Box 19, Folder 17, Complete Folder

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Box 19, Folder 17, Complete Folder

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NewYorkW~rld-Telegram
IDb.c ~un
A SCRIPPS-HOWARD NEW S PAPER
J u l y 27, 1963
May or I van Allen, Jr.
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mayor Alle n,
I have just read your testimony, given
Friday before the Senate Commerce Committee on the public accomodation bill.
Atlanta should be very proud, and I' m
sure it is. When an e lected official
can express himself so clearly and
persuasively on a matter of such grave
concern to the nation, he is an exceptional man o The incontestable
wi sdom of what you said to the Committee,
the compassion underlying your beliefs,
and the uncompromising honesty of your
stateme nt, all testify to an uncommon
and admirable level of statesmanship.
Sincerely,
~/.~
Normans. Nadel
Drama critic
New York World-Telegram
125 Barclay-st
New York 15, N. Y.
&
Sun
�I
ON CHRON ICLE
Mayor Of
AtlanfaAsks
U.S. Race Law
Friday, July; 26, 1963
-Page 5
tain provisions giving ~ities and "amount to an endorsement of
businesses " a reasonable time" private businesses ·setting up an
to desegregate before the · fed- entirely new status of discrimieral government intervened. nation throughout the nation."
Integration 'Limited
Allen described segregation as
Over the past several year~, "slavery 's stepchild" and said
Atlanta has desegregated public .
- "
schools, lunch counters, city it was a challenge _to all of ~s
facilities, swimming p o o I s , to make every Ai:neri~n fr,~e m
hotels, restaurants and movie fact as well as m theory ..
houses, and has star ted hiring - - - - - - - - - - - Negro firemen .
Three Die in Crash
But Allen conceded that the
city has achieved only a meas- Hong Kong (UPI - Three
ure . o_f s~ccess and said that Britis h army officers were
parhc1pat10n of Negroes has k'll d Th d
•h
th ·
1 e
been limited so far.
urs a_y \\ en
e~
The mayor said that if Con- plane crashed mto a mountam
gress failed to pass a public ac- near the Communist Chinese
commodations bill it would border during a flight exercise.
.
Wa s h 1 n gt on (UPI)-The
mayor of Atlanta Friday u_rged
~ongress, to enact President
. Ke~nedy_ s ~ r _o p? s a_ I to ban
racial d1scnmmat1on m hotels,
restaurants and other private
businesses open to the public.
The appeal of Mayor Ivan
Allen, Jr. , was the first by a
major Southern public official
favoring the so-called public
accommodations act at hearings
by the Senate Commerce Committee.
·
Allen led off a full day of
testimony on both sides of the
capitol Friday on civil rights
legislation. South Carolina Gov.
Donald S. Russell was schedto Mexico City
uled to appear before the Senate
Which 11 close to:
group after Allen.
"Cannot Dodge Issue"
Mayor Allen testified that if
' the open-facilities act is not enacted, some Southern cities
which voluntarily banned discrimination might re v e r s e
. themselves and return to poliMEXICO
cies of strict segregation.
Beautiful mountain and valley scenery. 100 acres of
"We cannot dodge the issue,"
everb looming gard ens with mill ions of flowers . YearAllen said. "We cannot look
round in the 70'1 with cool nights. Private golf, stables,
back over our shoulder or turn
movie theatre, mod ern water purifying plant. 5 swimthe clock back to the 1860s."
ming poo ls includ ing olympie. De luxe 250-room Hote l
and Cha lets, Beauty Inst it ute for milady, etc.
But Allen said a Q_ublic accommodations act should con- t- - - - - - - - -- - - -- - -- - - - - - -
·/fr-Hns. o~ (Jg
PAN
AMERICAN
JET
ameiu:eM -fhang;k._&:l
IXTA•AN
�JAMES
V JCE PRE S IDENT ANO TRUST OFFICER
H OUSTON, TE XAS
HOUSTON NATIONAL BANK
CAP ITOL 7-7111
�!eralll m'ribune .,;.. ,., ,
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All Alone With His Courage
A Dixie Mayor and Rights
By W alter Rugaber
Specia[ t o th e H erald T r i bune
ATLANTA .
arade
-Lord
ht-day
}Davies
t been
d with


mglas


. Fairr -old
rges.
ride
·new
nd
·-
For da ys t h e word went
out fr om the big business
men a nd civic leaders, the
political pros and public opinion molders, t he ;people in
At lanta who usually count
t h e most.
"You're making a big mi-st ake."
The message was plain,
blu
n d .near· unanimous.


Van Allen jr., t he 52 -yearol mercmmt-tw-ned-Mayor ,


listened very carefully.
Then, all alone wi th his
courage, h e flew off t o Wash ington and went before t he
Senate Commerce Committee to read a carefully drafted
14-page statement
"Gentlemen," t he Mayor
said firmly, "If I had your
problem, a·rmed with the local experience I have had,
I wou1d pass a public accommodations law ."
Mr. Allen t hus became t he
rstr-and just possibly the
outhem politician to
'lie, approval o! th~
aJ p ortion of
Kennedy and was angling for
About his testimony he says
a Federal job.
simply that t h e nation 's MayMr. Allen denied it stoutly, ors have been stuck out on a,
insisting that h e talked with
· -~,
h. t
t limb and left there to handle
no one m
vv a.s m g on excep
·t he committee official who • t he whole racial crisis by
invited him to appear .
th emselves.
The Suµrem a Court has
He later received a short
letter from ths President been striking down segregawhich praised "a number of tion laws for years, he point&
effective pomts" in the state - out, and yet no really solid 1
ment. Mayor ,\llen · seemed legislation h as taken ·their ,
"It took a lot of com·age to genui nely Gurpriseci by it .
place .
do what he did." one acquain- ·· -- - - -- - - - - - - -- -- - - , - - -- -- - -tance said with a touch of
awe, "and if t ha t's his personal view - h ell, I respect
him for it ."
Sure, t he fr iend continued,
segregation is wrong. But a
F ederal law against is somet hing else. This was t he cr ux
of t he worry: Mr. Allen had
"deserted private enterprise."
The prominent owner of
several cafeterias in t own
sent the Mayor a long, stinging telegra m expressing shock
and disappointment, t hen
placed blown-up copies in h is
windo ws.
But in pe1iect illustration
of the temper of things, the
man's eating places were being picketed at t he sa me ti me
by whi tes whose signs
branded h im
" ! " <i.<lP,. or
fa ther's mul ti - milli~n dollar
office supply firm he became
president of both the city and
state chambers of commerce.
But now t he board room
boys aire a little on edge. None
of that "Mau Mau" stuff, of
course. While t he Mayor's
political life may be damaged,
h is personal stature is adjudged secure .
�THE FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY
TALLAHASSEE
OFFICE OF
UNIVERSITY
THE
CHAPLAIN
August 26, 1963
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mayor Allen:
This is just to say that I appreciated very
much your recent statement to the Congressional
Committee. I am sure that your courage and candor
have nspired many.
Sincerely,
1L~
Paul M. Minus
University Chaplain
PNI'1: jb
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THE ~E W t ORK
~Ire N.enr (o-rk Q.!imes.
AD OL PH s . O Cl[ S , Publ ish er 18'!!6-1935
O RVIL E . D RY F0O S , Pu blis he r 1961-1063
r UB LIS HED EVERY DA T I N TH g Tr. Ail BT T HE N EW YORK 'r!M t~ COMPA N l
HAI DflfO I'.
ARTH UR H ATS S u L zu g n c o R , Cha irman o/ the B oard.
AP 1' H UR 0 C H 6 SU L ZB E RGE R , PTBsidc nt and. P ttbli sher
BUi'Ca o r T, Vlca P .-csident a nd /Secre tary
li" KA:sc t s A. Cox, Treasu,-er
Atlanta's Mayor Speaks
On rare occasions the ora torical fog on
Ca]!itol Hill is ierced by a voice resonant
with courage a nd dignity. Such a voice
was heard when Mayor Ivan Allen J r. of
Atlanta testified before the Senate Commerce Committee in support of President
Kennedy's bill to prohibit r acial discrimina tion in s tores, restaur ants and other public accommodations.
On t he basis of the very substantial accomplishments t hat his city of a h alfmillion, t he la rgest in the Southeast,
has made in desegregating publicly owned
and privately owned facilities, he might
h ave come as a cha mpioh of "states'
righ ts" a nd of the ability of localities
to ba nish discrimination wit hout Federal
law. Certainly, h e would h ave had much
more warrant to espouse that view than
the Barret ta, the Wallaces and t he other
a rch-segregationists who raise the specter
of Federal "usurpation" as a device· for
keeping Southern Negroes in subjection.
But Mr. Allen was not in Washington to
boast. He was t here to wa,rn that even in
cities like Atlanta the progress that had
been made might be wiped out lf Congress
turned its back on the Kennedy proposal
and thus gave implied endorsement to the
concept t hat private businesses were free
to finish the job started with the Emancipation Proclamation a centry ago: "Now
the elimination of segregation, which is
sla very's stepchild, ls a challenge to all
of us to ma ke ever y American free in
fac t as well as in theory- and again t o
e! ta blieh our n a tion as the true champion
of the free world."
�Honor able Mayor Allen:
I have gre at respect for you, air. You are honest, you are
in the tra dition of another recent Mayor of Atl anta , Ma yo r
Hartsfiel d .
I was a s oldie r at Fort Benning in 1954-55 and thought the
then May or and ne wspa pers of Ra l ph McGill were t he true
leaders of the entire So uth. I beli eve you and those same
news papers are the reel l ea ders i n t he So ut h .
I be l ie ve Atla nt a will benef it greatl y by t he st abil i t y and
forward t hi nking you personal l y po ss e ss . I be l ieve you ar e
a t ruly el ect e d and r epresena t i ve l eade r. Yo u underst and
people . I' l l neve r get a chance t o vote f or you bu t I wan t t o
say I ' m mi ght y pro ud to know of you and hear what you ar e
thinki ng as I rea d i t i n t he new spapers .
~
~ 6
�Ma yor of Atlanta
Atl anta , Gear g i a
�,I USTIC F. a-2:, 2 :,
�-- -
-
- ----
�•.
Sunday,_ Aur,ust 4~ 1963.
New York
l{eral b m'ribune
3
All Alone With His Courage
A Dixie Mayor a
By W alter Rugaber
Speci al t o the Herald T ribune
ATLANTA.
r
For days the word went
out from t he big business
men and civic leaders, the
political pros and public opinion molders, t he ;people in
Atlanta who usually count
t he most.
"You're making a big mist ake."
The message was plain,
blunt a nd nearly unanimous.
Ivan Allen jr., t he 52-yearold merchan t-turned-Mayor,
listened very carefully.
Then, all alone with h is
courage, h e flew off to Washington and went before t he
Senate Commerce Committee to read a carefully drafted
14-page statement
"Gentlemen," the Mayor
said firmly, "If I had your
problem , ·armed with t he local experience I have h ad,
I would pass a public accommodations law."
Mr. Allen t hus became t he
first-and just possibly t he
last-Southern politician to
voice public approval of t he
most controversial portion of
t he civil rights bill.
The Mayor followed an
outraged squadron of Southern political leaders, including Gov. Ross R. Barnett of
Mississippi and Gov. George
C. Wallace of Alabama. The
air was heavy with denunciat ion .
Sen. Strom Thurmond of
South Carolina, a member
of the Senate committee,
seemed hardly able to believe his ears at t he Mayor's
stand. A lot of the home
folks had the same reaction.
" I wish to nominate you,"
one man wrote, "as Mr. Mau
Mau of 1963. . . . I understood that you are a half-,
brother of Martin Luther
King and ~hat may explain
your posi~ion."
I t came as somewhat of a
surprise that a t least those
who wrote the Mayor suppo1·ted his stand about 2 to 1
in initial stages of t
reaction last wee
and city chamerce had moved
ite direction, and
political observer
father's multi - million dollar
office supply fi rm he became
president of both the city and
state chambers of commerce.
But now t he board r oom
boys are a little on edge. None
of that "Mau Mau" stuff, of
course. While t he Mayor's
political life may be damaged,
h is personal stature is adjudged secure.
"It took a Jot of courage t o
do what he did," one acquaintance- said with a touch of
awe, "and if that ':; his personal view - hell, I respect
him for it."
Sure, the friend con tinued,
segregat ion is wr0ng. But a
1', ederal law against is something else. This was t he crux
of t he worry: Mr. Allen h ad
" deserted private enterprise."
The prominent owner of
several cafeterias· in t own
sent the Mayor a long, stinging telegram expressing shock
and disappointmen t, then
placed blown-up copies in his
windows.
But in perfect illustration
of the temper of things, the
man's eating places were being picketed at the same time
by whites whose signs
branded him a "leader for
integration."
The cafeteria owner had desegregated most of h is chain
last June. His concern was not
civil righ ts, he insisted, but
the preservation of free enterprise.
The Mayor came back to
Atlanta and found two main
schools of thought about his
st artling behavior before t he
Commerce Commitee.
The least substantial version put i t down. as a shallow
bid for Negro vot es. But
Masoned obsetvers said that
even with a full turnout he
would still need plenty of
whites.
For a quarter-century winning Atlanta politics has been
based on a h ighly successful
"alliance" between Negroes
and the so-called "betterelass" whites.
And the thought was that
the latter might prefer free
enterprise over Mr. Allen
when the 1966 term comes up.
The ·1ayor has indicated that
he no\! intends to run again.
The second feeling about
the Mayor·s testimon:, considered the possibility that he
_ had talked w1,h President
Kennedy and wHs angling for
a Federal job.
Mr. Allen denied iL stoutly,
insisting that J·.e talked with
no one in Washington except
the commitLee official who
invited him to apprar.
He later r eceived a short
letter from th9 P resident
which praised "a number of
effective pomts" in the statement. Mayor .t,l!en seemed
genuinely ~urprised by it.
About his testimony he says
simply that i:.he nation's Mayors have been ::;iuck out on a
ltmb and left there to h andle
the whole racial crisis by
themselves.
The Suprem~ Court has
been striking down segregation laws for years, he points
out, and yet no really solid
legislation b~ taken their
place.
1
I
1
�._..,....,..,- v_.,. .,.,E,
w :; vc ui;:, -.:a-r:; a~ ~ne lVlaYOl" S
stand. A lot of the home
folks had the same reaction.
"I wish to nominate you,"
one man wrote, "as Mr. Mau
Mau of 1963. • • • I understood that you are a halfbrother of Martin Luther
King and t hat may explain
your position."
I t came as somewhat of a
surprise that at least those
who wrote the Mayor supported his stand about 2 to 1
in initial stages ot ~ '" action last wee
"DeepLv
tele
..., V ,&.J,DI W' J.V.l
V C""J.Vl.C
l.111~'-
••-
Commerce Commitee.
The least substantial version put it down. as a shallow
bid for Negro votes. But
seasoned obsetvers said that
even with a full turnout he
would still need plenty of
whites.
For a quarter-century winning Atlanta politics has been
based on a highly successful
"9:lliance" between Negroes
and the so-called "betterclass" whites.
And the thought was that
the latter might prefer free
enterprise over Mr. Allen
when the 1966 term comes up.
The Mayor has indicated that
he now intends to run again.
The second feeling about
the Mayor's testimony considered the possibility that he
had talked with President
0
and city chamerce had moved
site direction, and
political observer
as taken a very pcru.11
cp. I seriously doubt he
make it stick in the po · 1 forum - partlcu ai:ly 1f ·
ese things are still unsolved."
.Mr. Allen, with strong Negro
support, took office in January, 1962, after a harsh
battle with arch-segregationist Lester Maddox. The Mayor
drew 64 per cent of the vote.
He went in as a son of the
city's old-line business community. While with his
1- - - - - - - - - - - - -_ , ,
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Atlantan Thankful
For Thes·e Five
The Editors: I have seen a
number of letten; dawning segregation and upholding integration. A Negro is all right in his
own place, and that is Where
he should stay.
I want tx> thank God for such
wonderful men as our two senators, Russell and Talmadge,
for Govs. Barnett and Wallace
and for Atianta's own Lester
Maddox.
NEAL ADAMS.
Atlanta.
�Mattiwilda Dobbs (below) gave her
first recital in Atlanta's Municipal
Auditorium. on January 31. Mayor
Ivan Allen, Jr., told the soprano before the desegregated audience that
her home town is proud of her accomplishments. Earlier, she had ·been
awarded the key to the city.
A. L. ADAM S
�August 29, 1963
Dear Mr. Allen,
May I commend you, belatedly, for your
intelligent and courageous stand during
your recent appearance before the senate
committee hearings in Washington.
I appreciate and admire your efforts in
behalf of our negro citizens.
Sincerely,
9~~
Mrs. G. B. Strickler
�Morris is for use
of commerce clause
Re : You editortal " Civil rights
should be guaranteed without invoking commerce clause," Aug. 7.
While I am no iawyer, I think the
use of the commerce clause is justified . Although a restaurant may
rightly be called privately owned,
the service the owner sells for profit
is not private in any way. All persons
of good behavior should be served.
It is in our best national interest
that we desegregate our minds and
hearts and treat our minority groups
just like everybody else.
Just because we have been reared
in and taught in a certain tradition
does not mean it is right. What matters is not what we personally like
or dislike but what is best for our
c
try and world peace. ----...,.
I,,..,a m just about as Southern a1;
anybody. I was born so far South that
we called the people in Atlanta Yankees.-Edward 0. Morris, Route 1
ox 2, Palacios.
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Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
204 City Hall
Atlanta, Ga.
�*~~1 Eak~·F@}f~gt1 nF.
Atlanta
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5, Ga.
N. E.
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City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia

+143.215.248.55 16:45, 29 December 2017 (EST)
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-Associated P ress Wl.rephoto
Jvan Allen Jr. . . . Calls
f or accommodations action.
Atlanta Chief
Aslcs Ol{eh
For 'Rights'
Washington Post Co.
WASHINGTON, July 26 The mayor of Atlanta told Congress Friday it must enact 11
public accommodations law or
southern citirs like Atlanta
that have tried to ban di ·crimination may !'lip back into
segregated patterns.
MAYOR IVAN ALLEN Jr.
broke the solid line oI outht>rn opposition to civil rights
legislation as he injected this
new note into the hearing of
the Senate Commerce Committee.
'·Failure to pass this bill."
aid Allen, "would amount, by
inference, to an endor~ement
of private busines5 settin~ up
an entirely new tatus of dis<'rimination throughout the nation .
"Cities like Atlanta might
sJlp backwards."
Hotels and restauran t that
have already taken this i . ue
upon them elves and opened
thf'ir doors might find it ron\'f'nient to go bac·k to the olrl
i.tatus . . . in m .
�of squa bbles an d demon trations th a t we have had in the
pas t"
,
"I F I RAD YOUR p r obl em .
a r m ed w ith the l0cal exper iPnce I have had, I w ould pass
a oublir accommodation s bill,"
said Alli:n.
He asked t hat sou t hern communi t ies be g iven time to make
the adjustment voluntarily before being hauled in to court.
In J'esnonse to qi.1estions.
lie suggested a two-year
g race period for cities . :mil
more for sma.JJ communities.
" But t he point I want to
em n ha size a ga in." he saici . "is
that now is thP tim e for le'!iS·
lative action. We cannot dodge
·t he iss ue."
"\ VE i.\IUST take a ction now
1o ass ure a greater future for
our citizens and our country
... the elimination of segregat ion. which is slaverv's steoehild. is a chall en'!e t o aU of
us to make ever~, American
free in fact as well a s in t heory."
T his stron i; statem ent in hehalf or equal ri ghts from a 52:vea r-old na ti ve of Georgia
deeply moved liberal members
of t he committee.
"l THINK." :-iAlD Actin!;
Chair ma n John 0 . Pa tore fDR.I. l. "that w hen Presid Pnt
Kenned v wrote his book 'Profil es in ·courage' he was t hinkinl! of you."
It al so lea t o a sh arp exr han qe between P a tore r111d
Sen. Strom Thurmond CD-S.C.l,
all-out oooonent of an y civil
r ights legislation.
WHEN THURMON D a skPd
Allen i r h e would favor the
]P-:ris]ation even if. it m eant
dosin g every r estaurant in
Georgia. P astore cut him off,
call in g it a "loaded" qu e!' tion
or th e h ave-you -5toppPd-bea tinJZ-yo ur-wife? type.
P a to re said he wouldn 't nPrmif qu estion s a ked to emba rrass witnesse~ a nd to "r atc h
tomorrow m ornin g's
headl ine ."
" I DON'T WAN'.I.' t he mayor
to go home and be kn own as
t he m an who wants to close
all the little restaurants in
Georgia," said Pastore.
T hurmond called P astore',
action "improper" a nd sa id he
resented t he "insinuation" 1:ha
he had asked an unfair q uestion. He said he was try in.
only to get the tru th to the
American people.
You1· tl'uth
is not my
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����MRS . CLARENCE M . WESTON
20 52 EDINBURGH TERRACE . N . E.
ATLANTA 7. GEORGIA
Aug . 26, 1963.
Mayor I v an Allen,
Ci t y Hall,
Atlanta, Ga.
My
dear rlr . Mayor ;
This is to add a word of appreci a tion
f or your stand of courage in Washington recently
back ing t h e President's Civi l Rights Le g islation.
Whi le I agree t ha t voluntary dese grega tion
is preferable, as long as certain state g overn.men t
leaders continue to inflame public opinion and
embarrass ou r nation 's eff e c tive world leadership,
it seems t ha t spe c ifi c l aws mus t be made and understood. Therefore, I have wr i t ten our t wo Georgia
Senators and the Fifth District Representative
saying that I hope they can supp ort the Administrat i on, cl arified to include court ap peal for
fund- withhol ding from individual states not coo era t ing .
Sincerely and Apureciatively,
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�8 Berkeley Street
Cambridge 38, Massachusetts
29 July 1963
The Honorable Ivan .Allen, Jr.
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mayor Allen:
Your testimony before the Senate Commerce
Committee was the most superb statement on civil
rights made since the time of Abraham Lincoln,
and I am sure that it will go down in history.
These are the words of a man of great courage
I read everything the
Times carried aloud to nzy- two grown sons and a
Harvard student from Little Rock, a Negro who is
living with us this summer, and we all felt that
you had established a watershed. We are deeply
grateful to you.
and true nobility of mind.
}ly Senior Senator, Mr. Saltonstall, is fencesitting on the public accomodations section of the
Civil Rights Bill. I have just written to him,
asking him to examine his soul in the light of your
statement. I am convinced that public thinld.ne,
including perhaps the thinking of Mrs. Murphy, is
considerably ahead of Congress in this matter.
Thank you, Mr. Allen. You are a great man.
�202 Virginia Avenue
Warner Robina, Georgia
28 July 196,
Mayor Ivan Allen Jro
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mr o Allen:
Congratulations on your public stand, in
·ashington, D. Q, on the necessity of our
public officials upholding the proposed public
accomodationa law. As white northeners, we
have been aiamayed at the lack of courage of t he
so-called progressive leaders of this Stateo
Surely the United States is large and rich
enough to afford afirst class citiz enship for
all of its peopleo
Sincerely,
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�7 East 86th. Street
New York 28, N. Y.
July 27th. 1963
To the Wia yor of Atlanta,
Atl a nta, Ga.
Dear
lVfr.
Allen,
Having read in the New York Times
an account of your testimonybefore the Senate
Commerce committee I feel I must tell you of my
appreciation of ev e ry word you said.
I am a southerner; my father was a confederate
soldier.
You are a christian stateman, a gentleman
and a scholar.
The world needs more men of your
type and courag e.
May you be able to convince those who do
not ag ree with you of the folly of their way s.
Sincerely,
Mrs. J ame s Getaz.
�66 GOLF CIRCLE, N .
E.
ATLANTA 9, GEORGIA
July 29, 1963
Honorable Ivan All en
Mayor of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta 3, Georg i a
Dear Mayor Allen:
Congr atulations on your forthright
and courage ous t estimony before the Senate Commer ce
Committee l ast week !
Most Atlantans are proud of y ou, and
we believe that Atl anta will continue to make progress toward a peaceful solution of this problem
under your l eaders hip .
With best wishe s,
Sinc er ely yous,
fh~~
( Miss) Ashby Tuc ker
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BY AIR MAIL
PARAVION
AMERICAN SOCIETY OF AFRICAN CU!.TURE
PRIVATE MAil. BAG
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NO.
2814
NIGERIA
Mayor Ivan Allan,. Jr.,
Atlanta, Georgia,
U. S. A.
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171 5 H UMMINGBIRD L ANE, N . E.
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4050 E. BROOKHAVEN DRIVE
ATLANTA
19,
GEORGIA
July 27, 1963.
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
Atlanta, Ga.
Dear Mayor Allen,
May I take this opportunity to commend and congratulate you on your courageous stand in
the hearings of the Congressional Committee on civil
rights? Your leadership in these troubled times makes
me proud to be an Atlantan, and I only wish that our
Congressional representatives had more of the insight
into the problems that you have displayed.
Sincerely,
/J
7Y J ~ A, · ~ Mrs. Fleming Law
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Mayor Ivan All en
Atlanta, Ga.
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The City Hal I
Atlanta 3, Georgia
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�BECKNELL MANN ASSOC I ATES

3099 MAPLE DRIVE , N.E. ATLANTAS , GEORGIA
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�532 Daniel Ave., SE
Atlanta 17, Ga.
July 29, 1963
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
City Hall
Atlanta, Ga.
Dear Mr. Allen:
Just a word to say that I am glad that you
supported the President's civil rights legislation
before the committee in Washington the other day.
I appreciate the courage and straightforwardness it
took to do so.
I think many people who keep silent
agree with you.
I appreciate your speaking for us.
It is one more item to make me proud of Atlanta.
��347 VISTA DE LA PLAYA
LA
JOLLA, CALIFORNIA
TEL. : GL. 4-2654
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THE HOM.IVAN ALLEN (MAYOR )
ATLANTA ,GEORGIA.
�---
�29 July, 1963
Your Honor:
Your testi mony before the Senate
Commerce Co mmittee was a rare combination
of sincerit y , enli g hten ment, humility and
courag e, such as we are not accustomed
to hear on this trag ic is s ue.
I hope y our statement will, as it
well could, p rove the fulcrum on which
the whole is s ue of this historic legislation will turn.
It would be hard to e x a gg erate, I
think, the encourag e ment that such a
courag eous statement by a local leader
could g ive to a well-meanin g but timid
Southern Con g ress man.
Con g ratulations!
Si"1rI~~·L1J
Robert G. Wri g ht
Am eric a n Consulat e
No g al e s, Sonora, Me x ico
�\
MRs.
THOMAS
V.
BocKMAN
356 PINETREE DRIVEN. E.
ATLANTA
5,
GEORGIA
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�KEY BOULEVARD AND NORTH BRYAN STREET
ARLINGTON I, VIRGINIA
J. C . MURPHY
CHURCH TELEPHONES
M . EVERETT DORR
MINISTER
JAC K SO N 7 - 1085 AND JAC KS ON 2 - 6033
A S SOCIATE
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1111 -
hire her, but I wanted her to know that we had several
Negro girls on the staff and she would have to work
closely with them, eat in the same employees' lunch
room, and treat them courteously. Her reply was, "We
don't do it that way where I come from, but if you
say that is the way it has to be, I'll give it a try." It
wasn't a month before I saw her and a Negro girl returning from a coffee break, arm in arm.
Unfortunately, there are still businesses in my
community, and in yours, that practice discrimination
in hiring, mainly because they are afraid to make the
break. I understand this, because I was afraid, too.
However, the time is so late on the clock of
human relations that we need to encourage these businessmen to make a start toward integrating their staffs.
Our best hope for the future, in my opinion,
is in the schools. If we could get really integrated
schools much of the prejudice that still exists would,
in a generation, disappear.
My children go to a school that is 90 per cent
Negro. Because it is a good, well-run school, they are
happy even in this minority situation. But it would
be so much better for all concerned in this school if
the percentage of white children could get to be 25
per cent of the school population. We are working hard
to achieve that goal.
In addition to three children born to us, my
wife and I have an adopted American Japanese daughter named Jill . One day, when she was seven years old,
Jill came home from school and said ; "Daddy, I wish
I could be Negro at school and white at home." She
hasn't been able to achieve that, but last month her
5th grade classmates did elect her for an "Outstanding
Student Award," so apparently she has solved her
problems in other ways. I seriously doubt if we do our
children any favors by making their lives too easy,
considering the world which they will be inheriting.
from us.
In closing, I want to express my appreciation,
and I'm sure, that of the other awardees, not just for
the award, but also for the continuing work of the
N ational Conference of Christians and Jews in furthering true brotherhood. I want to urge that we all
keep everlastingly at the job of making the practice of
brotherhood a reality in our homes, in our schools,
in our businesses, and in our communities.
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�by WALKER SANDBACH
It seems a little strange to me to be accepting
an award for doing what comes naturally. In my case.and I imagine many of the awardees here today could
say the same, the award probably belongs to my parents and to my teachers. There are others who practice
brotherhood when they, because of their background
and up-bringing, don't believe in it and don't like it.
I have friends in that position, and I have great admiration for them. They do it out of a sense of fairness
and, sometimes, economic necessity. They have practiced brotherhood while deep within they have wished
desperately that the tremendous changes in our social
and economic life had never occurred.
It is interesting to contemplate on how we
arrive at the beliefs and principles which. guide our
lives. A short time ago my father, who is a Methodist
minister in Iowa, was visiting me. 1 was telling him,
with some pride, of this award. He replied, "I'm not
surprised that you are getting an award for practising
brotherhood, because that is what we taught you.
What I don't understand is why you accepted our
teachings on brotherhood but completely ignored our
training and example in politics."
Fortunately, brotherhood knows no party lines.
If vou were to poll this group of awardees I am sure
you would find both major parties well represented.
I personally am very much encouraged by the
progress that has been made in Chicago . toward . t?e
ideal of having jobs available on the basis of ab1hty
without regard to race, or color, or creed. Of course,
we still have a long way to go.
When I hired my first Negro sales girl in 1947
I was told by some of my business friends that _I w~s
committing econom::: suicide. The first day this glfl
went on duty, I began to wonder if they were right.
I manage a Co-op supermarket. This girl was hi~ed
as a checker. At one time during that first mornmg
two other girls who were also on duty were doing
stock work on the floor, leaving the Negro girl as the
only checker. A customer refused to be checked out
by her and called for the manager. When I arrived
she said, "I'm going to sit-down until you bri~g on a
white girl. I'm not going to have a colored glfl handling my food." I don't need to tell you how ridiculous
was her stand.
Her calling this girl colored reminds me of a
recent suggestion by Harry Golden, editor of the
Carolina Israelite. He says, "Since so many people
insist on referring to Negroes as colored, we should
start referring to whites as colorless." Then newspapers
could run stories of today's event as follows: "The
James M. Yard Brotherhood A ward ceremonies, held
today at City Hall, was attended by a large group of
colored and colorless people."
To return to the woman who was on a sit-down
strike, I told her she was welcome to sit. I even got a
box for her to sit on. She had to wait an hour until
the other girls were needed at the checkouts.
You know, that was the only trouble we ever
h ad. And yet, how close I came at that point to backing down on my decision to have an integrated staff
because I had half accepted the propaganda that disaster would strike if we tried to serve the public with
an integrated staff. I was told by some that I would
lose most of my employees and half of my customers.
Actually, we lost no employees and our business has prospered. It has prospered, as it turned out,
in part just because we have had a policy of being
willing to hire people of many different races, creeds
and nationality backgrounds. We now include in our
staff of 50: American Negroes; American Japanese;
an American Puerto Rican; and an American Indian.
In the matter of creeds we have had Buddhists, Jews,
Catholics, and Prostestants, as well as some young men
who thought they were agnostics or atheists. One of
our advertising slogans has been that the Co-op is
a United Nations in miniature.
Recently a newspaper reporter asked me if our
open hiring policy wo uld work in places other than
H yde Park, which is a community of people of many
races and creeds. My answer was that we had copied
from Gimbel's in New York the idea of using the
United N ations approach in advertising our integrated
staff. It has worked . In addition, I was able to say that
today our open hiring policy is not an uncommon one
in Chicago and more and more retail businesses, particularly in the field of food distribution, h ave open
hiring policies.
Another interesting incident comes to mind
that I want to tell you about. Several years after we
hired our first Negro, I had an application for a
checker's job from a colorless girl with a strong southern accent. She h ad just arrived in Chicago and was
an experienced checker. I told her I would like to
hire her, but I wanted her to know that we had several
Negro girls on the staff and she would have to work
closely with them, eat in the same employees' lunch
room, and treat them courteously. Her reply was, "We
don't do it that way where I come from , but if you
say that is the way it has to be, I'll give it a try." It
wasn't a month before I saw her and a Negro girl returning from a coffee break, arm in arm.
Unfortunately, there are still businesses in my
community, and in yours, that practice discrimination
in hiring, mainly because they are afraid to m ake the
break. I understand this, because I was afraid, too.
However, the time is so late on the clock of
human relations that we need to encourage these businessmen to make a start toward integrating their staffs:
Our best hope for the future, in my opinion,
is in the schools. If we could get really integrated
schools much of the prejudice that still exists would,
in a generation, disappear.
My children go to a school that is 90 per cent
Negro. Because it is a good, well-run school, they are
happy even in this minority situation. But it would
be so much better for all concerned in this school if
the percentage of white children could get to be 25
per cent of the school population. We are working hard
to achieve that goal.
In addition to three children born to us, my
wife and I have a n adopted American Japanese daughter named Jill. One day, when she was seven years old,
Jill came home from school and said; "D addy, I wish
I could be Negro at school and white at home." She
hasn't been able to achieve that, but last month her
5th grade classmates did elect her for an "Outstanding
Student Award," so apparently she has solved her
problems in other ways. I seriously doubt if we do our
children any favors by making their lives too easy,
considering the world which they will be inheriting
from us.
In closing, I want to express m y appreciation,
and I'm sure, that of the other awardees, not just for
the award, but also for the continuing work of the
N ational Conference of Christians and Jews in furthering true brotherhood. I want to urge that we all
keep everlastingly at the job of making the practice of
brotherhood a reality in our homes, in our schools,
in our businesses, and in our communities.
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CAMIIIDGE 38, MASS.
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Atlanta, Georgia J0J02
August 1, 196J
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
Atlanta City Hall
68 Mit chell Street, S. W.
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mayor Allen:
It is my desire to express an opinion in regards to
your recent appearance before the Senate Commerce
Corrnnittee in Washington, D. C.
May I congratulate you for making a national jackass of yourself. People in most states keep these
animals on farms but Georgia elects them to the
Mayor's Office of their largest city.
I trust you are proud of your accomplishment.
Sincerely,


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M. L. Jone s
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�M. L. Jones
P. o. Box 4147
Atlanta, Georgia 30302
·-· .. ---···----... ·~
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
Atlanta City Hall
68 Mitchell Street, S. W.
Atlanta, Georgia
PERSONAL
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���HARRY MARGOLIS
ATTORNEY AT LAW
P. 0. BOX 407
SARATOGA, CALIFORNIA
PHONE UNION 7 • 9029
September
4,
1963
Mayor Ivan Allan, Jr.
C1ty of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mayor Allan:
Your statement before the Senate Commerce Committee on July 26th, 1963,
is factual, courageous and intelligent. It has made a significant contribution
to the important fight for civil rights legislation. It is a strange world in
which we live that this fight should still be required.
I am writing to say 11 thank you" for your own efforts in behalf of a free
society. Your position must ultimately prevail because it is right.
Sincerely yours,
HM:lm
iiarfi Ma~lis
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890 Mitche ll Street S. W . :
Atlanta 14, Georgia
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The House Appropriations Committee cut $250,000
from Jekyll Island budget requests Tuesday, bringing
t he total bite into Gov. Carl Sanders' pr oposed two-year
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ . budget to $527,900.
Panel Puts
Execution
Age at 16
The Jekyll Committee had asked
for $750,000 for each of the next
two years to operate the island
resort.
SECOND-YEAR CUT
After intense questioning of
Jekyll's resident manager, A. J.
Hartley, the committee voted to
leave the first-year request intact,
but cut $250,000 from the second,
witl1 U1e tt·ong implication that it
was lime the state-nm re ort began paying for its operation out
of it own profits.
Hartley told the· commmce he
thought Jekyll would reach that
point in about five years.
A bill to aboli h teen-age electrocutions in Georgia got a quick
and drastic alteration job and then
a blessing from the Hou e Judiciary Committee Tuesday.
A Committee a m e n d m e n l
changed the miniumum age for
"Ben Fortson told us two years
electrocution from 21 to 16.
ago that Jekyll would be selfUnder present Georgia law the sustaining in two years," a comdeath penalty can be given a child mittee member said later in the
as young as 10.
hearing. Secretary of State FortRep. John Bell of Richmond son is chairman of the Jekyll
uthorihi. - - - - - - - - -u
County and Re . J
�TS •PROD UCT OF FINLAND • CUSENIER, N. Y,
ATLANTA HELL-BENT
FOR CULTURE,
SAYS POST WRITER
y
For years, Atlanta has been the business capital of the whole Southeast. And now, according to author Ben Hibbs, it's the culture capital, too.
In this week's Saturday Evening Post, Hibbs
reports on the showcase city of the South. He
tells how the culture craze has hit Atlantabut hard! How Atlanta eating places stack up
against those of Northern cities. And why
Atlantans are actually lucky that their business boom came so late.
Be sure to read the picture-studded article
"Progress Goes Marching Through Georgia"exclusive in this week's Saturday Evening
Post. Pick up your copy today.
Pos'f
A CURTIS MAGAZIN&
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�THE NEW YORK TIMES, SUNDAY, · JULY
SE
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ADOLP H
0 CH S, Publisher 1896-1935
O RV IL E. DR YF OO S , Publisher 1961-1963
P UBLISHED EVERY DAY IN THE YEAR BY THE NEW YORK TIMES COMPANY
ARTH UR H AY S SULZB E RGER_, Chairman of the Board
AR T HUR OC H S S U LZBERG·ER, President and. Publisher
HA RDI N G F . B AN CRO FT, "Vice President and Secretary
FR AN CIS A. Co x,
After t he Treaty
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The historic t reaty between the United States,
Britain and Soviet Russia banning all nuclear
weapons tests in the atmosphere, under water
and in outer space is being hailed throughout
the world as a promising beginning of a new
epoch in E ast-West r elations. After all the bleak
years of cold war and the recurring crises that
found their climax in the near-collision over
Cuba, the world breathes easier t oday and there
is new hope that it can banish the threat of
nuclear holocaust.
But, important as the treaty is for what it
11ays and what it may portend, it · is at best
only a start toward larger goals. President
Kennedy rightly warns that it is not t he millennium and that the r oad ahead is still long and
rocky. As he pointed out, it is a limited treaty
which does not even stop all tests; though it
would stop further lethal fallout. Both real disarmament and the political settlements that
must go hand in hand with it remain far off.
The key to a solution of these problems is
largely in Soviet hands. Premier Khrushchev
agreed t o the t est-ban t reaty be had previoUBly
rejected because, as Under Secretary of State
Harriman says, he "very much wanted one at
thiJI t ime." The Soviet ruler says he wants more
agreements. If so, the West will do its utmost
t o reach t hem. But will Khrushchev? And on
what terms ?
The hard fac t is that Soviet Russia's signat ure on t he t reaty does not mark the end of
·it s drive t oward .a. Communist world t riumph,
though it may 110w pursue that goal by means
short of nuclear war. In faC'I:, both the treaty
and the "nonaggressipn pact " Russia wants may
become weapons in the Soviet "peace" arsenal
- to line up Asia and Africa against the "warmongering" Chinese Communists and to soften
up the West for political settlements t hat would
impair its alliances. As Mr. Khrushchev told the
Chinese: "The struggle for peace, for peaceful
coexistence, is organically bound up with the
revolutionary struggle against imperialism. It
weakens the front of imperialism, isolates its
more aggressive circles from the masses of the
people and helps in the struggle for national
liberation," The West is warned.
Furthermore, the treaty itself can be abrogated if "extraordinary events" jeopardize "the
supreme interests" of any of its signatories. The
Russians insisted on this reservation, over a
narrower definition proposed by the West, as
an obvious safeguard against nuclear armament
by other powers. They · may have Germany in
mind and certainly they are concerned about
Communist China, which boasts that it will soon
break the "white" nuclear monopoly. They may
Trea$urer
to very little ? Is it not a game that every country
is playing with every other ? A game that nobody
can win? A game that isn't worth the effort?
Adjusting to Automation
The United Steelworkers of America and the
employers with whom it deals have again demonstrated that collective bargaining can produce
constructive answers to the problems of technological change without tests of economic muscle
or Government coercion. The contracts just
reached by the union and the major aluminum
producers r epresent an imaginative extension of
the progress-sharing principles embodied in the
union's agreements with the steel and can
companies.
All the aluminum workers-not just those
with long seniority-will qualify for 10 weeks
of vacation every five years, with 13 weeks' pay
to help them en joy their sabbatical. Fringe benefits will also be liberalized, but there will be
no increase· in direct money wages. The changes
are designed to give the workers a share in the
benefits of increased productivity on a basis that
will expand total employment opportunities and
avoid any increase in aluminum prices.
The new contracts, coupled with those already
signed by the union through its joint Human
Relations Committee in basic steel and its longrange committee in Kaiser Steel, ought to serve
as a spur to the deadlocked negotiators in the
nation's railroads. The guidelines for a sound
agreement have been laid down by two Presidential commissions, created only because of the
atrophy of the bargaining process in this piv~tal
industry.
Any formula Congress approves for barring
a rail strike through legislative compulsion will
set a damaging precedent. The month-long truce
agreed to by the railroads provides a last opportunity for the unions t o demonstrate that their
concept of bargaining is not summed up in the
single word "no."
Up t o now they have been gambling on the
proposition t hat the Government will continue
t o retreat in t he face of their obduracy, and that
finally they can extort a settlement that will
saddle the carriers with t housands of unneeded
jobs. The trouble with t his venture in brinkmanship is not only that t he gamble involves
a strike in which the economy would be the
chief victim but that a "victory" for the unions
would jeopardize all job security by' pushing the
railroads closer to bankruptcy.
This is the lesson the disastrous 116-day strike
of 1959 taught both sides in steel. Unfortunately,
there is no sign yet that the railroad unions
have achieved comparable enlightenment.
,...------11_ _;---:
�a/SO mean .l'Tance, OU S II T UUIIUlll l:, H ::! U W ll -:11U \Olt:C1L'
., force u
.
President Kennedy is trying to persuade Pres1• dent de Gaulle to adhere to the treaty, but
- success is unlikely unless France, an acknowledged nuclear power, is put on a par with Britain
and supplied with the same nuclear information
we now give the British. If we did so, the pur... pose would not be to "cause, encourage or partic-~- ipate in" further French tests, which is forbid= den by the treaty, but to make such tests


unnecessary without hampering France's nuclear


development.
French adherence to the new pact might prove
"~ a preliminary to agreement by France to join
~ ·'fn building a NATO nuclear force and to restore
..... Western solidarity. That is still an essential
~ : safeguard of peace.
,,
-·, .




The Art of Spying




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On rare occasions the oratorical fog on
Capitol Hill is pierced by a voice resonant with
courage and dignity. Such a voice was heard
when Mayor Ivan Allen Jr. of Atlanta testified
before the Senate Commerce Committee in support of President Kennedy's bill to prohibit
racial discrimination in stores, restaurants and
other public accommodations.
on · the basis of the very substantial accomplishments that his city of a half-million, the
largest in the Southeast, has made in desegregating publicly owned and privately owned facilities, be might have come as a champion of
"states' rights" and of the ability of localities
to banish discrimination without Federal law.
Certainly, be would have had much more warrant to espouse that view than the Barretts, the
Wallaces and the other arch-segregationists
who raise the specter of Federal "usurpation"
as a device for keeping Southern Negroes in
subjection.
But Mr. Allen was not in Washington to boast.
He was there to warn that even in cities .like
Atlanta the progress that had been made might
be wiped out if Congress turned its back on the
Kennedy proposal and thus gave implied endorsement to the concept that private businesses
were free to discriminate. He left behind this
charge to finish the job started with the Emancipation Proclamation a century ago: "Now the
elimination of segregation, which is slavery's
stepchild, is a challenge to all of us to make
every American free in fact as well as in theory
-and again to establish our nation as the true
champion of the free world."
' Do not implicitly trust anything you read
about spies and spying even if the source is im. peccabiy official. By the accepted rules of the
..:.. game, government statements may be deliber·:. , ately false in order to mislead "the enemy." But,
c of course, they may be true. Naturally, truth is
often very confusing.
The layman can be excused for ruminating in


this fashion as he reads his morning newspaper.


The cast of characters needs a Dickens or a
Dostoievsky (not a historian, of course ) to do
•.- justice to the parade of diplomats, scientists,
journalists, homosexuals, prostitutes and- best
of all- intelligence agents who betray t heir outfits and their fellow spies. Nothing could be
- more devious or fascinating than a double agent.
At least, it is comforting for the layman to
• contemplate the bungling and blindnesses of the
The Fiddlers
" professionals. Devotees of the whodunits surely
The long-legged, rasp-winged insects now come
could do better. Trained by Eric Ambler, Georges into t heir own, and we won't hear the last of
Simenon a nd Ian Fleming, they would never have them till hard frost arrives. They are the leaping
permitted a Bay of Pigs invasion; a successful fiddlers, the grasshoppers, the crickets and the
Christine Keeler; a fantastic 10-year career of katydids.
· ex-Nazi German intelligence officers providing
Grasshoppers are spoken of in the Bible as
the Russians with 15,000 photographs, 20 spools "locusts," and their hordes have contributed in
of tape and many a secret of the West Germans many lands, including our own West, to the long
and NATO. Not that the Russians should boast;
hi11tory of insect devastation and human famine.
· they had Penkovsky.
Walk through any meadow now, or along any
- Even though the real spy cases may be weedv roadside. and vou will see them leaning


stranger than fiction, you don't get the solutions ahe;d of you, hear the rasping rattle of their

as you do in the t hrillers. Nothing could be harsh wings in brief flight. But they do little real


· more fascinating than the stories of the British fiddling. The fiddlers now are the crickets.
journalist H. A. R. Philby, or the Swedish Air
Listen on any hot afti!rnoon or warm evening,
. Force Col. Stig Wennerstrom; but at their most particu larly in the country, and you will hear
· interesting points the volumes are snapped shut the crickets even though you seldom see them.
and put away in secret places where even in- In the afternoon you will hear the black field
telligence chiefs, like characters in a Kafkaesque
crickets, chirping as we say, and often into the
tale, probably cannot find them.
warm evening. But in the evening, from dusk on
'The outsider must be forgiven for believing
through the warm night, the more insistent sound
that any time any government wants to arrest will be the trilling of the pale green tree crickets .
• and/or expel X-number of spies, it digs into its Individually the tree cricket's trill is not so loud,
files and comes up with the requisite quantity.
but because all those in the neighborhood
· When spies are under surveillance they are, synchronize their trills the sound can be as
unbeknownst, spying for the country they are insistent as were the calls of the spring peepers
spying on. The most dangerous spies of all are,
back in April.
to be sure, the ones who are never caught. There
The loudest fiddlers of all are the katydids,
is nothing that the C.I.A., MI-5, K.B.G., Surete
which look like green, hunch-backed grasshopand all the other intelligence and counter-intelpers. Night after night they rasp wing on wing
ligence organizations can do about them.
and make that monotonous call, shrill and seemIs it not possible, in fact, that all this es- ingly endless. But the katydids won't be heard
pionage and counter-espionage ; all these agents for another two weeks or so. Meanwhile the
and double agents, intelligence officers, counter- crickets possess late July, chirping and trilling
intelligence officers, plots and paraphernalia the warm hours away as though summer endured
from infinitesimal microphones to beds, add up forever.
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100 Rooms
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Chautauqua 2-805
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�INVESTMENTS
WEBSTER 3 • 5797
MILTON CRANE
627 SOUTH LORRAINE BLVO.
Los ANGELES 5, CALIF"ORNIA
July
29, 1963
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
Atlanta, Geer gia
Dear Mayor:
I have read an account of your testimoey befcre
the Senate Conmerce Committee and write to tell
you bow much I admire your courage and sense of
justice.
�; Cabin Road,
Conley, Ga.,
August 1, 196;5.
Mayor Ivam Allen,
Atlanta, Ga.
Dear ~ay or Allen:
Thank you for your right, and forthright
stand ~ t h e public accomodations act.
It willjf15a'frence and some political risk
to bring equal justice to our Negro citizens,
but we are a hundred years late already,
and every forthright stand by a respected
public officia l counts.
s~~
(Miss ) Lor etto Chappell
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1609-10 CANDLER BUILDING
ATLANTA 3, GEORGIA
July 30, 1963
Dear Ivan:
I wish to say to you that I feel
that you handled yourself splendidly
before the Senate Committee. What
you said and how you said it should
have made all of us here proud. I
saw that part which was on television
and the s calawag Senator from South Carolina
was put in his place by the Chairman of
the Committee, which pleased me as much
as seeing Georgia whip Tech.
"Keep on keeping on .. "
Mos
Mr. Ivan Allen, Jr ..
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
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=AA02 88027
B NVA121 PD:NEW HAVEN CONN 30 936A EDT:
MAYOR IVAN ALLEN JR=
OFFICE OF THE MAYOR CITY HALL ATLA=
(44).
DEAR IVAN I AM PROUD TO BE YOUR ASSOCIATE AND FRIEND=
RICHARD C LEE MAYOR OF NEW HAVE N:
THE COMPANY WILL A P PR EC IATE SUGGESTIONS F ROM ITS PATRONS C ON CERN ING ITS SERVICE
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MARSHALL.
SSD71
PRESIDENT
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A LLU137 PD:ATLANTA GA 29 147P EST:


HON I VAN ALLEN:


MAYOR OF ATLANTA CITY HALL CG ATLA::
I WISH TO COMMEND YOU FOR YOUR COURAGEOUS AND
IMPRESSIVE APPEARANCE BEFORE THE SENATE COMMERCE,
COMMITTEE FRIDAY I CAN ASSURE YOU THAT I EXPRESS THE
CONCERTED OPINION OF THE RESPONSIBLE CITIZENS OF MY
COMMUNITY SINCERELY:
JOHNNIE YANCEY 1740 SIMPSON RD NW=
TH E COMPANY WILL APPRECIATE S UGGE STIONS F ROM ITll PATRONS CONCER1'/ IN O I T S SERVICE
�MERCER UNIVERSITY
MACON, GEORGIA
01/ice
July 29, 1963
or tile President
Mr. Ivan Allen
Mayor of the City of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
My dear Mr. Mayor:
I have long been a friend, but now I
am increasingly proud even to know you.
The courage required to be the honest man
you were at Washington last Friday was
admirable, and I want you to know how
deeply I admore you. The increased respect
which your testimony earns for Atlanta and
indeed for all Georgia must be evident,
and all is much appreciated by me.
Yours very truly,
17
/ju
~{ C . RIi,'.a'rri/4,s .
/A,J
h-t,-1
�Hendrix
67 wLake
Ne
H
P lace
aven, Conn.
The 0 Hon
• T van A
. llen, J
70 Norths.
Atl a nta
ide Drive r.
eorgia
' NW
J
��~TLANTA'S MAYOR
BACKS RIGHTS BILL
AS HELP TO CITIES
Calls Public Facility Clause
Key to Averting StrifeSenator Praises Views
E xcerpts from Mayor Allen's
testtmony are on Page 7.
By E. W. KENWORTHY
Special to The New York Timts
WASHINGTON, July 26['he Mayor of Atlanta appealed to Congress today to
pass legislation to eliminate
egregation, "slavery's stepchild."
"We cannot dodge the issue,"
Mayor Ivan Allen Jr. told the
Senate Commerce Committee."'
"We cannot look back over ou t
houJders or turn the clock bac t
o the 1860's. We must take
iction now to assure a greater
future for our citizens and our
country."
In the last several years Atanta has desegregated city
parks and golf courses, public ·
schools, lunch counters, princi- i
pal restaurants and its leading 1
hotels for tqe holding of conventions.
Mr. Allen, who was elect ed
Mayor in 1961, took pride in
the progress nonetheless. He
said, "It has been a long ex- 1
hausttng and oft en disco~rag- '.
ing process and the end is far '
· from being in sight."
·
Asks Passage of Bill
What Atlanta has accomplished, Mr. Allen said, has
been done partly by voluntary \
action and partly as a result
of court orders. But the task
of dealing with discrimination
in public accommodations would
have ·been easier ltf there had
been a national law to guide
local officials and businessmen, 1
e said.
<
He does not believe, he said, t
, hat any
en
w:trrb--.t.}J.e
ederal Government to · strict
unnecessarily the rights of
private business.
However, h,e added, I am
firmly convinced that the 'Supreme Colll't insists that the
sam~ fundamental rrghts must
be held by every American citizen."
Therefore, any failure by Congress to pass the bill "woul
amount to an endorsement o
private business setting up a
entirely new status of discrimi- nation throughout the nation,'
he declared.
�.... __.., .. ~ .n ~ Lurn 1;0 '.l'Urmoil
·s
g
t1s
i-
r
p
'
-•
,
"Cities like Atla nta might slip
backwa rds." He warned. "Hotels
nd restaurants that ha ve already taken this issue upon
themselves and opened their ,
doors might find it convenient ,
to go back to the old status." 1
The result might well be "the
old turmoil of riots, strife, 1
demonstrations and picketing," ,
Mr. Allen asserted, continuing:
"Gehtlemen, if I had your 1I.
problem, armed with the local
experience I have had, I would b
pass a public accommodation f.
bill."
n
asked the Senators wheth- f
er it was all right for the Negro
to go do n Main Street deositing his earnings at the
\:>ank and purchasing food at :
lhe supermarket just like any
other customer, and then be ~
e
Unlled Press International Tel photo
BACKS CIVIL RIGHTS PROVISION: Mayor Ivan Allen
Jr. of Atlanta urges passage of prohibition of segregation
in privately owned public accommodations during his
app_earance before t'1e Sena te Cw ·--;-;· :i Co-- 1ri '. J~~0
�SATURDAY, JULY 27, l
ATLANTA'S MAYOR
BACKS RIGHTS BIL
Continued From Page 1, Ool. 5
turned away at the restaurant
on the ground that the proprietor had a legal right to
cha.nge the Negro's citizenshiJ1
l!,S a matter of convenience.
"I submit that it is not right
to allow an American's citizenship to be changed merely
as a matter of convenience," he
said.
The Mayor suggested, however, tha t Congress should
arnen,d the Administration bill
to allow "a reasonable time" fo r
communities to abolish discrimination before Federal inter vention. He also thought that smaller cities should have a longen
ime than larger, since metropolitan a reas found it easie1
to adapt t hemselves to social
change.
Senator J ohn P. Pastore,
Democrat of Rhode Island, who
was In the chair, told Mr. Allen
at the concludion of his state.;
ment that it was more difficult
for him to have said the things
he did than it would have been \
for
some
officials
from
Northern cities.
"I am humbled In your presence," Mr. Pastore said.
Thurmond Poses Queries
Thereupon, Senator Strom
Thurmond, Democrat of Sou
Carolina, began a series of ques
tions similar to those he had
addressed to Gov .Ross R. Barnett of Mississippi and , Gov
George C. Wallace of Alabama
Would It not be better, Mr
Thurmond asked, to rely on voluntary action, or at least loca
ordinance?
"Senator," Mr. Allen retortJ
'I'd like to see definition on
national level. Congress shout
say what it thinks should b
done under the Supreme Cour
decision. We have been left u
in the air."
Wasn't it true that tbJs w
�.lUCGU ,
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,1,. ,u u .1. - ·-
mond asked.
"It would compel the same
rights be given to Negro citizens as to white citizens. Yes,
that's compulsion. Any federal
Jaw exercises some compulsion,"
the Mayor replied. He then
went on:
"We have reached a situation
that has been brought tnto being by the Supreme Court. We
look on the Supreme Court wit~
a schoolboy's reverence. This is
your court, our court."
Mr. Thurmond then aske
whether the proposed law would
not destroy business in Georgia.
"I don't see any business destroyed," Mr. Allen answered.
"I am asking Congress, as
local official, to give me a def
inltlon."
Senator Is Challenged
At this point Mr. Pastore anI grily protested Mr. Thurmond'•
questions, which, he sa id, wer
I "unfair. He said that if th
South
Carolinian
continuec
these "when-did-you-stop-beating-your-wife questions," h
would rule them out of ordei:
Mr. Thurmond said that th
chairman was trying to ."gagl
members. "If we can't cross
examine witnesses to find ou
how this would work, we hav
reached a dangerous stage," h
said.
Mr. Pastore retorted that M~


I'hurmond was asking "loadeo


uestions to catch the . head·
lines.
' :As long as I am chairman,'
he shouted, "I will see that al
witnesses are treated with dig
ni ty and decorum a.nd not embarrassed beyond the limits· o
fairness."
The audience rok!i: into applause, Mr. Thurmon<l asked
the chairman why he did not '
stop it.
"I can't stop it after it happened," Mr. Pastore said with
a grin.
Mr. Thurmond has contended
that the integr ation movement
Is "Communist-controlled."
Senator Philip A. Hart,
Democrat of Michigan, asked
~he Mayor if his city's desegregation moves were "Communist-inspired.' '
"There are no more Communists in Atlanta than there are
on the moon, Mr. Allen said.
South Ca.rollnlan H~rd
Later Gov. Donald Russell of
South Carolina opposed the bill
as unconstitutional. Taking the
opposite line from Mr. Allen, ,
the Governor argued that prog- ,
ress .could be made only by ,
\ voluntary local action and that
a Federal Jaw "will. breed re
sistance and perhaps violence.
Testifying before a Senate
Labor and Public Welfare subcommittee on fair employment
practices legislation, Roy Wilkins, executive secretary of the
National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People,
said it was as difficult for a
Negro to get into the plumbers'
union as into the Chase Manhat•
tan Bank.
He praised ~orge Meany,
president of the labor federation, for bringing pressure to
bear on unions that practice
discrimination. This, be said,
was having "some effect, but t
· us
the
movement
seems
, glacial.
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1
AA29 SSC10
A LLT115 PD:ATLANTA GA 1 245P EST=


MAYOR I VAN ALLEN JR=


CI TY HALL CG ATLA=
\\!2
DEAR SIR:
I TAKE THIS METHOD TO CONGRATULATE YOU FOR YOUR
WONDERFUL LOGICAL TALK ON CIVIL RIGHTS IN WASHINGTON D•


e A FEW DAYS AGO I WANT YOU TO KNOW TH AT MT CALVARY


BAPTIST CHURCH WITH HER 3200 MEMBERS ARE BEHIND YOU 100
PER CENT
WE PRAY THAT ALL MIGHTY GOD
WILL
COM
FORT YOU
AND STRENGTHEN YOU THAT YOU MAY CONTINUE TO CARRY ON YOUR
GOOD WORK AS MAYOR OF OUR GREAT CITY IF- I CAN
BE OF ANY
~
-
THE COMPANY WILL APPRECIATE SUGGESTIONS FROM ITS PATRONS CONCERNING ITS SERVICE
�~RVICE
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SERVICE TO YOU AT ANY TI ME PLEASE FEEL FREE TO CALL UPO N
ME:
B JOSEPH JOHNSON SR PASTOR GREATER MT
CALVARY BAPTIST CHURCH 388 GLENN ST
SOUTH WEST ATLANTA:
TH E CO M PAN Y WILL APPRECIAT E S UGGE STIONS FROM ITS PATRONS CONCERNING ITS SER VICE
�-Mrs·. Fred W. Patterson 2959 Andrews Drive, N . W . Atlanta 5, Georgia
July 30, 1963.
Hon. Ivan Allen, Mayor
of Atlanta,
City Hall.
Dear Mayor Allen:
,
Fred and I want you to know how
proud we are of our Mayor. Your fine speech was
not an easy one to make but in the light of world
events today( as well as local events) it was necessary, we believe.
As one travels about the country outside our area - one soon sees it is largely the
South which refuses to accept the inevitable.
It is reassuring to have a Mayor who
is a statesman.
Sincerely,
~ /~
'
�Atlanta'.s Mayor Speaks
On rare occas~cns the oratorical fog on
Capitol Hill is pierced by a voice resonant with
. courage and dignity. Such a voice was heard
when Mayor Ivan Allen Jr. of Atlanta testified
before the Senate Commerce Committee in support of President Kennedy's bill to prohibit
racial discrimination in stores, restaurants and
other public accommodations.
On the basis of the very substantial accomplishments that his city of a half-million, the
largest in the Southeast, has made in desegregating publicly owned and privately owned facilities, he might have come as a champion of
"states' rights" and of the ability of localities
to banish discrimination without Federal law.
Certainly, he would have had much more warrant to espouse that view than the Barretts, the
Wallaces and the other arch-segregationists
who raise the specter of Federal "usurpation"
as a device for keeping Southern Negroes in
subjection.
But Mr. Allen was not in Washington to boast.
He was there to warn that even in cities like
Atlanta the progress that had been made might
be wiped out if Congress turned its back on the
Kennedy proposal and thus gave implied endorsement to the concept that private businesses
were free to discriminate. He left behind this
charge to finish the job started with the Emancipation Proclamation a century ago : "Now the
elimination of segregation, which is slavery's
stepchild, is a challenge to all of us to make
every American free in fact as well as in theory
- and again to establish· our na tion as the true
TIAJ/35
champion of the free lJ~rJ1{,
NY,
�SA VOY HOTEL
FLORENCE
A '""~v-.A'\ \
\ - \ \.)
\ G\t,~
~ ~ ~ 0- \ l--\ Q \
'\
�/f
THE NEW YORK Tl~
6
i
~lrt N.e:nr ffork ~im~s.
ADOLPH s. OC HS , Publisher 1896-1935
ORVIL E. DRYF0O S , Publis her 1961-1963
l'UBLJSHED EVERr DAT IN THE Tr.AR Br THr. Nf.W TORK TIMES C014PAN1
ARTHUR HArs SULZIIERGER, Chairman of the Board.
ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER, P r esident and Publisher
HA1iirNa F. BANCROFT, Vice President and Secretary
FKANCJS A.
Cox, Trta3U1·er
Bi
']
Down to Earth in Space
mier Adoula to speed urgently necessary
fiscal and economic reforms.
The Congo has made progress and it is
still making progress; certainly there is
no promising alternative to the Adoula
Government. But the country faces disaster unless that Government curbs the intolerable budget deficit, stops printing
money to cover it and stems the soaring
inflation that is making people idle and
hungry and imperils economic recovery.
Premier Adoula is fully aware of the need
for reforms.
·
The United Nations cannot undertake to
cope with new Congos. Neither can the
African states, whose efforts to force a
premature independence on the unready
Portuguese colonies are endangering the
United Nations itself.
There is nothing out of this world about
the task facing Dr. George E. Mueller,
who has been chosen to succeed D. Brainerd Holmes as head of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's
manned space program. His first assignment should be a realistic, down-to-earth
re-examina tion of the cost and potential
value of the flight to the moon. Beyond
that, there ia need for a thorough review
of all . the activities and outlays carried
on by NASA.
This would not be necessary if Congress had been exercising ordinary supervision over our space effo rts. But, goaded
by Mr. Kennedy's determination to beat
the Soviet Union in the race to the moon,
Congress has permitted NASA to lead a
charmed life, providing what amounted Atlanta's Mayor Speaks
almost to a blank check for its operations
On r are occasions the orator ical fog on
and a free hand to its managers. NASA, Capitol Hill is pierced by a voice resonant
it seemed, could do no wrong.
with courage and dignity. Such a voice
Congress is now rectifying its mistake. was heard when Mayor Ivan Allen J r. of
As a result of its belated probing, it · has Atlanta testified before the Sena te Comcut NASA's mushrooming budget. The merce Committee in support of President
reduction includes shelving of plans for a
Kennedy's bill to prohibit racial discrimin$50 million r esearch center t hat NASA a tion in stores, restaurants and other pubhad sought for the President's home state. lic accommodations.
NASA still has to exert a greater degree
On the basis of the very substantial acof self-discipline. Its important achieve- complishments that his city of a halfments have occasionally been marred by . million, the largest in the Southeast,
sloppy practices, including a wavering has made in desegr egating publicly owned
ethical a ttitude to the commercialization and privately owned facilit ies, he might
of the astronauts. Despite Mr. Kennedy's have come as a champion of "states'
position on the moon race, the wisdom rights" and of the ability of localities
of the current "crash program" to that to banish discrimin ation without Federal
end - with its accompanying massive law. Certainly, he would have had much
diversion of human and economic re- more warrant to espouse that view than
sources - is highly questionable.
the Barrette, tl;te Wallaces and the other
There is no doubt that false starts and arch-segregationists who raise the specter
dead ends are inevitable in exploring the of Federal "usurpation" as a device for
unknown frontiers of space. But NASA's keeping Southern Negroes in subjection.
effec tiveness will be enhanced by tighter
But Mr. Allen was not in Washington to
controls over spending and greater co- boast. He was there to warn tha t even in
ordination of its activities, including a cities like Atlanta the progress that had
more sober' evaluation than we have yet
been made might be wiped out if Congress
had from it of the entire moon shot turned its back on the Kennedy proposal
program. The space agency needs a solid and thus gave implied endorsement to the
foundation on earth.
concept that private businesses were free
to finish the job started with the Emanci.. . and in Science
pation Proclamation a centry ago : "Now
The vastness of the Government's r e- the elimination of segregation, which is
search activities has prompted a demand slavery's stepchild, is a challenge to all
by members of the House Rules Com- of us to make every American free in
mittee for a broad inquiry into the char- fact as well as in theory- and again to
a cter, coat and conduct of federally establish our nation as the true champion
of the free world."
lall
ltUE!I:RJll.S
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�HOTEL NEW WESTON
A K N OTT H O T E L
M A DI SO N AV EN UE AT SQ'TJ1 S TRE E T
NE W Y ORK 22, N .Y.
�.<..... . ~-· ,
�DR. DOUGLAS GOLD
Clinical And Counseling
Psychologist
DUBLIN, GEORGIA
8-4-1963
Honorable Ivan Allen,
City of Atl a nta,
Atlanta, Geor g ia.
Mayor
Dear Mr. Mayor:
Please accept a whi t e man's
expression of appreciation f or the very intelligent and courageous expression you gave
the committee in Wa shing ton. Th e nation-wide
acclaim it has brought you is fully merited
and reflects great credit upon yourself and
the city and comm~nity you serve so well.
I woul d be interested to know the favorableunfa vo rable tally of commun ications y ou have
rec e ived, par ticul a rly f rom Geor g ia Cauca si a ns.
Ve r y sincer e ly
~Ft_
OFFICE:
U.S.V.A. Hospit al
Ph. 272- 1210- 34 1
HOME:
1515 Rice Avenue
Ph . 272-0326
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~
BY RU ST CRAFT
BX 406 - IB
"'-I•. V • • 4.
0 II US'Y C:"Al"T
���i -
�Aldus Books Limited
Aldus House Conway Street
Fitzroy Square London WI
telephone Euston 28 I I
telcgra!lls Alday London
31st July 1963
Dear Si r,
It i s with a gr ea t deal of gra ti tude t ha t I
write as an Ameri can citizen to thank you for your
testimony before t he Senat e Commerce Committe, as
re ported in the at ta ched artic l e by Al ista i r Cooke
i n The Guardian dated 29th July.
If America is, i n fact, go ing through a
revolution its heroes and patriots will hold a hi gh
place in future hi story. I bel i eve your statement
before the Committee will a ccord you a very high
pla ce of honor. Any c i tizen shoul d be humbled by it.
With sincere thanks.
The Hon. Ivan Allen Jnr.,
Ma yor,
Atlanta,
Georgia,
U. S .A.
Directors: Douglas M. Black Chairman (USA) · John T. Sargent (USA) · Wolfgang Foges Managing• James Fisher
�I
20
Portland, Maine, Press Herald, Saturday, July 27, 1963
Mayor .Of Atlanta Urges
Race Discrimination Ban
WASHINGTON (UPI) - Mayor "Fallure by Congress to take called charges the Negro integra
Ivan Allen J r. of Atlanta broke definite action at this time," the tion movement was Communistthe pattern of southern antago- Georgian said, "is by inference inspired "ridiculous."
nism to President Kennedy's civil an endorsement Of the right of pri- He told a House judiciary s3
rights program Friday by urging vate business to practice racial committee: "This is not & resul
Congress to outlaw racial discrim- discrimination and, in my opin- of Communist action. It is th
!nation in restaurants, hotels and ion. would start the same old result of failure to give the p i
other private businesses.
round of squabbles and demon- pie who were freed from chatte
At the same Senate Commerce stratlons that we have had in the slavery the rights of citizens. The:yj
Committee hearing, Gov. Donald past."
would be less than men if they
S. Russell of South Carolina said However, Allen urged congress did not protest."
that enactment of the controver- to write into the program a pro- -Gus Tyler, assistant president
slal public accommodations pro- vision giving local communities of the AFL-CIO International Laposal would aggravate race ten- reasonable time to try voluntary dies Garment Workers Union, endorsed the proposals to insure job
slons.
means to end segregation
The hearing was enlivened by Gov. Russell, In his 0 ;posltlon equality for Negroes and denied
anoth~r conflict between acting to the legislation, said it "offers that his union prevents Its Negro
comnuttee chairman John 0 . Pas- no sound remedy for the delicate a_nd Puerto Rican members from
tore, D-RI., and Sen. Strom Thur- and complex problem of racial filllng high offices.
mond, D-S.C. The two engaged relations ,.
-James Farmer, director of the
in a snappish verbal exchange
·
.
Congress of R aci a. 1 Equaliwhen Pastore accused Thurmond The South Ca.ro~a executive ty <CORE), and Roy Wilkins, exof asking "loaded questions to ~aid it w_ould militate against ecutive secretary of the National
The cordial atmosphere essen- Association for the Advance
catch tomorrow's headlines."
Allen testified that Atlanta has tlal to peaceful relations."
ment of Colored People <NAACP),
made & start toward integration. Elsewhere on the ciVil rights appeared before a. Senate subcommlttee to advocate passage of a
But he said failure of Congress legislative front :
to pass an anti-discrimination law -Norman Thomas, long-time So- bill setting up a fair employ
might encourage communities clallst candidate for president, ment practices commission.
where voluntary efforts have begun to )apse ba~k into previous McNamara Gives Order
i;egregation practices.

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  1. http://allenarchive.iac.gatech.edu/originals/ahc_CAR_015_019_017.pdf

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