Box 18, Folder 29, Complete Folder

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Box 18, Folder 29, Complete Folder

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IO
CLASS OF S ERVI CE
This is a fast m essage
unless its deferred char~
actcr is indicated by the
proper sym bol.
W . P . MARSHAL L
CHA I RMAN
or
T HE BOA RD
TELEGRAM
SYMBOLS
DL = Dnv Leet er
NL= Night Letrer
R. W. McFA LL
PRESI D EN T
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- Lcrccr T elcgram
The filin g time shown in the date line o n domestic telegr,ms is LOCAL TIME at point of origin. Time o f receipt is LOCAL TIME at point of descination
1114P EST SEP 7 66 AB678 OB430
0 SOB464 NL PO 9 EXTRA SAN DIEGO CALIF 7
YOUR HONOR MAYOR IVAN ALLEN
CITY HALL All_A
CONGRATULATIONS ON YQUR STAf'.O BOTH CONCILATION AND PURE GUTS .
GARY JERNIGAN FORMER BOYHOOD FIRNED FROM DALTON GEORGIA ANO
GEORGIA TECH

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�John S. J(night
The Atlanta Riot
JOHN S. KNIGHT
Unmasked·SNCC
T he recent riots in Atlanta
offer convincing e vidence that
most, if . not all, of the racial
violence in our large cities bas
been organized and led by a
smal l minority bent upo n the
destruction of our society.
My authority for this statement is Ralph McGill, publisher of the Atlanta Constitution, long a moving and militant force for equal treatment
of the N egro citizen as provided by law and the Constitution of the United States.
McGill places responsibility
for the Atlanta disturbances
squarely upon the Student NonViolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC, or SNICK) and its
I e a de r, Stokely Carmichael.
SNICK, according to McG ill,
L-----------.__
has no more than 300 members. These have been the
agents of anarchy in Watts,
New York, Chicago and other
major cities .
Confere nce, a Negro organiza- ••
tion, denounced both SNICK ·
and Carmichael, while calling
for constructive measures designed to alleviate problems
which directly concern the
SNICK'S begin nin g were
Negro.
·
more auspicious. lts earl y stuD
r.
Martin
Luther
K ing,
dent leaders were motivated by
high dedication to the civil president Roy Wilkins of the
rights cause. Now the John NAACP and Whitney Young
Lewises and other responsibles who heads the Urban League
are out. Control of SNICK is have all repudiated Stokely
held by the extreme radicals, Carmichael and his tactics.
of whom Car michael is the
ATLANTA has long enjoyed
dominating figu re.
an enviable reputation for raAs McGill says, SN ICK is cial amity. Ironically, it was
no longer a civil J ights organi- Atlanta's splendid image that
zation but an anarchistic group the destroyers sought to tar- •
which is openly and officially ni h.
committed to the destruction of
And yet, unwittingly, Stoke- •
ex isting institutions.
ly Carmichael and his followers ·
Though small in member- performed a useful service not • •
ship, SNICK appeals to all bat- only for Atlanta but for the • ·
ers of the white man. Its slo- entire nation.
ga ns of defiance int rigue the
For here was stripped away
very young, as was shown in
the
myth that Negroes are alAtlanta, where the mob was
largely composed of youngsters ways incited to riot over poor ~- ·
living conditions, Jack of emin the 12- to 18-age range.
ployment and denial of civil
THERE .APPEARS to be rights.
no question bu t that SN)CK'S
Carmichael has now refund~ are supplied
frQm vealed himself for what he is '
abroad . O ne of it~ lawyers is a - a cheming fomenter of disreg i tercd Castro age nt. Its order, a mad dog who attacks ,
ag ita tors ' sho ut Hava na sloga ns all whites indi criminately, a
to the effect that we musl revolutionist who seeks to burn
live th ro ugh violence. " Black·
and destroy, a terrorist who
Power·· is but the ra ll ying cry.
defies law and spits upon our
Fortu nately for Atlanta, it flag.
has a mayor who confronted
THE RIGHT peaceably to
the mob with rare courage.
Though physically manhandled assemble is guaranteed by the . ·
and taun ted with shouts of Bill of Rights, as is the free"white devil," Mayor Ivan dom to demonstrate and to
Allen J r., remained upon the seek redress of grievances.
scene until the crowd bad been
Together and in a spirit of
dispersed.
constructive co-operation, the
Mayor Allen gave short Negro and white communities '
shrift to charges of police bru- must find solutions and an- ·
tality. "I saw plenty of brutal- swers to the problem wh ich
ity," he said. "but it was all beset our cities. For they are
directed against pol ice offi. hoth numerous and difficult.
cers." At his press conference,
A major start has been
Mayor Allen ~tated that "i f made in many area . Where
Stokely Carmichael is looking fa ilures have occurred, the Nefor a battleground, he has cre- gro is usually as much at fault
ated one, and he will be met in as his white brother.
whatever situation he choose ."
But the effort must 80 ahead
Atlanta's egro community if we are to enJoy the fruits of
leaders were quick to decry a compatible society in which
the rioting and violence. The there is mutuality of purpose
tlanta Summit I eader. hip and re pect for all .
��Justice

Ill
Atlanta
What happened· to Stokely Carmichael
in Atlanta on Thursda.y strikes us as about
as close to even-handed justice as it's possible to get.
Carmichael was arrested ·on a charge of
inciting to riot in connection with the
hiring of a sound truck that urged Negroes
to protest the wounding of a car-theft suspect who tried to escape. In the riot that
followed, 15 persons were injured . .
Inciting to riot is a misdemeanor with
a maximum penalty of one year in jail.
There may well be places left in the South
where the charge would have been insur-
rection, a capital offense.
But Atlanta is a city of predominantly
thoughtful, moderate people. Justice there
is a point of pride. Carmichael will be
tried and found guilty or innocent. If the
finding is guilty he bas avenues of appeal
to the highest courts.
Carmichael, leader of the Student Nonviolent Co-ordinating Committee, has publicly advocated that if Negroes fail to get
what they want they take the law into
· their own hands. He can be thankful, we
believe, that the people of Atlanta hold
the law in higher respect tl.lan that.·
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��CLASS OF SERVICE
This is a fost message
unless its dcforre<l char·
actcr is indicated by the
proper symbol.
WESTERN U I
W. P. MARSHALL
CHA IRMAN OF T HC BOARD
TELEGRAM
®
R. W. McFAL L
P RC.:~IDCNi-
SYMBOLS
DL=Day Letter
NL
Nii,::ht Letter
LT
lmc:r11:1cional
Letter Tclt.i,:.rnm
The fi ling time shown in the date line on domestic telegrams is LOCAL TIME at point of origin . Time of receipt is LOCAL TJ:-.IE at point of destination
912P EST SEP 7 66 AH569
NSA647 NS HVA053 N~ PD 6 EXTRA HUNTSVILLE ALA 7
MAYOR IVAN ELLEN JR, MAYOR OF ATLANTA
ATLA
CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR VERY DIGNIFIED AND WELL SPOKEN APPEARANCE
ON TELEVISION TONIGHT AS WELL AS YOUR VERY NOBLE CONDUCT OF
YOUR OFFICE IN DEFENSE or NIGGERISM IF THERE IS EVER ANY WAY
I CAM HELP YOU PLEASE CALL ON ME
BEM H MARSHALL SR MD 206 EAST COLLEGE ST FAYETTEVILLE TENNESSEE
(44).
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MRS. A. MORRIS HAYNES
10431 Bonita
Det roit 24, Michigan
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10431 Bonita





Detroit 24, Michigan





.-e-; A. MO~RIS
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�The Editor's Notebook
Snick's Agents of A a c y
Are Fomenting Urba:t;1
ts
THE RECENT riots in Atlanta offer convincing evidence
that most, if not all , of the racial
violence in our large cities has
been organized and led by a
small minority bent upon the destruction of our society.
My authority for this statement is Ralph McGill, publisher
of the Atlanta Constitution, and
long a moving and militant force
fo r equal treatment of the Negro
citizen as provided by law and
the Constitution of the United
States.
McGill places responsibility for
the Atlanta disturbances squarely
upon the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (Snick) and
its leader, Stokely Carmichael.
Snick, according to _McGill, has
no more than 300 members. These
have been the a gents of anarchy
in Watts, New York, Chic ago,
Cleveland and other major cities.
Snick's beginnings were more
ausp1c1ous. Its early student
leaders were motivated by high
dedication to the civil rights
cause. Now the John Lewises
and other responsibles are out.
Con trol of Snick is held by the
ex treme radicals, of which Car:nichael is the dominant figure .
As McGill says, Snick is no
longer a civil r ights organizati on but an anarchistic group
which is openly and officially
commi tt ed to th e destruction of
exist ing institutions.
T hough small in membership,
Snick appeals to all haters of
the white man. Its slogans of defiance intrigue the very yo ung
as was shown in A tlanta where
the mob was largely com posed
of youngsters in the 12 t o 18
age ran~e.
the NAACP and Whitney
Young who heads the Urban
League have all repudiated
Stokely Carmichael and h is tac~
tics.
·*
THE CITY of Atlanta has
long enjoyed an enviable reputation for racial amity. Ironically, it was Atlanta's splen,did
image
that
the
destroyers
sought to tarnish.
And yet, unwittingly, Stokely
Carmichael and his followers performed a useful service not only
for Atlanta but for the entire
nation.
For here was stripped away
the myth that Negroes are always incited to riot over poor
Jiving conditions, Jack of employment and denial of civil
rights.
Mr. Carmichael has now revealed · himself for what he isa scheminlg 'fomenter of disorder, a mad dog who attacks all
whites indiscriminately, a revolutionist who seeks to burn and
destroy, a terrorist who defies
law and spits upon our flag .





THE RIGHT to pe~ceable
assembly is guaranteed by th e
Bill of Rights, as is the freedom
to demonstrate and to seek redress of grievances.
· Togeth~r and ip- a .spirit of
constructive cooperation, the
Negro and white communi~ies
must find solutions and answers
to the problems which beset our
cities. For they are both numerous and difficult.
A ma jor start has been made
in m a ny areas. Where failures
have occurred, the Negro is usually as much at fault as his white
brother. Sus picions, distrust and
fear of association have worked
against the Negroes' best interests.
But the effort must gc, ahead
if we are to enj oy the fruits of
a compatible society in which
there is mutuality of purpose and
respect for all.





THIS NATION will not,
however, permit the destroyers
of societ y - the Carmichaels
and his ranting radicals - t o
tear down what we have built,
to burn and destroy, to defy law
and order with- rocks and Molot ov cocktails or to hurl anarchi stic slogans and impr ecations
at our public official s.
The Ribicoffs and the Kennedys who continue to deplore
"our trag ic conditions" from
comfortable seats in t he U.S.
Senate should visit riot areas
and' seek to . quiet the mob, as
did Mayor Allen.
· If nothing else, the experience
might leave them better informed and not quite so ·sure
that all social ills can be cured
by dispensing . a few hundred
more millions from Wa~hington.
Plus C<1 Change, Etc.
TODA Y'S el ection in South
Vietnam is largely an exercise in
propaganda.
I ts purpose is to elect a 117member assembly charged with
writing a new national constitution. When that is done, a legislature is to be elected next year .
. The election has been n eatly
rigged by the ruling junta. Premier Ky's generals can change
any part of the new constitution
Unless two-thirds of the constituent assembly objects. This
rneans the junta could control
the assembly with a t hird of the
Votes, plus one, or 40 votes.
So despite ef fo r ts of t h e Vietco ng to di sru pt t h e elect ion by
llcts of viol ence against those
"who partic ipate, the outcome is
assur ed. It w ill be acclaimed in
W ash ington and Saigon as a trium ph ! o r representative government.





AN IN DEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
JOHN S. KNI G HT, PRESID ENT AND E0 ITOI!.
JOHN B. O LSON, GENERAL MANAGER
• b
.
morning y Kn ight N1wspap1rs, Inc., 321 Laf•Yaff• ll•d., D•holt. Mlchlgin et
LEE HI LLS, EXECUTl ~E EDITOR A NO PUBLISHER
Published every
IT I S, of cours e, a first tentat ive step in that directi on. But
lest we attach too much significance to the election returns,
these facts should be kept in
111ind.
1. T h e balloting is not a test
between the Vietcong and the
tlon-communist nationalists, for
f.1-
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As McGill says, Snick is no
THE RIGHT t o peaceable nedys who cont inue to deplore
Wash ington and Saigon as a trilonger a civil rights organizaassembly is guaranteed by the
"our tragic conditions" from
umph for represe~tative govti on but an anarchi st ic group
Bill of Rights, as is the freedom
comfortable seats in the U.S.
ernment.
wh_ich is openly ·and officially
committed to the destruction of
IT IS, of course, a first tentaexisting· institutions.
t ive step in that direction. But
Though smRll in membership,
~ ...
tf!1. tf!1.
lest we attach too much signifiSnick appeals to all haters of
~ '-' ,1,,
1,, .,...., ;;.,
cance to the . elect ion returns,
the white man. Its slogans of dethese facts should be kept in
fiance intrigue the very young
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
mind.
as was shown in Atlanta where
JOHN s. KNIGHT, PRESIDENT AND EDITOR
1. The balloting is not a test
LEE HILLS, EXECUTIVE ED ITOR AND PUBLISHER
JOHN B. OLSON, GENERAL MANAGEII.
the mob was largely composed
bet ween the Vietcong ana the
of youngsters in the 12 to 18
. Publiahld •••rv morning by Knight Nawspapar1, Inc., 321 Lafayette Blvd., Detroit, Michigan 4ml
non-communist nationalists, for
age range.
the Vietcong have been exThere appears to be no ques2 ·B
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 1966
eluded, as far as possible, from
ti on but that Snick's funds are
t he candidate and voter lists.
supplied from abroad. One of its
2. Charles Mohr, correspondlawyers is a registered Castro
ent for the New York Times,
agent. Its agitators shout Ha\
/ 1/ /
reports that in two weeks of
1
vana slogans t o the effect that
, \ \\
campai gning, the candidates
. ,/
we must live through violence.
~
,have not discussed the war,
"Black power" is but the ra11ynow to win it or how to negoing cry.
tiate its end.
3. While t h ere are no prohibiF ORTUN A TELY fo r 'Aflanta,
t ioi:ia . a-gainst de bating governit has a mayor who confronted
ment war policy, the candidates
the mob with rare courage.
are wary of standing laws that
Though physically manhandled
could punish those who "ham.
and taunted with shouts of
per" the war effort .
"white devil," Mayor Ivan Allen
In Saigon's election district 3,
Jr., remained upon the scene
some 200 persons heard speaker s
until the crowd had been disfrom 11 slates of candidates.
persed.
"Not one," according to correMayor Allen gave short shrift
spondent Mohr, "mentioned tb e
t o c_h arges of police brutality. "I
war, inflation, the American imsaw plenty of brutality," he said,
pact on Saigon or how -soon the
"but it was all directed against
ruling junta should step down."
police officers." At his press
The wariness of issues was
conference, Mayor Allen stated
rationalized by one candidate
that "if Stokely Carmichael is
who said: "We must have a conlooking for a battleground, he
stitution as a legal base for our
has created one, and he wi!J be
government. With a legal base,
met in whatever situation he
we can solve all problems."
chooses."
So when you read the optirnistic post-election pronounceAtlanta's N e g r o community
f
leaders were quick to decry the
r:nents to the ef ect that democrioting and violence. The Atlanta
racy is thriving in South Vietnam, leave a little room in y our
Summit Leadership Conference, a
Negro organization, denounced
mind for some wholesome skep.
ti cism.
both Snick and 0armichael, while
calling for constructive measures
The ol d French saying ,._ t h e
more things change, the more
designed to alleviate problems
which directly concern the Negro.
they remain the same - has spe•
Dr. Martin Luther King, Execif ic application to Vietnam.
cutive Director Roy Wilkins of
JOHN S. KN IGHT





t. . .o.
. . .. .
II





Ir
1/
.
�. - - -READ
September 8, 1966
Dear Mayor Allen:
I thought perhaps you might be
interested in the support you ire receiving
from the "Land of Lincoln, " quite close
to the home of General Grant, Galena,
Illinois.
You are absolutely right. These
hoodlums in the streets ~- white or negro- ~
must be dealt with as any other law-defiant
person, with a punishment to fit their crime.
William K. Todd
Associate Publisher
The Honorable Iv an Allen, Jr.
Mayor of Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgia
fwm the de~k of
William K. Todd
Enc.
�5:,9>
, , , ...,21
4}) OCTL YRO NEW YORK NY 09 _lap EDT
£$T
N 'Ylt80 U PO (
MAYOR IV AN ALLEN
CITY HALL ATLA
YOU »ID JENKINS
R£.CttYINODEKD<>OUS
ACCLAIM MERE.. MAYOR
UN)SAY SEM>S B[ST 91SH£S. SAYS YOU KAY£ THE ANSVDt AK> HOP€S
YOO l<EC:P HI; l It'. /l~~l> KE E? IT UP.
atU. LEA&. OVEllTON Cli'RlE RCA
·-
1270
( t - 51)
��lenlnr
More Than
lOCAL FORECAST-
14,000
Clear to partly cloudy and
mild today and Friday; baro-·
meter 30.30 steady; winds N
. at 10-12 mph ; sunrise Friday
5:56; sunset 6:36.
High
Low
78-82 57-60
Ex;pected today
82
57
Yesterday
Families
"aily
• • • In the
Heart of
Raaorbacklendl
107th YEAR-N.UM BER 74
The Public Interest Is The First Concern Of This Newspaper
Associated Press leased Wire and Wirephoto
FAYETTEVILLE, ARKANSAS, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1966
AP, King and NEA Features
·ew }lamp hir
!L won lib
Nancy
\ ·m
�••• ivnss 1va,ywr ! iem, swimsuit winner, ana IV11SS uauns,me-.awm eoem oi.cL01, puse 7ur
were listed as 187, against 885 photographers
enemy dead.
- In Tokyo, Gen. Maxwell
D. Taylor said he believed the
Communists have lost more
t~an lOO,OOO men ~om ~mbat, ATLANTIC CITY, N.J . (A~
P Wednesday night in the opening faul_t, performe~ a classical sedisease and de;,ertwn th 15_ year. One beautiful teen-ager round of competition in the Mi>S lect10n on the piano to take tah
Replacements Bf t_he p~mfully sobbed with joy and another America contest.
/
ent honors.
Miss California,
01arlene Miss New Hampshlre, Nancy
slow 1;1ethods of mf1ltration un- bubbled with happiness.
der <}Jr_ attll:ck must present_ a ,,The girls, from opposite· ids Diaue
alias, 19
was Anne Naylor, l~, vmn \\\\.~ ~W\l'l\
.
,'r'°oblcm.
h~ ~ - o me nauon, share
onors awai'tied her s ~ by <le-c suit competition. Hl:1° fath_er, an
leaders, the r~tired _chau - - - - - -- - - - -- - - - - -- -"T=-- - - -- Air Force pilot st.ationed m the
man of the U.S. Joint Cluefs of
Philippines, flew in as a surSt~ff and !Orf;ler ambassador to
prise after ,a year's absence. He
Saigon said . m a luncheon adbrought along her 15-year-old
·
brother Steven.
dress. He said, however, more
claims numerous personal injur- An easterly wave weather
ies.
situation - sometimes·a portent
of a storm - developed in the
Clark Quits Post
tropical Atlantic Ocean several
hundred miles southeast of Cape
Chester St~phiims, ~ore_man of Kennedy today, but weathermen
the Fayetteviljte Samtabon De- predicted rainstorms associated
partment, ha~ been named act- with it would remain south of
ing. su~rin~dent ~olfowing the the launch area and away from
Z:S1fillatien 1of Damel J . Clar~, petentia1 emergency landing
Clty Mana s<!T. <?.e-rald. 1i'G'!C s.a:i:d -z.oM..., needed at 1aunch ·m
tooay. ce
Friday.
Clark
sanitation superinten- "We've endeavored to lay thls
dent f r the past two years, re- flight plan out so we have a
signed ~ Tuesday, Sept. 6. Clark's chance of doing everything,"
future , plans were not revealed. Navy Lt. Cmdr Gordon said
Frj,x said applications for the
·
'
$6,f,.iOO per year position are now
_ b§.iing accepted in his office. An
mterview for the pesition will
be held this week.
Clark was instrumental in establishing the new garbage train
and commercial containerized
system in the city, Fox said.
The new system was placed inta
Police Chief Hollis Spencer
operation in June.
P·reliminary Miss America WinnersJNamed
mo
Johnson,S F·ore1gn
. AI·cf
I
he will probably accept an- in- quences.
U.S. troops and more air strikes
w~ be needed to bring North
Viet Nam to terms.
.
It was the s~cond attemp~ m WASHINGTON (AP) - Presii
two weeks to smk a U.~. ~me- dent Johnson's foreign aid pro~weeper ~nd_ th e fourt~ mcident gram is over the hill for th·s
m the sh1pp~g la?e smce Aug. year-but not out of the woods.
23, when a mme _ripped through After weeks of debate and
the U.S. cargo ship Baton Rouge f .
. $ b'l
vt
d kill d
A
· ussmg a compromise 3.5. 1 0
c~~ ~~e:nen eo nse;~ng ;er~ lion aid authorization was on its
·
· ·
·.
'
- - - - - - - - -- - Viet Cong n:me sank a Vietnam•
es;tavJ ;unesweep8J.
t d
1e.
· · com_m an r:por e
~:ro~~etii:~;~~;de:0 ;me ~e
7
pOf'·ice (rackdown
fn fayeff ev1'IIe
today warned Fayetteville motorists to observe the speed
LITTLE ROCK (AP) _ Gov. limits and stop signs en city
Orval Faubus said today that streets or suffer the conse-
·1
Clears Senafe·Br'/ E·ght
Votes. .
I
Speeders face
Faubus To Speak
s·11
PLACES BLAME-Atlanta Mayor Ivan Allen Jr.
charges Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNOC) is responsible for racial rioting t h at
rocked the Georgia oity Tuesday. (AP Wirephoto)
R. hf D( Pl _ s f
1g s eay eases ena ors
Three D1reclors
r k 'R lecl'1
J88 e-e
on
.
Nanc; said she· spotted be r
father, ' Lt. Col. Harold Naylor,
as she paraded down the 120foot runway in Convention Hall.
" I saw him there waving ove1
the floodlights," she said backstage la ter. "I was thrilled."
Mrs. N.:iylor ha_s ,been with
Nancy at the family s home at
way to the White House today.
But the measure, which previously had been approved by
the · House, cleared the Senate
Wednesday by only eight votes
to 25 Sen J W Fulbright
- 33
.
. . .
,
chairman of the Senate Fore~gn Nashua, N.hH. li d . d •
1d
Relations Committee which Nancy, w o ve an .rave ~
handled the measure, wasn't throughout Asia and 42 states m
even there to vote either aye or this country, hopes for a oareer
nay
in the diplomatic service. She i'S
B~t before the Senate gave its a sophomore at the University
southeast of Saigon. A sp~ke~~
approvall, onJe forlelign aid critic, of~~l:r~~tfornia played "Tocvitation to address the Demo.
man said there were no casualSen. A len . E ender, D-La.,
,,

cratic State Convention in Lit- The po~ ice depart_me~t
ties to the crew nor any dama e _Three. members of ~ayette- ~as urging that the _a~·propria- ca~, . by Khachadtullan.
h •
40
tie Rock next Thursday.
We.dnesday issued
traffic cit th hi
g ville's first Board of Directors tion measure providing the While calm an sure of er
O e s p.
The Arkansas Democrat re- 1Jations, most of th em for speed· WASHINGTON (A
whose terms expire at the end funds be slashed down The ap- self onstage, the statuesque
in and failure to observe sto
P) The transact business. After a 75· Grenade attacks, as.sassina.
t
. .
·
brown- haired beaut
broke
port~ .t,o<}ay that Faubus would . g
.
aff_P near-certainty that th Senate minute call of the roll produced tions and other violenc wer
o_f the yea: have p1ck:d lp pet!- propr1ab?n foll?ws the a~~or- d
. t
ft
"I
be mvited ta speak and that SJ_gns,_ m a crac.kdown on tr ic will not vote before th: Novem- the required 51 Wednesday Sen. the rise as the Co e . t e _on tions calhng for their re.eJec- ization bill, which sets ce1Jmgs own/n ,,e8fis a
s.
am
the ~vitation had the approv~l v10lat10ns that included the use ber elections o~
e hotly Philip A. Hart, D-Mich., 'man- creased their terr::tn~~t!~n; tio.n. City Clerk George, bavi_s and restrictions on the program, ec:a;f;n/
~Ii ible for
of J1:"1 Johnson, the Democratic of radar_.
disputed open housing ection of aged to get in a motion to take to disrupt the nat'
I l t' P said only the three ha,e peti- and may set off a new round of th
t ft
th g .. al
nommee for go.vernor and a "We mtend for these people the civil rights bill ;" br1·ngm· g up the bill
Sunday
iona e ec ion tions out. When signed hy 50 debate.
M~ pCaagli~anf _a er ed ord1g1hn
·
to sIow· down and stoP runnm· g quiet sighs of relief "" m some B t th S· te quickly turned
·- - - - - - . lly ap- tit!1sst
orrua
Vigorous
en"tic of F aub us.
persons t he pe tit·ions are kl,\J be The measure as fma
tin hsurren
d eret· ert
1· hts " S
.d "A
u
e ena
d .
t th l k' Off'
.
e o con ue er e uca wn a
Th . ·ta,ti n p arently was t
.
e ll'!Vl , o a p
. . sop ~g '
pencer sa1 .
senators up for re-eJe ion.
ro a $3.5-billion foreign aid au- Officers El
d
turne ID a
e c er s ice. proved was a compromise California State College in Hayissued m_ the hope of_ umting motons~ can expect to _get As matters st~d.' e Demo- thorizati0n. After it sent that
. ecte
Dale Dunn, Mrs.
Pelbert worked out by a co_nference ward, where she is a sophoDemocratic PartY: factions ~or caught m the rad~ net Just craflic leadership is W<ely to bill a!,~ng to President Johnson Clark McClinton of Fayette- Swartz and Dr. Garland !Jeiton committee that reconciled doz- more.
llie. g~n&:l ~~?ion Wn¥:gn a?<>u~, anywhere m Fayette- have to put the Ho e-passed by a 33-2S vote the quorum van- ville has been re-elected chair- Jr. wili ask re-election for four. ens of differences betw:en the
1
agaID
epu ican
op ville.
.
bill on the she~ atiter a couple of ished. When 'an hour's effort man of t~e Washington County year terms s~rting Jan. 1,
Senate and House versions of - - - - - - - - - - - Rockefeller.
Spencer said ~ere are too weekts _of snail-paced ilibuster- failed to get enough members Democr~tic Central Committee, After election last Febtllary the program.
ARKANSAS WEATHER
~ y young chil?ren an the ing by its ~ppone~ts. !!:~en if the back, Hart gave up and moved a cornm1t!ee spokesman said to- board members drew for te11ns Originally, the President had ARKANSAS _ Partly cloudy
I S
S
F
tate unera et
city s streets for his departm~nt measure _JS revived later, it for adjournment for the day.
day.
and the three drew short terms. asked for $3,367,000,000 for the with little change in temperaCAPE TOWN, South Africa !o tolerate f~st ~r careless driv- ~ould be m a po.5t-el tion ses- Democratic
Leader Mike ~lso returning to office were The other four members d. !he aid program-both military and tures through Friday with a
(AP) _ The body of assassinat- mg. He said m some are~s s10n.
Mansfield called the outcome _"a Mis~ Suzanne Lighton, the vice board are not up for re-eJeCt1on economic. The House had au- few showers in the south pored Prime Minister Hendrik F. around ~e schools the traffic In two days ofhnia1eu:7ering, disgraceful exhibition of domg chairman and A. D. McAllister this )'.'~ar.
.
thorized . $4,109,119,~00. But the tion tonight and Friday. Low
Verwoerd was flown today to ha~ard 1s worse becll:use the supporters of t ae ~gislation nothing." He said oppo~ents and J r ., secretary-treasurer.
The Petitions must be filed by can. Senate, ID an obviously rebel- tonight mid 50s. High Fliday
Pretoria for a state funeral as children do not have sidewalks have not been ble to keep proponents of the bill were ~ote was unanimous on all oC- didates between Sept. 9 ¾d lious mood, chopped the request 80-90_
two of South Africa's leading and crosswalks to use.
. enough senators on ~and to !CONTINUED ON PAGE THREE> ficers.
Sept. 28.
to $2,852,762,000.
papers called for tighter security procedures in Parliament.
"It is easy to be wise after an
event, but it looks as if security
.
.
d
bal
,:i
arrangements in Parliament
are surprisingly lax," said Jo- An AP News Analyst
Peking regime_ oes ~t want to donnybrook flf glo
prepor- masses." In Communist Ian- struggle and confusion in J:1':d . Then the Chinese ambassador 'l1he
Chinese
ambassador
hannesburg's Rand Daily Mail
By WILLIAM L. RYAN
get invelved in war with the tions.
.
guage,
"people's
masses" China, the emerging leadetsllip lll Warsaw, after_ one of_ his in- would not act on his own. He
in an editorial.
Red China's actions and United States. But it badly Communist parties in Europe means Communist par.ties. The wants to force Moscow to roake numerable meetmgs wi th the had specific orders. Evidently
R~ferring to Ve~woerd'sk ads- words these days suggest that needs an Qutside ene y to ex- now comment freely, frequently statement reflects Moscow's the first move and ' take the !_!._s. l~mbafss143.215.248.55r'g· agccuaseddu!~ the idea was tc, surround Pesassm the Cape Times as e ·
ur
Chi
.
de .<"I em 111 o
sin m
. ,
..
d
.
"How' was it that a foreigne~ the men now emerging at the cuse internal ~eas . It could and ,acidly on Red. .nese ~n- worry that more splintering and blame for breaking the sJen r with Washington about U.S.- krng s po~1tio~ ~n ~efend it
and rolling stone could be ap- t~p of the heap in Peking can- hardly do w1thout
United tics. At the same time, all ~is- confusion are in prospect under thread still holding the two to.. Chinese reconci_liation.. Moscow from ~ov1et ms'.nuations that
pointed as a messenger in the sider Moscow a threat to their States as an enem~ w and play worry that a . conta~ion the hammer blows from Peking. gether.
had been needling China about the Chinese, aft:r all,_ were not
precincts of Parliament?"
chances of nailing down and in- apparently wa~ts ~ d the So- which has swei;>t Chma nught Peking's latest official actions The latest sequence of events those talks in Warsaw, the only all that t?ugh m facmg up to
suring their power.
viet Union te its hst ~f: fGes for spread beyond its bo:ders and seem incomprehensible unless seems to make Moscow t~e Poiht of U.S.-Chinese contact for the Americans.
M ket D
Sh I Foreign Minister Chin Yi's good measure.
. pr?ve, as the Bulgarian party one considers a few probabili- main target of Peking's rnanetJ· Years.
Since there bas been no real
ar
rops
arp Y statement in Peking about the Whoever controls ~ed .c?lla said,_ " most d~gerous" to Com. ties:
vers. First, Foreign l\ltniSter Hopes for a ch~nged Peking change in attitude,
there
NEW YORK (AP)-The stock possibility of talks with the riow - and Defens(: r,,;m1ster mwust world _aims.
.
- That there has been _a Chen talked to Japanese Visitors attitude faded again.
emerges a picture of the Kremmarket dropped sharply at mid- United States on Viet Nam and Lin Piao seems!& be ~!ling the The Bulgarian party, faithful strong pro-Moscow element m about Viet Nam talks, saying 11e But there was no real conflict lin and all "revisionists" as the
day in moderate trading.
the stateme~t by the Chinese shots - the !:gime_. S1<etflS hell- echo of Moscow'. warns ~hat Chi- the Peking leadership a n d that aidn't want to_ see.. the United between Chen Yi's r~arks and main targets of_ such goings"?n·
The Dow Jones average of 30 ambassador m Warsaw, full of bent for coJlJ ien V.:il 1 :t,fa raw. na's purge, which Pekmg calls the Ki-emlin must be represent- States and China come to II those of his envoy m Warsaw. One can sm·m 1se that Pekmg
industrial st.ocks was dewn 9.08 l>elligerence toward the Ameri- Meanwhile, arou~d J1.e ~ed "the great proletarian cultural ed a wholly wicked if the "an- clash." This ~pmed to parK Chen _ and Mao Tze-tung him- really w:mls a final rupture and
to 768.31 at noen.
cans, are not so comtradid0ry world, every?ody 1s tllflg ll!to re\"olution, might spread to ti-revisionist" leaders are to nail h@pes in Wa hinglon. af fl elf _ had spoken befor~ about is "orking hard to prod MosPrices dropped without any as they might seem.
the act. Peking may he happ~y o_ther_countries and "create dif- dawn their autherity !or good. change in Peking's att_itude 10·111.ot wanting a clash with thej co~v·s patience to the break.ins
particular 1elling pressure..
It all seems to mean that he anticipating an all-(bj1llllun1st f1eulties in uniting the peeple's _ That in the tmdst ef the ward negotiations on Viet Nam, J\rnericans.
pemt.
J



J





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Ch l•n es e Leaders Seen As Seeking Final Split With Soviet
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Tit Public lme•it Is Tie First Concern Of This Htw1paper
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�Something to .Consider
The violent Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee has gone into
Federal court in Atlanta to ask nullification of anti-riot laws under which
its Chairman Stokely Carmichael was
arrested.
SNCC bas been trying to nullify
anti-riot laws all along by ignoring
them. When we see how SNCC acts
with riot laws on the bqoks, think how
it would act if they were nullified.
�NORMAN E . SOPER
1512 MINNEKAHDA ROAD
CHATTAN OOGA , TENNESSEE


3 7405


September 10, 1966
Honorable Ivan Al len, Mayor
City of Atlanta
Atlanta, G~ or gia.
Dear Mayor Allen :
Enclosed is a brief editorial from the Chattanooga
News - Free Pr~sP of this date, whi ch very well sums
up the case for SNCC Chairman Stokely Carmic hael,
�143.215.248.55
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LetterPublished letter
lected fo r pub
by stamped,
limited to co
With Sunday Morning Editian
Published by THE EVENINGSTARNEWSPAPERCO., Washington, D.C.
SAMUEL H. KAUFFMANN, Chairman of the Board
CROSBY N. BOYD, President
SIR:
NEWBOLD NOYES, Editor
sive surr
schools,
··BENJAMIN M. McKELWAY, Editorial Chairman-
A-12
every ;
evenm
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1966








L il
had t•
dI'UD'
of r-
Rioting In Atlanta
The most surprising thing about the
riot in Atlanta is that it should have
happened there. For Atlanta, by general
· agreement, has been a model for southern cities in its race relations.
Mayor Ivan Allen Jr. has walked the
last mile in search of racial peace. He
had almost solid Negro support when
elected. He was one of the few southerners t o t estify in support of the 1964 clvtl
rights bill. He has added Negroes t o the
police force. Atlanta's schools and city
facillties are totally integrated. Many
Negroes are employed by business establishments and the city has sent eight
Negroes to the state legislature.
All of this count ed for nothing,
h owever, when a suspected Negro car
thief was wounded while t rying to
escape from arresting police officers.
When some 500 or more Negroes took to
the streets the mayor climbed on top of
an automobile and tried t o reason with
t hem. He was shouted down . Taunts of
"white devil" and "black power" greeted
h im. Finally the mob surged around the
car and the mayor was jarred loose frolll.
his perch and fell to the street.
No, this didn't happen 1n a Birm-
Ingham or a Selma. It happened in
Atlanta. Little wonder that the Rev.
Martin Luther King Sr., who lives in
Atlanta, was heard to ask: "What do
they want? The mayor came down. He
tried to speak to them and they
wouldn't listen. What do they wapt?"
It was a good question, but hard to
answer. For most of the members of the
mob may not have known themselves
what they wanted-unless it was an
excuse to throw rocks and rant about
police brutality.
The mayor says the riot was deliberately caused by some of Stokely Carmichael's SNCC henchmen, and he may be
right. For the mob began shouting "kill
the white cops" a fter SNCC representatives, according to the police, spread t he
false word that the suspected car thief
"h ad been shot while handcuffed and
that he was murdered."
Wh atever may h ave been t he case
with the riot ers, it seems clear that what
the SNCC people want ts trouble, trouble, t rouble. And that Is what t hey are
going t o get, though n ot in the form
they want, if this .sort of madness keeps
up.
r•. .,g
se
pli
hJ
r,
~------.
w,.
-~-UP
s
�Capt. Virgil W. Harris, Box 572
Hq. AFSC , And r ews AFB
Wa s hing t on , D . C. 20331
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�CLASS OF SERVICE
This is ~ fost me !13).!·.:
unless its dcferreJ char~
actcr is indicated by the
proper symbol.
WESTE
SYMBOLS
TELEGRAM
NL:--.Ni~ht Le:rcr
R . W . McFA LL
PRCSIOCNT
LT_ I nrcrnariona.l
i\
6 AB186 BA431
HX HARTLAND VT 11
B HXA048 NL
MAYOR IVAN ALLEN
MAYORS OFFICE ATLA
AS A-GEORGIAN I HAVE ADMIRED YOUR CONDUCT IN BRINGING NEEDED
PROGRESSIVE CHANGES. I DO NOT UNDERSTAND YOUR ACTION THIS PAST
WEEKe I BEG YOU RECONSIDER YOUR POSITION RELEASE PRESSURE ON
NEGRO COMMUNITY PUNISH MURDERERS AND RESTORE ORDER PLEASE GOD
BE WITH YOU
WILLIAM CHRISTOPHER HARTLAND VERMONT.
SF120l(R%5)
- Lcr,cr T cl..:.!r:lm
D
�CLASS OF SERVICE
This is a fo~t mcs!-:::ii!e
unless its deferr ed chn r.actcr is indicated by the
proper symhol.
R
U IO ~/
TELE~RAM
,{J<,,["'f'" ifQClci:rams is LOCAL TIME
at
R':nc:::,:LL-'] J
point of ongm Time of rcc«pt
15
LOCAL TIM
ASYQA007 CGN PD HIGH POINT NCAR 11 1015A EST
MAYOR OF ATLANTA
ATLA
I THINK YOU ARE RIGHT. CONGRATULATIONS WITH OUR SUPPORT
PETE BRUTON

SF120I(R2-63}
at
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~~=;:t;:;143.215.248.55;lam
poinc of dcstinJt1on
�ESTERN UNIO
W . P . MARSHA LL
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD
in ;
TELEGRAM
R. W . McFA LL
PRESI0CNT
time shown i the dace line on domestic telegrams is LOCAL TIME at point of origin. Time of receipt is LOCAL Tl1'
SEP 9 66 AE523 LA420
PD TDPF CAVE CREEK ARIZ 9 458P MST
HOOORABLE MAYOR or ATLANTA GA
ATLANTA GA
MY COMPLIMENTS TO YOU FOR THE ACTION YOU HAVE TAKEN TO HALT
TERRORISM IN OUR CITY STREETS. A GRATEFUL CITIZEN
EARL C GOODRICH
CAVE CREEK ARIZONA
(02).
1)
TTY
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66 AF~S DA'59
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n£ HON IVM ALLEN, "AY0R OF ATLANTA
ATLA
HOORAY FOR YOUJ VE ARE SO PROOO OF YO~ ACTI<,,i ~HE RECEftfT
RIOT IH ATUNTAI WE ARE PROIJl 'THAT SOHE MAYOR Of $Ott! WONIXRFUL
CITY #IS TI£ COIRAGE TO DO 1114AT lS tllGHTI MORE POWER TO YOU
MAI\V C CROWLEY PR£SIOENT HOI£ INlEltORS ANO GIFTS lNC OAUAS
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l!O TAK£ CARE Of "roURSELf AND TRY
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�1closed c li poing expres s e s rrry s entin,en t s s o much bet ter
than I ·c oul d I t ake t he libert v of sen ing it t o you .
r:e h ave enemi es with in intent on a i ding th e enemy


Ti thout


byi·J fomen tin g c e on s t r ati ons,draft c a rd bur nings, r iots a n d wh a t
h ave you •
. rte have the publi c ity -happy get t i ng mor e f r e e T V, r a d i o
a n d news pape r attention t han t h ey c o l d
in t h e
~
a l ife- time effort
r i gh t dire ction.
I wish y ou knew how my h eart goes out to you , and how
gl ad I a m t hatstatesma.11 a s you : 'a re y ou ar e· facing a s itua tion
tha t iJ.1 a way
is grav er t h an When Atlai1 ta. b e c ame t he symbol
o f t h e South, t han ks to Gen . uhermai1 .
�· !l'hs News oldest business institution in 'l'exas, was established in 1841

whi le Texas was a Republic
E. M. (Ted) Dealey
Publis~er
James M. Moroney Sr.
Chafnilan of the Board
Joseph M~ Dealey
President
H. Ben Decherd Jr.
Joseph A. Lubben
Chairman, Executive Committea
• Executive Vice-President
William C. Smellagl!
SecretnrY
James M. Moroney Jr.
Vlce-PrP.sldent and Treullfff'-·
Jack B. Krueger
Manai\ni Editor
Dlek West
Editorial Editor
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1966
The Trials of Atlanta
_ UNTIL THIS week, t~e City of Atlanta had maintained a glowing reputation as one of the hardest-working
~ommunities in the building of interracial harmony and progress. Through
the efforts and cooperation of whites
and Negroes, it established itself as a
model of peaceful integration, a model
studiei by other Southern communities trying to solve their own racial
problems.
Then Stokely Carmichael came to
town with his inflammatory sales
pitch for "black power" and his rantings against "the white devils." And
on Tuesday night, Carmichael's loudspeaker campaign came' to fruition
with the rioting of a mob. This mob
a ttacked the mayor, who tried to reason with its members. It attacked the
policemen who tried to restore order.
But it did more-it attacked the concept Atlanta has represented, the concept that real compromise and cooperation can achieve a spirit in ·wnich all
races can work together to build a
better city.
• THIS WAS perhaps the greatest
damage that the mob did. Now other
city fathers may be tempted -to shrug
t heir shoulders and say: "What's the
use? Atlanta ·has done as much as any
city in the South to make co_operative
integration work, and look what happened."
Dallas citizens in particular may
be discouraged by Atlanta's experience, for the two cities are very much
alike in their populations, in their
economies and in their attempts to
build through interracial cooperation.
But before we decide to abandon
the path that Dallas and Atlanta have
tried to follow, it would serve us well
to look deeper into the events of the
current week. There is more to the
story than the headlined activities of
Carmichael's SNCC barnstormers or
of the hundreds of young rioters.
We should note that there were
Negro as well as white leaders who
tried, at the risk of their safety, to
quell the viole·nce. There were Negro
as well as white policemen who skillfully restored order before the riot
turned into a bloodbath.
And, perhaps most important, the
Negro Atlantans, local civil-rights
leaders and ministers, were the ones
who organized a door-to-door campaign the following day to counter
Carmichael's efforts to turn the city
into a battleground.
IN SHORT, in Atlanta, there is a
durable fabric of society, a fabric that
has been woven of both white and
black threads through the years of cooperation. The efforts of these years
have not been as dramatic or as wellpublicized as the riot, but in the final
analysis they should prove to be more
lasting in their results.
These results of the work of men
of good will will not be destroyed
overnight by men of Carmichael's
stripe. Rational Atlantans of both
races cannot stand by and see their
community torn asunder, because
those of both races know that they
have a stake in its future .
The Rev. Samuel Williams, president of the Atlanta chapter of the
NAACP, summed it up most succinctly when he declared:
"Atlanta is not by far a perfect
city but it is too great to be destroyed
by simpleminded bigotry."
�ifay or 1.llen o
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BARRY BINGHAM JR.
LISLE BAKER
Edito-r and Pubtisher
Assistant to the PubHsher
Executive Vice-President
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 1966. FOUNDED
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LOWES,_Editoria f t P ~ - -
J0HN ED PEARCE
WILLIAM PEEPLES
ADELE BRANDEIS
CHARLE S WALDEN
HUGH HAYNIE, Cartoonist
1826.
The Quality
Of Leadership
In Atlanta
REJECTING the easy and superficial course
of outraged denunciation, Mayor Ivan Allen,
Jr., of Atlanta is reacting sensibly and constructively to the recent racial disorders in
his city.
While condemning Stokely Carmichael and
his cohorts for their role in the rioting, the
Mayor conceded that t he substandard living
conditions in the Negro area where the outbreak occurred would be a fertile field for
agitation by anyone.
The city, he said, "must assume the responsibility of housing, education, and employment opportunities for many of these disadvantaged people, and in Atlanta we have
accepted this as our responsibility." The
Mayor also made it clear that he favors
passage of the civil-rights bill - now before
Congress with an even stronger open-housing
provision than it contains in its present-form.
With this kind of leadership, Atlanta should
continue to show the way to racial accommodation in the Deep South.
The rioting in Atlanta came after a policeman shot a Negro sought in a car-theft case.
The policeman's judgment, in this instance,
is open to question, but the use that Carmichael and his lieutenants made of the incident brings Carmichael's judgment into even
more serious question. The evidence is strong
that he provoked the violence, and to what
purpose?
Mr. Carmichael, it is becoming increasingly clear, is a liability to the civil-rights movement. His purposes are undefined and his
aggressions unfocused. His tiresome chant
of "black power" is dangerously provocative
and he has yet to define what it means in the
context of his operations.
Dr . Martin Luther King, on the other hand,
continues to speak in accents of reason. Commenting on the Atlanta outbreak, Dr. King
said: " It is still my firm conviction that a
riot is socially destructive and self-defeating
... (but ) ... while condemning riots, it is just ,
as important to condE>mn the conditions which
bring riots into being."
This is virtually the same position that
Mayor Allen takes, yet Mr. Carmichael implie that Mayor Allen is a raci t If he is, then
o is Dr. King, and Stokelv Carmichael is
going to ha\'e a hard time elling that idea.
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2 BLOCKS FROM
DOWNTOWN PEACHTREE STREET
255 COURTLAND ST . . N . E.
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303
ON IN TERSTATE 75 AND 85
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Mayo< I van Al len Jr.,
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��I . I think you HANDLED YOURSELF
magnifi cently ;
2 . I have alviays thought that Atlanta was
more kind to t he Ne gro Question than any
ci t~r lhn Ame rica .
3. I feel they have evidenced a gr eat
INGRATITUDE towards a citizenry a nd a Police
Departme nt which s hould not ha ve been subjected
to su ch inf amous a nd ungrat et'Ul DISORDERLY t r eatmn
t.
9- 8- 66
FRANCIS H. FANNON, K.S.G.
Pursuing Knowledge and Joys
IN MERRIE OLDE ENGLAND
Box 509, A lexa ndria, Virg inia, U.S.A.
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Honorable M~ ror of
ATLANTA, Georgia .
�Walter Abeles,
P . O. B. G8 0 3
As h tabula, Oh io.
1
9 -10 - 66 .
Th e Hon.Ivan Allen,
Ma yor o f Atl a nt a , Ga.
Dear S ir,
I saw y ou on television, wh en y ou
confrmnted courag eously a wild mob.I was even
more i mpressed, wh en I listened to your vords
of moderation and true d ecency after these
u g l y scenes, wh ere these h oodlums di d not show
t h e slig htest r e spect,if not a b out y our r aw
cour age,to confront them- but your gr ay h a ir ••
I a m convinced , t h a t wh atev er men li ke
y ou have work e d for:und erstanding o f b oth
races,fair p lay towards gr ievances of t h e
colored ma n-t he ne gro hoodlum will u n d o v
or a t l e ast r e tard . To k e ep t h e g o o d work
u p a nd not to become bitter a nd frustr a te d t a k es a great soul a nd c har a cter.
I t mi ght do y ou g ood,dear S ir,to
know ,th at y ou h a ve a n adm ir er in t h e u n d ers i g n e d, who, quit e irr eleva n t l y is white.
Re spec tfully :
1/ctlt; ~
Wa lter Abe l es.
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His Honour , Mr.Ivan Allen ,
Mayor,c/o. City Ha ll
At l anta, Georg ia.
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4849 E. EASTLAND ST.
JJ!CSON, ARIZONA 85711
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TIME ot point oi dest in,c:on
8P E SEP 9 66 AA791
CEC647 E FLB226 NL PO ~LINT MICH 9
MAYOR ALLEN
ATLANTA CITY HALL ATLA
CONGRATULATIONS ANG THANKS ON YOUR CITYS ACTION TO STOP ANY
PERSONS THAT MAY COME INTO A CITY FOR ·THE PURPOSE OF I NCIT ING
A RIOT OR DISTURBANCE. HOPE THE CHARGES WILL BE PRESSED TO
WHATEVER POI NTS NECESSARY• RESPECTIVELY
HARRY LAVENE
( ;1 ).
D
�Undeserved-Abuse For Atlanta
The civil r igh ts movement will
lose gro un d ·fasl if Negroes fall fo r
the phony "bl ack power li Lany
chanted by the liJ<es -0£ Snick's Stokely Carmichael.
The Carmichael crowd demonstra ted it poten tial for evil in Atlan ta t he
other n ight when it t urned an inciden t into a full blown riot .
Atlan ta is known t h1;oughout t he
na tion as a Southern city wil·h a solid
record o.f i;-aci?-1 progres . . Communication between the Negro communi ty
and Lhe city's leadership as represent-
ed by Mayor Ivan Allen was excellent.
Ye t when t he courageous mayor
strode in to t he crowd and appeared to
h ave it under control, t he Carmichael
ga ng worked its mi schief as though
t hey h ad rehearsed i_t.
The resulting destruction will set
race relations in Atl anta back many
yeaJiS. Atlanta did not deserve t his
a bu se. And as for t he rank and fil e
demonstrators who were deceived by
t he call for "black power," we quote
Mayor Allen's lamen t : "They don· t
k now. They j ust don't know."
�A Cause -For Anger
MAYOR Ivan Allen· Jr. of Atlanta is
one of the new breed of Soutnern political
leaders who seeks equal justice fo r all under the law. He has helped earn his community a repu ta ti on .for enligh tened handling of racial matters.
The mayor is angry. No t because he
was tumbled in the dust by a mob he was
trying to calm. He is angry because, he
says, the riot was egged on by a group
which calls itself non-violent.
There is substance in what the mayor
says. A sound truck manned by members
of t he Student Nonviolent Coordinating
Committee was rushed to the area of tension where police and taunt ing Negroes
faced each other. Over the loudspeaker
SNCC denounced ~racist police" and ext olled "black power."
In the ensuing violence 16 persons were
injured. Between 60 and 70 were arrested.
More moderate Negro leadership is
critical of SNCC's tactics. One Atlanta
minister said t he situation was under control before the "nonviolen t" ones arrived.
"They whipped them up with hate," said
t'he minister.
Others, including the Squthern Chr istian Leadership Conference, condemned
t he violence.
In these times of tension and unres t , no
community can afford t o point a fing"'r a t
another or close its eyes to its own shortcomings. The sit uation in Atlanta, how-
,ii Atlanta
ever, shows how easily violence can be
created ·by irresponsible agent s and how
seriously it can affect t he patient, dedicated search for sol utions by individuals of
both races.
May or Allen has cause to be angry and
so have those in Atlanta and elsewhere
who know that violence can only destroy.
j
�7 WEST 66th STREET , NEW YORK, N . Y. 10023


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Mayox Ivan Allen
City
Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
PERSONAL
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CHICAGO
SUN-TIMES.
Sept. 9, 1966
Dear Mayor Allen:
Just a quick note to say
hello and send you the enclosed
column, which I t hou ght would
interest y ou.
With e very g ood wish,
Kup
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90067
September 7th, 1966
Honorable Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
Atlanta, Georgia
My dear Sir:
The pictures and stories on the front pages of
our Los Angeles newspapers have given me hope to believe
that there are some still left in our Country who have
the moral courage of the men and women who struggled in
earlier days to make AmericaJt wha·t it is.
It was foolhardy of you to charge into the middle
of a riot scene - and I can .not thinm of a single
instance in modern times wher~ an official of our
go1m11nment in any capacity has done so,-any one vbo was
willing to be personally involved on the side of law and
order.
I have listened to gihowing reports of Atlanta from
a friend of mine, Mr. Dan Haughton of Lockheed, and now
I attribute much of what is happening there to its
Mayor.
Earlier I said it was foolhardy of you, but thank
you for giving a surge to my drooping spirits, I shall
long remember the picture of a determined man, unafraid
to stand up for what he believes his duty. But do be
careful, there are not enough of such as you.
Sincerely
_fl~~
�'3 e p t, •
12 ,
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,T,_1_c;-' n li 11e or two
o tell you
t' ···~t 11en of :rollr c2li ')er ~:;.'e :,driireo
,:, rr~af .
_1ese - i stnr>, uces · re 11::--l,ner1i11 ri l l over t:1e u· ·i on~ : y : 1~ {1
i 1m n~ so sure isn ' t ,e i n~ ea~iaeere
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for wr,.:- t~ is ri_:l1t .
T' ,e re~,or t; sri i,1 :ron 3;av e s11or c
sl1rif1, to c·,:n' ~es oF ~1olice 1:,r;1t·1 l it~- 9
t:i.o ,it1__:: 1 t -,l:- p, eviden'~ 1,'J t directed
-,:_;" ins, t"l e police t'nE: Jse l vr-=;-'3 .
'-,o,,J -i~::._-·1 1e .
I - ii' - 1 mo -:; f o r on:!.~ i, o 1 · c e ', e i i1 __: __:, iv e r1
r l l ,-c.,11:? 1'0l'P, 'c'O~,e Lll ' . r!ldli11:_: V , eRe
T.i.O 1, r1'S rll d 8 •1ire t:1e res ·r 'l itlv t ie:r
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A WELCOME PAUSE ON THE TRAI L
HONORAB LE S I R:
THIS CITIZEN APPLAUDS OBJECTI VE
PUB LIC ADMINISTRATIO~ .
THO NO SENTENCE CA~ REASONABLY
EXCEED THAT OF fv1AJ OR~ PENN ' S
ASSASSI N.
CW/ APOLOG IES TO OUR SUBJECTS OF
A SOCI AL NORM THAT HAS SO LONG
DEN IED OUR @MRtt~ JARTi fvlE SLOGANS .)
WOOD\oJARD, OK LA
73801
P RI NTED JN U . S . A .
ETHAN(?) ALLEN,CITY fv1AYOR
~KI~
CITY HALL
ATLANTA, GEORG IA
30300
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333- A North Louise Street
Gle nda l e , C a lifornia 9 1206
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It'$ On The House
JAMES
C. A. McKNIGHT, Editor
L. KNIGHT, President and Publisher
BRODIE S. GRIFFITH, General Manager
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1966
Atlanta's Mayor And Police
Handled Bad Situation Well
Stokely Carmichael of the now-misnamed Student Nonviolent Coordinating
Committee apparently got what he wanted
in Atlanta Tuesday - a riot by Negroes
protesting the shooting of a man pursued
by police.
Carmichael has gone to great lengths to
explain his idea of "black power" in terms
of political strength, insisting ihat it is not
a call to violence. But the real fruits of
his call for "black power" fell in Atlanta.
Mayor Ivan Allen Jr., displaying supreme personal courage and great concern
for his city, went into the midst of the
mob to plead for law and order. It was
only after he had been knocked from the
top of a car, where he was urging the
crowd to disperse, that Mayor Allen gave
orders to police to return force with force.
That was the only course left to the
mayor and the police in the absence of
cooperation from Carmichael and other
Negro leaders who had worked the crowd
to an emotional pitch. The airing of grievances must be tolerated, but the imposition
of a state of anarchy in a city is out of the
question.
Atlanta police showed considerable restraint in handling the crowd as they were
being pelted by rocks, bottles and bricks.
This restraint kept the number of injured
to a minimum. The police also reflected
the department's effective riot-control
training when the mayor gave the orders to
move against the mob.
It is regrettable that such an incident
took place in progressive Atlanta. It again
demonstrates that some elements of the
Negro community in most cities are easily
aroused against the police by the incitement
of extremists. It serves to remind us, too,
that police must always act with extreme
care in the use of firearms during arrests
in racially-tense areas.
All who heard and saw reports of the
Atlanta riot at the height of the action
were shaken by its savageness. Except for
the courage and decisiveness of Mayor
Allen and the professional conduct of the
police in the face of the mob, the bloodshed and destruction would have been far
worse.

�I
Maude Cooley Barnes
437 West Sixth Street
San Bernardino
California 92401
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�-,, w:isffriig'·f o"ir'"'TiaTry'"'News '"'~"972'07 6'6'""' "---~,_,_,_,_____"'"'-""""-----------
Mcfyo r Lookea Good in Atlanta Racial CriSis
By BRUCE BIOSSAT
ATLANTA, Sept. 20-Despioo
sudden abback upon him by
some white liberals, M.ayor Ivan
Allen of Atlanba seems sure to
emerge from his city's postLabor Day racial disturbances a
nger figure than ever.
ttesponsible Negro leaders
and s y m p at h e t i c white
spokesmen he1·e simply do not
buy any argument that the
incidents demonstrate that the
Mayor's intern at i o n a 11 y
celebrated assault upon Negro
!OndJ.1ions
is fundamentally
insincere.
Influentti.al Negroes and whites
criticize Mr. Allen on
porbant specifics of his
performance, but they do not
seriously question his motives,
his attitudes or his courage.
Most impre6Sive to these
people was liis risky mingling
with young hotheads stirred up
in the Sept. 6 outbreak in
summerhiil .
For an hour and a half, Mr.
Allen plunged from one angry
knot of rock-'throwing Negroos
lio another, trying oo calm them
down and a vert s tern police
action. He told this report.er in
an interview:
" Sometimes when I'd be
talking to one group, another
would be jumping a policeman
just behind my back.
Most of the aroused Negroes
did not know who he was. Some,
he found, did not know WHAT
a mayor was. While he milled
around, some p o l i c e m e n
helplessly muttered fears for his
safety.
An experienced Negro civil
rights leader in Atlanta says
privately:
"It was very significant that
Mayor Allen saw the trouble
first-hand, that he experienced
the anger and didn't just read
about it in police reports". He
w~t out there when his very
p1·esence could
provocative.
have
been laid at his door. Negro leaders
"It is good to know we have
a man who cares enough to go
in and see."
A white liberal, looking at the
mayor from a longer view, says
his determination to rid Atlanlla
of slums is "almost an
obsession" with h,lm. This
source thinks, in fact, that
others in the city's white power
structure are s o m e t i m e s
annoyed
at
the
mayor's
preoccupation wibh tihis and
other Negro problems.
·Some of the very same Negro
and white spokesmen who speak
feelingly of Mayor Allen's
dedication and courage believe
he has not really grasped the
depths of slum despair and
frustration, that he mov(!B too
slowly and too narrowly to
eradicate festering conditions
which could be growing worse.
Not all the blame for this is
often criticize themselves and
their middle class colleagues for
not showing more forceful and
imaginative leadership.
There was cr iticism of the
mayor, however, for arresting
SNCC leade1· Stokely Carmichael
and other " SNICK" workers on
charges of " inciting a riot." Id;
was argued that responsible Negroes in the distw·bance areas
were effectively casting out
Carmichael and his limited
followers on their own.
Tho ex p e r i e n c e d Negro
leaders vehemently disapproved
of Oarmichael's tactics, a
prominent lawyer among them
said privately that one group he
sat in with suggested quietly
llhat the stir "might do us a
whole lot of good."
The argument Is the obvious
one: there has been too much
attention oo Atlanta's shining
surface, too little to its seamy
underside.
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�ITHEN.IJTION.4L OBSERVER.
. :._ Monday, S~p~ember 5, 1966 -· _ ,
'
rll · Ouotables .
llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllflllllllllll
111111111
=
lng the
n foreign
t the very
an' ody,
e ·
sonfinal
1s our
. t-' t-' t-'
Stokely Carmichael, chalrman of the
Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee: "In Cleveland, they're building
stores with no windows. All brick. I don't
know what they think they'll accomplish.
It just means we have to move from
Molotov cocktails to dynamite."
t-' t-' t-'
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The Honorable Ivan AU.en
Mayor t the City of Atlanta
City Hall
ATLANTA, GEOIDIA
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�Mrs. Isabelle H. IVaut ,._
21 5 Woodrow Street
Columbia, S. C. 29205
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Coco a Beach. f Io ri da
phone- SU3 46 51
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��GEORGE
4530
Li · A . GALLIGAN
WASHINv~igton Rd. S. E .
N, D . C. 20032
�I
��BEN S. GILMER
195 BROADWAY
N EW YORK, N . Y.
10007
September 8, 1966
Dear Ivan:
The TV news here in New York ran a
film strip last evening on the recent racia l
dis_turbances in Atlanta. Part of the fil m
showed you standing on top of an automobile
and a later part showed you making a statement
about the incident.
I am sure that everyone, who had any
knowledge at all about the situation, who saw
you on TV felt a sense of pride in what you
had to say and the manner i n which you said
it. It is too bad, of course, to see this
kind of thing happening in Atlanta, but I rise
to s a lute you i n your response to it.
Wi th all good wishes.
Sincerely ,
The Honorable Ivan Al len, Jr.
Mayor of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
-
�Mrs. Paul W. Bumbarger
548 North Center Street
Hickory, North Carolina
SL.o~~
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�Mrs. Paul W. Bumbarger
548 North Genter Street
Hickory, North Carolina
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\143.215.248.55 16:36, 29 December 2017 (EST)
~0-)~~o..U-.
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�JAMES
c.
A.
McKNIGHT,
Editor
L. KNIGHT, President and Publisher
BRODIE s. GRIFFITH, General Manage1·
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1966
Atlanta's Mayor And Police
Handled Bad Situation Well
Stokely Carmichael of the now-misnamed Student Nonviolent Coordinating
Committee apparently go.t what be wanted
in Atlanta Tuesday - a riot by Negroes
protesting the shooting of a man pursued
by police.
Carmichael has gone to great lengths to
explain his idea of "black power" in terms
of political strength, insisting 1.hat it is not
a call to violence. But the real fruits of
his call for "black power" fell in Atlanta.
Mayor Ivan Allen Jr., displaying supreme personal courage and great concern
for his city, went into the midst of the
mob to plead for law and order. It was
only after he had been knocked from the
top of a car, where he was urging the
crowd to disperse, that Mayor Allen gave
orders to police to return force with force.
That was the only course left to the
mayor and the police in the absence of
cooperation from Carmichael and other
Negro leaders who had worked the crowd
to an emotional pitch. The airing of grievances must be tolerated, but the imposition
of a state of anarchy in a city is out of the
question.
Atlanta police showed considerable restraint in handling the crowd as they were
being pelted by rocks, bottles and bricks.
This restralnt kept the number of injured
to a minimum. The police also reflected
the department's effective riot-control
training when the mayor gave the orders to
move against the mob.
It ·is regrettable that such an incident
took place in progressive Atlanta. It again
demonstrates that some elements of the
Negro community in most cities are easily
aroused against the police by the incitement
of extremists. It serves to remind us, too,
that police must always act with extreme
care in the use of firearms during arrests
in racially-tense areas.
All who heard and saw reports of the
Atlanta riot at the height of the action
were shaken by its savageness. Except for
the courage and decisiveness of Mayor
Allen and the professional conduct of the
police in the face of the mob, the bloodshed and destruction would have been far
worse.
�MRS. HENRY J. REICHMAN
1075 HANLEY AVENUE
LOS ANGELES 49, CALIFORNIA
.
��LITTLE
ROCK,
A
�~v(~~
Carmichael Is Ordered eld
6A · •
ARKANSAS GAZETTE, Sat., Sept. 10, 1966.
In Riot Case; Bond Spurned
ATLANTA (UPI) - Controversial " bl ack power" leader
Stokely Carm ichael was bound
over to a Grand Jur y Friday on
.a charge of i,ilciting a riot and
t hen was returned to his jail
cell. Bond for Car michael, 25,
was s~t at $10,000.
Associates of Carmichael said
that he would remain behind
bars as a "poJ.itical prisoner ."
" Mr. Carm ichael is a political
prisoner captured by Atlanta
pol ice and chooses to stay in
jail ," Ja mes F orman, acting
ch ru rm an of the Student Nonviolent Co-ordinating Committee
said a,t a news conference.
Form an, who came here from
Philadelphia to ,t ake command
in Carmichael 's absence, and
othe r SNCC leaders issued a
barra ge of bitter statements
ag,ainst Atlanta Mayor Ivan
Allen , the Police Department
- ~=======- - - - , ! and ithe United States war effort
in Vietnam .
Forman said A,tlanta can
count on intepsified de monstrations in the near future but gave
no details.
The SNCC spokesman charged
tha,t Allen is " a pawn in ,a
national conspiracy to destroy
SNCC ,and a growing militancy
in the black community."
"Ev,ery white racist ,poliit.ician
in ,t his country wollld l.ike to see
SNCC crushed for its stand
against [President] Jofinson's
policies in Vietnam and the
, sending of black mercenaries to
fi ght an illegal wa r ," SNCC
, Progr am Director Cleveland
i SeJJ.ers said.
P olice arrested Carmichael
about mid night Thursday night.
He is accused of 1nciting :an
outbur~l T uesday In which 1,000
Negrors p e I t e d poli ce with
1
I
then his one-time associate
J ulian Bond the Negro repret t'
l ' t th G
·
sen a ive-e ec
e
e <Hg i a
House refused to se¥, announced he w:as pulling out of
SNCC, and fina11ly he was taken
into cus.tody.
Original 'Snick' Dead,
Publisher McGill Writes
.
.
..
In Friday morml!g ~d1llons of
the Atlanta Constitution , Publisher Ralph McGill devoted his
- UPI Tel~photo
fro nt-pa~~ column ,t o what he
te~med" .The Story of the Two Carmichael (right) sits in courtroom with lawyer.
Srucks.
. " Snick ~ay ," McG~ll wrote, Allen of saying that SNCC bas Court, and the case was trans" is Car michael s aymg th at run out on the black communi- £erred to jur isdiction of Superior


vhen you t~lk of black. P!)Wer ty but declaTed · " We are Court, a state court.


you are t alking abou~ buildmg .a '
, ·
..
In addition to inciting a riot,
movem~nt t hat w1~ . ~m~sh here-here, baby . We w1_ll s~ay he also is char ged with disturbeverytfrung ~estern civ1hza t1on and_ sh~ll k~e p on fi_ght mg ing the peace.
has created.
racism, mcludmg 1:he _r a~11sm of, ' - - - - - - - - - - - - -JJ
" ,1, * •
This new Snick ihas Mayor Allen and l us lies.
killed off the ori_ginal S~ick-;-t ~e Since l ast J anua~ 6 when
one ithat ,attrac ted t he _ide alistic de~ sed SN_CC Cha u-man John
college_s~udents of botli r aces to Le~v1s publicly denounced tl~e
shlil re Jail, fiear, ,te rror, and to Uruted States war effort. 1D
work together.
.
Vietnam, Car!lli~hael has r1~en
"This Snick is no longer a to ,top man wit hm the orgaruz~civil ri ghts organization ., "' • ·" •ti:on. " Black power" became his
Carmichael ·a pp ea re d , un- SY_l1!,bol and only th~ most
daunted by the turn of events. milita nt ha ve stuck by him.
Aske d \Vhat Ca rm ich ael had to Unde r his di rection, the ors ay wlrnn h o wn s led off to foil. go nization tepped \If> a ca m•
Howard Moore, Carmichael's paign oI s peaking out agai nst
tones a1td bo!U, anti toppled n.Uornev, reported tJrnt Iha nH d ta lc fnrPign pnlir It
er vli n N gro l e ad e r ti ged ~is ftHlo w • ha• 11H e nat e d olh 1' ri ii l'i!!hi
ll tri d to ren on wit h U1em , crs "to k op fightin~. l"
oq~aniz11tions.
Mbyo1· A lie n Crofh Ii
Denounced by many of his
people, <::armlchael ~etu_rncd to the riot-sca rred distr1ct Thursday ~nd w~nt from
doo r to door tcll_m g r esidents .he
was not_responsible for _the n ot.
But his ~roubles contn~ued to
' mount durmg the day. F irst, be
denounced on ,tJhe floor of
cwas
"anaTch"ist"'
ongress as ,an
own
L nto r SNCC called a news
Dr. Martin Lulher
King 's
confe 1-ence at whlch LL handed Soulhc ru Ch rl sllu n Lrodt•rs hit 1
out a bli tering statement in Confo rencr, -the NAACP an~ the
Carmichael's na me . It accused
Mayor Allen of being a racist,
and added : "I van Allen is not a
white Icing and we ,are not his
black subjects."
Th
t t
t
. d th
e s a emen c1aune , e
riot was a revolt .against the
'-=============I mayor "and his corrupt P olice
Department. " It also ,accused
1
ational Urban League QU1ckly
abandoned any pretex t of sy m pa thy for SNCC. Only the
Muslims and the Congress of I
Racial E qua 1 i t y remained
friendly
·
On advice of Moore, Carmich ael waived a preliminary
hearing Friday in Municipal
�~trA-~ ;
~ , 10,.
d~
!ft(,
I
�~
ATLANTA MAYOR Ivan Allen, arms folded across his chest, looks straight
ahead as Negroes shouting "Black power" mill around him on Capitol Ave., just
before a rock and bottle-throwing riot broke out. The Mayor personally walked
into the mob in an effort to halt the demonstration. (UPI Telephoto)
N£GROE~ANGE_R,.S:n
AT cu~nT11,..1 e ,.. ..
J
�CARMICHAEL ACCUSED
OF INCITING RIOTS
Congressman
Hays
Calls
For
~
i•

Crackdown On Negro Leader
WASHINGTON - Rep. Wayne
Hays. (D) Ohio, has called for
a federal crackdown on
egro
leader Stokely , Carmichael whom
he accused of "inciting riots" in
Atlanta, Ga., and Cleveland, Ohio.
Hays told the House:
"Carmichael and his anarchist
group belong behind bars and the
quicker we get him there the
better off this country is going
to be."
Both Democrats and Republicans - about 50 in the chamber
at the time - applauded after
e Belmont county Delllocrat'1

- -
- ----- -


�- - -- - -- - - - - - -
EDITORIALS
A New Star In King's Crown
Atlanta's Negro riot - and no
unruly gathering with overtones of
violence should slide by under the
euphemism of "demonstration" shows that in the field of racial
progress as in so many others, you
just can't satisfy some people.
Atlanta has long been regarded
as a municipal beacon of Negro
progress and interracial goodwill
shining in a darkened wilderness.
It has been held up to other areas
of the South as proof that Negroes
and whites can jointly build a great
city with opportunities and benefits
for all, that progress can substitute
for "never" and prosperity for
"freedom now."
.----
BUT SUDDENLY there is a smirch
upon the image of Atlanta which
had been as golden as the dome of
the state capitol, sitting there on its
own little Acr opolis. Atlanta has had
a race riot, its Negroes have poured
into ttie streets s ffillting "black
power," its mayor, second in succession with proved records of friendship to the Negroes of that city, has
been attacked while he talked with
the mob seeking an end to the
trouble.
It is no more logical to expect all
Negroes in a city to be wise and
logical and understanding than it is
t o expect all white citizens of a city
so to be. But it is tragic that a relative handful of nincompoops can
destroy for the reasonable, hardworking and understanding majority
of Negroes in a city such as Atlanta
most of the goodwill they have
enjoyed, ancl put sand in the gears
of continued progress.
ATLANTA'S RIOT, and the personal, physical attack upon its proNegro mayor, give obvious excuse
to other cities and other leaders to
reject efforts for cooperation with
Negroes for improved racial relations and opportunities. "If they
can't even be satisfied in Atlanta,
there's no point in trying," is going
to be a general reaction.
Thus once more the excesses of
the "black power" movement will
react against the best interests of
the vast majority of Negroes. And
everyone should remember that the
rioters in every city, north or south,
represent but a minute portion of
the Negro population of each city
involved.
But this excess was itself inevitable. No matter the need, as Martin
Luther King interpreted it, for focusing public attention upon the needs
and wishes of the Negroes, when
the civil rights effort took to the
streets it laid the groundwork for
rioting. And the successes which
met Dr. King's tactic of provocation
inevitably planted in other minds
the idea that it pays to riot.
'FHE PARTICULAR riot in Atlanta was triggered by the shooting
.of a Negro suspect in a car theft
investigation. Circumstances surrounding the shooting weren't clear
in press reports of the riot. But it
was white police against a Negro
suspect, and to the militant "black
power" groups anything a white
policeman does that a Negro doesn't
like is "police brutality."
This, too, is an outgrowth of the
King doctrine that there is a moral
obligation to disobey some laws.
From this sprang the idea that you
obey only the laws you want to obey,
which is the same as saying you don't
have to obey laws at all and those
who try to make you do so are oppressive brutes.
Martin Luther King and his
tactics of violent non-violence came
from Atlanta, and now they have
returned. In addition to all the
progress with which he is credited,
he must be credited too with
Atlanta's riot.
And with the fact that the same
day the, wires carried the story of
Atlanta's night of violence, they
carried the word that Senate leaders
concede passage of the newest civil
rights bill is virtually impossible.
�DRRDENTD
ERRlD
.
.
ftf t
O Nt:Y
JOHN T. HAMNER
Editor
D AILY
Nt.WSPA P ER
P U S Ll ~ HEO
IN
M~ N ,,'fEE '
C OUNl Y
W. E. PAGE, President and Publisher
WILTON MARTIN
R. P . RICHARDSON, JR.
Managing Editor
Advertising Director
W. E. PAGE m, Comptroller
4-A
Thursday, Sept. 1, 1966
But he who has doubts is condemned, if he
eats, because he does not act from. faith; for whatever does not proceed from
fa ith is sin.- Romans 14:23.
A THOUGHT FOR .TODAY


. *


l,





All the strength and force of man come~ from his faith in things unseen.
He who believes is strong; he who doubts is weak. Stroi1g convictions,. precede
great actions.- James F. Clar ke, American theologian.
·
EDITORIALS :
Comm·on Sen·se And Silliness
There have been some encouraglng- comments from Negro leaders
in recent weeks, seeking to put
common sense into the efforts fo r
improvement of the lot of Negroes
and to put an end to the mania for
achievement by riot. These are
keyed generally to offsetting the
rougher aspects of the " black
power" movement.
Out of these have come some good
words of advice. Even Martin Luther
King has tried to play down the
"black power" business, and called
off his planned march into Cicero,
Ill., with what appeared to be only
a face-saving agreement with officialdom, in the face of almost certain
violence.
THURGOOD MARSHALL, former
Negro precept, these are words
worthy of repeating. And they are
refreshing and encouraging.
But in the midst of these encouraging signs, there continue to be
indications of a lack of maturity in
· other areas of Negro leadership, and
of a basic misunderstanding of the
meaning of equality of citizenship.
The Florida NAACP, for instance,
has just pulled one which is best
described as silly.
IT HAS 4NNOUNCED that it will
hold a rally, and invite all candi•
dates for the Legislature and other
state offices. "And we will campaign
against any who don't accept the
invitation."
Apparently, then, the NAACP
leadership in Florida is not inter-
executive of the NAACP and the
ested in what f uture legislators and
first Negro ever to be appointed
solicitor general of the United
States, a former federal judge and
thoroughly competent lawyer, has
added his weight to the commonsense talk.
Speaking to a national Negro
fraternity's convention last week, the
solicitor general denounced "the
rock throwers and the Molotov cocktail throwers." And he added that
' 'lawlessness is lawlessness, anarchy
fs anarchy. Neither race nor color
t10r frustration is an excuse for
either lawlessness or anarchy."
state officials believe, what their
policies for better living conditions
are, what their ideas are about economic improvements which would
aid Negroes as well as others. The
NAACP leadership is merely inter
ested in demonstrating its blackmail
power to force candidates to come
before a convention audience.
_ _IN A. TIME ~h
both whites and
blacks are increasingly prone to the
Vl e t approach to problemsj and
n Dr. King's espousal
in an era
of moral law-bre · g is a major
THIS IS THE poorest form
leadership for Florida Negroes in·
cerely interested in improving their
lot, and the poorest form of political
leadership as well.
If the leadership of the Negroes
f l · a
s o .nore concept o
its role than it showed in that chal·
lenge, the outlook for bette1 days
for Negro citizens is not as rosy as
it has appeared to be.
.. I
��.
--
---
- - -- -
--
-
---
-
- -
-
--
-
--
�With Sunday Morning Edition
Publis ed by THE EVENING STAR NEWSPAPER CO., Washington, D. C.
SAMUEL H. KAUFFMANN, . Chairman of th e Board
CROSBY N. BOYD, President
NEWBOLD NOYES, Editor
BENJAMIN M. McKELWAY, Editorial Chairman
A-12
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1966








Rioting In Atlanta
The most surprising thing about t he
riot in Atlanta is that it should have
happened there. For Atlant a, by general
agreement , h as been a model for southern cities in its race relations.
Mayor Ivan Allen Jr. h as walked the ·
last m ile in search of r acial peace. He
had almost solid Negro support when
elected. He was one of the few southerners to testify in support of the 1964 civil
rights bill. He has added Negroes t o the
police force. Atlanta's schools and city
facilit ies a re totally integrated. Many
Negroes are employed by business establishments and th e city h as sen t eight
Negroes to the state legislature.
All of this counted for n othing,
h owever, when a suspected Negro car
t hief was wounded while trying to
escape from arresting police offic ers.
When some 500 or more Negroes t ook t o
the streets the mayor climbed on top of
an automobile and tried t o reason with
them. He was shouted down. Taunts of
"white devil" and "black power" greeted
him. Finally th e mob surged around the
car and the mayor was jarred loose from
his perch and fell to the street .
No, this didn't happen in a Birm-
ingharn or a Selma. It happened in
Atlanta. -Little wonder that the Rev.
M·a r tin Luther King Sr., who lives in
Atlanta, was heard to ask: "What do
they want? The mayor came down. He
tried· to speak to them and they
wouldn't listen. What do they want?"
It was a good question, but hard to
answer. For most of the members of the
mob may no~ have known themselves
what they wanted-unless it was an
excuse t o throw rocks and rant about
police brutality.
The mayor says the riot was deliberately caused by some of Stokely Carmichael's SNCC henchmen , a nd he may be
right. For t h e mob began shouting "klll
the white cops" after SNCC repr esentat ives, according to the police, spread the
false word that the suspected car thief
"had been shot while h andcuffed and
that h e was m urdered."
Whatever may h ave been the case
with the rioters, it seems clear that what
the SNCC people want ts trouble, trouble, trouble. And that ts what they are
going to get,, though not in t h e form
they want, if this sort of madness keeps
up.
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�RALPl1 McGILL
�Neg-roe_s, Hurl Bricks -r
in Atla-nta Violence -
~
e g r o e 8 and declared:
Mayor Allen is the i op
gun in Atlanta." ..
11
Toughs Ignore Leaders, Take to Streets
for T~ird Straight Night of r;>isturbances
BY JACK ~ ELSON
Tim es Staff Writer
ATLANTA - Violence ,
erupted here Monday in a
Negro di.strict for the
third straight night, despite pleas for nonviolence
by civil rights leaders.
Young Negro toughs
poured out of a church
meeting addressed by
Dr. Martin Luth.er King's
Southern Christian Leadership Oonference and began throwing rocks, bricks
and other--Objeots at new-men and whites pa sing in
ca1·- . .
Large numbers of police
rushed into the area and
sealed it off.
Officials of the SCLC
conferred w i t h several
member51 of the Student
Nonviolent Coordinating
Committee earlier, apparently trying to entlist their
help in easing tensions.
City officials have accused SNCC of provoking
violence last Tuesday in
one Xegro area and of aggrivating the trouble that
has rocked Boulevard, a
main thoroughfare, since
the fatal shooting of_ a N~
cc:ichairman of the _ tlanta
Summit Leadership Conference, a group of civil
right leaders, aid Dr.
King's SCLC has a policy
of not conducting demonstrations unless requested
to do so by local egro
leaders.
Mr. Williams, a member
of the SCLC board and
president of the Atlanta
chapter of the NAACP,
aid Tegro leaders "have
not requested and do not
expect to request" demonstrations.
He said the summ it conference is not opposed to
dem o nstr a ti o ns ,
"though we feel they
should not be done needlessly."
Aide Contradicted
Hosea Williams, a King
aide who was arrested and
charged with creating a
disturbance during Saturday night's di orders, had
called for ma ·ive demonstration to "turn this
town up ide down."
The Rev. Sam Williams
dismissed the King a ide as
"just a hired hancl " wh?
J
~
f
l
I s,
"Mayor Allen is nothing
but .a George Wallace,"
Ricks. shouted, "and we've
got to stop that cracker before every one of us ii
dead ."
·
'* !Lo~ ilngdeS' ~ iutt~
, TUES., SEPT. 13,tl 966-Pa ri I
25
�Southern Christian Lead- of the SCLC board and
ership Conference and be- president of the Atlanta
gan throwing rocks, bricks chapter of the XAACP,
and ·other--Objects at ncw:,- said Negro leaders "have
men and whiles passing in
cars.
Large numbers of pol ice
rusbed into the area and
scaled it off.
Officials of the SCLC
conferred w i th several
memberi of the Student
Nonviolent Coordinating
Committee earlier, apparently trying to entlist their
help in casing tensions.
City officials have accused SNCC or provoking
violence last Tuesday in
one Xcgro area and of ag-
grivating the trouble that
has rocked Boulevard, a
main thoroughfare, since
ihe fatal shooting of a Ne-
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Fire Bomb Charge
About 100 persons have
been arrested since the beginning of the racial disturbances a week ago.
One of those arrested
Sunday night and charged
with throwing a fire bomb
w as identified as Wilson
N. Brown, 33, a member of
SNCC.
Six members of SXCC
have been arrested since
Negro violence Hrst. erupt·
ed in Atlanta last Tue,:;day
when SKCC members,
protesting the 1hooting of
a Negro auto theft 6Uspe~t.
by white policemen, agitated a Negro mob.
.
In the initial violence m
Summerhill, an area of
aubstmdard Negro apart·
ment house5, the mob attacked police w ith rocks,
not requested and do not
expect to request" dcmonstn1tions.
He said Lhe summit conference is not opposed to
demon s t rat io ns ,
"though we feel they
should not be done need·
lcssly."
Aide Contradicted
Hosea \Villiams, a King
aide who was arrested and
charged with creating a
disturbance during Saturday night's di!iorders, had
called for massive demons tra t ion s to "turn this
town upside down.~
The Rev. Sam Williams
dismissed the King aide as
"just a hired handn who
"docs not set SCLC poli·
cy."
At an earlier meeting
another King aide, the
Rev. Andrew Young, exe.
cutive director of SCLC,
had urged that Negroes
mount nonviolent demonstrations to protest racial
injuStices in Atlanta.
"It's bad enough that
we've got crazy, mixed-up
cops in Atlanta," he said,
"but if we had a Mayor
Yorty or a ~layor Daley
we would be that much
worse off."
W i llie Ricks, one of
S N C C' s fiery agitators,
told the audience Allen i!I
responsible for k i 11i n g
Flyi1
'
orM
8
flig~
snac
inte~
Bra![
coJI
com~
l<e
Brazil
01
of the
flight!
Los A/
Cally,
flie
bottles and bricks. Fifteen
we·
t he rioting.
Tension subsided In the
area by the weekend. but
Negro violence flared
a new on Boulevard, about
2 miles from Summerhill,
Saturday night afrer a
white gunman passing in a
ear killed a JS-year-old Negr o boy and seriously
wounded another as they
1tood on a sidewalk.
A police sergeant who
went to investigate the
~hooting was hit In the
back of the head by a bullet apparently fired from a
group of Kegroes..~e is !n
satisfactory cond1tJQn m
an Atlanta hospital.
Soldier Jnjut'ed
).fore than 20 injuries
have occurred in the BouI I v a rd disorders, but
property damage has been
relatively light .
your
telepn:_
ANSJn
/TSE}
~nwhile, the ArmJ
reported a white soldier,
Ptc. .Terry Davis, 21, Mon~
roe, Ga.. was seriously in·
jured la.;t Tuesday night
when hit by one of several
hrick!. thrown by a group
nf Xegroes at his car as he
p,1~ed Boule,·ard on U.S.
78
Oavis is in nvery serious
('ondition• at a hospital at
Ft. McPherson.
Ea r lier last Tuesday,
Negroes rioted at Summerhill, but there was
little evidence of racial
tension on Boulevard.
Mayor Ivan Allen J r
met with two groups of
Negro leaders Jfonday and
later called the sessions
profitable. He said he is
tl·ying to establish helter
communications wilh the
residents of the riot area.
Rioters From Shun
Although the violence
has centered on a five-
This elect
complete
· and it costs le~
block stretch of Boulevan:I. many of the rioters
live in nearby Buttermilk
Bottoms. a Negro slum of
abject poverty.
Negro leaders of Atlanta, ,.,,ho generally have
agreed with Mayor Allen1s
handling of racial matters,
Monday declared they are
opposed to plans to staiie
protest demonstrations in
Atlanta.
'f'he Rev. Sam Williams.
CORNS?
. . . . Ntief! D,. Scbol.1'1 Super&ft
-=::-.-:!!.:t:u'f!,~ !;
~
hf:lp~corm.
..,..-,lino-pods•
Call now for a free
demonstration
e..~~rn
870-4777
TEL.
RSVP Sales
�- - - - - - - --
- - - - - ~~
��.
-
-
OFFICE MEMORANDUM
From:
Shreveport, La.
Telephone 86 8-0541
A. R. Wh erritt
�I
Berkeley Calif.
Sept 11, 196fu
Mayor Iva Allen,
Dear Sir:
WE rejoice that you had the goon
sense to put a stop of the continued violence
of the Negros,,An-esting t he ring JJeaae~ ;
Carmichel was not born in U. S. Is he
subject to EllL.E?
dt.;
Respectfully yours
���~ W..vt 7 °
(<o,T
3/oK ~
f3L_a_ c_cf( ---
�~ CA So/'
0 t CM
' C. >7
\
~
~ ... t;(
~
,
( THIS SIDE OF CARD IS FOR ADDRESS)
---J'~~_.,.....__
L_ -_ -_:-_:_ -_:-J'
~'rr.i""-
�Rio-t Follows
3 Shootings
111, Atlanta
ATLANTA, Ga. (}Pl- Rioting broke out in Atlanta
Saturday night after a Negro_ teen-ager was ki1led,
another wounded and a city
police sergeant shot in the
head. '
A resident said two Negro teen-agers were shot
from a passing car containing a white man and a
white woman. The policeman was reported in good
condition after treatment at
a hospital of a head wound.
About 400 Negroes quickly
gathered in the area and
several rocks and bottles
were thrown, smashing windows and windshields of
passing automobiles.
Riot - equipped p o Ii c e
sealed off an area of several
blocks in northeast Atlanta.
Officers made several arrests. One of those hustled
into a patrol wagon was
H o s e a Williams,· political
action director of the southern Christian · Leadership
conference and a top aide
of Dr. Martin Luther King.
�-AP
Wi rephoto
Youngster Joins The Chant
"black power" call inflames group at Atlanta
church
Riot Indictment
Nallles Carmichael
ATLANTA (UPI) - A grand jury Tuesday indicted
"black power" advocate Stokely Carmichael and 14 other
Negroes on riot charges in connection with Atlanta's worst
racial outburst in modem times.
The indictments were returned by the Fulton county
grand jury, which got the
case several days ago.
Mr. Carmichael is head or lanta Saturday night fanned
the controversial Student the racial fires again.
Nonviolent co - Ordinating
Police Tuesday .charged a
Committee. He was taken 42-year-old wl'lite man With
into custody last Thursday, that slaying.
two d a y s folloWing last
The suspect was identiTuesday's riot.
fied as William Haywood
Mr. Carmichael had hired James. His wife was held
a sound truck to cruise as a material witness.
through a Negro section and
James insisted he was ingive r esiden~s what authoroce
�-AP Wirephoto
Youngster Joins The Chant
.. . "black power" call Inflames group at Atlanta
church
Riot lndictIUent
Names Carmichael
ATLANTA CUPn - A grand jury Tuesday indicted
"black power" advocate Stokely Carmichael and 14 other
Negroes on riot charges in connection with Atlanta's worst
racial outburst in modem times.
The indictments were returned by the Fulton County
grand jury, which got the
case several days ago.
Mr. Carmichael is head of
Ian ta Saturday night fann ed
the controversial s tudent the racial fires again.
Nonviolent Co - Ordinatin~
Police Tuesday .charged a
Committee. He was taken 42-year-old
white man With
into custody last Thursday, that slaying.
two d a y s followmg last
The suspect was identiTuesday's rtot.
fied as William Haywood
Mr. Carmichael had hired James. His wife was held
a sound truck to cruise as a material witness.
James insisted he was innocent.
�Riot -Indictment
Na1Des Carlllichael
ATLANTA (UPI) - A grand jury Tuesday indicted
"black power" advocate Stokely Carmichael and 14 other
Negroes o~ riot charges in connection with Atlanta's worst
racial outburst in modem times.
The indictments were returned by the Fulton County
grand jury, which got the
case several days ago.
Mr. Carmichael is head of lanta Saturday night fanned
the controversial Student the racial fires again.
Nonviolent Co - Ordinating
Police Tuesday .charged a
committee. He was taken 42-year-old white man with
into custody last Thursday, that slaying.
two d a y s following last
The suspect was identiTuesday's riot.
fied as William Haywood
Mr. Carmichael had hired James. His wife was held
a sound truck to cruise as a material witness·.
through a Negro section and
James insisted he was ingive residents what au hor- nocent.
ities said was a distorted
report on an incident in
which p o 1i c e shot and
wounded a Negro car theft
suspect.
About 1000 Negroes poured
into the streets, alltacked
officers with rocks and bottles, tipped over a police
cruiser and attacked white
motorists.
Mr. Carmichael has been
held under $10,000 bond
since his arrest, but his
bond was lowered to $1000
Tuesday.
He said he would remain
behind bars as a "political
prisoner."
The riot charge is a misdemeanor under state law,
punishable by one year in
prison and a $1000 fine.
Following the riot, Atlanta's racial troubles appeared to ease, but the fatal
shooting of a Negro youth
in another section of At-
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Set 16, 1966
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Dear l a;yor _ llen:
This is to congratvlate you and the cit izens of Geor gia
upon the fine co- o ~ration bet ·een the rac es hic h has
exis t~d in the ast due t understanding and c onsider a t ion of Ci vil Rights on the part of these citizens.
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It is reeeet ab e that artin Luther King and his rioters
-~ -~ have not recognized this att itude; however, ~mat they
e ~~ . are doing now is roving ' thout a doubt that i t is not
.3 ~ ~ Ci v i l Ri~hts they want, but aqitation and hatred as a
egro for their " POWER"
00 ~ 'd ~ means of gaining sunport from the
~ ~ ~~ idea.
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~ ..... ';;j~I believe t~is intent on the part of these Co
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f1i v nounced by white city offici :1,ls as ell as the thinking


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; an- peace-loving Negros. We have 1' egroes her e in Shrevrc: ~ H v port who say i f they could t hey "would ' accidently '





Q ~ ~'@ their car run over fartin Luther King, and then back o.!f


~ ~ ~,fil and say ' excus e me ' and then start the car and run
+> 0 ~+> him again and repeat the ' excuse me ' •• • etc. " This
~-';indicates that there are Negroes who believe in and
~ m ...,·G appreciate just ice, and many of th~m realize they
.:g ~ro are much fart h•r ahead in An,, rica than they would
g -~ g$ have been had t hey stayed in Africa.
ov.
letf"
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I hope t' at alls eeches made will be man• with
DIG rrY instead of loud voice and ounding on aesk,
the quiet, strong and determined manner is far nore
ive. It was an interesting contrast to see the e~r make
his resoonse to your statement. q had
.
onlt his state ent that the white; mvstn~0 :~ason, no lo~1c,
Very truly, / ~ , ( ~ ~
~----------~----~
���Profile Of Courage
Atlanta Mayor Praised
By Sen. Robert Kennedy
WASHINGTON (uPI) - Sen.
Robert F . Kennedy, D-N. Y.,
praised Atlanta Mayor Ivan
Allen Thursday as a man who
has "matched political courage
with personal courage of a high
order" during recent race riots.
Kennedy said Allen's actions
"demonstrate that w h at e v er
laws we pass, however many
programs we initiate, however
muob money we spend, the in,
Idispensable
basis for peace and
progress :in the city is the leadership of dedicated and courageoUB men-men like" Allen.
"Atlanta, Georgia, .and the nation, can be proud of Mayor
Ivan Allen."
In a statement, Kennedy said
Allen "during these d:iff.icult
days, has been a source of
streng,th and leadership for his
city."
�G R E E N V I L L E N E W S", G R E E N V I L L E , S O U T H C A R O L I N A
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1.966 , \
���EDIT O R/AL P -A GE
. -8
SEPTEMBER 14, 1966
.The Uses · of Black Power
I
Dr. Martin Lu '. her King, . J r., the The bill's chances, never really strong,
civil-r ights movement 's chief apostle are clearly diminished by Atlanta 's
of nonviolence, was busy in Atlanta tragic news.
this week seeking a way to calm a
News of racial violence elsewhere is
situation that has broken into riots
doing
other harm, too. Civil-rights
several times in recent days.
groups
report a drop-off in contribuDr. King's consider able talents could
be put to much better use elsewhere. tions t o finance their constructive
Atlanta already has an enviable record work. Political candidates in several
of progress with civil rights , not only areas-not just the South- have been
among southern cities but in the na- reaching for the "white backlash," hoption as a whole. Yet it is now the ing to r ide it into office wi th an im scene of an ugly struggle for control, plied pledge to do less, not more, for
pitting Dr . Ki ng and hi s moderate Negroes. And as William S. Whi te
Southern Christian Leadership follow- r eported on this page the other day,
ers against a more r adical civil-rights fears of gangster ties wi th some of the
wing led by Stokely Carmichael a nd r igh ts groups is causing f ur ther disthe so-called Student Nonviolent Co- . enchantmen t.
The setback bei ng ha nded t he civilordinating Committee.
The Carmichael group, with its cry r igh ts movement is so obvious that
oi "b1ack power," is giving that vague one wonders if the lu re of publ icity, t he
term its worst possible meaning. F an- thrill of the limeligh t, a nd th e heat
ning emotions to the poin t of des troy- .of the fray a ren't more important to
ing property and injuri ng people is a this radical fri nge than Negro adfar cry from the ballot-box power a nd vancement. Dr. King and other vetthe marketplace power the American eran leaders, Negro and wh ite, have a
Negro can use legitima tely to help good deal more to show for their less
himseli. Yet destruction is the turn fiery efforts. The progress of many
the " black power" movement took in Negroes, of course, increases the frusAtlan ta with Mr. Carmichael's en - tration of those who have been bycouragement. And the damage goes passed so far. But the r igh ts movefar beyond a few broken windows.
ment will pick up momentum again
A critical vote takes place in the when Negroes by and large repudiate
U. S. Sena te today on ending a fili bus- the wild-eyed revolu tionaries and supter against a civil-rights bill that in- port -with sensible, reasoned "black
cludes the fair-housing prov1s1on power,"- tho e leaders who can use
sought fervently by Negro leaders. power effectively on their behalf.
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Civil Rights and Soundnees
1.-.aard
J. I'.erpebnan, a
JanltitM courtroom champion
fJf atYil riahu, may rep~smt
no trend in his opposition now
le any funher enensi.on of
civil ri,tlts to Negr~ . Hu action could focus the iact that
U. "trend in civil rights
1W19111 dearv, more widespread
•untandinf
llr. ~Iman is a Baltlaore lawyer who lives in
radally mtearated neipborboed; ii utufied still to send
t>is children to an int.ecrated
acbool. He ii a IDn1-time mem•
ff h
NAACP and has
amp.....-S for able Negro
c:aaa~ for lo-::al orrice. He
.. dtatarbed now ovu the wtJ .
...,._. of some Baltimore Ne1ro leaders to threaten a
Watu riot" ~re u a l~er
tlJ ~ about mo~ racial ad. . . . , That, of coarse, goe1
...,._. demonmaUons, which
civl ri.thta Nraden cootrol, t.o
.dolal mob action in which
jtAa::.ulttdNI and t!'Vell kill-
-- J9 - ~
ne
for police
•4irmci" in the civil
mo.-emeont ta Cb"tea mis....-.tood. primarily b«;use
a bu 10 often been mi&ltated.
llilbta

The ddiant aelft1atiGDl,lu caB
all demondtadmu "mobs,,.
when, in fact, demonstntiona 1
led by auch men as Martin/
Luther Kine, have never included rock and botUe throwing and propeM)' deatructiGl
which \1 what makes a demonstration a "mob." Yet aome
of. the ~v. Mr. 1C.1n1'1 field
worke~ven here in North
Carolint-have been observed
opmly playing loose with the
truth ln tryq to whip up milllance and emotional ill will.
They have at times gone ~
yond the troth of the racial unfa imess which exists. creatin1
passions which only racial advantage . not ncial taiineu,
would be required to redress.
The "trend" in civil right,
can be what a.uybody can persuade a 1ipiiticant number of
,PeOPff to beline. Mr. K.erpelman b.u done hu ahare el the
peraW1cilnl, and DO douk in'9nd.i to cootbrue.
oostraift that in bi1 dtJ he
means to retnain an ,-nd
1round effll ff tor a ...._ the
civil riehta movem• thera
doesn't. He aeta ~ ,CMII example !or everyone in 1/ny 00lll!a
muruty.
, · 'f""1'
But•.._

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