Box 19, Folder 7, Complete Folder

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Box 19, Folder 7, Complete Folder

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' ·- -
.
STA T EMENT BY:
MA YOR IVAN ALLEN, JR. '
Sunday, September 11, 1966
I promise every citizen of At lanta that the full forces of the City
g overnm.e nt will be used to apprehend and convict the person or persons guilty
of shooting and killing Herbert Vorner and the shooting and wounding of
Roy Wright.
I further promise and pledge that Atlanta will continue without
any lessening of its efforts to elirn.inate racial dis crirnination and provide
full and equal opportunity to all its citizens.
I further pledge that in this city we will enforce the law and demand
orderly and lawful conduct from every person.
After having made these commitments to every Atlanta cifi~en,
and especialLy those who are here today and live in this neighborhood, I would
remind you that Atlanta's efforts which have exceeded the efforts of any other
American city to eliminate racial prejudice and insure the Negro citizen of
equal rights and opportunity, cannot be accomplished or carried out except
under the authority of law and order.
These two are inseparable and neither
can succeed without the other.
With full realization of this, I assure each of you and every other
Atlanta citizen that we will not tolerate racial discrimination, injustice,
lawlessness or disorder.
Neither will w e allow to go unpunished those
responsible for such deplorable and dastardly acts as were perpertrated
las t night.
I am today posting a reward of $10, 000 for infonnation t hat leads
to t he arrest and conviction of the person or person s guilty of the shoot ing
and d e ath of He r bert Vorner and the shooting and wounding or Roy W ri g h t .
�The loyal members of the Atlanta Fire Department are providing
fire protection for the citizens of Atlanta on a round the clock basis.
They
are working greatly extended hours over their normal work week of 60 hours.
Of the 225 men on duty, the added hours has resulted in 40% more manpower.
These men are well-trained and highly skilled, and are dedicated to protecting
the people of Atlanta.
As a result of this increase in manpowei--, beginning Tuesday four
additional fire stations will be put into service on a 24 hours basis.
These four
stations will be activated day by day.
Most of the sorrounding governments have reaffirmed our long
standing Mutual Assistanct Pact of providing firemen and equipment should
an emergency arise.
I am moat grateful for this added help.
In addition; the Atlanta Police Depa.6tment has provided men at
each firehouse to take over many non-firefighting responsibilities; thereby
relieving our skilled men of those routine duties.
In case of an emergency,
other city employees are on a stand-by basis to render clean-up assistance.
l know all people of Atlanta will join me in expre sing appreciation for thi
cooperation.
Beginning Tuesday morning, the P r onnel Dep rtment is
ace lerating its
Department.
th
fforts to recruit people for the vacant positions in th Fire
Inform tion concerning th
e jobs can be obtain d by c lling
P rsonn 1 Dir ctor at 522-4463.
Th . City of
nd I wish to
dally.
ur
tlanta is w 11 protected u.nd · r thi
mergency condition
vety c::iti en that t:hi protection will continue and improve
�The File -Book Section of the Fulton County Tax Commissioners
Office reflects that 360 Nelson Street, S. W. Atlanta, Georgia was as of
Jarnary 26, 1966 owned by W. P. Ballard, Jr., 360 Nelson Street.
It is
described as in Land Lob 84, Land Distric t 14, and measured 50 feet by
151. 5 feet by 51. 8 feet by 136 feet.
The building was sold on February 1,
1966 to the Southern Education and Research Institute, Inc., for a sum of
$65, 000.
This transaction was handled by Mr. Howard Moore.
Prior to this time the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee
to buy
was occupying 360 Nelson Street on a rent-option/basis. In the Corporation
Commissioner's Office of the State of Georgia, the Southern Education Research
Institute, Inc. was issued a charter on Sept ember 7, 1965.
The stated purpose
of the corporation was a non-profit corporation o rganized exclusively for
charatible and educational purpos e s within the relm of Section 50l(C)(3) of
the U. S . Internal Revenue Ser vice Code of 1964.
The p e titione rs to form
were as follo w s:
Howard Moore, Jr.
John Lewis
James For e man
S he ffi Johnson
Faye Bellamny
Horace Julian Bond
Moor e a.vas identified as SNCC attorney and the re s t are all known SNCC members .
�.rr
TE
AYO
i u:rod y , iept.e.mb r


00 P . b: •


.t
hav
lVAI' ALLEN , JR .
, 1966
dii- e
Chl~f :H rb rt Jenkbi• to tnitiate lmnh diate ct.ton
· all per~on
responeibl
•Uth Atl nt
for
y •~ ni
T\.l a
y aro direct d t
ho:rity of th Ci
, di oi-de rs whi.eh to ... k pl c
u
ta
! At.l
v ry facility .uA 1
ec
d th.e
s .-y
appr hen , • rest and p:r eecut to th I. 1 •t e.x:~nt ot th
la
any
ra n in .rolv
L t t
in th wuawfal ere li n of
r
entlon of
eun e.rata dln

la
l'•a
r•.
t
la
cl
ur late tlo •
t.
�STATEMENT BY IVAN ALLEN, JR.
MAYOR OF ATLANTA
On Civil Disorder in Atlanta, Tuesday, September 6, 1966
The disorders in the Summerhill neighborhood in Southeast
Atlanta last evening were the result of a deliberate attempt by certain
members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee {Snick) to
.¢re ate an incident of this very nature.
We can be thankful there were no serious injuries.
Some 10
police officers received minor injuries, mostly as a result of tear gas.
Assessment of property damage has not been completed, but
it does not appear to be too severe.
Five City police cars were damaged as a result of bricks or
bottles thrown through windows.
Seventy-two arrests were made by the Police Department.
Conditions at this time indicate that the violence has ended and
calm exists throughout the area.
The Atlanta Police Department is now working two twelve-hour
shifts until further notification by Chief Jenkins.
All off-duty firemen have been placed on alert.
The firemen on duty during the night responde d promptly a nd
efficiently to several calls in the area.
The spark of viole nce ignite d by a few r e ckle ss and irrespons ible
i ndi v i duals touche d off an explosion of civil disorde r that s hatte red Atlanta ' s
long re c_ord of racial amity.
�( .
., ,_;: ,.
\
Page 2
I must again commend the members of the Atlanta Police
D e pa r tment for their prompt response and handling of this situation.
The cit i z ens of Atlanta, and especially the good citizens of SwnmerhillMecha~icsville, can be justly proud of their police officers this morning.
I am not talking from hearsay when I say that every citizen of
Atlanta owes a debt of wholehearted gratitude to our dedicated police
officers, for I was personally in the thick of the disturbance throughout
those frightful hours of mob hysteria.
No one need make charges to me about police brutality during
this disorder, I saw plenty of brutality, but it was being used against the
police officers, not by them.
From what I heard with my own ears and saw with my own eyes
in the center of this melee, I feel certain that hundreds of normally good
citizens were inflamed ;:out of their normal senses.
They were victimized
by those who sought to incite violence.
We ~in(;cr.ely app;r@~iat@ Urn e.~ti,in gf G©v@rn@~ Ga d Sen§i1e'e
and the Georgia Department of Public Safety for the backup men and
equipment provided to us.
It is a tragedy that a few irresponsible and misdirected youths
have such utter disregard and contempt for their fellow man that they
place the lives and property of innocent citizens in serious jeopardy.
___
�j
Mrs. Sue Crank, Director, Sum-Hee Center
65 Georgia Avenue, S. E.
Home - 799-7040
Mr. Johnny Popwell, Extension Manager, Sum-Mee Center
65 Georgia Avenue, S. l.
Home - 344-5871
Hr. Robert Phillips - ~xtension Assistant to Mr. T:'opweli, Sum-Mee Center
65 Georgia Avenue
Home - 753-06%
Mr. Richard Rembert - Extension Manager, Sum-Mee Center
65 Georgia Avenue, S. E.
Home - 758-5558
Mr. i.l obert McDanied, Chairman - 947 Crew Street, S. E.
Mrs. Katherine E. Harris, Secretary - 602 Reed Street, S. E.
Mrs. Patricia Price
- 70 Love Street,
Hrs. Joann Lemons


t-"1I'.


Jerry Waters
s.
E.
Capitol Avenue,
s.
E.
1040 Capitol Avenue,
s.
s.
E.
- 696
Mr. Otis Henderson
-
Mr. Frank Hatton - 768 Capitol Avenue,
E.
Mr . Hersheall Hendrix - 1051 Primrose Circle, ....C'
. E.
Mr. William Bailey - 980 Hill Street, S. E.
Mrs. Katherine Price - 335 Richardson Street, S. E.
Mrs. Elizabeth Harris
Mrs. Lucille \Jalker - 19 Georgia Avenue, 5 •. E.
Mr. Albert L,. Griffin
- 795 Fraser Street,
s. E.
Mr. Ui lliam Myerick -
Hr, Odell Billingsley - 696 Capitol Avenue, #4.
Mr. William Merritt - 33~ Lincoln Street,
s.
E.
s. E.
�The File Book Section of the Fulton County Tax Commissioner
Offi ce reflects that 360 Nelson Street, S . W. A tlanta, Georgia was as of
Jamary 26, 1966 owned by W. P . Ballard, Jr. , 360 Nel son Street.
It is
descri bed as in Land Lob 84, Land Distric t 14 , and measured SO feet by
151 . S feet by 51. 8 feet by 136 feet.
The building wa
sold on F bruaty 1,
1966 to the Southern Education and Research lnstitut , Inc ., for a
$65, 000.
um of
This transaction was handled by Mr. Howard Moore.
Prior to thi
time the Student Non - Violent Coordinating Committee
to buy
was occupying 360 Nel on Stre t on a rent- option/basis . In the Corpor Uon
Commissioner'
Office of the State of Cieor ia, the Southern Edu_c tion Resa rch
IA tit\lt , hlc. was i
of the corporation wa
ued a charter on September 7, 1965.
a non-profit corporation or
charatibl and educational
urpo e
within th
tated purpo e
nized exclu ively for
relm of Section 50l(C){3) of
the U. S. Iut rnal Revenue S rvice Cod of 1964.
were a
The
The petitioner
to form
follow :
John Lewis
Jam
For man
Sh fli John on
Fay
Bell mny
or c
Moore aaa identtfi d
Julian Bond
• SNCC
ttorney rid th r
t
r
ll Imo n SNCC member•.
�I
Chi f H. T J
Atlan"ta Poli
R o

Dear
i,: : ·
r,. . -
1ty
... -....
.1
�R E P F. A T E R S
WEDNESDA'Y SEPTEMBER 7, 1966
MORNING WATCH
. 208999,
SIMMONS, Freddie James



i."·239938,




LA1IDRESS, Jerry Doyal
B-24-M D.C. Disturbance
s.c. Dorsey
· W-24-M
n.c.
Larceny of Two Rifles G.T. Bennett
RINGFIELD, Alfonzo
B-28-M
n.c.
Disturbance
PUGH, Marvin Jefferson
B-22-M D.C.Disturbance
s.c. Dorsey
·1975l.i4,
LINGERFELT, James D.
W-28-M D.C. Disturbance
R.L. Davis G.P. Hicks
21L992,
LINGERFELT, David L•. .,
W-22-M D.c. Disturbance
R.L. Davis G.P. Hicks
• 238105,
WARE, Willie
B-31-M D. C. Dist. D.C. Inciting a Riot c.J. Perry
· 227121,
NOR.RELL, . Tommy Lee
, 233631,
~RS, Mary Lizzie·.
· 173560,


' 220L83,


~.~
. W-23-M n.c. Dist.
s.c. Dorsey
G.P. Hicks. R.L. Davis
B-20-M D.C. Mal Misch D.c. A&B on Off W.W.Pope J. E. T~llent
G.H. Wade
. ,,
,~
j 5711.i?, HICKS, Andrew Jr.
· 7 3976,
ROGERS,, Charlie
· 240957, . LIVINGSTON , Seabe
B-37-M D&O. Failing to Move on ·
J.Z. Gizemore
B-32-M D. C. Dist.
s.c . Dorsey
B-35-M D.C. Fai l to Move on D.c. Dist. L.F. Peaden
B-37-M D. C. Dist.
s.c. Dorsey
B-27-M D. C. Dist.
s. c. Dorsey
HILL, Calvin
B-18-M D.r,. Dist.
s. c. Dorsey
· 181672,
CAMPBEIL, Theodore E.
B-27-M n.c. Faiih.ing to move on
G.E. Davis
• 231362,
BROWN, Grady
B-24-M n.c. Failing to Move on
G.E. Davis
B•l7•M D,C , Failing to Move on
· >1,E. Davis
"< t- 91159,
MITTS, Henry Ervin .
'i188059,, CONYERS, Alvin J.
i· 226310,
,J<'f 2219u), RIDLEY, John Arthur
i
B-17-M D.C. ASS.&BATT.,
D. C. ASS • WITH DEAD Lr \©PON
235208 ANDTlFiW
S, Willie (NMN)
<ft 219350 SPEAR, Calvin Julius
· B-21-M-
n.c.
Dist.
· 2 26239 BROUGHTON, William Henry
B-19-M D.c. Dist.
E.A. Bell
mmE, Nathaniel Funicello . .B-25-M n.c. Dist.
Hicks, Davis
, 0Il.S352 GRESHAM, Herman
B-22-M D.C. Dist.
Pierce, Hicks
, 2390.54 BJYKIN, Ermon Jr.
B-18-M D.C. Dist.
Hicks, Davis
• 158047 TRIBBLE, James
B-30-M D.C. Dist.
Hicks, Davis
• IVIS.538 HAYNES, James Walter
B-29-M D.c. Dist.
Davis , Hicks
B-40-M D. C. Dist.
Davis, Simmons
• I
150703 TATE, James
• 168639 . QURTEREAN, Lonnie Ray '
f •2265Jl DORSEY, Mary Edith
·l
1
D.R. EUBANKS
D.R. Eubanks
'
,.
R1 DA VIS
B-21-M D.c. Dist.


21,,f
i,



·


F-.-
·222977 OWENS, John
,100924


I


CPHICKS

I
i
. B-27-M D.C. Dist.
Davis, Hicks
• B-18-M D.c. Dist • .
Davis, Hicks
' •.
·. :


�a;
NEW
it1
WEDNESDAY SEPI'F.MBER 1, 1966
il•t
i
MORNING WATCH
~ )( 2l,?462,
MILLER, Robert Louis
B-22-M D.c. Carrying Con Wpn D.c.
Carryine Pistol w/o Eic.
AtIDRfJ.fS, Hillie
B 17 M D.G. f,&B
EDWARDS, John Wesley
B-24-M D.C. Failine to Move on
R.W. Davis Sgt ~dwards
W.W. Garrett
2h21..165,
RAGLAND, Sylvester
B-17-M D.C. ~aaault w/Deadly Wpn
G.P. Hicks R.L. ~avis
2421.1 66,
WALTON, Bobby Vance.._
242467,
QUEEN, Gary Mack
W-20-M D.c. Dist.
R.L. Davis G.P. ~ick~
21..12468,
PIATT, Roscoe ·Edward
W-38-M D.C. Larceny
R.V. McDaniel
242/i69, . Sil1MONS, Thomas A.'
B-23-M D.C. Failing to Move on
A. Dominick
2u2470,
B-21-M D.C. Failing to Move on
J .A. Sizemore
j1 :L:SS-J- 08
~ - ~M..) ,
I
X.
D.G. Aoolt
w/
G.E. Davis
D. 1ilpn
G.P. Hieb; R.L. :3avi3
B-21-M D.c. Dist. D.c. Inciting a Riot Sgt Perry
·, .
COPELAND, Harry
,,·
242471,
· B-19-M D. C. Failing to Move on
GREEN, James
G.P. Hicks R.L. ~avis
'.
242Li72,
RIVERS, James Vinson
B-25-M D. C. Failing to Move on
G.E. Davis
2h2473,
SWAIDJ, William Ro,ser -!r,
B-30-M D.C. Failing to Move on
G.E. Davis
2)~ 2474,
CURRY, Terry
B.;.20-M D.C. Dist. D. c. Asslt on Off.
s.c. Dorsey
242475_, S"MITH, Hillie Louis
B-17-M D.G. Dist.
SC riorsey
21..12!176,
B-29-M D.C. ;Failing to move on
Det. G.E. Davi::;
REID, Coy Lee


,: 242477 WHITE , Clarence E


· W-30-M D.c. Vio Knife Ord
D.C Poss Dangerous Drugs
242478 White, Alvin David
242479 WALLACE, John Hugh
J L Fulmer-HE Brumblow
'
B..Jl...M D,C . Disturbance
DR Eubanks
B-18-M D.c. Disturbance
D.R. Eubanks
'i
->
" 242480 REID, Gregory
B-18-M D.C. Disturbance
D.R. Eubanks
\ 242481 KEMP, Essig
DR Turner-'WJ Englett
242482 CROCKETT, Russe 11 Anthony
B-22-M D.c. Disturbance
D.c. Cursing
B-24-M D.c. Disturbance
242483 BELLAMY, Faye Delores
B-28-F D.C. Cursing-D.C. Disturbance DR 'furner-WJ Englett
242484 SHARP, Monroe
B-26-M D.c. Cursing-D.C Dist
DR Turner-WJ Englett
242485 JACKSON, Rudolph Alfonson
B-26-M D.C. Disturbance
RL Davis-1'lli Everett
GOODEN, John Wesley .
B-43-M D.c. Disturbance
TR Pierce-GP Hicks
242487 BURTON, Edward Jr
242488 DAVENPORT, Charles E
B-35-M D.c. Disturbance
B-37-M D.c. Disturbance
TR Pierce-GP Hicks
RL Davis-GP Hicks
\
'1
,i
I
\
I
J'
~ 242486
1·1
~
~ 242489
JOHNSON, John


~ 242490 HOOD, James Jr


I:~ 242491
Iii
HAYNES, Edward Everett .
r: 242492 RIVERS, Elizabeth
242493 0 1 NEAL, Victor
. B-24-M D.C Disturbance
,,·
B-19-M
D.c . Disturbance
B-18-M D.c. Disturbance
EA Bell-McManus
GP Hicks -RH Simmons
R
L Davis-GP Hicks
GP Hicks-R L Davis
B-22-F
DC Disturbance
GP Hicks-RL Davis
B-27-M
D.C. Disturbance
GP
Hicks-RL Davis
'
�Persons Arrested Around Capitol And Ormond Sept. 7, 1966
about 4:00 P.M.
Robert Harold Winfrey
995 Primrose# B.
D.C.Inoiting a Riot
c.M.
21
Lamar Franklin C.M. 17
918 Crew St
D.C.Inciting a Rio~
Felton Daniel c.M. 29
1087 Primrose# B
DQC. Inciting Riot
George Nunnally' c.M. 19
845 Oak St
D.C.Inciting Riot
Michele Tony Benton c.M. 32
31 Vanira St
D.C.Inoiting Riot
Johnny Lee Bowden C.M. 31·
955 Connally St


Inciting Rio~


Oscar Hambrick c.M. 39
993 Windsor St# 3
n.c.Inciting Riot
Albert McMillin c.M. 20
lOOOWashington St# l
D.C.Inciting Riot
Johnny Hall c.M. 17
566 Capitol Ave.
D,C.inciting Riot
Jerry Lowe c.M. 18
29 Ormond
D.C.Inciting Riot
ArrestedciLater in the Night on Sept. 7, 1966
Alvin Bradley
34 Ormond St
n.c .Ric.:..
c.M.
Willie Ruth Jordan c.F. 30
875 Capitol Ave. Apt 16
D.C.Riot
Willie Clarence Manuel
986 ~ashington St
D.C.~illing to Move On
c.M.
19
�PERSONS ARRESTE D AROUND CAPITOL AND ORMOND SEPT. 6, 1966
J OHN MC-C OWN, CM
NO ADDRESS
ESSIE KEMP, CM 21
·ass CAPITOL AVE.
CAR L ROBINS ON, CM
74 0 COOPER ST.
NATHANIAL GOULD, CM 25
56 VANIRA
C. B. LIVI NGS TON, CM
912 CR E\\! ST.
HARRY COPELAND, CM 21
98 RICHARDSON ST.,~. E. #B
HOWARD OGLETREE, CM
WILLIAM R. SWAN, CM 30
467 WESTERN, N. W.
543 WIL SON
EDI SO N MART IN, CM
FREDDY J •. SIMMONS, CM 24
1016 WASHINGTON
EAR NEST JOHNSON, CM 32
260 WES T VIEW PL. _
JOHN W. GODDEN, CM 44
320 KENDRICKS AVE., S. E.
73 VANIRA
.,
I,
MONROE SH ARKS, CM
22 22 TELHURST ST.
GREGORY REID, CM
60 LITTLE
ANDRE W HICKS·, CM
522 CEN TRAL
CHARLES DAVENPORT, CM
1 D2 D PULLIAM
THEADDRE CAMPBELL, CM
825 WEST END AVE.
WILLIAM WARE, CM
142 VINE ST.
JA MES TRIBBLE, CM
BOBBY VANCE WALTON, CM
556 HOUSTON
-
633 CONNALLY
GRADY BROWN, CM 24
3006 DELMAR LANE
WILLIE L. SMITH, CM
· 854 CAPITOL
JA MES GREEN, CM
1020 WASH I NGTDN
JOHN W. WALLACE, CM 18
4 0 ORMOND ST.
SY LVESTER RAGLAND, CM
777 CAP ITOL
HERMAN BOYKIN, CM
819 SMITH
(.
JOHN JOHNSON, CM
CALV IN HI LL, CM
96 1 WIL KES, #575
804 CAPITOL
WILLI E A~ ANDRE WS, CM
840 MC-KAY, S. E.
TERRY CURRY, CM
1 030 CREW ST.
JAMES RIVERS, CM
1038 WASHINGTON ST.
ALVIN CONYERS, CM
1294 WESTMORELAND CIRL
MARVI N PUGH, CM
1 62 AMI ST• , S • E•
JAMES TATE, CM 40
723 CAPITOL AVE.
· SAMMY LEE TUCKER, CM 17
1033 WASHI NGTON ST.
ROBERT LEE COFFER, CM 20
1D33 WASHINGTON ST.
�CONT. ARREST SEPtEMBER
6, 19~
ALVIN DAVIS WHITE, CM, 31
J ACKSON ST.
YVONNE TERRELL,CF, 16-JUVENILE
99 VIOLET ·
GLEN HILL, CM 14-JUVENILE
875 CREW, APT. 14
MARY MYERS, CF
998 FERN ST.
GENE MC-CARVER, CM
22 ATLANTA AVE.
ANNIE SMITH, CF 16-JUVENILE
996 FERN ST.
COY LEE REID, CM
925 CAPITOL AVE.
ELIZABETH RIVERS, CF
1038 WASHINGTON ST., #5
EDWARD HAYNES,CM
732 CREW ST.
MARYE. DORSEY, CF
371 SANTALUCIA
JAMES W. HAYNES, CM
83 8 KING GRANT DR.
JOHN W. EDWARDS, CM 24
272 ATLANTA AVE.
WILLIAM BROUGHTON, CM
12 64 WOODS ST. ·
JAMES EDWARDS, CM 16-JUVENILE
388 RAWSON .
·
. i
RUSSELL CROCKETT, CM 24
945 FERN ST.
WILLIE LEWIS DOBBS, CM 26
466 MEAD ST.
CALVIN SPEARS, CM
2 09 DODD
RUDOLPH A. JACKSON; CM
296. EUGENE ST.
VICTOR OlNEAL, CM
1112 RIDGE AVE
JOHN A. RIDLEY, CM 17
34 ORMOND ST.
J OHN OWENS, CM 21
NO ADDRESS
THOMAS SIMMONS, CM
943 WASHINGTON ST.
HERMAN GRESHAM, CM 22
563 PULLIAM ST.
JAMES HOOD, CM 19
768 CAPITOL
ALFONSO RINGFIELD, CM
777 CAPITOL
YOUNG HOOD, CM 15-JUVENILE
768 CAPITOL
LONNIE RAY QUARTERMAN, CM
865 CREW ST.
EDWARD BURTON, CM 35
872 CREW ST.
CH ARLIE ROGE RS, CM
777 CAPITOL
DAVID LINGERFELT, WM 22
1 085 AR LI.NGT ON .
2222
FAY BELLAMY, CF
TELHURST
GARY MC-QUEEN, WM 20
2904 8TH ST., EAST POiNT
JAMES D. LINGERFELT, WM 28
1332 OAKLAND AVE.
TOMMY NORRELL, WM 23
1370 WASHINGTON ST.,COLLEGE PK.
~-
�COUNCIL ON HIBvIAN RELATIONS OF GREATER ATLAHTA, I NC.
5 Forsyth St., N. W., Atlanta, Georgia 532-1581
September 8, 1966
FOR IMMEDI ATE RELEASE
The Council on Human Re l ations of Greater Atlanta, Inc., an interracial
voluntary membership orga nization dedicated to equal opportunity for all
people in the At l anta area , today deplored Tuesday's violence but charged
that no one e roup, includine SlJCC can ·oe he lcl r osp6ns1.ble for the disturbanc ~s in Atlanta and that the bi~tc'iesponsibility lie s with Atlanta's
1.:i.ok of c once rn over oiserar, l o concl:i.tions in s lum areas .
In a l engthy statement the Council spells out the deficiences in the citr
and county and warns that the eliminat ion of one man or one organization
is not the solution .
They point out that the autho r ities cannot fail
to be aware of the grievances of the residents of the troubled area
and claim that only by default on the part of the community can any outs ide group gain control of the de stiny of Atlanta.
I nstead , the Council
concludes , Atl anta must face the bitter truth that only by a high l y
expensive and comprehensive r·ehA.hilit,~t.i.on
furthe r violence be eliminated .
-30-
1n:0e r!3.ffi ~ "ln
+.he t;Jn,.ea t of
�Statement issued by Council on Human Relations of Greater Atlanta, Inc,
Atlanta, Georgia 523-1581
Septembe r 8, 1966
5 Forsyth St., N.W.,
The Atlanta comrnuni ty - Negro and white - 1vill be making a sad mistake
if it writes off Tue s da y ' s disturbances in the s outhside as a plot of outside agitators, to be dealt with by replenishing the police department's
supply of tear gas,
Whateve r the i mmediate causes , the incident was anothe r in a
long series of warnings, that pove rty antl segregation breed conditions
which ca nno t be solved t hrough the per s ona l courage of the mayor or the
competenc e of t he police to ha ndle rio ts , nei t he r of which has ever been
i n q_ues tion ,
An editoria l comment on Tuesday ' s i ncident s ays " the troubl e followed
t he damagogic patte rn t he country has come t o r ecogni ze s i nc e t hi s i s no
longer one of t ho se pecu liar s out he rn probl ems ",
Unfor tunate l y the pa t t e r n i s t ragica lly f amiliar - s lums , 1rnempl oy111e11t,
poor s chool s , c ontinue d segr ega tion and a police inc ident to spark i t.
Tuesday ' s viole nce by wha t e ve r name i s r egr e ttabl e a nd t he Council on
Human Re l a t i ons of Grea ter Atlanta joi ns othe r c i ti zens in t he hope
t ha t it wil l not ha ppe n aga i n , We a l s o hope
that the cit y will make f u ll u se of the c ourts t o dea l with a ny
i ndividua l s or gr oups in the community whom t hey know to be pe r petra t ors
of vi ol ence bu t that a t the s ame time i t wi ll inte ns ify its effort s t o
a llevia te the s oc i a l and phy s i c -"l.1 h l i p:h L ~,h i 8 h i nev i t.~hly r esults i n
s uch unfortu na t e inc i rte nts ,
�Cont 1 d
-2-
This incident has been repeatedly described as a riot.
be as many different definitions of
11
There appear to
riot 11 as there were spectators at
the scene on Tuesday, numbers of who!!l say that it was not a riot.
was no looting, no shooting, no battles.
competence of the police
There
Perhaps this was due to the
in preventing a riot for which they deserve
the same praise as for stopping one.
One newspaper reported that
11
by
4:20 p.m., the point at which the disturbance turned into a riot 11 • •
without any explana tion of wha t happened a t 4 :20 to turn t he dis turbance
into a riot.
We urge the Police Committee of the Board of Alderman to
prepare and -~nke public a cooplc t c r eport of eve nt s as they occured s o that
they can be eva l uat ed ca l mly a nd ob j ectivel y .
The question mi ght be
rai s ed as to whether it was nece ssa ry to shoot in a r esidential ne i ghborhood in themidd l c of the aft e rnoon to serve a warrant on a ro bbery
suspect .
Any cha r ge of polic e bruta l i t y shou l d be care f ully c onsidered ,
r egard l ess of any t r utalit y di spl a yed t owar ds t he police .
Whethe r
char ges of polic e brutality prove t o be a ccur ate or not, the fear of it
i s a rea l f actor in the conditions which make f or r iot s .
The communi ty might we ll take this as an opportuni t y to examine and
eva l uate the e nti re policA rec~1i tment and t rai ning programs ind the
capabi l ity of the c i ty to perf'onr, 1~h<'l
1.·0 1 p 1:i1: orl -r0 7 i .r; n f1111 c \.i_ n H w i t l, t .h e
present leve l of the police budge t ,
As much as we deplore vi ol ence i n any c ircumstances , the Co,md l ori
Re l a tions of Great e r At l anta does not acc ept the expl ana tion that
11
TT1Jm::i.1 1
SNCC
membe rs were di r e ctly responsible f or Tue s day 1 s r ioting 11 •
SNCC member s are not r esponsi bl e for the condi t i ons unde r which Atlanta
ci ti.7,en8 live in the S, immer.hi ll anrl. Me 0.han icsville area .
�-3-
Cont'd
SrJCC members were not re sponsible for threat of rent strikes in that area
a year ago.
- SNCC membe rs were not r e sponsible for street demonstrations in the area
during the summer.
SNCC members are not responsible for peopl e living in houses which the
housing code finds unfit for human habitation.
SNCC members are not responsible for children attend ing school half a
day, in a building scheduled for repai.rs in the 1963 bond i ssue but which
was by-passed,
SHCC members are not r e sponsibl e for parking space for 4 ,000 c ars in the
middle of an area which has no parks for children to pl ay in (and to
whom the income derived f r om t he s tadi um i s ver;/ r emote).
SHCC me mbe rs are not r espons i bl e for the r ecent incident in that same
neighborhood involving polic e offic e r s and the wife of a ba llteam
membe r, an incid ent ,·rhich, r i 6 ht l y or wronGl Y, has been des cribed by
"respons i bl e Negroes " as a white wash of t he police rl.e partme nt .
SNCC memb er s are not respons i bl e for the pol icie s of the At J. r-mtR.
Authority which make s public ho us ing unava ilab l e to
m:my
JT 0 11n i n,n:
r P.s id e nts of
this nnd other are a s in dir e need of decent hous inG,
SNCC membe r s are not r e spons i ble for the fact that there i s no Negr o on
the mayor ' s staff, or i n any hi eh pos i t ion i n a de})artme nt of the city
gove rnme nt .
SNCC members are not respons i b l e for the i ncre::i.sing dispari ty between
employme n t opportunit i es for whi t e s and Neeroes and the fac t th;,,t. present
t rai ni nr.;
p.t:Of.7A.ms A.r:8
11op8 l osr, l y
in:=vlcr111R. t G
t o clo f\e th i s gap .
�Cont'd
-4-
SNCC members are not responsible for maximum welfare grants which do not
permit families dependent upon them to live in decency and dignity.
SNCC members are not responsible for the fact that there is no public
agency in any of the governments of metropolitan Atlanta with a continuing
and professional responsibility in human relations and civil rights.
SNCC members are not responsible for the fact that the leadership of
metropolitan Atlanta has refused to acknowledge that these problem require
continuing , professional attention, but has acted only in response to crises
with emergency measures and has continually
placed upon the aggrieved
groups the burden not only of raising the questions but also of suggesting
the answers .
To ask residents of the s outhside no w to list their grievance s in the
fir st pl a ce contradicts the theory that "SNCC membe rs are directly respons ible 11, but more ifilportunt it i gnores the wearying succ ess ion of
mee tings and surveys and petitions of r esi dents of tha t area and of other
citizens during the past months .
Such a request i gnores the authoritat ive report of The Community Council
of the At l anta Area , I nc . , on this and other blight ed areas .
It i gnores the efforts of the Council on Hwnan Re l ations of Greater
Atlanta and neighborhood civic groups which resulted in the establi shment
of the Southside Day Care Center and oth er programs.
It ignores tho su~veys and ~eco~mendations o3de by the various EOA citizen
committees, bef ore and after the .es tab lishment of the EOA Neighb orhood
Center.
I t ignores the requests of neighborhood leaders before the Atlanta
Housing Authority and the Citizens Advi sory Committee on Urban Renewal.
�-5-
Cont'd
It i&nor0s repeated statements before the Atlanta Board of Education by
parents of the area.
It ignores the findings and recommendations of the Commission on Crime
and Delinquency.
It ignores the continuous recommendations of the Atlanta Summit Leadership
Conference since its organization in 1963.
We raake no claims thnt the so]:1tion to the problems are simple.
solutions are complicated and costly.
The
They require changes throughout
the entire metropolitan Atlanta area, and they do not lie in Summerhill
or in the SNCC office.
As each of us has had a part in creating the problems, so each of us must
bear a part of the burden of solving thera.
Responsibility for dealing with these matters doe s not lie with "Negro
l eade r ship" or with "white leade rship".
shi p".
It lie s with "community l eade r-
These a ffairs a re too complica ted 8.nd too important to the f uturn
of the entire communi ty to be n e a lt wl~h
11.v n ny :r·a ,.d n Jl v
n-r
p ,· u , ,nrn i r .
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BLACK BROTHERS
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· [. · Last Tuesday, · a· white policem_a n sh,ot · one of our black bl'.".others
25 year old Harold Prather - a husband and father of four children.
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pr.other ' - · ~n d shot :·him. ·. '.
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' 5. Prather was wounded in his side, .·crawl ed, to his mother's house and
be g ged h ~r to get help .for him. -.
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7. A i"ar gc crowd of friends, nei g hb_or·s , and . younrr- pe o ple · .r,ot togethe ·c in

.front of the.. Prather, ho~ sc ·_be;ause they were
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AnGRY !
They were ANGRY
tir u ta l . :.,.7\ d i:.~n e c es s ,1ry s.no-ot :i r.r; . of :la rold Prr1ther.
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9. Let us think about the words that Mr s. Prath~r said to the white
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"YOU ·AIN'T G0i t1G . TO HURT . HI M NO MORE . THERE USEJ) TO BE DAYS .
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Hl.~TO
The S·~.: Nonviolent Coordinating
Com:mittee--2~:C-was born out of the
stru:ent sit-o cn·e:: A conference at Raleigh,
~or.h Carolim i:1 Easter Weekend in 1960
foo:e.d the T~rary Student Nonviolent
Coordin.atiD.£ O:.umittee. At an Atlanta conference later t±u:year, officers were elected,
programs ou;::r:d , and the "temporary"
drcwed-
From an :mnediate concern with lunch
couru.ers Zud ~ e theaters, SNCC moved



_actimy arros the entire Southern Black




Partioa:r.r: in the Freedom Rides in
1961 and _?Ulillg sense of the depth of
fear that sh:cijci..most Negroes of the South
convinced ~ C that some one would have
to take the rreuom movement to the millions of c:fu::;cr-..nchised, dispossessed and
degraded 1'e_pes of the rural South
a
·'
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SXCC DD J'lJST THAT
-- - - ---
.. . August, 1;,5: SNCC launched the Deep
South's first s::::oent manned voter registration proja-....:::.. _ . choosing Walthal, Pike and
Amite Counne in Southwest Mississippi.
Their drive de·doped into a student revolt
in McComb, b;_an to spread across the entire state and ciminated in the 1964 Summer Project ciE. · involved more than 1,000
volunteer wcr~.rs.
.
--
0
... October, ! ':itl - SNCC wor~ers opened
· up Albany, Ge:gia for the massive demonstrations that o:lowed that year and have
since organized -novements in the surrounding counties.
... January. ! '-6:i - SNCC workers came
to Selma, Alir.•s.ma, and with tl1e aid of
local groups §::!: the stage for the d rive that
resulted in ~ 1964 Voting Rights A ct.
®GRAM
. . SNCC'S grass-roots approach is· designed to
. . . build indigenous, trained leadership . . . in
small communities and urban centers of the South,
in high schools and college campuses .. .
SNCC workers organize and aid local and
stale wide movements, some never identified as
SNCC proj~cts. This is part of its program to insure a continuous comm1lted movement across the
South.
This program has captured the idealism and
imagination of students and adults all across the
country, and today, more than 150 SNCC field°
workers are engaged in the always dangerous,
often dreary and tedious work of organizing people in the most difficult areas of the South •
Mississippi - Southwest Georgia
Central Alabama - E astern Arkansas
(.
. SNCC · field secretaries receive subsistence
salaries when funds are available, but at times
have chopped cotton and picked squash to secure
food and a bed. They live in the community they
work in, in the homes of local residents and in
freedom houses, for the weeks and months required to break through generations of fear-enforced apathy and despair. A SNCC worker's
skills and drive help a community begin. Sustained_ personal_ con_tact, discussion and persuasion
and his de~ermina~1on to stay with the job gives
. a · community confidence to seek and assert their
rights and to make their own decisions.
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SNCC voter registration drives and work on
· Agricultural Stabilization Committee elections
have begun to give forgotten communities a power
they can use· to build their own organizations and
to help themselves .. .
. - t~e Mississippi J:r~edom Democratic Party
.. : an independent pohl1eal party which educates
by its work .•. . attempts to involve the disenfranchised in the political processes which are so
crucial to their lives.
.
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. - the Poor People's Corporation . . . "To
as~1sl low income groups in their efforts to receive financi al assistance to initiate and sustain
self-help projects of a cooperative nature that arc
designed to offset some of the effects of poverty."
- the Mi~sissippi Freedom Labor Union .. .
farm workers m the Mississippi Delta working to
improve economic conditions . . .
. ·- Freedom Schools . . . community centers
. . : .. all these things mean a ray of hope for those
Wllh no hope of help anywhere.
..,.
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�. 'l'ATEMEN 'f BY M.AYOR IVAN ALLEN. JR .
1'hur-sda.y, ··e t~
r 8,- 1966
S:
P.
I
ve direc
d City Attorney H nr
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gai st
and
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rso.n
utb At
The
n
f r the dieord r
T&•po slbl
T
az
y
ir ct
t
u•
ry
cUlty
al
f Ci
to th .fu.11
y
plac
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V
ldhol'ity of th City f At
1aw
hieb to
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ry
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appre
of
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�Vine City Incident:
Police received a call last evening to the corner of Magnolia and
Graves Streets where there was a disturbance.
The small open-
type building where SNCC liturature and a can requesting donations
were kept.
The building had been torn down and was being burned.
About 30 people had gathered on Vine Street, north of Magnolia
Street and were telling the 4 SNCC people present that they wanted
no violence, did not want SNCC in their neighborhood and did not
want the same thing to happen there that had happened in
Summer Hill.
They were dispersed peacefully.
llHHHRX
�The thouga,tvt
and
respon1lelt Negro 1itl••n• of Atlrlta deplore
aM oppos. tlle ~•• of violence at1d condemn thQse whe incite to riot.


>


It" wa•
\lllfost Mt~ that
aft
officer, ill the pursuit ef his duty, shot
a IHtli b.at \hat iftcide~i we, no suffieient ground for Stokely Car,a,
mlct.eel 8lld his organizatilffl te ~o ial0 the eonvnunity and lrH:ite the
people to riot.
lt is shameful that his irresponsible aeti• t esulted
in in;jury to lN!mceM chUdren and whe.,a looked at, it did nottil"'g to
to solve
~&&Te-ct •
aAy
of t ·tle problems which the community
f~~ ..
We call upoft the responsib1e 1R19111beri of the Sunvnerhill area k assume
le.dership attd llot \o allow StllCC tc ,u se thera as pawas la any nefarious
plot theJ 11aJ beve to de&<troy the city.
Atlanta I• AOt lie f1tr a pel'feet city.
desJ:royecl
~
city, not "
simple mlfldea ·b lgel9o
Yet it ts too 9~od to be
Oilr won muat be to mild the·
Ille~ It~
alterably opposed to violence.
So we ask 0\111 ci\l:aent all ov~ the
ci ~y to refrain fi--an cooperatiftg wtt\ll. tttos., who would !Mke
tools and victims of violence.
-$
VioSence is not the •a,~ ,.._1fy
the wrongs done Negrc ~eople fe~ eentv:rle•to resort to t he letlhftlques of
yQll
If-. lltgroes
••oteMe Uld brutallUe-t
against us, then we aye no better than they who have so
ff
~
9olftg
)oJIQ, "e9ed
ab.,isad
~s.
�\1 ~~
September 6, 1966
4
We are here to protest the latest outrage in a series against
the twelve B2ck :i:eople now held captive in the Atlanta Stockade for protesting the dying of Black men in the racist illegal War in Vietnam.
First of all, the twelve were seized illegally by the Atlanta
Police as they demonstrated at the Induction Center in protest
of the dying of Black men in the racist illegal War in Vietnam.
They were subjected to a "KANGAROO Court Trial" under racist
Judge T.C. Little who prejudiced himself by saying that
because he had a son in Vietnam who is fighting to defend
the principles ot this country be had to give the protesters
maximum sentences.
Thirdly, Dwight Williams was brutally beaten under the orders
of Captain Redding inside the jail. Part of this beastiality
was wi tnessed by William's attorney, Attorney Howard Moore.
In keeping with this country•s scheme to emasculate Bla ck men,
the ten men were forced to shave the ir beards and mustaches.
We know of no law that Black men wearing beards violate.
We protest the holding of Donald Stone and Simuel Shutz in
the County Jail five days after their bond had been paid.
We demand that the five days be credited to their sentences
at the Atlanta Stockade. on. Sunday August 4, we were not permitted to see Robert Moore
and Larry Fox because they were in the hole. Both ·1oore and
Fox suffer from Hay Fever. Both had been assigned to work in
a dusty area which would only heighten their hay fever miseries. They asked to be transfered to a less dusty detail.
Instead, they l.jvere thrown in the hole. This was on Thursday.
Fox, who refuses to cooperate with the beastial and unjust
penal system, has been on a hunger strike since incarceration, August 18.
is
The stockade physician a racist bigot who cannot deal with
Black Men. Therefore if any of the group ge ts sick, there ls
no one to treat them.
The group is completely isolated from the rest of the prisoners.
we charge that this is a form of political harassement just
as the illegal arrest and sadistic beating of one of our
workers, Robert Weaver.
We also note that the City Jail, Atlanta Stockade, and the
Fulton County Jail are blatantly segregated in spite of the
1964 Civil Rights Ac t.
If these conditions are not corrected and we continue to get
rep orts of cruel beastial treatment of prisoners, then we
will have to return to earlier forms of demonstrations,
in cl ud i ng sitting in at the :/fayor•s office.
�STA TE::vfEl -T BY IVAN ALLEN, J R .
M AYOR OF A TLANTA
On Civil Dis order in Atlanta, Tuesday, September 6, 1966
Th
iso _ders i n the Summerhill neighborhood in Southeast
A·::J.anta las-:: even_ing were the result of a deliberate attempt by certain
.e St dent Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (Snick) to
,c rea:
a _ L .cident of this v ery nature.
Ve c an be thankful there were no serious injuries.
Some 10
po.uce o fficer s receiv ed minor injuries, mostly as a result of tear gas.
_ ssessment of property damage has not been completed, but
it d
s not appear t o be t oo severe .
_ ive City polic e c ars were damaged as a result of bricks or
wn through windows.
S venty-two a rre sts were made by the Police Department.
Conditions at this time indicate that the violence has ended and
ca":i,.--i-i exists th roughout t he area .
Th
Atlanta Polic e D epartment is now working two twelve-hour
shifts unti- furthe _ notification by C hief Jenkins.
All off - uty firemen have been placed on alert.
_ he fire men on duty during the night r esponde d pr omptly and
effic:e _t y t o several calls in the area .
The spark of violence i g nite d by a fe w r e ckles s a nd irresponsible
L dividuals touched off an explosion of civil d is order that shattered Atlanta's
l ong r e cord of racial amity.
�Page 2
I m .ust again com me n d the members of the Atlanta Police
D narcncnt for their p rom p t r e sponse and handling of this situation .
..,..he ci iz.:: s o Atla n ta , and espe cially the g ood citizens of SwnmerhillMech .... n :.c ~vill , c a n be justly proud of their police officers this morning.
I
m not talking from hearsay when I say that _every citizen of
Atlanta ow es a de bt of wholehearted gratitude to our dedicated police
oiiic rs, io_ I w as personally in the thick of the disturbance throughout
ri ,. tfw. hours of mob hysteria.
. os
N o one need make c ha rges to me about police brutality during
.i
diso::-de _ , I saw plenty of brutality, but it was being used against the
po c
o. i:ce r s , not by the m .
From what I heard with my own ears and saw with r.::1.y own eyes
in th
c : te r of t h i s melee, I feel certain tha t hundreds of normally g ood
ciLze s w _
inflamed5out of their n o:rmal senses.
They were victimized
by
.ose wh o sought t o incite violence.
an
t'. e G,e org ia Department of Public Safety for the backup men and
e uipmer:t pr ovide d to us.
It is a tragedy that a few irresponsibl e and misdirected youths


':1- v


such utter d i sregard and contempt for their fellow man that they
plac
the ives and prope rty of innocent citizens in serious jeopardy.
�September 9, 1966
Mr. Ed Negri
Herren's Rest ur nt
84 Luckie Street, N. W.
Atlant, Georgia
Der Ed:
I ant to express my deep st
pprec1at1on for your corning to our re cue
Tuesday evening. You just can't 1m gine
ho he rt
rm1ng it is to me to kno th t
eh ve citizens such s you ho are al ays
illing to be of service.
With deepest appreci tion, I am
Sineerely,
Ivan Allen, Jr.
or
IAJr:eo
�S ptember 9~ 1966
/
Rever nd • C. Williams
St . John A., 1. E .
461 Holders Dr., S. W.
Atl nta ., Georgi
Der Rever nd Willi ms:
I m most g~ tetul tor your ssist nee
Tue day night. It is extr mely com orting to
me s the Chief Executive ot this city to kno
that I h ve your support during good times and
especi lly during trying times.
With de p apprec1 t1on, I am
S1ncerely,
I
IAJr;eo
n Allen, Jr.
yor
�September 9, 1966
/
R veren w. L. Gilliard
St. Peter A• • E.
620 H1ghl nd Ave., N.
Atl nt, 0 org1

Dear Rev rend Gilli rd:
I m most 8l': teful for your s 1st nee
Tue d y night. It is e teemely comto~ting to
e
the Chief Executive of th1 city to know
th t I h ,v e your support during goo · times nd
sp ci lly during trying times.
With de p
ppr cl tion, I
m
Sine rely_
Ivan All n, Jr.
yor
IAJri o
�September 9, 1966
R ve:rend R. F. Fol y
Trinity A.M.E.
144 cDo ough. .Blvd .• ., S. E .
Atl nt, Georgi
De r Rev.e rend Foley:
m most gr teful tor your ssistance
Tuesd y night. It 1e xtremely co rorting to
s th Chtet Executiv& or this e1ty to kno
t t I h v your support during good times nd
e p ci lly during trying t1m s.
I
W1tb d
p
ppree
tion. I
m
Sine rely,
J: •
I.AJr:eo
�September 9, 1966
Doctor M. L. King , Sr .
Eberneezer
ptist Church
2873
1 Creek Or . , N • •
Atlanta, Georgi
Der Doctor King :
I m moat grateful tor your
ssist nee Tuesday night. It is extremely
comforting tom
s the Chief Execut1v or
th1 city to kno th t I have your support
during good times nd especially during
trying t1m s .
With deep
pprec1 tion, I
m
Sincerely,
Iv n All n., Jr ..
yor
IA.Jr: o
�S ptember 9, 1966
.R veren<S R lpn Abernathy
est Hunt r Street Baptist Chur-ch
76 Cerro St., s. .
Atl nt , Geo gia
D
r
R
veren
I
A'bern thy:
m most
Tuesd y night.
m
t
th t I h v
Chief
your
It 1
t ful t01! your
ut1v o th
uppo
t dur1
p c1ally during trying time.
1th d ep
city to kno
good ti
ppr ci t1on, I
S1nc
ly#
Iv n All n, J .
yo
IAJi,; o
1 t ne
xtremely comtorting to
n
�September 9, 1966
Reverend :w. H. Borders
'Whet Street Bapt - t Church
24 Young Stre t 1 • E.
Atl nta, Georgi
Dear Doc tor·:
I e·m moat gr tetul for youl'" ss1etanee
Tuesd y n gbt. It is
tr
ly comforting to e
o the Chi r Ex cuti
ot th c1t.y to kno t t
I hav · your
upport during gooa t1
during try1ng t1m
W th d
p

ppreci t1on. I
s
m
Sine r ly,
Iv n llen. Jr.
yor·
IAJr:
nd especi lly
�September 9, 1966
Reverend • L. Cottrall
Beul h B ptist Church
890 Venetta Pl.z N• •
A tl nt , Georgi
Der R verend Cottr 11:
I
most gr t ·e ful tor your ss1 t nee
Tu d y night. It 1s
tremely comforting to
me
th Chief Ex eu·t1ve of this city to kno
th t I
v your support during good times and
sp ci lly during jrying ti es.
1th d
p
ppr ciation, I
Siner ly,
I
IAJr: o
n All n, Jr.
yor
�September 9, 1966
R verend E. R. Searcey
t . Zion 2nd B ptist Church
137 Boulevard, N. E.
Atlant, Georgia
Dar Reverend Searcey :
I am mo~t gr teful for your assist nee
Tuesa y night . It is extr mely comtorting to
me as the Chi f Executive of this city to kno
th t I have your support dur1ng good times and
especi lly during trying tim s.
1th de p
pprec1 t1on, I
Sine rely,
Ivan Allen, Ji,.
yor
IAJJI: o
�Mr . Lynn
Page Two
September 21, 1966
Please pass this information along to the c ommittee .
Sincerely yours,
Dan Sweat
DS :fy
cc: Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr .
Mr . R . Earl Landers
�September 9, 1966'
Reverend R. T. Busey
Big Bethel A.M.E.
220 Auburn Ave ., N. E.
Atl nt, Georgi
Dear Reverend Bussey:
I m most grateful tor your _ssist nee
Tuesday night. It is extremely comforting to
me as the Ch1et Executive of thi city to kno
th t I h ve your support during good tim sand
especi l1y during trying times.
With deep appreciation, I am
Sincerely~
Iv n Allen, Jr.
yor
IAJP: o
�September 9, 1966
Reverend B w~ Bickers
Em nuel Baptist Church
211 Ch lmers Dr., N. w.
Atl nta, Georgi
Dear Reverend Bickers:
I m mot gr te ul tor your ss1st nee
Tuead y n1ght. It is extremely co orting to
m s the Chief Executive o this city to know
th t I
ve your support during good times and
e pec1 lly during trying times.
1th deep
ppr c1 t1on 1 I
m
Sincerely,
Iv n All n, Jr.
yor
IA.Jr: o
�September 9, 1966
Reverend Sam w.
i lliams
Friendship Baptist Church
83(5½ Fair Street , s • •
Atlant , Georg
De r S m:
I m most grateful for your ssist nee
Tuesd y night. It 1 extremely comfortlng
to me as the Chief Executiv or this city
to kno that I have your support during
good times
times .
nd espeei lly during trying
1th deep appreci t1on, I
m
Sincerely,
Iv n Allen., Jr.
yor
IAJr: o
�MINISTERS INTERVIEWED FOR NYC COUNCIL - AUGUST, 1966
DATE
NAME OF MINISTER
7/14
W.W. Weatherspool
J. H. Langston
ADDRESS
TELEPHONE
CHURCHES
TIME
NSO AREA
2174 Gordon Rd., .N.W.
824 Drummond St., N.W.
758-2274
753-2436
Mt. Olive Baptist
Smyrna Baptist
2:00-2:45P
3:15-4:00P
N.W . Bowen Homes
N.W. Bowen Homes
7 /18 /R. H. Hicks
A. C. Epps
575 Mitchell St., S. W.
181 Ashby St., N.W.
524-2003
755-8931
West Mitchell C. M. E.
Warren Memorial Methodist
2:10-2:SOP
3:15-4:00P
Nash-Washington
Nash-Washington
7/22
B. J. Johnson, Sr.
P. L. Jones
388 Glenn St . , S.W.
391 Angier Ave., N.E.
755-7771
872-2609
Greater Mt. Calvary Baptist
2nd Baptist Peoplest
11: 15-11: SS A
l:OO-l: 45P
Sum-Mee
Price High
7/20
C.
C.
W.
A.
Boulevard Dr. & Howard
1400 Boulevard Dr . , N.E.
38 Hightower Rd., N. W.
503 Mitchell St., S.W.
378-5976
577-4740
758-5807
753-2980
Turner Monumental A. M. E.
King Memorial Methodist
Shaw Temple A. M. E. Z.
Central Methodist
2:15-2: 45P
10:40-11:ZSA
2: 45-3:30P
3:15-4: 00P
Edgewood
Edgewood
N.W. Bowen Homes
Nash-Washington
7/25
C. J. Gresham
J. A. Warren
R. L. Alexander
626 Lynn Valley Road
57 Selman St., S.E.
889 Wylie St., S.E.
344-3286
688-5782
524-5390
Shiloh Baptist
Ches t er Ave. Baptist
St . Phillips A. M. E.
5:20-5: 45P
11: 00-11: SS A
2:05-2: 45P
Nash-Washington
East Central
East Central
7 /26 v1foward Creecy
Homer Smith
D. A. Dixon
192 Ashby St., S.W .
462 Parkway Dr . , N.E.
1358 Eason St., N. W.
758-7917
872-3017
758-7969
Mt . Moriah Baptist
9:35-10:lSA
Mt . Sinai Baptist
11: 00-11: 45A
South-Side Springf ield Baptis t
3:45-4:30P
Nash-Was hington
East Central
Pittsburg
7/28
81 Chicamauge Ave., S.W.
85 Morris Brown Dr., S.W.
220 Auburn Ave., N. E.
395 Chamberlain St., S.E .
61 Leather Circle, N. W.
758-5616
753-5454
688-2855
525-3588
794-8778
Perry Blvd. Baptist
St. Paul A. M. E.
Big Bethel A. M. E.
Liberty Baptist
Parad ise-Reed St. Baptist
9:30-10: 00A
10:40-11:ZSA
2:00-2: 40P
3:00-3: 45P
4:00-4:45P
N.W . Perry Homes
Price High
East Central
East Central
N. W. Bowen Homes
93 Dalgreen St . , N.E.
681 Albert St ., N.W.
137 Boulevard, N. E.
521-3947
794-4381
524-5588
Cosmopolitan A. M. E.
Piney Grove Baptist
Mt. Zion 2nd Baptis t
11 : 05-11: SS A
3:30-4:ZOP
6:30-7:lSP
Nash-Washington
East Central
East Central
C.
J.
A.
S.
Hughes
Smith
Potter
Dickerson
R. F. Norwood
A. R. Smith
,A- R. T. Bussey
Melvin Watson
C. N. Ellis
7/29
Rev. L. J. Jones
Frank Jones
A. R. Searcey
8/1
R. N. Martin
S. A. Baker
S. W. Williams
236 Richardson St., N.W .
2980 Delmar Lane, N.W., B3
836~ Fair St . , S.W .
799-6544
794-3581
688 -0206
New Hope Baptist
Mt. Vernon Baptist
Friendship Baptist
10:35-11: 0SA
11 :35A-12:1 0P
4:00-4:45P
Sum-Mee
Nash-Washington
Nash-Was hington
8 /2
William Smith
Johnny Lee Jones
B. W. Bickers /
1031 Camilla St . , S.W.
38 Rockmart Dr., S.W .
211 Chalmers Dr . , N.W.
755-6583
753-8532
799-0620
Israe l Baptist
2nd Mt. Olive Baptist
Emmanuel Baptist
10 :30-11:lSA
11 : 35A-12: 15P
3 : 30-4:lSP
Edgewood
Nash-Washington
Pric e Hi gh
�- 2 -
DATE
NAME OF MINISTER
ADDRESS
TELEPHONE
CHURCHES
TIME
NSO AREA
10:00-10:45A
11: 30A-12: 15P
2:15-3:00P
Nash-Washington
Nash-Washington
N.W. Perry Homes
8/3 :iW. L. Cottrall
W. L. McCall
S. Randolph
890 Venetta Pl., N.W.
4196 Bakerferry Rd . , S.W.
1045 Culpepper, N.W.
794-4996
525-2668
351-6580
Beaulah Baptist
Providence Baptist
Springfield Baptist
8/4 ~W. L. Gilliard/
.., J. D. Grier ~
M. L. Hood
Marcus Williams
620 Highland Ave., N.W.
596 Glen Iris Dr . , N.E .
237 Burbanks Dr., N. W.
1008 Westmore Dr., N.W.
523-2079
874-4405
755-8757
MU-8-5679
St . Peter A. M. E.
Fort Street Methodist
St. Marks A. M. E.
Antioch Baptist
10:00-10:50A
11: 00-11 : 45A
1:15-2:00P
3:45-4:30P
East Central
East Central
Central City
Nash-Washington
8/5
962 Palmetto Ave., S.W.
76 Cerro St., S.W.
475 Boulevard, N. E.
2470 Collier Dr., N.E.
758-7882
755-9603
T94-6433
794-8100
Fidelity A. M. E.
West Hunter St. Baptist
Tabernacle Baptist
Zion Hill Baptist
9:30-10:15A
11: 00-11: 45A
12:00-12:35P
l:00-l:45P
N.W. Bowen Homes
Nash-Washington
East Central
Sum-Mee
N.W. Bowen Homes
Edsel
Ralph
X E. H.
L. M.
Robinson
Abernathy j
Dorsey
Terrill
8/7
J. C. Ward
1441 Eason St., N.W.
758-1695
Hunter Hills Baptist
7:10-7:50P
8/8
B. Bowens
O. L. Blackshear
35 Rockfort Rd. , N.E.
17 Weldon St., S.E.
378-3335
522-4278
St. Stephens Baptist
Mt. Pleasant Baptist
11: 15A-12: 15P
3:30-4:20P
8/9 ~ R. F. Foley
W. G. Parsons
.R. W. Freeman
144 McDonough Blvd., S.E.
3017 Tribble Lane, N.W.
1801 Boulevard Dr., S.E.
622-0677
794-8784
377-3926
Trinity A. M. E.
_
Providence Baptist South Atl.
First Baptist (Reynoldstown)
8/10 ~- W. Fielder
O. S. Sutton
P.O. Box 50, Hapeville, Ga. 761-5001
635 Boulevard, N.E.
875-6126
Vine City Baptist
Macendonia Baptist
8/11
2726 Collier Dr., N.W.
1645 Simpson Rd., N.E.
799-8154
794-3678
Union Baptist
Allen Temple A. M. E.
8/12X D. C. Woods
P. J . Dotson
G. W. Baker
768 Martin St ., S.E.
1060 Ira St., S.W.
2166 Penelope, N.W.
622-3926
688-5691
794-2393
Mt. Carmel Baptist
Mt. Nebo Baptist
2nd Mt. Vernon Baptist
8/13
E. W. McMillan, Sr .
1173 Fountain Dr., S.W.
758-3525
Ariel Bowen Methodist
8 /15
H. F. Shepard j
M. L. King, Sr.
808 Skipper Dr., N.W.
2873 Dale Creek Dr., N.W.
794-6695
688-7263
Travelers Rest Baptist
Eberneezer Baptist
8 /l (j
W. H. Borders J
W. C. Williams
24 Young St., N.E.
461 Holders Dr ., S. W.
522-3634
755-0962
Wheat St. Baptist
St. John C. M. E.
8/ 17
J. H. Lockett
1179 Welch St . , S .W.
755-4862
Zion Grove Baptist
J . A. Wilborn
A. D. Powell
3:15-3:45P
4:05-4:55P
6:30-7:15P
10:30-11:15A
12:15-12:45P
3:15-3:45P
4:30-5:20P
Sum-Mee
Price High
Price High
Price High
East Central
Nash-Washington
Price High
N.W. Bowen Homes
N.W . Bowen Homes
9:30-10:15A
12:00-12:45P
2:15-2:45P
Sum-Mee
Pittsburg
Pittsburg
5:00-5:45P
Pittsburg
10:00-10:45A
11:30-11 :40A
Edgewood
East Central
2:15-3:00P
3:30-4:15P
East Centra l
Sum-Mee
10:30-ll : 15A
Sum-Mee
�September 9, 1966
Mr .. Fl., nlc Gordy
The Varsity
61 North Avenue, N.
Atlant, G org1
w.
De r Pr nk:
Enclosed is our ch ck tor the rood
you pr p red Tuesday nd Wednesd y dux1ng
the emergency:
I have lw ys said th t you could
count on the V rsity to come through 1th
the best and the quick st .
n
your help during this e ergency.
t
rues tor
Sincerely,
Ivan Allen, Jr.
yor
IAJr:eo
�September 9, 1966
Mr. Yogi Yoh nnon
Yoh nnon's
Lenox. Square
Atl nt, Georgi
De
F
Yogi:
I c n l
ys count on you to
help eed us during n emergenoy. Thanks
so much tor your splendid response Tu aday
ev n1ng. W lso ppreciate uaing your
co~fee urns throughout the cr1 is.
I
1th highest person l reg rds,
m
Sincei-ely,
Iv n Allen, Jr .
yor
IAJr:eo
��udweiser®
KING
OF
BEERS
Pl!BtW/y143.215.248.55 16:40, 29 December 2017 (EST)JA&
~l{fJf.fkNlliP/JIP~//(J
THE LARGEST-SELLING BEER IN THE WORLD


-!JJ-~
ST. LOUIS
TAMPA
NEWARK
LOS ANGELES
HOUSTON .
-:···
~
Distributed By -
Atlanta Beverage Company
970 Jefferson St. N.W., Atlanta, Georgia
.
�WILLIAM C. BARTHOLOMAY
Chairman of the Board, Treasurer
JOHN J. McHALE
President, General Manager
THOMAS A. REYNOLDS, JR.
Executive Vice President, Secretary
The arrival of the Braves gives the Southeast its first
National League team and establishes Atlanta as the
sports capital of the South . The enthusiastic backing
of the citizens of this area has made this possible.
Your support has given us strength - your enthusiasm inspiration.
The Braves' family - made up of our players, employees
and ownership - dedicate their total effort to bring
championship baseball to Atlanta . At the same time
we hope to make your visits to Atlanta's new stadium a pleasant and enjoyable - experience.
The Atlanta Braves
�®ffin nf lqr ®nllrrnnr
CITY OF ATLANTA
J\.tlnnht
OFFICE of t h e MAYOR
Atlanta , G eorgia
<!!nrl
1;. Snnbrr11
30303
It is a di s tinct pleasure, on behalf of
all Georgians, to welcome the Atlanta Braves
to our Capital City .
W1'S. ANNY . .. 0 S t J
C•ll: C: UT I Y I[ l ( C:ot CT4" ~
Dear Sport s Fans:
I have often heard it said that your words will come back to haunt you •
and you have heard me say many times that we built the Atlanta Stadium on
ground that we didn 1t own • • • with money that we didn't have . , • for a
t eam that we hadn' t signed • , ,
Well, 1 am glad to be haunted by those words, and can proudly say that:
We built the stadium on an excellent piece of ground, with sound financing,
and with a great te am signed to play for twenty~five years.
We look forward to a close and enduring association between the Braves and
Atlanta .
Georgia has made tremendous progress in
many fie l ds during the past few y ears, and
the coming of the Brave.s to Atlanta has truly
boosted our State into the "Big Leagues" of
sports.
Atlanta and Georgia offer t he Braves a
traditional Southern hospitality. Georgians
will receive wh olesOme entertainment and a
spirit of competition in an atmosphere of
fairness .
With best wi s hes for a long and prosperous
friendship, I am
A tlanta is truly the Home 0£ the Braves . This is a great baseball team in a
great City. Our fans will be the most enthusiastic a nd the most loyal •• .
and we will cheer our Braves on to the pennant, and strive to make Atlanta
t he baseball capital of this country!
_zy you;-
p
IvanAllcn, ~
Mayor
CES/s,.
ATLANTA STADIUM
AUTHORITY
Arthur L. Montgomery
Chairman
Mills 8 . Lane
Vice Chairman
Opie S. Shelton
Secretary-Treasurer
Carling Dinkier
Henry Dorsey
Edgar Forio
Earl Landers
Earl Mann
Harold Mcc art
John A. White (deceased)
ATLANTA
CITY ALDERMEN
Sam Massell, Jr.
President
1st Ward
Robert S. Dennis
E. Gregory Griggs
2nd Ward
E. A. Gilliam
J. M. Flanigen
3rd Ward
William T. Knight
Q. V. Williamson
4th Ward
Hugh Pierce
Charles Leftwich
5th Ward
John A. White (deceased)
G. Everett Millican
6th Ward
Richard Freeman
Cecil Turner
7th Ward
Jack Summers
Milton Farris
8th Ward
Rodney Cook
Douglas Fowlkes
FULTON
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
J. H. Aldredge
Chairman
Archie Lindsey
Vice Chairman
Harold F. Mccart
�ATLANTA BRAVES' 1966 SCHEbUi.E
JULY
APR I L
MON
SUN
WED
TUES
3
4
5
10
11
12
N
13
18
N
N. Y.
24
N . Y.
19
PHIL.
2
N
20
N
S. F.
S. F.
MO N
TUES
2
7
8
9
14
15
N
21
27
N
22
28
29
10
2
1
3
....
4
8
9
HOU.
N
10
11
17
16
N
18
N
HOU.
22
2
CHI.
29
23
N
....
24
30
CHI.
N
25
31
PHIL.
N
12
N
19
7
N
13
ST. L.
N
14
N
21
CHI.
N
26
27
N
MON
7
8
PHIL.
CHI.
CHI.
21
22
28
9
N
16
WED
1
THU
N
2
7
6
13
PITTS.
19
N
14
N
21
N
15
PHIL.
N
22
27
-
N
28
N
23
10
29
N 17
N . Y,
29
18
N
25
24
L. A.
30
CHI.
O& N
L. A.
N
5
N
29
23
HOU.
N
(INN,
N
30
N
6
S. F.
THU
10
N
17
N
24
CHI.
MON
TUES
CHI.
'
N
11
12
N
18
19
D& N
s. ,.
N
25
26
N
13
N
20
N
27
PHIL,
S. F.
N
N
PHIL.
PHIL.
S. F.
N . Y.
L. A .
31
SAT
PHIL.
HOU.
N
CHI.
FRI
5
L. A .
30
!1
• , ,,,._, ( TMI
N
N . Y.
'
ST. l.
W ED
6
12
13
19
20
N . Y.
18
N
THU
CINN.
2
s. ,.
N
0 &: N -O EN O T E S D AY , H I G H T GAME
8
9
15
N
22
ST. L.
27
N
28
16
CHI.
CHI.
21
23
N
29
30
3
4
5
N
HOU.
N
10
N
17
N
24
N
N . Y.
CINN.
PITTS.
PITTS.
PITTS.
N
CINN.
1
OCTOBER
2
3
CINN .
N
S. F.
S. F.
N
HOU.
N. Y.
14
N
ST. l .
26
N
SAT
FRI
N
PITTS.
CHI.
PITTS.
TN- T W I LI GH T DOUB LE H E A D E R
7
PITTS.
N-DENO TES NI GHT G AME
- D ENO T ES
N
L. A.
PITTS.
HOU.
25
S. F.
2
16
N
CJNN.
N
1
4
N
PITTS.
PITTS.
23
N
HOU.
ST. L.
PITTS.
N
22
N
l. A.
SEPTEMBER
SUN
O&N
ST. L.
11
PITTS.
N . Y.
N
(No1e, Atlonlo Does Not G o On Doy l ight Soving Time.)
HOME
ST. L.
N
N 16
4
15
N
4
CHI.
HOU.
L. A .
SAT
N
PHIL.
N
CHI,
9
N. Y.
PHIL.
CHI.
N
N. Y.
PHIL.
PHIL.
20
PITTS.
L A,
8
N. Y.
ST. L.
12
26
N
3
S.F,
S. F.
5
FRI
N
28
W ED
L.A.
HOU.
PHIL.
N
N
L. A .
15
S. F.
TUES
N
ST. l .
3
CHI.
N, Y.
M ON
N
9
L. A.
ST. L.
ST. L.
2
JUN E
SUN
27
TUES
1
14
L. A .
L. A .
21
S. F.
N
AUGUST
28
CH I.
N
ST. L.
N
8-
HOU.
ST. l.
26
N
14
20
ST. l .
SON
N
ST. l.
ST. L.
20
7
s. ,.
HOU.
HO U.
SAT
2
l. A.
13
N
SAT
N
CINN.
(IN N .
CINN.
6
N
Al l * GAME
19
C tNN.
31
6
HOU.
12
CINN.
25
24
N
HOU.
....
18
CINN.
30
FRI
N
PITTS.
PITTS,
ST. l.
5
CINN.
CINN.
CINN.
15
N
PHIL.
PHIL
HOU.
THU
W ED
N
11
l. A.
17
MAY
SUN
5
HOU.
S. F.
N. Y.
N
HOU.
4
3
23
N. Y.
N
L.A.
FRI
S. F.
N ..Y.
N
PHIL
N
l. A .
THU
WED
1
16
N. Y.
PHIL.
PHIL.
26
25
N
TUES
SAT
1
PITTS.
PITTS.
17
FRI
THU
6
MON
SUN
6
CINN.
7
8
CINN.
D OUB L EHEAD E R
....-;t----------- ------------------- -----------------------------------------4
C&Scovers
the bases
in Georgia
M EM B ERS FDIC
W e're stri ctly big-l eag ue in Georgia. N ow more than 60 full service
C&S banking centers th ro ughout the state. Each o ne o ffe rs yo u
a wo rld of helpful fi nancial services. At C&S yo u can save, yo u ca n
bo rrow, yo u can cash a check, sto re va luable documents,
set up a trust fund and hand le alm ost any o ther money ma tter .
in just one visit. Team up w ith us and yo u' re batting a thousand.
THE CITIZENS
&
SOUTHER N B ANK S
Georgia's largest full service bank . .. w here you always g et perso na l interest.
�In The Center of Downtown Atlanta
STAY WHERE
THE PLAYERS STAY
A~
~~
~~
MOTOR HOTEL
SPRING ST. ANO CARNEGlli WAY
AIU COD[ 404 • PHONE &ll·HOD TWX 404·527•22M
Enjoy food at its very, very best in the
GOLDEN PALM RESTAURANT
THE FABULOUS PRIME RIB ROOM
Continuous Entertainment and Dancing
Ni~htly in the RED VELVET LOUNGE
NO COVER · NO MINIMUM , FREE PARKING
BASEBALL, ITS OPPORTUNITY THE NEW MAGNA CHARTA
By ~very measurement commonly employed by the most astute
minds in America, professional baseball is today ranked as one of
the most representative American institutions.
Professional baseball has won this appraisal by no particula r,
isolated action of its own but the public's esteem has been bestowed
upon the game because, by its nature, it is an integral part of American life.
Public ·approbation has been shown in every poss ible manner.
Sixty-five millions have paid admissions to see games in one season;
sixty-one leagues in 492 cities have opened and closed - a season
intact; a cross-section of business and professional men - representative Americans, all - have become officers and directors of clubs;
the language has been enriched by the colorful expressions lifted
bodily from the playing fields, and the youth of America have found
their idols among the stars of the diamond . The womanhood of
America has taken the game to their hearts and , by virtue of their
presence, have quietly but surely encouraged restraints in word and
action upon the field without in any manner destroying the fierce,
competitive nature of the game. Yes , America has proclaimed professional baseball as one of its representative institutions. It is only
fa Lr, and perhaps it is wise, to ask the que·stion-"How has baseball
been able to occupy this spot in the affections of the American
people?"
The answer to that question is, in my opin ion, one of the most
illuminating commentaries on "The American Way" that any Ameri can could possibly make.
Baseball is a reflection of the American viewpoint respecting
every important question. This viewpoint is expressed by the nature of
the game upon the playing field and is expressed by the administrative
structure that governs the organization of professional baseball .
Baseball is American democracy in action.
2
�THE FAMOU5 3 LEGGi;D BAR·B·QUED C\1\CKEN
• BAR·B·QU~D RIBS• TAKE. OUT PIZZA• PARlYTl<A'l'S
\loppYHerwan~
15
ATLANTA BRAVES
TICKET .OUTLETS
1966
All-Time Home
Run Leaders
1. Babe Ruth ...... 714
DAVISON'S ..
2. Jimmie Foxx ..... 534
THREE ATLANTA LOCATIONS:
Downtown
Lenox Square
Columbia Mall
3. Ted ' Williams . . . . 521
4. Mel Ott ......... 511
OUT OF TOWN:
Athens
Macon
Augusta
Columbus - downtown
6. Lou Gehrig . . . . . .494
7. EDDIE MATHEWS .477*
DELTA AIR LINES
8. Stan Musial . .. . .475
TICKET OFFICES
9. Mickey Mantle .. .473*
SOUTHERN AIR LINES
Welcome to the world's first
10. Duke Snider ..... 407
TICKET OFFICES
all-electric stadium
11. Ernie Banks ... . .404*
WESTERN UNION
Welcome, Braves! We hope you're enjoying your splendid
new home. The handsome Atlanta stadium scores high in
comfort, convenience and efficiency. And welcome, sports fans.
Everything · here is new, modern and all-electric, designed
to increase your pleasur e. A perfect setting to "play ball."
12. HANK AARON .... 398*
13. Gil Hodges ...... 370
14. Ralph Kiner . . .. .369
USE YOUR AMERICAN
EXPRESS OR
DINER'S
CLUB CREDIT CARD TO
15. Joe DiMaggio .... 361


Active


ALL LOCATIONS
PURCHASE
GEORGIA POWER COMPANY
Players
ea,uo1e4
BRAVE
TICKETS.
E NGRAVED
PLAQUES &
NAME
PLATES
PHOTO SERVICE
FRANK 0. ("RED") CARSON
447 Ponce de Leon Ave. N.E.
CUSTOM QUALITY

DEVELOPING

ONE DAY BLACK & WHITE
o
Atlanta, Georgia 30308
COPY NEGATIVE MAKING
PRINTING
o
ENLARGING
ONE DAY COLO R o MINOX PROCESSING
PH. 875-6173
RUBBER
MARKING PRODUCTS -
STA M PS - SE AL S - AUTO TAG S
3
�~erever You Live
What
have you
got
to lose ...
You're Just
Minutes From Sears!
22 Stores Serving Atlanta
Sears
Your child depends on you. Why risk his future
with inadequate insurance. Cotton States' EconoPlan makes it easy for you to afford needed protection now with one, small, convenient monthly
payment. Get the details on Cotton States' complete personal and commercial insurance from
your nearest agent today. He's listed in the
Yellow Pages.
any hour day or lli[!ht
SHOP BY PHONE WITH
SEARS CATALOGS ...
CALL 873-2311
COTTON _STATES
INSURANCE
Pick Up at Any of Sears 22 Convenient Locations
3348 Peachtree Road, N .E . • Atlanta, Georgia
CONCESSION -PRICES
Coca Cola
Fanta
Sprite
Canada Dry Gingerale
Coffee
Milk. White or Chocolate
Sealtest
.15
.15
.15
.15
.15
GOURMET STANDS
&
&
&
&
&
.25
.25
.25
.25
.25
.25
Corn Dogs
Chili Dogs
.40
.40
Hot Corned Beef
Hot Savory Southern Ham
.90
.75
Chick-fil-A
Chick-fil-A-French Fries in Basket
.75
1.00
.50
.50
.60
.60
Fried Shrimp-French Fries in Basket
1.00
Beer
Falstaff
Carlings Black Label
Miller High Life
Budweiser
4
has everything
Redfern Hot Dogs
Lazar "Kosher" Hot Dogs
Hot B B Q on Roll
Hamburger (¼ lb.)
French Fries
Assorted Sandwiches
.45 to
Served on Southern Bakery Bread & Rolls
.30
.40
.45
.50
.25
.85
Potato Chips
Fisher Peanuts
Caramel Corn
Popcorn with Megaphone
Ice Cream (Aristocrat)
.15
.15
.20
.25
.25
Chinese Egg Roll
Pizza with Cheese
Pizza with Pepperoni
.35
1.00
1.20
Thick Milk Shakes
.40
Falstaff Draft Beer
Miller High Life, 12 oz. Bottle
Budweiser, 12 oz. Bottle
.50
.60
.60
Blue Paneled Stands are Gourmet Stands. Located
on Lower Level, adjacent to Section 110 in Left
Field, Section 109 in Right Field. Upper Level,
adjacent to Section 302.
��J. D. Steak Ranch
2214 Stewart Ave., S.W.
ATLANTA, GEORGIA
CONGRATULATIONS
BRAVES
We are proud to have furnished equipment in the commissary, concessions
stands, club room and bar.
If You Don't Want
A
Good Steak At A
HOTEL & RESTAURANT
SUPPLY CO.
Reasonable Price
DON'T VISIT USI
382 West Peachtree St., N.W,
Atlanta, Georgia
522-7451
George Sparks, President





Manufacturers and distributors of all
types of food service equipment.
(
\
HENRY "HANK" AARON
777 W. Whitehall St., S.W.
Atlanta, Ga.
30310
CAPITOL
FOODS
Phone:
755-4511
Institutional
Frozen Foods . • •
Grocers . • • Sea Foods
This slugging outfielder from
Mobile, Ala. is in his 13th season
with the Braves. Aaron joined the
Braves in 1954 after a brilliant
two year minor league stay. Since
joining the Braves Aaron has won
many honors. He was the League's
Most Valuable Player in 1957, has
led the National Leag1:1e in hitting
twice, total bases twice, runs
batted in three times, doubles four
times, hits twice, home runs twice,
slugging percentage twice, consecutive games hitting streaks
twice, games played once, and in
addition he has received the Gold
Glove award as top fielding right
fielder in the National League
three times. Hank has the highest
life time batting average among
active players, .320, and has a
career total of 398 home runs .
He and Eddie Mathews rank as
number one home run duo of all
time with a career total of 803
home runs.
. The hot dog
you're eating
right now
tastes betterbecause -t'~=~.,.--~
served
with
Gulden's
Mustard. ·
iiiiii
You 'll like its )
( smoother flavor
at home, too.
moment
ATLANTA BRAVES
USE
6
Fifteen Minutes
from the
Atlanta Stadium
Think a
• • • Of course the home of the
BRE AD
Alcoholic Beverages Served.
HENRY AARO N AND
EDDIE MATHEWS
NUMBER ONE HOME RUN DUO
OF ALLTIM E.
How did this day at the game
begin ? Probab ly with a phone call to
a friend. Or to the ticket office.
So ma ny pleasant occasions begin
with a ph one call. And remembe r
... whether it's Long Distance or local
... we are always glad to get you ·
in touch with the people, places
and things yo u enjoy most.
@southern Bell
�THE
ORKIN MAN
Welcomes
the BRAVES
To Atlanta ...
lV.lUR.IE
c:::xc;;.~~·s
The Wo rld's Greatest
B aseball Club
E veryone a t Orkin of Atlanta extends a hearty welcome to yoti Bobby Bragan, your coaches, and your
players. Our best wishes for
a season of home nms and
a pennant-winning finish .
A Division of RoWM , I . .
ATLANTA BRAVES TICKET PRICES
LOCATION
PRICE
Field Level .. .. ........ .. .. .. .... ........... .... ...... ..... ....... .
Loge Level ....... .. ... ................... .. ........ .. .. .... ...... .
Upper Level .... ............. .. ............. ..... .. .............. .
Upper Level Child Under 12 .......... .. ........ ... .... .
Lower Pavilion ..... ..... .. .. ........ ........... .. ...... ........ .
Lower Pavilion Child under 12 ... .. .. .... .... .. .. ...... .
General Admission ....... .. .... .... ...... ... .......... ..... .. .
General Admission Child under 12 ...... .. ..... .. ... . .
$3.50
$3.50
$2.00
$1.00
$2.00
$1.00
$1.00
$ .50
ATLANTA STADIUM DATA
LOCATION
LETS YOU KNOW WHEN THE FUEL IS LOW
VU-lighter.
~
,Ne
NO. SEATS
Club Level .. .. .. ....... ...... .. ... .. .... .... .. .. ....... .... .. 2,755
Dugout Level .. . .. . .. .. .. . ... .. .. .. .. . ... .. .. . .. .. .... . .. ... . . 1,506
Field Level
....... .... ...... .... .. .. ..... ... .. .. .......... 16,757
Loge .... ......... .... ........ ........ .... .... ... .................. 2,100
Pavilion Level ... ....... ........... .... ........ .. ... .. .... .. 4 ,676
Upper Level .. .. .............. .. ................ ....... ........ 17,279
General Ad mission .. .. .. .. .... . .. .. . . . . .. . . . . .. 5.820
Capacity .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. . .. .. .. .. . .. 50,893
TICKET OFFICE
Atlanta Stadium, Capitol Avenue
Monday thru Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
7
�AMERICAN SE(:URIT-r
MOVING & STORAGE
CO., INC.
Welcome Braves
Atlanta's Leading
Long Distance Mover of
Household Goods
"PROS IN BASEBALL11
SHERWIN
Very Economical Rates
Call For Estimate
On Your Next Move
11
W ILLIAM S
PROS IN PAINTS"
There is a Branch or Dealer Near You
Telephone 767-2638
1240 Oakleigh Drive - East Point, Ga.
HAROLD W. BREFFLE
President
BRAVES SCOUTING STAFF
C
JOE BOWMAN
MIDWEST SUPERVISOR
JOHN MOORE
SOUTHWEST SUPERVISOR
Hal Bevan-Louisiana
Lou Brisse-South Carolina .
Lloyd Christopher-California
Mel Didier-Louisiana
Gerald Flathman-Minnesota
Johnny Groth-Florida
Robert Hartsfield--Georgia
Myron Hayworth-f'./orth Carolina
Robert Knoerlein-Maryland
Al Lamacchia-Texas
ATLANTA STADIUM
INFORMATION
Atlanta St ad ium-Baseball
Capacity (50,893)
JOHN "HONEY" RUSSELL
NORTHEASTERN SUPERVISOR
FRED "DIXIE" WALKER
SOUTHEAST SUPERVISOR
Harry Minor-California
John O'Neil-New York
Floyd Patterson-Kansas
Nap Reyes-Puerto Rico
Billy Smith-Tennessee
Clyde Sukerforth-Maine
Arthur Sulliva'n-New York
James "Zach" Taylor-Florida
Jack Tighe-Michigan
Al Unser-Illinois
RAY HAYWORTH
Director of Scouts
RADIO - TELEVISION
INFORMATION
Team up
with
Play-by-Play Announcers:
Milo Hamilton, Larry Munson,
and Ernie Johnson
HUBBARD
Telephone: (404) 522-7630
Field Measu rements,
L. to R. . . . 330-402-330
r,
Game Times: Night Games8:05 p.m .
I
Originating Station
Radio-WSB (750)
Television-WSB (CH 2)
Sunday Day Games
1:35 p.m.
Saturday Day Games 1: 15 p.m.
April 23 -
2:1 5 p.m.
Twi-Nite Doubleheaders
6:05 p.m.
May 30 - 6:00 p.m.
(Eastern St andard Time)
There is nothing more " fitti ng" than a pa ir of
finely ta ilored HUBBARD slac)<s.
HUBBARD SLACKS
BRE MEN , GEORGIA
8
SPONSORS: The Coca-Cola Company and it's bottlers, Falstaff Brewing Company, and the P. Lori lla rd
Company will be the principal sponsors of Braves games. Delt a Airlines
and Hertz Corporation will also pa rt icipate. The Pu re Oil Company will
sponsor both the pre-game and t he
post-game shows.
Number of Games
Radio-All ga mes, home and away.
Television-1 8 road ga mes
NOTES: In addition to the 18 regula r
season telecasts five of t he Braves
spring tra in ing games will be tele vised.
Aside from WSB radio and TV t he
Braves network will include approximately 35 radio st ations and 18 TV
Channels in Georgia, Florida, Ala bama, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee.
�BRAVES FARM DEPARTMENT
JOHN MULLEN, Farm Director
WALTER BECK-Minor League
Pitching Instructor
JOHN MULLEN
MINOR LEAGUE AFFILIATES 1966
CLUB
NICKNAME
LEAGUE
CLASS
MANAGER
Richmond
Braves
International
AAA
Bill Adair
Austin
Braves
Texas
AA
"Hub" Kittle
Kinston
Braves
Carolina
A
Andy Pafko
Yakim a
Braves
Northwest
A
(To be named later)
W. Palm Beach
Braves
Florid;3 State
A
Buddy Hicks
Sarasota
Braves
Florida Rookie
A
Tom Saffel
9
�11
GREAT on the
HOME PLATE!11
Avis needs you.
You don't need Avis.
Avis never forgets this.
Give us a ring at
522-3328
For out of town reservations
call the Avis Reservation Center:
ALWAYS U.S.D.A. CHOICE
~ E N D E R 10 TIMES OUT OF 10!
AVIS rents al l makes of cars .. . f eatures PLY MOUTH .
HOW TO KEEP SCORE
The simple code used by Baseball Writers makes scoring
easy and adds to your enjoyment of the game. The code is based
on numbering all players by position, as follows:
1 Pitcher
2 Catcher
3 First Baseman
4 Second Baseman
5 Third Baseman
6 Shortstop
7 Left Fielder
8 Center Fielder
9 Right Fielder
Begin scoring in lower right-hand corner, showing how batter
reached base (if he did!) . Then show what occurs to him as he
circles the bases. Use lower right corner for first base; upper
right for second; upper left for third and lower left for home plate.
There are several ways to indicate base hits. One of the
simplest is by drawing a horizontal line at right lower corner. If
a hit goes to right field, run a short vertical line at RIGHT end of
the hqrizontal line; if a hit to left place the vertical line at LEFT
of horizontal line; and if hit to center, place it at CENTER of line.
If hit to an infielder, place position number of fielder at end of
vertical line. Thus, a single through second base would be shown
by making a horizontal line with a short vertical line at right of
it, and a "4" marked at its end.
BETTER
FINE
LAUNDRY
CLEANING
I
\
'
APITAL CIT
Phone 522-6423
10
In case of an extra base hit, extend vertical line to second
base for two-bagger; if a triple, run vertical line
to second, continue horizontally from second to
third base; and for a home run , run line all the
way around square and place " X" in center.
Illustration shows 3-base hit into center field .
Other
Batsman,
Sacrifice,
Strikeout,
plays are indicated as follows: Base on Balls, W; Hit
HB; Foul, F; Error, E; Wild Pitch, WP; Stolen Base, S;
SH; Passed Ba ll, PB; Balk, B; Strikeout, K; Called
CK; Fielder's Choice, FC.
An out is indicated by the fielder's number. Thus a fly to left
is merely '7'. An infield out, short to first, '6-3'.
The diagram indicates that the batter singled
to left, stole second; went to th ird on a passed
ball, and was thrown out at the plate, shortstop
to catcher.
�The
Dillard Paper Company
is pleased to have
been chosen
to furnish the paper needs
of the
GO WITH
WINNER!
magnificent
• To the next town or across the nation
ATLANTA STADIUM
• Charters for group travel
• Escorted tours to Europe
• Escorted "Discover America" tours
"easiest travel on earth"
212 Sprinr St. N. W.
Qll[IKIIIO • C....TT[ • UlUCM • WUJIIIMCTOIC • WINSTOII-SALUl • 1MOMASY1lU • ATWITA • IICON
AUC:USll • Ul{[IWIUE • CILUMIU. • NMII[ . ••sroc . RICHMOHO • U OlYIU( • I IRMINCHlM
JAckson 5-1862
�·.. · uoT
DIGGJ
DAWG!
~
It's a Redfern wiener!
The freshest wieners in town, sold exclusively at Braves' Ga mes
Outside the Atlanta stadium there are only 1,067
places where you can buy wieners THIS fresh!
They' re the 1,067 stores in Greater Atlanta and
Georgia which sell Redfern Wieners and other
smackin' fine Redfern meat products.
The fresh taste is there because Redfern
Wieners ·are fresh -made EVERY DAY in Atlanta
and delive red direct to t hese stores. Not only
"BETTER MAKE IT
12
that, each package is CONTROL DATED - so,
if it's not sold right away, it will be snatched up
by an alert Redfern salesman. Th at's why Red fern Wieners are the only wieners fres her th an
springtime.
Enjoy one while you watc h t he ga m e, and
when you shop, remember th at yo ur family will
enjoy Redfe rn' s ext ra fresh flavo r, t oo!
Redfern ~
Redfe rn MAKES IT BETTER .. . AND FRESHER TOO!"
�SALESMEN FOR GROUP TICKET ORDERS TO BRAVES GAMES
AREA SALES MANAGER ... ....... . . . . EDDIE GLENNON . .. . . . . . . .. . . . 522-7630
Atlanta Stadium
Atlanta, Georgia
Fred Sington, Jr.
Sington Sporting Goods
Com pany
Gadsden , Ala bama
Phone: Off ice 546-5233
Home 547 -6626
Dave Sington
Sington Sporting Goods
Company
Huntsville, Alabama
Phone: Office 539-2738
Home 539-2544
Harold Seiler
150 2 2nd Avenue
Birmingham, Al abama
Phone: Area Code 205
FA 2-2525
822-2850
Jesse Royal
Opelika Hardware Co.
Opelika, Alabama
Phone: Area Code 205
74 5-3772
Brownell Tours
George Brownell, Pres.
P. 0 . Box 2029
Birm ingham, Ala. 3520 1
Phone 323-8981
Don Hawkins · Group Sales
Azalea City Travel
P.O. Box 130 5
3 North Royal Street
Mobile, Alabama
Dick Brunnell
Phone 433-5465
Persons-Landsey Travel
Service, Inc.
129 Central Avenue
P.O. Box 419
St. Petersburg, Florida
Cha rles Proper
Area Code 813
Office 894-4646
Home 828-89 15
Ralph Carroll
Hill Drug Company
Dalton, Georgia
Phone: Home 278-5985
Office 278-2 102
Andrew J. Brown
Travel-Ease
224 7th Street, Box 1187
Augusta, Georgia
Phone: 724- 1491
Travel Tours, Inc.
D. Jack Pharr, Pres.
Box 92
Charlotte, N. C.
Phone: 322-2125
Bobby Kemp
916 Tift Avenue (2611
Whisperin g Pines Rd.)
Albany, Georgia
Phone: Area Code 912
Office 435-5366
Home 432-0584
Dick Farrell
3800 West ern Blvd .
Raleigh, North Carolin a
Phone: Office 755-2 106
Home 832-0096
Bob Fulp
P. 0 . Box 13
Tri nity, North Carolina
Phone: 431 -2489
Glenn Wilcox
Wilcox Travel Agency
301 Northwestern Bank
Bldg.
Asheville, North Carolina
Phone: Area Code 704
254-0746
Home 254-1567
Keener .. Garrett
3 25 Dellwood Drive
Greenville, S. C.
Phone: Area Code 803
239-1321
Home CH-4 -4126
Dan Jones
Cooper River Playground
Com mission
North Charleston, S. C.
Phone: Office 747-3667
Home 743-3033
Piedmont Tours
8 River Street
Piedmont , S. C.
Ted Davi s - 8 45-7605
Bud Pike
1800 Magnolia Avenue
Knoxvi lle, Ten nessee
Phone: 525-9564
Home 689-5069
John Cate
Cat e Bros. Store
Cleveland, Tennessee
Phone: 4 76-5751
Home 4 76-4 264
Sam Hale · Bud Martin
Martin -Thompson Sporting
Goods Co.
713 Cherry Street
Chattanooga, Tennessee
Phone: 267-3373
Home 892-2981
Trailblazers
L. L. Treanor
Box 363
Nashville, Tennessee
Frank D. Nidiffer
Appa lach ian Athletic
House
613 Shelby Street
P. 0. Box 411
Bristol, Tennessee
13
�Home of Rogers Peet, Kuppenheimer,
Yorkshire and Middleton Clothes
,PARKS-CHAMBERS
ESTA BLISHED
1ege
D o wntown • L enox • W . P aces Ferry
/
BRAYES' HOME ON THE ROAD
JACK TAR
RICE HOTEL
WARWICK HOTEL
HOTEL
Houst on, Texas
Philadelphia, Penna.
San Francisco,
California
CHASE PAR K
11
Stay With the • • •.
ROOSEVELT
B R AVES
PLAZA
HOTEL
At the Chicago
St. Louis,
SH ERATON HOTEL
New York
Missou ri
Chicago, Ill.
N. Y.
SHERATON WEST
HOTEL
Braves' Home in Pittsburgh
Make it Yours
SHERATON GIBSON
HOTEL
Los Angeles, Cal.
Peter Fuller, Gen. Mgr.
For Reservations
Call 521 -21 82 Atlanta
PENN SHERATON
John H. Scheivly, Manager
Pittsburgh,
Pennsylvania
Fountain Square--Cincinnat i, Ohio
1966 ATLANTA BRAVES ILLUSTRATED (Yearbook)
t1ghty pages of interesting pictures, stories, record s, and player pictures in full colo r for one dollar. Pu rc hase
t hem at At lanta Stadium, Bra ves Downtown Ticket Office , your favor ite news stand , or by mail order.
To order by mail: Send check or money order for $1.30 to Braves Year Book, P.O. Box 1122, Atlanta, Georgia.
This will cover the cost of b9ok, tax, and mailing.
14
�Salted
in the Shell
PEANUTS
DELICIOUS . . .
Made by the
World's Largest Processor
of peanuts in the shell
Sold in Atlanta Stadium
While in ATLANTA
BRAVES
BRAVES
HOMEATTENDANCE
ROAD ATTENDANCE
FIGURES
FIGURES
1953-1,826,397
1953- 939,496
1954-2,131,388
1954-1,020,813
1955-2,005,836
1955- 915,804
1956-2 ,046,331
1956-1, 245,248
1957-2,21 5,404
1957-1,305, 137
1958-1 ,971 ,1 0 1
1958-1,547,255
ONE OF
AMERICA'S
TEN FINEST
1959-1 ,749,772
1959-1,633,244
(By National Poll)
1960-1,497, 799
1960-1,540,389
1961- 1,101,441
1961-1,197,534
1962-
766,927
1962-1,004, 144
1963-
773 ,018
1963-1,092,208
1964- 9 10 ,911
1964-1,212,087
1965-
1965-1,405,069
555,589
NO COVER

NO ADMISSION

PLANTATION
i s Open Week Days
Ti l l 2· A. M.
DANCING - 8 P.M. -'Til Closing
1480 Pe a chtree Street, N.W.
Atlanta
GET THE BEST . . . GET
OFFICE SU PPLIES

OFFICE FURNITURE
~•Xi'lie~
OFFICE EQUIPMENT
SINCE 194 6
EAST POINT
761-0633
MAKE-U M B R AVES
HEA P S T RONG
15
�B efore or Afffr tlte Ball
D IN NER 5pm-
Gr1111 f'
MIDN IGHT . OPEN OAILY-7am- 2am
TipariRo
bvRobt
· Burns
<l>
ef·'
EDDIE MATHEWS
Best seller at the
concession stand.
CHfM ICAl!.
Eddie Mathews, slugging third baseman of the Atlanta Braves, was born in
Texarkana, Texas. Eddie is in his 15th
season with the Braves and has amassed a·number of records in that time.
He holds Maj or League records for most
home runs in a lifetime for a third
baseman, most home runs in a season
for a third baseman, most assists by
a third baseman in a lifetime. He also
holds National League records for most
chances accepted by a third baseman
in a lifetime, tied with Willie Mays for
most years 30 or more home runs (10).
Eddie has led the League in home runs
twice and bases on balls four times.
Only six sl uggers in the history of the
game have hit more home runs than
Eddie' s 464.
grurTzemanu
house
RE~TA URANT • KING ' S L OUNGE
P eacht ree at 7th · P ark Free · 874-3519
ATLANTA
and
AUNT FANNY'S CABIN
Welcomes
THE ATLANTA BRAVES
to
e
ATLANTA
lNV[l 0PlS & P AOA(.1,.C,
Please Pass the Chicken
When you need
Glass
TONY CLONINGER
Tony Cloninger, f ireballing right
hander from Iron Station, North Carolina, won more games (24) in 1965
t han any right hander in the Maj or
Leagues. Tony pitched a one hitter
against th e Mets, a two hitter against
Cincinnati, and combined with Ken
Johnson and Chi Chi Olivo for a two
hitter against t he Dodgers. He also
pitched one of t he Braves' three shut0uts. Tony holds the club' s record for
most strike outs in a season with 211
in 1965. Tony has been described as a
strong finisher, who is almost unbeatable once he gets by the first few
innings. He is a hard worker and is
always in good condition.
16
u
AUTOMOSILE OLASS CO.
MOBILE GU~SS SERVICE
654 SPtllNO st..N W·AlLA-.1 •,0A
Call
874-5712
AUTOMOBILE GLASS CO.
656 Spring St., N.W.
Atlanta, Georgia
�VOICES
J
MILO HAMILTON is
Chief Announcer for the
Atlanta Braves. He is a
native of Fairfield, Iowa,
and received a degree
·in radio speech from the
University of Iowa. Milo
started his career as an
announcer, while serving
in the Seebees with the
Armed Forces Radio
Network.
The nationally prominent sportscaster has broadcast for the
former St. Louis Browns, · St. Louis Cardinals and the Chicago Cubs: He shared the
mike with Bob Elson on a 90-station Chicago White Sox network.
Hamilton came to Atlanta from Chicago
ra dio station WCFL. In 1963 he was named
Chicago's " Sportsman of the Year." He
announced Big Ten football and basketball, and had called play-by-play of at
least 250 football , basketball and baseball
games each year since 1961.
In addition to being "Voice of the
Braves", Milo is Six O'Clock Sports Editor
of WSB-TV and presents a fifteenrmihute
warm-up "Meet the Braves" before each
game on WSB-TV, as well as a five-minute
progra·m "B"rave Talk" at 6:25 p.m. arid
11:20 p.m . on WSB Radio.
i
Sports-m inded Georgians look
t o WSB Televis ion. In addition to carrying 18 out-of-town
Braves baseball games, WSBTV carri es " Meet the Braves" ,
a fifteen-m inut e warm-up before each game .. . NBC Major
League Basebal l .. . the AllStar Game .. . and, of course,
the Worl d Series. WSB-TV wil l
offer many of these t op games
in col or. Six O'Clock and
El ev en O' Clo ck Newsroom
Sports are also in color.
WSB-TV
CKANNEL
2
Of THE
BRAVES
.
LARRY MUNSON, a
member of the Atlanta
Braves broadcast team,
has a distinguished
background . in sportscasting of baseball and .,
other sports. The Minnesota native began his
radio career in 1945,
describing play-by-play
of University of Wyoming football and basketball.
.
Munson shifted to Nashville, Tennessee,
in 1947 and began a highly successful
stand of 14 years as voi.ce of the Nashville Vols of the Southern Association anp
anchor man for botb Vanderbilt University
football and basketball. He, in fact, · was
the first member of the press and radio
to travel with the Commodores, th:e year
being 1947.
·
_
Last year marked his 16th season as
voice of Vanderbilt basketball, and his
10th as chief announcer of Vandy football and sports director of Station WSM.
His excellence wa s· rewarded by a national
sportswriters and sportscasters organization, wh jch .voted him the No. 1 sj:Jpn:~c·aster. in · Tennessee for t~e past four
years.
.
ERNIE JOHNSON, Associate Director of Broadcast OperatioRs for The
Atlanta Braves and
member of the Braves
broadcas t team, has
been a member of the
Braves orga nization for
22 years. Ernie pitched
for the Braves in 1952,
when the club's home
was Boston, and pitched
for the Milwaukee Braves
from 1953 through 1958. He was a member of the 1957 World Champion Braves
and appeared rn three World Series games.
His last year as an active ball player was
with the Baltimore Orioles in 1959.
·
During 1962 Johnson was the color
man for the Braves TV games. In February 1963, he was hired as full time
Adm inistrative Assistant to President John
McHale, and in May,· 1963 was appointed
Public Relations Directpr of the Club. In
September of 1965, Johnson assumed
t°he duties of Associate Oirector of Broadcast Operations for the Braves. In addition to announcing, he assists Jim Fasz~olz, bir: pf Broadcast Operation,s, in setting UR and administering the extensive
Braves ' Radio anq TV Network.
WSB
RAD.I Q
750
When it comes to Baseball,
everybody in WSB-Land comes
to Radio 750, "The Sports
Voice of the South." Look at
the line-up: 162 Braves games
. .. the All-Star Basebal l game
. . . the World Series ... Milo
Ha milton's "Brave Talk" . . .
Frank Stiteler's " Sports Parade" and " Sports Final" .. .
" Schaefer on Sports" ... Monitor Sports . . . Plus , more
Sports at any moment on WSB
Radio.
17
�BC>N"Y. tak~s you out to the ball game
RESEARCH MAKES THE DIFFERENCE
'
wherever you are
Boating, swimming, camping . . . now you can relax outdoors anywhere and still see the ball
game.
SONY
takes a new step forward with a personal television that goes where you go.
No
need ever to miss your favorite show.
Inspect the complete Sony line in
our fabulous new showroom. Your
business card is all the introduction
you need. Ample parking facilities
on premises.
BEN HYMAN
AND COMPANY, INC.
Jr7 /wlesale Distributors / Pre,nimn JJi·v ision
715 West Peachtree St., N. E., Atlanta, c::-a.
..
18
Area Code 40-1 / 875-8115
I
�You are enjoying the music
of the Seeburg Hampshire ...
The Hampshire. Dua l Ultra-Voioo Speaker and large,
2-speed Leslie speaker, with two 40 watt amplifi cation
channels, provide ma jest ic stereo sound with clear,
throbbing bass. Continuously va riable Vibrato Control perm its
instant adjustm ent to any speed or depth. 32 voices
including 4 pre-sets; Guitar, Harp, Xylophone and 32-note
Chimes. Select-A-Rhythm elect ronically produces
astonishing percussion effects.
The superb Seeburg Hampshire is fine furniture in the contemporary
manner . .. richly done in a selection of lovely wood s. It is a magnificent
instrument with a range and versatility to match the accomplished artist
. . . and inspire the beginner. You will never outgrow it. And the brilliance
of Seeburg space-age, solid state engineering has created an electronic
masterwork that is impervious to humidity, time and atmospheric
conditions. You wi ll fi nd an impressive collection of Seeburg Organs
at better music dealers everywhere.
i,EEBURG®
A fresh new voice in electronic organs
AMERICAN LEAGUE PITCHERS
BALT IMORE
13 Barber
38 Sarnowski
40 Bertaina
32 Brabender
27 Bunker
35 Caria
25 Drabowsky
29 Hall
18 Larsen
28 Leonhard
19 Mc Nally
17 Miller, John
37 Miller, Stu
22 Palmer
36 Phoebus
39 Watt
DETROIT
37 Aguirre
41 Brown
22 Fisher
18 Fox
20 Gladdi ng
46 Graham
39 Hiller
43 Holtgrave
47 Kilkenny
49 Korince
29 Lalich
40 Marentette
42 Navarro
48 Patterson
28 Penna
15 Sherry
45 Small
21 Sparma
14 Wickersham
-
BOSTON
28 Bennett
27 Brandon
15 Charton
4 3 Dowd
40 Gray
37 Grilli
36 Herron
44 Jackson
16 Lonborg
45 Magrini
23 Morehead
19 Osinski
17 Radatz
46 Robinson
49 Rohr
21 Sadowski
29 Sanders
30 Santiago
18 Stephenson
26 Wilson
KANSAS CITY
Aker
Bosworth
Buschhorn
Dickson
Dobson
Hickman
Hunter
Joyce
Krausse
Lindbald
Monteagudo
Nash
Odom
O'Donoghue
Segui
Sheldon
Stock
Talbot
Tompkins
Wyatt
23
52
20
21
47
22
27
30
29
46
34
31
13
26
17
15
18
28
32
33
CALIFORNIA
43 Brunet
32 Burdette
31 Chance
38 Gatewood
39 Lee
33 Lopez
40 May
45 McGlothlin
17 Newman
57 Rubio
49 Sanford
23 Sukla
37 Warner
CHICAGO
47 Bolio
30 Buzhardt
28 Fisher
41 Higgins
20 Harlen
19 Howard
25 John
38 Johnston
27 Klages
45 Lamabe
23 Locker
48 Nyman
43 Peters
32 Pizarro
31 Wilhelm
CLEVELAND
39 Bell
38 Boyd
46 Closter
40 Culver
34 Hargan
37 Heffner
45 Kelley
31 Kralick
48 McDowell
44 McMahon
42 Siebert
43 Stange
32 Terry
33 Tiant
35 Weaver, Floyd
41 Weaver, Jim
MINNESOTA
23 Boswell
35 Cimino
41 Fosnow
33 Grant
36 Katt
27 Klippstein
26 Merritt
49 Morris
29 Nelson
40 Niesen
48 Ollom
17 Pascual
31 Perry
19 Pleis
30 Roggenburk
39 Roland
23 Siebler
18 Stigman
15 Worthington
NEW YORK
23 Beck
28 Blanco
56 Bouton
45 Cullen
24 Downing
50 Downs
16 Ford
19 Friend
39 Hamilton
29 Jurewicz
52 Peterson
14 Ramos
18 Reniff
47 Schroeppel
22 Stafford
30 Stottlemyre
58 Womack
WASHINGTON
36
50
35
17
19
-27
31
18
29
16
22
20
26
24
28
Coleman
Cox
Craig
Duchworth
Hannan
Kline
Koplitz
Kreutzer
Loun
McCormick
Moore
Narum
Ortega
Richert
Ridzik
TOP
LINE-UP
FOR
TASTE
Tareyton
,U
OIM( ,\IIIUICAN
TOIACCOCO.
111BB1II
~
Q \. l\ llft UC.AA( f fl \
v
BM
FILTIERS
IIC.(.(1! 4 MVI ... IOM(CO CO
HOPKINS MOTEL
Sky Room Restaurant
5 MINUTES SOUTH OF
STADIUM ON 1-75
COCKTAILS
ORGAN MUStr
�cM'ore taste .. Jine tobacco ...tey em
PIRATES
~
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
9
8
10
AB
11
R
12
H
13
RBI
14
PO
A
E
Stay at aDinkier Hotel/ Motor
Hotel...the leading hotel chain
throughout the South
In Atlanta ... Home of the Braves,
stop at the Dinkier Motor Hotel
98 Forsyth Street N. W.
OTHER PROPERTI ES
The Dinkier-Tutwiler Hotel
Birmingham, Alabama
Dinkier Carriaae Inn
Huntsville, Alabama
Howard Johnson's Moto r Loda•
Daytona Beach, Florida
Sun 'n Sand Hotel Court
Daytona Beach, Florida
Golden Sands Motor Lodge
Jacksonville, Florida
Belvedere Motor Inn
Decatur, Georgia
Campbell House Inn
Lexington, Kentu cky
Governor House Motor Hotel
New Orleans, Louisiana
Howard Johnson's Motor Lodge
Ash eville, North Carolina
Howard Johnson's Motor Lodge
Char lotte, North Carolina
3. Harry Walker, Mgr.
2. Hal Smith, Coach
4. Johnny Pesky, Coach
5. A. Grammas, Coach
6. Clyde Kin&, Coach
28. Steve Blau, P
Howard Johnson's Motor Loda•
Fayettesvi lle, North Carolina
Farragut Hote l
Knoxville, Tennessee
Dinkier-Andrew Jackson Hotel
Nashville, Tennessee
43.
26.
22.
32.
34.
19.
Don Cardwell, P
Elroy Fae,, P
Woody Fryman, P
Vernon Law, P
Alvin MeB11n, P
P. Mikkelsen, P
29.
38.
25.
39.
31.
22.
Don Schwall , P
J. Shellenbaek, P
Tommy Sisk, P
Bob Veale, P
Luke Walker, P
Jesse Gonder, C
12.
1D.
14.
7.
17.
9.
Jerry May, C
Jim Pagllaronl, C
Gene Alley, Inf.
Bob Balley, Inf.
D. Clendenon, Inf.
B. Mazeroskl, Inf.
11.
30.
18.
21.
Josa Pagan, Inf.
A. Rodgars, Inf.
Matty Alou, O.F.
R. Clemente, O.F.
24. Jerry Lynch, O.F.
15. Manny Mota, O.F.
45. D. Roberts, 0. F.
8. W. Star&ell, O.F.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
UMPIRES
BRAVES
POWWOW
-FALSTAFF
AND HOW!
Falsta ff Brewi ng Corpora tion, St. Louis, Mo.
ZIQ
BRAVES
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
9 10
8
AB
R
H
RBI
1--1-1-.1=2-+-1~3,-+~1~4~
PO
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
ALBERT J. BARLICK
WILLIAM BURKHART
HENRY "SHAG " CRAWFORD
AUGUST J. DONATELLI
ROBERT A. ENGEL
THOMAS D. GORMAN
DOUGLAS HARVEY
WILLIAM A. JACKOWSKI
JOHN KIBLER
STAN LANDES
CHRIS PELEKOUDAS
JOHN PRYOR
FRANK SECORY
MELVIN STEINER
ED SUDOL
ED VARGO
ANTHONY VENZON
HARRY WENDELSTEDT
19. LEE WEYER
20. WILLIAM WILLIAMS
A E
Before or after the gameenjoy
yourself at the Dinkier Motor
Hotel in Atlanta.
D Chance " R" for cocktails, atmosphere and top entertainment
D The Stirrup Room with emphasis
on gourmet specialties
D The Town & Country Restaura nt,
superlative service in a
relaxed surroun ding
D The Knife & Fork Coffee Shop
D And . .. the home of Atlanta' s
"Playboy Club"
D 650 beauti ful suites and rooms
f ully equipped with TV, telephone, and air conditioning
DA brand new swimming pool and
recreation su ndeck
D Dinkier and all major cred it
ca rds honored
D Free rese rv-a-service to over 120
Dinkier cities
DI NKLER MOTOR HOTEL
98 Forsyth Street N.W.
Atl anta, Georgia
36 Blasingame, Wade, P
20 Ca rroll, Clay, P
40 Cloninger, Tony, P
34 Fischer, Hank, P
24 Hlppauf, Herb, P
30 Johnson , Ken, P
23 Lemaster, Denver, P
35 Nlekro, Phil, P
33 O'Dell, BIiiy, P
38 Ollvo, Chi Chi, P
32 Umbach, Arnold, P
10 Bobby Bragan, Mgr.
8 Hitchcock, BIiiy, Coach
NEWPORT
6 Reslnger, Grover, Coach
3 SIivestri, Ken, Coach
4 White, Jo Jo, Coach
5 Wyatt, Whitlow, Coach
12 Ollver, Gene, C
15 Torre, Joe, C
16 Alomar, Sandy, Inf.
2
7
Bolling, Frank, Inf.
De La Hoz, Mike, Inf.
19
9
14
11
Menke, Denis, Inf.
Thomas, Lee, Inf.
Woodward, Woody, Inf.
Keough, Marty, Inf.
41 Mathews, Eddie, Inf.
44
29
43
18
Aaron, Henry, O.F.
Alou, Fellpe, O.F.
Carty, Rico, O.F.'
Garrett, Adrian, O.F.
31 Gelger, Gary, O.F.
48 Jones, Mack O.F.
42 Lum, Mike, O.F.
~ ... the menthol
cigarette
with real tobacco taste !
Buy a pack today
�SOUTH-WIDE SERVICES
s;,c,
11905
Rentals

Shopping Centers
Industrial Development
Sales


Property Management
Chain Store Leasing
~

Mortgage Loans
Adams-Cates Company

Insurance
STILL AT THE POPULAR GRANDSTAND PRICE • 86 PROOF • 4 YEARS OLD
1?,u;/.J,o,u
201 Hurt Building• Atlanta, Georgia , 30303 • Phone 404-522-5477
ATLANTA'S CRYSTAL
UNIFORM RENTAL SERV. INC.
"It Cost No More To Rent"
RIVERSIDE MASTERBILT
UNIFORMS
SHIRTS
PANTS
COVERALLS


.
Specialist In
Executive Renta l Uniform's
"FOR INFORMATION CALL"
ATLANTA'S CRYSTAL
UNIFORM RENTAL SERV. IN'C.
304 Angier Ave., N.E.
872-4751
CHICAGO
39 Abernathy
32 Broglio
31 Buhl
45 Dowling
37 Ellsworth
13 Faul
49 Hands
42 Hartenstein
33 Hendley
40 Hoeft
30 Holtzman
36 Humphreys
46 Jackson
35 Jackel
48 J.a m es
34 Koonce
47 Meyers
38 Paarlberg
41 Slaughter
CINCINNATI
35 Arrigo
47 Baldschun
37 Cra ig
56 Davidson
44 Duffalo
32 Ellis
49 Galligan
48 Henderson
30 Jay
46 Maloney
42 McCool
57 Neville
43 Nottebart
41 Nuxhall
54 Ostee n
31 O'Toole
34 Pappas
38 Tsitouris
33 Zanni
PHILADELPHIA
33 Bilinsky
59 Bennett
19 Boozer
28 Brubaker
14 Bunning
49 Colton
37 Culp
65 Everett
21 Herbert
29 Jackson
30 Jenki ns
34 Knowles
57 Lersch
45 Messerly
48 Schl ieve
41 Short
31 Wagner
44 Wegener
18 Wise
HOUSTON
30 Bruce
42 Carpin
44 Coombs
35 Cuellar
49 Dierker
13 Farrell
39 Gusti
48 Latman
33 Owens
46 Parsons
21 Ray
36 Raymond
41 Sembera
40 Taylor
54 Von Hoff
37 Zachary
PITTSBURGH
28 Bla ss
36 Bork
43 Cardwell
37 Ellis
26 Face
50 Fitzer
20 Gelnar
41 Knoch
32 Law
34 McBean
49 McKinley
19 Mikkelse n
29 Schwall
38 Shellenback
25 Sisk
39 Veale
31 Walker, L.
35 Wood, W.
LOS ANGELES
21 Brewer
34 Calmus
53 Drysdale
59 Hancock
37 Keklch
32 Koufax
15 Miller
38 Moller
23 Osteen
16 Perranoski
22 Padres
47 Price
35 Purdin
39 Reed
27 Regan
40 Singer
20 Sutton
45 Willhite
46 Williams, D.
We Have a COMPLETE TRUCK SERVICE ORGANIZATION Dedicated to Serve You Whether
You O RENT O LEA·SE or O PURCHASE - We Furnish EVERYTHING But The Driver
D FRESH NEW GMC or Other Fine Truck~ D Vans D Stakes D Tractors D Panels
D W alk-i ns OPickups D Semi-Trailer Vans.
GENERAL TRUCKLEASE, INC.
GENERAL GMC TRUCKS, INC.
361 PEARL ST., S. E.
SAN FRANCISCO
42 Bol in
18 Davison
25 Est,ille
28 Gibbon
45 Henry
34 Herbel
35 Linzy
27 Manchal
39 McDaniel
33 Overton
36 Perry, G.
38 Priddy
29 Shaw
49 Stanek
32 Stewart
ST. LOUIS
35 Aust
34 Bri les
50 Bu ist
32 Ca rlton
48 Cosman
29 Dennis
45 Gibson
47 Gi lson
49 Granger
43 Hoerner
38 Jackson
51 Jaste r, D.
39 Jaster, L.
14 Mahaffey
28 Purkey
37 Sadecki
31 Simmons
40 Stallard
52 Torrez
44 Washburn
4 6 Woodeschick
RENT • LEASE • PURCHASE
TRUCKS & TRAILERS
NEW YORK
31 Bearnarth
36 Bethke
44 Denehy
38 Eilers
22 Fisher
29 Gardner
32 Hamilton
46 Heller
40 Hinsley
45 McGraw
34 Musgraves
30 Ribant
41 Richardson
49 Rusteck
39 Selma
43 Sutherland
42 Wakefield
0(3GLJ~v
-
Wow ...what a wigwam!
~u~a-.:.-~l4-
~.Morri01f
MOTOR
DIAL
524-6601
HOTEL
• 2 Blocks from downtown
• 2 Cockta il lounges
• 2 Rest aurants
• Dancin g
Our Coffee Bar 's open 24 hours a day .. . so join us after th e ga~e.
Courtland & Ca in
Phon e 688-6500
�Out of town beer is fine.
Out of town.
.
.
.
Beer was not meant to travel.
Road-weary beer just isn't as fresh and lively
as a beer brewed nearby.
Black Label is brewed nearby. In fact we
happen to have the only brewery in town. And
we have seven more breweries across the country.
So even if you're out of town, you don't have
to drink out of town beer.
You are here. So is the 15eer.
@ CARLING
BREWING COMPANY, ATLANTA, GEORG IA, 1966
23
�Have a Great Season~ .
.
'
BRAVES!
.
.
.
. .
W~, re
with you
• • •
ATLANTA
FALCONS
DATES OF
FINAL MAJOR LEAGUE
IMPORTANCE
STANDINGS 1965
1966
get all ofyour
Atlanta Braves
Baseball Tickets
at DAVISON'S
and charge 'em/
April 12-Official
Opening
Day
"Active list" reduced to twentyeight players.
MAY
12-"Active
list" reduced to
twenty-five players.
• In downtown Atlanta: box
office, third floor. Park in Davison's garage, use bridge to the
s.tore. • At Davison's nearby:
Lenox Square and Columbia
Mall in Atlanta ... plus Macon,
Augusta, Columbus and Athens
June 1-10-Free
Agent Draft
July 12-AII Star
Game at St. Louis
September 1-Activl:! player limit increased from 25 to
40.
September I-Free
Agent Draft
October 2-End of
season
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Won
Los Angeles
San Francisco
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Milwaukee
Philadelphia
St. Louis
Chicago
Houston
New York
97
95
90
89
86
85
80
72
65
50
Ga mes
Behind
Lost
65
67 2
72 7
73 8
76 11
76 11½
81
90
97
112
16½
25
32
47
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Won
Minnesota
102
Chicago
95
94
Baltimore
Detroit
89
Cleveland
87
New York
77
Californ ia
75
Washington 70
Boston
62
Ka nsas City 59
Lost
-Games
Behin d
60
67 7
68 8
73 13
75 15
85 25
87 27
92 33
100 40
103 43
Los Angeles won the World
Series over Minnesota four
games to three.
October 5-World
Series begins
~:y
. . . . . . . . fft:A
.,41,
•DE~ICIOUSLY DIFFERENT
AVAILABLE QUALIFIED RESTAURANTS
24
81
..
WINNING
TEAMoutselling
all other
snack foods!
Fiti~iij~~
Available at Stadium r
Concession Stands
�N OVELTIES AND SOUVENIRS •
5.
2.
BRAVES OFFICIAL UNIFORM - Fine
quality wool flanne l. Authentic insigne and colors. SIZES Ex. Small ,
Small, Medium, Large ..... ...... ... $8.25
3.
l.
BRAVES OFFICIAL CAP-Wool and
Rayon, Leather Sweatband, reinforced
throughout. SIZES 6 ½ through 7 ½
···· ·· ·· ··· · ..
. $2.15
26.
22. AUTO TAGS -
REGULATION SIZE.
Red desig n on white backg round ..
Braves embossed Official emblem·
and ATLANTA
.............. $1.00
23.
BIKE TAGS-Same design as above,
size 3 x 6". Put one on your bike
····· ··· ······ ··· ···· ····· ······· ··· .. ... ... ..... $ .60
-
BRAVES T-SHIRT Finest quality
combed cotton. Nylon neck and trim.
Braves Indian Head Motif. SIZES 2
through 16 .......... .......... .... .... .... $1.55
BRAVES SWEAT SHIRTS-Flocked,
Official Braves Emblem , short sleeves.
White or white with red trim. SIZES
4 through 14
......... $3.00
" I'm a little Brave" PLAY SUIT-For
the youngest member of the family.
Two piece-T-shirt says "I'm a little
Brave" with runnin g Indian Brave
with Bat, white with red and blue
trim . Blue pants have plastic lining,
snap front with red ATLANTA and
Baseball motif.
SIZES Small (6 mos.), Medium
(12 mos.) , and Large (18 mos.)
4. BRAVES OFFICIAL JACKET-Wash 'n
Wear Gabardine. Team colors and insigne. Knitted collar, cuffs and waistband. SIZES 2 through 12 .... .... $6.95
For boys or girls. All Sizes. SIZES
14 through 20 .... .. .. ... .......... ...$7.95
16.
BRAVES HEAD SCARVES Braves
Indian Head motif in brilliant red and
jet black. Available in pink, yellow,
white or blue ......... ..... .. .......... ..$1.50
18.
BRAVES DECAL-Full color Braves
Indian on Blue background, 3 x 4¼"lnscribed "Go Braves." All purpose
decal, use on books, car windows,
etc . .. ...... ..... ........ .... ................... $ .25
15. CUFF LINKS-Sterling Silver, double
hinged lock bar, Indian chief, script
... .. ..... ...... .. ..... ... ... ......... ........ .... $2.95..
............ ...... ... ..... ... .... ......... ... .. ... $3.00
ATLANTA BRAVES ORDER FORM -
Please make your check or money order payable to Braves Novelty Mail Order
Dept. Currency and coin acceptable-if sufficient postage is affixed to envelope.
Indicate Size and Color where applicable.
Item No.
Quantity
Size
Color
Cost Each
Total
NOVEL TI ES
Braves Novelty Ma il Order Dept.
521 Ca pitol Ave ., S. E.
Atlanta, Georgia 303 12
Please send me th ese items
_ _ Ch eck
-
___ Money Order
___ Coin or Cu rre ncy enclosed
Name
Address
City_ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Total _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Sorry No C.O.D.
Stamps not accept ed .
Prices quoted include Georgia Sales Tax, Postage and Handling unless otherw ise specified .
Prices quoted herein now in effect.
Prices listed in Brochures and Yearbooks of previous years are obsolete.
25
�Why do so many people fly
Eastern from Atlanta?
Maybe because we care more
about people than numbers?
Last year, cl ose to a mill io n and a hal f peop le fl ew Eastern fro m At la nta .
Perh aps beca use of o ur conve nient fli g ht
sch ed ul es. Or th e helpfulness of Eastern's
G round Hostesses . Maybe because Eastern's
Whi sperjets a re th e most re la x ing jetl ine rs .
Or because th e peop le of Ea stern li ke w hat
th ey' re d o ing an d show it in th e.i r fr iendly
we lcom e.
Maybe it's as sim p le as th is : if y ou take
good care of peop le, t he numbers w ill take
care of t hemse lves.
EASTERN
See how mu ch better a n airli ne ca n be
�Every time a Brave hits a home run in the Atlanta Stadium he wins a Waltham
Watch courtesy of Ben Hyman & Co. You too can make a hit time after time with
Waltham Watches as incentives for more sales. Visit our magnificent new showroom and examine our complete stock of business gifts, jewelry and premiums.
Your business card is all the pass you need. Ample parking on premises.
YOUR 1966 ATLANTA BRAVES
Autograph Space
GENE OLIVER
ARNOLD EARLY
BILLY O'DELL
MIKE DE LA HOZ
SANDY ALOMAR
LEE THOMAS
/
Autograph Space
WOODY WOODWAR D
CLAY CARROLL
DICK KELLEY
27
�Compliinents of
COURTESY
CAB CO.
ii
V
CRAWFORD DOOR SALES CO.
~======= of Gftlanla, !Jnc.
Phone 872-1811
PHONE 753- 1 195
432 Trabert Ave., N.W.
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30309
654 LEE STREET, S.W .
JOE TORRE
This talented young catcher from
Brooklyn, New York has been called the
best catcher in baseball. Joe has been
with the Braves for five years and is
hoping that his sixth season will be his
best one. It will take some season to
surpass the great year that Joe enjoyed
in 1964 when he hit .321 to become
d
the first
catcher in nine years to h't
1
over .300, hit 20 or more home runs,
and drive in at least 100 runs in the
same season. Joe was the National
League' s All Star catcher (n 1965, and
many observers who saw him at f irst
base felt that he was the best in the
league at that position . Only 25 years
of age, Torre has a long career ahead
of him and by the time he calls it quits,
he may rank with the best.
ATLA NTA, GEORGI A
SAFE, COURTEOUS 24 HOUR SERVICE
ARCH GARY , Pres.
SA M P. McK ENZI E, Sec .-Trea s.
DAVI D FUL LE RTON, Mg r .
Your Braves Stadium
Best Prices P aid -
Clean-up Man
Prompt Efficient Pick-Up Service
ASSOCIATE D
CLEANING CONTRACTORS, INC.
for
Tallow -
Bones -
Grease
Co mm ercial- Indu str ia l Janitor Serv ice
685 Eleventh St., N.W. / 873-41 31 / At lant a
Bra nches i n Nashvill e • Houst on
Serving Greater Atlanta
Over 50 Y ears
Telephone 351-4467
DENIS MENKE
Atlanta Tallow Company, Inc.
"sportswear and gifts from the
markets of the world . . ... "
the
four
seasons, •inc.
9 16 east paces ferry road , n . e.
R.t la nbi. georgia . 30305
telephone 233-8500
28
Denis Men ke, a reliable shortstop
from Bancroft, Iowa, who was inju red
most of the 1965 season, is in his
fourth season wit h the Braves. Denis
was inj ured early last season in a collision with Pittsburgh's Jim Pagliaroni
at home plate. In 1964 Den is hit a
solid .283 for t he Braves wit h twenty
ho me runs an d 6 5 runs batted in .
Couple t his with a fi ne fi elding j ob
and you ca n understa nd Manager Bobby Bragan's statement "wit h a healt hy
Denis Menke in 1965 we could have
won t he pennant " . The Braves man agement is hoping th at a wi nter' s rest
has provi ded th e cu re t hat Menke
n~eded fo r a succe ssful season in 1966.
EA1
PIZZA
a t ATLANTA STADIUM
from the Ovens of
Damon Foods, Inc.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Dist ributed by
C & S Wholesale Grocery Co.
A TL AN TA
O
GEORGIA
�YOU CAN'T
HEAT A
SHIITILE
HUS TO THE
STADIUM
No, you can't beat a Shuttle Bus to the
Stadium - but you can catch one easily
enough. Beginn ing 1½ hours before
each game, buses will leave Peachtree
& Ca in, every few minutes, bound for t he
Stadium. Enroute, these buses pass
through the heart of downtown Atlant a,
close to over 25,000 parking spaces.
Then, by way of special Buses-Only Lanes,
you breeze right t o t he Stadium gate,
just steps from your seat. After the game,
buses stand ready to wh isk you back
downtown i n record time.
Regular cash fares apply. Transfers
honored to and from other ATS lines.
MACK JONES
A ,f leet cent erfielder who was corn
and lives in Atlanta, Georgia and came
on strong in 1965 for the Braves is
Mack Jones. Mack, who had several 'unsuccessful trials with the Braves before
last year, left even the most skeptical
observer with t he impression that his
career wou ld end up -as a " home town
boy makes good saga" . Jones hit 31
home runs for the Braves last year and
played a good defensive center field.
Mack fi rst came up to the Braves in
1961 but a lack of selfconfidence kept
him from displaying the talent that t he
Braves officials knew he possessed.
All of that is now behind him and 1966
should be a banner year as Mack ret urns to play before the home t own
crowd.
Bus Stations
Terminal
St ation
WADE BLASINGAME
ATLANTA TRANSIT SYSTEM
A stylish southpaw from Fresno, California who is in his t hird season with
the Braves, Wade Blasingame won 16
games for the Braves in 1965. He has
been called by ma ny, the new "Warren
Spahn" who incidently is his idol. In
his last two seasons he has won 25
games. Wade began his professional
career in 1961 after graduating from
Roosevelt High, where he won All-City
and All-State honors in baseball. In
addition t o being a fine pitcher, Blasingame is one of the better hitting
pitchers in baseba ll.
29
�Sports car?
Sport's car.
Can Budget rent you a sports car? No. A spo.rt's car?
Yes. Just tell us how big a sport you are. We'l l
match you with a compact at $5 a day, or a Ga laxie,
Impala, or Mustang at $7 a day, or Cadillac at $1 2
a day. Charges, plus 5¢ a mile (10¢ for Cad illacs)
and gas, save you up to 35% and more. Cars clean,
fully equipped ; insurance, wh ite walls. Coast-tocoast reservations. Credit ca rds ava ilable. Th reeminute pickup at Atlanta Airport and Ri viera Motel.
Call ma in office in Dinkier Plaza Hotel : 525-4641.
......,.,-·-·-·-·•1......
....
,... ·-·-·-·-·-·- ..,.,~
••r. 5ij Ba'OGET.
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..
Al.Ill"".:
,
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SYSTEM
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30
�•
if we had moved her ...
She'd still have them
For dependabl e Moving , Packing and Stora ge ca ll
BENTON BROS. DRAYAGE & STORAGE CO.
1465 Howell Mill Road, N.W. • 351 -3570 • Atlanta, Ga.
Benton Bro s. moving a nd storage also in
Albany, Brunswick, Savannah, Ga .• Beaufort, S. C. • Jacksonville, Fla.
�A~LANTA BRAVES
TV NETWORK
Atlanta, Ga.
Chattanooga, Tenn.
Greenville, S. C.
WSB-TV
WRCB-TV
WFBC-TV
Nashville, Tenn.
WSM-TV
Augusta, Ga.
WRDW-TV
Columbia, S. C.
WIS-TV
Jacksonville, Fla.
Orlando, Fla.
WDBO-TV
Birmingham, Ala.
WAPI-TV
Columbus, Ga.
WTVM-TV
WBIR-TV
Charleston, S. C.
WUSN-TV
Decatur, Ala.
WMSL-TV
WMAZ-TV
St. Petersburg, Fla.
WSUN-TV
Charlotte, N. C.
WSOC-TV
Florence, Ala.
WOWL-TV
Montgomery, Ala.
WSFA-TV
Tallahassee, Fla.
WCTV-TV
WJKS-TV
Knoxville, Tenn.
Macon, Ga.
Pensacola, Fla.Mobile, Ala.
WEAR-TV
Savannah, Ga.
WTOC-TV
Novelties
10. BAT RACK BANKSLouisville Slugger Bat
Rack Bank with 10
miniature bats imprinted with National
League Teams' insignia ... ...... .. .. .......$1.80
14.
BOBBING. HEAD
BRAVES DOLLLaughing Indian, 6"
tall with Bobbing
Head. Braves imprint
on uniform. Our best
seller in 1965.... $1.30
SEE ORDER FORM ON PAGE 25 FOR
BRAVES NOVELTY ITEMS.
ATLANTA BRAVES
RADIO NETWORK
Albany, Ga.
WGPC - 1450 KC
Asheville, N. C.
WLOS - 1380 KC
Chattanooga, Tenn.
Athens, Ga.
WRFC-960 KC
WDXB -
1490 KC
Atlanta, Ga.
WSB-750 KC
WIS-560 KC
Columbia, S. C.
32
Montgomery, Ala.
WCOV - 1170 KC
Greenville, S. C.
WFBC - 1330 KC
Nashville, Tenn.
WSM-650 KC
Huntsville, Ala.
WNDA-FM -95 .1 MC
Oak Ridge, Tenn.
WATO - 1290 KC
Jacksonville, Fla.
WMBR - 1460 KC
Orlando, Fla.
WHOO-990 KC
Jacksonville Beach, Fla.
WBIX - 1010 KC
Rome, Ga.
WLAQ- 1410 KC
Johnson City, Tenn.
Savannah, Ga.
WSGA - 1400 KC
Auburn, Ala.
WAUD - 1230 KC
Columbus, Ga.
WPNX (Phenix City, Ala.)
1460 KC
Augusta, Ga.
WGAC- 580 KC
Dalton, Ga.
WBLJ - 1230 KC
Birmingham, Ala.
WAPI - 1070 KC
Dothan, Ala.
WAGF - 1320 KC
Brunswick, Ga.
WGIG - 1440 KC
Fitzgerald, Ga.
WBHB - 1240 KC
WROL -
Cleveland, Tenn.
WBAC - 1340 KC
Florence, Ala.
WOWL - 1240 KC
WLAG -
Charleston, S. C.
WCSC - 1390 KC
Gadsden, Ala.
WGAD - 1350 KC
WMAZ - 94 0 KC
Charlotte, N. C.
WSOC - 930 KC
Gainesville, Ga.
WDUN - 1240 KC
WUN I -
WJCW-910 KC
Knoxville, Tenn.
1490 KC
LaGrange, Ga.
1240 KC
Macon, Ga.
Mobile, Ala.
1410 KC
St. Petersburg, Fla.
WSUN - 620 KC
Tallahassee, Fla.
WTNT - 1270 KC
Valdosta, Ga.
WGOV - 950 KC
Waycross, Ga.
WAYX - 1230 KC
�Official Ticket Agents
DRI ST0L•l<I NGSP0RT-
JOHNSON CITY
MO NROE
FOR THE BRAVES .
HOME GAMES IN MORE
THAN 60 CITIES IN THE SOUTH
Ada a·touch of pleasu re to your
business trips by seeing the Braves. And
make arra ngements the easy way. Contact
any Southern Tick~t office about tickets, game
reservatio ns, schedules and convenient Flights.
Southern Airways
Interested in purchasing
space in the 1967 Braves
Current Braves AH-Star Game Selectee
1953 ... ... ........ .. ... .... .. ... ...... ... .. ... ..... ....... ..... .. ..... .... ..... ....... .... . Eddie Mathews
Score Card? Your ad-
1955 ....... ................ .... .. ... ......... .. ..... ... .... ....... .... Hahk Aaron , Eddie Mathews
vertisement will appear in
1956 ... ........ ... .. ... ............ ......... .... .... ... .. ... ..... ... .. .Hank Aaron, Eddie Mathews
all cards sold throughout
1957 ..... ........ .... ......... .... ... ... .. : ... ...................... .. .Hank Aaron, Eddie Mathews
the 1967 Season includ-
1958 ................. ..... ...... ..... ... ... ... ........ ............. ... Hank Aaron, Eddie Mathews
ing exhibition games. This
1959 .... ................ .. ........ .... .. .......... ..... ........ .... ..... Hank Aaron , Eddie Mathews
1960 . .. .......... ..... ...... ....... .......... .. .. .... ...... ...... .... Hank Aaron, Eddie Mathews
media of advertising is
considered grade A by
many specialist s in the
1961 . ··· ····· ······ ··
... .... ... ........ Hank Aaron, Frank Bolling, Eddie Mathews
1962 ......... .
.... .. ..... ... ... .. Hank Aaron , Frank Bolling, Eddie Mathews
1963 .............. ........ ..... ........... .... ... . . ........... .. .. .. ....... Hank Aaron, Joe Torre
publicity field. Contact
1964
Brave's Advertising
1965 . . ... .. . ..... ... . . . ... . ... . ............ .. .. .. ..... .... .. ......... ..... Hank Aaron, Joe Torre
Department.
Alou selected with San Francisco in 1962
O' Dell selected with Baltimore in 1958, 1959
Lee Thomas selected with Los Angeles (A) in 1962
..... .... ........ .. .... ...... .... ..... ........ ....... ... .... .. .. ....... Hank Aaron, Joe Torre
33
�?Jlea/ 4 h te
2 6C7 f!la11J. (1/~w,fin 24k(1·
.J4 f?l>rarht,w !Jinct
A STOUFFER RESTAURANT
~1k- J,
• high above Ai:hJnta, a magnificent view
r§a.
• sizzling specialties like steaks and chops
• and master-mixed, man-sized cocktails
C
5:/(111
11:30 - midnight (1 a.m. Fri. & Sat.)
.
c/.(t'rDr




L/a vf.J






240 Peachtree Street N. W .
688-8650
YOUR 1966 ATLANTA BRAVES
DENNY LEMASTER
JIM 'BEAUCHAMP
HANK FISCHER
At the Game
or anytime,
style and
comfort count!
Higgins slacks look right
because t hey fit right!
Up to t he minute styling.
RICO CARTY
34
HIGGINS
SLJICKS
LI NEVILLE, ALABAMA
r~
\
KEN JOHNSON
�The fastest growing Tire Chain in Georgia
so nuuli
to so nuuag
When it comes to Tires .
Come to Duke
There's a Duke Tire and Automotive Center near you.
downtown , p a achtrea , walton, broad
lenox-aqua r e and greenbrlar.
BRAVES RECORD SETTING SEXTET
(Top row, I to r) Joe Torre, Gene Oliver, Henry Aaron, (bottom row,
I to r) Mack Jones, Felipe Alou, Eddie Mathews.
Henry Aa ron , Edd ie Mathews, Mack Jones, Joe Torre, Gene Oliver, and
Felipe Alou combined to establi sh a National League record for most players
on one t eam hitting twenty or more home runs in a season. In add it ion Aaron,
Mathews, and Jones set another National League record for most players
hitting th irty or more home run s in one season .
35
�e sas$y one from Canada Dry.
12. PENNANTS-National and American
League. Quality felt, stitched binding
with streamers, assorted colors, authentic emblems.
A. SIZES 5 x 12" ... .. .... .. ......... $ .35
8. JUMBO 12 x 30" ....... ... ... ... $ .90
C. PICTURE PENNANT 12 x 30"
Braves Full Color Team Picture
... .... ...... .... ... .......... ... ....... ... ... $1.25
9. BRAVES FITS-ALL RING-Adjustable
to any size. Indian Head insigne
....... .. ... .............. ... ....... ...... , ······ $1.55
11. PEN AND PENCIL SETS-Braves mi niat ure Louisville Slugger Pen and
Pencil ... ..................................... $1.00
19. BASEBALL BAT, MINIATURE-Player
Autographed (Torre, Mathews or
Aaron) , 16"
miniatu re, Hillerich Bradsby bat. Ideal fo r room Trophy
............. .. ... ... .. ... .. .......... .... ...... ..$1.00
17.
SEE ORDER FORM ON PAGE 25 FOR
BRAVES NOVELTY ITEMS.
36
BALL POINT PEN-Fine qua lity, co mplete wit h Braves Em blem an d Script
...... .. .. ........ .. ... ... .. .... .. ......... ....... $ .75
6. AUTOGRAPHED BASEBALL IN TRANSPARENT TROPHY CASE Atla nta
Braves Aut ographed Bal l -Authenic
fac simile signatures of all Braves
players. BALL only .. ... .. ..... .... .. .. $3.50
CASE only ... .. .... .. ..... ... ..... ... ...$1.55
8.
BASEBALLs---Oood quality plain baseba ll with horseh ide cover and felt
center. In mai ling box. Suitable for
practice, play or autographing .. ..$1.60
Think of a friend who would enjoy receiving a copy of this
souvenir score book of the Atlanta Braves • • • send him yours
and order another for yourself by writing to "The Braves Score
Book-P.O. Box 1122, Atlanta, Georgia," along with 35¢ in coin
to cover cost of book, tax, and mailing.
�S AVE
with
Southern Feder al
current yield

'
~~ ,~:~
4'.f',t:
I
~
~
e
24 HR.SERVICE
525--5466
4½o/o
..._"""
Day or Night
For Cab Service
Call
Savings & Loan Association
SAFETY
CONVENIENCE
~-;fr:t~

PER
ANNUM
..
paid quarterly
EstabJished 1936
Southern Federal
Savings & Loan Association
Ground Floor • Hurt Bldg.
Atlanta -
M U. 8-1935
Saoing~ Receit:ecl by 10thJ Earn fro m lal
Your Chevy Center -
EAST POINT
·cHEVROLET
FELIPE ALOU
Felipe Alou is the oldest member of
a baseball playing family which lives
in Projecto Ensanche Racho Santo Domingo, D. R. Felipe has a brother Jesus
with San Francisco, and another, Mateo, with the Pirates. Had not Felipe
been traded t he Alou's would have
formed the first all brother outfield act
in baseball. Last year Felipe hit a solid
.297 with 23 home runs and 78 runs
batted in t o give the Braves one of t he
best lead-off men in the game. Manager Bobby Bragan describes Felipe as
" one of t he best players, on or off the
field, t hat I have ever managed."
In Repeat Sales,
Batting over
CHECKER CAB CD .
R easonable Rates on Out-of-Town Trips
RADIO DISPATCH
R. F. (Dick) HEWATT, Presid ent
the
Continental
Look
IN CLOTHING
featured by
.600!
EYE FOR
REASON : AN
WHAT'S RIGHT
Drive A Little • Save A Lot
2443 Main St., East Point
Best wishes
Braves. • •
for a
Winning Season!
FRANK BOLLING
ctaa111PS I
ill their 1,eagues .
The veteran second baseman of the
Atlanta Braves is a native of Mobile,
Alabama. Bolling made a tremendous
comeback for the Braves in 1965 when
he raised his batting average seventyfive points. In 1964 Frank had stumbled to a .199 average and many felt
that "he was over t he hill", but the
cagey veteran proved that he had a few
seasons left by rebounding to a .264
average. Bolling is in his 12th Major
League season and in that time he has
compiled a lifetime average of .256.
Frank is very popular with his teammates as is attested to by his being
elected player representative for the
Braves.
37
�MEET BOBBY BRAGAN AND THE COACHES
BOBBY BRAGAN
Bobby Bragan, field manager of the Atlanta Braves,
is a resident of Fort Worth, Texas. He is in his fourth
season as Braves Manager and before that he managed
Pittsburgh (1956 & 1957), and Cleveland (1958). Bobby
also served as a coach for the Dodgers (1960) and Colts
(1961). He played for seven seasons in the Major
Leagues with the Phillies and Dodgers as a catcher and
shortstop. Bragan has been instrumental in developing
several ball players in the Dodgers chain, one of the
best known being Maury Wills. Bobby turned Wills into
a switch-hitter and what was once a dark future was
turned into a brilliant career.
Bragan is very popular with his players and never
hesitates to take to the field in their behalf should an
argument develop. In 1965 Bobby had his club in the
thick of the pennant chase until late September. 1966
should be a different story in a warmer climate.
KEN SILVESTRI
Ken Silvestri is the hard working bullpen coach of
the Atlanta Braves. He is a m~tive of Chicago, Illinois.
Ken is in his fourth term as coach and is extremely
popular with the players. He caught for the Yankees,
White Sox and Phillies for seven years and played with
Philadelphia in the 1950 World Series. In addition to
serving as a coach with the Phillies in 1959 and 1960,
Ken managed and coached several seasons in the
minors.
JO JO WHITE
After thirty-eight years in the game, Jo Jo White
continues to add to his reputation as one of the finest
teachers of outfield, base running and bunting fundamentals in the game. He spent nine years as a fleet
outfielder with Detroit, Philadelphia, and Cincinnati and
played in two World Series. He later managed mi~or
league teams to first division finishes in seven of nine
tries, coached and scouted for Cleveland, and coached
for Detroit and Kansas City. Jo Jo attended old Tech
High School in Atlanta.
WHITLOW WYATT
"Whit's" nine year tenure as Brave's pitching coach
is one of the longest among major league coaches, and
for good reason. He has long demonstrated that he is a
master of detecting flaws in a pitcher's form and delivery and has received much of the credit f?r de~eloping many of the young Braves hurlers. Whitlow Is no
stranger to the Atlanta fans, having managed the Cra~kers and being a native of nearby Buchanan, Georgia.
Whitlow was a star pitcher for the Dodgers in the 40's.
GROVER RESINGER
Newest addition to manager Bobby Bragan's staff
is a native of Eolia, Missouri. Grover Resinger came to
the Braves from the Cardinals organization, where he
was a successful minor league manager. Grover was
named Manager of ttie Year in the Texas League in 1964
at Tulsa, Oklahoma. Many of his players of 1964 are
now on the parent club's roster, which is indicative of
the fine managing job by Grover. He is also nationally
ranked as a handball player.
BILLY HITCHCOCK
A new addition to the coaching staff, but by no
means new to the Major Leagues, Billy Hitchcock played
for nine years with Detroit, Washington, St. Louis, Boston, and Philadelphia. He also managed the Baltimore
Orioles in 1962 and 1963 . Billy is well known in this area ,
having been an outstanding athlete at Auburn. He is a
native of Opelika, Alabama, and served as a Special
Assignments Scout for the Braves in 1965.
BASEBALL AND THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE
Baseball has had a powerful effect on the American language and vividly demonstrates how much
baseball affects the everyday conversation of people
who may never have attended a professional game.
For instance:
What we like is called A HIT. The man who fails
has STRUCK OUT, or at best DOESN'T GET TO
FIRST BASE. A person who is indiscreet is WAY
OFF BASE, and may end up being CAUGHT OFF
BASE. When we are unprepared, we are sometimes
CAUGHT OUT IN LEFT FIELD. Our salesmen make
PITCHES. When we understand a situation, we GET
THE PITCH. Otherwise, we DON 'T CATCH. The opponent in an argument who makes an extreme statement to retrieve a lost point is REALLY REACHING
FOR IT. An unfortunate mistake is A REAL BLOOPER . A person who behaves eccent rically is A SCREWBALL-one not to be trusted is A FOUL BALL. When
we refuse to be discouraged , it' s because WE ' LL
GET OUR INNINGS.
If you' re getting pressu re from both sides , you
may be t he victi m of a SQUEEZE PLAY. Unt il you
38
get going, you're just WARMING UP. After that,
you're RIGHT IN THERE, PITCHING. When you cover
every contingency, you TOUCH ALL THE BASES.
But when you compete outside your class, you ' re
NOT IN THE SAME LEAGUE.
The man who is ready to cooperate is WILLING
TO PLAY BALL WITH US. The fellow who operates
against big handicaps has TWO STR IKES AGAINST
HIM. The one who does something pu rely fo r effect
is making A GRANDSTAND PLAY. And the one who
tries to refuse an invitation gracefully, asks for
A RAINCHECK .
When you understand quickly, you get it RIGHT
OFF THE BAT. When someone asks an embarrassing
question , he has THROWN YOU A CURVE. A bril liant and accu rate st atement is RIGHT DOWN THE
MIDDLE. When success is assu red, you ' re HOM E
FREE. When you are alert , you are ON THE BALL.
When you defend som eone, you GO TO BAT FOR
HIM . A pe rson who is momentarily responsible HAS
THE BALL, and his associates BACK UP HIS PLAY.
And th at' s TEAMWORK.
�Meet us after the game.
�JO JO WHITE
Coach
Ford .
Compliments of Atlanta Ford Dealers , ,'.',
.~
40
�Atlanta's Braves
team up
with Delta!
The Atlanta Braves travel big league, too! As
official carrier for the Braves, Delta will speed
them on a total of 42 trips to play regular and
exhibition games away from home during the
1966 season. Almost 33,000 miles!
Tickets to all Braves home games may be obtained
at any Delta ticket office across the U.S.
1966 ATLANTA BRAVES ILLUSTRATED (Yearbook)
Eight y pages of interesting pict ures, stories, records , and player picture-s in full color for one dollar. Purchase
th em at Atlanta Stadium , Braves Downt own Ticket Office, your favorite news stand , or by ma il order.
To order by mail: Send check or money order for $1.30 to Braves Year Book, P.O. Box 1122, Atlanta, Georgia.
This will cover the cost of book, tax, and mailing.
BRAVES WON-LOST RECORD vs.
EACH OPPONENT - 1965
AWAY
TOTAL
W-L
W-L
3-6
2-7
7-2
4-5
9-0
4-5
5-4
5-4
5-4
6-3
4-5
7-2
4-5
4.5
2-7
4-5
5-4
6-3
9-9
6-12
14-4
8-10
13-5
6-12
9-9
10-8
11-7
44-3 7
42-39
86-76
HOME
CLUB
Chicago
Cincinnati
Houston
Los Angeles
New York
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
San Francisco
St. Louis .
W-L
BRAVES WON-LOST RECORD vs.
EACH OPPONENT - 1900-1965
CLUB
WON
LOST
TOTAL
Chicago
617
671
44
645
51
718
634
614
650
802
742
28
766
21
693
778
791
764
1,419
1,413
72
1,411
72
1,411
1,412
1,405
1,414
4,644
5,385
10,029
Cincinnati
Houston
Los Angeles
New York .
Phi lade Iph ia
Pittsburgh .
San Francisco
St. Louis
41
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�THE NATIONAL OBSERVER
Page 17
l,old/y elegant
"off/ce"spittoon
Sports Eye
~
MOST ELEGANT and /'_
obviou1 container eve r
conceived. Authentic
!~!1:i't:•fc:~:rlf~
• When Jack Nlcklaus won the Masters
golr tournament last week. he caused
a problem In protocol. Tradition calls for
the previous victor kl help the new champion Into his green coat. which symbolizes the winner or golf's most pres·
tlglous tournament. However, Nlcklaus
also won last year- the
~1
e,yery bar and poolhall. Serve1 in 1ilent
.eplendo r .. l?lante r, flower vase, wute re-
ceptacle or kmg-aiu ashtray. Real wutem
converw.tion p iece for a man'a offica or
home.
£'
"
The big ni ght in Atlanta when basebal l officially came to town. At right are the new home-town Braves w ith the Pittsburgh Pi rates.
The Sports Observer Watches the Braves Go to Bat in Atlanta
Baseball Moves Into Dixie in the Fight of Its Life
ATLANTA.
Football ls THE sport in Atlanta. It Is
the prime subject of cocktail-hour conver11atlon, the source of vast Income for Just
about any college that fields a team (es-
i,eclally U It wins), and the tie that binds
old alumni to their alma mater.
However, as much as southern tans
love tootball, they reluctantly admit that
It Isn't a year-round sport. ln the winter,
they watch basketball-0ccaslonally In the
flesh but more often on the television
tube. And ln the summer, well, there is
baseball. But baseball ls a poor second
or third sport. To many southerners, it's
something to wat.ch on television in an
air-conditioned room while sipping a beer
or mint Julep, perhaps while whistllng
the favorite football fight song, Ramblin'
Wreclc From Georgia Tech.
MajOr-league baseball has tor several
1eneratlons been a big-perhaps the blg1est-sport In the East anct Midwest. In
recent years, It expanded to California
l,Dd Texas. Last week lt came to the
w11theaat, the bastion of the gridiron, the
, producer or major-league baseball greats
but <until now) supporter or only minorleague teams, the virgin baseball land.
A Cou11 Ultimatum
When the ex-Boston, ex-Mllwallkee
Braves made their move south. It was In
the mld5t of what may be the greatest
battle organized baseball has ever known.
o n the day al'ter the Braves opened In
Atlanta, Wl.sconsln Circuit Judge Elmer
w. Roller ruled they had violated state
antltrusl laws and must return to Mil·
waukee an.er May 17 unless the National
League agreed by noon May 15 to expand
next year and put a team 1n Mllwaulr:ee.
Bueball answered that the JUdge does
not have the Jurisdictional power to rorce
bUeball to return, and pointed to a 1922
ruling by the Supreme Court thal base-
~ t~bll~;~ 1:::1:~!n-~i:1:i:
and the cue may go all the way to the
U.S. Supreme Court. Before lt's over, the
case could affect all professional baseball
aa lt'a now structured.
Even as Judge Roller wu putting the
flnlahlng touches to hla ruling (which
gave Wisconsin all It h ad asked for), the
Braves made the move a /att accomplt by
openina: their regular season In Atlanta
amidst an orderly but enthusiastic welcome. It was the city's biggest organized
celebration since the world premiere of
Gone With the Wind, the south's side of
th e Civil War, In 1939. There were receptions attended by top baseball ofllclals
and local political leaders, too many
cocktail parties to keep up with, and a
parade viewed by a crowd estimated by
pollce at 250,000 but nearer 100,000.
Amidst 11.ll the hullabaloo, however,
many an Atlantan voiced private misgivings about bascb&ll's future here. "Wlll
It be succes.srul? I really don't know" was
the almost invariable answer.
A Dwindling Crowd
The crowd or 50,671 at the city's beau.
tlful year-old stadium on opening night
Included some knowledgeable baseball
enthusiasts . But many more spectators
were there simply because It was a landmark In their proud city's history. The
game was a g00<1 one (the Braves Jost to
P ittsburgh, 3-2, In 13 innings), but by the
eighth Inning. with the score deadlocked at
1-1, many in the crowd left. By the loth
Inning, about halt the crowd remained.
The following night. attendance was
down, as might be expected. After au,
there ts only one opening night. However.
the size or the crowd was down far more
than might have been expected: 12,721 In
an Sl8,000,000 stadium that seats 52,000
for baseball and 55,000 fo r football.
A crowd of only 11,000 for a pre-season
exhibition wlth the World Champion Los
Angeles Dodgers prompted a sarcastic
column by the Los Angeles Times' Jim
Murray, who said the 42,000 empty seats
made more noise than the 11,000 occupied by what he called "Confederate
statues." Granted, the crowd would h&ve
been larger I! Sandy Koufax had been
there. But how many Koutaxes are there?
Bulldlng up major support for the
Braves will take time, and AUanta's Indefatigable mayor, Ivan Allen, Jr., knows
It. MaJor-Ieague baseball has Iong been
emphasized In the area's press, but enthusiasm must be nurtured. The city has
a long baseball history ; the old Atlanta
Crackers hung more pennants trom their
flagpole than any other team In minor
league history, However, baseball Interest
has declined In recent years. In 1947 the
crackers became the first double-A team
to draw 400,000 paid spectators. This rig.
ure dropped to 256,000 by 1957. This
wouldn't begin to pay fo r a major-league
team, but It must be. remembered the
crackers weren't in the major leagues.
The Ticket Sales
As of last week, only 4,000 season tick·
et.a: had been sold. This stands In marked
contrast kl Atlanta's pro football team,
the Falcons, who aren't even a team yet
and must start from scratch. Last Nov. 1.
the opening day tor season-ticket sales,
F.alcon otl'iclals were swamped with 7,000
requests for the eight-game $45 Uckets.
By Christmas Eve the sale waa closed at
Just over 45,000-and 25.000 acldlUonal requests came ln. In the Falcons, AUantans
must expect several loalng seasons by a
building team, while In the Braves they
have a potential pennant winner .
The long, bitter legal war Wlth Milwaukee for the Bravea• ownership obvl·
au.sly hurt tlctei sales. AUantana dldD't
know whether the Braves would represent
them or the burshen i rom the beer clty.
The team's abandonment of Mllwaukee
waa the nrat Instance of a slclpou.t by a
one-team city, and Mllwau.t:eean.s took
the planned exodus as a personal lnllult.
The Braves bad denied such a move was
being considered whlle actually moving
equipment and r ecords. Then they tried
to bUY their way out a year be!ore their
contract expired, ortertng Milwaukee 21/,
times as much money u they had paid In
rental fees the year before. Atlanta, as•
sured the Braves would be there tor the
1965 season, had paid an extra $700,000
to have the stadium !lnlShed In time.
Venting hls city's wrath on Atlanta.
George Rice. first assistant counsel tor
Milwaukee County (which owns the Mll·
waukee stadlumJ otf:lclally warned Atlanta
In October 1954 hls city would sue to keep
the Braves. He demanded that Atlanta
retract Its offer to the team and threatened "kl seek recourse In the courts for
lnjunctlonal relief from your [Atlanta's]
malicious conduct and continued interference wlth an existing contract."
Faced with this threat. the Braves reluctantly returned kl a hostile Milwaukee
and drew only 555,584 paid spectators all
season. The Braves played six times-all
exhlbltlons-ln Atlanta In 1965 and drew
194 ,000. In order to keep Its new stadium
from sitting Idle, Atlanta fielded a team
In the International League and drew 151.·
614.
P olitical Reper cu~slons
The delay, which threatened kl drag
out Indefinitely ln the courts when Mllwaukee refused to give up even after the
Braves' stadium contract expired , also
Jeopardized Mayor Allen's poilttcal career.
His opponents called the stadium "Allen's
White Elephant," and a political storm ensued before the 1965 election. But he survived, as did the Braves ln Milwaukee.
Mr. Allen had flrst run tor mayor In
1961, placing great stress on the need tor
a major sports stadium. His predecessor,
WIiliam B. Hartsfield, had blocked such
a structure. " Baseball fans are made up
of rilling-station operators, taxlcab drivers,
and garbage collectors," Harlsfleld once
To Mayor Allen and Atlantans, civic pride is akin to motherhood.
B,,.,..,_,_•. $15"
8>,i" hiah,topdlun.r.
l plt1HnAlhtr•r
Mini• n>,.replleo,3"
first
person to
win two
consecutive
Masters
~.,
crowns - and tourna' '·
ment
o!llclals
were
scratching their heads
and
reading protocol
books. He solved the
problem by slipping without ald into the
same coat he had won last year. Nicklaus
Is only 26 years old, and has won the
Masters three times. This year's victory
was his narrowest, for he waa forced into
an 18-hole play-on at the Augusta, Ga.,
course with Tommy Jacobs and Gay
Brewer . They bad tied In regular play
with even-par scores of 288. In the playoff, Nicklaus shot a two-under-par 70 to
edge J acobs by two strokes and capture
the $20,000 first prize. Jacobs won $12,300
for his second-place finish, and Brewer,
who slumped to a 78, received $8,300.
hir h with c:IJ-•roti.
Mdf•onlip.
FREE 64-PAGE WESTERN CATALOG
,.......,,Nd
America's Favorite Western Store
HAMLEY'S :::;.::n: ~:.,:::,::;
ldu lfar shrubs,
tr11s,bush11, tao!
• Aen t1-lrr l11t1
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1ras1 ••• wlth Yz
the wate r!
• lnwisibl1 •• • nevtr
111trhr1 wit h
IIIO'll'in1!
• Si111ple to Install
• P hiladelphia won the battle (for the
National Basketball Assoclatlon's Eastern
otvlalon title In r egular season play), but
Boston won the war. The Celtics captured
the Eastern Division play-offs la.st Tuesday from the team that had edged them
out or the regular-season crown by a single game. Boston won the best four-ofseven-a:ame play-oft, four games to one,
twice defeating the '16ers on their home
floor. The Ce!Ucs will be seeking their
eighth straight league crown when they
meet the Los Angeles Lakers, who last
week edged out St. Louis In the Western
tlnal. For the Celtlcs' coach, Arnold "Red"
Auerbach, It's the end or the line . He's
retiring.
••• per111ane.t •• •
canltt1St 1rrtt!
Unsightly brown spots disappearr lawns turn
greener than ever; plants and shrubs become
hardie r and more drou~ht-resistant! \'later-Ducts
collect and conserve water-make every d(OP
coun t DEEP DOWN where it's needed for build1ni
strongra olsysterns! Justpush into thegroun d!
53744Wattr·Ducts!15J.
!Set,3.99
53H4Witt r·Ductsf5 0J.
lStt, 6.98
539l4Watu·Ducts(I OO).
lStl,11.98
,.., ,.., ,..,
BREX:!K.'S
• Although Boston Celtics won the Eastern Dlvlslon play-offs again this year, they
didn't place anyone on the National Basketball Association's (NBA) sll-con!erence first team. Wllt Chamberlain 01 the
Philadelphia 76ers, voted the league's most
valuable player, replaced the celUcs• BILI
Russell as center this season on the a llstar flrst team. Cincinnati's Oscar Robertson missed by one vot.e being a unan.
!mous choice on the team, chosen by 86
sportswriters and sportscasters. In addition to Chamberlain and Robertson. the
first team Includes the NBA's rookie or
the year. Rick Barry of San Francisco,
Jerry West or Los Angeles, and Jerry
Lucas of Clnclnnatl,
011 eoeTON • e1NCW IW1W
It's a happy day for Marcia Platt, the Dogwood Festival queen.
compeUUOD-IDay hurt the Braves. The
nearea American Lea1t.11 ieam ta 1n WaabMO mlle1 away, and I.be Cloaeat
National Learue team la ClnctnnaU, . .
mllea dl.ltant. In Ml.hraukee, the Braves
eould always get " rrudie" teelln&: qatnat
Chicago, 90 miles distant. Atlantans don·t
bear much emotion for or against any
other clty In tbe league.
In tlme, as Atlanta continues to grow,
such rivalries may develop. TradlUon
stands tall here In the Deep south, and
a few memorable games may spur sup.
port for tbe Braves as nothing else can
do. The Braves may never see attendance
here to match the 2,215,40I who turned
out In Milwaukee in 1957.
The team obviously Intends kl stayIt signed a 25oyear contract with the stadium authority-unless Milwaukee accomplishes the feat Of forclnr them back
north. The Braves have spent a lot or
money moving South, and they expect a
good return on their investment.
tnaion.
Well-Heeled Help
A recent Chamber of commerce study
estimated that San Francisco fans spent
$11 ,271,000 directly and lndlrectty In 1961
Room lo Draw F rom
watching the Olants attain third place In
From a business standpoint, the Braves
the National League. Half the money came
from out of town. Using a formula sug· are In the best po&itlon since the Giants
They could
gested by the Federal Reserve bann, and Dodgers went West.
which estimate each dollar changes bands easily draw spectators from a seven-state
29 times in a given area, the chamber area, whereas many teama must be content wltb the northern or .southern porcalculated the turnover as $326,860,000.
tion or a state. The Atlanta Chamber of
Allen was the driving force tor bulld· commerce estimates 3,900,000 persons live
Ing the new stadium, but he had some In a 100-mlle radius of Atlanta. In a 200well-heeled help. Mills B. Lane, prealdent mlle radius it Is 10,714,000 and In a 300or the Citizens and Southern Bank, put mlle radius lt ls almost 20,000.000.
up about $100.000 or his own money In
To whet these potential customers' apthe early stages, and Arthur L. Montgomery, president or the local coca-COia petites, the Braves have set up a reg1onal
franchise. became head of the Atlanta- radio network or about 38 stations and a
television
network of 19 stations In GeorFulton County Recreation Authority, the
organization that eventually got the proj- gia, Florida, Alabama. North Carolina,
South Carollna, and Tennessee. The team
ect moving.
sold lt.s radlo-televlslon rights for $2,"It we don't build a stadium, It is 500,000.
going to damage seriously our city's
Just as people In this area take great
growth ," the mayor told a meeting of
city, county, and state officials In seeking pride In being Soutberners, they may In
their help ... To give Atlanta Its prope r time take pride In thelr Braves. The Atlanta
Stadium may have been appealing
place ln the natlonal picture, we must
have major-league sports, and this Is the to thls prlde on opening night when, amid
way to get It done." There were no dis- whistles and rebel yells, Its mllllon-<lollar
scoreboard fiaShed out the following footsenting votes.
note on hi.Story:
Appealing to Atlantans· civic prlde. the
"What happened on April 12, 1861:
mayor had hit home. Civic pride to AtFirst shots /Ired on Fort Sumter.
Iantans Is something akin to motherhood
What happened on April 12, 1966:
for most Americans. They are proud or
The South Rises Agai n:•
their beautlrul city. or the 24 million-plus
~ JAMES A. BRYANT
cities in population In the United States,
Atlanta was llstcd this month by the U.S.
Department of Labor as the fastest growlng economlcally. It Is the nation 's Wet Winner,
eleventh largest city In banking, ela:hth
In number or residential units autborized
Griping about the condition or the roads
for construction, fourth In airport traffic. Is an old American custom. but how many
Less than 1.8 per cent or AUanta's adults drlvers ever drive n at-out on dirt road.!! for
are unemployed.
3,000 mlles? The East African s ararl, a
It Is also the southeast's leading busi- gruellnr test of car and driver across
ness and educational center. Georgia enough of Afrlca kl match a dirt-road trlp
Tech, located here, Is a perennlal football from Boston to San Francisco, Is called
power, and Its gridiron successes over the by Its sponsors the toughest rally ln the
decades have whetted the area's appetite world . They had no argument on that score
for football . Graduates from many of from the forelgn drivers last week, for an
Tech 's opponents Ilve In the area, and rUJ were forced to abandon the rally after
Grant Fleld In Atlanta kl see their alma barely 24 nours on the road. A Tanzanian
maters <such as Georgia, Alabama, Au· team, Bert Shankland and Chris Rothwell.
burn, and Tennessee) take on the Yellow won In torrential rain In a French-bullt
Jackets. Lack of this factor- regional Peugeot 404.
New pr:lnciple that eon-o
tr a dlc t a eve r y i de a
you've e ver had aboui
p ipe, 1111.oklnc- I paran,,
teel t to nnob eoolud
mild hour a fter hour.
day alter day. wi thout
rest. without bite. blctor aludp.
To prove it. I'll
let JOU try a new
• Graustark, John Galbreath's unbeaten S-year-old and lead.Ing contender
ror this year's Kentucky Derby, ran h1a
first race last week In more than two
month!. Once aa:aln, he coasted to victory, this ttme at Keeneland, In Lexington, Ky., shOWlni he bad recovered rrom
an early-season injury thal had sidelined
him tor moat Of J'lortda':,
winter season. Two other
Derby contenders raced
last week. Prtceleu Gem,
Mrs. Ethel J acobs' tllly,
!bowed &he was baek at
the iop Of her form. She
won the P rloreu at New
York Clty'a Aqueduct by six lengths, but
later was dl&Quallfied for bumping another hOrse early In the r ace. Claiborne
Farms' MoccP.Sln, the 1965 filly champion,
lost her fi rst stat1 ot the season atter
eight consecutive victories last season
when jockey Larry Adams allowed her
kl get blocked behind rour other horses
In another race at Keeneland.
Carey Pipe.Bend
JOUr name and addrea today for my
U
I FOR
.6.VLoDept.2'f.DI ,Chlo,tgt,40.
l
THAT "V.I.P." ON YOUR GIFT LISTI
I " ~:~t;,.-:..,:":::::~~:,:::·~;.,c,
1
FREIi
eompletetr:lal oBer. Write to :E.. A. CAREY.
1920 Sun~
I ~7!1~~'!'.~~!~A\i'143.215.248.55 16:40, 29 December 2017 (EST) SKIN
I 143.215.248.55ii~
1~
Bll I IIECKILDL
BOSTON, MASS.
02210
"WILL YOU SMOKE MY
NEW KIND OF PIPE •••
,..,,.., ,..,
said. " I don 't llke to go to buebalJ game,.
They lthe fans] boo me."
Sport.a enthus.last.s had chafed under
this pronouncement, and knew Atlanta
could not aet a prore&Sional focnball team
-their Iong-cberlahed dream-unlesa a
baseball team came along to ahare the
rent. And they believed no major-lea11.1e
team would come to town unleaa there
was a new stadium.
Allen, a shrewd businessman and former Chamber ot Commerce preBldent,
knew thls. He also knew tbal a majorleague stadium would enhance AUanta
from a business standpoint. In addition to
the vast prestige, Atlanta would get more
visitors. More visitors meant more money ;
more money meant more tax revenue,
which can be used for other clvlc Improvements.

AddnluinJ""mf<>rto.nd.,,,lortulaidtmnool to:,c,,#
me. Enjoy •111t-tic ...w.,. do!ltl,,..,--.
equi~t. S.lil!M1.lon
or --r flmclad.Wrtleter,..ur • pr b dey.
,..,,.., ,..,
,,-
1\:8"
. . . . . . . . . .,,,
~!;_":;16:40, 29 December 2017 (EST)::~I;!143.215.248.55 143.215.248.55 16:40, 29 December 2017 (EST)·•:·A~!~L~~i~•
a u s 1sE·u Glm AND
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and
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" TEAR OUT
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�The NATIONAL
LEAGUE o
P
PROFESSIONAL BASEBALL CLUBS
CAREW
TOWER
CINCINNATI 2, OHIO
July 28, 1966
Dear Mayor Allen:
I was glad to get your note about the great
weekend attendance {160,000) the Braves enjoyed.
Attendance there has been most gratifying and
particularly so when one considers the club has
performed far below the pre-season predictions
by the 11 experts ".
It was most gratifying to us here, a nd I'm
sure you too, to win the State of Wisconsin's law
suit, and to win it on their home grounds. It was
the r e sult of v e ry hard work and long hours by
very able counsel unde r most prejudic e d conditions
and in a political and emotional climate.
P r esident
Hon. Ivan Allen , J r.
M a yor, C i ty of A tlanta
A tlant a, Ga.

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  1. http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_007.pdf

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