Box 18, Folder 24, Document 16

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_018_024_016.pdf

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Box 18, Folder 24, Document 16

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lrlHl[E
IR fE lf\J [ \/V [E R
NE V..- SLETTER OF THE C I TIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE
FOR URBA N R E NEV.; AL
Vol. 5 No. 7
Atla n t a, Georgia
July
1967
DEAR TH OF LAND ZONED FOR A P ARTMENTS BIGGEST
HO USI NG HEADACHE, ALEXANDER TELLS COMMITTEE
By comparison wi t h "vhat
is required for Atlar..~2.' s
five year housing endeavor,
only a minuscule quantity of land z oned for apartments is available, Cecil Alexander,
housing resources committee chairman, reported to our executive committee July 19.
Said Mr. Alexander : "Vac a nt l and now zoned for apartments totals 482 acres, but of
this total 125 a c res i s committed for low income housing and. 122 acres has been turned
down as unsuita ble . Another 31 acres have been planned for other purposes. That
leaves 204 acre s , bu t u sually only one-third of the acreage turns out to be suitable,
so that mean s only 68 a cres are available for the housing program. It is estimated
that a total of 1, 565 acres are actually needed, so with only 68 acres available, it
makes a bleak pictur e ." M r. Alexander also pointed out that while most Atlantans
regard F ive Poi nts a s t he center of the city, that is not geographically accurate. He
adde d that onl y 18 of t h e available 68 acres are located east of Five Points. He
stressed t h e p o i nt that h ousing needs reach out beyond the city limits to present a
truly m etro a rea problem. Said he: "The acreage of open land is much larger in the
west and n o rthw est sections of the city. When you try to go east you run up against
DeKalb C ounty, which h as no workable program. Housing is now a metropolitan
problem. T o be r e a listic, we are going to need something like 4, 500 acres zoned for
apartm ents. V: e mu st come up with an over all plan to distribute this as widely as
p os s i ble. "
By contrast with the
bleakness of the
available land picture,
Mr . Alex and e r report ed encouraging figures in firm and probable commitments for
hou s i n g u nits . He listed 5, 244 as firm, 2, 965 as probable, The combined total of
8, 209 comes t o almost half the five year goal of 16, 800. In addition, 8, 000 units are
being considere d , w i t h 2, 830 more regarded as doubtful. The grand total of more
than 19 ,000 r epresent s about 95 per cent of what is in sight at present, Mr. Alexander
estima t e d . Sumrr:. e d up the speaker: " V.;e must have a realistic determination to
build housing i n quantity to develop a market for it. We need a new zoning ordinance
quickly o r ~evel ope rs and non-profit groups will become discouraied and go to other
cities . " Mr. Alexander also called the committee 1 s attention to a new departure i11.
housing being carried out by National Homes in the Thomasville project area where
some modification of code re gulations is bein 6 tried. He cited this experiment, after
pointinJ out t hat code enforcement can cause hardships to home owners outside urban
renewal projects. Su c h owners cannot obtain the low interest loans for rehabilitation
which are availa ble i n s ide urban renewal areas.
HOUSING PICTURE NOT ALL GLOOM:Y, TOTAL
OF FIRM AND PROBABLE COMi.VU:TMENTS SHO\VS
Followin g M r • .Alexander's talk, Executive Committeeman Edgar Schukraft
pointed to the example of Minneapolis as having built housing throu 6 hout the city.
Said he : "Ne groes and poor people should not be shoved off in one o.irection. We must
look ten years ahead . At lanta is supposed to be a new city, but it will be a city without understanding u nl e ss all of us r ealize that Negroes and poor people are the entire
city's respons i bility." Executive Committeeman John V ilson made the point that an
overall plan is ess e ntial. Alderman John Flanigen, chairman of the aldermanic
zoning comffiittee , expr e s s e d hearty support of Mr. Alexander's call for an updated
zonin6 ordinance. Said he , "In connection with what Mr. Alexander has said, the
first thing I said to Mayo r Allen was that we need a new zoning ordinance. I uon't
want to hire an outside group of consultants. I'd like to see a committee of local men
s tudy the zoning ordinance a nd r e vi s e i t ." Then speaking of the scarcity of land in the
eastern section of the city, Mr . F l a ni 6 en s aid the situation there was almost as crit ical
as it has been in Buttermilk Bot t oms , w ith r e gard to relocation of people in new housing.
Sa id he: " There just isn' t any vacant l a nd wher e h ousing can be put to take care of
people who must be relocated. ;i Commen tin3 on M r . F lanigen' s r emarks, said C ha.ir m a n Somm erville: "From what / .- lderman F l a nig e n h a s said, i t is indicated that this
committee or its successor will have to be in bu s i n e ss fo r a long tim e ."
�-2PORTABLE HOUSING ON TEMPORAR Y BASIS
IS SEEN AS NEW RELOCATION EXPER I MENT
The Atlanta Housin 6
Authority is asking
federal approval of a
plan to provide portable h ous ing for temporar y relocation use, Lester H. Persells,
AHA redevelopment director , e xplained to our executi ve committee. Said he: " We
have some reason to believe that t he f ederal government will 6 0 along with our plan to
put portable housing on vacant land on a temporary basis. For example, 100 to 150
families could be relocated in thi s kind of housing for a year or a year and a half while
permanent housing is being constructed. Thi s is an experimental approach and could
be used in the Bedford .. P ine area. 11 Commenting on Mr. Per sells' remarks, Chairman
Sommerville said our com rr, ittee was keenly interested in s uch use of portable housing
and would like to be kept fully informed of any further developments.
FOUR GEORGIANS BEGIN YEAR'S TRAINING
AS U. R. INTERNS .FOR HQlJSING AUTHORITY
Special ~uests at the
July 19 meeting were
four young men who are
be ginning a year's training i n urban renewal as inte·rns with the Atlanta Housing
Authority. At the end o f their cour se of paid t r aining, they may become staff members
or go to positions elsewh ere. AU four a r e Georgians . Following are brief biographies:
.JAMES P . BI NG, born in Waycross, graduated from Center High School here, then
majored in Social Science at Morris Brown Colle 6 e, from \,vhich he was graduated last
May 31: DARRYL R. CHANEY, Atlanta born, after being graduated from Hapeville
High School, a ttended West Georgia College, then transferred to Georgia State College,
fr-om which he v,ill receive his BBA August 17; CURTIS PARRISH, born in Waycross,
a graduate of Center High Sch ool, then attended Morris Brown College, after completing his unde rg raduate work there, worked a year as social teacher and football
coach at Dr e x el C a tholic Hi gh School, Atlanta; SHELLEY B. STANLEY, born in
Dubli n , after graduation from Mathar Academy, Camden, S. C., attended Daniel Payne
College in Birmingham, Ala. two years and then finished his college education at Paul
Quinn C olle _Je in V. a co, Texas, from which he received a B. S. in Social Science.
Updated from the original
1958 version, the city's
land use plan now provid e s i nformation for projections up to 1983, Collier Gladin, city planning engineer,
explained t o the exe c utive committee July 19. He pointed out that the land use plan is
part of th e c ity' s comprehensive plan, which also embraces thoroughfares, community
facilities and public improveme nts. Sa id he: "Under the 1962 feder a l highway act,
the governments of the m etro area and the City of .A tlanta must come up with a
tho r oughfare plan fo r the five county area. This plan has to be approved by the
Federal Bu reau of Public Roads befor e highway funds can be released. · 1 He showed
that with data furni s h ed by the land use and thoroughfare plans projections c a n be made
on populatio n , growth, h ousing needs and many other points up until the yea r 1983,
when the Atlanta Metro area is schedule d t o h a v e 2,000, 000 population. Mr. Gladin
illu s trate d his explanatory talk with slides of maps showing residential, business and
industrial use s and a l s o showing improvement treatment. He pointed out that the CIP
had provided data on vac a nt l a nd and other land that is not fully in use . Mr. Gladin
further explained that t h e land us e pla n ha s been r e viewed by the Board of Aldermen
and the aldermanic planning a nd d e v e lopme nt committee. As the pla n prog re s ses, it
will continue to be re view e d . In a n s w e r to a question from Executive Committee
Member Grac e Hamilton, Mr. Gladin said that final approval was up to the aldermanic
board. In a discussion following Mr. Gladin' s remarks, Executive Committee Member
Rich inquired what wou l d be cione w ith the plan. Chairman Somm erville replie d that
the plan's future depended upo n a p olitic a l d e cis ion. E x ecutive Committe e M e mber
T. M, Alexander, Sr., emphasi zed that c oor dina tion a mong city d e p a rtme nts will be
a major factor in putting the plan to use .
NEW LAND PLAN INCLUDES DATA TO MEET
NEEDS U NTIL 1983, P LANNER GLADIN EXPLAINS
F igures compile d by the
Atlanta Housing Authority ,.
dis clo se tha t 764 p ers ons
participated in our urban renewal tours so far in 19 67 as c ompare d w i th 8 5 0 fo r a ll of
1967, Chairman Sommerville informed the execu tive c o mmittee . Sai d he: 11 T h e tou rs
have exposed a lot of people to both the good a nd the b a d a nd ha ve p r oved ve ry worth while . They also cause a financial problem for the com mittee. 11
HALF YEAR SHOWS BOOM INJlE NEWAL TOURS
COLLEGE TEACHERS HAIL EDUCATIONAL VA LUE
�Mr. Somrr;e:r ville explained tHat ou~ corrttnit~~e' s poi!cy is to finance tours only for
groups or organizations that do not have resources for such purposes. Executive
Director Howland expressed our committee's thanks to Mrs. Margret Ross and her
associates at the Atlanta Housing Authority for helping to conduct the tours. Illustrating the value of such first hand exposure to urban renewal, Mr. Sommerville read
a letter from Dr. Beate Bandy of the Georgia State College faculty which thanked us
for arrangin 6 a tour July 13 for two of her classes. Wrote Dr. Bandy:
Sin ce you took us on the tour of the Atlanta Urban Renewal Areas we have had
two very lively class ses sions. Most of my students know social problems of this
magnitude only from books; a realistic demonstration like this can make the points
better than any combination of classroom instruction and reading. I want you to know
how much my students and I appreciate the time and effort you spent on us, and also,
that this time and effort is put to very good use, :,
11
Warm appreciation of a tour conducted June 22 for teachers of disadvantaged
youth attending a NDEA institute at Emory University also was expressed by Dr. Dora
Helen Skype k, . institute director. Wrote Dr. Skypek,
"The tour was the highlight of the first week of our program. It was enlightening and enjorable not only for the 18 teachers from New York, Detroit, Denver, Seattle,
Spokane, Milwaukee and urban areas in California, Illinois and the Southeast, but also
for the 19 teachers and staff members who live in Atlanta. Some preconceptions were
shattered and limited information had to be revised. Emphasis on the rehabilitation
aspect of urban renewal was a worthy prelude to our required reading of H. Gans'
1 The Urban Villagers I and related sociological readings. 11
EX-SENATOR DOUGLAS AND HIS COMMISSION
ARE SHOWN HIGHLIGHTS OF ATLANTA RENEWAL
At the request of the
National Commission on
Urban Problems, a
special tour of Atlanta urban renewal projects and the model city target area was
arranged by our committee July 20. Headed by Chairman Paul Douglas, former U.S.
Senator from Illinois, the commission members who were in Atlanta for hearings July
21 , viewed Buttermilk Bottoms, Bedford-Pine, Butler Street, model city, part of
West End and University Center areas. High point of the tour was a stop at the Antoine
Graves housing for the elderly; Commission members visited a number of apartments
and expressed themselves as much impressed by what they saw. Tour conductors
were Director Howland and Mrs. Margret Ross, Atlanta Housing Authority information
officer. At the hearing next day, Director Howland made a brief appearance as a
witness to tell how our committee had helped obtain active citizen participation and
thereby obtained a cooperative attitude in Bedford-Pine planning. Mr. Howland also
expressed our committee's endorsement of the Housing Authority's plan to try
temporary housing as an experiment to relocate people while new permanent housing
is under construction.
On behalf of our
committee, Chairman
Sommerville July 6
expressed congratulations to the Celotex Corporation upon being selected as developer
of 208 units of housing in the University Center project. Chairman Sommerville.spoke
at the c ontract signing July 6. Also representing our committee were T. M. Alexander,
Sr. , chairman of our s pecial subcommittee to review redevelopment proposals, and
Director Howland. Said Mr. Sommer ville: 11 This is a splendid indication of the
blending of private enterprise and public service. The quality of thi.s proposal
assures us that we will not be building a future slum. I heartily congratulate the
Celotex Corporation and welc ome it to this first venture in the field of low and
moderate income housing. What has impressed me about all the development proposals is their excellence. Representing Mayor Allen was Dan E. Sweat, Jr. ,
dir ector of governmental lia i son for the city. Saying he p ers onally w as " exc ite d a nd
pleased with the selection", Mr. Sweat read a statement from Mayor Allen. "I
warmly congratulate the Celotex Corporation", stated Mayor Allen. This marks an
important new step toward meeting Atlanta ' s housing needs in that one of the largest
building materials manufacturers is entering this field for the first tim e . In so doing,
C elotex is d e monstrating a very high sense of public responsibility. I would also like
to e xpress my a ppre ciation of the excelle n ce of a ll se ve n propo sal s submitted. 11
CHAIRMAN ACCLAIMS SELECTION OF CELOTEX
AS 11 SPLENDID PRIVATE .P: ND PUBLIC BLENDING; 1
THE NEXT COMMITTEE MEETING WILL BE IN SEPTEMBER-NONE IN A UGUST

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