Box 15, Folder 2, Complete Folder

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Box 15, Folder 2, Complete Folder

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ATLANTA, GEORGIA
ROUTE SLIP
TO,
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FROM: Dan E. Sweat, Jr.
~ F o r your information
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FOR M 25 - 4 - 5
�ATLANTA, GEORGIA
PHONE 524-8876
From: Johnny C. Johnson, Director
Model Cities Program .
To
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FORM 25°13-J
Date
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R. EARL LANDERS
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For your information
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Please refer to the attached correspondence and make the
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F ORM 25 - 4 - L
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�MODEL CITIES PROGRAM
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�ATLANTA,GEORGIA
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FORM 25 - 4 - S
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�Allen Reassured
OnModelProgram
By ALEX COFFIN
'
Mayor Ivan Allen Jr. and key aidoo were reassured late last
week about what the Nixon atlministration intends to do about the
Model Cities program.
A telegram from the office of
George Romney, secretary of
Housing and Urban Developf
ment, and a call
to AJ'len from a
top White House
aide
calmed
lii.iimif'f1N'J fears that the
city might have
to start from
near scratch in
providing a better life for the
45,000 residents
of the six neighAlex Coffin
borhoods SOUVh
and e ast of Atlanta Stadlirum.
"The effect," said Dan Sweat,
deput ch!ief administrator to
AlTen, lS That filfan a' s plan- inui.cation last week that the
ning and organizing has not $7.2 million in supplemental imbeen in vain. We h a v e not plemenllation funds , approved
last January, finally are close
wasted any time or effort."
at hand.
The telegram from Romney's
office does indicate, however, Probably the best news to city
that some slight changes will be officials in Romney's telegram
coming. Perhaps the most i.rrl- was clarification of the role of
portant is that the mayor 's of- state government. Al!len and his
fice wn,1 keep a more watchful sbalff had been concerned that
eye on the program and will Niiron might seek to interpose
need to exercise closer super- the state between the federal
vision, with the Model Cities government and the city in runExecutive B o a r d becoming ning the Model Cities prog1riam.
sowewhat more advisery in na- Not so, said the telegram, although greater involvement by
ture.
City officials also had clear the state is sought.
Another important change,
and this pleased city officials,
is the erasing of the boundaries
of the area to be covered. The
city earlier itself had established the 3,000 acres and generally is expected to stick to
that area-however, in certain
cases, the boundary need not be
a barrier.
The Romney telegram also
called for the establishment of
Constitution Slate News Ser vice
priorities, rather than trying to
CALLAWAY GARDENS, Ga:. , "attack every conceivable probKnott Rice of Atlanta, a 22-year- lem within these neighborhoods.
old Emory graduate student, This obviously would be unwas elected chairman of the workable" and result in cities
Georgia FedeTation of Young "dissipating their resources in
Republican Clubs at their an- a vain effort to solve all" probnual convention at Callaway lems.
Gardens Saturday.
Allen already is engaged in
He defeated H. Royce Hobbs close scrutiny of the proposals.
of Macon, 374 to 323.
Model Cities Director J. C. JohnRice was the incumbent young son, sources say, is working
Republican national committee- hard, with some success, in
man and a former president of making a good case for the projthe Emory YR club. Hobbs, 34, ects, most of which are interwas a candidate for mayor of related.
Macon in 1967 and the Georgia
Minor adjustmoots wrlJ hiave
General Assembly in 1968.
to be made in the program, city
The convention opened Satur- officials are saying, but they
day morning with the defeat of wi1ll be minor ones - such as
then-chairman Terry Moshier getting more private involvefor temporary chairman by Hor- ment.
ace Taylor of the Fulton Coun- But, generally it oan be rety delegation, 395-316. Moshier ported flhat C'i ty officials aren't
had backed Hobbs while Taylor glum at all about l!he Nixon administration's attitude toward
supported Rice.
Fulton County and College Model Citie.R
clubs throughout the state provided Rice with his heavy support. Hobbs got most of his
votes from metropolitan areas
outside Atlanta. The same patterns held for the lower offices.
Dick Jones, 32, of the Fulton
County club was chosen national
committeeman over Fred Neal
of Augusta. Betty Baker of the
Fulton County club won the post
of national committeewoman
over Sandra Ford of the metropolitan Atlanta club.
Jenny Bailey, Georgia College
in Milledgeville, defeated Nancy
Grider of Atlanta for vice chairwoman.
Incumbant secretary Caroline
Meadows of the Cobb County
club was re-elected by acclamation.
The,
tory
t hri l
suer
the
tel a r
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Young
GOPs Piel{
Atlantan
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�ATLANTA, GEORGIA
PHONE 524-8876
From: Johnny C. Johnson, Director
Model Cities Program
To __D_a_n
__S_w_e_a_t__________ Date _5_-_1_9_-_6_9_ _ _ __
lR] For your information
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Please make necessary reply
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Advise status of the attached
The Attached spells out the requirements
for training and technical assistance
funds in Model Cities.
offered $70,000.
FORM 2 5-13-J
Atlanta has been
�UNITED STATES CONFERENCE OF' MAYORS
1707 H STREET, N. W.
WASHINGTON, D. C. 20006
April 29, 1969
Dan:
For your information.
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�ATLANTA, GEORGIA
From - Dan E. Sweat, Jr.
Director of Governmental Liaison
FORM 2 5 - 12
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ATLANTA, GEORGIA
PHONE 524-8876
From: Johnny C. Johnson, Director
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FORM 25• 15M
�ATLANTA, GEORGIA
PHONE 524-8876
From: Johnny C. Johnson, Director
Model Cities Program
Date
D
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For your information
~ a s e make n ecessary reply
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Advise status of the attached
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FORM 2 5-13-J
�ATLANTA, GEORGIA
ROUTE SLIP
FROM: Dan E. Sweat,
Jr.
D
For your information
D
Please refer to the attached correspondence and make the
necessary reply.
D
Advise me the status of the attached .
FORM 25-4-5
�TO:
FROM:
Ivan Allen , Jr.
D
For your information
D
Please refer to the attached correspondence and make the
necessary reply.
D
FORM 25-4
Advi s e me the status of the attached.
�TO:
FROM:
Ivan Allen, Jr.
D
For your information
D
Please refer to the attached correspondence and make the
necessary re ply.
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FO RM 25 - 4
Advise me the sta tus of t e attach e d.
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�ATLANTA,GEORCillA
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�ATLANTA, GEORGIA
PHONE 524-8876
From: Johnny C. Johnson, Director
Model Cities Program
Date
~ your information
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Advise status of the attached
FORM 25-13 -J
~J~_-_:J_--~k~77
�Memo
DATE
From GEORGE BERRY
Dan
To _ _
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
These are copies of
correspondence from the
files of the H~using
Authority re: the
Moody transaction.
You may want the m for
your file on Model
Neighborhood, Inc.
�atlanta model cities
673 capitol ave. s:w. atlanta ga. 30315 524-8876
�The Dire ctor Speak s ••••••••••••••
"The Model Cities Program, authorized by the
Demon s tration Ci ties and Metropolitan Development
Act of 1 966 , p rovides technical and financial assistance t o help communities plan and carry out compreh e n sive p rogra ms to upgrade social, economic, and
ph ys ica l c onditions in blighted neighborhoods.
A t o t a l of 150 communities have received
planning f unds since the · first grants were made in
Nov ember 1967.
Atlanta was one of the first 63 cities to
receive its p l a nning grants and is among the first
c ommunities in the Model Cities Program to submit
its comprehensive program to receive funds to carry
o ut its first year projects.
The Atlanta Model Cities document includes a
d efinitive use of HUD Supplemental Funds, describing
allocation s for programs and projects, representing
a total of $ 7,175 ,000 in Model Cities supplemental
fun ds.
In a d dition to these funds, the Atlanta
Pr o g ram has been given fund assurances for other
p rograms by the Department of Housing and Urban Developme n t , t h e De pa rtment of Health, Education and Welfare,
the Dep ar tment of Labor and the Office of Economic
Opportu n ity f o r a ctivities in the Model Neighborhood.
Thes e f u nds will represent an additional $16 million
for o ur first year programs.
The Model Cities Program is a new concept and we
have all learned as we have gone and are going along.
We recognize the fact that if our urban problems are
to advance toward solution, it is important, if not
imperative, that we alter our attitudes and previously
caged philosophies. The program is designed to contribute
to a well-balanced city containing a mixture of the facilities and services needed to serve the diverse groups
living and working in the city and includes projects and
activities further designed to make services and facilities,
jobs and housing outside the Model Neighborhood more
accessible to neighborhood residents.
We have made conscientous and serious efforts to
reap productive involvement from the neighborhood residents. Our document includes and reflects the constructive participation of the residents in planning
and the implementation of this program.
We have compiled a summation of the program which
we submitted to HUD and includes the allocations for
program areas listing their major projects."

Johnny Johnson
atlanta model cities
673 capitol ave. s.w. atlanta ga. 30315 524-8876
�Atl anta ' s model ne ighborhood covers 3 , 000 acres, and includes
48,000 people l iving in s i x sub neighborhood ~! The target area ranks
far below t he r est of t he c ity i n income, employment, education and
be:.:.lt h .
Th~ miemployment rate f or the model neighborhood is 15 percent
compared to 2 .8 perc ent f or the .city. Over half of model neighborhood
familie s have poverty l evel incomes and only 29 percent of neighborhood
reside nts have inc omes above $5,000 a ye ar. Almos.t twice as many model
ne i ghbor hood s t udent s drop out of hi gh school before graduation as
compared t o t he city a s a whol e, and 78 per cent of neighborhood parents
did not compl ete hi gh school. There are no physicians or dentists
living or pr acti c i ng i n the model ne ighborhood. About 70 percent of
the model neighbor hood popul at i on is Negro.
At l ant a ' s f ive year program was developed with the help , of 11 central
~~mmittees made up of re s idents fr om counterpart program subcommittees
in each of s i x sub-neighborhoods . The City Demonstration Agency(CDA}
lncluding staf f member s on loan from other public and private agencies
provid ed the committees with technical as sistance and staff work for
~he pl anni r.g . Pl ans went f rom the centra l connn i ttee to the 16-member
S\ ~ering Comm i tt ee of the Model Neighborhood Mass Convention, which was
or en to all ne i ghborhood re s idents. The Model Ne i ghborhood Executive
B<a.rd, ,:- omposed of cha irmen of elec t ed councils in t he six neighborhoods,
·i,x publ ic of fici ~l s , and t wo c i ti zen s at larg e appointed by the Mayor,
~s r espon s ibl e fo r policy guidance during the planning and final
a·1 "Oro val of plans bef ore submission t o t he Atlanta Board of Aldermen.
Five Year Stra~eE~
·
.
~
"d · g opportunities
.
. de nts while at the same time attacking !oot
resi
for model neighborhood
· va t i on to allow residents to ta k ea dva ntage
causes of soc i o- economi c depr i
at ate
To realize this goal Atlanta will conce .r . .
of actual opportun it ies .
and generate b enefits beyond initial
on programs t ha t suppor t one anot her
impact .
Pt b re~iJent s and the CDA, priority
Accord i ng t o st ~nda r d s SYt·
ba~i~ needs of model neighborhood
programs ar ~ t hose d necte~ at ~;: n: n~rtat i~n education, and employment.
residents. These ar e hou sine,
_P ocial ;ervices recreation and
Residents f elt that oth er progrem;e~:t : d to these pri;ary goals and
cul ture, and heal t h, a ~etcld o:~~I1 more s evere conditions are alleviated.
cannot be f ully appr ecia e
The At l anta Model Cities prugram will 10cus on wi enin
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�Employment
A major goal of t he Atlanta progr am is to reduce unemployment
from 15 perc ent to the cit y l evel of 2.8 percent. To accomplish
this goal, Atlant a will focus on innovative programs to improve
servic es t o t he hard core unemployed.
To i mpr ove job tnformation and recruitment, the Georgia State
Eruployment Service would operate a communications system with stations
i oc at ed i n four outr each posts to relay job information to target area
r esidents as rapidly as possible·. A Job Mobile vould provide back-up
s er vices to the outreach offices for recruiting residents and transporting them to outreach offices for referrals, and to job sites for·
i nt~rviews.
Many residents are unable to take advantage of job offers because
they lack money for transportation, clothes or minor medical assistance.
To overcome these problems, the program would provide direct medical
maintenance funds for eye-glasses and dental work, and an emergency
assistance fund to help the new employee meet basic needs until his
first pay day.
'
.
These activities would support existing programs, such as the
Nat i onal Alliance of Businessmen~ which enlists private business to
~reate Jobs for the hard-core upemployed, thereby increasing realistic
Job opportunities and reducing the high unemployment rate~
Economi c Development
· t ·
small bu.sinesses and encourage new businesses
To strengthen exis ing
.
. hb h d
to locate i n t he model ne i ghbor hood, Atlant a proposes a Neigllo~ o~
s
Development Corpor at i on to provide low-intere st .loans to sfmf.~
u;143.215.248.55s · ·
t f am il i arize cor:unercial loan o icers
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ropos ed
Suppl ementi ng thes e ac ivi J.es,
d
t~ ~es~siablished for mod el ne ighborhood businessme~ would id:ntify an
giv e a i d t o model neighborhood businesses and recruit new businesses.
An exist ing Out r each Pr ogram whi ch provide ~. te:hnical a~~i st
a143.215.248.55
t o small bus in es s es will be changed to focus exclu:ively on
e_mo and
nei hborhood . Thi s pr ogram, by classroom instruction! counselli~g
dis~ussj.on gi ves training in bookkeep ing , man~gement, a~~ ~ar~~!~:g
technique s as they appiy to the actua l operation of sma
us i
·
�Satisfactory Community Environment
The Atlanta program seeks to eliminate several major sources of
blight and decay in the model neighborhood. A Sewer Program Study will
determine the best means of controlling the flooding and overflow of
old sewers, and faulty sewers will be reconstructed or repl~ced under
the Neighborhood Development Program. Programs to replace and repair
water mains and to increase rubbish collection are also included.'
Rousing
The housing program, identified by model neighborhood residents as
a top priority, aims to increase the number of families living in adequate
housing by 6,432 or 160 percent. Home ownership among model neighborhood
families would be inc·reased by 25 percent.
A key element in Atlanta's housing strategy is establishing a
Model N~ighborhood Housing Center to include a nonprofit Housing Development
and Rehabilitation Corporation and a Home Ownership Agency. The Cente~
would provide extensive housing services to residents and promote selfhelp programs of housing rehabilitation and construction. ·The Center will
also attempt to promote equal opportunity in housing and assist residents
who want to move to other parts of the city. The Housing Corporation would
encourage rehabilitation and construction by sponsoring housing
projects, providing seed money .for sponsors, and doing the technical
preparation for housing proj ects that would then be bid on by commercial
builders.
·
Other programs for housing construction and renewal planned ~nder
the Neighborhood Development program would be supplemented by a Code
Enforcement pro_g_ram.
�USE OF HUD SUPPLEMENTAL FUNDS
(Alloca tions for program are as are shown with listing of selected major projec ts )
TOTALS
Resident Involvement
Employment
$
203,000
955,000
Jo b t r a i n ing and recruitment
Direc t Medical Maintenance
Job rea d i ness-Resident Welfare Fund
Manp ower Study; Data Gathering
Economic Development*
Education
35,000
2 , 317 , 000
Middle School
Ex tended Day Program
Pre -S c h ool Activities
New Sc h ool Construction
Community School Program
Social Service s
984,ooo
Day Care Cent er, Block Mothers & Family
Day Care
Recru it & Hire professionals & aides*
F-?:mily Coun selling, services to holllemakers
and Senior Citizens
Heal t h
319,000
Group Pr ac t ice Health Facility
Menta l Health and Retardation Planner
Pr i vate Pra ctice Group in Model Neighborhood
Cr ime and Delinquency Prevention
158,000
Crime Data Compilation
J uveni l e Delinquency Prevention
Group Foster Home
Uni ted Youth Outreach
Transportation
277,000
Intra-Neighborhood Bus System
Spec ia liz e d Passenger Vans
Pu bl ic Facilities Impact Evaluation
Re c reat ion a nd Cultural Activities
342,000
Atlanta Girls' Club-expansion of facilities,
e qui pment and programs
Pr o gram in Five Disciplines
Sto re Front Libraries
Housi ng and Relocation
635,000
Hous,i ng Development and Rehabilitation Corp.
Housing Center
Othe r Suppl emental Funds Not Yet Allocated


Dependent on non-HUD Federal agency funding.


988,000
�Social Services
To meet a serious shor tage of day care facilities for children
of working parents , Atlanta would use a combination of resources. An
extended Day Program ~or school children and for three-and four~year
olds will be supplemented b y training residents as family day care
mothers and b lock mothers t o care f9r children during the day and after
school.
The Soc i al Servic es Program emphasizes training model neighborhood
r esidents as sub-profe ssionals to work under the supervision of prof essionals in a variet y o~ services, including child care and family
s ~rvices. By performi ng such services, residents are also expected to
learn and communi cate good habits in family living.
Ex i sting resources would be expanded to provide professional and
A Homemaker Service will be
expanded to serve all res i dents who need it, rather than being limited
as presently to recipi ent s of public welfare. Services to the elderly
would be expanded to inclu de day care, meal-on-wheels, and advocacy for
older persons.
legal services in the mode l neighborhood.
Health
Health care for model ne i ghborhood residents is severely limited
by residents ' inabi lity to get t o medical facilities, lack of money to
pay for ade quate care, and i ns uf ficient information on available services.
To r emedy these cond iti o ns , Atlanta . plans a combination of programs to br ing health fac ilities to the model neighborhood and to educate
residents to the importance o f good health care. Plans call for construction
or a Group Health Practice fa cility in the model neighborhood and
·
re cruitment of dentists a nd physicians to staff it. Atlanta also
propos e s a progr am of Pre paid Medical Care to pay medical costs of
low- income pati ents and a medical screening f acility to examine all
residents o f the neighbor hood . Res idents who need furth er medical
at tention would then be referred to a physician.
Family Servic e . Teams wou l d employ and train model neighborhood
-res i dents as health aides t o vork with resident s to improve their
knowledge and attitude toward the importance of health car e , assist
residents t o heal th r esources , and provide f oll ow-up to health care.
�Education
The high school dr opout rat e for t he model neighborhood is 8. 9
percent compar ed to 4.9 perc ent for t he city.
To combat these probl ems, Atlant a 's compr ehens i ve program for
upgrading educat i on i ncludes cons t ruct i on of new scho ol s , expanded
vocationa l educat ion progr ams, curriculu.~ r edevelopment, pre-s chool
activities , and adult educat ion . Ex i sting pr ograms such a s Curriculum
Aides and Teacher Aides woul d cont i nue. New programs such as the
Extended Day Program t o keep s chools open 11 hours a day, a Twelve
Month School program f or all model ne i ghborhood high schools, and a
Commun i cations Skills Labor at or y are des i gned to increa se the impact
.of the schools on the communit Y., To deal wit h env i ronmental effects
on the educ ation process , plans call for School Social Workers, a
Parent Educ at i on pr ogram to help parents with home r elated problems,
and a -progr am of Curri culum Development and Fam ily Li ving to improve
the s elf confidence and social acc eptance of children. Atlanta also
plans a special Middle School f or chil dren in grades 6-8.
' .
i.1
·
Cr ime and Del i nquency Prev ention
Although cr i me and delinquency rates are expected to drop as~
r esult of ot her programs to alleviate basic causes of socio-economic
ills, t he At l ant a program calls for immediate activities.
The Georgia St at e Department of Criminal Justice would conduct
a Crime Data Compilation pro ject to further assess and offer approaches
to s olving the crime pr obl em i n the model neighborhood . An existing
program of using model neighborhood residents as Community Service
Officers att ached t o the Cr ime Pr evention Bureau would be expanded.
To prevent juveni l e delinquency from becoming a problem of crime, the
program calls f or a United Youth Outreach program in which young
people would be empl oyed by the At l anta Chi l dren's Youth Council to
reach "hard core yo ung people in the model ne i ghborhood . A Group
Foster Home for Delinquents and Pre-delinquent s will al so be established
·to serve adoleseent boys betw een th~ age s of 14 - 16 .
�Recr eat i on and Cul ture
The limi t ed recr eat i onal a nd cul tural facilities in the neighborhood
do ncit meet the needs of r e s i dents. Transportation difficulties prevent
the majority of residents from benefiting from existing recreational
facilities.
The program calls for buying land suitable for development of open
space parks, Block Parks and Playl ots. Park facilities will have full-time
recreation staffs to provide organized recreation activities for all age
groups. As an interim measure while parks are being developed, the
program propose s five Mobile Recreation Centers to provide recreational
opportuniti es for r e sid ents.
The progr am also ca lls for activities to develop cultural pride
and encourag e self-expres s ion among residents through classes in music,
drama, danc e , visual arts, and creative writing. Professional artists
working wi t h classes of 20 are expected to reach 1800 model neighborhood
residents a week in this program.
The program propos e s three store-front libraries within easy access
of bus routes and parking facilities.
Transpor tat ion
Unl e ss tran s port a t ion faciliti es
r e sident s wi ll ~e unaple t o take
are improved, model neighborhood
h ealth s e rvices .
advantag e of Job opportunities or
·
A key element in Atl t I t
I nt ra-Ne i hbor hood
a n as r ans~ortation program would be an
~ it hi n th; model n e:~~b143.215.248.55:~~ ! ~dpIOV l de tran~portation for residents
.
.
o surround i ng areas. Operating in a
l oc,p pa ttern, thes e bus es would
'd
het lth c ent ers, and po ints of t r~:~;~r etacc;~s t~ shopping facilities,
pla.\::--~d is a sys t em of specialized a
o o er us routes. Also
car e. cri:1 1ren, t he elGerly , t he han~i~=en:~r vans for Pfe-scpool day
emergency . ,ervice s .
PP ' and those in· need of
Progr .uns for . st r eet repa i r a nd widen i ng , side~ •alk
artd s tr 1 1 · ht'
w
construction,
ee, 1g 1ng wi ll be c onti nued and expa nded.
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-- - - - - - ~ -···-- -· ---- ·-- --
�Resident I nvolvement
The program calls for a series of special activities to increase
the quality and quantity of both model neighborhood resident involvement
and mutual involvement of neighborhood and city residents in the program.
_An incorporated nonprofit Model Cities Resident Organization would become
the central body for recruiting residents, involving residents in future
Model Cities planning and working with other groups in the neighborhood.
To organize neighborhood youth and coordinate youth activities, a Model
Cities Atlanta Youth Council would be established to serve residents age
14-21. The Atlanta program also proposes a special Resident Training
project to give residents skills in leadership, self-help activities
and social planning·. A-newly created Community Relations Commission
would direct a program to increase city-wide participation in Model
· Cities through activities such as a Talent Bank to incr·ease the use of
volunteers and a series of Town Hall meetings throughout the city.
MODEL CITIES PERSONNEL
ADMI NISTRATION
JOHNNY C. JOHNSON, DIRECTOR
Da vid F. Caldwell, Assistant Director for Administration
Donald v. Holland, Senior Budget Analyst
Velma L. Carr (Miss), Principal Stenographer
Mary Ann Ryder, (Miss), Senior Stenographer
Howard Turnipseed, College ~ntern
Edna Lockett, (Mrs.) Resident Trainee
PROGRAM MANAGEMENT
B. T. Howell, Program Coordinator
~lan Wexler, Techni cal Writer
Joseph A. Stroud, Program Specialist
PLANS AND EVALUATION
Roslyn wa lker {Mrs.), Evaluation Analyst
Mitche l l A. Mi tchell, System Analyst
Pa t Akin (Mrs .), Stenographer
Bayard Irwin, Research Specialist
PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT
Jame s L . Wright, Jr., Direct9r of Phrsical Development
Louis Orosz , Phys i cal Planning ~oo:dinator
Micha e l Lewa llen, Graphics Specialist
John Sluss , Draftsman
Bar bara Hawk (Miss ,), Stenographer
Cont'd.
�SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT
James R. Shimkus, Director of. Social Development
Davey L. Gibson, Soc.i al Planning Coordinator
Frances Eisenstat, (Mrs.) Social Planner II
Ellen s ·a hoa tes, (Miss) Social Planning Technician
Billy Warden, Crime and Delinquency Planner
Willie P. Thompson (MrsJ Social Planner
Mary Ann Hewell, (MrsJ Stenographer
· ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND EMPLOYMENT
o.
D. Fulp, Manpower Resources, State Labor Department
Ed Berry, Employer Relation Representative
Winfred Knight, New Careerist
.Nan Brown (Mr&}Stenographer
Tom Devane, State Labor Department Representative
Jim Culp, Economic Development Planner I
Rose M. Graham, (Miss), Economic Developnent Program Specialist
COMMUNITY AFFAIRS
Xernona B. Clayton (Mrs.), D~rector of Community Affairs
Rose-Marie Stewart (Miss}, Neighborhood Organizer
Lyall Scott, Neighborhood Organizer
Maria McDonald (Mrs.), Stenographer
Ruby M. Coleman (Mrs.), Community Relations Assistant
Laverne Maddox (Mrs.), Community Relations Assistant
Elizabeth Lee (Mrs.), Community Relations Assistant
Mary A. Roberts (Mrs.}, Community Relations Assistant
Elizabeth Parks (Mrs.), Commjnity Relations Assistant
Eleanor Rakestraw (Mrs.), Community Relations Assistant
Betty Tye, (Mrs.} Community Relations Assistant
�MECH AN ICSVI LLE
MESSENGER
JULY
1969
ISSUE
NO
Newsletter Supplies
Area Informal ion
M .C . Program
Involves Citizens
The Mechanicsville Messenger will be the official means
of gett i n g i n formation about
t he neighbo rhood t o t h e residents of Me chanicsville. It
will be publi shed b y the
Me chanicsvi l le Ne ighborhood
Coo rdi n a ting Pl a nning Commi ttee wor k ing with Har land
Bartho l omew a nd As s ocia t e s,
pl a n ning c onsulta n ts f or the
ne i ghbo r hood.
Mechanicsville is one of
si x neighborhoods which make
up the Atlanta Model Cities
Area . Although it is -sma ll in
size, it includes the mo st
peop l e of any o f the six
neighborhoods.
The success o f ne ighborhoo d i mprovement will depend
on t h e interest and suppor t
of the res i dents. This Newsletter will be. the best sou rce
of information concerning the
Mechanics v i lle parts of the
Model Citie s Program. It will
inform the people as to wh a t
is being done and will help
them in their efforts to take
par t . Eve ry issue should be
read carefully by every resident with an int erest in his
neighborhood. In this way,
the citi zens of Mechanicsvil le
may take a useful part i n the
improve me nt of the neighborhood.
The Committee plans to
mail the Messenger to residents
of Mechanicsville once each
month .
1
The Model Ci t ies Pr ogram
h a s one ma jor o b jective: to
fac e the ma ny differe nt kinds
o f problems o f urban living in
order to increase h uma n opport u nity and enjoyment.
·
The program is intended
t o rebuild the worn- ou t f&cilities. It is intended to increase the supply of hou sing
fo r l ow and mode rate income
f amilies .
It is intende d to
i n crease the earni ng p ower of
the people through training and
expanded job opportunities. It
is intended to provide the needed public facilities such as
parks, scho ols, s t reets and
u tilities.
In short, the program is intended to provide an
environment for good living related to the n e eds and desires
of the residents. To accomplish these goals requires
cooperative effort - of the
citizens, of the city of the
Model Cities staff, of the
·Atlanta Housing Authority and
of professional planners
assisting in the work.
�Consultant Action
Mr. Joe Ross represents
the planning consultant , Harland Bartholomew a nd Associates . His work wi th the
Committee will include :
A survey of possible 1970
acquisition areas
A relation of areas chosen
to the overall improvement
plan and preparation of
necessary maps and reports .
Other consultants , such as
economists , appraisers and
architects will also be used.
Agencies At VJork
Planning Committee
The urban rene wal progr am
in Me chanics vi lle involve s the
work o f several g r oups and i ndividual s.
The f irst is the Model
Cities Administr~tion wh i ch
operates as a separate part of
the city. Making use of a
planning consultant and working with the residents, the
Model Cities Program (MCP) prepares plans and submits them
to the Atlanta Housing Authority. The MCP al s o provi des a
means of hearing individua l
problems and recomme n dations .
Th e Atlanta Housing
Aut hority's rol e i s that of
action and assistance.
It is
th e AHA's res po ns i b ility to
carry o u t the p l ans. It als o
gi ve s assist ance in relocation
and o th e r problems .
The City of Atlanta is,
of cour s e , the final authority
The City pays one-third of th e
cost and provides other types
of services. Th e Planning Dep a r tmen t will insure that the
1 97 0 activities agre e with the
1983 Mode l Citi e s Pl a n.
The Neighborhood Coordinating Planning Committee is
mad e up of the heads of operating committees under the
Model Cities Program and the
Advisory Council. These are
r es idents and ·businessmen of
Mechanicsville. This committee is the di r ect contact with
the consultants and the Mode l
Cities staff. Any qu e stions
of residents shou ld be discussed with them. The commi t tee~ responsibil i t i es are :
1. To keep a ll r e s i dents info r med of e xisti ng and planned
ac t ivities .
2. To e n coura g e a ctive particip a ti o n in meetings and by
ques t ions and comments to make
this participation meaningful.
3 . To encourage every resident
to help in planning.
4. To furnish the means for
the residents to be heard in
all phases of the urban renewal
process. The committee will
provide ideas or proposals to ward the solution of existing
problems .
�i
PROJECT OFF ICE
The Atlan ta Housing Auth o r ity ' s Office in Model Cities is
known as the Mod el Cities Neig h b orh ood Development Program
Area Office . This o f fice is r espon sib le for carrying out the
physi6al imp l emen t a ti on of the plan t hat the Model City
Planning Off ice has develop e d, i n c ooperation with the many
citi z en p a rti cip a t ion gro ups .
The Mo del Citie s Neighborhood De v elopment Program Area
Office has t,vo separ ate sec t ions . Th e first is charged with
the responsi bil ity of satis f actor i ly relocating the residents
and busine ss e s f rom t hose are as that a r e scheduled to be
cleared a nd redeveloped int o a t ruly model residential communi t y. The o ther sectio n is concerned wi th t h e remodeling
o f those strtic t ure s that ar e wi t h in t he designated rehabilitation areas . This i n clude s a n a ctual inspection of each
dwelling a n d t he prepar a t i on of a li s t of needed repairs.
In
many c as e s fin a n c ial assistan ce i s avai l a b l e through either
the Lo an or Grant Program. The Rehabilitat i o n Advisor follows
t he cons t ruction from beginn ing to end, i n s pec ting e ach step
to assure the h ome owne r o f r e c e iving compl ete value fo r his
doll a r i nveste d.
The Mo de l Cities Ne i g hbo r hood Development Project Office
is presently lo c ated in r oom 141 o f t he Martin Lu ther King
Memorial Hig h Ris e for the e lderly a t 53 0 McDanie l Str eet,
s.w . , one block o ff Ge o r gia Av e nue. The t e lepho n e n umbe r is
523 - 024 5 .
On J u ly 15th t h e o ffice will b e moving to its new and
permanent address, 683 Capitol Avenue, S.W. a t t h e corner of
Georgia and Ca p itol Avenue . Our n ew telepho ne n umber will b e
523 - 5851.
For f uture r e f ere nce, l is t e d b e low are the d epartme ntal
Superv is o rs.
W. R. Wilkes, Jr . Thomas Walker
Wa l t er W. Reid
R.C . Littlefield Miss Dorothy MoonC.V. Dickens
-
Pr o ject Di rec t o r
As s t . Proj ect Director
F amily Services Consultant Supervisor
Rehab i l i t ation Super visor
Secre tary
Financial Advisor
�MRS. EVA GLOVER
Mrs. Glover's primary interest is making
Mechanicsville a better place for family life.
Although she was born in &parta, Georgia , she
has lived in the Mechanicsville area since
1925.
She was a strong force in organizing
local support for the Community Center and is
active in its operation. Besides her work on
the Advisory Council , Mrs. Glover is chairman
of the Relocation Committee, serves on the Program Committee and sings in the choir at St.
Paul's AME Church. Mrs. Glover campaigned hard
MRS , GLOVER TALKS WITH for her election to the Council because she
knew she could do a good job for the committee,
ONE OF HER NEIGHBORS
which
she has been doing.
ABOUT THE NEI GHBORHOOD,
Participation
The Model Cities Program
dep e nds o n citiz e n participation.
Thi s action is three
fold.
The resident is re sponsi~
b le for taking an interest in
his n e ighborho9d. He can read
t h is Ne wsletter and others
following, and he can talk
wi th th e members of the Adv i s o r y Council f rom his block.
The se a re l isted on page four.
The Ne i g hborh ood Coordinating P l a nning Committee will
keep t h e resident i nformed.
It will d istribu te information
to the r e sid e n t; for e x ample,
thi s Ne wsle tte r.
The cons ulta nts provide
the technical servi ces needed
in working out a plan with the
residents.
The cons u l tant
will work with the Committee
and the Advisory Counci l a s
well as other groups. -
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Renewal Activities
In the summer of 1968 the
Model Cities staff began meeting with citizens and the
Neighborhood Coordinating
Planning Committee from Mechanicsville. When the Model
Cities application -was funded
by the Federal Government it
inc luded three and a half
blocks in Mechanicsville for
acqui sition during 1969.
Two blocks bounded by Windsor, Fulton, Formwalt and
Richardson.
One block bounded by Richardson, Cooper, Crumley and
Windsor.
One half block o n the eas t
side of Formwalt between
Georgia and Glenn.
Planning for 1970 activities was begun in May 1969. On
June 23, the first meeting of
the committee was held with
t he planni ng consultant.
REVEREND M.M. THOM
AS
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Reverend Thomas grew up in Jackson, Georgia
and later moved to Atlanta. He has lived
in Mechanicsville for the past 15 years.
Reverend Thomas is employed by the LockheedGeorgia Company in Marietta. His spare time
is divided among his family and his two
churches, the Sardis Baptist Church and the
Shoal Creek Baptist Church in Pike County.
In spite of this busy schedule, he finds
time to serve on the Advisory Council.
Reverend Thomas has shown himself to be
willing and anxious to work for the improvement of living conditions in Mechanicsville.
REVEREND THOMAS
RELAXES IN
HIS SPARE TIME
�r -.
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Mechanicsville Neighborhood
Coordinating Planning Comm ittt;!e
Mrs . Alyce Nixon,
Vice Chairman
703 Cooper Street, SW
524-4920
ADVISORY COUNCIL
Rev . Simon Shuman
Miss Doris Thomas
Rev . B . J . Johnson
Mrs. Ann Childs
Mrs. Janie Lowe
Mrs. Bessie Aaron
Mr. William Gaston
Rev. W. L. Finch
Mrs. Emma Rose
Mrs. Ma ttie Compton
Rev . J . H. Grames
Rev . J.H . Loc k ett
Mrs. Beatri ce Goode n
Rev . L . C. Clack
Mr . Arth u r L . Hodges
Mrs . L . M. Thomps on
Mrs . Ernestine Hurley
Mrs . Bessie Ke lley
Mr s . Dorothy J e n k i ns
Mr s . Dor oth y La wrence
Mrs . Lu cy Hall
Re v . M. M. Thomas
Rev . T . R. Jones
Mrs . Ev a Glover
Mr s . Hattie Mos ley
Rev . L. M. Terr i ll
428 Hightower Road, NW
4 01 Rawson Street , SW
388 Glenn Street , SW
620 Ira Street, SW
623 Ira Street , SW
74 Whiteford Ave nue , NE
465 Pryor Street , SW
465 Pryor Str ee t , SW
563 Cooper Str eet , SW
56 7 Cooper Street, SW
740 Amber Place , NW
606 Pryor Street, SW
637 Pulliam Street , SW
5 91 Pulliam Street , SW
69 8 Crew Street , SW
2 23 Bass Str eet , SW
2 9 4 Bass Str e et, SW
70 9 Pryor Street , SW
25 2 Hendri x Str eet , SW
194 Hendri x S t ree t , SW
74 0 Centr al Stre e t , SW
931 Fo r t r e ss Stree t , SW
1437 Murry Street , SE
675 Ira Street, SW
374 Bass Street , SW
6 06 McDaniel Street , SW
5 24-2 36 8
521-1271
523-4056
5 22 -276 2
523-4930
523-4 930
5 21-0244
322-3695
755- 4862
52 4 -5160
5 23-7054
5 24 - 1 87 0
5 2 5 - 97 5 5
688 -8 821
5 24 - 0062
CHAIRMEN OF OPERATING COMMITTEES
Mrs .
Mrs .
Mrs.
Mrs .
Mrs .
Mrs .
Bertha Barton
Carrie Berry
Rosa Burney
Dor o thy Finney
Eva Glov er
Annie Ruth Newton
Mechanicsvi ll e Messenger
1 700 Commerce Drive , N. W.
Suite 111
Atlanta , Georgia 30318
260
721
7 12
803
675
528
Bass Street , SW
Coope r Street , SW
Garibaldi Street , SW
Cooper Street , SW
Ira Str ee t , SW
We lls - Street, SW #1590
525 - 8 919
525 - 3903
521 - 2118
524 - 753 7
688 - 8821
577 - 5 0 4 4
BULK RATE
U. S. POSTAGE
3 . Be PAID
Atlanta, Georgia
Permit No . 1089
�Wha
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AUGUST 1969
ISSUE NUMBER 3
SUMMERHILL

PLAN PRESENTED
A Mass Neighborhood Meeting was held
on July 30th at the Thankful Baptist
Church on the corner of Martin and
Bass Streets. The Model Cities Summerhill Plahning Committee and its
Consultant reported on the 1970 and
long-range planning for the Model
Summerhill Neighborhood.
The Summerhill Planning Committee and
its Co.nsultant have met every week since
May.
Two Mass Meetings were held in
June to inform the residents of the progress being made in planning Summerhill's
future.
Two newsletters were also distributed throughout the neighborhood to
keep you informed.
If you haven't
received the newsletters, call a member
of your Planning Committee. Watch for
notices of future mass meetings. We
need your participation!
THE LONG-RANGE PLAN
The recommended long-range plan for
Summerhill was discussed by a member of the Consulting firm.
The residents of Summerhill expressed general
agreement on the proposals.
The long-range plan shows many improvements for Summerhill. The most outstanding new facility would be the Educational Park complex to be located east
of Connally Street in both the Summerhill and Grant Park Neighborhoods.
This
would include a new middle school and community service facilities . A new primary
school is also planned along Terry Street
between Little and Love Streets.
The Plan shows that Georgia Avenue
can have a new face when all improvements are completed. A new and
enlarged shopping area is planned for
the vicinity of Georgia and Capitol
Avenues.
i970 SUMMERHILL ACTIVITY AREAS
DISCUSSED
Activities which should be accomplished during 1970 under the Model
Cities Neighborhood Development
Program for Summerhill were discussed. Seven activity areas are
recommended for next year. Four of
the areas would be scheduled for
clearance to provide land for schools
and new housing, while another three
areas would be for rehabilitation
treatment. A MAP OF THE RECOMMENDED
1970 ACTIVITY AREAS APPEARS INSIDE.
Th~ proposed 1970 Activity ~ reas
were received favorably by the residents attending the meeting.
SOLUTION FOR TRAFFIC CONGESTION
The traffic congestion that plagues
the s ·u mmerhill Neighborhood whenever
a major event occurs at the Stadium
may finally be eliminated . Although
no time table has been established,
an improved street system, recommended in the long-range plan , is
designed to prevent Stadium traffic
from invading residential areas .
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YOUR VOICE IN SUMMERHILL'S FUTURE
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�DID YOU KNOW ?
by Mattie Ansley
Did you know that in the year
1 866, on Fraser Street in the Summerhill Section of At l anta, there stood
a little red church?
that time
It was known at
as Clark Chape l because i t
was name d for Bishop Clark who was
found e r of Clark Unive rsity .
The colore d a nd wh ite p e ople wors hippe d t o g e the r in Cl ark Ch ape l in thos e
l o ng a g o y ears .
One of the Truste es o f Clar k Ch a p el was Mr. Kimball, the fou nder
of t h e famou s Kimb a ll Hou se Hot e l which was t o r n down ma n y years ago.
So me y ear s l a t er the Con g r e g ation move d -t o Hunte r a nd Cen tra l rlVe nue s .
It
was the re that an o f f e r was made t o s e ll to the Co l ored Membe rsh i p of t he Ch u r c h .
La t e r, t h is same Church was r e n a me d the Ll o y d S t r ee t Chu rch; a n d u nder that name
i t s aw th e b egin n ing o f Cl a rk Unive r s i ty a n d Ga+nmon The ologi ca l Semi n ary .
were h e l d i n the bas e me nt o f t he Chu rch jus t
l ike they are today.
Classes
Now the Church
s its a t 50 3 Mitc h e ll St reet S .W. and i s known as the Ce ntra l Methodi s t Chu rch.
Yes , Summe r h il l h a s some t hing t o b e prou d o f !
b umps a nd t u rns h a s h er His t ori c Spo t.
Fraser S tree t with h er
Mu ch good was d o n e for the c ommun i ty
thr o u g h t h e little r e d c hurch under the l e a d ership of Re v e r e nd J. W. Lee .
Who knows what we may di g up l a t er abou t Summe r hill a nd h e r pas t h istor y.
We'l l l ook for facts about those who l ived i n th is Community regardles s of r a ce .
2
�THE· FACTS
ABOU T CLEARAN CE & REHABILITATION
AREAS IN YOUR ---NEIGHBORHOOD
IF YOU LIVE IN AN AREA WHERE HOUSES
WILL BE ACQUIRED AND CLEARED:
IF YOU LIVE IN AN AREA WHERE THE
HOUSES WILL BE REHABILITATED:

You don't have t o move ri ght
away !


You will ge t a rea sonab l e
pr i c e fo r y our p r ope rty .
Don ' t do a n y maj o r r e mo d e ling
until a r e hab i litation advi sor
f r om t he Atl a nta Hous ing
Authori t y come s to see y ou.

Archite ctural s erves are a v a i l able t h r o u g h the Atlan ta Housing
Aut hori t y .

Re hab ilitation g ran t s a nd l oans
are avai l abl e .

Don ' t become th e v i ctim of a n
u n e thica l contractor . Ta l k to
y our rehabilitati o n adv is or first .

You wi l l get mov i ng expe ns e
mone y .

A re location ma n wi l l h e l p
y ou fin d ano the r h ous e o r
a par t ment .

Your n e x t hou se or apartment
wi ll be in good condi tion.

A r e location man wi l l he l p
y ou ge t money for b e t t e r
housing .
WHEN YOU DE CIDE TO MAKE IMPROVEMENTS TO
YOU R PROPERTY, CALL YOUR REHA BILITATION
ADVI SO R.
TH E ATLANTA HOUS ING AUTHORI TY HAS
EXP ERI ENCE D RELOCATI ON PEOPL E TO
HELP MAKE YOU R MOVI NG AS EASY AS
POSSI BL E. CALL YO UR RELOCATION
MAN TO GET ALL THE CORRECT IN FOR!~ATION.
Do n't s i g n a c ontract for home improve me nt s u n til i t is a p prove d b y y our
r e h a b i litation a d v isor .
Th e Atlan ta Hous ing Au t hority will g e t
e stima t es fr om seve ral r e liab l e con t r acto r s . You a nd y our a dvisor can
d ec ide which one will give you t he most
f o r y our money.
Do n ' t l isten to r urnor s - -le t the
reloc a tion man he lp y ou . That
is hi s j ob !
If y ou h a v e any q u es t i o n s , ca ll the me mb ers of y our P lanning Commi t t e e whose names
are liste d i n t h e fir s t t wo n ewsl e tte r s . Or call o n e of th e se s up e r v i sor s at t h e
Model Ci t ies Nei ghb o r h ood Deve lopment Progr am Ar ea Off i ce.
The i r numbe r is 523-0 2 45
be fo r e September 1 s t . Aft e r Septe mbe r 1s t, c all 52 3- 585 1
W. R. Wilkes , Project Dire cto r
Thomas Walker , As s is tan t P roje c t Director
Wa lter Re id , F ami l y Se r v ice s Co nsultant
Su oe rv i s o r
R. C. Litt l e field, Re h abi lita t ion Supervi s or
C . v. Di cke n s, F inancia l Ad v i sor
Mi ss Do r o thy Moon, Secretary
IF YOU RENT , PLEASE SHOW THI S NEWSLE TTER TO YOUR LAND LORD .
BE HAPPY TO SEND HI M A COPY , IF WE RECEIVE HI S ADDRE SS .
3
WE WOULD
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RECOMMENDED SUMMERHILL ACTIVITY AREAS FOR 1970*
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,-:
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(I)
C l ea r ance
,-:
(I)
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(I)
ST.
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Area
Twelve b uilding s will be cle ared f r om this s ite
t o provide needed s p ace f or the E . P . Johnson
Sc hool .
P r operty owne r s and tenants wil l be
contacted by the Housin g Authority during 1970 .
Don ' t move u ntil y o u hear f rom the Hous ing
Authori t y next ye a r!
STAD I UM
,,
,
'
t-=
,, ' I'" •
0
I'
A total of 93 buildings are located i n fou r areas
sch e d uled for reh abilitation treatment du r ing 1970 .
Where rehabi litati on is not f easible , b uildings
will b e acquired and cleared. The Atlanta Housing
Authority is prepared to assist homeowners to rehabi l itate their properties. Grants and l ow- i n terest rate loans are availab l e to all who qua l i f y .
Area
A new prima ry s ch ool i s s c heduled for c o nstruc tion on
this site.
During 1 969 , the
Atlanta Sch o ol Boar d wi l l a c quire bui ldings in t he c enter
of the sit e.
In 1970 , the 34
buildings in the red area will
be acquired and cleared. Propert y owners and / tenants who
move before the Hou s i ng Authority contacts them c o uld lose
o u t on relo cation ass istance
and benefits . DON'T MOVE UNTIL
YOU HEAR FROM THE HOUSING
AUTHORITY I N 1970!
I,.
Area
Twenty- two bui ldings on
t his s ite are schedul ed
f or cle arance . The parcel will become part of
the proposed e ducational
park complex.

1,

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A r ea
Thir t y- three b u ilding s wi l l be cleared from this site to prov ide land for the wideni ng and improvement of Little Street.
New curbs and s i dewalks are planned. The land remaining wil l
be d eveloped for low and moderate income housing .
ii:
'l
ct
0
•Although the activities on this map are recommended
for 1970, limited funds and time could delay some of
the activities until after 1970.
.
••
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Clearance
.
Rehabilitation
GRAPHI CS
BY :
URBAN
R ESE ARCH
B
DEVELOPMEN T
ASSOCI AT ES , I NC.
,,·,
�Here's The Information You Asked For
A Progress Report On 1969
Summerhill Activity Areas
AS OF THE SECOND WEEK OF JULY, 1969
71
GEORGIA
11
Ir
SITE NUMBER 69C6
SITES NUMBER 69C3 and 69C5T21
Three (3) of the parcels have
bee n purchased and options have
been taken on four (4) parcels.
Fifty-nine (59) parcels scheduled for
acquisition and clearance. Eleven (11)
of the parcels have been purchased and
options have been taken o n twenty-two
(22) additional parcels.
__JJ.___
____,I L
> - - -- C(
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o -·:.-:-- ·-,:"-:(::_::;:;::
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I- :-;:;:::.-:-.:.
(!) ·. -.-·-:-;:. •
z------
1~ATLANTA
SITE NUMBER 69C5T11-12
SITE NUMBER 69C5T16
One (1) parcel has been
purchased.
Eleven (11) parcels scheduled for acquisition and
clearance in 1969.
�SUMMERHILL
PLANNING COMM ITTE E
V ICE
GETS
CHAIRMAN
.SCHOLARSHIP
Exciting t h ing s are h app e n ing to Summerhi ll res i d e n ts . Take Jimmi e
Ke n nebrew for example . Mr . Kenn eb r ew i s Vi ce Chairman of the Summerhill
P l ann i ns ~ommittee . He was award e d a scholarship to attend the
Ecume ni ca l I nst itut e i n Chicag o, Illinois wh e re he will t ak e a
course i n Socia l" Se r v ice and Commun ity Or g anization.
Mr. Ke nneb r ew l ef t At l anta on J uly 19 t h and wi ll s p end
e i gh t ( 8 ) week s a t t he Ecume ni ca l Ins titut e. Wh e n h e r eturns, he p l an s t o use h is new t r aining i n work ing with the
Summe r h ill P l ann i ng Commit tee and on o t her ConL~un ity Ac ti v ities .
Community service is no t n ew t o Jimmie Kennebrew . Since
he c ame to Atlanta i n 1 944 , he h a s been inv olve d in ma n y
ac ti v iti e s whi ch s e r ve the Ne i gh borhood.
At p res e nt, h e se r ves
a s Vice Chairman o f t h e Mode l Cities Summerhi ll Planning Committe e,
Vi ce Ch airman o f t h e SuMac Community Neigh borhood Ad vis ory Coun c il, Ch a i r man of the Manpower Committee of t he EOA Centr a l Citi zens Adv i so r y
Counci l and a memb e r o f ~he Summe r hi ll Mod e l Citi es Adv i s ory Coun c il and
Chai r man of t he Housing comm.i t t ee.
He i s al so a me mb e r of CAMP S Adv i sory
Commi ttee, a c ity - wide gro up conce r n e d wi t h emp l oyme nt .
Why i s Jimmi e Kenn eb r ew so ac ti v e ?
asked h im :
Thi s i s what he said when we
Living in th e Summe r hi ll Communi t y I b e came a war e of t he d i sadvan t ageou s conditions and de c ide d I wante d t o he l p d o some thing about t hem. We have to s how the re st o f Atl a nta tha t
we are a n x ious t o h e l p our s e l ves and do our part to mak e Model
Cities a success.
Besides be i ng a cti ve i n c ommuni t y s erv i c e , Jimmie Kenn e b rew works h a rd
at his r egu l ar j ob . He i s a ce rti fi e d Air Conditioning and Refr igerati o n
Mechani c a nd has DeKa l b Co unty Air Conditioning Board ce rti f i c ation f or warm
air, ai r cond i t ion i ng, steam and hot wate r .
He t r ai ned f or t h is wo rk at the
Hoke Smith Schoo l .
In his spare time ( d o you think h e h a s any? ) Mr . Kenne brew like s t o
bow l, attends bal l game s a nd c h ap erones a t dances a t the SuMac Cente r . Although he was not born in At l an ta , it has b ee n home t o him for most of his
life.
He and hi s wife, Doro t hy , li ve at 79 Ri cha rdson St ree t , S.W.
7
�THE AGENCIES
SPOTLIGHT ON
ATLANTA
SERVING
YOU
SOUTHSIDE COMPREHE N§!VE
HEALTH CENTER
Ridge Avenue, Peoplestown
~~UFO~U~~u::r.:,; BE~~E:o~Tso:TI~i~~°a!E! } '0lf.!::ei!~o~;rtt b:tw.: ist~:~it ."~a:~f!!£
miracle to turn the old bed spring facto i;y))/)/. :;::::·· you' 11 s a.:.f ~/ time
n other<¥.e.·x nbers of ··.·
into one of the most modern comprehen,s.ifii))))>
your fam(i.i / need tre ··: ent.
·-::::::::.::.
health centers in the entire United .S"ti t:\if/ jf··
.):}:/
· :./:}:: ..
,: :-";::<J/j:}{})/
a:dA.Jf
You
{ / even have
li t i f~} { ones get ti
Ce:rit ~r f
is equippe :
$:f ct1:i.;6·n staffed by ·-:
·t<? i~e
.:::; ~J::":are
Of course, the perseverance .. ::::.~!( :~ };t/{ /\ ;race
Barksdale Is Health Sub - .. .c"i:5ifuiii:t tee<··of the
Central Advisory Counc;:i :i \ i{~ip~J/ that miracle along quite . a, .)#if / )i).#.f::C;race tells
it, the Committee .;:;.i.ij .1;1i t ?ai.& ·j t rest until
wthorerywa·yi :_i ·:U
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.. ee ,
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with a Child <d iir.e
s who are tri:i-iri~d
children w·f iii~/ ·
doctor.
><.%..
{f t
it knew at that
. tJ.i'.~/ )/f
(~
¾:f{
f ~oth would
get
pulled


t,Iif}n$\{

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mprehensive
Health
·.·: ·.·:·. ..·::·: ·..:· .:'.·: ·:.'·.:·"'~
..' :~.~.·fi/ you
·.
- - -·
don It have
a - -- - of getting
the Health \ )
.·:-:·.·
Center all ..:-:
......
by yourself,
don't fret.
The Center
is even prepared to do
so mething
about that
problem . If
y ou c a ll th e
Ce nte r, t h e y
will arrange
f or one of
th e ir d r ive r s to call
for you.
to leav e ,
y ou wi ll
y our home .
more
{/!~we've got e v e rything from
·:;::=··Pediatric Do ctors to Podia trists o n our staff . " We
a r e just as p r epare d to
he l p the a r thr itis v ictim
c ope with this proble m as
we ' r e p r epared to fit eyeg lasses and diagnose ear, nose
problems .
1.· n
and throat
1
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YOU' RE I N FOR A SU
YOU VI SIT
THE CENTER FOR TH ii F I RS T TIME .
Th e
o f f ic es and rooms a :· t h e br i gh t e st a n d
c h ee ri e st colors y o :! c an imagi n e .
The
whole p lace is as p tty as a pic ture.
Can y ou b e li e v e it?
I f y ou live s o uth of
Georgia Avenu e in the People stown o r Summe r hi ll Ne ighbor hoods , and can qualify und er the OEO income gui deline s, all the servi c e s o f the Health Center are available
at NO COST TO YOU . There isn ' t even a
charge fo r medicine ; and a Pharmacist is
on dut y t o se r ve y ou whenever the Cen t e r
i s open .
i
,;

- -And the Staff
We ' r e sure y ou'll
y our neighbors
a n education al u n it
munity r e s i d e nts wh
b e r s o f the Cente r'
If you qua lify fo r s ervices at t he Compre hensive Health Center , all y o u hav e to do
i s regi s t e r . The He alth Cente r staff will
t ake it from the re and s ee th a t y o u r e c eive
t he kind of help you need.
be ni c er .
.· ecogni z e s ome o f
.: s e the Cent er has


. o r t r a ining com :i then become mem ~ staff .

r


Why no t
servi ce s ? P l an to
registered n ow !
8
t h e Center ' s
wro. ole fami l y
·"
�s
WN
PRIDE
THIS NEWSLETTER COMES TO YOU FROM YOUR PEOPLESTOWN PLANNING COMMITTEE
ISSUE NUMBER 3
PEOPLES TOWN
AUGUST 1969
PLAN PRESENTED
Twice in three weeks, the Mt. Nebo Baptis t
Church, corner of Martin and Haygood Streets,
played host to Mas s Meetings called by the
Peoplestown Planning Committee. Re side nts
turned out to hear Planning Committee Members and their Con s ulta nts report on the longrange and 1970 planning for the Model Peoples town Neighborhood .
THE LONG-RANGE PLAN FOR PEOPLESTOWN
At the July 8th mee t ing, the recommended land
us e plan for Peop l estown was unveiled. There
was general agreement that the proposals
d e veloped by the Planning Committee and Urba n
Research should become the long-range Plan for
Peoples town.
Many questions were asked by the Peoplestown
residents.
Streets and street conditions were
a major concern. The P lan calls for wide ning
Haygood Avenue and Farrington Avenu e . A n ew
road would be built to connect these t wo streets
to provide Peop l es town with direct and improved
access to Hill S treet. No time tab l e has been
made for this improvement.
OTHER NEW STREETS
The long- range p l an proposed s olutions to the
problems of dead-end and narrow streets that
residents have complained about. One-way,
loop streets are proposed for the Dunning
Stree t, Linam Street, Fern Avenue and Violet
Street area. The widening of Martin Street
was a l so included in the long-range plan. The
e xtension of Vani ra Street or Tuskegee Street
to Hill Street is also being considered.
MORE SPACE FOR PARKS AND SCHOOLS
Expansion of existing parks and schools and
the addition of new facilities are proposed
in the Plan. Both S tanton .Park and Stanton
El ementary School are expected to expand
their grounds. This would bring Stanton
P a rk up to City standards for neighborhood
parks a n d provide much needed play s pace
for the Stanton School area.
1970 PEOPLESTOWN ACTIVITY AREAS DISCUSSED
What s hould be accomplished in 1970 was the
main topic of discussion at the J uly 29 th
meeting. The Planning Committee and Consultants pres ented two small clearance areas
and one large rehabilitation area to be scheduled for attention in 1970 .
The proposals
were favorably received and will now be
discussed with City agencies.
About forty boys and girls atte nding
the July 29th meeting indicated tha t
more recreation faci liti es are needed
in the wes tern portion of Peoplestown.
This matter will be seriously considered
by the Planning Committee .
Residents assisting with the presentation included Mrs. Christine Cook, Rev.
L.W.Hope, Mrs. Martha Weems, and Mr.
Willis Weems. Deacon Charles Cook
presided at both me e tings.
A MAP OF THE RECOMMENDED 19 70 ACTIVITY
AREAS APPEARS INSIDE.
�THE FACTS
ABOUT CLEARANCE & REHABILITATION
AREAS IN YOUR NEfGHBORHOOD
IF YOU LIVE IN AN AREA WHERE HOUSES
WILL BE ACQUIRED AND CLEARED:
IF YOU LIVE IN AN AREA WHERE THE
HOUSES WILL BE REHABILITATED:

You don't have to move right
away!


You will get a reasonable
price for your property.
Don't do any major remodeling
until a rehabilitation advisor
from the Atlanta Housing
Authority comes to see you.

Architectural serves are available through the Atlanta Housing
Authority.

Rehabilitation grants and loans
are available.

Don't become the victim of an
unethical contractor.
Talk to
your rehabilitation advisor first.

You will get moving expense
money.

A relocation man will help
you find another house or
apartment.

Your next house or apartment
will be in good condition.

A relocation man will help
you get money for better
housing.
WHEN YOU DECIDE TO MAKE IMPROVEMENTS TO
YOUR PROPERTY, CALL YOUR REHABILITATION
ADVISOR.
THE ATLANTA HOUSING AUTHORITY HAS
EXPERIENCED RELOCATION PEOPLE TO
HELP MAKE YOUR MOVING AS EASY AS
POSSIBLE. CALL YOUR RELOCATION
MAN TO GET ALL THE CORRECT INFOR:~ATION.
Don't sign a contract for home impro v ements until it is app roved by y our
reh ab ilita tion adv iso r.
The Atlanta Housing Author ity will get
estimates from several reliabl e con tractors.
You and your adv iso r can
decide which one will giv e y ou th e most
for y our money .
Don't listen to rumors--let the
relocation man help you.
That
is his job!
If you have any questions, call the members of y our Planning Committee whos e name s
are listed in the first two newsletters.
Or call one of th e se sup ervi sor s at the
Model Cities Neighborhood Dev elopment Program Are a Of fi ce.
The ir number is 523-0 245
before September 1st. After September 1st , call 5 23-5851
W. R. Wilkes , Project Director
Thomas Walker, Assistant Project Director
Walter Reid, Family Serv ices Co nsultant
Su oervi sor
R. C . Littlefield , Re habili tati on Supervisor
C. V. Di ckens , Fi nanc ia l Advi s or
Miss Doro t hy Moon, Secreta ry
I F YOU RENT , PLEASE SHOW THIS NEWSLE TTER TO YOUR LANDLORD.
BE HAPPY TO SEND HIM A COP Y, IF WE RECE I VE HI S ADDRESS .
2
WE WOULD
�Here's The Information You Asked For
A Progress Report On 1969
Peoplestown Activity Areas
AS OF THE SECOND WEEK OF JULY, 1969
~,----,I ~
'
ATLANTA
____.I
I_
____.I L
AVE.
SITE NUMBER
~
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Sixteen ( ]6 ) of the p arcels h ave been
p urchased and an option h as been taken
on one r ema ining parcel. Twenty-two
dwe l lin g units wi ll b e c o n? tructe d for
low a nd mode r ate income f ami l i e s .
Eigh t o f t he hou s e s are e xpec ted to be
r e ady f or occupancy b y December 1, 1969.


r:


0
u
SITE NUM BER 69C5T10
Eight een parce l s are
s c hedule d for acquisition a nd clear ance in
] 969 .
3
69C4
s.
�RECOMMENDED PEOPLESTOWN ACTIVITY AREAS FOR 1970*
SOUTHE:AST
Clearance
EXPRESSWAY
Area
Thirteen buildings will be acquired and cleared from this
site during 1970. The land
will be used for temporary
housing until such time as development of low and moderate
income housing is feasible.
Property owners and tenants
who move before they are con tacted by the Housinq Authority could lose out on relocation assistance and benefits.
Sit tight until you hear from
the Housing Authority.
Rehabilitation
t-=
Cl)
t-=
Cl)
STADIUM
GEORGIA
AVE.
Area
This area contains 99 buildings will be scheduled
for rehabilitation treatment during 1970. Where rehabilitation is not feasible, buildings will be acquired
and cleared.
The Atlanta Housing Authority is prepared to assist property owners to rehabilitate their
buildings.
Grants and low-interest rate loans are
available to all who qualify. During 1970 the Housing
Authority will contact property owners in this area.
z
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ORMOND

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ST.
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'
ATLANTA
.,,-:
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AVE.
Clearance
Area
Fourteen buildings will be acquired and cleared from this
site to make room for development of low and moderate income housing. Property owners
and tenan ts will be contacted
by the Housing Authority in
1970.
Don't move until you
hear from the Housing Authority
next y ear!
...J t - - - - - 1
1-,.....__
,__._--J
• Although the activities on this map are recommended
for 1970, limited funds and time could delay some o f
the activities until after 1970 .
0 t - - - - --.1
1 i---11----1
Q.
r---.1---J
~ r--..11..--1.iJ--~II--..J
Clearance
I I
7
HAYGOOD
-
AvE_1r-
Rehabilitation
GR APHICS
4
5
BY :
URB AN
RESEARCH
Ill DEVELOPMENT
ASSOCIATES , IN C.
�WHAT KIND OF NEW HOUSING SHOULD
COME
TO
PEOPLESTOWN ?
The new housing to be built in Peoplestown
may take many forms.
Some of it will b e
SING LE-FAMILY
housing .
We will have some
new TOW N HOUSES ,
Some interesting
HIGH-RISES,
And GARDEN APARTMENTS.
6
�NOTES AND QUOTES _FROM PEOPLESTOWN
Some very intere sting statements are made at meetings called by the Peoplestown Planning Committee. The Committee would like to share some of them
with people who could not attend the meeting.
JOHN A. WHITE, Director of the Stanton Park Recreation Center,had
this to say at a Mass Meeting.
"The Recreation Center is like a new neighbor in Peoplestown. When you move into a community, there's something
y our neighbors can do to make you feel wanted. Right now
I don' t fe el wanted because we don't have very much participation f rom the community, other than the kids."
(Ed-U:on: I 6 you have.n't 1.ie.e.n the. new Re.c.Jte.a.,t,,i,on Ce.nt~
BtLU.cung, mak. e. up yOM mind to VA./.J ,Lt ,Lt -6 OOn. It 1 -6
woMh 1.i e.ung and hM many pnogMm6 to 066~-)
REV. DAVIS , Communi t y Or ganize r f or the Atlanta South Si de Compreh e nsive Health Center , called a problem to the atte ntion of the
Planning Committee.
" What can b e done about the junkyard on Capitol Ave nue?
We've been working on this p roble m without much luck .
With t h e Health Ce nter a c r o s s from it, something will
have to be don e about i t . "
(Ecuton: The. Pl ann.,Lng Committe.e. WM glad t o have. ~
pnoblem bnought out into t he. ope.n. The. Plan no!t Pe.opl u town w,i,U inc..lude. 1.i tanda.Jr.d6 to p!tote.c;t the. pubu c. 61tom
un1.iighily 1.itoMge.. )
REV. HOPE, Me mber of the Peoplestown Planni n g Committee .
"If we're goi ng t o have a Mode l Ci t y Pr o g ram, I b eli e v e
it is n ecessary for u s to have s ome safe side wa l ks , n ot
only for the chi l dren but for adults too. The re are some
f ellows who try to make speedways out o f t h e s t reet s tha t
are v e ry narrow.
It is n ecessary that s idewalks b e p l aced
on these streets to protect t h e r es idents. "
EARL WEEMS, Member of the Peop l estown Planning Commi ttee.
"Regardless of what this P lanning Committee does , it can ' t
satisfy everybody.
I hope e v eryon e rea li zes that something has to be done in Peoplestown. You either have to
change with the times or ge t trampled."
7
�SPOTLIGHT ON THE AGENCIES
ATLANTA
SE RVING
SOUTHS-IDE
HEALTH
YOU
COMPREHENSIVE
CENTER
Ridge Avenue, Peoplestown
~!; ~~::~;~:; :~:~;~;:~~;;:~; ~~;i<JN~:~i.~
·.
health centers in the entire United
·:··al.··.:·:.:.:·..·:·. ·..·;.:·oa~:·..:· .:.:~.·;: :~ ] ~;~:~: •••
/3.~~f{f.;{ff):::--
·.: -_:···:_-.· :\_///:
You doii.i::f . even have
li tt);~}(bnes get tin
Cent~i:/ is equippe
Se¢-l iiciri staffed by f
t_d.)(i:iike good care of
/ j ~:ti) are visiting wit
·.· · ·.·.···· ·
U /¥.l \ou don, t have a
/:/


"::


Of course, the perseverance .q:f ;i-{r{:~
{./t;iace
Barksdale' s Health Sub - c-oinmitt.ee/ 6:E the
Central Advisory Councu.·iielp~d\ that miracle along quite a p±.f/ )i}:i(s}Gi-ace tells
it the Cammi ttee "J'i:iiiit:: d.l:°i:ln.1 rest until
it' knew that t);J:~
would get
pulled at tb¢}#.ew/ /¢.J i:n_p·rehensive Health
Center Bui}1f#.i < \ //{/<:
.·.·:·. ·:·:·:·: .· .:.·
..--'·"..:..:.:·.;..·:·_


. · _ _ _


/}{iit;>i:6~~t


~
~~:=:~: .


the Center Is
is even pre-


t.~{WfjfJ!·

=~~
:eD~~=c143.215.248.55 16:05, 29 December 2017 (EST)




~a::=t~~
nd;
abou t that
prob l e m. If
y ou call th e
Ce n ter, they
wi l l arrange
f o r one of
th e ir d r ivers to call
When you , e ready to lea v e ,
for you.
you will be delivere ': back to y our home.


?:::t.~;r;;\s services by . say ing,


.·.·.·.-·.·.·.·.·· ,



/:.':~We ve got e very thing fr om




j/!ie diatri c Doc t ors to Podiatrists on our staff." We
are just as prepared to
h e lp the arthritis victim
cope with this problem as
we're preparect to fit eyeglasses and diagnose ear, nose
problems.
·.w





tYJ








i.;···;.·;:~.:·:...=.:..



o worry aBJJt \ .t he




) in the way. ":::··· ·:~:ll e
·:: with a Chilcl\ C:.iire




ks who are triiri~.d






i:· our children wfi{ i ( >.
\ the doctor.
. ·./·.":.:



·.·· >\




of getting t6/ )
t h e Heal th \ (
Center all
·-::;


t1;ii

;4itii~






~










-<Ma~tn;i : weeims,
~:;l~:?t.•.
and throat
YOU'RE IN FOR A SURP
THE CENTER FOR THE
offices and rooms ar
cheeriest colors you
whole place is as
Can you believe it?
If you live south of
Georgia Avenue in the Peoplestown or Summerhill Neighborhoods, and can qualify under the OEO income guidelines, all the services of the Health Center are available
at NO COST TO YOU.
There isn't even a
charge for medicine; and a Pharmacist is
on duty to serve you whenever the Center
is open .
And the Staff just
We're sure you'll
your neighbors beca
an educational unit
munity residents who
bers of the Center ' s


















,:
,;
'•








'.:





'
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,:
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Why not take advanta ';
services? Plan to ge •',,
registered now !



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If y o u qualify for se r vices at the Compreh e n sive Heal t h Center , all y ou have to do
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the kind o f help y ou ne e d .
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�LEGEND
c;::s 1969 CLEARANCE AREA
~
1969 REHABILITATION AREA
MODEL CITIES URBAN REDEVELOPMENT AREA
ATLANTA, GEORGIA
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT THE
MOOfi CITIES OFFICE
673 CAPITOL AVE. S . W.
PHONE - 523 -5851
•••••
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�1612 K STREET, NORTHWEST
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20006
Vol. I, No. 2, December, 1969
HEW INCREASES FUNDS FOR MODEL CITIES
The Department of Ht;alth, Education, and Welfare has announced tentative figures for funding reservations for Model
Cities; the Department will _be placing in reserve for Model Cities use a total of $54.8 million for 38 programs. Specific
program earmarks are not yet available. In addition to these reserved funds, HEW's support for Model Cities in FY 70 will
include continuations of funding for Model Cities projects funded from FY 69 resources, currently estimated at between
$50-60 million of FY 70 project grant funding. HEW also plans to provide support to model cities through technical
assistance contracts and non-geographically focused programs.
For the first time, HEW will utilize formula grant resources that will be "targeted" for Model Cities use in selected State
plan programs on a demonstration basis. HEW will attempt to seek redeployment of State plan funds to be used more
effectively in model neighborhoods, as a complementary approach to funding reservations, which is aimed at increased use by
Model Cities of the large institutional funds passing through the state which constitute 80-90% of HEW's total funds.
Thus, the total FY 70 support for Model Cities from HEW will be in the neighborhood of $ 100-120 million, plus
nonreserved priority programs and redirected formula grant resources. These earmarks are subject to the appropriation
process and may be affected by the level of HEW appropriations for these programs.
HEW ENCO URAGES WIDE USAGE
OF "SERVICE" FUNDS
On November 10, 1969, the Under Secretary of
HEW, John Veneman , issued a new policy statement aimed
at encouraging improved coordination of the massive institutionalized HEW dollars now going into the Model Cities
areas. He cited the limited use of HUD supplemental funds
in Model Cities as part or all of the non-federal share in
formula grant programs which require "local" matching. To
date, "limited HUD supplemental funds are being used to
provide services which can be readily provided under the
institutionalized programs of HEW and other departments.
The services being purchased with 100% HUD and local
funds include day care, pre-vocational counseling, employment counseling, adult and pre-school education, welfare
consultant planning, homemaker services .. ." He stressed
that the new policy would require innovative approaches
toward uses of HEW resources and the close cooperation of
the appropriate State agencies.
Examples of innovative uses of HEW funds and HUD
supplemental funds can be found in the Baltimore,
Maryland, and Portland, Maine, Model Cities program. In
Portland, HUD has declared the whole city eligible for day
care services and has provided $230,500 worth of supplementals to be matched with $872,000 of Title IV-A HEW
funds. Baltimore has a variety of day care programs, each
funded on a 3: 1 (HEW: HUD) basis. One program provides
for a decentralized system of six centers for a total of
$393,452. Another provides "block day care" facilities for
a total of $346,627. A third facet of the program provides a
$35,527 emergency aide child care service. In all of these
programs, HUD supplemental funding has served as a fiscal
incentive to innovative programs.
ASSISTANT SECRETARY HYDE RESPONDS
TO STEERING COMMITTEE
In response to requests by the Model Cities Directors
Association, Assistant Secretary Floyd Hyde responded in a
letter to Michael DiNunzio, Denver CDA Director, on
November 12, 1969, on several areas of crucial concern. In
his letter, the Assistant Secretary stated :
"In order that the Model Cities Service Center
can satisfactorily carry out the activities you
suggested in your September 5 letter, which are
(Con tinued on page 2 )
�The CDA Director, chosen from the School of
Engineering, was given a one year leave of absence in which
to complete the Model City planning; all other faculty consultants retained their teaching assignments but were expected to inject relevancy into their classes through the
Model City planning effort. The Assistant Director, who
had OEO and Federal program experience, was chosen to
provide continued direction following termination of the
University contract. Rounding out the CDA staff was a
model neighborhood planning aid and an office secretary.
similar to my own conception of the Center's
activities, I would be receptive to utilizing
supplemental funds for dues to be paid to the
Center for activities related to the Directors'
Association. As I have stated before, however, I
do not wish to separate the CDA Directors
from the city governments which have ultimate
responsibility for the Model Cities program."
The Assistant Secretary also noted that it was most
important that CDAs be involved early in the process of
selection and negotiation of contracts with state governments. He stated, "We also intend to involve CDAs in
evaluating these state technical assistance contracts." The
letter went on to suggest that the Association might wish to
establish working committees on such activities as state
role. These committees would work with MCA staff on
matters of common interest and concern. Mr. Hyde closed
his letter on the following note: "I look forward to working
closely with the Association."
This staff of four is responsible for coordinating
planning activities, scheduling meetings, arranging for
expert consultations to task forces, and submitting required
reports to HUD. The university consultants serve as discussion moderators to citizen task forces, submit meeting
reports, conduct data searches and joint problem analyses;
they are also responsible for preparation of the mid- .
planning and final planning statement in compliance with
submission requirements.
After five months of problem analysis these University consultants had acquired sufficient data, information,
and community perspective to prepare detailed summaries
of citizen attitudes and needs for improved urban life that
would form the basic components of the required MidPlanning Statement. Following a series of writing sessions
that involved CDA Staff, consultants and citizen representatives, a Mid-Planning Statement was prepared for submission to the Model Cities Review Board and City Council. It
outlined the city's problems, community objectives to
relieve these problems, and a strategy for achieving them all of which reflected the needs and desires of the neighborhood residents. The total time-period consumed was six
months - the time alloted in the original work planning
schedule.
UNIVERSITY INVOLVEMENT: THE COOKEVILLE,
TENNESSEE EXPERIENCE
Written by CDA Director A. Cannella, this article
describes the Cookeville, Tennessee experience in
utilizing university talent to meet HUD's planning requirements. It does not purport to be the only solution to personnel shortage problems, but suggests a
source of professional assistance available to many
communities.
After its selection as a second round city in November, 1968, Cookeville officials endeavored to hire CDA staff
to complete the first year planning effort as prescribed in
HUD guidelines. Because Cookeville is a semi-rural community of 15,000 and in a depressed area of Appalachia,
staff planners of the type required are not locally available.
The city is the home of Tennessee Technological University, a source of ample professional and para-professional
persons most of whom reside in the city. Consequently ,
after a futile search for staff employees, the city contracted
with Tennessee Technological University to provide a fulltime CDA Dir~ctor and seven consultants to work continuously with citizen task forces throughout the planning process. In addition , graduate students with specific talents
were provided to undertake research studies such as housing
needs, solid wastes management, health facilities and
others. All facilities of the University were available to the
CDA, including an IBM 360 Computer with requisite software and programmers. The faculty and students assigned
were selected on the basis of their knowledge, interests, and
wi!Iingness to work cooperatively with citizens of every
type background and economic level without pedantry.
During the next three months these University consultants will continue to update the Mid-Planning Statement by filling data gaps, preparing program descriptions
and budget requirements and setting an order of activity for
the first year action plan. This will , of course, involve continued meetings with citizens as well as agency heads and
local officials.
The University-CDA effort has proven most satisfactory and the results achieved thus . far are very commendable. Professional areas represented by the seven task
force consultants include sociology , history , political
science, economics, engineering and education. They have
all developed outstanding rapport with neighborhood residents participating in the task forces analyses and have
served as excellent catalysts in group dialogue ; they have, in
effect, provided sensitivity training within their respective
task forces , producing a temporizing influence that has
been most beneficial in achieving the objectives of Model
City planning.
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UNIVERSITIES AN D URBAN PROBLEMS
Training and Technical Assistance
There is a natural tendency to look to universities for
training and technical assistance support in the fields of
community action and community development. However,
results thus far have been, at best, mixed. It is clear that the
"glancing blow" technique is unsuccessful. Exposure of
agency or organization personnel to brief, one-shot lectures
or seminars provided by the universities is of little value.
The faculty member usually has no deep understanding of
the strengths and weaknesses of processes and programs
that the agency might employ to achieve its objectives; the
faculty person is, therefore, perceived by the staff or
agency volunteers as dealing in generalizations or abstractions. Additionally, the more formally structured classroom
approach tends to be repellant to many community
workers.
The following article, written especially for the Technical Bulletin, is by Dr. Thomas Broden, Director of
Urban Studies at the University of Notre Dame. The
author's premise is that the universities have thus far
contributed to the conditions of blight and poverty
instead of helping to remedy them. The forthcoming
discussion is concerned with ways in which this cycle
can be reversed.
Internal Reform
If the universities wish to be helpful to the Model
Cities efforts, they must first ask themselves several questions which reflect the current state of their internal operations: Do the recruiting, admission, and aid practices of the
university result in a student population fairly representative of Black, Mexican-American, and Indian students?
What can the university do to improve this record? How
many minority faculty members, administrators, employees,
and trustees does the university have? What can be done to
improve this record? Is the curriculum of the university
reflective of the multi-racial and multi-cultural character of
the world in which we live? Does it accurately deal with
race and cultural relations, past and present, in America and
around the world? Do the community relations and investment policies of the university help or hinder the achievement of the Model Cities goals of community development,
the alleviation of poverty, and equality of opportunity?
What can be done to improve this?
The talents of faculty members or stude"nts for
training and technical assistance are more likely to be
helpful if a more personal, cooperative working relationship
of some duration can be established between the Model
Cities staff or volunteers and university persons. Representatives of the university should make clear the kinds of
resources - legal, accounting, architectural, economic
development, management, community development, etc.
- that are available. It is then up to the Model Cities
neighborhood residents, staff or volunteers to decide
whether or not they wish to avail themselves of the services
of these students or faculty. If they do then an on-going
working relationship, preferably in the community, can be
established so that the general professional or disciplinary
capabilities of the student or faculty can be translated into
the circumstances of the particular community and program involved.
Qualitative improvement in our communities will
only take place when our basic institutions - schools, business, labor, industry, law enforceme nt, courts, government
services, church - are changed and become more open to
and responsive to the needs and interests of all citizens.
Universities must change in this regard and their change
may encourage other institutions to do likewise. In any
event, it is necessary to clean up one's own house before
presuming to help out elsewhere.
This requires joint planning by the university representatives and persons in the community. It also implies an
expenditure of time and effort on the part of faculty and
students that exceeds "spare time" activities. This means
that student work-study of this kind should address fundamental causes of blight and poverty such as institutional
racism; impersonality , ineffectiveness, and injustice of
modern urban institutions; the difficulty and complexity of
urban environmental control ; and so o n. The student
sh ould understand the strategy and tactics of the organization or group he is working with to alleviate one or more of
these root causes and scientifically report his findings and
conclusions from time to time. There should be regular
meetings with community people, faculty members and
other students engaged in related work-study efforts. Such
work-study activities can be helpful to the community , a
learning process for the students and faculty, and the basis
for the development of a body of community research data.
When study and teaching, research and service are meshed
in to such a work-study activity , academic credit should be
nd
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In the same vein, predominantly white universities
can be helpful in interpreting the Model Cities program to
the leadership and citizenry of the white community. By
indicating support for the Model Cities effort, a white
university confers a measure of respectability and credibility on the program in the white community. This support may take many forms - from active institutional
involvement in the program to technical assistance to neighborhood and community groups who themselves are more
directly involved. This may call for a change of posture for
many universities, away from an "establishment" orientation t oward a more community-wide orientation .
- 3-
�CDA LETTER NO. 10 IS SENT
TO STEERING COMMITTEE
extended for it to the students; it should also be recognized
as part of the faculty member's semester or yearly load,
not something he is expected to pile on to an otherwise full
load.
One other word on agency staff training. Many community workers, particularly the poor or those subject to
discrimination, place a high priority on academic certification and look most favorably on training programs that
combine job skills with such certification. Many schools,
particularly community colleges, have collaborated in the
development of staff training programs which combine
more traditional college work with skills training and result
in some kind of academic certification.
The CDA Steering Committee is being sent copies of
various policy statements to be included in CDA Letter No.
10 for their comments. CDA Letter No. 10 arose out of
city submissions that have so far been reviewed. Past
experiences with model cities indicated the need to specify
what was expected of cities under the Model Cities program. The policy statements contained in this letter, supplemented from time to time, provide cities with answers to
the real questions that have not been adequately dealt with
through present requirements.
Determination that a city is in compliance with these
and other applicable policies will be an important part of
the review of comprehensive programs, and of projects and
activities within comprehensive programs. HUD expects
CDAs to distribute these policy statements to all program
participants.
The policy statements are being considered in the
following areas: Resident Employment, Administrative
Capability, Use of New Corporations, Equal Opportunity,
Citizen Participation, Economic Development, Loans, Expenditure of Funds, Use of Supplemental Funds,
Expenditure Rates, and Maintenance of Effort.
Research and Evaluation
Universities are generally more competent in the areas
of research and evaluation than they are in the areas of
training and technical assistance. In the research area
particularly, they are doing their own thing. However we
have a long way to go in the development of a system of
critical evaluation and reporting of the many pilot, demonstration, experimental, and other efforts that have been or
are addressing community problems. And we are even
farther away from the development of an effective communications network or system so that interested communities, government agencies, foundations, and universities can keep abreast of the strengths and weaknesses of
various efforts to alleviate blight and poverty. Industry,
government and the foundations have a far more effective
communications system in the field of physical sciences
than we have in this area. There are one or two encouraging
developments worthy of mention. The first is the effort to
develop indicators of social progress to serve as measures or
benchmarks of social needs and the impact of programs
addressing these needs. Implicit in this effort is the need for
a more comprehensive and consistent social information
base. The second is HUD's Urban Observatory Program
under which a handful of local communities and universities are joining in the analysis and reporting of local
efforts to alleviate social problems. The communities in the
program then are to develop a systematic exchange of data
and current information. Both of these are embryonic but
promising efforts.
COMPREHENSIVE PLANNING ASSISTANCE SUPPORT
TO MODEL CITIES FISCAL YEAR 1970
Planning funds are available to eligible applicants for
the support of Model Cities planning and evaluation
activities through the Comprehensive Planning Assistance
Program (701 Program).
1. Scope of the Program
The Comprehensive Planning Assistance Program provides grants to foster sound community , regional and statewide comprehensive planning. The broad objective of the
program is to establish the comprehensive planning process
as a continuing function of government. More specifically,
it attempts to strengthen the capacity of government to
guide the allocation of scarce public and private resources,
to address critical social concerns, to improve the quality
and efficiency of the development of land and associated
facilities, to improve the quality of analytical methods and
techniques used in the planning process , and to secure the
participation of business and voluntary groups in the
planning and development process.
Conclusion
The same can be said of university-Model Cities
cooperation. Some faculty members and students want to
make their talents available to the communities of which
they are a part and some Model Cities neighborhood residents staff and volunteers want to make use of these universit~ resources. However we are just beginning to develop
effective processes to satisfy these mutually supportive
interests.
2. Funding Levels
Assuming an expected appropriation of $50 million
in fiscal 1970 for the 701 Program, a total of $6 million is
tentatively allocated for the Special Projects Account, a
substantial portion of which is specifically identified for
Model Cities support. The remaining allocations in Special
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Projects Accounts, though directed at other priority areas,
will undoubtedly result in important, though indirect,
benefits for Model Cities. The remaining $44 million in
Regular Account is not specifically identified with Model
Cities. However, Model Cities may be among the beneficiaries of Regular Account 701. The proportion of
Regular Account funds made available to support model
cities planning will depend largely on the quality, timeliness
and relevance to national priorities of applications for
assistance.
b.
Studies, analyses and recommendations for
meeting identified problems and opportunities;
c.
Studies and analyses of government processes
and fiscal resources and capacities;
d.
Determination of priorities for action in meeting problems and fulfilling opportunities;
e.
Coordination of related planning activities;
f.
Preparation of implementation elements,
including fiscal plans and programs for capital
investment and services, and legislative, regulatory and administrative actions to support comprehensive planning;
g.
Activities necessary to establish and maintain
proper citizen participation;
h.
Reviews and evaluation studies to assess the
quality of plans and implementing instruments.
Special Projects Account activities must be innovative
in character, susceptible to careful evaluation, and. present
attempts to advance the level of knowledge in response to
urban problems. Special Projects will be closely monitored
by Central Office of Metropolitan Development; the lessons
learned will be disseminated to interested agencies throughout the country. The Special Projects Account is the
"cutting edge" of the 701 program. It was established to
encourage a fresh look at old problems, the development of
imaginative approaches to new challenges. HUD will give
special attention to those proposals which will increase the
role of Blacks, Mexican-Americans, and Indians in the comprehensive planning process, as participating citizens and
professionals. In addition, it is concerned with assisting
state governments to gear up for a concerted attack on
critical urban problems.
3. Priority Activities
Highest priority will be given to applications for 701
assistance in planning activities related to housing (including Breakthrough), minority assistance, governmental
management and coordination, citizen partjcipation,
volunteer services, inner city, water, sewer and open space.
4 . Eligible Beneficiaries and Applicants for 701 Assistance
Model cities may be eligible beneficiaries of 701
planning assistance through state planning agencies as applicants for 701 if they have populations under 50,000, are
counties regardless of size, or are exception cities, i.e., EDA
Title IV designated redevelopment areas, disaster areas, or
federally-impacted areas.
In addition, Metropolitan Regional Councils, including organizations of public officials (such as COGs), Metropolitan Planning Commissions, and Joint City-County
Planning Commissions, may be eligible applicants for 701
funding of planning activities which are carried out as part
of their metropolitan-wide planning and are closely related
and useful to model cities.
States may be eligible applicants for 701 funding to
enhance the capacity of the governor's offices to coordinate
State planning and programming activities as they relate to
and benefit local model cities planning and programming,
to assist and encourage State departments to provide
technical assistance to model cities, and to encourage State
departments in providing State program funding to Model
Cities as well as helping facilitate the flow of Federal program funding to Model Cities for which the States act as
conduit.
6. Technical Assistance
Regional HUD staff has been instructed to offer technical assistance to potential beneficiary model cities and
eligible applicants in identifying planning activities where
701 support can be most constructive. HUD Regional staff
has been urged to offer technical assistance to eligible applicants in filing applications fo r 701.
With respect to Special Projects, applicants should
not prepare complete 701 applications, but rather prepare
short (2-3 page) pre-application descriptions of proposed
activities, to be used as the basis for discussion with Regional staff.
5. Regular and Special Projects Accounts
Comprehensive 701 support to Model Cities is available from R egular A ccount and Special Projects Account.
Regular Account activities are described in the Comprehensive Planning Assistance Handbook (MD604 l. l) pp.
23-28 for activities funded through state agencies and pp.
42-44 for activities fu nded through Metropolitan Regional
Councils. Examples of eligible Regular Account activities
are :
a. Identification of human , economic, social, physical and government problems and opportunities;
7. Additional Information
Additional information regarding the Comprehensive
Planning Assistance Program as it relates to Model Cities,
will be available from the HUD Regional Model Cities
Administration staff and the Regional Program Coordination and Services staff, or from David Einhorn, Urban
Planning Advisor, Program Development Staff, MCA , HUD ,
Washington, D.C. (202-755-5524).
- 5-
�served and detailed reporting. If the agency agrees to
perform detailed project evaluation, then the CDA can concentrate on other types of evaluation such as evaluation of
the total program. However, if agencies operating projects
do perform evaluation, then the CDA must make sure that
the quality of the evaluation meets the needs of the Model
Cities program and that agency staff is available and
qualified to do the job.
c. Other evaluation activiites and resources. Many
programs in existence before Model Cities will probably be
part of the city's plan. These programs might have evaluation data which is useful for problem analysis, project
evaluation, or program evaluation. There may also be
agencies which have collected data in the past and now have
information systems which can be used. For example, a city
may have a file on land properties which gives their land use
and property value. All information sources should be used
to avoid doing work that has already been done. Also, it
may be possible for a CDA to submit a joint application for
evaluation money from programs other than Model Cities.
For example, a local planning agency might submit an
application for 701 funds to be used for Model Cities
evaluation.
Where possible, cities should use funds from different
sources for evaluation, not just supplemental money.
Money for planning surveys, for example , could be tied into
a year's evaluation activity for the program as a whole, even
though the money comes from one program source.
Demonstration projects are another source of evaluation
money, since many of these kinds of projects require
extensive evaluation activities. Planning moneys funded in
one functional area can be legitimately used for planning
and evaluation in another functional area, where there is
overlap and where the money is used to find out effects of
different programs on one another.
ORGANIZING FOR EVALUATION
This article continues the series on evaluation which
began in the first issue of the Technical Bulletin.
Reprints of this article are available on request; cities
can also modify this article for their use. In order to
make this series useful to you, we would like your
suggestions for subjects to be discussed in future
issues.
Introduction
The article about evaluation that appeared in the
previous bulletin discussed general questions of evaluation.
Many cities are faced with the practical question of how to
organize to perform evaluation. This article deals with the
conditions that affect how one decides to organize for
evaluation and the advantages and disadvantages of using
the local Model Cities Office (called City Demonstration
Agency or CDA), cooperating agencies, contractors, and
residents. Whatever the organization a city sets up for evaluation, it should always have the capability to:
a)
define what it needs to evaluate
monitor evaluation performed by persons who
b)
are not CDA staff, to assure a useful evaluation
delivered on time
analyze the information provided by evaluation
c)
d)
give the results of evaluation to all parties
making decisions
use the information to affect decisions about
e)
the program and improve the program for the
next year.
Conditions That Affect Who Performs Evaluation
Important conditions that affect who performs
evaluation are: the number and quality of staff available to
do evaluation, arrangements with cooperating agencies,
other evaluation resources and activities, and the coordinating and management function of the CDA.
a. Staff available. All other conditions being equal,
evaluation of projects coordinated by the CDA is best done
by the CDA. However, the staff may be small, cooperating
agencies may be willing to do project evaluation, and the
CDA may decide that using staff to evaluate total program
while only evaluating priority projects would be more
efficient. In general, assuming that staff is capable, the CDA
should use its own resources on the most important evaluation needs.
b. Arrangements with cooperating agencies. When a
contract is signed with an agency to operate a program, that
contract should define what kinds of data will be reported,
how often, and what other types of evaluation aside from
regular reporting will be performed by the agency. The
activities defined in the contract can vary from limited data
collecting and reporting to in tensive follow-up of people
d. Coordination and managment. In most cases, the
CDA will be coordinating and monitoring projects,
evaluating them, and planning for an improved program.
This means that, in the beginning, much of the evaluation
may be project monitoring to see that organization of
projects, their staffing, training, basic operating conditions,
etc., do occur on schedule and with desired quality.
Further, once the programs begin operating at full
capacity, the CDA will want to know what are the accomplishments of the program and the projects, whether they
are meeting expected objectives, what their problems are ,
and a host of other questions which can all be summed up
by asking, "What is happening in the program?" Regular
monitoring of the projects by the CDA staff and the operation of an information system from the cooperating
agencies to the CDA is the most common way of obtaining
such information. The size of a city, and the complexity of
a program, shape the design of such a system.
- 6-
�Alternatives in Implementing Evaluation
CDA staff are needed to be sure that the contractor is
performing the correct job, and the city may get results
which have less effect on people because there is no one
personally involved with the report or because the city may
not fully understand or be committed to the findings.
There are four basic alternatives to consider in
choosing who shall conduct evaluation; evaluation by inhouse staff, evaluation by cooperating agencies, evaluation
by a contractor, and evaluation by residents. How much
one relies on any one of these four choices affects how the
CDA is organized. There are good and bad points to consider in each choice.
a. In-House Staff. Utilizing in-house staff has the advantage of CDA control over personnel, their assignments,
and direct project supervision. Bureaucratic delays and
necessary cooperating agreements are by-passed. The translation of data analysis into recommendations for action is
sometimes considerably shortened.
Disadvantages are that CDA staff time is sometimes
not available and, if available, may get taken off evaluation
to meet emergency or other situations. Evaluation of one's
own activities is often helpful, but sometimes one can get
more useful information by having another person evaluate
your operation because he may have a more independent
view. If other agencies are to be evaluated by CDA staff,
the diplomatic channels and agreements for how this is to
be done must be worked out in detail to reduce conflict
between agencies.
b . Cooperating Agency. Utilizing cooperating
agencies for evaluation has the potential opportunities for
sharing costs, providing for data collecting in the most
efficient manner, creating in advance the groundwork for
making sure that evaluation results in action by involving
the affected agency, freeing your own staff for other work,
and generally increasing the involvement and coordination
of other agencies with the Model Cities program.
The disadvantages are that the CDA does not have
direct control over the work being performed, the agency
involved has a stake in the results of the evaluation and will
tend to be less objective, the CDA is dependent on agency
agreement, and the evaluation project will tend to be controlled by the needs of the cooperating agency. The CDA
needs must be clearly specified in advance and agreements
must be reached so that the work is done in a way that
meets CDA requirements.
c. Contract. Advantages of utilizing contractors are
that the CDA has brought specialized services presumably
tailored to needs, the contractor is responsible to the CDA,
more objectivity is acquired by utilizing someone outside
the program, staff resources are freed for other uses, and
the contractor can sometimes perform evaluation that the
CDA might not wish to undertake because of political
reasons.
Some disadvantages are that contractors often do not
train staff and therefore do not usually give a long-term
benefit to the agency , they are not familiar with the local
situation and spend time learning it, special effort by the
d. Residents. Using residents in evaluation has the
advantages of ensuring that evaluation meets the needs of
the people, helps tie the results of evaluation into future
planning and programming, helps lift the technical competence of the residents, and gives special emphasis to the
insights of people who actually experience the problems of
the neighborhood.
Some disadvantages are the lack of professional
experience and knowledge necessary for some evaluation,
necessity for training and orientation, and possible bias in
collecting data and analyzing results.
An Example to Illustrate How One Might Assign Responsibilities for Evaluating a Project
Suppose there is a project in Education which has
priority because if it is successful, it might be greatly expanded and lead to significant changes in the way model
neighborhood children were educated.
The CDA might agree with the school system that the
system would not only provide regular quarterly reporting
but that an outside consultant hired by the school system
would be used to evaluate the project in greater detail than
the regular reporting ordinarily provides. The CDA would
be given an opportunity to participate in the evaluation
design and the final report. Special provision would be
made for residents to independently comment on how the
project was operated and how it affected them.
Another situation might be that the CDA staff has an
educational expert who is respected by all parties. In this
case, he alone might be responsible for the evaluation, in
addition to the regular reporting of the school system on
the project.
· A third choice might be an independent consultant
working alone because neither the CDA nor the school
system has staff available and/or qualified to do the job. In
this case, special efforts must be made to ensure that the
consultant does his job according to the needs of the school
system and the CDA.
A fourth choice might be to assign primary evaluation
responsibility to a resident evaluation unit which is staffed
by professionals but responsible to the citizen participation
structure. The school system and the CDA Evaluation unit
would be given an opportunity to participate in the evaluation design and the final report.
Whatever choice is made about who is to do the
evaluation, the work is useless unless the report can be
understood and its findings used to decide if the project
should be changed, expanded or dropped.
- 7-
�No. 1: Process-Oriented Concerns
COMPONENT ANALYSIS : RELATIONSHIPS OF
CDAS TO CITY GOVERNMENT
A. Patterns for CDA
Structure
This pattern of internal structure is usually divided
into divisions or program units responsible for planning and
evaluation, program administration, coordination, and community organization. Of the first thirty-five model cities to
receive supplemental grants, twenty-three cities had a CDA
internal structure based on process oriented concerns.
Examples: The CDA in San Antonio, Texas, is organized
into the following units: program planning and evaluation,
program coordination, administration, and citizen participation; the CDA in Smithville-DeKalb County, Tennessee,
is organized into divisions for planning, coordination,
evaluation, and administrative and management services.
Location in City Governmental
A recent analysis completed by HUD and the Model
Cities Service Center is the result of a survey of the first
thirty-five cities approved for Model Cities implementation.
Four models, or distinct patterns, have emerged based on
the CDAs' location in the city governmental structure.
Pattern No. 1: CDA as Part of the Chief Executive
Officer's Office.
Of the first thirty-five cities, fourteen were organized
in the mayor's or city manager's office. Examples: The
Baltimore Model Cities Agency is a unit in the Office of the
Mayor and will use the powers of the Mayor for program
management and the discharge of its coordinating functions; in Denver, the Model City core staff coordinates,
evaluates, and monitors all program activities, and is
directly responsible to the Mayor and assigned to his office.
No. 2: Functional Area Concerns
This pattern of internal structure is usually divided
into divisions or units with responsibilities for one programmatic area - health, social services, physical redevelopment, etc. Of the first thirty-five Model Cities to
receive supplemental grants, thirteen cities had a CDA
internal structure based on functional concerns. Examples:
The CDA in Reading, Pennsylvania, is organized into units
that include human resources development and physical
development; the Dayton, Ohio, CDA is organized into
units responsible for health, social services, and employment as well as for planning and coordination.
Due to the nature of the Model Cities program, CDAs
that are organized based on functional areas also usually
include a unit that is process-oriented, i.e., planning and
coordination.
Pattern No. 2: CDA as a City Department.
Of the first thirty-five cities, eleven were organized as
a regular department of city government. Examples: The
Huntsville Model City Staff Office operates as a city department directly under the Mayor; the Texarkana, Texas CDA
is an established department of the city called the
Department of Community Development with status and
authority equal to that of other city departments.
Pattern No. 3: CDA as a Division or Bureau within an
Existing City Department.
OPERATING RESULTS IN
SOME EARLY MODEL CITIES
Of the fust thirty-five cities, three were organized as
divisions or bureaus of existing city departments.
Examples: Highland Park, Michigan has a Department of
Community Development with a City Demonstration
Agency Division; in Tampa, Florida, the CDA is the
equivalent of a bureau of the City of Tampa.
HUNTSVILLE, ALABAMA
Huntsville has 80 of its 84 operating projects and
activities underway. *Two hundred and fifty persons are
enrolled in adult education and vocational training. *More
than 200 youths, either first offenders or near delinquents,
are taking part in vocational training, crafts, and recreation
in a program directed by the juvenile division of the
Sheriff's office. *In-school programming, all of which began
promp tly in September, has provided for or is providing for
testing of 8 0 students, 1OS students in special education ,
and social case work with 150 potential dropouts.
Pattern No. 4: CDA as an Independent Board, Commission,
or Agency.
Of the first thirty-five cities, seven CDAs were
organized as an independent board, commission or agency
with its administra tive staff reporting direc tly to it and not
to the city's chief executive officer. The City Council has
ultimate responsibility for the program. This pa ttern of
administrative structure has caused problems fo r HUD in
the review process. Consequently , amendments have been
required to assure that the ci ty has full and ultimate
responsibility for the program and to assure that the city
exercises that responsibility.
NOR FO L K, VIRGI NIA
Although Norfolk's contract was not tendered until
August I 5, 1969, the city has negotia ted third-party contracts or agreements for 83% of its first year supplemental
fu nds. *One of the four neighborhood service centers is
open and functioning at full staff. It now offers recreational
activities, health services, mental health services, and welfare services. Soon the adult basic education and home
B. Pattern s of CDA Internal Structures
The internal structures of ci ty demonstration agencies
are organized according to one of two patterns:
- 8-
�economic class will be in operation. *Norfolk's Model Cities
education program was started immediately upon contract
for the beginning of the school year. Projects include team
teaching, teacher training, early childhood education, a
community school, and parent-teacher consultation, involving a total of 13,000 children in the model neighborhood.
total program will be underway by December 1-15. *In recognition of the City's bankrupt state, it is important to note
that supplemental funds have been successfully used as a
multiplier in several projects now underway. *The program
is using $130,000 (supplemental) to hire increased teachers
and provide better facilities for a model demonstration
school. *Another project uses $50,000 (supplemental) as
seed money by a newly established Local Development
Corp. to attract other funds to underwrite neighborhood
minority business.
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
A good start has been made in getting the majority of
priority first year projects into operation. Twenty-five
projects totalling $26 million ( out of a total supplemental
grant of $38 million) are underway. *Two of four Comprehensive Health Centers ($2.8 million supplemental; $2.5
million city bonds) are ready to open with professional
staff hired and 56 neighborhood paraprofessionals in training. *The Early Childhood Education project ($225,000
supplemental) is already close to its fust year goal of providing concentrated services to 250 two and three year olds.


Community Development Corporations ($1.8 million supplemental) have been formed in all four model neighborhoods under the leadership of the Mortgage Bankers


Association, Chicago Economic Development Corporation,
and Sl3A. *The Increased Streets and Sanitation project
($2.4 million supplemental) has employed 170 of an
anticipated 500 neighborhood residents; special screening
committees are insuring that at lease 50% of these hired are
hard core unemployed.
ATLANTA, GEORGIA
60 out of the 80 projects are already underway in
Atlanta. *An inner-neighborhood bus system connects
the model neighborhood to job sites previously not reachable by public transportation. Subsidy from supplemental
funds make possible a 10¢ fare; the system hooks into the
regular Atlanta transit system. From May 29 to September
30, there were 93,742 riders. *A multi-service center has
been built from the ground up with attractive, prefabricated modules. Employment, education, vocational rehabilitation, and children services already are operating. A
housing advisory center, built the same way, has opened
next door.
EAGLE PASS, TEXAS


School libraries have opened evenings in four


schools. Special and children's sections of the public library
have been expanded. *Nineteen Home Demonstration aides
have completed training to provide counsel in homemaking,
health, nutrition and consumer education. They have already contacted 413 homes and have provided instruction
in 313. *Two minibuses have been ordered and will be in
operation this month, providing free transportation to
elderly, ill, students, and other residents.
DAYTON, OHIO
Projects totalling $1 million, one-third of Dayton's
first year program, are already in operation. *A Model
Cities Housing Development Corporation ($ 108,600) has
been incorporated and has secured approval of an initial
50-unit Section 235 application. 500 units should be underway by June. *The Comprehensive Manpower Center
($460,000 supplemental, $800,000 HEW, OBES, Labor,
and City) is a good example of the extensive negotiations
necessary to launch a project involving several local,
Federal, and State agencies, Model Cities staff and residents. All of these parties were involved in the discussions
about how the local CEP program was to be administered
and refunded. The Comprehensive Center will be the operator under subcontract from the City, but the CEP refunding
package will probably not be completed and approved until
January, and the center will not be able to get underway
until then. Beginning in January, spending will be at a
$225,000 monthly level ($80,000 mo. supplemental) with
200 underemployed to be served by June and 400 by
October.
INVOLVEMENT OF U.S. ARMY CORPS OF
ENGINEERS IN THE MODEL CITIES PROGRAM
Assistant Secretary Floyd H. Hyde recently informed
CDA Directors of possible assistance available to Model
Cities from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.
It was pointed out that environmental considerations
have a major impact on the quality of urban life. The Corps
has the potential for materially assisting Model Cities in
their environmental plans and programs. The Corps can
provide technical assistance to CDAs through its engineering consulting expertise. It can also provide direct
action to Model Cities through establishment of a budget
item to undertake a particular public works project. A
District representative of the Corps will be in touch with
each CDA Director in the near future.
EAST ST. LOUIS, ILLINOIS
Thirty projects, totalling $1.5 million of the $ 2.1 million first year entitlement are funded and in operation. The
- 9-
�park complexes and the development of community-based
cultural arts programs.
For example, in Savannah, Georgia, the technical
assistance efforts will be directed toward developing a
mechanism for neighborhood involvement in recreation
planning; community organization is identified as a major
goal. Tampa, Florida is concentrating on the design of new
facilities, with primary attention to the full utilization of
existing and future school facilities. Butte, Montana,
working with a youth board, is concerned with developing a
full range of programs for young people.
N.R.P.A. CORNER
National Recreation and Park Association
Model Cities Technical Assistance Contract
1700 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20006
(202) 223-3030
-~-
Technical Assistance: Recreation and Culture
The National Recreation and Park Association is administering the contract to provide technical assistance to
selected Model Cities and to help selected Model Cities
resolve special difficulties experienced in program planning
organization and operation in the development of innovative recreation and cultural programs. The contract has two
components: (1) direct consultation and on-site visitation
provided to selected cities by consultants whose expertise is
directly related to the special needs of individual localities
and (2) indirect assistance to all 150 Model Cities through
the preparation and distribution of technical publications
and resource materials.
The National Recreation and Park Association
(NRPA) is a private, non-profit service and educational
organization dedicated to improving the quality of life
through the wise use of human and natural resources and
through the development of relevant and meaningful
recreation and cultural programs for all groups. During the
past few years, increased staff resources and program
efforts have been directed toward urban recreation concerns in an attempt to establish a comprehensive recreation
system in urban communities and to work toward integrating recreation and culture into the total human service
system in urban areas.
Indirect Assistance
In addition to preparing material for the Technical
Bulletin, the NRPA project staff is currently compiling information for general resource publications: a listing of
sources allocating monies for recreation and cultural programs and facilities ; a bibliography of pertinent reference
material, and a listing of audio-visual aids.
On October 9-10, a regional workshop was held in
Atlanta, Georgia. Eighteen of the 23 model cities in Region
III attended the two-day session designed to present new
ideas in programming and facility design and to inform the
cities of available financial and technical assistance
resources.
HUD Expands "Parks- In -Cities" Program
HUD has announced and expanded "parks-in-cities"
program designed to encourage the acquisition and development of parks and recreation areas in low-income neighborhoods. The program involves setting aside up to $15
million fo r the 50-50 matching grants under the open-space
land program for the purchase of land for small and
moderate size parks in blighted city areas. Communities
applying fo r funds should contact the Assistant Regional
Administrator for Metropolitan Development at the
appropriate HUD Regional Office. Communities submitting
letters requesting fu nds before January 1, 1970, will receive
letters of assured financial assistance within one week of
receipt of the request, according to new HUD procedures.
Direct Consultation
To date , NRPA has provided consultant expertise on
13 different service visits. Cities selected to receive assistance
include Toledo and Dayton, Ohio ; Tampa, Florida; Seattle ,
Washington ; Portland, Maine ; Savannah , Georgia; Butte ,
Montana ; and High Point, North Carolina. Additional cities
will be visited in the future as requested by the MCA office
in Washington, D.C.
Representatives from the NRPA project staff, from
the MCA Washington, D.C. office, and specially selected
consultants visit cities to undertake a general survey of the
recreation and culture operations, to assist with tl1e development of a work program fo r future action and to offer
specific help on problems or the development of new
approaches to programmi ng and facil ity design .
Among the concerns identified by the first cities
selecte d are the design and operation of educational camps
and water-based facilities, ways of encouraging and
achieving citizen involvement in planning recreation and
cultural activities, design and use of mini-parks and school-
Special Procedures
l.
- 10 -
Applicants may either file a complete application under the Open Space Land Program or
they may sin1ply file a letter of intention to
submit an application. The letter of intention
should contain the following: (a) Name and
address of applying agency, (b) General neighborhood or location of the site(s) to be
acquired, (c) Estimated total project acreage
and cost including acquisition and development, (d) A commitment to acquire the land
and complete development within one year.
�2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Upon rece1V1ng an application or letter, the
Assistant Regional Administrator for Metropolitan Development (ARA/MD) may issue a
"letter of assurance" immediately, but in any
event, the Regional Office shall respond to the
applicant within one week.
The letter of assurance will temporarily set
aside necessary funds following which the community has 90 days to complete the necessary
action that can permit formal action on an
application. If the applicant has not taken
action on the assurance after 90 days, the
assurance is cancelled.
Applicants need not specify individual tracts or
parcels for acquisition. Approximations {"four
sites totalling about three acres") will be adequate for the purposes of the letter of
assurance.
Land appraisals need not accompany the application, but appraisals will be required prior to
contract execution. If a community goes ahead
without a concurred-in-price, it does so at its
own risk if the price exceeds HUD's subsequent
price determination.
Only low-income neighborhood projects qualify
for these special procedures. Any neighborhood
with a median family income of $5 ,000 or less
will automatically qualify.
The letter of assurance procedure is effective
until January I, 1970.
TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE CONTRACTS
Consulting firms have made several misrepresentations to Model Cities recently . They have stated that they
are the "approved" technical assistance contractors under
contract with the Deparment of Housing and Urban Development in the various functional areas in which contracts have been le t. Most of the technical assistance
contracts that have been awarded by the Department are
contained in the first issue of the Technical Bulletin on
page eleven . All others are included below. The Planning
and Evaluation technical assistance contract with OSTI was
inadvertently left off the last list of HUD contracts fo r
technical assistance to model cities.
TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE ON INC OME PROGRAMS
Alvin Schoor of the Brandeis University Income
Maintenance Project in Washington, D.C., a project funded
by the Ford Foundation, recently prepared and distributed
technical assistance materials on income maintenance to
model city agencies.
HO USIN G AND URBAN DE VELO PMENT
ACT OF 1969 NEARS PASSAG E
The House and Senate have passed differing versions
of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1969, and
conferees are scheduled to meet the first week of December
to work out a compromise. As presented to Congress by the
Administration, the original bill was relatively
uncontroversial ; its primary function was to extend HUD
program authorizations due to expire at the end of this
fiscal year. The bill also provided increased federal
contributions for public housing.
Both the House and the Senate, however, added
many new provisions, including greatly liberalized
construction cost limits for federally-assisted housing, elimination of the income limits on the Section 312 rehabilitation loan program, and elimination of the workable
program requirement for certain federally-assisted housing
programs .
The Senate bill contains a new subsidy for very low
income public housing tenants (Brooke amendment) and
authorizes disposal of surplus federal land to local governments on favorable terms for housing sites.
The House bill has two provisions of direct interest to
Model Cities. One requires the HUD Secretary to give a
preference in processing urban renewal applications to
projects which are part of approved Model Cities programs.
The other authorizes the use of IO percent of total Model
Cities grant funds in smaller cities without regard to the
limitation that grants cannot exceed 80 percent of the local
share of other programs employed in the area.
The House bill also contains language which changes
the Neighborhood Development Program (NDP) from a
strict annual process to allow local discretion to proceed on
a two-year basis. A specific percentage of the total urban
renewal authorization is set aside fo r NDP projects. In
addition, an amendment was added on the House floor by
Rep . Lowell Weicker (R-Conn .) which re quires that each
low or moderate income housing unit torn down in an
urban renewal project must be replaced with a new one in
the project area.
EVALUATION CONTR ACTS
Subject
Contractor
CDA Information System . . . . . . . . . . . . Consultee , Inc.
Training and Installation . . . . . . . . . . Transcentury Corp.
Peat, Marwick, Mitchell , & Co.
Training, Research, & Development, Inc.
Fry Consultants
Final action on the bill is expected before the end of
this Congressional session .
- 11 -
�HUD APPROPRIATIONS CLEARED BY CONGRESS
JOB OPPORTUNITIES
The FY 1970 appropriations bill for the Department
of Housing and Urban Development was cleared for the
President's signature November 18, as both the House and
the Senate adopted the conference report which resolved
differences between the versions of the bill each had passed
earlier. The bill includes $575 million for the Model Cities
program. The House agreed to accept the Senate figure of
$1 billion for Urban Renewal, but in return the Senate
acceded to a House figure of $50 million for the rent supplement program. The complete appropriations picture for
HUD is set out in the following chart:
MODEL CITIES DEPUTY DIRECTOR (Project
Coordinator), Fresno, California, $1019-$1239 per mo.,
must have a B.A. or B.S. in public administration,
sociology, education or related field, and at least three
years experience in group work, or in a health, employment, or social service agency, including two years at a
supervisory level. If interested, send applications to the
Model Cities Office, lO ll E. Florence Avenue, Fresno, and
the Fresno City Personnel Dept. For application forms,
write to Fresno City Personnel Department, 1230 N Street,
Fresno, California, 93721, or phone 266-8031, Ext. 311,
Area Code 209. Exam I.D. No. 901-16-1169.
Program (figures in millions.)
Budget
Request
Urban Renewal
Model Cities program
grants
Homeownership (235)
Rental Assistance (236)
Rent Supplements
Public Housing
701 Compre. Planning
Rehabilitation loans
(312)
Title 8, Comm.
Dvlpmt. Tmg.
Neighborhood
Facilities
Open Space
Water & Sewer
Urban Research
Fair Housing
(a)
House
100
nate
250(a)
Final
250(a)
675
100
100
100
473
60
500
80
70
50
473
50
600
100
100
100
473
50
575
90
85
50
473
50
50
45
45
45
8
3
3
3
40
75
135
25
5
40
75
135
25
7
40
75
135
25
6
45
85
135
30
10.5
MODEL CITIES PROGRAM DEVELOPER, Fresno,
California, $742-$902 per mo., B.A. or B.S. in soc., pol.
sci., ed., or related field and at least one y_ear experience in
health, ed., or social agency. If interested, see above for
application procedures. Exam I.D. No. 903-22-1169.
Sen-
250(a)
MODEL CITIES DEPUTY DIRECTOR (Planning),
Fresno, California, $859-$1044 per mo., B.A. or B.S. in
above fields, and three years experience in group work or
with a governmen ta! planning agency, including two years
at a supervisor level. See above for application procedures.
Exam I.D. No. 902-15-1169.
PUBLICATIONS
Adde, Leo, Nine Cities: The Anatomy of Downtown
Renewal, Washington, D.C., 1969.
The results of an intensive investigation and reporting
on the experiences of nine American cities combating
the decline of their downtown districts.
$750 million was appropriated in advance for FY 1970 last
year. The $250 million additional appropriation brings the
total to $1 billion.
Arnstein , George E., "Colleges Can Reach Out to Troubled
Cities with Action, Assistance, Analysis," College and
University Business, September, 1969.
To help colleges become involved in the Model Cities
program, this planning guide offers specific
suggestions as to where higher education can fit into
the process of Model Cities.
A concerted effort by the National League of Cities,
U.S. Conference of Mayors, and National Association of
Housing and Redevelopment Officials to secure Senate
passage of the full $1.6 billion authorized for urban renewal
failed by two votes (34-36) but key Senators committed
themselves to work for a supplemental appropriation bill
before the end of this fiscal year which would include the
additional $600 million authorized to be appropriated for
renewal. This $600 million total includes $187.5 million
expressly authorized for renewal projects in Model Cities.
Holleb, Doris B., Social and Economic Information for
Urban Planning, Chicago, 1969.
A handbook designed to help planners locate
information relevant to urban issues.
This Bulletin is prepared for and in cooperation with
the Model Cities Directors Association.
Paul R. Jones
President
Horace L. Morancie
Erwin France
Secretary
First Vice President
James J. Miller
Donald A. Slater
Parliamentarian
Second Vice President
Prepared by the
MODEL CITI E S SERVIC E C E NTc R
of the
Center for Program Implementation
National League of Cities and the United States Conference of Mayors
�TLANTA
VOL. I NO.' 3
OFFICIAL MODEL CITIES PAPER ·- 673 CAPITOL AVE.,
s~w.
ATLANTA, GA • .
I
WHAT WILL HAPPEN
IN MODEL CITIES
IN 196Q
�CLEARANCE. ~•WHERE?
19
69
MOST OF THE HOUSES IN THE ARE~S SHOWN BELOW WILL BE BOUGHT BY THE ATL~NTA HOUSING AUTHORITY
TO HELP MODEL CITIES GROW.
WHY
ARE THE HOUSES
BEING TORN DOWN _
Our neighborhoods are too
crowded ; there aren't
enough p a rks ; and the playg roun ds at the schools
a re t oo s mall. The streets
a r e too n arrow and many of
the houses are dangerous
h ealth hazards •. Some houses
111us t be torn down to make
Lvom fo r wider streets,
more parks, larger playgrounds, more and better
schools, and to rid the
community of the dangerous
health hazards. Some areas
ne e d more complete shopping
areas. New homes and apartments will be built on much
o f the land the Housing
Authority will buy. Th ese
homes will be available
first to residents of Model
Ci ties and will not cost
more money than Model Cities
r esidents can pay.
HOW
IT BE BOUGHT
1'wo independent p rof e ssior .a1
p roperty appra i s ers will
t ell the Hous i ng Authori tv
what your prop erty i s wor tn.
The Fe deral Government will
look at the s e appraisals
and t~ll the Hous ing
Authority how muc h y o u con
be paid for your prope rty.
A ma n from the Hous ing
Authority will offer y o u
this much mone y for y our
land. If y ou do not think
this is e nough money, t h e
law provide s a way f or
you to appe a l the price .
1
.>
<(
143.215.248.55t¥rJ
GLE NN
W HAT
HAPPENS TO THE PEOPLE
I f you own your home, and
it is bought by the Hou s i qg
Authority, you will be
eligible for up to $5,000
in addition to the money
you receive for your home
to help you buy another
home. You w'i ll not be put
out on the street.
A
Relocation Man will come
t o help you find .a good
place to live that you
can pay for
DO NOT
MOVE UNTIL HE COMES.
Your mover will be paid
b y the Housing Author ity.
Or, if you want to ·move
yourself, the Authority
will pay you. The relocation man will help you
until you are settled. ·
Some families, who want
t o live in the new house s
built where their old
h ouse was, will be moved
i nto comfortaple, modern,
t emporary homes in their
neighborhood until the
n2w hous e s are f i nished.
ST.
I
I
I
I
I
I
r.1:
- STEPHENS
§.
,._
... - -
•-
~-
':
I
i
I
I
.I
I
s
I . I. ! , r~
t~ --,
~~
1 f· ·.
-·---- ~-


.
143.215.248.55
Utb-d :
.s T.
DON'T M OVE UNTI L YOU CALL YOUR RELOCATION MAN
523-0245
�.
---·-···
... ... . .-
OR.M.EWOOD-
-'-'.;?'F = south & -Ea~ B
·- · ' --= .:::- ,., .
oundory
. : /,'/ / ----.
_J
~
l-
ti
~l
I
~ ·
\J
HOW
.L THIS HAPPEN
~ will be held in
~hborhood. A r eh a pn Man from the
Ho u sing Authority
t the meeting to
ur questions and
h e program. He
and l ook at your
Be wi ll tell you
h o u se needs and
HAT YOU WANT FOR
AVE. .
AV£ .
WHO
PAYS FOR IT
If you earn 1ess than $3,000
each year, you may be able
~o get a grant of up to
$3,000 maximum to help fix
up your house. If you cannot get this money or need
more money, the rehabilita-tion man can help you borF OW more money.
If you
e arn more than $3,000 each
year, the rehabilitation
man may be able to get a
s mall grant based on income
and help you borrow the
r est of the money to fix
your house.
~
·rhe rehabilitation man will
help you find a builder who
will fix your house .right
and make sure that he ·does
it.
WHAT ABOUT BUSINESS
Businesses located in the
rehabilitation areas are
eligible under .certain conditions for rehabilitation
loans at low interest rates .
For information call the
Moqel Cities NDP office :
~30 McDaniel Street , S.W.
523 - 0245
E. He will help
e wha t you can do
money you have.
al s o h e lp you get
y.
ON YOUR HOUSE UNTIL YOU CALL YOUR REHABILITATION MAN
523 · 0245
...
I
�WHAT
ABOUT
THE
· REST
OF
MODEL
CITIES
0
0
0
0
0
0
. ·What . about 1971,
1972 ' 1973?
What about 1970 ?
SEE FUTURE ISSUES OR CALL 523-0245
.
SEE FUTURE ISSUES OR CALL
523-0245
Others in Model Cities should contact the Atlanta Codes
522 4463
c.
Compll·ance Off ,·ce
-
MODEL CITIES DIRECTOR - Johnny
Johnson
This Issue prepared by James Henley, AHA; Ed Billups,
Al Wexler and John Sluss
�CITY OF ATLANTA'S EVALUATION
REPORT OF THE PROPOSED MODEL CITIES PROGRA
CITY OF ATLANTA
OFFICE OF CITY COMPTROLLER
ATLANTA , GEpRGIA
�0
CITY OF ATLANTA'S EVALUATION
REPORT OF THE PROPOSED MODEL CITIES PROGRAM
FEBRUARY 1969
DATA PROCESSING OPERATIONS DIVISION
�EVALUATION REPORT
1.
INDEX
Page
1.
11.
111.
IV.
V.
Index
Historical Background
This section of the report gives a very general
description of the p~ojects' history ............................... 1
City's Participation in the Proposed Program
This section of the report discusses the City's
participation and the pre liminary negotiations
of the system ...................................................... 2 ,3
Anal y sis of the Program and the Formula Used to Arrive at Cost
This section of the report sets forth the personnel
requirements which the Cit y will be expected to furnish
and gives the formula used in arriving at the cost to
the City ...•................... .... ......... ........ ............... 4,5
The Two Major Types of Cost and Final Conclusions
This section of the report gives a deta iled cost figure
on both one time and continuing basis and gives a brief
conclusion ....... ................................................. 6
�II.
HISTORICAL BACKGROUND
The Model Cities Program employed Arthur Anderson & Company to
design a Management Information and Control Sys tem which could keep
track of the ac coun ti ng functions of the various projects involved
in this program.
This information system would also be us ed to
produce other management information reports showing how well the
goals of each proj e c t are being a chi eved.
The consultan t s have divided their proposed system into three
major groupings .
They are as follows:
1.
Responsibility Re porting
2.
Project cost r e porting
3.
Benefit reporting and cost - bene fit ana lysis
In November, 1968 , Ar thur Andersen & Company presented to
Model Cit ie s a genera l p roposa l titl e d "Atlant a Mod e l Citi es Program
Manag e ment Information and Contro l Syst e m" in which is set forth the
proposed automated system.
1
�III. CITY'S PARTICIPATION IN THE PROPOSED PROGRAM
We have met with the consultants from Arthur Andersen & Company
briefly on three occasions to find outJwhat role the City will be
expected to play in this application.
It seems that this will be a
package.application with the consultants furnishing all systems,
programming, and design concepts.
They will be responsible for all
clerical procedures, correction routines, and testing of the system
until it is operational.
At this point they will turn the programming
and all documentation over to the City.
The consultants will require space for the ir personne l for a
period of two months.
The Cit y is asked to furnish one Programmer
for approx imatel y two days.
The purpose of the City furnishing a
Programme r is to familiarize our staff with the prog rams which we
must maintain after they become operational.
We have reached tentative agreements in the following areas:
1)
The Cit y will furnish one Prog ramme r the required
indoctrination p e riod.
2)
The necessary space will be allotted on the 13th Floor
by utili z ing the Conf erenc e Room.
3.
The Cit y wi ll fu r n is h the no r ma l comput er time n e c e ssary
for comple ting the s y st e m during the regular two-shift
operat ion .
If the consultants d e si re more time, they
will us e the machine o n the 3rd shift .
2
�4)
All City personnel who will be involved in the operation
will be given a brief introduction to the procedures they
will be expected to foll~w.
3
�IV. ANALYSIS OF THE PROGRAM AND THE FORMULA USED TO ARRIVE AT COST
"
In the last meeting we held with the consulting firm we were given
some of the detail proposals which they had completed.
This included
report formats, card layouts, master record layouts, transaction file
descrip~ions, transaction code arrangement, and a system flow chart.
No concrete volumes could be given at this point but a not-greaterthan figure was arrvied at based on the information
which is available.
The preliminary findings indicate that the City will be committed
in the following areas:
1)
Data Control and Scheduling
2)
Key Punching
3)
Comput er Processing and Reporting
4)
Program Maintenance
The major types of cost were forecast based on the following
assumptions.
It must be not e d that if any of the rules are changed or
adjusted that it wi ll make a difference in cost.
This difference could
be considecable in many cas es.
1)
The Master File will contain 2,000 records and each
record will have 200 characters.
2)
The Master File will have 1,500 transactions to be
processed against i t each month.
4
�Model Ci~i e s - Sy stem Para me t e rs:
Estimat e d monthly volume:
a.
Voucher transaction
1400
b.
File Maintenance
1000
Keypunch:
84000
1400 x 60 (characters per card)
4000
88000 characters
100 x 40 (average character per card)
@
Printout:
Repor t
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18


Numbe r


of Copies
8
1
200
200
12
12
1
1
1
1
1
2
10
1
1
1
Ayerag e
IF of Lines
Total
160
20
3000
3000
360
360
40
20
20
15
15
30
30
40
2000
1350
2000
40
50
100
40
40
30
1500
10
5350
40
50
100
80
400
30
1500
10
14 , 460
-
@
15,000
One Time Eleme n ts:
2000 M. F. rec ord s x 125 ( Avg. char / req uir e d ca r d )= 250,000 char .
2000 program x 3 prog. x 4 0 ( Avg. char / re q. ca r d ) =
5
250 , 000
�V.
THE TWO MAJ OR TYPES OF COST AND FINAL CONCLUSIONS
Using the above st ated formul a we ha ve further divided the cost into
t wo majo r br eakdowns:
operating cos t .
(1) one ti me conversion cost, and (2) cont i nuing
One ti me or conver sion co s t will be as follows:
1. · Pr ogramming
$65.60
2.
Ke y Punching
860.00
3.
Compu ter
4.
I nvalid Dat a Re r un
4,000.00
201. 60
Total
$5,127.20
Monthly Operat i ng Cost
1.
Control Sec ti on
15.00
2.
Key Punch Se c t ion
74.00
3.
Computer Se c t ion
75.00
4.
Misc.
25.00
5.
Program
&
Supplie s
&
Sy s tems Maint.
3.50
To t al
$192 . 50
The Mode l Cities P~ogram will fluct ua t e from a min imum of 70 t o a
ma xi mum of 200 projects, there f ore, no a c c urat e o r comprehe ns·i ve cos t
fi g ure c a n be establishe d until we have gaine d s ome e xperie nc e.
It i s
_s ugge s ted that t h is Info r mation Sy stem be reviewed at lea st on a
qua rterly ba si s a nd r ev ised cost figures be submit t e d a s the y oc cur.
The operating co s t s ho ul d steadily inc r ea s e as the project age s .
6
�•
Management Information Serviee
International City Managers' Association/ April 1969, Vol. 1 No. L-4
�lessons
From the
Model Cities
Program
To the growing number of local officials disen,
chanted with the problems in federal aid for America's cities, the Model Cities program has been
promoted as a radically improved product. President
Nixon had been in office less than a week when his
associates made it known that the Model Cities approach is to be "applied across the board to the entire
system of federal services."
The program was enacted in 1966, authorized by
the Demonstration Cities and Metropolitan Development Act of that year. Since then, more than 150
cities and counties have begun the involved planning
process to implement the program. Grants of $512.5
million are available for operation, plus $142 million
for urban renewal within designated Model Cities
neighborhoods.
The goal of Model Cities is to coordinate all other
urban programs ; focus them on areas of physical and
human blight in selected cities; offer additional funding; and forge a partnership among local government,
the neighborhood people to be benefited, and the
private resources of the community. The process involves concentrating public and private agency programs on related problems of, say, housing,
education, health, and employment.
Toward this end, sponsorship was lodged with
local government (city or county) and structure was
loosely specified to meet three basic objectives:
• To focus on a rational demonstration of results so
that viable solutions to basic causes might have
lasting, nationwide applicability.
• To develop citizen participation structures to insure involvement of the people whose lives are
affected by planning and implementation of
planning.
• To serve as a planning and coordinating rather than
a service-delivery vehicle.
This report was prepared for MIS by Paul R.
Jones, Executive Director, Charlotte (N.C.)
Model Cities Commission, and Chairman, National Model Cities Directors A ssociation; and
by Barbara R. Bradshaw, Ph.D. , Research Director, Charlotte (N. C.) Model Cities Commission.
2
Through this new "total-attack" approach, Model
Cities holds great promise to city administrators seeking to identify and overcome the persisting problems
of our cities. Yet it must be cautioned that Model
Cities is so far largely unproved in practice. The progra m remains, after three years of federal activity ,
rather vaguely defined, even in theory, and the first
"operational grant" (as opposed to the initial planning grants) was awarded to Seattle, Wash. , only late
last year.
The program, however, has by now generated various strategies for shaping Model Cities, as evidenced
by examining the voluminous applications submitted
to the Department of Housing and Urban Development. Since the initial application must describe the
intended scale and depth of the full program to be
undertaken by a Model City, a foundation has now
been laid for preliminary discussion of Model Cities
strategies that might be borrowed by other cities.
This report briefly outlines Model Cities lessons that
appear to be emerging from the program .
�Patterns of Poverty and Neighborhood Deprivation
HOUSING:
Maintenance Costs
Financing Costs
Tax Costs
Construction Costs
Lan~ Costs
Codes
Absentee Landlords
.ln-Mgration of

,~~
Disadvantaged Groups -
Demand fo r
lJJw Cost Housing
lJJw Market Demand
or Housing Improvements
Out-Migration of
Successfu l Fami lies
& Individuals
~
JJ{_
lJJw Mai ntenance &
Investment in Housing
I
lJJw Community
,t
Organization & Leadership
Substandard, ~
vercrowded & O
Deteriorating Housing
Ra~i:~j~d~~:nic
~
Lack of Observation of
Communi ty Standaros
Excessive
Internal Mobility
Poor Police Relations
Cri me & Violence
Inadequate
Commercial Services
Lack of Motivation;
Drug Addiction
Feelings of Frustration, - . . . .
Alcnholism
Powerlessness & Isolation ~
Juveni le Deli nquency
Inadequate Community
Medical, Education, Social,
Legal Services & Faci lities _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _,.

,!_
SOC IAL PROBLEMS
lJJw Participation in
Community Affai rs
Racial & Ethnic
Concentrations
Lack of Choice
in Housing
Lack of
Avai labi lity of Credit
"'
Inadequate Public &
Private TransjXJrtation
Lack of Access
to OpjXJrtunities
Inadequate Public
Information System
Lack of Job
OpjXJrlunities
1
Changing
Production Methods
Lack of LDw-Ski lied
Jobs Available
Job Restrictions from
Union Practices,
Industry Hiring Practices
& Minimum Wages
Poor Job Skills
Il legitimacy
Lack of Fami ly Stabi lity
ECONOMIC PROBLEMS
lJJw Income
High Unemployment
Hi gh Dependency
High Debt & lJJw Savings
Lack of
On-The-Job
Traini ng OpjXJrtunities
lJJwWork
Performance
i,' Absenteeism
HEALTH PROBLEMS
High Illness
High Infant Mortality
LDw Life Expectancy
EDUCATION PROBLEMS
lJJw Educational
Attainment
High School
Drop-Out Rates
Poor Communication
& Understandi ng
Figure 1 - Reinforcing Relati onships in Cycle~ of Poverty
S o urce:
Developing a Program Focus
As an indication of the new Administration's support of Model Cities, Mayor Floyd H. Hyde of
Fresno, Calif., one of the program's strongest
boosters, was named HUD Assistant Secretary for
Model Cities. Th4s, the Fresno Model City application serves as something of a "model among models"
in characterizing the central focus of the program.
Here is a statement from the Fresno application
that well summarizes the program focus of most
Model Cities:
"It is necessary for residents to become acquainted
with the steps and processes necessary for assimilation into the mainstream of community life. Any
Arthu r D. Little, Inc., Strategies for Shapi ng
Model Cities (1967) , p. 35.
broad and general program that will be set up in this
depressed section must take into consideration the lag
in our present social, economic, educational, and legal
systems and institutions as they apply to noninfluential groups, termed often as indigenous.
"A comprehensive program must recognize that in
order to bridge the gap between the existing institutions and the poor there must be an attempt to bring
the services to the people on a decentralized basis so
that they may take full advantage of them, for often
the helping services of existing institutions are removed from the deprived community, both physically and psychologically.
"Therefore, a major need for this community is to
remove the physical and psychological distance of
3
�Model City Objectives
To Combat Poverty and Low Income
1. By decreasing the number of families now living in
poverty.
2. By reducing the number of unemployed in the
area.
3. By reducing the number of underemployed (those
working only part-time or in jobs which pay too
little).
To Provide Better Housing and Better Environments
1. By making more homes available, with emphasis on
low cost.
2. By providing families with a choice of decent
homes in environments of their choosing.
3. By providing adequate housing to families requiring relocation, and by minimizing economic loss
due to relocation.
4. By improving the physical appearance of Portland
West, making it compatible with family living.
To Provide Better Education and Proper Child Development
1.
2.
3.
4.
By providing adequate school facilities.
By increasing the quality of public education.
By raising the level of educational performance.
By providing educational opportunities for all children, including the handicapped and emotionally
disturbed.
5. By encouraging more parent involvement in school
policies and administration.
To Provide General and Personal Social Services to A ll
1. By improving and expanding existi ng services and
making them read ily available t o all residents,
young and old.
2. By making preventive social services avail able to all.
3. By providing day care for all chi ld re n.
To Provide Adequate Recreational Opportunities
1. By providing conveniently located fa cilit ies fo r
outdoor recreation.
2. By establishing indoor fa cilities for cult ural and
recreational programs.
3. By overcoming barri ers which preven t more extensive use of existing programs and facil ities.
To Reduce the Crime Rate and Juvenile Delinquency
1. By directing attention t o t he specific conditions
which cause crime o r cont ribute t o it .
2. By emphasizing crime prevention ; by t reating delinquency in its early stages.
3. By aiding in t he rehabilit atio n of potential and
chronic offenders.
To Improve the Health o f the Community
1. By increasing public understa nding of health needs
and atti t udes.
2. By providi ng comprehensive, coord inated health
services to children and ad ults.
3. By recruit ing mo re health person nel.
4 . By making health information accessible to all.
Figure 2 - Statement of Objectives, Portland, Maine
4
these services by placing them in the deprived area,
and in turn, making them easily accessible to all residents of the area . A related factor in the provision of
these services on a decentralized basis is actual employment, whenever possible, of people from the area
in both professional and subprofessional capacities.
Such a provision in a program will tend to show the
residents why they should strive to better themselves.
Providing the training and work opportunities for as
many people as possible will help to change the attitudes of others and motivate them to strive fo r
improvement."
Statements similar to this can be fo und in the applications of other Model Cities, thus evidencing that
the program has helped focus official thinking on
ways to break the patterns of poverty and neighborhood deprivation (see Figure 1). The key word here is
"focus," fo r Model Cities is designed to zero in on
specific objectives for a limited area of the city. In
the program formulation stage, the earlier specific
statements of objectives can be developed, the more
effectively they can guide the program. Specific objectives (1) provide a focus for data collection and
evaluation; (2) speed the process of program design ;


(3) provide a basis for selecting appropriate projects;
and (4) prevent the formation of vested interests in
specific approaches.
SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES
In developing a program focus, a city is confronted
with a bewildering variety of possible approaches to
and proposals for attacking patterns of poverty. No
accepted criteria exist for choice among them. To
produce a coherent, integrated program strategy,
however, a city must have some method of selecting
and relating program elements.
Experience thus far suggests the usefulness of
focusing on a critical process (e.g., in-migration of
disadvantaged groups), opportunity (e.g., enhancing
physical and social mobility opportunities), event
(e.g., construction of a new highway through the
Model City area), population group (e.g. , elderly
couples), or resource (e.g., private industry).
Illustrative of a well-prepared objectives statement
is the list appearing in the application from Portland,
Me., and reproduced in Figure 2.
Note that this statement of objectives builds essen-

�•
,,,

tially around the patterns of poverty specified in the
Figure 1 chart.
THE "TARGET-AREA" APPROACH
As stated earlier, Model Citites requires a geographic as well as a program focus. Selecting a limited
area of the city as the target for the program has
several advantages: (1) It maximizes program impact
by avoiding the diffusion of effort and allowing projects that reinforce one ano.ther. (2) It increases the
visibility of the program. (3) It promotes efficiency in
the identification and evaluation of program results.
Cities have chosen their "target areas" for the
Model Cities program in different ways. Some have
selected the neighborhoods with the most severe and
the most intractable problems. Others have chosen
areas in which problems are less visible and less difficult. The shape and composition of the areas selected
also varies. No one kind of target area is suitable for
all cities, but several factors generally influence target
selection.
The "typical" target area has experienced significant economic and social changes traceable to regional industrial growth and the migration this has set
in motion. Important elements of the population,
particularly low-income and minority migrants, have
been unable to adjust with the shifts in economic
activity . They have thus suffered reduced job, educational, and other opportunities; increased social
disadvantage ; and, for welfare recipients at least, continuing dependency. Physical environment and social
forces have combined to concentrate a high proportion of such groups in the target area. Here poverty,
housing, and environmental deficiencies, ill health,
and other conditions are the most acute, and inaccessibility has contribut ed to underutilization as well
as insufficiency of public services.
Despite the advantages of focusing resources on
specific geographic areas of need, an important lesson
emerging from the Model Cities program is that problems do not stop at target-area boundaries. Robert A.
Aleshire, executive director of the Reading (Pa.)
Model Cities Agency, notes:
"Meanwhile back at t he metropolitan level, a very
legitimate questio n arises. How can a program which
strives for a high level of achievement for 10 percent
of the residents of a city be effectively meshed wit h a
metropolitanwide effort to strengthen the impact of
regional interests? For example, the streets of a
Model Neighborhood may very well form an important link in a regional network and constitute the
lifeline of a central business district. Citywide and
regional interests demand increasing st reet capacity.
This means more land and more t raffic, both of
which tend to be adverse to the goal of strengthening
the residential nature of the neighborhood."
Thus "a balanced effort recognizing the goals of
the neighborhood as compared with citywide and
metropolitan interests ... is certainly not beyond the
responsibilities· of a Model Cities program," Aleshire
observes.
MANAGEMENT
INFORMATION
SERVICE
April 1969 - Vol. 1 No. L-4
Editor: Walter L. Webb
Management Information Service reports are
published monthly by the International City
Managers' Association, 1140 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036. Copyright
© 1969 by the International City Managers'
Association. No part of this report may be reproduced without permission of the copyright
owner.
Subscription rates (including inquiry-answering and additional services) are based on
population of subscribing jurisdiction and will
be furnished on request.
This report is intended primarily for subscribing jurisdictions above 25,000 population.
Concurrent monthly reports, prepared primarily for jurisdictions below 25,000 population,
are available from Management Information
Service.
UNIFIED PROGRAM ELEMENTS
Just as patterns of poverty, frustration, apathy,
and decay are mutually reinforcing, an effort focused
on breaking these patterns must attempt to integrate
all elements of the program. The effectiveness of any
single project or activity can often be increased if it is
associated with the effects of other program elements. Different projects can thus reinforce one
another. For example:
• The value of a health clinic can be increased if
information about the services it offers and transportation to the clinic are provided.
• Assuring that jobs are available for those with
certain skills increases the value of a training program.
• Increased home ownership can provide community leadership necessary for improving the neighborhood environment.
Yet experience has shown that project items must
be consistent or they may nullify each other. For
example , public housing or school programs geared to
the cultural transition problems of children from
ethnic groups now in the area would be inconsistent
with a program to attract middle-class and other
racial and ethnic groups t o a target area. Attracting
such groups is likely to require provision of singlefamily homes and high-quality educational facilities.
On the other hand, projects designed to make a neighborhood attractive to outside groups may lead to
increased rents and property values and thereby displace current residents.
5
�Thus, the interrelations of program elements must
be examined carefully to assure mutually reinforcing
objectives. The Model City application of Portland,
Me., illustrates this principle through its statement of
overall strategy :
"Our overall strategy is three-fold: (1) to increase
the purchasing power available to residents so that
they will be free to make choices in the planning and
conduct of their lives; (2) to improve the physical
surroundings and cultural opportunities of Portland
West so that the residents will have a variety of alternatives among which to make those choices ; (3) to
promote the ability of residents to make those
choices wisely and enjoy them happily."
OUTPUT SCHEDULE
A major dilemma of the Model Cities program is
that of balancing long-range approaches that do not
immediately show results with the necessity of engaging in projects with high visibility and early
impact. Priorities must be made , and the support of
the community as a whole and the residents of the
model neighborhood in particular is often contingent
upon visible results. Though early-impact efforts are
primarily symptom-oriented, they are necessary if the
more effective, cause-oriented components basic to
the demonstration aspects of the program are to be
implemented. Therefore , some resources must be allocated to early impact, high-visibility projects, but care
must be exerted to insure that more lasting, less
visible programs are also begun early and carefully
evaluated in accordance with the Model Cities concept.
Such projects as the development of vacant lots
for playgrounds; repair of street potholes; improved
street lighting; street numbering; painting of fire
hydrants , utility poles, and fe nces; and pest extermination can all be quickly initiated at little cost. Yet
such activities can help develop support required to
undertake projects with more lasting significance.
Initial programs need not have a physical in1pact ,
but they must be finely tuned to neighborhood
grievances and special problems." For example, meeting demands for appointment of Negro policemen
and firemen for duty in the ghetto - or the appointment of civilian police review boards or neighborhood
councils for police relations - can be effective, some
Model Cities have discovered.
Other highly symbolic projects are those whose
impact is of unmistakable benefit primarily fo r the
target-area residents. Among such projects are:
• Programs such as changes in administrative procedures in welfare and social service programs to
remove restrictions, red tape, and degrading investigations and inquiries.
• Programs to make absentee landlords responsible for repairs and maintenance .
6
• Financial aid, training, and m,anagement assist-
ance programs to help small businesses in the area.
• Provision of government information in the
tongues spoken in the area and the use of bilingual
personnel at key contact points.
Focusing at the outset on such "immediateimpact" projects as these has been found helpful in
overcoming initial resistance to "another all talk, no
action" program - which is how many slum residents
have come to view government efforts in their behalf.

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION
In a demonstration effort, the organization structure must include a strong research and evaluation
component. The lack of sound documentation has
been a weakness in many other programs designed to
alleviate urban problems. To be effective, such an organization structure must have fl exibility and engage
in continuous planning so that research findings can
impact on the direction of demonstrations and the
search for effective solutions. By the same token , the
research component must experiment with innovative
techniques where indicated and be extremely
cautious in the use of rigid experimental design.
What is beneficial to a community often is not
conducive to tightly quantifiable research results on a
short-range basis, so that exploratory rather than experimental designs may fre quently be more fe asible.
In this sense , research becomes " contemporary
history" that provides a guide fo r evaluation of experience and consequences. 1 Quantifiable measures
of various types should be used whenever possible to
supplement and complement other approaches. The
goal is evaluation on all levels to give the fullest possible picture of results of the demonstration. Dissemination of findi ngs should be an important component
throughout to serve both educational and resource
development functions.

Citizen Participation
The Demonstration Cities and Metropolitan Development Act of 1966 states that there should be
"widespread citizen participation in the program"
including " ... maximum opportunities for employing
residents of the area in all phases of the program and
enlarged opportunitie s for work and training."
Thus the law delineates "widespread" rather than
"maximum feasible" participation (as was called for
in the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964) and also
designates city government as the responsible administering agency. If structure and auspice determine function ( or as Freud stated more colorfully,
"Anatomy is destiny"), this consideration has important implications for citizen participation.
1 The discussion of researc h by Marris and Rein is most
helpful in gaining a perspective on the role of research in poverty programs. See Peter Marris and Martin Rein, Dilem mas
of Social R eform (New York: Atherton Press, 1967).

�•


Citizen participation has been interpreted if! a
wide variety of ways depending on the orientations of
the sponsoring agencies. In some instances, such as
under the direction of many community action agencies, citizen participation has been used as a base of
power to force local institutions to assume greater
responsiveness to poverty areas. In other instances,
such as under the direction of many relocation programs, citizen participation has meant largely the task
of selling residents on acceptance of projects and programs that have already been planned for them. The
Demonstration Cities Act approaches the problem
differently . The Act sets forth a challenge to cities to
incorporate citizen participation into local government in such a way that a new institutional form can
be evolved that relates people to their local government in a cooperative fashion.
Many critics, looking at this dual challenge to
Model Cities to be a part of the local establishment
and the emissary of the less privileged people for
change, might feel that the inherent contradictions
are too many and complex for success. Indeed, success is improbable unless the dilemmas are clearly
faced and strategies for meeting the problems are
carefully implemented to develop meaningful citizen
participation.
Perhaps the most important single issue of our
time is that of the distribution of power. This issue
has bred its discontents not only in the ghettoized
inner city but also in sprawling suburbia, where the
middle class exhibits growing disenchantment and
feelings of disenfranchisement. This sense of powerlessness is, in large part, a fu nction of the complexities and growing size of mass society, but it is aggravated by the inability of our institutions as they now
function to cope with these complexities and to
improve the quality of individual life.
As noted by the National Commission on Urban
Problems: " In 1967, our metropolitan areas were
served by 20 ,745 local governments, or about onefo urth of all local governments in the nation. This
means 91 governments per metropolitan area - an
average of about 48 per metropolitan county. If these
units of government were laid out on a map, every
metropolitan area in the count ry would look as if it
had been 'nonplanned' by a mad man ."
There are at least three fu ndamental problem areas
where awareness must be constantly focused if meaningful citizen participation structures are to be developed. These are: the place of Model Cities in the
local governmental structure; the role of Model
Cities in the mo del neighborhood community; and
the relationship of Model Cities to the state and federal levels.
THE PLACE OF MODEL CITIES
IN LOCAL GOVERNMENTAL STRUCTURE
As a new arm within local government and having
broad, often unrealistic and poorly specified responsibilities, the city demonstration agency is easily perceived as threatening to the older, more entrenched
departments. It is well-documented that bureaucratic
structures are resistant to change, and Model Cities is
rightly seen as an instrument of change. It is often
seen as another poverty program, associated in the
minds of many with disruptions, confrontation politics, and demands that local governments presently
are not capable of meeting.
This association, along with vestiges of the Protestant ethic often reinforced by years of experience
with the most disorganized element of the poor,
leaves many administrators cynical about the capability of the citizenry to make meaningful contributions to the solution of complex problems. Further,
elected officials see citizen participation as a potential
threat to their own political structures and interests.
A pessimistic view might well see that an approach
such as Model Cities would harden resistance and
complicate the development of new alliances between
citizens and local government, particularly in cities
where conflicts among decision-makers and between
government departments are many and unresolved.
The strategies to be used to insure that residents
from model neighborhoods have a voice in the
decision-making process will depend on the special
circumstances of each city. The role of the citizen
must be adapted sensitively and with an eye toward
the future so that such involvement may become accepted during the life time of the program, enmeshed
with the ongoing fabric of government.
In a speech to the U.S. Conference of Mayors, the
former Assistant Secretary for Model Cities and Governmental Relations, Department of Housing and
Urban Development, called for: " . .. a policy under
which projects or programs that significantly affect
the model neigl1borhood area will not be approved
unless they have first been routed through the CDA
(city demonstration agency) and its citizen participation process, and have been approved by the chief
executive of the City ( or county)."
What was being recommended is dual responsibility
between local government officials and the residents,
but no concrete suggestions for accomplishing this
end were offered. This is the characteristic of all the
HUD guidelines dealing with citizen participation.
Thus, because of the great diversity of local governments, implementation is left up to the particular
urban governments with only vague, generalized federal guidelines. However, based on the broad HUD
guidelines and t he above discussion, a few directions
emerge that should prove helpful in thinking through
the problems involved.
• First, model neighborhood residents should be
included from the inception on the decision-making
commission or board that ca"ies recommendations
for action to city councils or other local governing
bodies.
They should be elected in some democratic
fashion by the residents and should be numerically
strong enough on the policy-making body to insure
that the aspirations of the residents for their own
community are given careful consideration.
7
�• Second, residents should be continually involved on planning task forces working to develop
and implement a comprehensive program for the
model neighborhood area.
Full and significant participation is a developmental challenge that in most instances will take time
and considerable patience in searching out representative leadership and establishing working relationships between residents and others involved in the
planning process.
• Third, because of sponsorship by city government, it appears that advocacy planning should generally be avoided.
This is a highly controversial matter, but if the goal
is to institutionalize a structure within the framework
of local government in which citizen participation
will evoke greater flexibility and responsiveness, then
the planning responsibility should remain directly
within that structure rather than be relegated to planners exclusively accountable to residents' organizations.
• Finally, the oft-used term "widespread citizen
participation" should be taken to mean not only involvement of residents of the model neighborhood
area but also of citizens from throughout the total
metropolitan community.
This should also be oriented toward encouragement of private initiative and enterprise of all types builders, business and financial leaders, voluntary
organizations, and concerned citizens from all walks
of life. There are tremendous untapped resources of
concern and enlightened self-interest in our cities that
must be activated if the Model Cities demonstration is
to be effective. -In addition, it is only through this
wide involvement that many local governments can
begin to develop mechanisms for responsiveness, not
only to the needs of people in the most blighted areas
but also to the total populace.
All of this is a gradual process that involves maintaining a delicate balance and continually instigating
mechanisms for change. It is clear, however, that the
Model Cities concept will fail if it simply assumes a
militant stance as have many community action agencies under OEO. Model Cities must utilize the
growing demand for greater responsiveness from local
government to reform the structure from within ,
rather than just react to demands from outside. Thus,
a primary goal is to develop greater sensitivity in
government and local institutions.
THE ROLE OF MODEL CITIES
IN THE MODEL NEIGHBORHOOD
8
Facing toward the model neighborhood community, the Model Cities concept is beset by an
equally difficult set of problems. Residents of
blighted areas are generally discouraged and disenchanted, frustrated and even hostile. Years of experience with local government have taught them
bitter lessons about lack of concern, false promises,
bewildering bureaucratic mazes, and their own inabilities to control the events affecting their lives. To convince residents that Model Cities is a serious effort to
develop participatory mechanisms when the political
realities of local government dictate a gradual process
is a difficult task. It is further complicated by existing
community groups who are demanding rapid change
and by the general community attitude that combines
alienation and militancy into a dangerous combustible atmosphere.
As within city government, a delicate balance must
be maintained if the city demonstration agency is to
be effective in the neighborhood. There are obvious
actions that must be taken and some less obvious
ones that must be given careful consideration.
Perhaps the most obvious is the necessity of earlyimpact, high-visibility projects. As noted earlier,
these are usually symptom-oriented, and an easy
fallacy is to place too much emphasis on such projects to the detriment of longer-range more basic programs. Yet as a technique to gain support, show good
faith, and begin the process of true citizen participation, early-impact projects are of great importance.
They begin the process of breaking through the barriers of apathy and distrust and move th~ disaffiliated
away from destructive-like militancy toward a more
constructive willingness to consider other alternatives.
Also fairly obvious is the in1portance of expediting
tjl.at aspect of the act that calls for "maximum op-.
portunities for employing residents of the area in all
phases of the program and enlarged opportunity for
work and training." Focusing on employment opportunities, on a broad scale has two major advantages:
(I) It gets at one of the basic causes of poverty and
opens avenues for mobility that remained closed in
many past efforts at citizen involvement. (2) It alleviates some of the preoccupation with confrontation
politics by moving somewhat away from an emphasis
on mass social movements.
To the extent that Model Cities programs can
draw staff from among the residents of the model
neighborhood, there is an increase in program support. Most important, however, is the necessity of
experimenting with innovative approaches to employment opportunities and job-upgrading methods that
will receive the support of both public and private
spheres and move significantly in the direction of an
adequate standard of living for all people.
For instance, in the Charlotte , N.C., Model Cities
proposal, concern is directed toward an adequate
minimum standard of living as defined by the U.S.
Department of Labor, rather than focusing only on
poverty levels. Therefore, programs have been developed that provide for "income assurance" incentives t o allow residents to take advantage of developmental opportunities on a " family career contract"
basis that will eventuate in incomes adequate for
entering the mainstream of American life. Also, economic and housing development corporations are
being fo rmed that will allow for increased entrepreneurship among residents.



�CONDITIONS FOR COORDINATION
The effectiveness of Model Cities as a coordinating
vehicle is· dependent on a multiplicity of factors that
will vary from one urban area to another. It is perhaps a truism to say that if some kind of workable
coordination is not achieved, the Model Cities concept will have failed and the city demonstration
agency will be only another of the many already fragmented projects being carried out in urban areas. The
need for coordination is clear. Daniel P. Moynihan,
chairman of the Council on Urban Affairs, has
pointed out that as of December 1966 there were 238
different federal programs impacting on urban areas.
In addition, both employment and expenditures have
been increasing rapidly at the state and local levels. If
the vast quantities of money and energy being expended can be brought together into a system - not
systems - of developmental opportunities, past failures and the lessons we have learned from them can
be translated into social innovations to meet the
growing needs of urban complexes. The Model Cit!es
concept is a logical alternative to further destructive
fragmentation of local government.
Implementation of coordinating mechanisms rests
on a number of conditions within local government.
There must be a recognition of the need for coordination on the part of key officials and administrators.
Given the inevitability of resistance from some departments that view this as a threat to their interests,
the recognition of the need must be accompanied by
commitment from top officials to act to insure necessary linkage. Even with recognition and commitm~~t,
successful coordination will depend on the capacities
and capabilities of local leadership and the size and
complexity of local governments. For instanc~, the
idea of coordinating the 1,400 governments m the
New York metropolitan area is a staggering notion.
Obviously, selection criteria are needed to de~elop
even minimal coordination of the most pertment
agencies and departments.
.
Conditions necessary for coordination with orgaruzations not under the auspices of the local governmental body sponsoring Model Cities are similar to
those above, but they involve some different problems and certain facets require more emphasis. Open
communication channels are vital in securing cooperation and willingness to participate in building a coordinated system. This is also true of departments
within the local sponsoring government, of course,
but it is less difficult to establish such channels within
an administrative structure than it is with organizations having no formal interrelationship. A further
condition for success in coordinating with other
agencies is a willingness to sustain continued efforts,
often in the face of initial discouragement and even
10
influence with no formal structure and never tried to institutionalize coordinative mechanisms. CPI clearly aligned itself
with governmental structure and, although much criticized
for its lack of advocacy of the rights of the poor, was able to
accomplish much because it had the backing of existing structures that became committed to policies of change from
within.
hostility from some groups who feel theatened by the
new agency and its directives to bring about changes .
The hard truth is that many programs have been
oriented toward providing symptom-oriented services
rather than working in a direct, cause-oriented framework. Many past and present service-orientation
efforts have been, in effect, direct and indirect income maintenance programs,4 which are fraught with
disadvantages associated with continuing d_ependency
while lacking the advantages of offering developmental opportunities to break the cycle of poverty.
Although it is obvious that many present programs
are necessary while change oriented to basic causes is
taking place, some programs that are now aimed
solely at providing finger-in-the-dike indirect income
maintenance and other services for the poor need to
recognize that planning must begin early so as to redirect energies and restructure goals within a developmental framework.
In one sense, many service-oriented efforts are
institutionalized tokenism which, with·the availability
of greater funds, has become an overabundant
tokenism with little lasting impact on the cycles of
poverty, blight, and decay. Problems o~ c~ordinati?n,
then become more than merely establishing working
relationships with existing structures but also involve
developing mechanisms for establishment of new
goals and redirection of emphasis. In many servicedelivery agencies there is a growing recognition of the
need for restructuring of goals. Such recognition can
prove invaluable when incorporated into planning for
change. Looking introspectively for redirection and
new mechanisms that fit present-day needs, however
painful, can result in far higher cost-benefit ratios
than are presently obtained.
MECHANISMS FOR COORDINATION
From the above, it can be seen that coordinative
mechanisms are needed on two levels: ( 1) planning,
which should be of sufficient magnitude to contribute
to the creative development of the entire urban area;
and (2) service delivery. In addition, both levels of
coordination need to take place in at least five overlapping arenas: local governmental structures, state
government, federal government, private agencies and
services, and (perhaps most importantly because of
previous neglect and great future potential) the
private sector.
Coordination Within the Sponsoring Governmental
Structure. A look at the organization of almost any
city government clearly reveals the vast fragmentation
that exists. One of the most important goals of the
Model Cities demonstration should be to implement
the development of a municipal department concerned primarily with coordination of efforts. Fo~ effectiveness this department should not be JUSt
4Welfare is the obvious direct income maintenance service. Indirect income maintenance is provided in th~ form of
such services as public health clinics, charity hospitals, free
school-lunch programs, public housing, etc.


�•


another line department but should be directly in the
office of the mayor or chief executive officer ( or
whatever other governmental structure is pertinent)
and should act as a coordinating vehicle through
which all planning endeavors - local, state, and federal - pass. It should be governed by a policy-making
commission or board composed of broad membership
from various departments involved, as well as citizens
representing the communities most directly involved,
and should be responsible to local elected officials.
This central coordinating department should be
staffed by professionals involved in the various planning endeavors as well as specialists who can act as
consultants to develop coordinated urban responsiveness to federal and state programs. The success of
such an approach will be highly dependent on local
factors such as the multiplicity of governing structures and their willingness to cooperate, but at least
the approach would insure coordination within the
local governing body that has responsibility for Model
Cities and would serve as a demonstration in moving
more urban municipalities toward consolidated government.
Model Cities has a special role to play in working
for the development of a coordinating framework
within local government. In effect, such a department
must represent a new type of administrative structure
in which change is institutionalized through a system
of social accounting based on ongoing problem
analysis, long-range planning, and evaluation of
existing efforts. As a demonstration project, the
Model Cities program provides incentives to move
toward incorporating the demonstration technique
into much larger social experiments that emphasize
flexibility and responsiveness to the needs of the
people.
While it is undoubtedly true that most issues today
are national rather than local, the capacity of local
governments to adapt national program approaches to
meet specific local circumstances is essential if an attack on basic causes of complex urban problems is to
be implemented successfully. In this sense, the Model
Cities concept is much more than a short-term
demonstration effort to alleviate the causes of poverty and urban decay, but rather a vehicle that can
validate the need for local coordination and implement the development of an administrative structure
to help insure sound development of the entire metropolitan area.
Coordination With Other Organizational Structures.
No coordinating administrative mechanism can assume or assure involvement of other governmental
structures. As with private agencies and services, open
communication channels and continuing efforts toward coordination must be maintained, but given the
multiplicity of governing bodies there is no assurance
of direct coordination. In one sense, this may be used
to advantage, since social change can be facilitated by
competition among organized structures to prove
their capacities to respond to the needs of the
citizenry.
Developing coordinative mechanisms with other
governmental structures and private agencies involves
continuing efforts and a delicate balance between
planning and service delivery. On the planning level,
the task force approach has proved an excellent
mechanism for bringing together professionals, residents, and citizens at large in a mutual endeavor to
plan in a comprehensive, coordinated fashion. Such
an approach opens up communication channels and
··
institutionalizes cooperative relationships.
This task force approach should be reciprocal,
making for Model Cities involvement in planning efforts initiated by other agencies. Such a philosophy
should be incorporated in all metropolitan planning
efforts. Political pragmatism undoubtedly will be a
keynote in such task force approaches. Utilizing the
lessons gained from experiences of such organizations
as the Kansas City Association, cities should not attempt to structure formal coordinative mechanisms
quickly, but should be geared to developing alliances
and working relationships through which trust, confidence, and support can be achieved.
On the service delivery level, formal and informal
cooperative agreements specifying functions to be
performed can do much to insure desired coordination. Service-delivery programs that are in no way
dependent on the existence of Model Cities may well
tend to resist efforts for coordination, and it is not
realistic to expect immediate full constructive alignment of all such programs. However, continual evaluation aimed at the goal of increasing social accountability can serve as a coordinative mechanism of
sorts and can prove of some value.
If the basic causes of poverty and urban blight are
to be successfully alleviated, an essential coordinative
focus must be placed on the development of
economic and human resources within the private
sector. With major efforts made toward developing
new opportunity structures for the underprivileged,
particularly in income and employment (with obvious
but complex relationships to education), there is a
need to recognize that the emphasis of the private
sector on outcomes rather than processes has an invaluable contribution to make. Model Cities program
goals should aim at developing economic resources in
the metropolitan area that can meaningfully offer
employment opportunities with upward mobility
potentials to the economically deprived.
Considerable coordination in planning can be accomplished by a developing partnership of enlightened self-interest among business and financial
interests, social planners, and residents of the model
neighborhood area. Constructive alignment can be
further enhanced by economic incentives to the
private sector fo r participation both in planning and
program execution. One matter that needs more adequate exploration is economic development, exclusive
of employment, in blighted inner-city areas. Attention can be stimulated by incentives to invest in the
economic development of model neighborhoods. This
whole arena of private sector involvement is only
beginning to be explored, and local governments need
11
�to place high priority on utilizing the very talented
and result-oriented capabilities of private business,
manufacturing, and financial resources.
In summary, then, coordination is an ongoing
process that will face many difficult problems. Complete success cannot be expected and is, in fact, probably not even desirable. However, significant coordination at both the planning and service-delivery
levels must be achieved to insure the success of the
Model Cities demonstration and the development of
long-lasting mechanisms to increase local problemsolving capability. The twin strategies of utilizing
formalized mechanisms of coordination where
possible and building informal networks of mutual
cooperation should be applied with a realistic understanding of what can be done now and what can be
developed in the future. Perhaps the most important
contribution the Model Cities approach has to make
is to demonstrate that coordination is an essential
component for coherent, creative growth of metropolitan areas .
Implications for All Cities
City Manager Graham W. Watt of Dayton, Ohio,
has succinctly summarized the implications of the
Model Cities program for all cities:
"Immediately, it would seem that the Model Cities
program forecasts several basic implications of importance to all communities. Inevitably, we shall see
increased decentralization of public services. Cities
will, with increasing frequency, establish branch city
12
halls, neighborhood service centers, store-front police
offices, etc.
"Second, we will see growing application of a
philosophy of compensatory services - we must prepare to design our public service programs specifically
to meet the unique and particular needs of each of
the neighborhoods within a city.
"Third, we shall witness a much greater degree of
participation by citizens in the identification of
neighborhood needs and in the design of public
responses. This will require of each of us a reorientation of our traditional criteria of success, for in the
future we must accept to a greater extent than ever
before the concept that participation by citizens is a
desirable end product of our efforts."
Over and above significant movement toward alleviation of defined problems, the Model Cities concept can be utilized to establish a framework on the
local level that can increase the responsiveness of the
vast institutions of government. Potentially, the
Model Cities concept can be translated into concern
about the quality of individual life - not only for the
poor, but for all inhabitants of and participants in
urban complexes.
As a demonstration project, Model Cities is searching for ways to improve the quality of American life
through local decision-making processes in a coherent, rational fashion. This concept and the mechanisms that can be developed during the limited lifetime of the program will be, perhaps, Model Cities'
greatest contribution, by establishing within
municipal governments movement toward clearly
defined goals and ongoing response based on sound
resear~h and social accountability.



�•
Appendix
Employment and Education Strategies for Model Cities


Most Model Cities officials agree that deficiencies in employmen t (i.e., jobs) and
education (i.e., training to get jobs) are
major causes of other troubles that beset the
residents of deprived urban neighborhoods.
A man with a job, which in tum depends on
being educated for the job, achieves through
his earnings the purchasing power to make
free choices about the conduct of his life.
As a supplement to the general discussion of Model Cities strategies covered in
this report, this appendix presents specific
examples of Model City approaches to providing employment and education opportunities for the underprivileged. The appendix in large part is based on a discussion
of these topics that appears in Survey of
Model Cities Applications in Northern
California, prepared by the consulting firm
of Sedway/Cooke and published by the University of California Extension, Berkeley
(1968). Thus, many of the examples are
from cities noted in the study. Other
example°s are taken mainly from Model City
applications submitted to the Department
of Housing and Urban Developmen t.
It should be cautioned that the examples
cited are illustrative only. The cities mentioned do not necessarily represent the best
examples of projects cited, but rather reflect
information available to MIS. Indeed, since
the Model City application is simply a proposal, some projects may never actually be
attempted by the specific city mentioned or
may already have been abandoned.
Employment Strategies
Many employment proposals of Model
Cities seem to be based on ground already
broken by recent and on-going programs.
Thus, job and income projects may be largely premised on existing skills centers, Neigh-
borhood Youth Corps, Job Corps, and similar antipoverty programs. A few involve
continuation of experimental projects.
Employment proposals include the following:
• Creation of jobs as a direct or indirect
result of the Model Cities program.
Residents would be hired as part of the
agency or local citizen staff as community
workers, research assistants, home improvemen t consultants, and similar subprofessional employees.
Oakland, Calif. , would include payment
to local leaders for their effort in attending
to community affairs. Residents would be
trained and employed in clearance, rehabilitation, construction, and housing project
management and maintenance.
New Haven, ·c onn., would focus attention on part-time jobs, a relatively undeveloped phase of employment, designed
principally at three groups - family heads
with underpaying full-time jobs, mothers
with only half-days to spare, and in-school
youths.
• Increased job resources and upgrading.
Applicant cities would search for new
jobs in existing public and private establishments. Aside from a continuing inventory of
vacancies, this would include a reexamination of public and private programs for possibl e new jobs and careers; of civil service
requirements to see how present jobs could
be upgraded, or where new positions designed for low-income and minority groups
might be added; and of policies and procedures of employment services to make
any necessary revisions (e.g., to put more
emphasis on the trainability of low-income
workers vis-a-vis other conventional standards). This also includes proposals for hiring
residents as police cadets; interns; and aides
to teachers, social workers, and health
workers.
In Seattle, Wash., some $75,000 of its
Model City funds will go for a community
renewal corporation, operated by residents,
with city contracts to beautify the neighborhood.
Dayton, Ohio, has been particularly
active in efforts to attract Negro recruits for
the police department. Other fun ctions for
which deprived residents are being recruited
include health, welfare, community relations, and automotive equipment maintenance.
Detroit, Mich., also has been conducting
extensive and successful efforts to attract
the disadvantaged into city employment in
these same categories.
Richmond and Pittsburg, Calif., would
appoint job development specialists.
• Small business development.
Aside from encouraging commercial and
industrial establishments to locate in or near
the model neighborhoods, a variety of
means would be explored to help residents
establish businesses as their main occupation
or to supplement their incomes.
Oakland, Calif. , would tap federal aid
resources to establish small business development (or investment) companies to
help residents create individual or cooperative businesses, encourage demolition and
rehabilitation workers to form their own
contracting firms, and provide for the development of "mom and pop" stores.
New Haven, Conn., proposes creating
with the Chamber of Commerce a small business assistance office in the model area,
staffed by retired businessmen, to provide
technical and financial assistance to small
businessmen.
�In Rochester, N. Y., the Eastman Kodak
Company has proposed a plan aimed at promoting formation of independent, locally
owned businesses in Rochester's inner city.
Suggested businesses include such industries
as wood product manufacture, production
of vacuum-formed plastic items, ,camera
repair service, and microfilming of public
documents. The company itself would also
serve as a potential customer for some of
the products and services of the new businesses. K,odak also has agreed to provide
training as well as production and marketing
advice and consultation to the enterprises
suggested in the plan.
• Comprehensive training and employment
services.
Cities· would expand or continue expanded programs and facilities for "outreach and intake," testing and evaluation,
counseling, training, and placement and
job-upgrading services.
In an effort to raise the education level
and increase employment opportunities for
model neighborhood residents, Waco, Tex.,
proposes to use the facilities and resources
of the James Connally Technical Institute of
Texas A & M. Located on a former Air
Force base, the Institute will provide temporary housing and total family training for
some families and vocational training and
retraining in 60 separate fields. Training
periods from three months to two years will
coincide with construction and rehabilitation of housing in the model neighborhood,
so that families who live on the base during
training will return to upgraded housing.
The city also envisions using a massive
public works program as a major in-service
training device.
Cincinnati, Ohio, officials recognize that
it does little good to provide employment to
an individual if nonjob--related problems interfere with his work performance. As a
consequence, an "employee diagnostic
center" is to be set up as part of the Cincinnati pilot city program to assist people in
solving such nonjob-related problems as
drinking, poor health, family sickness, and
marital difficulties.
Similarly, disadvantaged youths in the
Oiicago, .J/1., Jobs Now program receive instruction in how to understand oneself,
others, the community, and the world of
work and money management.
Richmond, Calif. , mentions a "Youth
Tracking Program" that would trace the patterns of employment, education, marriage,
military service, etc., of youth aged 16-21
years to determine their problems and aid in
their education and employment.
• Subsidies.
Pittsburg, Calif. , would provide a maintenance allowance for breadwinner trainees
and a "training stipend" for underemployed
trainees, in addition to payments for day
care, transportation, and clothing under its
current vocational rehabilitation project.
Oakland, Calif., would examine the possibility of subsidizing transportation for area
residents employed or wishing to · be employed in the suburbs if transportation costs
are found to be an inhibiting factor.

Education Strategies
As with employment programs, proposals in education appear to be based on
conventional and innovative approaches that
are already current. Proposals usually include the following:
• Broadened and intensified curriculum
including adequate programs and facilities
for both preschool and adult education. .
Among these would be compensatory
education programs, "motivational" education and day care of nursery-aged children,
and job- or home care-related courses as well
as basic courses for adults and prospective
employees.
New Haven, Conn., proposes creation of


�a "center of innovation" in which preschool
through second-grade students could be
grouped in small units of 15 children, and
selected teachers could be given the opportunity to develop and implement new forms
of organization, new teaching methods, and
new curriculum. Outside resources could be
used, and the center could become a base
for the training of teaching staff aides and
community workers who could carry new
approaches into the classrooms of regular
schools.
Richmond, Calif. , contemplates an adult
education program that would help mothers
train their children from infancy.
• Team teaching, ungraded classes, reduced
teacher-pupil ratios, tutoring, and new
technology.
As the typical inner-city teacher ordinarily comes from a middle-class background, it is important that he be ex posed
to life in the model neighborhood. Hartford,
Conn., therefore proposes to renovate suitable structures or to construct new dormitories in the model neighborhood so that
teachers and educational personnel employed
in the neighborhood can reside there. Hartford also proposes establishing a "tutoring
corps" drawn from college and high school
students, including paid indigenous tu tors
and regular teachers.
Oakland and Richmond, Calif., contemplate a departure from the singleclassroom, all-subject-teacher format and
would also utilize new technological teaching devices (closed circuit T.V. , computers,
video tape, teaching machines, etc.).
• Racial integration.
Hartford, Conn., proposes these steps in
pursuing · its strategy for integration: (1)
Substantial expansion of intercommunity
compacts for schooling model neighborhood
children in suburban schools. (2) The construction of "middle schools" for which
sites have been selected. They would be
situated so as to draw together pupils from
widely diverse social, economic, racial, and
ethnic backgrounds. (3) Establishment of a
series of child development facilities physi~
cally related to existing schools and so
located as to bring together preschoolers
from widely diverging social, economic,
racial, and ethnic backgrounds.
• Facilities and physical plant.
Aside from proposals to repair, expand,
or modernize the physical plant, some cities
are examining the development of educational parks as a major alternative to decentralized facilities.
Pittsburgh, Pa. , "plans to establish five
large, comprehensive, strategically located
high schools that will serve all the children
of the model neighborhood along with
children from the entire city. The new high
schools, to be called "The Great High
Schools," would be the fust truly comprehensive and fully integrated high schools in
the country. Their very size, each enrolling
5,000 to 6,000 pupils, would enable enriched curriculum offerings including over
100 separate vocational-technical programs.
Berkeley, Calif., is contemplating the
establishment of "middle and satellite"
schools to implement the educational park
concept. Experimental facilities are also proposed to be built into model schools.
The basic thru st of proposed programs,
both in employment and education, seems
to be - fust, determine all possible or conceivable resources, then "deliver the inventory." Present services would be made more
comprehensive in terms of the types of assistance provided and the opportunities
offered; They would then be focu sed and
extended to the clients, through the decentralization or "local centralization" of service facilities. Many cities thus come close to
proposing junior civic centers as the main
symbolic vehicle for their programs.
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lnttm,llioNI City Mm.gm' Assocl1 tiot'I / April 1969, Vol . 1 No. L-4
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geared to the need s of large cities, th e othe r focusing on
problems of smaller juri sd ictio ns. Dozens of earlier reports
also are available and may be ordered . Reports are designed for handy filin g in 3-hol e'bi nd ers, which we supp .
3. Special Publications. Periodically yo u receive reports puo li shed by govern ment agencies, uni versi ti es, and other as sociations. Copies made available as obtai ned . No extra
charge.
4. Public Man agement. Thi s timely urban affairs magazine is
sent as part of your subscripti on. Articles cover such sub jects as new approaches to improved government financing , methods for dealing wi th crime , and topical comment
on the ways and means of assuring future growth for rural
towns.
5. Municipal Year Book. A "must" referenc e. Its 600 pages
annually summa ri ze activities of more th an 3,300 ci ti es.
Many usefu l stati stics, too.
6. MIS Newsletter. Reports trends in local government management and serves as a forum for the exchange of ideas.
Filling th e information needs of
municipal offic ials in cities of all sizes
Management Information Service
Conducted by the
International City Managers' Association
11 40 Conn ecticut Avenue, N. W.,
Washing ton, D. C. 20036
Tel : (202) 293-2200

1
�824 HURT BUILDING
TELEPHONE JA. 3-6074
ATLANTA 3, GEORGIA
J anuary 24, 1969
Mr. Johnny C. Johnson., Director
Office of Model Cities Program
673 Capitol Avenue, S. W.
Atlanta, Georgia 30315
Dear
• Johnson:
This is in reply to your memorandum dated January 16, 1969,
and constitutes a commitment by the Atlanta Housing Authority that
necessary funds , staff, and equipment have been budgeted in the
Neighborhood Development Program, approved by the Federal govern~
ment, to carry out the activities described on the attachment to
this 1 tter in the Model Cities Area .
Very truly yours ,
Enclosure
cc:
~ Earl
Landers
Mr . Ch rles L. DaVi
Mr. Colli r 01 din
HO:hl
�M . B . S A TTERF I E LD
EDWIN L. ST ERNE
E X ECUTIV E
CHA JR >. 1/\N
D I R E CT OR A~ J:> S E CRE T A R Y
LESTE R H . PERSELLS
A SS O C IAT E
GEOR GE S. CR A FT
E XE CUT IV E
DI RE CT OR
VICE CHAI RMA N
C A RL T O N GA R R E TT
D IRE C TOR
OF
F'I N A NCE
G I L BE RT H. BO GGS
J. B . SLA YTON
DI RE CT OR OF HO US ING
FRANK G. ETHE R IDGE
HOW A RD OPENSHAW
DI R ECTO R
JACK F . GLENN
82 4
R ED E VELO PMEN T
GEO RG E R.
HU R T B UILDI NG
SA NDER
TECH NICA L DI RE CTOR
ATLANTA, GE O RG IA 30 3 03
JAC KS ON
or
3 · 6 074
January 27, 1969
Pi·oj e ct:
D8scription:
Nei ghbor hood' Devel op11cnt Program
The acquisition of 378 Parcels of Land; Clearance of
52 Acr es ; The r ehabilitati on of 570 hou sing units; Also
r eloc ation of 431 f amili es and 10 busi ne sses wi t h t he
goal of havi ng 91111N.A famili e s turni ng i n a dequat el y
s er vice d standard, affor dabl e hous ing units by t he end
of 1969 as a r es ult of New const r uct ion and rehabili tation
activiti es .
$ 12, 626, 969
Total Cost:
Thi s i ncludes :
$349, 467
431, 250
1,627, 528
6: 812,483
3,406,241
Feder al Rel o8ation Grant
Federal Rehabi li t ation Gr ant
Dispositi on Pr oceeds
Federal Pro j e ct Capital Grant
Local NCG IA. Cre di ts
The l ocal shar e is$ 3, 406, 241 , f unded
by t he fol l owi ng Non-Cash-Grants in-a i d :
1. All of thes e f und s are commi tted ~
Compl et ed Non-Cas h- Gr ants i n - Aid :
Hoke Smith Hi gh School
Gi de ons Element ary School
Pryor Elementary Sc hool
D. H. Stant on Ele.!'l~ School
Capitol Avenue El em. School
Grant Park
Key Park
Stanton Park
191 , 851
680, 827
1, 007 , 620
1;;368,180
27,000
86, 686
57, 565
1.so,873
$ 3,580,602
$
Require d Non-Cash- Gra nts - in- Aid:
..§?
3,406,241
Surplus Non-Cash-Grants - in-Aid:
$
174,361
�Page No. 2
January 27, 1969
Nei ghborhood Devel opment Program
2.
The approve d budget i ncludes funds to hire staff and buy equipment
suffici ent to meet t hes e goals thi s year if the staff can be recrui ted.
3,
The application for Feder al grants to carry out these acti viti es
in the Model Ci ties a rea under the ije i ghbo rho od Development Pr ogram
for 1969 has been submitted and approved by the Federal grant in
the a mo unt of $6 , 999,200.
�D E P AR TMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPME NT
JAt·~ :, 1969
PEA CHTREE SEVENTH BUILDING, ATLANTA , GEORGIA 30 323
Room 645
December 26, 196~
REGION Ill
Office of the Regional Administrator
IN REP L Y R E FER TO:
3DM
Mr . Johnny C. Johnson
Director
City Demonstration Agency
673 Capitol Avenue
Atl anta, Georgia 30315
Dear Mr. Johnson:
As you know, the Regional Inter agency Coordina ting Commi ttee has
completed i ts review of t he Atl anta Comprehensive City Demons t rat ion
Program. During our meeting with you and your staff on Decem ber 18
we conveyed a number of recommendations concerning alterations and
improvements which should be made in vari ous parts of your program
including, ~ r alia , your proposed administrati ve budget f or 1969.
As previously indicated, the commi t te e believes t hat the fo llowing
changes should be considered in the staf f i ng pattern set forth in
your administrative budget :
1.
Add one planner and one program manager to your Economic
Development Di vision to assist the Di vision Director in
carrying out the numerous tasks arising out of continued
planning as well as implementation of the first year
program .
2.
Add at least two fiscal management personnel, preferably
in the Administrative Division to assist in monitoring
the numerous r equis itions from local operating ar,enciP.s
and in carrying out the numerous other .tasks which w.1.ll
need to be performed in order to comply with the procedures spelled out in CDA Letter ffe3.
3.
Add resident trainees to the various divisions of the CDA
staff, where a ppropriate, for the purpose of providinG
sufficient on-the-job rtnd technical or academic t raininr,
to enable each trainee to attain competence in his or
her fi eld of interest.
In addition to the above matters which pertain to your administrative
budget, it will be necessary for the CDA to submit to this office soon
�·'
0
Page 2
"

' J.' .. ~
after approval of the Comprehensive Program a work program which
identifies t he planning activities t o be undertaken in 1969, and
which specifies _t he activity, the r esponsible entity, the source
and amount of funds, and the _staff and time period required to
carr y out the activity.
I would encourage you to subnit a revised administrative budget
r eflecting the foregoing recommendations as soon as possible to
permit review by this office prior to fin~ action by HUD on your
application for supplemental grant funds.
Sincerely yours,
Earl H. Metzger, J r .
Assistant Regional Administrator
for Model Cities
�'·
January 27, 1969
MEMORANDUH
TO:
. FROl.'1:
SUBJECT:
Mr. Johnny c. John ~on, D~rector, Atl anta Hodel Cities
Program l,gency
Jack
c.
Delius, ,General Nanager o f P~rks and Recrea tion
1969 I?r6grar:1, Atlanta Node1 Cities
In re sponse to your memorandum of Jcmuary 16, 1969 which had atta ched
thereto a schedule o f proj e cts to be undertaken by the Depar-i.:.ment o f
P a rks· during 1 969 , \ ·Te ·wi sh to make the follm·ring corr.men-ts and
commi tment s .
$60,000 from the 1969 Park Imp rovement P rograrn has been alloca_ted for
Ho del Cities f or the p url;Ose o f develop ing existing und n ew park l ands .
Approva l must now be o btained from the Citizen ' s Park J,dvisory Committee before the entire 1969 Park Impro vernent Bu dget is voted into
l aw by the Board o f l,ld2 rrnen.
$22,000 has b een set aside in .Accoun t No . G 3 4-62-77 8-J-l, " Purcha se
of Land for Park P urposes ," as this depurt ment's contr ibution toward
the purchase o f vaca nt land for block parks and pleylo ts .
Regarding o ur r equeste d comrni tment th.:1t s uf ficient staff and equi pment ·
clre a vail able to complete the proj ects outlined on your attachments ,
we are assuming that t he Parks Committee o f the Board of Alde r men
would place top priority o n each and every o ne o f the se item$ and
wou l d , in fact , not ob j e ct. i f the respect ive r-:o del Ci ties Park Improvement proj ects and purcbase o f odditional l ands preempted all o ther
1969 capita l proj e cts. In othe r ·rords, itcrns covered in t he Hodel
Cities Project will take priority over Urba n Beautification and the
fegular 1 969 Park Improvement Progrum .
As to your request t hat we st2te •• •••.• can foresee no reason why
these projects c ~mnot be completed as required , 11 we wi ll have to h ave
ths full cooperation o f other age ncies , .such as the City La,.,, Department and the City Land ; ~gent , in e~r .,e diting app raisals , p rep aration
of co.ttstruction contracts, etc. With their ~ss i s tance we c an, in
£ ~c t , foresee no r ea son why the s e pr oj e cts cnnnot b e completed as
r equired.
�.Mei--r,orandurn to:
Mr. Johnny c. Johnson, Director
Mo del Cities Program Agency
2
January 27, 1969
The Model Cities staff , 1orking with the Parks and Recreatio n staff
who hc:id been loaned to Model Cities on a fulltime basis , h ove determined that the follmdng additio nal stuff personnel are needed for
parks in the Mode l Cities area:
1
Additional Staff
Needed
Locati ons
Existing
Staff
Adair Park
2
1 Recreation Leader
Pit~man Park
4
1 Recre·a tion Leader
4 ,632.00


St anton Park


2
1 Recreation Leader
4 ., 635.00


Key Park


--· 0

Direct or
0
.,,c
4,632.00
1 Cornmunity Center
2 Recreation Leaders


Grant Park


Cost
5,712.00
9,274.00
1 Community Center
Director
2 Recreation Leaders
5,712,00
9 , 274 .00
D.:)dd Avenue
2
0
0
71 Little street
2
0
0
12
9
Total
$43, 868 .00


Parks above are without recreationql programs . Tne fund s requested


($12,000) will be used to equip and initiate recre ational program
activities.
We understand that the Personnel Departme nt is presently reviewing
reque sts from all departme nts that need add itional staff to
implement .t>!odel Cities 1969 Program and, of course, ,1e cannot
commit our sel ves to the o peration 0£ a progr2m unless the above
personnel are supplied .
JCD:jw
cc:
Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
Alderma nic Pa r ks Comrnittee
Mr. R. Earl La nders, Mayor ' s Of f ice
Mr. Charles L • .Davis , Directo r o f Finance
Mr. Stanley T. Martin, Jr., Asst. Gen . Mgr. of Parks
Mr. A. P. Brindley, Parks Engineer
\
�DEPARTMENT OF BUILDINGS
(~~roject
Code Enforcement
Description
Designated housing in Model Neighborhood Area
will be inspected. This housing is understood
to be that other than housing scheduled for
clearance and rehabilitation during 1969.
Total Cost
$ 12,000
- --·- --·- - - - - - -- - -- ----- -------- ---- -------- --- - -~
1.
The above amounts have been appropriated in our 1969 Budget.
2.
The necessary staff and equipment are available within the department to complete this work d u r ing
the 1969 fiscal y ear.
�POLICE DEPARTMENT
Project
Descrip t ion
Police Services
Maintenance of present level of pol i c e perfonnance in Model Neighborhood Area .
Crime Prevention Bureau and
Community Service Officers
Addition of three (3) crime prevention
officers plus 15 community service officers
to come from Model Neighb orhood Area.
To tal Cos t
$1,2 55,000
9 4 , 00 0
- ---- --- --·- ----- - - - ---- - ------ --- ------- ----------- --------- --~
1.
The above amounts have been appropriated in o~r 1969 Budg et.
2.
The n e cessary staff and equ ipme nt a r e av ai labl e wi t hi n th e departmen t t o c omp l e te t hi s work d u r ing
t he 1969 fiscal y ear.
�WATER DEPARTMENT
Proje.c t
NDP Clearance Area Water Mains and
NDP Rehabilitation Area Water Mains
Description
Plug and install 6,640 feet of substandard
water mains. Excavate, haul and install
new mains in 26, 4 16 feet of substandard
lines.
Total Cost
$131,000
121,000
1.
The above amounts have been appropriated in our 1969 Budget.
2.
The necessary staff and equipment are available withi n the department to complete this work during
the 1969 fiscal year.
�TRAFFIC DEPARTMENT
Project
Description
Street Light Improvement
Total Cost
$71,000
1.
The above amounts have been appropriated in our 1969 Budget.
2.
The necessary staff and equipment are available within the department to complete this work
d ur ing the 1969 fiscal year.
�PARKS DEPARTMENT
Description
Project
Develop Existing and New
Park Land
Daniel S t anton Neighborhood Park
James L . Key Neighborh ood Park
developed .
Purchas e Vacant Land fo r
Block Parks and Playlots
L
_! --
-
-
~
3 0,000 *
16, 000*
Adair Ne ighborhood Park develop ed
16 , 0 00*
Peoples t own Block Park d eve lop e d
36,000*
Bl~ck Park and Playlot d e v e loped
12 , 000*
Pittsbu r gh P lay lot p urchased;
Adair Park P lay lot p urc ha s e d ;
Mechanic svi lle P l a y l o t # 1 purc h a sed; Me cha nic svill e Play lot


2 p u rchas e d ; Summer h ill Play lot

2 purch ased ; P eoples.t own Blo ck Park


pur cha s ed; Gr a nt Park P l ayl ot p u r chased.








--
$ 10,000*
Pittman Expanded Neighborhood Par k
develope d.





,. -
Tot al Cost
13 0, 000**
$ 6 0 ,000 i n city funds, $24 , 000 in fund s from Department of
Housing a n d Urban Developme n t , $36 , 0 00 in funds from U.S.
Bureau of Rec reation.
This amount is made of $22 ,000 in city fund s , $43 , 00 0 in
supplemental funds and $65 ,000 i n grant funds from HUD .
�Parks Department
Continued
Page 2
Re.creation Programs and Staff
Park Recreation Programs
Park Recreation Staff
Continue existing recreation programs
and staff. Add 10 full time recreation
professionals. Develop prog rams not
existing in park s and establish additional recreation facilities.
Public Information Director
Add one full time public information
director.
Recreation Advisory
Council
Add six citizen advisory councils
on recreation and 12 workshops on all
phases of recreation and c u ltu ral programming .
$
73 I 000
12 ,000
47,00 0
1.
The above amounts have been appropriated in our 1969 Budget .
2.
The necessary staff and equipment are available within the depart ment to complete this work during the 1969 fiscal y ear.
3.
Pre s ent staff is adequ ate to ~ ake a p pl ic at ion s fo r the required f e deral g rants a nd t o i mp l eme nt
the pro g rams a s d e s c ribe d ab o ve d u r i n g t he 1969 fiscal year.
�ATLANTA HOUSING AUTHORITY
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - Description
Project
- - - --- ----- --- ---Neighborhood Deve lopment Progr~n
Total Cost

-------- - ---------
The acquisition of 445 housing units;
clearance of 48 ac res; th e rehabilitation
of 647 housing units. Also relocation
of 431 families and 15 businesses with
the goal of having 911 additional MJ:-.JA
families living in adequ atel y serviced,
s tandard , a f f o rd able ho~sing ~nits by
the end of 19 69.
$14, 706,000* ,

- ------1.
The above amounts have been appropriated in our 1969 Budget.
2.
The ne ces sary staff and equipment are available within the department to complete this work during
the 1969 fiscal year.
3.
Our sta ff has the capability of filing application for the required fed er al grants and co~pleting
t he work r e quired in implementing these d u ring 1969.


Note :


Of this a mo u nt, $4,076,000 is to be furnished by the city in th e form of non cash grant in
aids with $298,000 coming from HUD in the form of relocation grants and $10 ,3 32 , 000 coming
f r o m HUD in the form of NDP credit.
�,
PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT
(Street Division)
Project
Description
Total Cos t
Pittsburgh Street Resurfa cing
Complete resurfacing of Mayland Ave . Stewart to Hobson; Mayland Cir. - University to Mayland Ave.; Hope St. Stewart to Hobson; Hobson St. - Fletcher
to Mayland
Grant Park Street Resurfacing
Complete resurfacing of Park Ave. - Berne
St. to Glenwood Ave.; Sydney St., - Hill St.
to Park Ave.; Augusta Ave. - Hi l l St. to
Cherokee Ave.; Pavilion St. - Cherokee Ave.
to Oakla nd Ave.; Berne St. - Bou levard to
Park Ave .; Waldo St . - E. Confederate to
Glenwood; Rosalia St. - Boulevard to Park
Ave.; Gress Ave. - Home Ave. to Mead St.;
Marion Ave . - Home Ave. to Ormwood .
60,000
Adair Park Stre et Re s urfaci n g
Complete r e surfa cing o f Tift Ave. Pearce
S t. t o She l t on Av e.; Bonnie Brae Ave. Allene t o Tif t St. ; El bert St . - Brookline to Allene Ave .
10 , 0 00
Mechanicsville-Pe o p le s t own/
Summerhill Street Resurfacing
Comp l ete re sur facing o f streets to be
determined a ft er l a nd us e plan is f i n alized.
Greenfield-Ormon d t o Van ira, Martin-Ormond
to Atlanta.
22,000
Continued
$
8,000
�Public Works Department
(Street Division)
Page 2
Sidewalk Construction
In Peoplestown, add sidewalks to one side
of Capitol-Milton to University; in Pittsburgh, add sidewalks to: one side of Hobson
Arthur to Rockwell-N. side of UniversityMayland to ~ cDaniel; in Grant Park, add
sidewalks to Grant St. - Grant. Cir,. to
Atlanta Ave.; additional sidewalk construction
as needed according to final land use plan.
Extend Fulton St. West from
Windsor to Glenn
Completion of extension of Fulton St. west fro
Windsor to Glenn
$40,000 \
¼a~
~
..
1.
The above amounts have been appropriated in our 1969 Budget.
2.
The n e cess a r y staff a nd equipment within t he depa rtment to ~omplete this work during the 19 69
f i s cal year are ava ilable.


No te:


Of this amount, $ 300,000 is c omi n g from the s tate and $15 0 , 000 is coming from the Ci t y.
�PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT
Description
Project
Sanitation Services
Addition of four crews, one front-end
loader, o n e weed cutter, one garbage truck
and one open body truck and increase starting
salaries for waste collectors to $82.00 per
week.
Sewer System Study
Make application for federal grant from
Department of Hou sing and Urban Development
for report on combined sewer s y stem problem. Kak e available staff and equipment
necessary to comp lete report of feasible
remedy for this problem.
NDP Clearance Area Sewers and
NDP Rehabilitation Are a
Re construct 1,620 feet of substandard sewer
lines in the NDP clearance area a nd rehabilit a t i on a r ea .





Total Cost
$171 , 0 00 t.
459 , 000*
..
Of this tot a l amount $ 219, 0 00 i s to be in city funds with the
remaining $240,000 to c ome from a federal grant from the Departmen t o f Ho u sing a n d Urban Development.
1.
The above amount s h ave been a p pro priated in o~r 1969 Budget.
2.
The necessary staff and equipment are availabl e within the department to complete this work during
the 1969 fiscal year.
3.
The application necessary for the grant from the Department of Hous i ng and Urban Development will
be completed and all related work performed by our staff.
�;fk-o/1 ~1'? :£.
MINUTES
GRANT REVIEW BOARD
DECEMBER 31, 1968
(2...,
//01
The City of Atlanta Grant R e view Board met in the office of the Director of
Gov e rnmental Liai s on at 9: 30 a. m. on D e c e mber 31, 1968, to r e view the .
Atlanta Mode l Cities Progr a m appl ication to the U. S. Department of Hous ing
and Urban Development for Supplemental Funds. In attendance were:
Dan S w eat, Director of Governmental Liaison, Chairman,
Grant Review Board
Collie r Gladin , Planning Di re ctor, Membe r, Grant R e vie w
Board
Georg e Berry, Deputy Comptroller, Member, Grant
Review Board
Johnny Johnson, Director of Mod e l Cities
George Aldridge, City· Planner
Carl Paul, D e puty Director of Personne l
J a y Founta in, S e nio r A c co unt a nt
The Grant Review Board discussed with Mr. Johnson several major points of
conce r n , primarily proc e dure s for approval by r e sponsible City d e partme nts
and a ge nci es ; a d m inistra tive or ganiza tion ; a nd p e rsonn e l r e quir e m e nt s .
In view of th e complexities o f the M odel Cities P ro g r am a nd the n eed for f ull
understanding by all responsible City officials, the following concensus o f the
Grant Revi e w Board m e mbership is her e by presented:
The M od e l Ci ti E:s Pr o gram as es t a bli s h e d by the Pr es ident ancf Con g r ess o f the
United S t a t es i s perh a p s the m o s t compreh ens ive a n d o pti m i s ti c g r ant - i n-aid
pr o g ram eve r offered to A me ri ca ' s cities .
The conce pt a n d intent of the M odel Citie s Pro gram is g ood. It provide s fo r th e
l egally r espons ible l ocal g ove r ning a uthority t o exer ci se it s auth o r ity and
in fluence in demonstrating b ol d new t echniques o f u rban p l anni ng and d evelopment .
It provides max i m u m opp ort unity for r eal involvement and parti cip ation by
citi zens of ne i ghborhoods i n t h e plann i ng a nd exec ution of p r ograms whi ch effect
the i r daily lives.
�Page Two
And it promotes coordination among local, state and national agencies and
departments of the limited resources which are available.
The successful planning and execution of a Model Cities Program can be a
valuable experience for any city in its search for ord e rly and timely solutions
to its multitude of urban proble1ns.
Atlanta's City Demonstration Agency has attempted to meet the challenge
and intent o { +he Model Cities legislation.
Citizens of all six neighborhood areas encompassed by Atlanta's Model Cities
Program were actively involved in organizing and planning for Model Cities
more than a year in advance of the beginning of the City's formal planning stage.
Local, state and federal public agencies and numerous private groups
participated in the preparation of the required planning grant application.
The Mayor and Board of Aldermen endorsed and supported the planning effort.
The Model Cities planning staff worked long and h ~ rd to prepare the documents
necessary for successful funding of the first year program.
The final documents detail a bold and innovative plan of attack on the major
problem areas in the Model Cities neighborhood. The Model Cities staff
has made an admirable attempt to live up to the concept of the Model Cities
program. To a great extent they have met both the needs and wishes of the
citizens of the area and the requirements of planning and administration of the
City and federal governments.
The Model Cities Program also places on all City departments and agencies
the requirement for cooperation, coordination and approval of program
components.
There are indic·ations that this requirement has not been met.
Where it has not done so, each department and agency is obligated to review
and pass on the specific components of the program which assigns e xe cution
responsibility to that department.
Each committee of th e Board of Aldermen should review and approve/disapprove
each program component w hich falls within the responsibility and authority of
the committee.
The Planning and Development Committee should exercise its responsibility
for overall planning of the city by re_viewing the Model Cities plan and making
�_Page Three
the determination as to th e compatibility of the Model Ci:ties Program
with overall city plans .
The Finance Committee should determine the financial feasibility of the
program and the capability of the City to meet the requirements placed
upon it by the progr am.
The full Board of Aldermen should carefully consider the priorities involved
in the Model Cities exe cution, its impact on the area served and the el-- ~-~re
city as well.
The Grant Review Board believes these approvals should be given before
Aldermanic sanction is granted.
We feel that if the prov1s10ns of the Model Cities application are understood
and accepted before final approval is granted a much stronger pro gram ¥{ill
result.
It should be understood that this is not intended as criticis1n of the planning
grant docume nt or the work of the Model Cities staff, but is an effort to gain
full understanding and support of the strongest prog ram in the b es t interest
of all citiz ens of Atlanta.
It is therefore recommended that the Mayor and Board of Aldermen require
written acc e ptance or denial of each component of the :Model Cities plan by
the departments and agen cies res ponsibl e for the exe cution of each comp onent
befor e final approval of the grant applica tion is given.
1;L
D an Sweat
Chairman
t,
DS:fy
~ - (\
vi~,\( ~(\ .:}_\ .~\
Georg e '.i 3err_y, Membe ~
-
143.215.248.55 ~J~~ ~~ <~ ~
Collier Gl a din, M e mber
r
1J.
Llv,143.215.248.55
E. H. Underwood, Memb e r
·
�M. INU TES
GRA N T REVIEW BOARD
DE C EMBER 31, 1968
The City of Atlanta Grant Review Board met in the office of the Director of
Governme ntal Liaison at 9:30 a. 1n. on D e cember 31, 1968, to review the
Atlanta Model Cities Program a pplication to the U. S. Department of Housing
and Urban Development for Supple mental Funds. In attendance were:
Dan Sweat, Director of Governmental Liaison, Chairman,
Grant Revi ew Boar d
Collier Gladin, Plann ing Director, Member, Grant Revil!W
Board
George Berry, Deput y Comptroller, M ember, Grant
Review Board
Johnny Johnson, Director of Model Cities
Georg e Aldridge, Cit y Plann.er
Carl Paul, Deputy Dir e ctor of Personne l
Jay Fountain, Senio r Accountant
The Grant Review Board d iscussed with Mr. Johnson s everal major points of
concern, prima rily proc ed u res for approval by r esponsibl e City d epartments
and agencies; adminis tr ative organization; and personnel requirements.
In view of the complexities of the Model Cities Pr o gram and the need for full
understanding by a ll responsible City officials, the following concensus of the
Grant Review Board membership i s hereby presented:
The Model Cities Program as establishe d by the President anc:f Congress of the
United States is perhaps the most comprehensive and optimistic g.r ant-in-aid
program ever offer ed to· America's cities.
The concept and intent of the Model Cities Program is good. It provides for the
legally responsible local governing authority to exercise its a utho rity and
influence in demonstrating bold new technique s of urban planning and development.
It provides maximum opportunity for real involvement and participation by
citizens of neighborhoods in the planning and execution of programs which effect
t heir daily lives.
�Page Two
And i t promotes coo rdination a m ong local, state and n ati onal agencies and
departments of the limite d res ources which are available .
The succe s s ful planning and exe cution of a J\1odel Cities . Program c a n be a
valuable e x perience for any city in its search for orderl y and time ly solutions
to its multitud e of urban problems.
Atlant a's City Demons tration Agency ha s attempted to meet the challenge
and intent of th.e Mod e l Cities l e gi s lation .
Citizens of all six n e ighborhood areas encompassed by Atlanta's Modd Cities
Program were active ly involved in organi z ing and plannin g for Mod e l Ci~ies
more than a year i n advance of t h e beginning of the City' s formal planning stage.
Local, sta t e a nd fe d e r a l publi c age ncies a nd nume r o u s private g roups
p a rticipate d in th e pr e p aration of the r e quire d pl a nni n g g r a nt applic a tion.
The Mayor and Boa rd of Alder men endors e d and suppo r t e d the planning effort.
T h e M od e l Cities p l anning s t aff worked l ong and h ar d t o prep a r e the d ocum ent s
necessary for s u ccessful f u nding of th e fi.rst year pro gram .
The final do c u ments d e t ai l a b old a nd innovative pla n of attack o n the m ajo r
p roblem areas i n the M o de l Cities n e i g hbo r h ood . T h e ~.fo d el Cities staff
h a s made an adm i rabl e a t temp t to live u p to t h e conce2t o f t he M od e l Cities
pr o gram. T o a great extent they have m e t b oth t h e needs and wishes of the
citizens o f the area and t h e requi reme nts o f planning a nd a dmi nistrati on o f the
City and federal governme nts .
The Mode1 Cities Program al so places o n ail City departments and agencies
the requirement for cooperation, coordination and approval of pro gram
components.
There are indications that thi s requir ement h as not b e en met .
Where it has not done so, each department and agency is obliga ted to ·review
and pass on the specific components of th e program which assigns execution
responsibility to that department.
Each committee of the Board of Aldermen should review and approve/disapprove
each program component which falls within the responsibility and authority of
the committee.
The Planning and Development Committee should exe.rcise its responsibility
for overall planning of the city by reviewing the Mod e l Cities plan and making
�Page Three
the determination a s t o the compatibility of the Model Ci.t ie s Program
with overall city plans .
The Finance Committe e should determine the financia l fea s i bility of the
program and the capa bility of the City to meet the require m e nts placed
upon it by the progr am .
The full Board of Al de rmen should carefully consider the priorities inv olved
in the Model Cities e x ecution, its impact c;n the ar ea se r v e d and the entire .
city as _well.
The Grant Review Board believes. these approvals should b e given before
Aldermanic sanction is granted.
We feel that if the p r ov1 s 10ns of the Model Cities applic ation ar e und e rstood
and accepte d b e fo r e final a pprova l is gr ant e d a muc h stro n ge r prog r a m V{ill
result.
It should be und e r sto o d that this is not inte nde d a s critici sm of th e plann ing
gra n t document o r the w ork o f t he M o d e l C i ties s t a ff, b ut is an effort to g a in
f ull unders t a nding a n d s u pport o f the s t r _ongest p rogr a m in th e b es t inte r es t
o f a ll citizen s o f Atl anta.
It i s therefore recommended tha t the Mayor a n d Board of Alde rmen r e qui r e
writt en a c cepta n ce or denial of ea ch com ponent of the M o de l Citie s pl an by
the d epartments and age ncies r e sp ons ib l e fo r the e x ecu t i on of each c o mponent
b ~fore final approva l o f t h e gra n t a pplicat i o n i s g i ven.
Ctairma n
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�CITY OF ATLANTA
TRAFFIC ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT
Atla nta , Georg ia
30303
January 27, 1969
KA RL A . BE VIN S
Traffi c E ng i n ee r
Mr. Johnny C. Johnson, Director
Model Cities Program
673 Capitol Avenue, S. W.
Atlanta, Georgia 30315
Dear Mr. Johnson:
In answer to your memorandum of January 16, 1969, and confirming our conversation with you regarding the projects listed in the Atlanta Model Cities Program
Application to HUD for the year 1969, we have the following report.
nue · primarily to a 2.172 per cent rate increase on street lighting services
which was effective as of December 1968 and which was not anticipated in September
of 1968 when our budget request was prepared, there are no funds in our 1969
appropriation accounts to cover your proposed upgrading of street lighting in
the Model Cities Area. A sum of $21,000 will be required to cover the cost of
the leased street lighting that is proposed in your program. We whole heartedly
agree that the street light upgrading program which you propose is necessary as
we ll as desirable and we agree that it is ·· particularly desirable that this wor k
be completed dur i ng the year .1969.
Our a s s i s t ant traffic engineer who handles street lighting will be able to
do the neces s ary pl anning and engineering work required to prepare the r eso l utions
for cons ider a tion by the Mayor and Boa rd of Aldermen during the time per i od th a t
you set forth . We would anticipate complet i-ng our por tion of th i s work with i n
three t o f ive month s . Each uni t of the wor k would be passed on to the Geor gia
Power Company as soon a s it was completed by us and app r oved by the Board of
Aldermen. This would permit the Geor gia Powe r Company t o c omp let e their
engineering and installation work at t he ear l ie st poss i ble date . The Georgia
Power Company will comp l et e their wor k on proj ects of thi s t ype ten t o fifteen
weeks after receiving authorization by the Mayor and Board o f Aldermen.
With the positive knowledge that the money wil l be avai l able to finance this
project, we could have the first groups o f street lights ready for consideration
by the Board of Aldermen at the February 3, 1969, meeting and have a similar
group ready at each subsequent meeting, thereby completing our part of this work
by May or June of 1969. The Georgia Power Company will then have the months of
July, August and September and possibly October in which to complete the projects
that were still in their hands when we complete our part of the work in May or
June.
�=
2
=
Mr. Johnny C. Johnson
January 27, 1969
If the sum of $21,000 is made available to us during the month of February,
we see no reason why the street light upgrading projects should not be completed
as requested during the calendar year 1969. If you desire additional information,
we will be glad to try to supply it promptly.
Sincerely,
Karl A. Bevins
KAB/fd
cc:
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mr. R. Earl Landers
Mr. Charlie Davis
�OF' A.TLP~ T~
CITY H ALL
A TLAN TA, GA, 30303
Tel . 522·4463 Area Code 404
DEPARTMENT OF PLANNI N G
COLLI E R B. GL A DI N, Dir ec tor
January 20, 1969
Mr. Johnny Johnson, Director
Model Cities Program
673 ·Capitol Avenue, S. W.
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Johnny:
As you remember the Planning Staff reviewed the proposed
Land Use Plan late last November and forwarded their comments
discussed them with you and give you a copy of them. I realize
impossible to make any changes at that time while the weight of
your final report and application was on you.
Model Cities
to me. I
it was nex t to
preparing
Now that the application has been approved and the program funded, th is
would be a good time to continue the planning process through a closer look
in order that these 9uesti0ns may be resolved. The original comments have been
reviewed again and divided into three categories. The first are observations
which we think would be helpful to you but involve no errors of fact nor conflict
with plans or policies of the city. The second category involves errors of fact,
that is where no difference of opinion exists, somebody just put the wrong color
on the map. The third group contains the most serious of these comments,
these refer to apparent conflicts between Model City plans as we know them
a rid officially adopted plans and policies of the city.
I want to take every opportunity th is year to improve our working relationship
a nd insure that all the plans and policies that result will facilita te the implementation
of the Model Ne ighborhood and are consistent with the overal I goals and plans
of the c ity . I am sure you feel the same way .
Si ncerely ,
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B.
Co l ie r
G la d in
Pla nni ng Dire ctor
C BG/jp
�COMMENTS ON MODEL CITIES LAND USE PLAN
I.
Observations which may be of assistance.
A.
ALL NEIGHBORHOOD AREAS - GENERAL COMMENTS
1.
The overall residential densities have been measured anticipating
development slightly above average for the density range
indicated, i.e., if range is 5 - 10, the 8 unit per acre
has been used.
This plan can be expected to accommodate
the existing resident popJlation.
There have been some
minor adjustments that will improve the situation.
However,
care must be taken not to arbitrarily change the present
proposed density ranges unless compensations are made in
other locations.
This means no single family areas should
be inserted where high density is now proposed unless densities
are increased in another location.
An alternative to this is
to abandon the no-displacement goal.
2.
Some deficiencies still exist in park areas and to overcome
this and provide space, obviously densities will have to be
increased somewhere also.
B.
MECHANICSVILLE
1.
In the area bounded by the Expressway, Bass StreE;_t, Formwalt,
Dodd and Pryor Streets, the plan proposes high density and
mixed colillilercial in the next five years; however, redevelopment
is not proposed until after 1974 and the present use is mostly
single family and vacant.
It will be difficult to accomplish
the proposed land use in the proposed time period without a
program of treatment.
�7
- 22.
In th e area bounded by th e South and West Expressway, Bas s
and Formwalt Stree ts, the pl an proposes l arge are as of
commer ci a l and high density resid enti al; however, no treatment is called for prior to 1974 and the present use is now
equally div:i.ded be t ween vac ant, commercial and single f amily
residences.
C.
I
SUMMERHILL
1.
Betwe en the Expressway and Fulton - Glenwood Streets, the plan
calls for high de nsity resid ential; however , the treatmeHL.
plan only calls for activity after 1974 and the present use
is mostly vacant, duplexes and single family residences.
This area also extends into the Grant Park neighborhood.
Obviously some development of this type will occur,
but not enough to achieve the expected population density.
D.
PEOPLESTmrn
1.
It is reconmiended that the frontage along the west side of
Washington between Atlanta and Ridge Streets be devoted
exclusively to high density residential which is in accord
with the present uses there.
2.
In the block between Washington and Crew Streets from Weyman
to Little Streets, high density residential is called for;
however, the treatment plan calls for action aft_:_r 1974 and
present use is primarily single family with some apartments
maki ng it medium density over all.
E.
GRANT PARK
1.
To compensat e f or t he t wo pr oposed block p arks r edes i gnated for
school purposes , t he r ecre ati on pl ann er s propos e that one-half
of the block bounded by Ormond, Grant, Atlanta and Hill Street
be made a block park.
The majority of ·t he structures in this
block are substandard and slated for clearance in the period 1971 - 73 .
�- 32.
The block bounded by Hill Street , Sou t h Avenue , Primr ose and
Little Streets is propos ed for commercial use.
There appears
to be come doubt that the topo of this block is suitable for
any kind of unified connnercial development.
3.
In the blocks bounded by Grant, Sydney, Orleans Streets and
Cherokee Avenue, high density residential is proposed.
How~
ever, present use is perdominate ly single f amily and the proposed
I
treatment is rehabilit a tion in the period 1971-1973.
4.
I
In the area between the Expressway, Grant, Sydney Streets and
Park Avenue, the proposed use is high density residenti ~l.
This area is for rehabilitation in 1970 and the present use
is primarily single family.
To achieve the indicated high
density, a significant number of high rise units must be
built.
5.
The area just west of Grant Park Elementary School is proposed
for high density residential.
However, no redevelopment is
proposed prior to 1974 and the present use is mostly single
family or vacant.
II.
Errors of Fact
A.
MECHANICSVILLE
1.
The plan calls for a government center use in the triangle
between the railroad, the Expressway and the Pryor Street
School.
Since most program administration is to be accomplished
at two other locations, there appears to be no justification for
this center area.
It is recommended that this part icu lar
area be used for medium density residential.
�[
-4 ~
B.
GRANT PARK
1.
The Boys' Club is located in the block bounded by Killian,
Marion, Burn and Eloise Streets.
In the Model Cities pl an
this has been indicated as single family use which is a
mistake and should be changed.
2.
The recreation planners have indicated that the area south
of Jerome Jones School designated for park purposes · should
be changed to school use.
~-
The industrial use existing at the corner of Boulevard and
the railroad has been omitted and single family residential
use substituted.
4.
This should be changed to industrial use,
On the east side of Hill Avenue between Grady and the railroad
medium density residential is indicated.
This is presently_
good single family residential use at low density and no
clearance has been proposed.
This area should be indicated
as low density residential.
5.
The recreation planners have indicat~d that the block park to
the east of Slaton School should be used instead for school
expansion purposes.
6,
The block of the proposed educational park bounded by Hill,
Primrose Streets, Georgia Avenue and Cherokee Place is .in
reality intended for another use, that of some sort of
private welfare type activity, either profit or non-profit,
and should be indicated as such and not as an educational
use.
�-5C.
Sill1MERHILL
1.
An expansion of the small commer cial area at the southeast
corner of Atlanta and Capitol is proposed for expansion north
and west .
The condition of the major structures in the
northwest portion is fairly good and there is no progr am
of treatment slated prior to 1974.
This would indicate
that such a change in use is not indicated nor does there ·
appear to be a need for additional commercial use when there
are other commercial areas 11earby.
III.
Conflicts With Adopted Plans and Policies
A.
SUMMERHILL
1.
This item concerns the park proposed in the blocks bounded by
Georgia, Capitol, Little and Crew Streets.
The entire
Summerhill area needs two twelve acre or more neighborhood parks.
The recreational facility proposed at Hoke Smith is
not a neighborhood type development and will not serve the
neighborhood needs north of Georgia Avenue.
This facility
south of t;eorgia Avenue is proposed to be a "central park"
type facility and, therefore, would not s eem to meet the
neighborhood recreational needs of the area south of Georgia
Avenue.
The northern block of the park is obviously more suitable for commercial devel opment in conjunction with the
other blocks along Georgia Avenue immediately adjacent
to the stadium.
The other two blocks contain a number of
substantial standard apartment buildings whose removal would
be expensive and undesirable.
�- 6~
The mai n just i f ic atio n th at appear s for this site
is its proximity to the Capitol Ave nue School; however,
the long r ange future of this school ~s questionable in
terms 0£ its site and its location relative to the existing
and proposed popul a tion to be s e rved.
A better p ark location would be nex t to the proposed
K,1-3 school mentioned e arlier especially if the Capitol
Avenue School could also be relocated to this site.
The
area adj ac ent to the new school site is proposed for clearance
in the period - 1971-1973 - while no treatment is proposed
for the pa rk site adjacent to the present school until after
the 1974 time period with the exception of the block i mmediately
adjacent to Georgi~ Avenue.
2.
The plan calls for a school site in the two blocks bounded
by Martin, Little, Ami and Kenneth Streets.
The school planners
reveal this is only to be a K, 1-3 school requiring only
three acres at maximum; therefore, w~thout further justifica tion,
for example, a new gr ammar school to replace Capitol Avenue,
this site appears to be excessively large.
3.
In considering the land use aspects of the Hoke Smith Educational Park, it is our understanding tha t the Parks Department
is highly reluctant to buy and develop any large recr eational
facilities directly abutting a high school as it feels the
fac i lity will be monopoli zed by the school to the de tr i ment
of t he re st of the connnuni ty .
The School Boar d , on t he ot her hand, believes that the
Parks Department shoul d acqui r e the portions of the educational
park allocated f or r ecreational use .
�- 7The resolution of this pr obl em is no t in the province
of the land use pl anners; however, the gr aphic expression
of proposed l and use should show a solution tha t either
indicates all educ a tiona l facility reduced in size to what
the School Board would acquire or a recreation use area
that is situated to the satisfaction of the Parks Department.
One glinnner of hope is that the school pl anners used
$80,000 per acre as an acquisition cost; however, the land
is slated for clearance in ~970 and hopefully the l and
could be sold to the School Board at cleared land prices
of about $20,000 - $30,000 an acre.
B.
PEOPLESTOWN
1.
Neither the recreation planners nor the city wide Land Use
Plan and Parks Plan call for a block park to be located at
the end of Linam Street just south of Vanira Avenue.
C.
PITTSBURGH
1.
In this area, there appears to be only one major comment
to be made.
This is that in comparison with the city wide
Land Use Plan which propos es a uniform medium density
throughout the neighborhood, the Model Cities proposal
indicates two high density areas .•• one at the northwest,
the other at the southeast.
The high density area at the
southeast can be adequately served by the existing Pittman
Park; however, the high density area to the northwest will
provide a large concentration of people who will not be
conveniently served by an adequate recreation facility.
�- 8D.
MECHANICSVILLE
1.
All pl a ns call for a community facility .to be loc a ted in
the block just east of Dunb ar School, and it is my understanding th a t social progr ams are expected to be administered
from here; howeve r, the Land Use Pl an does not indic a te a
space for this facility.
2.
II
Since one block of land tha t was to be used for park
purposes in our city wide Land Use Plan has been pre- empted
by the school bo ard for a second school in the area accor<l ing to the Model Cities Land Use Plan, it will be necest ary
to add the block now occupied by the Atlanta Transit System
to the park proposed in the Model Cities plan in order to
get adequate space to serve this large population concentration.
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D- EPARTM
JAN 21 1969
NT OF H '. U SING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT
............~ T R E E SEVEN 'd BUILDING, ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30323
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645
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Jan
ry 16, 1969
REGION Ill
otf'ice of the Regional Administrator
IN REPLY REFER TO:
Mr. Johnny C. Johnson
Director
City Demonstration Agency
673 Capitol Avenue
Atlanta, Georgia ):) 315
De&r
Mr. Johnson:
Subject:
Model Cities Program
Following review by the Regional. Inter ency Coordinating COllllittee
the Atlanta Comprehensive City Demonstrat i on Program (CCDP) has now
been reviewed by the Washington Interag cy Committee, and, as
indicated in our letter to Mayor Allen or January 14, 1969, the Departaent of Housing and Urban Development e.nno\.Dlced approval of the Atlanta
Program on January 8, 1969.
The folloving work items must be accomplish id, however, before a grant
contract can be ottered by HUD:
Submission ot your revised .bmget for program adm:Jn:Jstration (See
rq letter dated December 26, 1968.)
1)
2) Submission ot your statement ot non-federal contribution ahow1Dg
eligibility for the supplemental grant of t,,175,000. As you know, all.
projects tor which the CM claims "base" must 'be aubmitted to lltl> in
accordance with CJ». 17 and CDl '4-, Pa8e 16. Where they exist, you ray
Yiah to submit project descriptions or a\Dll&l'i.ea thereof' i"rom exiating
applications
3) Submiasion of a letter from the area CAMPS cOllllittee stating that
the committee has renewed and approved the CCDP. I UDCl.erst&Dd this
was accomplished on January 6 and a letter troa the CAMPS coad.ttee so
stating will be sutticient.
�In addition to the foregoing, I V&Dt to 8hare with you the tollovil:ig
ccaaent• and receaaendatio • tl o:>DCerning varioua components ot your plan
baaed 011. the W ah1ngton rev1
and on your cenversatiena on January 14
with Don Dodge, Area Deak ott1 1 r, and Tom W111181118 1 Atlanta Coordi.Dator:
Beaident Involvement - I UDder• and that you diacwaaed with Maaara. Dodge
and Williama project• ll-002B
i BB-0031' aa veil u projects CD -OOlll
Uld CD-Ol2B, all ot wbich are to be operated by the Atlanta Youth Co
11. It would be helpful 11' you vould upplelllnt the existing project deacriptiona with• short atataent deac tlting the Atlanta Youth Co\JDCil and
1Dd1eat1ng the relationahip among these tour project•.
~ ~or
Job-training actirttiea, there vi
need to be further cenaideratiOD
ot taat part ot the project which c~>Dteaplates training tor aevi.Dg whine
operator• aince it appears the Depu
t ot Labor he.a turther queationa
concerning the propoaal.. Mr. Willi
will be in touch with you in the
near future to arrange a meeting lfit~\ appropriate membera ot your •tatf'
and the state and :federal agencies CO\ cerned.
l(!plt>yment - With regard to Projec~~ D(-014:N which pl'CYidea
J;collODlic Devel.opllent - One of the cone1erna noted during the Waabington
review was that there appeared to be ntl link between the Development
Corporation (!X::-OOJ.B) and the 01.ttreach ,Project (!C-OO)C). BoveTer, I
UDderatalld. that the same sponsor 111 contemplated tor IX:-003C and tor
the Si.ngl.e-Purpoae Develepn.e~t Corporation (IX:-0055) and that both project•
rill work vith the financial pool to be C.! re&ted. under IC-001. I also
UDderatand that you are aubmitting an a .lication for t 1mcUng to the
Bconomic Dffelopaent Administration and that some change• 1n project
descriptions and budget& may be necesaitat,"1 depending on the reault of
this application.
Bducation - As indic:ated during your meeti
vi.th the Interagency
Ceo~ting Comittee, a statement clar1ty11,g the cit:,•• 11&.iPt-enenc
of effort in this cc.ponent should be submit
in the near future. It
would also be advill&bl.e to have letters :fra t.he Atlallta Board ot
Education and the State Depe.rtment ot BducatiOn 11141catin8 renew azad ·
concurrence in your pl.an. I vould al.ao like t4I> reiterate the concern
previeua~ expressed to you by the RICC that the program.a propoaed 1n
this cm.ponent do not appear to provide the
e.Aa to make the educational
system more responsive to the felt need.a a.nd e.xpreaaecl rtew• ot reaic\enta.
'l'hie should be f'urtber conaidered by the CDA. t!or the purpose ot cleaigning remedial propoaala. With regard to Project 11)-0~•, I UD4erataacl
this ia tor the purl)C)ae of assisting the CDl to nal.•te nev educatioD&l.
programa to be illpl.emuted under the N04el Cit iea plan and ia not tor
eT&l.m.tion of exiati.Dg programs.
�Pag
3
Health - I understand that a non-profit corporation, entitled the Model
Neighborhood Better Health Corporation bas recently been establishe~
composed of elected resident repr sentatives, repre entatives ot t be
feur local medical and dental societies and three social service &1 encie
which will be responsible for operating the major programs in thi s
component. A short statement describing the corporation and its
relationship to the local professional agencies would be helpful.. I
would also sugge t that the corporation, if it is to be the pcr.llsoring
agency for the proposed health facility, should be advised to ·begin
discussion with the Atl.aota FHA Insuring otfice at the earlie~/t possible
nt.
Transportation - I understand that project TR-017N, entitled, Public
Facilities Impact Evaluation will in fact be a consultant s 'clliy tor the
p\ll'pO&e of developing specific transpci)rtation recouanendatic-,na and is not
an evaluation of first year activities in this cmponent.
Housing - With regard to project RR-005N, Housing Center, I understand
that Messrs. Dodge and Williams discussed with you the 81A.visability ot
seeking an appropriate sponsor in lieu of CDl operation of the project
and that you are nov in the process of exploring thia nr&tter.
I would urge your immediate attention to those items listed above which
must be completed to enable us to move toward tendering of the grant
agreement. Mr. Williams will, of course, be availabl~ for discussion
should you have any questions on these matters.
Sincerely yours,
F,,. ' ( ';fj
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Earl H. Metzger, J r .
Asaiatant Regional .AdmiDistrator
tor Model Citiea
�Cll"Y OF
AT
DEPARTMENT OF
FINANCE
501 CITY HALL
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303
CHARLES L . DAVIS
DIRECTOR OF FINANCE
EDGAR A . VAUGHN, JR .
DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF FINANCE
GEORGE J. e·ERRY
DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF FINANCE
/
January 13, 1969
Mr. Johnny Johnson
Director
Model Cities Program
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Johnny:
While I realize that we are both aware of the following facts,
I feel that it is important that they be pointed out and emphasized
at this time so that there will be no chance of a misunderstanding.
The federally approved budget under which the Model Cities Project
is now operating is authorized only through January 31, 1969. While
we have noted in the press that the Model Cities execution grant
containing the 1969 administrative budget has been approved, there
has been no indication that the City will receive a binding commitment from the federal government in time for the Budget Commission
and Board of Aldermen to act on it at their nex t regular meeting
on January 20, 1969.
I am aware that your staff is now preparing a request for an ex tension of the present planning budget until such time · as a new
administrative budget can receive official federal and city action.
Again, time is of the essence in receiving a federal commitment for
this ex tension. If it is not received in time for action on January
20, the nex t regular meeting of the Board is on February 3 which is
after your current budget e xpires.
It is, therefore, ex tremely important that we receive some definite
commitment from the federal agency prior to January 20, 1969 . Please
call on me if there is anything that I can do to assist in obtaining
federal agency approval .
I would also like to advise that all of the staff positions that
have been authoriz ed by the new administrative budget were cr eat ed
�Model Cities Project Budget
January 13, 1969
Page 2
by action of the Finance Committee on January 6, 1969. These positions, however, were contingent upon federal funds being available
and therefore none of the positions can be filled until we receive
a specific federal commitment to funding these positions.
Very truly yours,
d vv~---- ;?JZ~
Charles L. Davis
Director of Finance
CLD:cs
cc: Messrs.
Earl Metzger
Earl Landers
Dan Sweat
Milto~ G. Farris
Everett Millican
Gregory Griggs
Carl Paul
Tom Stephens
�•
~
u~•
UNITED' STA~ GOVERNMtNT
<.?, 66>
Memorandum
CDA DIRECTORS
RmIONAL ADMINISTRATORS
TO
DEPARTMENT OF
HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT
DATE: December 30,
1968
In reply refer to:
Attention:
ARA for Model Cities
ADMINISTRATIVE MEMO NO. 13
FR.OM
Walter G. Farr
Model Cities Administr at~on
SUBJEC'l':
Letters to Proceed f r,r Admi n1 strative Costs Incurred a:rter
Submission -of Com:pr ensive City DeJJ10us~ration Program
It is essential that the p~riod between the submission by the CDA of its
comprehensive demonstratic/n prQg1'am &ii the date of execution of the grant
agreement for the execution phase be used effectively in gearing up for the
administration of the program. This memorandum sets forth the procedure for
the issuance of Letters t o Proceed, which are designed to provide the CDA
with a statement from HUD that :f'unds expended in conformance with an approved
budget a.re eligible for r eimbursement from the administration grant peyable
under the grant agreement. This grant will pay for a maximum of 80 percent
of the eligible costs of program administration.
1.
The CDA's Request
a . The chief executive of the City may request a Letter to Proceed. as
soon as (a ) the City ' s comprehensive demonstration program has been submitted
t o the Department of Hous ing and Urban Development and (b) the local gover ning
body has authorized that submission. This request may appropriately be filed
with th~ comprehensive <lemonstration program.
b . The CDA's l etteT of request (See Attachment A) should be filed with
the fol lowi ng back-up documents:
(i)
(ii )
Budget Schedule (Use Att a.chment _ 1 to CDA Letter No. 6, HUD 7039* )
J ustif ications (Use Attachments 3a and 3b to CDA Letter No . 6,
HUD 7042 811d 70~3** )
( iii)





Work Programs -- The work programs may be brief and need not
present detailed time schedules nor provi de work descriptions
for individual staff members . The work program may include
such items as :
In the headi ng of column B, strike out the phrase "Year
a.nd insert in lieu t hereot: "90 days".








--- of
Program" ,
Ins er t i n l i ne 2 of each form the following: "Program administration prior
to execut ion of grant agr eement".
�,..
2
(1)
Prepare ame~nts or additions to the comprehensive
progr am subsequent to discussion -11th Federal officials.
(2)
Prepa r e fund applications for categorical grant-in-aid
progr ams .
(3)
Develop administrative procedures for execution period.
(4)
Survey possible locations for neighborhood facility.
c. It is expected t hat grant agreements will be executed for most cities
within 90 dey-s from the dat.e the local governing body authorizes submission
· of the program.. However., times will vary and no CDA will know exactly the .
length or time in which ad,plinist~ative costs will pe incurred prior to
execution of the gra.nt 96reenient. · All budgets . supporting Letters to Proceed
should be for a 90 de.y period.
2. . HUD Action
mm
Model Cities Regional staff will provide cities with any assistance
needed. in requesting Lett ers to Proceed. Requests will be reviewed prompt~
and when approved, Letters to Proceed will be issued by the Regional Administrators, in the form indicated in Attachment B. The Letter is effective as
of the date of issue. It should be noted that the issuance of the Letter to
Proceed does not represent a Federal commitment of funds. Accordingly, if the
city's program is not approved, there is no basis on ·which reimbursement can
be obtained by the CDA.
3. Allowable Costs
a. Continuing Items. Most expense items which will be necessary for
this period in which the administration of the program commences are continuing
items : ·salaries for staff of CDA, delegate agencies and neighborhood groups,
travel, rent, etc. Many of these items have been eligible planning costs
du.ring the planning period. It is, · of course, assumed that eligible planning
costs will be ~aid for under the planning budget · until p,lanning :funds (both
the Federal planning grant and the non-Federal contribution) are exhausted.
b. New Items. In addition,' CDA's ms;y, du.ring this period, add certain
central sta.:ff which will be essential to the operation, and preparation foroperation, of the comprehensive program. These ma,y include fiscal, lega.l and
central administrative personnel who will be needed regardless of the exact pattern
of First Year Action components. However, the Letter to Proceed should not
cover costs in connection with new capital projects and activities. The
Letter to Proceed ma,y cover costs of reproducing the federa.lly-required number
�. ... .
4
3
of copies of the c omprehensive program.
4. Non-Allowable Costs
While the followi ng list does not purport to. be exhaustive, you should be
alerted to the fac t that the following costs should not be covered by the
Letter to Proceed:
a.
b.
c.
d.
5.
Costs· PS¥able under the planning budget for which planning funds are
available .
Costs incurred in connection with new projects and activities.
New third party contracts or significant amendments to existing
contracts.
Costs not allowable under CDA Letter No. 8~
Relationship to First Year Action Budget
In preparing its fi rst year action budget in accordance with CDA Letter No.
me.y prepare an administrative budget for a period up to 15 months-the presumed 90 d~y period under the Letter to Proceed plus the 12-month
period commencing with the execution of the grant agreement. In the alternative,
the CDA me.y submit a 12 month administrative budget at the time the comprehensive
program is submitted , and then amend this before the execution of the .grant
amendment so as to add the period for which reimbursement is sought for expenditures under the Let ter to Proceed.
6, CDA's
~;;t?jj /4.Msr,/kJ~
-f-Y-'
Director
Attachments
~
�ATTACHMENT A
Request for Letter to Proceed
Dear (Regional Adminj.;trator J
The City of _
_ ___________ requests a Letter to Proceed
for a 90 day period so that costs incurred in prep~ing for the administration
of our comprehensi,,e city demonstration program may be eligible for reimbursement f'rom the gra.r,t f or a.dministrative costs under section 105(b) of the
statute.
A budget and work program for costs estimated to be incurred during this
period to susta ~n such activities is attached.
This attachment includes a
statement of t he 20 percent non-Federal share of these costs.
I understand that reimbursement cannot take place unless and until the
Secretary of t he Department of Housing and Urban Development has approved
(-city name) ' &i program and a Grant Agre·ement is executed between (city name)
and HUD.
Sincerely yours,
(Local chief executive)
Attachment
�..-.
...
ATTACHMENT B
Letter to Proceed, for Execution Phase
Na.me of Chief Executive
Title
City
Address
Dear

--
Your comprehensive demonstration program submission has been received.
Although the Department ha s not yet acted upon your program, it has no objection
to your commencing prepar~t ion for the execution phase.
Costs incurred
on and after the· date of this letter which are in accordance with the attached
budget and work program. will be eligible for reimbursement if a grant agreement is executed and i f the terms and conditions of the agreement and CDA
Letter No. 8 (copies of both attached,) are satisfied.*
Sincerely yours,
Regional Administrator
Attachment


Modify this sentence appropriately if CDA Letter No. 8 has already been


sent to the CDA or if a draf't has been or is being sent•,
�DEPAR T M E N T
OF
JPJ'
H O USI N G A N O URB AN DE V ELO PME,NT
.., 1969
PE AC HTREE SEVENTH BUILDING, ATLANTA , GEORGIA 30323
Room 645
December 26, 196~
REGION Ill
Offi c e of the Regional Admini s t r ator
IN
REPL Y REF ER T O:
3DM
Mr. Johnny C. J ohns on
Director
Cit y Demonstrati on Agency
673 Capitol Avenue
Atlanta , Georgia 30315
Dear Mr . J ohns on :
As you know, t he Regi onal Int er a genc y Coordinat ing Commi t t ee has
compl eted its r evi ew of the At lanta Compre hensive Cit y Demons trati on
Progr am . During ou r meeting with you and your staf f on Decem be r 18
we conveyed a number of r ecommendations conc e rning alter ations and
improvements whi c h s hould be made in various parts of your program
inclu ding , i nte r alia , your proposed adminis trat i ve budget f or 1969 .
As previ ously i ndicated , the committ ee bel ieves t hat t he foll owi ng
changes shoul d be cons ide red i n the staf fin g pattern set f orth i n
your administrative budge t :
1.
Add one planner and one pro gram· mana r,e r to your Econom i c
Development Di vision to assist the Di vision Director in
carrying out the numerous tasks arising out of con tinued
planning a s well as i mplementat ion of the first year
program .
2.
Add at least two fiscal management pers onnel , preferably
i n the Administrative Division to assist in monitor inG
t he nume rous r equis itions from local opera ting arrenc iPs
and in carryi ne out the numerous otner t asks which wi ll
need to be performed in order to comply wi th the procedures spelle d out in CDA Lett er -/IB .
3.
Add res ident trainees to the various divisions of the CDA
staff, where a ppropria t e , f or the purpose of pr ovi<.lin;~
sufficient on-the- j ob ~nd technical or academic traini nr,
to enable each trainee to at t ain competence in his or
her field of i nterest .
In a ddi t i on to the a bove ma tters which pertain to your admini strative
budget, it will be necessary for the CDA to submi t to this o ff ic e soon
�Page 2
a fter approval of the Comprehensive Program a work program which
identifies the planning activities to be undertaken in 1969, and
which specifies the activity, the-responsible entity, the source
and amount of funds, and the staff and time period required to
carry out the activity.
I would encourage you to subnit a revised administrative budge t
reflecting the foregoing rec0111nendations as soon as pos sible to
permit review by this office prior to final action by HUD on your
a~plication for supplemental grant funds.
Sincerely yours,
Earl H. Metzger, Jr.
Assistant Regional Administrator
for Model Cities
�YP1
CITY OF ATLANTA
Ju
OFFICE OF MODEL CITIES PROGRAM
673 Capitol Avenue , S.W .
Atlanta, Ga . 30315
404 -524 -8876
Ivan Allen Jr., Mayor
J. C. Johnson, Director
J.
l
tin
o
tr
2., Cit
y.
u ly
1
••••
,
t
,oo


�M !_ N U T E S
MODEL NEIGHBORHOOD EXECUTIVE BOARD
Tuesday, June 10, 1969
10:00 a.m.
The monthly meeting of the Model Neighborhood Executive Board was
held on Tuesday, June 10, 1969 at 10:00 a.m. in Committee Room #2,
City Hall.
The following members were present:
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr., Chairman
Mrs. Mattie Ansley
Mr. Clarence Coleman
Mr. John Hodd
Alderman E. Gregory Griggs
Alderman G. Everett Millican
Mr. Walter Mitchell
Mrs. Martha Weems
Mr. Joe Whitely
Absent:
Mr. Sam Caldwell
Deacon Lewis Peters
Mr. J. D. Newberry
Dr. c. Miles Smith
Mr. Bill Wainwright
Other City Department Heads, representatives from neighbor hood
or ganizations and the press were also present.
The cha irman, Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr., called the meeting to or der.
He t hen entertained a motion for the adoption of the May 14 Minute s .
I t was s o moved and unanimously approved without correction .
REPORT OF THE MASS CONVENTI ON STEERI NG COMMITTEE
Mrs . Weems reported f or the Mass convent ion St eering Committe e. She
said that seve ral r e s o lutions wi l l be present ed t o the Board follow1
the Mass Convention me eting on Sunday , June 15. Mrs. Weems also
reported that the Steering Committee had bee n incorporate d under the
name of Stadium Heights, Inc., and have now been designated to be
the recipient of a $72,000 grant of OEO/HUD funds for training assie
tance to Model Neighborhood reside nts. The purpose of the Mass
Convention Meeting will be to get its approval before proceeding fu.t
ther with compliance of the requirements to receive the grant.
�2
RECOMMENDATION FROM REVIEW COMMITTEE
Mr. Millican read the recommendation from the Review Committee which
approved the projects for implementation and recommended the execution of contracts with the Atlanta Board of Education and the Georgia
State Employment Service. A list of these projects were distributed
to all Board members.
Mr. Mitchell moved that the recommendation be approved by the Board.
Mrs. Weems seconded the motion. The Mayor then asked if there was
any discussion of the motion and recommendation. Mr . Coleman said
that he felt that he was not in a position to give an intelligent
vote because of his lack of information about the projects involved.
He said that he as a Board member should be more informed and that
the community should be more inf ormed. The Mayor outlined the procedure that has been followed in disseminating information about the
projects and activities of the Model Cities Program to the Board
members and the Model Neighborhood Area residents. He also gave
background information on the formation and function of the Review
Committee that he appointed to review all projects in the program
and to make recornr.lendations to the e n tire Board . He invited Mr . Cole
man to s e rve on that Committee and i nvited other Board members to
sit in on the meetings if they desired. Mr. Coleman accepted the
seat on the Review Committee.
Mr. Coleman then suggested that the Board be divided into committees
t o correspond with the a r eas included in the program and that these
committe es should meet regularl y wi th the Model Cities Staff .
Mr. Johns on s t ated that the Staff would b e happy to meet wi th a ny
o f the Boa rd members a t a ny time. He also stated tha t ther e were
a l ready existing Board committees that correspond with the a r eas
of the progr am, a nd that these commi t t ee should be utiliz ed r a the r
than establi sh ing new ones.
A vote was then t aken on the prev i ous mot ion to approve the rec ommendation of the Rev iew Committee. The motio n was approved by the Bo ard
DIRECTOR'S
REPORT
Mr . Johnso n a sked f or the Board's approval to transfer
funds from
Pro ject HR-OO 3N to the Mul t i- Pur pose Facil i ty Pr oject . It h as bee n
necessary to i n crease the size o f the build i ng fr om 15 , 000 feet t o
20, 1 00 fee t , and t he co s t has increased from $180 , 000 to $280 , 000 .
Mr. Hood mov ed that t he t r ansfer be app roved and the contr a ct be
awarded to the bidde r. The motion was second ed and u nanimously
approved.
Mr. Johnson also asked approval to reimburse the Georgia State Employ
ment Service in the amount of $21,966 for salaries of the staff they
provided the program last y e ar and this year . Mr. Griggs moved that
the Georgia State Employment Service be reimburse the $21,966. The
motion was se~onded and unanimously approve d.
·
�3
Mr. Johnson then asked for approval to proceed with Project No.
EM-014N for staffing only
The project needs two employees to do
the intitial paper work and interviewing to get the project in
motion. A discussion followed on whether the two employees would
be area residents. Mr. Fulp from the Georgia State Employment
Service said that the two positions called for professional interviewers with experience in the State Employment System.
Further
discussion followed on the steps taken to actually seek out Model
Neighborhood residents for positions available in the Model Cities
Program. As a result of the discussion, the Mayor proposed that
Mr. Coleman make a motion that the GSES be required to hire Model
Neighborhood residents to fill the two positions in Project No.
EM-014N.
Mr. Hood seconded the motion. Mr. Johnson then stated
that the Board should concern itself with the greater issue of
employment rather than two individual positions and suggested that
a general policy be established as a guide for the employment practices of all agencies involved in the program. ~~- Hood then offered
an amendment to the motion to state that priority be given to community residents for the positions in Project EM-014N.
Mr. Coleman
accepted the amendment and the motion was approved.
The Mayor then re-emphasized the fact that no one should be hired
for any job unless a basic effort has been made to hire from the
Model Cities Area. He then appointed Mr . Coleman, Mr. Millican and
Mrs. Weems to draft a policy statement that outlines the Board's
position that an all out effort must be made by agencies under contract with the program to hire all of their personnel from the Area
or to provide tra i ning for residents to fill other positions. The
special committee is to report at the next Board meeting .
Mr. Johnson introduced two new members to the staff.
Samuel Russell, Jr .
Director of Pr ogram Management
They are:
Howard E . Turnipseed
Contract Administrator
NEW BUSINESS
Mr. Whitley brought tottle Boar d' s attention that there is a different
policy by the Board of Education for condeming and taking property
needed for school expansion.
There is n o assistance offered for
families who are displaced. Mr. Johnson concurred with Mr. Whitley's
report. He stated that Project HR- 041N provides special relocation
assistance for families that are displaced and a r e not in a clearance
area. This project was designed because of the failure of some
agencies to provide relocation assistance.
The Mayor asked Mr. Whitle
to get a full report on the amount of property that will be taken by
the Board of Education and to give a report at the next meeting.
Mr. Hood commented that committees are constantly being appointed
to handle different activities rather than using the ones that alrea~~
exist. Mr. Coleman requested that each Board members receive a
list of the committees and their members. He also proposed that the
Bo.ard
discuss the function and structure of the conunittees at the
I
next meeting.
�4
The meeting was adjourned at 11:50 a.rn.
APPROVED:
Mayor Ivan Alien , Jr., Chairman
Model Neighborhood Executive Board
�MODEL NEIGHBORHOOD EXECUTI VE BOARD
Commi ttee ~ss i g n me nts
FI NANCE COMMI'I"l'EE
Alderman Everet.t Milli.can
.Mr. Clur ence Coleman
iV.ir.
Walter Mi t chel l
PERSONN.EL COM.M ITTEE
Ald erman E. Gregory Griggs
Dr. c. Mi les Smith
~tr . Cl a r ence Cole man
CITI ZENS PAR'l1ICIPATION COMMI 'l"T'EE
Alderman E. Gr e gory Grig gs
Deac on Lewis Peter s
Mr . J. D. Newb e r ry
Dr. c. Mi l es Smith
SOCI AL PLANNI NG COM.tvlITTEE
Mr . J o e Wh itley
Mrs . Martha Weems
Mr . Sam Caldwel l
PHYSICAL PLANNING COMMITTEE
Mr. Bill Wainwright
Mrs . Mattie Ansley
Representative Joh n Hood
REVIEW COMMITTEE
Alderman G. Everett Millican
Dr.
c.
Miles Smith
Mr s. Martha We ems
.M r. Walter Mitche l l
�May 28, 1969
OFFICE OF MODEL CITIES PROGRAM .
673 Capitol Avenue, S.W.
Atlanta . Gs. 30315
404-524 -8876
Iva n Alle n Jr., Mayor
J. C. Johnson, Director
N O T I C E
The Mode l Ne ighborhood Exe cuti v e Board wi ll hold its
regular monthly meeting on Tue s day, J une 1 0, in City Hall,
Co mm it t e e Room # 2 at 1 0:00 a .m .
vlc
�MI NUTE ~
S-
MODEL NEIGHBORHOOD EXECUTIVE BOA..~D
Wednesday, May 14, 1969
10:30 a~rn.
The monthly meeting o.f the Model Neighborhood Executive Board was
held on Wednesday, May 14, 1969 at 10:30 a.m. in Com..~ittee Room #2,
City Hall.
The following membars were present:
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr., Chairman
Mrs. Mattie Ansley
Mr. Clarence Coleman
Alderman E. Gregory Griggs
Mr • John Hood
Alderman G. Everett Millican
Mr. J. D. Newberry
Deacon Lewis Peters
Dr. c. Miles Smith
Mr. Bill c. wainwright
Mrs. Martha Weems
Mr. J. c. Whitley
Absent:
Mr. Sam Caldwell
Mr. Walter Mitchell
Other City Department Heads; representatives from Arthur Andersen
and Company, Eric Hill Associates and the Atlanta Housing Authority;
representatives from neighborhood organization; the general public
and the press were also present.
Vice Chairman Everett Millican called the meeting to order. He then
entertained a motion for the adoption of the April 15 Minutes. It
was so moved and unanimously approved without correction. The Chairman, Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr., then proceeded with the meeting.
REPORT OF THE MASS CONVENTION STEERING COMMITTEE
Deacon Peters stated that he had no report of the Mass Convention
Steering Committee because of the postponement of the regular meeting
of the convention.
�Page Two
NEW BUSINESS
The Mayor read the letter received from Floyd H. Hyde, Assistant
Secretary for Model cities, which stated that "the city of Atlanta
comprehensive city demonstration program has been approved and
that a grant agreement in the amount of $7,175,000 has been authorized for carrying out the first year action program." The Mayor
congratulated Mr. Johnson and the Model Cities Staff for making
Atlanta one of the first three cities in the nation to receive
funds for implementation of its Model Cities Program. He th~n
moved that the Aldermatic Board be asked for a resolution accepting
the grant agreement. The motion was seconded and unanimously
approved.
REPORT FROM MAYOR ON REVIEW COMMITTEE PROCEDURE FOR EXECUTION OF
DELEGATE AGENCY CONTRACTS
The Mayor reported that the Review Committee that was authorized
at the last meeting has met three times to review the projects
contained in the program. The members of the committee are:
Dr. C. Miles Smith, Mrs . Martha Weems, Alderman Everett Millican,
Mr. Walter Mitchell and the Mayor. The committee has reviewed over
fifty percent of the projects and will continue to have review sessions in the coming weeks. Mr. Johnson had previously suggested
that since the staf f must review each project f or f inal action
before implementation that the s taff be allowed to make recommendations to the Review Committee for actbn. Mr. Wainwright moved
that this procedure be appr oved. The motion was seconded and
unanimously approved without discussion .
REPORT FROM FINANCE COMMITTEE ON DESI GNATI ON OF BANK FOR GRANT
FUNDS
Ma yor Alle n reported for t h e Fina nce Commi tte e on the designation
of t h e bank to receive the letter o f credit for t he $7, 175, 000.
It was the recommendation of the Committee that t h e Citizen ' s Trust
Company be the designated bank. Alderman Griggs moved that the
Board accept the recommendation of the committee. The motion was
seconded and unanimou sly approved.
PRESENTATION OF RESOLUTION ACCEPTING GRANT AGREEMENT
Mr. Johnson explained that it would be necessary to draw up a new
resolution authorizing the Mayor to enter into contract with the
Federal Government because of some changes by the Nixon Administration in the handling of the fundso The money allocated under the
�r
Page Three
grant agreement was allotted by components rather than projects
and this called for some changes in the wording of the resolution.
Mr. Wainwright moved that a new resolution be adopted to be in
keeping with the requirements of HUD. Mr. Coleman asked if line
items were transferable. J:vlr. Johnson answered that line items
were transferable by 10% or $100,000, whichever is less.
Mr. Coleman then asked who was authorized to make adj.u stments or
transfers. It was concluded from the discussion that followed
that the Staff and the Executive Board could make recommendations
to the Board of Aldermen for any adjustments in a line item. The
previous motion by Mr. Wainwright was then seconded and approved
unanimously by the Board.
DIRECTOR'S REPORT
Mr. Johnson presented two groups to give reports to the Board.
Mrs. Roslyn Walker, Evaluation Analyst-Model Cities Staff and
Mr. Dave Houser of Arthur Andersen & Company presented a report
on the Evaluation and Management Information Systems. Mrs. Walker
outlined the staff activitie s to date with i t s latest work being
the preparation of an evaluation framework for the Model Cities
Program projects. Mr. Houser explained the management information
and control system. He presented a sl ide presentation o f the actual
print -out from the computer of the fi nancial and evaluation reports
of the projects in the program.
Mr. Louis Dismuke s and Mr . Paul Muldawer presented the report on
the housing study, "Lowering the Cost of Housing", which was compiled by Eric Hil l Associates . The study was a research study
to provide background information on the problem of housing in the
Model Neighborhood Area. Mr. Dismukes listed the procedure followed
in conducting the study and the conclusions drawn from the study.
Some of the conclusions were: ( 1 ) there are no easy answers (2) the
cost of housing can be reduced about 30 or 40 percent by (a) inducing
new technologies, (b) removing local constraint~ (c) programming
housing production to the needs of individualized families and
(d) using maximum housing assistance programs. Mr. Muldawer discussed various housingpatternsthat could be applicable to certain
neighborhoods in the Model Neighborhood Area.
A discussion followed after the presentation which resulted in
Mr. Hood suggesting that the Physical Planning Committee of the
Board work with the consultants and review the proposals in the
study and bring a report back to the Board. Mr. Coleman then moved
that the report be accepted as information and be referred to the
Physical Planning Committee for consideration . The motion was
seconded and unanimously approved.
�Page Four
Mr. Coleman also moved that the City Attorney be asked to give
a ruling on who has the authority to ma1<e adjustments in line
item contained in the budget.
OLD BUSINESS
Mr. Griggs said that he had been contacted by Mr. Clarence Ezzard
concerning Southside Day Care Center, which is located in the Model
Neighborhood Area. He stated that the Board should give some statement as to whether Mr. Ezzard's center will be included in the program. Mr. Johnson stated that it was the recom.rnendation of the
Model Cities Staff to proceed with the Day Care Program as it is
outlined in the comprehensive plan, which excludes Mr. Ezzard's
program. Southsid e Day care Center is funded already by EOA and
it is expected that they will maintain their effort. Mr. Coleman
moved that the Executive Board meet with the Board of Trustee of
Southside and make some decision at t he next meeting. The motion
was seconded and unanimously approved.
Mr. Millican sugge sted that in the future consultant reports be
given at meetings separate from general business meetings so as to
conserve time.
Mr. John son introduc ed the latest addition to the Model Cities Staff
who is Mr. Frc11k Keller, Physical Planner .
The meeting was adjourned at 1 2:2 0 p .m .
APPROVED:
Johnny-- ,C. John"Son, Director
Mode l cities -Program ·
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr., Chairman
Mode l Neighborhood Executive Board
�)J/J/
CITY OF .ATLANT.A
May 22, 1969
OFFICE OF MODEL CITIES PROGRAM
673 Capitol Avenue, S.W.
Atlanta, Ga. 30315
404-524-8876
Ivan. Allen. Jr., Mayor
J. C. Johnson, Director
MEMO RA.ND UM
TO:
Mayor Ivan Allen and Model Cities
Project Review Committee
FROM:
Johnny C. Johnson and Model C i t i e s ~
Plans and Evaluation Staff
C::::::S~
SUBJECT:
Implementation of Transportation
and Education Projects
TRANSPORTATION:
Because of the dire need for improved transportation facilities
in the Model Neighborhood Area and because of the high visibility
factor involved in this project, we recommend the signing of the
contract between the City of Atlanta and the Atlanta Transit
System for the immediate implementation of the following project:
TR- OO3N
Intra-Neighborhood Bus System
EDUCATION:
It is our recommendation that the contract between the City of
Atlanta and the Atlanta Board of Education be signed immediately
for the implementation of the following projects:
ED - OO3N
ED - OO5N
EDO19C
ED - O2OC
ED - O21C
Middle School
Supplemental Classrooms
Tutorial Program
Communication Skills Lab o r ato ry
Lead Teache r s
�-2-
ED-022C
ED-023C
ED-024N
ED-025N
ED-039N
ED-041C
School Social Workers
School Library Program
Extended Day
Pre-School Activities
Inservice Training
Community School Program
We are not prepared at this time to recommend the implementation
of two other projects in the Education Component. They are the
following:
ED-026N
Camping Program
The Board of Education has proposed taking all fifth graders in
the Model Neighborhood Area and exposing them to a one-week camping experience. This project is too restrictive in nature to
meet any real needs of the program. We would prefer a situation
in which children from this area would have an opportunity to
live with and relate to children from other areas of the city. A
camping program with such severe time and participation limits
as these cannot be tied directly to any of the first-year objectives of the Model Cities Program. We recommend its cancellation
for this year since any need that it might fill under the existing
plan can be filled by any number of other projects in the Education, Social Services, and Recreati~n and Culture components.
ED-030N
Coordination and Evaluation
All evaluations of Model Cities projects wi ll be performed under
the supervision of the Plans and Evaluation Division and/or consultants representing the CDA and the city.
It would n ot be
logical nor would it be in the interest of complete objectivity
for the Board of Education to evaluate i tself. This same policy
holds true for any other administering agency. We have no objection to the Board of Education doing a self-evaluation for its
own sake, but for the benefit of the CDA and the city of A.tlanta
an objective third party should perform this task.
CONCLUSION:
All projects mentioned above in Education and Transportation have
been carefully reviewed by the Plans and Evaluation Division of
Model Cities and by the committee selected by Mayor A.llen for the
purpose of reviewing all proposed projects of Model Cities. We
recommend, therefore , that contracts for the implementation of
these projects be signed as soon as possible in order that r esi dents may begin to see concrete evidence of the effectiveness of
the Model Cities Program.
�j
~~ / ; l
~ITY tCDF ATLANTA
/
.DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE
50 1 CITY HALL
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303
r:tl 2411 1969
CHARLES L. DAVIS
DIRECTOR OF FINANCE
EDGAR A . VAUGHN , JR .
DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF FINANCE
W. ROY SMITH
DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF FINANCE

�model
F"UliilAilY
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2D
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2B
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MARCH
M T W T F a
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2345678
9 ID 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 2D 21 22
232425 26 272829 '
, 30 31 •. ..•..• . •
Bl·MOHTHLY REPORT
NEAR
THE
~l;GINNJNGi
cities
�,.
...
FEBRUARY-MARCH
MONTHLY MILESTONES:
Major emphasis was on reviewing all project{ staffing,
constructing a project control and planning system, and taking all other
necessary steps to be prepared for implementation.
Delays in signing the HUD
supplemental funds implementation contract caused certain adjustments to be
made in prev~ously-established plans of the Model Cities administration and the
38 delegate agencies which will use 1969 supplemental funds.




















MILESTONES NEXT PERIOD:
Signing the HUD contract, finalizing all projects,
signing contracts with the delegate agencies, constructing a temporary multipurpose service center, staffing, and developing additional administrative 1
mechanisms.




















�CONTRACT NO . Mp-10-001
City of Atlanta
Model Neighborhood Program
673 Capitol Avenue, S.W.
Atlanta, Georgia 30315
Johnny C. Johnson, Director
February-March Bi-Monthly Report
April 10, 1969
Report No. 6
Prepared by Alan Wexler,
Technical Writer
INDEX
MAJOR DEVELOPMENTS. •
1
Gener a l . • . • .
1
Administration.
Social Services • • .
Physica l Planning.
Economi c Development
State Partici pa tion .
... .. . ...
6
........ .
Prob lems . . . •
.
9
9
ADMINISTRATIVE STRUCTURE.
.
...
RESIDENT INVOLVEMENT.
.
.. .. .
.. .
....
...
....
..
..... ....
.....
... . .
....
Pe>licy and Advisory Groups
FEDERAL ASSISTANCE.
..
8
Dat a Collection .
Staff.
.
1
2
4
10
10
10
10
10
�I.
MAJOR DEVELOPMENTS
A.
General~ Project St a t usL and Othe r Related Pro jec~s Under
Coordination
A.l.
Administration
A.l.a .
The HUD-Atlanta Model Cities 1969 implementation contract
had not been s igned as of the end of this r eporting period.
Thi s contrac t , which i n 1969 is expected to be for some
$7.175 million, was expe cted to be signed within 30 days.
A.l.b.
Because of the de l ay in contract si gning, HUD granted
the Atlanta pro gram a planning grant extension. Atlanta
had r e ceived a total of $245,500 in planning furtds since
November, 1967. In another related action, HUD and the
Model Cities Exec utive Boar d approved a blanket 15% shifting
of f unds in l ine items.
A. l.c.
The $8 . 9 million HUD-Atlanta Model Cities Urban Renewal
con t r ac t (NOP - Neighborhood Development Pro gram) had be en
signed earlier this year. During this reporting perio3
the local Model Cities dele ga te agency (Atlanta Ho using
Authori t y) began full i mplementatio n (See Physical Services
section of this report).
A.l.<l .
A contract was effected with Arthur Andersen and Co., a
managemen t consultant . The agreeme nt stipula-ted that the
company would assist in developing a pr.ogram implementation
and control system. As part of the system, Arthur Andersen
worked with Model Cities staff in developing the necessary
work programs (involving timing) and budgeting for each
project. Basically, the system will give us an accurate
ana l ysis of project status at anytime.
A.1.e.
Sampl e contracts were developed to be discussed with
delegate agencies which will use supplemental funds.
The agency contracts cannot be signed until the grant
contract is signed .
A.l.f.
Several coordination meetings were held with delegate
agencies which will use supplemental funds. One meeting
concerned practices the agencies will follow regarding the
hiring of indigenous aides (health aides, housing aides,
social work aides, etc.)
�-2-
A.2.
A.l.g.
Another highly important meeting was held with the 9
agencies scheduled to occupy the proposed multi-purpose
buildings. The 2 new build ings will be constructed near
the site of the present Model Cities ed i f i ce. All agencies
seemed to agree on the need for a cowman basic-information
system in the building, joint purchasing of furniture and
equipment, and methods of coordination.
A.l.h.
The 2 new buildings will be constructed on land to be
leased from the At l a nta Housing Author ity. Bids for
construction of the bu i ldings were · to be let in April.
A.l.i.
Regarding the commo n b asic-information system, a tentative
plan was worked out between Model Cities and Economic
Opportunity At lanta , Inc. EOA would receive some $35,000
in supplemental funds to run the system. The plan would
include some 7 resident aides who would file, bring clients'
common data to the agencies, etc.
A.l. j.
Joint purchasing through the General Services Administration
appeared to be impossible except possibly for Model Cities
and l ocal agencies alre ady having GSA a ccount numbers.
A. l. k .
Letters of committment were ob t ained from several agencies
regarding on- l oan pl a nners and other personnel for 1969.
A.1 . 1.
The d i rector attended an inter-agency meeting in which
the need fo r better corrnnunic a tion wa s discussed. United
Appeal Agencies, EOA, and the Urban League were also
represented.
Social Service s
A.2.a.
Discussions cont inued with Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.
regarding its proposed additional 2 sub-centers. The 2
sub-centers are being coordina t ed with emp l oyment outreach
programs in the two aeighborhoods. The 2 s ub-centers would
be placed in the Grant Park and Adair Park neighborhoods.
As of the end of t h is reporting period, the preliminary
plan call ed for the 2 new centers to be f unded entirely
by the Model Cities supplemental fu nds . EOA recently
established an additional neighborhood center in Mechanicsville.
A.2.b.
The 25-member Model Cities Better Health Corp . Board of
Directors met several times. (The Board is composed of medical
and dental professionals, and area residents.) A committee
was formed to study site selection for the future medical
facility . The facility will house a group medical practice
and a multi-phas i c screening center - for examination of
people obstensibly well . The site selection committee worked
with students of t he Geor gia Tech School of Architecture .
Another connnittee studie d the 8 new pr ojects which will be
involved in the l 969 Model Cities Heal t h Component . This latter
committee sought to develop a full understanding of the community
health needs and i mp l ementat i on me chani sms.
�-3-
A.2.c.
A health technical advisory group began studying the
details and scope of the proposed multi-phasic screening
facility.
A.2.d.
The Social Services staff held preliminary discussions with
the Wesley Community Centers, Inc., regarding the latter's
proposal to deal with special problems of Mechanicsville
area children.
A.2 . e.
The Social Services Section Staff began making some 1,100
interviews of area recipients of old age assistance payments.
Model Cities resident neighborhood workers were also
helping in the project. The purpose of the survey was to
determine hou sing conditions, housing preferences of the
recipients , the social service needs and other needs. From
the survey results , more comprehensive and effective programs
for the aged . . expected to result (including the housing aid
to the aged project). The study was initiated by the Fulton
Coun ty Department of Family and Children Services. It was
to con ti nue during the next reporting period.
A.2.f.
The Georgia General Assembly failed to provide the $4 million
r equested as re placement funds which would be necessary if th1
federal welfare freeze is effected this July . As of 1967,
there were 6,766 Model Cities area residents receiving as s ist;
(involving some 3,100 famili es ). The freeze would only affec
a id for dependent children recipients (4,683 individuals, or
1,091 families in Model Cities) .
A. 2. g.
The Crime and Juveni l e Delinquency Prevention planner met witl
the Southeastern Regional Director o f the Law Enforcement
Assistance Admini s tration (a branch of the Justice Department
The Assistance Administration is the agency administer i ng
the Omnibus Crime and Safe St reet Act funds . During March,
the C & D planner attended a conference on pre-planning
sponsored by the State Planning Bureau. The Bureau is the
State coordination age ncy for the funds . Fund ing to the
State appears to be likely in early summer. Mode l Ci ties
is expected to be ne fit signific antly through more eff iciency
in the Atlanta Police Departmen t, the Ful ton County Jmrenile
Court and other local criminal justice agencies.
A.2 . h .
The Atlanta Board of Education agreed to continue ongo ing
federal programs and init i ate seve ra l new 1969 projects, all
of which would be contingent on a con tinuation or new grants
of federal funds . Involved in the Board's agreement was
approximately $680,000 fo r a riew primary school and $230,000
for a middle school (to be named fo r Dr. Martin Luther King}. ·
�-4-
A. 3.
Physical Planning
A.3.a.
The Atlanta Housing Authority,which has signed its $8.9 million
contract with HUD f or the 1969 Mode l Cities urban renewal
work , began intensive operations. By the end of the reporting
period, there were approx imately 25 Housing Authority employees
working on the Model Cities - Housing Authority Program.
Involved in the work was inspecting property for Model Cities
project rehabilitation standards compliance, making rehabilitation grants (4 grants made already), processing
several loan applications, negotiating with rehabilitation
contractors, inspecting the work of those private contractors
and performing surveys of the residents' housing needs
(those residents in 1969 clearance areas.).
Three of the 4 rehabilitation grants amounted to the maximum
of $3,000, and the other came to approximately $2,800 .
Over 700 appraisals were made by independent, professional
appraisers. Regulations require 2 such appraisals on each
of the 378 parcels scheduled for 1969 clearance.
The sur vey of cle~rance area r esidents ' hous ing needs was
performed by approx imately 4 r e location wor kers.
A. 3.b .
An Urban Design proposal for t he Mode l Ci ties area was
formulated which wou l d us e Mode l Cities supplement a l funds .
However, be cau se of the delay i n HUD's appr ova l of the
impleme nta tion contract , other f und ing pos sibi lit ies were
t e nta t i ve ly explor ed . The Ur ban Design proposal wou ld ·
seek t o combine t he disci p line s o f architecture, lands cape
architecture and city planni ng in
mak i ng the ar ea mor e
attractive .
A.3.c.
Along the line s of the Ur ban Design propos a l,Model Cities
staff met wi t h the Atlanta Hous ing Author ity to di scus s the
rol e o f consultants h ired by AHA. Such consultants would
attempt t o obtain residents' input into t he design pl an .
A. 3 . d.
Meetings were he l d with AHA and t he Ci ty Bu i lding Department
to coor dina t e policy making on ins pection procedures. It
wa s decided, among o ther thi ngs, t hat AHA would perform
nearly a l l i nspect ions in 1969 c l earance and rehabil i t ation
are as and the Building Department would inspect the other
par ts of Model Ci tites. The Bu i l d i ng Department would al so
inspect in 1969 c learance and rehabilita tion are as upon
. r e ce iving complaint s or upon noticing obvious violations
of Mode l Citie s project rehabilitation standards compliance·.
Other matters di s cussed with the Bui lding Department were
procedures regarding building pennit issuances and informing
residents about bu ildings r egulations, benef its, etc .
�-5-
A.3.e.
Approximately 4 meetings were held on establishing a nonprofit rehabilitation corporation (under HlID' s 235-J pr ogram).
The program would find residents needing housing rehabilitation, and have the corpbration buy the house, rehabilitate
it and sell it back to the c;:iginal owner. One problem
encountered has been finding a sufficient number of residents
who need such rehabilitation and who mee t the minimum income
requirements. Black contr actors wou ld be used wherever
possible.
A.3.f.
Generally related to the above was a city-wide me e ting atte nded
by Model Cities staff. The purpose of t he confab, which
sponsored by the Ford Foundation , was to discuss m8thods
of encouraging the development of bl ack c ontractors thr oughout the city.
A.3.g.
A meeting was held with r esidents of the Sugar Hill community
in Model Cities. They had been concerned that the ir land l ords
would sell their dwell ing units because t he prope rty was
zoned industrial. Appr oxima tely 150 people live in that
community, which is alre ady heavil y indus trialized. The
residents want the a r e a rezoned res ident ial. Mode l Cities
began researching the area's land use h i story and othe r
related matters to determine t he proper course o f ac tion .
A.3.h.
A meeting was held with FHA off ic ial s , who had expressed a
desire that Model Cities should do everything poss ib le to u s e
the 100 units a llocated t o the area in 1969 under HUD's 235
programs. The 235 program encourages the construction of low ·
and moderate income housing. Mode l C:i.ties s a i d it was studying
the matter intensively .
A. 3. i.
Discussions were eld with AHA to d<= termi ne co what extent
it would be feasible and/or neces sary to provide social
services to residents of clearance a nd rehabil i tat ion ar eas.
A.3.j.
Model Cit ies in 1969 will have 5 bu s es (4 regul a r, 1 reser ve)
circling t he area to provide i nner- neighborhood publ ic trans portation. The project wi ll cost $205 ,000 in Model Citie s
supplemental funds , which will he lp pay for most of t he
operational costs. During this reporting period, 2 of the
5 buses were painted the Model Cities colors (blue & white ) .
�-6A.4.
Economic Development (Employment and Industrial-Commercial Development)
A.4.a.
One of the major efforts in this section was the recruiting
of residents for the approximately 400 full-time and 190
part-time jobs directly resulting from the 1969 programs.
Nearly 10,000 newspapers were distributed in the area to
inform resident s of job descriptions. As a result of the
newspapers and other methods of communication, 279 persons
applied during pre-established interview times in the 6
neighborhoods composing Model Cities. In addition, some
300 active applications in the 3 area EOA Neighborhood
Service Centers were placed into consideration, as were
nearly 120 applications from professional workers in various
fields.Georgia State Employment Service (GSES) handled
the interviewing and provided the other aspects of coordination during the 8 interviewing days. In the next several
weeks, Model Cities and GSES are expecting to hold additional
interviews, possibly even a few night interviews, for -people
who had to work during the regular interviewing schedule.
A.4.b.
Several meetings with trade union officials produced no
significant advance into placing ghetto residents with the
unions. AFL-CIO representatives participated in the discussions. The only verbal commitlment obtained from the
unions was that they would work to improve .the skills of
lower-level worlcers already employed in industry. They said
these workers could be shifted to jobs in housing rehabilitation, etc., given training and accepted into the unions if
they met the requirements. The positions they would leave
in f)T'i.v.ate industry would then be filled by disadvantaged
r e sidents. But, importantly, the unions did not agree to
~ring their e ntrance requirements. Further discussions
were still being planned by GSES~ Madel Cities am:l. the unions.
A.4.c.
There has been union involvement in the Atlanta Urban League's
LEAP proposal (Learning Education Advancement Program). This
plan would give individuals possessing certain basic educationa
qualifications the necessary training to help make them more
compe titive when appearing before the various union apprenticeship boards. But eve n this program fails to include the
large portion of Model Cities who are educationally disadvantag,
A.4.d.
The Model Ci ties Director continued to particupate actively
in CAMPS (Cooperative Area Manpower Planning System), which
coordinates all public manpower programs in the area. In
December, ·1968, Model Cities presented its employment plan
to CAMPS. The l a tter approved it and included it as an
addendum to its 1969 program. The Model Cities - GSES staff
planner also submitted to CAMPS Part A of the Fiscal Year
1970 Model Cities plan (general information on programs
available, suggested changes to existing programs, suggested
new programs , etc.).
�-7A.4.e.
Discussions continued among representatives of the
Model Cities Employment Task Force. In addition to
Model Cities representatives, other agencies involved
on this committee include the following: Vocational
Rehabilitation; Vocational Education; Economic Opportunity
Atlanta, Inc.; and GSES. During this reporting period,
2 residents were added, bringing total representation
up to 20 people. One of the main efforts of this Task
Force is to effect the best coordination of available
manpower programs.
A.4.f.
Discussions continued with the President of the Citizens
and Southern National Bank. The institution decided to
participate in the Peoplestown neighborhood in a clean-upi
paint-up campaign, but not in a more extensive ca~paign
because of the delays necessary while Model Cities and
housing officials decide ~hat will be involved in intensive
rehabilitation, clearance, etc. The Bank will also be
involved in a ma jor development corporation geared to
increasing ghetto home and business ownership.
A.4.g.
Increased e f forts by the local cha pter of the National
Alliance o f Businessmen continued to have ramifications
for Model Cities. The NAB plans to devote extensive
empha s i s t his ye ar on obtaining increased female employment,
improving transportation to job locations, improving the
attitudes of 1st and 2nd line supervisory levels, and
obtaining additional job commitment s.
'l'he GSES-Model Cities
employment representative presented a speech on Model Cities
a t a mee t ing of t he Georgia Chapter of the Interna tional
Association fo r Personnel i n Employment Services. The
confab also included a s peech by the Local NAB Director
stressing emphasis on above s ubjects.
A.4.h .
The GSES-Model Cities Employment Coord inator dealt with at
least 4 major firms ,,,hich had expressed interest in hiring
Model Cities area workers. The J.C . Penny Co . agreed t o
h ire some 35 residents in its warehouse operation. Hiring
i s expected to be in the period July-September 1969. Model
Cities attempted to work ou t a trans portation plan assuring
easier access to the warehouse, located several miles away.
A.4.i.
Dixisteel, a subsidiary of Atlantic Steel, expressed an
interest about phasing in more women in its galvaniz.ing department, positions previous ly considered male-only jobs. Certain
success has been experienced by the company in the 5 positions
opened through the NAB program last year.
A.4.j.
Southland Engineers and Surveyors, Inc., appeared to be
optimistic about the possible placement of 5 residents at a
time in a training situation which would pay $1.70 an hour
and which would lead to some interesting future employment
possibilities. The training was expected to take 6 months
for someone with an 8th grade education.
�-8-
A.4.k.
The Best Manufac tur ing Corp . (Menlo, Ga .), said it was
definitely intere sted i n placing a plant in Model Cities
which would empl oy some 200 - 500 r e s i dents i n a glove
sewing operation. However , a great deal of adminis trative
paperwork must be accompiished t o overcome cer t ain pol ic i es
which previous ly have exc luded sewi ng ope rations from heing
eligible for Manpower Development T-r.aini ng Act funds (HDTA).
Negotiations will conti nue furthe r wi t h t he company if and
when such a bottleneck can be overcome .
A.4.1.
Model Cities-GSES staff began exa'ln.m.ng the approx i mate l y
78 projects which will nse supplemental funds to l earn if
there are a ny salary i nequit i e s among positions having simi l ar
responsibil i t ies.
A.4.m.
Model Cities began intensively r e viewing t he Atlanta Busines s
School proposal to train i ndiv iduals having a 10th grade
education or better . The training would take approximate ly
9 months.
A. 4.n.
The GSES-Model Ci.ties staff assis ted a n area candy manufacturer to obtai n managemen t and engineering a s sistanc e.
A.4.o.
Review was given to t he proposal submit ted by t he Golden
Age Employment Service to develop job-openings and to p l a ce
some of the hard - to-a ss ign people ( seni or citizens, the
handicapped, and the you t h) . The Se rvi ce is spons ored by
t he National Counc il o f Jewisl Women.
A. 4 . p .
GSES continued to provide 3 f u l l -t i me employe es, 1 part - time
e ~ploye e and one New Careerist. All of them have been provided
free o f char ge to Model Cities; but when the At lanta-HUD contract
is s igned, Model Cit i e s will cont r act with GSES for a p1 r ox imate l y $27, 000 to de fray the 1969 GSES costs.
A. 4 . q.
The GSES-Model Citie s represe ntat ive bega n wor k'i.ng with the
Phys i cal Pl anning Director on a program which wou ld provide
training for residents in painting , sheetrock work , paperhanging, light carpentry 9 e tc. Mo s t of thi s work wou ld oc cur
i n housing rehabilitat i on projects .
A.5.a.
The State Depar~ment of Fani ly and Chi ldr en Ser vices agreed
to reproduce a reprinting of the one-year and five -year
document.
A.5 . b.
GSES continued t o provide 2 planner3 a nd a s e cretary . In
addition, it t empora r ily loaned a n i nterv iewe r and a ssigned
a New Career s' t r ainee.
A.5
�-9-
B.
C.
Data ColleillQ.n
B. 1.a.
Discussions intensified with the Urban Observatory. The
Observatory, one of 6 in the nation, will be operated by
Ga. State College. The main paint of discussion with the
Observatory concerned establishing an evaluation program
for Model Cities. Observatory funds, as with Model Cities
supplemental funds, had not been granted by the end of the
reporting period.
B.l.b.
Eric Hill and Associates, Inc. presented its report on
residents' housing preferences, resources and needs which
will be involved in the Model Cities housing component.
B.1.c.
Contacts were made with the Bureau of Labor Statistics concerning its census of the area. BLS said the initial statistics would be available sometime within the next f;ew· ·
months. The entire census will be completed ·approximately
in October, with final tabulations being made available in
late 1969 _or early 1970. This census is e~ected to provide
the base data for the Model Cities program.
B.l.d.
The social services and resident involvement components
started a 11 100 questionnaire survey on housing and other
aspects concerning Old Age Assistance residents of the area.
(See Social Servi'ces section)
B.l.e.
The Atlanta Housing Authority surveyed all of the residents
in 1969 clearance area s. The data obtained was on general
family characteristics, housing conditions , and housing
preferences.
B.1.f.
A rodent control program,using EOA funds, began in the Pittsburgh
neighborhood. During the re.p orting period, the main emphasis
was on surveying the rodent population. Eventually this year,
an eradication phase will be effected .
B.l.g.
Fulton County Juvenile Court gathered data on Model Cities
area juvenile offenders. The statistics were categorized
according to census tract, offense , age , sex, race, school.
attended, and certain other categories.
B.1.h.
The Atlanta Police Department continued to supply data on
Model Cities area adult offenders. This information was
categorized under each of the 7 major offenses. The statistics
were only on crimes committed in Model Cities.
Problems
C.1
\
The major problem was the delay in signing the implementation
contract. This delay caused scheduling adjustments to be made
by the approximately 38 delegate agencies which will use
supplemental funds.
�-10-
II. ADMINISTRATIVE STRUCTURE
A.
B.
Policy and Advisory Group~
A.1.a.
One new member was added to the 14-member Executive Board Walter Mitchell, County Commission Chairman, who took the
place of Charlie Brown, the former Commission Chairman.
The other policy and advisory groups recorded no changes.
B.l.a.
There were 24 staff members as of the end of this reporting
period; in addition, there were many on-loan assignees and
consultants.
B.l.b.
Several other staff members were expected to be hired in the
beginning of the next reporting period.
Staff
III. RESIDENT INVOLVEMENT
A.
Activities
A.1.a.
Incorporation procedures were initiated for Stadium Heights,
Inc., the new name for the resident organization. Charter
calls for 15 members. Several meetings of residents,
attorneys, and Model Cities ~taff were held in formulating
the charter and by-laws.
A.l,b.
One meeting was held in each of the 3 1969 rehabilitation areas
to inform residents of the grant or loan procedures, and
involvement of the C & S National Bank. A total of approximately 225 persons attended the meetings.
A.l.c.
The resident involvement staff arranged for 200 free Alliance
Rasident Theatre tickets each week to be given to Model Cities
residents (mostly school children).
A.l.d,
Two issues of the Model Cities newspaper were distributed,
The issues concerned housing and employment. Some 10,000
copies of each issue were distributed.
A.1.e.
Model Cities staff met with residents of the Sugar Hill
community (See Physical Section).
IV. FEDERAL ASSIS~
A.1.a.
Continuous contact was made with HUD regional officials on
various aspects of the program.
Program
�C TY OF A.TLANT.A
CITY HALL
March 3, 1969
ATLANTA. GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison
MEMORANDUM
To:
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
From:
Subject:
Dan Sweat
6<1
Grant Review Board - Model Cities
Attached are the minutes of the Grant Review Board meeting of
December 31, 1968. The recommendations set forth in this document
were accepted by the Model Cities Director and have resulted in much
better lines of communications between the Model Cities program and
the various City departments, other governmental agencies, and
private organizations who are involved in the execution of the Model
Cities program.
The Grant Review B o ard on February 27, 1969, discussed the curr ent
status of the Mo d el Cities program and the resolution for approval for the
first year program which will be brought before the Board of Al de rmen on
Monday, March 3.
Collier Gladin, the City I s Planning Director, felt that the approval of th e
resolution should be initiated jointly by the Planning and Development
Committee and the Finance Committee and should not imminate from the
Al dermanic representatives on the Model Cities E xe cutive Board. It was
the concensus of the Grant Review Board that the resolution for approval
should come from the E x ecutive Board and that it is the responsibility of
each Aldermanic C ommittee chairman to insure that his committee has
given proper attention to the program. It would be desirable for each
committee involved to give its approval/disapproval on any paper coming
from the M o del Citi e s E xec utive Board prior to its being introduced in the
Al d ermanic Board. Such Aldermanic Committee expre ssion attached to
a M odel Cities paper would certainly strengthen the paper and result in
much better communications of the entire Model Cities program.
�Mayor Allen
Page Two
March 3, 1969
In the final analysis, whenever a paper is introduced, it should be the
responsibility of each member of the Board of Aldermen to ask that it
be referred to the particular committee if there is some question about
its contents. The Model Cities organization should continue to seek
prior approval of City departments and Aldermanic committees prior
to introduction of a resolution or ordinance for approval by the full
Aldermanic Board.
DS:fy
�-
·'
T
MINUTES
GRANT REVIEW BOARD
DECEMBER 31, 1968
The City of Atlanta Grant Review Board met in the office of the Director of
Governmental Liaison at 9: 30 a. m. on December 31, 1968, to review the
Atlanta Model Cities Program application to the U. S. Department of Housing
and Urban Development for Supplemental Funds. In attendance were:
Dan Sweat, Director of Governmental Liaison, Chairman,
Grant Review Board
Collier Gladin, Planning Director, Member, Grant Review
Board
George Berry, Deputy Comptroller, Member, Grant
Review Board
Johnny Johnson, Director of Model Cities
George Aldridge, City Planner
Carl Paul, Deputy Director of Personnel
Jay Fountain, Senior Accountant
The Grunt Review Board discussed with Mr. Johnson several major points of
concern, primarily procedures for approval by responsible City departments
and agencies; administrative organization; and personnel requirements.
In view of the complexities of the Model Cities Program and the need for full
understanding by all responsible City officials, the following concensus of the
Grant Review Board membership is hereby presented:
The Model Cities Program as established by the President and Congress of the
United States is perhaps the most comprehensive and optimistic grant-in-aid
program ever offered to America I s cities.
·
The concept and intent of the Model Cities Program is good . It provides for the
legally responsible local governing authority to e xer cise its authority and
influence in d emonstr ating bold new techniques of urban planning and development .
It provides maximum opportunity for real involvement and participation by
citizens of neighborhoods in the planning and execution of programs which effect
their daily lives.
�-.
~I
I
'
Page Two
And it promotes coordination among local, state and national agencies and
departments of the limited resources which are available.
The successful planning and execution of a Model Cities Program can be a
valuable experience for any city in its search for orderly and timely solutions
to its multitude of urban problems.
Atlanta's City Demonstration Agency has attempted to meet the challenge
and intent of the Model Cities legislation.
Citizens of all six neighborhood areas encompassed by Atlanta's Model Cities
Program were actively involved in organizing and planning for Model Cities
more than a year in advance of the beginning of the City's formal planning stage.
Local, state and federal public agencies and numerous private groups
participated in the preparation of the required planning grant application.
The Mayor and Board of Aldermen endorsed and supported the planning effort.
The Model Cities planning staff worked long and hard to prepare the documents
necessary for successful funding of the first year program.
The final documents detail a bold and innovative plan of attack on the major
problem areas in the Model Cities neighborhood. The Model Cities staff
has m .c1.tle an admira ble attempt to live up to the concept of the Model Cities
program. To a great e x tent the y have met both the needs and wishes of the
citi zens of the ar ea and the r equirements of planning and administration of the
City and federal governments.
The Model Cities Program also places on all City departments and agencies
the requirement for cooperation, coordination and approval of program
compone nts.
The r e are i ndications tha t thi s r e quirement h as not b een met.
Where it has not done so, each d e p a rtment and agency is obligated to r evi ew
and pas s on the specific components of the program which assigns execution
res ponsibility to that departme nt.
Each committee of the Board of A lde rmen should review and approve/disapprove
each p rogram component which falls within the responsibility and autho rity of
the committee.
The Planning and Development Committee should exercise its responsibility
for overall planning of the city by reviewing the Model Cities plan and making
�Page Three
the determin ation as to the compatibility of the Model Cities Program
with overall city plans.
The Finance Committee should dete rmine the fin a ncial feasibility of the
program and the capability of th e City to m e et the requirements placed
upon it by the program.
The full Board of Aldermen should carefully consider the priorities involved
in the Model Cities e x ecution, its impact on the area served and the entire
city as well.
The Grant Review Board believ e s these a pprovals should be given before
Aldermanic' sanction is granted.
I
I
We feel that if the provisions of the Model Cities application are und e rstood
and accepted before final approval is granted a much stronger progr a m w ill
result.
It should be understood that this is not intended as criticism of the planning
grant document or the w ork of the Model Cities staff, but is an effort to gain
full understanding and support of the strongest program in the b e st interest
of all citizens of Atlanta.
It is the refore recorrune n d ed that the Mayor and Board of Alderme n require
written accepta nce or de n ial of each cornpone nt of the Model Cities plan by
the dep a rtments and agen cie s responsible for the execution of each component
before final approval of the grant application is given .
~;J:tDan S w eat
Chai r man
DS :fy
~1
.
KMen:~~
Px
G ~?fi~t,:y,
~t~C)~~c~
C o llie r Gladin, Memb e r
f.
IJ. .~
~ { . M- O-Ge
E . H. Underw ood, Member
�The following is the motion proposed by Alderman Millican
at the Executive Board meeting on February 10, 1969. The
motion was referred to the City Attorney for legal opinion
and action.
MOTION:
WHEREAS, the E xe cutive Board of the Model Neighborhood
Program was created by resolution adopted and approved
November 20, 1967, by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen
to administer the planning phase of the program conducted
un<ler Title I of the Demonstration Cities and Metropolitan
· Development Act of 1966, and
WHEREAS, the planning phase of the Model Neighborhood Program
has ended and an appllcation has been prepared and submitted to
the U. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development for first
year action funds,
IT IS, THEREFORE, MOVED that:
1.
The e xi stence of the Model Neighborhood Executive Board
be continued until further action by the Mayor and B 0 ard of
Aldermen for the purpose of administering the first year
action program and budget and/ or other funds for this
program derived from Federal grants;
2.
That the membership of the said Executive Board remain the
same as it now is composed;
3.
The Model Neighborhood Executive Board shall h ave all the
powers and responsibilities granted to it heretofore and
especially those listed in said resolution of November 20, 1967,
and shall have the responsibility for recommending to the
Board of Aldermen the allocation of grant funds :received for
this program from the Federal Government together with the
responsibility of administering the first year action program
and funds allocated;
·4.
That the City Attorney be requested to prepare a resolution
for submission to the Board of Aldermen which embodies the
contents of this motion.
'
�CITY OF ATLANTA PLANNING DEPARTMENT
OFFICIAL POSITION PAPER
RELATION OF PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE
AND PLANNING DEPARTMENT TO MODEL CITIES EXECUTIVE BOARD AND STAFF
PROBLEM STATEMENT AND RECOMMENDATIONS- -
Re spe ctfully subm itte d ,
~G~d~~
Planning Dire ctor
February 13, 1969
�The ·purpose of this paper is to identify certain problems which have
arisen in the comprehensive planning process in Atlanta over the past year.
The problem centers around a misunderstanding of the responsibilities of
the Mode I Cities Program staff and Executive Board in relation to the
responsibilities of Planning and Development Committee and its professional
staff arm, the Planning Department.
In November 1967, the Planning and
Development Committee of the Board of Aldermen sponsored and recommended

approval of a resolution establishing the Model Cities Executive Board.
This resolution was subseque ntly adopted by the Board and approved by the
Mayor on November 20, 1967. The resolution specifically stated that
11
the
Model Neighborhood Executive Board is hereby created for the purpose of
administe ring the planning phase of (the Mod e l Neighborhood) program . 11
The Planning Department invested a great deal of time and effort both
in preparing the Model Ne ighborhood Application and subse quently in assi sting
in de ve loping the Mode l Ne ighborhood Plan.
In fact, mu ch of the mate rial
c ontained in al I the Model Cities re ports and applications originate d and was
refined in the Pla nni ng De pa rtmen t by its sta ff personne l .
It was and st i ll is
our intention to work c lose ly wi th the Mode l C it ies staff in a ssur ing the success
�-2-
of th is program. There appears now to be a lack of understandi ng on the
part of the Model Cities staff as to the role and responsibility of the
Planning and Development Committee and !he Planning Department. The
committee, using the department as its staff arm, is charged wi th the
responsibility of reviewing al I plans and programs concerne d with urban
growth, development, and redevelopment throughout the city. The
Model Cities Program, on the other hand, is a spe cial purpose six
neighborhood demonstration program primar ily concerned with one te nth of
the city's residents and less than five per cent of the city's area . For
consiste ncy sake , obviously the Planning and De velopme nt Commi ttee
should review the physical programs, plans and proposals developed by this
age ncy for the Mode I Neighborhood area as it wou Id review plans and programs
of any other are a of the city for conformance with ove rall city po li cy and
goals . The Planning Department's concern is no t control over th e Model
Citie s Program.
Instead, the department is simply exercising those functions
for whi ch it is respo ns ibl e a s sta ff a rm to the Pl anni ng and Deve lopment
Committee and as set forth in the Code of the City of Atlanta. The depar tme nt,
a s a ge ne ral planning age ncy , mu st have the opportunity to rev iew plans.
When in the de partmen t 's professiona I judgme nt inadv isab le proposa ls have bee n
a dvoca ted that lack a ny justific ati o n in view of ex isting city po lic y, the n th e
department must have the o pportunity of reporting such situations with positive
re comme ndations for improve me nt to th e Planning and Deve lopm e nt Committee
�-3and eventually the Board of Aldermen.
We had assumed at the beginning that conflicts could be resolved through
a close inter··staff relationship between the city planning agency and the
Model Cities agency.
Unfortunately and frequently, because of conflict
commun_ications have broken down and th is has not been achieved. The source
of conflict has been a disagreement over the necessary degree of conformity
between Model City plans and programs and City overall goals and objectives.
The Planning Department has attempted to explore and resolve this problem
with the Model Cities staff.
However, the Model Cities staff seems to
interpret this action as a Planning Department attempt to run their program. An
analysis of their lack of understanding indicates no apparent realization of
the fact that the planning effort for a portion of the city should be coordinated
with the city's overall planning effort.
It is important to point out here that we
ore not attempting to stiffle the Model Cities Program or to prevent innovative
approaches to problem solving. To take such a view ignores the fact that
through the leadership and effort of the Planning Department, with much assistance
from oth er agencies, Atlanta was awarded one of the first Model Citi es Grants
in the nation.
Perhaps this whole misunderstanding is based on the Mode l Cities staff's
perception of the Planning De partme nt as a I ine department.
Planning transcends
traditional departmental lines, is a staff function, and established responsibilities
as de fined in the Code of th e City of Atlanta must be met. One of HUD 's
under lying goals for the Mode l Cities Program was to bring into clear focus
�-4problems in governmenta I organization. The department has been we II
awa re of such prob le ms in th e Atlanta gove rnm e ntal system as witnessed in
the PAS report, a product of th e Cl P and pl.anning. Though that report found
fault with the governmental system, it indicated that the present system
has worked very well, primarily on the basis of mutual trust and cooperation.
In order to avoid further conflicts it is imperative that such a cooperative
atmosphere be established.
It is inadvisable that the aldermanic committee
system be used at times and ignored at others, depending on which happens
to serve one's purpose best at a particular time.
It is difficult enough to
make the system work now. The proposed approach being offered by the
Model Cities Program (which is to ignore the aldermanic committee system}
would invite chaos, unless a suitable and acce ptabl e ove ral I re form is
accomplished.
The Planning and Development Committee expressed its concern over this
problem in its meeting of January 17, 1969. Chairman Cook asked the Model
Cities director several questions concerning the role of the Planning and
Development Committee , other aldermanic committees, and city departments
in the Model Citie s Program. Mr . Johnson took the position that the Mode l
Ci tie s Executive Board would report to the full Board of Aldermen through the
two alderman ic membe rs of the Exe cutive Board. Th is procedure , in effect ,
bypasses the Planning and Deve lopment Committee and to a large extent
ignores the a ldermanic standing commi ttee conc e pt unde r which the Atla nta
City Government presently operates.
In effect, the Model Cities area is th us
�-5treated as a separate entity, apart from the total city.
It offers no
opportunity for the Planning and Development Committee to review Model
Cities plans and to make recommendations to the Board
ol Aldermen
concerning plan conformity with city general plans. Chairman Cook further
indicated that the Planning Department had certain reservations about
physical plans for the Model Cities area and asked what role would be
played by the Planning Department in further testing plans for the area. Mr.
Johnson stated that he felt the physical plans for 1969 required no change.
Here lies the crux of the problem.
Mr. Cook stated that the Planning Department
was responsible for al I planning activities throughout the city, therefore,
the Planning and Development Committee has the responsibility to review and
evaluate physical plans developed for the Mode I Cities area.
This paper deals with a confrontation in responsibilities between the
Model Cities staff and Executive Board, the Planning Department and Planning
and Development Committee of the Board of Aldermen. We strongly suspect
that the fundamental problems and issues involved here cou Id spread. Thus, other
confrontations could develop between other departments and their aldermanic
committees and the Model Cities staff and Executive Board.
In this light, we offer the following recommendations:
The adoption of a formal review procedure by the Boa rd of Aldermen that
is consistent with the existing aldermanic committee system is warranted.
In
other words, every resolution, ordinance, etc ., when introduced into the Board
�-6· of Aldermen meeting, must be referred to a standing committee of the Board
of Aldermen unless such a rule of procedure is waived by majority vote of
the full Board of Aldermen. A time I imit on the period of review by the
standing committee of the Board of Aldermen could be specified. As with all
issues concerning the city, the matter will eventually be resolved on its
merits by the full Board of Aldermen.
The value of such formal review procedure by the Board of Aldermen
should be fairly apparent.
It keeps the appropriate aldermanic committees
end department staffs informed of proposals and offers an opportunity for
reviewing, making recommendations and achieving coordination.
As mentioned earlier, to ignore the aldermanic committee system is
to invite chaos, unless a suitable and acceptable overall reform is accomplished.
A second alternative approach to the current situation would be to immediately
move toward es tab I ish ing a Department of Administration in the Mayor's Office
as recommended by the PAS Report. Such a department would include the
following functions: Planning, Budgeting and Management, Personnel, Public
Information, and Data Processing. The Model Cities Program, with its innovative
approaches and demonstrations, would serve as a testing vehicle for administrative
and technical purposes and would be responsible to the Mayor and Board of
Aldermen through the Department of Administration.
�-
EXHIBITS
�. f -·. J
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Chapter 32
URBAN RENEWAL*
Sec. 32-1.
Sec. 32-2.
Sec. 32-3,
Sec. 32-4.
Sec. 32-5.
Sec. 32-6.
Sec.
Sec.
Sec.
Sec.
Sec.
Sec.
Sec.
32-7.
32-8.
32-9.
32-10.
32-11.
32-12.
32-13.
Duties of planning department.
Duties of planning engineer.
Determination of phasing and of allocations to be devoted
to project areas.
Dekrmination of locations of projects.
Rezoning recommendations.
Processing· applications embracing subdivisions, requests
for building permits.
Commitments by builders.
Minimum structural requirements.
.
Varying specifications in description of materials.


D~signation of chang es in "description of materials".


Restriction on issuance of building permits. ·
Technical committee.
Reserved .
"'- .Sec. 32-1. Duties of planning department.
Urban renewal activities of the city shall be conducted in
the department of planning under the general supervision
of the mayor and board of aldermen through the planning and
development committee. The department of planning shall
study the urban renewal requirements of the city, to determine
ways and means for their accomplishment, and to promote and
facilitate timely coordination and orderly development of
urban renewal plans, projects and other related activities
throughout the city. (Cum. Supp., § 56A.3; Ord. of 6-1-64,
§ 2; Ord. of 12-21-64)
Editor's note-The planning and development committee has been
substituted for the urban r enewal committee in §§ 32-1, 32-2 and 32-13,
pursuant to Ord. of Dec. 21, 1964 aboli shing the urban r enewal committee and transferring its functions to the planning and development
committee.
Sec. 32-2. Duties of planning engineer.
The planning engineer shall devote p·a rticular attention
to the requirements and commitments of the "workable program", as defined in the National Housing Act of 1954, as
amended, and shall call tipon the various departments, agen*Cross references-Minimum housing standards, § 15-21 et seq.;
responsibility of department of -.building inspector relative to demolition of buildings,§ 8-12; director of urban renewal emeritus,§ 21-75(y).
State law reference-Powers of municip·a Jities as to urban r enewal,
Ga. Code, Ch . 69-11.
Supp . No. 5
1617
..
...






�',,
§ 32-2
. § 32-5
ATLANTA CODE
cies and agents of the city, as required, to carry out their responsibilities thereunder to include annual revisions for recertifications of th~ "workable program". The planning engineer shall ins ure coordination of capital improvement projects with urk.n renewal project plans in order to obtain the
best possible advantage for the city. H e shall frequently consult wit h the mayo:;: and chairman of the planning and development committee of the board of aldermen and keep them
informed as to urban renewal requirements and the state of
development of the city's urban renewal plans, a nd shall make
recommendations thel'eon for facilita.ting progress of urban
· renewal in the city. ( Cum. Supp., § 56A.3; Ord. of 6-1-64, § 2;
Ord. of 12-21-64)
Note-See editor's note following § 32-1.
Sec. 32-3. Determination of phasing and all allocatior:~. to be
. devoted to project areas.
The planning department, in coordination with the housing
authority of the city, will determine the phasing considered
desirable for construction of F.H.A. 221 housing allocations
and what portions thereof, if any, should be devoted to urban
renewal project areas, and shall make recommendations accordingly to local F.H.A. officials . .(Cum. Supp., § 56A.4;
Ord. of 6-1-64, § 2)
r
.
'
.,,.,., I
Sec. 32-4. Determination of locations of projects.
The planning depa1tment will study proposed loca tions for
such projects and determine those considered most suitable
from the city's standpoint for 221 ho•.1sing projects and shall
coordinate thereon with local F.RA. offi cials. (Cum. Supp.,
§ 56A.5; Ord. of 6-1-64, § 2)
Sec. 32-5. Rezoning recommendations.
The Atlanta-Fulton County joint planning board will make
timely recommendations to the zon ing committee for rezoning
such areas as it considers appropriate in order to facilitate
the 221 hous ing progn1m. (Cum. Supp., § 56A.6; Ord. of
12-21-64)
-:·,
Editor's note- Ord. of Dec. 21, 1964 r edesignated the planning· and
zoning committee as the zoning committee.
·Supp. No. 5
J
1618
'\

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§ 2-39
ATLANTA CODE
§ 2-40.i
recommendations with references to civil defense ; to supervise the expenditure of appropriations made to civil defense
by the city for civil defense purposes, and to hand]€ all matters
in connection therewith. (Code 1953, § 28.11; Orel. No. 19GG46, § 2, G-20-GG)
Amendment note-Ord. No. 19G6-46, § 2, enacted ,Tune 20i I96G, an_d
effective Dc,cember 31, 19GG, amended § 2-39 to add the prov1s1ons codlfied herein as subsection (b).
Cross references-Duty to grant permits to places selling sandwiches,
soft drinks, §§ 17-159, 17-lGO; duty to formulate rule? and re_gulations
for police departm ent, § 25-l(a); duty to pass on pernuts and licenses, §
25-l(b).
Sec. 2-40. Special duty of finance committee relative to annual
tax ordinance.
In addition to the powers, duties and authority set forth in
sections 2-29 and 2-31, the finance committee shall ·prepa re
and report to the m ayor and board of aldermen the anm1ai tax
ordinance. (Code 1953, § 28.12)
Cross references-Duty of building and electric lights commi~tee to
supervise department of building inspec tor, § 8-3; power of t2:c committee to cancel business license penalties and fi. fa. costs, § 17-24;
petitions for license to peddle articles not enumerated in annual tax
ordinance to be referred to finance committee, § 17-323.
.
.
~
D
- Sec. 2-40.1. Planning and development committee.
(a) Creatio·n. A committee of the board of aldermen is
hereby created to be entitled the planning and development
committee.
(b) Me1nbershs-i1J. The planning and development committee shall l;>e composed of six members and a chairman (total of
seven) to be appointed by the mayor. The mayor shall appoint
the planning and development committee so that a representation is obtained of alctermanic committees concerned with
community development, redevelopment and impro v"'ments.
~
(c) Functions, responsibilities. This planning and development committee shall have the primary responsibility to review and coordinate the long range plans and programs of all
city efforts in the fields of community development, redevelopment, facilities and improvements, and to make suggestions
to other appropriate aldermanic committees or recommend
actions and policies for adoption by the board of alciE:rmen to
Supp. No. 4
52

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§ 2-40.1
ADMINISTRATION
§ 2-41
insure maximum coordination and the highest quality of
urban community development. This responsibility shall in~
elude the review and evaluation of the ele)11ents of the comprehensive (general) plan development by the planning department with guidance from the Atlanta-Fulton County
Joint Planning Bo~rd; this comprehensive plan to be composed
of at least a land-use plan, a major thoroughfare plan and a
community facilities plan with public improvements program.
The committee shall further be responsible for developing
policy recommendations on all other matters concerning the
planning and coordination of future city developments including, specifically, the community improvements program
(CIP), the 1962 Federal Highway Act, the workable program
for community improvement, urban renewal preliminary and
project plans, and other related urban renewal matters. (Ord.
of 12-21-64)
Editor's note- Ord. of Dec. 21, 19G4, from which ~ 2-40.1 is derived,
did not expressly amend this Code, hence the manner of codification
was at the discretion of the editors. That part of said ordi!!ance abolishing the urban re newal committee and providing· for transfer of its
functions and activities to the planning and development committee, has
riot been codified as part of this section.
Sec. 2-40.2. Urban renewal policy committee; membership.
There . is hereby established a standing committee of the
board of aldermen to be known · as the urban renewal policy
committee, to consist of five (5) members of the board of
aldermen, to be appointed by the mayor, including the chairman, the vice-chairman and one other regular member of the
planning and development committee, and two members to be
appointed by the chairman of the Housing Authority of the
city. (Ord. of 1-18-65)
Editor's note- Ord. of J a n. 18, . 1965 did not expressly amend this
Code, h ence the manner of codifica~:on was at the discretion of the
editors. The preamble to said ordinance recited the f ;:~t that said committee, pursuant to resolution, is c::::::rdinating urban renewal activities
and programs between the city and its urban renewal agent, the housing
authority.
I
,
Sec. 2-41. Duties of zoning committee.
The duties of the zoning committee shall be to hold any
public hearing required to be held by the provisions of the
Zoning and Planning Act of the General Assembly of Georgia
approved January 31, 1946, and contained in Georgia Laws
Supp. No. 6
53

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,f'
0 \ TCE OF c1n -CLF.RK ----- - --- · ---
r.
CITY HALL
A\ .MITA., CEDRGIA..
A RESOLUTION
BY PLAN r--JIN G AND DEVt . ':> PMENT COMM ITTE E
WHEREAS , pu rsu~· t to a re solution a dop ted by the Boord of Aldermen
on Morc'i 6, 1967 , th e City of \ Ionto has subm itte d on opp l ic.o t io n to the Federa l

Deportment of Housing a nd Urba, 1evelopme nt for a ~ode i Cities pla nning grant
under Title I of the Demonstrat i on ·.
i• ie s a nd M etropo l i tan Ot>velopme nt Act of
1966 and,
WHER EAS, the an noun_e · 11t of those cities .,.,h:c h ho ve bee n chosen
'
to re,:ei v., ~vc'i grants was made Nove
·_- '6, 1?67 anrl
WrlEREAS, Atl anta i.-. an
,A
stortec
ri~REAS, it is impo , to •
f.!d 1otely ~ince th1; pl,,-,,,
Jr•;•
H,J,
r1 o:,6


it


th, F 1
--., i te j t
I
~
,
!l
~,/',; ,
·, t~ ,.
In
on E.l(e
1.- '1·.
e
Boo rd com p:::>,;e
1i •r
'
1
1\t ...
I
},*"1Qd
t•.J ·
'a
•f,a
J
C:'
A;! O'l l u
of this p1og rom be
·v,
and,
the auth o rity
n~mbers of th e Boord
.,, (li a1 rman of th ~ Fu l ton
Cou;-;ty (._ ..,,
to
ssiu ,. )
ll'
member tor.,.


pp::1··t .j,


'
e rn or; an d th ree members
I
repre:,e ;' he private sector of the (Ommur ,ity, en .. :•o - .,e g en e ra l pub lic ,
one from c.•o'·g the City ' s Negro 1-?adtrship a ·,d
Are11 re~iaf:'
r,Jr, •I-, .,. Mode l N e ighbor hood
1•s.
"~aw , THEREFORE,
Alde rme:-- rhut th e
~ode I
I
BE
Ir
RESO LI·
Nej gh92 ho.:>d E..<ec
e!lrpose of adminis tering the pl
unde r Title
,-p
Jt:.
r ·
c 30<.•
~
1,:-:1or and Board of
1$
iereby c re a ted fo r
the
n n ing phase of sJct !' ,~ yr ... hi.c h is conduc ted
of the Demonstra t ion Ci t ies a nd Me tr0pu' 1ta11 Develo pm ent A ct o f
1966 , common ly known as the Model Citie s Program , and for wh ich fe de ra l financial
ass istance js
cc:se ixerl
THAT the Model Neighborhood Execut ive Boord shol I be composed of
the Ma yo r of th e City of Atlanta, who shall serve a s Cha irma n; two members of the
t
I
�~·
, ...
.• ...
· - ..
~
.. .i ......
~
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t

-2.. '
Boord of Aldermen, to be se l c ted by the me mbersh ip of that body, one of which
..
.
shall be from among those mem\ rs representing th e first and fourth wards; the
President of the Atlanta School \1oard; the Chairman of th e Fulton County Commissicn; .
one member to
be appo inted by the Governor; and th ree me mbe rs to represe nt th e
private sector of th e communi ty ,
,,e to be appointed by the Mayor from th e
.genera l public, one to be appointee. by the Mayor fro'm among the City•s Ne gro
leadership, and one to be selected b> and from the mem be rshi p of a committee to
be
forme d repr esenting the citizens of the Model Neighborhood Area (Model Neighborhood
Area Cou nc i I) .
THAT the Model Ne ig hb9rh ood Exec u tiv e Boord sh all have th e
authori~ and responsi b jlity for admin is tering the planning phase o f th e Cityts Model
by
the project staff a nd th e re conc i I inu
f c on fl ictiqg plans, goals , progrgijl s,
priorities and ti me schedu le s oft
the re spo nsjbi l ity for recommendin g to the Board o f Aldermen
the gJ location
of crggt
~ s recei ved for th is program from the Fe de ra l Gove rnmen t .
THAT the Mayor is re quested to ma ke such , ppoi ntments as he is
a u thor ized to make under th e above provisions and is furthe r requested to contact th e
Fu lton County Commission, the Atlanta Board of Educa ti on and the Governor
of Georgia, and to request that they make appointments to the Model Neighborhood
Execu t ive Boord in conformance with the above prov is ions.
ADOPTED BY BOARD OF ALDERHEN NOVDiBER
20,
1967
APPROVED ~OVF.MBER 20, 1967


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OitFICE ·oF CITY ·CLEifJ( _____
. CITY HI\LL
ATLANTA, GEORGIA
-
-· ·---- - - - - - --- --
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·--· -
·-
·- - ·---
-···--· ·· ·- ·-·- ··-
- - -· - .
A RESOLUTI or
BY PLAN !'~ !~ G ·. ND DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE
WHER i. ,\S, pursuant to a resolution adopted by tl: e Boord of Alde rmen
on March 6, 1967, ; 1e City of Atlanta has submitted on application to the Federal
I
Departm e nt of Housir' _\ and Urban Development for a ~ode I _ Cities planning grant
uncle( Title I of the De,·. onstration Cities and Metropolitan Development Act of
1966 and,
WHEREAS, tt

announcement of those cities which have be~ ,1 chosen
to receive such grants was , ·:::ide November 16, 1967 and,
· WHEREAS, Atl c ,~a is among thos~ cii ;es c i··;-~e . · and,
WHEREAS, it is ir-, pc, rtant that the plc nro ing ph a~ of this program be
started immediately since this ( -. -:ise ;, limited to a cn e year ~riod and,
WHEREAS, in its opf. !icotion the City pr c;.:,0s~d ~fiat the o u tb.,osl.!Y
in an Ex ecut ive Board composed ::,f the fv',::J /Or of Atlant ,.
~
t-....,:,
memben .::,f the Board
~,:,:.~
of Alde rm en. the Pres ident of th,; Atlanta Sc hool Soc rd,
County Com m issio n; one membe r to be oppr.·;n te d b:,
tr-,,
,.. C~o irm ,rn of ~he Fulton
Nern,::, r; and three members
to represe nt the private sec tor of the c omm uni ty; o n e f rcn, + e generci pub li c,
one from am o ng th e City•s Negrc le a dership end one fr v r : -,e Model !'fo ighbo rhood
Area resid ents.
NON, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOL V ED
t.: 1 ;; , ':!
t .~o yor and Soa rd of
under Tit le I of the D e monstra tion Cities and Merro.t..---·
o0 ! :ic::·, o~._"~l
o;:;,m;:.• -, r _A. c t o f
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---
_ _ _commo
____


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_
_ _a_
_
__
_ __

· - a r.d fo r whi c h
-- -~
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" ial
""'
1966,
n ly
nown
s_
th e_M
ode
l Citie
s Program,
fo-J ~r.JI
firon
--
assistanc e i.u:e..--e i,),le.d .
THAT th e M cx:.le l N e i ghborhocd Ex ecutiv e ecc .- 3 shall b e c om?Os:-! d of
th e M ayor of the "City of Atlanta, who shall serve as Choi rmo n; t,.vo m em~'·~rs o f th e
·,
_)
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i
·~/;~!·_
,r:i :
Boar d of A! df:rrn e n, to be selected by the member ),
shall
b::,c /, one of which
be fr om am ong those members representing t~ e f; : :::·.d fo,;rth words; the
t!11:
Presid ent of the Atlanta School Board; the Choirmori
Fulron County Commissic-n;
l
one member to be appointed by the Governor; c:··,• ·, ,:-- :-1, '-• ,11\.:.,~ rs to represent the
private sec to~ of the commu_n ity, one to be opp<., : '
, ,.,! •
..
ge ne ral p .J b !;c , one to be appointed
1
.i ~'/
•h,-
Mayor from the

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by
the .~.,k 1 , '.rorr,
C ' )!c:f'. 9
the City's Negro
leodershi i-,. and one to be se lected by a nd fr c rr i; ,_. T«.'"lLt · ~!, ,p c,f a committee to


,~ , , i ··. tme·; t s


be
as he is
Fulton C c !; ' ry Comrn;ss ion , the At !.; _· 1 -:J . Boord __r


j ,; .~~-


),


m d_J_he G overnor


of G eers · .: . .ind to request th c t the ;, ,,a!..:e op p-:--
-, t,.,_,.
~ ~: ~'-- e .V .,)de I Neighbo rhood
-I
- ·· -.,
ADOPTED BY BOARD CF .:,lt Ef..~J:\' r-.-CYE.'<BF.R 20, 1967
-¼/'· ·~.true
APPROVED ~OVEHBER 20, 1967
- , ,/

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�MINUTES
GRANT REVIE W BOARD
DECEMBER 31, 1968
The City of Atlanta Grant Review Board m e t in the office of the Director of
Governmental Liaison at 9: 30 a. m. on December 31, 1968, to review the
Atlanta Mode l Cities Program application to the U. S. Departme nt of Housing
and Urban Development for Supplemental Funds. In attendance were: ·
Dan S w eat, · Director of Governmental Liaison, Chairman,
Grant Review Board
Collie r Gla din , Plan ning D i r e ctor, M emb e r, Gra nt R e view
Board
George Berry, Deputy Comptroller, Member, Grant
Review Board
Johnny Johns on, D i rector o f Model C i tie s
George Aldridge, City Planner
Carl Paul, D e puty Dir e ctor of P e rsonne l
Jay Founta in, S e nior Acco unt ant
The Grant Review Board discuss e d with Mr. Johnson several major point s of
concern , _E)rimarily p rocedur e s for approva l by responsible City d e partments
and age ncie s ; a dmini stra tive or gani zation; a nd personne l r e quir e m ents.
In view of the comp lexities o f t he Model Cities Program and the n eed for f ull
understanding by all responsible City officials, the following concensus o f the
Grant R e view Board m e mb e rship i s her e by pr esente d:
The M ode l C i t ies Pro gram as establi s h ed b y t he P r es ident and C ongress of the
Unit ed Sta t es i s perhaps t he mos t c omp reh ens ive and opt imis ti c grant-in-ai d
p rogram ever offered t o America ' s cit ies.
The c o n c_e pt and i n t ent of the Mod e l Citie s P r o g r am i s good . It p r o v i des fo r the
l egally responsib l e local g overning aut h o r i ty to exercise its auth ority and
influence in demonstrating bol d new t echniques o f urban planning and development.
It provides max imum opportunity for real involvement an<;l participation by
citizens of neighborhoods i n the planning a nd execution o f programs which effect
their daily lives.
�Page Two
I'
And it promotes coordination among local, state and national agencies and
departments of the limited resources which are available.
The successful planning and execution of a Model Cities Program can be a
valuable e x perience for any city in its search for orderly and timely solutions
to its multitude of urban problems.
Atla·nta' s _C ity Demonstration Agency has attempted to meet the challenge
and intent of the Model Cities legislation.
Citizens of all six neighborhood areas encompassed by Atlanta's Model Cities
Program were actively involved in organizing and planning for Model Cities
more than a year in advance of the beginning of the City's formal planning stage.
Local, state and federal public agencies and numerous private groups
participated in the preparation of the required planning grant application.
The Mayor and Board of Aldermen endorsed and supported the planning effort.
The Model Cities planning staff worked long and hard to prepare the _documents
necessary for successful funding of the first year program.
The final documents deta il a bold and innova tive plan of attack on the major
problem areas in the Model Cities neighborhood. The Model Cities staff
has made an admirable attempt to live up to the concept of the Model Cities
program. To a great e x tent they have met both the needs and wishes of the
citizens o-f the area and the requirements of planning and a dministration of the
City and f e deral governme nts.
The Model Cities Program also places on all City departments and agencies
the requirement for cooperation, coordination and approval of program
compone nts.
There are indica tions tha t thi s requirement h as not b een met.
Where it has not done so, each department and agency is obligated to review
and pass on the spe cific compone nts of the program which assigns e xe cution
res ponsibility to that d e p art ment.
Each committee of the Board of A ldermen should review and a pp rove/disapprove
each program c omponent which fa ll s within the responsibility and authority of
the committee .
'
The Planning and D evelopment Committee should e xe rcise its responsibility
for overall planning of the city by r ·e vi ewing the Model Cities plan and making
�Page Three
the determination as to the compatibility of the Model Cities Program
with overall city plans.
The Finance Committee should determine the financial feasibility of the
program and the capability of the City to meet the requirements placed
upon it by the program.
The full Board of Aldermen should carefully consider the priorities involved
in the Modei Cities execution, its impact on the area served and the entire
city as well.
The Grant Review Board believes these approvals should be given before
Aldermanic sanction is granted.
We feel that if the provisions of the Model Cities application are understood
and accepte d before final approval is granted a much stronger program will
result.
It should be understood that this is not intended as criticism of the planning
grant document or the work of the Model Cities staff, but is an effort to gain
full understanding and support of the strongest program in the best interest
of all citizens of Atlanta.
It is thP-"t"efore recommended that the Mayor and Board of Aldermen require
written acceptance or denial of each component of the Model Cities plan by
the departments and agencies responsible for the execution of each component
before final approval of the grant application is given.
DS:fy
f.
tJ. Ltv~ ct_~~
E . H . Underwood, Member
�·.
,. § 2-39
ATLANTA CODE
§ 2-40._i
recommendations with references to civil defense; to supervise the expenditure of appropriations made to civil defense
by the city for civil defense purposes, and to handle all matters
in connection therewith. (Code 1953, § 28.11; Orel. No. 196646, § 2, 6-20-GG)
Amendment note-Ord. No. 1966- 116, § 2, enacted .Tune 20, 1966, and
effective December 31, 19GG, amended § ·2-39 to add the provisions codified herein as subsection (b)·.
.
Cross references-D uty to grant permits to places selling sandwiches,
soft drinks, §§ 17-159, 17-lG0; duty to formulate rul e~ and re_gulations
for police department, § 25-1 (a); duty to pass on pernuts and licenses , §
25-l(b).
Sec. 2-40. Special duty of finance committee relative to annual
tax ordinance.
In addition to the powers, duties and authority set forth in
sections 2-29 and 2-31, the finance committee shall prepare
and repoi't to the mayor and board of aldermen the anniial tax
ordinance . . (Code 1953, § 28.12)
Cross references-Duty of building and electric lights committee to
supervise departm ent of building inspector, § 8-3; power of tax committee to ca ncel business license penalties and fi . fa. costs, § 17-24;
petitions for license to peddle articles not enumerated in annual tax
ordinance to be referred to finance committee, § 17-323.
D
Sec. 2-40.l. Planning and development committee.
(a) Creation. A committee of the board of aldermen is
hereby created to be entitled the planning and development
committee.
(b) Membershs-izJ. The planning and development committee shall be composed of six members and a chairman (total of
seven) to be appointed by the mayor. Tbe mayor shal! appoint
the planning and development committee so that a representation is obtained of aldermanic committees concerned with
community development, redevelopment and improvements.
(c) Functions, responsibilities. This planning and development committee shall have the primary responsibility to review and coord-inate the long range plans and programs of all
city efforts in the fields of community development, redevelopment, facilities and improvements, and to make suggestions
to other appropriate aldermanic committees or recommend
actions and policies for adoption by the board of aldermen to
Supp. No. 4
52·
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�··. I

§ 2-40.1
ADMINISTRATION
§ 2-41
insure maximum coordination and the highest quality of
urban community development. This responsibility shall include the review and evaluation of the eleh1ents of the comprehensive (general) plan development by the planning department with guidance from the Atlanta-Fulton County
Joint Planning Board; this comprehensive plan to be composed
of at least a land-use plan, a major thoroughfare plan and a
community facilities plan with public improvements program.
The committee shall further be responsible for developing
policy recommendations on all other matters concerning the
planning and coordination of future city develop_m ents including, specifically, the community improvements program
(CIP), the 1962 Federal Highway Act, the workable program
for community improvement, urban renewal preliminary and
project plans, and other related urban renewal matters. (Ord.
of 12-21-64)
Editor's note- Ord. of Dec. 21, 19G4, from which § 2-40.l is derived,
did not expressly amend this Code, hence the manner of codification
was at the discretion of the editors. That part of said ordinance abolishing the urban renewal committee a11d providing for transfer of its
functions and activities to the planning and development committee, has
not been codified as part 9f this section.
.
Sec. 2-40.2. Urban renewal policy committee; membership.
There . is hereby established a standing committee of the
board of aldermen to be known as the urban rene,\'.al policy
committee, to consist of five (5) members of the board of
aldermen, to be appointed by the mayor, including the chairman, the vice-chairman an d one other regular member of the
planning and development committee, and two members to be
appointed by the chairman of the Housing Authority of the
city. (Oi:d. of 1-18-65)
Editor's note- Ord. of Jan. 18, 1965 did not expressly amend this
Code, hence the manner of codification was at the discretion of the
editors. The preamble to said ordinance recited the fact that said committee, pursuant to resolution, is coordinating urban renewal activities
and programs between th€ city and its urban renewal agent, the housing
authority.
Sec. 2-41. Duties of zoning committee.
The duties of the zoning committee shall be to hold any
public hearing required to be held by the provisions of the
Zoning and Planning Act of the General Assembly of Georgia
approved January 31, 1946, and \!Ontained in Georgia Laws
Supp. No. 5
53
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�FEB
7 196!f
2/h/69
.. •.·

RESOLUTION
WHEREAS, l-~. J. C. Johnson, Director Atlnnta Hodel
Cities Prograi:1, has requested the Atlanta Housing Authority
to enter into a lease agree.i""llent for certain propsrties
within Project GA. R-10, Rawson-Washington Project (identi- .
tied on attached map); and



HER.EAS, the property is to be used for the location of




the Kodel Cities Offices, which is a civic and social c~deavor
serving the needs of p~ople in the Urban Renewal Areas imr:mdiately adjacent;
NCJ:l, THEREFGRE, BE IT RE.SOLVED BY THE BOARD OF CO~·!:.-!ISSIONERS
OF THE HOUSil;G AUT:--IORITY OF THE CITY OF .ATLPJ--iTA, GSOrlGIA, that
the Executive Director, after co:-...currence by the Renewal Assistance
Administration and the Board of Aldermen of the City of Atlanta, is
authorized to execute a L9ase .Agreer.:,:mt u...--ider th~ preva.ilL,g provisions of tha lrrt Handbook.
I
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Chapter 32
URBAN RENEWAL*
Sec. 32-1.
Sec. 32-2.
Sec. 32-3,
Sec. 32-4.
Sec. 32-5.
Sec. 32-6.
Sec.
Sec.
Sec.
Sec.
Sec.
Sec.
Sec.
32-7.
32-8.
32-9.
32-10.
32-11.
32-12.
32-13.
Duties of planning department.
Duties of planning engineer.
Determination of phasing and of allocations to be devoted
to project areas.
D etrrmination of locations of projects.
Rezoning r ecommendations.
Processing applications embracing subdivisions, r eques_ts
for building permits.
Commitments by builders.
Minimum structural r equirement s.
Varying specifications in description of materials.
D esignation of changes in "description of m aterials".
Restriction on issuance of building p ermits.
Technical committee.
Reserved.
,Sec. 32-1. Duties of planning department.
Urban renewal ac:tivities of the city shall be conducted in
the department of planning under the general supervision
of the mayor and board of aldermen through the planning and
development committee. The department of planning shall
study the urban renewal requirements of the city, to determine
ways and means fo1· their accomplishment, and to promote and
facilitate timely coordination and orderly development of
urban renewal plans, projects and other refated activities
throughout the city. (Cum. Supp., § 56A.3; Ord. of 6-1-64,
§ 2; Ord. of 12-21-64)
Editor's note- The planning and development committee has been
substituted for t h e urban renewal committee in §§ 32-1, 32-2 a nd 32-13,
pursua nt to Ord. of Dec. 21, 1964 abolishing the urban r enewal committee and transferring its functions to the planning and development
committee.
Sec. 32-2: Duties of planning engineer.
The plann ing engineer shall devote particular a ttention
to the r equi rements and commitments of the "workable program", as defined in the National Housing Act of 1954, as
amended, and shall c_a ll upon the various departments, agen*Cross references-Minin1t1m housing st andards, ~ 15-21 et seq.;
responsibility of department of · building inspector relative to demolition of buildings, § 8-12; director of urbari renewal emeritus, § 21-75 (y) .
State law r efer ence- Powers of municip·a Jities as to urban renewal,
Ga. Code, Ch. 69-11.
Supp. No. 5
1617

r .
r
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§ 32-2
§ 32-5
ATLANTA CODE
cies and agents of the city, as required, to cany out their responsibilities thereunder to include annual revisions for recertifications of th'3 "workable program". The planning engineer shall insure coordination of capital improvement projects with urban renewal project plans in order to obtain the
best possible advantage for the city. He shall frequently consult with the mayo1· and chairman of the planning a nd developmen t committee of the board of aldermen and keep them
informed as to urban renewal requirements and the state of
development of the city's urban renewal pl ans, and shall m ake
recommendations thel'eon for facilitating progress of urban
· renewal in the city. ( Cum. Supp., § 56A.3; Ord. of 6-1-64, § 2;
Ord. of 12-21-64)
Note--See edito::-'s note following § 32-1.
Sec. 32-3. Deter nination of phasing and all allocations to be
devoted to project ar eas.
The planning depa rtment , in coordination with the housing
autho:·ity of the city, will determine the phas ing considered
desirable for constrnction of F.H.A. 221 housing allocations
and what portions thereof, if any, should be devoted to urban
renewal project areas, and shall make recommendations accordingly to local F.H.A. officials. (Cum. Supp., § 56A.4;
Ord. of 6-1-64, § 2)
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Sec. 32-4. Determination of locations of projects.
The planning depai-tment wiil study proposed locations for
such projects and determine those consider ed mos t suitable
from the city's st an dpoint for 221 housing projects and shall
coordinate thereon with local F.H.A. officials . (Cum. Supp.,
§ 56A.5; Ord. of 6-1-64, § 2)
Sec. 32-5. Rezoning recommendations.
The Atlanta-Fulton County joint planning board w ill make
timely recommenda tions to the zoning committee for rezoning
such areas as it considers appropria te in order to facilitate
the 221 housing progntm. (Cum. Supp., § 56A.6; Ord. of
12-21-64)
Editor' s note-Ord. of Dec. 21, 1964 redes ig nated the planning and
zoning committee a s the zoning commit tee.
-Supp. No. 5
1618
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�August 6, 1969
MEMORANDUM
To :
Dan Sweat
From :
Ray Fleming
The idea of management seminars for the concerned busi.nessm n (or those
affected by relocation) in these re s i s an important idea .
How ver, in light o! the languag of the p opl e , I think it may be still too
"highbrow · It needs to be thoroughly orienteJ to the av rage busine smen
in the area. It i folly to try to assume ~ /ii rket potenti l or training
£or most of the e bu ines
• Seminar cla see s}Jobld focu on busine
pr ctic
uch
bookkeeping nd dev lopm nt of the neighborhood market.
l would lso state that be ides simpl busin se skill • th definite stres ing
of warene s of agenci s that can h lp in th relocation and new fac:ilitie
exp nae • Th e g ncie , public or private, should b mor than . dvic
giv ra. I believ that th s businesses cannot surviv the r loc tion mov
if not given financi l help for th y are pr · tty close to marainal tat.us now.
Cone rning reloc tion .... reloc tion should b
and retranaition bould b
d
quickly a
th lo s of acb bu in s ' narrow m rket.
m de a clo ly aa poa ible
pos ible o that to pr elude
AU c nt r ahould also k ep n ongoing, fr
dviaory geney for helping th ae
m
peopl
nd ould ncour e "r habilitat d" bu in
with their view
nd opinion•.
In ummary, I think th proj ct i useful for
short t rm appro ch to k eping tbes
RF:je
om
smen to help
redir c:tion to
exi ting smaller busine • s
d contribute
rd a
liv •
�CITY OF .ATLANT.A
July 31, 1969
OFFICE OF MODEL CITIES PROGRAM
673 Capitol Avenue, S.W.
Atlanta, Ga . 30315
404 -524-8876
I v an Allen Jr., M a yor
J. C. Johnson, Director
MEMORANDUM

TO:
Mr. Dan Sweat
Governmental Liaison
FROM:
James L. Wright, Jr. ~ a,.JAl,Q-. .
Director of Physicallf>evelopment
SUBJECT:
Model Cities Meeting
Will you please contact the following City Department Directors
and their staff members for a meeting August 5, 1969 at 2 p.m.
in City Hall:
Ray Nix on
Karl A. Bevin s
Dorsey Brumbelow
Robert C . Pace
Paul Weir
W. T. Bush
Frank Br own
George Timbert
G. F . Steele
Floyd E. Garrett
J . W. Came ron
Jack Deliu s
A. P . Brindl e y
Vi rg i n i a Carmi chae l
Betty Ya rbrough
Ruel Morrison
Darwin Womack
Dan John s on
Public Works Department
Traffic Engineering
Sewer Division
Sewer Division
Water Department
Water Department
Water Department
Street Lighting
Street Engineering
Street Engin eering
Sidewalk Division
Par ks Depa r tment
Park s Depar tmen t
Rec r eation Depar tmen t
Rec r eation Depar tmen t
Atlant a Public Schoo ls
Atlant a Pub l i c Schoo l s
Street Mai n t ena nce
The purpose o f this meeting will be (1 ) to d is cuss the Model Cities
Planning Work Program for 196 9 a n d the invo l veme nt of thes e Depart me nts; (2) to obt a in dat es for 197 0 proj e ct exe cution schedules and
(3) to outline neede d non - cash credit information for the 1970 NDP
applic a t ion .
�l
Mr. Dan Sweat
Page 2
July 31, 1969
It is particularly imperative that the non-cash information be
obtained quickly to meet 1970 NDP submittal targets , ~
ti¥,
I.., .woul.d,__appreciate ~m..ur._pr_e.sen-G~-a:1:.- t..he-me-et±n---g-to assist in '
e~--s---i-z-ing_!J?.i s point ~
bah
cc:
Johnny C. Johnson
Eric Harkness
Collier Gladin
Louis Orosz
Howard Openshaw
Torn Eskew
Frank Keller
�CITY OF ~TLANTA
August l, 1969
CITY HALL
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secret ary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison
MEMORANDUM
To:
From:
Dan Sweat
Subject:
Model Cities Programming Meeting
On Tuesday, August 5th at 2 p. m. in Committee Room #1, a meeting
will be held to reach decisions in the Model Cities Program which
will have a significant effect on your department.
The purpose of this meeting is to obtain non-cash information to
m ee t 1970 NDP submittal targ e ts.
I hope you can atte nd this m eeting so tha t w e might h a v e your
recommendations.
DS :j e
�URBAN RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATES, INC.
FULTON NATIONAL BANK BUILDING• SUITE 710 • ATLANTA, GA. 30303 • 404-523-2877
BETHLEHEM, PENNA.

DENVER, COLO.

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF·
July 29, 1969
Mr. Dan E. Sweat
Director of Government Liaison
206 City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mr. Sweat:
It was a pleasure meeting with you to review our work for the Atlanta
Housing Authority as it relates to the Model Cities plans and the Stadium
Authority• s future space needs. Our since re thanks for providing time
from a busy sche d ule.
Your comments were v e ry enlight e ning and we hav e since discussed
the stadium activ itie s with the Chairman, Mr. Montgome ry and Mr.
Scarborough, the Manager.
Hope fully , w e we r e able to give you a bri e f insight into the work
we ar e doing and our conc ern for the stadium 1 s n e ed for additional parking
space. A plan must be de ve loped that will r ec o g nize t h e long ra nge ne e ds
of both the stadium and the Model Cities N e ighborhood. This w ill not b e
an e asy task , but afte r reviewing the existing c onditions w e are confid e nt
that a w orkable plan can be achie ve d w hich w ould b e an asset to all people
using the area .
A g ain , thank you for you r aid and pleas e do not h e sitate to c all if
we c a n b e of assista n c e.
Ma rtin C . Gilchrist
E xec utive V ice P resident
cc: Mr. A rthur L . M o nt g omery
Mr. Le s ter H. PerSclls
Mr . Johnny C. Johns o n
MCG/nh
PLANNING THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT FOR BUSINESS •
INDUSTRY •
GOVERNMENT

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  1. http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_015_002.pdf

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