Box 3, Folder 1, Complete Folder

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Box 3, Folder 1, Complete Folder

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March 28 , 1968
MEMORANDUM
To : Mr . John Cox
From: Dan Swe t
I think that th attached letter is a very good one.
I · ee no :re son why it should not be issued by Bob Wood.
That w yj it ca11ries the combined weight of the Mayor
and the Youth Council.
I as um this would be sent to Community Ch
DS:fy
t
gencles.
�Atlanta Children and Youth
1201-B CITY HALL
PHONE 522-4463
IVAN ALLEN, JR . , MAYOR
JOHN
w. cox,
- EXT. 437
ATLANTA,
FRANKLIN
City of Atlari:t~ 3
ROBERT M. WOOD, CHAIRMAN
Council
Services
GEORGIA 30303
w. THOMAS,
V. CHAIRMAN
MICHAEL H. TROTTER, SECRETARY
MRS . RHODES PERDUE, MEMBER AT LARDE
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
FLETCHER COOMBS, TREASRUER
MEMBERS !
FRANK R . CARMINES
FLETCHER COOMBS
DE,JONGH FRANKLIN
G. ARTHUR HOWELL
MRS. VIVIAN W . HENDERSON
OCIE J. IRONS
JERRY LUXEMBURGER
FRANK A . PLAYER
MRS. MARY B . SANFORD
MRS. C. R. YATES
MEMO TO:
Youth Opportunity Participants
FROM:
The Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council
(Youth Opportunity Headquart ers)
SUBJECT:
Information Meeting for Summer. 1968 Youth Opportunity Campaign
DATE: Friday, May 10, 1968
TIME : 10:30 A. M, - 1:00 P,M,
PLACE: E.O.A, in the Conference Room
on the 4th floor~
The purpose of this meeting is to gather up loose ends of information
and present a total picture of the resources available to Youth
Opportunity Participants. It is e ss ent ial that the director of your
summer programs for youth attend, as well as those in charge of the
various aspects listed . The community has produced many available
services, but only informed participants will be able to effectively
utilize these resources.
AREAS
ro
BE COVERED:
1.
Level of Funding - E.O.A. Representative Presentation;
2.
Job Opportunities and Procedures;
3.
Medical Examination Procedure
(Bring information as to total number of youth
expected that need free examinations, ages, location
and form for examination,)
4.
Publicity
(Please bring any information, publicity or
hfochures about your programs that will be
helpful to the Publicity Committee in promoting
the Youth Opportunity Campaign&)
E x- O FF1c10 - C H 1EF o F PoL,c E, HERBERT T. JE NK I N S
·
SuPT . OF
Sc 1-t o0L s, JOHN W. LETSON
-
-GE NERAL
MGR. o r
P A RKS,
JACK C . DELIUS
�~·
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f'.age Two
5.
Resources Information Package to be Presented;
6.
Transportation Information~
7.
Volunteer Assignment and Orientation Procedure
Please let us know if you are able to attend.
Kwl.vYl -~~
Karen Kovac
Program Coordinator Assistant
(ilt~J,.))
�ATLANTA CHILDREN AND YOUTH SERVICES COUNCIL
1201-8 CITY HALL
PHONE 522-4463 - EX.437
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303
D
Fran klin M . Thomas, V. C hairman
M ichael H. Trotter, Secy-T reasure r
Mrs . Rhodes Perdue, Member at Lorge
Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor
Robert M. Wood, Cha irman
John W . Cox, Executive Director
Members - Fronk R. Carmines
Fletcher Coombs
DeJon g h Frankl in
G . Arthu r Howell
Mrs. Vivion W. Henderson
Ocie J . Irons
Jerry Luxemburger
Fronk A. Player
Mrs. Mory 8 . Sanford
Mrs. C. R. Yates
Oewm.bex 2, 1968
Dear Friend:
First, let me apologize for the seemingly rather impers0nal nute of gratitude
for you participating in the 1968 Mayor's Conference on ~hildren and Y0u:th.
Though impersonal the note may seem, it carries a very persc.nal "thank y u" on
b~half of the Mayor, t he Board of the Y.Q.uth Council and the many participating agencies.
Fror:1 the report to r.e , the conference began t o cc.ue t o grips with j.ssues in
education_and yGut!i enpl0ynent in our eor:u::iunity,
As a follow-up, we have already asked Mrs. Parh.a.i~ with the Atlanta-Fulton League
of Wooen Voter~ to aevelop ongoing study groups to further explore rec0c ~ £-or-pro~, using a~ a core 9 the confer~e workshop participants.
The League will also help us develop and conpile the conference report. All participants in the conference will receive a copy of the r eport when it is co;Jpleted.
We are asking that the planning connittee neet on Decei:lber 11, 1968-2:00 p.u.;
Coooittee Rooo 4 here at City Hall to discuss further action (connittee menber
please use this letter as your invitation to the Decer..ber 11 ~.1eeting ).
If you did not get a chance to do so, please indicate any particular coru.1ents
you nay have and want to continue deliberations on, or that might i nprvve next
year's conference.
Again, thank you for your support and cooperation,
Sincerely yours ~
~ . ,vu, ,143.215.248.55b\A,,~
·-J erry ILuxer:iburger
Chairnan
JL/vp
Chief of Police, He rbert T. Je nkins - Supt. of Schools
John W . Letso n - Gen . Mgr . Porks, Jock C. De liu s
�Oc tober 13, 1969
MEMORANDUM
TO: Johnny J ohnson
FROM : Dan Sweat
SUBJECT, Atl anta Youth C o uncil - Model Cities Proposals
Several days ago you stated to me that you would inform Mrs.
Perdue of the s tatus of Youth Co uncil p roposals . W uld yo u.
please let me know the statu of the following :
1. Abs nteeism Project
2.
Centr 1 Coordination Services !or Model Cities Youth
3.
J uvenile Delinquency Prevention
4.
United Youth Outr ach and th Mod 1 Citie
Atlanta Youth Congr sa.
DESJR:sm
Branch of the
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CITY OF ATLANTA
OFFICE OF COMPTROLLER
CITY HALL
Atlanta, Georgia
30303
June 13 , 1968
CHARLES L. DAVIS
C OMP TR O LLE R
EDGAR A. VAUGHN, JR.
DEPUT Y CO M PTROLLER
Mr . Henry Bowden
City Attorney
City of Atlanta
Atlanta , Georgia
Dear Mr . Bowden:
The Atlanta Children and Youth Service Council was established by
the Board of Aldermen by an Ordinance adopted on February 9 , 1966.
It wa initially called the Atlanta Youth Council . By n Ordinance
adopted on June 5 , 1967 , certain changes wer mad including the
change of the na
A question has arisen as to the exact powers of the organtzation
as now created . The ca e in point is n application for f der l
funds to undertake a project . The proj ct will r quir
gr nt
agreement with the federal gover
nt . Our que tion is whether or
not the Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council , as now organized ,
ha the power to contract in this fashion . lt hould be emphaaiz d
that they propo•e to nt r into the contract in their own name, not
aa the City of Atlant .
I will very much appreci t your opinion on tbi a soon aa it i
convenient for you . We have a contract pendina which will be held
in abeyance until w receiv your advice on this point .
Very truly yours,
Charles L. Davia
Comptroller
CLD:cy
b e e : Mr. Dan Sweat
�---Atlanta
-Children and ·Yorith
1201-B CITY HALL
PHONE
Services Council
522-4463
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYDR
ROBERT M.
JOHN
wooo.
w. cox,
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303
FRANKLIN M . THOMAS, V. CHAIRMAN
CHAIRMAN
MICHAEL TROTTER, SECY-TREASURER
MRS. RHODES PERDUE, MEMSER AT LARac
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
I
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MJC-,EERS : FRANK R. CRAMINES
FLETCHER COOMBS
OE JONGH FRANKLIN
G. ARTHUR HOWELL
MRS. VIVIAN HENDERSON
OCIE J. IRONS
JERRY LUXEMBURGER
FRANK A. PLAYER
MRS . MARY B. SANFORD
J
MRS. C. F:. YA7E:£
December 1 2 , 19 58
Dr. John Letson, Superint endent
Atlanta Public Schools
224 Central Avenue, S. w.
Atlanta, Georgia
30303
Dear John:
The Recreati_on Sub-Committ ee for t he 1969 Youth Oppor t un ity Prcgrarr. he l d a neetin~ on Decerr.be r 10 to begin t he plannir-,g for t he "Sum:ner ' 69" progr am.
One of the topics discussed was better cooper a tibn and syr.c hroni zat ion of effort
between the various public and private organi zat ions participating int e
"Summer 1 69" program.
More specifically, the Committee requested that the sc hool syst ems par ticipate in the various ne i ghb orhood discussions be i ng he ld for the Youth Opportunity Council by t ~e Citi zens Advi sory Committees of the E O A. ThEse me e tings
are being held in order for ci t i zens to discuss with opera-t:i ng ai;e ncie s t he
types and kinds of progra,1s desired for t he ir neighborhoods .
Mr. Koth has agreed, wit h your approval, to dis cuss this rr.a:: ter with Area
Superintendent s and Principals, advi s i ng t hem that t hey wil l be i nvited to participate in the discussions of t hese area committees. An early i n volve me nt of
school officials at all levels in the planning of the summer prograr.i is~esir ed
goal of this year 1 s campaign.
Knowing of your deep interest in the Youth Opportunity Progr am , I wou ld appreciate
your lending support by way of c om~unication from your office to area s upe r intendents and principals. Please urge them to be present or delegate some members of their staff to represent them at t hese area c ommittee meetings.
,,
E x · DF YICID · C >< •EF DP PcL1CE, HERBERT T. JENKIN S
SuPT. DP- ScHDDLS , JOHN W. LETSON
G~NCRAL M GR , D, p,.,,,K 8 , JACK C. CELIUS
I
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J
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Page 2
Dr. Letson
December 12, 19 68
Mr. Duke Harrison, E O A l'epresentative, will rec;,uest the area chairman -::o send
.invitations to the principals of schools in their particular areas.
The Parks Department , E O A Neighborhood Centers, The United A?peal Age~ci e s a~d
several other agencies will participate in these sessions,
The area committees will make their recomme ndations about activities, use of
facilities, location of programs, and personnel selections to operatiEg agenci e s,
schools_, churches, park s and recreation departments ; as well as to t he Yout h
Opportunity Council.
I shall be writing you later concerning funding resources from the school
system to support the 196 9 effort,
It is also my understanding that Mr . Koth will be rnakin~ several recommen<lations
to you concerning this prograJn within the next fe w days,
I personally appreciate your cooj;ieration in this effort to get
on the program for su~mer 1969,
2.n
ear.J..:,· start
With kindest personal regard, I am,
Sincerely ::,--ours,
~~
Clarence Elsas
Chairman, Yout h Cyportur. ity
Program 1% 9
CE/vp
Honorable tlayor Allen .,/
Mr. Jerry Luxemburger
Mr. Dan Sweat
Mr. Jack Delius
Mr. Allen Koth
Mr. Irwin Lewis
t-1r. I-iarolc. Barrett
Dr. Jahr, Martin
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AWARDED IN GRATEFUL RECOGNITION TO
whose participation in the 1967
Youth Opportunity Campaign
advanced the welfare of the Nation
by helping young Americans help themselves
�/'
A TLANTA CHILDREN AND YOUTH SER VICES COUNCIL
1201-B CITY HALL
PHONE 5 2 2-4463 - EX.437
Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor
Robert M . Wood, Chairman
John W . Cox, Executive Director
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303
Franklin M . Thomas, V. Chairman
Micha e l H. Trotter, Secy-Treasurer
Mrs . Rhodes Perdue, Member at Large
Members - Fronk R. Carmines
Fletcher Coombs
DeJongh Franklin
G . Arthur Howell
Mrs . Vivian W . Henderson
Ocie J . Irons
Jerry Luxemburger
Frank A. Player
Mrs. Mory B. Sanford
Mrs. C. R. Yates
November 13 , 1968
Dear Friend:
Again, the May or, t he Boa r d of the Atlanta Children and Youth Services
Council, and s e veral other co-sponsor ing organizations are invi ting you
and your f r i ends to par t icipate in t he 2nd Mayor' s Conference on Chilqr en
and Yout h.
Th.i s year's confer ence will be held all day, November 21 , 1968 f r om 8: 30
to 6; 00 at the Dinkler Plaza Hote l.
The t heme f or thi s year ' s conference will be "Equa l Education and Employment: Affirmative Action Agains t Disorde~' .
The committee has planne d a mos t i nteresting and action ori ented confer~
ence f or you, providing full part i cipation throughout the day. Impl ici t
in our t heme for this year is solut i ons t o problems, not further discussion
of problems.
The keynoter for this year will be Dr . Fre d Cr awf or d, Dire ctor, Center for
Research and Socia l Change of Emory Univer s ity. Our lunche on speaker will
be Dr,. Vivian Henderson, President of Clark Co.l lege, Atlanta, Georgia and
national e xpert on manpowe r and economic s.
·
We hope tha t you will be able to j 0in u s . The fee f or t he conference t his
year will be $7 .00 f or adults and $3 . 50 for yout h under 20 . This fee wi ll
cover meal , coffee and a get acquainted hour after the conference .
We hope tha t you will please make your reservations t o attend i mmediatel y.
x.:-~-/{
Yours truly,
>,.,(:A-"'. . ) (. . . .,--
!
J. Luxemburger
Chairman
/
JL/aes
Ch ief of Po lice, Her be rt T. Je nkins - Su pt. o f Sc hoo ls
John W . Letson - Gen. Mgr. Porks, J ack C. De li us
�October 28. 1968
Mr . Robert Dobbs , Chairman
No rthwest Coordinating Cowicil
The Atlanta Urban League , Inc .
239 Auburn Avenue , N. E .
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Mr. Dobbs:
Thank you for calling to my attention the request that th Pe rry
Homes community be considered as one of the areas for the
Rodent Control Program.
As you probably know, Economic Opportw,ity Atlanta will
administer this program in behalf of the City and th various
ag ncies.
I h ve forwarded your 1 tter to Mr. Jim Parham, Executive
A dministrator of Economic Opportunity Atlant • and I am sur
th t EOA will give coneid ration to your request.
Sincet' ly your ,
Ivan All n, Jr .
Mayor
IAJr:fy
c:e: Mr. Jim Pa.rh m
�THE ATLANTA URBAN LEAGUE, INC.
An Educational Community Service Agency Covering Over 47 Yea rs of Preventive Social Se rvice
521·2355 •
239 AUBURN AVENUE , N. E . •
NATIONAL URBAN
L E AGU E AFFILIATE
ATLANTA , GEORGIA 30303
October 24, 1968
Mayor Ivan Allen
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mayor Allen:
\
The Northwest Cooordinating Council was happy to rea.d that
the city of Atlanta has received a grant from the U. S, Department of Health, Education and Welfare for a rat control program.
We would like to request that the Perry Homes community be
considered as one of the areas for the program.
Sincerely,
/(!Jk:r~
Robert Dobbs, Chairman
Nor thwest Coordinating Council
RD/rl
United A ppeal M ember A gency
�Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council
1201-B CITY HALL
PHONE
522-4463 ·
E XT.
437
I VAN A LLE N, JR., MAYOR
City of A tlanta
RO GER T M. WOOD, CH AIRM AN
JO HN W. CO X , E xc cUTl v t: O irn:c To R
FRANK LIN
w.
GEORGIA 30303
THO MAS.
V.
CH AIRMAN
MICHAEL H . TROTTER, B <c RCTARY
MRS. RHODES PERDUE, MtMBCR AT LARIJC
FLETCHER COOMBS, TR CASRUCR
McMBCRB :
ATLANTA,
Sept emuer 23, 1 968
FR ANK R . C ARMINES
F LE T CHER C OOM DS
D E J ONGH FR ANKL IN
G . AR THUR H O W ELL
M RS. V I V I AN W . HEND ERSON
-,
OCIE J. IRO N S
J E RRY LU X E M B UR G E.R
F R ANK A. PL AYE R
M RS. MARY D. SA NFORD
M RS. C.R . YATES
!:on . Lil t on C . L1.r1' i:; , Chc:.irrr.c. n
City of Atl w.n to. fi11a n ce Coc1:n i t te c
50 1 Ci t y ti c:::11
At lan ta, Geor~ io. 303 0 3
Cca r Al der ...:in l'c:irri s :
~hi s r esj:.-on sc i ~ J. '. ·,ep l y to a SeptcnL cr· J , l e tt er c en t to ~.-.c
City Comptr o ll er , con c e rni n~ Lu d~ e t r 8qucs t fo r 1 9G~ .
L,j·
··.r . l.\:v i s ,
The At l a nt a Ch i h lrc n a n d Yo ut l1 Serv ic es Co unci l
i s herei: y ::; uLm i ttin c:; a
p re li mi nary Lud 1~e t 1, q uest of ~~S l, ~Gu :f01~ it ::; reg ul ar 1- re ;r, m t o~e th er ,1 it :1
a SUi)p ler:1ent o[ :;; l G, CJJO t o p l a n, coorJ ii1d te .J. I1 d a J.m i n .i. s tu, Uc l '.J i..S ::;UJnmer
Yuuth Op!Jortu;1 .i.t.. y 11u1.,rc1r.1 ,
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Cu r 1 96 9 r c4uLst i n~o lves an i ncre~ s0 cf Slb , 300 , Thi ~ i 1.c 1 ea::;c wi ll al~o~
us to (1) acld one ( 1) pro:'.:ess i or;d l c:;tv if :;:;erso n and enc (l) cL:rk ; ('.2) i t
vi il l al so allow 101° c1 :i co sa l ary .i. ncre r.c :i t
f 0 r ou r pr·e3e ,,t s L,_ff ; an c;, ( 3 ) it
1-:i ll cover some mJ. nor inc reases in a Jm ini s t ra ti ve an d o,reru tiu ic, cc s t o f ti1 e
Counc il.
Ludge t rcc;_11r.::; t to c arry cut t h <! (l, Lllcil ' .s rcs1-·onsi t, ili t.i. c~- i:1 t;1e l s:lo'J
i ro~~ raJ11 .i. s ccntir,:.., u ,l c 1 1-it,,.::: t l1er or ne t. i.,: ~L-'a l f und_=>_ _
c1re avcJ.ild~l c i 0 t..: ,( Cou nci l as th r:::y \\Cl" ii, 1 968 . P.s jCU ;.;1.0 '". , rla nn i , ..;
1unc.ls fo r tl1 '~ J.'· CG ·~0u th O,r'port un i t/ l' ro~r:0 ;;1 we re ;n.::;. ce .:.:vdi~ tt .:l e t r, r'ou.; z-, 2


Si e cia l ;rant fr o· 1 );t., ;, ,


·. ie are unc c rl .:i. i r, , t iiOUJi1 iiop e .L'ul , ti :a t tJ1 2::;e funJs
1< ill aga i n i1e a v ,·dlcil le in 1 9G9 .
I f l :H? Y ,-: r1:: , our re 1u :: ::;t ic- r 196 0
plo.nnin&; f u1 1d s for Li1c Yo ut h O_rµort u 1i t y l'1'u,~rcrn1 1-: il.l be res c.i.nccd .
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·,;c, hc-,;, c th a t y cu r cv,:-,ittce and ot 1u · r..f~ :1Lc rs c f t he Deare. of Al C:.erme:11 \, i l l
Le pl e ased ,;it:1 t l, 1,;ork an d yro g r e so._; 0i t !.e Co un ci l d u rin_s Lhe 1 YG7- 68 }'ro 6 r.J.m
yeo. r. Our Anri11;i 1 J'p- art wh ic h wil l Le s ul'r:ii Lt eu in Nave .. .:. t.:r .::. long 1. itli t !1e
Ex Dr rrcro
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o,- PoL1c1:, HERBER T T . L.JENK I NS
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SUPT.
o ,. ScH ou Ls, JOHN W . LETSO N
G lN£RA L
Mo~. o,-
PAR KS,
JACK C. DELIUS
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�lion. Mil t o n G. Fa rri:.:;
Page Two
September 23, 1 968
f ull Luclg e t t' cqu e st und docume nta t ion mat eri a l, ,:.i. 11 h i:_;hlight s ome c,f e ii s
1,:or k . ·1~e t h ink t hat 196<.J will Le even more prot.lu c t i v e i f nee de d c,p cra tiona.::..
a 11d a dm i 11 i s t1'c1tiv e f und..:; c an L'::! o L tained,
The ,·:ayer c1nd Loard of 11.lderme ll i n cre ati nc, t 11e Cou11cil ancl e ::, ta0 l is t1.i.t'16 i t
as a c ity a 1_,ency , 6 av12 .. it. a mo~t i r:ir ort a nL t a.:::k Lu i:~ rform f o r t his ,; r eat
City, Un f crtu n::i. tely , th e f ina nc.i.al res o urces l ur Ju i n~, tlie tot a l joi.J h ave
Lee n s eve r (; l y lir.1i ted .
".:e iioµe t ha t tl; e i:,e,ard of /1l c.lc:::-mer:. will be: .:1L.i. e t o l1vn ur
o ur rc.J.u.:.::..; t. i. ur t:.e
s ufficient funt.:.s hliich s ho ul d enab le the Co u.nc .i. l r.1Lt' ' c!ue •,1uc1 ;: e .i.y to ~c:,, ·'i '~
t he c1~-1p 1~oxir:.at c ly 20 0 , 000 cli i l o r e 11 an c.1 you tl1 o f our Cit y .
rurt he r, t i112 ex1Jan 0ecl s ervi ces si10u l d br.i.11,~ a b ou l c1 s i _,; lli .i:- i can t reL: u ct i c 11
i 11 Je linq uE.::1 cy, ch i ld neg l e c t, poor he al t h I l10,11e l e ss 11e s s ,mcl no,1- s ui:.,e r v i se:d
r e c r eat i onal activ iti es a n J c o n0 i ti c u s in our C.i. Ly .
The Goar cl e, f t ile YoutL Council wo ul d be mo s t cipp r ec i a ti vt! of ap pec:1r· i 116
i.le 101'e ti ,e rinunce Co1nr:1.i.tt ee oc api-,roµ riate ,.~1~l:,er3 tli c r~ o f wi1e n ~ic,til our
i)r c iirn i 110.ry d S we:il a~ o ur f i na l Lud 6 e t s are c or,s .i. uc reu .
'i'na.nk you a:.;a i n for ./ o ur v ery 1-,onde r f ul cOOJ:.ierat i o n a 11<.. illt erest i11 t i1 i ~
r.ia ti. \c r ,
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S i nc erciy ,
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Cl1<.1inn,1 11
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ATTAC Hl-iI.:N T I
Pf:LLIMIH F1RY DULCi..,T P.!; ,~UL '3 T FOR THE
/\!:Ll YOU] i SJ::RVICS S
CO Ui,jCIL H 1i{ 1 9G c:J
!1TLAl! TA Cll I LDREt
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Staff S~ lariPs
1 <:J G8 Bud 1;et
1 96 9 Reques t
lllcreas e fo1' 1 96 9
$28 , 0 00
4 2 , 000
11-, , oo o
Th e l 'J V.: iucre ase i s to c over t.ll c p r esen t s t aff sal ;..i ri e s
p lus a. ::i % · r.n ua l in cremen t .
It 1-· iLL a lsc a ll cv; for tr,e c:.c'G i tior.
of o n e ( l ) prof ess .i onu. l sto ff p o'so n 2.nc'. cl!e ( 1 ) c .ierk .
II.
fr i nge i.lE'ne:°it:::;
1 %8 Dudg e t
1 9 :·'J Re4ue s t
Ir.c c ease fo r 1 969
0
J , ooo
3 , 000
~·he l ~( <J r e qL:es t will c cver t i1c cos L of es t a b l.:. _.i ,i n __; c1n
in s ura nc e c11 1c.l retiremen t ;,iro,; rdiil 1 o r the Co u n cil :::; t a .;."f s i r. ,.:.l u r ly
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J uri ng l SGG, t ile Ch i l d ren and Yuuth Services Cou ncil s er ved a s




co crdinato r fol' the 1 9Gb Youth Op1Ju rt un i t y Pro,;ram fo r ti1e Atl<lnta
i< et r opoli t c1 n Commu n ity .
The Cuunci l wa.s ab .l.e to d ., La in i \J ll cc,operc1 ti on o f c:i 1--•µr0xi; ,1.:i t 12 ly 7 5
or 6 an i:c: c:1.ti o1 1s ti1rou"'h out t h e m.~tru p u li t an a re:2 .
Ti :e · Coun c i l i,;o. s a l so in s l l' l: i ;cr, t a l i n ol., t c1.i 1, ir.g fer vc.1r.L0u ;_; p a rts oi"
t h e YOF f ur:d s , tic keu:; , ec;_t:i v1,,c11 l c.1 n d supi:,lies .
The Cc unc il c oord inat ed t i1 c ciJcrL :... o f t he Atla nte::. Juo. r d of l.d uc e1ti on,
L . 0 . /\ ., t he l il rks and l"< c cre a ti or: Lq, J rl rr.c. ut , t li e Uri i tec'. ." µµ co. l , t he
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join t ef fort s a n c.l activiti es .
The Counc il de ve~op in f-orr ,1c1 liun am: inve n tor i es on ~,r ut,£·c111 ,s a r,d
a ct iviti es on e v e r y ph2.::: e o f y o utl1 uc li v i t) .
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and wi l l be i ss u ed si!c rtly .
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L;E::
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�Se-pt em er 30 , 1968
Mr. Ol iv~r Wcl dl. Dil"Et.Cto~
t t
.lanning D p rtm nt
Stato of G r
At l ant ,
Th
t: l ant
the
ntion
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th t we be included in 11
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j or and pri ary
J. D. Ac• w
~afe Stre~t
with you , I
w~iting ou requo ting
hri fin• larnin and instructional
tha~c Acts .
, ph
int nd to
Cri
ro r
d r lntion hi will .be with th
o . progr- s ~ projecta rel tod t o th
ci.aily in tbe ar
of res rch and
de onstrAtion .
In both of th sc area• w will , of cottl' , b working in close rel tion&hip
with Mr. Van Sweat . Gov m nt 1 Liaison Dir ctor for th City of Atl t •
ta • ropos ls un
nd Control Act of 1968 an
t thi
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fully
Act
w re o · the faot that g uid lin
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ontaet j:)ertaon en this . tt
• Co~ ; City Fall , 522
ti • John
should hs our ...x cntivu Dix, -~to~,
li63, • t n$ion 437,.
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�ATLANTA,GEORGIA
PHONE JA. 2 •4463
Ivan All en,
J,.,
Maym
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Q;?
�CITY OF A.TLANTA.
CITY HALL
Augus t 26, 1968
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522-44 63 Area Code 404
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Admini strative As sist ant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES , Execut ive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR ., Director of Governmental Liaison
MEMORANDUM
T ·o:
Mayor I van Allen, Jr.
From:
Subject:
Dan Sweat ~
City of Atlanta participation in federal programs
to combat crime and delin quency
The Omnibus Crime C ontrol and Safe Streets Act an d the Juvenile
Delinquency Prevention and Control Act of 1968 are two recently
enacted federal g rant-in-aid statutes whic h offer real promise of
assistance to the City of Atlanta.
With the emphasis on law and order in the platforms of the national
political parties, it is evident that full funding of these acts a s w ell
as additional federal tools in this area will be forthcoming.
In order to fully participate, it will be necessary for the City of
Atlanta to develop comprehensive and realistic plans for training,
research and operational planning for riot prevention and control.
There is also demonstration money which might b e used very
effectively if we have the means to use it.
The attached p ro posal which w ould reorganize the Atlanta Childr en
and Yo uth Services Council illustrates the need for some car eful
consideration of Atlanta's immediate and future needs in the
planning and development of programs to prevent and combat crime
and delinquency.
In view of this, the following points are suggested:
1.
No action be taken at this time on the proposed amendments to
the resolution creating the Atlanta Children and Youth Services
Council.
�Mayor Allen
Page Two
August 26 , 1968
2.
Serious consideration be given to merging the Atlanta
Children and Youth Services Council with the Metropolitan
Atlanta Cornrnission on Crime and Delinquency. The ACYSC
might be the youth or delinquency arm of the Crime Commission.
3.
The Crime G_ommission be designated as our planning agency
for the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act and the
Juvenile Delinquency Act.
4.
Whatever the organizational structure, the Youth and Juvenile
Delinquency programs should provide for the involvement of
young people in the planning and execution of the program.
The policy board should be composed entirely of people under
30 years of age.
5.
The Crime Cornrnission should be recognized and supported
by the City and the counties of Metropolitan Atlanta.
6.
It is recornrnended that the Mayor ask the Chairmen of the
Crime C o mmission and the Youth Council to discuss a possible
merger of the two organizations at an early date in order that
we get full advantage of the federal legislation.
DS:fy
�A ugust 14 , 1968
MEMORANDUM
To: Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr .
From: Dan Sweat
The attached memo from John Cox relates to the Rodent Control
proposal he has worked on for quite some time .
The Grant Review Bo rd considered this proj ct and recommended
it b llll d by EOA. This w s done with the underst nding that no
money w s v il ble.
l h v
talk d with J ohn about thi
many times.
It is my ie ling that w should not attempt to obtain political
influence to get this propo 1 accepted. l fe l that :U: do s not
m tit th t much importanc .
DS :fy
�__
,
Atlanta Children and Youth
1201-B CITY HALL
PHONE
Services
522-4463 - EXT. 437
ATLANTA,
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
JOHN W. COX,
Exc:c:UTIVE
w.
GEORGIA
THOMAS,
v.
30303
CHAIRMAN
MICHAEL H. TROTTER, SECRETARY
D1RCCTOR
MRS. RHODES PERDUE, M£MBCR AT LARCl£
FLETCHER COOMBS, TR£ASRU£R
MEMBERS:
FRANKLIN
City of Atlanta
ROBERT M . WOOD, CHAIRMAN
Council
July :L3, 1968
FRANK R. CARMINES
FLETCHER COOMBS
DEJONGH FRANKLIN
G. ARTHUR HOWELL
MRS. VIVIAN W. HENDERSON
OCIE J . IRONS
JERRY LUXEMBURGER
7
FRANK A. PLAYER
MRS. MARY B . SANFORD
MRS. C . R. YATES
c:)>_
MEMORANDUM TO THE MAYOR
FRO!-i:
John W. C o x ~
As you kno~, the Youth Council and several other agencies submitted a
Rodent Control Proposal to DHEW.
The proposal. was submitted t,y E.O.A. The City's Sanitary Department
and several other agencies will be co-sponsors.
We thought at the time that the Rodent Control Funds would have been
appropriJted. It was passed by the House, but not by the Senate. It
looks pretty dim to me that special rodent money will be availe~le.
However, I do understand that HEW has some funds tnat it might make
available for some special project.
The request is that you do whatever you can to help us get this project
funded.
Since this was to have been a part of the YOP effort, the Vice President,
as well as Senator Talmadg e might be helpful here.
E x - O Fn c 1o ~C H 1EF'
O F' P O L ICE,
H E RB E RT T . JE N K INS
-
S UPT. O F"
S c:H o o L. s, JOH N W . LETSO N
-
GE NE R A L
MaR .
O F'
P A R KS ,
J A C K C . DELI U S
�MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT BETWEEN
THE ATLANTA CHILDREN AND YOUTH SERVICES
COUNCIL Al"'ifD THE COMPREHENS1VE HEALTH PROJECT
Acceptance and Endorsement of the Community Development
Aide Project Subject to the approval of the Comprehensive
Health Project; the Atlanta Children and Youth Services
Council Board of Directors; the Public Health Service of
the U. S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare; and
the availability of Federal Grant Fund 314 (e) (1), the
Comprehensive Hea~th Project will carry out the specific
responsibilities outlined below and included in the Community Development Aide Project approved subject to the
terms and conditions set forth below:
The Comprehensive Health Project fully endorses the Community Development Aide Project and agrees to be a
cooperating agency carrying out the specific responsibilities
outlined below.
A.
The Comprehensive Health Project will assist in the
administrative aspects of the training of aides (i.e.,
assist in teacher recruitment, etc.) No health Project
funds are to be involved directly .
~
-143.215.248.55 -sd ~
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.
('Name-)
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A -
Calvin A. Brown, Jr., M.D.
(143.215.248.55l~)t Co-Direc_t_o_r_ _ _ _ _
�MEMORANDUM OF AGREEY£ NT BETWEEN
THE ATLANTA CEILDREN AND YOUTH SERVICES
COUNCIL AND THE FULTON COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT
Acceptance and Endorsement of the Community Development Aide Project
Subject to the approval of the Commissioner of the Fulton County Health
Department; the Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council Board of
Directors; the Public Health Service of the u. s. Department of Health,
Education and Welfare; and the availability of Federal Grant Fund 314
(e) (1), the Fulton County Health Department will carry out the specific
responsibilities outlined below and included in the Community Development
Aide Project approved subject to the terms and conditions set forth below.
The Fulton County Health Department endorses the Community Development
Aide Project and agrees to be a cooperating a gency carrying out the specific
reiponsibilitie s outlined below:
A.
The Fulton County Health Department will request work crews and crew
chiefs as need ed for rat control work. The health department will be
responsible for training the requested crews in the ir areas of competence
concerning the health-related aspects of rat-borne disea s e s, rat ha bits,
and rat poisons. It will also provide advice to the Rat Control Proj e ct
in deve loping me thods a nd proc edures for the surveys and poisoning
programs.
Director, Environmental .Health Services
(Title)
Approved
··
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Commissioner of Health , Fulton County
\
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C ITYO · .A'I,T "ANr-t:~~
crrY HALL
ATLANTA. GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
August 26, 1968
'
, ;.
IVAN ALLE N, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Admin ist ra t ive Assistant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secret ary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental liaison
MEMORANDUM
To: Mayor Ivan Alle n, Jr.
From: Dan S w e a\lt ~
Subject:
City of Atlanta participation in federal programs
to comba t crime and d elinquency
The Omnibus Crime C ontrol and Safe Stre e ts Act and the Juvenile
Delinquency Pre vention and Control Act of 1968 are t w o recently
enacted fede r a l g ran t-in -aid sta tutes whi ch offe r r eal p r omi se of
as s istance to the C ity of Atlanta .
With th e e m pha s is on law and order in the platforrns of the national
political pa r t ie s, it is evi dent that full fundin g o.:'. these a cts a s well
as add iti onal fede r a l to ol s i n this ar e a w ill b e fo rth coming.
I n o rd e r to fully p articipa t e , it will b e neces sary for t he C i t y of
Atlanta t o d eve l o p c om pr e h ens i ve a nd r eali s ti c _pla n s for tr a ining ,
re s ear ch a nd o p e rational plapni ng for riot p revention a n d c ontrol.
There is a l so de mons t rati on mone y w..hich migh t b e u sed v ery
effe c t i vel y if we h a ve t he m e ans to u se it.
The a tta ched propo sal w hich would r e organiz e the Atlant a Chil dr e n
and Youth S ervi ces C o unc il i llus tr a t es th e n ee d for s ome c a r eful
c onsiderat ion of A tl ant a ' s i mmedi a t e and future needs in the
. pl a nning and d evelopme nt of programs to pr e vent and combat crime
_and d e linque n c y .
In view o f t his, t he foll owing point s are sugges t e d:
1.
No a ction be t aken at t h is time on the proposed amendments to
the resolution creating the Atl ant a Children and Yo uth Servi ces
Council.
�-·
Mayor Allen
Page Two
August 26 , 1968
I
2.
Serious consideration be given to merging the Atlanta
Children and Youth Services Council with the Metropolitan
Atlanta Commission on Crime and Delinquency. The ACYSC
might be the youth or delinquency arm' of the Crime Commission.
3.
The Crime Commission be,-designated as our planning agency
for the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act and the
Juvenile Delinquency Act.
4.
Whatever the organizational structure, the Youth and Juvenile
Delinquency programs should provide for the involvement of
young people in the planning and execution of the program.
The policy board should be composed entirely of people under
30 years of age.
5.
The Crime Commission should be recognized and supported
by the City and the counties c:if Metropolitan Atlanta.
6.
It is recommended that the Mayor ask the Chairmen of the
Crime Commis s ion and the Youth Council to discuss a possible
merger of the two organizations at an early rlate in order that
we get full advantage of the federal legislation.





DS:fy
�.
'
r'
I
I-·
I
I
C ITY OF., .ATLAJ: T.i~
I
CITY HALL
'
!
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
August 26, 1968
II
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
Ii
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secre tary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison
,
i
MEMORANDUM
. ...
.," .
·I
To: Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
From: Dan Sweat
Subject:
--At?~
p . .,. .
City of Atlanta participation in federal programs
to combat crime and delinquency
The Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act an d the Juvenile
Delinquency Prevention and Control Act of 1968 are two recently
enacted federal g rant-in-aid statutes whi ch offer r eal promi se of
assistance to the Ci ty of Atlanta.
Wi.th the emphasis on law and order in the platforms of the national
politi cal parties , it is evident that full funding of these act s a s well
as additi onal f ederal tools in this area w ill b e forthcoming.
In ord er to ful ly p articipate , _it will b e necessary for the City of
Atlanta to d evelop compr e h e nsive and r e_ali s tic _plans fo r tr a ining,
re search and operational pla?ning for riot prev e ntion and control.
There 1.s al so d emons tration money whi ch might be used very
effectively if we h ave the means to u se it.
..
The attached propo sal w hich would reorganize the Atlant a Childr en
and Youth S ervices Council illustrates th e need for some careful
c onsiderati on of Atlanta's immediate and future needs in the
. planning and development of programs to prevent and combat crime
and d elinquency.
In view of this , the following p oints are s u ggested:
1.
No action b e t aken at this time on the p ropos e d amendments to
the resolution creating the Atlanta Children and Youth Services
Council.
�.. ~

Mayor Allen .
Page Two
August 26, 1968
I
2.
Serious consideration be given to merging the Atlanta
Children and Youth Services Council with the Metropolitan
Atlanta
Commission on Crime and Delinquency.
The ACYSC
.
r
might be the youth or delihquency arm of the Crime Commission.
3.
The Crime Commission be,-designated as our planning agency
for the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act and the
Juvenile Delinquency Ad:.
4.
Whatever the organizational structure, the Youth and Juvenile
Delinquency programs should provide for the involvement of
young people in the planning and execution of the program.
The policy board should be composed entirely of people under
30 years of age.
5.
The Crime Commission should be recognized and supported
by the City and the counties of Metropolitan Atlanta.
6.
It is recommended that the Mayor ask the Chairmen of the
Crime Commission and ·th e Youth Council to discuss a possible
merger of the two organizations at an early date in order that
we get full advantage of the federal legislation.
,
DS :fy
/
-
.
�i ~11
ii
I
I
I
C ITY OF .ATLANnn_.l\_
i
CITY HALL
Tel. 522 -4463 Area Code 404
August 26, 1968
I
To:
IVAN ALLEN, JR ., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS , Administrati ve Assistant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governme_ntal Liaison
,
MEMORANDUM
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
.,." .
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
From:
Subject:
Dan Sweat
p-w~
City of Atlanta participation in federal programs
to combat crime and delinquency
The Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act and the Juvenile
Delinquency Prevention and Control Act of 1968 are two recently
enacted federal grant-in-aid statutes which offer real promise of
assistance to the City of Atlanta.
With the emphasis on law and order in the platforms of the national
political parties, jt is evident that full funding of these acts as well
as additional federal tools in this area will be forthcoming.
In order to fully participate, it will be necessary for the City of
Atlanta to develop comprehensive and re_alistic _plans for training,
research and operational pla_nning for riot prevention and control.
There is also demonstration money w...hich might be used very
effectively if we have the means to use it.
The attached proposal which would reorganize the Atlanta Children
and Youth Services Council illustrates the need for some careful
consideration of Atlanta's immediate and future needs in the
. planning and d ev elopment of programs to prevent and combat crime
and delinquency.
In view of this, t he follo w ing points are suggested:
1.
No action be taken at this time on the propose d amendments to
the resol ution cr e ating the Atlanta Childr en and Youth Services
Council.
�Mayor Allen
Page Two
August 26, 1968
·,
2.
Serious consideration be given to merging the Atlanta
Children and Youth Services Council with the Metropolitan
Atlanta Commission on Crime and Delinquency. The ACYSC
might be the youth qr delinquency arm' of the Crime Commission.
3.
The Crime Commission be,tle signated as our planning agency
for the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act and the
Juvenile Delinquency Act.
4.
Whatever the organizational structure, the Youth and Juvenile
Delinquency programs should provide for the involvement of
young people in the planning and execution of the program.
The policy board should be composed entirely of people under
30 years of age.
5.
The Crime Commission should be recognized and supported
by the City and the counties of Metropolitan Atlanta.
6.
It is recommended that the Mayor ask the Chairmen of the
Crime C o mmission and the Youth Council to discuss a possible
merger of the two organizations at an early date in order that
we get full advantage of the fed e ral legislation .
.,
DS:fy
.,
"
�[Hf R
~
INTER-OFFICE
Subject:
To:
e
n
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e
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r
348 PE ACHTR E E STREET
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30308
404•524•8041
MEM ORAN D A
Navy L e ague Youth Programs
. Dan Swe at
From:
Tom Tucke r
A co py of t his n ews r e l e as e went to Earl Lan d e rs .
able to us e i t .
-T T T c b
Mr. Dan Sweat, Jr.
The Mayor's Office
City Hall
6 8 Mitchell Street
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
s
Date: 22 Aug 1968
H ope you fello w s we r e
�NAVY LEAGUE OF THE UNITED STATES
For Immediate Release
1 7 August 1968
BLUE WATER SAFARI
For Navy League Cadets
A group of Atlanta boys, age 12-13, will have an opportunity to satisfy Youth's
natural interest in the ways of the Sea.
They are to spend several days on hoard the
Navy's newest Mine countermeasures ship the USS OZARK )MCS-2).
enclosed).
(photograph
The Ozark has just returned from its arduous task of searching for the
nuclear submarine Scorpian.
The Commanding Officer of the Ozark is Captain
William B. Hooffstetter. (photograph enclosed).
Navy League Cadets are recruited from all walks of life.
voluntary.
Cadets assume no military service oblig ation.
Membership is enti rely
Cadets may re sign a t any
time or they may ~ mplete an entire 5 year program by advancing to the Sea C a det
Corps at age 14.
If the Cadet wishe s, at a g e 17, provided his scholastic standing in
hig h s chool is satisfactory, he will b e e l igible t o take adva ntage of the N avy 1 s m a ny
educ a tional opportunities at the college of h is choic e, i n cluding Ana poli s .
could mean the equiva lent of a $15, 000. schola rship .
known Atla nta citizens .
e n joy it.
Thi s
All Cade t Of fic e rs ar e w ell
These men a re exp e rie n c ed in w o rking wit h boys and they
They a re cap abl e inst r ucto r s .
The y serv e without p a y.
The C o mmanding Officer of t his group of Atlant a boy s is L i e ute nant: C o mmander Delb ert D . Spr a gue .
w h ich w e re at sea.
M r. Sprag u e s erved w ith t h e Navy fo r m o re than 24 y ears .
16 of
H e i s a sub ma riner by c h o ice and is a m u ch deco rated o fficer.
Sinc e M r . Spragu e is a nuclear e n gineer , o ne of hi s a ssig n ments wa s o n bo ard t he
Savannah.
(
Cur rently h e i s w ith t he fi rm o f R o bert & C ompany Ass ocia te s of Atlanta,
Ge o rgi a .
Altho ugh a ny boy age 12 - 13 may j o i n the Navy League C adet Co r p s they must first
pass the Navy's standard AQT test and physical e xamination ,
T h es e t e sts and
�Page 2
For immediate release (17 Aug 1 68)
examinations are given each applicant without cost or obligation to the applicant.
Every boy age 12-13, and his parents, is entitled to know something about that boys
mental and physical apptitudes._ Standard Navy tests and examinations such as
those given to Cadet applicants sometimes reveal unknown talents.
Cadets · are required to have very high ratings.
Navy League
After review of the results of
these tests and examinations by an impartial Board, the applicant is notified as to
whether he should come in for counciling, should repeat the tests, or has successfully passed the requirements.
If the applicant then w ishes to take advantag e of Cadet training, a deposit of $ 35.
is required to cover the cost of insurance and administrative expe nses for o n e
( -
year and the replacement cost of uniforms and personal equipment .
Unifor ms
and equipment issued to Cadets by thei r Offic e rs are the p r ope rty of the Navy
League o f the United States a nd ar e lo a n e d to t h e C a de ts during the i r traini ng per iods ,
Sh ould a Cad e t l e ave the Co r ps fo r any r e a son h e is re q uir e d to t u r n i n all
uni fo r ms and equipment issue d to him a n d he will be refund ed $1 0 . when all unifo r ms and equi pment a r e r et u r n e d t o the N a vy L eague.
All ~ adets t rain at drill and i n cla ss r ooms in t h e Nava l T r a inin g Center o n t h e
G eorgia Tech C a mpus .
D rill and Cl as s r oo m pe r i o d s
curr entl y fr om 7: 00 P M to 9 : 00 P M e ve r y F riday.
s hip, fir st a id, a nd safety .
They a r e p r ovi de d wit h
ar e t w o h o ur s ea c h week,
H e r e they lea rn bas i c s e amanm ent al , mor a l a nd phys i cal
tr a ining thru the m e dium o f N aval and o t he r in st ructi ons.
(
\
They have an oppor -
1n
tunity to qualifyA s wimmi n g a nd marks man s hip.
They develope p r incipals of
p at r iotism, good c h aracter, and good citizenship.
They becom e i n stille d w ith a
�Pag e 3
For immediate release (1 7 Aug '68)
/
I
sense of duty and discipline, self-respect and respect for others.
Should later in
life a Cadet decide to enter the military forces he will, by virtue of having completed Sea Cadet Training, be eligi ble to enlist i n the United States Naval Reserve
as a Seaman, two pay grades ·above the normal enlistee.
All practical factors training of Cadets is not necessarily on Naval Ships,
Naval Stations and Installations.
Here they learned about backpack -
They constructed shelters, learned how to build fires,
and to cook their own meals from dehydrated ingredients.
to snare trout in the trouts native habitat.
~-
at
Last June their survival training took them to
remote areas in the mountains of Tennessee.
ing and trail recognition.
or
They were shown how
They saw a part of the forrest w h ich
never had been i nhabited by man and w here no t re e s had ever been cut ·or any
(
forrest fires had burned.
This is the primeval forrest just as it w a s w hen the
first w hite man set foot on Ame r i c an soil.
moss .
T he fo r res t floor i s c arpet ed with
The re i s no underbrus h e x c e pt n ear the streams.
And sunlight is broke n
i n to shafts as it streak s thru tre es as tall as highrise building s.
At Sea on board t h e Ozark there will b e a n entirely differ ent life .
T he C adets will
be mixed with t he r e gula r c r e w and will p erform t he s ame dut ies and stand the
same wat ches.
T hey will b e b i lle ted wit h the crew and will e at wit h the c re w .
Each Cadet will have a p e r sonal instructo r to show and demonst r ate the m yriads
of c hores ne ed ed to k eep a man- o f-w a r o n act i ve d uty.
He w i ll have an opportun-
ity t o put t o us e the contents of the Blue Jac ket s M anu a l w h ich he ha s been study(
ing.
Accompa nying the Cadet s on this crui s e will b e the Navy Leagues Sixth Naval
�Page 4
Fo::!: irmnediate release (17 Aug 1 68)
(
District National Director of Youth Programs, Mr. Thomas T. Tucker.
the son of Mrs. Cornelia Tucker of 21 Lamboll Street in Charleston.
Wava Dell, is an Officer in the Navy League Cadet Corps.
He is
His wife,
While the men are on
"Blue Water" she and their daughter Deveney Tucker will be staying in Charleston
at 21 Lamboll Street.
Their son, .John Hyrne Tucker, is one of the Cadets w ho
will be on board the Ozark during its sea maneuvers.
Another son, Roger St.
George Tucker, is a Sea Cadet and is in "Boot Camp" training at the Naval Air
Facility, Orlando, Florida.
on the seas.
Being a native Charlestonian Mr. Tuc.ker is at home
His listing in "Who's Who" reads like a story book and show s that
he has always breathed life into Youth Programs.
C
When he was President of the
Atlanta Council of the Navy League he established the Sea Cadet Program.
program is designed especially fo r boys from ag es 14 thru age 17.
Thi s
He wa s Chair-
man of the special council cormnittee which started training the age 12-13 C a dets.
These Cadet Programs are the United States Navy Leagues national ans w er to
training teenagers for a useful life in our society.
that he is trustw orthy and of good cha racter.
able to perform the duties of a Cad e t.
Each Cadet must demons t rate
He must prove that he is p h ysically
He must show that he has sufficie nt edu -
cati o n al b ack g r oun d to abso r b t h e t r a i n i n g offere d to h i m .
Cade t t rai ning str e s ses
the Naval virt u e of p e r son a l hygiene , neatness , courtesy , obedie nc e, d ependability, a s·ense of respo n s ibilit y fo r d e veloping good cha r a c te r, a nd a motivation of self
dicipline.
(
�August 14, 1968
MEMORANDUM
To: Mr . John Cox
From: Dan Sweat
I will be glad to discus
this with you.
I
nothing wrong with it as long as it is und rstood that the
Atl nta Children and Youth 5 rvices Council has not b en
d ignated as our official g ncy to d velop plans for Atl nt
or the m t:ropolit n 1'e under ith r of th s · actions.
00:fy
�- - - - - - --
• , I
- - --
-
- - ------,, , - - -
Dan,
JXg
and Youth Services Council
I should discuss this with
you
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303
!2-4463 - EXT. 437
it.
FRANKLIN
'.ity of Atlanta
w.
THOMAS, V. CHAIRMAN
MICHAEL H. TROTTER, SECRETARY
__ _.gust 12, 1968
MRS. RHODES PERDUE, MCMDCR AT LAROE
f""LE.TCHlt.f"( t,;UUMB!;;i, rREASRUICR
McMDCRs:
FRANK R. CARMINES
FLETCHER COOMBS
OE .JONGH FRANKLIN
G. ARTHUR HOWELL
MRS . VIVIAN W. HENDERSON
OCIE J. IRONS
JERRY LUXEMBURGER
FRANK A. PLAYER
MRS. MARY B . SANFORD
MRS . C. R. YATES
Mr. Oliver Welch, Director
State Planning Department
State of Georgia
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mr. Welch:
The Atlanta
the City of
in the Safe
and Control
Children and Youth Services Council, an official agency of
Atlanta, is interested in full participation with the State
Streets and Crime Act and the Juvenile Delinquency Prevention
Act of 1968.
To follow-up on previous conversations with you, I am writing you requesting
that we be included in all appropriate briefings, planning and instructional
meetings and, conferences related to these Acts.
While our major and prir,-.a ry emphasis and relationship will be with the
J. D. Act, we do intend to propose some programs and projects related to the
Safe Streets and Crime Program, especially in the areas of research and
demonstration.
In both of these areas, we will, of course, be working in close relationship
with Mr. Dan Sweat, Governmental 4iaison Director for the City of Atlanta.
We will be preparing for submission at this· time, proposals under several
sections of the Juveni le Delinquency Prevention and Control Act of 1968
and the Safe Streets and Crime ActQ
I am fully aware of the fact that guidelines and proceudres for neither of
these Acts have been developed.
Our contact person on this matter should be our Executive Director,
Mr. John W. Cox, City Hall, 522-4463, extension 437.
E x- O,nc 1o·C H 1C F OF P o L1c e, HERBERT T . JENKINS
·
SUPT, OF SCHOOLS, JOHN W. LETSO N
·
GcNER AL MoR. OF P ARKS, JAC K C . DELIUS
�j_
Mr. Oliver Welch
August 12, 1968
page -2If you have further instructions, please convey them to Mr. Coxo
Thanks again for your cooperatio~.
I am·
Sincerely,
Robert M. Wood
Chairman
RMW: JWC: hdj
cc:
Mayor Allen
Mr. Sweat
Senator Ward
Representative Alexander
Chief Jenkins
·,
_
�Atlanta Children and Youth
1201-B CITY HALL
PHONE
Services ·Council
522-4463 - EXT . 437
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303
IVAN ALLEN, JR ., MAYOR
,RANKLIN
City of Atlanta
ROBERT M. WOOD , c .. ..:1RMAN
JOHN W. COX, ExEcUTIV E DIRECTOR
THOMAS,
v.
CHAIRMAN
MRS . RHODES PERDUE , MEMBER
AT
URDE
.August 2, 1968
,LETCHER COOMBS, TREASRUER
McMBER s:
w.
MICHAEL H. TROTTER, SECRETAR Y
,RANK R. CARMINES
,LETCHER COOMBS
OE JONGH rRANKLI N
13 . ARTHUR HOWELL
MRS . VIVIAN W . HENDERSON
OCIE J . IRONS
JERRY LUXEMBURGER
rRANK A . PLAYER
MRS . MARY B . SANrORD
MRS. C . R. YATES
MEMORANDUM FOR THE MAYOR
I mentioned the Modernization Program of the HUD when we were
coming back from the resident camp tour.
This prog ram is made available with funds set aside by the
Secretary 'of HUD to r:l evelop physical: .and , social modernization
programs in public housing.
Funds for this program can and must be used in a variety of
creative and innovative ways to improve buildings, grounds and
prqgra ms in public housing.
The major stipulation is that the Authority develogsa program
of citizen involvement.
JWC/hd J
Ex-O , .. c1c - c .... , c, PCLIC£, HERBERT T . JENKINS
.
SUPT . CF SCHOOL S, JOHN
w.
LETSON
ClENeR AL MaR. c , P ARKS , JACK C. DELIUS
�MEMORANDUM FOR THE MAYOR
The Moderriiza~io~ ~ro~ram was authorized in December 1967
by HUD, Housing Assistance Administration.
The program is designed to upgrade physical plants, change
out-moded management policies and expand community services programs and facilities in low-rent public housing projects.
The local authorities would be expected to develop long
and short range programs in:
tion of buildings and grounds;
(c)
(a)
modernization and rehabilita-
(b)
involvement of tenants;
expansion of community services;
intensifying efforts
(d)
to assist tenants in economic advancement;
(e)
increased
employment for tenants.
The financing of modernization work is to be met from
current operating and development funds.
The latter is provided
to the extent that the modernization work cannot be financed by
residual receipts and opera~ing reserve funds.
limitations.
There are other

This program seems like a major .tool in carrying out part
of the Mayor's Housing Improvement Program.
At the same time,
there is - a good possibility for youth empl oyment and training.
�I am not sure how much money could be made available under
this program.
However, it seems to offer some real assist if local
housing authorities will use it.
I understand that Atlanta, so far, is not using this program potential.
�Atla~·ta Children and Youth Services Council
1201-B CITY HALL
PHONE
522-4463
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303
IVAN ALLEN, .JR., M AY OR
FRANKLIN M . THOMAS, V . CHAIRMAN
ROBERT M . WOOD, CH A IRMAN
JOHN
w. cox,
MEMBER S :
E X ECUTI V E
MICHAEL TROTTER ,
DIRECTOR
Sccv · TREASURER
MRS . RHODES PERDUE, MEMBER AT LARGE
FRANK R . CRAMINES
FLETCHER COOMBS
DE .JDNGH FRANKLIN
G . ARTHUR HOWELL
June 17, 1968
MRS . VIVIAN HENDERSON
OCIE .J . IRONS
.JERRY LUXEMBURGER
FRANK A . PLAYER
MRS . MARY 8 . SANFORD
MRS . C . R . YATES
TO:
COMMUNITY NEWS DIRECTORS
FROM:
ATLANTA CHILDREN AND YOUTH SERVICES COUNCIL
RE YOUTH OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM ACTIVITIES
This office shall send each week's schedule of youth activities to you on
Monday. Please make spot announcements of these activities or publicize
them any way you can. The contact person is listed in case you wish to
cover the story in depth. The activities listed are in "underprivileged"
areas only. These events are successful only if the public is aware of
t hem. Thank you for helping pass this information on.
Sincerely,
~
dJ.
~
Execqtive Director
E x · DFnc1o· C H1EF OF' PoL1cc, H E RBERT T . JE NK I N S
-
S u PT,
o f° S c: H ooL s , J O HN W . L E T SO N
-
G ENERA L
MGR. o F
Fl A RKs,
JACK
c.
DE L IUS
�•
..
"E'V' EN T


'


II
YOUTH OPPORTMTY ACTIVITIES
JUNE 24-JUNE 30
F~.:.n. ~o-:vl



c · I~ :7'.1 -:-n Tu::..-ne r Road



.-_,:~t·~::.t :


Ant hony Robert
Bowling program every Monday through Friday at 10:00 a.rn ••
duced r a tes for needy organizations.
Free shoes and re-
Royal Knights Foundations, Inc.
255 Vine Street
Phone : 524-7312
Cont act : ~.r . John Brown
There is a free day camp that provides instruction in physical education,
persona l hygiene, and behavior. There are sports facilities in swimming, baseba ll ,
munic , archery, and arts and craf ts. Campers will take a trip to Six Flags Over
Georgia on Wednesday, June 26th and a trip to Sunbeam Bakeries on Fr iday, June 28th.
Cf.-. >::t r :.:i. l City EOA Center
n "J r-'i.:::de t ta Str eet
Il,·:n?:; 873-6759
C-:.. ,_ t .. c t : l'irs . Cut hi e
~unday, June 23, Playboy Club is spons oring a day at Lake Al t oona for anyone
in t 2.:::-ei3 t ed .
I'i..1 2sday , June 25th at 7: 00 p.m., there will be a record dance hop.
Th~ts day J une 27th, the Ruth Mitchell Dance Company is spons oring a jazz dance
c1.:>.2. s fo r youths 10 years ol d and up.
-~~ r E {)mes Community Girls I Club


.- . , ~-c.: .1 Stree ts. W.


Y: ·.-.- · 524- 3361
C :-::
Cc~ : ·-~ ... t:
Mrs. Hood
Wednesday J une 26th, the At lanta Gas-Light Company wil l t each a course in
gas and elec tr i c appliances.
Price Neighborhood Service Center
1127 Capitol Avenue S. E.
Phone: 767-7541
Contact: Mr. J araes Callan, center manager
Wednesday June 26th, there will be a tour of Atlanta's libraries. Also
on Wednesday at 1:30 there will be a story telling hour in the Community Center.
Butler Street Y.M.C.A.
22 Butler Street N. E.
p·!,-:-~, : 524-0246
('.-.; ...~·.ac t: Mr,. Charles Stephens
There Will be a fabulous week long camp outing every week fer any indigent
�page 2
youngster.
seminar.
This cnmp begins on Monday.
The YMCA is also sponsoring a work-study
Parks Department
Recreation Department
Phone: 522-4463
Contact: Mr. Cliff Alexander
The Atlanta Chiefs soccer team is sponsoring a soccer clinic. They will
teach prospective teachers this Saturday. Subsequently, these teachers will
organize a league. The league will work with the Chiefs. Contact your local
recreational leader.
Festival Cinema II
653 Fair Street S. W.
Phone: 577-3892
Contact: Mr. George Ellis
Mr. George Ellis will open his newly remodeled 900 seat theater every
Wednesday afternoon. The films are free and will begin at 1:30 p.m •• Adults
who are escorting children will be allowed free entrance.
F.OA Center
Neighborhood Youth Corps
Phone: 525-6266
Contact: Mr. Frank Raughton
Barbara Hall will sing on the
June 27th at 7:00 p.m.
Showr.tobile at Butler Park.
This will be on
Northwest Neighborhood Service
1927 Hollywood Road N. W.
Phone: 799-9322
Contact: Mr. Howard Jefferson, director
Every Monday a dance class at Finch Elementary School from 8:45 - 10:30 a.m.
and at Scott Elementary School from 11:00 to 1:00. Also, every Tuesday and
Thursday a singing class at Springfield Baptist Church fron 9:00 to 11:00 a.m ••
Pittsburg Neighborhood Service Center
993\ McDaniel Streets. W.
Phone: 523-1577
Contact: Mr. Sam Baxter, director
Monday June 24th a story hour program will be held from 10-12:00 a.rn. and
from 2-4 p.m. for children 3 years to 9 years old. There will be volunteers and a
librarian to conduct such.
Sum -- Mee Neighborhood Service
65 Georgia Avenue S. · •
Phone: 577-1351
Contact: Rev. Daniel BGa~d, director
Mrs. Boozer, information
Monday June 24th, a play at Chaney Stadiua
at 7:30 will be produced.
It
�page 3
is entitled "Charlie's Aunt".
Atlanta Singers will teach musie and have been teaching music to elementary
school children. Every Monday at 7:30 beginning in July will hold concerts.
Contact the directr,rs of the EDA c(lllters in Perry <1rea, Pittsburg .area, F.clgewood
area, Nash Wash area.
Spelman College
Contact: Dr. Allison
Room 103
Fine Arts Department
From Monday to Friday from 9-11 p.m. there will be voice classes.
Atlanta Public Library
Phone: 522-9363
Contact: Jean Coinn
For youth between the ages of 16-18 there will be a photography program.
There will be 6 one hour s~ssions from 2:30 to 9:30 p ..m. for six weeks.
Registration is held at Center ~f Arts, 1243 Simpson Road, S. W.
�June 11, 1968
,
Miss Kar en Meader
Yout h Employment Rese rcher
Nat ional Associ tion for the
Advancement of Colored Peopl e
17 90 Bro dway
New York, New York 10019
D
r Mi
Meader:
I have forwarded your 1 tter to Mr. John Cox., Ex cut lvi
Director. Atl t Chlldr n and Youth Sel"Vice• C ouncil.
Mr . Cox ii r •pon ibl for coordinating youth progr ms
in th City of tlanta.
I am sure that you will he r from him oon.
Sincerely your •
Dan Sw
DS:fy
t
�I
lATIONAL A SSOCIATION FOR THE ADVA CEMENT OF COLO ED PEO PLE
SEVENTEEN NIN ETY BROADWAY
NEW YORK , N. Y. 10019 . •
212-245-2100
May 29, 1968
Mayor's Office
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Sir,
The Youth and Coll e g e Divisi on of the Nat ion a l Association
for the Advancement of Colored People (NAA CP) is prese ntly
developing a yout h emp loyment project~ - Tn:i.s oper at i on will
cover ten cities, one of which is yours, and will be a cooperative effort of NAA CP natio n a l staff and our local units
in each community. The project will b e des igne d to include
both long -r ·.n g e and part-time or summer youth empioy--rnent.
So that th e best possible pro ject be desi gned, it is
necessary for us to catelog ue all effort~ now being conducted
in this prog ram area in your locatjon. Thus, we wo uld
appreciate it if you would let us know as soon as possible
exactly what o pe rations you a r e fundin e or conducting in your
city. Critical informa tion about pro gram d es i gn, hi story,
· scope, etc., would be in va lua b le, if avail ab le.
We would a ppr e ciat e hearing from y ou as soon as p ossible.
Sincerely,
l-<~ ~~
Karen Meader
Youth Employment Researcher
~Lku~·
v&i-~ cl~
-
'
�I
1968 YOUTH OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM
SUMMARY REPORT to
THE MAYOR of ATLANTA
Subnitted by
THE ATLANTA CHILDREN and YOUTH SERVICES COUNCIL
Robert M. Wood, Chairnan
John W. Cox, Executive Director
�I NTRODUCTION
This report is a suonary review of work done by various agencies, or ganizations, individuals and branches of governoent Feder al, State and Local i n
the 1968 Youth Oppor tunity Prograra.
In late Januar y 1968 Vice Pr esident Hubert Hunphrey, Chai rman of the President's CoClfili.ttee on Youth Opportuni ty invited the city of Atlant a to a special oeeting in Washington, DnC. The overall purpose of thi s oeeting wa s to
provide activi ties for dis advantaged Youth in the areas of Ebployoent, Recreation and Education o
AtJ.anta began .i oraed~.atdy t o pJ.o..n and coord inate prograos for youth act ivi ties using a 11 ava ila ble ~·es ou1·ce.s ~
Feder.al a s sistance ;,.rac gi ven to he lp Atlanta get it's prograos for yout h
underway . This assistanc e i:::1cluded a $30 , 000 planning grant froo the Depar t oent of Housing and Urban DG"vel opoento Thc::;c planning f unds were utili zed
by t he Atlanta Chi l dren and You:.:h Se:r:vi ce s Council, the of ficial coordinating agency for t ha ci ty o::2 !'. tlc.1ctan
The s t aff of th'3 Atlan~a. Ch:i.ld _·.m and Yout h Services Council was a~s igned the respons i bili ty f or br oad coordina tion of the entire Yout h Oppor t unity
Prograo. The prograo ,1as designed by ~pril 1968 and iopleoented in J une
1968 .
Meober s of the s t aff are: J ohn Wn Cox , Executive Director
L c·;·: ir. F o Di.d dns
Te:r:::y Allen
St2ve Fox
ORGANIZATION
Responding t o the Vice President 1 s request the city of Atlanta, at the
request of Mayor Ivan Allen, Jrn, established the Mayor's Council on Youth
Opportunity. Out of this Council caoc sub~coooittees t o deal with the problens. These are:
1.
Enployoent
..
Mr • Charles Stora, Lockheed Corp., Georgia
2.
Recz-eation
~
Mrc H.'.lrry Helton, YMCA
3c
Educatir:n ~- Mrs . Betty Cantor, B'na.i B' rith
4~
Pu~Hcity .. Mi2s Ann Cobb, Shell Oil Coopany
5,
Spec:.2.l Events
~
Nro Steve Fox
The effectivenesc of th0se coooittees as well as the entire Youth Opportunity Prograo is doc,xie:cted in the proceed:;.ng pages. There were two additional coaoittees:
1. Juvenile Delinquency - Mr. Janes McGovern
2.
Individual and Casework
Services~ Mrs. Edith Hanbrick
Mrs. Marian Ford
�1
PLANNING
The 1968 Yout h Oppoi:'tun::.ty Prograo was coordinated by the Atlant<l
Children and You t-·h SE':;:vices Co:mcilo This council is Perving as staff ·
to the Met:::opolitan Youth Opportunity Council. It is cooposed of app"".
roxioately ffi agend.P.:: and organizations.
The Mayor of the city of Atlanta serves as general chairoan of the
Youth Opportunity Prograo. The Board of Directors of the Atlanta Children and Youth Se.rv:i.ce.:; Council serves as the Executive Connittee of the ..
Youth Opportunity Progrso, The representatives of the various participating ag~;:ici.es nnd or gr.nir.:ations serve as the oeobers of the Youth Opp,,.
or tUi.1ity Progr an~
Early in 1968 the Ch~iman of the Atlanta Children and Youth Services
s e nt corH:spond enc~ t o e,: c,:.:::y agency in the Metropolitan Atlanta area, in~
viting thc:o to pa r ::icip<-1.1:·~ in the Youth Opportunity Prograo. Correspond'"'.
ence ·u as also seut t o i !ld:;.1,·.i.ch.!-:. ls and resid ents inviting then to participate. Mo:.:·e t h;:n 8.'J ~~"-:-;.c :L e.~ a nd oany individuals and businesses indi~
cated th~y would partic ipate.
Every p::,~dcip.:~:;.t :::::.cl or-g::-.,:1._:;~tion tald.ng part in the Youth Opportunity
Pr ograo- wsre j_nvol\;,~d :!.::. t i, ~ pL:::-1nin 3 p ::: oce:s s . Several exploratory neetings
were held e :.::i:rl y i.:1 1 9S G ~t ~vh5.ch v arious coonittees and sub-coooittees were
fol."oed. Mo;~-=, t ~1a ·n "/;; p 1.:::.:..:.::!.:'..::..g r.icet:1.ngs ,;.~er e held. At these nee tings, the
following activ :i. t i e n ·,:.ve!'2. u,.1d or~'.sken~
1.
2,
3.
4,
s.
.-:s tabli.2 hoe-:::.t
es t a b lis h r:i2:1 t
establis hoe.n-:
establisho Qnt
establ i s ho?.n t
Jf
of
of
of
of
p'.!:osrao pl."iorities
cr:-ipJ.oynent sub~coooittee


re.erention sub ~coIIDittee


e:i.uc::i.tion sub~coooittee
g eogra phical sub-cor:u:;iittce
I n 2dcit i o::1 , Eco:io~ic Opp o~ t unity Atianta, Inc., IDA Neighborh~od Service
CentP.rs, '.;;he U:1ited A:_Jpea l l\.gencie s 0 a nd the Atlanta Youth Congress ·held
s ev t:::ra l o eet i n g2 .::nd confa~rcnc e s wi t h their participants and oeobers to
as c ":\r t a in t hoi:i:: needs and i nterests"
Th0 prinary pla n~ing r e sponsibilities for the 1968 prograo were assur;:ied
by:
1, E. O.Ao~ Inc3 (~onounity Ser vices Departoent)
2. E. O,A., I nc, CNAc~s
3 o United Appea :!. AgenciE's
4 . 'Ihe Pa:cks .r:.nd R2creation Depart oent
5 . The .At l a nt.::i. Ch:i.ldre:1 and Yout h Serv i c es Counci l
6. ':he Atlanta Public Schools
Other agenciE'.S p articipating in p l anning wer e:
1. The G orgia .St2.te Eoployoent Services
2 ~ \ii'.O?.: Tiad j_o StQtio::1
3 , '2:he F€.1e::.·:1 l &:8C'. ttive Board
4 o -::1e City P.:-·.:::s:::,,,n'-"l Depc.rt:oe.n t
5. :r::w r ~tic::al AlJ.::.;::i_,-:c o f Bu::: inessoen
6, -::1'2! f.t:! ..::.;.,:: t ::::. PubJ.~.c: U.bYG,:::-y
7.. '::h~ P..tJ 2::, t:-::i. Art::, C-:>·.:ncil
8. '2hG G2.org;.:: t.r t :: Connir,;:i ion
9. '.;:hG Of.C.c - o f City ~r.:-v kcn Coordina tion
10. The Unit,:,.d 1\;?pE.3.l Casc.';JO?~k Ag<',n cies
11. ~he D-2:~.::.lb C:::,-uc,.ty Eralz.h Depnrtraent
12 0 The FuJ.ton Co ..mty l-k.2.lth Departoent
13. EJ.:10r y t.:n ~.ven i ty
14. Atlanta Univ<: ·;-:-s ity
15. C~.a:r.k CoJ.1.egc
16. Moreho~~e CollcgP.
0
-
�2
17 .
18 .
19~
20 ,
21~
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
Spelr;ian College
Metro-Coooission for Crio e and Delinquency
Fulton County Medical Society
Grady Hospital (M&l Project)
The Christian Co~ndtl of Atlant~
The NAACP
The Atlanta Urban League
The Junior Chaober of Co~ erce
The Shell Oil, Co.
The Lilles, Battle and Neal Public Relations Firo
The Atlanta Police Depar toent (Crioe Prevention Bureau)
The Atlanta Youth Congress
All a gencies and individuals requesting funds for the Youth Opportunity
Prograo were asked to suboit a proposal to the Mayor's Council on Youth
Opportunity for approval under OEO and Youth Opportunity Progr ao guidelines.
A screening coDDittee was then organized to evaluate the proposed prograos.
The coornittee personnel were representative of the total coDrJunity, i.e.,
Youth Agencies, Private Agencies, Public Agencies and individuals froo the
coonqnities to be served.
The proposals subnitted for funding were presented to the Connunity Services Departoent E.o.A., Inc. by the screening cor.u:iittee. The Coanunity
Services Departoent developed, under the guidelines (OEO and Youth Oppor tunity Prograo) all prograos subo itted. The total package of proposals was
then subo itted to OEO-Washington f or approval.
Included in the planning process were the several surveys and studies
oa de to assess the needs of Atlanta's youth and the gaps in services to
oeet these needs. The followin g priorities wer e establis hed:
I.
PROGRAM PRIORITIES
A. Enp loyoent
1. Youth 14-21 years of a ge
2. Poor youth
B. Recr ea t i on
1. Recreational a c tivities of older youth dur ing evening hours
2. Coweunity organized a t hletics and ac t ivities
3. Organized athletic activi ties fo r i nner city youth
c. Education
1. Reoedial prograns i n poverty schoo ls
2. Tutorial and study help prograos
3. Cultural enrichoent progr aos
4. Make-up programs f or children attending half-day clasnes
5 . Socially, acadeoically and nentally retarded youth
11. AGE PRIORITIES
A. Uneoployed poor youth 16-21
B. Socially and acadeoically·retarded youth 6-13
C. Delinquent and potentially delinquent youth 14-21
D. Culturally deprived youth of all ages
E. Cot:10unity services and leadership developoent aoong youth 14-21
Each subnitted proposal dealth with t he priorities listed above. As
well as other needs in the city of Atlanta . These activities, for the
ooot part cons tituted the oajor portion of the 1968 Youth Opportunity
Prograo planning process .
The adoinistrative cost involved in the planning were borne by E.o.A.,
Inc. and the Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council.
The r;iany experiences encountered in the planning of this year's Youth
�3
Opport unity Prograo necessitates the following recoooendations;
1. That planning for the 1969 Youth Opportunity Prograo begin now at
the Neighborhood level.
2. That i oprovenents be nade on sooe coordination at the neighborhood
level aoong the various agencies concerned.
3. That the city appropriate to the council a soall fund for hiring local
coordinators froo March-June (part-tine) froo June-Septenber (fulltine).
4. That the Youth Council be strengthened and expanded and that it be
given authority and sanction by participating agencies to carry out
the necessary activities to effect i nptenentation of various prograos.
5. That the planning and adoinistrative staff of the Youth Opportunity '
Progran be nore clos.e ly related to the executive officers of the
Youth Opportunity Progran, Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council
or the agency so designated.
6. That all prograos in the Youth Cpportunity Prograo, funded or endorsed
by local resources, be reviewed and evaluated and receive a sign-off
by the Atlanta Youth Congress.
7. That the type of cooperation as existed between EOA, United Appeal
and the Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council serves as a prototype for all participating in the Youth Opportunity Prograo.
8. That a part of the city's and other funds be appropriated to ahe
Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council for coordination.
9. That youth and indigenous residents participate oore fully and less
superficial in the Youth Opportunity Prograo planning .
PROGRAM COST and FUNDING
It is oos t difficul t to oake a clear deteroination of the true oonetar y
cos t of this pr ograo. However, the yout h coordinator estioates the total
pr ogr,o cos t to be $2,127,529. A detai l ed description is as follows:
Prograo Cost (Local , Sta te , Federa l )
Arts Pr ograo
Priv~t e Bus iness
Atlanta Public Schools*
City of Atlanta
Unit~d Appeal Special Funds
TOTAL
$1 ,300,529
75 , 000
237, 000
205, 000
300 , 000
10 . 000
$2,127,52 9
The above figures are the esti oated ca s h cost of t he year's prograo.
As usual the cost in effort, tine, volunteers and other support can't be
expressed in nonetar y value. However, these particular facets of the pr ograo have proved to be invaluable contributions t o prograo operatio~s.


The


figure for the Public Schools does not include the cost of operating
60 schools in a special suooer project.
�r
I
4
EMPLOYMENT
The clijor eophasis of the 1968 Youth Opportunity Prograo was youth
eoployoent. A job sub-coor:Jittee ~as created to deai with this specific
prograo. This coonittee studied and devised plans to register, orient,
counsel, develop jobs; and place youth in jobs. The oajor objective was
to provide a job for every youth seeking one.
In order to deternine the nuober of youth desiring eoploynent this
sunoer, approxioately 40,000 pre-job registration foros were sent to the
schools, neighborhood Service Centers and other agencies. 26,000 youth
indicated that they wanted soae type of suoner eoployoent. Because of
this large need for jobs, coordinated job developoent prograos were i nplea ented. The resulting job placeoents by groups and agencies in lieu of
coIJDittoents are as follows:
JOBS FILLED
JOB COMMITTED
AGENCY
Na tional Alliance of Businessoen
3,000
3,300
674
Sumer Recreation EOA Proposals
Federal Agencies
700
590
Subsidized Jobs (NYC) Vocational
Educa tion, Title I, etc .
600
2,032
Cit y of Atlant a
175
688
Fulton County
0
15
Atl anta Youth Congres s
0
200
500
5,275
7, 730
Miscellaneous (GSES)
Tota l
731
The 7,730 youth eop loyed thi s s unner exceeded the conr.1ittoent by
approxioately 47% .
The approxioate aoount of ooney earned by youth this s uoo.er was
$4,250,000 .
Detail ed figures based on $600 pe r capita is as f ollows :
Wage Cost
Agency
National Alliance of Businessoen
$1,800,000
EOA
404,400
City of Atlanta
Fulton County
Youth Congress
Misc. (GSES)
412,800
9,000
120,000
438.600
Sub-total
Federal Agencies
Subsidized jobs
Sub-total
TOTAL
$3,184,800
354,000
711,200
$1;065,20.0
$4,250 ; 000
�5
/
A.
Butler Street YMCA - Work Incentive Der:1onstration Prograo - - - - 'Ihis project
was designed to serve 100 oen between the ages of 16-21 in a work incentive prograo with the hope of eoployoent after coopletion of the project.
The project lasted two weeks, and served 85 oen.
B.
Butler Street YMCA - Canp Ipproveo ent Project---- This eoployment prograo
was designed to utilize 90 youth between the ages of 16-21. The youth
were involved in three weeks of caopsite ioprovenent of the Butler Str eet
YMCA's Lake Allatoona Caopsite. Activities included the winterization
of existing canp structure, landscaping, and waterfront ioproveoent.
It served 82 youth.
c.
Young Men I s Civic League, Inc. ----- This unique work-recreation project A):, A ,
utilize 20 outh and young adults, oale and feoale, ages 16-21, in a


r~ r_y-prograo to upgrade their connunity. Activities included cleaning str eets, /


alleys, eopty lots, and rodent control.
D.
()winnett County EOA ---- A coop rehensive eoployoent, recreational and
educational enrichoent prograo serving about 6,000 youth and children
both nale and feoale. The project enp loyed five teen leaders to be
divided aoong the four centers. Project activities included field
t~ips, personal hygiene, sewing classes, classes in water and hunting
safety, first aid, body care, draoa, and ousical groups. The project
lasted approxinately ten weeks.
E.
West End Neighborhood EOA Center - - - - This eoployoent, recreat i onal and
cultural enrichnent prograo was designed to serve a nuober of yout h in
the area . The project eop loyed a nuober of youth to coordinate and supervise recreational a nd enrichoent prograos (a ges 17-18). Activities
i nc l uded baseba ll, basketba ll, volleyball, s occer, s t or y hour, and
trips. I t las ted for eleven weeks.
F.
Vi ne City Founda t i on - Pr oject Recr ea t i on Pl ug-In ---- This wa s a
pilot eop l oyQent progr ao designe d t o u t ili ze indi genous teenage youth,
ages 16- 25, to s erve as coonuni ty recreat i on orga nizers. The youth
Recrea t i on Organize rs r ecruited , organi zed , pla nned, a nd s upervised
ten othe r t eenager s each to provi de planned s unoer r ecr eation on a
24-hour basis. The projec t lasted fo r e l even weeks .
G.
WAOK Radio Station, EOA, Connuni t y Schoo ls - Junior D.J. PrograQ ---- An
employnent, cultural , and coonunications program uti l izing ten junior
D.J.'s froo high density areas trained in use of P.A. equipment to provide record hops for about 10 , 000 high s chool and young adults, ages 1625, during the evening hours (7: 30 - 10:00 P.M.). These hops were given
in all of the 14 neighborhood Service Center areas. The project lasted
four months .
~ H.
Northwest Young Men Civic Association - Operation Tighten Up---- This
progran designed to serve some ?_i..OOO teenage and young adults, ages 1325, in a oulti-purpose-progran. The progran eop loyed a nunber of indigenous youth and young adults. Activities included lectures, tours, youth
foruos, development of youth business, general sports (in-door and outdoor), and creative games.
Northwest Perry EOA Center - "Sock It to Me" --H An eoploynent project p,J
designed to serve 1,000 r.iale and feoale youth, ages ranging from 13- 25
f -,~
l
�6,
in an intensive prograo of training and counseling. Lead teenagers and
professionals worked with teenagers who have no work history as "peer"
Group Counselors. The project lasted approximately twelve weeks.
Pittsburg Neighborhood E0A Center---- This pilot program was designed to
utilize youth in a community beautification program, as well as provide
manpower for existing recreational facilities. The project eoployed
twenty oa les., a ge 15-20 9 in the Beautification Prograo, six fe1,;1ale
team managers, age 14-20, and three oale league planners to carry on
itc e · eague activities. The project also provided hooeoaker training for girls 9~17. The project lasted twelve weeks. Nine men eoployed and twenty volunteers discontinued because of lack of paid supervision.
K.
Metropolitan Atlanta Boys' Club, Inc . ---- This cooprehensive eoployraent
and recreational project atteopted to oeet the needs of 10,000 boys in
severa.l Boys 'Clubs in the city, age 6-18. The project employed a nuober
of youth, ages 16 .. 21, to plan and develop prograos for areas served. Summer activities included group clubs, dancing, cooking, music appreciation,
puppetry, photography, nrt, desk help, handicrafts, drama, ceramics, and
Wood work. The project lasted approximately twelve weeks.
L.
Wesley Coomunity Centers - Expanded and New Services---- This educational,
employoent, recreational, and cultural program designed to oeet the needs
of boys and girls 6-21. Progran activities included a six-week training
prograos for 11th and 12th grade, including craft skills, canp skills, so
as to be able to work with so~ ller children in caop situations. The project lasted for ten weeks.
-.-.., M.
l
-\ v ~.
5 i~u_,, r
Suo-Mec Neighborhood EOA Center---- A comp rehensive emp loynent, recreational, educational and cultural project serving 5,000 youth, oales and
females, of all ages, in the Surn··Mec area. Activities included· tutorial, typing, fi l mstrips , draoa, counseling, field trips, etc.
N.
Dekalb YWCA - Job Preparation Prograo ---- An eoployoent program designed
to serve 25 teenage girls, 16-18 years of age, and training and counseling in going about getting a job. The program lasted for seven months.
o.
Rent-A-Kid~--- This unique eoployoent project was designed to provide
enployQent for youth on a contratual bases. It operated in the West
End area and served a large nuober of youth.
P.
Mobile Job Recr uiter---- This enploynent progran was designed to decent r alize emp loymen t facilities c It consisted of a bus traveling throughout the c ity t aki ng jobs to youth; and it served nany a large nunber of
youth .
0
I
The a bove to ta l does not include the nany youth hired by pr i vate c i tizens
in various job s lots.
Atlanta is es pecta lly proud of t he s uccess of thi s yea r 's job program.
However, many d i fficulti es occured wh i ch haope r ed the t ot al effort and prevented it froo being more successful. To overcone these difficulties in the
future, the following recoooendations are offered;
1.
That the employment s ervices be designated the official and only agencies
responsible for screening, placement and job developnent for the Youth
~
_.,. 11 Jle
ur
�7.
Opportunity Prograo. Such recomra~rtdation I:J.eans that ~t ieastt 94o//,, of the
eoployoent services efforts will be put into job developI:J.ent, 5% in placeQent and 1% in sc r eening .
2.
That the Youth Opportunity Progtao's effortl be teported froo all other
adI:J.inistrative operations.
3.
That a full tine job developoertt person be hired to wot k exclusively
and all year round on sunoe~ ahd Youth Opportunity Prograo jobs~
4.
That the pre-registration of youth for Guoner jobo be elimnated.
5.
That the National Alliance of Businessnen not be the official agency
for handling the Sur.rr:1er Job Prograo even though their participation
will be solicited~
6.
That direct hires by Federal and private organizations without prior
screening by the eoployoent services be elioinated or not counted as
a recruit for the Youth Opportunity Progran. If such recoi:rrnendation
is followed the probleo of being occured of not hiring poor, inner
city and/ or o inor ity youth will be greatly oinimized .
7.
That a job corporation be foroed in order to provide o ore jobs for
youth under 16.
8.
That laws relating to youth eoploynent be car efully read, revised and
changed wher e neces s ary so that youth nay obtain jobs.
9.
Tha t non-profit priva te and public a gencies increase their hi r ing of
youth.
10.
That t he prob l eo of t rans por t a t i on to j obs in outlyi ng a r eas be r eoedied
and realistically dea lt with .
11.
That the Youth Opp ortunity Caopaign work toward conne c ti ng t he s ituation
in which the s tate hired few if any youth during the s uooer to work i n
State Parks , Hospitals, Highways and ot her s uch Departments .
12.
That Departoents o f City governroont other t hnn the Parks and Sanitary Departments i ncrease their hiri ng of oinori ty youth , i.e., Atlanta Housing
Authority , Hospital Authority, Public Library , e tc .
13.
That oore effort be nade in teaching youth job s eeking, j ob getting, etc.
14.
That t he subsidized jobn be doubled in Atlanta,
EDUCATION
The najor ope rating educat ional prograns were suDfiler schools operated by
t he Atlanta Systeno A fee was cha rged for these schoo la; however, no needy
child was denied admission t o s uorne.r school because of noney . PTA's and other..
coonunity groups promoted attendance of suQOer school for children needing
renedial work.
OBJECTIVES:
1.
To provide needed renedial and tutorial prograns for youth;
�8.
OBJECT!VES cont ' d
2.
To provide vocatinnal informati on ~µd ~ducntional activities
needed by youth to enter into the labor fo t~e;
3.
To allow cr eativ~ and inh~vati~e hducatioh~i prograns not
possible during the wintet' months;
4.
To allow coupling of education, enploynont, culture and recreation;
5.
To offP.r prograoo and couraon not generally available to poor youth
during the regular school year.
SfECIFIC GOALS:
1.
To provide curnmer r 0m~dial·prQgraor. for 2,024 stud~nta;
To pr0vide tutori~l servic~s for 1,362 otudcnts;
3.
To providr. vocation~l, technical, dnd occupational information
for 2,185 students;
4.
Tq provide enrichment and advance programs for 1,000 students;
5.
To provide creative and experimental program~ conbining eq, loyment,
enrichment, recreational and occupationa l information for needy stud~nts;
6.
To launch an int~naivc back"to-ochool effort to g~t 2,500 studont~ to
retur n t o ochool in th~ f a ll;
7.
To ~s~iGt neody high school gr a duates t o obtain scholdrs hi p~ 4nd
tuit i~n Qid to continue thei r education , ~i ving spec i a l a tt~ntion
to "hi gh ris k" gr adua t 1C?a ;
B.
To nssio t t he ~chool and comnunity i n mee ting the ~p~ci al neede of
s t uden ta wit h th~ apccial personal, social and oconomic probl em.,.
Publicly-Spons o~ed Educat i onal Proj ects
The pub l icly-spons ornd pr ojects cons i s t of s i x school~ which op@n 12
hours daily and 6 days each week, concen t rating on ba~ic education snd
oduca tiona l progr ans . Th~ number of youth attending the various schoel~
w~re as f ollowa :
School sxsts_e:
Number of Youth
Atl~nta Public School s
12 ,090
Fulton County School Syoteo
2·, 900
Total-- ~--~-- ~- -------~
14 , 900
Thia total does not include the children and youth that participated in the
varir.us cducati0n and recreation prograrruJ opcratP.d by the Board nf Education.
Mor-n that 20,000 you.th participatr-,d in programs and activities operated in
th~ 60 schools which were operated by the Atlanta Public School~. The City
of Atlanta Board of Education provided a t~tal of $205,677.00 for scholarships. An -additional amount was rnnde available for ~ub~idies and individuals participating in the summer school program.
�9
Sone of the tutorial and study-help prograrJS operated in the Youth Opportunity Progran are as follows:
a.
Cabba getown Recreation/Work Youth Center: This progran was designed to
involve 50-100 oales and feoales i n and out of school, ages 12-21, in a
progran of recreation, eop loyraent, education, and cultural enrichment
activities as field trips, caoping , tutorial, etc. The project lasted
for twelve weeks and served 100 youth per day.
b.
Central YWCA - Job Exploration for Teen Teaos: This enployoent, educational and recreational progran utilized 40-50 youth in a six week training program to work with various children's prograos (ages 5-11), including playgrounds, tutoring, story telling, etc. A group of ten teens
(ages 15~17) and a young adult leader worked as a teao in areas . The
project lasted -f or approxioately seven weeks, and served 14 youth per
day.
c • . Butler Street YMCA - Education and Enploytlent: A work~study setlinar con'"
ducted a t . resideht canp _for twelve high school graduates f t oo poverty
backgr ounds. The activity of the senih~~s consisted of inforoation that
was applicable to college entran~~• discussion on curtent sociai events,
etc, lhe project lasted for w e i ve weeks snd ser ved io youth per day i
d~
~
e.
&Jory University - Division of Librarianship: Story-telling Courses
This educational prograo was designed to provide efficiency for a Story
Teller used during the sur;:u:;ier in various recreation prograns. The project provided twelve courses utilizing 20 enrollees for an eight week
period.
Sun- Mee Neighborhood EOA Center - Mechanicsville Suooer Project: This
progr ao operated out of the Pryor Str eet School. It provided recrea~
t ion and educat i on needs during the suoner nonths . A large anount of
youth of t he area were hir ed.. The project lasted for three months and
ser ved 300 youth per day.
In addition t o the above prograns other pr i vate organi zations oper ated
tutorial and study~help progr aos ~
The Anti-Defornation Lea gue o f B'nai B' r i t h ope ra ted a tutorial proj e ct
in the Perry Hones Area.
An i n ter-agency projec t working with high absenteeiso f anilies, including
130 you t h f roo these f aoilies operated in the Perry Hones Area.
Saint Vincent de Paul Church oper ated a tutorial project in the Perry
Hon es Area .
The Third Arny op erated a f ull and comp rehensive prograo i n t he Poole
Creek Area which included educa tion , recreation , tuto ring a nd special
events.
The Arts and
were perhaps the
ting projects in
the Atlanta Arts
large variety of
Cultural activities of the At lanta Youth Opp ortunity Prograo
raost cooprehensive of any city with cooparable groups operaall sections of the city . The oeobers and associates of
Council as well as the Georgia Arts CoCll!lission offered a
prograos and activiti es to Atlanta's youth. In addition
�•
10
the Atlanta public schools, the Parks and Recreation Department and EOA
offered cultural activities.
The various arts and other groups offering programs and services were as
follows:
Phyllis Wheatley YWCA ~ Project A Twilight Enricho.ent Prograo ---."".. _'l;hio
cultural, recreational, educational, group guidance and leadership developoent project was designed to help youth enrich their social and spirit•
ual lives in the Vine City, Siopson, Beckwith, Fair and Walnut Street
areas o The project attenpted to help 45 pre~teens (6-12) and 35 teenagers
(13-16). The specific activities included day camp activity. The project lasted approxioate ly eight weeks and served 155 youth per day.
Central City EOA ~ 02,eration~- ~ ··~~ .. This is an enploynent, recrc~tional,
cultural, and educational prog:rao which served 500 oales and feoalee, .ages
5-25, in and out of school , in a conprehensive prograo of recreation and
cultural activities, including diversified playground prograns, field
trips, crafts, dramatics, dance, group discussion, etc, _The project lasted
eleven weeks.
The Church of the Master, United Presbyterian USA ..... __ This progra9t was, a
recreational, educational and cultural enrichoent prograo serving youth
in arts and crafts , lectures (sports, cocial topics, current events),
field trips, tutorial prograos, dancing, games, sports, and counseling
services. The project lasted approxioutely eight weeks,
Ruth Mitchell Dance Coopany ~ Dance Instrnction in Modern Jazz Ballet-143.215.248.55
This recreational, educational, and cultural progran was designed to utiii~
ze youth, ages 9~15, in providing classes in Modern Jazz Ballet, in pre- _
pnration for a prograo presented by t~e youth. This pro ject lasted for
ten weeks.
·
Acadeoy Theatre - Project Circus -·"" A recreational, educational, a11d
cultural prograo designed to utilize sooe 50 youth throughout Atlanta
who were trained in theatre and dranatic techniques, The Acadeny pro- _
duced five showo (Circus) per week for a six week period. The Theatre
handled 180 kids per perforoancee
Theatre A~~ ~"-" This project produced plays which wa-r e presented on
n nobile theatre facility to four · EOA target areas.. The. project served
nnd enployed youth and young adults, and lasted for_ eight weeks.
There were two photography pi·oj ects operated in the Youth Opportunity Prograo. One wos financed by a loca l group through Clark College and the
YMCA, and the other was financed by the Georgia Arts CorJrJission. These
proj-1':cts served 30 youth weekly.
Arthur Harris, Pretident of Sttipto, contribut~d 1,500 dollars to begin
nn art prograo, Thir. prograra was succeasfully sustained. It l asted
fron July 3 to Septeober 3.
The Briggs Gallery bponsored art contests for the under~privileged.
prize as well as a ponsible scholarship was awarded the winnero
A
Leroy Neinan, Playboy Magazine Art Director, cane to Atlanta on a no salary basis to conduct an art school for the poor people,
t
�[,

11
--u
Workshops. Inc.
This project- provided nuober of plays for recreational prograos throughout the city. 500 young people have participated in
this prograr:i..
Another project working in support of the Educational and Cultural aspect
of the Youth Opportunity Prograo was the Back-to-School Project. The Atlanta
Schools, the Youth Council, EOA and Connunity Chest agencies launched an effort to get youth to return to school. This effort took place beginning in
August, 1968. Approxinately 3,000 school dropouts and potential dropouts
were contacted and urged to· renain in or return to school. Many of these contacts were on a person-to-person basis.
It is estinated that approxioateiy 30,000 children and youth were involved
in various types of reoedial, advanced, and special educational prograos, including foroal suooer school.
·
Upwards of 50 , 000 di sadvantaged children and youth participated in the
225 educational prograos"·
In addition to the regular sunner prograo, several special prograns were
provided under Title I and III EASA by the Atlanta and Dekalb County Boards
of Education.
The Education aspect of the Youth Opportunity Prograo generally operated
effectively. However , sane specific probleos did occur. In order to prevent
their reoccurance in the future the recorn:iendations following are offered;
1.
That fornal and infernal aspects of the education prograr:i. be operative
up to the last week of August, thereby elio inating confusion.
2.
That oore afternoon and evening reoedial prograos for older working teena gers be operated duri ng the sur:ner oonths.
3.
~hat private and parochia l s chools be urged to participate in the You th
Opportunity Prograo by of f ering prograns, scholarships, personti.el, etc .
to inner city youth .
4.
Tha t t he Board of Educa t ion exp l ore t he poss i bility of find i ng citizens
or youth groups under Ti tle I and other resources to ca rry out innovations
and creative Educationa l Prograoso
5.
That t he Voca tiona l Educa t iona l Departnent undertake creative Work- Study
Prograr:is during t he suC10er to intr oduce to high s chool youth var ious
voca t ional occupations.
6.
That the Board of Education and t he Fulton and Dekal b Counti es Depa rtnents of Public Welfare undertake a day and r esiden t canp Prograo f or
the educationally retarded ind i vidua l using a conb i na tion of State and
Federa l fund s.
7.
That the Board of Education support a youth operated curriculuo developnent project operated during the SUDC1e r 1969 utilizing EA.SE Act
noney?
8.
That the Atlanta Colleges be encouraged to identify and sponsor programs
that will enable high risk, talented and/ or poor youth and ninority
youth to attend college in the fall.
9.
That a greater participation by private agencies in tutorial prograns
be undertaken,
10.
That early lines of cor:inunications by area offices and citizens be esta•
�12
blished to decide what programs could best meet cooo.unity needs.
11.
That e ducation orientation projects be ectablished during the suoner
so that youth who are recent releaseGs froo institutions are provided
-with reorientation,
12.
That closer coordination between educationaand recreation prograns be
undertaken.
RECREATION
There are approximately 500,000 children and youth in Greater Atlanta.
Most of these were seeking ways to spend their suoner leisure tine. Unfortunately, the lack of recreational and informal educational programs was
most acute in the poverty c0Dr.1unitiesc Realizing the great need and shortage of wholesooe recreat~onal activities yea r round, the various parks, the
public schools and libra rie~, the art groups, the EOA Heighborhood Service
Centers, the CoCJDunity Chest Agencies, and sever al youth groups planned
approxioately 6 0 pr ojects ~ The se pr ojects coobine seve:;:al recreation, and
education and eoployoen t o Many of thes e wer e youth oana ged and operated.
The City of Atlanta Parks and Recreation and School Departoents, EOA,
United Appeal, and several other a gencies carried the oajor responsibilities
for the recreationa l prograo in the target a reas o The activ ities of these
prograns varied.
The r e were several priva tely""s ponsored r ecreationa l projectD. These
included caop ing activitie s by the Boy Scouts, Canp Fire Girls, YMCA, YWCA,
and the Bethleheo Centers. The nuober of youth served in the various caoping prograos are as follows:
Day Caop
Resident Cao2
AGENCY
1968
1967
1960
1967
Metropoli t an YMCA
Butler Street YMCA
Me tropol itan YWCA
Boy Scouts
Sa lva tion Arny
Girl Scouts
Canp Fire Girl s
Wesley Hooe
Atlant a Parks Depart o.ent
G:1.rl s Club
Boys Club
Grady Girl's Club
Total
681
434
Hl5
868
54
431
8072.
893~
4440 _.
457
4010
180
754
429
200
646
70
533
-
12612
765
754
690
79
2143
430
140
1645
51
700
624
740
121
200
1463
311
150
1319
112
-900
1002
7597
7042
A significant part of the recreation prosrao is the fact that it enployed
approxtoately 1,300 youth to work in various pr.ograns and activities.
The Atlanta Parks and Recreation Departoent has served approxioately
525,000 youth (tu1·nstile count) in suooer recreational opportunities. In
addition , a large nuober of youth have received recreational opportunities
thro~gh the vurious schoo l activities . In this respect, the public agencies
have far exceeded any efforts at any tine in the past in their various recreational prograos and activities.
Usually, the ultioate success of any prograo depends upon the concern and
�14
involvement of private groups and organizations. The vari~us pr ivate org~i-~
zations and· agencies in 4tlanta have significantly contributed to the overall
suoner recreational effort.,. Many of these agencies have pr,ovided resources
over and above normal expectation3.
Dekalb YWCA - Kirkwood SWi!i]I'Jing Class---- This progran provided· swimming
activit.ies for fifty youth ages 7-12,in school. It lasted for approx~t_ely
twelve weeks.
Edgewood Neighborhood EOA Center - East Lake Youth Suomer Recreation Prograt:1~~-:."'.'.
This SUCJIJer recreation progran served about 500 youth of all ages.. Activities· included se·wing, crafts, staop collections, guitar lessons, piano lesSDns,
dancing, wood work, nnd sports • . It lasted approxi'C'.lately nine weeks~.
. .
1
F.dgewood Neighborhood EOA Center - Kirkwood Skating Project---- A prograra to
provide skating activities £or 200 youth and young acb lts, age 6~_25~ The ·
project employed twelve young adults froo the coonunity. The · projec.t iasted
approxioately ten weeks.
·
·
J
Rockdale County EOA and Recreation Conmission ---- The project provided r ec"'.".
creational, educational, and cultural activities for sooe 600 youth and young
adults. The project employed 30 argct area youth to supervise the oajor ac~
t ivities as teacher aides, ground keepors, cquipnent Mnagers, and conce_s -:
sion workers. Activities included sports, arts and crafts, dr ana, and act~
ting •. The proje c t l a~ted for t welve weeks.
West Centra l EOA Neighborhood Cen~er 143.215.248.55-~ A recreational, educational, and cul~
tural enrichment pr ogram w.hich served app~-0xi Mtely 5,400 persons of 4~1 ages~
Activities for this program i nc1.uded i ndoor and outdoor r ecreation, arts and
crafts , headstart, t rips to interesting places , neighborhood cleanups ,_ etc .
The project lasted approxinat.e l y eieven weeks .
&lgewood Neighborhood EOA Center ~ Su0I:1er Crash Recreation Project --.-- This
unique pilot project utilized six youth from the a rea to work with men t ally
retarded children. The project served 24 mentall y r etarded children by pro~
viding daily oental and physical activities . I t l asted f or nine weeks ~
Emmaus House---- A unique program designed to take 100 boys and girls of
the Peoplestown-Suornerhill area to Jekyll Island f or one week in an attempt
to replace a sluo setting with a oemorable experience of a world they have
never known. Activities for this program included recreational activity,
and counseling. After returning these youth engaged in a seven week recedial reading prograo. The project lasted for eight weeks.
College Park Civic and Education Club, Inc. - -- ~ This project both recrea~
tional and educational served approximately 9,000 youth, both cale and fe~
oale o~ 11 ages that reside in low~incone coomunities. the project ut~~i~
zed ~'p, or youth as youth assis~ance and nine young adults, Activities
for this program included recreation, spo-rbs, arts &nd crafts, daily.person•
al hygiene, trips and excursions, ceramics and diversified playground programs. It lasted for twelve weeks~
·
East Point Recreation Departoent 143.215.248.55 12:54, 29 December 2017 (EST) This .project covered the four target
areas in the city. It was designed to oeet the recreational needs of 5,000
persons of all ages
The. project employed eight young adult$ and youth £roe
each of the area blockso Activities included sports, playground activities,
arts ·and crafts, ceraoics, sewing, personal hygiene and grootrl.ng, trip:s and
eK?Jrsions, teen progrataS, senior citizen's prograc, swicr.dng and pre-school

�15
pr6graos,
The project lasted fo r eight weeks~
North Fulton EOA Center---- A twelve week program designed to provide recreational activities for sone 500-600 youth of both sexes, ages 8-18. The
project consisted of hiring one youth worker in each local conounity to work
under the local supervisor. Activities for the project consisted of softball,
horseshoes, basketball, badointon, baseball, volleyball, and croquet.
In addition to the various recreation projects, special activities hav.e
been offered by some agencies and, organizations.
The WAOK Dance Mobile has entertained and provided recreation for 14,000
youth in the Youth Opportunity Prograo.
· The Book Mobile has served lD,000 youth this sur:iner.
200 youth participated in the Junior Olynpics Program.
The overall efforts of the recreation program has been generally more ext enesive and oeaningful as opposed to last year's prograo. Several businesses
and cf tizens have nade significant contributions to this prograc.
The Atlanta Rotary Club nade available many canperships for several yout~.
In addition the Atlanta Rotary Club assisted in the establishment of a
Boy's Club in one of Atlanta's Poverty Areas. The cost of both of these
contri butions was $14,000.
In addition to regu1&r Parks facilities, sone of the additional operating facilities provided by the Parks and Recreation Departnent are as
follows:
Facility
NUC1ber
Tot Lots
73
Porta-Pools
14
The total ·c ost of the recreation progra.n for the 1963 Youth Opportunity
Cciopaign was approxina.tely $1,260,300 . A description of approximately how
rauch noney wa:, : spent in this coaponent is listed as follows:
· AG8NCY
City of Atlanta
F,.OA , (Including OEO grant)
Private Donations
United Appeal Agencies (unfunded)
Total
COST
$300,00.0.
60.0,000.
35.4,0Q0.
s.;,oo •
. $1~260,300.
." Many other 'd onations were mde to this aspect of the Youth Opportunity
Progr8c for which cash value is difficult to deterninate. These donations are
listed in another part of this report.
The recreational aspect of the Youth Opportunity Progran has far exceeded
any previous ef£<1rts. The Parks and Recreation Departoent, EOA and United
A~peal agencies have provided outstanding participation and eupport~ Scee
probleos did arise, however, and the following reconmendations a.re aiced at
�I'
16
preventing thera in the future;
I
1.
That an increase in the quality and quantity of recreational activities
for teenagers be provided.
?.
That swinoing pools be open during sorae evenings until 10 o'clock. ·
3.
That churches and private agencies provide substantially nore caoperships for inner city youth.
4.
That the locatins of recreational services and facilities be re•exaoined
and gaps and duplication be elininated.
5.
That private agencies nake better and wider use of their staff and facilities throughout the sur:iner nonths·~
6.
That closer coordination between EOA and the Parks Departoent be undertaken.
7.
That funds be made available to the Recreation Departoent at the first
of the Year'.
SPECIAL DONATIONS
The fact that the regular projects and prograas in the 1960 Youth Opportunity Prograo have operated so effectively nay be due to the various dona~
tions and contributions oade for the sunoer effort by private citizens, bus~
inesses and civic organizations and groups and federal agencies.
The Federal Executive Board donated 3,000 envelopes and postage for use
in the Back-to-School Project.
$15,000 was donated by the Coca Cola Company, the Coca Cola Bo~t ling Coo•
pany, and a private citizen for the purchase of the Show Mobile.
Davison's, an Atlanta · Departoent Store, donated the printing of 40,000
resources inventories.
The Montag Corporation donated raore than 300 reaos of paper and art sup•
plies as a special contribution to the Youth Opportunity Program;
I
'feu!>r,rta-Pools (portable swinning pools) were donated to the sunr;ier
Youth Opportunity Prograr.i by private businesses and organizations. 'Ihey
are:
1 Porta Pool
1. Ivan Allen Conpany -
2~ C & S Bank
1 Porta Pool
3. Trust Company of
Georgia
1 Porta Pool
4. Rich Foundation
5 Porta Pools
5o Coca Cola Conpany
1 Porta Pool
6. Georgia Power Co.
1 Porta Pool
�17
Southern Concrete Company donated a $50 caopership to the Youth Opportunity Program for under-privileged youth.
Miss Rachel Bailey, private citizen donated $10.00 worth of Art supplies
to the Youth Opportunity Program.
4,000 free passes to Six Flags over Georgia plus $4,000 in spending money
was donated to the Youth Opportunity Prograo ·by a donor.
The Atlanta Braves donated 70,000 free passes to Braves Baseball gaoes.
The Atlanta Braves - Chiefs donated 180,000 passes to the Atlanta Chiefs
soccer gaoes.
The Coca Cola Company donated 1,000 special passes to the Atlanta Braves
Baseball Clinics and gaoes. This donation included free hotdogs and c kes.
Arthur Harris, President of Scripto Coopany donated $1 , 500 to begin a
special Art Prograo.
Frank Barracliff, a private citizen donated $100.00 worth of plywood and
other lumber for use in the Youth Opportunity Program.
The Atlanta Braves donated 400 free passes to the College All Star Footbal l gane as a special contr i buti on to the Youth Opportunity Prograo.
The Atlanta Braves dona ted 400 f ree passes to the Atlanta Jazz Festiva l
as a special contribution to the Youth Opportunity Prograo.
Theatre Under t he Stars dona t ed 3,100 free passes to poor youth as a
special contribut ion to the Youth Opport unity Program.
Festival Cineoa donated 3,100 free passes f or youth over a s ix week peri od as a special contribution t o the Youth Opportunity Progr am.
The various donations and contributions by private citizens and businesses
were in part irameasurably responsibl e f or the success of t he 1963 Youth Opportunity Caopaign .
s. Chandler, a private citizen donated a variety of sport and
athletic equipment to the Youth Opportunity Prograt!l. Mr. Chandler's
donation was utilized by the Vine City Foundation.
Mr. Henry
In addition to the above donations in the fora of talent and skills have
been by entertainers and athletes of national faoe.
Camen McRae, a national recording star, donated a concert to the Youth
Opportunity Prosran. Miss McRae entertained several hundred youth for
two hours.
The Tans, a top recording group, donated several perforoances to the Youth
Opportunity Progran.
Miss Pat Lundy, a national recording star, donated several concerts to the
Youth Opportunity Progran.
�18
VOLUNTEERS
In addition to the various donations, another crucial aspect of the Youth
Opportunity Program was the volunteer program. The key to the success of the
entire Youth Opportunity Program was the nuober of volunteers recruited. The
oanpower needed to carry out the many activities in this program was too nuoerous to be obtained from the liraited funds available. Therefore, a rigorous
effort was nade to recruit the necessary volunteers for the 1968 Youth Opportunity Progran.
One thousand and one hundred Federal eoployees volunteered to perform certain activities such as, recreation, tutorial, educational, and Arts and
cultural programs. More than 300 of these volunteers agreed to use their
cars for transpor_ting youth to and from various locations as one-shot assignnents.
Aluoinum Corporation of Ar:ierica volunteered the use of one coopany station
wagon once a week.
Mr. Tone Harris of Higgens, Harris and Coopany volunteered to work on Satnrdays in the Youth Opportunity Program.
Mr. H. L. Selsch of Chaoblee, Georgia volunteered to coach or tutor in the
Dekalb County section of Atlanta.
Two hundred volunteers contacted and encouraged sane 2,500 youth drop-outs
to return to school.
~olunteers from Morehouse College and geveral Federal Agencies worked in
the absenteeisD pro j ect.
Thirty volunteers worked in the Voluntary Probation Officers Program which
operated through the Fulton and Dekalb County Juvenile Courts.
The Fulton County Medica l Society (nenber physicians) volunteered free
physical examinat i ons for 795 youth. An additional 340 boys received free
phys i cal examinati ons at the Kirkwood Health C~nter .
Eastern Air lines Stewardesses v i sited several centers i n August and gave
discuss i ons and exhi biti ons on poi se, make-up and etc.
INDIVI DUAL and CASEWORK SERVI CES
An unwed oo t hers projec t spons ored by the Enory Medi cal School, Uni•ad
Appeal Cas ework ~gencies , EOA ; Ful ton County Wel fa re Depar t nent , Community
Chest of Atlanta , and the Atlant a Youth Counc il operated i n the Northwe st
section of the city. Plans are now underway t o expand this prograo to
include the entire Metropolitan Area .
SPECIAL EVENTS
Many special prograns were provided in addition to regular surnner prograns
and activities. These special prograos and activities were as follows:
1.
Delta Airlines - free rides for 334 poor youth
�19
2.
5,000 free passes to the Cycloroma
3.
Delta Airlines donated free rides to Jekyll Island for 120 youth.
4.
The Air Force Association held a special event for youth at the Stadium.
5.
Juan Marchal, the top Giant pitching ace, spoke to 200 youth at Suomec FDA Center.
6.
In conjunction with WSB, an art exhibition was held at Lenox Square Shaping Center in July and early August.
7.
Willian Curry, a professional football player and forner Georgia Tech
All Anerican, gave filo lecture denonstrations at three FDA centers.
8.
The Women Chanber of Cor.u:1erce gave 2 watermelon cuttings serving a total
of 335 people.
9.
400 poor youth attended the Atlanta Jazz Festival free.
10.
400 poor youth attended the All Star Football gaoe free.
11.
Chattalanta Games
325 youth conpeted with the youth of Chattanooga in 3 athletic events.
The activities took place in Chattanooga.
12.
5,000 youth attended free the July Jubilee.

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