Box 15, Folder 3, Complete Folder

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Box 15, Folder 3, Complete Folder

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July 23 , 1969
822 Grant Street, S. E.
Atl
t , G orgi
Mr . Ben Bl ckburn
House of Repr sent tiv
Washington, J). C.
D ar Mr . Bl ckburn:
I
ending thi l tt r to your
c tur offic sine I under tand
letter concerning th probl
with th Mod 1 Citi e her in Atl t
ref rred to your loc 1 office for h ndling.
yr cent
has been
I ppr iate your reply r ceived on July 22 indicting th t thi•
tt r h
been turned over o the Offic of Houain and Urban D velop ent for action.
Sine writin t
you previously, we hav continued to try to sell the
prop rty through individuals and r al atat comp nies who h ve running d
int
wap pr adv rtiaing for rent 1 and inv stment ~roperty. We h ve
b
advia d by two different real at te r pres nt tiv e that thy h v
ch eked 1th per on l conuct
t City
11 and ere advised that it would
be i os ible ior th
to re-e 11th prop rty if they buy it bee u
City Inap ctore have be n advi1
not to approv any prop rty in the r
for
y type YA loan
d th t •11th b nka io the city hav an agre
t not
to finance any purcbaa
in the ar a. 1.'haa two r al stat ag nt, did ot
give u• the n
I of their cont cte at City Hall sine
th y • id the infortion w sivau to th
atrictly off the record .
'lll clodn date on our n w home 1a fut approach ins
d at thia p int the
only 1olution ••
to be for ~del Citi a to purch 1• th property to ua as
t
orary hou1ing for peopl who r being dialocat din clearance
•••·
ince as I ind1cat din y previous 1 tter one individual who inquired t
the City Planni g office 1 City Hall about purchasin the properl y wa1 infor d not to purchate becau1 th y "had plan• for the property it voul be
my opinion th t they plan to ev ntually purchaa the property for ao
purp<>e.
Un r the1e circ 1tance1 I b liev• you will agree that it would b
co
ical for th
to purcbaae property 1uch as our• to ua as t
houaing th~::~~ pureh•••
bile typ t porary oueing or at l aat
nt
the mobile type. 'lbia ould al o l believ solve our robl
•• w 11 ••
othera who re preaently or
y at a futur d te find t
aalvea tranaferr
out of the a,: a.
�Again, I will state that 1 do not believe we are making an unre sonable
reque t, and 1 believe you will gree that with a long range plan such a
this some provision hould h ve been made initi lly to cover such situations.
Thy apparently er not and as a re ult we find our elves in
situation
of . being unable to dispose of property in th are b cause thy hiv it t
up where no on is intere ted in the property for rent 1, investm nt, or
ho , and y t when you try tot lk to anyone in th ir office h re they just
keep ref rring you from one pr on to anoth r until you ar b ck talking
with the fir t person you spok with and the circl b gin all over gain •
.y111 be expecting to hear from someone within
incer ly,
(Mr . )
L z 11 Kirkl nd
(Cli
d E. Kirkl d)
822 Grant Str et, s. E.
Atlant, Georgia 30315
Telephone - 622-9074 or 688-8036
cc: Mayor Ivan Allen
cc: Mr . Johny Johnson· Model Cities Offic
cc: Mrs.
ona Cl yton• Hodel Citi s Offic
few d y .
�822 Grant Street, S. E.
Atlanta, Georgia 30315
Mr . ·B n Blackburn
Huse of Rep~e nt tive&
Washington, D. C.
Dear h' . Blackburn:
1 would like to register a complaint ab ut our s , c lled Model Cities"
program.
We owu our hoinc at the above ddr
and shortly
"M del Citi s"
program w a tlnnounced my husband'$ comp ny tran ferr d him ~ut of the City
of A.tlant . Althous,1 it h
proven t be quit e p nsive for h
to co ute
ie have wd ted for tw yeat to e . wb t
s goin to bapp n in the are
befvre trying to eell and move nearer hi work. During thi tim w h v~
been advised n um rou occ sion by our children's teach r
get th
in a less cro ded school since they have so
ny childr n i
chool thy
attend who ither woA't, c 't r re net ncou~ag d to l arn th t they
dv it hav th ti
to give the children who c
and try to l rn the
instructions thy need
d des rvc . The chool h s b co
worse and wors
and w,ea lt be enc 8 ary the last three days ~z the school t ·rm t o keep
policemen c.-.t th premise to vo·i d conflict between the grammer acho l and
high school, we decided it wa tie to
le a
ve
'nli > of cour•.
combined with th
·ac:t th t we
Since all relidente of the are
office
thdr
efor
ffic
buyi
.1
ed to set closer to my huauand' s work.
had be n advi ed t o contact t e ' d 1 Oiti
ents) y hu band wont t
Mr • . itohcll. Mr. Mitchell told him our
1 11
, building or m king impr v
and talk d with
hou c definit ly wa not scheduled for de olition and it would
all ri ht t o put it up for 1ale.
perfectly
f
r al eet te br,k rand found that \Othin
put th house in the hand
cau
ha peed during th throe QlOnth of 11 contract. W no find th t
not op opl
t the s
answers frc th "Model Cities" offic every-on
they think thy
y buy a house d hav it torn clown
i afraid o
ithin a y u or two.
�Since the agentt
contract has run out, we hove been attempting t
ell the
on ur own . I cont acted the Model Citie office to <let
ine if they
b ve any contact with peopl int re ted in property in the ares or if they
hous
have de any arr
em nt to purch s property from people in the ar
wbo
migh~ be transferred out of the city for one re son or anoth r . They ref¢rred
me to
Mr , ilke who told me h i in the re - location and r -habilit tion
office nd they had o such arr angements . I asked if they could not use the
property to hou
p ople who might b displ ced becau e of d
l ition and
he told e they would ot relocate di placed per on in the Model Citi
Are
ince it ould not be fe ible to do so.
An individu 1 who wa intere ted in the property checked with tb City
or City Pl nning Office and(although we had been told our p oy rty
s
ly
not going to be in the clear c are) h w informed ot to purcha e pr perty
in th ar ab cue they h d pl n and wee going to do omething with the
property shortly.
There are, of course,
the pr op rty off our hands
if we were willing to give it aw y, but
fford to
tbi. I do not
think we are being unreasouabl to egp ct
arr gem nts to be made to
a 1 t peopl in OUT po ition to dispose of property at
re sonabl pri~.
And I do n~t think w ar being unrc on bl to ask $9,500 for property for
which we p id ~,500 five y are ago and have m de quit
it mor than $1,000
of improv
nt
ince that' tim.
If there is anything that c n be done to auJ t 11ot vnly u, but oth re in th
rea who m y be having the Ii e probl a, it will be sincerely appr ciat d .
Sincerely,
(Mr . ) Lazoll Ki:rkland
(Clifford
822 Grant
• Urkl
)
tr et, • B.
Atl nt • GeoTgi
cci
cc:
cc:
cc:



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Mr .
Mr.
rman 'talmadge
ua1 11 ~ nate
Mayor Xian Alle;
Kr. Johnny Johnson•
del Ci tiea Of ff.ca
�·--· - ---- ·--- - -- ·-
-- -- ..-~·-··.:..-__· ....-----· r_ _ _
i
MODEL CITi Es PAI NT COMMIT'11EE MEETI NG ON MAY 13 e 1969 AT THE MODEL CITIES OFFICE
.t
Pre s ent ~ Wa Ao Edge, Mrs G C o B. Wright. Harold Owens, Horatius
Rosser , F! ., H. Hines , J immie Kennebrew, Mrs .. Mattie Ansley, Mrs.
· Ida Wrigh t, Mrs o Edi t h Te nnantr Mra e Christine Cook, Charlie Cook,
E~ G. We-s.tns, Floyd Rutherf ord , Rev c L. W. Hope, Sr . , Bernard
Smit h, J t,ne Co f e r ., Huber t C" Blankenship, Lewi s Peters, Dewey
Gatley , Ellis Simmon 0 Edward French, Sum-Mee Center, and Model
Ci t ies Community Relat i ons Assis t a nt s .
_ The inee :ting was called t o order by Lyall W. Scott, who explained
the~ge.o al::::·o f.,,:.:l:11e pai n t up campa i gn, the t ype of pa int available
to residents and the purpose o f this meet ing and the role of the
Model Ci ti:':!S Pa.int Cornroitte e i n t his campaign.
Deacon Lewi s Peter s
. now available. Mr.
presently available
gui deline s so that
asked Mr. Scott as to whether this paint was
Scott sai d that s~soo gallons of paint are
a nd that this committee should begin to develop
t h e distribution can begin as soon as pos sible.
A Model Cities s u r ~~ was distribu ted wh i ch showe d number of
structures with i n. each eommuriit y a nd the number o f structures that
would be c l eared i n 1969.
A chart was also presente d by Mr . Scott showing number of structures
a f te~ c l earance in each neighborhood, percentage of structures
wit hin each neighborhood when compared to t otal , Model Cities
s ·-tructures, ratio () f paint to be distribute d wi thin each community,
based on perc!entage of structures t o tatal Mode l Cities a rea, and
approximate number of containers that each community would be
e l igible for.
·
After considerabl e discussion Mr . Hubert Blankens h ip made a motion
to accept suggested ratio of distribution . This was seconded by Mr.
E A G. Weems and Mrs. c . B. Wright and carried unanimously. ·
E. G. Wec •.i.s 1r.ade a motion that each neighborhood paint committee
assume responsibility for sele ction of houses to be painted, and
fur distr ibuting paint within the community. This motion was
seconded 'by Mrs. c. B. Wright and carried unanimously.
Mr .
Mr. Jimmie Kennebbew made a motion that absentee landlords be
e ligible for paint but this moti on did not receive a second and
was ·defeated.
Mr. Jimmie Kenne r
ugges ed that p ledge cards be drawn up
for individuals applying for paint and that they be submitted to
nail')t committ ee withi.n t h eir community . Mr. Kennebrew made this into
motion and was seconded by Mr. Blankenship and carried unanimously.
(See pledge card in guidelines)
The committee also worked out wording for pledge card and was
accepted. D~~con Lewis Peters made a motion to recommend to Model
Cities Steering Committee have Model Cities pay to transport paint
to each local community. This was seconded by Mrs. Mattie Ansl~y
and · carried ,,,.. ...... .; ft'I"'" .. , :.
Further sugg9stions made but with no official action were:
�•· , t
. ·:;
~
!
1..
'
Before and / ,;! ~~p·: i cture·s . 'ShoulcC~be';J.ir~ n,. f;;r .t:""""
to\1~biicity
.- pu~p.oses.
, · .
.
'
~·..-,>~_,,).
'
._,
-
'
·~
2:. · If any communit y has paint left from amount issued they
· ·will allow some other community to use it .
3.
·Fl yers be printed by Model Cities office with instructions
for mixing paint.
4.
Community Rel ations Assistants will be available to assist
.,,(,Nk ·niilghbo:Jit'.n16:06, 29 December 2017 (EST)n~f143.215.248.55 16:06, 29 December 2017 (EST)e'S.
5.
Each neighborhood paint conunittees ahould elect a chairman that
can deal directly with Model Cities office.
·
6 ... piscussion of Banquet post poned until next meeting
A~ting Secretary
Mr s. Elizabeth Parks
,.~
�' -~,.." .' .i. ;.:. . "...
~
~
f
..
MODEL CITIES PAINT CAMPAIGfilTGUIDELINES
1.
"'
Each neighborhood paint c ommittee will assy.me the responsibility .
. for selection of houses to be painted, acting upon pledge
cards, and arr anging for paint t o be distributed within their
comm.unity.
2o
Absentee landlords will not be eligible for paint.
3.
Each individual wishing to apply for paint must agree to sign
pledge card, which must then be approved by paint commintee
4.
The following allocations willbbe made to each community
Gallons
ADAIR PARK
GRANT PARK
MECHANICSVILLE
il48
'2'244
842
808
PEOPLES TOWN
PITTSBURGH
2015
1'836'
SUMMERHILL
Model Cities
11
Paint Up" Pledge Card
of

name
____________________,
I,
address
Do agree to use paint furnished by
Model . Cities for painting above
property and to return all unused
paint .
Amount Gallons Issued


Si gnature
Containers
150
449
168
162
403
367
�CITY OF .ATLANT.A
CITY HALL
July 8, 1969
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
IVAN ALLEN , JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Admini strative Assistant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental liaison
MEMORANDUM
To: Mr. Lyle Scot~
1
/J
From: Dan SweatyJU(___
Attached is a letter from Mrs. Calhoun who says you didn't
give h e r a fair share on the paint.
Please give m e a call and l e t m e know what the story 1s on
her paint complaint.
DS :fy
Attachment (1)
�CITY OF A.'l..,L~~T.A
CITY HALL
June 3, 1969
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison
MEMORANDUM
To: Mr. R. Earl Landers
._.,, \
From:
Subject:
Dan Sweat ·~
Review of Code Enforcement Policy m Model Cities Area
Attached is a copy of a memorandum from Jim Wright to me
spelling out the revised policy of the Atlanta Housing Authority
and the City's H o usin g C ode Division in the Model Cities area.
This came about as a r es ult of problems being called to our
attention in the Adair Park Area whe're the c ity had compl e ted
a hous e by house rehabilitation program within the l as t f e w years.
You might recall at the time we were discussing the Model
Cities Program with residents of that area, they were very
much concerned with hous ing cod e activity which was going on
at that time .
We assured them we would not place them in double jeopardy
when the Model Cities Program started. The re we r e indications
that we were doing this by requirin g the same prope rty owners
to brin g their prope rty in line with th e new code standards of
th e Atlanta Housing Authority und e r the Model Cities Program.
This r e vi se d policy w as adopted afte r a m ee ting in my offi ce
with officials of the H o using Authority, the Building Department
and M o d e l Cities.
DS:fy
cc:
Mayor Ivan All e n, Jr.
Mr. Johnny R obinson
�1. -. •'
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t, ... ~
._.,
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-






·•


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May 29, 1969
OFFICE OF MODEL CITIES PROGRAM
673 Capitol Avenue, S.W .
Atlanta, Ga. 30315
404 -524 -8876
Ivan Allen Jr., Mayor
J. C. Johnson, Director
MEMO RA:t--.mUM
TO:
Mr. Dan Sweat
Director of Governmental Liaison
FROM:
James L. Wright,
Director of Physical DeveloP~ent
SUBJECT:
Atlanta Housing Authority and Housing Code Division
Activities in the Model Neighborhood Area
Jr.~~w,n...
(.> '
Attached hereto, is a revised copy of the policy regarding AHA
and Atlanta Housing Code Division in the Model Neighborhood
Area. The addendum to the original policy which was developed
in February of 196 9, refers to properti.es which have, in recent
years, been brought up to City Housing Code standards. This
policy is outlin ed in paragraph 2 under the heading Rehabilitation
Policy - Model Neighborhood Area.
The Atlanta Housing Authority will obtain a list of structures
which have met Code Enforcement standards of the City of
Atlanta Building Department -in recent years. Owners whose
properties currently meet these standards will have the
option of either taking advantage o f possible grants or loans
under the Atlanta Housing Authority rehabilitation program
to meet project standards or continuing to maintain structures
in compliance with the City Housing Code.
As you know, it was formulated by Messrs. Lester Persells, Executive
Director of Atlanta Housing Authority; C. M. Smith, Architectural
Engineer; James Smith, Chief Housing Code Inspector; Malcolm Jones,
Chairman of Housing Resources Committee; and myself, representing
the CDA. This agr e ement was reached during the meeting with you
in your office on May 26. The purpose is to provide the most
equitable arrangement to benefit property owners in the rehabilitation program.
cc:
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
William Wofford
Lester Persells
C . M. Smith
Malcolm Jones
James Smith
Johnny Johnson
�. ·. ~-. ,.1·:
If
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.
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C
May 29, 1969
OFFICE OF MODEL CITIES PROGRAM
673 Capitol Avenue, S.W.
Atlanta, Ga. 303 15
404-524 -8876
Ivan AJlen Jr., Mayor
J. C. Johnson , Director
Policy Regarding Atlanta Housing Authority and
Atlanta Housing Code Division Activity in the
Model Neighborhood Area
Rehabilitation Policy - Model Neighborhood Area
The Atlanta Housing Authority will obtain a list of structures
which have met Code Enforcement standards of the City of Atlanta
Building Department in recent years. Owners whose properties
currently meet these standards will have the option of either
taking advantage of possible grants or loans under the Atlanta
Housing Authority rehabilitation program to meet project
standards or continuing to maintain structures in compliance
with the City Housing Code.
In rehabilitation areas other than those of current year action
areas, the City Building Department will participate on a
complaint investigation basis only. New enforcement cases will
be undertaken in a ccordance with Department personnel capability
and on a full code compliance basis.
Demolition Policy - Mode l Ne ighborhood Area
The Atlanta Housing Authority is fully responsible for demolition
activities in NDP current year clearance action areas. When
emergency situations occur necessitating prompt action on particular
structures in the clearance areas, the City Building Depa rtment
will become involved for enforcement efforts.
In demolition areas other than those of current year action areas~
the Building Department will become involved only on a compliant
basis to effe ct ful l code compliance with the except ion that
generally no installation of additional equipme nt wil l be required.
A possible e x ception will .ar is e if it is determined that the failure
to install additional equipment may result in jeopardy to th e health,
safety on general we lfare of a structures inhabitants.
�HUDNEWS
U . S . DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING
AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT
WASH I NGTON D . C . 20410
HUD-No. 6 9- 0555
Phone (202) 755-7327
FOR RELEASE AFTER:
2:00 P.M., Monday
June 30, 1969
MODEL CITIES CONTRACT TENDERED
TO PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA
Secretary George Romney,of the U.S. Department of Housing
and Urban Development,today announced the tender of a $3,296,638
Model Cities contract to Philadelphia, Penns y lvania.
The b a l a nc e of the outstanding reservation of $25,113,000
of Model Cities funds for the City of Philadelphia was being
continued into the next fiscal year, Secretary Romney said.
HUD Assist a nt Secretary Floyd H. Hyde , who administers the
Model Cities Program, made the following stat ement in connection
with today' s ac tion.
"The Model Cities program proposed by the City, a s revised
during the past several months b y the City , repre sents a broad,
comprehensive five-year attack on the phy sical, socia l and
economic problems of the Mod el Cities area . The contract t e nder
a nnounced to day i s limited to a portion of Philadelphia's t o t a l
first y ear reservati on bec a u se o f several proble ms which must sti ll
b e resol v ed by t h e City. A numb er of projects proposed to be
initiated during the first a ction year are not y et ready for funding, because of reliance by the City on the carrying out
of these proj ects by corporat ions not yet formed.
"In the near f uture , the City is expected to recast its
approach and a lso to d evelop a higher leve l of coordination with
respect to the us e of funds from Federal sour ces other than
Model Cities and State, loca l a nd private f unding sources. Once
these improvements are made , the City will be able to receive
further Model Cities grants for the remainder of i ts o utstanding
reservation. The changes which the City has recently made in
the direction of strengthening the administration of its Mode l
Citie s program are encouraging and give promise of continuing
improvement.
more -
�HUD-No.
69- 0555 -,
-
2 -
"Today's action by Secretary Romne y will permit the City
to initiate several projects immediately and also provides
funds for the continued administration of the Philadelphia
Model Cities program, including the necessary replanning efforts.
The grant approved today likewise gives financial support to
Philadelphia's citizen participation structure at its current
operating level."













V
�HUDNEWS
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING
AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT
WASHINGTON D . C. 20410
HUD-No. 69-0545
Phone (202) 755-7327
FOR RELEASE AFTER:
2:00 p.m., Monday
June 30, 1969
MODEL CITIES CONTRACT
TENDERED TO ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI
Secretary George Romney of the U.S. Department of Housing and
Urban Development today announced the tender of a $5,183,000 Model
Cities contract to St. Louis, Mo.
St . Louis w ill also be given support from other programs administered
by HUD, by the Department of Health, Education and Welfare, the Department of Labor, and the Office of Economic Opportunity.
State, county, local and private resources w ill also be used by the
city in its concentrated, coordinated attack on the serious social ,
physical and economic problems within the Model Cities area .
Secretary Romney said that the remainder of St. Louis' $9,485,000
allocation of Model Cities funds has been reserved for the city, pending
further development of additional projects and activities planned by the
city and their approval by HUD.
"St. Louis has developed a comprehensive overall plan and has
carefully established priorities for the start of its first year activities,"
Secretary Romney said. "Our action today approves those projects
which the city is ready to start on immediately. While funding of
neighborhood corporation operations has been approved, more w ork
needs to be done with re spect to those corporations before these projects
get underway . Further work is also required to develop projects to make
use of the more than $4 million of program funds still held in re serve
for possible use in St. Louis this year. We will give prompt consideration
to the remaining projects and activities when they are presented t o us."
Secretary Romney, who is also Chairman of the President's Cabinet
Committee on Voluntary Action, noted the private and public involvement
in the St. Louis program.
- more -
�HUD-No . 69-0545
- 2 -
Many components of the St. Louis model cities program are benef itting
from volunteer efforts. For example, recreation programs in the model neighborhood will use volunteers from church groups, civic organizations and
business groups.
In the Jeff Vander-Lou area, several local business men, architects
and area residents are involved in a housing rehabilitation program.
neighborhood residents will receive training in building skills through
the St. Louis Associated General Contractors and the AFL Labor Council..
The Danforth Foundation of St. Louis has contributed to the arts and
educational programs.
Commenting on the decision to tender a contract, Secretary Romney
explained that this was done after a careful review of the St. Louis
comprehensive plan. The plan was thoroughly studied and analyzed
both by the Regional and Washington Interagency Review Committees
representing those Federal Departments and Agencies with urban aid
programs.
A total of 150 communities in 45 States, the District of Columbia
and Puerto Rico are participating in the Model Cities Program. The first
applications for planning grants were approved in November 196 7.
For further information:
Mar_garet B. Wilson, Acting Dire ctor
Model Cities Agency
Civil Courts Building
12th and Market Streets
St. Louis, Mo. 63101
Mayor Alfonso J. Cervantes
City Hall
St. Louis, Mo. 63101
NOTE: A summary of the St. Louis Model Cities Program is available upon
request to the Office of Public Affairs, U.S . Department of Housing
and Urban Development, Washington, D.C. 20410.













V
�HUDNEWS
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING
AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT
WASHINGTON D . C . 20410
HUD-No. 69-0525
Phone (202)
755-6980
FOR RELEASE AFTER:
2:00 P . M., Monday
June 30, 1969
HUD TENDERS MODEL CITIES CONTRACT
TO TEXARKANA, TEXAS
Secretary George Romney of the U.S. Department of
Housing and Urban Development today announced the tender of a
$1,558,000 Model Cities contract to Texarkana, Texas.
Today's action by Secretary Romney will enable the city
to begin the first-year action phase under its comprehensive
five-year Model Cities program. State, county, local and
private resources will also be used by the city in its concentrated, coordinated attack on the- serious social, economic
and physical problems within the Model Cities area.
HUD pointed out that the programs for Texarkana, Tex as
and Texarkana, Arkansas were developed as a joint effort. Both
cities received planning grants on the basis that they would
demonstrate the feasibility of inter-city, inter-state
cooperation.
In the first action year of their respective programs, eight projects will be carried out jointly by the two
cities.
Funding of projects to be operated by the Texarkana
Independent School District has not been approved pending the
outcome of the Department of Health, Education and Welfare
Title VI proceedings . The obligation of the Tex as Independent School District to come into full compliance with
Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 is in no way diminished
by HUD's approval of the Te~arkana, Texas Model Cities program.
Secretary Romney, who is Chairman of the President's
Cabinet Committee on Voluntary Action , noted the Public and
private involvement in the p l anning phase of the Texarkana
p r ogram as well as in carrying out the first year action
projects.
- more -
�HUD-No.
69-0525
The Texarkana Home Builders' Association and the
Texarkana Board of Realtors were involved in planning and
developing the housing element in the comprehensive plan.
Individual members of the Home Builders' group are building
housing for low-income families under the FHA home0wnership
assistance program.
The Texarkana Chamber of Commerce, Carpenter's Local
No. 379, the University of Arkansas, Texas A & M, and
Texarkana Junior College also participated in the planning
phase. Among the groups cooperating in preparing the health
and social service components were Senior Citizens Services, Inc~,
the Texarkana Dental Society, the Texarkana Council on
Alcoholism, and the Mental-Health Retardation Center.
In addition, local television and radio stations publicized
the program, and Texarkana Newspaper, Inc. donated time, staff
services and equipment to print the "Community Developer" as a
supplement to the local newspaper.
Commenting on the decision to tender a contract, Secretary
Romney explained that this was done after a careful review of
the Texarkana comprehensive plan. The plan was thoroughly
studies and analyzed both by the Regional and Washington Interagency Review Committees representing those Federal Departments
and Agencies with urban aid programs.
A total of 150 communities in 45 States, the District of
Columbia and Puerto Rico are participating in the Model Cities
program. The first applications for planning grants were
approved in November 1967.
For further information:
Leo Bounds, Jr.
Model Cities Agency
P. 0. Box 1967
Texarkana, Texas 75502
Mayor A. J. Womack
City Hall
Texarkana, Texas 75502
NOTE: A summary of the Texarkana Model Cities program is
available upon request to the Office of Public Affairs, U. s.
Department of Housing and Urban Development, Washington, D. C.,
20410.











V
�HUDNEWS
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING
AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT
WASHINGTON D . C . 20410
FOR RELFASE AFTEP:
2:00 P.M., Monday
June 30, 1969
HUD-No.
69-0543
Phone
(202) 755-6980
MODEL CITIES CONTRACT
TENDERED TO PORTLAND, OREGON
Secretary George Romney of the U. S. Department of
Housing and Urban Development today announced the tender
of a $1,262,987 Model Cities contract to Portland, Oregon.
Explaining HUD's action, Assistant Secretary Floyd H. Hyde,
who administers the Model Cities program, said, "Portland has
developed a comprehensive overall plan and has brought a
number of projects to the point where they appear ready to
start operation.
For other projects, however, the proposed
arrangements with local operating agencies have not been
'Norked out firmly enough so they can be funded at this time.
Portland also is expected to strengthen its overall administrative capacity to carry out its Model Cities program."
Assistant Secretary Hyde said that the balance of the
$3,745,000 allocated to Portland would be held in reserve
and would be available for funding additional Portland
activities when necessary improvements have been made.
"The funds approved today for Portland provide for a
substantial start," he said.
"We hope Portland will soon be
in position to use its full allocation."











V
�EWS
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING
AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT
WASHINGTON D.C. 20410
FOR RELEASE AFTER:
2:00 p.m., Friday
June 27, 1969
HUD No. 69-0521
Phone (202) 755-7327
MODEL CITIES CONTRACT
TENDERED TO TULSA, OKLA.
Secretary George Romney of the U. S. Department of Housing and Urban
Development today announced the tender of a $3,553,000 Model Cities contract to
Tulsa, Okla.
Tulsa will also be given support from other programs administered by HUD,
by the Department of Health, Ejucation and Welfare, and the Office of Economic
Opportunity.
Today's action by Secretary Romney will enable Tulsa to begin the first
year action phase of its comprehensive five-year Model Cities program. State,
county, local and private resources will also be used by the city in its concentrated, coordinated attack on the serious social, physical and economic
problems within the Model Cities area.
Secretary Romney, who is Chairman of the President's Cabinet Committee on
Voluntary Action, noted the private and public involvement in the Tulsa program.
Last year, during the planning phase, The Tulsa Chamber of Commerce convened
a nation-wide Growth Seminar which devoted time to the Model Cities Program.
The University of Oklahoma Extension Office in Tulsa was directly involved in
preparing the city's comprehensive plan. A non-profit corporation, The Target
Area Action Group, will help identify voluntary opportunities f or residents and
community-wide interests in the first year action phase of the Tulsa program.
In addition, the Red Cross North Tulsa Chapter will also be involved.
Commenting on the decision to tender a contract, Secretary Romney explained
that this was done after a careful review of the Tulsa comprehensive plan. The
plan was thoroughly studied and analyzed both by the Regional and Washington
Interagency Review Connnittees representing those Federal Departments and Agencies
with urban aid programs.
·
"During the past several months, Tulsa has done an excellent job in revising
its proposals and improving its capability to operate its first year action program," he said.
-more-
�IDJD No.
69-0521
-2-
A total of 150 connnunities in 45 States, the District of Columbia and
Puerto Rico are participating in the Model Cities Program. The first applications
for planning grants were approved in November 1967.
For further information:
Dr. C. J. Roberts
City Demonstration Agency
Beacon Building
Tulsa, Okla.
74103
Mayor James M. Hewgley, Jr.
City Hall
Tulsa, Okla.
74103
NOTE:
A summary of the Tulsa Model Cities Program is available
upon request to the Office of Public Affairs, U.S.
Dspartment of Housing and Urban Development, Washington,
D. C.
20410.













V
�HUDNEWS
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING
AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT
WASHINGTON D . C . 20410
HUD-No. 69-0504
Phone {202) 755-6980
FOR RELEASE AFTER:
2:00 P.M. Friday
June 27, 1969
HUD MODEL CITIES CONTRACT
TENDERED TO BOSTON
Secretary George Romney of the U.S. Department of Housing
and Urban Development today announced the tender - of a
$7,718,000 Model Cities contract to Boston, Mass.
Boston will also be given substantial support from other
programs administered by HUD, and the Department of Health,
Education and Welfare, Department of Labor, and the Office of
Economic Opportunity.
Today's action by Secretary Romney will enable the city to
begin the first-year action phase under its comprehensive fiveyear Model Cities program. State, county, local and private
resources will also be us ed by the city in its concentrated,
coordinated attack on the serious social, economic and physical
problems within the Model Cities area.
Secretary Romney, who is the Chairman of the President's
Cabinet Committee on Voluntary Action, noted the extensive
private involvement in the Boston program.
The Boston Model Cities Administration has obtained commitments of funds and services from local corporations, private
organizations and universities. Among the groups to be involved
in manpower and economic development are the Boston Urban Foundation and the National Alliance of Businessmen. The Contractors
Association of Boston Institute will work with the housing
development program.
The Urban League will operate two innovative e ducational
programs with curricula developed by five institutions- - Wheelock,
Boston Un i versity, Boston Coll ege, Simmons and the Massachusetts
Institute of Technology.
Commenting on the deci sion to t ender a contract, Secretary
Romne y explained that thi s was done after a careful review of
the Boston comprehe nsive plan. The plan wa s tho roughly studied
(MORE)
�-2-
HUD-No. 69-0504
and analyzed both by the Regional and Washington Interagency
Review Committees representing those Federal departments and
agencies with urban aid programs.
"During the past several months, Boston has done an excellent
job in revising its proposals and improving its capability to
operate in the first-year action program," he sa i d.
A total of 150 communities in 45 states, the District of
Columbia and Puerto Rico are participating in the Model Cities
program. The first applications for planning grants were
approved in November 1967.
Pa ul Parks, Administrator
Model Citie s Adm inistrat i on
Bartlett Building
2401 Washington Street
Boston, Massachusetts 02119
For furthe r information:
Mayor Kevin Whi te
City Hall
Bos ton, Ma s sachuse tts
Note :
02101
A s ummary of the Boston Model Cit i es pr ogram i s a v ailable
upon requ e st to t h e Offi c e o f Publ i c Affa irs , U. S .
Department of Housing and Urban Development ,
Washington , D. C.
20 410.













�July 8, 1969
Honor 1 Gregory Grisg
oard of Ald
n
Ctty of tl n
Post Offic~ Box 9751
Atlant ,.
D
r
otg
30319
• Griggs:
the c:onfusio which h s c
d the d :fe
nt of E · '
• Th re i nothing proj ct d
ich hould
c
e
nyon 'a p rt .
�July 8,. 1969
Honorable Gr gory Griggs
Boa~d of Ald rman
City of /1.tlant
Post Office Box 9757
Atlanta, Georgia
30319
l)e
Mr . Griggs:
W regtet th confu ion which h s c used the defertnent of EO '
Model Cities pl n . Th· re i nothing projected which should be c us
for muciety on anyon ' s part.
A you know, EOA ha.·. large h vily populated target ·r a within
the Model Cities bound ia , nd w hav be n ctive theri ith in•
ufficient
r source sine 1965 . Ith a leo b en difficult to
ad quately s rv s0tne parts of the low-incom community b caus of
r id nti 1 p tt rna .
��NATIONAL LEAGUE OF CITIES
1612 K STREET, NORTHWEST, WASHINGTON, D. C. 20006
UNITED STATES CONFERENCE OF MAYORS
July 2, 1969
To :
~
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
Members of the NLC Executive Committee and Advisory Council
Officers, Trustees and Members of the USCM Advisory Board


tvlembers of the National Steering Committee, Model Cities Directors Association


Executive Directors of State, County and Municipal Government National Associations
Relevant to Model Cities Administration
(5) Executive Dire ctor s of State Municipal Leagues
Subject: HUD Contract With Model Cities Service Center
We have just signed a twelv e-month contract with the Department of Housing and Urban Developm ent which will permit the Le ague of Citie s - Confe r e nce of Mayors Mode l Citie s Service Center
t o render technical assistan ce to all mode l cities. This is a n a dva nce a nnouncement; a p ress
release will follow.
As was explained to the officer s of the re cently-forme d Model Cities Dire ctors Association, at a
meeting he ld here in Wa shington, this c ontr a ct pr ovides s tart-up funds for what we hope w ill
evolve into a m ajor service pr ogram of bene fit t o ..not only the me mbe rs of that Association but to
otliler re levant nat ional a s sociations , as listed in one of the closi ng paragraphs of this letter.
The se key associations, essential to the succe ss of the mode l cities proce ss, will be given
subcontr acts fr om our joint Center , as funding dev elops, to aid them in the perfor mance of
essential task s .
Th e contract a s execute d with t he Office of the As sistant Se cretary for Demon s t rations a nd Inte rgovernmental Re lations provides for the foll owi ng services for a ll par tie s interest e d in the mode l
cities pr ogram: (1) The h oldi ng of conference s , sem inars a nd training sessions ; (2) T he pr eparation of a monthly Mode l Cities Technical Assistance Re p ort communicat ing significa nt local experi ences and h ighlighting innovative activitie s; (3) The making available of a wide range of profes s ional s who will provide te chnical assistance ; and, (4) The pre paration of case stu dies and special
informati on repor t s. A de ta i le d s tate ment of wor k is e nclosed for those r e cipie nts of this le tter
identified a bove as groups (3) and (4) . Copie s are available for others intere ste d . .
The contract, which will start August 1, 1969, provide s for two a dmini strative pos itions, a
Proje ct Direct or and a Dir ector of CDA Se rvice s. The perfor mance of the contract has bee n
pla ce d w it hin our Mode l Cities Se rvice Ce nter whic h i s under the general s upervi s ion of John
Garvey, Jr. , Director , League of Cities - Conferen ce of Ma yors Center for Program Imp le m enta tion.
T he pe rson s e lected to administer t hi s $90 , 000 proje ct i s Mr . Ross D. Davis , former Assis tant
Secretary of Commer ce for Economic De ve lopme nt. Mr . Davis , a strong advocat e of the model
cit ies concept, ha s been active in interagency re\ations, focus i ng on program s for social and
economic deve lopment, with particular emphas is upon management and organization and upon
private-public sector aspects. Recruiting is underway for t he position of Director of CDA Services,
�- 2 -
a particularly significant position requiring a background of CDA experience, and a combination
of professional and technical, association and inter-organizational-type talents. Suggestions are
welcomed.
We would like to take this opportunity to pay recognition to and to thank the representatives of the
following national public interest organizations with whom we have worked and jointly sponsored
model cities conferences with over the past year: American Institute of Planners; Council of State
Governments; International City Management Association; Model Cities Directors Association
(prior to May 27, their CDA Directors Steering Committee); National Assembly for Social Policy
Development; National Association for Community Development; National Association of Counties;
National Association of Housing and Redevelopment Officials; National Education Association;
and the National Governors Conference. The ultimate potential of the model cities concept can
only be achieved with the support, understanding and active involvement of organizations ·such
as these. We hope to develop a number of opportunities in the coming months which wtll strengthen
this consortium of effort.
We are thankful to the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Demonstrations and Intergovernmental
Relations for making possible this "seed money," permitting us to launch this significant joint
service. This occasion calls to mind a similar funding of start-up costs made possible by this
Office, March, 1967, which then permitted the National Association of Counties and the National
League of Cities to launch a National Service to Regional Councils, now fully operational.
We are in the final stages of gathering information pertaining to staffing and organizational
details of model cities programs and hope to publish this by mid-month. The gathering of data __for this comprehensive directory has given us a unique opportunity to document those elements
of the model cities program which have the hi,ghest priority of need. Working in cooperation with
the national public interest organizations, HUD, and under the policy direction of the Board of
Directors of the League of Cities-Conference of Mayors joint administrative service program,
our Model Cities Service Center plans to concentrate first on these highest priority needs.
Jo~E~
U. S. Conference of Mayors
Patrick Healy, Executive D ·
National League of Cities
cc : Office of the Assistant Secretary for Demonstrations and Intergovernmental Relations
Ross D. Davis
�July 8, 1969
MEMORANDUM
To: Mr . Lyl e Scott
From: Dan Sweat
Attached is lettear from Mrs . Cal houn who
give her a f ir sh re on the paint.
ys you didn't
Pl a e giv m a eall and let me know what the story is on
h r p int complaint.
DS:fy
Attachment (1)
~-or~
x~
&iP4
clt_ e_a,,J!:a_
3011/
�TELEPHONE :
298-7535
(Area Code 202)
UNITED STATES CONFERENCE OF MAYORS
1707
H
STREET,
WASHINGTON,
NORTHWEST
D.
C.
20006
July 3, 1969
Pruidnu:
T ERRY D. SCHRUNK
l-.hyor of Portland, Ore.
LJ1r11
Vice Prcsidcnl:
ARTHUR NAFTALIN


M'.ayor of Minneapolis


Pail Prc1idcn11:
JOSEPH M. B ARR
l-.fayor of Pittsburgh
J EROME P. CAVANAGH
M:iyor of Detroit
RICHARD J . D ALEY
l,.Uyor of Chicago
RICHARD C. L EE
M:ayor of New H11.ven
Trs11ue1:
. CLYDE E. FANT
Mayor of Shreveport
JOHN V . LINDSAY
Mnyor of New York
FRANK F . McDoNALD
Mayor of Evansville
JAMES H. J . TATE
Mat-or of Phihdelphin
G EORGE VAN TASSEL
iut-or of T usca100S3
J.oUIE \V'ELCH
Mayor of Housron
Adf/Uory BoMd:
]ACK D. :MALTESTER, Cha.irman
l,.Uyor of S10 Londro
I VAN ALLEN, JR.
Mayor of Adanra
LESTER L BATES
Mayor of Columbia, S. C.
B EVERLY BRILEY
Mayor of NashvilJe
A. }. CERVANTES
l,.Uyor of St. Louis
STEPHEN P. CLARK
Mayor of Miami
ORAN K. G RAGSON
Mayor of Las Vegas.
MILTON H . GRAHAM
Mayor of Phoenix
D AVID HALL
Mayor of Dayton
HERSCHEL J. lASHKOWITZ
Mayor of F11Cgo
BEN H. LEWIS
M:1.yor of Riverside
HENRY \V'. :MAIER
l\Uyor of Milwaukee
The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia 30315
Dear Mayor Allen:
~ ~IJ1J
/4
I~
-/ii d4f <iP
The u. s. Conference of Mayors and the u.~Conference of City Heal th
Officers are interested in the pr ocess of hea lth planning within the
context of the Model Cities planning effort. A survey sponsored by the
Conference of Mayors under contract with the Publi c Health Service is
being administered t o l ocal health departments t o determine their role
in planning and implementing the Model Ci ties health component.
In order t o get a different perspective on the health planning process
of the Model Cities, we are a sking Mayors t o respond personally to the
enclosed companion survey. The survey is f or informational purposes
only. The overall results of the survey will be made available to
those participants desiring them. Individual responses will, however,
be kept in confidence.
Completion of the questionnaire will not require more than fifteen (15)
minutes of your time. If the space provided for your answers is not
sufficient, please feel free to write on the blank side of the questionnaire.
Your personal cooperation in this effort will be greatly appreciated.
M . E. SENSENBRENNER
l-.hyor of Columbus, Ohio
Sincerely yours,
ALLEN C. THOMPSON
Mayor of Jackson, Miss.
W ILLIAM P. WALSH
Mayor of Syr:icuse
SAMUEL \Y/. YORTY
Mayor of Los Angeles
FRANK N. ZULLO
Mayor of Norwalk, Conn .
Exoculive Director:
J OHN J . GUNTHER
Enclosure
�Jv
J ..
I , I
�DEPARTM E NT OF HOU S ING A ND U R BAN D E VELOPMENT
PEACHT_REE SEVENTH BUILDI NG, ATLANTA, GEORG I A 30323
Room 645
REGION Ill
June 3, 1969
IN REPLY REFER TO:
Code 3RF
Mr. Ge orge L. Aldri dge, J r .
Director
Communi ty Improveme nt Pr ogram
City Hall
68 Mitchell Street , S. W.
. Atlanta, Georgi a
30303
Dear Mr. Aldridge :
Subje ct:
Pr oj e ct No . Ga . R- 97(CRP )
Community Re newal Program
Approval of Hous ing Costs Study
The Housing Costs Study for t he Atlanta Community I mprovement Progr am
has b een r e viewed and found t o be satisfac tory .
It is recommende d t hat t he Model Cit i e s Agency be a dvi sed of the
following :
a. To conside r the re commendations and conclusions c ontained in
the Housing Costs Study in planning relocation resources , espe ciall y
a s t h ey concern housing preferences, timing of development of
resources , treatment of particular neighborhoods or sub- areas, the
style a nd cost of housing a nd full uti lization of HUD-a ssisted
housing p rograms.
b. To coordinate the Study re commendations with proposed NDP activities
with in t he Model Cities Area .
c. To include in the Reloca tion Pr ogram f or t he Model Cit i es Area
the matters i ncluded in paragraph a above , in addi tion t o reviewing
estimates of displa cement found in the St udy.
Rel a t i ve t o h ousing resources proposed for relocation of reside nts
i n or from the Model Cities Area, displa ceme nt should not exceed the
s upply of new hous i ng which ca n be assured of development within the
same displ acement period. In view of the experimental nature of the
Mode l Cities ef fort and t h e . re commendations i n the St udy to use all
possibl e methods and programs to keep housing prices low, it may be
necessary and desirable to show resources on a year-to-year basis
with first year displacement limited t o the resource supply for that
d.
�2
year, allowing the time for development of innovative housing programs
and in attaining necessary sponsorship on an open-ended basis. This
would require assurance that displacement and resource supply will be
reviewed annually with amended Relocation Programs provided to HUD
for concurrence before displacement occurs.
D~
I
Sincerely yours,
./·
r
J ;' ,\ !'I
r
?NJ,w,/,'i\
-~-
cc:
Mr. Fountain
.
) 11 ;:N V
/ ··'
John I'.' Eafrn.inds
Assistant Regional AcL~inistrator
for Renewal Assistance

�~~
CITYOF.ATL
June 12, 1969
OFFICE OF MODEL CITIES PROGRAM
673 Capitol Avenue, S.W.
Atlanta, Ga . 30315
404-524-8876
Ivan Allen Jr., Mayor
J. C. Johnson, Director
MEMORANDUM
TO
Alderman G. Everett Millican
Mr. Walter Mitchell
Mrs. Martha Weems
Dr. c. Miles Smith
Mr. Clarence Coleman
FROM.
Johnny C. Johnson, Director
Model Cities Program
SUBJECT:
Review Committee Meeting
c::::-0
~
The Mayor has scheduled the next meeting of the Review Committee
for Wednesday, June 18 at 10:00 a.m. in Committee Room No. 1.
Your attendance is urgently needed in order to e x pedite an effective review of the projects involved.
VLC
CC :
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
�GEORGIA I NSTIT U TE
OF
TECHNOLOGY
ATLANTA. GEO R GI A 30332
SCHOOL OF
ARCHIT ECTU R E
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,
\\ Citiz ens of Hodel Cities m~e now rightly p2.rticipating in activities uhich aim
(
to do i mmediately what
~
be done i mmedintely- --i1hile planning for the future.
They are tired of b2in 6 the p assive subj e ct. of surveys and plmis that bring no
immediate benefits--·
But as they move for·mi:cd by self dc/e,erminG d practical steps---as citiz ens of. the
State of Georgi a, th.:;y uill expect, t.o take advank1go of nll the ne,·r syste;-;, s nnd
devices th at modern t e chnology can c or.ie up uith to meet their needomd requirements-and to benefit fro:-n th3 St ate 's investment in Technological Research and Education.
J..11
hmv~
lit)odern technology"is no::1 oriented to other things--~ to l½e middle class
~

~
-- -..::...'"":::!!
ttincentive" values of suburbr.n affluent living--~ancl tbe ttsecurity 11 val>.:es of making ~
..c we.r.
It is r,ot yet oric:.1te0 ~o tbe n eeds and requirements of
11
Hodel Cities"---
and ha s no on-goinr; program, in this nrenJI that cDn noH come up with spe cta cular
fv\
advances at short intervals---such as occur in the other areas.
.
1' J'2R.M
.
~h-1.iJ;-he 1-; atioiial
.
h.~G<-'"""' .,;, "1
}!odal Ci ties and similar prograJJs are jwl-1~r so vast and
critical to the 1-!atlon 1 i:,h at t='cbnology is now cbli.:'. ecJ to becom:?. oriented
to
them--
end ready to s erve the Citizens 1-ho live there .
Atlanta's Hocbl Citi es prog:rr:m he~ the opportunH,y and tho1,rs the promise of
leading the nation-- and Georgia Tech ~~.shes to do its part in this by providing
the technolog:ically-~af sd education and in~ ovative research that is needed to do
this job.
Such ne;,r purpose and dire ction can ect as a ereat incentive to help raise our
levels of acade·J1ic achi~vemc..11-t-- and cur students will be better citizens b rlCc:mse
of their involvement in it.
One thing in particular has to
oe
~aid about _this --:,·~
We should not ever imagine Georgia Tech's store of t echnological expertise
to be
.;·
like the wealth of some rich family, reP.dj~--to make charitable gifts to poor
·..
relations.
'
Tech very much needs new ch ~
es
- that are commensurate with~ resources -- ~nd the challenge of the 1Hodel Cities'
The shoe may well be on the other foot.
program is in this sense something of a gift to Georgia Tech.
Our association with Mode 1 Ci ties- can 'o e much more fruitful to us
than
- 5imilar associntion with Urban Renewal has been in the past.
·1.Hodel
Cities' has tbe built-in capacity to succeed where previous programs
proved abortive.
This is because of its bnsic princivle of Citizen participation
an~ its total integration of Social economic and physical improvement measures.
What this architecture class is attempting,is n relatively small project, to
�,;
be explor:cd ~nci developed at a high speed-- as th8se .things
Go ----
but it is important to us at Georgia 'i'ech_p bec ause it ccm prepare the way for


deeper studies.
O ur immediate assets he:.:.'e c1re:
1) f>-t,uc't2nts., msmb2rs of the /J:A Nationnl Student Organizdion)·--
who have c1sked to be given this kind of task in their classes--- They
are ~lready motivated.
2) C-i;rrlcnt clirr.2.te cf o;;inion that sees improved educationnl values in
this kind of project···-·· when prop:rly oreanized.
3) Paople
wh0 know the difficulties wo face in attempting this---
and
eire e•-i:.:.ippc·.:i z~:d ree.dy to give us all the help t, hey can.
The students


rill p
rocluce.: ;: rcpo:rk


and grnphic displays...._,.o.coverin~
survey---ac:u~
and
~ -~~--::::-~~
a . J , ~ ~-;:~ ~---~
-=~-;--.;:.,.:u
~~.:,--~J;:.:.a.
a"'lalysis of the health s-~:cvice needs and "}X)SG:i.0ili tics for meeting these with
143.215.248.55 16:06, 29 December 2017 (EST)
...r=~ ~ .. · ~ - , . ; : c . = = ~ - - - ~ " " D ~ . l f t . : . ~ ~ " l l l a ' " ~ ~ ~ - : : = . . , - . ,
services and facilit i e:.=:.
er.icc:
'I'he study will also, of cours:::, include proje';cted designs
.,.a;s;----;;r==r;crr~
e -::::r:r:, :r,-
.for !il.'.ljor h~.2lth service
~uil6.: ngs, with empba.:ds
.
Orl
the
t:Se
of recently dev eJ,._O,lli':.~
~
~
--- - - -·te-chriiques- likely to l5e· ·m:ost appropiate ·in ""this ·situation, ai;: well as of iruaginative
...
,-.:a,


but basically practical ir.nov2tion~.
The pressntat:5.on prcducts e;j'lerf,ing fro:n th•3 study will b~ as .follows:
A~ics of sy:r;chronized
audio tap'3S a!'1d
slici:~S :or aiidi
torium
~ ~.,;...;;..;..;.;..;;;_;..;;.,;;....;..;.....;;,.;_.;;..;~.,;.,.~
............;..=....,.,.,,_.....,_,.__-.o
_
_
- presentation.
....
Utilization of these proth1ets · ~;ill be as follows:
· a) Educa tional u3e f.9.r f~~ ...~_;J a 143.215.248.55,s, not only to CC!TI'r:mnic .;1te valuable
knouledge of this area of public nscdi but also as a stirn1lus and
· guide for those making sirniln!' studies in other areas of need.
/
· b) For pr?.g,t,~t.,1}_~=2!:..~f.~?..I!.~ s in architecture~ city_ planning, er.gine ering, ~edicine and health services---- -- to pro~ote and facilitate
bette r understanding of the needs and possibilities for effective
acticn, including interdisciplinary colzboration (such as mutally
adv anti.geous ~d!!ptatic.nof vurious aspect solutions, to allow fo r
their consolidcition in a unified total a ss err..bly).
·- ·.:.·-cf For lo cal l e aders and ·cit.i zens-- as .m aid to democratic decision-mak.
_ing., in-an on- going proc e ss of community in1provement. 1'
�..
RELEVA NCE AND REALITY IN TECHNOLOGICAL EDUCATION
AN EXERCISE IN PROBLEM STUDY METHODS AND COMMUNICAT ION TECHNIQUES--FOCUSSED ANO INTENSIFIED BY
APPLI CAT ION TO THE HEALTH FACILITY NEEDS OF ATLANTA'S
'MODEL CITIES' FAMILIES
AR CHITECTUR AL DESIGN STUDENTS AND FACULTY CORDIALLY
IN VITE YOU TO VISIT THE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND
SEE:
MON. JUNE 9th
AND ALL WEEK
AN EXHIBIT
IN ROOM 225
MON,
9
TUESo , THURS,*
9 a.m. & 4 p.m.
AN AUDIO-VISUAL PRESENTATION IN THE STUDENTS
LOUNGE


OR BY REQUEST-- CALL 873-4211, EXT .. 394


I
�CITY OF .ATLANTA
CITY HALL
June 2, 1969
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrat ive Assistant
MRS . ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison
,- -- - -- --------- . ·-·
I
Mr . . Richard Wilson
School of Architecture
Georgia Institute of Technology
Atlanta, Georgia 30332
Dear Mr .. Wilson:
-
_/·-"\
/





\
r
\
l
,
I
\
J-
I'
\_~
~----Y
The work being done by your students in the new Model Cities
involvement 11 project is of great interest to those of us in
government involved in the Model Cities Program.
11
For some time, it has been my feeling that our academic
institutions could serve the community and their students much
more effectively if academic curricula could be geared to
contemporary problems and projects.
The results of such work should be made available to interested
governmental or community leaders so that the innovations of
the youthful mind of the college student can be shared by those
responsible for building progran~s for the good of the total
....
com...'Tiuni...y.
I wish for your students success in their undertaking and I
hope it is just the beginning of many other proje_cts in which
the City can share.
S ·ncerely yours,
· )1;-.. ;1/)/~~:~u rV
ari Sweat
II
DS :fy
-- -----..
I
l 1~
�CITY OF A.TLANTA.
June 5, 1969
OFFICE OF MODEL CITIES PROGRAM
673 Capitol Avenue, S .W.
Atlanta, Ga . 30315
404-524-8876
Ivan. Allen. Jr., Mayor
J. C. Johnson, Director
M E M O R A N -D -U -M
TO
Dan E. Sweat
FROM
Johnny C. Johnson
SUBJECT:
Copies of the Eric Hill Housing Report
~
The Eric Hill Housing Report is in the hands of the City
Purchasing Department for the reproduction of 200 copies.
We have been informed that it will take approximately
three weeks to finish this report. We will be glad to give
you a copy as soon as it comes off the press.
JCJ : vlc
�THE UNIVERSiTY OF GEORGIA
INS T I TUT E
OF
T ERRE LL
0
HA LL
G OVE RNMEN T
ATHE NS ,
GEORG I A
3060 1
AREA
CODE 4 0 4
5 42 - 2 7 36
Jun e 17, 1969
Mr . J ohn C. Johnson
Director, Model Citi es
673 Capi t ol , S . W.
Atl ant a , Georg i a
30315
Dear Mr . Johnson:
Base d u pon our me eting of May 23 and upon subsequent conversations with
Mr . J ames L . Wri ght, Jr. of y our st aff, we wish to make the fo llow ing
propos al for a training p rogram in Mode l Cities projec t p lannin g and
management. Mr . Donald T. Kelley , Assistant Profes sor , College of
I ndustrial Management, Geo rgia Institute of Technology , will be emp l oyed
b y t he University of Georgia to develop and implement a training p rogram
for Model Cities projec t agency personnel . The instruction wi l l emphasize
a. network planning , crit ic al p a th approach to Mode l Cities pro j ec t manage ncn t . All training wi ll be conducted during the months of J uly and
ugust, 1969 .
. uring the training period, Mr . Kel l ey will conduct a maximum of six
wo -day classroom sessions and . two one-half clay follow-up sessions for
each proj ec t agency represe nt ed in the cl assroom s ess ions. During the
cl assroom meetings, part i cipants wil l b e introduced to the concept of
network planning and its Model Cities application . Before the end of
the classroom instructions, p articipants will begin to develop th eir
own project n etworks . Follow-up sessio~s will b e h eld for each project
agency in order to assist project managers in the refinement of n etworks
initi ated in t he cl assroom sessions . Thi s approach to the training
assume_s that each classroom session wi ll b e attended b y twelve trainees,
representing four project agencies . Thu s, i f maximum p articipation is
achi~ved, a total of seventy-two pro j ect ma n agers representing twenty four project agencies wi ll receive tra i ning b y August 31, 1969.
This training program wi ll be funded primarily by a gran t obtaine d by
the Universit y of ·ceorgia under the provisions of Title VIII of th e
Housing Act of 1964. The only direct costs to be paid b y participating
Mode l Cities agencies will be the costs of travel, housing and meals
if the classroom sessions are held i n Athens .
�Mr . J ohn C. J ohnson
Page two
J une 17 , 1969
I f th e provisions of this proposal are a cc e ptabl e to y ou, we are asking
you to t ake th e following ac tio n :
1.
Obtain comm itme nt s from Hode l Cities proj ect agencies to
particip a t e in th e train in g program .
2.
Determine the de sir a b i lit y of part icipa ti on by s e l ected
membe r s of your staff, and consid e r the feasibility of
devoting the fi rst cl a ssroom s ess ion exclu sive l y t o
training you r staff per sonne l.
3.
Determine the loc a t ions for classroom sessions . Sp ace
i s .available a t t he University of Geo r gia ' s Ce nt er for
Continui ng Ed uca tion on the fol l ow ing dates : Jul y 10 - 11,
14 - 15, 16 -17, 24 - 25 , 31 -August 1, 7- 8 . Alth ough th e
Ath ens l ocat ion of fers some advantages, cl assroom
session s can b e h e ld in At l a nt a just as easily, prov id e d
adequate classroom fac i l ities a r e available .
We are ex tr eme l y please d to submit this proposal . We f ee l th at this program
.n ma ke a significant contribution t o the ac c omplishment of City of
Atla nt a Model Cit ies program objec t ives. I wil l be availa bl e to meet with
y ou or yo ur staff representativ e s a t any t ime to pr ovide add it io na l information or to finalize program arrangements .
Sinc ere ly,
J ohn W. Vining , Jr .
Coordinator of Government a .l Training
.JWVJr: rbb
cc:
Carl Sutherl3/ld
Da n Swea t
George Be r ry
v
�DEPART MENT
O FFI C E O F T H E A SSI S T ANT S ECRET A R Y
FOR M ODEL CI TIES A ND G O V ERN M ENT A L RELATIONS
Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor of Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
I N RE P L Y R EFE R TO :
JUN 1 1 1969
Dear Mayor Allen:
In his press conference of April 28, 1969, Secretary Romney
made the following statement:
"The 10% population restriction on the size of the
target neighborhoods will be dropped . • . . [T]his
. . . does not mean that the program will be expanded
city wide within ea ch city. Its purpose will remain
t hat of focusing resources on par ticularly poor and
blight ed ne i ghborhoods, but local officials will be
given grea ter l a t i t ude in dr awing progr am boundar ies
that confo rm to l ocal condit i ons. "
The Secretary ' s comments have been given wi dely dif fer i ng inter pretations in news papers and periodicals around t he country. I n
order to avoid a ny confusion I would like to expand a bit on t he
Secretary ' s remarks.
Cities are certainly not requ ired t o expand their model nei ghb orhood boundaries . They will be permitted to do s o in or der t o
remove arbitrary geographic limitation s tha t prevent logical and
effective program development. For example, in one city a small
geographic area was eliminated from the model neighborho od in
order to meet the population limitation. This area is contiguous
to the model neighborhood, is a blighted area, with essentially
the same kind of population mix as the model neighborhood, and contains only a few thousand residents. Expansion to include this
contiguous area would not materially affect the capacity of this
city to mount a program that will have substantial impact on the
neighborhood problems. This represents an artificial constraint
which may be removed, if the city seeks to initiate such a change.
�2
Any addition to the model neighborhood must still meet all
statutory requirements. The additional area must be a
blighted one. The program for the expanded area must meet
all the statutory criteria, including the requirement that
the program achieve a substantial impact on the neighborhood's
problems.
No additional supplemental funds will be available for the
expanded areas. For most first round cities, this means that
new projects or extended projects in the new areas would depend
on funds from other than Model Cities supplemental grant funds.
All cities may find it difficult to assure the program impact
required by the statute if the model neighborhood is greatly
expanded unless substantial additional resources are available.
In most situations, however, as CDA's develop their capabilities
to plan, coordinate, and evaluate the program in their first
target area, much benefit could be derived from expanding these
activities of the CDA to those resources and programs presently
going into poverty areas of the city other than the present
model neighborhood.
This expanding role of the CDA as the program continues would
enable the cities to be in a position to better utilize additional
resources in the future as they may become available.
Any request for area expansion should set forth the reasons therefore and demonstrate that the city has the capacity to administer
the program in the expanded areas in accordance with the foregoing
considerations.
Very truly yours,
~-~ · ~kFloyd H. Hyde
�DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT
WASHINGTON, D. C.
20410
OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY
FOR MODEL CITIES AND GOVERNMENTAL RELATIONS
IN REPL Y REFER TO : . /'
JUN 1 1 1969
' ·Jr .
30303
D r Mayor Allen:
tn hi pr se confer c of April 28, 1969, Secret ry Rt>mn y
d
th
followu
t t
nt:
10% popul tion r st:rict1ou on th
t n ighborhoods 'Will be dropped • • • • [T)h1
• • • doe not · n that th progr
will b
panded
cit wide within
ch city. Its purpo
will r
in
that of foeuai
re ourc on p rticul rly poor nd
bli ht
i hborhooda, b t loc l offic ls will be
iv gr t r 1 titud in dr wing progr boundari
that confoni to loc 1 cot\ditio ,"
HTh
tar
siv n wid ly diff rin
int r-
round th country.
uld U.k
to ap nd
In
bit on th
�2
Any addition to the model neighborhood must still meet all
statutory requirements. The additional area must be a
blighted one. The program for the expanded area must meet
all the statutory criteria, including the requirement that
the program achieve a substantial impact on the neighborhood's
problems.
No additional supplemental funds will be available for the
expanded areas. For most first round cities, this means that
new projects or extended projects in the new areas would depend
on funds from other than Model Cities supplement 1 grant funds.
All cities may find it difficult to assure the program impact
requir d by the tatute if the model neighborhood is greatly
expanded unless substantial additional resources are available.
In most situations, howev r, as CDA's develop their capabilities
to plan, coordinate, and evaluate the program in their first
target area, much benefit could be derived from expanding these
activities of the CDA to those resources and programs presently
going into poverty areas of the city other than the present
model neighborhood.
Thi expanding role of the CDA a the program continues would
enable the cities to be in a position to better utilize additional
r ources in the future as they may become vailable.
Any requ st for area expansion should set forth the reasons therefor and demonstr te that the city has th capacity to administer
the progr
in th expanded reas in accordance with the foregoing
consider tions.
Very truly yours,
~a~~cJFloyd H. Hyde
�DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING A~/t~B
WASHINGTON, D. . 041
OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY
FOR MODEL CITIES AND GOVERNMENTAL RELATIONS
Ho1;.orable Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor of Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
IN REPLY REFER TO :
JUN 11 1969
Dear Hayer Allen:
In his press conference of April 28, 1969, _~ecretary Romney
made the following statement:
The 10% population restriction on the size of the
target neighborhoods will be dropped . . . . [T]his
._. . : • • does not mean that the program will be expanded
city wide within each city.
Its purpose will remain
that of focusing resources on particularly poor and
blighted neighborhoods, but local officials will be
given greater latitude in drawing program boundaries
that conform to local conditions. 11
11
•l
The Secretary's comments have been given widely differing interpretations in newspapers and periodicals around the country. In
order to avoid any confusion I would like to expand a bit on the
Secretary's remarks.
Cities are certainly not required to expand their model neighborhood boundaries. They will be permitted to do so in order to
remove arbitrary geographic limitations that prevent logi cal and
effective program development. For example, in one city a small
geographic area was eliminated from the model neighb orhood in
order to meet the population limitation. This area is contiguous
to the model neighborhood, is a blighted area, with essentially
the same kind of population mix as the model nei ghborhood, and contains only a few thousand residents. Expansion to include this
contiguous area would not materially affect the capacity of this
city to mount a program that wil l have substantial impact on the
neighborhood problems. This represents an artificial constraint
which may be removed, if the city seeks to initiate such a change.
�2
Any addition to the model neighborhood · must still meet all
statutory requirements. The additional area must be a
blighted one. The program for the expanded area must meet
all the statutory criteria, including the requirement that
the program achieve a substantial impact on the neighborhood's
problems.
·
No additional supplemental funds will be available for the
expanded areas. For most first round cities, this means that
new projects or extended projects in the new areas would depend
on funds from other than Model Cities supplemental grant funds.
All cities may find it difficult to assure the program impact
required by the statute if the model neigliliorhood is greatly
expanded unless substantial additional resources are available.
In most situations, however, as CDA's develop their capabilities
to plan, coordinate,_ and evaluate the program in their first
target area, much benefit could be derived from expanding these
activities of the CDA to those resources and programs presently
going into poverty areas of the city other than the present
model neighborhood.
This expandihg role of the CDA as the program continues would
enable the cities to be in a position to better utilize additional
resources in the future as they may become available.
Any request for area expansion should set forth the reasons therefore and demonstrate that the city has the capacity to administer
the program in the expanded areas in accordance with the foregoing
considerations.
Very truly yours,
,.-· ·-<
, , , ..
~
_,,,
-·.,J...n
,. ~'-1 .
~
_.,,.-.
--<.....~ •
Floyd H. Hyde
t._... ' . .,,.,--~ ;. ·,. .....
~---~ \ .. ··-
�DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URB
WASHINGTON,~ 4 1
OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY
FOR MODEL CITIES AND GOVERNMENTAL RELATIONS
Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor of Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
IN REPLY REFER TO:
JUN 11 1969
Dear l1ayor Allen:
In his press conference of April 28, 1969, Secretary Romney
made the following statement:
.,
"The 10% population restriction on the size of the
target neighborhoods will be dropped . • . . [T]his
. • . dbes not mean that the program will be expanded
city wide within each city. Its purpose will remain
that of focusing resources on particularly poor and
blighted neighborhoods, but local officials will be
given greater latitude in drawing program boundaries
that conform to local conditions.
The Secretary's comments have been given widely differing interpretations in newspapers and periodicals around the country. In
order to avoid any confusion I would like to expand a bit on the
Secretary's remarks.
Cities are certainly not required to expand their model neighborhood boundaries. They will be permitted to do so in order to
remove arbitrary geographic limitations that prevent logical and
effective program development. For example, in one city a small
geographic area was eliminated from the model neighborhood in
order to meet the population limitation. This area is contiguous
to the model neighborhood, is a blighted area, with essentially
the same kind of population mix as the model neighborhood, and contains only a few thousand residents. Expansion to include this
contiguous area would not materially affect the capacity of this
city to mount a program that will have substantial impact on the
neighborhood problems. This represents an artificial constraint
which may be removed, . if the city seeks to initiate such a change .
�2
Any addition to the model neighborhood must still meet all
statutory requirements. The additional area must be a
blighted one. The program for the expanded area must meet
all the statutory criteria, including the requirement that
the program achieve a substantial impact on the neighborhood's
problems.
No additional supplemental funds will be available for the
expanded areas. For most first round cities, this means that
new projects or extended projects in the new areas would depend
on funds from · o.ther than Hodel Cities supplemental grant fund s .
All cities may find it difficult to assure the program impact
required by the statute if the model neighborhood is greatly
expanded unless substantial additional resource s are available.
In most situations, however, as CDA's develop their capabilities
to plan, coordinate, and evaluate the program in their first
target area, much benefit could be derived from expanding these
activities of the CDA to those resources and programs presently
going into poverty areas of the city other than the present
model neighborhood.
This expanding role of the CDA as the program continues would
enable the cities to be in a position to better utilize additional
resources in the future as they may become availa bl e.
Any request for area expa nsion should set forth the reasons ther e fore and demonstrate that the city has the capa city to administer
the program in the expanded area s in accordance with the for egoi ng
considerations.
Very truly yours,
• _.,.· . _ __.........
Floyd H. Hyde
~
\
'"
'r -~
..........-c:-
�7
JUN 18 BEC'O
Tcli'plwni': (-10-/ J r, 88 -8 7 78
ational
)
So11th£'m N egio 1111I
q(fice
Cl;.ircnce D. Colcm a11, Diri!c/Or
I 36 /l·fariell a S tri'e l . N. W.
A 1/11111,1, Geo r g ia ] 0303
June 17, 1969
Mr. JohnPy Johnson
Director
Hodel Cities Prog::run
673 Capitol Avenue, S. W,
Atlanta, Georgia
30315
Dear Mr. Johnson:
As a follow-up of our recent Executive Board meeting of Model Cities,
I am in the process of developing a statement which I hope to discuss
with the committee which was established at the last meeting concerning the pe . ·s onnel pra ctices of the Model Cities Board and Sub-Contractors of the Model Cities Program.
It will be helpful if you would shar e with me at your earliest convenience a comple te roster of the Mod el Cities staff which indicates
the race, sex, salary, job title, and other related information. Also,
I would appreciate it if you would indicate which of the present employees
were residents of the Model Cities area at the time of employment. I
would need the same information with regard to the staff of the Sub-Contracting agencies of the Model Cities project tha t would help the committee
to determine to what ex tent Sub- Contractors at
pt to employ Model Cities
residents.
Cla ence D. Coleman
Sou hern Regional Director
)
CDC/all
Boarcl of Trust ees
Pre!>iclenr
Treasurer
JAM E S A. LI NEN
!\·! o rris B. Abra m
1rs. M a x Asrn li
Assistan t Treasu rer
William M. Batte n
L F.S L!E N . SHAW
Vivi~.n J. De:.i.mon
Mrs. Ha ley Bell
Ed gar M . Bronfm a n
Ex,·c11ti1•e Direc to r
WHITNEY M. YOUNG, JR. Chesie r Burger
Barbara Bunon
Kenncih W. Clemen!
D a niel A. Collins
Mil ton K. Cummin gs
S enio r Vice- President
RAMON S. SCRLGGS
Vice- Fresh/en ts
JOII N 1-1 . J Ol-1 :--JSON
LO U IS E . MAR f'I N
MARTIN E. SEGAL
Secretary
£RSA II. POSTON
IV AN C . M c LEOD
Wendell G. Frecla.nt!
A . G . G as io n. Sr.
J o hn A. Grono us ki
Ch a rl es H am ilto n
Pa.ul Ji.:nnin ~s


\l a r1in D . Jenkin s


T a lm at!~e Kenly
'-'1rs. nhur H. Krim
Ro bert Laza rus. Jr.
ln abcl R. Lind sa y
Henr y A. Loeb
St a nley Ma rc us
\ ·! rs . O . Cl ay
M ax well . Sr.
Floyd J. McCrce
D o nalt! H. ~lcG a nn o n
Iv a n C. ~kL cot!
\ •!rs. Le M . .\l er\' iS
G. Willi a m :\!til er
James F. Oates, Jr.
FrcJcrid.: (J'Ncal
Henry G . P:;rks . Jr.
Bis ho p Ha ro ld IC
Perry, S .V.D.
Contributions to th e Natio nal Urban L eague a; ·e tax cleduc tible
Sa muel D . P rono r
Clay!o n R. Yates
Fran cis S. Quillan
\I r, .. nrucc Zenk e!
Henr y J. Richard son. Jr. D wigil t II.. Zr>o k
Lesli e N . Sh a w
As h by G. Sm it h. Sr.
H (>11orury Tru :;tce<
David Sulli ,·a n
\\' 11.L! A~l H . H.\ LO\\'l:S:
\!rs. Ar1hur Ochs
SLil Lht.: rl,!c r
ROBEK 'I W. Dt,WL!:S.G
Willi a m J. Tren t. jr.
LLOYD K . G RRI SO:-S
Edward ~1. Tuft
TH EO DO R E W. K II EEL
Kalie E. Whick ha m
LINDSLE Y F . K l ~lU ,\LL
Leonard W oodcock
H E ' I,\' STEEGER
�June 19, 1969
Mr. Clarence D. Col eman
Southe rn Reg io nal Director
lliationa l Urban L cg,_, u2 , Inc .
136 Marietta Street, N. w.
Atlanta , Georgia
3 0 3 03
Dear Mr o Coleman:
In re s ponse to your l e tter of June 17, I am herein enclosing
a complete ro s t er of the Model Cities Staff with the i nformation you req ues ~e~ .
At this time, it i s impo ss i ble to give you this same information with regard to the staffs o f the sub- contrac ting
agencies b e cause i t is not r eadi ly ava ilable in forma t.
I believe the inform a tion on my staff wi ll facilit a te your
developing a stateme nt concerning our personne l practices .
However , i f you ne e d a ny additional inf orma tion, plea se feel
free to contact me.
Sincerely,
Johnny c. Johnson
Director
vlc
Enclosure
�MODEL CITIES STAFF
POSITION
NAME
c.
J OHNS OtI , J.
DIRECTOR
-SALARY*
-$678. 00
RACE
SEX
N
M
Wright, J. L.
Director, Physic al
Developrnent
574. 00
w
M
Ru ssell, Samuel
Direc tor, Pr ogram
Management ·
506. 00
N
M
Shimkus, J. R.
Directo r, So cial
Management
5 0 6. 0 0
w
M
Director, Community Affa irs
466. 00
N
F
Caldwell, D. F.
Asst .· .Director ,
Aoministration
466. 0 0
w
M
Gibson, D. L.
Social Pla nning
Coo rdinator
447. 00
N
M
Oro sz, Louis
Phy s icai. Planning
Coordinato r
447. 0 0
w
M
Howell, B. T.
Program Coordinato r 429.00
N
M
Keller, Frank
Physical Planner
429. 00
N
M
Walker, R. P.
Evaluation Analyst
411. 00
N
F
Wexler, Alan
Commu nity Af fairs
Co ordinator
394.0 0
w
M
Eizenstat, F.
Social Planner
394. 0 0
w
F
Mitchell, M. A.
Senior Systems
Ana~yst
378.00
w
M
Senior Budget
Analyst
378.00
w
M
Stroud, J. A.
Program Specialist
333.00
N
M
Hicks, Jamesl
Pro gram Specialist
333.00
N
M
Turnipseed, H. E. Contrac t Admini1strator
333.00
N
M
Culp, Jim
333 .00
w
M
Clayto n,
x.
B.
I
Holland, D.
v.
Economic Development Planner
�Model Citie s Staff
Page ~.,,,o
RACE
SF:X
Rese arch Spe cialist 333~00
w
M
Neighborhood
Organizer
320.00
N
F
Neighborhood
Organizer
3 2 0.00
w
M
Lewallen, Mo
Graphic Specialist
28200 0
w
M
Scho"ates, E.
Social Pl anning
Technician
249.00
N
F
Principal Stenographer
229.00
N
F
Sluss, John
Dr aftsman
211.0 0
w
M
Ryder, M. A.
Senior Stenographer 211.00
N
F
Hawk, B. A.
Senior Stenographer 211.0 0
N
F
Resident Trainee
202.00
N
F
McDona ld, M.
St enographer
186.00
w
F
Hewell, M. A.
Stenographer
178.00
w
F
Akins, Patrici a
Stenographer
178.00
w
F
Trawick , P. B.
Stenographer
178.00
w
F
eustodian
150.00
N
M
NAI-1E
-
POSITI ON
Irwin, B. M.
Stewart, R. M.
11 -:sco tt,
Carr,
Lyall
v.
L.



Lockett, Edna





"-'Render , earl


tBi-weekly Salary



Resident of Model Neighborhood Area




BREAKDOWN:
17
Negroes; 17 Whites
21 Males; 13 Fema les
SALARY*
�REVIEW COMMITTEE
MODEL CIT I ES EXECUTIVE BOARD
June 25, 1969
11:w


4


Contract Agency and Projects
I.
II.
Agency Representative
Resident Corporation
RE-OOlC
Xernona Clayton
Director of Community
Affairs
Atlanta Parks Department
RE-003N
RE-005N
Stan Martin
Administrative Assistant
Atlanta Parks Department


* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * .* * * * * * * * * * * * *


Recommendatiora for deletion :
Supple menta l Funds
SS-023N
Income Maintena n ce Study
This recommendation is based on the fact that
there no longer exists a need for such a study inasmuch
as the Nixon Administration is undertaking this study on
the nat i onal level.
$ 25 , 000
Tr aining o f Re s ide nt s
$3 5 ,00 0
The r e sid e nt org anization i s t o receive OEO-HUD
funds for the p u rposes of training r e sidents and acqu iring
technical assistance. F unding this project wo uld resu l t, ther efore ,
in a duplication of funct i on.
RE ~ 004N
�C T
OF.P.:. LANT
CITY HALL ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING
COLLIER B. GLADIN, Dir ector
June 24, 1969
MEMORANDUM
TO:
Collier Gladin
Rodney Cook
Dan ~weat
Cecil Alexander
Col. Malcolm Jones
Robert C. Watkins
FROM:
George L.
SUBJECT:
Status of Propo~
Studies
Three proposals concerning the Housing Study to be conducted by the City
of Atlanta were recently submitted by Eric Hill Associates. These proposals were sent to various agencies, including the Atlanta Regional Metropolitan Planning Commission, to encourage their opinions and to determine
any possible overlapping areas between the City's proposed housing study
and any other studies likely to be conducted in the area of housing.
On Thursday, June 19, 1969, Margaret (Peg) Breland of ARMPC, presented
the broad outline of a study that ARMPC is planning to conduct concerning
housing. Larry Fonts, of the Fulton County Planning Commission, Louis
Dismukes of Eric Hill Associates, and George Aldridge and Cindy McCloud
of the City of Atlanta Planning Department attended this meeting.
It was determined at this time that there were possible areas of overlap between ARMPC's proposed housing study and the City's proposed housing
study. The Atlanta Regional Metropolitan Regional Planning Commission has
been requested by this office to provide us with a copy of the broad outline of their proposed study. Upon receipt, the Department will study
this proposal and try to resolve any areas of overlap or duplication that
may have arisen.
�Memorandum
June 24, 1969
Page 2
Copies of the ARMPC proposal will be forwarded to the Chairman of the
Housing Restudy Panel of the Housing Resources Committee for their use and
perusal. Any comments from this group would be welcomed.
Ultimately, we hope to schedule another meeting at which time we
shall discuss the ARMPC proposal and the City proposal for a housing study
as revised.
GLA:ds
�HUD NEWS
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING
AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT
WASHINGTON D . C . 20410
HUD-No. 69-0506
Phone (202) 755-6980
FOR RELEASE AFTER:
10:00 a.m., Thursday
June 26, 1969
MODEL CITIES CONTRACT TENDERED
TO DENVER, COLORADO
Secretary George Romney _ of the U.S. Department of Housing
and Urban Development today announced the tender of a
$5,766,000 Model Cities contract to Denver, Colo.
Denver will also be given support from other programs
administered by HUD, and the Department of Health, Education and
Welfare, the Department of Labor, the Office of Economoc Opportunity and the National Foundation for the Arts and Humanities.
Today's action by Secretary Romney will enable Denver to
begin the first-year action phase ~nder its comprehensive fiveyear Model Cities program. State, county, local and private
resources will also be used by the city in its concentrated,
coordinated attack on the serious social, economic and physical
problems within the Model Cities area.
Secretary Romney, who is Chairman of the President's Cabinet
Committee on Voluntary Action, noted the extensive private and
public involvement in the Denver program. Volunteer groups will
be active during the first-year action program. For example ,
the Metro Denver Fair Housing Center, Inc . will operate the
Housing Finance and Development project. The city also proposes
to enlist the Advisory and Investment Group to operate the
Consultive Services Organization project. The Board of Directors
of this organization includes the industrial and commercial
leaders of Denver as well as residents of the model neighborhood.
Several United Fund agencies are also participating in the
Denver Model Cities program, including the Metro Denver Child
Care Association and the Metropolitan Council for Community
Services. It is planned that the construction trade unions will
conduct two manpower projects and the Urban League will be
involved in a pre-apprenticeship training program.
Commenting on the decision to tender a contract, Secretary
Romney explained that this was done after a careful review of the
Denver comprehensive plan. The plan was thoroughly studied and
(MORE)
�-2-
HUD-No. 69-0506
analyzed both by the Regional and Washington Interagency Review
Committees representing those Federal departments and agencies
with urban aid programs.
"During the past several months, Denver has done an excellent
job in revising its proposals and improving its capability to
operate in the first-year action program," he said.
A total of 150 communities in 45 states, the District of
Columbia and Puerto Rico are participating in the Model Cities
program. The first applications for plan~ing grants were approved
in November 1967.
Michael DiNunzio
Model Cities Director
1150 Bannock Street
Denver, Colorado 80202
For further information:
Mayor William H. McNichols
Denver City and County Building
Denver, Colorado 80202
Note:
A summary of the Denver Model Cities program is available
upon request to the Office of Public Affairs, u. S.
Department of Housing and Urban Development,
Washington, D. C.
20410.













�HUDNEWS
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING
AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT
WASHINGTON D . C . 20410
HUD-No. 69-0514
Phone (202) 755-6980
FOR RELEASE AFTER:
10:00 a.m., Thursday
June 26, 1969
MODEL CITIES CONTRACT
TENDERED TO TRINIDAD, COLORADO
Secretary George Romney
of the U.S. Department of
Housing and Urban Development today announced the tender
of a $1,225,000 Model Cities contract to Trinidad, Colorado.
Trinidad will also be given substantial support from
other programs administered by HUD, and by the Department of
Health, Education and Welfare, the Department of Labor and
the Office of Economic Opportunity.
Today's action by Secretary Romney will enable Trinidad
to begin the first year action phase of its comprehensive
five-year Model Cities program. County, local and private
resources will also be used by the city in its concentrated,
coordinated attack on the serious social, physical and
economic problems within the Model Cities area.
Secretary Romney, who is Chairman of the President's
Cabinet Committee on Voluntary Action, noted the extensive
private and public involvement in the Trinidad program.
Civic, business, educational, welfare, medical and professional groups were involved in the planning process, and
will also participate in the first year action phase.
Officials of several organizations active in the Trinidad
program include the President of the Chamber of Commerce, the
Superintendent of the Nursing Home and the President of Trini-dad State Junior College. Among the private groups involved
are the Southern Colorado Railroads Association which will
donate a building to hQuse a Juvenile Youth Offenses Center
and the Historical Society which will restore a store facade as
a demonstration of historic preservation.
- more -
�HUD"""No. 69-0514
-
2 -
Commenting on the decision to tender a contract,
Secretary Romney explained that this was done after a careful
review of the Trinidad comprehensive plan. The plan was thoroughly studied and analyzed both by the Regional and Washington
Inter-agency Review Committees representing those Federal Departments and Agencies with urban aid programs.
"During the past several months, Trinidad has done an excellent job in revising its proposals and improving .r ts capability
to operate its first year action program," he said.
A total of 150 communities in 45 States, the District of
Columbia and Puerto Rico are participating in the Model Cities
Program. The first applications for planning grants were
approved in November 1967.
For further information:
James E. Griffin
CDA Director
City Hall
Trinidad, Colorado
81802
Dr . . James E. Donnelly
Mayor, City of Trinidad
City Hall
Trinidad, Colorado 81082
NOTE:
A summary of the Trinidad Model Cities Proqram is
available upon request . to the Office of Public
Affairs, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban
Development, Washington, D. C. 20410













�HUD NEWS
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING
AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT
WASHINGTON D . C . 20410
FOR RELEASE AFTER:
10:00 a,m., Thursday
June 26, 1969
HUD No. 69-0511
Phone (202) 755-6980
MODEL CITIES CONI'RACT
TENDERED TO CAMBRIDGE, MASS.
Secretary George Romney of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban
Development today announced the tender of a $1,523,000 Model Cities contract
to Cambridge, Mass.
Cambridge will also be given support from other programs administered
by HUD, by the Department of Health, Education and Welfare, Department of
Justice and the Office of Economic Opportunity.
Today's action by Secretary Romney will enable Cambridge to begin the
first year action phase of its comprehensive five-year Model Cities program. State, county, local and private resources will also be used by the
city in its concentrated, coordinated attack on the serious social, physical
and economic problems within the Model Cities area.
Secretary Romney, who is Chairman of the President's Cabinet Cormnittee
on Voluntary Action~ noted the extensive private and public involvement in
the Cambridge program.
Beginning with the preparation of the application for planning funds,
voluntary participation from many parts of the Cambridge community has been
a strong feature of the Cambridge model cities program. Schools and other
private groups will take part in first year action projects. Harvard and
the Massachusetts Institute of Technology will be involved in the education
component, and MIT will also assist in designing improvements for Sennott
Park.
In the housing area, the Cambridge Corporation is supporting the
development of a prop osed cooperative project and scattered site public
housing.
Commenting on the decision to tender a contract, Secretary Romney
explained that this was done after a careful review of the Cambridge comprehensive plan. The plan was thoroughly studied and analyzed both by the
Regional and Washington Interagency Review Committees representing those
Federal Departments and Agencies with urban aid programs .
-more-
�IBJD No. 69-0511
-2-
"During the past several months, Cambridge has done an excellent job
in revising its proposals and improving its capability to operate its
first year action program," he said.
A total of 150 connnunities in 45 States, the District of Columbia and
Puerto Rico are participating in the Model Cities Program. The first
applications for planning grants were approved in November 1967,
For further information:
Gordon L. Brigham
Community Development Section
City Hall
Cambridge, Mass. 02139
Mayor Walter J. Sullivan
City Hall
Cambridge, Mass.
02139
NorE:
A summary of the Cambridge Model Cities Program is
available upon request to the Office of Public Affairs,
u. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development,
Washington, D. C.
20410













V
�HUD NEWS
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING
AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT
HUD-No. 69-0534
Phone (202) 755-7327
WASHINGTON D . C . 20410
FOR RELEASE AFI'ER:
10 A.M. Thursday
June 26, 1969
MODEL CITIES CONTRACT
TENDERED TO BALTIMCRE, MD.
Secretary George Romney of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban
Development today announced the tender of a $10,554,000 Model Cities
contract to Baltimore, Md.
Baltimore will also be given support from other programs administered
by HUD, by the Department of Health, Education and Welfare, the Department
of Labor, and the Office of Economic Opportunity.
Today's action by Secretary Romney will enable Baltimore to begin the
first year action phase of its comprehensive five-year Model Cities program.
Local and private resources will also be used by the city in its concentrated,
coordinated attack on the serious social, physical and economic problems
within the Model Cities area.
Secretary Romney, who is Ghairman of the President's Cabinet Committee
on Voluntary Action, noted the extensive private and public involvement in
the Baltimore program.
Civic, business, educational, welfare, and medical groups were involv ed
in the planning process, and will also participate in the first year action
phase.
During planning , the Chairman of the Great er Baltimore Committ ee, a
privat e organization comprised of leading businessmen in the city, serv ed
on th e Policy Steering Board and helpe d develop the comprehensive program.
There was also strong university involvement, with John Hopkins University
playing a major role in helping to dev e lop some of the health components.
Morgan Stat e College made one of its faculty members available to s erv e a s
Chai r man of the Policy St eering Board . Also, physicians and dentists in
the mod e l ne ighborhood provid ed t echnical assistance to the task forc e on
health .
• more •
�'
HUD-No. 69-0534
-2-
Commenting on the decision to tender a contract, Secretary Romney
explained that this was done after a careful review of the Baltimore
comprehensive plan. The plan was thoroughly studied and analyzed both by
the Regional and Washington lnteragency Review Committees representing
those Federal Departments and Agencies with urban aid programs.
"During the past several months, Baltimore has done an excellent
job in revising its proposals and improving its capability to operate
its first year action program," he said.
A total of 150 communities in 45 States, the District of Columbia
and Puerto Rico are participating in the Model Cities Program. The first
applications for planning grants were approved in November 1967.
For further information:
William G. Sykes, Director
Model Cities Agency
City Hall
Baltimore, Md. 21202
Mayor Thomas J. D1 Alesandro
City Hall
Baltimore, Md. 21202
NOTE:
A summary of the Baltimore Model Cities Program is available
upon request to the Office of Public Affairs, U.S. Department
of Housing and Urban Development, Washington, D.C. 20410





V
�HUDNEWS
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING
AND UR B AN DEVELOPMENT
WASHINGTON D . C. 20410
HUD-NO. 69-0503
Phone (202) 755-6980
FOR RELEASE AFTER:
10:00 A.M., Thursday
June 26, 1969
HUD TENDERS MODEL CITIES
CONTRACT TO TOLEDO, OHIO
Secretary George Romney of the U.S. Department of
Housing and Urban Development today announced the tender of a
$4,410,000 Model Cities contract to Toledo, Ohio.
Toledo will also be given support from other programs
administered by HUD, the Departments of Health, Education and
Welfare, Labor, Agriculture and the Office of Economic Opportunity.
Today's action by Secretary Romney will enable Toledo to
begin the first-year action phase under its comprehensive fiveyear Model Cities program. State, county, local and private
resources will also be used by the city in its concentrated,
coordinated attack on the serious social, economic and physical
problems within the Model Cities area.
Secretary Romney, who is Chairman of the President's
Cabinet Committee on Voluntary Action, noted the extensive
private and public involvement in the Toledo program.
Segments of the larger Toledo business community have been
involved with two groups of young professionals and semiprofessionals-- Harambee and the Toledo Council of Business-- in
the planning and implementation of a number of model neighborhood projects. Other private groups involved in the Model Cities
program include the National Association of Businessmen, Community
Traction Company, Owens- Illinois Corporation, Chamber of Commerce,
the First National Bank and the Toledo Trust Bank. The president
of the local Laborers Union served as chairman of the Employment
Functional Committee.
These groups were also active: Northwest Ohio Council of
Social Services Agencies, American Cancer Society, Maumee Valley
Hospital, Tuberculosis Soc iety of Toledo and Lucas County and
the University of Toledo .
Commenting on the decision to tender a contract, Secretary
Romney explained that this was done after a careful review of
the Toledo comprehensive plan. The plan was thoroughly studied
(MORE)
�HUD-No. 69-0503
-2and analyzed both by the Regional and Washington Interagency .
Review Committees representing those Federal Departments and
Agencies with urban aid programs.
"During the past several months, Toledo has done an
excellent job in revising its proposals and improving its
capability to operate in the first-year action program," he said.
A total of 150 communities in 45 states, the District of
Columbia and Puerto Rico are participating in the Model Cities
program. The first applications for planning grants were
approved in November 1967.
For further information:
Charles Penn
Model Cities Director
City Hall
1100 Jackson Street
Toledo, Ohio 43624
Mayor William Ensign
City Hall
1100 Jackson Street
Toledo, Ohio 43624
Note:
A summary of the Toledo Model Cities program is available
upon request to the Division of Public Affairs,
U. s. Department of Housing and Urban Development,
Washington, D. C. 20410













�HUD NEWS
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING
AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT
WASHINGTON D . C . . 20410
FOR RELEASE AFTER:·
HUD-No. 69-0524
10:00 a.m., Thursday
Phone (202) 755-6980
June 26, 1969
MODEL CITIES CONTRACT
TENDERED TO WINOOSKI, VERMONT
Secretary George Romney of the U. S. Department of
Housing and Urban Development today annou~ced the tender o·f a
$788,000 - Model Cities contract to Winooski, Vermont.
Winooski will also be given support from other programs
administered by HUD, the Department of Health, Education and
Welfare, and the Office of Economic Opportunity.
Today's action by Secretary Romney will enable Winooski
to begin the first-year action phase of its comprehensive fiveyear Model Cities program. State, local and private resources
will also be used by the city in its concentrated, coordinated
attack on the serious social, physical and economic problems
within the Model Cities area.
Secretary Romney , who is Chairman of the Pr esident' s
Cabinet Committee on Voluntary Action, noted that the Winooski
model cities plan was largely the product of voluntary effort-reflecting the fact that in Winooski, because of its small size
(8,000 pop.), most of local government is done on a volunteer
basis.
Sta t e a g e nc ie s a l s o pa rt i c i p at ing in the p l a nning were:
Department of Social Wel f are, the Off ice o f Local Af f airs, The
Interagency Council on Aging, the Vermont Highway Department,
the Governor's Office , the Ce ntra l Planning Offic e , t h e Depar tment
of Voca tional Re habil i t a tion, and other s .
Comme nting on t h e d ecision t o t end er a contract , Secretary
Romne y e xplained that t h is was d o ne after a care f u l rev iew of
the Winoo sk i comprehe nsive plan. The plan was thor oug hly studi ed
a nd analyzed b oth by the Regional and Wash ingto n Interagenc y
Rev iew Comm ittees representing tho se Fed eral Departments and
Agencies with u rban aid programs.
"During the past sev e ral months, Winoo s ki h a s done a n
excel l e nt job i n r evi s ing it s p r opos a l s and impr oving i t s capability t o operate its first - year action program," he said.
(MORE }
�HUD-No. 69-0524
-2-
A total of 150 communities in 45 States, the District
of Columbia and Puerto Rico are participating in the Model
Cities Program. The first applications for planning grants were
approved in November 1967.
For further information:
Dave Drew
Model Cities Agency
City Hall
West Allen Street
Winooski, Vermont 05404
Mayor Bernard Sumner
City Hall
Winooski, Vermont 05404
NOTE:
A summary of the Winooski Model Cities Program is
available upon request to the Office of Public Affairs,
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development,
Washington, D. c. 20410
�June 3. 1969
MEMORANDUM
To: Mr . Johru:>.y Johnson
From: Dan Sweat
Subj ct: Copies of the Eric Hill Housing R port
Wh n re you going to get some copies of the Bric Hill
Model Cities Housing Report?
l would like to have a couple, ple
DS~fy
�CITY
IVAN ALLEN.JR.
MAYOR
OF
ATLANTA
June 3, 1969
Mrs. Arnicia Jones
Mrs. Janey L ee Spe ncer
Mrs. Mamie Griffin
Mr. Howard Smith
Mr. Dennis Goldstein
Capital Avenue
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Residents:
Last week you were kind enough to bring me your
petition concerning your anxiety o v er having to move
from your location on Capital Avenue.
.,
Sinc e then, I ha ve discuss ed with Mr. Chapman, of
Cha pman Rea lty, your concerns, and h e info r ms me
that there is some consideration about the sale of the
property, but that he feels certain that whomever buys
the property will continue to ope rate it as apartments.
-1
1
i
I
I
I
I
IajR;AM
CC : Model Cities Dir ector
�I
June 4 , 1969
Mr . Roy W. Mann
The Beet M nuf cturing Co.
Menlo, G orgi
30731
Dar Mr . M nn:
This ie in further response to your inter
plant in Atlant .
tin est blishing
glove m nu£ cturing
I regret to advise that our efforts to obtain pprov l from
1 Government
for use of Mod 1 Citi
monies in needle tr d s tr ining programs b s mt 1th
n g tive results . We are therefor unable to as ist you in an on-the-job tr ining
program.
We could , of cour e , provide recruitment, scr ening , pre-voe tiorutl tr ining and
supportiv services should you desire to provid th
ctual tr ining at your own
xpen e. We would also be happy to a iet you in obt ining fund through the
SBA for thi op r tion.
Plea e dvi
of your d sites in 11 ht of th foregoing information.
your int rest in loc ting
plant in Atlanta is ppfeci ted.
In any
Sincer ly,
oC--
J.C . Johnson, Dir ctor
Model Citi
Pro r
JCJ:nb
CC ; Mr. Dan w at
~
v nt,
�:i,..· •
.1.,.
.• . ~ ..,L:
NATIONAL LEAGUE OF CITIES
1612 K STREET, NORTHWEST, WASHINGTON, D. C. 20006
UNITED STATES CONFERENCE OF MAYORS
1707 H STREET, NORTHWEST, WASHINGTON, D. C. 20006
April 25, 1969
TO:
Mayors and Managers of Model Cities
Directors of Model Cities' City Demonstration Agencies
SUBJECT:
Proposal for State Administration of Model Cities Program
The State of Connecticut has submitted the attached proposal to Secretary George
Romney of the Department of Housing and Urban De velopment. It proposes that
Connecticut be designated to conduct an experiment in administering the Model Cities
Program within the state.
This proposal, if approved by HUD, has very significant implications for the entire
Model Cities Program, even though the experiment might not prove to be entirely
successful or permanently accepted as an operating procedure by HUD. It will
obviously result in s timulating a host of applications from other states for similar
experime nts or for expanded state authority over Mode l Cities Programs.
The second enclosure, an excerpt from a report of the Advisory Task Force on
Community Deve lopme nt and Urban Re lations of the National Governors' Conference,
dated April 9, 1969, indicates the des ire and strategy of states to sec ure control of
the Mode l Cities Pr ogram. This clearly indicate s that the Connecticut proposal is
not a localized consideration of state control of Mode l Cities. Note that in both
documents the emphasis is on state control and supe rvision as contrasted with state
support of Model Cities efforts.
Ne ithe r Secre tary Romney nor Assistant Secr etary for Mode l Cities , F loyd Hyde,
has at this point indicated s upport for this proposal. HUD has reques t ed further
information from the State of Connecticut concerning the way in which the State would
admi.nister the program . The s tate has also been requested to work out the r e lationship of its ope rating procedure with the HUD regional office. This work is curre ntly
in process.
We urge that you r e ad these reports carefully. Your views should then be conveyed
to Secretary Romne y and Assistant Se cre tary Hyde . Such communications s hould be
prompt . They s hould als o be the subje ct of any futur e personal discussions with key
personne l of the Departme nt of Housing and Urban Deve lopment. Particular emphasis
s hould be placed upon full consultation with Model Cities ' mayors and CDA 's prior to
a federal decision on such a major r e structuring of fede ral - city r e lations in this program.
Patr ick He aly , Exec utive
Nationa l Le ague of Cities
E nclos ure


~


irector
United States Confer ence of Mayor s
�A PROPOSAL
FEO:M
THE DEPARTEBIT OF C0}iHUNITY AFFAIRS
STATE OF CONNECTICW
TO
DEPA.~NEN'l' OF .HCUSING .AND URBAN D.t.V hiLO?~·iENT
TO
DEMCNSTR..<\.TE AH EX? ..A.NDED STATE ROLE
IN THE
MODEL CITIES FROCEW1
�r
A PROPOS AL
TO DEMONSTRATE
AN EX PANDED STATE ROLE I N THE
MODEL CITIES PROGRAM
.I ntroduc tion
page 1
Expand e d State Ro le i n Model Ci tie s
page 4
Rela t i onsh i p of Mo de l Cit i es to CDAP
p age 7
Rel at ionshi p of Mo del Cities t o Communit y Re lations Team
page 8
Relationship o f Mod e l Cit ies Pr ogram t o co :zi. , t o
Mun icipal Gove ~nme nt t o Ne ighbo r h ood
page 1 0
St a t e Pr og r am Impl icat i ons
page 14
a.
Corr.munic ations
page 14
b.
Orig ination o f Progr am s
p age 16
c.
Ec onomic Devel opme n t Te ru~
page 1 6
d.
Discretionary Funds
p age 19
Administrat ion
pag e 21
�A PROPOSAL
.AN EXPAl.~ DED STATE ROLE IN THE
MODEL C I'i" :i:C:S ?RC..;?-~·i
Introduction
Early indications se e m to point to a new promin e nce tor the Model Cities concept
.in the new administration's approach to federal participation in ~rban oriented pru grams.
Since such a change may require extenstve administrative and policy restruc-
turing on the fed e ral level, the DPpartment of Housing and Urban Deve lopmPnt will need
to have before it a maximum of experience in dealing with the administration of the
Model Citis program at all levels, in order to develop that structure which will most
effectively achieve the objectives of the Model Cities Program.
It is becoming in-
creasinqlv c~ear that such a structure must include a greater role for state governments in effectuating the program; howev er, outside of Connecticut there is a paucity
of hard information concerning possible constructiv e roles states can play .
To help provide such information, we propos e that the Connecticu t Depa rtment o f
Community Affairs
(DC A) b e designated to carry out a d emonstration p rogr am intended
t o test the thesis that ·an integral role for state gov ernments with the B.111 coopera-
.--
t ion of the f ede ral government can greatl y i ncre ase th e effect ive ness of the Model


Cit i es P.r ogr:a m, and e nhance the deg r ee to which its object ives are a c t ua l ly reali zed
in the local mu nicipa l i ties .
There are s evera l r eason s why Connec t icut i s uniquely p r epared t o execut e such a
demon s tration with maximum r esul t s .
Conne c t icu t n ow has operative a n e xte ns ively de-
veloped Department of Cow~un ity Affair s , an Agency with ability and e xperience and
charged with the responsibility of dealing with a v.ide spectrum of urb a n life.
The
Commun fty Develo;r.,.ent Action Plan (CDAP), through which oc.; affects the total com prehensive planning and execution functions in Conpe cticut communitie s , is a Program
with import-:1nt relationships to the Madel Cities Prog ram.
Each of Connectic .1t ' s :-tod el
1
�2• .
Cities Cotr.munities is also engaged in CDA? planning.
Geographically, Connecticut is a compact state and therefore cond'.lcive for a
centralized state agency to decentralize when necessary in ord& to maintain close
contact and coordinate developments in local communities. Since Connecticut's model
cities range from small to medium in size, they constitute a manageable laboratory
for e x periment in urban change .
The numbe:-of these cities, fiv e , is large enough
and the 'problens in each varied enou:;h to provide a productive sample for the demonstration; yet their size and variety certainly fall within DCA's demonstrated capacity.
The whole compl ement of urban ills exists in Conne cticut, but in a magnitude which is
not overwhelming and which will yield to creative planning and judicious admi~~tration
more readily than in larger cities where conditions are more u<:.. t,pei. ....... -.. •
Consequently
DHUD should anticipa t e early reports, prelimina r y e valua tions, and the nec es sary fle x ibility of DCA to adjust to possible federal policy change s within a reason able d e ~onstration period.
Conne cticut ' s al ready adv a nta g e ou s s i tu atio n shoul d b e come e ven b ett er during the
present session of the legislature, since that session is expected to adopt legislation
codifying t h e state's role in Model Cities, provid i ng discretionary Program funds ,
and o f f e ri ng n ew p o ssib i lities fo r community d evelo pme nt.
Finally , a nd of most im9ortance, Connecticut has amassed valuable e xperi e nce in
ways in which state government c an p romote and enh anc e the Hodel Citie s Program, t h r ough
the a ::tivities since June o f 1968 of.it s four Model Cities Coord i nators.
This Demon-
stration was made possible when Connecticu t r e ceiv~d the initial 7 01 grant to derr.o:i.strate potential state coordin ation of t h e Model Cities Program .
The coo:cdinators ,
working under and through the Governor s Inter-Ag ~nc y CoIT'.:nittee on Mode l Cit ies , has
sought wa ys by whic h the re s ources of f edera l and state, public and 9rivate agencies
�3.
can be most effectively mobilized to the benefit of the State's model cities
One significant result of the team's work has been to demonstrate that a state
agency can maintain a much closer relationship to a local program (and thus be more
able to appraise it accurately) than can a federal regional office.
Most signifi-
cantly, this proximity to the local program can be seen in the fact that the coordinators
have developed a close rapport with Model Neighborhood residents and grou~s.
They are
thus in a position to evaluate and influence programs from a perspective not often
achieved by government agencies.
Our proposal not only calls for the team's present
· functions to continue but for them to be expanded and intensified.
In summary, we propose that Connecticut's Department of Community Affairs be
designated HUD' s agent in managing the Model Cities programs in the St.a te, and be
granted adequ~te funding · to provide additional staff and equipment necessitated by
this expanded role.
The proposal ·which follows will explain in detail how this can
be done, and why Connecticut is in a particularly advantageous position to carry out
such a d·emonstration.
It will also examine some implications for specific programs.
�4_.
That the Nadel Cities team has a::coCT\plished since its inception nine rr'.Onths ago
is a matter of record, and appears in the two quarterly reports which have been su~mitted to hlJD.
It is no~ perfectly clear that those acco~plishments could have been
more significant had certain problems been more clearly foreseen and more a~e~uate
provisions been m2.de to de2.l •,1ith them.
~rese~t proposal.
These shortcomings are corrected in the
Some are dealt with later in the section on program implications,
but the mcst serious inability which the staff ex9erier.ced arose from the St2.te's
anomalous position in the ~-Iodel Cities P.::ograra~
Lacking both authority and respon-
sibility in the federal Program, t..11.e S_t ate was nevertheless asked tq exert a constructive
influence on that P::-ograr., 's .::::-eception in the cities.
nine .nom:as e - erience, _ is_ t ~
ductive state parti';=ipat~ e s ire
he given a full share of a thor.-it1""- an· responsibility in
s,
---
The inescapable conclusion, after


th_


that the state
fec.~al t-!odel Cities
cture.
Connecticut is particula::-ly well prepared to denonstrate such a new role, not
only by its unmat::hed experience with Hodel Cities, but al·so by its own State programs in the cities, the cost ioportant of which is CDAP.
The Model Cities ?rogra.-:1.
and the CDAP Progra~ are inextricably tied together in· the Connecticut model cities.
Both progr:ms have a five year tL.ie s_chedule; bot.li. de!:!and citize!l participation; bot.:7.
call for comprehensive pla~ning and execution; path focus qn the social aspects of
physical rene~,al.
In fact, the primary differe:1ces between t.~e two Progra~s a:::-e that
CDAP enco~passes the entire cor.~unity inste=c of designated target areas, has a possi~le
two ye=r plannir.g r;eri:::d insteac. of one, and evaluates t ·.,elve mu ::li::ip-3.l functions
r athe:::- than the te:1 suggested in the Model Cities ?rcgra.--n. 1
that the y be ar:::::.ins~ere-i :,·ith t;-,.2 rn a.:<is•.lr:i. possible cco.:-:::: i""a t:..0::1..
·-:-he l ocal p:::::grc::-.3
lof t.:, ese t·...-o, CJ.=-.? ex:~:::ines :::u::i.ici?al gc•1e!":":..-:-ent2.l e ffe-:ti-v·e~ess a~::!
is the~e!:c!:2 r:~':. ~irectl"! ;.?p.lic~!J:!!e to tte ~:o·=. -=l Ci ti es ?=c·;-:-::-:1. ':~:
ot!ler, rnt ~~!."~ ~==-:;= r.J..1 cc~.::-.·~ ~ic=tiort s , ::'liq'?".t ·~=11 be a ?art of ~-~odel Ci ti-:!= ,
since its ~c:1= -: ~n c : rt~i:::~!- i s 3. ::-e~~i 5it : of citizen 9a":"ti.ci~atio:-:.
�s.
r ·s t i ntegrate planning and action und ertaken in.the Model Neighborhood into the
d c sig :1 f or the total community which the CDAP will acccmplish, _ allo_c ating priorities,
staff and budgets fro;n a perspective which takes full account of r_equirements of both
Progra~s and which seeks to mesh them for the most efficient possible amelioration
of the city's problems.
Th~s is a process which ·demands care in administration at
the local level, since the inter-relatedness of the urban complex is such that a
decision in either Program inevitably has immediate ~d far-reaching i~plications
for ti·,<i:! otho2i.· , r-,ecessi i::ating · new adjust!"'.le!"lts and coordinations.
The review process by which the fede r al and state concerns in the Programs are
protected, are equally complicated, and must be carefully coordinated if they are .to
be of maximum effectiveness in yielding information to state and federal agencies
and guidance to local Model Cities and CDAP agencies.
This coordination, difficult
at best, will b e best accomplished when DCA, which bears responiibility for leading
a municiE,ali ty through a ·successful CDAP, plays a similar role in coordination with
HUD in the r1ode l Cities Prograr:l.
DCA' s Model 'cities staff and CDAP evaluation staff
are already in daily contact, anci can now formulate the processes and guidelines which
will most e ff iciently lead to optimal results in both programs .
The experience accumulated· by DC.!\' s Model Ci ties staff provides an excelle.nt
foundation for devel oping this coordination.
Each coordinator has assumed primary
responsibility for a particula!:" model city, and has become extremely familiar with
the realities of urban life in his city.
Each has revie,ved Hodel Citie s applications,
has served on local task forces, and has initiated s:.ibstan-tive progra'T'.S and follo~ved
them through·to their realization.
Each has attenJed CDA? review meetings, and ~as
pre ssured and cajo'.l.ed rr-.ur-,:.~ipal officers and citizen groups to wed( togethe:::- to el(-
,
ped:j..te
-
t..'1-ie t:.-;o Programs in a cooperative effort.
E:ach has attended local CDA meetings
on a regular ba.sis and ha s ,.-;ork2d directly with neighborhocd groups - so~e direct
�6.
ou tg r owths of the Model Cities Program.
AD have, in short, been directly involved
in b Gt h Programs.
In both structure and function, DCA is well equipped to assume added Hodel
Cities authority.
The field offices and review staif of the CDAP Program ar.e in
daily contact with the Model Cities team, and the director of the Model Cities team
is in daily contact with the Com.~issioner of DCA.
DCA's team of urban specialists
are available to both the CDAP and Hodel Cities teams.
DCA has effective liaison
with other state departtents an~ agencies through the State Interagency Model Cities
Cormnittee, created by the Governor and established as the State's Model Cities
authority.
This committee is operatioff3.l and includes with DCA as coordinator the
respective commissioners and their delegate agents from each of the major State agencies
involved in urban matters; i.e., health, education, housing, mental health, crime and
delinquency, finance and control, labor and welfare.
In light of the above, DCA propos e s the following:
by contract, HUD shall dele-
gate to the Commi ssioner of DCA for a period of no less than t we lve months joint
authority over the Connecticut Model cities Program.
This authority will include
joint federal-state review of applications and requests for release of funds; the
negotiation of planning' grant contracts; the review of work progra ms and re vi sed
work programs; the authority to recommend terminating a city's Model Cities status;
and other authority incidental to and logically flowing from these functions. 2
2 This would involve joint HUD-CCA staf f meetings on ~!odel Cities
matters, inclusion of DCA in federal ~olicy ~aking meetings,
attendance of DCA staff at regular conferences, etc .
�7.
Relationshin of Model Cities to CD~P
it has e~rlier been stated that in Connecticut's Model Cities there is ihevitably a close relationship beb:eeP. the Model Cities Prog::::-am and the COJ>.P P::::-ogran.
This was noted as re~~i~ing coo::::-dination i~ overse~ing the t\,O P::::-cgraws, which,
it was said, could best be accomplished if OCA were to enjoy a partnership role with
mp) in managing this State's Model Cities Programs.
Now it is important to note certain benefits which can be expected to accrue to
both Programs as a re~ult of their being carried out in concert.
Administratively,
this would have the obvious advantage of preventing duplication of effort, shariP.g
costs of overlapping programs, sharing staff capc;ibilities, preventing conflic:ting
'\
plaru.ing, =I.ficiently pro1} iding information developed by each program to the other,
and expediting early action programs.
But, more important thanthis, CDAP is a
comprehensive program in which successful Model Cities innovations can immediately
be implemented in a city's other problem areas.
Discretionary administrative control
exercised by the Cowmissioner will require that joint Model Cities-CDAP guidelines
be prepared, and techniques of joint review developed, at both state and local levels
so that the coordination will be guaranteed.
�8.
Relat 5.onshio of Model Cities to co·mmunit y _Relations Team
What happens in a central city affects every corr.:.,unity contiguous to the city,
and-m,:i.ny which are fc:1.r:the.!'." removed from the city ii...self.
In the same way, the -;.:iod
or ill health of the city favorably or unfavorably influences the fortunes of
every bus i n e ss and co~.!ners ial or industria l ente rpr i se in the r e gion.
It follows,
then, that any concent:;:·ated attack on urban probler.1s (such as is envisioned in the
Model Cities Program) and any rr,obiliza!=ion of .availabl.e resourc-es to neet such
problems can ill aff or d to ove rlook r e source s exi s ting in suburban and exur b a n - communities, and also must endeavor most assiduously to enlist all possible help from the
private business and industrial communities.
This, the Connecticut Model Cities staff,
will seek to accomplish.
One important reason for the relative failure of such atte~pts in the past has
been a break-down of communication.
Suburban governments, r e pre sent i ng resid e nts
wno a r e in the subur b precisely becau s e they sought to escape b eing p l agued with
urban problems, are not likely to respond to appeals to help t h e cities until and
unless the i r cons titue nts are full y convinced tha t they have an urgent conc ern with
the we ll -being o f the core-c i t y which i s t h e heart o f the region wh lch they inh abit .
In the s ame wa y , busine sse s and indus tries in the r egion have i n t h eir accoun ting
procedure s no e asy indicator of what blighted human exis t en~e in the ghetto c o sts
them each yea r in lost production, theft, v andalism, r .estri.cted. market, etc.
Someone
must tell them, if they are to . have a significant role in bettering the cor,di tions
of life in our cities.
The
Connecticut l·!odal Citias team will have at its disfJCSal ir:tporta...11t assistance.
as it seeks to overco:ne this co:c,rr.unications barrier.
oc.:; has under way a · community
relations project, in ·w hich a five-nan team are seakir.g to ~='··~lop ways to r.>.a)._e
residents of non-urban regions mor~ : \var~ of their de9en.::~r...ce on the c°i ty, and to
�9.
bring them to accept a more proper share of responsibility for ·improving urban life.
This demonstration program is being undertaken pursuant to a grant from HUD (Title IX
I
of the Demonstration Cities and Hetropolitan Act of 1966).
Interestingly, this is
- the only progra.-n of its kind in the country and offers DCA a unique opportunity to
study under laboratory conditions the complex and perr.aps uncefir.able action-reaction
relationship existing ·between urban and suburban communities throughout this country.
The same team could carry out a similar communicating function with tne business
and industrial communities.
The increasing centrality of the Model Cities Program on the urban scene will
mean that the Model Cities coordinators will be an indispensable resource for this
Community Relations team: while the Conununity Re_lations team will in turn be · valuable
to the coordinators' efforts to enlist the widest possible assistance in urban im-
provement.
�10.
Relationship of State Model Cities ?rog!:"a.c-n to CiJA, to
t-Iunicioal Gove r rrmea t:al Structure and to
Neighborhood ~rouos
The fac:j: that DCA has become HUD's delegate through- the process which has been
suggested will immediately render DCA !:!Ore effective in dealing Hith t:iose local agencies which dete!:1!1ine the course of e•:ents in a Medel N'eighbo:::-hood.
An agency possess-
ing neither statutory nor administrative authority must rely only on persuasion to
influence the program, and this alone is too often not enough to alter a city's pre·determined plans.
This can . result, and ha·s resulted, in collisions between CDAs and
the federal review team, with consequent delay in the local programs.
These confronta-
tions can be clearly foreseen from the State Hodel Cities staff's perspective, and
could be avoided were-the . State staff accorded an appropriate degree of influence on
local planning.
The proposed DCA-HUD partnership will immediately increase DCA's impact on the
local government, and will provide a new dir.1ension in the review and evaluation pro-
. cess, since DCA's Model Cities staff personnel have close contact not only with the
CDAs .but also with ne ighborhood groups in the Model Neighborhoods.
Through this double
insight and direct pe rsonal contact, a more balanced objective and complete evaluation
of the Program can be made than would b e possible frcm ev en the best written reports.
The DCA-HUD partnership will alsp make av ailable to CDAs and/or neighborhood groups
a variety of tech..ri. ical assista nce av ail a l be f rom DCA ' s own st:a f f 3 and from the sta f fs
of those state departments r e presented on the State Interagenc y Mode l Cities
3 Tha t part of DCA' s o rga~i zat i on throu g h whic~ se rv ices are
d eliv ere J con sists o f two p a rts : Dis ;; ri c t Fiel d Opera t ion s a nd
Su pportive Servic e s . Opera ting und e r its Di~ ec to r, each
Distric t s taff ha s capab ili ty t o aid lo ca l gcvernme n t s , CAPS
or oth er g ro ups i n prep a ring propo s a ls f o r s143.215.248.55e a s s i s tanc e ,
to r evie~ such progra~s ar.d to reccmm~nd acti0n on them to
the Commi s siorrer. .~va.ilable through the Su~~,::i.::-ting Sen;ice s
sta ff a re s pecialist s in hou s ing, urban rene~al, civil design
engineer i ng, code enforc e Dent, s ocial servic e s, hum~~ resource development, we l f a re education, day care, city planning, recreation
and l e is·..1re and manpm-;~r develop2ent.
�11.
C OTI"u'7\J..'t-'-'""'Ce 4 •
It has b~cn t~e practice of t~e coorc~nators to maintain close contact
with the all Model Cities-related developrr.ents, with a view to engac;ing statc:-offered
technical assistance ,wherever this may be useful.
When a need for such assistance
arises, the coordinator acts as liaison between th~ CDA or the neighborhood on
the one hand and the appropriate sta te agency on the other to insure maximum effP-ctiveness.
In .the case of DCA' s own staff, thi~ means bring frig Distr:i ct strtff into
contact
with local agencies for program development and application processing in connection
with projects in which DCA can offer support.
It means similarly involving the
Supportive Services staff in many evaluating, planning or training functions.
case of other state agencies, it first means an inquiry directe~
In the
tn +hat agency's
contact pers on on the Interagency Model Cities Committee to establish what p e rsonne l
are available for the needed function, follo wed by negotiation to make that personnel
productive on behalf of the Mode l Citie s group.
(a}
Working wit h City Gove r nment s
To insure smooth and prornpty delivery of such services, the coordinators
will likewise maintain regular in-depth contact with those officials in
each cit y r esponsibl e f o r t he. Model Citie s Program, t o r evi ew the p lanning
being developed by CDA and .city staf f, to encourage explanation o f innovat i ve
and experimental possibilitie s, to offer those kind s o f techn i cal a s sistance
availabl e fr om the st ci.t e, a nd t o make sur e th a t ma.'<irnal c i t izen partic i pation is - included i n t h e planning at every step.
They wi l l also regu l a~ly
4 Represented on t he co~~i ttee, o r read ily accessibl e to i t
and t o the ~:odel Ci ties staff, are the state departments of:
Consumer ?rotection; Corrections; Connecticut Develop~er.t
Commission; Education (including dJvisions of vocational
education a~d rehabilitatio~ ) ; Health; Labo~ (inclu~ing the
Connecticut St at e 2:7\?loy.nent Service ); :·!ental Heal t h; ~-Ielfare
(inclu_d ing Social S~rvices and Child :·: elfare); and the Governor's
Cor:unittee on Crime and Juvenile Delinquency.
�r
12.
attend meetings of the cou;:i.cils and task forces representir.g resi.dents of the neighborhood, i.i order to provide similar stimulation
and assista:ice in their ,-, ork.
(b)
Working with Neighborhood peoole
One of the disadva1:t2.qes under which neighborhcod people labor is
a lack of information about the programs of government, federal, state
and local, which can be made to work on their behalf.
This can lead
to a reaction of hopelessness which cuts the tap-root of any possible
citizen participation.
Disillusionment which results when govern-
mental promises seem to the residents not to be redeemed (even if the failure results fran the residents' own ineptness in dealing with
governme nt structure) can have the same effect.
For these reasons, it is important for the coordinato~s as soon as Fossible to
those individuals and groups in the Model Neighborhood which re.f leet validly
and attitudes existing in the neighborhood and/or exercise or have the
potential to exercise leadership.
When these key persons ?nd groups are . found, con-
tinuing contact with them wust be maintained, in orcer that the coordinator may have
a.realistic picture of the Modcl Ne igbborhood in all its dimensions, in or d er that
I
he may inform residents of the new po.ssibili ties the Model Cities ·Prog:r:-am opens to them,
and in orde r that he may enlist their p articipation in the fullest and most ·produc-·
tive wa y.
Succ ess i n establishing , maintaini ng and using such rapport with neighbor hood
peop l e has be~n a signal ach ievene nt o f the Connec t i cut Model Cit i es sta f f in their
first year o f existe nce under the 701 gra nt.
This kind of concern with the e xisting viable structures in t h e Model Neighbo:-hoods
has in many cases led to the establishment ot mutually bene=icial liaiso'.i with the
�l
13.
Community Action Agencies, through which the CAAs and Model Cities programs have
achieved an important working relationship.
This emphasis·on neighborhood liaison at the state level gives to the Connecticut Model Cities
operation a balance which cannot be duplicated, and which
has great promise for the success of the demon~tration being proposed.
Important
as the achievements in thi~ .regard have· heen to date, they can he magnif?_Pd and
enhanced if the items proposed are granted, since each coordinator will have more
time to devote to the city which is bis essential responsibility, and because he
and the staff of which he is a part will have the capability to exercise a greatly
intensifi~a i.mpact on the local program and thus to produce positive results on
behalf of neighborhood residents.
�L


1


14.


--


Scace ?ro2r2m Imolic acions
In the ligh t ·ol: DCA ~s e:-:?e rie.:-.ce .,.,ith Con.necticut' s Nadel Cities Programs,
there are certain items of progra~~ing which already reco-:n.~end themselves as
desirable .for irr~.ediate. implementation.
Specifically these are: improver.tent of
the communication flow, added emphasis on innovat_ion in 1-~odel Cities planning and
a program to foste r the development of indigenous economic competence. · lJ'hile ~e
pro~ose that an early star t on these is necessary~ we forsee that there ¥ill be others
-which will become important during the period· covered by this proposal, so th cit it
is necessary that there be maximum flexibility in the State's }lodel Cities function
to allow for implementing these new high-priority items.
Communications
There are four ways in wh i ch the communication flow in our present program
·m ust be improved for maximum effectiveness to be achieved; (1) access by the
Connecticut Model Cities Office to federal and other pla~nini concerning Model
Cities; (2) intra-department communications; (3) communication with other departments of state government; and (4) cotni."tlunication with local CDAs and ne.ighborhood
groups.
1) DCA's Model
es office must be re
all _federal conferences
dealing with Model Citie s, a·nd at many such spon-sored by private agencies. · This
is a must if the c.oordinators are to be the productive, up-to-date res ource which
is needed by the Hodel Cities programs. DCA, in such confer.ences can have a
valuable input to federal thinking because -of its .unirue e:<perience:

Also, pro-
I
~ision must be made for frecuent field trips to vtsit promising experimental programs
I
••
~

I.
in other states which may be adaptable to meet Connecticutrs needs .
Likewise,
DCA must develop withi n its Model Cities office a resource library making as much
infonnation as possibl e i::.:nedi-3tely avai'lable .
�.
"'--~ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ~ - -....__,_.____--=-- ~ -...---,11,
-15. ·
2)
As the 'N0 del Cicies programs in Co.nneccicut move cowarci t he execution phase,
th~re wtll be an i r: cre asing n~ed for close coo~dination of all DCA progra.'.1s in Nadel
Cities cor...-:iunities .
T' i s wi ll be par tly taken care of by the Director participating
in regular meetings of the District DirectorsJ but will also. require the institution
of a reporting _syst-;?m by which the Hodel Cities office rezularly receives status reports of all DCA programs in Model Cities QUnicipalities.
Further, to improve
intra-department communications, it will be urged that programs of sensitivity
training be made mandatory for many DCA eraployees, aimed on the one hand to . sensitizing workers to each other, and, on the other, at ·sensitizing field workers to
the pa_rticular communications problems of residents of Nadel Neighborhoods and other
. ghetto corranunities •
... .
3)
Since the developr:1ent of good communications with other departments of the.
state government will play ·a major role in the success of the Model Cities staft's
efforts, the approach will . be to make fuller use of the Inter-Agency Model Cities
Committee.
Their meetings must now be regularized; and the agenda must include
full reports on the status of each city's pr~gram and a calendar of upcoming Hodel
. Cities events to which other departments will be expected to make
4)
Finally,
a
contribution.
--
though the individual· efforts of the coordinators have established
·good relations between DCA and lccal· Model Cities groups, there remains
new avenues through which communication can take place.
a
need for
Fer this reason, DCA will
·sponsor regular state-~ide or even regional conferences for.local DCAs ana/or


neighborhood gr oups , at which information can be imparted and participants i n local
programs can share idea s with each oth er .


major c omp on ent o f such conferences .
.
Sensitivity training ma y also becccie
a
�16.
Since it will be
a
contiriuing concern of the Model Cities team in
ricA to work
~ith agencies of municipal ~overnment and with neighborhood groups to encourage them
to a maximum of innovation and experimentation in developing the components of the
local Model Cities P-ogram, the team will work c~rsely with DCA's battery of ~~ban
experts to originate new and imaginative attacks on urban problems.
The team will
also seek to enlist all possible federal ~ state, and local, public and private, assistance available, to local municipal agencies end neighborhood groups in putting such
plans into .execution.
The coordinators will further seek to acquaint themselves will new problem
solving !=pproaches being tried in other states, ( e.e., Ne_w Jersey's guaranteec
income, New York's Vest Pocket Housing, etc.) to determine wr: :--".he:- :·.. .h programs
offer promise for meeting some of Connecticut's needs.
In particular, the team will bring to bear on such problems the technical
assistance available on DCA's own staff and the staffs of Departments represented
on the Inter-Agency Committee, with a view to developing the full range of possibilities open to each Nadel Cities Agency in meeting its o-wn local situation.
The
emphasis will be on developing ideas and programs which establish new directions
or concepts on an experimental basis.
The team will then communic·ate these possi-
bilities to the municipalities and the }!ode! Neighborhoods, and will assist them
in translating such programs into action .
Eco~omic Develooment Team
It is ax iomatic that the standard of living of low-income urban residents
i annot be raised unless they are allowed and encouraged to share in the total economic
productivity of their ccnB1unit y.
The history of urban development, ho wev er, has
shown that the se progra'.r.s adver sel y affect the e~onoC'.'\ic destinies of the inhabitants .
�17.
It;: is not atypical to find that 40% of the businesses within a_ renewal area
subsequently fail.
This mortality rate reflects poor business practices that
caused the operation to be marginal, personal service operations that were geared
for a .particular area, and in most cases these smell business ventures had no
direct relationship to the larger business col!lITlunity and therefore were strangers
to the local Chamber of Corr.mere~ lending institutions, etc.
For these reasons, it is necessary to employ all available governmental and
private resources to provide imaginative Model Cities programming designed to save,
support, and improve existing businesses and industries in Model Neighborhoods.
In
the same way, new businesses and industries must be created that are competitive
an~ encuwpa ss new markets, new technology, and the assistance necessary to develop
sound rr.anagerial skills and practices.
Likewise, these new businesses will be
influenced by Model Neighborhood residents and the City Demonstration Agency by
virtue of their involvement in new manpower training and employment opportunities
that must be developed.
To this end, the 'Hodel Cities staff will establish an Economic Development Team
possessing ext ensive expertise in all matters relating to economic development.
It \Jill be this team's responsibility to provide technical assfstance to Model
Neighborhood groups to enable ehem to develop a socio-economic barometer of the
neighborhood and thereby to determine the number, size and kinds of busin ess
enterprises which may be required in the redevelopment neighborhood and those ~hich
have favora ble prospects for succ ess.
The team will also assist the local group
in surveying and consultin$ . with existing business in order to establish ~hich
businesses ought to re~ain in the neighborhood, ~hether sone should relocate, ~hich
-will beco?T,e red '.1Lcdar:.t, ~:hich should shift to a different type of operation, which
should expand, etc.
Sinilarly, the number and kinds of ne•,1 businesses ,;.,hich will
�18.
be needed ~us':: be est?.blished.
1i!hen su t:h det e!"mination h.as been made) the ·tec1rn
will provide technical assistance t6 aid potential entrepren ~urs
through the
problems of establishing, funding and organizing new enterprises consonant with the
community's socio-economic plan.
In the same way, the team will assist with the
reorganizing, reloc:-tion, ex pansion or conv·ersio ,:-:- process ~hich existing .busin;sses
will ·h,we to undergo.
/
In addition to the full-time economic development person, who will be director
I
.
of t'he tE:. au1, personnel for this ti:::am will be ~o-opted on a p2.1:t-tin1i::: basis from
the staff of DCA and other relevant state departments, some will be available from
private enterprise, some can
be enlisted from federal agencies, and when necessary,
because of highly technical situations, consultants will be engaged.
DCA has already taken the legislative steps necessary to effectuate this pro-
. posed program.
They fall into two categories.
First, in 1967, the Connecticut
Legislature established a state funding program for small business development
centers (P.A. 524).
Unde~ this Act, the Connecticut Development Commission was empowered
to make grants to an SBA defined small business development center or a municipally
designated agency or organization approved by the CDC which "has as its function in
whole or i n part the developing of local entrepeneurship through rendering of consultive, techn ical, educational, and financ i al assista nce".
Th e s t ated pur pose of th i s Ac t was to establish and stimulate · t h e ·gr owt h o f ·
sma ll business en ter pr i ses particular l y a s r~l ated t o the low-i ncome gr oups wi th in
the community .
Th e 1969 Leg i slatur e has b efor e i t a DC A sp ons or ed Bi l l (S. B.3 83 ) ,
1
which prop o ses that t h e CDC ' s · f uncti on be t r ansferred t o the Commi ss i on er o f DCA.
is a~ticJpated that this 3ill will be passed int o l aw.
The s e cond DCA s ponsored Bill empowers municipally designated non - stock
corporations, cor.:posed of neighborh ood res.idents, to undertake programs for small
It
�19.
rl_<;ve_op!:!e::.t,
1

b usi-:-:esz
·
1 ·
inter
,Lia
(~
_ .B. 6.?4'1
·- ,
.
These tT,;o bills tie in directl~, T,;ith e:-:isti.':!.g pro;r:!Els administered by the federak Sillall Business Associatic~.
The Econo~ic Oppo=t~~i:y ~o~ns to s~2ll Busi~ess
Progra~ (Title IV; 42 USC2901-05); Loans to State and Local Development Compariies
Prog~am (15 USC 661, 695 and 696); and the Procurement and Management Assistance to
Small Businesses (78 Stat 526; Title IV; 42 USC 2901-07) all provide for financial
and technical assistance to low-income persons, whether they be members of a corporation, community organization or acting independently, interested in becoming
involved in private entrepreneurship.
Further, there is the Department of·commerce
administered Program (Public Works and Economic D~velopm~nt Program, 79 Stat. 552),
~hich aims at developing private enterprises in economically distressed areas.
Ai ... L..11ese programs must be coordinated with the CDAP and Nadel Cities Programs
to develop a comprehensive plan for redeveloping target areas.
In this context,
the Economic Development Team will seek to develop all possible wa y s in which the
local Nadel Cities ?rogram.1 itself can be m2de to benefit local entrepreneurs, ex isting
or ~otential.
These might include funding neighborhood development corporations,
giving pref erence to local developers, and according preference in bidding procedures
to entrepreneurs based in the neighborhood and/or incorpor2ting training procedures
intended to upgrade local skills.
The team will then work .-..,ith lo.cal CDAs and Task
Forces to implement such possibilities as fully as possible .
Discretionarv Funds
As has already been noted, it is not possible to forsee all the program iteffi s
~hi ch developing circumstances may render desirable , or even necessary, duri ng the
grant period.
The final val ue of the deGonst r ation which is proposed depends largely
on the progra~ being designed with enough flexibility to allo~ the staff to respond
quickl~
and .positively to unforseen needs or newly emerging opportunities .
Thus it
i s expected that there ~ill be added during the grant period a nurnb2r of new program
�20.
items beyond those which have been mentioned.
For this reason, the grant should provide for cert2in flex ible funds which
the Com.~issioner, at his discretion, could use for any r~del Cities related function
to enhance the success of Connecticut's Hodel Cities Program.
j
!
�21.
Administrative Procedures
The ability of the Department of Co1mnunity Affai!'."s to administer the fede!'."al
Model Cities Grant Program and supervise the activities allowed therein would enable
the Department to m=.ximize utili.zatior: of r.esou!'."ces a:lc. ma."l.pcwer now existing as part
of the agency's ove!'."-all prog!'."a~.
At t~e pres2nt time the 701 Urban Planning Assistance
Program, 701 State Advisory Program, the Title VIII program and Title IX progra~ as
well as a nurr~er of other innovative type activities being funded through federal and
state grants are housed under one administrative office within the Department's organizational structure.
It is proposed that the Model Cities Grant Program be added
to the office to assure not only coordinative activities but more importantly that
the activities of the various programs are supportive to one another and will contribute
lar~ely to a comprehensive approach to community development in all of Connecticut's
municipalities.
It is felt that the Model Cities Program and the exp3..csion of technical -assistance
to municipalities on all total staff levels will afford the state the opportunity to
provide advice ., counsel, and resources to municipalities qualifying for such assistance on a specific problem solving level.
The combining of these activities will,
on the most part, provide the coordinated services in keeping with the philosophy
of the Department of Community Affairs, that is an outreach and community-oriented
program.
To demonstrate the practicality and feasibility of this effort it is estimated
that we will require a considerable expansion of the present Hodel Cities Coordination Progran staff.
The current coordination stuc1y term i nates on May 30, 1969.
The four coordinators now functioning .as
a Model Citie s Ccordina tio n Team ·· ,iould be
~etained and will become a part of the proposed ten person staff which is outlined as
�Profession~l Positio~s
1 Director
15,530.
5 Coordinators:
1 Assistant Director
4 Coordinators @11,960 ea
12,760
47,840.
1 Economic Development
Specialist
1 Corr~unication Specialist
2 Municipal Services
Coordinators II @10,380 ea
11,560.
9,680.
20,760.
118,130.
Clerical Staff
4 Stenographers and
typists @5,040.ea
20,560.
STAFF SALARIES
Administrative Staff
1 Accountant
1 Clerk and/or machine
operator
Total Administrative Staff
7,500.
5,040.
12,540.
Salary Related Costs
15,117.
166,347.
TOTAL NODEL CITIES PROGR.&'1 STAFF
Staff Responsibilities
The administration of the ne·,;, Hodel Citie_s Program will be assi,gned to the
Department's Office of Supporting Progr·arns for the reasons as explained above.
The
major responsibilities of the Director will be to supervise-the functions of all
members of · the :Model Cities staff .
He wiJ_l be directly responsible to the Commissioner
in the latter's function as Coordinator for Model Cities and Chairman of the Governor's
Inter -Agency Committee for Hodel Cities .
Re will establish such working relat_onships
�23.
~ith c~~er Civisior.s ~f t~2 Depart~~nt as ~e called fo~ i~ th~ p=8posal, p:rti~~-
larly the ilh::~shing of. ,:.,oc1el Cities and CDA? fu .. ctio:1s ar,d coordinatL,g District
functions. into the over-all Model Cities effort in Model Cities communities.
For
this purpose, he w_ill participate in the regular n,2etings of the District Dire .... --:ors.
He
will negotiate with the CD.AP Design and Review staff the policies and procedures
which will most effectively assure that the two programs complement each other, and
achieve maximum .e=fectiveness.
He wili employ the talents of the Community Relations
team in those ways which will best insure the greatest comnmnication and the most · response in support of Model Cities and other urban efforts. He will sit as ·chairman
i"n all reyiews of Nadel Cities programs in Connecticut.
The;; ~vvrdinators will each have responsibility for liaison with all Model _Ci ties
functions in one of Connecticut's first and second round Mode 1 Ci ties programs, but
will also have other res9onsibilities as well.
They will be chosen for their .broad-
guage qualities and experience, enabling them to respond effectively in a wide variety
of situations, but they should aJ.so possess real expertise in one or more of the following categories:
interpersonal r ·e lations, community organization, municipal govern-
ment, and federal and state urban programs.
The Coordinator named Assistant Director will supervise the work of all five
Coordinators, to insure maximum effectiveness of the state's efforts, and to use the
individual abilities and expertise of each coordinator wherever they may be call ed
for in any of Connecticut's Hodel Citi~s programs.
He may act on behalf of the
Director in circumstances to be determined by the Director.
-
Each coordinator will be creo~red to lend that helo which he can most effectivel y
'
...
-
offer as part of the t ot al 1-!cdel Cities Coordinat±ng Tea".'. in whatever city the Direct.a:-and/or Assistant Dirc=tor ..1ay determine needs his aid.
in
All coordinators will pe.rticipate
all Model Cities revie~s, with the coordinator assigne~ to the liaison function with
�· the city under review acting as principal interrogatnr of CDA proced~res.
to foster new or struggling business or industrial enterprises, and for his organizational ability.
He ·;ill assembly from DCA, from ,t:.er Connecticut state and f.?.deral
agencies, and from the ·private sector, the Economic Developnent Team, whose sole purpose will be to offer every needed assistance to Nod~l Neighborhood entrepreneurs,
existing or potential, who wish to start, develop or improve their own commercial or
industrial enterprise.
He will ensure that this tea:n makes availabJe all technical
assistance needed by such ventures, and will formulate guidelines by · which ·each Medel
Cities pro~ram can support them.
The Comunications Specialist will be chosen for his expe:•+;_se
! _-


eveloping


an efficient flow of informa,tion between government agencies and with neighborhood
people as well as municipal agencies, and for organizational abilities.
He will de-
velop procedures and mechanisms by which the Model Cities.office in DCA can most
efficiently trans~it relevant inforr.-,ation to other divisions of the Department and,
in turn, receive such informat_ion from them.
He will also develop similar mechanisms
and procedures for communication with local Model Citie~ groups.
He will develop the
Hodel Cities Resource Library, and will organize whateverc-onferences er meetings the
team may decide will be beneficial.
The Municipal Service coordinators will be chosen for thei:::- knowledge of and e xperience in federal, state and local fisca,l processes.
It will be their responsibility
to facilitate the ::l o w of Model Cities funds into the l.ocal ~1odel Cities progr?-ms and
to administer state and federal discretio~ary fund s available to the I Model Cities Team.
They will functi on only within p olicy de~ined b y the Inter-agency ~-!odel Cities Comraittee
and/or the Director, and will be directly responsible to the Director.
The four Cleric3l positions should include on9 per so n with some bookkeeping abili ty,
�25.
to assist the Fir,3.nci?.l .r..dministrator s, and one pe!"scn ~·.'ith so::ne kno~i!.e-;e of library
sci"er-.ce, to aid in the fcrr.iatior. o:: the resource library.
All should be proficient
in the usual s ecretarial skills.
Space needs will include:
one private office (for the Director) · with adjacent
secr etarial space; office space for five coordinators, with so~e provisions for
privacy, with one adjacent s e cre tar ial space, and with a small confere nce
room near by
and available; sufficient office space for the Economic Development Specialist anc
the two Financial Administrators, with two adjacent secretarial spaces.
The total cost of equipment required to make the program ooerational totals
$16,840.
This figure includes office space as well as transportation costs for the
field ope rations segment of the program as well as a variety of furniture and equipment.
As d e scribed and for the reasons stated above, the discretionary fund is a neces-
s a ry item t o k eep the program on an a ction orie nted bas i s .
It is r equ est e d t hat $50 , 000
be a llocated for this purpose .
Total Operating Funds Requi red
Based on the above proj ects , t he est imated total f unds required to make the pro g ram operational is a mi nimum of $233,187.
�- 12 -
The Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare and the Chairman of the
National Governors' Conference should appoint a Joint Task Force to
prepare legislative and administr a tive proposals to meet the housing
needs of all persons receiving federa l welfare and housing assistance.


*







*


The States and Mode l Cities:
Recommendation 13:
HEW and HUD
HEW-Mo del Cities Relations
As HEW beg ins to re-structure its programs to provide
that adequate attention is focu sed on urban areas and_
Model Cities in particular , HEW should seek to renovate
existing HEW-State rel a tions to accomplish this task
rather than trying to develop its own HEW delivery
system at the loca l level, as it is now doing in Model
Cities. The Se cre t ary of HEW should require the concurrence of the Governor for all HEW funds earmarked
and spent throu gh state a gencies in Model Cities.
HEW should seek to re-structure its relations with its own Regional Offices,
State Agencies and the Governors with a view to insuring that State machinery
is responding to the prior ity n eeds o f u rban a reas. This method is preferred
over the alternative of direct HEW-local relations as is being undertaken
in the Model Cities Program. HEW already has 200 field people assigned to
work directly with Hodel Cities . A simila r deployment of personnel to the
Governors' offices would produce an ability to coordinate and deliver most
HEW and Stat e services ne eded for th e orderly deve lopment of all local
communities. Direct Federal-local r e lations have no great record of achiev eme nt, except in food pr oduction. HEW h as historica lly used the States to
deliver a good record of health, education, and social services to people
regardless of where th ey live. We recommend a modification of the existing
HEW-Stat e system rather than direct HEW-local relations , to meet the priority
needs of urban America.


* * * *


Recommendation 14:
HUD-Mod el Cities Relations
Congress should amend the Model Cities legis l ation to
provide for a l egitimate and positive role f o r Sta te
gove rnme nt in th e operation of the pro gram. Specifically, Section 105 of the "Model Cities and Metropolitan Development Act of 1966 should be amended to
authori ze the Se cre tary of Housing and Urban Development to make matching grants to th e States to provide
continuing planning , coordination, programming and
technical assistanc e services to model city agencies.
In those states where the state contributes a substantial portion of th e l ocal non-federal financial share,
the program s h ould provide for state concurrence in
the approval of the selection, program development and
fundin g of all mod e l cities applications.
�- 13 -
HUD should immediately provide for State review and
comment on model city work programs and supplemental
grants.
The Model Cities Pro gram should be re-evaluated with a
view toward its extension to the entire city and making
it the coordination and delivery system for all federal
grants coming into the model city, plus an appropriate
role for the State for the delivery of State pro grams.
The Model Cities program has reached the point where closer Federal-State
Community cooperation is essential. The program very shortly will be operating in over 40 States and in some 150 cities, both large and small, with
a total population of 50,000,000 people. Not only the 6,000,000 people in
the model neighborhood areas stand to benefit, but also the total city by
the emphasis upon local innovation and the development of more effect-ive
and responsive procedures and policies at all levels of government. This
program could well become the prototype for a new federal assistance
delivery system.
HUD has invited Governors and other appropriate State officials to participate as partners with the cities in the development of Model Cities comprehensive program submissions, and to contribute to the review of these programs.
However, federal legislation provides no clearly defined role for State government in the program, and the problems of coordination among the federal
departments involved remained unsolved.
The States continue to be concerned about the lack of communication between
HUD, model city applicants, and the Governor's office. The States have
repeatedly said that state budgets and programs cannot be suddenly changed
at some indefinite future date when the model city applicant comes to the
state for approval of project elements that are part of long-range state
development programs.
At the state level, the Governor's office should assume authority under
federal legislation to coordinate the program as it operates through line
agencies, to sychronize local Model Cities plans with state plans, and
(either directly or through an agency for community affairs) to provide
financial and technical assistance to the Model Cities.
Either through administrative change or by amending the Demonstration Cities
Act, supplementa l federal funds should be made available to states which
appropriate funds for financial or technical assistance to Model Cities.
This, in turn, would provide the incentive of the "multiplier effect" to
State Legislatures and would encourage large appropriations. Where possible, both federal and state flexible funds should be earmarked for priority
use in Model Cities, as has been done with federal urban renewal funds.


* *










�June 2-. 1969
D r . Richar d Wilson
S chool of Arc hitecture
Georgi a 1n titute of Technol ogy
Atlanta, Georgia 30332
De r Dr . Wilson:
The work b ing don by your tudent s in the new Model Citi s
" involvement" pi-oj ct is of great interest to those of u ln
gover.nm nt involved in the Model Cities P1·0gra.m.
F o r eom tim.e, it hae be n my feel ing ihat our cad mic
iJl titutions could s t"ve the community n d th b tudents much
more effectively if endemic curricul could b
contempb r ry probl m s nd projects.
ge red to
Th r sults of s uch ork ehou.ld be m d
v ll bl to inter ted
overnment o~ coxnmunlty 1 ders so that the ln.novations of
the youthful l'nind c,,f th coll g
tud nt can b sh red by tho
responelbl for bwJ.clin pro rams for he good of the total
.eo~unity.
l wieh for your s \Id nt success in their unde~ lng and I
hop it h ju t th b 1lnnlng of many othe proj cts in which
the City can s r •
Slnc r ly yo\U" ,
Dan Sw at
DS•fy
�GEORGIA INSTITUTE O F
.
TECH N OLOG Y
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30332
SCHOOL OF
ARCHITECTURE
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\\ Citizens of Hodel Cities m·e now rightly p2l'ticipatini in activities ·nhich aim

to do j_r:m1edintely what

~

be done ir.1medintely--~-uhile planning fo1' the future.

They are tired of b8in 6 the passive subject of surveys and pl~ns th at bring no .
immediate benefits-But as they move fo r·wa::cd by self determine d pract ical steps--~as citizens of the

State of Georgia, tlv:::y rrill expec'c, to t ake advantage of c111 the new syste;;JS e.nd
devices th at moder n technology can cor.ie up uith to meet their needci .nd requirements-and to benefit fro:-11 tha State's investment in Technological Research and Education.
Jill

hm-1~

~ lrrio~ern technology"iD no1;1 oriented to oth8:r~
tbin;f~--"to fue middle class
.~.

"incentive" values of suburb.sn affluent living---a.'1d the "sccurity11 veh,es of making yP,.~ ..c Her.
It is r,ot yet oric!ltec1 :.o the needs ~nd requirements of

11

l1odcl Cities"---

nnd has no on-going progr:im , in this urea, that cnn now come up with spectacular

advances at shor t inl.erval s---such as occur in the other area s.
. . •

M(l,<M-\ ~h.:.e..;r-tte



h_,._ C4\,\,, .,;:_ ·1

Natio;ial l{odel Ci ties and similar programs are jio..-1 ~r s o vast and

cri tical to t be tfatlon , tho.t t ~cbnology is noH oblit::ed to b ecome oriented to them-- -.
and ready to S8rve the Citizens ·1.ho live there .
Atlanta'c i-focbl Cities progrc:.m ha s th e opportunlt,y ,3nd thows the promise of

leading the nation-- a.nd Georgia Tech w:i.shes to do its part in this by providing

.the t echnolc~~cally-~a~ed education and in~ovative researc h that is needed to do
this job.
Such new purpose and dire ction can act as a great incentive to help raise our
levels of acade~1ic achi~vemcnt-- and. our students will be better citizens b~cause

of their ir.volvement in it. One thi ng in particular has to be ~aid about .this~-:··
We should not ever imagine Georgia Tech!s store of technological experti~e

to be like the wealth of some rich family, readj --to nrnke charitable gifts to poor
. .
'
relations.
0

The shoe may well be on the other foot.

Tech very much needs new challenges

that are commensurate with its r es ources-- and the challenge of the 'Hodel Cities'
program~ in this sense something of a gift to Georgia Tech$
Our association with Hodel Cities- canoe much more fruitful to us
thnn
simiiar association with Urban Renewal has been in the past.
·•Hodel Cities ' has the built~in capac:tty to succeed where previous programs
pr oved a~ortive.
This is because of its bnsic principle of Citizen participation
and its total integration of Social economic and physical i mprovement measures.
What this architecture class is attempting, is n relatively small project, to
oH~
�I-
be explored ~nd developed at a high speed-- as these -things
Go----
but it is import ant ·to us at Georgia 'i'ech, because it c an prepare the r1ay for
ckcp0r studies.
Our immediate assets he,.'e are:
1) Students, ms;nbers of the AIA National Student Organizv.tion1--t,iho have asked to be gi-.ren this kind of J<.ask in their ·classes---
They
are nlready motivated.
2) Curr ent clirr.2.te cf oi;;inion that sees improved educational values in
this kind. of project~--- rihen prop.2;rly organized.
3) People who know the difficulties uo face in attempting this--c1rc ,'::q'.!.:i.J 1p ~d
~;20.
r e t!dy to giv0 us all the help t, hey c an
and
p
The students ;rill prorlnce rcpo:rtG and graphic displays coverinf; survey a.nd
~ , . -.s,::::=::=.,~ . . , - ; , - ~_:.:,- = r . ~
-
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~alysis oi the he alth :3.3rvice ne eds D.nd ·posGi'vilit:i.ca .for moeting the se riith
~~-~
servic~s

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.
.
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-a""~""'1;~iTi ties .
'!'he study will also, of course, includ~ projt;cted designs
~ ~ r---:r::::a
=r:::t


for msjor h82l th service '.>uil(1ngs, with emph a.d!: on th~ "t;Se of ~ec-2!2_,t~ de~e-JQ.1?_0~


-- - --- - - - 1,e-chn1.ques.. likely to -15e- -r-:."o st appropiate ·in -this ·situation, a8 well as of i ruaginative

~
I
but basically practical ir:novc!tionE: .
.
~
The presentation prcducts eiilerr,ing froJ1 th•3 study will ba as .follows :
brochl,_re.
S8 rics of synchronized audio ta p'3 Ll;Jld sli1.bs for audi tcrium
· presentation.
-=-=-=,==,,
3) A
..
Utilizat,io~ of these products will be c1s follows :
a ) Fdi.:cational U 3 e -f,_q.r_fut ur<:..-S.l~ ~~s, not only to c c;!lmunic~te valuable
knm-1lcdge of this area of public ne ed, but also as a stimnlus and
guide for those Trlaking sirnila:!" studies
in .other
.,.
. . areas of n eed •
· b) For pr3,,9J,.i,.9J. Jl~...E:.£!!,~_fil...g9._.~s in architecture, city_planning, er.gineering, TGedicina and heal t h services------ to promote and facilitate
better understanding of the needs and possibilities for effective
acticn, including inte1·discipl:i.nary colaboration ( such as mutally

··· --a dvantcigeous •.:<fa.pt. aticnof VJ.rious asr,ect solutions I to allow for
their consol.idc1.tion in a unified total assembly) .
··- ·:.-·cf·F or lo cal leaders and ·citizens - - as a n aid to democr atic de cision- mak..
__._ing,inan on- going process of co!TI!lluni ty impr ovement. "
�. -o
PROPO_SAL FOR A GRANT TO
FOR TRAINING
AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE I N MODEL CITIES
\.
I.
.
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:
The purpose of th:i.s program is to build - the capacity of Model Cities
iesidents in ·_ _ _ __ ___ to re s pond knowledgeably and effective l y to
the requirements of the Model Citi e s Program by establishing responsible
neighborhood ·organi zaUons so ~hat they can assess their prob lems and can
"-'Ork effec tively with ci·ty government a nd other local instituti ons in the
planning, execution and evaluation
of programs.
It is our understanding
that the Model Ci ties Administration and OEO will join in this project as
.
part of an effort to build effect i ve .a nd responsible community participati on
and to make availabl e funds and as si stance to model nei ghborhood groups in
both first a nd second roundcities.
Two major obj ectives of the program are :
1.
To provide citi zens wi t h a dive rsity of experience and capability
in local i nstitutional pl a nning , program implementation and
program eva luatio n.
2.
To foster maximum feasible integration of organi zation and
function by CAA a nd CDA neighborhood groups and to plan and
move toward the eventual consolidation of resident participation
o rganizati o ns covering the mode l neighbo r hood area.
lnhererit i n making the i r training, technical assistance, a nd planning
funds a vailab le i s the assumpti.on by OEO and HUD that citizens have a
�,.

-2-
major role to play in both t he Community Action Program and the
Model Cities Program.
Further , both OEO's and HUD's philosophy
,--acknowledges t~e righl of people affected- by public programs
to have access to and influence on t he process by which dec~sions
about their lives are made;
--accepts that many of the bes t intentioned officia ls and
•technicians are often, by their training, experi ences, and
life-styles, unfamiliar with or even insensitive to the
problems and aspirations of model nei ghborhood residents ;
theref ore , resident ideas a nd priorities can result in mpre
releVant, sensiti~e, a nd effective plans a nd programs;
--recognizes that the process of parti c ipation makes it pos sible
,--
for those citizen~ formerly outside the system to learn how it
functions and how to make it function in their interest-and
that the process makes it possible for res i de nt s to s t rengthen
existing skills and to develop the kind of new skills needed
for effective citizensh:i.p beyo nd as well as within the Mo del
Citi es Program.
In light of the above and in order to overcome th ese problems, OEO
and HUD are encou raging CAA's, CDA's and the neighborhood sroups to test this
technical assis tance strategy through the use of these f unds ,
Funds
allocated to neighborhood groups under these grants may be used to
provide planning, training and ~echni c al assistance s ervices to
___.,,......,.
··-··.:.
'
..- ~
·
..;...
..-----·----·
�- 3-
neighborhood r es i dents inclu ding b u t r ot limited t o the followi1 g:
1~
Fu l l -tfme staff f or neighborhood group s to plan and
c:tev elop services under. t heze progi·ams .
.,
'. 2..
F~r.ma l . training programs for ne:i.ghbo r h ood resi d ent groups and
!{i?;;{ ' •
~Mf .
.·.. · ., . .::<:~1';i. -~'Cocl!~c.~;:tcin. and .d isseminat:ton of re levant i nfo rmati o n abo u t·
{:_;fl~\)J;i(~?< -+t ::·_:·_. ' ' :
rr_'.'::\(<f.t-?::,t :fties· and t dttted progra ms t o neighbot·hood r e sident s .
I

Mo del
,.~ \. ~ ; . ~ •:
.·4 ;,.. Retai ning consultan ts , (la:wye.r.s, commu nity o rganizer s , p la nne r s ,
programmatic s peci9.l:i!-ts, e tc . } to adv i s e o n s ubstantive prog r ams
and planning .
s. ·.
To develop and ca~ ry out ci. tizen eval u ation of the Mo de l Ci t i es
and all other elannin~_!ivlties that a ffe ct t h e neifht orhood.
6.
A portion
of grant f unds may b e u sed by neighborhood g roups to
con t r a c t di.rectly with organizations of their own choosing which
B.r:e -cegu larly engaged in providing T&TA .
11,
PROCESS P.RIOR TO WORK. PROGRAM
I.
The CAA a.nd
~
will d i 1,c 1.1s s thi s p r ogr·am.
(del ete r ema:!.nde r o f
sentence.)
2 , They wi ll discuss thei1· co mmitme nt fi.l-r t he nex t twelve mo;1ths o f
fund s f o r t r ai ning a nd tec hn i c a l ·a s sis t a nce s e rv ice s to
ne i ghborhood grou ps .
�..,.
-4~
.
3.
Designation of neighborhood groups to pl!ln th~ program and
receive funds by the CAA and CDA.
The neighborhood group with as s istance acceptable to it from
4.
the CAA and CDA wi.11 decide wha t trai nip_g and technical
assistance t:hey require for the development of the proposa_l
,.
for neighborhood~group support f unds.
!

If this assistance is not available in the city, the CAA and
5.
!
.
CDA wiq make every effort to obtain it.
We hope OEO and the
other. Federal, state and local agencies involved in the Model
I
I
I.
I
'
Cities Program wi 11 make,


1 t


ava il ab le to the neighborhood
I
I
group -- assistance which is a cceptable to the group.
, 6.
.
I
If the neighborhood group or g r oups feel that promised training
a nd t e chnical assi stance i s no t being r e ceiv ed o r is i nadequate,

our good of fic es ta r emedy the
we, t h e CAA and CDA will u se -,.--
.,.
s ituation.
Ill. Wo rk Prog r am.
1.
The neigll.b6 rhood group with the above technica l - assistance wi ll
prepare a f ormal writ ten a pplication.
They will a l so p repare
a summary of t ha t a ppl i cati on f o r circulation to residents of
the mode l neighbo rhood .
2.
.
After the int erim boa r d and / o r fuembership of the neighborhood
group has appr oved the appli ca t ion it should be submitte d through
t h e CAA a nd CDA t o OEO and a copy sent t o HUD .
l f CDA funds a re
no t included in t h e a p~l ication , t hey must be in tegrated
.f nto the a pplica tion .
Prio r to thi s submission, the CAA , CDA
�~
..
...
-5-
and res:i.dcnt groups sha 11 meet together t o discuss thei r
re~ ntionship s within the fra.newor.k of the proposal.
3.
Incl~ded i n the final app licatio n will be a descriptive
history of th e ways in which the steps in th e wo r k proce ss
outlined a bov e have b ee n met.
4.
The application will al.so indicate the way s CDA funds and
assistance will be niacle avai loble to the n~ighborhood group .
.
The apppcation :iilJ_ show as spec:i.fically as· possible what
kinds of activitJcs will bc _und e rtakcn, wh e n and how.
5. The . appl_:lcation wi 1l a lso desc ribe what, when and ho\·! of
training dur i ng the program year .
,6.
The application will al so s pe cify ho w con ~ult a nts hire d by
the nei ghbo r boocl group wi 11 b e accountable to tl-ie neighborhood
group or groups .
7.
The a pplication will a l so descri b e how thi s training an d
techn ica l assistan ~e 1.G re l ated to CDA e nd CA/\ pln ns .and programs .
8.
The work prog r am w1.ll s pell out h iring procedures:
purticularly
the rights end re s po ns ibil ities of the nei ghbo r hoo d group,
the CAA ond CDA.
9.
The. work progrmn ,-,ill al so i nd:iq,te by name wh en~ver posstblc
specific C/\A- CDA s to f f and st.a ff of 111:d.chhorhood 01;gan izaU.o ns
who ,-Jill b e! involved in. imp1c:nc nt.ing tl1c program ..
�··.:·
'il,' '
. ..y
•'.





,..
.
- 6-
10.
.
2.
We a r .e commi t t e d t o observi ng t he te rms of the HUD/0E0
The neighborhood g r oup wi ll compl e te the training pl a n no
later tha~ 60 day; a f t er. the funds have bee n obliga t ed.
3.
The f i r s t draft o f the p r o po s~ l a nd the s ummary for
· communicat io n t o nei ghbo rhood r esi dent s should b e complete d
no l a t er than '15 day s after the f u nds hav e been ob ligated.
4.
The fi nal wo r k program wi.11 b e submi tt·e d no later than 90
days after the· grant funds have been ob l igated .
V.
Budget .
Sample CAP 25 ,·
80% Staff
20% space, overhea d
�SPECIAL CONDITIONS
The Region may want to special condi, tion· the grant to insure periodic
progress repo·rts .
Other desirable special conditions whi ch Regions
~~ · :· _:._,.,.-,: ~-Y i_want to consider .are :
\\i_--:.~ 4; .. ~



'.! \




t


..


.
~ '
.
~
.
~~?).:'(' ' .. . .


- ',,:. ,';{,:.'< ~;~:-1~1i~ 'i:(unda : undj;i;: .t his ~rant ought to be expended until OEO approved


-:-:.} l.-_,-:-·'/·1~~2?:r-ti·. -r:."· / ,; -- ·-. -:. ·- · ·
··-·f,r.;:~:-:>:/···'1!:~ ,_.
tfot :90 day proposal which emerges f-rom the work program described
in this gra~t .
..
2.
Incorporation is not necessary for release of funds from OEO
provided . that the CAA in conjunction with CDA agree to spend the
, funds as requested b y the neighborhood group and indicates the
mechanism with which it will make fiscal accountability to ~

for the group.
,-
�DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING A N D URBAN DEVELOPMENT
MODEL CI TIES ADMINISTRATION
WASHINGTON, D. C.
20 4 10
~y 15 1969
I N REPL Y R E FER TO:
DMP
Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr .
Mayor of Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Mqor Allen:
As you may know, an interim report on the experiences or Atlanta,
Dayton, and Seattle during the planning period has been prepared by
Marshall Kaplan, Gans, and Kahn and has been distributed to all model ·
cities.
The report, A History and Analysis of the Planning Process in Three
Cities, is useful to both first and second round cities. lli cities
should benefit by a better understanding or the difficulties faced
during the planning process and your city' s solutions tor those
difficulties. The findings of the study' of the planning process
indicate that different·cities can find satisfactory though different
solutions to similar problems. This ability of cities to develop
answers suited to local situations is a basic goal of the Model Cities
program.
I am pleased that Atlanta is included in this report because you have
shown that a competent city and its dedicated people can acconplish
significant achiev~ments through cooperation and with hard work. It
is 11\V' understanding that Marshall Kaplan and Mr. John c. Johnson
have reviewed the text's discussion of Atlanta, and that Mr. Johnson
has agreed that it is an accurate description or your planning
experience.
The
generous efforts of you and your staff are greatly appreciated.
Thank you again for your assistance.
Sincerely yours,
wi~~wJr.
Director
�May 21. 1969
Mr . Mason L. Wyatt
Deputy Dirvctol'
Model Cities Department
City of Lawton
1202 Lee Boulevatd
Lawton , Oklahom 73501
De r Mr . Wyatt:
Mayor Allen h s sked me to answer your letter of May 14 ;
requesting information on Atlanta 's city government organization.
I m afr id that any information we might try to compile would
be 0£ limited b nefit to you in pl nning yollr Model Cities program.
However, the U . S. Dep rtment of Houslng and Urban Development
has recently r 1 as d
history and analysis oi the planning pl'Oc s
in 3 M od l Clti s. Th y wer th fir t 3 cities sel cted - Atl nt ,
Se ttle; and Dayton.
This study contain i.nforma.tion on th City of Atl nta's governm nt org niz tlon and the process we w nt th.rough in putting
togeth ?' th Mod l Citi s program. I beU v thls will b of much
more v lu to you than anything 1 might be bl to upply. If you
do not hav a copy, you may obtain on by writing HUD or to the
Superintendent of Documents . U. S. Gov ,:nm nt Printing Offlc •
Washington, D . C. 20402 (Gov rnm nt Prillting Office # 0 .. 39 .... 676).
Sincer
ly yours.
Dan Swe t
DS:fy
�MODEL CITIES DEPARTMENT
CITY OF LAWTON
1202 LEE BLVD.
LAWTON, OKLAHOMA 73501
TEL. (405) 357-5013
MAY
14, 1969
MAYOR OF THE CITY OF ATLANTA
. ..
ATLANTA, GEORGIA
30303
DEAR SIR:
THE CITY OF LAWTON, OKLAHOMA HAS BEEN DESJG NATED A MODEL
CITY AND IS NOW ENGAGED IN
rrs
PLANNING YEAR ,
CITY GOVERNME NT ORGANIZATION HAS BEEN SELECTED AS ONE
OF THE AREAS OF STUDY,
THEREFORE, REQUEST
I BE FUR NISHED A
CO PY OF YOUR CITY GOVER NMENT ORGA NI ZAT ION FU NCTIONAL CHARTS,
COD ES AND GRDI NA CES OR OTHE R REFEREN CE MATER IAL THAT YOU
DEEM APPROPR IATE FOR A STUDY ON CI TY GOVER NMENT ORGANIZAT ION,
THAN KI NG YOU I N ADVANCE,
MLW:B LR
�ROBERT AND COMPANY ASSOCIATES, ATLANTA
May 19 , 1969
1r. Johnny C. J ohnson
Di ector odel Cities
City Demonstration Ageney
673 Capitol Avenue
Atlanta, Georgia 30 315
Dear 1r. Johnson:
It was recentl y announced by Mr . George Romney,. Secretary of the
Oepartme t of Housing and Orban Devel opment, that tho Model
Cities Progr
will not only be reactivated, but every assistance
ill
given to ake it n important and successful program.
As you kno, the goal of urban design is to re erse the
pread
of urb
uglin s and blight , and to work or or der and ore
effecti
plann · ng o as to achieve ore li eabl e , ork ble and
beautiful citie and towns. Orban dosign is a specialty of our
fi
and we woul like very uch to hear f r
you if you think
e could be helpful in chieving your over-all go ls.
Sin
r ly yours,
.s-
ASSOCI TES
RT AND CO
d Orb
S:rla /
cc:
t/4.r.
Dan S
Colli r
• Bo
rd
Design
�5-8-69
Model Cities
M odel Cities Headquarters
Bids should be taken for deformed reinforcing
Model
steel bars for concrete foundation slabs -
Cities
Model Cities headquarters buildings in
funds
accordance with architectual plans.
when
Federal
EMERGENCY EXPEDITE
grant is
approved.
�4<5
EWS
U.S. DEPARTMEN OF HOUSING
AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT
WASHINGTON D . C . 20410
HUD-No. 69-0359
Phone (202) 755~6980
HUD TENDERS MODEL CITIES
CONTRACT TO SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
FOR RELEASE:
A. M. Papers
Saturday
May 10, 1969
Secretary George Romney, of the U.S. Department of Housing
and Urban Development, today announced the tender of a $5.2
million Model Cities contract to Seattle, Washington.
Seattle has also been given assurances for substantial funds
from other programs administered by HUD, and the Department of
Health, Education and Welfare, the Department of Labor, and the
Office of Economic Opportunity.
Today's action by----S-ecretary Romney will enable the city to
begin its first year action phase under its comprehensive fiveyear Model Cities program. State, local and private resources
will also be used by the city in its concentrated, coordinated
attack on the serious social, economic and physical problems
within the Model Cities area.
Of the $5,200,000 in Model Cities supplemental funds, approximately $1,200,000 will generate $10,100,000 in capital construction, Secretary Romney said. HUD has approved a neighborhood
development program for Seattle as well as a neighborhood facilities project, parks and urban beautification, 100 units of lowrent public housing on scattered sites under the leased housing
program, 25 units of rehabilitated housing, and 100 new houses
under FHA's new mortgage insurance program .
HEW has stated that, in addition to substantial HEW funds
which presently provide health, education and welfare services
to the Seattle Model Cities area, HEW has indicated the poten tial availability of $2,095,600. HEW will continue its ongoing
efforts with Seattle to make these funds available to carry out
the plan , to the extent possible under e xi sting program legislation.
Included a r e programs for dropout prevention, fo r teacher
training , the Teacher Corps , mate rna l and infant care ,for the
elderly , and f or treating the mentally r etarded .
A total of $2,347,000 for a Concentrated Employment Program
in Seattle,funded by the Dep a rtment of Labor, will provide work
training, work experience and other manpower services for Model
Citie s area residents. The Office of Economic Opportunity in dicated that it expects to maintain the present $2.4 million
level of annual funding for Corranunity Action Program activity
within the Seattle Model Cities area for the coming year.
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�HUD-No. 69-0359
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Secretary Romney, who is the Chairman of the President's
Cabinet Committee on Voluntary Action, noted the extensive
private involvement in the Seattle program. Besides the contributions of private groups in the planning process, which is
expected to grow during the action stages, volunteer help is
available from such organizations as the Seattle Chamber of
Commerce, the American Medical Association, Seattle-King County
Labor Council, the King County Bar Association, Boeing, and the
Weyerhaeuser Corp. The United Good Neighbor Fund, the Urban
League, and other private agencies were represented on the
Advisory Council.
"The largest volunteer contribution has been the neighborhood residents themselves," Secretary Romney said.
Commenting on the decision to tender a contract, Secretary
Romney explained that this was done after a careful review of
the Seattle comprehensive plan. The plan was thoroughly studied
and analyzed both by the Regional and Washington Interagency
Review Committees representing those Federal Departments and
Agencies with urban aid programs.
"During the past several months, Seattle has done an excellent job in revising its proposals and improving its capability to operate in the first year action program," he said.
"Other comprehensive plan approvals and contract tenders are
following a similar process and additional announcements will
be made over the next several weeks."
A total of 150 communities in 45 States, the District of
Columbia and Puerto Rico are participating in the Model Cit i es
program. The first applications for planning grants were
approved in November 1967.
Attached is a summary of Seattle '.s comprehensive plan which
includes descriptions of first year action p r ograms using Model
Cities supplemental funds.
Fo r furthe r infor mation :
Walter Hundley
Director,Model Cities Agency
1700 E . Che r ry
Seatt l e , Washington 981 22
( 206) 583 -5 700
Hono r ab l e F loyd Miller
Mayo r, City Hal l
Seat tle, Wash ing t o n 98122
�SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Seattle was one of 63 cities named in November 1967 to start
planning in the Model Cities program. Subsequently it received a
$209,720 planning grant to develop a plan for a 2.25 square mile
area in the center of the city.
About 10 perc·ent of the city population, or 58,000 people
live in the model neighborhood on two percent of the city's land
area. The model neighborhood contrasts sharply with the general
prosperity of Seattle, which is considered a "white collar" city
with a median average income of $6,942.
Unemployment in the model neighborhood is three times the
city rate, median annual income is 27 percent lower, nearly half
(45 percent) of family heads did not finish high school, and onethird of the families live at or near the poverty level.
Eighty-five percent of Seattle's Negro population live in the
model neighborhood, making up more than half the neighborhood population. The area also includes Japanese and Chinese communities as
well as small numbers of American Indians, Eskimos and Filipinos.
Ten percent of the residents are white.
Citizens Involved
Seattle's five year program for upgrading this area incorpor. ates the work of 10 citizen planning task forces working closely
with volunteers from public and private agencies at the local,
State and Federal levels.
During seven months of weekly and semi-weekly meetings, over
1700 citizens participated in task force planning. Proposals approved by the task forces were passed on to the Seattle Model City
Advisory council, composed of 86 representatives from neighborhood
organizations, ranging from church and fraternal to militant civil
rights groups. The City Demonstration Agency (CDA) staff, a group
of 23 professionals, including seven persons on full time loan from
city, county, State agencies and private enterprise, worked closely
with th~ task forces and the Council to develop the final plan for
approval by the Mayor and City Council.
Five Year Strategy
Seattle's five year program aims at a turn-around of all as pects of life in the target neighborhood.
"Solutions will be aimed as much at the inherent contradictions
of our institutions as the individual victim of these contradictions"
the Seattle program says.
"We need altered ways of life as well as
altered lives."
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To accomplish this, Seattle looks to both public and private
support.
Two key elements of the plan, an economic developme nt
corporation and a housing development corporation, are expected to
bring several million dollars of private and other non-federal funds
into the n e ighborhood and multiply the impact of this money by keeping it in the neighborhood.
Backing up these programs will be concentrated manpower training and supporting health and social services to give model neighborhood residents the chance to get the jobs involved in the physical and economic improvement of the neighborhood.
At the same time, fundamental improvements in the education system -- dealing with what is taught, how i t is taught and how parents
and childre n in the neighborhood look at the scho o ls -- are projected
as ess e ntial to the long r a nge self-s uffici e ncy o f individua l residents and of their community.
Coordination of these various efforts will take place bath at
the city level, where similarly operated agencies have gain e d new
experi e nce working togethe r, and at the neighborhood level, where
the Model Citie s program already h a s opened n e w ch a nn e ls fo r p a rticipation in gove rnme ntal and other decisions affecting the neighborhood.
PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS
Economic De v e lopme nt and Employment
Seattle's basic approach is to provide adequate family income
to overcome poverty in the model neighborhood and at the s2me time
increase the amount of economic leadership in the neighborhood and
elimin a t e ma rginal employment by upgrading skills.
The City hopes
to double in the ne x t five y e ars the number of mod ~ l _neighborhood
f a mi li e s who own or control e conomic r e source s.
A k e y e leme n t for
d e v e loping n e w res ide nt-owned bus inesse s in the n e igh~o r h ood i s t h e
United Inne r-City Development Foundation now being organized with
the coope r a tion of some 30 groups in the area.
This .corporation
would dra w on the r e sources of the Washington State Deve lopme nt
Co r pora tion and pri v a te and Fe d e ral resource s to increa s e t e n f old
a n ini t ial c api t a li zation of $3 million.
Th e economic de v e lopme nt p r ogram wi l l b e b acked u p by c h a nges
in the d e live r y of manpower services, e x panded skills and managemen t tra ining and a n e x tensive consumer prote ction program .
To coord inate existing e mp loy me nt c o~s e lling, t ra ining a nd p l a c ement now
pro v i ded by 12 agencies , t h e p l a n c a lls f or a n Emp l oyme n t UniCe n ter
with outreach and one-stop serv ices. Among o t h er activi ties, the
UniCenter would immediately start a Manageme nt and In tern program
d es igned to bring r es ide nts into supervisory and policy @aking
positions in government and eventua ll y in t h e pr i v a te sector.
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A City Trainee program would also be started to give special
training and placement to model neighborhood residents normally
ineligible for city jobs.
Housing, Physical Planning and Environment
The Housing program in carrying out its objectives to increase
the supply of housing and the degree of homeownership in the neighborhood will be another key element in the economic development of
the neighborhood. A non-profit Housing Development Corporation is
expected to bring $6 million into the neighborhood to meet a goal
of 5,400 housing units over the next five years. The Corporation
will be owned by stockholders from industry, government and the
neighborhood, with neighborhood stockholders electing the Board of
Directors. · Planning is under way for the first 150 uni ts of new
and rehabilitated housing. A start would also be made on establishing a Land Bank to purchase vacant land in the neighborhood for
housing use.
The Physical Planning and Environment program focuses on expanding recreation areas in the neighborhood, transportation needs of
r e sidents, and resolving problems caused by two proposed transportation corridors through the neighborhood.
Planning will continue on a public transportation and development corridor to include parks, recreation-entertainment centers
and public facilities along the proposed R.H. Thomson motorway runni ng nor th-south thr ough the entire length of the neighborhood. A
simi lar study f or a housing and park complex is scheduled f or the
proposed I-90 which would cross the neighborhood in an east-west
direction.
The start of several recreation projects and block developme nt to provide sma ll recreation areas in each block is scheduled
immed iately . Th e p r ogram also include s a proj e ct in which r es i dents
wil l o perat e a r ovi ng " F i x- it" wagon to provide minor home r epa i r
services at cost to neighborhood families.
Educ ation
Despite f our y e ars o f compens a tor y e ducation progra ms , model
neighborhood student s are f our y ears beh i nd other cit y c h ildren at
the end of high school . Seattle' s go a l s -- e n riching e ducation,
making educatio n a better preparation fo r wor k life , and b r o adening
parent, teacher a nd studen t p a r ticipati on in the s c hoo ls -- are
designed to deal both wi th felt and expressed n eeds and realization of institutional c h ange.
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SPattle has given priority to the socio-economic integration
of schools as a means of enriching education when combined with
curriculum redevelopment and staff training and retraining. As
the first in a series of educational complexes planned by the
Seattle public schools, a Middle Schools Educational Park Demonstration for grades 5-9 would be planned and built on the edge of
the University of Washington campus.
Since no complete program for vocational education now exists .~
in the schools, Seattle plans an early start of an extensive Occupational Skills and Incentive program to provide technical training
for 6,000 students immediately. As a start towards its objective of
doubling employment of model neighborhood residents in schools,
Seattle would begin a project to hire 100 students as apprentices
and tutors, and 200 adults in a New Careers program for education.
These activities, combined with Youth Leadership Development and
counselling, are designed to better prepare model neighborhood students for work.
s ~veral activities are also aimed at increasing neighborhood
participation in the schools, including a Model Neighborhood Educational Advisory council and an office to handle complaints or problems of teachers, pupils and parents.
Welfare
Seattle's welfare program is based on an assumption that the
quality of social service is directly related to those requiring
the service. Tying in closely with economic development, the welfare program aims to eliminate poverty in the model neighborhood,
heighten the dignity, status and self-esteem of recipients and
strengthen and coordinate social services.
As a part of its coordination and concentration of social
services, the city plans comprehensive day-care services for 5,000
children; neighborhood centers to coordinate social service delivery,
and expanded services for the elderly.
To test possible modifications in the welfare system that would
offer incentives for reducing welfare rolls, the city proposes a
Direct Income Grant Demonstration program for a limited number o f
model neighborhood families. This is one of two in the nation under
serious consideration by the Department of Health, Education and
We lfare.
As a means of improving communication between welfare recipients and the Wel fare Department, the program calls for special support to the ADC Motivated Mothers Council .
Health
The Health program focuses on delivery and increased use of
health services by model neighborhood residents to achieve a level
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of heal.th in th e neighborh o od c omp a r a bl e to th a t of the cily.
On e
appro a ch will be a multi-s e r v ice he a lth cente r with outrc ac l1 into
the neighborhood through health stations that would provide 24-hour
emergency treatment a nd transportation ser v ices. Another clement
will involve Group Health Cooperative of Puget Sound and Blue Cro s sBlue Shield with servic e s being financed throug h a pre p a id health
insurance plan.
The program also calls for a Detox ification Center to treat
alcohol and drug abusers. All health activities in the neighborhood
would be coordinated through a special Model Ne ighborhood Health
Advisory Board.
Law and Justice
The
probl e ms
ment and
tution a l
Law and Justice program focuses on both the short-r a ng~
of easing racial and comrnuni ty tensions around l av; e n forcethe long-range impact of chang e s in the judicial and instis y stems.
As a start toward increasing the minority repr e s e ntation on the
police force, the city would establish a Public Safety Trainee program for residents, leading to a career in the Police Department.
Other activities to improve police-community relations include paying officers for time spent in non-enforcement functions and employing reside nts in non-enforc e ment dut i es and a s observe rs to record
police and resident interaction.
To improve legal services for residents the city would e x pand
the public defender system, and continue planning to provide legal
help to the marginal poor, and work toward increasing the number of
judgeships.
Culture and Arts, Youth

The Arts and Culture program is designed to help give Negroes
in the model neighboihood an opportunity for cultural ~d e ntity and
to increa s e th e numbers of residents in art related careers . A
priority project to start immediately is the conversion of a former
synagogue into a multipurpos e neighborhood center with an auditorium
for movies and the p e rforming arts, and space for other community
activities including a Teen Canteen . Also planned immediatel y is
an Afro-·Ame rican Arts Museum which would display the work of residents and well-known artists and include a bookshop and arts shop .
The plan calls for a revised school curriculwn to include courses
in African a r ts and culture.
The Youth program f o cus e s o n e conomic lif e chanc es o f yo uth
t h r ough a special emp loyment service and registry for part time
job s . To p r omote man a g er i a l . s ki ll s th e pro g r aD pro po s es d eve lop ing
bu s ines s es s uc h a s a youth-oper a t e d Maintena n ce Serv ic e tha t wo ul d
con t ract wi th l o c a l b u s i ne s ses a n d a9 artm2n t b u i ldi ngs and a Yo uth
Tr a n s p or t Service to prov ide minibu s s e rvice to th e mo del ne ig hb o rh o od.


# # #


�/G~
EWS
U.S . DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING
AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT
WASHINGTON D.C. 20410
HUD-No. 69-0355
Phone (202) 755-6980
HUD TENDERS MODEL CITIES
CONTRACT TO WACO, TEXAS
FOR RELEASE:
A. M. Papers
Saturday
May 10, 1969
Secretary George Romney, of the U.S. Department of Housing
and Urban Development, today announced the tender of a $2,642,000
Model Cities Contract to Waco, Texas.
Waco has also been given assurances for substantial funds
from other programs administered by HUD, and by the Department
of Health, Education and Welfare, the Department of Labor,and
the Office of Economic Opportunity.
Today's action by Secretary Romney will enable the city
to begin the first year action phase under its comprehensive
five-year Model Cities program. State, local and private resources will also be used by the city in its concentrated, coordinated attack on .the serious social, economic and physical
problems within the Model Cities area.
Of the $2 ,642, 000 in Model Cities supplemental funds,
approximately $500,000 will be used to generate some $2,600,000
in capital construction, Secretary Romney said. HUD has approved
a $1,500,000 sanitary sewer project, and e x pects to approve
$200,000 for a neighborhood facility, an urban renewal program
and 100 units of public housing.
HEW has stated that, in addition to substantial HEW funds
which presently provide health, education and welfare services
to the Waco Model Cities area, HEW agencies have indicated the
potential availability of $663,700. HEW will continue its ongoing efforts with the City of Waco to make these funds available to carry out the Waco plan, to the extent possible under
existing program legislation. Included are programs for higher
educational activity, the Teacher Corps, maternal and infant
care , comprehensive health planning, rehabilitation research and
training, and treating the mentally retarded.
A total of $2 , 087 , 000 for a concentrated Employment Program
in Waco , funded by the Department of Labor ,wi ll provide work training, work experience and other manpower services for Model cities
area residents.
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�HUD-No. 69-0355
-
2 -
The Office of Economic Opportunity indicated that it
expects to maintain the present $621~ 000 level of annual
funding for Community Action Program activity within the Waco
Model Cities area.
Secretary Romne y , who is the Chai r man of the President's
Cabinet Committee on Vo l untary Action, noted the extensive
private involvement in the Waco program . Besides the contributions of private groups in the planning process, which is
expected to grow during the action stage, volunteer help is
available from such organizations as the McLennan County Medical Society, the American Institute of Architects, the United
Fund and the Alta Corporation.
The County Medical Society is contributing $13,600 towards
a coordinated health program. The Alta Corporation is sponsoring a minority h ome builder to build 1 4 dwelling units in a
Residents Homebuilders project .
"The largest volunteer contribution has been the neighborhood residents themselves," Secretary Romney said.
Commenting on the decision to tender a contract, Secretary
Romney explained that this was done after a careful review of the
Waco comprehensive plan . The plan was thoroughl y studied and
analyzed both b y the Regional and Washington Interagency Review
Committees representing those Federal Departments and Agenc i es
with urban aid p r ograms .
"During the past several months, Waco has done an e x cellent
job in revising its proposals and improving its capability to
operate in the first y ear action prog r;:, m," he said .
"Other comprehensive plan approvals and contr ac t tenders are following a
similar p r ocess a nd addit i o n al announceme nts will be made o v er
the n ext sev era l week s . "
A total of 150 communities in 45 States , the District of
Columbi a a n d Puerto Rico a re participating in the Model Cit i es
program . Th e f ir st a pplications for plann ing grants were app r oved in No vembe r 1 9 6 7 .
At tached is a summary o f Wa c o ' s comprehen s iv e p l an which
i n c l udes de s cript ions of firs t y ear ac tion p r og r ams using Model
Cities supplemental fun ds .
Fo r further informatio n :
Jame s J. Miller
Model Citi e s Office
City Hall
Wac o , Texas 767 0 1 (817) PL3 - 2441
Honorable Howard Dudgeon
Mayor , City Hall
Waco , Texas 76701













�WACO, TEXAS
Some 15,000 people, or 14 percent of the population live
in the Waco model neighborhood, with about two-thirds Negro and
one-third white and Mexican-American. The unemployment rate in
the target area ·is three times the rest of the city, while 63
percent of the housing is considered substandard. About 50 percent of the adults have less than a high school education, and
about 40 percent of the families earn less than $3,000.
Citizen Participation
Developing Waco's five year program involved nine task
forces working closely with six model neighborhood citizen boards,
independent organizations, volunteer groups and city, State and
Federal agencies.
More than 500 citizens participated in planning the Waco
program. More than 400 meetings were held with model neighborhood residents and task force planning committees.
city Demonstration Agency staff comprising three professionals
and seven persons assigned from local organizations worked closely
with a Model Cities Commission and Model Neighborhood Boards to
develop the final plan submitted to City council.
Five Year Program
Waco's five year program is aimed at correcting the phy sical
blight in the area while improving its social and educational
conditions. To accomplish this, Waco seeks to involve private
enterprise and public support. The major elements of the program
are directed at improving housing through the construction of 400
new units by private enterprise and non-profit corporations, while
up-grading resident employment a nd training opportunities. The
model neighborhood residents gave first priority to improving
drain age facilities and s treet conditions in the area. The second
priority is in education, and calls for curriculum development
and improving educational opportunities for pre-school children .
Other program elements include improving medical and social
services with f ull emphasis on developing training opportunities
in pre- professi onal positions for residents by coordination with
city, county, and State non-profit organizations. A new health
and extended medical services program has been designed ~
PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS
Employment
The Concentrated Employment Program (CEP) will be used to
help reduce an unemployment rate of 9 percent for men and 7 percent for women. Other work-training programs will provide residents
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with an opportunity to participate in developing businesses.
Planned for the future is a Work Skills Development program
operated by James Connally Technical Institute which will provide vocational as well as academic training for entire families
who will live on the campus.
During the first year, CEP activities will include a New
Careers program, adult basic education, vocational and technical
training and on-the-job training.
Education
The basic program approach in education is to develop a
comprehensive pre-school educational program and expand vocational
technical training. The curriculum of the model neighborhood
schools will be reformed through the use of computer assisted
instructional programs and Instructional Media Resources Centers.
A communication mobile unit in the target area will help students
with learning problems by providing aid in such basic skills as
reading, writing, and speech.
Several programs are proposed for upgrading teacher skills,
including an instructional laboratory for training teachers to
work with disadvantaged children. A cross-Over Program to help
teachers recognize the social and educational problems of students
involved in desegregation would be expanded. Also planned is an
Experienced Teacher Fellowship Program at Baylor University offering university courses to 30 teachers to increase their skills
needed to teach the disadvantaged.
During the first year computer terminals will be installed
in three area schools to carry out the instructional program.
An Occupational Skills Analysis Laboratory which will provide
special instruction through video tapes, will also be started.
Social Services
Social services programs are directed principal l y at coordinating services of numerous social agencies and in improving
their accessibility to residents. The social services corr~onent
will also deal with developing welfare aid and employment oppor tunities within its services.
A Foster Grandparent program and a nutritional program will
serve the elderly. Other first year activities include a Homemaker Service for the elde rly and disabled, and an Extensive
counselling Program for y oung women and husbands of planned parenthood clients.
Health
The principal health components include health care for the
elderly, visiting nurses services in the home, and extending
family planning services. The Medical Society will help develop
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a continuity of care concept through a medical education program.
This program is intended to bring about b etter coordination of
all health programs and providing medical training opportunities
for model neighborhood residents.
A Family Physician Program will reorganize and coordinate
health services and recruit doctors to Waco and to staff model
neighborhood facilities . Also included in the plan are a
Detox ification Center fo r Alcoholics and Mental Hea l th-Mental
Retardation S e rvic es .
During the first year, construction of the Mental Health
facility will begin. Two school health programs focusing on
medical e x aminations for mode l neigborhood students and Health ,
Sex, and Drug Educati on will also start immedi a tely .
Law Enforcement
Juvenile services and improved police community relations are
emphasized in this component. Specific first year activities include a Police Science Libr ary to supplement a n exis t ing degree
p r o gr am f o r l aw en f orcement o f fice r s and expans ion o f a Juven il e
Po lice Bureau t o in i ti a t e a del i nquency prevent i on p r ogram.
Recreation
The recreati on progr am calls for community cente rs and
dev eloping programs in c rafts and cu l tural enr ichment. Model
n eighb orhood res idents wi ll be emp l o ye d in the p r og r a m. Pl a ns
a l s o c all f o r devel opin g re c reation fa ci lities o n the Brazos
Riv er wh i ch runs t h rough the model neighborhood.
Phy sic al Planning Ar eas
This comp onen t o f the Waco p r o gram i s aime d a t up- gr a d ing
existing physical c o nd itions s uch as streets, housing a nd community facilities and providing new facilities wh ere need ed. Three
elemen ts are e mphas ized - - urban design , h ousing , a n d public
f ac iliti es.
The goa l of the urban d esign component i s p roper l and use,
including commercial, i ndus t rial and hous i ng facilities, and a
transportati on system meeting the needs of the model neighborhood residents.
An Urban Design Center is prop o sed to bridge the gaps in
design, as well as provide technic al assistance to model neighborhood residents involved in this phase of the program . The center
will feature visual aids which will show existing physical conditions in the area as well as project f uture goals a nd concepts
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to be achieved in the Model Cities program. Waco proposes to
use the new Neighborhood Development Program for physical renewal of the target area. The goal of the housing component
is suitable new and rehabilitated standard housing for all model
neighborhood residents at prices they can afford. Some 400 new
housing units through public and private resources are proposed.
First year activities include street construction, a sanitary
sewer project, construction of drainage systems, a coordinated
code enforcement project and a study of user needs for low-income
housing in the model neighborhood. Also planned is a Resident
Homebuilder project which would combine construction of 14 new
homes with training a minority resident to establish a homebuilding
firm.
�1'b
May 8, 1969
Dr. John Letson, Su rint n en-t
Atlant Public Sehool
Admini tr tion Office
224 Central Av u
tl t ,
rgi
Dar Dr. Letsonc
On
y 8
A visor with
r c iv d
mm
in
a 11,
rom Mr . Oscar Mims,
w sb.ington,
ich confirm d
ucation
r c t con-
had from th a gion l Offic of
ucation. Mr. Mim
t
th t th Offic of duc::ation ha
ark
386,000
for Atl t •
1 Citi
Progr • 'l"h fund•
d sign ted
for four education l progr
ar as.
tr ining)
$50,000
2 0,000
71,000
l ,000
y 12 with Mr. Bill P rg nd,
th
d th
rrison of your ta.ff
fun
nd.
We
to
vi
a.UM.1.1,..t&ciatr tio •
tanc

ction
to th cities
d
�e look forward to
continu
clo er lation hip with th
Bo d of ducat ion
th oi ty .
into impl
~tion of
th Model Citi
plans.
Sin
-~
r ly your.
Johnny c. Johnson.
Director
cc:
Mayor Ivan 11 n. Jr.
Dr. u 1
rri on
�HU D .96
(7 .66)
UNITED STATES GOV ERNMENT
Memorandum
TO
See addressees below
I, .
FROM
SUBJECT:
DEPi\RTt--1ENT O F
HOUS l TG AND U R BAN DE VEL O Pt\'l ENT
Wal
Mod
April 28 , 1 969
In r ep ly refe r t o :
4
~-4~
I/
G 1\
D ATE:
Jr.
rt\,!s A .inistration
Letter to Model City Mayor s on Secreta r y Romney' s Stat ement on t h e
Model Citie s Pr ogram
We have s ent t oday a lett er with the following t ext t o the mayors
or chief executive of ficers of all mode l citie s.
I wanted to be s ure you have a copy of Secr etar y Romney ' s
s t atement on t he Model Citi es program . With thi s strong
Presidentia l endor sement you can be assured of all possibl e
support t o your efforts t o improv e the qua lity of l ife of
your disadva nt aged citi zens.
The progr am i mprovement s endorsed by President Nixon
s hould make our joint efforts more effective . Representatives of our Regional Of f.i'ces will be worki ng with you
and your CDA staff to make sure that your city ' s program
take s full adva nt age of these new program approaches .
Sev er a l copi es of the Secretary' s statement a r e i nclosed for your
information. We s uggest t hat CDA Di rectors make at least one copy
available to their citizen part icipation structure as soon as
possible, in order to avoid pot ential misunderstandings which might
result f rom any i ncomplete reports of the statement .
Director
Enclosure
Addressees:
CDA Directors
Regional Administrators
Attn: Assistant Regional Administrators for Model Cities
Governor's Repre sent at i v es
Washington Interagency Committee
Regional Interagency Coordinating Committee
Model Cities Professional Staff
�ws
.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING
A
D URBAN DEVELOPMENT
WASHINGTON D . C . 20410
HUD No. 69-0321
Phone: (202) 755-7327
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday, April 28, 1969
SECRETARY ROMNEY'S STATEMENT ON MODEL CITIES
The Model Cities program is an ambitious effort.
It seeks to
coordinate a vast array of Federal programs, to concentrate their
impact on specific depressed urban neighborhoods, and to make local
governments stronger and more flexible.
My Ccmmittee on Model Cities of the Council for Urban Affairs
has been intensively examining the program.
Its study has shown
that the program's goals are sound, but that there have been critical
deficiencies in its administration which call for immediate correction.
Among them:
Federal agencies have not been sufficiently responsive
to local proposals reflecting specific local conditions.
In developing their proposals, local authorities have
been hindered by uncertainty as to the amounts of funds
that -would be available from the Federal departments.
Few effective attempts have been made to secure the
involvement of State governments.
Federal guidelines have forced cities to set "model
neighborhood" boundaries that often have been arbitrary,
and that have created unnecessary divisions among Model
Cities residents.
�2
The President has approved the r ecommendations of the Urban
Affairs Council that the Model Cities program be revised in the
following important respects:
1.
The Council for Urban Affairs will assume direct responsibility for inter-departmental policy affecting Model Cities.
2.
Secretaries of the departments involved will have
personal super vision of their departments' funding
of Model Cities proposals , and will reserve program
funds specifically for that purpose.
This will
ensure the availability of departmental funds for
Model Cities, and will give local authorities a
better idea of the amount and kind of funds they can
expect from the various department s for their
Model Cities plans.
3.
Administration of t he program will be fed into the
reo r ganization of the regional Federal offices,
now und erway.
One effect of this will be to facili-
tate inter -departmental coordination at the regional
level.
In the past, variations among the Federal
of fices in program procedures, headquarters locations,
and structures of authority, have hand_icapped wellintentioned Feder al officials and confused local
officials, thus ser iou s ly compromising the Model Cities
program at the city level.
4.
Greater efforts will be made t o involve the State
governments in the Model Cities pr ogram.
Lack of
�3
State involvement has proven a critica l deficiency
because many of the Federa l funds needed for Model
Cities are administered through State agencies.
Our
aim will not be to add another administrative layer
between the cities and the Federal Government, but to
make better use of the States' resources, experience
and perspective.
Model Cities is intended to be and
will remain a local government program centered upon
the Mayor's office with a continued requirement for
adequate citizen involvement.
5.
The 10% population restriction on the size of the target
neighborhoods will be dropped.
This guideline has been
administered haphazardly in the past and has hindered
progress at the local level.
Eliminating this guideline
does not mean tha t the pr ogram will be expanded citywide
within each city .
Its pur pose will remain that of focusing
resour ces on particularly poo r and blighted neighbor hoods,
but loca l officials will be given gr eater latitude in
drawing program boundar ie s that conform to local conditions .
6.
Priority cons idera tion will be given to those cities that
suc c ess f ully enlist t he participation of pr ivate and
vol untar y organizations in their Model Cit i es pl ans .
The
increased flexibility in establishing program boundarie s
wil l make it eas ier for these organizations to contribute.
7.
Local governments will be asked to estab l ish clear
priorities in developing t heir Model Cities proposals,
�4
and to strive for "comprehensiveness" only in the
programs' five-year planning cycle.
Many cities have
interpreted Model Cities legislation and administrative
guidelines requiring a local "comprehensive" plan of
attack on blight and poverty in their target neighborhoods as requiring proposals to immediately attack
every conceivable problem within these neighborhoods.
This obviously would be unworkable; what is important
is that citr governments set clear priorities for
attacking their problems so that they can make rapid
and substantial progress toward solving their most
urgent, rather than dissipating their resources in a
vain effort to solve all.
This Administration will
completely scrutinize applications to eliminate unwise
or unnecessary proposals.
With these revisions, I feel that t he Model Cities program can
help us to achieve two important goals -- a more rational and
creative Federal-State-local system, and city governments that are
more flexible and responsive to the needs of their citizens.
We
must realize that elimination of blight and poverty in our central
cities cannot be accomplished overnight.
It will be a hard and
often frustrating struggle, but Model Cities does offer us the means
of better using our present resources, and thus taking an important
step in that direction.
�,I ..
I





I
I
I
J
021126 EVDAA
X
202724 13013 MSCDV316370
RAAUIJHZ RUEVDFH0006 1182004-tJt.JUY.--RUEVDAA.
FM GEORGE CREEL DIR OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS DHUD WASH DC/HHFA/
TO RUEVDDAA/1/ REGL ADMIN DRUD ATLANTA GA ATTN: SPECIAL ASST FOR
.··.PUBLIC AFFAIRS & ARA'S FOR MODEL CITIES
BT
THE FOLLOWING STATEMENT WAS ISSUED BY SECRETARY ROMNEY TO NEWS
MEDIA AT 4 :00 PM APRIL 28. ASSISTANT SECRETARY HYDE WILL BE
TELEPHONING EACH OF THE REGIONAL ,ADMINISTRATORS TO DISCUSS
THE IMPLICATIONS OF THIS STATEMENT WITHIN THE NEXT FEW DAYS.
.
II
SECRETARY ROMNEY I s STATEMENT ON MODEL CITIES i,
THE MODEL CITIES PROGRAM IS AN AMBITIOUS EFFORT. IT SEEKS .TO _
COORDINATE A VAST ARRAY OF FEDERAL PROGRAMS, TO CONCENTRATE THEIR
IMPACT ON SPECIFIC DEPRESSED URBAN NEIGHBORHOODS, AND TO MAKE LOCAL
GOVERNMENTS STRONGER AND MORE FLEXIB.r.E. MY COMMITTEE . ON MODEL CITIE~
OF THE COUNCIL FOR URBAN AFFAIRS HAS BEEN INTENSIVELY EXAMllNING · THE :
PROGRAM. ITS STUDY.HAS SHOWN THAT THE PROGRAM'S GOALS ARE SOUND~
BUT THAT THERE HAVE BEEN CRITICAL DEFICIENCIES IN ITS ADMINISTRATION
WHICH CALL FOR IMMEDIATE CORRECTION. AMONG THEM:
AGEN€:IEJL HAVE N©'I'. BED : Str1,FICIENTLY RESPONSIVE ·
. TO LOCAL PROPOSALS REFLECTING SPECIFIC LOCAL CONDITIONS.
--FGERAl,
DEVELOPING THEIR PROPOSALS, LOCAL AUTHORI'l'IES HAVE
BEEN HINDERED BY UNCERTAINTY AS TO TiiE AMOUNTS OF FUNDS
THAT WOULD BE AVAILABLE FROM THE FEDERAL DEPARTMENTS.
=.::IN
--FEW EFFECTIVE ATTEMPTS HAVE BEEN MADE TO SECURE THE
INVOLVEMENT OF STATE GOVERNMENTS.
--FEDERAL GUIDELINES HAVE FORCED CITIES TO SET "MODEL
NEIGHBORHOOD" BOUNDARIES THAT OFTEN HAVE BEEN ARBITRARY,
AND ~T HAVE CREATED UNNECESSARY DIVISIONS AMONG MODEL
CITIES RESIDENTS.
THE PRESIDENT HAS APPROVED THE RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE URBAN AFFAIRS
COUNCIL THAT THE MODEL CITIES PROGRAM BE REVISED IN THE FOLLOWING
IMPORTANT RESPECTS:
·l.
THE COUNCIL FOR URBAN AFFAIRS WILL ASSUME DIRECT RESPONSIBILITY
FOR INTER-DftARTMENTAL POLICY AFFECTING MODEL CITIES.
2 • . SECRETARIES OF THE DEPARTMENTS INVOLVED WILL HAVE PERSON.At
. SUPERVISION OF THEIR DEPARTMENTS' FUNDING OF MODEL CI'JI ES
PROPOSALS, AND WILL RESERVE PROGRAM FUNDS SPECIFICALLY FOR
THAT PURPOSE. THIS WILL ENSURE THE AVAILABILITY OF DEPART- 1
MENTAL FUNDS FOR MODEL CITIES, AND WILL GIVE LOCAL AUTHORITIES
A BETTER IDEA OF THE .AMOUNT AND KIND OF FUNDS THft CAN EXPECT
FROM THE VARIOUS DEPARTMENTS FOR THFI R MODEL CITIES PLANS.
�PAGE TWO RUEVDFH0006 1182004
3. , ADMINISTRAT!DON OF THE PROGRAM WILL BE FED INTO THE REORGANIZA-
\ TION OF THE REGIONAL FEDERAL OFFICES, NOW UNDERWAY. ONE EFFECT
\OF THIS WILL BE TO FACILITATE INTER-DEPARTMENTAL COORDINATION
~T THE REGIONAL LEVEL. IN THE PAST, VARIATIONS AMONG THE
~EDERAL OFFICES IN PROGRAM PROCEDURES, HEADQUARTERS LOCATIONS,
~ STRUCTURES OF AUTHORITY, HAVE HANDICAPPED WELL~INTENTIONED
FEDERAL OFFICIALS MTD CONFUSED LO<:!AL OFFICIALS, THUS SERIOUSLY
COMPROMISING THE MODEL CITIES PROGRAM AT THE CITY LEVEL.
4.
GREATER EFFORTS WILL BE MADE TO INVOLVE THE STATE GOVERNMENTS
IN THE MODEL CITIES PROGRAM. LACKOOF STATE INVOLVEMENT HAS
PROVEN A CRITICAL DEFICIENCY BECAUSE MANY OF THE FEDERAL FUNDS
NEEDED FOR MODEL CITIES ARE ADMINISTERED THROUGH STATE
.
AGENCIES. OUR AIM WILL NOT BE TO ADD ANOTHER ADMINISTRATIVE
IAYER BETWEEN THE CITIES AND THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT, BUT TO
MAKE BETTER USE OF THE STATES'RESOURCES, EXPERIENCE AND PERSPECTIVE 9 . MODEL CITIES IS INTENDED TO BE AND WILL REMAIN A LOCAL GOVERNMENT PROGRAM CENTERED UPON THE MAYOR'S OFFICE WITH A
CONTINUED REQUIREMENT FOR ADEQUATE CITI.ZEN INVOLVEMENT.
5.
THE 10%.' POPULATION RESTRICTION ON THE SIZE OF THE TARGET
NEIGHBORHOODS WILL BE DROPPED. THIS GUIDELI NE HAS BEEN
. .. . . ~:J.U>MINISTERED HAPHAZARDLY IN THE PAST AND HAS HINDERED PROGRESS
AT THE LO.GAL LEVEL. ELIMINATING THIS GUIDELINE DOES NOT MEAN
THAT THE PROGRAM WILL BE EXPANDED CITYWIDE WITHIN EACH CITY.
ITS PURPOSE WILL REMAIN THAT OF FOCUSING RESOURCES ON PARTICULARLY POOR AND BLIGHTED NEIGHBORHOODS, BUT LOCAL OFFICIALS WILL
BE GIVEN GREATER LATITUDE IN DRAWING PROGRAM BOUNDARIES THAT
CONFORM TO LOCAL CONDITIONS.
6.
PRIORITY CONSIDERATION WILL BE GIVEN TO THOSE CITIES THAT
SUCCESSFULLY ENLIST THE PARTICIPATION OF PRIVA~E AND VOLUNTARY
ORGANIZATIONS IN THEIR MODEL CITIES PLANS. THE INCREASED
FLEXIBILITY IN ESTABLISHING PROGRAM BOUNDARIES WILL MAKE IT
EASIER FOR THESE ORGANIZATIONS TO CIDNTRIBUTE.
7.
LOCAL GOVERNMENTS WILL BE ASKED TO ESTABLISH CLEAR PRIORITIES
IN DEVELOPING THEIR MODEL CITIES PROPOSALS, AND TO STRIVE FOR
"COMPREHENSIVENESS" ONLY IN THE PROGRAMS' FIVE-YEAR PLANNING
CYCLE. MANY CITIES HAVE INTERPRETED MODEL CITIES LEGISLATION
AND ADMINISTRATIVE GUIDELINES REQUIRffiG A. LOCAL "COMPREHENSIVE"
PLAN OF ATTACK ON BLIGHT AND POVERTY IN THEIR TARGET NEIGHBORHOOD A S REQUIRING PROPOSALS TO I MMEDIATELY ATTACK EVERY CON- -OEIVABLE PROBLEM WITHIN THESE NEIGffBOimOODS~ ffl:tS O:BVIOUSLl'
WOULD BE UNWORKABLE: 'WHAT IS I MPORTANT IS THAT CITY GOVERNMENTS SET CLEAR PRIORITIES FOR ATTACKING THEIR PROBLEMS SO THAT
THEY CAN MAKE RAPID AND SUBSTAf..lTIAL PROGRESS TOWARD SOLVING
THEIR MOST URGENT RATHER THAN DISSIPATING THEIR RESOURCES IN
A VA:EN EFFORT TO SOLVE ALL o THI S ADMINSTRATION WILL COMPLETELY
SCRUTINIZE APPLICA'I'IONS TO ELIMINATE UNWISE OR UNNECESSARY
PROPOSALS o
f
�PAGE THREE
RUEVDFH0006 118200
WITH THESE REVISIONS, I FEEL THAT THE MODEL CITIES PROGRAM CAN HELP
US ·To ACHIEVE TWO IMPORTANT GOALS--A MORE RATIONAL AND CREATIVE
FEDERAL-STATE-~AL SYSTEM, AND CITY GOVERNMENT.$ THAT ARE MORE
FEEXIBLE AND RESPONSIVE TO THE NEEDS OF THEIR CITIZENS • . WE MUST
REALIZE THAT ELIMINATION OF BLIGHT AND POVERTY IN OUR CENTRAL
CITIES CANNOT BE ACCOMPLISHED OVERNIGHT. IT WILL BE A HARD AND
OFTEN FRUSTRATING STRUGGLE, BUT MODEL CITIES DOES OFFER US THE
MEANS OF BETTER USING OUR PRESENT RESOURCES, AND THUS TAKING
AN IMPORTANT STEP IN THAT DIRECTION. " .
NNNN
121126 EVDAA
\
\
\
�X
021126 EVDAA
202724 13013 MSCDV310370
RAAUIJHZ RUEVDFH0006 1182004-UUUU--RUEVDAA.
FM GEORGE CREEL DIR OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS DHUD WASH DC/HHFA/
TO RUEVDDAA/1/ REGL ADMIN DHUD ATLANTA GA ATTN: SPECIAL ASST FOR
.: ·:.: :.PUBLIC AFFAIRS & ARA'S FOR MODEL CITIES
BT
THE FOLLOWING STATEMENT WAS ISSUED BY SECRETARY ROMNEY TO NEWS
MEDIA AT 4:00 PM APRIL 28. ASSISTANT SECRETARY HYDE WILL BE
TELEPHONING EACH OF THE REGIONAL . ADMINISTRATORS TO DISCUSS
THE IMPLICATIONS OF THIS STATEMENT WITHIN THE NEXT FEW DAYS.
11
SECRETARY ROMNEY'S STATEMENT ON MODEL CITIES"
THE MODEL CITIES PROGRAM IS AN AMBITIOUS EFFORT. IT SEEKS TO
COORDINATE A VAST ARRAY OF FEDERAL PROGRAMS, TO CONCENTRATE THEIR
IMPACT ON SPECIFIC DEPRESSED URBAN NEIGHBORHOODS, AND TO MAKE LOCAL
GOVERNMENTS STRONGER AND MORE FLEXIBI:,E. MY COMMITTEE ON MODEL CITIES
OF THE COUNCIL FOR URBAN AFFAIRS HAS BEEN INTENSIVELY EXAMING THE
PROGRAM. ITS STUDY HAS SHOWN THAT THE PROGRAM'S GOALS ARE SOUND.
BUT THAT THERE HAVE BEEN CRITICAL DEFICIENCIES IN ITS ADMINISTRATION
WHICH CALL FOR IMMEDIATE CORRECTION. AMONG THEM:
--FEDERAL AGENf!I.E.S HAVE N0'E .B.EEN .Stnr.FICIENTLY RESPONSIVE
TO LOCAL PROPOSALS- REFLECTING SPECIFIC LOCAL CONDITIONS.
~~IN DEVELOPING THEIR PROPOSALS, LOCAL AUTHORITIES HAVE
BEEN HINDERED BY UNCERTAINTY AS TO THE AMOUNTS OF FUNDS
THAT WOULD BE AVAILABLE FROM THE FEDERAL DEPARTMENTS.
--FE.W EFFECTIVE ATTEMPTS HAVE BEEN MADE TO SECURE THE
INVOLVEMENT OF STATE GOVERNMENTS.
--FEDERAL GUIDELINES HAVE FORCED CITIES TO SET 11MODEL
!llF.T~RBORHOOD" BOUNDARIES THAT OFTEN HAVE BEEN ARBITRARY,
AND 'J.'J:iA'J.' liAVE CREATED UNNECESSARY DIVISIONS AMONG MODEL
CITIES RESIDENTS.
THE PRESIDENT HAS APPROVED THE RECO~DATIONS OF THE URBAN AFFIARS
COUNCIL THAT THE MODEL CITIES PROGRAM BE REVISED IN THE FOLLOWING
IMPORTANT RESPECTS:
1.
THE COUNCIL FOR URBAN AFFAIRS WILL ASSUME DIRECT RESPONSIBILITY
FOR INTER-DEPARTMENTAL POLICY AFFECTING MODEL CITIES.
2.
SECRETARIES OF THE DEPARTMENTS INVOLVED WILL HAVE PERSONA~
SUPERVISION OF THEIR DEPARTMENTS' FUNDING OF MODEL CIT[ ES
PROPOSALS, AND WILL RESERVE PROGRAM FUNDS SPECIFICALLY FOR\
THAT PURPOSE. THIS WILL ENSURE THE AVAILABILITY OF DEPART~
MENTAL FUNDS FOR MODEL CITIES, AND WILL GIVE LOCAL AUTHORITIES
A BETTER IDEA OF THE AMOUNT AND KIND OF FUNDS THEY CAN EXPECT
FROM THE VARIOUS DEPARTMENTS FOR THEIR MODEL CITIES PLANS.
�PAGE TWO RUEVDFH0006 1182004
3.
4.
ADMINISTRATION OF THE PROGRAM WILL BE FED INTO THE REORGANIZA·TION OF THE REGIONAL FEDERAL OFFICES, NOW UNDERWAY. ONE EFFECT
\OF THIS WILL BE TO FACILITATE INTER-DEPARTMENTAL COORDINATION
~T THE REGIONAL LEVEL. IN THE PAST, VARIATIONS AMONG THE
FEDERAL OFFICES IN PROGRAM PROCUDURES, HEADQUARTERS LOCATIONS,
AND STRUCTURES OF AUTHORITY, HAVE HANDICAPPED WELL-.INTENTIONED
FEDERAL OFFICIALS AND CONFUSED LOC?AL OFFICIALS, THUS SERIOUSLY
COMPROMISING THE MODEL CITIES PROGRAM AT THE CITY LEVEL.
GREATER EFFORTS WILL BE MADE TO INVOLVE THE STATE GOVERNMENTS
IN THE MODEL CITIES PROGRAM. LACK'OF STATE INVOLVEMENT HAS
PROVEN A CRITICAL DEFICIENCY BECAUSE MANY OF THE FEDERAL FUNDS
NEEDED FOR MODEL CITIES ARE ADMINISTERED THROUGH STATE
AGENCIES. OUR AIM WILL NOT BE TO ADD ANOTHER ADMINISTRATIVE
LAYER BETWEEN THE CITIES AND THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT, BUT TO
MAKE BETTER USE OF THE STATES 1 RESOURCES, EXPERIENCE AND PERSPECTIVE. MODEL CITIES IS INTENDED TO BE AND WILL REMAIN A LOCAL
GOVERNMENT PROGRAM CENTERED UPON THE MAYOR'S OFFICE WITH A
CONTINUED REQUIREMENT FOR ADEQUATE CITIZEN INVOLVEMENT.
S.
THE 10%POPULATION RESTRICTION ON THE SIZE OF THE TARGET
NEIGHBORHOODS WILL BE DROPPED. THIS GUIDELINE HAS BEEN
.ADMINISTERED HAPHAZARDLY IN THE PAST AND HAS HINDERED PROGRESS
AT THE LOCAL LEVEL. ELIMINATING THIS GUIDELINE DOES NOT MEAN
THAT THE PROGRAM WILL BE EXPANDED CITYWIDE WITHIN EACH CITY.
ITS PURPOSE WILL REMAIN THAT OF FOCUSING RESOURCES ON PARTICULARLY POOR AND BLIGHTED NEIGHBORHOODS, BUT LOCAL OFFICIALS WILL
BE GIVEN GREATER LATITUDE IN DRAWING PROGRAM BOUNDARIES THAT
CONFORM TO LOCAL CONDITIONS.
6.
PRIORITY CONSIDERATION WILL BE GIVEN TO THOSE CITIES THAT
SUCCESSFULLY ENLIST THE PARTICIPATION OF PRIVATE AND VOLUNTARY
ORGANIZATIONS IN THEIR MODEL CITIES PLANS. THE INCREASED
FLEXIBILITY IN ESTABLISHING PROGRAM BOUNDARIES WILL MAKE IT
EASIER FOR THESE ORGANIZATIONS TO C©NTRIBUTE.
7.
LOCAL GOVERNMENTS WILL BE ASKED TO ESTABLISH CLEAR PRIORITIES
IN DEVELOPING THEIR MODEL CITIES PROPOSALS, AND TO STRIVE FOR
"COMPREHENSIVENESS" ONLY IN THE PROGRAMS' FIVE-YEAR PLANNING
CYCLE. MANY CITIES HAVE INTERPRETED MODEL CITIES LEGISLATION
AND ADMINISTRATIVE GUIDELINES REQUIRENG A :'.,LOCAL "COMPREHENSIVE"
PLAN OF ATTACH ON BLIGHT AND POVERTY IN THEIR TARGET NEIGHBORHOOD AS REQUIRING PROPOSALS TO IMMEDIATELY ATTACK EVERY CONCEIVABLE PROBLEM WITatN THESE NEIGHBORHOODS. Til!S OBVIOUSLY
WOULD BE UNWORKABLE : WHAT IS IMPORTANT IS THAT CITY GOVERN-_
MENTS SET CLEAR PRIORITIES FOR ATTACKING THEIR PROBLEMS SO THAT
THEY CAN MAKE RAPID AND SUBSTANTIAL PROGRESS TOWARD SOLVING
THEIR MOST URGENT RATHER THAN DISSIPATING THEIR RESOURCES IN
A VAIN EFFORT TO SOLVE ALL. THIS ADMINSTRATION WILL COMPLETELY
SCRUTINIZE APPLICATIONS TO ELIMINATE UNWISE OR UNNECESSARY
PROPOSALSo
�PAGE THREE
RUEVDFH0006 118200
WI~H THESE REVISION, I FEEL THAT :THE MODEL CITIES PROGRAM CAN HELP
US U-10 ACHIEVE TWO IMPORTANT GOALS--A MORE RATIONAL AND CREATIVE
FED~RAL-STATE-LOCAL SYSTEM, AND CITY GOVERNMENTS THAT ARE NONE
FDE~~BLE AND RESPONSIVE TO THE NEEDS OF THEIR CITIZENS. WE MUST
REALIZE THAT ELIMINATION OF BLIGHT AND POVERTY IN OUR CENTRAL
CITIES CANNOT BE ACCOMPLISED OVERNIGHT. IT WILL BE A HARD AND
OFTEN FRUSTRATING STRUGGLE, BUT MODEL CITIES DOES OFFER US THE
MEANS OF BETTER USING OUR PRESENT RESOURCESr AND THUS TAKING
AN IMPORTANT STEP IN THAT DIRECTION."
NNNN
121126 EVDAA
�•
lf
021126 EVDAA
202724 13013 MSCDV316370
RAAUIJHZ RUEVDF'H0006 1182004-UUCTU:-- RUEVDAA.
FM GEORGE CREEL DIR OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS DHUD WASH DC/HHE'A/
TO RUEVDDAA/1/ REGL ADMIN DHUD ATLANTA-GA ATTN: SPECIAL ASST
· · . -~·PUBLIC AFFAIRS & A._AA' S FOR MODEL CITIES
BT
FOR
THE FOLLOWING STATEMENT WAS ISSUED BY SECRETARY ROMNEY TO NEWS
MEDIA AT 4 :00 PM APRIL 28. ASSISTl\..N'I1 SECRETARY HYDE WILL BE
TELEPHONING EACH OF THE REGIONAL ADMINISTRATORS TO DISCUSS
THE IMPLICATIONS OP THIS STATEi"\IBN'l' vr.tTHIN '!1IIB NEXT FEW DAYS.
·
"SECRE'1'A..~Y .ROMNI!."'Y'S
STATEY.LENT ON MODEL CITIESi'
· THE MODEL CITIES PROGRAM IS Af~ AflBITIOUS EFFORT.
IT SEEKS TO .
COORDINATE A VAST ARRAY OF FEDERAL PROGRAl"\1S , TO CONCENTRATI.' THEIR
IMPACT ON SPECIFIC DEPRESSED URBAN NEIGHBORHOODS, AND TO i~~E LOCllJ.
GOVERNMENTS STRONGER AND MORE FLEXIBLE.
MY COMMITTEE . ON MODEL CITIE!,
OF THE COUNCIL FOR URBAN AFFAIRS HAS BEEN INTENSIVELY EXAM]NING THE
PROGRAM . ITS STUDY. HAS SHOWN 'l HAT THE PROGRAM' S GOALS ARE SOUND,
BUT THAT THERE HAVE BEEN CRITICAL DEFICIENCIES IN ITS ADMINISTRATION
WHICH CALL FOR IMMEDIATE CORREC'l,ION. AMONG THEM :
1
-.:.F~OERAL AGEN€IRS _HAVE !110T BEEN :.SUF,FICIENTLY RESPONSIVE ·
. TO LOCAL PROPOSALS REFLECTING SPECIFIC LOCAL CONDITIONS .
=~IN DEVELOPING THEIR PROPOSALS, LOCAL AUTHORITIES HAVE
BEEN HINDERED BY UNCERTAINTY AS TO THE AMOUNTS OF FUNDS
THAT WOULD BE AVAILABLE FROM THE FEDERAL DEPARTMEN'l'S .
·--FEW EFFECTIVE ATTEMPTS HAVE BEEN MADE TO SECURE i ' tlE
INVOLVEMENT OF STATE GOVERNMENTS.
--FEDERAL GUIDELINES HAVE FORCED CITIES TO SET "MODEL
NEIGHBORHOOD" BOUNDARIES THAT OFTEN HAVE BEEN ARBITRARY,
AND THAT HAVE CREATED UNNECESSARY DIVISIONS AMONG MODEL
.CITIES .RESIDENTS.
.
THE PRESIDENT HAS APPROVED THE RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE URBAN AFFAIRS
COUNCIL THAT THE MODEL CITIES PROGRAM BE REVISED IN THE FOLLOWING
IMPORTANT RESPECTS:
·l .
THE COUNCIL FOR URBAN AFFAIRS WILL ASSUME DIRECT RESPONSIBILITY
FOR INTER-DRPARTMENTAL POLICY AFFECTING MODEL CITIES.
2. , SECRETARIES OF THE DEPARTMENTS INVOLVED WILL HAVE PERSONAL
, ··
-. SUPERVISION OF THEIR DEPARTMENTS I FUNDING OF MODEL CITr ES .
PROPOSALS, AND WILL RESERVE PROGRAM FUNDS SPECIFICALLY FOR
THAT PURPOSE. THIS WILL ENSURE THE AVAILABILITY OF DEPART-,
MENTAL FUNDS FOR MODEL CITIES, AND WILL GIVE LOCAL AUTHORITIES
A BETTER IDEA OF THE . AMOUNT AND KIND OF FUNDS THEY CAN EXPECT
FROM THE VARIOUS DEPARTMENTS FOR TH.EC R MODEL CITIES PLANS.
�PAGE TWO RUEVDFH0006 1182004
3. , ADMINISTRA'I'[ON OF THE PROGRAM WILL BE E'ED I1>.7TO THE REORGANIZA""."
\ TION OF THE REGIONA.L FEDEP~JH., OFF.I CBS, NOW UNDERWAY. ONE EFFECT
\OF THIS WILL BE TO FACILITATE IN'l1 ER-DEPART!vIBNTAL COORDINATION
AT
THE REGIONAL LEVEL. IN THE PAS.T, VARIATIONS AMO:NG THE
I
FEDERAL OFFICES IN PROGRll..M PROCEDURES, HEADQUAJ~TERS LOCATIONS,
AND STRUCTURES OF AUTHORITY, HAVE HA.i.~DICAPPED WELL.=.INTENTIONED
FEDERAL OF'FICIALS AND CONFUSED L0<2AL OFFICIP-J.iS, THUS SERIOUSLY
COMPROMISING THE MODEL CITIES PROGRAM AT THE CITY LEVEL.
-1.
GREATER EFFORTS WILL BE MADE TO INVOLVE THE STATE GOVERNfv!EUT S
IN THE MODEL CITIES PROGRAM. LACKCOF STATE INVOLVEMENT HAS
PROVEN A CRITICAL DEFICIENCY BECAUSE M.l\NY OF THE FEDERAL FUNDS
NEEDED FOR MODEL CITIES ARE ADMINISTERED THROUGH STATE
..
AGENC!EG
OUR AIM WILL NOT BE TO ADD .Al-:rOTHER ADMINISTRATIVE"
LAYER. BETWEEN THE CITIES AND THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT, BUT TO
PAT<E B.E~TER USE OF THE STATES I RESOURCES, EXPERifil.TCE AND PE.RSPEC_::
TIVE~ . !,!ODEL CITIES IS INTENDED TO BE AND WILL REMAIN A LOCAL
GOVERNMEN'l' PROGRAM CENTERED UPON THE MAYOR ' S OFFICE WITH A
. CONTINUED REQUIREME~"'T FOR ADEQUATE CI TI.ZEN INVOLVEMENT.
o
THE 10%' POPUL.i\'I'ION RESTRICTION ON THE SIZE OF THE TARGET
NEIGHBORHOODS "WILL BE DROPPED.
THIS GUIDELINE HAS BEEN
~:,;,'-.~:ADMINISTERED HAPHA.Z.ARDLY IN THE PAST AND HAS _HINDERED PROGRESS
AT THE LOCAL LEVEL. ELIMINATING THIS GUIDELINE DOES NOT MEAN
THAT THE PROGRAM WILL BE EXPANDED CITYWIDE WITHIN EACH CITY.
5.
ITS PURPOSE WILL REMAIN THAT OF FOCUSING RESOURCES ON PARTICULARLY POOR AND BLIGHTED NEIGHBORHOODS, BUT LOCAL OFFICIALS WILL
BE GIVEN GREATER LA'I'ITUDE IN DRAWING PROGRAM BOUl\TDARIES THAT
CONFORM TO LOCAL CONDITIONS.
\
I
6.
PRIORITY CONSIDERATION WILL BE GIVEN TO THOSE CITIES THAT
SUCCESSFULLY ENLIST THE PARTICIPATION OF PRIVATE AND VOLUNTARY
ORGANIZATIONS IN THEIR MODEL CITIES PLANS. THE INCREASED
FLEXIBILITY IN ESTABLISHING PROGRAM BOUNDARIES WILL MAKE IT
EASIER FOR THESE ORGANIZATIONS TO C©NTRIBUTE.
7.
LOCAL GOVERNMENTS WILL BE ASKED TO ESTABLISH CLEAR PRIORITIES
IN DEVELOPING THEIR MODEL CITIES PROPOSALS, AND TO STRIVE FOR
"COMPREHENSIVENESS" ONLY IN THE PROGRAMS' FIVE-YEAR PLANNING
CYCLE. MANY CITIES HAVE INTERPRE'rED MODEL CITIES LEGISLATION
AND ADMINISTRATIVE GUIDELINES REQUIRING A. LOCAL "COMPREHENSIVE"
PLAN OF ATTACK ON BLIGHT AND POVERTY IN THEIR TARGET NEIGHBOR~
HOOD AS REQUIRING PROPOSALS TO I.MM.EDV.TELY ATTACK EVERY CONCEIVABLE PROBLEM WITE-1IN THESE NEIGfillORI-IOODS. ·'I'!-I:tS OBVIOUSLY
WOULD BE UNWORKABLE: WHAT IS IMPORTA1fl IS THAT CITY GOVERNMENTS SET CLEP-..R PRIORITIES FOR ATTACKING THEIR PROBLEMS SO-THAT
THEY CAN MAKE RAPID AND SUBSTANTIAL PROGRESS TOWARD SOLVING
THEIR MOST URG~'NT RATHER THAN DISSIPATING THEIR RESOURCES IN
A VAIN EFFORT TO SOLVE ALL. THIS ADMINSTRATION WILL COMPLETELY
SCRUTINIZE APPLI CA'I'IONS TO ELIMINATE UNWISE OR UNNECESSARY
PROPOSALSo
J
1
�PAGE THREE
RUEVDFR0006 118200
WITH THESE REVISIONS, I FEEL THAT THE MODEL CI TIES PROGR&~ CAN HELP
US ·To ACHIEVE TWO IM.PORT.l-\NT GO.A.LS--A MORE RATIONAL AND CREATIVE
FEDERAL-STATE-·LOCAL SYSTEM , AND CITY GOVERNMENTS THAT ARE MORE
FDEXIBLE AND RESPONSIVE TO THE NEEDS OF THEIR CI TIZENS • . WE MUST
REALI ZE THAT ELIMINI-iTION OF BLIGH'I' AND POVERTY IN OUR CENTRAL
CITIES CANNO'I BE ACCOMPLISHED OVERNIGHT. IT WILL BE A HARD AND
OFTEN FRUSTRATING STRUGGLE, BUT MODEL 9ITIES DOES OFFER US THE
MEANS OF BETTER USI NG OUR PRESENT RESOURCESP AND Th--US TAKING
1
AN IMPORTAN'I' S'1.'EP IN 'J~HAT DIRECTION. " .
NNNN
121126 EVDAA.
..





I
\
\
\
�X
021126 EVDAA
202724 13013 MSCDV310370
RAAUIJHZ RUEVDFH0006 1182004-trlJUU--RUEVDAA.
FM GEORGE CREEL DIR OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS DHUD WASH DC/HHFA/
TO RUEVDDAA/1/ REGL ADM.IN DHUD ATLANTA GA ATTN: SPECIAL ASST FOR
· : . ..:;PUBLIC AFFAIRS & ARA'S FOR MODEL CITIES
BT
THE FOLLOWING STATEMENT WAS ISSUED BY SECRETARY ROMNEY TO NEWS
MEDIA AT 4:00 PM APRIL 28. ASSISTANT SECRETARY HYDE WILL BE
TELEPHONING EACH OF THE REGIONAL _ADMINISTRATORS TO DISCUSS
THE IMPLICA'I IONS OF THIS STATEMENT WITHIN rr1HE NEXT FEW DAYS.
--
1

II
SECRETARY ROMNEY I s STATEYJ.ENT ON MODEL CITIES II
- THE MODEL CITIES PROGRAM IS AN AMBITI OUS EFFORT. IT SEEKS _TO .
COORDINAT·.B A VAST ARRAY OF FEDERAL PROGRAMS , TO CONCENTRATE THEIR
IMPACT ON SPECI FIC DEPRESSED URBAlq NEIGHBORHOODS, AND TO MAKE LOCAL
GOVERNMENTS STRONGER AND MORE FLEXIBLE. MY COMMITTEE . ON MODEL CI TIE$
OF THE COUNCIL FOR URBAN AFFAIRS HAS BEEN IN'I'ENSIVELY EXAM:tNING THE
PROGRAM. . ITS S'!'UDY . HAS SHOWN THAT THE PROGRAM'S GOALS ARE SOUND,
BUT THAT THERE HAVE BEEN CRITICAL DEFICI ENCIES IN ITS ADMINISTRATION
WHICH CALL FOR IMMEDIATE CORRECTION. AlvlONG _THEM:
AGEMCIE.9 . HAVE N0'F. BEEN ,_.StrF,FICIENTLY RESPONSIVE ·
. TO LOCAL PROPOSALS REFLECTING SPECIFIC LOCAL CONDITIONS.
-..:.FmOERiU,
=~IN DEVELOPING THEIR PROPO SALS , LOCAL AUTHORITIES HAVE
BEEN HINDERED BY UNCERTAINTY AS TO THE AMOUNTS OF FUNDS
THAT WOULD BE AVAILABLE FROM THE FEDERAL DEPARTMENTS .
l'
J
EFFECTIVE ATTEMPTS HAVE BEEN MADE TO SECURE THE
INVOLVEMENT OF STATE GOVERNMENTS.
·-~FEW
l
I
I
I
--FEDERAL GUIDELINES HAVE FORCED CITIES TO SET "MODEL
NEIGHBORHOOD" BOUNDARIES THAT OFTEN HAVE BEEN ARBITRARY,
AND T~T HAVE CREATED UNNECESSARY DIVISIONS AMONG MODEL
CITIES RESIDENTS.
i
THE PRESIDENT HAS APPROVED THE RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE URBAN AFFAIRS
COUNCIL THAT THE MODEL CITIES PROGRAM BE REVISED IN THE FOLLOWING
IMPORTANT RESPECTS:
-1.
THE COUNCIL FOR URBAN AFFAIRS WILL ASSUME DIRECT RESPONSIBILITY
FOR INTER-DSPARTMENTAL POLICY AFFECTING MODEL CITIES .
2. , SECRETARIES OF THE DEPARTMENTS INVOLVED WILL HAVE PERSONAL
·, SUPERVISION OF THEIR DEPARTMENTS ' FUNDING OF MODEL CITC ES .
PROPOSALS, AND WILL RESERVE PROGRAM FUNDS SPECIFICALLY FOR
THAT PURPOSE. THIS WILL ENSURE THE AVAILABILITY OF DEPART-I
MENTAL FUNDS FOR MODEL CITIES, AND WILL GIVE LOCAL AUTHORITIES
A BETTER IDEA OF THE . AMOUNT AND KIND OF FUNDS THEY CAN EXPECT
FROM THE VARIOUS DEPARTMENTS FOR THEt R MODEL CITIES PLANS .
�1
·
I
'
PAGE TWO RUEVDFH0006 1182004
3 . -, ADlfJ.INI STRAT:OON OF THE PROGRAM. vvILL BE FED IN"F.O THE REORGANIZA""."'
-\ TION OF THE REGIONAL FEDEP~L OFF.ICES, NOW UNDERWAY.
ONE Ec'FECT
,OF THIS WILL BE TO FACILI'I1l1.TE IN'I'ER- DEPARTMENTAL COORDINATION
AT TffE REGIONAL LBVEL. IN THE PAST, VARIATIONS AMONG rrlE
FEDERAL OFFICES IN PROGRAM PROCEDURES, HEADQUARTERS LOCATIONS,
AND STRUCTURES OF AUTHORITY, HP..VE HZ-\NDICAPPED WELL~INTENTIONED
FEDERAL OJJ'FICIALS AND CONF USED LOGAL OFFICIALS, THUS SERIOUSLY
COMPROM..1SING THE MODEL CITIES PROGRAM AT THE CITY LEVEL.
I
I
~.
GREATER EFFORTS 'WILL BE Ml>J)E TO INVOLVE THE STATE GOVERNMEN'l.1S
IN THE MODEL CITIES PROGRAM. LACKOOF STATE INVOLVEMENT HAS
PROVEN A CRITICAL DEFICIENCY BECAUSE ~.AN"'Y OF THE FEDERAL FUNDS
NEEDED FOR MODEL CITIES l~RE AD.MINISTERED THROUGH STATE
__
AGENCI ES. OUR AIM WILL NOT BE '!:J F..DD ANOTHER ADMINISTRATIVE LAYER BETWEEN THE CITIES AND THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT, BUT TO
MA..l(E BETTER USE OF THE S':PATES 'RB SOURCES , K-CPERIENCE AND PE..~ SPEC.::_
TIVE~ MODEL CITIES IS INTENDED TO BE AND WILL REMAIN A LOCAL
GOVERNMENT PROGRAM CENTERED UPON THE MAYOR'S OFFICE WITH A
- CONTINUED REQUIREMEN'l1 FOR ADEQUl-\TE CI'.J:lI-ZE'N INVOLVEMENT.
5.
THE 10%' POPULA'I'IOliT RES~iRICTION ON THE SIZE OF THE TARGET
NEIGHBORHOODS WILL BE DROPPED. THIS GUIDELINE HAS BEEN
>..:,, ~1.ADMIN'.i STERED HAPH..1\ZARDLY IN •rHE PAST AND HAS HINDERED PROGRESS
AT THE LOCAL LEVEL.
ELIMINATING THIS GUIDELINE DOES NOT MEAN
THAT THE PROGRAM WILL BE EXPANDED CITYWIDE WITHIN EACH CITY.
ITS PURPOSE WILL RE~JAIN THAT OF FOCUSING RESOURCES ON PARTICULARLY POOR Af..1]) BLIGHTED NEIGHBORHOODS, BUT LOCAL OFFICIALS WILL
BE GIVEN GREATER LATITUDE IN DRAWING PROGRAM BOUNDARIES THAT _
CONFORM TO LOC...\L CONDITIONS.
)
6.
PRIORI TY CONSIDERATION WILL BE GIVEN TO THOSE CITIES THAT
SUCCESSFULLY ENLIST THE PARTICIPATION OF PRIVATE AND VOLUNTARY
ORGANIZATIONS IN THEIR MODEL CITIES PLANS. THE INCREASED
FLEXIBILITY IN ESTABLISHING PROGRAM BOUNDARIES WILL MAKE IT
EASIER FOR THESE ORGANIZATIONS TO CIDNTRIBUTE.
7.
LOCAL GOVERNMENTS WILL BE ASKED TO ESTABLISH CLEAR PRIORITIES
IN DEVELOPING THEIR MODEL CITIES PROPOSALS, AND TO STRIVE FOR
"COMPREHENSIVENESS" ONLY IN THE PROGRAMS' FIVE-YEAR PLANNING
CYCLE. MANY CITIES HAVE INTERPRETED MODEL CITIES LEGISLA'rION
AND ADMINI STRA.TIVE GUIDELINES REQUIRDTG A- LOCAL "COMPREHENSIVE 11
PLAN OF ATTACK ON BLIGHT A.i."'ID POVERTY IN THEIR TARGET NEIGHBOR~
HOOD AS REQUIRING PROPOSALS TO IMMEDIATELY ATTACK EVERY CONCEIVABLE PROBLEM WITHI!!-1 THESE NEf.GfiBo:a._-qooDS. ·ffii:S OBVIOUSLY.
WOULD BE UNWORKABLE : WHA'.r IS IMPORTAN1 IS THAT CITY GOVERNMENTS SET CLEP-.R PRIORITIES FOR ATTACKING THEIR PROBLEMS SO THAT
THEY CAN MAKE RAPID li.ND SUBSTANTIAL PROGRESS TOWARD SOLVING
THEIR MOST URGENT RATHER THAN DISSIPATING THEIR RESOURCES IN
A VAIN EFFORT TO SOLVE ALL. THIS ADMINSTRATION WILL COMPLETELY
SCRUTitrlZE APPLICA'I'I ONS TO ELIMINATE UNWISE OR UNNECESSARY
f
1
PROPOS ALSo
�PAGE 11-IREE
RUEVDFH00 06 118200
WITH THESE REVISION S, I FEEL TEAT THE MODEL CITIES PROGRAM C~~ HELP
US ·rro ACHIEVE TWO IMPORT1--L"f\J"T GOALS- -A MORE RATI ONAL AND CREATIVE
FEDERAL-S'I'ATE-LOCAL SYSTE:ivl, AND C ITY GOVERNlfillNTS THAT ARE MORE
F DEXIBLE AND RESPONSIVE T O THE NEEDS OF THEIR CI'I1IZENS. . WE .MUST
REALIZE THAT ELIMINATI ON OF BLIGH'l' AND POVERTY IN OUR CENTRAL
CITIES Cl-\.NNO'I' BE ACCOMPLISHED OVERNIGHT.
IT WILL BE A HA.RD AND
Olc"'TEN FRUS'I'RATING STRUGGLE, BUT MODEL CITI ES DOES OFFER US THE
ME.ANS OF BET'I'ER USING OUR PRESENT RESOURCES t- AND THUS TAKING
AN IMPORTAN'l' STEP IN 'I'.HAT DIREC'J.1I ON. " .
NNNN
1211 26 EVDAA
,
i
\
I
\
\
\
\
�~
021126 EVDAA
· 202724 13013 MSCDV:316370
RMUIJHZ RUEVDFH0006 1182004-UUUU- - RUEVDAA.
FM GEORGE CREEL DIR OF PU".!3LIC AFFAIRS DHUD WASH DC/HHFA/
TO RUEVDDAA/1/ REGL ADMIN DRUD ATLANTA GA ATTN: SPECIAL ASST FOR
· : .:..:·.PUBLIC AFFAIRS & ARA' S FOR MODEL CITIES
BT
T"tlE FOLLOWING STATEMENT WAS ISSUED BY SECRETARY ROMNEY TO NEWS
MEDIA AT 4:00 PM APRI L 28. ASSI STANT SECRETARY RYDE WILL BE
TELEPHONING EACH OF THE REGI ONAL }IDMINISTRATORS TO DISCUSS
THE IMPLICATIONS OF T HI S STATEME~"T w-:CTHIN THE NEXT FEW DAYS.

11
SECRETARY ROMNEY ' S ST.A'.i:F.MENT ON MODEL CITIES i,
. - THE MODEL CITIES PROGRAM IS ~.N AMBIT IOUS EFFORT . IT SEEKS TO .
COORDINATE A VAST ARRAY OF FEDERAL PROGRAMS, TO CONCEi~RATE THEIR
I MPACT ON SPECIFIC DEPRESSED URBhl~ NEIGHBORHOODS, AND TO MAI<E W C..l\L
GOVERNMENTS STRONGER AND MORE FLEXI BLE v MY COMMI TTEE ON MODEL CITIES
OF THE COUNCIL FOR URBAN AFFAI RS HAS BEEN I NTENSIVELY EXAMI NING· THE
PROGRAM. ITS STUDY .HAS SHOWN THA.T THE PROGRAM'S GOALS ARE SOUND .
BUT THAT THERE HAVE BEEN CRITICAL DEFICIENCIES IN ITS ADMINISTRZ\.TION
WHI CH CALL FOR I MMEDI ATE CORRECTION. AMONG THEM :
-..:.F~ERAL AGENCIES. HAVE
J!-10'1'. BEEN :..S~FICIENTLY RESPONSI VE ·
. TO LOCAL PROPOSALS REFLECTING SPECIFIC LOCAL CONDITIONS.
=~IN DEVELOPING THEIR PROPOSALS, LOCAL AUTHORITIES HAVE
BEEN HI NDERED BY UNCERTAINTY AS TO THE AMOUNTS OF FUNDS
THAT WOULD BE AVAILABLE FROM THE FEDERAL DEPARTMENTS.
·--FEW EFFECTIVE ATTEMPTS HAVE BEEN MADE TO SECURE THE
INVOLVEMENT OF STATE GOVERNMENTS.
--FEDERAL GUIDELI NES HAVE FORCED CITIES TO SET "MODEL
NEI GHBORHOOD" BOUNDARI ES THAT OFTEN HAVE BEEN ARBITRARY,
AND TI~T HAVE CREATED UNNECESSARY DI VI SIONS AMONG MODEL
CI TIES RESI DENTS.
THE PRESIDENT HAS APPROVED THE RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE URBAN AFFAI RS
COUNCIL THAT THE MODEL CITIES PROGRAM BE REVISED IN THE FOLLOWING
IMPORTANT RESPECTS :
THE COUNCIL FOR URBAN AFFAIRS WILL ASSUME DIRECT RESPONSIBILITY
FOR INTER-D~PARTMENTAL POLICY AFFECTING MODEL CITIES.
l.
2 • ._ SECRETARIES OF THE DEPART~NTS INVOLVED WILL HAVE PERSONA!i
<" ··


.t-··



.
SUPERVISI ON OF THEIR DEPARTMENTS' FUNDING OF MODEL CITI ES
PROPOSALS, AND WILL RESERVE PROGRAM FUNDS SPECIFI CALLY FOR
THAT PURPO SE . THIS WI LL ENSURE THE AVAILABILI TY OF DEPART- I
MENTAL FUNDS FOR MODEL CI TIES, AND WILL GIVE LOCAL AUTHORITIES
A BETTER I DEA OF THE . AMOUNT AND KIND OF FUNDS THEY CAN EXPECT
F ROM THE VARIOUS DEPARTMENTS FOR THEIR MODEL CITIES PLANS.
�PAGE '!'WO RUEVDFI-!0006 1182004
3. ·, ADM_-CNI STRA'I';I;ON OF THE PROGRAM vvI LL BE F ED I b1TO THE REORGANI ZA\ TION OF T:S:E REGIONAL F EDEP0L OFF.ICES, NOW UND ERWAY. ONE EFFECT
\OF THIS WILL BE TO FACI LI'I'ATE I l>i-n:L'ER- DEPARTI'f.LENTAL COORDINATI ON
AT
THE REG I ONAL LEVEL.
IN THE PAST, VARI ATIONS AMONG THE
I
FEDERAL OFFICES IN PROGRAM PROCEDURE S, HFADQUARTERS LOCATI ONS,
STRUCTURES OF AUTHORITY, rV~VE HA.t.'IDICAPPED WELL~INTENT I ONED
FEDERAL OF'FI CIALS AND CONFUSED LOGAL OFFIC I ALS, THUS SERIOUSLY
COMPROM..t SING THE MODEL CITIES PROGRAM AT THE CITY LEVEL.
A1ifD
~.
GRENL'ER EFFORTS WILL BE .MADE TO INVOLVE THE STATE GOVERNMENT S
IN THE MODEL CI'l'IES PROGRAM .
LACKOOF STATE INVOL,lEM&!-rr HAS
PROVEN A CRITICAL DEFICIENCY BECAUSE MANY OF THE FEDERAL FUNDS
NEEDED FOR MODEL CIT I ES ARE ADMINISTERED THROUGH STATE
..
AGENCIES.
OUR AIM· WILL NOT BE TO ADD Ai~OTHER ADr-1INISTRiJ..'T.iVr~
LAYER BETWEEN 11HE CITIES AND THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT, BUT TO
MAKE BETTER USE OF THE STATES'RESOURCES, EXPERI ENCE AND PERSPEC~
TIVE • . MODEL CITIES IS INTENDED TO BE AND WILL REMAIN A LOCAL
GOVERNMENT PROGRAM CENTERED UPON THE MAYOR'S OFFICE WITH A
. CONTINUED REQUIREMENT FOR ADEQUATE CITIZEN INVOLVEMENT.
5.
THE 10%' POPULA'f!ON' RES'r RICTION ON THE SIZE OF THE TARGET
NEIGHBORHOODS WILL BE DROPPED. THIS GUIDELI NE HAS BEEN
~:;,"~1.ADMINI STERED HAPHAZARDLY IN THE PAST AND HAS HINDERED PROGRESS
AT THE . LO.CAL LEVEL.
ELIMINATING THIS GUIDELINE DOES NOT MEAN
THAT THE PROGRAM WI LL BE EXPANDED CITYWIDE WI THIN EACH CI'rY.
ITS PURPOSE WILL REMAIN TF..AT OF FOCUSING RESOURCES ON PARTICULARLY POOR AND BLIGHTED NEIGHBORHOODS, BUT LOCAL OFFICIALS WILL
BE GIVEN GREATER LATITUDE IN DRAWING PROGRAM BOUNDARI E S THAT .
CONFORM TO LOCAL CONDI TIONS.
1
I
6.
PRIORI TY CONSIDERATION WILL BE GIVEN TO THOSE CITIES '!'=!AT
SUCCESSFULLY ENLIST THE PARTICIPATION OF PRI VA~E AND VOLUNTARY
ORGANI ZATIONS IN THEIR MODEL CITIES PLANS. THE INCREASED
FLEXIBILITY IN ESTABLISHING PROGRAM BOUNDARIES WILL MAKE IT
EASIER FOR THESE ORGANIZATIONS TO CIDNTRIBUTE.
7.
LOCAL GOVERNMENTS WILL BE ASKED TO ESTABLISH CLEAR PRIORI TIES
IN DEVELOPING THEIR MODEL CITIES PROPOSALS, AND TO STRIVE FOR
"COMPREHENSIVENESS" ONLY IN THE PROGRAMS' FIVE-YEAR PLANNING
CYCLE. MANY CITIES HAVE INTERPRETED MODEL CITI ES LEGI SLATION
AND ADMINI STRATIVE GUIDELINES REQUI RING A. LOCAL "COMPREHENSI VE"
PLAN OF ATTACK ON BLI GHT AL~
POVERTY I N THEIR TARGET NEI GHBORHOOD AS REQUIRI NG PROPO SALS TO I MMEDIATELY ATTACK EVb"'RY CON- · -
~
CEIVAB LE PROBLEM WITHI!!-1 'l'HESE NEIGHBORHOODS.
ffi!S OBVIOUSLY
WOULD BE UNWORKABLE : 1ilHAT I S I MPORTAN1l1 I S THAT CI TY GOVERNMENrS SET CLEli-4~ PRIORITIES FOR ATTACKING THEIR PROBLEMS SO THAT
THEY CAN MAKE RAPI D l illD SUBSTANTIAL PROGRESS TOWARD SOLVING
THEIR MOST URGENT RATHER THAN DISSI PATING THEIR RE SOURCES I N
A VAIN EFFORT TO SOLVE ALL.
THIS ADMINS'rRATI ON WILL COMPLETELY
SCRUTINIZE APPLICA'I'IONS TO ELIMINATE UNWISE OR UNNECESSARY
PROPOSALS .
�PAGE THREE
RUEVDF"cl0006 118200
WITH THESE REVISIONS, I FEEL THA'I' THE MODEL CITIES PROGRAM CAN HELP
US ·To ACHIEVE TWO IMPORT.ANT GOALS--A MORE RATION2\L AND CREATIVE
FEDERAL-STATE-LOCAL SYSTEM, AND CITY GOVERNMENTS THAT ARE MORE
FLEXIBLE AND RESPONSIVE TO THE NEEDS OF 'rHEIR CI'I1IZENS . . WE MUST
REALIZE THAT ELIMINATI ON OF BLIGHT AND POVERTY IN OUR CENTRAL
CITIES CANNO'r BEACCO.MPLISHEDOVERNIGHT.
r.t1 WILL BE A HARD AND
OFTEN FRUSTRATING STRUGGLE, BUT MODEL QITIES DOES OFFER US THE
MEANS OF BE'l'TER USING OUR PRESEN'r RESOURCES~ AND THUS TAKING
AN IMPORTAN'I' STEP IN' 'l1 IIA'11 DIRECTION. " .
NNNN
121126 EVDAA
i
'\
\
\
�.l
X
021126 EVDAA
202724 13013 MSCDV31G3.70
RAAUIJHZ RUEVDFH0006 1182004~UUUU.--RUEVDAA.
FM GEORGE CREEL DIR OF PUBLI C AFFAIRS DHUD WASH DC/HHFA/
TO RUEVDDAA/1/ REGL ADMIN DHUD ATL.l\NTA-GA A~TN: SPECIAL ASST FOR
· · _.-·J?.TJBLIC AFFAIRS & ARA'S FOR MODEL CITIES
BT
THE FOLLOWING STATEJ.'iENT WAS ISSUED BY SECRETIL~Y ROMNEY TO NEWS
.trJ.EDIA AT 4:00 PM APRIL 28. ASSISTANT SECRETARY HYDE WILL BE
TELEPHONING EACH OF THE REGI ONAL _ADMINISTRATORS TO DISCUSS
THE IMPLICATIONS OF THI S STATEMENT WITHIN THE NEXT FEW DAYS.
· "SECRETARY .ROMNEY'S STP..TEM.ENT ON MODEL CITIESi'
· THE MODEL CITIES PROGRAM IS AN AMBITIOUS EFFORT. IT SEEKS TO .
COORDINATE A VAST ARRAY OF FEDERAL PROGRAMS, TO CONCE.i.~RATE THEIR
IMPACT ON SPECIFIC DEPRESSED URBAN NEIGHBORHOODS, AND TO l~~.$B LOCAL
GOVERNMENTS STRONGER AND MORE FLEXIBLE. l/fY COMMITTEE . ON MODEL CITIE$
OF THE COUNCIL FOR URBAN Jl.FFAIRS HAS BEEN IN'l1 ENSIVELY EXA..tvn;NING THE
PROGRAM. ITS STUDY.HAS SHOWN THAT THE PROGRAM 'S GOALS ARE SOUND ,
BUT THAT THERE HAVE BEEN CRITICAL DEFICIENCIES IN ITS ADMINISTRATION
WHICH CALL FOR IMMEDIATE CORRECTI ON. AMONG THEM :
-.:.F:JilDERAL AGE?~€IE.S. HAVE N0T BEEN ,.SUFFICIENTLY RESPONSIVE ·
. TO LOCAL PROPOSALS REFLECTING SPECIFIC LOCAL CONDITIONS.
==IN DEVELOPING THEIR PROPOSALS, LOCAL AUTHORITIES HAVE
BEEN HINDERED BY UNCERTAINTY AS TO THE AMOUNTS OF FUNDS
THAT WOULD BE AVAILABLE FROM TUE FEDERAL DEPARTMENTS .
·--FEW EFFECTIVE ATTEMPrS HAVE BEEN MADE 1I'O SECURE ~.rtlE
INVOLVEMENT OF STATE GOVERNMENTS.
--FEDERAL GUIDELINES HAVE FORCED CITIES TO SET "MODEL
NEIGHBORHOOD" BOUNDARIES THAT OFTEN HAVE BEEN ARBITRARY,
AND T~T HAVE CREATED UNNECESSARY DIVISIONS AMONG MODEL
CITIES RESIDENTS.
THE PRESIDENT HAS APPROVED THE RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE URBAN AFFAIRS
COUNCIL THAT THE MODEL CITIES PROGRAM BE REVISED IN THE FOLLOWING
IMPORTANT RESPECTS:
-1.
THE COUNCIL FOR URBAN AFFAIRS WILL ASSUME DIRECT RESPONSIBILITY
FOR INTER-DSPARTMENTAL POLICY AFFECTING MODEL CITIES.
2 • . SECRETARIES OF THE DEPARTMENTS INVOLVED WILL HAVE PERSONAL


-" ·· , ··


, SUPERVISION OF THEIR DEPARTMfill"'TS' FUNDING OF MODEL CI'lY ES .
PROPOSALS, AND WILL RESERVE PROGRAM FUNDS SPECIFICALLY FOR
THAT PURPOSE. THIS WILL ENSURE THE AVAILABILITY OF DEPART-I
MENTAL FUNDS FOR MODEL CITIES, AND WILL GIVE LOCAL AUTHORITIES
A BETTER IDEA OF THE . AMOUNT AND KIND OF FUNDS THEY CAN EXPECT
FROM THE VARI.OUS DEPARTMENTS FOR THEI R MODEL CITIES PLANS.
�PAGE TWO RUEVDFH0006 1182004
3.
ADMINISTRA'l 'lDON OF THE PROGRAM 'WILL BE FED I11TO THE REORGMU ZA--:-
'\TION OF THE REGIONAL FEDEP0,L OFFI CES, NOW UNDERWAY.
ONE EFFECT
\OF THIS WILL BE TO FACILI 'I'ATE I NTER-DEPARTMENTAL COORDINATION
~T THE REGIONAL LEVEL. IN THE PAST, VARIATIONS AMONG THE
FEDERAL OFFICES IN PROGRAM PROCEDURES, HEADQUARTERS LOCATIONS,
AND STRUCTURES OF AUTHORITY, H~.VE HAl~DICAPPED WELL~INTENTIONED
FEDERAL OFFICIALS AND CONFUSED LOGAL OFFICIALS, THUS SERIOUSLY
COMPROMISING THE MODEL CITIES PROGRAM AT THE CITY LEVEL.
I
GREATER EFFORTS WILL BE MZ\DE TO INVOLVE THE STATE GOVERNMENT S
IN THE MODEL CITIES PROGP..AM . LACKOOF STATE INVOLVEMENT HAS
PROVEN A CRI'I'ICAL DEFICIENCY BECAUSE MANY OF THE FEDERAL FUNDS
NEEDED FOR MODEL CI'I' I ES A.'l:'?.E ADMINISTERED THROUGH STATE
..
AGENCIES. OUR AIM WILL NOT BE 'I 0 ADD Ai'10 THER ADM.I.NI STRATIVE
LAYER BETWEEN THE CITIES AND THE FEDERAL GOVERNI".i.ENT, BUT TO
l'I.AKE .BETTER USE OF THE STATES 1 RESOURCES, EXPERI ENCE AND PERS PEC,::
'I'IVJJ: • . tmDEL CITIES IS INTENDED TO BE AND WILL REMAIN A LOCAL
GOVERNMEl\f'i' PROGRAM CEN'l.'ERED UPON THE .MAYOR I S OFFICE WI'l'H A
. CONTINUED REQUIREMENT FOR ADEQUATE CI TI.ZEN INVOLVEMENT.
1
5.
THE 10%: POPULA'I1ION RESTRICTION ON THE SIZE OF THE TARGET
NEIGHBORHOODS WILL BE DROPPED. THIS GUIDELINE HAS BEEN
~-_;, "\:.ADMINISTERED HAPHAZARDLY IN rrHE PAST AND HAS HINDERED PROGRESS
AT THE . LOCAL LEVEL.
ELIMINATING THIS GUIDELINE DOES NOT MEAN
THAT THE PROGRAM WILL BE EXPANDED CITYWIDE WITHIN EACH CITY.
ITS PURPOSE WILL REMAIN THAT OF FOCUSING RESOURCES ON PARTICULARLY POOR AND BLIGHTED NEIGHBORHOODS, BUT LOCAL OFFICIALS WILL
BE GIVEN GREATER LATITUDE IN DRAWING PROGRAM BOUNDARIES THAT
CONFORM TO LOCAL CONDITIONS.
\
6.
PRI0PITY CONSIDERATION WILL BE GIVEN TO THOSE CITIES THAT
SUCCESSFULLY ENLIST THE PARTICIPATION OF PRIVA'EE AND VOLUNTARY
ORGANIZATIONS IN THEIR MODEL CITIES PLANS. THE INCREASED
FLEXIBILITY IN ESTABLISHING PROGRAM BOUNDARIES WILL MAKE IT
EASIER FOR THESE ORGANIZATIONS TO CIDNTRIBUTE.
7.
LOCAL GOVERNMENTS WILL BE ASKED TO ESTABLISH CLEAR PRIORITIES
IN DEVELOPING THEIR MODEL CITIES PROPOSALS, AND TO STRIVE FOR
"COMPREHENSIVENESS" ONLY IN THE PROGRAMS' FIVE-YEAR PLANNING
CYCLE.
MANY CITIES HAVE INTERPRETED MODEL CITIES LEGISLATION
AND ADMINISTRATIVE GUIDELINES REQUI RrNG A- LOCAL "COMPREHENSIVE"
PLAN OF ATTACK ON BLIGHT AND POVERTY IN THEIR TARGET NEIGHBORHOOD AS REQUIRING PROPOSALS TO I M!.JJ.EDI ATELY ATTACK EVERY CON- -CEIVABLE PROBLEM WITi-II!!-i THESE NEI GHBORI-IOODS . 'I1I:i:S OBVI OUSLY
WOULD BE UNWORKABLE : WHAT IS IMPORTAN11 IS THAT CI TY GOVERNMENrS SET CLEll..R PRI ORI TIES FOR ATTACKI NG THEIR PROBLEMS SO-THAT
THEY CAN MAKE RAPI D AND SUBSTANTIAL PROGRESS TOWARD SOLVING
THEIR MOST URGENT RATHER THAN DI SSI PATING THEIR RESOURCES IN
A VAIN EFFORT TO SOLVE ALL. THI S ADMINSTRATION WILL COMPLETELY
SCRUTINIZE APPLICA'I1I ONS TO ELI MINATE UNWISE OR UNNECESSARY
f
PROPOSALS o
�PAGE THREE
RUEVDFH0006 118200
WITH THESE REVISIONS , I FEEL THAT
THE MODEL · CITIE S PROGRAM CAN HELP
US ·To ACHIEVE TWO IMPORTANT GOALS--A MORE RZ~TIONAL AND CREA.TIVE
FEDERAL-STATE-·LOCAL SYS'l'Ei."1, AND CITY GOVERNMENT S THA'r ARE MORE
FDEXIBLE AND RESPONSIVE TO THE NEEDS OF THEIR CITIZENS • . WE MUST
REALIZE THAT ELIMINATION OF BLIGHT AND POVERTY IN OUR CENTRAL
CITIES Cl1..NNO'I! BE ACCOMPLISHED OVERNIGHT. IT WILL BE A HARD AND
OFTEN FRUSTfil\.TI NG STRUGGLE, BUT MODEL CITIES DOES OFFER US THE
lli.EJ.\..NS OF BETTER USING OUR PRESENT RESOURCES,, Al\1'1) THUS TAKING
AN IMPORTAN'I' STEP IN 'fi-IAT DIRECTION.
11
NNNN
121126 E\"'DAA
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021126 EVDA./\
202724 13013 MSCDV316370
RAAU!JUZ RUEVDE'H0006 1182004-UUUU- -RUEVDJ\..A.
FM GEORGE CREEL DIR OF PUBLIC AF'FAIRS DRUD WASH DC/HHFA/
TO RUEVDDAA/1/ REGL ADMIN DHUD ATLANTA GA ATTN: SPECIAL ASST FOR
· · •...:·PUBLIC AFFAIRS & ARA'S FOR MODEL CITIES
BT
THE FOLLOWING S'1.1ATIDI..ENT WAS ISSUED BY SECRETARY ROl'-1:tifEY TO Nt..WS
MEDIA AT 4 :00 PM APRIL 28.
ASSIS'fi\NT SECRETARY HYDE WILL BE
TELEPHONING EACH OF THE REGIONAL J\DMINISTR..~TORS TO DISCUSS
THE IMPLICATIONS OF THIS STATEMENT WITHIN THE NEXT FEW DAYS.
·
"SECRETARY ROMNEY I S STATEYJ.El\fT ON MODEL CITIES i,
CITIES PROGRAM IS AN AM.BITIOUS EFFORT. IT SEEKS _TO .
COORDINATF. A VAST ARRAY OF FEDERAL PROGRAMS, TO CONCENTRATE THEIR
IMPACT ON SPECIFIC DEPRESSED URBAN DTEIGHBORHOODS, 1'..ND TO MAKE LOCAL
GOVERNMENTS STRONGER AND l• ORE FLEXIB.lf:,E.
l-'I':l COMMITTEE . ON MODEL CITIES
OF THE COUNCIL FOR URBAN AFFAIRS HAS BEEN INTENSIVELY EXA.MJ;NING · THE
PROGRAM. ITS STUDY.HAS SHOWN THAT THE PROGRAM'S GOALS ARE SOUND,
BUT THAT THERE HAVE BEEN CRITICAL DEFICIENCIES IN l:TS ADMINXSTRAT!ON
WHICH CALL FOR IMMEDIATE CORRECTION. AMONG _THEM:
. - THE MOD:(:;t,
_ ..;.FE_OERAL AGEMCIE.S . HAVE N0T.-.BEEN, StmFICIENTLY RESPONSIVE
. TO LOCAL PROPOSALS REFLECTING SPECIFIC LOCAL CONDITIONS.
==IN DEVELOPING THEIR PROPOSALS, LOCAL AUTHORITIES HAVE
BEEN
THAT
HINDERED BY UNCER_TAINTY AS TO THE AMOUNTS OF FUNDS
WOULD BE AVAILABLE FROM THE FEDERAL DEPARTMENTS.
·-~FEW EFFECTIVE ATTEMPTS HAVE BEEN MADE TO SECURE THE
INVOLVEMENT OF STATE GOVERNMENTS.
--FEDER.AL GUIDELINES HAVE FORCED CITIES TO SET "MODEL
NEIGHBORHOOD" BOUNDARIES THAT OFTEN HAVE BEEN ARBITRARY,
AND T~T HAVE CREATED UNNECESSARY DIVISIONS AMONG 1"DDEL
CITIES RESIDENTS.
THE PRESIDENT HAS APPROVED THE RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE URBAN AFFAIRS
COUNCIL THAT THE MODEL CITIES PROGRAM BE REVISED IN THE FOLLOWING
IMPORTANT RESPECTS:
·l.
THE COUNCIL FOR URBAN AFFAIRS WILL ASSUME DIRECT RESPONSIBILITY
FOR INTER-DePARTMENTAL POLICY AFFECTING MODEL CITIES.
2. , SECRETARIES OF THE DEPARTMENTS INVOLVED WILL HAVE PERSONAt
' SUPERVISI ON OF THEIR DEPARTMENTS I FUNDING OF MODEL CIT.c ES
~-·· ; ··
PROPOSALS, AND WILL RESERVE PROGRAM FUNDS SPECIFICALLY FOR
THAT PURPOSE.
THIS WILL ENSURE THE AVAILABILITY OF DEPART-1
MENTAL FUNDS FOR MODEL CITIES, AND WILL GIVE LOCAL AUTHORITi ES
A BETTER IDEA OF THE . AMOUNT AND KIND OF FUNDS THEY CAN EXPECT
FROM THE VARIOUS DEPARTMENTS FOR THE: R MODEL CI TIES PLANS .
,-.
�PAGE TWO RUEVDFH0006 1182004
3.
ADMI NISTRAT~ON OF THE PROGRAM WILL BE FED INTO THE REORGA.i.~IZA' TION OF THE REGI ONAL FEDEF0L OFF.ICES, NOW UNDERWAY. ONE E?FECT
\
,OF THIS WILL BE TO FACILI'I'A'rE IN'l'ER-DEPART.MENTAL COORDI NATION
AT Tl·lE REGIONAL LEVEL. IN THE PAST, VARIATIONS AMONG THE .
FEDERAL OFFICES IN PROGRF-~M PROCEDURES, HEADQUARTERS LOCATIONS,
Alm STRUCTURES OF AUTHORITY, r~~VE HAL~DICAPPED WELL=INTENTIONED
FEDERAL OF'FICIALS AND CONFUSED LOGAL OFFICIJ\.LS, THUS SERIOUSLY
COMPROMISING THE MODEL CITIES PROGRAM A'J..1 THE CITY LEVEL.
I
GREATER EFFORTS WILL BE !1ADE TO INVOLVE THE STATE GOVERNMENTS
IN THE MODEL CITIES PROGP..AMo LACKOOF STATE INVOLVEMENT HAS
PROVEl'i A CRITICAL DEFICIENCY BECAUSE MANY OF 'I'HE FEDERAL FUNDS
NEEDED FOR MODEL CI'l'IES A.i.'Q.E ADM.!NISTERED THROUGH S'l.,ATE
..
AGF..'NCIESo OUR AIM WILL NOT BE TO ADD Ai·mrrI--IER ADMINISTRATIVE
LAYER BETWEEN THE CITIES AND ~':HE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT, BUT TO
MAKE BETTER USE OF THE STATES 1 R~SOURCES, EXPERIENCE AND PER.SPEC=
'l1IVE. · MODEL CITIES IS INTENDBD r.1:10 BE AND WILL REMAIN A LOCAL
GOVERNMENT PROGRAM CJ,,JN""TERED UPON THE MAYOR ' S OFFICE WITH A
CONTINUED REQUIREMENT FOR ADEQUATE CI TI.ZEN INVOLVEMENT.
5.
THE 10%.' POPUL~TION RESTRICTION ON THE SIZE OF THE TARGET
NEIGHBORHOODS WILL BE DROPPED. THIS GUIDELINE HAS BEEN



' ;,"A;U\DMINISTERED HAPHAZARDLY IN THE PAST AND HAS HINDERED PROGRESS




AT THE LOCAL LEVEL. ELI!~INATING THIS GUIDELINE DOES NOT l..-IBAN
THAT THE PROGRAM WT.LL BE EXPANDED CITYWIDE WITHIN EACH CITY.
ITS PURPOSE WILL REMAIN THAT OF FOCUSING RESOURCES ON PARTICULARLY POOR AND BLIGHTED NEIGHBORHOODS, BUT LOCAL OFFICIALS WILL
BE GIVEN GREATER LATITUDE IN DRAWING PROGRAM BOUNDARIES THAT
CONFORM TO LOCAL CONDITIONS.
J
I
6.
PRIORITY CONSIDERATION v'l!LL BB GIVEN TO THOSE CITIES THAT
SUCCESSFULLY ENLIST THE PARTICIPATION OF PRIVA~ E AND VOLUNTARY
ORGANIZATIONS IN THEIR MODEL CITIES PLANS. THE INCREASED
FLEXIBILITY IN ESTABLISHING PROGRAM BOUNDARIES WILL MAl<E IT
EASIER FOR THESE ORGANIZATIONS TO CIDNTRIBUTE.
7.
LOCAL GOVERNMENTS WILL BE ASKED TO ESTABLISH CLEAR PRIORITIES
IN DEVELOPING THEIR MODEL CITIES PROPOSALS, AND TO STRIVE FOR
nCOMPREHF.NSIVENESS" ONLY IN THE PROGRAMS ' FIVE-YEAR PLANNING
CYCLE. MANY CITIES HAVE INTERPRETED MODEL CITIES LEGI SLATION
AND ADMINI STRATIVE GUIDELINES REQUIRING A" LOCAL "COMPREHENSIVE"
PLAN OF ATTACK ON BLIGHT&~ POVERTY IN THEIR TARGET NEIGHBOR~
HOOD AS REQUIRING PROPOSALS TO IMMEDIATELY ATTACK EVERY CONCEIVABLE PROBLEM'. WITHIN THESE NEI GHBORHOODS. 'THIS OBVIOUSLY
WOULD BE UNWORKABLE: WHJ-lT IS IMPORTAN'l.1 IS THAT CITY GOVERNMEN'l ' S SET CLEF-.R PRIORI TIES FOR ATTACKI NG THEI R PROBLEMS SO THAT
THEY CAN MAKE RAPID l\ND SUB STAbfrIAL PROGRESS TOWARD SOLVING
THEIR MOST URGENT RATHER THAN DISSIPATING THEIR RE SOURCES I N
A VAIN EFFORT TO SOLVE ALL. THIS ADMINSTRATION WI LL COMPLETELY
SCRUTINI ZE APPLICA'l'I ON'S TO ELIMINATE UNWISE OR UNNECESS ARY
f
PROPOSALS o
/
�PAGE THREE
RUEVDPH0006 118200
WITH THESE REVISIONS, I FEEL THAT
THE MODEL CITIES PROGRAM CAN HELP
US 'TO ACHIEVE T'v'lO IMPO~TANT GOALS--A MORE RATIONAL AND CREATIVE
FEDERAL-STATE-·LOCAL SYSTEM, AND CITY GOVERNMENTS TH.AT ARE MORE
FI,EXIBLE AND RESPONSIVE TO THE NEEDS OF THEIR CITIZENS. . WE .M.UST
REALIZE THAT ELIMINATION OF BLIGHT AND POVERTY IN OUR CENTRAL
CITIES C)l..N.NOT BE ACCOMPLISHED OVERNIGHT. IT WILL BE A HARD A1'i"<D
OFTEN FRUSTRATING STRUGGLE, BUT MODEL CITIES DOES OFFER US THE
.MEANS OF BETTER USING OUR PRESENT RESOURCESr AND THUS TAKING
AN IMPORTAN'l' SIJ.1 EP IN 'l'HAT DIRECTION. 11
NNNN
121126 EVDAA
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�FLETG~
T_HOMPSON
514 CANNON BUILDING
MEMBER OF CONGRESS
WASHINGTON, D . C.
RICHARD ASHWORTH
ADMINISTRATIVE AS SIST~ P.IT
5TH DISTRICT, GEORGIA
C!tongress of tbc Wnitcb ~tattj
327 OLD POST OFFICE, ATLJ.NTA
1!]ouse of l\epresentatibes
ma~fttgtott, 1)9. "·
May 1, 1969
Mr . Dan Sweat, Director
Governmental Lia i son
City Hall
Atlanta , Georgia 3 0 3 03
Dear Dan:
Enclosed is a copy of S ecretary Romney ' s statement
announcing changes in the Model Cities program.
I thought you ' d find this helpful .
Kindest personal regards.
Yours very truly,
FT/lh
Enc.
20,15
30303
�- - - --- 1...,
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WASHDNGYON D . C . 20 4 'i0
HUD No. 69-0321
Phone: (202) 755-7327
FOR IBMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday, April 28, 1969
SECRETARY ROMNEY'S STATEMENT ON MODEL CITIES
The Model Cities program is an ambitious effort.
It seeks to
coordinate a vast array of Federal programs, to concentrate their
impact on specific depressed urban neighborhoods, and to make local
governments stronger and more flexible.
My Committee on Model Cities of the Council for Urban Affairs
has been intensively examining the pr ogram.
Its study has shown
that the program's goals are sound, but that there have been critical
deficiencies in its administration which call for immediate correction.
Among them:
Federal agencies have not been suff iciently res ponsive
to local proposals reflecting specific local conditions,
In deve loping the i r proposals , l ocal authorities have
been hinder ed by uncerta i nty as to the amounts of f unds
tha t w uld be ava ila ble from the Federal departmen ts.
Few effective attempts have been made to secure the
involvement of State governmen ts.
-- · Federal guidelines have f orced cities t o set "model
neighborhood " boundaries that often have been arbitrary,
and that have created unnecessary divisions among Model
Cities residents.
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The President has approved the recommendations of the Urban
Affairs Council that the Model Cities program be revised in the
following important respects:
1,
The Council for Urban Affairs will assume direct responsibility for inter-departmental policy affecting Model Cities,
2,
Secretaries of the departments involved will have
personal supervision of their departments' funding
of Model Cities proposals, and will reserve program
funds specifically for that purpose.
This will
ensure the availability of departmental funds for
Model Cities, and will give local authorities a
better idea of the amount and kind of funds they can
expect from the various departments for their
Model Cities plans.
3.
Administration of the program will be fed into the
reorganization of the regional Federal offices,
now underway,
One effect of this will be to facili-
tate inter-departmental coordination at the regional
level,
In the past, variations among the Federal
offices in program procedures, headquarters locations,
and structures of authority, have handicapped wellintentioned Federal officials and confused local
officials, thus seriously compromising the Model Cities
. program at the city level.
4.
Greater efforts will be made to involve the State
governments in the Model Cities program,
Lack of


j,


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_ _ ____ _ _ _ __ _ __ ..___
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State inv_o lvement has proven a critical deficiency
because many of the Federal funds needed for Model
Cities are administered through State agencies.
Our
aim will not be to add another administrative layer
between the cities and the Federal Government, but to
make better use of the States' resources, experience
and perspective.
Model Cities is intended to be and
will remain a local government program centered upon
the Mayor's office with a continued requirement fo~
adequate citizen involvement.
5.
The 10% population restriction on the size of the target
neighborhoods will be dropped.
This guideline has been
administered haphazardly in the past and has hindered
progress at the local level.
Eliminating this guideline
does not mean that the program will be expanded citywide
within each city.
Its purpose will remain that of focusing
resources on particularly poor and blighted neighborhoods,
but local officials will be given greater latitude in
drawing program boundaries that conform to local conditions.
6.
Priority considera tion will be given to those cities tha t
successfully enlist the participation of private and
voluntary or ganizations in t heir Model Cities plans.
The
increased fl ex ibility in esta blishing pr ogr am boundaries
will make it easier for these organ i zations to contribute.
7.
- I,,;.
Local governments wil l be asked to establish clear
priorities in developing their Model Cities .proposals,
V
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4
and to strive for "comprehensiveness" only in the
programsi five-year planning cycle.
Many cities have
interpreted Model Cities legislation and administrative
guidelines requiring a local "comprehensive" plan of
attack on blight and poverty in their target neighborhoods as requiring proposals to immediately attack
every conceivable problem within these neighborhoods.
This obviously would be unworkable; what is important
is that city governments set clear priorities for
attacking their problems so that they can make rapid
and substantial progress toward solving their most
urgent, rather than dissipating their resources in a
vain effort to solve all.
This Administration will
completely scrutinize applications to eliminate unwise
or unnecessary proposals.
With these revisions, I feel that the Model Cities program can
help us to achieve two important goals -- a more rational and
creative Federal-State-local system, and city governments that are
more flexible and responsive to the needs of their citizens.
We
must realize that elimination of blight and poverty in our central
cities cannot be accomplished overnight.
It will be a hard and
often frustrating struggle, but Model Cities does offer us the means
of better using our present resources, and thus taking an important
step in that direction.
..,I
�DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT
MODEL CITIES ADMINISTRATION
WASHINGTON, D. C.
20410
IN REPLY REFER TO :
April 28, 1969
Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor of Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Mayor Allen:
I wanted to be sure you have a copy of Secretary Romney's
statement on the Model Cities program. With this strong
Presidential endorsement you can be assured of all possible
support to your efforts to improve the quality of life of
your disadvantaged citizens.
The program improvements endorsed by President Nixon
should make our joint efforts more effective. Representatives of our Reg ional Offices will be working with you
and your CDA staff to make sure that your city's program
takes full advantage of these new program approaches.
Sincerely,
Director
Enclosure
�DEPARTM ENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT
MODEL CITIES ADMINISTRATION
WASHINGTON, D. C. 20410
IN REPL Y REFER TO:
April 28, 1969
Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor of Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Mayor Allen:
I wanted to be sure you have a copy of Secretary Romney 's
statement on the Model Cities program. With this strong
Presidential endorsement you can be assured of all possible
support to your efforts to improve the quality of life of
your disadvantaged citizens.
The program improvements endorsed by President Nixon
should make our joint efforts more effective. Representatives of our Regional Offices will be working with you
and your CDA staff to make sure that your city's program
takes full advantage of these new program approaches .
Sincerely,
Walter G. Farr, Jr.
Director
Enclosure
�HUDNEWS
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING
AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT
WASHINGTON D.C . 20410
HUD No. 69-0321
Phone: (202) 755-7327
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday, April 28, 1969
SECRETARY ROMNEY'S STATEMENT ON MODEL CITIES
The Model Cities program is an ambitious effort.
It seeks to
coordinate a vast array of Federal programs, to concentrate their
impact on specific depressed urban neighborhoods, and to make local
governments stronger and more flexible.
My Committee on Model Cities of the Council for Urban Affairs
has been intensively examining the program .
Its study has shown
that the program's goals are sound , but that there have been critical
deficiencies in its administration which call for immediate correction.
Among them :
Federal agencies have not been sufficiently responsive
t o local proposals reflecting specific local conditions.
In developing their proposals , local authorities have
be en hi nder ed by uncertainty a s to t he amounts of f unds
tha t would be available from the Feder al d epar tments .
Few ef f ec tive a t tempts have been mad e to secur e the
involvement of Sta t e gov ernments .
Federal guidelines have forced cities t o se t "model
neighborhood" boundaries that often have been arbitrary,
and that have created unnecessary divisions among Model
Cit i e s r esidents.
�2
The President has approved the recommendations of the Urban
Affairs Council that the Model Cities program be revised in the
following important respects:
1.
The Council for Urban Affairs will assume direct responsibility for inter-departmental policy affecting Model Cities.
2.
Secretaries of the departments involved will have
personal supervision of their departments' funding
of Model Cities proposals, and will reserve program
funds specifically for that purpose.
This will
ensure the availability of departmental funds for
Model Cities, and will give local authorities a
better idea of the amount and kind of funds they can
expect from the various departments for their
Model Citie s plans.
3.
Adminis tration of the program will be fed into the
reorganization of the regional Federal offices,
now underway.
One effect of this will be to facili-
t a t e int er-departmenta l coor dination at the regiona l
level.
In t he past, varia tions among t he Federal
of f ices i n program pr ocedures, headquar t ers locations ,
and structures of authority , have handicapped wellintentioned Federal officials and confused local
officials, thus seriously compromising the Model Cities
program at the city level.
4.
Greater efforts will be made to involve the State
governments in the Model Cities program.
Lack of
�,~--~.
-
3
State involvement has proven a critical deficiency
because many of the Federal funds needed fqr Model
Cities are administered through State agencies.
Our
aim will not be to add another administrative layer
between the cities and the Federal Government, but to
make better use of the States' resources, experience
and perspective.
Model Cities is intended to be and
will remain a local government program centered upon
the Mayor's office with a continued requirement for
adequate citizen involvement.
5.
The 10% population restriction on the size of the target
neighborhoods will be dropped.
This guideline has been
administered haphazardly in the past and has hindered
progress at the local level.
Eliminating this guideline
does not mean that the program will be expanded citywide
within each city.
Its purpose will remain that of focusing
resources on particularly poor and blighted neighborhoods,
but local officials will be given greater latitude in
drawing program boundaries that conform to local conditions.
6.
Priority consideration will be given to those cities that
successfully enlist the participation of private and
voluntary organizations in their Model Cities plans.
The
increased flexibility in establishing program boundaries
will make it easier for these organizations to contribute.
7.
Local governments will be asked to establish clear
priorities in developing their Model Cities . proposals,
�4
and to strive for "comprehensiveness" only in the
programsi five-year planning cycle.
Many cities have
interpreted Model Cities legislation and administrative
guidelines requiring a local "comprehensive" plan of
attack on blight and poverty in their target neighborhoods as requiring proposals to immediately attack
every conceivable problem within these neighborhoods.
This obviously would be unworkable; what is important
is that city governments set clear priorities for
attacking their problems so that they can make rapid
and substantial progress toward solving their most
urgent, rather than dissipating their resources in a
vain effort to solve all.
This Administration will
completely scrutinize applications to eliminate unwise
or unnecessary proposals.
With these revisions, I feel that the Model Cities program can
help us to achieve two important goals -- a more rational and
creative Federal-State- local system, and city governments that are
more flexible and responsive to the needs of their citizens.
We
must realize that elimination of blight and poverty in our central
cities cannot be accomplished overnight.
It will be a hard and
often frustrating struggle, but Model Cities does offer us the means
of better using our present resources, and thus taking an important
step in that direction.
�,<
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HUD No. 69-0321
Phone: (202) 755-7327
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FOR Il1MEDIATE RELEASE
Nonday, April 28, 1969
I: . .
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SECRETARY ROMNEY'S STATEMENT ON MODEL CITIES
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The Model Cities program is an amb itious effort,
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It seeks to
coordinate a vast array of Federal programs, to concentrate thefr


impact on specific depressed urban neighborhoods, and to make local


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governments stronger and more flexible.
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My Committee on Model Cities of the Council for Urban Affairs
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has been intensively examining the program.
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deficiencies in its administration which call for immediate correction.
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Among them:
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.
Its study has shown
that the program's goals are sound, but that there have been critical
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.
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I
Federal agencies have not been sufficiently _responsive
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that would be available from the Federal departments.
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been hindered by uncer t ainty as to the amounts of funds
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Few effective attempts have been made to secure the
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Federal guidelines have forced cities to set ."model
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The President has approved the recommendations of the Urban
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The Council for Urban Af f airs will assume direct responsi-
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Secretar~es of the departments involved will have
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per sonal supervis ion of t he i r department s ' funding
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of Model Cities pr oposa ls, and will reserve program
funds specifically for that purpose.
This will
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ensure the availabi lity of depar tmental funds for
Model Cities, and will give loca l authorities a
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expect from the various departments for their
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better idea of the amount and kind of funds they can
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Administrat ion of the program will be fed into the
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reorganizat ion of the regional Feder al offices,
now underway.
One effect of this will .be to facili-
tate inter-depar tmental · coord i nat ion at the r egional
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level,
In the past, variations among the Federal
offices in program pr ocedures, headquarters locations,
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and s truc t ures of authority, have handicapped well-
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intentioned Feder a l offi cials and confused l ocal
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officials, thus seriously compr omising the Model Cities
. program at the ci ty l evel.
4. · Greater efforts wil l be made t o involve the State
government s i n the Model Cities pr ogr am.
Lack of
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State involvement has proven a critical deficiency


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because many of the Federal funds needed for Model
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make better use of the States' resources, experience
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and perspective.
Mo.del Cities is intended to be and
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will remain
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adequate citizen involvement.
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neighborhoods will be dropped.
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This guideline has been
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administered haphazardly in the past and has hindered


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progress at the local l evel .


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Eliminating this guideline
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within each city.
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Its purpose will remain that of focusing
resources on particularly, poor and blighted neighborhoods,
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but local officials will be given greater latitude in
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does not mean that the program will be expanded citywide
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The 10% population restriction on the size of the target
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between the cities and the Federal Government, but to
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·aim will not be to add another administrative layer
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drawing program boundaries that conform to local conditions.
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Priority consideration will be given to those cities that
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successfully enlist the participation of private and
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voluntary organizations in their Model Cities plans.
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increased flexibility in establishing program boundaries
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will make it easier for these organizations to contribute •
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Local governments will be asked to establish clear
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priorities in developing their Model Cities ,_proposals,
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and to strive for "comprehensiveness" only in the
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programsi five-year planning cycle.
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Many cities ha~e
interpreted Model Cities legislation and administrative
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guidelines requiring a local "comprehensive" plan of
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attack on blight and poverty in their target neighbor-
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hoods as requiring proposals to immediately attack
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every conceivable problem within these neighborhoods.
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This obviously would be unworkable; what is ;important '
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is that city governments set clear priorities for
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attacking their problems so that they can make rapid
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and substantial progress toward solving their most
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vain effort to solve all.
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This Administration will
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or unnecessary proposals.
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completely scrutinize applications to eliminate unwise
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With these revisions, I f eel that the .Model Cities program can
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help us to achieve two impor t ant goals -- a more rational and
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creative Federal-State-local sys tem , and city governments that are
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more flexible and responsive to the needs of their citizens.
must realize that elimination of bli ght and poverty in our central
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cities cannot be accomplished over night ~ It will be a hard and
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often frustrating struggle , but Model Cities does offer us the means
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of better using our present r esour ces, and
thus taking an important
step in that direction.
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�GAMBRELL
&
MOBLEY
3900 FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303
DAVID H. GAMBRELL
SUMTER KELLEY (1903-1963)
JOHN H . MOBLEY
ALBERT SIDNEY JOHNSON
J . ROBERT OWENS
ROBERT D. FEAGIN JJI
April 18, 1969
404 / 525 - 8571
JEREMIAH LUXEMBURGER
Mayor Ivan Allen
City of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Re: Atlanta Youth Council
Model Cities Grant
Dear Mayor Allen:
I am writing you as a result of the discussion at
the Board Meeting of the Youth Council yesterday with
respect to our applications under the Model Cities Program.
The Youth Council would like very much to cooperate
with the review committee which you have established which
is reviewing the Model Cities proposals. I have asked Louis
Dinkins to attend the first review meeting, which I understand
is today, in order that he might answer any questions and
supply additional information with respect to the Youth Council
proposal which is being considered .
We would appreciate it if your review committee would
give us the opportunity to appear at other meetings where the
Youth Council proposals are being discussed . It has been my
�Mayor Ivan Allen
Page 2
experience from other sessions involving proposals for
federal grants that sometimes a few minutes of conversation
are as valuable and sometimes as explanatory as several
pages of written material.
Very truly yours,
ATLANTA CHILDREN AND
YOUTH SERVICES COUNCIL
~
JL:ar
uxemburger, Chairman
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THE ATL/d\TA COi\STITUTIO t '; W ccln csd,,y, April 16, 1969
-/:
Mayor Ivan Allen Jr. asked The Georgia State Employfor and got authorization Tt.:es- ment Service would get $807,291
day to name a committee to for various job programs under
r eview proposed agencies to nm the proposals with another $2.4
some 78 programs in the Madel million going to other agencies
Cities area.
for employment programs.
Allen insisted the namin" of Of the ·latter amount. $1.2 milth'! re~iew coml1iiltee is rne~·e!y lion would go to Eco11omic Oproutine and follows past prac- I portunity Ati ant a for the J\t!a,,tices, but other City Hall sources ta Concentrated Employm ent
said he is concerned about some Program (ACEP), which has
of the recommendations of the had its sh are of probl ems.
Model Cities Executive directer, The Youth Council would get
J. C. Johnson.
$167,000 for youth activities and
Allen asked for the authorization from the Mo cl e I Cities
Executive Board, whi ch m·et
Tuesday. At the mayor 's request, Alderman Everett Millican made the motion and it was
carried.
HOW MANY?
Later in the meeting, Allen
asked Model Cities staff members ho 1v many unemployed persons reside in the 3,000 acres
covered by the program .
0. D. Fu!p, who works with
economic development and employment, repEed there were
3,000 to 6,000 with another large
number underemployed. He said
exact figures aren't c1.vailable
because the lates t statistics are
from the 1960 census.
Because the fed eral funds still
have not arrived from Wasl:lington, Allen said the committee,
· which he hasn't yet named, will
have time for the review with- '
out jeopardizing the start of programs.
AWAITING MONEY
The Model Cities programs
have administrative funds, but
implementation can not be
started unit! the Nixon adm inistration provides the supplementary money.
Although Allen's exact concerns aren't cl ea r, it is thought
they incl ude funds to be used 1
for emp'oyment and fer the At- l
lanta Children and Youth S-,rv- -1
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ices Council.
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some officials wonder if the
small staff could effectively use
that amount of mon'3 y.
Some city officials also have
ques tions about a $16,000 proposal by a public relations firm
which includes State Reps. Ben
Brown and Julian Bond "l,1 relate people and the entire Model
Cities an int~gral part of U- e Atlanta area."
Allen emphasized he is n o t
" balking at these progra1,. 1. i
just want to review them ."
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�CITY OF ATLANTA
DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE
50 1 CITY HALL
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303
'rill • 1969
CHARLES L. DAVIS
DIRECTOR OF FINANCE
E DGAR A . VAUGHN , JR .
DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF FINANCE
GEORGE J . BERRY
DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF FINANCE
Mr • . 1T uick
bp?:Qatatt •
a.
hepherd
.
of the ARhit~t•
901 City Hall
.rat.a
· ,Atlant••·
YotfS.C.ttoo of ~nt•
. ~ {et fl!tlea H!fd!~~•l'.!
· Ile:
D. ar
n
111
.;, bav
forth ·
pi-o,
city
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ud to Ch . ueetlon 1:1,•t tD ,our lett er ot April 10 •
d the 11&t.te~,
the city' • poait t.011 . .
.-ueucb

Z.-atory houetq
· • t 1• that ·
f -r the
et CS.tie•
l · f..t c.o be conaide
&a• ttillllpOrU, reloc•tabl• •tnact ~•o
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tff
bJ tbe
W• U• -..re that ~•l CiUM lnt . • to purcba.. thU
ild ·
k .l lr,e tbat the tttoo r noulcl • eoua1dend Q
ld " •
"111 " • 1:-,...:tecl to ·oth•r alt•
t the 1.... at t pr .
l:, propoa..S l ~ l •
If JOU ·h ••· ·• 1 add1•1.-1
tM
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1'8
a 1. ·· ·, r•prdl
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to p ~ e
a cb1• •tructvre.
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�CITY OF ATLANTA.
March 21, 1969
OFFICE OF MODEL CITIES PROGRAM
673 Capitol Avenue , S.W.
Atlanta, Ga . 30315
404 -524-8876
Ivan Allen Jr., Mayor
J. C. Johnson, Director
MEMORANDUM
TO:
FROM:
RE:
Dan Sweat, Liaison to Mayor for Governmental Affairs
~
Bill Warden, Model Cities Crime
Consultant
&
Delinquency Prevention
Federal Crime Prevention and Control Monies
Enclosed are articles from the Atlanta Journal and the
Constitution, both of which appeared in their March 19 issues.
Though the point is well made in the articles, I believe that in
the case of Atlanta, the State Planning Bureau has a definite
"plan" in mind. The plan being to let Atlanta have a tok en
amount of these funds at best and that the use of the planning
funds is a small indicator of things to come in the awarding of
the Omnibus and Safe Streets Action grants . From a politicians
point of view, where there is a door left open like this, it is
merely good thinking to prime the various power bases for future
use. However, the City of Atlanta, over a period of five -plus
years stands to lose several million dollars.
As pointed out in the enclosed articles, the Omnibu s Crime and
Safe Streets Act of 1968 was specifically designed and intended
to combat organized urban crime and, more specifically, street
crimes. Organized, and street crime, is not a big problem in
Hahira, Nahunta and Ludowici but if some action is not taken they
are going to receive substantial funds designed to prevent same.
It seems to me that one of the best ways to combat this might be
to c he ck with a number of the members of the advisory boar d who
�-2-
were appointed to assist, theoretically, the state administrator
of the program and funds. Several of the board members are from
the Atlanta area and they and their constituents would be
damaged by this plan by the state politician. I believe they
would react in a manner that we would consider favorable.
Members of this board who are from this area, and who may be
sympathetic to this line of thinking, are J. Carroll Larmore,
Chief Probation Officer, Fulton County; Johns. Langford, Fulton
County Juvenile Judge; Norman Shipley, Cobb County Juvenile
Judge; Robert Croom, Fulton County Juvenile Court; Charles Watt,
NCCD and Neil Satterfield, Chatham County United Fund. Too, I
have a speaking relationship with George Murphy who is the
regional administrator at the federal level and if you think
it wise, we could contact him regarding our concerns.
We are ready at any time to assist and cooperate with you in
combating this malicious plan to deprive this city of funds that
rightfully belong to it.
�:City Seen Loser .
·;In Crime Grants·
By DUANE1tINER
Constitution Wa1hington Bureau
WASHINGTON- Atlanta was cited Tuesday by the National
League of Cities (NLC) as an example of how federal planning ·
funds provided under the omnibus Crime Control and Safe
Streets Act ·of. 1968 are not being channeled in Uie proper di-
_rectian.
~ " 3 , - / ) - C , 5 { " " ~-
Sta'-;,ticrime tund
Distribution ·Criticized
.&aaata Joana) Waablnsion Bureau
647 JlfaU.al Praa llalldlns
WASHINGTON-The Georgia
Plamting Bul'eau has been criticized by the National League of
Cities for its handling of federal
funds under the Omnibus Crime
Control and Safe Streets Act of
1968.
At a Tuesday press conference
here, Allen Pritchard, assistant
director of the NLC, cited Georgia as a bad example of the way
the funds are being handled.
pointing out the Atlanta metropolitan area has 30 per cent of
· the state's population and 6-0 per
cent of its street crime, yet received only 15 per cent of the
.initial p l ~ grant funds allocated to the state under the
1U68 act.
The State Planning Bureau,
which distributes the federal
money to regional planning
groups, gave the Atlanta area
only $33,750 of a total state
grant of $403,750. The grants are
intended to establish initial local
crime~ontrol planning.
Pritchard b l a s t e d Georgia
along with 23 other recently surveyed states for spreading initial planning money ' 'without re·
gard to capability to do criminal
justice planning or considering
the inte111Sity of crime in the
area covered."
But it was noted Georgia's
area planning and development
commissions "are established,
have some staffing and rather
extensive involvement by local
government officials."
The NLC official called upon
the U.S. Justice Department for
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. 'The funds are funneled by the Justice department to the
states and thence to area planning agencies.
Allen Pitchard, assistant NLC executive director1 said the ·
Atlanta metropolitan a-rea acc0tmts for 6-0 per cent of the street
crime in Georgia and 30 per cent of the state's population but
received only 15 per cent of the safe-street planning grant a,llocated to Georgia.
"Our point has been that in 24 of the 31 states we surveyed,
1 they had set up over 200 area-wide planning operations, and the
money for planning was being spread around without regard to
capability to do criminal justice planning or intelhsity of crime
in the area covered," Pritchard declared at a news conference.
Under the present system , it is impossible to "really get
into the problem in any signi ficant way at all," Pritchard main,iained.
Poirvting ,to an area plaM.ing agency in one state that reooived only $850, Pritdlard ~ id the intent ci Coogress in pass-ing the Safe Streets Act was 1'to get at areas of high-crime .iocidence, and not just -to plan universally ."
,
Pritchard noted, however, that Georgia's area pl;uming and
developmerit commissions "are established, have ~ staffing
and rather extensive involvement · by local government of.
ficials ." He said it was "not quit.e as difficult as in some states
where they set up an organization arbitrarily for safe street
'
planning that doesn't represent anybody."
·
The National League of Cities 88id it was not advocating
that the Justice department dictate how states should use their
Safe Streets Act grants but called upon the department to
, tighten surveillance "to see that it will actnally produce plans,
and focus money in high~rime areas ."
Georgia's Safe Streets Act grant is administered by the


State Planning Bureau, a division of the governor's office.


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closer surveinance on states to
see that they actually pml 1cf
crime-fighting programs and
concentrate in high crime ;irea.'! '
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�DR. GEORGE L. SIMPSON, JR .
JAMES L . M c G O VERN
CHAIRMAN
l!XC::C UTIV O:: D IR ECTO R
...
F.
M . BIRD
HAMILTO N L O KEY
VIC Ci'. CHAIRMAN
GK N l! R A L CO UN B II L
HUGH PETERSON , JR .
!JCCRET AR Y -TlH! A S
un u n
TRU S TE ES
JAMES A. AL f ORD . M . 0 ,
IVAN ALLEN 111
OR. SANFORD ATWOOD
J . PAUL AUSTIN
ROBERT 0. FOWLER
LAWRENCE C . GELL-ESTEDT
DR. HUGH M. GLOSTER
COMMITTEE COUNS E L
Metropolitan Atlanta Commission on Crime
and Juvenile Delinquency, Inc.
J . ROBIN HARRIS
JESSE HILL. JR .
DONALD L . HOLLOWELL
L. BEVEL JONES
T. R . MAY
LORIMER D. MILTON
ROMAE TURNER POWELL
DEAN CARRIE SCANDRETT
FRANCIS SHACKELFORD
JACK TARVER
JOHN C . WILSON
ROBERT M. WOOD
SZ FAIRLIE STREET . N . W.
ATLANTA. GEORGIA
30303
!524-3B69
April 24 , 1969
DA11RINGTON H . DRAN C H
H . D O Y CE C O NN EL L . JR .
F . D E AN COP E LI\ND
PEARCE HARDWICK
G. LEMUEL HEWES
DEVEREAUX MCCLATCHEY. JR.
R . KENT FRAZIER
JON 0 . FULLERTON
ROBERT W . PATRICK . JR .
G . KIMBROUGH TAYLOR
Mr . Jo hnny C. Johnson
Director
Model Cities
673 Capi t ol Ave n ue, S . W.
Atlanta , Georgia 30315
l~e : Ilo u se or Use
Dear Mr . Jo hn so n:
Th e Hou se of Use is a prog r a m set u p to provide
counse l i n g, jo b opportu n it y a n d recreatio n se rvice s to
h ard - core yo u t h in t h e age g roup from six t ee n to twe n t yfive . Th is proj ec t i s loc a t e d i n t h e Summerhill area
i n a bu i l di n g situa t ed at t h e cor n e r of Ge orgia Aven u e
and Terry St reet .
Th is l e tt e r will confirm my prior conversations
wit h Mr . Lyle Scott of you r ofLicc co n cer n ing th e


111 ocotio n of so me 50 g;1 11 o ns o r p;
ii n t to t he !lou se or


Use ,or paint in g t he in t e ri.o r ;11 1<! ex t e ri o r or t he
h ll i ] d j n g ill Iv Ji i C Ii l h i S pr O _j CC t I S Ji O ll S C d .
T h e 1 H b r 11 c Ce s s ~l I')' Iv i I I he p r O \I i d Cd t h r O ll g h
t h e vol unte er sc r v ·i ces or t he !l o u se or Use c li e n ts a n d
t h e n e c essary bru s h es , rollers and any ot he r p;,ijnti n g
e quipm e n t will be sup pl ied b y the !lou se of Use.
�Mr . Johnny C. Johnson
April 24 , 1969
Page 2
Your interest jn t hi.s m:1tt c r i.s appr eci ate l.
Please advise me of your decision 1,v ith re spe ct to this
reques t a n d I shall arra n ge for th e pickup and transportation of th e paint to the Hous e of Use .
JLM : g h
cc: Victor J. War e
cc : Dan Sweat
�April 21, 1969
Mr. Johnny J ohnson
Director of Model Cities
673 Capitol Avenue , S . W .
Atlant , Georgia
Dear Johnny:
Attached is a check p yable to Transport Clearings , Inc.
in the mount of $1, 540. 00 to cover th shipping cost for
the Model Cities share of the paint giv n to th City through
the President's Council on Youth Opportunity.
This is in lin with our convers tion wher by you h v
ssured
me th t this dvanc of funds from th Sou.them Council on
Int ern tional nd Public Aff ire will b reimbursed from
Model Cities Project lunds as soon as such funds h ve been
relea ed to th City from th D p rtm nt of Housing and Urban
D v lopment.
Sine r ly yours ,
Dan E. Sw at, Jr.
DESJr:fy
Enclo ure (1)
�DR. GEORGE L. SIMPSON. JR .
JAMES L. McGOVERN
CHAIRMAN
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
F. M. BIRD
HAMILTON LOKEY
VICE CHAIRMAN
GENERAL COUNSEL
HUGH PETERSON. JR.
SECRETARY-TREASURER
TRUSTEES
JAMES A . ALFORD. M. D.
IVAN ALLEN Ill
DR . SANFORD ATWOOD
J. PAUL AUSTIN
ROBERT D. FOWLER
LAWRENCE C . GELLESTEDT
DR. HUGH M. GLOSTER
J. ROBIN HARRIS
JESSE HILL. JR.
DONALD L. HOLLOWELL
L. BEVEL JONES
T.R.MAY
LORIMER D. MILTON
ROMAE TURNER POWELL
DEAN CARRIE SCANDRETT
FRANCIS SHACKELFORD
JACK TARVER
JOHN C . WILSON
ROBERT M . WOOD
COMMITTEE COUNSEL
Metropolitan Atlanta Commission on Crime
and Juvenile Delinquency, Inc.
52 FAIRLIE STREET. N. W.
ATLANTA. GEORGIA
30303
524-38,69
April 17, 1969
BARRINGTON H, BRANCH
H. BOYCE CONNELL, JR,
F . DEAN COPE.L AND
PEARCE HARDWICK
G. LEMUEL HEWES
DEVEREAUX MCCLATCHEY. JR.
R. KENT FRAZIER
JON 0. FULLERTON
ROBERT W. PATRICK. JR.
G. KIMBROUGH TAYLOR
Mr. Dan E. Sweat, Jr.
Office of the Mayor
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia 30334
Dear Dan:
Enclosed is a check in the amount of $1,540
payable to Transport Clearings, Inc. in Charlotte,
North Carolina.
This check represents an advance of funds to
the Model Cities Program to cover shipping costs of
paint from the President's Council on Youth Opportunity.
We understand that we shall be reimbursid upon the
release of Model Cities' funds by the U. S. Department
of Housing and Urban Development .
yours,
J LM:gh
Enclosure/check
cc : Mr. A. B. Padgett
cc : Mr. Pet er C. White

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