Box 3, Folder 3, Complete Folder

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Box 3, Folder 3, Complete Folder

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THE MINUTES OF A SPECIAL MEETING
0-Ftt"- - -
THE CITY OF
GEORGIA
A special meeting of the Commiss ioners- of the Housing Authority of
the City of Atlanta, Georgia, was held in the Conference Room of the
Authority, 824 Hurt Building, Atlanta, Georgia, at 11:00 A.M. on
D0ce111ber 11, 1969.The meeting was called to order by the Chairman, and upon roll call,
those present and absent were as follows:
Present
Absent
Mr. Edwin L. Sterne
Mr. George S. Cr aft
Mr. Jack F. Glenn
Mr. J.B . Blayton
Rev. W.H. Borders
The Chair-man decla r ed a quorum .present.
The Chairman reported that this speeial meeting was convened pursuant
to a duly dated and si gned Notice of Special Meeting whi ch wa s served
each Comrn issioner in due time, form, and mann0 r as required by law.
The Chairman read the original of the "Notice and Cert if icat e 11 set
forth b elow, and the same was ordered spread on the minutes, as
follows:
NOTICE AND CERTIFICATE
1.
NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING TO THE
BOARD OF COMM ISSIONERS OF
THE HOUSING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY OF ATLANTA, GEORGIA
Noti.ce is here by given that a special mee ting of the Board of
Commissicners of THE HOUSING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY OF A'rLANTA, GEORGIA,
will be held at 82L~ Hurt Building , in the City of Atlanta, Georgia,
E.S.T., the re gul ar meeting place thereof, at 11:00 o 1 clock A. M.,
on the 11th day of De cember, 1969, for the purposes of conside ri ng
and adopting a RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING THE ISSUANCE OF NEW HOUSING
AUTHORITY BONDS ( SEVENTH ISSUE) OF THE HOUSING AUTHORITY OF TI-IS CITY
OF ATLANTA, GEORGIA, I N THE PRINCIPAL AMOUNT OF NINE MILLION~ SEVEN
HUNDRED FIFTY-FIVE THOUS AND DOLLARS ($ 9,755 ,000 ) TO AID IN FINANCING
LOW- RENT HOUSING AN D PURPOSES INCIDENTAL THERETO; and for the purpose
of transacting any other business whi ch may properly come before
such meeting.
Dated this 11th day of December, 1969.
Cha irman
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2.
CERTIFICATE OF SERVICE
I, LESTER H. PERSELLS, Secretary of the Board. of Commissioners of the
Housing Authority of the City of Atlanta, Georgia, HEREBY CERTIFY
tha t on the 8th d ay of December 9 1969, I se r ve d a true copy of the
fore g oing Notice of S pe cial Meet i ng on ea ch and e very Commissioner
of the Board of Commis si on ers o f the Hous i n g Au thor i ty of the Cit y of
Atlanta, Georgia, in the followin3 manne r: by letter.
Witness my hand this 11th day of December, 1969.
Secretary
The following resolution wa s introduced by Mr. Craft, read in full and
considered:
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�Commissioner Cra ft mov ed tha t the foregoing resolution be adopted
as introduced and re a d, which motlon was seconde d by Commissioner
Glenn, and upon roll call the "Aye s 11_ and "Nays II were as follows:
AYES
Mr. Ge org e S. Cr aft
NAYS
None
Mr. Jack F o Gl e nn
Mr. Edwin L. Sterne
The Chairman the r eupon declared said motion carried and said resolution adopted.
There being no f urthe r busine ss to come befor e the meeting , upon
motion duly ma d e a nd seconde d, the mee t ing was adjourned.
Chairman
.· Counsel
Secre t ary
r
t
�,r
,,
For Release:
3:00 P. M., Wednesday
December 11, 1968
I
URBAN RENEWAL PROGRESS - 1968
REMARKS BY HOWARD OPENSHAW
DIRECTOR OF REDEVELOPMENT
FOR
THE ATLANTA HOUSING AUTHORITY
BEFORE THE
CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE
FOR URBAN RENEWAL
DECEMBER 11, 1968
�In reporting to this Committee one year ago this month, I predicted
that in 1968 cons truction totaling $26.2 million would be started on urban renewal
land, i ncluding the start of const ruction of 1,468 dwelling units, a subst antial
increase over the previous year .
I am happy to r eport that construction wa s
~ct ual y §tart
§d on 1mprovement g t otali ng $39 ,9 mi lli.on, including the st art of
,.
1,033 dwelli ng ·units of which 884 dwelling units have been compl et ed.
This housing
construct ion r e pr e sents over fo ur t imes t he number of dwelling unit ~ started and
21 times t he number of units compl eted t he previ ous year .
This i s t he first time
in Atlanta 's Urban Renewal Program history wher e hous ing construction exceeded the
number of dwelling uni t s demolished.
I site this as a specif ic exampl e of a con-
scious ef for t on the par t of the Housi ng Authority not only to demonstrat e a
fe asibl e reloc ation plan by sj ting the availabilit y of housing fo r f amilies being
reloca ted by governmental ac tion at r ents peopl e c an affo rd - but actually t o provide sufficient housing f or those f amil ies being di splaced .
This has not been the
pat t ern of urban r enewal in t he pa st in t hi s City or any other, a f ault well t aken
by crit ic s of the Urban Renewal Program .
It seems to me t hat we are clearly moving
in the r ight di rection.
From t he period Dec ember 1, 1967 t o December 1, 1968, t he Atlant a
Hous i ng Authori t y has acquired 285 parcels of l and at a cost of $6. J million .
Authority r eloc at ed 180 f ami lies , 77 individual s , and
The
55 bus i ness concerns f rom
urban renewal ar eas , and provided hous i ng assi st ance ·to an addit io nal 328 f amil i e s
and 98 indi viduals r el ocat ed a s a r esult of other governmental acti on (i .e . Code
Enforc ement, Stat e Hi ghway, Board of Educ at i on, and airport expa nsi on ) .
During the past 12 mont hs the Authority demol ished 284 s t r uctures comprising 484 dwelling units , and compl et ed r ehabi lit ation of 154 dwel l ing units .
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�The Authority sold 31 parcels of land for $3.5 million and put under
contract for sale an additional 21 parcels having a value of $ 2.6 million.
I
Construction was begun on improvements totaling $39.9 million.
These
tmprovements include the star~ of 1,033 dwelling units, the Ira Hardin office
building, an addition to :the Marriott Motor Hotel, and improvements at Georgia
State College and the Georgia Institute of Technology.
Improvements totaling $11.2 million were completed in the past 12
months, including 884 dwelling units.
Several other activities during this period should be noted.
The
Housing Authority received Federal authorization to provide 60 relocatable housing
units in the Bedford-Pine Area.
This was the first authorized use of relocatable
housing units on urban renewal land in the country, and was in direct respons e to
a corrnnittment made by the City to residents of the Bedford-Pine Community that only
those areas ready for rede velopment would be cleared, and that every effort would
be made to permit the maximum number of f amilie s to remain in the area - even while
permanent housing was being constructed.
Site improvements fo r these units is now
underway, and we ho pe that the first relocatable housing units will be in place and
ready for occupancy befo re the end of the ye ar.
A seco nd item of note wa s the development compe tit io n by the Housing
Author ity of t he 96 acres of Federal surplus l and, fo rmerly U. S. Penete nt i ary
pro perty, made ava ilabl e to the Cit y by President Jo hnson i n December , 1967, to
help meet cr i t ic al urban needs .
The natio na l competition consisted of the design
of an entire community, i nc l uding housing f or f amilies of l ow and moderate i ncome,
school s, parks and shopping fac i lities - a community designed to encourage a
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�harmonious social and economic mix .
Five r edevelo per 's proposals were r eceived
and submitted f or r eview and evaluation by a jury of five nationally reco gnized
professionals experienced in housing development (the first time a professional
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jury was employed to j udge improvements on urban renewal land in Atlanta).
On
Monday of this week, t he Mayor- announced that the Atlanta Housi ng Authority had
selected the National Home s .Corporation of Lafayette, Indiana to develop the
Federal. surplus l and.
The National Homes propo sal contains 600 units of housing
for familie s of low and moder ate income , shoppi ng f acilitie s, a town center, t wo
elementary s chool sites , a middle s chool site , and a six acre park .
The
redeveloper's improvements are est imated to cost $8,7 million.
A third signific ant act ivity during this period wa s the preparation
of a Nei ghborhood Devel opment Program appl i c ation out lining the Ci t y ' s ur ban
renewal activitie s to be undertaken in 1969 .
The Neighborhood Development Pr ogram
author i zed by t he Housing Act of 1968, is a program of urban renewal action now.
The program wa s developed :
(1) to permit pl anning and executio n activi t ies t o be
undertaken concµr rentl y , i. e . to permi t r ehabi litation, clearance and redevelopment
to be undert aken i n spec i f ic area s , even while planning i s still underway ;
( 2) to
mor e quickly r espond to the critical ur ban needs of t he Cities by accel erat i ng
provi si ons of publi c fa ciliti es and s ervices; and ( 3 ) to fa ci litate a more effect ive
pro gramming and budgeting of urban r enewal activit i e s on an annual cash- needs ba sis ,
i. e . the Feder al government and the City provi ding funds annually f or ur ban r enewal
activities to be c arried out in specific areas of t he Ci ty.
The City ' s Nei ghborhood Devel opment Program applicati on, f i l ed with the
Federal government on December 6, for the peri od J anuary 1 t hrough December 31 , 1969
includes executi on acti vities in t hree areas :
Bedford-Pi ne , Georgia Tech I I, and
Model Ci tie s , and planni ng activities in East Atlant a and Vine City .
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The appl ication
�requests a Federal grant in the amount of $24.3 million.
The City's share is made
up of completed non-cash grants-in-aid in the amount of $10.8 million.
Looking ahead to 1969, the Atlanta Housing Authority will continue its
· urban renewal activities in 8 existing projects and begin planning and execution
activities in the five are a s included in the City's Neighborhood Development Program.
These urban renewal activities encompass 5,700 acres of the City - a sizable task
indeed.
In addition, the Authority estimates that construction will be started
on improvements to taling $59.7 million on urban renewal land in 1969.
These improve-
ments include 1,037 dwelling units, the Butler Street elementary school (which will
permit the Authority t o close out Atlanta's first urban renewal project), t he stadium
motel, elementar y schools in Roc kdale and Thoma sville , improvements at Geo rgia State
College and Georgia Tech, and the enclosed mall shopping c enter in We st End.
As
we sta nd on the threshold of a new day, a new year, Atla nta shares
the s ame f ate as every major City i n Americ a .
pover t y? Wha t fate bef alls our Cities?
How can the poor be lifted from
In our affluent society , i t is unthinkable
that millions of Americ ans rema i n ill-housed ; that affluent white s co ntinue fl ee i ng
to the suburb s, l eaving our urban co re t o the poor 8nd the black; that spreadi ng
slums and blight are l eading us not to decay but destruction, while in many cities;
off i ci als remai n i ns ens itive to t he plight of the peqpl e .
The bell continues to t oll .
Time i s runni ng out .
We will sur vi ve onl y
as we succee d in re spond i ng to the de sper at e ne eds of our peopl e, in terms of providing opportunities for housing, educati on, and employment; in t erms of impro ving
the qual ity of urban life; i n terms of l ift i ng t he hopes and aspi rations of the poor
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�and the depressed; in terms of involving people in their destiny.
As we face a new year, this is our choice, our opportunity, our
challenge.
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MU\\£
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I HOUSING AUTHORITY OPPOSED
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t~NTI.1"1~\-....,__
.. f ~-·O, A~ St.vt:1\
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EOA Asks Legal Aid, . e •yi'!~ ·· J nonsty
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Economic Opportunity Atlanta
i overiruled objections of the AtJ lanta
Housing A u t h o r i t y
Wednesday in asking for federal
· funds of the Atlanta Legal Scrvi~s progrnm.


M. B. Satterfield, AHA diirec'tor, wrote EOA to ask that fund. ing be delayed untii an investiga'. tion could be made into activi! ties of Legal Aid whic'h SaHeri field called .a "disruptive 1nflu, ence on tJhe public housing pro1 gram and serves only to cause


fri ction in the community."
.
The boaird of directors of
. IDOA, on the recommendation of
. member Jesse Hill, approved
the $326,695 budget-$271,939 in
· feder al funds .
" It is 1rnap.proprlate not to
move ahead," board Chairnm n
Boisf.euillet Jones said. He · sa id
he would "honor ,the complaint
fo ,t he extent of look,ing into 1ts
meirits."
I
Robert Dobbs, another board
memher, also urged ithe request
for funds, despite ,the AHA let.ter. "The housing authority
ought to look at itself. H has
some problems itself."
Jones said he had 1received an
anonymous ca.J.I several months
ago about Michael Padnos,
director of Legai Aid. Jones said
the caUeir threa,tened Jones unless he got rid of Padnos.
"'11hat's the last I heaird of it,"
Jones said with a l,augh.
Satterfield's letter said that
rthe AHA was withhoJ.ding "endorsement of this a pplication ait
rthiis time, pending cl arification
of certain acl!ions ,t aken by
Lega,I Aid which a fifec,t the Atlanta Housing AuthorJty and the
community."
SaLterfield's letter saJd Padnos !had made "serious general
allegations conc,erning Atlanta
Hol.l'sing Aubhority po1icy and
conduct of activities." But, the
The EOA board also approved fedeml funds, a111<i_4u.mmi>r recletter said, wheri called on for the Head St:;irt program, which rna.tion, including $620,000 iii'
specific f.aots behind the allega- includes a request for $516,649 in (,e<lernl lunds .•
-tions, "Legal Aid has refused to
flLl'nish such facts ... That refusaI can be documented."
P.adnos'. objections generally
were that the AHA operates
"arbitrnrily." He said he refused ito give names of those
complaiining bec,a use of ,t he lawyer-client reJ.ationship.
Jones explained ;tihat the AHA
had been infm·med of the application for legal services, but
solely b.ecause they were. an in,t eres.ted party, not a holder of a
veto .
KIDNEY n.u..,r-ci> c:1r.Nt.l c.
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�BSDFORD PTI,: E AR.SA


1. What: in your esti ,-.,o.t ion, is the best or no3t feasible 8.~p1·oci.ch to the pi·o"':ll::Ll o:::'
housing clispb.c ccl pe:csono?
Persons displaced by governrn.ental action rn.ust be r e located within the general
·confines of tl).eir immediate :neighborhood. Displac eme nt of families or persons
. outside their;' neighborhood disrupts family unity and creates untold social problems.
Programs which w ill allow gradual demolition and replacement of housing rather
than wholesale demolition of neighborhoods must be established.
2. Whe:'e, E',re your vieHs conc e1·ning t er::po1·s.1::' reloc,J..tc.b le hou sing ? Pros ancl Cons
I favor temporary relocatable housin~. It "vill hel p prevent disruption oI
neighborhoods and familie s . Such temporary housing must not be allowed
to dev e lop into permanent u:..r1de s irab le, bel ow code housing.
·~


. What posit ion does City Eall te.ke uith rega rd to relocatable housing?


specificall:,r the tn>e to be used in the Bedford ?ine Project.
Then
City hall proposed a n d encourag ed the relocatable housing demonstration 1n
B e dford-Pin e and Mod e l Citie s .


~ ·


l~. \':'hat rol e •,rill the City pl £>.;," ,rith r ez;urcl to this t e::.pore.r;r reloce.t o.b l e housi:rlg?
See Numb e r 3 . Atla nta Hous i n g Authority is t h e City ' s agent for a d min iste ring
th e urban r e n e wal and h ous i ng p rogram.
5.
~foat ple.ns does Ci t y- Ha ll ha ve in ,1ind 1rith re3:8.rd t ::i th e Bedford. F ine are2.?
HoH do the s e p l ans differ fr o!:! the actual plans?
The actual pl ans a s submitte d b y the Atl a nta Housing Authority ar e the p lans of
th e City s i nc e Af{A 1s the City's agent for ,housing red e v elopmfn t.
6. Wha t long r a ne; e go!l.1 s n.nd plans 2..re projected for the ar ea ?
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7.
·1
!hat :i.n your e stir~o.t ion, ,-rould be1~efit the area the r,wst? \'[hat are their ir:uJ.ediate
neecls?
The immediate needs in the ~rea are in the area of providing decent housing.
Parks and sGhools have been dev e loped and are in operation. Economic
Oppo7:..tl;l-nity programs must of necessity go hand-in-hand with the development
of physical facilities.
1,1
6. 11·/hat conrcrt..mication lfoks does the Cit~-- have with the I,e,~_ford Pine Ne::,;ro leacle1·ship?
Beclford-Pine Negro leader s hip communicated with City Hall through t he
Bedford-Pine Urban Renewal Corn.rnittee or Sub--Cori-irnittee to the Citi zens
• Advisory C on1.mittee for Urban Renewal.
by using these tet:1pora17 relocat ab le housing units it .-rill heJ.p
strengthen the nei,chborhoocl concept? Encourage people to st r..y in the area?
Explain.
9. Do you think that
Yes. People establish roots in an area and even though it might be substandard, it is hoE1-e to them.
".:i. .


,;


10. Do _you antici:pat.e usinr; t he t e~:.1:)o r e.ry housin6 else·.rllere i.n the futur e? I f so
for ~ihat use· irnd i'rhe1·e? ~Ihat uill b e do~--ie with th a nnits during the interin?
Yes in th e Model Cities p roj ect. The red e velopment needs in thi s city are so
great that ther e would always be a us e for temporary housing units and ther e
would be no inte rim period w h en these unit s wo uld be allowe d to stand vacant .
11. What type o:£' reloca tion pb.ns are there for retaini::-1g c~mrches a.71d locs.l stores in
the neir;hbor~ood ':
See Atlanta Housing Authority plans.
12. Are you a•.-r:?..re of' · any- neu -propos3.ls -for the :area, such as ex;,~·n::ling the c1.v1.c cent er
or utilizing t he a.re;_ f;r co::::::ercial development purpo ses? ·,·Tr.at are City Ralls
vie•.-rs? How 1-rould you like to see the area deve lop ed?
Expound.
I am aware of no specific proposal for expanding the Civi"c Center or utilitizing
the area for commercial d e ve l opment . The area should be primarily redevelop e d
for housing. W e should not, howe ver, d eny the ~tl anta a rea ad e quate c1;vic
faciliti es a nd the total n ee d s of th e city mus t be weighed with th e needs of the
Bedford-Pine community in d e t ermining reuse.
13.
~foe.t
is t he curre;1t status of the 3edfo~·d Fine pro ject?
Se e Atl anta Housing Authority.
�..
11~. Does the City· plan to initiate 2.ny ne,-! types of · lou cost housing for the area?
If so explain.
See Atlanta Housing Authority.
15. ~·That oth er asencies, on e. loce.1 r;overnnental level, are envolved in the planning
· or developr:ient stages of this project?
Atlanta Housing Authority and City Planning Department.
16. ';[hat suggestion s Hould yot1 h2.ve for copfog with the housing proble:n other than
using the t er.:1"901·a ry- r e loce.t2.ble housing?
.~
., .
List alternatives.
The Mayor's Housing Program sets forth specific goals and has provided for
machinery to push housing plans. A copy of this program is attached.
'.
'.
Dan Sweat
Director of Governmental Liaison
City of Atlan ta
Thank you
�BILL OF RIGHTS
FOR
PUBLIC HOUSING TENANTS
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1.
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~I.
RIGHTS OF APPLICANTS FOR PUBLIC HOUSING
Sec lo The local agency shall use application forms
which provid~ o1i!_y : - such information as is pertinent to / the size of the household unit, the income of that
\ household unit and the need of that unit for public
housing . Questions concerning the legal stan~ing of
the marital status of members of the family, the ·
legitimacy of the children in the family, the police
record of members of the family and other such infor mation, including race or religion are specially pro hibited from appearing on the application formo
Any otlE r criteria. beside income and family size whic h
is utilized in d~terming eligibility by the housing
authority must be submitted to the Department of Hous i ng
and Urban Development for approvalo
0
Seco 2o Once the application .form has been comp leted,
the a ppl i cant must be g i ven a nwnber which i ndi cates
his chr ono l ogical place on t he wa i t i ng l is t f or the size
apartmen t necessary for his f amily unles s on the face of
t he appl i c a tion the family is by t he publ is hed standards
ine l igible be cause of exce ss i ncqme or on the face of
the a pp lica t i on t he r e i s shO\-n.1 no demons trab le need for
public housing (i. eo , t hat t he f amily lives i.n decent
housing and pays a ren t it can afford). For this initial
det ermination, all statements made on the application ar~
deemed t o be trueo
Seco 3o For the purpos e of determining initial eligibility or inelig i bility, all statements made on the
application are pres umed to be trueo If the local
authority believes that some or all of the statements
are untrue, the authority may conduct an investigation
after the initial determinatton of eiigibiiity has been

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made and the person given his chronological place
on the waiting listo It is the sole responsibility
of the housing authority to collect all information
available in public records. The applicant may authorize the authority to collect relevant data not available in public records· from persons other than the
·
applicant. No negative inference shall be drawn from _the failure of individuals other than the applicant
himself to cooperate with the housing authority
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(a)
If the _;Local authority -determines tha1:
despite the statement given on the application
form·the person or family are ineligible for public housing because of excess income or no
need, the family must be notified in writing
within 3Q days following the date of the
application of their ineligibility and the
detailed reasons for it. If the household
unit is held to be ineligible and wishes to
challenge this determination , a hear ing shall
be afforded . This he a r ing s ha l l comply with
t he provisions of Part I I Io 1 Howe ver, during
t he time that such proc edure s are being
utilized and until a dec is i on upon the hearing,
t he person shall cont inue t o b e listed as
el igible and ·s ha l l rema in on t he waiting lis t
in t he chrono l ogica} order based on the original
number g iven t o t he familyo
(b )
Any a pplicant not notified that he is ineligible
wit hi n 30 days after the date of the application i s deemed t o b e eligible and thereafter
the hous ing authority may not challenge his
eligib i l ity unles s there is a sub s tantial
change in the income of the family or the
composit ion of the household unit as it relates
to inc ome, or the housing authority can demonstrate there is no longer a need for public
housing (ioeo, the applicant has moved to
decent housing at a rent he can afford) or
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the authority can demonstrate fraud on the
part of the applicant in providing eligibility
informationo
Seco 4o Applicants shall be processed in strict
chronological order and no priority shall be given
ex_':e_p_t for:
(a)
persons who are forced to relocate as a
result of a comprehensive urban renewal
program which includes _demolition of ~he
premises in which the persons reside or in
the event that they are forced to relocate
as a result of the Public Hous ing Aut hority
having acquired the pr emis e s in which they
reside and said premises arc to be demolished
so that public housing projects can be built
on that site 9
(b)
pers ons who demonstra te~
of nee d
(io e o, elderly individuals, l arge f amilies,
those who are destitute) .
Se c o So The local agency must mak e avai l able f or
inspection at reas onable t i mes and places the rent
schedul e in effect at all proj e c ts adminis terecl by
that agenc y , and the number Qf apartments available
i n each proj ect br oken down by t he size of apartmcnto
The lo cal authority must als o make avai lable f or
inspection the general schedule of maximum income
based on family size which will permit persons to be
eligible for admissio~ t o its projectso The authority
must ~ls o make available f or public inspection the
waiting list of app l i c antso
Seco 60 When an applicant has been notified that he
is eligible and that an apartment is available, he
may challenge the housing authority's determination
of rent through hearing proceedings outlined in
Part Illo No leas e shall extend f or a period of less
than 1 ye ar durationo
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RIGHTS OF TENANTS IN PU~LIC HOUSING
Sec 0 1 0 The lease shall be written in clear concise
language able to be understood .. by laymen of average intelligence. Where required, the lease shall be written in the
applicants native language· if said applicant does not speak
Englishc
Secc 20 The signed lease does not in any way derogate the
rights of the tenant and the authority as declare d and
guaranteed by the United States Constitution, fede5al and
state statutes, decisional law and regulations promulgated
by the Dep artment of Housing and Urban Deve lopment
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Sec . 30 No lease, regulation or other ·written or oral
agreement sha ll permit the termination of a tenancy on
groubds other than the_ following:
(a)
chronic non- payment of rent after efforts have
been made to develop a sche dule of rent payments
throughout the r e nt period which the tenant
could mee t;
(b)
commission of active waste (phys ical destruction)
of the leased premises by t enant;
(c)
tenant in over-income as, de;ermined by the Housing
Au thority except where eviction would work extreme
hardship on the family unit;
(d)
substantial interference with other tenants in
such a manner as ·to materially diminish their
enjoyment of the premises; substantial interference
must relate to actual conduct of the tenant and
not to such matters as are specifically prohibited
from appearing on the applications of prospective
tenants by Section 7 of Part I of this Bill of
Rights; issues arising from a proposed tenancy
shall be submitted to the Hearing Panel and no
evic tion shall apply except to the individual
offender unless he is the head of the family unit
and no other responsible individual is a member
of the family unite
·r
�- 5 (e)
failure of resident to provide the Housing
Authority with income statement within 60 days
from date of request.
Seco 4o No local housing authcirity shall interfere directly
or indirectly with the right of its tenants to free speech,
, to organize or to seek redress of grievances. No tenant
shall be evicted or otherwise penalized for engaging in
such c1ctivity o
Seco So No local housing authority shall interfere with
the right of its tenants to quiet enjoyment of the... premises
they rented nor shall the authority infringe upon its
tenants' right to privacy. The authority shall not enter
the premises rented by a tenant without the tenant's
express permission except for an annual inspection or in
an emergenc yo
.. ,.,/
Seco 60 Rent is defined as that sum of mone y expressly
provid e d for in the lease b e tween the tenant and the housing authority as consideration for housing provided to the
· tena11to No local hous ing authority shall levy any fines,
fees, or o the r financial sanctions upon tenantso The cost
of repairs shall be charged to a tenant only if the Hearing
Panel determines it was caused by the tenant's own malicious
or r~ckless ac t and s uch cost o f re pairs s ha ll be collec tible
only by a separate civil actiono
Seco lo Tenant s s hall be cha rgeable for repairs only when
management can affirmative ly e stablish fault on the part of
the tc n,:rn t. The tonant shall not b e rcsponslbll' for
ordina,~y \vc·ar an<.l u~..1.r, or for negligence (except gross
negligc,nce ) o Any det ermina tion of faul t shall be subject
to review by t he Hear ing Panelo
Seco 80 Where repairs are deemed necess ary, a tenant or
tenant organjzation shal l have the right to submit a
\\-rritten or oral complaint to the local housing authority
I[ i...i1e cu1 11!Jla.i.11i., .i.s oi:ctl, Ll1e responsible official of the
authority shall reduce that complaint to writing on an
appropria te form~ If the needed repairs are not of an
immediate 11.:1.turc or do not create an emerge ncy situation,
0
�- 6 -
the authority shall have 30 days in which to consider the
complaint and take appropriate actiono If no action is
' t aken by the authority within that time, the complaint ·
shall automatically be consid~_red by the Hearing Panel .
I f the repairs are needed immediately, the authority must
act within 48 hourso If the authority fails to act, the
.tenant may contract privately to have repairs made which
will eliminate the emergency conditions (ioeo, those
necessary to eliminate dangers to health and safety)o
.The tenant ' s action shall be reviewed by the Hearing Panelo
.,
Sec 0 9 0 If the Hearing Panel determines that the comp l aint
i s val i d, the tenant shall have the option of withhold i ng
r ent to the e xt ent ·of rent - impairment de t er mine d by t he
Panel , or to make repairs at his own expense and reduce t he
rent pro tantoo The Hearing Panel shall have the addit i onal
authority to invite loc_a l housing · inspection unit to i nspect
subj e c t pre mises in order to de termine e x is tence of housing
violat i on or v iolations and the housing a uthority s hall
wa ive any immunit y i t may ot herwis e possess with res pec t to
the a c t ion of such insp ection unito
Sec l Oo· Overall r e s pons i bility f or r odent c ontrol and
maintenance of hallways, stairc as es and other common areas
of the Project shall rest in t he Authorityo It shall bear
·all expenses f or material s and labor and shall- replace
tenants' garbage r e c e ptac les i n ~e ed ~f sameo Where regular
garbage collection is ins uffic ient t o control infestation,
additional collections shall be made at the expense of the
Authorityo
0
Seco llo The graded rent system, whereby a tenant is
charge d a rental which accords with his income , shall be
applie d uniformly.
Seco 120 Rent shall be redetermined no more often than
once a year, preferab ly once every 2 years, with the
exception of "hardship rent"" Where, during the course of
a tenancy, a tenant undergoes a serious reduction in income
and thereby qualifies for the hardship rent, rent shall be
�.
.
..
. ;:-~--.
-,
- 7 -
modified downward immediatelyo Such hardship rent shall
then continue until the next annual or biannual redetermi na- · .·
<tion, with the obligation upon the tenant to report any
restoration of original income.level during this periodo
Seco 130 In any redetermination of income, temporary
income shall not -be projected on an annual basis , unless
tenant's prior work history clearly indicates a patter n of · .
maintaining temporary jobs on a continuous basis .
Seco 140 Only a substantial "incre~se or decrease.!' in
family income shall bring redetermination procedures into
operation (and require reporting by tenant)o Such amount
shall be no less than $400, computed on an annual basis,
or other basis if work is temporaryo This same principle
is to be followed in the case of decrease
0
Seco 15 . Decreases in rent shall be retroactive to the
begi nning of the r ent determinat i on per iodo · I ncreas e s in
rent s ha ll not be re t r oactive except i n case s where the
Authority can pr ove beyond a r easonable doub t t hat the
tenant willfully concealed i nf ormat ion. Such a determination shal l be made by t he Hearing Panelo
Seco 160 Any dispute s r egarding redeterminatio~ shall be
submitted t o the Hearing Panel or otper arbitration bodyo
The "re duced rent" concept, by wqich' the tenant agrees in
advance t o be bound by any increas es (up t o maximum rent),
shall be eliminated o
-;.
.- ·
�- 8 -
III.
Tl-IE RIGHT TO AN ADMINISTRATIVE
HEL\RING AND DUE PROCESS
_______________
_ -------------_.
Seco lo The local agency shall adopt and promulgate
· regulations establishing policies for occupancy or continued
occupancy which shall give full .. consideration to the right
of tenants or applicants rejected for tenancy in low-rent
housing projects _to due process of lawo Said regulations,
which shall be incorporated in all leases executed by
tE!nants at or before the commencement of occupancy and shall
be posted on all bulletin boards accessible to the tenants
or to the public within the project, shall provide... at least
the minimum protections hereinafter set forth.
Seco 2.
I
Notices
(a)
Every notice of eviction or other sanction against
tenants or refusal to take action on the complaints
of tenants or ·of rejection of applications shall
be typewritten, signed by an official of the agency
and mailed in a postage prepaid envelope addressed
to the tenant's apartment of residence in the
project, or, in the case of applicants, the address
furnished with the application by registered mail,
return receipt re quested .
(b)
The notic e shall advise the tenant, or applicant
of the time and place of a hearing on the grounds
for the action taken~ t~ be held on a date no
less than 10 -days after receipt by the tenant or
applicant of the notice, and, if feasible, during
the evening hourso The notice shall further
advise the tenant or applicant in clear and precise
language of the specific grounds for the action
taken
Where the local agency has reason to
believe that the tenant or applicant if, Spanish
speaking, the notice and all of its contents shall
be in Spanish as well as Englisho
~
0
(c)
\
'\
The notice shall further advise the tenant of:
his right to be represented by legal counsel
(including the address of the local legal services,
legal aid, or other office where such assistance
can be obtained) or any other person of his
�- 9 .-
choosing at the hearing; his right to examine
all the written evidence to be used by the local
agency against him (at the hearing) prior to and
during the hearing, or a~ any reasonable time
after the hearing; his right to other discovery
as hereinafter set forth; his right to crossexamine :hostile witnesses and to bring his own
witnesses; his right to demand that the local
agency produce at the hearing any employee whose
testimony is alleged relevanto A copy of the
rules governing the conduct of hearings s.hall be
attached to the Noticeo
~
(d)
Every such notice of hearing shall issue wi thi n 5
days of a final decision by the agency on the
application, eviction or complaint, which final
decision in the case of applications and complaints
shall be made ·within 10 days after presentation
by the applicant or tenant of the appl i cati on or
compla into In the ev ent t he agency fai ls t o comply
with the provisions herein, the tenant or a pplic ant
may r equest a hearing unilaterally i n a l e tter to
·the hear i ng pane l s t ating t he circumstances of the
re quest and , unles s t he re quest i s fr i v olous on
its face, t he panel sha l l i t se l f schedule a hearing
t o be held o
Seco 3o Ans wer t o the Not i ce
The tenant or applicant s hall acknowledge in writing, or in
person, receipt of the notice and his willingness to
participa t e in a hear ing on the scheduled date , within 5
da ys of receipt of the notice . If the ten ant or a pp licant
does n ot so acknowledge, and no reasonable e xcuse is shown ,
the hear ing shal l be cancele d and the matter t e r minat edo
'!he agency s ha ll give c onsideration t o reasonable re ques ts
for postponements of hear ing dateso
Seco 4.
Pla_E~ ~of Hea.ri~
Hearings under t his paragraph s hall be conducted, to the
extent feasible, in a well-lighted, confortable room in
the project containing ample space and chairs for the.
parties and for other interested personso
�~ -
-J
\.
10
Sec
0
So
Hearing Officers
a) Hearings shall be conducted before a panel
of three officers; one officer to be designated by the agency,
who shall not be an employee of the agency; one officer to
be designated by the tenants of the project, and one officer,
to represent the public, to be designated by agreement of
the other officerso
b) The representative of the tenants on~the
hearing panel shall be elected by majority vote of the
tenants at a meeting initially called for that purpose within the project on at least ten days notice, published on all
bulletin boards, by officers of the tenants' associationo
c) All officers · shall act in their respective
capacities for one year terms to conclude on the same date
~ach yearo After the initial designation of the tenants'
representative, subsequent elections shall be held on a date
exactly one year after the original election unless otherwise
agreed to by majority vote of the tenantso In the event of
resignation or disability to serve, the successor representatives
shall be designated within five days of the effective date of
said resignation or disability, to serve as officers for the
balance of the respective one year termso An interim tenants'
representative shall be elected in th~ manner prescribed in

subparagraph (b)o
d) All officers shall be compensated out of the
agency 's f unds at the rate of twenty-five dollars for each
day of hearing service, or substantial portion thereofo
e) The hearing officers shall mutually designate
and retain at the commencement of the initial term of service
and as often thereafter as necessary, the services of an
attorney whose duties shall include attendance at all hearings
for the purpose of furnishing legal advice and guidance to the
presiding officer and otl'E r officers of the panel, and the
prep~ration of the panel's decision in each case, and who
shall be compensated for his services out of agency funds at
the rate of fifteen dollars for each hour of legal service
rendered
,
�- 11 ..:.
f) The members of the ·panel shall serve in
rotation as presiding officer at each complete hearingo _
the other officers may participate in the examination of
witnesses or in discussions with the parties or counsel but
only the presiding officer, with the assistance of counsel
to the panel, may m_a ke rulings during the course of the
· hearirg o
-
'1
·.,


t


g) The panel, at its discretion, may elect to
·hear several cases, separately, at one hearing session and
will so advise the agency officials responsible for issuance
of notice s of he aring.
Sec. 6
Jurisdiction of the Hearing Panel
a) The panel sha ll have jurisdiction to decide
issues r e l a ting to rejecti ons of applications for admission
to the projects, evictions, or other sanctions sought to be
impos ed by the agency on t e nants, rent dete rmina tions , and
complaints by tenants against management personnel but not
against other t enants (unle ss such complaints against other
tenants ~re considered as part of an eviction action under
Sect i on I (d) of Pa rt II of this Bill of Rights)o
b) The pane l shall de t ermi ne whether the a ct i on
taken by management conflicts with the Housing Act, and t he
regulat i ons of the Public Housin~ Administrat ion and the local
a gencyo I f t he pane l de t e rmines that a confl i ct exis t s , it
shal l d i~miss the not i c e of evic tion, order t he app l i c ation
reinstate d or order any ot her necessary and appropriate re l ief.
In the ev ent tha t the ma t ter of iss ue does no t c onflict with
a spec ific prov is ion of the statute or the r egul ations , the
panel s hall decide the case, i n an equitable manner, with
the obj e ct of e ffe c tuating the humane intent and purposes of
t he Housing Ac to
Seco 7
Conduct of Hearing
a) Rights of Partieso I n any hearing held pursuant
to this Section, any party s ha ll have t he r i ght to appear,to
be repre sented by c ounsel or other per s on of h is choosing; to
call, exami n e , and cross - examine witness e s; to int roduc e i nto
the record docume ntary or other evidence ; and to present an
opening statement and closing argumento
~-
..
�.\.
- 12 -
(1)
Cross-Examination; Exclusion of
Certain Evidenceo In any hearing the
· tenant or applicant shall have the right to confront and
cross-examine all witnesses who testify or furnish or have
furnished evidence adverse to the applicant or tenant;
including persons who have· furnished information contained
·in case records, investigation reports, affidavits, statements,
and other documents the Housing Authority wishes to introduce
into evidence at the hcaringo If the Housing Authority fails
·to produce any such person for cross-examination by the
applicant or tenant, no evidence, oral, written, err otherwise,
attributable to such person may be admitted in evidence except
at the reque st of the applicant or tenant, provided however
that nothing herein· shall preclude the admission of evidence
otherwise admissible under judicially recognized exceptions
to the hearsay ruleo
(2) Discove!.Y..2.. At least seven (7) days prior
to t:he da te set for the hearing the applicant or tenant shall
receive upon request: a list of all witnesses who are to testify
on behalf of the Housing Authority; copies of all statements
of such witnesses in possession of the Housing Authority which
have b ee n reduce d to writing and signed or otherwise approved
or adopted by the witness; copies of all written or other
evidence which the Haus ing Authority intends to read from or .
introduce into ev idence at the hearing; copies of all s tatutes,
rules, regulations, and policies•to which the Housing Authority intends to rely, at the hea~ing and othe rwise in support of its
actionso Any witness not disclosed, or document not furnished
in accor_d ance wit h this sub - section may no t testify, or be
introduc ed in evidenc e, at the hearing.
b) Rules of Evidenceo Every party shall have the
right to present his case or defense by oral or documentary
evidence, to submit re buttal evidence, and to conduct such
cross-examination as may be required for a full and true
disclosure of the factso Subject to the provisions of subsection (a) of this Section, any oral nr rlo~Dment~ry ~uirlen~e
shall be received except that which is clearly irrelevant,
immaterial, or unduly repetitious.,
�\.
- 13 ..:
c) Burden of Proofo In any hearing involving
an eviction, denial of application, or rent determination
the burden of proof shall be on the Housing Authority to
support its position by a fair preponderance of the evidence.
In a hearing involving any other issue the same burden of proof
shall be on the party requesting the hearing. The party having
the burden of pr·oof shall present its case firsto
d) Transcript~ In any hearing held pursuant to
this Section a verbatim record of the proceedings shall be
kept, either by a stenographer or by an electroni€ deviceo
When this record shall have been transcribed, copies shall
be furnished to th~ parties~ A copy of the transcript shall
be furnished to the q:plicant or tenant free of charge upon
request 0
e) Briefso At the conelusion of any hearing, both
parties shall be advised of their right to submit briefs in
support of their respective positions. The applicant or
tenant shall be granted a minimum of two (2) weeks after
·receipt of the transcript of the hearing in which to file his
briefo The Housing Authority shall be granted a minimum of
orie (1) week after receipt of the brief of the applicant or
tenant in which to file a reply briefo A brief is "filed"
within the meaning of this sub-section when a copy has been
filed wi th the hearing panel and a copy has been served on the
adverse party or his counsel.
f) Decisiono No final decision shall be rendered
by the hearing board until each member of the board has had
an opportunity to review the transcript of the hearing and to
read the briefs of the partieso The board shall only consider
evidence contained in the record of the hearing , to wit,
the transcript, exhibits admitted into evidence , and the
briefs of the partieso Decisions shall be by a majority of
the hearing panel and shall be binding upon the par tie s i
subject to the right of judicial review provided in Section 8.,
(2) The decision shall be in writing and shall
set forth in detail the findings of fact and conclusions of law
upon which the decision is basedo The hearing panel is .required
in its decision to c onsider and dispose of all is s ues and
�I
...L...
t.,
f.
- 14 ..
,.,
contentions raised by the partieso Each finding of
fact and conclusion of law in the decision must be
supported by and in accar rlance with a preponderance of the
reliable and relevant evidence in the hearing recordo
'i
A decision ·shall be rendered within two
(2) weeks after receipt by the panel of the case record
and briefs of the partieso Copies of the decision shall
be served upon all parties and their respective counselo
(3)
Sec. Ba
Judicial Review
a) The housing authority and the tenant or
applicant, if aggrieved by the decision of the hearing panel,
shall have the right to seek such judicial review as is provide.cl by the laws of the jurisdiction in which the rearing
was heldo The decisioµ of the r~viewing court shall be
binding on the panel and the parties unless reversed on appealo
,~
b) The filing of the complaint or petition for
re~iew shall not stay enforcement of the decision of the
hearing panel, but the hearing panel may order such a stay
in the interests of justice, except that the filing of such
a complaint or petition shall operate to stay an eviction
pending the exhaustion of judicial remedies by the tenanto
c) Within ten (10) days. af~ r service of the
complaint or petition, or within such further time as the
court may allow, the hearing panel shall transmit to the
reviewing court a copy of the entire record of the proceeding
under review.
d) Nothing in this section shall be deemed in any
way to foreclose or diminish the right to o-ther means of
judicial review, redress, relief, or trial de nova provided
by lawo
Seco 9o
Hearing Optioral
a) Notwithstanding any other provision contained
in this Bill of Rights, the hearing procedure provided herein
shall be deemed to be optional with the tenant or applicanto
The tenant or applicant shall have the right to refuse a hearing
�- 15 ..
t,.'
before the hearing panel and to seek in the first instance
such relief as is available from the courts of the jurisdiction in which the housing authority is locatedo
b) The hearing procedure provided herein shall
be deemed to be mandatory on the housing authorityo The
authority must utilize the hearing procedure in the first
instance and may only seek Judicial review of decisions of
the hearing panelo
....
July 5, 1967
�CITY OF ATLANTA_
July 25, 1969
CITY HALL
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive SecretMy
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaisor.
The Honorable George Romney
Secret.:1ry of the United States Department
of Housing and Urban Development
Washington, D. C.
_D ear Mr. Secretary:
In November, 1966, we be gan in Atlanta a concentrated effort to
stimulate the developn1ent of 16,800 units of low and moderate income
housing to provide safe and sanitary shelter for thousands of less
fortunatP citizens .
This effort, called "The Mayor's Housing Resources Program" was
supported by the U. S. Depart1nent of Housing and Urban Development,
private banks_, developers, churches, civic groups and individual
citizens at all level s .
This program has produced results. As of thi s date, 21,013 of the
five year goal of 16, 800 units have been completed, are under
construction, or in planning . The most r ece nt status report is
attached for y _o ur information.
Within the n ext few we eks , the single most significant developme nt
generated by our programs will be placed under construction. It is
the East Lake Meadows turnkey project, w hich is the lar ges t tu.rnkey
public housin g deve lopment in America with comprehensive community
facilities.
Because of the significance of this undertaking and b ecause it embodies
so many of the aspects of community housing action whic h you so
magnificently support, all of u s in Atlanta - City Hall, the builders,
our housing officials, and citi zen s in general - f ee l that we want to share
the b eginnin g of thi s proj ect w ith you.
�Secretary Romney
Page Two
July 25, 1969
_,
I have been asked to is sue you an official invitation from all of us to
inaugurate construction of this most important housing development for
poor people. If your schedule will permit you to come to Atlanta in the
next few weeks after August 21, we shall schedule the ceremonies for
your convenience. It would also give us the opportunity to show you some
of the operational components of Atlanta I s Model Cities program.
Highlights in the development of the East Lake Meadows Project w ill
give you some idea of its importance not only in relation to the solution
of urban problems of Atlanta but perhaps in other cities.
The land on which this project is located was once a golf course owned
by prominent conservative businessmen in Atlanta. They sold it to the
March Company, a private development company, and supported difficult
rezoning in an area which had hitherto had :i;io public housing. City
officials, local Housing Authority, and the Regional Housing Authority,
together with local business people, civic groups, communications media,
were all i11v olved. The project includes 800 living units, 150 for elderly,
shopping center, community and health facilities, city park, recreation areas
.,, ..... r1 ·t-1-,
r1,,d;,...,,t;,... .... ,-,f c:,-h,--,,..,1 c:it ,, c:.
An e xample of corn.rnu:nity
.
support
involves the four leading banks in Atlanta who formed a consortium to
finance the interim construction costs in an e ffort to assist in the solution
of Atlanta's housing problems for its low-income citizens. This development represents the highest type of coop e ration among city, business,
government interagency planning and implementation - a model community
effort.
0
Your presence here on this occasion, therefore, would serve to give
strength to the solution of the many difficult problems we still face in
Atlanta and to spotlight one of the landmark public housing developments
in America.
Those of us who are faced with the community level problems of l eadership
are thankful that you are in the crucial position at HUD.
Sincerely yours,
Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor
IAJr:fy
cc:
Mr. Edward Baxter
�July 25, 1969
CITY HALL
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LA;~OERS, Adm inistrative Assistant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
[)AN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liaison
The Honorable Geor ge Romney
Secretary of the Unit ed States Depa1 tment
of Housing and Urban Development
Washington, D. C .
.Dear Mr. Secretary:
In Novemb er , 1966, we began in Atlanta a concentrated effort to
stimulate the development of 16, 800 units of low and moderate income
housing to provide safe and sanitary shelter for thousands of less
fortunate citizens.
This effort, called 11 The Mayor 1 s Housing Resources Program 11 was
support ed by the U. S. D e partment of Housing and Urban Development,
private banks, deve lop e rs, churches, civic gro ups and individual
citiz ens at all levels.
This program has produced results. As of this date, 21,013 of the
five year goal of 16, 8 00 units have b een completed, are under
construction, or in planning . The most recent status report is
attached for your . information.
Within the next few weeks , th e s ingle most significant development
generated by our pro grams will be placed uncle r construction. It i s
the East Lake lvleadows turnkey proj ect, which is the l arges t turnkey
public housing deve lopment in America with comprehensive community
facilities.
Because of the significance of this undertaking and because it embodies
so many of th e aspects of community housing action w hich you so
magnificently support, all of us in Atlanta - City Hall, th e build e rs,
our ho us in g official s , and citi ze ns in g e neral - fee l that we w ant to s ha r e
the b e ginning of this project with you.
�Secretary Romney
Page Two
.July 25, 1969
_.,
I have been asked to is sue you an official invitation from a ll of us to
inaugurate construction of this most import ant housing development for
poor people. If your schedule will permit you to come to Atlanta in the
next few weeks after August 21, we shall schedule the ceremonies for
your convenience. It would also give us the opportunity to show you some
of the operational components of Atlanta I s Model Cities program.
Highlights in the development of the East Lake Meadows Project will
give you some idea of its importance not only in relation to the solution
of urban problems of Atlanta but perhaps in other cities.
The land on which this project is located was once a golf course owned
by prominent conservative businessmen in Atlanta. They sold it to the
March Company, a private development company, and supported difficult
rezoning in an area which had hitherto had no public housing. City
officials, local Housing Authority, and the Regional Housing Authority,
together with local business people, civic groups, communications media,
were all involved. The project includes 800 living units, 150 for elderly,
shopping center , community and health facilities, city park, recreation areas


ind the dedication of school sites. ...A..n example of coro_rnunit~,r s1.1pport


involves the four leading banks in Atlanta who form.ed a consortium to
finance the interim construction costs in an effort to assist in the solution
of Atlanta's housing problems for its low-income citizens. This development represents the highest type of cooperation among city, business,
government interagency planning and implementation - a model community
effort.
Your presence here on this occasion, therefore, would serv~ to give
strength to the solution of the many difficult problems we still face in
Atlanta and to spotlight one of the landmark public housing developments
in America.
Those of us w ho are faced with the community level problems of leadership
are thankful that you are in the crucial position at HUD.
Sincerely yours ,
Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor
IAJr:fy
cc:
Mr. Edward Baxter
�CITY OF .A TLAN1..~~
July 25, 1969
CITY HALL
ATLANTA. GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Exec utive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR., Director of Governmental Liai son
The Honorable George Romney
Secretary of the United States Department
of Housing and Urban Development
Washington, D. C.
Dear Mr. Secretary:
In November, 1966, we began in Atlanta a concentrated effort to
stimulate the development of 16,800 units of low and m .oderate income
housing to provide safe and sanitary she lter for thousands of l es s
fortunate citizens.
This effort, called "The Mayor's Hou s ing R e sources Program" wa s
supporte d by th e U. S. D e partment of Housing and Urban D eve lopment,
private bank s , de v e lop e rs, churches, civic groups and individual
citizens at all levels.
This program has produc ed i:esults. As of this date, 21,013 of the
fiv e year goal of 16, 800 unit s have b een complet ed , are und er
construction, or in plannin g . The most recent status r e port is
attach ed for your information.
Within the next few weeks, the single most significant d eve lopment
generated by our programs w ill b e placed under construction. It i s
the East Lak e Me a dows turnk ey p r oj ect, which is the lar gest turnkey
public housing deve lopment in America w ith compr e h ens i ve community
facilities.
Because of the s i gnific ance of this undertaking and b ecause it embodies
so many of th e aspects of community housing action whi ch you so
magnificently support , a ll of us in Atlanta - City Hall, the build ers,
our housing officials, and citizens in ge neral - fee l that we w ant to s har e
the beginning of this proj e ct with you.
�Secretary Romney
Page Two
July 25, 1969
_.,
I have been asked to issue you an official invitation from all of us to
inaugurate construction of this most irn.portant housing development for
poor people. If your schedule will permit you to come to Atlanta in the
next few weeks after August 21, we shall schedule the ceremonies for
your convenience. It would a lso give us the opportunity to show you some
of the operational components of Atlanta's Model Cities program.
Highlights in the development of the East Lake Meadows Project will
give you some idea of its importance not only in relation to the solution
of urban problems of Atlanta but perhaps in other cities.
The land on which this project is loc ated was once a golf course owned
by prominent conservative businessmen in Atlanta. They sold it to the
March Company, a private development company, and supported difficult
rezoning in an area which had hitherto had no public housing. City
officials , local Housing Authority, and the Regional Housing Authority,
together with local business people, civic groups, communications media,
were all involved . The proj ect includes 800 living units, 150 for e lderly,
shopping center, community and health facilities , city park, recreation areas
and the dedication af schaal sites. A ·n pv::,rnpl P ,--,f rr,rnrnnnity ~nppm·t
involv es the four l e ading banks in Atlanta who formed a consortium to
finance the interi1n construction costs in an effort to assist in the solution
of Atlanta's housing problems for its low-income citizens. This development repres e nt s the highes t type of coop e ration among city, business,
government interagency planning and implementation - a model community
effort.
Your presence h e re on this occasion, the r efore, would serve to give
strength to the solution of the many difficult problems we still face in
Atlanta and to spotlight one of the l andmark public housing developments
in America.
Those of us who are faced with the community level problems of l eadership
are thankful that you are in the crucial position at HUD .
Sincerely yours~
Ivan Allen, Jr .
Mayor
IAJr:fy
cc:
Mr. Edward Baxter
�r,
.'
.)
HUU:::i lN G ll.E:::iO :. mCE S COMI.1ITTEE
May 1 5, 1969
l
T o ... :ii Dwe ll i ng Units Permitted in Atlanta:
1...,63 - 9 , 129
196 6 - 2,-382
Dwelling Units Demolis hed Under Ho using Cod..9 ~
SU11JMARY
1 96 4' - 3, 8 29
1967 - 4,630
1 44
Nov . & DGc. 1 966
1 9 6 5 - 2,656
1968 - 5,333
Durin
g
1967
1
,
2
72
STATUS OF ACCELEREATED I.OW-INCOME HOUSING PROGRAM
Duri
n
g
1968
1
,0
53
(Commenced Nov. 15, 1966)
1969 to Da t e
33 4
TOTAL
2,
803
5 yr. Program, 1967-71
Go a l s:
½ e st ablished for first 2 yrs.
100%
(57%)
(13%)
(30%)
(0%)
( 0)
( S3 me % used for 5 yr. period)
16,800
(2,184)
(5,040)



(9,576)




.,L./ o.J !
St atu s


No. Units


P.H. & TK
5-15-69
4,839
5-15-68
2,031
Und er Cons t r u ction
7,256
5,108
(144 7)
In Plnnning
7,90~
7 , 151
19 , 998
1 2 015
21,013
I nc re a se or Def ici t
+4 ,213
Be in g Consid er e d(al l c at . ) 3,535
Co mp l e ted (Ne w Constr.)
To tal In Sight
Plus Lea si n g Progra m
5-15-69
(790)
.
'-•' ' /
.' ..""" "' :
Pvt. Devel. (Conv.)
FHA
5-15-69
(1082)
5-15-68
(510)
5-15-69
(2809)
(910)
(1858)
(1188)
(1 313)
(291 4 )
(5273)
14,290
281
14,571




(3550)






(1015)
(4 565)
(3906)
(281)
( 4 18 '7)
-2,229
4 ,481
(-5011)
(-5389)
0
5-15-68
(82)
'---.
El derl y & N. H.
- 5-15-68
(1439)
·s - 1 5- 6 9
( 1 58)
(3710)
(3010)
( 2 4 1)
(3 6 51}
(688)
( 1 4 0)
( 62 4 )
(44 6 )
(8218)
(53 4 9)
(7207)
( 4 589)
( 1 023)
(44 6 )
(+6034)
(f3165)
( +2167)
(-4 51)
(t1023)
( +44 6 )
5- 1 5-68
Did Not Mat eria lize ( Se e Note A attached )


Figu r e s in this column a re ba sic and re p r e s e n t th e e n ti re prog r a m; ( ) in columns to t he right , i n dic a te b r eakdow n by programs of


f ig ure s inc luded in ba sic col u mn . * *Wil l r equire additi o na l r e s ervat ion o f 1, 93 6 units n o t yet reques t ed b y the Ci ty. *** In additio n ; 1, 0 1 5 un i t s hav e b ee n lea s ed ior P. H. Also 2 2,83 2 un it s ha ve b e e n re ported b y the Housing Code Div ision as r e pai red (re ha bilitate d).
How eve r, t hose figu res i nclude u n its fou nd in compl i a nce on orig i n a l inspe ction.
It is e stima t e d that 7 5% of this fig ur e, or
17,12 4 substa nd ar d un i t s have bee n b rought i n t o compliance throu~;h ~c t u a l reh abi lit at ion. 4 35 u n i t s ha ve been rehabilit a ted by t he
H.A. i n the We s t End U. R. ar ea ; 13 in Be d f ord - P ine; a nd 7 in Mode l Cities. These rehabil it ated u nit s do n ot incre ase t h e nu mber
o f hous i ng unit s av a il a ble, b ut d o increa s e t h e supply o f s ta n dard units.
No t e :
Inc l ud e s onl y unit s f i na nced u nd e r Fe f e ra l assis ted low a nd medium income h ousing p r o g ra ms; and units cons truc ted under
conventi o nal fi nancing a s follo ws:
Mu l ti -fam ily u nits costing not more tha n $10,000, exclus i ve of land
Respe c tfully submitted,
" $12,000 ,
"
"
"
Dup l e x un i t s
"
"
"
.,__.,.
,---·1'\
" $1 5 , 000,
"
n
u
Single Family "
"
"
"
,,-•__,
·;
'.)
\'
• •~
.., ...-<
/ ,,,,... .,,. .. -__..c...,..-= --::;-: . ~
E nc l s:
l.
2.
Summary o f Public Hous ing in Atlanta
Notes
? -~--·· ~
/ /
Malcolm D. Jon·e s
Ho us ing Coordinator-
�HOUSING RESOURCES COMMITTEE
May 15, 1969
SUMMARY OF PUBLIC HOUSING IN ATLANTA
8 , 874




Existing Units in operation when accelerated program started, Nov. 15, 1966 - filled.
Units completed since program started, Nov. 15~ 1966, and under Conventional Development,
as follows:


(650)


Units off McDaniel St., in Rawson-Washington U.R. Project; (310) of these units completed
-7-25-68; remainder completed 11-10-68
(140)
Units in Perry Homes Extension - South of Procter Creek.
(78) 3 Bedroom
(46) 4 Bedroom
Bids opened March 7, 19670 Perm~t issued May 1967. Construction
(16) 5 Bedroom
behind Schedule. 85% completed 11-10-68. Completed 3-27-69.
(350)
Units Under Construction in Thomasville U. R. Project
(40) 1 Bedroom (16 Elderly) Bids opened May 15, 1968. Contract .signed 7-1-68.
(120) 2 Bedroom
Ground broken 1-17-68. Will try to have part delivered
· (80) 3 Bedroom
before final scheduled completion date Jan. 1970.
(80) 4 Be droom
(30) 5 Bedroom
(730)
(1,715)
(1,374 )
300
7,640
(1,015)
L6 ,514

1,140



6,200




(2,381)
7,640

Units reserved to Atlanta by HUD for new construction:
(Allocations made by HUD - Under Construction, Hollywood Road, 202; Bankhead Hwy., 500;
Gilbert Road, 220; Prison Cro-Leila La nd, 175; In Planning, East La k e Golf Course No. 2,
800; Jonesbbro Road, 160; Wellswood Apts., 324.
(730 units of this reservation are approved for use in the leasing program.)
(1,715 units of this reservation are already utilized in tentative comm itments as follows:
Bedford-Pine U. R. area, 451; Boulder Park, 300; Browntown Rd., 450; Pittman-Hilliard,
100 (Elderly); Techwood-North Ave., 250; Gilbert Rd., 50; Jonesboro Rd., 114.
(1,374 units not repor t e d as comm itted.)
Units allocated for Leasing Program (Leased units can only be utilized for P.H. occup ancy
as they become vacant. Total units under lease 1,015.)
Total units Completed, Under Development, In Planning, Uncommitted & authorized for Leasing Progra '
Units under lease (9 locations); most of these are occupied or avail a ble for occ u pancy
as Public Housingo



On September 16, 1968, Bd. of Aldo approved Resolution authorizing H9A. to request reservation




from HAA of 2,000 additional units of Public Housing. Approved by HAA Marc h 17, 1969
(Included in this figure).
Total Public Housing Potential


Figures in ( ) in this column are included in figure above not in ( ) .


Encl . No . l
�HOUSING RESOURCES C01\1MI1'TEE
NOTES
21,032 unit s proposed did not materialize, of which 13,764 were included in the previous report of Jan. 15, 1969, and 7,268
3dd itional units are listed - in this report, as Lost.
(The majority of these losses was due to disapprovals of sites, a large
p ortion of which were denials of zoning petitions.)
In view of difficulties encountered in zoning and getting other approvals on sites proposed for large multi-family development s,
it is apparent that the Low-income Housing Program will have to lean heavily on Developers and Builders providing a substantial
portion of the requirement on small scattered sites by both Conventional and Federal assisted financing.
Also Public Housing
in s mall projec t s, to include small developments on scattered si.tes is strongly · advocated, for future development .
1.
Proposed locations for low-income housing are coordinated through the Plan. Dept. for adequacy of Community Facilities, existing
or proposed. Proposals are also reviewed . periodically with the School Department for adequacy of school facilities.
The Travelers Ins urance Company financed 75 new single family low-cost houses in the Thoma sville Urban Renewal project area
u n der the Flffi 221 d(2) insured mortgage program. Equitable made $1,000,000 available to Atlanta Mor tgage Brokerage Co. for
fin ancin g low-cost homes at favorable rates.
Interest is still increasing in development of home o wn ership housing.
No proposal ha d yet been made for construction of units (even efficiency or 1 bedroom) to rent or sell for as low as $50 per
month, although the Lond on Towne Houses, a 221 d(3) co-op devel opment now under construction, is approaching this, with its one
bedr oom unit selling at $69 per month. The City's greatest heed is in the $30-$50 per month rental-purchase range, which
appear s to hav e little chance of accomplishment, without substartial governmenta l subsidy.
P re fab di stributors and conventional builders have interesting p otential houses to offer but, because of fear of local Codes
diff iculties, are currently erecting very few single-f am ily houses in Atlanta to sell in the $10,000-$15,000 range for wh ich
the re is a strong d e ma nd and market. Perhaps the greatest difficulty is availability of suit ably priced land within the City
Lim its. Economics for this price-range sales housing requires land which will cost the developer not more than $1,500 per
unit. A 5,000 sq o ft o lot is considered amp le for this type house which should reduce land costs by 33 1/3%; most houses in
th is price r ange are cuirently being erected in Atlanta on R-5 lots having a minimum size of 7,500 sq. ft.
I ~ perial Homes of Griff in, Ga., manufacturers of pre-cut sectionalized frame houses, has developed a 24'x36', 3 bedroom & bath
hous e desig ned to sell , to the occupa nt for $8,000 to go on his land; and is developing a 4 bedroom & bath house to sell
sim il arly f or about $ 9,000. National Homes of Lafayatte, Ind . is erecting 200 units of pre-built, 4 bedroom, bath and½
u n its in Chicago and is doing the site planning and landscaping. This firm wa s recently successful bidder, throu gh design
compet ition, for construction of 600 medium and low-income housing units on the Honor Farm #1 site.
The nonprofit Greater At lanta Housing Development Corporation is now in business. The CACUR's nonprofit corporation to
rehabilitat e existing unit s under 221 (h) has completed its first group o f 5 houses in Lindwood Park. Vanguar d Housing Corp.
h 3 s obtained FHA commitment for r eha bilitation of 6 units under 221 (h) •· Mor ris Brown College is another such sponsor .
North West Community Forum has also filed applications for 4 projects under 221 (h)
I n formation is welcomed as to corrections, additions or deletions of material contained in this report.
Ex t. 430 or 431 0)
•1cl: No
o
2
(Call 522-4463,
�I
June l 6, 1969
Mr . Ed.win L . Sterne
Trust Company of Georgia Building
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
De r Edwin:
Under and by virtue of the Georgia Housing .Authority
Law, and ith th consent of the Gov rnor. I a.m hereby
r ppointing you
a member of the Atl nta Hou ing
Authority for a full term of ten (10) ye rs. · aid term
expiring June 10, 1979.
A copy of this ppointm nt, tog ther with the cons nt
oi the Governor• i being filed with th . City Cl rk of th.
Board of A ldermen of th City of Atlanta, a required by
law.
BY
ND WITH MY CO NSENT:
., '
�June 16, 1969
M r. Edwin L . Sterne
Tru .t Com . ny of Geor ia Building
Atlant • G orgia 30303
D
r Edwin:
Under and by virtue ot the Georgia Hou ing .Authority
Law., and itb th con ·e nt of the Oovernor. l m bereby
r ppointin you a am mber of the Atlan . H01Uing
utho.rity for ·a !ult term of ten (10) ye r ,.
id term
expiring .Tune 10, 1979.
A copy of tbie · ppointment, to ther with th con nt
of the Qov I'll Or,. t being !il d itb th City Cl rk of ta
B rd of ldermen of th . City of A tl nta,
r quired by
la •
BY .AND
1TH
Y CONSENT:
.•
�l- - '
1.
URBA N
RENEW A L .
MONTHLY
ST ATUS
PROGR A M
REPO R T
June 1, 1969
•..
.,.
'
..

·~..:
.
},


-.


·..
·,
... ~
·
~-· ..


.
ATLANTA
HOUSING
AUTHORITY
�.
. •: I
, ' I
{.
'
-1- .
i ·.
I•'
, . l
r. I
June 1, 1969
URBAN RENEWAL STATITS REPORT
\
ATLAJITA HOUSING AUTHORTIY
J f
ll
i
. 'I
,-, I
,


r i


ACQUISTIION
...;
'.
·- 1
[:. JI..
Parcels t o
be · Acquire d
PROJECT
·;I
Acquired to
Date
I \
.RELOCATION
I Total to be
Yet· to be
Relocated
Acquired ~ Family & Indo
..
Relocated
To Date
Family & Ind.
Bus.
3US
e


l.emaining to be . Structures


jto be
Relocated
--- , am1.Ly & .Ln.a. JjUS. lDemoli shed
I


j


TOTAL
,
l'i/


I


.
. ,I
5457


1



...,,,·;


·1js utlcr Street
R--9
4795
662
6647
,.'
6h8
5740
539
907
0
[;
D:EMOLITION
!
.i
!I
Demolished
To Date
Yet to be
Demolished
4843
4238
605
594
594
0
I
_I
I
'
600
600
0
1261
103
1261
103
812
812
0
1115
76
1062
76
~i·
0
1253
79
1250
79
3
421
18
421
18
0
11
. ~.H Raw son- •vlas.hi_ng t on R- 10
J nivcrsity Center
R- 11
868
-
860
8
Tho:nasvill e
R-21
R- 22
.
'}corgia .State
Snd
'
i
. II
435
435
0
984
0
0
46 3
456
7
316
19
310
19
6
·o
305
302
3
29
0
20
48
20
48
0
0
52
52
0
R-85
58.
261
57
0
1
357
352
5
335
R- 90
334
1
511
82
.f
41 8
J11
107
~
I!
1'<~ or gi a Te c h II
A~2-2
0
0
0
A-2-3
398
3
395






.
. ;-:odel Cities
i
593
A-2-1
.
I
62
·3c c.:'ord- ? ine
261
471
1093
I
5
431
97
453
-74
18
23
476
351
125
103
702
65
391
38
539
380
159
37
0
0
0
21
10
0
0
0
278
.
. '
j
981
0
879
29
..,.
.
I
941
'
1'
. ·) 1?orgia Te ch





11
791
,
R-59
"
1
I
I
I
~
I
Rockdale
1·':ie s t
ij
802
.
'
5
431
37
10
21 .
278
I
I
�........
__________
_. ,
...
URBAN RENEWAL STATUS REPORT
·--·- -·- -···-·-- -------·· -·---- .....-. .
,
TOTAL
.
Acres Sol d Under ·_..
Contrict
to Date .
1008o5
55707
I
.,' ·Not
REHABILITATION
To:tal t o be
Complete
Rehabilitated ,
t o date
.
Under-"
Contract
. 371 oO
80o0
5470
1 o5
2o0
186
Bulter St ree+
R- 9
81o7
78o2
Rn·A's on-Wash
R-10
123.,8
9801
23.o 1
206
NA
104o2
8308
7o5
13o0.
1804
University
Center
R- 11
Rockdal e
R-21
24204
Thor.12.sville
R- 22
26203
GeorgiaState
R-59
807
-- -··· -· --··
.;--H ·.
TIT ~Pn.c:;T'l'T mT
Acres To
be Sold
..
June 1~ 1969
Page 2
Project
-- -
'
I
Yet t o be
Rehab .
2982
182
J,
0
0
NA
NA
0
0
1744
60
0
0
3o0
NA
NA
NA
18400
69o0
9o3
92
87
5
NA
NA
NA
0
0
-
2. 882. 207
i.
I
I
<4 ·
~
..
208.,3
807
1,990, 862
2488
o5
31
I TEM- IMPROVEMENTS
Budget
Complete d
Amount
662 0000
561A 1 72
1., 105.9 249
1,051.9249
0
!'
~
i
0
I
Geor gi2..Tech
Wost- End
45oO
R-85
,
_36.,8
-
3o3
NA
5oO
NA
600, 860
NA
199., 251
\
R- 90
'98.,).j.
9.4
43o5
46oO
2338
I
446
202., 598 '
1892
177,190
1 1
A-2-1
Georgia Te~h II A- 2-2
~odel Cities
A- 2- 3
42o0
J
27e2
14.,8
0
480
13
467
I
I
l II
I
I
Bedford- ·
Pine
.
I
II
14, 000
0
0
0
0
0
NA
NA
NA
42, 000
0
0
0
0
0
570
16
554
255, 500
0
I!
�~f.
'.
Page- 3
'
Urban Renewal Status Report
I
i
J
Amo~nt Required
PROJECT
I
.. .
'.
' .
CASH
1
• •
••
ITEM II NON- CASH IMPROVEMENTS
Amount t o be Receiv0d
Amount Received
from City
I
Total Costs
l~mount Completed to Date
-~
Amount to
C'n:npletion
p'
TOTAL
R-9
Butler Street
$ 627,727
$ 1,186.,600
$ 186,567 .
$
~ ~. I
$
(558,873) -*
$ (
196, 468
9,901)
$
33,14.5.,541
··a; 1.,875, 807. ·
~~
620,780
$
..
$11,061,540
$ 22., 084, 001
i~
I,l.
· 1,255, 019
I





R-10
Raws on-Washington
$
R- 11
$
Rockdale
R- 21
$
Thomasville
R-22
University Center
Georgia State
$
$
. : R-59
>
I'
$ '
-0-
49,714
67,202





$
$
- 0-
$
-0-


j; ( 87,726)


87, 726
$: (139,461)
189,175
67.,202
$
.5Jf988
$
$
- 0-
( -0-
)
. :B
I' $
~:li
5,921.,380
5,376,499
3,002., 413
( .53,988)~~


1,824.,502


( -0-
$
$ 3,934,379
$


5., 025, 863


$


~


I
·!!
t ,.
1., 987, 001
I
It I'
p:
J_,,0, 6j O.
~
$

!·, .
tl.
2,434,829
567,584


~


734, 967
$ 1, 089,535
I
'
I
1.
I! i.
L
lI
Il
)
66,24.5
$
16,170
$
f ..
I
50,075
I
II.
-; I.
),
Georgia Tech
R-85
West,.. End
R-901
$
$
- 0-
. $ 324,244
$
$
267,797
(267,797)
$ ( - 0-
324,244
$
)
I
$
- 04, 901,878
$
- 0-
$ 2,195.,428
1$
l l'
- 0-
I I
I;
.
..t'i'
,. :


~ I


$ 2, 706, 4Su
l
Georgia Tech II
Model Cities
A-2-1
A-2-2
A-2-3
$
$
$
-0-
$
-- -
-0-0-


Park


- 0-
-
$ ( -0-
)
$
5.,699.,960
$ .5.,292,344
407, 616
'
'
$
$
- 0-0-
,h
,p
$
(-o.:.
( =0-
)
)





- 0=
$
4, 476., 857
- 0-
$


~ 3., 696,478


Site•
.,** Thomasville
Ineligible Cost
$
I
rt
.•
Bed.ford-Pine
II
'
$
$
=0.





l .:
780,379
\
J
I:
•·.
I
~
'
�,.
Page
4
June 1.., 1969
Urban Renewal Status Report
,,
I ,'
I
TOTAL VALUE OF TI1PROVEMENTS
HUMBER DWELLING UNITS
I•
I
f
I·1 '
1
PROJECT
--
Under
Construction
Coilml eted
[Proposed
Total
Con1pleted
$69, 790,019
Unde:::Construction
ct-
TOTAL
Butler Street
,;
-
...
R-9
2316
630
2873
5819


1064


31
5
1100
R.~wson-Washington
R- 10
650
University Cent er
R-11
223 .
Rockdale
R--21
Thomasville
R-22
I
l
642
.$ 22.94.36,546
209
197
6 29
$
0
0
1500
1500
379
389
602
1370
R- 59
0
0
0


p


5.9000
$ 4.d27., 164
$ 5_.,671, 000
-.$ 115,ooo
I t1 0 951s.9 350
0
,j,

$ 5..,998.9000
$106.9695_.,L,18
$ 212.9 04 3.,637
$
·? 33., 1~8 3, 694
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R- 90
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----




Georgia State
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Propose d
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�ATLANTA,G.EORGIA
PH ON E JA . 2 • 4 46 3
I van All e n , Jr. , Mayor
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FORM 25-2
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PHONE 522-4463
R . Earl Landers
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PHONE 522-4463
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6
THE ATLANTA CO NSTITUTION, Friday, June 13, 1969
-
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Che:3i Asked W Aid Housing
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The Atlanta Housi ng Resources Cormnittee voted Thursday to urge the Community
Chest of Metropolitan Atlanta
Inc. to provide funds for emergency temporary housing for
displaced per sons.
And the committee, headed by
architect Cecil Al exander and
including citizens appointed by
the mayor, decided to explore
the problem itself on a priority
basis.
The Community Chest's executive committee mee ts Friday
to act on reques ts of member
agencies.
HRC members noted that the
Salva ti9n Army provides emergency housing for men and
women, but not families.
The housing group expressed
specific concern for the some
300 families that are to be dis~
placed from housing owned by
the J; P. Stevens & Co. Inc.
pl ant, which has closed down.
Various groups such as the
Atl anta Real Estate Board, the
Atlanta Housing Author ity and
the Community Relations Commission have been aPiproached
by Economic Opportunity Atlanta in order to find assistance,
but so far in vain.
The plant is on Marietta
Str eet, near Ashby Stree t and
the famili es 3re to be d.i.splaced
late this summer.
The HRC also voted to invite
all the candidates for mayor to
a fu ture meeting to give views
on provic'.>!ing hcusing for the
low-income fam ilies . .
Col. Malcolm J ones, HRC
director, reported that 21,103
low and mcderate units have
been compl eted, have been put j total was 18,259 units.
under construction or have been I The program continues to run
planned since the mayor in 1966 ahead in all categories except
announced his goal of 16,800 public housing, which is · 5,011
units by 1971. The .January 1969, behind the goal.
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C ITY OF .ATLANT.A
July 25, 1969
CITY HALL
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522 -4463 Area Code 404
IVAN ALLEN, JR ., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS , Administrative Assi stant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR ., Director of Governmental Liaison
The Honorable George Romney
Secretary of the United States Department
of Housing and Urban Development
Washington, D. C.
Dear Mr. Secretary:
In November, 1966, w e began in Atlanta a concentrated effort to
stimulate the d e velopment of 16, 8 00 units of low and mod e rate income
housing to provide safe and sanitary shelter for thousands of less
fortunate citizens.
This effort, call e d "The M a yor's H o using R e source s Pro g ram was
support e d by the U. S. D e partme nt of Housin g and Urban D evelopment,
private bank s, de v e lop e rs, churches , civic g roups and individual
citizens at all l e vels.
This program has produced i:esults. As of thi s dat e , 21, 013 of the
five y e ar g o a l of 16, 800 un its have b ee n compl e ted, ar e under
construction, or in plannin g . The most rec e nt status r e port 1s
attached for your information.
Within the n ext few week s, th e s in gl e mo s t si gn ifican t deve lopme nt
g e nerated by o ur pro g rams w ill b e plac e d u n cl e r con s truction. It is
the East L ake Me a d ow s turnke y p :;:oj ec t, w hich is th e lar ges t turnkey
public hou s i ng d eve lopment i n A me rica with compr e h ens i ve community
faciliti e s.
B e cau se of t he s i gnifican c e of this u nde rt a kin g a nd b ec au se it e mbodi e s
so many of th e asp e ct s of community housin g action which you so
magnific entl y support, all of us in A tl anta - City Hall, th e buil ders ,
o ur housing o fficia l s, and citi ze n s in gene r a l - fee l that w e w a nt t o s h are
t h e begi nn ing of thi s p roject w ith you .
�Secretary Romney
Page Two
July 25, 1969
_.,
..
I have been asked to is sue you an official invitation from all of us to
inaugurate construction of this 1nost im.portant housing development for
poor people. If your schedule will pennit you to come to Atlanta in the
next few weeks after August 21, we shall schedule the ceremonies for
your convenience. It would also give us the opportunity to show you some
of the operational components of Atlanta's Model Cities program.
Highlights in the development of the East Lake Meadows Project will
give you some idea of its importance not only in relation to the solution
of urban problems of Atlanta but perhaps in other cities.
The land on which this project is located was once a golf course owned
by prominent conservative businessmen in Atlanta. They sold it to the
March Company, a private development company, and supported difficult
rezoning in an area which had hitherto had no public housing. City
officials, local Housing Authority, and the Regional Housing Authority,
together with local business people, civic groups, communications media,
were all involved. The project includes 800 living units, 150 for elderly,
shopping center, community and health facilities, city park, recreation areas
and the dedic a tiorl of school sit e s. A ~I"'!. example of t.:orrnn1..m ity support
involves the four leading banks in Atlanta who formed a consortium to
finance the interim construction costs in an effort to assist in the solution
of Atlanta's housing problems for its low-income citizens. This development repres e nts the highest type of cooper a tion among city, business,
government interagency pl a nning and implementation - a model community
effort.
Your presence her e on this occasion, therefore, would serve to give
strength to the solution of the many difficult problems we still face in
Atlanta and to spotlight one of the landmark public housing developments
in America.
Those of us who are faced w ith the community level problems of leadership
are thankful th a t you are in the crucial position at HUD.
Sincerely yours,
Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor
IAJr:fy
cc:
Mr. E dwa rd B axt er

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