Box 18, Folder 24, Document 20

http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_018_024_020.pdf

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Box 18, Folder 24, Document 20

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NEWS LETTER OF THE CITI ZENS A DVISOR Y COMMITTEE
FOR URBAN RE NEWA L
Vol. 5 No . 6
Atlant a , G eorgia
June 1967
DE TERMINED TO KEEP FAITH WITH BEDFORD- PINE
P EOPLE ON HOUSING, PERSELLS ASSURES COMMITTEE
Despite the difficulties
of obtaining federal
approval for public
housing in "racially identifiable " areas, the Atlanta Housing Authority is determined
to keep faith with the people of the Bedford-Pine area and install housing there.
That was the a s surance given our executive committee by Lester H.
P ersells, AHA rede velopment dir e ctor, in a discussion foliowing an updating
summary of the far fr om rosy housing picture given by Gilbert Boggs, AHA
director of hous ing. Said Mr. Pe rs ells: "The policy of HUD aria. the Public
Housing Admi nist r a t ion is that they do not choose to finance housing in I racially
identifiable' a reas , but housing will be built in the Bedford-Pine area. The federal
agencies are n ot delaying us. Vl e are going full steam ahead. Vl e are going to keep
our faith with the Bedford-Pine people. " In answer to a question from Herbert
Y.T aldrip, chairman of the Bedford- Pine associate citizens advisory committee, as
t o what action would b e taken if the federal agencies refuse to finance housing in
t he area, Per sells replied, "They are not going to say No. 11
FECERAL DE CISI ON ON BEDFORD. PINE
V.'ILL HA VE BEARING ON OTHER AREAS
Mr. Persells further
pointed out that there
is talk that no more
public housing can be built in the western two thirds of Atlanta because it is
11 racially identifiable" s ince it has a large percentage of Negro population.
Asked
he : 11 How can y ou writ e off 66 and Z/ 3 per cent of the population ? 11 He then pointed
out that i n u rban renewal areas the population seemed always to be almost 100 per
cent white o r almo st 100 per eent Negro. Said he: "The Bedford-Pine area is also
1 racially i d e ntifiable ' as almost 100 per cent Negro.
But these people want to remain
there in bette r living conditions." He added that the Bedford-Pine application had
been delay e d for some time while federal agencies are considering this problem. He
also mentio ned tha t t he conditions in Nash-Bans and Model City areas are sL-nilar to
those in Bedford. Pine. Accordingly, the federal answer to the Bedford-Pine
application will have b e aring on these projects. Mr. Persells also added that, in
the two year program embracing more than 9, 000 housing units, from ten to 25
different sites will be required. He made the final point that our committee could
be of servic e in encouraging the federal and city governments to locate low r e nt
housing in various s ec tions of Atlanta.
In discussing the
immediate housing
efforts, Mr. Boggs
said that emphasis was being placed on the new turnkey plan, but that turn downs on
sites by the regional H UD offic e w e re slowing progress. He explained that tentative
approval had been give n t o four sites which would provide room for 1,125 units, but
six sites which would have provided for 1, 650 units had been rejected. Summed up
Mr. Boggs, " We are c ontinuing to submit sites. V!e are hopeful that we can produce
the housing that is n ee ded. Y.' e can provide more housing more quickly under the
turnkey program, but we fac e another difficulty because such housing is not approved
unless the costs are ten per c ent under costs for other housing. 11 A final point made
by Mr. Boggs was that applications h ave been filed for 500 more units of l eased
public housing.
SITES APPROVE D F OR 1, 125 UNITS,
BUT SIX FOR 1, 650 A RE TURNED DOWN
In a question and answer exc h ang e , Edgar Schukraft urged that 300
addit i onal units for the elderly be construc ted a djoining the John O. Chiles building.
He a l so suggested that churches should join i n s ponsoring apartments. Executive
Committeeman Calloway sounded a note of opt imism, saying that Atlanta is now
reali s tic a lly facing the housing problem which h as b een building up over several
ye a rs. Sai d he , " We have the spirit now and it is the ~pi r it that will conquer. 11
�- 2-
U.S. POLICY, ZONING A ND AVAILABLE LAND
DISRUPT HOUSING EFFORT, JONES DECLARES
Asked by Chairman
Sommerville to comment
on the crash program
on housing, Col. Malcolm D. Jones, housing resources coordinator, linked zoning
and availability of land with federal policy as having disruptive efforts. He explained
that on the previous day the Housing Resources Committee had asked the City
Planning Department to furnish a list of tracts of land embracing five or more acres
that could be zoned for multiple family housing. Col. Jones also pointed o~t that the
present trend was toward cooperative housing. Chairman Sommerville requested
Col. Jones to update our committee at the July meeting.
COMMITTEE INSTRUCTS CHAIRMAN TO ASK
MAYOR TO EXPEDITE AVAILABLE LAND LIST
Following Col. Jones'
talk, the executive
committee adopted a
resolution requesting Chairman Sommerville to write Mayor Allen asking that the
information on available land tracts be expedited. Mr. Sommerville said he would
do so promptly.
CITY COUNTING ON FEDERAL AID T6 EXPAND
SUMMER RECREATION PROGRAM, DIRECTOR SAYS
Atlanta again is counting
on financial help from
the federal government
to enable it to step up its recreation program to meet the extra needs of the summer
season, Miss Virginia Carmichael, city director of recreation, explained to our
executive committee June 21. Said she: "For many years, Atlanta has carried on a
very fine all year recreation program for all ages, but our funds are insufficient to
meet the e xtra needs for the summer. Last year we received funds from the federal
government which made it possible for us to expand our regular progra1n in such ways
as leasing and staffing playlots and "operation champ" areas. We were able to
conduct an all around program, including picnics, tours to industries, to ball games
and many other activities. So last year we had one of the best summer programs we
ever had. We received $25, 000 for an intensive swimming instruction program.
This reached more than 20, 000 children, 12, 000 of whom were taught to swim. But
all these funds were cut off on Labor Day, so since then we have had to carry on the
playlots out of regular funds. Now we have gone to the federal government again.
While we have not heard from them yet, we are going ahead on faith. Vi e plan to
operate and staff 25 playlots and 22 champ areas. Last year, we did not get the word
until July 4 , but we had gotten ready and so we went into operation on July 6. We can
do that again. "
In the questions and answers that followed Miss Carmichael's talk, it was
brought out that the Metropolitan Foundation of which Executive Committeeman A. B.
Padgett is director had been most helpful in sustaining a residence camp for children
at Lake Allatoona. Miss C armichael also stressed the success achieved by four
portable swimming pools obtained with $30, 000 given by the Rich Foundation. These
are being operated in "hard core" areas and 1nay be loaned to the school department
after the summer season. Summed up Chairman Sommerville: "The donation of
four portable swimming pools is not a small thing at all, but it was done at the time
it was needed. If things like this can be done when there is need, a great deal can
be accomplis hed. " In the discussion the re were also several comments regarding
the city' s prompt action to improve conditions in the Dixie Hills area following the
recent disturbances there. Said Mr. Calloway: "Agitators always pick areas which
present them with an opportunity t o 'get the show on the road'. Let us give thought
to providing facilities immediately in areas where we know they are nee ded. 11
Commented Chairman Sommerville "I wish the city could avoid putting itself in the
light of rushing bulldozers to work aft er these incidents. It's ridiculous. If we know
of these places, let ' s put our fingers on the m and b e in there doing something b efo re
incidents happen. 11
FEDERAL FUNDS NOW SEEM ASSURED
Two da ys after our
meeting , city recreation
officials received unofficial word that the requ ested federal financial assistanc e
would be forthcoming. Accordingly, the expanded s umme r program outline d by Miss
Carmichael seems assured.
�-3There was no bias or
discrimination in the
awarding of the Rockdale
redevelopment contract to David Rosen Associates, Executive Committeeman T. M.
Alexander, Sr ., reported at the June 21 meeting. Mr. Alexander, chairman of our
special subcommittee on rede velopment proposals, explained th~t the developer's
plans made good use of the land taking into consideration the entrances, exits a~d
transportation. He also pointed out that the Union Baptist Church has become
affiliated as a sponsor.
NO BIAS IN AWARD ON ROCKDALE,
LAND USE GOOD, COMMITTEE IS TOLD
MEMBERS OF NATIONAL TEACHERS INSTITUTE
TAKEN ON TOUR OF PR OjECTS AND MODEL CITY
More than 40 elementary
school teachers from
all over the U. S. were
guests of our committee on a tour of urban renewal projects and the model neighborhood target area June 22. The teachers were attending a Nati.anal Defense Educational Association Institute at Emory University. Since all are engaged in instructing
disadva::itaged children in mathematics, one of the objects of the institute is to obtain
first hand observation of the kinds of environments in which su.c h children reside. It
was pointed out that this enables the teachers to emphasize the sociological concept
in their classes. The institute is directed by Dr. Dora Helen Skypeck, of the Emory
faculty. Arr2.ngements for the tour were made by Dr. Ann Grant, of the Morehouse
sociology faculty, who is working with the institute. Mrs. Margret Ross, Atlanta
Housing Authority information officer, and Wilson McClure, West End project
director, acted as "barkers" on the bus. At the luncheon stop at Paschall's
restaurant, Executive Director Howland spoke briefly, explaining our committee's
activitie s and str e ssing the emphasis being placed on the enhancement of human
values as w ell as the improvement of property in urban renewal projects. Mr.
McClure outlined the progress of the West End project.
ALEXA NDER VOICES COMMITTEE'S CONGRATULATIONS
AT ROCKDALE CONTRACT SIGNING CEREMONY
Executive Committeeman T. M. Alexander, Sr.
and· Executive Director
Howland represented our committee at the signing of the Rockdale redevelopment
contract, June 15. Mr. Alexander expressed congratulations to David L. Rosen
Associate s of New York, upon winning the competition for the single largest project
to date in Atlanta's urban renewal program. Said Mr. Alexander, "I congratulate
the David Rosen gr oup for their fine concept of a very complicated plan. Of all the
four proposals submitted -- and all were excellent -- this was the most outstanding.
We are happy that the Union Baptist Church is a sponsor. 11
In a press statement
Mayor Allen said: "I cordially congratulate David L. Rosen upon being selected to
carry out the largest single development in all eight years of our urban renewal
program. In arriving at its decision, the Atlanta Housing Authority was aided by
the thinking of a wide variety of individuals, representing the city government,
professional and citizen groups. I would like to express my appreciation to all."
Commented Rodney M. Cook, Chairman of the Aldermanic Planning and Development
Committee: "This development will add an entirely new community, well.:.planned
and designed to meet the needs of the people who will live there. " Just before
sitting down to sign the 17 page contract, Edwin L. Sterne, Chairman of Board of
Commissioners, AHA, said: "We are pleased to award the contract for the
rc tlcvclopmcnt of the Rockdale Urban Redevelopment Project to David L. Rosen.
We \Vere d e lighted with the superior quality of all four proposals received. They
were all s u bstantial and any one of them would be a credit to the Rockdale community.'.'
Picking up the pen to
affix his signature,
Mr. Rosen, with a
smile, said to Mr . Sterne: "Now I owe you almost $900,000." He referred to the
price of $896, 000 fixed for the 154.12 acres of residential land and the 9.14 acres
for commercial use. The Rosen proposal calls for the construction of 1, 386 dwelling
units, of which 85 per cent will be apartments and 15 per cent townhouses. The
total will include 140 one bedr oom units, to rent at from $60 to $68 monthly; 830 two
bedroom units to r ent at from $70 to $78 monthly; 416 three bedroom units, to rent
at from $80 to $90 monthly. The housing is designed in clusters in the different
sections on relatively level "island communities!' along the ridges of the hills.
PROPOSAL CALLS FOR l, 386 DWELLING UNITS;
PRICE OF $896,000 ESTAB LISHED FOR LAND

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