Box 19, Folder 18, Complete Folder

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Box 19, Folder 18, Complete Folder

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�Ounque dos golas de ·. \
agua se parezcan.
son dislinlas.
[veryone in l~is
everloving world !oohs
a liHle lihe someone else.
�,,
�(THIS SI DE OF CARD IS FOR A DDRESS)
�i!lnntr Nrwn -Wrihuur
Published afternoons (except Saturday) and Sunday m orning at 403 Tribune Str eet by
News Publisll,ing Co. B. H , M OONEY JR., President.
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rates on r equest. Second- class postage paid at Rome, Ga.
Associ ated Pr ess and UnitE-d Press- International
Telephone- All departments (except Society) 232-1511-Society 232-3303
PAGE FOUR
~
WEDNESDAY, JULY 31, 1963
Glad Mr. Allen Is Atlanta's Mayor
A.tlanta Mayor Ivan Allen Jr. last
week became t he first sou thern public
official t o testify in behalf of the Kennedy administration's prize pack age of
civil rights legislation, particula rly f'.:>r
the so-called elimin'1tion of discrimi
nation in public accomodations.
Mr. Allen, one recalls, is indebted to
the large Atlanta Negro vote for being
mayor of that city, so his t estimony m
Washington last Friday can be viewed
in th at ligh t as far as judging its impartiality.
Mr. Allen e>.::pressed t he fe&r that
without Co11gressional action, "cities
like Atlant a might slip backward." In
essence, that without the compul~ion
af federal law, individuals might p1 esume to make individual choice in their
associations and the disposition of their
proper ty and services.
At ,no point in his rather lengthy dis·:.rt,a.tiun t o the Senate Commerce Comrn ittee does Mr. Allen deplore dangerous a n d provocative street demonstra-
t ions which have impeded public safety
nor does he condemn the destruction of
individual rights at the hands of mobs
who demand the right to t hei~ own set
of laws by defying those with which
t hey do not agree.
Presumably M.r. Allan secs nothing
wrong in having the federal government move as fast as it can int,o area s
of private rights on the specious ground
t hat so-called "anti - discrimination"
measures enjoy a "moral" priority in
n ation~! a ffairs. What h e would promote is the basically 11:n-American notion that Negroes must be set up as a
special minority, not only to be afforded equality of treatment but, 1n fact,
made py federal compulsion a. special
category of citizensh ip more than
"equal."
Mr. Allen, we h ave pointed out , i !
mayor of Atlanta. We are grateful,
indeed, h is peculiar philosohy is a,t
least far removed from Rome. We
doubt if it represents n1ajority thinking
in his own city.
GE Shows Community Pride
J<... mployes at GE's Medium Transformer Department h ere in Rome are,
in dicating the pride they have in their
company as w~ll as community by displaying unique license plates advertis·
ing that "Tran sfonners For The World"
are m ade in Rome, Georgia. These blue
an d white plates which are displayed
on the front of tb.eir cars will certainly
be carried far and wide during t he
two weeks G El employes en joy thPir
two-week vacation shutdown.
- ~ .T..LJo
+--. .--,olflr
+o- ..t...-r
gram µJI the more gratifying. The fact
t ha.t QE employes want to voluntarily
adv~rtise their company and community whe11 ever they go ls certainly
helpfµ.l to Rome and Floyd County in
bringing t o the coun try's atten tion t h at
we are a center of a worldwide market
for p roducts made in Georgia.
We hope that this spirit of pride tn
their work find the pl acE> in which the '
live a exhibited by GE employes js ju<1t
DAVID LAWR ENCE
Role of
th
WASHINGTON - What j g the
true function of the clergyman in
the rii,cial controver sy nowaday~?
I s i t to instigate and lead " non·
violent" demonstrations thnt m ay
become violent ? It it to get one 's
self arrr sted b y t h!! police for <1ist11r bing the pPace in ordrr to nnimati7.P t he grlevancei; o! a n oup
in the comm unity? Or is i t to in<:ulcnte 11, spll'it of human brotherhood 1m1011g n ariiihioner anlt to
help t hPm sePI~ divine ~uldonep In
tM rel11tions of man to 1111\11?
These questions al'ise not onlv
bt'CQllJSt! 1•lrnrch IIJ'OUPII of V rio1i'11
rtt>nom111atlon1s
that tll y wlll
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W. P . MA RS HA LL.
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"7A EST .JUL 27 ~~ AAOS7
A LLA,9 NL PD ATLANTA CA 26
IVAN ALLEN JR, MAYOR
CITY HALL ATLA
! VANT TO CONGRATULATE YOU ON YOUR FORTHRIGHT ANO COURAGEOUS ,
STAND BEFORE THE SENATE CCMMITTEE
P C MCDUFFIE SR.
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359A EST JUL~ 63 AAOSS
A LLA62 NL PD ATLANTA GA 26
MAYOR IVAN ALLEN
CITY HALL ATLA
SIR YOUR WELL REASONED ANO HIGHLY COURAGEOUS STAND IN THE CttlMERCE
C<f1MITTEE FAVORING PASSAGE OF T~E PUBLIC ACCCMODATIONS ACT
GIVES ME, FOR THE FIRST TIM£, REAL PRIDE IN AN OFF!CE HOLDER
IN MY NATIVE STATE. THANK YOO YOU WILL HAVE MY VOTE ANO SUPPORT
IN T~E FUTURE
MARGE MANDERSON 711 WILSON RD NW.
�STERN UNION
CLASS OF SERVICE
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453p EST JUL 28 63 AB110 BA182
B NTA011 NL PO NANTOOKET MASS 28
MAYOR IVAN ALLEN JR
ATLA
THE HUMILITY DIGNITY CLARITY AND COURAGE OF YO~ CIVIL RIGRTS
TESTIMONY WERE INSPIRING YOU SPOKE MORALLY FOR THOUSANDS OF
US ANO WE ARE DEEPLY GRATEFUL MOST RESPECTFULLY
RABBI EVERETT GENDLER 21 FOREST DRIVE PRil'CETON NJER
(37).
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�CLASS OF SERVICE
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WESTERN UNION
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W . P. MARSHA L L .
Pllt&S IO IIN T
The 6Jiog rime sh own in the dare line on domestic relegrruns is LOCAL TIME or point o f o rigin. Time of receipt is LOCAL TIME ar poi nt o f desti nation
103sP Esi JUL 26 63 AE520
NSB413 NS LLB154 NL PO JB TUSKEGEE ALA 26
M4YOR IV AN ALLEN DLR DO NOT FOr£
ATLA
ICCEPT MY COr+1ENOATION FOR YOUR HONEST TESTIMONY !£FORE Tl£
COl+lERCE COMMITTEE YOU AR£ Tl-£ FIR~T TRUTHFUL SOUTt£RN POLITICIAN
I
IT HAS !£EN MY GOOD FORTUl\E TO HEM Lit<E ABOU E£N ABHEM MAY
YO~ TRI BE INCREASE
HRS AR SHIELDS TUSKEGEE INSTITUTE ALA.
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The filing time shown in the date line on domestic telegr:uns is LOCAL TIME at point of origin. Time of receipt is LOCAL TIME•• point of destination
228'A EST JUL 6Z7 6~ AA067 RA026 R WAO,, NL PO WASHINGTON DC 26
MAYOR IVAN ALLEN JR
ATLA
YOUR TESTIMQNY TQDAY MAGNIFICANT IN MY OPINION MOST SIGNIFICANT
STATEMENT BY SOUTHERN POLITICIAN SINCE CIVIL VAR MAY YOU AND
YOUR FAMILY ENDURE FOREVER FOR YOUR HAVING COURAGE AND WISDOM
TO SPEAK THE TRUTH
VA GUS PARTEE JR.
�CLASS OF SERVICE
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645P
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P ENA1'3 PD ENGLEWOOD I NJER 27 62,p
EST JUL
27 63
PA!:UIOEN T
AB168
EDT ,
HONARABLE IVAN ALLEN JR
CITY HALL ATLA
OONQRATULAnONS ON YOUR CLEAR HEADED AM> COURAGOUS STATEMENT
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AAO6 SSF77
IA LLT5 PD=ATLANTA GA 29 1O36A EST:
MAYOR IVAN ALLEN, PSNL DLY ONLY DONT PHONE:
CITY HALL ATLA CG:
REAL REAL PROUD OF YOU=
HELEN BULLARD=
THE COMPANY WILL APPRECIAT E SUGGESTIONS FROM ITS PATRON S
LT-l ntcrna tional
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�WESTERN UNION
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PAUIDENT
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Eat poin t of destination
AA07 PA198
P JRA148
CGN
PD:JERSEYCI
TY
NJER
29
1148A EDT:
HON IVAN ALLEN, MAYOR OF ATLANTA' C·ITY HALL ATLA: '
1
CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR WONDERFUL PROGRESSIVE STAND ON
CIVIL RIGHTS YOUR OPINION AS EXPRESSED AT THE HEARING IN
WASHINGTON SHOULD HELP PASS THE CIVIL RIGHTS BILL AS
- - - PROPOSED BY OUR- PRESIDENT WE NEED MORE PEOPLE
LIKE
YOUIN PUBLIC SERVICE IN THE SOUTH AND IN THE NORTH EAST
.
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SAMUEL KIPNIS DUPONT PLAZA HOTEL MIAMI 32 FLO-
THE COMPA NY WILL APPRECIATE SUOOESTIONS FROM IT$ PATRO
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A LLR264 PD=ATLANTA GA 29 222P EST:


HON MAYOR IVAN ALLEN JR:


CITY HALL CG ATLA:
PLEASE PERMIT US TO EXPRESS HEARTFELT THANKS AND
ADMIRATION FOR YOUR COURAGE DIGNITY AND CONCERN FOR
THE PROBLEMS OF OTHERS WE ARE CHALLENGED BY YOUR ACTION
AND WE HOP E TO PROV E WORTHY OF YOU R CONF ID EN CE=
MR AND MRS JESS E HILL JR:
THE C O M PAN Y WILL A P PRECIAT E SUGGESTION S F ROM IT$ PATRO N S CON CE RN ING ITS SERVICE
�CLASS OF
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&......dw.'crrcd char,
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proper symbol.
TELEGRAM ·
W. P . M ARSHALL.
The filing
tun~shown in
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P R£S IO~NT
the dnte line on domestic telegram s is LOCAL TIME nt point of origin. Time of receipt is LOCAL TIME 3t poi
8,3P EST JUL 27 63 AE197
'
A LLA421 NL PO ATLANTA GA 27
MAYOR IVAN ALLAN
NORTHSIOE OR ATLA
FROM Tl£ GHAN>I YOUTH COUNCIL MAYOR IVAN ALLAN, THE GHANDI
YOUTH COUNCIL FEELS 'fHAT THE TESTIMONY , YOU GAVE BEFORE Tt£
SENATEp0Mr£RCE COMMITTEE R£PRESENTS ONE
Tl£ ITRlNIIEST RE~FFIRM~TI8NS
OF THE PRINCIPALS OF LIBERTY ANO EQUALITY BY SOUTI-ERN POLITICIAN
IN MODERN TIMES. WHILE THERE ARE STILL A GR.EAT MANY THINGS
TO IE JON!REGAROING CIVIL RIGHTS IN THE ATLANTA AREA YOU HAVE
or
THANKFULLY REJECTED Tl£ COURSE OF BLIND OPPOSITIONS OWN BY
TI£ GREAT MAJORITY OF YOUR SOUTHERN POLITICAL COLLEAGlES BUT
INS'TEAO _SHOWN TRI.£ STATESMANSHIP BY YOUR CO~AGEO~S ANO FORESIGHT.
E THEREFORE SALUTE YOU HAYOft ALLAN BUT AT T~ SAME TIME HOPE .
lli\T Tt£' REPRESENTATIVE WELTNER ANO ESPECIALLY SENATOR LEftOY
R JOHNSON ANO DOCTOR CLEMENT WILL SEE FIT TO FOLLOW YOU\ EXAMPLE
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P. MARSHALL.
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PR&8 10RN T
The filing time shown in the dace line on domestic telegrams is LOCAL TIME at point of origin. Time of receipt is LOCAL TIME at point of destination
OF COURAGEOUS NOW THAT YOU HAVE SHOWN Tt:E WAY RESPECTFULLY
YOURS
ARCHIE BLACK PRESIDENT GHANOI YOUTH COUNCIL Ar<> ROSS MARAIN
VICE PRESIDENT•
�WU 116 CGN PD ATLANTA GA JUL 26 1225P EST
IVAN ALLE N J R, DO NT FONE
3700 NORTHSIDE DR NORTHWEST ATLA
CO NGRATULATIO NS ON YOUR TESTI MONY FOR COMMON SENSE AS SWELL AS
VI RTUE . S INCERE APPRECIATIO N AND MY BEST WISHES ALWAYS
GRACE T HAM ILTON
1231 P
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F162 PD ATLANTA GA JUL 27 334P EST
MA YOR IVAN ALLEN
3700 NORTHSIDE DR NW ATLA
MY PERSONAL CONGRATULATIONS FOR THE SINCERE AND SCHOLARLY FAS HIO N IN
WHICH YOU SPOKE FOR WHAT IS RIGHT BEFORE THEUS SENATE COMMERCE
COMM ITTE E THOUGH YOU KNEW YOURS WAS AN UNPOPULA R STAND MY FEELI NGS
ARE THAT YOU HAVE GA INED SUPPO RT AND DEEP RESPECT FROM MY
COMMUNITY RESPECTFULLY
C MILES SMITH
DDS
406PME
�CLASS Of S ER(,ICE
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unless its deferred char ..
nctcr is indicated by the
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W . P. MARSHALL.
P 111:&s10aH1
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75,r'. EST JUL 26 63 AE477
A LLC3~ PD ATLANTA GA 26 715P EST
MAYOR IV AN ALLEN JR, ·oELIVEft
·3 700 NORTHSIOE OR NORTH WEST ATLA
YOU WEftE SENSAnONAL TODAY IN WASHINGTON WE ARE INDEED PROUD
DOOROTHY GREER DAVID GREER 2069 I GLENWOOD AVE SOUTt£AST
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1963 JUL 26 PM 8 09
RC ATLANTA GA
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��People
Fair
Stories and pictures of fa-
Fair and warm.
mous personalities.
High 94; low 68.
Turn To Page 3-A
Foremost Newspaper of The Carolinas
More Weather Data-Page 2-A
78th Year, No. 130
SATURDAY, JULY 27, 1963
7 Cents
A
TEST-BAN TR.E AT¥
Atlanta Mayor
Backs JFK's
Bill On Rights

28 Poges
JFI( Calls .,Pact
Vital 'First Step'
Passage Of Accommodations Bill Urged;
Voluntary Action Is Termed Not Enough
By JACK CLAIBORNE
AROUND BASES
Observer Washinston Bureau
WASHINGTON - Atlanta Mayor Ivan Allen Jr. told
the . Senate Commerce Committee Friday that voluntary
action was not enough to solve the nation's racial problems.
McNamara Ol(s
Off-Limits Areas
He urged Congress to enact a federal law outlawing
racial discrimination in places of public accommodation.
Not to do so, he said, would mean turning back the
clock and reversing the uneasy progress that has been made
recently by men of good will.
"Even now, the knowledge that this bill might not
pass has caused some business men who agreed to desegregate their businesses to question whether they made the
right move," he said.
The graying mayor pleade dwith the Congress to,
"give us some direction, give us some definition."
As be talked he leaned forward toward the microphone on the desk before him and his words came out
softly, distinctly.
The committee and the small
ceilinged hearing room w e r e
hushed by the drama and the
eloquence of his statement.
"As the mayor of the south'!ast's largest city, I can say
to you out of first-hand experience and first-hand knowledge
that nowhere does the problem
of eliminating discrimination between the races strike so closely
home as it <loes to- the local
elected public official. He is the
man who c a n n o t pass the
AP W lre PhOIO
ATLANTA MAYOR IVAN ALLEN JR.
. . Asks Public Accommodations Law
'Your T1·utl1
Is Not
l\ly Truth'
buck."
"From this viewpoint." lie
1aid, "I speak of the prob)cm
as having been brought mto
sharp focus by decisions of the
Suprcm Court of the U n it e d
fates and tten
1crally ig-
Pnstore, Thurnwnd
Shout Angr;[y
All World
To Benefit,
He Asserts
Senate May Give
Early Approval
�r
'-'OIJJ;tesses 01 me um tea :state .
"Like a foundling baby, this
awesome problem has been left
on the doorsteps of local governments throughout the nation."
After tracing Atlanta's progress in r ace r elations and voluntary desegregation, and praising
the community spirit that made
it possible, the mayor said:
SEN. PASTORE
" On the other hand, following
the line of thought of the decisions of the federal courts in
the past 15 years, I am not convinced that current rulings of
the courts would grant to American business the privilege of
discrimination by race in the selection of its customers. . •
"Are we going to say that it
is all right for the Negro citizen
to go into the bank on Main
Street and to deposit his earnings
or borrow money, then to go into
the department stores to buy
what he needs, to go to the supermarket to purchase food for b"is
family, and so on along Main
Street until he comes to a restaurant or a hotel?
"In all these other business
places he is treated just like
any other customer. But when
he comes to the restaurant or
hotel, are we going to say that
it is right and legal for the operators of these businesses, merely as a matter of convenience
to insist that the Negro's citizen~
ship be changed and that, as a
second class citizen, he is to be
refused service?
"I submit that it is not right
to allow an American's citizenSee DIXIE Page 3-A, Col. 1
SEN. THUR!\'IOND
Stro1n eh ied For '
By JACK CLAIBORNE
Observer Washington Bureau
" I do not believe that any
sincere American citizen desires to see the rights of private business restricted by the
federal
government
unless
such restr1ction · is absolutely
necessary for the welfare of
the people . of this country.
WASHINGTON - Sen. John
Pastore, acting chairman of
the Senate Commerce Committee, publicly rebuked S o u t h
Carolina Sen. Strom Thurmond
for " brow - beating" Atlanta
Mayor Ivan Allen Rr. on Friday.
When Thurmond objected to
the rebuke, the two senators
engaged in an angry shouting
match, their second in the recent round of hearings on the
President's civil rights bill.
Mayor Allen and the sparse
crowd in the hearing r o o m
looked on in astonishment as
the two senators exchanged insults over the big hearing
room's public address system.
Pastore's feelings a r o s e
during Thurmond's questioning of Allen about th e
mayor's endorsement of the
President's public accommodations bill.
But when Pastore tried to regain the floo r " to make a comment" Thurmond r efused to
yield.
When . Thurmond did yield,
Pastore m a calm voice that
belied his rising feelings delivered a lecture "to the members of this committee" about
the station of many of the witnesses. He said they were "distinguished men in their own
right" and "entitled to t h e
courtesy of this committee. "
When Pastore had completed his lecture, 'Thurmond
• •,•• .
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lnside-Washin·g;;~
·······~·"l.:.·.i.·
Explains Capitol Standstill
Whatever happened to Congress?
What hapened to the President's propo3als? Is the
legislative branch of our government breaking down?
To get the answers to these questions, reporters in
The Observer's Washington Bureau talked with key insiders at the White House and in Congress. These insiders told the story, speaking frankly when assured that
they would not be named.
You'll be able to read the answers in The Observer
Sunday.
The G~eat. Internal Struggle
Is the nation facing the worst domestic crisis since
1865 as the struggle over integration deepens?
To assess this situation, the Associated Press sent a
team of its top reporters into the nation.
They present their findings in a penetrating series
of Sunday reports. The fin,t one will appear in The Observer on Sunday.
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committee report to McNamara, Kennedy said "a serious morale problem is created for Negro military person~
nel when various forms of seg-
leaned into the microphone
to ask if the acting chairman
was implying that Thurmond
had been discourteous to Allen.
Pastore leaned back in his
chair and laughed. "Well to
be perfectly frank about it,
yes. You asked a 'when did
you stop beating your wife
question; and I won't tolerate
that kind of question from
this committee."
His temper still rising, he
said, "If .it's necessary we'll
go into executive session and
talk about it. "
Thurmond was furious. He
denied asking any 'loaded'
questions and said he resented
Pasture's accusations.
Pastore shouted that Thurmond had asked a question
that went something like, 'Mr.
Mayor, ·since the enactment
of this bill would close many
businesses in s m a 11 towns
throughout the South, don't
you think that would mean a
taking of property by the
federal government without due
process of the law?' "
Thurmond angrily denied
asking such a question.
Pastore then asked, "Will
the reporter (a stenographer who takes down everything said during a hearing)
read the question back?"
'Thur mond interrupted, snouting, "Well, all right, suppose
I did ask the question. I reserve t he ri ght to cross-ex-
!~~n~
s:~esit."witnesses any
Pastore, a short, mustached
m:i:nWh::sd: r~!~n;ean, 'crossexamine,' " he shouted. "This
eating' ·
are distinguished people whose
presence before this committee is a service ."
"I'm only trying to get at
the truth," Thurmond said. .
"Your truth is not my truth,"
replied Pastore.
At that the crowd laughed
and broke into applause.
Thurmond quickly accused
Pastore of not maintaining
the proper decorum jn the
hearing room and said Pastore should have stopped the
laughter.
"How can I stop
it
when
By DONALD GRANT .
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
HAVANA - (A') - P r e m 1• e r
Fidel Castro told a group of
.
.
Americans
Friday that he would
.
Ilk~ to talk to the people of the
Umted States " but you m u s t
invite me to your house. "
Otherwise, Caslro said, " il is
difficult .
Cubans In Castro's entourage
declined to interpret the premier's Informal remark made
at the close of a garden party
for international ,•isitors to the
tenth anniversary celebration
of the attack on Ft. Moncada,
which marked Castro's rise to
power.
A Cuban offic ial suggested th at
h . .
m
·
.
Au_t ontabve sources . Pans
predict French P ~ e s i den t
Charles de Gaulle will refuse to
sign the limited test-ban agreement initialed in Moscow Thursday and will proceed with plans
for an independent French nu·
clear force.
Communist China already bas
declared it would ignore any
agreement .reached .in _Mosc?w.
The President, speakmg "m a
spirit of hope," said the agreement outlawing nuclear tests in
the atmosphere, outer space and


t~:!11~/~f


ne~ position - that of deputy President Tito dec~eed Friday
-143.215.248.55 16:46, 29 December 2017 (EST)t!ti143.215.248.55
assistant secretary of defense ~nd today days of natwnal mourn- toward reduced world tensions
for civil rights - to carry out mg.
an broader areas of agreean anti-discrimination program. . Rescue _squads rus~ed to Skop- ment."
Je, a city of mmarets and
mosques 210 miles southeast of
He gave this grim alternaBelgrade. From all over Yugo- tive: "A war today or t-0morslavia trucks and buses were row, if it led to nuclear war,
pressed into service to evacuate would not be like any war in
victims.
history. A full-scale nuclear exTanjug reported a mercy air- change, lasting less than 60
lift was operating between Skopje minutes, could wipe out more
and Ljubljana in northern Yugo- than 300 million Americans,
slavia to ferry rescue teams and Europeans and Russians, as
medical supplies.
well as untold numbers elseBy noon (6 a .m. EST) about where.
WASHINGTON - (UPI> _ 'The 200 bodies had been identified.
.
.
. ,
.
Rescuers still were diggine1 " And the survivors, as ChaircoSt of hvmg rose to new heights through the rubble from which man Khrushchev warned t h e
"Socialism in our country is last month and a La~or -~~par~- screams and calls for help could Communi~t Chinese, 'woul~ enV!
a little less informal ,,
f th ment spokesman said this is be heard. Aftershocks were re- the dead. For they would mhen t
.
k d ' one O e primarily a story of sugar ciga- corded as rescuers toiled in the a world so devastated by explooff1cers .remar
e
.
'
·
·
·
.
rettes and taxes "
rums.
s1ons
a11 d poison
and r·ire th at
In addit10n to the Chinese
h d
t ·t
"d ·t
today we cannot conceive of all
there were Russians a delee1a. T e epar men sai 1 s conTens of thousands of persons its horrors."
·
· dex mcre?se
·
d bY stood in the ruined streets, E ven without a war, Kennedy
tion from Japan, a ' man w "'h O sumer price
m
sa id he represented the B u d d- four-tenths of 1 per cent m June. some weeping, others just star- said unlimited testing in the fuhists of the world, a graup of It was the biggest one-month in- ing blankly at the wreckage of ture woul.d mean unnatural inIndonesians, a gay pair of young crease in nine months.
their homes.
creases "m the ~umber ?f ch1l~lgeri'.1ns, a n~1!1ber of Africans, The index ~tood at 106.6 per A
f t
ti
all dren_ a~d ~tndch1ldr.~~ ~ 1tt ca~ana~1ans, British, and L a tin cent of average 1957_59 prices.
s a sa e Y precau on ,
\cer m 1eir ones, w1
eu emia
~ ne_nc:ns from all over the The reason for the June jump
See QUAKE, Page 2-A, Col. 2 See KENNE DY, Page 2A, Col. 2
misp ere.
was attributed primarily to these -------'----=- --'---....:..--- --~- -=--.....:....-factors:
Fidel Tells AmericansHe'd Lil{e Tall{ In U.S.
C~stro could have meant he
,.i_s_ n_o_t_a__c_ou_r_t_r_oo_m_._T_h_es_e might attend the September sessian of th_e U.N_. Gen~r~ Assembly at wh1c.h Pnm e M_1m~ter Harold Macmillan has md1cated a
meeting of himself, S o v i e t
p
· N"k"t s Kh h
remier . 1 1 a .
rus chev
Big George
3-B
and
P
resident John F . Kennedy.
Classified
7-13-B
exCastro's . manner was
Comics
14-15-B
2-B tremely friend ly as he greeted
Editorials
the Americ'.ms. Cuba's seizure
Financial
8-9-A of
the :Amenca.n Em bassy in HaGoren on Bridge
15-B vana m reprisal for a U.S.
Obituaries
6-7-B freez~ of Cuban funds was not
Horoscope
14-B ment10ned by the Cuban premier.
People
3-A
The garden part." , 1·n t h e
Puzzle
3-B
.,
grounds of a mansion fonnerly
Sports
4-6-B
belonging to one of Cuba's
TV Timetable
11-A
sugar barons, was attended by
Theaters
10-A
about 500 persons. These in3-B
eluded a deleg "~tio11 of Com1nu·
Travis Column
Women
4-5-A
nist Chinese naval officers in
Observer Phone-FR 5-8885
impeccable white uniforms.
On TI1e Inside
it's already happened," Pastore
said. "I didn't know they were
going to laugh."
The crowd laughed again.
Thurmond accused Pastore
of being an improper c}lairman, of condoning · outbursts
from an audience "full of leftwingers and sympathizers for
this bill."
"Mr. Thurmond," roared
Pastore, "I've been around
here a long time, and t h a t
question you asked was a
loaded question."
He then banged the gavel
and told the crowd it would
have to control itself.
Fires liro e out. Great clouds
of dust rose over the city of
270,000 as buildings came crashing down. Thousands fled to
streets and squares in panic,
clad only in night clothes.
1"egation ·and discrimination
.
.
.
exist in corµmunities neighbor- .. Radio Belgr~d~ sai~, ther~ were
Ing military bases."
. thous~ds of rnJured but 1t was
,
If!!POss1ble to say yet how ,!11any
McNamara s memorandum to died, although the number must
Kennedy, and an accompanying be very great. "
directive, contained few specific
Some Americans, tourists or
actions against discrimination.
other visitors, were reported
Instead
McNamara ordered in the city when the first shat.'
.
the services to outlme plans and tering quake struck. There was
to report to him by Aug. 15.
no word wheth er any had been
He authorized creation of a killed or injured.
Snow-Blowers
Sell Out Fast
Despitie Heat
Living, Costs
Rose Again
Last Month
-Sugar. In May and June,
because of a complicated world
market situation that included
involvement by speculators and
some crop failures, the price
of sugar skyrocketed. Sugar
prices in June were 32 per cent
higher over the month. The
average housewife paid 84 cents
for five pounds of sugar, whi ch
is_ 42 per cent more than she
did a year ago.
WATERTOWN, N. Y. _ (A'l _
Winter is never too far from
rnind in this northern New York
snow center _ even when the
temperature soars to a sizzling
90 as it did Friday
A'
t
t th
·
bl
- Cigarettes.
Manufacturers
s ore pu
ree snow- owers on sale th is m ornin and sold raised prices about 3 per cent
them soon after the sto~e opened in June for the first general inLast F eb. 22, the store sold crease since 1957. This r~ ised t~e
eight lawnmowers in a s a 1 e cost of a carton of non-filter e1gheld when the temperature hit'aretles by seyen cents an~ push11 below zero, and snow lay in ed up the smgle-pack price by
drifts of 10 feet or higher.
a penny.
. - - - - - - - - - - - - -Taxes. Real estate taxes increased in Minneapolis, Seattle,
Phiiad_elphia, .P itts~urgh and Kansas City. This raised homeownBy the time a boy g et s ers' costs a11d pushed up rents .
old enough to know h O w Also, sales taxes in New York
c·t climb d f
3 t 4
Inuch be owes his parents, I Y
.e
rom
~
per
some girl usually comes cent and m Penn~ylva.ma from
4 to 5 per cent. This raised costs
along and gets most of the of clothing, house furnishings,
interest.
new cars and other items.
Chuckle
I
Wirtz Calls New 1-Iuddle
Of RR, U11ion Deleg.ates
WASHINGTON - <UPil Stung by charges that t h e
government was tryi ng to dictate a settlement of the railroad crisis, Labor Secretary
Willard Wirtz announced Friday that union and management negotiators would make
another attempt to settle the
work-rules dispute themselves.
Wirtz made the unexpected
disclosure during an appearance before a Senate Com merce Committee hearing on
President Kennedy's proposal
to put the four-year-old hassle
into the hands of the Interstate Commerce Commission.
His announcement came a
few 1lours before the union management
se,sion
was
scheduled.
Wirtz' disclosure of the new
collective bargaining effort
came after AFL·CIO Presi-
dent Geo1·ge Meany in ef.
feet rejected the Kennedy
plan and suggested that Congress set up a special committee to oversee a fresh
try at a negotiated settle •
ment.
The labor secretary said the
new bargaining session would
be held in bis office starting
at 8:30 p.m. EDT. He will sit
in on the discussions.
A spokesman for Wirtz explained that this was not an
indication that a break-tbrouglt
might be imminent in the
work-rules dispute.
Wirtz was obviously annoyed
by charges during the Senate hearing by heads of the
rail unions that the President's
proposal for the ICC to make
issues in the dispute was radical, dangerous and in favor
of the management -ide.
�F ---
Ocyober 18, 1963
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
Atlanta, Ga.
Dear Mayor Allen:
Even though I'm late, I wish to thank you
ror what you said before the Senate Commerce Committee, in Washington. I was
born and brought up in Georgia and have
been so grateful in recent years for · the
leadership which several people in Atlanta
have given in the effort to give to a l l
citizens their constitutional rights. I
have long thought that what we need in our
part or the country -- the southeastern
states -- is leadership, constructive
leadership. I think we are as intelligent
and as willing to have justice done to all
people as are persons everywhere. We are
Just tangled up with a lot or inherited
ideas that make us prejudiced and emotional.
It persons in authority would help us to
"see etra1ght 11 , I believe their following
would be or surprising size, and I truly
hope your state~ent ls repeated many timee,
" ... the eliinination or segregation, which
1a s+aTery's stepchild, le a challenge to
all or us to make eTery American ~ree in
tact as well as in theory."
Again, thank you for your true and helpful
leadership.
Very sincerely,
[;:~gS~
Route 1, Box 143
Chapel Hill, N. C.
���C /JI
do"'
/0
/,
�\
by
PETER HOWARD
and
ANTHONY HOWARD
starring
LELAND HOLLAND
CECIL BROADHURST









ILENE GODFREY
cast of 79 from 17 nations
�PETER HOWARD
(Co-Author)
P eter Howard started his writing
career as a journalist with Lord
Beaverb rook. He was for many years
one of the most widely read political
columnists in the British press. He
captained England at Rugby footb all
and was a member of the British
bobsled team which won the world
championship in 1939. He married
Doris Metaxa, Wimbledon doubles
tennis champi on . Their h ome is a
farm in Suffolk, England. They h ave
two sons and a da ughter.
P eter Howard has become the
trusted friend of statesmen and of
thousands of ord inar y men all over
the world .
His thirteen plays are known and
loved by milli ons th ro ugh theatre and
television. Elizabeth Bergner of the
German theatre said, " Th ese plays
are the most intelligen t in the world
today and are the theatre of tomorro w." They have been crea ted fr om
a deep in sight into h uman nature and
fr om fi rst-hand experience · of world
even ts. His books h ave sold over
fo ur million copies.
In 1955 the musical play , The
Vanishing Island, was seen by
twenty-two Heads of State and Prime
Ministers in nine month s. Opening
in the Nati onal Theatre, Washington,
it was performed before fuli houses
in the principal cities of Asia, the
Midd le East, East Africa and Europe,
finishing its tour a t The Hippodrome
and the Princes Theatre, London .
Earlier this year P eter Howard's
play Music at Mi,dn ight, starring
Nora Swinburne, played to audiences
totalling more th an 100,000 in the
United States and Canada, following
219 performances in London and
other British cities. The play has
been filmed and will he released
shortly.
His most recent success in London,
Through The Garden Wall, headlined by The Tim es of London as
"hope fo r a divided world" , is currently playing at the Westminster
Theatre.
P eter Howard was the first Westerner to be asked to speak at Tokyo's
Waseda University this year.
Adenauer, Sukarno, Nehru and
Robert Kennedy -had preceded him
in addressing the university hut the
verdict of professors and students
was that his address entitled "Beyond
Communism to Revolution" was one
of the fin est ever heard .
ANTHONY HOWARD
( Co-Author)
Anthony Howard who is 24, is a
Suffol k farmer , freelance journalist
and writer. He is co -author of the
play Men Must Choose which toured
the United States in 1959, and the
m u5ical, Miracle in the Sun (1960).
HERBERT ALLEN
( Mu sical Director )
Co-Co m poser
Herbert Allen studied music under
J ohn Hopper in his native Seattle,
where he had his own dance hand.
One of America's finest xylophonists,
Featuring the Olympic stars
JOHN SAYRE
RICHARD WAILES
( Co smo naut Chief)
( Astro naut Chief)
.] ohn Sayre was a member of the
four -oared crew with out coxswain
that won a go ld medal fo r the United
S tates at R~me in 1960. He stroked
th e 1958 Uni versity of Washington
crew th at ,ms victori ous in Moscow,
a nd was stro ke of th e 1960 Lake
Washin gton Rowing Club Ol ympic
champi on crew. He was elected to
th e Hefm s Rowin g Hall of Fame.
Hi s home is in Seattle, where he
was president of an investment company and a real estate broke r. He is
27 yea rs of age, married and has
two so ns.
Richard Wailes was a member with
Sayre of the fo ur-oared crew that
won a gold medal at the Olympics in
Rome in 1960. He was also a member of the 1956 Yale Olympic ch ampion crew that won a gold medal
at Melb ourne. He captained the 1958
und efeated Yale varsity crew. He h as
been elected three times to the Helm~
Rowing Hall of Fame.
Wailes, wh o also comes from Seattle,
is a prorrra m planning engineer with
Boeing 0Airplane Company. He is
27 yea rs of age, ma rried and has
two daughters.
he was heard weekly for seven years
over American r adio and has appeared on television and radio around
the world. The " Neue Zurcher
Zeitung" recently described him as a
virtuoso.
He is a member of ASCAP and
has composed over 200 songs . H is
recording, So ngs of Oklahoma, is a
fa vo rite in the Southwest.
(Orc hestra Conductor)
Co-Compose r
Rich ard Hadden was b orn in E ast
Orange, New Jersey, and educated
at Rutgers and Princeton. He is
married to pianist-composer Frances
Roots Hadden with whom he h as
performed as a duo-piano team in
many countries, and both are mem-
RICHARD HADDEN
�SPACE IS SO STARTLING
CHARACTERS
MUSICAL NUMBERS
in order of appearance
Man in Space
.. ... ...... ..... . .. . .. .... .. ... ..... ....... .LELAND HOLLAND
Mr. Nod ... .
. . .. . . .. . ... .. . . ..
.
CECIL BROADHURST
Boy .
... .ALFRED VONDERMUHLL
Astronaut Chief ..
JOHN SAYRE
Cosmonaut Chief .
. ...RICHARD WAILES
Mother .
. ..!LENE GODFREY
Father
. . . DAVID ALLEN
Uncle Jim ....... .... .... .. .. . . ........ .... \ .... .. .
...... .BILL McLAUGHRY
Sonya .
. . LEENA LIUKKONEN
Twister-in -Chief
.. . HERBERT ALLEN
Squatter-in-Chief .. ...... ... ...... ...... ....
....... .TOM KENNEDY
Cosmonaut Premier
..MA TT HEW MANSON
Pearly King .
. .. ..... ... ..
. ..... ..... HERBERT ALLEN
Pearly Queens ... .. .... .... ..... .. .. CHRIS CHANNER, FERNANDA SMITH
Scots Dancers
.... .. ....... .. ... ANNE, JANET, LESLEY HUTCHISON
AND ALISON WRIGHT
A Girl .
.... . ...... .FRANCES CAMERON
Cats
..... CHRIS CHANNER, FERNANDA SMITH
Lambs
. . MARGOT CAMPBELL, AMARIE NATIVIDAD
Ram
... ..... ..... TOM KENNEDY
Dog
.... HERBERT ALLEN
Oarsma n .
. ....... JOHN SAYRE
Mounta ineers
. RICHARD WAILES, BROR JONZON
TAP STEVEN, PAULI SNELLMAN
Cosmonauts, Astronauts, Generals, Commissars, Soldiers, Beatniks,
Twisters, Squatters, Examiners, A Cowboy, Hungry Men, Haters,
Lovers, Sporting Types, Police, Businessmen, Teachers-the
whole World .
Time -
THE PRESENT
Place- ANY HUMAN HEA RT
Music by Herbert A llen, Richard Hadden a nd Cecil Broa dhurst
Directed By Martin Fluetsch
Produced by MORAL RE-ARMAMENT
Act
1
\
Mr. Nod's Song .
. .... ....... ... ... . MR.NOD
. .. .... ..... .MR.NOD
Sleep On, Dream On ...
Millions of Years Ago .
. .......... CHORUS
The Ideal Spot .
.. UNCLE JIM & SONYA
.. TWISTERS
Why Worry? ..
It Would Help A Lot To Squat .
... SQUATTERS
Wake Up, Your Dreams May Yet Come True .
. .. .. ... ... .. MR. NOD
Space Is So Startling ....
MAN IN SPACE
I'll Be A Sort Of Uncle To You .. .. .. .. ... ....
MAN IN SPACE
Any Moment Now .
.. COSMONAUT WORLD
Scotland The Brav~ ..
.. .. ASTRONAUT WORLD
We've Got To Be F rst .
. .... ASTRONAUT WORLD
An Astronaut Is Just Like Us . .. ...UNCLE JIM & ASTRONAUT WORLD
God Is In Ou r Cities .
. .. ASTRONAUT CHIEF &
ASTRONAUT WORLD
Whoever Dares To Point A Finger
... ASTRONAUT &
COSMONAUT WORLDS
What Do The Eyes of The Millions Seek? .
. .. MR. NOD & CHORUS
Have You A Place For Me Up There? .
. ....... G IRL
If Only .
. ... MOTH ER, FAT HER, SONYA & UN CLE JIM
Interm ission
A ct 11
Sportsmen of The W orld .
. .... . CHORUS
We're Scaling The Flanks of Mount Com mun ism . .. . . . .. .. . . CHORUS
.. .. ... .... MR. NOD
Neighbors Are N eighbors
The World Ca n Be One Fam ily
. MAN IN SPACE & CHORUS
... MAN IN SPACE & CHORUS
Space Is So Sta rtlin g
W hat We Need Is A n End To An ti
.......... UNCLE JIM & CHORUS
. ........................ CHORUS
Where's That Basket? .
Do You See Wha t I See? .....
. .............. ...MOTHER
. MOTHER, FATHER, SONY A
One Plus One Can Yet Make One .
UNCLE JIM, BOY & CHORUS
Peace Be Upon You .
. MOTHER
... .. THE WHOLE WORLD
Reprises .
�WHO'S WHO.IN THE CAST
LELAND HOLLAND
( tl fon in Space )
Leland H olland m ade his fi rst m a j or stage appearance in 194,8 in the
baritone lead of the m usical revue,
The Good R oad at H er Majesty's
Theatre, London. Two years later
Va riety named him one of the outstanding singing stars of the Broadway season, for his role in ] otham
Valley. In 1955 he starred in The
Vanishing Island, which premierell
in the National Theatre, Washington,
a nd ended a world tour in T he Princes
Theatre, London. He has performed
in more than thirty countries on
four continents.
Leland Holland comes from Los
Angeles, California. During World
War JI he served as a combat infantryman in General Patton's Third
Army.
ILENE GODFREY
(Mother )
Ilene Godfrey started to study
singing at the age of twelve with
Ma rie Partrige P rice of Berkeley, Californi a. She gave her fi rst recital a t
the a!!:e of ' fo urteen. She won a
schola'r·shi p to the Sa nta Ba rbara
Academ) of :VI usic and later became
a soloist with the Berkeley Chamber
s inge rs. She has sta rred in musicals
on Broadway. in London and in many
other pa rts of the world. Among them
are }otham Valley, The Vanishing
Island and Picl.-le Hill. Miss Godfrey
has a lso pl ayed in featured roles in
the American productions of The
Ladder and He Was Not There.
R I CHARD HADDEN (con t'd )
hers of ASCAP.
He studied piano with Maxwell
MacMichael a nd the noted accompanist Geo rge Vause; harmony with
Howard D. McKinney and John
Finley Willi amson . He composed the
prize-winning Rutgers Un iversity
football song, The Bells Must Ring,
music and theme songs for the war time victor y revues, You Can Def end America, Battle Together For
Britain a nd Pull Together Canada,
as well as music for The Good Road
(194,7) , Talce It To The World (1951)
and T urning Of The Tide (1958).
WHO'S ·W HO IN THE CAST
thro ugh Asia. In 1961 he played in
The "Ladder at the Westminster
Theatre, London, and then toured
Britain with the prod uction.
With the whole cast of Spa ce Is
So Startling, Broadh urst was on
Japanese National Television which
sent the musical to an estima ted
vie,r ing audience of 15 mill ion .
STAFF
G ene ra l Ma na ger .
.. .. .... Dona ld P. Bird sa ll
Com p a ny Mana ger . . .
.. ...... G eorge Ford
Press Rep resentative . .. ..... .Do ra thi Bock Pierre
Assistan t to t he Ge nera l Ma na ger
CECIL BROADHURST
( Mr. Nod)
Co-Composer
G eneral Auditor .
. ... Erik H. Petersen
Staff Secretaries . . ... ... ...... { MBarbaEra Mt e nninger
ory
Stage Manager .
Assistant Stage Manager .
Cecil Broadhurst who plays Mr.
Nod was a one-time ranch-hand and
bush pilot. Born in Canada, his
fi;.st stage role was in the 1933
Canad ian production of Sutton
Vane's OLitward Bound, Before the
war he worked on the radio and
prod uced and featured in his own
prorrrams on Canadian networks. He
wo11-ed for _1etro-Goldwyn-Mayer in
Hollywood and featured in Youth
Marches On and recently i1~ The
Crowning Experience.
In 194-5
Broadhu rst, who is a member of
A.S.C:.A.P., wrote the musical play,
The Cowboy Christmas, which is
staged a nn ually in many parts of the
world . I ts theme song, The Cowboy
Carol, which he wr ote, is well kno wn
to m illions in Britain as a popular
featu re at the Ro yal Albert Hall
Christmas concerts by the Royal
Choral Society under Sir Malcolm
Sargent. He wrote and co-starred in
the musical, ] otham Valley, on
Broadway, across America and then
as man
. ... .. ...... .... Keith Hanning
.. .. Jack Hipps
Assistant Stage Manager ... .. . C h ris Borchgrevink
Master Carpe nter
.. .. Lewis L. S mith
Moster Electrician .
.... C larence Wells
Master of Properties .
.... Joe Bowers
Wa rd robe Mistress
.. .J ean Cla rke
.... Guy Livingston
House Manager
CREDITS
Silks by Kanebo, Tokyo; Dresses by the School
of Chio Tanaka, dressmaker to the Imperia l
Fa mily of Japa n; Hats by Mitsuyasu of ' Les
Be lles Modes,' Tokyo; Men ' s costumes and a ll
accessories by Mitsukoshi De partment Sto re, Tokyo; Shoes by Norvic Shoe Co. Ltd., London;
Individual costumes by G rieder of Zurich .
Volkswagen courte sy of Charles Street Garage ,
Boston.
Miss God fre y 's and Miss Liukkonen's dresses by
At he na of Beve rly Hills, Ca lifo rn ia .
S pecial lighting effects by Zeiss Ikon , G ermany;
Lighting b ri d ge by Aluminum S. A., Switze rland .
Stage Setting Designed by Miss Chen Wen, Republic of Ch ina .
O rc hestration of " I' ll Be A Sort of Uncle"
Joh n Lesco
O rchestration of " Ideal Spot" ........ Brian Cooke
�Album of songs from
the show recorded by
I
PHILIPS 632 303 12 LP
.
MONO $4.00
STEREO $5.00
ON SALE IN THE THEATER LOBBY OR FROM:
" SPACE IS SO STARTLING," 112 EAST 40th STREET, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10016















































0
So~k of lyrics
.
The complet e lyr ics
of all songs fro m
SPACE IS SO STARTLING
EACH 50c
PETER HOWARD' S NEW BOOK
BRITAIN AND THE BEAST
A challenging assess me nt of conte mporary •Britain by the author of
" Space Is So Startling." It is also the blueprint for a plan which the
author believes will e nnble any mode rn d e mocracy to show humanity how to rebui ld a broken world. $2.75 fro m MRA, 112 E. 40 St., N ew York
Printed in U.S.A.
~
~
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f'J~
v-;r; ~
AfAN/])
,
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.
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WILLIAM BRUCE LOUDEN
COLLEGE OF LAW
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA
~ ~ .?/tr,
.
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�, S,;,_. _Pttersburg Tim.es, M~nday, Aug11st 5, 1963 BACKGROUND-INTERPRETATION
11-A
BACKGROUND
Atlanta's Mayor: 'All
Alone- W -ith His Co r
By WALTER RUGABER
Special To The Times
From The N.Y. Herald Tribune
ATLAN'I'A - For days the
word went out from the big
businessmen and civic leaders,
the political · pros and public
opinion molders, the people in .
Atlanta who usually count the
most.
"You're making a oig mistake."
,The rn es s a g e was plain,
iblunt, and nearly unanimous.
lvan AIJen Jr., the 52-year-o!d
merchant - turned - mayor, listened very carefuIIy.
Then aII alone with _his· courage, he flew off to Washington
and went before the Senate
IVAN ALLEN JR.
Commerce Committee to read
• . . listened, but
a carefuily - drafted 14-page
statement.
" Gentleman,"
the mayor or Allen seemed genuinely sursaid firmly, "if I bad your prob- prised by it.
lem, armed with the local exAbout his testimony, he says
perience I have had, I would simply •:that the nation's maypass a public a ccommodations
ALLEN THUS BECAME THE
first - and just possibly the
last - southern politician t o
voice public ,approval of the
most controversial portion of
the civil rights bill.
The mayor came back to Atlanta and found two m ain
schools of thought about bis
star tling behavior before t h e
Senate committee.
The least substantial version
put it down as a shaIJow bid
for Negro votes, but seasoned
observers said that even with
a full turnout he would still
need plenty of support from
whites.
For a quarter.cent ury, win,
ning Atlanta politics has been
ibased on a highly successful
"alliance" between Negroes and
so-called better class whites.
And the thought was that the
latter might prefer !ree enterprise more than Allen when
the 1966 term comes up. The
mayor has ind-icated that he
intends to run again.
T1{E S E C O N D FEELING
about the mayor's testimony
considered the possibility that
he had talked with President
Kennedy and was angling for
a federal job.
AIJen denied it stoutly; fo.
sisting that he talked with no
one in Washington e,reept the
committee official who invited
· him to appear.
He later received a short Jet~
ter from the President which
praised "a munber of effective
ints" in the statement. May-
ors have been stuck nut on a
limb and left t here to handle
the whole r acial cr isis by them•
selves.
. The Supr eme Court has been
striking d o w n segregation'·
Jaws for years, he points out,_
and yet no really solid legisla·
tin has taken its place.
-MAYOR ALLEN has faced
nearly a dozen "mayor" de·
segregation crises. The collapse of · r acial barriers has
come with increasing frequency here, always with some dif
ficu lty.
" The whole damn thing is:
pushed down the throats of Io,
cal officials because everyone
is scared to t ouch it," the may-·
or declared.
"Local governments have no·
definition of responsibility," he
complains. ". . . this is a na-.
tional problem <Jnd it deserves.
national direction."
�:he
Senator Hails Allen
For Attacking Bias
By TED LIPPMAN
Const itution Was hi ngton Burea u
WASHINGTON, D.C.-Mayc,r Ivan Allen Jr. Friday
urged Congress to pass a "public accommodations" civil
rights bill.
He said the country needs " a
clear defin ition from Congress"
on what must be done to do away
with racial discrimination. Without that, he said, cities like Atlanta that have made progress
oluntarily will "slip back."
The mayor said that if Coness does not act, it will be in
ct an "endorsement" of segation.
,e m ayor was the fi rst Southpolitician to testify in favor
e legislation. He was warmly
1sed for his statement by the
iliman and other members of
i! Senate Commerce committee,
, ·ch is handling the bill.
RMED VALIANT
"I am humble in your presence," Chairman John P astore of
Rhode Island told Allen. He said
Allen displayed " courage" in
speaking out for civil rights because he came from an area
"where sincere people disagree."
Pastore is an advocate of civil
rights legislation. He and Sen.
Strom Thurmond, D-S.C., who is
opposed to the pending bill, got
' into a hot and angry, top-of-thelungs argument while Allen was
on the witness stand.
e PINPOINTING ASKED
P astore accused Thurmond of
asking Allen " loaded" questions
and threatened to rule hirrl out
of order. Thurmond accused Pastore of "gag" rule and accused
the audience, which had applauded P astore, of being "a bunch of
left wingers."
The burden or Mayor Allen's
testimony was that if Congress
, would specify just where discrimination is illegal, it will be
easier for local governments and
businessmen to comply with demands from Negroes for more
' rights. He said Congress ought
• to outlaw discrimination in private
business-but give communities
"24 months or more" to adjust to
the new law.
"I have heard dozens of businessmen say that if there had been
a cowt order or definition by
Congress, it would have b e e n
easier to desegregate," Allen said.
Sen. Thurmond pointed out to
Allen that eight of 10 examples
the mayor cited of desegregation
,:n Atlanta had been voluntary acir
!'> Continued on Page 5, Column 1
!I
Associ ated Press Wire photo
BACKS BILL
Mayor Ivan Allen Jr.
Girl, 8, Dies
Of Encephalitis
'
At Savannah
SAVANNAH !A'l - Nancy Fay
Justice, 8-year-old girl who bad
been critically ill for two weeks
with symptoms of encephalitis,
died Friday at Hunter Air Force
Base Hospital.
She had been admitted to the
hospital July 15.
A Hunter public information office spokesman said that the
"probable cause of the little girl's
death was due to a type of encephalitis not connected with the
recent equine variety reported in
Chatham County.
Several horses have died here
in the past two weeks, their deaths
being blamed on a type of sleeping sickness.
Nancy was the daughter of Ca
and Mrs. James E . J H_
�\lo - .n .\7}.I._.._ - = - -.;...., ... ,.. ----- -
· ...·- -- - -- - - - , ,
Senator Hails Allen
For Attacking Bia~
Continued From Page 1 give me a definition of how tha
business is to be preserved ana
tions asking, "Don't you feel at the same tlime how the righ
there was less tension when there of 200,000 Negro citizens in Atlanta
are to be protected."
was voluntary action?"
Another witness before .the Commerce Committee Friday was Gov.
Donald Russell of South Carolina.
He opposed the bill as unconstitutional and said it "offers no
sound remedy for the delicate and
The need for congressional ac- complex problem of racial retion "to take us out of a pit of lations."
indecision" was the theme Allen
returned to time and again. When "MORE DIFFICULT"
committee members tried to get
Russell said, "Actually, legishim to talk about the legal and lative coercion can aggravate and
constitutional intricacies of the make more difficult the whole
proposed legislation, he always problem. New York state has as
begged off. "I'm not a lawyer," stringent a code of so-called antihe said several times.
discrimination legislation as can
In his prepa red statement he be envisaged. Has such legislation
said, "I beg of you not to let solved race relations in New
this issue of discrimination drown York? There are riots in the
Bronx. There are demonstrations
in legalistic water."
in Manhattan. There are sit-downs
in the offices of both Gov. RockeWHAT TRIBUNAL MEANT
feller and M~or Wagner. There
In another place in his state- are strident indictments of the
ment, he said, "lf the Congress City of New York as a city of
should fail to clarify the issues racial ghettos. Laws have not givat the present time, then by en New York racial peace."
inference it would be saying that
you could begin discrimination The third witness of the day was
under the guise -of private busi- R. Carter Pittman of Dalton, Ga.,
ness. I do not believe that this an attorney. He opposed the measis what the Supreme Court has ure and discussed the "interesting
intended with its decisions. I do history" of the Constitution's Comnot believe that this is the intent merce Clause. That is what the
of Congress or the people of this administration is relying on as the
country."
basis of the constitutionality of the
proposed law.
At one point, Thurmond asked
Allen about the possible adverse
Pittman said none of the deleeffect an anti-discrimination Jaw gates to the Constitutional Conmight have on some private busi- vention believed that the Comnesses. "I think you know I'm not merce Clause should be "pervertin favor of the destruction of . · . . ed into" a powe1· to regulate the
private property, Allen said. use of private property at rest
"What I'm asking Congress is to within a state.
"No. If we had a clear definition from Congres.s it would be
easier," the mayor said. "The
courts have left us up in the air."
J
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�TH~
GUAR D I A N
Monday July 29 1963
9
R ights of the Negro
-by Southerner
Senator says: ' I am humbled'
From ALISTAIR COOKE
New York, July 28
It begins to appear that when everyone has had his
say befor e the Senate Commerce Committee, which
tomorrow begins its third week of hearings on the President's Civil Rights Bill, the complete transcript of the
testimony will constitute a classic State paper covering t he
spectrum of American opinion in mid-century on the status
of the Negro in American life.
The task of weighing the ·pros and cons fell to the
Commerce Committee because the legal loophole t hrough
which the a dministration hopes
to drive a Federal law is that
section of t he Constitution
C
h
.
whic h g rves to
ongress t e
power " to regulate comme rce
. .. among t he several Sta tes ."
hopes to
The Adml·ni·s"-ati·on
•~
make it a Federal offe nce
to refuse to serve or to seat or to
accommodate anyone who enters
a store, a restau rant, a theatre,
or an hotel th at gets its fo od, its
furnish ings, or any other service
through inter-State commerce.
Hence the last-ditch resistance of
most of the Southern witnesses
on the grounds that such a law
would abolish or unconstitutionally restrict the right to
private property.
Since the heari ngs started, the
committee has heard from such
witnesses as the Rev. Martin
Luther Kin~, Attorney-General
Robert Kennedy, Secretary of
State Dean Rusk. the indignant
~vernor Wallace of Alabama
(" Is not the real purpose to
disarm this country as the Communists have planned?") , and
the learned Senator Sam Ervine,
of North Carolina, the famous
constitutional lawyer who call s
the Civil Rights Bill " as drastic
and indefensible a proposal as
has ever been submitted to this
Congress."
ost remarkable
accepted the Supreme Court's
decisions as inevitable and as the
law of our land .. . .
"It has been a long, exhausting,
and often discouraging process,
and the end is far from beini in
sight. . . Step by step, sometimes
under court order, sometimes
volu ntarily, sometimes adroitly,
and many times clumsily, we have
tried to find a solution to each
specific
problem
through
an
agreement between the affected
while ownership and the Negro
leadership.
' 'Fake action '
" Gentlemen, If I had your problem, armed with the local e perlence I have had, I would pass a
public accommodation bill.
" Now is the time for legislative
action. We cannot dodge the issue.
We cannot look back over our
shoulders or tum the clock back
to the 1860s. We must take action
now to assure a greater future for
our citizens and our country.
" A hundred years ago the
abolition of slavery won the US
the acclaim of the whole world
when it made every American
free in theorv. Now, the elimina•
tion of segregation, which Is
slavery's stepchild, is a challenge
to all of us to make every American free in fact . .. and again to
establish our nation as a true
champion of the free world."
When he had done, Senator
Thurmond of South Carolina, the
old Dixiecrat, leaped in, challengthe Mayar to deny that the
ru ings of the Supreme Court.
if incorporated in the bill, would
mean " compulsion." The Mayor
replied : " It would con\pel the
same rights to be given the
Negro citizen as the white citi7.en.
Yes, that's compulsion.
Any
Federal law exercises some
compulsion ."
A Democrat of Michigan
j umped in to ask the Mayor if
he didn't think Atlanta's desegregation programme was " Communist inspired," a favourite
point of Senator Thurmond.
"Senator," said the Mayor,
" there are no more Communists
in Atlanta than there are on the
moon."
At the end, the chairman.
Senatol' John Pastore, Democrat
ot Rhodl' Island satd he apprec1atecl that 1t had b en
{I r
for a r Allen to a
at he
had al than 1t wo
b n
for mayors of
rn
ct !es. " Mr Ma or '
nator Past e, " I am humb
in
inf
Of all the witne6ses so far,
owever, the most remarkable,
and the most characteristic of
e South's agonising second
ughts, was the last one to
appear this weekend : Mr Ivan
!Allen, jun., the nationally known
Mayor of Atlanta, Georgia, which
has, in the last year or two,
slowly at\d with ml.Wh dissension,
managed to desegregate its parks
and golf course1;, its restaurants,
, lunch counters, theatres, public
schools, and hotels.
Mr Allen's testimony needs no
gloss. It was a long statement
delivered without bombast, and
without much self-esteem either.
' Here are some of the most
typical passages, delivered in a
soft, almost apologellic Southern
accent:
" It is tru
h t At111nla has
achiev d success m cllmlnatin&
discrimination in areas where so.qie
other cities have failed, but we do
n t boast o{ our success ... we
have achieved It only becau!le we
looked acts In the face and your pres
�TEMPLE
C H AR L E S
S TREE T
A N D
SI NA I
SEWALL
A VENUE
BROOKLIN E 4 6 , MAS SACHUSETTS
B E RYL
D. Co HON, D. D .
July 29/63
RABBI
Mayor
Ivan Allen Jr.
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mr. Mayor:
[ ust a word of appreciation of
your
testimony before the Senate
committee. Thank God for you; may
He grant you long life to carry on.
�ATL ANTA WATER WORKS
MEMO
From the office of - P AUL WEIR , Gene ral Manager
To:
~~
3
�VOICE OF EXPERIENCE
Mayor Allen Explains ·why He
Spoke On ·Civil Rights Bill
By PAT WATTERS
"We cannot dodge this issue ... We must take action
now to assure ·a greater futmre for our citizens and our
country."-Mayor Ivan Allen,
before the U.S. Senate Com mittee on Commerce.
NOT EVEN consic/ering its considerable political implications, Mayor Ivan Allen's endorsement of
the Kennedy
public accommodations legi s I a tion was
one of those
sort of surP rise news
stories of the
highest significance.
I was intrigued with the question of
why he did it.
In the past, he has not sounded
off to any great public extent
on the essentials of civil r ights,
sticking instead to specifics of
local situations. He was not one
of those on either side with
stock reactions easily predictable. His credentials in the bluechip community of business
<whose freedoms are supposed
to be so threatened by the legislation) are well known.
INFLUENCE
And his stand flew in the face
of a unanimity of virtually all
the rest of the state's political
leadership against the legislation.
!The importance of all these
factors on the influence of his
stand in the climate of public
opinion shouldn't be overlooked.
As a leadership and prestige
influence, they say to people
puzzled and troubled over the
measure that it is possible to
be for the historical imperatives and morality involved without being hounded as a hopeless idealist or Communist or
something.)
He didn't have to speak out.
His stand was bound not to sit
well with some. I finally went
over and asked him why he
did it.
In effect; he said e did because he was qua lified to. No
o t h e r political officials in
America, he pointed out, have
nad to face full-blast the practical job of the civil rights
revolution as have city officials
like himself. ( And not all city
officials either, he said-which
is true over most of Georgia.)
He is convinced from such experience, he said, that it is high
time, nine years after the
school ruling, that the federal
government help out with the
problems created by the mandates of the federal courts. This,
he said, is the "biggest social
problem in my lifetime," and
Congress needs to act as it fi.
nally had to in comparable social
upheavals of the past. He listed
as comparable child labor,
women's suffrage and the labor
struggle. ,
"The cduntry's in the biggest
mess it's ever been in, and Congress has not taken a single
step to help clarify things . . .
Congress can't expect local gov-
ernments to handle as difficult
a problem. as this . . . with no
help, no definitions, no support.
M's been damn unfair."
He cited ten recent desegregation steps Atlanta has made as
an example. (These were listed
in his statement to the committee, along with, incidentally, an
assessment of our achievements
and still-serious shortcomings
better than any I've ever seen,
, a portrayal of Atlanta to the
nation and world more honorable and in the real sense more
favorable than any in some
years.)
IN MIDDLE
In most of those ten steps,
Mayor Allen pointed out, he was
caught in the middle-aworking
for " logical agreements." His
point was that so much of it
shouldn't be on a mayor and
city officials, and that often to
the hurt of a city and the nation, officials duck out of such
responsibility. "You never please
many with anyi decision" in the
situation, he said.
His decision to speak, then,
and what he said came out of
the pragmatic knowledge of fir thand experience such as few
in America have of a situation
about which many ha\'e opinions. As such, what he said was
significant. His decision to say
it may be even more important
at this crucial midpoint in his
first political office-for what it
says of his character and his
concept of his responsibility.
Out of uch decisions come
important leader .
�1105 QUARRIER STREET
<illyarle.sto11 1, ~est 3§irgitria
THE REV. WILLIAM M. KIRKLAND.
Assoc1ATE REcToR
August 16, 1963
The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
May or of Atlanta
Atlanta, Ge orgia
Dear Mayor Allen :
As a native Ge orgian who hopes to
return to Georgia, I am writing this
word to thank you for y our strong ,
courageous statement to t he United
States Congress on civil rights. I
hope that what you have said and done
will be heeded.
Wi lliam M. Kirkland
WMK :b h
�ON
U. S . 17- W ITHI N
THE CITY LI M ITS
GEORGE TOWN . SOUTH C A ROLINA
July 28, 1963
The Honorable Mayor Allen
City of Atlanta
Atlanta, Ga ..
Dear Sir:
I have just read an ac conJht of your testiainy
before the Senate ' s Commerce Commitee on the
proposed Civil Rights Bill. May I s ay that your
co urageous express i on of opinion makes me wish
t h at I liv ed in Atlanta so that I c ould vote
for you.
I especially applaud your contention that
a federal law will be necessary to implement re~
form on Civil Right s . Such reform has been found
wo efully wanting at the local and s tate levels,
due to their own abdication of their own responsibilities.
I suppose that in the next election demagogic
opponents of you will make the m~st of your expressed
opinions. It is even conceivable~hat, like Mr. Brooks
Hays, ~~e ex-Congressman from Little8ock, you may
lose the election. However it may be, you may rest
secure in that you have done your duty and have been
true to your ideals.
Courage like yours is rare indeed. May~ the
South be blest with more leaders like you. And
be curst with less like Mr. Thurmond!
Respectfully•
'2}~/G-1Daniel Keefe
�•
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���������Atlanta's Mayor Speaks
On rare occasions the oratorical fog on
Capitol Hill is pierced by a voice resonant with
courage and dignity. Such a voice was heard
when Mayor Ivan Allen Jr. of Atlanta testified
before the Senate Commerce Committee in support of President Kennedy's bill to prohibit
racial discrimination in . stores, restaurants and
other public accommodations.
On the basis of the very substantial accomplishments that his city of a half-million, the
largest in the Southeast, has made in desegregating publicly owned and privately owned facilities, he might have come as a champion of
"states' rights" and of the ability of localities
to banish discrimination without Federal law.
Certainly, he would have had much more warrant to espouse that view than the Barretta, the
Wallaces and the other arch-segregationists
who raise the specter of Federal "usurpation"
as a device fo'r keeping Southern Negroes in
subjection.
But Mr. Allen was not i Washington to boast.
He was there to warn that even in cities like
Atlanta the progress that had been made might
be wiped out if Congresii turned its back on the
Kennedy proposal and thus gave implied endorsement to the concept that private businesses
were free to discriminate. He left behind this
charge to finish the job started with the Emancipation Proclamation a century ago: "Now the
elimination of segregation, which is slavery's
stepchild, is a challenge to all of us to make
every American free in fact as well as in theory
- and again to establish our nation as the true
champion of the free world."
�' f


p


-£~
~ /Pr-
�Inside Today
Weather
Fair to partly cloudy and continued
quite warm through Sunday with
widely scatt.er ed afternoon and even·
ing thunder showers. Highs Saturday
in the mid-90's. Sun r ises 5:32 a.m .,
sets 7:29 p.m. Mor e details on P ag e
2-A.
?6 l75-Founded Feb. 18, 1891
Business •. s, 9-A Theater ••••' 11-B
Comics .... 5-A TV-Radio ... t.A
Deaths •• , • • 2·A Want Ads •• 2·7-B
Editorials •. 10-A Weather • • • • 2·A
Sports ... .. 6, 7-A Women. ... .. 11-A
Telephone AL 6-3461
Columbia, S. C., Saturday, Juliy 2 7, 1963
2 Sections -
20 Pages
Daily, 10c; Sunday, 20e
. ·~:::-~.:2· ¼;.,.. . ..:=z::,.. ;,. '" ..-.. ~i1.tt~rr1¥'i
Treaty
Away
rom War'


~ Excerpts I-!


~F rom
~:
Kennedy's 1;
'
J
Address !J.
t
Page 3-A
Over 2,000 Perish
In Yu·g oslav ual{_e
�J;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;::;:::;::::;:::;:::;::::::;.~~IB-m-Fr1 a a y ~ e
map nset1 . Tii1s
were digging tlfrough the ru 51e -~ftera _two:mo1ltll pen01:1or srcr"gullible" in its past dealings
_ ::..::_....:.:__~_::__ _~:...__ _-\_ _:_::...__ _:__ _ _ __ _ _ _ _...:...._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _~ - - -- -- ----:::;,-- ~- from which screams and calls for bility, prices . advanced rn June
with Russia and said he hopes
MOSCOW (AP) - Prerm"r
help could be heard. Aftershocks for most_ ma3or type~ o~ goods
"we will not be suckered in this Khrushchev urged the Wllljt
wen~-- recorded- as Ti?SC!i\Cl"S toiled and services. _Substantial mcreasfu'C\~,"
F.ri•fay: to r!)S · al1e.~,J with
·.J-.


O


in the ruins.
es were noted lll _food, toba~CO and
. He said everal times, "I just negotiations' for 1'11. nona •;;r~J 'Tens of thousands of persons used cars. New mcreases rn ~8;Ies
hope we know what we are doing.
sion pact between the Atlan ·c
stood in the ruined streets some taxes also helped boost livmg
Pei·sonally, I should be very alJiance and the Commuu
weeping, others just ~tai·ing costs.
wary" taking their word.
bloc. He caUed the pa
blankly :it the wreckage of their
FURTHER INCREASE
General i\1ark Clark, Presitest ban treaty initialed
homes.
.
Arnold Chase the bureau's asdent of The Citadel in Charlesday a step toward ending
As a safety precaution, all citi- sistant commi;sioner for prices,
war tensions.

zens were ordered to stay out of predicted a further increase for
ton, _replied with a terse, "No
Be said Britain and
their homes for the next 24 hours. J uly but" said it would be mostly
comment." He said he would
. EMERGENCY CENTERS
seas~nal.
United States already
have no comment on any
.,"'reed u·I t11.•_ test ban
y ugos1av ·army um·ts set up The new June index means that
phase of tbe te5t ban, nor on
to negotiations on the
. emergency distribution. centers it now costs 66 cents more to buy
tbe President's requeS t for a
aggression question.
WASHINGTON (AP) _ The T e state's Washington Bureau governor was accompanied by At- WASHINGTON (AP)
Air for water since the city's supply the items that $10 would have purf Atl t G
d th
G N _ The uru·ver- torney General Dan McLeod, As- Force Lt. . Col. John A. P owers, - as well as its telephone and chased 1·0 the 1~7-59 period.
public debate.
Khrushchev's views w e
Allen l't1. Mohn Jr., of 216 Maple
mayor O
e
SHIN TO
1
th
an a, a., an
released to the newspape s governor of South Carolina took
will
1 sistant A.ttorney General G r a d Y controvers1a s~kesm~ f?r . e telegraph lines- was knocked out. Chase said the story of the liv-~f S143.215.248.55e~aro143.215.248.55ri Mo~~;i~I Patterson, State Rep. ~oseph Rog- U.S. astronauts, 1s losrng his Job. Army barracks and Communist ing cost rise in June was " priSt. said, "It's ridiculous to think Pravda and Izvestia as e opposing sides Friday on a bill to
that a man of public responsibility confered in the Kremlin '"i h outlaw racial discrimination in wi out disorder in the event of ers of Manning and his son, Don- This was confirmed Friday by party headquarters were reported marily the story of sugar, cigarwowd believe the Russians."
Undersecretary of State
hotels, restaurants and other pub- a ·nal court order requiring her ald Jr;
a source within the National Aer-- toppled as was the four-story New ettes and higher taxes." Seasonal
He said he thinks the whole Averell Harriman on t e lie accommodations.
ad ission, Gov. Donald Russell
onautics and Space Administra- Macedonia Hotel. There were 200 trends helped too, he said, particthing, on the part of Kennedy, is thorny problem of Laos. T
S R
ll f S th sa here· Friday.
tion.
guests in the hotel when the first ularly in used cars for the sumO
an attempt to "shore up his ·sag- United States wants Khrush
Gov. Donald · usse
ou
The source said that while Pow- shock hit at 5:17 a.m. and mer driving season.
th
th
e state
denounced
will
.
gmg
pres tige," an d possiblY chev to use ltis influence to Carolina
tration-backed
measuree asadminis"coer-- ob' The
erve people
law andof order"
in ,such
ers, generally known to newsmen ~ecked i·t. Ho,V manY lost their Cha se indicated
. , howe
. ver. , that
--l remam
· a t · the lives was not known ·
the general price rise did not
drag a few "fence si·tters" rn·to ,,..-et tile fi.,,,.htin.,"' stopped i
as "Shor·ty" \'vu
cive leo-is]ation" which he said an event, he told newsmen when
.
that Red-threatened Southea
.,.
Manned spa' ce Fli"ght Center at It was believed_ some of the point to an inflationa~ tren_d but
supporting hrm.
"will breed
resistance and per- qu ied on the subJ·ect. "We have
'"'-- s a·d
h
thi
k
·th
th
Asian
kiu~doru.
Houston, Tex., he " wi·11 not be rn
· guests were Americans.
reflected more past inflationary
Mouu
1 e
n s, Wl
e
haps violence."
de onstrated that in the past and
publi·c affairs."
Witnesses reaching Belgrade pressures than future.
RUSSl·ans 1·t 1· s ;~possi·ble " to es
,
uu
11,,-a
..
nr
Ivan
Allen
J,
r
.
of
Atlanta
wil
do
so
in
the
future."
.
~
What Po"•ers' new J"ob wi·ll be from
_ the _str_icken city reported He said this_ was tru_e of c1gar_·tablish any sort of rapport wi·th
full-scale nuclear
exchange of
I ss s~;d
feder-al Jeo-islation "'Ould
help R sell made the observation in
w
'
buildmgs collaps_e before ett~- Th e _c igarett': rndus_try ~s
·
·
no strings attached."
=
.,.
"
the
source
would
not
say.
Powers
see~g
than 60 mmutes "could wipe ut advance voluntary desegregation.
of a question as to whe-1.s on loan to NASA ~-"om the "·· their eyes. Among the_first w~re ~ng. to brmg nonfi~ter prices m
James,
-illi·on Americ s, He s~;d
rac1·a1 dIS. cn·nun·ation 1·s an ther e USC admission would be
.t'tiJ. ....
th M · S. St
t Mpas- more than 300 '"
=
·
F . and . eli "blu f
etir
.-vo Wes t German gir1 ~.ounsts lin e wi th those f or filter typ es as
to Dr. f Feltbam
r O
e am ree
e t b· EuropeaiIS and Russians, as ell all-American problem requiring as U ventful as the entry of Neorcte next isF bgi e oaftr r
who had spent the night at the well as trying to meet rising
odist Church, described the as untold numbers elsewhe1 ." an all-American solution, and if gro arvey Gantt to Clemson Col.
men of d tye ~-ua1rydi · eWr ld New Macedonia Hotel.
costs, Chase said.
years
u ' me u ng . or
HOTEL COLLAPSES
OTHER HIKES
proposed test ban as "a fine As Soviet Premier Khrushc v Congress does not pass the bill It lege earlier this yeai·.
steP - a good step - il we said, Kennedy remarked, the s r - would "amount to an nndorsement Th governor was less specific
War II and Korea.
" We left the hotel shortly after Indi"cating anntl1er probable ad
"
By ROBERT McHUGH
An offic1·a1 NASA spokesman, 5 a m t o catch the a1rpor
·
t bus ,,
f Jul "ch
·d · th could onJy trust the Commu- vivors "would envy the dead.'
of private business setl:ing
up an when asked about president Kennists."
Second, he said, the tre ty entirely new status of discrimina-- nedy' current standing in South
Governmental Affairs Editor
Julian Scheer, had no comment said ~ne. "We were barely


~ceth~~ mI~ts ~!~~


u:
He· expressed hope that the ban could help free the world
m tion throughout the nation." ,., Cai·o · a in light of his current A second Negi·o student has qua- on _the report 0ther th~ to say, yards from . the hotel when the this time of the year along with
ENLIVENING ROW
push for civil rights legislation. Iified for admission to Clemson "We gene~ally agree with what ground began jo run1ble. Then we eggs and dairy products and used
would work, but gave it little the fears and dangers of radi cchance, citing the large number of tive fallout.
The two Southern officials testi- "I h en't taken any Gallup polls College this fa)J and a third Ne- Powers said yesier~. I expe~t saw our hotel collapse like a cars and gasoline. Medical costs
tr~ties the R~ssians have brok-- Third, he said, it could be a fied at a hearing of the Senate in th state," he responded.
gi·o has filed application for ad- anxtannor~emen
be ma e house of cards."
can be expected to be rising, he
en rn recent ~story.
.
. step toward preventing the spre Commerce Committee which was He ikewise ducked a prediction mittance to the University of ne wee ·
.
.
Another account came from a said.
outcome of a possible Ken- South Carolina.
~ 0.~cf"s t was t m .thWJX~fg!odn Yugoslav pilot, Aleksander Bia- The bureau reported that net
Ben L. Strozier, Rock Hill Urut- of nuclear weapons to natio enlivened by a row between the
ed Fund director - " I hope it other than the four now
_ acting chairman, John o. Pastore, ned - Goldwater race. "We will Clemson President Robert C. .u~~ !for° Jmee WI
. - gojevic.
.
spendable earnings of factory
a~ e~ W. Webb and "I saw the railroad station go production workers increased subwill work out. I think it is one sessing them: the United Stat , D-R.I. , and Sen. Str·om Thurmond, loo at 1964 when 1964 comes," he Edwards declined Friday to give mrnistr
D--S.C.
sai .
the name of the student who will
leputy admrniStrator Hugh L. down in front of my eyes, it was stantially in June for the second
of the most important things to the Soviet Union, Great Bri
happen in a long time and I am and_ France.
.
P astore accused Thurmond of R tssell made the observations enter Clemson. Harvey G an t t, ryAften. ard p
l d a teNible sight," he said in iUl straight month.
Finall
Kenn d
d
th
.
,.
,,
,,
afte testifying before the Senate Charleston Negro, completed a se- "I eiws ' owersl ~omm_en et' interview over Radio Belgrade.
Take-home gross earnings, less
Y,
e Y sai ,
as_krng Allen loaded_ and w_hcn,, Com erce Comrm·ttee rn· opposi· _
am ure my roe is gorng o
b h
d f
Se ·
gratified our government has been
chan e."
"A woman near y _s oute or federal income_ and Social cur.·1treaty could check the nucle
mester at Clemson in May.
1e to accomplish so much."
.
.
did
you
sto
_
p
beating
your
wife
tion
laws
forci·ng
rn
·
teo,•ation
of
g
O
arms race m a manner which O
b'
Gantt was the first Negro to R
.
,
.
. help. It was a foreign woman ty tax deductions, advanced by
L . Don Matthews, retired Anny
,
type ques~ons and declar~d . h~ publi accommodations.
enter a n all white state - supumors ofalPowehrs rebs1gnati?n tourist whose husband succeeded over 90 cents in June to a record
th
general living in Rock Hill - "I balance:
would _ strfar
engthen
. South CaroIi na. . - ulated
or remov
cir- ·
·
t th tr· t She 1e. "'08
country s maturity
more tha was_ not gorng to stand for mtim1- Be re comi·ng to Capi tol Hill, ported school in
.
th- 22 ave
b"t een
. ht r m escapmg o e s ee .
""° .38 for the average worker \Vl·th
have no opinion. Like a lot of old a continuation of unrestrict d~~on ;i.nd embarrassment of the Russ U met with Secretary AnEXAl\llNA'.l'ION TODAY
c
smce e. -or I 11ig o mained in her room since the three dependants and ~0.57 for
thon Celebrezze of th e Depart- ~ e third Negi·o to apply at the ::oMna:t. L. Goi don Cooper Jr. ~ent door prevented her from go- the worker witl1?ut dependen~.
(See WHAT s.c., Page 2-A)
testing.
W1 ess.
Thurmond, · an opponent of the ment of Healtl1, Education and uruversity was J ames L. Solomon It h Y I
b
kn
h
mg out too. We helped her out.
A strong factor rn the food pnce
civil rights bill, said he resented Welfa e. He confirmed tl1e talks ,Tr. professor at Morris College that Was shorn
· ngt eenf It ?wn h eulrde " I am afraid there must be a rise of eight-tenths of one per cent
the chai·acterization and was not dealt with the question of school
'
a
g on e
It s o
I t f hildr
· tim
f th · J
th
I
boo t ·
going to have a "gag" imposed. dro uts, but would not elaborate in Sumter. He will b~ among those have more control over publicity o o ~
·en v1c s o
e m une was e s 1~rp
s ':1l
taking an examination today for d ~1;_
.th th
tr
ts
d quake smce they could not get the cost of sugar. Prices for this
OTHER COl\:lMENTS
beyo d that.
eo.u.ng Wl .
e as onau -an
product rose by · 32 per cent in
Elsewhere on the civil rights Fo his committee testimony the
(See TWO l\lORE, Page 2·A)
Powe1-s resisted.
(See THOUSAND, Page 2-A)
June and were 44 per cent above
legislative front:
a year before.
"We may see a decline but sug- Norman Thomas, 78, six-time
ar prices are not likely to go
Socialist party candidate for presiback to where they were," Chase
dent, told a House Judjciary s u b - - - - + - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - said. "There will be high prices
committee that Negro civil rights
for sugar for some time to come."
In the Pee Dee, people c'all it the "Golden
fully justified
demonstrations
Weed." They also call it their life's blood. The
and
lambasted are
Southern
Democrats who oppose the legislatiqn
1963 South Carolina tobacco market opens
as "wr1x museum politicians."
Thursday. Sunda11's edition salutes South Caro-Gus Tyler, assistant president
lina's No. 1 cash crop-a $116-mitlion m·oposi(ex-President Manuel Prado of
majority of the people can<AP)-Cuban
other Latin American counof the AFL-CIO Inlernational Ladtion-with a special section, chock full of facts,
Peru), of Frondizi (ex-Presinot vote.
ies Garment Workers Union, told
tries."
Fidel
Castro
figures and interesting features and pictnres.
dent Arturo Frondizi of ArThe prime minister told
the House group that federal legisFranklin O'Dell, Laurens.
Castro declared: "All counrevolutions Friday in
If it's about tobacco, it's in Sunday's Tobacco
gentina), of Ydigoras (excheerlllg crowds: "What haplation is needed because voluntary
Elbert L. Culp, Chester.
tries
that
do
what
the
CUban
American nations.
President Miguel Ydigoras of
efforts to give equal rights to Nepened in Cuba was not a
Special.
Miss Charlotte Stoney, Oharles•
that
has
occw-rGuatemala),
miracle.
It
can
occur
exactly
that
such
rebelpeople
have
d~:ie
will
have
promised
have
failed.
,
groes


ton.
ed with those governments
the same in many other Latin
would be supported by
the decided support of the
What happens when two women get snow-bound
-Two Negro leaders urged a
0 . J, McCallum Jr., Rowland.
servile
to
imperialism?"
American
countries."
entire Socialist camp."
Senate Labor subcommittee to ap- the oviet Union.
O'Conley Gantt, Batesburg,
fn a Colorado cabin with a bunch of youngsters?
Referring to Venezuela, Casea: tro, addressing a mass
Latin America, the bearded
Castro said some Latin
prove legislation to create a Fair
Mrs. Rose Barre, Lexington.
Things get right hectic and comical, that's what
tro said, "There they have
prime minister shouted, "is
American countries are stable
Employment Practices Commis- rally · Havana on the 10th
Mrs. J. J. !\lcAUlster, Scranton, .
happens. Be sure and set aside a few moments Sun
the puppet President Romulo
a continent in crisis, a conenough not to be included in
sion. They were James Farmer, anniv ·sary of tl1e blow that
W. E. Taylor Sr., Newberry.
day to chuckle along with two South Carolina wome
time
there
Betancourt.
Every
the
revolutionary
belt,
and
detinent
where
revolution
is
inultima
ly
led
to
his
takeover
national director of the Congi•ess
Mrs. J. P. Raymond, Harde&rage.
is
a
coup,
he
goes
into
clared:
"The
countries
with
who had their children ask, "Mother, whoever hear
in
1959
declared
his
revoluevitable.
of Racial Equality, and Roy Wilville.
in
frathe
least
political
stabi.lity
"We
send
greetings
of
"°In Argentina, every day
ot snow in June?" It's one of the many nterestin
kins, executive secretary of the tion ha benefitted the CUban
Mark Shell~y, OOnway.
. ternity and so:.:dai·ity to the
Latin America are those that
there is news of a military
National Association for the Ad- people.
Fletcher Pinson, Gaffney.


features in the big reading package corning thi


supPQrted imperialism against
Venezuela revolutionaries who
revolt and more counterblows.
Castro added in a broadvancement of Colored People. WilR. Henry Moseley, Anderson.
Sunday in THE ST ATE and THE COLUMB
with impressive valor confront
CUha."
That is the representative
kins said an FEPC would " prod cast mo itored here : \Vhat
P. H. Seigler Sr., Myrtle Beach.
RECORD.
He continued: "Who does
the force of reaction and of
democracy impelled by the
those employers who won't move has bee done in Cuba also
(For details see page 3-A).
imperialism."
not
recall
fue
hatred
of
Prado
(See SPARKS FLY, Page 2-A)
Ya.I.kees, in whose country the
is possi le to do in many
spaw,11Iz-s
At HeaI"Ing

On R1·~o·hts
A-'l;tronauts'
t Um·"ver·s1"t_
v of S C.
Russell Predi·cts s I
po {esman
• · ·Losm"()"
• J0 b
uiet .I nt egrat ion









T,vo More

11-
Negroes
·
May EnroII
lo
';:
20
ie
We've Got News
For You Sunday
RUSSlall
• Support
lJTrg·es La.ti·n Revolutions

Deaths
�~ ay
O'Dell, 65, of. Laurens, died in
the Laurens District Hospital Frida
~~ was a native of Laurens
County, the son of the late John
d A
s ·th O'D 11 d
sts J
e ' an
~ke · an farnna mt
was
a
mer.
ser survwors
·
· 1ude hi s Wl"! e,
me
sPark
S
Fl y
wly
(Continued from page l·A)
je d encourage those who .want to
all an . ,,
· move. ONLY FOR POOR
m-
~
R C t . Pittman Dalton Ga.
· ar er
'
'
'
attorney, to!~ the Senate Co!11th
!11er~e Committee at race mixmg 1s only for the poor, not for
"th h
·ti· al
t
t ,.
e ypocri c P1u ocra ·
Noting that the public accommodation bill would exempt bona fide
private clubs, Pittman said:
"pfesl"O~fit'""O. 1'.1-1 vvumah<s-E(OOlC F une~; se.rvi~~ wt
e
ia,y for B yea rs, and was a char Monday~ Baltimore, wi th burial
ter rpetnber of the Athena L1ter- in Arling!on National Cemetery.
ary Club and a member of the
Lexington Home Demonstration
R. · Henry Moseley
Club. .
..
SU1vwors rnclude one daughter, ANDERSON - R. Henry MoseMiss Martha Ba rre of Lexington , ley, 84, died at his residence Frib
·
h
and
ews. a num er of rueces and nep - day.
Mr. Moseley was born in LownFuneral services will be held at desvill e a son of the late Dr. J .
4:30 p.m. Saturday from St. Steph- B. and 'Annie Bruce Moseley and
ens Lutheran Church conducted by served as cashier of the Bank of
the Rev. Otto Reenstjerna anq the Lowndesville for many years. He
Rev. Earle R Loadholt. Interment moved
from Lowndesville to Anwill be in the church cemetery.
derson where he se1ved as cashActive pallbearet'S will be J. T.
Rauch Henry J. Rauch William ier of the bank there for many
.· k, years. He then moved . to Abbe' ·
L. Mathi~,
Harold G. 'D7 emc
ville where he ~as employe? in
Ger~d Amick and Fred ~ . Long. the bank there lDr a . short time.
Friends may call at the Sale
Funeral Home or at the residen·ce. Mr. Moseley came to Anderson in
Any contributions may be sent 1927 and was associated with the
.
to the memorial fund of St. Steph- Orr Gray Drug Co. before his
ens Lutheran Church.
retirement a short time ago. He
was the delinquent tax collector
W. E. Taylor Sr~ for Anderson Co1;111ty for 17
years.
.
NEWBERRY - William Edgar Survivors include his wife, Mrs.
Taylor Sr. , 65, died Friday at the Elia.beth Kay Moseley of the
Newberry County Memorial. Hos- home, and one daughter, Mrs. S.
pital.
v. Foster.
Mr. Taylor was born and rear- Funeral se1.vices will be held
- --~----------------------
.,_ (Conti
adinittani
graduate
Solomoi
ther of I
member
partment
He sai1
ta.nee to
told he '
ex~nat
tials coul
aminatio1
at 8:30 a.
Center 01
Solomo1
gr.ee in
and am
ma.tics
Universit
The Atl
try for a
ted to tht
Henri l
lumbia gi
mitted to
eral Dis!
uncertain
at the uti
tre Dam
where st
man yea:
R. G.
Negro,
versity ,
day his
The exemption in this bill is a
e carefully devised rat hole for
on- those wljo spend their time
Y preaching integration for th e poor
So whites, while philosophizing about
re it over cocktails within the segreof exempt
clubs."
gated
shelters
Pittman,
whom
ThU1·mond
introduced to the committee as "one of
the ablest constitutional lawyers"
• in the country, presented a
lengthy paper contending that the
history of the· commerce clause
makes it clear this never was int;Y tended to be used as the basis ,
have ap
I for such legislation as the public
there ha
accomodations bill.
other st
The measure relies chiefly on
of highe
8
the commerce clause but also is
The following dispatch from friendly as he greeted the Ameri- Edwar
based on the 14th Amendment's Havana by conespondent Don- cans. Cuba's seizlll'e of the Ameri- ment lat
aid Grant of the St. Lotiis can embassy in Havana in reprisal "The f
equal {>rotection clause.
Pittman said he had li tened to Post-Dispatch was made avail· for a U.S. freeze of Cubari funds is made
Alien's testimony but never had able to Tbe Associated· Pres,; was not mentioned by the Cuban from T
seen the Atlant.a mayor in an in- for distribution to its mflm· premier.
informati
hers. Grant, reglllar United
The garden party, in the grounds bet· and
tegrated restaurant.
"Don't you think that's an un- NlltioDs correspondent for the of a mansion formerly belonging cations s
fair statement to make when the newspaper, was in Bavl;Ula to one of Cuba's sugar barons, lege by
er- mayor is not here?" asked Pas- covering the tenth anniversary was attended by a bout 500 per- "For
ry- tore.
of the Cuban ZGth of July sons. These. inclu?ed a delegatio~ year, 2,94
Pittman said he did not realize movement.
of Co~umst Chinese na_val off!- received
Allen had left, and Sen. Hugh
cers l.II impeccable while um- missions
Scott, R-Pa. said: As a Southern
forms.
.
.
1404 app
By DON ALD GRANT
g~ tleman, don 't you think you
. "Socialism in our country 1s a ed, that t
should withdraw that statement?"
S t . Lollis Po st -Dispatch
little Jess mf.ormal, one o1 the trance r
Pittman replied that he thought
Slaff Correspo nd ent
officers remarked.
been so
Allen would confirm what he had HAVANA (AP)-Premier ~de] At the time a combo on the im- "All a
said if the mayor were present. Castro told a group of Americans provised stage was beating out a in chron
SAVE THE TROUBLE
Friday that he would like to talk tune as a round ly built Cuban
a.nee wit '
Pastore said he would order to the people of the United Stales woman belted out the words.
Pittman's remark expunged from "but you must invite me to you.i" These were interpreted for the of th e b
the record. Pittman then said that house."


American group by an American permane


to save him the trouble, he ·.vould Otherwise, Castro said, "It is Catholic p1iest, the Rev. i-- elix Mc- S. Di stri '
difficult."
Gowan.
Wyche d
withdraw it.
Allen, the day's first win1ess
Cubans in Castro's entouPage "This is a country that has con- dered by
said Atlanta !}as achieved a limit'. declined to interpret the premier's quered inequality," the words Appeals.
ed amount of rac1'al accommoda- info1inal remark, made at the went in part. "We have troubles, "One
tion after a long, exhausting and close of a garden party for inter- but we will all work together with a.pplicant
often discoul."aging process."
national visitors to the tentn an- Fidel."
admissio
of If Congress do~s not pass a pub- niversary celebration of the attack Father McGowan - reared in f?'red ~o
lie accommodation law, he said 00 Fort Moncada, which marked New Rochelle, N.Y. - . hesitated side~s rn
ey cities like Atlanta might slip back'. Castro's rise to power.
a
at the line which went a_pplicant
A Cuban official suggested that "Hail Mary, brown-skinned girl. " nleged
e ward.
ve " Hotels and restaurants tha t Castm could have meant he might Fireworks exploded over the names ?f
. ~ have already taken this issue upon attend the September session of garden at the party's climax. of apphc
\Jlk themselves ai:1d opened their doors the United Nations _Gener~l. As- Then as . the Internationale was sent of t
the might f tnd it convenient to go sembly at which Prime _Mi_msler played with a Cuban r hy thm , the same
back lo the old status," he ~aid. Harold Macmillan has 1~d1caled crowd sto_od a nd Ca t1·o mover! gi·c1des a
He urged, however , that the law a meeting of himseU, Soviet _Pre- o~t, stoppmg freq uently to greet Ga ntt i
allow one or two yeari; for each mier Khrushchev and President his guests as if it were-and in is c-onsid
m local government to try to i;olve Kennedy.
a large, measure it was-his per- to Clem.
the problem on a volun tary basis. Castro's manner was extremely sonal birthday party.
standing
Hm'ts for U. s·,. lnvi·tati"on
Castro Celebrates
H is
• R ise
• to . p ower
J
01
li~e
�- -· ~
~
-~
,
-Ao/..:'~.:..:. _} \ .,,,. ·T
_=._:__~-,7,-~ ~ ~ &
'H -
~
.---
--
\ , ~
-:?. ~~/ /
--.;
- ,.__. 4 \
~
, . . ·-:.; -t .,._,.,../
- ~v.,~--·"--..··---·.<"~.;,
/
'
-=""
rtir:~~a
p ·-f~"lJ.if1:7J.1~~ '~ill~~
�'
·- - - -- -
�e
Toward Equality
The three sat before a cluster of
microphones in the offices of Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy
-a Negro woman, leader of a
racial protest movement in Call;·
bridge, Md.; a. white man, an offl•
cial of that city; and Mr. Kennedy.
Their voices were weary as t hey
spoke into the microphones, telling
of an a greement for racial peace
in Cambridge which they had ham·
mered out in, eight hours of nonstop negotiation. But their words
were words of hope--"orderly desegregation . . . a new era . - . a
victory for all."
, 11·11.i:-1b
The scene last Wednes ·. J.r- ·
its promise of a settlemen
has been a particularly
cal dispute, was symboli
tain shift in t he sit1J,i:::nationa.l scale. Both arnon...,
leaders and local w'hite oh
a greater willingness for a
modation seems to be emergu11;,,
and greater efforts are being made
to prevent the Negro protest moveent from getting out of hand.
BuUons for ·'March'
Thus, the principal Negro organizations showed last week t hat
they were keenly aware of fears
that their "March on Washington"
Aug. 28 could lead to outbreaks of
violence a nd a backfire of Congressional resentment that could
hurt their cause. A special coordinating committee began distributing "March on Washington" buttons among the church and social
groups sponsoring t he civil rights
rally. Along with the buttons went
precise instructions for weeding
out potential trouble-maker,s, assembling in Washington for a parade up P ennsylvania. Avenueand getting out of town by nightfall.
Thus, also, came evidence that
White Dixie was not quite as solid
o.r. e&1: gation as some of its
spokesman claim. Before the Sena te Commerce Committee, which is
holding hearings
,d 'irit ,.,
on the Adm in- ~-o•
i~tration'~ civil ~ ~
~
nghts b!ll, ap- -- ~ !·
pea.red the Mayor t
,_
•,
of Atlanta, Ivan ·JIIUflEtllOI)
Allen Jr., with ~ . _,, ,.,."'/
an appeal that "-!1'1-toll_:;.,,r
ma.de the committee chairman,
John P. Pastore of Rhode Island,
.,~_.,,,,.,1 In ,mr.nrise MaY_Qr
'+~
a 1me
11
Tl
Ul.
1..u.c;
.u.uu...,.e, -.u.-ov _,.._
leadership of the liberal wing of their relationship t o na tional to themselves to
the party; ( 2) to !)ffset the damage needs;" second, "the family rela- to interfere in C
caused to his popularity by his re- , tionship between immigrants and ness. Their case
cent remarriage and (3 ) to polar- persons a lready here, so t hat the fore t he House
ize his points of difference with r eunit ing of families is encour- partment, which
Mr. Goldwater, now regarded as aged ;" third, "the priority of reg- Russians build
the frontrunner for the nomina- istration,"-i.e., first come, first so tha t the Russ
tion. Mr. Rockefeller had said a served. Total immigration would let the United S
week earlier that some of the Sen- be increased slightly, to about its cramped Moso
drab apar tment b
ator's "radical right" supporters 165,000 a year.
the depar tment
p "bl Ch
were planning an election camto assure newly
paign based on "writing off" the
oss1 e
anges
Negro vote and called on Mr. GoldThe general r ule would be that can nations that
water to disavow the "lunatic no country could provide more to find embassy !
fringe" of the par ty 'llld the John than 10 per cent of the total an- ton.
nual immigra tion ; actual details
Birch Society.
The New ' Yorker never got to of how the 165,000 spa ces would
• · ·.,, .,_ · · .- ti.•1-:1cd be distributed have yet to be
P roject Apoll
.
i,ruu neverthe- worked out. For some nations, the
· emocrats, holding a 34· change would increase immigra tion on the moon bef
in the nation's State to the U.S.-Italy's total could rise of the Russian
sought to avoid the di• to 16,500. For others, there would down by what \1
uestlon by voting to abol- be a decrease-English immigra- say has been ~
conference's resolution com;. tion, now about 25,000 a year out feud between D
But the strategy back· of a 65,000 quota, would be limited director of the
ite Democrats managed to to 16,500. For any nations that gram, and J am
J themselves look like memwould be "disadvantaged" in t his the National A
bers of a party trying to sweep way, the President r equested a u- Administ ration.
an Issue under a rug. The in- thority to r aise the 10 per cent observers, Mr.
fighting producedl this exchange figure. Mr. Kennedy a lso asked ruffled by wha
terference by M
between Governor Rockefe1ler and for repeal of t he "national origin"
Gov. Richard Hughes of New laws, which require that if half a to-day adm · ·
Jersey.
person's anc~stors come from an Last month M11
Mr. Rockefe1ler said: "This Asian or Pacific nation he must resign, and it
clearly makes t he Republican be considered under the quota of Mr. Webb wouJ
that nation. no matter where he est in t he sele
party the party of civil rights."
Mr. Hughes replied that, if t he himself was born or lives. Thus a for the man
Republican governors concur in person of J apanese descent living
Last week
this, let t hem inst ruct their Con- in England must apply under
gressional delegations that, "We've J apan's quota. Mr. Kennedy called a vice preside
switched signals now; we'd like that a "discriminatory formula" to nology Laborat
you to support President Ken- prevent t he admission of Orientals.
with 23 years'
nedy's civil rights program."
It Is doubtful that Congress will ous aspects
get to the bill this session. When space technolo
Chiding by President
it does, the outlook in the Senate tive aspects o
But even the P resident seemed is good. But in the House it is flight post w
to chide the Democrats. He told a dim, despite the death this year of a move that it
group of teenagers who had voted Representative Francis Walter, the give Dr. Muel
a resolution condemning discrim· most powerful opponent of major over t he prog11
!nation at the "Boys Nation" in changes in the quota system. The commented, "
Washing ton that t hey had shown House traditionally is reluctant to czar, you've g
"more Initiative in some ways increase immigration, particularly
than t he Governors Conference." in times of widespread unemploy. Press Secretary P ierre Salinger ment. And it is also likely to be
temper d tha 1,, s a,y.in
th8-.-1JLW.1.a.P Y
t ...i.1.1•......i~~1i.....P-l•.Jn,_-_.__o;.,Ow.....Jl)l.<:;t:n 01J
President "was not r eferring to crease in the proportion of !mmi- Criminal Cou
any specific issue," but Mr. Ken- grants from the "no11-Nordic" liber a ted f or
nedy's words were out.
countries.
Gareth Ma.rtii
In general the feeling was that
colleague, of
Mr. Rockefeller had scored a sue- Embassy Row
charges (int
cess by dominating the news at
driving and
the conference, forcing the racial
With increasing frequency, for- an accident ).
issue and putting it up to Mr. eign governments represented in May ' 19; fiv
Goldwater to declare his feelings Washington have been aba.ndoni11g when a car
about support from rightists and t heir embassies in downtown com- Mr. Martini
segregationists. And, said one un- mercial areas and moving out to r eened hea d
committed Western Governor: "He fashionable r esidential sections. cle. The cas
.~ - - - -Not
ll Wa.._<iliin.g-_ton r_es1dl
e ment and
Man for tH
�- ------ --· ___ ...,., ... _ ..... .,;, .........~ ~ ~r'~e~sident "Was not referring to
ate Commerce Committee, which is any specific issue," but Mr. Ken·t~. J'Al,._, ,
holding hea~gs
A~i:i
ne::·~::: :::ef:~~;ng was that
rights bill, apMr. Rockefeller had scored a sucpeared the Mayor
cess by dominating the news at
of Atlanta, Ivan
the conference, forcing the racial
Allen Jr., with
Issue and putting it up to Mr.
an appeal that
Goldwater to declare his feelings
made the committee chairman,
about support from· rightists and
John P. Pastore of Rhode Island, segregationists. And, said one unsit forwl).rd in surprise. Mayor committed Western Governor: "He
Allen said that Atlanta and other made a lot of friends here."
Southern cities need the help of
Miami Beach made it certain that
a new "national law" banning all Mr. Rockefeller is not counting
• set;Tegation as "slavery's step- himself out of the race. Corrobora•
child.
tion came from Albany, where it
Nevertheless, all over the coun- was learned that he plans a swing
try racial unrest was continuing, thr.o ugh nine states this fall and
breaking out in new areas even as the usual candidate's tour of Euit subsided in others. Last Fri- rope. This weekend, he is taking
day's issue of the New York Times his case before some 2,000 leading
carried 25 stories dealing with Californians.
various aspects of the Negro movement; half the items were about
pickets, demonstrations, arrests. 'The Huddled Masses'
In 1958 the junior Senator from
And .there was still doubt as to
whether the civil rights bill, the Massachusetts, .John F. Kennedy,
Administration's main answer to wrote a. pamphlet called "A Nathe problem, will be enough to tion of Immigrants. In it' he derestore peace to the country even clared:
ii' it 'p asses with its key _provision
"The famous words of Emma
-a ban on discrimination in 7p bli
Lazarus on the pedestal of the
accommodations-intact.
Statue bf Liberty read: 'Give me ·
your tired, your poor, your huddled
Legal Controversy
masses yearning to breathe free'
On that score, some legislators
. . . Under present law it is sughave objected to the bill because gested that there should be added:
it ls based on Congress's power to 'as long as they come from northregulate interstate commerce; they ern Europe, a.re not too tired or
feel this may involve imprpper too poor or slightly ill, never stole
infringement on private property a. loaf of bread ... and can docurights, and they would prefer to ment their activities for the past
base the ban on the "equal protec- two years.'"
t ion of the ·law" clause of the 14th
The U.S. immigration lawAmendment. Last week the Ad- passed in 1924 and modified slightministration accepted a. proposal ly in 1953- sets up an annual imby Senator Kenneth B. Keating, mig ration quota of about 150,000,
Republican of New York, tha t the with each nation's quota based on
bill be based on both the commerce clause and the 14th Amend- the percentage of persons · of that
ment. One witness in Congress, national origin living in the U.S.
Dean E rwin M. Griswold of the in 1920. In that year the popuHarvard Law School, suggested lation was predominantly northern
reliance on both those clauses and European- English, German and
also a. t hird- the 18th Amendment. Irish- and as a consequence the
This amendment freed the slaves, quotas are weighed heavily in favor of tha.t area..
and Dean Griswold a rgued that
discrimination is & "vestige of
Asks End of Quotas
slavery."
In recent years the northern EuThe compromises thWI suggested
improved t he bill's prospects, but ropean countries have not been
the ma.In question is whether the filling their quotas: England, IreAdministration can round up the land and Germany, with a total
two-thirds majority it wm need in quota of 109,200, send over only
the Senate to break t he filibuster 53,000 immigrants a year. Counplanned by the Sout hern Demo- t ries with low quotas- Raly,
crats. For that it will need all the Greece and P oland in particularnon-Southern Democratic votes, have large backlogs of immigraplus 22 of the 33 Republican votes, tion applications. I taly, for examand whether these votes are to be ple, has a quota of only 5,500 and
had is still in doubt.
a backlog of about 300,000 persons
who would like to come to the
U.S. But the law does not allow
Rockefeller's Round
transfer of unused quota numbers.
Once a year, the Governors of
Last week President Kennedy
the 50 states meet at the National asked Congress to make the Jaw
Governors Conference. Its declared more equitable. He proposed that
purpose is "to serve as a medium the quota system be abolished over
for exchange of views on subjects five years and that a.ppl1cants be
~~ra143.215.248.55's
/~~p,t<>,7'~\
I .
.,. rv
crease in the proportion of immigrants from the "no11-Nordic"
co.untries.
Embassy Row
With increasing frequency, foreign governments represented in
Washington have been abandoning
their embassies in downtown commercial areas and moving out to
fashionable residential sections.
Not all Washington residents have
welcomed this trend. In the Chevy
Chase area, residents have banded
together against construction of a
new Soviet Embassy there-they
say it would cause "embassy
blight." And at Belmont Road,
N.W., the French, who want to
add office space to their embassy,
have had trouble with an influential neighbor-William Fulbright,
chairman of the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee.
·To prevent further "blight," Mr.
Fulb1ight sponsored a bill in the
Senate to prohibit construction of
embassy offices in Washington residential ateas--embassy residences
would not be affected. Last week
the Senate passed the bill by voice
vote. Even if the bill is passed by
the House and signed by the President, work on the French Embassy
would not be stopped, since it is
already in progress. But construction of the Soviet Embassy could
be affected- it has been postponed
by a court injunction issued last
week, and would not get under way
at ali if the bill were pas'sed before
the injunction's Oct. 1 expiration
da te.
'Fhe bill aroused deep resent-
Q
s
Criminal Cour
liberated fol'
Gareth Mart'
colleague, of
charges (into
driving and I
an a 7cident). 'l
May 19; five
when a car,
Mr. Martinis
reen'ed head-o
cle. The case
ment, and br
further invest·
cident.
Last week
York State D
Vehicles found
of leaving the
dent, refusing
ometer test,
traffic and ·sp
of the state
code. His lice
30 days, at t
will be able to
Tomorrow a g
delibera~ions o
Mr. Martinis
cide. The case
by the Police
of conflicting
witnesses) , the
t orney and t
22,300
The Syncom
munication) ss
spa ce vehicle
"stationary" ab'
Is accomplish
com into a hig
-an altitude
speed is exact!.
1
.1.. Pair these men- P resident Kennedy, Prune ·
Minister Macmillan, Premier Khrushchev - With
t he following statements concerning last Weel{•s
nuclear test ban agreement: ( a ) "Let us now a ctvan~e further toward the easing of international~
t ension . . ."; (b) "This treat y is not the Ini!Jenium. It will not resolve all conflicts . .." ; (c ) "l ·
a m very anxious that we should regard t his .• . as a step to something very valuable.
·
2. Before a proposed nuclear test -ban agreement
can become effective, it must be approved by ( a.)
both Houses of Congress, (b) the Secretaries of
Def~nse and State, or (c) two-thirds of the Senate.
Which?
S. President Kennedy proposed to Congress last
week t hat the railroad dispute be submitted to
the Interstate Commerce Commission. Is the
chairman of the I .C.C. William McChesney Martin
Jr., Rupert L. Murphy or Newton N. Minow?
4. The Security Council last week heard complaints by 32 African nations against South Africa. I
and Portugal. Can you name the four African
nations that were original members of the u. ~ . ?
5. The "July 26 movement" celebrated its 10th
a.nnivet·sary last Friday.
Where?
�Sat., Sun., July 27-28, '1963
2 in South Ol)ponents
At Rights .B'ill Hearing
WASHINGTON m,,-The mayor of Atlanta and the g-0vemor of
South Carolina took opposing sides Frida y on a bill to outlaw
racial discrimination in hotels, restaurants and other public acwmmo11da1lions.
/
Gov. Donald Russell of South
Ca rolina denounced the adminis- ator 'Fhurmond of a sking Mr.
t rationJbacked measure a s "co- Allen " loaded" a nd " when-dideroive legislation" which he you-stop.lbeating-your-wjfe" type
said "will breed resistance and of questions and declared he was
perhaps violence."
not going to stand for intlmidaPROBLEM FOR ALL
tion and embarrassment of the
Mayor Ivan Allen J,r. of At- witness.
lanta s aid federal legislation Senator Thurmond, an oppowould help advance volunta ry nent of the civil irigtts bil!, s~id
desegration. He said racial dis- he resented the ~aracter1za,t10n
c riminatlon is a n all-American and was not gomg to have a
problem requiring an all•Ameri- "gag" imposed.
c an solution, and if Congress
- - - -- does not pass the bill it would
"amount to an Jndorsement df
private business setting up an
e ntirely new s tatus or discrimination :throughout 1he nation."
The two southern officials tesV811eran St. Louis newspapert ified a t a hearing of the Senate man Irving Dilliaro has been
Commeroe Committee which was appointd Ferris P·rofessor of
e nlivened lby a row between act- Journalism and Public Relaing chairman P astore (Dem.), tions, at P ninceton Universiey,
Rhode Island and !Senator l1hur- the University announced Frirnond (Oem.), South Carolina.
day.
LOADED QUESTIONS
Duning the coming academic
Senator Pastore accused Sen- year, Mr. Dilliaro will be a
lrv"ing ·o·,11,·ard Gets
'Princeton U. Post
BACKING new federal eivil
r.ighits legislatfon i-s Mayor
Ivan Allen Jr. of Afl!anta,
Ga.
-A. P. Wire'J)hoto
visiting lecturer at the New
J ersey university, with the rank
of professor of Engl.dsh. He will
conduct.seminars fur the Woodrow Wilson School of P ublic and
Intemalt)ional Aff.ai:rs and will be
a vi&itiing senior f.e11ow of '!ihe
University Co u n c i l of 11he
Humaruties.
<l
I
�from
HE LEN
BULLARD
Consultant
July 29,
Dear Herbert,
~Jr~
· I am sure Ivan lsarAalready seen the attached, but I wasn 't sure you had. I
have never been as proud of anybody as I was of not only his stand but the
way he handled the whole situation. If I wore a hat, I certainly would take
it off/.!
I know that you, too, are proud. It was a fine day for somebody
from the South to stand up and be counted and I am glad that it was Ivan.
Sincerely,
Helen Bullard
TOOMBS, AMI SANO & WELLS
Architects & Engineers
70 Fairlie Street, N , W . , Atlanta 3, Georgia, Te lephone Ja . 4-2801
�7
C
ATLANTA'S MAYOR Segregation ls E;ntrenched in Mi~souri's Bootheel
Action by Governor Is Sought
BACKS RIGHTS BILL Some Negro Pupils Must Go
VIRGINIA NEGROES
I MAROH iN·PROTEST
Demand Reopening of Prince
Edward County Schools
FARMVILLE, Va., July 26
('0PI)-Negroe11 re5Ullled antis egregation protestll here today
and vowed to continue demonstrations until Prince Edward
County reopen., its public
• chools.
About 50 pickets paraded
down the main street of this
f arm t own for the second cons ecutive day in the first Negro
desegregation drive here since
s chools w er e closed . in 1959 to
&void integration.
The Rev. L. Fran cis Griffin,
11tate president of the National
A ssociation for the Advancem ent of Colored People, said
the orderly proteata would conUni ted Press International Telephoto
tinue "indefinitely on a daily
SIT-IN TROUBLE IN ATLANTA: Police drag demonstrator from a segregated res·
basis."
Sines t):ie closing of the taurant. He was arrested after he sat down in the doorway and refused to leave premises.
s chools after a F ederal court
order to desegregat e, most of
the c ount y's white p upils h a ve
been a ttending p rivate schools,
while most of t he 1,700 schoolage Negro c hildren have gone
Special to The New York Time,
gation a t fi rs t simply did not vinced that th e Supreme
wi.thout f ormal education.
WAJS HIN GTON, Jttly 26
under stand and would h a 1·dly
Cour t ins is ts tha t the same
F ollowing are excerpts f rom believe tha t the business,
am ental rights must be
4 Held ar Delinquents testimony today before t he civic a nd p olitical interests fund
held by every American citiSenate
Commerce
Committee
by
of Atlanta ha d intently con- zen.
By R. HART PHILLIPS
Mayor I van A l len Jr . of A tlanta cerned them selves with the
Atlan ta ls a case tha t
lpeclal • TM New TMII Tl.mu
on elimination oI discrimination
N egro population. I still do proves tha t the p roblem - of
ST. AUGUSTINE, Fla., July in public accommodaticms;
not believe tha t they are con- di scrimination can be solved
2S-Four Negro ju\leniles are
As the Mayor of t h e South- vinced tha t all of our civic
to some ex tent. And I use
in the county jail here t oday east 's largest city, I can say bodies b acked by the public t his "some ex tent" cautiousawaiting transfer to Florida to y ou out of_ first-h and ex- interest and supported by the ly, as w e certainly h ave not
school for delinquents as a re- perience and f irst h and knowl- city government h ave da ily solved a ll of the problems ;
.sult of participation in demon- edge that n ow}ler e ~oes t he concerned them selves w ith an but we h ave m et them in a
numb er of areas. This can be
.
problem of eluninating dis- effort t o solve our gravest
atratlons against segregation.
. . ation between t he races problem-which is relations done locally, volunta ril y, and
County Judge Charles .Mathis, 143.215.248.55 so closely home as it between our r aces.
by priva te business itself.
who is also judge of the Juve- does t o the local elected pubGen t lemen, A tlanta has no t
Defiance Is Discerned
nile Court, explained that they lie official
swept this ques tion un der the
On the other h and, there
were being kept in the jail beHe is the man who cannot r ug at any point. ::Step by
are hundreds of communities
cau~e St. Augustine h3:s no ju- pass the buck.
step-somefu?es under co~t and cities, certainly, throughverule shelter for delinquents.
From this viewpoin t, I speak order-sometimes voluntarily
out the nation t ha t have not
He said the two boys would be of the problem as having been moving ahead of pressuresever addressed themselves to
sent to the State School for brought into sharp f ocus by
sometimes
adroitly - and the issu e, wh ereas others h ave
Boys and the two girls to a decisions of the Supreme Court many, many times clumsilyflagrantly ignored the de•
sin)llar ins titution for girls. All of the United States and then
h ave t ried to find a solu- mand, a nd today stand in a ll
.are bet ween the ages of 14 generally ignored by the Pres- we
tion to each specific Problem defiance to a ny change,
and 16.
idents and Congresses of the
through an agreement beThe Congress of the U n ited
The folJl', with three others United States. Like a fountween the affected white States is n ow confronted with
and nln• "'lults, w ere arrested dling baby, this awesome
ownership
and
the
Negro
a grave decision. Shall you
last We9l'
,1en they staged a problem has been left on the
leaders hip_
pa ss a public accommodation
sit-in at ~ Saint George Phar - doorsteps of local gov~mTo do this, we have not bill that forces this issue?
macy in down town St. Augus- ments t hroughout the nat ion.
app ointed a huge general bi- or shall you create another
tine. The group r efused t o leave
I t is true that Atla~ta_has
round of disputes over segon req11est of the m anager, who achieved success in elunma t- r acial committee, w hich too
reg a tion by r efusing to pass
often merely becom es a burial
r :i.lled the police, and they w ere ing discrim ina tion in areas
place for unsolved pr oblems. such legisla tion ?
c·,arged with disorderly conduct wher e s ome other cities have
S urely, the Congress r~a lE ach tim e a specific p roblem
and resisting a n officer.
failed b ut w e do n ot boast
izes that after having failed
At the hearing held last Tues- of o~r success. Instead of has come int o focus, we
to
t ake any definite action
day t he parents of three of the boasting-, w e say with t he have appoin ted t h e people
involved to wor k out t he so- on this subject in the last 10
s~".e~ arrested a ccepted respon - humility of t hose who believe
years, to fail to pass this bill
s1b1hty f or their children and in r eality that w e have lution- theater owners to
they were pla ced in the parent s' achieved our measure of suc- w ork with t op Negro lea der s would amount to an endorsem en t of private business set•
care. The p a rents of the four cess only because we look ed --or h otel owners to wor k
ting up an entirely n ew status
wit h the t op lea dership-or
now 1n jail r~fused to accept facts in the face and accept ed
of d iscrimination throughout
certain r estaurant owners
any responslbll1ty and the teen- the supr eme Court's decision s
the n ation. Cities like Atagers refused to a gree not t o a s inevitable and as the Jaw
have of their own volition
take part in demonstratio!1s, As of our land. H aving embraced
dealt with t he top N egro lanta m ight s lip backward.
a. result, the four were Judg ed r ealism 1n general w e then
leadership.
By developing H otels and r estaurants that
have a lready taken t his issue
delinquent youths.
set out to solve spe~lfic probthe lines of communication
and respectability, we have upon themselves a nd ?Pened
Appeal Planned
lems by local cooperation betheir
doors might find it conDr. R. B . Ha.yling, a dentist tween people of goodwill and been able to reach amicable venient to go b ack to th 0
solutions.
y;ho Is pres ident of the local good sense representing both
old status.
1
Excerpts From the Statement by Alle11
f~iled to a ct on ~ pr oposed_pubIle a ccommodat10ns law.
..
to School 35 Miles Away As a result, Missour i N egroes on Public Accommodations
p
1 c I 5
_ _ _ ___
have scheduled a march on J ef- 1__-,-_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
C t in d F
on ue
rom age ' 0 ·
ferson City, the capital, for Aug. . . ·
1
turned away at the r e._staurant
By DONALD JA N SON
10 to demonstra t e their dis- P1ls m cla ssrooms nearer their
on the ground that the proSpecial to The New York Times
pleasure and demand action.
h o~~t m onth, also b·y court o"9
prietor had a legal right to HAYT;, Mo., July h24-Ttrhavel-t Pover ty is deep in the fertile der the Charleston school sys-'
·t·
h" ers passmg throug sou eas
t ' i\Till b - integrated The
change the Negro's c1_ 1zens 1p Missouri are surpr ised to find Bootheel, ~n ar ea. of half a dozen em ' , . e
.
. co~it as a matter of convenience.
themselves halting their cars for counties ex t ending from Arka n- 00thfeel s fdrs}0b 1~~;~~ss racial
"I submit that it is not right school buses on blistering days sas to Poplar Bluff and Charles- P~~·ble~~ e was established 1n
to allow an America.n's citi- like tod!l-Y·
ton.
·
Charlest~n this m onth.
zenship to be changed merely In this _appe nd age of th e O)d The bla ck delta s oil, reclaimed The n ext target will be Hayti
as a matter of convenience," he Sou th , childretn go kto scho£°1 m from the Mississippi River (pronoun ced Hay-tie) and the
the summer o ma e up or a.
"campus" t ha t Negroes consaid.
two-month recess in the f al l for sloughs tha t once m ade the ar ea .
f h
The Mayor suggested how- · k "
tt
" Swa.mpeast Missouri," outpro- s1d~r a _symbo1 o sc oo1 segre,
pie mg ~ on.
gation m the area
ever, that Congress should Buses carry 'Neg ro pupils in duc~s a ll the r est of the state
·
.
W k p
I . ed
d th Administration bill all grades from as far a s 35 a gr1cultura lly, but the a ba namen
e
. ,,
miles awa to an imposing com- doned houses that dot the cot- Veterinary
ee
roe aim
to allow."~ reasona b~e t~e _for plex of rla br ick school build- t on ,. corn a nd soybean fi elds WASHINGTON,
July
26
communities to abolish_d1scrun- ings in the dilapidated Negro t estify to the r eplacement of (UPI ) _ P resident Kennedy
ination before Federal mterven- section of this little a gricultura l t~e sharecropl?er on th e planta- today proclaimed the w eek of
tion. He also thought that smal- town.
tions by m achmery.
July 28 as Vet erinary Medi•
I
it· · h O uld have a longer Negroes in the Missouri Boot- As a consequence most of the .
.
.
.
~r c ies s
heel so called because of the Bootheel's 30,000 N egr oes sub- cme Week t o h onor ".etermar1tune than larger, smc~ met~o- sha 'e of the area tha t juts into s ist on income from r e)ief checks ans w ho . have cont ributed . to
politan areas found 1t easier Arifansas have labeled the com- and dwindling seasona l work "human health and welfare an~
to adapt themselves to social plex a cen'tral "dumping ground" with the crops.
.
the1 ~~ane t reatment of amchange.
hr ns:-e school dibtricts, e. "cam- Most cf the whit es. a.re also m3..s.
s tor Joh1'l p Pastore pus" established to a void the poor. The farmland lS own ed ============~
ena
·
' in'tegration that would result if by only a f ew and the area h as
Dem?crat of R-!1ode Island, who Negroes, like whites, wer e lit tle indus try t o. employ the
was m the chair, told Mr. Allen taught at the schools n earest ~-est. The pop ula tion 1s decl~~at the concludion of his state- their homes.
11:1g . The separ a t e sch ool fac!hment that it was n:iore diffi_cult To get h ei:e, some Negro ?es are a burden on the r emamfor him to h~ve said the things pupils board buses a t 6 A .M., m ~, t axpayers. . _
.
he did than it wo~l~ have been then jounce over rural r oads
But the ~rad~tions he_re _are
for
som~ . offlc1als
from and through t owns with a ll- Deep Sout h, said a1; e~1to1 <!f
Northern cities.
.
white s chools, a r riving t oo late a . weekly n ewspaper, and 1t
• • • sEE R~ntica
"I am humbled m your pres- for the da y's first classes .
will take a revolution to cha ng e
ence" Mr Pastore said.
.
t h em."
~ avIURNI ADLER
ueries
Segrega tion E ntrencl1ecl
Th e N.A.A.C.P. ha s achieved
,
.
nd
Thurmo Poses Q
Segregation is m or e firmly some gains this summer. By
Thereupon, Sen ator Strom entrench ed in the Booth eel than F ederal court order, integration
Thurmond, Democra t of South anywhere else in this border of the high s ch ools and junior
Carolina, b egan a series of ques- state. E x cept for token com pli- high s chools in W a rdell and
tions similar to thQse he had ance in a f ew of t he larger Deering began last week. By
addressed to Gov .Ross R . Bar- towns, the Suprem e Court 's de- n ext July the elementar y grades
nett of Mississippi and Gov. segregation r uling of 1954 has will be int egrated .
George C. Wallace of Alabama . been ignored.
Sch ool
a u thorities
called
Would it not be better, Mr. In addition, public accommo- whi te parents together recently
'I'hurmond asked, to rely on vol- da tions are closed t o Negroes. and told them that they h a d no
Untary action, or a t least local Jobs, except for menial tasks choice but to comply. There
ordinance?
and t eaching in segrega t ed were no inciden ts a s more tha n
"Senator," Mr. A llen retorted schools, are limited to part- a hundred N egro p upils in the
'I'd like t o see definition on a time fi eld work. Housing is al - t wo towns, r elieved of the l(mg
95 CENTRAL AVE., WHITE PLAI NS, N. Y.
llatlonal level. Congress should ways on t he ot her side of the bus r ides that m ade t hem m iss
(Exit 22, Bronx River Pkwv.) WH 8-7755
say wha t it thinks should be track s .
classes a t the overcrowded
Op•n Mon, Thu r, Fri 10 9 P.M. (Doilv 10 6)
done under t he Supreme Court "In some ways it is worse Hayti school, joined white p udecision. W e h ave been left up than the Deep South," sa id
ln the a ir."
Clyde s. Cahill of St. Louis, an
Wasn ' t it true that this would a ttorney for t he National Assolb.ean com pulsion ? Mr . Thur- ela tion for the Advancement
lb.ond a sk ed.
of Colored People.
. "It would com pel t he same Mr. Cahill has spent consid1:"1ght s be given t o Negro cit- erable t ime in the Boot heel r elZens a s to wh ite citizens. Yes, cen tly t o press school desegrethat •s compulsion. Any federal gation suits.
NEW AND US ED
law exercises some compulsion,"
"In Alabama and M ississippi
the ¥11yor replied. He t hen the Negro knows there a re sep \Vent on :
arate eating and lodging fac ili"We h ave reached a situation ties. In mos t places in the
Spinets
Low11t
that has been brou ght tnto be- Bootheel t here are none a t a ll,"
ing by the Supr eme Court. ~ e Mr. Ca hill said.
Consol es
Prlc11
look .on the Supreme Court i:vit_h
Same in M uch of State
a schoolboy's rever~~e. This is
E xcept for a few large cities, All Styles
Ever Otfere•
Your court, our cour t.
this applies to m uch of MisM:r. Thurmond then a sked souri. The Missouri Commission
Finishes
You Owe It
Whether the proposed law wo~ld on H uman R igh ts r eports:
not destroy business in Georgia. "A Negro can a ctually travel To Match
to Yourself to
"I don't see any business de- the width and breadt h of the
~troy ed," Mr. Allen answ ered. s tate and not find one cafe
Your Decor
INVESTIGATI
'I_ am asking Congress, as a restaurant, hotel, motel or re~
)~~al official, to give me a def- sort t hat will accommodate him.
"<ition."
"Even when traveling on an
Senator Is Challenged
in terstate bus in the uniform
4'6" - 4'8 - 5' I" - 5'4" - S'l" - 6'
.
.
of h is country, t he Negro is
CH ICK ER ING
A t t his point Mr. Pastore an- often refused service a t the
H. W. PERLMAN
BRAMBACH
griJy p rotes ted Mr. T hurmond's bus station r es t s tops."
STE I NWAY
HAR DMAN
BRADBURY
questions, wh ich , h e said, were Negroes have asked Gov. J ohn
STECK
HARRINGTON
SHONINGER
"Unfair ." He sold that it the 1\f n ~l~nn t n " "~ 1, . . .,., __ _ , .. ~: . . ,
r"u" ..,.,
f
BEFORE
YU BUY
I
~~-,;·
I
~~,
~-
MODE•WAY
FURNITURE
JULY CLEARANCE SALE
FAMOUS NAME .GRANDS
I
�l,J.I. c,1.u.1,;u, V.I.
I.Jl C: 4o 'lfc:l,l. .lV.U d,J. ~ o ! , U l,.;,ld,-
t ion for the Advancement of
Colored People and adviser to
the N.A.A.C.P. Youth Council,
said today an appeal would be
made.
~udge Mathis said . the appeal
must be to the Circuit Court,
which sits in St. Augustine,
while Dr. Hayl ing is trying to
appeal to the Disttjct Appellate
Court of Tall_a hassee, the capital
of Florida.
Dr. Hayling said presentation
of the appeal had been delayed
until this point is cleared up.
Meanwhile, picketing by members of the N .A.A.C.P. Youth
Council, which started several
weeks ago, continued today
against the segregated lunch
counters of W oolworth's, McCrory's and the Service Drug
St ore in midtown St. Augustine.
Three to five pickets were
placed at each establishment
carrying signs protesting discrimination. Woolworth's is rem o'Ving its · lunch. counters.
All p ickets are over 17 years
of age. J uveniles have not participated since Judge Mathis
issued. & directive last week forbidding them t o picket.
N o arrests were made last
Tuesday when 150 Negroes
gathered at the County Jail to
protest the holding of the four
teen-agers. The following day,
however, five juveniles wer e
arrested in a car parked near
the jail. They were a ccused of
a ttempting to incite prisoners
11,nd turned over t o the custody
of their parents.
Under a Federal Court order
Bt. Augustine will desegregate
some schools next Sept. 1.
The applications of a number
of Negro children fo r entry
tnto white schools have already
been. approved, city officials
aaid. Schools and recreational
fac ilities here have always been
1eg:-egated, but there is no city
c,rd\nance providing for segr egation.
Oambridge Guard Ohanging
CAMBRIDGE, Md., July 26
300 National Guard
troops r olJed out of Cambridge
in a 40-truck convoy today
and t hose remaining were given
a new commanding officer.
The 300 guardsmen still garrisoned here will leave for home
tomorrow, to be r eplaced by a
fresh batallion of about 450
men.
Col. Elmer Bright was named
t odav to t ake over command
o f the Cambridge t r oops today
from Brig. Gen. George M.
Gelston.
"I t hink ws oughthe'soElp . . d
"I think he's done a r emarkable j ob," Maj. Milton A. Reckord sald of General Gelston in
making the announcement. "I
think we ought t o give him the
opportunity to rest up a little
( .AP ) -
bit."
Geneul Gelston announced
yesterday considerable easing
o! the militia law restrictions
that haven been in force since
July 12, when troop~ were ordered into the city of 12,000
after a night of racial rioting.
A ban on demonstrations like
those that led to violence remains in effect, vehicles still
are subject to search, and persons With firearms in their vehicle• repain 1ubject to arrest.
,ld, l,;t;:'O::, .
In attacking
the specifi c
pr oblems, we a ccepted the
basic truth that the solutions
which we sought to achieve
in every instance granted to ,
our Negro citizens rights
which white American citizens and businesses previously had reserved to themselves
as special privileges.
These speeial privileges
long had been propped up by
a multitude of local ordinances and statewide laws
which had upheld racial segr egation in almost ever y conceivable form.
In Atlanta we had plenty
of these props of prejudice to
contend with when we set out
to solve our specific problems
of discrimination. In attacking these problems, I want to
emphasize that in not one
single instance have we retained or enhanced the privileges of segregation.
'A Long Process'
It has been a long, exhausting and often discouraging
process and the end is far
from being in sight.
Atlanta has achieved only
a measure of success. I think
it would assist y ou in understanding this if I explained
how limited so far has been
this transition from the old
segregated society of g enera tions past, and also how limited so far has been the participat ion of the Negro
citizens.
Significant as is the voluntary elimina tion of discrimination in our leading restauran ts, it affects so far only
a small percen tage ?f the
hundreds of eating places in
our city.
And participation by Negroes so far has been very
slight. For example, one of
Atlanta's t opmost r estaurants
served only 16 out of Atlanta's 200,000 Negro citizens
during the first week of freedom from discrimination.
The plan for eliminating
discrimination in hotels as
y et takes care only ot convention delegates. Although
prominent Negroes have been
accept ed as guests in si•,eral
Atlanta hotels, the Negro
citizens as a whole sddom
appear a t Atlanta ho tels .
Underlying all the i>motions of the situation i$ the
matter of economics. It
should be remembere4 that
the right to use a facility
does not mean that it will be
used or misused by any
group, especially the g1•oups
in the lower economic: :tatus.
Now I would like t o submit my personal reaso11s why
I think Atlanta has resolved
some of these problems, ·vhile
in other cities solutions have
seemed impossible and strife
and conflict have resu lted.
As an illustration, I would
like to describe a recen t visit
of an official delegation from
a great E astern city which
has a Neg ro population of
over 600,000 consisting of in
excess of 20 per cent of its
whole population.
The members of this dele-
l.iOUrL n.,w1ngs \..I U,t:; U
I do not believe that any
sincere American citizen desires to see the rights of private business r estricted by
the F ederal Government unless such restriction is absolutely necessary for the welfare of the people of this
country.
On the other h and, following the line of thought of
the decisions of the Federal
courts in the past 15 years,
I am not convinced that curren t rulings of the courts
would g-ra nt to American
b-..isiness the privilege of discrimination by r ace in the
selection of its customers.
Here again we get into the
area of what is right and
what is best for the people
of this country, If the privilege of selection based on
. race and ·color should be
iranted, then would we be
giving to business the right
to set -up a. segregated economy? And if so, how . !ast
would this right be utilized.
by· the nation's people? And
how soon would we again be
going thro!lgh the. old turmoil of riots strife, demonstrations, boycotts, picketing ?
Are we going to say that it
ts all right for the Negro
citizen to go into the bank
on Main Street and to deposit his earnings or borrow
money then to go to department stores to buy what he
n eeds, to go to the superm arket to purchase food for
his family, and so on along
Main Street until he comes
t o a r est aurant or a hotelin all these other business
places he 1s treat ed just like
any other customer - but
when he comes to the restaurant or the hotel, are we
going to say t hat it is right
and legal for the opera tors of
t hese businesses, merely as a
matter of convenience, to insist that the Negro's citizenship be ch anged and that, as
a second-class citizen, he is
to be r efused service?
I submit that it is not right
to allow an American's citizenship t o be ch anged merely
as a matter of convenience.
If the Congress should fail
to clarify the issue at the
present time, then by inference it would be saying that
you could begin cliscrimination under the guise of private business. I do not believe
that this is what the Supreme
Court has intended with it$
decisions. I do not believe
that this is the intent of Congress or of the people of this
country.
I am not a lawyer, Senators.
I am not sure I clearly understand all of the testimony
involving va rious amendments to the Constitution and
t he Commerce Clause which
has been given to this committee. I have a fundamental
resper.t f or the Constitution
of the United States. Under
t his Constitution we have al•
ways been able to do what
is best for all of the people
of this country. I beg of you
not to let this Issue of discrimination drown in legalis·
tic waters. I am firmly con-
1ra11ure oy 1..,on1,re;, s cu
t ake definite action a t th is
t ime is by infer ence an endorsement of t he r ight of
private business t o pr acti~e
r acial discrimina tion and, m
my opinion, would start the
same old round of squa1'bles
and demonstrations that we
have h ad ,t11 the past.
Gentlemen, if I h ad your
problem, armed with the local experience I h ave had, I
would pass a public acco1;1modation bill. Such a bill,
however, should provide an
opportunity for each Ioc~l
e-ovem ment first to meet th is
problem a.nd attempt t o solye
it on a local. voluntar y ba~1s,
with each business makmg
its own decision.
Reasonable Time Asked
I think a public accommodation law now should stand
only as the last resort to
assure that discrimination is
eliminated, but that such a
law would grant a rea~onable
time for cities and businesses
to carry out this function before Federal intervention.
It might even be necessary
that the time fa ctor be made
more lenient in favor of smaller cities and communities, for
we all know that large metropolitan areas have the capability of a djusting to changes
more rapidly than smaller
communities.
Perhaps this, too, should be
given considera tion in . your
legislation. But the pomt I
want to emphasize again is
that now is the time for
legislative action. We cannot
dodge the issue. We cannot
Joolc back over our shoulders
or turn the clock back to
the eighteen-sixties. We must
t ake action now to assure a
greater fu t ure for our citizens and our country.
A hundred years ago the
abolishment of slavery Won
the United States the acclain-t
of the whole wor ld when it
made every American free in
theory.
Now t he elimination of seg.
regation, which is slavery• 5
stepchild is a chalJenge t o an
of us to make every American
free in fact as well as in
t heory-and again to establish
our nation as the true charn.
pion of t he free world.
a
51
..::,..,-.....a... "
u.
oraer, as ot her Governors have
~hese wh~n- d1d-you:sto~;beat- done recently, or to call a speci al
mg-your-wife . questions,
he session of the State Legisla ture
would rule them ou_t of order. to oµtlaw discrimination in pubMr. Thurmond said that t he lie accommodations
chairman was t rying to "gag" The Democratic· Governor
mem~ers. "If we can' t. cross- who is from the Bootheel t owr:
examm~ witnesses to fmd out of Kennett, r eplied that he had
how this would work, we have no authority to issue such an
r e~ched a dangerous stage," he order. He said h e would think
said.
about calling a special session.
Mr. Pastore retor~ed ~ at Mr. In the r egular session t hat
Thur1:1ond was askmg loaded ended Jw1 30 the Legislature
questions to catch the heade
'
lines."
"As long as I am chairman,"
he shouted, "I wilJ see that a JI
wi tnesses ar e treated with dignity and decorum and not embarrassed beyond the · Jimits of
fairness."
The audience broke into applause, Mr. Thurmond asked
the chairman why he did not
stop it.
"I can't stop it after it happene_d.," Mr. Pastore said with
a,grm.
Mr. Thurmond has contended
that the integration movement
IS "Communist-controlled."
Senator Philip A. Hart,
oemocrat of Michigan, asked
.1-_he Mayor if his city's desegregation moves were "Communist-inspired."
"There are no more Communists in Atlanta than there are
on the moon," Mr. AIJen said.
South Carolinian Heard
Later Gov. Donald Russell of
south Carolina opposed the bill
as unconstitutional. Taking the
opposite line from Mr. Allen,
the Governor argued that progress could be made only by
voluntary local action and that
a Federal law "will breed resistanc_e and perhaps violence."
Testifying before a Senat e
Labor and Public Welfare subcomn:ittee on fair employment
p~actices legislation, Roy W ilkms_. executive secretary of the
National Association for the
A~v~cement of Colored P eople,
said it was as difficult for a
Negro to get int o the plumbers'
union as into the Chase Manhattan Bank.
H e praised George Meany,
president of the labor federation, for bringing pressure t o
bear. o!1 unions that practice
discrmui:iation. This, he said,
was havmg "some effect but to
us . the
movement ' seems
glacial."
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�THE
Y ORK . TIMES, SATURDAY,
JULY 27,. 1963.
-- .NEW
. --,_ .
C
8
..
sT~LOUIS.ADOPTS. P~ntago_n FightsDiscrimination MAGAZINESCORES


_N


--s
-CH..· ·ooL'· ·PL-AN' Itt· Communfties
A round·····Bases RA.CE Ex·T-RE
_M
_ ·1sT·-s
OR-.u
41
·
·..; ·
.
.
.
Church:~¢o~_n ci( Lea_der Joins_Br.~ok~y~ .fiC?k':t~,_ PAJB.SQNU,~lfS~-j:!
OPEN1MEMBER~HtP
By
1
MARTm: AR_NOLD - . Potter Urges Mote Whites "Yest 147th Str~~\li~s_is~tafit ii~- '
~
'l'he ei'tMutlve. director of the • ·
. ,t1onM, cO!JfinUmtY. . dnec ()~~_f qr .
. .: :; . ;.. t.
.: l~ , ; ;·.
.:.c · · "~
·. . '
· ·
·
·
·
·· ·
.
· J
. .
·

• •
• • · • -• . · ·
A"d
R
p
t
t
...
<::ORE,. and Walter F 1escl't1 26, . . . , · 1 · , :,,
1
, ;.;.; ·
..
·. :. ·
ContlnuedFromPag!l l ; ·coI. l
.
,
[ ote st a~ c C61.1!1C1l ~o! ~ .ew~qrk fO'
I
ace ro es s-:;~· df ,~178 Thompson Street;•· Mr. ;- · .,_--··-' -'· ~ ._


_, ..


•. ·. · ·
· -· · _ _. ·
.· , . . • '. .· . . •
.
.'Bi&otr I Is _S_ee'n in .Attacks j rtc1 c~v~l rl~~ts dE!mon_s tr_a: ,
_
_· · . · ,G.t>ile is the only N egro who has Burldrng Group. .to .Adm1t All
But_.~ e~ro:~: ~r~tes~ ~!m,ts i:resident:s Comtmftee on-Ej_q_uir
. " I:=> . -- ~
_.
t rs m Brooklyn yest er day a~d
First Negro Senten(:td,.. &l!en sent enced._ .
_


, Qtlalif.ied:Appllca.nts.:L,.:':..


Se-ton Pup1! Transfers ' Opporturuty In the~ Arn,iM
.
on Rig~J_s _Mod_erates
r omlsM that ruare white - ~= ~ = ~ -~ ..._~~
·Both &leased _for Appeal
·
-- ______ = .
_F'."orces, liad cited o'ff-ba.'i ~ :di •
.,,
-· ,. · · · , ~
rotestartt mirt.isters.would t ake the picket lines every day, and TM y were arrested JlJ,ly 11 . · J .; · 1--:_, •. _ · , .; -- ! i. : ·:,1.,
~-:.
-. - .
. cfutlifiati6n as the IJlOSt serioui;
~
Specht! 16 The mw York Times .
rl't tlE!xt WM!t.
will eticoUI'age much more in a detnonstratiOfi ·at the East
' l:i~eci~ to•Th_e Ne\if Y4fkT \lhtf.' '/f:
~y-~ON~


,
AN.SQ.~ ,., ; .._problem uncovere~ i~ i~s ~ur~


~ CHICAGO J uly 26 ·- TM i Tiie ReV. Dr. D an M. Potter, participation by ministers and_Side ltous~g project when they P.ATEnl:SON,- N.' J ., J~y -·26.,·
10
~~clAJ The New Yark_-'r1n1•~- _ • Y~Yf ~lt~6_Yg1l it ni.en~oned.~ome
{ Ghi1stian Century, a lilJeral ·t1 chUl'ch lead~ ~atd t hat "if members next we~k.
lay on t he1r backs ort the street. - Unions . in t he .=bulldJng -&nd~
S1':" LOUIS, J~ly 26 ~ .Tlie discrim11:ator,1 pr actices within
~ nondenominational . l;'rntest ant e whites_a-f~ not mv~tved, t he Y_ester day_melrmng 55 perso~s and· Clbstructed t rucks, They constructUlli,- tr~des ,Jlere ~:v.ot~
Board of Education adopted a the servJces ~s well.
.
weekly that has often spoken '#egroes ma,y be, fCJr ced mto who had lie~h arrested pre- were charged_ With disorderly unanimous! t oda.y to ,ett their .
out slro'i1.gfy for civil r ights at- vlofence'. ' h~ t he )jl!lief that they viouSly for blocking the t raffic conduct and mt ruding on an- j
Y
d
op :i'El~ti •
policy of limited open enroll- The comrmt tee, a seven-man
rd
mE!itt ilm- t he st Louis schools gro~p he_a ded , _by : derha A:·
tacked today bigo'ts and '• •sx- had fl6 . support from the w~W! of mat erials afld wot'kers t o tM other _person's property.
. ourneym_a n. art< =_&pp : . _0: '
~ .
·
Gesell, a Washmg'fon lawyef, 1g
t mists" in t h€ "racia:l ·revolu- community.
constr uction site appeared be- Judge Quinn said that_ ne1- programs t o -a~l q-ualifted. al)pl.itocl_ay.
_
prepar ing ~wo a.dcli!idna~ st!-fd·
tf;fi ! ' _ '_
,
He picket_!!~ for mot~ than f_ore Judge Abr~ham _ RotH in ther sHowed remot'se and he im- cants.
· · ,.
,
.
., ~.


'ote wits _g t o 3. _T he ies, ort_e of tJ:ie Reserves a~d


"Bigotry re'fiiains . bigotry kn MUI' at· the cortsti'll?t~on sltE! Criminal Cour~. Brook~y1~, H ow- posed on ~a.ch two 60~day sen- The announcement was~tttade :.
new _p ehcy had Men str~uously ~a_tional Guard . al')d oM oft
however much if changes its ot t ht! Downs tat e Med_1cal Gen- ever, t heir cases were adJ Ourned tences, to ru~ c_on;urren t_ly. a.ft.\'!r-'8. meeting ca.Iled, byMA-yot" ,
c,ppnsed by the board's three ov~seas personnel. .. _ ,.
Later, Supreme Coutt Justic_e
..
.
1 r · nd bi otry is particular- Mr, Wher~ -~32 perso1;1s ~avo ufl til sept. 12.
0 0tJ~ fin ·. gto t h~ absolutist, been
N egro members as fal1ing far One of the cdmrruttee'? recarr_ested _ in _ ~em?nstra- At the Medical c entor sit e Geor ge P ostel g ranted cel't,i f1- P'rank Gr_:l.~es, J r ., t o _l5", 1~r ..,
shor of the kind of open en- ommendations
suggesteg.
a
kite· a;,. N~gtCJ ,, t M maga.zltle uons to fotce t!te htl'II!g of more 200 policemen were on du ty cates of reaso11able doubt and demal'lds o~ _c;:~~ .rli;:tr_ts ,8'~gups "'
.
,
shutdoWn of military hl!,1,.es tri
Id ..
.in -'.,.
.
Negroes and .P uerto R icans on a t one point in the day, but released them in $1 bail .eaqh t ha t had )\een 151_c keti11g ·,~1£y,rollh)ent ~ha~ could . effectively communi ties where discHmina~
sa "it l~p.t143.215.248.55 »f:·ott y, to say as the p_11oje~t. The!'e were . no they were h'ardly neede~. Even pending an appeal.
·ha ll ro'r ·m6re' j'obs'· 'tor 'racial
fost'er ra".1al mtegrat10n. . - - tion has ~ ade ~~ di~~!~µ1 t for
s ome' et a e-a' ~ in th_e ra.1cial 3:rre~ts ;yesterday, for tM first t he si~ging and Chanting _ap- Mr. Goi:e read a statement in mtnor itieS: f- .,_
. • . • - = ·:
,d .-,
F o~owmg . t he _S~preme 'l'!egroes and tliei::_ families __to
struggle -~0~ · do, t hat if one is turte tnfs Wetlk, _
__
pea.re~ to . b_e more mechat11cal court before_being sente~ced. .
The . resolutiOtt:. a~lali'eli·:3 ll' r_;,
ourt!s school-mtegrat1on dec1- fmd housing or carry on 1 eano t a 'l'om Paine· ·fa the r acial
2 JaUea .ltM 60 Days
than mspired, as it had Meh
"The rotten core of dls~rim1- '"W wur . . pt aJ>p'l.l'c tto . - .:
•i01>- of 1954, St. Louifi swiftly s~rta_ble so_clal and ~1t !,Jral d!t
batHe tte iS rtecessa.rllY an Uncle Howev~. t wo derttt'lnstr~tors previously.
nat!on !rt t his nation" . ~ ..:n o ~or j;Ufllf!~~ce or a- · re~tlc~~ ,.
integrated its schools under the tt~iti_es :-V1t h out su ermg

Torn.
· · .
w ho had bee'fi arrested at Rut•
Ooverrtor 1s View Scored
secret, he .declared.
. · ·. ' ·
·
~
• . ~P. ·,~·, ' c
f
·g • crunmation.
..
Asso<llatea Pres..
The editorial said tllat the -e s Houses a city hous,
"We have been asked to wa1t i" examine .their qualifi:caboijs-arl'd
" · hb h d" r
0
i:~up~~s
ufe ~~ho:1:s~:a~- h-f~~ra~~a.rr:rtli
esP~e;~
R ober ts. lUcN'ltfflara'
·:cu~r~ t r.acia l r_evolu.tiond".dil.etea, ~: project 0 ~ t he lowet East siti~v1:n~ r! i i~~e!143.215.248.55 16:46, 29 December 2017 (EST)
he- _sald. "We., h ~Ve waited for if _qllalifie~ underth!'! ~t~id&f ~s ;.
0
1
.
.
.
,
,
,_
- -ed its Tom Parnes as 1 he 'de were sentenced yesterday
. .
. . . d b t h 100 years anu m many ways of the local Urtions l -th.,.r wtn
est their hoffies. SHifts m res- dent, 'I do not regard this as
American Revolution but they si •
. . .
· Of hmng
was cnttc1ze
Y e we are taking tl1e law into our
. "f
/i,
nr'"tr ;~
0
idetltial patterns s1/Jce then a leasib1e ac tion at this ,time. tarY, department_s unti_l '?-u!l'. 15 wel'e seido.ni able to' ma~e the toh se~: t: nce~ay!e~ l:i~eia\hy Rev. William A. J o_nes, ~astor ?f own hands, but we are not ·t ry;,- ~;s
?;a~:~o~~ ~
c-:
1
have result ed _in a la_rge-s?ale reCalls For Regfilatl0'11s
to _rmplement his d1_rect1ve. He benefits of re'Volut l6t!s petrna- :r ~ e
T.
Vincent
Quinn the Bethany_ Baptist C urch m ing tci subvert the law." . ~
or ~ationaJ origin,"• , .• .: ; ; ··, ·.;.
turn to segregation m the The
Secretary's
directive des1gna teg the Assist ant Sec- !lent. "Uncle ·'l'om" ls a pejot'a- ~ ~ itninal Court.
the Bedfot<d-Stuyvesant area of ' Sit-in demonstrations Cofl- . Sa! Maso president ·of t~-,
0
sc143.215.248.55s.board'S action followed called for specjal instt uctions, ~e~a:!t !o~efh~!~e
ti;:d
! ~len:e~e~iv Jud~~ ~rtr°r~1fo~1s, ~ ho is cOordinat- ~ 143.215.248.55 16:46, 29 December 2017 (EST)feh!~~t~fiicea~t
~bili\ci1e1;z -c!~:~1tt.·
!
t~-" ·
~-
. · .. :~. ·
Th:
nst _,
f
~~
\ ;K~~
a.;~ft:~if
fe143.215.248.55
1oe!~::l'~::~::i143.215.248.55g143.215.248.55; ~~li~~d
ii: N:t~~;e~'.
~~v~~b~
~i~
ci-11'1~t~i°~t~r;i i::t
t:;
~~
f
r~::
o!
1
============143.215.248.55===~~========~
APPRENTICE PLAN
TIGHTHNED BY us
regation.
'1'ht board named a. top-11:lvel
citizens' committee to investigate. That body reco~e!lded
major changes to acl\1eve mtegration. I t ad~ls d the board
t o adopt a pollcy 0 ~ open enrollment ancl t o as s1gn tea<:h•
«?rs, redraw school bound arie!;;
Oontinued From Pa e 1 Col. 3 cant number of positions under
g '
one of the systems .. the Ap• prenticeship Bureau' said in afi
vailin~ wages on _F ed~ral con interpretation
accompanying
struct1on, employer s will _not be the regulations.
allowed to pay &pprentices in . The standards also prohibit
unregistered programs les& than discrimination in appren ticllsbiJ)
the t•egular jo~rneymen's wage training or employment during
. ,
, .
apprenticeship after selections
t:f!t'
hepe for frMdom a:~d justtce1
Then_ why smear fits car Wit)l
stlnlung eggs liecause h~ has 11,
Christian allegiance w_h1ch will
not let him resort to violeneE! jI1
the pursuit of justice?
,tTHe racial strtigglt!! neecls
Tom P ftines who irritatinglY
stir and dri ve the people, o•
~
0




 !






itsonor
~tu: n:nPs\143.215.248.55 16:46, 29 December 2017 (EST);i~ t~tatt~i o~:= 55th sieet a!1d it fr~Itc-lf Paterson nego£iatl~g-· (!?~
-:~
Rockefeller feels hts po1it1- Mayor agners o ice a ~ 1 Y tee, . explalned' tltat ·- t l'le i'esolli.! ,
143.215.248.55t:!io:adrn b~e:;~: ! at~ ~:~~alth:fudg~ ~ tf~~ons~r;1c!s~
Dse;::t~~!t~~ i~ht~:i
ti!h id in 143.215.248.55at!.61: s
w~ies. ~imonstrators t o te-rmse
irrawin demand for integra - ThE!se would ertcourage military
.
..

t The e I ou a
sa . .. ny and 60 days, but they received
ti
g
s
leaders to assume respon.sll:iil- s~ryicef~ are required to l'epor Amer icans whtl i'~E!Cted revo. certificates of reasonable doubt
1• from Supreme Cour t Justice
IOnTransfers t o Be Granted
ity for coping with, discrlmi- t
eM~N~rtiara told th!! Presi• 11.!ti~n:,ry
Under the new policy, trans- naflon on aii~ off. military bases. dent t ha t he was al!lo plani'itng nc~ aso~es~ecta~le t oo do so. Ori'! J os_eph ~ - Sarafite and - w~re
fer§ would be gratitM to pupils Th~ difective also cal_led ~or to cf eate a special post within "Ta rej ect such ,peoPle as Un. relea:1~d m $1 bail each pendmg
1
on·lhe basis of ach~evement and 143.215.248.55u~~li~r~a.~~P!!143.215.248.55t~1 0 s;,~: his offi?e _to deal With ptcrbletns cle Toms because they will not sp~~t the peak of the Brooklyn
several other cons1derattons.
. _
.
", of discrimmation .
_
support some particular tech.
t t'
Also a..pproved was a recom" tern f o: r_egularJy r_epor~lng, He poifitE!d otit in his memo- rti tie in the racial protest t · c;1emons ra ion yesterday1 s1:vanendation to limit stiarply any mOn!~Oririg an~ mea~urmg_pfOlf· rand!1m tfiat Ute P ft!sident"s spe- le q ex tremists set the ace 'a o enty-_seven perso~s, bot h v, h1te
integration of 4,600 Negro pupils ress in achieving e~~I oppor- cial committee hlld f6Und that de~and -that ettecybod~ mar~~ and Negro, were _on t he_p1c~et
transporte~ hfrohim overcrowdeld tuf tt143.215.248.55 3fh1~f~ r~~ff-limits" "in th ~ main, ra~iii~,e,t1 li~y t 1~ to it or be ~utnlliated, _i§ to cor. :r:~telhbe!t ~3!1/e ~~n!~te!;~
.tchools, wit w te students n sanction should not be used in a rs~lity on m11tta , ., ase o rupt _the ;evolution anti fl6st. to bloc){ th~ entance of trucks
un~~wg~t5dchi1~~- fqllbWed the ~,h e Uni ted St a ~,elJ without . the dar,'.l'he Depar tment of Def~nse
i~i! f 11~~ri:e ~u~:~::igt~f or workers.- ' ..
.
.
'
administrators' advice in r@- pri_o r app"l'oVa_l . of the Sacre- Will elimina te ·the except1ot1s revolution could tttiike possibl ~ Dr. Potter sa1a that he ~~d
the military department and guard tHe continu1~g ~eal- the editorial said, .
e, t>ee~l~po;,iz:-d by the council~
jecUng appeals to redraw_sch?ol tary
boun.dary lines and arb1trar1ly Concerned.
ity, Mr', McNamara. prom1sea, It referred to an in(:idE!nt
b?ak ·t
tf ctors to join t he
t o integ_rate faculties to fost er In overseas area:s,_ militar_y H e conceded that in the past the national cortvefitlon of t~t pie e s.
,
·
integration.
·
commandez:s have ~ der lab ~ the Department of DefenilE! fia.d Nationa l Association . fo f the
Walits More WWt4iit to Aid
The Negro members of the tude tl1an m the Um ted States "only imperfectly recognized Ad
e .,
1. d p
board called . the _b'oard's de- '.1-nd presuma~lf are _not inhib• tJ:ie ~ arm flow~g from off-Mse her:a:i:is~rr;;:!~t~f ;~!n':r11.ttt:il>ke tl1e:it~o~:ger;grapy hav been
clsion.8 "contmuatioi:i of Jun 1ted by t rad1t10ns exis_t~g in d1scnm mation_.
_
. MereditH the first krtoWn 'N · 0.,. 1 bu~b •8 h d . ~~ve ad a
Crow.ism" and "minimum token- some Amet'ican commlln1t1es.
"That imperfect f~eagnit10n
' .
. ... ~- v '!
/ -- f t ule, he exism."
As indicated by Mr. Mc- has in turn meant the lack of gr_o ~o ~tt~d the University of pl!i med. We are now encouragAnticipating
the
boar_d 's rqamara _in his memorahdun:i to a progr_am _to correct t he conal- Mississippi, wa~ ch_tded to tears Ing_ White elergyth.en as well as
a ction, the National Associat10n the President, reco_m men_dations t!ons g1vmg n§e to tha ha rm," for a moderate speecn to the whit_e laymertt to _a,ctl~!?Iy supgr~up.
.
_
f5bI1 thes~ demonstr~tion§."
f or the Advance'Il'lent of Colored for , placing certain areas off he said.
P eople picketed in t he street limits would be made by m t!!- Mr. McN!itnara said that tfie h Who i.(1 tH~ bdoing J ~oWd . The .eounc'il has 1,700 11lE!frtbE!r
five fl oors below the r oom wltere t ary commanders only after Pentagon would discus§ wit h as done as mUeh ~s . atn~s cH\Jrch~s. Earlier th!$ week,
the board met. Their songs of they had failed "in their best the President's committee var• Meredith to sytnbol!Ze 1!1 P'C!r- cOtil'lcll staff _members · d{d join
protest could be- heard by the eff~1;ts wi th community lead- ious recornmettdati6ns that the soJtal courage tlnd res6llt bon _the the pickets, :Or. Potter said, but
board members~
ers.
panel had ma.de for coping With bat_tle of .a. lone Negt o against none of the-m Was attested as
,,.,
D
d f r Action
The Secretary gave the mili- discriminat ion.
wh!te poht1cians, WHite c1ourts, ~hey had be~n instrncted not to
,.. ,,ro em_a n s o
. ,
white customs ~?- wtiltl! aws ? int~ e~e With the p~ssage of
Today's action was the boa.J.d s
.
Then wtty humt hati!_ h_im and workeis ~nd materials into t he
answer t o t he demands of Neveloped m the past must be break his heart be_cause he re- const rUctioJ! area.
groe · for integration. .
disregarded to the extent neces- fuses to chant iff . a.ppraved Dr. Potter said tha:t civil
Negro and other _civil ris1its
sary to provide opportunities terms_a..;fat~: ~ °tie Wan ts t ights would be etnphasizea in
l ea.ders held a _series of derr·
for current selection of qulili- to h~ariem crowd 1t - d tnaa- all membet . ~11.urches of the
' ' fied ·member!I of racial d ethnic dmgh a Matti - L
one as co~n~~ statbl'lg n~t week, and
olu!tirat!ons e8:rlier thll!I _year o
ize tpolicies
hen• _contention
hat
_ __ _ __
, . . Jr.
mucto lifst ....,
u .1,
n l<:ing that We will have someone o.n
dramat
board'!!
fostered t!legm 1non·tY grc,ups f or an
a s1gmf1we An
mm-ican
egro•i;
___
,the
MARCH IN PHOENIX
IS MET BYMAYOR

.


.
I future in New York State
~ II not be affected very much
by the Negro vote_." "
However, he said, our ~!~
Congres~o~!u a/~f:::e;J:ernsystem, . s
.
ment al systems, are based upon
quotas.~
Dr, Potter called the ~ egro
5 pel.~b:en,~a
d~dll;"-ds
buil mg .~a es
in t~e s:!s'e rted, however, that
some quota system was neeessaD:', or "you . ~end to get
tokemsm"-the hmng of a few
~egroes ~d :Puerto Ricans _to
give. the_ rm_pre?s~on of no discrimmat10n m hiring.
The_ Gongre?s of Racial
Equality also issued a sta te·
ment irt answer to t he comments the Governor made on
Thursday, The sta tement said:
"lt ls realistically possible to
put large nutnbers of Negro~s
on construction jobs. TI!etl'! a re
numbers of Negro journeymen
who are available f ol' work if
openings can M n1ade for t hem
through the efforts of the Govem or.
"CORE feels tha~ lt is !,he
Covernor's resi,onsib1l'lty t o find
t he openings. If you don' t start
M w nothing will ever be do~e."
Tlie two demonstrators who
were sentenced yesterday' to 60
days i.rl. the workhouse were Robert Gore
. ' a1 - years old, ot 620
Hall. Four persons were a t the tion- differed -from .that- -adbpted
g~tve~ or;s office and l O at by the Mercer l;ounty ~utidil'lg :,
i'flie ~~tgers Houses. project Trades Counc;il, ~ , t'!at ) t.. ip~ '
was picketed again by 35 per- c!uded the atllm ss1on of a,pp..ren-_,
sons, but no one _was arrei;t ed. ti~.!it1rnr H 61lcKVay,'f f>t esti:Ient
Six other persons continued f th p te fb
. t'- l h ,J
picketing at tM White Castle o . e a rson . ranCh -<\ ·.t E!' _
hamburger stand at Allerton National Assoc1a.··t ton f'ecJafto'rhe N~wTottr"l'lm• for t11e Advancement of Colored :.~ WAR,K, July, ~6 ~ -~·The :
People and the City Commission bl.l'll,c1~t , N.,e"Y1;lnk .9oordm#ing :
H
RI hts
t
er al· Cpuncil_ continued to . . pieket
flgedu:::nm~atio:ti ~:l}.sing C_itr ~ an t?~f , tq _·pr~test,
develelpments operated by the c1a discr1mmctt.1on ft{ t,he~puild.
ing trades. ·.
,
,
,
1 ·
msurance com~any.
Members , distl·itmte.d hal:fct~
Demonstration Oalled
bills announcing !lo rally SW\day
Madison Jones, ex~cut1ve d1'- at l:SO P .M: .. at _W-est _J{inney
rector of the 1:omm1ss~ot1, a nd and Broome streets and·a d~mFrank Lowe, vice president _of onstration .at 7 · .A.'.M". ~l.(onday
the company In charge of its at the site of . the n~ ,Eairr
housing, said that t alks would rin ·er lllgh School
w~r.e
continue nex t week and that. no wo~kets · th~·poJice an;t'pi<.~ets .
flnal agreement had beert clashed-~n J uly 3 .
"'
teached, _
'th '!!iokets marched' lJ1 fron1
But Bernard H. J ack_son of of cit ·Hall for two0 hotil's,
t he Bronx N ,A.A,C.P. said that be in '1f
at 2 P..1r1:., una.war e
a •·commitment" had been made th gt ~ . building · had' been
by t he company R!ld t ha,t a clo~ed be~e--Of th& heat.
planne<J demonstr~tion . at Its Police Director Domin)(lk 'A.
P arkche11ter housmg lil the Spina issued orders "to .make
Bronx, scheduled f o~ t oday, arrests if orderly plOkeilnK 'i s
had been called off l)y his group. not
, at ·the Jugli ·
h ,maintained'!
M d
1
.
. sc _oo . on -~Y-:,....,...._ __ ~,
number ot marchers at 3,000. N.A.A.C.P. contended had not
Elizabeth M ttu• Clll.led
Some advance reports had pre• h1 t'~d Negroes except for men
. 1al
s~~Jal,to TJ\~New:rorl!Tllllesdieted that 5,000 persons . would positions.
ELIZABE1r.H ;N.J., .. Jtilf 26
take part.
Goldwater's was sold last - The Ellzab'etb br:anch of fhe
Ma yor Mardian said most of1year to t he Associated Dry N.A.A.C.P. fo da -callod . m~ctt he demands in the proposed Goods Corpoution of New ing· f r- T ucii(!aY to :yal\lato dc1proclama tion were met when he tYork . TM Senat01··.s br othll!·. velopments --i1t it!, -ca~ai~n
established a H uman Relations 'Robe1·t Gold wa t er, who contm- again!5t 111lcgcd . discr iml ~n
ft ;
g143.215.248.55
f~! s:i::(a.%
bJ!rf~i~ts
11~r/~OUI~·,.
/a~..
?ff .
"
.,,...
1 "\
�Wltll 111r:egrs;nur
a,


'"J &e


Q~,,
.rr~p:ro-~rU'J: 'OC'O•t .rp;
L.l..ac& gcr,; --.
0
..,
--,., - - - -- ---,
,,a
-
" 0 ."':'::>'""'_"v . , -··':'·~ · tM Commission Jia:s. on_ .mm qo;n,: wa P!lJ _m ~m:, 9 ,"Y :'"i~"'J'· . :.tt;,i:c1;m=.rr,,.,-,,.,.. ..__.. J'.!: u~ . ~ -- - - - its practice of segregattrtg pli· neyme_n's rate. The percentage sion of its rl'!gional directm's, J effersons Who with sound jtldl;.
titn~ for two me!'ltings, have
'W ~ c6rit3:~ted the Govetn~t den.t_ ,_Qf ., t;h,e .,b1canc~ : ~a1~ · tp~ 1;
pil~ \\i'ho werl'! traflsported t~ rises as the- apprentice's train- are ..to. eri~orce the sta.nda:tds, fil@ii~ _and_ th ·. lorig _view p~t a
B JACK LANGGUTH
been genetally skepti?al _abo_ut [_PaU1 ,_F:annm) about. to.~~Y..S mee~g- w~ -~iie.ft,,bec~µs ~-;Gb
Y
the 15-member comm1ssom . .matcn; _¥,J'. Ero?lts said, put ch¥1g!Pg... a~~!~!Jd~s! !' !);,,, ~he; .,
otijer sch_o~s !,)e~use 0 !1cro~ Ing advances. The practical ef- Instructions are being pre• fiatiofi _togetherc. It needs [Hened conditions m tfie r 0
.
. pared to cover this. They will FY, L16yd] G&I'PisOfis who sttlbSpecial 10 TM N 6~ York Times
"The best thing' I cart say about hf was m W~shm~ton _a nd he un_io:QS -~011owmg T!J; ; 1!'-~t~g,,; ~f "
schools.
. . . :ect_of los~ of regiS t ratlon of _a be told to peTiodically survey' ~ornly and l'!verlastmgt exa.s- PHQIDNIX, Ariz..,_ July - 2_6~ -it" said one, ."is tliat . it is a did _not c5end . a rep~es~nf8:t}V:~· the, N~w: Jf;_fs~y )lu1fgin_g.:,~ . z
For three years, _st. Lows has progr~m. ~o~ld be to deny aP.- ap'prenticesliip programs in :per~te ~Ii! pe_opfe Ufltil tbey- a.ct Htindt'Ms ot_Ne~roes and ~h~tes to){enism group." .
. _We t;11d ,not Co!ltac~ . ~~n3:tor ,OQ11struc~~o1,1 3 • ~a,de,·: ,99~9:cu: ·:
taken Negro pupils from t_h~ prentices in. it wor"k opportum- their areas to ma){e sure of !6f Justice, but ft also needs Lin- ~archM ~Wo_ .and one•half miles
Compii.rties Nam~
aold'-1/~ter . because 1,t .w?uld her?; ~ar1iey .th,l,S r~~ fTT-.,wJMcg_1
er wded West End t o Unctowf" ties on ·Federal construction compliance. They also will be eo111s who· 'with ffla1ice ' toward m 100-degreee heat to~ay ·. to In their list of grievances, ha,ve )jeen a w~ste .o! out tm:~e, council leaders contended_ ili j
t,
ed schoois in , South S . i::,ou 5~ projects.
.
instructed to investigate cdfri- flone; with charity for an: with p1°otest ec_oildm~? dlscriminat10n N,A.A.C.P. leaders n&med spe- Tl:_J.e 1itor11 1s ,poh_cies w~re ho d1f- discrjmination did» not ~.x1st- ~
a white section. 'hiere th e Ne
·
.
.
plaints.
firfiiness in the right . . . bind agii,iiist rmnorlties.
cific companies. One long-stand- fer~.t when his family OW!1,ed the mdustr,y 31\d. fu.att :,;,Q\1.9~a
55
groes are taught by Negro The . new regulations, ; ued
k _ .
lip the rtatlon's wcJi.tft/1s.' We It was ttte ·first mass demort- ing ' target of the integrationists lt-:-"'no Negro clerks, no Negro hiring _cquld __I)ot ~i)~ .c_9n;5j~eJed.
teachers in classrooms separate by the Labor Deya:tme~t s BuT~ See ~pplicmits
. fieE!d both; we heed botlt simul- stration lh Arizona, t11e home was' the Motorola corporation, bookkeepers. lVIr. _Broo){s added:


.


_ · ~ ·_' , 5~.: _
fro those of the the wliit~. teau of Apprenticeship and The circular 1s~uea to?ay m- taneously."
.
state of Senator Barry _Gola- the city's largest employei:. :·We , und~rstand
S~nator l-nterior Fund, ,Bi IL Sign~d
Training, wm apply to the pro- structed the ~·eg10~al . dire?tors
·
·- .
watet, a pos~ible cont~n?e r f_d r N.A.A.C.P. leaders estimate Goldwater said in Washmgton WASHINGTON, July~S. (,AE)
6 New Schools Due
- taltls of about 9 ooo ·oint la· to make special efforts to se- h ·f R
-•
• .1
fk. the Flepubhcan Presidential that Motorola employs 15 Ne- that the march was a good
.
,
.,_
t.
A _;>ear tro_m S! ptem»er, t~e g .
'
J
- - cure q?lllified _a pplicants for rUer O IC<Jns- in r~orwa
nomination rtext year.
'
groes among a work force of thing. :fie means 'Be go~d lit• -~reside~t :R'enn~dy, sign~i -.•0 - op . ng of SIX n_ew s_Ghools I~ bo: manag~tn~t . ap:z:,r_entice _ apprenticesfiip ptclgrams ftom
Invited tc,
M
' etlng Seinatot Goldwater \Vi s not 4,975 persons.
' .
tie boys. You can march 1f yo11 day 11, $952,~5.,,5QQ ~pprsiil1~~-tht ~ Mt En<! may end, tern ship corru.mttee~ i~Volvmg some among minority ~roups.
IVIC e
invit€d to st!nd _repres~nta~lves Other companies names as wiµit to._ ~.othing's goihg. to -tion bill for t~e.,lnterior pepar~h
st
pot1,trly at lea , _t e need for 150,000 &pprentices.
Coh~t ru<Jtion muons and .9mspecial 10 Th• New York Tim..
to today's march, c1y11 . rights disc1iminating against Neg~oes come_of 1t.
rrtent. ' The-· tot~ Lis -$4!;,1552,~00 .
tMs-ttansfer program._ Ton. Toe crpening up of apportun- ployets objeoted to the new NORWALK C
than· :Mt ,ienrledy-teq_ueso.,
1 16 leaders said because Negroes Mexican-Americans and Indians Some restaurants also refus.e 1
st
1
Superintefid~t of Ifl ruc_i itles for Negroes to enter these standards mairtly ofi t he! g'roi.tnd
·
- do not con~ider him :;;ympa- were the Goodyear Rubber Com- to - ~erve
Negroes,
the ess
'
,

• onn., Ju Y
rd
Philip J. HiclH!y told t~~- boa
-. - .
.
.. th;i,_t tli~ mal{e the Ooverr'lriient A mass meet_ing to in1pro'va un- theHc to their cause.
pa.ny, Sperry-Rand and the Gen- ·N.A.A.9.P. officials . said. The ed. _fOf th_e d~p~rtn_len~ 5, ope53<·
th
0
0
on -wectnesday tha..t se:varal ~~ ~8:11's h_as b~en llig1l !1 e t~e firta1 judge of Who is quaJ- derstanding between local a.d- The march escort_ed lly city eral Electric Corporation.
city · officials are being asked_tiops, b1?-t $30,000,~0_0 .more -~
-,
hundred" (J.lf tM 4,600 _pupils t_o agend a_of civi~ ri?nts ~roups._
ifled for apprentk@shii;,
mmlstrlithte'-· agancies ·-;tnd this tMtorcyde polici!q1enJ w~s ·en- The Goldwater Departmentto investigate several.
· t~e,HouseLh4a1,o nJ1i)ll-Uiy vot~c;I. .
1
b& .t r~ferrect in tlie_ne1lt scll.Ool u:1~11!ed J6bs ar: !8-'P dl_Y ~h~y .also arg~!~ th~t the city's gr'owlftg PUeri:o :R{ciin ti rely ptiaceflil. The de!l;onstr~- Store; formerly · owned :by . the ~bout 4 p~r · cent of metro- Tl}.e ..b!U . J.i\Clµa~s: ,;5i ,P0O: ~~:r:
yea.r could be intl'!graled- w1 th varushi1lg Under the rmpact of new standards cont_~ifted "a Aug. 24
·
·
tors were met ol.!tside th!'! Mum- family of senato11 Goldwater.·pohtan Phoen1xts ·6.00,000 popu- prelilninary . -~ !Jr~ . on , ,~ fl:-.,.
ptipil~_ a.t six of ~el. _ s ch ools automation and 1JtMr forms of veiled quota sysU!m," They have M.
·
·
.
cipa.l Butidfng by Mayor Sam- was among the stores that the lation. is Negro.
museum in , WasJµ,itgtQi;t. ·.,:, .. ·,
re6eiving . th! trarts. ers."
" technol~ ·cal change. Negroes, cortslstent!y objected to any sys- .- _ayor -Frank. J , Cooke_ a.t- uel Mardiart Jr.
.
. ..
- .
- ..• . .·
Negroes_called this a. tok_e n
.
_gi
tern that would require accept- ianged the mMting: after_ a. .te- Led by the Rev. George . B.
and •.;tar from adequate" meas- wi th . an ~ne~~l?y_ment rate ing: a fixed percentage of Ne- cait cpnferel'i.M . with ~ilberto 13r6oks, . Negro I?resbyteria11
u'l'.e.-They threatenM ne\V clE!m- that 1s twice as h1gh as t~e groes,
Gl&m~h? of Hartford, field rE!P· minister who ts president of tjle
ostrations and court action general rate, face an economic A spokesman for the Build· resentative of tlie D~parttrt.mt Maricopa ~aunty chapter of the
if ,'t he board _acceP._te_d _!!:te. pl_a n. crisis unless .they can break ing ahd Construction Trades ot Labor of Puerto Rico.
National Association for .the
MF. Hickey sai? full -~s!Illlla- into skilled jobs in greater num- Department of the American ~r. Cai:nacho visi~eEI. the o!ty Advancement of Colored People,
tlon would be impossible be- b - t h th h
- th
t Federation of Labor and Con- to 1tivest1gate an ific1dent In the marchers gave the Mayor
cause of bus schetlt1les and_ dif- . e_rs . an_ -ey a:e
e pas ·' gress of Industrial Organiza• W?ich s_everal local Puerto and . other elty <lfflcfa ls a list
ferr nces between the ~ransport- Negro l@aders beheve.
tions said :
Ricans had_been art'e~ted_ after of grievances and a proposed
Construction Program
"We want to conform artd we a fracas with ,tM pohce in t11e city proclamation.
ed and the other pupils In a~e,
.
Size of March Disputed
numbers and achievement rec- Many apprenticeship pro· have conformed to the need for dowrttawrti bU_sines_s area.
ords.
.
n tructiott eliminating discrimination. We Those t!Vlted to the meeting The size and success of the th
to a permanent C>pen-~· ~rams lire m
~ co h~r also are atrl'..lcl that these !'egula• inl!lUd~ Police Chfef Max Or- march were disputed afterward.
rollment policy, t h!! Supetm- ~au str ~ _YHo~ev';:;·an~facturing tions will completely destroy' IWs and .th_~ Rev. John Gon- One .a! the participants, John ll:.
tend ~ t suggested that vacant a .e ~ n . . d
. _. .
_ tM yoltttttary appttffiticeshlp zales, a Span1:1h-speaking priest. Evans secretary treasurer of
seats Jn "active1' classrooms . be_ alt~~:1'~~!ms~a143.215.248.55er~s- provida sys~~m of many Yl!ai'il ~tand_Pu_e rt~ R._1can residents will the A~-izona American F'edera:
assiitned to students requestm~ that existing program?, to . re- Ing . - - - - - -- -_invited to attend the m eet- tion of . I.iabor ~d ~ongress of
traru,fers on a fi rs t-come flr 5t ta.ltl. their fedE!ral reg1stra tiort,
g - - -,---- - - lndustnal ·Orgamzat1ons, called
~eryed basis.
must pick apprcntioes on the Spanish Anthology on Way
.
._
,
the demonstration '_'a" damned
Plan l!;xcludes Vaca nt Rooms basis of merit a lone, unless the VANCOUVER, B. C. (Canadi·
l_:anadran Battles Cougar good thing for Phoem_x ._
.
. selections made otherwise show an press)-Prof. John A. McCAMPBELL R!VER 1 B. C. Others in the c!Vll rights
He ~xcluded vacant ~Jaso~ equality of opportunity.
Donald of the University of (Ca1_1adian Press)-R. W. Black rnovement were disappointed by
rooms m uncrowded ~ch<l\~ose
Programs th&t opera~e on a British Colurnbia has received of Redonda Island has asked the number of marchers, w_ho
th e grou~fh t~t fllhnftudents merit ba.sis must provide foi· a Cana da Council g rant to com- the Government to thin out the were estimated by the pohce
roorr;J w; ch · ef~tegratlon selection of apprentices, Mter plle a bilingual anthology of growing cougar population. Re• at 800. Threee hundred to 400
no a d 1
ents pay fuU and fair opportu,nty for ~p- Spanish poetry. He will spend cently he attacked a cougar onlookers were gathered at the
e propose
.,..r d that plicatiort, in accordance Wl.t_h a.. year visiting Cuba, Spain, With his bare fists to make it Municipal Building' for the
t ~~pio~tailon . st5 e~ owered objective standards that permit Mexico, Chile, Arger:itina, the drop his pet dog, but his MIP meeting with the Mayor.
at m~ s tra or1~ ets whose edu review.
United States and Bntam.
was too late.
Mr Brooks, however, put the
o r eJec a pp 1can
.
This calls for determinatior.
·
cational achievement was below of eligibility by specific requirethat of the class that ha d t h e ments so that questions of disempt y ~eats.
tftE Allt!QUARY
SIJ.'l'ALT!J.sc»l'T
1 cl'lmina tlon in ~ lectl.on can be
He said_su_ch a program wou d promptly adjudicated. It also
tHE ANTIOUAJ.Y
probably limit transfers to fewer calls for dissemination of inforthan 400 pupils next year.
matlon publicly about the availHe recommended that no bou ability' of &.pprentlceship 0 pporary changes be ma~e beca1:1sE! tu nitfes.
they would not be m keepmg
In situations where the pro·
with the city's general "neigh- grams sponsorl1 do not wish to
bo_rhood" policy of assigning adopt a merit system based on
each pupil to the school nearest objective standards tliat permit
hts home.
_
review, the regula tions provide
He opposed reassignment of t hat their selections must inteachers simply to furt her fac- elude a "significant" number of
ulty integration.
openings for members of minorThe board had lnst1'1:1cte~ the tty groups and make a good•
Nowl let VIASA: non-stop ~YC to Santo Domingo_and. Caracas SIUldays.at i
Superintendent to advise . it on faith effort to fill t hem.
each of the citizens committees'
N ew Programs Curbed
4:00 PM, NYC to Curacao and Caracas Tuesdays at 4:30 PM., non~top NYC to, :
recommendations, It was on Mr.
Caracas Thursdays and Saturdays at 4:30 PM. Also new on ViASA! Mlaff!I ~
Hickey's follow-up proposals th
The standards specify that
the board acted today. ,
programs applying for Federal
Kingston every Saturday. Regularly scheduled flights, ·still· in effect fro111
Both Sides Score Proposals
registration in t he futur e must
Miami to Curacao, Maracaibo and Caracas ••• and New .Orle~ns~tct ft!a,r;,.a cai~ While integrationtsts bitterly adopt the merit approach.
. and Caracas. Genuine hospitality, superb service, finest foods .and b-,verages,.
denounced hts proposals, white
They also specify t hat action
parents in South St, Louis criti- must be taken to offset t he
keynote all Convair 880-M flights on VIASA, the world's first alHe~ airljn~;
cized his limited open•enrollment effects of any previous pracsuggestions as going too far. tices under which discrimina"An appeasement measure to tory patterns of employment
,
social reformers," Chester A. resulted.
INTERNATIONAL AIRWAYS
.• l'
Under this requirement, proVirga, spokesman for the Public
,.
School Patron's Alliance, said, grams that have operated on a
Before t he board meeting merit basis or have enrolled Time stands still for this great Scotch Whisky. Your taste will prove its maturity,
For ftnt alasa or economy r••"•tfona and f r lnfOrmatlon oa .,.,......, pla , . · r.E\
Wednesday the alliance present :t\'"'egroes in significant numbers mellowness and subtle flavor are beyond compare. No Other whisky is as highly re• 110w In effec,t, •ee your Travel Agent Oi' call VIAIA, 8 W, SI Stred, CO'WUO. · ·
~
petitions, beartng sever al thou- would not have to t ake action. garded in England and Scotland •••All gOOd reasons to ask for THE "ANTIQUARY."
=
.
.
. .
• • •
- • • . ;: • .. .,,
.
s ~ signat ures, opposing fur- "Where these conditions a.re
86.8 P,:oof. Ca~'11o• fmpo ,ten . l1<f. fill!, '-"• N.,.,- fo ti ff
t her integration.
not met, application lists de- Costs a litt (e more, natlfrally,
It called o~ th~_b?ard_to e_nd paid a percentage of the jour- field staff, under the supern- it al_sd nl!'eds WMningtons ahd
-!" '
0
4
~
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PLUS NEW FLIG .'·S:·TO
MORE PLACES ON VIASA
i
~
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"All the r
That's Fit to
.,.
ow
4
VOL. CXII . . ..
(I)


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Weather Bureau Report (Page 30) torecasta:
Sunny, hot and humid
today and tomorrow.
Temp. range : 96-75; ye_sterday : 96-72.
Temp.-Hum. Index: low 801 ; yesterday: 83.
\_ _ _ ___:__~---~~:-:--::::-::--::-~--------:143.215.248.55iNCJWfS
NEW YORK; SATURDAY, JULY i7, 1963.
++
M
TEN CENTS
.) 1963 by The New York Times Company.
Times Square, New York 36, N. Y.
Devastates Skoplje, Yugoslavia; ATLANTA'S MAYOR KENNEDY AND KHRUSHCHEV .
east 400,!)ea,d;TollMay T op2,000 BACKSRIGHTSBILL CALL PACT ASTEP
PEACE,
'z e
TO
.,
,. , _,,, _, . .
ASHELPTOCITIE~
Secretary Summons Carrier
and Union Men to Parley
at Pastore Suggestion
Calls Public Facility Clause
Key to Averting StrifeSenator Praises Views
SENATOR HALTS HEARING
E xcer pts from M ayOT Allen's
t estimony are on Page 1.
Inquiry Into Kennedy's Plan
Recessed a Day to Let
/ Negotiators Try Again
CITY EDITION
u. s.
BUTNOT AWARPREVENTIVE
RUSSIAN CAUTIOUS Red China Expects PRESIDENT ONTV
Atom Arms Soon
Tells Nation Treaty Is
'Victory for Mankind'
but Not Millennium
T ex t of K ennedy's address
is printed on P age 2.
By TOM WICKER
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CLASS OF SERVICE
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unless its deferred char,
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WESTERN UNION
TELEGRAM
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P. MARSHALL.
SF-1201 (4-60)
SYMBOLS
DL= Day Lener
NL=Night Lener
LT-lntcrnotionol
- Letter T clcgram
PRllSIDENT
The filing time shown in the dote line on domestic telegrams is LOCAL TIME ot point of origin. Time of receipt is LOCAL TIME at point of descinncion
1049A 'EST JUL '27 6; AB0;4
A LLA212 PO ATLANTA GA 27 1038A EST
MAYOR IVAN ALLEN JR
CITY HALL ATLA
Atl)REW JACKSON SAID- "ONE MAN Wint COURAQE MAKES A MAJORITY"•
CONGRATULATIONS
WALTERS RICHARDSON
(45).
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TELEGRAM
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P. M ARSHALL.
PAK8 1D&N f
The filing time shown in the date line on domestic telegrams is LOCAL T IME at point of origin. Time of receipt is LOCAL TIME at po·
S16P EST JUL 26 63 AE481
~ LLA395 PO ATLANTA GA 26
750P EST
MAYOR IVAN ALLEN JR
3700 NORTHSIOE OR NORTHWEST ATLA
THE STANO YOU TOOK BEFORE THE CONGRESSIONAL COMMITTEE ON CIVIL
RIGHTS LEGISLATION WAS A COURAGEOUS ANO FORTtflIGHT OtE MY FAMILY
IS 0t£ AMONG MILLIONS OF AMERICANS WHICH SALUTES YOU FOR THIS
CONTRIBUTION
PRESIDENT FRANK CUNNINGHAM MORRIS BROWN COLLEGE
(15)•
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�CLASS OF SERVICE
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unless its deferred char•
acrer is indicated by the
proper symbol.
WESTERN
UNION
TE LE GRAM
1201 (4-<,0)
W. P. MARSHALL.
PRESIDENT
1%3 ,,,, _, ,
-
'
SYMBOLS
DL =Da y Letter
NL=Night Letter
LT-I n tern atio nal
-Letter Telegram
The filin g time shown in the date line on domestic telegrams is LOCAL TIME at point of origin. Time of receipt isl~C"~IE /?M,int
AA24 RA345
(37).
R DUA134 PD:DURHAM NCAR 26 136P EST:
-MAYOR I VAN ALLEN
JR=
- ATLANTA CITY HALL ATLA CG:
.
THANK YOU FOR MAYOR FOR INITIATING HIGH ECHELON .SOUTHERN
SUPPORT OF OUR PESIDENT:
ROYCE DOBBS:
THE COMPANY WILL APPR ECIATE SUGGESTIONS FROM ITS PAT RO N S CONCERN IN G ITS S ERVICE
�August 27, 1963
M r . Henry S. Jacobus
Secretary- T reasurer
Pollock Paper Company
Dallas , Texas
Dear Mr . Jacobus:
It wa a real pleasure £of me to receive
your letter of July 31. concerning my testimony
before the Senate Commerce Committee in
'?fashington.
I read your letter to my father, who
is now 87 and quit active , and he also took pride
in your commendation.
With appr ciation., I am
Sincerely yours ,
Ivan Allen, Jr.,
Mayor
~r/eo
�l
EXEC UTI VE O FFI CES
POLLOCK PAPER COMPANY
DALLAS
HENRY S . JACOBUS
July 31, 1963
S ECRETA RY-TREASU RER
Persona l
Mr Ivan .Allen, Jr .
c Io Ivan .Allen Co.
Atlanta, Georgia
0
Dear Mr. Allen
I have just read in the New York Times excerpts from your
t e stimony before the Civil Rights h earing in Washington and,
as a former resident of Atlanta, I hasten to congratulate you
on your stand. It takes a lot of "inte stinal fortitude" for a
Ge orgian to speak out as you have , particularly one in politics.
I knew your father in 1910 and 1911 b ecaus e I d eliver ed him
every week a Saturday Evening Post when the store was at
Marietta and Forsyth Streets.
I moved here from Atlanta in 1920. You no doubt know we
have a plant in Atlanta and have had for many years. Wh n
I am next there, I will try to come by to see you.
The City of Atlanta is indeed fortunate in having men like you,
Ralph McGill, and your pr edecessor, Mr. Hartsfield.
As you stated, Dallas and .Atlanta have accomplished many
things but we must be careful we don' t lose some of these
gains but continue to work with interested parties to improve
the situation wherever possible.
Sincerely yours
He nry S. Jae obus
hs
�August 27, 1963
Mr. Roscoe C . Edlund
Rogers, Slade and Hill, Inc.
Thirty East 42nd. Street
New York 17. New York
Dear Roscoe :
How nice it was for you to have written
on July 29, c oncerning my recent testimony be fore the Senate Commerce Committee.
It was a hard course to take. but one
about which I feel very strongly.
I often think of our good days in NSOEA
and I am looking forward to our as s ociation in
the future under the sam e pleasant conditions.
With highest personal regards, I a m
Sincerely yours,
Ivan Allen, Jr.•
Mayor
I AJr/eo
�•
R O G E R S,
S L A D E
CONSULTANTS
THIRTY
EAST
TO
FORTY-SECOND
MURRAY
AN
o
I N C.
MANAGEMENT
STREET
HILL
H I L L,
NEW
YORK
17,
N. Y.
2·2550
July 29, 1963
His Honor Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor of Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Ivan:
May I congratul a te you on your clear and courageous statement last week before the Senate Commerce
Committee? The progress which Atlanta has made in
this difficult problem is heartening to the entire
nation, and your plea to the Congress for realism
sounds just like the realistic chairman we had the
pleasure of serving in the NSOEA Survey Committee.
Since our NSOEA study we here have made an even
more extensive study for NSSEA, the National School
Supply and Equipment Ass oci ati on. The enclosed letter
from NSSEA indicates the fine reception given to our
Report -- and their Board and Executive Committee are
taking active steps of implementation of each of the
122 Recommendations the Report contained.
If ever an opp ortunity exists to serve you in any
aspect of your busy life -- public or business -- it
would be a privilege and a pleasure.
With great respect, and very sincerely
Roscoe C. Edlund
RCE : jo
Encl.
I
�August 27 . 1963
M rs . David E . Hein
125 Blackland Rd., N . W.
Atlanta 5, Georgia
Dear Virginia:
Your note of the 30th. concerning my
testim ony in Washington was gratefully received.
P lease consider that your note and
encouragem ent helped m e through a very difficult
p eriod.
Sincerely,
Ivan Allen, Jr.,
Mayor
IAJr/eo
�August 27, 1963
Mr . Jesse B . Blayton, Sr .
Pres ident
Mutual Federal Savings and Loan Association
205 Auburn A ve . , N . E .
Atlanta 3, Georgia
Dear Mr . Bla yton:
,I
Thank you so much for your kind note
of July 27, concerning my recent testimony before
the Senate Commerce Committee .
I am deeply grateful for your thoughtfulness in writing and support on this issue .
Sincerely,
Ivan Allen, Jr.,
Mayor
IAJr/eo
/
�1i
ut;ua/
Federal
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION DF ATLANTA
205 AUBURN AVENUE, N. E. • ATLANTA 3 1 GEORGIA • JACKSON 3•8282
2563 GORDON ROAD, S. W. • ATLANTA 10, GEORGIA • 753-2164
July 27,1963
Mr. Ivan Allen, Jr., Mayor
City of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Your testimony before the Commerce Committee of the United States Senate
yesterday in support of Senate Bill No.l 732 was strictly high class.
The thinking people of the south will long remember this appearance, and
call your name
11blessed11 .,
.As an Atlanta citizen, I am deeply proud of
my city and its chief executive.
urs sincerely,
... ~
resident
�I
'
~ . -CttS!f -C let-Ct'
.,....
�WILL GLI CKMAN
J uly 29, 1 963
Dear Mayor Al len :
You have s poke n
as a
man of conscie nc e a nd integrity .
No doubt y ou will be at t a cked vi ol e nt ly
by t h e ignor a nt a nd t he pre j udi c ed, but
I hope you will cont inue to re f lect
the
good a nd brave s pi r it tha t you ha ve
shown.
At lanta should be
proud of you .
Cor dially ,
141 Ea.st 55t h St reet
New York 22 , New York
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���730 24th St. Apt 403
Washington , D.C. 20037
July 29 , 1963
Mayor Iva n Allen , Jr.
City Hall
Atlant a , Georgia .
Your Honor,
What a joy it wast~ read your thoughtful - and f or a Southener,
cour ageous te sti mony in fav or of the proposed Na ticna l Civi l Ri ght s le g~sla tion.
I a gree with Sena to r Pasto r e wh en he s a id that you should be include d in
President Kennedy ' s Profiles of Courage. I am sure t hat wi t h peop le lik e you to
h elp t hat so me time in the f uture we ma ~r a ll salmh.e eour flag and when we
s ay " with liberty a nd justice f or a ll" we may n o longer n eed to su f f er the
knowl edge tha t , a t present this sta tement i s not true.
Man . t hanks f or y our h elp towa rds a bett er Americ a .
Sincerely yourr,
£. t~ !}~L
Edmund (Rb ohnson

�l
n
FIRST NATIONAL CITY BANK
399 PARK AVENUE , NEW YORK 22 , N . Y .
IN REPL Y
PLEASE QUOTE
F DO
July 29, 1963
'
'
Mr . Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor of Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgia
(
Dear Mr. Allen; '
I
Please permit me to compliment you upon your excellent
statement before one of the Congressional Committees last
week. It took a lot of courage to make this forthright and logical
statement. I believe your statement will materially improve
the chances for passage of the anti-s e gregation legislation .
May I wi s h you continued succ e ss in your excellent
administration of one of our most forward-looking cities in th e
Unit e d Stat e s.
Sinc e rely yours ,
F . D. O ve rfelt
Assista nt Vice Presid e nt
�OzE
ENOCH HORTON
1970 WALTHALL DRIVE.N . W .
ATLANTA 18 , GEORGIA
July JO,
1963 .
Hon . Ivan i llen , Jr.,
City I all,
Atlanta , Geore ia .
De ar "ir . Allen:
In the certainty t hat you will re c eive a great
deal of adverse criticism because of your testimony
before the Congressional Committee consi de ring civil
rights leg islation , we are writing to assure you of
our supp ort in your efforts to contribute some
sanity and morality toward the solution of our racial
problem . · ·e are convinced that the s,vift deterioration of relations be t ween the rac es will lead the
nation to catastrophe , if strong a ction is not forth coming to reverse the trend.
, ith appreciation f or your understanding and
courage , we are
u;~
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or on
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�155,4 South Wes tern Avenue
Los Angeles , Ca li f ornia 90006
Jul y . 2 7~' 1963
The Honor able I van Allen . J t\·
Mayor of t he City of At lanta , Georgia
Atlant a, Georgia
Si r :
At lanta, t he South and the Nat ion are f ortunate to h ave
a man of Jour- GQUrage and humanene s s among their leaders.
Your t estimony b efor e t he Congressional Committee exempl if i ed these and other f i n e qual i t i es that make lib erty lovi ng Amer icans proud.
I sal u t e your s t a tesmanshi p and wi sh y ou Godspeed .
r7~
ctfu~ours ,
Grayson
��UNIVERSITY OF' SOUTH CAROLINA
COLUMBIA
July 30, 1963
Department of International Studies
Mr. Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor of Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mr. Allen:
I have just read the New York Times account of your
appearance before the Senate Commerce Committee last Friday
and I wish to take this opportunity to congratulate you for
your courageous statement B.Ild to commend you very much for
speaking out on the President's civil rights proposals. It
was certainly very refreshing to read your statement, especially
coming from the mayor of one of the great cities of our country
and the largest in the southeast.
Again, my congratulati ons .
I am
Sincerely yours,
~ t o.~
Raymond A. Moore
Assistant Professor
RAM:cg
�6108 IC1mba:rrk Avenue
Chica go 37, r 111no1s
.ruly 29, 1963
Mayor ,-van Allen. Jr.
gtlanta, Georgia
T wa nt to comme nd you
for your support of the Civil Rights nill now
before congress. Tread about your endorsement of this bill in your testimony before the
senat e commerce commission.
T recognize of cours e th5t the proposa ls
of president Kennedy won~t go very far and will
be only a short step forward. But they represent an important step, and a s t ,ep we should
take now.
r have read about the progress you have
been making in t.la nt.a. in this area of civil
rights. fhis progress is evidence of intelligent leadership.
T know y6 u have been reading about the
racial demonstrations here in Chicago. Tve
have abolished certains forms of segregation
but it seems to be all the stronger in other
areas • . have to go through the agony here
in the Norrth, just as you do in the south .
�BARCLAYS BARCLAY
COUNSELORS AT LAW
MAIN 8 WARD STREETS
HIGHTSTOWN, NEW JERSEY
PHONE C609J 448 - 2100
ALBERT C. BARCLAY
ALBERT C. BARCLAY, JR.
July 30, 1963
Mayor Ivin Allen, Jr.
Atlanta
Georgia
Dear Mayor Allen:
As an advocate of civil liberties, permit me to congratulate you on
your courageous, intelligent and realistic statement made before the
Senate Commerce Committee in Washington last week.
It takes great courage, I am sure, for an elected Georgia official to
take such a forthright stand.
What this country needs is more men of your caliber in public office.
sail
Albert C. B a re 1a
ACB/dyd
�.,.
July 30, 1963
The Editor
The Atlanta Constitution
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Sir :
Having ju t re d the courag ous and forthright statement on civil
libertie made by your Mayor. lvin Allen, Jr • • before the U. S.
Senate Commerce Committe , I hasten to congratulat e the people
of Atlant on their selection.
Mayor Allen has
dded greatly to the stature of Atlanta, and it is
his forthrightness and astuteness .
hoped that the p ople will appreciat
Again, congratul tion .
Sincerely,
Albert C ~ B relay
ACB/dyd
�,,.
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2. y "2 \ ~ ClA(:c.• • ._;:4t.. S>~
,
.
-
��July 29, 1963
Mayor Ivan Allen9 Jr.
01 ty Hall
Atlanta., Ga.
Dear Sir:
. Congratulations on the forthright s tand you took before
the Commerce Committee in Washin~ton last week! Knowing that
your mail will be heavily loaded with v1tuoerat1ve abuse, I
hope that among these letters you will find these few short
lines of appreciation from a fellow American.
I s~lute your coura.p;e !
Sincere l y,
Frank C. Goodrich
530 The Alameda
Berkeley 7, Calif.
��DR. ALFRED A. WEINSTEIN
849 PEACHTREE STREET , N. E.
ATLANTA 8, G EO RGIA
August 1st, 1963.
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.,
City Hall,
Atlanta, Georgia.
Dear Mayor Allen:
I would like to compliment you on your
splendid presentation before the Congress, i n support of the President ' s program for Civil Rights. /
Q,el
./
I gm grateful to you personally, for your
statements,f'Dd there are many of my friends/ and I
who stand ready, willing and able to helpL6u wit~our
minds, our brains, and our checkbooks inq:>olitical
It is my hope that you wil l have an
campaigns.
ext ended term of s ervice as our Mayor for many decades.
Sinc~relt ' /) A-1/ d,
~ /7:~ ~-tf/~
~ A . WEINSTEIN, MD.
mp
�MRS. EARL F. MYERS
5043 MAYWOOD AVENUE
LOS ANGELES 41, CALIFORNIA
31 July 63
Mayor Iv.an Allen, Jr.
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mayor Allen:
I read in the July 27 issue of the NEW Y RK TIMES
of your appeal to Congress to pass the President's
Civil Rights bill.
I wish to congratulate you on your stand and to let you
know that many of us "northerners" share the view that
when equality before the law becomes a reality the Negro Is best friend will be found belo w the Mason-Dixon
line.
I particularly liked your expressed views on the
Supreme Court. I, too, have a schoolgirl's reverence
for the Court and believe that in our present civil
rights struggles legislation must lead the way for
the expanding heart and the opening mind.
Kno wing full well ho w your hands must be filled with
the exigencies of your high office, nevertheless I am
brash enough to hope that perhap s I may have the
pleasure of hearing from you sometime in the future.
Again I salute you. When that happy dawn breaks when
racial strife in the United States will be a thing of
the past, you and your worthy neighbor Ralph McGill , can
well bask in the ensuing sunshine.
Sincerely,
Marye Myes
�DISTRICT THREE
ORGANIZED IN 1913
-
HOME OF'F'iCE
-
WASHINGTON, D. C.
JOHN MCINTOSH, SECRETARY
L. C . MOMAN. F'RES!DENT
703 W. 45TH ST,
1731 IL.UNOIS ST.
SAVANNAH , GEORGIA
.JACKSON VI LLE 9, FLORIDA.
L
H. H , THOMAS, V I CE•PR~SIOENT
G.
LOCKHART, TREAS URER
816 WEST END AVE . , S. W.
SiU5S PARSONS S T . S . W.
ATLANTA 10, GEORGIA
ATLANTA 14, GEORGIA
955 Parsons St. s.w.,
Atlanta 1 I4 Ga.,
July Ju, I963e
Mayor Ivan Allen
City Hall,
Atlanta,Georgia.
Jr.,
My dear Mr. Allen;
May I take this opportunity to congratulate you for your
forthright testimony before the Commerce Committee of United States
Senate in Washington n.c.,recently and the f ine words spoken in behalf
of the local Negro and white leadership in attempting to solve our
manifold problems .
We know that it took courage of the hignest order to speak
out as you did and one of the syndicated columists said that Mayor Al_len Jr.,of Atlanta broke the patteDm1of southern antagonism to Pres ident
Kennedy ' s civil rights program Friday by urging Congress to outlaw racial
dis~~nation in restaurants , hotels , and other private businesses."
Further· as a city we have made much progress under your administration as M,yor of all of the people of greater Atlanta , and before the
end of your regime ,we are confident of making further gains as a cosmopolitan center .
I n reviewing the results of the mayoralty ra.ce,we were pleased
to note that our Seventh Ward gave you a total of II,235 votes,and the
city-wide total of votes for your candidacy was 64,227 votes . ·
Please accept this note as a token o~ our appr eciation,and
again may I say, -"Thank you Mr . Mayor", for your fine support of the
public accommodatimns section of the Civil Rights Bill now before
The Congress.
We beg to remain
files .
Harold H. Thomas,Leader
Pr ecinct D, Seventh Ward.
�SAMUEL ROTHBERG
AT LA N T A
BI LT M O R E
ATLANTA, GEORGI A
July 31, 1963.
n ear Ivan:
i,Jhen The Ti mes g ives any one a ful l column on the first
p age - a two-column hoto and another co lumn on page 7,
he's "g ot it made. 1 1
I am very p roud of y ou! In fact, my sister, Peggy
Gidding in Plainfield, New Jersey, wrote me h ow much
she was i mpre ssed, not only by what you said, but the
mann er in which you s o cl early expressed your t hinking.
Keep up y our efforts to l e t Washing ton know your views.
They need more men with y o ur courag e to make them "see
the lig ht• II
This is a rather t a rdy word of congratulat ion on the
s plendid t a lk y ou g ave at the Ann u a l Meeting of the
Commer ce Club. It went ove r nicelye When a g roup of
solid business men stand to show their appreciation of
as eech, y ou k now it meant a lot to them.
Do not ~et d iscouraged.
Some folks will not agr e e with
your thinking.
Do not let tha t bot h er y ou in the least.
I look for big thing s for y ou in y our p olitic a l life in
the future .
Kindest per sonal reg ards.
s
Mayor Ivan Allen , Jr .
Atlanta , Geor g ia.
CC:
SR : H
Peggy Gidding.
�Qlo-lumhia 'mfrto-lo-gical ~tmittttll!
Jilt ,atur. ~ t .o-r gin
OFFICE OF THE P RESID E N T
July 30, 1963
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
City Hall
Atlanta 3, Georgia
Dear Ivan:
This is just a note to express my personal appreciation for your clear-cut
and courageous statement concerning civil rights legislation before the committee of the United States Senate l ast week.
It is refreshing to have a Southern political leader make this kind of statement for a change, and I am proud of you for your stand.
Wishing you continued success and usefulness as a public servant and with
personal esteem and every good wish, I am
Cordially yours,
J. McDowell Richards
JMR/jct
�July 31, 1963
Hon. ·Ivan Allen
Mayor, City of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mr. Allen:
Your testimony in behalf of the pending civil rights legislation
deserves a note of audible support from all those who share your
viewpoint. It is with distinct pleasure that I applaud your
statement . Your courage and willingness to face the outcry of
many is to be commended.
It has been said that all that is needed for evil to take over
is that good men do nothing. I think your stand for what you believe is right is one of the most encouraging signs i n our nation.
May I share my view in brief? I fear many are losing s ight of
the forest because of the trees . Debate is being turned away f rom
the basic question of whether Negroes will be given ful l rights
as citizens to a side issue on property . It is good to have a
public discussion on property because t here are some genuine
reasons for i t , but unf ortunately in t he present context it is
mostly a red herring.
It is being said t hat a man 1 s business property is like his home .
Only in a sense is t hat true. Business property depends on t he
communit y for survival. Conversely t he community depends upon t he
business proper t y for i t s survival. Business property and the
community are i nter dependent.
Recognizing t his fact the government already regulates businesses
/ and their clientel e. For examples: A liquor store owner cannot
sell t o mi nor s ; zoning laws will not allow unrestrict ed business
pr operties , nor will i t permit hodge-podge expansion . Along the
same line the government even s ei zes properties by expropriation
through the power of eminent domain when the publ ic 1 s interest
dictates it . Therefore I see not hing of the government overstepping its bounds if it chooses to pass the public accommodations
law.
My best wishes to you. My fel l ow worker, Miss Frances Furlow
said she wants to add an 11amen 11 to what you said in . Washington!
<1:1cer;z , ~-t:- ,
c ~~
A.
Ki:1; ~
�r
CITY OF ATLANTA
PAUL WEIR
Gener al Manage r
DEPARTMENT of WATER WORKS
J. H. BULLARD
Maintenance and Distribution Division
J . D. VAUGHN
A s st. Superinte nde nt
651 -14th Street, N. W .
M. D. BRACKETT
Atlanta 18, Georgia
July 30, 1963
S~ e ri n t e nde nt
Offl ce Manag er
T e l. TRinity 3-342 1
Mayor Ivan Allen Jr.
Mayor's Office
City Hall
Dear Mr. Mayor:
This is a fan letter.
I have just read the newspaper account of your speech to the Senate
Committee, and I just have to write and tell you how proud I was and
am that you are our Mayor.
That speech was one of the greatest appeals to reason that I have
ever read. I am sure that many of Atlanta's citizens feel the same
way. Right now we need all the forsight and reason we can get to
deal with things as they are, so we are lucky to have you in the
Mayor's office.
I admi t that when I first learned that you were the next elected Mayor,
my first feeling was relief that it wasnt going to be Lester Maddox.
I was deathly afraid h e was going to be elected , and having known him
and his views for many years, I saw citizens of Atlanta shooting at each
other in the streets.
Since you have been our Mayor I have been more and more impressed with
what I can only call your plain good sense. You have more courage than
I have. I have hated segregation all my life, but have said nothing that
would call down criticism and unpleasantness on myself. I know this is
moral cowardice, and confess it, but I just like to get along with people.
I saw you on television, and hearing you in the Committee room and knowing
the whole country was hearing you, I swelled with pride fit to burst .
That row between Senator Pastore and Senator Thurmond tickled me to death .
I am just a city Clerk-Typist at the Water Works, but I wanted you to know
that I am one white citizen that feels as you do.
I'm proud of you Mr. Mayor.
I mean it.
Sincerely and respectfully,
,m ~Lc~~
Mildred Callahan
"ATLAN TA GRO WS WHERE WATER GOES"
�MUNICIPAL REFERENCE LIBRARY
CITY HALL
CLEVELAND 14 OHIO
A DIVISION OF THE
CLEVELAND PUBLIC LIBRARY
LEE WACHTEL
MUNICIPAL REFERENCE LIBRARIAN
August 9, 1963
The Hon. Ivan Allen, Jr.
yor of the City of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgi.a
My
dear Mayor Allen:
The Manchester Guardian Weekly of August 1,
1963 reports part of your testimony before the Senate
Commerce Committee of this (Congress.
May I congratulate you on the fine statement
which you made before this Committee. It is ironical
that a British newspaper gave this much greater space
than our local newspapers here in ·C leveland.
Sincerely yours,
_£;;?

L~
chtel
Li brarian
LW:ek
�I
UN IT ED LIBERAL CHURCH
ROOM 26l , 1145 PEACHTREE ST REET , N. E.. ATLA NTA 9 , GEORG IA,
I
TEL. 872-9887
UNITARIAN
UNIVERSALIST
August 5, 1963
The Honor abl e Ivan Allen, Jr •
•ayor
City of tlanta
City Hall
Atlant a , Georgia
Dear
ayor Allen:
By vote of The Boar d of Trustees, we wish to convey our deep
appre ciation to you for the intrinsic rightness of your feelings
on the Public Accomodations legislation, and for t he courage to
express these feelings so publicly and so eloquently .
We , among Eany others (of which only a small percentage may make
their support known to you), are pleased an' encourage by your
thoughts and action in this vital natter . Even tho se who nay
isagree must, certainly, be mpressed by your sincerity and
forthrie}1.tness . Perhaps t his is one of those rare instance s when
the "right" thing is also the politically expedi ent thing . We
hope so .
Our grateful good wishes for your continued good work .
C • Ad]_e r, Pro sident
for The Boa
of Trustees
UNITED LIBERAL CHURCH
(Unitarian-Univers" list)
OF ATLANT
HC, / a.fs
SUNDAY SERVICES 10:30 AM
1176 TENTH STREET, N .E.
EUGENE PICKETT, MIN ISTER
�Nrbrasku §nrirty
OF THE
Sons of the American Revolution
Board of Managers
Officers for 1963-1964
Lowell R. King, Lincoln
Lynn G. Barnes, Omaha
Harmon M. Turner, Lincoln
Frank H. Binder, Omaha
E. Forrest Estes. Lincoln
F. E. Borchers, Omaha
Carl M. Davidson, President
Earle V. Conover, Senior Vice President
Harold C. Elliott, Junior Vice President
Henry Miot Cox, Historian-Registrar
Rev. Earle V. Conover, Chaplain
H. M. Cox, Secretary-Treasurer
1145 North 44th Street
Lincoln 3, Nebraska
(Tel.: 466-2761)
Sterling F. Mutz, Past President General
Ralph S. Moseley, National Trustee
August 19,1963
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mr. Allen:
I enclose the editorial page from the Lincoln Sunday Journal and Star
for August 18. The tribute paid to you in the column, "More or Less
Personal," is fully aeserved and Mrs. Cox and I as natives of Georgia
are glad to add our word of appreciation to that of the editor.
ertry M. Cox
1145 North 44th Street
Lincoln, Nebra ska 68503
NATIONAL SOCIETY: ORGANIZED APRIL 30, 1889; INCORPORAT ED BY ACT OF CONGRESS
NEBRASKA SOCIETY: ORGANIZED APRIL 26, 1890
�JAME S M . D A BB S , PRESI D E NT
ALBE R T W. DEN T, V I CE P RE SI DE N T
MARIO N
A . WR I GH T , V I C E - P RES I D ENT
JOSEPHINE WIL K IN S, V ICE -PRESI D E N T
RUFU S E . CLEMENT, VI CE- P RE SI DENT
JOHN H. WHEEL E R, CHAIRMAN
E X ECUTIV E COMM ITT EE
JOSEPH HAAS , CO U NSEL
LESLIE W . DUNBAR , E XECU TI V E DI R ECT OR
July 30, 1963
The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor of Atlanta
Georgia
Dear Mr. Allen:
I'm sure you don't need me to tell you how many people
appreciate your splendid performance before the Senate
Commerce Committee last week, but I can't restrain my
admiration. I think your representations were intelligent, eloquent and persuasive, and a good thing for
the country.
I understand you gave this audacious, statesmanlike
and businesslike ( in a rare and unusual sense) testimony against a good deal of solid, if backward looking,
advice. If this is the case, my compliments are ardent,
indeed. So this is to thank you for a lot of us in
Atlanta.
Sincerely,
Margare t Long
ML/mg
�THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY
138 SPARKS BUILDING
UN IVERSITY PARK, PA.
July 28, 1963
College of Liberal Arts
Department of German
Mayor Ivan Allan, Jr.
Atlanta, Ga.
Dear Sir:
Your testimony before the Senate Commerce Committee
as reported in the Saturday issue of the New York Times
was the most heartening piece of news in this sorry controversy.
Your forthright stand and clear logic gives real
encouragement to all who wish to see all Americans enjoying those basic political and humanrights that most
of us in this good land take for granted.
A good deed done or a courageous stand taken carry
their own rewards, but may you also be assured that many
in this community - and all over the land - share my
whole-hearted approval and admiration for your stand and
the way you said what you did.
Sincerely yours,
~c
Verner F. Striedieck
Assoc. Prof. of German
Pennsylvania State University
University Park, Pa.
�AMERICAN
FRIENDS
SERVICE
COMMITTEE, INC.
41 Exchange Place, S. E., Atlanta 3, Ga.
Em ployment
0 11
M erit Program
TELEPHONE
523-4451
NOYES COLLINSON, Direct or
SoutheaJJem Regional O/fica
1818 S. Main St.
High Point, N. C.
30
July
1963
Honorable Iva n Allen, Jro
Mayor, City · of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georg ia
Dear Ma y or Allen:
It is wi th inestima b le plea sv~e t h at I dro p y ou this
note o f commen dat i on on the forthri ght p osition your
testi mony on t h e civil ri ghts bill will reflect.
As we re a d yo ur pre p are d testimony a nd the Ne w York
Times' re p orts upon y our replies during t h e colloquy,
we we r e i mpressed with t h e dif f erence between a statesman a nd a p ol i tician. We salute yo u a s a statesman
imbue d wi t h a f i r m u n de rstand i n g o f t he moral va l u e s
underl ying the civi l r igh ts iss u eso
I f you c an p oss i b l y f i nd a te n - mi nu t e bre a t hin g spac e
in your Wednesday (Ju ly 31) s che dul e, r wo u l d be g rateful for the o ppo rtun ity of a brief coa c hing s e ssi on with
you .
I am to a ppear befor e the Senate Sub- Committe e on
Employment and Manpower of the Labo r and Public Welfare
Committe e to g ive testimony in support of S 773 and
S 1937 ( the Clar k and Humphrey Bills, respe c tively) o
My prepared te s timony has a l ready been pla ce d i n the
committee ' s han ds .
I am advise d that I am to g i v e o ral
testimony and parti c ipate i n a c o l loquy fo llowing it .
Since this is my maiden f l ight be f ore the aug ust Senate,
I could profit from a brief c onfere n ce with you who have
acquited yourself s o well o n thi s l ates t and earlier
occasions before the Senate o
Sincerely yours,
Collinson
NC: sjs
-
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - AT N ATI ONAL H EADQUARTERS - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - •
HENRY J. CADDURY, Honorary Ch,1ir111t1n

C L ARE NCE E. P ICKETT, Executive SccreltlfY Emeritt1s
e
COLIN \'(/. B EL L, Exocmivc SccreJary
H A RoLo EVANS, Chairman
�ALVIN G . BUSBY, B . D • • MIN I STER OF ADMINISTRATION
Peachtree Christian Church
PEACHTREE STREET AT SPRING
ATLANTA 9, GEORGIA
July 27 ~ 19 63
The Honorable I van ~llen
City Ha ll
Atlanta ,· Ga . 30303
Dear !'r . .Al en,
Jut a not to state that I think
stand before t e enate nd that
.iy voice here in the South isn't
see many people an periodically
of my contacts I will deligent
yo1 made a brave and c ourageous
I
behind you al l of the ·wa: •
very powerful, but I do get to
I do some preachiJJ.E; and in all
sup ort the stand you have made.
Al though I come from llashi ngton State , I have grown t o l ove Atlanta
and the many fi ne people in this city. ~en uch as yourse. ves ha •e
~iven me more confidence in the South and it s people than_ ever
thought possib e. Your courage in face of the bitt er and cynica
obstacles amazes me, and I must admit it al o baffles me. God
Bless ou. My rayers and thoughts are wit h you and I wish I
could figure out more constructive ways to put my actions behind
you also.
One of the ways we are hoping to confront our youth with an objective
way of ookin3 at these problems is by a Youth Week with its theme:
Jan Against Himself--a study of race relations. I believe our
Minister of Education. asked you or one of our staff members to
speak to us dur · n this week. I do hope it wi 11 be pos ible for
you to come and be with us. These fine children are often confused by the conflicting claims of diverse opinion ad need to be
lead to take 8 constructive stand on this vitally im ortant isste.
Again I want to comnend you for the posit ion you took and are takinG
on the Race Issue .
Sincerely,
~ )) . ~
Alvin G. Busby
7
�GEORGIA COUNCIL ON HUMAN RELATIONS
41 EXCHANGE PLACE, S. E.

ATLANTA , GEORGIA
30303
..
THE REVEREND CHARLES DEMERE
CHAIRMAN
TEL E PHO NE
!5215- 6468
DR . LIONEL NEWSOM
MRS . FRANCES PAULEY
FIRST VICE- PRESIDENT
EXECUTIVE DI RECTOR
MR. A. J. MCCLUNG
THE REVEREND OLIVER W , HOLMES
SECOND VICE- PRESIDENT
ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR
MRS. HARRY V . RICHARDSON
SECRETARY
MR. JOHNNY GLUSTROM
TREASURER
July 26, 1963
Mayor Ivan Allen
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear :Mr. Mayor:
Congratulations for making the announcement in the paper
today that you would speak for the Presidents Civil Rights
proposal. Such positive remarks will ease the tension in
our city.
Best wishes for your success.
Sincerely yours,
f~~
p~
Mrs. Frances Pauley
FP:es
....
�The Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity
ROOM
200 ,
5
FORSYTH
STREET,
N . W ..
ATLANTA
3 ,
GEORGIA
e
JACKSON
July 26 , 1963
'
·,I
The Hon. I van Allen
City Hall
At l antap Ge orgi a
Dear Mr. Allen :
Just ~ brief wor d -not requiring any
a cknowledgement fr om you- t o thank you for your t estimony
today in support of the Pr esident's Civil Ri ghts l egisl ati on. Rest assured that there are many white Atl ant ans
as well a s Negroe s who are proud of you and gr ateful f or
your leadership.
On another sub j e ct , I hope that t he day
her e ha s passed wit hout t he arrival in At lanta of threatened
obstruc t i onist demonstra t i ons of the l ying- down- in-the-stre et
variety which we a r e b eginning t o see el sewhere 11 particularly
in the North . Such were considered by Negr o student l ead ers
I understand. While support ive of di rect a ction pr ot est of
the now more traditional s ort, and having been involved in
such in va r i ous situations, I do not think that the dif fus ed,
non-directed, and, as I call it, "obstructionist 11 type of
protest is needed or effectiveo If I can be of any service
anytime in setting thi s perspective forward, a s one who has
himself beefa involved i n direct action othe:n-.ri.se, I shall
be happy to be availableo
The Rev. John B. Morr is
Executive Director /
PSALM IJJ
5 - 7975
�THECJDCJR F . HIRSCH,
MARYCJN T. HIRSCH ,
PRESIDENT
SECRETARY
MARYON HOSIERY MILL 1 Inc.

=====================--! !-:====================-- 'J h
I!
23 Ht in C 'ta ft~ man~ hip
CARROLL TON, GEORGIA
7-29-63
MR.IVAN ALLEN, J'R.,
MAYOR,
CITY OF ATLANTA_,
CI TY HALL,
ATLANTA, GA.
DEAR MR .ALLEN:
WE THOUGHT YO U 1 D BE INTERESTED IN SEEING
THE ATTACHED CL I PPING, FROM THE NEW YORK TIMES.
THE MANY,MANY THOUSA N~S OF GEORGIA
MOD ERA TES
WHO FEEL AND TH INK AS Yo u;; 0 WERE . V E R y,
V E R Y PROUD OF YOUR PERFORMANCE ON CAPITOL HILL,LAS T WEEK.
· OVER THE LONG PULL,
MEN SUCH AS YOURSELF
WILL PREVAIL · , AND OUR COUN TRY WILL
GO FORWARD AND
NOT BACKWARD•
AND WE ARE
WE ARE INDEED GRATEFUL To YoU,MR.AL LEN,
,,WITH Yo u,. ALI/THE WAY ! ,,
WITH ALL GOO D WISHES,
SIN CERELY YOURS,
TE~
.,
MAR'YON HOSIERY MI LL, IN C.,
CARR OLLTON, GA.
TFH:
AT
�CAMP HIGHLAN D , R. F . D . ND . 1. S M Y RNA , GA .
72 E DG E WOOD AVENU E, NORT HEAST
PHYL L I S WHEAT L EY BRAN C H , 599 TATNALL S T .. 5 . W.
ATLANT A , GEORGIA
August 8, 1963
The Honorabl e Ivan Allen
Mayor of Atlanta,
City Hall
Atlanta 3, Georgia
Dear Mr . Allen :
How p roud I was to be a citi zen of Atl anta when I read your presentati on to President Kennedy's Committee on Civil Ri ghts!
There a r e many of us who feel that whenever the rights and
privileges of any one group of people are denied, the right s of others
are in jeopardy.
We believe that when a business is 11 open to the public " , it
should mean all the public, not just "white public", Protestant public ",
et cetera .
It is certai nly connnendable when local connnunities desegregate
voluntarily, as Atlanta has done in some instances . However, this Federal
action seems necessary to enable all to move forward in this regard.
The Young Women's Christian Association, of which I am President
in Atlanta, has long been working to help build an appreciation of the
dignity and human rights of all people, regardless of race, creed, or
color .
We admire your courage and will continue to support your
efforts in behalf of our city.
Sincerely,
Mrs. Edward L. Askren
President
LMA/lb
�MOTOR HOT EL
Spring Street at Carneg ie Way
At lanta 3 , Georg ia
Telephone 688- 8600 • Area Code 404
Mar v in C . Go ldste i n ,
Pres ident
August 6, 1963
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
City of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta 3, Georgia
Dear Mayor Allen:
Just a note to let you know I was indeed proud of your
fine stand on Civil Rights taken in Washington last week. I just
returned from a trip to Europe and my secretary had your statement on my desk, Although I feel that there must be many changes in the public accommodations law as it is presently written
in order to preserve our democratic rights and ideals, I feel that
your statement generally was a courageous and just one and I want
to compliment you upon having made it for the people of our City.
You know that I am most pleased to try to cooperate
with you whenever possible.
With all good wishes,
MCG : ef
" IN THE CENTER OF DOWNTOWN ATLANTA"
'
-~
Free In - Hotel Parking , Swimming Pool and Sun Deck , Convention Facilities, Golden Palm Restaurant
�~niuerziilJ of ~otre ~rune
~.otre ~ame, .'.Jlnmana
July 27, 1963
_ ~•pnrhn•nt nf ji;ncinlnsl!
His Honor, the Mayor
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mayor Allen :
Having read excerpts from your recent testimony befor e the Senate Commerce
Cormnittee, I s hould like to express my gratitude and admiration for your
courageous and reasonable stand on the elimination of discrimination from
public acconnnodations. I devoutly hope that mayors in o ther cities, in the
Nor th as well as in the South, will be guided by your example.
I wish you well in your work, Mr. Mayor, and I trust that this brief note
of appreciation will help to counterbalance the bitter criticism your
statement is bound to elicit.
Sincerely yours,
Robert H. Vasoli,
Assistant Professor
�SMITH, KILPATRICK , CODY, ROGERS
&
M~CLATCHEY
HURT BUILDING
MARTIN E. K ILPATRICK
WELBORN B . COD Y
ERNEST P. ROGERS
DEVEREAUX f". M~CLATCHE Y
L O UIS REGENSTEIN 1 JR .
HARRY S. BAXTER
A.G . CLEVE LAND, JR .
GEORGE B . HALEY 1 JR .
BAR RY PH I LLI PS
TH OMAS C. SH ELTON
HARR Y J . MEHRE,JR .
W IL BU R B RA NCH KING
HARO LD
HIR SCH
11681 - 19 .3 9 1
ATLANTA 3. GEORGIA
MAR I ON
SMITH
(168 4 - 1947)
A . STEVE CLA Y
11905 ·1 9 4 :S/
HAROLD E . ABRAM S
M I L ES J . A LE XAN DER
W ILLI AM W , COWAN
THOMAS E . JOINER
THOMAS B. BRANCH 1 III.
RICHARD A . NEWTON
D. LURTON MASSEE, JR.
EMM ET J, BONDURANT
JEFFERSON DAVIS, JR.
JAC KSO N
2 •7420
July 29, 1963
The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor of the City of Atlanta
City Hal 1
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Ivan:
I want you to know that I am very
proud of your act in testifying before the
Senate Commerce Committee. This was a fine
and courageous thing to do.
Yours,
~
Loui s Regenstein,
Jr.
LR: 1kb
j
�UNIVERSITY
GRADUATE
SCHOOL
PITTSBURGH
OF
PITTSBURGH
OF
PUBLIC HEALTH
13,
PENNSYLVANIA
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH PRACTICE
July 28, 1963
Mr. Ivan Alan, Jr.
Mayor
Atlanta
Dear Mayor Alam
It was w1 th a great deal of interest · and pride that I
read of the testimony which you delivered in support
of the President's civil rights package.
I was bom and raised in the South -- Atlanta and
south Texas - and am only temporarily absented while
I am doing my doctorate. I have become of late quite
sensitive to the crying lack of moral leadership which
seems so prevalent in certain of the southern states.
I think that there does exist a sizeable group of
intelligent leaders who are willing to assess this
problem and its consequences in long range tenns.
However, up to now, it almost seems as it this group,
if they do in fact exist, have abdicated their responsibility.
Your actions in the past, and your verbal affinnation of this policy last week, have renewed my belief
that "the intelligent southerner", forthright in expression, does exist.
Sioo~,
xv~
to!1'~6
May
S ~ l Science Program
�C TY
OF A T LAN TA
DEP ARTMENT of POLICE
Atlanta 3, Georgia
July 3l, l963
HERBERT T . JEN K INS
C h ief
Honorable I v an Allen, Jr.
Mayor
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
My dear Mr. Mayor:
Congratulations for the very fine speech and
appearance before the S e natorial Committee last F r iday. It
was a very wonderful e x position of the great courag e and
leade rship that you poss e ss, and I am delight e d and honored
to b e on y our t e am.
I w as in St. Louis at the time and the papers and
television t h e re gav e you w ide and highly compliment a ry
c ov erage .
Herb ert, J r. w r i t es me fr o m N ew Y o r k that all
t he televisio n stations and t h e press there gave y ou w i de and
c o m plim e ntar y coverage.
A t ta c hed hereto is a clippi ng fr o m the S t. L o u i s
Globe Democ rat and also a n ote and clipp i ng fr o m Helen Bullard.
Sincerely yo u rs,
HTJ : gp
attac h
ti:)p
�ESQUIR~ RADI~., WQXI
July 30, 1963
The Honorable Mayor Ivan Allen
City of Atlanta
Dear Mayor Allen:
May I express my deep and sincere admiration for your
courageous testimony before the Senate Commerce
Committee last Friday.
We genuinely hope you will accept this invitation to
elaborate on your civil rights thinking through the
facilities of our "Open Line" program.
We make this available at your convenience.
Be s t Personal Regards,
John Truitt
Ne ws Director
WQXI - Atlanta
7101«: • Esquire Broadcasting Co. • A Divisim of Esquire, Inc. • 9165 Mathieson Dr., N.E., Atlanta 5, Ga. • :291-:2970
�ESQUIRE RADI~® WQXI ATLANTA
NUMBER
29
Monday, July 29, 1963
A parade of top Southern leaders has been appearing before the
· Senate Commerce and Judiciary Committees t'o testify on the
Administration's Civil Rights P~oposals.
Most of them, including Georgia's Governor Carl E. Sanders,
are speaking out strongly against the new Civil Rights legislation ...
especially the Public Accommodations Bill, Senate Bill 1732.
One ~an has been the dissenter.
He is Atlanta's Mayor Ivan
I
Allen, who has testified in favor of Civil Rights legislation ...
and in favor of a Public Accommodations measure.
Because of his stand ... Mayor Allen has come in for strong
c:r;iticism in Atlanta and around the state.
WQXI therefore offers Mayor Allen an open invitation to appear
on our nightly telephone discussion program "Open Line" to
explain and defend his Civil Rights thinking.
courageous stand.
He has taken a
We offer him now an opportunity .. . at his
convenience ... to demonstrate once and for all to his critics ...
that he also has the convictions of that courage.
1901eo
• Esquire BroadoolJting Co. • A Division of Esquire, Inc. • 8165 Mathieson Dr., N .E ., Atlanta 6, Ga. • t81-t970
I
,;
~
i't..
..I
,.
l
�CHARLES J. DARLINGTON
Chairman , General Committee
SAMUEL R. LEVERING
Chairman , Executive Council
26 Bowen Avenue
Woodstown, New Jersey
Ararat, Virginia
245 SECOND STREET, N.E . • WASHINGTON 2, D.C. • LINCOLN 7-4343
July
99, 1963
Mayor Ivan Allen
Atlanta , Ga.
Dear Mayor Allen:
I was very much :ilnpres sed by the test:ilnony you gave last Frieday
before the Senate Commerce Committee . I do hope that you have an
extra copy which you could s end me.
E. RAYMON D W ILSO N
Execu tive Secreta ry Em e ritus
EDWA RD F. SNYDER
Executive Se cre tar y
CHAR LES H. HARKE R
Administ rative Sec reta ry
JEAN ETT E HADLEY
Assistan t Secretary
FRANC ES E. NEELY
Legisla tive Assista n t
�SPELMAN COLLEGE
CF'F'ICE
CF'
THE
PRESIDENT
ATLANTA 3, GEORGIA
July 29, 1963
Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor of the City of Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mayor Allen:
I have read with interest the courageous testimony you gave
on July 26 before the Senate Commerce Committee on elimination of
discrimination in public accommodations. I was deeply impressed
with the enlightened point of view you expressed on this matter.
You are doing a tremendous work for Atlanta, and when the going
gets tough, as it must sometimes, I hope you are sustained with
the thought that many citizens, including myself, appreciate your
efforts to move Atlanta forward.
Sincerely yours,
tlU.ut::- g,
J'ha...sJ'l
Albert E. Manley
AEM h
�VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY
NASHVILLE
5
TENNESSEE
37203
The Divinity School
July
ao,
1963
The Honor ble Ivan Allen, Jr.
M yor of Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear M yor Allen:
I
hould like to send you a 'bti:ef word of tb!lnks in behalf
ot my family and friends for the te timony which you gav before
the Senate Commerce Committe l ast week. Your forthright support
of legislation to eliminate the evils of segregation baa no~ gone
unnoticed or unappreciated. I salute you for your wi sdom and your
cour ge.
W1 thout question the progreaa made· ln Atlanta baa been an
example to the whole country. Fortunately, Nashville i also
making progress, but other cities in Tennessee and in the states
further south of us have a long way to move. May you keep up the
good work and win the support of all fair-minded citizens of your
city, staie and country.
Yours truly,
Gregory T. Arm trong
Aasistant Professor of
Church History
�•
MOREHOUSE COLLEGE
ATLANTA, GEORGIA
OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
July 29, 196 3
The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Sir:
I am very glad that you testified as you did before the
Commerce Committee in Washington last week.
I am not willing to concede that your testimony in
Washington means political suicide. It may be the very thing
that will put you over in case you see fit to run for office
again. There are many white people in Atlanta who know that
you did right but do not have the courage to say so now. I
believe it will be different two years fran now.
Then too the atmosphere will have so changed in the nation
and in Atlanta by 1965 that you will find your statement there
all to the good.
With kindest regards and best wishes, I am
Very twly yours,
Mays
BEM :H
I
l
�Mrs. HarryM. Gershon
.
·
1336 Harvard .Road, N. E. Atlanta 6, Georgia
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�THE METHODIST CHURCH
THE PO RTLAND AREA
July 23, 1963
The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr.
Mayor of Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgia
My dear fellow American:
As Chairman of the Division of Human Relations and
Economic Affairs of the Board of Christian Social Concerns o f The Methodist Church, may I e xpress my deep
appreciation for your sple ndid witness before the Sena te
Commerce Corrnnittee on July 26th.
We join hands in emphasizing the dignity of all
men everywhere. May your e xcellent administration
the re continue to e xemplify Americanism at its highest
and best.
With a ll good wishe s,
Gra t efully y our s,
ARG: r p
BISHOP A . RAYMOND GRANT
814 JACKSON TOWER

PORTLAND , OREGON 97205
�Iion
g. mas-on
&
co.
8TH FLOOR
Financial Coordinating Services
522-1734 Bus .
233-7096 HOME
FULTON FEDERAL BUILDING
Juzy 28, 1963
ATLANTA 3 , GEORGIA
Honorable Ivan H. kll.en, Mayor
City of' Atlanta
Atlanta City Hall
Atlanta 3, Georgia
Dear Mr. .Allen:
Congratulations for a hard j ob well done.
agree with you.
I heartily
However, I deplore the need for the Civil Rights Law, but
when many still so completely- cherish the past, I guess the µ- esent
has to be spelled out.
One
1.
would think that history
\ll:> uld
be enough:
"Taxation mthout representation is tyranny."
By James Otis
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
The Boston Tea Party.
The American Revolution.
The words of Patrick Henry, "I am an American
Citizen not a Virginian. 11
The Constitution.
The Civil War.
The Emancipation Proclamation.
The words of Robert E. Lee, "Madam, recollect that we
form one country now. Abandon all local animosities
and make your sons Americans o 11
The
14th Amendment .
10. The Supreme Court ruling.
But, as you say, we must spell it out by law, and
The fact that the law is far more str:ingent than volunteer
action lOuld have dictated is just too bad .
Again, congratulations, and perhaps some day we will be
able to better approach the doctrine of the Golden Rule and our
own National Oath.
LGM/k
�ARTHUR H.MOTLEY
Pre sident
-.
\
Parade Publications, Inc.
~
TN 7-1100
733 Third Avenue, New York 17, N. Y.
�MOREHOUSE COLLEGE
ATLANTA, GEORGIA
OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
August 30, 1963
The Honorable Ivan Allen, Jr .
. Mayor of Atlanta
Georgia
Dear Mayor Allen:
It was with great pleasure and
pride that I read your eloquent testimony before the Commerce Committee of the United States
Senate earlier this summer. I was in New York
at the time and I was happy to show my friends
there the issue of the New York Times which
carried the story, and to let them know the
kind of leadership we have here in Atlanta.
Despite occasional lapses and embarrassing set backs, all of which you wisely acknowledged,
Atlanta is showing the South and the nation
that orderly change is being effected. With the
same kind of leadership, it can also be done in
other places in the nation.
I hope the young men from Bowdoin and
Williams Colleges, whom you graciously received
when they visited Morehouse last spring, will
read your statement. It was a forthright and
courageous document that did not attempt to
cover up what still must be done in our city.
Because of it, your personal and political
prestige have enhanced the good image of
Atlanta.
t
incerel~
\ ~ T. Henderson
Assistant to the President
BTH:gm
�SAME . LEVY
111 6 LOS ANGE LES AV ENUE, N. E.
A TL ANTA 6, G EORGIA
August 1, 1963
My dear Ivan:
I re call a poem of years ago, called "Stand the Gaff !"
It goes
somethi ng like this :
"Stand firm, my son, when you're right .
Stand the Gaff .
The worl d seems ready to jeer you .
Let 'em laugh .
There are those who give thought ,
Some have vision short .
Whose a ctions and mouthings make you snort.
Stand the Gaff!
"Tho many may jeer and make sport of your plight,
There ' ll be many more who will see the light .
So, when the time come s before you to be or
seem right,
Then, to Hell with appearances,
STAND UP AND FIGHT !!!
Honestly, I am so proud of you . I am proud I have been shoulder
to shoulder to a mon ,rho has the intest ina l fortitude to speak
his p,fce; a man who stood bead high when he spoke in Washi ngt on
l a st week to the Senate Committee; a man who stands four-square
for the r i ghts of a ll peoples and dared to say s o .
There will be many who will criticise. Many may even try to
vilify you for your speech. Thank God, there will be many more
who will stand with you. I know I will .
God bless and kee p you, n ow and for a long, long time.
With my very best regards and
The Honorable Ivan Allen
Mayor , The City of Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgia
�----
.:;.
161
August
1963
Editor
Atlanta Journal
Atlanta, Geor as
The r e cent statement of -~ or Ivan Allen, Jr.• to t he Senate Commerce
Committee in Washin ·ton is; to my mind, t
most courageous,
tatesmanlike
utterance a.de by a polit ical f i •ure in lleor gia during the p
tone hund~ed
years.
In a time of grave social cris is; t his man chose to say at1d do what
Hi tory
considered ri ght,
~
or Allen
11 valida t e his decision.
eemed a lonely, minority voice f rom
ance i .a ephemeral a nd illuoory.
J ef fer on; Abra
as fortifi d
ar orod Tith t
th
t
Thi
man wa
or ·a but such appear-
tra.veling i n spirit wit h Robert
m Lincoln a.n.d Franklin Roo
v lt.
tradi t i on of our J udaic-Christian cult ur ;
democr t i c
-p ons of e quality, f
r pl
Thi man
- w
, moder tion and
j us t ie •
to e
ure,
of Am ric
-
Obl iviou
t h prOmis
r i ion and hate ,
t
dro
-;yor All n
t hat mu t not di
~
proudly
�August 27, 1963
Mr . Adrian H . Pembroke
Salt Lake C i ty., Dtah
Dear Adrian:
What a nice thing i t was for you to d r op me
your note of J uly 29. It was good to hear from you,
and I wish I could see you and Cami lle.
I hear many nice things about your c ontinuing
interest i n the Associati on and frequently run across
people from Salt. Lake City, all of whom hold you in
high regard.
I hope that in the near future I will get a
chance to be at one of the national conventions so
that our paths may cross again.
Sincerely,
Ivan All n, Jr. ,
Mayor
IAJr/eo
�ADRIAN H. PEMBROKE
SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH
July 2 9 t 19 6 3
Ivan Allen, Jr.
C/0 Ivan Allen Company
Pryor Street
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Mayor Ivan:
It is a great thing you are doing.
lesson in courage all of us need to learn.
I wish you continuing success.
Adrian
P. S. Please say hello to Mr.
AHP:lt
11
Stationer. 11
A
�August 27, 1963
/
/
Mr . Sol Zatt
Sol Zatt and Company
342 Madison Avenue
New York 17, New Yor k
Dear Sol:
Thanks for your note of the 31st and it was
good to hear from you again.
I appreciate your interest in my testimony.
nd I certainly hope to have the pleasure of your
company in the near future.
Sincerely,
Ivan Allen, Jr. ,
Mayor
IAJr/ o
�SOL ZATT and COMPANY
Public Relations and Publicity Counsel
3 42 M a d iso n A ve nu e
N ewYo rkl 7, N . Y.
O X ford 7-2 190
J uly 3 1 , 1963
Mayor I v an Al len
City Ha ll
Atlanta, Ga .
Dea r I v an :
I r ead wi th tremendous interes t i n the New York Ti mes
your t es t i mony to th e Congre ss ional Committee on
Rac i a l Inte grat i on and felt ve ry s i ncere ly proud of
your courageous s t a nd .
It was wi thout a doub t,th e mo ~ t
co n st ructi ve and intellig e nt a pproach to th e inf ec tiou s
probl e m for i t i s not limit ed to on e area in th e country.
This i s only t o app lau d a nd co ngratulat e you on your
thoughtful l e adership th at ha s gr own considerably s in ce
th e time we spe nt tog e ther i n NSOEA.
Wit h warme st wi s h es and re g ards .
SZ/rs
�r----------~--------..~------
August 27. 1863
Honorable Richard C . Lee ,
Mayor of New Haven
City Hall
New Haven, Connecticut
Dear Dick:
Belatedly, may I eapress my appreciation
for your kind telegram regarding my recent testimony in Washington.
Your friendship means so much to me.
and your telegram was very encouraging.
Sincerely,
Ivan Allen, Jr .,
Mayor
IAJr/eo
�August 2 7, 1963
Khe Most Reverend Paul J . Hallinan. Archbishop
Catholic Arch Diocese of Atlanta
2699 Peachtree Rd. , N. E .
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear A rchbishop :
Your note concerning m y recent testimony before the Senate Commerce Commi ttee
helped carry m e through an extrem ely d ifficult
p eriod.
I hope that I may continue to merit
your favor . With grateful appreciation, I am
Sincerely your •
Ivan Allen, Jr.,
Mayor
IA.Jr/ o
�Au gust 2 7, 1963
Rabbi Jacob M. Rothschild, D. D.
1589 Peachtree Rd. , N. W.
Atlanta 9, Georgia
Dear Jack:
Thank you so much for your kind note
concerning my recent testimony in Washington.
.
May I say that I sincerely needed
some commendation of m y stand as I certainly
received enough local criti cism .
With appreciation, I am
Sincerely yours,
Ivan Allen, Jr.,
Mayor
IAJr/eo

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