Box 18, Folder 11, Complete Folder

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Box 18, Folder 11, Complete Folder

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TO:
FROM:
Ivan Allen, Jr.
~ your information
D
Please refer to the attached correspondence and make the
n e cessary reply.
D
Advise me the status of the attached.
j'
FORM 25-4
/
�Recommende d Pric e Reducti ons
on 221 lots in Thomasville U. R. Prcj e ct
No reci.uctions on singl e l ots
Group of 10 lots
Reduce $100 per lot
Group of 20 lots
Reduce $150 per l ot
Group of 30 lots
Reduce $200 per l ot
50 lots
Reduce $250 per lot
Group of
Gr oup of 100 lots
Reduce ~p JOO per l ot
All lot s at one time
Reduce ~;350 pe:r 1qt ·
�ROUTE
FROM:
~
D
SLIP
R. EARL LANDERS
or your information
Please refer to the attached correspondence and make the
necessary reply.
D
Advise me the status of the attached.
FORM 25-4- L
./
�William W. Gates
3407 Roswell Rd. N. E.
Atlanta1 Georgia 303 05
(40lJ.) 233-6040
Urban limerlea Inc .
s saehusat t .s Ave . ,
Washington, D. C•. 20036
1717
2h, 1967
• ,J.
Attent ion:
Dear
arch
• James P.
Tt-10
E!Y
· • Twomey!
A ·c onference was held wit h essi-s. Cecil Alexander.
atld \!aleolm Jones in the City Hall today.
·• ilexande~ stated that be diseussed your l et ter
to him ~ted ar,eh 10, 1967 wi th -eyor Ivan Allen.
The Ira.y'or indie a'ted that be is ·i n agre.ement 'Wit h
terms providing that no fees are to be ec>ll~cted: -either by 'TJrban. AJilerica inc . or me for '1113'
servic~s in eonneetion wit h projeets· submitted to
tb.e Heu~:l:ng Reso~s. e · ttee for guidance or
-adV:!..ce.


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I !fa,s instructed t o advise you accordingly.
The Rousing esources Co ·ttee at. preset confines
i:t •s actiVi.ties t o l ov and medium cost housing ti.thin
th · t lanta Citq Limits and t heref ore i n ey opinion,
i.n which
ssrs Al ~der· and Jones concur, proposed
projects in the five county metropolitan area outside
o.f the Cit y Lurl.ts 1 ould be considered in the s · 1e
·category as. Savannah, ltaeon and other Georgia cities .
Very sineerely yours,.
.cc :- Mayor Allen
Mr • . Alexander
k'. Jones .
W.W. Gates
�,.





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WE TERN UNIO
W . P . MARSHALL
CIIAIRMAr"' OF THE BOARD
TELEGRAM
SYMBOLS
]::Le,, Day Lett er
• - Ni~hc Letter
R. W . McFA LL
(iJ;. lnternn.tional
- Letter T elcs;ra
PRESIDENT
The filing time shown in the date line on domestic telegrams is LOCAL TIME at point of origin. Time of receipt is LOCAL TIM.Ea t point of destination
406A EST FEB -14 6'7 AB070
·A LLC54 NL PO ATLANTA GA 14
MA YM IVAN ALLEN
OARE STATE CAPITOL ATLA
DEAR &ENTLEMENs
THE An.ANTA BRANCH CF THE NAACP SPONSORED A HSUSING CON='ERENCE
FEBRUARY 11TH AN> WITH THE COOPERATION <F MALCOLM JONES, ALDERMAN
Q V WILLIAMSON AND FIVE REPRESENTATIVES FROM THE DEPARTMENT CF HW 1 HOUSING NEEDS AND GOALS WERE SHARED WITH 53 CF ATLANTA'S
LEADING CIVIC I SOCIAL, ·ANO CIVIL RIGHTS CITIZENS•
FROM THE CON='ERENCE EVOLVED SEVERAL RESOLUTIONS At() RECOMMEN:lATIONS
WHICH VERE UNANIMOUSLY
APPROVED BY . THE GROUP THE RESOLUTIONS
.
WERE BROAD IN SCOPE BUT REAL IS ITC IN CONCEPT OEALI~ SPECIFICALLY
WITH BASIC ISSUES Cf' FAIR ANO EQUAL HOUSING FOR -ALL CITIZENS.
THE FOLLC71ING AREAS ARE INCLUDED IN THE DOCUMENT PLACING
s F 12~~QJFIC EMPHASIS ON EACH ISSUEJ 1e BALANCE CF DISPERSION IN
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W-ESTERN UNION
W . P . M ARS H A L L
CHAll'lMAN
OF' THE
BOARD
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SYMBOLS
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NL= Night Lener
R . W . M c FA LL
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The filing time shown in the d1te line on domestic telegrams is LOCAL TIME lt point of origin. Time of reccipc is LOCAL Tl.ME at point of destination
A LLC;A PAGE TWO
NEW PUS.IC HOUSit.-.8 CONSTRUCTION. 2. ELIMINATION CF ALI:. PATTERNS
<F SEGREGATieN IN EXISTING HOUSING UNITS ,. ESTABLISHMENT CF
NON-DISCRIMINATMY PRACTICES ANO PROCEDURES IN ALL PUBLICLY
FUM>ED MOUSING
4. RE•EMPHASIS ON HUMAN VALUES CF RENEWAL WITH THE REHOOS ING
FROORAM 5• NEIGHBMHOOO STABILIZATICN 6. F'AIR HOUSING LEGISLATION
ANO OTHERS
TH~E RESOLUTIONS ARE READY FOR US TO SUBMIT ANO. WE SUGGEST
YOU #'FORD US _THE OPPMTUNITY TC SHARE THESE IMPORTANT ISSUES
WITH YOU AT YOUR EARLIEST CONVENIENCE. WE FE&:L OUR COtf'ERENeE
JNO· ITS INITIAL RESULTS WILL BENEFIT YOUR COMMITTEE IN DETERMINING
VAYS ANJ MEANS BY WHICH YOU 'LL PURSUE A SOLUTION TO THIS VAST
MD SERIOUS PROBLEM COM-"RONTING OOR CITY••• HOUSING •• DECENT
SF1toWMt~ FOR EVERY CITIZEN
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R . W . McFALL
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The filing time shown in the d;ite line o n domestic telegrams is LOCAL TfME at point of origin . Time of receipt is LOCAL TIME,, point of dcstin,rion
A LLC54 PAGE THRE E
DOCTOR A M DAVIS PRESIDENT OF A1t.ANTA NAACP.
SF120l(R2-65)
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�Jammed City Hall
Seeks More Space
STREET MARKS TIME
siderable space is given over to
lawns and to parking space.
Mr. Monroe feels a major secondary building could be
erected on the Trinity Avenue
side of the existing City Hall
but he thinks any such structure would have to incorporate parking floors.
IRON MOUNTAIN, Mich., March 30 (UPI) - Iron Mountain and Kingsford on Michigan's Upper Peninsula share a
street.
Going from one side of that street to the other could take
..,..,
an hour Saturday, the day Iron Mountain goes on E astern
By n.ALEIGH BRYANS
Standard time. Kingsford won' t go on Eastern Standard until
Atlanta plans to shoe-horn a little ·extra floor space into 24 hours later, at 2 a.m. Sunday.
More Doctor,ates
City Hall but it still faces overcrowding, which suggests to at - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - least one official that a major city hall annex will be a must been many remodelings which block ar ea, and that's not good WASHIN~TON, March 30 UP).
in five years.
carved space from hallways and 1 think we ought to start plan- '.111,e proportion of Lutheran semTo meet space demands al- the school department relin- such to augment the office .
.
mary and college professors
ready confronting it, the city quished most of its space in space available. An example is nmg now for a ma1or new an- with earned doctor's ~grees has
is preparing a 6,000-square-foot the hall and occupied the build- a ground floor job that expand- nex.
increased from 40 per cent in
1960 to 57._1 per cent at present,
addition to City Hall-the first ing next door that did house the ed the city cafeteria.
such in the 37-year life of the old city health department.
"If we continue to grow at CITY HALL SQUARE occu- an educational survey shows.
Spanish-Gothic structure.
Last year, three other city the rate we are now, we're go- pies the city block bounded by
The addition is to occupy a departments moved out of the ing to h;:ive to make some major Mitchell Street on the north,
" well" or " court " between 2_ hall and down the street, to a provision for additional office Washington Street on the east,
story wings at the second- and building at 260 Central Ave. that space within the next five Trinity Avenue on the south and
One More Customer
third-floor levels on the south, is dubbed " City Hall Annex. years," Mr. Monroe says.
Central Avenue on the west.
A pp ly imm ediately
or Trinity Avenue, side of the The departments were sanitary, " We're simply outgrowing this In the square is City Hall itPICKRICK
b '!din
parks and personnel.
building - every building we've self and the building that hous,/
ill
City_ Hall
t _W
' ! ca tt· ered over a , two- es:..:.;
FUNITURE
The g.sum of $150,000 has ~en __In __
_ itself,. there
. . _ have _~~:
_er:
th;e~s: c::;h~o~ol,,:_d~~e:!p:ar
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. ~A~c:o~n~-~!!'!!!!!!!!!1!!"!~'!!!1!!!!!!!!111!!!~!!'1_.,,.
set aside for the addition and
for some alterations that will be
made in the aldermanic chamber, which occupies the second
floor of th,e existing west wing.
Building Supt. Howard Monroe, whose department will supervise the contemplated expansions and renovations, says he
expects to select an architect
for the job soon.
WANTED
ATLANTA'S City Hall wa s
completed and occupied in 1930
and long ago proved inadequate
to house all of the city government's gr owing departments and
services.
Some years ago, for example,
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CONSTITUTION
SUN·DAY, FEBRUARY S, 1967 / ( ~
an a
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ANOTHER WATTS SO·ME SAY
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By D. J. R. BRUCKNER
LOI Aniietes Times New1 Service
ST. LOUIS, Feb. 4-Almost
2,000 tenant families of the
largest public housing development here are preparing for a
rent strike March 1 against the
Public Housing Authority in an
effort to force major improvements in living conditions.
Tenant spokesmen who set
the strike deadline said the alternative to over-all upgrading
of the huge development is
widespread rioting. Tenants r e£erred to " another Watts" and
some teen-agers told a reporter,
" It's corning, man , it's coming
big !"
Involved in the dispute are the
Pruitt homes and the Igoe
apartments whlch form a single
housing complex about two
miles from downtown St. Louis.
They are operated by the housing authority for low-income
tenants.
Representing the tenants is
the Pruitt - Igoe Neighborhood
Corp., a community group organized last summer by the
Urban League and the War on
Poverty to upgrade the comtnunity.
Housing authority officials
and members of the city's
board of aldermen agree that
conditions at the development
have deteriorated r apidly in recent years. But the housing authority is requir ed to operate
entirely from rent receipts, and
the officials say they do not
have the money to make ne~ded
repairs .
tion. Today, it is the worst slum
in~! : _ ~ ~- '-mITTgoe1s-43 sfmliar-looking buildings, each with 11
floors, set in a tract of 30 square
blocks. The land ar
is stre
oken bottl
p cans_
1 es o etirl.s.
Inside _Jjle builgip~
worse tfia~uiside. Each buil f lffame ~
or which stops
only at the fi rst, fourth , seventh
and 10th floors. A reporter went
into four buildings before he
found an elevator that worked.
The hallway walls are gray
cement stone blocks. They
never have been painted. Most
of the floors also are gray. The
RECENTLY, they promised are commonl filled with
es
~s a-nd oro"k:en ~ ass.
to begin major repa_ir s in the
spring, but tenant spokesmen 1"1'11'l'IWl~tni,)"'li
' FP"ovel'run 1i r ats
n u s.
said work must begin immediately if the strike is to be The stench in some buildings
avoided.
is overwhelming; many ventiWhen it was built 13 year s lating fa ns do not work. Broken
ago, Pruitt - Igoe was widely windows are common, and
praised as one of the best pub- many refrigerators and drain
lie housing facilities in the na- pipes do not work. A number
of kitchen stoves no longer work ] attention given to work orders
because tenants over-used them placed by tenants which the corto heat their cold apartments .
poration says have been ignored
for months.
BANDS OF roving youths All these things, the corporaam the elevators, break laun- tion says, must be done on a
y machines and windows and crash program.
ock out hallway lights.
Eugene Porter, corporation
About 10,000 people live it:,i president, claims his corporaPruitt-Igoe, and all but one of tion represents 1,900 of the 2,000
the 2,000 fa milies is Negro, tenant famili es and could enMore than 60 per cent of the fo rce its rent strike easily. The
families have no male head of housing authority says a rent
household and an equal per- strike would , in fact, cut off
centage a re on public relief.
even the meager operating
The tenant corporation's de- funds it now has for the project.
mands include adequate heat
and hot water immediately, imes' P,a rties Q~
mediate repair of broken stoves , .
refrigerators, windows and ele_yators, and regular police protection to replace the two
guards assigned by the housing
authority to the entire project.
It also wants a janitor assigned to each building, contending that the present assign,
ment of one for two buildi ngs is
insufficient. It wants immediate
�cc:
The Honorable Ri chard J. Daley, Mayor
City of Chicago
Chicago, Illinois
cc:
The Honorable Jerome P . Cavanaugh, Mayor
City of Detroit
Detroit, Michigan
cc :
The Honorable John V. Lindsay,May or
City of New York
New York, New York
c c:
The Honorable J ohn B. Collins, Mayor
City of Boston
Bost on, Massachusetts
cc :
Mr . John Gunther
Exe cutive Director
U. S. Confe ren c e of Mayors
~c cc :
Mr. Patrick Heal ey
Exe cutive Direct or
Nat ional Lea gue of Cit i e s
The Honorable John J . Sparkman
Room 320 3 Ne w Sena t e Off i ce Buildi ng
Was hington, D. C.
The Honorab l e Wrig ht Pa tman
Hou se Off i ce Building
Wash ington, D. C.
The Honorable Will i am A. Barre t t
Room 230 4 Raybur n House Offi ce Building
Washington, D. C.
�Planning Dep ar t me nt
November 21 , 1966
Potentia ls for Low-Income Housing in Atlanta
INTRODUCTION
The purpose of this report is to exp lore the low-income housing ma rke t in
Atlanta a nd to locate sites for 5000 units so they might be constructed in the
s hortest possible time. The report is organized under the following headings:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Projects undet1'Jay.
Projects in planning.
Proposed sites.
Low-rent housing proposals.
Financing.
Sunnnary and recommendations.
Appendix.
Information on existing projects and projects in planning was obtained from
the Atlanta Housing Authority. Tre Housing Code Section of the Building Department,
Atlanta Youth Council and the Planning Department collaborated on site l ocation.
1.
PROJECTS UNDERWAY
Perry Homes
A 140 unit public housing addition to Perry Homes is now in the fi aa l stage
of working drawings and specifications which should be going out to bid by the end
of 1966. The addition contains large 3, 4 and 5 bedroom units situated across
Proctor Creek from the existing project and adjacent to the Gun Club par.k site now
under development. A bridge across Proctor Creek linking the existing a nd proposed
projects has recently been completed by the city.
Units are expected to be available by July or August, 1968.
No community facilities are being made available within the addit i on but t wo
rooms will be added to . the existing Community building across Proctor Creek in the
existing Perry Homes project. Schools in the area arl operating at cap~city
enrollment now. The proposed elementary school in the Rockdale project is expected
to relieve the situation but is not yet funded.
Local shopping facilities are also badly lacking in the area.
Thomasville
Three hundred and fifty units of Publi c Housing , 16 of which wil l be f or t he
elder ly, are now in the "schematic design stage". Plans are _scheduled f or comp l et ion
in February , 1967. The project will be executed in stages with the fi rs t uni t s
comp leted by May or June, 1968.
Si t uated in the Thomasville U.R.A . , north of McDono ugh Road and south of t he
proposed right-of-way for the Lakewood Ext ension (Expressway), this pr oje c t will
become a part of the Thomasville Community . Dobbs Element a ry School whe.re
Thomasville children attend is op~rating at capacity e nrollment, which me a ns t hat
a new elementary school will have to be bu ilt. The site has bee n s e t a s id e but t he
s chool is not f unded .
Rawson-Washington
McDaniel St r eet Pub l ic Hous i ng , whi ch is now in t he constr uc t ion .,; :.. .:, •.c , will
consist of 650 unit s , i nc l uding 154 high- r ise units fo r t he elder ly.
�I, ~
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Page 2
Potentials · for Low-Income Housing in Atlanta
11-21-66
Completion dates are scheduled as follows:
248 units - October 1967
402 units - March 1968
650 units (including elderly) - October 1968
A community building will have day care facilities and auditorium space
divisable into smaller rooms. The high-rise for the elderly has space for social
activities, arts, crafts and meeting rooms.
An elementary school and park will be built adjacent to the -project. An
architect has been hired for the school which is expected to be finished in two
years.
2.
PROJECTS IN PLANNING
Rockdale
Recent interest in the development of 22l(d)(3) housing in the Rockdale U.R.A.
has prompted the city's Planning Department and Housing Authority to produce a new
development plan for the Rockdale Project which has been predicated on the principle
of cluster development to make best use of the rough topography.
The amendment to the project has been completed. It is expected that the land
can be offered in December 1966 and close March 1, 1967.
The Rockdale Project will add 1500 units to the low income housing market, but
due to F.H.A.'s unwillingness to finance more than 150 units at a time it could take
at least ten years to complete the project.
Existing Rockdale Elementary School expansion for 500 pupils and a proposed
elementary school for 1,000, neither of which have been funded, will serve pupils
both inside and outside the project. An existing Health Center in the project will
continue to serve the area.
Pub 1 ic Rousing
Housing Assistance Administration (formerly P.H.A.) has approved a reservation
for 1200 Public Housing units and 300 units under the new Low-Rent Leasing Program
for Atlanta's relocation needs. Units will be divided between the four Urban
Renewal projects now in various planning stages - Bedford-Pine, East Atlanta, Vine
City and Cooper-Glenn. Each one of the projects is being planned with a full
complement of community facilities to serve the housing, educational, recreational,
and social needs of the people. Each one of the proposed Urban Renewal areas
except East Atlanta is to get a Community School whi·c h will provide city recreational,
social and educational services as well as space for E.O.A. neighborhood programs.
22l(d)(3)
A number of 22l(d)(3) projects are in the planning stage:
(a)
The Atlanta Housing Authority is offering thirteen acres at Hu nt e r
Street and Northside Drive in the University Center U.R.A. to p rovide
260 units.
(b)
The Atlanta Housing Authority i s a lso ready to offer a 7. 5 a c r ,.! s .Lte
between Capitol Homes a nd I-20 Ea st which would provide 122 111' i. ts .
(c)
A third stage of Wheat Stree t Gardens in the Butler Street
provide an additional 149 units of low rent housing .
u.n
A. will
�Page 3
(d)
Potentials for Low-Income Housing in Atlanta
1.1-21-66
A number of other sites are under private negotiation for
22l(d)(3) housing.
3.
PROPOSED SITES (See Map - Low Income Housing Sites)
Inf<?rmation on vacant property obtained from C.I.P. data has been plo tted and
40 sites have been located varying in size from 1.5 acres up to 112 acres, totaling
809 acres+. Locations with acreages appear in Table I. Each of these sites needs
study in greater detail to obtain information on the following and other items so
that intelligent decisions can be made.
Topography
Utilities
Community Facilities
Transportation
Zoning
Employment Market
Housing Market
Adjoining Land Use.
Environmental Factors
Desires of potential residents
Housing on any site should not be considered until each one of these items
has been thoroughly studied.
4.
LOW-RENT HOUSING PROPOSALS
Table II indicates that the six Urban Renewal Areas now in various planning
stages will produce a relocation load of 7025 families now living in substandard
housing. In addition to this, if all families which the CIP has found to be in
structurally and environmentally substandard housing were provided standard housing,
25,000 housing units would have to be provided for low-income families. This is a
monumental task, one which will require not only new concepts and techniques but
also financial resources ($362,500,000.00 based on the current net cost, $14,500.00
of public housing units).
The question of whether the city can afford such a program must be weighed
against whether the city can afford the waste of human resources and human dignity
as well as the implied dangers in the ever widening gap between the poverty ridden
and the middle and upper income group . It has been proved over. and over again that
most social problems come out of the slum environments - the crime rate and the
records of jails and mental institutions testify to this.
It is important that the emphasis of any new program be dire cted toward upgrading the individual, not just building up an inventory of housing. To have any
real value, programs to improve housing conditions must be coordinated with programs
to improve the educational, vocational, social and economic potential of the poor.
It is obvious from the attached Table III that the city is going t o need a
greatly expanded low-income housing program i n order to come up with 5,000 new units
immediately. It is also obvious that new concepts and new techniques of designing
and constructing low-income housing should be explored if we are ever going to be
able to meet relocation and migration needs.
Explore High-Rise Needs Objectively
Study the use of the high-rise apartment buildings as a part of the total
housing program. There are problems involved in the use of high-rise but
many
such as play space, elevators, corridors, lighting, private space and acoustics
can be reso lved through good design and a feeling on behalf of everyone involved
that the environment should be one in which people can maintain t he ir individual ity;
where pride and self-respect can be built, not degraded; and where corrnnunicat i on
between the resident, management and the city are in good working order. Facilities
to improve the socio-economic situation of low income people must be bui lt into the
�.
.
Page 4
Potentials for Low-Income Housing in Atlanta
11-21-66
program or else another "ghetto" is the result. The design and location of high
rise should take into consideration whether single people, young married couples,
the elderly or families with children are being accommodated. Community facilities
would be different in each case. Transportation is another important factor.
Excerpts from various publications are inserted in the Appendix to point out
some of the advantages and problems which are a part of high-rise living.
The open-corridor scheme for high-rise living has many advantages over the
inner-corridor and is particularly suited .to our climate. The use of escalators,
utilization of roof and yard space, underground parking, common facilities and
management all need open-minded investigation.
Develop High-Rise over Stadium Parking
A proposal which deserves study is the development of high-rise apartments
over the parking area east of the Atlanta Stadium. Parking decks which take
advantage of the thirty-foot drop in grade between Fulton St. and Georgia Ave.
could provide the additional parking needed for the stadium as well as parking
for the apartments. Such a scheme would provide apartments for young working
people and the elderly. The site has excellent access to transportation and
the downtown and would create a good relocation resource.
Use Pre-Fab to Cut Construction Time
Pre-Fab techniques for housing have been used successfully in many nations.
For a number of reasons - lack of interest , conservatism and preservation of the
status-quo by labor, real estate developers and builders - pre-fabing has been
held back in the U.S.A. However, it is being used to solve low-income housing
needs- in Miami, Fiorida; Michigan City, Indiana; Rapid City, South Dakota and
Chicago, Illinois. Grants are available from the Federal government to_ underwrite pre-fab demonstrations.
Pre-fabs have a number of advantages:
(a)
Faster construction.
(b)
Ease of maintenance by the use of concrete and other low
maintenance materials.
(c)
Achievement of variety by the arrangement of wall panels ,
window openings, balconies, etc.
(d)
Machine-made components with close quality control produ ce
a product superior to that of conventionally built housi ng .
Pre-fab construction has no cost advantage; however, savings are r eported
in maintenance. The great advantage is in faster con~truction which makes up
a good part of Atlanta's problem.
Use Small Sites
The city should expand its thinking to encompass development of low-income
housing on small sites of one acre minimum. This approach might incre~se
administrative work but if we are really seri ous about solving our hou sing
problems, the program must be one which encompasses a wide variety of solut ions not just the typical large public housing development whose drawbacks are we ll
known.
(a)
Loss of identity.
(b)
Social and economic segregation.
�Page 5
Pot e ntials for Low-Income Housing in Atlanta
(c)
11-21-66
Ins titutionalized appea r ance of the project (an area s et
apart for a segregated group)
Eve ry e f fort should be made to make the low-income housing a part of the
ne ighborhood.
Use Mobile Homes to Create Instant Housing
The use of Mobile Homes should be given study. They provide a ch eap way of
f urni shi ng limited housing which has the -great advantages of speed, sma ll site
deve l opment costs and mobility.
Use Rehabilitation Whenever Possible
Methods should be developed to use rehabilitation of existing structures to
a greater extent. Rehabilitation has the three distinct advantages of not adding
to the relocation load, improving the environment of existing neighborhoods, as
well as the pride and involvement of the people. Such a program requires a close
working relationship between the city and the people as well as a willingness on
behalf of the city to adopt new methods of dealing with such problems as:
-
Redevelopment of small lots
Provision of open space
Community facilities
Community relations
Financing
Use Cooperative Home Building to Give Vocational Training and Resident Participation
Another idea which needs exploring to add greater flexibility to our housing
program is the enlisting of help from neighborhood people to help in building
their homes or apartments. Such a program would be feasible if Pre-Fab techniques
were used and would give the people a sense of pride and responsibility in their
homes and neighborhood.
The cooperative could be set up so that the rent paid would actually go
t oward the purchase of the home or apartment if the people so desired. In
di l apidated areas of owner occupied property, land might be pooled for cooperative
building.
Enlist Support of Non-Profit Organizations and Foundations
Non-profit organizations should be sought out and a meeting called to acquaint
t hem wi th the housing needs of the city and advise them of the various programs
avai l ab le in the low-income housing field.
5.
FINANCING OF LOO- INCOME HOUSING
Financ i ng for low-income housing i s available by a number of methods:





Federal
22l(d)(3)
Public Housing
Turnkey
Acquisition and Rehabilitation
Rent Suppleme n t
Leasing





These programs are covered in Se c tions 106 , 107, 116 , 117 and 120 o f Fede ral
Aids to Local Governme nts .
�Page 6
Potentials for Low-Inc ome Housing in Atlanta
1 1. - 21-66
City financing
Public and private partnership
Private
Private foundations
Cooperatives
Public and private partnership
Low-income families should be able to buy their own homes or apart ment units
by making payments in lieu of rent. The city needs to explore financing which
would allow people to remain in their homes even when their incomes rise above a
certain level.
6.
SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS
A.
This report will accomplish a great deal if it does no more than suggest
some really exciting poss·ibilities and techniques for low-income housing,
and stress the need to develop a program.
B.
Ideas have been suggested, some of which may be out of the que s tion. It
is necessary, however, to explore every idea. The following procedures
are recommended for developing solutions to the problem:
1.
Organize a brain storming session which would include imag.i. na tive
professionals, city officials and citizens in the low-income gr oup
to suggest and refine ideas.
2.
A slide presentation should be made to city officials, private
developers and others to show them the latest and most imag inative
solutions to low-income housing.
3.
As a follow-up to the Housing Conference, appoint key priva te
developers and architect-planners and sociologists to a committee
for effecting the production of low-income housing.
The committees could be organized according to the various hous ing
proposals. Suggested chairmen and committees are as foll m, s :
Chairmen
Developers:
Charles Ackerman
Tom Cousins
John Portman
Architect-Planners:
Joe Amisano
John Gould
Paul Muldawer
Alan Salzman
Ike Saporta
Andrew Steiner
Committe e .
High-ri s e
Pre-fab
Mobile Homes
22l(d)( 3 )
Rehabil itation
Cooperat i ves
Sociologists: ·
Jack Schmidt
The above represent a nucleus for a list.
Community service should be s tressed because some of the p1~o j ects
may have limited profit potential. Call attention to the ·ac t that
if private development does not build this housing, public ho using
will take over the low income market.
�',J
Page
7
Potentials for Low-Income Housing in Atlanta
11-21-66
Chairmen would appoint their own committees which would constitute
subcomrnittees under the general cha irmanship of the Housing Resources
Committee.
The city would provide staff and research facilities for the various
comrnittees,
c.
There are 4,645 low-income housing units scheduled for completion over
the next five-plus years, which is a long way from the immediate need
of 5000 units.
D.
A large resource of vacant land (over 800 acres) has been located for
additional study.
E.
Make it possible for the city to buy vacant land for low-income housing
in advance of actual need.
F.
A well planned program cannot be put together overnight. Hast e could
result in a lasting mistake that the city would pay for in huma n
problems.
G.
The planning of a low-income housing program for Atlanta to at t ack the
total problem, not just increase the housing inventory, should be started
immediately. The program should seek to do the following:
-
Outline goals.
Study existing and new kinds of financing.
Better site plans.
Integrate housing with existing neighborhoods and study
techniques for this purpose.
Study management problems.
Study tenant and ownership problems.
Plan urban renewal and low-income housing together for
a fifteen year period.
Develop an inventory of low-income housing sites and re :;e rve
them for future use.
Develop a program which is based on many different types of
projects and housing techniques so that the city can d r aw
from a wide resource base and at the same time give l m, income people the kind of acconnnodation which is best
suited to their needs.
Prepared by:
Planning Departme nt
City of Atlanta
November 21, 196 6
,a
�November 15, 1966
TABLE I
Housing Resources on Privately Owned Vacant Land
Proposed Sites
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
. 25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
Note:
Acres
Anniston and Woodbine Avenues - East Atlanta-------------------------- - -----4
N. side of East Expressway east side of Grant Street------------------------2
E. side of Stadium (over) parking lot--------------------------------------17
Various sites within Summerhill area--------------------------------------Rich's property at E. Expressway and Chester Avenue------------------------20
McDonough Blvd. in area of Chosewood Park----------------------------------12
Custer Avenue east of Chosewood Park---------------------------------------12
Southwest corner of Cleveland and Hapeville Road---------------------------14
Jonesboro Road (east side) south of Hutchens Road--------------------------10
North of intersection of Jonesboro Road and Circumferential Expressway-----63
Gilbert Road north of Flynn Road-------------------------------------------10
Poole Creek Road (s. side) east of Crown Cork and Seal Co.-----------------42
Various vacant sites east of South Expressway between Ashwood Avenue
and Reynolds Drive------------------------------------------------- --- ---West of South Expressway at Manford Road----------------------~------------24
Salvation Army College on Stewart Avenue------------------------------ - -----6
Various vacant sites in Cooper-Glen Area----------------------------------Carter Street and Electric Avenue--------------------------------------------2
North Avenue at Elm and Vine Streets---------------------------------- ·-----11
Westview Drive at Holderness Street-----------------------------------------7
Oakland Drive (w. side) south of Richland Road------------------------------5
Plaza Avenue (s. side) east of Greenwood----------------------------------1.5
Bridges Avenue (n. side) west of Dovers Alley:----------------------------1.5
Arlington Avenue at Selwin--------------------------------------------------2
Simpson Road (s. side) west of Lincoln Memorial Park Cemetery---------------8
Hightower Road (e. side) north of Simpson Road-----------------------------14
Cushman Circle area--------------------------------------------------- - ----20
Campbellton Road, east of Stanton Street and west of Ft. McPherson---- - ----27
Southwest side of Gordon Road at City Limits-------------------------- - ----21
Boulder Park Drive (s. side) west of Brownlee Road--- 0 ---------------------13
Railroad Avenue, North side between Valley Road and Lakeside Drive----------5
Grove Park (e. side) south of Rockdale Park Area---------------------------60
Gun Club Road and Alvin Drive----------------------------------------------60
Brook Avenue between Hollywood and Lotus Avenue----------------------- - ----10
North Grand Avenue north of Center Hill Park---------------------------- -- -13
James Jackson Parkway west of Magnolia Cemetery--------------------- - - - - - --35
James Jackson Parkway north of Etheridge Drive-----------------------------44
Proctor Drive (unimproved) (s. side) west of James Jackson Parkway---------41
Watts Road (e. side) north of Bankhead Highway------------------------~----24
Watts Road (w. side) north of Bankhead Hwy. to Northwest Drive------------112
Skipper Drive and Harwell Road·--------------------------------------------36
. TOTAL
809
Only vacant properties have been listed.
only one structure have not been located
Many large lots or tracts with

�November 15, 1966
TABLE II
Relocation Needs
Project
Georgia Tech #2
Estimated Families
To Be Displaced
No, Dwelling Units
Proposed
Net Loss of
Housing Supply
358
0
358
Bedford Pine
1190
671
519
East Atlanta
1072
780
292
Vine City
2324
990
1334
Cooper-Glenn
1983
?
?
98
0
98
7025
2441
2601
Plunket town
TOTALS
�TABLE III
LOW-INCOME HOUSING SCHEDULE
AVAILA.BLE
PROJECT
1967
1968
248
140
402
350
1969
1970
TOTAL
1970--J;, "(
Public Housing
Perry Homes Addition
Rawson-Washington ·
Thomasville
Urban Renewal Projects in PlanningBedford-Pine, Cooper-Glenn, East
Atlanta, Vine City
140
650
350
1200
Not scheduled
221 {<lH3l
150
Rockdale
Wheat Street Gardens
Rawson-Washington
University Center
150
149
122
234
TOTAL
248
0
1041
1500
149
122
234
300
Not scheduled
Low Rent Leasing
ij
506
150
4645
..!
�LOW - INCOME
HOUSING SITES
legend
PROPOSED
SITES .••. a
I,,
SCALE N ..._ES
.
,
�APPENDIX
I -
�The three plan studies which follow are taken from Methods of
Reducing the Cost of Public Housing.
'
I
Research Report of the School of Architecture
Pratt Institute
Brooklyn, New York
Sponsored by the New York State Division of
Housing
New York, N. Y.
I .





I
�- - .:..-;-:."":;"-::-·--, -·
. =--·-··
....
JOV/1'.:!1 SC HEN\E
f his is the nwne gi'l (;I) lo
p lan !/ pc 'll hi::h i~ r.1p pro,: i:·:j5 r!'. ~;-r.: "; ! ,-::--:. ·;,..rf ,;J J
1.: n 11·.c:-d
f oi }( ..: id r: s of ( 1 c.i::n tr(I I <J;f·i i:: 2 r.or" ': . if ;,,.,~ Li ~
suu cssful ly for mid dl c -i n<:fJri,c ho u~: 1,~j in rfo·u Ynrk
u nd Chi caso si nce the !Gk ] ? ,W's. ;\s fo r OS c0 uld
be uscc rloincd, th e tow e r sch ,-,me hu s not ye t b ee n
used fo r low-incom e housing, p robobl y fo r the rr:ason
di scusse d below.
r::.-..: ~-.. 1y
-/;: j .-; ;.;,
U
··,:~h !h r"\ ,·,>
1
The tower ·scheme hos a nu mb er o f o d van to g c s and
o ne serious c!isod vc111!age. It is readily app c i-c nl tho t
the compc1cl p la n resu lts in a minimu m o f peri meter
construction crnd th e short e st p o ssible uti!ity r uns, with
a Henclon t eco no mies. Eve n mo re significa nt is th e
reduction in the a mou nt of exp ensive p ub lic corridor
spo ce; in the _tower sch e me the area o f public co rridor
per construction room is about hol f tha t in the inte riorcorrido r sche me, ond p ublic corrido r space is rela tively ex p e nsive a s w ill be shown in Chop te r Four_
In most cases, the tower p lan provide s cross-ven tilation and tw o exposures for each apar tme nt, o very
desirable arrangemen t a s far a s livability is concerned. The tower scheme a lso offers a d vo nk1 9 e s in
site-pla nni ng. The s9 uare plan is e asy to d ispose,
even on an irregu la r site, a nd when used in la rge
pro jects, it res ul ts in a g re ate r feelin g of cp cnne·ss o n
the site than occu rs wh e n long narrow building s a re
used.
A seri o us eco no !nic ha nd ica p to the lo we r sch eme is
the high cost o f elevators. Providing only fo ur to six
a partments p er floo r, a s co mpared to !en to twelve
o portm e nts p e r floo r in th e interior-corridor scheme,
the cost o f clevotors p e r dwell ing unit is thu s two to
two r.in d one-half tim e s higher in the to·se r sche 111 e.
For this high e r cost, g reat ly improved livob ility is provid e d. This sclwme is p resented here in the bc!ief
tho t the econo mi c s no ted in the parngrap hs above
w ill offse t th e hig he r cost of the se rvice core, thu s
affording imp ro ve d liv a bility a t no in crease in cost.
..
�. · ·--·· .- -- - . - --- -·-· ... ··-. ··-= .
-- ..... -
.~-
...• .......
ii
-I
.Pc r-sr, cctivc of Towe r ~uildings .
�:· -...
.
...
-, -:. ;· - -·-;;---
--
- --- , ·<!•·•--· --..
ln th is type o f bu il d ing o il o f !he rJ[)(l rf mr,n ts <:re
rrx:c h c cl b y mcons o f o ulJ oo r corrid o rs o r " .-+ ,·,c:t,, d
sid e wc:lks, 11 as th e:y o re ~orncl imes co il ed. The ch o rr · 1- 7 .
I
' ': ~ 0. f r !lth Cl b11 i!, !i nc, is IA':': ..


 
i~i:1.


The ,.:,F -.:: cor~ id o r :;chemc ha~ b ee n U$e d f~. !., .. , ind
mi ckl k -i,~com e ho1Js ing in mon y pbccs, b o th in this
count 1'y an d a bro c1d . .
- -- ....
. . . . ..· .
~
lmjJ rovccJ liva bility is the o ut slancl in:J o<l·1antaae of
this sche me. Eve ry apar tme nt has through- ·, e:n ti !a ti o n
and tw o exposur es, a nd eve ry apo rt rnen t can have
th e mos t fovorab le· orie nta tion . A ll · roo ms, inclu ding
b o throo ms, . h ave outs ide li g ht an d venti latio n. The
inte rior corrido r, w hi ch . in p rc:cticc is ofte n c: n unp lea sa nt sp a ce - na rro w , d c rk, . crnd smel ly ._ is
e limina te d e ntire ly. Th ese go in s a re par ti c1 ily o ff set
by so me loss o f p rivacy for th e roo ms tho t ope n on
the corridor.
Th e o p e n-co rri do r sch e me e l!:n in cle s the cc~ t of mecha ni ca l ve nt ilatio n fo r the b a throoms r;n d !he cost of
th e int e ri o r corrido r w ith it s expensive fin ishe s. But
the op e n-cor rid o r, b e ing " si11 g le- loode d," must b e at
leas t l ½ ti me s as long C1S the in te ri o r co rri d o r. Since
co d e s limit th e max imum di sta nce fr om on apa rtm e nt
to a stair, the o pen -c'o rrid o r building must e ith 0_r be
conte nt w ith few a p a rt me nts p e r fl oor or, a s in th e
ex ampl e sho w n h e re·, it mus t se p a ra te the two required stairs. Th e o p e n-co rrid o r, o f co ur se , ne e d not
b e l1 eo te d but ·so me p rovisio n mu st b e mode fo r sn o w
rem o val; in N e w Yo rk th e Bui ld ing Departmen t re .. q uir e s th e in sta ll a tio n o f ele ctri c h ea ti ng cab le in the
fl ~o rs of a ll o p e n co rrid o rs. Si nce o il apm tme nt d oo rs
op e n to th e o utside , th es e doors mus t be o f the e x te rio r · type an d mus t b e weathers tripp e d . The lon g,
thin bu il d ing shape , w ith its hig h pr o p o rtion o f pe rime te r to e nc los e d a rea , is no t b as ic o ily eco nom ica l,
no r, in a hig h -r ise b1Jilding , is it bosi co ll y stab le ; ex tra
·cos t for wi nd- braci ng mu st be as sumed .
In ·view o f o il th e it e ms noted in the pre vio us pora grop h, it ' mig ht be conclud e d tha t th e ec onomic positio n o f the ope n-cor rido r sc hem e is unfovo rob le . Bu t
thi s is no t th e co se. Rece nt cos t studies fo r o ,~ cw !y
de sig ned pub li c housing project in N ew Yo rk indicut~
ve ry, su bs to ntio l cos t sovi11gs rewlti no fr om the! use o f
th e ope n- cor ri do r scheme.
�·-·
' · - ·.· -~~-:=--: - . ···--~-- ..::·~ ~.:.._.. _:;.- -:-: : - :,. ··_: ,, ' . ·- · :_......
I".~ • .



--




.. ••••
- . · · . ' . ... .
- . -~- ·---
~
In the cxo111pl0 presented h ere and on the following
p o9 e s, the ope n-co rridor sch eme has b ee n combined
wi th sk ip -sto p e !cvcitors. In this arrang e me nt th e eleva tors sto p only ot e ve ry third fl o o r; tena nts o n the
infcr:~1edio lc flo o rs ha ve to wolk up or d own one
fl oor. Th e op e n corridor occurs only at e levator- slop
.-4
1 1 ,. : ' ~ : :
-
21
20
19
!:~~ , .. , .. :"" ;·,:--:, r ~ th e c0rrid cH·; stoirs are
\\·i! ~i in t:!c ~po r tn~c:·:ts \,:! !d o r12 nh., ;nt oi11 e d by the
t::·· ~:;, t_ Thi s sc he nw hc,s u ~c :1 usc cl in a no te d uppe rinco:~1c pro ject in Cu n.bridg e , Ma ssachu se tts, an d in
0
--··
ELEVATOR
sro ;, 1-L()(_;;;


(;


17
pro p ose d low- income proje ct in New York.
(OP EN COR RIDOR)
16
15
INTERMEDIATE STOP FLOOR
Th e sk:? -slop sch e me save s the cost of fwo out of three
corr ic o : s cind e le vator d oo rs and co ntrols. Against
this ;c v i ri g mus! b e bolanced the cost of the private
stai rs ard th e fir e e scape bcilconie s in two out of three
of the oportme nts. A significant advantage of this
scheme is lhe eli mina tion of most of th e privacy problem . By pl a cing the larg e r a po rlments on the interme dia te f1 o o rs, it was possibl e lo orrunge the plan so


h.. : .10 bed roo m op e ns 0:1 a corridor.


14
ll
(NO CO RR IDOR)
12
II
INTERM EDIATE STOP FLOOR A
10
INTERMEDIATE STOP FLOOR B.
9
.,
ti
T~c s!ruc!urcl syste m employs re gulor!y spc1ce d reinfor cE: d co nc re te columns, two p e r bay, with the floor
sk: b, con!ilcvered 4 fe e l b e yond the columns on each
sid e. Thi s fra ming syste m is cfocussed in d e tail in
Cha pte r Two. Stair an d e leva tor towe rs ha ve b e en
p 1o ccd o utside the b uildi ng proper, and d esigned to
svp? ly -.vindb racing for the to ll, narrow building.
. 7.
6
!I
4
INTERMEDIATE STOP FLOOR
3
ELEVATOR STOP FLOOR
R-:: q uir,:!d di ;t ri b utio n o f opC.1 rt rn c nl type s is p ro vide:d
in on,: bui lding. The t wo b m ic fl0 o r p la 11 s ore d e tail e d
o n the foll owing p ag e s along wi1 h alt ernat e fl oor
p ion; re qu ired fo r co rnpk l0 cktri6 u!i o n. This distrib utio n is explu inecl in ch ar t form on th e fo llo w ing
poge.
2
•._.......,.,,~. <~-.-.~.::.._
•- . •

•"•'
. • ~
-••--,,. ' ' ,L•
-- - ••,- 1
Cross-sc cfi o n th rough Open-Corrido r
SEE PLM ~ l'-I EXT PAGE
SECTION
S-8
0
iru:
5
10
I~
20
25
=--=r·:· ·r , :~:-.,1
SC.Il l[
Ff. /
- - ..
�.,-
·.
,·.· . ..
~·,-.
--~ ···.
.

w• •
"t°°?)
~-:c-. V
INTE!7.l0ll-CORRIDOR
SCHEME
Tl1c inf,, ,-i 0 r-r: 0 aidor ~cliNne is now in co 1n 1no n u-;c fr,r
10°.'/ (ind midd lc-i 1ic 0 1nr:! ho 1J sin9.
I! is a ~i 111 p l1; rin d
econornir:cd sch ,~mc , permit ting te n to twe l'lc c,p cir!;· . , _ ·1 ·
,
l!
, !q ,~5 P (J},
b,::,,·,•n;v0.r .. ;···( · ·
1 · -
1
( f r:, <. <,~
·1r:11lik,:, .,,1 c x r: r; p t fo r th e fo ur r:ornc r o pod:::;:;;1~. !n
New Y,:, ,-k City public housing, the re quir e men t of

cross-~r: nti lat io n for e ll apcrr!m c, n! s hav ing nw rc than
one b ed ro o m hm pr od 1;cc d a var iat io n c f th.is sc h e me ·
in which ihr: se rvic ~ core forms a " pi nche d wa ist" ·
w hich p e rmi ts th e four adj occ nt ap e1 rtrn enls to meet
the techni ca l re quirem ei1ts for cross-v e ntilation. Since
in practic e the irnprov e.rncnt in the ventilat io n •)f these
fou r aportrnen!s is slight, if an y, and th e cos! of p roviding it is con sid erob lc, this reci uir e me11 t lw s b ee n
_ignored in the exa mple pr ese nt e d _in the following
pages. It is b e li eved ·1hot if c ross-venti lation is lo be
con sid e re d a primary ·va lue, ih e n the op e n-co rridor
or th e towe r scheme shou ld be use d rat he r tha·n the
int erior-corrid o r sche r'n e.
Like th e oth e r exampl e s 111 this Chapt e r the inte ri o rcorridor scheme is shown with 110 ba seme nt, wi th
re gulcrr column spa cing, a nd with th e full distribution
of apartment types in a single building. In common
with the open-corridor sch e me, it em ploys a _ twocolumn bay w ith cantilev e re d floor slci bs, a stiUc!ural
sys tem w hich is discusse d fu r th e r in Chapter Two.
Th e gro und floor plan of tl'. e building is shown at the
right. Since there is no b ase me nt, th e faciliti e s usually
found th e re have b een loca te d obove ground. The
re!_noinde r of the ground fl oo r has b ee n le ft ope n to
provide useful covered spo ce and pl eason t vista s
thro ugh the building.
·
Th e mo in purpo se o f th e int e ri o r-c or rid o r sch e me a s
p re sen te d h e re is Jo study th e sugg es tion tha t the
li ving room might b e us e d a lso for slee ping. The
recrso ns fo r co nsid e ring this id ea ore discu ssed in the
fo ll owi ng pag es , a lo ng w it h tlw sugg es te d plcinning
so lutions for putting it into c fT c ct. If this idea shou ld
be co nsid ere d fea sibl e · fro m th e po int o f vi.:,w o f
li va bility, the co st sa vin gs wou lJ b e ve ry app re ci a ble,
si nce o ne b e droom wou ld be c li111in ate d from e ac h
opcrr trn e nt. Th e re ductio n in area is show n grophic a lly a t the right.
-
�-- - ..
·~· : ..
.
I
I
- - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - ___ _ _ __ _____ ...J
-I
G!-:O Ui·JD FLO O f!. PLAI\J, LOBBY
CUILDl1'-!G BLOC K B
i
(As pe, this s t u d y )
l;
19 0'- o "
I
r
~J:.1
·-· .L
CU llJJt !-!C 8LOCIC A
S:·unc Cl r<.ls )
2 3 7' -



--·····-:-- ---
.
--- - -- ~
-"
•• •
7- .
The lower b lock shows !he size o f
!he b uildi ng c!cs:0:~c d a ccor di ng lo usu,il housing
sta nclmcl s. Th e uppc-: r block shov.,s, cit !h e sci111e sccile,
th e size o f th e b uil ding cl es i9 11C'd fo r this study . Tho
re cluctio n in 1011 91 '1 is tt 7 fee l cind the sc1vi11g in floo r
mcci is 1927 sci ucirc fee t, or C1pproxi11wt c lr 20%.
The recluction in cost wo uld b e som e what less than
20%, since plu 111bi ng , ki!ch c n eciu ip111ent, a nd e le VC1 tors ore no t o/Tcc tc d, but !he sa ving sho uld a111 ou 11I
lo n1_o re . th 0 n. l _?'lo _of t)1 e .cq~t of. t.l!e b~1i !ding, ..· . .

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Today :m increasing number of families are,
or even tually will be, liYing in hig h -rise :ipartment bui ldings. Our exper ience clea rly i11dic:ites that such an enYi ronmcnt sometimes .
brings for th unusual family and m anagemen t
problems which thus far have not been adequately delineated and analyzed.
This repo rt is a compilation a nd eva luation of
the responses of local housing authorities, experienced in high-ri,:e design and m a nagement,
to questionnaires and inter views. It is neither
a statement of Public H ousing Administration
policy nor a set of standards. Nevertheless, I
believe it wi ll prom helpful not only to local
housing authorities, their architects and managers, but to all who may be c onsidering the use
of high-rise structures fo r fam ily living.
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Elisabei'h Coit
Miss Elisabeth Co it's extensirn professional
experience makes her em inently qualified to
do th is provocati 1·e study. She was Principal
Project Planner o f the New York City Housing
Authority for many years and is a fellow of the
American Institute of Architects.
FAIA
As Publ ic Housing Commissioner, l am deeply
concerned with the proper resolution of the
problems of high-rise housing a nd believe sincerely we can clo much more than we have in
the past to orient ou r design to famil y needs
and management r ealities. While this paper
docs no t g ive fin al solutions, it d oes identify
many of the perplexing situations relating to
livability and opnations in h igh-rise housing
and offers s uggestions for further explora~ion.
)ak< c.1ta/L
PUBLIC HOUSING ADMINISTRATION
MAnIE C. McGUIRE
Commissioner
Public Housing Administration
HOUSING AND HO ME FINANCE AGENCY
Ma y 1965
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rban living is more and more the pattern of modern life all over
the world. The tall el evator-serviced apartment house rises
up in tiny Italian towns, in new cities of India, in P aris suburbs, and
not the least in the United States, author of the skyscraper.
H ousing authorities faced with high land costs are of necessi ty providing elevator buildings at least for part of their inventor y. T hey
are p ersuaded that not all design techniques used successfully in rowh ouse and walkup. a partment buildings are appropriate fo r high
structures.
The accompanying report contains suggestions, in large part provided
by these ingenious _a uthorities, that make for case and econ omy in
long-term management practice and in family satisfaction and cooperation.
It is not to be taken as a final word. Authorities look for a new
approach in the design of urban structures and tu rn to the architect
_for imagination and invention, tempered by a practical knowledge of
problems inherent in densely occupied bui lding groups.
Public housing developments are not in their nature "institutions" and
need not look or feel as if they were. They arc built for people. Their
design must call forth people's interest, acceptance and understand ing,
must stimulat e their iuiti ative, and meet their social r equirements.
Nadi ne Gordimer, South African author, has said in another context,
"An utterly impossible job-to improve th e liYing cond itions and
morals of people while at the same time stifling their opinions and
taking away from them any responsibility for their own destiny" .
Authorities are concerned with techniques that will result in a "possible" job. This report offers suggestions toward that end. Its purpose is to supply a fo undation of exp erience upon -ivhich the a rchitect
will build h is own New Jerusalem in a " green and pleasant land'"O
�'r
'lf'i he image of a l!C'.V city ha~ been a~C<'ptcd by cit izens and is being
Ji implemented with the :11 d of [, ctleral a nd local government.
Schemes a rc proposed :mcl undertaken to break 11·ith old traditions and
to provide a new, liYcly mclropolitan co mplex.
Public housing is pa rt of this cornpl<'x. Its tk\'clopm cnts must be
dcsi crned in keepin(T with the invi 0crora ted ci t)' so il1ai lh C)' 11ill be a
satisfa ction and a pride to all cit izens.
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ElcYator-ser\'iced buildings, 16, 20 stories, and eYen higher, are becoming a necessary part of the supply of "decent, safe and sanitary"
housing within the framework of community de,·clopment.
Renewal schemes in rundown city areas and new high ways slicing
thro ugh the outskirts result in masses of families turned loose, many
of whom must be accommodated in public housing developments.
Also the impact of in-migration from the countryside, and the notable
increase of individual family size are as well kno wn to architects as
to sociologists.
This r eport will acquaint architects with some difficulties encountered
in tall b uildings popula ted by fa milies many of ,rhom lived formerly
in decrepit city slums a nd by others unused to urban living.
All la rge-scale housing developments have complex problems, but there
are certain ones that characterize h igh-rise buildings and require
special thought for solution. Chief among these are:
1. Separation from the ground. Babies and small children need
sunny play space close to their mothers; p arents and older children want the equivalent of a nea rby porch _for informal gatherings, relaxation, and for making the acquaintance of new friends.
2. Loss of identity, as well as a sense of pressure in the multiplefa mily floor of a ma ny-familied structure. Ranks of pigeonhole
dwellings close together make difficulties boLh for the gregarious
and fo r those who cherish privacy. The first type misses opportu nity for self-expression in the impersonal trafficways of narrow
corridors and c rowded elevators; the second is oppressed by the
closeness of his many neighbors.
Different, and someti mes conflicting, solutions are here offered to the
a rchitect fo r his di scri minati ng evaluation.
The report also contains notes of experiments now being discussed by
authorities to further increase orderly managemen t of the property,
resulting in tena nt sati sfa d ion an d consequent accicp lancc of rcsponsil1il ity for th e fabric of the b uildings.
The a rc hitect will need to visit exi sting developme n ts, both with authority personnel and by himself, fo r firstha nd obs;erva tion. He will
rel'icw ho using puhlicati o11s and guides. He will S'lud y the results of
experimental schemes ancl demo nstration buildings as they develop,
such as parki ng troughs al Flemingdon P a rk, To1i<1rnto, or the forthcoming Pratt Institute (l3rooklyn ) stud y of·constrUiction methods that
is sponsored by the HHFA. He will not scorn 311)7 scrap of practical
in formation.
Architects and authority staff must work closely tog;,ether from the first
sketches to the "As-l3ui lt" drawings. The authori'ti.J ' supplies detailed
man agement experience, knowledge of the market, a nd iLs own official
relaLions with city departments and ,community o.rganizations. The
a rchitect should aid in developing the program a-n d offer a physical
translatio;1 of it. · He provides experience with 1t1ew materials and
construction methods, and an inventive attack on ]Problems p osed by
the authority. He will stress the importan ce of goo d workm anship as
well as approp riate materials.
Both architect a nd a uthority sliould make use of tfu.e social scientists'
contributi on. For one example, a French study o.f workers' families
showed that people with less than 8-10 s1.1uare moeters of space per
person had twice as many · social and physical diisor ders than those
with 10-14, meters.1
Both must have clearly in min<l the encl client, the: t enant famil y. No
development is better than its 1Y1anagcrnent but, eq mially, no good management is possible without tenant cooperation iill the techniques of
apaTtment living. One authority has a slogan, "Oenr,onstrate to tenants
that management cares : tenants will care."
Public housing has its own traditions, properly Jbased on the need
for rigid economy, both in capital costs and maimtenance expenses.
But, as M. Roland of the P aris Opera said rccent~y , " How agreeable
it is and how necessary to break intelligently w ith tradition and
routine".
1 From address lo the American I nstitute of Architects' 'Convent ion, 1963, by
Dr. Ed ward T. Hall.
S 10 1ut e of
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INTRODUCTIO ~
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The first view off ,a housin g developm ent gi ves tenant and visitor alike
a strong impression, whether or not it is a conscious one. This is
particularly true of groups of tall buildin gs where greenery cannot
disguise a11d sofu.cn building sh apes and positions. The high masses
dominate the scene.
A simple pattenn of well-spaced structures comfortably set in landscaped grounds, ,m ay be allaincd in many different ways. A study
model with movmble buildings ca n be advantageous to architect and
authority during the first phases of design. Some architects think
themselves fort =a te if a combin ation of hi gh and low buildings is
contemplated, w, ether attached or separated, as it gives th em scope in
the overall design. This, of course, mu st be justified by land cost and
subsoil conditioms and by the benefit gained by housing large families
near the groun d!..
On e-story extens:iions or separate low buildin gs for managementmaintenance offic es, community spa ces, for a row of shops, even for
a school ( the aull:lh ority will no doubt explore th at J)Ossibility with the
local board of ed!:ucalion) , all th ese break up vertical masses an d provid e eye-level atecents.
Among the 12 '"A spects of Quality" listed by Hobert Katz, the 2 th at
he thi nks most neglected arc " bl endin g into the neighb orh oo d" and
"individu ality. " Mr. Katz also heli cvcs that a livabl e design should
be, so far as is p ossible, based on a specific program with allowa nce
for future adapt a tion .1
'Int ensity of D<:;'clop mcnt nnd L iva bility of M ulti-Fam ily Ho usin g Projects.
Robert D. Katz. I• HA Techni cal Studi es Progra m, No. 509. 1963.

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SITE DESIG N
Architects stud yin g occupied developmen ts will do well to make some
visits on rainy days. A pool here or a p uddle there wit nesses insufficient study of drainage requirements and of the ground settlement
to be expected.
Th ey may also fin d, in any weather, tenant- made or even staff-made
walks no t in th e original desig n, or an uninYiting amount of expensiYe
chain-li nk fe ncing.
Publi c streets within the site are unh and y for easy tenant circulation
and arc un sa fe in deYcl opments tccm iug with children. Private streets
protec ted hr movable stanchi ons will take ca re of maint enance trucks,
moving rnns, or emergen cy vehicles for bu il dings within the site.
Auth oriti es prefe r, if possib le, to have bu il ding entrances nea r public
streets.
Di fficu lties Encountere d
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a. Lawn s crossed by unpla nned p:iths or caged m by high metal
fencing.
b. T rnfli c snarls al h11ildi 11g entran ces .
c. Co rn er c11 tti ng .,t wa lk i11tcrst'ctions.
d. f> rc:ll"y aspect of 11 ninlerrupted asph:ilt surfa ces Ill walks and
re.c reat ion areas.
e. Erosion .
f. Dama ge to pl an t ma ter ial.
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�Suggestions
a. Walks planned \l'here people need and \\·::int to go; e.g., direct
access from buildings to public sln ·ets, tr:rnsporla li on stops,
school~, shops, as \l'cll ::is conn:11ie11L patlnrnys to playgrounds
and to all entrances wi thin the site.
Lawns rai~ctl 18 inches or so aLo YC rnrroumling g r::iclc, sometimes higher to form a ,rinclbrcak for benches set ::igainst the
r etaining wal l.
b. Entr::inces planned to ::tYoid cross-tr::inic concentration.
· Walks from entrances designed as a "horn of plenty" to accomrnod::ite the outrush of .children.
c. Walks curYed a t intcrsectio.ns.
Radii designed for snow-removal machinery in cold climates.
NOTE: A heating tunnel under main. walk1rnys is said to pay for
itself in. ease of repairing lines and in l01veri11 g snow removal
cost.s.
cl. Concrete w::ilks as well as asphalt, each defi ning certain uses.
Colored concrete patterns in nrnlls and play spaces to provide
play material and interest.
Walks edged with cobbles or bricks set in cement.
Curbs designed to avoid trimming grass by hand.
e. Tllrf or gr oun d coyer on steep slopes.
Drain basins ·with top masonry courses that can be raised or
lowered easily if unexpected settlement or heaving occurs.
Raised lawn areas.
f. . fassed shrub beds have built-in protection.
Thorny bushes are more effective th an "Keep OfI" signs.
The budget for trees is better spent on reasonably well-g rown
ones than on a larger number of small trees.
Ex isti ng trees stand up best of all when site design can incorporate them.
Vines on building walls add to the supply of greener y at little
expense and keep children fr om marking walls.
Flower beds to be used in competitions between old and young
tenants or residents of different buildings stimulate r espect for
a ll plant material.
Garden plots for vegetables are successful in some areas.
St.inchions . . . l nvin Glavan, Architect


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PARKING
Open µarki ng lots demand close a ttention during site design if they
arc not to clraw too much a ttention in the fini shed development. They
should be near public streets to avoid expensive heavy-duty access
roads. They should be away from buildings to keep noise and fumes
from dwellings. Decision between scattered lots and fewer larger ones
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Low P.o.rking Lc,·el . . . Th oma.s f. M c Donough, Architect
Existing Tree
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depends partly on site characteristics; but small lots are usually considered preferable in that Lhcy arc less conspicuous and can be closer
to the owner's ho11<11c. P a rking lots that penetrate deeply into the site
interrupt nalural ,circulation and cut off buildings from each other.
A sea of p arking Jots along the site's perimeter, on th e other hand,
makes an island of the building group.
Diffi culties Enco ntered -
a.
b.
c.
d.
Parking lots overcrowding open space.
Danger to playing children.
Annoyance from noise and fumes.
Space appropriated by nontenants.
Sugg e stions
a. Study of amount of open space fo r tenant needs unencumbered
by cars before parking lots are laid out.
.
Waivers from citywide r egulations for the ratio of cars to families, if less need is demonstrable.
Parking under buildings, or in troughs covered by walks and
play spaces, :lo economize on land use and to separate cars from
people, both for safety and a ppearancc.
Carports with playgrounds on the roofs, for the same r easons.
NOTE: Bnilding entrances near public streets diminish the need
for visitors' parking space.
b . Fencing to k-cep children from pelting through the parking lot.
c. Thick shrub planting and bushy trees surrounding parking lots
to hide ,cars from view and t o counteract fu mes.
H ardy vines o n fences in northern climates to prolong protection.
Parking lots s lightly lower tha n surrounding grade level, whether
by taking advantage of natural terrain or by short ramps, to
diminish noj se.
d. Signs warning outsiders that Lheir cars will be towed away.
T ags issued to residents.
List of tenants' license plates fo r staff use, or that of a tenant
committee.
Numbered, assigned places plus violation stickers.
Kcy-opcrat
cha in or gale.
Elcclrically opera ted gale.
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These play spaces should he near entrances, but not so near as to interfere with normal traffic. They afford also gay accents througi1 br ig htly
colored benches and play equipmen t. Architects should insist on
proYiding the color scheme for playground equipment so that it will
complement and enhance overall design.
A large playground for older children and their parer.ts is planned
if a city park or playground is not nearby. Sometimes it is designed
according to park department standards, built by the a utho rity, and
run by the park department. If not, an open area largP. enough for
softball games and equipped with basketball standa rds, parallel ba rs,
shuffie board markings, etc., will be needed. A running track of four
laps to the mile could border the space for many such acth·ities and
will itself be a popular attraction.
The large playground can be a useful counter to mischief resulting
fr om teenage energy.
Chief Justice Clark has r emarked that, "Most boys would 1:ather steal
secon d base than steal a bicycle."
Paths for bicycle ridi ng and roller skating are needed away from
pedestrian ways, to avoid noise and accidents. It has been observed
th at a sign, "No Bicycle Riding," is appar ently illegible to a boy who
has no other track than the pedestrian way in which to show off his
speed and daring.
Existing rock outcrops that lend themselves to play add an economical
b onus.
Spray pools are welcomed in warm weather. Integral or a pplied color,
e.g., swimming pool blue, in the concrete dish adds cheerfulness. The
pool can be used as a skating rink in winter.
Childre n's Piny Arca ••• Kc.hn an d Jacobs , Architects
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RECREATION AREAS
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Small playspots for liLLlc children and for mothers sunni ng the babycarriage trade arc conlrihutions to city living always o/Tcrccl in pu blic
hou sing development s. One may sa y that in this coun tr y, at lens!,
· private developers now ,copy public l1ousing d c~ig n in this r espect.
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Difficulties Encountered
a. Piny spaces unused by sma ll children and theiir mothers.
b. Lawn areas used for play and digging.
c. Play equ ipment marke<l up.
cl. Broken benches.
e. Small playspots overrun with "6 to 12s".
f. Large playgrounds li ttle used.
Su ggestions
a. Sturdy, varied play equ ipment.
NOTE: Small children soon tire of crawling .a nd want to climb,
tire of climbing and want to jwnp.
Shady spots to make play spaces usable on hoii: days and to attract
children away from entrances and lawns shacied by buildings.
Comfortable benches, a few with high metal mnbrellas to protect
against sun and short summer showers.
Plywood chips under equipment desig ned for small children.
b. Small grass plots within or close to the plo.y space, labeled "For
Benches . . . Ar.die:& ]. Thomas ; Simeon /l e /lcr, Archittcts


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open space
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Junior E xcavators," to furnish an auth orized pl ace for little
children wlro want to--p crh aps mu st -di g.
C aution : Sa nd pi ts as usua lly designed may be unsanitary a nd
d angerous unless under consta nt supervision. R aised sand containers, some combin ing san d a nd water pl ay, a re now ob ta inable.
c. Bright, du d ble paint tha t can \;>e cleaned easil y and that adds
gaiety to the scene.
b. Benches of p ip e rail with ,voo d slats, or of concrete with heavy
plastic slats..
Slats so fa stened that they can b e replaced, if broken, without
injury to the frame.
e. Separate p!ay spaces designed fo r " 6 to 12s," with equi pment
such as exercise units, checker tables, removable shower, chalk
games.
NOTE: Pavem ent marlcing for Hop S cotch and Tic-Tac-Toe,
however, if p rovided also in the small pla yspots, will ke ep the
older child .sent out to watch his you ng brother or sister fr om
becoming bored and drifting away.
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f. The large playground as cl ose as possible to the bui ldings, considering the noise invoh·ed, and in a ny case with easy access to
it from all parts of the site.
High fencin g to keep b alls insid e.
Benches for occasion al spectators, dou bli ng as a place to leave
coats.
Hose bib for "water b oy" if a drink ing foun tain is not feasible.
It is also needed for cleaning, an d can be used to tran sform a
curbed runnin g track into a winter skating ri nk .
Night lighting for info rmal dances or for dra ma tics.
Comfort station with stora ge space, open u nder supervision at
definite h ours.
NOTE: S wings, slides, and other fast-movin g equipment are
usually considered dangeroiis in playgrounds lacking supervision.
NEIG HBO RHOO D COM MONS
"Neigh borh oo d Commons," a progr am invented an d ·put into practice
by P rof. Karl Linn, Landscape Arch itect, completed its fir st dem onBuildin g n Nc if:hborh ood Common, . . . Kar l [,inn . Landsccpe Archirccl
Park Dcparl r:1 c nl Playc roa::, d . . . Emery R oth & S01u , A rcltit ec lJ
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�strat ion at l\Ielon P a rk, Philadelphia, in 1%2. The movement has
spread to a number of other c ities.
.
In essence it consbts of trans forming a city-o wned, vacant, rubbi shy
lot into a park-playgro und th roug h the labo r of Yo lunt cc r worke rs and
you th "ro ups under Yoluntcer profc~;;ional and tcd1nical g uid :111ce.
D ona ti~ns of new an d secondh and makria l from co11 tractor::-:, g ifts o f
trees fr om the city's par · departmen t :1ml fn1m pri \'atc nurse ri es, etc.,
are incor porated to m ake "a place of mee tin g wh ere youn g am! o ld
may g ather toge ther to e ngage in d1~- ::-JH)n t,1nco 11 s cckbrali o n of public
life." 1
Builders and users are the sa me people : adolescen ts o fTcr their young
m uscles in con struction jobs; their elde rs pro\·idc ski lled kno wledge;
little children dig away with bi g shovels or cover retaining walls with
mosaic patterns; and moth ers bring refreshments, an important ingred ient of volunteer work.
The resulting oas es g ive local pride and sa ti sfaction because of the
n eig hborhood's invclve:;ient fr0m the outse t. This involvement, like
th a t of tenant-mainta i:: 8d flo werb eds m e ntioned above, could increase
pleasure in and r espect for outdoor living sp ace in housing d evelopments.
NOTE: The Nation al Capital Housing Autlw rity, cooperating with the
1
Ex erp t from the Neighbo rhood Commo ns Charter.
Dcpnrtmcnt of llealth, Edu cation, an d W el/arc, Jws slartcd such a
self-help ten ant grounds impro vem ent program in a Washin gton develop111 cnt, com plete 1l'ith indoo r m eeting room, u;orrlr.shop, and storage
space. Auth oritiP.s and architects wanting lo kn o w m ore about the
techniqu es and results sh ou ld conscdt Karl Li1111, N ciglcb orlcood Comm ons, 8-10 N ccu /Jr11nps hire A venne, JVaslcington, !J .C.
LI GHTIN G
N ig l1t illu minntion o f t!ic ll" h olc ~itc pays in r cd uc · i on o f cily o r staff
patrol th roug h the g ro unds. Th ere arc tenants u nfamili a r wi th urban
living in hig h building developments, there arc o ft en undesirable,
so metim es j eal ous people li ving near ·the s ite, the.re may be teenage
gangs or wandering crim inals who find opportun i ty for di sturbance
and violence in dimly lit opr,n spaces away fro m public streets.
Lights on building corners a re less ex pensive than s l anda rcls. Usually,
h owever, some s ta nd a rds w ill be needed for ,rnlks,, m a lls, and parking
lots.
T enants can m eet each other a ft er a workin g <lay in well-li ghted sitting
areas as many o f them were accustomed to m eet n p orches an d steps
of the ir fom1 er d wellings. Neighborly groups o n b ei1ches r emoved
from buildin gs will n ot dis turb other tenants, and! th eir presence will
discourage prowlers or obs treperous youn gsters.
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Di ,1cu_lrie s En,ou nl e re d
Ten ant Doys a t \l;'ork
a. Insufficient genera l illumination.
b. Dark po ckets in malls, tree clumps, and b tF.:i.l cling angles.
c. Smashed lamps.
Suggest ions
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a . Li ghts at entrances a nd building corne rs pla<c..ed to g ive maximum
illumination to adjoining grounds.
Lighting coordinated with present or p ro•poscd public street
lighting.
L ayo uts tak ing accoun t o f tree growth as well.I as tree location to
in sure noninterference with tree roots and with the futu re height
of gro wing trees.
b. Light sources a t different heights lo illumin al e pockets under tree
pl antations as well as to provide genera li lighting over open
stretches.
c. Mer cury vapor lamps in plastic cases.
Light fi x tures designed for qui ck relampin g,;.
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NOTE : Em erge ncy call boxes may be insta.lDed on lightin g standards f or convenience of communication 1t'ii th the office.
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INTRODUCTION
A lively, welcoming entrance encourages good manners from tenants
as much as it delights a visitor. The simplest design for easy, safe
access, fortun a tely, provides esthetic possibilities that architects will
take advantage of.
E asy approach to a well-defined and well-lighted door way prevents
accidents; a canopy protects from weather and fr om fa lling objects ;
smooth panels framing the entrance can be cleaned easily, house
numbers must be legible from the strert, and so m ust directional signs
for buildings that do not face the street.
NOTE : Architects should be consulted on the design of all major
signs used in the development, including any found necessary after the
buildings a.re occup ied, for example, a community building title or a
parking lot warning, to preserve unity of color and lettering.
Thus rational design provides the ingredients for an impressive and
pleasant gateway: a wide, canopi ed entrance that oilers a horizon tal
contrast to the vertical structure ; color and texture different from the
overall facing material; and attractive accents in house labels and light
fix tures.
Architects often ad opt some variation in entrance treatment for a
group of buildings to add sparkle to the picture.
Nonetheless, an entrance is only a passageway.
Benches or p arapets at the entrance platform will turn it into a bottlen eck. If steps are necessar y, a baby carriage ramp will speed traffic
and save wear and tear on vehicle and the mother's feelings. Sitting
areas a bit removed will draw away people who come out to take the
air, or tired shoppers who want to relax for a few moments outdoors
before attacking their housekeeping.
Diffi culties Encounte red
11
a . Entrn11ce planting damaged.
b. \Valls near entrance marked up.
e. Sash i11 door and sidelights broken.
d. Doors marred.
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F.ntrancc Cnnopy . . .
EtgtrJ & lliggills, A ,cliitccts
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a. Raised plan ti ng beds along the walls, ~ta rting at the point where
glazed ·tile or other eas ily clr arn:·d fini,-h st ops. Plants will prevent children fro m marking on thr walls brhind.
b. Gbzccl tilr, ccr:1111ic tilr, marble, or other imprn·ious material
fra111i11g the rntrnnce.
c. Acrylic pl ast ic or trmpered glas;; p:rnes in door panels and sidelights, sized for easy replacement.
Lower p:mcls of stainless steel or enamclrd metal.
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�NOTE: Acrylic plastic is scratchable, but scratches can be
ru bbed out in sh eets of good q uality. On e airlin e, at least, uses
acrylic plastic sheds zcith a fr ee-form prescratclz ed deco ration on
-th em, th us anticipat in g 1l;o11 ld -b e decorators .
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d. Doors ,ric1c enough to take bulky furnitur e.
P atterned stainlc.;:~ -stccl or heavy-gage aluminum protec ti on
plates hi gh enough to protect again st baby ca rriages, ll!arkc t
carts, kicks, and sc ratches :
Pu sh-and -pull ha ndles.
Sealants between fram e and sash covered ll" ith metal stripping so
that chi ldren cannot pull out the calking.
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THE LOBBY
The lobby is ~ con co urse, a waiting place, a nd several tim es a day it
will°harbo r a traffi c jam. I mpatient children, tired parents, carc~free
messenger boys all belo ng here. All ,r ill leave their mark, \\"hcther
made by mu<ldy boots or lipsti ck decorations.
And an unguard ed lo bby may attract prowlers. l\fo st authorities decide on one or another type of patrol system for tha t r eason. It has
been suggested tha t a closed-circui t TV in stallation from lobby to
m anagement office would be useful. Some authorities think the idea
has a "Big Brother is Watching You" .conno tation. Others beli eve it
would g ive tenants a feeling of safety.
Inst allation cc,sts "-o uld be high and cou ld onl y be determined by a
study of bui ld ing location and layo ut, length of cable being an important facto r in costs. Strong illumination is r equired to project the
i mage. It seems doubtful th at the scheme would be practicable for
more than at most two buildings for one viewer, even if econom ical
to install and opera te. P erha ps the "Human Use of Hum an Beings"
on a face-to-face level works better than a remote g uard watching a
little box.
Difficult ies Encountered
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
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Wa lls marked an d scratched · sta ined floors.
Lamps stolen or sma shed. '
Lobby attractive to hoboes.
Mai lb ox covers and frames damaged.
Burn ing matches pushed through m ailb ox cover slits.
Nam eplates in ma ilboxes and <lirectories removed.
Ma il pi lfered. ·
a. Wa ll an d fl oo r fini sh of easily cleaned ma terial; e.g., walls of
g lazed stru ctu ral tile, ceramic tile, cement-enamel bl o.ck.
Floo rs of terrazzo, quarry tile, ceramic tile.



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Mud-catching mat fo r stormy days.
b. Fluoresccnlt ligh t in plastic cases.
Incandesce:mt light bulbs paired in caged fixtures or recessed in
ceiling, wi\~h protective covers.
c. Lobby desr-6 11 avoiding offsets or alcoves.
Entranced, ors locked at night with lock keyed to apartment keys,
or provisiom for emergency opening by night patrol, city police,
·or maintcnmnce guar d.
Buzzer-anmunciator system to each apartment, with doors locked
at all t imes .
d. Stainlcss-sCIDel mailbox frame and door.
e. Slits protected by acr ylic plastic shields, or slits so narrow th at
matches cr.c:n not be inserted, if acceptable to the U .S. Post Office
Departmen'.t .1
f. Nameplates crimped at edges.
Protective p lastic cover on directo ry.
g. Mailbpxes iin locked mailroom off lobby, opened by tenant key
plus keys f@~ mailm a n and staIT, with wire glass panel in door and
dir~ctory osn inside of door panel.
Mailroom :flor mailman a nd staff ouly, with mail feel from back
into " pige mhole" horizontal boxes with tarnperproof bronze
doors on fo bby side.
Package r Olom in management office.
' Principal Requ£rements of th e Post Office Department. Architectural Record,
September 1963, p. :204.
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PUBLIC TOILET
A small public restroom ofI the lobby is considered desirable for
children in neighboring play spaces and for those waiting for an elevator during rush hours.
Diffi culties Encounte red
a. T oilets misused to the point that most of those provided have
been locked up.
h. Damage to fixtures.
Sug g estions
a. A new design , not yet perfected, rather like the European
urinoir," requiring little formal supervision, easily cleanable,
and with minimal fi xtures. Local codes must be satisfied.
b. Super vision during times most needed and otherwise locked.
Openable only hy staff or tenant key.
FURNI SHINGS
The practice of providing a lobby unheated and bare of furnish ings
will discourage, especially in northern cities, its use as a night shelter
for drifters. It may also discourage tenant ·p ride in the lobby, and
lack of interest in and resp onsibility for its appearance.
An increasing policy of locking entrance doors al night makes comfortable waiting space more feasible than if doors are open or removed
altogether.
Some authorities prefer small lobbies to discourage "loitering" among
ten ants and the attendant disturb ance to occupants of nearby dwellings.
Recent designs, however, often avoid dwellings near entrance lobbie:;,
using that space for laundr_ies, mail box rooms, a custodian's r.partment,
Cle.
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Other authorities believe a large lobby decreases traffic problems and
will consider space for game tables in some b uildings.
The appearance of lobbies in privately managed developments is considered of particular importance. It sets the tone of the building. No
doubt, pride in one's home i enjoyed also by tenants of public housing
where thought has ·been given lo provide a cheery, attracti\·c pace.
Architcc-ts can suggest st urd y furniture or orn amental objects to be
installed as an experiment.
A bench for m others wait ing for an elevator is hardly a luxury.
Neither is a wcll-de~in-ned hulk-t in board for tenant- or staff-supplied
notices of cnt ntain mc11ts, PTA meeting·, etc.
P adlocked ashtrays, a masonry f1 owcrbox, a candy vendi ng machine,
or other inexpensive attractions ,could be installed and later remon·d ·
12
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if people took no interest in or care for them.
Caution: Vending m achines need cage protection, perhaps best set
into wall niches with padlocked gra tin g when no supervi sor is at hand.
And perhaps music could be broad c:ist in lobbies at ce rtain hou rs.
In any case, gay colors and patterns ca n be provid ed on wa ll s. The
Londo n County Council initi ated a success fu l prog ram Ly in viting
young artists to c ollabo rate with arc hi tects aml c p 11tracto rs in the
de,·elopment of new deco rat ive ,rn ll trea tm ents. The methods used
had to be practicable within limits of what contractors ,,ere geared to
accompli sh and at costs (side fr om a fee to the arti sts) within those
of the normal fac ing materia l replaced.
Gl ass mosaic tiles introduced into tiled wall s, preshaped wo od forms
provided for the concrete contractor, polyc~tcr r esin incised on chipb oard panels, photosta ti c m urals sprayed wit h plastic, wa ste wood and
b roke n t iles from the site debri s fi xed in polyester r esin, and many
other unusual, cheap and lastin g surfaces were inventcd. 1
Similar methods ham now been adopted in other British cities.
N"e1ghb oring comm unity h ouses might be happy to have their ceramic
classes design decorations to be built into lobby wa lls under the architect's super vision.
1 Decorative Tr eatment on New Buildings.
London Coun ty Council, 1959.
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INTRODU CTION
The elevator i:s apparently the most fascinating bit of play equipment
that an indulgent authority ca n provid e fo r its children. Self-service
elevators, moreover, can be a source of trouble and danger on occasion.
No doubt the eleva tor is the chief reason for authoriti es' relucta nce to
proceed from ro,~house a nd walkup structures to tall apartm ent types.
Some managers report that children's curiosity in the workings of an
elevator wanes after several mon th s. One cannot count on this relief
in a high building bulging with children.
Peakloads at school lunchtime or at the en d of a school day, will fill the
lobby with hungry, excitable children . Staff or tenant committee
control is commonly adopted to prevent overcrowding and misuse.
Design to ease the need for control is also helpful.
Difficulties Encountered
a. Crowded elevators with exasperating waiting time.
b. Hatchway doors and bucks defaced; cab walls scratched; do or
shoes damaged.
c. Call buttons pull ed ofI ; flo or num erals scratched out.
d. Children ridin g on top of cab.
e. Urin ating on cab fl oor.
£. Confrontation with dangerou s strangers.
Su ggestions
a. Two eleva to rs side by side (for economy in controls and for
conveni ence) stopping a t all fl oors in build ings over six stories
high.
Elevators speed determined by calculating acceptable waiting
time in th e local community.
Provision of relay for rush hours so that the car's down travel
can be stopped onl y by a call button fr om the publi c corridor.
Sliding doors, to arnid accidents and to spL:ed service.
Attend ant opera tion for emergency use.
Car progress signals.
On e regular and one service elevator.
One elevator manned at rush hours.
A third elevator for rush hours and for bulky furniture.
b. Stainless-steel hatchwa y doors and bucks.
·steel fini shed with heayy plastic paint.
Metal shoes for leading door edges.
Patterned stainless-steel cab walls.
Vinyl tile fl oors, to resist urine stain.
Epoxy-cement flo oring.
c. Steel or heavy aluminum call buttons.
Floor numerals etched into car control panels.
d. Ceiling escape hatch openable from t op only if local codes allow.
Alarm bell to ring if hatch is opened.
e. See discussion of publi c toilet off the lobLy and of su ggestions
to interest ch ildren waiting for the thi rd or fourth appearance of
the elevator, on page 12.
f. Two p rotected lights in each cab ceiling.
Alarm bell designed so th at a hand must be pressed on the button
continu ously if it is to be silenced.
Automatic alarm that rin gs whenever a car stops between fl oors.
Gl ass or pla stic small windows in cab and hatchway door;;.
Intercom in ele\·a tor, conn ected to man agement office .
T ra nsp arent materi al for cab and ha tchway doors, where local
codes permit.
�.
INTRODUCTION
Dift1 culti e s Encount e re d
The stretch of walkway fr om elevato r landing to :1 par t111ent d oor is a
"side1rnlk in the sk y," whether designecl as an open ga llery or an
in teri or corridor. T he open g a ller y is p referred hy some a11thorities.
T hey pra ise ease of s uper \'ision. They g iYc credit to th roug h dra ft
in dmJ lings and to the ach·a11 tagcs o f 11r igl1bnrly po rch li fe. They
poi nt out the lack of cooking od or s. T hey like the appeara nce 0 11 the
b uilding facade.
T he " porc h"' sp;1ce on galleries is best enj oyed by tenant s if there is a
fin or elongated column between each family's space. It p rovides a
place fo r chair or crib out of nor mal circulation a nd also defines each
fa m ily's a rea of r esponsibility. One adva ntage inherent in gallery
access design is that tenants ca n observe sources of no ise and litter
fr om their dwellings and can size up a neighbor wit hout contact, much
as if the apar tment wer e on a street.
Auth or ities, however, who prefer d ouble-loaded interior corridors
speak of plan economy, ease of all-weather cleaning, less traffic d isturbance, and better privacy within the dwelling. T hey note that local
codes in northern cities may r equire h eat in gallery Jloor slabs.
S ep1ratin, Fins . . . Oskar Stonorou, Archi!t!Ct
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, 1. . Gnllc rics
a. Danger of accidents lo d 1il<lren.
b. Danger th at objecl.s fa ll fro m or ar c th ro wn from g alleries ; fea r
o f some rc;;idcnls a ll() ul hig h places.
c. i\ !arking 0 11 ,,-,'.il ls ; ch ild ren's toys left aho11t ; w heel Luy a,id roller
skating a 11noya nce.
cl . Lack o f pr iv,tcy ; possible pilfering thro ugh ,·.-i ndows.
e. Cold dra fts in d well ings.
f. Snow removal in nor thern cities.
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Sugg e stions
a. ,\u thorities uml"illi ng to cha nce accidents p ro vide completely
caged-in galler ies.
Others consider barriers 5 to 6 feet high quite sa fe.
b. Curb at galler y edge.
Canop y at entrance under galler y.
Screening comb ined with solid panels to give· ~ sense o f security.
c. Tenant responsibility fo r keep ing wall and flltoor a dj acent to his
Call e r)' Pro tec ti on . . . l~ illiam F. R . Bal/cu d , Arch itect
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dwelling cle..-.n a nd uncluttered.
Glazed brick ,or other easily cleaned wall finish.
Slop sink cf=et with h ose hib nearby.
Ridges on fki>or to discourage roller skating and the use of wheel
toys.
b. Screens and' venetian blinds on gallery windows to combine
privacy with wentilation.
Bedrooms am<l living rooms away from gallery side.
e. Foyer with e xterior ·and interior doors.
J alousie p anels in one door for warm weather ventilation .
£. Floors pitche d for quick drainage to adequate drains.
_Technique mif having tenants sweep snow to curb, followed by
staff r emova l.
Galleries planme<l on lee side of building.
Diffic ul ties Enco ..n 1tered
Tenant comm ittee r esponsible for bulb ·replacement.
N OTE : The provision of left-hand bulbs, useless in apartments,
u.sually results in their being smashed with apparently extra
vigor.
f. Interviewers in apartment doors.
One-way vision panel from apartment to corri dor where local
codes permit.
Fluorescent Lisht!
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Dreary aspoct.
Litter; trash. spilled in front of incinerator hopper.
Markin g on walls.
Cooking odo,rs.
Light bulbs smash ed or stolen.
£. No observatfom of corridor activity from apartment.
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Suggestions
a. Bright, light-reflecting colors on walls.
Plastic paint ,on entrance d oors.
Variety in do-or colors on the corridor side.
Asphalt or \.'].n yl ~ilc flo or finish in b old patterns.
b. T ena11t r espo nsibility for cleaning corridors.
Slop sink clo:set with power outlet on each flo or.
Corridor wide enough for fl oor polisher.
Incinerator h opper in sh allow alcoYc open to corridor.
Heavy h opper <loo~ fr ames anch ored to resist b anging.
Hopper not ,too close to elevato r land in g, h ut insulated from
d welling paFtition s.
Portable sled con tainer p aclloc.;kcd below h opper, to catch debris.
c. Walls of glazed strud 11 ral ti le, ena mel hlock, or plastic paint.
Col ored cl1 ar1dloarJ panels lo g ive practical, localizecl enc.;ouragcmcnt for the 11m ivcrs:il chi ldi !>h need to scr iliblc.
d. Forced vcnfiiluti on.
Corr idor wiu dows.
Comn1011 hakon ics openi ng fro m corrid or.
c. f luorescent lights in pl astic covers.
Protected in€:anclcscenl b~lb~ in pa irs.
SPECIAL FACILlTIES
Autho rities sometimes provide balcony play space off corridor or
gallery for rainy days, fo r airing babies, and for inform:il gather ings.
This arrangement g iyes welcome light aud Yentilation to interior corridors and dirnrts chil dren's play from ga llery walkways. A b it of
play material will attract children ; a small bar e sp:icc, whether in the
air or at. gra<lc lcYrl, i:=: little 11:=:r d .
It lws hr cn suggcstc<l th:it a comm on r oom or an open wiu<lowe<l
a lcl1Ye off an inter ior Cl)!Ticlor would he more useful tha11 a balcon ·
in northern cities.
The d ividing part ition m ight he fo rme<l hy low lockers \\·here chil<lrm
could . l ure push-p ull top :, oYcr;shoc:=:, and the like-an aid to ncatnc::.s
in the d welling tha t hou;scwiYc::' ,rnuld appreciate. If lockers are not
fea sible, the room st ill can serve as n transition between outdoors and
indoors as n porch docs in a r owhousc dwelling.
16
�The room should, in any case, be visib le f rcim corridor or gallery,
whether by half-partition, visio n pa nels, ur othcnl"i se. It is not necessarily provided on eYcry fl oo r, and should be des ig ned 11"ith ease of
tena nt care ::r nd supervis ion in mind _
One autho rity r ecords proYi sio n of a s pecial ruom, supervi ~cd by
r eti red teacher volun teers, where ch il,lr,' n may do their lt o111 c work
away fr um tl:e Ji :3tr::,ctio11s of the fom ily d welling. Th e chi ldre n who
use this room h aYe been recommended by their teachers as th ose who
would benefit from the program .
A competi tion to g i,·e people a ch:rnce to exp ress individu a lity for their
apartments has been suggested . The enterprise would all ow tenants
to decora te the outside of thei r apa rtment do o rs with washable poster
paint. The winnin g doo r deco ra tio n could be preserved for a li mited
time, a t least long enou gh to be ph o tographed for the tena nt newspa per,
if no t for the local press.
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�Suggestions
INTRODUCTION
The No. 2 enemy to calm living in an elevator apartment building is
the fire exit stair~..-a y : a convenient shelter for hoboes; a trystii1g spot
for r omantic adol escents; a perfect setting for smokcwriting, wall
cartoons, bonfires~ damage to lights and to firehose, etc.
Difficulties Enco tn.nfered
a. Need for con.slan t supervision.
b. Defacement ,of walls and stair soffils.
c. Light bulbs smashed or stolen; windows broken:
d. Firehose slashed and nozzles stolen; flood ing from valves
turned on by mischiefmakers.
e. Standpipes in windowed stai r ways fro zen in cold weather.
f. H andrails needing frequent repainting.
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a. An open stairway, visible from grou nrls, if local codes and fire
regulations allow.
Stainrnys planned on either side of t he elevator la ndi ngs with
windows so arranged that there is a good view of both stairways
from the public area on every fl oor.
Locked roof door;:, if code$ permit.
Glazed panels in doors.
Stairs ending at entrance floor, or a locked door at that leYel if
stairway must go to the basement.
Door hardware that all ows exit from each floor but no r eentry
except on the lowest two fl oors.
·
b. Walls and stair soffits finished with easily cleaned material ; for
example, plastic paint. H ose bib for flushing down stair way.
Caution : The bib must be placed where only the staff can get at
it, possibly in a nearby slop sink cl oset. Floor drai ns, of course,
will be needed.
c. Fluorescent lighting in plastic covers. Incandescent bulbs protected by wire g uards. ~crylic piastic sash instead of glass
panes.
d. Hose cabi net in public hall, for easier supervision. Agreement
with the local fire department that since it use.;,. its own hose, the
requirement for a b uilding-stored hose is un necessary if not
r idicul ous and should be canceled. Arrangement by which
fi remen bring their own valves, if local codes permit.
e. F ire standpipe placed on the inside of an enclosing stairway
partition, if the stai rway has wind o,1·.s. T he valve is exposed
on the stairway si de of the partiti on. Sta ndpipe ins ulated in
corner of stairway.
f. Vinyl handrails, to save r epainti ng.
NOTE ON GLASS BLOCK WALLS
Open Exit Snairwny . . . Noonan & Thomp:Son & A'rockcr & Mnrm ori & Mok , Arcliitc1cu
Gl ass block exterior ,rnlls or panels will light stairways e:fiectiYely
without danger of freezing the standpipe. Caution : A pa1iicularly
ingen ious for m of cl :111iage, ho,1·cn·r, has occurrerl. A small hole is
punched th ro ugh the surface. a 1l'ick di pped in benzine or other \'Olatikflui rl is pu~hccl int0 the ho ll ow spncf' 1l'ithin th e block, th<-' wick is
lighted, nn d hang!
Stnin,ar:. Fl:.111king El e nitor Londini;-. . . . llnrbr,nr1 /l o:zih 1. irin&ston ,.t· l orJo n, A rch itt·ctJ
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�INTRODUC TION
Difficul ties Encount ered
l\fany large de,·clopmcn1s re nt laundry !'p:1cc to co ncess iona ires who
run the faci lity with or with out full -ti me superv ision . The need for
common bundries r a rics in clifTe rcn t ci ti es . A conces::: iona ire wi ll
refu se to renew a contract if other methods o f lau nd eri ng m:1kc hi s
bu :;in c$S unprofitable.
La undries, ,,hcther large or small , ca n be s unny and gay . Any laundry
1wt close '. o t!::: c.-..:dling nee ds roo m fo r baby carriages an cl fo r you ng
children',; p! a y, as ,, ell as comfo rt able benches.
Entrance Aoor laund ries may oYe rl ook a play space nea rby to
advan tage.
L aundries wi ll foster a neighborly at titp de among tenants if they are
attractive. It is st ri ctly a matter of safety to ·encourage mothers to
bring their small chil dren along rat her than to leave them alone in their
apartmen t; bu t bored ch ildren preclude a cheerfu l, sociab le a tmosphere. Commercial " laundryettes" usually install candy vending
machines as well as th ose for soap and bleach. A la undry supervised
by ren ter or tenant committee might ,,·ell consid er installing a " space
rocket" or other am usement.
Although mechanical dri ers are commonly found in large laundry
rooms, several authori ties ask for clothesline drying spaces, one of
them noting tha t "outside drying areas a re the only proper and healthy
means of drying."
A.•
Common Laundry
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If,nu:, ,lries
a. Laundri es without at lemlance sub ject lo d isonler.
b. Money s lok 11 from cashh oxes.
c. Clothes darn:igcd or slolcn fro m a ir-drying c:iges.
cl. Abu se of laundry toilet.
c. Doors d anwged.
f. Wct fl oors.
e. Co11d e11sation .
Suggest ion s


i. Laundri es on entrance fl oors rather than :i n b:isements to take


advantage of more li ght, venti lat ion, and ii.11formal supervision.
Laundry doors keyed to apa rtme nt keys.
Gla ze d panels ( clea r wire glass or ac rylic _plastic ) in door and
corridor partitions.
b. T okens to activate machines sold at th e m,rnagement office.
Window guards.
NOTE: Window gua.rcls for l.au.ndries on. entrance floors are
preferably not of prison like design.
c. Dryin g cages of me tal, large enough so t.I'. t drying lines can be
well away from the enclosure.
Drying machines where clients are willing r use th em. Caution :
Place ven ts from dryers where rl ischarge ,..-ill not be blown into
apartment windows above.
d. T oi let designed, if poss ible, as a package dleal to serve laundry,
lobby, and nearby pl ay areas. See "Pub,l ie Toilet," page 12.
e. Steel protection plates for laundry door.
f. Floor pitched away from front of machine_
g. Glazed tile walls, terrazzo fl oors, or oth er m aterials to resist the
effects of condensation.
Di ffi culties, Encountere d
ll . lilome Lm, ndri es
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a. Condensation fr om we t li ne n h angin g up to dliry all over the apartment.
b. Detergent backup from . au toma tic mach io es a ttached to waste
lin es.
Suggestions
a. Sma ll, tenant-controlled lau ndries on eadn :floor with washtubs
an d drying cages, plus a couple o f au tonna tic machi nes in a
locked room on th e entrance fl oo r. A key trn that room is sold by
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management for a small fee.
Laundry tu ri in Lathroom, as in Swedish practice, with enough
drying lines- it herc for a normal wash.
NOTE: U1w1,t tached m achines can be used in either of the cases
above.
b. Prohibition ,of machines attached to plumbing lines within apartm ents.
Bypass on p lumbing lines at lower floors.
ROOF LAUN DR
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Some authorities •express interest in the idea of providing roof laundries. Examples found in pri vately m anaged buildings and in some
British "estates" bave been much enj oyed. At Carl Mackley Houses,
Philadelphi a, for example, where washing machines were later installed
on entrance floors , most of the r esidents still prefer to use th e roof.
Many women insist that open-air drying is desirable and take advant age of it wher e prnssiblc; witness not only r owhouse dryi ng yards but
also tenement hous e backyards gaily hung with clean clothi ng, as well
as P aris balconies simil a rly adorned in spite of large "Dcfendu" signs.
It is hard to under sta nd the horror some people have of this in nocent
manisfcstati on of m ban life. It might be considered as colorful and
appropriate as an lllmLrella on a beach.
The use of ro ofs for laundering, on the other hand, is looked at unfavorably by othe r authorities. Heavy-duty roof construction and
· protective harriers arc costly. Elevator traffic will in cr ease if a laundry
is not provided om every rooftop. Plumbing system requirements are
expensive sh ould a utomatic m ach ines be installed. Supervision of an
unattended la und'r y is more diffic ult on a roof than on an entrance
floor.
There are some answers to these obj ections. New types of roofin g arc
bringing down costs. Most cities r eq uire some roof-edge protection
wheth er or not tenants arc allowed on the r oof, and maintenance men
need it on high u ilclings even if it is not r equi red by code. Protection would, of course, have to he increased in height from that
usuall y supplied. P ro tective ha rr iers arc not so costly as solid construction on the e ntra nce fl oor, ,d 1crc space could be phnned for
la rge famili es with their own ent rances instead of for laundries. Use
of a roof laundry could he confined to the Luilding tenants hy mPans
of apa rtmenl.-ma~[,ercd keys. Tenant des ire for open-air dr yin g and
for clea n, brighr. surro undings would facili tate tenant -orga nized
control.
Roo£ Lnundr)· . . . K a.Jtn er, Stonorov , Dc,iincn; W . Pope B arn ey, Archilcc,
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necessary r oofto p structu res such as elevator madhinc rooms, incinerator slacks, clc., obscured instead of stan<l ing 01~i:l: against the sky in
the usual bleak huddle.
There will need to Le prov ision also for locking troo f play or loun ge
area, for rcf11 ge . pace open to the roo f exit door if local fire regula tions requ ire it, a nd an ala rm bell on the door <:H ga te of the playgroun d area.
.
Ha lfway between tead1er-supervisccl roof pla ygro1:in d and the sumleck
watchetl uvc.; r by a willin g dde 1ly tenant, this type u I roof facility needs
a group ready to keep order and schedule events.
Authorities with successful experience with local c mm unity organizations and tenant commi ttees will k now \\here to fi nd such a group.
Competi tion a mong caretakers of cli!Ieren t roofs ;w ill maintain initial
enthusiasm.
Architects can suggest roof construction and roug~ing for mechanic al
lines to make f uture r oof use possible if an auLuor ity is not will ing
to exper iment at the start or wants to Lry out one:: roof.
INTRODUCTION
Happy is the manager in a city where the code allows roof access doors
to be locked against tenan t or prowler. The urge to investigate roo fs
is so strong that one find s a locked cage in front of a lo.eked door to
prevent damage.
Diffic ulties Encountere d
a. R oof t re:;pass lead ing to damage of roof fabric, venti lating fans,
TV a nten nas, and to the danger of children falling or objects
thro11 n from roof.
b . Obj ects stufTed into plu mbing vents.
c. Danger to children and to equipment if childr~n climb incinerator
stacks or break into elevato r machine roon1s.
Suggestion s
a. Locked roof door, where codes allow.
Alarm bell at roof doo r.
TV antennae, if needed, out of r each.
b . Vent stack above children's r each with wire guard protection.
c. Interior locked access from top floor to machine room.
Access to incinerator stack fro m scuttle in roof of machine room
structure, separated by partition or cage from m achine room
proper.
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ROO F USE
A few autho rities a re considering the nettle-grasping response to
t enants' desire to invade the roof by providing some form of activity
there. · A roo f laundry h as been mentioned on page 20, and some
objections to roof use arc there discussed.
Roof playgrounds are found in city schools, and imndecks in private
apartment buildings, even in some priva tely subsidized low-rent structures. Roof lounges for adults h ave been successful in subsidized
buildings for elderly occupants.
High buildings are largely the result of high land costs. R ecent
products designed to give heavy-duty performance on roofs may
lower considerably the cost of a usable fin ish, an d might even show
a saving by economy in land area needed for the development. Roof
spaces, mo reover, are not overrun with a utomobiles or permeated
with gas exhaust. Play equipment ca n be spot welded to heavy metal
plates grou ted to the deck finish to avoid piercing it. Vents have been
ra ised above normal height a nd g iven metal sunshade umbrellas
sleeved to the f'haft.
A combin ation of wi nd-scr een walls, open-mesh fencing, a bad-weather
lounge or laundry ( or both) wo uld present a h appy diversity, with
21




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Authorities a ftetn p rov ide som e stora ge sp ace outside of the dwelling
for tena nt-owm, d bul ky a r ticles.
A room for b ab j' carri ages and wh eel toys is usually provided, prefer·
ably a t ent rance !level. Th is ro om h as become empty a nd ab a ndoned
or h as b een pu t fto an other use in ma ny developm ents.
Who really ex prx ts a moth er with a b ab y carria ge full of 5 p ound s of
potatoes, four rrn ilk bottl es, three loaves of bread , t wo chi ckens, and a
baby to unl oad ;and m a rshal this a rra y th ro ugh the lob by a nd up an
elevator lo th e TI. 8 th fl oo r? Also, onl y a ver y trusting boy will padlock his bicycle "in a stora ge room with out worryin g.
Diffi culties Enco un te red
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INTRODUCTIO N!
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a. T ena nt-con.itro lled cages subj ect to theft.
b. Disorder im cages a nd acc umulation of wo rthless ob jects.
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Difficult ies En ca;u ntere cl
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a . Carr iages d'.;am agc cl , dirtied, burnt.
Carriage arn d bicycle wheels stok n.
b. Vehi cles pill.ed on t op o f each oth er.
Sug g estion s
a. Conven ien t ffi pacc for b aby ca rr iages within 1he d welli ng.
Bicycle lock!c rs a t p a rk ing lots.
b. T ena nt-con oiled. storage space on each fl our off pub lic corricl or
or galle ry.
Sec " the P mblic Co r rid or," page 15.
ALL TEN AN T STiORA G E WITH IN THE DW ELLI NG
Crne ral stora ge, ii f tl1crc is none 011t s idc the d 1..-cll i11 3, is usua ll y pl:rn ·
ncd a ll in <,n c pl\ 1cc i11 or ,wa r the ki 1cl1e11 , a ltli ou1-'.h tl1 e Pllt\ a$k,:.
o nl y for 0111 :-fift h.., a l least, nf ge ne ra l sto rage in th a t locat ion. A rr hi -
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Suggesti o ns
a . L ocke d stoirage room accessible onl y to tena nt accom p ani ed by
stafI emplo»'cc.
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tects wh o obsen ·e a b i.cycle h alf in, h alf out of a kitch en cl oset may
wonder h ow t he fl our bin, pa ckaged cereals, and supergian t b oxes of
washing po ,rdcr s fa re b ehind it.
Di ffi cultie s En co un tere d
a . L ack of opp ortu n it y to organ ize st orage of a rt icles d ilicrin g in
ch arac ter , size, a11 d use, r esultin g in disor der a nd d irt · p ockets.
Sug gesti o ns
a . An open a lc~Ye 11 ea r e nt rance fo r b ab y ca rri a ge, m a rket cart,
stroller, etc., ,,·ith shch ·ing ab oYc fo r bu lk y toys, card table,
h ob b y equip ment. {A11 alco ,·e la rge enough for a h icycle " ill
take oth er Yl'h icl cs as well. )
Ki tche n cl ose! sh l" h in g a t rnr iou,.; h eights fo r ;-Lor ing la rge
car to ns, h oll ies, ll() u~,·li ,1 lcl a icl s, a nd also for sma ll package,] an d
ca nn ed fno cl s not 11 et' d i11 g refri gc ra t i,,11 .
NO T E : A / c1c ad j11 stahlc shelt·cs arc h l' l la th an 111 a11y fi xed ones.
22__
�INTRODUCTI ON
The dwellin cr is the h ea rt of the building. The h ousing bw requiremen ts for '\iccent :md '\,anita ry" !iring co nd iti on:; " ·ithi11 the d1rcllin g: it$Clf mu st be upheld more by it s occ uj' .t nl $ than hy the best prncti L~'S o f a nian::igcrial ,:tafL
D1,·elling design and eq uipment, th crcfvrc, ~lw nld p romo te dece nt
dwellin gs by an ord erly and co mfor t::ib le arrangnn cnt, allll sa nitary
dwellings by conrenicnce for the housekeepe r.
1Iorc than th::it, ::i convenient, s::ife, and orderly h ome crea tes the
climate for fami ly sa ti5faction and pride. Tenant co mfort overflows
fr om the dwelling i11to public spaces, albeit sornclimes aided by a
management sympa thetic toward famili es un::icquainled with urban
living techniques.
Desiirn of a wo rk a ble apartmen t within stringent cost limitations for
this ; epetitious pl::i n el ern ent (not one en trance door to a b1~ilding,
say 160 - not one small toilet, but 160 bathrooms, etc.) r eqmres an
architect's devo tion and most cunning contrivance.
Space organ izati on is not easy to come by, g iven curr ent room areas
and relationships. One wise a rchitect has sai d that apartment areas
should be, room for room, larger than those in rowhouses.
F or one th ine:. the fr ont and b ack doors of a ro11·h ousc na turally route
traffic in an ~~rdcrly wa y; for another, porch and backyard give an
extra dimension lacking in an ap artment.
Dut a bedro om plann ed to an swer the desi re, th e: ncc·cJ , rather, to be
al one or lo be ah le to ta lk qui etly (o r noisil y) \'i ith fri end s of one's
own age al\'ay from th e tense, com pditive cit y atmos phere is not
co nfined lo 01·e rpri vil ('gc d" pcrscJ11 s. Pri vac y 11\' itltin th e dwelling
is the fir ;< l rcquirc111 c11l for "quiet enjo yment uf the premises".
St::i 11d a rd public ho11 "in g C(,n~ tru d ion fo r tall b UJ ildin gs o!Tcrs m ore
pri1·acy th a n ,;n mc " 111 :rnr y" spec ul a ti ve Luildings, 1l1i s brgdy becau se
of materials usccl th at arc :su it a ble for long -term amortization, ::ind
the need to hold dow n ma int enance expense amd to gel favorable
fire ins urance rates .
But unlike mo st European co untri es, th e United l::i tcs has at present
co de provi sion s for so und co ntrol in apartmen t :b uilclings,1 although
a sta rt in that direction h::is been made. Stand ai rd construction for
multifamily buildings rnay s u/Ter from li ght wcigh!!: di vid ing p::irlitions
and ca reless pi ercing of partiti ons or fl oo r slabs. Vibrating electrical
gadgets acid th eir share Lo th e con sequent din.
110
Concrete slab fl oo rs resist impact noise fairly wd l.
Partitions between apartmen ts of cind er block,. gyps um block, or
solid plaster are accept a bly so und dea dening. P lli!'titions of staggered
s tud design are preferred, if the budget permits.
1 The 0 1uner's Viewpoint in Residcnlial Acouslical Co,n lrol.
Acou stica l Society of Ameri ca. Frederick P. Rose. 19631
Li ving Room in UH
Various ways to approxima te that dimension on a comm un al basis
have been noted in earlier chapters. Private balconies do provide
occupan t-controlled outdo or space, an d are though t by some authorities to be worth thei r cost in high buildings.
The usefuln ess of a dwelling layout is tested by early furniture studies.
Draftsmen sometimes minimize furniture dimensions a bit, and are
apt to place large items where heating risers or convectors will appear
in fully developed plans. Bureaus shown pa rtly against columns are
not unknown in such stu dies that, if so pl aced, would create dirt
p ockets. · Six i nches along a bedside does not give room to make
up a bed . A crib with its head again st a h eat riser and its foot o\'crlapping a window is probably as goo d a way to g ive the baby sn iffies
as any other. A hi gh win dow in a two-windowed b edroom provides
wall space below for a dresser if a convector is n ot p laced under it.
It can be cons id ered ext ravaga nt to design a space useful for only
one function within the small a rea allotted to each family. One usual
example, howeve r, is perhaps undesira ble ; th at of combin ing meal
service with clothes washin g, parti cularly for families with young
child ren. Dinn ers and Ji apers are not compatible.
23
Address to The
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H eavy co ncrete teross walls used m b ox construct ion a re, of course,
even better bctKeen apa r tm ents.
Tall buildin gs ~ ·jth only four dwellin gs to a flo or have b een built
within public lrnrns in g budget limita tions and provide the amenity
of few close neig h bors as well as th at of a sm all, easily kept public
space.
COMF OR T
Difficu lti es Enco untered
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a.
b.
c.
d.
c.
f.
A wa ren ess of ncigl1b ors.
Outs ide world irru p ting into li ving ro om .
N o chan ce It o withd raw temporaril y fr om r est of family .
L ack of sc1, .ara ti on of d ifferent h om e fun cti ons.
Jn ackqual c 1Ja th fa eiliti e.,; for large fa mili es.
P ull ch a in !'> co nsla11tl y brea ki ng, with the result th at light s a rc
left CJ ll d ay an J ni ght.
D ini ng S pac e in Ki1 c1u n
Wall -mounted m edicine cabin ets.
Lead b ends from b a throo m above con ta ined m fl oor slab or
boxed in .
Windows of adj acent apart ments in an interi or corn er of a Tor H-sha ped buildi ng well separa ted, o r, better , o ne apa rtm ent
wra pped aro und th at in teri or angle so tha t wind o\1·s nearest the
corner are in the same d\1·elli ng.
b. Sm all foy er g ivin g sepa rate access to li ving ro om, b edro oms,
and kitch en.
Coa t closet ofT foy e r to keep m ud a nd out,;ide dir t from r est of
dwelling.
Door b uc ks well anr hored against win d action in h igh build ings.
c. Bed room wall $p:i ce a rra ngL·d lo all o w for dc_k or ta ble in add iti o n to urn:i l Ji ,,d rlio m f urn iturc.
S pace for s,·11 in g 111:1r h in c or oth er taLlc in pa rent s' bed room.
d. D i11in g: !<p:ic-,'. in a l,·on ' Ll'l \1t·r11 li\·ing room a nd k ill'h cn.
Di ning ,;pace for la r ·e fami lies in kit chrn, to pro ,·iclc ea:;c in
sr rvi11g mea l;:. a nd , in effer t, ofTe rin g tw , li \·in g spa r ;:. for cl iffr rr nt U S C'$ .
K it che n equip me nt o ut L'f !- ight o f living roo m.
e. La rnt o ry ( 1rn tnc-l osc·t and was h Las in) for brgc fa mili es in
ad d ition to the ba th ro om.
13a th room wall mat er ia l .clcs ig nccl for fu turr shO\\' ~r if 11.ot co ntemplated at fir st.
0
Su ggest ions
a . A des ig n plac ing ro oms of li ke f unct ion aga ins1 pa r titi o ns th a t
di vide ap a rtme nts.
Closets set z.gain st di vid in g pa rt iti ons.
- Hea ling ri e rs prov idcll ·w ith csrn tcheons ·a nd th e fl our sla h.
o pen in g pa,clcd with in sula ti on ( use ful also fo r ve rmin co nt ro l)
�NOTE : A shower uses normally aboi1t half as much water as a
tub bath and takes less time and tu.b cleaning.
f. No electric pull cha ins in dwellings.
SAFETY
H ome accidents have been well documl'nted an d publ il' izrJ. Some,
luckily, such as those from stairs-uni ·:as the build ing k1s t w0-story
fiats-do not concern us here. 13ut kitchens :ind bath rooms are still
dangerou:::. AcciJ cnts from things foilin g from high shch·cs, or people
falling while trying to reach t hem, from collision ,vith fu rnit ure,
ranges, and heating risers and, worst of all, fo iling out of windows
must be faced.
Difficulties Encountered
a. Children and obj ects falling out of windows ; windows difficult
or frighten ing to clean.
b. Kitchen ranges placed a t the end of a row of fixtures where
children can knock against pot handles.
Gas ranges near blowing curtains or having storage cupboards
over them.
e. Slipper y bathroom floors.
Tubs lacking safely grip handles.
Sturdy grab ba r a t tub.
cl. Electric outlets and pull chai ns (i f i)llll chai ns there must b,e)
at a sa-fc distan<:e from tu b, basin , and sink.
NO'/'E : The dan gers to children who push hairpins into clect1,ic
outlets, bu mp against heat risers, all/l swallow poisons are perhaps only lo be countered by their mothers. The tenant " ll--.elco111ing" bouklet, cfcurly ilf:1stra /1·tl by the rtrchitccl, can icn:rn
tenants. Authorities who provide radiant healing in floor s
have solved part of the prolJ!e11t, ar/ll consider the system ec o. no111ical in first c;ost and upkeep.
ORDE RLIN ESS
P lanning for privacy, as noted above, in itself promotes orderlincess
by ·cparating activities.
Most clutter results from poor organization, anJ dirt re!3ults fr mn
clutter.
Easily d eaned fini shes in dwellings are stancla rll; attracti ve pas-'l:el
colors wi ll get more tender, lov ing care than will J rab, neutral ton.c s.
Asphalt tile patterns in micltones show fo otmarks le$s than very ligl1t
or dark unpatterened ones, and are less likely to be covered with tlb.in
li noleum carpets that do no good to the underlying tile a nd may
harbor vermin.
/
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d. Electric outlets near water supply.
Sugges!ion s
Fa mily P articipa l ioa
a. Heavy-duty screens on all sash ope!lable more than 4 inches.
/ · .• l _
Locking device on windows without screens to limit opening
to 4 inches, except when window is being cleaned or children
are being watched.
"·)
,
Windows, of whatever type, of glass size and design so that
window clean ing is possible with no more than an elbow outside.
NOTE : Removable sliding sash are obviously the easiest to
d ean, and also a broken sash can quickly be replaced by a
tenant's trip to the maintenance office.
Casement sash close to grade or on galleries or balconies are
hazardous.
Awning windows that swing out beyond the building wall run
the risk of being shattered by an object failing or being thrown
from above.
b. Ranges placed between worktops or other barriers.
Ra nges at least two fee t from windows.
No cabinets over ranges.
c. Nonslip bathroom floors.
25
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Di ffi cul ties En co untered
a. Condensation within the dwelling.
b. Wall space interrupted by scattered columns, doors, windO\vs.
c. Storage spaces inadequate, particularly in the kitchen.
Large Rcfrit;cralor
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!
A kitchen planned for more than one worker lightens the moth er's
load and encourages fa mil y participation in housework .
Opin ion varies as to the need for closet doo rs. Authorities who agree
with voca l tenants and shocked critics have provided them on all
closets. Others are content to put them on fo yer and p assageway
closets only, and on living room closets if, by an unhappy chance,
precious wall surface is used fo r a closet there.
Authorities who look fo r good housekeeping standards may well consider providing doors on all closets, since tenant-provided curtains
are apt to be flimsy and neglected. Even when clean and well hung,
they give a s1ipshod appearance to the d welling and do not protect
clothing from dust.
Open shelves over convector runout pipes take the place of toy storage
boxes at slight expense. They also protect the pipes from children
and the children from pipes.
Su gge stion s
~
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a . Dwelling d rsign to provide some posit ive air leakage even at the
risk of slight heat loss on the coldest days.
No laundering within the apart ment. See "the Laundry," page
i
19.
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Tile or other impervious fi nish arou nd tub.
P ositive ,·cntilation for kitchen range.
b. Some uninterrupted wall spnce for la rge pieces of furniture in
each r oom.
Furni ture lnyouts carefully studi ed, preferably showing more
tha n one possible arrangement.
c. Flush door;;, cabinets, and bnsebonrds.
Convector lou,·crs on Ycrtical surfnccs, not on the top.
Tile behi nd rnn gt:.
Ch nir r nil t0 protect wnll if dinin g table is in kitchen .
llsc of pla~tie pnin t to lengthrn repainting cycle.
T enant rcpai11! i11g.
l\'01'f: l'nint rollers 1Citl1 pallcrncd surfaces l:a1·c been used on
corridor 1rnlls. They migl,t be lcnr to people ca/:',er fo·r individuality in th eir d !l'ellings. 1
r ami ly Tnwd Htt 1.: k~
1 Psychiatries or Paperhangers?
E dit ori:il in " Housing :ind P l:inning New::."
Citizens' H ousin g and Plann ing Counc il of New York. October 1%3.
·
20
�d. Kitchen shelving planned for both large and small articles.
Kitchen cupboards with backs, for vermin control.
Utensil drawers.
Range and refrigerato r sized for t11e family's needs.
H igh and low ha uging poles in ch ildren's clo~ds.
DaJo stri ps in ba throoms at 3 and 5 fee t fr om ri uor, fo r fa mily
to,rnl racks.
Space in bathroom fo r clot11es hamper.
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NOTE : Orr;anization of general tenant storage space 1s d iscussed on page 22.
"\
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REDESIGN
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Some a uthorities show interest in a proposal to redesign the standard
ap artmen t layout by planniug a small living room off the foyer and
a large kitchen-dining-play ( or study) room. This arrangement
justifies the prevalent housewifely habit of "keeping the kids ou t of
the living room." It alluws a busy mother to keep an eye on infants


11


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packed apartment, and it gives the house-prou>d ( a nd latent houseproud) homemaker a chance to show friends amd the priest or rabbi,
or the Fuller Brushman, a neat reception roorm.
A bedroom so planned that it later can be dividecil into two small rooms
will provide flexibility for a family with growiing gi rl and boy. A
sliding partition would allow daytime use of the entire space.
I_
MOD EL APARTMENT
•_
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while doing kitchen chores ; it is a place for TV, plastic-covered furniture, games and homework, children's and adults' gatherings.
It d ivides living space into noisy and quiet a reas within a tightly
A model apa rtment has been fo und usefu l to suggest inexpensive,
space-saving furnitu re ra ther than old-fashioned{Jrnge piaces. Chairs,
sofas and dressers based on Scandinavia n desitgns, and knockdown
packaged furniture can be fo und in city shops or obtained through
mail-order houses. Reconditioned pieces, suclln as arc sold by the
Goodwill Ind ustries, for instance, are at bargaim prices. Bunk beds
27
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A NOTE O N W INDOW SHA DES
Window shad es are standa rd equ ipment for publi c hou sin g developments, so much so that th ey often serve to distingui sh p ublic fr om
private apartmen t buildings.
They arc chec1p, th ey do their work well. But that th ey are far fr om
attractiYe is iiot disputed. So far no equally trustworth y a nd economical m ethod has been found to d a rken bedrooms, to set the stage
for TV entertainments, to shu t away the outside world .
·
Possibly a window casing detail for cu1-tain rod s at the outside and
sh ades in side would be acceptable to au thorities who enj oy the "happening" made by different famili es' differently colored curtains.
1
Possibly new side-h ung fabrics will be pri ced one d ay to compete
with shades. In th at case ten an t curtains will not be needed and the
color pattern can be built in .
1
1
T wo-S to ry Flat . . . 1/ o:l!':rd R. Mey er , Archittcc.
'
arrangement offers each la rge family privacy and easy access to outdoors, even to an outdoor family playspot, and also relieves pressure
on elevators.
Certainly th e architect who devises a sturdy, in expensive, attractive
substitute for the wind ow shade will find a mon umen t to his ingen uity
lifted high aga in st the sky.
are not unknown ! o or scorned by former tenement house dwell ers.
If the mod el apartment is to Le left in a fully occupied build ing to be
used for homem -ing classes, its locati on and exits should refl ect
that use.
BA LCONIES
Pri vate balconi es ib ave been n oted earlier in this ch apter as proYiding
a porch for tenants who li ve fa r fr om th e ground . Babi es a nd yo un g
children can pla y out of doors with out leavin g tl1eir qu arters, all(]
adults ca n cool off in slippered case duri ng hot evenin gs.
Costs and local cus toms weight the decision about incl11ding them,
as well as the d esire a nd <1bili ty of tenants to p ay for th e advantages of
a bakony of th eir own.
Architects will be ha ppy with th e cfTcc l of balcon ies on an oth er wi se
shee r fn cadr. if th e need for them is clemon slrn bl P.
A solid para pet fo r tli c fi rst few fcr.t o f ba rri er g ives a frdin g o f protcclio11 and l1id cs l he arra y of chi ldren's toys or household m ops an d
pa il s pu t oul to sun .
TWO-STORY FL A TS
Ap a rt ment s for lar-gc fa mi li es have hcc n desig ned ra ther li ke two- story
row lwu ses on the e ntrance an d second fl oo r of tall buildi ngs . This
"\Vhat we need is a brnnd new idrn thnt has bc-c-n thoroughly tested."
Al
~"JS:D rl in~arnr
o courtesy , S11t urdn, _R evi;w
U S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OHICE ; 1965 0-76J - !150
2U
�HOUSING, PUBLIC
GEORGs~
l.t t\: S T
il l u·-I:"
IL. OF
TEC: iN OLOGY
ARCHITECTU RE LIBRARY
17
11 ,
THE SOCIAL IMPLICATIONS
jll
OF
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PUBLIC HOUSING
IN
METROPOLITAN TORONTO
!I


The Metropolitan Toronto Housing Authority

August 1963
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�CPJ.\. PTER VIII - SUHMf,RY AND CONCLUSIONS
,
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1. Basic Premise
The conclusions of this study which d eal with tha ?.ttitudes towfl.rds · ublic
housin? of families who h;:ive moved out fire a ff 8cted by t}-,e move-out ·rate which
exists in the pro,iects under the administrA.tion of the l"ietropolit;m Toronto
Housinf Authority.
If i t 1s considered that these move-out rates are greater
than might ordinarily exist in the priv;:\tc rentel TTlA.rket, then the c~ta t akes
on more sipnificance.
Conversely, if t!rn move-out r?.tes are consid - ,·ed to
be less than the normal priv~te experience, then the data tak0s o~
sirnific2.nce.
sscr
It should be clc<'-rly ur10P.rstood that the fir1dings o f ·,his
study are based essentially on interviews held with tliose families
t :'.10
he ve
left -public housin3 communities in Hetropolitan Toronto.
2.
Physi cal AccommodAtion and Environment
It would appe?.r, b;,sed on the evidence supplied by former kn;,nt s, t hat th e
public housing co mmuniti es are es s entially satisfc=;ctory plcices to L .ve , .cit
l east as for a s the majority of tenMt families Are concerned.
It ,.,,ould also
appe..ir that the housing pro,jects provide a r eason~bly satisfactory environrnent
'•I
for the majority of the families.
The major satisfaction which t ends to k e ep the fAmily in the public housing
project centres around the ph~rsic;:,l ac corrn:ioc1r1tion.
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As fPrnilies Are g iven
housing to meet their renuirements physical overcrowding s eldom occurs.
The
.l
larger units provide accommodation which literally c an not b e found "'nywhere
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else in the 1-I etropolitan Toronto area.
The housing u.I1it, particulcir l y t he
hous e type , provides t!1e families with their greatest singl e satis .:.:.--.:::tion .
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3.
Faciliti e s for Ch;idr cn at Proi e cts
· This s-t udy indicates little dissatisfaction with the faciliti es pro'J:
children in the housing pro,iects.
2d for
What was indic;,ted, however, WP.S t :a pro-
jects which are densely child populcited produce an irritcition with th e children
in the project.
the children.
The tenant app:irently feels th8t he is unP.ble to f<:: t -:r,ray from
This probably accounts for the action tPken on th e p,r t of the
Temints' Associ;:ition in coth pro,"jects to get community centres with c i'1ild
oriented programme::;.
This l!.'1CO:'.'.ti c-:_ous r.,,;c+-.ion
t0
thA J.E.r ge number of children s eems
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larrc w1i ts in one site as in South Regent P.:1rk.
A J...-i.rrcr pro-
iJOr:.ion of houses to ap2.rtmcnts seems nccess;:,ry.
4~
!1.ttitud e Tow&rds I-ianagemen t
Pe rhaps it will te surprising, at least to thos e who administer publ·: · h c,u.;ir.: ,
that there is a very positive f eeling to 1~rards the public housi !1f: exp,- ri e:--c e
of thos e f amilies who h? ve moved out.
Only a ve ry sm::i ll percentage of ttis
group felt trJ<!lt no housing should be supplied for other fc1.nilies in simi.j_ci."'
circumstanc e s.
More tha n 9Cf/o of the families int erviewed felt thet s ome ~rr,- -
gramme of public housing is nccessciry.
The ma.jori ty of f amili es fel t th<Jt,
they had b een helped, ;:i.t le;:,st firnrnci2lly, by their public housin~ cxr-,,3ri e1.c;3
The Housing Authority has for a long time felt thRt perhRps it interferec too
much in the lives of its ternmts.
This study do es not bear out, t hi s f e eling
at all, in fact, there was little expressed diss"1tisf,, ,ction with t he control
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exerted by the Housing Authority.


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On the contr;:iry, these frimi.lies indicat ed
~that t .here was too little control exercised over other fprrd.lies in th ) com-


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munity •. This group felt thPt the beh8viour of the neighbours should 8e ~ore
strictly supervised.
In this lPtter reaction, however; the expression w::,s by
a minority of former residents. -
5•. Mobility of Public Hou sine: F-".milic s
The annual move-out rc1te for
proxii'E.tely J.L%.



i.




f amily in pro,i c cts under administr ,itj_c 1 is a u-
~,ud', .rc.te~ a;.·c fom 1d to bi::: l ess thrin th[lt which obi tins
tn:i:Lz~ . S!-.hL~:.- ,~J-.id: w,-mt o.s high :ts
J.8%
in 195i~.
'vih:i.J. e ::oa::.j sf.q ction with public housing livirlg is possibly -;:,he nt"-~or r e1., s o1, w'::y


[amili6s stay, it is n.lso likely that the mobility is some,-1h::it ~-esti'ict.eJ b:r


th e
la1,;k of a n Rltern.stive choice. · The private housing rrarket ha s hE-:~:-,
·,1:·1P-.J•. -::
to provide this alternative. - In order to assess the importance of ,~r: i ~ ~; ,,;re
of an Al t erna tive , th e satisfactions and dissA.tisf e. ctions of f;:i;nili ~s 1·t:m:-.:,n:.r. ::,.
in public housing might b e studied to determine why th 8:' .:.' 8n,a.i.n ir. pu'..:.i_i (:
housing.
Thj_s might possibly be the next study carried out b:,r t: ie :'1et rop.~li:.[l.-:-l
Toronto Housing Authority.
6.
SociPtl We lf::i re Considercitions
One rather disconc a rtj_ng fflct ,qppen.rs in this stud y whi ch s eems to St1 ,'f8 s ·l
f urther a ct ion b y the Housing Aut!1ori ty.
This is the f,qct t h?.. t the z · i c t ,.~d
fa milies are substs1ntially the kind of fe.milies ·who should b e he '...p,::d
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y t i10
public housinc program.r;e. · They are l Rrgc f;,.r.ri.lies with low inco:nes c ont a l u i -,g
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both par ents.
For some re;,son they h;:. ve no t b een Pble to .cid,iust to J_iving in
their n ew environment.
11
Becc1.use these fc=irnili es Are prob c1 bly
probl em11 fPmilics, Although they r epr esent
A-
11
tro uhl e " or
v ery sm;i ll perc ent-"EC
/' the
public housing populPtion, it is possible thAt th ey r eauire more ti m and a ttention thc1 n has b een given to them up to the pr es ent.
It would als o suggest
th?.t greater efforts to reh~bilitat e these families are necess~ry.
Co-opera tion
with a ll essential Wclf;:,re Ag(mcies should b e established so thc>t gr r0?.t er sup-
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port A.nd assist;:,.nce c ."':1 be provided.
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s 01-1rc,2; 01' sat~_s.fc1.cti..m.
come
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The fact thf't the monthly r ent fits the fr:mi.-!..y I s in-
thJ. t ii,co:ne fluctu?tes h2.s bE:: en thought by rnany ex:ps:rts to r:- ovid8
thG .fnrnilies with an excellent for m of soci2l ;:,..nd economic s e curity •,1:1ich :)·vho :·
far;ri.lies do not have.
satisf;iction.
In the o~J, therefore, this should b e
r1.
In pr;i.ctic e this expe ct-".tion is not realiz ed .
r.tP..,ior sct:r ~c r,.i.
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there wn.s dissat isfac ti on expressed on the pc>rt of t he move-out f;:i :nili c s _. ·ii;;,
the rental scale.
This might hAve been expect ed in th e upper incon --: r An--: -=-.:=:
where t he nenalty r ent char ved in public housing ;:ippli eso
nc¼"ever,
li es with very low i nco mes felt that the r ents wer e too hiFh~
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This fePll!cS ::.s
brought a bout largely from the est r1bl.ishment of mi nimum rm1ts, whic ·. c f.a ~,~
thAt many famili es are paying too high a proportion of the ir inco me: in r 8n"t. ,
The rec1.l dissr1tisf.<>cti on with th e r e nt.:i l s cr1le shows up in thos e f;i mili e s
refus ed public housinr.
not low rentn.l.
1,vt10
They felt th;:it .the rents P.sked by the Authorit y 1,.er e
In fact, when th e other :nove-in c!l.;"trges were A.ddec:: to t he
first month's :rent rn£.ny families could not afford to move into
r;t.i
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This stated dissr1tisfnction on the rnrt of move-out f-?.milics and rofus ?.l f : :>. rd lie s indic;:i tcs thc'..t tho rental scf'lc do e s not wholly pcrfor:n its function certni.r.ly
"S
it ,,ffocts the fc:mili es on
WT?
low incomes.
lndicP..tions are t h:i.t
the cst;iblishmcnt of a new sc;-i.le, upd~tcd to f.<1.mily cxpendi turcs of th e pre s ent
time, is an absolute necessity.
Such a scale if devised should be h~s ed uJX)n
a dynamic situ?. tion c1nd chanred on review periodic;:illy r ather than h?.p:--,"vrdly.
8_
High-Ris e Build~_p.g s
This study does net :i::~ (,dL,·~-& rl.n,n:=tgi ng 1;vld e nce a ra inst high--risc :9.p.c> r t r::e:1t s
1
.s., ~()1 .nt cc; f or by t ho f ::i ct thr1 t 1 and 2- b edroom f ;:i_mili e s :i.n La·.,rre!1c: e Hc-::. .= :r-t s
-!:ind it ea si er tu mov'3 out thc1 n the 3-bedroom fr mlie s in So"Jth Re,e-:er.t
..\J.thot1g11 h i g!1-ris c buildings s e em to provide g r e~ t e r ri12..I1rtger!1ent and
0
.?.:::·!: .


L ·~-· . . .,~.e1.~2 "1~._


costs ,:,o t:·: e r, dministr.,., tion, t h e exc ell ent phy s ic;'l.l l ;iym1t of t h e 2.ctu,
-.:·.r, :._ .
J.
r:.
........
..
l ing ur1it appea rs to outweigh .s.ll proble:ns in th e '.'lines of t he t em.n t s ,
should b e not ed th.-i t t h is e vide nce is b " s cd on f a ~lic s ,·rho h-"'vo ::iovoc 0·:,.t
a.nd not .families who c~nt inu 8 to l i ve in tht'.: pr'ojccts o
9-
SociP.l 3ti gm.:.
In gen eral, whil e t h e r e w is some dis s<iti s fac t ion expr e ss ed with
,:1,
·,,, ~·
1•
.J
,.
l . •'•
s ocial fac t or s t h e se d i d not s eem i'l.s grea t as might be expr e ss ed by f;, : .ll?; S
who vol unt a rily moved out of public housing .
tc affect t h e move-out rat e to t he same d erree
shoppi ng ;ind transport a t ion fa c ili ti e s.
The sociRl f a c tors do no:.
BS
t he r ent ~nd l <i ck o f
S -3Vii,


, d 201.~Fl."~.s


Althoug h the r e w?. s a slight f, ~li~g
I
r
1•!1
~!


,


f;
.,
'-·
I"
�of stigma c<1ttAched to pu'r.lic housing it did not seem to m1nifest i tself in
m~ny fc>:milies .
IH fAct, it is prob"'ble thrit the sociel re~ctions expres sf':d
by these fnmilie.s ;,re no grePter than those thc9t mipht aoply in nn:v n ~ighbourhood.
10.
Rect~ons for Reftisal
In descending of importance famlies in eppPrent need of housing r ef\ . ed for
the following reasons:-
~
-i!
'f.1
(4)
'!:tong type of dw0lling i.e. n.p..~rtm-3nt instec>.d oi house
(5)
~ulcs nnd regulntions
(6)
Personal and far.ri.ly rea sons
(?)
Condition of unit offEre d
It is interesting to note that the first two reasons were f?.r and
most important a ccounting for nearly
60%
of all reasons givenu
2i~-;f-,.;/
tnc
�CITY OF .A'I LANT.A
HOUSING RESOURCES COMMITTEE
CITY HALL
Room 1204, City Hall
June 23, 1967
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522 -44 63 Area Code 404
IVAN ALLEN, JR ., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Admini strative Assistant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR. , Director of Governmental Liaison
Dear Committee Member:
The next monthly meeting of the Executive Group of the Housing Resources
Committee will be held at 10:00, Thursday, July 6, in Committee Room #2,
Second Floor, City Hall. We hope you can attend this meeting.
The low and medium income housing program is still confronted with major
obstacles, which have recently been emphasized by the local news media. The
"White Paper 11 prepared by this Committee and used at the last meeting,
highlighted the problems and has been very well received. However, Mr. Alexander
desires to discuss several of the items further with you and will look to you
for suggestions as to action this Committee should take.
Also we would like to have a brief report on the activities of each Panel.
The Housing Inventory Report is being brought up to date, and should be
available for our July 6 meeting. It should provide a clear picture of the
current status of the program.
We still do not have information on the following:
Ee gal Panel--Chairman & Vice-Chairman
Public Housing~-Vice-Chairman
Land Acquisition Panel--Chairman & Vice-Chairman
Social Problems Panel--Vice-Chairman
Please be prepared to provide us at the next meeting with names of those
elected to the above positions.
Also please let us know on the enclosed return address postal card if
you plan to attend the meeting or, in the event you cannot attend the meeting, the name
of some other member of your panel who will represent you at the meeting .
-
Sincerely,
~ ~ e c&~ 2 - < . < 2 - -
Malcolm D. Jones
Supervisor of In ·
MDJ/pjm
Encl:
Return Address Postal Card
tion Services
�June 7, 1967
The Honorable J obn J . Sparkman
The Honorable Wright Patman
The Honorable William A . Barrett
Gentlem n :
Thi lett· r is to call to your attention my seriou cone rn with problem
facin the enforc ment of ho in codes in Atlanta and I m certain in
all th nation' cities .
In ccordance with the
ought by Secretary W
vigoro ly with th bou
tho e re s where an
c ntration rea
ists,
low intere t loan .
mpha is pl ced on housing cod enforcement
r nd our own de ir , w
ve moved ahead
ing code provision in Atlanta. As you know. in
b n ren wal project or code nforcement con ..
hom owners inn d m y q Ufy for gr nts nd
with-
r
they ca
to me t t th ••
r one ar entitl d to r 1 • In effect they
i, a co
rod by U. S. Gov rnm nt acti
s · c · th r qub d
p:rosram cover• thee ir city. They ehoul ot be unduly
• To contln lo do ao ere t a n unfair st tlon which will
th ntir
ff :rt of citl to nforc
it.
1. th r fore,
8U
eat two
ug st that action b
8ibl COUl'See.
taken to 11 vi.at tbl
Uuatio .
W
th lr
ns
•r thb
rived peraon who are •
I
tea

rcea
�June 7, 1967
Pag
2 - The Honor ble John J . Spa.rlanan
The Honorable Wtight Patman
The Honorabl William A . Barrett
are faced with r habilitation requirements under cod
nforc ment. As
tated bove the Workable Progr m is. in effect,
F d r l requireme11t
for the -ntir city. It ems possible that the law allowing grants and
loan could b
stend d to cov r all citizens und r
wor ble program.
1 would appr ciat your giving this problem your mo t
ation.
Sincerely,
I
n All n, Jr .
Mayor
cc:
The Honor bl Richard J . D ley, M yor
Chic go, 11,. uuu-,.a
The Honor ble .r l'O!Xl P . C vanaugh, M yor
D troit, Michl
The Hcm.orabl J hn V . Linds y. M yor
N
York, N w Yo~k
Th Honor bl John B . Collins, M yor
Bo1ton, M
achu tt
Mr. John Gun er, E_zecutive Director
U. s. Conf rpe of M yor
Mr. Patrick a aley, Ex cutive Dir ctor
N donal
. of Cltl s
rnest c on ider-
�Finch Alexander Barnes Rothschild & Paschal
June 6, 1967
The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor
City of Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Ivan:
Enclosed is treletter that Bill Slayton suggested you write to
Senator Sparkman, etc. He has reviewed the letter and finds it
in order and is enthusiastic about your undertaking this.
Sincerely,
/)
I //
~
Cecil A. Alexander
J3
vb
encl:
JamesH. Rnch, F.A.I.A.
Cecil A. Alexander, f.A,I.A,
Miller D.Barnes, A.I.A.
Bernard B. Rothschild, f.A.1.A. f.C.S.!.
Caraker D. Paschal, A.I.A.
ASSOCIATES
Robert D. Ah/strand, R.A.
Sidney S. Daniell, R.A.
Ira 6rayboff
Thomas 6. Joyce, A.I.A.
H. King McCain. N.S.P.E.
John J. McDinough, P.E.
Architects Engineers Interior Designers
WIiiiam l. Pulgram, A.I.A.
44 Broad Street N.W. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Phone 688-3313
John Steinichen. A.I.A.
Terry-Hutchens Bldg., Huntsville, Ala. 35801 Phone 539-9648
�DRAFT
June 6 , 1967
The Honorable J ohn J. Sparkman
The Honorable Wrigh t Patman
The Honorable William A. Barrett
Ge ntlemen :
This letter is to call to your attention my serious concern with a
problem facing the enforcement of housing codes in Atlanta and I am
certain in all the nation's cities.
In accordance wit h the emphasis placed on housing code enforcement
sought by Secretary Weaver and our own desires, we have moved ahead vigorously
with the housing code provisions in At l a nta. As you know, in those
areas where an urban renewal project or a code enforcement concentration area exists, home owners in need may qualify for grants and low
int erest l oans .
However, t here are many areas of Atlanta wh ere we seek to prevent
further deter i oration by code e nfo rcement that are as yet not covered
by e i ther of the above programs . Home owners i n these areas are with out recourse and are in the unhappy situation of having their homes
condemned unless they can produce the necessary funds .
It seems to me that these persons are entitled to relief. In effect
they are in an area covered by U. S. Government action since the re quired workab l e program covers the entire city. They should not be
unduly penalized . To continue to do so creates an unfair situation
which will undermine the entire e ffort of c ities to e nforce their codes.
I therefore s uggest that action be taken to all eviate this situati on .
We s uggest two possible courses .
1. As a minimum approach the F.H.A. shoul d ease up on their requirements unde r 203K and make loans under this program easily avail abl e for financially deprived persons who are sub jec ted to code enforcement expenditures .
2. Much more coul d be accomp l ished if the benefits of th e $1500
grants and the 3% l oan were extended t o all persons wi thout resources
who are faced with rehabilitation requirements under code enforcement.
As stated above the Workable Program is, in effect, a Federal require -
�June 6, 1967
Page 2 - The Honorable John J. Sparkman
The Honorable Wright Patman
The Honorable William A. Barrett
ment, for the entire city. It seems possible that the law allowing
grants and loans could be extended to cover all citizens under a
workable
/
~ this problem your most earnest consideratio~
Sincerely ,
Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor
cc:
The Honorable Richard J. Daley, Mayor
Chicago, Illinois
The Honorable Jerome P. Cavanaugh, Mayor
Detroit, Michigan
The Honorable John
Lindsay, Mayzjr
New :Jork,New York
The Honorable John B. Collins, Mayor
Boston, Mass .
Mr. John Gunther, Executive Director
U. S. Conference of Mayors
Mr. Patrick Healey, Executive Director
National League of Cities
v:
�C T
T
OF .ATLANT~
CITY HALL
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
June 7, 1967
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Execu tive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison
The Honorable John J. Spark.man
The Honorable Wright Patman
The Honorable William A. Barrett
Gentlemen:
This letter is to call to your attention my serious concern with a problem
facing the enforcement of housing codes in Atlanta and I am certain to
all the nation's cities.
In accordance with the emphasis placed on housing code enforcement
sought by Secretary Weaver and our own desires, we have moved ahead
vigorously with the housing code provisions in Atlanta. As you know, in
those areas where an urban renewal project or a code enforcement concentration area exists, home owners in need may qualify for grants and
low interest loans.
However, there are many areas of Atlanta _where we seek to prevent
further deterioration by code enforcement that are as yet not covered
by either of the above programs. Home owners in these areas are without recourse and are in the unhappy situation of having their homes
condemned unless they can produce the necessary funds.
It seems to me that these persons are entitled to relief.
In effect they
are in an area covered by U. S. Government action since the required
workable program covers the entire city. They should not be unduly
penalized. To continue to do so creates an unfair situation which will
undermine the entire effort of cities to enforce their codes.
I, therefore, suggest that ~ .c tion be take n 'to alleviate this situation.
suggest two possible courses .
We
1. As a minimum approach the F. H. A. should ease up on their
requirements under 203K and make loans under this program easily
available for_financially deprived p ers ons who are s ubj ected to code
enforcem e nt exp e nditures.
2. Much more could b e accomplished if the b e nefits of the $1500
grants and the 3% loan were ex tended to all persons without resources who
�June 7, 1967
Page 2 - The Honorable John J. Sparkman
The Honorable Wright Patman
The Honorable William A. Barrett
are faced with rehabilitation requirements under code enforcement. As
stated above the Workable Program is, in effect, a Federal requirement
for the entire city. It seems possible that the law allowing grants and
loans could be e x tended to cover all citizens under a workable program.
I would appreciate your giving this problem your most earnest consideration.
Sincerely,
Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor
cc:
The Honorable Richard J. Daley, Mayor
Chicago, Illinois
The Honorable Jerome P. Cavanaugh, Mayor
Detroit, Michigan
The Honorable John V. Lindsay, Mayor
N e w York, N e w York
The Honorable John B. Collins, Mayor
Boston, Massachusetts
Mr. John Gunther, Exe cutive Director
U. S. Conference of Mayors
Mr. Patrick H e aley, Executive Director
National Leag u e of Cit i e s
_;;,._
�{~ r
~
1
~hJ4 ~
·
'
HOUSING RESOlrn.CES cor-r-iIIT'l'EE
C ITY HALL
ATLA:r-;TA, G A. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
Room 1204, City Hall
IVAN ALLEN, J R., MAYOR
May 23, 1967
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DANE. SWEAT, JR. , Director of Gove rnmental Liaison
Dear Committee Member:
The next mont hl y meetine; of the Executive Group of the Housine
Resources Committee · (which would normally be held on June 1) will be
held at 10 : 00 A. M., Wednesday, May 31, in Commi tte e Room t/1 , Second
Floor, City Hall. We especially hope that )rou can attend this meeting .
The l ow cost housing program i s currently runni ng into some major
difficulties which I need to discuss serious ly with you, with vi ew to
adopting a policy posit i on of the Committee as a whole and pl anning a
cour se of act i on t o pursue .
We wi ll have at the meeting basic f actual data on which to base
our conclusions and I hope al s o a list of land tracts in the City by
size and location which are appropri ately zoned f or construct ion of
mul ti- ffu~ily housing .
We still have not been informe d as to the foll owing :
Legal Panel - Chairman and Vice - Chairman
Public Housing Panel - Chairman and Vice - Chairman
Land Acquisition Panel - Chairman and Vi ce - Chai r man
Social Problems Panel - Vice -Chairman
Please be prepar ed to provide us at the mee ting with appropri ate
information on the above.
Also_pl ease l et us know on the enclose d r et urn address postal card
if you pl an to attend the meeting or, i n the event you cannot att end,
t he name of some other member of your panel who will represent you at
t he meeting.
Si nc erely,
---~~-~ 16:32, 29 December 2017 (EST)~
Cecil A. Alexander
Chairman •
Encl :
Return address postal c ard.
�r:iil\;l.JTES
HOUSING RESOURCES EXECUTIVS COMMI TTEE 1iEETING
i\iA Y
31 , 1967
Members of the Housing Reso ~rc es Commi ttee Executive Group met
on Wednesday , May 31, 1967., a t 10:00 a . m., i n Com~i ~tee Room # 1,
City Hall. The -foll owing me~j-rs were pre sent;
lf.tr . Cecil A. Alexander, Chairman
Dr . Sanford S. At~ood, Co-Chairman
Mr . Lee Burge, Chairman, f'ir.anc e & Non-Profit Fund s Panel
Mr . John C. Wilson , Finance & Non - Profit Funds Panel
lf.tr . Dale Clark , Pub l i c Informa tion Panel
Dr . Vivia::1 Hend ers o:ri ., Land Acqu isition Panel
Mr . RolanG Maxwell, Represent ing -~ - Virgil Milton, Business
Partic ipat ion Pane l
!V7ir . rorman Underwood, Representing Mr. Charles L. We ltner,
Lega l Panel
rvir. Robert Winn., Representing Dr. Harrison , Constru ction and
Design Panel
~ . Ma lcolm D. J ones, Director
Mr. W.W. Gate s, Consultant
The Pub lic Housing Panel and the Soc ia l Problems Pane l were not
represented at the meeting .
Mr . Cecil A. Alexander, Chairman., presided . Mr. Alexander read
the Ho using Resources Cammi ttee I s "White Paper 11 ( copy attached )
and exp l ained the di fferent divisions of this r eport . Ee then
e xplained the other do c unents which 1-J'ere attached. He also
st~ted that there were severa l difficulties in locating rental
housing sites., partially because of the racial problems i~ Atlanta,
and gave his interpretation of the May 5, 1967 letter from HUD,
pertaining to HUD ' s reluctence to approve Public Housing sites
in racially concentrated areas .
Dr. Vivian Henderson, Land Acquis i tion Pane l, stated that this did
not necessarily hold true in all case s ; that he did not thin~ the
announced HUD policy was intended to apply to racially ir.tegrated
projects in previo usly all white neighborhoodso Dp. Henderson alsc
asked about his Panel's previous request for a list of possible sites
for locating low-cost housing .
Mr . Jones explained that this has been requested from t~e Planning
Department, but not yet prepared; however, that he has been
provided ttith a group of Land Lot sheets showing va cant property
(with current zoning) in the eastern half of the city; and these
locations were being looked into.
�Page Two
Dr . Henderson suggested t ~a t the need for such a list of avail able
sites be reported to t, e Board of 1 ldermen .
M~. Al exander reported tha t the Planning Committee initially
prepared a l ist of sites comprisi -~ 800 ac r es of land that were
considered avai l able for use o_ that cculd be re -zo~~d. He also
stated that t he developers !:ad already looked i nto t hese prop erties
but that only four tra ct s· had been approve d s o far.
Mr . Jones stat e d that he knew of only t wo, or possibly three, of
thes e t hat had been actually approved by BUD .
Mr. Alexander stated that one of the mai n prob l em s was t hat the
land devel opers c ould not always use the sites be c ause ·of locations,
costs, and building codes.
jV[r. John C. Wilso:-. ...,::. :.a nce and Non -Pro fit Funds Panel, suggested
that t ... e cornmitt e ~ ~---- ~P t all the l and possible, because to provide
al l the housing required, all available la nd would be needed.
~w . Al exa nder s tat ed that this Commit te e should take action one way
or another to get these prob l ems corrected before any further
subst an tial deve lopments ca n be made .
Mr. Jones stat ed that it was this Commit t ee's policy to cons ider
any suitab l e l ocati on that was submitted or prop o sed a nd to tr y to
ge t a ct i on based on merits of individua l tra cts.
Lee Burge, Finance and Non -Profit Funds ~anel, asked ~f this
Committee was over-playing the housing pr oble ms, or if this was
just the normal type of thing which resulted fr om trying to get
through zoning changes , Housing h.u t hor i ty and/or .- FHA approval
of a housing deve lopment.
~~.
~r . Alexander explained that there is a greater low-re ntal need in
the city than apparently some members of the FHA underwriting staff
feel justified .
Mr. Jones said that the problems were not being over-pla yed
because there were many prob le ms in trying to locate low-cost
housing sites. He explained that this was the p0 r p ose of this
meeting; to try to work out some of these problems.
Dr. Henderson stated that many of the present problems appeared
to be with the Planning Department , and they were not very good
reasons.
Mr. Alexander stated that the City is striving to get a workable
Land Use plan which people feel that they can rely on.
Mr. Dale Clark, Public Information Panel, asked if the Pla-nni"ng
Department is represented on t his Committee.
�Page Three
Mro Jones st at ed t hot it is not; but t ha t we are wor king i n
clo se contact with each other.
i\lr Alexander stated t hat t he genera l fee l i:ie; is that i n some
re sidential area s the zoning from single fa~i l y houses to
a partments wi ll be a ne cessity o He asked the press not to
mention any specif:i..c areas wne r e th i s ma y be poss ible, be cause
there are no definite plans to this effect as yet .
Mr. Burge asked if it would not be~ - ~pful to create a link
between the Housing Resources CornLl ittee and the Planning
Department?
Mr. Ale1:ander stat e d that it wou ld also be a good i de a . to create
such a relationsh ip with t he Board of Aldermen.
rvr..r. Burge said., i n r ela tion t o item (d) under ttDist.:cu s s io n in
the 11 Wh ite P&per 11 ., that he would l:..ke to k now how t he zor.ing
people felt about th i s o
Dr o Henders on s aid that i t was e asy to disc uss this problem
but tha t it would not a l ways work out in pra c t ice, and that the
real iss ue is the diffi c ulty of l ocating in an area that does


not 1·rnnt housing deve lopments .


Mr o Burge a sked the r eason given by FHA for it s action in
connecti on with the s ites near Mag~olia Cemetar y , Ether:d ge
Drive , and Gun Cl ub Roado
Mr. Alexander referred the q uestion to Mr . Ga t e s for ans wer .
Gates stated tha t proximity _,t:) Rockda 2.e Urban Re newa l Project.,
in which ab out 1)500 units are to be constructed during t he r.ext
four years, ~ould be take~ int o consideration in determining
the probable market abs orpti on in the general area. Both the
Ci ty of Atlanta and the Federal Government have considerable
investment in Rockdale.
ffir.
Mr . Alexander asked Mro Jones to [\ ive a report on possib le
loca t~ons :or pre-fabricated 143.215.248.55 ~ ~sin Atlanta.
T-'lr. Jones stated that there is some effort to build this type
of house in Atlanta., But that there is difficulty because of
tht At2.anta Building Code . This code states that the plumbing,
electrical, and heating fixtures be installed on site in
Atlanta, and that the pre-fabricated houses come with thes e
fixtures and electrical circutes already instal led. towever.,
there are plans being matlc now for so~e sites on which prefabricated houses could be located by des~gina ting special areas
�Page Four
where t his type of housing could b e installed o He al s o st ated that
t_he a mount of land r eqLlired to bu i ld a house on was too gre·at
economically in Atlanta for t his t ype of hous e ., nnd that there
are also plans under wa y t o corre c t this by permi t ting them to
be built on a 50 1 x 100 1 lot, or 60 x 83.33 1 (5,000 sqo feet i nstead
of 7,500 sq. feet, ·which is now requ::.redo)
Mro Alexander stated that· he thought tha t organizatio~s su ch
as Tech sould organize stud ies of t he housing s it uation in
Atlanta, which wo uld be mad e availab le to this Committee . He
asked Mr. Winn if the Construction and Design Panel were looking
into this now?
Mro Robert Winn , Construction a nd Design Panel, stated that
there will be a!·meeting of his panel a week from next Tuesday to
discuss this.
Mr. J one s inquired if the pre seut meet ing time 2nd date for
this Committee was satisfactory, and the reply was affirmative .
He a l so stated th2t he h ad appea red before t he Zoning '.:::,-:-,:..mi ttee
on sever2 l occasions a nd felt t hat it would carry more influenc e
with them if th~s Committee co uld t2ke definite a ction on some
areas before he re-appeared. He stated that there were three sites
in partic ular coming up for r e -zoning hear i ngs soon on which he.
would l ike for t he Committee as a group to i ndorse and support, i~
1.
2o
3o
Fairburn Ro ad
Jonesboro Roa d
North of Baker 's Ferry Ro a d
Ml~o Alexander sta ted tha t he felt t ha t i t was too soon to t2 ke any
defini te action on these sites as ye t.
Mr . Burge moved t ha t t h i s Committee a ccept t he pr e sent
Paper" as a g uide f or furthe r· a c tion.
11
w:r'li te
Th e mot i on was seconded and car r i ed unanimouslyo
There being no f urth er b usine s s , the meet ing was ad jo ur ned at ll i35
a .mo
Respectfully submitted ,
~a:-l~~6,._~;fe\,,~/Q_...
Ma lcol m D. J o~i
Super visor of---!nspe ct ion Servic es
Encl:
"White Paper" (without a tta chments )
�HOUSING RESOURCES COMM ITTEE
May 31 , 1 96 7
White Paper
}1ission :
The Hous ing Resources Committee is charged wi th :
(a)
Promoting low cos t housing and facilitating i ts construction i n l~lanta a~
2~
accelerated basis .
(b)
Br ing ing together the vari ous interests needed to produce low cos~ housi ng .
(c)
Insuring that t e human factors i n housi~g are given ~ull play .
(d)
Informing the publ ic of the· housing problem in Atlanta .
G,'.)21S :
The City!s goals in the low cost housing new construction program, base~ on f ~ndinzs
of tje recently completed CIP study and as announced by the Mayor i n Housing Confe~e~ca
on November 15, 1 966 are :
9,800 units during calendar years 1 96 7 and 1 968 .
2,333 units each year during the nexT succeecing 3 year period .
nits tot al by end of 1971 .
16,800
Accomplishments to Date :
72 separat e proje cts have been proposed, totaling 15,391 units in t he follo~ing
cat egori es :
Firm
4,286 units
Probabl e
2,57 8 units
Total."-
7 , 264
Under Cons iderat i on
4 , 464
Doubtful
3,663
Total Propos ed
unit s In Sight
15 , 391 of which 6 , 149 units, pPe viou::;Jy
.;.
--· . •
are currently in jeopardy due to objections f rom vari ous sources as to .1.o,:,'.Ti. :):,:, .


Inc l udes 1 ,140 units of Publ ic Housing + 144 units l eased for ? ublic ~o~si~; .


~la j or ?roblems :
(a )
See
(b)
Also see attached :
11
Problem Ar eas 11 attac hed dated April 20 , 1 967, revi sed .
l.
Memorandums dated April 25, 1967 and Nay 24, 1S67 p21°tc=-~·. n:~r: ;:; ·'·· ... . . , .. :·,.
of land i n the City appropriat ely zo ned for construction of l<:>\•I c,:,;~: h-.:-.::,..:.:·:~: :,
and ,
2.
" Statement of Necess i t y 11 undated, extract ed froi'.1 a -cypi.c...,l
proposed zoning application .
l ' L1:(' t .tJ·,
,.
I
I
�3.
Letter to the Mayor fro1 EUD, dat ed May 5, 1967, attached .
4.
Two news clippings dated My 8 and 9 , re spectively .
Discuss ion :
The above factual data and attached papers cle rly illustrat e wh re th ~ d~fficlie and suggest so e obvious indicat ed solutions .
T .e program cannot be s uccessfully carried out , unless these prob lems are resolv~d .
~~
In t he initial Hous ing Conference last November the City called on pri vat e enter~ris2
assist i n a large measure in this program .
While initial efforts r,ave : :uc.c2e:.u1 i 1. r.,::··.:, -·
ducing the 7, 264 uni ts i n s i ght listed above , t·.. ',, is little re a son -co assu:·~e d n c, ...
timistic attitude toward futur e effo rts .
At this time combina t i ons of Federal pcl~cias,
zo ing pro.o:ems , land costs, code requirements and general uncerta inty per-: · .:.nirJ,'i; to t t.2
?rogram have severe l y curtailed future prospects .
Many developers and bui leers Kho tave
attempted to part icipate in the program are confronted with i nsurmounta~le obstacle s
2Ld
are withdrawi ng .
Several aevelopers are holding up on subQitting zoning pet~tions beca~~
~f t~e
discouragement as to ~avorab_e action .
In order for the Housing Resources Cammi ttee to perform its ass.:.g:i.ed :·:!i ~~si.cn , ;::::::~ ~e
probl ems should be placed before the elected city officials and the ou~l ~c.
(a)
?8r a 143.215.248.55n: e :
Zoning throughout the City is now being analyzed to insure that the cu~rant
needs of the entire city are be ing met .
(b)
Citizens should be encouraged to realize and accept the fact that i . a larg e
a:1d rap i dly growing city, such as Atlanta , single fami ly houses cannot be :-r,2d,, 2.v2.i.la!:ile
for all citize ns and that many must of necessity reside in multi-fami ly housing un ~~s
( e ither rental or co- op . )
(c)
In zoning matters , pertaining to an overall community proDlet:, ..'., l.de::.·,;:,er1 ~, h ,::,u~.cl
a ct on . eeds of t he City as a whole , as opposed to loca l ne i ghborhood uress·.a 1;,E; .
0
(d )
Provis i ons f or decent and adequate hous ing is the nuo.ber one priority :fo::' th-s
City and is a ne c essary prerequi sit e fo r solving many other oroblems .
(e )
Compliance wi th HUD I s anr.ounced policy of discourag i ng pu:Olic nou~;i::s;
j_n
areas of rac i a l concentration has severely limited the availa bility of s~~2s .
(:::')
Land in adequate quantitit es , and at prices wh ich make lm,, cc: !,t :~ot.,si:::;:;
econom ically feas i ble , are apparently not avai l a· le in all seg·7errts o,-- ·:::::,! C::·::,.- .
(g )
More local churches a nd civic groups should be encouraged t o ~ss~sc --
program as non- profit sponsors .
(h )
An ovcr - 2.ll non-p,'.'ofit hou sing f und si1ould be cPectteci to ::,;:,.:):!:-::it,:i .-1.L ... .. , .
of the program .
�Recommended Action :
(a)
Submission by the !:-iRC to t e Mayor a nd Board of P.l dc;_~rr:en a


):c·.J.ci


.:,:··:.t,: ,:.,·1 .
port on current status of the low cost housin: progr am .
(b)
The Hous ing Resou~ces Com ittce to act ively support re - zon i~g 0~tit~0n~
wh ich are reasonable and in intere st of f urther ing t he nous i ng program .
( C)
Conduct promptly a hard- hitt i ng Publ i c Information c ar:ipa i gn
l.
r ·"n·r,··1_. per t~:1 (:: pu::.L c
.Li._ .L . I ~ ~ le:.,
of the current di fficult i es encounter~d and offerin~ concrete pos i t i ve suggestic1s fer
the i r sol ution .
As listeci.
�Finch Alexander Barnes Rothschild & Paschal
ay So,, 1967
COPY
Dv. Alb X't M.Davis, Pl"e id nt
National A soei tion or Th .Adv nc
859·1/ 2 Hunter Stti et .w.
AtUnt,, Gori&, 30814
ent Of Colored People
Ori. D vi:
D
In~ r th t th bX' kdown of c uu!cation yQU f el exist can be
r otif!ed,
y I ask if you ould rv on the Land. Acquisition Pan l
of th · Housin R oUI'C . C itt ?
COPY
f cin tb progra: in thi
oat v lua.ble rvice to th city
Since you ar
re ,, I bal
in helping
I 1001< forw
to h arin fro you.
Sincer _ly,
Cec1l A. Al xand r
COPY
vb
yor Iv n All n /
bee: Mr. Malcolm Jones
COPY
�May 31, _967
nOUSING RESOURCES CO:VIMITTEE
Cecil A" 'Alexander, Architect., Chairii1an
Dr Sanford So Atwood, President, Emory U~iversity, Co-Chairman
Dr Benjamin Eo Mays, Pres ident, Morehouse College, Co - Chairman
0
0
PA1 ELS
Leg al
c: arles Weltner, Atto~ney
Ac ting Chairman
Donald Hollowell., Reeional Di~ector, Equal Empl oyment
Opportuni ty Commission
Honorable Lut~e~ Alver son, J udge, Fulton County Superior Court
Mr o Archer Do Smith III., Attorney, Harmon and Thackston
Mr o Norman Lo Underwood., Attorney., Sander.s, Hester and Ho ll~y
Construc tion a · ~ De sign
Dro Edwin Harri son., Presidest, Georgia Institute of Technology,
Chairman
Herman Russe ll., Contra ctor
Moreland Smith, Director of Urban Planning Projec t ., Southern
Reeional Council,
Vic e-Chairman
Rev o John Ao Middleton., President., Morris Brown College
Henry Fo Alexander, Bui l der
Ja mes Moore, President , Atlanta Labor Council
Finance
&
NJn-Prof it Funds
Dean Harding Bo Young, Atla nta University
L ee Bur ge ., President, Retai l Credit
ChaL·:TJan
Butler To Henderson, Assistant to Dro Mays, Morehouse co __ege
Mills B Lane , Jro, President, Citizens and Southern ational
Bank
A~ Ho Sterne, President, The Trust Company of Geor ia
Gordon Jones , President, The Fulton National Bank
Vice-Cha irman
Joseph Earle Birnie, President, The Na tional Bank of Georgia
Ao B o Padgett, Execu tive Dir ector, Metropolitan Foundation of
Atlanta
Eernilton Douglas Attorney
Rev . William Holmes Borders, Pastor, Wheat Street Baptist Church
Dro Rufus Clement, President, Atlanta University
John Wilson, President, Horne Wilson Company
Albert Love, Executive Vice President, The McCall Corporation
Scott Houston, Jr., Executive Director, Wes l ey Woods Apartments
0
�Public :-Ious ing
Edwin L · Sterne, Chairian, Housing Au t horit y of the City of
Atlanta
D~ . Albert Manle y., Presiden t, Spelman Col l~ge
L~v~ard Reinch , President , Cox Broadcast ing Compa ny
Clarence Oolem2n., Regi onal Dire c tor ., .C at ional Urban League
Acting Chairman
~a rles Ra . Pa l mer ., President, Pal. er, Inco
0
La :-·.,~ Ac~uis i ti on
Wo Lo Lee , Pres i dent, Atl a nta Gas Ligh t Comp~ny
Co Ro Yates ., President., Yates-Mi l ton S t ores
Acting Chair ... an
Dr Vivian Henderson 0 President, Clark College
Jim E., Land, Cliie f Engineer for Georgia, Southern Bell Telephone
& Telegraph Coo
0
Social Prob lems
Charles Oo Emmerich, Administrat or., Ec onomic Opport uni ty At _anta,
I nca
Du a ne Beck, Direct or, Community Council of t he Atlanta A~ea., Inc .
Mrso Su jet te Crank, Social Dir ector, Neighborhood Services, EoOoAo _
Dro T o Johns on , Professor of Pol~tical Sc ience, Morehou se College
Dean Wil liam J acks on, At _anta Univers ity
Chairman
Mr ~ Erwin Stevens, Chairman, Citizens Central Advisory Comm ittee,
EaO.A .,
Mr o Lewis Cenker, Attar ey
Business Particination
Virg il Milton, Re tired Atlanta Grou p Manager, Sears, Roebuck &
Company
Chairma n
Eo Lo Simon, Auditor., Atlanta Life Insurance Company
Vic e-Chairma n
Harlee Br anch, President, The Southern Company
Co Ao 11 .Art 11 Jenkins, Director of Indu s trial Relations, Lockhe ed
Roland Maxwe ll, President , Davis on's Department Stores
Publi c I nformation
J.ames L. Townsend, Townsend and Assoc iate s
�Public I ~forrnat i on ( c ont i nued)
Dale Cla rk , Direc t or of Pu bli c Affair s , WAGA - TV
Ray Moore, News Di r ec tor, WSB - 'I-V
Jim Wood., News Direc t or., 1,·oAK
Vice - Chairman
STAFF
ROOM 1204, CITY HAL~
Tel. 522-4463., Ext. 430
Malcolm D. Jone s , Di r e ctor
W, W. Gates, Con su ltant
Miss Joyce McKnight, Secretary
Cha irman
�HOUSI\iG RESOURCES cmG I1.i'TEE
1
Mr Cecil JJ. o P.lex2nder J Ch2 i· · .,an
Ho using Resources Comrnitt e
Finch., Al exander, Ba!"nes J Rot:1schild and Pascn.a l ,
10th Floor Sta~ ard Federa l Bui-d i n~
44 Br oad Street , No Wo
At l a. ta., Georgia
O


."'c .itccts


Dr . Sanford So Atwo6d, Co-Chairman
Housing Resources Co~.~r:1i ttee
President ., Emory U iversity
At lan t a , Ge orgia
30322
Dro Benjamin Eo Mays, Co-Chair ma n
Ho us i ng Res o urc es Committee
Pres i dent , ~oreho us e Col _ege
Atlanta , Georg i a
PANELS
LEGAL
Mr., Charles 1~ Welt ner , Attorney
The ?irs t National Bank !) Suite 2943
2 Peachtr ee Street
Atlanta ., Georg i a
l.Vlr. Dona l d Holl owell ., Regier.al Direc tor
Equa l Emp _oyment Opportunity Commission
1776 Peach tree St reet, N. w.
Atlanta, Georgia
Honorable Luther Alver son, Judge
Fult on County Superior Co urt
136 Pryor Street , So 'WG
Atlanta, Georgia
~~. Archer D. Smith III, Attor~ey
-.a rmon and Thackston
1944 Nntion3l Bank of Georgia D~ g~
Atlanta, Georgia
M.ro Norman Lo Underwood, Attorney
S 2nders , Heste:..
· -: :Iolley
1001 Comnerce Bui aing
Atla nta., Georgia
Ac t ing Cha irma n
�i
p3ge Two
CONSTRUCTION ANlJ DcSIGN
Dro Edwin Harri s on, Pres i de t
Georgia Inst itute of Technology
225 North Avenue , No Wo
Atlanta, Georgia
Chairman
Mro Her man Jo Russell, Contractor
504 Fair Street., So 1.17 0
At lanta, Georgia
30313
Mro Moreland Smith, Director
Urban Planning Project
Southern Regional Counc il
5 Forsyth Street ,~ - 1 o
Atlanta, Georgia
Vic e - Chairman
Revo John Ao Midd leton, Presideht
~orr is Brown College
673 Hu~ter Street, No Wo
Atlant3 , G,~- . · ~
Mre Her..ry F' o Alexander::, Builder
2439 Fernlea~ Cour t , No Wo
Atlanta , Georgia
Mro Ja rnes Moore, Preside~t
At l anta La bor Council
15 Peach tree Street, No Eo
Room 2oe
Atlanta, Georgia
FINA.JC~
Dean Harding Bo Young
Atlanta Univer sity
223 Chestnut Street., S. WG
Atlanta, Georgia
Mro Lee :Surge., President
Retai l Credit Company
P o Oo Box 4081
Atlanta , Georgia
30302
rlir o Butler T Henders on
Aosistant to Dr. Mays
Morehouse Colle3e
223 Chestnut Street, So Wa
Atlanta, Georgia
g
Ch a irman
�Page Three
FI NANCE (continued)
Mr. Mills B o Lane, J ro, President
The Citizens and Southern Na tional Bank
Po O o Box 4899
Atlanta, Georgia
J'vlr. Jo seph Earle Birnie , President
The _·ational Bank of'. Georgia
Peachtree at Five Points
AtlantaJ Georgia
30303
Itra Augu stus H. Sterne, President
The Trust Corrpany of Georgia
36 Sdgewocd Avenue , N o Eo
Atlanta, Geor 6 ia
30303
!VIro Gordon J one s, President
The Fulto:.--. -· ·- -t i onal Banl{
Po O o Box l.;. 387
Atlanta, Georgia
30302
NON-PROFIT
FUNDS ( Combined
with Fi:_2nce Panel)
Mr. A. B. Padgett, Executiv e Direc tor
Metropolitan Foundation of At lanta
1423 Candler Building
Atla nt a , Georgia
30303
M~ . Hamil ton Doug l as, Jr , Attorney
Nationa l Bank of Georgia Building
Atlanta, Georgia
Rev William Ho l me s Borders, Pas tor
Whe2t Street Bapt ist Church
,1c,;:,,
· -• ••, Q::::;
•l ey D.
, _v
rive , S
..I.
o
Vice - Chairm2n
l.r
VVo
Atlanta, Georgia
Dr$ Rufus Clement, President
Atlanta University
223 Chestnut Street, S W
Atlanta, Georgia
0
M.r o John Wi lson, Pre sident
Horne Wilson Company
163 Peters Stree t, S o Wo
At anta, Georgia
30313
�NON-PROFIT FUNDS (continued )
Mro Albert Love
Executive Vice Presidebt
The McCa ll Corpora t:on
P ,. Oo Box 1000
Doraville, Georgia
300 ~0


vrro Sco tt Houston , Jr o, Executive Direc tor


We sley Woods Apa rtments
Po Oo Box 15468
.
Atlanta, Georgia
30333
PlJ-:SLIC BODS ING
Mr ~ Edwin L., Sterne.;, Chairman
Housing Author i ty of t he City of Atla nta
639 Trust Company of Georgia Building
Atlanta, Georgia
30303
Dro Albert ~anley, President
Spe l man College
350 Leonard Street, S o Wo
Atlanta , Georgia
Mro Leonard Reinch, President
Cox Broadcasting Compa ny
1601 Wes t Peachtree Street, N io
Atlanta, Georgia
Mr o Clarence Da Coler,1an Regiona l Director
· Na tional Urban Leag ue
78 Marietta Street , No Wo
Atla~ta , Ge orgia
· Mr., Charles F o Pal::ner, Pre sident
Pa lmer, Inc a, Palmer Building
41 Marietta Street
Atlanta , Georgia 30303
Act :L-:g Chairman
�P2e;e Five
LAND ACQUISITION
Mr o ·wallace Lo Lee President
At l anta Gas Light Company
P., 0 ., Box 4569
· ..,. neo-r>
_ g·ia
30302
_,r-,:-....1 an -c-a
~
3
Mr o Clayton Ro Yates, resident
Yat es-Mil ton Store s
228 Auburn Aven ue, N. E o
Atlanta, Geo!'.'gia
Jim E c Land
Chief Engineer for Georgia
So ut hern Bell Te l ephone & Te legraph Compa ny
805 Pea chtree Stre e t 3 N. E a
At l ant a 3 Georg i a
l\1r o
Dro Vi vian Henders on , President
Clar k Col lef;e
240 Che stnu t Street, S o Wo
Atlanta ., Ge org ia
Ac t i ng Chairman
SOCIAL PROBLE'vIS
J\'Ir .. Charles Oo Emmerich Ad .1inistrator
Economic Opportunity Atlant a, Inco
101 Mar ietta Street, 11 • W.
Atlanta, Georgia
3
Duane Beck, Exec utive Direct or
Community Council of the At lanta Area, I nc ..
1000 Glenn Building
Atlanta, Georgia
30303
rvri r o
Mrs. Sujette era· 1-: , Socia l Director
Neighborhood Services , E Oo A., Inc
101 11arietta Street
Atlanta, Georgia
D~ o Tobe Johnson 3
Professor of Pol itica l Science
OCorehouse Coll ege
223 Chestnut Street, s. W
Atlanta, Georgia
0
Dean Wi lliams . J a ckson
Atlanta Uni versity
223 Chestnut Street, S
Atlanta, Georgia
Cha irma n
w.
�Page Six
SOCIAL PROBLEi'!iS (continued)
Erwin S~even s_; Chairrr:an
Ci tizens Cent_ a l Advisory Co~m ittee., E.O. A.
799 Parson s Street, S. W.
Atla nta, Ge orgia


Mr.


Mr. Lewis Cen1{er, Attorr~ey
20 45 Manchester, N. E .
Atlanta, Ge org ia
BUSINESS PARTI CIPAT I ON
ivT, r.
Virg il Mi lton
3626 TLxedo Road, N. W.
Chairman
At la nta., Georgia
lf~. Ed wa rd L. Simon:_ udit or V~ce - Chairman
Atlanta Life Insuranc e Company
148 Aub urn Avenue., N. E.
Atlanta., Ge orgia
Mr . Harlee Br anch., President
The Sou thern Company
3390 Peachtree Road ~ N. E.
Atla nta., Georgia
Mr. C. Ar t hur J e nkins
Director , Ind us t rial Relations
Lockheed Company
Marietta , Georgia
30060
Mr . Rol2nd Maxwel l, Pr eside nt
Davis on's Department Stor es
180 Pea ch tree Street, N. w.
At lant a , Georgia
PUBLIC I NFOR~~T ION
James L. Townsend '
Townsend and Jwso c iates
10 14 Hea ley Bldg.
Atlanta ., Georg ia
iVir.
�Page Seven
PUBLTC Il'~P.0RI,'i_l'/I' I 0N ( cc~'cinued;
r.~r D2 l e. c _a r~<
Di~e c to~ cf Public Af_a ir s
WP.GA - TV ,
1551 Bri 9 rcl iff Ro2 d, N. E.
Atlanta, Geor 6 i a
c· _a i~rnan
O
i\';r. Ra y Mo ore
Nel'l s D:Lrector
v!SB - TV
'
1601 West Pea chtr e e Stree t,
At l an ta , Georgia
30309
Mr. Jim Wood
v -:,__ ce - Ch2,irman
r!ews Dire c to~, HA0K
110 Ed gewood Avenu e, ~ . E.
Atla nta , Georg ia
STAFF
ROOM 1204, CIT:i HALL
Tel. 522-4463 , Ext, 430
Malcolm D. Jo nes, Dire ctor
W. w. Gates , Consult a~t
Miss Joyce McKnight, Secretary
�r
~
~
-
MINUTES
HOUSING RESOURCES EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING
MAY 4 , ·1967
Members of the Housing Resources Committee Executive Group met on Thursd a y,
May 4, 1967, at 10:00 a. m. i_n City Hall. The following members were present:
Mr. Dale Clark, Public Info rmat ion Panel
Dean William S. Jackson, Social Problems Panel
Mr. J. E. Land, Lan d Acquisition Panel
Mr. Archer D. Smith, III, Le g al Panel
Mr. Edwin L. Sterne , Public Housing Panel
Mr. Hall Ware, Finance and Non-Profit Funds Panel
Mr. John C. Wilson, Finance and Non-Profit Fund s Panel
Mr. Robert Winn, Construction and Design Panel
The Business Participation Panel was not represented at the meeting.
Col. Malcolm Jones presided in the Chairman's absence. Col. Jones explai ned
that this was the second in a series of monthly meetings designed to bring the
Committee members up to date on the progress of the program. H e then asked
each of the panel representatives to make a rep ort on the a ction taken by their
r espe ctiv e panels.
Finance and Non-Profit Funds Panel - Mr . Wilson and Mr. Ware explained
that the Committee is actively engage d i n developing a local funding group to
provide II seed" money t o promote low co st h ousing. Preliminary dis cuss ions
have been held and material from other such organi zation s is being reviewed.
Social Problems Panel - Dean Jackson reported that this panel has met to
organize their group and has discussed some of the broad areas to be
encompassed by the panel. Two main decisions came out of this meeting:
1.
The panel should have representatio n from the community it self and,
therefore, two new members have been added. They are: D r. Charles
F. Schwab, President, Protestant Welfare and Social Services, Inc.,
and Mr. Erwin Stevens, Chairman, Citiz en s Central Advisory
Committee, Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.
2.
The panel felt it would be helpful to develop some guidelines as to what
is anticipated as goals for adequate living.
�Page Two
Dean Jackson added that one of his cl as ses is presently conducting a surve y
of the attitudes of families living in the vicinity of the B e dford-Pine ar ea
to be completed by the end of this month. If anything helpful comes out of
the study it will be shared with the Conunittee.
Land Acquisition Panel - Mr. Land reported that this panel is still in the
process of thoroughly organizing. However, as a result of the first meeting
it was decided that two or three real estate men would be added to the group
and this is in process at present. Meetings are planned with the Atlanta
Housing Authority and the Federal Housing Administration.
Construction and Design Panel - Mr. Winn reported t:q.at three archi tec ts have
been obtained to work with the panel in carrying out its functions. The panel
members have organized and have scheduled regular monthly meetings and
are beginning to plan their program.
Legal Panel - Mr. Smith, representing Mr. Weltner, stated that two attorne y s
have been added to assis t in the work of the panel. They are: Mr. Archer D.
Smith, III , Attorney, Harmon & Thackston, and Mr. Norman L. Underwood ,
Attorney, San ders, H ester & Holley. The panel members are working in thre e
areas at the present time:
1.
2.
3.
Research and examination of the laws dealing with FHA housin g,
particul arly the requisites for obtaining FHA grants and loans;
Study of complaints and problems concerning the enforcement of the
Housing Code; and
Res earch into the pa rt of t h e law particularly co n cerne d with the
Grant and Loan Program (fo r re habilitation o f sub-standard housi ng)
being restricted to U r ban Renewal and Code Enforcement areas.
Public Hrusing Panel - Mr. Sterne reported that this panel has met once and
at that meeting the members were generally acquainte d with what is going on
in public housing. Mr. Stern e told the group of many of the program.s the
Housing Authority is presently engaged in.
Public Information Panel - Mr. Clark reported that th e pane l members have
met and that he also met with Col. Jones and Mr. Alexander for a bri efing on
the overall program. He stated that his concept of this panel's ftmction is: one
of informing the general public and to report fully through the news 1nedia
what the Committee is doing, and that until some definite action is taken hy
the Committee and the function of the Committee is a little better focused,
this panel will n ot be able to really move forward on their program.
�Page Three
Col. Jones then distributed up-to-date copies of the Inventory of the various
housing projects which have been proposed and provided members of the pr e ss
with a summary of this report. He reviewed the summary with the comm itte e
and discussed in detail some of the problems the committee is encountering in
getting these projects underway. The major problems include:
1.
Attitude of home owners toward apartment units;
2.
Zoning; and
3.
Determination of the location of housing {HUD prefers that such housin g
not be located in areas of racial concentration).
The group discussed possible solutions to these problems but no positive
decisions were reached.
Col. Jones also told the group of a meeting Mr. Alexander has reques t ed for
a special meeting of the Board of Aldermen for the purpose of inviting builders
and developers to appear before them to discuss their problems from their
points of view. He added that it would be helpful to have some members of the
Executive Group at this meeting also. Mr. Land of the Land Acquisition Panel
said that his panel would definitely be represente d at the meeting.
Col. Jones requeste d each of the panels to elect permanent Chairme n an d Vi ce
Chairmen as soon as possible, if they have not al~eady done so, and to a d v ise
him who has be e n ele cted.
Mr . Cl a rk told the E xe cut ive Group members that his panel (Public Infor mati on)
is alw ays ope n to committee member s for any sugge stions or r e comme n dati on s
a s to h ow th e public infor mati on p r o g ram can help f urth er the goals of the
Committee. H e also re commended to Col. Jones t h at the informatio n containe d
i n :: t he s u mmary o f t h e proble m areas be made available to the press . Col. Jone s
agree d w i t h Mr . Cl ark a n d a dvis e d that h e would t a k e up this matte r w i t h
M r . A l e xand er.
There being no further bus i ne s s t h e me eting w as adjourn ed at 11 : 30 a. m.
R es p e ctf ully s u bmitte d ,
,_,__-~:f)t.J!·O.-,
/?.?,-Jee _.d
Malc olm D . Jo n,~
Supervisor of In s pection Servi c es
�HOUSING RESOURCES COMMITTEE
Room 1204 City Hall
Tel, 522-4463, Ext, 430
May 4, 1967
V'
,ii
,,,,,,I,'I
,1;
The Executive Group of the Housing Resources Committee, recently established
,j
'I
by Mayor Allen to promote and facilitate construction of low and medium cost housing in
Atlanta, held its regular monthly meeting today in the City Hall,
Cecil A, Alexander,
Chairman, Dr. Sanford Atwood, President of Emory Univer>sity . and Dr, Benjamin E. Mays,
President of Morehouse College, Co-Chairmen of the Committee, were unable to attend,
The Executive Group (consisting of the Chairmen of the nine working panels
into which the overall Committee is organized) studied a recently prepared Committee
report on the status of the current housing progr>am,
submitted by various developers,
It is summarized as follows:
No. Units
1967
Firm
3556
(1312)
Probable
3553
Category


',7109 In Sight


Total
Being Considered
4569
Doubtful
3088
Total Proposed
The report contained 71 proposals
(1312)
Estimate When Available
1968
1969
1970
1971
(1928)
(316)
(1681)
(672)
(500)
(700)
(3609)
(988)
(500)
(700)
14,766 of which 6504 units (1243 listed in the· Firm category,
3409 in the Being Considered category and 1852 now included in the Doubtful category)
previously considered likely, are currently in serious difficulty of materializing due
primarily to objections from various sources as to proposed locations,


', Includes 1140 uni ts of Public Housing, plus 144 existing uni ts leased for Public Housing.


In addition, 1782 units have been rehabilitated since October under the Housing Code.
The goals established by the City for the program are 16,800 units by
the end of 1971 , consisting of 9800 units during 1967 and 1968 and 2333 units during
each of the succeeding three years.
The principal difficulties currently confronting the Committee in
developing the program are the following:
(a)
General objection by single family home owners to multi-family units
being built anywhere near them, even though the multi-family construction may be a v~ry
high type of cooperative sales housing for purchase and occupancy by family units and
presold before construction begins,
l

- - - -- - ---------------:----- - - - - - - - -------.
�.. - .
'
-2-
(b)
Difficulty in getting sufficient suitable tracts appropriately zoned,
because of objections from residents of the areasinvolved.
(c)
Persistent efforts by certain groups to effect the spreading of
low and medium income housing throughout all sectors of the City, even though suitable
tracts of land may not be available in some areas to developers at prices which make
construction of such housing economically feasible.
(d)
Recently announced policy by HUD discouraging the location of
public housing in areas of racial concentration.
(e)
Conservatism by FHA on approving projects in certain areas, to
insure against the possibility of over-building the market in any portions of the City.
(f)
Discouragement on the part of promoters and developers faced with
the above indicated problems.
The combination of these problems is slowing down the program
substantially and, if continued, will make the goals very difficult to attain.
·,I
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�May .Z3, 1967
MEMORANDUM
TO:
Colonel M~lcolm Jone
FROM:
Mayor lvan Allen, Jr .
. The attached reply from the Housing Authority h the information
requeated by the Housing Rea011rce Committee.'
Sincerely yours,
Iv n Allen, Jr.
Mayor
1AJ'r/br
Encloaur
�EDWIN L. STERNE
M. B. SATTERFIELD
CH AIRMA N
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR ANO SECRETARY
GEORGE S. CR A FT
CARLTON GARRETT
VICE CH AI RM AN
DIRECTOR OF FINANCE
J. B . SLA YTON
GILBERT H. BOGGS
DIRECTOR OF HOUSING
JOHN 0. CHILES
GEORGE R . SANDER
FRANK G. ETHERIDGE
TECHNICAL DIRECTOR
82" HURT BUILDING
ATLANTA, GEORGIA
30303
JACKSON 3-6074
May 17, 1967
The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor of the City of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mayor Allen:
This replies to your letter of May 10 transmitting copy of a
memorandum submitted by the Housing Resources Committee and
requesting our specific comments on items 5, 6 and 9. These
comments are as follows:
(5) We are unaware of any offers for sale by owners of
103 units on Boulevard resulting from housing code inspections.
As a general rule it is not financially feasible to acquire old
housing by purchase since necessary financing of the resulting
project must extend over a 40 year life.
It is preferable to
lease units in such buildings since the economics usually do
not justify purchase.
(6) At the present time negotiations are proceeding concerning
the leasing of units in four additional separate sites. We hope
t o be able to add to the total number of units now under lease.
The great difficulty is the l ow vacancy rate in housing of
acceptab l e standard in the Atlanta area, which has resulted in an
attitude by most landlords that there is no financial advantage
t o them to enter into a lease agreement with the Housing
Authority since they already have extensive waiting lists and
are n o t having to make improvements that possibly would be
required under the Housing Authority leasing program.
�Mayor Allen
~age 2
May 17, 1967
The Housing Authority representative is devoting ample time to
the investigation of all available leads. All real estate firms
listed in the Yellow Pages have been circularized as well as
members of the two real estate boards. Constant visual
investigations are made in trips to various sections of the city
to find out where vacancies might be in existence.
The processing of individual tenant leases for occupancy of
units in private housing is not greatly time consuming since it
only averages about thirty minutes per tenant.
It i s considere d very important for the leasing represent a tive
to make very frequent checks of existing leased housing to make
sure that the public housing tenants are living up to their
obligations affecting the care of the premises, etc.
If this
program can b e controlled so that private landlords see that
public housing tenants are better than average tenants this
should h a ve a n importa nt impact on t he availabil i ty of addi tiona l
units f or l e as e . Althou gh the numb e r of le a s e d sites h a s not
increased in the past few weeks, the number of public housing
tenants has had a steady growth as dwelling units have become
available in pres e nt locati ons.
(9 ) Redu c ti on i n minimum p ri ce of sing l e family l o t s fo r
sal e in the Thoma sville Urban Redev e lopme nt P ro j ec t b e l ow the ir
cu r r ent minimum has been c ons i dered i n t he pas t.
The staff is
of t h e opinion tha t such reduction would not encourage the
deve l opment of t he se lots b e c a use:
(a )
The p r ice a s n ow s e t is l e ss t han the value of
the lots shoul d t he de v e l oper ac qu i re l and at
reasonable price and prov ide the stree t s ,
utilities , and other ameni ties as provided
by this p r o j e ct.
(b)
The Federal Housi n g Admi nis tra t ion will a ll ow
as land valu e onl y the amou nt actual ly paid
to us by the deve l oper. Therefore, any
redu ction in the price of the land wouldmly
res ul t in a redu ct i on in the amount of the
loan unde rwritt e n by FHA .
At the moment it appears to us the greatest opportunity for
provision of additional units for low income famili e s l i e s in
�Mayor Allen
Page 3
_May 17, 1 967
the 221D-3 Program, and hopefully in increasing the number
of units leased for public housing use, although the latter
does not increase total housing supply.
Sincerely yours,
.Lzz-
M. B. Satterfield
Executive Director
MBS/fm
�Finch Alexander Barnes Rothschild & Paschal
May 16 , 1 967
The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr ., Mayor
City of Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Ivan:
Many thanks for the help with Lord & Taylor . Joel Cowan feels that
your interest has been most helpful in his negotiations.
Sincerel y,
~
Cecil A. Alexander
vb
James H,Finch, F,A.I.A.
Cecil A, Alexander, F.A.l,A,
Miller 0. Barnes, A.I.A,
Bernard B, Rothschild, f.A.1.A. F.C.S.I.
Caraker0. Paschal, A,1,A.
ASSOCIATES
Robert 0. Ahlslrand, R,A.
Sidney S. Daniell, A.A,
Ira Graybofl
Thomas 6. Joyce, A.I.A.
H. KingMcCain, N.S.P.f.
J.J. McDonough
Architects Engineers Interior Designers
William L. Pulgram, A.I.A.
44 Broad Street N.W. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Phone 688-3313
John Steinichen, A.I.A.
Terry-Hutchens Bldg., Huntsville, Ala. 35801 Phone 539-9648
�Finch Alexander Barnes Rothschild & Paschal


y 161 1967


·It' . Rodney M. Cook
COPY
34 10th trot . ,E.
Atlant . , Geo~gia, 030
COPY
Siner l y ,
COPY
~~L~C il A. Al
COPY
X&C
~
�BESSEMER PROPERTIES, INCORPORATED
Two
PE A CH TR EE STR E ET,
S U IT E
3400
ATLANTA , GEORGIA 30303
TELEPHONE
404•523 -25 18
~
May 17, 1967
The Honorable Ivan Alle n, Jr.
Mayor of the City of Atlanta
Atlanta, Geor g ia
Dear Mayor Allen:
Just a note to thank you for your h e lp with the Lord &
Taylor matter.
I b e li e v e you h ave h e a r d di rect fr om t h e m that city cooper ation was most h e lpf ul.
T h e tax a ss e ssors we r e mos t c oope r a tive a s well, and
ope n e d suffici e nt files to complete ly assur e th e m of the ir position.
A gain, my thanks and w e hope thi s p r oj e ct w i ll b e broug h t
t o a s u ccessful conc lusion, w h ich will be a credit to the City.
Sincer e l y ,
JHC:rp
CC: Mr. C e cil Alexand er
�MINUTES
HOUSING RESOURCES EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING
MAY 4, 1967
Members of the Housing Resources Committee Executive Group met on Thur sday,
May 4, 1967, at 10:00 a . m. i_n City Hall. The following members were present:
Mr. Dale Clark, Publi c Information Panel
Dean William S. J ackson, Social Problems Panel
Mr. J. E. Land, Land Acquisition Panel
Mr . Archer D. Smith, III, Legal Panel
Mr. Edwin L. Sterne, Public Housing Panel
Mr. Hall Ware, Finance and Non-Profit Funds Panel
Mr. John C. Wilson, Financ e and Non-Profit Funds Panel
Mr. Robert Winn, Cons tructi on and Design Panel
The Business Participation Panel was not represented at the rn.eeting.
Col. Malcolm Jones presided in the Chairman's absen c e . Col. Jones explained
that this was the second in a series of monthly meetings designed to bring the
Committee members up to date on the progress of the progra1n. He then asked
each of the panel representatives to make a report on the action taken by their
respective panels.
Finance and Non-Profit Funds Panel - Mr. Wilson and Mr. Ware explained
that the Committee is actively engaged in developing a local funding group to
provide "seed" money to promote low cost housing. Preliminary discussions
have been held and material from other such organizations is being reviewed.
Social Problems Panel - Dean Jackson reported that this panel has met to
organize their group and has discussed some of the broad areas to be
encompassed by the panel. Two main decisions came out of this meeting:
1.
The panel should have representation from the community itself and,
therefore, two new members have been added. They are: Dr. Charles
F. Schwab , President, Protestant Welfare and Social Services, Inc.,
and Mr. Erwin Stevens, Chairman, Citizens Central Advisory
Committee, Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.
2.
The panel felt it would be helpful to develop some guidelines as to what
is anticipated as goals for adequate living.
�Page Two
Dean Jackson added that one of his cl a sses is p r es e ntly conducting a surve y
of the attitudes of families living in the vicinity of the B e dford-Pine a r e a
to be completed by t h e e nd of this month. If anyt hing h e lpf ul comes out of
the study it will b e sha red wit h the Committee .
Land Acquisition P a nel - Mr. L a nd reported that this pane l is still in t he
process of thoroughly organizing. H ow e ver, as a r e sult of the first m e e t ing
it was decided that two or three real estate men would be added to the g roup
and this is in process a t present. Meetings are planned with the Atlanta
Housing Authority and the Federal Housing Administration.
Construction and D es i gn Panel - Mr. Winn reported that three archite c t s have
been obtained to work with the panel in carrying out its functions. The pan el
members have organized and have scheduled regular monthly meetings and
are be ginning to plan t heir program.
L e g al P a n e l - Mr. Smith, re p re senting M r. W e ltner , state d that two a ttorn e ys
have b ee n adde d t o as s i st i n t h e w ork of the panel. They are: Mr. Arche r D.
Smith, III, Attorney, H a rmon & Thackston, and Mr. Norm.an L. Underwood,
Attorne y, Sanders, H es t er & Holley. The panel members ar e working in t h re e
ar e as a t the pres ent t ime:
1.
2.
3.
R esearch and examina tion of the l a ws d ealing wit h F H A hous ing ,
p articularly the re quis ite s fo r obtaining F HA grants and loans;
S t u d y of comp l a ints and problems conc ernin g the enfor ceme nt of the
Housin g Code ; and
Re s earch into t h e part of the l aw par tic ul a r ly conc e rne d with t h e
Gr ant a nd L o an Pr o gra m (for reh a bilita tion of sub -standard housing )
b e i n g r e stri c ted to Urb a n R e newal and Cod e E nfo r c ement areas .
Public Hrus i ng Panel - M r . S tern e re porte d tha t this p anel h a s met on c e and
at that meeting the members w ere gen e rally ac quain t ed with w h a t i s going on
in public h o using. Mr . S terne tol d t h e group o f m a n y o f the pr o gram.s the
Housing Aut ho rity i s p re sen t ly engaged i n .
Publi c Informati on Panel - Mr . Clark r ep orted that the panel members have
met and that he also me t with C ol. Jon e s and Mr. Alexander for a brie fing on
the overall program. He stated that h i s concept of this panel's function is one
of informing the general public and to report full y through the news 1nedia
what the Committee is doi ng , and that unt il s ome definite action i s taken by
the Committee and the functi on o f the C ommi ttee i s a l ittl e better focused,
this panel will not be a ble to really move for w ard on their program.
�Page Three
~Col. Jones then distributed up-to-date copies of the Inventory of the various
housing projects which have been proposed and provided members of the press
with a sum.mary of this report. He reviewed the summary with the co1nmittee
and discussed in detail some of the problems the committee is encountering in
getting these projects underway. The major problems include:
1.
Attitude of home owners toward apartment units;
2.
Zoning; and
3.
Determination of the location of housing {HUD prefers that such housing
not be located in areas of racial concentration).
The group discussed possible solutions to these problems but no positive
decisions were reached.
Col. Jones also told the group of a meeting Mr. Alexander has requested for
a special meeting of the Board of Aldermen for the purpose of inviting builders
and developers to appear before them to discuss their problems from their
points of view. He added that it would be helpful to have some members of the
Executive Group at this meeting also. Mr. Land of the Land Acquisition Panel
said that his panel would definitely be represented at the meeting.
Col. Jones requested each of the panels to elect permanent Chairmen and Vice
Chairmen as soon as possible, if they have not already done so, and to advise
him who has been elected.
Mr. Clark told the Executive Group members that his panel (Public Information)
is always open to committee members for any suggestions or recommendations
as to how the public information program -can help further the goals of the
Committee. He also recommended to Col. Jones that the information contained
in :: the summary of the problem areas be made available to the press. Col. Jones
agreed with Mr. Clark and advised that he would take up this matter with
Mr. Alexander.
There being no further business the meeting was adjourned at 11:30 a. m.
Respectfully submitted,
~<-.42c-~-.!!!:..--t)-o.
u -Q ____,
Malcolm D. Jones
,_
Supervisor of Inspection Service :3
�HOUSING RESOURCES COMMI TTEE
Room 1204 City Hall
Tel. 522-4463, Ext. 430
May 4, 1967
The Executive Group of the Housing Resources Committee, recently establ ished
by Mayor Allen to promote and facilitate construction of low and medium cost housing in
Atlanta, held its regular monthly meeting today in the City Hall.
Cecil A. Alexander,
I
'·!
Chair man, Dr. Sanford Atwood, President of Emory University . and Dr. Benjamin E. Mays,
President of Morehouse College, Co-Chairmen of the Committee, were unable to att end .
The Executive Group (consisting of the Chairmen of the nine working panels
into whi ch the overall Committee is organized) studied a recently prepared Committee
report on the status of the current housing program.
submitted by various developers.
It is summarized as follows:
No. Units
1967
Firm
3556
(1312)
Probable
3553
Category


',7109 In Sight


Total
Being Considered
4569
Doubtful
3088
Total Proposed
The report contained 71 proposals
(1312)
Estimate When Available
1968
1969
1970
(1928)
(316)
(1681)
(672)
(500)
(700)
(3609)
(988)
(500)
(700)
14, 766 of which 6504 uni ts ( 1243 listed in the· Firm c ategory ,
3409 in the Being Considered category and 1852 now included in the Doubtful category)
previously considered likely, are cur~ently in serious difficulty of materializing due
primarily to objections from various sources as to proposed locations.


Includes 1140 units of Public Housing , plus 144 existing units leased for Public Housing.


In addition, 1782 units have been rehabilitated since October under the Housing Code.
The goals established by the City for the program are 16,800 units by
the end of 1971, consisting of 9800 units during 1967 and 1968 and 2333 units during
each of the succeeding three years.
The principal difficulties currently confronting the Committee in
developing the program are the following :
(a)
General objection by single family home owners to multi-family
units
'
'
'
being built anywhere near them, even though the multi-family construction may be a very
high type of cooperative sales housing for purchase and occupancy by family unit s and
presold before construction begins.
l
'
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.
~
.
-2(b)
Difficulty in getting sufficient suitable tracts appropriately zoned,
because of objections from residents of the areasinvolved.
(c)
Persistent efforts by certain groups to effect the spreading of
low and medium income housing tnroughout all sectors of the City, even though suitable
tracts of land may not be available in some areas to developers at prices which make
.!
construction of such housing economically feasible.
(d)
.:1
,I
Recently announced policy by HUD discouraging the location of
,I
public housing in areas of racial concentration.
,,
(e)
Conservatism by FHA on approving projects in certain areas, to
I
insure against the possibility of over-building the market in any portions of the City.
(f)
Discouragement on the part of promoters and developers faced with
the above indicated problems.
The combination of these problems is slowing down the program
substantially and, if continued, will make the goals very difficult to attain.

.·.·1
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�HOUSING RESOURCES COMMI TTEE
C ITY HAL L
ATLANTA, G A. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
Room 1204, City Hall
IVAN ALLE N, J R., MAYOR
.May
23, 1967
R. EARL LANDERS, Adm inistrative Assistant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secret ary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Direct or of Governmental Liaison
Dear Commi ttee Member:
The next mont hl y mee tine of the Exec utive Gro up of the Housing
Resources Committee (whi ch woul d normally be held on June 1 ) will be
held at 10: 00 A. H. , Wednesday, Hay 31, i n Corn."Tlitt e e Room Ill, Se cond
Fl oor, City Hall. We e specially hope t hat you can at tend this meet ing .
The low cost housine; progr am i s currentl y runni ng int o some ma j or
difficul ties which I need t o discuss seriously with you, wi t h view t o
adopting a policy position of the Commi t tee as a whole and pl anning ·a
cour se of action to pursue .
We will have at t he meeting ba sic f actual dat a on whi ch t o base
our conclus ions and I hope also a list of l an d tracts i n t he City by
s i ze and l oc ation whi ch are appropriately zoned f or constructi on of
mul t i-family housing .
We still have not been i nforme d as t o the f ollowi ng :
Le gal Panel - Chairman and Vi ce - Chairman
Public Hous ing Panel - Chai rman and Vice - Chairman
Land Acquis ition Pane l - Chai rman and Vi ce -Chairman
Social Problems Panel - Vice -Chairman
Pl ease be pr ep ar ed to provide us at the mee t ing with appropriate
information on the above .
Also pl eas e l et us know on the enclose d r et urn address postal card
i f you plan to attend t he meeting or, in t he event you c annot attend,
t he name of s ome ot her membe r of your panel who will repre sent you at
t he meeting.
Sincerely,
.,,.,,.....
' ~ /7 . . .
- -~ ~ ?~ - t?
c{~ ~ ~
Ce ci l A. Al exander
Chairman
Encl:
Re t urn address postal c ard.
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Finch Alexander Barnes Rothschild & Paschal
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. tnit t
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F - Relatively Firr:i (Fl- 21)
P - Probable ( Pl - 11)
C
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D
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HOUS ING RESOURCES COMMITTEE
An Inven t ory of
Tot u l d·,;e1 lin; un i ts cons·,_1"'uctc8.
LOW AND MEDIUM COST HOUS ING IN ATLANTA
1%3
~ce~tly Comp ~ted_L __in ~ v ~ ~ ~sed
Hegot i at i e,n s st2.rted ·:1i th FHA
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1968
rJrocessed by Fh,\ . Rent Suµ l .
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2382

Contents

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Off Gordon Rd ,
/'.l l e n 'Ter:1pl e
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[·'. ontiily Pmts ~ Es tinate
No o Bedroomstr Rentals
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HOUSING RESOURCE S COMMITTEE
DATE A1,r i l 20 , 1S6 7
An Inv2nt ory of
LOW AN D MEDIUM COS T HOUSING IN ATLANTA
l e t ed~ in Development and Proposed
Rec el1t ly Comp
.
--=--~-==- = =
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No o
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No o Units
New Ex ist
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Ha lcyon Pa rk
( Lon d on Town e
Eouse s )
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Le;ca t ion
De signa t ion
=
,,_,,.- = : ~
Pcogr~- L l --12-=-~3-
221 ci ( 3)
Coop .
Of f Boulde r Park
Dr , near Cu shman
Circle ,
~-~1
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Be drooms
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Parce l C-Lf
Parce l C- 3B
Pa rce l C-11
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vailable -r=O~t;.,.h=e=r_ v- a~ l =u-e ~ = = =~====~=~C=o~m~rn~e=n=t~====
83 1i 5 . sd
70
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ki!3e inr::-
_p roc essed by FiiA ·, 20 P • •
~~ on so r - FC H, I nc . ( Sa~ e peo~ l e who
pc v e loµed Ec:..st·,;yci1 Villase ) To be
, es of 37, 4 7, 53
1<leve l op~d i n 4 st ab_


<>C 6 3 u n i·t· s rcspe c t ive l y .. I' ros;,ec t s


,1c hang_e ci fro m Pr·obab le to i:' i nil . 6
d i ff; 1~en t month l y p1,1ts . 1, 2 , 3 & 4
le<lrooms , some wit h ba se ment s .
i
r·:4 Bedrooms To-.-1 l l!ouses
f'liA .
~e .i.n~ p r o c esset.i Ly
Ren tal
!i 1:c l. all utiliti es . final a?p l.
1s u b1,1itt cd r!ov . Hi ' c..G .
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Ro ckda l e U. R .
,\ rea ( LR i ssued,)
Pro j e ct
1350 additiona l pot enti al
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7 01 , 00G p;,::.ce Bids opened ;.;a.r . 15 , l <Ju 7 - 150 A .

for ries . l and Re s . and S . 1 1~ A. Con
r.1 . 1~ bil:~; sub1,1 i ttel ; 2 c or.ve!':.tion.::.l; 2 iricluoed


coop . Gic,ccrs .. t:l'e :
rou 6 l2.:.,-i.rlen of ::u, Ycrl<
Ddv ic. L. ::use 1 t o::.- : : ew Ycrx.
i:o} ..:t , L: .1,•·cl ,!.,C..\·. CvL:.;t . l.'u . 0.1.· .. . 1



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�HOUSIN G RESOURCES COMMITTEE
DATE
An Invent ory of
LOW AN D ME DIUM CO ST HO USIN G I N ATLANT A
Recen~~ ~ t e d_i 143.215.248.55!1~~velopme2:_t and P:c op os e d
Noo Units
New Exi st
Item
No ,
F- 8
Designatio1;..,
Locat ion
= , . -c.- -~-......,___"L._~= ~=143.215.248.55-~=l--~"~~=L ~:-~-f===~
.
Thc mo. sv i l J. e
?ro j ect
Publ ic Hous i ng
35 0
Perm i t or
ItiI~;dr~ooi~s -~~-~
· 1 Ren~al~3~ ; AvaJ.~:~~e_J Ot her Val ue
=~-~
1
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u.
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-,.-=~==143.215.248.55


cost
$Ff , 500/U ,
Comment
·-
Se e surr,J:la ry of PuLli c 1-: o us~n~ ,
c:tt c:i c:, cci , ... . ....., l:rea k Cto1·1n .


/1v ,


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F- 9
Fublic Housing
1 40
i' Pe rry
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19G 7
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c 0s t
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rI
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Same Vic i n i t y
c1ttc.c li e d .





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' .! .
,:o audl tloual unit.;s 1,-~ased sin-..:c
Total unckr l_ r;a::;e ,1c:;rcci,W r,t , ,.
( I nclude:s 7 8 units :;m-, under I tu1<1nt J. co.:fo )
76


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:;nary of Fu:Ul i c



Lc:d. Se r c...;otiatc<.l L.y l t . 1\ ,


C.:11, t d: e
'1,c::;s,2ssion o:iJ.y o.s uni ts b:cci,,c:
vc:.canl: ; 5 units :r,o·.., ur.u.e1' i:i, cont1'ol ,
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s it:,· fo r c i,,.:l r1~e 01,,Ge1. . . . Succe:ss.ful
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+ ri.l .


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s L!JTl I:1ary of 1-'ublic !ious i n0 , at ta. c f:ed ,
f or ,. rcaKUO'.·ill , Delc.y due t o neces -
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�HQUSIN G RE SOURCES COMMI TTEE
l (.!t:. '7
.L ..J V I
An Inve n t ory of
LOW AND MEDI UM COST HOUSING IN ATLANTA
Rece~~t ly Compl_:_t ed_~_=i::i= ~':e.v e l opme nt ~ P~ p ~e d
When
j Pe r mi t or
Comment
Availa ble , Ot her Value
~===;==~=-16:32, 29 December 2017 (EST)==-==-~ == ~=~=~=========
!


Pe r mit


!8 8 2 , 500
I
F-14
Ii ··..····.. 41
I ,·.:,: 12
n e.
Le
Jan .
1
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2 3 j i: e b •
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Sing le Fam i ly
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!Var i ou s throu g hout
City .
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' ( other tl~an in
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25 .:ov .
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t he s tc.rn da rd housinr; SUi)p l y .
!iO'.·/
Fi~ures for Feb . anJ :-;ar . / a na ar eu ~ of; f1ou. s ing Co<l e En fc r c e me nt , activity
x' c qu e s-:: r, d :; cv~l'. 'd l ti T.1 cs , b ut no t pi."ovi L'e r_l ·
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S<.1i1·,c c c!. .1 ~1c r1t as ,~:.,o v 1:! ,
�HOUSI NG RESOURCES COMMI TTEE
/m I nvent ory of
LOW AND MEDIUM COST HOUSING IN ATLANTA
teds in De ve lopme
nt a -nd~ Proposed
Rec e ~~l!,Y Comple
=~-=-"""-OL1EC--=·=-~ ~.
~
~=-=
I tem
No o
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3:J'?:,~,.143.215.248.55=~=-~
No
Units
De s i gnation
Location
Program
When
Ren t als
.
Available
l ~--T ~- 3 l
!Noa Bedrooms
·--')~-~'.r-=·- 3·
1
In U-~-R.. ~=-r=o=J=.e~c=-=
t-s= = ~ ~ ~ = 4 -===
-1--=~~--i--= -~
·=--~17:.::.
Permit or
Comment
Other Value ~ ~ ~ = = = = = = = ~

=
--~- 7~~
Permi t s i ssued for rehab ilitat ion
t hru tl c ilousing !,uth .
r-,er'm i t )
(
1 Av er<.1r;e 2 un i ts per
F- 17
1 0 D~c .
3 4 J,f o .
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1 7 FE:Jb ,
l ?. i-iJr .
103 1'ot a l
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iE is illtcrestecl in buyiLg o ila;,i !catcd l o\-/ cost st
:.'uct ur 2s a.1;0. 1-ia:.atl·1 ·




.
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·p . I-:a i."'t , has alre::iciy re:1abec.i. 30 uni ts
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30
F- 18
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1277
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f. - 19
-
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crr,::11 1'.p ts .
& Du 1)l c ;,:es
7
L.i11d:.;cy S l iU
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C6nv .

$2lf , 000
12 0 Da .
lJ.(; ~UvO
. iC, l'Ch 19G7
J.Lf ,


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17 , G'/0
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li . L ,
0~111.._r - I; . it , Dc..:.c:~:..;t.:'0.:1
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000
359 Lo.n i e r St . i-i'./
2
2
1r0 l
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120 Da .
I, ,
�- ------ ------ ------------ ~---~---·
HOUSIN G RESOURCES COMMITTEE
DATEi-~r i l 20 ~ 1S6 7
!m I nvent or y of
LOW AN D MEDIUM COST HOUSIN G ·1N ATLANT A
~
I tem
No o Unit s
No o
---
New
F- 20
220
E~ :-=::=...,_
..:.. b
6
I
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1U y Co~ le i:_:~-2_ .in De ~ ~= !!opos e ~
Noa Be drooms
Rentals





Permi t o r
Hhen
· ot her Value
Lo -:at i on
Desig_!'l~tion
I
.
Turnkey
!Gilber t Rd . &
!Flynn B.d , SE
i'I
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Th is is on ly
~ ~
ich
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Comment

=========~===~=·--===--
20 Ii , site zo11 ed for ai--ts . • coEs i. deced
favoro.bl_i by liA . Pro:not er - Bil l
Woodwar d of Adams Cates , Duilder
l
ha s ~l v en te nt l tive approvi l ,
lI II
Wh itinJ-Tu rne r . To Le ~e veloped a t
dens ity of 11 Li p2 r i-L U , l-.as
t ent at i ve l y allocateJ 220 units .
i'
F- 21
Un iv e r s ity Cecter
22 .i d ( 3 )


~? 1+, 0G0 . 00


U. R. Proj e ct
i!on - Pl.~of i t
Offerini
' price fo r
J
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iia;;no lia
1
Cemetery Sit e
I;:est
of llol ly-,;ood
'. Rei ., 1-ii·i ( Hort h of
1 Proctor c 1~eek )
I
20 ,5 A +?
ITrn'.'nkey
posed in
lv ic_inity
un<.kr 22 1
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1
This projec t i i s cons i de:cecl excct l ent by Hf. Jand HtlS i ~i tip.Uy_ favoro.bly considerec.· by rL'\A ;
now opposed by· tiic Ir,t c r-groun l~e l cit.ions Section of IiUD . ,T enta ti vely <lisappruvcd Ly· l fl /\ •
I

-------------l' - 2
S1,onsor - \·/h i ti11G-'f'1.,;:cne r Const . Co.
( Bys t ry )
Promo t 12r - Dill '.iooc."i 1.1a.rd of /,0.i:..11s Cat ,'"s .
i\ 1)~) 1 , for re - zoni11z fi l ed DP.c . G;
a:.,provc ,.1 by Zoni11s Cvir,;,,i ttee Ja.r, . 19 .
130.:trcl of ,'\ld . ct,.> •.:rovcJ f'eb . 6 . U11.i.ts
tentc.1 ti vely p l ed 0 e,d b~1 LA.
J\lso c1d d
units pro -
d '('3 )
1 3 A. offered Ly E.f.. J,"n . 1 5 . Hi;\
has r.:; i vcn re:~r:::1\vc1tion . DiUs o~e:r e u
/ipri l 1 2 .
8 s uLs t antia l b i tls re c e iv e d .
1
off !!;n,\•:8 11 Rd.
I

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l!\·/1
l

~---·--------
Turnke y
This pro j,~c~ is , ppusc<.l l,y t_i1e ; ·11!,CP in lette r to tlic t,.3 ~·01' ;;,11°ch 21 , l~b 7.
f\ls c, oL jcct ed to ' by Inter~r9up l·'. , lations Section ct l ,~c2, .i.011n l O.i.-ficc o.f
lilJD in l et tee to JI. A.





I

· ---3Lf ,\ , Zc,r,ca ; und,~r 0 1,t:.on ; I ,;., cil lci r',-:_,
li b:: ; OK '.·!i.th PoLi.c::i· Ccr,>~ . i,i, ·.:i.JJ.~n__;
to cccc,ivc lJX'o,os a. ls, S"onso1'
,'c .LG.'.:lcr6 ·· :'.i ,,l u' i~,:ei lt.,·. u.. its t<..iiti,tiv,q.1--l'"~(~L~Lc.~ LJ' H.1 •
�HOUSING RESOURCES COMM I TTEE
DATE
h~ril 20 ,1 96 7
An T.nventory of
LOW AND ME DIUM COST HOUSING IN ATLA NTA
_R-e=c-e=~=t ~ l e ~ e<:1_~_~i-~=~~ lopmen t an~~ose=d~
Noa Units
Item
No a Bedrooms
_N
~ o..;.'- ~ ~l=
fo=·-w..:1,t.=x..2~s=t- -=1P.=~D
_e=s=-i g~;..~t io~= ~ ~ ~~ ·_!:9~a t i?2;,.__=~~
P- 3
Program
J
Ce,.,etery site ,
.)
.,
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Butl e r Stree t
U. R. Pro j e ct
Cas t
l
II
I
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75
I
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of I,olly1-:ood
'
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In prc - cor
!n1i tr.ient st Ge - fliA


!F in anc i nu ; Fishe r E, Pt1illi p s ( Le~a l )
>:t . to 3- '.25 -li7
1c Let teP outst c.mJ i ,1s. F
!
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i





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85
I
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l
Dr. , _; , ',/ ,
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S:c,e:c .
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22 'f
7 'J
I
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i'-'/)
!,
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l j . G /. ; :..·c:;1. ...">itJ l;J l,//··. . ~;_.. o:.::.. ... ~·c 1. ~;L _ vctc. • .,.:.<o:, 0.•.• , c:: _•• 1•c,·,; . .i ,J, .... 3


'.t' 1 Jl.!~c<.
.t ic11 :.;u_·1:.iLtt:;,~


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L,vi. n :.:, dif,Jic ulty ..:,E ttin -~ r' L1\ ~o.p 1Jrova.l ( Fp!.i , 9 ) , S:_.011:.;oi' i:-c :orts
f'- 7 - ( .11 cl;• 'eC:. i.i
i
I
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5 . Sf1 . - S;:.or1sor - I. Sut)orta


~,.cn t al I11cl . util i ti cs . ~:ezcneci


,;iov . 17 . rrosi)ccts c1i2.,i 0 .::cl :;:re,;r_
'ril'1,1 to ?ro:.. ··L!.e .
S;o:,sc1' i.ciG tri ed



inccCc
c;_n , te, 0 ct Fhi\ at"'·~ro v<1l ,




~ e ~lined t o aJprov 7 ;
( , :J rJ.1 12 )
'
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er
i'i'urll;zey
1
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S;-ouscr has b en trying ;.; i nce
Gt dtcd is Ln 1riticcil area and i1


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n 1, . _:,us:..;cll t"lf_:= Lth,, ric ' :_;e




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Jo.r]
I
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Comment
143.215.248.55----=====~
10 1 • s it e ; Pro ~1erty is a lready
lzoue d 1, -:1, i!A has tentative l y
r l edgea a llocations .
I
no lia Cemetery
i

~~-=-=-=-
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I
Ci1 arnber l a in
Rea lty Pro j ect
Permit or
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HOUSIN G RES OURCES COM MIT TEE
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C,
! 1 6
An Inven t ory of
LOW AND ME DI UM COS T HOUS I NG IN ATL ANTA
Re c en t ly Comple ~ ~ -~l~men ~
No o Uni t s
New Ex i s t
Item
No o
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Loc a t ion
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Rumor is t h a t a pp .ica ti o n wa ~ wi t cJra,. n L •c aus,2 of jn e i g}1Lorho od
res i stanc e . Nm-i cce k i n13 s i t c s in S . E .I
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Subse qu ent l y Ki t hd r awn Ly a p licant .



·, s am e .Gu i l d e r s t a t e s t ha t c omi,e titor




fi led a r:;p l i cat i o n wi t h FhA c1;,ea<l of
h i m o n sit e he had uncie r o~ t i on .
I
?-.d . , ;;·.; . F-'ii i l i p Al sto1 - Promo ·- -=r .
J i ke Trott~r - ~cgal .
Th i s t oie t hc r wit h c os t of l and makes
to t a l c c s t µ r oh i b i t ive .
�I
NOTES ON R~T~ TE D MATTERS
i
I
I
I
I
I
A.
I
I
I
Si nce con!p iling t h e p y, e v i o us re po rt (F e brua ry 20 , 1 96 7 ), 1 2 add i ti ona l r,rof os a l s hav e be e n mace . To tal ::.s no ,-; 7.l.. liv'. ,C;'/ •~ l' , l S of tL c::
c ons tit uti ng 65 04 u n i t s , wh i c h wer e exp e c te d t o b e a p pr ove ~ , a r e in se r i o us d iff i c u lty du e ~rim~ ri l y to o b j ec tion s f r om va ri cu~ sou r143.215.248.55
l o c a ti o ns .


,ror osals


to
2s
B,
Th e fm; nda.tion f or Coope rative Hous i ng , ,1lli c h d eve l op ed Ea st ,-:y c li Villag e a; icl i s current l y de v e lo;_) i n;; Ca.:J:,rid i e Ssua.re ( Do t h i n Lei-:aJ.:r~ Cout,tj ),
no w ha s a f u l l t i Ti1e r e p r e ;, ent ative i n Atl a nt e. a n d is s e e l, i ni cli er:ts . The y a r c s p onsori ng t i, G 2.0 0 un it !:..ondon 'i' owne Lous e s de vc1 op;-.eri t i n
At l an t a ( It e o f - 5 ).
C.
Sa u l Gr ay ( p a r t ne r in a Co r p o ra ti on ) o wn s 28 0 n ew u nits off Bank h e ad a t Lll.ir i d;;e St ., ·,.;h ich
f or 51 2 add itio n al un i t s.
D.
Propos ed loc a ti on s f o r loi·i cos t hou s ing a re be i ng c oord i nate d ,,:it li t r1 e Pl ann i ng Dep t., wne n i n itially s uLTiiit te d , :for 2.d e c;.u 2.cJ of Cc.,mrr,u:-:i tj, fac i ~i t i~
e xi s ti ng o r p r opose d .
E.
Rer1ab il i ta ti on Ly ~ous i n 5 Code Division of Bu ild i ng Dc?artme11t m1 13ou l e vard i n Iledf ord - P i,,e U. R. Pro j ec t
February 1. 'fr,e U. R . p roj e ct i s st i ll i n s u r ve:r- a 1,d p l a:-rnin.s st2ge .
f .
A l i s t i s a va ilab le i n Eous ing Res o ur c es Comrn i tt e e o f fic e of 1 0 3 un i ts on Bou l e v a r d whic n t h e u ,m e r s i1ave s t cJ.t C:: ci t Ley ·-: i s h to s e ll .
i-18
,.,,,ant s t o se ll ,
T
a po t e ;, ~i a l r:r,v'°': ,.~ "·c'"'t c,, , t~,E: s i te
(a. j:, 1; r-c;;i:-:-,at e l y ? GO u r. i ts i Lvclve c. ) c:0rm::er,ccri
~ur i n g Nove mber; ile cembe r a n d J anuar y , 1 52 9 unit s we r e r ehab i l itat ed by t he ho us i n~ Code Div ; no r e~o r ts jro v i d e d s i r, c e ( It es f - 1 5 ) .
i n Wes t End U, R. Pro j e ct h a ve b e en reh a b i lit a t ed by t he hou s in g Put hority . (It em F- 16 ),
1 2G u ~ i ts
ii .
Deve l opers ,-;il l hs.v e t o provi de a sub s tan t i a l p o r tion of t he proz; r al"'i on s mall scatt e r ed s it e s .
I.
l!o p rop o sal ha s y e t bee n mad e for cons t ru cti on o f un its ( e ven 1 be d r oo~ ) t o r e nt fo r as low a s $ 5 0 , 00 fCr month . T~e Cit y ' s i r eat est ne~d i s in
t r,e $3 0 . 00 - $50 . 00 1,e r mon t h r e nta l r a ng e . Chc: r le s A. :-:ue l l e r Cor:ip a ri i c s of Jon e s b oro is pr omot i ng th e S,;eat E':i.ui t y Pro::_; r a.r.1 ( Fi if, ilist.:n:,d ;-;-,o r te;a 6 e )
•.-hereby t he p urc hase r ea rns th e bulk of h i s do wn pi.:'Ym e nt ti1ro ugr1 cleaE i n;:; , p aint i n[; a nd l a r,dsc o.µ in.; . 1i2.tioi'l a l liomes Corp . of Lafa::,-et-:=e , I1:c . r,l : ced
on t h e Darke t f et . 1, 1 96 7 , a 80 0 S . f . ( O. S . c: i mens i o n s ) ~ -bedr o om , pr e f ab ric a te d , r eass e~b l ~d pane l, si ng l e fam i ~ - ho c se to reta i i ( ~:c.er FE _
221 d ( 2 ) ) fo r abou t $8 , 00 0 . 00 ( e xcl us ive o f l a n d ), p l us a 96 s .r . ( I . S . d i me n s ions ) s t ora~e bu i ld i n~ nan ufa ct u r ed by Arrow i~e tal ?ro~ucts CcrJ ,
Price i n c lude s p l umb in g , e l ec t ricu l , h eati n g un i t , stove f, refri g era tor . ]louse c au be comp l e tely ass e mb l e d i n 8 5 ma n ,,o ur s ; wants au i:i.ori t/ t o
erect i n P.t l &n ta . Est a b l i shmen t o f S?e cia l z on i n~ d i s tr ic t s f or 1 011 c o s t pre fa b s a p;,ea r s to b e t he mos t p l a u sabl e so l uti0n . f.dr i an l!or:ie s Corp . lias
propos ed a pre.fob to re tail fo r about $ 7 ,'.JOO j;J.L .1 s lanu , f ouu da ti o n , clos inl a nd ;;css .i blyt a pp i ng f ee s ,
,J .
( 1 ) l' :_rst
there
( 2 ) Jo~rn
be low
Y. .
Tr,feirmat io!l
/ol'tgaJe Adv i sary Corpora tion i s int c r c st ec: i ·. pro vi d i ng ?u CLJ.gc f i nanc i r.g t o de v e l op e rs , eSi'e c i ally cor,struct i on lcanG ; clair..s t;1a.t
are r:o :'.. e[;a l ur stanc.:l:J fees or hie.den c lia r~es a11c1 no cle ~;os i t re ,1ui r0 cl .
..-ilood f, Co ., Inc . , One '.·/,i l l St ., ;;ew York , i 1; i n.:crC::s t ccl i n f i nari cing Fk\ i-,ro j cc t l oans a 11d also cunstructior, fi ;-:a:ic iu[; on L: A LLl c. ( 3 ),
marke t rate , construct i o n l ~ac s .
i. 3
welcomed as to c hant;e s , aud i t i or,s o r c~eletio1, s i n rr:atcr i al cor;tai11ed
111
t;iis rq:..or t . ( Call 5:!2 -Lt L!u3 , Lxt . 430) .
�i,p ril 20 , 1 % 7
SUi·'.i-:/1F.Y
Estima te Avail&.b l e
l'!o . Uni ts
1 S6 7
1%8
1 969
Firr:1
355 6
(1 3 12 )
( 1928 )
( 316 )
Proba b le
355 3
7109 In_ Sig ht
(1 68 1 )
(1 31 2 )
( 36(J9 )
( 6 72 )
( SSS )
Cat egory
Total ··
Be ing Considered
4569
Goubtful
30 88
Total Prop osed
14 , 766
1 S7 CJ
( 500 )
( 5()0 )
1971
(7 GO )
( 7 00 )
of Hhich 6 , 504 un i ts , p r e vious c ons_i dered li ke ly , are current ly in serio u s d i ff iculty due ;_:ir i mar i ly to
o b j e ction s from va ri ous sources as t o lo c c.'.t i ons .
In add ition , 178 2 un its l1ave been re hab ilitated and 1424 units are p roposed for re hab il i tat i on .
i:I nc l udes 1 1 1f0 units of P . 1-i. + 144 units l eased for P . H.
·-··
0.143.215.248.55 16:32, 29 December 2017 (EST)
~~<>1,J.]_6-,
r-,alcolm D. Jone"'
Su; erviso r of Ins~ e ction s~rvices
Enclosure :
Sur:1~nary of PuLli c
rous i n3 i n /,t l anta
�Aj?ril 20, 1 96 7
SU Hl·iARY OF PU BLIC !:OUSING IN AT LAliTA
Units in operation - fi lle d .
88 74
1140
Uni ts i n Deve l opment s tage, as follo1-1s :
( 650 )
Un i ts off Nc Dan i el St , , in Rawson - Wa s h ingt on U. R. Proj e ct ( scheduled for crnnpl et i on by June 30 ,
(248) by Oct , 1 67
(402 ) by M~rch 1 68 _
( 350 )
Un i ts in Thoma svi l l e U, R , Pro j e ct
( 40 ) l Bedroom
(16 for e l derl y )
( 120 ) 2 Bedroom
( 80 ) 3 Bedroom
( 80 ) 4 Be droom
( 30 ) 5 Be droom
( HO )
1200
300
1
60 )
Now in hahd s of arc hi t e ct . Cannot a dvertise unt il
a out May 15 . 2- 1/ 2 - 3 DO~t hs a dd itional Le fore
construct i on cian start , 12 mont hs , a t least ,
a dd itional for construction ,
Will try to ha ve part deliver ed befor e f i nal.
Units, Per1°y Homes F.:xt e ns ion - Sout~ cf rroct er Creek ,
·
( 78) 3 Bedroom
( li 6 ) 4 Bedroom
Bi ds ope ned t a r ch 7, 1 96 7 .
( 16 ) 5 Bedrooin
Estimat e 18 months to construct .
Units pr eviously allocated - Pr oposed Turn Key ( a ll t e nta ti ve l y pl edged ),
Un it s alloca ted for propos e~ purc has e or l eas e ( On l y possiLility fo r a dditi onal Pu blic Eou sing un its i r1
occupancy by mi ci -1.967; can only be t ur ned over f or Pub li c Hou s i n 6 occ u~ancy a s bec or:ie va c ant ).
": :r,
Units under l e a se i44
.....
( GS u1 it s , I:u r J?hY Apt s .. ; 48 un i ts , TEr.r. e s s ean Cc:w;ions ; 31 un i t s , Si ms ::ado.ox ' s Apt s , a t Cap i to l
a nd Vi nar a , re qu i re r eha b ilitatio n ,)
2640~·,
Tot a l add itiona l pl anne d ( as i n di c ated a bcve )
300(;:':
!iC!w Allocat ion - Propos e d Turn Key ,
an nounced FcLruary 24 .
f,f,j,;ro ved. Ly BC: , of Al c:ermer. Dc c crr.b er 20 , l S66 ,
( 300 t erd:a t i v eiy i,- l ed.:_:;ea )
~Tota l a ddi tiona l un it s ~reje c t ed ( 5640 )
14 , 514
l:.r.cl :
Tot a l Potent i a l
Re: se: rva. t ion uy l i\Ji)
�HOUSING RF.'.SOURC:S S COYJ!'~ITTEE
Topics f or discussion with the 1ayor
May 8, 1967
Surmnary of April 20, Housing Resource s Committee report shows:
1.
Estimate when avai l able
No. Units
1967
1968
1969
Firm
3556
(1312)
(1928)
(316)
Probable
3553
(1681)
(672 )
Category
1970
1971
(500)
(70'J )
(500)
( 700 )
- -7109 I n Sight (1312)
Total
Being Considered
4569
Doubtful
3088
(3609 )
(988)
14, 766 units
Total Proposed
Of the 71 proposals cont ained i n this report, 19 of the best ones
and those which unti l recently were considere d among the most promising
(comprising 6,504 units) have ei ther been turned down or are i n jeopardy .
The princ i pal reasons fo r this, toge tr..er wi tb some suggestions to iJ prove
the situation 1 Kere inc l uded in l etter of April 12 , t o the Chai rman of t he
Housing Resources Committee.
The proble~ areas of greatest concern are
indicated i n the accompani ng l ist.
2.
2ffects of the problem encountered with the NAACP and the I nter- gr oup
Relations Sect ion of HUD i s beginr.ing to be fe l t loc ally i n FctA also.
It is apparent that the position t aken by the I nter-group Relations Section
of ?.U D has been brewing for some time and now has the support ·of HUD LTJ.
ivas hingt o •
Thus far we have depended primarily on private developers to
c ome in with proposed sites.
Unless the current situation can be materially
i mproved s oon, it may behoove the City t o go into t he business of sys temicall y
cicte r mining sites for low cost housing and acquiring the land needed for such
use, by condemnation if necessary, in much the sar1e manner as is dor.e by the
Scnool Board f or needed school .sites.
Of t he 9800 unit goal f or t he first t wo yenrs of the low co st housing
progrc.. , alloc ation breakclmm specif i ed by the ifayor in the Housine Conf'er e ice


.re as f oll01-rs 






-
-

~-
-
�- 2 -
Public Housing
57%
C:
5586 uni t s ( 5640 alloc ated)
Private Develo)ers
(conventio al
30~~
=
2940 units
22ld(3) Non- prof it
13%
=
1274 unit s
Total
9800
It seems that t he 22 l d(3), co- op i s the most popular approach t o the nonpr ofit development and is best for bot h t he City and the purchaser- occ upant .
The prospect i ve home owner gets more for his money in t hi s t ype of home
ownershi p t han in any other manner thus far propose d.
The failur e and
f oreclos i ng r ate nat i onal ly on the s e developments i s negligi bl e .
Thi s
t ype development s· _o uld be abl e t o ac count for a gr eater proporti onate
share of the over al l r e~ui r ement t han t he 13% previ ousl y i ndic ated; i t
should be widel y encouraged .
4.
.An article by Alex Coffin in the Atlanta Constitut i on, April 17,
s tat ed t hat 25% of Atlant a is in vac ant lot s .
I f thi s be t r ue, our most
available resource f or l ow- cost housing, both publ i c and pr ivate , i s on
s catter e d sites.
I nci dentall y such pro cedure woul d create a mi nimu."';;. of
nei ghbor:0.ood ob j ecti on and polit ical di f f i culty.
Bot h privat e devel opers
and the Housing Aut hority s hould be calle d upon to pursue this principl e
t o t he maximum.
5.
The Housing Code i nspections on Boul evard have produced offers f or
sale by ovrriers of at l e ast 103 units .
6.
No adciiti onal sites under t he Public Housi ng le asing progr am have been
&cc_t.:.ir ed since previous
ousi ng Resources Cornin.i t t ee report of Fcbru.s.ry 20 .
It appears that most of the time of the fousing Authority repr esentative
assigned to leasing is t aken up in processing indivi dual t enm~t l eases for
occupancy of the l eased units rather t har1 devot ing t he mai n effort t o
sec~ring leases fo r adoitional units.
The leasing of additional project s
for Public Housing should be pushed.
--- ------
--

- --- - - - -
�- 3 -
7.
Al though rehabilitation of sub - s tandard dwe l l ing units does not pro -
vide additional hous i nb (and such is not i nclude d in Housing Resources
Conmittee tabulation t otal s o_ prospe ctive housing uni ts ) , still t his
feature adas materially t o the availabl e reso urce s of st an dard housing
and tends to reduce t he r equirement for new hous i ng .
Consequent l y it
i s des i rabl e for the Housing Res ources Cammi t t ee to ha•ve cur rent inf or mation on t he extent of rehabi litation and princ i pal areas involve d .
Thi s i nform&tion is cont ai ned i n r outi ne monthl y report s of ac t iviti es
of the Housing Co de Di vision and has been r eques ted several times , but
has not been r ece i ve d since J anuar y and only par tial i nformation was
provided for Decembe r and Janu.s.ry .
There appears t o be no l ogical r e as on
why c cp i e s of the Housing Code Di vision ' s mont hl y rep orts s hould not be
r;}t e,, ':'!;'
(11) f tti
made avai l able t o t he Hous ing Resources Commi ttee.
8. Although s ome of the di ff ic ul ties confront ing t he low- cost hous i ng
progr am may be beyond t he abili t y of the Ci ty, however t he odcome of
zoni ng petit i on numbe r Z-67-33G (deni al of r ezoni ng f rom M-1 t o A-1)
i s t ypic al of situati ons over which the City doe s have control and 1-1her e
r ez oning may have to be accomplished i n order to provide ample locations
f or deve l opment of low- cost housi ng .
9.
There are s t ill 157 singl e family l ots in t he Thomasville Urb2n
Renewal Pro j ect which have not been sol d f or 221 de ve l opment.


t--1ir1imum


.
h ave b een es t abl_is
. h.e d on a 11 of t hes e 7_ov~ s, ranging
.
"
&900 ~vO
prices
1rom
~
!;:.2 100
eacn .
In order to enc ourage development of t hese lots, r eco,1i:- end
t:i.at pr ice reductions be made for multipl e pur chases, as shown on the
attached card and that publicity be gi ven to that effe ct.
our FHA consultant, conc urs wi th this principl e .
~
ivJ:r. Gate s,
The s ugge s ted r educt i on
~as been shown to a r eputabl e and experienced developer who agree s t hat
it is practical and should result i n de vel opment of these lots.

1-,J
to~r/
�- 4 -
10.
In order to keep the interest and confidence of prospecti ve developers
in the low- cost housing field, suge;est t hat a confe r ence be c a lled by the
I·' ayor with the Board of Alder:nen and t hat some of the most interested lowcost housing prrn oters and developers be invited to present their views
and comments on the prograin .
such an opportunity.
Several have indicated that they ,·1 ould welc ome
Suc h meeting might produce s ome he l pful ideas .
In
any event it would provide an opportunity fo r them to stat e their side of
the problem and should s e rve to cle a r tie currently conf used at~nosphere .
Also suggest that the Pr ess be i nvited to such a meeting .
Encls:
Sug e;ested p rice r educ tions on Thorr.e.sville lots
I1emo d ated April 21, 1967
�- - - -- - - - -- - - - - - -~ - --.- - - ----- -- -· ~ - ·
-
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_ ..
.. ._ _ _ ..~_ _ _ _ __ __ , _ , _ _ _
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April 21. 1967
MEMORANDUM
·
To: Mr. Dan E. Sweat, Jr.
Director of Governmental Liaison
F -rom: Malcolm D. Jones
Supervisor of Inspection Services
Pursuant to our brief discussion this morning, the following is
a concise list of major problems currently being encountered in
the low-cost housing program (for more detail see copy of my
letter of April 12 to Cecil Alexander).
1.
Difficulty for developers to find land suitably zoned
and at prices which make low-cost housing development
economically feasible.
2.
NAACP objection to sites proposed in areas which they
. consider occupied predominately by Negroes.
3.
Support of the NAACP position by the Intergroup Relations
Section of the Regional Office of HUD. with apparently the
backing of HUD at the Washingtonllevel.
4.
FHA reluctance to approve locations which they consider
might offer competition to development of Rockdale; also
constant and extreme conservatism against ov er building
in any area until each development is actually tested as
to marketability; plus the ov erflow effect of the difficulty
e x pla ined in 2 and 3 above , although no directive to that
effect appears to have yet actually reached the local FHA
office.
l
�l
....
Mr. Sweat
Page Two
April 21, 1967
5.
Neighborhood resistance by home owners, generally to
apartments going anywhere near them.
6.
Reluctance of the Board of Aldermen to rezone suitable
areas because of neighborhood objections.
7.
Reluctance of the Planning Department to recommend
.
rezoning of necessary areas because of inconsistency with
previously adopted plans in most areas.
8.
Difficulty in keeping developers interested in view of the
combination of the above listed problems.
9.
Slowness of non-profit groups to sponsor projects (a
mandatory provision of the 221 d (3) low-interest rate
program).
Malcolm D. Jones
Supervisor of Inspection Service s
MDJ:'fy
��-------
--
EOUSING RE SOURCE S r ·nH:,;T T',Tl-:
- --
1% 7
---· --. -
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2 S8
i

·•
Program
Location
i

. --~---=.-- ::::._
---·
- -··--· -,.
1:cc~t cf Ho llyv;ocd Ro ad
llorth of Froctcr Creek
Turnkey
Opro s e<l by Eacial Relc.tions SectioE of HUD ir.1 l e tte r
to Jious in~ Aut hority .
Tent a "': i vely den ie d by HAA
r - L
45 0
Harwe ll Road Sout h ~f
B_a_rJ<l-,ead J; i ;:;nwa_y
Turnkey
.,./
Zcned A- 1 . Strong!) opposed by ~AACP in l etter tc Nayar
Al len , Te ntatively den i ed Ly hAA
f- - 3
1 25
Jackson F~rkway , just
~ort h of Ba nkhead
• Turnkey
I
L /,,
Zone d A- 1 . Site not acted on by hlA , bec ause of ob jection
to t ne area b-..r:!·v I r, terproup
Re latior,s Se ct ion of J:lJD
._,
-
EQst of Hollywood Road
£,! orth of I~a Jn o l i E Cer.:etery
' [ :,,:per ir::entc J
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·-
P- 6
i
262
j
!
C-1
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204
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p
FHA
ha s
decl i ned to a -pprove.
-
oc:..::
Lt :i~r i dge Dr ive East
.l .i
404 Si:; e: cial
of Ja ckson Parkway
or Turnkey
BetweeP.. Hollywood Road and
Gun Clu:0 Road , N • ',,i •
Turnkey or
221 L. ( 3 )
Re - zo11 ed rece:nt l y for lo,, cost J-.cus5. r:g 1-ro6 ram. Housing .
Autt;or i t::,, ll'.)t interested i n sit <= ; FBA r: ot s ymp at tetic
towc1.rd it .
Bet wee n ueKalb Avenue and
t'.c Ls r.do:1 at Earnpton Terr .
221 d ( 3 )
Rent Sup l.
Zoned R- 3 .
re - zo ned .
Pl anning Department is dub ious aLout getting
\·:e st of Jack son Parkway
of ? re ctor Creek
221 d ( 3 )
Zoned . - 5 .
Pl2.,m ing Departme nt cool tcv:ard re - zonin~ .
Between Pey ton Roac and Willis
i-i ill Road .:crt h of utoy Creek
Turnkey
221 d ( 3 )
Zoned R- 3. Plann i n2; Dep art ment is reluctant to get r e zonec. . ( Ho usirig I.ut hority is e1.t usiasti c a !.iout sit e )
~
Hav i ng difficulty in ge tting F!-iA ai-)proval.
'
l
C- 5
I
1 50
10 0
n ort ,1
C- 18
C- 21
1 ,7 00
600
221 d ( 2 )
I
Otr,er
'
! :Or' t':-i of
Fairl:.urn r:.oac. ,.
Eoly Far:1ily Ho syital
~urr.key or
Dan)<:1:ead Hi c:hway at
Czbur7l P.oac.
Turnkey
221 d ( 3 )
Zoni1:g c ha ng e r equ ired . Site not acted en by Hf-./ i.-ecaus e
of oiJ ject i on by l r,terc!,rOU? Re lations Se ction of huiJ to
z; e1,era.i are a i n fre liorth1;.·est .
I
I
I
I
!
'I
C- ::2£
175
.
-.
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Sit e not acted on by HM,, becau s e of ol.Jjection to t he area
t:,- Irit er grcu p Re l ations Se ction of liUD .
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ilrowns mi l l Road s out h..
of 0 2. k Dr i ve
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Letwee n Hollywood and
~ol to n Rds .
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I
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48 0
C- L3
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i
s:-. .- .-, .- .r~ s:-. r . , :l '-.i..: U •_lU:-...\..., .L U
Zoned "i".: - ..L' . Si t e not a ct ed O .i! by EAA, becaus e of
c b j e ction t o t he are a by I nte r group P.e lat ior.s Section
of HUD .
. .
221 d ( 3 )
Co - op .
Zoned t-!- 1.
Ob j e c tion fr or:i some r e si den t s of ne i ghbor;-iood .
Re - zon i r1g den i ed /1pr i l 17 , l:.,y Board of Al de r r.ien .
South Side Simp son Road
East c f Hi ghto1·re r Road
2 21 d ( 3 )
Hocdb i nE: at Bou l evard
Dr ive
Turn key
o..1.c. r-
So ut h;..:e st of ~-l il dwood La ke
221 d ( 3 )
Town house s
Zoned R- 3 . Pl a11ni ng j)epart ment i s r e luct ant to ha ve
rez oned because not con si sta n t wi t i1 Boulde r Park Plan .
,#le st of Morelar:d Avenue
221 d ( 3 )
Re j ec t ed by FHA a s not su i tal:le s it e
Bould er Park Drive
.?
221
(j_
0:'
(3)
Str o::g l y op1-os ed by cit i ze;-;s r e s iJing i 1' Col li er Iie i ghts
.
i n prot e s t s to Eoar cl o r- .r.. .Lcermen
. Si te i s not i n
Co l li e r He i p;hts Pl a r; Area ,
.
Housing Aut hority no t i nt e r e s ted in t his si te f or
Turnk ey ; FHA cool t owar d it .
Soutn of Constit utio n Road , SE
Co -op
Cus te r Ave nue East of Chcs ewood
Park
Tur nkey
Pl an ni n.:; De partment ant icipat e s str ong opj_:Josition t o
de velo pment of th i s tra ct fo r l ow cost hou sing .
221 d ( 3 )
App lica tion on one s i t e submi tt e d to FHA. and subs equent l y
wi t hdr awr, ( appa r ently be c ausE:: of ne i ghbor iiOo d ob j e ct ion·);
ot ner app l ic at i on wi t hhe ld ( iJ1°es umabl y f or similar r eason ) .
Ti1is const i tutes app r o:drna t ely 2/3 of t e Ci ty ' s goalf or t i,e f i rs t t1;0 years of t he pro6 r am . Deve lopers who
we re ori g i nal l y ent hus i ast i c a r e becom i ng VCr/ discour aged
and sor:ie are s ugg e s t i ng quitt i ng the proi; r am .
�HOUSING RESOURCES co_r.r ,HTTEE
1204, City Hall
ay
MEMORANDUM TO:
4, 1967


.tr . Collier B. Gladin.,


Planning Engineer
A tract of land (171 acres) located between illis Mi ll Road, s.w.
and Peyton Road, s .w., north of Utoy Creek, has been p~oposed for
_Community Unit Plan development, including housing under 22ld(3) co-op
and perhaps some Turnkey development .
Request that this proposal bo studied by your partment as to
adequacy of Co unity Facilities, especially schools and parks, existing
or pr oposed, and t hat this office be advised as soon as possible as to
your dotermin tions .
Sincerely,
,falcolm D. Jones
Supervisor of Insp cticn Services
cc .:


/.


fr . R. Ear l Lande r
r. Dan E. Sweat, Jr.
�- .. - ;,
..
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CITY HAL
.TLANTA , CA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Arca Code 404
Room 1204, Ci ty Hal l
!VAN A_LE:N, JR., MAYOR
irpri l 2 5, 196 7
R. EARL LANDERS, Admir.istrative Ass'sta;it
MRS. ANN M. tl.OSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison
Dea:- Corn.'.11ittee ?·'.i:e bcr:
.::~::· Chain.an is out of the City, but before leaving town he asked


-;;e to i
1for:n you t~ at the regule.r monttly rr.ee ing for 'i.fay of t:t"e


ixecutive Croup of t i:.e :'ousing .esourc es Co!:hr.ittee will be he l d at
10:00 A. I-'i., Thu:csday, ?fay 4, 1 96 7 i n Co.nmittee Room il2, Second Floor,
City Hall. We hope tnat you can attend.
The Com,, i ttee I s pericdic report on 11 Ir. . ventory of LoH ar.d '~edix:m
Cost Housing in f..tl2.nta, recently completed, in develop:nent and pro~1osed 11
is bej_ng revised now a.ncl wi ll be available fo r the Executive Group meeting.
It shou2.d provi de mate ial for an interestirg discussim as to progr ess
O.L the p rogram during tte first six months of operation of this Cor:i.·:1i ttee .
Tnere are ceveral problem areas on wr ic . . we need your considerc:.tio:r, arid
advice.
Panels w~ich have not yet elected per,1arient Chairmen and Vice-
c· air.neri are urged to do so be£'ore the meel,1.ng and aovise us as soo
as possible, in order ttat those newly elected ir.ay als o be i nvi te
this rr.eeting .
to
Please let us know on the enclosed return adc:ress post card, whetrier
you plan to atter..d .
n the event that you ca:. . not cor.1e, please arra: ~e for
so .1e otter me,. ber of your Panel to attend and advise us on the enclosed
post c a.rd wil.o ,;-:ill represent your Panel at tte r:;.ee tine .
Sincerely,
1'· ale oh. J . jone s
Supervisor of Inspectic . Se··vices
3tcl.
Re tur~ address post card
�MINUTES
/
HOUSING RESOURCES EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
APRIL 6, 1967
Members of the Housing Resources Committee Executive Group met on
Thursday, April 6, 1967, at 10:00 a. m. in City Hall. The following
members were present:
Mr. Cecil A. Alexander, _Chairman
Mr. Lee Burge, Finance Panel
Mrs. Sujette Crank, Social Problems Panel
Mr. Virgil Milton, Business Participation Panel
Mr. Ray Moore, Public Information Panel
Mr. Moreland Smith, Construction and Design Panel
Mr. Charles L. Weltner, Legal Panel
Mr. John Wilson, Non-Profit Funds Panel
The following panels were not represented at the meeting:
Land Acquisition Panel
Public Housing Panel
Mr. Alexander reviewed the general functions of the Housing Resources
Committee and informed the participants of the Housing Resources Committee
Offic e that had been established in the City Hall. He also advised that
Col. Malcolm Jones has been assigned to coordinate the housing program
and Mr. William Gates, as consultant 6n FHA matters, is assisting in the
office one day each week. He announced that the City has also just approved
a secretarial position for this office to be filled as soon as possible.
Mr. Alexander then introduced Mr. M. B. Satterfield, E x ecutive Director
of the Atlanta Housing Authority, who briefed the group on the public
housing program.
Mr. Satterfield report e d on the number of public housing units at the present
time:
1.
There ar e presently 8,874 units with virtually no vacancies.
2.
650 units are under construction at the McDaniel Stre e t Proj ec t .
3.
A bid has b een accepted for 14 0 units extension to the Perry Homes
Project.
�Page Two
4.
350 units in the design stage have been submitted to the Federal Housing
Administration for review. The Housing Authority expects to let bids
on these units this summer.
5.
140 units are under lease under the leasing program.
He pointed out these different projects on a city map to give the Committee
members an idea of the location of this . housing. He stated that some concern
has been expressed for the need of public housing in the eastern quadrant of
the city and explained that the main difficulty is in securing any open land in
this area that would be useable. Developers are being encouraged to consider
this section of the city. He explained that the Atlanta Housing Authority
presently has 4, 200 units reserved (allocated) by the Federal Government.
He then reviewed the different programs available in providing this lowincome housing. These includ e :
1.
Direct construction by the Housing Authority and the Turnkey Program.
2.
Purchase and rehabilitation of older and existing houses.
3.
Leasing by the Housing Authority of standard dwellings.
At this point Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. spoke to the group briefly regarding the
housing program. He said that he was greatly impressed with the interest
being shown in efforts to get more low-income housing underway in the city.
He pointed out, as Mr. Satterfield did, that the main problem he has
encountered is in securing suitable and available locations for these units.
He expressed a desire to see more non-profit sponsors willing to carry
through on a project to construct such housing units.
Col. Malcolm Jones then revi ewe d with the members of the Committee the
various pieces of informational material made available to them today and
brought these reports up to date on changes that have taken place. _ He also
pointed out the different proposed projects on a map of the city so the
members might see th e distribution of the units.
The following revisions were reported in the February 20, 1967, report:
�Page Three
No. Units
1967
Firm
3092
(1226)
Probable
4685
Total
7777
Categor1y
Under Consideration
3405
Doubtful
2968
Total
(1226)
Estimate When Available
1970
1968
1969
1971
( 1550)
(316)
(2573)
(912)
(500)
(700)
(4123)
(1228)
(500)
(700)
14, 150
·Col. Jones also distributed a report concerning the problem areas of the
program. Currently there are 4, 900 units in all categories which are facing
serious difficulties for various reasons. This report was to advise the
Committee of the situations ex is ting.
The Chairman next recommended and requested the following to the Committee:
1.
A monthly meeting date.
the month at 10:00 a. m.
2.
He requested all panels to submit the names of their Chairmen and
Vice Chairmen as soon as possible.
3.
He reques ted th e Legal Panel to investigate th e feasibility of amending
and broadening F ederal l egislati on concerning financial assistance to
home owners in urban renewal and cod e enforcement areas whose homes
are cond emned. At pres ent, home owners in urb an ren ewal areas and
Federal approved code enforcement areas are the only persons eligible
for such assistance. He feels that such assistance should be city-wide.
4.
Mr. Al exander asked that encouragement be given to neighboring
commw1ities to have good Workable Programs. Atlanta's program
is in good order but this does not apply to all other communities in
Metropolitan Atlanta.
5.
He asked the Legal Panel to investigate the State t ax laws. He feels the
present tax laws are favorable to retention and creation of slums.
It was established for the first Thursday of
�Page Four
6.
He announced that the Finance and Non-Profit Panels have been combined.
7.
He advised that he and Mr. Lee Burge are looking into the need for
formation of a Housing Development Corporation. Suggestion was made
that the Chamber of C ommerce be asked to look into the matter and to
assist.
8.
At the present time he is trying to. get some information from the City
Planning Department regarding the available land in the city. However,
it will be some time before this information is complete.
9.
He expressed his concern over the difficulties that are being encountered
in securing approval of sites. This is caused by various reasons, as
indicated in the special report distributed by Col. Jones. He feels
that this is becoming a very serious problem and that something must
be done as soon as possible to try to provide solutions to these :problems.
10.
The Committee and office staff have been approached many times by
developers requesting that they refer them to lawyers and archite cts
familiar with the housing programs. The professional organizations of
thes e groups have been asked to supply the Housing Resources Office
with a list of those persons familiar with and interested in this field
and these lists will be furnished the develop e rs upon request.
11.
He recommended to the Construction Panel that they take under advisement the, various codes of the City of Atlanta and other agencies to
det ermine if such codes are practical and feasible.
12.
He requested assistance from the Social Pr oblems Panel in providing
solutions to the many problems being created in the location of these
housing units.
13.
There are s eve ral areas of the city that have not been touched for
additional low cost housing and he feels a much more aggr e ssive program is n ee ded. He referred to such areas as Vine City and
Mechanicsville.
14.
He asked th e members to consider the problem of r e location of p eople
displaced w hil e units are under construction and to come up w ith some
�Page Five
workable way to build thes e units without completely disrupting the
neighborhood.
15.
He proposed that a task force be set up in the areas of prime
consideration to improve communications with the residents.
After a short discussion period the meeting was adjourned at 11:45 a. m.
Respectfully submitted,
~~- d}e-cL !-~~ , ·,: ,--;
........ ~ ,,.,,,. -. -·;.""'~~·
'
'
Malcolm D. Jone
Supervisor of ii<s'pection Services
Director
MDJ:fy
�MINUTES
HOUSING RESOURCES EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
APRIL 6, 1967
Members of the Housing Resources Com1nitte e E x ecutive Group m e t on
Thursday, April 6, 1967, at 10:00 a, m. in City Hall. The follow ing
members w ere present:
Mr. Cecil A. Alexander, Chairman
Mr. Lee Burge, Finance Panel
Mrs. Sujette Crank, Social Problems Panel
Mr. Virgil Milton, Business Participation Panel
Mr. Ray Moore, Public Information Panel
Mr. Moreland Smith, Construction and Design Panel
Mr. Charles L. Weltner, Legal Panel
Mr. John Wilson, Non-Profit Funds Panel
The follow ing panels were not represented at the meeting:
Land Acquisition Panel
Public Housing Panel
Mr . Ale x ander revie w ed the general functions of the Housing Resources
Committe e and informe d the participants of the Housing Resources Committee
Office that had b e en established in th e City Hall. He also advised that
Col. Malcolm Jon e s has b e en assigne d to coordinate th e housing program
and Mr. William Gates, as consultant on FHA matters, is assisting in th e
office one day each week. He announced that 'the City has also just approved
a secretarial position for this office to be fill e d as soon as possibl e .
Mr. Al exand e r th e n introduced Mr. M. B. Satt e rfi e ld, E x ecutive Dir e ctor
of the Atlanta Housing Aut hority, who brie f e d th e group on the public
housing program.
Mr. S a tterfie ld r e porte d on the numb e r of public housing units at the pr e sent
time:
1.
Ther e ar e pr e s e ntly 8, 8 74 units w ith virtually no vacancie s .
2.
650 u n its a re unde r con struction a t th e McD a niel Str eet Proj e ct.
3.
A bid has b ee n a c ce pte d for 140 unit s ext e nsion to th e P erry H ome s
P r oj ect .
�Page Two
4.
350 units in the design stage have been submitted to the Federal Housing
Administration for review. The Housing Authority expects to let bids
on these units this summer.
5.
140 units are under lease under the leasing program.
He pointed out these different projects on a city map to give the Committee
members an idea of the location of this housing. He stated that some concern
has been expressed for the need of public housing in the eastern quadrant of
the city and explained that the main difficulty is in securing any open land in
this area that would be u s eable . Developers are being encourag e d to consider
this section of the city. He explained that the Atlanta Housing Authority
presently has 4, 200 units reserved (allocated) by the Federal Government.
He then reviewed the different programs available in providing this lowincome housing. These include:
1.
Direct construction by the Housing Authority and the Turnkey Program.
2.
Purchase and rehabilitation of older and existing houses.
3.
Leasing by the Housing Authority of standard dwellings.
At this point Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. spoke to the gr o up brie fly r ega rding the
housing program. He said that he was greatly impressed with the interest
being shown in efforts to get more low-income housing underway in the city.
He pointe d out, as Mr. Satterfie ld did, that the main problem he has
encountered is in securing suitabl e and avaiiabl e locations for th e se units.
He expr e ssed a desir e to see more non-profit spon s or s willing t o c a rry
through on a proj e ct to con s truct such hous ing unit s :
Col. Malcolm Jones then reviewed with the members of the Committe e the
various pieces of informational material made available t o them today a nd
brought the s e r e ports up to d a t e on changes that have t a k e n plac e . H e also
pointe d o ut th e diffe r ent pr o p ose d proj ec t s on a m a p of the city so the
me m b e r s might see the di s tribution of the u n its .
The follow ing revisions w ere r e ported in the F e bruary 20, 1967, report:
�Page Three
No. Units
1967
Firm
3092
(1226)
Probable
4685
Total
7777
Categor1y
Under Consideration
3405
Doubtful
2968
Total
{1226)
Estimate When Available
1968
1970
1969
1971
(1550)
(316)
(257 3)
(912)
(500)
(700)
(4123)
(1228)
(500)
(700)
14, 150
Col. Jones also distributed a report concerning the problem areas of the
program. Currently there are 4, 900 units in all categories which are facing
serious difficulties for various r e asons. This report was to advise the
Committee of the situations existing.
The Chairman n ext recommende d and reques ted the following to the Committee:
It was established for the first Thursday of
1.
A monthly meeting date.
the month at 10:00 a. m.
2.
He requested all panels to submit the names of their Chairmen and
Vice Chairmen as soon as possible.
3.
He requested the Legal P ane l to inv es tigate the feasibility of amending
and broad ening Federal l egislation concerning financial assistance to
home owners in urban renewal and code enforcement areas whose homes
are condemned. At pr esent, home owners in urban renewal areas and
Federal approved code enforcement areas are th e only persons eligible
for such assistance. He feels that such assistance should be city-wide.
4.
Mr. Ale xander asked that encouragement be given to neighboring
communities to have good Workable Programs. Atlanta 1 s program
is in good order but this does not apply to all other communities in
Metropolitan Atlanta.
5.
He asked the L egal Panel to investigate the State tax law s. He feels the
pre sent tax laws are favorable to retention and creation of slums.
�r
Page Four
6.
He announced that the Finance and Non-Profit Panels have been combined.
7.
He advised that he and Mr. Lee Burge are looking into the need for
formation of a Housing Development Corporation. Suggestion was made
that the Chamb er of Commerce be asked to look into the matter and to
assist.
8.
At the present time he is trying to get some information from the City
Planning Department regarding the available land in the city. H owever ,
it will be some time before this information is complete.
9.
He expressed his concern over the difficulties that are b e ing encountered
in securing approval of sites. This is caused by various reasons, as
indicated in the special report distributed by Col. Jones. He feels
that this is becoming a very serious problem and that something must
be done as soon as possible to try to provide solutions to these problems.
10.
The Committee and office staff have been approached many times by
developers requesting that they refer them to lawyers and architects
familiar with the housing programs. The professional organizations of
these groups have been asked to supply the Housing Resources Office
with a list of those persons familiar with and interested in this field
and these lists will be furnished the developers upon request .
11.
He recommended to the Construction Panel that they take under advisement the various codes of the City of Atlanta and other agencies to
determine if such codes are practical ai:-i.d feasible.
12.
He requested assistance from the Social Problems Panel in providing
solutions to the many problems being created in the location of these
housing units.
13.
There are several areas of the city that have not been touched for
additional low cost housing and he feels a much more aggressive program is needed. He referred to such areas as Vine City and
Mechanics ville.
14.
He asked the members to consider the problem of relocation of people
displaced while units are under construction and to come up with some
�Page Five
workable way to build these units without completely disrupting the
neighborhood.
15.
He proposed that a task force be set up in the areas of prime
consideration to improve communications with the residents.
After a short discussion period the meeting was adjourned at 11:45 a. m.
Respectfully submitted,
><l
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.
Malcolm D. J' ·q 1:7
Supervisor of inspection Services
Director
MDJ:fy
�W USING RESOURCES CO·t1ITTEE
Rco, 1204, City Hall
April
14, 1967
Hr .. 1' .. B. Satterfield, Executive Director
Hcusing Authority o~ the City of Atlanta
824 Hurt Bllilding
Atlanta., Georgis 3030.3
Dea:r .Sat =
tter.ipting to coord.1l1 te oe~ntial Co unity Facilities
nt of low-cost housing under the accelerated fi~ ye
The City is
with develo
progr

I
ve been r quested to refer all proposal ~ hen .first made, for
thi:s typ of
volopnent to the Planning Depo.r -ent (Collier Gladin)
£or co
sehool
oon a
ideration a to adequacy of C unity F ollit~e, especially
d po.r I and fol" report back thereon to this Com:nitte a
p


d.ble •


.In rn.any in tances wher
Turnkey devalopnont 1
oonte plated, the
proposed location
re taken dir ct to your gency 'b6.f'oro this oftic
is a.dvi ed about the • In such in tone a I
ll ppr ciate
1ng
intor d s oarly
pr~tieabl a to tho propos d loo tions and
n ber of units con pl ted,. in order that tha P :ning D p
ent
ay be call d upon to con idor C
unity Faciliti.ea 1 existing or propo d, ~ allabl to ser th develo
t.
inc
l1't
lcol.m. D. Jone
upe vi OJ" of I ns otion ' rvie
CCI
v:.r. R•
�HOusrno ru;; -oURCES CO&tIT'rEE
1204, Cit y Hall
April 14, 1967
.:MORANDUM TO :
.Ir . Collier B. Gladin,
Planning Engineer
The tract of land ( pproximatel y 20 acres ) located vest of Brown ' s
Mill Road, S. E., South of Oak Drive; S. E. and just North of the inter.
section or Macedoni Rod, S.E. ith Brown ' s Mill Road, s.E. (Zoning
petition Z-67-33-0) h s been ropoaed for housing develop ent under
221 d(J) eo~op (ea.lea housing .
Request that this proposal be considered by your Department ae to
adequaoy of Community Facilities ., especi lly schools d p rks, existing
or proposed, and that this office be advised s soon as possibl as to
your determinations .
Sincerely.,
Malcolm D. Jone
~upervi or of Inspection .;ervio
oct Vur . R.
nrl Land re
B
�HOUSING RE!,OURCES
cm HTTEE
1204, City Hall
April
MEMORANDUM TO:
14, 196 7
Mr . Collier B. Gladin,
Planning Engineer
The tract of land (59 acres) leoated on the \.Jest side of Fairburn
Road, Ni . , just orth of Holy Family Hospital, (Zoning petition
Z..67-47-E) has bean proposed for housing development under 22ld(J) .
Request that t his.proposal be considered by your Department as to
adequacy of Community Facilities , especially schools and parks , existing
or proposed, and that this office be advised as soon as possible as to
your determinatio •
Sincerel y,
colm D. Jones
Supervisor of Inspection Services
ee i
V-
Mr.- R. Earl Landers
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1
HOUSING RESOURCES COMMITTEE
April 6, 1967
I
Problem Areas
Item
No.
No.
Units
24
250
19
450
7
152
West of Hollywood Road
North of Proctor Creek
Harwell Road South of
Bankhead Highway
South Side Simpson Road
East of Hightower Road
We st of Moreland A venue
South of Constitution Road, SE
East of Hollywood Road
North of Magnolia Cemetery
Off Etheridge Drive East of
Jackson Parkway
Woodbine at Boulevard
Drive
Off Boulder Park Drive
Southwest of Wildwood Lake
Between Hollywood Road and
Gun Club Road, N. w.
I
I
I
,
46
160
8
156
9
262
20
62
28
364
33
204
44
100
34
150
51
280
Location
West of Jackson Parkway
North of Proctor Creek
Between DeKalb Avenue
and McLendon at Hampton
Terrace
Custer Avenue East of
Chosewood Park
Turnkey
Turnkey
221 d (3) ?
221 d (3)
Co-op
221 d (3)
Experimental
404 Special
or Turnkey
·Turnkey or
221 d (3)
221 d (3)
Town Houses
Turnkey or
221 d (3)
1 , 700
4 ,900
--·--
Be tween Peyton Road and
Willis Mill Road North of
Utoy Creek
Principal Difficulty
Opposed by Racial Relations Section of HUD in letter
to Housing Authority
Strongly opposed by NAACP in letter to Mayor Allen
Strongly opposed by citizens residing in Collier Heights
by protests to Board of Aldermen
. Rejected by FHA as not suitable site
FHA is reluctant to approve
Having difficulty in getting FHA approval
221 d (3)
Housing Authority not interested in this site; FHA cool
toward it
Zoned R-3, Planning Department is reluctant to have
re-zoned
Re-zoned recently for low cost housing program.
Housing Authority not interested in site; FHA not
sympathetic toward it.
Zoned R-5. Planning Department cool toward re-zoning
221 d (3)
Rent. Supl.
Zoned R-3. Planning Department
getting re-zoned
Turnkey
Planning Department anticipates strong opposition to
development of this tract
Application on one site submitted to FHA and subsequently
withdrawn (understand because of neighborhood objection);
other application w ithheld (pr e sumably for similar reason)
Zoned R-3, Planning Departme nt is reluctant to get rezoned (Housing Authority is enthusiastic about site)
221 d (3)
250
360
Tot a l
Program
Turnkey
221 d (3)
221 d (2)
Other
15
dubious about
This constitutes 1/2 of City 1 s goal for first t w o years of
program, Promoters and de v elopers, w ho were originally
en thus ias tic , are becomine verv dis couraeed.
�HOUS ING liE SOlJHCl~S COM1'1ITri<-; lE
Summary of Propo s als
(Report of February 20, 1967 up dated to April 6, 1967)
Est~nate When Available
Cate s ory
Firm
No. Units
3092
1967
(1226 )
Probable
Total
(1226)
Under Consideration
3405
Doubtful
2968
Total
14,150
1968
1970
(1 550 )
(316 )
(2573)
(912)
(Li23) (1228}
1971
(500) . (700)
(500)
(7 00)
Proposed, of which 4900 (all categories) are
currently· facing se rious problems.
�F bru ry 15, 1967
• .M. D vi
Pre id at, Atl :ta C
Dr.
pt r
NAACP
859 - 1/2 Hunter Street, N. W.
Atlaot , Ceor
D
r D%.
vie:
rec 1
I
uld e
nd.
of your
r •
e t that yo
be
, to
•••
C
Thi•
1 V 1
Si
tter to le: i•
Uer
d will be fully auppor
erely,
AU
, Jr.
IAJr:
c;c:
r. Ce ll A,....i11a1o11-1.UJr
r.hvin&
.e Natto
t

�Finch Alexander Barnes Rothschild & Paschal
March 30, 1967
The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor
City of Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgia
Re:
"Jammed City Hall"
Dear Ivan:
Any help or guidance you could give us on developing this
commission would be greatly appreciated .
Sincerely,
~
Cecil A. Alexander
jd
James H,Finch, f, A,/,A,
Geel/ A. Alnander, F.A,I.A,
MIiier 0, Barnes, A.I.A.
Bernard B. Rothschild, F.A.I.A. F.C.S.I.
Caraker 0. Paschal, A.I.A,
ASSOCIATES
Robert 0, Ah/strand, R.A.
Sidney S. Daniell, R,A.
lraGrayboff
Thomas G.Joyce, A.I.A.
H, King McCain, N.S.P.E.
J J. McDonough
Architects Engineers- Interior Designers
William L Pulgram, A.I.A.
44 Broad Street N.W. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Phone 688-3313
JohnStelnichen. A.I.A.
Terry-Hutchens Bldg., Huntsville, Ala. 35801 Phone 539-9648
�-
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~
,J . -
C I T Y H ALL
January 25, 196 7
_TLANrf'A , CA. 30303
Tel. 522 -44 63 /\rea Code 404
!VAN ALL EN, J R. , MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS , Admin istrative Assistan t
MRS . ANN M. MOSES , Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director cf Governmenta l Lia ison
Mr. Mill s B. L ane, Jr . , P res ident
T he Citizens an d Southe rn National Bank
P. 0. Box 4899
Atlanta, G eorgia 30303
D ear Mills :
As you know a Housing Resources Co mmittee ha s be e n forme d
for the purpose of provi ding low cos t ho u sing in the C ity o f
A t lanta . W e a r e pursuing this to r e li eve the a cute shor tage
in hous i ng in this category wh ich has be e n e m phas ized by t he
C IP study r ec(;!ntly completed .
O ne of the major keys to the problem i s the financing o f the
ne eded uni ts . Your pres ence on the C ommitte e w ould lend i t
greatly needed pres ti ge and support. May we ask you to serve
and, in addition, to appoint some member of your staff to take
an active rol e w ith the c ommittee?
C e cil Ale xande r, as C hair man, i s ·calling an o r ganiz ational
meeting on Tuesday, F ebruary 14 , 196 7, 10 : 00 a . m. at the
City Hall. I hope you w ill be ab l e to acce pt m emb e rship on
the Financial Panel of the overall Committee and will attend
the meeting.
Cordially ,
Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor
IAJr:fy
�. - .. ,/
' - I

_1
.. · ..
....
-~-· ·C I TY H A L L
A TLANTA. G A. 3 0303
Tel. 522- 4463 Area Cod e ,; 04
J a nua ry 25, 19 6 7
IVAN ALLE N, JR., MAYOR
R. EAR L LANDERS , Admin ist ra ti ve Assis t ant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Exec ut i ve Secr et ar y
DAN E. SY/EAT, JR. , Di rec t or of Governm ental Li aison
M r . A . H . S te r ne , Pr es i d ent
Th e Tr us t C on1pany of G eor g ia
3 6 E dg ewo o d A venu e , N . E .
Atlanta , G e orgi a
D e a r B i ll y :
As y ou know a H ousing R eso urc e s Cornn i ttee ha s be e n forme d
fo r t he p ur pose of provi d i n g low c ost hous i ng i n t h e C ity o f
Atl a nta . W e a r e purs u i ng t his t o r eli eve th e a cute s ho r t age
i n h o u s i ng in this c atego r y w hich h a s been e mph a s i z ed by t he
CIP s t u dy r e c ently c ompl e t e d .
On e of th e maj o r keys t o the prob l e m i s the financing of the
n ee d e d units . Y o ur pr ese n c e o n the C o m m.ittee would l end it
g r eatly needed pr e sti g e and sup po rt. May we ask you to ser v e
a nd, in a ddit i on, to app o i nt some memb e r o f y our sta ff t o take
a n activ e r ole with t h e C omm i tte e ? G e or g e Kenne dy, b e caus e
of his p a st e x pe rience , WOD;ld be a m o st we lcome appointe e.
C cil Al cxand r , a s Ch a i rman, i s call ing an or ganizati onal
mee ting on Tue sday , F e brua r y 14, 19 6 7 , 10: 00 a . m . at the
City Hal l. I hope y o u w i ll b e able to a cc e pt m e mb e r s hip on
t h e Fin a n cial P anel of the o v e r a ll C ommi ttee and w ill a ttend
the meeti ng .
C ordi ally ,
Ivan All e n , Jr.
Mayor
IAJr:fy
�- - - - -- - ----- -----·--
I .- .
_r-:__~ - . .-- .c-:
C I TY HALL
Jan u a ry 25, 19 6 7
ATLA N TA, GA . 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
IVAN AL LE N, J R. , MAYOR
R. EAR L LANDERS , Admini strat ive Assis t ant
MRS . ANN M. MOSES, Exec ut ive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Directo r of Governme nta l Li aiso n
M r . J a mes D. R obinson, Jr .
Chairman of the Board
T he First N a tional Bank of A tlan ta
P. 0. Box 4148
A tl anta , G e orgia
D e ar J im :
A s y ou k now a Housin g R e s our ce s C ommi ttee has be e n f or me d
for th e purpos e of providing low c ost housin g in the City of
Atl a nt a . We are pursuin g this t o rel i eve t h e a cute shor tage
i n h ou s i ng in this c a t egory which has b een e mphas iz ed b y the
CIP s t u d y r e c e ntly completed .
O ne of t he maj or k e ys to the problem i s the f i nancing o f the
n eeded units . Yo u r pr e s ence on the C ommittee w o uld l end i t
g r eatly needed p r es ti ge and supp ort. May we ask you to serve
and, i n a d dition , to appo i nt some member of yo ur staff to take
an a ctive r ol e w ith the C ommi ttee?
" Bo " W h itman, th r o u gh
h i s i n t e r e s t in urb an probl ems, woul d b e a most wel come
appo intee .
C ecil Alexander , as C hairman, is calling an organizational
meeting on Tues da y, F ebruary 14, 196 7 , 10 : 0 0 a . m. at the
City Hall . I h ope you w i ll be able to accept m emb er s hip on
the Financial P a n e l of th e overall Committee an d w i ll attend
th e m eetin g .
Cor d i ally ,
Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor
IAJr:fy
�...., - ,.__, _.
C ITY HALL
January 25, 196 7
ATLANTA , G A . 30303
Tel. 522-4 463 Arca Code ~04
IVAN ALLEN, JR ., MAYO R
R. EARL LA NDERS, Adm inistrative Assist ant
MRS. ANN M. MO SES, Executi ve Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR ., Direc tor of Governmental Liaiso n
M r. J o s e ph E. Birnie, Pr esident
The N a tion a l Bank of Geor g i a
34 P e achtree Str e et, N . W .
Atl a nta , G eor g i a 30303
D ea r J oe :
As you know a Housing R e s ource s C o mrn i tt e e has been f or me d
for the purpos e of provi d i ng low c ost h ous i ng in th e City of
Atl anta . We ar e pursuing thi s to re lieve the a cute shor tage
in h ousin g i n thi s c ategor y w hich h a s b e en empha siz e d by the
CIP stu d y r e c e n t ly co1n pl eted .
O ne of the m a jor ke ys to the probl e m i s the finan cing o f th e
need e d uni ts . Your pr e s enc e on the C omm.ittee w o u ld l end i t
g r eatl y needed pr e sti g e and support. May w e a s k y ou to s erve
and , i n a d d i tion , to a ppo int s o me m e mb e r o f y o ur s taff to t ake
a n a ctive ro le w ith t h e c ommitte e?
C e c i l Alexa nde r, as C hai r m an , is c a llin g a n o r g aniz ati onal
meetin g on Tue sday, F e br uary 14, 19 6 7 , 10 : 00 a . m . at the
Cit y Hall. I hop e y ou w i ll be a bl e t o a c c e pt m e 1nbe r shi p on
the Finan cia l Pane l of th e ove r all C ommi ttee an d w ill a t tend
the m ee tin g .
C ordially,
I van A ll e n, Jr.
M a y or
IAJr: f y
�----- .
- t Cj"'I
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..,
-
~
--- . . . -- ~.·
.;
C ITY HALL
Janua r y 2 5, 1967
ATLANTA , GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 /Hea Cod e 404
IVAN ALLEN , J R. , MAYOR
R. EARL L/,NDERS, Adm ini st rative Ass is t ant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Exec ut ive Secretar y
DANE. SWEAT, JR. , Di r ector of Governmental Lia ison
Mr . Gordon Jon e s , President
Fulton a tional Bank of Atlanta
5 5 Marietta Street, N . W .
Atlanta , G eorgia
D ear G ordon :
As you know a Housing R esource s Committ ee has be en formed
for the purpose of p r oviding low c ost housing in the C ity of
Atl a nta . We are pursuing this t o r elieve the ac u te shorta ge
in housing in this category whi ch has been emphasized by the
C IP study r e cently compl eted .
One of the major keys to the prob l e m i s the financing of the
needed units . Your pres en c e on th e C ommi tt e e w ould l end it
greatly need e d prestige and support. May we ask you to serve
and, in addition, to appoint some member of yo u r staff to take
an active role with th e C on-nnittee?
Cecil Alexander , as Chairman , is c a llil1g an organizational
meeting on Tuesday, Feb ruary 14, 1967, 10:00 a. m. at the
City Hall. I hope you w ill b e able to accept membership on
the Financial Pane l o f th e overall Committee and will attend
the meeting.
Cordially,
Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor
IAJr:fy
�HOUSING RESOURCES COMHI TI'EE
February 7, 1967
Hr . Francis Gilmer e ., Pr esi dent
Spor t smen ' s Countr y Cl ub
P. O. Box 4715
At l anta, Georgi a 30302
Dear
• Gil.mere :
Mayor Al len, who is currently out of town , has asked me to
r epl y to your recent l etter to him, Re : Crash Progr am and Urban
Develop ent .
I wish t o thank you on behal f of t h Hayor f or your very
interest ing l etter and offer t o a sist in eli.min ting sl ums and
providing ulti-f amil y hous ing and urban devalopment in t he City
ot: Atlant .
Al so your e ff or ts t o br ing the VI Pan- American Games to
Atlanta is t imel y and of much interest.
As you know, tayor All n hos r ec ntly established the lou ing
Resources Com ai t tee and appoint ed Ceoi l A. Alexander as Chairman .
I am now devot ing full tiin , i n
staf f c apaci t y, to th Commi t t ee .
preci a.te your interest in the housin5 development proet·am
and hope that you will k ep us advi ed as to your f uture plans tmd
activities 1n this fiel d.
Very truly yours,
1a.lcolm .D. Jones
Superviaor of Inspecti on 8ervices
cc: 1' yor Allen
ell A. A1 ander
�F e bruary 7, 1967
Mr. John B . Chapman
Chairman, Taxation and
Legislation Committee
A tlanta Real Estate Board
H ea l ey Building
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mr. Cbapm.an:
May I acknowledge receipt of your letter to Mayor
Allen. He i out of the city, but it will be brought
to his attention upon hi r turn.
The matter hich you discus ed and al o brought
to the ttention of Rodney Cook, i being considered
by the Mayor' Houaing Re ource Committee. With
the combin d effort of everal committe , w have
good hope to et the nee,
ry enforcement provision •
Sincer ly.,
M r .. Ann Mo e
E xecutive S ecre
AM/ e
ry
�OFFICERS "
C . D. LEBEY, JR., PRESIDENT
MARION BLACKWELL. JR., VICE PRESIDENT
J . MARION CRAIN, V ICE PRESIDENT
NOEL C . TURNER, VICE PRESIDENT
J , ADAIR McCORD, TREASURER
A . H. STURGESS. JR.. SECRETAR Y
DIRECTORS
OM·t¢W·S--1---l•l-il·iiil•i¢M•l=ill-l=t·i!ii•l;i-._D
HEALEY
BUILDING
MRS. TOMMIE JACKSON, EXECUTI VE SECRETARY
February 6, 1967
HENRY C . BALDWIN
FRANK CARTER
THOMAS V. C A UBLE
ROY A . DORS EY
GEORGE A . EW ING
EMERSON HOLLEMAN
C . D . LEBEY. JR..
HAR RY NORMAN , J R.,
FRANK C . OW ENS, JR.,
JAMES L. STARNES
S TEW ART W IGHT
W ARD WIGHT
Hon. Ivan Allen, Mayor
City of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Ivan:
I bring to your attention an article in the Sunday Atlanta J o urnal-Constitution
about the r e nt strike against the Public Housing Project in St. Louis b e cause
of th e deplorabl e condition the property is in. The article r e lat e d that the
proj e ct w as 12 y e ars old and the elevators are out of order, ther e is g ar b ag e
in th e hallway and e x treme valdalism, most of which is done by childr e n who
live in th e proj e ct and who are fr o m fatherl e ss famili e s. Ther e w as also r e porte d cans , bottl e s and garbage in th e yards. The articl e r e p ~Hte d f urther
that the s e p e opl e propose to continue this "r e nt strike " until this depl o rabl e
con dition is cor re cte d b y th e City of St. L p uis b y pro v iding mor e p o li ce protection and b e tter janito~l s e r v ic e . It s eems to m e that some o f th e s e probl e ms
coul d b e sol ve d by b e tt e r hous ekee ping on th e part of th e tenants inste ad of ex p e ctin g th e g o ver nm e ntal authority to loo k aft e r the m.
I h ave jus t written a l e tt er t o R odn e y C ook re lating to p o ss i bl e l e gi s l atio n
a g ainst t e nants o f w illful d e struction to p ro p e rty. It s eems to m e that now
is t h e ti m e t o re quir e th e te nants to s ho w re sponsibi lity and a ppr e c ia tion fo r
t h e i r own p r op e rty a s well as th e prop er ty of o t h er s . W e w ill b e happy to
d o a ny thing we c an t o h e l p thi s t ype of l egislation throug h th e p r oper chane l s.
K i nd regard s , and I l ook forw a rd t o h e arin g yo u s p eak t o o u r Boar d on
the 15th .
JBC tj
�r-==- - - ---=---,,--....c- ~ --=-~·-:..·:=-=--=--=-='-·'--'-=-=·-=-==»--~ ~==143.215.248.55- - - -- - -- ·- -·--- -~- - - '
£ ,c;,-,/ Len c/.t:.¥8
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CITY HALL
ATLANTA. GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison
January 10, 1967
Mr. Ray Moore
News Director
WSB-TV
1601 West Peachtree Street, N E-.
Atlanta, Georgia 30309
.
Dear Mr. Moore:
We wish to thank you for your acceptance of our
recent invitation to serve on the Housing Resources
Committee, and to confirm your appointment by the
Mayor as a member .of this Committee.
Your ex perience and advice in this field will be
most welcomed and I am sure will be very helpful
to the program .
As soon as we have Heard from other nominees, an
organi zational meeting will be called to acquaint
Committee members with the program and to assign
specific missions to various groups of the Committee.
Alexander, Chairman
Resources Committee
CAA: eo

�Finch Alexander Barnes Rothschild & Paschal
January 9, 1967
The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor
City of Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Ivan:
Enclosed is a resume of Bill Gate ' s career . He has volunteered to
serve our Housing Resources Committee on a one day per week basis
as adviser on F.H.A . matters. May I suggest t he following announcement?
Mayor Ivan Allenra~d Cecil A. Alexander, Chairman of Atlanta's Hous ing
Resources Committee, announce the appointment of Mr . Wi lliam W. Gates
as Special Adviser to the Housing Resources Committee .
He will be avai lable from 9:00 A. M. to 4:00 P.M. every Thursday in
the office of the Committee on the twelfth f loor of the City Hall .
Mr . Gates recently retired after thirty years of service with the
Federal Housing Adminis tration serving successively as Architectural
Inspector, Appraiser, Chief Appraiser, Chief Underwriter, General
Underwriting Supervisor and General Underwriting Adviser . J us t prior
to retirement he served as Chi ef Underwriter i n Atlanta for a period
of six years. He has received the Distinguished Service Award of the
Federal Housing Administration, the highest civilian award available
from the Department of Housing and Urban Deve lopment ., p
If you a r e in agreement, pl ease a nnounce this appointment as soon as
convenient.
Sincer el y ,
~~
James H. Finch, f,A,/.A,
Cecil A. Alexander, f,A,/,A,
Ceci l A. Alexander
MIiier 0. Barnes, A.I.A,
Bernard 8, Rothschild, F.A.I.A. F
.c.s.i"b
Caraker 0. Paschal, A.l.A.
ASSOCIATES
Robert D, Ahls1raod, R,A,
SidneyS, Daniell, R,A,
cc:
Dr.
Dr.
Mr.
Mr.
Sanford s. Atwood
Ben jamin E. Mays
Ma lcolm D. Jones
Dan E . Sweat, Jr .
lra Grayboff
Thomas G. JoyC1!, A.I.A.
H. KingMcCain, N.S.P.E.
Architects Engineers Interior Designers
J.J. McDonough
William L. Pulgram, A.I.A.
44 Broad Street N.W. Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Phone 688-3313
John Steinichen, A.I.A.
Terry-Hutchens Bldg, Huntsville, Ala. 35801 Phone 539-9648
{
�LL
~
• GATES
3407 O wELL RD. 1 N, ...,. ,
ATLAl-lTA, GEORGIA 30305.
BO
CE:
TBCHNICAL £·f!!~;!~
,
71) •

�233

�HOUSING RESOURCES COMMITTEE
Cecil A. Alexander, Architect, Chairman
Dr. Sanford S. Atwood, President, Emory University, Co-Chairman
Dr. Benjamin E. Mays, President, Morehouse College, Co-Chairman
Legal
Honorable Charles Weltner, Attorney and former Congressman
Donald Hollowell, Regional Director, Equal Employment Opportunity
Commission
Honorable Luther Alverson, Judge, Fulton County Superior Court
Construction and Design
Dr. Edwin Harrison, President, Georgia Institute of Technology
Herman Russell, Contractor
Moreland Smith, Southern Regional Council
Rev. John A. Middleton, President, Morris Brown College
Henry F. Alexander, Builder
James Moore, President, Atlanta Labor Council
Finance
Dean Harding B. Young, Atlanta University
Lee Burge, President, Retail Credit
Butler T. Henderson, Assistant to Dr. Mays, Morehouse College
Non-Profit Funds
A. B. Padgett, Director, Atlanta Metropolitan Fund
Hamilton Douglas, Attorney
Rev. William Holmes Borders, Pastor, Wheat St.r eet Baptist Church
Dr. Rufus Clement, President, Atlanta University
John Wilson, Director, Atlanta Chamber of Commerce
Albert Love, Executive Vice President, The McCall Corporation
�I.
Public Haus ing
E. H. Sterne, Chairman, Atlanta Housing Authority
Dr. Albert Manley, President, Spelman College
Leonard Reinch, President, Cox Broadcasting Company
Clarence Coleman, National Urban League
Land Acquisition
W. L. Lee, President, · Atlanta Gas Light
C. R. Yates, President, Yates-Milton Stores
Vivian Henderson, President, Clark College
Social Problems
Charles 0. Emmerich, Director, Economic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.
Duane Beck, Director, Community Council of the Atlanta Area, ,Inc.
Suje.tte Crank, Director, Summerhill-Mechanicsville Neighborhood Center
Dr. T. Johnson, Professor of Political Science, Morehouse College
William Jackson, Dean, Atlanta University
Business Participation
Virgil Milton, Retired Atlanta Group Manager, Sears, Roebuck & Company
E . L. Simon, Atlanta Life Insurance . Company
H a rlee Branch, Southern Company
C . A . "Art" Jenkins, Director of Industrial Relations, Lockheed
Rol and Max w e ll, President, Davison ' s Department Store s
P ubli c I n fo rmati on
James T ownsend, Atlanta Magazine
Dale C l ark, Directo r of P ub li c Affai rs, W AGA - TV
Ray Moore, News Directo r, WSB-TV
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C TY OF A.TLAN
CITY HALL
December 30, 1966
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmen tal Liaison
Mr. Ray Moore
News Director
WSB-TV
1601 West Peachtree Street, N. E.
Atlanta, Georgia 30309
Dear Mr. Moore:
A Housing Resources Committee is being established in Atlanta to
work closely with and as an adjunct to the Mayor's Office in a
special effort to provide through pr·i vate enterprise, non-profit
organizations and public housing sufficient housing units for all
those in low and medium income brackets in Atlanta to be housed
in decent, safe and sanitary housing and to eliminate existing
slums in our city.
Sub-committees of the Housing Resources Comnittee will soon be
appointed in various fields of endeavor to serve on the Committee
for accomplishing this momentous objective.
You have been nominated to serve with several others on the
Public Information Sub-Committee. It is anticipated that at its
first meeting each Sub-Committee will . elect its own Chairman,
wh o will also be the Sub-Committee's representative on the
Executive Group of the Housing Resources Committee as a whole.
It is also expected that each Sub-Committee, in addition to
supplying "know how" in its particular field, will also be
influential at all levels to gain acceptance for and promotion
of the program and would select at least two young men from
firms which can afford to devote part of their time for intensive
work with the Sub-Committee.
It would also be helpful if each Sub-Committee could form an
advisory panel of people active in the field of housing who would
�Mr. Moore
Page Two
December 30, 1966
remain free to pursue their active business without conflict of
interests.
We hope that you will be able to serve on this Sub-Committee.
Please advise Col. Malcolm Jones (telephone 522-4463, Ext. 432
or 437).
Cordially,
I
Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor
Cecil A. Alexander, Chairman
Housing Resource s Committee
Sanford s. Atwood, Co-Chairman
Housing Resources Committee
Benj ami n E. May s , Co- Chairman
Housing Resources Committee
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Legal
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Hon. Charles Weltner, Congressman
Donald Hollowell, Regional Director, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. .. . ·.·.. . . ·,:,' :.. .
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Hon. Luther Alverson, Judge, Fulton County Superior .Court
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Robert Wood, General Counsel, Southeastern .. Ar·e a, Sears · Roebuck Co. ·


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Construction And Design
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Pres. Edwin Harrison, Georg ia Institute of Techno~ogy
·Herman Russell
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Frank Malone, Pre~ident, South~rn Bell
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Ed Hatch~ President, Georgia Power ·co.
Moreland Smith, Souther~ Regional Council
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Rev. John A. Middleton, Pres., Morrf s Brown _
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Finance
Jack Tarver, Federal Reserve Bank
Richard Courts, Courts & Co •
·Jesse Hill, · Atlanta Life
Dean Harding B. Young, At~anta University
Lee Burge , Pres., Retail Credit.
Harold Patterson, Pres., Federal Reserve Bank ·
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Butl er T. He n ders on , Ass i stant to Dr. M ay s, M o rehou s ~ C o lle_ge_
Nonpr ofit Funds
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A. B. Padgett, Director Atlanta Metropolitan Fund ·
Boisfeuillet Jone s, Director, Woodruff Foundation
Hamilt on Do_u gl as , Attorney_.
Rev . Holmes Borders .
Dr. Ruf us Clement, Pres ., Atlanta Univers i t y
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John Wilson, Director, At lanta Chambe r of Commerce .
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Albert Love; Ex-Vice Pres., The McCall Corp.
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E. H. Sterne, Chairman ; Atlanta Housing Author ity·
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Dr. Albert Hanley
Lucien Oliver , Vice Pres ., Sears Roebuck Co,
Leonard Reinch , Pr~s ., Cox · Broadcasting Co. · ·
Clar'ence Colema n, Nationa l Ur ban Le_a gue
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Land Acquisition
Robert Biven , President, Central Atla nta
Robert L, Sommerville, President, Atlanta Transit
W. L. Lee , Preiident, Atlanta Gai Light
C. R. Yates, President ,. Yates-Mil t6n St ores
Vivian Henderson, President, Clark Coll_e ge
Socia l Prob l ems ,
Charles Emmerich~ Director E. 0.A.
Duane Beck, Director, Community Council
Suyette Crank
Prof. T. Johnson, Political ·Science, Morehouse Coll_e ge
William Jackson, Atlanta Unive~sity
C. A. Bacote





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T. D. Archer, President,. Buildin$ Trade s Council
Henry F . .Alexander
James Moqre, President, Atlanta .Labor Council

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Busine s s.Participation .·
J ohn J. McDonough, Finch,Alexander,Barnes,Rothschild &·Paschal, · Architect
Virgil Milton, 3626 Tuxedo Road N.W.
L. D. Miltsm, President, Citizens Trust
E. L. Simon, Atlanta Life
Harlee Branch, Southern Company
W. A. Pulver, President, Lockheed
Rolland Maxwell, President, Davison's Dept. Stores ,-
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Public Infor ma tion
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John Crown, City. Editor, Atlanta Journal
William I. Ray, Executive Editor, Atlanta Newspapers
c. A. Scott, Atlanta Daily World
Ernest M. Pharr, Editor, Atlanta Inquirer
James Townsend, Atlanta Magazine
Dale Clark, WAGA
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Ray Moore, WSB
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The . subcommittees are, in addition to supplying "know-how", also to be influential at all levels in gain acceptance for the program. Each Committee
will s elect at least two y·ounger men to work with_the·m. · These men should come
from f irms that can afford to donate part of their time for intensive work.
Su_g gestions of a f ew follow:
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"Bo" Whitman, First National· •Bank
H. Alan Elsas, The Robinson Humphrey Co.
Geo_r ge Kennedy, Trust Company of G~o.rgia
Tom Porte:r, The Coca -Cola Co.
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In addi tion ~ each Committee will s elect ar;i advisory panel of .men :active i n the ·, . .·.: ~· ·. _.:.:·: r·'
f i e ld o f hous ing. It is understood that this panel · will be avciilable to ad· ··· · ..:- ' ·
vise when needed but will be free of any ·conflict in pursui_n g ~ctive housi_ng · : : _.: ..
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