Box 18, Folder 24, Complete Folder

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Box 18, Folder 24, Complete Folder

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Official monthly publication of the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce · Seventy-five cents
�Reprinted from Atlanta Magazine, March, 1967
�ATLANTA• VOLUME 6, NUMBER 11
ANATOMY OF A SUPERSCHOOL
The master plan for the stunning, split-level Georgia State CoJl ege of the
future is still largely o n the draw ing board, but n eed , logic, and vision are
solidl y in its corne r , a nd th e first steps have already b een taken.
Bv BRUCE GALPHIN
. \N ATLANTA ALDERMAN looked with a mixture of admiration
and doubt at the plans for the Georgia State Coll ege of the
futu re, sprawling over ten blocks in the heart of the city, handso me buildings connected by tree-lined p edestrian plazas
straddling the busy streets below. "Mr. Steiner," he asked, " do
yo u believe a ll this will ever be?"
His skepticism was appropriate. A few yea rs ago the school's
home was a converted six-story garage, and before that it
had occupied at least eight other sites in Atlanta under eight
different nam es. But to And rew Steiner, the Robert & Company
architect who has spent two years developing the handsome
and ambitious plan, th e answe r about its fulfi llment is an emphati c "yes."
I n fac t, to a degree few Atlantans realize, the transformat ion is well under way. Georgia State already occupies four
buildings; another is nearing completion ; three more already
have been fund ed and let to design contract. The Board of
Rege nts has endorsed the entire master pl an, and the city has
approved th e first two p edestrian bridges across D ecatur
S treet th at tangibly mark it as a sp li t-level ca mpus.
Th e multi-level, or "platform city," feature of State 's 1112.ster
is o! g r e at si g nifican ce iunc ti.o n a lly, a esth e t i c ally , a nd
svmholically.
Fu nctionall y, it's the devi ce that makes the whole scheme
"·o rk : how to transform a few city blocks criss-crossed by
hea\·il y trave lled streets into a campus for 25 ,000 students by
'lJ7'i · By confining through traffic, deliveries, service, uti li ties,
~nd parking to lower levels, the plan will permit a vehicl e-fr ee
upper level connecting fort y-four acres of campus.
T he aesthetics of the future campus depends heavily on the
platfo rm concept. Principall y, rising above city traffic will
, rrate a fee ling of unity. This will be emphasized by land" aping, notably a tree-lined prom enade above D eca tur Street
fro m the expressway to C ourtland. But the platform, combined with landscaping and judicious placement of th e bui ldings, will also allow di viding the campus into more intimate
areas : smaller plazas, places for sitting to read on a wa rm day
0r informa l gatherings, sites to display sculpture and other
wo rks of a rt.
As a sym bol, a platform campus is peculiarly appropr iate
IIJ Atl a nta , for downtown Atlanta itself is largely sp lit-level.
Ma ny newcomers ( and quite a few older hands) don 't realp\an
ize how much of wha t appears to be "street level" in the central city is really viaduct level. Few have explored the dusty
old Atlanta beneath today's busy streets, though recently there
have been suggestions of making it a tourist attraction. Even
before the turn of the century, Atlantans had been forc ed to
grapple with the fact of the city's sharp gradi ents and had
come to a solution similar to the one now proposed for
Georgia State. There are two main distinctions : Old Atlanta
sealed off its earl ier level from the light, whereas the Geo rgia State platform will be pierced to provide light and beauty of sight below; and ..even more important, older Atlanta
made the mistake of letting cars come upstairs.
Though in a sense Atlanta already is one, the platform
city is a hot item of innovation among civic designers around
the country. If implemented on schedule, the Georgi a State
complex would be a trai l-blazer. It's doubtful whether the
exam ple could be widely imitated on such a scale. For a fl at
city, th e cost could be staggering. But Atlanta's topography
is especiall y suitable. In the ·six or so blocks from Five Points
eastward to th e expressway, the altitude drops more than fifty
feet . Th e original ga rage building of Georgia State sits on
ground at l eas t t hi rty feet higher than the lowe r e nd of t h e
proposed camp us.
· Thus an artificially raised main cam pus level wou ld be consistent with what Atlanta already has don e to conquer its rolling terrain. It also wou ld complement the recently announced
com mercial p latform city planned to span th e rail road complex north and east of the State Capitol.
The Steiner p lan explai ns how the new pedestrian plaza
could be woven into the fabric of the surrounding city without any rough seams or sharp edges. The reason that so few
Atlantans rea lize how much of thei r downtown is artifi cially
raised is that there are comparatively few visible seams. They
can be seen from Central Avenue or Courtland Street, for
these streets cross the rai lroad gulch. And an even more dramati c view of how Atlanta raised itself up off its tracks can
be seen from the T echwood and Hunter Street viaducts, which
span the vast rail yards that probably wi ll be platformed
ove r in fu ture development of the city.
But for the most part, since buildings have been constructed
right up against the downtown viaducts with few openings to
th e old city below, the viaducting is not so obvious. Under
�• Georgia State College had occupied eight different homes before it moved to an old garage on I vy Street. No w it's permanently rooted in one of the m ost advantageous lo cations of any
urban university in America. The site photograph belo w suggests
State's future role: at the center of Atlanta's transportation (expressway at the left and bottom, rapid transit main station to be
nearby) , close to its financial he·art ( Five Points at upper right ) ,
adjacent to a major medical center (Grady Hospital at left center), and near Atlanta's government centers ( Capitol, County
Courthouse, and City Hall at top center) . Th e remarkable location adds validity to Andre w Steiner's proposal for an " urb an
extension" to hel/1 solve problems of cities of the futur e.
�,
th e Steiner plan, one wou ld not lose all sense of the natural
g rou nd level at Georgia State. The present streets would continu e to p rovide vehicular access to the campus, and th e
spans above would be pierced to admit light and views of
the ca mpus. T o avoid abrupt drops around the periphery of
the ca mpus, Mr. Steiner p roposes grad ual d ropping of the pedestria n level and extensive use of landscap ing. Further, he
suggests that the fut ure cam pus' high-rise buildi ngs - except
for the adm inistrative center which is the foca l point of the
entire plan - be placed on the outer edges, thus blending
in wi th the city's other tall structures, priva te a nd public.
High-rise buildings a re not ideal fo r heavily used classes.
Either an unreasonable a mount of space must be devoted to
elevators, or there is an intolerable delay fo r students rushing to class. Since the entire 1975 campus is designed so th at
th ere will be no more th an a ten-minute wa lk from a ny one
class to a ny other, the qu estion of bui lding heights raises a
problem . F or accommodating as many as 3 2 , 0 0 0 people (including fa culty and staff ) on a campus of less than fi fty acres
necessarily mea ns ve rti ca l expansion . Mr. Steiner solves
th e prob le m by keeping heavil y used classroom bui ldings relatively low; th e tall er stru ctu res wo uld be used for such ac tivities as adrninistration, research , a nd housing.
Georgia State President Noah L angd ale, Jr., with customary
enthusiasm an d verbal color declares tha t " the pla tform complex resembles th e raised plazas of th e classic city of Veni ce."
There is indeed , in addi tion to the modern elements, a fl avo r
of old E uropean capitals when monarchs had the power a nd
the money to raze the old and ugly and build whole new cities
in a centuri es-long riva lry to create th e j ewel of th e continent.
The p latfo rm ed Geo rgia State would have a uni ty and a sweep
tha t evokes well, maybe V eni ce or maybe Mr. Steiner's
na tive Vienn a .
Th e p la t form wo uld begin to the west of Courtla nd ; drop
slirrht ly below Courtland, wh ich itself is a viaduct ; rise bac k
up ; a nd then begin an uninterrupted sweep almost all the
way to the expressway. Thi s would be th e ma in axis of th e
new ca mpus. The minor axis, crossing at th e ad ministration
buildi ng, wo uld be a small er spine extending northeastwa rd
a long Piedmont to a point beyond the rear of the old Municipal Auditorium . D ecatu r, Piedm ont, and Butler all would
be bridged .
Beca use the nat ural g round level d ro ps ra pid ly towa rd
the east, there would be room fo r as ma ny as fou r laye rs of
pa rking below the plaza, an importa nt consideratio n, since
estim a tes fo r the 1975 demand run from a bout 4 ,400 to
8,750 spaces, dependin g on th e ava ilabil ity of ra pid tra nsit
and other public transporta tion .
On tb."' ~, lutt.ercd platform above, accord ing to the Steiner
phm,--'-'--\,a-ndscaped plazas are one of the most important uni fying elements of the campus and shou ld be designed to create
a ri ch and va ried environm ent, including intimate sea ting an d
rea ding a reas. Other imp orta nt pa rts of the la ndscape trea tment a re such elements as street furniture and the many
small details which can ma ke life on the ca mpus p leasant
and exciting. By street furniture we mean a ll th e obj ects tha t
furn ish our sidewalks, such as lighting sta nda rds, signs, baskets, benches, fl ower boxes and containers, vend ing m achines,
kiosks, a nd shelters fr om wind and rain. In som e of the open
spaces, book stalls, fl ower stalls, and even outdoor cafes a nd
small structures for sa le of so ft d rinks a nd sandwiches could
be an importa nt p art of the overall d esign." Hurt Park, the
only ma jor greenery that relieves the sta rkn ess of the present complex, would be drawn even more intim a tely to the
future ca mpus when the bl ock of Gilmer Street between the
park an d the college is closed.
In its expans ion, Geo rgia State is perfo rm ing the not-a t-allincidenta l job of urb a n renewa l. Most of th e existing ca mpus
space was acqu ired with federa l urban renewal assistance, a nd
college officia ls hop e to obtain even more of the futur e re-
The 1975 campus is designed
so that no classes are more than a
ten-minute walk apart.
1. Campus Plazas 2. A dministrative Center 3. Communications
Center an d Th eatre Arts 4. Central L ibrary Comp lex 5. Sparks
H all- Classrooms 6. Fine A rts Building- Classrooms 7. A rts
and S ciences - Classrooms 8. Schoo l of Business A dministration
9. Physical Education Building 10. S cience Center - Physical
Sciences 11 . M edical and Nu rsing Center 12. Future E xpansion
Area 13. Grady Hospital E xpansion 14. Stud ent A ctivities Com ,
plex 15. S pecial S tudies 16. Pri vate Development ( possible cooperative use) 17. High R ise S tudent Ho using 18. Grady Hospital
�The proposed expansion plan will
enable community and college to make
immense reciprocal contributions.
quirements through the same method. The college already has
swept aside some of the city's worst slums: rows of pawnshops, cheap hotels, rundown warehouses - areas which contributed heavily to the city's crim e rate.
But a valid question remains whether this is the wisest use
the city could make of the property. Since their conversion
from slums to office buildings, apa rtments, and motels,
other urba n renewal distri cts are now adding millions of dollars to Atlanta's tax base. \ ,Vhy p lace Georgia State in such a
potentially productive location? Few if a ny other major urban
colleges occupy so mu.c h space so close to the city's commercial heart. And Geo rgia Sta te h as moved befo re frequently. Since it was found ed in 19 13, it has occupied space
a t Geo rgia T ech, the Walton Building at Walton and Cone,
the Peachtree Arcade, an attic at Auburn and Pryor, 106¼
Forsyth Street, scattered offices donated by Atlanta businessmen, 223 v\Talton Street, 162 Luckie Street, and fin ally th e
garage on Ivy Street which is the taproot of th e present cam pus. It has been designated the Georgia T ec h Evening Schoo l
of Commerce, University System of Georgia Evening School.
University Extension Center, University System Center, Atlanta Extens ion Center, Georgia Evening College, Atlanta Division of the University of Georgia, a nd Georgia State College
of Business Administration .
In 1962, Atlanta city fathers m ade their basic commitm ent
to th e proposition tha t Georgia State has found a permanent
hom e. They designa ted · a n area of a little more than
two blocks as the " Geo rgia State Urban R edevelopment"
area, thus qua li fyin g it for federal assistance. The \i\1hite H ouse
a nnoun ced approva l fiv e months la ter, in reco rd time.
There is more than ample justification .for the ald erm en's
judgm ent. After all, express1rnys also remove huge tracts of
land from the tax d igest. ( The Memorial Interchange, for exam ple, occupies more ac reage than the Steiner pl an proposes
for the 1975 Georgia State campus. ) Yet expressways are
vital; the expenditures of land a re made. And it can be convincingly a rgued that a vital camp us in the midst of the city
ret urns fa r grea ter intangible va lues to Atlanta.
It is more th an just a question of meeting the growing demand fo r higher edu cation in Atlanta . It is more than a llo\\·ing students to work downtown while also attending college a n unqu es tioned asse t for the city. It is more th an convenience
for the Atlanta businessmen ( with a surprising number of advanced degrees ) who teach part-time. Given the nea r- comp lete
expressway system a nd rapid transit within a few yea rs, a
downtown Georgia State is within an hour's j ourn ey of about
half Georgia's population. It is I immedi ate ly adj acent to centers o f g ove rnm e nt, m edi cin e, comm e r ce, a nd fin a n ce. C o m-
munity a nd college can have im mense recipro cal contributions to make.
Jvlr. Steiner summarizes the potential as " urban exten ion"
- a highl y sophisti cated cousin of th e agricul tura l extension
• Platf arming is the key to solving space and traffic problems at
the Georgia State of 1975 and later. I t's a solution long used in
Atlanta, w hich has been rising on viaducts abo ve its railroad
tracks for almost a century. But at State there would be a diff erence : Th e platforms would be for people, and the cars would
stay below, where they w ould still receive daylight through perforations in the cover. Th e illustration at left ( abo ve) shows
how the perforations might look at the pedestrian level. The rendering below it shows how plat/ arming would affect t he vista of
a motorist. The overall view (right abo ve) shows such treatment
of Decatur Street. The lo cation's sharp dro poff from I vy S treet
to the expressway would allow increasing layers of parking and
service access, shown in the cross sections at right .
��cooperation of colleges and agribusiness that has achieved
such dramatic results in the past decades. The urban extension concept was suggested in the 1962 annual report of
the Ford Foundation. Says the Steiner master plan:
" There are many fragments of theory, observation, empirical
research, and practical tools cf application, sca ttered through
the rel ated fi elds and disciplines, which could make major
contributions to such a program .... Hum an ecology, physical
planning, and urban design are concerned with different aspects of the geographic-physical environment and its organization into cities and regions. Economics has well developed
macro and micro concepts which are every day proving their
practical value in regulating the American economy and which
are being extended to deal with international problems of finance and economic development.
" Political science, through techniques of interpersonal and
group dynamics, is aiding the constructive understanding and
control of the forces of social change. To all of these, the cultural interpretations of the creative arts and the mass media
of communications are making a vast contribution. The value
of mathematics, science, philosophic logic, and the computer
are too well recognized to bear elaboration, but their critical
and generalizing fun ctions must be built into any total conceptual frame."
Thus Georgia State, which already has established excellent
and reciprocal relationships with Atlanta's business community, in the future can be expected to expand its role to
include th e interests and needs of the entire com munity, viewing them with the integrated eye of all the academic disciplines rather than the narrower vistas of the math ematician,
sociologist, artist, etc., working alone.
What would be the dollar cost of the ambitious Steiner
plan? Obviously, it won 't come at bargain basement rates.
But considering the location of the complex and its scope, th e
estim ate is relatively modest: about $96 million for land and
buildings not already fund ed. And of co urse this does not
mean a cash outlay of that much by the Board of Regents
• The view from Edgewood Avenue, belo w, indicates how existing fa cilities might be utilized and how the j1latf arming could be
tap ered off and landscaped to avoid any shar/1 edges. Hurt Park,
at present the only gree nery around Georgia State, would remain
an important focal point. S f1arks Hall, right center, wo uld tie in
with future classroom buildings, and the old Municipal Auditorium, left center, also is included in th e master plan.
immediately or even over the next eight years. Some or all of
the buildings could be constructed under bond issues, and
many phases of th e expansion would qualify for various federal assistance grants.
Some eyebrows were raised when Mr. Steiner included the
present Atlanta Police Department headquarters in the overall
campus. The plan also includes Georgia State's ownership of
the old Municipal Auditorium. With the cooperation of the
city government, these should prove no major barricades to
the plan. A new auditorium and convention complex.. is being completed now on Piedmont between Forrest and Pine.
When the second phase - extension of the convention facilities across Pine - is accom plished a few years hence, the
city's need for the old auditorium will be at an end. Implementation of the Steiner plan would indeed require building
of new police headquarters elsewhere, but the present building
itself would not be razed . With some interior remodeling, it
would become an integral part of the new campus, surround ed at its second-floor level by the platform which would
be part of the principal pedestrian plaza of the future campus.
An expenditure that might cause greater controversy is the
setting aside of I per cent of the' total building budget for art.
The idea is well established in Europe. In Zurich , the art
allocation is Io per cent. But in the United States, few governm ent units have adopted the scheme for public buildings. Priva te developers have been bolder than the government
in this respect.
The Steiner plan is insistent on the point. And it's not talking merely abo ut paintings hung on interior walls. The unique
plaza campus, the report asserts, offers unusual opportunity
to create beauty, contribute to the status of art in th e
university system, and provide an outstanding example for
civic design. The master plan urges imm ediate developm ent
for a "systematic, comprehensive, and ambitious" plan for art
development and for appointment of an art ists' committee
with full power to pass on acquisitions and acceptance of
don ations.
Experience shows that it's a long trip from the drawing
boards of ambitious master plans to realization. But the
Steiner plan has overwhelming logic as well as beauty on its
side. It accommodates the projected student load . It makes
brilliant use of Atlanta's topography and the man-made delineations of rails and street patterns. Above all, it helps establish a clear definition of Georgia State's role in the future
of Atlanta and the state.
W
�~- -
Li[H][E
R[E IT\l[E\W[R
NEWSLETTER OF THE CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE
FOR URBAN RENEWAL
Vol. 5 No. 11
Atlanta, Georgia
December 1967
J
OPENSHAW CALLS FOR CONCERTED ACTION TO HALT BLIGHT
AS HE GIVES REPORT ON YEAR OF URBAN RENEWAL GAINS
Delivering an inspiring report of notable progress in urban renewal during 1967
to our Dec. 19 full committee meeting, Howard Openshaw, Atlanta Housing Au ..
thority redevelopment director, also sounded a call for private enterprise, churches.
labor organizations and civic groups to join with public efforts in a concerted en ..
deavor to turn back the spread of blight. Summed up Mr. Openshaw: "Too many
people look to a single tool to solve all the problems of the city. For example,
urban renewal was not designed to speak to the problems of unemployment,
lack of education, crime, and other social diseases. Too long have we looked
to public programs alone to solve our problems. Churches, civic organizations,
labor unions, industry - private enterprise must become involved if we are to
succeed in our endeavors."
In addition to citing the gains achieved by Atlanta'~ urban renewal program duz,ing
196 7, Mr. Openshaw also reviewed the exciting outlook for 1968. The text of his
report follows: SLUMS AND BLIGHT ARE GROWING - "Atlanta, like every maj<,r
city across our land, has awakened to find itself sitting on a potential powder keg.
Countless ages of neglect and apathy has resulted in an accumulation of urban
blight and decay. People are rebelling against their environment, and we see the
resulting strife and turmoil in Milwaukee and Detroit. To make matters worse
the slums and blighted areas are growing, not shrinking. In the last 5 years,
Atlanta has increased its number of dwelling units by 9, 141. During this period,
the number of dilapidated structures were reduced from 12, 000 to 3,000. How.
ever, the number of substandard units increased from 22,800 to 49, 300.
"The City's population increase is projected at an annual rate of 2%, with the
negro population increasing by 62% and the white population by 4%. Those who
can afford it are moving to the suburbs. The City's financial resources are
limited, there is no help from the State, and the demand for Federal funds is
three times the available supply. We simply do not have adequate resources to
cope with all of our problems. 11
MUST USE EVERY AVAILABLE RESOURCE - "The time for action is upen us.
We must use every available resource, every tool to make our cities more
livable, to enrich the quality of men's lives, and to make every citizen a pro.
ductive member of Society. We must eliminate our slums, yes. But also, we
must halt the spread of blight. Urban renewal is the tool that can allow us to
have a slumless city. An effective program of code enforcement is essential
to preserve our neighborhoods and to halt the spread of blight. A top priority
in the city is to provide housing for low and moderate income families. The
mayor has set a goal of 16,800 units to be constructed in the next five years.
But even here, we are finding it difficult to find suitable, reasonably priced
land for low-cost housing."
PAST TWELVE MONTHS SHOW PROGRESS IN ALL PHASES OF RENEW AL
PROGRAMS - "In 8-1 /2 years, Atlanta's urban renewal program has made
giant strides in redeveloping its blighted areas.
�- 2-
"From the period D e cember 1, 1966 t o December 1, 1967, the Atlanta Housing
Aut hority ha s a c qu.ir ed 538 parcels of land at a cost of $4. 7 million. The Autho r ity r e locat ed 5,6 f a m ilies from urban renewal areas, and provided housing
a ssis tanc e t o 6 8 7 a dditional families relocated as a result of other governmental
a ction , During the past twelve months, the Authority demolished 477 structures
c omp r i sin g 76 6 dw e lling units, and completed rehabilitation of 201 dwelling units.
T he A uth o ri ty sold 97 p arcels of land for $886, 72a and put under contract for sale
a n a d diti o nal 60 pa.reel s of land having a value of $2 million.
Construction was
b egun on improvem en ts t otaling $2~ 1 million. These improvements include 106
a part men t unit s in the Butl e r Stre e t Project, and 38 single family units in Thomasville. Improvemen ts t c':.:.·~::~~ $4, 8 million were cortipleted in the past 12 months,
i ncludi ng office bu 1 ldin gs ·for the tJ,
Rubber Company, Ford Motor Company,
A vis Rent - A- Car, and Cousins P ~operties, Construction was, started on 240
dwelling u nits and a n a dditional 41 dwelling units completed during th~ peribd. 11
s.
N INE P ROJEC T A ME N DMENTS APPROVED - "Amendments were submitted and
F ed e ral a pp r ova l r ec e i ved on the following urban renewal projects: Butler Street,
t o p r ·ovid e a s e con d },_i_g !1- rise for the elderly adjacent to Graves Homes on
Hilliard S tre e t, and l and expansion for Ebenezer Baptist Church; Rockdale, to
p rovide f o r c hange s i n land use a nd street pattern; Thomasville, to provide public
h ousing n ort h of M'CDo n ough Road; Georgia State, to add the block north of the
p olic e st a tion t o the p r oject area; Georgia Tech, to include an additional $737,810
a s Sectio n 112 c r e d it s toward the City's share of project cost; Buttermilk Bottoms,
r eceived Fede ral a pp r o val of Part I of the Application for Loan and Grant;
B e dford-Pine , to com bine the Buttermilk Bottoms project with Bedford-Pine;
Bedford- Pine Lett er of Consent, to permit acquisition of additional street rightof- w a y fo r th e Auditorium; Bedford-Pine draft Part I Application for Loan and
Gr a nt. A m endrne n t,s w ere submitted on the following urban renewal projects for
w hic h Fed eral app r ov a l has not yet been received: Rawson- Washington, to extend
p r oj ect b o undary t o p r ovide land for school expansion, park, and neighborhood
c enter; B edfo rd- Pine E arly Land Acquisition Loan, to provide a site for public
h ousi n g, a nd to m a ke a v ailable rehabilitation loa ns and grants for properties
a l on g Bou levar d , 11
C OMPETITIO N SP URS SUPERIOR PROPOSALS -"A significant achievement of the
r enewal p rogram w as the development competitions for land in Rockdale, Rawson ..
Wa s h ingto n and Um.ive r sity C e nte r Projects. A fixed price was e stablished on the
l and, a nd rede v elo p ers propos a l s w e re r e stricte d to r e side ntial development under
S ection 2 2 1 d 3 . ..,,..he Atlanta Housing Authority staff, the City Planning D e part.
ment, the Am eric a n In stitute of Architects, American Society of Landscape Archi.
t ee t s, the Citi z en s Advis ory Committee for Urban Renewal, the Housing Resources C ommi ttee, the State Planning Bureau, the U~ban Renewal Policy Com.
m itte e a n d the Hou s ·ng Authori ty' s B o a rd of Commissione rs reviewed four re d eveloper s propo s a ls in R oc kda l e , seven proposals in Unive rsity Cente r, a nd six
proposals in R a ws on- W a shington. T he fixed land pric e , development compe tition
a pproach not o nly .result e d in superior proposals from redevelopers, but assured
maximum livabili ty fo r families of low and moderate incomes. The Authority,
w ith assi s t a nce fr o m CACUR, conducted l, 271 p e ople on tours of Atla nta's urban.
ren e w al a nd p u bli c housing p r o grams ."
MOD EL C ITY , BE DF ORD- PINE E XECUTION TOP EXCITING OUTLOOK F OR
NEW YEAR - " Ex.,citing t hing s a nd a lot of hard work lie ahead for 1968. The
C ity , in c oope r at i o n w ith o the r agencie s and residents of the a r ea, will begin
pla nning t he m o deA city a rea, T h e urb a n ren ew a l a nd public hou s ing prog r a m s
will be i n volved i m. the tota l attack on t h e s ocia l a nd phy s ic a l blight of t h e 3 , 000
acres of .la n d extending fr om We st End t o the other s ide of Grant Park. T h e
Bedfo r d - Pine Ur b an R enewal Area w ill enter execution. The Authority will
p rovid e t empor ar y r e l ocation hou s ing for those famili e s living in the initial cle ar .
anc e a r ea. Stagin g t he e xecution a c tivities will minimize the number of fam ilie s
displac ed. Con str uc tion w ill b e started on improvement s c o sting $ 26. 2 millio n on
urban renewal lan d i n 1968. The s e improveme nts include 1, 468 dw e lling u nits ,
the Ira H ardin Office B uild ing , s t a dium mote l, a n d the I nt e rna tional Hou s e in
Universi t y C ent eit".
�... 3 _
"The ninety-five areas of land on McDonough Road :b,ic~rttiy made available to the
City by the Federal Government will be added to the Thotnasville Project; and
plans will proceed immediately to IFl'Ovide land for public housing, townhouses,
single-family development, and an elementary and middie-high school. We must
continue our commitment to eliminate slums wherever they occur, and to halt the
spread of blight. We must provide decent housing for all our people, with special
emphasis on low and moderate income families. But we must do more than this.
We must become more sensitive to the physical design and development of our City.
For, unless Atlanta is to become a haven for the homeless and the poor, we must
create an environment t o attract people of every economic level of life as together
w e seek to make Atlanta the great city it is destined to become. 11
HUD' S STRAUB CONGRATULATES ATLANTA
ON PIONEERING MODEL CITY CONVENTION
Thanking Mr. Openshaw for his
pertinent and perceptive report,
Chairman Sommerville emphasized
the importance of the model city program and called on Charles N. Straub, Federal
Agency Liaison Specialist, from HUD, to bring our committee abreast of developments in this new city-federal cooperative endeavor, Explaining that Atlanta was one
of only nine southeastern cities and 63 in the nation t o receive conditional approval,
Mr. Straub pointed out that final disposition of the planning grants reserved, depended
upon the cities presenting acceptable work programs to HUD. Such plans are exptected within 45 days. He specified that HUD had requested Atlanta to outline a
five year program with a specific work plan for the first year. He pointed out that
Atlanta 's plans would have to be revised because the city's request for $500, 000
as a planning grant was cut to $152,000. In discussing this reduction, Mr. Straub
mentioned that Atlanta had received an additional $100, 000 from EDA, but only
$18, 000 of this would apply directly to studies in the model city area.
Then Mr.
Straub congratulated Atlanta warmly on innovating the plan of holding a convention
open to all residents of the model city area. This convention, held at Hoke Smith
Technical High School Sunday.~afternoon, Dec. 10, is regarded as a new departure
in citizen participation, Mr. Straub stressed. Said he 11 No city has really thrown
the model city program open as Atlanta did with this convention. The city also is
to b e congratulated on accepting what the people asked for. 11 (NOTE- This refers
to action by the Aldermanic Board Dec. 18 approving the request made at the convention for a representative from each of the six neighborhoods involved on the
governing board of the model city program)
In a following discussion, Mrs. S . F . Crank pointed out that EOA was a prime
mover in organizing the c onvention. Mrs. Grace Hamilton a lso e xpressed congratulations to the Aldermanic Board in accepting the recommendations made by
the convention. (NOTE - Among others representing our committee at the conve ntion was Director Howland.)
Action is under way to locate
houses for s uitable r e habilitation
by our nonprofit corporation,
CAC URRCI under the 221 H program, the full committee meeting was informed.
Executive committeewoman Hamilton reported that with Walter Screws of the Atlanta
Housing Authority, and Director Howland , s he inspected a number of dwellings in
and n e ar the University Center project on De cember 14. She s tressed the point
that if such houses could be found in this area, their rehabilitation would improve
the pr oject's public image. Mr. Screws added that all houses seen were single
family occupied. In reply to a question from Executive committeeman Percy Hearle,
Chairman Sommer ville said 19 houses had b een located east of Gl en Iris and north
of Hunter Street. A guess~ s timate would b e tha t th e houses would rang e in value
fro m $ 4 , 500 to $8,000 and that rehabilitation would cost from $2,000 to $4,000.
E xecutive committeeman Harold Arnold a lso suggested some houses on Morgan
Street and Boulevard Place. He pointed out that also considered had been the area
Mrs. Hamilton inspected , the area .adj ac ent to the Nash-Banns section, the South
Atla nta region beyond the model cities area a nd the a r ea east of Bedford-Pine.
In s upport of the B oule v a rd Place - Morgan Street location , Mr. A rnold pointed
out th at it h a d exp e rie nced racial unrest and that location of the 221 H project
there, would indicate interest in solving its problems. In the following discussion,
Mrs. Ha milton urg e d that the Atlanta Housing Authority keep a coordinated list of
pro pertie s s cr een ed~ C h a irman Somme rville pointed out that such lists would be
a v ailable fr o m the city B uilding Depa rtment and the Housing Authority.
ACTION BEGINS TO LOCATE 221 H HOUSES;
TWO LISTS OF SUGGESTED DWELLINGS GIVEN
�1flH](E
R[l!\l[E\W[R
NEWSLETTER OF THE CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE
FOR URBAN RENEWAL
Vol. 5 No. 11
Atlanta, Georgia
December 1967
OPENSHAW CALLS FOR CONCERTED ACTION TO HALT BLIGHT
A S HE GIVES REPORT ON YEAR OF URBAN RENEWAL GAINS
Delivering an inspiring report of notable progress in urban renewal during 1967
to our Dec. 19 full committee meeting, Howard Openshaw, Atlanta Housing Authority redevelopment director, also sounded a call for private enterprise, churches,
labor organizations and civic groups to join with public efforts in a concerted endeavor to turn back the spread of blight. · Swnmed up Mr. Openshaw: "Too many
people look to a single tool to solve all the problems of the city. For example,
urban renewal was not designed to speak to the problems of unemployment,
lack of education, crime, and other social diseases. Too long have we looked
to public programs alone to solve our problems. Churches, civic organizations,
labor unions, industry - private enterprise must become involved if we are to
succeed in our endeavors. 11
In addition to citing the gains achieved by Atlanta•~ urban renewal program during
196 7, Mr. Openshaw also reviewed the exciting outlook for 1968. The text of his
report follows: SLUMS AND BLIGHT ARE GROWING - "Atlanta, like every major
city across our land, has awakened to find itself sitting on a potential powder keg.
Countless ages of neglect and apathy has resulted in an accumulation of urban
blight and decay. People are rebelling against their environment, and we see the
resulting strife and turmoil in Milwaukee and Detroit. To make matters worse
the slums and blighted areas are growing, not shrinking. In the last 5 years,
Atlanta has increased its number of dwelling units by 9, 141. During this period,
the number of dilapidated structures were reduced from 12, 000 to 3, 000. However, the number of substandard units increased from 22,800 to 49, 300.
"The City's population increase is projected at an annual rate of 2%, with the
negro population increasing by 62% and the white population by 4%. Those who
can afford it are moving to the suburbs. The City's financial resources are
limited, there is no help from the State, and the demand for Federal funds is
three times the available supply. We simply do not have adequate resources to
cope with all of our problems. 11
MUST USE EVERY AVAILABLE RESOURCE - "The time for action is upon us.
We must use every available resource, every tool to make our cities more
liv a ble, to enrich the quality of men's lives, and to make every citizen a productive member of Society. We must eliminate our slums, yes. But also, we
m u st halt the spread of blight. Urban renewal is the tool that can allow us to
have a slumles s city. An effective program of code enforcement is essential
to preserve our neighborhoods and to halt the spread of blight. A top priority
i n the city is to provide housing for low and moderate income families. The
mayo r has set a goal of 16,800 units to be constructed in the next five years.
But even here, we are finding it difficult to find suitable, reasonably pric:ed
land for low-cost housing."
PAST TWE LVE M ONTHS SHOW PROGRESS IN ALL PHASES OF RENEWAL
PROG RAMS - " In 8-1/2 years, Atlanta's urban renewal program has made
giant stride s in r edeveloping its blighted areas.
�-2"From the period December 1, 1966 to December 1, 1967, the Atlanta Housing
Authority has acquired 538 parcels of land at a cost of $4~ 7 million. The Authority relocated 576 families from u rban renewal areas! and provided housing
assistance to 687 additional families relocated as a result df other governmental
action . During the past twelve months, the Authority demolished 477 structures
comprising 766 dwelling units, and completed rehabilitation of 201 dwelling units.
The Authority sold 97 parcels of land for $886, 722 and put under contract for sale
an additional 60 parcels of land having a value of $2 million.
Construction was
begun on improvements totaling $2. 1 million. These improvements include 106
apartm ent units in the Butler Street Project, and 38 single family units in Thomasville. Improvements tailing $4. 8 million were completed in the past 12 months,
including office buildings for the U. s. Rubber Company, Ford Motor Company,
Avis Rent-A-Car, and Cousins Properties. Construction was started on 240
dwelling units and an additional 41 dwelling units completed during the period."
NINE PROJECT AME NDMENTS APPROVED - "Amendments were submitted and
Federal approval received on the following urban renewal projects: Butler Street,
to pr·ovide a second high-rise for the elderly adjacent to Graves Homes on
Hilliard Street, and land expansion for Ebenezer Baptist Church; Rockdale, to
provide for changes in land use and street pattern; Thomasville, to provide public
housing north of McDonough Road; Georgia State, to add the block north of the
police station to the project area; Georgia Tech, to include an additional $737,810
as Section 112 credits toward the City's share of project cost; Buttermilk Bottoms,
received Federal approval of Part I of the Application for Loan and Grant;
Bedford- Pine, to combine the Buttermilk Bottoms project with Bedford-Pine;
Bedford-Pine Letter of Consent, to permit acquisition of additional street rightof-way for the Auditorium; Bedford-Pine draft Part I Application for Loan and
Grant. Amendme nts were submitted on the following urban renewal projects for
which Federal approval has not yet been received: Rawson- Washington, to extend
project boundary to provide land for school expansion, park, and neighborhood
center; Bedford-Pine Early Land Acquisition Loan, to provide a site for public
housing, and to make available rehabilitation loans and grants for properties
along Boulevard."
COMPETITION SPURS SUPERIOR PROPOSALS -'!A significant achievement of the
renewal program was the development competitions for land in Rockdale, RawsonWashington and University Center Projects. A fixed price was established on the
l and, and redevelopers proposals were restricted to residential development under
Section 221 d 3. The Atlanta Housing Authority staff, the City Planning Department, the American Institute of Architects, American Society of Landscape Architects, the Citizens Advisory Committee for Urban Renewal, the Housing Resources Committee, the State Planning Bureau, the U~ban Renewal Policy Committee and the Hou sing Authority's Board of Commissioners reviewed four redevelopers proposals in Rockdale, seven proposals in University Center, and six
proposals in Raws on- Washington. The fixed land price, development competition
approach not only resulted in superior proposals from redevelopers, but assured
maximum livability for families of low and moderate incomes. The Authority,
with assistance from CACUR, conducted 1,271 people on tours of Atlanta's urban
renewal and public housing programs."
MODEL CITY, BEDFORD-PINE EXECUTION TOP EXCITING OUTLOOK FOR
NEW YEAR - "Exciting things and a lot of hard work lie ahead for 1968. The
City, in cooperation with other agencies and residents of the area, will begin
planning the model city area. The urban renewal and public housing programs
will be involved in the total attack on the social and physical blight of the 3, 000
acres of .land extending from West End to the other side of Grant Park. The
Bedford-Pine Urban Renewal Area will enter execution. The Authority will
provide temporary relocation housing for those families living in the initial clearance area. Staging the execution activities will minimize the number of families
displac ed. Construction will be started on improvements costing $26. 2 million on
urban renewal land in 1968. These improvements include 1, 468 dwelling units,
the Ira Hardin Office Building, stadium motel, and the International House in
University Center.
�- 3"The ninety-five ar eas of land on McDonough R o ad rec ently m a de ava ilable to the
City by the Federal Governme nt will be added to the Thoma s ville Project, and
pla ns will proceed immediat ely t o g.;rovide land for public housing, townhouses,
single -family development, and a n elementary a nd middle-high school. We must
continue our commitment t o e liminate s lums wherever they occur, and to halt the
spr ead of blight. We must p r ovide dec e n t hous ing for all our people, with special
emphasis on l ow and mode rate income families. But we must do more than this.
W e must becom e more sensitiv e to t he physical design and development of our City.
For , unless Atlanta is t o become a haven for the homeless and the poor, we must
create an environment t o a ttract people of every economic level of life as together
we s e ek to make At l anta the gr eat city it is destined to become. 11
HUD'S STRAUB CONG RA T ULATES AT LANTA
ON PIONEERING M ODE L CITY C ONVE N T ION
Thanking Mr. Openshaw for his
pertinent and perceptive report,
Chairman Sommerville emphasized
the impo r tance of t he model city program and called on Charles N. Straub, Federal
Ag ency Liaison Specialist, from H UD, to b r ing our committee abreast of developments in this n ew city-federal coope r a t ive e ndeavor. Explaining that Atlanta was one
of only nine s outh easte rn cities and 63 in t h e nation to receive conditional approval,
Mr . Straub p ointed out t hat final disposition of the planning grants reserved, depended
upon the citie s p re s enting acceptable work p r ogr ams to HUD. Such plans are exptec t ed within 4 5 days. He specified that HUD had requested Atlanta to outline a
fiv e y e ar progr am w ith a specific work plan for the first year. He pointed out that
Atlanta's plans w ould hav e to be revised because the city's request for $500, 000
as a planning g rant w as cut to $152, 000, In di scus s ing this reduction, Mr. Straub
mentioned that Atl ant a had received a n additional $100, 000 from EDA, but only
$18, 0 00 of thi s w oul d appl y dire ctly to studie s in the model city area.
Then M r.
Str aub cong ratulated Atlanta warmly on innovating the plan of holding a convention
open t o all re sidents of the model city area. This convention, held at Hoke Smith
Technical High Sc hool Sunday.., afternoon, Dec . 10, is regarded as a new departure
i n citizen par t icip a t ion, M r. Straub stressed. Said he 11 No city has really thrown
the model city program open a s Atlanta did with this convention. The city a l s o is
to be congratul ated on acc epting .what the people asked for. 11 (NOTE- This r efers
to acti on b y the Alde r manic Board Dec. 18 approving the request made at the convention for a repre s e n tat i ve from each of the six neighborhoods involved on the
g overning board of the m odel city program)
In a following d is c u ssion, Mrs. S. F . C rank pointed out that E OA was a prime
mover in organizing the c onvention. Mrs. Gra ce Ha milton a lso express e d congratulations to the A l de rmanic Board in accepting the recommendations made by
the c o nven tion. (NOTE- A mong othe r s representing our committee at the convention was Diredor Howland. )
A ction is unde r w a y t o loc a te
hous es for s uita ble r e h a bilita tion
by our nonprofit corporation ,
CACURRCI unde r the 2 2 1 H program, the full committe e meeting was informed.
Executive committ eewoman Hamilt on r e porte d that w ith Walter Screws of the Atlanta
Housin g Authority , and Directo r Howla nd, s h e i nspe cte d a numbe r of dwe llings in
and near the University Center project on D ecemb er 14 . Sh e s tr ess ed the p o int
that if such houses c ould be fou nd i n this ar ea, the ir reh a bilitation would impr ove
the project's public image. Mr . Screws a dded that all houses seen were single
family occupied. In reply t o a quest i on fr om :Executive committeeman P e rcy Hearle ,
Chairman Sommerville said 19 h ouses ha d bee n located east of Glen Iris a nd n o r th
of Hunter Stre e t. A guess~ stimate w ou ld b e that the houses w oul d range in valu e
from $ 4 , 500 to $8, 000 a nd that r e h a bilitation woul d c o s t fr om $2 , 000 t o $4, 000.
Exec u tive c ommitteeman Harol d Arno ld also suggested s ome hou ses on Mo rgan
Street a nd Boulevard Place. He pointed out that al s o considered had been the a rea
Mr s. Hamilton inspecte d, the area ,a d jacent to the Nash- Banns section, the South
Atlant a region beyond the model citie s area and t h e area east o f Bedfor d -Pine.
In support of t he Boulevard P l a c e - Morga n Street l o cation, Mr. Arnold p ointed
out that it had experien ced racial u nres t and tha t l oca tion of the 22 1 H proj e ct
there , would indicate interest in solving its pr oblems . In t he following d i scussion,
Mrs. Hamilton urged that the Atla nta Hou s ing Au thority keep a coordina t e d li st of
properties screened. Chairman Sommer ville p ointed out that s u ch lists would b e
available from the city Bu ilding Dep a rtme n t and t h e H ousing Authority.
ACTION BEGINS TO L OCA T E 2 2 1 H HOUSES ;
T WO LISTS OF SUGGESTED DWE LLINGS GIVEN
�CITIZENS
FOR URBAN RENEWAL
OFFICE OF THE MAYOR
CITY HALL-ATLANTA, GA. 30303
PHONE 524-2745
ROBERT L . SOMMERVILLE
CHAIRMAN
WILLIAM S. HOWLAND
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
MRS. EVELYN DODDS
SECRETARY
December 11, 1967
Dear Committee Members:
Twill be the sixth day before Christmas and all through our program
will be items of timely interest for our last full committee meeting of 1967.
We will start off with a report on the year's activities in urban
renewal and allied undertakings by Howard Openshaw, director of redevelop.
ment for the Atlanta Housing Authority. In addition to telling what has been
going on during 1967, Howard will give us a concise preview of what is ahead
for 1968.
Then we will have some updating on the Model Cities Program by
Chuck Straub, in charge of this program in Atlanta for the regional office of
HUD.
Thirdly, we will have some updating on our participation in the 221-H
program. Before our meeting, Mrs. Grace Hamilton and I are going out to
look at some possible sites for our project. We are asking Mrs. Hamilton
to tell us about these sites. We hope to have this program fully underway
after the first of the year.
Then, if time permits we have asked James A. Smith, chief of the
housing code inspection service, to tell us about the streamlining of the housing
code that has recently been effected by the Board of Aldermen.
I am sure there will be some questions and answers on these
various topics.
Chairman Sommerville and I will be looking forward to seeing you
on Tuesday afternoon, December 19, 2:30, Atlanta Room of the C & S National
Bank.
Sincerely yours,
j(J~~./J
William S, Howland
NOTE: time changed to 2: 30 p. m,
~
�I
I
-IJ1rat1w
7r- (Ji lE lR[[NfWER
NEWSLETTER OF THE CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE
FOR URBAN RENEWAL
Vol. 5 No . 10
Atlanta,
Georgia
November 1967
CHAR T ER PUTS OUR CORPORATION IN BUSINESS
T O I MPLEMENT $96, 000 221 -H ALLOCATION
At our executive committee
meeting, Nov. 21,
Attorney Hugh Peterson, Jr.
pr esented a prestigious document, bearing the gold sealsof the State of Georgia and the
Superior Court of Fulton County. Said the first page of the document: "I, Ben Fortson,
Jr. , Secretary of State .of the State of Georgia, do hereby certify that "The Citizens
Advisory Committee for Urban Renewal Rehabilitation Corporation, Inc. was on the
sixth day of November, 1967, duly incorporated under the laws of the state of Georgia
by the Superior Court of Fulton County for a period of thirty five years from said date."
This document went on to list the incorporators as Robert L. Sommerville, William S.
Howland, H. W. Whitm an, Harold Arnold, Herbert Waldrip, Mrs. Grace Hamilton,
Percy Hearle and Harold Davis. It then set forth the corporation's purposes saying
"Said corporation is and shall be organized and operated exclusively for the purpose
of assisting in the development of projects, undertakings, studies and other activities
by itself or in cooperation with local government and civic bodies and other corporations
and associations for the elimination of slums, blight and blighting influences and to aid,
assist and foster the planning, development, renewal and improvement of the metropolitan, Atlanta , Geor gia, area, all for the primary purpose of combatting community
deterioration and securing adequate housing, community facilities and related facilities
f or the general welfar e of the community. 11 The document further stated "no part of
the principal fund s or income of the corporation shall ever inure to the benefit of any
private shareholder or individual or beneficiary, or revert to any donor or to the estate
or heirs of any donor and no part of its activities shall ever be carrying on propaganda
or otherwise attempting to influence legislation or participating in or intervening in
(including the publishing or distributing of statements) any political campaign on behalf
of any candidate for public office. 11 The document included an order by Superior Court
Judge Jack B. Etheridge granting the charter. As Attorney Peterson handed the papers
t o Chairman Sommerville, he said, with a srr.ile, "Now we'll get a seal for the corporation if I can just get all those letters on one. 11
The essence of all the words and seals and signatures on the papers which made up the
blue bound document is that what is known as a legal entity" has been created to put
i nto action the $96, 000 221 H grant allocated in response to our committee's application. Summed up Mr. Peterson: "The corporation is now in business. Application
for tax exemption has been sent to the Internal Revenue Service. I understand that the
committee received the grant even before the corporation was organized, so now everything is ready to roll w hen tax exemption approval is received. 11
On the afternoon prior to
our Nov. 21 executive
committee meeting, our
new non profit corporation, the Citizens Advisory Committ ee for Urban Renewal
Rehabilitation Corporation, Inc. me t with Attorney Hugh Peterson, Jr. to complete its
organization. All eight incorporators, as listed previously, were named trustees of
the new corporation. In turn the quorum present elected two officers to carry on the
corporation ' s work. Officers are Robert L. Sommerville, president and chairman,
William S. Howland, secretary-treasurer. It was also decided that CACURRCI will
h o ld regular monthly meetings on the same date as the monthly meetings of our
comrnittee.
CACURRCI ORGANIZES SELF , INCORPORA TORS
NAMED TRUSTEES, OFFICERS ARE CHOSEN
Acceptin 6 the charter
documents, Chairman
Sommerville explained that
the a p p r ova l of a $96, 000 221 H grant for our committee specifies that the new corporati on will r e habili tate eight dwellings . He pointed out that the 6 rant calls for the pur ..
chase , rehabilit ation and resale of this number of structures.
NEW CORPORATION WILL REHABILITATE
EIGHT STRUCTURES, CHAIRMAN POINTS OUT
�-2The Atlanta Housin g Authority ha s a g reed t o a.ss~st CACURRCI in locating the
structure s , h e a dded. Said M r. Sommerville :'This numoer o:£ structures - ei g ht_
may se em sn:. all, but the idea will spread. "
FHA OF FICIAL OUTLINES PROCEDUR ES
FOR PU TTING OUR CORPORATION TO VlORK
Followin~ deli very of our
new corporation's charter,
Otis Haire, FHA real
e s tate evaluator assi 6 necl to the 2 21 H pro g rarn in Geor gia, outlined to the executive
comn.i ttee the procedure by whi ch the $96, 000 g rant allocated to our pro;ect will be
put t o work. M r . Haire first pointed out that 21 applications for 221 H grants so far
h ad been m ade in the state, four of these in Atlanta . He expressed the hope that our
comn, ittee's plan to rehabilitate eiJht houses will spur J rowth to include several
hundred units. Said he " Expansion brick by uric1,, house by house, street by street,
n ei g hborhood by neighi:>orhood is the only way this can be done. It serves a two fold
pu r pose -- ..; etting rid of dilapidated houses and up 6 rading people as well as structures . ' '
First step for CACURRCI will De to review rehabilitation requirements with the
city buildin6 inspector's office, he pointed out . This is essential, Decause a work
w rite-up itemizing deficiencies from foundation to roof will be required for each
structure. Next point is that all rehabilitation in one project must be carried out by
one contractor, chosen from competitive bids . The contractor will stipulate the exact
price , after which 20 per cent of the fee will De held back until all rehabilitation is
completed . This is in lieu of a performance bond . Upon cornpletion of repairs,
individual appraisals w ill be made. The arr. aunt of loan ~~ ranted will vary with re 0 ard
to the size of families and other factors . After completing the initial paper work and
other preliminarie s, the CACURRCI' s next step will be to make financial arran 6 ements
with local lending institutions for acquisition of properties
After houses are
rehabilitated and sold , FHA will pick up the tab. Mr. Haire also pointed out that FHA
has certain stipulations about the types of houses to be purchased and repaired. For
exa;.n ple, so called " shotgun houses ' ' will not be approved. The speaker also ur g ed
that at least lo to 20 houses De considered for choice of the initial ei ght for the project,
because frequently approval difficulties are encountered .
In a discussion followin 6 i\ r . Haire's talk, i'.frs. Grace Han-.ilton asked if there
were any restrictions on location of the eiJht units . John F. Thigpen, Director, (Georgia)
Department of Housing and Urban Development, Federal Housin.:;; Administration,
replied that any area within the city could iJe used for location . Mr. Haire added that
location of any project w ithin a two mile radius was desirable both from the corporation's
viewpoint and that of the contractor . In reply to a question from I\ rs . Doris Lockerman,
about value of houses, Chairman Somm erville pointed out that the total ~rant of
$9 6, 000 would indicate a value of $12, 000 per house .
Two groups of houses were
brought to the attention of
the new corporation by
James Henley of the Atlanta Housing Authority. One is located east of Glen Iris Drive
and south of the Sears store. These are on Rankin, Wilmer and Dallas Streets. The
o t her g roup is in an area bounded by McDonough, Lakewood and Carver Hoines . Mr.
Henley pointed out that no individual houses had been designated but that preliminary
surveys indicated that the houses were in a purchase price ran g e of $4, 500 to $8, 000,
with repair estimates rangin 6 from $2, 000 to $4, 000. Said he: "The houses appear
to need considerable repair w ork, but are not beyond rehabilitation. They also appear
to be owner occupied, single family dwellin 6 s ' '; Mr . Henley emphasized that the
Housing Authority would be delighted to do all within its power to assist CACURRCI.
I n an ensuing Q & A session , A. B. Padgett asked Dan E. Sweat, city director of
6 over nm ental liaison, if the new corpo r ation would help the city's model city program
(fo r w hich Atlanta had recently received federal approval) by choosing homes in that
a r ea . Mr. Sweat replied that this would definitely be of assistance, but that since
considerable time would be required before definite model city plans could be made,
he s u 66 est ed that CACURRCI go ahead with its pro g ram in other areas. In reply to a
qu est ion a bout whether churches were showing interest in 221-H, Mr. Haire said that
a Sunday Sc hool class at the Second Ponce de Leon Baptist Church had called a meeting
t o di scuss participation. In reply to another question about time limits for a project,
Mr. H ai r e s a id a total of 00 days would be allotted- - 30 days for choosing a site, 30 days
fo r naming a cont r ac t o r.
AHA SUGGESTS TWO GROUPS OF HOUSES
FOR NEW CORPORATION TO CONSIDER
�- - --
-
- - -- - -- - -.- - - - - - - - - - - -
-3As the discussion ended, FHA.Housin 6 and Ur bah Developmen.t Director Thigpen
remarked that his or 6 anization is so pleased with bur participating in the 221 H prog ram
that he is assi 6 ning two of his top assistants to work with CACURRCI.
BEDFORD- PINE LEADERS SEEKING TO EXPEDITE
PARK THERE, CHAIRMAN WALDRIP REPORTS
A nun1ber of leaders of
the Bedford- Pine urban
renewal project area met
Nov . 20. with me.r.. ~bers of the Board of Aldermen and representatives of the Atlanta
Housin~ Authority to discuss how a park for that area could be speeded up, Herbert
Waldrip, chairman o f our Bedford-Pine associate comni ittee told the executive
comn·,itte e
Said M r. "\V aldrip - ;'The property for a park (adJoining the new C. W. Hill
School) ha s been cleared for a year and the people in the comn-1unity hate to see another
sumn ,er come around with no recreational facilities for the children there. 1 1 M~r .
Waldrip pointed out that the Nov . 20 meeting was told that the Board of Education was
holdin g up development of a park and that another meeting to include representation
from the Board of Education will be scheduled shortly, but that he feared that it would
be June before any action on a park would ~et under way.
NOTE -- The clay followin 6 our executive comm ittee meeting , Director Howland, who
attended the Bedford-Pine meeting, arranged for M r . Waldrip to confer with Mayor
Allen and also with Dr . Darwin Womack, assistant superintendent for scnool plant
plannin 6 and construction, about the need for action on a Bedford- Pine park .
At the Nov. 21 meeting,
Chairman Somn. erville
expressed our comrr ittee's
reJr et on the death of Dr. Rufus B. Clernent, a lon 6 ti me ;..:: e rr1i.1er
Said M r .
Sor"!l. r., erville : 11 Dr Cl ement was seldon1 able to attend m.eetings, uut no rner:: ber
w or '.(ed harder to help our comn-,ittee and the subcomn. ittees on which he served
achieve their purposes. I never knew a man r: ,ore g entle in speech norm.ore powerful
in 6 ettin 6 thin3 b done. If you asked Dr Clement to do something , I know of nobody
who would 6 0 to m ore trouble to help you. "
CHAIRMAN EXPRESSES APPRECIATION
O F DR . CLEMENT'S NOTABLE SERVICES
Before y ear I s end, final
surveys and reports of the
CIP are due to be received
for evaluation, Director Geor J e A ldridg e reported to our executive com.n. ittee . He
added that since many of these will have to be su bmitted to comn . ittees for review, he
probably will not be a ble to present a full report until our January rneeting.
FINAL CIP STUDIES BEING EVALUATED,
DIRECTOR ALDRIDGE TELLS COlvi.MITTEE
Active citizen participation
is among maJor requirements of the model city
program in which Atlanta i s one of the first 63 cities to receive a federal J r ant, Dan
E . Sweat, Jr . , city direc tor of 6 overnmental liaison, emphasized in an updatin 6 talk
to our executive comn, ittee Nov . 21. Although Atlanta w ill rec eiv e only $15 2, 000 out
of the $500, 09 0 plannin 3 fund requested, the city probably will obtain another $74,000
for model city purposes, iv'.: r . Sweat said. This latte r amount is being reserved in the
Comi-..1.unity Ir.. proven-, e nt Prog r am funds. The city m ust show need for it in the mode l
city pro 5 rarn . l\ti r . Sweat delineated the m odel city a rea as com prisin 6 3 , 000 acres
in the southern section of the city , oounded on the north uy I n t erstate 20, on the west
by Lee Street, and on the south and east by the railroad belt line. Althou 6 h c ompri sin~
only 3. 7 per cent of the c ity land area, the model city site includes
5 per cent of the
total population , on a 7 5 per cent Ne g ro, 25 per cent white basis . As reasons for its
choice for the m ode l city prog ram, I\/. r. Sweat showed that this a re a includes 8 3 per
c ent of the total housing units, but 2 0 per cent of these a r e s u bst a ndard A l so it
includes 11 . 3 per c e nt of the city ' s illiter a t es a nd 2 0 per cent of the population with
incomes under $3, 000 per year . Unen1.ployn, ent rate is 5 1/ 2 per cent as com pared
with the city wide r a t e of 3 1/2 per cent . All in a ll, the area r e pr es ents 20 to 25 per
cent of the city I s maJor probl ems . Mr Sweat a l so 0riefly outlined the methods by
whi c h the .i\·: odel city pro g ram will ue a d m inister e d
Top dir ection will be provided by
a pr o Ject e x e cutive boa rd, consisting of policy rr..akin 6 officials
NOTE-- On Nov . 22,
Mayor A lle n a nd othe r city officia l s conferred with Re 6 ional HUD A d m ini strator Ed
Baxter and other re 6 ional fede ral officia l s involved in i n, plementin g th e m od e l city
program , Our comr.1itte e was represented iJ y Director Howla nd
F ULL COMMITTEE MEETING -- TUESDAY, DECEMBER 19-DETAILS LATER.
CITIZEN PARTICIPATION rv:AJOR ELEMENT
IN M ODEL CITY PROGRAM, SWEAT EXPLAINS
9:
�lf{H(E
lR[E[NfEW[R
NEWSLETTER OF THE CITIZENS AbV1SORY COMMITTEE
FOR URBAN RENEWAL
Vol. 5 No. 10
Atlanta,
Georgia
November 1967
CHARTER PUTS OUR CORPORATION IN BUSINESS
TO IMPLEMENT $96, 000 221-H ALLOCATION
At our executive committee
meeting, Nov. 21,
Attorney Hugh Peterson, Jr.
presented a prestigious document, bearing the gold sealsof the State of Georgia and the
Superior Court of Fulton County. Said the first page of the document: "I, Ben Fortson,
Jr., Secret ary of State .of the State of Georgia, do hereby certify that "The Citizens
Advisory Committee f or Urban Renewal Rehabilitation Corporation, Inc. was on the
sixth day of November, 1967, duly incorporated under the laws of' the state of Georgia
by the Superior Court of Fulton County for a period of thirty five years from said date."
This document went on to list the incorporators as Robert L. Sommerville, William S.
Howland, H. W. Whitman, Harold Arnold, Herbert Waldrip, Mrs. Grace Hamilton,
Percy Hearle and Harold Davis. It then set forth the corporation's purposes saying
"Said corporation is and shall be organized and operated exclusively for the purpose
of assisting in the developm:eilt of projects, undertakings, studies and other activities
by itself or in cooperation with local government and civic bodies and other corporations
and associations for the elimination of slums, blight and blighting influences and to aid,
assist and foster the planning, development, renewal and improvement of the metropolitan, Atla nta, Georgia, area, all for the primary purpose of combatting community
deterioration and securing adequate housing, community facilities and related facilities
for the general welfare of the community. 11 The document further stated 11 no part of
the principal funds or income of the corporation shall ever inure to the benefit of any
private shareholder or individual or beneficiary, or revert to any donor or to the estate
or heirs of any donor and no part of its activities shall ever be carrying on propaganda
or otherwis e attempting to influence legislation or participating in or intervening in
(including the publishing or distributing of statements) any political campaign on behalf
of any candidate for public office : 11 The document included an order by Superior Court
Judge Jack B. Etheridge gr anting the charter. As Attorney Peterson handed the papers
to Chairman Sommerville, he said, with a srr.,ile, 11 Now we'll get a seal for the cor. poration if I can just get all those letters on one. 1 1
The essence of all the words a nd seals a nd signatures on the papers which made up the
blue bound document is that what is known as a "legal entity has been created to put
into action the $96, 000 221 H grant allocated in response to our committee's application. Summed up Mr. Peterson: "The corporation is now in business. Application
for tax exemption has been sent to the Internal Revenue Service. I understand that the
committee rec eived the g rant even before the corporation was or ganized, so now e verything is ready to r oll when t ax exemption approval is rec eiv ed. 11
On the afternoon prior to
our Nov. 21 executive
committee meeting, our
new non profit corporation, the Citizens Advisory Committee for Urban Renewal
Rehabilitatio n Corporation, Inc. met with Attorne y Hu gh Peterson, Jr. to com plete its
organization. All eight inc orporators, as listed previously, were nam.ed trustees of
the new corporation. In turn the quorum present e lected two officers to carry on the
corporation's work. Officers are Robert L. Sommerville, pr esident and chairm an,
William S. Howland, secret a ry-treasurer. It was also decided that CACURRCI will
hold regular monthly meetings on the same date as the monthly me etings o f our
c omrnittee.
CACURRCIORGANIZESSE LF, INCORPORATORS
NAMED TRUSTEES, OFFICERS ARE CHOSEN
Acceptin 6 the charter
documents, Chairman
Somn,e rville explaine d that
the approv al of a $9 6 , 000 221 H g rant for our committee specifies t hat the new corporation will rehabilitate e i ght dwellings. He pointed out that the 6 rant calls for the pur ..
chase, rehabilitation and resal e of this number of structures.
NEW CORPORATION WILL REHABILITATE
EIGHT STRUCTURES, CHAIRMAN POINTS OUT
�-2The Atlanta Housing Authorit y h as ag:teed to as sist CACURRCI in locating the
structures, he added. Said Mr. Sommerville " Thi s numoer of str uc t ures - ei g ht_
may s ee m sn--.all, but the idea will spte ad. 11
FHA OFFICIAL OUTLINES PROCEDURES
FOR PUTTING OUR CORPORATION T O WORK
Followin 6 delivery of our
new corporation's charter,
Otis Haire, FHA real
estate evaluator assi 6 ned to t h e 2 21 H pro g ram in Geor gia, outlined to the executive
comn _ittee the procedure by w hi ch the $9 6, 000 g rant allocated to our proJect will be
put to work. Mr. Haire first pointed out that 21 applications for 221 H grants so far
had been m ade in the state , fou r of these in Atlanta. He expressed the hope that our
com n, ittee's plan to rehabilit ate ei 6 ht houses will spur ,; rowth to include several
hundr ed units. Said he "Ex pansion br ick by uric K, house by house, street by street,
nei;shborhood by neig h oo r hood is the only w ay this can be done . It serves a two fold
purpose - - .;; etting rid of dilapidated houses and up 6 radin g people as well as structures . ' '
First step for CACURRCI w ill De to review rehabilitation. requirements with the
city buildin,;; inspe c t o r 's office, he pointed out. This is essential, Decause a work .
wr ite-up itemizing d eficiencies from foundation to roof will De required for each
structure. Next p oint i s that all rehabilitation in one project must be carried out by
one contracto r, chos e n fr om competitive bids . The contractor will stipulate the exact
price , after whi c h 2 0 per cent of the fee will De held back until all rehabilitation is
completed . This i s i n lieu of a performance bond . Upon co rnpletion of repairs,
individual apprai s als will l> e m ade . The a r.:, ount of loan ~~ ranted will vary with re 0 ard
to the size of fami lies and other factors . After completing the initial paper work and
other prelim inarie s , the CACURRCI's next step will b e to m ake financial arran 6 ements
with l o cal l e n di ng ins t ituti ons for acquisition of properties
After houses are
rehabilitate d a nd sold , F HA will pick up the tab. ivi r . Haire also pointed out that FHA
has certain s t i pul ations about the types of houses to be purchased and repaired. For
example, s o calle d " shotgun houses ' ' will not be approved . The speaker also urged
that at lea s t 16 t o 20 houses De considered for choice of the initial ei ght for the project,
oe c ause frequently app roval difficulties are encountered .
In a di scuss i on followi n 6 j\ '. r. Haire's talk, 1'. frs . Grace Harr.ilton asked if there
were any re s tric ti ons o n location of the ei J ht units. J c,hn F. Thigpen , Director, (Georgia)
. Depar t ment of H ousing a nd Urban Development, Federal Housin~ Administration,
replied that any area w ithin t he city could ue used for location . Mr. Haire added that
location of any pr o j ec t w ithin a two mile radius was desirable both from the corporation's
viewpoint and tha t o f the cont ractor. In reply to a question from l\ ,rs. Doris Lockerman,
abo ut value of hou ses , Chair m an Somm erville pointed out that the total ~rant of
$ 9 6, 000 would i ndicat e a value of $12 , 000 per house .
Two groups of houses were
brought to the attention of
the new corporation by
James Henl e y of the Atlanta Housing Authority . One is located east of Glen Iris Drive
and south of the Sear s stor e. These are on Rankin, \Vilr.i er and Dallas Streets. The
other group is in an are a bounded by McDonough, Lakewood and Carver Hoines. Mr.
Henley pointed out t hat no individual houses had been designated but that preliminary
surveys indicated tha t th e houses were in a purchase price ran g e of $4, 500 to $8, 000,
with repair estimate s ran g in 6 from $2, 000 to $4, 000. Said he: " The houses appear
to need considerabl e rep a i r w ork, but are not beyond rehabilitation . They also appear
to be owner occupi e d , sing le fam ily dw ellin 5 s " . Mr . Henley emphasized that the
Housing Authority woul d be deli 6 hted to do all within its power to assist CACURRCI.
In an ensuing Q & A session, A. B . Padgett asked Dan E . Sweat , city director of
6 ov ernmental liaison , if th e n ew corporation would help the city's model city pro g ram
(for which Atlanta had rece n t ly r eceived federal approval) by choosing homes in that
area . Mr . Sweat replied t hat this would definitely be of assistance, but that since
considerabl e time would be re qui r ed before definite model city plans could be made,
h e su oo
·., 7e sted that CACURRCI u•YO ahead w ith its pro -z r a m in other areas. In reply to a
question about whether churches wer e s how ing interest in 221-H, M r . Haire said that
a Sunday School clas s at the Sec ond P once d e Leon Baptist Chu r ch had called a meeting
to di s cuss participation . In reply t o a n other question about tim e lim its for a project,
Mr. Haire said a t otal of 00 days w ould be allotted- - 30 days for choosin6 a site, 30 days
for naming a contractor .
AHA SUGGESTS TW O GROUPS OF HOUSES
FOR NEW C ORPORA TION TO CONSIDER
�- 3As the discussion ended , FHA .Housin 6 and Uroan Development Director Thi g pen
remarked that his or g anization is so pleased with our participating in the 221 H pro g ram
that he is assi 6 ning two of his top assistants to work with CACURRCI.
BEDFORD-PINE LEADERS SEEKING TO EXPEDITE
PARK THERE , CHAIRMA N WA LDRIP REPORTS
A nun 1ber of leaders of
the Bedford- Pine ur oan
renewal project area m et
Nov.20 . with mer.. bers of the Board of Aldermen and representatives of the Atlanta
Hou s ing Author ity to discuss how a park for that area could be speeded up, Herbert
W aldrip, chairman of our Bedford-Pine associate comr,. ,ittee told the executive
comn--ittee
Said 1\-i.r. 1,V aldrip - " The property for a park (adJoinin 6 the new C . W. Hill
School) has been cleared for a year and the people in the community hate to see another
sumn !er come around with no recreational facilities for the children there . " Mr.
Waldr ip pointed out that the Nov . 20 meeting was told that the Board of Education was
holdin g up development of a park and that another meeting to include representation
from the Board of Education will be scheduled shortly, but that he feared that it would
be June before any action on a park would ~et under way.
NOTE -- The day following our executive com m ittee meeting , Director Howland, who
attended the Bedford-Pine meeting, arranged for Mr. Waldrip to confer with Mayor
Allen and also with Dr. Darwin Womack, assistant superintendent for scnool plant
plannin 6 and construction , about the need for action on a Bedford- Pine park .
CHAIRMAN EXPRESSES APPRECIATION
OF DR . CLEMENT'S NOTABLE SERVICES
At the Nov . 21 meetin 6 ,
Chairman Somn, er ville
expressed our com.rr:ittee's
r eJret on the death of Dr. Rufus B . Clement, a long time :.:r,.e ;:n,.ler
Said Mr.
Sor"11ne rville: " Dr Clement was seldorn able to attend n,eetings, uut no rn.eL : ber
w or '.(ed harder to help our comrc ittee and the subco1nn . ittees on which he served
achieve their purposes. I never k new a man r: ,ore g entle in speech nor n,ore powerful
in 6 etting thin31:, done . If you asked Dr Clement to do something, I know of nobody
who w ould 6 0 to m ore trouble to help you. "
FINA L GIP STUDIES BEING EVALUATED,
DIRECTOR ALDRIDGE TELLS COiv1MITTEE
Before year's end, final
surveys and report·s of the
GIP are due to be received
.for evaluation, Direc t or Geor 6 e Aldridge reported to our executive comn:ittee . He
added that since many of these will have to be submitted to comn ittees for review, he
probably will not be able to present a full report until our January· meeting.
CITIZEN PARTICIPATION M AJOR ELEMENT
IN MO DEL CITY PROGRAM, SWEAT EXPLAINS
Active citizen participation
is among maJor requirements of the model city
program in which Atlanta is one of the first 6 3 cities to receive a federal grant, Dan
E . Sweat, Jr . , city director of 6 overnmental liaison, emphasized in an updatin~ talk
to our executive comm ittee Nov. 21. Althou 6 h Atlanta will receive only $152, 000 out
of the $500, 0 90 plannin;:s fund requested, the city probably will obtain another $7 4, 000
for m odel city purposes, :r,t r . Sweat said . This latter amount is being reserved in the
Corrn.,unity Ir. .provement Program funds . The city m ust show need for it in the model
city pro 6 rarn. Mr. Sweat delineated the model city area as comprising 3, 000 acres
in the southern section of the city, oounded on the north uy Interstate 20, on the west
by Lee Street, and on the south and east by the railroad belt line. Althou 6 h comprisin.:;;
only 3. 7 per cent of the city land area, the model city site includes 1 . 5 per cent of the
total population , on a 75 per cent Negro, 25 per cent white basis. As reasons for its
c h oice for the model city pro 6 ram, l\·~r . Sweat showed that this area includes 8 3 per
cent of the t otal housi ng units, but 20 per cent of these are substandard
Also it
includes 11 . 3 per cent of the city's illiterates and 20 per cent of the population with
inc omes under $3, 000 per year. Une m ployment rate is 5 1/2 per cent as compared
with the city wide rate of 3 1/2 per cent . All in all, the area represents 20 to 25 per
cent of the city's major problems . M r Sweat also i.)riefly outlined the rnethods by
which th e l\ : odel city pro g ram will ue adm.inistered . Top direction will oe provided by
a project executive board, consisting of policy .::r..a1cin 6 officials
NOTE- - On Nov . 22,
M ayor Allen and other city officials conferred with Re g ional HUD Administrator Ed
Baxter and other re c:,,1ional federal officials involved in i m ple1nenting the model city
program, Our comr. 1ittee was represented i.;, y Director Howland .
FULL COMMITTEE MEETING -- TUESDAY, DECEMBER 19-DETAILS LATER.
�CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE
FOR URBAN RENEWAL
OFFICE OF THE MAYOR
CITY HALL-ATLANTA. GA. 30303
PHONE 524-2745
ROBERT L. SOMMERVILLE
CHAIRMAN
WILLIAM 5. HOWLAND
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
MRS. EVELYN DODDS
SECRETARY
November 17, 1967
Dear Executive Committee Member ..
I feel sure that all of us agree with The Constitution's editorial today which said "Yesterday's announcement that Atlanta had been approved for a model
cities planning grant is an event of major importance. It gives Atlanta what
is potentially the most powerful tool it has ever used to reverse urban decay
and to serve a changing population.
"Atlanta's selection is at once a reward and a challenge.
11
Since our committee has been an ardent supporter of the Model City Program
from its inception, I have asked Dan E. Sweat, the city's Director of Governmental Liaison, to brief us on the program I s present status and future
potential at our meeting at 2 p.m., Tuesday, November 21, in the Directors
Room, Fulton Federal Savings and Loan Building.
Sincerely,
, ':'s
I I . !I
J
( ·1-v t t { ~
William S. Howland
�CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE
FOR URBAN RENEWAL
OFFICE OF THE MAYOR
CITY HALL-ATLANTA, GA. 30303
PHONE 524-2745
ROBERT L. SOMMERVILLE
CHAIRMAN
WILLIAMS. HOWLAND
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
MRS. EVELYN DODDS
SECRETARY
November 14, 1967
Dear Executive Comn,ittee Member -
Just to remind you that because of the Turkey Day holiday, we are meeting
next Tuesday, repeat Tuesday, November 21, at 2 p. m. in the directors
room of the Fulton Federal Savings and Loan building, on the southwest
corner of Pryor and Edgewood.
Even though that is two days before Thanksgiving Day, we have a lot to be
thankful for and to be interested in.
For instance:
1. Our legal eagle, Hugh Peterson, Jr., has completed the
incorporation of our non-profit corporation to enable u s to participate
in the 221-H rehab program. Mr. Peterson will brief u s about the
w o rking s of our non-profit corporation with its almost non-pronounceable
name ... The Citizens Advisory Committee for Urban Renewal
Rehabilitation Corporation, Inc. (CACURRCI) . How's that for a tongue
twister and a headline writer's headache?
2. We have received official confirmation from John F. Thi gpen,
Georgia FHA director, that we have been granted $96, 000 to cover the
rehabilitation of eight dwelling units.
3. To help CACURRCI get started PDQ on putting this grant to
work, Mr. Thigpen is delegating Otis M. Haire, Georgia FHA real estate
evaluator, to meet with us Tuesday and outline the steps that CACURRCI
must take.
4. Also to help us to get started with utmost speed, Lester H.
Persells, AHA Associate Executive Director, will give us some specific
sites to consider.
�-2-
So how we can begin active participation in 221-H will be the first order
of business Tuesday.
Also we will have a brief report from Herbert Waldrip, our Bedford-Pine
Associate Committee Chairman, on some recent developments in that
area.
All in all, a full menu is presented for our pre-Thanksgiving meeting.
Chairman Sommerville and I will be very thankful if you can attend
and give us the benefit of your thinkin~.
Sincerely yours,
-.
~11(
I
IlA
~-~~
William S. Howlarid
�. ..
. .. 1
lR[NlEWlElR
. NEWSLETTER OF THE CI Tl ZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE
FOR URBAN RENEWAL
Vol . 5 No. 9
Atlanta, Georgia
October 196 7
COMMITTEE FORMING NONPROFIT CORPORATION The Citizens Advisory ComTO PARTICIPATE IN 221 H REHAB PROGRAM
mittee for Urban Renewal
will form a nonprofit corporation to participate actively in the new 221 H federal rehabilitation program.
T h at was the unatlimous decision of the executive committee at its October 19
meeting. Following the September meeting, at which the details of the new federal
program were explained, the city attorney's office was asked for a ruling as to
whether the committee by itself could receive loans and grants ·to participate by
handling a project fol' the rehabilitation of dwelling units.
Edwin L. Sterne, associate city attorney replied, saying, in substance, that the aldermanic resolution
creating our committee provided that our function was to advise on urban renewal
matters but had nd authority to act as a nohpt4ofit d:rgahizatioh. Mr. Sterne held
that our committee is nbt what is known as a "legal entity 11 , but a group of persons.
Accordingly, he suggested that we create a rtohprofit corporation which would be a
legal entity and be authorized to enter into contracts, etc. In line with Mr. Sterne's
suggestion, Chairman Sommerville called for a motion to create a nonprofit corporation. The motion was unanimously approved for a nonprofit corporation to be known
as The Citizens Advisory Committee for Urban Renewal Rehabilitation Corporation.
The following were named as incorporators: Robert L. Sommerville, William S.
Howland, H. W. Whitman, Harold Arnold, Mrs. Grace Hamilton, Percy Hearle,
Harold Davis, all of our committee and Herbert Waldrip, chairman of the BedfordPine Associate Advisory Committee. Hugh Peterson, Jr. was engaged as attorney
to effe c t the incorporation. Mr. Peterson briefly outlined the incorporation procedure saying that the chief expense involved would be _publication of the charter in
a legal newspaper. This he estimated, would not exceed $100. Chairman Sommerville explained that these and other initial costs will be taken care of by a loan from
the Atlanta Transit System. Summed up Chairman Sommerville: "I think it is important for our committee, by means of this nonprofit corporation, to participate
actively in the 221 H program. If it is carried out under the aegis of our committee,
it will get good n otices and it will be very encouraging to the kind of people we have
been w o rrying about." Commenting on the committee's action, Henry R. Fillmer,
present in his new capacity as assistant chief of the real estate disposition depal:'-tment, HUD regional office, said: "This should generate actir,n by other nonprofit
groups in Atlanta. "
Carrying out General Nathan
Bedford Forrest's famed
battle ·plan of "gittin' thar
fustest with the mostest", immediately following the Sept. 27 luncheon conference
with the federal officials, Chairman Sommerville and Director Howland filed an
application for a federal allocation of $96, 000 to rehabilitate eight dwelling units
under the 221 H program. On October 23 we received the good news from Kenneth
Finn, architect in the regional FHA office, that our application had been approved
by Washington headquarters. Accordingly, while our nonprofit corporation is being
formed to implement this allocation,. preliminary steps to determine a site for the
project have been taken with the Atlanta Housing Authority. It is our intent to locate
our rehabiliation undertaking adj.a.cent to or in the vicinity of an urban renewal project.
OUR APPLICATION FOR $96,000 ALLOCATION
FOR 221 H PROJECT WINS FEDERAL APPROVAL
DRASTIC CHANGES IN RENEWAL CONCEPT URGED A resolution calling for two
BY NAHRO DELEGATES, OPENSHAW REPORTS
sweeping changes in urban
renewal was adopted by the
1800 delegates to the 31st Conference of the Nn.tional Association of Housing and
Redevelopment Officials, Howard Openshaw, Atlanta Housing Authority, redevelopment director who attended the Portland, Oregon meeting reported to our executive
c ommittee.
�..
'
2
One change was that the urban renewal concept be one of total community
development instead of single project approach. The other was that the federal
contribution be made .90 percent (instead of 66-2/ 3 %) and that local credits be
eliminated. That would mean the 10 percent local contribution would be all cash.
The resolution further proposed, Mr. Openshaw explained, that Congress adopt a
goal for national housing produc tion-at the rate of 2 million units per year for the
next 20 ye~rs, and that 500, 000 of this total production be established for low and
moderate income housing, one half of which should be reserved for an expansion
of the public housing program. The delegates also stressed the need to decentralize
the Department of 11ousing and Urban Development to provide more decision making
pow ers at the re~ional level to expedite urban renewal and housing programs. The
res olution further rec ommended special attention be directed toward meeting the
housing needs of large families and very low income families.
ATLANTAN'S DESIGN FOR SAN FRANCISCO
Mr. Openshaw also told the
EMBARCADERO CENTER IS IMPRESSIVE
executive committee that he
.
.
was very much in1pressed
by San Franci sco 1s prbposed Embarcadero Center, as designed by Atlanta's John
Portm ah. He explained that the plan calls for 2, 800, 000 square feet of office space,
a hotel, entertainrr.ent center and landscaping with sculpture and foun t ains ,
In
additioi1, the Golden Gateway Center contains townhouses and high rise office
buildings; a 1300 car garage and more sculpture and other works of art. Mr.
Openshaw pointed o_u t that the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency requires that
at lt:!ast one perteht of construction costs be devoted to exterior works of art.
Fr esno, California, also is carrying out a m~jor urban renewal project, transform.fog its main street to a mall, 16 blocks long. Landscaping and extensive use
of art are employed. Summing up, said he: "My particular interest was not only to
see redevelopment programs of other cities, but also to secure the design standards
and contr ols that produce such magnificent redevelopment areas. 11 Corr:,n1enting
on the national acclaim Atlanta's urban renewal program receives, he said "We
have only begun to scratch the surface. 1 1
FINDING SUITABLE SITES FOR HOUSING
DIFFIC ULT IN ALL AREAS, JONES REPORTS
Finding suitable sites for new· housing is diffic~lt . iri..a.U.a.r.eas of:...
the city, Col. Malcolm Jones,
Director, Housing Resources committee, pointed out to the executive committee,
He added that sites for 3, 300 units are awaiting zoning action. Col. Jones said that
6,340 unit s now seem firm and 1,479 more appear probable, making a total of 7,819
that can be regarded as definite so far in the five year program. He added that the
number available for use by the end of 1967 should be scaled down from the earlier
estimate of 2, 534 to a little more than 1, 900. The prospect for 1968 is seen as a
total of 3, 159. He said that the Housing Resources committee had recommended the
selection of scattered sites. In a discussion following Col. Jones' remarks, Collier
Gladin, city planning engineer, reported that the land use study is proceeding slowly
with continued revisions. He expressed hope that an acceptable plan would be ready
by January 1, 1968. Executive Committeeman Calloway urged support of a project in
the Jackson -- Boulevard-Hollywood area. It embraces 60 acres, including 221 D 3
units, apartments, shopping center and condominiums. Mr. Calloway added that it
was adjacent to the first turnkey project and was awaiting federal approval. Referring
to the difficulty of obt aining sites for housing, Lester H. Per sells, AHA associate
executive director, pointed out that4·, 500 public ·.hou.aing units mea~s finding some
40 parcels of land. Consequently, they will have to be located in different areas in
the city. He als o pointed out that with the lead time on individual projects ranging
from six to 18 months, the need for action is apparent.
An honor guest at our October
19 meeting was Maruo Shioda,
deputy chief editor of Shukan
Yomiuri, weekly magazine with a circulation of 700, 000, published by a leading
Japanese newspaper. In Atlanta as a participant in the State Department's international visitor program, :tv.. r. Shioda was making a special study of u r ban problems,
with emphasis on the sociological and human factors.
JAPANESE EDITOR IS OUR GUEST,
TELLS OF HUGE HOUSING COMPLEXES
�-3Asked by Chairman Sommerville to address the comrr.ittee, Mr. Shioda spoke
briefly through Ichiro Mike Nishimura, State Department escort-interpreter. He
stressed the point that the housing shortage iri Japan most serious affects the middle
income groups. Government housing is supplied in very lar 5 e complexes, which
include parks, shops and super markets. Housing is in high rise structures,
extending to 15 stories, with 22 to 25 families on each floor. Mr. Shioda also
photographed our comrr:ittee in action .
NEW GA . STATE PROGRA!v: TO DEVELOP
TRAINED URBAN WORKERS, DA VIS EXPLAINS
The airn of Geor Jia Stat e
ColleJe' s new urban affairs
program is to develop skilled
people to work with cities and counties, Executive Committeeman Harold Davis,
public relations dire ctor at the colle 6 e, explained October 19. He pointed out that
the four year course, for the dec,;ree of Bachelor of Science in Urban Affairs, will
train students to help solve uroan problems. After two years ·o f general studies,
thos e seekin 6 this degree will devote their final two years to courses in urban
J eography, racial minorities , the politics and economics of urban life, demoJraphy
and kindred subjects . To support this program, the City of Atlanta is contributin 6
$18,000, he said. Mr. Davis also briefly mentioned the remarkable 6 rowth
achieved by Georgia State over the past <lecade. In that period, the colleJe' s
academic program has expanded from one degree and eight majors to 23 degrees
with 13 7 majors. He also pointed out that the State Board of Regents had authorized
a new school, the colle J e's fifth, to open next July. This is the School of Applied
Health and Sciences. Its pro 6 ram will embrace courses in therapy, nursing and
health subJects o the r than the disciplines required for the MD degree.
NEW URBAN RENEWAL REPRESENTATIVES,
STONE AND THOMAS, ARE INTRODUCED
Hank Fillmer, who for the
past six years has been workinc;; closely with us as HUD' s
representative, introduced his successor and associate to the executive comrnittee
October 19. Directly succeeding Jl.'~ r. Fillmer, who has been promoted to assistant
chief, real estate disposition department, is Clyde Stone, now Atlanta urban renewal
representative. Mr. Stone for m erly was urban renewal representative for North
Carolina, South Carolina and Florida areas. Also introduced was Anthony Thomas,
who will be associated w ith M r. Stone in the Atlanta area, actin g chiefly as urban
renewal repre sentative for East Point, College Park and Decatur.
As you may have noticed, the
new ' 'Plan for Better Cities"
cornn. emorative stamp is
being u sed on our comr.- ittee' s October mailings . This has brou 6 b.t a comrr_endatory
letter fro m Atlanta Postmaster Geor ~e W. Camp, who wrote "This is a great idea
and you are t o be corn.rr~ended for promoting your pro 6 rams in this very excellent
way". Re 6 ardi n g this unusual and attractive stamp, explained Postmaster Camp:
·'This stamp was designed by Francis Fer ..;Uson, instructor in the School of Architecture, Division of Urban Planning , Colun , bia University, New York City. It was
issued to hi 6 hli g ht the critical need for urban planning, an objective in which our
government is vitally interested I con~ratulate your committee for its work toward
intelligent planning for the renewal of sections of our city.
USE OF "PLAN FOR BETTER CITIES' STAMP
BRINGS ACCLAIM FROM POSTMASTER
FOUR SCORE MEMPHIS LEADERS HERE
TO STUDY CENTRAL CITY PROGRESS
As guests of Central Atlanta
Progress, Inc. , some 80
business and professional
le aders of Memphis, Tenn., are visit ing Atlanta this week to see at first hand and
hear at first ear how Atlanta sets the pace of progress for the Southeast. Headed
by Philip A. Perel, president of the Downtown Associat ion, the Memphians are
paying particular attention to the central city. In so doing, they will see how
importantly urban renewal is involved. It will be recalled that, after Mrs. Joan
Strong, chairman of the Memphis Citize ns Advisory Comn,ittee, attended one of our
meetings last fall, Executive Director Howland was invited to tell the Memphis
committee how our committee helps keep Atlanta's urban renewal program moving
forward.
NEXT EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING - NOVEMBER 21 - DETAILS LATER.
�CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE
FOR URBAN RENEWAL
OFFICE OF THE MAYOR
CITY HALL-ATLANTA, GA. 30303
PHONE 524•2745
ROBERT L . SOMMERVILLE
CHAIRMAN
WILLIAM S . HOWLAND
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
October 13, 1967
MRS. EVELYN DODDS
SECRETARY
Dear Executive Committee Member:
Somehow a gremlin got mixed up in the typewriter on
Columbus Day and the time of our Thursday, October 19, meeting
was omitted.
The time will be, as always, Z p. m.
The place is the
Directors Room of the Fulton Federal Savings Association
Building, Pryor and Edgewood.
Sincere ly your s ,
)/J,tlk,tJ~.
Willia m S. How land
�CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE
FOR URBAN RENEWAL
OFFICE OF THE MAYOR
CITY HALL-ATLANTA, GA. 30303
PHONE !524-2745
ROBERT L. SOMMERVILLE
CHAIRMAN
WILLIAM S. HOWLAND
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
October 12, 1967
MRS. EVELYN DODDS
SECRETARY
Dear Executive Committee Men:ber:
First of all, our October meeting is to be held next THURSDAY, OCTOBER 19
(instead of the customary third Wednesday of the month) in the Directors Room
of the Fulton Federal Savings Association Building, S. W. corner of Pryor
Street and Edgewood Avenue.
Chairman Sommerville and I earnestly hope you will be able to join us at this
meeting because we have a very important rr.atter to consider with you.
It is - how our committee can participate in the new federal 221 H program to
rehabilitate deteriorated housing. If you attended the September meeting, you
will recall that Mr. Finn of FHA explained the details of this new program. What
he said indicated that it offered a fine opportunity for our committee to help meet
our city's need for adequate housing.
We h a ve taken a first step by filing an application for a federal grant of $96, 000
w hich w e hope may be approved by next Thursday . To put this grant to work,
we n eed to form a nonprofit corporation. How we can do this will be explained
Oct ober 19. It is not a difficult undertaking. W e would like the benefit of your
thi nki ng on w hat c an be a very worthwhile project for our committee.
In addition to di s c u s sing t he 221 H program next Thur sday , we will be b r ou ght
up to d a t e o n ur ban r enew al by Howa rd Openshaw, r edevelopment d i rector fo r
Atlanta Housing Autho r i ty.
Also, if time permits, Har o ld Davis , o ur e x ecutive committee man w h o d irects
public relations for Georgia State College , will t e ll us bri e fly about the colle ge's
new urban affai rs academic progr a m .
Sincerely,
William S . How l a nd
P. S. As you can see by the enve lope in w hich thi s lette r comes to you that the
Post Offic e Dept. is putting a sta mp of approva l on our activitie s .
�CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE
FOR URBAN RENEWAL
OFFICE OF THE MAYOR
CITY HALL-ATLANTA, GA. 30303
PHONE !524-2745
ROBERT L. SOMMERVILLE
CHAIRMAN
WILLIAM S. HOWLAND
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
MRS . EVELYN DODDS
-- -
�.---r-' C
I A..
[Rf N[W·[ R
NEWSLEf tEi:t
Vol. 5 No. 8
OF tHE C!TIZENS AbV!SOR y COMMl'tTEE
Jtdlt URBAN RENEWAL
Aiianta, Georgia
September 1967
NEW PROGRAM FINANCES RkHAb OF' HOUSES
BY NON PRO.F't't SPONSOiUs 1 COMMITTEE HEARS
A new federal funding prog r am
under the Federal Housing
Administration, known as 221 H,
provides itiE!ans by which non profit sponsors can undertake rehabilitation of deteriorating housing units, our committee was informed at its first fall meeting, Sept. 20.
Introduced by Henry Fillmer, urban renewal representative in the regional HUD
headquarters, Kenneth Finn, a rphitect in the architectural section of the Georgia
FHA office, explained the details-.,of the progi,am for which $20 million has been
appropriated by Congress. Accocl-panying
Finn were Otis M. Haire, Georgia
FHA real estate evaluator, and Glenn Barger, :chief of HUD's disposition branch.
At the outset Mr. Finn first stressed the point that the main purpose of 221H is to
provide homes for tho se who cannot purchase houses at current market prices. The
chosen instrument through which old but restorable houses can be rehabilitated to
achieve the program's purpose will be a non profit sponsor. Such can be Chambers
of Commerce, church groups, civic organizations, our committee. In substance Mr.
Finn explained, any going concern that can be certified by the internal revenue service as non profit organization may enter into this program.
Mz'\
To qualify for funding under
221H plan, a sponsor mus t
designate not less than five
houses for rehabilitation, Mr. Finn pointed out. These can be anywhere within the
city, in an urban renewal area or elsewhere but for efficient operation, should be
within a two mile radius for each project. After selecting the houses to be rehabilitated, the sponsor with the assistance of Mr. Finn and Mr. Haire applies to the
federal agency for an allocation of funds.
Following approval of the application
FHA appraises the property. Then a work sheet is made out for the contractor to
bring the prope rty up to code standards established for this program. To finance
this work a conventional construction loan is obtained. Upon completion of the rehab work, a loan at 3 percent interest, guaranteed by the Federal National Mortgage
Associtltion goes into effect, under terms of which a qualified purchaser can buy the
home under 25 year. t erms at this low rate of interest. Mr. Finn further explained
..that certain limits on income and cost of house had been set. For example, under
the present market analysis for the Atlanta area, a family of four can have an income
of $3,800 a year and under the 221 H plan, can pay up to $11,400 for a house. He
pointed out that this means that the head of a family of four. earning $75 to $8 0 a
week, can purchase a $1 l, 400 house and pay for it at 3 percent interest over 25 years.
This works out at a monthly payment of $54. 50. In reply to a question, he said
there was no terminal limit for home purchasers.
FHA'S FINN OUTLINES PROCEDURES
BY WHICH SPONSOR PUTS PROGRAM INTO ACTION
First non profit sponsor to
apply for an allocation in
Atlanta is Morris Brown
College, Mr. Finn reported. In reply to a question he said the 221 His not limited
to single family dwelling units, but if multiple units are included, they must be side
by side on the ground and not superimposed. Each unit must be occupied by a home
owner. To facilitate home ownership, the sponsor can act as a cosigner on the property. So can a close blood relative of the purchas e r.
In reply to questions about
maintenanc e of properties, Mr. Finn pointed out that annual inspections would be
made and that the sponsor would ~ork with the new owner to help him keep his house
up to code standard.
He added that FHA requires all units to be equipped with a new
cooking range, a 30 gallon automatic water heater and an automatically defrosting
refrigerator.
MORRIS BROWN COLLEGE FIRST SPONSOR
OF A 221H PROJECT IN ATLANTA AREA
�2
Replying to a question, Mr. Finn said that if the original purchaser sells wihtout the
sponsor's consent to an ineligible purchaser, interest on the purchase loan would go
up to the standard market :rate , If the owner's income increases, he still can live in
the house and pay off his purchase pric e at 3 percent interest. Answering another
question, Mr. Finn said that to participate in 221H, a sponsor would need some
$2, 500 to $3, 000 "see_tl money" and some volunteers to do the paper work, etc. The
overhead for ·which initial tnortey would be needed would include fees for drawing
deeds, passing on titles, arid interest on the conat:t-ucHon loans.
MANY POINTS ON zzi H DETAIL$ RAISED
Keen interest by committee
IN SPIRITED ~ UESTION AND ANSWER SESSION
members in the 221 H program
.
was indicated by qliestidns
asked in a lively question and answer session following Mr. Finn's talk. For example,
it was stressed that occupancy limits would be enforced in rehabilitated dwellings.
Also, it was explained that the only new construction to be permitted would be the
addition of a bathroom, where needed, and the reconversion of a duplex to a single
family dwelling. In that event, each unit would have to be purchased at a single
dwelling price. In reply to another question, it was explained that financial assets
(other than income) of a purchaser are not considered. '\' ith regard to relocation of
people during rehab work, Mr. Finn expressed the hope that the city relocation service would help in this. Lester Per sells, AHA associate executive director, made
the point that the sponsor should seek this help from the Housing Authority. Asked
how rapidly a would be sponsor might expect a reply from his allocation request,
Mr. Finn said he would think a reply could be received in two weeks. As closing
time for our meeting approached, Chairman Sommerville summed up by saying
"This committee will pursue the 221 H program with the banks, the housing author ity,
and others with the idea of getting some sponsors."
Our committee on
Sept. 20 un.anim·ously
endorsed the P. tlanta
Chamber of Commerce Board of Directorsrecently adopted resolution calling upon the
ci·.ty of Atlanta to adopt an updated land plan and a new zoning ordinance based upon
this plan. The resolution was presented to our meeting by Executive Committeeman,
George Kennedy, chairman of the Charr.ber' s Housing and Development Committee.
Because of its important bearing upon all redevelopment and housing activities, the
text of the resolution follows in full:
COMMITTEE ENDORSES CHAMBER OF COMMERCE CALL
FOR UPDATE D LAND PLAN AND ZONING RULES
"The Atlanta Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors recognizes as a
matter of serious concern to the entire community the current shortage of adequat e
housing available to the low..i.ncome and moderate-income families in the City of Atlanta.
This Board is further aware that this shortage of housing, unless the problem is
dealt with forcefully and effectively with all the resources at hand, likely will become
even more serious in nature .
It is heartening t o this Board to note the eff~rts and the tangible results
achieved by the Mayor's Housing Resources Comrr.ittee, which is serving as a
c oordinating agency in the community.wide effort to encourage construction of new
housing. The Committee has accepted the responsibility to help assure the construction
of some 16,800 new housing units in Atlanta by the end of 1971. It has been directed to
the attention of the Board, as a result of the studiea of the Atlanta Chamber's Housing
and Redevelopment Committee, that one of the major obstacles in attempts to alleviate
the housing shortage is a severe scarcity of available land which has been suitably
zoned for construction of multi.family structures. V\hereas some 1,565 acres of
suitable zoned land would be required for fulfillment of the five year goals, it is
apparent that only about 68 acres can be reasonably anticipi. ted for use for this purpose.
The last comprehensive zoning for the City of Atlanta was done in 1954, and countless
amendments to the zoning ordinance have been made in the intervening years. It is
the belief of this Board that a new zoning ordinance for the City of Atlanta is not only
essential but long overdue.
�3
'Therefore, it is resolved by t h e Atlarita Chamber of Commerce Board of
Directors that immediate steps sh'.ould be taken by the City of Atlanta, through its
Planning Department and the Board of Aldermen, to adopt an updated land use plan,
and that new zoning ordinance , based on the land use plan, should be prepared for
submission to the Board of Al.d ermen at the eailiest possible time.
11 It is further resolved by this ll»oard that any new zoning plan adopted by the
City of Atlanta s hould make provision for adequate land for multi-family housing and
open up land for increased density of housing in all quadrants of the city, in order
to serve the best intere sts of a changing and progressive City of Atlanta. This Board
also declares its willingness and desire, and that of the Atlanta Chamber's Housing
and Rede~elopment Committee, to counsel arid assist in any way possible toward the
attainm e nt of thi s end. •1 September i 3, 1961.
TRACK BEING CLEARED FOR PROPOSAL FOR
GQMMIT':f~E; .TO.SPONSOR A 22L-H PROJECT
Immediately following the
explanation of the new 221 H
program to our full committee
Sep~. 29, Chairman Sommerville and Director Howland began setting the wheels in
motion for a pi'opo ~ai to be made to our executive committee October 19 that CACUR
spohsor an Atlanta rehab project, At a luncheon meeting Sept. 27 FHA' s Kenneth Finn
outlined the steps for applying to the agency for an allocation of funds. Attending the
luncheon, in addition to Mr. Finn and Mr. Haire of FHA and Mr. Fillmer of HUD,
were Lester Persells, associate executive director, and Howard Openshaw, rehabilitation director of the Atlanta Housing Authority, Cecil A. Alexander, founding chairman of our committee and now chairman of the Atlanta Housing Resources committee,
George Kennedy, chairman of the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce Housing and Redevelop.
ment committee, A. B. Padgett, chairman of our CIP subcommittee, Mr. Sommerville
and Mr. Howland. In addition to discussing procedural details, a number of possible
project sites wer e mentioned by the luncheon group. Following this meeting the city
attorney was asked to give our committee guidance on the legal specifics necessary
for us to participate actively in 221 H. It is Chairman Sommerville' s intent to present
a definite proposal to the executi ve committee Oct. 19.
CODE ENFORCEMENT, P LANNING GAINS PRAISED
AS WORKABLE PROGRAM IS RECERTIFIED
Atlanta's progress in housing
code enforcement and planning
was recertified until August 1,
1968. Accompanying HUD Regional Administrator Edward H. Baxter to present the
certificate to Mayor Allen were George Papageorge, workable program branch director,
and Richard L. Larkin, special assistant for public affairs. Representing our committee were Chairman Sommerville and Director Howland. As he handed the certificate
to Mayor Allen, said Mr. Baxter "Atlanta has met all requirements and is moving
steadily ahead on its program of improvement. 11 Replied Mayor Allen: "Without the
help of the federal government, Atlanta would not have the standards it has today. We
are going to continue to do the job required and we are counting on you to help us do a
better job." Then Mr. Papageorge chimed in, saying "Three years ago there was
some difficulty with code enforcement. Now there is tremendous improvement. We
are so proud of Atlanta's achievements that we are pointing it out to other cities as an
example." Mr. Baxter added a pat on the back to City Planning Engineer Collier Gladin
saying "Planning is a lot better. " Commented Chairman Sommerville: "The city is
doing a wonderful job. Our committee seeks to help the city departments whe n e ve r it
can." (Note as an example of this, we arranged the certification ceremony.)
CHURCH CONGRATULATED ON HOUSING PROJECT
Our committee joined the
Atlanta Housing Authority, city
officials and other agencies in congratulating Ebenezer Baptist Church on being cho sen
as the developer of 152 housing units in the Rawson-Washington urban renewal project.
Representing our committee at the contract signing ceremony were J.B. Blayton, Sr.,
Mrs. Grace Hamilton and Director Howland. Speaking for our committee, Mr. Howland
said: "On behalf of Chairman Sommerville and our entire committee, we h eartily congratulate Ebenezer Baptist Church and its co-pastor s, The R ev. Martin Luther King ,
Sr. and Jr., upon their outstanding proposal, which includes notable s ocia l considerations as well as excellent design. "
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING -
OCTOBER
19th
-- DETAILS LATER
�CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE
FOR URBAN RENEWAL
OFFICE OF THE MAYOR
CITY HALL-ATLANTA, GA. 30303
PHONE !524-2745
ROBERT L . SOMMERVILLE
CHAIRMAN
WILLIAM S. HOWLAND
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
MRS. EVELYN DODDS
Sept ember lZ, 1967
SECRETARY
Dear Committee i,.,,:ember:
Comes now (next week, that is) the fall equinox when our lon6 and occasionally hot
summer changes int_o our cool stimulating autumn.
Also comes next week, to be exact, at 2 p. m., 'Wednesday, September 20, in the
Directors Room of the Trust Company of Georgia, our thi rd quarter full comrr.ittee
meetin 6 .
Just as the Minnesota T w ins have been leadin6 the American Lea6'1e pennant race
(rr.ost of the time, that is), our prog ram will op en with a double billin6 . Our old
friend, Hank Fillmer, will pres e nt, as lead off batters, Kenneth Finn and Otis Haire,
of the architectural section of the Georgia F. H. A. office. They will tell us all
about a new and highly s ignificant progr am known as 221 H, whose aim is to bring
about widespr ead re habilitation of old but economically rest o r able prop ertie s by
non profit sponsor s . I a m s ure we a r e all fa miliar with the national renow n AUanta
h a s a chieved thr ough its applica tion of the 221 D 3 progra m t o n ew construction
proj e c ts (Wheat Street Gardens is a shining exampl e of t his ).
Bu t 2 2 1 H is s o mething new under the federal sun. It provide s way s and means to
r e build and repair ol d properties. As s uch, it opens up exciting n ew vistas for non
p rofit sponso rs (our committee c ou ld even be o ne ).
Next will be a report on what' s now going on and what's in prospect in urban renewal
from Howard Openshaw in h i s first appearance before us in his new capacity as
director of redevelopment. Howard will be presented by Les Persells , -who is also
in a new capacity as associate executive director of the Housin.6 Authority.
Also on hand to update us on planning and housing and to answer questions will be
Collier Gladin and Col. Malcolm Jones.
And, of course, Chairman Somn1erville will have something to say.
Chairman Bob and I are lookin6 forward to meeting with you Wednesday, Sept. 20.
Sincerely,
William S. Howland
�August 2., 1967
The Rev. C . A . Samples
Northwest Community Civic Forum
131 7 Westmoreland Circle, Room 451
Atlant , G orgia 30318
Dear Mr . Samples :
Th nk you for your letter of July 31 .
Chairman Sommerville and I do hope th t you will find time
to attend ou.r next meeting in September because I think th t there
will be many timely subjects to be di · cu sed. It is our intent to
keep all meetings on timely subjects and to encourage informal
discu slon.
To inform you what took place t the la t two committ e
meeting , lam enclo ing copie of our monthly newsletter .
You will note that t e chm eting th re la con ider bl di cue ion on the topic that were brought up. If you would like
to rec lv · this new letter monthly, I will be lad to put you on
the m lling li t.
When our September meetin t
cbeduledi I will end you
th notic w 11 in adv nee and again hope th t you will be able to
tt nd.
Sincerely your ,
William S. Howland
WSH: d
nc.
bcc:~
/
yor Allen, Jvf r. Sommerville
�lrlHl[E
IR fE lf\J [ \/V [E R
NE V..- SLETTER OF THE C I TIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE
FOR URBA N R E NEV.; AL
Vol. 5 No. 7
Atla n t a, Georgia
July
1967
DEAR TH OF LAND ZONED FOR A P ARTMENTS BIGGEST
HO USI NG HEADACHE, ALEXANDER TELLS COMMITTEE
By comparison wi t h "vhat
is required for Atlar..~2.' s
five year housing endeavor,
only a minuscule quantity of land z oned for apartments is available, Cecil Alexander,
housing resources committee chairman, reported to our executive committee July 19.
Said Mr. Alexander : "Vac a nt l and now zoned for apartments totals 482 acres, but of
this total 125 a c res i s committed for low income housing and. 122 acres has been turned
down as unsuita ble . Another 31 acres have been planned for other purposes. That
leaves 204 acre s , bu t u sually only one-third of the acreage turns out to be suitable,
so that mean s only 68 a cres are available for the housing program. It is estimated
that a total of 1, 565 acres are actually needed, so with only 68 acres available, it
makes a bleak pictur e ." M r. Alexander also pointed out that while most Atlantans
regard F ive Poi nts a s t he center of the city, that is not geographically accurate. He
adde d that onl y 18 of t h e available 68 acres are located east of Five Points. He
stressed t h e p o i nt that h ousing needs reach out beyond the city limits to present a
truly m etro a rea problem. Said he: "The acreage of open land is much larger in the
west and n o rthw est sections of the city. When you try to go east you run up against
DeKalb C ounty, which h as no workable program. Housing is now a metropolitan
problem. T o be r e a listic, we are going to need something like 4, 500 acres zoned for
apartm ents. V: e mu st come up with an over all plan to distribute this as widely as
p os s i ble. "
By contrast with the
bleakness of the
available land picture,
Mr . Alex and e r report ed encouraging figures in firm and probable commitments for
hou s i n g u nits . He listed 5, 244 as firm, 2, 965 as probable, The combined total of
8, 209 comes t o almost half the five year goal of 16, 800. In addition, 8, 000 units are
being considere d , w i t h 2, 830 more regarded as doubtful. The grand total of more
than 19 ,000 r epresent s about 95 per cent of what is in sight at present, Mr. Alexander
estima t e d . Sumrr:. e d up the speaker: " V.;e must have a realistic determination to
build housing i n quantity to develop a market for it. We need a new zoning ordinance
quickly o r ~evel ope rs and non-profit groups will become discouraied and go to other
cities . " Mr. Alexander also called the committee 1 s attention to a new departure i11.
housing being carried out by National Homes in the Thomasville project area where
some modification of code re gulations is bein 6 tried. He cited this experiment, after
pointinJ out t hat code enforcement can cause hardships to home owners outside urban
renewal projects. Su c h owners cannot obtain the low interest loans for rehabilitation
which are availa ble i n s ide urban renewal areas.
HOUSING PICTURE NOT ALL GLOOM:Y, TOTAL
OF FIRM AND PROBABLE COMi.VU:TMENTS SHO\VS
Followin g M r • .Alexander's talk, Executive Committeeman Edgar Schukraft
pointed to the example of Minneapolis as having built housing throu 6 hout the city.
Said he : "Ne groes and poor people should not be shoved off in one o.irection. We must
look ten years ahead . At lanta is supposed to be a new city, but it will be a city without understanding u nl e ss all of us r ealize that Negroes and poor people are the entire
city's respons i bility." Executive Committeeman John V ilson made the point that an
overall plan is ess e ntial. Alderman John Flanigen, chairman of the aldermanic
zoning comffiittee , expr e s s e d hearty support of Mr. Alexander's call for an updated
zonin6 ordinance. Said he , "In connection with what Mr. Alexander has said, the
first thing I said to Mayo r Allen was that we need a new zoning ordinance. I uon't
want to hire an outside group of consultants. I'd like to see a committee of local men
s tudy the zoning ordinance a nd r e vi s e i t ." Then speaking of the scarcity of land in the
eastern section of the city, Mr . F l a ni 6 en s aid the situation there was almost as crit ical
as it has been in Buttermilk Bot t oms , w ith r e gard to relocation of people in new housing.
Sa id he: " There just isn' t any vacant l a nd wher e h ousing can be put to take care of
people who must be relocated. ;i Commen tin3 on M r . F lanigen' s r emarks, said C ha.ir m a n Somm erville: "From what / .- lderman F l a nig e n h a s said, i t is indicated that this
committee or its successor will have to be in bu s i n e ss fo r a long tim e ."
�-2PORTABLE HOUSING ON TEMPORAR Y BASIS
IS SEEN AS NEW RELOCATION EXPER I MENT
The Atlanta Housin 6
Authority is asking
federal approval of a
plan to provide portable h ous ing for temporar y relocation use, Lester H. Persells,
AHA redevelopment director , e xplained to our executi ve committee. Said he: " We
have some reason to believe that t he f ederal government will 6 0 along with our plan to
put portable housing on vacant land on a temporary basis. For example, 100 to 150
families could be relocated in thi s kind of housing for a year or a year and a half while
permanent housing is being constructed. Thi s is an experimental approach and could
be used in the Bedford .. P ine area. 11 Commenting on Mr. Per sells' remarks, Chairman
Sommerville said our com rr, ittee was keenly interested in s uch use of portable housing
and would like to be kept fully informed of any further developments.
FOUR GEORGIANS BEGIN YEAR'S TRAINING
AS U. R. INTERNS .FOR HQlJSING AUTHORITY
Special ~uests at the
July 19 meeting were
four young men who are
be ginning a year's training i n urban renewal as inte·rns with the Atlanta Housing
Authority. At the end o f their cour se of paid t r aining, they may become staff members
or go to positions elsewh ere. AU four a r e Georgians . Following are brief biographies:
.JAMES P . BI NG, born in Waycross, graduated from Center High School here, then
majored in Social Science at Morris Brown Colle 6 e, from \,vhich he was graduated last
May 31: DARRYL R. CHANEY, Atlanta born, after being graduated from Hapeville
High School, a ttended West Georgia College, then transferred to Georgia State College,
fr-om which he v,ill receive his BBA August 17; CURTIS PARRISH, born in Waycross,
a graduate of Center High Sch ool, then attended Morris Brown College, after completing his unde rg raduate work there, worked a year as social teacher and football
coach at Dr e x el C a tholic Hi gh School, Atlanta; SHELLEY B. STANLEY, born in
Dubli n , after graduation from Mathar Academy, Camden, S. C., attended Daniel Payne
College in Birmingham, Ala. two years and then finished his college education at Paul
Quinn C olle _Je in V. a co, Texas, from which he received a B. S. in Social Science.
Updated from the original
1958 version, the city's
land use plan now provid e s i nformation for projections up to 1983, Collier Gladin, city planning engineer,
explained t o the exe c utive committee July 19. He pointed out that the land use plan is
part of th e c ity' s comprehensive plan, which also embraces thoroughfares, community
facilities and public improveme nts. Sa id he: "Under the 1962 feder a l highway act,
the governments of the m etro area and the City of .A tlanta must come up with a
tho r oughfare plan fo r the five county area. This plan has to be approved by the
Federal Bu reau of Public Roads befor e highway funds can be released. · 1 He showed
that with data furni s h ed by the land use and thoroughfare plans projections c a n be made
on populatio n , growth, h ousing needs and many other points up until the yea r 1983,
when the Atlanta Metro area is schedule d t o h a v e 2,000, 000 population. Mr. Gladin
illu s trate d his explanatory talk with slides of maps showing residential, business and
industrial use s and a l s o showing improvement treatment. He pointed out that the CIP
had provided data on vac a nt l a nd and other land that is not fully in use . Mr. Gladin
further explained that t h e land us e pla n ha s been r e viewed by the Board of Aldermen
and the aldermanic planning a nd d e v e lopme nt committee. As the pla n prog re s ses, it
will continue to be re view e d . In a n s w e r to a question from Executive Committee
Member Grac e Hamilton, Mr. Gladin said that final approval was up to the aldermanic
board. In a discussion following Mr. Gladin' s remarks, Executive Committee Member
Rich inquired what wou l d be cione w ith the plan. Chairman Somm erville replie d that
the plan's future depended upo n a p olitic a l d e cis ion. E x ecutive Committe e M e mber
T. M, Alexander, Sr., emphasi zed that c oor dina tion a mong city d e p a rtme nts will be
a major factor in putting the plan to use .
NEW LAND PLAN INCLUDES DATA TO MEET
NEEDS U NTIL 1983, P LANNER GLADIN EXPLAINS
F igures compile d by the
Atlanta Housing Authority ,.
dis clo se tha t 764 p ers ons
participated in our urban renewal tours so far in 19 67 as c ompare d w i th 8 5 0 fo r a ll of
1967, Chairman Sommerville informed the execu tive c o mmittee . Sai d he: 11 T h e tou rs
have exposed a lot of people to both the good a nd the b a d a nd ha ve p r oved ve ry worth while . They also cause a financial problem for the com mittee. 11
HALF YEAR SHOWS BOOM INJlE NEWAL TOURS
COLLEGE TEACHERS HAIL EDUCATIONAL VA LUE
�Mr. Somrr;e:r ville explained tHat ou~ corrttnit~~e' s poi!cy is to finance tours only for
groups or organizations that do not have resources for such purposes. Executive
Director Howland expressed our committee's thanks to Mrs. Margret Ross and her
associates at the Atlanta Housing Authority for helping to conduct the tours. Illustrating the value of such first hand exposure to urban renewal, Mr. Sommerville read
a letter from Dr. Beate Bandy of the Georgia State College faculty which thanked us
for arrangin 6 a tour July 13 for two of her classes. Wrote Dr. Bandy:
Sin ce you took us on the tour of the Atlanta Urban Renewal Areas we have had
two very lively class ses sions. Most of my students know social problems of this
magnitude only from books; a realistic demonstration like this can make the points
better than any combination of classroom instruction and reading. I want you to know
how much my students and I appreciate the time and effort you spent on us, and also,
that this time and effort is put to very good use, :,
11
Warm appreciation of a tour conducted June 22 for teachers of disadvantaged
youth attending a NDEA institute at Emory University also was expressed by Dr. Dora
Helen Skype k, . institute director. Wrote Dr. Skypek,
"The tour was the highlight of the first week of our program. It was enlightening and enjorable not only for the 18 teachers from New York, Detroit, Denver, Seattle,
Spokane, Milwaukee and urban areas in California, Illinois and the Southeast, but also
for the 19 teachers and staff members who live in Atlanta. Some preconceptions were
shattered and limited information had to be revised. Emphasis on the rehabilitation
aspect of urban renewal was a worthy prelude to our required reading of H. Gans'
1 The Urban Villagers I and related sociological readings. 11
EX-SENATOR DOUGLAS AND HIS COMMISSION
ARE SHOWN HIGHLIGHTS OF ATLANTA RENEWAL
At the request of the
National Commission on
Urban Problems, a
special tour of Atlanta urban renewal projects and the model city target area was
arranged by our committee July 20. Headed by Chairman Paul Douglas, former U.S.
Senator from Illinois, the commission members who were in Atlanta for hearings July
21 , viewed Buttermilk Bottoms, Bedford-Pine, Butler Street, model city, part of
West End and University Center areas. High point of the tour was a stop at the Antoine
Graves housing for the elderly; Commission members visited a number of apartments
and expressed themselves as much impressed by what they saw. Tour conductors
were Director Howland and Mrs. Margret Ross, Atlanta Housing Authority information
officer. At the hearing next day, Director Howland made a brief appearance as a
witness to tell how our committee had helped obtain active citizen participation and
thereby obtained a cooperative attitude in Bedford-Pine planning. Mr. Howland also
expressed our committee's endorsement of the Housing Authority's plan to try
temporary housing as an experiment to relocate people while new permanent housing
is under construction.
On behalf of our
committee, Chairman
Sommerville July 6
expressed congratulations to the Celotex Corporation upon being selected as developer
of 208 units of housing in the University Center project. Chairman Sommerville.spoke
at the c ontract signing July 6. Also representing our committee were T. M. Alexander,
Sr. , chairman of our s pecial subcommittee to review redevelopment proposals, and
Director Howland. Said Mr. Sommer ville: 11 This is a splendid indication of the
blending of private enterprise and public service. The quality of thi.s proposal
assures us that we will not be building a future slum. I heartily congratulate the
Celotex Corporation and welc ome it to this first venture in the field of low and
moderate income housing. What has impressed me about all the development proposals is their excellence. Representing Mayor Allen was Dan E. Sweat, Jr. ,
dir ector of governmental lia i son for the city. Saying he p ers onally w as " exc ite d a nd
pleased with the selection", Mr. Sweat read a statement from Mayor Allen. "I
warmly congratulate the Celotex Corporation", stated Mayor Allen. This marks an
important new step toward meeting Atlanta ' s housing needs in that one of the largest
building materials manufacturers is entering this field for the first tim e . In so doing,
C elotex is d e monstrating a very high sense of public responsibility. I would also like
to e xpress my a ppre ciation of the excelle n ce of a ll se ve n propo sal s submitted. 11
CHAIRMAN ACCLAIMS SELECTION OF CELOTEX
AS 11 SPLENDID PRIVATE .P: ND PUBLIC BLENDING; 1
THE NEXT COMMITTEE MEETING WILL BE IN SEPTEMBER-NONE IN A UGUST
�1f lHl[E
R[I~ l[\~JV[E R
NEV. SLET T E R OF THE CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE
FOR URBAN RENEViAL
Vol . 5 No. 7
Atlanta, Georgia
July
1967
DEAR TH OF LAND ZONED FOR APARTMENTS BIGGEST
HOUSI NG HEADACHE, ALEXANDER TELLS COMMITTEE
By comparison with what
is required for Atlanta's
five year housing endeavor,
only a minuscule quantity of land zoned for apartments is available, Cecil Alexander,
h ousing resources committee chairman, reported to our executive committee July 19.
Said Mr. Alexander: "Vacant land now zoned for apartments totals 482 acres, but of
thi s total 125 acres is committed for low income housing and 122 acres has been turned
down as unsuitable. Another 31 acres have been planned for other purposes. That
leaves 204 acres, but usually only one-third of the acreage turns out to be suitable,
so that means only 68 acres are available for the housing program. It is estimated
that a total of 1, 565 acres are actually needed, so with only 68 acres available, it
makes a bleak picture." Mr. Alexander also pointed out that while most Atlantari.s
re gard Five Points as the center of the city, that is not geographically accurate. He
added that only 18 of the available 68 acres are located east of Five Points. He
stressed the point that housing needs reach out beyond the city limits to present a
truly metro area problem. Said he: "The acreage of open land is much larger in the
west and northwest sections of the city. v\'·hen you try to go east you run up against
DeKalb County, which has no workable program. Housing is now a metropolitan
problem. To be realistic, we are going to need something like 4, 500 acres zoned for
apartments. v: e must come up with an over all plan to distribute this as widely as
possible. "
By contrast with the
bleakness of the
available land picture,
Mr. Alexander reported encouraging figures in firm and probable commitments for
housing units. He listed 5, 244 as firm, 2, 965 as probable. The combined total of
8, 209 comes to almost half the five year goal of 16, 800. In addition, 8, 000 units are
being considered, with 2, 830 more regarded as doubtful. The grand total of more
than 19,000 represents about 95 per cent of what is in sight at present, Mr • .Alexander
estimated. Sumrr:ed up the speaker: 11 Yi e must have a realistic determination to
build housing in quantity to develop a market for it, W e need a new zoning ordinance
quickly or ~evelopers and non-profit groups will become discouraged and go to other
cities. " Mr. Alexander also called the committee I s attention to a new departure in.
housing being carried out by National Homes in the Thomasville project area where
some modification of code regulations is bein 6 tried. He cited this experiment, after
pointin 6 out that code enforcement can cause hardships to home owners outside urban
renewal projects. Such owners cannot obtain the low interest loans for rehabilitation
w hich are available inside urban renewal areas.
HOUSING PICTURE NOT ALL GLOO1v~Y, TOTAL
OF FIRM A ND PROBABLE COMMITMENTS SHOWS
Following Mr • .Alexander's talk, Executive Committeeman Edgar Schukraft
p ointe d to the example of Minneapolis as having built housing throuJhout the city.
Said he: "Neg roes and poor people shoulci not be shoved off in one o.irection, We must
l ook ten years ahead. Atlanta is supposed to be a new city, but it will be a city with.
out understanding unless all of us realize that Negroes and poor people are the entire
city ' s responsibility. 11 Executive Committeeman John V ilson made the point that an
o verall plan is essential. Alderman John Flanigen, chairman of the aldermanic
zoning comrr:ittee , expressed hearty support of Mr. Alexander's call for an updated
zon i ng ordinance. Said he, In connection with what Mr. Alexander has said, the
fi rs t thi ng I said to Mayor .Allen was that we need a new zoning ordinance. I -.i on't
want to h i r e a n outside g roup of consultants. I'd like to see a committee of local men
study the zon ing ordinance and revise it. 11 Then speaking of the scarcity of land in the
easte rn section of the city, Mr. Flani 6 en said the situation there was almost as critical
as it has b een in Butte r milk Bottoms, with regard to relocation of people in new housing!
Said he: "The re just isn't any vacant land where housing can be put to take care of
people who mu s t be r elocated. CommentinJ on Mr. Flanigen's remarks, said Chairman Somm e rville: " F rom what P·lderman Flanig en has said, it is indicated that this
committee or its succe ss or will have to be in business for a long time, 11
�L
~2PORT ABLE HOUSING ON TEMPORARY BASIS
IS SEEN AS NEVi RELOCATION EXPERIMENT
The Atlanta Housin 6
Autho r ity is asking
federal approval of a
plan to provide pdrtable housing for t emporary relocation use, Lester H. Per sells,
AHA redevelopmeht director, explained to our executive committee. Said he: ' 1 we
have some reas on to believe that the federal 6 overnment will 6 0 along with our plan to
put portable housihg on vacant lan<l on a temporary basis. For example, 100 to 150
families could be reloc ated in this kind of housing for a year or a year and a half while
permanent housing is being constructed. This is an experimental approach and could
be used in the Bedford-Pi ne area, 11 Commenting on Mr. Per sells' remarks, Chairman
Sommerville said our comrr..ittee was keenly interested in s uch use of portable housing
and would like to be kept fully informed of any further developments.
FOUR GEORGIANS BEGIN YEAR'S TRAINING
AS U. R. INTERNS FOR HOUSING AUTHORITY
Special JUests at the
July 19 meeting were
four young men who are
beginning a year's training in urban renewal as interns with the Atlanta Housing
Authority. At the end of their course of paid training, they may become staff members
or go to positions elsewhere. All four are Georgians. Following are brief biographies:
JAM ES P. BING, born in Waycross, graduated from Center High School here, then
maj ored in Social Science at Morris Brown Colle 6 e, from vvhich he was graduated last
May 31; DARRYL R. CHANEY, Atlanta born, after being g raduated from Hapeville
High School, attended We st Georgia College, then transferred to Georgia State College,
from w hich he v,ill receive his BBA August 17; CURTIS PARRISH, born in Waycross,
a graduate of Center High School, then attended Morris Brown College, after completing his undergraduate work there, worked a year as social teacher and football
coach at Drexel Catholic High School, Atlanta; SHELLEY B. STANLEY, born in
Dublin, after g raduation from Mathar Academy, Camden, S. C., attended Daniel Payne
College in Birmingham, Ala. two years and then finished his college education at Paul
Quinn ColleJ e in V. aco, Texas, from which he received a B. S. in Social Science.
Updated from the original
1958 version, the city's
land use plan now provides information for projections up to 1983, Collier Gladin, city planning engineer,
explained t o the executive committee July 19. He pointed out that the land use plan is
part of the city's comprehensive plan, which also embraces thoroughfares, community
facilities and public improvements. Said he: "Under the 1962 federal highway act,
the governments of the metro area and the City of .Atlanta must come up with a
thoroughfare plan for the five county area. This plan has to be approved by the
Federal Bureau of Public Roads before highway funds can be released. · 1 He showed
that with data furnished by the land use and thoroughfare plans projections can be made
on population, gr owth, housing needs and many other points up until the year 1983,
when the Atlanta Metro area is scheduled to have 2,000, 000 population. Mr. Gladin
illustrated his explanatory talk with slides of maps showing residential, business and
industrial us es and also showing improvement treatment. He pointed out that the CIP
had provided <lata on va cant land and other land that is not fully in use. Mr. Gladin
further explained that t he land use plan has been reviewed by the Board of Aldermen
and the aldermanic planning and development committee. As the plan progresses, it
will continue to be reviewed. In answer to a question from Executive Committee
Member Grace Hamilton, Mr . Gladin said that final approval was up to the aldermanic
board . In a discussion following Mr. Gladin' s remarks, Executive Committee Iv1err.ber
Rich inquired what would be done with the plan. Chairman Sommerville replied that
the plan's future depended upon a political decision. Executive Committee Member
T. M. Alexander, S r . , emphasized that coordination among city departments will be
a major fact o r in putting the plan to use.
NEW LAND PLAN INCLUDES DATA TO MEET
NEEDS UNTIL 1983, PLANNER GLADIN EXPLAINS
Figures compiled by the
Atlanta Housing Authority,.
disclose that 764 person s' .
participated in our urban renewal tours so far in 1967 as compared with 850 for all of
1967, Chairman Sommerville informed the executive committee. Said he: 11 The tours
have exposed a lot of people to both the good and the bad and have proved very worthwhile. They also cause a financial problem for the committee. ' ' .
HALF YEAR SHOWS BOOM IN RENEW AL TOURS
COLLEGE TEACHERS HAIL EDUCATIONAL VALUE
�... 3_
Mr. Somrr~erville explained that dtii". ct>tntnihee I s pdlicy is to finance tours only for
groups or orgahbations that tlo not have r esources for such purposes. Executive
Director i-Iowiand expressed our committee's thanks to Mrs. Margret Ross and her
associates at the Atlanta Housing Authority for helping to conduct the tours. Illustrating the value of such first hand exposure to urban renewal, Mr. Sommerville read
a letter from Dr. Beate B andy of the Georgia State College faculty which thanked us
for arrangin 6 a tour July 13 for two of her classes. Wrote Dr. Bandy:
"Since you took us on the tour of the Atlanta Urban Renewal Areas we have had
two very lively class sessions. Most of my students know social problems of this
magnitude only from books; a realistic demonstration like this can make the points
better than any combination of classroom instruction and reading. I want you to know
how much my students and I appreciate the time and effort you spent on us, and also,
that this time and effort is put to very good use. ! I
Warm appreciation of a tour conducted June 22 for teachers of disadvantaged
youth attending a NDEA institute at Emory University also was expressed by Dr. Dora
Helen Skype k, . institute director. Wrote Dr. Skypek,
The tour was the highlight of the first week of our program. It was enlightening and enjorable not only for the 18 teachers from New York, Detroit, Denver, Seattle,
Spokane, Milwaukee and urban areas in California, Illinois and the Southeast, but also
for the 19 teachers and staff members who live in Atlanta. Some preconceptions were
shattered and limited information had to be revised. Emphasis on the rehabilitation
aspect of urban renewal was a worthy prelude to our required reading of H. Gans•
' The Urban Villagers• and related sociological readings. 11
11
EX -SENATOR DOUGLAS AND HIS COMMISSION
ARE SHOWN HIGHLIGHTS OF ATLANTA RENEWAL
At the request of the
National Commission on
Urban Problems, a
special tour of Atlanta urban renewal projects and the model city target area was
arranged by our committee July 20. Headed by Chairman Paul Douglas, former U.S.
Senator from Illinois, the commission members who were in Atlanta for hearings July
21, viewed Buttermilk Bottoms, Bedford-Pine, Butler Street, model city, part of
West End and University Center areas. Hig h point of the tour was a stop at the Antoine
Graves housing for the elderly: Commission members visited a number of apartments
and expressed themselves as much impressed by what they saw. Tour conductors
were Director Howland and Mrs. Margret Ross, Atlanta Housing Authority information
officer. At the hearing next day, Director Howland made a brief appearance as a
witnes s to tell how our committee had helped obtain active citizen participation and
thereby obtained a cooperative a ttitude in Bedford-Pine planning . Mr. Howland also
expre ssed our committee's endorsement of the Housing Authority's plan to try
temporary housing as an experiment to relocate people while new permanent housing
is under construction.
On behalf of our
committee, Chairman
Sommerville July 6
expre ssed congratulations to the Celotex Corporation upon being selected as developer
of 208 units of housing in the University Center project. Chairman Sommerville . spoke
at the contract s igning July 6. Also representing our committe e were T. M. Alexander,
Sr . , chairman of our s pecial subcommittee to review redevelopment proposals, and
Director Howland. Said Mr. Sommer ville: 11 This i s a spl e ndid indica tion of the
blending of private enterprise and public service. The quality of this proposal
a ssures us that we will n ot be building a future slum. I heartily congratulate the
Celotex Corporation a nd welcome it to this first venture in the field of low a nd
moderate income housing. What h as impressed me a bout a ll the developme nt proposals is their excellenc e . Representing Mayor A llen was Dan E. Sweat , Jr. ,
directo r of governmental liais on for the city. Saying he p ers ona lly w as 11 exc ite d a nd
pleased with the selection 11 , Mr. Sweat read a statement from Mayor Allen. 11 1
warmly congratulate t he Celotex Corporation 11 , stated Mayor Allen. "This m arks a n
important new step toward meeting Atlanta's housing need s in that one of the largest
building mat erials manufacturers is entering this field for the first time. In so doing,
Celotex is demonstrating a v ery high sense of public r es ponsibility. I w ould a l so like
to express my appreciation of the excelle nc e of a ll seven propos a l s submitted. 11
CHAIRMAN ACCLAIMS SELECTION OF CELOTEX
AS 11 SPLENDID PRIVATE P~ND PUBLIC BLENDING'
THE NEXT COMMITTEE MEETING WILL BE IN SEPTEMBE R-NONE IN A UGUST
�CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE
FOR URBAN RENEWAL
OFFICE OF THE MAYOR
CITY HALL-ATLANTA. GA. 30303
PHONE 524 - 2745
ROBE:RT L . SOMMERVILLE
CH A IR MAN
WILLIAM S. HOWLAND
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
July 11, 1967
MRS . EVELYN DODDS
SECRETARY
Dear Executive Committee Member:
11
Tis the la s t rose of summer
Left blooming all alone
All her lovely compa n i ons
Are faded and gone . 11
1
Perhaps Thomas Moor e 's famed verse does not e x actly appl y to CACUR 1 s a c tiviti es,
but I have borrowed it t o call to your a t tention that our last meeting of the summer
will be held at 2 p . m., Wednesday, July 19, in the Fulton F ederal Dir ect o r s' Room ,
on the southw est corne r of Pryor and Edg ewood.
Alt hough w e s hall not have the last r o s e on h and, we s ha ll p resent a p r ogram
b lo oming with info rmation as follows :
1. Collier G l adin will give us a r u n down on the city ' s l a n d us e pla n, which
is s o importa nt in pla nning future urban r enewal and hou s ing projects .
2. Cecil Alexander, Housing Resources Committe e Chairman, will bring us
a b reast of deve lop ments in the city's housing progr a m, exclus i ve of pub lic housing .
3. Gilb ert Boggs, Atlanta Housing Authority Housing Dir ector , will update
us on public h ousi n g p r ogress .
4 . Le ster He rman Per s ells, Atlanta Hou sing Author ity Redevel o pment
Director , will fill us in on what i s g oing on now and what i s i n the immediate
future i n urban renewal and associated act i vities .
Because so many commi ttee members will be out of town in August, we shall not
m eet again until September.
Chairman Sommer ville and I are l ooking forward to meeting with you on J uly 19.
Sincerely,
w ~:Owl~d
Nv
··~ ~ A
Exe cutive Dir ector - --- ·
�CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE
FOR URBAN RENEWAL
OFFICE OF THE MAYOR
CITY HALL-ATLANTA, GA. 30303
PHONE 524-2745
ROBERT L. SOMMERVILLE
CHAIRMAN
WILLIAM S. HOWLAND
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
MRS. EVELYN DODDS
SECRETARY
June 2 7, ~
The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor, City of Atlanta
City Hall
68 Mitchell Street, S. W.
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Mr. Mayor:
Your concern to do everything you can to push forward housing
construction in Atlanta is well known to us and at all of the
meetings of this committee we review the situation.
At last week's meeting there was considerable discussion about
the reluctance, or refusal, of the HUD people to approve some
suggested sites for public and other low cost housing. This leads
naturally to an increased search for sites that might be more readily
acceptable.
It was brought to our attention that one of the most pressing
needs is a complete and up to date listing of all vacant land in the
city that is, or could easily be, zoned for low or moderate income
housing. We are informed that the City Planning Department is in
the process of this listing. Is there any way in which their work
could be speeded up? Is there any way in which we could help?
Sincerely yours,
RLS:sgs
%
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IR EIN[E \!\/lE IR
NEWS LETTER OF THE CITI ZENS A DVISOR Y COMMITTEE
FOR URBAN RE NEWA L
Vol. 5 No . 6
Atlant a , G eorgia
June 1967
DE TERMINED TO KEEP FAITH WITH BEDFORD- PINE
P EOPLE ON HOUSING, PERSELLS ASSURES COMMITTEE
Despite the difficulties
of obtaining federal
approval for public
housing in "racially identifiable " areas, the Atlanta Housing Authority is determined
to keep faith with the people of the Bedford-Pine area and install housing there.
That was the a s surance given our executive committee by Lester H.
P ersells, AHA rede velopment dir e ctor, in a discussion foliowing an updating
summary of the far fr om rosy housing picture given by Gilbert Boggs, AHA
director of hous ing. Said Mr. Pe rs ells: "The policy of HUD aria. the Public
Housing Admi nist r a t ion is that they do not choose to finance housing in I racially
identifiable' a reas , but housing will be built in the Bedford-Pine area. The federal
agencies are n ot delaying us. Vl e are going full steam ahead. Vl e are going to keep
our faith with the Bedford-Pine people. " In answer to a question from Herbert
Y.T aldrip, chairman of the Bedford- Pine associate citizens advisory committee, as
t o what action would b e taken if the federal agencies refuse to finance housing in
t he area, Per sells replied, "They are not going to say No. 11
FECERAL DE CISI ON ON BEDFORD. PINE
V.'ILL HA VE BEARING ON OTHER AREAS
Mr. Persells further
pointed out that there
is talk that no more
public housing can be built in the western two thirds of Atlanta because it is
11 racially identifiable" s ince it has a large percentage of Negro population.
Asked
he : 11 How can y ou writ e off 66 and Z/ 3 per cent of the population ? 11 He then pointed
out that i n u rban renewal areas the population seemed always to be almost 100 per
cent white o r almo st 100 per eent Negro. Said he: "The Bedford-Pine area is also
1 racially i d e ntifiable ' as almost 100 per cent Negro.
But these people want to remain
there in bette r living conditions." He added that the Bedford-Pine application had
been delay e d for some time while federal agencies are considering this problem. He
also mentio ned tha t t he conditions in Nash-Bans and Model City areas are sL-nilar to
those in Bedford. Pine. Accordingly, the federal answer to the Bedford-Pine
application will have b e aring on these projects. Mr. Persells also added that, in
the two year program embracing more than 9, 000 housing units, from ten to 25
different sites will be required. He made the final point that our committee could
be of servic e in encouraging the federal and city governments to locate low r e nt
housing in various s ec tions of Atlanta.
In discussing the
immediate housing
efforts, Mr. Boggs
said that emphasis was being placed on the new turnkey plan, but that turn downs on
sites by the regional H UD offic e w e re slowing progress. He explained that tentative
approval had been give n t o four sites which would provide room for 1,125 units, but
six sites which would have provided for 1, 650 units had been rejected. Summed up
Mr. Boggs, " We are c ontinuing to submit sites. V!e are hopeful that we can produce
the housing that is n ee ded. Y.' e can provide more housing more quickly under the
turnkey program, but we fac e another difficulty because such housing is not approved
unless the costs are ten per c ent under costs for other housing. 11 A final point made
by Mr. Boggs was that applications h ave been filed for 500 more units of l eased
public housing.
SITES APPROVE D F OR 1, 125 UNITS,
BUT SIX FOR 1, 650 A RE TURNED DOWN
In a question and answer exc h ang e , Edgar Schukraft urged that 300
addit i onal units for the elderly be construc ted a djoining the John O. Chiles building.
He a l so suggested that churches should join i n s ponsoring apartments. Executive
Committeeman Calloway sounded a note of opt imism, saying that Atlanta is now
reali s tic a lly facing the housing problem which h as b een building up over several
ye a rs. Sai d he , " We have the spirit now and it is the ~pi r it that will conquer. 11
�- 2-
U.S. POLICY, ZONING A ND AVAILABLE LAND
DISRUPT HOUSING EFFORT, JONES DECLARES
Asked by Chairman
Sommerville to comment
on the crash program
on housing, Col. Malcolm D. Jones, housing resources coordinator, linked zoning
and availability of land with federal policy as having disruptive efforts. He explained
that on the previous day the Housing Resources Committee had asked the City
Planning Department to furnish a list of tracts of land embracing five or more acres
that could be zoned for multiple family housing. Col. Jones also pointed o~t that the
present trend was toward cooperative housing. Chairman Sommerville requested
Col. Jones to update our committee at the July meeting.
COMMITTEE INSTRUCTS CHAIRMAN TO ASK
MAYOR TO EXPEDITE AVAILABLE LAND LIST
Following Col. Jones'
talk, the executive
committee adopted a
resolution requesting Chairman Sommerville to write Mayor Allen asking that the
information on available land tracts be expedited. Mr. Sommerville said he would
do so promptly.
CITY COUNTING ON FEDERAL AID T6 EXPAND
SUMMER RECREATION PROGRAM, DIRECTOR SAYS
Atlanta again is counting
on financial help from
the federal government
to enable it to step up its recreation program to meet the extra needs of the summer
season, Miss Virginia Carmichael, city director of recreation, explained to our
executive committee June 21. Said she: "For many years, Atlanta has carried on a
very fine all year recreation program for all ages, but our funds are insufficient to
meet the e xtra needs for the summer. Last year we received funds from the federal
government which made it possible for us to expand our regular progra1n in such ways
as leasing and staffing playlots and "operation champ" areas. We were able to
conduct an all around program, including picnics, tours to industries, to ball games
and many other activities. So last year we had one of the best summer programs we
ever had. We received $25, 000 for an intensive swimming instruction program.
This reached more than 20, 000 children, 12, 000 of whom were taught to swim. But
all these funds were cut off on Labor Day, so since then we have had to carry on the
playlots out of regular funds. Now we have gone to the federal government again.
While we have not heard from them yet, we are going ahead on faith. Vi e plan to
operate and staff 25 playlots and 22 champ areas. Last year, we did not get the word
until July 4 , but we had gotten ready and so we went into operation on July 6. We can
do that again. "
In the questions and answers that followed Miss Carmichael's talk, it was
brought out that the Metropolitan Foundation of which Executive Committeeman A. B.
Padgett is director had been most helpful in sustaining a residence camp for children
at Lake Allatoona. Miss C armichael also stressed the success achieved by four
portable swimming pools obtained with $30, 000 given by the Rich Foundation. These
are being operated in "hard core" areas and 1nay be loaned to the school department
after the summer season. Summed up Chairman Sommerville: "The donation of
four portable swimming pools is not a small thing at all, but it was done at the time
it was needed. If things like this can be done when there is need, a great deal can
be accomplis hed. " In the discussion the re were also several comments regarding
the city' s prompt action to improve conditions in the Dixie Hills area following the
recent disturbances there. Said Mr. Calloway: "Agitators always pick areas which
present them with an opportunity t o 'get the show on the road'. Let us give thought
to providing facilities immediately in areas where we know they are nee ded. 11
Commented Chairman Sommerville "I wish the city could avoid putting itself in the
light of rushing bulldozers to work aft er these incidents. It's ridiculous. If we know
of these places, let ' s put our fingers on the m and b e in there doing something b efo re
incidents happen. 11
FEDERAL FUNDS NOW SEEM ASSURED
Two da ys after our
meeting , city recreation
officials received unofficial word that the requ ested federal financial assistanc e
would be forthcoming. Accordingly, the expanded s umme r program outline d by Miss
Carmichael seems assured.
�-3There was no bias or
discrimination in the
awarding of the Rockdale
redevelopment contract to David Rosen Associates, Executive Committeeman T. M.
Alexander, Sr ., reported at the June 21 meeting. Mr. Alexander, chairman of our
special subcommittee on rede velopment proposals, explained th~t the developer's
plans made good use of the land taking into consideration the entrances, exits a~d
transportation. He also pointed out that the Union Baptist Church has become
affiliated as a sponsor.
NO BIAS IN AWARD ON ROCKDALE,
LAND USE GOOD, COMMITTEE IS TOLD
MEMBERS OF NATIONAL TEACHERS INSTITUTE
TAKEN ON TOUR OF PR OjECTS AND MODEL CITY
More than 40 elementary
school teachers from
all over the U. S. were
guests of our committee on a tour of urban renewal projects and the model neighborhood target area June 22. The teachers were attending a Nati.anal Defense Educational Association Institute at Emory University. Since all are engaged in instructing
disadva::itaged children in mathematics, one of the objects of the institute is to obtain
first hand observation of the kinds of environments in which su.c h children reside. It
was pointed out that this enables the teachers to emphasize the sociological concept
in their classes. The institute is directed by Dr. Dora Helen Skypeck, of the Emory
faculty. Arr2.ngements for the tour were made by Dr. Ann Grant, of the Morehouse
sociology faculty, who is working with the institute. Mrs. Margret Ross, Atlanta
Housing Authority information officer, and Wilson McClure, West End project
director, acted as "barkers" on the bus. At the luncheon stop at Paschall's
restaurant, Executive Director Howland spoke briefly, explaining our committee's
activitie s and str e ssing the emphasis being placed on the enhancement of human
values as w ell as the improvement of property in urban renewal projects. Mr.
McClure outlined the progress of the West End project.
ALEXA NDER VOICES COMMITTEE'S CONGRATULATIONS
AT ROCKDALE CONTRACT SIGNING CEREMONY
Executive Committeeman T. M. Alexander, Sr.
and· Executive Director
Howland represented our committee at the signing of the Rockdale redevelopment
contract, June 15. Mr. Alexander expressed congratulations to David L. Rosen
Associate s of New York, upon winning the competition for the single largest project
to date in Atlanta's urban renewal program. Said Mr. Alexander, "I congratulate
the David Rosen gr oup for their fine concept of a very complicated plan. Of all the
four proposals submitted -- and all were excellent -- this was the most outstanding.
We are happy that the Union Baptist Church is a sponsor. 11
In a press statement
Mayor Allen said: "I cordially congratulate David L. Rosen upon being selected to
carry out the largest single development in all eight years of our urban renewal
program. In arriving at its decision, the Atlanta Housing Authority was aided by
the thinking of a wide variety of individuals, representing the city government,
professional and citizen groups. I would like to express my appreciation to all."
Commented Rodney M. Cook, Chairman of the Aldermanic Planning and Development
Committee: "This development will add an entirely new community, well.:.planned
and designed to meet the needs of the people who will live there. " Just before
sitting down to sign the 17 page contract, Edwin L. Sterne, Chairman of Board of
Commissioners, AHA, said: "We are pleased to award the contract for the
rc tlcvclopmcnt of the Rockdale Urban Redevelopment Project to David L. Rosen.
We \Vere d e lighted with the superior quality of all four proposals received. They
were all s u bstantial and any one of them would be a credit to the Rockdale community.'.'
Picking up the pen to
affix his signature,
Mr. Rosen, with a
smile, said to Mr . Sterne: "Now I owe you almost $900,000." He referred to the
price of $896, 000 fixed for the 154.12 acres of residential land and the 9.14 acres
for commercial use. The Rosen proposal calls for the construction of 1, 386 dwelling
units, of which 85 per cent will be apartments and 15 per cent townhouses. The
total will include 140 one bedr oom units, to rent at from $60 to $68 monthly; 830 two
bedroom units to r ent at from $70 to $78 monthly; 416 three bedroom units, to rent
at from $80 to $90 monthly. The housing is designed in clusters in the different
sections on relatively level "island communities!' along the ridges of the hills.
PROPOSAL CALLS FOR l, 386 DWELLING UNITS;
PRICE OF $896,000 ESTAB LISHED FOR LAND
�lf lH!!E IREIN[E\1\/EIR
NEWSLETTER OF THE Cl Tl ZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE
FOR URBAN RENEWAL
Vol, 5 No. 6
Atlanta, Georgia
June 1967
DETERMINED TO KEEP FAITH VllTH BEDFORD-PINE
Despite the difficulties
PEOPLE ON HOUSING; PERSELLS ASSURES COMMlTTEE of obtaining federal
.
approval for public
housing in "racially identifiable" areas_; the Atlanta Housing Authority is determined
to keep faith with the people of the Bedford. Pine area and install housing there,
That was the assurance given our executive coinmittee by Lester H.
Persells, AHA redevelopment director, in a discussi9n following an updating
summary of the far fro~ rosy housing picture given by Gilbert Boggs, AHA
director of housing, Said 1\1-i, Persells: 11 The policy bf HUD and the Public
Housing Administratioh is that they do not choose to finance housing in 'racially
identifiable' areas, bu~ housing will be built in the Bedford-Pine area. The federal
agencies are not delaying us, Vl e are going full steam aheaa. v.~e are going to keep
our faith with the Bedford-Pine people. " In answer to a question from Herbert
Y!aldrip, chairman of the Bedford.Pine associate citizens advisory committee, as
to what action would be taken if the federal agencies refuse to finance housing in
the area, Persells replied, "They are not going to say No."
FECERAL DECISION ON BEDFORD. PINE
V.' ILL HAVE BEARING ON OTHER AREAS
Mr. Persells further
pointed out that there
is talk that no more
public housing can be built in the western two thirds of Atlanta because it is
" racially identifiable" since it has a large percentage of Negro population. Asked
he: 11 How can you write off 6 6 and Z / 3 per cent of the population? 11 He then pointed
out that in urban renewal areas the population seemed always to be almost 100 per
cent white or almost 100 per cent Negro. Said he: The Bedford-Pine area is also
'racially identifiable' as almost 100 per cent Negro. But these people want to remain
there in better living conditions." He added that the Bedford-Pine application had
been delayed for some time while federal agencies are considering this problem. He
also mentioned that the conditions in Nash-Bans and Model City areas are shnilar to
those in Bedford. Pine. Accordingly, the federal answer to the Bedford-Pine
application will have bearing on these projects. Mr. Persells also added that, in
the two year program emb1·acing more than 9, 000 housing units, from ten to 25
different sites will be required, He made the final point that our committee could
be of service in encouraging the federal and city governments to locate low rent
housing in various sections of Atlanta.
In discussing the
immediate housing
efforts, Mr. Boggs
said that emphasis was being placed on the new turnkey plan, but that turn downs on
sites by the regional HUD office were slowing progress, He explained that tentative
approval had been given to four sites which would provide room for 1,125 units, but
six sites which would have provided for 1, 650 units had been rejected. Summed up
Mr. Boggs, Vi e are continuing to submit sites, V.'e are hopeful that we can produce
the housing that is needed. Y.' e can provide more housing more quickly under the
turnkey program, but we face another difficulty because such housing is not approved
unless the costs are ten per cent under costs for other housing." A final point made
by Mr. Boggs was that applications have been filed for 500 mol'e units of leased
public housing.
SITES APPROVED F OR 1,125 UNITS,
BUT SIX FOR 1, 650 ARE TURNED DOWN
In a question and ans'Ver exchange, Edgar Schukraft urged that 300
additional units for the elderly be constructed adjoining the John O. Chiles building.
He also suggested that churches should join in sponsoring apartments. Executive
Committeeman Calloway sounded a note of optimism, saying that Atlanta is now
realistically facing the housing problem which has been building up over several
years. Said he, "We have the spirit now and it is the .spirit that will conquer. 11
�- 2-
U.S. POLICY, ZONING AND AVAILABLE LAND
DISRUPT HOUSING EFFORT, JONES DECLARES
Asked by Chairman
Sommerville to comment
.
on the crash program
on housing, Col. Malcolm D_
. jones, housing resources coordinator, linked zoning
and availability of land with federal policy as having disruptive efforts. He explained
that on the previous day the Housing Resources Committee had asked the City
Planning Department to furnish a list of tracts of land embracing five or more acres
that could be zoned for multiple family housing. Col. Jones also pointed out that the
present trend was toward cooperative housing. Chairman Sommerville requested
Col. Jones to update our committee at the July meeting.
COMMITTEE INSTRUCTS CHAIRMAN TO ASK
Following Col. Jones'
MAYOR TO EXPEDITE AVAILABLE LAND LIST
talk, the executive
·
committee adopted a
re solution requesting Chairman Sommerville to wri!:e Mayor Allen asking that the
information on available land tracts be expedited. Mr. Sommerville said he would
do so promptly,
CITY COUNTING ON FEDERAL AID TO EXPAND
SUMMER RECREATION PROGRAM, DIRECTOR SAYS
Atlanta again is counting
on financial help from
the federal government
to enable it to step up its recreatioh program to meet the extra needs of the summer
season, Miss Virginia Carmichael, city director of recreation, explained to our
executive committee June 21. Said she: "For many years, Atlanta has carried on a
very fine all year recreation program for all ages, but our funds are insufficient to
meet the extra needs for the summer. Last year we received funds from the federal
government which made it possible for us to expand our regular progra1n in such ways
as leasing and staffing playlots and "operation champ" areas. '\'/ e were able to
conduct an all around program, including picnics, tours to industries, to ball games
and many other activities. So last year we had one of the best summer programs we
ever had. We received $25, 000 for an intensive swimming instruction program.
This reached more than 20, 000 children, 12, 000 of whom were taught to swim. But
all these funds were cut off on Labor Day, so since then we have had to carry on the
playlots out of regular funds. Now we have gone to the federal government again.
While we have not heard from them yet, we are going ahead on faith. Vl e plan to
operate and staff 25 play lots and 22 champ areas. Last year, we did not get the word
until July 4, but we had gotten ready and so we went into operation on July 6. We can
do that again. "
In the questions and answers that followed Miss Carmichael's talk, it was
brought out that the Metropolitan Foundation of which Executive Committeeman A. B.
Padgett is director had been most helpful in sustaining a residence camp for children
at Lake Allatoona. Miss Carmichael also stressed the success achieved by four
portable swimming pools obtained with $30, 000 given by the Rich Foundation. These
are being operated in "hard core" areas and may be loaned to the school department
after the summer season. Summed up Chairm.an Sommerville: "The donation of
four portable swimming pools is not a small thing at all, but it was done at the time
it was needed. If things like this can be done when there is need, a great deal can
be accomplished. " In the discussion there were also several comments regarding
the city's prompt action to improve conditions in the Dixie Hills area following the
recent disturbances there. Said Mr. Calloway: "Agitators always pick areas which
present them with an opportunity to 'get the show on the road'. Let us give thought
to providing facilities immediately in areas where we know they are needed. 11
Commented Chairman Sommerville "I wish the city could avoid putting itself in the
light of r ushing bulldozers to work after these incidents. It's ridiculous. If we know
of these places, let's put our fingers on the m and b e in there doing something before
incidents happen. 11
FEDERAL FUNDS NOW SEEM ASSURED
Two days after our
meeting, city recreation
officials rec e ive d unofficial word tha t the requested federal financial assistance
would be forthcoming. Accordingly, t h e expa nded summer program outline d by Miss
Carmichael seems assured .
�-3There was no bias or
d1scrimination in the
awarding of the Rockdale
redevelopment contract to David Rosen Associates, Executive Committeeman T. M. ·
Alexander, Sr., reported at the J-tine 2J me~ting. Mr. Alexande:t 1 chairman of our
special subcommittee on redevelopment proposals, explained that the developer's
plans made good use of the land taking into consideration the entrances, exits and
transportation. He also pointed out that the Urtion Baptist Church has become
affiliated as a sponsor.
NO BIAS IN AWARD ON ROCKDALE,
LAND USE GOOD, COMMITTEE IS TOLD
MEMBERS OF NATIONAL TEACHERS INSTITUTE
TAKEN ON TOUR OF PROJE CTS AND MODEL CITY
More than 40 elementary
school teachets from
all over the U. S. were
guests of our committee on a tour of urban renewal projects and the model neighborhood target area June 22. The teachers were attending a National Defense Educational Association Institute at Emory University. Since all are engaged in instructing
disadvantaged children in mathematics, one of the objects of the institute is to obtain
first hand observation of the kinds of environments in which such children reside. It
was pointed out that this enables the teachers to emphasize the sociological concept
in their classes. The institute is directed by Dr. Dora Helen Skypeck, of the Emory
faculty. Arrangements for the tour were made by Dr. Ann Grant, of the Morehouse
sociology faculty, who is working with the institute. Mrs. Margret Ross, Atlanta
Housing Authority information officer, and Wilson McClure, West End project
director, acted as 11 barkers II on the bus. At the luncheon stop at Paschall' s
restaurant, Executive Director Howland spoke briefly, explaining our committee's
activities and stressing the emphasis being placed on the enhancement of human
values as well as the improvement of property in urban renewal projects. Mr.
McClur e outlined the progress of the West End project.
Executive Committeeman T. M. Alexander, Sr.
and· Executive Director
Howland repre sented our committee at the signing of the Rockdale redevelopment
contract, June 15. Mr. Alexander expressed congratulations to David L. Rosen
Associates of New York, upon winning the competition for the single largest project
to date in Atlanta's urban renewal program. Said Mr. Alexander, 11 I congratulate
the David Rosen group for their fine concept of a very complicated plan. Of all the
four proposals s ubmitted -- and all were excellent -- this was the most outstanding.
We are happy that the Union Baptist Church is a sponsor. 11
In a press statement
Mayor Allen said: 11 I cordially congratulate David L. Rosen upon being selected to
carry out the largest single development in all eight years of our urban renewal
program. In arriving at its decision, the Atlanta Housing Authority was aided by
the thinking of a wide variety of individuals, representing the city government,
professional and citizen groups. I would like to express my appreciation to all. 11
Commented Rodney M. Cook, Chairman of the Aldermanic Planning and Development
Committee : 1 This development will add an entirely new community, well-planned
and designed to meet the needs of the people who will live there. 11 Just before
sitting down to sign the 17 page contract, Edwin L. Sterne, Chairman of Board of
Commissioners, AHA , said: 11 We are pleased to award the contract for the
redevelopment of the Rockdale Urban Redevelopment Project to David L. Rosen.
We \-:ere delighted with the superior quality of all four proposals received. They
were all substantial and any one of them would be a credit to the Rockdale community. '. 1
ALEXANDER VOICES COMMITTEE'S CONGRATULATIONS
AT ROCKDALE CONTRACT SIGNING CEREMONY
Picking up the pen to
affix his signature,
Mr. Rosen, with a
smile, said to Mr. Sterne: 11 Now I owe you almost $900,000. 11 He referred to the
price of $896, 000 fixed for the 154. 12 acres of residential land and the 9. 14 acres
for comme rcial use. The Rosen proposal calls for the construction of 1, 386 dwelling
units, of which 85 per cent will be apartments and 15 per cent townhouses. The
total will include 140 one bedroom units, to rent at from $60 to $68 monthly; 830 two
bedroom units to rent at from $70 to $78 monthly; 416 three bedroom units, to rent
at from $80 to $90 monthly. The housing is designed in clusters in the different
sections on relatively level 11 island communities! 1 along the ridges of the hills.
PROPOSAL CALLS FOR 1, 386 DWELLING UNITS;
PRICE OF $896,000 ESTABLISHED FOR LAND
�~3/N---'<~-' ~~
lflHI[ IR[IN[ ~V[EIR
NEWSLETTER OF THE CITIZE NS ADVISORY COMIViITTEE
FOR URBAN RENEWAL
Vol. 5 No. 5
Atla nta, G·e orgia
April 1967

- ...·- ··------ ------- --~-- ·- -~~-- - - .. --·- ---· ·-- -
CAN COUNT ON ONE PROJ E C T APPROVAL ANNUALLY
DESPITE FUNDS SQUEEZE, EDMUNDS GIVES ASSURANCE
Speaking informally to
our executive committee
for the first time May 24,
John T. Edmunds , HUD a s sis tant regional administrator for renewal assistance, told
us that -Atl.a nta c ou l d reasonably expect approval of one new urban renewal project
anmrally, ~despite the ex isting s queeze in federal funds. Said Mr. Edmunds: "It now
looks as though Congress will appropriate $750,000,000 for urban renewal nationally
for the new fis cal y ear . This is the same amount as for the past two years. That
would s eem t o mean t ha t Atlanta could count on one additional project being approved
each year, exc lusive of the model neighborhood program. As it now looks, the second
Georgia Tec h p roject probably will be financed. Administrator Edmunds added that
HUD is seeking to work out a priority plan for financing of projects in this region.
He pointed ou t tha t t he demand for federal financing of urban renewal in the region
already is three times t he supply of money available. He stressed the point that top
priority would be give n p rojects which are designed to center on residential reuse
with low and m od erate income housing. Institutional projects, such as Georgia Tech
and Geor gia State w ould receive moderately high priority.
The code enforcement
type programs offer
cities new opportunities
for action, Mr . Edmund s also mentioned. He pointed out that the federal government
assumes two-thirds of t he cost of these programs, plus site improvement. He
explained that particularly suitable for such programs are areas where little
demolition i s required. He singled out Grove Park area in Atlanta as suitable for this
type of progr am. M r. Edmunds stressed the point that HUD's regional headquarters
is eager to s ee Atlanta's pioneer projects closed out and that it now appears that this
may be possi b l e f or But ler Street, University Center and Thomasville within the
coming year .
CODE ENFORCEMENT TYPE PROGRAMS PRESENT
NEV\T OPPOR T U NI TIES, ADMINISTRATOR POINTS OUT
In reply to a question
at the May 24 executive
committee meeting,
Lester H. P e r s ells , AHA redevelopment director, said that the work of combining
the Butterm ilk Bottoms and Bedford-Pine projects into a single project now is in the
last stage of i t s f ir s t part. The proposal should be turned over to the regional HUD
headquarters w ithin two months, he estimated. Mr. Persells also made the point that
the city should re ceive a non cash credit of two and a quarter million dollars in the
combined p r oje c t for the new municipal auditorium and exhibition hall. He also called
to the attention of ou r ex ecutive committee that the Citizens and Southern National Bank
had obtained a ruling from the comptroller of the currency that bank funds may be used
to assist non profit organizations in building low rent housing and 221 D- 3 type housing.
This opens up an e ntir e ly new f inancing channel, he explained.
WORK OF J OINING BEDFORD-BUTTERMILK PROJECTS
APPROACHING FINAL STAGE, PERSELLS REPORTS
Shortly before noon on
May 18, R. Earl Landers,
administrative assistant
to Mayor Allen, Collier Gladin, city planning director, and 'William S. Howland,
our executive director , ste pped into Room 645 of the Peachtree-Seventh Building to
deliver a most important document with illustrative maps to Ed Baxter, regional HUD
a clrninistrator. The blue bound docume nt, which weighed one pound and was threefourths of a n inch thick, was Atl anta ' s application for recertification of its workable
p rogram for community improve m e nt. T his i s the basic "charter" under which federal
urban re n ewal fund s are made availab le.
LANDERS, GLADIN, HOW LA ND HAND DELIVER
V:' ORKABLE PROGRAM DOCUMENT TO ADMINISTRATOR
�,
..
-2 With Regional Administrat or Bax ter to receive the ~pplication were S. Frederick
Smith, assistant regional admini s trat or f or program coordination and service, and
.,.,t
George Papageorge, director of workable program bra.~ch. As Mr. Landers handed
the document to Mr. Baxter, it was pointed out that deHvery was being accomplished
14 days ahead of the June 1 deadline • . Included in the application was a four page
condensed summary of ou r c ommittee's activities. supported by various data and
photographs . The summary pointed out that during the past year Memphis and
Jacksonville had sent their a dvisory directors to Atlanta to study our citizen participation methods and that a l a r ge delegation of South Carolina officials had come to
Atlanta for a program ar ranged by our committee~
l
NASH-BANS AREA MEET ING JUNE 6
Our executive committee
was informed that a
meeting of citizens of the Nash-Bans area (formerly called Vine City) will be held at
7: 30 p . m . on June 6 in the Cosmopolitan Church. Purpose is to determine if citizens
are inte r e sted in a nd will support future designation of the area as an urban renewal
project. Mayo r Allen and Alderman Cook will be among the speakers.
HOPES F OR M ODEL CITY WORD JULY 1,
FEELS CHANC E S GOOD, GLADIN SAYS
Saying he thought that
Atlanta's chances of
obtaining a planning
grant are good, Collier Gladin, city planning engineer, told our executive committee
he hoped to receive word on the model neighborhood program by July 1. Mr. Gladin
also briefly discus s e d the city's application for recertification of its workable program.
He expla ined that the a nnual application had become more of a progress report th'an in
previous ye ars and, a s such, it was put together this year by two Planning Department
staff m embers. He also expressed appreciation of the cooperation shown by other
departments . Referring to the model neighborhood application, Mr. Gladin explained
that the type of program to be launched would depend on the amount of money made
available. He t old our executive committee that the Community Improvem e nt Prog ram
is now in i t s h ome s tretch. The aldermanic planning and development commit t e e i s
holding three special m eeting s to review final CIP reports. Mr. Gladin also r eported
that during the m o r ning of May 24 he had joined Mayor Allen and Rodney Cook, chairman of the alderm a nic pla nning and development committee, in taking Charles Haar,
assistant secretary of HUD for metropolitan development, on a tour of Atlanta and a
discussion of the city ' s problems.
In a discussion following
Mr. Gladin' s talk, it
was brought out that
many problems for which solutions are sought in Atlanta reach out over areas that do
not have workable program s . Pointing out that two of these are housing a n d transportation. Mr. Gladin mentioned t o M r . Papageor ge tha t such problems w ere a matte r
of concern to the planning departme nt. Dan E. Sweat, city director of gove rnmental
liaison, joined in t o empha size the point that the city is directly affected by what takes
place all over the metro a rea and stressed the importance of getting other parts of the
area to formulate workabl e programs. He also made the point that areas that receive
federal assistance for other p r o gr a m s should share in efforts to solve the housing
problem.
REGIONAL ACTION SEEN AS ESSENTIAL
ON PRO B LEMS REACHING BEYOND CITY
Following his remarks,
Mr. Edmunds p a rticipate4
in a live ly que stion a nd
answer session. Executive Committeem a n B ob Bive ns ask e d why r eside ntia l renew a l
w a s be ing given preference over hel p t o central core a r eas . In reply, Mr. E dmunds
said that central city projects were v ery costly, but added that cities which have a
good record in low rent housing s tand be tter chance s of getting h e lp for core projects.
Member John Wilson requested clarificat i on on p olicies fo r locating low i nc ome
housing. He asked why such housing should not b e pl aced on l and presently vacant,
suc h a s in the Nash-Ba ns area (formerly known as Vine City). In reply Mr . E dmunds
m ade the point tha t present policy seeks to put new housing in areas other t han t h ose
known to be preponderantly occupi ed by one race.
CORE CITY HELP, VACANT LAND USE
DISCUSSED IN SPIRITED Q & A SESSION
�-3Executive Committeeman William L. Calloway offered the comment that one
thouJht regarding the Nash-Bans situation was that there were other areas available
for such housing. Said he "What is known as ghettoing, and I'll not try to define that
word, contributes to the continuation of old slums or the formation of new slums."
Mr. Calloway recalled that when the Butler Street project went into execution, his
realty company alone transferred a thousand families to the Carroll Heights section.
In reply to a second question from Mr. V.Tilson as to what becomes of vacant land, Mr.
Calloway emphasized that this was an old problem to which we are continually seeking
solutions . Said he with a smile "There is no finger pointing at anyone". Chairman
Sommerville concluded the discussion by commenting "Sooner or later, we are going
to have to come to a policy of open housing. Over a long period of time, that will
sort of work out a solution to the entire problem, but it is not a short job. "
ATLANTA PROGRESS IN CODE ENFORCEMENT
WINS HIGH PRAISE FROM PAPAGEORGE
"Atlanta is really moving
forward. That note of
hi 6 h commendation for
the city's advance in code enforcement was struck by George Papageorge, regional
HUD direct or of workable pro 15 ram branch, in speaking to our executive committee
May 24. Said he 11 \ \ihen the federal housing act was revised three years ago, the
housing code provisions gave the cities three years to ~et set and put their plans into
operation. That's just what Atlanta has done. The budget for code enforcement has
been raised from $690, 000 to $1, 028, 000. The staff has been increased from 99 to
128 employes. We can recall that previously there had been some prodding from
HHFA -- and this has not been without results. The records for the eight states in
this region shows that 117, 000 units have been brought into compliance with workable
program standards and that 32, 000 additional units unfit for human habitation have
been demolished. Ri 6ht here in Atlanta, 24, 000 units have been brought up to code
standards and 3, 500 units have been demolished. It is very significant that 24, 000
units have been brought up to standards. This is the practical way of protecting
neighborhoods from deterioration. Rehabilitation is better than demolition because it
does not reduce the number of units a.nd displace people. That figure of 24, 000
includes only those reported by inspectors. In addition, many have been repaired by
property owners without receiving citations." Mr. Papa3eorge concluded on a warning
note saying "There can be no let up on the program of rehabilitation. It must be
carried on permanently. For once a neighborhood has been rehabilitated, it is
necessary to go back and reinspect it to keep it from deteriorating again. This should
be done every two to five years. 11
Explaining that Atlanta's
application for recertification of its workable
program was now being reviewed, Mr. Papageorge praised the city's action in making
increases to its code inspection staff and comrr~ented that there would be no question
about approval of the codes section of the application. Then he paid our committee
a high tribute. Said he "And there is no question about citizen participation.
Atlanta's record on this is excellent. A substantial part of the credit for this excellent
record is due to this committee's work. 11
HUD OFFICIAL ACCLAIMS COMlV~ITTEE
FOR "EXCELLENT CITIZEN PARTICIPATION 11
EDITORIAL COMMENDS CHAIRMAN'S POINT
Saying that he had been
impressed by evidences
of individual fixing up that he had seen in the Summerhill area, Chairman Sommerville
made the point that all over Atlanta there were little things that could be done by
private citizens on their own as well as by the city. On M~ 28, the Atlanta Journal
and Constitution commended our chairman's point. Said the editorial in part:
"Little things mean a lot as the song, always, and Robert Sommerville, sometimes,
reminds us. Mr. Sommerville issued his most recent reminder of that fact as
chairman of the Citizens Advisory Committee on Urban Renewal.
The city is
apparently making some progress on providing equal service to all citizens.
Many things do get done that should be done. It is not a bad thing, however, to be
reminded that a better job should be done. And Mr. Sommerville has done the city
that service admirably. "
FULL COMMITTEE MEETING -- JUNE 21 •••• : •• DETAILS LATER
�7r. / ? L ~
lflHl[E IRlEIN[~N[IR
NEWSLETTER OF THE CiTiZENS ADVISORY COM?v'ilTTEE
FOR URBAN RENEWAL
Vol. 5 No. 5

· ------·- ··---
Atlanta, Georgia
April 1967
---·- --~---- - -·---- ·-- -
CAN COUNT ON ONE PROJECT APPROVAL ANNUALLY
DESPITE FUNDS SQUEEZE, EDMUNDS GIVES ASSURANCE
Speaking informally to
our executive committee
for the fir st time May Z4,
John T. Edmunds, HUD assistant regional administrator for renewal assistance, told
us that Atlanta could reasonably expect approval of one new urban renewal project
annually,, despite the existing squeeze in federal funds. Said Mr. Edmunds: "It now
looks as though Congress will appropriate $750,000,000 for urban renewal nationally
for the new fiscal year. This is the same amount as for the past two years. That
would seem to mean that Atlanta could count on one additional project being approved
each year, exclusive of the model neighborhood program. As it now looks, the second
Georgia Tech project probably will be financed. Administrator Edmunds added that
HUD is seeking to work out a priority plan for financing of projects in this region.
He pointed out that the demand for federal financing of urban renewal in the region
already is three times the supply of money available. He stressed the point that top
priority would be given projects which are designed to center on residential reuse
with low and moderate income housing. Institutional projects, such as Georgia Tech
and Georgia State would receive moderately high priority.
CODE ENFORCEMENT TYPE PROGRAMS PRESENT
NE Vi OPPOR TU NI TIES, ADMINISTRATOR POINTS OUT
The code enforcement
type programs offer
cities new opportunities
for action, Mr. Edmunds also mentioned. He pointed out that the federal government
assumes two-thirds of the cost of these programs, plus site improvement. He
explained that particularly suitable for such programs are areas where little
demolition is required. He singled out Grove Park area in Atlanta as suitable for this
type of program. Mr. Edmunds stressed the point that HUD's regional headquarters
is eager to see Atlanta's pioneer projects closed out and that it now appears that this
may be possible for Butler Street, University Center and Thomasville within the
coming year.
In reply to a question
at the May 24 executive
committee meeting,
Lester H. Persells, AHA redevelopment director, said that the work of combining
the Buttermilk Bottoms and Bedford-Pine projects into a single project now is in the
last stage of its first part. The proposal should be turned over to the regional HUD
headquarters within two months, he estimated. Mr. Persells also made the point that
the city should receive a non cash credit of two and a quarter million dollars in the
combined project for the new municipal auditorium and exhibition hall. He also called
to the attention of our executive committee that the Citizens and Southern National Bank
had obtained a ruling from the comptroller of the currency that bank funds may be used
to assist non profit organizations in building low rent housing and 2.2.1 D-3 type housing.
This opens up an entirely new financing channel, he explained.
WORK OF JOINING BEDFORD-BUTTERMILK PROJECTS
APPROACHING FINAL STAGE, PERSELLS REPORTS
Shortly before noon on
May 18, R. Earl Landers,
administrative assistant
to Mayor Allen, Collier Gladin, city planning director, and Vdlliam S. Howland,
our executive director, stepped into Room 645 of the Peachtree-Seventh Building to
deliver a most important document with illustrative maps to Ed Baxter, regional HUD
administrator. The blue bouftd document, which weighed one pound and was threefourths of an inch thick, was Atlanta's application for recertification of its workable
program for community improvement. This is the basic "charter" under which federal
urban renewal funds are made available.
LANDERS, GLADIN, HO\i' LAND HAND DELIVER
Y'ORKABLE PROGRAM DOCUMENT TO ADMINISTRATOR
�-2Vl ith Regional Administrator Baxter to receive the application were S. Frederick
Smith, assistant regional administrator for program coordination and service, and
George Papageorge, director of workable program branch. As Mr. Landers handed
the document to Mr. Baxter, it was pointed out that delivery was being accomplished
14 days ahead of the June 1 deadline. Included in the application wa.s a four page
condensed summary of our committee's activjties. supported by variou.s data and
photographs . The summary pointed out that during the past year Memphis and
Jacksonville had sent their advisory directors to Atlanta to study our citizen participation methods and that a large delegation of $outh Carolina officials had come to
Atlanta for a program arranged by our committee~
NASH-BANS AREA MEETING JUNE 6
Our executive committee
was informed that a
meeting of citizens of the Nash-Bans area (formerly called Vine .City) will be held at
7: 30 p. m. on June 6 in the Cosmopolitan Church. Purpose is to determine if citizens
are interested in and will support future designation of the area as an urban renewal
proje ct. Mayor Allen and Alderman Cook will be amorig the speakers.
HOPES FOR MODEL CITY WORD JULY 1,
FEELS CHANCES GOOD, GLADIN SAYS
Saying he thought that
Atlanta's chances of
obtaining a planning
grant are good, Collier Gladin, city planning engineer, told our executive committee
he hoped to receive word on the model neighborhood program by July 1. Mr. Gladin
also briefly discussed the city's application for recertification of its workable program.
He explained that the annual application had become more of a progress report than in
previous years and, as such, it was put together this year by two Planning Department
staff members. He also expressed appreciation of the cooperation shown by other
department s. Referring to the model neighborhood application, Mr. Gladin explained
that the type of program to be launched would depend on the amount of money made
available. He told our executive committee that the Community Improvement Program
is now in its home stretch. The aldermanic planning and development committee is
holding three special meetings to review final CIP reports. Mr. Gladin also reported
that during the morning of May 24 he had joined Mayor Allen and Rodney Cook, chairman of the aldermanic planning and development committee, in taking Charles Haar,
assistant secretary of HUD for metropolitan development, on a tour of Atlanta and a
discussion of the city's problems.
REGIONA L ACTION SEEN AS ESSENTIAL
ON PROBLEMS REACHING BEYOND CITY
In a discussion following
Mr. Gladin 1 s talk, it
was brought out that
many problems for which solutions are sought in Atlanta reach out over areas that do
not have workable programs. Pointing out that two of these are housing and transportation. Mr. Gladin mentioned to Mr. Papageorge that such problems were a matter
of concern to the planning department. Dan E. Sweat, city director of governmental
liaison, joined in to emphasize the point that the city is directly affected by what takes
place all over the metro area and stressed the importance of getting other parts of the
area to formulate workable programs. He also made the point that areas that receive
fede:r al assistance for other programs should share in efforts to solve the housing
problem.
Following his 1·emarks,
Mr. Edmunds participatep
in a lively question and
answer session. Executive Committeeman Bob Bivens asked why residential renewal
was being given preference over help to central core areas. In reply, Mr. Edmunds
said that central city projects were very costly, but added that cities which have a
good record in low rent h ousing stand better chances of getting help for core projects.
Member John Wilson requested clarification on policies for locating low income
housing . He asked why such housing should not be placed on land presently vacant,
such as in the Nash-Bans area (formerly known as Vine City). In reply Mr. Edmunds
made the point that present policy seeks to put new housing in areas other than those
known to be preponderantly occupied by one race.
CORE CITY HELP, VACANT LAND USE
DISCUSSED IN SPIRITED Q & A SESSION
�-3-
Executive Cotnmitteerrlan William L. Calloway offered the cott'l.ment that one
thou 6ht regarding the Nash-Bans situation was that there were other areas available
for such housing . Said he "What is known as ghettoing, and I'll not try to define that
word, contributes to the contihuation of old slums or the formation of new slums."
Mr. Calloway recalled that when the Butler Street project went into execution, his
realty company alone transferred a thousand f~mi1ies to the Carroll Heights section.
In reply to a second questioh from Mr. V.7ilson as to what becomes of vacant land, Mr.
Calloway emphasized that this was an old problem to which we are continually seekihg
solutions. Said he with a smile "There is no finger pointing at anyone". Chairman
Sommerville concluded the cliscussion by commenting "Sooner or later, we are going
to have to come to a policy of open housing. Over a long period of time, that will
sort of work out a solution to the entire problem, but it is not a short job. "
ATLANTA PROGRESS IN CODE ENFORCEMENT
WINS HIGH PRAISE FROM PAPAGEORGE
"Atlanta is really moving
forward." That note of
hi~h commendation for
the city's advance in code enforcement was struck by George Papageorge, regional
HUD director of workable program branch, in speaking to our executive committee
May 24. Said he 11 \Vhen the federal housing act was revised three years ago, the
housing code provisions gave the cities three years to ~et set and put their plans into
operation. That's just what Atlanta has done. The budget for code enforcement has
been raised from $690, 000 to $1, 028, 000. The staff has been increased from 99 to
128 employes. We can recall that previously there had been some prodding from
HHFA -- and this has not been without results. The records for the eight states in
this region shows that 117,000 units have been brought into compliance with workable
program standards and that 32, 000 additional units unfit for human habitation have
been demolished. Right here in Atlanta, 24, 000 units have been brought up to code
standards and 3,500 units have been demolished. It is very significant that 24, 000
units have been brought up to standards. This is the practical way of protectL.-ig
neighborhoods from deterioration. Rehabilitation is better than demolition because it
does not reduce the number of units a.nd displace people. That figure of 24, 000
includes only those reported by inspectors. In addition, many have been repaired by
property owners without receiving citations." Mr. Papa3eorge concluded on a warning
note saying "There can be no let up on the program of rehabilitation. It must be
carried on permanently . For once a neighborhood has been rehabilitated, it is
necessary to go back and reinspect it to keep it from deteriorating again. This should
be done every two to five years."
Explaining that Atlanta's
application for recertification of its workable
program was now being reviewed, Mr. Papageorge praised the city's action in making
increases to its code ins p ection staff and comrr~ented that there would be no question
about approval of the codes section of the application. Then he paid our committee
a high tribute. Said he "And there is no question about citizen participation.
Atlanta's record on this is excellent. A substantial part of the credit for this excellent
record is due to this committee's work."
HUD OFFICIAL ACCLAIMS COMMITTEE
FOR "EXCELLENT CITIZEN PARTICIPA TION 11
EDITORIAL COMMENDS CHAIRMAN'S POINT
Saying that he had been
impressed by evidences
of individual fixing up that he had seen in the Summerhill area, Chairman Sommerville
made the point that all over Atlanta there were little things that could be done by
private citizens on their own as well as by the city. On Ma.y 28, the Atlanta Journal
and Constitution commended our chairman's point. Said the editorial in part:
Little things mean a l ot as the song, always, and Robert Sommerville, sometimes,
reminds us. Mr. Sommerville issued his most recent reminder of that fact as
chairman of the Citizens Advisory Committee on Urban Renewal.
The city is
apparently making some progress on providing equal service to all citizens.
Many things do get done that should be done. It is not a bad thing, however, to be
reminded that a better job should be done. And Mr. Sommerville has done the city
that service admirably. "
FULL COMMITTEE MEETING -- JUNE 21 ••• •••• DETAILS LATER
�CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE
FOR URBAN RENEWAL
OFFICE OF THE MAYOR
CITY HALL-ATLANTA, GA. 30303
PHONE 524-2745
ROBERT L. SOMMERVILLE
CHAIRMAN
WILLIAM S . HOWLAND
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
MRS. EVELYN DODDS
SECRETARY
May 18, 1967
Dear Executive Committee Member:
Three timely topics top the program for our Executive ~ommittee
meeting at 2 p. m. Wednesday, May 24 in the Fulton Federal Savings and
Loan Directors Room, at Pryor and Edgewood.
I. George Papageorge, special assistant to the regional administrator,
HUD, on Community Relations, will give us some up-to-date comments on
code enforcement and other points pertinant to Atlanta's workable program.
2. Collier Gladin, city planning engineer, will bring us abreast of
deve lopments on our city's urban renewal program and associated activities,
such as the model neighborhood program, which barely escaped extinction
in the Congress this week.
3. Chairma n Sommerville and members of our Rockdale-University
C e nter Subcommittee will have something to say about the e x cellent
de v elopme nts p r opos a ls pr es ented for these two p r ojects .
We al s o h ave invited John T . E dmunds , assi s tant regional a dmini str a t o r f o r renewal a s sistanc e H UD, to s p e ak to u s b riefly a b ou t how his office
views our present and proposed proj e cts .
Ch a irman Sommerville and l are looking forward to meeting with you
n ext Wednesday afternoon.
Sincerely,
1;~t7/u4.IJ
William S. Howlan:-r
�R[ N[W[EIR
NEWSLETTER OF THE CITIZENS ACVISORY COMMITTEE
FOR URBAN RENEVl AL
Vol. 5 No. 4
Atlanta, Georgia
April 1967
PAS SURVEY STUDY LEADS TO REDUCTION
IN CITY DEPARTMENTS, MASSE LL REPORTS
The number of city departments
is being reduced from 22 to 18
as the result of recommendation~
made by the Aldermanic Government Study Committee, Vice Mayor Sam Mas sell,
chairman of that committee, told our full committee meeting April 26. Mr. Massell
pointed out that the committee which he heads had been appointed in April, 1966 to
study the survey of Atlanta's city government made by the Public Administration
Service, the first of many surveys completed urlder the Community Improvement
Program, now nearing its termination. In addition to Chairinan Ivlassell, the
committee includes Alderman Rodney Cook, John Flarti3en, Richard Freernan,
Gregory Griggs, Everett Millican and Hugh Pierce. He explained that the committee
had devoted considerable time and thought to studying and discussing the 100 plus page
PAS survey which included more than 100 recommendations whose complete implementation would cost several hundred million dollars ~ In addition to the slice in the
number of city departments, other government study comtnittee recommendations
being put into effect include such items as: l, a resolution to investigate the use of
city owned houses and vehicles;
2, increase the authority of the city purchasing
department; 3, put city parking tickets on a computer system (which is expected to
increase revenue by some $300, 000 a year); 4, reorganize the police internal security
division; 5, eliminate apartments for city prison personnel; 6, review the business
license system; 7, amend the city charter to revise method of promotions and hirings
in city departments; 8, prepare a report on mechanical changes required to develop
a city department of administration; 9, improve coordination among departments on
annual reports.
Discussing the development of a central city
department of adminis tration, as recommended by the PAS survey, Government Study Committee Chairman
Mas sell expressed strong endorsement of such action. Said he -- "The most important
recommendation made by the PAS survey is for the creation of a department of
administration. Our staff has prepared a study of how this could be done. Vdth a
department of administration in being, this committee of ours would not be needed.
The department of administration could implement the PAS recommendations. It also
could coordinate the administrative functions of the city 3overnrnent. " As the
discussion with our committee members continued, :M r. iv:Iassell made the point that
the city charter was not exact in defining the powers of the mayor and the powers of
the aldermanic board. Said he -- "Members of the board of aldermen enjoy directing
item s of administration that come to their attention. The general situation is that if
the aldermanic committee chairman is a stronger individual than the city department
head, he more or less runs the department and vice versa. Minutes of all department
meetings are open to the public. Sometimes it would be embarrassing if they were
read and disclosed how much time had been spent on minor details, such as the type
of decoration s f or ban<.l stands."
AD!vUNISTRA TION DEPARTMENT, AS RECOMMENDED
BY STUDY, FAVORED BY COMMITTEE CHAIRW.LAN
In response to questions from
committee members, · 1v1r.
r,1.iassell expressed the opinion
that the creation of a department of administration would not take place soon.
Explained he: "For the department to be effective, it must have power to act. This
power would have to come from the Board of Aldermen. It does not appear likely
that the Board would relinquish such powers to the new department. So far our full
committee has not recommended creation of a department of administration.
PROSPECTS ARE NOT SEEN AS BRIGHT
FOR NEV·.-· DEPART i\tIENT IN NEAR FUTURE
�-2.
"I think that a departme nt of administration would make for a better city
government, but the feeling is that we now have a good city and a good city government.
Unless a crisis should occur, it is not likely that the board would turn over its powers
to a department of administration. Also, by reducing the number of departments, the
need for coordination also is reduced. "
In further Q & A session, Mr. Massell pointed out that since the mayor has
the power to appoint all committee members and committee chairmen, along with the
power to veto aldermanic action, the present authority of Atlanta's mayor is not so
weak as sometimes portrayed. Asked Mr. Massell -- "How much power should a
mayor or a board of aldermen have? That is a hard question to answer definitely
because no two cities in the United States have the same powers vested in the mayor
and board of aldermen or council." In response to a question from Executive
Committeeman Hearle, Mr. Massell expressed the opinion that eventually an administration department will be created, as the city's growth demands more time of
aldermen. Noting that the city hall was closed on April 26 (in celebration of Confederate
Memorial Day), commented Mr. Massell -- "The thought has occurred to me that we
should stop closing city hall on this date when nearly' all other city halls are open. "
METRO GOVERNMENT, CITY MANAGER IDEAS
ALSO RAISED IN LIVELY DISCUSSION
The possibility of Atlanta
eventually combining with
Fulton County in a metro
government and the potential of adoption of a city manager plan were points also
raised in the lively discussion which followed Mr. Massell's opening remarks. In
reply to a question, Mr. Massell said that we have good people in the city and county
3overnments and accordingly could make a good combination of the two governments.
Alderman John Flanigen, a member of the government study committee, joined in to
say that he felt that such a merger could not be effected so long as part of Atlanta is
in DeKalb county. He added that he thought eventually there would be some form of
consolidation. With regard to the possible creation of a Department of Administration,
Alderman Flanigen raised the question of how the head of such a department would be
chosen. He pointed out that this was as important as determining where the department head's responsibility would lie. In response to a question from AHA Redevelopment Director Les Persells as to the estimated "several hundred million dollars" cost
to implement the PAS recommendations, Mr. Mas sell poibted out that the proposed
pension system revisions alone would cost at least $100 million. Asked about the
present status of the Government Study Committee, Mr. Massell smiled and said,
"It has just about 6 one to sleep. It has no meetin~s scheduled. He explained that it
was still in active existence. Commenting on Mr. Mass ell's remarks in general,
said our Chairman Robert L. Sommerville -- I would regard what Mr. Massell has
said as very solid. I am not one of those who believe that we always must have
something entirely new, costing a lot, all neon lighted and chromium plated 11 •
In the designation of future
urban renewal projects, the
desire of the neighborhood for
such treatment will be 6 iven primary consideration, Rodney Cook, chairman of the
aldermanic planning and uevelopment committee told our full committee n1eeting
April 26.
NEIGHBORHOOD WISH FOR URBAN RENEWAL
NOW REGARDED ESSENTIAL, COOK EXPLAINS
"This is a change of policy", he explained, ' 'In the past we have undertaken
urban r enewal as a physical tool. Now we feel that the people in a neighborhood
must d esire and ask for urban renewal. In the past there has been a major problem
in that people have not been included in the planning. We have started to chang e
this in the Bedford-Pine project. West End has gone all the way in this respect.
Now in Vine City and other areas, we are in the process of settinJ up meetings and
discussion groups. If the neighborhoods want urban renewal, they must ask for it
and then participate with the city in planning the projects. 11
During April our committee
was host for two urban r~newal
On April 13, more than 60 members of the Federal Executive Board were our
On April 20, the Georgia State College Women's Club combined with Dr.
E. Garren's Urban Complex class to fill a bus. Mrs. Margret Ross, Jim
and Tom Kresbach of AHA served as guides with Director Howland.
FED BOARD, COLLEGE GROUPS TOUR GUESTS
tour s.
guests.
Robert
Henley
�-3MERGING OF TWO PROJECTS VIEWED
AS WAY TO PROVIDE TEMPORARY HOUSING
The biggest problem in all
urban renewal projects is the
relocation of the people already
living in these areas, Alderman Cook reported to our full committee as he explained
that Vine City and East Atlanta are being considered as next in line. "The rehousing
of people should be in the same area that is being cleared", he continued, "therefore,
temporary housing must be provided before demolition takes place. This can serve
u ntil permanent housing can be constructed later. With that in mind, the thinking now
is that the Buttermilk Bottoms and Bedford-Pine projects should be combined to provide
a:nple space for temporary housing. Another possibility is to have vacancies in public
housing adjacent to urban renewal projects." Mr. Cook also mentioned the redevelopment of a project by stages as a method to allow for temporary relocation of displaced
persons . He also stressed the importance of greater utilization of public housing
resources.
MORE MARKETABILITY EVIDENCE SEEN
AS VITAL TO DECISION ON PROJECTS
In talki'ng of Atlanta's ftiture
program, Mr. Cook emphasized
the importance of having adequate evidence on marketability of the land to be cleared for any project. Also in mind,
he said, is the thought of sale of land prior to its acquisition for clearance. He pointed
out, by way of illustrating the need for land marketability evidence, that four excellent
proposals for Rockdale were now being studied. Returning to projects in execution,
Mr. Cook explained that Lee Street School is presenting a problem in West End. The
location of the present school is in the middle of the proposed shopping center as set
out in the redevelopment plan. Since the present school cannot be demolished until a
replacement is built, a delay of a year or more is indicated. A possible solution is to
begin developing the section of the shopping center farthest away from the school site
and proceed by stages. Mr. Cook also stressed the point that increasing weight is
being placed on good design in the criteria for redevelopment. Speaking of the area
for which Atlanta is seeking a model neighborhood planning grant, Mr. Cook asked
t hat our committee give thought to how housing code enforcement could be best handled
during the interim period.
An honor guest at our full
committee meeting was John T.
IS HONOR GUEST AT APRIL 26 MEETING
Edmunds,who takes office May 7
as assistant regional administrator for renewal assistance in the Atlanta HUD headquarters. A native of Hopkinsville, Ky., and a graduate of Vanderbilt University
and Yale Law School, Mr. Edmunds has been serving as acting assistant regional
administrator since the retirement of R. Bruce Wedge December 31, 1966. For the
previous 11 years he has been in the regional office and has become thoroughly familiar
with urban renewal in his role as a chief attorney on urban renewal matters.
NE¥l ASST. REGIONAL UR ADMINISTRATOR
OUR COMMITTEE PARTICIPATES
IN ROCKDALE PROPOSALS HEARINGS
At the request of Lester H.
Persells, Atlanta Housing
Authority redevelopment
director, our committee took an active part in surveying the four proposals submitted
for the redevelopment of Rockdale urban renewal project. Chairman Sommerville
appointed a special subcommittee, consisting of T. M. Alexander, Sr., Chairm a n,
A . B. Padgett and Mrs. Grace Hamilton to s tudy the written proposals and to listen
to the verbal presentations by the would-be deve lope rs at two four - hour h earings
April 11 and 13. Chairman Sommerville and Director Howland also attended the
hearing s. Our subcommittee then made its comments for the recommendations which
are now under final consideration.
MASSELL TALK SPARKS EDITORIAL
The day after Vice Mayor
M assell a ddres sed our
committee, the Atlanta Journal had a lead editorial on his remarks. Said it in part:
"Sam Massell, the fireball vice-mayor who seems to be everywhere at once, has
spoken up about the Government Study Committee of the alder manic board. Mr.
Mas sell says the committee 1 h as just a bout gone to sleep '. Somebody s hould nudge
the committee awake. The a ldermen may b e s l eepy, but t he p:t"·oblems of runnin g the
city of Atlanta are as awake as a bright n ew day. "
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING MAY 24 -- DETAILS LATER
�CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE
FOR URBAN RENEWAL
OFFICE OF THE MAYOR
CITY HALL-ATLANTA. GA. 30303
PHONE 524-2745
ROBERT L. SOMMERVILLE
CHAIRMAN
WILLIAM S. HOWLAND
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
MRS. EVELYN 00005
SECRETARY
)1't'
,w µf'~IJ!
A
~ ~
V . ~
~cJJ-< !/-'(~
) ,vi" i,I, lr"I Ir:oJ ~
(' {;t ~ ' o.JA' April
fr
ZO,
. ~
1967
We are going to celebrate Confederate Memorial Day, April 26, with a
progr m for our second full committee meeting of 1967.
time is 2 p. m.; the place is the Atlanta Room of the Citizens and
So thern National Bank Building, Marietta and Broad Streets.
am Massell, Jr., vice mayor and president of the Board of
will be our first speaker. Mr. Massell, who is chairman of
manic Government Study Committee that has been evaluating
Administration Service survey of Atlanta's city government,
us up to date on his committee's findings and ideas.
Aldermen,
the Alderthe Public
will bring
Rodney Cook, chairman of the Aldermanic Planning and Development
Committee, will be our second speaker. He will discuss conditions
affecting areas being considered for futui;e urban renewal projects.
Chairman Sommerville and T. M. Alexander, Sr. , chairman of our
special Rockdale Proposal Study Committee, will give us the latest
information on the Rockdale situation.
Chairman Sommerville and I hope you will be able to be with us from
2 to 3: 15 p. m. Wednesday, April 26.
Sincerely,
�CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE
FOR URBAN RENEWAL
OFFICE OF THE MAYOR
CITY HALL-ATLANTA, GA. 30303
PHONE 524-2745
ROBERT L. SOMMERVILLE
CHAIRMAN
WILLIAM S. HOWLAND
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
MRS. EVELYN DODDS
SECRETARY
April 12, 1967
Dear CIP Subcommittee Member:
Just a reminder that we are meeting again with CIP Director
George Aldridge on Friday, April 21 at noon in Committee Room No. 4
in City Hall.
A Dutch treat box lunch will be served.Please call your reservation - 522-4463, extension 233.
Chairman Sommerville and I are looking forward to meeting
with you then.
Sincerely,
/, nJ;J . ,
//)/1.
/J
/)
1f>!F!/!!!~
i fDMt
William ~- Howland
�Maroh 29 , 1967
tr . Robert L. Sommerville
~ Chairman
..::9itizena Advisory Committee
For Urban Renewal
Office of the Mayor
City Hall A
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Mr. Sommerville:
Due to y illness for the past six weeks and by orders
from my physician restricting my activities, I regret
to say that I will have to resign as a member of the
Citizens Advisory Committee For Urban Renewal .
y
I would like to recommend, Mr . R. J . Butler, 250 Tenth
Street, N. E., Atlanta, Georgi, 30303 who succeeded
me as President of the Atlanta Georgia Labor Council
AFL-CIO, to take my place on ti..!:s Committee.
Thanking you, I am
Sincerely,
o. oore
cretary
Georgia State AFL- OIO
J.
S
JOM/glo
cos
Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr . /
Mayor, City of Atlanta
cc:
R. J. Butler, Pr sident
Atlanta Georgia Labor Council AFL-CIO
opeiu 21
afl .. cio
�rch 28, 1967
M~ • Ivan M . .Jenkin
1618 C nt . ri1 · Driv , S . W.
Atlanta,, G :0r,g ia
Sincei- ly y
IAJ'r/b~
CC: Mr. Bill Howland
a,
�CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE
FOR URBAN RENEWAL
OFFICE OF THE MAYOR
CITY HALL-ATLANTA. GA. 30303
PHONE 524-2745
ROBERT L. SOMMERVILLE
CHAIRMAN
WILLIAM S. HOWLAND
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
MRS. EVELYN DODDS
SECRETARY
Enclosed with this RENEWER is a reprint of Bruce Galphin' s story
on Georgia State College from the current Atlanta magazine.
Because of
Georgia State's extensive involvement with urban renewal, both in the present
campus and future expansion plans, I believe you will find "Anatomy of a
Super School 11 interesting and informative.
The reprints were made avail-
able to us by Executive Committeeman Harold Davis, Georgia State Public
Relations Director.
~{1
Williams. Howland
�ttlHI (E IREIN{EW[EIR
NEWSLETTER OF THE CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE
FOR URBAN RENEWAL
Vol. -5 No. 3
Atlanta, Georgia
March 1967
FOUR ROCKDALE REDEVELOPMENT PROPOSALS ARE
VERY GOOD, PERSELLS TELLS EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
All four proposals
for the redevelopment
of the Rockdale
urban renewal project received when bids were opened March 15 offer excellent
potentials, Lester H. Persells, Atlanta Housing Authority redevelopment director,
informed our executive committee March 22. Said he: "Of the 14 requests for
documents upon which to make bids, we received only four proposals.
We cannot
go wrong on any of them. All are very good proposals from responsible develop~rs.
All bidders are from out of town, but all have local associates. We feel very much
encouraged by what is happending in Rockdale. You might say that an area that
nobody seemed to want, first was sold for nearly a million dollars (A fixed price of
$896, 000 was established for the area. ) Now we have four bidders trying to break ·
down our doors to get in and carry on redevelopment of approximately $20, 000, 000.
All four proposals offer good site plans, and good architectural plans."
Mr. Persells explained that all proposals center on providing 1500 units of
221D3 housing for low and moderate income families. Two proposals call for
cooperative sales housing to be included. He listed the bidders as David Rosen,
New York; Marvin Warner, Cincinnati, Ohio; Douglas Arlen Organization, New
York; and Robert Chuckrow, New York. He pointed out that all four bidders have
records of outstanding past performance.
OUR COMMITTEE WILL BE ASKED TO HELP
IN ROCKDALE REDEVEOPMENT SELECTION
Along with a number of other
civic and professional organizations, our committee will
be asked to help in making the final selection from the four proposals to redevelop
Rockdale, Mr. Persells said. He explained that when the bids were opened, each
bidder was given ten minutes to explain his proposal, but no questions were permitted. The plan to determine the ultimate choice is to allow each bidder one hour
to explain all details of h is bid, at meetings to be held within the next two or three
weeks . Our committee will be invited to participate in these meetings at which the
bidders will be questioned on the proposals and their explanations of the proposals.
Mr . Persells emphasized that the Atlanta Housing Authority is determined to expedite action on redevelopment of Rockdale. The schedule calls for final selection
of the developer within 60 days. Then the developer is to get construction under
way within 12 months and completed within 48 months. He cautioned that such a
speedy schedule could be slowed up by time required for federal processing of
221D3 applications. This usually consumes 270 days but he expressed hope that this
could be accelerated. Mr. Persells also pointed out that FHA probably would not
permit over 500 units to be constructed at one time.
Mr. Persells further explained
that the area in Rockdale
offered for sale and redevelopment totaled 157 acres, with nine acres reserved for a regional type shopping center.
Two church sites also are specified. AHA already has reserved one church site.
The existing school is to be enlarged, as is the existing County Health Center.
Answering a question from Executive Committeeman Richard H. Rich about adjacent
housing, Mr. Per sells pointed out that land sold or being offered for sale under
the same conditions as Rockdale included 13 acres in Univers ity Center (bids to
open April 12) and 7.6 acres in Rawson-V/ashington (bids to apen May 1). Also
in the Q & A session, he explained that the nature of the Rockdale terrain, along
with market angles and community acceptability had contributed to the long delay
in Rockdale.
REDEVELOPMENT AREA EMBRACES 157 ACRES;
SHOPPING CENTER, CHURCH SITES INCLUDED
�-2BANKER JACK GLENN ASSUMES POST
AS HOUSING AUTHORITY COMWtlSSIONER
To fill the position left vacant by the
death of John O. Chiles, on M arch 20
Mayor Ivan A llen, Jr. administered
the oath of office to Jack F . Glenn to the Board of Commissioners of the Atlanta
Housing Authority. Mr . Glenn since 1951 has been assistant president of the
Citizens and Southern National Bank. Mr. Glenn is a native Atlantan and following
his graduation from Georgia Tech in 1932, Mr. Glenn held a number of positions
with the Coca-Cola Company before becoming associated with Courts and Company,
investment bankers. He was a general partner in this firm for several years before
assuming hi s present high exe cutive position with the C & S National Bank. For
many years, M . .·• Glenn has been a ctive in civic and charitable affairs.
During
·v.r w 2 he served as a lieutenant in the United States Naval Reserve. He is married
and the father of four children. A ppointment of Mr. Glenn brings the Housing
Authority Board to full strength. Other commissioners are Edwin L. Sterne,
chairman, George S. C r aft, J. B. Blayton (a member of our executive committee)
and Frank G. Etheridge.
HOUSING RESOURCES GROUP RECEIVES
59 PROPOSALS TOTALING 11, 4 90 UNITS
The Housing Resources Committee
has received 59 proposals, Col.
lV.a.lcolm D. Jones, city supervisor
of inspection services on loan to the committee as staff associate, reported to
our executive committee. The 59 proposals include 11, 490 housing units, which
he separated as follows: reasonably firm proposals, 3372 units; probable, 4237
units; under consideration, 2489 units; doubtful, 1392 units. Col. Jones added
that the reasonably firm category included 1140 units of public housing presently
under construction or in planning. He listed them a s 650 in the McDaniel Street area
of the Raws on- v. ashington project; 140 adjacent to Perry Homes. Under the new
leasing program 144 units will be leased as they become vacant. He also reported
that since last October 654 units have been rehabilitated. Sa id Col. Jones: "VI e
will not be able to make the goal set by Mayor f llen for 1967 but by combining
the 1967 and 1968 figures , we hope to be able to r e ach the quota set for the two
years. t1 He explained that a total of 1322 units will be available in 1967 which
will be short of the ye ar ' s quota, but the 5133 units in s ight for 1968, would be
233 m o re than the 1968 goal. The combined total still would be 3345 short of
the two year goal but the c ommittee hopes to close this gap. Col. Jones said.
Commenting on the figures report, Chairman Sommerville pointed out that the
McDaniel and Thomasville units had b een in the making a long time.
To meet the changing challenges
of our expandin3 urban re newal program, the A tlanta
Housing Authority is putting into effect a revised line and s taff system of operations,
Lester H . Persells, AHA re deve lopment dir ector, toid our executive committee ,
Mar ch 22. Explained Mr . P e rsells: t1 The purpose of this re organization is to
decentralize operations and put more responsibility on the field (project)offices.
The plan is for the director of a proj ect to be responsible for a ll that is g oing on
in that project. This has been tried out in We st End and has proved v ery s uccessful. The central office w ill exerci se overall s uper vi sion a nd will provide technical
advice and a.ssistance . The centr al office a lso Y. ill h andle special relocation s ituations , but relocation in general w ill be under the s upervision of the project director.
As we see it, this new plan of operation w ill be very helpful in the Model Cities
Program. 11
FIELD OFFICES HA VE lvi:ORE R ESPONSIBILITY
IN REORGANIZED HOUSING I UTHO RI TY SETUP
As Atlanta's t1CI P 11 ent ers
the hom e s tr e tch l eading to
its June completion, our
subcommittee will resume work conferences to e va luate the 11 CI P ' surveys and as sist
in making final recommendations. The s ubcommittee , headed by A . B . Padgett,
now fully recovered from recent minor s ur gery at Emory Hospital, will hold its
first work confer e nc e in Committee Room 4 , City Hall, at noon A pril 5. C h airma n
Sommerville, :Cirector Howland and Sec y.
Dodds will attend also . The c onferences are being resun1ed at the request of George I .ldri?g e , "CIP 11 director.
OUR SUBCOMi'v:iITTEE TO RES UME CO NFERENCES
AS 11 CIP 11 PROGRAM SPEEDS TO COMP LETION
�CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE
FOR URBAN RENEWAL
OFFICE OF THE MAYOR
CITY HALL-ATLANTA, GA. 30303
PHONE !524-2745
ROBERT L. SOMMERVILLE
CHAIRMAN
WILLIAM S. HOWLAND
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
MRS. EVELYN 00005
SECRETARY
March 3, 1967
Dear Executive Committee Member ACHTUNG !
As our German friends put it,
Or in American Navy terms,
11
NOW HEAR THIS!
11
Our March meeting is postponed one week, from Wednesday, March 15,
to Wednesday, March 22, at the same hour - 2 p. m., in the same place Fulton Federal Savings Directors Room.
Chairman Sommerville and I have not worked out the full program, but
our lead-off speaker will be Les (Lester Herman) Persells, who says
he now has his organizational ducks all in line for pushing Atlanta's
urban renewal program. That is what he is going to talk about. All
of us who have hear d him previously know that he will present some
inter esting and stimulating facts and figu r es.
Chairman S ommervill e and I a r e looking forwa rd to m eeting wit h you
on March 2 2.
Sincerely,
. ll!/hu-t ( }/r1kw~
William S. Howland
WSH•• bea
�CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE
FOR URBAN RENEWAL
OFFICE OF THE MAYOR
CITY HALL-ATLANTA, GA . 30303
PHONE 524-2745
ROBERT L . SOM M ERVILLE
CHAIRMA N
WILLIA M S . HOWLAND
EX E CUTIVE DIRECTOR
MRS. EVELYN DODDS
SECRETARY
February 8, 1967
Dear Executive Committee M ember:
As you have p r obably r ead, seen or heard that Atlanta is in the process
of an all out effort to be included in the federal government's brand new
M odel City Program (in which Uncle Sugar Able starts off by putting up 80
percent of the cost).
So fo 'I: our e x ecutive committee meeting at 2 p. m., Wednesday,
Febr uary 15, i n the Atlanta Room of the Citizens and Southern National
Bank w ill centa r i t s a t tention on this new p r ogram.
Bill Ba s sett , w ho i s h e ading up the cit y Planning Department's task
for c e prepari ng Atlanta ' s a pplication to be included in the federal prog r am,
will t e ll us about the area s e l e cte d fo r p r oposed d evelopment as a model
neighborhood . He will al s o b rin g us up to date on the p r og ress of putt i n g
together Atlanta ' s a pplic ation fo r a f e deral planning g r ant . Cit y Planning
Engineer Collier Gladin als o w i ll b e on h a nd t o an swe r questions.
Al s o o n our pr ogram will b e a d i scu s s i on o f a pr opo s ed con stitu tiona l
amendment to provide tax relie f t o p r o perty ow n er s w h o reh abilitate the ir
buildings . Our fellow commi ttee membe r, Mrs . G ra c e Ha m ilt on, who is
doubling in b r ass as a member of the Ho u s e of Repres e ntative s, has been
as k e d to t ell us a bout this propo sed amend ment.
Cecil A l e x a nder , chairman of the Atlanta Housing Resources Committe e , who was unable to be w ith u s a t the last meeting, has been asked
to bring us up to d a te on his com mittee's activi t i e s .
Chairman Bob Somm e rvi lle and I h ope you will b e with us on We dne s d a y,
February 15 .
�ATLANTA DIVISION
E . A . YA TE S . JR.
VICE PR ESID E N T
15
FORSYTH
STREET.
S. W.
February 1, 1967
Dear Ivan:
Thank you for your kind invitation to become a member of the
Citizens Advisory Committee for Urban Renewal, under the
leaders hip of Chairman Bob Sommerville .
I accept this appointment with pleasure and hope that I can
carry on the fine example set by George Brodnax.
Sincerely yours,
Cf~
E. A. Yates, Jr.
Honorable Iva n Allen, Jr .
Mayor City of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, G e orgia 30303
�January 12, 1967
Mr . Eugene A . Yates, Jr ., Vice President
Georgia Po r Company
Box 4525
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear G ne:
At the suggestion of Chairman Bob Sommerville,. I would
like to invite you most cordially to become a member of
the· Citizens Advisory Commit.tee for Urban Renewal.
A you doubtless kno ., Geor e Brodnax wa a highly
valued member of thi committ e for a .i.number of years
prior to his xetl rement last month.
I hope that you will be able to ace pt this ppointment
ith thi important com.mitt
and carry on th tradition
of b d pful dvice and coop ration that
s be n e t bll hed
by Geol'gia Po er.
Sincerely your ,
Iv n Allen, Jr.
�lr[HHE
[R[E N[E W[E [R
NEWSLETTER OF THE CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE
F OR URBAN RENEWAL
Vol . 5 No. 1
Atlanta, Georgia
Jamary 1967
MUST NOT BEQUEATH OUR HOUSING PROBLEM
TO NEXT GENERATION, lViA YOR ALLEN DECLARES
Atlanta I s housing situation is
no more serious than that in
any large city, but we must
do all possible not to leave it as an unsolved legacy to t h e ne:<:t generation.
That was the challenge laid down by Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr., at the b e ginning of
his address to our first 1967 full committee meeting, January 19. Sai d Mayor Allen:
"In American cities in years past, no consideration was give n to where p e ople lived
and the "do or die" attitude prevailed. Until the middle of the p re sent century, there
was no positive planning about where people should live and the growth of cities was
haphazard.
In the past nobody cared what happened to the unfortunate. Now there is
a greater public conscience. Now we have the awareness of the federal government
about the problems of people. The planning techniques which first brought raised eye
b r ows. and tongue in cheek attitudes are accepted. It is realized t h at out of planning,
comes the only hope of solving our urban problems. 11
Mr. Allen then focused his remarks on Atlanta. He pointed out that the city has
been struggling with limited funds and some federal aid to upgrade its planning in
g eneral. He emphasized that young men are taking the lead in the city's planning,
mentioning Collier Gladin, Bill Bassett and George Aldridge as examples.
Then he stressed t h e importance of Community Improvement Program, disclosing
the specifics of Atlanta's problems. He cited that the CIP has shown that some 17, 000
out of Atlanta's 175,000 housing units are substandard and that some 16,000 families
must be relocated because of government actions. Said he: "Our city, and other cities,
are now beginning to face up to the responsibility of taking care of displaced people.
ltn Atlanta, public housing has made a great start toward solving our housing problem.
It is a thrilling sight t o see what the Housing Authority has accomplished in the last
few m o nths. We already have more than 9, 000 units of public housing and soon will
have another 1, 000. This has been supplemented by urban renewal, which covers
more than 2, 500 acres. People from urban renewal projec ts have been moved into
better housing, even though it is not all standard. Urban rcne v,al has been the catalyst
that has br ought such great prosperity to our cit y. "
HOUSING A UTHORITY'S A CCOMPLISHMENTS
ARE HAILED AS "THRILLING SIGHT"
In pushing its all out effort to
solve the housing problem, the
city is going to stir up hornets
nests, and will continue to need the strong support of our committee, Mayor Allen
declared. He pointed out that under present financial conditions private enterprise is
reluctant to invest in low income housing, but that the housing problem cannot be solved
without the support of private resources. Said he: "The people of Atlanta wei-e s tunned
by the magnitude of the task disclosed by our Housing Conference held in the latter
par t of 1966. 11 He pointed out that the Board of Aldermen had approved a request for
a federal reservation of 3, 000 additional housing units. Summed up Mayor Allen:
"To solve our housing problem, we must do more than just replace worn-out units.
The purpose of this committee is to further the aims of good planning and to obtain
fac tual information to help rebuild the deteriorated portions of this city and keep other
sections up to standard. Our goals are known. We simply must get on with the job.
The city needs this committee's support and help".
CITY TO STIR UP HORNETS NES'T S,
NEEDS OUR COMMITTEE'S STURDY SUPPORT
�-2.
CHAIRIV.tAN PLEDGES COMMITTEE SUPPORT
TO CITY IN ITS STEPPED UP SLUiv! WAR
The city will have our committee's full support in its all
out effort to solve the housing
problem and to eliminate slums, Chairman Sommerville assured Mayor Allen. Said he:
11 Our Committee will help in any way possible,
We have spent a long time in studying
the reports of the CIP which have made clear what we have in the city.
Now we know
where to go and how to do what needs to be done. Working with CIP is to be one of our
main businesses this year." Chairman Sommerville added that our committee can exert
strong influence. Said he : 11 This Committee now has weight in this city. 11
HOUSING AUTHORITY OFF TO FAST START
IN PUBLIC UNITS, SATTERFIE LD SHOWS
The Atlanta Housing Authority
has responded quickly and
effectively to Mayor Allen's
call for action toward solving Atlanta 's housing problem, M. B. Satterfield, AHA
executive director, demonstrate d in a talk to our January 19 meeting. He first pointed
out that the November 15, 1966 housing conference disclosed that 16,800 families would
be displaced in five years and that Ivlayor Allen had set a goal of 9, 800 housing units for
a two year crash program. This breaks down into 2940 private units, 1274 of 221D3 units
and therest or 57 percent, 5586 public housing units. This total is in addition to the
8874 units now in operation, but included the 1140 units now presently under development.
These embrace the 650 units under construction in the McDaniel Street area, 140
adjacent to Perry Homes and 350 in Thomasville. The McDaniel Street program calls
for 248 units to be ready in 12 months, 154 units for the elderly in 17 months, the rest
in 22 months. Our speaker said bids for the 140 units adjacent to Perry Homes would
be advertised for in a matter of days and that they should be finished in some 18 months.
He explained that the se units would be designed to meet the demand for large families,
all having 3 or more bedrooms. The 350 Thomasville units are awaiting final plans
from the architects. These also will include some units for the elderly.
In addition to these units now
under development, reservation has been made for 1, 500
additional units - 1, 200 for construction, 300 for lease, Ivir. Satterfield said. Major
emphasis will be placed on utilization of the new "turn key" program under which a
develope r builds the units and then sells them to the Housing Authority. he explained.
One site for such development on Harwell Road has been: approved. Another site on
Hollywood Road is being studied for 250 units. Still another is a ten acre tract near
the present Bowen Homes which could accommodate 125 units. £1.'ir. Satterfield also
expressed hope that 375 units will go into the Bedford-Pine project now in planning
stage . Sites already approved or being surveyed will use up the present reservations.
The city has requested a reservation for 3, 000 more units. Said he: "The present
difficulty in making use of the "turn key" plan is uncertainity about the cost of land.
Y!e have asked that the federal rules be amended to permit acceleration of appraisals."
I\1r . Satterfield also told our committee that the Authority is getting started on leasing
units for use as public housing. The first project includes 65 units in East Atlanta
which ar e being made available as vacancies occur. On the day of our meeting, the
Authority signed for 48 adjacent units and is hopeful that 36 more will soon be available.
i'.1 r. Satterfield further reported that 31 units in Yanira Street, near Capitol Avenue,
had been converted into large units and that another 27 units had been brought up to
standard. He added that he hoped this will set a standard for leasing more units in the
area. Turning t o the 221D 3 program, he showed that this can be employed anywhere.
in the city. He pointed out that interest has been shown in Rockdale advertisements but
that progress has been slow. As sites for 221D3, he said that the University Center


project could handle 208 units and about 150 units could go in a section of the RawsonV/ashington project.


NEW 11 TURN KEY" PLAN TO BE USED
IN 1,500 UNITS UNDER RESERVATION
�-3NEED M UCH MORE PRIVATE I N TERES T
TO MEET CITY GOAL, JONES REPOR TS
So fa r some interest in
p r oviding low rental private
housing is being shown by
private investors, but still far t oo litde t6 tneet the 1967 goal. Col. Malcolm H. Jones,
supervisor of inspection servic es now on loan t o the Housing Resources Committee,
told our January 19 meeting. Said Col~ Jones: "Some investors are looking, some have
taken options and some ar e acquiring property, but not nearly enough to meet the city's
requirements . It looks as though we'll get about one-third the number of units we need
this year. Next year we should be close to reaching the goal of 4, 900 units. 11
PROMPT PAVING OF SIDE WALK PROMISED;
BEDFORD-PINE CITIZENS MEET INFORMED
Following a conference with
Paul Weir, city water depart1nent general manager, prompt
a c tion to surface t orn-up sidewalks on Boulevard was promised to Chairman Sommerville,
Director Ho w land infor med a mass meeting of Bedford-Pine citizens at Mt. Zion Second ·
Baptist Church Januar y 23 ~ He read a letter from Chairman Sommerville to Herbert
Wa ldrip, B ed fo r d-Pine associat e committee chairman, in which it was explained that
M r . We i r had given assurance that laying of temporary asphalt paving would begin
J anua ry 27. T h e sidewalks had been removed to install new water mains. Mr. Howland
al so reported that Chairman Sommerville and he had inspected the area earlier that day
and had found that g r avel had been spread over the soft spots to furnish better footing
u n til paving coul d b e laid. Main speakers at this latest meeting of Bedford-Pine proj e ct
area c itizens w ere Lester H. Persells, redevelopment director, Howard Openshaw,
chief planne r , and David IvfcNair, project director, all from the Atlanta Housing
Autho rity, a nd Ernest Hicks and the Rev. John D. Grier, Jr., representing the neighborh ood c om mittee.
C ITY PIC KS 3, 000 A C R E "DEMONSTRATION TARGET", Atlanta is making every effort
WILL A PPLY FOR PLANNING FUNDS Wi.ARCH l
to be among the first to be
chosen as participants in the
new 11 M o d e l cities" fede r al program, Mayor Allen told a meeting of city officials,
representatives of federa l and county social services and other interested agencies
January 24. Our c on1mitte e was represented by Chairman Sommerville and Director
H owland. As exp laine d by Mayor Allen and City Planning Engineer Collie r Gla din, the
cit y h as c h osen as a "demonstration target" an area embracing some 3, 000 acres in
southeast A tlanta. Now under way are surveys to provide specifics for the city
app lication for f e deral pla nning funds. Also efforts are being m a de to involve the
residents of the area i n planning. Target date for submitting the city's application to
regional and Washingto n H UD offic e s is March 1. The are a proposed to b e redeveloped
is bounded o n the north by I- 20, on the west by Lee Street, on the s outh by the A & WP
railr oad and on t he east by the belt line railroad. This area could set standards for
the e ntire city, Mayor A llen emphasized. A final figure of $100,000,000 would not be
beyond reason , Mr . Gla din explained, adding that no firm estimates of any costs were
available.
On the following d a y, Cha irman Somme rville and Dire ctor Howla nd atte nde d a
southeastern regional c onfe rence at which H. Ralph Taylor, HUD assistant secretary
for Demonstrations a nd Int er -governmental Relations, outlined the aims of the new
program and discussed details in a Q & A session. M r. Taylor made the poi n t that
applications for first fiscal y ear pla nning funds w ould not b e cut off b efor e May 1 a nd
that applications would no t b e c on sidered s imp ly on a firs t come , fir s t serv e d basi s.
Earl H. Metzger , J r. , forme r A HA r edevelopme nt dir e ctor , will b e i n charg e of the
new program for H UD ' s s outheaster n region.
FDR'S DAUGHTER LAUDS 'CH UC K ' PALM ER
Speak ing a t the d e d ication of
the Palme r House , n ew h igh
r i se public housing for the elderly , Mrs . Anna R oo sev e l t Hal sted, FDR I s dau ght e r, paid
high tribute to our committee m embe r Charles F . P alme r for hi s effecti ve trail blazing
in slum clearance. Speaking only a few hundr e d y a rds from where Techwood Homes,
the nation's first public housing proj ect w as d e d icated by h er father Nov. 29, 1935,
M rs. Halsted said, 11 ! have always felt that m y parents w ere a part of T echwood a nd
had a d eep inte r est in Iv1r. Palmer ' s concern over s lum clearance. 11
••• E XECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETS WEDNESDAY, FEB. 15 - DETAILS LATER • • •
�January 16~ 1967
Mr. John C . Wil on
Horne - Wilson, 111c.
163 Petel"s Str et, S . W.
Atlanta, Georgia 30313
Dear John:
Thank you. for your willingne
to continue serving
on the Citizens Advis ry Cornrnitte for Urban
R. new l. We bav made great progress and I m.
sure
will 1:ontin.ue a long as we hav men like
yCftl who .a re illing to help.
Thanks so much for th picture which I · m pleased
to dd to my crapbo.ok.
Sincerely yours,
Ivan Allen, Jr.
· yor
lAJr/br
�HORNE-WILSON, INC.
DISTRIBUTORS
PLUMBING METALS -
HEATING -
AIR CONDITIONING
ROOFING -
APPLIANCES
ATLANTA,
GA.
CHARLOTTE,
N. C.
TALLAHASSEE,
FLA.
JACKSONVILLE,
FLA.
ORLANDO,
FLA .
ST. PETERSBURG,
FLA.
TAMPA,
FLA.
MIAMI,
FLA.
163 PETERS STREET, S. W .
ATLANTA, GA.
30313
January 10, 1967
Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor
City of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georg ia 30303
Dear Ivan:
During the period that I have served on the
Citizens Advisory Committee for Urban Renewal I have
come to admire Bob Sommerville, Bill Howland and the
contribution which the Committee is making to t h e
welfare of the City.
I am pleased that you have
aske d me to continue to serve as a member of the
Committee a n d I am deli ghted to accept .
The attached photographs were taken by Charlie
Horton on the occasion o f our selection as Wh olesaler
of the Year. We thought that you might like to have
these for your records.
Warmest regards and best wishes for a most
successful year.
Sincerely,
JCW :tc
Attachment
/(
GA.
ALBANY,
�CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE
FOR URBAN RENEWAL
OFFICE OF THE MAYOR
CITY HALL-ATLANTA, GA. 30303
PHONE 524-2745
ROBERT L. SOMMERVILLE
CHAIRMAN
WILLIAM S. HOWLAND
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
MRS . EVELYN DODDS
SECRETARY
January 16; 1967
Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor, City of Atlanta
City Hall
68 Mitchell Street, S. W.
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Ivan:
I am delighted to hear from Bill Howland that you are
going to be able to attend the Citizens Advisory Committee
for Urban Renewal on Thursday.
I think you know that you have solid support in this
Committee and I hope you will not hesitate to tell us how
best we can help you in the general area of housing in
which we are involved.
You know that we were much concerned last year with the
CIP program. There are probabiy aspects of this that should
be emphasized during this year. There are certainly angles
that should be clarified and we hope to be of use to you in
this matter.
yours,
RLS : s g s
�January 5. 196j
Mr. John. C . Wil on
Horne - Wilson, I c .
163 P ter Street, S. W.
Atlant , Georgia
Dar John:
Information h
reached me that ince you h ve been elected
Vice President of the Atl
Chber of Commerce you hav
d
to relinquish th chairma hip of the Cham er'• Urban Renew l
Commltte •
B ing mindful of all you baVi done to help the pro r
e:le ance nd red velopm nt p:ro rams, I don' t
t the city to b
d priv d of the b
it of your expe:d nc
nd thlnkin •
Accordingly~ I i vit you mo t cordl lly to b com
th. Citiz ns Advitory Committee for Urb
Re,...,............
Bob Sommervill J in
it me in th earn st hop
b
bl to ace · pt nd conttnu the :faithful tt nda c
t it me tin
bich you carried 1'1 x-offlcio in your former c_hainnan•hip.
Sin.c rely,.
Ivan All n, Jr.
1AJr •• ea
cc •••• Mr. R. L. Sommerville
Mr. W. S. Howland
�f

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