Box 19, Folder 6, Complete Folder

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Box 19, Folder 6, Complete Folder

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\Vhy They Cry Black Power
.O utbreaks in Atlanta
he
sense of belonging to one human family can :tlonc sa\'c this
planet. But the time is short before h:ite shuts the doors.
The time is· coming when we will regret the billions wastecl
in Vietnam. The time is coming when we may regret the
· · number· of Negroes we have trained there in guerrilla war.
There is hardly a city where the Negroes do not already dominate the strategic areas through which the affiuent comm(Jter
passes on his way to the inner core. SNCCs hostility to the
war is not disloyalty but wisdom. We cannot rebuild that
.s ense of community so essential to our bcloved~.country's fu:ure by engaging in a white man's war in Asia- while a black
nan's revolt rises at home.
~,
in
e1e
'.)
,r
e
y
SNCC'S VERSION OF WHAT HAPPENED
IN ATLANTA
lf/e 1ho11gh1 (J ur n ·_,J ,,rs 11·,,11/d lilt· 10 Jt:t' Sf\:CCs ,-er1iu11 of
u•h,11 , J>,11 lud th,· ,1t/.;111/,1 ,·iot.<. Al.11·.',,11 R.1rr.~ of SNCC' J IY/ ,11hi11AI0 11 office J:,11·,.-, t he f,1JJo u ·i111,:. :ll°f t; unl /IJ the.> / )r,?JJ Sc/1/ , R o,:
hi; n'/11'1! from Atl,1111.1 u·hae h,· u •.11 tJ/l,·11di11x, tJ S/\'CC 11:orklho/1
,,,J,,·n t he (,r,1 r, 111h,·,·,d uccurr.-d Sc/>!. 6:

At appnn: i11l.Ht·l r l I ~ p .rn . two whitl' pcili(ttn t·n ~ro p pt.·\! J 1. J r
d ri \·t:n hy H .trul,i Pr.1t h t·r. .1 -' ' · '-·l·:l r 1d,f ;\;l·).:rP. -.1. hr > Ii\(:\! t i nf .1
hlot k J\1,,·.1r. Tiil· 1. nt ' '" f" r n i l';Jtl:c r Jt <.J pi:11! .1,t·n u c .1 rki <) r r:11)n .t
~:
l\u o rdin.1! t 11 : ') o r ~IJ p t: r,un"' v. 1,._, ,, 1tnc·.S. 'th! t h e 1n\ 1J t:nt.
Prather jun:1,cd f1u 111 thl' (,If .Hh1 r.,n .! n,! ,, .1, , hnt thrt.T t ir~H....... br
o ne of the w h itl" t,ftiH·r--.. " l' r.1 tht·r kep t ni,;,in.~ .1t ;t \t·ry !-h ,w ~pct.·1.I
and was ti red upon a,,:ain as he: tric·J to gc-t to h,~ hom,· Yi .,( J hl", k
away," sa i<l one: w itness. He: fi nally ma,k· it :tnJ ft.I I o n the pord1.
I mmc:diatt'i y after !ht· s hoot ing, a aowd of l ~O ro 200 pt·rso ns
_gathc:rcJ a t Prather's hou~t' to protest tht' shooting. Tht·re wcr<' n c1
SNCC pcoplt- prc:sc:nt. Stoke-Icy Carmichael , SNCC d1:1irman . n·turn - .
ing from a radio inttrvic:w heard about tht• in,id(·nt 0\'c:r thc: raJio
and went to the sten<:. The p <:0ple there were \'Cry anj\ry. The . lo cal
people wanted Carmichael to come back and help organize a pea(eful protest dc111on:Hratio n . It wits ,allt-J for -I p .111.
Witnesses Asked to Speak
At approximately 3:30 p.rn . two SNCC 1x·oplt arrivcJ at Capitol
A\'e. and Ormond St., the: sn~ne of the d emonstration ; 200 µcop lc
w<:re the re . The !oral people: h a<l ,nad<: thc-ir own s i~ns a nd .- gone
arouhd in th,: various n,:;ig hborhomls informing their frien<ls as to
wh:1t had hapl'C:nt·J . At 3 :/4'.i p .m. Hi ll \\:1 :irt·. l'rojcct Jircct6r fo r
s;--.:C:C', A t lanta Projto:t . anJ thrt·t· othn SNCC pt'Ople arri"ed with


1 ".,u nd rru,k .


\X' .rrt· .t,kt-d tht· :1s,t:rnhlt-,I pc·oplt- what haJ hapl'<'!lt·,l Jn,! th,·\' b<",1:.rn t<' tdl !,ii,, _ \X ' :ir" , :1 iJ tht· whole: grrn, p ,houl d
kn,," wl1.1t h.1d lr:q ' J'l'l\<',i JnJ J,l.;,·,I ,i "l!n<·~-,,-, " "u l,I tel l :ihout t h,·
1nt. id c: n t ()\er tla · puhli \ .lr.. l drt·\ ~ ;\ r ~t (·n t.
.
~t·l'l: r.rl 1'l'f,11n, hq.:.111 t, li ,n,,.: "hat the)' h.i.i ,,Tn. Poli, .: o th«"
11nm l'di :lldy 11111\'ni rn and t,,Id \X' an: to turn ofl th<: P.A . <\·. tu n.
\X1 :1n.: info rmed the rolill·nKn th:11 ht· w:rna·d to stop , um, >r s :111,l
makt: s ure that e veryone: km·w what h:rJ happt·ne,t'. The p,)li«·nKn
i m mt-xliatdy arrestc<l W a re . Another SNCC worhr :1 ·kt:d if p,·opltstill wanted to ta lk . The lotal ptoplt: said "y(·s ." The talking continued and police arrested tht SNCC perso n . This made the cro wd
a ng rier. They demandt:d tha t police relc:ase the two SNCC people.
The local pc-oplt said that they would sit in the stret'ls unti l the two
persons were released :ind the Mayor suspended the policc-m:in who
shot Prather.
T he police me n t ried to remove people and arrc:steJ snmc w ho· liv<:d
in th(: m:ig h borl,o od. T he a rrests were immediatc:ly protested b y the·
crowd , h u t to no a vail. T he peop le really got :ingry and started
p ushing some: of the officers a nd sevc:rnl bottlc:s _W<·re thrown . M ay_or
1-.·.rn Allc·n a rri vt•d o n th(: scene and h roug h t with hun I 50 -200 wlute
i"'li,<·11wn a nd an :irmo rcd tru( k lo ad ed w ith w h_ite mps, machim·
1.: uns mJ otht·r riot equi1, mc:nt. White offic<:rs w ith shotguns w~c
,t:1tionc:J a ll alo n ..: the: st rc.:et.
A t tha t tirn<: M ayor Allen tried to lead th(' crowd to the Atlanta
stad ium some: 4 o r 5 blocks away. T h e crowd rc:fused to leave their
nt•1ghborhood. T he c rowd was also a n.~ry hc:cause all of the white
otfin·rs had mach ine g11ns anti shotg uns, hut tht: Negro otficers had
o nl y t hc.:ir pi stol s. This rt·allv S<:t tht' crow d off. ttottlcs. !'>ricks a nd
oth <:r ob jects " 'tr<: t hrown ;11· thl' whi t<· nllir,·r~.
What the Protesters Wanted
Allen trit·d to ta lk to tht· pt·opl<: ( rom· ;1to1' a pol in· ,ar but th<'y
would n u t listc:n b<:cause tht: crowd wantt-d one of their h:~<lt'rs to
ta lk anJ not A llen. The h lo, k lt"J<lcr w ho got on top of the ca r
J e mand ed that I ) w h ite cops g et out of th<:r<: with mad1in,· gun~
and sh o tg u ns, 2) the release of all those lllegJlly and unju,tly arrested. anJ 3) the cops be fired who shot the young Negro. The
crowd ch tered the demands but Allen refused 10 answer. He refused
to address himself to their grievances, at which time he was toppled
from the police car. Theo 50 to 60 cops rushed into the crowd and
start<:<l hitting and pushing people. Mayor Allen thc:n directed that
tear gas be use<l to disperse th<: I 500 people who were on the scene.
'Tear gas them or tear those houses down," Allen shouted.
All 400 to 500 officers began firing their pistols und shotgum
wirhnut warning. hOfh in t he a ir an,! al the c rowd. It WJS a ter rify .
CONT. P. 3
�i!i.W..
ATLANTA RACE RIOTS - THE
11
0THER 11
. S1DE PRESE" !TE Dooo
cont . frol]l P. 2


n_g exp<;rience. Unarmed people were assaulted bv ·o.fficers armed


with tea r gas, pis to ls, machine guns and shotgu ns. Never seen anyrhinj: like it. Little ki ds, 7 or 8 y<_;a rs old were hit with tear gas
, .11,-; -'t•rs. Black women were clubbed to the g round. Anyone who
was nu, ..
- fi st enoug h was iinmedi.1tely arrested and thrown
head first in the p. _ :; wagon. Cops fi red tear gas ind_iscriminately
into the ho mes of Black people who were not even on the street.
Litt le kid s came o ut gasping for air. Cops went onto Black people's
rorchcs to beat and arrest them. D uring th is period, several police
nu-s were stoned, and several poF •1e, " e inj ured. During all of
this, the attack was directed by . ..
Ivan Alkn . He ordered little
kids tear-gassed. H e ordered whit<· , . ..,~ to bea t and arrest black
people.
SNCC's Role in t he Outbreak
Now as to SNCC's role: 1) SN CC has only one pro ject in .Atlanta


rnd that is in an area call ed V ine Ci ty whi ch is on the other side


of the town from the disorders. 2 ) SNCC has neve r worked in the
nt·i~hhm hood where the disorders took place. 3 ) It was the shooting
of the young Negro by the whi te cops, then subsequent arrests of
SNCC peup l<:: that made people angry. 4 ) T he local people themst: h·l'~ made the signs and got th ei r fri nds togtthcr. 5 ) Stokdey
C.arn1i r hnd d rove throug h the area on ly nftcr th e: disorders began.
(, ) Mus t of ... ':' ·rr . ·'"> pie arri, ,-d on the: · scene after the crowd
h:1.I iia tht·red and police "" hi·a ting peo pl(·. 7) The focus should
ht· on Mayor Allen and his r.
rr, ps anJ not SNCC. A t 11 a.m.
that day SNCC members h.,J P,0 1.
the Maror·s office with a complaint com:ern ing police officials. ,. ,
-~ time Mayor A llen refused
to speak with Lhe gro up and d ismis.. , 1 .. ~ by stating, "You're out
llf line; in Atlanta which is known for its r.jr and equal rreatment
of all citizens.:·
�October 17, 1966
Mayor Ivan Allen
Atla nta City Hall
Atlanta , Ga .
Dear May or Allen :
I have for some time want ed to express my
thanks to you fo r speaking forthrightly
c oncernin so many i ssues, inc luding this
gube rna torial race . vhile your views have
not been popular in many qua rters, you
nonetheless had the pol itica l co urag e
to speak wha t was ri g ht . Your courage
in the r a cial tens ions of recent days were
also to be admired .
I wish y ou success in the coming days
of this administrati on.
Sincerely,
Al an ·vexler
905 Rome St .
Carrollton , Ga .
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��ATLANTA, GEORGIA
PHONE 522- 4463
CFORM 25-6
�Atemo
DATE
October 7, 1966
From CHARLESL.DA~S
Mrs o Ann Moses
To-- - -- - - -- - - - -- - - - - Dobbs House will not bill for the
coffee we received from them on
September 6 for the Police Department.
Party to contact or write
Mr . B. F. Buttrey, Vice President,
Dobbs House, Atlanta Airport.
C.L.D.
�SYMBOLS
CLASS OF SERVI CE
DL = Day Letter
This is a fost message
u nless its deferred char~
3Cter is indic3tcd by the
proper symbol.
W . P. MARSHALL
CHAIRMAN OF T HC BOARD
TELEGRAM
'.f\,
NL=Nigh, Lener
R. W. McFALL
PRESIDENT
LT= Inrern:nion:il
Letter T clegram
The filing t ime shown in the date line on domcsric telegrams is LOCAL TIME at point of orii;in . Time of receipt is LOCAL TIME at point of deS1ination
935P EST OCT 11 66 AA649 BA8S4
B AHC589 NL PD , AH NEW YORK NY 11
MAYOR IVAN ALLEN
CITY HALL ATLA
STRONGLY URGE YOU INTERCEDE TO HAVE BLACK ANTI-WAR . DEMONSTRATORS
RELF.ASED FROM PRISON WHILE AWAITING APPEAL. THIS UNWARRANTED
AND DEPLORABLE CONFINEMENT VIOLATES CONSTITUTIONAL PROTECTION
AND MUST BE STOPPED
LROBERT L ALLEN JR CHAIRMAN AFRO-AMERICAN FOR SURVIVAL•
SF1201(R2-65)
�ATI.A
SHOCi<ED Tllt\T TOU CONTUl)E TO S'UILE U:;AL PIOTEST "CAtNST A
vn IHICM. llAS BEEM DESCRIJIEP AS • lllST utllOPUUI VAR Af£RICANS
HAVE 8EDI XN'IOLfD nt•. PROTEST A<:AINST TK\T lltl Yll.S SF.EN _STF.ADILT
l«rUKfl*,:. ACROSS TRE COUHTRY COVERNKE'NT OFFICIAL~ OOKP£t.U:DT0 LIST£1f TO TIIE JUST C:IIEYARCtS' or PIX>f>L£ OPPOS.?HC DR. bPECJ'ALLT
BIA~ PIDPLE W1I) J'JIII) 'fllEIISEI.HS CAllli:ltT IN ;.Jil'OIIEI PlllSE OF
vtCJDUS CTCLE nPJnllC TUD coarr1011 IN PIS m-,rat IN '
.. NP 01l£R CITY llAtt.. on ICIAI.S ~en, tflt MQ£a OF AUUTfC OFJ'IClAts.
~ - T:EH PEISONS AUESTED t:AJti.'f LAST IDffl AND $1"11.L...lm.l) _VlTIDUT
PEIKlSSIOff TO P1'l" • MIL COIISTITltft All Aff:CM'f 1rf cm OF
- ATV.lff'A TO CbS1l NOTES! ff Bu.CK PEOPLE 11D llEJECT PallTIC!PATIOlf
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ARE DOOE'r> COK'rllOL Oi TMtllS• VE' DE~ffll THAT Tlf.E TEN BE GIV'EN
Tllt Rl'.t;ffr T~ ltJt pa,"css BY A.LUlWIHG: 1.111:Pf TO m: .,Pfl)£1J Otrr.
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POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT
ROUTING SLIP
TO :
BUREAU, OFFICE OR
ID APPROVAL
ROOM NO.
ID SIGNATURE
10 COMMENT
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
ID
t----~--------------+--------1 0
2
I
SEE ME
AS REQUESTED
D INFORMATION
t----------------------i----------<I D READ
AND RETURN
I
I
D READ AND FILE
t------"--'~~- -=-----------+----------,I D NECESSARY ACTION
3
4
ID INVESTIGATE
t------'-"-'-='-------------+---------.,. .,,
t.l ·~ .,. .
�Atlanta and LA
There are mayors and there
are mayors.
Mayor Ivan Allen Jr. of Atlanta has been 1a:tely in the news,
his city having been the scene of
racial rioting even though it is the
mos,t advanced of major Southern
cdities in the enlightened handling
of its racial pTOblems. Mayor Al. !en not o-Il!ly acknowledges the
problems but concedes that his
' city has not pl.'logressed as fast as
desiraMe in eliminating them.
In stark cont rast to most
Southern politioia,ns, he testified
in favor of the public accommodaticms section of the Civil Rights
Act of 1964, saying Federal law
in this area was necessary; he
has favored the open occupancy
section of the civil rights bill
which p•aissed the House of Represenrtartives.
Throughout the riotilng in h1s
city, Mayor Allen was on the
scene, in the thick of it, literally
r isking life and limb.
He didn't remember a speech
he had to give in another part of
the state, excuse himself from
duty and take off.
He didn't limit his efforts to
the obvious cries for ·support of
the police in the face of violence.
He worked closely and constantly with Negroes and whites trying
to ·restore order.
One has the feeling that if
Mayor Allen of Atlanta were appe~ring before a Senate committee there would be no need for
questionling concerning his leadership abilities, but that if such
questions were asked, and no
matter how severely phrased, he
would have meaningful answers,
for his city and for himself. He
wouldn't plead helplessness.
There are mayors and there
are mayors.
�G. VANCIL
3422 E. 56TH PIACE
TULSA, OKLAHOMA
JfilIN
HONORABLE IVAN ALLEN
MAYOR
CITY OF ATIANTA
CITY HALL
ATIANTA, GEORGIA
·--~-
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�.,..\\nrtiott- BOT SHOPPE]
5 16 1 RIVE R ROAD
WAS HINGTON , D. C.
2 0016
J. W ILLA.RD MAR R IOTT
CHA.I ID:1.AN OF T HE BOARD
September 19, 1966
Atlanta, G e orgia
D e ar I v an:
I thought th e e nclosed e ditorial from the
Washington Star was a v e ry good on e and that
y ou w ould like to s ee it . Many of us are proud
of the stand that you have tak e n on Civ il Rights.
In my opinion it is th e ri g ht s t and.
I hop e y ou ge t eve rythin g strai g ht e n e d out
the r e for I know it is difficult. N ex t tim e I
am in .Atl a nt a I w ill g i ve y ou a call.
B e s t w ishes alw a y s .
Sinc e r e l y,
/~~·
J. W illard M a rr io t t
Encl osure
�,,
'
-~t·
The Week in Perspective
OPINION
Obituaries, Weather
B
WASHINGTON, D. C., SEPTEMBER 11, 1966
Dead End Awaits the Black Power Road
EDITORIAL
The arrest of Stokely Carmichael
gation of last month's trouble in the
Anacostia a rea is a case in point.
That affair, involving a clash between Negroes and police, has been
under study by a group of prominent
citizens appointed by Commissioner
Tobriner. Its co-chairman is Sterling
Tucker, a respect ed Negro leader.
The study group has reached no
conclusions. In fact, it is just beginning
the job of drafting its report . Yet Adam
Clayton Powell, whose posit ion in Congress entitles one to expect something
better from him, has charged into print
with the accusation that the investigation is a "whitewash " and that the committee has too many "mild-mannered
Negroes." Following this lead, Julius
Hobson, who heads the group known as
ACT, paid his respects to "pasteurized
Negroes" on the committee who, he said,
would sell oth er Negroes short "for a
and two of his SNCC lieutenants on
charges of inciting last week's riot in
Altlanta may mark a turning point in
what appears to be a struggle for supremacy beitween the moderate and the
extremist elements in the civil rights
movement .
The importance of the decision by
Atlant a's Mayor Allen, who has taken a
strong lead in behalf of Negro rights,
-lies in one simple fact. Public officials,
assuming that the requisite proof is in
hand, must be willing to prosecute a
Carmichael or anyone else where a serious offense is involved. If for a political
reason or some other reason they will
not take firm action against a leader,
how can they expect those in the lciwer
echelons to respect and obey the law?
And, of at least equal importance, wh y
should anyone suppose t ha;t--the moderate civil rights leaders will speak out
and act against violence 1! the civil authoribies are unwilling to do so?
This is a testing year, a year in
which events may d-et ermine whether
good sense or "black power" in its ex~
treme manifestations will carry the day.
It will be t ragic 1!, because of weak
knees in oity hall, it should be made to
appear that the rock-thrower and the
Molotov cocktail are the wave of the
fut ure.
There is risk of oversimplification in
discussing the moderate as opposed to
the extremist wings. There is good reason to believe that a very large majority of Negroes do not support and are
even opposed to the extremist tactics.
This does not necessarily mean, however, that all moderates will condemn
t he extremists out of hand. Some of
them may even derive a certadn vicar1- ..
ous saJtisfaction from the excesses of a
Carmichael or an Adam Clayton Powell,
[ even though t hey know in their hearts
that an appeal to black power, for ex' ample, can eventually lead only t o a
1 dead-end street as far as any perma-
I
1
few pieces of silver. " To -the ext ent that
'Trouble I got, man-what I want is progress!'
nent advancement of civil rights is
concerned.
In this connection, it is interesting
to note t he results of a recent survey
conducted by a respeoted polling agency
in Watts, Harlem, Chicago a nd Baltimore. The questions were asked by
trained Negro pollsters. And the responses revealed that most Negroes,
even in the ghettos, want pretty much
the same things that most white people
want . They want better housing. Not
surprisingly, since they are the principal
victims, they are worried about crime,
and th ey are more interested in adequa,te police protection than in talk
about police brwtaJity. They want their
children to have a sound, disciplined education. In Harlem only 2 percent of
t hose interviewed said that school integration was t heir greatest problem. The
real educational problem, in the majority opinion, is the pressing need for better neigh borhood schools.
Again, a cautionary note is in order.
It does not necessavily follow from the
survey findings that most of the people
in the ghettos are against violence 1:n
pursuit of their reasonable objectives.
In Watts, for example, 48.4 percent ot
those interviewed think the rioting
there helped their chances for equali~
in jobs, schools and housing. Only 23,Q
percent believe the rioting was harmful
d
The obvious in eren e tro{n h1 1
that the demagogue, t-he racist-in-reverse, will find his best opportunity tn
the ghettos and that this ls why he
makes his major pitch there. It hould
be borne 1n mind, however, that the
ghetto is not synonymou With the N gro
commi1111ty tn the United s
anyone fn Washington takes Powell and
Hobson seriously, this sort of demagogic
prejudgment is as harmful as it is outrageous. And it should not be allowed
to go unchallenged.
Althoug·h not aimed specifically at
the Powell-Hobson combination, the
executive board of the District chapter
of the NAACP h as just approved a resolution which is a reflection of responsible thinkihg by moderate leadership.
The resolution, offered by H. Carl
Moultrie, president of the local branch,
said that t he NAACP "must condemn
with equal Vigor the gath ering Of crowds
to protest the arrest of an individual,
or individuals, as it does any form of
police brutality." If witnesses think the
police are guilty of brutaJity in making
an arrest, the resolution continued,
~here are appropriate avenues, including the NAACP, through which corrective action can be sought. But "violen ce
on t h e part of a person, or persons, or
gr oups of persons, must be unequivocally
condemned." The resolution ended with
an expression of· hope that "all other
organizations do the same as we in calling· for law and order."
. _so far the call from other organizations has been considerably less than
deafening. The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther
King, however, has just denounced
"black power" in any context of violence. As the struggle within the civil
rights movement shapes up, and if
public authorities follow Atlanta's example in cracking down on violence
and incitement to violence, the country
should hear before long from other mod-
erate voices.
F
�those interviewed . think the rioting
there helped their chances for equality
in jobs, schools and housing. Only 23.8
percent believe the rioting was harmful
t o attainment of this objective.
The obvious inference from t his 1s
t hat t he demagogue, t he r acist-in-reverse, will find his best opportunit y in
the gh ettos and that t his is why he
makes his maj or pit ch there. It should
be bor ne in mind, however, t hat t he
ghetto is not synonym'.bus with t he Negro
communi ty in the United States. Many
Negroes do not live in ghettos. The moderate Negro leader, however, has a responsibiUty to help allevialte the conditions in the ghetto. And he also has a
responsibility to st and up and be counted
in oppositiion to those who seek t o exploit the distress in the ghettos for purposes of their own-from mot ives which
are ~~ best dubious and which in the
long run can only retard the drive of
the Negro for his equal and righ tful
place in the American society.
Here in Washington, t he investi-
a-own n n cm,nc,c----,. . - - - - ample n crac
and incitement to violence, the country
should h ear before long from other moderate voices.
For if one thing is clear, it is thait
fut ure progress in civil right s depends
upon co-operation within the framework
of law by whites and Negroes whose
dedication to equal treatment and equ~l
opportunity is genuine rather than opportunistic. If an yone doubts this, let
him look at what is happening to t he
1966 oivil rights bHl iI\ the Senate.
There certainly is nothing to be
gained in the fu ture by following those
who think or who p,r etend to think of
progress in terms of black power, and
who talk nonsense about burning down
the city to get what they want.
An important thing for everyone to
remember is t hat gains can be lost . And
one way to reverse the national mood
which has produced so many very substantial civil r igh ts gains is to enlist an
army under the racist . banner of hot heads who want the Negro t o go it alone.
�LLOYD W. TAGGART
BOX
560
CODY, WYCMIN13
September 12, 1966
The Honorable Ivan Allen
Mayor
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mr. Allen:
We are disturbed to read in the news of the rioting
and unrest in Atlanta. We are proud of your courage in
the face of the mob but we are also concerned with your
safety. You have waged an enlightenment campaign to
better the plight of the negro in Atlanta. You have been
recognized nationally for the job done. We are convinced
your strong vigorous approach to violence is proper.
We can't vote for the Mayor of Atlanta but we sure
support you.
�MEMORANDUM
September 13, 1966
From
PAUL QUENEAU
Ivan Allen
.. To._ _______________
____
Dear Ivan :
I read in "The New York Times"
about your many achievements and your
recent "Civil Rights" troubles . Con gratulations on your record to date .
Have you noticed the odd slant
this newspaper (see enclosures) gives
to " student committee". Surely it
should always be "S tudent Committee"
so as not to convey a wrong impression
to the reader . Elsewhere in their
columns capitals are judiciously used
or not used, i.e., " Black Panther"
and 11 Panther 11 ; " police force" and
"police brutality" .
Best regards,
�NEW YORK, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 1966.
!ATlANTA NE~ROE~ I
RIOT AfTER POU~E
WOUND A~U~PE~
Tear Gas and Gunfire Cur
Angry Crowd-Mayor Is
Toppled From Auto
By GENE ROBERTS
SptdalttJThtNewYortTlmPI
A'JJLANTA, Sept, 8-Rioting
Negroes fought the police with
bricks and bottles today and
toppled the city's Mayor from
the roof Of a car when he at- 1
~
led to calm th<\11-
The pollce quelled the vlo
Jenee by tossing canisters of
tear gas and repeatedly firing
pistols and riot guns above the
heads of the Negroes.
At least a aozen Negroes, two'
ot them members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating
Committee, the militant civil
rights organlza.tion, were taken
into custody by the police.
The disturbance was touched
off In midaftemoon after the
Police shot and seriously
wounded a. Negro who Willi sus•
pected of car theft.
Cry for 'Black Power'
Within three hours ot the
shooting more than 4~
Negroes, tnclutllng several
members of the ~ were rushing through
m!!!S,e.
the streets shouting "Black
power- police brutality."
One police car was overturn@()
and windows were smashed in
several others.
When Mayor Ivan Allen Jr.
rushed to the scene and climbed '
upon & police car to talk to the
rioters, they surged toward him
and rocked the car &Cain &nd
again until the Mayor, !b.aken
but uninjured, tumbled to the
street.
The 55-year-oJd Mayor
scrambled to his feet and then
raced about the riot area, which
Is only two blocks from the new
$18-milllon Atla:nta: Stadliml.
"Go h ome," be pleaded
"Please go home."
"Don't go-slay here and protest police brutality," said lpembers ot the student committee,
who walked behind the :Mayor,
The police said Stokely carmlchael, the committee's 25year-old chairman, had reached
tree-lined Capitol Avenue soon
atter the shooting and told
Negroes that "we're going to be
back at 4 P.M. and tear this
place up."
Two members of t h e ~
~ . Wlllie Ware and Bob
Walton, were taken into custody by the police while touring
the area ln a sound truck, urging Negroes to gather to protest
the shooting,
'-rhey were bringing different
people into the area," Sgt D. J.
Perry, a Negro Police officer,
told newsmen, "and they were
saying that the man had been
shot whJle handcuffed and that
he wa..s murdered by white
1
police."
The police dented
lions. The wounded
Louis Prather, was reported by '
a spokesman at Grady Memo-
C<Gllnued ~ Colwnn I
~f
T
t. U
- -·· ..... .Lct-.:.1~
�Un lttd Pms Jnttmatlona l Clblrphoto
AT LANTA i\l A \'OR AT IU OT SCJ•:N~: Mayor Inn .Allen Jr .• right, holding handker•
chief a fter police used tea r gas, gestures to N'ei;ro residents to enter their homes. Ea rlier,
he had been toppled fro m a pat rol ca r aft er he had mounted it to address an angry crowd ,
ATLANTA NEGROES
BATTLE POLICEMEN
Continued From r age J, Col, 4
rial Hospital to be in "poor
condition."
'An E:q1lo11h·e Art:,'
"This is an explosive area
and th~ [the police] come
down here and shoot a. Neg·ro.
Good God almighty," said Cleveland Sellers, t he stude9t conv
~ ' > project and , program
director. "People here arc just
reacting to police brutali ty."
Otlier s.N.C.C. officials on
Gapitol .\_venue during the rioting were Mrs. Ruby Doris Robinson• executive sec retary of


,~;
~i~


1
~:naE,fe;d o~n~he
zation's New York office.
In the beginning, the missilethrowing was sporadic. But after the police used tear gas to
rout a group of bottle throwers,
Negroes hurled volley a fter vol•
Icy of bricks and bottles.
At one point, the police thre\\
tear gas into a home, whic
they sai d had been a center of
bottle throwing. A mother, he
fi ve small children and her
grandmother were forced into
the street.
The nearly hysterical mother,
Mrs. Imogen-e I:;indley;-22---yean
old, and the rest or her family,
were taken to Grady Memorial
Hospital in an ambulance.
Across the street f rom her
house. a white sedan had been
overturned and its windows
kmashed. A resident of the N cgro district said that "some
white fellows': had bcc11 in the
car.
Three Negro men stood on
lhe curb nearby and watched
two white men walk past. The
Negroes chant:
"It's gonna get dark after
a.while."
T he violence surprised Mayor
Allen, one of the few Southern
pffi cals who has advocated civil
rights legislation.
Except for tension in recent
weeks between the police and
advocates of the black power
philossophy espoused by t he
= an\ec,emJi\W:· .143.215.248.55 16:39, 29 December 2017 (EST)!3 b~.~~
tality" complaints that ha, e
eightened tension in other
ities.
Atlanta
desegregated
its
hools without incident five
years ago under a Federal court
order. Since then it has become
known as one of the South's
ode! cities in race relations.
tlanta Negroes hold nine seats
n the state Legislature and
freely patronize most of the
tity·s restaurants, movies an
nightclubs.
The rioting also stunn
inany of the city's Negr
leaders. The Rev. Martin Lut~e
J{ing Sr., father of the c vi
ights leader, and the R v.
alph Abernathy, an aide to
the younger Dr. King, toure
he area after dark to help
ead off any recurrence of th
ftcmoon rioting.
�BLACKPANTHERS
PICKET ASCHOOL
Anti-Integration PartyWould
Boycott P.S. 139 in Harlem
By THOl\'IAS A. JOHNSON
Harlem's recently formed
Black P anther party, an antiintegration g roup of articulate
young militants, staged its first
direct-action demonstration yest erday-picketing a local school.
Twelve of Its members were
promptly a rrested. The charges
included disorderly conduct.
Representing what appears
to be one of the most enthusiastic of Harlem's youth-oriented
"black power" organizations,
the Black P ant9ier members are
attempting to organize a boycott of the old and decrepit
Public School 139, on 139th
Street between Lenox and
SeventJh Avenues.
"Many of the brothers [party
members] went to this school,"
a party official said as he
watohed a picket line of 15 in
the a.f.temoon that replaced the
demonstrators arrested during
the morning.
Officials said 80 per cent of
the school's 1,200 pupils attended, a nd said most of the
a bsences were normal for the
first day of school.
Their boycott demands include the placing of more
Negro educa tors in supervisory
positions, the teaching of
African and Negro history 11,nd
the promotion of ,t he neighborhood-school concept so that
"the administrative structure
reflects the ethnic composition"
ot t Jte nelgborhood.
· Parents' Position
I
The local P arents Association
has long advocated similar r eforms, but it does not back t he
Black Panthe s, although some
?Jarehts .do. Isa, pro-integration parents who are In a dispute With the Board of Education at Intermediate School 201
nea rby do not want the new
party's support.
J3lack Pantljfr officers refuse .£o ffiscuss the number of
members, but observers estimate their hard-core enthusiasts a t about 30, with almost
100 members in all. They say
t he group is popular among
1
Harlem's you_ng u lb::l!.~tan!§,
An an~algamation of con-
venience with t he New York
Congress of Racial Equality
was broken recently when a
Panther member got into a
'11st hght with a white CORE
worker during a joint demont ration.
The party does, however,
have t he backing of the black
nationalist Harlem People'.
Parliament, made up mostly of
the African-robed Yoruba Temple. The People's Parliament
interprets t he
Position
on education
r e irst step
toward the eventual total
Africanization of all ttarlem
schools.
,
With basement offices at 2409
Seventh Avenue, the patty got
off to a. running start with a
series of mass rallies and fundraising affairs; the publication of highly detailed po ·ition
papers; the inauguration ot the
Malcolm X Liberation School
tfor members only) and the
boycott.
'l'hey look to the chairman of
the Student Non-Viol nt Coordinating Committee, 25-ycar-old
tokely Carmichael, as their
"elder statesman." They took
tll ir name from the £lack p~.tru:.r.. symbol of the Lown Ni
1:;oi'ffity Freedo
Orga.niza tion
that r. C rm1chael founded In
Alab ma in 196 •
The p rtv l
v med b
1:5-mcrnber conunltt e lfa · n
11.' rage ngc of 2·1, and
Im
lcclion o! p rm n nt of!lr.
asPa,\hGf
�An- a.n:ialgama 10n o
convenience with the N ew York
Congress of Racial Equality
was broken r ecently when a
Panther member got into a
?1st !igtit with a white CORE
worker during a joint demon- ,
stration ..
I The party does, however,
have the backing of the black
nationalist Harlem People's
Parliament, made up mostly of
the African-r obed Yoruba Temple. The People's Parliament ,
interprets the Panther position
on education as the Iirst step
toward the eventual total
Africa.nization of all ~arlem
schools.
,
With basement offices at 2409
Seventh Avenue, the P1!I"tf got
off to a running start with a
series of mass rallies and fundra ising affairs; the publication of hig;hly deta iled position
papers; the· inauguration of the
Malcolm X Liberation School
(for members only) and the
boycott.
They look to the chairman of
the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, 25-year-old
Stokely Carmichael, as their
"elder statesman." They took
their name from the black pan.t!:!m:.. symbol of the Eownaes
"County Freedom Organization
that Mr. Carmichael founded in
Alabama in 1965.
The party is governed by a
15-member committee with a n
average age of 24, and plans
elections of permanent officers
- i.--....,.....,.in November. At present Eddie
1
Ills,
,
fOrm1
at'yl:)U
,r.
ganizer, speaks for the group.
Leaders Write for Magaz.lnrs
Like .several of the party's
leaders, Mr. Ellis <is a freelance
writer. He and Ted Wilson, 24,
and Larry Neal, 27, also party
leaders, have. contributed to
such organs of militant Negro
thought as The Liberator and
they plan to write for a similar
magazine now in preparation
called Pride.
Other leaders include Donald
Washington, 30, a forlner aide
to the late Malcolm X, and Walt er Ricks, 27, an organizer for
Haryou's NeighboFhood Boards.
The party organizers sought
to put together a visible entity
that wm get something done
in Harlem. one official said. It
plans to run candidates for elections "eventually, and to Influence all local elections from
now on," he said.
The leaders declare that "organization brings strength,
·strength brings unity, unity
brings power and power !brings
freedom.
The ipa11ty gives tacit support
to the Black Panther Corps, a
black-shirted paramilitary unit
that wears the shoulder in ig•
nia of a leaping panther.
�SD NC. C. ASSAILED"
. ON ATLANTA RIOl
City Officials Show Anger,
but Criticism by Negro
Leaders Is Tempered
By ROY REED
Special to The New York Times
ATLANTA, Sept. 7 - The
. Student Nonviolent Ooordlnatlng Committee,. .chief advocate
Of black power, encountered
mounting hostility today as a
result of the Neg-ro riot here
\ yesterday.
White officials and state pollI ticians placed all the blame fot
tho riot on ithe student commit~ A few Negro leaders added
cautiously worded criticism, bu
others said a potential for racial
explosion had existed in he.no
area '"ft)r some time.
Mayor Ivan Allen Jr. and
Police Chief Herbert Jenkins
promised stern offic~al action to
keeg the studllnt committee from
inciting trouble.
"It is now the Nonstudent
Violent Committee," Chief Jenkins said as he announced that
the police force was strengthening its riot control organization. "We must and will deal
with it accordingly," he said.
Several candidates for the
' on Page 36, Column 1
' Continued
�] .N.C.C. ASSAILED
ON ATLANTA RIOT
Continued From Page I, CoL 4
I
Democratrl.c nomination for Governor in next Wednesday's primary joined in the condemnation.
.
Ellis Arnall, the most liberal
of the candidates and the election favorite, said th:e student,
~omm,ittee was "shameful.
"I denounce black power, racial violence, insurrection and
civil anarchy," he declared.
Stokely Carmichael, the 25I
year-old chairman of 1lhe ~
" mitte&, who made famousthe
cry of plack power, was singled
out for severe denunciation.
Mayor Allen, clearly angered,
said :
- -'-'"J.1'- Stokely- Carmiehael is
looking for a battleground, he I
created one last hight, and he'll
be met in whatever situation he
cares to create."
However,
some
disputed
whether Mr. Carmichael had
created the battleground.
Dr. King Comments
The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr., president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, who was in Chicago
t oday, ' issued a statement
through his Atlanta office.
It said:
"It is still my firm conviction that a riot is socially destructive and self-defeating. On
the other hand, while condemning riots it is jus t as important
to condemn the conditions which
bring r iots into being.
"A r iot is the desperate language of the unheard. What
has America failed to hea r ? It
has failed to hear that the economic plight of the Negro p·o or
has worsened and that the
promises of equality have not
been m et."
The C ommunity Council of
t he Atlanta Area, Inc., recently
studied the area where the rioting occurred and reported that
the chances of an outbreak
were "good."
It cited poor h ousing, dislike of the p olice, few r ecr ea tion facilities and s kepticisrn
toward the city's p romises of
help.
Some r esidents of ,S ummerhill, the scene of t he disturbance,
met today to draft a list of
grievances t o present to the
city. Committees w·
go from
door to door to gather complaints.
The Rev. Roy WilliaJJlS, vice
president of the summei·hill
Civic League, contended 't hat
the swdent committee had
whipped them up with hate"
yesterday. But he added:
"I have told our city politl·
cians we were sitting on a powder keg. Conditions here are
some of the worst in Atlanta."
The scene of the Tiot Is a
deteriorating neighborhood tha
has almost completed a transi
,t ion from white to Negro. The
stud.ent commtttee reportedlYi
Tas worked itnere severa
months.
Yesterday afternoon, a cit~
detective shot and wounded a
fleeing N eg,ro he w~ trying to
arrest as a suspected car thief.
Several hundred angry Negroes
,g athered and soon were join
lby leaders of •t he s91den.t comitte
P'.!Ign;rlng the pleas Of Mayor
Allen, some Negroes attacked
the poliee with stones, sticks
and bottles. The police broke
up the mob with tear gas and
by firing guns into the air.
William Ware, the
committee's Atlanta proJec 1recfor, was charged with 1nciting to riot and creating a distu1·bance. He had entered the
neighborhood in a sound truck
and denollJlt:l!d the pollcP.. His
hond wa/1 set 1tt 10,050 and he
r mained ln jail today.
·1xtee11 person. were lnjur d,
seveml cars wcrr. damaged and
between 60 and 70 p~r. on.,; were
1
$Ufe;t
arrested during the rioting,
whic)I. occurr d on Capitol Av ·
""
tum t,!,.,.
i'l'
M• nt • ·
�door to door to gather complaints.
The Rev. Roy Williams, vice
president of the Summerhill
Civic League, contended 1lhat
the student committee had
"whlppeci them up with hate"
yesterday. But he added:
"I have told our city politicians we were sitting on a powder keg. Conditions here are
some of the worst in A!tlanta." I
The scene of the riot is a.
deteriorating neighborhood that
has almost completed a transition from white to Negro. The
student commit-tee reportedly
"mis worked •tinere several I
mont hs.
Yesterday afternoon, a city
detective shot and wounded a
fleeing Negro he was trying to
a rrest as a suspected car ,thief.
Several hundred angry Negroes
gathered and soon were joined
lby leaders of the student com~ r i n g the pleas of Mayor
Allen, some Negroes attacked
the police with stones, sticks
and bottles. The police broke
up the mob with tear gas and
by firing guns into the air.
William Ware, the ~ture;t
committee's Atlanta proJec 1rector, was charged with inciting to riot and creating · a dis- .
turbance. He had entered the I
neighborhood in a sound truck
a nd denounced the police. His
bond was set at $10,050 and he
remained in jail today.
Six.teen persons were Injured,
several cars were damaged and
between 60 a...TJ.d 70 persons were
arrested during the rioting,
which occurred on Capitol Avenue two blocks from Atlanta.'.s
new $18-million .stadium.
About 750 city policemen
were in the area and 300 state
police troopers stood by.
A large police force patrolled
the 11rea toda.y, but only a few
Incidents were reported. About
10 persons were arrested this
afternoon when they refused to
break up a street-comer "black
power" rally. ·
Fire Bomb Thrown
A Molotov cocktail was
throw into a building a t a nother Negro area about two
miles away early this morning.
The building, 'housing a tire
company, was heavily damaged.
Four other less serious fires
that officials considered possible case of arson were reported. Fire fig hting was hindered because about 500 firemen
are on strike.
Atlanta officials never have
been friendly toward the t deot cmnmi~ee, which has id
its headquar ers here since it
was organized in 1960. But the


tttitude has become more hostile in recent months as the


organization has turned toward
black power and way from nonviolence.
The st~de~t 1,ammjtte,e has
been iifvo ve in at least two
other disturbances In Atlanta
in the last month.
First, a. Negro crowd tried to
free a committee worker who
was being arrested on a. traffic
charge. A few days later, several committe~ members -were
among a. group of anti-war
demonstrators who tried to
force their way into an Army
induction center.
�. ... ,...
o1 .. . ..,. , .
Mayo r Ivan Allen, Jr .
3700 Norths ide Drive, N.W.
Atlanta, Georgia
__j
�PAUL QUENEAU
·oLD ACADEMY Ro.AD
FAIRFIELD, CONN.
_J
��������I Injured as Hundreds.of Negroes Riot,
Tpss Rocl~s at Police, Smash Cars Here
Defy Allen,
Repulsed by
Tear Gas
G LCNN
I
GEOQ.C.l P..
S_T_
. __
.
I _
[ _
At least 15 persons - includA<
ing four policemen - were injured Tuesday afternoon when
hundreds of Negroes rioted near


r


'L OV C ST, the Atlanta Stadium after being
egged on by members of the
a~
Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in the
wake of the police shooting of a
Negro auto theft suspect.
Sixty-three persons were arrested before the riot was
quelled.
SCENE OF TROUBLE
The rioters ignored pleas of
reason from Mayor Ivan Allen
Jr., who braved thrown bricks in
his efforts to restore peace, and
were halted only when city police fired warning shots in the
afr and discharged tear gas
about two hours later.
As police reinforcements arrived in the neighborhood, centered on Capitol Avenue and
01 mond Street SW, the officers
broke out shotguns - which apBy DICK HEBERT
peared to incense the crowd.
A
grim-faced
Mayor Ivan
WHY THE GUNS?
"Why the shotguns? Why the len walked into the middle of
shotguns?" the crowd shouted. jeering, angry throng of N

es.daY
ternoon a
if
!
1 l~
I
In Middle
Of Moh--The Mayo
,..
Staff Photo-Robert Connell
~_!-
�tec t you."
• p•.~ ·rn;~IS t1=::;-;==--=~~
--mg over peacea~---y.
Standing shoulcTer to shoulder
in the center of . a chanting
crowd of hundreds, Allen said
through a portable megaphone:
'LET'S GO'
"How about listening to me
a minute now? How about letting me speak? I'm going to
Constitution r epor ters cov- walk up Capitol Avenue to the
ering this story were Dick stadium - and if you want to
Hebert, Keeler McCartney, come, let's go."
Negroes repeatedly asked the
Michael Davis, Bill Shipp and
mayor, "Why are there only
Charles Moore.
white people with shotguns?"
and bottles at the officers, hit- The mayor answered, "In the
ting some.
first place we don't need any
The mob started to break up shotguns, and I'm not here with
only when the officers began anything. Ain't nobody going to
firing shots over their heads get killed and you know that."
ROCK CAR
and firing tear gas.
CARS OVERTURNED
After the crowd refused to folAt the peak of the riot, one low him to the steps of Atlanta
police car and a civilian's car Stadium and refused to hear
were overturned and members him as he stood above them on
l}_f the mob tried to overturn two the roof of a police car, the
paddy wagons. Police and the Negroes rocked the car and al\lehicles of white people were most turned it over.


toned as they drove through


Allen was pulled down but he


othe area , and several wind- landed on his knees and climbed


a shields were shattered.
back onto the car.
·
Shortly before midnight Mayor
At @ne point, a Negro in a red
' Allen surveyed the scene and sh.irit climbed on top of the car
s_aid, " I think the people who ~ith Allen and pointed a finger
live here have gone to their mto Allen's face, spitting out the
Continued on Page 12, Column 1 words, " Black power! ,,
REPEAT CRY
The crowd took up the chant
as its leader brandished his fists
m the air. Allen stood watching
rimly.
A few minutes later the Capttol _Avenue area was tom by
gunfire, exploding tear gas
bombs and flying bricks, sticks
?0 d socia bottles. Allen still was
m the midst of it, caught in a
crossfire.
A'S newsmen and police scampered from the rain of bricks
and bottles, Allen ducked behind
the armored police riot trucks
but minutes later was again approaching Negro groups to disperse them.
LIFE ENDANGERED
Later he scoffed at the idea
that he had placed his life in
danger.
" The only thing you think of
A number of Negro y o u th s
shouted in answer , " Kill the
white bastards, kill the white
cops."
Some of the youths carried
large clubs. others rained rocks
Continued on Page 6, Column 1
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TELEPHONE
Wants you to call
Returned your call
D
MESSAGE
D
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Is here to see you
Came by to see you
Left the followin g message:
Date: _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Time _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ a. m. / p. m.
By- - - - - - - - -- - -- - -- - - - - -- - - - - F O RM 2 5•6
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"Business is business. I work with white men every day and I get along. But when they start fooling around with
my brothers, that's it. I don't care anymore. Long as his skin's the same as mine, he's my brother."
-Atlanta Journal, Sept . 7, 1966
Photo: Julius L este r
PERSPECTIVE on THE ATLANTA REBELLION
Copyright 1967
Aframerican News Service
360 Nelson Street, SW
Atlanta, Georgia 30313
Published by
The Movement Press
449 14th Street
San Francisco, California 94103
Additional copies available
from either address
50¢
Text by Julius Lester
Photos by Ru fus Hinton
Juliu s Leste r
Jimmy Lytle
In seeking to determine the cause of the recent rebellions *
in Atlanta, Georgia , the mayor, city officials and the press
looked no further than to the presence in the city of the Student
Non-Viole nt Coordinating Committee a nd then closed their
investigation. By attacking SNCC the y joine d the increasi ng
number of government officials and newspapers who claim that
the rebellions of this past summer have not been acts against
a s ys tem th at offers a Ii vi ng dea th to black me n, but h ave been
only th e result of agitation by Communists and / or bl ack nationa list groups . No evi de nce has ever been put forward to substantiate th ese cl a ims. Yet th ey a re repeated over a nd over
aga in in th e face of much evide nce to the contrary. The refusal
to accept the meaning of the rebellion s of this past summer will
only result in more disturb a nces of the same nature.


We u se t he word "r ebe lli on" in stead of riot , b eca u se it c0 nveys a


tru e r mea ning of what has been occurring. In no ne of the in 'c idents of
the summer of '66 did black people go int o white ne ighbor h oods . Their
first target was always tbe po li ce . Their second has been wh it e - owned
busi nesses in th e g he tt o . These targets h ave bee n chosen deliberately,
be ca us e they a re the most visib le s igns of oppress ion in the ghetto .
These reb e llions h ave be en co nsci o us political ac t s, just as the s it-in s
and picket lin es were co ns cio us political acts. Demonstrations in the
g h etto do not te nd to co mply with the accep t able mea ns of protest. To
use the word riot gives rise to images of black men running amok,
w ithout ca use or reason. This im age does the black man no h arm, because he knows why he's throwing bricks at policemen. It does do a
disservice to whit es, though, wh o are n ot given the opportuni ty to
understand.
�No grievances
justify
mob action and
insurrection."
-Congressman
Charles Weltner,
Sept. 7, 1966
II.
Atlanta had many warnings of something to come. In June
1966 there were street demonstrations in Mechanicsville, a
black ghetto that is adjacent to Summerhill, the rebellion area.
These demonstrations were organized by local residents to
protest inadequate facilities . The police managed to quiet th e
residents and some temporary measures we re taken to provide
adequate playground facilities. In August there were two consecutive nights of incidents outside the Palladium, a black
club, in southwest Atlanta, when black people felt that the
police were unjustly arresting patrons of the club . In both
instances the y tried to free the arrested pad:ies and run the
police from the area . In one instance they succeeded.
The most direct warning to the city of Atlanta came in a
report presented to the mayor in February, 1966. This report
was prepared by the Community Council of the Atlanta Area,
Inc. , under a Federal grant from the Urban Renewal Administration of the Department of Housing and Urban Redevelopment.
It was called "Social Blight and its Causes (with special
reference to the blighted areas surrounding Atlanta Stadium.)"
This area, in part , is Summerhill-the area where the rebellion
occurred , the rebellion for which the Mayor can find no other
cause than Stokely Carmichal and SNCC.
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�III.
Atlanta, Georgia is hailed by many as the most progressive
city in the South. The New York Times of September 7, 1966
says:
The city has been Widely praised as a model
for the South in its peaceful acceptance of
school desegregation , and its two daily newspapers-The Constitution and The Journalare among the most liberal in the region in
racial matters.
Perhaps Atlanta is the most progressive city in the South beca use it , more than any other Southern city, resembles the
cities of the North . It has its industry , its imposing skyline,
an air of affluence , a symphony orchestra, an annual arts festiva l , a major league baseball team, a professional football team,
a nd air pollution. If these credentials are not enough to qualify
Atlanta as a metropolis of the sixties , it also· has urban renewal.
As it has bee n exercised in most cities, including Atlanta,
urban ren ewal is nothing more than evicting poor black people
from their homes , razing the area and "renewing" it with high
cost apartm ents, hotels, motels , and e xpressways. In Atlanta
the Ma rriot Hotel , a delu xe accommodation for those who can
a ffo rd to be delu xely a ccommodated , sta nds in the heart of what
use d to be a bla ck slum a rea, Buttermilk Bottom.
Bl ack s lums a re never a nything to brag about. .. shacks,
rats, roa che s, ga rbage th at spills out of the cans and into the
stre ets beca use the Sa nitation Departme nt seems to collect
more on a whim than a sche dule. The shacks and apartments
in the s lums that bl ack people dignify b y calling home are
usually rented fr om la ndlord s who pocke t the rent and refuse to
make re pa irs . If he is e ve r c a rrie d to court for refusing to maintain his ·property acco rding to the building and health codes, the
resulta nt fine i s s o low a s to enc ourage him to continue to do
nothing. Eve ntua ll y, these "homes" a re conde mned a s unfit;
the city pays the slumlord a health y sum for the prope rty (which
he has inte n tiona lly a llo wed to de te riora te so it would be condemned a nd bou ght by th e city) a nd th e residents , poor , black
powerless, are told they mu st move . The are a is t o be "re newed".
T his " re newa l " is ha iled almost as loudl y a s would be an
annou ncement tha t J es us was goin g to prea ch a t First Baptist
on the third Sunday. T he newspa pe rs procl a im the new s far and
wide . The Chamber of Comm e rce pre pa res a new publicity brochure. T he mayor is inte rv iewed on his wa y to th e ba nk with his
latest haul of graft fr om this "boo n to th e c ity . " The victims
of this "boon", blac k people, rece ive the he a rtfelt s ympath y
of city offic ials a nd are kno wn throughout hi s tor y a s the "ine vitable victims of progress." (Afte r a ll , didn 't Jesus Himse lf l ay
the cornerstone for capitalis m whe n he sa id , 'A nd the poor ye
shall always have with yo u .'?) But a few ca n 't be a llowed to
hold back what is good for a ll , we are told , s o th e y pa ck up
their clothes and belongings a nd move in to a n a lready overcrowded part of the city . T his is the urba n re newa l blue print
from city to city across America . Atlanta has fo llowed it c onscientiously .
"I don't care
how many buildings
they put up.
They ain't for us ."
-Resident of street in ph oto to author .
�J
]
IV .
"I'm running this city,,,
There're a lot of people in it who're not very good,
but I'm running it,"
- Mayor Ivan All en, At lanta Const itu tion , Sept. 7, 1%6
There was much e xc itement in the halls of the Chamber of
Commerce when ta lk began abo ut the possibility of Atlanta
acquiring a major l eague bas eball team . You can't be a big
le ague city without a ball team a nd Atlanta wanted to be "big
lea gue " . An 18-million-dollar s tadium was built s o that Atlant a
could be . The bl a ck victim s of thi s s te p toward progress were
forced to move without any hous ing being provided for that which
was to be dest royed. L ike refugees from the conflagration of a
wa r the y didn' t understand , they moved into Sum merhill and
Mechanics ville .
Prior to the e rection of this hous e of progress, Summerhill
was not considere d a slum, although the trend had begun due to
the changing e mployment opport unities and the aging of the
hous e s. According to the Community Council's report:
This deterioration h as been accentuated
through clearance by reduci ng the available lowincome housing·-units. This increased demand for
housing has resulted in a further division of old
houses into several apartments and in a more
widespread doubling up of families . One of the
most common remark s to our inte rviewers by
long-term re sidents concerned how rapidly the
areas nearest the s tadium have changed since
the clearance . The doubling up and increased
pressure for housing caused "a good many of the
s table people to move away . " During the four
months that we have been talking with people in
the area closes t to the s tadium , the interviewers
ha ve observed an extremely high turnover among
renters and a loss of homeowners ... Many of the
area s surrounding clearance s eem to become
little mo re than temporary qua rters for people
who are constantly forced to move. Thus , clearance and relocation , without careful cons ideration of the effect on neighborhoods , has a
sn owballing effect in the destru ction of the
surrounding areas.
That is Summerhill, expendable , as black people have always
been.
�f
V.
To many, including Mayor Ivan All en and Mr. Ralph Mc Gill
of the Atla nta .Constitution, it is possible fo r someone to ente r
a n area with a soundtruck, shout "Black Power!" several times
a nd people will knock each other ove r getting out to the s t reets
with bric ks a nd bottles i n the ir ha nds . If the Mayor a nd the press
a re t o be believed , this i s actua lly wha t happened. A re bellion ,
howe ver, cann ot be induced by some witch docto r na med Stokely
from the s tone-age SNICK tribe. Rebellions ha ppen beca use
people know no other way in which to ma ke themse lve s heard.
T hose who de mons t rate with Molotov c ocktails a re not people
who can go to c ity pl annin g c ommissi on hearings a nd hear thems e lve s discus sed as an it em in the budge t. A re be llion i s the
la nguage of those who must ta lk t o the deaf.
The report by t he C ommunity Council was prepa red in language that the Mayor could hear a nd understand.
In the a rea a round the stadium 8 to 12% of the
families have annual inc omes of less · tha n $1 ,000
Another 15-25% have incomes betwee n $1,000
a nd $2,000. Educ ation s h ows a simil a r pa tte rn:
5-10% of the adults ha ve ne ver been in school.
Another 20-30% have ha d le ss tha n 5 yea rs of
educa tion. About one-fourth to one-third of the
children live with only one pa re nt. The infant
mo rta lity rate is betwee n 40 a nd 50 de a ths pe r
1,000 live births, twice a s high as middle cla ss
areas . The ir streets a re unpaved ; the school s
are muc h more crowde d; the e nforcement of sanit ation , ho us ing and other s ta nda rds is muc h less
stringent; in man y nei ghborhood s s treet li ghts
are virtually no n-existe nt. . . Cou pled with t he
absence of services have been many unfu lfille d
promises to improve condit ions. Bond iss ue s
have been sold on the promises of improved
school s o r s tre ets or pa rks, but the s e servi ces
h a ve not mate rialized. P ublic officia ls have
stated the ir desires to improve this or that si t uation , but conditions re main e s sentially unchanged. It s hould be no s urprise that mos t
people simply do not believe the be nign express ions of good intent made by local officials.
our summers of riots are caused
by America' s winters of delays."
11 •• •
- Martin L uth er Ki ng, Jr . At lanta Journal, Sept. 10, 1966
"
�VI.
"The Atlanta Community-Negro and white-will be making a
sad mistake if it writes off Tuesday's disturbances in the
South Side as a plot of outside agitators, to be dealt with
by replenishing the police department's supply of tear gas."
-The Counci l on Human Relations of Greater Atlanta, Inc .
Atlanta Constitution, September 9, 1966
The summer was almost over and Atlanta was about to
relax, because "niggers ain't never been known to riot in the
winter." The day after Labor Day a white policeman shot a
black man suspected of auto theft. (Given a chance he could
have proven he had borro wed the car he was driving. ) "The
ambulance come to take him off and he lay down there ," said
Mrs. Marjorie Prather, mother of the victim . "My other s on and
this other police was about to get into it out there . He wa s
saying, ' I know you didn 't have to shoot him. You didn't have to
cause this. You could ha ve caught him cause he wasn't running
that fast.' And some of the people told me that when the policeman shot him once , he said, 'Lord , let me make it back to the
house. Let me make it back t9 the house. ' I told the policeman
'You didn 't have to do an ything except take a long step to catch
him , but you didn't even try·. You were too busy s hooting at him'.'
Thus, it began. How many other times had wh ite policemen
shot black men? How many other times had white policemen
beaten black men and taken them off to jail? How many other
times? But this time was the one time too many. In Cleveland
it was not being able to get a glass of water in a bar run by a
white man. In Watts it was the simple arrest of two men on a
traffic violation. It's always something that has happened an
infinite number of times before, but on one occasion it becomes
the proverbial straw breaking the camel's back.
�"You go home and eat a big steak with mushrooms,
while we has to go home and eat sardines.
Let us go home with you."
-Atl anta Constitution, Sept. 12, 1%6
VII. ,
No matter how many times the city of Atlanta and the press
scream that SNCC was respon s ible for the rebe llion, the black
people of Atlanta know that SNCC did not des troy h o~es for
hot els , mote l s , expressways and a ball s tadium . The y know that
SNCC did not fo rce the se people to move into Summerhill , Mechanicsville and other a l ready crowded are as of the city. They
know tha t SNCC does not set the exorbitant prices bl ack pe ople
are forced to pay for groceries in the ghetto s tores o wned by
whites . Yet , Ivan Allen s ays SNCC is respons ible for the rebe llions. Thos e black men he has bought off with tea a nd c ookies
can say, a s did the Rev. Otis Smith, "Our main c oncern i s
Stokely Ca rmichal. Whethe r or not we have a riot is up to him . " .
The Re v . William Holmes Borde rs can s a y, " We 've got to s top
him before he s tops us. " Dr. 0. W. Davis can s ay , "Mr. Ca rmichal is an albatross around our necks.' '
Like Shadrach, Mesha ch and Abednego, Ivan Allen a nd the
city of Atlanta a re in a fiery furnace , but they do not feel the
heat. It is not, howe ver, the grace of God that keeps t hem from
feelin g the flame s. It is their own inability or unwill ingne ss to
respond to des pera tion a nd des pair. Rather than recognize this ,
which would be no sha me, the y launch a ve ndetta against SNCC .
Whether SNCC lives or dies i s not important, becau s e the
black c ommunity will continue to fi ght unti l a s ociety i s c reated
in which the black ma n will be able to fulfi ll him s elf. In that
society there will be no place for the Ivan All ens , who think a
city' s image and progre ss can be s eparated from the peop le
of that city .
P h oto : Jimmy Lytle
��Ann-·
This was being handed out tofay at corner of
Marietta and Forsyth streets by a negro girl.
Henry Bowden
I _
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II
�LAST MONTH
/
JULY
S M T W T F
s
1
8
15
22
29
2
9
16
23
30
3
10
17
24
31
4 5 6
111213
18 19 20
25 26 27
7
14
21
28
1966
s
M
7
14
21
28
1
8
15
22
29
NEXT MONTH
AUGUST
w
2 3
9 10
16[17)
23 24
30 31
T
1966
T
F
4
11
18
25
5
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19
26
SEPTEMBER
s
6
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20
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SMTWTFS
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11 J 2 13
18 '19 20
25 26 27
1 2
7 8 9
14. 15 16
21 22 23
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WED.
229 ·
17
AUG.
WEDNESDAY,AUGUST17
-136
�93'7P EST
DEBS36 DE ARA255PD ANN ·atiROOR MICH 16 '750P ES1'
PIA 'YOR IVAN AlJ.EN JR
CITY )(A_LL
ATLA
VE PRDT£ST U ILLEGAL ARREST OF S1'0K1£Y C~RMICKAL 2> ATTE'MPT
TO S'ITr PUBLIC 81.AflfE FOR REC£Nt RIOTS fllOM £STU3ILS\ttD POVER
STRucrtrltE TO
SNCC VHICll lS. IJOING N3ST IEUVANt WOK TO CP.EATE
·NDI l:~ID C:OOD SOCIETY l> ATT£MPT TO DESTROY S.NCC BECAUSE OF
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�226A EST SEP 17 65 AA09}
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A LLC21 NL PO 11 EXTRA ATLANTA GA 15
-THE HONORAll..E !VAN ALLEN
Cil'Y HAL.l ATU
I M GRATEFUi.. FOR YOUR COORTESY NO HOSPITALITY HOIIEVER KTffi
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PSEETIIIG TOOAY VrTH YOUR FINE POL1CE CH?a:' JEMING THE OAY INVESTIGATING ~ICE DEPARTMENT THAT SOJ11£
OIGOTEO rtatBERS <F THE ATLANTA POLICE OE?AR~T Mt S0LEL Y
RESPOl«>tS.E FOR THE CRISES lN TOUR CITY. I A~ OIS!V.YED Af.O
SHOCKED AT THE Yll.E RACIST TTP£ SUPERINT'Et«lENf CARROt.l AT l>£
FULTON COONTY JAIL ¥HO VOOLO N0i ALLOW llf£ TO YS!T THOSE PRISONERS. _,_
CCH-"lNEO THERE AS A RESULT Of nE" RE.BELLI~
·/,,-S ih~;:.:. 1,·_ c., .•_ . .
ntE AEV A IIENHU.. INITM CHAUIMAN tWl.!tl
crn.'ZENS
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�GEORGIA ASSOCIATION OF JUSTICES OF THE PEACE

AND CONSTABLES, INC.
P . 0 . ADDRESS
B O X 18 13, A T LANTA, GEORGIA 3 0 301
A Resolution
We, the Justices of the Peace, and Constables
from every part of the State, in meeting assembled at
the State Capitol, hereby express our deep concern over
the disturbances in our Capitol City in recent days by
persons not really concerned with the welfare of all
·o ur citizens.
As Judges and Law Enforcement Officers, we
deplore any violent rupture in the peaceful life of all
people within our State.
Particularly, we wish to commend the Honorable
IVAN ALLEN, JR., as Mayor of the City of Atlanta, for his
forthright and courageous stand in this matter, and for
his outstanding leadership and personal command of the
situation.
Let a copy be furnished to Hon. Ivan Allen, Jr.
AND to the news media.
ADOPTED, this 19th day of September, 1966, at
the House of Representatives, State Capitol, Georgia.
Georgia Association of Justices of the Peace
and Constables, Inc.
�- "T-
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�COOPERATION-NOT COMPETITION:
COMM UNITY - NOT THE INDIVIDUAL. 11
11
From Poolhall P.-ddress
De livered at It, Miesissippi
( February 2, 1960)
"Keep your cue- stick chalked, 11
-Junebug Jabbo Jones-
�Education, as it: is now constituted, is a disruptive force
to the needs of Afro-Americans and the Afro-American community, To
focus on this thesis, it is necessary to discuss the beginnings and
history of Negro education.
The first schools black people attended, were slave breaking
schools, where black men, women and children, would have their
spir-its broken in order to make them into obediant servants of their
white masters. The history of our education in the United States
cannot be separated from this fact.
In Africa, Asia, etc., education grew out of what people
had to do in order to survive and the need for one generation to
pass on to the Rext the knowledge acquired through experience. But
in America, where white men and black men met, this was not the
case.
In America, some men were taught to be masters, and others
were taught to be slaves.
Mass edu:: ati on in the United States grew out of the need to
rationalize racism and exploitation in the United States .
It i s
important to understand this if we are to begin to effectiv ely deal
with the problems of edu::ationwe face today.
The first Negro colleges were set up for the half-breed or
!!illegitimate" children of whi te slave owners.
understood then, as he does not.r,
Afro-American community.
the nec~ss1'ty
The white man
of
spl:tntering tJ1e
The most effective mechanism for affecting
this has .been the tttt.!8ht- arrl
bred-in orientation towards a white
culture projected as superior.
�There are many historical examples of how Negro edte ational
institutions have abdicated their respohsibilities to the Afro-=
.
\
.American cbrnmuni ty, am embraced the concept of white supremacy.
During it's early days, Howard University required you to submit
a picture of yourseli before you w~re admitted.
Of course, the
,
,I
picture established yollt Golor crec1entials. ,t;If white, all right;
if bladki bet back;"
al6ng with the
tr palm
test" i--the palm of your
\ I
hah1 had th eome damn d1ose tb the color of your face in order for
yob to get
i
lnl
At F!sk University, the Fisk Jubilee SiI~ers were "happy ahd
satisfied," educated darkies, in the finest of white cultural trad ition; and to this day are acclaimed for establishing much of the
prominence and validity of Fisk University.
They sang before Queen
Victoria of Bri ti an (which at thr t · time was the major colonial force '
oppressing our colonia~ brothers and sisters around the wor1d ...--11 the
sun never sets on the British Empire, 11
11
take up the white mans burden"
am that sort of rot) --- and were acclaimed great because th ey sang
by white standards (four part harmoni es, round ed tones, and pr oper
diction), am didn't pat their feet, shout, and get happy- -ya 1 11
know, embarrass the race.
Booker T. ~Washington and his policy of accommod ation is
another example of Negro education.
Tuskef;iee Institute was
attempting to provide Negroes with "industri al education11 •
At the
beginning of the 20th Century, the industrialists who financed
Booker T. kr:lliW industrial education was not going to do the black
�man any good.
It was outdated arrl could only keep the black man in
tasks of menial, servile, labor.
Today, there is a statue of Booker
T. on Tuskeegee 1 s campus, in which he is supposedly raising the v&'.1:1
from over the head of a young Negro who is kneeling.
At least some
people say that he is raising the wil; probably he is lowering it.
But, supposing for the moment t ~at he is raising it, that statue
f ·-.flds as a symbol of the fact of Booker T. 1 s acceptance of the
j
dohc ept of Afro-Americans' inferiority- that Afro-Am~rftans had toi
be raised and uplifted to the level of whites.
Ih oth ~r words,
Booker T~ tva~ a white supremist (an insidious example . of the white
,j
war to annihilate feelings of blackness is found in the number of
1,,
Negro schoo i~ Ht3med Booker T. Wash i hgton) i
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At <Net y leve l , f.he history of our educati on has he~ motion
I
towards
wht~~
start1 etds
cuit ure~· ot a white posture, wlii ch was
t;:j;f
somehoJ sup~o§ed to be s Jperi or l
.
I
Educ ated Negroes -were set up
as
a s ~patate class, the model toward which the community should aspi re
i n order to be consid ered
11
civilized, 11 or on the way to progr ess.
Negr o progress is measured by its closeness to total i mitati on of
the -whi t e mode l .
Another exampl e of the orient ati on towards whiteness- i s


reflec t ed in the ori entat ion of freshm an males at Howard University.


On the first night of residence, fr eshman males are gathered on top
of Dr ew Hall and warned of the dangers of the surrounding community
of northwest Washington.
11
Bl ock boys" beat up Howard men, r ape
gi r ls and steal, the students are t old .
The are f urther t old, that
�if they have . to go out at night (to be avoided if possible), try
not to go out alone.
'
Avoid community parties.
Always, the posture
I
of the university is how to defend yoursGJ.f from that savage, wild,
uncivilized community.

those niggers.
They are saying in fact, "yott':re better than
I
You might get your picture in Eboey Magazine."
I'
this is a double tragedy, because 1) Howard University students
are subject to all the ciliove dangers. Howard is an alien in what
.
• •I
could be a resp6nsive community; and 2) given what it is oriented
I I
to, it seems impossible for Howard to change itself in order to
become relevant to the needs of the Afro-Americ~ns community around
!
it.
Therefor~, it stands as a source bf frustration !n the eJes
of the
A:fro1...Ameri ~an dommJni ty that surrounds it, subject to the
host ili t y t hat f lows from what it (Howard) denies.
Howard is typic al of Negro schools.
To describe them in
terms of what they r eally are is to call them is~snds of whiteness
in a sea of blackness.
These schools relate to the white community,
and feed individual Negroes into the white community, that is they
t each these i ndividuals how to step on the backs of their bl ac k broth ers,
"up" towards wh itey, and/or act as a buffer and transmit th e 'tJlite
mes sage and c ul ture into the Afroc:American communi t ies.
In a real
and profound sense, Negro schools are only i nportant as t hey rel ate
to the whi t e communi ty.
They t ell the Afro-American peopl e that you
are inferi or; that yo u have noth i ng to offer; t hat you are rot worth
giving anything to.
Negro educational institutions are very much
vulnerable to questions
f.'rom
Afro-Americans as to why th ey should be
allowed to ~ist if they continue to play such a destructive role in
our community..
-4-
�If we accept the proposition that Negro schools are -whiteoriented, ard geared not to th~ neea of A1r6-Amerid~hs, but to the
needs of white supremacy, then to examine Negrb edt.rl a.ti on is also
to
ekamine in part the nature 6£ education in this country.
I.
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The
-
idea b:t education as a magic key that unibcks the door, that gives
you entrar.ce into the chambe~, that has tHe tuttons, that runs
. things, is a myth,
us in our place.
The educ ad on tHat tve get
i~
designed to keep
For irstance, in Cctober, when Stokely Carmichael
was invited to speak at Fisk as a gu<fat lecturer by students involved
in the honors program; the white people of Nashville put pressure
on acting Fisk President James Lawson to cancel the engagement.
Knuckling under to pressure, Lawson cancelled the engagement on
the supposition that Carmichael's presence would be disruptive to
the campus ard the city of Nashville.
We have to urderstand that education is exclusive.
The
persora who are educated, or the children of the persons who are
educated, have the best chance of being edt..-cated.
does not expand very much.
~Q
this exclusiveness.
In white society, class is important
In the Negro community, caste and class
are ~P.Y to this exclusiveness.
to white
~Q
And, as you know, those closest
of the highest caste.
Ed"tCation
a myth.
That circle
~.:S
a key to running things in the country is also
The nountry is run ~.d:f'ormally and the first requirement is
no", a college degree, but a white skin. How maey presidents of
mc\_:Or corporatioris have you s een ~ve-rt.:i sed for?
They are bred.
�I
Tuey meet certain social, as well as ed~eational requ rements! If
~
.
they have a college degree, it is because socially, It's required
these days.
And us scuffling niggers is just out here, believ.tng
all the stuff the man says about
up',
1get
a degree arrl work your way
like the brother in Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man who on
seeing the contents of an envelope given him by the President of
what might be Tuskegee, saw: "Keep this nigger running."
Toe motion of the so-called civil rights movement around
the question of edteation has been on the assumption thlit Negro
schools were inferior in this society.
for the teachers.
The facilities were poor
The teachers were poor for the students. The
students were culturally inferior.
Finally, in 1954, the
u. s.
Supreme Court decided that us poor cullud folks could go to the
superior white folks schools.
They did it for us, they say,
however, in many respects the 195h
.S,.q.:rcmC? C'.0111't . deuieion
marks
a new stage in the United States program of International Pacifi.-a-t-.iou.
Faced with a world-wide struggle against westerm imperla-
lism, the
u. s. had to project an appearance of resolving the
contradiction between it 1s claims as a representative of "democracy',
arrl "freedom", and it 1 s domestic policy of racial exploitation.
Needless to say, the hypocrisy of that move is reflected today in
both the Vietnam war an::l the situation of Afro-Americans.
The white schools decided to integrate with
speed".
That is, about 4 or 5 years apart.
II
all deliberate
We were supposed to
be most appreciative of this opportunity opened up to tS through
the
II
good" graces of white society. Halleluah, we could all go
to white schools.
-6-
�We began to feel as if we had to push as many Negroes as
we could into these schools, in order that they get the information
that we felt whites were getting.
This was vitally necessary to
functioning in the white society.
The whole Afro-American community
was kept in motion, directing our energies towards the responsibilities necessary to allow individuals .from our community to function
in the white mans society.
Several thi~s happened in regards to this integration effort.
There was massive resistarce, especially in the south and in the
north when we came in great masses.
became all black.
Fo~merly all-white schools
We began to realize that if we ever wanted to
integrate with whites, we would have to chase them all over the
country. The south in macy instanc es put up [hysical resistance.

- ----
In order to make it easier on the whites, in some northern areas
it was proposed that a few black students be bussed out of the
ghetto before dark.
Sort of a daytime whiteness attempt.
And in
the south, we were asked to ignore spit in our faces, mobs around
our children ard bombs thrown at our homes.
On the col lege level, the effort of Negr o colleges is to
become as "good" as white
am ,
therefor e, schools like Harvard,
Yale, etc. are being used to evaluate the needs of Negr o educ ation.
One result of t hese kinds of evaluati ons is th at the President of
Howard University has recommended that within five to ten years,
Howard become 60% white in order to be able to compete with white
schools.
In essence he was saying that it was impossible for a
Negro school--that is a school for those of African descent, a black
-7-
�school--to measure up to white schools; therefore, these schools must
be flooded with whites, who 1s presence by definition would brir:g
superiority.
Another development in regards to Negro colleges is the
concept of pairing.
Prioceton takes responsibility for Miles, the
University of Michigan for Tuskeegee, Brown for Tougaloo.
These
schools irould corre{;t standards, design a better curriculum in
f- c: nns
ci.1 n a ti onal
edttc a.t i onal st andards.
Whiten them.
Brothers
an:1 Sisters "First there is a tragedy, then there is a farce".
The deep crisis in education that we face today flows from
a much broader and profound political problem that pervades every
segment of the black community.
In a ]itiase, we, blacks, control
none of the resources and institutions in our communities. And,
until ~e can begin to move to exercise this control over our
lives, anything else is an exer cise in futility.
Ed~ation consists mainly of t wo factors: indoctrination
to a certain poi nt of v i ew (e.g. the slaves we r e civ i li zed by
being brought here; the I nd ians were savages and destroying them
was tami r.g the west); arrl the accumulation of factual infor matio n
(e.g . the s un is~tn the sky - water is wet). However, our indoc trination in many r espects determines wh at i s fac t ual . For example,
you would laugh if we said that England wasn' t discovered unti 1 t he
first time Sekou Toure, President of the African country of Guinea,
first set foot there, but we accept the idea of Columbus' discovery
of America, despite the fact that pilq:le were here to meet him.
- 8-
�•
-
Columbus, a poor navigator at best, accidentally got here
trying to get to India ar.d he died thinking he had made it to India.
We are only educated in our schools, but the white attitude
also breaks into the Afro-American community through television,
radio, movies and magazines (both white and white aspiring-dig
Ebony); through advertising such as Nadinola, Silky Straight and
the white knight that drives out dirt.
In fact, we are overwhelmed.
It is safe to say that every device for indoctrination
irx::ludi ng institutional education is used to lock us mentally within
the white prison of western civilization.
If we are to survi"':~, we must break the chains that bind
our minds and bodies within the prison of western civilization.
We must, ~therefore, build within our communities, educational
insitutions that allow us to locate and utilize in our own interests,
the resources that we have as a people.
This effort, which we must
all commit ourselves to, will be resisted, as it has been historically
by this country and her sister countries of the West, who 's committment
to the protection of white supremacy prevents an urrl erstanding of
human rights and r.eeds.
We want to begin now, to bre.ak out of a very negative concept
of ourselves an::1 of our possibi liti-es taught us as a result of our
American captivity.
•'
We should urderstand that thile th ere world
wide oppression an::1 exploitation along color lines, there is strength
for us in the struggle against the oppression.
For we, the oppressed,
represent 87% of the worlds population.
We have outlined a di'seription of white cultural ard educational
domination arrl many of you must be asking by now, how do we deal with
this?
-9-
�How do we move as Afro-lIJericans to meet our educational
needs?
Let us begin to think of a school, international in i tts
scope, yet parochial in that it 1s aimed at the needs of Afro-Americans
colonized within the United States.
Toe thrust of su::h a school would be to break out of the mental
barriers posed by western (the
u.s.
in particular) education. There
would be a positive and a direct effort to relate to Africa, Asia and
Latin America.
Langu99e as a basic communications tool, would be
very important; emµiasis would be put on these lengu99es: Swahili
and French in terms of Africa; Spanish in terms of Latin America;
Chinese an~ Japanese inr:terms of Asia.
Coupled with this language
learnir:g process would be to travel to countries in these areas
to begin to break through the overwhelming mental effect of a life
with in the American society who-iif every fuoction is controlled by
whit es.
We need to begin to conceive of our community
light.
in a different
Instead of a place to esc ape from, we must now see our lif e, ·
work, l abor and love, in t erms of th at community.
With t his different
attitude toward s our community in t erms of our life work, we mus t
begin to get specifi c technic a l s kills directly r elevant to the AfroAmerican c ommuni ty.
Spec ific t echnic a l ski l l s gotten by indiv iduals
should be seen as c ommunity resources rather than individual profit;
for true profit for the indiv idual flows from t he profit of his
community.
Medical care and health for example, would be organized
as community programs, not as lucrative private practices. Technicians would see as a part of their work, the organizing and eocourage\
ment of their communities to tap it 1s own resources in it's own mr~~e.$t~.
-10-
�For in the fh1al analysis, education is not a gathering of
intellectual skills, but a preparation for participation in living;
and life is lived with people and community.
Integral to the purpose of this kind of s&.n ool, is the
shedding of our inability to understand in anything other than
-
western cultural standards. The west is not the culture, but a
-
culture; one of many and in many ways more primitive than most.
We, asAfro-Americans, mt.JSt choose on which side of the
color line we stand.
We have, in fact, only one choice.
choice is made by the color of our skins.
LET US NON FREPARE.
Copyright 1967
Student Voice
36o Nelson Street, s. w.
Atlai~-~~ Geo't'gia 30313
The
�STATEMENT BY lVAN ALLEN, JRo
Sentencing of William Jame to Life
February 9, 1967
The conviction of William Haywood James for the murder of
Hulet Varner, Jr. iB proof certain that all per ons are equal before the
law and subject to the demand
of the law in the City 8£ Atlanta, Georgia.o
On September 11, a few hourt after the shooting of the youth,
I reminded the people of this city that Atlanta 1 · effotta which have been
unexcelled by any other American <:ity, to eliminate racial prejudico and
inture the Negro citizen of equal ri.ghte and opportunity. Thie cannot be
accomplished
Ol'
carried (u,it except under ihe auth.o rity of law and order;
and that these two are ins e
rable., and neither can · ucc ed without the
other.
This belief w: ·
A
put t0, it · highest teat in thi . ca e.
a teeult, all citizen• of
tlanta c
etand
little atr iahter
and el ep . little eaeier tonight.
I m inati-\1.CtinS the City Attorney to con£ r with Chief Jenkin•
~
a,..rdin the dlabutaement of the $10, 000. re ard which le to th
and convie ti n of 1:he murd rer.
~r
t
�December 8 , 1966
Mr. Clive S . Koonz
Paci.fie Alaskan Land and Livestock C •
P . O. Box 963
North Pole. Ala ka
Dear Mr. Koonz:
In reply to yo\ll." letter of December 2nd rega.-ding
the racial di turbance, of Septexnbe.r 8th, I am
encloijing a copy of the New York Time magazine.
lf you ill r ad the article on page 32, l .ca.n a sure
yo\l that this i a £actual a ·c counting of what: happened.
Since:rely youra,
Ivan All n, J~.
Mayor
lAJr/br
�. PACIFIC ALASKAN LAND AND LIVESTOCK CO INC
An Alaskan Corporation
·•
.
P . 0 . Box 963 - North Pole, Alaska
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�.PROPCSJ,. L FOR AN LFRO-AMERICJ. N EDUC/ ;. TION
A ND CULTU RJ,. L CENTER
Introduction:
Key to the struggle for human rights that b .fro-americans are engagec1 in, is the development of internal strength.
Throughout the history
of the struggle this need for internal strength has been phrased in many
ways: Identity, Dignity, Pride, Black Consciousness.
The question then,
is how is fulfillment of this need structured and programmed?
The culture of a people -- what defines a people internally, is not
seen and is constantly in flux.
Music, art works, recorded history are
all cultural expre·s sions but not culture itself.
A positive awareness of
the expressions of culture as clues to the nature of what one is is necesq.r y
tO" the vitality of any people.
P e r haps the most tragic effect of the racism
directecl against Afro-am e ricans has been the systematic destruction of
our cultural i d entity.
A concerte d effort must be made to search out pro-
grams that can deal with this denial.
L ny program which seeks t o rectify close to 400 years of cultural
denial must of necessity be long ranged.
U sing their history, lifro-
arnericans must define themselves in terms of their aspirations
~
community for the future.
The Idea:
The Afro-american 6iltural and Education Center would serve two
specific functions .
school children.
During the clay, it woulcl operate for the benefit of pre ...
Through programs in dance, music, reading and recr -e a-
tion, it would seek to instill at an early age a positive self-awareness.
�Page Two
P art of this pre-school pro gram wrul d be d esigned to involve the parent s
of these children as much as possible.
Community support from fin an ci a l
to participation. woulcl be solicited anc1 hopefully, this program will be selfsupp orting in one year.
In the evening. the center would be run as an .f-:..fro-a.rne rican coffee
house.
The evening p rogram would feature folk music and jazz musicians,
poets. movies. lectures. discussions and debates.
Coffee, tea, sandwiches
and pastries woulcl be sold an d a small admission fee wruld be char ge d .
The concept pf the coffe house is to provide entertainment for the cmnmunity while at the same time engaging in a social pro gra...in with the communit y.
Vi7hatever funds a re gained from this effort, will b e turned into the develo::_:, ment of another such c enter in a different section of the ::-i. \' community.
hnplemntation:
In December o f 196 5, a small coffee shop was o :,enec1 up in I tlanta
on Hunter Street calle d the
n
Lovin 1 Spoonful. 11
It sought to provide the
ghetto community of N o rthwest l,.tlanta with the opp ortunity to go to a p l ace
whe re both enjoyment of the A fro-american 1 s contribution in many areas
of
art could be appre ciatecl and discussions of various social is s u es could b e
pursued in a relxecl and informal atmosphe re.
The high ove r head and the
unwillingness of the managers to be prohibitive in terms of money. mad e it
impossible to sustain the coffee house.
Rent plu s the cost of living even
minimally, eventually forced the closing of the "Lovin1 Spoonful." Since
closing of the Lovin' Spoonful, s e ver al persons frorri the l's tlanta communit y
�Page Three
have been discussing the reopening of a similar coffee house.
One person
has committed himself to the full time operation of it if funds can be found
to guarantee on~ year's existence without the worry of rent ancl feec1 costs.
Several other persons have volunteered part time help if ever the coffee
house is reopened.
Lecturers and entertainers can be gotten for the cost of
transportation at most.
Location of the center will be on Hunter Street, the
main street of the Northwest .t:.tlanta ghetto.
There is a group of young parents and students who have eicpre ssed
interest in the pre-school program.
Volunteer help can be gotten from this
group anC: at least two full time staff personnel.
The main cost in operating
this progra.in is material, much of which will have to be clevelo ped.
The
Student Voice, Incorporated, an Afro-american publishing house in Atlanta,
is now laying plans for publishing children's material and it will be available at low cost.
Other effective material will have to be searched into
through institutions such as the Ban Street School in New York and individual educators.
�BUDGET FOR TEE L FRO-.AMERIC.L'l.N EDUCATION
/:...ND CULTURL L CENT ER ( l Year)
Rent•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••• $1800 at $150 / month
Food for Coffee House • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • $ 600 at $ 50 / month
Subsistence salaries •••••••••••••••••• , $1440
f.,.
B.
manager of coffee house at $40 per week
two persons for pre- school pro gram a.t ~;40 p er week
Materials for Pre-school program •••••• $2000
TOT A L •.....••••..•.••.••••..•...•.. $58 40 . 00
Submitted by:
Charles Cobb
36 0 ITelson Street S . V! .
l l.tl an ta, Ge or gai 30 3 13
�_..
---···-~-.
Student Nonuiolent
Coordinating Committee
360 Nelson Street, S. W.
Atl11ta, Georgia 30313
688-0331
Fduca -b:i on C.omruit te
JrogJ""ru:U ]A, pa.1--Lme u:t;
Strait Islanders
-- Tbrres
--- - ---- -- - - - -
Denr
·-
THE Education Committee of the Student Non-Violent
Coordinating connnitte met Febt1ro-y -1.th.,to the 6th,in
Atlanta Ga.
Sience Kingston Springs where stokley Cir rnichial
was elected chainnan, The Student N n-Violent Coordinating
Co.mmittee ho.s been working to deveJ.8pe new and meaningful
programs around the slogan mBI.LCK POWER."
These steps were. necessary when it became apparent
that the nature of the struggle must change. Let's no-tt
forget that the edonihmic,political,housing,education and
cuJctura-li. conditions of white racism still exsist.
'
Your support and' coopera.1fion is needed now,more : than
ever. Demonstrate your contim1eing commit~t: ( l) by
letting us know what you think of these changes:(~) by
devoting a BI!l.A.11 portion of yoan· time doing something for SNCC (3) Pa.a& thim: letter bn to some of your friends,J (4)
And by sending a. obntribution t-o SNCC'~ EDUCATION COMMITTEE
Yours in the Struggle
Fred Mealy
Education Coordinator
n
Vne
m
an,
,,
On• ,,,
Vo.I •
~'l'.'&!i!ir
�November 18, 1966
Mr . Joe Walburn
Area Supervisor
Atlanta District
Howard Johnson' s
3113 Main Street
East Point, Georgia
30044
Dea.I' Mr. Walburn:
I am returning the check for $67. 57 which was ent in payment
of the statement yOQ malled to the Geo:rgf.a State Pattol. In my
previous letter 1 enclosed the statement.
We ppreciate your g nerous , s istance in thi matter but
cei·tainly intend to pay fo>: the meals.
Sincerely your ,
Mrs. Ann Mo es,
Executive Secreta:ry
AM/br
Enclosur
�'
~owA 0Jo1.anson'S
"host of the hiDhways"
311 3 MAIN STREET
EAST POINT, GEOR G IA 30044
November 17, 1966
Mrs. Ann Moses
Executive Secretary
City of Atlanta
City Hall, Georgia
30303
Dear Mrs. Moses:
In response to your letter of November 15,
with attached check in the amount of $67.57 ,
we are returning your check in accordance with
our letter to Mayor Ivan Allen , dated November 10,
a copy of which is attached.
If we may be of further assistance, please
do not hesitate to contact me.
Yours very
tru~
rea Supervisor
Atlanta District
JW:awn
Enc.
�•


�l§l.epnrtn·u~11:t nf JI-uhli.c ~nf.et:g
¥n,t
(@ffi.c.e
'lfilnx 14 5.6
J\,t1nnfn t
COLO N EL H . LOW ELL CONN ER
D I RECTOR
November 16, 1966
Honorable Ivan Allen , Jr .
Mayor City of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta , Geo_gia
Dear Mayor :
Thank you for your kind words and we will dupli cate
your letter and send it to those who ass isted .
If we can be of service at any time , please let us
know .
With warm personal regards and best wishes , I run
Sincerel y ,
~
LLC : ee
~~
H. L. COIJNF.R
�November 15 , 1966
Mr . Joe Walburn
Area Supervisor
Atlant Di triet
Howard Johnson'
3113 Main Street
E t Point, Georgia
Dear Mr . Walburn:
Attached is the city's check in payment of the
to the Georgia State Pati--ol.
Sine rely your ,
Mr • Ann Mcs
J:xeeutive Secretary
AM/br
E ncloaure
tatement sent
�so 'S
SOUTHERN
WA
DIVISION
"host of the highways"
3113 MAIN STREET
EAST POINT, GEORGIA 30044
November 10, 1966
Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor
_C ity of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mayor Allen:
Please find enclosed the check that you
forwarded to us for payment of meals consumed in
our restaurant at 735 Washington Street, S.W., by
special Georgia State Patrol detail on September 6
and 7.
We certainly feel that the protection offered
us , and the outstanding performance of this detail
warrants our paying for their meals.
Yours very truly,
ea Supervisor
Atlanta District
JW : awn
Enc .
�HowARD
JOHNSON lNc. OF FLORIDA
1415 BISCAYNE BLVD.
P. 0. BOX 4541
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33101
TELEPHONE FR. 9 -6541
DATE
To-
GEORGIA STATE PATROL
MAJOR R.H. WEAVER
P.O. BOX 1446
ATLANTA, GEORGIA
AMOUNT
PLEASE DETACH AND R E TURN WITH YOUR PAYMENT
DATE
OCT 31 1966
REFERENCE
INVOICE
NUMBER
ACCOUNT
N U MBER
CHARGES
CREDITS
$ ------
BALANCE
BALANCE FORWARD
67.57
-
'
IF THE ABOVE DOES NOT AGREE WITH YOUR RECORDS, KINDLY ADVISE US BY RETURN MAIL.
~OWARDJo1-1 nson'S
PAY LAST AMOUNT
IN THIS COLUMN
�~.tq.-ntrtm.e1·tl: .crf W"uhli.c ~nf.et:g
~:ci1r.cr '!!,Ii.c.ctts.c ~iuisi.o-n
®.cO'l'.ght ~htt.c l ~ittrn1
CO L ONE L H . LOWE LL CONNER
DIRECTOR
'tJilur.c,ttt llf ~tt1r£.s-tigmilllt
tJllux 145 6
J\thtttht 1,1'.!o.c.trrght
~11,rt
LT . C O L. E . B . HARB! N
DEPUTY DIRECTOR
(@ffi,~
Ilovember 14, 1966
dayor Ivan Allen
City Hall
At l anta , GeorP,ia
Dear ~ayor Allen:
In compli ance with your telephone request this date, we are
enclosing the Howard Johnson bill that was incurred by embers
of this Depart~ent dur ing the Vine City i ncident in September .
If we can be of service at any time, please let us know .
With warm r ers ona.l regards and best wishes , I am
Sincerel y ,
~~E. B. HAR IN
Lieutenant-Colonel - Deputy Di rector


cmr: ee


encl ,
�-
November 14. 1966
Colonel Lowell Conner
Director of State Patrol
959 Confederate Av nue , S . E .
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Lowell:
I would lik to thank you gain for all you did to
assi t the City during the disturbance the firet
pa.rt of September .
It i mo t gr Ufying to me to know I had your
cmnplet cooperation and s1.1pport. I wmud be
most grateful if you ould .xpi-e
my pprec~
toy
fine m n.
Sine r ly your ,•
Iv n All n, Jr.
Mayor
lAJr/br
·
�r
October 25, 1966
Mr . Kiliaen Townsend
120 North Avenue, N. W.
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Kiliaen:
We are enclosing City of Atlanta chec k in the
amount of $67. 59 covering meal f urni bed th
special detail of th G orgia State Patrol on
September 6th and 7th.
We certainly app;reciati, your a sistance and are
particularly grateful for your not billing us for
the room u ed by the Stat Patrol.
With kinde t personal regard , I am
Sincerely,
Ivan Allen, Jr.
M yor
IAJr:lp
Enclo ure
�LILLER
NEAL
ATLANTA
&
BATTLE
RICHMOND
TAMPA
LINDSEY
NEW
IN"C
YORK
1 371 PEACHTREE STREET NE
ATLANTA, GEORGIA
30309
October 17, 1966
Mr. Ivan Allen
Mayor of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mr. Mayor:
I've been meaning to write you for several weeks to express my
pride and that of my family and associates in the job you are
doing as mayor.
Your physical courage during the recent racial problems, and
your political courage at the time of the election returns
have strengthened more than ever our support of you and the job
you are doing.
The months ahead conceivably could be difficult for those who see
Georgia in terms of the future rather than the past. Nevertheless,
please be assured that there are still many of us who feel as you
do and welcome the chance to be of whatever services we may be to
aid you in assuring an even brighter future for Atlanta.
With best personal regards.
REH : dp
MEM
B
E
R
AME
RI
CAN
A SSOC
IATI
ON
OF
A DVE
R
T
IS
I
NG
AGENC
I
ES
�October Zl, 1966
Mies Chri ty Saunders
7 315 J:!oyer Stre t
Philadelphia, Pe:rmyylvania 19ll9
De r Mi
Saunder :
I c rtainly ppr ciate your letter of Octo :r 18th
and your gener :U comment about the article
in the New Yor Tim s mag zine.
Ther is no 011 who would like to h ve th an
r ·
to yowt que tion bett r than I . I can only e y th t
harmony com froDl under tanding, and understanding
comes from le ming.
Sincerely yours,
Ivan All n, Jr.
IAJ'r:am
�Oc tober 19, 1966
Reverend B . M . Weave r
First Baptist Church
of Chattahoochee
1950 Bolt o Road, N. W .
Atlanta, Georgia. 30318
Dear Reve end Weaver:
May I express my humble appreciation for the
letter from the First Baptist Church of
Chattahoochee .regarding the City' position
during the recent racial di turbance .
lt i through supp0,rt uch a . your that Wi haV'
courage to eontinue our efforts ia what we ow
i
right.
With ppreciation, 1 am
Sincer ly your ,
Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor
lAJr/br
�Jfrirst ~aptizt @qurtq
OF CHATTAHOOCHEE
1950 BOLTON ROAD, N. W.
CHURCH , Sy 4-4922
HOME,
SY 9-1213
ATLANTA, GEORGIA
30318
October 14, 1966
The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mayor Allen:
Our church wishes to express thanks and appreciation for
your courageous and wise leadership during our recent
racial disturbances.
we· want you to know of our interest and prayers as you
continue to give the kind of leadership that will rid
our City of prejudice, hate and violence. We want our
City to be characterized by understanding, love and
good-will.
May you know wisdom that comes from above as you guide
our City.
Sincerely yours,
First Baptist Church of Chattahoochee
B. M. Weaver, Pastor
BMW :SE
Seeking To Know Christ And To Make Him Known
B . M. WEAVER
PASTOR
�PRESS STATEMENT
VINE CITY COUNCIL
560 Magnolia S t reet
Atlanta, Georgia
October 11, 1966
We, the members of ~ the Vine City Council are outraged
at the shocking and inhuman treatment of the 10 y oung peopl e
b e ing h e l d in the Atlanta Stockade.
The se p e opl e have b e en h e ld sinc e August 18, 1966 on
charges rangin g from d is ord e rly conduct to Insurr e ction.
Their arrests came as a r e sult of their participation in an
anti -war demonstration at the Army Induction Ce nte r.
On the 16th of Septemb e r, Att. Howard Moor e filed an
app e al in the Fulton County Sup e rior Court and on the 21st
of S e ptemb e r, App eal Bond was p o st e d for the 10. Jud ge T .C.
Littl e h a s r e fus e d to si g n the r e l eas e p a p e rs f or the 10
young p e opl e .
We f e el tha t this is a n outrage and a deni a l
p e opl e 's constituional ri ght to APPEAL.
of thes e
We a r e a lso outrage d t h a t t he Atlanta St oc k a d e af t er t he
passage of the 196~- an d 1965 Civil Ri ghts Bills is st :i ll
racially s egregat e d.
We ar e furth e r outr age d by t he i ~huma ~ tr e atmen t o~ t h e se
yo u ng p e opl e by gu a r d s and off icl a s at t he Atl ant a Stoc k ade be caus e of t h e ir politic a l be l ief s , and be c a us e t hey a r e Bl ack .
We DEMAND the imme di a t e r e l e as e of the s e 1 0 y oung p eopl e
on Bond!
We fee l tha t it is ir on ic tha t Bl a ck me n who a r e s o
r ig i dly s e gr e ga t ed a nd d e ni e d t h e ir constituti onal ri ghts
h e r e at 11 h ome " a r e exp e c t e d t o f i ght in t he Jungl e s of
Vi e t Nam , a ll t o pre s e rv e t h e Le s t e r Mad d ox
At l an t a ( Ame rican )
sty l e of s egr egation.
Si g ned ,
The Vin e Ci t y Cou ncil
�October 26, 1966
Mr . A . O . Coc:h~an
Justice Court of Fulton County
1332nd G . M . District
Z856 Church Street
East Point, Georgia
Deal' Mr . Cochran:
I arn most grateful for the Resolution passed by the
Georgia Association of Justices of the Peace and
Constables, Inc.
It is most gratifying to have your support and 1 wish
to ssure you that my efforts will be dedicated to
the continuance of a peaceful life for all ouT people.
Sincerely yours,
Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor
lAJr/br
�,
0FFI CE
STATE OF GEORGIA
RESID ENCE
767-8244
761-6367
Justitt- G!nurt of ltulton County
1332nd G.M. DISTR ICT
1332nd G.M. DISTRICT
285.s CH URCH ST. - EAST POINT, GA.
A. O. "ANDY" COCHRAN
~ge
October 25, 1966
The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor, City of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear
Sir:
We feel highly honored to have been asked to pass on to you
the enclosed resolution adopted by The Georgia Associati on of
Justices of the Peace and Constables, Inc. at their meet ing
recently.
Respectfully yours,
AOC :LAS
Enc.
~
IA.. 0. Cochran
�JO HN C . BAKER
200 EAST 66 !'C,-STREET
October 11, 1966
NEW YORK,N E W YORK 10021
The Honorable Ivan Allen
Mayor of Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Ivan :
Just a brief and belated note of most
sincere congratulations. Your handling of the tough
situation you fa ced some weeks ago warmed the hearts
of everyone who sympathize : with you in your present
problems . Your courageous, dispassionate and firm
stand was admired by everyone .
I look forward to seeing you soon.
Cor · ally yours,
· C.,~ Baker
�t
October 7 • 1966
Mr. B . F . Buttl'ey
Vice President
Dobbs House
Atlanta Airport
Atlanta, Georgia
D ar Bill:
We have alway considered the people of the
Dobbs House our good friends. but we are
now more grateful bee use of your generou
as istanc during th recent disturbance when
you provided coffe for our police per onnel.
Many. many thanks.
Sincerely,
Iv
IAJr:am
All
, Jr.
�Crown Cork & Seal Company, Inc.
Atlanta, Georgia 30315
OFFICE OF THE VICE PRESIOENT
October 11, 1966
The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor, City of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mr. Mayor:
I have no idea how many crank letters you receive, or how
many people attempt to tell you how the Mayor's office
could be run more effectively.
This is not one of those letters . As a resident and an
enthusiastic supporter of everything that is good for
Atlanta and Georgia, I want to commend you for your forthright and courageous position in the current political
quagmire.
Your leadership in dealing with the problems existing in
the Fire Department further d emonstrated to me that the
offices of the Mayor were in very sound hands.
As I sat, comfortable and secure, watching you on television
being violently shaken from the rooftop of the automobile in
the recent civil rights demonstrations, I couldn't help but
wonder how many of your critics would have the " guts" as
Mayor, to go directly into the fray in an effort to use the
power of your office to restore logic and order to the city.
I only hope that a situation of this kind making demands
on your bravery may never recur.
sincere respect and appreciation for the good job you
are doing as the Mayor of Atlanta.
My
Sincere ly,
EPS : mb
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�THE TRUTH
At approximately 1:15 PM Tuesday, September 6, 1966 in Atlanta, Ga. two white cops shot a young
25 year old Negro several times in the back as he was running -to his home ¾ blocks away. The
cops were supposed to have had a warrant for his arrest.
A crowd of some 200 Black people gathered outside the home of Harold Prather, the 25 year old
Black man who had been shot. They were angry because a white cop had shot their friend. THERE
WERE NO SNCC PEOPLE PRESENT.
WOULDN'T YOU BE MAD IF A WHITE COP HAD UNJUSTLY SHOT YOUR FRI END OR YOUR NEIGHBOR?
The 1,000 ·1ocal people demanded that the white cop who had shot their friend be dismissed from
the force. The mayor refused to listen.
He brought with him 300 white policemen armed with submachine guns, teargas, shotguns and
pistols".1H.EY1IROUGllT ALL-OF ~THfS TO SEND UNARMED BLACK PEOPLE HOME.
The local people didn't like all the white cops coming into their neighborhood with all that hardware.
Wquldn't you be mad if 300 white cops came into your neighborhood and beat you?
THE WHITE COPS PU~HED AND BEAT BLACK WOMEN. THE WHITE COPS THREW TEAR GAS (IT BURNS
YOUR EYES AND SKIN) IN THE EYES OF 6 AND 7 YEAR OLD CHILDREN.
THE WHITE COPS SHOT AT BLACK PEOPLE. THE BLACK PEOPLE HAD NO GUNS TO DEFEND THEMSELVES, SO THEY THREW BRICKS AND BOTTLES.
WHAT WOULD YOU DO IF YOUR WOMEN AND CHILDREN WERE BEING BEATEN?
SNCC STOOD UP FOR YOU. WILL YOU NOW STAND UP FOR SNCC?
BLACK PEOPLE ARE NOW IN JAIL. THEY NEED YOUR HELP. THEY NEED $20,000 FOR BONDS.
$20,000 IS NEEDED TO GET PEOPLE OUT OF JAIL IN ATLANTA WHAT CAN YOU DO?
1. SEND A DOLLAR FOR FREEDOM NOW!
2. SEND PROTEST TELEGRAMS TO 1) MAYOR IVAN ALLEN-ATLANTA, GA.
2) CHIEF OF POLICE HERBERT JENKINS
................ -------------------,
I wpuld like to contribute to the SNCC Defense Fund.
I
want to pledge $ _ _ _ _ __
Name _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Address _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Make checks payable to SNCC Defense Fund
107 Rhode Island Avenue, N.W.
387-7445
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I.
Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee
107 Rhode Island Avenue, N. W.
387-7445
�ST_OKELY _CARMICHAEL
JAILED IN ATLANTA, GA.!
.
WHIT,E RACISTS ARE TRYING TO FRAME ·SNCC AGAIN

STOKELY CARMICHAEL, CHAIRMAN OF THE STUDENT NONVIOLENT COORDINATIN°G COMMITTEE WAS
ARRESTED FOR SAYING l°HINGS A LOT OF US BLACK PEOPLE FEEL AND WANT TO SAY, things we are
afra_id to say because we know white people are always listening. Sto°kely Carmichael has been
talking to his Black Brothers all over the nation, in Watts, Harlem, Chicago, Philadelphia, and
Washington, D. C.
Here are some of.the things he has been saying:
"Black power means organizing to fight fear and the development of "B lack consciousness," selfrespect, pride in the history of Black people, our culture and ou r in stitutions.
"If you work real hard, if you sweat, if you are ambitious, then you will be successful. I'm here to
tell you that if that was true, Black people would own this country, because we sweat more than
anybody else in this country.
"They oppress us because we are Black and we are going to use that Blackness to get out of the
trick bag they put us in. Don 't be ashamed of your color.
"We have to talk about nonviolence among us, so that we don't cut each other on Friday nights and
don't destroy each other but move to a point where we appreciate and love each other. That's the
nonviolence that has to be talked about. The psychology the man has used on us has turned us
against each other. He says nothing about the cut-ting that goes on Friday night but talk about
raising one finger-tip towards him and that's when he jumps up. We have to talk about nonviofence
among us first.
,"We don't have to be ashamed of James Brown; we don't have to wait for the Beatles to legitimize
our culture.
"We've been worrying too long about what white people are saying and thinkin g. Black power
doesn't mean that we are anti-white, it means that we are too busy tending to our real work,
organizing poor black people, to worry about white people.
"Black power is a search for a sense of home, for something we can call our own."
BLACK POWER
(PLEASE TURN OVER)
~.:.~
�•
116 Oa k Str,.,~t
ummervill e , Geor gi a
Sept ember 28 , l 9 66
Mayor Iva n All en
City Ha ll
tl.i.nta , Geor gi .
ea r 1fa yor All en:
I , A t ea cher with sev ente en ye rs ' exp eri en c e , would
li ke to congra tul a te you on your pa rt in tryin g to solve th e
riot s in Atl ~nt a .
In my opini on , the arr est i ng of Ca r mi chael
is the most con s truc t ive effort to stop rio ting t hat any city
h .3 made .
i ty.
Peop l e do not riot and plund r i n the i r own i den t-
Un l ess they . re caught in the mob spirit, th ey will not
l oot and plunder a s a mob do es .
To arrest the p er3on who
i ncites oth er5 t o lo se th eir identity and be c ~u ght i n t he
mob spirit 5eems to be a re as ona ble method in curbin g ~uch
a ctions.
Ju s tice s u ffered a severe blo w when th e charge
against Ca rmichael was le ssened .
Yours truly,
~
0---
~
Mrs. Wa lter Rich
I
�D . 0. Form No. 48 (Rev. 2·1iT> ·
CIVIL SUBPOENA TO PRODUCE DOCUMENT OR OBJECT
lltuiteh ~fates ilistrirl Qtnurt
FOR THE
NORTHEH
1 .....
••· -, _
GE0RG~.A
CIVIL ACTION FILE
N o ..............
STOKELY CARMI CHAEL , et al.,
Pla i ntiffs,
vs.
10421
No.
IVAN ALLEN, J R. , et al.,
Defendan t s.
To
HON . IVAN ALLEN , J R.
MAYOR, CI TY OF ATLANTA
CI TY HALL
ATLANTA, GEORG IA 30303
YOU ARE HEREBY COMMANDED to appear in the United States District Court for the
Northern
District of
Georgia
Room 318
on
at Old Post Offic e Bl dg .
in the city of Atlanta
o'clock
P • M . to
t he 29th
day of
September,
19 66
at 2 :00
testify on behalf of p 1 a inti ff s
any and all statements, speeches, memoranda , orders, directions , and other writt en reports or documents in your
pos se ssion or under yo~r . co~t:ol, or issued _at your order, relating in any
manner to the alleg ed riot in the Summerhill Section of Atlanta Georgi a
on Septemb er 6, 1966 .
'
'
intheaboveentitled actionandbring with you
Se pt emb e r 28,
66
..............................······, 19.........
~
or ·
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·
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st . ..,... w•..
Claude L. Goza Clerk
··············i=·
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By............. ..
8 59½...Hun te r ..
N •.
A ddress
Atl R.nt a, Georgi a
Deputy Clerk.
RETURN ON SERVICE
Received this subpoena at
and on
served it on the wit hin named
by delivering a copy t o h
and t endering to h
allowed by law.'
By..........·········..................................................•...••
................$
Subscribed and sworn to before me, a
day of
the fee for one day's attendance and the mileage
............................................................................,
Dated:
············ .·······················• 19........
Service Fees
Travel ................$
Services ................
Total
on
at
this
, 19
Ji'ees and milenge need not be tendered to the witness upon service of a subpoena leeued in behalf of the United States or an officer or
agency thereof.
28 USC 1826.
1
NOTE.-Affldavit required only if service ls made by a person other than a Unlt,ed States Mar&hal or his deruty,
�September 28, 1966
Mr . Edward D. Smith
The First National Bank of Atlanta
Post Office Box 4148
Atlanta, Georgia 30302
· Dear Ed:
I am most grateful for your letter of September
26th telling me of the many favorable· conunents
which you heard in New York.
I am most grateful for the support received for
our .s ta.nd in Atlanta.
Sincerely yours,
· Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor
IAJr/br
�THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF ATLANTA
POST OFFICE BO X
4148
ATLANTA , GEORGIA
30302
September 26, 1966
EDWARD
D.
SMITH
PRESIDENT
Dear Ivan:
I have just returned to Atlanta from a week in New
York City. I was up there to attend the 50th Anniversary
World Convocation of the National Industrial Conference
Board. This meeting was attended by officials of a great
many of the major corporations of the country, some of
whom I have gotten to know fairly well through the other
activities of the Conference Board.
I can't tell you how many people came up to me
and told me what a fine job they thoughtAtlanta had done
in the face of the difficulties created by Stokely Carmichael
and his "Snick" associates. Most of these men knew you
by name, a nd many of them knew you as "Ivan Allen, 11 not
just "Mayor Alle n. 11 You would have been g ratified if you
had h eard what the se m e n had to s a y a bout you and what
they felt you had contributed to Atlanta and our city's
posture in the country.
The Hono rabl e Iv an Allen, Jr.
Mayor of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
�September 28, 1966
Mrs . G . F. Andrews
767 Collrtenay Drive, N. E .
Atlanta, G e orgia 30306
Dear Mrs . Andrews :
I a.m most grateful for your letter of September
27th and the clipping from the Daily Enterprise
in Riverside·, California.
I appreciate your support of our position in
Atlanta.
Sincerely yours,
Ivan Allen, Jro
Mayor
IAJr/br
�CP DIVISION
PAPER COMPANY
471 Glen Iris Dr ., N. E., Atlanta, Georg ia 30308 Tel. 524-2681 (404)
At l anta , Ga o
Sept ember 27 , 1966 .
Hon . I van Al len, Jr.
Mayor,
Ci ty of Atl anta,
City Hall,
At lanta, Ga o
De ar S ir:
I am t aking t h e liberty of a t taching an item shown in the
Daily Enterprise, Rivers ide , Cal iforni a 9/20/66 , thi s
art i cle havi ng been s ent t o me by my cou sin Roy Butler of
De sert Hot Springs, Cal i forn i a .
Mr. But ler i s h imself a f ormer Atl ant a boy and i s very
under s t andab ly proud of our gre at c i ty and i ts Mayor.
I t may be someone else h as s ent you t hi s article, however,
it was so good the wr i ter did not want you to miss it.
May the wri t er also add than she i s also proud of our
great city and its very courage ous Mayor o
Yours very truly
-n i/v.v
0. :;, wv~ ~
Mrs . Go F Andrews


767 Courtenay Dr . NoE.,


Atlanta, Ga . 30306
0
GFA/s
�September 26, 1966
Mr. R. L . Galloway
1557 Fama Drive, N . E .
Atlanta, Georgia 30329
Dear Mr. Galloway:
I am most grateful for your kind letter of
September 24th and wish to thank you for
your very generous comments .
Sincerely you.rs,
lvan Allen, Jr.
Mayor
IAJ'r/br
�'
Sept. 24, 1966
Hon. Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor
City Hall
Atlanta, Ga.
Dear Mr. Mayor:
Many letters IllllSt surely have come to you
since the recent explosion of unrest in this great city.
Most of them Illllst have been complimentary. People respect
courage.
Churchill said, "Never before have so many
owed so Illllch to so few. 11
He was speaking of the entire
Royal Air Force!
I think Atlanta can say, "Seldom have so
many owed so much to just one man. 11
Having had the privilege of growing up with
you during a part of your earlier years, I am not surprised-but I am, indeed, grateful to you!
• J. Galloway
1557 Fama Dr • .,
Atlanta, Ga.
�Tulsa, Oklahoma
September 19, 1966
Honorable Ivan Allen
Atlanta, Georgia
De£r Mayor Allen;
With all the criticism being levelled and all the news media play
being given to your recent racial situation, I would like to take
this means of expressing my approval (for what little it is worth)
of the manner you and your city have handled yourselves.
Presently living in Oklahoma, moving there from 4 years in Alabama
proir to which I lived for 3 years in Chicago, I have a relatively
objective -viewpoint regarding the racial issue geosraphically
speaking. I have no .feelings one way ot the other regarding colors
or races as such.
However, I have learned to harbor very strong feelings with regard
to rights v. s. responsibilities and so have very little regard for
those groups, regardless of color, who would prefer to demonstrate
and protest, rather than work for their objectives. While I feel
there many people who symphatize with this view, I certainly had not
seen it exemplified by many of our public office holders and political
aspirants. For the most part they had capitulated to whatever radical
demands that came along and actually allowed . themselves be "shook down"
or blackmailed into giving in to demands just to quie~ the noise and
minimize any political repurcussions. It was then, especially refreshing
to see you exercise restraint while giving the radical elements a
chance to quiet the waters on their own initiative, r efusing to talk
until the waters were quieted, and then taking firm action when it
was proper and driving home the fact that your city was above all else
a city of law and order.
I'm sure that the great majority of the citizens of Atlanta admired
and respected your course of action. My only purpose in writing this
letter is to let you know that there~ome of us in other sections of
the U. s. who do too. When we have enough men of conviction in all the
various public offices, rights and responsibilities will come in the
same package and earned, not rioted for.
Sinc~rely You5\//
~
- ~· t;/Y.;1-~~
t - - - : : i""'"'-.u.u.
G. Vancil
(_
��September 21, 1966
Mr. George Page
Corre.spondent - Saigcm Bureau
NBC News
P . O . Box N 7
Saigon, Viet Nam
Dear George:
l certainly was thrilled to hear from you and did
not realize that you had been shipped ou.t to the
Saigon Bureau. l know this must be very
timulating
signment and wish you God Speed
to return afely.
I am most grateful for your comments about. the
manner in which the racial disturbance were
handled in Atlanta. Now that things are all quiet,
we can look back in retro pect and
e where our
efforts of the past aved us !ram what (:O\ll.d have
been
terrible situation.
Taki care of yourself and let u
whereabou •
know of your
Sincerely yours,
Ivan AUen, Jr.
Mayor
lAJr/ r
�NBC NEWS
A DIVISION OF NATIO NAL BRO A DCASTIN G COM PA NY , INC.
104 - /06
SAIG ON
MA.IL:
OABLE:
NGUYEN
HUE , SAIGON,
VIETNAM,
TEL. 2 /06~
BUR EAU
P.O .
BOX
N
7
NATBROOaS T
SAIGON
Septe mber 15 , 1966
Mayor Ivan All en
City Hall
Atl ant a, Ge or gia
USA
Dear Mr. Mayor:
- •,
I have been d" stre s c ed to h e ar abou t Atl anta's racia l dis orders.
I had hoped Atl anta would be spared such hool i ganism in vie w of
the city ' s s ensibl e and progres s ive approa ch to t he race problem.
However, when it did hap pen, no one could have asked f or more
direct and courageous le adership than yours.
I am sure most Atlant ans, i ncluding us "expatr i ates, " are very
proud of you.
Warm regards,
ta<M~~P~~
George Page,
Correspondent
SAIGON BUREAU
GP/suu
�September 21, 1966
Mr . J . Willard Marriott
MARRIOTT
5161 River Road
Washington, D . C.
20016
Dear Bill:
Thank you very much for the editorial from
the Washington Star . I believe everything is
in good order in Atlanta and we are working
hard to keep it that way.
Looking forward to seeing you when you cmne
to Atlanta, I am
Sincerely yours,
Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor
lAJr/br
�September 21, 1966
M r . Robert Ward
318 Lindbergh Drive. N . E.
Atlanta. Georgia
Dear Mr. Ward :
I appreciate your kind letter of September 19th,
. but you have asked me some questions which I
cannot answer, as I do not know the motivations
which create compasion and sympathy in people.
The $10, 000 reward was offered by public spirited
citizens who wanted to express their sympathy and
und rstanding. This is of a personal nature to
those individuals who came forward and specified
th reward.
It i a great personal sorrow to m when any citizen
of Atlanta is injured or is caused to lose bis life.
Sincerely your ,
Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor
IAJr:am
�September 19, 1966
Mayor Ivan Allen
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
30303
Dear Mayor Allen:
After reading the article in the Atlanta Journal on
Tuesday, September 13 concerning the policeman who was shot
in the disturbance on Boulevard while attempting to help the
two colored boys who had been wounded, I would appreciate the
answer to a few questions that confront us all.
Why was it seven days after the disturbance before the
public was given the details of what happened to the officer?
I am one hundred per cent for the reward of $10,000
that has been offered for the apprehension of the ones guilty
of the murder of the young colored boy. This · is just and is
as it should be. This was one of the worst crimes ever committed
in our city. But why was there not a reward offered for the
capture of the person or persons who wounded the policeman, and
why was there no reward for the ones who injured the newspaper
reporter, or the soldier who was critically hurt by a flying
brick while traveling down Ponce de Leon on his way home on
furlow?
My father Henry A. Ward owned a small store at 208 Georgia
Avenue directly across from Cheney Stadium. A few years ago he
was murdered in cold blood at high noon on a clear sunny day while
trying to earn an honest, meager, living. He was bludgeoned over
the head by a robber in his store and the murderer was never even
close to being apprehended.
My question is this: Why was there no reward for this
awful crime? If a reward had been offered maybe a few tongues
in that neighborhood would have been loosened. My family never
received even a letter of regret from the President of the United
States, the Mayor's Office or any word on the lack of progress
from Chief Jenkins' office. This does not seem consistent with
the way othe r families have been treated in our city, or did my
family just happen not to belong to a minority group?
�Mayor Ivan Allen
September 19, 1966
Page 2
I want to say Mr. Mayor that I admire your courage in
dealing with the riots that have hit our city in recent weeks.
Eve:r:y law-abiding citizen in our city should thank you for
standing for what we all believe and trust as the democratic
way of life.
In closing, I would only say that as far as protection
by the law is concerned it seems to me that we definitely lean
toward a double standard. I hope this is not true in the majority
of cases but has happened only in my experience. My sincere
thanks for your time.
Sincerely,
Robert Ward
318 Lindbergh Drive, N. E.
Atlanta, Georgia 30305
CC:
Chief Herbert T. Jenkins
�C ITY O F A TLA NTA
OFFiCE OF CITY COMPTROLLER
ATLANTA 3, GEORGIA
September 7, 1966
TO:
Mrs. Ann Moses
FROM:
Howard Ro Green
SUBJECT:
The following members of the Co Ho Mo C. worked Tuesday night
and Wednesday morning at the Stadium:
~
~~
,.,.----j'-e rry Kerlin - l J~
Crick ~
ius Waters - u)oLi,,,~
l Slider - ~
~ - T ~ r - u},di:r~ Cheek
~
~ l y Hester wct.4,
L ~ Bradley ~
-~
Waits
Cu~
~~ r Hendrix - -~
~~ . Haynes uJa,,/iA-j _M Mo Thomas
-~
~ 1 1 Campbell lJa,5,..- ..-rnrrr Gaines
~
.
~ k Jackson
~
--@_h Crawford
~
t-&vaughn - ~~ ~
e Timbert - ~
- K Lo Dean . - ~ ~
d McClelland d;(c..-.....q7
~
Smith - ~ i..-errlton McAlvin ~ /
~ R. Green- ~
�CITY OF ATLANTA
OFFiCE OF CITY COMPTROLLER
ATLANTA 3, GEORGIA
8 September 1966
TO:
Mrs. Ann Moses
FROM:
Howard R. Green
SUBJECT:
Please include the following names on the list of City Hall
Men's Club members who worked at the Stadium in connection
with the riot incident:
2:, 0 \
/~ d ( etCe!.
\*L• .Callaway ~
pY
T
H. E. Barnett - Wcv\VL-
l}J<"A.
Hardwick
W~
These men attended the food concession all night Wednesday
night and until 9:00 A.M. this morning.
Sinc e there apparentl y is no further need for this service,
we will not send any additional volunteers to the area.
You are certainly to be commended for your devoted assistance
during the entire incident and I am sure that everyone, and
especially Mayor Allen, is most appreciative.
HRG/rf
�Septe mber 15, 1966
Mr . Lloyd W . Taggart
Box 560
Cody , W yoming
Dear Lloyd:
How thoughtful of you to write me such a nice
note, and particularly when my feelings needed
all the support I could get.
Frankly, we got by without any major problems
in Atlanta, and have had excellent support of 98%
of the Negc,o leadership in the city. l think we have
now ended Mr . Carmichael forever.
I sincerely hope that Mr . Woodruff will give me an
opportunity to come back to Cody some day, and
with best wishes , I am
Sincerely,
Ivan Allen, Jr.
IAJr:am
�80
BUTLER
ATLANTA,
STREET,
GEORGIA
S.
J . W. PINKSTON . JR.
E.
S U P E R I N T E N D E N T
ROBERT E . SLEIGH T
3 0 3 0 3
ASST .
SUPERINTEND E NT
WILLIAM L . SHEPHERD
ASS T .
SUPERINTENDENT
FRED M. WALKER
C
O
N
S
U
L
Sept mber 12, 1966
Willi m Funer 1 Home
Tue r . G •
D
r Sir :
During the night of S ptemb r 6th when w
d n m rgency
it . _
t iou in our city, we c ll d on you to provl
n
to atand by t th Atlan St dium in the ev nt th .t o
would
b required . Your pond d immedl t ly to th c;;
of our
nl ht Adminiatr tor,
r . Horac B rden, t 7:00 P . • nd
rem i d r ft r midnight.
e r gr tetul to you for providing thi
community.
poci 1
rvic
Very truly yours,~
C)r-(_,6cl--J . W. Pinkston, J"t.
p rln


mk


c:
Vllo orable Ivan All n
C l ! H r rt J nkin•
Mr .
ar J . F rio
d nt
to our
T
A
N
T
�J. W . PINKSTON . JR .
80
BUTLER
AT LA N TA,
STREET,
G E O R G_I A
S.
E.
SUPERINTENDENT
ROBERT E. SLEIGHT
3 0 3 0 3
ASST.
SUPERINTENDENT
WILLIAM L. SHEPHERD
ASST .
SUPERINTENDENT
FRED M . WALKER
C
O
N
S
U
September lZ, 1966
Cox Bi-others Funeral Home
380 Auburn Avenue, N. E .
Atlanta, Ga.
Dear Sirs:
Duri_n g the night of Sept mbe;r 6th when we had an emergency
situation in our city, we called on you to provid an . mbulance
to stand by .t the Atlanta Stadium in the ev nt that on would
b r quired o You responded immediately to the call of our
night Admini tr tor, Mr . Horace B earden, at 7 :00 P . M . and
remained lar after midnight .
We r e gr _t ful to you for providing thi
community.
cial service to our
cp~~Y
=•i
J. W. Pink ton, J-r.
Superint ·ndent


mk


cc; Ylionor ble Iv n AU n
Chief H rbert J nkin
Mr. dgar J. Forio
L
T
A
N
T
�80
BUTLER
ATLANTA ,
STREET,
GEO ·RGIA
S.
J . W. PINKSTON . JR .
E.
5 U P E R I N T E N D E N T
ROBERT E . SLE I G H T
3 0 3 0 3
ASST .
SUPERINTENDE N T
WILLIAM L. SHEPH E RD
ASST.
SU PE RINTEND E NT
FRED M . WALKER
C
O
N
S
U
L
September lZ, 1966
Paul T . D onehoo Funer l Home
7 36 N. Central Avenue
Hapeville, Ga.
Dear Sir : .
During the night of Septemb r 6th when we had an emergency
situation i n our city, we called on you to provid a n amb ulance
t o tand by at th A~lanta Stadium in the event th tone would
b i-equired. You re ponded immediat l y to the c 11 of our
night Admini t:rator, Mr. Hor ce B arden, at 7: 00 P . M. nd
remain d f r fte r m i dnight.
W
r gr teful to you for providing thi s special ervice to our
community.
Vory truly yours,~
9!~ eY)
J . W. Pink t on, lr.
Superintendent


mk


cc: ,Y'Honor ble I v n All n
Chief Her-bert J nkin
Mr. Ed r J. orio
T
A
N
T
�80
BUTLER
ATLANTA,
STREET,
GEORGIA
S.
J. W. PINKSTON . JR .
E.
SUPERINTENDENT
ROBERT E. SLEIGH T
3 0 3 O3
ASST .
SUPERINTENDENT
WILLIAM L . SHEPHERD
ASST .
SUPERINTENDENT
FRED M. WALKER
C
O
N
S
U
L
T
Septemb r 12, 1966
Alfon o D w son Funeral Home
3000 Gordon Ro d , s. W.
Atlanta, G •
D ar Si r :
During the ni ght of September 6th when we had an m ergency
situation in our city, we c 11 d on you to provid an am.bul nee
to tand by a t the Atlanta St dhun in the ev nt tha.t one would
be r quired . You rt, pond d immediately to the call of o ur
night Adminiatr tor, Mr. Hor.a c e Bearden, at 7: 00 P~ M . nd
r mained far fter midnight.
W
r grateful to you for providing th i s
our community o
V,,~
peci 1 ervice to
1
truly y~ur ,
- L
&
'
.
J. W. Pink · ton, Jr.
Superint endent


mk


cc: .,,, Honorable Ivan All n
Chief H rbe rt J nkin
Mr . Edgar J. Forlo
A
N
T
�J . W . PINKSTON . JR.
80
BUTLER
ATLANTA,
STREET,
GEORGIA
S.
E.
SUPERINTENDEN T
ROBERT E. SLEIGH T
3 0 3 0 3
ASST .
SUPERINTENDENT
WILLIAM L. SHEPHERD
AS S T .
SUPER I NTE N DEN T
FRED M . WALKER
C
O
N
S
U
L
September 12 0 1966
H. M. Patterson Fwieral Home
1020 Spring Streetc, N . E .
Atlanta., G •
Dear Sir :
. During the night of September 6th when we had an emergency
situation in, our city, we calle d on you to provid an ambulance
to t nd by at the Atlanta Stadium in the event th t one would
be required. You re ponded immediately to th c 11 of o ur
night Admi ni trator, Mr. Hoi- ce Bearden, at 7 :0 0 P . M . and
remained far afte r midnight.
W are grat ful to you for providing t his
our community.
peci l
ervi c
~:
u


~


ur
1
/
J?w.
Pink ton, Jr.
Superintendent


mk


cc: a/Honor ble Ivan All n
Chief Herbert:, nkin
Mr . Edgar J. Forio
to
T
A
N
T
�80
BUTLER
ATLANTA,
STREET,
GEORGIA
S.
J . W . PINKSTON. JR .
E.
SUPERINTENDENT
ROBERT E . SLEIGHT
3 0 3 0 3
ASST .
SUPERINTENDENT
WILLIAM L. SHEPHERD
ASST .
SUPERINTENDENT
FRED M. WALKER
C
O
N
S
U
L
September lZ. 1966
Hine Fun ral Home
1258 B nkhead Avenue, N. W.
Atlanta, G •
Dear Sir :
. During the night of September 6th wh n we had an em rgenc y
ituaUon in our city. we call d on you to provide an ambulance
to tand by at the Atlanta St dium in the event that one would
be requir d . You responded immediat ly to the c 11 ot our
night Admini trator. Mr. Hor ce B eard n , at 7: 00 P . M . and
r m. ined far after midnight.
We are r teful to you for providing this
O\U" community.
peci l servic::e to
Very truly your ,
C):1-
L
~'g(
J . W. Pinkston, Jr.
Superintend nt


mk


<;c: ....-Honor bl Iv n All n
Chief Herb rt J nkin
Mr. Ed r J. Forio
T
A
N
T
�a
80
BUTLER
ATLANTA,
STREET,
GEORGIA
S.
J. W. PINKSTON . JR .
E.
SUPERINTENDENT
ROBERT E . SLEIGH T
3 0 3 0 3
ASST.
SUPERINTENDENT
WILLIAM L . SHEPHERD
ASST .
SUPERINTENDENT
FRED M . WALKER
C
O
N
S
U
L
September 12, 1966
Bi hop
Poe Funeral Home
Fairburn, Ga •
.Dear Sir :
During the night of September 6.th when we had an emerg(mcy
ituation in our city, we called on you to provide an ambul nee
to tand by at th Atlant Stadium in the event that one would
b requir d. You r ponded immediately to th call of our
night Admini tr tor, Mr. Hor ce B eard n , at 7: 00 P . M . nd
remained far fter midnight.
We are grateful to you for providing thi
community.
p ci 1 ervice to
O\U'
91_:y~:; ··</
J. W. Pink ton, Jr.
Superintend nt


mk


cc: v"'Honorable Ivan All n
Cble.f Herb rt J nkin ·
Mr. Eda r J. Forio
T
A
N
T
�September 21, 1966
A Z/ c James R . Darris
AF 14904511
Det. Z, Com Doc AAUS
APO San Francisco 96Z73
Dear Airman Hards :
l am most grateful for your taking the time to write
me your letter of September 17th and I would like to
add that it was most heartwarming to know that our
m.en in Viet Nam. have such a fine insight into our
problems both internationally and locally.
Since you are an Atlantan, I know you will agree with
me' .that the reason we have not had this problem
before is becallS'e of the progress we have ma.de in
Atlanta. I sincerely believe had it .not b en for . n
outsider who cared ·n othing .about the liv and property
of Olll' people, this would have never happened.
I wish you God Speed in coming home s fely.
Sincer ly yours,
Ivan Allen, Jr.
M yor
lA.Tr/br
�CI'I;Y OF A.TLANTA
CITY HALL
ATLANTA, GA. 30303
Tel. 522-4463 Area Code 404
May 12, 1966
IVAN ALLEN, JR., MAYOR
R. EARL LANDERS, Administrative Assistant
MRS. ANN M. MOSES, Executive Secretary
DAN E. SWEAT, JR. , Director of Governmental Liaison
lvlEMORP...NDUM
To:
Mr. Duane Beck, Executive Director, Community
Council of the Atlanta Area , Inc.
lvlr. Karl Bevins, Traffic Engineer
Mr. Henry Bowden, City Attorney
Mr. Charles L. Davis, Comptroller
Mr. Jack Delius, Parks General M~nager
Mr . C. O. Emmerich, Administrator , Economic
Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.
Mr. Collier Gladin, Chief Planner
Mr . Stafford Graydon, Sanitary Engineer
Chief C. H. Hildebrand, Jr., Fire .Chief
Mr . John Hall Jacobs, Library Director
Chief Herbert T. Jenkins, Police Chief
Mr. R. Earl Landers, Administrative Assistant
Mr . Ray Nixon, Chief of Construction
lvlr. M . B. Satterfield, Executive Director, Atlanta
Housing Authority
Mr. Robert Sommerville, Chairman, Citizens Advisory
Commi ttee for Urban Renewal
·
Mr. Dan E . Sweat, Director of Governmental Liaison
M r . Paul W e ir, v · a t e r Depa rtment General Manager
Mr. William Wofford, Building Inspector
From: Iva n A lle n, Jr., Mayor
S u b j ect: Services t o S l wn Areas
Several areas of our cit y cont inu e to d e t e r iorat e in ph ysical condition
and in human blight. These areas generally a r e e n compassed in an
East-West swath through central A tlant a and are within 1 - 3 miles
of City Hall.
Urban Renewal has alleviated some of the worst slum areas nearer
downtown and several UR and Public Housing Projects underway at
�Page Two
May 12, 1966
present will provide some relief for additional citizens.
But theH
past and cur?ent projects have but scratched the surface when
considered in the light of total needs.
Realistically, we. can expect to move only as fast as financial
resources are av$ilable to cope with slum clearance and rehabilitation. With the completion of the Community Improvement Program
study, we hope to have a city-wide priority established and the basis
for adopting a total program and schedule of action in these blighted
neighborhoods •
.Present conditions in many of these neighborhoods are intolerable.
The citizens who have the misfortune of economic failure or lack
of social status and are trapped in this environment must be given
relief at _the earliest moment.
Therefore, and with full awareness of the City's lack of adequate
financial resources, shortage of labor and equipment, and ever
burdensome daily work load, I am request.ing a cooperative and
coordinated attack on the conditions which exist in these slum area s.
In order to test the City's ability to increase and advance services
in these neighborhoods I am directing the Department of Planning to
inunediately prepare a map for each departmental u se listing a
priority of implementation, with initial action i n neighborhoods of
greatest need.
The following actions are minimum r equirements which must be
met by individual departments and/or city .related agencies:
l. Sanitation Department
Trash pick up twice a week.
Garbage pick up twice a week or three times if necessary.
Clean streets once a week.
Remove abandoned automobiles,
Coordinate with EOA to clean up vacant property and the
elimination of hazards to children at play.
2.
Construction Department
Clean out storm drainage.
�Page Three
May 12, 1966
Clean right of way of debris,
Grade and gravel unpaved streets,
Patch paved streets,
Pave streets on petition basis.
3.
Building Inspector
A.
The Building Inspector, according to the policy established
in the Housing Code Compliance Program, will in proposed
Urban Renewal areas:
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
4.
Placard where warranted and seek demolition.
Correct hazards and coordinate with the Health
Department any unsanitary conditions (Example:
water standing in basements).
Reduce overcrowding - Liaison with Housing Authority
for relocation help.
Vacate unfit units.
Clean up premises.
B.
In the remaining areas as designated on the Planning map,
step up housing code enforcement to the greatest extent
possible without deviating from the established policy.
C.
Enforcement of Zoning Ordinance.
Parks Department
A.
Equip and staff a massive recreation program using all
park and school properties and other land secured under
short-term lease. This should be coordinated with EOA
to secure funds and com.munity support.
B.
Maximum development of properly supervised day and
evening social activities and recreational programs
(Example: evening movies and possibly street activities).
C.
Coordinate with Traffic Engineer the possible blocking
off of streets for recreational activities.
�Page Four
May 12, 1966
5.
Police Department
Improve police protection to residents and homes.
An expanded crime prevention program.
Increase traffic speed control efforts.
6.
7.
Fire Department
A.
An expanded fire prevention program.
B.
Investigate the possibilities of street showers for children
using fire hydrants on a weekday basis, weather permitting
coordinate with the Water Department.
Traffic Department
Install speed control signs.
Survey area and provide stepped up street light maintenance
activities.
8.
Planning Department
A.
9.
10.
Inform Planning and Development Committee of Services
to Slum Areas Program in order to begin implementation
of a survey and planning application for the following
areas: Vine City, Blue Heaven, Cooper-Glenn and
Plunkettown.
Law Department
A.
Determine accelerated legal methods of disposing of
junked cars, both on public and private properties.
B.
Determine legal methods of forcing prbperty owners
to clean up their vacant lots.
Library
A.
The bookmobile schedule be increased and expanded in the
affected area .
B.
Branch libraries located within this area be given maximum
support and attention.
�Page Five
M a y 12, 1966
C.
11.
12.
Li~r ;,a ry coordination with such activities as Projects
Uplift and Headstart to promote and enl!;QUr age max imum
use of library facilities,
Atlanta Youth Council
A.
Coordinate the Sur.runer Youth Opportunity Campaign
to p r ovide the max imum number of jobs for y oung
people in private industry and the public agencies.
B.
Coope :::-a t ion with the City Parks and Recreat ion
D e p a:::-tm e nt, E conomic Opportunity Atlanta, Inc.,
and t h e Community Council of the Atlanta Area , I nc .
to monitor and recomme nd adequate playground a n d
r ec re a t ion facilities in the targe t neighborhoods.
M a y o r 's Offic e
A.
Coo r dinate public relations t hrough Citi zens Adviso r y
Committee fo r Urba n R enewal, EOA, and t he C ommunity
Council giving week l y pr o gre ss a n d s t atus . (Bill H owland)
B.
C o o rdi nate acti viti e s of n on -departmental agencies
(EOA , Hous ing A u thority, utility companies , private
grm.i_ ps, Fede r a l and State and County agenci es inv·o lved,
You t h C ounc il , etc . ). (Dan Sweat)
C.
C o o r d i nation of t otal e ffort and City d epartmental
ac t i vi t ie s. (Ea r l Lande r s )
In o r d er fo r maximum d e si r ed results t o be achieved , w e m u s t a ll work
t o geth er , T he A l derm e n re p r esenting t he Ward s affect e d must m onitor
the activities of the i r W a rd , e valuate t h e effe ctiveness of s ervices and
make prompt recommendation s fo r change s o r impr o v e ments.
It is recommended that non-de p artmental age ncies designate a coordinator
who can devote full t i me to t h eir coordinated program.
It is recommended that each depa rtment head appoint a department coordinator
to work directly in this area.
Implementation of this project in initial target neighborhoods will begin immediately.
IAJr:fy
�Septe mbe r 21 , 1966
Mr . B ob Lynn
Extension Area Manager
East Central Neighborhood Center
4 86 Decatur Str eet, S . E .
Atl anta , Georgia
Dear Bob :
When you and the gro up from the Boule vard section were
in m y office one of the p r oblems d i s cussed was traffic on
the residential stre ts in that area .
I am advised by t he Traffic Enginee ring Department of the
City that the City Ordinance now prohi bits tra ctor trailer
trucks from us ing any of the streets which cross Boulevar d
except Ponce de Leon Avenue , N o rth Avenue, For rest
Avenue, Highland Avenue , Irwin S treet and E d gewood
Avenue .
Special Trucks Prohibite d s igns are currently pl ced on
Morgan Street and Wabash A venue . The Traffic Engineering
Department is now -checking the phy ical conditions of the
signs on M o rgan Street and on Waba h Avenue and will
rrange t o install additional s igns on the other east .. we t
l" sidenti 1 streets which cross B e ul v rd in this are.a and ·
from which tractor tr iler are prohibited in the Ordinanc .
As soon a the signs re r pl ced , th Tr ffic Engine ring
Department will advi
th Atl nt Police Dep rtm nt and
I m sur the P olice Dep rtment will t ke appropri te ction.
The Sanitary Department nd the Health Dep rtment re
coop r ting in th rat b iting program which w s on of
the big problems discussed. 1 hope th t th Neighborhood
C nter can take some ction on the eugg stion in my
lett r to George D o dd on S ptember 15.
�September 6, 1966
We are here to protest the latest outrage in a series against
the twelve BBck :{:eople now held captive in the Atlanta Stockade for protesting the dying of Black men in the racist illegal War in Vietnam.
First of all, the twelve were seized illegally by the Atlanta
Police as they demonstrated at the Induction Center in protest
of the dying of Black men in the racist illegal War in Vietnam.
They were subjected to a "KANGAROO Court Trial" under racist
Judge T.C. Little who prejudiced himself by saying that
because he had a son in Vietnam who is fighting to defend
the principles of this country he had to give the protestors
maximum sentences.
Thirdly, Dwight Williams was brutally beaten under the orders
of Captain Redding inside the jail. Part of this beastiality
was witnessed by William's attorney, Attorney Howard Moore.
In .keeping with this country's scheme to emasculate Black men,
the ten men were forced to shave their beards and mustaches.
We know of no law that Black men wearing beards violate.
We protest the holding of Donald Stone and Simuel Shutz in
the County Jail five days after their bond had been paid.
We demand that the five days be cred i ted to their sentences
at the Atlanta Stockade.
On. Sunday August 4, ~e were not permitted to see Robert Moore
and Larry Fox because they were in the hole. Both -1oore and
Fox suffer from Hay Fever. Both had been assigned to work in
a dusty area which would only heighten their hay fever miseries. They asked to be transfered to a less dusty detail.
I nstead, they virere t _hro wn in the hole. This vvas on Thurs day.
Fox, who r efus e s to cooperate with the beastial and unjust
penal system, has been on a hunger strike since incarcera t ion, August 18.
is
The stocka de physician a r a cist bi got who ca nnot deal wit h
Black Men. Therefore if any of the group gets s i ck , t here is
no one to t rea t them.
The group is complet ely isol ated fr om the re st of the prisoners.
We charge t hat this i s a form of political harassement just
as the illegal arre st and sadis t ic beating of one of our
worke r s, Robert weaver.
We also note tha t the City Jail, Atlanta St ocka de, and the
Fulton County Jail are blatantly segregated in spi t e of the
1964 Civil Rig hts Act.
If thes e cond i tions are no t correc ted and we continue to get
reports of cruel beas tial t r eatment of prisoners, then we
will have to re tu rn t o earlie r forms of demonstrations,
including sitting in at the ~ayorts office~
�September 13, 1966
Mr • Alice Nixon
703 Cooper Street, S . - •
Atla ta, Georgi
D ar Mr .• Ni.¥





I appreciat your coming 'by MoD.day morning io
pers
lly dell er the petition to me from the
re ident of the Summerhill nd Mecha.ni.c vill
n ighborhood •
1 think you r
doing · plendid job with yO\.UI'
committee a
l am a king Mr. Dan S eat of
my office to be vallable to di cus the e matt
ith you at any tirn •
ith ppr ciati
, 1 am
Sincer ly yours,
l n Alle , Jr.
M yor
JAJr/br
CC: Mr. Dan Sweat
I
�S ptem· r 16, 1966
c.
.?0037
r . Norton~
D
Both olficially
dp
of t e { -r, impar ·
ber 6, whic
oddR
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ppr d ti
on
f u. •
\lt •
ff_ tty
by t •
m
y
e.
on
aup r jo
fr
Sl c :rely,
tva Alie • Jr.
ay
c.".
a
r
a
ritin •
�September 7, 1966
MEMORANDUM
TO:
R. E. Landers
FROM:
Ann Moses
Dear Earl:
Attached are the two tickets for the food last evening ior the
policemen from the Varsity in the amowit of $296.84. You said
you would get Charles Davis to pay this . I would like to have
_the check in order that I can write a thank•you letter to Frank
Gordy.
So far I still have two more bills coming ·- one from Yohannan's
fior 25 gallons of coffee and some food and the Lowe and Stephens
advertising bill which we will send to Sutherland.
�STATEMENT BY IVAN ALLEN, JR.
MAYOR OF ATLANTA
On Civil Disorder in Atlanta, Tuesday, September 6, 1966
The disorders in the s t mmerhill neighborhood in Southeast
Atlanta last evening were the result of a deliberate attempt by certain members of
the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (Snick) to create an incident of this
very nature.
The spark of violence ignited by a few reckless and irresponsible
./
individuals touched off an explosion of civil disorder that sha:rttered Atlanta's
long record of racial amity.
ly through the coura eous and forceful action of our police
officers was this s
~tgJ,
mefui outbreak co
restored.
Atlanta's o
the explosion w as
damage was
loss of life.
I am not taking from hearsay when I say that every citizen of
Atlanta owes a debt of whole hearted gratitude to our dedicated police officers)
f or I was personally in the thick of the disturbance throughout! thos e fr i ghtful
hours of mob hyste ria .
No one meed make charges to m e about polic e brutality during
this d i sorde r , I saw pl enty of brutality, but it was b e ing us ed a g ain s t the
p o lic e o ffi c er s , not by the m .
F r om wha t I h e a r d with m y o wn ears an d saw with my own eyes
in the center o f thi s m e l ee , I fee l c erta in t hat hdu n d red s of normally good citizens
were inflame d out o f the i r n o rmal sense s .
T hey were victimized by thos e who
$ cc-/t,,f--
�I/
I
to incite violence.
It is a tragedy that a few irresponsible and misdirected youths
have such utter disregard and contempt for their fellow man that they
\ VJ
place the lives and property of innocent citizens in serious jeopardy.
�STATEMENT BY IVAN ALLEN, JR.
THE DISO
VILLE
AREA LAS-
WE CAN BE THANKFUL THERE WERE NO SERIOUS
0~
INJURIES.
SOME 10 POLICE OFFICERS RECEIVED MINOR
INJURIES, MOSTLY AS A RESULT OF TEAR GAS.
ASSESSMENT OF PROPER TY DAMAGE HAS NOT BEEN
(__,,~7)
COMPLETED, BUT IT DOES NOT APPEAR TO BE TOO SEVERE.
FIVE CITY POLICE CARS WERE DAMAGED AS A
RESULT O F BRICKS OR BOTTLES THROWN THR OUGH WINDOWS.
SEVENTY -TWO ARRESTS WERE MADE BY THE POLICE
.f
"',
DEFAR TMENT.
CONDITIONS AT THIS TIME INDICATE THAT THE VIOLENCE
HAS ENDED AND CALM EXISTS THROUGHOUT THE AREA.
THE ATLANTA POLICE DEPARTMENT IS NOW WORKING
TWO TWELVE HOUR SHIFTS UNTIL FURTHER NOTIFICATION
BY CHIEF JENKINS.
ALL OFF - DUTY FIREMEN HAVE BEEN PLACED ON ALERT •
.
,
�PAGE TWO
THE FIREMEN ON DUTY DURING THE NIGHT RESPONDED

PROMPTLY AND EFFICIENTLY TO SEVERAL CALLS IN THE AREA.
I MUST AGAIN COMMEND THE MEMBERS OF THE ATLANTA
POLICE DEPARTMENT FOR THEIR PROMPT RESPONSE AND
HANDLING OF THIS SITUATION.
THE CITIZENS OF ATLANTA,
AND ESPECIALLY THE GOOD CITIZENS OF SUMMERHILLMECHANICSVILLE, CAN BE JUSTLY PROUD OF THEIR POLICE
OFFICERS THIS MORNING.
WE SINCERELY APPRECIATE THE ACTION OF
GOV . CARL SANDERS AND T HE GEORGIA DE P AR TMENT OF
PUBLIC SAFE TY FOR THE BACKUP MEN AND EQUIPMENT
PROVIDED TO US.
�,
'
_ _..
t
O F
A
DEPARTMENT OF LAW
11 14 WIL L IAM -OLIVER BU ILD I NG
Atlan ta , Georgia 30303
ROB E R T S. WI GGINS
MA RT IN MCFARLAND
E DWIN L. STERNE
R ALPH C . JENK I NS
JOHN E, DOUGHER T Y
FE RR I N Y . MATHEWS
CH AR L ES M. L OKEY
TH OMAS F . CHOY CE
September 14, 1966
HE N R Y L. B O W DE N
CIT Y
/
AT TO RNEY
LE WI S R. S LAT O N
A SSI S T A NT CI TY A TTOR NEY
A SSO C I A T E C I TY ATTORN E YS
ROBERT A . HA RR IS
HE NRY M . M UR F F
C L A I MS ,:' T T ORNE VS
Mr. Mills B. Lane, Jr., President
The Citizens and Southern National Bank
P. 0. Box 4899
Atlanta, Georgia
30302
Dear Mills:
You can't imagine how much I appreciate your note
of September 12 and your offer of financial help in the
case of need.
I thoroughly agree with you that this matter of
SNCC and Stokely Carmichael are problems that Atlanta
must meet successfully . We are using every bit of investigative ability that the Atlanta Police Department has in
an effort to obtain evidence
to insure the conviction of
.
Carmichael, and Lewis Slaton, Solicitor General, has assured
us that he will prosecute the casef ilr rously .
'
We shall see what happens .
/
Yours, ,wi hf! ·indest rega rds ,
z
HLB/ l mw
Henry~- Bowden
�September 12, 1966
MEMORANDUM
To: Chief Herbert J nkins
From: R . E rl Lander
Ray Nixon, Chief of th Con truction Dep rtment, will have
tw nty men lerted at all time to uard the inactive fi-re
stations . The
m n ·11 be Pl"epared to wor tw lve-bour
shift Just a the policem n are no working .
H prefer not to submit list bee use of pos ibl chang •
from
y to day. Ho ver. he a ur
u that them n will
be vailabl upon call .
REL :lp
..
~~
CC : Mayor Ivan All n, Jr. /
Chief R y A. Nixon
�r
STATEMEN_T BY MAYOR IVAN
Thursday, Sep mber 8 , 1966
5 :00 P . M .
I have
LLEN, JR .
'rect d Cit y A tto rney Henry Bowden
d Police
Chief He1·bei-t Jenkins to initiate imm-=:diate act ion again t
and all per ons res pons ibl
in South At
nta Tu
They ar
for the di o rders
tlir cted t o u e
t
J"r
v ry facility and 1
b
l
n d the State oi G org~~ nee
d pro ecut to th
tulle t
1 w any per on invol ved in the unl wful ct·
L t th r
bich took pl ce
d y evening.
uthority of the City of Atl nta
to appr bend ,
ny
s ry
xtent 0£ th
tion of thi
incld nt .
no mi und r t nding about our intention
in the apprenh n ion of the
l wbr akera .

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