League, Inc .
Southern Regional Office
136 MARIETTA STREET, N.W., ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 • AREA CODE 404 - 688-8778
CLARENCE
D.
COLEMAN,
Director
President
LINDSLEY
F. KIMBALL
S enior Vice-President
RA M ON S . SCRUGGS
Vice-Presidents
December
Seventh
1 9 6 7
JOHN H. JOHNSON
L OUIS E . M ARTIN
M ARTIN E . SEGAL
S ecretary
ERSA H . POSTON
Treasurer
IVAN C. McLEOD
Assistant Treasurer
MEMORANDUM
LESLIE N . S HAW
Executive Director
TO:
Mr. Dan E. Sweat, Jr.
Director of Governmental Liaison
Hon orary Trustees
FROM:
Clarence D. Coleman
W ILLIAM H . BALDWIN
ROBERT W . DOWLING
LLOYD K. G ARRISON
THEODORE W . KHEEL
HENRY S TEEGER
RE:
CHANGE OF MAILING ADDRESS
W HITNEY M . YOUNG, JR.
D eputy Executive Director
M AHLON T. PURYEAR
Board o f Trustees
Morris B. Abram
Mrs. Max Ascoli
Joseph M. Baird
Vivian J. Beamon
M rs. Haley Bell
Eugene H. Buder
Chester Burger
Kenneth W. O ement
Milton K. Cum mings
Wendell G. Freeland
A. G. Gaston, Sr.
John S. Hayes
Merritt D. Hill
Martin D. Jenkins
John H. Johnson
Lindsley F. Kimball
Mrs. Arthur B. Krim
Robert Lazarus, Jr.
John G. Lewis, Jr.
Inabel B. Lindsay
James A. Linen
Henry A. Loeb
Louis E. Martin
Mrs. 0 . Clay Maxwell, Sr.
Ivan C. McLeod
Mrs. Leo M. Mervis
G. William Miller
Joseph J. Morrow
Edward C. Myers
James F . Oates, Jr.
Everett P. O'Neal
Frederick O'Neal
Henry G. Parks, Jr.
The Most Reverend
Harold R. Perry, S. V. D .
Ersa H. Poston
Samuel D. Proctor
Hobson R. Reynolds
Henry J. Richardson, Jr.
Ramon S. Scruggs
Martin E. Segal
Leslie N. Shaw
Louis Simon
Mrs. Arthur Ochs Sulzberger
William J. Trent, ir.
Leonard Woodcock
Clayton R. Yates
Mrs. Bruce Zenke!
Dwight R. Zook
Please change my mailing address from my home to
my office as follows:
136 Marietta Street, N. W.
Suite 242
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
- :-
Affiliated with National Social Welfare Assembly, National Conference on Social Welfare
Contributions to the National Urban League are tax deductible
~231
�II
November 30, 1967
Mr . M . C . Gettinger
Executive Director
Atlanta Jewish Welfare Federation, Inc .
41 Exchange P lace , S . E .
Atlanta , Geol'gia 30303
Dear Mr . Gettinger :
Thank you for your letter explaining the organization of the
Atl anta Jewish Welfare Feder tion, Inc.
Attached is a copy of memo I have forwarded to m mbers of
the St ering Committee of the Atlanta Urban Coalition. I am
· ure th t th y will gree that the Fed ration would be the
appropriate representative of a.11 th Jewish org niz tions in
gr ater Atlanta.
I hop that you can lao attend the December 13 conference
on expanding employment opportunities .
Sine r ly your ,
D n Swe t
DS :fy
E nclo ur s
�C ITY HALL A'r.....ANTA, GA. 30303
November 30 , 1967
Tel. 522-4463 Arca Code 404
I
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative A,si stant
MRS. AtlN M. MOSES, :execu tive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Go·,crnmental Liaison
MEMORANDUM
To: Mem.bers of Urban Coalition Steering C ommittee
¼'-,
1· · (
I
From: Dan Sw~e-at"
"'-~' .../
.
Enclos e d is a letter of invitation and pro g ram con cerning the
December 13 meetin g of t he Task Force on P r i vate Employment
o f the National Urban C oalition.
I hope that all of you c an make your plans to att end thi s i mportant
confe renc e .
We might need to ask members of the St ee r i n g C ommittee to
actively participate in the wo rk shops as part .of panel discussions .
If this sho u ld be the case, I will notify you at the earliest possible
mo1nent .
I am a lso attaching a letter from Mr . M . C . G ettinger, E xe cutive
Director of the Atlanta J ewi sh Welfare Federation, Inc ., which
is a newly formed central agency involving the Atlanta J ewish
C ommunity Counc il, the J ewish Welfare Fund and the J ewish Social
Service Federation. As Mr . Gettinger 1 s l etter states , th e
F eder ation r e presents virtually all the adult J ewish organizations
in Atlanta and w ould be the most appropriate represe ntative of all
the Jewish organizations on the Urban Coalition Ste ering Committee .
Several organizations and many individuals have called n1y att ent ion
to the fact that the Jewish community is not repr e sented on t he
Ste e ring Committee and I feel that the Steering Committee should
giv e some thought to invitin g Mr . Abe Goldstein , Pr sid nt o f t h "'
Atlr t t J wis1
t h e St ei-h
DS .fy
w He1'
tt
F cl . ti
l
I
J.1
I
I
t s •
~
a
n1b
�ATLANTA
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
11
1300 COMMERCE BUILDING /
P . 0. BOX
1740
I ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30 30 1
November 28, 1967
Dear Mr. Employer:
The National Urban Coalition Task Force on Private Employment will hold a:
Regional Planiling Conference in Atlanta on Wednesday, December 13, to explore
the possibilities of expanding employment opportunities for the hard-core unemployed.
~
~ The Atlanta Chamber of Commerce and the City of Atlanta are cooperating with
the Urban Coalition: in this effort. Atlanta's key business executives are being invited
to participate because of the special significance of this conference for Atlanta business.
~ Mr. Gerald L. Phillippe, Chairman of the Board of General Electric Company
and also Chairman of the Task Force, will keynote the conference. He will discuss
programs instituted by private business to provide meaningful and productive jobs for
the hard-core unemployed.
~ Another part of the program will be a slide presentation on Atlanta's unemployment
problem and its relationship to private business. The presentation was prepared by
several Atlanta organizations as a means of stimulating discussion of approaches to our
dual problem of people who need jobs and unfilled jobs which need people.
~ The conference will be at the American Motor Hotel, 160 Spring Street, N. W.
Registration will begin at 8:30 a. m., "followed by a general session, workshops and a
luncheon, with adjournment at 3:30 p. m . There is no registration fee; price of the
luncheon is $4. 75 per person.
~ Please make your plans now to attend, and return the enclosed card to assure
your reser vati on.
Sincerely,
~-t ~ - ~-~~ President
Mayor
�The n ewl y formed central a gency merging the Atlanta Jewish Cor.imunity Council,
Jewish We/fore Fund an d 1he Jewish Social S ervice Federation
41 Exchange Place, S. E.
0
Atlanta, G e oigia 30303
\\
0
Phone 525-4825
ABE GOLDSTEIN
PRE S I DENT
M,
C.
Nov ember 29, 1 967
G;;:T T INGER
EXEC U TIVE DI RECTO R
Mr . Dan Sweat
Ci ty Hall
68 Mitche ll S t . , S . W.
Atlanta, Ga.
30303
Dear Mr . Sweat:
In a cco rdanc e with our telephone convers ati on of
last F ri day I wi sh to~ advise you that the Atlanta
Jewish We lfare Federation i s interested i n participating
in the work o f the Atlanta Urban Coali tion .
The Atlanta Jewish Welfare Federation represents
virtually all the adult Jewish organizations in greater
Atlanta . As the letterhead indicates this central
Jewish communal agenc y is the res u lt o f the rec ent
merger of the Atlanta Jewish Community Council, the
Welfare Fund and the Social Service Federation .
I am
enclosing a chart describing the structure and program
of the Federation.
Please do not hesit a te t o c all upon us if we can be
of any assistance to the work of the City of Atlanta.
Sincerely yours,
f
.

'-
.
M. C. Gettinger
Executi v e Director
Enclosure
MCG:rgf
�STRUC' 'URE
or
ATLAl iTf\. JEWISH WELFJ\RE FEDERATION '
'C .
f.
,
.Eiv1i3ERSH IP
ORGANIZATION J\1Ef'1BERS
Jewi s h organiz .tion s
wi th minimum embe r ship of so.
INDIVIDUAL MEMBERS
All adul t
contribute s t o
Annual Campaign.
CONSTITlG:.'\T
Co posed o _
benefici a y
a g e ncies .
I
DELEGATE ASS MBLY
Composed of rep r esentati ves o f aff i liated or ganizations and
representat ives-at-large; acts largely as a forum body.
-
48 MEMBERS
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Adm iniste 0 and conducts t h e affairs of t e
Central Communal Agency.
I OFFICERS I
·==---r
I EXECUTIVE CQviM I TTEE ~- -
I S TANDING
COMl'vllTTEES
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
!
I
I-
DEPARTMENTS
A Vice-President and a Vice-Chairman responsible
for eac h Department.
I
I.
CAMPAIGNING AND ALLOCATIONS
Plans and conduc ts Annual Campaign; collects and disburses funds;
clearing house for fund-raising efforts directed at Jewish commun it:Y--,
IIo
CCMMUNITY RELATIONS AND INTERNAL JEWISH AFFAIRS
Combats discrimination and promotes idC!:).lS of democracy ; promotes
general welfare of the Jewish Communityi conducts Community Calendar
I
III. SOCIAL SERVI CE
Conducts Jewish Family and Childrenv s Bureau agency, Ben Massell
Dental Clinic and any social welfare programs assigned to it.
I
I
IV .
CCtvJMUNITY SERVICES Al\TD PLANNING
Coordinates and promotes Liter-agency cooperation; responsibl12 £or
community-wide planning, fact-finding and social research in
following areas:
I GROUP SERVICES I
I
(Jewish
Community
Center
AGED CARE
-( Synag ogue
Youth Groups
Institutional
Care
(Jewish
Home
II
I
I
JEWISH EDUCATION
!
(Youth
Serving
Orgs.
I
Servi~0s
in Community
(J.F.& C9B.)
(J.C.Center)
(Housing an
other
ser vices
I
Bur.of
J <Ed.
I
(Co~ j
unit
Schools
(Study Groups
of Orgs.)
7/27/67,
�The Urban Coali ion
I
Federal Bar Building West/ 1819 /-I Stree t, N. w. Washingion, D. C. / 20006 ·
Steering Committee Co -chairmen: Andrew Heisk ell / A. Philip Randolph
November 24 , 1967
\\
NATIONAL COORDINATORS WEEKLY RE PORT
LOCAL COALITIONS
The third in a series o f reg ional co fe r ences to assist l ocal
communities in f o rming their own Urban Coalitions will be held
in San Francisco on November 30 in the San Francisco Hilton.
Th e progr~~ f o rmat will be similar t o tho s e used for the
previous two success ful conferences in Chicago a nd Minneapolis,
with emphas is o n "how- t o-do-it" work s h o p s. The three general
sessions will feature remarks by San Francisco ayo r Shell~y
and Mayo r - Elect Alioto , The Most Reverend Joseph McGucken ,
Kenneth Wright, Vic e President and Chief Economist of th e Li fe
Insurance Association o f Americ a, California State Assemblyman
John T. Knox, Bishop Donald Harvey Tippett and Frances Barnes,
Vic e Pre sident of the Crown Zellerbach Cor poration and President
of the Management Coun c il f or Bay Area Emp loyment Opportunity .
A similar regional conference for eastern cities, orig inally
set for December 11 in New York City, has been postponed
because of scheduling problems to the second week of January .
Yo u will shortly be advised of the exact date .
PUBLIC SERVICE EMPLOYMENT AND URBAN LEGISLATION
More than 40 Washington representatives of organization s which
support the pro gram of the Urban Coalition attended a luncheon
meeting in the Stat ler Hilton Hotel on November 20.
Featured speaker Mayor John Lindsay of New York City stressed
the necessity of a united legislative effort to move bills
supported by the Coalition through Congress . Andrew Biemiller,
Legislative Director of AFL-CIO, cited a case history to
illustrate the positive value of business and la_bor representatives going together to call on Congressmen . Rabbi Richard G.
Hirsch of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations described
National Coordinators: John Feild/ Ron M. Li;ton
Telephone 293-1530
�.
• 2
the growing awareness o f c hur ch gro ups o f the need to be active
in publi c affairs .
PRIVATE EMPLOYMENT
\I
On No vember 21 the Task Fo r c e on Private Empl oyment met in
Detro it with the Empl o yment and Edu c ati o n Committee of the New
Detro it Comm i ttee . The meeting was c ha i red by William M. Day ,
president o f Michigan Bell Tel eph o ne Company .
In his remarks t o the gro up, Task For c e -Co -Chairman Ger ~ ld
Phillippe , Chairman of the Board of the General El e ctric Company ,
said "As a representative of the Task Forc e on Privat e Emp :i.oyment
I have been enco uraging businessmen to enter into a regular
program o f ex changing i deas on this sub j ect and pit ch i ng in on
useful programs t o get at s ome of these urgent needs.
All
se c t o rs o f the soc iety need to help ea ch o ther and we need t o
j oin t o gether i n useful programs to c reate new o pportunities
f o r self- realizat ion i n o ur City s l ums. "
" In some c ities it would sound strange, but there is a growing
fee.ling among businessmen of my acquaintance and among some of
our own General Electri c plant managers that a substan tial
measure o f our business success in the future is going to d epend
on our ability t o help a g o od number of these hard - core unemployables b~ c ome produ c tive workers and citizens . "
HOUSI NG, RECONSTRUCTION AND I NVESTMENT
The Task Force met in New York on No vember 21. Twelve additional
members have been recruited to work with this group.
A major
working paper is being developed t o guide this Task Force in
develop i ng a l o ng- range pro gram.
�CITY OF .ATLANTA.
CITY HALL
November 30, 1967
ATLANTA. GA. 30303
\\
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison
MEMORANDUM
To: Members of Urban Coalition Steering Committee
From: Dan ~
Enclosed is a letter of invitation and program concerning the
December 13 meeting of the Task Force on Private Employment
of the National Urban Coalition.
I hope that all of you can make your plans to attend this important
conference.
We might need to ask members of the Steering Committee to
actively participate in the workshops as part of panel discussions .
. If thi s should be the case, I will notify you at the earliest possible
moment.
I am also attaching a letter from _Mr. M. C. Gettinger, Executive
Director of the Atlanta Jewish Welfare Federation, Inc., which
is a newly formed central agency involving the Atlanta J ewish
Community Council, the Jewish W e lfare Fund and the J ewish Social
Service Federation. As Mr. Gettinger' s letter states, the
Federation represents virtually all the adult Jewish organizations
in Atlanta and would be the most appropriate representative of all
the J e wish organizations on the Urban Coalition Steering Committee .
S e v eral organi zations and many individuals h ave called my attention
to the fact that the Jewish community is not represented on the
Steering Committee and I feel that the Steering Committee should
give some thought to inviting Mr. Abe Goldstein, Preside nt of the
Atlanta J ewish W elfare F e deration, Inc. , to serve as a member of
the Ste e ring Committee .
DS:fy
�ATLANTA
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
1300 CO MMERCE BUILDING / P.O. BO X
1740 I ATLANTA, GEOR GIA 30301
November 28, 1967
Dear Mr. Employer:
The National Urban Coalition Task Force on Private-Employment will hold a:
Regional Planning Conference in Atlanta on Wednesday, December 13, to explore
the possibilities of expanding employment opportunities for the hard-core unemployed.
~
~ The Atlanta Chamber of Commerce and the City of Atlanta are cooperating with
the Urban Coalition in this effort. Atlanta's key business executives are being invited
to participate because of the special significance of this conference for Atlanta business.
~ Mr. Gerald L. Phillippe, Chairman of the Board of General Electric Company
and also Chairman of the Task Force, will keynote the conference. He will discuss
programs instituted by private business to provide meaningful and productive jobs for
the hard-core unemployed.
~ Another part of the program will be a slide presentation on Atlanta's unemployment
problem and its relationship to private business. The presentation was prepared by
several Atlanta organizations as a means of stimulating discussion of approaches to our
dual problem of people who need jobs and unfilled jobs which need people.
~ The conference will be at the American Motor Hotel, 160 Spring street, N. W.
Registration will begin at 8:30 a. m., 'followed by a general session, workshops and a
luncheon, with adjournment at 3 :30 p. m. There is no registration fee; pr ice of the
luncheon is $4. 75 . per person.
~
Please make your plans now to attend, and return the enclosed c ard to assure
your reservation.
Sincerely,
~--r~~·
President
~.~~·
Mayor
�..
...
Th e newly fo rmed ce ntral a ge ncy merging the Atlanta Jewish Comm unity Co uncil,
Jewish W el fare Fund a nd the Jewish Social S e rvice Federa tion
41 Exchan g e Pla ce , S . E.
0
Atlanta, Geo rg ia 3030 3
\\
Phone 525-48 25
ABE G OL DSTEIN
PRESIDENT
M.
C.
Novemb er 2 9, 1 967
GETTINGER
EXECUTI V E D I RE CT O R
Mr . Da n S weat
City Ha l l
68 Mi t c hel l S t . , S . W.
Atlant a, Ga .
30303
De ar Mr . Sive a t :
In a ccordance with our telephone c onversation o f
last F r iday I wish t o advise you that t h e At l anta
Jewish We lfare F eder a t i o n i s inte r es ted in par t icipat ing
in t h e wor k of the At lanta Urban Coal i t ion .
The Atlanta Jewish Welfare Federation represents
virtu a lly all the adult Jewish org an i zat ions in greater
Atlanta. As the l et t e rhead indicates this c entral
Jewi s h communa l agency i s the res ul t o f the rec ent
m,2 rger o f the Atlanta Jewish Commun i ty Council , the
We l fare Fund and the S o cial Service Federation .
I am
enclosing a chart des c ribing the structure and program
0 £ the Federation .
Please do no t hesitate t o cal l upon u s i£ we c an be
of any assistanc e to the work 0£ the City of Atlanta .
Sincerely yours,
(
-
... -;-
M. C . · Get ti nger
Executive Direc tor
Enclosure
MCG:r g£
�STRUCTURE OF ATLANTA JEWISH WE LFARE FEDERATION,
INC .





ME

INDIVIDUAL MEMBERS
All du lt
c ontri b ut rs to
Annual Campaiqn.
ERSHIP
ORGANIZATION MEMBERS
COl'!STI TUZi" T !iiE'1; BERS
Jewish orga1_izc. ..-cions
wi th mi imum membership 0£ so.
Composed o f local
bc:ncf iciary
aqencie:s.
DE LEGATE A SSE IBLY
\I
Comp osed o f r epresentat ives of affili ated or ganization s a nd
r epresentati ves-at-lar ge; act s largely as a forum body.
I
i
BOARD OF DI RECTORS - 48 MEMBERS
Adm inister s and conduc t s the a{fairs of the
Cent~al Communal Agenc y.
OFFICERS
j
1 · EXECUTIVE
DIRECTOR
I
EXE CUTIVE c rn·iM ITTEE ~- S TANDING C S1)HTTEES
~
DEPARTl\1ENTS
A Vice-President and a Vi c e-Chairman responsible
f or each Departmento
I
I
l
... .
AND ALLOCATIONS
-CAMPA IGNING
Plans and c o nduc ts A r-L:,
Cz...l11_t? ign; collects and disburses fu nds ;
y_
c learing house for f und-raising efforts direc t ed at Jewish cornmuni t ....,
I
Io
I
CQ.ViMUNITY REU\TIONS AND I NTERNAL JEWISH AFFAIRS
I
Combats d i sc rimination and promotes ideals of democ racy ; promo es
I
general welfare o:f the Jewish Community;- conducts Community Calendar!
I
I
III.
SOCIAL SERVICE
Conduc ts Jewish Family and Childr en's Bureau agGncy, Ben Iv assell
Dental Clinic and any social welfare programs assigned to it.
'I
IV.
CO~MUNITY SERVICES AND PI.ANNING
Coordinates and promotes iuter-agency cooperation; responsible for
community- wide planning, fact-finding and social resear c h in
followin areas:
I GROUP SERVICES]
I
I
(Jewish
I _
_._(_Y_o_u_t_h
__
Community
Center
Serving
Orqs.)
(Sy nag ogue
Youth Grou s
AGED CA.:-<E
Institutional
Care
(Jewish
Home
Servir:es
in Community
(J.F.& C .. B.)
(J.C.Center)
(Housing an
other
services)
I
JEWISH EDUCATION, I
I
'
Bur. of i
/ J. Ed . )
i


I


I ( Cornn-:
unit yl
Schoo.LS
Groups
!(Study
of Orqs.)
�STRUCTURE OF ATLANTA JEWISH WELFARE FEDERAT-ON ,
INC .
·1
,
MEf\' B.t!.RSHIP
I NDIVI DUAL MEMBERS
All d ult
contri ut rs to
Annua l Cam aiqn.
ORGANIZAT I ON , ~MI3:SRS
Jewish organi zc tion s
wit" minimum member ...
s hi o:r so.
COl':STI TUENT ME:V;BERS
Compose d o loc al
benefic iary
age n ci es .
\1
DE LEGATE ASSEMBLY
Comp osed of representative s of affiliated o ganizations a n d
r epresentati ves -at-large; ac t s lar g ely as a forum body.
I
I
I
BOARD OF D I RECTORS - 48 MEMBERS
Ad~ inisters and conduc ts the a fairs o f the
Central Communal Agenc y.
OFFICERS j
I EXE CUT IVE DIRECTOR I
EXE CUTIVE CQviMITTEE '~-
-
STAND ING COM:Vl ITTEES
I
DEPARTME TTS
A Vice-President and a Vice-Chairman responsible!
for each Department.
...
L e
CAMPA IGNING AND ALLOCAT I ONS
Plans and conduc ts An:.
C&., i? .:.gn; collects and disbu rs es :fund s;
clearing h o u se for fund - rais i ng e f fo r ts d irec ted at J e wish commun i t i
I
I
II .
COi\1MUN ITY REU\ TIONS AND I ~T.:'..RNA L J EWISH AFFAI RS
I
Com ats discrimination and promo t es ideals of d e mocracy; promo te s
I
general welfare of the Jewish Commun i ty ; condu cts Communi ty Calenda r i
I
II I .
SOC IA L SERV I CE
Conducts Jewish Family and Ch ildren 9 s Bureau agGncy , Ben ~assell
Dent a l Clin ic a n d any social welf ar e program s assig ne d to it .
l
IV.
CCMMUNITY SERV I CES AND PLANNING
Coord i nat es and promo t es it1ter - a g ency cooperat ion; resp o ns ible £ o r
commun i t y-wide planning, fact-finding and social research in
f o llowing areas :
I GROUP SERVICES]
I
( Jewish
Community
Center
_I______
(Youth
S erving
Orgs .
(Synagogue
Youth Groups
AGED
I nstitut iona l
Care
( Jewish
Home
CA.:-<E7
I
Ser v :i~cs
in Commun i ty
( JoF . & C. B.)
( J.C. Center)
(Housing an
other
ser v ices)
JEWISH EDUCATION, !
I
Bur . o f ;
J , Ed. ) I
I
'
I
( Cor.un - :

I
unity
Sch~ols
(Study Groups
o f Orgs.)
7/27/67-

--·------
i
I
�The Urban Coali ion
1
Feder I Bar Building West / 1819 /-I Street, N. W . W ashington. D. C. / 20006
Steering Committee Co-chairmen: Andrew /-leiskell / A. Philip Randolph
Novembe
24, 1967
11
NAT IONAL COORDINATORS vv"EEKLY REPORT
LOCAL COALITIONS
The third in a series o f region~l conferences to assist l ocal
communi ties in f ormi ng th ei r m•m Urban Coalitions wi ll be hel d
in San Francisco on November 30 in the San Franci s co Hilton .
The program format will be similar t o those used f o r t e
previous two successful conferences i n Chicago and Minneapolis,
with emphasis on "h ow-to-do-it" workshops. The three general
sessions will featu r e remarks b y San Franci s co r ayor Shell~y
and Mayo r-Elect Alioto, The Most Reverend Jo seph McGucken,
Kenneth Wright, Vic e Pre s ident and Chief Econ omist o f the Life
Insurance Associ ation of Ame ri ca , California State Assemblyman
John T. Kno x, Bishop Donald Harvey Tippett and Frances Barnes,
Vice President of the Crown Zellerbach Corporat ion and President
o f the Management Coun ci l f or Bay Area Employment Opportunity .
A similar regional conference for eastern cities, originally
set fo r Dec ember 11 in New York City , has been postponed
because o f scheduling problems to the second week of J anuary .
You will shortly be advised of the· exact date .
PUBLIC SERVICE EMPLOYMENT AND URBAN LEGISLATION
More than 40 Washington representatives of organizations which
support the program of the Urban Coal ition attended a luncheon
meeting in the Statler Hilton Hotel on November 20.
Featured speaker Mayor John Lindsay of New Yo rk City stressed
the necessity o f a united legislative effort to move bills
supported by the Coalition through Congress.
Andrew Biemiller,
Legisl a tive Director of AFL- CIO, cited a case history to
illustrate the positive value of business and labor representativ es go ing together to c al l on Congressmen . Rabbi Richard G.
Hirsch of the Union o f ~..meri c an Hebrew Congregat ions described
National Coordinators: John Feild / Ron M. Linton
Telephone 293-1530
�2
the growing awareness of chu r c h gr oups of the need to be active
in public affairs.
PRIVATE EMPLOYMENT
\\
On November 21 the Task Force on Private Employment met in
Detroit with the Employment ancl Education Committee o f the New
Detroit Committee. The meeting was chaired by William M. Day,
president o f Michigan Bell Telephone Company .
In his remarks to the group, Task Force- Co - Chairman Ger ~ l d
Phi llip pe, Ch a irman o f t he Bo a r d o f t he Gen eral El e c t ric Company ,
said "As a representative of th e Task Force o n Pri vate Empl o ym ent
I have been encouraging busines s men to enter into a r egul a r
program of exchanging ideas on this subject and pitching in on
useful programs to get at some of these urgent needs . All
se c t o rs o f the soci e ty need to help each o ther and we need to
join together in useful programs t o c reate new o pportunities
f o r self- realizati o n in o ur Ci ty slums ."
"In some cities it would sound strange, but th er e is a growi ng
feel~ng among businessmen of my acquaintance and a mo~g some of
our own General El e ctri c plant managers ~hat a subst a __tial
measure of our business success in the future is goi ng to depend
on our ability ·to help a good number o f these hard - core unemploy ables become productive workers and citizens ."
HOUSING, RE CONST RUCTION AND I NVESTMENT
The Ta sk Force met in Ne w York on November 21. Twe lve a ddit io na l
members h a ve been rec r uited to work with this group.
A ma jor
working paper is being develop ed to guide this Task Force i n
developing a long- range program.
}
�clf-tfanta :Jt:wLj__h <Wt:[fa'it: 9-t:dnation, [/nc.
The newly formed central agency merging the Atlanta Jewish Community Council,
Jewish Welfare Fund and the Jewish Social Service Federation
41 Exchange Place, S. E.

Atlanta, Georgia 30303

Phone 525-4825
ABE GOLDSTEIN
PRESIDENT
M. C.
November 29, 1967
GETTINGER
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Mr. Dan Sweat
City Hall
68 Mitchell St., S.W.
Atlanta, Ga.
30303
Dear Mr. Sweat:
In accordance with our telephone conversation of
last Friday I wish to advise you that the Atlanta
Jewish Welfare Federation is interested in participating
in the work of the Atlanta Urban Coalition.
The Atlanta Jewish Welfare Federation represents
virtually all the adult Jewish organizations in greater
Atlanta. As the letterhead indicates this central
Jewish communal agency is the result of the recent
merger of the Atlanta Jewish Community Council, the
Welfare Fund and the Social Service Federation.
I am
enclosing a chart describing the structure and program
of the Federation.
P lease do not hesitate to call upon us if we can be
of any assistance to the work of the City of Atlanta.
Sincerely yours,
<¼.C- ~
M. C . Gettinger
Executive Director
Enclosure
MCG : rgf
�STRUCTURE OF ATLANTA JEWISH WELFARE FEDERATION, INC.
MEMBERSHIP
INDIVIDUAL MEMBERS
All adult
contributors to
Annual Campaign.
ORGANIZATION MEMBERS
Jewish organizations
with minimum membership of so.
CONSTITUENT MEMBERS
Composed of local
beneficiary
agencies.
\\
DELEGATE ASSEMBLY
Composed of representatives of affiliated organizations and
representatives-at-large; acts larqely as a forum body.
BOARD OF DIRECTORS - 48 MEMBERS
Administers and conducts the affairs of the
Central Communal Agency.
I OFFICERS I
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
J
I
EXECUTIVE CClvlMITTEE!--
I STANDING Ca.1MITTEES I DEPARTMENTS
A Vice-President and a Vice~Chairman responsible
for each Department.
I.
CAMPAIGNING AND ALLOCATIONS
Plans and conducts Annual Campaign; collects and disburses funds;
clearing house for fund-raising efforts directed at Jewish communitv
II.
Cav1MUNITY RELATIONS AND INTERNAL JEWISH AFFAIRS
Combats discrimination and promotes ideals of democracy; promotes
qeneral welfare of the Jewish Community; conducts Community Calendar
III.
SOCIAL SERVICE
Conducts Jewish Family and Children's Bureau agency, Ben Massell
Dental Clinic and any social welfare programs assigned to it.
IV.
CCMMUNITY SERVICES AND PLANNING
Coordinates and promotes inter-agency cooperation; responsible for
community-wide planning, fact - finding and social research in
following areas:
I GROUP SERVICES I
I AGED CARE I
I
I
\ (Jewish
Comm.unity
Center )
I
(Youth
Serving
Orgs.)
(Synagogue
Youth Groups)
I
Institutional
Care
(Jewish
Home)
I
S e rvices
in Community
(J.F .& CoB.)
(J.C.Ce nter)
(Housing anc
other
services)
.....---------,
I
JEWISH EDUCATION!
I
I
Bur. of
CominJ. Ed.)
unity
Schools
I (
I
Groups
!(Study
of Orgs.)
7/27/67,
�DR . ALBERT M . DAV I S
MRS. EUNICE COOPER
PRESI D ENT
S ECRETARY
DR. C . MILES SM ITH
T REAS U RER
ATLANTA BRANCH
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF COLORED PEOPLE
859- 1/2 HUNTER STREET, N . W .
SUITE 105
ATLANTA,
GEO RG I A
November 15, 1967
30314
524-8054
\\


M'.ayor I van Allen, Jr.


City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia 303 03
Dear Mayor Allen:
The NAACP was very happy to hear of your recent appointments of
Reverend Samuel W. Williams and Mr. Erwin Stevens to the Urban Coalition
Committee.
We feel that astute judgement was exercised in their selections,
for both men possess a high degree of professionalism. Here again is an
affirmation of your expressed view that your appointments will always be on
a best qualified basis.
Sincerely yours,
RBF:cab
�November 9, 1967
Mr. Charles F . Wittenstein
Southeast Area Director
The American Jewish Committee
526 Hartford Building
100 Edgewood Avenue , N . E .
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Mr. Witteastein:
Thank you very much for your letter offering you't assist nee to the
Atlanta Urban Coalition. I am su:re that any effort to organize an
Urban Coalition in Atlanta could not be successful without the cooperation
of th American Jewish Committee and other interested organization$,
I have taken the liberty of adding you to our mailing list of Urban
Coalition members and will pass you:r 1 tt r along to the Steering
Committee.
I am sure that you understand that Atl nt 's Urb n Co lition at this
time is a very loos ly organized entity nd that detail for further
organiz tion will be worked out in the near future.
I would ppr ci te ny eugg tions you might h v for enlarging or
refining th Coalition so th t I might pass them on to oth rs involv&d.
Sincer ly youl' ,
Dan Sw a.t
DS:ty
�Atlanta Chapter
THE AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE
Hartford Building, Suite 526-100 Edgewood Avenue, N. E: • Atlanta, Georgia 30303 • 523-8451
November 7, 1967
Mr-. Jjan Sweat,
Gov ernmental :Liaison Director
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
.Dear Mr. Sweat:
The Atlanta Chapter of the American Jewish Committee would welcome
the opportunity to participate in Atlanta 's Urban Coalition. The American
Jewish Committee is participating in this effort on a national level, and
our people here can and should make a constructive contribution to the
solution of local problems.
Our Chapter Chairman, William B. SChwartz, Jr., is President of Zep
Manufacturing Company and a Vice-President of National Service Industries.
He would be willing to serve, as would F.dward Elson, Vice-Chairman and
President of the Atlanta News Agency and Elson 's Book Stores. Mr . Elson
participated in the Washington meeting at which the National Coalition was
formed.
Please advise us whether it would -be possible for us to cooperate in
this venture.
CFW:ru
cc: Mayor Ivan Allen
WILLIAM B. SCHWARTZ, JR ., Chairman
LOUI S 0. HERTZ, JR., Vice Chai rman
EDWARD M . ABR AMS, Vice Chairma n
MRS. RALPH K. UHRY, Secreta ry
EDWARD E. ELSON, Vice Chairman
CHARLES S. ACK ERMAN, Treas u rer
Sou t heast Area Director
CHARLES F. WITTENSTEIN
�November 3, 1967
1
Mayor Ivan Allen
Attention: Mr o Dan Sweat
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
1
]
Dear Sir:
The Exe cutive Board of the Christian Council of Metropolitan Atlanta, Inc. voted unanimously
to participate in the Atlanta Coal it ion Steering Committee. The Church leaders of the metropolitan area are grateful to the mayor for his dynamic aggressive and imaginative leadership
given to this fast growing community.
In response to your request for suggestions, I would like to list the Jewish Welfare Federation,
41 Exchange Place S.E., Atlanta, Georgia, 30303.
Sincerely yours ,
I
'.
I ;,/u
-' ~ 1-11AAh W
/
l{
rmon D. Moore
Executive Director
HDM: msb
OR . L. BEV EL JONES
PR ES ID E NT
W ELFARE & SOC I AL SER VI CES
873 - 2108
GA, ASSOC . FOR PASTORAL CAR E
5 2 3- 4 711 • EXT . 207
87 2-56 7 8
DR . HARMON D. MOOR E
E X ECUTIVE D I REC TOR
8 7 2- 5678
RAD I O AND T V
872 - 5678
�\\
A.R. ABRAMS
MILES J. ALEXANDER
WILLIAM BREMAN
DR. ROBERT L. BUNNEN
LOUIS CARROL
DAVID CENTER
HERBERT B. COHEN MAX.CUBA
JOSEPH EICH E3ERG
ELMO ELLIS
HARRY ELSON
WASHINGTON FALK, Ill
NORMAN FRANKEL
MRS. DeJONGH FRANKLIN
J. LESTER FRASER
WILLIAM H. FREY
JONATHAN GOLDEN
Executive Committee
DR. MARVIN GOLDST EIN
JERRY GOLDWASS ER
JACK GOREN
DR. IRVING L. GREENBERG
ELLIOT L. HAAS
DR. T HEODORE L EV ITAS
NATHAN I. LIPSON
SAM MASSELL, JR.
SYLVAN MEYER
ANTHON Y MONTAG
DONALCYOBERDORFER
SANFORD H. ORKIN
STAN LEY RI NZLER
MENDEL ROM M, JR.
MRS. JACOB ROTHSCHILD
SIMON S. SELIG, JR.
MARVIN H. SHOOS
AARON THAL
M RS. MORTON L. WE ISS
ELIJAH WISEBRA M
MR S. NATHAN F. WOLFE, JR.
~;iH0~g~AifR~t;s
DAVI D J. HARR IS .
MRS. DAV IDE. HEIN
ARTH UR HEYMAN
BERNARD HOWARD
SINCLAIR S. JACOBS
NIELS JACOBSON
I. L. KUNIAN
KIEVE LAN DESBERG
ELLIOTT H. LEVITAS
Advisory Committee,
Pa st Chapter Chairmen
CECIL A. AL EXAN DER
HERBERT R. ELSAS
DeJONGH FRANKLIN
ELLIOTT GOLDSTEIN
DAVID GOLDWASSER
HERMAN HEv°MAN
MRS. MARSHALL J. MANTLER
ALBERT MAYER
LOUIS REG ENSTEIN, JR.
HERBERT A. RINGEL
MORTON L. WE I SS
Honorary Chapter Chairmen
LOUIS ARONSTA M
LEONARD HAAS
ARMAND MAY
A. J. WE INB ERG
r
NATIONAL OFFIC ERS
MORRIS B. ABRAM, President
PH ILIP E. HOFFMAN, Chm ., Executive Board
OR IN L EHMAN, Chm., Board of Governors
NATHA N APPLEMA N, Chm ., Board of Trustees
EMERY E. KLINEMAN, Treas urer
MRS. SAN FORD SAMUEL, Secreta ry
MORR I S H. B ERGREEN, Associ ate Treasurer
BERTRAM H. GO LD, Executive Director
JACOB BLAUST EIN, Honorary President
LOU IS CAPLAN, Honorary Pres ident
H ERBERT B. EHRM ANN, Honorary President
IRV ING M. ENGE L, Honorary President
JOSEPH M . PROSKAUER, Honora ry President
ARTHUR J. GOLDB ERG , Honorary Vice-President
JOSEPH KLI NGENSTEI N, Ho norary Vice-President
FRED LAZARUS, JR., Honorary Vice-President
SAMUEL D. LEIDESDORF, Honorary Vice-Pres ident
JAMES MARSHALL, Honorary Vice- President
WILL IAM ROSENWALD, Honorary Vice-President
RALPH E. SAMU EL, Honorary Vice-President
HORACE STERN, Honorary Vice- President
MAURI CE GLINERT, Honorary Treasu rer
JOHN SLAWSON, Executive Vice-President Em eritus
REUB EN W. ASKANASE, Houston , Vice-President
0. ROY CHALK, New York, Vice-President
HAROLD SHERMAN GOLDBERG, Boston, Vice-President
ANDR EW GOODMAN, New York, Vice-Presi dent
JACK GOR EN, Atlanta, Vice-President
ARTHUR GROMAN, Los Angeles, Vice- President
HENRY L. KOHN, Ch icago, Vic e-President
MAR ION I. L EVY, Cleveland, Vice-President
WILLARD L. LEVY, St. Lo uis, Vice-President
ELM ER L. WINTER, Milwaukee, Vice-President
ROBERT I. WISHN ICK , New York, Vice- President
�November 7 , 1967
Mr . Al Bows
Vice President
Arthur Andersen & Company
Bank of Georgia Building
Atlanta , Georgia 30303
Dear Al:
Pardon the delay in answering your letter but I wanted to get
past a particular meeting at which was discussed a proposed
December 13 seminar to be held in Atlanta by the national
Urban Coalition ' s Ta k Force on Private Employment .
. I have mentioned this to Opie and I am sure that if he has not
alre dy done so, h will discuss with you the propos d partici•
p tion for our loc l coalition and Ch mber of Conunerce.
1 would be delight.ad to g t together with you at your convenience
to d cues this or any other subjects which you might have on
your mind. Plither November 15 or 16 would be a good day for
m.
Sine rely your ,
Dan Sw
DS :fy
t
�ARTHUR ANDERSEN
& Co.
34 PE ACHTREE STREET, N. W.
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303
October J l, 1 967
Mr . Dan E. Sweat, Jr.
Director of Governmental Liaison
City of At lanta
City Ha ll
Atlanta, Geo rgi a JOJOJ
Dear Dan :
Thanks for your several commu ni cations about the
National Urban Coalition .
I have no suggestions as to changes in the draft
other than the ones made at the meeting in which the State
Government is mentioned .
I wo uld hope , in view of recent
events , that we attempt to get the new Depart ment in the
State Government working with our Coalition g roup .
I b e l ieve
the only way we will make p ro g r ess in this area is to g et
them involved , and I don 't think we should take a ne gative
approach based on their past actions .
Th e State must
participate .
I have talked about the dra ft statement with
Mr. Bill Ster ne, President of the Chamber, and Opie Shelton,
our Executive Director, and we plan to have it approved at the
next Chamber Board meeting which is on November 8 .
I would like ve ry much to ge t the benefit of your
views as to how we may undertake some specific proposals in
the business community next year .
I have some open time on
November 15 and 16 for lunch, and if you do, it might b e well
to see if we could get to ge ther and try to ge t Opie or one of
his delegates so that we h ave some specific ob jective s on this
program du rin g the com in g year .
With best wishes ,
Sincerely,
cc:
Mr . Op ie L. Shelton
�No vember 7, 1967
Mr . Charles E, Smith
Regional Dire ctor
Regional Contract Compliance Office
Department of De{ens e
2100 Maple Drive , N . E .
Atlanta, Georgia 30305
Dear Charles :
Thanks !or your letter on the Urban Coalition.
We al."e still in the early stages of development and are quite
flexible at this point. However, I would be happy to receive
ny suggestions you might have for developing strong local
Urban Coalition.
P l a e feel fte
to drop by when you get
chanc .
Sine r ly yours,
Dan Sweat
DS :fy
�DEFENSE SUPPLY AGENCY
DEFENSE CO N TRACT A DMINISTRATION SERVICES REGION, ATLANTA
3100 MAPLE DRIVE , N . E .
ATLANTA , GEORGIA
30305
IN REPLY
REFER TO
DCRA-V
26 October 1967
Mr. Dan E. Sweat, Jr.,
Director of Government Liaison
Off ice of the Mayor
City of Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Dan:
I read with interest Alex Coffin's article in today's Constitution
concerning the organization of the coalition to deal with the
problems of our city. I talked with Alex briefly this morning
and would appreciate an opportunity for discussing the
possibilities of my involve ment.
Recognizing the need for and the importance of such an
organization, I am sure that you will agree that thorough planning
and involvement of knowl e dgeable operating personnel are
necessary for success.
Hoping to hear from you soon with an indication as to. the time
and place for a meeting if such is your desire, I remain
Sincerely,
CHARLES E. SMITH
Acting Chief
Office of Contr acts Compliance
�October 30, 1967
M rs . Merlyn E. Richardson
League of Women Voters
3121 Maple Drive, N. E o
Atlanta, Ce·o rgia 30305
Dear Mrs . Richardson:
Thank you very much for your letter of October
Z7th and the support of the League of Women
Voter of the formation of an Atlanta Urban
Coalition.
We have just begun and we will be pleased to
ke p you dvi ed.
S incerely yours,
Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor
IA.3r/br
CC: Mr. Dan Sweat/
�LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS
OF GEORGIA
3121 Maple Drive, N.E.
Suite 2
ATLANTA, GEORGIA
30305
Telephone 237-2559
Affiliated with the
league af Women Voten of the United States
October 27, 1967
The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor of Atlanta
204 City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Mayor Allen:
The League of Women Voters of Georgia wishes _to express its
appreciation for your formation of an Atlanta Urban Coalition. As
you may know, two of our national officers attended the Emergency
Convocation of the Coalition meeting on August 24 in Washington
and the League of Women Voters of the United States irrnnediately
announced its support of the goals of· the Urban Coalition. We
believe that nruch can be done by this group to encourage the
utmost corrnnitment on the part of every segment of our corrnnunity
to solve the dilerrnna of the urban crisis.
If at any time you find that there is a role that the state
League can fulfill as your plans further materalize, please let
us know.
Sincerely,
Mrs. Merlyn E. Ri chardson
President
ELR:FS
�October Z7, 1967
Mrs . Joshua D . Shubin, President
Atlanta Section
National Council of Jewish Women
793 Piedmont Avenue, N . E .
Atlanta, Georgia 30308
Dear Mrs. Shubin:
Thank you very much for your letter of October
26th and your interest in the Atlanta U rban
Coalition.
May 1 as ure you that we appreciate your offer
of a istance and will be glad to give consideration
to the National Council of Jewi h Women a we
further expand our plan •
Sincerely youl" ,
Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor
lAJr/br
CC: Mr. Dan Sweat /
�NATIONAL COUNCIL OF JEWISH WOMEN
79~ PIEDMONT AVENUE, N. E.
!4,. TLANTA, GEORGIA 30308
ATLANTA SECTION
876-7236
October 26, 1967
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mayor Allen:
In this morning's Atlanta Constitution
there is an editorial on the establishment of the
Atlanta Urban Coalition.
On September 7, 1967, we wrote you offering the help of the Atlanta Section in furtherance
of the establishment of such a Coalition.
At this
time I would like to renew our offer of help in any
area you feel the National Council of Jewish Women
can be of assistance.
Sincerely,
11+~
Mrs . Joshua D. Shubin, President
Atlanta Section
·
Na t ional Council of Jewish Women
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�October 26, 1967
Mr. Harold N . Arnold
Executive Director
The Atlanta Urban League, Inc .
239 Auburn Avenue., N . E .
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mr . Arnold:
Thank you very much for your letter of October 23rd,
regarding the Atlanta Urban Co lition Committee .
Natur Uy, the Urban League will be a part of our
urban coalition. The meeting yesterday was just to
formulate initial plan •
I appreciate your letter and we will keep you advised.
Sincerely yours,
I
IAJr:am
n Allen, Jr.
�THE ATLANTA URBAN LEAGUE, INC.
An E ducational Community Service Agency Covering Over 47 Yea rs of P reventive Socia l Se rvice
5 21·2355 •
239 AUBURN AV E NU E , N, E . • ATLANTA , GEORG I A 30303
N A TIO NA L U RBAN
L EA GU E AFF ILIAT E
October 23, 1967
Mr. Ivan Allen, Jr . , Mayor
City of Atlanta
Ci ty Hall
Atlanta, Georgi a
Dear layor Allen:
We wish to congratulate you f or f ormin an Urban Coalition Steering Committee alon the lines of the National Urban Coalition.
Thi s is to request that The Atlanta Urban League, Inc., be invited to be
a member of Atlanta's Urban Coalition Steering Committee. We make t hi s
request because since 1920, our Agency has been concerned 1vith urban
prob lems , particularly, in areas of lousing , Health and ~ l f are, Job Development and Employment and Youth Incentives and Education. \ e em loy
the techniques of Community Organization in our a t tempt t o do reventive
social work. \'l e are an United A eal A ency and shoul d we have a successf ul United Appea l Campaign, January, 1968 , we ex ect to substantially add
to our communit y resources deve lo ment efforts; which woul d ~reatly add to
the ab ility to communicate with the grass-root eop l e i n Metro olitan Atl anta ;
both in the areas served by Poverty Programs and otherwise .
On the Urban Coa lition Steering Committee, e would want to be identified as
an Educat ional Community Services Agency sup orted by a ll of the citizens of
t he Atlanta Community .
We respectf ully ask that this request be granted.
Very truly yours ,
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�C TYO
.ATLA
T.A
CITY HALL
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
October 30, 1967
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison
MEMORANDUM
To:
Members of Steering C o mmittee,
Atlanta Urban Coalition
From:
Subject:
Dan Sweat
Weekly Report, National Urban Coalition
Attached is a copy of the October 27, 1967, weekly report of
the C o ordinators of the National Urban C o alition.
I am sure you will find some interesting items on activities of
the Task F o rces and on programs in other cities .
DS:fy
P. S .
Please let me have your suggested changes to the Atlanta Urban
C o alition Statement Draft so I might issue a final paper .
�October 27, 1967
MEMORANDUM
TO:
Members of the Steering Committee
FROM:
Steering Committee Co-Chairmen
The next meeting of the Steering Committee will be held
on December 18 at 4:00 p.m. in the Van Antwerp Room on
the 8th Floor of the Veterans Memorial Building, 151
West Jefferson Street, Detroit, Michigan. Mayor Jerome
P. Cavanagh will host a dinner for the members of the
Steering Committee or their representatives to be served
in the penthouse at 6:30 p.m.
Please advise the National Coordinating Office as to
whether you and/or your designee will be present.
The Urban Coalition
1819 H Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20006
(202) 293-1530
�#





.
October 27, 1967
NATIONAL COORDINATORS WEEKLY REPORT
\\
LOCAL COALITIONS
Six cities have now announced the formation of urban coalitions and
intend to affiliate with The Urban Coalition--Detroit, New York City,
Minneapolis, Gary, Indianapolis, and Atlanta.
Sparked by the Chicago
"Mobilizing Urban Coalitions" planning session dozens of other cities
now have organizing committees.
The California League of Cities, meeting in San Francisco, formally
endorsed the formation of coalitions in all its constituent cities
on a motion by Mayor Floyd Hyde of Fresno supported by officials of
San Diego.
Both cities announced they are organizing coalitions.
Regional meetings like the one in Chicago have been scheduled for
San Francisco on November 30 and New York in early December.
PRIVATE EMPLOYMENT
On October 25, some 40 major Pittsburgh employers and labor leaders
attended a meeting hosted by Mayor Joseph M. Barr on private industry
plans for hiring hard-core unemployed.
On October 27, at the invitation of Mayor Herman Katz of Gary and
Mr. George Jedenoff, Superintendent of the U.S. Steel Gary Works,
The Urban Coalition Task Force on Private Employment joined with
several hundred leading Gary employers and unions in developing a
program of expanded employment opportunities. Mr. David Stahl, of
Mayor Daley's office representing the Task Force, spoke briefly at
the luncheon.
Other local meetings on private employment have been scheduled for
Baltimore (November 14) and Detroit (November 21).
Task Force cochairman Gerald L. Phillippe will speak at both meetings.
In Baltimore, _Mayor Theodore McKeldin and Council President Thomas
D'Alasandra and fifteen major industrial leaders are convening a
meeting of top management representatives of Baltimore firms to
launch a program of expanding Negro entrepreneurship in the ghetto
stimulated by sub- contract arrangements wi th leading industr ies .
-I
�(2)
This is being viewed as a "breakthrough" type of program and is
being carried out through the Baltimore Council on Equal Business
Opportunity (CEBO). CEBO is a pr·o ject of The Potomac Institute .
In Detroit, the New Detroit Committee's employment and edµcation
committee is convening a meeting of industrial and labor leaders
to discuss expansion of private employment in the ghetto. The
Ford Motor Company has announced that it will recruit 6500 new
workers from the central city and the Michigan Bell Telephone Company
has announced plans to concentrate its training efforts in an allNegro high school in the center of Detroit.
LEGISLATION
Coalition co-chairmen Andrew Heiskell and A. Philip Randolph
urged members of the House/Senate Conference Committee on Independent
Offices Appropriations to adopt the Senate's recommendations for
funding model cities and rent supplements--$637 for model cities
arid $40 million for rent supplements. Rent supplements received
$10 million (the House had earlier approved no funds) and model
cities received $312 (the House had approved $237 million).
The fact sheet and position paper on the Social Security amendments
will be mailed to the Steering Committee the first part of nex t week.
EDUCATIONAL DISPARITIES
The Task Force will meet on November 7 to map its program and round
out its membership .
HOUSING , RECONSTRUCTION AND INVESTMENT
The Task Force had to reschedule its October 19th meeting for early
Novembe r.
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITIES
Task Fo r ce workin g commi ttee meets November 3 in Wa s h i n g t o n to
con s ide r a p i l ot th r ee c i t y projec t inv olving de v e l opment o f new
l owe r-income h ous ing o n a n open o cc upancy b asi s in s ubu rban ar e as.
Al s o scheduled fo r t he mee ting a r e pl a n s to draw tog e th e r s ome 3 00
Fair Hous ing Committees n ow ope r a ting in s uburban communities for
a national action session on ope n housing to be held in Chicago
e arly in January.
�r
--=i"
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~-
CITY HALL
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
October 30, 1967
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Ass istant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Di rector of Governm ental Liaison
MEMORANDUM
To:
Members of Steering Committee,
Atlanta Urban Coalition
From:
Subject:
Dan Sweat
Weekly Rep_ort, National Urban Coalition
Attached is a copy of the October 27, 1967, weekly report of
the Coordinators of the National Urban Coalition.
I am sure you will find some interesting items on activities of
the Task Forces and on programs in other cities.
DS:fy
P. S.
Please let me have your suggested changes to the Atlanta Urban
Coalition Statement Draft so I might issue a final paper .
�.
"
October 27, 1967
NATIONAL COORDINATORS WEEKLY REPORT
\\
LOCAL COALITIONS
Six cities have now announced the formation of urban coalitions and
intend ·to affiliate with The Urban Coalition--Detroit, New York City,
Minneapolis, Gary, Indianapolis, and Atlanta. Sparked by the Chicago
"Mobilizing Urban Coalitions" planning session dozens of other cities
now have organizing committees.
The California League of Cities, meeting in San Francisco, formally
endorsed the formation of coalitions in all its constituent cities
on a motion by Mayor Floyd Hyde of Fresno supported by officials of
San Diego. Both cities announced they are organizing coalitions.
Regional meetings like the one in Chicago have been scheduied for
San Francisco on November 30 and New York in early December.
PRIVATE EMPLOYMENT
On October 25, some 40 major Pittsburgh employers and labor leaders
attended a meeting hosted by Mayor Joseph M. Barr on private industry
plans for hiring h ard-core unemp loyed .
On October 27, at the invitation of Mayor Herman Katz of Gary and
Mr. George Jedenoff, Superintendent of the U.S. Steel Gary Works,
The Urban Coalition Task Force on Private Employment joined with
several hundred leading Gary employers and unions in developing a
program o f expanded employment opportunities. Mr. David Stahl, of
Mayor Dale y's office r e presenting the Task Force, spoke briefly at
the luncheon.
Other local meetings on private employment have been scheduled for
Baltimore (November 14) and Detroit (November 21). Task Force cochairman Ge rald L. Phillippe will speak at both meetings.
In Baltimore,· Mayor Theodore McKeldin and Council President Thomas
D'Alasandra and fifteen major industrial leaders are convening a
meeting of top management representatives of Baltimore firms to
launch a program of expanding Negro entrepreneurship in the ghetto
stimulated by sub-contract arrangements with leading industries.
�(2)
This is being viewe d as a "breakthrough" type of program and is
being carried out through the Baltimore Council on Equal Busine ss
Opportunity (CEBO) . CEBO is a pr·oj e ct of The Potomac Institute.
In Detroit, the New Detroit Committee's employment and edµcation
committee is convening a meeting of industrial and labor leaders
to discuss e xpansion of private employment in the ghetto. The
Ford Motor Company has announc e d tha t it will r e cruit 6500 new
workers from the central city and the Michiga n Be ll Te lephone Company
has announced plans to concentrate its training efforts in an allNegro high school in the center of Detroit.
LEGISLATION
Coal ition co-cha irmen Andrew He i skell and A. Phi l ip Ra ndolph
urged members of the House/Senate Conference Committee on Inde pendent
Offices Appropriations to adopt the Senate's recommendations for
funding model cities and rent suppleme nts--$637 for model cities
arid $40 million f or rent suppleme nts. Rent supplements rec e ive d
$10 million (th e House had earli e r approve d no funds) and mode l
citie s r eceive d $312 (the House h a d appr ove d $237 million).
The fact sheet and position paper on the Social Security amendments .
will be mailed to the Steering Committee the first p a rt of nex t we ek.
EDUCATIONAL DISPARI TI ES
The Task Force will meet on November 7 to map its program and round
out its membership.
HOUSING , RECONS TRUCTION AND INVESTMENT
The Task Force had to reschedu le its October 19th meeting for early
Nove mbe r .
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITIES
Task Fo rce workin g c ommittee meets November 3 i n Wash ington t o
consider a pilot three city proj e ct involving developme nt of new
l ower-income·housing on a n ope n occupancy b asi s i n subur b an areas.
Al s o sch eduled f o r th e meeting a re plans to draw t ogether some 30 0
Fair Housing Committees now operating in suburban communities for
a national action session on open housing to be held in Chicago
early in January.
�~
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--
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CITY HALL
\\
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
October 30, 1967
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Govern me ntal Li ai son
MEMORANDUM
To:
Members of Steering Committee,
Atlanta Urban Coalition
From:
Dan Sweat
Subject: Weekly Rep_ort, National Urban Coalition
Attached is a copy of the October 27, 1967, weekly report of
the Coordinators of the National Urban Coalition.
I am sure you will find some interesting ite ms on activitie s of
the Task Forces and on programs in other cities.
DS:fy
P. S.
Please let me have your suggested changes to the Atlanta Urban
Coalition Stateme nt Draft so I might issue a final paper.
�October 27, 1967
NATIONAL COORDINATORS WEEKLY REPORT
LOCAL COALITIONS
Six cities have now announced the formation of urban coalitions and
intend -to affiliate with The Urban Coalition--Detroit, New York City,
Minneapolis, Gary, Indianapolis, and Atlanta. Sparked by the Chicago
"Mobilizing Urban Coalitions" planning session dozens of other cities
now have organizing committees.
The California League of Cities, meeting in San Francisco, formally
endorsed the formation of coalitions in all its constituent cities
on a motion by Mayor Floyd Hyde of Fresno supported by officials of
San Diego. Both cities announced they are organizing coalitions.
Regional meetings like the one in Chicago have been scheduled for
San Francisco on November 30 and New York in early December.
PRIVATE EMPLOYMENT
On October 25, some 40 major Pittsburgh employers and labor leaders
attended a meeting hosted by Mayor Joseph M. Barr on private industry
plans for hiring hard-core unemployed.
On October 27, at the invitation of Mayor Herman Katz of Gary and
Mr. George Jedenoff, Superintendent of the U.S. Steel Gary Works,
The Urban Coalition Task Force on Private Employment joined with
several hundred leading Gary employers and unions in developing a
program of expanded employment opportunities. Mr. David Stahl, o f
Mayor Dale y's o ffice representing th e Task Force, spoke briefly at
the luncheon.
Other local meetings on private employment have been scheduled for
Baltimore (November 14) and Detroit (November 21). Task Force cochairman Gerald L. Phillippe will speak at both meetings.
\
In Baltimore, · Mayor Theodore McKeldin and Council President Thomas
D'Alasandra and fifteen major industrial leaders are convening a
meeting of top management representatives of Baltimore firms to
launch a program of expanding Negro entrepreneurship in the ghetto
stimulated by sub-contract arrangements with leading industries.
�(2)
)
This is being viewed as a "breakthrough" type of program and is
being carried out through the Baltimore Council on Equal Business
Opportunity (CEBO). CEBO is a pr·o ject of The Potomac Institute.
In Detroit, the New Detroit Committee's employment and education
committee is convening a meeting of industrial and labor leaders
to discuss expansion of private employment in the ghetto. The
Ford Motor Company has announced that it will recruit 6500 new
workers from the central city and the Michigan Bell Telephone Company
has announced plans to concentrate its training efforts in an allNegro high school in the center of Detroit.
LEGISLATION
Coalition co-chairmen Andrew Heiskell and A. Philip Randolph
urged members of the House/Senate Conference Committee on Independent
Offices Appropriations to adopt the Senate's recommendations for
funding model cities and rent supplements--$637 for model cities
arid $40 million for rent supplements. Rent supplements received
$10 million (the House had earlier approved no funds) and model
cities received $312 (the House had approved $237 million).
The fact sheet and position paper on the Social Security amendments
will be mailed to the Steering Committee the first part of next week.
EDUCATIONAL DISPARITIES
The Task Force will meet on November 7 to map its program and round
out its membership.
HOUSING, RECONSTRUCTION AND INVESTMENT
The Task Force had to reschedule its October 19th meeting for early
November.
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITIES
Task Force working committee meets November 3 in Washington to
consider a pilot three city project involving development of new
lower-income ·housing on an open occupancy basis in suburban areas .
Also scheduled for the meeting are plans to draw together some 300
Fair Housing Committees now operating in suburban communities for
a national action session on open housing to be held in Chicago
early in January.
�!
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ATLANTA, GA. 30303
\\
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
October 30, 1967
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Admin istrative Assistant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governm ental Liaison
MEMORANDUM
To: Members of Steering Committee,
Atlanta Urban Coalition
From:
Subject:
Dan Sweat
Weekly Rep_o rt, National Urban Coalition
Attached is a copy of the October 27, 1967, weekly report of
the Coordinators of the National Urban Coalition.
I am sure you will find some interesting items on activities of
the Task Forces and on programs in other cities.
DS:fy
P . S.
Please let me have your suggeste d changes to the Atlanta Urban
Coalition Statement Draft so I might issue a final pape r.
\
I
�.
l,.
October 27, 1967
.
NATIONAL COORDINATORS WEEKLY REPORT
\I
LOCAL COALITIONS
Six cities have now announced the formation of urban coalitions and
intend -to affiliate with The Urban Coalition--Detroit, New York City,
Minneapolis, Gary, Indianapolis, and Atlanta. Sparked by the Chicago
"Mobilizing Urban Coalitions" planning session dozens of other cities
now have organizing co~ittees.
The California League of Cities, meeting in San Francisco, formally
endorsed the formation of coalitions in all its constituent cities
on a motion by Mayor Floyd Hyde of Fresno supported by officials of
San Diego. Both cities announced they are organizing coalitions.
Regional meetings like the one in Chicago have been scheduled for
San Francisco on November 30 and New York in early December.
PRIVATE EMPLOYMENT
On October 25, some 40 major Pittsburgh employers and labor leaders
attended a meeting hosted by Mayor Joseph M. Barr on private industry
plans for hiring hard-core unemployed.
On October 27, at the invitation of Mayor Herman Katz of Gary and
Mr. George Jedenoff, Superintendent of the U.S. Steel Gary Works,
The Urban Coalition Task Force on Private Employment joined with
several hundred leading Gary employers and unions in developing a
program of expanded employment opportunities. Mr. David Stahl, of
Mayor Daley's office representing the Task Force, spoke briefly at
the luncheon.
Other local meetings on private employment have been scheduled for
Baltimore (November 14) and Detroit (November 21).
Task Force cochairman Gerald L. Phillippe will speak at both meetings.
In Baltimore, · Mayor Theodore McKeldin and Council President Thomas
D'Alasandra and fifteen major industrial leaders are convening a
meeting of top management representatives of Baltimore firms to
launch a program of expanding Negro entrepreneurship in the ghetto
stimulated by sub- contract arrangements with leading industries.
�(2)
-This is being viewed as a "breakthrough" type of program and is
being carried out through the Baltimore Council on Equal Business
Opportunity (CEBO) . CEBO is a pr·o j ect of The Potomac Institute.
In Detroit, the New Detroit Committee's employment and edµcation
committee is convening a meeting of industrial anq labor leaders
to discuss e xpansion of private employment in the ghetto. The
Ford Motor Company has announced that it will recruit 6500 new
workers from the c e ntral city and the Michigan Bell Te l e phone Company
has announced plans to concentrate its training efforts in an allNegro high school in the center of Detroit.
LEGISLATION
Coalition co-chairme n Andrew He isk e l l and A. Philip Ra ndolph
urged members of the House/Senate Conference Committee on Independent
Offices Appropriations to adopt the Senate's recommendations for
funding model cities and rent supplements--$637 for model cities
arid $40 million f or rent supplements. Rent suppleme nts r e ceive d
$10 million (the Hous e h a d e a rlier approve d no f und s ) and model
cities r e c e ived $312 (the Hous e h a d approve d $237 million).
The fact sheet and position paper on the Social Security amendme nts
will be maile d to the Steering Committee the first part o f n ext wee k.
EDUCATIONAL DISPARI TIES
The Task Force will meet on November 7 to map its program and round
out its membe rship.
HOUSING, RECONSTRUCTION AND I NVESTMENT
Th e Task Force h ad t o re s che du l e i t s Octob e r 19th meeting for e arly
Nove mber.
EQUAL HOUS I NG OPPORTUNITIES
Task Fo rc e workin g c ommitt e e me e t s Nov e mber 3 in Washington t o
cons ide r a pilot three city proj e ct involving d e v e lopme nt o f n ew
l owe r -income ·hous ing on an ope n occup ancy basis i n subur b an areas.
Als o s chedul ed f o r the meeting a r e p l ans t o d raw t oge t her some 3 00
Fair Housing Committee s now ope rating in suburba n communities f or
a n a tiona l actio n s ess ion on o p e n hou s ing to b e h e ld i n Ch i cago
early in J a nuary .
�-----"li ··- -f
,~
-,.
• - f7
. __,l . . . - -
--
CITY HALL
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Cod e 404
October 30, 1967
IVAN Ali;.EN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Ass istant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison
MEMORANDUM
To:
Members of Steering Committee,
Atlanta Urban Coalition
From:
Subject:
Dan Sweat
Weekly Rep_o rt, National Urban Coalition
Attached is a copy of the October 27, 1967, weekly report of
the Coordinators of the National Urban Coalition.
I am sure you will find some interesting items ort activities of
the Task Forces and on programs in other cities.
DS:fy
P. S.
Please let me have your suggested changes to the Atlanta Urban
Coalition Statement Draft so I might issue a final paper.
�. •.1
October 27, 1967
NATIONAL COORDINATORS WEEKLY REPORT
LOCAL COALITIONS
Six cities have now announced the formation of urban coalitions and
intend ·to affiliate with The Urban Coalition--Detroit, New York City,
Minneapolis, Gary, Indianapolis, and Atlanta. Sparked by the Chicago
"Mobilizing Urban Coalitions" planning session dozens of other cities
now have organizing committees.
The California League of Cities, meeting in San Francisco, formally
endorsed th e formation of coalitions in all its constitue nt cities
on a motion by Mayor Floyd Hyde of Fresno supported by officials of
San Diego. Both cities announced they are organizing coalitions.
Regional meetings like the one in Chicago have been schedule d for
San Francisco on Novembe r 30 and New York in early December.
PRIVATE EMPLOYMENT
On October 25, some 40 major Pittsburgh employers and labor leade rs
attended a meeting hosted by Mayor Joseph M. Barr on private industry
plans for hiring h a rd-core une mploye d.
On October 27, at the invitation of Mayor Herman Katz of Gary and
Mr. George Jedenoff, Superintendent of the U. S. Steel Gary Works,
The Urban Coalition Task Force on Private Employme nt joine d with
several hundre d leading Gary employers and unions in deve loping a
progra m o f e xp a nde d e mployme nt opportunitie s. Mr . Da vid Stahl, of
Ma yor Da l e y' s o ff ice representing the Ta sk For c e , spoke briefly at
the luncheon.
Othe r local meetings on private employment have b e en schedule d for
Ba ltimore (Novembe r 14) and Detroit (Novembe r 21) . Task Force cocha i rman Ge r a ld L . Phil lippe will s peak at bot h meetings .
In Baltimore, · Mayor Theodore McKeldin and Council President Thomas
D' Alasandr a and fifteen major industr ial lea der s a r e conve nin g a
meeting o f top ma nage me nt rep resenta tive s o f Ba ltimo re firms to
laun ch a p r o gram o f expanding Negro e ntrepreneu rship in the ghet to
stimu lated b y sub -co ntract arrangement s with leading indu stries.
�r
(2)
This is being viewed as a "breakthrough" type of program and is
being carried out through the Baltimore Council on Equal Business
Opportunity (CEBO) . CEBO is a pr·o j ect of The Potomac Institute.
\,
In Detroit, the New Detroit Committee's employment and education
committee is convening a meeting of industrial and labor leaders
to discuss expansion of private employment in the ghetto.
The
Ford Motor Company has announced that it will recruit 6500 new
workers from the central city and the Michigan Bell Telephone Company
has announced plans to concentrate its training efforts in an allNegro high school in the center of Detroit.
LEGISLATION
Coalition co-chairmen Andrew Heiskell and A. Philip Randolph
urged members of the House/Senate Conference Committee on Independent
Offices Appropriations to adopt the Senate's recommendations for
funding model cities and rent supplements--$637 for model cities
arid $40 million for rent supplements. Rent supplements received
$10 million (the House had earlier approved no funds) and model
cities received $312 (the House had approved $237 million).
The fact sheet and position paper on the Social Security amendments
will be mailed to the Steering Committee the first part of next week.
EDUCATIONAL DISPARITIES
The Task Force will meet on November 7 to map its program and round
out its membership.
HOUSING, RECONSTRUCTION AND INVESTMENT
The Task Force had to reschedule its October 19th meeting for early
November.
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITIES
Task Force working committee meets November 3 in Washington to
consider a pilot three city project involving development of new
lower-income ·housing on an open occupancy basis in suburban areas.
Also scheduled for the meeting are plans to draw together some 300
Fair Housing Committees now operating in suburban communities for
a national action session on open housing to be held in Chicago
early in January .
�••~I
DECATUR FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
300 E . Pon c e De Leon Avenue, Decatur-, Georgia 30030
M i n i st e r s :
B eve l Jo n es
H a l N. B rady
B . C. Ke rr
Wm. H. Co l e
October 25, 1967
The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Ivan:
Please excuse me for the mix-up this morning. Your communication of October 20, had been sent to my old address and was not in
my hands in time. As soon as your secretary called, I asked Harmon
Moore to represent me. He and I have just talked, and we are both
excited about what you are doing.
As you have noted in previous conversations with us , we are
anxious to unite our efforts with those of other responsible citizens
and agencies in the metropolitan community in the constructive solution of urban problems. Dr. Moore will present this to the Executive
Board of the Christian Council, and I am confident the body will be
wholehearted in its endorsement of our involvement in the Urb a n
Coalition.
Again my apology for the trouble we caused you , and my a ppreciation for the courageous and farsighted leadership you a re g i ving
us as Mayor of Atlanta.
I am especially grateful fo r your p e r sonal
friendship.
BJ/ j a
�TrL1st Company of Georgia
POST
OF"F"ICE
DRAWER
4418
Atlanta, Georgia 30302.
AUGUSTUS H.STERNE
PRESIDENT
October 23, 1967
Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor, City of Atlanta
200 City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Ivan:
I regret that because of a prior commitment I
won't b e a ble to join you for the meeting of your newly
e stablished urban coal ition. Al Bows, who as you know is
the upcoming president of the Chamber, does plan to be on
hand.
I am proud of the way in which you keep probing
into our problems and looking f or solutions. Your urban
coalition may prove quite h e lpful.
I think the business
community and its leaders h ave not done all they should
have, and I hope to see many more business people become
more intimately involved in and concerned with the city's
probl ems. There must be some way through the Chamb e r to
bring this about, and I would welcome any suggestions you
might have .
Sincerely yours,
AHS / frb
�October 19, 1967
Mr . A . H . Sterne , Jr ., Pres ide nt
Atlanta Chamber of Commerce
Post Offi c e Box 4418
Atlanta, Georgia 30302
Dear Billy:
I am sure that you are aw re of the movement t the national
level to develop a st.ong c oalition of ui-ban interest in an effo:rt
to exert more influEmce in national progfams and priorities for
the benefit of our cities .


Representatives of busin ss , labor, civil rights, religion , education


and Mayors of urban citi s have joined tog ther in an Urban Coalition
to provide coordinat d machinery for getting the story of our big
city problems cross to the nation.
lam tt ching om information materials on the Urban Coalition.
The e will explain the b ckground and goals of the nation l st ring
c;:ommitte .
It h
been ~ . cognh:ed from th beginning th t ln ord r to be
flectiv • local c:ounter-p rt coalitions muet b dev lop d in
p ts of th cou.ntry to Uppol"t thee goal · . It i my belief th t
ior ye rs Atlant has be n a.bl to gtow and p\tO p r through
~f! ctiv and inform l coalition rel tlonship of busin s nd gov rn•
ment and with th support of th oth r ~e
of int rest which r
a p n ol th nation co ltion tfort. I bellev • how v i-; that
w n ed to r cogni
Uttl more formally the co · 1tions which
keep our city moving and lso to d v lop a loc coalition r l tion ..
ship with th
tional Urban Coalition.
�Mr. Sterne
Page Two
O ctober 19, 1967
It is rny thinking that an initial step would be for us to get together
the top repre.sentatives of these key interest gJ'oupa to form a local
coalition steering committ~e and invite the participation by other
organized groups . The initial stee11ing committee could be composed
of the Mayor, as chief elected official of the city, the President
of the Chambe,: of Commerce ; the President of the Atlanta Labor
Council, the President of the Atlant Christian Council, the CoCha.irman of the Summit Leadership Conierence. the Superintendent
of public education, and the Chairman of the Citizens Central
A dvisory Council, who is the ~lected representative of participants
in the Economic Opportunity program.
I have dr · fted a statement which might be considered by this group
which recogniz s the need for a local coalition nd endorses the
declar tion of principles of the national coalition. A copy of the
principl s of the nation 1 coalition is also attached for your
consideration.
By recognizing the existence of a co lition we will be ble to b tter
communicate urban problems and focus maximum re ource s upon
their solutions .
·
l:n ord r that w might consider this propoe , 1 have invited th
following p opl i o meet with m.e t my offic
t City Hall on
Wedne
y, Octob r 25, t 10:00 • m.:
Mr. A. H. Steni , Pre id nt
Atla.n C mb r of Commerce
Rev. S mqel Willi ma
_ C o -Chairman
Summit Lead r hip C onference
Mr. obert J. Butler, P re s ld nt
Atlant L bor C ouncil
l
�CfTY HALL
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
October 19, 1967
IVAN AL!..EN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison
Mr. A. H. Sterne, Jr., President
Atlanta Chamber of Commerce
Post Office Box 4418
Atlanta, Georgia 30302
Dear Billy:
I am sure that you are aware of the movement at the national
leve l to d e velop a strong coalition of urban i nteres t s in an effort
to exert more influence in national programs and priorities for ·
the benefit of our cities.
Repres entatives of busine s s , labor, civil rights , r e ligion, education
and M ayors o f urban cities have joined to gether in an Urban Coa lition
to provide coordinated machinery for ge tting the s t ory of our big
city problems across to the nation.
I am attaching some information materials on the Urban Coalition.
The s e will explain the background and goals of the national steering
committee .
It has been recogniz ed from the beginning that in order to b e
effective, local counter-part coalitions must b e developed in all
parts of the country to support these goals. It is my belief that
for years Atlanta has been able to grow and prosper through an
effective and informal coalition r e l ationship of business and government and with the support of the other areas of inte r es t whic h are
a part of the national coalitiori effort. I b e lieve, however, that
we need to recognize a little more formally the coalitions which
keep our city moving and also to d evelop a local coalition relationship with the national Urb an C oalition.
�Mr. Sterne
Page Two
October 19, 1967
\\
It is my thinking that an initial step would be for us to get together
the top representatives of these key interest groups to form a local
coalition steering committee and invite the participation by other
organized groups. The initial steering conrrnittee could be composed
of the Mayor, as chief elected official of the city, the President ·
of the Chamber of Commerce, the President of the Atlanta Labor
Council, the President of the Atlanta Christian Council, the CoChairman of the Summit Leadership Conference, the Superintendent
of public education, and the Chairman of the Citizens Central
Advisory Council, who is the elected representative of participants
in the Economic Opportunity program.
I have drafted a statement which might be considered by this group
which recognizes the need for a local coalition and endorses the
declaration of principles of the national coalition. A copy of the
principles of the national coalition is also attached for your
consideration.
By recognizing the existence of a coalition we will be able to better
communicate urban problems and focus maximum resources upon
their solutions.
-In order that we might consider this proposal I have invited the
following people to meet with me at my office at City Hall on
Wednesday, October 25, at 10:00 a. m.:
Mr. A. H. Sterne, President
Atlanta Chamber of Commerce
Rev. Samuel Williams
Co-Chairmam
Summit Leadership Conference
Mr. Robert J . Butler, President
Atlanta Labor Council
�Mr. Sterne
Page Three
October 19, 1967
\\
Rev. Bevel Jones, President
Christian Council of Metropolitan
Atlanta, Inc.
Dr. John W. Letson
Superintendent
Atlanta Public Schools
Mr. Erwin Stevens, President
Citizens Central Advisory Council
Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.
Sincerely yours,
Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor
IAJr:fy
\
�---- -----
October 20 , 1967
Mr . Boisfeu.illet Jones
230 Peachtree St:reet, N. W.
Suite 210
Atlanta , Georgia 30303
Dear Mr . Jones:
Attached is a copy of the loc 1 Urban Coalition material
which I promi ed you. I would appreciat · any comments
or criticisms.
I would also hope th t the EOA Board would be in a po ition
to adopt a re olution joining the Co Ution if th se six people
agree to be :recognized as the steering com.mitt e of the
local coalition.
Sincerely your ,
D n Sw at
DS:fy
Enclo ure ·
�C TYO
I~ANT
Clq'y HALL
October 19, 1967
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison
MEMORANDUM
To:
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
From:
Subject:
DanSweat
$t8
Or ganization of Local Coalition
Attached is a proposed letter to the people we discussed who might
make up the initial steering committee of the lo cal coalition.
Also attached is the statement mentioned in the letter as well as the
other material for your consideration.
I feel that if you can get this group to adopt such a statement which
contains an invita tion for other group s and organi zations to join as
part of the coalition that we can obtain some quick action by official
boards such as EOA, C o mmunity Council, Housing R esources
C ommittee, e tc. to adopt r esolutions joining the coalition.
DS:fy
�I
YOFA.TLA.N
CITY HALL
October 19, 196 7
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assi stant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liai son
Mr. A. H. Ste rne , Jr .
Pres ide nt
Atlan t a Chamb e r of Comme rc e
P. 0. Box 4 418
Atlanta, Georgia 30302
D e ar B i lly:
I a m s ur e that you a r e awa r e of the m o ve m ent at the nati onal
le v el to d e v e lop a strong coalition of urban inte rests i n an effort
t o exe rt m o r e influe nc e in n a tional pro g r a ms a n d prio ritie s for
t h e b enefit of o ur cities.
R e p resent a tives of b usiness , l a b o r, civil rights, religi on, education
and M ayors of urb an cities have joine d together in an Urban Coalition
t o provide c o ordinat e d m a chi n e r y for getting the s tory of o ur bi g
c ity pr oble m s ac r oss t o the nati on.
I am attaching some informati on materials on the U rban Coalition.
T h ese w ill explain the background and goal s of t h e national Steering
C o mmittee .
It h as b een recogni ze d from the b eginning t hat i n order to b e
effective1 l ocal counter-part coalitions must be d evelope d in all
parts of the country to support these goals. It is my belief that for
y ea r s Atl anta has b een able to grow and prospe r through an effectiv e
and informal c oalition relationship of business and gove r nment and
wit h the s u pport of the other areas of interest w h ich are a part
of t he nati onal coalition effort. I b elieve, howe v e r , that we need
to recognize a little more formally the coalitions w hi ch keep our
city moving and also to develop a l ocal coalition re l ations hip with
the national Urban Coalition.
�,,
Mr.Sterne
Page Two
October 19, 1967
It is my thinking that an initial step would be for us t get together
the top representatives of these key interest groups o form a local
coalition steering committee ?,nd invite the particip ion by other
organized groups. The initial steering committee c uld be composed
of the Mayor, as chief elected official of the city, t e President
of the Chamber of C o mmerce, the President of th Atlanta Labor
Council, the President of the
un
r
, the Co-Chairman
of the Summit Leadership Conference, the Superintendent of public
education, and the Chairman of the Citizens Central Advisory
Council, who is the elected representative of participants in the
Economic Opportunity program.
I have drafted a statement which might be considered by this group
which recognizes the need for a local coalition and endorses the
declaration of principles of the national coalition. A copy of the
principles of the national coalition is also attached for your
consideration.
By recognizing the existence of a coalition we will be able to better
communicate urban problems and focus maximum resources upon
their solutions.
In order that we might consider this proposal I have invited the
foll °1:ng y eople to meet with me in my office at City Hall on


L-at


frM 1 :
r;c ,
0
5
JD





Mr. A. H. Sterne , President
Atlanta Chamber of Commerce
Rev. Samuel Williams
C o- Chairman
Summit Leadership C onference
Mr. R obert J . Butler, President
Atlanta Labor Council
,., /}
_ lfn
~d
�Mr. Sterne
Page Three
October 19, 1967
Rev. Bevel Jones, President
Christian C o uncil of Metropolitan
Atlanta, Inc.
Dr. John W. Letson
Superintendent
Atlanta Public Schools
Mr. Erwin Stevens, President
Citizens Central Advisory Council
Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.
Sincerely yours,
I v an Alle n, Jr .
M a yor
IAJr:fy
�\\
October 23, 1967
MEMORANDUM
TO:
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
FROM:
Dan Sweat
SUBJECT:
Wednesday A . M . meeting of Local Urban Coalition
The following format is suggested for the Wednesday meeting :
1.
Mayor briefly state background for formation of National Urban Coalition.
(a ) Grew from. a concern that the country ' s national priorities placed
the problem of our urban cities far down the list -· behind Defen e,
Space , Agriculture, Highways, etc.
2.
(b )
The need for a reordering of priorities to make cities the No. 1
concern of the nation.
(c)
Congre s not only ha an attitude which i freezing urban expenditures,
but i actually cutting b ck on ocial progr m of long tanding. (The
Social Security amendments as pa ed by the House freezes th number
of aid to familie with dependant children to current levels, which
would mean that Atlanta or Fulton County DFCS could certify no more
AFDC ca es than the total number at pre . ent. )
Who mak
(a)
up Urban Co lition?
National Steering Committee of 33 memb r • M yors of urb n citie ,
top labor leaders, bu ine men, civil right• le der , educ tor and
churchmen.
�Page 2
3.
What does it do?
(a) This coalition pulls together the key elements in cities for
discussion and joint actions on the major urban problem areas
lums, poverty, unemployment, housing, education, etc.
(b) The coalition will distribute information among it
members on
pending legislation before Congress and conduct an educational
campaign to make the nation aware of the massive problems which .
cities face.
(c) The coalition will attempt to stimulate interest by private business
to provide jobs and programs in cities (the $1 billion Insurance
Industry Housing Pi-ogram re.s ulted from the Urban Coalition)
and develop resources from all other areas to bring maximum
impact on urban problems.
4.
What can an Atlanta Urban Coalition do?
(a) Act as a communications link between National Coalition and local
organization •
. (b) Provide an identifiable group representing all ar as of Atlanta life
to convene and bring to bear on any city criei •
(c) Stimulate maximum cooperation and coordination mong Grganizations.
(d) Act
a o.u nding board for new program propo
where certain programs should be placed.
nd recommend
(e) Provide upport from local community for legi lative propos 1 to
the N tional Congres and State Legislatur •
(f) A _ i t City in determining locai priorities.
�Page 3
7. Suggested Steps for Follow-Up.
(a) Mayo:r ' s Office will coordinate Coalition initially, but encourage
volunteers to provide staff assistance. (Perhaps some organization bas a per on they could ass ign to ooordinate the program
full-time. It doesn't have to be done from City Hall .)
(b) Other organizations who express interest in joining will be added
and kept informed.
8. Mayor mention probability of Task Force or Private Employment
holding conference here on November 15th to discuss ways private
industry can provide jobs and training for unemployed and underemployed.
DS/br
\
j
�October 13. 1967
Mr . Boi sfeuillet J ones
230 Peachtree Street,. N . W .
Suite 210
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Mr . Jones :
Attached is a copy of a memo I sent to the M a yor
regarding the est blishment of a local eoe.lition in
Atlant .
I thought you might want to glance oveJ." this prior to
our meeting on M onday morning.
Sincerely yours ,
Dan Sweat
DS:fy
Enclo ut-e (l)
'
�October 12, 1967
Mr . Gerald T . H o rton
2342 Bank of Geo rgia Building
Atlanta. Geol"gia 30303
Dear Jerry:
The Mayor hasn't seen this yet.
I would appreciate your
comments and c.riticisme of this appi"o ch,
Sincerely yours.
Dan Swe t
DS:fy
Enclosure (1)
�7
6 lj----M.
I
r
A. H. Sterne, Jr., President
Atlanta Chamber of Commerce
588-7123
Board of Directors - 34 members
THe main purpose is to bring in new businesses, encourage expansion
of present business, and create new jobs. 11
11
Robert J. Butler, President
Atlanta Labor C oun cil ·
f',
/i
Executive B o ard - 18 members
to create better relationships between the affiliated labor unions and
keep them aware of civic and political happenings in the community and
take whatever concerted action we can to improve these.' ~
11
Sam Williams
)
Jesse Hill
)
Co-Chairmen
Q. V. Williamson )
Summit Leadership Conference
688-0206
Steering C o mmittee - membership varies - approx imately 25
C ombination of all groups such as SCLC, NAACP , Grass R oats C o uncil, etc.
and civic organizations for the 11 purpose of making Atlanta a better city 11 •

-----~
Dr . J ohn W . Letson, Superintendent
Mr. E d S. Cook, President
Atlanta Board of E d ucation
·--- -------------
522-3381
Board - 9 members
P urpose - To s e t policies and approve budget for Atlanta Sch ool System.
The B oa rd is completely responsibl e for the operation of t h e School System.
�~ ! e v e ! Jones, President
Dr. Harmon D. Moore, Executive Director
Christian Council of Metropolitan Atlanta, Inc.
Each participating church is represented by 2 to 5 delegates, dependent
on the size of the congregation, plus its pastor. Presently, there are 170
churches in the C o uncil.
"It is a fellowship of churches, Christian organizations and individuals
involved in mutual ministries _to the growing 5 county area comprising
metropolitan Atlanta.
. . . .. . . . . . .
The mutual ministries combined in
the Council are 3-dimensional; Social, moral and spirtual. The power of
group incentive moves into action, offering ways and means to meet total
needs."
Mr. Erwin Stevens, President
Citizens Central Advisory Council
Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.
Council - 39 members (3 from each center
by the E xe cutive Administrator)
523-5791
= 33
-- and 6 members selected
Purpose - To provide further representation from the poor at a city-wide
level in the administration of the Economic Opportunity program.
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
�A . H, Sterne, Jr . , President
Atlanta Chamber of Commerce
Board of Directors .. 34 membe:rs
"THe main purpose is to bring in new businesses, encourage expansion
of present business, a,nd create new jobs. 11

·-----~--~-----·-~-------·--------.~--~~--·-----------·~----~Robert J . Butler, P:resident
Atlanta Labor Council
·
Executive Board - 18 members
"to create better relationships between the affiliated labor unions and
keep them awai-e of civic and political happenings in the community and
take whatever concerted action we can to improve these.~
Sam Williams
Jesse Hill
Q, V . Williamson
)
)
J
Co-Chai:rman
bJ'K - t);uJ(p
Summit Leader hip Confe:rence
Steering C ommittee .., membership vade
... pproximately 25
Combin tion of all groups such as SCLC, NAACP, Gr ss Roots C ouncil,, etc.
and civic organiz tione fo~ the "purpose of making Atlanta a better city".
Dr. John W. Letson, Superintendent
Mr, Ed S. Cookw President
Atl nta Bo rd of Educ Uon
~ ~ - 3.38/
Board .. 9 m.emb rs
P ul,'pose ... To et polici.e and pprov budg t for Atlant School Sys t m.
Th B oa11d i c:ompl t ly l' pon ible for the op t' tlon of the School Sy tem.
�Rev. Bevel Jones, President
Dr. Harmond D . Moore. Executive Director
Christian C o uncil of Metropolitan Atlanta, Inc.
Each participating church is represented by 2 to 5 delegates, dependent
011 the size of the c ongregation, plus its pastor. Presently, there are 170
churches in the Council.
"lt is a fellowship of churches; Christian organizations and individuals
involved in mutual minists;,ies to the growing 5 county area comprising
metropolitan Atlanta.
• . • .• • • . • . • The mutual ministries combined in
the Council are 3-dimensional; Social, moral and spirtual. The poweJ" of
group incentive moves into action, offering ways and means to meet total
needs . "
Mr .. Erwin Stevens, P:resident
Citizens Central Advisory Council
Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc .
523-5791
Council - 39 members (3 from each center = 33 ·- and 6 m mbel's sel cted
by the Executive Administ"I' tor)
Purpose ... To provide ful"ther ,:,epresent tion £rom the poor at city•wid
lev l in the adminl tr tion. of the Economic Oppo'ttunity prog~am.
M yor Ivan All n, Jl'.
�THE URBAN COALITION
CHICAGO CONFERENCE: f~OBILIZING URBAN COALITIONS
TASK FORCE ON LOCAL COALITIONS
Mayor Joseph M. Barr
Pittsburgh
Co-Chairmen:
Charles P. Taft
Cincinnati
"
Arnold Aronson
New Yo r k
WORKSHOP A (Room 322 - part of the Illinois Room)
Chai r man: John Denman, Manager, Dept. of Urban Affairs, Ford Motor Co .
Resource Persons: Wm. Hildenbrand, Legislative Asst . , Sen . Caleb Boggs (R.Del .)
Clifton W. Henry, Acting Director, Comm. Relations Serv . ,USCM
James Twomey, Director, Non-Profit Housing Center,Urban Amer.
James Hamilton,Director, Wash i ngton Office, Nat ' l Council of
Churche~
WORKSHOP B (Room 331)
Chairman: John Gunther, Exec. Director, U. S. Conference of Mayorl_
Resource Person s : -Thomas F. Roeser, Dir. of Public Affairs,The Quaker Oats Co .
I r a Bach, Ex. Director, Chicago Dwellings Assoc .
Vernon Jordan, Dir . , Voter Educ . Project,Southern Reg . Cou~ci ·
Dan Sweat, Dir . , Governmental Liaison, Mayor Ivan Allen's
Office, Atlanta, Georgia
WORKSHOP C (Room 334)
Cha i rman: Mrs . Fr ank Williams, League of Women Voters Education Fund
Re sou r ce Persons: Hugh Mields, Assoc . , Wise/Gladstone, Assoc .
Bruce Cole, Jobs Now (Div . Director of Programs,Y MCA of Met . Ch
Don Canty, Dir . , Urban Information Center,Urban America, Inc .
Guichard Parris, Dir . , Public Relat i ons Dept . , National
Urban League
WORK SHO P D ( Room 505-6)
Ch a · rman : La r old Schulz, Coord i nator, Ant i -poverty Task Force,Nat ' l Counc i l of
Chu r ches
Re s ou ce Pe r son s: Alan Pri tchard,Jr., Asst.Exec.~ir . ,Nationa l League of Cities
J ames Ph i ll i ps, Construction Mgr . ,Rehabilitation,U . S . Gypsum
Abbot Rosen, Midwestern Dir . ,B'nai Br i th,Ant i -Defamat i on Lge .
Me l vi n Mister, Project Dir . ,D . C. Redevelopment Land Agency
WO RKS HO P E (Hu ll Ho us e)
Chai rma n : Ha r old Fl emi ng , Pres i dent, Potomac Institute
Res ou r c e Pe r sons : Dona l d E. Nicoll, Admin . Asst . , Senator E. S .M usk i e (D . - Me . )
A. Donald Bourgeois,Gen .M gr. for Model City Af fa ir s,St . Louis
Edwa r d Holmg r en, Exec . Dir . ,Leadersh i p Counc i l f or Me t r o .
Op e n Commu ni t i es, Chicago
Pe t e r Tufo , Leg i slative Asst . , Mayor John Lin ds ay ' s Of fi ce ,
New Yo r k Ci ty .
�The Urban Coalition
I
Federal Bar Building W est / 1819 H Street, N.
w.
Washington, D . C. / 20006
Steering Committee Co -chairmen : Andrew Heiskell / A. Philip Randolph
October 7, 1967
Honorable Ivan Allen
Mayor of the City of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Ivan:
Here are some comments and suggestions on some of the ideas we discussed
in Atlanta.
The establishment of a six-to-eight member committee to act as an organzing
or steering committee is a very worthwhile approach. I suggest that leaders
from business, labor, religion, and civil rights be invited to serve on the
committee. You may wish to add representatives from other sectors of the
community to the committee. This committee should be formed as soon as
possible because, as you know, the Urban Coalition is holding a National
Conference to discuss the formation of local coalitions in Chicago on October 17, 1967. It would be advantageous to have representatives from this
committee attend.
One of the initial actions the committee could take is to convene a meeting
of 50 to 60 local business and labor leaders to consider the formation of a
local task force on private employment.
It is suggested that the format for the meeting be a luncheon followed by
a two-hour working conference, To set the mieting in its proper perspective, the participants should hear from a nationally known business leader,
preferably Gerald Phillippe of General Electric, co-chairman of our Task
Force on Private Employment and Entrepeneurship. We would be happy to
assist in obtaining a speaker for the occasion.
The discussion at the working session should focus on the development of a
local private employment task force and the establishment of working committees
to (1) assess the local unemployment and underemployment problems, (2) develop
programs with specific goals, and (3) issue evaluation reports on the progress
of the programs.
Staff personnel from the par ticipating companies would be assigned to perform
the specific duties. Technical assistance and specialists should be used as
needed .
National Coordinators : John Feild/ Ron M. Linton
Telephone 293-1530
�HON. IVAN ALLEN
(2)
OCTOBER 7, 1967
A second meeting will be convened within a month at which time the
working committees will present recommendations and programs. Commitments from individual companies to support and implement the
programs will be obtained at this time, including financial and
personnel support.
·
I would be happy to com.e to Atlanta to meet with your organizing
group at their convenience. If we can be of further help, let us
know.
Cordially,
Jo~
Nat i ona l Coor dina tor
�CITY OF A.TI A
TA
\\
CITY HALL
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison
October 26, 1967
Mr. Al Bows, Vic e President,
Atlanta Chamber of Commerce
Mr. Robert J. Butler, President
Atlanta Labor Council
Dr. J oh n Letson, Superintend ent
Atla n ta P ublic School s
Dr. Harmon Moore , Executive Director
Christian C ouncil of Metr opolitan Atla nta
Mr. Erwin Ste v ens, Chair man
Citiz ens C e ntral Adv i s ory C ommittee
R e ver e nd Samuel Williams , Co-Chairman
Summi t Leader shi:p Confe r e nce
Su bj ec t : Atl anta Urban Coal i t ion
G e ntlemen:
Thank y ou for m eetin g t oge the r w ith me at City H a ll t o d isc u s s
the formation of an Atlanta U r b an Coalition.
I h o p e th a t you will carefully consid er the s t ateme nt of th e
Na t i onal U r b a n C oalition, and l e t me kn ow i f y ou a g ree that this
state ment can be end or s e d and supporte d b y you as part of the
stee ring c om mittee of the Atl anta Urban C oalition.
A l so, I hope y o u w ill each e d i t th e draft s t a t eme nt on t he l ocal
coalition and re t urn it to Dan Swe at so that h e can consolidate
our e fforts i n t o a final stat e m e nt.
�October 26, 1967
Page Two
Several organizations have expressed a desire to become
affiliated with the Atlanta Urban Coalition, either as members
of the steering committee or of a broad representation which
we hope will develop. Your ideas as to how we should proceed
with expanded representation will be appreciated. In the meantime, we will include all organizations who desire on our mailing
list so that they might be better informed.
Thanks again for your help.
Sincerely yours,
Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor
IAJr:lp
�CITY OF.AT ANTA
CITY HALL
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison
October 2 6, 1967
Mr. Al Bows, Vice President,
Atlanta Chamber of Commerce
Mr. Robert J. Butler, President
Atlanta Labor Council
Dr. John Letson, Superintendent
Atlanta Public Schools
Dr. Harmon Moore, Executive Director
Christian Council of Metropolitan Atlanta
Mr. Erwin Steve ns, Cha irman
Citizens C entr a l Advisory Committee
Reverend Samuel Williams, Co- Chairman
Summit Leadership Conference
Subje c t: Atlanta Urban Coaliti on
Gentlemen:
Thank you for meeting together wi th me at City Hall to dis cuss
the formation of an Atlanta Urban Coalition.
I hope that you will carefully consider the statement of the
National Urban Coalition, an,;} l et me know if you agree that this
statement can be endorsed and supported by you as part of the
steering committee of the Atlanta Urban Coaliti on.
Also, I hope you will each edit the draft s tatement on the local
coalition and return it to Dan Sweat so that he can consolidate
our efforts into a final statement.
�,..
October 26, 1967
Page Two
Several organizations have expressed a desire to become
affiliated with the Atlanta Urban Coalition, either as members
of the steering committee or of a broad representation which
we hope will develop. Your ideas as to how we should proceed
with expanded representation will be appreciated. In the meantime, we will include all organizations who desire on our mailing
list so that they might be better informed.
Thanks again for your help.
Sincerely yours,
, Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor
IAJr:lp
�CITY OF .ATLANTA
CITY HALL
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison
October 2 6, 19 67
Mr. Al Bows, Vice President,
Atlanta Chamber of Commerce
Mr. Robert J. Butler, President
Atlanta Labor Council
Dr. John Letson, Superintendent
Atlanta Public Schools
Dr. Harmon Moore, Executive Director
Christian Council of Metropolitan Atlanta
Mr. Erwin Stevens, Chairman
Citizens Central Advisory Committee
Reverend Samuel Williams, Co-Chairman
Summit Leadership Conference
Subject: Atlanta Urban Coalition
Gentlemen:
Thank you for meeting together with me at City Hall to discuss
the formation of an Atlanta Urban Coalition.
I hope that you will carefully consider the statement of the
National Urban Coalition, am) let me know if you agree that this
statement can be endorsed and supporte d by you as part of the
steering committee of the Atlanta Urban Coalition .
Also, I hope you will each ed it the draft statement on the local
coalition and r e turn it to Dan Sweat so that he can consol idate
our efforts into a final statement.
=
�October 26, 1967
Page Two
Several organizations have expressed a desire to become
affiliated with the Atlanta Urban Coalition, either as members
of the steering committee or of a broad representation which
we hope will develop. Your ideas as to how we should proceed
with expanded representation will be appreciated. In the meantirne, we will include all organizations who desire on our mailing
list so that they might be better informed.
Thanks again for your help.
Sincerely yours,
Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor
IAJr:lp
�.
CITYO
A.TLANTA
CITY HALL
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Cod e 404
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Admin istrative Assistant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Lia ison
October 26, 1967
Mr. AI Bows, Vice President,
Atlanta Chamber of Commerce
Mr. Robert J. Butler, President
Atlanta Labor Council
Dr. John Letson, Superintendent
Atlanta Public Schools
Dr. Harmon Moore, Executive Director
Christian Council of Metropolitan Atlanta
Mr. Erwin Stevens, Chairman
Citizens Central Advisory Committee
Reverend Samuel Williams, Co-Chairman
Summit Leadership Conference
Subject: Atlanta Urban Coalition
Gentlemen:
Thank you for meeting together with me at City Hall to discuss
the formation of an Atlanta Urban Coalition.
I hope that you will carefully consider the statement of the
National Urban Coalition, anQ- let me know if you agree that this
statement can be endorsed and supported by you as part of the
steering committee of the Atlanta Urban Coalition .
Also , I hop e you will ea ch e dit the dra ft s ta t em ent on th e l ocal
coa ition and r tu n it t D. n
ti
fJ -
rr
ip
a. l
w t s th -th
ns H · t
�•
October 26, 1967
Page Two
Several organizations have expressed a desire to become
affiliated with the Atlanta Urban Coalition, either as members
of the steering committee or of a broad representation which
we hope will <level.op. Your ideas as to how we should proceed
with expanded representation will be appreciated. In the meantime, we will include all organizations who desire on our mailing
list so that they might be better informed.
Thanks again for your help.
IAJr:lp
be : Mr . B oisfeuille t Jone s
Mr. O p ie Sh el t on
/
Mr. D a n Swea t ~
'
�CITY OF .ATI AN
\\
October 11, 196 7
CITY HALL
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaiso n
MEMORANDUM
To:
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
From:
Dan Sweat
Subj ect : Organization of L ocal Urban C o alitions
A priority goal of the Steering Committee of the National
Urban C oalition is the estab lishment of strong local coalitions
in the 50 largest urban cities of the nation. This is, of
course, essential to the very life blood of any sustained
effort to develop a meaningful coalition which can speak
for urban America as a whole.
The direction taken by these local coalitions will depend upon
the individual city or urban area and the wishes of the local
leadership. We can safely predict they will take on a wide
variety of shapes and forms from city to city.
The more I analyze the alternatives to organization of a
coalition in Atlanta, the more I am convinced we already
have several single -purpos e groups functioning in this
very capacity. I believe the identification of these groups
as our coalition might reduce or negate the requirement
for establishment of any other body, although I believe at
some point a leadership meeting should be held to explain
the Urban C o alition .
�Mayor Allen
Page Two
October 11, 1967
Probably the best example of a local coalition organized to
attack a particular problem area is the Board of Directors
of Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. This group, originally
appointed by the governing authorities of the City of Atlanta
and Fulton County; and now operating under a non-profit
charter, clearly represents the six broad areas of Business,
Labor, Civil Rights, Education, Religion and Local Government,
which make up the national coalition. (A copy of the EOA Board
is attached. )
A second group organized around a single -purpose is the
Housing Resources Committee. (Copy of Committee Structure
attached.)
Other groups which would fall in this category would be the
Community Relations Commission, Atlanta Y o uth C o uncil,
and the Citizens A d visory C o mmittee on Urban Renewal.
(C o pies of CRC, AYC and CACUR B o ard members attached.)
Each of these groups is organized to perform in an area of
primary concern to the national coalition; EOA - P ove rty;
H o using Resources Committee - L ow Inco1ne Housing;
C o mmunity Relations Commission - Civil Rights; CACUR Urban Redevelopment.
The final Model Cities Executive B o ard - Technical A dv isory
C o mmittee - Citizens Advisory Committee structure will provide
for another coalition of individuals and groups designed to
produce cooperative action in planning and implementing the
M o del Cities Pr og ram . (Copies of proposed B o ard and
C o mmittee Structure attached . )
It is readily apparent that no recognized local group is
established for the specific purpose of developing employment opportunities for the poor . While a large part of
EOA's program is designed to reduce unemployment and
�Mayor Allen
Page Three
October 11, 1967
underemployment, no broadly-based organization currently
exists which can function in a capacity which will bear the
local responsibility for meeting the national Urban Coalition
goal of one million jobs for the poor. (This was the first
announced goal of the Urban Coalition. )
I believe, however, that a project in the works during the last
eighteen months by the City of Atlanta, EOA, the C o mmunity
C o uncil, Atlanta Chamber of Commerce and the Sears-R oe buck
Foundation might have produced the mechanism for creation
of a coalition on employment opportunities.
This group has met informally at least once a month during
this time in an effort to produce a color slide presentation
on problems and opportunities for employment of the poor.
The Sears-Roebuck F o undation financed the employment of
a top advertising agency to assemble the materials and design
the presentation under the supervision of the informal group.
The presentation is now completed and Mr. Lucien Oliver of
Sears will, in the next three or four weeks, invite a select
g roup of key business executives to a luncheon to be exposed
to this production. He is expected to ask each of these
executives to sponsor luncheons for a wider group of businessmen in an effo rt to disseminate the informati on to as many
firms as possible .
The businessmen will also be encouraged to direct their
personnel management to become better infor med on the
problems of unemployment and underemployment among the
poor and to investigate all possibilities for providing entry
level jobs for additional employees who lack skills and
training.
�Mayor Allen
Page Four
October 11, 1967
This will fit perfectly into the scheme of the national coalition,
which is encouraging the top executives of the large national
firms to direct their plants throughout the country to do essentially
the same thing. (There has already been some definite response
to this program. I 'have had an indication from Sears and F o rd
offices here that the word has already come from the top.)
In view of the impending National Steering Committee C o nference
on Employment here in November, I am encouraging the meeting
of the first group by Mr. Oliver be held in advance of the
Coalition. I believe this initial group should be considered
as the local coalition and worked into the National Conference.
I recommend that you ask Mr. Oliver to attend or send Dan
Garies or B ob W o od to the October 17 all-day meeting on
local coalitions in Chicago. I would also recommend that I
attend as your representative and that you ask Vernon J o rdan
to represent us in the area of Civil Rights. Vernon is on loan
to the Urban C o alition staff and w ill be in attendance and is
more aware of what is going on than any other individual from
Atlanta.
I also would hope that at a very early date we can show you the
e mployment pr esentation and get your ideas on how we can
provide follow-up.
DS :fy
�·'
,'
1
i
I
ECONOMIC OP:?ORTUNITY ATLANTA,
BOARD MEMBERS
I
INC.
\\
Authority Cha i r ma n :
Boisfeu i llet Jones, 210 Peachtree Ce~~er B~ilding, 230 Peachtree Street,
N. w. , Atlanta r Georgia 30303.
'I'e l eph one: 522-8511
1,5""V--T-~J-.,
Members app ointed by Ful~or.·county:
I
Harold Benson , Ben sor. Chev~ole~ Company , lQOl Alpharetta Street, Roswell,
Georgia 30075.
TelephoEe: 993-4 4:..4
~t
r
Melvin Granth a m, 2152 Woodberry
Telephone:
758-866 1 , Ext. 57
•.
v e nu e , East Point, Georgia 30044.
.
~
_,,.
.
John W. Greer , 811 Healey .Bui ding, Atlanta, Georgia 30303.
Telep~one~
524~4223
P'


Jesse Hill , Vice President and Actua ry, Atlanta Life Insurance Company,
148 Au u~n Av ru e , N. E., Atlanta, Georgia 30303.
Telephone:
JA 1-0513
M.
Carl Plunkett , P l u nkett a nd Company, Inc . , 20 1
At l a n t a, Geo r gia 30 303 .
Telephone~
JA 1-2438
s-~,r~J"l
~treet, N. W.,
~
Dr. Paul D . Wes;: Su pe r 143.215.248.55 end ~nt, r ~ul ton ,~ounty S~h~ols, 165 C~n! ra .1--,.
Avenue, S . W., A-lanta, ~eo rgia 3J~OJ. T _lephone. J72 - 2211
~
Mr s. W. H. (Lucy Aiken, 2 3 9 West Lake Avenue , N. W., Atlanta, Georgia
303 14.
Telepr:o:-: e:
794 -243 1
6»[)_ ~~
Member 3 ::i.pp0 inted c y tr: 2 Ci t Lof A t ieo r~ta:
Willi a::-n L. Ca l2.oway, Cal]_o':..;ay Realty Ccmp an-1 0 193 Auburn Avenue, N. E . ,
Atl anta , Georgi3 38~03o
?eiep~one ~ JA 2-4525
~ ~ :t
Rev . Joseph L. 2riggs, Fastor
1450
Go=don Street P res b yteria n Church,
0
W., At_a nta , Georg ~a 3 0310.
Telephone: PL 3- 6121
Ave n ue, S . Wo, A~l a n t a , Geo r g~a
,\tlanta Pui:::lic Schools, 224 Central
'J:' e lephone :
5 22-3381
,, ~
W. H o ~:on ta.gu2 0 Sr . , President , Georgia S-tate AYL- CIO , 1 5 Peach_) ree
Street , IT. E o , Atlanta, Georgia 30 3030
Telephone:
525 - 2793 ?i
Revised:
12/8/66
�I .
,,
-
2
Members appoir:ted by the City of Atlanta (Cont '_d). : :-...
II
A.H. Sterne , President, ~r~st Co~pany of Georgiao 36
N. E., Atlanta, Georgia 30303. · Telephone: · 588- 71 23
Mrs. LeP.oy (Ann) Woqdwardh. ~; ~ .~akdale Road,
Telephone: D~ 3-4020 ~
~;j".
dgew?od Avenue,
~
E., Atlanta, Georgia 30307.
27
Rev. M. L. King , Sr., ?astor, Ebenezer 3aptist Ch rch, 413 rub
orn Aven~e,
"'
'
1


A


\ .;..--,-/ f.h •
N. E., Atlanta, Georgia. Telephone: 688-7263
~~_'g-:_~_.._____
--
John S. Eerndo::1 (Gwinnett b ember), Suwannee, Georgia 30174.
Telephone: 945-5375 ~
Julian Sharpton (Gwinnett Member), Whippoorwill ~treet , Duluth, Georgia
30136. Telephone g 963-3491 or 476-2170
~
George L. Edwards, Jr. (Rockda le .Member), 1842 Cal loway Drive , N. W.,
Atlanta, Georg i a 30314. Te lephone: 483-8647 ~ r /:lo
.' 1.
Mrs . Nanci e 3towers (Rockdale .Member ), Director, ::Jepartment of Family
and Children S e rvi ce$, West Avenue , Conyers, Georgia 30207.
Tele phon e: 483-86 06
· LJ...>..t.l~
,.
-
Members appoir..t e d b y the Citi z ens Central Advisory Council (CCAC):
Mr . Erwin Stev e ns, 799 Parsoris Stre et, S o W., Atlanta, Georgia 30314 .
Telep~one : 523- 5791 or 873 - 65 24
Mr-s-.- -Ma-raie -G . - W7 -r..-.'"1-,- -14-G§ - 31:-id-9-e&- -A--v:sr-;1J, 9
v - ~, -
W-.-.- -A:t;.laR ta 7
-
Geo.r..g.ir=i. _3 0 31.0 __
T-e-1-ephGne~--~§S-4-2-3-0-Rober t ~obbs, 2455 Abner P lace, N. W.
Telephone~
622~0919 or 794-1487
0
Atlanta 0 Georgia 30318.
Mrs. A o L. Ben ton . 162 .Lama r Street, S . E . , At l anta, Georgia 30315.
Tel e p hone: 524 -6 075
Mr. H . D. 11 Bo 11 Wil ey
Mr. Robert Barnes
Mr. W. T . Brooks
Mr. L e roy Dobbs
Mrs. Ethel Cox
Mrs. Susie Labo rd
Mr. Edward Young
Mrs. B eatric e Garl and
M rs. W ayman Mitchell
Mr. Lawre nc e Col eman
Revised:
12/8/66
_,.
�•
..





rr;a y
31., _967
HOUSIFG RESOURCES cmsfJI':i:'TEE
Mr o Cecil Ao Alex2nder., Ch2irma n
Housing Resources Comoit t ee
Finch, Al exand er., Ba~nes, Rothschild and Pascha l , i r cnitcc~s
10th Flo or Stan ·ard Federal Building
44 Broad Street , No Wo
Atlanta, Georgia
Dro Sanford So Atwo6d., Co - Cha i rma n
Housing Resources Co~~ittee
President, Emory Univer si ty
At lan t a, Georgia
303 22
Dro Benjamin Eo Ma ys, Cu -C hair ma n
Hous i ng Res o urces Commi tt ee
Pr es id ent , Morehouse College
At - anta , Georg i a
PANELS
LEGAL
~ro Cha r les Lo Wel t ner , At t orney
The Fir s t 1~ t ional Bank , Suite 2943
2 Pea chtree Street
Atlanta , Georg i a
Mr. Dona l d Hol lowel l, Regional Di rec t or
Equa l Employ!nent Opport uni ty Commi ssion
1776 Peachtr ee Stre et , N. Wo
At l an t a , Georg i a
Honorable Luther Alverson, Judge
Fulton Co unty Superior Co ur t
136 Pryor Str eet , So. Wo
Atlanta, Georgta
~~. Archer D. Smith III, At torney
Harmon a nd ThackEt on
1944 Nati on3l Bank of Georgi a ~i ge
Atlanta, Georgia
Mro Norman Lo Underwood, At torney
S c:nders, Hes te:..· .·. ~ Holley
1001 Commerce Bui ding
Atlanta, Georgia
Chairman
�Ps.ge Two
CONSTRUCTION AND DES I GN
Dro Edwin Harrison, Pre s ide t
Georg ia Inst i tute of Technology
225 1Torth _
A.venue , No Wo
A tla .. ta , Georgi a
Chairman
Mr o Herma n Jo Russel l , Contractor
504 Fair Street, Sa W.
At lanta, Georg ia
30313
Mro More land Smi th, Director
Urban Planning Pro ject
Southern Regiona l Council
,l.J_ h St.,,ee .,_V, ,.a,r o -.5 Fo -r-sy.
At lanta, Georg i a
v..:..
Vice - Chairman
o
Revo J ohn A. Middleton , Presideht
1110:rris Brown College
673 Hunter Street, No Wo
Atlant2 , GP - - . ·· Mr . Henry P o Alexand er, Bu ilder
2439 Fernlea ~ Court , N. W.
Atlanta, Georgia
Mro J ames Moore , Pres ide~t
Atla nta Lab or Co uncil
15 Peach tree Street, No E.
Room 20~
Atlan ta, Georg i a
30303
FINANCE
Dean Har ding Ba Young
Atlanta University
223 Ches t nut Street, s . W.
At lan ta , Geor g ia
Mr . Lee Bur e , President
Re t ai l Credi t Company
P. Oa Box 4081
Atlan ta, Georg ia
30302
0
Mr o Butler TQ Henders on
Assistant t o Dr . Ma y s
Moreho use College
223 Chestn ut S treet, S . Wa
Atls.nta, Ge org ia
Chairman
�FINANCE (continued)
Mr. Mills B o Lane , Jro , President
The Citizens and Southe~en 1Tat.:.onal Bank
Po Oo Box 4899
At lanta, Georgia
30303
Joseph Earle Birnie:; President
The National Bank of Georgia
Pea chtree at Five Points
Atlanta, Georgia
30303
IVIr.
i!Ir ~ Augustus HQ Sterne, President
The Trust Company ·of Georgia
36 Edge~ood Avenue, N ~ Eo
Atlanta, Georgia
30303
ivir o Gord or. J ones, President
The Fulto~ :.~t i onal Bank
Po Oo Box 4387
Atlanta, Georgia
30302
Vice - Chairm2.n
NON-PROFIT FUNDS (Combined with Fi nance Pane l)
Mr . A. Bo Padgett, Executive Director
,-1etropoli t an Foundation of At l ant a
1423 Candler Bui l ding
Atlanta, Georgia
30303
Mr. Hamil t on Do uglas., Jro, Attorney
Na tional Bank of Georgia Building
Atlanta , Georg i a
Rev Wi l lia~ Holrne s Borders , Pas tor
Whea t Street Baptist Ch urch
11.~26 !-1ozley Dr i v e., So Wo·
Atlan ta , Georgia
Dr. Rufus Clement , Pres i dent
Atla nta Univ er s ity
223 C~es t nut Street, Se W.
At l anta , Geor g ia
l'fir o J ohn Wils on , Pres i dent
Horne Wi ls on Company
163 Peter s Stree t, $. Wo
At anta , Georgia
30313
�Pa 6 e Fou_
NON-PROFIT FU:N""DS ( cont L_ued )
Mr . Albert Love
Executive Vice Presideht
The McCal l Corporation
P O. Box 1000
Doravi l le., Georgia
30040
Mr. Scott Houston , Jr • ., Executive Director
Wes l ey 1,-voods Apartments
Po Oo Box 15468
.
At l anta., Georgia
30333
PUBLIC BOUS ING
lfD'.' ~ Edwi n Lo Sterne , Chairman
Ho using Authority of t he City of Atlanta
639 Tr us t Company of Georgia Bu ild i ng
Atlanta , Georgia
30303
Dro Albert ~anley, President
Spe l man College
350 Leonard Stree t ., S. Wo
Atlanta, Georgia
Mro Leonard Reinch, President
Cox Broadcasting Company
1601 Wes t Peachtree Street, No E •
Atlanta, Georgia
Mr . CJ.arence Do Coleri1an Regi onal Direct or
· Na tional Urba n League
136'X~ Marietta S'creet., No W, Suite 24:::I
Atlar.ta, Ge orgia
Charl e s F o Pal~er, President
Palmer, Inc., Palmer Building
41 Marietta Street
Atlanta., Georgia 30303
~!Jr.
~
Chairman
�Pae;e Five
LA:N""D ACQUISI':i:'I01T
Mr Wa llace Lo Lee., President
At l anta Gas Light Company
P. o. Box . 4569
-4:"-lant-a-; Georgia
30302
0
Mr o Clayton Ro Yates., President
Yates-Milton Stores
228 Auburn Avenue , r. E.
At lanta., Georgia
Jim E o Land
Chief Engineer f or Georgia
Southern Be _l Telephone & Telegraph Company
805 Peachtree Street, No Eo
At lanta., Georgia
Ivir o
Acting Cha irman
Dro V2..vi an Henders on., President
Clarlc Collese
240 Chestnut Street, So Wo
Atlant a., Georgia
Mr . J. A. Alston, President
Atlanta Real Estate Board Representative
Empire Real Estate Board
Mr . Stewart Wi ght
Alston Realty Co .
19$~A Auburn ·Ave . N. E.
SOC IA t Ji'!f~:§tE~JS'rgia 30 30 3
f
Wight , Couch & Ward
15 Peachtree Bldg., Room 822
Atlanta, Georgi a
30303
deceas ed ~.r.--G~e1~1-l--e,e-e-o-E~re-F-~8-R, Adm ini s tra tor
Economic Opportunity Atlant a, Inc.
101 Mar ietta Street, Ne W.
Atlanta., Georgia
Mro Duane Beck., Executive Director
Comm unity Council of the Atlanta Area, I nc.
1000 Glenn Building
Atlanta., Georgia
30303
Mrs. Sujette Cranl-::, Social Director
Neighborhood Services., E O A., Inc
101 Marietta Street
Atlanta, Georgia
D~. Tobe Johnson ,
Professor of Political Science
Morehouse Coll ege
223 Chestnut Street, S. Wo
Atlanta, Georgia
Dean William S J ackson
Atlanta University
223 Chestnut Street, S Wa
Atlanta, Georgia
0
Chairman
�Page Six
SOCIAL PROBLEr,'iS (continued )
Mr. Erwin Stevens., C _air-rr:an
Cit izens Centra l Advisory Co~mittee, E.O.A.
799 Parso_ s Street, S. W.
Atlanta, Georgia
Lewis Ce:r..ker, At torney
2045 Manchest er, r- . E.
Atlanta, Ge orgia
i'-'Ir.
BUSINESS PARTICIPATION
ivT. r.
Virgi l Mi lton
3626 Tuxedo Ro a d., N. W.
Chairman
Atlanta, Georgia
Mr. Ed ward L. Simon: Audit or Vice - Chairman
Atlanta Life Ins urance Cotpany
148 Auburn Avenue , N. E.
At lanta, Georgia
Mr . Harlee Branch, President
The Southern Company
3390 Peachtree Road., N. E.
At lanta., Georgia
Mr. c. Ar t h ur Jenkins
Director, Ind us trial Relations
Lockh eed Company
Marietta, Georgia
30060
Mr. Roland iVI2xweL!. , Pre sident
Davin on's Department Store s
180 Peach t ree Street, N. W.
Atlanta, Ge orgia
PUBLIC I NFORMAT I ON
Mr. J ames L. Townsend '
Tm·msend and Asso ciates
1014 Hea l ey Bldg.
Atlanta, Georgia
�•
Pa ge Seven
PUBLIC n -:P.ORI Ll\.T ION {ccn'cinued)
11r . Da l~ Cla r k
Dire c to~ of Public Affairs
WP.GA - TV ;
1551 Bri qrcliff Road , N. E.
Atlanta, ·9eori; i a
Chai~~ari
Mr. Ray Moore
rJew s D:irec'tor
1
WSB - TV
1601 ·w est Peachtree Stree t, _ • E.
At lanta , Georgia
30309
Mr . Jim Wood
New s Directo~ , WAOK
110 Edgewood Avenue,~. E.
At lanta, Ge o g ia
Vice -Ch2.irman
STAFF
ROOM 1204, CITY HALL
Tel. 522-4463, Ext , 430
Malcolm D. Jo nes, Director
W. W~ Gates , Consultan t
Mis s J oyoo McK1'4ig.l::l--t , Secretary
A~~
,tM,ciC'"!.4-1
�'
COMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMISSION
1203 CITY HALL
ATLANTA, GEORGIA
\\
Mr. Irving K. Kaler, Chairman
1820 Fulton National Bank Building
Atlanta, Georgia
Home-255- 7694
Office-525-6886
Mrs. Eliza K. Paschall
Executive Director
Room 1203 City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Home-373-1966
Offi ce- 522-4463, Ext. 433
Mr. Robert Dobbs
2455 Abner Place, N. W.
Atlanta, Georgia
~
-622-0919
Offi ce J:! U .tl@i'
Miss Helen Bullard
Toombs, Amisano & Wells
70 Fairlie Street, N. W.
Atl anta , Georg ia
Home-874-3986
Dffice - .5 77-3600
Ar chbishop Paul J. Hallinan
Ca t holi c Archdiocese o f Atlanta
P. D. Box 1 2047, No r th side Station
Atlanta, Georgia 30305
Dffice-261-1000
Mr. Roll a nd Maxwel l
c/o Da vi son' s
180 Peac htree St ree t, N. W.
Atlant a , Geo rgia
Home- 351-2053
Office- 522-1300
Mr . Joseph Haas
1116 First Na t i onal Bank Building
Atla nta, Georgi a
Home-255-1300
Office-525 - 6141
Mrs . Fr ed W. Patte rson
2959 Andrews Drive, N. W.
Atlanta, Georgia
Home- 233 - 1624
Mr. Clarence G. Ezza r d
245 Atlan t a Avenue , 5. E.
Atlanta , Georgia
Home- 627- 1187
Of fi ce-522-9616
Mr. R. J. Butler
250 - 10th Street, N. E.
Atlanta, Georgia
17;l. -S-3 q(:;
Dr. Robert E. Lee
Lutheran Church of the Redeemer
731 Peachtree Street, N. E.
Atlanta, Georgia
Home-237-3903
Office-874-8664
Mr. Sam Massell, Jr.
Vice Mayor, City of Atlanta
c /o Allan Grayson Realty Company
40 Pryor Street, S. W.
Atlanta, Georgia
Home-355-4112
Office-521-1694
Rabbi Jacob M. Rothschild
The Temple
1589 Peachtree Road, N. E.
Atlanta, Georgia
Home-233-8365
Office- 873-1731
Mrs. Sara Baker
938 Park Avenue, S . E.
Atla nta , Georgia
Home-627-8193
Mrs . Mary Stephens
2840 Dee rwood Dr ive , 5. W.
Atlanta, Geor gia
~ - 523-1577
Off i ce. C I I iGbl
Re verend Samuel Williams
Friends hip Baptis t Church
437 Mitchell St reet , S. W.
Home- 755-2 35 2
Office-6 88-0206
Mr . M. O. "Buzz " Ryan, Gen . Mgr.
Marriott Motor Hote l
Cour tla nd at Cain Street
Atlanta, Georgia
Home-351-2444
Offic e-6 88-6 500
Mr. Hami l ton Douglas , Jr.
Nationa l Bank of Georgia Bldg,
Atla nta, Georgia 30303
Home-355- 2292
Office-522 - 2200
Mr. T. M. Alexander, Sr .
208 Aubur n Ave nue , N. E.
Atla nta, Georgia
Home-753-8760
Office-521- 054 9
Mr. R. Byron Attridge
Trust Company of Ga. Bld g .
Atlanta, Georgia
Home-351-2773
Office- 525-0484
Mr. Jack Sells
1416 Hills Place, N. W.
Atlanta, Georgia
Home-872-4795
Office- 355-4311
�ATLANTA CHILDREN AND YOUTH SERVICES
COUNCIL BOARD OF DIRECTORS
SEPTEMBER 12 , 1967
Chairman:
Mr. Robert M. Wood
Genera 1 Counsel
Sears, Roebuck & Company
675 Ponce de Leon Ave., N.E.
Atlanta, Georgia 30308
Phone: 875-8211
Res: 18 Chathm Road, N.W.
Phone: 233-3705
Mr. Michael H. Trotter
Attorney
Alston Miller & Gaines
12th flobr, C & S National
Bank Building
Atlanta, Georgia
Phone: 524-3241
Res: 120 Biscayne Dr., N.W .
Phone: 355-8148
Treasurer:


Vice-Chairman:
Mr. Fletcher Coombs
205 Auburn Ave., N.E.
Atlanta, Georgia
Phone : 523-8282
Res: 380 Waterford Rd, N. W.
Phone: 799-1473
Mr. Franklin W. Thomas
General Secretary
Butler Street Y. M.C.A.
22 Butler Street, N.E.
Atlanta , Georgia
Phone : 524-0246
Res: 290 Flagstone Drive, S. W.
Ph one: 344-2685
--· ...
-
Member at La r6 e :
Mrs . Rhodes Perdue
2012 West Pa ce Ferry Rd,, N. w.
Atla nt a, Georg i a
Phone: 355 - 9508
Mr . J oh n W. Cox
Exec utiv e Di rector
At l an ta Ch i ldren and Yout h
Se r vic e s Council
1201 -B Ci ty Hall
At la nta , Georgia 30303
Phone : 522 - 4463, Ext . 437
Re s: 1800 Memorial Dr., S.E .
Phone: 378 - 0340
Mr. Jack C. Delius
General Ma nager
Atlant a Parks De part me nt
City Hall Annex
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Phone: 522-4463, Ext . 311
Res: 215 Piedmont Ave., N.E.
Phone: 688-0925
Chief Herbert T. Jenkins
Atla nta Polic e Dept.
165 Decatur Street, S.E.
Atlanta, Georg i a
Ph one: 522-7363
Res: 654 Morngsdel Dr., NE,
Phone : 522 .7363
Dr. John w. Letson
Superi nt endent
Atlanta Public Schools
224 Central Ave., s.w.
Atla nta, Georgia
Phone: 522-3381
Res: 92 Laurl Dr., N.E.
Phone: 237-3161
�MEMBERS
Mr. Frank R. Carmines
180 Peachtree Street, N.E.
Atlanta, Georgia
Phone: 522-1300, Ext. 281
Res: 5535 Dupree Dr., N. W.
Phone: 255-4598
Mr. Ocie J. Irons
1275 Capitol Ave. s.w.
Atlanta, Georgia
Phone:. 11 525--5.?25
Res: 2~63 Handy Dr., N.W .
Phone: 799-5444¼
Mr. Dejongh Franklin
First National Bank Building
24th floor
Atlanta, Georgia
Phone: 521-1200
Res: 1585 West Pace Ferry Rd, N.W.
Phone: 355-0224
Mr. Jerry Luxemburger
Gambl~rell & Mobley
3900 First National Bnk. Bldg.
Atlanta, Geor~ia
Phone: 525-8571
Res: 568 E. Wesly Rd., NE.
Phone: 237-8380
Mrs. Vivian Henderson
1209 Foundtain Dr., S.W.
Atlanta, 'Georgia
Phone: 758-1201
Mr. Frank A Player
531 Biship Street, N.W.
Atlanta, Georgia
Phone: 351-3481
Res: 146 W. Wesley Rd. ,NW
Phone: 233-3512
Mr. G. Arthur Howell
Hass Howell Building
6th floor
Atlanta, Georgia
Phone: 522-2508
Res: 3727 Tuxedo Rd., N.W.
Phone: 233-1369
Mrs. Mary Sanford
Perry Homes Extension
1660 Drew Dr., N.W.
Atlanta, Georgia
Phone: 351-6711
Res: 1521 Drew Dr., N. W.
Phone: 351-5101
Mrs. Mae Yetes
Executive Director
Carrie Steele Pitts Home
667 Fairburn Ro3d, N.W .
Atlant e , Georgia
Phone: 799-7431
Res: 1221 Hunter Rd ., N.W.
Phone: 753-0768
�CITIZENS ADVISORY COM!V"ilTTEE FOR URBAN RENEWAL
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
\\
Robert L. Sommerville, President
Atlanta Transit System, Inc,
P. O. Box 1595


.:: 1:-2492


Li:>c-~ e:r~ ·1v1~ s_._ DQ.i:is
Celwnn.ist, ,.4 tlaat~ Constitation
Alexander, T. M. , Sr.
President, Alexander & Associates, Inc • .
208 Auburn Avenue, N. E.
JA 1-0549
Mathias, Charles c., Staff Representative
United Steel Workers of America
Suite 334, 1776 Peachtree St., N. W.
TR 5-5351
3411 Pinestream Rd., N.
237.2597
w.
Bivens,, Bob, Exec. Director
/J,.......,, _ ,_ Mays, Dr. Benjamin E.
Upt-ewn '1 ssn. of AtlaB-ta ~tU?..- ~
resident, Morehouse College
6.1.5-Feachtree St. , Rm. 9.t4PAL>r/ ~
- 223 Chestnut Street, s. w.
873-6983 ~ if>~ _.:fucf:e_ ~ 1 1,0
MU 8-4223
r
Milton, L. D., President
Citizens Trust Company
212 Auburn Avenue, N. E.
JA 4-0614
Blayton, Jesse B., Sr. President
Mutual Federal Savings & Loan Assn.
205 Auburn Ave., N. E.
JA 3-8282
c_ .Q . 0a..ez.,,, I t;h_.
&ed~Geoxge % , Jr., Vice Pres.
.t\tlanta Div., Georgia Power Co.
Box 4525
522-6121 , Ext. 8312
W.ulton, Virgil W.
3626 Tuxedo Road, N. W •
Atlanta 5, Ga.
237-6656
Calloway, William L., Pres.
Calloway Realty Company
193 Auburn Avenue, N. E.
JA 2-4525
Padgett, A. B. , Executive Director
Metropolitan Foundation of Atlanta
1423 Candler Building
MU 8-4117
Haas, lvlrs. Leonard
Grizzard & Haas, 306 Carnegie Bldg.
133 Carnegie Way, N. W.
525-4821
Rich, Richard H.
Chairman of the Board, Rich's, Inc.
Box 4539
JA 2-4636
Hamilton, Mrs. Grace
Hamilton Associates - Consultants
582 University Place, N. W.
MU 8-7249
Robiasoa, Janu!'s D. , Jr.
Hearle, Percy
Chairman of the Boax d, 1st NatC Bank
Fi"fiJt National Bank Bldg., Box 4148
58lF-Sl)OO
Schukraft, Edgar E.
Owner, Schukraft Florist
1050 Cascade Avenue, s. w.
PL 8-2684
�-~
Warren. Roy Ch .
Roy D. War~ airman. 41. ~ .aoa.=.
30 Pryor S t r e e t ~·' Inc,
JA 3.-6262
f • f
Yates, Clayton R
Yates & Milt
•' President
22
on Stores In
. 8 Auburn Avenue
E C,
N
JA 1-1401
'


J ( w ~ ~ 1 tl~ !If'
7-µ,,l- /1~ ,Jit3,._.,,l
~j;L/2
~ t t / ~ / k'
~-Id~
/ t-3 /143.215.248.55aJ-
\I
�CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE FOR URBAN RENEWAL
Adair, Jack, President
.i\dair Realty & Loan Company
56 Peachtree St., N. W. JA 1.0100
Blayton, J. B., Jr., V. P. -Gen. Mg x-~
WERD Radio Atlanta, Inc •
330 Auburn Ave., N. E.
JA 4-066 6
Aiken, W. H. , General Manager
Aik en, Inc.
239 Westlake Avenue, N. VI. SY 4-2431
Brewer, Oby T., Sr., .Pr esidea.t ~
Geo. Muse Clothing Company
1/J V-fu- ,& ~
52 Peachtree St. , N. W.
JA 2-5400
Allen, Mrs. John L.
League of Women Voters
3360 Nancy Creek Rd., N. W.
Burns, Fred, Jr., Owner
Fred Burns Company
1070 White St., S. W.
-
CE 7.6870.
Arnold, Hve5fc( ExegJ-tiveDirector
Atlanta---trrb':°
~ b u~
e., N. E.
521-2355
~-gue
758-7275
Chile
ohn 0,/,7?~dent
Ad ns-C~e-sC~mpany
urt j3uilclinV
JA 2-5477
...-
Anderson, Mrs. Amber W.
Asst. Solicitor General-Fulton County
Fulton County Courthouse
JA 2-5310
Clement, .Cr. Rufus, President
Atlanta University
223 Chestnut Street, s. W. JA 3-6431
Cooper, Sam I., President
Cooper, Barrett, Skinner, Woodbury
and Cooper, Inc.
Henry Grady Building
JA 2r98 <1.r--
,143.215.248.551-~·a,W
Crank, Mrs. S. F,, E ,..,e. Seey. ~
\Ul!CA
5-99-Tatnall
•, · •

SE./1J.~
r
JA 3- S-43
Da vi s, Har old, Public R e l ations Di:-:- ~-- -··
Ge o rgi a Sta te College
33 Gihner St. , S. E .
523- 7681
Beers, H. W. , Jr., Ch. of Board
~~ers Construction Company
70 Ellis St., N. E .
JA 5 -0555
Ford, Clement, Architect
240 W. Andrews Dr . , N . W.
CE 3-07 C'
Bennett, Rembert B., President
Bennett Realty Corporation
15 Peachtree St., N. E.
JA 2 .. 8336
Bickers, Joseph T., Exec. V. P.
Atlanta Mortgage Brokerage Co. Inc.
187 Auburn Avenue, N. E.
MU 8-3259
Cooper, V. F. (retired)
a:>11 Birchwood Dr., N. E.
Atlanta, Georgia
Bird, F. M. , Attorney
Jones, Bird & Howell
Haas-Howell Bldg.
Gerson, John W., Exec. V. P.
Atlanta Transit System, Inc.
P.O. Box 1595
JA 4-24.';' ..
JA 2-2508
CE 3-.1904
�-2Grizzard, Claude, Jr.• President
Grizzard Advertising, Inc.
~42 W. Peachtree St., N. W. JA 3.8441
McDonald, Dr. Harold, Owner
Ballenger-McDonald Urology Clinic
Peachtree.Baker Bldg.
MU 8-3322
H~c kney, Dr. Richard c.
1C--Ray Laboratory
239 Auburn Ave., N. E.
.Moore, Fred, Manager
Georgia Properties Co.
825 Rhodes Haverty Bldg.
MU 8 ... 9071
Ja 3.6646
Hallman, Noel W. , Secy •• Treas.
Hallman Bros. Construction Co.
45 Eleventh St., N. E.
TR 2 .. 6688
Moore Jame , ~res·ent
Atl
a,
• Labo C143.215.248.55 16:05, 29 December 2017 (EST) _ - ~
l
-~ac ree St., N. E. ~ 20~5-2793
Harris, Dr. J. B.
Herndon Building
Morris, Joe L. (retired)
1098 Lullwater Rd. , N. E.
Harris, Julian H.
Sculpturing Studio
177 Fifth St., N. W.
Hendley, Albert G.
5801 Riverview Rd., N. Vf.
JA 2-3225
378-1682
MEH".lcy, Willis
1070 Beeehhaven.:Bd. , N. E. €,J6 1764
TR 4-3105
255-3559
Munford, Dillard, Ch. of Boal"d
Atlantic Company
P. O. Box 1417
MU 8-1900
Palmer, Charles F., President
Palmer, Inc.
303 Palmer Bldg.
522 ... 9238
Jones, Gordon, President
Fulton National Bank
Fulton National Bank Bldg. JA 3-7511
Patter son, Eugene, Editor
Atlanta Constitution
10 Forsyth St., N. W.
JA 2-5050
Jones, Mrs. Maymie, Attorney
J ones, Jones & Iviabry
Grant Building
JA 5-2996
Randall, Luther H. , Ch. of Board
Randall Fuel Co. , Inc.
665 Marietta St. , N. W.
JA 2-4 711
Kearns, Jack W.
Jack W. Kearns Insurance Co.
2476 Meadow Lark Dr.
761-65.Z.<l
East Point
Richardson, Dr. Harry V., President
Interdenominational Theological Center
9 McDonough Blvd., s. E.
JA 5-8843
Manley, Dr. Albert F., President
Spelman College
350 Leonard St., s. W.
MU 8-2148
Martin, E. M., V. P. and Secy.
Atlanta Life Insurance Co.
148 Auburn Ave., N. E.
JA 1-0513
Roe, Donald J., V. P.
C & S National Bank
Advertising Dept -
588-3258
Scott, c. A. , Editor and Manager
Atlanta Daily World
Zl.0 Auburn Ave., N. E.
Atlanta, Ga.
JA 1-1459
�-3Shaw, W. J., Owne.J: and Manager
Odd Fellows Bldg.• Re.al Estate
250 Auburn Ave., N. E.
JA 1..1891
Whitman, H. W. (Bo). Asst. V. P.
Fir st. National Bank
Box 4148
588-651.!:
Shrider, Robert E. , Director
Bethlehem Community Center
9 McDonough Blvd., S. E. MA 2-0919
Willis, Mrs. Ralph
12 Camden Road, N. W.
TR 6 - 7269
Simon, E. L. , General Auditor
Atlanta Life Insurance Company
148 Auburn Ave., N. E.
JA 1-0513
Sutton, R. O., V. P.
Citizens Trust Company
212 Auburn Ave., N. E.
JA 4-0614
Tarver, Jack, President
A tlanta Newspapers, Inc.
10 For syth Street, N. E.
JA 2-5050
Tatum, Luther S., V. P.
A t l anta Feder al Savings & Loan Assn.
18 M a rietta Street, N. vr.
JA 3-84 21
Terrill, T h e R e v. L . M .
Zio n Hill Bapti st Church
2740 Collier Drive, N . W.
SY 4 -8100
Thompson, Buford H. , President
South Side Atlanta Bank
1700 Lakewood Avenue, s. E . Wl.A 2-3521
Toms, William A ., Broker
H a rris Upham Company
4 4 Broad Street, N. W.
JA 3-7611
Ulrich, VI. Roy
301 Ardmore Circle , N. W. A pt. 3-A
876-2 03 3
Upshaw, Mr s . G l ady s
6160 Roswell Road, N . E .
255 - 0560
Vfhite, R obert H., Sr. , Chm. of Board
Southern Wood Preserving Co.
P .O. Bo x 10798, Sta. A
PO 7-0211
(Nov ember 5, 1965)
�MODEL CITIES EXECUTIVE BOARD
Mayor, City of Atlanta
Chairman, Fulton C o unty Commission
President, Atlanta Board of Education
Member, Atlanta B o ard of Aldermen
Member, Atlanta Board of Aldermen
Representative, State Government
Representative, Private Sector
Member, M o del Neighborhood Area C o uncil
Representative, Negro leadership
�MODEL CITIES TECHNICAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE
Administrative Assistant to the Mayor, Chairman
Fulton C o unty Manager
Superintendent, Atlanta Public Schools
Executive Administration, Fulton C o unty Department of Family and
Children Services
Director, Fulton County Health Department
Administrator, Grady Hospital
Executive Director, Community C o uncil of the Atlanta Area, Inc.
Executive Director, Atlanta Region Metropolitan Planning C o mmission
General Counsel, Atlanta Legal Aid S o ciety
Executive Director, Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.
Chairman, Civic Design Commission
Director, State Department of Family and Children Services
Executive Director, Metropolitan Atlanta Community Services, Inc.
Judge, Fulton County Juvenile Court
Executive Director, Atlanta Housing Authority
Atlanta Region Director, State Employment Service, Georgia
Department of L a bor
E xe cutive Vice -President, Atlanta Chamber of C ommerce
Atlanta District Supervisor, Division of Vocational R e habilitation,
Georgia State Department of Education
Director, Atlanta C o mponent, S o utheastern E d ucation Laboratory
G ene ral Secretary, YMCA
E xecutive Secretary, YWCA
C o mptroller, City of Atlanta
Building Inspector, City of Atlanta
Parks General Manager , City of Atlanta
Chi ef of Construction, City of Atlanta
Planning Director, City of Atlanta
P o lic e Chief, City o f Atlanta
Minister, Central Presbyterian Church
�I ,
/
I
I
The Urb'a.n Coalition
&~
Federal Bar Building West/ 1819 H Street, N. W. Washington, D. C. / 20006
Steering Committee Co-chairmen: Andrew Heiskell/ A. Philip Randolph
November 3, 1967
Dear Friend:
Due to the continuing requests of cities for assistance in
shaping local coalition efforts and the success of The Urban
Coalition's recent Chicago planning conference on local
coalitions, two additional local coalition planning conferences are now scheduled.·
On November 30, 1967, .a one-day conference will be held in
San Francisco. A second such conference will be held in
New York City on December 11, 1967. As was the case with the
Chicago conference, these meetings are designed to assist
leadership from communities interested or involved in local
counterpart action to The Urban Coalition. The format and
substance of each of the two meetings will be substantially
s imilar to the Chicago confe rence .
The purpose of writing you at this time is to advise you
of these upcoming meeting dates so that if you would like
to attend, you c a n choose the a ppropriate mee t i ng and mark
y our c a l e ndar. Program details with respect to the two
mee t i n gs wi l l b e s e n t to you
s hortly .
,
Sincer~
!:':eild
National Coordinato r
Ron M. Lin t o n
National Coor d inator
N ational Coordinators : J ohn Feild / Ron M. Linton
Telephone 293 - 1530
�r
The urban Coalition
I
Federal Bar Bui lding W est / 1819 H Str~et. N. W. Washington. D. C. / 20006
Steering Committee Co-chairmen : Andrew Heiskell/ A. Philip Randolph
National Coordinators : John Feild/ Ron M. Linton
Tc- ie;;hone 293-1530
NEW YORK TIMES
October 12, 1967
Getting Off the Ground
The concern of the Urban Coalition, expressed so
strongly late last summer by public-spirited citizens
during an emergency post-riot convocation in Washington, is beginning to find rootholds where it counts
-in the front-line cities of AmerJ~a.
Mobilization · of the nation's public and private
resources for a vigorous attack on that urban hydraunemploy.ment, slum housing ·and aimlei;s , education
-is getting off the ground. Leaders In some fifty
cities wiU meet in Chicago next week to establish
local action groups that can enlist the resources and
energies of business, labor, religious, academic and
community organizations. In this city, a New York
Co~lition has just started to translate the iofty policy
language of the national steering committee into local
terms.
High-mindedness, of course, will not be · enough.
Hard-core· unemployment will take hard-core solutions.
Lobbying of superhuman proportions wilt' be required
in the busihess and labor communities to break down
·
traditional attitudes.
The Federal Government is in the forefront of action.
For this reason the first step of .the local Coalition ls
to discuss _the inclusion of New York City in the pilot
program, recently announced by the President, to
engage the private sector in the attack on u'nemployrpent. But the true effectiveness of the Urban Coalition, the New . York Coalition and those to come in
· other cities will be measured . by more than simply
seeking inc.reased assistance from Washington.
Municipalities with archaic laws and practices that
have effectively barred the poor and disadvantaged
..from job and housing gains wil1 have -to be persuaded
to change their customs. Certain· industries that have
blocked Negroes from full opportunities will have
to be re-educated. Certain unions which have denied
membership on racial grounds will have to reform
their practices.
By enlisting the community-action groups - the
spokesmen for the jobless and ill- housed - the New
York Coalition is getting to the core of center city's
problems.
·
�JOURNAL (cont.)
ATLANTA CONSTITUTION
October 2 6, 19 67
Atlanta Joins Urban, Coalition
Urban Coalition Is a term gaining increasing currency these days and one on which an
increasing riumber of people concerned and
involved with the growing frustrations of city
life are staking their desperate hopes that our
society can survive without undergoing a
wrenching upheaval that would surely threaten its very foundations.
What is the Urban Coalition? Nationally it
ls an organization formed last summer by
1,200 leaders representing city government,
business, labor, religious and civil rights
interests. Its broad goals are to focus
attention on the problems of our cities and,
more important, to develop action programs
to solve these problems.
Our cities are where three-fourths of 190
million Americans live, yet their problems
are rapidly approaching a crisis-indeed, the
day of crisis is here in many cities-and these
problems are being met by w1conscionable
indifference. The indifference is not total, but
Its magnitude is what makes it unconscion-
burners, but potential match lighters are being born and growing up every day in the
slums where frustrations and· frictions are
· causing the matches to flare. It is to those
frustrations and frictions that more energy
and effort must be addressed.
And it is here where the national Urban
Coalition intends to concentrate its energy and
efforts. As a "super lobby" for the cities, it
will focus attention and seek solutions in
these problem areas: poverty, lack of job
skills, unsound housing, inadequate parks,
schools, absence of adequate municipal services, lack of motivation and the increasing
desperation among our ghetto poor.
To bring about the "total commitment of
all community resources and a reassessment
of priorities" so necessary if we are to solve
these and other problems facing our cities,
the national Urban Coalition is urging local
"counterpart" coalitions to join the fight.
This week Atlanta joined New York, Detroit and other great cities in answering this
call and thi!' opportunity to "get acrws to the
people and the Congress the urgency of the
problems of the cities . .. and encourage pzivate initiative." Atlanta already has an effective informal coalition. Judging from records of men named to the steering committee
for the formal coalition, we have a very good
chance to bolster national and local efforts:
able.
When state governments turned their backs
to the cities' plight, the federal government
stepped in to lend a hand. Many of the federal programs show great promise, but Congress has yet to recognize or sense the urgency. When a city burns, Congress immediate· Jy wrings its collective hands, bewails the
manifold sins and wickedness of the burners,
Success in these efforts is absolutely necbut effectively ignores the despair that essary, and the time is late. Failure to solve
really struck the matches.
the grO\ving problems of our cities is unOf course we should punish and stop the thinkable.
ATLANTA JOURNAL
Octob er 25, 1967
143.215.248.55®ml
t1Jrt@~uu CC@cJLlD!~a@uu
Summit Group, C of C, Labor
Urged to Work for Jobs, Housing
By LORRAINE M. BENNET1'
Mayor Ivan Allen Wednesday called on six leaders of various
phases of Atlanta life to form an urban coalition whose goals .
will be to provide decent jobs, housing and education in urban 1
areas.
I
The mayor and Dan Sweat,
director of governmental liaison,
presented a sta tement to the
leaders which they will carry
back to thei r respective groups
for approval.
Accepting the statement were
Al Bows and Opie Shelton of the
Atlanta Chamber of Commerce.
the Rev. Sam Williams of
the Summit Leadership Conference. Robert J . Butler of the
Atlanta Labor Council, Dr. Harmon Moore of the Christian
Council of Metropolitan Atlanta.
Dr. John W. Letson. superintendent of the Atlanta Public
Schools and Erwin Stevens of
the Citizens Central Ad visory
Council (EOA ).
Mayor Allen recently attended
an emergency convocation of the
urban coalition in Washington at
which 1.200 leaders representing
city governments. business, tabor. religious and civil rights
interests offered their views on
how · to deal with the urban
crisis.
THE LEADERS a g r e e d to
carry back to their own cities
the determination to form local
coalitions made up of the same
leadership cross-section to imple·ment the progra m on a local
level.
_
The statement Mayor Allen
presented to the head.c; of Atlanta's interest groups said that
although the federal government
has expressed concern for the
plight of the cities, Congress
faj!ed to · register the sense of
urgency of the urban crisis.
· "The r esul t is now a tragic
chapter in America n history.
Riots, rac ial disturbances. civil
disobedience in city after city
throughout all parts of the country have cast a lasting imprint of inaction and indifference, the statement continues.
LACK OF job skills, unemployment, unsound housing, inadequate parks and schools. the
absence of realistic municipal
services, lack of motivation and
loss of fa ith and of hope these are the problems of the
cities.
The urban coalition hopes to
bring a "total commitment of
-all community resources and a
reassessment of priorities by
national and state government. "
The working together of these
forces, the coalition hopes. "ca n
produce results on a scale large
enough to sufficiently change
the d.Jrection of our cities," the
statement reads.
�. . ..:.:~~--~~..:,:_:::: - ·., ,,-- i ", ,·~
"f:
'When the riots occurred, we
re-examined what we were
doing to see if we were
doing enough - and we're
still looking for new ways
to help'
Radio Corp. of America
Executive
CITIES
[!
BUSINESS WEEK
October 21, 19 67


Summer's backlash



'., more job programs
!a;~
In wake of riots, business takes a second look at the Negro
'Businessmen who didn't
recognize it before are aware · ~::
job problem. Companies are accelerating current
that the Negro's troubles
programs, initiating new ones, and revising hiring policies
cannot be ignored and

'
What did business learn from the
riots that erupted in over 70 AmeriJames B. Ammon
can cities last summer?
Vice-president,
\Vhen Business Week reporters
Baxter Laboratories, Inc.
talked to top executives last week
they found:
'The thinking of
• There's little sign of a corporate
businessmen regarding
backlash on civil rights programs.
• The riots have spurred a broad
hiring practices has taken
cross-section of companies, particua new twist ... They're going
larly large national concerns, to accelerate programs or to initiate new
into the ghettos to hire
·-··--~·-· ones.
Negroes'
~
• Other companies are taking a
Pittsburgh manufacturer
second look at their own policies
and those of local and federal agen'We will do everything in our
cies. Their concern allays the fears
power to liberalize screening
of some observers after the riots
that business would pull back from
and testing methods'
civil rights efforts out of disillusionRaymond T. Perring
ment or fear of financial risk.
Chairman,
James B. Ammon, vice-president
Detroit Bank & Trust Co. I ;_;
and treasurer of Baxter Laboratories,
Inc., says: "I think the riots have
'We would think twice about
made businessmen realize that the
Negro's problems will be more of a
putting up a store in a
factor in our society and businesses
Negro neighborhood'
in the future, not less of a one .. . If
we don't develop programs today,
Florida grocery chain
we just won't have as many options
Executive
five years from now."
'Riots are going to occur
William F. X. Flynn, who heads
the
National Assn. of Manufacturers'
until there's visible evidence
STEP (Solutions To Employment
of improvement . .. but you
Problems) program, concurs. Flynn
and his staff collect and circulate
can't get any solutions in a
case his tories of corporate and comriotous atmosphere'
munity action programs to interReed 0. Hunt
ested companies. "After the sitChairman,
uation this summer . . . we found
Crown Zellerbach Corp.
companies impatient to move faster."
And a California industrialist
'We've been breaking our
minces no words: " Perhaps riots
help more at some stages in the evobacks for several years to
lution of this thing than they hurt.
get jobs for Negroes. Now
How the devil do you get 200-million
people to wake up?"
with all the demonstrations,
New trend. Such words obviously
business might just decide
would disconcert many businessmen
to rest on its oars'
who feel they were facing up to the
problem long before the riots. But
Milwaukee executive
the fact that business has stepped
up its effor ts in the wake of the sumexpected to melt away'
194 Cities
mer's violence appears 11ii,l,·11iahle.
The Urban Coalition is just one
sign. The new national advisory
group includes such top business
names as Chase Manhattan's Davi<l
Rockefeller, Andrew Heiskell of
Time, Inc., Litton Industries' Roy
Ash, and General Electric's Gerald
L. Phillippe. The group is not only
preparing task force reports on urban problems, but has backed such
legislative programs as the ClarkJavits proposal to create I-million
jobs for ghetto residents. It is also
helping to blueprint some 50 loca1
urban coalitions.
At least three such groups have
already been set up-the New Detroit Committee headed by Josepl
L. Hudson, Jr., of J. L. Hudson Co.
the New York Coalition led by Chris
tian Herter, Jr., vice-president ·o t
Mobil Oil, and a statewide coalition
in Minnesota.
The Detroit group (whose m em bers include Ford Motor's Henrv
Ford II, General Motors' James M.
Roche, and Chrysler's Lynn Townsend) hasn't wasted any time. Meeting with Michigan Governor George
Romney last week, it called for passage of a statewide open hous ing
law-unquestionably the most powerful support such legislation has
ever had in the state.
Such groups, of course, are me-rely
advisory in nature, and the big q ue~tion is whether in the long run they
will generate more than sound and
fury. For the present, it's clear that
business thinking has taken a significant new turn. As one observer
comments : "Industry is no longer
content to play follow the leader on
urban problems. It is moving ahead
itself, drawing on its own resources."
Other action. This heightened concern is reflected not only in the insurance industry's announced intention to put $I-billion into slum
renewal, but in a spate of local programs surfacing since last summer:
• In P ittsbur~h. some 19 corpornBusiness Week October 21, 1967
�BUSINESS WEEK (cont.)
October 21 , 19 6 7
tions have contributed $1.4-million
to set up Allegheny Housing Rehabilitation Corp., which will buy and
renovate old houses in ghetto areas
and sell them back to ghetto residents. With a goal of $3-million, the
organization hopes to renovate more
than 1.000 housing units a year.
• A major corporation is now completing plans to construct a manufacturing facility within the ghetto
area of a Midwestern city.
• 1n· Tampa, the city and General
Telephone of Florida have set
up a Community Relations Council
h eaded by Negro businessman James
A. Hammond. Dozens of graduates
of th e council's training courses have
found jobs.
• In Baltimore, over 1,000 ghetto
residents were hired in a crash employment program that was initiated
last August by companies in the
area.
• In Cleveland, five banks and six
companies put up $400,000 f?~ a _revolving fund for slum rehabihtat10n
projects. Negro candidate for mayor,
Carl B. Stokes, comments: "Frankly,
I don't know what the motivation is,
fear or genuine social concern, or
both. But the important thing is
that business is becoming more involved. "
The lis t is endless. In cities across
the nation-St. Louis, San Francisco, Camden, Wilmington, Denver
-new programs are being mapped
out, old efforts intensified. In Detroit
for example, between 7,000 and _10,000 ghetto residents have b een hired
by the auto companies since the
riots. "The jobs were there b efore,"
says an ob server, " but communications with the community were
poor." In u ps tate New York, Rochester Jobs, Inc., an agency that started
function ing just last July, has already
found over 400 entry-level jobs fo r
slum dwellers.
All of this apparently reflects considerable soul-searching at the highes t corporate levels. Understandab~y,
most companies are reluctant to discuss such matters. "We've learned
not to talk about any progress we've
made," says one man. "No one wants
to admit they haven't been doing all
they can." But Ford Motor Co.'s
creation of a top-level department
of urban affairs is indicative of the
new mood.
Hiring reforms. One area in which
corporate thinking is shifting is in
hiring practices. Comments the employee relations director of a major
Pittsburgh company: "In the past,
corporations pushed the idea of hiring 'qualified' Negroes-protesting
that giving preference to a Negro
simply because of his race was reverse prejudice. But since the riots,
many corporations have been hiring
people who couldn't begin to compete with whites for jobs.
This doesn't mean that companies
are throwing away their yardsticks
of productivity and profits. What's
happening rather is that many are
recognizing that old rules and practices may be screening out potentially competent p eople. As Reed 0.
Hunt, board chairman of Crown Zellerbach Corp., puts it: "Most ghetto
kids have jail records, but you have
to ask what for? You have to ask if
he can do a good job?"
Long-term goals. Other companies
are reviewing th eir contributions
programs. Says a Chicago executive: "We used to take the shotgun
approach and give $1,000 to every
group with a good story. Now we're
thinking in terms of five-year commitments in sp ecific areas."
As companies become involved in
urban problems , many report a
heightened sens e of purpose. U.S.
Gypsum Co. , for example, rehabilitated six slum buildings in New
York's Harl em this summer. It is
now working on 150 apartments in
Chicago and 64 units in Cleveland,
and it has options on 450 more units
in Chicago. "We're going along,"
says an executive, " not with the expectation of a great profit, but to
demon strate th at private industry
does have a role and responsibility.
We are beginning to feel a deepseated involvement th at can't be
measured in return to stockholders."
Other side. Not everyone shares
this feeling, of course. Many companies voice a sense of outrage at
the riots. "You can't run a society
with riots," says one executive, "and
you can't be intimidated by lawlessness." In Milwaukee, currently
p lagued by civil rights demonstrations for open hous ing and the scene
of two nights of rioting last July, a
backlash among some segments of
the business community is evident.
"We've been breaking our hacks to
get jobs for Negroes," says a businessman, "Now with all th e demonstrations, business might just decide
to rest on its oars."
A number of companies report no
appreciable change in th eir policies
since the riots. "\Ve've alwavs tried
to hire qualified Negroes,"· is the
typical comment. One industry observer, in fact, reports that some executives are coming to regard riots
"as seasonal hazards, much like
hurricanes and tornadoes."
But others are anything but complacent. Says Crown Zellerbach's
Hunt: "You can't ask the-Negro people to be quiet. . . . Riots are going
to occur until there's visible sign of
improvement. End
�MINNEAPOLlS TRIBUNE
September 14, 1967
Substituting Action
NEW YORK TIMES
October 10, 1967
fo.r Oratory
THE $14,000 contributed by Minneapolis area businesses to study the
creation of an Urban Coalition shows
a -growing awareness that the total
community, public and private, must
become more involved in the effort to
solve our problems of race and pov. erty.
Critics might say that the time for
studies is past. In this case, however,
there would be no point in forming
a coalition if .the members had little
idea of what they could do or how they
should do it. These are the questions
that this study must answer. And at
nine weeks, it is a short one as studies
go.
Participants at the recent National
Urban Coalition meeting in Washington, D.C., resolved boldly to push for
a million more iobs, a million . more
homes for the poor, better schools and
social conditions. Whether these goals
can be attained will depend greatly on
the grassroots pressure and contributions of key leaders at the local level.
This is where the Minneapolis coalition comes in. This is where the white
community must show Negro critics
at the national meeting that it is not
attempting to sub_s titute oratory for
action.
Earl Ewald, president of Northern
States Power Co. and temporary chairman of the contributing local businessmen, said that none of them sees merit
in creating just another organization.
"But maybe a new kind of organization
like a genuine 'Urban Coalition' can
help," he said. "We hope to find out."
We hope the find ings are affirmative.
URBAN COALITION
MOVES ON SLUMS
Panel Set Up to Help Local
Leaders Form Groups
By SYDNEY H. SCHANBERG
The Urban Coalition, the recently formed prestigious national alliance of business,
labor, municipal, religious and
civil rights leaders, took a step
here last night to help local
communities fight a more organi,zed battle against slum
problems.
A three-member panel was
set up by the nationwide coalition to help community leaders
form local coalitions to press
for solutions to crucial urban
needs, particularly jobs, housing and education.
The panel was announced at
a meeting of the Urban Coalition's 33-member steering committee in the Time & Life Building, at 50th Street and the
Avenue of the Americas. It was
the first gathering of the highlevel committee, one of whose
members is Mayor Lindsay,
since the convocation of the organization on Aug. 24 in Washington.
The members of the localcoalition panel are Mayor Joseph M. Barr of Pittsburgh, Arnold Aronson, executive secretary of the National Leadership
Conference on Civil Rights, and
Charles P. Taft, Cincinnati lawyer. __
The next step by the task
force will be to hold a meeting
of community leaders interested
in fortning local units. Leaders
in about 50 cities have expressed interest in the idea and are
expected to be at the meeting,
scheduled for a week from today in Chicago.
Mayor Lindsay, one of the
foun ders of the Urban Coalition, has already organized a
local coalition for New York
City and is expected to announce its chairman and other
members very soon.
Abou_t 50 persons, many of
them aides to members of the
steering committee attended
last nigh~·~ committ~e meeting.
In addition to Mr. Lindsay
the participants included Mayo;
Barr; Mayor Jerome P. Cavanagh of Detroit; Andrew Heiskell, board chairman of Time
Inc.; Joseph D. Keenan, secretary of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers
and ~vid Sullivan, president
of the Building Service Employes International Union.
Also, Frederick J. Close,
board chairman of the Aluminum Company of · America·
Gerald Phillippe, board chair~
man _of General Electric; Harold
Flemmg, president of the Po~omac Inst!t_ute in Washington,
td A. Ph1hp Randolph, presi_~nt . of the Brotherhood of
leepmg Car Porters.
�GRAND RAPIDS PRESS
September 1 7 , 19 6 7
Whitney M. Young Jr.
Biracial C'oalition,
Leadership Crucial
This summe.r 's r a c i a I vio-1
Jenee has caused a crisis of
leadership. The riots have made ,
it easy for "backlashers" to i
justify resistance to necessary
social changes. But this leads to
a dangerous polarization of attitudes which could lead to more
violence .
Negro leadership has lived up
to its responsibility by speaking
oul against riots and by proposing rational programs to end
their causes. Now it is time for
white leader-1
ship to speak
out and condemn the
backlash e r s
and start doing something
to end the
ghetto's problems.
Churc h e s,
liberal organizations, politiYOUNG
cal clubs, business and labor, interracial and
human relations groups, all,
have to speak out now and re-'
gain the initiative from th~
backlashers. They have been silent for too long.
There are signs that some
leaders realize the urgency of
t he situation and are willing to
join t he coalition so despe~ateIy needed if our country 1s to
have peace and progress. _I took ,
part in a r ecent meetmg to i
form just such a group.
It is called the Urban Coalition, and our first meeting included leaders of business, labor, religion, city mayors, and 1
civil rights groups. From this l
came proposals for an emergency work program to provide .
jobs and training for the unem- 1
ployed, the establishment of job.
centers in cities, and the com- '
mitment of private industry to ·
take all steps necessary to insure full employment.





This last item is especially:
significant because business has:
not done enough to provide the .
jobs and training needed. Negro workers are unemployed at!
I
a rate more than twice that 1
for white workers and Negro,
family income is $3,000 less per:
year than for white families. ·
Something has to be done about
this-now.
Many business leaders understand that they have a tremen-.
dous stake in urban peace and
some of them realize they can 't'
affor d to continue old ways of
doing things. But the r eal test
will come at the local level.
Businessmen . and community
leaders are going to have to
come forward with vigorous
support for r adical changes.
That is why various local ur-1
ban coalitions are now being '
formed. In New York, for ex- 1
ample, Mayor Lindsay, who!
was at our meeting, has set up,
a New York Coalition of local l
leadership to attack ghetto
problems. Other cities and re-1
gions will do the same.
'
The Urban Coalition could he
the most exC!tTllg MW development in a long time-hut only
if its members are sincere in
'pushing for radical change. The :
·time is long past for mere lip
service to the ideals of equality.
Responsible leaders and estahlished organizations must be
given the resources to deal adequately with ghetto problems.
Negro citizens are tired of being promised jobs and not getting them, they have been lied
to once too often.
·
The business and civic leaders now formin g such coalitions
in their communities will have
to deliver on their promises.
This coalition will have to create jobs and strengthen the economic life of the ghetto. It will
have to end racial barriers in
housing, health and education.
These can't be temporary steps
to stave off a riot; they must
be steps which get at the heart
of the problems caused by racism and solve them permanently.
We really h;we little choice.
This country can take the high
road to social progress and
iequality by a strong commitment to far-reaching progra ms
to create jobs and better living
conditions for the urban poor .
or it can take the low road to
social disaster and violence by
letting the backlashers speak
for it and allowing ghetto conditions to wor sen. We have to
take that high road.
�W AS HINGTO N POST
October 27, 1967
Church Plans Housing
Cardinal Urges Coalition
To Meet D.C. Urban Ills
By William R. MacKaye
Wa s hi ngton Pos t S ta ff W r iter
Patrick Cardi nal O'Boylr.
u rged creation ycstcrcl11y o( a
Washington ur ban coal ition to
mee t the cha ll>e ngc of the urban crisis.
At a press con ference, the
Cardi nal:
• Pl edged the support of the
Roma n Cat holic Archdiocese
to a soon-to-be-launched drive
to raisP. a · $2 million Hous ing
De velo pment Fund.
• Said that chur ch officials
arc planning a 1150-unit housing proj ect on a 15-acre tract
at 4th and Edgewood Streets
ne .. t he site now occupied by
S t. Vincent's Home and School.
• Announced that the Archdiocesan Office of Urban Affairs, headed by t h-e R1~v. Geno
Baro ni, will back twu rehabilita tion projects for low-income
~
housing.
• Said that t he Archd iocese
and the Presbyte ry of ', Wash-,
ingto n City (U niter! Presbyccria n) will pool fu nds to remodel a building at 141~ V st.
nw. fo r use as an urban affa irs o ffi ce. T he Presbyte ria n
body will provide $55,000 for
t he j ob, which C a rd i n a I
O'Boyle estimates will c,3t
$100,000.
• Announl'ed t he launching
of a n exte n~ive educationa l
progra m designed to make city
and suburban Catholics sensiti1·c to each others' needs.
Cardinal O'Boyle expanded
by saying that ar ea clergy
wo uld exchange pul pit visits,
followed by special semina rs
and meetings for laymen "to
promote a better understanding of urban affairs a nd com munity relations."
"The aim of the chur ch and
the refore of the Washingto n
Archdiocese," said the Cardinal , "mus t be to build a society which will afford the ordinary citizen and every citizen
the opportuni ty to pursue his
salvation in conditions of life
that are not de basing and exp losive, but human and encouraging."
.'\ t one point, he obser ved
. We're not playing Lady Boun'.
tiful . . . We've got an obligation to do this."
The Archdiocese's efforts in
t erms of housing will include
an unspecified contribution to
the H o u s i n g Development
Fund.
Such a fu nd is necessary
to fi nance Governme nt - subsidized housing projects here. A
fund of $2 million m ight provide the basis for 40,000 new
low - a nd moder ate - income
housing units in the area.
One group already pursuing Feder al aid is the Housing
Development Corp., headed by
the Rev. Channing P hillips of
the United Church of Chr ist.
Mr. Phillips' group, wh ich
h as access to $100,000 in capit al, currently i s sponsoring
construction or rehabilitation
of 2000 housing units.
Mr. Phillips was at t he press
confer ence yesterday, as were
two officials of the proposed
Fund. They are John Nevius,
a lawyer who is one of t he appointees to the new City Council, and Re uben Clark, also a
lawyer .
Cla rk pointed out that the
shortage of equity capital "front money" - now in the
hands of the Housing Development Corp. and similar groups
has limited the area's ability
to take advantage of the low
cost loans available under the
loans to nonprofit corporations
section of the Feder al Housing
Act.
The proposed housing at the
St. Vincent's site would be
financed under that rent subsidy section-Section 221 (D)
3 and would provide a m ix of
apartments for the elderly
public housing uni ts and non~
profit dwellings for families
of low and moderate income.
The Archdiocese is involvin "
itself in t hree other housing
programs.
A group .. of laymen organized in a group known as S ursum Cor da, Inc., working wjt h
St. Aloysi us Church and Gonzaga High School, already has
secured Federal support for
a $3.7 million, 199-un it housing developme nt off North
Capitol Street jn the North\\·est One urban r enewal area.
The other two proj ects include one elsewhe re in No rt heast One and the othe r-i n
coopera tion with five nonCatholic ch urches a nd three
synagogues- on Capitol Hil l.
The Ur ban Affairs office
will be part of t he plant of
SS. Paul and Augustine P arish. The first two floo rs of
the building will oe converted
into a communi ty ce nter .
Upper floors are expected
to provide space for such opera tions as Father Baroni's office, the Metropolitan Ecumenical Training Cen ter a nd
the Presbytery's office of
urban mission.
�KANSAS CITY (MO.) TIMES
September 14, 1967
GARY (IND.) POST TRIBUNE
October 12, 1967
FORM COALITION
4,000 Jobs Hunted
By Urban Coalition
TO AID JOBLESS
Urban Leaders to Act
for Minority Group
Members
NOTE LABOR'S ABSENCE
Group Asks Convocation
· of Both Kansas
Citys
An Urban Coalition was
formed yesterday of top
community leaders to concentrate on programs to
provide jobs for unemployed members of minority groups.
The coalition agreed to call a
community . wide convocation
from the two Kansas Citys to
consider the primary goal of
finding jobs for the unemployed .
Se<:ondary goals to be undertaken later will be to improve
housing and education for disadvantaged citizens, most of
whom are Negroes.
For Group Here
A group of 18 leaders met
yesterday at the invitation of
Mayor Dus W. Davis to form a
local group patterned after the
national Urban Coalition which
held a convocation the last
week in August in Washington .
It was organized outside federal
government sponsorship as a
r esult of citizens concern over
urban riots and inequality of
opportµnit y.
At the meeting yesterday at
the Hotel President were representatives of local government,
top business executives, civil
ri~h ts grpups and the clergy.
Absent Were labor leaders although five labor leaders were
invited to the meeting.
D. P eter New!,'luist, assistant
to the ma yor, said he had been
told the labor leaders were unable to attend because thev were
involved in labor negotiations or
were out of town.
Bishop Joseph V. Sullivan,
auxiliar y bishop of the Kansas
City-St. Joseph Catholic diocese,
saicl the group would need the
support of labor.
Methods of providing jobs for
hard-core unemployed will be
discussed Oct. 27 at a luncheoninformation meeting of Gary's
Urban Coalition.
A panel of educators, employment counselors, employers,
government officials and civil
rights leaders will convene in
the Hotel Gary then to search
out job problems in Gary.
The Urban Coalition is a federally sponsored group of locally interested citizens organized / :
to coordinate and implement
existing and new programs in
employment, education, training, housing, reconstruction and
equal opportunity.
Mayor A. Martin Katz called
for the latest meeting of the
group to interest private industry in providing as many
as 4,000 jobs for Gary's unemployed:
Attending this conference will
be the major employers in the
Gary area and representatives
from various educational and
training groups, and from the
employment agencies.
Katz said the obvious real
need is to match the requirements of business and industry
with available resources and up· grade the full potential of our
total manpower resources.
The plans for the conference
on employment were ·outlined
by George A. Jecl):!noff, general
suprintendent of U.S. Steel's
Gary Steel Works, who was
named to organize and chair
the conference proceedings.
Jedenoff noted that this conference can serve as a real
benefit to Gary by bringing together the various groups interested in making the maximum
use of the Gary human resources.
·The 'employment phase of t1'1e
four-point basic principles submitted by the Urban Coalition
Steering Committee calls for
fair employment; basic training fo r employees under exist-
ing program,s ; education plans
to assure upward job mobility;
re-examination of methods to
eliminate · any practices that
may unnecessarily bar qualified
candidates ; f u 11 cooperation
with responsible agencies de,voted to the improvement of
inter-group relations within the
community; and further participation in the Gary community
of Plans for Progress under the
Committee of Equal Opportunity appointed by President Johnson.
The steering committee submilted this program for the
Urban Coalition and is chaired
by George R. Coker, executive
director of the Urban League
of Gary.
Its members include : Joseph
Radigan, Republican candidate
for mayor ; Richard G. Hatcher,
Democratic candidate for mayor ; L. I. Combs, builder and
president of the Gary Chamber
of Commerce ; Jedenoff; Matthew Glogowski, superintendent,
Budd Company ; James Breed,
manager, NIPSCO ; Leo Lewis,
manager, Gary - Hobart Water
Company ; Al Jackson, manager, Illinois Bell Telephone
Company; Rev. William Paris ;
Robert Gordon ; Marion 0 .
Mitchell , manager, Sears, Roebuck & Company: Mamon Powers, Powers & Sons Construetion Co. Inc. and Walter Ridder ,
publisher of The Gary PostTribune.
Others on the Steering Committee include Curtis Strong ;
Orval Kincaid, United Steelworkers of America ; Donald
Belec, school board ; Mrs. Bernice Terry ; Harold Hagberg,
Northwest Indiana Bldg. & Construction Trades Council; Robert Gasser, Gary National
Bank; Ray Daly, Bank of Indiana ; Reverend 'S. Walton Cole,
president, Council of Churches;
Rev. Julius James , president,
Gary Human Relations Commis. sion ; and Glen Vantrease, cit y
controller.
�JET MAGAZINE
November 2, 1967
URBAN COALITION: NEWEST WEAPON TO FIGHT SLUMS
NEW ALLIANCE BETWEEN DIFFERENT
By FREDERICK GRAVES
While the long, hot summer of 1967 is now a part of the
past, concerned persons are attempting to pool their resources and reorganize their thinking and values, hoping
to prevent the predicted long , hot summer of 1968 from
becoming a part of the future . To accomplish this monumental task a new alliance between leaders in civil rights,
religion, business. labor and local governments was
formed . It is called The Urban Coalition, and some look
upon it as one of the last measures available to save our
cities.
On August 24, after clean-up crews in Newark and Detroit had begun to clear their rubble-filled streets, Urban
Coalition leaders held what they termed an emergency
convocation. One thousand delegates attended the session
at the Shoreham Hotel in Washington, D. C. , and they
represented all groups that have strong interests in the
survival of the cities.
GROUPS COULD SAVE U. S. CITIES
The Urban Coalition is co-chaired by Negro labor leader
A. Philip Randolph, president of the Brotherhood of Sleepi~g Car Porters, and Andrew Heiskell, board chairman of
Time, Inc . At the emergency convocation they were joined
by rights leaders Roy Wilkins and Whitney Young Jr. The
business community was represented by Asa T . Spaulding,
president of North Carolina Mutual Insurance Co.; Gerald
L. Phillippe, board chairman of the General Electric Co.,
and Henry Ford II, board chairman of the Ford Motor Co.
Labor representatives included Walter Reuther of the
United Auto Workers ; George Meany, AFL-CIO president,
and I. W. Abel, United Steelworkers president. From the
religious community were Rabbi Jacob P. Rudin, president of the Synagogue Council of America; Archbishop
John F. Dearden of Detroit, and Dr. Arthur Fleming, president of the National Council of Churches.
Local government was represented by the top men-the
mayors : Richard J . Daley of Chicago, Milton Graham of
r
. ,:.,f .
In Wa shington 111 H ei sk ell t alks w ith Lindsay ; in Chicago,
Lincoln , Neb. , Mayor Samuel Sch w artzkopf and Saginaw, Mich .,
N egro Mayor H enry Marsh .
After session, Johnson joins chat with · {l - r / Bishop Ja mes w.
Montgomery, Chancellor Norman Parker and Mayor Daley_
15
14
(MORE)
�JET MAGAZINE (cont.)
November 2, 19 67
··-
l
-....
,.
{,.,orkshop p~~elfst; i~~luded such Negroes as Bo!frgeois {l) and
Mrs. Williams and Dr. Deton Brooks who aired views.
'
Panelist Henry criticized city governments. John Cardinal Cody
congratulates Naftalin after speech.
Urge Forming Local Coalitions To Solve Problems
Phoenix, John F. Collins of Boston and Joseph M. Barr of
Pittsburgh, president of the U. S. Conference of Mayors.
Keynote speaker at the session was New York Mayor
John v. Lindsay who told the 1,000 delegates that local
coalitions must be formed to help raise the standards of
housing, education, job training, welfare a~d raise the
employment rate. No time was wasted on isolatmg the
problems ; everyone there knew quite well wh~t. prob 1e_m s
exist in cities. Also no time was wasted on decidmg which
groups in the cities this new coalition program should
help . The answer was obvious: The same alienated, po~r
people who had used molotov cocktails to destroy th_e business establishments of unfair merchants and their own
rat infested homes in sub-standard buildings.
_
Convocation delegates left the one-day meet charged
with the responsibility of returning ~o_ their urban c~n:munities and establishing local coaht1ons between civil
rights, labor, business, religion and governmen~. The national Urban Coalition promised help and advice when16
ever needed. Urban Coalition headquarters in Washington ,
D. C., said it does not plan to dictate how local groups
should be organized. Officials there said each urban area
has its own personality and it will be more practical fot'
each city to do its own mobilizing of force·s . But t he national group did offer one strong bit of advice to the local
coalitions: Poor people-Negroes, Puerto Rica ns. White
Appalachians-should be included in local groups, along
with militants.
As part of the mobilizing of local groups, the nation a l
Coalition sponsored a one-day meet last week at the University of Illinois' Chicago Circle Ca mpus. It was attended
by 250 persons representing areas that were attempting t o
form their coalitions. There were representatives from 46
cities. Although they were from most parts of the country,
there were more Mid-Westerners t han any other geographic group. Because of this the Washington office
plans to hold three other such meets to make sure every
urban area has a chance to benefit from the advice of
experts.
The opening general session of the. Chicago meet was
17
{MORE)
�JET MAGAZINE (cont.)
iJovember 2, 19 67
Meaning Of America Is Urban Issue, Publisher Says
presided over by JET-EBONY Publisher John H. Johnson,
co-chairman of the national Coalition's Task Force on
Communications and Public Support. He helped set the
tone for the day when he told the registrants : "We are
engaged here .in creating a will that speaks not so much
to Negroes but to the fundamental issue of the meaning
of America. Whatever we do, we must not deceive ourselves. The decision before us now is not a decision
about the Negro but a decision about America. It is not a
decision about civil rights but a decision about the future
of the city."
Lindsay
Randolph
One of the main objectives of the Coalition is to organize a force strong enough to move, sh ake, push 8:nd
prod Congress into passing much needed legislation which
can alleviate some of the problems faced by cities. These
include retraining programs, the Model Cities plan and
adequate welfare financing without strict, inflexible rules
which prohibit funds going to those who need it most_.
At the Chicago session registrants attended a senes of
workshops which included pan els composed of top-flight
Negroes in governmental agencies and social ":'elfare
groups. They included Vernon Jordan of Atlanta, dir~ctor
of the voter education project of the Southern Regional
council ; Melvin Mister of Washington, D. C., director of
the D. C. Redevelopment Land Agency; A. Donald Bourgeois, general manager of the St. Louis Model Cities p_rogram; Mrs. Frank Williams of Indianapolis, representing
the League of Women Voters Education Fund, and Clifton
w. Henry, a community services representative from the
U.S. Mayors Conference, Washington.
Henry said that up 'ti! now there has been no will on
the part of cities to deal effectively with their problems:
One of the big questions is, "Will The Urban Coaht10n
be able to get cities to stop playing politics and start planning creative programs to help their ghetto residents become a part of the predominant affluent society?" In
short, "Can America be saved?"
Ford
Rustin
....
Wheeler
Different cities are handling the mobilization of local
coalition in different ways. Chicago, for example, is not
planning to make an effort for such action. Its mayor,
Richard J . Daley, said the city has always had such a coalition between business, labor, religion, etc. Then Daley
ticked off a list of city agencies and commissions which h e
said encompass all walks of the city's life.
In Minneapolis, Minn., Mayor Arthur Naftalin admitted
to some failures in his city and said members of the militant Negro community should be consulted and asked to
take an active part in local coalition groups. "If we can't
close the gap between young militants and the established
community, it will destroy us," h e warned.
19
18
�r
The Urban Coalition/ ACTION REPORT
Federal Bar Building West / 1819 H Street, N. W. / Washington, D. C. / 20006
National Coordinators: John Feild/ Ron M. Linton
October 31 , 1967
During its second month of operations , The Urban Coalition
moved ahead on four major fronts--the formation of local
coalitions, developing pilot programs to increase job opportunities for the hard-core unemployed , enlisting key segments
of the communications industry in promoting public understanding of the urban crisis and urging Congress to "move without
delay on urban problems."
LOCAL COALITIONS
In response to requests from communities across the country ,
the Task Force on Local Coalitions sponsored a one-day planning
conference on "Mobilizing Urban Coalitions" on October 17 in
Chicago. Two hundred and fifty leaders in local government ,
business, labor , religion and civil rights--from 52 cities-attended.
Major addresses at the conference were given by Mayors Richard
J . Daley of Chicago and Arthur Naftalin of Minneapolis and Dr.
Kenneth Wright , Vice President and Chief Economist of the Life
Insurance Association of America . John Cardinal Cody, Archbishop
of Chicago , and Bishop James Montgomery, Co-Adjutor Bishop of
the Episcopal Diocese of Ch.i::ago added their support . Also
participating in the program .were Mayor Joseph Barr of Pittsburgh ,
Co- Chairman of the Task Force on Local Coalitions and President
of the U. S . Conference of Mayors and Mayor Milton Graham of
Phoenix.
I . W. Abel, President of the AFL- CIO United Steel wo rkers of America wag represented by John J. Sheehan , Leg i sla tive
Dir e cto r· of -the Steelworkers.
The c ortference ·was open ed b y
J ohn H. J ohn son , President of J ohnson Publ i cat i o n s a n d Co-Ch airman of the Task For ce on Communications and Pub lic Suppo rt and
the closing s es sio n was chaired b y Arnol d Aronson, Executive
Secretary of the Le a de r sh ip Confe rnc e on Civil Rights and CoChairman o f the Task Force on Local Coalitio ns.
At a second meeting, two days later in Minneapolis, the Mayors
of eleven additional cities me t with the leadership of the newly
formed Minneapolis Coalition to review ideas for urban coalition
activity. Two additional planning sessions are now scheduled- one for the western cities to be held in San Francisco (Nov. 30)
and one for eastern cities to be held in early December .
�National Steering Committee
I. W. ABEL, President, Uniced Steelworkers, Pittsburgh
THE HONORABLE /VAN ALLEN, JR., Mayor of Atlanta
ARNOLD ARONSON, Executive Secretary, Leadership Conference
on Civil Rights, Washington, D.C.
ROY ASH, President, Litton Industries, Beverly Hills
THE HONORABLE JOSEPH M. BARR, Mayor of Pittsburgh,
President, U S. Conference of Mayors
THE HONORABLE JEROME P. CAVANAUGH, Mayor of Detroit
FREDERICK J. CLOSE, Chairman of the Board, Aluminum
Company of America, Pittsburgh
THE HONORABLE JOHN F. COLLINS, Mayor of Boston
THE HONORABLE RICHARD J. DALEY, Mayor of Chicago
THE MOST REV. JOHN F. DEARDEN, Archbishop of Detroit
GILBERT W. FITZHUGH, President, Metropolitan Life
Insurance Company, New York
DR. ARTHUR FLEMMING, President, University of Oregon, President,
National Council of Churches, New York
HENRY FORD II, Chairman, Ford Motor Company, Detroit
THE HONORABLE MIL TON GRAHAM, Mayor of Phoenix
ANDREW HEISKELL, Chairman of the Board, Time, Inc.,
Chairman, Urban America Inc., New York
JOSEPH D. KEENAN, Secretary, International Brotherhood of
Electrical Workers, Washington, D.C.
THE REV. DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR., President, Southern
Christian Leadership Conference, Atlanta
THE HONORABLE JOHN V. LINDSAY, Mayor of New York
GEORGE MEANY, President. AFL-CIO, Washington, D.C.
J. IRWIN MILLER, Chairman, Cummins Engine Company,
Columbus (Indiana)
THE HONORABLE ARTHUR NAFTALIN, Mayor of Minneapolis
GERALD L. PHILLIPPE, Chatrrnan of the Board, General Electric:
Company, New York
A. PHILIP RANDOLPH, President, Brotherhood of Sleeping Car
Porters, New York
WALTER REUTHER, President, United Auto Workers, President,
Citizens Crusade Against Poverty, Detroit
DAVID ROCKEFELLER, President, Chase Manhattan Bank, New York
JAMES ROUSE, President, The Rouse Company, President,
Urban America Inc .. Baltimore
RABBI JACOB P. RUDIN, President, Synagogue Council of America,
New York
THEODORE SCHLESINGER, President, Allied Stores Corporation,
New York
ASA T. SPAULDING, President North Carolina Mutual
Insurance Company, Durham
DAVID SULLIVAN, President, Service Employees International
Union, Washington, D.C
THE HONORABLE JAMES H.J. TATE, Mayor of Philadelphia,
President, National League of Cities
JOHN WHEELER, President, Mechanics and Farmers Bank, Durham,
President, Southern Reg,onal Council
ROY WILKINS, Executive D,rector, National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People, New York
WHITNEY YOUNG, JR., Executive 0,rector, National Urban League,
New York
JOHN FEILD, U S. Conference of Mayors, National Coordinator
RON M. LINTON, Urban America Inc. National Coordmator
�-2As of October 31, local coalitions were moving toward affiliation
in Detroit, New York, Gary, Indianapolis, Minneapolis and Atlanta.
Other communities across the nation are also apparently beginning
to move. In California, for example, the League of California
Cities. at its recent annual convention, called upon all California
cities to establish urban coalitions . Fresno and San Diego
sponsored the resolution and announced they were taking action in
their communities . Similar word has been received from such
diverse areas as Newark, Chatanooga , Denver, Phoenix, both Kansas
Cities , Washington, D. C. and Seattle.
PRIVATE EMPLOYMENT
&
ENTREPRENEURSHIP
The Task Force on Private Employment has been contacting individual businessmen, business organizations, labor unions and civic
groups for ideas on the role private industry and unions can play
in meeting the problems of unemployment and underemployment in
our cities. Ideas are being exchanged , case histories are being
developed and guidelines for suggested local action are currently
being prepared. Officials of the National Industr ial Conference
Board are cooperating with The Urban Coalition in developing plans
for a national clearing-house on hard-core unemployment and
training pr ojects.
Two meetings have been scheduled-- in Baltimore and Detroit--to
examine in detail different local approaches to this pr oblem .
The Baltimore meeting (Nov. 14) will concentrate on how Negr o
bus iness opportunities can be expanded through sub- contracting
with industry . The Detroit meeting (Nov. 21) wi ll emphasize
t raining and upgr ading. Task Force Co- Chair men Ger ald L .
Phillippe a nd David Sullivan will speak a t bot h meeti ngs .
In addition , r egiona l meetings on pr iva te employment a r e
s chedu led f or Atlanta (Dec. 13), Phoen i x {Jan . 17 ) and Kansas
City, Mo. (J a n. 24 ) .
COMMUNI CATIONS AND PUBLIC SUPPORT
The new Task Force on Communications and Public Support is
headed by Jose ph H. Allen, President of McGraw Hill Publications,
John H. Johnson, President of Johnson Publications and Harold
Fleming, President of Potomac Institute. Through their efforts,
key comrr~nications organiza:ions such as the Advertising Council,
the American Business Press Association and the Public Relations
Society of America are being contacted for ideas and support.
�-3-
McGraw-Hill Publications has scheduled a special supplement
on urban problems which will appear in January in all forty
of thier publications. This is only the second time in their
history that McGraw-Hill has undertaken such a project. A
special supplement to City magazine on the August Convocation
has been sent to all those who attended and is receiving wide
national distribution.
Press support for the Coalition continues strong. Since the
August Emergency Convocation, editorials supporting the Coalition's goals and principles have appeared in some 70 newspapers
and magazines. In addition, news stories have appeared in a
wide variety of dailies, weeklies, and magazines , including
business journals, labor union papers, religious publications
and the Negro press.
(See sample clips)
LEGISLATION
On October 23 , Coalition Co-Chairmen Andrew Heiskell and
A. Philip Randolph wired members of the House-Senate Conference Committee on Independent Offices Appropriations urging
that they support the Senate's recommendation of $637 million
for funding the model cities program (the House had approved
$237) and $40 million for funding rent supplements (the House
had killed the program). In final action , model cities
received $312 million and rent supplements received $10 million.
In the i r wire , Heiskell and Randolph reminded members of the
Committee that 1 , 200 national leader s gathered at the Coalition's Augu s t Convocation in Washington had unanimously
declar ed :
"Congr e s s must move wit hout delay on ur ban pr ogr ams.
The country can wai t no longer f or measur es tha t have
been de n i ed the people of the citi es a nd t h e nation
as a whole.
(Statement o f Principl e s , Goa ls, and Commitments)
11
EQUAL HOUSING
Mr. James W. Cook, President of the Illinois Bell Telephone
Company, has accepted the co-chairmanship of the Task Force
on Equal Housing Opportunities. Representatives of the Task
Force Co-Chairmen are exploring the current private2and
�1
-4-
government investment situation, and the effect of government
housing and financing programs on plans for metropolitan open
housing. The group is also surveying the experiences of existing
fair housing groups and determining how this Task Force can
relate its work to the local coalition movement. Particular
emphasis is being paid the problem of new lower-income housing
in suburban areas on an open occupancy basis.
A national action session for some 300 suburban fair housing
councils is planned for early next year in Chicago. The Leadership Council for Metropolitan Open Communities, under the
Chairmanship of C. Virgil Martin, President of Carson, Pirie
Scott and Company will serve as the local host.
EDUCATIONAL DISPARITIES
Expansion of this Task Force is under way, work areas are
being defined, and technical resources are being surveyed.
Representatives of the Task Force Co-Chairmen met following
the October 9 Steering Committee to discuss Task Force goals:
particular attention was paid to ways in which the Task Force
can relate to efforts of local coalitions to deal with educational problems.
A full Task Force meeting will take place November 7 in
_New York.
HOUSING RECONSTRUCTION
AND
INVESTMENT
Representatives of the Task Force Co-Chairmen have met twice
and are dra fting a position paper on the goals of the Task
Force , the technical resources it can make use of, and the policies it will consider recommending.
Task Force Co-Chairmen and representatives meet November 2 2 in
New Yor k.
�·\
-·-n, - .T
~--..::...


..


CITY HALL
October 11, 1967
ATLANTA. GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
IVAN AL!.:EN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental liaison

MEMORANDUM
To:
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
From:
Subject:
Dan Sweat
Organization of Local Urban Coalitions
A priority goal of the Steering Committee of the National
Urban Coalition is the establishment of strong local coalitions
in the 50 largest urban cities of the nation. This is, of
course, essential to the very life bloo_d of any sustained
effort to develop a meaningful coalition which can speak
for urban America as a whole.
The direction taken by these local coalitions will depend upon
the individual city or urban area and the wishes of the local
leadership. We can safely predict they will take on a wide
variety of shapes and forms from city to city.
The more I analyze the alternatives to organization of a
coalition in Atlanta, the more I am convinced we already
have several single-purpose groups functioning in this
very capacity. I believe the identification of these groups
as our coalition might reduce or negate the requirement
for establishment of any other body, although I believe at
some point a leadership meeting should be held to explain
the Urban Coalition.
�Mayor Allen
Page Two
October 11, 1967
Probably the be st example of a local coalition organized to
attack a particular problem area is the Board of Directors
of Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc. This group, originally
appointed by the governing authorities of the City of Atlanta
and Fulton County, and now operating under a non-profit
charter, clearly represents the six broad areas of Business,
Labor, Civil Rights, Education, Religion and Local Government,
which make up the national coalition. (A copy of the E OA Board
is attached. )
A second group organized around a single -purpose is the
Housing Resources Committee. (Copy of Committee Structure
attached. )
. Other groups which would fall in this category would be the
Community Relations Commission, Atlanta Youth Council,
and the Citizens Advisory Committee on Urban Renewal.
(Copies of CRC, AYC and CACUR Board members attached.)
Each of these groups is organized to perform in an area of
primary concern to the national coalition; EOA - Poverty;
Housing Resources Committee - Low Income Housing;
Community Relations Commission - Civil Rights; CACUR Urban Redevelopment.
The final Model Cities Executive Board - Technical Advisory
Committee - Citizens Advisory Committee structure will provide
for another coalition of individuals and groups designed to
produce cooperative action in planning and implementing the
Model Cities Program. (Copies of proposed Board and
Committee Structure attached.)
It is readily apparent that no recognized local group is
established for the specific pnrpose of developing employment opportunities for the poor. While a large part of
EOA's program is designed to reduce unemployment and
�..
Mayor Allen
Page Three
October 11, 1967
underemployment, no broadly-based organization currently
exists which can function in a capacity which will bear the
local responsibility for meeting the national Urban Coalition
goal of one million jobs for the poor. (This was the first
announced goal of the Urban Coalition. )
I believe, however, that a project in the works during the last
eighteen months by the City of Atlanta, EOA, the Community
Council, Atlanta Chamber of Commerce and the Sears-Roebuck
Foundation might have produced the mechanism for creation
of a coalition on employment opportunities.
This group has met informally at least once a month during
this time in an effort to produce a color slide presentation
on problems and opportunities for employment of the poor.
The Sears-Roebuck Foundation financed the employment of
a top advertising agency to assemble the materials and design
the presentation under the supervision of the informal group.
The presentation is now completed and Mr. Lucien Oliver of
Sears will, in the next three or four weeks, invite a select
group of key business executives to a luncheon to be exposed
to this production. He is expected to ask each of these
executives to sponsor luncheons for a wider group of businessmen in an effort to disseminate the information to as many
firms as possible.
The businessmen will also be encouraged to direct their
personnel management to become better informed on the
problems of unemployment and uncle remployment among the
poor and to investigate all possibilities for providing entry
level jobs for additional employees who lack skills and
training .
�Mayor Allen
Page Four
October 11, 1967
This will fit perfectly into the scheme of the national coalition,
which is encouraging the top executives of the large national
firms to direct their plants throughout the country to do essentially
the same thing. (There has already been some definite response
to this program. I have had an indication from Sears and Ford
offices here that the word has already come from the top.) .
In view of the impending National Steering Committee C onference
on Employment here in November, I am encouraging the meeting
of the first group by Mr. Oliver be held in advance of the
Coalition. I believe this initial group should be considered
as the local coalition and worked into the National Conference.
I recommend that you ask Mr. Oliver to attend or send Dan
Garies or Bob W o od to the October 17 all-day meeting on
local coalitions in Chicago. I would also recommend that I
attend as your representative and that you ask Vernon Jordan
to represent us in the area of Civil Rights. Vernon is on loan
to the Urban C o alition staff and will be in attendance and is
more aware of what is going on than any other individual from
Atlanta.
I also would hope that at a very early date we can show you the
employment presentation and get your ideas on how we can
provide follow-up.
DS:fy
�,.
'
Ii
I
ECO:.'JO~EC OP?OR'I'UNITY A'ILJ\N'I'A ,
BOAR:> Mm':BERS
I
INC.
Authority Chairma~:
Boisfeuillet Jones, 210 Peachtr2e Ce~~er B4ilding, 230 Peachtree Street,
....,,
, 'i--L..
N. W., Atlanta: Georgi-:. 30303.
Telephone: 5 22-8511
1 :;,.,1.---< -C~V..."--' ·,
Members 3ppcinted by Ful~o~·county:
I
Harold Ber.son, Bensor. Chev=ol2~ Co~pany, 1001 Alpharetta Street, Roswell,
{\
, . '
~ , ~~
Georgia 30075. Telephone: 993-4414
Melvin Granthan:, 2152 Woodberry Avenue, Eas:: Poir.t, Georgia 30044.
Telephone:
7 58-8661, Ext. 5 7
J\b-
John w. Greer, 811 Healey.Building, Atlanta, Georgia 30303.
Telep~one:
524-4223
~
Jesse Hill, Vice Preside~t and Actuary 1 Atlanta Life Insurance Company,
148 Aubu::-n
Av~:r1.ue,
N. E., Atlanta, Georgia 30303. Telephone:
JA 1-0513
( ',
I
• •I
~ ~_'.~-
Carl Plunkett 6 Plunkett a~d Company, Inc., 201 Sprin~ Street, N. W.,
Atlant2, Georgia 30303. Telephone;
JA 1~2438 i , ~ . .
Dr. Paul D. West, Saperintendent, Fulton County Schools, 165 Central , .
Avenue, S. W., A::lanta, ·Georgia 3~l30J. Telephone: 572-2211
'£.l!_,,....._!_;t.,(.e(f".-. ,
--- --~~
Mrs. W. H. (Lucy) Aike:::1 1 239 West Lake Aver.ue; N. W., Atlanta, Georgia
30314.
Telepr:o::e:
794-2431
0.»J, ;/..,_,.-:,]JJ
Me±ers -3ppointed cy t1-:e City of A t lct:ta:
Willi2:n L. Cal .:..ow3.y, Callo·.,;ay Realty Ccmp :2 ny 0 193 Auburn Avenue, N . E.
. !
)
, ~t '-· •_LI
It'......:. - ~ t .,,
Atlanta 0 Ge0~gi3 38~03.
?elepr.one g JA 2-4525
I
Rev. Josspn L. 2riggs, Pasto~ 0 Go~do~ St~eet P~esbyt9rian Church,
'"'+--o~.1..
,-,
1450 Go -ra,-~,..,
W., Atlanta, Georg~a 30310. Telephone~ PL 3-6121
't ) i. ... 't ~ ._ - - - r_ :
.:, ,
~ L ( ; :~t'h
.,
r:J
"'· · ,-.,=,ri'"'+-e-,~e,,.L.
Dr • V7 ohn
Atl2-.:nta :ru:":;lic Schools, 224 Cen.tral
,.,o
--=> V - '-1
UU..t:-_ _
., ;
/ Avenue, S . W., A~ lahta, Ge crg~3 30303 . 7elephone :
522-3381
. .-' ._,... ~.,..,
T 0 .;.. _ _ ,..,
.,;.,JC:: ....
i_
·'- • -
--'-,
-- ...
W. H. ~ontagus6 Sr ., President Georgia State AFL-CIO , 15 Peachtree
_,I I
Street, N. E., Atlanta, Georgia 30303. Telephone:
525-2793 ~~:u .
0
-=------l.
Revised:
-
\
12/8/66
�,i
-
2
MemJ::-ers appoi r-. te d b v the City of Atl a rlta (Co!"lt'd). : :
A.H. Sterne, President , ~r~st Co~pany of Georgia . 36 f?gewood Avenue,
N. E., Atla n ta, Georgia 30303.· Telephone: · 588-7123 ~
Mrs. Le~oy (Ann) Wo qdward, 834, Oakdale Road, ~ - E. , Atlan t a, Georgia 30307.
r\ f"I
'-1·'
Telephone: D~ 3-4020 ~ ( . . ~~:.::~--
--
-.....
Rev. M. L. King 0 Sr. , ?astor, Ebenezer 3ap~ist Ch~ rch, 413 Auburn . Aven~e ,
. - f . .11 '
Ii I)
' 1 ·
N. E., Atlanta, Georgia.
Telephone:
688-7263
-t...-~ t..f' '- \._,..l,VI..,{
1~'-; ~ -G'
.
..
-/
I
John S. Eern d o:1 (Gwinne t t Hember ), Suwannee, Ge orgia 30174 .
Telepr,one:
945-5 37 5 V -.::.,-~
...,
.l
'
.
I
.





. !
Julian Sharpton (Gwinnett Member) , Whi ppo orwill
Street
. Duluth, Georgia
,r
\
...
30136. Telephor..e ~ 963-3491 or 476-2170
~-~..v ' ,\....· _____ .
Georg e L. Edwa rds , Jr. (Rockdale Membe r), 1842 Calloway Dr ive, N. W.,
· · 'I
·-. > ~.
Atlanta, Georgia 30~14. ':'elephone: 483-8647 "'··J_,..._,,,I .-~~-
-
Mrs . Nan -:::ie 3tow2:!'.'s (?.ockda le Me:nb-er) , Director , Dep a rtment of F amily
and Ch i ldren S e ~vi c e$,West 1~yen ue , Conyer s, Geor gi a 30207.
Tel.e phone : 48 3-86C.6
· l,u...l.·-!:..,:"
~~ -Members appo i r.t e d b y the Cit i zens Central Adv isory Council (CCAC):
Mr . Erw.:..n Ste·ve i".s, 7 99 P ar soris Str-2e t ,
Te l e p hoDe ~ 52 3- 5 7 91 or 87 3- 6 524
S.
W. , At ~an t a , Georgia 30314.
l-k--s-.- -Mch'1':.:he - G. - Wy-rr:.~,- -14-G§-31:~<l.g-e-a- -A-·.;:s~ ;.Q.,. - £ ,- .W...-u--A-t.la:t:lta
~-e-l-ep-h-G-~ e ~--~§S--4-2-3-0- 1
7
-
G.eor.g.ia-3 0 3 10__
Rober t ~ Qbb3 0 2455 Abner P lace , N. W.Q At la n ta . Georgi a 30318.
Te lephcne:
622- 0 919 o r 7 94-148 7
Mrs. A . I... BentonQ 1 62 .La::-:3r Stre e t
Telephon 2 :
52 4-6 075
Mr. H. D. "Bo " Wile y
Mr. Robert Barnes
Mr. W. T. Brooks
Mr. Leroy Dobbs
Mrs. Ethel Cox
Mrs. Susie Labo rd
3
S. E . , Atlanta , Georgia 30 315.
Mr. Edward Young
Mrs. Beatrice G a rland
Mrs. W a yman Mitchell
Mr. L awrence Coleman
Revised:
12/8/66
,,.
�:-'Iay
31, 1967
HOUSING RESOURCES
Mr. Cecil A. P.lex2n.der., Ch2irmz.ri
Housing Resou2'.' ce s Co:1:r:1 i t t ee
Finch , Alexande~J Ba~nes, Rothschild and Pascna l, Architcc~s
10th Floor Sta~dard Federal Building
44 Broad St~ect, No W.
Atl2nta, Ge org ia
Dr. Sa nford s. Atwo6d, Co-Chairman
Housing Reso~rcas Cc~~ittee
President, Emery Unive~si ty
Atlanta, Georgia
30322
Dro Benjamin E. Mays, Co-Chairman
Housing Res ourc es Committee
Pre sident, Morehous e Col lege
Atlanta, Georg ia
PANELS
LEGAL
Mre Charles L~ Weltner, Attorney
The First National Bank., Suite 2943
2 Pea chtree Street
Atlanta, Georgia
Mr. Donald Hol lowell, Regional Director
Equal Emp loyrr.ent Opport unity Commission
1776 Peachtree Street, N. W.
Atlanta, Georg ia
Honorable Luther Alverson, Judge
Fulton County Super i or Court
136 Pryor Street, s. ·w.
A_ '-lan-'-a
1.,
••
l,
,
Geo·..,
0-;.-.:.b-:,8
lf!r . Archer D. Smith III , Attorney
Harmon and ~hackston
1944 N2tion3l Bank of Georgia Eldg.
Atlanta , Georgia
M.ro Norrr.an Lo Underwood, Attorney
S 2.!1c1ers ,
Hes t e:.
· .-.-::~ Holle y
1001 Commerce Building
Atlanta:; Georgia
Chairman
�)
COI\'STRUC':!:1 1 0N Al'TD D3S=:crn
Dro Edwin 2arrison., Presid2n t
Georgia Institu~e of Technology
225 North Avenue, N. Wo
Atlanta., Geo::..,,gia
Chairman
Mr. Herman Jo Russell., Contractor
504 Fair Street., S~
Atlanta., Georg ia
Wo
30313
!v"iro Moreland Smith, Director
Urban Planning P~oject
R
. e 6~io--1
Sou ~~er~
l,o.L
i ! C - Counc~l
-5 Forsyth St~eet, ~. w.
Atlanta., Georg i 2
•J.
.1.
Vice-Chairman
..!..
Revo John Ao Middleton., Presideht
T-102:ris B:::..,,m,m College
673 Hu~ter Street, No Wo
Atlanta., G::_;:- ··: ~ :-:
Henry F o Alexander., Builder
2439 Fernlea~ Court, N. W.
Atlanta., Georgia
r,,r:i:,
G
Mro Ja mes Moore ., Preside;tt
Atlanta Labor Council
15 Peach tree Street, No E.
Room 20$
Atlanta., Georgia
30303
FINA}JCE
Dean Harding Bo Young
Atlanta Un ivers ity
223 Che s tnut S tree t., s. W.
Atlan ta ., Georgia
Mr. Lee :Surge ., :?re sid ent
Retail Credit Co~pany
P. Oo B ox 4081
Atlanta., Georgia
30302
ffir o Bu tler T Eender s on
Ac s istant t o Dr . Ma y s
~oreho~ se Collese
223 Ch e stnut Str e e t., s.
Atlant a , Georgia
Q


¼.


w.
Chairman
�I
-
Page Tr111ee
FINANCE (contin Ll ed)
Mr. Mills :0., Lane., J r .,, President
The Citizens a nd Southern National Bank
Po O. Box 4899
Atlanta, Georg i a
30303
Mr. Joseph Earle Birniej Presiden t
~he Na tional Bank of Ge orgia
Pea cht ree at Five Points
Atlanta, Geori ia
30303
Mr. Aug ust us H. Sterne j Presid ent
The Trust Corrpany of Georgia
36 Edge~ocd Avenue ., N ~ E.,
Atlant a, Georgia
30303
1/rr>o Gordon Jones., President
The Fulto~ : ~ t ional Bank
,,~,Q7
P o Oo BOX --::)v
Atlanta , Georg ia
30302
Vice-Chairm2n
NON- PROFIT FUNDS (Comb i ned with Fi nance Pane l)
Mr. A. Bo Padget t, Exe cut i ve Direc t or
Metronol itan Fo undati on of Atlant a
1423 ~andler 3 ui lding
Atlanta, Georgia
30303
r1r . Hamilton Doug l as , Jr., At torney
Na t i ona l Bank of Geor gia Bui l ding
At l ant a ., Georgia
Rev Wi l l ia~ Holmes Borders, Pa stor
Whea t Stree t Bap tist Ch urch
1426 Mozley Driv e , S . Wo Atlanta ., Georg~a
Dr . Ruf us Cl ement , President
Atlanta University
223 Ches t nu t St reet ., s. W.
Atlant a , Geor g ia
Mr o John ~Jilson., Presiaetlt
Horne Wils on Company
163 Peters Street , S. W.
Atlanta ., Georg ia
30313
�Pa 6 e ~our
NON-PROFIT FU~TDS (co~tinued )
I il'. Albert Love
Execu tive Vice President
The McCall Corpora t ion
P.O. Box 1000
Doraville , Georgia
30040
1
Ivir. Scott Housto::1 J J r
Exec utive Director
\'1'e sley Wood s Apart r::ents
P. o. Box 15468
·
Atlanta, Georg ia
30333
o :1
PUBLIC BOUS ING
Mr" Edwin L., Sterne; Chairma n
Housing Authority of t he City of Atl2nta
639 Trust Company of Georgia Building
Atlanta , Georgie
30303
Dro Albert ~a nley, Presiden t
Spelman College
350 Leonard Street, s. W.
Atlant a, Georg i a
Leonard Rei:r-. ch , Pre s id ent
Cox Broad ca sting Company
1601 West Peacht r ee Street, N.
Atlanta, Ge orgia
Mr .
t.
Mr . Clarenc e D. ColeDan Reg i ona l Dir ec t or
· Na t i ona l Urban League
1361~ :£vTa r ietta S1.:;re et , N.
Atlar:.ta, Georgia
w.,
Sui t e 242·
~~. Charles Fo Pa l ~er , Pres id ent
Palmer , Inc., Pa l mer Building
41 Mariett a Stree t
At lanta , Georg i a 30303
~
Cha i rr:ian
�l
P2e;e Five
LA:N""D P.C QUIS I':i:'IO:\T
Mr. Wall2c e L. Lee , Presiderit
Atlanta Ga s Light Company
P.O. Box , 45 69
,~ 1·a~n,~ .
G' eor r. i 2.
.). ., 0.)..., 02
.-,._._
v-a·;,
0
~ir
Clayt on R. Ya t e s, President
Yates-Milt on St ores
228 Auburn Avenu e , N. E.
At lanta, Georgia
0


rrir ~ J im E Land


o
Chief Engineer f or Georgia
Souther n Bell Te lephone & Telegraph Company
805 Pea chtree St reet , N. E~
Atlanta , Georgie.
.Acting Cha i rr.ian
Dr Vivian Henderson, Presid ent
Clark Collebe
240 Chestnu t Stree t, s. W.
Atlanta., Georgia
Mr. J. A. Alston, President
Atlanta Real Estate Board Representative
Empire Real Estat e Board
Mr. Stewart Wight
0
Alston Realty Co.
Auburn -Ave. N. E.
!t
~A'143.215.248.55Q~.pr
soc I _ll...L, )R '...,.=i~F.0 gia 30303
19i-A
Wight, Couch & Ward
15 Peachtree Bldg ., Room 822
Atlanta, Georgia
30303
- -G-f=~-=-::.-2-e - fh-~:i':~-9-?"~e~, Ad mini s tra t or
Ec onomic Oppor t uni ty At l anta , Inc.
101 Marietta Street , N. w.
Atlanta , Georgia
deceased ~
~ir. Duane Beck , Executive Di re c t or
Com~unity Counc i l of the Atlanta Area , I nc.
1000 Glenn Bui lding
At l anta , Georgia
30303
Yirs .. Suj e tte Cx•a:'11·: , Soc ia l Director
Neighborhood Services , E.O . A. , Inc.
101 Marietta Street
·
Atlanta , Georgia
Dr . Tobe John s on ,
Professor of Polit i ca l Sc ience
~6rehouse Co l l eg e
223 Chestnut St ree t, S o Wg
Atlant a , Geor gia
Dean William So J ackson
Atlanta Uni v ers ity
223 Ches t nut Stree t, S. Wo
Atlant a , Georgia
Chairr,,an
�Page Six
,l
S0CI.f'..L


?R03~_;S!·!S ( co:'1tinuec1)


Mr. E::,,."win St2ve11s ., Chaizir.~an
Citizens Centr2 l Adviscry Co~mittee., E.0.A.
799 Parsons Street., S. W.
Atlanta, Geor~ia
Mr.
Le1·iis Ce:r..1-:er ., At torney
2045 Manchester, N. E.
Atlanta., Georgia
BUSINESS PAR'I ICIP.A:J1ION
1
rvr.r. Virgil Milton
3626 Tuxedo Road, N. W.
Chairman
Atlanta., Georgia


Mr. Edward L. Simo1:1: Audi tor


Vice-Chairman
Atlanta Life Insurance Company
148 Auburn Avenue, N. E.
Atlanta, Georgia
Mr. B2rlee Branch., President
The Southern Company
3390 Pe2chtree Road, N. E.
Atlanta., Georgia
'Mr . C. Arthur Jen_l-cins
Director , Industrial Relations
Lockheed Company
Marietta, Georgia
30060
Mr. Roland Viaxwe l:. _ Presider..t
· Davi 8on 's DeDart ment Stores
180 Peachtree Street, N. w.
Atlanta., Georgia
PUBLIC INF0RMP.TICN
Mr. J ames L. Toi:msenc '
Tm·rns end and Associates
1014 Healey Bldg.
Atlanta, Gecrgia
�Page Seven
Mr. D2 l~ Clark
Directo~ of Public Affairs
Chair~ari
WI.i.GA-TV :
1551 Briarcliff Ro2d, N. E.
Atlanta, 'oeor 6 ia
1
fib:'. Ray Moore
Ne1·rs Direc'tor
WSB-TV
l
1601 West Peachtree Street, N. E.
Atlanta, Georgia
30309
r-ri r. Jim Wood
Vice-Ch2irman
News Directo~, WAOK
110 Edgewood Ave nue, N.
Atlanta, Geor gia
STAFF
ROOM 1204, CITY HALL
Tel. 522-4463, Ext, 430
Malcolm D. Jones, Director
W. w. Gates, Consultant
Miss J-oyce--r-'1cKnight, Secret2::::-y
() ~
.1>
..,b-\!\.o..k-~ q ~
�... - - . .·-----------,
,
COMMUNITY RELATIONS COMM ISSION
1203 CITY HALL
ATLANTA, GEORGIA
Mr. Irving K. Kaler, Chairman
182'0 Fulton National 1lank Building
Atlanta, Georgia
Home-255-7694
Dffice-525-6886
Mrs. Eliza K. Paschall
Executive Director
Room 1203 City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Home-373-1966
Office-522-4~63, Ext. 433
Mr. Robert Dobbs
2455 Aboer Place, N. W.
Atlanta, Georgia
~-622-0919
Of fic e - ~48---7
Miss Helen Bullard
Toombs, Amisano & Wells
70 Fairlie Street, N. W.
Atlanta, Georgia
Home-874-3986
Office-577-3600
Archbishop Paul J. Hallinan
Catholic Archdiocese of Atlanta
P. 0, Box 12047, Northside Station
Atlanta, Georgia 30305
Office-261-1000
Mr. Rolland Maxwell
c/o Davison's
180 Peachtree Street, N. W.
Atlanta, Georgia
Home-351-2053
Office-522-1300
Mr. Joseph Haas
1116 First National Bank Building
Atlanta, Georgia
Home-255-1300
Dffice-525-6141
Mrs. Fred W. Patterson
2959 Andrews Drive, N. W.
Atlanta, Georgia
Home-233-1624
Mr. Clarence G. Ezzard
245 Atlanta Avenue, S. E. '
Atlanta, Georgia
Home-627-1187
Dffice-522-9616
Mr. Sam Massell, Jr.
Vice Mayor, City of Atlanta
c/o Allan Grayson Realty Company
40 Pryor Street, S. W.
Atlanta, Georgia
Home-355-4112
Office-521-1694
Rabbi Jacob M. Rothschild
The Temple
1589 Peachtree Road, N. E.
Atlanta, Georgia
Home-233-8365
Office- 873-1731
Mrs. Sara Baker
938 Park Avenue, S. E.
Atlanta, Georgia
Home-627-8193
7M'. ~~-(l'/,r,2t-~~- // 30 ~ J I _ tf.,,., ,Ji.,
H~r3---3Bn
()1f_ ().AJa__, fj a . :S a 3 I ?
Mr, -~
.f75"-ctf"&I
Mrs. Mary Stephens
2840 Deerwood Drive, S. W.
Atlanta, Georgia
~
-523-1577
Office-~
i
Reverend Samuel Williams
Friendship Baptist Church
437 Mitchell Street, S. W.
Home- 755-2352
Office-688-0206
Mr. M. 0. "Buzz" Ryan, Gen. Mgr.
Marriott Motor Hotel
Courtland at Cain Street
Atlanta, Georgia
Home-351-2444
Office-688-6500
Mr. Hamilton Douglas, Jr.
National Bank of Georgia Bldg.
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Home-355-2292
Office-522-2200
Mr. T. M. Alexander, Sr • .
208 Auburn Avenue, N. E.
Atlanta, Georgia
Home-753-8760
Office-521-0549
Mr. R. J. Butler
250 - 10th Street, N. E.
Atlanta, Georgia
!7~ - S-3q b
Mr. R. Byron Attridge
Trust Company of Ga. Bldg.
Atlanta, Georgia
Home-351-2773
Office- 525-0484
Dr . Robert E. Lee
Lutheran Church of the Redeemer
731 Peachtree Street, N. E.
Atlanta, Georgia
Home-237-3903
Office-874-8664
Mr. Jack Sells
1416 Hills Place, N. W.
Atlanta, Georgia
Home-872-4795
Office- 355-4311
.. _-.,: .• :4----
• _ _;
�.ATLANTA CHILDREN AND YOUTH SERVICES
COUNCIL BOARD OF DIRECTORS
SEPTEMBER 12, 1967
Chairman:
Mr. Robert M. Wood
Genera 1 Counsel
Sears, Roebuck & Company
675 Ponce de Leon .Ave., N.E.
Atlanta, Georgia 30308
Phone: 875-8211
Res: 18 Chathm Road, N.W.
Phone: 233-3705
Secretary:
--
Mr. Michael H. Trotter
.Attorney
.Alston Miller & Gaines
12th floor, C & S National
Bank Building
Atlanta, Georgia
Phone: 524-3241
Res: 120 Biscayne Dr., N.W.
Phone: 355-8148
Vice-Chairman:
Treasurer:
Mr. Franklin W. Thomas
General Secretary
Butler Street Y.M.C.A.
22 Butler Street, N.E.
.Atlanta, Georgia
Phone: 524-0246
Res: 290 Flagstone Drive, S. W.
Phone: 344-2685
Mr. Fletcher Coombs
205 Auburn Ave., N.E.
.Atlanta, Georgia
Phone: 523-8282
Res: 380 Waterford Rd, N. W.
Phone: 799-1473


-
~~mber_au~r~
Mrs. Rhodes Perdue
2012 West Pace Ferry Rd,,
.Atlanta, Georg ia
Phone: 355-9508
N.w •
~-- -- ~ ~ EBS
Mr. John W. Cox
Executive Director
Atlanta Children and Youth
Services Counc 11
1201 -B City Ha ll
Atlanta, Georg i a 30303
Phone : 522 - 4463, Ex t . 437
Res : 1800 Memorial Dr., S.E.
Phone : 378 - 0340
Chief Herbert T. Jenkins
Atlanta Police Dept.
165 Decatur Street, S.E.
Atlanta, Georgi a
Phone: 522 - 7363
Res: 654 Morng sdel Dr., NE,
Phone: 522 . 7363
Mr . Jac k C. Delius
Ge ne ra 1 Manage r
At la nt a Parks De pa rt ment
Ci t y Hall Annex
Atlant a, Ge orgia 30303
Ph one: 522 -4463, Ex t . 311
Res: 215 Piedm ont Ave., N.E.
Phone: 688-0925
Dr. John W. Letson
Superi ntenden t
Atlanta Pub li c Sc hools
224 Ce ntra l Av e ., S .W.
At la nt a, Georgia
Pho ne: 522 -3381
Res : 92 Laurl Dr., N.E.
Ph one: 237-3161
�MEMBERS
Mr. Frank R. Carmines
180 Peachtree Street, N.E.
Atlanta, Georgia
Phone: 522-1300, Ext. 281
Res: 5535 Dupree Dr., N.W.
Phone: 255-4598
Mr. Ocie J. Irons
1275 Capitol Ave. S.W.
Atlanta, Georgia
Phone:. 525-5J25
Res: 2e63 Haridy Dr., N.W.
Phone: 799-5444:t
Mr. Dejongh Franklin
First National Bank Building
24tti floor
Atlanta, Georgia
Phone: 521-1200
Res: 1585 West Pace Ferry Rd, N~W.
Phone: 355-0224
Mr. Jerry Luxemburger
Gamblerell & Mobley
3900 First National Bnk. Bldg.
Atlanta, Geor~ia
Phone: 525-8571
Res: 568 E. Wesly Rd., NE.
Phone: 237-8380
Mrs. Vivian Henderson
1209 Foundtain Dr., S.W.
Atlanta, Ueorgia
Phone: 758-1201
Mr. Frank A Player
531 Biship Street, N.W.
Atlanta, Georgia
Phone: 351-3481
Res: 146 W. Wesley Rd. ,NW
Phone: 233-3512
Mr. G. Arthur Howell
Hass Howell Building
6th floor
Atlanta, Georgia
Phone: 522-2508
Res: 3727 Tuxedo Rd., N.W.
Phone: 233-1369
Mrs. Mary Sanford
Perry Homes Extension
1660 Drew Dr., N.W.
Atlanta, Georgia
Phone: 351-6711
Res: 1521 Drew Dr., N.W.
Phone: 351-5101
Mrs. Mae Y~tes
Executive Director
Carrie Steele Pitts Home
667 Fairburn Ro~d, N.W.
Atlante, Georgia
Phone: 799-7431
Res: 1221 Hunter Rd., N.W.
Phone: 753-0768
�CITIZENS ADVISOR Y COMIV!lTTEE FOR URBAN RENEVlAL
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
'Locker.rna:n. ·zvir s •. Doris
Robert L. Sommerville 1 President
Atlanta Transit System, Inc,
P. O. Box 1595
': :: i-2492
Colwnni-st,-Atlanta--C-onstitution
3411 Pinestream Rd., N. W.
237 . 2597
Alexander, T. 1'11. , Sr.
President, Alex ander & Associates, Inc•
208 Auburn Avenue, N. E.
JA 1-0549
Mathias, Charles c., Staff Representative
United Steel Workers 0£ America
Suite 334, 1776 Peachtree St., N. W.
TR 5-5351
Bivens_, Bob, Exec. Direct9r
J
Mays, Dr. Benjamin E.
Uptown--Assn..--oLAtlanta ~
~~t l tl i!__. U"?'.t'.O-- -,l:z.:pre sident, Morehouse College
615.. Peachtree.-St.-,-Rm.- 914 r')_-<---":;(U-::,o.,,_
Jl.,cc..,. 223 Chestnut Street, S. W.
(J
,
873-6983 ~..::.1 !,P l:i__c-(__, -..,.1u:_~
,
~ 1 1- 0
MU 8-4223
t;
I
Blayton, Jesse B., Sr. President
Mutual Federal Savings & Loan Assn.
205 Auburn Ave., N. E.
JA 3-8282
0,r'-t=z-= ,
.Wrilton, L. D., President
Citizens Trust Company
212 Auburn Avenue, N. E.
JA 4-0614
f Q .
'-;'h .
.
l>rodnax·, George-H.--,-J-r., Vice Pres.
Atlanta Div., Georgia Power Co.
Box 4525
522-6121 , Ext. 8312
Milton, Virgil W.
3626 Tuxedo Road, N. W.
Atlanta 5, Ga.
237-6656
Calloway, William L., Pres.
Calloway Realty Company
193 Auburn Avenue , N. E.
JA 2 - 4525
Padgett, A. B., Executive Director
Metropolitan Foundation of Atlanta
1423 Candler Building
MU 8-4117
Haas, l-.1Irs. Leonar d
Gri z zard & Ha as , 306 Carnegie Bldg.
133 Carne gie Wa y, N. W.
525 -48 21
Rich, Richard H.
Chairman 0£ the Boar d , Rich's , Inc .
Box 4 539
J A 2- 4636
Hamilton, Mrs. Grace
Hamilton Associates - C onsultan t s
582 University Place, N. W.
IvIU 8-7249
Robins on,- Jam-esTI. , Jr .
Chairma:n-uH:he- Boa-rd,tsrNatr. Bank
Fi-r-st--Na-tional- Bank- Bldg; ,Box 4148
588=5·00-0--Schukra£t, Edgar E.
Owner, Schukraft Florist
1050 Cascade Avenue, s. w.
PL 8-2684
�-~
Warr~
.
Roy
D WRoy' Chairman.
.cl +'h ... 'D - - - .!30

ar;ren Co<npa.n
_,_, ..,.,..._
Pryor Street S . y, Inc,
JA 3 .-6262
· '-1- 0- Wf
(
William son Q
V
,.....,_
iA 2_;;9;~ St.,
N,3' /
Atlarita c·-, ' • • ' Pre si°aent
· 1
,
u:r ren
'
·
C"f' Exchange
·
";55 'H t ·
-
)
~~ ~
Yates, Clayton R
Yates & M·lt
•' President
In
1 on Store
228
Auburn
A
s,
·
venue N E C.,
JA 1-1401
'
• ,
lk.,
l ;t
t./ ll~ ,t-t1- (tf'- / t;.£, _,_;(1,(. l
r~
W.z..1Zr-i- ;J/!,fr.,,v'-- ;-,;;-,_
/ 390/.1-,p!AJ {lv_v
J/,b../ I" 1:C.:li: r0-1u 1 t!.,,,Lj !/ f7
Jv;;,J )J,l tz;c,; J /J,.,,,.l
A'-'I- f;L/ 2
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1
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�CITIZENS ADVJ;SORY COMMITTEE FOR URBAN RENEWAL
Adair, Jack, President
.!\.dair Realty & Loan Company
56 Peachtree St., N. W. JA 1. 0100
Blayton, J. B., Jr. 1 V. P. -Gen. Mg :-:-~
WERD Radio Atlanta, Inc •
JA 4-066 6
330 Auburn Ave., N. E.
A i.ken, W. H., General Manager
Aik en, Inc.
239 Westlake Avenue, N. VI. SY 4 . 2431
Brewer I . Oby T. ' Sr. , -President cA_
a.cv -,,,. .L-,_.,....
Geo. Muse Clothing Company
t'j 'l k ~ .Jc- (1A. J,
52 Peachtree St. , N. W.
JA 2-54.00
Allen, Mrs. John L.
League oCWomen Voters
3360 Nancy Creek Rd., N. W.
Burns, Fred, Jr., Owner
Fred Burns Company
1070 White St., S. W.
CE 7 . 6870
,,,,,....
758-7275
-
Arnold, Harold
, ExecutiveDirector

,,,Atlant~ -Urban League

23-9-----A,,,-·ubur~ _Ave.,
N. E.
521-2355
Chiles, ./John O., President
/
.- Adams-Cates
Company
/
/
Hurt _.,.Building JA 2-5477
Anderson, Mrs. Amber W.
Asst. Solicitor General-Fulton County
Fulton County Courthouse
JA 2-5310
Clement, :Cr. Rufus, President
Atlanta University
223 Chestnut Street 1 s. W. JA 3-6431
Bain, .,,1:)£ _~ !<est~
Ch~ an _,,,,---Dep€.yo-rftic~ Sc1ence, Emory yn1v.
n'so -,Oxford ,Rd.,
377-2411
Cooper, Sam I., President
Cooper, Barrett, Skinner, Woodbury
and Cooper, Inc.
Henry Grady Building
JA 2-98".1 ./..
, _,. . ,.
N. E?'"
'1:J (,. ~ :7 j; .. , I l, //. · (.. . ' L.C-l.- ,,-t....../
b.:c'..tl;i_ei'~~ l-/Ix.s. - Paui--(Ch. UR Committee)
League of Women Voters
44-00-E.---B-r-ookh-a-ven- Dr.
CE r-0&301? 1.s~ C , l 1-L4, ,<_(~ t ) ; f",
Barfield, Carroll C., President
Harry Barfield Co., Inc.
304 Parkway Drive, N. E. JA 3- 3421
Beers, H. W., Jr., Ch. of Board
~ee r s Construction Company
7 0 Elli s St ., N. E.
J.A 5 - 0555
/
Davis, Harold, Public Relations I)j._.- ~ -Geo r gia State College
33 Gilmer St., S. E.
523-7681
Ford, Clement, Architect
240 W. Andrews Dr. , N. W.
Fr~c<
·.
CE 3 - 07U
B enne tt, R embe r t B., P r esi dent
Benne tt Realty C o rpo r a t i on
15 Peachtree St., N. E.
J A 2- 8 336
A rthur p / s r . , J ? r eent
si7
F7.enc ~ / 4 , r eam .co./
.
~3 Georgia
ve.,
S.
JA
5-88
7
/
,
/
Bickers, Joseph T., Exe c. V. P .
Atlanta Mortgage Brokerage Co. Inc.
187 Auburn Avenue, N. E.
M U 8-3259
Cooper, V. F. (retired)
a$11 Birchwood Dr., N . E.
Atlanta, Georgia
Bird, F. M. , Attorney
Jones, Bir d & Howell
Haas - Howell Bldg.
Gerson, John VI., Exec. V. P.
Atlanta Transit System, Inc.
P.O. Box 1595
JA 4-2~ '; ..
JA 2-2508
vi:
CE 3-1904
�-2Grizzard, Claude, Jr., President
Grizzard Advertising, Inc.
34 2 W. Peachtree St., N, W. JA 308441
McDonald, Dr• Harold, Owner
Ballenger-McDonald Urology Clinic
Peachtree .. Baker Bldg.
MU 8-3322
TZ::-,c kney, Dr. Richard C,
Moore, Fred; Manager
Georgia Properties Co.
825 Rhodes Haverty Bldg.
£.- Ray Laboratory
239 Auburn Ave., N. E.
MU 8 .. 9071
JA 3..6646
H a.llman, Noel W. , Secy•• Treas.
Hallman Bros. Construction Co.
45 Eleventh St., N. E.
TR 2.6688
Moore ./.Jam,,?'.-(~res·dent _/
Atla~ , Ga. Labo Cou~il
~
1¥1?.e ashfree St., N. E. ~m 20~5-2793
Harris, Dr. J. B.
Herndon Building
Morris, Joe L. (retired)
1098 Lullwater Rd., N. 'E.
Harris, Julian H.
Sculpturing Studio
177 Fifth St., N. W.
H e ndley, Albert G.
5801 Riverview Rd., N. Vl .
JA 2-3225
378-1682


Mo-z--l-eyFVffiJ:ts


1-01-0-Beeehha-ven::Rd.-,-~N=-i ·E. &3-6'-:1:7-64
TR 4-3105
255-3559
Munford, Dillard, Ch. of Board
Atlantic Company
P. O. Box 1417
MU 8-1900
Palmer, Charles F., President
Palmer, Inc.
303 Palme r Bldg.
522 .. 9238
Patterson, Eugene, Editor
Atlanta Constitution
10 Forsyth St., N. W.
JA 2 -5050
Jones , Mrs. Maymie , Attorney
J ones, Jones &: Mabry
Grant Building
JA 5-2996
R a ndall, Luthe r H. , Ch. of Board
R a ndall Fue l Co., Inc.
665 M arietta St., N. W.
JA 2 -4711
Kea rns, J a ck W.
J a ck VI. Kearns Ins urance Co.
24 7 6 Meadow Lark Dr.
East P oint
761-652.9.
Richardson, Dr. Harry V., P re s i d e nt
Inte rde nom i national T heological C ent er
9 Mc Donough Blvd ., s. E . JA 5- 8843
Manley , Dr. Albert F., Presid ent
Spelman College
350 Leonard St., s. W.
M U 8-2148
Martin, E. M., V. P. and Secy.
Atlanta Life Insurance Co.
148 Auburn Ave., N. E.
JA 1-0513
Roe, Don ald J., V.P.
C & S Nat i onal Bank
Advertising D ept -
588-3258
Scott, C. A., Editor and Manager
Atlanta Daily Vlorld
21.0 Auburn Ave., N. E.
Atlanta, Ga.
JA 1-1459
�-3Shaw, VT. J., Owne.J: and Manager
Odd Fellows Bldg.. Re.al Estate
250 Auburn Ave., N. E,
JA 1.1891
Whitman, H. W. (Bo). Asst. V, P.
Fi:,; st National Bank
Box 4148
588-65E
Shrider, Robert E, , Director
Bethlehem Community Center
9 McDonough Blvd., S. E, MA 2.0919
Willis, Mrs. Ralph
12 Camden Road, N. W.
TR 6-7269
Simon, E. L. , General Auditor
Atlanta Llfe Insurance Company
148 Auburn Ave., N. E.
JA 1.0513
Sutton, R. O. , V, P.
Citizens Trust Company
212 Auburn Ave., N. E.
JA 4-0614
Tarver, Jack, President
Atlanta Newspapers, Inc.
10 Forsyth Street, N. E.
JA 2-5050
Tatum, Luther S. , V. P.
Atlanta Federal Savings & Loan Assn.
18 Marietta Street, N. Vl .
JA 3-8421
Terrill, The Rev. L. }.;l .
Zion Hill Baptist Church
2740 Collier Drive, N. VI.
SY 4-8100
Thompson, Buford H., President
South Side Atlanta B a nk
1700 Lake wood Avenue, s. E. MA 2-3521
Toms, William A., Broker
Harris Upham Company
4 4 Broad Street, N. W.
JA 3- 7611
Ulrich, W. Roy
3 01 A r dmore Circle, N. W. Apt. 3 - A
8 76- 2033
Upshaw, Mr s . Gladys
616 0 Roswell Road, N . E.
255 - 0560
White, Robert H., Sr., Chm. o f Board
Southern Wood Preserving Co.
P.O. Box 10798, Sta. A
PO 7-0211
(November 5, 1965)
�MODEL CITIES EXECUTIVE BOARD
Ma_yor, City of Atlanta
Chairman, Fulton C o unty Commission
President, Atlanta Board of Education
Member, Atlanta Board of Aldermen
Member, Atlanta Board of Aldermen
Representative, State Government
Representative, Private Sector
Member, Model Neighborhood Area C o uncil
Representative, Negro leadership
�MODEL CITIES TECHNICAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE
Administrative Assistant to the Mayor, Chairman
Fulton County Manager
Superintendent, Atlanta Public Schools
Executive Administration, Fulton County Department of Family and
Children Services
Director, Fulton County Health Department
Administrator, Grady Hospital
Executive Director, Community C o uncil of the Atlanta Area, Inc.
Executive Director, Atlanta Region Metropolitan Planning Commission
General Counsel, Atlanta Legal Aid S o ciety
Executive Director, Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.
Chairman, Civic Design Commission
Director, State Department of Family and Children Services
Executive Director, Metropolitan Atlanta Community Services, Inc.
Judge, Fulton County Juvenile Court
Executive Director, Atlanta Housing Authority
Atlanta Region Director, State Employment Service, Georgia
Department of Labor
Executive Vice-President, Atlanta Chamber of Commerce
Atlanta District Supervisor, Division of Vocational Rehabilitation,
Georgia State Department of Education
Director, Atlanta C ompone nt, S outheastern Education Laboratory
General Secretary, YMCA
Executive Secretary, YWCA
Comptroller, City of Atlanta
Building Inspector, City of Atlanta
Parks Gene ral Manager, City of Atlanta
Chi ef of Construction , City o f Atl anta
Planning Director, City of Atlanta
Police Chief, City o f Atlanta
Minister, Central Presbyterian Church
�........,
'
LEADERSEI P 2~I ~?I ~G 2APE R
Mobilizing Ur jan Coalitions
I
Chicago, Illinois--October 17,: 1967
I.
U~B~N LEGISLATION
As _ firs-;:: st:e;?s toward' the i 2 :9:!. e::n:2n ta tio :., of ·c1::e cc:~ ,i t::-.'.2 r. ts r,tac":.e
at b 1e August ED.erg e ::icy Co:::1v cc a.-tio n, t h e ~~atio n al St seri::-:s: Co=-:-c ti tt e-2
announced ~ts support for t h e Emergency Em~ lovme~t Act, co-s~onso~ ea
in the Senate by Senators Cl ark a n d Javits~ ~he Coa~ition SU??Ort e ~
tl1e Prouty 2t,e r a.,-nerit ,.-, h ic~1 woul ci h2_ve enlarc ec. t h s L,volve::;.en t of
---,i·v~C.L..


-e c-or- LL.c'C.


·--~ni~s i ,i -'-r~i


--i- --l'::,;


i :~,.., PQ, e, ~ for n ·u~,___,i·c
-:::",::,r,1-ice
-'o.':i""
l:'L.
0.-......J-...
-_
j
.::> •
T~e vote in the Senate was clos e -- 4 7-42. The ~ eas ~ra · has been
refe::::-red back to the Senate Lab or Corn-"- --nittee T.-,:,e re 3er:ator Clar:-c
has ann ounced he will conduct adciitional hearing s.
,1 _......,
--•
. 'I
_1'.,
_.::,
_
~
j
T2e Coalition also announced ~~s SU??Ort for fu~l ~u~c.i n1·· =or tie
Poverty Prog ram, Model Ci ties, a n d Rent Su:;_::iple:::ne n t.s. ':' ~1e Se~ate
has ac·ted b y inc:.:-easing th e Ac1-:1i ~1is tration' s appro :_:i:.:::ia. tior1 request by $168 million for t~e p overty program, resto:.:::ed t~e
a9pro?riations for Rent SU??le~ents wh ich was delet e d i n the House
and has authorized ~ost of the money requested ~y ~~e A~mi ~i st r atioI'- for Model Cities. The latter t wo measures are nm, in Conf ereI'-ce Corruni ttee at.temp ti ng to reconcile considera:)ly ::..o,:·1e r
Hous2 appropri a tions. Th e House has ~ot yet acted on t~e ?overty
Pros-ram.
~~e
Urban Coalition has a lso s up?orted civ il ri g:_ ~~ =air ~ousi ~g
legislation and Co-Chair~ an And:.::: ew Heis kell has t es tifi2l jefore
~ ~e Senate Cownittee on beha lf o= t h e A&~ inistra tio n 1 s ::_)rO ? Osal.


,,-

: t ~-.e present tifile , t h e St.eering Corr:.rn ittee .:.. s stud y.:..n g ·t h e ne,.-1




r 2 s t riction s on the Social Security PrograB imposec ~y t2e Souse
of Re?rese~tatives.
T~,.e Z:c:ergency Task Force o:-: :? rivate E:ti.ploy::-r,e n t and :i:::.1 t::::a::?e::cei.: r s h i?
is i n t he p roce s s of d ev e~o p i ng prog r2..m s to i n? l e~e::c t t ~: 2 2rb a n
Co ali tion's Statement of Pr inc i ples, Goals, a n d Co~oitme ~~s
ado?ted at the Emergency Co nvocat~o n.
\
2resent tim~, the Task Fo r ce is work i ng on
goals:
. I
�Mr . Stel'ne
Page Three
October 19, 1967
Rev . Bevel Jones , President
Christian Cow-icil of Metropolitan
Atlanta, Inc .
Dr . John W. Letson
Superintendent
Atlanta Public Schools
Mr . Erwin Stevens; President
Citizens Central A dvisory Co uncil
Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc .
Sincerely yours ,
Ivan Allen. Jr.
Mayor
1AJr:£y
�• . : ~ ...
· - ·.J •
EAGZ T·;·; o
BRIEFI NG
WORKSHO? LEF. . D2RS}~IP
l.
Ass i stinc the ~usiness sector I in develo~ina
nractical
. techni~ues a~d ~echanisms of expan~ing p rivate e~?lo~rnen t opportunitie3 for c e~tral city residents.
2.
Er.. co urag·ing and 2.ssis·c. i ng the :;:,rivat:e sec-tor in develo::;,in-;
specific communi ty-wi de progra2s anC:. resources ne c essary
to make a.n "inpact on un e m;? loyment and 1.:.ndere:c::::,loy::r.e r. t.
3.
Ir..creas ing· and broader:.i::."g 'c he in vol ve:-.1en-= an.d co::-,r1i t.--:ier;, t
of business, l abor and c ivi l l eaders~i? ~n i ~?l e~enting
the State:·L1e;,1 t of Princip les, Goals, anC:. Corr...--ni wne n ts
of the Urban Coalition .
J
..J
.i..
The Ta sk Force is ta king t he ~allowing actions to i ~pleraent t h ese
three goc.l.s:
1. . Maki ng field v isi::s to several com..,rnnities to assess
current c onditions .
2.
Working with loc al leader s i n laun c ~ i ng S?eci~~c nr ograms in three ci~ies: A~lanta , Ba lti~or e and 0a t r oit.
3.
Planning for a na~iona conference c~ represent ~t ives
,,from at leat 50 local p riva te em;:)lo·,e:ntn tas!< :::orces
/ to exchange experie n ce and enlarge t ~e n~t:.ional efrort:..
4.
5.
Creating a Techn~c al ~o rking Group of key ?Srso~s fro~
personnel, lab or, educ at io ~ , ~r a i~~ng, c ivi c group~, a~d
maapm12r res2arc;,1 . T:.1i s gro;_1p will !:>2. ava~la.ble · to ::-o t ::
the Tas k Force at the national level and to local counter par t t as: forces .
Inviting addition a l i nterested leaders ::re= busi~ess ,
lab o r , religion, educa ~i on, t ra i ni~g , c~v il rigits,
and local gover ni...,_.,,en t to T_,m rk T,._;it:i.. t ne Tas:.C ?c :::-cs.
Although t:i..e Ta s k Force is aldressi~g itse lf to ::;,robleis on t~e
na ti onal level :v.u c h 0£ t:ie success of the progra.:-'.1. wi ~l d.2?e::.--_2. on
t he c.e.veloprr.ent of local priva·::.e e:~plo y~e n t tas ;.c fo r ces 1 ar:.c. t ~e
cotluni t ~en ts ~ade ~y the private s ector. Thus, t he discussio~ o~
private emp lo::,,ri1ent might well i:oc us o n o rga:1izi~:g t ~:.e p riv c.te sector
for action o n t he local level.
'
The l ocal tas k. forces s :-iould consist
of h i 9·:-i-l evel lea2.2rsL:.:_:i fro:n
a cross section of t h~ priva t 2· sector a~d have sufficient raso~rces,
includi:1g staff, to devel o? a :id i r11.:9 le::-.ent prog·ra~s. The tas::.C :::orce
should :: unctio :1 as a vmrk i ng c c::cL--.:1i·t tee, al t. ':·wugi:1 t:.£"1e ac tual du ties
may be assigned to sta ff personnel and specialists.
�,l
p_-;.GE ':i:'n~:::
3~I:2:5'I!\""G ,i:.~::;~.:o
1·: oR:.;:sn:02 L:2Jl_;J:2RSHIP
Sin c e ec:c~.!. cor...:~l:ni-c.y nc.y ~l>lis l: to. a:)"')r·oach ·ct1e 2ro;)l e:-:i. c:i £:.:"er2:1tl:-i,
ap?r O?riate infor~a tion should be daveloped to assist t ~e tas~
for c e on p r iorities and progra~s . A p~ogram of acticrr for a local
ta s k force c ould be as follows :
co:r;:_-,m r:i ty .
2.
~n inven to r y o f manpower ?rogra~s in o~aration .
4.
Continous e v aluation ~ ~d re?orting ot the p r ogress a~d
problems in t h e co:":l!~unity .
·
HOUSH!G
III.
'I'r1e. urban Coalition has t vm Task Forces i n t :1.e hous i:r-.:~:i and reco:::-istruction area . The rt.econ struction Ta s:.::. Forc2 is cu:!:"re.:, tl v 0.2.v elo:?i:'lS
a lo~g·- 2:" 2.n g e ;>ro g r c.ill aimed. at i r1c:c- e a s 2-ng i !'lvcst::-:1e.r1t .-- ~: c e:-.~e::- -c 2..t.y
are.as a::.d. a t expanding housing· a v a ila ble fo!:' lo,:12:::- ,,2..r:.co::-:12 f c..::-.i.il i es .
The. 3qual Oppbrtunities in Rous i ng Task Fo:::-ce is work i ~g out a ?rogran
~·1 it~ local fa i .~ nous ing· c o!T'ICLittees a::d. -..ri_ th k.ey e2.e::ne:::ts L,. t2e ·
real estate, develop:::i.ent a~d :nortgage i n stitutions .
I V.
PC3LIC SUPPORT
T::.e T a si-: Force or1 Coz-,nunic a tions 2.1c.d Pt::O l i c Su9::_:::>or"!: 2..s cur rE:::-stly
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effo:::::-ts c:.re. being lur-.c he.d wit:1.. key el e::r..ei1ts of t:-:.e :::i.ass :r..e.c. ::..a a ir.1ed.
at e...-:i.?nasizins teh nc..t·.: . r e. o f t :-:..e. urba.~-:. cr.:.s i s . i:.,ocal cmi::-~te.:: : - ':)a :::-t
task forc es c a n g r eat ly assi s t t h is ef for t a~~ s~o u l d 1 if ?O ss i b~e ,
dire c t~y and ?er sona lly invo l ve r 2p:: : - e sentativ e.s of t hs ~ass ~ e.dia
o n a -loca l b asis .
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LOC~~ COALITIO~S
See 0iscussio~ Paper and Guid el ines for Local Coali tio n s
~..!._
�I
/
VI .
D:i:SC "JS S I O:-J -P 20C:SDURES
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o rgan-i z i ng l oc 2. l c cal i t. i o n a.c-c.i vit.ie s . The par-ti c i)a.n.-!:.s '::.:.. 2.1 be
divided i nto fi ve wo rksho p g r oups . Ea c h di s c us sio n grou? will have
a c hairman an~ fo ur resource co n s ul tan ts . It is e x;e c~ed t~a t each
d i scussion group will add r e ss i t. self to t.wo top ics i ~ t h e ~ or 7 i ~:
wor~ s~O? S (t he review of t he nat io na l legislat i ve pi cture a ff e ct.:..~g
c i t ies and a revi ew o f O??Ortun itie s fo r a nd me t.hots o ~ e x ? a nd i ~g
9ri va te enployZ::1 2:1t) 2.nd t ,,10 to·::,i c s i n t l"1e a f te r n c ct1 0 '.ou s i :~s and
r e c ons tru c ti o n p~oble~s ana w2.y s o f d evel op ing pu~li c s uppo rt a n d
loc al c o alition s).
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Th e~e a ra o nlv t wo key co~c s ~n s ~hat t he Nat i o na l Stee~ing Co~~ittee
now ·has con c ern ing local coali t ion s . On e is t~a t ~e e x?ect t he~
to t a k e d if f erent fern s bec a use of l o c al c onai tions a ~~ t h e o tie r
i s that we exp e ct t hei r g ov s ~n i ng board s to be r epresentat i ve ,
i:r:c :..udin.g t he e l e:ne:-_t.s ~epre s2::1.ted on t:t.1.e N2..tio r12..J.. s ·tcsr i ::1s Cc ~:c.:.. tt.::e
(b u s i ne ss, lab or , loca l g over::::.,,uent, re lig i o n , civil rig~ts and
e ~uc ation ). Ou r o ffici a l v i ew is t ~a t we e x o e ct l o c a l c oa l i~ i ons
to inc l ude lea der s hip f r o~ t he gie t to s and barrio s . Two r e?r esentative 3 from loc a l c oalition ~ wi ll be elec ted t o s e ~ve o ~ t h a
Ste e r i:'!g Coi1ini ttee b y a Cou n c il o f Ur jan Co a litions to ;:;a ::or:::1ea
l a t e r t:.1i s year .
Loca l c oal i t i ons, loc a l t ask f orc 2s and s p e cia l ? r o j ec~s S? O~so r ed
b y the n ation a l task for c es wi l~ ? roviae f ull o p?ortun i ~y fo r t ~e
p a rti ci?a tion of inte r e sted cit i z e ns in ach i evi ~g t ~e s o al 3 of t h e
Coa 2. 2.t.ion .
T11e posture o f · ti12 S t e 2ri:.1.g Corr~i ·i:.t~c is t:12.t ~·ie
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cc:-.;_ 2 SU?:?O:Ct f o r t:1e St a te~:e nt o f Pri nc ip l es, Go 2 l s , 2::1C: Co:-.::'.1i t .-.e :-. ts
and ~e ex9ec t local c oal i t i o n s t o expand o n t h ese ?ri~c i?les
t hrous~ local ef f o r t s an d i n c orr s ultation wit~ the Natio n a - St 2e r i~g
Cori-ni t ·cee tnroug h t h e Counci l o f Urban Coalit.ior: s .
':':-is •,.10rksho-;::, c hairmen ar:.d r esource co nsul t a.:-:-::s s I::oulc. s trc:.s s -::r.e
i 3 ?0rtanc e of no~ilizing nationa l sup? o rt f o r a gre2.te= al~oc a t i o n o f ):)0th pu:Ol ic and private r e sou!:'ces to deal ,_.,-i ·c~1 the ·:'.Jro ble~s o ~ t~e c en t er-cities . The resour c e -peo~
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- le bear a n ea;ecia:
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~'!e a vy res~::,ons ibi l i ty- -to L1tet:9ret t::-_e e r:o rr.1 it y ar:.c. c o:::? l ex .:_ty
o~ this un c.artaki ng . · Stress mu s t be placed o~ the fa c t t ~a~ Co~;rass
is cur rently n ot responding t o t ~e need as tl _e Coaliti on sees it .
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A sense of urgen c y nust be ma i nt~ined a t tlie s~22 t ine t~2t
reco:~ition is give~ t o t he ~ifficult i es an{ ~ 2g~tive s i~ t ~s
presen t n2tio ial cliuate . I~ nust te ma~2 c: aar t~2t t~2 National
s·ce ering· Co:-~~-1ittee e:-<is t.s pri~a 2:'ily to a_ssi.st. locc.l c o~-~A~~-:i.l~-: i·::i::!s to
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�l
THE URBAN COALITION
1819 H Street, N.W.
Wa~hington, 0. C. 20006
October, 1967
GUIDELINES FOR LOCAL COALITIONS
On August 24 in ~ashington, D. C., the Emergen~y Convocation
of The Urban Coalition issued an urgent appeal to all
concerned American citizens to join with the Coalition in
efforts to fashion a new political, social, economic, and
moral climate that will make possible the breaking of the
vicious cycle of th~ ghetto.
Action at the community level
must now follow.
As leaders in your community, your commitment and ingenuity
are no~ called upon to mµster the support and involvement of
your fellow citizens for a massive reordering of both
national and local priorities in the face of the unresolvep
urban emer~ency,
The Urban Coalition looks to you to initiate formation of a
local coalition in your city or metropolitan area to work in
concert wi~h the National Steering Committee in pursuit of
common objectives.
�- 2 -
OBJECTIVES
At the conclusion of the August Emergency Convocation, The
Urban Coalition adopted a comprehensive Statement of
Principles, Goals and Commitments.
It is this document which
charts the course for our mutual efforts.
(A copy of the
Statement is enclosed.)
You will note from the Statement that the Coalition has
identified seven specific areas of urban affairs calling for
action by the Coalition and the nation.
Emergency Task Forces
have been created reflecting these problem areas .
They are:
l.
Emergency Task Force on Public Service Employment
2.
Emergency Task Force on Private Employment and
Entrepreneurship
3.
Emergency Task Force on Educational Disparities
4.
Emergency Task Force on Housing Reconstruction and
Investment
5.
Emergency Task Force on Equal Housing Opportunities
6.
Emergency Ta sk Force on Communications and Public
Support
7.
Emergency Task Force on Local Coalitions
The St a tem e nt of Goal s adopt ed by th e Coalition mak es c l ea r
t, ha t th e key to r e s olv i ng the se inte r- r e lated probl ems is a
mass ive em erge ncy work program of a t least on e ~illion ne w
public ser vice-ty pe jo bs, de ve lop ed a nd fi nance d by the Federal
Go vernment, incl uding new training opportunities for the
�- 3 -
unemployed and underemployed.
The elements of such an
emergency work program are described in the Statement.
Such a program is a prerequis~te to the restoration of
economic health to our cities and hope to the lives of
millions of urban Americans.
The pervasive social and
economic costs of continued high levels of unemployment
and underemployment in our cities can spell further disaster
to our society .
The alternative is to implement a crash,
national, employment program of the character The Urban
Coalition proposes.
The business of The Urban Coalition is to induce a complete
revision in the allocation of talent, time, money and
resources to meet i ng the basic needs of America's cities .
While special emphasis has been given in The Coalition's
Statement to the basic need for full employment, this is not
to minimize the urgent needs for new capital investment,
revitalized publ i c education, substantial increases in the
housing supply, mo r e and better urban services and facilities,
and en hanced equal opportunity in housing.
The Statement adds
that the " next or der of business .. . shall be the development
of a broad prog r am of urban reconstruction .. . including the goal
of r ehabilitation and construction of at least one million
ho us i n g uni ts for l owe r - i n come fa mi l i es an nu a l l y . 11
�- 4 -
All sectors of American society have a role to play in accomplishing the goals The Urban Coalition has proposed.
Awakening
those sectors to the emergency at hand and mobilizing them for
appropriate action is the immediate task.
Essential to The
Urban Coalition s performing that task is the formation of
1
local coalitions which will first, pledge their suppbrt of the
Statement of Principles, Goals and Commitments, and second,
work in concert with the National Steering Committee, with all
resources available to them, to accomplish these go~l~.
STRATEGY AND AGENDA FOR LOCAL COALITIONS
As an initial target, the Steering Committee of The Urban
Co glition is responding to the requests of communities in at
least f i f ty major urban areas for assistance in the formation
of local coalitions by the end of November, 1967.
As is the
case with the Steering Committee, these local organ j zing
committees will be made u~ of representatives from the commDnity s
1
bu s ines s, or ganized labor, religious, civil rights, educational,
~


-
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local govern ment, and communications leadership.
.,---
It is important
t hat the sectors represented correspond with those represented
on the National Steering Committee so as to be broadly
repres e ntative of the life of the community.
In some cases , it
may be that coa l itions have already been f ormed aroun d such issues
as j obs , schools or housing .
These existing group s m~y wis h t o
iden ti fy wi th a nd work with The Urban Coalition .
�- 5 -
Where a general, as contrasted to a single issue, coalition is
being formed, the first order of business for the organizing
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committee is to round out representative participation on a
local Steering Committee.
Secondly, the Steering Committee
should develop a draft Statement of Principles, Goals, and
Commitments which endorses the national Statement and broadens
it to include major local concerns.
In those cities where
several single issue coalitions already exist, they _may wish to
jointly create a steering committee to work with the National
Steering Committee.
It is strongly recommended that, where new coalitions are being
formed, the local organizing committee arrange for at least one
staff person to work . full time for the local coalition.
It is
likely that this staff person could be borrowed from the staff
of one of the participating elements of the coalition.
While
the National Steering Committee is not able to offer any financial
assistance to local organizing committees, it will provide other
assistance in preparing and convening local coalition activities.
In addition, the Steering Committee has accepted an offe r by the
National Institute of Public Affairs to furnish, where desired,
technical assistance to local organizing committees in program ming of local convocations and subsequent seminars and workshops
on urban affairs.
provide s~
The Mational Steering Committee will also
ers, where needed and requested, in any or all of
the substantive areas under consideration by The Urban Coalition
Task Forces mentioned earlier.
�- 6 -
With respect to ne wly-formed local coalitions, it is expected
that the local structure wi ll include a steering committee and
task forces to deal wi th national urban legislation, ex pan ~i on
of private employment, housing, educat i on and public
information.
Finally, it is contemp l ated that the local coalitions will
pa r ticipate in a nd help shape the prog r ams of The Ur ban Coalition
through a Council of Urban Coal i tions .
Each city should pl an to
-
designate two r e pres entatives to serve on this national Council.
At its f i rst meeting to be held before the end of th i s year, the
Council will elect t wo rep r esentatives to serve on The National
Steering Committee and will continue to advise The Na t ional
Stee ri ng Committee on policies that are of national conce rn .
By definit i on, a coa l ition, whether it be single purpose or
otherwise, is an as s oc i ation of constituencies fo r so me ag r eed
pu r poses and not at all necessarily a fo r mally organ iz ed , r egulated
a nd s tr uctu r e d en tity .
Local co a l i t i ons , whether s i ng l e purp ose
or ot he r wi s e, may, t he re fo r e, be a s soc i at i ons of le a de r sh i p f r om
a lr e ady or gan iz ed s tr uct ur es and sec t or s of com mun i t i e s.
It i s
not necessa r y, a ltho ug h i n so me cases it may be desi r a ble, fo r a
lo c al grou p to f orma lly incorpor a te a local coal i t i on .
na t i onal Ur ban Co alit i on ha s not chosen to inco r po r a te .
The
In the
case of uninc orp orated l oca l coa l iti ons , fun ds may be channe l ed
through a separate fis c al agent such as a cooperat i ng organiz a ti on .
�- 7 At this point it is appropriate to mention in connection with
those local groups that choose to incorporate, that careful
attention should be given to weighing the advantages and
disadvantages of seeking tax exempt status under Section
/
50l(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code .
Perhaps one of the most
important considerations in reaching a determination on _whether
to seek tax exempt status is the f act that organizations enjoying
such status are not in a position to attempt to influence the
decisions of legislative bodies.
Given the potential importance
of this fact for any organization attempting to deal in a
comprehensive way with the range of urban problems, careful
deliberation of this subject is in order on the local level before
a decision is taken with respect to tax status.
Members of the
steering committees of such tax exempt organizations may nonetheless make appeals for legislation if they are acting as individuals.


* *


�GUIDELINES FOR LOCAL COALITIONS
The Emergency Convocation of The Urban Coalition has issu e d an urgent
appeal to all concerned American citizens to join with the Coalition
in efforts to fashion a new political, social, economic , an d moral
climate tha t will make possible the breaking of the viciou s cycle of
the ghetto.
Action at the community level must now follo w.
As leaders in your community, your commitment and ingenuity are now
called upon to muster the support and involvement of your fellow
citizens for a ma ssive reordering of priorities and programs in the
face of the urban emergency.
The national Steering Committee of The Urban Coalition is already at
work developing strategy and programs to achieve the goa ls it has set
for itself.
But its focus is primarily on national decision makers and
national priorities and programs.
This will not be enough.
There
must be complementary action a t the local level where ultima te responsibility rests and where urban problems are most clearly perceived.
The Urban Coalition therefore looks to you to initiate formation of a
loca l coa lition in your city or metropolitan area to work in concert
with the n a tiona l Steering Committee in pursuit of common objectives.
OBJECTIVES
At the conclusion of the August Emergency Convocation , The Urban
Coa lition a dopt ed a comprehensive Statement of Principles, Goa ls a nd
Commitments.
It i s this document which charts the cours e for our
mutual e f fo r ts.
(A copy of the Statement is enclosed) .
You wil l not e f rom th e Statement that the Coalition h a s identi fie d
s even s pec i f i c a re a s of urban affairs calling for conside rat ion and
�-2action by the Coalition and the country.
Emergency Task Forces have
been created reflecting these problem areas through which the substantive efforts of the Coalition will be channeled.
They are:
1.
Emergency Task Force on Public Service Employment
2.
Emergency Task Force on Private Employment
3.
Emergency Task Force on Educational Disparities
4.
Emergency Task Force on Reconstruction Investment &
Urban Development
5.
Emergency Task Force on Equal Housing Opportunities
6.
Emergency Task Force on Corrnnunications
7.
Emergency Task Force on Local Coalitions
The designated urban concern of each Task Force demands irrnnediate attention and action.
But while such a division of tasks is essential for
efficient organization of the Coalition's endeavors, the very real
functional inter-relationships between the major urban problems must
not be overlooked.
It is the position of The Coalition that given current urban American
conditions, the key to resolving these inter-related problems is a
massive emergency work program of at least one million new public
service-type jobs, developed and financed by the Federal Government,
including new training opportunities for the unemployed and underemployed.
The elements of such an emergency work program are described
in the Statement.
Such a program is a prerequisite to the restoration of economic health
to our cities and hope to the lives of millions of urban Americans.
Equally important is the fact that in the absence of such a governmentally-generated emergency work program even the most enlightened
and massive efforts to improve public education, housing, an -.:1 health
an d we lfare services wi ll meet with failure.
The pervasive social and
economic costs of continued high levels of unemployment and underemploy-
�-3-
ment in our citie s can spell sure disaster to our society.
The alter-
native is to implement a crash national employment program of the
character The Urban Coalition p roposes .
The business o f The Urban Coalition is to induce a complete revision
in the allocation of talent, time, money and resources to meeting the
basic needs of America's cities.
While special emphasis has been
g iven in The Coalition's Statement to the basic need for f ull employment, this is not to minimi z e the urgent needs for new capital investment, revita li zed public educa tion, substanti al increa s es in the
housing supply, more and better urban services and facilities, and
enhanced equal opportunity in housing.
The Statement states that the
"nex t order of business ... sha ll be the devel opment of a broad program
o f urban reconstruction ... including the g oa l of rehabilitation and
construction o f at l east one million housing units for lower-income
families annually ."
All sectors o f Ame ric an s oci e t y have a rol e to pl ay in a ccomplishing
t h e goa ls The Urban Coa li tion h a s propos e d .
Awak ening t hos e s e ct ors
to the emergency at hand and mobilizing them for appropriate action
is the immediat e t a sk.
Essen_tial to The Urban Coalition's perform-
ing tha t t ask i s the f orma ti on of loca l coa li ti ons wh i ch , we hope ,
wi ll fir st, p l e dge the ir s upp ort of the Sta t emen t of Principl es , Goa l s
and Commitments, an d second , work i n concert wi th t h e nation a l St e ering
Committee, with a ll resources ava ilable to them , to accompl ish thes e
goals.
STRATEGY AND AGENDA FOR LOCAL COALITI ONS
As an i n itia l t arget, t h e Stee ring Committ ee o f The Urban Coalition
is r e spondi n g to the r e quests of commun it i es in at l east f if t y major
urb an a r eas for a s s i s tance in the formation of l ocal coal i t i ons by
Novembe r 15 , 1967.
In each o f t h e f i fty communiti e s , a sma ll organi z-
ing committee o f local l eaders is be i ng cal led together.
As is the
cas e with the Steering Committee , the l ocal organi zing committee wil l
�-4be made up o f r ep r e sent at ives from the c ommunity's business, organized
labor, religious, civil rights, educational, local government , and ·
communications leadership.
It is important that the sectors repre-
sented correspond with those represented on the national Steering
Committee so as to be broadly representative of the life of the
community.
In some cases, it may be that coalitions have already been
forme d around such i ssues as jobs, schools or housing.
These groups may
wish to identify with and work with The Urban Coalition.
The loca l or ganizing commit t ee and oth er existing coalit ion groups are
being invited to des i gnate representatives to attend a one-day Local
Urban Coalition Pl anning Session to be held on Tuesday, October 17
1967 in Chicago , Illinois.
The plaming session , convene d by the
~ational Steering Commi tt ee, wi ll dea l ex clus i v e ly with organi za t ion
a nd progr amming o f local coa l it ions.
Further informa tion will be
furnished to you shortly on the subject of the planning s e ssion.
I n no ev en t, h owev e r, s hould t h e organi za t ion of local coalit ion s be
defe r r e d pendin g t h e Chicago p l anning s e ssion.
Time i s of t h e
ess ence.
Where a gen eral , a s contrast e d t o a sing l e i s s ue, coa lit ion is be ing
f orme d the fi rs t orde r o f busine ss for the organi z ing c ommittee is t o
round ou t represent a tiv e p a rt i cipa tion on a loca l St eering Committ ee .
Secondl y, the St e erin g Commi t t ee should devel op a dra f t Sta t ement of
Princip l es , Goal s , and Commi tments whi ch endorse s the na t ional Sta t emen t and broa dens it to i nclu de ma j or local concerns.
Nex t, conv ening
of an emergency c onvocation of the l oc a l c oa lition t o rev iew and a dopt
a Sta t emen t of Goals and devel op pl ans for i mp l ementa tion mi gh t be
under taken .
Thi s convoca tion , patterned a f t e r the n a tional Eme r gency
Convocat i on he l d i n Au gu s t , s houl d be c a lle d a s soon as pos sibl e, h opefu l ly, no later t h an mid-Nov emb e r .
In those cities wh ere several sing l e
issue coalitions a l ready exist, t h ey may wish to j oin tly conv ene such a
convocation.
�r
-5It is strongly recommended that, both in the initial organizational
phase as well as the post-convocation phase,where new coal i tions are
being formed,the local organizing corrnnittee arrange for a t least one
staff person to work full time on the local coalition.
It is expected
that this staff person could be borrowed from the staff of one of the
participating leaders.
THE LOCAL EMERGENCY CONVOCATION
The local convocation will serve to bring together the significant
corrnnunity leadership and will serve both as an organizing device as
well as a vehicle for arousing and educating the community to the
urban emergency.
The convening of the convocation and the endorsement of a Statement of
Principles will have local and national significance to the extent
t hat the convocation enjoys the participation of the corrnnunity's
leadership representing the same constituencies represented in the
organizing committee .
This is an enterprise requiring as much citizen
support as possible so that community leadership involvement must be
broad and numerically substantial.
The convocation can be focused on the problems of a single c i ty er on
the pr obl ems of the metropolitan area in which it is located, whiche ' e r is f easible and appropriat e .
It is fully expected that the local
c oa l ition and th e convocation will invo lve representatives o f maj or
employers an d un i ons whether their constituents and/or func ~i ons are
in the city or the suburbs.
While the nationa l Urb an Coalition is not able to offer an:· finan cial
ass i stance to loc al organizing committees, it wi ll provide
assistance i n p reparing an d convening the local convocation.
che~
In this
regar d, the October 17th planning conference in Chicago will offer
ori e~ t at ion and counsel on a range of factors pertin ent to succe s sful
�-6local coalitions.
In addition, the Steering Committee has accepted an offer by the
National Institute of Public Affairs to furnish, where des ir e d, technical assistance to local organizing corrnnittees in programmi ng of the
local convocation and subsequent siminars and workshops.
The national
Steering Corrnnittee will also provide speakers, where needed and requested,
in any or all of the substantive areas under consideration by The Ur ban
Coalition Task Forces mentioned earlier.
A necessary outcome of the convocation is endorsement of a minimal
organizational structure to pursue the goals and commitment 6 adopted.
With respect to newly-formed local coalitions, the local structure
should include a steering corrnnittee and a minimum of three t ask forces
to deal with legislation, expansion of private employment,and public
information, respectively.
Beyond the substance of these three task
forces, local groups may set up other work groups.
The nat i onal Urban
Coalition, however, is presently going through program dev e lopment with
its other task forces and will be prepared to coordinate other local
task force action areas in the near future.
Finally, it is contemplated that the local coalitions will pa r t icipate in and help shape the programs of The Urban Coalition .
�\
YO
LAN
CITY HALL
ATLANTA. GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Cod e 404
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assi st ant
MRS . ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Li aison
October 23a 1967
MEMORANDUM
TO:
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
FROM :
Dan Sweat
SUBJECT :
Wednesday A. M. meeting of Local Urban Coalition
The followi ng format is sugg e sted for the Wednesday meeting:
1.
Mayor briefly state b a ckg round for formation of National Urba n Coalition.
{a) Grew from a concern that the country 1 s national prior i ties plac e d
the problems of our urban cit ies far dow n the list - - b e h i nd D e fense a
Spa c ej A g ricultur e, Highw ays j e tc .
2.
(b)
The need for a reord e ring of prior i tie s to make cities the No. 1
conc ern of the nation.
(c)
Cong r es s not only h a s a n att i tude w h ich is fr eez ing urb a n exp e nditur e s ,
but i s actu a lly c u t t i n g ba c k on social pro g rams of long s tandi n g . (The
Social S ecur i ty a m e ndm e nts as p a s se d b y t he Hous e free z es t h e numb e r
o f aid to families w ith d e p e nde nt c h ild ren to c u rre n t l evels, w h ich
w ould m ean t h a t Atla n ta or F ulton Count y DFCS could certify n o more
AFDC ca s e s than the tot al n u mb er a t pr e s e nt. )
W ho mak e s up U r b a n Coalit i on ?
(a)
N ati onal Steerin g Committee of 33 me mb ers . Mayors of urban cit i es »
top l ab or lead ers , b usinessme n » c ivil righ ts leaders 8 educ ato r s a nd
c hur c h m e n.
�Page 2
3.
What does it do?
{a) This coalition pulls together the key elements in cities for
discussion and joint actions on the major urban problem areas
slums , poverty, unemployment, housing , education, etc .
(b) The coalition will distribute information among its members on
pending legislation before Congress and conduct an educational
campaign to make the nation aware of the massive problems which
cities face.
(c) The coalition w ill attempt to stimulate interest by private business
to provide jobs and programs in cities (the $1 billion Insurance
Industry Housing Program resulted from the Urban Coalition)
and develop resources from all other areas to bring max imum
impa c t on urban problems.
4.
What c an an Atlanta Urban Coalition do?
(a) A c t a s a c ommunica tions link b etw ee n N a tional Coa lition a nd local
o rgan i z a t i ons .
(b ) P r ovid e a n i d e n tifiable g r oup re pr esen ting a ll are as of A t lanta life
t o c onve n e and bri n g to b ea r on a n y city cris is.
(c) S timulate m aximum c o o p e r ation and c o or d i n ation a mong organ ization s.
(d ) A ct as a soundi n g boar d for n ew p r ogram pr opo s a ls a nd recom mend
w h ere certain p r ogram s shou l d b e pl aced .
{e) P r o vid e support from local c ommun ity for le gis l ative p ro p osals to
the N a t ional C on gres s a nd S tate L egislature.
(f) Assist C ity in determinin g local priorities.
5.
M ayor ask for c omm e n ts on proposal and on d raft resolution.
6.
Mayor ask for endorsemen t of N ational C oalition Goals.
�Page 3
7.
Suggested Steps for Follow-Up.
(a) Mayor's Office will coordinate Coalition initially, but encourage
volunteers to provide staff assistance. (Perhaps some organization has a person they could assign to ooordinate the program
full-time. It doesn't have to be done from City Hall.)
(b) Other organizations who express interest in joining will be added
and kept informed.
8.
Mayor mention probability of Task Force or Private Employment
holding conference here on November 15th to discuss ways private
industry can provide jobs and training for unemployed and under ~
employed.
DS/br
�8:30 am
Registration -
Atlanta-American Motor Hotel
Atlanta, Georgia
9:30 am
Opening General Session: Grand Ballroom
Presiding: David Sullivan, President
Building Service Employees
International Union AFL-CIO
EXPANDING EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
Atlanta-American Motor Hotel, Atlanta, Georg ia
Greetings: Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor, City of Atlanta
Eastern Regional Action Conference
December 13, 1967
Remarks: William Flynn, Director
STEP Program, National Association
of Manufacturers
Dr. Lawrence D. Reddick
Executive Director
Opportunities Industrialization Center
Institute
Augustus H. Sterne, President
Chamber of Commerce
Atlanta, Georgia
10:30 am Workshops : Expanding Private Employmen t
Opportunities
Five concurrent wo_rkshops will be held, all dealing with the same topics.
Morning Session: Film - "Employment Programs,
City of Atlanta"
Organizing local employment
campaigns
Recruiting, training and placement of the hard-core unemployed
Reassessing under-employment
12:15 pm Luncheon Session: Georgia Ballroom
Presiding: John Wheeler, President
Mechanics and Farmers Bank
Durham, North Carolina
President, Southern Regional Council
Address:
2:00 pm
Gerald L. Phillippe,
Chairman of the Board
General Electric Company
Concurrent Workshops
Afternoon Session: Job development and upward
mobility
Entrepreneurship-Promotion
of economic growth in the
ghetto.
3:30 pm
~
@
Adjournmen t
'

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